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The Ward Medal Honors Williston Alumni Who “Do Good Well”

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uring the traditional Senior Dinner at the end of the school year, Robert A. Ward, who was headmaster at The Williston Northampton School from 1972 to 1979, told the following story: When a granddaughter of poet Robert Frost graduated from college, she said to Frost, “Don’t you think that it’s everybody’s duty to do good in the world?” He replied, “I’d rather do well than good.” But she countered, “Wouldn’t it be possible to do good well?”

Robert A. Ward

Headmaster Ward encouraged all Williston students to “do good well,” and in his honor, Williston’s Alumni Association created the Ward Medal in 1987. It is the highest award given to members of the Williston community who have given outstanding service to humanity.


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2006

Lawyer Samantha Healy Vardaman ’89 worked with the American Bar Association Central European and Eurasian Law Initiative in Moldova, where she helped law schools to open legal clinics and trained attorneys to assist voters. Now she works for Shared Hope International, where she led a team of undercover human rights investigators to create a report that spurred new legislation to combat human trafficking.

Bruce Yarber ’48 started a new career as a full-time volunteer after retiring from an insurance career. His main activity is as a patient representative at his local hospital, where he facilitates interactions between patients and hospital staff; he also works with the Kiwanis Club, the Visiting Nurses Association, and other groups.

Richard Adelmann ’61 has volunteered regularly with The Children’s Village (a residential school for needy and orphaned children in Dobbs Ferry, NY) and has also been generous in helping homeless individuals in his community to secure permanent housing.

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2004

Erik Nicolaysen ’51 was honored for his volunteer contributions to his community, which include joining both the Chappaqua Fire Department and the Chappaqua Ambulance Corps. He has served as captain in both departments.

2003

Andrew Wooden ’73 helped to found the Bosque School, a college preparatory school in New Mexico that focuses on community service and respect for the environment. He served there as assistant head of school and then head of school. In 2011 he became head of school at Marymount of Santa Barbara.

2002

Dr. Timothy Janeway ’51 received the medal for his efforts with the medical relief organization Orthopedics Overseas, where he trains doctors in medically underserved nations. Occasionally, he has brought patients back to the United States for treatment at Shadyside Hospital in Pittsburgh, where he is an orthopedic surgeon.

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read and watch ward medal recipient speeches at

www.williston.com/intheirownwords

DOING GOOD WELL


“There are many ways to “do good.” One can be a hands-on, grassroots activist, a policy advocate, a fundraiser or donor . . . You should be standing here with me, as should the many people giving to these efforts in whatever form they are able and comfortable to give.” —Samantha Healy Vardaman ’89 2009 Ward Medal Recipient


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2000

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Patrick Archbald ’79 and Stephen Trudel ’69 both received the medal for their work in response to domestic violence. As chief of police in Williamsburg, MA, Patrick authored a federal grant to fund educational workshops for police officers, victims of abuse, and victim advocates. Stephen was recognized for his work as an intake coordinator with the Men Overcoming Violence Project, where he helps convicted abusers to enter counseling programs. Both honorees encouraged students to consider work in public service, saying that working for social causes is both challenging and rewarding.

Mary Kimball Holland ’32 served on boards of directors for numerous organizations with interests in adult education, the mentally ill, and music therapy. For decades, she conducted a brass band, taught recorder to children, wrote music and lyrics for children’s theatre, and was active with a singing group that regularly visited nursing homes.

read and watch ward medal recipient speeches at

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1999

Stephen Herbits ’60 was an advisor to the White House, the Pentagon, and Congress early in his career. At Seagram and Sons, he was one of the first executives at a Fortune 150 company to come out as gay, and helped the company become more inclusive. He also chaired the board of the AIDS Action Council and was an advisor to the Dade Human Rights Foundation.

1998

As president of Byers’ Choice Ltd. and the Byers’ Foundation, Robert Byers ’57 was honored because the international company he oversees, which sells Christmas caroler figures designed by his wife Joyce, donates more than 20 percent of its profits to charity annually. Bob has also served on the boards of numerous community and civic organizations.

1997

Virginia Goodrich Craig ’27 received the medal in recognition of her pioneering work in the field of reading education for dyslexic children. Starting out as a volunteer and advocate for her child in the Norwell School District, she eventually became the district’s reading coordinator.

www.williston.com/intheirownwords

DOING GOOD WELL


“Reciprocity is a good way to start. As others have shown you generosity, be generous in return.” —Andrew Wooden ’73 2003 Ward Medal Recipient


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1995

Deborah Black Berman ’58 was awarded the medal for her work with Summerbridge (now the Breakthrough Collaborative), a nonprofit that connects college-age student teachers with high-potential, low-income middle school students in a summer tutoring program. She is also a trustee of the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

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1995

Businessman Peter Wold ’67 served in the Wyoming State Legislature for three years, concentrating his work on the Education Committee. He has held leadership positions with several nonprofit boards including Montessori School of Casper, United Way, and Salvation Army.

1990

Charles Benoit ’60 received the medal for his work with refugees in South Vietnam through the Agency for International Development, and his later work as a social scientist for the Rand Corporation documenting the affects of war.

1988

Gertrude Nolan Marshall ’30 was the first recipient of the Ward Medal for her leadership in creating affordable housing for low- and moderate-income families.

Frances Crowe P’64, ’68, ’70 was recognized for her volunteer work as a peace activist with the American Friends Service Committee. She was arrested 28 times in 40 years while engaging in nonviolent demonstrations against various U.S. military activities.

Lawyer Shannon O’Brien ’77 served seven years as a Massachusetts State Representative and Senator. During that time she sponsored the first comprehensive child abuse legislation in the state, which defined child abuse as a felony and established the first laws focused on abuse and neglect of children.

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read and watch ward medal recipient speeches at

www.williston.com/intheirownwords

DOING GOOD WELL


Ward Medal for "Doing Good Well"