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Frontenac 2017 Information Guide

Park Information www.ontarioparks.com/park/frontenac www.frontenacpark.ca Park Office Address and GPS destination: Frontenac Provincial Park, 6700 Salmon Lk. Rd., Box 11 South Frontenac Township, Sydenham, Ontario K0H 2T0

Park Office Phone Number ........ 613-376-3489 Public Phone ................................. Located outside the Park Office Police, Fire, Ambulance, Emergency Rescue, (Specify Kingston Fire Rescue) .................................. Forest Fire Reporting ............................................... 1-888-239-4565 Kingston General Hospital ......................................... 613-548-3232 Hotel Dieu Hospital – Kingston ................................. 613-544-3310 Poison Control Centre ............................................. 1-800-267-1373

911

A Park Permit is required for all visitors to Frontenac Park, whether for interior camping, camper’s vehicles, walking, skiing, snowshoeing the trails or bringing in a canoe. If in doubt, check with the Park Office. Visibly display your Park Permit on the dash of your vehicle at all times!

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Frontenac Provincial Park

2017

Welcome to Frontenac Provincial Park

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In spite of the outstanding scenery, one of Frontenac’s greatest resources is the people who have been contributing to the ongoing stewardship of the greater landscape. Frontenac Provincial Park is privileged to have a strong group of Friends and community partners that celebrate the rich history of the landscape, and contribute to projects throughout the Frontenac Arch Biosphere Reserve. The Friends of Frontenac Park is an incorporated charitable volunteer organization that works to supplement and enhance the educational, recreational, research, and resource protection

The First Nations People of Canada travelled the Park’s waters, forests, and scenic vistas. Early Canadian settlers and industries laboured within what is now the Frontenac Region living and working on the landscape. Ongoing initiatives help to maintain the Park in an ecologically intact state for visitors to appreciate through recreation. Whether you are new to Frontenac Park or a seasoned backcountry enthusiast, please enjoy the landscape responsibly and do your part to maintain the Park’s splendor for future generations to enjoy. Some interesting new initiatives await visitors in 2017! Welcome to Frontenac Provincial Park!

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elcome to Frontenac Provincial Park; a Natural Environment Class park spanning 5230 hectares within the UNESCO Frontenac Arch Biosphere. Frontenac Park offers backcountry adventures on over 100 kilometers of connected semi wilderness trails; and four season interior camping on 48 campsites at 13 site clusters throughout the park. The Frontenac Provincial Park office also offers indoor Frontenac Provincial Park is a unique threshold interpretive natural history displays, wilderness skills wilderness area situated above an ancient granite programs, and facilities to host educational groups. ridge linking the Canadian Shield to the Adirondack Mountain Range. This geologic feature is known as the Frontenac Arch occupying a region in Ontario July 21, 2017 where five differing forest types converge; resulting in enhanced species diversity. In 2002 the Frontenac Arch was recognized as a World Biosphere Reserve by AT ALL PARKS the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural OntarioParks.com/hphp #HPHP Organization (UNESCO); one of only 16 Biosphere Reserves in Canada. Although the Frontenac Arch extends beyond park boundaries, Frontenac Provincial Park offers a distinctive opportunity to explore large undeveloped portions of outstanding scenery by water or by land without the need for mechanized travel. The park’s extensive hiking trails, water routes, and year round backcountry camping provide some excellent options to explore the Frontenac Arch.

programs of Frontenac Provincial Park. In 2017, the Friends will have been active in the park for over 25 years, and continue to make significant contributions towards ongoing education, work projects, cultural heritage, and research (Page 4); as well as the increasingly popular Frontenac Challenge (Page 5), and several of the Wilderness Skills Training Programs (Page 20). Park Staff continue to enhance and enrich the experiences of visitors to the park, and provide information to new visitors (one recently departed staff member has been doing so for over 30 years…Congratulations!).

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From the Park Superintendent

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would like to personally welcome you to Frontenac Provincial Park and hope that your time spent here during the 2017 season is safe and enjoyable. Park staff strive to make your stay a memorable one and hope that you can experience all that Frontenac has to offer. Last fall our long-time Assistant Park Superintendent, Bert Korporaal, retired after 30+ dedicated years at Frontenac. Bert’s dedication and commitment to the park has been instrumental in what Frontenac is today, his knowledge and guidance will be greatly missed. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Bert for everything he has done for Frontenac Provincial Park and Ontario Parks and wish him all the best in his retirement Frontenac Park will be making some significant improvements to some of our facilities in 2017; each is designed to make your stay more enjoyable and rewarding. One such improvement is the expansion of the Big Salmon Lake parking lot which will now be double in size. It will also include a designated parking area for vehicles with trailers. We will also

continue with the installation of food lockers at selected campsites as a way for our visitors to securely store their food and keep their site clean (see page 14). The Friends of Frontenac have also graciously provided 5 interpretive signs that will be placed at various locations throughout the park. They are intended to highlight the significant cultural history of the park and provide another enjoyable element to your Frontenac experience (for more info please see page 5). I would also like to draw your attention to the Wilderness Skills Program for 2017. Full details are on page 20, please ask park staff for more details if necessary. Whether you are a first time visitor or a returning one I hope that you have a safe and enjoyable time at Frontenac. It is truly a special place and each of us plays an important role in ensuring it remains that way. Please contact park staff immediately if we can be of assistance in any way; Ben Chabot Park Superintendent

Cover Photo – Doug Hamilton; Insets – Ontario Parks

Explore

childrensoutdoorcharter.ca

MNRF #3441 (13k P.R. 16 02 20) Rev ISSN 1714 – 471X ISBN 978-1-4606-9015-4 (Print. 2017 ed.) © 2017 Government of Ontario Printed in Canada


2017

Frontenac Provincial Park

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F ront e n a c Prov i nci a l P a rk’s Fa n t a s t i c F ro g s

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id you know that Frontenac Provincial Park is home to nine species of frogs as well as one species of toad? The wetlands and forests of the park are located within the Frontenac Arch Biosphere Reserve and provide habitat and connectivity for frogs and many species of flora and fauna. While exploring the park, you may run into one of the following amphibians. Use the following identifying features to help distinguish between the frogs (and toad!) of Frontenac Park. Please leave animals in peace by not handling or disturbing them. It is an offence to disturb, remove, harm or kill an animal or plant within a provincial park.

Bullfrog

Green Frog

Bullfrog • 9 – 15 cm – Ontario’s largest frog • Green, olive or brown •T  he male’s eardrum is twice the size of its eye • Male has a bright yellow throat • Call: deep “jug – o – rum…jug – o – rum” Green Frog • 5 – 9 cm • Green • 2 dorsal ridges extending along its back • Bright green upper lip • Dark bands on hind legs • Male has yellow throat and eardrum twice the size of the eye • Call: sounds like plucking a banjo string

Mink Frog

Grey Treefrog

Northern Leopard Frog • 5 – 9 cm • Emerald green to brown • 2 dorsal ridges extending down its back • Has dark brown or black ‘roundish’ spots outlined in yellow on its back and sides • Call: chuckling sound, similar to rubbing a wet balloon Northern Leopard Frog

Pickerel Frog

Wood Frog

Pickerel Frog • 4.5 – 7.5 cm • Cream to brown • Has two rows of dark square spots on its back between the two dorsal ridges • Similar dark square spots on its sides • Groin area is yellow to orange • Call: long drawn out nasal snore Wood Frog • 3.5 – 7 cm • Brown to beige with a black face ‘mask’ behind each eye - on the side of the head • It has a white line along the upper jaw • Usually found in woodlands • Call: a rolling ‘quacking’ sound like a duck All photos: Joe Crowley – Natural Heritage Information Centre Chorus Frog photo: Scott Gillingwater

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INCe 2004 we’ve received 951 snake sightings from visitors as they explore the Park. We’re pretty certain that most of these sightings were actually Black Ratsnakes, based on descriptions of where the snake was seen, what it was doing, digital photos, and what it looked like. But of course, photos are the best way for Park staff to know if the snake you saw is actually a Black Ratsnake, so try to snap a picture if you can!

turtles, but elsewhere in the country their habitat is shrinking. As well, females are being hit on roads as they lay their eggs. There are 5 species of turtles in the Park, and they can be hard to tell apart, so take a picture to show Park staff.

Snake Sightings

In 2007 we also started receiving turtle sightings. Frontenac is a special Park because it is home to three rare turtles in Canada – Stinkpots (also known as Musk Turtles), Blanding’s Turtles, and Map Turtles. Frontenac seems to have healthy populations of these

Why are we collecting these sightings? Snakes and turtles are hard for biologists to study – snakes hide in trees and underground, and of course turtles hide in the water. Snakes and turtles also move around a lot. Collecting sightings from the public helps us learn which habitat areas these animals are using in the Park. The more we understand where the important habitat is, the better we can protect it. Thanks for all your sightings, photos, and videos! Please continue to report your sightings to the Park Office.

Mink Frog • 4 .8 – 7 cm •T  he dorsolateral ridge along back does not extend all way down the back •O  live to green back with a few scattered roundish dark spots • I t is bright green above the mouth • I t has a musty odour when handled •C  all: like a galloping horse or hammering in the distance Grey Treefrog • 3 .2 – 5.1 cm •L  ight green to grey– it can change colour to match surroundings •H  as a square white spot below eye • I nner thigh is orange or yellow • I t has large expanded toe discs for climbing on plants and trees •C  all: a short high-pitched bird-like trill

Chorus Frog

Chorus Frog • 1 .9 – 3.9 cm – small frog •L  ight brown with three dark, sometimes broken stripes down its back • I t has a white upper lip • I t also has a dark stripe down the side of its body from the tip of snout to the groin •C  all: sound of a finger nail running along the teeth of a comb

Spring Peeper

Spring Peeper • 1 .9 – 3.2 – the smallest frog in the park •B  rown to tan • I t has a dark band between the eyes • I t also has a distinguishable dark ‘X’ on its back • I t has small toe discs •C  all: loud, short continuous ‘peep… peep… peep…peep’

American Toad

American Toad • 5 .1 – 9 cm •O  ne or two ‘warts’ per dark spot on the body • I t has a white belly covered in dark spots •M  ales have a dark throat and are smaller than females •C  all: a long 20 to 40 second, high pitched trill

Report your Sightings! Ontario Parks, and community partner ecologists and naturalists are always happy to receive information on species sightings within a Provincial Park. Accurate location data and quality photographs are appreciated; provided that species are not disturbed. Please complete this Species Reporting Form and provide to park staff.

S pec i es R epor t i ng F orm Name of Species: Date: seen | heard (circle one) Location details:

(Accurate location descriptions or G.P.S. Coordinates are extremely valuable when available (in UTM NAD 83 format). Alternately, describe location by marking map or using known land features, and speaking with a staff member)

Observers: Additional Comments (Photos appreciated):


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Frontenac Provincial Park

2017

The Friends of Frontenac Park

P.O. Box 2237, Kingston, ON K7L 5J9 www.frontenacpark.ca www.facebook.com/frontenacpark

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Friends’ Projects

Photo: J. McDuff

he Friends of Frontenac Park is a not-for-profit volunteer organization working in co-operation with Ontario Parks to promote public appreciation of Frontenac Park by supplementing and enhancing programs, recreation facilities, visitor services, research and resource protection. The Friends’ activities are co-ordinated by a Board of Directors and undertaken by a committed group of volunteers. The Friends and volunteers have been involved in many projects which help support the Park and “Return a favour to nature”.

2016 Volunteer Training Day

Join the Friends of Frontenac

Work Day

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he Friends of Frontenac Park, now in their 25th year, are always happy to welcome new members. Why should you join them? The Park comprises 54 square km (approximately 13,230 acres), yet it has only two permanent and very few seasonal staff. Therefore Park operations benefit greatly from your help. If you are interested in participating in the Friends’ activities, details about signing up as a new member may be found on our website, in our Newsletter, and in our pamphlet available at our information kiosk and at the Park Office. You may also want to support the Friends by making a charitable contribution, which will be of direct benefit to the Park. Members of the Friends enjoy discounts at stores such as the Novel Idea bookstore in Kingston.

There is always maintenance to do in Frontenac Park. Each of the four seasons brings unique challenges in keeping the trails, portages, bridges and campsites safe. The Friends of Frontenac Park are front and centre in the monitoring and repairing of damages caused by heavy rains, snow, frost, and wind. Beavers and deer also significantly affect the environment in the park. Keeping a balance between

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the park’s wilderness status and allowing our many visitors to enjoy a safe hike or paddle requires much thought and effort. Park staff and volunteers report any areas that require attention. This spring after the trail sweep on April 2, a sizeable group of volunteers, under the direction of Bert Korporaal, repaired a foot bridge that had been washed out west of campsite 10. As these repairs often take place quite a distance from the Park office and require bringing in tools and lumber, we must thank these hardy souls for their efforts.

Bridge west of campsite 10

Park Guides and Frontenac News

Winter Trail Guide

Frontenac Park is an all-season park that provides winter visitors with a range of recreational activities, from cross-country skiing and snowshoeing to winter camping and wilderness skills programs. Throughout the winter, 10 km of trails marked for cross-country skiing with 8 km track set when there is sufficient snowfall. The Doe Lake Loop, Arab Lake Gorge Loop and the Bufflehead trail are favourites for snowshoers and hikers.

The Doe Lake Trail Guide captures many of the elements that are important to the Frontenac story, and is a fine introduction to the Park. This trail guide and the Friends’ Checklist of Vertebrate Animals and Vascular Plants, are for the benefit to keen naturalists. All these publications and the Arab Lake Gorge Trail Guide are available The Frontenac History Book at the Park Office. Various bits of informa– Their Enduring Spirit tion about the Park and the activities of the By authors Christian Barber and Terry Friends of Frontenac Park may be found Fuchs, this is a book for anyone who has in Frontenac News, our official newsletter, eturn ever passed by a crumbling foundation in the latest edition of which may Rbe found in a favo ur our information kiosk at the Park Office. to nature the Park or pondered the story behind a stone fence. This book can be purchased Previous editions of the newsletter may be or ordered at the Park Office. accessed on our website.

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Trail Volunteers and Host Program

The Friends maintain a hosting program in the Park Office during the winter weekends from January to March and on long weekends during the rest of the year. Hosts can assist you in planning your outing and offer you hot chocolate when you return to the Park Office from your winter adventure. Park interior Trail Volunteer members are on-the-trail ambassadors who provide information to visitors they meet on the trails, canoe routes or campsites. The Trail Volunteers report problems and major concerns to Park staff, and assist with campsite and trail maintenance. If you would like to join the Park Volunteers, the Volunteer Training day is Sunday, April 09, 2017, starting at 9:00 a.m. at the Park Office.

Trail Sweeps

Photo:

Friends Publications

In addition to events designed to promote public awareness and participation (see back page), the Friends assist the Park with financial contributions to Park projects and equipment and with educational workshops and many hours of volunteer commitment.

Once in the spring and often again in the fall, groups of volunteers take on the task of cleaning and checking the conditions of the trails and campsites. The Spring Trail Sweep day is scheduled for Saturday, April 22, at 8:30 a.m.. At the end of formal trail sweeps, volunteers meet back at the Park Office to enjoy a warm bowl of chili and fellowship.

Work Projects

The Friends, in cooperation with Park staff, are continually engaged in trail maintenance and revitalization projects. Such projects normally involve the building and repairing of boardwalks and foot bridges, measures to prevent trail bed soil erosion, installation of rest benches and the upkeep and upgrading of signs along the trails. In 2016 the Friends of Frontenac Park assisted in the production of several weather proof interpretive signs installed at historically significant landmarks throughout the park (see page 5). This past year, the Friends also contributed towards the development of a new wall sized park map for visitors to the office. The new display features all of the parks trails, portages, and campsites; overlaid onto a 6 X 10 foot colour aerial image of the park landscape. Spend a few minutes considering future backcountry trips with the new Frontenac Park wall map display! If you would like to help Return a Favour to Nature; consider participating in seasonally recurring volunteer activities, or making a donation to the Friends of Frontenac Park. The Friends’ financial contributions are raised through membership fees, the sale of Park maps and publications, donations as well as the occasional raffling of items donated to the Friends. For details on scheduled work days, check the Friends’ website www.frontenacpark.ca or our newsletters which can be found in our information kiosk at the Park Office.


2017

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Frontenac Provincial Park

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and Historical Plaques Nature Historical Walks

rontenac Provincial Park…is one of the richest regions in the province for understanding not only the geological and natural history of the land but also the social history of Native residents and European settlers who have called this land their home. In the park, you can hike within metres of one of the largest mica mines in Ontario, ski through abandoned farmyards, camp near a creek used for log drives in the 19th century, paddle around islands which once housed hunting and fishing camps”. (From the book “Their Enduring Spirit – The history of Frontenac Provincial Park 1783 – 1990” by Christian Barber with Terry Fuchs)

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on-site historical information, at several outdoor locations where remnants of rich cultural history are still evident. If you would like to be a part of the unfolding history of Frontenac Provincial Park, consider joining the Friends and contributing your ideas and time; or by making a donation towards future Friends of Frontenac Park projects.

ocated on the Frontenac Arch of the Canadian Shield, and in a transition zone with both northern and southern plants and animals, Frontenac Park is home to a wide variety of flora and fauna and therefore is an ideal place for nature walks.

A walk emphasizing the History of Human Settlement in Frontenac Park will be led by Jérôme McDuff on Saturday April 29, 2017. The Spring Nature Walk led by Maureen Sly and Anne Robertson is scheduled for Saturday May 6. There will be an Early Bird Spring Bird Walk with Kathy Felkar on Sunday May 7. When hiking in the park remember to be prepared for inclement weather at all times. Dress appropriately and bring sufficient food and water for your needs. Dogs are not permitted on these organized nature hikes. See back page of tabloid (Page 20) or call the park office at 613-376-3489 for details on these and other events.

A sneak preview of some of the new Historical Plaques

Over the last year, The Friends of Frontenac Park initiated the design and development of weather-proof historical plaques to be permanently installed throughout the park interior. The new plaques will provide

In t er i or Park M ap

The Frontenac Challenges Threee more prints to come

Approved by :

Produce according to drawing

Date :

Send a new drawing

Produce according to annotations

1220, montee Masson, Laval (Quebec) Canada H7E 4P2 450.664.4414 1.888.788.4747 450.664.4420 1.866.525.4319 info@kalitec.com www.kalitec.com

Frontenac Trek

Project canceled : Send bill for infographics

Frontenac Provincial Park Drawn by :

Checked by :

Date :

Drawing # :

Edger

September 19th, 2016

Revision time :

Frontenac Provincial Park-2016-09-19

Project # :

Total time :

0.5 hour

Rev.

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*All informations on these plan are Kalitec’s property. Total or partial reproduction without the written approbation of Kalitec are prohibited.

Photo: Simon Lunn

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The Frontenac Trek comprises any six hiking loops within the park excluding the Doe Lake, and Arab Lake Gorge trails. The Frontenac Trek is a good option for individuals who may have time constraints or difficulty Threee more prints to comeand most arduous completing the longest hikes. In 2016 there were 26 Trek Finishers. Well done!

All Season Camper Challenge

Approved by :

Date :

also open of all Project canceled : Sendto bill people for infographics different trailheads to efficiently complete all This challenge is ages, and requires camping overnight in the 1220, montee Masson, Laval of the loops without excessive walking from Frontenac Provincial Park (Quebec) Canada H7E 4P2 park for of one month, Revision time : night per Drawn by : Total time : Checkedaby minimum : access points. In 2016, there were 191 people 450.664.4414 1.888.788.4747 0.5 hour Edger over Drawing 12 consecutive months. 18 hearty souls 450.664.4420 1.866.525.4319 that completed the full challenge, with Date some Project # : : #: Page Rev. info@kalitec.com www.kalitec.com September 19th, 2016 Frontenac Provincial Park-2016-09-19 2 of 2 braved the elements in the previous year and who have been challenging the trails for over were awarded this past November. There will 20 years! Congratulations! likely be some brave newcomers in the 2017 Since 1993, other Challenge options have graduating class! been developed to welcome additional participants including the Junior Challenge, the Frontenac Trek, and the All Season Camper Challenge. To commemorate the 25th anniversary, a new Frontenac Challenge variation is in consideration for 2017, stay tuned!

he Frontenac “Challenge” is to completely hike 11 of the parks trail loops during the months of September and October. The original Frontenac Challenge was conceived in 1993 in an effort to promote autumn hiking in the park. In 2017, The Friends of Frontenac will be celebrating their 25th year of supporting and facilitating The Challenge. Challengers register and obtain a hike tracking form from the park office detailing the trail loops; and record completion dates upon finishing the hikes. The Friends of Frontenac host a November event at the park office to award certificates to all Challenge finishers.

Produce according to drawing

The Challenge hikes can be completed in any order at one’s own pace, and are open to people of all ages. The Challenge can be organized either as a series of leisurely day hikes; or a sequence of linked trails with the potential to camp overnight in between. Personal or group schedules require some strategic planning and creative use of the parks

The Junior Challenge is only open to hikers up to the age of 12 years old and comprises any six hiking loops within the park including the Doe Lake, and Arab Lake Gorge trails. There were six lively people that completed the Junior Challenge in 2016. Congratulations to Ana, Archie, Kai, Scotia, Sophia, and Sophie!

Produce according to annotations

Send a new drawing

*All informations on these plan are Kalitec’s property. Total or partial reproduction without the written approbation of Kalitec are prohibited.

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he new Frontenac Park Interior Routes Map was published by the Friends of Frontenac Park in 2015 and features all of the parks trails, campsites, portages, and access points. A new watercolour painting was generously contributed by Friends patron and local artist Katherine Cartwright for use on the map cover. The current map illustrates important topographic and historical features to assist in route finding, navigation, and orienteering. • Proceeds towards the Friends of Frontenac Park! • Paper version for $12.00 tax inclusive •W  ater-proof/Rip-proof copy: $25.00 tax inclusive • Shows Campsites, Trails, Lookouts, and more • Build your own route with new trail features •A  ll major trail loops highlighted with kilometers • Distances between all junctions in kilometers • Historical features highlighted on map • Hiking and portage trails differentiated in colour •W  ater routes displayed over lakes • 1 : 20,000 scale • 1 kilometer (5 centimeter) grid reference •T  opographic contours with relief shading •T  rail distances measured by Geographic Positioning System (GPS) • Projection NAD 1983 UTM Zone 18 •T  rail map on back •A  vailable at the Park Office and various retailers •A  lso available at Ontarioparks.com/ parkstore

Junior Challenge

INTERESTED IN UNDERTAKING RESEARCH AT FRONTENAC PARK? The Friends of Frontenac Park have funded a research award of up to $2,500 to support a full-time post-secondary undergraduate or graduate student conducting research in Frontenac Park. A proposal from any discipline will be considered providing that the research will be related to Frontenac Park. This includes, but is not limited to, research on the biology, geology, hydrology, history, sociology or human geography of the Park, or expressions of art related to the Park, such as photography or literature. It is expected that the recipient will use the Park itself as the subject of research, though archival research may also be considered. If interested in applying for the research award, please email frontenacpark@frontenacpark.ca

The Dedication Trail

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he new Dedication trail was opened in 2014 after several years of planning. This trail is dedicated to all past, present and future Park Volunteers, whose commitment to the Park visitors, resources and attributes we could not do without. Our Volunteers make Frontenac an even nicer ’Special Place’. The Dedication Trail bisects the Cedar Lake Loop, almost in half. It gives day hikers two additional hiking options to consider, with a modest 2 – 3 hour hike, past ponds, marshes and through hardwood forests over the Canadian Shield landscape. Please venture forth, and enjoy this new trail!

Photo: D. Hamilton


Page 6

Poison Ivy – Avoid the Itch!

P

Frontenac Provincial Park Ticks and Lyme Disease

D

o ticks and Lyme disease make you wary of going outdoors this summer? By being aware of ticks and understanding the role they play in spreading Lyme disease you are taking the first step necessary to protect yourself and your loved ones.

If untreated, problems with the heart, nervous system, and joints can occur months or years later. Lyme disease is easily treated in the early stages so seek medical attention if you feel unwell.

When you are out in tick habitat you can better protect yourself by taking a few There are many different species of tick precautions: and not all of them carry Lyme disease. 1) W  ear long sleeves and tuck your The most common tick you may pants into your socks. encounter is the American Dog Tick, 2) W  ear light coloured clothing so you which does not carry the disease. can detect ticks before they attach. The only tick that carries Lyme disease 3) U  se insect repellent containing in Ontario is the Blacklegged (or Deer) “DEET” (please follow manufacturer’s Tick (Ixodes scapularis). Both ticks can directions). be found in wooded areas or tall 4) C  onduct a tick check. Look on your grass habitats. clothes, body and pet. Pay close attention to your neck and scalp reTicks feed slowly, and an infected tick gion, lower limbs and under arms. must feed on you for at least 24 hours in order to infect you with the bacteria that By following these simple suggestions causes Lyme disease. If you become you can have a safe and enjoyable time infected from a tick bite, symptoms exploring Frontenac Provincial Park. usually begin within 1 - 2 weeks, but can For more information please consult the take as long as one month to begin. The Public Health Agency of Canada’s website: “classic” symptom is a bulls-eye rash http://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/public/ that can develop anywhere on the body; publications/disease/lyme.aspx however, this rash may not occur in all cases. Early symptoms of Lyme disease You can also visit: www.ontario.ca/lyme or the Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and can include flu-like symptoms such as Addington Health Unit: fever, headaches, stiff neck, jaw pain, www.KFLAPublicHealth.ca and sore muscles.

oison Ivy is quite common in some areas of the Park, especially in open areas along the edges of campsites, beaches, portages and trails. The best way to avoid the itchy allergic reaction (caused by oils on the plant) is to learn to identify the plant, so as to not brush up against it. Poison Ivy is a three-leaved plant (shrub, bush or vine). Its three leaflets are usually drooping and somewhat shiny, the middle leaflet has a longer stem than the other two leaflets, and it has a woody stem at its base. In the spring the new leaves are a reddish green, in late summer the plant produces a small cluster of white berries, and in late August or the fall the leaves turn orangey before they drop off. You can get the oil on you from this plant, at almost any time of the year. You can even get an allergic reaction if the plant is burned, from the oil in the smoke. Many times each year hikers and campers wonder how they got the itchy rash when they say they were quite diligent to avoid it. It can be transferred to you from the laces on your hiking boots, from your pant cuffs, from setting your backpack onto a plant and then later placing the same pack on the seat of your car, and even from your pet dog walking through it and then you pat the dog or the dog lays on your furniture, and the oils transfer from the dog’s fur to your hand or skin elsewhere. If you think you have been in contact with Poison Ivy, wash with soap and water as soon as possible, and wash your clothes (separately) with warm water and soap. If you are unsure of what this plant looks like, stop by the Park Office for information or to view a display of a Poison Ivy plant.

2017 Found a Tick? DO • Use fine point tweezers • Grasp the tick as close to your skin as possible • Gently pull straight out • Disinfect the bite area • Save tick (alive if possible) in a jar, with a piece of wet paper towel for identification and potential testing. Take your tick to any staff member, they will direct you to the local Health Unit • Watch for symptoms and seek medical attention if you feel unwell or if you cannot safely remove the tick

DON’T •Grasp around bloated belly •Use a match, heat or chemicals •Twist when pulling out the tick

Blacklegged Ticks (Ixodes scapularis) are found on a wide range of hosts including mammals, birds and reptiles. Blacklegged Ticks (Ixodes scapularis) are known to transmit Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi) to humans and animals during feeding, when they insert their mouth parts into the skin of a host, and slowly take in the nutrient-rich host blood. Blacklegged Tick (Ixodes scapularis) on a blade of grass

Photo by: Jim Gathany, CDC

Wondering what to do with your empty propane cylinder? Keep our parks beautiful, safe and litter-free! Single use (non-refillable) propane cylinders should be deposited in Orange Drop collection cages found in many provincial parks. Single use cylinders may also be brought to an Orange Drop collection site. Visit www.makethedrop.ca and search by postal code to find out where to drop-off your cylinders and other household hazardous waste. Refillable tanks should be refilled and reused as many times as it is safe to do so. Safely disposing of your propane cylinders ensures that any remaining gases will be captured and the metal, valves and other elements will be recovered and reused. Orange Drop is operated by Stewardship Ontario, the industry-funding organization responsible for managing household hazardous

waste such as propane cylinders, single-use batteries, empty oil containers and other products that require special care for recycling or safe disposal. Because of risks to people and the environment: • Don’t discharge leftover propane into the atmosphere, even if the cylinder comes with a device to do this. • Don’t deposit any propane cylinders into your blue box. • Don’t put cylinders in the garbage. When it comes to the environment, we all have a responsibility!

A PROUD PARTNER OF ONTARIO PARKS


2017

Frontenac Provincial Park

Page 7

Backcountry Information Park Office

The Park Office at Otter Lake is open daily from early May to late October. It is also open most weekdays during November through April. The Park Office is where you pick up your permits and information on trip planning, as well as a gathering place for the Wilderness Skills Training Programs. To register for a program and for all inquiries, please contact the Park Office at (613) 376-3489.

Camping

Frontenac has 13 campsite clusters which are open for camping year round. The clusters are indicated by triangles on the Park Boundaries and Facilities Map (page 9), and by orange campsite signs at the sites themselves. Most clusters have four tent pads and a privy toilet. Camping is permitted at your designated campsite cluster, only on the tent pad, with a valid permit. Each campsite cluster can accommodate up to 24 people (6 persons per site), with the exception of campsite clusters 5 (max 12 persons), 2 (max. 18 persons), and 13 (18 persons). You may stay at any given campsite cluster for a maximum of three consecutive nights. Each person must be registered. Maximum of two small tents per tent site. Checkout time is 2:00 pm off your site. The beach and waterfront area at each campsite is for the use of the registered campers only. Camping permits must be purchased at the Park Office, prior to entering the Park. There is no car, RV or trailer camping at Frontenac Park.

Self-Serve Registration

When the Park Office is closed, the Park operates on a self-serve registration system for day use (and for camping during the off season). You will find registration envelopes, instructions, and a deposit box in the kiosk adjacent to the Park Office.

Trip Planning

The success of any canoeing, hiking or camping trip depends upon the planning, resourcefulness and experience of those involved. *Night travel and travel across ice is not recommended! Stay on the trails. If you wish to travel extensively in the interior of Frontenac, then the Park Office should be your first stop. Here, you will find a wall-sized aerial map of the Park and the surrounding area. Ensure that you arrive at the Park Office before office closing to purchase your permits and obtain directions, so that you are travelling by daylight. If you are arriving late, call the Park Office to make alternate camping arrangements. For Park Office hours, see the Campsite Reservation Service. During the peak season, interior permits are not issued after 8:00 p.m. or after 7:00 p.m. after Labour Day. If you have never been to Frontenac, call the office for trip planning advice and route selection, before you make your reservation. Also visit the Friends’ web site www.frontenacpark.ca

Drinking Water

If you plan to camp at Frontenac in the period from May to October you should make a reservation. Weekdays as well as spring and fall are more quiet, however, weekends always tend to get busy. For reservations, call 1-888-668-7275. Please phone the Park weekdays at (613) 376-3489 for information and for route planning assistance. Also, please note that a maximum of three consecutive nights is permitted at any one campsite cluster location.

Treated drinking water is available at the Park Office. Giardia lamblia, a microscopic organism carried in the feces of humans and some domestic and wild animals, may be present in untreated water in this area. To guard against contracting Giardiasis, be sure to carry treated water from domestic sources or boil untreated water for 2 minutes prior to use. Chemical purifiers can be added as well, but these alone will not always kill the giardia parasite. A handout entitled, What is giardia? is available at the Park Office. (Dogs can pick up Giardia as well.)

Registration

Campfires

Reservations

Before heading into the backcountry, you must register all persons and each vehicle. When you obtain your permits, leave your name, address, vehicle licence number, route of travel, and the colour of your tents and canoes with Park staff at the office. This safety precaution will help our staff locate you should an emergency occur. Advise a friend or relative of your planned trip itinerary. Preplan your outing and know where you can obtain emergency assistance before setting out. Cell phones do not always work in Frontenac Park.

Youth Group Camping

Although there are no group campsites at Frontenac, a limited number of qualifying youth groups may camp at designated interior campsite clusters. The maximum party size is sixteen (16), depending on the campsite cluster to be occupied and campsite availability. (Four persons per tent pad; 2 small tents per site).

For schools, youth camps or youth group reservations please call (613) 376-3489, direct.

Campfires are allowed only at designated campsite clusters, in the fireplaces. Shore and trail side fires are not permitted. Firewood can be purchased at the Park Office. Only the gathering of fallen dead wood is permitted. Never leave your campfire unattended. Before going to bed or leaving camp, make sure your fire is dead out. There is only one safe way to put out a fire – drown it with water, stir thoroughly, and drown it again. Drown your campfire whenever you leave your campsite. During the fire season (April 1 to October 31), please exercise extreme caution when building campfires in the interior of Frontenac Park.

Fire Ban

In the event of a fire ban, NO fires are permitted. Be prepared with a camp stove. If you detect a fire, report it immediately to the Park Office (613) 376-3489 or call 1-888-239-4565 (Backcountry Info. continued on page 10)

Pet Owners Must Heed Rules • Pets must be kept on a leash at all times – not exceeding 2 metres. • Pets must not disturb any other Park visitor or make excessive noise at any time. • Pets must not chase any wild animals or damage any property. • Pets are not permitted on any beach or in any swimming area, as per health regulations. No dogs are permitted in the water at the campsites. • You must always clean up after your pet and dispose of the “doggie bag” in a garbage can (not down the privy). * Free doggie bags are available at the Park Office • Dogs must be kept under control at all times. • The minimum fine for a pet violation is $95.00. Register Your Pet – Please advise the Park staff of your pet and register the name and breed on your camping permit.

Ontario Parks

Campsite Reservation Service Call toll-free 1-888-ONT-PARK (1-888-668-7275) (7 a.m. to 9 p.m. EST, seven days a week) or online www.ontarioparks.com/reservations HAVE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION READY, WHEN MAKING A RESERVATION • Park name and type of site required eg. interior / backcountry •A  rrival and departure dates • Name, address, postal code, phone number • The campsites you wish to reserve, (have an alternate route, in the event that your first choice of campsites is not available) •T  he number of people in your party (maximum 6 persons and two small backpack tents per tent site) and (a maximum of three consecutive nights are permitted per campsite cluster) • Method of payment (credit card number and expiry date) • Make online reservations for Frontenac at: www.ontarioparks.com/reservations (select “backcouuntry” tab). MORE ABOUT RESERVATIONS • If you have never been to Frontenac, contact the Park Office at (613) 376-3489 for route planning assistance and for a Park information package. •A  llow yourself enough time to register all persons and all vehicles at the Park Office prior to entry into the backcountry •W  hen planning keep in mind sunset times, weather and wind conditions and registration time. Travel at night is not recommended. NOTE: Ensure that you arrive at the Park Office before the office closes, to register, pay for and pick up your interior camping permits and your vehicle permits. No person may enter the backcountry or occupy a campsite without a valid permit. All campers must be registered. Park Office hours: May to Labour Day 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.; after Labour Day to October 30 weekend, Fri. & Sat. 8:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.; all other days 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

•A  fter October 30 to early May – Reservations are not available. • Reserving interior campsites at Frontenac, is site specific. eg. 3b; 9c; 13a; 8d •W  hen you arrive at the Park Office, you will need to pay the balance of the campsite fees, which is per person per night. • Our interior campsites can be reserved between May 5 and October 30. GENERAL INFORMATION •T  here is a 5 month reservation window. eg. for June reservations you can call in January. •T  here is a non-refundable reservation fee and a $50.00 camping deposit for each reservation made. • Youth Group, Youth Camp and School Group reservations call the Park direct (613) 376-3489 (special conditions apply) • Reservation payment is by VISA, or MasterCard. • If you need to change your reservation, or need to cancel, call 1-888-668-7275, or do it online at www.ontarioparks.com •C  ampsite reservations are held until 8:00 a.m. the day following your scheduled arrival date. •A  t Frontenac a campsite can be reserved for a maximum of 3 consecutive nights at any one campsite cluster. • Parking spaces for additional campers’ vehicles cannot be reserved, however valid permits for additional vehicles apply and vehicles must be parked where directed. Fees and prices are subject to change. Costs are accurate at the time of printing. Obtain your free 2016 Ontario Parks Guide at provincial parks, MNRF offices, Ontario Travel Information Centres and MNRF Information Centres.

For information www.ontarioparks.com


Page 8

Frontenac Provincial Park

2017

2

3

1

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A

Doe Lake

B

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C

4

Big Salmon Lake

B

D

Hiking Trails Trail Name

C A

C

Hiking Distance From Distance Park Office (km) (km)

Significant Features

Hiking Time Degree of (Approx) Difficulty

Arab Lake Gorge..........1.5 .....................0.............................Extensive boardwalk...........................30 minutes............ Easy Doe Lake.......................3.0 .....................0....................... Lakeshores & beaver ponds.........................1 hour............ Moderate Cedar Lake Loop.........14.0 .................. 1.8....................... Wetlands in various stages........................ 4-6 hours....... Mod. to Diff.

D

Dedication Trail (North) .8.6 ........................2.9............N half of Cedar Lk Loop. Hardwoods and ponds............. 2-3 hours .............Moderate Dedication Trail (South) .9.8 ........................1.8............S half of Cedar Lk Loop. Hardwoods and ponds............. 2-3 hours .............Moderate

Slide Lake....................21.0 .................. 4.6.......... Most rugged part of the park. Scenic vistas.........7-9+ hours ....Very Difficult Small Slide Lake............ 9.0 .......................9.6...........................Scenic vistas & very rugged.............................. 4 hours................Difficult

5 A

Big Salmon Lake

Big Salmon Lake.........17.0 .................. 4.5.................... Shoreline forest. Scenic views..................... 5-7 hours....... Mod. to Diff. Arkon Lake..................11.0 .................. 1.9............Bog complex, mature trees, beaver pond............ 3-5 hours.......... Moderate Bufflehead Trail.............. 8.0 .......................1.9..............Scenic ridge, creek valley and beaver ponds................2-3 hours.............Moderate

Little Clear Lake...........7.0 ................... 7.5............Sites of several 19th century homesteads............ 3-5 hours....... Easy to Mod. Little Salmon Lake......10.0 .................. 3.5.............. View of Moulton Gorge. Mature bush.............. 3-5 hours....... Mod. to Diff. Tetsmine Lake.............10.0 .................. 9.6.... Abandoned mines & homesteads, Moulton Gorge..... 5-6 hours.......... Moderate Gibson Lake..................9.0 .................. 11.5..............Remains of log cabin & logging trail............... 5-6 hours....... Mod. to Diff. Hemlock Lake..............5.0 ................... 9.5.................. Mature trees & abandoned fields................... 3-5 hours....... Easy to Mod. Note: Big Salmon Lake Road is closed to vehicles starting in mid-November for winter trail grooming. Add 1/2 hour to walk the road and another 1.5 hours to get to the nearest campsite cluster.

B

B

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C

Photos: Bert Korporaal

6

Portage Distances

D Little Salmon Lake

Portage

7

Birch Lake

A B

C D

8

D A

Degree of Difficulty Terrain

Distance (m)

Black Lake to Little Clear Lake.................................... Easy ................................................flat ...................................... 503 Black Lake to Bear Lake.....................................Easy to Moderate.............................. 2 hills & flat................................ 977 Buck Lake to Slide Lake............................................... Easy.......................................... 1 small hill.................................. 81 Otter Lake to Doe Lake.......................................Easy to Moderate............................1 two stage hill............................. 341 Birch Lake to Arkon Lake......................................... Moderate.......................................1 long hill................................. 393 Birch Lake to Clearwater Lake................................. Moderate...........................................1 hill..................................... 1003 Kingsford Lake to Devil Lake...................................... Easy.................................................flat....................................... 761 Devil Lake to Moulton Lake...................................... Difficult..................................... rocky & hilly............................... 653 Devil Lake to Bear Lake............................................... Easy.................................................flat....................................... 572 Devil Lake to Big Clear Lake..........................Moderate to Difficult............................. 3 stage hill................................. 898 Big Clear Lake to Black Lake................................... Moderate.......................................... 2 hills..................................... 666 Big Clear Lake to Labelle Lake................................ Moderate...........................................1 hill...................................... 190 Labelle Lake to Big Salmon Lake................................ Easy.......................................... 1 small hill................................. 491 Big Salmon Lake to Camel Lake.............................. Moderate...........................................rocky..................................... 453 Big Salmon Lake to Little Salmon Lake............Easy to Moderate..........................1 hill at north end........................... 974 Little Salmon Lake to Little Clear Lake................... Moderate...........................................1 hill...................................... 856 Big Salmon Lake to Little Clear Lake...................... Moderate..................................... 2 small hills................................ 923 Birch Lake to Little Salmon Lake..........................Very Difficult...................... 2 steep hills & 2 small hills................... 1138 Arab Lake Parking Lot to Arab Lake............................ Easy...............................................1 hill...................................... 173

D

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B

Hardwood Bay

Little Clear Lake

C A

D

Devil Lake


2017

Frontenac Provincial Park Regional Setting Map Perth

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10

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Page 10 Page 8

Frontenac Frontenac Provincial Provincial Park Park

2017 2012

More Information More Backcountry Backcountry Information Wild Animals Wild Animals Animals, such as raccoons and

Animals, such and bears should not as beraccoons a problem, if bears should not be a problem, if you take the following precautions: you take the following • precautions: Put all food items in new Food

Storage Lockers (Page 14), or •hang Put all your food in a pack and 4 metres off ground away hang it well off the ground from tents where food boxes are (4 available. m), and away from the not vicinity of your tent. • •All placed in in Allgarbage garbageshould shouldbebe placed your suspended in in yourlitter litterbag bagand and suspended the your food thesame sameway wayasas your food pack, with you. pack,and andpacked packedoutout with you. • To help eliminate food odours, • To help eliminate food odours, washyour yourdishes dishesimmediately immediately wash aftereach eachmeal meal(preferably (preferably well after well away(20 (20- 30 - 30m)m)from from your away your campsite)and andfrom fromthethe lake. campsite) lake. • Dispose of waste water down • Dispose of hole. waste water down the privy privyentice hole. or touch wildlife. •the Never Do not takeor food intowildlife. your tent. • •Never entice touch • Do not take food into your tent.

Recyclables As one of the province's leading Recyclables

conservation agencies, leading Ontario As one of the province’s Parks is committed to conservation agencies, Ontario maintaining a clean healthy Parks is committed to and maintaining environment for this and future a clean and healthy environment generations to enjoy. You may for this and future generations to place cans, plastic pop bottles, enjoy. You may place cans, plastic andbottles, glass inand theglass respective pop in the recycling bins. Propane/Butane respective recycling bins. Propane cylindersmay are be hazardous cylinders dropped waste. into You may drop cylinders into the the orange recycling baskets. orangecylinders baskets, are or you can help Butane hazardous us to and reduce unnecessary costs by waste should be taken home taking your disposable cylinders with you for disposal. home with you.

IfIfYou YouGet GetLost Lost or Injured or Injured

With onon well Witha agood goodmap, map,staying staying well marked trails and portages, and marked trails and portages, and with withmany manyother otherpeople peoplebesides besides yourself using Frontenac’s yourself using Frontenac's backcountry, there is littleis little wilderness areas, there chance you will get lost. If If you chance you will get lost. you do most doget getlost, lost,however, however,thethe most important calm importantthing thingisistotokeep keep calm and look around for the last trail and look around for the last trail marker. your marker.Sit Sitdown, down,evaluate evaluate your situation to to situationand andmentally mentallytrytry retrace your steps. Chances areare, retrace your steps. Chances you will figure out where you you will figure out where you went getget back wentwrong wrongand andhow howtoto back on trail. oncourse. course.Stay Stayononthethe trail. If this doesn’t work, and you are still lost,doesn't or if there is an in If this work, andinjury you are your party, stay put and signal for still lost, or if there is an injury in help. of and any signal kind for yourThree party,signals stay put (three blasts on a whistle, three help. Three signals of any kind flashes a signal mirror) three (threefrom blasts on a whistle, constitute the universal for flashes from a signalcall mirror) help. Wildlifethe and natural areas constitute universal call for can sometimes hazardous. help. Wildlifebe and natural areas Be prepared. can sometimes be hazardous. Be prepared. *Travelling at night and ice travel are notat recommended. *Travelling night and ice travel are not recommended.

Report a Poacher... Report Poacher... & HelpaCatch a & Help Catch a Thief! Thief!

Youcan canhelp helpput putaastop stoptotopoaching poaching You by reporting any hunting and by reporting any hunting and fishingviolations violationsororany anyillegal illegal fishing activitiesthat thatyou yousee seeininFrontenac Frontenac activities Parkororanywhere anywhereininOntario. Ontario. Park Reportany anyviolations violationsand andproblems problems Report Parkstaff staffasassoon soonasaspossible possibleatat totoPark (613)376-3489 376-3489orortelephone telephonethe the (613) Ministry of Natural Resources Ministry of Natural Resources TIPSHotline Hotline at at 1-877-847-7667 TIPS 1-877-847-7667oror CrimeStoppers Stoppers 1-800-222-8477. Crime 1-800-222-8477.

Telephones Telephones There is a public telephone in the

There is a public telephone Park Office breezeway. This in the Park Office breezeway. This phone takes phone cards only, phone takes phone cards only, unless you are calling 9•1•1, the unless you are calling 9•1•1, the operator or reversing the charges. operator or reversing the charges. Cellular Cellular phones phones do do not not work work in in most areas of the Park, as most areas of the Park, asweweareare on of of cellular coverage. onthe theedge fringe cellular coverage.

Canoe, Kayak and Canoe, Kayak and Equipment Rentals Equipment Rentals Many people, particularly those

Many people, particularly who may be relatively new those to who may be relatively canoe tripping, prefer tonew rentto canoeortripping, to rent some all of theprefer necessary some or allThere of theare necessary equipment. retail stores equipment. retail stores and outfittersThere in the are Sydenham andKingston outfittersareas in thewhich Sydenham and supply and Kingston which supply partial outfittingareas services. Their complete or partial names, addresses andoutfitting telephone services.may Their addresses numbers benames, found on the and telephonepages numbers may advertisement 13, 14 andbe found on tabloid. pages 10 and 11 of this 15 of this tabloid. We do however rent snowshoes.

Supplies Supplies Groceries, gasoline and other

Groceries, gasoline and other supplies may be obtained in the supplies may be obtained in the nearby communities of nearby communities of Sydenham, Harrowsmith, Verona Sydenham, Harrowsmith, Verona and Kingston. Consult pages 17, 18 and Kingston. Consult pages 10 and 19 for further details. and 11 for further details.

Lost Lost and and Found Found

Report Report aa description descriptionofofthe thelost lost article to office staff. If you article to office staff. If youfind find something, something, please pleaseturn turnititininatatthe the Park Park Office. Office.

Alternative Alternative Accommodations Accommodations

If you you would wouldlike liketotoattend attendone one Frontenac's many manywilderness wilderness of Frontenac’s skills training trainingprograms, programmes, skills but do do not notwish wishtotocamp, camp, but we can can supply supplyyou youwith withthe the names of of Bed Bed&&Breakfast Breakfast names establishments,resorts, resorts,motels, motels, establishments, and private privatecampgrounds campgroundswithin within and a reasonable reasonabledriving drivingdistance distance from the the Park. Park. from

Emergency Emergency Assistance 911 Assistance Emergency assistance in the form

emergency in thefrom form of basic firstassistance aid is available of basic first aidOffice. is available from staff at the Park the staff at the Park Office. Forall allother othermedical medicalemergencies emergencies For or suspected drowning, please or suspected drowning, please call 9•1•1, and also advise call and also advise. Park Park 9•1•1 staff: ,613-376-3489 staff. ForFire FireRescue, Rescue,bebesure sure specify For to to specify “Kingston Fire Rescue” “Kingston Fire Rescue”

Park Roads

The road to Big Big Salmon SalmonLake Lake (open April to October October31 31 yearly) is a single single lane laneonly. only. Drive slowly. Watch Watch for for pedestrians and wildlife. wildlife. Pull-offs along the the road roadare are available to ease ease vehicle vehicletraffic traffic and passing. Do Do not not park parkor or leave your vehicle vehicle unattended unattended on these pull-offs. pull-offs.

Poison Ivy Ivy Poison Poison Ivy is prevalent at Front -

Poison is should prevalent at Front enac, soIvy you know how to enac, so you should know how identify this poisonous plant. to identify poisonous plant. “Leavesthis of three, let them be,” "Leaves three, let them is a goodof rule-of-thumb (see be," pg 6). is a good rule-of-thumb to live by.

Winter Winter Use

Frontenac allyear year Frontenac Park Park is open open all and for all all andpermits permits are required for day regardless dayuse use and and camping regardless of ofthe the season. season. Camping is permitted campsite permitted only only at the campsite clusters. clusters. There There are five emergency emergency barrels barrels located throughout They are for throughout the the Park. Their emergency use only. Their locations are identified with cross locations arethe identified symbols on map on with page cross 9. symbols map on page 7. They areon forthe emergency use only. *Night is not not *Night travel travel or ice travel is recommended. recommended. Ice Ice conditions vary lake or or vary greatly greatly from lake to lake even Thin ice ice even on on aa single lake. Thin has for hasaa very very low tolerance for mistakes. mistakes. Searches Searches for lost persons Call persons can can be very costly. Call ahead conditions. ahead for for advice advice and conditions.

Important Park Information & Rules This is a summary of rules, prepared for your convenience, but is not a complete list of the various regulations which apply in provincial parks. Since certain rules affect different parks differently, you should contact the Park Office if in doubt about how a specific regulation applies to the park you are visiting. Let us know your comments and suggestions on the back of your permit.

Protecting You and Your Park

We want your stay at Frontenac Provincial Park to be as safe and enjoyable as possible. One basic rule applies in all of Ontario's provincial parks. Have care, respect and consideration for your fellow visitors and the park environment. Park Wardens enforce the Provincial Parks and Conservation Reserves Act as well as other legislation within Frontenac Provincial Park. Please report poaching and illegal camping, fires and all violations or problems to Park staff immediately.

Loud Noise and Disturbing Other Persons

Be considerate to others using the Park. Excessive noise is not permitted at any time. This includes barking dogs. Keep your voice down to a reasonable level. Sound travels a great distance over water and noise seems amplified when in the wilderness and at night. It is not only inconsiderate but also contrary to Park regulations to cause excessive noise. Please turn off cell phones.

Campfires and Firewood

Fires are permitted in the designated fireplaces at the registered campsite only. Stripping bark, cutting branches from trees or cutting any standing tree is unlawful. Help conserve firewood by building small fires or by using a portable stove whenever possible. Firewood can be purchased at the office. In the event of a Fire Ban, NO fires are permitted. Be prepared with a camp stove. Shore fires and trailside fires are prohibited. Transporting firewood in Ontario is restricted (see page page 312for fordetails). details).

Pets

It is unlawful to have your pet off a leash and pets are not permitted in any swimming area. Your pet must be kept under control and must not disturb other persons. Porcupines, raccoons, skunks, deer and bears can seriously harm a pet while protecting themselves or their young. We ask that you consider not taking your pet into the backcountry. You must clean up after your See for the Pet Rules. pet. See Pages Pages75and and11 9 for Rules.

*

*

Park Permits

Camping permits and vehicle permits must be purchased at the Park Office prior to entering the Park. Remember, you must have a valid permit to camp or to bring a vehicle or vessel (canoe or boat) into the Park. You must have a valid permit clearly displayed on your vehicle and your camping permit with you (and on your campsite post when camping), when in the Park. each person must be registered. Walk-ins, drop offs, and Rideau Trail hikers must register at the Park Office. If you need to change your trip itinerary while camping in the Park interior, you MUST return to the Park Office to make those changes. The camping party leader is responsible for the condition of the campsite and the conduct of those persons on the site.

Nudity

Nudity is prohibited in provincial parks.

Power Boats

Power boats and motors are strictly prohibited on all interior lakes. However, you may operate motors on most of the boundary lakes. This includes the following lakes: Buck, Devil, Birch, Kingsford, Otter and Big Clear. Waterskiing, jet skis and tubing are not permitted at or near any of the campsites or beaches. Electric motors are permitted only on Big Salmon Lake. A permit is required to bring a vessel into the Park or into any Park lakes.

Camping

Frontenac is open year round and all of its 13 campsite cluster locations are identified by a triangle and number on the enclosed map, and by orange campsite signs in the interior. Most campsite clusters have 4 tent sites and a privy toilet. Camping is permitted only at the designated campsite clusters. A valid camping permit is required for all persons wishing to camp and for their vehicles. You must camp at the designated sites to which you are registered (on the tent pads only). There isisnonocar, trailer camping camping at carRV,orortrailer at Frontenac Provincial Park. Frontenac Provincial Park.

Vehicles and Parking

All vehicles and vessels (boats and canoes) entering the Park must have a valid permit. Vehicles must have the permit clearly displayed on the dashboard. Vehicles must be parked in the available parking lots - not along the roads. Vehicles without permits may be ticketed and/or towed. Park Wardens may ticket any vehicle that does not display a valid permit or is illegally parked. Be sure to display your permit for the Wardens to see.

Hunting and Firearms

Hunting and all types of firearms are strictly prohibited in Frontenac Park.

Motorized Vehicles/Equipment

ATVs, mountain bikes, power ice augers, chainsaws, generators and snowmobiles are not permitted in Frontenac Park.

Fireworks

The possession or ignition of any fireworks is prohibited in all provincial parks.

Alcoholic Beverages

The consumption of alcoholic beverages is permitted on your registered campsite only.

Garbage and Litter

You must bring out everything you bring in. All refuse and garbage must be packed out and placed in the garbage cans provided or taken home. Do not throw garbage down privy holes or leave garbage or litter at your campsite, fireplace, or at your picnic site. Failure to keep your campsite clean, and littering, are offenses. Free litter bags are available at the Park Office. Please help us in our recycling efforts by placing recyclables in the proper receptacles. You must at all times keep your campsite clean so that it will not attract nuisance wildlife.

Fishing

Fishing is permitted in the Park in accordance with the regulations as outlined in the Recreational Fishing Regulations Summary. Most Ontario residents, Canadian residents and non-residents require a licence to fish. You must have all parts of this licence with you when fishing. Catching bait or frogs in the Park is illegal. Catch and release is encouraged, however, you must still abide by the Ontario Fishing Regulations by having a valid Angling Licence and the season must be open to fish for any species.

Attention Anglers There is nowhere close to the Park to buy a fishing licence. You may purchase your licence or current year tag at most Service Ontario offices, at some outdoors stores or you can purchase a licence and print a temporary licence by going to: www.Ontario.ca/outdoorscard or you may call 1-800-387-7011. If calling to update or purchase a licence, you should wait at least 21 days for delivery. N O T E : There are new frog and crayfish regulations in Ontario.


2012

Frontenac Provincial Park

Page 9

2017 2012

Frontenac Provincial Park

Page Page119

Water Safety - Your Responsibility P Water Safety - Your Responsibility Wa t er S afe t y i s Yo u r R• espons i l water i tareasyonly. Never swim alone. Adults andi b shallow

arents must carefully supervise children • There are small NO LIFEGUARDS – ALWAYS supervise andChildren non-swimmers. and newThis swimmers near water means watching children • WEAR LIFEJACKETS every second they are in the / P.F.D.’s – Children should arents must carefully always wear properly fitted lifejackets anywhere near water. Why not swim with supervise small children the water. Guardians can role model water safety by them? and non-swimmers. This wearing their own Personal Flotation Device (P.F.D.). means watching children Parents, children • Take a LESSON –inThe every second theyare areyour theNational Lifesaving Society, responsibility. RedWhy Cross, Wilderness water. notSupervise swim with Medical Associates, Ontario children and haveCanoe them and wearKayak a Recreational Association, and them? lifejacket when nearcourses, the water. B.O.A.T. Safety provide the fundamentals Never aswimming child for leave basic ability, First Aid, and responsible Parents, children arealone, your even for a moment. There are paddle-craft or boat operation responsibility. Supervise no lifeguards on our beaches. children and have them wear a lifejacket when near the water. Never leave a child alone, even for a moment. There are no lifeguards on our beaches.

should swim • items Protect neck. dive • Be RESPONSIBLE – Act within your experience children and law toalways have the following onyour board and Never accessible with a buddy. into shallow water from docks, abilities, learn lifesaving techniques and responsible at all times: • Learn learn the shoreororPersonal from rocks or canoeing skills, never dive head first into unknown wa- to swim – 1and appropriately fitted lifejacket Floataprevention, water survival cliffs. Cliff diving and rock shallow water areas only. • Never swim alone. Adults and ters, learn and avoid inclement conditions such as severe tion Device (P.F.D.) for each person on board is prohibited. rescue childrenskills. should swim • jumping Protect your weather and wind, or cold water – Aalways sound signaling device (whistle orneck. horn)Never dive • Wade and swim in towards • If you suspectwater a drowning or with aout buddy. into shallow from docks, – 1 buoyant heaving line any at least 15type metres long • AVOID Alcohol – Even Small amounts of alcohol comshore. other of (49’3”) water • the Learn to swim and learn the shore or from rocks or – 1Avoid bailer or manual pumpCliff diving promise reaction time, judgment and swimming •ability Be responsible. alcohol please and contact cliffs. rockthe prevention, water survival and bilgeemergency, – N  avigation lights if vessel isOffice operated after dark or when involved in water related Park 613-376-3489 jumping is prohibited. rescue skills. • Contact 911 and the Park Office – Immediately, if you – swim A waterproof flashlight allow your vessel to or be activities 9-1-1 • recreational Wade out and in towards • call If(will you suspect a drowning suspect a drowning or any other type of emergency seen by passing motor boats on border lakes) • On-shore winds are a must; the shore. any other type of water winds inflatables • Bring a Boat Safety Kit – In Canada, the operator of responsible. a – Ablow dditional equipment may be required depending on • offshore Be Avoid alcohol emergency, please contact the Attention Anglers dangerous waters. Use Canoe or Kayak up to 6 metres in length is requiredout byinto type and size of vessel when involved in water related Park Office 613-376-3489 or inflatable rafts or toys in recreational activities call 9-1-1 • On-shore winds are a must; offshore winds blow inflatables Attention Anglers out into dangerous waters. Use inflatable rafts or toys in Did you know… It is illegal to attempt to catch any fish species during its closed season, even if you plan to release the ermits are required for all Park use (from short day visits to extended overnight camping trips). If a Park Warden fish Did immediately? you know… ItDo is not illegal to target Bass or Lake cannot see a valid permit on your vehicle dashboard, a parking ticket is issued for “fail to display (not “fail to attempt to catch any Trout fish out of season! A closed season species during its closed season, have”) permit”. Always remember to visibly display your permit on your vehicle dashboard when in a provincial park. protects fishplan during a vulnerable even if you to release the ermits are required for all Park use (from short day visits to extended overnight camping trips). If a Park Warden part of their life cycle, helping fish immediately? Do not to ensure a healthy population target Bass or Lake Trout out cannot see a valid permit on your vehicle dashboard, a parking ticket is issued for “fail to display (not “fail to the rest of the year and for of season! A closed season have”) permit”. Always remember to visibly display your permit on your vehicle dashboard when in a provincial park. future generations. protects fish during a vulnerable part you of their life cycle, helping Did to ensure know… a healthy population theisrest of the year and for it illegal Within a provincial park, Park Wardens and lay charges, arrest, and/or evict persons from NDeR THe PROVINCIAL PARKS future generations. to capture Conservation Officers have the power and the Park. and Conservation Reserves Act, the wildlife Did you – registered permit holder is responsible for the authority of an Ontario Provincial Police including know… frogs – within a (OPP) officer, including the power of arrest, The following table lists some of the more conduct of all campsite occupants and could provincial it is illegal park! Northern search and seizure. Park Wardens and common laws enforced in Frontenac and be charged with an offence committed by Within a provincial park, Park Wardens and lay charges, arrest, and/or evict persons from NDeR THe PROVINCIAL PARKS Leopard Frogs are the only to capture Conservation Officers are on patrol to: other provincial parks (fines include victim occupants of the campsite. have the power and the Park. and Conservation Reserves Act, the species of frog that may be used wildlife – to, Provincial and ensurePolice the safety surcharge and court administration fees). authorityinformation of an Ontario registered permit holder is responsible for the provide as bait in Ontario, but cananot including frogs – within This park tabloid is for of Parkofficer, visitors; protect Park resources; and This Actof and legislation governing (OPP) including the power of arrest, The following table listsinformation some of thepurposes more conduct allother campsite occupants and could be acquired in Provincial Parks. provincial park! Northern only. It is neither a legal document nor a enforce Park rules and regulations to ensure behaviour in provincial parks can be search and seizure. Park Wardens and common laws enforced in Frontenac and be charged with an offence committed by Leopard Frogs are the only everyone has an enjoyable visit. Depending complete collection of the current reviewed on the e-laws website at Conservation Officers are on patrol to: other provincial parks (fines include victim occupants of the campsite. For information on Ontario’s species regulations of frog that or may on the infraction, they a warning, Fines areadministration subject to change. www.e-laws.gov.on.ca surcharge and court fees). provide information to,may and give ensure the safety regulations. fishing on be baitused as bait in Ontario, but can This park tabloid is for information purposes of Park visitors; protect Park resources; and This Act and other legislation governing harvest rules, pick up a freenot be acquired in Provincial Parks. only. It is neither a legal document norFine a behaviour parks canOffence be copy of the 2012 Recreational Category in provincial Offence Minimum Fine Category enforce Park rules and regulations to ensure Minimum everyone has an enjoyable visit. Depending complete collection of the current reviewed on the e-laws website at Fishing Regulations Summary For information on Ontario’s on the infraction, they may give a warning, regulations. Fines are subject to change. www.e-laws.gov.on.ca at the Park Office. Park fishing regulations or onstaff bait are Environmental Protection Unlawfully cut or remove ............................................................................$155.00 remove plant, plant, tree tree or or strip strip bark bark.................................................................................$155.00 available to answer questions. harvest rules, pick up a free possess protected protected wildlife wildlife or or plant.................................................................................$240.00 plant ..................................................................................$240.00 Hunt, trap or possess copy of the 2016 2012 Recreational Category Offence Minimum Fine Damage, deface or remove crown property .........................................................................................$155.00 remove crown property.........................................................................................$155.00 Number of People Fishing Regulations Summary at the Park Office. Park staff are per Campsite Litter Litter, causecut litter or fail to toplant, keep campsite campsite clean ..................................................................................$155.00 Environmental Protection Unlawfully or or remove tree or strip bark ...............................................................................$155.00 Litter Litter, cause litter fail keep clean. .................................................................................$155.00 available to answer questions. A maximum of six persons is Fail totrap properly store wildlife wildlife attractants, attractants, food or..................................................................................$240.00 refuseatatcampsite. campsite.................................................$155.00 ..................................................$155.00 Hunt,to or possess protected wildlife orfood plant Fail properly store or refuse permitted on each campsite. Damage, deface or remove crown property .........................................................................................$155.00 Number of People All persons must be registered Pets Permit domestic domestic animal animal to to be be at at large large // off offleash, leash,disturb disturbpersons personsor orchase chasewildlife.............................$95.00 wildlife .............................$95.00 Pets Permit per Campsite on the campsite permit, Permit domestic animal to make excessiveclean noise..................................................................................$155.00 or be bein inswimming swimmingarea...........................................$95.00 area ...........................................$95.00 Litter, cause litteranimal or failto tomake keep excessive campsite Litter Permit domestic noise or including theof people who are A maximum six persons is Permit domesticstore animal to cause injury ................................................................................................$125.00 Fail to properly wildlife attractants, food or refuse at campsite ..................................................$155.00 Permit domestic animal to cause injury...............................................................................................$125.00 arriving permittedlater. on each campsite. Fail to clean up after and dispose of animal waste .................................................................................$95.00 Fail to clean up after and dispose of animal waste.................................................................................$95.00 All persons must be registered Pets Permit domestic animal to be at large / off leash, disturb persons or chase wildlife .............................$95.00 Park Hostspermit, and on the campsite Fire & Safety Have of fire othertothan fireplace at registered Permitcontrol domestic animal makeinexcessive noise or be incampsite.......................................................$180.00 swimming area ...........................................$95.00 Fire & Safety Have control of fire other than in fireplace at registered campsite......................................................$180.00 including the people who are Interior Trail Start fire during fire banto orcause duringinjury fire restriction ................................................................................$180.00 Permit domestic animal ................................................................................................$125.00 Start during fire ban or during fire restriction ...............................................................................$180.00 arriving later. Fail tofire extinguish fire ............................................................................................................................$180.00 clean up after and dispose of animal waste .................................................................................$95.00 Volunteers Fail to extinguish Possess fireworks fire...........................................................................................................................$180.00 or ignite fireworks......................................................................................................$95.00 Our Hosts in the Park Park Hosts andOffice Fire & Safety Possess fireworks or ignite fireworks ....................................................................................................$95.00 firearm park (includes air gun)campsite.......................................................$180.00 ....................................................................$240.00 Have control of in fire other than in slingshots fireplace atand registered and Interior Volunteers are Interior Trailyou in Possess park and air................................................................................$180.00 guns) .................................................................$240.00 Start firefirearm duringinfire ban(includes or duringslingshots fire restriction available to assist Camping Permits Unlawfully occupyfire park land or campsite or unlawfully camp over night ..........................................$155.00 Fail to extinguish ............................................................................................................................$180.00 Volunteers planning your day outing or Camp other than interior campsite or on designated Camping Permits Unlawfully occupy land or campsite or your unlawfully campcampsite................................................$155.00 overnight (per person)......................$155.00 Possessonfireworks orpark ignite fireworks......................................................................................................$95.00 your trip. Interior Volunteers Our Hosts in the Park Office Unlawfully camp more than three consecutive at acampsite campsite(per ................................................$95.00 Possessonfirearm infor park (includes slingshots and designated airnights gun) ....................................................................$240.00 Camp other than interior campsite or on your person) ..........................$155.00 assist the Park with trail,are and Interior Volunteers excessive number of more persons onthree campsite (6 max nights per site) Unlawfully camp for than consecutive at ...................................................................$95.00 a campsite................................................$95.00 portage campsite availableand to assist you in Camping Permits Unlawfully occupy park land or campsite or unlawfully camp night ..........................................$155.00 Excessive number of persons on campsite (6 max per site) (perover person in excess) ..............................$95.00 maintenance, and also assist planning your day outing or you Noise/Rowdyism Use discriminatory, insulting or gestures.............................................................$180.00 Camp on other than abusive interior or campsite or language on your designated campsite................................................$155.00 while on the trails.Volunteers Don’t be your trip. Interior Disturb othercamp persons or make excessive noise ....................................................................................$180.00 Unlawfully forabusive more than three consecutive nights at a campsite ................................................$95.00 afraid to ask questions from our Noise/Rowdyism Use discriminatory, or insulting language or gestures............................................................$180.00 assist the Park with trail, excessive number of persons on campsite (6 max per site) ...................................................................$95.00 well informed volunteers! Disturb other persons or make excessive noise...................................................................................$180.00 portage and campsite Vehicles and Boats Unlawfully take motor vehicle or vessel (boat/canoe) into park without permit .................................$155.00 maintenance, and also assist you Operate vehicle or bike off roadway or on trails ororongestures.............................................................$180.00 closed road .....................................................$155.00 Noise/Rowdyism Use discriminatory, abusive or insulting language Your Kayak while onCanoe the trails.& Don’t be Vehicles and Boats Unlawfully take motor vehicle or vessel (boat/canoe) into park without permit. . ...............................$155.00 Unlawfully operate power boatexcessive on park lakes Disturb other persons or make noise......................................................................................$155.00 ....................................................................................$180.00 afraid to ask questions Requirements? from our Operate vehicle or bike off roadway or on trails or on closed road ....................................................$155.00 well law informed volunteers! The and you…… Parking Unlawfully operate power boat onvessel parkvehicle........................................................................................$30.00 lakes. .....................................................................................$155.00 Fail to display permit on parked Vehicles and Boats Unlawfully takevalid motor vehicle or (boat/canoe) into park without permit .................................$155.00 You must have the following in Operate ATV or snowmobile orother operate generator or portable ice auger in park ..................$155.00 Park in prohibited than parking lotclosed or designated area ...........................................$30.00 Operate vehicle or location bike off or roadway orchainsaw, onintrails or on road .....................................................$155.00 Your Canoe &fitting Kayak your canoe: a proper life Unlawfully operate power boat on park lakes ......................................................................................$155.00 Requirements? jacket or PFD for each person; Parking Fail display valid on liquor parkedinvehicle.......................................................................................$30.00 Alcoholic Beverages Havetoopen liquor or permit consume other than your residence (your campsite) ............................$125.00 paddles; 50 ft floating throw The law aand you…… Have liquor or consume liquor invehicle........................................................................................$30.00 boat or canoe..........................................................................$125.00 Parking Park inopen prohibited location or than in parking lot or designated area...........................................$30.00 Fail to display valid permit onother parked rope; a bailer; a sounding You must have the following in Park in prohibited location or other than in parking lot or designated area ...........................................$30.00 device (whistle) and afitting floating your canoe: a proper life Angling Beverages Fish without licence ..............................................................................................................................$155.00 Alcoholic Have open liquor or consume liquor in other than your residence (your campsite)............................$125.00 watertight flashlight (if out at jacket or PFD for each person; Fish without licence on your person or consume consume liquor .....................................................................................................$125.00 in boat otherorthan your residence (your campsite) ............................$125.00 Alcoholic Beverages Have open liquor or liquor in canoe.........................................................................$125.00 night). each item missing paddles;For a 50 ft floating throw Over (more liquor than your limit) Have possession open liquoroforfish consume in boat or ....................................................................................$100.00 canoe..........................................................................$125.00 + there can be a fine of $200.00. rope; a bailer; a sounding Angle for species not in season or possess species not in season.........................................................$240.00 Angling Fish without licence.............................................................................................................................$155.00 A life jacket onlyand works if it is device (whistle) a floating Deposit live fish from one waterbody into another (i.e. minnows) ......................................................$365.00 Fish without licence ..............................................................................................................................$155.00 Angling on your person....................................................................................................$125.00 worn. Wear it! watertight flashlight (if out at Fish without licence on (more your person .....................................................................................................$125.00 Over possession of fish than your limit)....................................................................................$100.00 + night). For each item missing Over possession fish your limit) ....................................................................................$100.00 Angle for speciesofnot in (more seasonthan or possess species not in season........................................................$240.00 + there can be a fine of $200.00. Angle for species not in season or possess species not in season.........................................................$240.00 Deposit live fish from one waterbody into another (i.e. minnows)......................................................$365.00 A life jacket only works worksififititisis jacket only Deposit live fish from one waterbody into another (i.e. minnows) ......................................................$365.00 Possess fish cut, skinned or packaged so that number or species cannot be identified........................$125.00 worn. Wearit! it! worn. Wear

I have a permit!

Why did I get a parking ticket? I have a permit! P Why did I get a parking ticket? P

Photos: Doug Hamilton Photos: Doug Hamilton

P

Rules and Regulations for Park Visitors

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Page 12

Frontenac Provincial Park

2017

Algonquin land claim negotiations update O

n October 18, 2016 the Government of Canada, the Government of Ontario and the Algonquins of Ontario celebrated a major milestone in their journey toward reconciliation and renewed relationships by signing a historic Agreement-in-Principle (AIP). This is a key step toward a modern-day treaty to resolve the Algonquins of Ontario land claim addressing an area of 36,000 square kilometres of their traditional territory in eastern Ontario that was never surrendered under a treaty. The signing of the AIP paves the way for continued negotiations toward a Final

Agreement that will define the ongoing rights of the Algonquins of Ontario to lands and natural resources within the settlement area.

What would the proposed settlement mean for Ontario Parks? •T  here are 13 operating provincial parks within the Algonquins of Ontario land claim territory, including Frontenac Provincial Park. Opportunities to enjoy these parks will not be changed as a result of the land claim negotiations. They will

continue to be available for the residents and tourists who visit them each year. • In fact, the overall result of the proposals set out in the Agreement-in-Principle would be a net increase in the amount of parks and protected areas in the claim territory. •T  he proposed package includes recommendations for an addition to Lake St. Peter Provincial Park and a new 30,000acre provincial park in the area of Crotch Lake in Frontenac County. The negotiators expect there will be about five more years of negotiation before

the Algonquin land claim will be fully resolved. Public consultation opportunities will continue to be provided as the negotiations proceed. To learn more, including detailed information about the Ontario Crown lands proposed for transfer to Algonquin ownership, which include some non-operating park land, please visit the Ontario Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation website at: ontario.ca/algonquinlandclaim. You may also contact the Ontario negotiation team by calling 613-732-8081, toll-free at 1-855-690-7070, or e-mailing alcinfo@ontario.ca.

Midnight Marauders

R

ACCOONS AND BeARS are part of the natural environment and therefore become part of the camping experience. It’s not the fault of these animals that they raid packs and steal food. Raccoons and bears are opportunistic omnivores that will eat anything you may eat. They are foragers by nature and unwary campers often prove to be bountiful suppliers of tasty food.

Some campers at Frontenac have had to cut their trips short because “the darn raccoons stole all the food”. It is much easier to ensure that nothing gets its paws into your food by keeping your campsite clean and your food stored in our new Food Storage Lockers. If situations arise that prevent use of food storage lockers, be sure to package and hang food items away from campsites at least 4 metres above ground. For proper bear proofing, place all food and toiletries into a pack and hoist it up into a tree, away from the vicinity of your campsite, along with your garbage bag. The ideal setup is a length of rope slung over a strong tree limb so that the pack is no closer than 4 metres to the ground, 1.5 m down from the limb and 2 m from the tree trunk. Any less than these dimensions and you have merely made a piñata for a hungry bear or raccoon. Advise Park staff of all bear encounters. Other steps to bear and raccoon proof your site are to pour your dishwater down the privy (if you scatter it in the bushes, the odours will attract animals and insects), and clean fish on an island or down the shore at least 300 m away from your campsite.

ATTENTION

REPORT INVASIVE SPECIES Invasive species threaten our parks. Learn how to stop the invasion at ontario.ca/invasionON Follow #invasionON

Bears are not picky eaters Be BEAR WISE. Just like us, bears love hotdogs roasted over a campfire. But they will also chow down on candy wrappers, fish bait and toothpaste. Remember to clean your cooking equipment and secure food, garbage, and toiletries away from your tent. For more information on camping and bears, visit ontario.ca/bearwise.

Always call 911 in an emergency Always call 911 in an emergency Call 1-866-514-2327 to report a problem bear CallOffice 1-866-514-2327 to to report a sighting Park 613-376-3489 report a bear sighting

ontario.ca/bearwise • 1-866-514-2327 • TTY 705-945-7641

If you do all these things you will greatly reduce the chance of having an unwanted furry visitor “sharing” your food and keeping you and your neighbours awake all night.

A single piece of firewood can destroy millions of trees. Did you know that transporting firewood allows invasive species such as the emerald ash borer to spread, as they hide under the bark where you can’t see them? Something as simple as bringing your own firewood when you travel to or from your favourite campsite could threaten and destroy thousands, even millions, of trees. Please leave firewood at home to prevent the spread of these pests. A better alternative is to purchase firewood locally around the park; however please check for pest infestation and avoid purchasing ash firewood. To help slow the spread of emerald ash borer Ontario Parks will continue to seize firewood transported from all areas regulated by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). You could face penalties of up to $50,000 and/or prosecution if you move firewood out of an area regulated for a quarantined pest without prior approval from the CFIA. For more information and the latest updates about emerald ash borer and regulated areas, please visit www.inspection.gc.ca or contact the CFIA at 1-800-442-2342.


Frontenac Provincial Park

Frontenac Park Management Plan W

e were very pleased to announce the release of the approved Frontenac Provincial Park Management Plan on October 2016. Ontario Parks would like to thank you for your patience, comments and dedication to this planning process since the initial invitation to participate was released in 2002.

of Frontenac Provincial Park for the next 20 years. The vision of Frontenac Provincial Park as a “Threshold Wilderness” includes protecting and promoting the park’s natural and cultural resources and environments, while continuing to provide an alternative to developed campgrounds and facility-intensive recreation.

This management plan will guide the management, operation and development

A new wilderness zone (2,043.5 ha) has been established to recognize and protect a large area of wilderness landscape in the south section of the park. Two properties, with a combined area of approximately 7 ha (17 acres), are awaiting regulation in order to be added to the park boundary. New policies will allow for additions to existing parking areas, walk-in layover campsites, additional interior campsites, and a small number of backcountry cabins.

Preliminary Park Management Plan

Frontenac Provincial Park continues “to protect an outstanding natural environment within the provincial parks system and to provide high quality, dispersed, low intensity recreation.” The Frontenac Provincial Park Management Plan is available online: www.Ontario.ca/environment-and-energy/ provincial-park-management-direction

Page 13

Amazing Places! P

eople who have been coming to Frontenac Provincial Park know what a beautiful and special place it truly is. But the park is part of something bigger – the Frontenac Arch Biosphere. In 2002, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) declared our surrounding area a biosphere reserve. Biosphere reserves are areas of ecosystems which are internationally recognized for promoting a balanced relationship between people and nature. This Biosphere is one of only16 biosphere reserves in Canada, with more than 600 worldwide in 117 different countries. The Frontenac Arch Biosphere spans much of the Frontenac Arch (also referred to as the Frontenac Axis), an ancient, finger-like geological formation that connects the vast, rocky Canadian Shield of central and northern Ontario, to the Adirondack Mountains of New York State. It lies roughly in an hourglass shape, stretching along the St. Lawrence River from Gananoque to Brockville, and extending northwest into Frontenac County (north of Kingston) and beyond Frontenac Provincial Park, covering an area of about 2700 km2. A great diversity of plants and animals live and find refuge here, including many species at risk. Frontenac and Charleston Lake Provincial Parks are two core protected areas within the Biosphere.

The Frontenac Arch Biosphere has many special places. One – the Mink Lake Lookout in Frontenac Park – was selected as one of the 10 “Amazing Places” in the Biosphere. This magnificent lookout is located along the north end of the Slide Lake Loop, southeast of Campsite # 4. The Mink Lake Lookout is one of the highest points in the park and provides a sweeping view of the park. Mink Lake Lookout

Photo: D. Hamilton

2017

For more information go to visitamazingplaces.ca/frontenac-arch, or check out the Frontenac Arch Biosphere at www.fabr.ca. Enjoy your visit to this internationally recognized area!

Are You Hiking Safely?

Allow enough time to be off the trail and back at your vehicle before dusk. In the fall/winter, do not start out on any longer trail after 3 p.m. and always carry a flashlight. Wear footwear and clothing appropriate for the trail and seasonal weather conditions. Sandals and flip flops are poor choices.

Do not rely on your cell phone. Service may be “limited” to “none at all”. Use caution when walking trails. You could encounter wet areas, downed branches/trees, snow, and icy conditions. Blue markers identify trail routes. In barren rocky areas, the trail is marked with rock cairns (small rock piles). To avoid confusion, please refrain from building cairns or ‘inukshuks’, or destroying the trail defining cairns. Pack the essentials – ensure you have a map, first aid kit, water, compass, light, sunscreen, bug repellent and some snacks. Your safety is ultimately YOUR responsibility. Be prepared!

Photo: P. Dawson

Know your limitations! Check the length, difficulty, and time required to walk the trail before you start out. Know how much pack weight you can carry for long periods, during different times of the year! Know your health issues and old injuries and plan your hiking trip accordingly.

Join us in August for the

OntarioParks.com/hphp

#30x30challenge

2017 marks the 150th anniversary of Confederation in Canada. As one of the founding members of Confederation, Ontario is celebrating with events and investments across the province showcasing Ontario’s innovative spirit, culture and diversity, and leaving a lasting legacy for the next 150 years. Visit Ontario.ca/150 to learn more.


Page 14

NEW O

Frontenac Provincial Park

2017

Food Storage Lockers at Frontenac!

ver the summer of 2016, Frontenac Provincial Park introduced metal food storage lockers at a majority of the campsites within the park. At the time of publication of this article, food storage lockers have been permanently installed at 39 individual campsites; on 11 of the 13 site clusters within the park. Food storage lockers replace bear hang cables, and provide a convenient, weatherproof, and secure method for overnight backcountry campers to store food and other scented products. Our food storage lockers are located a short distance away from respective campsites and

Food Storage Locker – “Do’s and Don’ts” Do: • Pack out all garbage, and maintain clean campsites

prevent animals from sampling a campers’ backcountry menu and toiletries. Because the park is an important home for many animal species, campers should maintain Leave No Trace backcountry ethics throughout Frontenac at all times. Do not feed or attract wild animals with food items or scented products. Keep campsites clean and free of animal attractants and do not store scented items in tents or on campsites.

PACK OUT ALL GARBAGE and LEFTOVER FOOD items, and leave food storage lockers completely empty at time of departure from campsites.

CELEBRATE

• Leave food lockers completely empty upon departure, and ensure locker lids remained closed • Use storage lockers only for food items, scented products, toiletries, and clean utensils

Do Not: • Do not leave garbage, personal belongings or any food items inside lockers or at campsites when departing • Do not vacate campsite with any items left inside food lockers; or keep storage locker lids open at any time • Do not use storage lockers for storage of camping gear or personal items that can absorb food odours

July 21, 2017

FREE DAY-USE

AT ALL PARKS

OntarioParks.com/hphp

Acknowledge a job well done Help us select the next recipients of the Ontario Parks Partners Bursary program. Each year, our corporate partners recognize outstanding young people who work in Ontario’s provincial parks with an Ontario Parks Partners Bursary. Students who demonstrate exceptional customer service, initiative and leadership are eligible for the bursary. Recipients receive a grant of $500 towards their education. You can nominate any student working in Ontario Parks by completing a nomination form before September 15. Ask at the Park Office for details.

Thank you to our 2016 Bursary Partners:

#HPHP

1. Built on bare soil or exposed rock. 2. from the wind. 3. Located at least from the forest, overhanging branches or other flammable material. 4. Small. A small fire is best for cooking and is easier to control and put out. The forest is no place for a bonfire. : soak 5. with water then stir the ashes with a stick or shovel to uncover hot coals, and soak again.

6. A pail of and a shovel at hand to control the fire. 7. them at all times. For more information contact your local Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry Fire Office. © Registered Trademark of Partners in Protection Association.

ontario.ca/fireprevention

Paid for by the Government of Ontario

Template 2A. FireSmart Campfire Ad colour (English)

Join The Friends of Frontenac Park

Revised January 2015

www.frontenacpark.ca

frontenacpark@frontenacpark.ca


2017

Frontenac Provincial Park

Page 15

Frontenac Winter Wonderland Winter in Frontenac provides outdoors enthusiasts with unique opportunities to explore snow covered landscapes by hiking on foot, with snowshoes, or on cross country skis. Over 100 kilometers of overland routes throughout the park are available ranging in time from one hour to several days; to appreciate nature in a semi-wilderness environment, or to practice cold weather travel and camping skills. Frontenac Park offers 10 kilometers of marked cross country ski trails that are groomed when weather conditions are favorable.

Big Salmon Lake Road is closed to vehicles from mid-November until spring, providing four kilometers of pedestrian and snowshoe trail, parallel to a separate groomed track-set for cross country skiing; weather conditions permitting. Snowshoes in a range of sizes are available for rent at the park office and include poles. In addition, the Friends of Frontenac Park and other providers offer several Wilderness Skills Training Programs throughout the year. Come visit Frontenac Provincial Park for a memorable snow day.

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Page 16

Frontenac Provincial Park

2017

Photo: B. Korporaal

Camper Etiquette

C

onsider your neighbours and the Park environment during your stay. Frontenac’s campsites are designed to accommodate a limited number of people and pieces of equipment, so that the impact on the environment is lessened. Please set up your tent on the designated tent pad and restrict your camping experience to the campsite area, refraining from cutting hot dog or marshmallow sticks, picking flowers, cutting trees and stripping birch bark. All persons using or visiting our parks come to enjoy the outdoor recreation and for the peace and quiet. All must obey some basic rules. Parks are here for people to enjoy today but also for future generations to experience as well.

Leaving litter at your campsite when you leave, negatively affects the next camper’s visit and his/her experience of the park. Before you put on your backpack and head down the trail or before you shove your canoe away from the shore, take a few minutes and check over your campsite for any bits of garbage you may have missed. Whatever you find, pack it out with you and dispose of it in the proper receptacle at the trail head. Washing your dishes or yourself in the lake is not a good practice either. No one wants to be drawing their drinking water along the shore at the campsite where someone is washing their hair or where someone has washed their cooking pots.

Top 5 List of Things Others Do That Upset Campers

Pets are welcome to accompany you on your visit to Frontenac, however you must obey the pet rules while here (see page 7 for more information). Pets must be kept on a leash at all times; you must pick up after your pet and dispose of the ‘gift’ with your garbage; the dog may not disturb other visitors; and it must not be permitted to swim at any campsite or beach. The park is here for everyone to enjoy, so it’s important that a pet isn’t allowed to run at large or disturb others with its barking.

Each year we receive numerous camper comments and while the majority are positive, there are those we receive that relate to concerns with fellow campers, as well as opinions on Park facilities and services.

Litter

Frontenac Park does not have a can and bottle ban, which most backcountry parks have. Instead, we rely on each Park visitor to bring out what they bring in. Litter left around campsites, in fireplaces, on trails and portages and in parking lots and the picnic areas, upsets many visitors.

Dogs

Noise and Disturbing Others

One of the most common complaints is loud noise other campers cause, not only at night but during the day as well. Barking dogs, loud voices, radios, use of profane language

and excessive use of alcohol may enhance this. You are out in the backcountry. Noise and voices are almost amplified in the quiet of the bush and over water, especially at night. Be considerate of others, enjoy yourself but keep the noise level to a minimum. Some campers have commented about excessive noise from neighbouring campers, and from those who arrive late at night. It is an offense in all Parks to use loud, offensive, insulting, or abusive language, disturb others and to create excessive noise at any time. Try to be part of nature, not an intrusion in it.

Occupying Another Campsite or Camping Off Site

All campers must register at the Park Office upon arrival and be in possession of a valid camping permit. At Frontenac, it is site specific interior camping. Each campsite is numbered and you must place your tent on that specific site for your specific night(s). When a camper carefully plans out a trip and campsites well in advance, pays to reserve specific campsites, and picks up their permits at the Park Office, they expect those sites to be open for them after they hike or paddle to that site. Some people are inconsiderate and occupy sites belonging to others or camp wherever they want. It is an offence to do this. You must place your tent directly on the tent pad and occupy only those sites to which you are registered. Remember, even if you have a reservation, you still must register at the office and pick up your permits.

Vandalism

Vandalism and misuse of Park property costs us all. Carving into picnic tables and benches; graffiti in privies, washrooms and on rocks; destruction of signs, blue trail markers, fireplace grates; cutting of vegetation, trees and stripping of birch bark are all examples of vandalism. It is unfortunate that some find it okay to do this. It costs the Park money, time and effort to replace or repair acts of vandalism and it spoils the beauty of the natural environment of the Park. We at Frontenac Park truly try to make your experience a pleasant and memorable one. Help us keep Frontenac beautiful and natural.

Borrow Fishing Equipment for FREE

For a complete list of 140 loaner sites, dates and locations for Travelling Tackleshare events please visit: tackleshare.com

Park Wardens help control these and other illegal activities by giving warnings, laying charges and/or evicting offenders from the Park. However, it would be more enjoyable for everyone if all visitors would use some common sense and remember one of the Park’s most important rules – have consideration and respect for the Park, the environment and your fellow visitors. If you see or encounter illegal activity, let us know and call the office 613-376-3489. Brought to you by:

Join The Friends of Frontenac Park

www.frontenacpark.ca

frontenacpark@frontenacpark.ca


Frontenac service Directory This publication is made possible with the participation of local businesses and organizations. Show your appreciation by giving them your support.

RetuRn a FavouR to natuRe B e c o m e a M em b er o f Th e F r i e nd s o f F r o n t e n a c P a rk For further information please write to:

The Friends oF FronTenac Park

Know what you’re doing and have fun!

Box 2237, Kingston, ON K7L 5J9

email: frontenacpark@frontenacpark.ca www.facebook.com/frontenacpark https://twitter.com/frontenacpark

www.frontenacpark.ca

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Frontenac service Directory This publication is made possible with the participation of local businesses and organizations. Show your appreciation by giving them your support.

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Friends of Frontenac Park 25th Anniversary! To register for any of the programs described below, please telephone

(613) 376-3489 The presentation fee is payable to the PRESENTER and the Park Daily Vehicle or Camping Permits must be purchased at the Park Office. Programs presented by the Friends of Frontenac Park are identified with the Friends logo.

Warm Winter Camping Trip Planning

Saturday, January 21 Presenter: Zabe MacEachren, Queen’s University, Outdoor Ed Co-ordinator Winter camping can be a hot experience with a portable wood stove and wall tent. With proper equipment and clothing, groups and families can travel safely and comfortably on extended trips during the winter. All basics are covered, including trip planning, equipment details and safety, so you can feel confident planning your own trip. Cost: Park Daily vehicle permit Time: 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Warm Winter Camping Overnight

Saturday, January 21 to Sunday, January 22 Presenter: Zabe MacEachren, Queen’s University, Outdoor Ed Co-ordinator Following the Day Workshop you may stay and experience the night in the wall tent (max. 8 people). When registering, specify any dietary restrictions. Participants must supply their own camping equipment/sleeping bag and personal items. Recommended equipment list will be provided by the instructor. Space is limited. Fee includes the instructor cost, the basic equipment and dinner and breakfast. Cost: $60.00 plus the Park camping fee

Winter Camping Trip Planning

Saturday, January 28 Presented by: The Friends of Frontenac Accurate pre-trip planning can minimize many of the discomforts associated with backcountry travel during the winter. Topics: route selection and assessment, safe winter travel, shelters, clothing, equipment, menu planning, physical fitness and conditioning, and safety. Share ideas and concerns about winter camping and trip planning. Register with the Park Office. Cost: Park daily vehicle permit Time: 10:00 to 3:30

Survival Techniques for the Outdoors

Saturday, April 8 Presented by: Walter Sepic, Firefly Adventures, Kingston ON Learn how to plan for survival. Workshop will include: planning a trip, what should be in a survival kit, importance of water and filtering, food, avoiding hypothermia, clothing, types of shelters, uses of tarps and garbage bags, winter survival and snow, survival scenario, wind and rain, fire starting techniques, and communication methods. Please take notes if desired. Cost: $20.00 person plus Park permit Time: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

2017 Warm Winter Camping Course

Friends Historical Walk

Saturday, April 29 Presented by: Jérôme McDuff and The Friends of Frontenac Join history enthusiast, Jérôme McDuff for a leisurely, interpretive walk along the Big Salmon Lake Road to learn about the early homesteaders in the Park. Bring your lunch, water and comfortable walking shoes. Register with the Park Office. Plan to go rain or shine. Cost: Park daily vehicle permit. Time: 10:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Spring Nature Walk

Saturday, May 6 Presented by: Maureen Sly and Anne Robertson and The Friends of Frontenac Join the Friends on this short leisurely walk to examine the plant and animal life along the 3 km Doe Lake trail. Bring your binoculars, camera, a drink, snack, hiking shoes and bug repellent. Plan to go rain or shine. Please, no dogs. Register with the Park Office. Cost: Park daily vehicle permit Time: 10:30 a.m. (meet at Park Office)

Introduction to Backcountry Camping

Saturday, May 6 Presented by: Don Stables & Jérôme McDuff and the Friends of Frontenac For those who wish to venture to the backcountry to enjoy the outdoors, but who are unsure what to pack or buy, this is a workshop for you. Topics include: how to get started, clothing, footwear, equipment, food, water treatment and safety in the outdoors. This day-long workshop is meant to introduce the new backwoods camper to this form of recreation. Register with the Park Office. Cost: Park daily vehicle permit. Time: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

“Early Bird” Spring Bird Walk

Sunday, May 7 Led by: Kathy Felkar & Mike Burge and the Friends of Frontenac Join Kathy and Mike from the Prince Edward Point Bird Observatory (peptbo.ca) on a ramble about the park to find spring migratory birds that may be returning to the area. Warblers, Vireos, Scarlet Tanagers are all possibilities! Bring binoculars, camera, drinks, lunch, hiking shoes and bug repellent. Please, no dogs. Register with the Park Office. Cost: Park daily vehicle permit Time: 8:00 a.m. (meet at Park Office)

Wilderness Navigation Map and Compass – Level 1

Saturday, May 13 NOTE: also offered Saturday, May 27 Presenter: The Friends of Frontenac Our wilderness navigation workshop provides participants with theoretical and practical skills of reading and interpreting topographic maps in order to safely plot a compass course through the wilderness. Register with the Park Office. Cost: $25.00 plus Park permit Time: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Wilderness Navigation Map and Compass – Level 1

Saturday, May 27 See May 13 course outline above.

Wilderness Navigation Map and Compass – Level 2

Sunday, May 28 Presenter: The Friends of Frontenac This workshop is designed to give participants time to build on the knowledge acquired in the Level 1 course. Use your new skills to navigate off trail the entire day, as a group and under the supervision of the instructor. Everyone will have a chance to get a lot of practice. Be prepared to spend most of the day outdoors, rain or shine, Bring a lunch and water, and come dressed for the weather and bush travel, including long pants and hiking boots/shoes. Participation in Level 1 is recommended but not necessary, if you know how to use a map and compass and want more practice navigating off trail. Includes basic introduction on how to use your GPS. Register with the Park Office. Cost: $25.00 plus Park permit. Time: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Red Cross Wilderness First Aid

Friday, June 2 to Sunday, June 4 NOTE: also offered June 16 to 18 Septembver 15 to 17 Presented by: Steve Tripp, Wilderness Tripping, Kingston, ON This 20 hour course takes place in the park interior and is designed to give participants training needed to care for a casualty for up to 24 hrs in a wilderness or remote context. Focus is on prevention but in this scenario based course you will learn and practice assessment, treatment and stabilization of the patient. CPR-C and AED training is included. No pre-requisites. Camping equipment and food not included. Camping gear available for rent. It is recommended to hike or canoe to the campsite Friday. Register with the Park Office. For more information, please contact Steve Tripp at wildernesstripping@gmail.com Cost: $210.00 HST incl. plus Park camping permit Time: Friday - p.m. to Sunday 4:00 p.m.

The Amazing Tarp -Tarping Made Easy

Sunday, June 3 Presented by: Barry Irish, Paddle Away Adventures, Kingston, ON Learn how to put up tarps easily. Topics include: types of tarps, ropes, different methods of putting up tarps, useful knots, and more. This is an opportunity to learn the many uses of tarps and to share your own ideas. Register with the Park Office. Cost: Park daily vehicle permit. Time: 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Canoe Clinic

Sunday, June 4 Presented by: Walter Sepic, Firefly Adventures, Kingston, ON You will go through dry land lessons first with: canoe design, parts, paddles, emergency and mandatory legislated equipment and their use, proper PFD’s or lifejackets, balancing, proper sitting or kneeling, bow and stern positions and what is required of both positions, portaging and types of portages, entering and exiting a canoe, holding and using a paddle, types of strokes and when to use, extended paddling tips, and on water practice of those strokes. After lunch, for a finale you will go out on South Otter Lake for a more extended paddle. Must bring your own equipment and canoe. Cost: $20.00 plus Park daily vehicle permit Time: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

ORCKA Basic Canoe Certification (Tandem) Level 1, 2 and 3 or Basic (Solo) Level 4

Saturday, June 10 to Sunday, June 11 Presented by: Barry Irish, Paddle Away Adventures, Kingston ON This is the ORCKA introduction to tandem canoeing and is the basis for all other ORCKA skills. Learn how to canoe or those interested to advance to other ORCKA skill levels. Topics: canoeing skills, safety, equipment selection, etc. Required equipment: your own canoe, paddle, PFD and safety equipment. There are a limited number of canoes, if needed. For further information, contact Barry Irish 613-634-4177 or 613-539-4864 or birish@cogeco.ca Cost: $200.00 plus HST per person, plus Park daily vehicle permit Time: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Red Cross Wilderness First Aid

Friday, June 16 to Sunday, June 18 See June 2 to June 4 course outline

Celebrate the 25th Anniversary with the Friends of Frontenac at the park Saturday, June 17 Presented by: The Friends of Frontenac All welcome. Details to follow at www.frontenacpark.ca

FISHING 101 For Women

Saturday, July 8 Presented by: Yvonne Brown, FISHING 101 For Women This workshop is for women only. It focuses on fishing techniques, equipment, baits, lures, casting, knots, fish care and handling as well as actual practice at Otter Lake. All loaner equipment, rods, reels, etc. is provided. Bring your lunch, drinks, sunscreen, hat, etc. Minimum age 14 yrs. No fishing licence is needed during this week. Pre registration required. Cost: $15.00 person plus Park permit. Time: 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Paddle Canada – Introduction to Flatwater Sea Kayaking

Saturday, July 22 Presented by: Christine Showler, Frontenac Outfitters Canoe & Kayak Centre, Sydenham, ON A day on, in and under the water, teaching you the fundamentals of Sea Kayaking, theories, strokes, rescues and recovery skills. Past participants often repeat this confidence-building course to refine their skills. Register by calling 613-376-6220 or at www.frontenac-outfitters.com. Course to take place at Frontenac Park. Kayak and paddling gear included! Cost: $185.00 plus HST, per person, plus Park daily vehicle permit Time: 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Kayak Basics –“Getting Started” Kayak Course

Saturday, July 29 Presented by: Christine Showler, Frontenac Outfitters Canoe & Kayak Centre, Sydenham, ON Discover the world of kayaking with this ½ day ‘getting started’ course. The focus is on basic paddling techniques, kayak design and safety. A tranquil paddle on South Otter Lake at Frontenac Park will quickly prove kayaking is a sport anyone can enjoy. To register: 613-376-6220 or at www.frontenac-outfitters.com. Kayak and quality paddling gear included! Cost: $95.00 plus HST, per person, plus Park daily vehicle permit Time: 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

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Dutch Oven Gourmet Wilderness Cooking

Saturday, September 9 Presented by: Barry Irish, Paddle Away Adventures, Kingston, ON Camping food does not have to be boring. Topics: food preparation, storage, food safety, recipes, stoves, utensils, and more. Explores good and interesting food in the wilderness using Dutch ovens and small twig stoves. An opportunity to exchange recipes, ideas and techniques. Register with the Park Office. Cost: $25.00 (includes food), plus Park daily vehicle permit Time: 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Electronics On Wilderness Trips

Saturday, September 9 Presented by: Barry Irish, Paddle Away Adventures, Kingston, ON This clinic explores the use of electronics in the wilderness. Topics: Satellite phones, cell phones, text messaging systems, GPS, power supplies for your electronics, apps for your cell phone or tablet. Register with the Park Office. Cost: Park daily vehicle permit Time: 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Red Cross Advanced Wilderness First Aid

Friday, September 15 to Sunday, September 17 Presented by: Steve Tripp, Wilderness Tripping, Kingston, ON Advanced Wilderness First Aid is an additional 20 hours to the Basic Wilderness First Aid program, and focuses on patient care for more than 24 hrs. This bridge course is a continuation of the Red Cross WFA program within the year of 2014 and can be a continuation of any Red Cross Training Partner WFA. This course is more situation-based, with more hands-on. Pre-requisite: the 2014 WFA, card and manual. Register with the Park Office. More information: Steve Tripp at wildernesstripping@gmail.com Cost: $200 plus Park camping fees Time: Friday p.m. to Sunday 4:00 p.m.

Christmas Bird Count for Frontenac

Saturday, December 16 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Presented by: The Friends of Frontenac The Friends are leading the “Frontenac” Christmas Bird Count (CBC) field surveys for the Park area. A great opportunity to learn more about birding while exploring different habitats. Join the fun – more people allow better coverage of the Park. Information and registration: 613-5314578 or bonta.johnson@sympatico.ca. Cost: Free! Time: 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Frontenac Provincial Park 2017 Information Guide  

Frontenac Provincial Park 2017 Information Guide