Jewell Magazine Fall 2020

Page 1

the MAGAZINE of WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

16 Fa c u l t y P ro f il e DR. GINA LANE

20 Al u m n i Vo ic e s GUIDING US

PAGE 10

NO BARRIERS. NO BOUNDARIES. Ne w s t udents a s p ire to sh ap e the f ut ure.

THROUGH A GLOBAL PANDEMIC

26 Ca rd in a l At h l e t ic s POWERLIFTING AND WRESTLING

Fall 2020


the MAGAZINE of WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

Editor CARA DAHLOR Design S P R I N G B OA R D C R E AT I V E Contributors J A E LY N N E L L I S O N ANDREW NASH C I C E LY N G U Y E N R I VAS P H OTO G R A P H Y Editorial Board B L A N E B A K E R , ’8 6 , Professor of Physics

E R I C B L A I R , ’0 1 ,

Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing

A N D R E A M E L O A N , ’9 9 ,

Director of Alumni Relations

C L A R K M O R R I S , ’9 1 ,

Vice President for Institutional Advancement

B ERT STOU FFER , ’ 91 ,

Alumni Board of Governors President

SUSAN TIDEMAN,

Associate Vice President for Institutional Advancement

Co v e r: S h a p e t h e F u t u re g ra n t re c i p i e n t s No a h Ma y o , Ca m e r y n Je n k in s , B o b b i e Po l l a rd , Ja s m i n e Ma l i s o s a n d An g e l Ca s t rej o n

Jewell Magazine is published by the William Jewell College Office of Marketing and Public Relations, 500 College Hill, Liberty MO 64068. Send address changes and alumni updates to alumni@william.jewell.edu or 816.415.7831.


IN THIS ISSUE Fall 2020

1 0 O N T H E C O V E R

D I V E R S I T Y, E Q U I T Y AND INCLUSION

1 6 FAC U LT Y P R O F I L E GINA LANE

1 9 JOURNEY BACK HOMECOMING

2 0 A L U M N I V O I C E S COV I D -19

2 4 FAC U LT Y AWA R D F I N A L I S T S 2 6 C A R D I N A L AT H L E T I C S NEW SPORTS AND COACHES

3 8 G R A D U AT E H I G H L I G H T S

FALL 2020

3


PRESIDENT’S NOTE

R e c a s t i n g th e Mo l d

Entering my fifth year as President of William Jewell College, I find that I am more enthusiastic today than the first moment I arrived on The Hill. New student enrollment is up by 12% over D r. E l i z a b e t h MacLeo d Wall s, President

last year, our fall 2020 class is the most diverse in our history, and these successes have been fueled by $45 million given by supporters advancing our strategy over the past two years. Moreover, Operation Safe Campus, recognized by our expert partners across the Region as a “gold standard” in campus safety, has allowed us not simply to resume on-campus education but indeed to thrive in the midst of a pandemic. The state of the College is good, Jewell family, and I am privileged to celebrate this success while looking optimistically to our future. That future will be given life through a mindset of innovation and a commitment to opportunities without barriers for all students. The Board of Trustees and I refer to our current and future initiatives as the recast of William Jewell College. As you’ll learn from this issue, under the recast, we have lowered tuition almost by half beginning in fall 2021. We have made a deep investment in our commitment to inclusivity, forging new relationships with communities of color and fostering a sense of belongingness among all students. And, we have designs on upending the way we engage other student audiences—in-person and online—through entrepreneurial endeavors that are well on their way to launch. The motivation behind these and all of our efforts is a zealous desire to provide life-changing education that dismantles cycles of poverty, lifts high school and adult students to new echelons of professional opportunity, and advances a shared prosperity across our region for generations to come. William Jewell is uniquely positioned to give everyone the ability to think critically and act with purpose—which is why we are recasting the molds of our foundational, and vital, practices and pedagogies in order to forge a new way of living and learning on The Hill and throughout the world. Deo Fisus Labora, my fellow Cardinals!

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WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


Artist D iploma in

INTRODUCING THE FALL 2020 INAUGUR AL CL ASS Turner Staton b a s s - b a r i t o n e ; B . M . Vo c a l Performance, Pepperdine U n i v e r s i t y ; M . M . Vo c a l Performance, Cincinnati Conser vatory of Music

Jessica True soprano; B.A. Italian and Vo c a l P e r f o r m a n c e , I n d i a n a Universit y; M. A. O p era Performance, Kansas University FIND OUT MORE.

» j e w e l l .e d u /a r t i s t- d i p l o m a Matthew Harris baritone; B.M. Vo i c e a n d O p e r a , Stetson University 2 - Y E A R G R A D U A T E - L E V E L C E R T I F I C A T E P R O G R A M ;

24 CREDIT HOURS WITH SEMINARS, PRIVATE AND

GROUP LESSONS, COACHING AND ACTING CLASSES I N T E N S I V E A N D H I G H L Y S E L E C T I V E

(6 singers p er year)

M O D E L E D A F T E R P R O F E S S I O N A L Y O U N G A R T I S T

PROGRAMS, YET WITHIN AN ACADEMIC SETTING

OUR FACULTY

Jewell’s own Grammy Award-winning baritone and Julliard School graduate Daniel Belcher, ’92, serves as program director. He is passionate about growing the next generation of singer-actors who will impact the world of opera for generations to come. Guest faculty include some of the nation’s leading opera creators, such as Kathleen Smith Belcher, 19-year director at the Metropolitan Opera. Others rotating as teachers for the program include artists from the Metropolitan Opera, Opera Colorado, Lyric Opera of Kansas City, Opera San Antonio, Utah Opera, Opera Saratoga, Opera Orlando and more.

Ellie Brown mezzo-soprano; B . M . Vo c a l Performance, We s t m in s te r Co l l e g e ( Uta h)

Hallie Schmidt B . M . Vo c a l Performance, Oklahoma City University

Sarah Hennessey s o p r a n o ; B . M . Vo c a l Performance, The Boston Con ser vator y; M. M. Opera Performance, Kansas University

FALL 2020

5


AROUND THE HILL

Campus News

Ca m p u s Ne ws

KI N D EST SCH O O L AWARD

At Synergy Services’ 30th annual awards, Jewell was named Kansas City’s Kindest School. Synergy cited engaged learning, specifically the Pryor Leadership Studies Program, which guides students to enhance the lives of vulnerable populations through Pryor Legacy Projects. Another top honor went to retired collegiate football coach Bill Snyder, ’62, as the Kindest Kansas Citian.

NEW VICE PRESIDENT

In January, Joseph Garcia joined Jewell as vice president of finance and operations and chief operating officer. A retired lieutenant colonel and 28-year veteran of the U.S. Air Force, Garcia most recently served as executive vice president for administration at Empire State College in New York and previously as vice president of finance and business at The Citadel. Before transitioning into higher education, Garcia provided financial leadership within the federal government, including serving as CFO for FEMA during Hurricane Katrina recovery in New Orleans and as CFO for a federal agency at USDA. Joseph Garcia

He has a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of Arizona, an MBA from the University of Central Oklahoma and an Executive Master’s in Leadership from Georgetown University. He has authored four books on leadership as well as built curricula and taught leadership to cadets at the U.S. Air Force Academy.

S T U D E N T/ FA C U LT Y R E S E A R C H

Dr. Blane Baker, ’86, professor of physics, and Sungjune Park, a junior mathematics and physics major, collaborated on a research project and paper, “Novel demonstration to show resonant oscillations of a simple pendulum.” Their article will appear in a spring 2021 issue of The Physics Teacher.

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WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


NATIONAL ACCOLADES THE PRINCETON REVIEW

No . 19 G re a t To w n- G o w n Re l a t i o n s ( 14 0,0 0 0 s t u d e n t s u r v e y s o n h o w t h e y ra te t h e ir c o l l e g e to w n a n d a re a re s i d e n t s); B e s t 3 8 6 Co l l e g e s; 2 0 0 B e s t Va l u e Co l l e g e s WA S H I N G T O N M O N T H LY

Am o n g t h e to p 24 8 B a c h e l o r’s Co l l e g e s in t h e c o u n t r y MONEY

2 0 2 0 B e s t Co l l e g e s in Am e r i c a fo r Yo u r Mo n e y WA L L S T R E E T J O U R N A L /T I M E S H I G H E R E D U C AT I O N

No . 318 o f t h e b e s t 8 0 0 c o l l e g e s fo r re s e a rc h , e n g a g e m e n t, o u tc o m e s , e n v iro n m e n t

2 13 15 48 6 8

S T U D E N T A N D FAC U LT Y

RESEARCH IN THE COUNTRY

Wa s h i n g t o n M o n t h l y

FO R OV E R A L L I M PACT

ON THE PUBLIC GOOD

Wa s h i n g t o n M o n t h l y

F O R C O M M U N I T Y A N D N AT I O N A L SERVICE IN THE COUNTRY

Wa s h i n g t o n M o n t h l y

F O R P E R C E N TA G E O F S T U D E N T S RECEIVING PELL GRANTS

Wa s h i n g t o n M o n t h l y

B EST VA LU E S C H O O L S (BAS E D

O N ACA D E M I C Q UA L I T Y A N D C O S T)

U. S . N e w s a n d Wo r l d R e p o r t

BEST MIDWEST COLLEGE

U. S . N e w s a n d Wo r l d R e p o r t

BOARD OF TRUSTEES NEWS » S usan Chambers, ’90, completed her service as Board chair in May, and Bill Gautreaux, ’85, was

elected chair. Gautreaux serves as managing partner at MLP Holdings and is chief marketing officer and president of the MSL Division of Crestwood Midstream Partners. He has been a member of Jewell’s Board since 2011. » L isa (Reichert) Essig, ’89, of Kearney, joined the Board in March. She is owner-operator of 18

McDonald’s restaurants and has been a part of the organization for 40 years, holding leadership roles such as Heart of America Co-Op president, Heartland Region National Leadership Council representative and National Leadership Council Realignment Task Force chair. » D iane (Hopkins) Webber, ’81, of Alexandria, Virginia, became a Trustee in March. A retired Rear

Admiral in the U.S. Navy, she completed tours as Commander of Navy Cyber Forces in Virginia, Deputy Commander of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/U.S. 10th Fleet, and Commanding Officer of U.S. Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station, Bahrain, during Operation Iraqi Freedom.

FALL 2020

7


Campus News

AROUND THE HILL

HONORING AN ARTS IMPRESSARIO

Clark Morris, ’91, began his journey with the HarrimanJewell Series as a student, selling tickets to performances. Clark Morris, ’91, on his 30th anniversary with the HarrimanJewell Series

For the next 20 years, he worked alongside co-founder Richard Harriman until Harriman’s death. Now the executive and artistic director, Morris celebrated his 30th anniversary with the Series in June. To commemorate his steadfast leadership to the program, his loyalty to the founding mission and especially his guidance during a pandemic, the Harriman Board of Advisors set out to raise $30,000— $1,000 for every year of Morris’ service. They swiftly surpassed their goal, surprising Morris with a $40,000 gift in his name to support programming and artistic experiences for next year’s 57th season.

FA C U LT Y U P D AT E S » D r. Joseph Shih, assistant professor of biology, is co-inventor of a patent granted to Stanford

University. The device, which provides protection for the connection site between a central line catheter and the umbilical cord stump, was spun off from Stanford as the product LifeBubble™ by Novonate. It is now being used on NICU patients at various flagship hospitals. » D r. Ronald Witzke, professor of music, was named Jewell’s 2020 Carl F. Willard Distinguished

Teacher. Each year the Faculty Development Committee recommends Willard honorees to the provost and president, who make the final selection. Witzke has been a member of the voice faculty since 1984 while maintaining an active performance schedule. » D r. Jane Woodruff, professor emerita of history and classical languages, retired this summer after 30

years at Jewell. She served as an Oxbridge Honors Program tutor and taught courses in Greek and Latin languages and literature, as well as the core curriculum (CTI 100 and 403) and ancient, medieval and world history. She may be reached at woodruffj@william.jewell.edu. Jewell recently welcomed new faculty: » D istinguished Faculty Artist Daniel Belcher, ’92, directs the new Artist Diploma in Voice program

(featured in this issue). He is a Grammy Award-winning baritone and Julliard School graduate who has performed in operas around the world. » A ssociate Professor of Music Dr. Dorothy Glick Maglione also serves as associate director of bands.

She conducts and coordinates the new Cardinal Sound athletic band and teaches in the music history and music education sequence. » D irector of Debate Adam Testerman joins Jewell from Texas Tech University, where he coached

the nation’s top-ranked debate team and was a national champion as an undergraduate student. He is president of the National Parliamentary Tournament of Excellence Board.

8

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


100

1920-2020

PL ANNING COMMIT TEE Gina Bowman, ’80, C hair M e l a n i e (G r i f f i n) C l i n e , ’ 7 8 A l l i s o n (G r i f f i n) E l l i o t t , ’ 1 2 P a t t y ( P e n c e) E v a n s , ’ 6 9 C y n d i (G i b s o n) G a m b l e , ’ 7 9 R o n i l u e ( B e e r y) G a r r i s o n , ’ 6 3

WE H O PE YOU CAN WAIT A LITTLE LO N G ER TO

S a r a h ( H a s s a n e i n) H o n , ’ 8 8

H E L P U S S A L U T E A P I V O TA L Y E A R I N J E W E L L’ S

Eileen Houston-Stewart, ’79

been rescheduled for Homecoming 2021. You’ll hear more

P a m ( C o o k) K i r k l a n d , ’ 8 1

H I S T O R Y . Our 100 Years of Women formal celebration has

details in the coming months from the planning committee. If you’d like to serve with this team, it’s not too late! Email alumni@william.jewell.edu.

S a n d r a ( L e w i s) J o n e s , ’ 7 8

A s h l e y (G r i f f i n) L e n h a r t , ’ 0 9 K i t ( T r u e x ) M a i r, ’ 7 7 Va l i s s a ( S m i t h) M a r s t o n , ’ 8 0 K a r e n ( R a h t e r) M a t h e s , ’ 8 0

We look forward to recognizing a century of women in the next issue, and we’d like to hear from you. Who influenced your Jewell journey? Whose legacy inspired you? Please email your recommendations and stories

R o b b a (A d d i s o n ) M o r a n , ’ 8 0 Kate Noland, ’05 P a t r i c a ( Z w i e b e l) P e t t y, ’ 7 7 Deb Powers, ’80

to alumni@william.jewell.edu, or connect with a member

L i s a ( S o l o m o n ) S h o e m a k e r, ’ 7 7

of the planning committee.

D e a n a ( M c C r o s s e n) Z a h n d , ’ 8 8

FALL 2020

9


D I V E R S I T Y, E Q U I T Y A N D I N C L U S I O N

Opportunities WITHOUT Barriers R e i n f o r c i n g o u r l o n g - s t a n d i n g c o m m i t m e n t t o d i v e r s i t y, e q u i t y a n d i n c l u s i o n , J e w e l l i s w o rk i n g to c re a te a c u l t u re of belongingness and eliminate obstacles to a s uccessf ul college exp erience. On the follo wing p ages, we share some of our go al s and outcomes, intro duce staf f and alumni who are helping us on our journe y and highlight students who are foc u sed on emp o wering meaningf ul change. Read m o r e a n d f o l l o w o u r p r o g r e s s a t j e w e l l . e d u /d i v e r s i t y.

and their families who right now do not see an attainable path to William Jewell or other higher education institutions,” she said.

EQUIT Y IN ADMISSION Starting with applications for the 2021 academic year, Jewell eliminated standardized testing as a requirement for accep-

AFFORDABILIT Y Sallie Mae and Longmire/Ana-

10

$18,360, compared to the previous cost of $33,500.

tance (except for some distinct programs and premiere scholarships). The new holistic admis-

lytic Marketing Innovations sur-

President Elizabeth MacLeod

veys reveal that 60% of students

Walls says the high-tuition,

and parents are unaware that

high-discount rate model is a sig-

most private colleges discount

nificant barrier for many families.

the published tuition price, and

“This tuition pricing clarity is

ering their school performance,

63% of students say they elimi-

more than a response to per-

personal growth, leadership and

nate schools based on published

ceived tuition costs: It is a

ambitions. Jewell also dropped

price alone. Jewell chose to rec-

demonstration of our resolve

its $200 tuition deposit, so pri-

oncile the gap between sticker

and commitment to extend an

oritized enrollment and housing

price and real price. Beginning

accessible, equitable and inclu-

assignments are no longer based

fall 2021, Jewell tuition will be

sive education to more students

on the ability to pay ahead.

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

sion review process maintains Jewell’s high standards, allowing students to tell their story beyond a test score, also consid-


30%

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT

26 . 7%

25%

DIVERSITY AT JEWELL

20% 15%

Percent of students who s e l f- i d e n t i f y a s A s i a n , African-American, Hispanic, American Indian, Pacific Islander or Multiracial

ENROLLMENT INCREASE

5%

12%

2010

F I R S T-Y E A R C L A S S

TRANSFERS

GROWTH IN

sity (students, faculty and staff )

2015

2016

2017

2018

2 0 .7 %

2019

2020

36%

FA L L 2 0 2 0 N O N -W H I T E

Growing overall campus diver-

1 8 .9 %

6 .0 %

FA L L 2 0 2 0

GROWING ENROLLMENT AND DIVERSIT Y

1 9 .0 %

1 3 .6 %

2001

3%

1 8 .9 %

10%

0%

FA L L 2 0 2 0 T O TA L

1 9 .8 %

F I R S T-Y E A R S A N D

this fall, with 36% of new students identifying as non-white.

S TUDENT RE ADINESS

“ T he program has taught me the importance of education a n d e m p o w e r e d m e to s er ve m y co m m unit y a n d m a k e a n impact in society once I graduate. Coming f rom a t wo-year institution, I had the basic educational skills, but af ter being a part of the S h a p e Yo u r F u t u r e p r o g r a m , the professors gave me a broader understanding of m y s e l f a n d t h o s e a r o u n d m e .”

is a priority outlined in the

Instead of focusing on whether

strategic plan and is the focus

students are college-ready,

of several teams on campus.

Jewell shifted its focus to

Despite national trends of

becoming student-ready. The

declining college enrollment,

new Shape Your Future program

Jewell’s focus on growth has

has established a more sophis-

yielded two consecutive years

ticated, more personalized and

of increases in the first-year

more supportive environment

class: 5% in fall 2019 and 12% in

aimed at fostering success for

fall 2020. Widening the circle to

all students. The year-long pro-

JERRY CANTAVE, Orlando, Florida;

invite diverse perspectives, val-

gram launched this summer to

Tr a n s f e r : N o r t h l a n d C o m m u n i t y

ues and people, Jewell welcomed

help provide a smooth transition

its most diverse class in history

to college and foster belonging.

a n d Te c h C o l l e g e ( M i n n e s o t a ) ; Data Science major; Football; Black Student Alliance

FA L L 2 02 0 11


D I V E R S I T Y, E Q U I T Y A N D I N C L U S I O N

The three free courses promote

FACULT Y AND S TAFF

E XPLORING IDENTIT Y,

knowledge and cognition, social

DE VELOPMENT

R ACISM AND PRIVILEGE

responsibility and personal development. More than 40

To complement professional development and department

In 2017, faculty unanimously

action plans, a new tool is

approved a new course in the

helping faculty and staff better

Critical Thought and Inquiry

of color, academic at-risk and

understand cultural differ-

core curriculum. Identity and

others) opted in as members of

ences and adaptive behavior.

Society (CTI 150) is a seven-week

the inaugural cohort.

The Intercultural Develop-

course developed by the Diver-

ment Inventory (IDI) outlines

sity and Inclusion Workgroup

a development continuum—

and is required for all students.

denial, polarization, minimi-

Students also take two more

zation, acceptance and adap-

courses that focus on diversity

tation—from a monocultural

and inclusion, such as U.S. Plu-

to an intercultural mindset.

ralism, Intercultural Communi-

students (transfers, first generation, international, students

Employees completed a benchmark IDI in 2018 and received profile results and a personalized development plan before retaking it this fall. Jewell’s goal of reaching intercultural

“I wanted to meet ne w classmates and facult y members on a more personal l e v e l a n d e x p e r i e n c e J e w e l l ’s communit y before coming t o c a m p u s . S h a p e Yo u r F u t u r e helped me form relation ships before classes started. Having those people to hang out with made me feel comfortable on campus, especially with C OV I D -1 9 m a k i n g i t h a r d t o meet people during the first co u p le d a ys o f th e s e mes te r.” JOLEE McMULLIN, Lee’s Summit, Missouri; Blue Springs South High School; Nursing major

12

IN THE CL ASSROOM

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

cation, World War Two, U.S.Latinx Experience, Philosophy of Sex and Gender, Philosophy of Race, Social Psychology, Civil Rights and Liberties, Music in the Non-Western Traditions and

competence and putting that

Democracy American-Style.

mindset into practice will result

CTI 150 teaches students to

in a more welcoming campus

think about how they have

environment.

formed their own identity,


how they can connect to and

classes, students read Ta-Nehisi

1619 Project. Although each class

understand people whose lived

Coates’ “Between the World and

can differ as faculty integrate

experiences are very different

Me” or his case for reparations;

their own insight and interests,

from their own, and how to keep

some read “Hillbilly Elegy”; some

all sections dissect racism and

respectful dialogue going, espe-

complete case studies on Con-

privilege, and many include units

cially on tough subjects around

federate monuments; and others

on gender, sexuality, immigration

diversity and justice. In some

analyze the New York Time’s The

and socioeconomic class.

“The overarching theme of my CTI 150 course is humanization versus dehumanization. Through intense examination and discussion of the treatment of Black people through a long and painful journey—the history of slavery in Missouri and Liberty, the Dred Scott case of 1857, the evolution of the Ku Klux Klan, the Jim Crow era, lynchings, the rise of hate groups, the Ferguson race riots of 2014 and the rise of Black Lives Matter—students grapple with the tensions around race today. Most importantly, students consider how they can become allies and humanize each other. Because the course requires deep discussion on these topics, students gain a deeper understanding of the experiences of others as human beings with dignity and worth.”

“Implicit bias is the single biggest idea that resonates with my students in CTI 150. Most people don’t want to be prejudiced, yet most of us are. Sometimes societal messages give us permission to be prejudiced by normalizing ideas. For instance, the stereotype that ‘poor people are lazy’ is just that—a stereotype. It is rooted in the belief that all people can prosper in the United States if they just work hard, which isn’t true. When these ideas are repeated, they become engrained in our minds and we act on them without thinking. That is the manifestation of implicit or unconscious bias: we pre-judge people based on a characteristic because society has told us it is okay to do so. In this class, students come to recognize they have acted in prejudicial ways because they have deeply rooted unconscious biases, and they realize it takes serious conscious effort to change their own thinking so they don’t act on stereotypes.”

D R . T H O M A S V A N S A G H I , A s s i s ta n t P ro fe s s o r o f

DR. DONNA GARDNER,

N o n p ro f i t L e a d e rsh i p ; D i re c to r o f S t ra te g i c P l a n n i n g

P ro fe s s o r o f E d u ca t i o n a n d C h a i r

FACULTY REFLECTIONS

ALUMNI ADVISORS

A new Alumni Advisory Council for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion convened for the first time in September to help the College foster meaningful change on campus. The group will be advising the president and cabinet members in the areas of policy, practices, the student experience, recruitment, retention and a welcoming campus culture. The College’s vision includes expanding the Council’s scope to serve as a network for students of color, hosting events designed to give voice to their experiences. Thank you to this alumni group for helping advance these equity efforts at Jewell: To m i k a An d e rs o n , ’0 4 ; C h r i s to p h e r Ca r r, ’0 8 ; B r i t ta n y D u n c a n , ’ 1 1; Er i c a Fe rg s o n , ’ 10; S te v e H a r r i s , ’ 8 7; Ca r i H i l l , ’ 16 ; Ve r n o n Ho w a rd Jr., ’ 8 6 ; Ja c q u i n ta H a m m o n s Ne l s o n , ’ 16 ; S e l i n a R i o s , ’ 10; Q u e n t i n R i s e r, ’ 1 5; Q u i n l a n R i s e r, ’ 1 5; C h r i s R o s s o n , ’0 6 ; E d d ie S c o t t, ’ 1 3 ; Ma rk S te v e n s o n , ’0 9 ; B r i t ta n y Ta l l e y, ’0 9 ; Li l i a To s o n , ’0 7; Mi c a h W i l l i a m s , ’ 2 0 FA L L 2020 13


D I V E R S I T Y, E Q U I T Y A N D I N C L U S I O N

S h a p e th e F u t u re G ra n t R e c i p i e n t s

students. The four-year renewable grant is designed to promote equity and remove financial barriers while also promoting access to higher education for students who want to change our society. Their aspirations affirm the diverse ways

NEED-BASED SCHOLARSHIPS AND ACCESS SCHOLARSHIPS FOR STUDENTS OF COLOR ARE

they will serve their communities with a Jewell education, such as counseling teens with men-

A STRATEGIC PLAN PRIORITY TO MAKE A JEWELL

tal health issues, solving the global water crisis,

EDUCATION AFFORDABLE FOR ALL STUDENTS.

reducing hatred by teaching civil discourse, men-

Alumni and friends have shown their support to

toring immigrants, offering financial education

empower change in a meaningful way, contributing $12.5 million to student aid in the past three years.

to low-income families, advocating for nursing home patients and promoting peace through law

One resulting initiative is the Shape the Future

enforcement, among many others. Read how a few

Grant, awarded this fall to underrepresented

of our inaugural recipients plan to make an impact.

the College’s intensive inclusivity efforts,

tive through Sophic Solutions, LLC, a

which include such tasks as supporting

change management consulting firm

the recruitment and retention of students,

they co-founded.

faculty and staff of color and forging meaningful relationships with communities of color in Kansas City and beyond.

NEW VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACCESS AND ENGAGEMENT

For two decades Dr. Rodney Smith has worked in a variety of higher education

14

In the education arena, Smith most recently served in the International Center for Supplemental Instruction at

“I’m really excited about this new

the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

position because the possibilities are

He worked at Belmont University in

endless. I see myself as the ‘chief hope

Nashville, Tenn., as associate director

officer’ and look forward to extending

of annual giving and special gifts; at

Jewell’s footprint and visibility. For me,

Fisk University in Nashville as director

that’s hopeful,” Smith said. “I aim to cre-

of admissions and recruitment; at Clark

ate a sense of belonging and community

Atlanta University in Georgia as admis-

where Jewell students can come togeth-

sions counselor/recruiter; and at Morris

er and create a dynamic that supports

Brown in Atlanta, also in admissions.

personalized learning, empowers critical

Smith obtained his bachelor’s degree at

roles focused on student success. Now,

thinking and fosters belongingness.”

he’s combining that experience with his

Prior to joining the College’s leader-

college, majoring in fine arts with a

passion for equity and justice as Jewell’s

ship team, Smith and his spouse and

concentration in architecture. He earned

first vice president for access and en-

business partner, Stephenie K. Smith,

a master and doctorate of education,

gagement. He was hired in August to lead

assisted with Jewell’s inclusivity initia-

both from Tennessee State University.

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

Morris Brown College, a historically black


A N G E L C A S T R E J O N , Ka n s a s C i t y, M i s s o u r i ;

has been growing by leaps and bounds, and that

Pa se o Aca d e my a n d KC S c h o l a r; B u s i n e s s

means we won’t have enough medical providers

major; Music minor; Card inal Sound

to serve our expanding community. According to

Athletic Band

the U.S. census, although Hispanics make up 17%

“I want to set an example for all

of the total population, the percentage of Hispanic

the kids who grew up in the city

nurses in our country is only 3.6%, and the percent-

that they don’t have to turn to

age of Hispanic nurse practitioners is even lower.

gangs and other bad routes. I want

I am determined to change these numbers. One

to be able to inspire others through music that

person can make an insurmountable difference.”

no matter where you come from, or how much money you have, that you can still accomplish your dreams, you just have to fight for them. I also want to be able to give back to the Kansas City Public School District for everything they did for me and what they try to do for all of us. I want to give back to my whole city.”

NOAH MAYO, Plainfield, Illinois; Wheaton

Academy; Economics and Oxbridge I n s t i t u t i o n s a n d Po l i c y m a jo rs; Tra c k and Field, Black Student Alliance

“I will shape the future by working towards the actualization of freedom for the Black community.

C A M E R Y N J E N K I N S , K a n s a s C i t y, M i s s o u r i ;

I will do this by empowering my

P a s e o A c a d e m y ; M u s i c m a j o r ; C a r d i n a l Vo i c e s

community in my personal life, but also through

“I hope to touch people’s hearts

involvement in the U.S. government or a non-

with my music. I want kids my

governmental organization that is committed to

age to know that it is okay to live

this end. My goal in life is to positively impact the

honorably and have integrity for

lives of people who will be born after I die.”

years to come. Once I am established in my career, I want to give money to my family members to ensure that they can still pay their bills after they retire. I also want to fund businesses that provide comfort and safety for victims of sexual abuse and assault. I am passionate about victims’ voices being heard.”

BOBBIE POLLARD,

Ca c h e , O k l a h o m a ;

Cache High Scho o l; Nonprofit L eadership m a jo r; Tra c k a n d F i e l d

“I am passionate about individuals with special needs and how they are treated differently from what society identifies as ‘normal.’ I want

J A S M I N E M A L I S O S , Ka n s a s C i t y, M i s s o u r i ;

to impact my community by creating an

Lib erty North High Scho ol; Nursing major;

environment where people with diverse needs can

S p i r i t Te a m , S t u d e n t N u r s e s A s s o c i a t i o n ,

be together without having to worry about being

P re - h e a l t h H o n o r S o c i e t y, M i G e n t e ,

judged for their disabilities. I have worked with

B al l ro om D ance C lub

children with disabilities and find they work harder

“I have always been passionate

at trying to fit in than focusing on their passion. I

about becoming a nurse

want to teach others that acceptance is what these

practitioner. It would give me

individuals would love. In today’s society, many

great joy to prevent illnesses and

people lack respect for their peers, and I want to

heal others from pain and suffering. My home

help raise awareness for people who don’t get the

is in Liberty and always will be. The Northland

chance to express their talents.”

FA L L 2 02 0 15


FA C U LT Y P R O F I L E

D r. G i n a L a n e

WINNING ROUNDS 3 6 ye a rs o f m e n to r i n g c h a m p i o n d e b a te rs and students

AS 2020 MARKS 100 YEARS OF WOMEN AT JEWELL, IT’S ONLY APPROPRIATE TO RECOGNIZE THE LONGEST SERVING MEMBER OF OUR CURRENT FACULTY, WHO HAS HER OWN STORIED HISTORY AS A FEMALE ROLE MODEL IN COLLEGIATE DEBATE.

Dr. Gina Lane, professor and chair of the Communication and Theatre Department, is in

casting career for a year, Lane thought, so she moved to Fayetteville. She discovered by working a part-time radio station job that she did not want the life of an announcer. But she did find a love for coaching debate and teaching. She finished her degree, was named director of debate and enjoyed

her 36th year of teaching on The Hill and was

three years at Arkansas.

director of debate for 26 years.

In 1985, a growing college dubbed the “Harvard

Growing up in south Kansas City, Lane was on the debate team at Hickman Mills High School.

of the Midwest” hired her to lead its nationally acclaimed debate program.

Her coach and mentor, Georgia (Pearson) Brady,

“Jewell was the perfect job for me,” Lane said.

’73, was a debater at Jewell under Dr. Georgia

“We were a special liberal arts college, and I felt

Bowman, ’34, who started the College’s communi-

very lucky to join the faculty and work with the

cation program that Lane would one day lead.

students that Jewell attracted.”

Lane was a broadcasting major at Northwest

Under Communication Department Chair Tom

Missouri State University. Although her interests were in radio and television, her success on the

16

debate coach. She’d just be delaying her broad-

Willett, Lane also taught public speaking and completed her Ph.D. at the University of Kansas

university debate team changed the trajectory

while working full time.

of her career. Upon graduation, the University of

At that time, she was among a handful of women

Arkansas offered to fund her master’s degree in

to both serve as a debate director and have a

communication for her service as the assistant

female debate team. She is proud to have been a

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


role model and help young women achieve their

workshop and being part of the conversation

goals in debate. Lane says she worked with many

to add a curriculum initiative.

phenomenal debaters in her career. “Jewell debaters were always careful thinkers,” she said. “That was a hallmark of the way I taught debate: Never glib, it was always important to them to make the best argument, even if it wasn’t an argument that won them the round.” Lane was active in the debate circuit, holding a number of national positions on boards and committees. In the early 2000s, she took Jewell’s program in a new direction, moving from the Cross Examination Debate Association to the National Parliamentary Debate Association. That move, she says, heralded a rebirth of the program. In 2011, she handed the reins to younger leadership and continues to oversee the program. From an instructor to the ranks of professor and chair, Lane has helped the department evolve.

» S he was part of the committee that recom-

mended faculty scholarship as a promotion requirement. “It was a difficult transition, but it was important. Research and scholarship are part of every faculty member’s discipline, and the system rewards faculty for that work.” As a professor, Lane enjoys developing students who are advocates for their ideas and watching them transform from their early classes to their senior capstone. She also enjoys the teacher-aslearner role. “Debate was absolutely essential to my growth as a person. I learned about so many different

FORMER

D E B AT E R S A N D STUDENTS OF DR. LANE’S:

RECONNECT WITH HER.

» l a n e g @ w i l l i a m . j e w e l l .e d u

topics and ways of thinking. But since I quit being a debate coach, I learned that my intellectual curiosity can still be fulfilled through my classroom teaching. In the core curriculum, I teach Plague, Piety and Public Policy, and I’m teaching

Faculty added courses such as theory, research

that class during a pandemic. Who would have

and public relations to an already strong founda-

thought I would ever be doing that? It’s been a

tion of public speaking and advocacy. They also

great personal reward to teach at Jewell where I

elevated theatre as an equal part of the program

could explore so many different ideas and develop

and changed the department name to Commu-

myself in ways that I could not have done else-

nication and Theatre. In the past few years, they

where. I wouldn’t trade it.”

added majors in musical theatre, public relations and digital media communication and a certificate in ballroom dancing. Proud to have been part of numerous initiatives at Jewell, she says some are particularly meaningful. » S he helped organize the first David Nelson

Duke Colloquium Day in 2000 for students to present scholarly work. “I think it still sets us apart. The day illustrates an ongoing philosophy at Jewell that every student has the opportunity to achieve.” » S he led the faculty initiative on diversity and

Debate Coach Highlights P I K A P PA D E LTA N AT I O N A L C H A M P I O N S , E r i c J e n s e n a n d S h e l l e y Te m p l e - K n e u v e a n , 1 9 9 1

C R O S S E X A M I N AT I O N D E B AT E A S S O C I AT I O N P R E S I D E N T , 1999-2000 N AT I O N A L PA R L I A M E N TA R Y T O U R N A M E N T O F E X C E L L E N C E N AT I O N A L C H A M P I O N S , Ke v i n G a r n e r a n d Lu k e L a n d r y, 2 0 0 7

M I S S O U R I S T A T E C H A M P I O N S , 2 0 0 7, 2 0 0 8 , 2 0 0 9 , 2 0 1 0 , 2 0 1 1

inclusion, helping coordinate the first faculty

F A L L 2 0 2 0 17


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J E W E L L . E D U / M S E D

JEWELL & LIBERTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS GRADUATE PARTNERSHIP

Liberty Public School teachers: Participate in a Liberty Professional Development Initiative and you can enroll in a closely aligned Jewell graduate class. Earn credit while learning for your own professional growth, and/or earn up to 15 credits toward a Jewell M.S.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction. Graduate instruction provided on the Liberty Schools campus. J E W E L L . E D U / L I B E R T Y P D

18

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

90+% 1 5 -Y E A R

P L A C E M E N T R AT E


JOURNEY BACK

Homecoming

1974 Al u m n i Chuckwagon Picnic

The History of

HOMECOMING

1990 Quad games

JUST BEFORE JEWELL’S 75TH BIRTHDAY, THE FIRST HOMECOMING ON THE HILL TOOK PLACE IN 1923. THE MODEST CELEBRATION

ENTAILED A FRIDAY AFTERNOON FOOTBALL GAME WITH ALUMNI CHEERING FOR THE “BIG RED” CARDINALS AND A PRE-GAME

parents’ lunch. In the 1930s, activities expanded to include a parade, queen coronation, fraternity house decorations, pep rally, bonfire (with the burning of an outhouse) and a talent revue with music and poetry readings hosted by the New Ely men. Dances were added in the 1960s. Then came the Quad games of goldfish swallowing, rope tugging, car stuffing and pyramid building, and the friendly competitions of golf cart f loats, campus sings and the naming of Miss Peppy and Mr. School Spirit. Students gave back during a day of community service, and alumni gathered for the Athletic Hall of Fame, service awards, class reunions, tailgates and basketball and golf tournaments. Saturday night Gano concerts featured student and alumni choirs and special guests, such as Dionne Warwick in 1974. Nearly a century later, Homecoming has evolved into a weeklong series of longstanding traditions and modern twists, and we look forward to celebrating them together in 2021.

1963 Homecoming court: Diana Isley Hill ’65, Carolyn Davison Bennett ’65, Queen Sue James Eby ’65, Carol Shigemura Underwood ’65, and Carole Mullin s Harmon ’64

FA L L 2 0 2 0 19


ALUMNI VOICES

COV ID -19

GUIDING us through a GLOBAL PANDEMIC A s C OV I D -1 9 w a s r e s h a p i n g l i f e a s w e kne w it in 2020, Je well partnered with

Hania Osman, ’18

E n g i n e e r i n g H e a l th Ca re S o l u t i o n s

biorisk and medical experts to create a safe environment and provide students the in-person experience we value as a

HANIA OSMAN, ’18; Biomedical engineering

residential campus focused on learning

g ra d u a te s t u d e n t , S a n Jo se ( Ca l i fo r n i a )

i n c o m m u n i t y. O u r a s s e s s m e n t m a t r i x

State University

helped us respond quickly across a

In April I had the opportunity to participate

continuum of threat le vels and was

with an amazing team in the MIT (Massachusetts

adopted by other regional schools and businesses. Read more about Operation S a f e C a m p u s a t j e w e l l . e d u /c o r o n a v i r u s .

Institute of Technology) COVID-19 Challenge, a health hackathon with 1,500 participants dedicated to finding technical solutions for the pandemic. Our device was one of the winners in our

Of f The Hill, Je well alumni also have

track, COVID-19 Treatment and Management.

been hard at work, actively engaged in

It was an amazing experience and took collabora-

keeping their communities healthy and

tion between all different engineering disciplines.

i n f o r m e d . We’ r e g r a t e f u l t o a l l t h o s e

We represented four different continents and

behind the scenes and on the f ront lines

three time zones, but we worked tirelessly for

who are advancing the f ight again st the

48 hours with minimal sleep to engineer a Split

p a n d e m i c . We’ r e p r o u d t o s h a r e a f e w

Kit, which is a differential flow splitter device that

of their stories.

could potentially allow multiple patients to be put on one ventilator safely and efficiently. It’s a low-cost device, with minimal risk of cross

20 W I L L I A M J E W E L L C O L L E G E


contamination, and it can accommodate patients

message about freedom and safety with respon-

of different ages and lung damage severities using

sibility. In my work as a physician, we’ve had five

flow rate control. The Split Kit could save millions

rules. The first is to save the patient. The second is

of lives in the event of a ventilator shortage. You

to do the right thing. The third is to be the bridge.

can meet my teammates and see our device at

The fourth is to ask questions and seek answers.

splitkitcom.wordpress.com.

And the fifth is to remember those who laugh last.

I am interested in pursuing biomedical engineer-

I think all these rules fit a pandemic perfectly. If

ing—particularly research and development roles for cardiovascular implantable devices—because I want to use my problem-solving skills to create a positive impact on the people around me. I’ve always been good in STEM, and I’ve always been interested in the healthcare industry, especially after both of my grandparents died of cancer and a lack of proper healthcare. Being a girl in STEM has its challenges, but it’s definitely a rewarding career path.

we could all focus on trying to help take care of each other, then we will be doing the right thing. That makes us the bridge to a future in which this pandemic is under control and we can go back to life as normal. We each have to ask questions about how to do that, and the answers are found in science and good decision-making based on our shared tradition about securing the blessings of liberty for each other. And, finally, it is so important to continue to laugh throughout this difficult time. A real positive in this pandemic is our amazing success with telemedicine. It has revolutionized

U N I V E R S I T Y O F K A N S A S H E A LT H SY S T E M M O R N I N G M E D I A U P D AT E , F R E Q U E N T LY F E AT U R I N G D R . S T E V E N S T I T E S

» f a c e b o o k .c o m / k u h o s p i ta l / v i d e o s

our ability to reach patients in their homes, especially in rural areas where they don’t have good access to health care providers. We’ve also watched people perform extraordinary acts of kindness that make a difference every day.

Pe rs p e c t i ve f ro m a C h i e f Me d i c a l O f f i c e r STEVEN W. STITES, M.D., ’82; Pulmonary

a n d Cr i t i ca l Ca re Me d i c i n e ; E xe c u t i ve V i c e P r e s i d e n t a n d C h i e f M e d i c a l O f f i c e r,

D r. S t e v e n Stites, ’82

University of Kan sa s Health System; V i ce - C h a n ce l l o r fo r C l i n i ca l Af fa i rs , University of Kan sa s Med ical Center

Every day we just try to do the right thing. Whether it’s in our work as physicians or in our morning media presentation, we’re trying to get across a

FA L L 2 0 2 0 21


COV ID -19

ALUMNI VOICES

I know we’re all frustrated, but it is through innovation and science that we will secure a future that will feel more like our past than our

Ca re a n d H o p e fo r th e H o m e l e s s

today. Coronavirus is not a superhero. In fact, coronavirus is weak. Coronavirus depends on you to spread it. It can only get from one person to

HEATHER DUNCAN, PH.D., MSN, APRN,

another as long as it has a host, and that makes

F N P , ’ 8 8 ; A s so c i a te P ro fe s so r o f N u rs i n g,

you the key part of that story. You are strong. You

No rth Park University; Famil y Nurse

can be so strong that we can beat coronavirus even without a vaccination, even without new

P r a c t i t i o n e r, L a w n d a l e C h r i s t i a n H e a l t h C e n t e r M o b i l e H e a l t h Te a m

therapy. You can show coronavirus who’s tough by

When the COVID-19 crisis hit Chicago, resources

wearing a mask, washing your hands, keeping your

were stretched to the brink, so it took weeks before

distance and by not pretending it doesn’t exist.

consideration was given to homeless residents. Because of our expertise with the homeless population, Lawndale Christian Health Care spearheaded the first shelter screening in Chicago where

D r. H e a t h e r Duncan, ’88

we provided weekly health services. I was fortunate to be on that team. Lawndale worked alongside infectious disease specialists from the University of Illinois at Chicago to screen approximately 400 residents of Chicago’s largest shelter before there were any testing capabilities. So little was known about the novel coronavirus. This added another level of uncertainty on top of the lack of infection control, which is difficult in large shelters. We were at the forefront of a historic pandemic, doing something no one had done before, meeting the needs of the patients we care about so much. As the pandemic progressed, it became clear that what was needed was primary prevention. Residents of large shelters who were most at risk were moved to a hotel. At the maximum, we housed and cared for over 170 medically complex homeless patients, trying to keep them out of the hospital and adding another burden to the medical system. There were also unintended complications. We removed patients out of their comfort zone. Lockdown triggered feelings of incarceration and lack of control,

22

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


compounded by the hopelessness of being homeless. On the positive side, many residents had the time and space to rest and prioritize their health. After 30 years of nursing and a Ph.D. in urban studies with a concentration in poverty, I can say that homelessness is complicated. Most people who are homeless work. No one sets out to be homeless. Issues of systemic racism, under-education, incar-

Kelsey Neth, ’18

ceration, lack of affordable housing, mental health issues and the insidious nature of the opioid crisis make climbing out of homelessness almost impossible. Hopelessness is always banging at the door and just needs a little crack to slip in. I truly believe that every person is a child of God and deserves

relationships that have helped me get through this

our respect and care. We are not better people by

year and be more effective in my role. The abil-

virtue of our privilege. We partner with our patients

ity to handle multiple projects at once is crucial

and consider them our equals, regardless.

to this job. I was definitely able to hone that skill during my time at Jewell. Those experiences and my internship with the city of Lenexa, Kansas,

I m p ro v i n g H e a l th th ro u g h In fo r m a t i o n and Education

gave me many tools that helped my transition into a one-man team at a health department. One of the hardest parts has been that the pandemic is a marathon, not a sprint, and so it has tested my endurance. This event has taken a toll on my mental health—the increased workload, the high

KELSEY NETH, ’18; Communications

Specialist, Clay County P ublic Health C e n t e r ( L i b e r t y, M i s s o u r i )

Just two years out of college, I feel lucky to already be in a position where I can make a difference in my community through the ways I share information and educate about important topics related to this disease. The fact that I grew up in Clay County and went to college here helps increase my passion for this job. I know and truly care about the people I’m working to serve.

stakes, the negative social media comments—and I’ve had to be proactive about taking time away and surrounding myself with positive influences. I am proud of our team at the health center. We’re just regular people, trying our best to deal with the challenge set before us. COVID has strengthened many relationships between the health center and our community partners like schools, cities, hospitals and more. After COVID calms down, I’m excited to see the ways those strengthened relationships will help us continue

Being in my role for a year before COVID-19

our mission to “empower all people in Clay

allowed me time to build many of the skills and

County to lead healthier lives.”

FA L L 2 02 0 23


FA C U LT Y AWA R D F I N A L I S T S

HIGH ACHIEVERS her honors project, was personalized around her passion for empowering women in countries devastated by civil war. Through several grants, she researched violence against women in Mexico City; completed a comparative analysis of women in Nepal, Rwanda and Colombia; and conducted

Margo E v i l s i z o r, Facult y Award Winner

interviews in Jordan and Syria. During this time, she studied Arabic at Jewell, in Jordan and at University of Oxford, Mansfield College, where she also was on the rowing team. Her long-term plan is to be part of the solution to provide women more opportunities, either by impacting public policy with a law degree or through the private CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 2020

SENIOR HONOREES FOR THE FACULTY

AWARD, JEWELL’S MOST SIGNIFICANT

their business ventures.

STUDENT HONOR.

SOFIA ARTHURS-SCHOPPE, finalist

MARGO EVILSIZOR, faculty award winner

Graduating with honors in com-

An Oxbridge Institutions and Policy major, Margo Evilsizor also graduated with honors in international relations and was named a Fulbright Scholar this spring. She is completing an internship in Mexico City through the prestigious Fulbright Binational Internship Program. On

24

sector by employing women and microfunding

munication and a second major in chemistry, Sofia Arthurs-Schoppe was cited by the award committee for achieving excellence in both areas. She attended 15 conferences for her various Jewell activities, including the American Chemical Society national

campus, she was the Pi Sigma Alpha Honor Society

meeting, the world’s largest gathering of scientists

president and was involved in Christian Student

in 2019. A great deal of her work has been outside

Ministries, Handbell Choir and Mortar Board.

the classroom, as Hilltop Monitor chief editor,

Evilsizor’s undergraduate experience, including

International Student Association president, oSTEM

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


(LGBTQIA+ individuals in STEM fields) president,

completed extensive undergraduate research.

Kansas City University Venture Fund associate and

At Maria Mitchell Observatory in Massachusetts,

a University Innovation Fellow through Stanford

she worked on an optical process to discover

University’s d.school. The New Zealand native

intermediate-mass black holes. She presented her

also published a book about people experiencing

research at the American Astronomical Society

conflict in the Middle East and Europe. She worked

meeting, winning the Chambliss Astronomy

for the German Press Agency in Washington, D.C.,

Achievement Student Award. During her junior year

studied economics and journalism at George

at University of Oxford, she used data from Galaxy

Mason University and furthered her research on

Zoo to continue her astronomy research. She was

sustainable electricity generation in Peru. Arthurs-

one of 15 Americans chosen for a summer research

Schoppe is a venture analyst for Stray Dog Capital,

experience in Switzerland at the world-renowned

an impact investing firm in Leawood, Kansas.

CERN laboratory. Her research and dedication to

TATE COOPER, finalist

Tate Cooper completed Capital Semester on Leadership and the American Presidency his junior year, taking courses at George Mason University and

science earned her the elite Barry Goldwater Scholarship in 2019. At Jewell, Pittman was a Pillsbury Scholar, a Pritchard Humanitarian Service Award recipient, Society of Physics Students president and an editor of Inscape magazine.

serving as a legislative intern with U.S. Rep. Ann

ELLIOTT YOAKUM, finalist

Wagner (R-Mo.). The Fund for American Studies

An Oxbridge Honors Program Literature

program is held in partnership with the Ronald

and Theory major, Elliott Yoakum was

Reagan Presidential Foundation and Institute, and

fully immersed in his University of Oxford

Cooper received the program’s award for Aca-

year of study at Mansfield College. He was selected

demic Excellence in Public Policy. After a semester

for the St. John’s Chapel Choir, participated in the

at the national capital, he spent a semester at the state capital as a legislative intern and research analyst with the Missouri Department of Public Safety. Cooper graduated with honors in Oxbridge Institutions and Policy and minored in mathematics and music. He was involved in band, Jazz Band, Mortar Board, Pi Sigma Alpha political science honor society and was a Cardinal Host. He attends the University of Missouri School of Law. CAELEY PITTMAN, finalist

Caeley Pittman’s love for astronomy took her to Boston University, where she is beginning a Ph.D. in astronomy

LGBT society and was engaged in local events, such as lectures at Oxford’s Human Rights Institute. At Jewell, Yoakum delved into world literature, critical theory, interdisciplinary humanities and women’s studies. He attended the MLA convention, presented a paper at the National Undergraduate Literature Conference and was accepted to present at the 2020 Sigma Tau Delta English Honor Society National Convention. Outside of academics, Yoakum performed with Handbell Choir, Schola Cantorum and Concert Choir; worked for the Harriman-Jewell Series; and was a member of Mortar Board, Alpha Lambda Delta honor society, Hilltop Monitor editorial staff, Diversity and Inclusion

and researching young star systems. A triple

Workgroup and was president of Jewell’s LGBT

major in Oxbridge Literature and Theory, physics,

association. He is exploring graduate programs in

and applied critical thought and inquiry, Pittman

global thought and cultural studies.

FA L L 2 02 0 25


C A R D I N A L AT H L E T I C S

New Sports

Powerlifting

Ca l l i n g A l l Co m p e t i to rs

JE WELL ADDS 2 SPORTS TO THE LINEUP

THIS FALL JEWELL LAUNCHED ITS

FIRST-EVER MEN’S AND WOMEN’S

POWERLIFTING PROGRAM. THE SPORT HAS SEEN TREMENDOUS GROWTH IN

AREA HIGH SCHOOLS, CREATING NEW

OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENTS TO BE

INVOLVED IN INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS.

Jewell is now one of only three colleges in the Kansas City region to offer powerlifting and Olympic Lifting, joining Missouri Valley and Ottawa University. Fellow Great Lakes Valley Conference members Lindenwood and McKendree also field similar programs. The Cardinals will compete in the United States Powerlifting Association. Powerlifting consists of three exercises: squat, bench press and deadlift. The best lift in each category is then added to the competitor’s total, and the highest total in each weight class is declared the winner. In the event of a tie, the competitor

Powerlifting head coach, Devin Hance

with the lowest body weight earns the win. Olympic Lifting focuses on the events performed at the Olympic Games and includes snatch and clean and jerk. Each competitor gets three attempts in each discipline, choosing whether to increase the weight on each. The highest weight completed in each event is used to determine the total for each competitor, and thus the winner of each weight class. MEET THE COACH

Leading the College’s first powerlifting team is Devin Hance, who joined the Cardinal staff in January. A Joplin native, Hance has a bachelor’s degree in physical education and a master’s in human health and performance from Pittsburg (Kansas) State. He spent one year at Riverton High School in Southeast Kansas as powerlifting coach Wrestling head coach, Keenan Hagerty

26

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


and strength and conditioning teacher. He then

Conditioning Association, the Kansas Association for

served on the strength staff at the University of

Health-Physical Education-Recreation-Dance and

Missouri-Kansas City.

the National High School Strength and Conditioning

Last year he worked with professional, college and

Association. He holds a Certified Strength and

high school athletes at KC Speed and Sport. Hance

Conditioning Certificate, CrossFit Level 1 Certificate

is an active member of the National Strength and

and USA-Weightlifting Olympic Certification.

Wrestling

along with associate members Ouachita Baptist and Davenport. MEET THE COACH

JEWELL BECOMES ONE OF THE FIRST NCAA

The only NCAA-II

WOMEN’S WRESTLING AND REINSTATE MEN’S

Kansas City is led by

D-II INSTITUTIONS IN MISSOURI TO ADD WRESTLING AFTER A 27-YEAR HIATUS. COMPETITION BEGINS IN FALL 2021.

wrestling program in a product of Kansas City wrestling. Named

Women’s wrestling received emerging sport status

Jewell’s head coach in August, Keenan Hagerty

in January at the NCAA Convention. Jewell is the first

attended Blue Springs High School where he won

college in the Kansas City metro to add the sport, joining GLVC schools McKendree, Lindenwood and Davenport (associate member). The Missouri High School Activities Association began offering a state championship in girls wrestling in 2019, with about 200 high schools fielding teams in Missouri and 150 in Kansas. The next step for the sport to move to NCAA Championship status will be reaching a min-

a state championship under his father, Mike, a National Wrestling Hall of Fame inductee. For the last four years, Hagerty was the top assistant coach at Maryville University (St. Louis), helping the Saints to 19 All-GLVC selections, 15 NCAA-II national qualifiers, seven All-Americans, one national champion and three consecutive NWCA

imum of 40 NCAA-affiliated varsity programs. Until

DII Team Academic National Championships.

then, women will compete in the National Wrestling

Hagerty spent his own collegiate career at

Coaches Association Women’s National Championship.

Maryville with a record of 125-28 and numerous

Men’s wrestling was first added at Jewell in 1950 and

accolades. He was a four-time national qualifier,

became a conference-sponsored sport in 1961. The program claimed 14 conference championships and 20 national qualifiers. Two of Jewell’s 19 wrestling

1978 -79 Jewell Wrestling Te a m

three time All-American (National Finalist as a freshman), Newcomer of the Year, Male Athlete

ALUMNI SHARE HOW BEING

A ST U D EN T-

AT H L E T E S H A P E D THEIR LIFE.

» w a tc h a t b i t .l y/ 3 j t p Au q

of the Year, three-time Super Regional finalist

coaches include hall of famers Fred Flook (1962-

and 2013 winner, NWCA All-Academic and school

1972) and the late Darrel Gourley (1958-61, 1980-81).

record-holder for wins in a season (42) and career

The men will compete with GLVC schools McKend-

(125). He graduated in 2016 with a degree in busi-

ree, Lindenwood, Indianapolis, Maryville and Drury

ness administration.

FA L L 2 02 0 27


C A R D I N A L AT H L E T I C S

New Head Coaches Cory Herchenroeder

24 VA R S I T Y SPORTS.

20 NCAA

D-II SPORTS. FOLLOW US @

» j e w e l l c a rd i n a l s .c o m

C O R Y H E R C H E N R O E D E R , w o m e n’ s s o c c e r

MIKE McGLINCHEY, fo o tb al l

In February, Cory Herchenroeder was named

Mike McGlinchey joined the Jewell staff in January

the eighth head coach in program history. The

as head football coach. He spent the previous four

four-year player at William Woods University

seasons at Colorado School of Mines as co-defensive

obtained a bachelor’s degree in sports manage-

coordinator, working primarily with the defensive

ment. While earning a master’s degree in athletic

line and as special teams coach. During his time

administration and serving as a graduate assistant

with the Orediggers, the team won three confer-

at his alma mater, he helped the Owls to a 20-16-2

ence championships and made the playoffs three

record, including nine shutouts. He was hired as

times. He coached 13 all-conference performers

the goalkeeper coach at Jefferson City High School

and coordinated a defense that led the nation in

under current Jewell men’s soccer coach Eddie

rush defense and ranked ninth overall in 2019.

Horn, with the team claiming 42 shutouts in three

Before joining Mines, he served as the defensive

years. At Missouri State University, Herchenroeder

line coach for a season at Salisbury University

spent two years as assistant coach for the men’s

(Maryland) and spent three seasons with North

and women’s teams and mentored 17 players to

Carolina Central University working with special

all-conference selections—four as all-region picks.

teams, running backs and the defensive line. He

Most recently, he spent three years at Sam Houston

has also worked as a coach for Princeton University,

State University (Texas). He was promoted to

Towson University (Maryland) and the United

associate head coach in his second year, working

Football League’s Las Vegas Locomotives. As a

with five All-Southland Conference selections.

player, McGlinchey earned four letters for Towson as offensive guard and tight end. He completed a bachelor’s degree in sports communication.

28

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


Mike McGlinchey

Craig Sager

Greg Te m p l e

CRAIG SAGER, golf

GREG TEMPLE, swimming

With the recent addition of Craig Sager,

Greg Temple completed his first season as men’s

Jewell’s men’s and women’s golf teams are led

and women’s swimming coach. He had served as

by a full-time coach for the first time in program

head coach and program director for the Des Moines

history. Sager had served three seasons as the

(Iowa) Swimming Federation for nine years where

men’s golf coach at North Central Missouri

he helped develop multiple Junior National, Senior

College (in his hometown of Trenton). During

National and U.S. Olympic Trial qualifiers and sent

that time, he led the Pirates to back-to-back

more than 40 athletes to the collegiate level. His

Region XVI championships, six All-Region

swimmers won multiple championships on the state

selections, three All-District honors and four

and sectional level, earned National Interscholastic

national tournament qualifiers. Additionally,

Swimming Coaches Association All-America status

his team was named the 2018 Academic Team

and went on to become Division II and III All Ameri-

of the Year by the National Junior College

cans. Additionally, he served on the Iowa Swimming

Athletic Association for boasting the highest

Board of Directors and was named the ISI Senior

team GPA in the nation. Sager holds a bachelor’s

Coach of the Year twice. Temple competed colle-

degree in business management from University

giately at Missouri State University where he was a

of Central Missouri. He is a member of the

three-time All-Conference team member, winning

Golf Coaches Association of America and has

championships in the 100 and 200 breaststroke and

worked nearly two decades in the golf industry,

posting four other top-10 finishes. He held the 100

including 10 as a golf professional.

breaststroke school record and ranked second in team history in the 200 breaststroke.

FA L L 2020 29


News

CL ASS NOTES

C l as s Notes

ZOE (WOOD) LINZA, ’74,

received the 2019 Bolton Award from the National Association of Bar Executives for outstanding bar leadership. She has been executive director of The Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis for 13 years. GARY BARNES, ’75,

was named to the 26th edition

1940s

1960s

REV. PAUL POWELL, ’47,

LARRY HOLLEY, ’67,

of The Best Lawyers in America publication, a peer-reviewed ranking recognizing lawyers for professional excellence. He is a partner

as

received the Missouri Sports Hall

pastor and retired after 75 years

of Fame Pinnacle Award to rec-

of church ministry. He has lived

ognize a lifetime of work enhanc-

most of his life in St. Louis and

ing sports. He retired from Jewell

KEN PERSONETT, ’79,

recently moved to Abilene, Texas,

in 2019 after 48 seasons as head

is the developer and exclusive

to be near his sons.

men’s basketball coach and the

home builder of Timber Ridge,

REV. DEAN LEWIS, ’49,

all-time winningest coach among

an estate-sized lot community in

Missouri four-year colleges.

Liberty. He has restored several

resigned

from

his

position

moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico,

Connection

after

more

than

Trustee.

historic properties in the Kansas

to live closer to family. In 2016, he ended the Presbyterian Cuba

with Husch Blackwell and a Jewell

City area and was named Out-

1970s

standing Preservationist by Historic Downtown Liberty, Inc.

20 years of post-retirement partnership and raising more than

DAVID YOUNG, ’71,

$1 million to support the Cuban

of Lee’s Summit is the president

retired from social work and now

Presbyterian Church.

of the Missouri Prairie Foundation,

provides community resources to

an organization that works to protect and restore native prairies and grasslands. He also is a retired

1950s DR. WILLIAM HOOPER, SR., ’53,

published

his

10th

“Congregational

Song

book, in

the

Worship of the Church” (Pickwick

Publications

-

Wipf

and

W ILLINDA (JE FFRIE S) PER KIN S , ’ 7 9 ,

families in her church. She resides in Kansas City.

Missouri master gardener emeritus.

CHRISTY (SANDRETTO)

DR. PHILLIP ASH, ’73,

moved with her husband from

was a strategic management consultant in the United States and Asia. He also was an executive coach for the Asian Development

CARPENTER, ’79,

Arizona to Poland, Maine, after retirement to pursue a love of Percheron draft horses.

Bank before returning to the States

EILEEN HOUSTON-STEWART, ’ 79,

Stock). He is professor emeritus

in 2013 to teach at Grand Canyon

was named director of communi-

of music at Southwest Baptist

University. He retired in 2016 and

cations for St. Joseph (Missouri)

University in Bolivar.

resides in Peoria, Arizona.

schools.

30 W I L L I A M J E W E L L C O L L E G E


1980s T he Shar p famil y, D ecember 1959: John ’63, William ’62, Cather ine B alan ’ 7 7, Pauline (S e t t l e) ’ 3 7, W. E d w a r d ’ 3 3 , Ma r y V in ce n t (a t te n d e d), Thomas ’66, and Douglas ’71.

ROBERT KIRKLAND, ’80,

was named to the 26th edition of The Best Lawyers in America publication, a peer-reviewed ranking. He is the founding partner of Kirkland Woods and Martinsen and resides in Liberty. TRISHA MCLAUGHLIN

GOERING ADAMS, ’80,

opened Trisha Adams Fine Art gallery in Herndon, Virginia. Her painting, Dazzled by the Light, was selected for Amica Insurance’s 49th annual Thanksgiving card. STEPHEN LINDSAY, ’81,

became the chancel choir director at North Cross United Methodist Church in Kansas City in 2018. He has been the handbell choir director since 1985 and associate director of the North Star Community Band since 2014. He is also the workshop floor supervisor at Vocational Services Inc. (HOOVER) MARTIN, ’81,

was elected chief judge of Missouri Court of Appeals, Western District. Her two-year term began in July. VIKI (BONUCHI) PERSONETT, ’ 84,

of Liberty retired from the Park Hill (Missouri) School District as a reading interventionist. She now tutors children with dyslexia and watches her two grandchildren. JUDGE ZEL FISCHER, ’85,

McMillian

the

2019

Judicial

S u b m i t te d b y D r. Ja m e s K . P ie rc e , ’6 6

The Wolf Creek Ski Area, located in the San Juan mountains of southwest Colorado, celebrated its 75th anniversary in 2019. A photo in a YouTube video about the history of the ski area caught my attention. It pictured the W. Edward Sharp family and recognized Ed for the key role he played in establishing the ski

JUDGE CYNTHIA L.

received

THE SHARP LINE AT JEWELL

area, an accomplishment that placed him in the Colorado Ski Hall of Fame. The fourth of six children in that family was Tom, my roommate at Jewell. What is fascinating about the photo is that all eight members of the family attended William Jewell. They were active on campus and have exemplified the deep-rooted tradition of achievement among alumni. Ed, Bill and Doug have been recognized as Achievers. Pauline was recognized as Alumna of the Year. All have been successful in their fields: doctor, musician, aerospace scientist, computer scientist, minister, lawyer and mortician. According to family records, 21 Sharps in four generations have graduated from Jewell.

Theodore Excellence

FA L L 2 0 2 0 31


News

CL ASS NOTES

DO YOU KNOW SOMEONE W H O W O U L D T H R I V E AT

JEWELL? SHARE THEIR EMAIL

CRAIG ZAHND, ’89,

University in St. Louis.

a Jewell Trustee, was

JULIE (CAMERER) LOGAN, ’87,

named senior vice

of St. Louis joined Thompson

president, general

LIFE ON THE HILL.

Coburn as director of associate

counsel and chief compliance

» a l u m n i .j e w e l l .e d u /re fe r ra l

recruiting

support

officer of the Federal Reserve Bank

services. She also serves as pres-

of Kansas City. He had served as

ident of the Association of Legal

managing director and general

Administrators - Gateway Chapter.

counsel of Swiss Re.

AND WE’LL TELL THEM ABOUT

Award

from

the

Missouri

Bar

Association. He has served on the Missouri

Supreme

Court

since

2008, including a term as Chief Justice from 2017-2019.

and

legal

PAUL PAUTLER, JR., ’87,

chair of Husch Blackwell’s Labor and

Employment

Kansas

City,

practice

was

named

the

Academy of Hospitality Industry

GIARRATANO, ’85,

won his 900th game as a collegiate

1990s

in

national president-elect of the

ANTHONY “NINO”

Attorneys.

JEFFREY CLAYTON BROWN, ’90,

co-directed a film, “We Believe in Dinosaurs,” that tells the story

baseball head coach. He is the

BRIAN WOOD, ’87,

of Noah’s Ark reproduction in

winningest coach in history at the

was inducted into the Quincy

Kentucky. It was shown at the

University of San Francisco.

University Athletic Hall of Fame

San Francisco Film Festival and

for

DR. JASON KINSER, ’05,

received

the

2020

David

J.

King Teaching Award for career achievement and the 2020 Teacher of Distinction Award from George Mason University where he chairs the Computational and Data Sciences Department. He recently published his fifth book, “Image

2019

was voted outstanding documen-

director

tary at the St. Louis International

of sports medicine for the 1994-

Film Festival. Brown resides in

1995 men’s basketball team. He is

Chicago

also a two-time member of Halls

Northwestern University.

for

the

second

serving

as

time the

in

of Fame at William Jewell and Clark University. He resides in Gardner, Kansas.

and

teaches

film

at

KRISTEN (FAIRLIE) SMARR, ’91,

has been named deputy chief marketing

and

communica-

GREG DUNCAN, ’88,

tions officer for the University of

is vice president for production

Missouri. She has led communi-

with Artisan E-Learning, a cus-

cations at the university’s College

tom-built online training program

of Agriculture, Food and Natural

Bus!

for companies and organizations.

Resources for the past 15 years.

(Simon & Schuster),” “Emergency

A Liberty resident, he also serves

Kittens!”

on City Council.

Operators” (CRC Press). JODY JENSEN SHAFFER, ’86,

has “It’s

published a

Field

several Trip,

books:

Busy

(RH/Doubleday)

and

“Who is Jackie Chan?” (Penguin

STEFANIE (SCOTT) WEST, ’92,

was inducted into the Missouri

MICHELLE (DILLARD) YOUNG, ’ 89,

Athletic

completed

gang

Hall of Fame. She is the direc-

DR. CAREY ADAMS, ’86,

activity in Belize that was pub-

tor of sports medicine for Peak

was named provost of Hanover

lished by InterAmerican Develop-

Sport and Spine and the athletic

College

ment Bank. She resides in Wake

trainer for Hickman High School

Forest, North Carolina.

(Columbia).

Workshop).

(Indiana).

He

most

recently served as vice president

32

for academic affairs at Fontbonne

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

a

study

on

Trainers

Association


DAVID HAZELS, ’93,

GLOETA MASSIE, ’96,

LAURA SMITH-EVERETT, ’01,

was named the national managing

is pursuing a Ph.D. at the Uni-

was named by Kansas Gov. Laura

partner of advisory services for

versity of Queensland in Austra-

Kelly to the Coordinating Coun-

Grant Thornton in Kansas City. He

lia. She received an Australian

cil on Early Childhood Develop-

recently led the firm’s risk services

Government

ment Services and was elected to

division.

Program Scholarship to support

SCOTT O’NEILL, ’95,

serves as senior vice president of operations for Element

Research

Training

her research on the impacts of controlled predator exposure on the reintroduction of Australian marsupials.

Community

County

College

(Kansas) Board

of

Trustees. She is an ELL teacher for the Shawnee Mission (Kansas)

JILL (ESELY) DURNIN, ’02,

25 years of expertise in the renew-

was inducted into the Missouri

2000s

able natural gas industry, includ-

Sports Hall of Fame as part of

ing project development, regulagreenhouse gas management.

Johnson

School District.

Markets in Houston. He has

tory policy, methane capture and

the

the 2019 “Filbert Five” basketball DR. BROOKE WHITWORTH, ’01,

received the 2019 Outstanding

team. She is an assistant principal at Camdenton (Missouri) Middle

HON. BLAKE ADAMS, ’96,

College Science Teacher Award

was elected a Collier

from

County Judge in

Teachers

Florida’s 20th Judicial

received a $1.37 million research

of Lenexa, Kansas, was named the

Circuit. He earned a

grant from the National Science

executive director of First Hand,

J.D. and M.B.A. from the

Foundation. Whitworth is an asso-

the

University of Tulsa and resides

ciate professor of science educa-

Cerner. She has worked with First

in Naples.

tion at the University of Mississippi.

Hand in various roles since 2002.

the

Mississippi Association.

Science She

also

School. SHANNA (HILT) ADAMIC, ’02,

corporate

philanthropy

of

CITATION FOR ACHIEVEMENT

Our 2020 recipients of Jewell’s highest alumni honor were celebrated in February: Rev. Dr. Vernon Percy Howard Jr., ’86, senior pastor at St. Mark Church in Kansas City; president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference of Greater Kansas City Jill (McCrea) Nagel, ’98, contracts manager at Eurofins BioPharma Product Testing; head girls basketball coach at Rock Bridge High School in Columbia, Missouri Phil Youtsey, ’82, vice president of ticketing and sponsorships with the Carolina Panthers (retired in 2019); executive advisor of the Charlotte Sports Foundation

FA L L 2 02 0 33


News

CL ASS NOTES

world.

ERIC BUNCH, ’04,

she

worked

tor of software development for

rights,

gender

and

Shamrock

councilman on the Kansas City

technology-related

policy

and

and graduated from Leadership

(Missouri) City Council in 2019.

programs at the U.S. Depart-

He is the co-founder and director

ment of State. She splits her time

of strategic initiatives for Bike-

between Washington, D.C., and

WalkKC.

San Francisco.

ELIZABETH WALSH YODER, ’06,

DR. LINDSEY CHAPPELL, ’07,

was named to the de Beaumont

is an assistant professor of English

Foundation’s inaugural 40 Under

specializing in 19th-century Brit-

40 in Public Health list. She is a

ish literature at Georgia Southern

public health statistician for the

University. She earned a Ph.D. in

Kansas

English from Rice University in

was

elected

City

Fourth

District

(Missouri)

Health

in

human

Department.

2017. She resides in Savannah.

JOSEPHA HADEN

JUSTIN BARCLAY, ’07,

CHOMPHOSY, ’06,

was promoted to chief analytics

of Kansas City was named exec-

officer for Consumer Edge, a data

utive director of the WordPress

insights and research company

open source project for Automat-

focused on the global consumer.

tic, the parent company of Word-

He resides with his family in Brook-

Press, Longreads and more.

lyn, New York.

DANIEL STRICKER, ’07,

SARAH (RAHAL) WAHRER, ’08,

of Des Peres, Missouri,

is a nurse at Bozeman Health and

was named president

is working on a master’s degree in

of Ascension Post-Acute

clinical nurse leadership at Mon-

Services. He had served as

tana State University.

chief operating officer for

City office of Lathrop

received a master’s degree in

Gage as an associate on

medial dietetics at Saint Louis

the insurance recovery and coun-

University and is a registered dieti-

seling team. He worked as a

tian with Touchpoint Support Ser-

catastrophe claims adjustor for

vices at Ascension Via Christi Hos-

a large insurance carrier before

pital in Pittsburg, Kansas.

going into law. In 2019, he earned his juris doctor from the University

BETSY BRAMON, ’07,

with

Facebook’s

Con-

of Missouri-Kansas City.

tent Policy Team to make the

ADAM MICKELSON, ’09,

new community standards res-

is a member of the Olathe, Kan-

ponsive to the diverse and com-

sas, City Council after winning

plex needs of people around the

the Ward 2 election. He is a direc-

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

Corporation

Olathe in 2019.

2010s BRITANY RILEY, ’12,

graduated

from

Stanford

Law

School in 2019 and began clerking in the D.C. Court of Appeals. She previously served as a conference assistant to Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy on the U.S. Supreme Court. JAMES WEBBER, ’15,

completed a master’s degree in accounting from the College of William and Mary and was hired as an audit associate at PricewaterhouseCoopers in Tysons, Virginia. AYNA PALVANOVA, ’15,

is an analyst for the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, working out of her home city of Ashgabat, Turkmenistan.

joined the Kansas

PATRICK JAMES, ’07,

works

Trading

NOAH NASH, ’09,

Ascension Living.

34

Previously,

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» a l u m n i .j e w e l l .e d u /c l a s s- n o te s


CL ASS NOTES

In Memoriam

B id d in g fa re w e l l to m e m b e rs o f t h e Je w e l l fa m il y

1940s

Virginia (Crossett) Carter, ’42, of Chillicothe, Missouri, Feb. 15, 2020 Anita Marie (Summers) Loar, ’43, of Grapevine, Texas, Jan. 26, 2020 Dolores “Gwen” (Herron) Turnage, ‘46, of Jacksonville, Florida, Oct. 4, 2020 Marilyn (Ashley) Halferty, ’47, of Smithville, Missouri, May 9, 2020 Catherine “Jean” (Reed) Payne, ’47, of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, July 10, 2020 Frances (Halferty) Payne, ’47, of Prairie Village, Kansas, Dec. 21, 2019 Irene (Simon) Thomas, ‘47, of Liberty, Missouri, August 26, 2020 Dorothy (Casebolt) Hall, ’48, of Bella Vista, Arkansas, Feb. 10, 2020 Imogene (McCormick) McConkey, ’48, of Daytona Beach, Florida, July 4, 2020 Rev. Dr. J. Bruce Melton, ’48, of St. Charles, Missouri, March 10, 2020 Ella (Massey) Pascale, ’49, of Harrisonburg, Virginia, June 28, 2020 Sue (Eames) Sinclair, ’49, of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Feb. 16, 2020 1950s

William Coil Jr., ’50, Independence, Missouri, July 9, 2020 Dr. James Helvey Jr., ’50, of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, April 5, 2020 Dr. Richard Kirkendall, ’50, of Claremont, California, June 26, 2020 Francisco “Frank” Olvera, ’51, of Kansas City, Missouri, May 31, 2020 Janet Boone, ’52, of Darien, Illinois, Nov. 17, 2019 James Hunter, ’52, of Leawood, Kansas, Dec. 8, 2019 VIEW MEMORIALS

SINCE JAN . 1 , 2017

» a l u m n i . j e w e l l . e d u / memoriam

Betty (Fisher) Boulton, ’53, of Sebring, Ohio, July 15, 2020 Nancy (Dougherty) Denman, ’53, of Santa Fe, New Mexico, March 12, 2020 Ted Harris, ’53, of Nixa, Missouri, Nov. 24, 2019 May Marie (Knapp) Irwin, ’53, of Loveland, Colorado, Oct. 17, 2019 John “Jay” Pitts, ’53, of Chillicothe, Missouri, March 14, 2020 Neil Seaman, ’53, of Overland Park, Kansas, May 6, 2020 Donald Kiernan, ’54, of Washington, D.C., Dec. 21, 2019 Frieda (Franklin) Lubkeman, ’54, of Janesville, Wisconsin, May 12, 2020 Norman Amos, ’56, of Kansas City, Missouri, Nov. 21, 2019 Joseph Crouthers, ’56, of Montrose, Missouri, Oct. 18, 2019 Dr. Richard Morrison, ’56, of Overland Park, Kansas, March 4, 2020 Dixie (Sanders) Pollard, ’56, of Kansas City, Missouri, July 27, 2020 Bob Carson, ’57, of Overland Park, Kansas, March 15, 2020 Dr. Edgar Chapman, ’57, of East Peoria, Illinois, Oct. 11, 2019 Dr. John Philpot Jr., ’57, (professor emeritus of physics) of Liberty, Missouri, Oct. 1, 2019

FA L L 2 02 0 35


CL ASS NOTES

In Memoriam

Jesse Baird, ’58, of Lawson, Missouri, Jan. 4, 2020

Melissa (Keen) Shafer, ’73, of Weston, Missouri, Oct. 25, 2019

Charles Blaylock, ’58, of Rock Hill, South Carolina, Jan. 6, 2020

Daniel Cox, ’74, of Carrollton, Texas, April 9, 2020

Mary (Frith) Bruns, ’58, of Pensacola, Florida, Jan. 26, 2020

Steve Raps, ’74, of St. Charles, Missouri, Jan. 17, 2020

Jerry Sheridan, ’59, of Leawood, Kansas, May 18, 2020

Richard Gray, ’75, of Kansas City, Missouri, Oct. 18, 2019

1960s

John Shank Jr., ’75, of Springfield, Missouri, Oct. 7, 2019

Rev. Jim Abel, ’60, of Sullivan, Missouri, Dec. 12, 2019

Calvin Spence Jr., ’76, of Leawood, Kansas, Dec. 25, 2019

Patricia (Russell) Birdsong, ’60, of Excelsior Springs, Missouri, June 29, 2020

Larry Hollowell, ’77, of Overland Park, Kansas, Nov. 21, 2019

Donald Blalock, ’60, of Overland Park, Kansas, Nov. 15, 2019 Larry Edgar, ’60, of Middletown, Ohio, Sept. 15, 2020 William Jewell Griffey II, ’60, of Excelsior Springs, Missouri, July 7, 2020

Peggy (Hutchison) Smith, ’78, of Kansas City, Missouri, Jan. 19, 2020 David Albright, ’79, of Liberty, Missouri, March 7, 2020 1980s

Janet (Herman) Henry ’61, of Topeka, Kansas, Feb. 10, 2020

Diana (Vincent) Storey, ’80, of Mt. Juliet, Tennessee, June 22, 2020

M. Ollie Parker, ’61, of Gladwin, Michigan, June 30, 2020

Paul Stonner Jr., ’84, of Columbus, Ohio, June 29, 2020

Cynthia (Tucker) Jamieson, ’62, of Frisco, Texas, May 31, 2020

Ann Ryan, ’88, of Kansas City, Missouri, Nov. 28, 2019

Jack Jordan, ’62, of St. Louis, Missouri, April 25, 2020

1990s

Xavier Moreno, ’62, of Kansas City, Missouri, March 31, 2020

Donald Raby II, ’97, of Gladstone, Missouri, Jan. 2, 2020

Melvin Dixon, ’63, of Turney, Missouri, Nov. 10, 2019

2000s

Virginia (Tanner) Bryan, ’64, of Richmond, Missouri, Dec. 17, 2019

Tamara (Kohler) Wilson, ’02, of Pleasant Hill, Missouri, Nov. 2, 2019

Jasper Edmundson, ’64, of Poplar Bluff, Missouri, Jan. 3, 2020

2010s

Gene McMahon, ’64, of Kansas City, Missouri, June 9, 2017

Alexander Holden, ’17, of Sacramento, California, Jan. 27, 2020

Alan Boyer, ’66, of Liberty, Missouri, April 18, 2020

FRIENDS

Alfred Ludlow III, ’66, of Las Vegas, Nevada, Oct. 30, 2019

Dr. E. Bruce Heilman (former trustee) of Richmond, Virginia, Oct. 20, 2019

Linda (Taylor) Dinning, ’68, of Harrisonville, Missouri, Jan. 14, 2020 Helen (Hunt) Barkley, ’69, of Parsons, Kansas, Oct. 7, 2019 John Davis, ’69, of Liberty, Missouri, Jan. 11, 2020 Janice (Toloso) Harding, ’69, of Sandy, Utah, Oct. 22, 2019

Darrel Gourley (associate professor emeritus of physical education) of Liberty, Missouri, May 21, 2020 Dr. Otis Miller (professor emeritus of economics) of Liberty, Missouri, Jan. 29, 2020 Lee Ann Zech (former staff) of Liberty, Missouri, Oct. 5, 2019

1970s

William Bliss, ’70, of Lee’s Summit, Missouri, Oct. 29, 2019 Glenn Manis, ’70, of Macomb, Illinois, Oct. 26, 2019 William Tharp, ’72, of Rome, Georgia, March 1, 2020 Daryl Billings, ’73, of Joplin, Missouri, Jan. 2, 2020 Linda (Cannady) Owen, ’73, of Florissant, Missouri, May 18, 2020

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WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

To n o t i f y u s o f t h e p a s s i n g o f J e w e l l a l u m n i , plea se email alumni@ w illiam .je well.edu or mail the obituar y to the Of f ice of Alumni Relations.


TE AM EPIC

EPIC THINKING ELEVATES PERFORMANCE BY

EMPOWERING PURPOSEFUL REFLECTION AND STRATEGIC APPLICATION OF IDEAS.

Organizations have become so focused on brainstorming and testing new ideas that most have forgotten about the essential part of creating lasting change: execution. This competency-based program couples topic-focused content with powerful learning opportunities that challenge your team to deepen their thinking and act with purpose on their discoveries. On-site and virtual workshop on dozens of topics customized for your organization’s needs: D E S I G N T H I N K I N G

V I S I O N C A S T I N G

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P I V O T P L A N S

S T R A T E G I C P L A N N I N G

P R O C E S S I N N O V A T I O N

S Y S T E M S T H I N K I N G

C R I S I S M A N A G E M E N T

Conner Hazelrigg, ’15, serves as our p r o g r a m d i r e c t o r. S h e h o l d s a n M B A f r o m th e Unive rs it y o f Mi s s o u r i-Kan s a s Cit y and specializes in business startups. The innovators and educators on our team have more than 50 years of experience in business and leadership.

C O N TA C T U S :

w w w.epic-thinking.com hello@epic-thinking.com 8 1 6 .4 1 5 . 5 0 5 7

FA L L 2 02 0 37


G R A D U AT E H I G H L I G H T S

Class of 2020

CAUSE FOR Emily Hemphill, M.A. in Cultural Heritage and Museum Studies, University of East Anglia, Nor wich, U.K.

Disapp ointed? Yes. Exc u ses? No. Je well seniors might have f inished college vir t ually, but their success is ver y real. Some of our 2020 graduates share plan s for their next chapter. Rey Camareno, M.A. in Te a c h i n g , W i l l i a m J e w e l l C o l l e g e

38

Shaneann Fross, Ph.D. in Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Indiana

Allison Malott, Event C o o r d i n a t o r, R o n a l d M c D o n a l d House Charities of Kansas City

Chris Davison, Doctor of Physical T herap y, Universit y of Missouri

M a j o r W a l k e r, F i e l d E n g i n e e r, McCownGordon Construction, Kansas City

Jeremy Hofman, J u r i s D o c t o r, Wa s h i n g t o n Universit y, St. Louis

A l a i n a Vo g e l b a u g h , R . N ., Pe d i a t r i c IC U, C h i l d re n’s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


Ta n n e r D e v o r e , I n c i d e n t , Investigation and Intelligence Threat Analyst, RiskIQ , Lenexa, Kansas

Sergio Guevara, (December 2019), Human Resources Specialist, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas City

Janessa Johnson, M.A. in Coun seling – Child/Family T h e r a p y a n d Tr a u m a , A r c a d i a Un i ve rs it y, G l e n s id e, Pe n n s yl va n ia

Ril e y Fin d l e y, M . M . in O p e ra Performance, Indiana University

S a m a n t h a S c h a e r, J u r i s D o c t o r, University of Iowa

Hayden Fulk, Audit Associate, BKD, Kansas City

Alexis Nelson, D.O., Kansas City University of Medicine and Bioscience

Lo gan McKinne y, M.D., University of Kansas School of Medicine

Paige Cunningham, Third Grade Te a c h e r, C h o u t e a u E l e m e n t a r y , North Kansas City Schools

Jameson Howard, E x e c u t i v e D i r e c t o r, H i s t o r i c D o w nto w n Liber t y, Inc.

Darcy Sweet, M.S. in O cc up ational T herap y, Wa shington Universit y, St. Lo ui s

Parker Jenkins, Early C h i l d h o o d , Te a c h F o r A m e r i c a Corps, Kansas City

FA L L 2020 39


THE CRITICAL THINKING COLLEGE ®

NON-PROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID WILLIAM JE WELL COLLEGE

500 COLLEGE HILL LIBERTY MO, 64068

Ki t t y ( Wy a t t) Brinkman, ’70

WHY I GIVE “I attended my first class at William Jewell in 1949 when I was taken to a child psychology class to be observed as a baby by my father, Harley Wyatt, Jr.! He was getting his education after serving in World War II and fell in love with this special institution. He later served as the admissions director for 31 years and has been credited with touching the lives of 10,000 students in his career. So you might say that I have a long association with the Campus of Achievement, including being in the Class of 1970. What impresses me the most, and encourages me to contribute annually, is Jewell’s emphasis on a strong liberal arts education. There has always been the concept of giving students the skills to adapt, and I am a good example: elementary education graduate who used every aptitude in teaching the gifted; married into an agricultural family and learned about farming, ranching and market values; and then became a fishing resort manager in Colorado with my husband! Skills, learned through a fine liberal arts program, that can be applied to a myriad of opportunities that one never thinks of at the age of 21 or 22 are so important. I hope that contributing to scholarships gives Jewell students both the knowledge to find opportunities upon graduation and the skills to carry them through life.” Kitt y ( Wyatt) Brinkman, ’ 70, lives in Libert y and is a member of Je well ’s John P riest Greene Society, recognizing her annual support of student scholarships, and the Alexander Doniphan Heritage Societ y, recognizing her planned gift/estate gift to the College. 40 W I L L I A M J E W E L L C O L L E G E