Jewell Magazine Fall 2023

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the MAGAZINE of WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

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PERFORMING ARTS Ref lec t in g the hum an ex p er ience

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NEW MAJORS

Cr it ica l T h in k in g in t h e D ig ita l Wo rl d CAPITAL CAMPAIGN

F u n d ra i s in g a n d Co n s t r u c t io n Up d a te

GIVING SPOTLIGHT

B il l a n d Lin d a D re ye r Fall 2023


the MAGAZINE of WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

Ed i to r CARA DAHLOR D e s ig n S P R I N G B OA R D C R E AT I V E Co n t r ib u to rs DON I POCK PHOTOGR APHY R I VAS P H OTO G R A P H Y ERIC BLAIR, ’01

V i c e P re s i d e n t fo r Ma rk e t in g , En ro l l m e n t a n d S t u d e n t Li fe

J A E LY N N

ELLISON

A s s i s ta n t At h l e t i c s D i re c to r fo r Co m m u n i c a t i o n / S e n i o r Wo m a n A d m i n i s t ra to r

ANDREA MELOAN , ’99

S e n i o r D i re c to r o f A d v a n c e m e n t a n d A l u m n i Re l a t i o n s

CLARK MORRIS, ’91

V i c e P re s i d e n t fo r In s t i t u t i o n a l A d v a n c e m e n t

EL AI N E WARREN

A d v a n c e m e n t Ca m p a i g n a n d S p e c i a l P ro j e c t s Ma n a g e r

Co v e r: Ca rd i n a l i s a n d O rd a in e d c h o i rs p e r fo r m t h e w o rl d p re m i e re o f “Ca n o n fo r R a c i a l Re c o n c i l i a t i o n” i n No v e m b e r. Im a g e b y R i v a s Me d i a .

Jewell Magazine is published by the William Jewell College Office of Marketing and Public Relations, 500 College Hill, Liberty MO 64068. Send address changes and alumni updates to alumni@william.jewell.edu or 816.415.7831.

tiktok 2

Top: T he Link Project groundbreaking, fall 2022 . Bottom: T he Link Project Phase 1 nears completion. Photo taken in November by Jonkman Con str uction.


IN THIS ISSUE

14 M U S I C A N D T H E AT R E T H E A R T O F C R E AT I N G AN D CO N N ECTI N G

Fall 2023

1 1 NEW MAJORS

2 7 C A R D I N A L AT H L E T I C S

CRITICAL THINKING IN

L ACROSSE FINDS A

T H E D I G I TA L W O R L D

2 0 ALUMNI VOICES A S P OTLI G HT O N YO U N G ARTI STS

HOME ON THE HILL

32

CL ASS NOTES

39

IN MEMORIAM

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PRESIDENT’S NOTE

T h e Li n k P ro j e c t g ro u n d b re a k i n g c e re m o n y

Ar t o f th e Po s s ib l e In my first communication with alumni, faculty, staff, and friends to the College in July 2016, I wrote about the art of the possible at Jewell. The Jewell magic, I said, is born of the resilient, optimistic, creative mindset that defines our living and learning experience on The Hill. I knew then that we could—and we would—build upon that magic and energy to establish a bold new vision for the College, one that would lead to growth and vitality for Jewell. That bold new vision, led by our Board of Trustees and supported by faculty, staff, and donors, resulted in establishing our strong identity as The Critical Thinking College ®, serving Kansas City with graduates who can think, adapt, create, and communicate in a rapidly changing professional landscape. The bold new vision encouraged us to reimagine enrollment management and engage students in wholly new ways—resulting in 20 percent growth in our incoming classes since 2019. The bold new vision led us to establish our inclusivity movement at Jewell, which in six years has increased the diversity of our student body by 14 percent (as a whole, we are 38 percent diverse). And our bold new vision led the Board to establish In Pursuit: Jewell’s Campaign for the Future in 2018. This ambitious endeavor challenged our community to raise $75 million in five years to support people, places, and programs at Jewell. In October 2022, we announced the public phase and increased our goal to $100 million, having raised $88 million in gifts and pledges. Of that $88 million, $25.3 million has been pledged in support of our largest capital project in history, The Link, which will be an innovative and welcoming new home for athletic teams, staff offices, a student fitness center, a dance and movement space, and academic and social spaces. I am deeply grateful to every donor for demonstrating their support for our exceptional students, faculty, and staff—and their belief in Jewell’s vibrant future. D r. E l i z a b e t h Ma c L e o d Wa l l s , P re s i d e n t

The Jewell magic is thriving on The Hill and continues to give life to ideas and initiatives that strengthen our Mission. I look forward to sharing much more with you about our burgeoning new strategy—and our abiding sense of possibility—as we approach our 175th year of shaping the minds and the lives of the students we serve.

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WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


J E W E L L’ S FIRST ONLINE DEGREE PROGRAM

The high-quality education Jewell has provided on The Hill since 1849 is now available wherever you are.

From an associate degree to a B.S. in Business Administration in 2 years A Jewell degree can be yours for less than $12,000 a year with competitively priced tuition at $385/credit hour. Combined with state and federal financial aid, this program gets even more affordable.

NOW ENROLLING: JEWELL .EDU/BUSINESS-ONLINE

Know someone who would make a great Cardinal? Let us know at jewell.edu/refer.

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Campus News

AROUND THE HILL

Ca m p u s Ne ws FA C U LT Y A D VA N C E M E N T S A N D R E C O G N I T I O N S » P rofessor: Dr. Jennifer Cotter, English; Dr. Anthony Maglione, music; Dr. Azadeh Rafizadeh,

mathematics; Dr. Bhupinder Vohra, biology » A ssociate Professor: Beth Hazels, J.D., business; Dr. Taqsim Husnain, civil engineering; Dr. Michael

Stoll, education; Dr. Tom Vansaghi, nonprofit leadership » A ssistant Professor: Tiffany Condren, nursing; Anna M. Kaaiakamanu, nursing » A ssociate Dean of the Core Curriculum: Dr. Sara Morrison » D epartment Chair: Dr. Daniel Kotzin, history; Dr. Azadeh Rafizadeh, mathematics and data science;

Dr. Lilah Rahn-Lee, biology; Dr. Shane Price, chemistry and biochemistry; Dr. Elizabeth Sperry, Oxbridge Honors Program Senior Tutor; Dr. Michael Stoll, education; Dr. Ruth Williams, English » Faculty Emeritus: Dr. Kenneth Alpern, Oxbridge Honors Program and philosophy; Dr. Debbie

Chasteen, communication; Dr. Donna Gardner, education; Dr. Gina Lane, communication; Dr. Elaine Reynolds, history; Dr. Patricia Schoenrade, psychological science; Kevin Shaffstall, nonprofit leadership » D r. Keli Braitman, professor of psychological science and chair, and Dr. Rein Staal, professor of

political science, were selected as Carl F. Willard Distinguished Teachers for 2022 and 2023. Named after a former Jewell Trustee, the award was established 30 years ago to honor an outstanding Jewell educator each year.

M AT H E S I N N O VAT I O N C E N T E R

Alumni Mark and Karen Mathes, Jared and Mary Mathes, and the entire Mathes Family funded the new Mathes Innovation Center on campus. This full-service entrepreneurial hub supports students and community members from the moment of their business proposal through the investment process. A unique service of the Center is close collaboration with identified investors that will vet and present opportunities for funding. For Jewell students, this means mentorship in launching a business that will generate profit to help fund their education. Mark Mathes, ’79, said the family wants the Center to create an environment where collaboration and innovation allow students to live business as they learn. Visit je w el l inn o va t io n .co m .

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WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


A C C R E D I TAT I O N » In fall 2022, Jewell’s accreditation body, the Higher Learning Commission, conducted an on-site

survey visit and granted Jewell full re-accreditation. HLC’s Criteria for Accreditation includes five areas: Mission; Integrity: Ethical and Responsible Conduct; Teaching and Learning: Quality, Resources and Support; Teaching and Learning: Evaluation and Improvement; and Institutional Effectiveness, Resources and Planning. HLC will conduct its next comprehensive evaluation in 2028-2029. Jewell has been continuously accredited since 1915. » J ewell’s Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering program has been accredited by the Engineering

Accreditation Commission of ABET, the global accreditor of college and university programs in engineering and engineering technology. Jewell’s civil engineering graduates have interned and been hired at organizations such as American Rail Engineers, HNTB, McCownGordon Construction, JE Dunn Construction, Tennessee Department of Transportation, BNSF Railway, Geotechnology Inc., Garver Aviation Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Kansas City District, Kansas Department of Transportation and City of Shawnee (Kansas) Public Works Department. See more grad placements and meet our Advisory Board at je w el l .e d u/engin e e r ing. C A B I N E T A N D T R U S T E E U P D AT E S » V ice President of Academic Affairs Dr. Daniel Jasper joined Jewell in May. He served

for 20 years at Moravian University (Pennsylvania) in a variety of faculty and leadership positions, most recently as the associate provost and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Jasper earned a B.A. from Macalester College and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the New School for Social Research (New York), all in sociology. He also holds a Certificate in Marathi Language and Culture from Tilak Maharashtra Vidyapeet (India). » B eto Lopez joined the Board of Trustees in March. He serves as president and CEO

of Guadalupe Centers, the country’s longest continuously operating agency serving Latinos. Lopez previously worked as a commercial lending manager and a vice president at Arvest Bank. Now in his second term on the Lee’s Summit City Council 3rd District, he also serves as Mayor Pro Tem. He holds bachelor’s degrees in political science and Spanish from Rockhurst University and an MBA from Baker University. » N ew Board of Trustees member Chris Rosson, ’06, is the president and CEO of

United Way of Greater Kansas City. Rosson graduated summa cum laude from both Jewell (B.A. in Business Administration and Economics) and Johns Hopkins University (M.A. in International Economics and International Relations). He has served as an advisor to the Governor of Missouri, a public affairs specialist in Washington, D.C., a George Mitchell Scholar in Ireland, a program director with the Federal Reserve System and executive director of Teach for America Kansas City.

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Campus News

AROUND THE HILL

N E W ACA D E M I C P R O G R A M S A N D ACA D E M I C PA RT N E RS H I P S » J ewell launched its first 100 percent online program. The Bachelor of Science in Business

Administration is designed for students with an associate degree and can be completed in two years. Read more or refer candidates: je w el l .e d u/o n lin e-b u s in e s s. » T hree new bachelor’s degrees will be available starting in fall 2024, pending approval by the Higher

Learning Commission: computer science, cybersecurity and information technology. » J ewell formed a new 4+4 partnership with Kansas City University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Participants attend four years at Jewell and four years at KCU for a B.A. in biochemistry, biology or chemistry in addition to a doctor of osteopathic or doctor of dental medicine degree. Eligible students must meet GPA and other requirements; however, the MCAT is not required. » A new agreement with Liberty Hospital provides accelerated track nursing students an opportunity to

complete their Bachelor of Science in Nursing for less than half the cost with a three-year commitment to work at the hospital. See more details at je w el l .e d u/accele ra te d-n u rs ing. » T he graduate level Artist Certificate in Choral Conducting started this fall. The highly-selective one-year

conducting program builds on undergraduate academic and conservatory experience or complements graduate work to refine and train participants for doctoral degrees, professional conducting engagements and beyond. Meet the renowned faculty leading the program: je w el l .e d u/co n d u c t ing.

C O L L E G I AT E N U R S I N G A C A D E M Y

This new collaboration began this fall to prepare high school students to sit for the Certified Nursing Assistant exam at the end of their senior year. Participants complete 75 hours of instructional training on Jewell’s campus in the fall, followed by 100 hours of clinical instruction at Liberty Hospital in the spring. Students who complete their CNA certification are guaranteed an employment interview at Liberty Hospital. Learn more at je w el l .e d u/CNA.

in p a r t n e rs hip w ith

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WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

+


JEWELL TODAY 29.5%

FULL TIME FACULT Y OF COLOR

INCREASE IN

S TA R TING AV ER AGE S A L A RY FOR GRADUATES IN LAST 5 YEARS

20%

5%

R AISED SINCE 2018 FOR IN PURSUIT CA MPAIGN

1% 2%

9.5% 0.5% 13%

IN ACCESS GR ANTS AWARDED IN 2023-2024

AMERICAN INDIAN OR AL ASK A NATIVE ASIAN BL ACK

RACE

HAWAIIAN/PACIFIC ISL ANDER

7% TOTAL INSTITUTIONAL AID

IN 2023

$88 MILLION

TOTAL ENROLLMENT GROW TH SINCE 2019

$1.89 MILLION

11%

IN 2019

67%

HISPANIC/L ATINO T WO OR MORE RACES WHITE

AWARDED IN 2023-2024

$9,917,474

99% GRAD SCHOOL

PLACEMENT/EMPLOYED

38%

STUDENT BODY DIVERSITY

(U.S. CITIZENS WHO SELF-IDENTIF Y AS NON-WHITE)

WITHIN 6 MONTHS

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Campus News

AROUND THE HILL

N AT I O N A L A C C O L A D E S U.S. NEWS AND WORLD REPORT

» B e s t Co l l eg e s » No. 2 B e s t Va l u e Sch o o l s; h igh e s t ran k e d

co l l eg e in th e Kan s a s Cit y- a re a » No. 8 (t ie) B e s t Regio n a l Co l l eg e s in

Mid w e s t Regio n THE PRINCETON REVIEW

» B e s t 3 8 9 Co l l eg e s (to p 1 5% o f al l 4 -ye ar

s ch o o l s in th e U. S .) » 2 0 9 B e s t Va l u e Co l l eg e s » B e s t Mid w e s te r n Co l l eg e s

NEW CARDINAL STORE

Jewell’s bookstore contract ended in 2022, and the College’s textbook partner is now Akademos. All other items are available in the all-new Cardinal Store. A large selection of apparel and gifts are available for in-person shopping on the lower level of Yates-Gill College Union and online at ca rd in al s to re.je w el l .e d u .

WA S H I N G T O N M O N T H LY

» To p 5% o f B a ch el o r’s Co l l eg e s: St u d en t an d

Fa c u l t y Re s e a rch » To p 10%: Im p a c t o n th e P u b l ic G o o d » To p 11%: G ra d u a t io n Ra te

R A C I A L R E C O N C I L I AT I O N U P D AT E

Visit jewell.edu/racial-reconciliation to read about the progress on research around the racial

MONEY MAGAZINE

history of the College in addition to a Statement

» B e s t Co l l eg e s in Am e r ica (to p 3 0% o f al l

of Atonement and Principles of Commemoration

p u b l ic an d p r i va te co l l eg e s) » 4 . 5/5 s ta r ra t ing fo r q u a l it y, a f fo rd abilit y

an d o u tco m e s

that establish a plan for addressing historical inaccuracy, commemoration, repair and restoration, and creating a better future.

SPIRIT TEAM

Courtney Brummett joined Jewell as a full-time campus spirit coordinator and head coach of the cheer and dance team. Her experience includes collegiate coaching, performing in the NBA, judging dance competitions and teaching technique and choreography across the country. In this newly created role, Brummett is helping grow the teams, implementing fan experiences, incorporating school spirit and hosting youth clinics. Follow them on Instagram at jewellspiritteam.

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WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


C RI T I C AL TH I N K I N G I N TH E D IGITAL W O RLD

3 NEW MAJORS LAUNCHING IN FALL 2024*

Computer Science

prioritizing skills in software development and project management that produce high-functioning applications and other products

Cyb e rse c u r i t y innovative blend of courses in technical cybersecurity, business and

LEARN MORE

» j e w e l l . e d u / t e c h - m a j o r s

political science

I n fo r m a t i o n Te c h n o l o g y study of computer infrastructure, hardware and networks with an emphasis on problem-solving, social and ethical implications, and communication of technical concepts *A P P R O V E D B Y J E W E L L F A C U LT Y ; P E N D I N G A P P R O VA L F R O M T H E H I G H E R L E A R N I N G C O M M I S S I O N

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CA P I TA L P R O J E CT

A

GROUNDBREAKING Day

DURING 2022 HOMECOMING FESTIVITIES, THE JEWELL FAMILY GATHERED FOR A CONFETTI-WORTHY CEREMONIAL GROUNDBREAKING FOR THE LINK PROJECT. THE LARGEST CAPITAL PROJECT IN COLLEGE HISTORY ENCOMPASSES THE MULTI-USE CARLENE BASORE CHRISMAN CENTER, AMPHITHEATER STADIUM, ADJACENT OUTDOOR SPACES AND ROAD IMPROVEMENTS.

Ca rl e n e ( B a s o re) C h r i s m a n , ’67, a n d t h e Wo m e n’s Te n n i s Te a m

In Pursuit: Jewell’s Campaign for the Future launched in 2017 with strategic priorities to support students, faculty and program development. Donors have contributed more than $88 million to date to the overall campaign, including $25.3 million for The Link Project. Phase 1 of construction began this summer with crews creating a new campus entrance road, tree-lined walkway, hillside terraces, art walk extension, amphitheater stadium, parking lots and underground utilities. With the national average of construction costs continuing to escalate, Jewell seeks additional donors to secure the final $5 million in funding for the next phase of constructing the Carlene Basore Chrisman Center. Me n’s B a s k e t b a l l Te a m

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WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


$500,000 AND ABOVE

Carlene (Basore) Chrisman, ‘67, and Chris Chrisman Edward Gaul, ’55 William T. Kemper Foundation - Commerce Bank, Trustee J. E. and L. E. Mabee Foundation Steven Karbank Mark Mathes, ’79, and Karen (Rahter) Mathes, ’80 Gary McElwain, ’68, and Kathy (McCarty) McElwain, ’69 Helmar Nielsen, ’58 Dan O’Dell, ’76, and Wanda (Neth) O’Dell, ’77 Sunderland Foundation $100,000 - $499,999

Gary Ainsworth, ’82, and Kristin Ainsworth Stuart Bascomb, ’63, and Phyllis (Linck) Bascomb, ’64 Susan Chambers, ’90, and Chip Chambers Li n k s u p p o r te r s Ka re n ( R a h te r) Ma t h e s , ’ 8 0, a n d Ma rk Ma t h e s , ’ 7 9 ; P re s i d e n t E l i z a b e t h Ma c L e o d Wa l l s; Jo n a t h a n Ke m p e r re p re s e n t i n g t h e W i l l i a m T. Ke m p e r Fo u n d a t i o n ; D a n O’ D e l l , ’ 76 , a n d Wa n d a ( Ne t h) O’ D e l l , ’ 7 7

Russ Cline, ’70, and Melanie (Griffin) Cline, ’78 Bill Dillingham, ’97, and Keri Dillingham John Dillingham Lisa (Reichert) Essig, ’89, and David Essig Charlie Funk, ’76, and Connie Funk Bill Gautreaux, ’85, and Christy Gautreaux Goppert Foundation M. Tyler Griffin, ’01 Eric and Charlene Hughes Dan Lanning, ’08, and Sauphia Lanning Harry Wilson Loose Trust, Bank of America Trustee Jim Pierce, ’66, and Marcia (Love) Pierce, ’66 Sarah Rowland John Strada, ’74 Rick Wright, ’78, and SueAnn Wright $25,000 - $99,999

Shane Davolt, ’93, and Megan (Thomas) Davolt, ’95

Thank you to these lead donors for their generous gifts to The Link Project (received through fall 2023).

In November, the College announced the naming gift for the new building, Carlene Basore Chrisman Center. The 1967 alumna is Jewell’s first female studentathlete and a pioneer in women’s sports. Learn more about her legacy: » j e w e l l .e d u / c h r i s m a n- c e n te r.

Doug Doll, ’90, and Melanie (Jones) Doll, ’90 Monte Harmon, ’88, and Tammy Noah-Harmon Aaron Hicks, ’98, and Whitney Hicks Linda Holley Walt Holt, ’82, and Anita (Diffenbaugh) Holt, ’83 ARCHITECT RENDERINGS

Jason Houseworth, ’96, and Beth Houseworth

A N D P R O J E CT F E AT U R E S :

Jason Klumb, ’90, and Begoña Klumb

» j e w e l l .e d u /t h e- l in k

Eric Levings, ’98, and Mandy (Martin) Levings, ’99 Ronald Masters, ’77, and Julie Masters Jason Parks, ‘98, and Becky (Wisniewski) Parks, ‘00 Keith and Margi Pence Andrew Peters, ’02, and Emily Peters Rein Staal, Ph.D. Weldon Stubbs, ’94, and Angie (Seymour) Stubbs, ’95 Rear Admiral Diane (Hopkins) Webber, ’81 John Wilkinson, ’72, and Cindy Wilkinson

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P R O G R A M F E AT U R E

Performing Arts

CREATING and CONNECTING through the ARTS Seeing the arts as a way of reflecting the human

experience in a critical and creative way is central to Jewell’s mission, says Dr. Ian Coleman, department chair since 2004. “Who and what we are as people and who we aspire to become are often reflected in and informed by the arts. We take that role in the life of the College and in the Kansas City region very seriously.” The performing arts have been part of the College’s fabric for more than a century, establishing Jewell as a place that nurtures the art and the artist, the learner and the teacher. In the early 1900s, students enrolled in music courses and performed plays with

W in d En s e m b l e a t Lig h t in g o f t h e Q u a d

the Philomathic Literary Society. A music program was in place by 1921, and a few years later, English Department Head Dr. J. P. Fruit organized the first Dramatics Club. Theatre took off in 1930 when alumna Dr. Virginia Rice started her 45-year run as program director while co-eds’ interest in music required expanding the one-faculty department to six by the end of WWII. By the mid-sixties, more than 350 students were involved in the arts.

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level programs that produce talented performers, composers, writers, teachers, designers and more. Add to that the value of the Harriman-Jewell Series—with the world’s most prominent artists performing and providing master classes for

Since then many beloved faculty have continued to

students—and the Lydia Lovan Community School

elevate music and theatre, with the two programs

of Music training the next generation of aspiring

combining in 2020 to become the Department of

artists, and Jewell’s regional influence as an arts

Performing Arts with six majors and two graduate-

powerhouse is undeniable.

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC

Whether it’s holiday classics at Lighting of the Quad, jazz on Trotter Arts Plaza or the fight song on game days, Jewell’s talented instrumentalists bring the spirit to treasured campus traditions. Ensembles consist of music majors and enthusiasts, some of whom receive scholarships up to $7,500 as Instrumental and Orchestral Scholars. Director of Instrumental Studies Dr. Langston Hemenway is a conductor, adjudicator and clinician whose work as an artist brings even more professional

The Liberty Symphony Orchestra, the 52-year old ensemble with an all-Jewell lineage of conductors, from founder Dr. Phillip Posey to Dr. Tony Brandolino and now Hemenway. For many years, Professor Phil Schaefer helped bring spirit to football games with the jazz band. Then, to expand music opportunities and scholarships, an athletic band was established in 2020. Dr. Dorothy Glick Maglione conducts Cardinal Sound, the “Heartbeat of The Hill” at pep rallies, tailgates and games. Amplifying the spirit is a new color guard,

and collaborative opportunities to students. For

Crown Jewell.

instance, several Jewell students are members of

College Organist Dr. Ann Marie Rigler brings a wealth of expertise as a solo recitalist, clinician, adjudicator and chamber musician, such as her leadership in the American Guild of Organists and national committees. A number of adjuncts who perform worldwide also are an important part of the instrumental faculty, helping bring students and professionals together in new and innovative ways. VOCAL MUSIC

As with instrumental music, the vocal music experience for majors combines private instruction, performance labs, ensembles, recitals and research with classroom instruction. Students from all majors may take lessons, audition for scholarships and participate in Jewell’s highly acclaimed ensembles.

Ca rd i n a l i s C h o i r a n d KC Ae r i a l A r t s a t Un i o n S ta t i o n Ci t y S ta g e T h e a t re in “O u r Tr u e Co l o rs” (p h o to: Ke l l i e G re e n , V i ta l i t yXp o s e d)

JOIN US FOR A PERFORMANCE

» j e w e l l .e d u /a r t s- c a l e n d a r

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P R O G R A M F E AT U R E

Performing Arts

T h e Co n c e r t C h o i r’s En g l a n d /S c o t l a n d to u r in 2 022 fe a t u re d p e r fo r m a n c e s in h i s to r i c v e n u e s s u c h a s E l y Ca t h e d ra l , Lin c o l n Ca t h e d ra l , S t . G i l e s Ca t h e d ra l , S e l b y A b b e y a n d Un i v e rs i t y C h u rc h o f S t . Ma r y t h e V i rg in - O x fo rd .

Concert Choir, conducted by Director of Choral Studies Dr. Anthony Maglione, has released three CDs, placed second in The American Prize in Choral Performance College/University Division two times and performed at state and national conferences. Expert voice faculty have helped students place in competitions such as National Association of Teachers of Singing and Classical Singer, and last summer students coached by Professor Emeritus

Je w e l l T h e a t re Co m p a n y c a s t a n d c re w f ro m S h a k e s p e a re’s “A Mi d s u m m e r Nig h t’s D re a m”

Dr. Ron Witzke were selected for prestigious young artist opera programs in Hawaii, Idaho and Texas. Jewell choirs have an active performance schedule, appearing with greats such as Canadian Brass, The King’s Singers, American Spiritual Ensemble and The Boston Camerata in addition to local collaborations with Youth Chorus of Kansas City, Friends of Chamber Music and Kansas City Civic Orchestra, to name a few. In 2015 Maglione founded

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piece was the first collaboration of composers and performers bringing together the rich heritages of African American and Orthodox sacred music.

the unique ensemble Cardinalis that pairs Jewell

Along with new collaborations, choirs continue

Choral Scholars in one-on-one apprenticeships with

longstanding traditions such as The City Come

professional singers for high-level performances.

Again holiday performance at Grace and Holy

In one of the most moving performances to date,

Trinity Cathedral and the triennial England and

Cardinalis joined Ordained gospel choir in “Canon

Scotland tour established in 1985 by department

for Racial Reconciliation,” commissioned by Jewell

chair Dr. Don Brown and longtime choral conductor

and written by Isaac Cates and Nicholas Reeves. The

Dr. Arnold Epley, both emeritus professors.

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


THEATRE AND DANCE

Greatly evolved from the Dramatics Club of the 1920s, theatre and dance is a robust academic and co-curricular program. Theatre, musical theatre and speech/theatre education majors along with a certificate in ballroom dance expose students to techniques from classical to contemporary. Evidenced by the success of numerous alumni around the globe, the program effectively prepares young artists for graduate study or careers such as teaching, film, performance, design, production D r. A r n o l d Ep l e y, D r. An t h o n y Ma g l i o n e a n d D r. D o n B ro w n c o n d u c te d t h e s t u d e n ta l u m n i c h o i r a t Ho m e c o m in g C h a p e l .

and administration. Professor Nathan Wyman, ’95, now the director of theatre and dance and producing director of theatre, joined the Jewell faculty in 1998 and took over the program when longtime professor Dr. Kim Harris retired in 2012. In choosing the fall and spring productions each year, Wyman ensures a wide genre of plays, from Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” last year to this spring’s Broadway hit musical, “Head Over Heels,” set in medieval times to eighties music by The Go-Go’s. This fall’s inaugural Play in a Day festival challenged students to present staged readings one day after receiving a scene assignment. They also learned that improvisation applies beyond a course in the catalog: when the pandemic paused live theatre, faculty pivoted, teaching filmmaking techniques for a student multimedia production of George Orwell’s “1984.” The Garnett Peters Endowment ensures students are using the industry standard in scenery, costume, sound and lighting technologies, and the theater spaces are outfitted with nearly any tool needed to construct sets or costumes and engineer other parts of productions. In addition to the 220-seat Garnett Peters Theater, a new black box studio theater was

Ho m e c o m i n g p e p ra l l y w i t h Ca rd i n a l S o u n d

formed in 2020, serving as a creative laboratory with flexible space for student-produced work.

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P R O G R A M F E AT U R E

Performing Arts

GRADUATE-LEVEL PROGRAMS

With a growing reputation for producing talent, Jewell now offers two graduate-level programs for budding artists. In its fourth year, the Artist Diploma in Voice bridges academia and the professional world. Grammy-winning baritone

T h e a t re’s re c e n t p ro d u c t i o n o f “ T h e S e c re t in t h e W i n g s” i n Pe te r s T h e a te r

Daniel Belcher, ’92, built and directed the program for three years, handing over the reins this summer to co-directors Joanna Ruszala and Matthew Haney. The program’s first production was Mozart’s “Cosi Fan Tutte,” inventively set on Jewell’s outdoor

Summer Programs and Festivals in opera companies around the country as well as professional

Trotter Arts Plaza in fall 2020 when the pandemic

engagements in opera theaters.

had silenced the rest of the arts world. Last year the

New this fall, the Artist Certificate in Choral

program collaborated with Kansas City Chamber

Conducting is a one-year intensive program

Orchestra, under the direction of Bruce Sorrell, ’83,

that trains artists for doctoral degrees and

at the Folly Theater. Students in the highly selective

professional conducting engagements. Program

two-year program have won multiple prizes at the

Director Dr. Anthony Maglione is assisted by

district level of the Metropolitan Opera Laffont

visiting artist Dr. James Jordan, who is a Grammy-

Competition and have been selected for Resident

nominated conductor, and a cast of renowned

Artist Programs, Apprentice Artist Programs, and

supporting faculty.

Ar t i s t D i p l o m a s t u d e n t s i n Ju l e s Ma s s e n e t’s o p e ra , “ We r t h e r”

SUPPORT OUR THRIVING

PERFORMING ARTS PROGRAM

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WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


FAC U LT Y P R O F I L ES

Jewell welcomes new full-time faculty DR. AMY BARTH

JENNIFER RYAN

Associate Professor of Education

Assistant Professor of Nursing

Ph.D., University of Kansas

M.S., University of Central Missouri

RAECHEL BLADES

DR. LEA SKELTON

Instructor of Nursing

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering

M.S., Pittsburg (Kansas) State University

Ph.D., University of Alabama

MEGAN GRONINGER, ’11

DR. JACE’KARMON THOMAS

Assistant Professor of History

Assistant Professor of Education

Ph.D., Florida State University

Ed.D., University of Kansas

MATTHEW HANEY

DR. CORY WASHINGTON

Department of Performing Arts

Assistant Professor of Psychological Science

M.M., University of Missouri-Kansas City

Ph.D., University of Kansas

DR. MAHSA HOSSEINI

SAVAUGHN WILLIAMS

Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Assistant Professor of Communication

Ph.D., Université du Littoral Cote d’Opale

M.A., Ball State University

DR. DANIEL KOTZIN

DR. HILARY WRIGHT

Professor of History and Chair

Assistant Professor of Marketing

Ph.D., New York University

D.B.A., Creighton University

JACQUELINE LAND Assistant Professor of Digital Media Communication M.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison

DR. GE ZHU Assistant Professor of Communication Ph.D., University of Iowa

DR. JOANNA RUSZALA Department of Performing Arts M.M., Karol Szymanowski Silesian University

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ALUMNI VOICES

UNDER THE K ANSAS Illuminating the possibilities Q

WH AT S T AN DS O U T ABO U T Y O U R J E WE LL J O U R N E Y?

A

Jewell provided a constructive environment for me to experiment with my artistic process. Administrators, faculty (both theatre and nontheatre) and alumni all contributed by connecting me to resources for advanced learning opportunities and trusting my creative input as I finessed my eye for design. That collaborative spirit challenged my idea of a singular, “right” way and illuminated the possibilities of how the process could be.

Z o e S p a n g l e r, ’1 8

Q

H O W DO Y O U AP P R O ACH A N E W P R O J E CT ?

A

Every theatre design process is an ongoing negotiation of needs. The script is your origin and these needs center on the creative impulse of the text. It is your responsibility to ensure the design blends well with the work of the rest of the design team. A designer’s work truly begins only after all the lights are hung and ready. It is only in the moment with everything as it is supposed to be that finally, the design takes form.

Q

J E WE LL H E LP S S T U DE N T S P U R S U E T H E IR P AS S IO N AND

Zoe Spangler, ’18, is a technical director and lighting technician with credits as a lighting and projections designer for Jewell theatre and music productions as well as KC Aerial Arts, Kansas City Actors Theatre, Heart of America Shakespeare Festival, Unicorn Theatre, Johnson County Community College Department of Theatre and UMKC Conservatory. She holds a theatre degree from Jewell and an MFA in Lighting and Projection Design and Technology from UMKC.

w w w. z m s p a n g l e r.c o m

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WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

P U R P O S E . IT S E E M S Y O U ’ VE F O U N D Y O U R S ? A

I was interested in lighting design as a high schooler but didn’t have a clear idea how it could be a viable career path. I arrived at Jewell with the intention of learning stage management—I thought that was less of a “long shot.” However, Jewell helped me find the confidence I needed to take a risk. Working backstage and technical design is the love I share. Every project is like starting over—new collaborators, new challenges, new objectives. I don’t think I’ll ever have enough of it. Projects that excite me the most are the ones that involve collaborative effort between designer and performer. I gravitate to a lot of dance and circus productions. Movement artists like aerialists and dancers seem to respond to lighting like they always knew what it was supposed to be. I’m working for a fantastic aerialist studio where my designs are a valued part of the process—it is a dream come true.


CITY LIGHTS

Meet t wo yo ung th ea t re a l umn i ga i n i ng re co g ni t i o n a s f ul l -t i me a rt i s t s

Making his voice heard Q

H O W D I D J E WE LL T H E AT R E P R E P AR E Y O U ?

A

Professor Nathan Wyman and Dr. Chris McCoy gave me a platform to explore my ability as an artist, but also to explore other possibilities in the arts… being a producer, writing plays, culture representations on stage. Without their belief and support, I wouldn’t be the professional I am today.

Q

W H A T H AS BE E N A S T AN DO U T M O M E N T IN Y O U R CAR E E R ?

A

I received a Crescendo Award through Theatre Community Fund of Kansas City, co-produced at The Arts Asylum, that produces new work from underrepresented artists. This grant gave me the opportunity to explore playwriting and producing and to direct my play, “Black Man, MO” [Missouri], a story about the ongoing violence in Kansas City presented from a mother’s point of view after the loss of her teenage son from police brutality. It’s not an easy business but what makes it worth the journey is the passion and hunger of starving artists who’ll put in the effort and time to make their voices heard through their craft.

Q

W H A T I S Y O U R BIG DR E AM ?

A

I want to start my own entertainment company in Kansas City for Theatre, motion picture, television, music, art galleries, etc. Right now I’m continuing to grow as I'm still acting in the city, but I want to build an empire for myself and all artists who have a voice and want to showcase it versus waiting for Hollywood or Broadway to pick up their scripts and start investing.

Q

H O W D O Y O U S E E T H E AT R E CO N T R IBU T IN G T O S O CIE T Y

Te r ra c e Wy a t t , Jr., ’ 2 0

Theatre major Terrace Wyatt, Jr., ’20, has performed on most of the stages in Kansas City, living his dream as a full-time actor, playwright and producer. Some of his performance credits include “A Charlie Brown Christmas” (The Coterie Theatre), “Dreamgirls” (New Theatre & Restaurant), “Peter Pan and Wendy” (KC Rep), “A Raisin in the Sun” (The Black Repertory Theatre of Kansas City; co-produced with The White Theatre at the J), “Titanic: The Musical” and “Camelot” (Music Theater Heritage), “Toni Stone” (The Unicorn Theatre), Smart People (Kansas City Actors Theatre) and The Grapes of Wrath (The Arts Asylum).

A N D S O CIAL CH AN GE ? A

Theatre is the wake-up call; a mirror you could possibly see your reflection in that tells something about yourself you haven’t noticed. This art form is an opportunity to not only show your mad hunger for creativity, but also to express your thoughts about the reality we live in; life itself is how we tell our stories.

w w w.in stagram .com/ter race w yatt.jr w w w.facebo ok.com/ter race w yattjr

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ALUMNI VOICES

M e e t t w o e m e rg i n g a r t i s t s i n v o c a l p e r fo r m a n c e

A “breakout artist” (Boston Globe) with “a voice that is theater itself” (Classique News)

Q

WH Y AR E Y O U DR AWN T O O P E R A P E R F O R M ANC E?

A

To pull it off, you have to really give it your all: it takes discipline to learn roles, flexibility to respond to the ideas of music staff, a dramatic instinct and shedding of inhibition to try things out in rehearsals, and nerves of steel to do it all in a funny wig and heels in front of a live audience. But really there is so much incredible music that I love to sing for different reasons. I love performing art songs, especially with my husband. As a soprano-piano duo, there is a vast world of repertoire to explore.

Q

WH AT AR E S O M E CH ALLE N GE S AS A

Ha n n a h D e P r i e s t, ’1 3

P E R F O R M IN G AR T IS T ?

Oxbridge music major Hannah

A

There is a lot about being a singer that feels surreal, even contradictory. To be an artist you need to remain vulnerable and open; you must allow yourself to feel things very deeply. At the same time, you face a lot of rejection, quite candid feedback about everything from your repertoire choices to your outfit, and you’re often performing far from your home and support system. To endure the stress, you must protect yourself and develop psychological armor.

Q

H O W DID J E WE LL H E LP P R E P AR E Y O U F O R A

De Priest, ’13, is a lyric soprano equally at home on the opera stage and in chamber music, especially renowned for her Baroque repertoire. Recent credits include her Kennedy Center debut, European debut at the Innsbruck Early Music Festival and multiple productions with Boston Early Music Festival. Debuts this season include role and house debuts with Chicago Opera Theater, Atlanta Baroque Orchestra and Haymarket Opera. Among her recent honors is 2nd Prize at the International Cesti Competition for Baroque Singing. In 2024 the Chicago resident will record her debut album, tackle her first title role (Dido in Purcell’s “Dido & Aeneas” with Atlanta Baroque Orchestra), and sing Mary Magdalene in Handel’s “La Resurrezione.” w w w.h a n n a h d e p r i e s t .c o m

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WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

F U LL- T IM E CAR E E R IN P E R F O R M AN CE ? A

I had such a fantastic education at Jewell. I was truly mentored by Dr. [Anthony] Maglione, and I’m grateful for many professors who saw something in me but never imposed limits on me— they simply encouraged me to work hard and keep pushing. My junior year at Cambridge University exposed me to a whole new pace of music making, singing in chapel choir and tours to Dubai, Austria, and the West Coast. Looking back, it wasn’t just my time on stage and in rehearsals that shaped me; the literature, philosophy, religion, and history courses I took at Jewell expanded my mind.


Finding a greater purpose Q

DO YOUR CAREER AND SUCCESS EVER SEEM SURREAL?

A

I think the most surreal moments are when I get to see my work from the other side or others see my work and tell me about it. I just finished a feature film starring Anne Hathaway, Peter Dinklage and Marisa Tomei called “She Came to Me” directed by Rebecca Miller. Hanging out with Anne at our premiere party was certainly a pinch-me moment. Another one is being publicly awarded for my work. I now have four Grammy nominations and two wins for my work as a soloist, and I’m just as taken aback with each new accolade.

Q

W H A T R O LE S H AVE BE E N T H E M O S T M E AN IN GF U L?

A

“Blind Injustice” by Scott Davenport Richards is by far the most important opera I’ve ever gotten to be a part of. I have always believed my purpose was far greater than just singing pretty songs. Telling the story of Laurese Glover, a 16-yearold falsely convicted of murder, was the perfect way to make the best difference I can to continue reform of our criminal justice system. Using my voice to effect change will never get old. Another story I’m proud to tell is “X: The Life and Times of Malcolm X” by Anthony Davis.

Q

WHAT STANDS OUT ABOUT YOUR JEWELL EXPERIENCE?

A

When they say it takes a village, they must’ve been talking about me. Everyone I crossed paths with helped me to be a better version of myself. I took complete advantage of every opportunity afforded to me, whether it was a night at the Kansas City Symphony, Lyric Opera or seeing my favorite singers and dancers on the Harriman-Jewell Series. My time at Jewell set the foundation for my professional successes, and I use the tools given to me by my educators every single day.

D a v i d Mo rg a n s , ’14

A proud Kansas Citian, David Morgans, ’14, is a tenor based out of New York City. He made his Metropolitan Opera debut in 2019 in “The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess,” where he’s returned as a soloist every season since. Morgans has been a resident artist at Portland Opera, an apprentice artist with Sarasota Opera and Des Moines Metro Opera and appeared at Lincoln Center Theater and New York City Opera. This fall he’s singing the role of Ally in “X: The Life and Times of Malcolm X” at the Met; next up is “Gianni Schicchi” with Bronx Opera and “Eugene Onegin” with Opera Baltimore. He earned a B.S. in Vocal Performance at Jewell and a Master of Opera Performance from UMKC.

w w w.hunkentenor.com Facebo ok and In stagram: HunkenTenor

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Jewell joined hundreds of colleges across the country—and most of the schools in our GLVC conference—by adding an esports program. Students have the opportunity to play in both competitive and more casual settings as a part of the program and are enjoying our new esports center in Yates-Gill College Union. Esports student-athletes can earn up to $3,500 in scholarships per year in addition to other merit and need-based aid.

MEET THE COACH

JEWELL ESPORTS

VA LUE S

TEAMWORK SPORTSMANSHIP CRITICAL THINKING GROWTH MINDSET

Conon “EF5 Albino” Gillis has been a lifelong gamer, competing in several regional and national championships, winning a worldwide tournament and representing multiple sponsored U.S. gaming organizations. Now a member of Jewell’s Admission team, Gillis taught high school social studies for 10 years and

FOR MORE INFO AND AN INTEREST FORM, VISIT

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WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

coached an esports team across multiple titles.


CA R D I N A L AT H L E T I C S

Ne w Co a c h i n g S ta f f K Y L E Y B A C HA N D h e a d w o m e n’s b a s k e t b a l l c o a c h

Kyley (Simmons) Bachand joined the Cardinals in June from Colorado State University where she spent two seasons as an assistant coach, helping the Rams to a WNIT appearance and mentoring the first All-American in two decades. At Eastern Illinois she assisted with the best two-year turnaround in the NCAA, while at Sioux Falls (South Dakota), she helped guide the Cougars to the conference tournament final and was a Women’s Basketball Coaches’ Association 30 Under 30 honoree. She also made a stop at Southern Methodist. As a player, Bachand spent two years at Missouri where she was an All-Big 12 Freshman Team honoree and the only player to start every game with a team high 36.2 minutes per game. In her final two seasons at Illinois, she started all 60 games, received the 2015 Big Ten Sportsmanship Award and averaged 11 points per night. Bachand earned her bachelor’s degree in communication and a master’s in recreation, sport and tourism, both from Illinois.

J IL L B R OWN d i re c to r o f a t h l e t i c p e r fo r m a n c e

Jill Brown rejoined Jewell this summer as director of athletic performance, making her one of only eight women nationally to lead a Division II athletic performance program that includes football (169 schools). Brown was at Jewell from 2018-2021 as a graduate assistant then as assistant athletic performance coach. In 2021, she accepted a position at Luther College (Iowa) as the assistant athletic performance coach and was promoted to co-director the following year. During the last year, she has directed the training of the Norse 21 teams, which included six conference titles along with six teams and five individuals who advanced to their respective NCAA DIII National Championships. A native of Elkhart, Indiana, she was an All-Conference volleyball player at Ancilla College before completing her career as a two-year starter at libero at Mississippi College (NCAA-II). Brown has a bachelor’s degree in exercise science and a master’s from Concordia University Chicago.

S E A N D U N S T ON h e a d p o w e rl i f t in g c o a c h

This summer Sean Dunston took over Jewell’s powerlifting program that sent 10 athletes to the USA Powerlifting Collegiate National Championships last year. Dunston comes to The Hill after five years at Kansas City Barbell while also serving as the Missouri USA Powerlifting state chair. He previously spent five years as the director of programming, head coach and founder of Mount Vernon CrossFit in Virginia. In addition, he served as the state chair, responsible for doubling the Virginia membership and referee pool. As a powerlifting competitor for more than 15 years, Dunston won four gold medals in international competition as a member of Team USA, won a 2017 Equipped National Championship and holds numerous state and American records. The Carmel, California, native has an undergraduate degree from UC Santa Barbara along with a juris doctor from the University of Pacific. He spent a decade practicing law, with a focus on estates and trusts.

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CA R D I N A L AT H L E T I C S

E M ILY K E Y h e a d w o m e n’s s o c c e r c o a c h

Emily Key has taken the reins of the women’s soccer program, coming to Jewell from NAIA Avila University where she served as an assistant coach for four years. During her time at Avila, Key helped the Eagles to a third-place finish in the Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference and an appearance in the KCAC Tournament semifinals. She mentored 20 All-Conference student-athletes during her tenure. Key also was head coach of the Kansas Olympic Development Program, director of the Junior Program for Kansas through the Kansas City Scott Gallagher Soccer Club and assistant coach for three seasons at Shawnee Mission (Kansas) South High School. A native of Wolverhampton, England, Key was a three-time All-American Midwest Conference student-athlete at Park University, earning Conference Player of the Year and NAIA Honorable Mention All-America honors during her senior season in 2016. She played professionally in Iceland and semi-pro for the KC Courage UWS and KC Courage WPSL. She holds a master’s degree from Avila.

D E S IR E E R A M O S h e a d w o m e n’s w re s t l in g c o a c h

Desiree Ramos inherited a nationally ranked team and sent one to the national championships in her first season. While Ramos hails from California, she spent her collegiate career in the Show-Me State at Missouri Baptist University where she earned a bachelor’s in health and exercise science and a master’s in business administration. For the last five years, she served as head coach of Somar Wrestling Club, leading the program to three consecutive California freestyle state championships. In 2021, the team competed in the USA Wrestling Showcase National Championship, winning by more than 100 points with every wrestler placing no lower than third and two wrestlers claiming individual championships. She also spent three years at Cerritos High School (California) where she mentored state placers in each season. In her tenure, Ramos has coached 28 All-Americans, 42 state placers, nine high school national finalists, three collegiate All-Americans, four Pan-American champions and one World Team member.

R AY S HAWN WA L KER h e a d c ro s s c o u n t r y, t ra c k a n d f i e l d c o a c h

Rayshawn Walker was named head coach after three seasons as assistant coach. He mentored three track and field conference champions and sent two student-athletes to the DII Outdoor National Championships, with one earning All-America honors. Prior to Jewell, Walker served as the cross country and distance coach and recruiting coordinator at NCAA DI University of Arkansas-Little Rock where he mentored the 2019 Sun Belt Conference champion in the men’s indoor mile. He also coached the women’s champions in the 800 meters, the 3,000 steeple and the 400 meters. As an assistant at NCAA DI Abilene Christian (Texas), he helped coach six individual conference champions, and the conference cross country championship team and the women’s track champion in four events. Walker graduated from Notre Dame College (Ohio) where he was a NAIA national qualifier in the 4x800 relay and the 800 meters. A year later, he completed a master’s in kinesiology, sports recreation and management from Hardin-Simmons University (Texas).

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WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


JEWELL LAUNCHES LACROSSE K A L L IE M U C K

MEET THE COACHES

h e a d w o m e n’s c o a c h

Kallie Muck joined Jewell from University of Saint Mary (Kansas) where she spent one year as the head coach. She had eight players named Scholar-Athletes and the team won the Conference Champions of Character Award. Muck earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from NCAA DI Liberty University (Virginia) where she held the lacrosse program record for starts with 74 and finished her career in the top-10 in program history in nine areas. She served as the women’s lacrosse director for the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, coaching multiple national teams before moving to Kansas City. As the head coach for Blue Valley High School (Kansas), she helped the women’s varsity team to an undefeated season and a conference championship. She also was the director and head coach of Midwest Top Gun program and served as a director for KC Elevate Lacrosse.

In early 2022, Jewell announced the addition of men’s and women’s lacrosse as the 23th and 24th varsity sports. NCAA II competition begins in 2023-24. Six members of the Great Lakes Valley Conference compete in both men’s and women’s lacrosse, and one hosts a women’s program while two other schools are associate conference members for the sport. Lacrosse is one of the fastest growing sports in the United States with more than 213,000 competitors at the high school level. Jewell will become the seventh varsity collegiate program in the state of Missouri on the men’s side and the ninth women’s program, joining nearly 200 programs in NCAA Division II.

RYA N B U RKE h e a d m e n’s c o a c h

Burke comes to the Cardinals from the University of Montevallo (Alabama) where he was an assistant coach for the conference championship team. A native of Virginia Beach, he holds a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice and a master’s in sports business, both from Saint Leo University (Florida). He was a four-year midfielder and team captain, then started his coaching career at Saint Leo with five seasons as a recruiter and offensive coordinator. He helped lead the Lions to a conference championship and national title game appearance while mentoring three USILA All-Americans. In Kentucky, he was a volunteer assistant at Bellarmine University and a head coach and recruiting coordinator for L4 Lacrosse. In 2019, he was the program director for SweetLax Florida where he oversaw the startup of the Tampa Regional program and was a national coach for a top-10 ranked team.

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CA R D I N A L AT H L E T I C S

FIELD FACELIFTS The four fields that make up the Spratt Sports Complex received a significant upgrade with the addition of synthetic turf and lighting. Cardinal Field and the Talley Stadium at Fred Flook Field were completed with Double Play FieldTurf, designed specifically for baseball and softball with the intention to create the best results of the ball-surface interaction, speed and consistency. Baseball also received new fencing, and the bullpen was moved just outside the left field wall. The two former grass practice fields for soccer and lacrosse were completed with Prestige XT FieldTurf. Jewell partnered with Mammoth Sports Construction for the projects, which are part of a major investment by the College in facilities infrastructure. The enhancements also link to long-term strategic plans as turf fields significantly decrease the annual maintenance costs of natural grass and create revenue for the College through rental opportunities. Student-athletes are missing fewer classes with the addition of lights to all the fields which expands scheduling options for practices and games. Other sports teams are positively impacted as well with decreased programming demands and use of the Norris Patterson Field in Greene Stadium.

PH OTOS PROVI D ED BY

TECHLINE SPORTS LIGHTING

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WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


Legacies on H o l l e y Co u r t A y d e n , Tr e y a n d Bree Shannon

The Shannon siblings, former Wellington-Napoleon High School Tigers, sport the same jerseys again as Jewell Cardinal basketball players. Back for his fifth year, Trey is a business administration major and twins Ayden and Bree are sophomores. Their

In their first season as Cardinals, Bree and Shannon

mom, Jobie (Jeffries) Shannon, ’98, was a four-year

pitched in for nearly 500 season points, both

Cardinal player and All-Heart of America Athletic

scoring season-high 19 points in multiple games.

Conference Honorable Mention.

In his career as a Cardinal, Trey is a multiple

Perhaps the Cardinal connections are why Ayden says Jewell felt like a second home to her when she visited campus, and Bree thought the team had a family feel as soon as she met the players

Academic All-GLVC honoree, scoring more than 400 points. He had a career-best 20-point game as a junior and finished that season with the team’s highest free-throw percentage at 87 percent.

and coaches. In high school, the women earned

“We have always had a great support system,”

multiple All-State honors in basketball, volleyball

said Trey, “so it is great seeing our parents in the

and softball and helped lead their basketball and

stands every night together rather than being split

softball teams to Missouri Class 2 state titles. Trey

up chasing us around the Midwest. It also is easier

also was a standout four-sport athlete, earning All-

for my sisters and me to support each other as we

State basketball honors playing under his father,

get to see each other on and off the court every

Missouri Basketball Coaches Association Hall of

day. Knowing that you don’t see this very often

Fame member Todd Shannon. All three siblings are

creates a very humbling experience for us three

on the school-record board for track.

on The Hill.”

For the fourth consecutive year and the eighth time in Jewell’s 11 years as an NCAA member, the Cardinals were named to the President’s Award for Academic Excellence. They joined 43 other Division II schools that achieved a fouryear (2012-2015) Academic Success Rate of 90 percent or higher. Jewell posted a 91 percent ASR. The NCAA and the federal government measure time to graduate within a sixyear window of first-time enrollment, so graduation rates for the 2012-2015 cohorts were reported from 2019 to 2022.

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CA R D I N A L AT H L E T I C S

Jewell celebrated Cardinal athletes and coaches at the 2022 Athletic Hall of Fame Induc tion Ceremony.

50 Ye ars o f Wo m e n’s S p o r ts The 2022-2023 academic year marked the 50th year of women’s varsity sports at Jewell and the 50th anniversary of Title IX of the Education Amendments. For women, the passage of this landmark act meant equal opportunities in all aspects of education, including sports. The first Cardinal varsity teams—basketball, volleyball, swimming, tennis and field hockey—are still offered with the exception of field hockey. Today, the College also offers women-athletes cross country, golf, lacrosse, powerlifting, soccer, softball, track and field, and wrestling. Jewell celebrated the growth and accomplishments of women’s athletics throughout

30

2 0 2 2 IN DU CTEES SALLY MERRELL O’QUINN, ’81 b a s k e t b a l l , t ra c k & f i e l d S TEFANIE C ARSON SIMS, ’04 soccer S TAC Y MC ALE X ANDER DRY ER , ’06 basketball NIK K I CHAMBERS ME ARS, ’11 te n n i s A JOK DENG, ’12 c ro s s c o u n t r y 1981 VOLLE Y BALL TE AM

the year, headlined by an all-women’s Athletic Hall of

20 05 BA SK E TBALL TE AM

Fame class.

2010 SOCCER TE AM

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


SPIRITUAL EXPLORATION THROUGH PERSONAL FLOURISHING CLASSES Courses are open to the Jewell community

REGISTER NOW:

Personal Flourishing classes focus on faith as it relates to literature, science, politics, the arts, music, health, finance, biblical studies and more.

The Center for Faith and Culture offers 18 courses this year. See the descriptions and faculty bios: »j e w e l l .e d u /fa i t h- c l a s s e s

Courses are taught by Jewell faculty and local pastors on campus and at local partner congregations, with some virtual offerings. Most courses meet four times, with master classes meeting once.

NEW CHRISTIAN FELLOWS PROGRAM $3,000 – $7,500 scholarships, renewable for up to 4 years

The Center for Faith and Culture challenges students to examine what a life of flourishing might look like in relation to their major, future profession and life’s calling. The Center is building a team of Fellows to take part in small groups, service-learning and student-led worship in addition to worship leaders to lead music during services. R E A D M O R E : j e w e l l .e d u /f l o u r i s h i n g -fe l l o w s h i p s

Re v. Melissa Br yson D o wling, ’0 6

If you know prospective students who would be a good fit for

COLLEGE CHAPL AIN

this program, please share their names at jewell.edu/refer.

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CL ASS NOTES

News

C l as s Notes

D R . M U R R A Y J E N N E X , ’ 7 8 , made

the Stanford/Elsevier’s list of the top 2 percent of scientists in the world for the fourth year. He is

1960s

DR. OLLIE MALONE, JR., ’75,

returned to his primary occupation as president of Olive Tree Associ-

L A R R Y M A T T H E W S , ’ 6 5 , rep-

resents Jewell’s Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity Chapter in the Order of Merit, the international fraternity’s highest alumni award. He is one of four men from Jewell in the Order, joining D R . R I C H A R D H A R R I M A N ,

a clinical professor of computer information systems at West Texas A&M.

ates, the organizational consulting

D A L E L A B U A R Y , ’ 7 9 , was

firm he founded in 1993. He is the

inducted into the 2022 Missouri

former vice president of human

Sports Hall of Fame for 27 years

resources at Dallas-Fort Worth

as football coach at Monroe

International Airport.

City High School, including two

SARAH (GAMBILL) TIPTON, ’75,

self-published “Finding Truth in

state championships and two runner-up titles.

a World Full of Lies” formatted

J E F F R O S S , ’ 7 9 , released “Next

as a 10-week Bible study. She is a

Step Devotions,” a book of

than 400 men of the more than

retired pharmacist.

discipleship lessons on New

300,000 initiated members have

K A T H Y ( H U S T O N ) W I E B E , ’ 7 5 , is

ever been recognized in Lambda

director of marketing at Barclay

Chi’s Order of Merit.

College in Haviland, Kansas, and

’ 5 3 , W A L T E R H O L T , ’ 8 2 , and C H R I S T O P H E R L E A V E R , ’ 9 4 . Less

Testament passages.

manages marketing and advertising for her family’s business.

1970s

S T E V E W I L S O N , ’ 7 5 , is president

of Marriage Matters Now ministry. D R . S T E P H E N J O N E S , ’ 7 0 , is

and executive director of A Seat at

of Kansas City and published two

the Table which provides mentor-

and Courage in a Civil War Pastor” and “Learning Jesus.” LINDA (BOSWELL) TRAGESSER, ’ 7 0 , was appointed executive

director at Southwest Illinois Metropolitan and Regional Planning Commission.

32

B O B S T E R G O S , ’ 7 7 , is cofounder

co-pastor of First Baptist Church books last year: “Galusha, Crisis

1980s

ing and community resources in a Christian environment for at-risk young adults. THE HONORABLE STEPHEN H E M P H I L L , ’ 7 8 , was

awarded Jewell’s honorary Doctor of Humane Letters. Retired from

R O B I N ( C O X ) A N K R O M , ’ 8 0 , is

in her 44th and final year of teaching elementary music at Falls City (Nebraska) Public Schools. DR. DANA (MATHANY) B L A L O C K , ’ 8 1 , is a dentist and

owner/founder of Sleep Better South Carolina.

the State Department, he

D R . J E F F B U S C H E R , ’ 8 1 , received

CHARLEEN (SHEPARD) AYERS,

continues to travel the globe in

the Central Baptist Theological

’ 7 4 , is still performing as a

support of Jewell students and

Seminary Alumni Award for

singer/actress and teaching

organizations promoting peace-

Ministry Excellence. He serves as

voice at Friends University in

building, human rights and

community impact coordinator for

Wichita, Kansas.

international relations.

United Way in Helena, Montana.

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


C H R I S H U N T E R , ’ 8 1 , is principal

L I S A E S S I G , ’ 8 9 , was among 10

of Cornerstone Business Solutions

Fred L. Turner Golden Arch Award

after a career in international

U.S. recipients for 2022. This

electric utility and mining finance.

is the highest recognition for a

B Y R O N M O T L E Y , ’ 8 1 , produced

McDonald’s franchisee.

BOARD OF GOVERNORS ALU M N I S E RVI CE AWARDS

“The League” documentary about

KIMBERLY (BERNARD) GREBNER,

the history of the Negro Baseball

’ 8 9 , is a supervisor with Missouri

Leagues. It was accepted into

STAT, a special victims unit

the Tribeca Film Festival and

investigating crimes against

was released in theaters and to

children. She has been assigned

streaming platforms in 2023.

to an FBI Child Exploitation

Dr. Ronilue Beery Garrison, ’63

Task Force and to the St. Joseph

Jo h n F. Tr u e x Aw a rd fo r Li fe t i m e S e r v i c e

HOLLEY (POWELL) SMOTHERS, ’ 8 1 , is a National Board Certified

Resident Agency office.

2 022 R EC I PI E N T S John Gill, ’79 D i s t in g u i s h e d A l u m n i S e r v i c e Aw a rd

Dr. Cecelia Robinson Ho n o ra r y A l u m n i Aw a rd

Teacher and works for Pearson.

D O U G P E R R Y , ’ 8 9 , founded

She also owns a business to help

Fellowship of the Martyrs as well

people live a healthy lifestyle as

as the Liberty Disaster Relief to

they age.

care for needs in the community.

David Alonzo, ’76

He has written eight books and

D i s t in g u i s h e d A l u m n i S e r v i c e Aw a rd

J E A N E T T E M E Y E R , ’ 8 3 , was

awarded the highest level of service achievement in the real estate

posted nearly 2,000 videos on YouTube.

2 023 H O N O R E E S

Bill Dreyer, ’60 Jo h n F. Tr u e x Aw a rd fo r Li fe t i m e S e r v i c e

industry, Quality Service Certi-

Susan Tideman

fied ® Platinum, for the 17th year.

Ho n o ra r y A l u m n i Aw a rd

D R . B R A D C A R T E R , ’ 8 5 , was

named associate provost for outreach and engagement at the U.S. Naval War College in

1990s

Rhode Island. THE HONORABLE GARY

DR. SUSAN CHAMBERS,

Employee of the Year for his contri-

chief judge of the Mis-

’ 9 0 , the retired executive

butions as a Calming and Recovery

souri Court of Appeals,

vice president and chief

Environment teacher. He published

Western District. He was

people officer for Walmart

his ninth book, “The Feeling is

appointed to the Western District

Inc., received Jewell’s honorary

Bright: Self-Regulation Through

in 2010.

Doctor of Humane Letters. She

Rhythm and Rhyme.”

W I T T , ’87, was elected

J O H N T W E E D D A L E , ’ 8 8 , was

named a top 50 OUTstanding global executive ally by Yahoo! finance and INvolve. He is a senior

mentors women entrepreneurs in Africa, speaks on culture and community building, and leads nonprofits and educational boards.

J I M R I C H E R S O N , ’ 9 0 , captained

the U.S. team that won the 2022 Women’s PGA Cup. He was elected PGA president in 2020 and serves

vice president with Pearson and

ROB LEYTHAM, ’90,

as general manager of The Riviera

is on the Greater Boston PFLAG

was named the

Country Club and The Riviera Tennis

Board of Directors.

Liberty Schools Support

Club in Pacific Palisades, California.

FA L L 2023

33


CL ASS NOTES

News

ANGE (MCMULLIN) RUSH, ’90,

D R . K A R E N S E A T , ’ 9 2 , received

Order of Merit award for service at

has worked for Sun Life (previously

the inaugural University of Arizona’s

the local chapter level.

Assurant Employee Benefits and

Distinguished Head/Director’s

Fortis Benefits) for 25 years, cur-

Award and was conferred the title

T O D D B A R T O N , ’ 9 5 , celebrated

rently in knowledge management.

Distinguished Scholar. She is head of

D R . B R I A N S T I L L , ’ 9 0 , is the vice

provost for online learning at Texas

the Department of Religious Studies and Classics.

Tech University. He previously

W A R N E R B A I L E Y , ’ 9 3 , is in his

served as interim dean of the

12th year with the Boonville School

College of Arts and Sciences and

District as the choir teacher for

chair of English.

grades 6-12.

SHARA (CLEVENGER) BRICE, ’91,

B I L B R O W N , ’ 9 4 , is the creative and

of Shawnee, Kansas, is the executive

digital specialist at Liberty Hospital.

director of Gift of Life. B I L L P E T E R S , ’ 9 1 , was named

five years as minister of music at First Christian Church of Kearney. L E S A M A R S H A L L , ’ 9 5 , is a nurse on

the Cardio Progressive Care Unit at University of Kansas Health System. ANDREA BRANDES NEWSOM, ’95,

was named senior associate general counsel at Indiana University. J E R R Y N I X O N , ’ 9 5 , is a senior

product manager for Microsoft

C H R I S L E A V E R , ’ 9 4 , received

and teaches computer science at

the prestigious Lambda Chi Alpha

Colorado Christian University.

director of senior adult ministries at Fellowship of Wildwood Church. KRISTEN (FAIRLIE) SMARR, ’91,

returned to her position as associate vice chancellor for communications and marketing at University of Missouri after serving nearly a year as interim vice chancellor and chief marketing and communications officer for the MU System. KRISTI SOLIGO FLESHMAN, ’91,

has been selling real estate in the Kansas City area more than 25 years. D R . S H A N N O N C A T E , ’ 9 2 , teaches

English at the Ready Program, the Illinois Region 9 alternative school. She continues editing translations

The 2022 Distinguished Alumni

M. Tyler Griffin, ’01, Healthcare IT Executive and Strategic Advisor

into English and tutoring Japanese

Coreen Dawkins Jackson, Ph.D., ’84, Dean of the Honors College,

clients learning English.

Tennessee State University

D R . J I M D I X S O N , ’ 9 2 , opened his

dental practice, Liberty Park Dental, 20 years ago.

34

CITATION FOR ACHIEVEMENT

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

The Honorable W. Brent Powell, ’92, Justice, Missouri Supreme Court Chris Rosson, ’06, President and CEO, United Way of Greater Kansas City


D R . R A N D Y O L I V E R , ’ 9 7 , is the

CAROLYN SHADID LEWIS, ’01,

new principal at Joplin High School.

created the animated docu-

When serving in Independence

mentary “Inter-Generation”

Schools, he was named the 2022

that was part of the Kansas City

Missouri Assistant Principal of

Underground Film Festival. It is

the Year.

a cross-generational journey of

J I L L ( M C C R E A ) N A G E L , ’ 9 8 , was

Boston’s past and present.

inducted in the 2022 Missouri Sports

JANA (LITECKA) MAGNUSON,

Hall of Fame. Columbia Rock Bridge High School has won five state

’ 0 1 , started an accounting con-

sulting firm, APT Consulting LLC,

championships in women’s basket-

in Kansas City after 20 years in

ball in her 17 years as head coach.

corporate accounting.

S A R A ( M C C L U N G ) R O S S , ’ 9 8 , is

in her 13th year as the library media specialist at Dogwood Elementary in Kearney.

Jewell’s 2 0 0 3 W O M E N ’ S S O C C E R T E A M was inducted in the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame Kansas City Enshrinement Class of 2023. The team was ranked as high as No. 3 in the nation,

DR. BROOKE WHITWORTH, ’01,

qualified for the NAIA National Final Four and

received a National Science

was the highest scoring team at any level of

Teaching Association Fellow

women’s college soccer.

Award and the Outstanding

J O Y P A I N T E R H A R V E Y , ’ 9 9 , is

Science Teacher Educator of the

the coordinator of Library Services

Year Award from the Association

for the Lincoln (Nebraska) Public

of Science Teacher Education.

Schools. She previously taught

She is an associate professor at

special education.

Clemson University.

City, Missouri, City Council.

DR. ALEXIS (BARNES) RICHTER,

DR. CINDY (KNOWLES)

’ 0 2 , completed a Doctor of

T H O M P S O N , ’ 0 4 , was appointed

Education in Education and Lead-

dean of libraries for the

ership from Rockhurst. She is

University of Missouri-Kansas City

employed by the U.S. Army Com-

University Libraries.

2000s

D R . K E V I N B O Y D , ’ 0 0 , is a

mand and General Staff College.

E R I C B U N C H , ’ 0 4 , was re-elected

to a second term on the Kansas

D R . A L A N W E G E N E R , ’ 0 4 , was

dermatopathologist and

J U S T I N W E N G E R , ’ 0 2 , finished his

elected president of the North

pediatric dermatologist for the

10-year career as the head base-

Central States Optometric Council.

Mayo Clinic Health System in La

ball coach at Rockbridge County

Crosse, Wisconsin.

(Virginia) High School. He serves

infrastructure engineer at H&R

KRISTEN (VIBBERT) JENKINS,

as the senior director of engage-

Block in Kansas City.

B R A N D O N B U H L I G , ’ 0 5 , is a senior

’ 0 0 , has worked as a program

ment for Sigma Nu Fraternity, Inc.

manager with Tetra Tech for

DR. MARTHA (ZIEGLER)

received a two-year studio

C A R L E T T I , ’ 0 3 , was named the

residency for writing at

E D M O O R E , ’ 0 0 , of Minnesota was

2023 Distinguished Educator of

Charlotte Street Founda-

recently promoted to AVP of Secu-

the Year at Benedictine College

tion and an ArtsKC Inspira-

rity - Identity and Access Manage-

(Atchison, Kansas) where she is an

tion grant for his book of prose

ment for Carnival Corporation.

associate professor of biology.

and poetry, “The Thread.”

15 years.

ANDREW JOHNSON, ’05,

FA L L 2023

35


CL ASS NOTES

News

D R . K E V I N U H R I C H , ’ 0 5 , com-

R E B E C C A D I L L O N , ’ 0 8 , received

LAURA (ANDREAS) BEHLER, ’11,

pleted his Doctor of Ministry in

a master’s degree in educational

and her husband started Saint

Worship Leadership. He is the

technology through Capella

Giles Christian Academy in Leav-

associate pastor of church music

University. She was the 2023

enworth, Kansas. She serves as

and worship arts at Concord

Teacher of the Year at Eureka

the school nurse and a teacher.

Baptist Church in Anderson,

(Missouri) High School where she

South Carolina.

is in her 15th year.

A B B Y P R A T T , ’ 1 1 , is a family

J E S S I C A F L A N A R Y , ’ 0 6 , serves as

BETHANY HUGHES, ’08,

deputy chief nurse executive at

completed a seven-year,

VA Portland Healthcare System.

18,221-mile trek the

HEATHER JONES-BROWN, ’06,

was promoted to the assistant

length of the Americas. She engaged local popula-

Transplant Network. DR. ANNIE (SHEPARD) F A R R I S , ’ 1 2 , com-

pleted a Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Prac-

tions in storytelling, learning how

tice from Missouri State

humans and animals are adapting

University and works at Center-

to a changing planet.

point Hospital in Independence.

Volunteer Service Lifetime

VANESSA (AYERS) THOMSON,

T R I S T A T U R L E Y , ’ 1 2 , joined

Achievement Award.

’ 0 8 , was named a Milken Educator

the Columbus, Ohio, law firm

by the Milken Family Foundation

of Isaac Wiles as an associate

and received a $25,000 cash prize.

in the public law and litigation

She teaches second grade in

practice groups.

North Kansas City Schools.

JENNIFER (CARNEY) KAHMANN,

chief diversity officer for staff equity at Grinnell College (Iowa) and received the President’s

D R . J O S H U A H A S T E Y , ’ 0 7 , pub-

lished his first book, “China, Faits Accomplis and the Contest for East Asia.” He is an assistant professor of government at Regent

MAJOR TYLER B. FOLAN, ’09,

’ 1 3 , was named director of

University (Virginia), and R E B E K A H

is the commanding officer of

people operations at The

( B O U A S ) H A S T E Y , ’ 0 8 , serves as

Recruiting Station Denver. Less

Scarbrough Group in Kansas City.

the children’s ministry director

than 3 percent of all Marine

at Trinity Presbyterian Church

majors were selected for this

J R . , ’ 1 3 , completed a

in Norfolk.

competitive position.

Ph.D. in Educational

clinical dietitian for Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas

sity of Virginia and is an

2010s

assistant professor of social work at University of Houston.

and A N D R E A ( D E R E G N I E R ) J A M E S , ’ 0 7 , is an elementary

DR. EDWARD SCOTT,

Psychology at Univer-

S H A W N J A M E S , ’ 0 7 , works as a

CHRIS STATHOS, ’14,

music teacher for the Girard

A S H T O N B O T T S , ’ 1 0 , serves as

was promoted to

(Kansas) School District.

senior manager of contracts at

director of partnership

E M I L Y W A L E S , ’ 0 7 , was named

president and CEO of Planned Parenthood Great Plains after

36

services coordinator at Midwest

Perceptyx, Inc., and is an actor

development for the

and director in Kansas City, repre-

Kansas City Chiefs.

sented by Moxie Talent Agency.

serving as chief operations coun-

KRYSTEN (WAECKERLE) OLSON,

sel and general counsel. She grad-

’ 1 0 , works for the Greater Kansas

uated from Harvard Law School.

City Coalition to End Homelessness.

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

A N N I E B I R Z E R , ’ 1 5 , is

a nurse in Interventional Radiology at University of Kansas Health System.


VIEW MORE ALUMNI NEWS, INCLUDING RETIREMENTS A N D F A M I LY U P D A T E S , O R S U B M I T Y O U R O W N :

H A N N A H K O E H L E R , ’ 2 1 , attends

Wake Forest University’s graduate

» a l u m n i .j e w e l l .e d u /c l a s s- n o te s

program in clinical mental health. K O L E W A G E N E R , ’ 2 1 , is in the

Doctor of Psychology program at Kansas City University. He previ-

DR. STEWART DUNCAN,

M A D E L I N E D O U G L A S , ’ 1 7 , was

’ 1 5 , completed a Ph.D.

appointed to the Biden-Harris

in Musicology from

administration as the director

Indiana University and is

of scheduling for Education

L O G A N P E T E R S O N , ’ 2 2 , com-

an assistant teaching professor at

Secretary Miguel Cardona.

pleted her nurse residency at KU

the University of Missouri-Kansas City Conservatory.

A R I E L H U T C H E O N , ’ 1 7 , is com-

of counseling at Old Dominion

M . S . E D . ’ 2 0 , was named the Inde-

University (Virginia).

of the Year. She teaches 5th grade and is working on a second master’s degree in elementary math. J A M E S M I L A M , ’ 1 5 , was promoted

to a human capital senior consultant in Deloitte’s Government and Public Services practice and resides in Nashville with his wife. DR. BRADLEY DICE, ’16,

Medical Center.

E M M E L I N E T A L B O T , ’ 1 7 , is an

occupational therapist with the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs in Oregon. MYKAYLA MOESCHEN, ’19,

completed an MSN - Family Nurse Practitioner degree from Rockhurst University and works as a nurse practitioner in oncology at Saint Luke’s Hospital.

is a senior software

CITATION FOR ACHIEVEMENT The 2023 Distinguished Alumni

engineer in data analytics at NVIDIA Corporation. He has a

Health Services as a caseworker.

pleting a Ph.D. and residency

HAILEY HANKINS, ’15 AND

pendence School District Teacher

ously served Tri-County Mental

2020s

Ph.D. in physics and scientific

The Honorable Timothy J. Flook, ’89, Circuit Judge, 7th Judicial Circuit, Clay County, Missouri

computing from the University of Michigan - Ann Arbor.

JESSICA (HOLCOMB) SLOAN, ’20,

Dan Lanning, ’08, Head Football Coach,

S T E L L A ( W I L S O N ) S E I T Z , ’ 1 6 , is

is a search engine optimization

University of Oregon

employed by United Health Care

associate at GALE media and mar-

and was named a member of the

keting agency in Topeka, Kansas.

Nextgen Under 30 Oklahoma.

C H R I S T I N A V O G L E R , ’ 2 0 , teaches

G R E T C H E N B R I T T , ’ 1 7 , was named

middle and high school vocal music

vice president of information

in North Kansas City Schools, is a

technology at Liberty Hospital.

member of Cardinalis Choir and is

She has worked in healthcare for

actively involved in church music

25 years, 20 as an RN.

and directing musicals.

Dr. Sasha (Schoville) Shillcutt,’97, Dr. Gail Walling Yanney Professor of Anesthesiology and Vice Chair, Department of Anesthesiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center D E TA I L S O N T H E 2 0 24 C E L E B R AT I O N :

j e w e l l .e d u /a c h i e v e m e n t- d a y

FA L L 2023

37


GIVING SPOTLGHT

BILL AND LINDA DREYER HONOR THEIR JEWELL ROOTS For more than 40 years, Bill Dreyer, ’60, and Linda (Hill) Dreyer, ’61, have been giving back to Jewell through financial support and service. In 2021, the San Antonio, Texas, couple offered another transformative gift by establishing the $400,000 William E. and Linda H. Dreyer Scholarship. “Jewell is important to us and our family,” Bill said. “I love Jewell a lot, and Jewell has been important to my career.” Their three-generation Jewell legacy started in 1958 when Bill was chairing a Young Republicans meeting on campus and met sophomore Linda Hill. He told his roommates at the Kappa Alpha house he’d met the girl he was going to marry. “The guys said I was crazy, and two and a half years later, they were in our wedding,” Bill said. Linda passed away in 2021, just shy of their 60th anniversary. “She was the love of my life and supported me in every way.” Before Bill graduated with a history degree, Jewell’s dean of men recommended him to meet with a recruiter from Southwestern Bell. Bill was immediately hired and said his Jewell education gave him an advantage over the other new hires from large universities. His contributions to SW Bell (now AT&T) led to many advancements during his 39-year

38

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

Bill and Linda Dreyer

career, and he retired in 1998 as senior executive vice president. In retirement, Bill was a Jewell Trustee and has remained active with Kappa Alpha Order, including serving four years as Knight Commander, KA’s highest national volunteer position. Linda’s focus was helping raise their two daughters and sharing her gifts as a musician. After her mother asked her to turn down a full scholarship at the famed Juilliard School for something closer to home, Linda earned a music degree at Jewell. As Bill’s career took them to large cities, she played the cello in various orchestras, taught piano and directed a church choir. Their daughter Beth (Dreyer) Norris, ’85, found her way to Jewell and married alumnus Ed Norris, ’83. One of Bill and Linda’s five grandchildren, Will Norris, ’19, continued the Jewell and KA legacy, serving as chapter president. When Bill and Linda created their endowed scholarship, they wanted to support students with the interests that meant so much to them: Kappa Alpha Order, Alpha Delta Pi sorority and music. To support scholarships through the Jewell Fund or to make a legacy gift, visit alumni.je well.edu/ je well-f und or email alumni@ w illiam .je well.edu .


CL ASS NOTES

In Memoriam

Fa re w e l l , Je w e l l fa m il y

1950s

Norma (Moss) Barto, ’50, of Jupiter, Florida, Aug. 24, 2020 Robert Barto Jr., ’50, of Jupiter, Florida, Aug. 26, 2021 Dwight Coon, ’50, of Kansas City, Missouri, Jan. 19, 2022 Sue (Husman) Donnell, ’50, of Kansas City, Missouri, Nov. 29, 2021

VIEW MORE MEMORIALS

» a l u m n i . j e w e l l . e d u / m e m o r i a m

Charles Owens, ’50 of Shawnee, Kansas, Dec. 27, 2021 Jeannine (Tussey) Preston, ’50, of Greer, South Carolina, Nov. 26, 2021 Rev. Sylvia Robinson, ’50, of Dracut, Massachusetts, Nov. 21, 2022 Karl Shade, ’50, of Raymore, Missouri, Nov. 11, 2021 Tom Williams, ’50, of Omaha, Nebraska, Oct. 14, 2021 Evelyn (Heller) Jones, ’51, of Plainview, Texas, Sept. 6, 2022

1930s

Margaret (Lynn) Miller, ’38, of Lenexa, Kansas, Dec. 29, 2021 1940s

John Tucker, ’40, of Santa Fe, New Mexico, Sept. 2, 2023 John Cox, ’42, of Lenexa, Kansas, March 12, 2022

Dr. Dick McCoy, ’51, of Independence, Missouri, June 19, 2022 Jim Oates, ’51, of North Granby, Connecticut, Jan. 17, 2023 Gil Breipohl, Jr., ’52, of San Jose, California, Feb. 11, 2020 Raymond Brock, Jr., ’52 of Liberty, Missouri, Sept. 30, 2022 Larry Nicholson, Jr., ’52, of Raytown, Missouri, Oct. 10, 2022 Betty (Lyon) Blair, ’53, of Liberty, Missouri, April 16, 2022

Joan (Clarke) Stutler Clopton, ’43, of Madisonville, Kentucky, Feb. 27, 2023

Rev. Dr. David Bunch, ’53, of Smyrna, Georgia, July 24, 2023*

Russell Newport, ’43, of Springfield, Missouri, Feb. 23, 2022*

Melba (Burris) Crain, ’53, of Houston, Texas, May 2, 2022

Betty (Brewer) Shannon, ’44, of Edina, Minnesota, Feb. 13, 2023

Leopal “Lee” Day, ’53, of Overland Park, Kansas, March 24, 2019

Betty (Westbrook) Swisher, ’44, of Marshall, Missouri, Jan. 24, 2022

George Dooley, ’53, of Kansas City, Missouri, Dec. 23, 2021

Rosemary (Stokes) Williams, ’44, of Westminster, Colorado, June 26, 2022

Charles Jacobson, ’53, of Louisville, Colorado, July 22, 2023

Anna May (Searcy) Miller, ’46, of Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 26, 2023

Robert McKee, ’53, of Phoenix, Arizona, Feb. 23, 2022*

Lillian (Garrison) Purdue, ’46, of Kansas City, Kansas, Jan. 30, 2022

Dottie (Kilpatrick) Hightower Medlin, ’53, of Garber, Oklahoma, April 30, 2023

Bernita (Talbot) Stockton, ’46, of Menifee, California, Feb. 2, 2021

Kenneth Strumm, ’53, of Estero, Florida, Aug. 23, 2022

Rev. Paul Powell, ’47, of Abilene, Texas, April 10, 2023

Jim Bender, ’54, of Punta Gorda, Florida, June 22, 2023

Betty (Mallett) Smith, ’47, of Malibu, California, Nov. 23, 2021

Coy Brown, ’54, of Surprise, Arizona, May 19, 2023

The Honorable William Turnage, ’47, of Jacksonville, Florida, March 14, 2023

William Brown, ’54, of Raytown, Missouri, July 29, 2023

Marie (Williams) Bartel, ’48, of Ballwin, Missouri, Aug. 17, 2022

Lt. Col. Craig Royston, ’54, of Clinton, Mississippi, Nov. 27, 2021

Harriett (Dickinson) Benedict, ’48, of Chillicothe, Missouri, Oct. 6, 2022

Glenn Stevenson, ’54, of Trenton, Missouri, Nov. 7, 2021

Mauritza (Frisbee) Adams, ’49, of Kansas City, Missouri, Feb. 10, 2022

Rev. James Waters, ’54, of Franklin, Indiana, Jan. 15, 2022

Lucille (Forman) Elliott, ’49, of Bellevue, Nebraska, Feb. 7, 2023

Linda (Hardy) Zahnd, ’54, of Savannah, Missouri, Nov. 18, 2022

Rev. David Head, ’49, of Leawood, Kansas, Sept. 2, 2022

Dr. Richard Dayringer, ’55, of Grove, Oklahoma, Oct. 13, 2022

Frances Itokazu Head, ’49, of Leawood, Kansas, Sept. 7, 2021

Jim Fries, ’55, of Kansas City, Missouri, 2022

Alice (Leavitt) Hurst, ’49, of Richmond, Virginia, Dec. 7, 2021

Rev. Bob Kenison, ’55, of Hannibal, Missouri, April 1, 2023

Dr. Floyd Neth, ’49, of Robertsdale, Alabama, Feb. 20, 2023*

Rev. Robert Pattison, ’55, of Loveland, Colorado, Aug. 12, 2021

Rose “Suzie” (Clark) Ranson, ’49, of Athens, Georgia, April 28, 2023

Edward Protz, ’55, of Galveston, Texas, July 26, 2023

Rosie (Cantlon) Shepherd, ’49, of Liberty, Missouri, May 31, 2022

Rev. Tom Raisner, ’55, of Pittsford, New York, Oct. 17, 2021

Jane (Mabes) Wiberg, ’49, of St. Paul, Minnesota, June 19, 2023

Dorothy (Johnson) Sizemore, ’55, of Raleigh, North Carolina, April 4, 2023

Dan Golden, ’54, of Kearney, Missouri, May 20, 2023

FA L L 2023

39


CL ASS NOTES

In Memoriam

Richard Tobias, ’55, of Rapid City, South Dakota, Aug. 2, 2023

1960s

Judith Brooks (Taylor) Buck, ’56, of Quincy, California, May 4, 2023

Major Dean Berry, ’60, of La Vernia, Texas, Jan. 17, 2022

Mary Ann (Nance) Byrne, ’56, of Jacksonville, Oregon, Aug. 31, 2021

Anita (Stark) Booth, ’60, of Kansas City, Missouri, March 2, 2023

Ed Dixon, ’56, of Ames, Iowa, Feb. 25, 2022

Jesse Funkhouser, Jr., ’60, of Salem, Oregon, March 23, 2021

Jerry Emery, ’56, of Prescott, Arizona, Aug. 18, 2022

Gretchen Van Hoosier, ’60, of North Canton, Connecticut, Feb. 7, 2023

Dr. Neita (Frohmuth) Geilker, ’56 (former faculty), of Liberty, Missouri, July 18, 2023

John Jackson, ’60, of Tallahassee, Florida, June 25, 2023

Lt. Commander Earl Keele, ’56, of Greenville, Missouri, Dec. 18, 2021 Rev. Ron Tipton, ’56, of Adrian, Michigan, Oct. 25, 2022 Warner Wilson, ’56, of Springfield, Missouri, Sept. 1, 2022 Chuck Borchelt, ’57, of Baldwin, Missouri, July 4, 2023 Raymond Cowan, ’57, of Kansas City, Missouri, Dec. 10, 2021 Gladys Doane, ’57, of Chillicothe, Missouri, Aug. 2, 2023 Dr. Mary Jo (Smith) Evans, ’57, of East Amherst, New York, Sept. 26, 2021*

Cara (Rodenbach) Jamieson, ’60, of Fremont, Nebraska, March 29, 2021 Donald Jamieson, ’60, of Dallas, Texas, Dec. 14, 2022 George “Moe” Lago, ’60, of Kansas City, Missouri, July 27, 2023 Cleora (Williams) Sargeant, ’60, of Bow, Washington, Oct. 14 2023 Maurice Snare, ’60, of Belton, Missouri, Oct. 5, 2022 Mary (Clark) Bentley, ’61, of Kansas City, Missouri, May 21, 2023 Jay Borders, Sr., ’61, of Nevada, Missouri, July 5, 2022

Phyllis (Clark) Gehrke, ’57, of Kansas City, Missouri, Feb. 10, 2023

Dr. David Burhans, ’61 (trustee emeritus), of Henrico, Virginia, April 11, 2023*

Thomas Graves, ’57, of Grandview, Missouri, Oct. 17, 2023

William “Al” Diman, ’61, of Independence, Missouri, Oct. 19, 2022

Nill “Nip” Mohler, ’57, of Creve Couer, Missouri, Dec. 29, 2021

Larry Hamilton, ’61 (former staff), of Smithville, Missouri, Jan. 5, 2023

Rev. Bill Myers, ’57, of DeKalb, Illinois, March 22, 2020

David Konold, ’61, of Overland Park, Kansas, May 11, 2023

Rev. Raymond Shelton, ’57, of Lee’s Summit, Missouri, Dec. 15, 2021

Dr. Lynn Schmitt, ’61, of Holt, Missouri, Dec. 9, 2021

Janet (Lukens) Blaylock, ’58, of Rock Hill, South Carolina, April 6, 2022

Dr. Steve Turner, ’61 (former trustee), of Greenwich, Connecticut, Jan. 20, 2023*

Curtis Bye, ’58, of Knoxville, Missouri, Jan. 31, 2023 John “David” Howard, ’58, of Kansas City, Missouri, March 15, 2022 Ron Moberly, ’58, of Liberty, Missouri, March 9, 2023 Dr. Norman Nester, ’58, of Placerville, California, April 22, 2022 Richard Waring, ’58, of Liberty, Missouri, July 4, 2022 Fred Wilson, ’58, of Odessa, Missouri, July 21, 2022 Rev. William Bell, ’59, of Pittsburg, Kansas, Sept. 4, 2021 George Boyd, Jr., ’59, of Carthage, Missouri, Jan. 23, 2022 Ruth (Tipton) Carr, ’59, of Agawam, Massachusetts, Sept. 18, 2022 Carroll Clark, ’59, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Dec. 27, 2022 Marilyn (Nelson) Frans, ’59, of Leawood, Kansas, June 11, 2022 Richard Frohock, ’59, of Grand Junction, Colorado, Sept. 13, 2021 Nancy (Ezell) Gabriel, ’59, of Overland Park, Kansas, Dec. 27, 2022 Robert Gilhaus, ’59, of Normal, Illinois, March 13, 2022 Verlin “Pete” Henry, ’59, of Topeka, Kansas, Dec. 22, 2022 Ann (Allen) Kim, ’59, of Oak Grove, Missouri, Feb. 17, 2022 Rev. Jim Perdew, ’59, of Gray Summit, Missouri, Aug. 4, 2022 Dr. Carol Ann (Carter) Ryser, ’59 of Mission Hills, Kansas, April 14, 2022* Shirley (Gabbert) Shotkoski, ’59, of Plattsmouth, Nebraska, July 16, 2023 Ron Turner, ’59, of Leawood, Kansas, Jan. 29, 2022

Patrick White, ’61, of Columbia, Missouri, April 6, 2022 Norman “Lee” Bowman, ’62, of Arlington, Texas, July 8, 2023* David Carney, III, ’62, of Chesterfield, Missouri, Aug. 25, 2023 Ed Collins, ’62 (former faculty), of Liberty, Missouri, May 25, 2023 Dr. Richard Getty, ’62, of Sumter, South Carolina, Dec. 25, 2022 Dr. Robert Hufft Jr., ’62, of Kansas City, Missouri, Aug. 11, 2023 Betty (Meier) Johnson, ’62, of St. Peters, Missouri, Jan. 15, 2022 Tom Jones, ’62, of Liberty, Missouri, Sept. 9, 2022 Commander James Lewis, ’62, of Surprise, Arizona, July 6, 2020 Dr. Don Rogers, ’62, of Sierra Vista, Arizona, Dec. 5, 2021 Dr. Mary (Wright) Romjue, ’62, of Rockledge, Florida, July 4, 2022 Dr. Ron Weger, ’62, of Rapid City, South Dakota, May 7, 2022 Bill Black, ’63, of Danville, Illinois, Sept. 9, 2023 Anne (Moore) Bolton, ’63, of Whitefish, Montana, Oct. 24, 2021 Julia (Teague) First, ’63, of Bartlesville, Oklahoma, March 19, 2022 Carol (Hershe) Green, ’63, of Gardner, Kansas, April 18, 2022 Ronald Haggard, ’63, of Republic, Missouri, Feb. 2, 2023 Shirley Adams Harris, ’63, of New Albany, Ohio, July 24, 2022 Richard Hensley, ’63, of Lima, Ohio, Jan. 19, 2021 David F. Jones, ’63, of St. Louis, Missouri, Nov. 1, 2021

40

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


Larry Megown, ’63, of Columbia, Missouri, Sept. 23, 2022

1970s

Joyce (Ballew) Rich, ’63, of Lakeland, Colorado, Jan. 20, 2022

Duane Burton, ’70, of Moore, Oklahoma, Feb. 19, 2022

Suzanne (Shrum) Storm, ’63, of Charlotte, North Carolina, Nov. 24, 2022

Donald Derryberry, ’70, of Alice, Texas, Sept. 28, 2023

Dr. Loyal Stubbs, ’63, of Fort Worth, Texas, Jan. 15, 2022

Rev. Gary Ferbet, ’70, of Mint Hill, North Carolina, May 5, 2022

Jim Burnham, ’64, of St. Joseph, Missouri, Oct. 6, 2023

Phillip Schlotterer, Jr., ’70, of Liberty, Missouri, July 26, 2023

Dr. John Clizbe, ’64, of Easton, Maryland, May 11, 2022*

Dr. Ann (Graves) Weissenborn, ’70, of Madison, Mississippi, Sept. 15, 2023

Rev. Norman Dalton, ’64, of Amelia Island, Florida, April 29, 2023

Marlyn Atkinson, ’71, of Excelsior Springs, Missouri, Feb. 11, 2022

Charlie Hensley, ’64, of Kansas City, Missouri, March 21, 2022

Kathy Baughman, ’71, of Grandview, Missouri, Aug. 8, 2023

Jerry Hudson, ’64, of Las Vegas, Nevada, March 6, 2023

Philip Love, ’71, of Sanibel, Florida, Oct. 14, 2022*

Joe Johnson, ’64, of Denver, Colorado, March 26, 2023

Kathy (Bellington) Stockdall, ’71, of Independence, Missouri, Oct. 21, 2022

Craig McSparren, ’64, of Independence, Missouri, May 16, 2023

Danny Brown, ’72, of Weston, Missouri, Dec. 1, 2021

Eva Lee (Kuhlman) Waits, ’64, of Kansas City, Missouri, March 7, 2022

Rev. Vernon Debose, Jr., ’72, of Shawnee Mission, Kansas, Sept. 15, 2023

James Young, ’64, of Pueblo, Colorado, Nov. 30, 2022

Jo Ann (Long) Griffon, ’72, of Glen Allen, Missouri, June 20, 2023

Noyce “Nick” McGarity, ’65, of Grapevine, Texas, July 31, 2023

Susan (Richesson) Miller, ’72, of Kansas City, Missouri, May 25, 2022

Kyle Moore, ’65, of Toledo, Ohio, Feb. 10, 2023

Mollie Morton, ’72, of Boulder, Colorado, May 16, 2023

Edmond Newland, ’65, of Gladstone, Missouri, Feb. 28, 2022

Carol (Harrison) Odam, ’72, of Kansas City, Missouri, Dec. 9, 2021

The Honorable Ken Romines, ’65, of St. Louis, Missouri, Oct. 3, 2022*

Dr. Larry Sutterby, ’72, of Glendale, California, July 19, 2022

Mary (Shuman) Sturm, ’65, of Gladstone, Missouri, Aug. 12, 2023

Christopher Brooks, ’73, of Kansas City, Missouri, Nov. 1, 2021

Nancy (Brown) Welsh, ’65, of Sunrise Beach, Missouri, Oct. 15, 2022

Tom Hardy, ’73, of Pleasant Hill, Missouri, July 13, 2022

Marcia (Sandberg) Bailey, ’66, of Spring Grove, Virginia, Jan. 1, 2022

William Wornall, Jr., ’73, of Charlotte, North Carolina, July 23, 2022

Robert H. Jones, ’66, of Independence, Missouri, May 25, 2022

Sharon Knutter, ’74, of St Joseph, Missouri, Oct. 23, 2022

Wayne Mathias, ’66, of Augusta, Kansas, Aug. 1, 2022

David Middendorf, ’74, of Humboldt, Kansas, May 9, 2023

Susan (Burk) McMahon, ’66, of Kansas City, Missouri, Sept. 8, 2022

Margaret (Andrews) Page, ’74, of Raymore, Missouri, March 25, 2023

David Moman, ’66, of Indianapolis, Indiana, April 22, 2023

Randall Allen (former staff), ’75, of Liberty, Missouri, July 11, 2023

Duane Vincent, ’66, of Oldsmar, Florida, Nov. 12, 2022

Beverly Arnold, ’75, of Independence, Missouri, Sept. 23, 2022

Larry Holley, ’67 (former staff), of Liberty, Missouri, May 12, 2022*

Stan Mosier, ’75, of Kansas City, Missouri, Nov. 4, 2022

Dave Loomis, ’67, of Evergreen, Colorado, Dec. 26, 2022

Robert Carder, ’76, of Kansas City, Missouri, March 23, 2023

Carole (Bruner) Palmer, ’67, of Raytown, Missouri, July 10, 2022

Ira Paul Ingold, ’76, of Kansas City, Missouri, June 10, 2022

Dr. Allen Reed, ’67, of Brownwood, Texas, Jan. 12, 2023

Debbie (Justus) Lehmann, ’76, of Liberty, Missouri, March 5, 2023

Charles “Chuck” Rosecrans, ’67, of Huntsville, Alabama, Feb. 21, 2022

Greg Lewis, ’77, of Danville, Illinois, Aug. 27, 2022

Dan Wheeler, ’67, of Highland Beach, Florida, Feb. 19, 2023

Dorothy (Ware) Robbins, ’77, of Gladstone, Missouri, May 20, 2022

Larry Wyss, ’67, of Lee’s Summit, Missouri, Dec. 13, 2022

Paul Slates, ’77, of Chesterfield, Missouri, Jan. 17, 2020

Mary Jane (Campbell) Houston, ’68, of Liberty, Missouri, Dec. 22, 2021

Max Burk, ’78, of Kansas City, Missouri, Sept. 30, 2023

Karen (Kirk) McGuigan, ’68, of Olathe, Kansas, Sept. 19, 2022*

Mary Jo “Ferris” Colgan, ’78, of Liberty, Missouri, April 28, 2023

Anita (Peak) Noble, ’68, of Kansas City, Missouri, Aug. 6, 2023

Chris (Coffman) Ferguson, ’78, of Lee’s Summit, Missouri, Aug. 7, 2022

Diana Balthasar, ’69, of Kansas City, Missouri, July 16, 2022

Judy Hickman, ’78, of Lee’s Summit, Missouri, Dec. 14, 2021

Jim Freeman, ’69, of Whidbey Island, Washington, June 19, 2022

Charles Wright, ’78, of New Bern, New Carolina, Nov. 18, 2022

Sam Gilliam, ’69, of Gravois Mills, Missouri, May 5, 2023

Dr. Jeffrey “Chip” Luerding, ’79, of Riverside, Missouri, Jan. 28, 2022

Hugh Howard, ’69, of Hyattstown, Maryland, June 18, 2023

Terry Teachout, ’79, of New York, New York, Jan. 13, 2022*

Joyce (Birch) Morris, ’69, of Liberty, Missouri, March 13, 2023 Lynda Templeton, ’69, of Warrensburg, Missouri, Jan. 13, 2023

FA L L 2023

41


CL ASS NOTES

In Memoriam

1980s

David Reyburn, ’94, of Kansas City, Missouri, Oct. 17, 2023

Philip Briggs, Jr., ’80, of Paris, Texas, Aug. 31, 2022

Sandy (Parrish) Ball, ’96, of Warsaw, Missouri, April 26, 2023

Frances Ginn, ’80, of Liberty, Missouri, Aug. 13, 2022

Jennifer Blyth, ’96, of Independence, Missouri, April 23, 2023

Laurie (Brown) Eisman, ’81, of Independence, Missouri, Oct. 17, 2023

Ryan Bruce, ’96, of Edwardsville, Illinois, Oct. 3, 2023

Robert “Dave” Love, ’81 of Louisville, Kentucky, May 9, 2019

Matt Gremling, ’96, of Republic, Missouri, Feb. 16, 2022

Rev. Deborah Rothe (aka Kathryn Stuart), ’82, of Wichita, Kansas, Oct. 18, 2020

Dr. Laura Tinning, ’96, of Lansing, Michigan, Jan. 8, 2023

Steve Crouch, ’83, of St. Louis, Missouri, April 30, 2023 Sharon Dunfee, ’83, of Grant City, Missouri, March 13, 2023 Gary Miller, ’83, of Chillicothe, Missouri, Aug. 29, 2022 David Reid, ’83, of Solon, Iowa, Jan. 20, 2022 Don W. Brown, ’84, of Clinton, Missouri, May 18, 2022 Julia (Briant) Dolt, ’84, of Lawson, Missouri, Oct. 21, 2022 Geralyn Hosticka, ’84, of Liberty, Missouri, Aug. 1, 2023 Wanda (Roberts) McKinley, ’84, of Lafayette, Indiana, Aug. 20, 2022

Teresa (Jones) Berry, ’99, of Excelsior Springs, Missouri, March 13, 2023 2000s

Kyle Slusher, ’00, of Scottsdale, Arizona, Feb. 11, 2022 Emily (Bowles) Frost, ’01, of Westwood, Kansas, Aug. 22, 2022 Dana (Youngs) McEachen, ’01, of Overland Park, Kansas, Nov. 16, 2021 Erin (Talbert) Coleman, ’04, of Punta Gorda, Florida, June 16, 2022 Jared Powers, ’04, of Highland, Kansas, Dec. 10, 2022 Lindsay (Haston) Haralson, ’08, of Kansas City, Missouri, Nov. 12, 2021

Lynn (Branstetter) Purdue, ’84, of Tulsa, Oklahoma, May 13, 2023

2010s

Peggy Shull, ’84, of Kansas City, Missouri, April 1, 2023

Dacus Bowles, ’12 of West Plains, Missouri, Oct. 15, 2023

Marshall Dicks, ’85, of Allen Park, Michigan, Jan. 26, 2023

Brandon Starks, ’15, of Kansas City, Missouri, Oct. 18, 2023

Karen (Mische) Grantham, ’85, of Raymore, Missouri, April 23, 2022

Aubrey (Stewart) Douglas, ’16, of Olathe, Kansas, April 20, 2023

Charlotte (Coffey) Nevius, ’85, of Louisiana, Missouri, June 17, 2022

Alec Fister, ’16, of Barnhart, Missouri, Jan. 12, 2022

Michael O’Hare, ’85, of Liberty, Missouri, Oct. 23, 2023

FRIENDS

Bonnie Weldishofer, ’85, of Apollo Beach, Florida, Oct. 21, 2022 Susan Davis, ’86, of Independence, Missouri, Jan. 1, 2023

Dr. Will Adams, Jr. (professor emeritus) of Kansas City, Missouri, Sept. 13, 2023

Cheryl “Cheri” (Bailey) Edge, ’86, of Pittsburg, Missouri, May 1, 2023

Dr. Jimmy Albright (former trustee) of St. Joseph, Missouri, Jan. 10, 2022

Cynthia Glass, ’86, of Titusville, Florida, Nov. 30, 2022

Rev. Richard Bolland (former faculty) of Kansas City, Missouri, March 8, 2023

Lora Sue (Barnett) Hudson, ’86, of Kansas City, Kansas, July 18, 2023 Jeff Morhaus, ’86, of Liberty, Missouri, Jan. 6, 2023 Rena Tulipana, ’86, of Liberty, Missouri, Feb. 26, 2023 Dr. Kevin Gibson, ’87, of Omaha, Nebraska, April 25, 2022 George Houser, Jr., ’87, of Kearney, Missouri, Oct. 16, 2022 Scott Williams, ’87, of Kearney, Missouri, May 26, 2022 Cory Wohlford, ’87, of Trimble, Missouri, May 10, 2023 John Hensley, ’88, of Jefferson City, Missouri, Sept. 2, 2023 Alan Johnson, ’88, of Independence, Missouri, Dec. 19, 2021 Robert Kelly, ’89, of Liberty, Missouri, July 11, 2022 Cathy (Patterson) Lowe, ’89, of Kearney, Missouri, June 24, 2022 Nancy (Niederwimmer) Skahan, ’89, of Shawnee, Kansas, June 9, 2023 1990s

Doug Bullerdick, ’91, of Mequon, Wisconsin, Dec. 14, 2022 Hazel (Fast) Lawrence, ’92, of Independence, Missouri, Jan. 20, 2022

Dr. Ed Chasteen (professor emeritus) of Liberty, Missouri, Oct. 12, 2022 John Cole (former staff) of Liberty, Missouri, July 7, 2022 Dr. Sandy Emig (former faculty) of Winter Park, Florida, June 19, 2022 Katherine Griffith (former faculty) of Lenexa, Kansas, Nov. 22, 2022 Dr. Larry Jacobson of Kansas City, Missouri, Aug. 30, 2022 Kelly Marsh (former faculty) of Houston, Texas, Oct. 18, 2023 Mike Reuck (former staff) of Osage Beach, Missouri, Aug. 9, 2022 Elinor Louise Rhoads (former staff) of Marion, Illinois, Sept. 9, 2022 Jim Sharpe (former faculty) of Kansas City, Missouri, Feb. 6, 2023 Dr. Steve Shaw (former faculty) of Kansas City, Missouri, Feb. 24, 2023 Jean (Long) Stonner of Richmond, Missouri, April 5, 2023 Liza Rowland Townsend, of Kansas City, Missouri, Nov. 26, 2021 Evan Vandiver (student) of Richmond, Missouri, July 13, 2023 Francis Warner (University of Oxford Emeritus Fellow), Dec. 8, 2021 Rev. Dr. Don Wideman (former staff) of Kansas City, Missouri, May 3, 2023

Preston “Scott” Pulido, ’92, of Prairie Village, Kansas, Feb. 24, 2022 Tony Compton, ’93, of Shirley, Missouri, Jan. 24, 2023

42

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

*A l u m n i Ci ta t i o n fo r Ac h i e v e m e n t Ho n o re e s


G R A D UAT E H I G H L I G H T S

Class of 2023

P u rs u i n g a Me a n i n g f u l Li fe

Meet a few members of the Class of 2023 and see the people and communities they chose to serve in their lives beyond The Hill.

JAYME COON

BRANDON HOMAN

Analyst, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City

Coastal Engineer, Freese and Nichols, New Orleans

MIRIAM ALLEN

Doctor of Physical Therapy, Washington University, St. Louis

ALEXANDRA ENTZ

RN, Mother/Baby Unit, University of Kansas Medical Center

CARLY MANTIA

D.O., Kansas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Wichita

GABRIELLE FOURNIER

English and North American History and Culture Teacher, North American Language and Culture Assistants Program, Valencia, Spain

CARLOS LOPEZ

Tax Associate, Grant Thornton, Kansas City

DRE’SHON TOLBERT

Vocal Music Teacher (grades 6-12), Cameron School District

AGATHA ECHENIQUE

Ph.D. in Philosophy, University of Pittsburg

ELI ENGLEDOW

M.D., University of Washington School of Medicine at Spokane

FA L L 2023

43


THE CRITICAL THINKING COLLEGE ®

NON-PROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID WILLIAM JE WELL COLLEGE

500 COLLEGE HILL LIBERTY MO, 64068

WHY I GIVE In appreciation for their own education and for the education received by their four children, Dr. Leroy Seat, ’59, and June (Tinsley) Seat, ’59, established the Leroy and June Seat Family Scholarship in 2021. They wanted to contribute to Jewell’s expanded diversity and inclusion initiatives in a way that would directly support students from various racial, ethnic and cultural backgrounds. The Seats were honored to personally present the inaugural scholarship to Edd Becton, a public relations major from St. Louis and Cardinal football team member (pictured). Longtime champions of peace and justice, the Seats were missionaries in Japan from 1966 until their retirement in 2004, and Leroy served on faculty and later as chancellor at Seinan Gakuin University. He holds a doctorate in theology, is an author and an active blogger (The View from This Seat) and has volunteered on the Northland Justice Coalition, the Northland Martin Luther King Day Committee and the Symposium on Racism and White Supremacy planning committee for his church. June, after staying home with their young children, was an English teacher, then initiated the successful Active Parenting program to help Japanese families hone their parenting skills. It is still taught today, and June regularly contributes columns to the Active Parenting Newsletter. The Seats’ Jewell legacy now extends to another generation with the arrival of two great-grandchildren in 2022. The grandparents are 1980 graduates Keith and Brenda (Helland) Seat, and 1982 alumna Kathy (Seat) Laffoon and her husband, Tim Laffoon.

44

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


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