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Alumnae Quarterly

SPRING 2011 • Volume 84 • Number 2

Wilson Gymnast Competes at National Competition page 22


Contents: Feature Story: 6

Tropical Ecology of Belize

In Every Issue: 4 Message from the President 5

Archives

11 Mid A Group of Pines & Maples: News from Around Campus 17 Alumnae Association Board Nominees 20 Odds & Evens: Alumnae News 23 Shaping the Future: Advancement News 25 Athletics 28 Welcome Dr. Barbara K. Mistick 30 Class Notes 50 Life Lines

Tropical Ecology of Belize Page 6 Cover Photo Sophomore, Alexandre Howard at the Eastern College Athletic Conference

Last call for suggestions To accommodate requests from alumnae we are extending the time to send in your ideas and suggestions for a name for the quarterly. Please write a note to Alumnae Relations Office, 1015 Philadelphia Ave. Chambersburg, PA 17201 or email aq@wilson.edu.


Alumnae Quarterly Spring 2011 • Volume 84 • Number 2

Rita Dibble

Alumnae Association BOARD

COPY EDITOR

PRESIDENT

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Cathy Mentzer

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Dr. Laura Altfeld Lisa Augsburger ’10 Jessica Carnes ’12 Chris Mayer ’07 Cathy Mentzer Dianna C. Heim Mary Ann Naso Monique Pare ’11 Shelly Novak ’92 Ali Thorpe ’11 Nicole Twigg ’11 Denise McDowell

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Debra Collins Shelly Novak ’92 Ryan Smith

Design Jennifer Glosser

PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE Lorna Duphiney Edmundson

VICE PRESIDENT FOR COLLEGE ADVANCEMENT Jeffrey Zufelt

DIRECTOR OF ALUMNAE RELATIONS Rita Dibble

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF ALUMNAE RELATIONS

Paula Spezza Tishok ’71

VICE PRESIDENT Marian “Mimi” Stevenson ’74

SECRETARY Peggy McCleary ’71

TREASURER Jennifer Nickle Banzhof ’94

ALUMNAE TRUSTEES Ellen Van Looy Reed ’53 Tracy Leskey ’90 Nancy Kostas ’64

DIRECTORS Jane Appleyard ’66 Linda Collenberg Bisaccia-Ammerman ’68 Sandra Griggs Clark ’85 Mary Cramer ’91 Tina Robertson Dorsey ’92 Kendal Hopkins ’80 Cazella Hinojosa Goodall ’70 Jane Stever Jones ’73 Kristina Heuck Knubel ’02 Patricia Darras Hockenberry ’74 Patricia Keffer ’96 Laureen Lutz ’08 Rebecca Ross ’05 Susan Ross ’66 De-Enda Peck Rotz ’05 Sarah Muller Smith ’85

NOMINATING COMMITTEE Betty Jane Weller Lee ’57 Robin Herring ’07 Amy Allen Boyce ’73

Dianna C. Heim

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Debra Collins

Wilson College Alumnae Quarterly (USPS-685-580) is published quarterly by the Office of College Advancement and the Alumnae Association of Wilson College, 1015 Philadelphia Ave., Chambersburg, PA. Periodicals postage paid at Chambersburg, PA 17201 and additional post offices. Subscriptions are $15/year. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Wilson College Alumnae Office, 1015 Philadelphia Ave., Chambersburg, PA 17201-1285, 717-262-2010 or aq@wilson.edu. Opinions expressed are those of contributors or the editor and do not represent the official positions of Wilson College or the Alumnae Association of Wilson College. Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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MESSAGE from the President

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ith fewer than four months left to serve as your president, I am savoring every moment of my time on campus and am happy to have opportunities to meet with you once more in cities throughout the country. I also look forward to the many events that engage us and signal the approaching culmination of the academic year. The topic of this year’s Orr Forum keynote speech, “Representing Muhammad: Competing Visions of Islam’s Prophet,” is a timely and important one. Wilson’s Second Annual Student Research Day and Academic Awards Banquet is also approaching quickly. Few experiences are more rewarding and inspiring than these two events that highlight Wilson’s commitment to scholarship and spirituality, as well as our students’ accomplishments. Being present when our graduates accept their degrees at Commencement on the third Sunday in May will be as memorable as always, heightened this year by yet another fine commencement speaker, Dr. Hazel Henderson. A world renowned futurist, she is also an evolutionary economist, syndicated columnist, consultant on sustainable development and the author of nine books, including the award-winning Ethical Markets: Growing the Green Economy. Two other individuals will also be honored: alumna and former trustee, Carol Heppner, will become Trustee Emerita and former trustee, Reverend James Brown of Market Square Presbyterian Church in Harrisburg, PA will receive an honorary degree. During Alumnae Reunion on the first weekend in June we’ll engage you in discussion about the progress being made in implementing our Global Citizenship Initiative (GCI) that builds on Wilson’s rich heritage, exemplary alumnae, high percentage of international students, faculty and staff expertise, and growing number of partnerships in other countries. With these strengths as a foundation, we must now fully fund the endowment to support the Global Citizenship Initiative, one of the four priorities you helped us identify for the Leading With Confidence Campaign. Without this endowment, we cannot realize the full potential of the GCI to educate our students for worldwide citizen-leadership. Through curricular and co-curricular experiences that integrate academic and experiential learning emphasizing understanding, effective communication and substantive engagement with other cultures, Wilson graduates will be prepared to exercise that leadership ability to help create ethical, sustainable solutions to the world’s problems. Wilson faculty and staff come from many different countries including: Iran, India, Ivory Coast, Finland, China and Ecuador. Many Wilson alumnae are already engaged as global citizens. Here are just a few: • Beva Chapagain ’08, Nepal, employed by the World Bank in the division of water resource management. • Aruni Liyanage ’04, Sri Lanka, 2006 graduate of American University, International Peace and Conflict Resolution program. • Delia Moraru Velculescu ’97, economist, International Monetary Fund, Washington, D.C.

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• Chethika Hapugalle ’95, Sri Lanka, M.A. in International Relations from Istanbul Bilgi University, Turkey; currently regional communications and marketing manager in Asia for Alpha. • Anne Grimes ’82, U.S. Department of State Foreign Service officer, currently serving as director of The American Center of the U.S. Consulate General Mumbai, India. • Pamela Frances Kiehl ’66, current Trustee, recently retired U.S. Department of State Foreign Service officer with extensive experience abroad. • Patricia Weaver Telkins ’63 recently retired from the U.S. Department of State. Following my retirement as president of Wilson, I look forward to returning to my own research and scholarship on the power of cross cultural work and study that I began some years ago when Dan and I lived in Europe and North Africa and during my time as a Fulbright research scholar in Japan. I am eager to build on my Fulbright study of visionary Japanese and American women leaders, expanding it to include what I have learned from my growing network of colleagues in China, South Korea and the Middle East. I also have been invited by several organizations to serve as a consultant in strategic planning, college governance, women’s education, and international education. On the personal side, Dan and I look forward to living under the same roof after 18 years of commuting. We’ll divide our time between our apartment in Brooklyn and a home we recently purchased in Sharon, a small town in the northwest corner of Connecticut where we formerly owned a renovated barn that served as our country house in the 1980’s when we lived in New York City. Dan plans to continue working for several more years as an international business lawyer, which will also afford us additional opportunities for study and travel abroad. We especially look forward to having more time to spend with our family, ranging from our two grandchildren to my 93-year-old mother. Before I leave Wilson, I hope you’ll join me and many others at Alumnae Reunion in early June to help celebrate the Reunion theme “Moments in memory – moments of expectation.” There are also several opportunities to travel with the Alumnae Association, including a trip to Italy. The Alumnae Association has graciously invited Dan and me as their guests for this trip, and we would love to have you with us. In any case, as I prepare to leave Wilson, won’t you please help me build the endowment for the Global Citizenship Initiative by directing your Campaign gift to this purpose? Your gift will be an investment in the future, preparing our graduates for world leadership and service. We must do this and do it well. Thank you. Sincerely,

Lorna Duphiney Edmundson, Ed.D., President


From the

Archives

Commencements Past

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Amy Lucadamo, College Archivist

was recently contacted by the niece of an alumna from the class of 1916. She was working on her family’s genealogy and came across some documents from her aunt’s Wilson College days. If we were interested, she said, she would donate a 1916 Commencement Week program. We were and I added the small, leather bound booklet to the collection in early March. In 1916 World War I was tearing apart Europe, Poncho Villa was on the run in Mexico, Woodrow Wilson was in the White House, and American women still did not have the right to vote. At Wilson, Dr. Warfield presided over pious commencement activities, personally giving the baccalaureate sermon. The festivities started with an organ recital on Saturday, June 10 by Dr. Orlando A. Mansfield. Sunday’s Baccalaureate was described by The Pharetra as “impressive as well as beautiful.” Seniors and faculty processed to Thompson Hall their black academic gowns contrasting with the bright white of the undergraduates’ dresses. The choir opened the ceremony singing “May Jesus Christ be Praised” and Dr. Warfield spoke about “the importance of God’s Book, God’s Day, God’s Work, and God’s Spirit in

every-day life.” He challenged the graduates to “stand up for the highest thoughts and ideals.” Monday, June 12 was a day of celebration with tennis tournament finals in the morning and a reception in the afternoon at which the Seniors wearing long white dresses and holding bouquets of roses and daisies greeted guests in front of Main Hall. That evening the Senior Class presented The Tempest. On Tuesday, June 13, in an evening ceremony, the Seniors planted ivy and “handed over” South Hall to the Junior Class. They completed the ceremony with the Sophomore Class carrying a daisy chain and a step sing that included guests and alumnae. Finally on Wednesday, June 14 at 10:30 a.m. Commencement Exercises began. The Rev. Robert MacGowan of the First Presbyterian Church of Lancaster, PA spoke about the “Spiritual Sanction of Social Service” as it related to “the college woman’s place in the world.” The 27 graduates from the Class of 1916 then received their Bachelor of Arts degrees. The words evoke another time and place and yet retain the solemn dignity of a Wilson Commencement.

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Tropical Ecology of Belize By Dr. Laura Altfeld, Assistant Professor of Biology

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ver January-Term, my colleague, Dr. Brad Engle, and I took 12 participants – nine full-time students and three alumnae - to Belize as the travel-abroad portion of our course, Tropical Ecology of Belize. This course was offered as an upper-level elective within the biology department and was open to all

students, who could receive biology, environmental studies or transdisciplinary credit. Dr. Engle and I agree, the course was an incredible success!

Tropical Ecology of Belize was designed to: (1) provide participants with the background and opportunities for studying several of the most prominent tropical ecosystems that contribute to global biodiversity, and (2) help students understand how human cultures value biodiversity and, therefore, act to conserve it. We focused our course work on mechanisms, theories, field methodologies, cultural history and legislation related to tropical broad-leaf forests, mangrove forests, sea grass beds, tropical riparian corridors and coral reefs. In doing so, we covered a broad range of topics in the areas of ecology, zoology, botany, marine biology and oceanography, anthropology, conservation science and environmental policy. Specifically, the course intended to combine an understanding of the ecologies of the select ecosystems and their biodiversity in the context of culture and how culture affects conservation practices and environmental policies. Belize was a natural choice for the academic thrust of this course for several reasons. First, Belize is a relatively new independent nation with low population density and high endemic biodiversity. Many of its ecosystems remain in pristine condition. As a new nation, Belize is still in the process of establishing environmental policies that will protect native biodiversity and preserve ecosystem integrity. In the area of environmental policy and practice, Belize is seeking creative solutions to some of the challenges of conservation, particularly with respect to funding. We certainly wanted to highlight creative solutions in this course. Second, Belize has a highly diverse human population,

including peoples of Mayan, Garifuna and Kriol (British Creole) descent. Third, the official language of Belize is English, which made it easy for us to get around and interact with Belizean people. Fourth, I had a set of excellent references for a tour group that employs local guides for ecotourism. My references came from other academic institutions that have run very successful courses using this tour group in Belize. Our J-term course schedule was divided between one week on campus and two weeks in Belize. During the first week, we spent three hours each day in traditional class lecture and formal discussions of reading assignments. The first weekend, the students had a comprehensive exam. Weeks two and three were spent in Belize. Our time in Belize involved traveling between three main locations. Our first location was outside of Belize City at the Tropical Education Center. There, we studied geography, culture and ecology, and learned about some of the most valued species in Belize. In addition to hiking in the savannah and rainforest, we spent time at the Belize Zoo. Our first visit to the zoo was at night, when we were escorted on a nocturnal tour. Highlights of the nocturnal zoo included seeing animals such as howler monkeys, jaguars, ocelots, pumas, margays and tapirs up close. Our second visit to the zoo entailed a detailed day tour, when we got to see and learn about the ecologies and care required for Belize’s most prominent native wildlife. This part of the trip included an opportunity to get very close to (close enough to touch) a captive jaguar named Buddy and to bottle feed juvenile tapirs.

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Belize Cover Story

On another day, we hiked through a region of rainforest to a Mayan cave, Actun Tunichil Muknal. Our group was divided into two, and each of the two smaller groups was led into the cave by two or three Mayan guides. This was an extraordinary experience, as we navigated through the Blue Creek River that runs through the cave and climbed into an inner chamber where, over 2,000 years ago, Mayan villagers would hold religious ceremonies. By the middle of our first week in Belize, we had traveled across coastal mountains into the more southerly city of Dangriga. There we boarded a skiff that took us out to Billy Hawk Cay, where we were hosted by a Garifuna family. We spent seven days on the cay, snorkeling and kayaking around mangrove islands, over sea grass beds, and through various patch reefs. The highlight of this portion of the trip, for me, was our day on Belize’s barrier reef. This barrier reef system is the second-largest in the world - second only to Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. Belize’s barrier reef is listed as a World Heritage Site. It was beautiful. While on the barrier reef, we also had an opportunity to visit Carrie Bow Cay, which sits on the reef and is the site of a Smithsonian marine research facility. We spent our last night at Billy Hawk Cay, enjoying a traditional Garifuna celebration. Then we boarded the skiff to Dangriga again and traveled to the Mayan village of Santa Theresa. After a traditional Mayan lunch in the village, we loaded our gear into tandem, inflatable kayaks and put in to the Moho River, which runs through a 8

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pristine rainforest in the Mayan Mountains. We traveled the river for three days, navigating small falls and rapids, stopping to camp each evening in the rainforest. At night, our Mayan guide led us on hike through the forest. When we reached the end of our river journey, we traveled to Lubaantun, an ancient Mayan city in ruins. Without a doubt, all of the participants met the academic learning objectives established by Dr. Engle and me. They learned about and experienced each of the ecosystems under study, learned how to collect biodiversity data and worked with each other to collect data specific to their chosen projects. We all learned about the Maya and Garifuna cultures, and had many opportunities to view the outcomes of Belize’s environmental policies. And more importantly, we engaged in discussions with Belizean people and learned about their cultures through conversations that were enhanced because they took place in the Belizeans’ native land. Unexpectedly, the participants shared with me that they were challenged to exercise greater courage, leadership and teamwork than they had expected. Our travels were frequently physically - and sometimes emotionally - demanding. I am incredibly proud of the work each participant completed, and I am proud to have had the opportunity to run this course with such extraordinary women. I only hope I have an equally amazing group the next time the course runs in J-term 2013. Keep in mind, alumnae, you will be welcome to participate then, too.


Belize Cover Story By Lisa Augsburger ’10

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y first thought when this class started was, “How did I ever manage a full course load, work and a social life when I was full time student at Wilson?” Even having graduated this past May, I felt like I was out of practice. It didn’t take long, though, to get back into the busy pace of taking a class, studying and preparing, particularly for a J-Term class which normally moves at a faster pace. It felt very good to be learning new material again. I am very grateful that Wilson opened this class to alumnae because through this course I had many experiences I don’t think I ever would have been exposed to otherwise. I learned so much both inside and, particularly, outside the classroom. For example, instead of just learning about sponges in class and a textbook or looking at pictures or preserved specimens, we got to see them thriving in their environment. I really feel like the trip to Belize changed my life, not only academically, but also culturally. Not only did I gain knowledge through participation in this course, but I feel like I gained quite a bit on a personal level too. Just seeing how happy and eager all the people were that we met, how they were so passionate about their culture and how excited they were to live their day-to-day lives made me realize that I would benefit from the same attitudes in my life. We all have fallen into the habits of taking our lives for granted, but sometimes we need to take a step back and smell the roses, or in this case, the hibiscus flowers.

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Belize Cover Story Fulton Center for Sustainable Living Program Manager By Christine Mayer ’07, M.E.

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was thrilled when Drs. Altfeld and Engle invited me to participate in this adventure to Belize. Since I have a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies with a minor in Biology, this type of experiential learning was right up my alley. After hearing more about the specifics of the course and especially the emphasis on the various cultural components, I became even more excited about the opportunity. Given my master’s degree, which is is in educating for sustainability, and my work as program manager for the Fulton Center for Sustainable Living here at Wilson, I am constantly looking for ways to connect economy, culture and environment. This course seemed like a perfect blend of all three components, which are the bedrock of sustainability education. I was sure that we would be able to see first-hand the intersection of these areas and the profound effects of one on another while studying in Belize. My particular area of study during this trip was the agriculture in Belize. We saw conventional, large-scale farms, including banana plantations, citrus orchards and home gardens galore. Of special interest was the Mayan system of milpa agriculture, which is as much a social system as it is an ancient method of sustenance farming. During our time in country, I was able to interview both Mayan and Garifuna farmers, and learn directly from them. This new knowledge will serve as a solid basis for a course, Agroecology in Costa Rica, that will be offered this June during Summer I session’s study-abroad experience. This pilot program is being offered to students in Wilson’s Women with Children program. The greatest benefit of this experience for me, though, was the chance to connect with students, faculty and alumnae in a way that would not otherwise have happened. I had a remarkable opportunity to get to know the participants through our common experience in Belize. In addition to the incredible academic opportunities we had, many shared experiences will never be forgotten: swimming and climbing through an ancient Mayan sites, sailing (and rolling) a kayak, watching magnificent sunsets, eating oranges and coconuts straight from the tree, card games and campfires, holding that seahorse in my hand, jumping into the swimming hole, seeing those spider’s eyes staring back from the dark jungle, the iguana rodeo and the eerie cries of the howler. These are memories that will bind us to Wilson College. I am grateful for this experience. Thank you, Drs. Altfeld and Engle, and you wonderful Wilson women! 10

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MID A GROUP OF PINES & MAPLES News from Around Campus

CHAMP

Cardiac Health Assistance for the Multiple Risk Factor Population

By Cathy Mentzer

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partnership between Wilson College and Summit Health Inc. is helping prepare Wilson Exercise and Sport Science (ESS) students for future careers, while assisting cardiac patients with improving their overall health and fitness. For the past two years, Wilson students majoring in ESS have helped out with Summit Health’s Cardiac Health Assistance for the Multiple Risk Factor Population (CHAMP) program. The twice-yearly program helps heart patients make healthy lifestyle changes through diet and exercise. Initially, Summit Health dieticians provide patients with four weeks of nutritional guidance and education. During the fifth and final week of the program, Wilson students provide education, fitness assessments and exercise plans for the cardiac patients participating in the program. “I think it’s a wonderful platform for our students to see how things work in real life,” said Anjuli Gairola, assistant professor of exercise and sport science and chair of the department. “They get to apply the knowledge they learn in the classroom - how to assess people, test them, how to make an exercise program for them. It’s an important application of knowledge because it’s very different from what they learn in textbooks.” That real-world experience has made a big difference to Wilson senior Beth Bush, who has participated in the past two CHAMP sessions, held every fall and spring at Chambersburg Hospital. “CHAMP has influenced me to want to get into the medical field,” she said. “I love exercise and I love sports, but I wanted something where I was able to help patients in a different way. I wanted to be able to do more than just help them learn how to exercise. That’s important as well, but to me, being able to help a patient come through something like a heart attack and return to their lifestyle is even more important. ” Bush hopes to become a doctor and has applied to medical school. Overall, Wilson students appreciate the chance to apply what they’ve learned in the classroom in a practical setting and interact with people as they might do when they enter careers after college. “Working at CHAMP has been a great experience for me,” said junior Laura Beck. “By being involved with this program, I have become better prepared for the future because my knowledge of the importance of exercise, how to properly exercise and the amounts of exercise a person should be doing has increased.” ESS majors typically find work in such fields as physical rehabilitation and allied health professions, sport leadership and the fitness and sport industry, according to Gairola. “It’s a booming major,” she said. “Students can go to graduate school in allied health fields or they can go into jobs in rehabilitation, obesity clinics, wellness or the fitness industry.” Wilson’s ESS department also houses a sport management major that combines business and the ESS curriculum that

From left, front row: Victoria Whitbred Davis, Mandy Grahn, Katie Omori. Back row: Anjuli Gairola, Beth Bush, Leigh Roche, Laura Beck.

prepares them for careers in the sport administration and management industry. Gairola, an exercise physiologist, initiated the Wilson partnership by reaching out to Summit Health about ways the health care corporation and her students could benefit each other. “I was trying to build a relationship,” she said. Initially, her hope was for students to be able to use hospital facilities for observation. Gairola eventually met with Dr. Aylmer Tang, a local cardiologist who started the CHAMP program, and presented a plan for how Wilson students could assist. “He just loved it,” said Gairola. “I think that’s a big compliment for our students.” Summit Health is pleased with the arrangement too. “The partnership between the CHAMP program and Wilson College is a perfect fit,” said Cindy Green, Summit Health’s cardiac quality coordinator. “The participants love having the students there and the students enjoy the participants.” When CHAMP participants come to the exercise sessions, Wilson students perform fitness assessments by having the patients do things like walking as fast as they can for two minutes, performing reaches to determine their flexibility levels, and using dumbbells to test their strength. “Once they’re done with their fitness testing, we give them the results and go over the results with them,” Gairola said. “Then we give them a home-based exercise program we have designed that doesn’t require any fancy equipment. They can do it on their own. It’s a whole-body program.” The exercise program, which was developed by two ESS students and Gairola, is a combination of cardiovascular and muscular exercises for major muscle groups that people can do simply by using their own bodies or with resistance bands. “We give them the whole program with modifications if they can’t do a particular exercise,” said Gairola. “We teach them about why they should exercise and the importance of exercise.” Wilson’s involvement with CHAMP has led to other opportunities with Summit Health. Wilson ESS students helped with Chambersburg Hospital’s Staff Activity Day in February and Gairola has spoken at a free community seminar on heart disease. Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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MID A GROUP OF PINES & MAPLES News from Around Campus

Conversations By Dianna C. Heim

Dr. Laura Altfeld, asst. professor of Biology, shares the environmental concerns of Belize, which she recently visited. Student Becky Harrison ’12 talks about her intern experience in the programming and marketing aspect of the Office of Student Activities.

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t seemed like one of those ideas whose time was long overdue – bringing together accomplished students, faculty and alumnae and encouraging conversations. The College’s Office of Alumnae Relations hosted its first “Conversation at The Commons” in January during the Alumnae Association’s Winter Board Weekend. Sitting across from each other in Lenfest Lobby, alumnae had the opportunity to speak with students Sierra Schnable ’12, Kacie Oberholzer ’12, Rachael Wilson-McCall ’13, Becky Harrison ’12 and Jess Domanico ’11 and faculty members Chris Mayer ’07, program director of the Fulton Center for Sustainable Living, and Dr. Laura Altfeld, asst. professor of Biology, both of whom recently returned from a College trip to Belize. With jared halter, assistant dean of students, Harrison of Birdsboro, PA, an EFT and EQS Studies major, spoke about the opportunities she’s received by participating in a transformational internship opportunity with the Office of Student Activities (OSA). In this program, three educationally intense, pre-professional positions are available: Leadership Development, Orientation & Marketing, and Programming & Marketing.

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Kendal Hopkins ’80 and Jess Domanico ’11, EFT and English spoke about her love of poetry

Each position and its significant responsibility are overseen by students; with responsibilities ranging from developing and designing semester long leadership workshop series, to event planning and marketing, to researching, evaluating, and designing orientation programs. Domanico of Chalfont, PA, an EFT and English major, loves the written word and spoke with Kendal Hopkins ’80, who works in library science. Jess’s article, “Sincerity in Soliloquy: The Unraveling of Hamlet’s Murderous Identity” was featured in 2010 in the academic journal: Valley Humanities Review. She presented this paper at the annual English Association of Pennsylvania State Universities (EAPSU) conference last year. She also won the Outstanding Peer Teacher award in 2010. This award is given in recognition of exemplary service as an FYS Peer Teacher for 2009-10. Jess also has served as a copy editor for The Billboard. Wilson-McCall of West Chester, PA shared with Susan Ross ’66 why she chose VMT as a major. Sandra Griggs Clark ’85 and Rachael also enjoyed a laugh about Wilson’s ‘Odd’ traditions. Rachael acts with the Kittochtinny Players.


MID A GROUP OF PINES & MAPLES News from Around Campus On the same evening as the Conversations, these students and alumnae met again at Main Street Deli for dinner. The Office of Alumnae Relations is hoping to hold another Conversation at the Commons during 2011 Leadership Weekend, Sept. 23-24. “I am extremely pleased that so many of our alumnae were on hand for the Winter Board weekend and had the opportunity to meet these very accomplished future alumnae,” says Rita Dibble, director of alumnae relations. “There is nothing equivalent to sharing your dreams with those who have gone before and for the alumnae, to see what their alma mater is doing now for young women.” Susan Ross ’66

In spring of last year, she performed in two one-act plays held in Thomson Hall’s Alumnae Chapel. Rachael recently wrote a paper on “Thalidomide’s Effect on the Body and the Necessity of FDA Drug Testing.” Oberholzer of Greencastle, PA, a VMT & Equestrian Studies major with a Minor in History, was excited to share her upcoming travel plans with Amy Allen Boyce ’73. This summer, Kacie will be studying abroad at one of the top equestrian schools in the United Kingdom, Hartpury College. Renowned for its Veterinary Equine Therapy Center as well as their Equestrian Studies programs, Hartpury is hosting either the Canadian or the Australian Olympic Equestrian Teams in preparation for the 2012 Olympics in London. “I have two passions in life: to work with horses and to interact with people. What better way to do that than through the field of medicine?” she shared with Boyce. Schnable of Fayetteville, PA, a Sociology major with a minor in Women’s Studies and Political Science, is a busy body – literally. She is president of the Political Science Association, chair of the WCGA Constitutions & By-Laws, co-president of the Behavioral Sciences Club and a peer teacher in Honors FYS. She has strong interests in gender and deviance and talked with Nancy Kostas ’64 about sociology. “This was a superior idea,” says Rebecca Ross ’05. “I’m interested in us having each oncampus population represented at something like this, possibly including continuing education students as well.”

Alumnae Association Legacy award winner Sierra Schnable ’12, Sociology/ Minor in Women's Studies and Political Science, explains her family’s long relationship with Wilson College. Seated next to her is Kacie Oberholzer ’12, VMT & Equestrian Studies/Minor – History

Wilson College welcomes a new Assistant Director of Alumnae Relations. Dianna C. Heim is no stranger; she has been an invaluable part of the Wilson advancement team for the past 18 months. She graduated Magna cum laude from Westminster College and has extensive education and experience in marketing and public relations. Dianna is also the author of Cumberland Valley Barns: Past and Present, published by Shippensburg University Press 1997. Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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Fencing at Wilson College By Ali Thorpe ’11

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nterest in the sport of fencing is growing on campus since it was introduced as a club sport in 2007. Our first officers, now seniors, Naomi Hedrick ’11 and Chrissy Shick ’11 led the club for several years and built a firm foundation for fun and swordplay. The first meet held on campus in 2008 was against a veteran Millersville University club. Despite our bruises, it was a learning experience that energized the participants and built confidence in their skills. Flash Forward to 2011 and there is a freshman dominated club, anxious to learn and ambitious with future planning. This year, the club had an away meet with the Gettysburg Fencing Club and hosted a three weapon clinic with Gettysburg and Ursinus College. In April the club is looking forward to hosting the inaugural Joyce Donatelli three weapon open, honoring the Professor Emerita who helped resurrect the fencing program at Wilson College. Representatives from York, Gettysburg, Millersville and Penn State are expected to attend. Continued growth should lead to increased student participation, league competitions, and the Collegiate Club Championship Competition. The club practices twice a week under the direction of volunteer coach, David Colletta. It was through Joyce Donatelli that we were able find a nationally rated athlete and fencing coach in Chambersburg, who gives his time so generously to the

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club. David has also recruited other nationally ranked coaches to help out with the club so Wilson fencers have the privilege of personal attention just like in the classroom. This is a three weapon club meaning students can participate in foil, epee or saber. Wilson College has been generous by providing the gear so students can participate regardless of means. Fencing attracts students with a wide variety of interests. The members are very committed to the club and to what some may consider an unconventional sport. Dr. Douglas Crawford, faculty advisor, praises the sport for both its physical and mental rigor. “This is a sport of strategy where you often win by out thinking your opponents rather than out muscling them. Fencing is a great fit at Wilson College because the small but mighty can compete, have fun, and build confidence in themselves.” Most of the members had never fenced before and some had never even participated in a sport before the Wilson College Fencing Club: “Before I came to Wilson in the Fall of 2010, I did some online research for club information and stumbled upon the Wilson College Fencing Club. It looked interesting so when activities day came around, I signed up at the table and came to the first meeting. Ever since then, I’ve been hooked. Going to practice is like going away to another world for a few nice hours. All the stress of college life melts away when I’m spending time with the team. We’re all an extended family who laugh, sweat, and have fun with


MID A GROUP OF PINES & MAPLES News from Around Campus one another. The support from everyone, the coaches included, is fantastic. If I only did one thing right at Wilson, it was to join this club,” Victoria Maddox ’14, daughter of Dawn Franklin ’76, Secretary for Wilson Fencing Club. “I enjoy the teamwork that comes with fencing. I was never an active person, but fencing is the only sport that I play. We always have fun when we go at it,” Jamie Strawbridge ’14. “Fencing is an amazing and inspiring sport. I love it because even though you have the support of a team during practice, once you get on the strip, it’s all riding on you and your individual abilities. Fencing is all about speed, determination, and strategy. I adore this sport more than anything else at Wilson, and I hope to be fencing all the years I am here and for many years afterwards,” Emma Echanis ’14. All of the members are dedicated to the club. They have led several fundraisers, they attend practices regularly and put in their best effort when they are there. The approaching tournament has encouraged them to perfect their skills. Current club president Gillian Barth ’14 conveys the same optimism as the other club members. “I have greatly enjoyed working with the other officers, our club members, and our coaches and have been focusing hard on consistent practice, interaction with the fencers of other schools in the area, team camaraderie, and club growth. In the next year, we hope to increase both club membership and funding; both of these will

facilitate an increased armory as well as participation in local tournaments and the hiring of certified referees. My goal as president is to revive the tradition and make sure the club becomes firmly established on campus. We are lucky to have experienced and dedicated coaches, and with strong student participation have excellent potential for growth; with this in mind I am excited for the future of fencing at Wilson.” En Garde!

Success by leaps and bounds … The hunt seat show at Grier school was a huge success for Wilson IHSA and we wanted to share it with you. On the first day, several of our riders placed high. Suji Helmer placed fourth in Novice on the flat; CJ Giacomini placed 2nd in Intermediate on the flat; Allie Forbes placed first in her walk trot class; Melanie Getz placed first in beginning walk/trot/canter and pointed up that day to advanced walk/trot/ canter and Sarah Morrison placed second in advanced walk/trot/canter. There was a lot of team spirit and every team member helped each other before the next class. Overall, Wilson College Hunt Seat team placed fourth as a team. On the second day, Suji Helmer place first in Novice over fences, 2nd in Novice on the flat and won Reserve High Point Rider of that day’s show. Suji rode exceptionally well and our whole team is very proud and excited for her. Melanie Getz placed third in her first advanced walk/trot/canter class. Christine Van Sicklin got first in beginning walk/trot/canter. Alex Taber placed second in Novice over fences. Allie Forbes placed second in walk/trot. Allie Veach placed third in beginning walk/trot/canter. On both days, our riders were very supportive of one another and helped each girl prepare for her class. It was a great team effort and our team spirit was high. We have a very cohesive team this year and it really shines while we are at shows. We are very lucky to have this team and to have Kina as a coach. She is a wonderful trainer and a great asset to the team. We wanted to share our amazing weekend. Sincerely, Wilson College IHSA Team John B. Tukey, DVM Director of Equestrian Studies Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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MID A GROUP OF PINES & MAPLES News from Around Campus

Retention Mary Ann Naso, Vice President for Enrollment, Chair of the Retention Committee

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recent survey of more than 2,500 U.S. two-and four-year colleges and universities indicates that just 67 percent of first-year students returned to those institutions for their second year. Keeping the students who enrolled in prior years is as important as enrolling new students every fall. Retention is a high priority on college campuses and the rationale for this emphasis is that 55 percent of the students earning bachelor’s degrees today have attended at least two colleges and 20 percent have attended three or more. “Swirling” is the name given to this pattern of enrolling in multiple colleges and the causes for this “swirling” pattern are many. Many of us who are involved in retention efforts realize that the underlying cause is simply that the traditional students view education differently than students in years past. Colleges must keep pace with these changing expectations in order to keep the students they enroll. Wilson College had been addressing retention in a number of ways. It started with the Office of Admissions, where we dissected high school transcripts to ascertain the courses taken at the college preparatory level or higher. We changed the required writing sample from an original essay to a graded English paper to judge the expectations of the applicant’s high school. The faculty committee helped evaluate the writing samples submitted. The Office of Student Development overhauled the orientation program to better meet the needs of students in their transition to college. They focused on educating parents, helping them allow their daughters autonomy and control over their lives in college. An early alert system was put in place where erratic class attendance, failing grades and other signs of disengagement were brought to the attention of student life and academic personnel. While these were very helpful, President Edmundson recognized that we needed a more organized and substantive program. A new Retention Committee was charged with the development of a best practices approach. Four vice presidents now constitute this committee – those representing academic affairs, finance and administration, student

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development and enrollment. We agreed to pursue specific initiatives that are reportedly working at other small colleges. The first was identifying “at-risk” students whose progress and attendance could be monitored behind the scenes by academic and student development personnel. “At-risk” students are often first-generation college attendees; those with difficulties in core subjects, students with identified learning differences and transfer students with multiple colleges in their backgrounds. After the 2010 fall semester, only 7 percent of this “at-risk” population was on probation. This is a success story in the making as we continue to refine what needs to be done for these students. Retention expert John Gardner of South Carolina has researched “Killer Courses” – those taken by first-year students that produce the greatest number of grades of D or F or result in withdrawals during the semester. These courses are indicators that the students may not be prepared for the subject matter. A grade of D, F or W “kill” a student’s grade-point average, self-confidence, motivation and desire to remain at the college. The academic division at Wilson College has researched the past three years to identify those courses at Wilson and its plans to address the situation are in the developmental stages. Further, a committee made up of representatives from offices and operations across the campus has been meeting since the fall semester to address customer service on our campus. We expect a report later this spring. Another initiative called Developing Goals for Personal Success (GPS) was launched for the spring semester. Under the guidance of the dean of students, each young woman is learning how to write and design effective and realistic goals, establish target dates, measure her achievement, ask for assistance and stay focused. Institutions that have used this retention strategy say that realistic, ongoing goal-setting helps keep students focused on their reasons for being in college. I am pleased to report that these new initiatives have produced a fall-to-spring retention rate for first-time students of 92.7% - and we’re just getting started.


Alumnae Association Board Nominees Cynthia Fink Barber ’73 Cynthia has earned two Master degrees after graduating from Wilson College; she earned a Master of Special Education from the College of William & Mary and a Master of Education Administration from West Virginia Graduate College. She currently serves as an elementary school principal. Cynthia was selected by ASCD to be a part of an educational cadre visiting South Africa in 2001. Cynthia volunteers with many organizations; American Cancer Society, School PTA, Weekend Lay Director for Emmaus Community, and serves as Chairperson of the Administrative Council at Pikeside United Methodist Church. In her spare time she enjoys reading and needlework. Cynthia has represented Wilson College at Shepherd University’s presidential inauguration in 2007. At Wilson she is an Aunt Sarah. She has previously served on the Nominating Committee of the Alumnae Association Board.

Dorothy M. Van Brakle ’09 Dorothy was a nontraditional student at Wilson College who received her degree in Business Management in 2009. Previously she received her Associates degree in 2006. Her 30-year tenure at Letterkenny Army Depot has culminated in her current role as the chief of the logistics division in the Directorate of Public Works, where she supervises 130 employees. She is a member of the Equal Employment Opportunity Special Emphasis Program committee and the manager of the depot’s Minority College Relations Program. She also serves on the ELM Street Board of Directors in Chambersburg.

Dorothy belongs to the Federal Managers Association, the Federally Employed Women Organization, the National Association of Active and Retired Federal Employees, as well as the AARP.

Tina Robertson Dorsey ’92 Tina is a graduate of the class of 1992 with a major in psychology and biology and was involved in the Wilson College Government Association as blue book editor and as chief justice. She is currently completing a two-year appointment to the Alumnae Association Board. Tina has been employed by the state of Pennsylvania since 2000. She has served in leadership capacity on several projects such as Pennsylvania’s Medicaid Health Information Technology Incentive Program, the DPW’s Enterprise Data Warehouse PROMISe redesign, the Information Technology/Data Support Unit within the Bureau of Program Integrity of the Office of Medical Assistance Programs, the Office of Medical Assistance Program’s Fraud & Abuse Detection System and Payment Error Rate Measurement Pilot Project. Currently she is the special projects coordinator for the Department of Public Welfare, Office of Medical Assistance Programs. Tina was a member of the class of 2007 Leadership Development Institute for Women in State Government and has continued her involvement in its alumnae association as a class representative. Tina has been actively involved with United Cerebral Palsy and the Hershey Medical Center. She enjoys travelling, exploring new cities, organic gardening, exercise, hiking in national parks, and reading.

Mail-in Ballot Form Tear off and mail to: Wilson College Alumnae Association of Wilson College 1015 Philadelphia Avenue Chambersburg, PA 17201-1285

NOMINEES FOR ELECTION TO THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION BOARD SLATE 2011-2014 SECRETARY Patricia Keffer ’96 ALUMNAE TRUSTEE Marie Behler Schleicher ’68 DIRECTORS 60’s Decade Rita Handwerk Fisk ’64 70’s Decade Cynthia Fink Barber ’73 80’s Decade Sarah Muller Smith ’85 90’s Decade Tina Robertson Dorsey ’92 00’s Decade Lorrie Rejoinis Trader ’05 ADP Representative Dorothy M. Van Brakle ’09 Nominating Rep. Cathie Sunderland Jenkins ’71

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ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News BALLOT NOMINEES FOR ELECTION TO THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION BOARD SLATE 2011-2014 SECRETARY Patricia Keffer ’96 ALUMNAE TRUSTEE Marie Behler Schleicher ’68 DIRECTORS 60’s Decade Rita Handwerk Fisk ’64 70’s Decade Cynthia Fink Barber ’73 80’s Decade Sarah Muller Smith ’85 90’s Decade Tina Robertson Dorsey ’92 00’s Decade Lorrie Rejoinis Trader ’05 ADP Representative Dorothy M. Van Brakle ’09 Nominating Rep. Cathie Sunderland Jenkins ’71

VOTE FOR

VOTE AGAINST

NAME ________________________________ CLASS YEAR

DATE

________________________________ 18

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Rita Handwerk Fisk ’64

Cathie Sunderland Jenkins ’71

Rita Handwerk Fisk ’64 grew up in Bethlehem, PA, graduated from Wilson with a degree in biology and made her way to the Philadelphia suburbs to teach junior high school science and coach basketball and tennis. She earned a Master degree in education from Lehigh University in 1968. Rita then moved on to the corporate world, as a patent analyst at DuPont in Wilmington, DE, during the early days of database development - utilizing what seems like ancient equipment – a Dictabelt machine and 80-column paper forms to construct Boolean logic searches that were keypunched and sent by courier to a computer housed in several rooms. Search results were returned by courier the next morning. After three years, she went back to teaching and met her husband John, an English teacher. Three energetic sons, Nick, Doug and Peter, kept them busy with sports and music activities. When Rita returned full time to the workforce it was as an information scientist/librarian, again at DuPont, but at the dawn of the Internet age. She found the job of technical/business librarian very creative and requiring confidence and problem solving skills nurtured at Wilson. Since retiring last year, Rita is indulging in art courses at the Barnes Foundation. She enjoys reading, wandering through art museums or beautiful gardens, cheering on the Philadelphia Phillies, and travelling anywhere in the world with friends and family.

Cathie earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in English at Wilson with a minor in music and education. She went onto pursue graduate work at Temple, Penn State University and Shippensburg University. She served on the Association board from 1984-86 and served as her class ambassador and reunion chair. Cathie is generous in her giving to Wilson and inspires her classmates through her example. She made life-long friends while at Wilson and found it to be a challenging yet nurturing and supportive environment. She speaks fondly of playing the organ and being in the choir and believes the personal attention from faculty and staff was the key to her success at Wilson. A retired English teacher of the Carlisle Area School District, she is a member of the National Council of Teachers of English, the National Education Association and the Pennsylvania State Education Association. During her career, she was honored with the Outstanding Educator and Guest Lecturer award from the Shippensburg School Study Council and named the Area’s Finest Educator in 2007 by the Carlisle Sentinel/Dickinson College. She still serves students as a volunteer with the Carlisle High School. She also works with Project Share and the United Way. She and her husband, Dr. William Jenkins, have two sons. Her favorite joy is as grandmother to Amelia Catherine. She is a member of the First Presbyterian Church and enjoys reading, writing, travel, stitching and fitness.


Alumnae Association Board Nominees Patricia M. Keffer ’96 Pat is a 1996 Alumna of Wilson College. She is retired from CenturyLink (formerly Embarq) where she was a Project Manager. Pat now works three mornings a week at Park Avenue United Methodist Church as their secretary. In her spare time, Pat is a docent at the John Brown House in Chambersburg, a volunteer for Adult Literacy and a friendly family for a Wilson College student from South Korea. For fun Pat likes to read, attend her monthly book club meetings, travel with her husband, Bob, attempt to paint watercolors, spend as much time as possible with her seven grandchildren and take walks with her lovable little Shihpoo, Cosmo.

Marie Behler Schleicher ’68 Marie, an English major at Wilson College, was involved with “Billboard,” yearbook, May Day celebrations and served as chair of May Day weekend in 1968; this was the beginning of her decades of volunteer service. Her career as a volunteer began in earnest when she joined the Junior League of Harrisburg in 1983, which she called her ‘springboard’ into the community. Marie has served on or continues to serve on numerous boards: Tri-County Association for the Blind, United Way of the Capital Region, Allenberry Professional Theater Conservatory, Harrisburg Symphony Society, Pinnacle Health Foundation, the YWCA, and UCP (United Cerebral Palsy) of Central Pennsylvania. Marie has been the recipient of

numerous awards including Volunteer of the Year in 2001 from United Way of Carlisle and Cumberland County; inaugural honoree as JLH Keeper of the Flame in 1997; YWCA Advocacy Award; TWE (also YWCA) in 2009. Over the years, Marie was active with the Harrisburg Wilson Club, coordinated fundraising phonathon and worked as an admissions contact. She served on the Alumnae Association Board of Directors from 1990 to 1993. She loves to travel, read, research history and genealogy, aerobics, knitting, puzzles and the all-important visits to and by daughters and three grandchildren. The Schleichers have a wealth of friends to show for the fact that they have lived in the Harrisburg area for 40 years.

ment and in the Affordable Housing division of the marketing department. After seven years at Fannie Mae, Sarah became a stay-at-home mom to their son Dylan, who was joined by Logan, and finally by Karissa. Sarah worked part-time for an executive networking group, administering their admissions process. After 15 years in Texas, the family moved to Williamsburg, Virginia, where Sarah began volunteering at a free medical clinic, substituted at her children’s elementary school, temped for a year at the College of William & Mary Mason School of Business, and finally landed full time in the Athletics Department at the college as Assistant to the Associate Athletic Director. She is thriving personally and professionally.

Sarah Muller Smith ’85

Lorrie Rejonis Trader ’05

Sarah Muller Smith graduated from Wilson College in 1985 with a degree in communications. While at Wilson she participated in Orchesis, WCGA, and the tennis team. Her first job following graduation was at The Nature Conservancy in Rosslyn, Virginia, where she worked in the division responsible for securing bequests of land suitable for either preservation or sale, in the latter instance with the proceeds going toward purchase of preservation-worthy lands. She moved on to Capitol College in Maryland, where her husband was an engineering student, and worked in the institutional advancement department. Sarah’s next stop was Fannie Mae’s corporate headquarters in D.C. Following her husband’s graduation, they moved to Texas, where he had accepted a job; Sarah was able to transfer to Fannie’s Dallas offices. While with Fannie Mae, Sarah worked in the multifamily depart-

It hasn’t been that many years since Lorrie hung up her black and red beanie for the title of a teacher. Lorrie graduated from Wilson with a Bachelor of Arts degree in elementary education with a minor in mathematics. Twenty-eight-year old Lorrie is a fifth grade teacher at the Old Forge Elementary School in Smithsburg, MD for the Washington County School System. At Wilson, Lorrie was active with the WCGA, yearbook and served as a work study and tour guide for Admissions. She was also named May Queen during May Court in her senior year. She now serves on the Wilson Young Alumnae Donor Council and took part in a Young Alumnae Initiative begun by the Office for College Advancement last spring. She has taken her desire to make a difference to her extra-curricular activities at the school, serving on Old Forge’s ‘green school’ and ‘anti-bullying’ committees. Lorrie is active in her church. She married a research biologist, David, and together they have a three-year-old daughter, Mackenzie.

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ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News

Birthright

Written by Gwendolyn Jensen Book Review by Jessica Carnes ’12

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etirement, we are told, is supposed to be for rest and reflection. Fortunately, for the literary world, Gwendolyn Jensen, President Emerita of Wilson College, decided to dedicate her ‘free’ time to the latter. She has shifted the energy, which she once extended to Wilson College, to discovering her muse. She has become a poet during a time when writers usually wind down. Still, the results speak for themselves. In her first book of poetry Birthright, Jensen touches on her experiences as a little girl, and explores the devastating death of her daughter as well as the suicide of her grandfather. Though these topics are not foreign to poetry, Jensen also addresses the creation of a beautiful piece of art to the creation of the world. Jensen tackles every subject with the same inquisitive nature which she employed other times in her life. In Birthright, the reader contentedly follows Jensen’s lead - her words clear and proud - and together, Jensen and the reader learn what follows after retirement, and after the reading of a superb poem—quiet reflection with an emotive hitch. Born in 1936, Jensen grew up in Lansdowne, PA. The first poem, “Expulsion,” drives home to a young girl the value of freedom, and then the sickness of losing it forever. As

a child, Jensen found a hidden area of a creek underneath an overhang of a tree. A boy soon infiltrated her paradise. Jensen writes, “He told me go from that place, not mine, / but his, and so obedient I went. /Even had I stood, bold to fight, /my place was gone. /I have never found its like again.” True to her style, Jensen leaves the reader with a sense of finality which evokes the silent awe of reflection, and raw, if constrained, feedback. Birthright consistently demonstrates her proclivity to contain her emotions, to understand them and come to terms with them. The only poem that shows untamed restraint, though only as a necessary evil, was a work entitled “The Cormorant.” In this piece she observes an ocean bird feasting, “It hooks, it wrestles, it hurls a fish/thrashing wounded down/into a neck bound with hemp/then heaves it into fish-slick hands—/tribute paid hungry still.” It’s as if Jensen, trapped by a civilized decorum of an earlier generation, reveals her desire of mastery through an altercation in nature. In another reference to nature, Jensen finds an uncertain identity. In the poem “Theirs,” Jensen recognizes the uncomfortable world she inhabits, which excludes her and belongs to others. In the final moments of the poem, she clings to Mother Nature, enigmatically. “Mine the dark/blue lacquer of the sky. I’m rocked by something/certain new, moon or clouds or sky, / I cannot

say.” Jensen’s uncertainty begs the question: Would she tell us if she knew? In Birthright, Jensen admits a dull fear that she experiences, as she confronts ‘self’ during the process of writing a poem. In the poem “Each Unwritten Poem Has a Face—” Jensen confesses that giving a poem life takes the breath out of something else. In her piece, she says, “Even when dipping to the bottom of my mind/I cannot—do not wish to—understand/that gritty ghost with ashes on its breath/on whose compunction I must depend/if I am to haul myself out of being.” For Jensen, a rare clear, downbeat passage, yet for a superbly self-contained woman, the passage demonstrates the courage to reveal a vulnerability to her readers. In Birthright, Jensen has given into her muse, which insists on being heard. Her words glide easily from one to another. Her images taken from the sea add a special charm to her poetry. Birthright heralds us to an incredible talent. Editor’s Note: Helen Evans Febbo, Gwen’s sister, created the artwork for “Birthright.” To order the book, call Birch Brook Press at (607) 746-7453. It can also be purchased (soft cover only) from www.amazon.com or www.barnesandnoble.com or (hard cover only-a limited edition) from www.abebooks.com. Gwen has offered to do readings for Wilson College club meetings. If your club is interested, write her at gwen.jensen@verizon.net.

Upcoming alumnae events: A Fun Night in the ‘Burgh

A Night At The Phillies Ballpark for Wilson Alumnae!

Friday, April 29, 2011 • 5:30-7:30 p.m.

Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2011 • 7:05-10 p.m.

Join Pittsburgh area alumnae at The Retro on 8th...for a fun evening with great eats from Tin Front Cafe! Bring your business card - you are Wilson College’s guests. Parking is free after 4 p.m. & available on both sides of E. 8th Ave. Learn more about our hostess, Hayley Kile ’92 at www.retroon8th. com or visit her Facebook page and check out Tin Front at www.tinfrontcafe.com.

Get your tickets now for this fun night when the Phillies face off against the Washington Nationals! Tickets are just $30 and available through the Alumnae Relations Office. Make checks payable to Wilson College and send to the Alumnae Relations Office, Wilson College, 1015 Philadelphia Ave., Chambersburg, PA 17201. Last day of ticket sales is Sept. 10, 2011. For more information, call 1-866-446-8660, ext. 3180.

The Wilson College Alumnae Association’s trip to Charlottesville, VA April 28-30 has been cancelled due to a lack of registrants. The Association is hoping to schedule more regional trips in 2012 and is looking for College clubs interested in helping to coordinate these trips. For more information, contact the chair of the Alumnae Tour and Travel Committee, Loretta Hunt Marion ’61 at LMarion-Consultant@Scholastic.com. 20

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ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News

“The Unforgotten” The Life and Work of Renée Vivien (1877-1909) “The Unforgotten” is a direct translation of the title of a collection of Renée Vivien’s short stories, L’inoubliée (1909), published just after her death. This title seemed particularly appropriate for Melanie Gregg’s Mazur presentation, given that one of the central purposes of her project is not only to make known and available to modern Anglophone audiences the long forgotten and lesser-known works of the Symbolist poet Renée Vivien, but also to vindicate her memory, since much of what has been written about her is based on legends, misogynistic critics who abhorred her lesbianism, and the quarrels of jealous lovers who had the advantage of outliving her, and therefore out-writing her, or so they thought. In April, Melanie Gregg shared excerpts from a five-volume project she has undertaken to preserve the works and correspondence of Renée Vivien, as well as remembrances and poetry written in her honor by those who knew and loved her. Below, is her working translation of Vivien’s poem, “You for whom I wrote.”

You for whom I wrote

You for whom I wrote, oh lovely young women! You whom alone I loved, will you reread my verse On future mornings when snow falls upon the universe And on future nights of roses and flames? Will you dream, amid the charming disarray Of your disheveled hair, and your unfastened robes: “This woman through grief and happiness, Held high her gaze and her lover’s lips.” Pale and breathing the sweetness of your flesh In the magical evocation of the night, Will you say: “This woman had the ardor that eludes me… Why isn’t she alive! She would have loved me…” (At the Sweet Hour of Hand in Hand, 1906)

Music Review by Monique Paré ’11 Les Vonderlin ‘91 is a talented singer/songwriter alumna who has been performing with the award-winning group, Voxology, since 1998. Vonderlin recently released her first solo album, entitled Les is More. The album is full of beautiful vocals with string and piano accompaniment. According to iTunes, Les is More is characterized as pop/rock. However, it also has pertinent attributes of folk and bluegrass. Each of the nine songs on the album is as unique and intriguing as the name that Vonderlin has assigned to it. The album includes titles ranging from “Mahala,” to “Allejujah,” to “Junk.” The slow, soothing, fluid melodies of each song invite the listener to relax. At the same time, this music has a rhythm that will keep your foot happily tapping along with Vonderlin as she sings out clearly and harmoniously. The cover of the album, depicting Vonderlin in a sunny meadow, is an accurate portrayal of the music itself. Indeed, this music brings the listener into a peaceful mindset, similar to that experienced by those dwelling in the quiet and exquisite serenity of nature. Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News

Alumnae Gatherings

Gathering in Na

ples, March 2011

2011 rlando, March

Gathering in O

Gathering in Palm Beach, March 2011

Alumnae and husbands gathered under the warm Sarasota sun to discuss forming a Wilson College Club of the Greater Sarasota Area in February 2011. Look for more news from this dynamic group.

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SHAPING THE FUTURE Advancement News

A Lenfest Challenge Story

By Denise McDowell

Patricia Szabo ’73 describes her recent gift to the Wilson Fund – made as part of the Lenfest Challenge – as a “full-circle moment” in her life. Her parents made it possible for her to attend Wilson College and last year, it was her parents who made it possible for her to give back to the College in a significant way. Pat, a physician in the Philadelphia area for the past 25 years, still feels a deep sense of gratitude to Wilson, as well as to her parents, for allowing her to fulfill her dreams. An opportunity to support the College in a way she had longed to over the years arose with the passing of Pat’s mother last year. She wanted to make a significant gift and, when she heard of the Wilson Fund Lenfest Challenge – which matches gifts of $10,000 or more – she felt the time was right. Pat came to Wilson to study science on the advice of a high school teacher who recognized her aptitude for it. She wanted to become a doctor. She had heard of the College’s solid reputation as a strong women’s college with a rigorous science department and, after visiting the campus, she felt Wilson was the right school for her. Pat made the most of her four years at Wilson, involving herself in all aspects of campus life, including WCGA, Silver Key, and many other clubs and activities. And, like many other Wilson women, she also made lifelong friends in her time at the College. As graduation approached and she prepared to go on to medical school, her plans hit a snag. She and two Wilson classmates who had also applied to medical schools received so many rejection letters that they plastered their science professor’s walls with them on Senior Night, she recalls with a laugh. So, after graduation, she moved back home to Clifton, New Jersey, and began exploring other options, eventually enrolling in Seton Hall University to pursue a master’s degree in biology. But after working in the local laboratory and hospital, Pat realized she still wanted to become a doctor. She applied to several medical schools abroad and was accepted to a seven-year program at the University of Budapest in Hungary. In 1974, Pat began her studies along with nine other American students enrolled in the University of Budapest Medical School. She remembers it as a daunting, yet exciting chapter in her life, and credits Wilson for giving her the self-confidence and independence she needed to persevere in a demanding program in a foreign land. Ultimately, Pat realized her dream. After completing her residency requirement back in the United States, she entered into practice in the Philadelphia area, where she has continued serving patients for more than 25 years. Pat lives happily in Springfield with Nancy Krody, her partner of 11 years.

Wilson salutes the generous donors who have given at the $10,000 level to the Wilson Fund Lenfest Challenge. For an up-to-date listing of all of these donors please visit our website at www.wcampaignforwilson.org. For more information or to discuss making a gift to Wilson College please call the Advancement Office at 1-866-446-8660 or visit us online at www.wilson.edu/makeagift.

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The 2011 Wilson College

“Blue Jacket” G lf Classic Friday, June 3, 2011

Chambersburg Country Club

8 a.m. Shotgun Start

Registration 7:30a.m.

Two-person Modified Ryder Cup Format

Calling all golfers! • Everyone welcome • Breakfast and lunch • Sponsorships available • Door prizes • Games • Registration $75 A lovely early summer morning on a scenic golf course – sound appealing? You will find this a wonderful way to begin your reunion weekend and help support Wilson students. Enjoy breakfast, greens fees, prizes, games and lunch – all for just $75! All skill levels are welcomed and the tournament is open to all Wilson graduates, family, spouses, partners and friends.

The Wilson College “Blue Jacket” Golf Classic was initiated in 2007 to provide funding for students to expand their educational experiences. The funds raised are dedicated to student participation in off-campus seminars, academic programs and competitions. Call your classmates and friends – get a twosome or foursome together – and join us for a fun summer morning at a course, very close to campus.

Register today! Call 1-866-446-8660, ext. 3403 Ask for Diana Hollada or email alumnae@wilson.edu 24

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WILSON ATHLETICS

Wilson Student-Athletes Earn Regional Recognition

Alexandre Howard ’13

Vanessa Whitfield ’14

Wilson College Student-Athletes Vanessa Whitfield ’13 and Alex Howard ’14 earned regional recognition from the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC). The ECAC is the nation’s largest athletic conference and only multi-divisional conference, with approximately 300 member institutions ranging across 16 states from Maine to North Carolina and westerly to Illinois.  Established in 1938 with 58 charter members, the ECAC has since emerged as the nationwide leader in service. 

GYMNASTICS Sophomore, Alexandre Howard ’13 (Tucson, AZ/ Homeschooled) was named as the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC) Division III Women’s Gymnastics All-Around Gymnast of the Week, after earning a first place finish as an all-around competitor with a career-best of 36.45 in a dual meet versus Ursinus College. During the meet, the sophomore standout set a Wilson College record on the uneven bars with a 9.275, earning her second place in the event. Howard followed up her performance with a third place finish on the balance beam (8.875), a fourth place finish on the floor exercise (9.250) and a fourth place finish on the vault (9.050). The Bears defeated the Phoenix 179.725-165.850. Howard is currently a sophomore at Wilson College, pursuing a dual major in French and Dance.

BASKETBALL Following her selection as the North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC) Athlete of the Week, freshman, Vanessa Whitfield ’14 (Chambersburg, PA/ Chambersburg) was named Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC) Division III Southern Player of the Week.

Whitfield scored 50 points, tallied 40 rebounds, 7 assists, and 4 steals in two games posting two consecutive double doubles. Her performance included recording 17 points, shooting 42% from the field, and 27 rebounds in the Phoenix 60-53 victory over Morrisville State. The next day, she contributed 23 points and 23 rebounds in Wilson’s 60-51 win verses Cazenovia College. For the game, Whitfield shot 29% from the field and went 8 for 10 from the line. This season, Whitfield averaged 13.9 points per game, shooting 37% from the field. She is currently ranked 12th in the North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC) for scoring. She also averaged 11.1 rebounds per game, ranking her 4th in the NEAC and 25th in the NCAA Division III. In addition, Whitfield has recorded 11 double doubles this season earning her a national ranking of 32nd. Whitfield’s hard play and energy has positively impacted the Wilson basketball team. According to head coach, Angie Grove, “Vanessa is an incredibly talented athlete and is really developing into a consistent threat on the court both offensively and defensively. Her scoring ability played a huge part in our back to back road wins. I am looking forward to seeing Vanessa continue to improve her game and make an impact in the future of Wilson basketball.” Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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WILSON ATHLETICS

2010-2011 Wilson College Basketball Recap

Welcome to the Future!

Use you phone to check on all the latest news and scores:

Vanessa Whitfield ’14

Tara Fields ’13

Alaina Hofer ’11

The Wilson College basketball team finished the 2010-2011 season with an overall record of 5-20-0 (4-18-0 in the NEAC). Leading the Phoenix this season was freshman forward Vanessa Whitfield ’14 (Chambersburg, PA/ Chambersburg), with 14.9 points per game, 11.5 rebounds per game, and 12 double doubles. Sophomore Tara Fields ’13 (Berryville, VA/ Clarke County) was also a threat on the court this season, averaging 13.1 points, 5.1 rebounds, and 3.4 steals per game. In the paint, senior Alaina Hofer ’11 (Duncannon, PA/ Susquenita) averaged 10.2 points and 8.1 rebounds per game for the Phoenix. The season performance by Whitfield and Fields also earned them National Statistical Rankings in the top 30 players in Division III of the NCAA. Whitfield finished 26th in the nation in Rebounds Per Game and Fields finished 29th in Steals Per Game (3.4 per game). According to head coach Angie Grove, “Overall I am very proud of this team and the success it has had this year. I am looking forward to next season to see our program continue to develop into a contender in the NEAC conference.”

SAVE THE DATE

Soccer Alumnae Game Sunday, August 28th 3:00 p.m. at Kris’s Meadow Picnic to follow the game!

Wilson College Celebrates National Girls and Women in Sports Day On Saturday, February 19th, the Wilson College Athletic Department celebrated National Girls and Women in Sports Day to increase visibility for female athletes. That afternoon, the Wilson coaching staff, current Wilson student-athletes, and 21 Chambersburg children gathered for a day of free sports clinics, basketball, and fun for young girls. The day began with registration and two free clinics for girls ages 8 -14 years, where participants learned the basic fundamentals in the sports of tennis

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and soccer. Participants also took part in the Phoenix Fan Fair that will included bowling, poster making, face painting, and a picture with the Phoenix mascot. Pizza was also provided and the event ended with a NCAA Division III basketball game where Wilson College took on Penn State Abington. With the support of the NGWSD participants, The Phoenix defeated the Lady Lions 73-59 in an overtime victory.

National Girls and Women in Sports Day began in 1987 as a day to remember Olympic volleyball player Flo Hayman for her athletic achievements and her work to assure equality for women’s sports. Since that time, NGWSD has evolved into a day to acknowledge the past and recognize current sport achievements, the positive influence of sport participation for girls and women, and the continuing struggle for equality and access for women in sports.


WILSON ATHLETICS

2010-2011 Wilson College Gymnastics Recap

Sam Vance ’11

Alex Howard ’13

The Wilson College Gymnastics team concluded the season with a team high season score of 171.200 at the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC) hosted at SUNY Cortland. The Phoenix Gymnasts, under the direction of head coach Kirsten Mull, also boasted a victory against Rhode Island College. In addition, senior Sam Vance ’11 (Winchester, VA/John Handley) broke her own Wilson College Floor record previously set in January 2010. She posted a season best performance of 9.6 at the home meet in January. Sophomore, Alexandre Howard ’13 (Tucson, AZ/Home Schooled) posted a 9.275 breaking the Wilson record on uneven bars previously held by Stacy Johnson. “We competed with a small squad of talented gymnasts this year, and the road win was exciting for us as a team,” says Mull “We have made great strides and I look forward to building on our recent accomplishments.” While Mull is quick to give credit to her gymnasts and their accomplishments, the gymnastics coaches honored her as the ECAC Coach of the Year. “We are very proud of Kirsten and it is quite obvious that she is dedicated to her gymnasts and the Wilson College gymnastics program,” says Athletic Director Lori Frey, “We look forward to her team’s future success.”

Wilson Gymnast Competes at National Competition Wilson College gymnast, Alex Howard ’13 (Tucson, AZ/ Homeschooled) competed at the National Collegiate Gymnastics Association (NCGA) Division III National Championship on March 25th at the University of Wisconsin- Eau Claire. Howard qualified for NCGA Nationals in the all around as an individual qualifier and was selected based on a combination of her seasonal scores and her performance at the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC) Division III gymnastics championship. At Nationals, Howard finished with an all around score of 35.950, making her the 19th ranked all around Division III gymnast in the country. On the four events, Howard scored a 9.2 on the vault, an 8.825 on the uneven bars, an 8.825 on the balance beam, and a 9.1 in the floor exercise. According to Head Coach Kirsten Mull, “I am very proud of the way Alex competed at Nationals and glad she had this opportunity. She has improved since her appearance at Nationals last season and will continue to improve during her career.”

Follow your passions and discover your potential. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division III released a new positioning statement which begins with a phrase intended to simply describe the student-athlete experience: “Follow your passions and discover your potential.” The statement continues: “The college experience is a time of learning and growth – a chance to follow passions and develop potential. For student-athletes in Division III, all of this happens most importantly in the classroom and through earning an academic degree. The Division III experience provides for passionate participation in a competitive athletic environment, where student-athletes push themselves to excellence and build upon their academic success with new challenges and life skills. And student-athletes are encouraged to pursue the full spectrum of opportunities available during their time in college. In this way, Division III provides an integrated environment for student-athletes to take responsibility for their own paths, follow their passions and find their potential through a comprehensive learning experience.”

As a Division III member, the Wilson College Athletic Department embraces the concept and philosophy behind the DIII platform, and has actively promoted the student-athletes on-campus. The NCAA funded advertising efforts for each member institution (via signage and media images), and these can be found through-out campus. In addition, the department took the initiative one step further and each student-athlete is recognized via a personalized poster on campus – identifying them as a student, an athlete and all leadership activities, honors, and organizational affiliations. “Our student-athletes are dynamic individuals, active in a wide range of clubs and organizations,” says Athletic Director Lori Frey, “They exemplify the ideals of the Division III philosophy and we believe that their success is driven by the opportunity to explore and create an educational experience that is most important to them as individuals. Hence the slogan – “D3: Where I can be ME!” Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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Wilson Community Welco Wilson College’s next president, Dr. Barbara K. Mistick, was welcomed on March 31 by the campus community during an event in the Harry R. Brooks Complex auditorium. After being greeted by speakers representing various groups from within the College community, she addressed Wilson’s students, staff, Trustees and alumnae for the first time since she was chosen as the College’s 19th president. She will assume the presidency on July 1.

“I have a grateful belief in the value and importance of women’s focused education, and the tremendous difference women can make in the community and the influence they have on their families.” — Dr. Barbara K. Mistick

“May our welcome to our next president extend beyond formal occasions into open hearts and open minds.” — The Rev. Rosie Magee, Helen Carnell Eden Chaplain Invocation

“I must say as a student how exciting it is to see the level of energy and enthusiasm that you bring to your role as president. Also, what a comfort it is to know that our future leader is such a strong supporter of Wilson’s core values and the things that make Wilson unique.” — Stephanie Bachman ’12, WCGA President

From left to right: Trudi Warner Blair ’76, Board Chair, Dr. Mary Hendrickson, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty, Dr. Barbara K. Mistick, Wilson’s next president, Paula Spezza Tishok ’71, Alumnae Association President, Dr. Lorna Duphiney Edmundson, President, Stephanie Bachman ’12, WCGA President

r ’76,

Trudi Warner Blai Board Chair

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As Dr. Mistick spoke, a picture was shown of the announcement of her appointment that ran on a big video screen in New York City’s Times Square.


omes Her 19 President th

“Your position as president of Wilson College will be challenging, interesting and fulfilling. The faculty and staff warmly welcome you as our new president. We offer our unqualified assistance and support as you transition to this new role.” — Dr. Mary Hendrickson, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty

Each speaker gave Dr. Misti ck a bouquet of daisies.

“I am delighted to welcome Dr. Mistick to Wilson College on behalf of the entire Alumnae Association… We are ready and eager to support Dr. Mistick as she takes the reins of leadership from President Edmundson and wish her every success at Wilson College.” — Paula Spezza Tishok ’71, Alumnae Association President

“You want the acting president and the new president to be joined at the hip in supporting all of you in doing everything that we’re planning for the future…I feel so proud to be able to leave knowing that I’m leaving Barbara this wonderful, accomplished, talented group of faculty, staff and alumnae.” — Dr. Lorna Duphiney Edmundson, President Stephanie Bachman ’12, WCGA President

“To succeed in life, and at Wilson, you need three things: you need a wishbone, and a backbone and a funny bone. I think Barbara has all three.” — Trudi Warner Blair ’76, Board Chair, quoting the philosophy of Reba McEntire at the conclusion of the event.

Dr. Lorna Duphiney Edmundson, President

Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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Don’t miss

Reunion Weekend • June 3-5, 2011 Weekend Activities Wake Up Activities – Friday, June 3 and Saturday, June 4 6:45-10 a.m.

Alumnae College – 3 - 4 p.m. Roy Pitz Micro-Brewery Tour and Tasting. Cost per person is $12.

Class Procession – 11:15 a.m. Lenfest Green. Gather in front of Lenfest Commons.

Riding: Riding is by appointment only. Call for more information 7 - 10 a.m.

Welcome Reception - 4 p.m., Brooks Complex Atrium. All alumnae and guests are invited.

All-Alumnae Luncheon – 11:45 a.m., Jensen Dining Hall.

Laughter Yoga: With instructor Cathy Hansen. Minimum of 12 registrants to hold this class with a $5 per person charge 6:45 - 8 a.m. Gentle Yoga: All levels welcome. Minimum seven registrants to hold this class, 6:45 - 8 a.m. Guided Walk: Meet on the Alumnae House porch at 7 a.m.

Friday, June 3 Play in the Blue Jacket Golf Classic. Enjoy a breakfast, greens fees, prizes, games, goody bags and lunch - all for just $75! Registration: 7 - 7:45 a.m. Shotgun start 8 a.m. Alumnae College – 10 a.m. — Archiving at Wilson - Chat with Archivist Amy Lucadamo. Brooks Complex Tours and Campus Tours - 10 a.m. - noon and 2 - 4 p.m. Guides will meet you at the Brooks Complex lobby 10 minutes before your tour time. Oral History Booth at the Hankey Center - NEW! - A new initiative to collect stories from visiting alumnae; bring a friend and come have a 20-minute conversation which will be taped and later distributed. Please sign up for your preferred time at registration. The booth is open Friday 10 a.m. - noon and 2 to 4 p.m. and Saturday 8-9 a.m. and 2-4 p.m. Alumnae College – 2 - 4 p.m. - Global Citizenship Initiative Open Forum Hankey Center Library. Join President Edmundson, Dean Hendrickson and Professor Bertin Kouadio to hear updates.

Odds/Evens Dinner – 6 - 7:30 p.m., Jensen Dining Hall. Step-Sing – 8 p.m., Norland Porch. Join alumnae and President Edmundson to sing the best songs of Wilson. Alumnae College –Self-directed tour of historic Chambersburg. A tour designed by our own Ginny Ott Stake ‘61 based on her work, John Brown in Chambersburg, Limited number of copies will be available for sale at reunion registration. You will get a map and directions of how to explore historic Chambersburg and are welcome to take this tour anytime at your own pace and leisure. A Nightcap at Alumnae House – Friday and Saturday 8 - 10 p.m. everyone is welcome.

Saturday, June 4 Oral History Booth at the Hankey Center - NEW! - A new initiative to collect stories from visiting alumnae; bring a friend and come have a 20-minute conversation which will be taped and later distributed. Please sign up for your preferred time at registration. The booth is open Friday 10 a.m. - noon and 2 to 4 p.m. and Saturday 8-9 a.m. and 2-4 p.m. State of College – 9:30 a.m., Alumnae Chapel. President Lorna Duphiney Edmundson will give an update on Wilson College. Alumnae Association General Meeting – 10:15 a.m. Alumnae Chapel.

Class Pictures – 1 p.m. Class pictures will be taken in Lenfest Commons area. Alumnae College –2 - 4 p.m., Potomac Beading in Laird Hall. The $20 charge covers the cost of all materials and instruction. Pre-registration is required for this event. Orchesis Gathering – 2 p.m. Lounge outside Appenzellar/Buchanan Dance Studio Pines & Maples Society High Tea – 2:30 p.m. Sharpe House. Attendance by invitation only. Alumnae College – 3 - 4 p.m. - Tuscarora Mt. Wine Tasting. Pre-registration is required. Alumnae Awards Reception – 4 -5:30 p.m., Brooks Complex Atrium Class Dinners – 6:30 p.m. check the reunion brochure for locations.

Sunday, June 5 Alumnae Choir Rehearsal - Sunday, June 5, 8 a.m., Alumnae Chapel. Memorial Chapel Service – 9 a.m., Alumnae Chapel. A service to remember alumnae who have passed away. If you are interested in representing your class, please contact the Alumnae Office by April 30. Faculty Award Brunch - 10:30 a.m. Jensen Dining Hall. Join us as we recognize and honor Col. Alfred Kitts, former professor and director of the equestrian program at Wilson.

Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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1015 Philadelphia Avenue Chambersburg, PA 17201-1285

CHIANTI & the ITALIAN RIVIERA Experience the trip of a lifetime through two of Italy’s best-loved regions, Chianti and the Italian Riveria, on an eight-day trip Oct. 8-17, 2011. Beginning in Florence, the tour will immerse you in this historic, lovely city’s museums—Galleria d’Accademia and the Galleria degli Uffizi, among others—and offer you an opportunity to say farewell to President Lorna Duphiney Edmundson, who is retiring from Wilson in June after a decade of exceptional service to the College. The cost is $3,045 per person, with a $500 discount per couple at bookings made by May 10, 2011. Highlights of the trip include: • Enjoying flavorful Tuscan cuisine during a private cooking demonstration. • A private tour and wine tasting at Castello di Monsanto. • Visiting the storied towns of San Gimignano, Siena, Lucca and Carrara. • Traveling the Chianti Road to visit the well-preserved hill town of Castellina. • Seeing the ancient walled city of Lucca. • Journeying to the picturesque towns of Santa Margherita and Portofino. • Visiting beautiful and remote Cinque Terre. And more! Visit the AHI website (www.ahitravel.com) to see a sample itinerary.

Call the Alumnae Office at 1.866.446.8660 and reserve one of the 36 spaces on this Wilson College-exclusive trip!

If you are interested in visiting museums and galleries during your free time in Florence, please reserve your tickets as soon as possible. The Uffizi and Accademia galleries can only be visited with tickets issued for a specific date and entrance time. You may book these on line at www.b-ticket.com/b%2Dticket/uffizi/. Click the British flag in the upper right corner for English, sign up, select the museum and buy. After entering your credit card # click ‘invio’ which means ‘send’; clicking ‘annulla operazione’ will cancel your transaction. Print the voucher. Please know that these tickets are non-refundable and cost 6.50 Euros each. Your day in Florence will fall on the Tuesday of your trip with leisure time in the afternoon; please request your entrance no earlier than 1:15 PM and no later than 3:30 PM You can also buy these by calling the state museum office; it is an international call 011-39—055-294-883 – Italy is six hours ahead of US Eastern Standard Time. Call AHI or the Alumnae Relations Office at Wilson College if you have any questions.

Spring 2011 Alumnae Quarterly  

Wilson College Alumnae Quarterly Spring 2011

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