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WILLAMETTE VALLEY P L A C E S T O G O. . . P E O P L E T O S E E . . . T H I N G S T O D O

Volume 5 Issue 2/Spring 2014 (Display until July 1, 2014) WillametteValleyLife.com

5 Must See Gardens Exploring the Willamette Valley’s array of public gardens PAGE 6

THE MARIONBERRY ALL HAIL

P.8

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS BILL COBERLY/TEARDROP TRAILERS

P.13

EAT ASPARAGUS QUESADILLAS

P.15

VINEYARD WINE TASTING TIPS

P.18

Spring 2014 • Willamette Valley Life

1


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2164 Davcor St. SE, Salem • TearDropsNW.com Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2014

Buy-Sell-Trade, Guns, Knives, Ammunition...Lots of Collector Items

Sat. June 7 : 8 AM to 5 PM Sun. June 8: 9 AM to 4 PM

Adults $5 (Kids under 12, Free)•Free Parking Food Available On-Site 520 S. Pacific Hwy. West, Rickreall, OR 97371 Ph: (503) 623.3048 • Toll Free: (888) 229.6818

Future Gun Shows: Dec. 13-14, 2014


C O N T E N T S

To Advertise Call (541) 926-8683 or email: mike@kgal.com

We Have Remote Deposit!

The Oregon Garden. Photo by Kathy Bryant.

6 FEATURE

D E PA RT M E N TS

4 Valley Floor

MEMBERSHIP HAS ITS BENEFITS

13 Opportunity Knocks 14 People/Places 15 Eat

5 Must See Gardens

16 Best Years Yet

Exploring the Willamette Valley’s array of public gardens

20 Vineyard ON THE COVER Wooden Shoe Tulip Farm Photo by Kathy Bryant. kathybryantphotography.com

PUBLISHERS Randy and Dawn Hill SENIOR EDITOR Jessica Gardner ASSOCIATE EDITOR Erin Grace ART DIRECTION Hill Design Studios PUBLISHING COORDINATOR Ken Gardner DISTRIBUTION Profile In Delivery, Kathy Melson CONTRIBUTORS Angela Boweter, Sophie Hawley, Randy HIll, Sarah Horner, Ryan Reichert, Herb Swett ADVERTISING SALES L. Andrew Brown/Concept Marketing Randy Hill

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 17264 Salem, Oregon 97305 EMAIL publisher@willamettevalleylife.com WEBSITE willamettevalleylife.com Willamette Valley Life Magazine is published quarterly. Opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Willamette Valley Life Magazine. This publication cannot be reproduced in any form without written consent from Willamette Valley Life Magazine. Although we have made very effort to insure the accuracy of the information in this publication, due to the passage of time and the anomalies inherent in the publishing process, we cannot be responsible for errors or incorrect information. Please contact the individual establishments to confirm information.

Copyright 2013 by Willamette Valley LIfe Magazine

PHONE 503.507.1228

One year subscriptions are $16. Send check or money order to Subscriptions: P.O. Box 17264, Salem, OR 97305. Make payable to “Willamette Valley Life.”

503.364.7999 | www.vhpecu.org NOT EVERY TOWN HAS A THEATER PUB!

Bringing Dining & Movies Together In Salem 3893 Commercial Street SE

Pizza, Burritos & Wraps•Popcorn •Desserts Fine Award Winning Wines, Micro Brews and More! 3-D Shows $6 - Regular Shows $3 - Student Night Thursdays in theatre 3, all ages, all night!

www.northernlightstheatrepub.com • Movie Hotline: 503.304.0280 Spring 2014 • Willamette Valley Life

3


VA L L E Y F LOOR

Keith Achepohl: If It Please You Lord Keith Achepohl’s art offers a glimpse into the intimate world of ex-votos

A

chepohl is a nationallyrecognized artist and Professor Emeritus of Art from the University of Iowa who lives in Eugene. During the past four years, he has created a series of images inspired by ex-votos, votive offerings to a saint or divinity. Organized by Director John Olbrantz, the exhibition features 40 mixed media works on paper and includes a selection of 19th- and 20th-century ex-votos from the artist’s collection. Achepohl became intrigued with exvotos and started collecting them from cities throughout the Mediterranean over 40 years ago. Ex-votos often take the form of a flat embossed metal sheet that represents either a plea for help to a saint or divinity, or one’s gratitude for an answered prayer. An image of a swaddled baby might represent the desire for a good birth or the answered prayer for the healing of a sick child. “I’ve always been fascinated by what these have meant in people’s lives. Throughout history, who has not made a wish or communicated a private aching need or tender longing to a higher power? I have a profound

Photo: Keith Achepohl, Untitled 19, 2011-2013, mixed media on handmade Venetian paper, 13.5 x 17 in., courtesy of the artist, Eugene, Oregon.

respect for any object that allows a person to convey a personal emotion so powerful as to give over or suspend reason for blind faith,” says Achepohl. For Achepohl, each piece in his series represents a narrative of the imagined journey of various individuals whose intimate prayers have been answered, and the corresponding beautiful and tender process of giving thanks. Where: Study Gallery and Print Study Center, Hallie Ford Museum of Art

Steve Martin & the Steep Canyon Rangers featuring Edie Brickell

S

teve Martin and the Steep Canyon Rangers, featuring Edie Brickell, will perform songs from their album Love Has Come for You. The tour will showcase new material performed by Martin and Brickell, along with the unique hybrid of bluegrass and comedy that Martin and The Steep Canyon Rangers have been delighting audiences with at their sold-out, critically acclaimed shows.

Where: Silva Concert Hall, Hult Center When: May 9, 2014, 7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Contact: theshedd.org

When: Now through April 27, 2014,

Deepwood Wine and Jazz Fest

Retro Bungalow Bird House

Willamette Valley wineries, local gourmet food vendors and live music will all be nestled in the lovely Deepwood Gardens this June, when the grounds are resplendent with the color and fragrance of early summer blooms. The event benefits the Friends of Deepwood, a non-profit organization.

ll our feathered friends want a mid-century modern house to A live in, right? The Retro Bungalow

Where: Deepwood Estate, 1116 Mission Street, SE, Salem, Oregon When: June 29, 2014, 4 - 9 p.m. Contact: historicdeepwoodestate.org

Science has never drummed up quite as effective a tranquilizing agent as a sunny spring day. –W. Earl Hall

4

Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2014

Bird House, by Foothills Wood Factory, will give them the upgrade they deserve. Includes hanging hook. Cleanable and made by hand in Sisters, Oregon. See more at: foothillswoodfactory.weebly.com and madeinoregon.com.


S P R I N G

2 0 1 4

C A L E N D A R

April, May, June April

3 – Cherry City Music Festival – Salem. 8th Cherry City Music Festival celebrates independent music with multi-venue performances and live television broadcast. Admission varies per venue. 503.364.1403. cherrycitymusic.com. Through May 4 – Wooden Show Tulip Festival – Woodburn. Bring your family and enjoy over 40 acres of tulips and daffodils. Delight in a variety of daily and weekend activities along with the Tulip Farm’s beautiful fields. 503.634.2243. woodenshoe.com/tulip-fest.

3 – Peony Paradise – Salem. Feast your eyes on hundreds of varieties of peonies in the display garden and the indoor display. Walk the garden, bring a lunch and have a picnic. Don’t forget your camera. 503.393.6185. peonyparadise.com. 15 - 18 – Keizer Iris Festival – Keizer. Soak up warm spring sunshine as you stroll through 10 acres of gardens. Bring a picnic lunch and marvel at over 500 colorful iris varieties. Various events all month long. irisfestival.com. 16 – The Detroit Lake Fishing Derby– Jefferson. Detroit Lake Recreational Area Business Association (DLRABA) is excited to host the popular annual fishing derby. All ages are welcome to participate with many fishing and raffle prizes. Come join the fun! Participation fees vary.

12 – Farm Fest and Draft Horse Plowing Competition – McMinnville. Experience oldtime farming as 16 to 20 teams of draft horses and mules get the ground ready for planting and compete in a plowing competition. Enjoy blacksmith, sawmill and steam engine demonstrations, as well as music, food, kids’ activities, agricultural and historical displays, and more. 503.434.0490. odhba.org and yamhillcountyhistory.org.

22 – Polk County Bounty Market. Features growers, producers and artisans from the Polk County area. Special events such as cooking demonstrations, youth booth, family activity day, kids days and more. 503.623.2564. dallasoregon.org

19 – Earth Day – Silverton. A fun filled, earth wise day at the Oregon Garden with exhibitors, hands-on activities, demonstrations, a tree giveaway, live music, food and more. oregongarden.org. 26 – Walk For Wishes Benefiting MakeA-Wish Oregon – Salem. Bringing hope, strength and joy to children in your community who are battling lifethreatening medical conditions is as easy as lacing up your walking shoes. The 7th Annual Walk For Wishes® takes place April 26, 2014, at Riverfront Park in Salem. Create a team or join as an individual! 503.802.7843. Oregon.wish.org. 25-27 – The Oregon Garden Brewfest – Silverton. Enjoy a multitude of seasonal and flagship beers from over 65 breweries, live music and Northwestern cuisine. oregongarden.org.

May

2 – Cinco de Micro Brewfest – Salem. The third annual Cinco de Micro Brewfest, presented by OZ Cap LLC, features local and Northwest brews, eateries, musical entertainment and the opportunity to taste spring release brews. Proceeds benefit the Boys & Girls Club. 503.581.7383, ext. 15. CincoDeMicro.com.

As your local Farmer’s agent, I can help you understand available coverage options and provide you with insurance coverage options for your individual needs. Call me today and start saving tomorrow. YOUR LOCAL FARMERS AGENT CURRENTLY OFFERS SAVINGS FOR:

5 – First Friday – Silverton. Join us for a fun evening in downtown Silverton on the first Friday of each month, featuring live entertainment, refreshments and new exhibits. Fun venues are open late for shopping and dining. 503.873.5615. silvertonchamber.org.

19 – Free Easter Egg Hunt For Children 0-10 – Sublimity. Please join us rain or shine! 6,000 eggs, filled with candy and toys, will be hunted. Saturday, April 19th at 10:00 a.m. near the duck pond at Marion Estates. 390 SE Church Street, Sublimity. 503.769.3499.

Combine with Farmers and Save Hundreds.

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In the past I couldn’t stand for

more than an hour due to severe pain caused by several injuries. It drastically affected my life. As of today, I am close to pain free and can stay on my feet throughout an entire work day. Before I met Dr. Quijano, standing over an hour was impossible.

7 – State Parks Day/Silver Falls Challenge Foot Race – Sublimity. Begin the day with a dash over the creek and through the woods. Take advantage of free camping in regular tent and RV campsites. Day use is free on Saturday. 503.874.0201. racenorthwest.com.

7 – David Douglas and the Western Hemisphere Orchestra – Monmouth. Acclaimed trumpeter, Dave Douglas, joins WOU’s Western Hemisphere Orchestra for a fantastic evening of music. Douglas’ unique contributions to music have garnered distinguished recognition, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, an Aaron Copland award, and two Grammy nominations. Western Oregon UniversityRice Auditorium. 503.838.8333. wou.edu/sfa.

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June

7 – Carousel’s 13th Birthday Celebration – Salem. Free activities! Help us celebrate our 13th anniversary of being open to the public. Enjoy $1 rides all day, birthday singing and cake at noon (cake while supplies last), face painting and chalk art activity. Salem’s Riverfront Carousel. 503.540.0374.

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New Patients recieve a $20 .00 gift card! (Ask For Details)

22 – Santiam Heritage Foundation Garden Tour – Stayton. A self-guided walking tour of Stayton/Sublimity area gardens. Proceeds benefit the Charles and Martha Brown house. 503.769.8860. brownhouse.org.

For addional calendar listings visit willamettevalleylife.com

Spring 2014 • Willamette Valley Life

5


5 Must See Gardens

Exploring the Willamette Valley’s array of public gardens B Y

S A R A H

H O R N E R

Winters

tend to be wet and gray here in the Willamette Valley, a small but soggy price to pay for the lush, green fields and hills. Nevertheless, the spring sunshine and bursts of bright color in the many public flower gardens are a welcome sight at the end of winter. Here are some gorgeous spots to take in the Valley’s beauty and smell the flowers as the days grow longer.

Located in Woodburn, the familyowned Wooden Shoe Tulip Farm has been a local favorite for nearly 30 years. During the farm’s annual Tulip Fest, visitors are awestruck by more than 40 acres of tulips. Each year, the varieties and colors are arranged differently so the view is never the same from year to year. This year, the festival runs from March 28-May 4. There are family friendly events and activities in addition to the breathtaking tulip fields. Cut flowers and bulbs are also available for sale. Check the website for field reports and more information. Wellbehaved, leashed dogs are also welcome. woodenshoe.com.

BORN 1945

Wooden Shoe Tulip Farm

Schreiner’s Iris Gardens

weather, visitors can enjoy thousands of irises free of charge. There are 500 Schreiner’s Iris Gardens iris varieties in bloom at that time, in colors spanning from almost black, Irises, in all their colorful and to purple, to deep red, to bright blue. dramatic glory, bloom in early May. Picnic tables are available for visitors That’s when Schreiner’s Iris Gardens to enjoy a packed lunch as they open their 10-acre display garden to take in the brightly-hued scenery. the public. Established in 1925, Schreiner’s is the Open dawn to dusk, regardless of SIG-PrintAd-WillametteValleyLife -Spring2014-PressReady.pdf 1 2/6/2014 12:00:06 PM nation’s largest retail grower of irises. shreinersgardens.com.

Join us for our annual

BLOOM SEASON OPEN GARDENS!

May 9 through June 1, 2014 3625 Quinaby Rd NE, Salem, OR 97303

(503) 393-3232 6

The city of Portland is known as the Rose City with good reason. A spectacular way to experience these gorgeous blooms is by visiting the International Rose Test Garden in Washington Park. The the oldest public garden of its kind in the United States, this garden features more than 10,000 plants representing more than 500 rose varieties. The garden’s main purpose is to be a testing ground for new rose varieties. There are outdoor concerts held in the garden and it is

Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2014

KATHY BRYANT PHOTOGRAPHY

International Rose Test Garden

Wooden Shoe Tulip Farm

a beautiful spot for a picnic. Within the garden itself there are also other small gardens, including a garden dedicated to miniature rose testing as well as a Shakespeare-themed garden. rosegardenstore.org.

The Oregon Garden Located in Silverton, the Oregon Garden is an 80-acre botanical garden comprised of more than 20 specialty gardens showcasing the diverse botanical bounty of the Valley.


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CONLAWPROF

Not to be combined with other offers or coupons. Not valid on previous purchases.

International Rose Test Garden

There is a garden to suit everyone’s fancy, including a sensory garden, rose garden, children’s garden and even a petfriendly garden. Dedicated to sustainability, the Garden’s Resdiscovery Forest features some remarkable trees while the Wetlands Habitat utilizes the City of Silverton’s treated waste water in pools that host myriad wildlife. The Oregon Garden is open 365 days a year with a free, hosted tram tour running from April to October. oregongarden.org.

Swan Island Dahlias Now in its 87th year, Swan Island Dahlias is the largest dahlia grower in the United States. Located in Canby, the farm’s prized dahlias thrive in the Willamette Valley’s rich soil. There are more than 350 varieties grown on the 40 acres that are open to the public during blooming season. A highlight of the dahlia bloom time is the farm’s annual Dahlia Festival. Typically held in late August to early September, the event is held over two weekends, including Mondays.

Visitors can roam the gardens and also enjoy the indoor areas that feature over 400 dahlia floral arrangements. dahlias.com. These are far from the only great public gardens in the beautiful Willamette Valley. Also check out the Portland Japanese Garden (japanesegarden.com), the Lan Su Chinese Garden (lansugarden.org), Bush’s Pasture Park (cityofsalem. net), Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden (portlandoregon.gov) and the Heirloom Roses garden (heirloomroses.com). Sarah Horner is a freelance writer, photographer and winemaker. Eight years of experience in the local wine industry allowed her to explore the rich culture the Willamette Valley offers. The sights, sounds and stories of the region inspire her and she enjoys sharing her discoveries with readers. Sarah lives with her husband, two teenage boys and miscellaneous pets.

(503) 363-9744 • 1210 Commercial Street SE • Salem, OR 97302 Sale ends 6/30/14 - Not to be combined with any other offers or coupons. Not valid on previous purchases.

2014 Wooden Shoe

Oregon’s Most Beautiful Event!

• Tulip Display Gardens • Children’s Acre Fun Zone • Great Food & Wine • Tulip Themed Gift Shop • Crafter’s Market Place • and much, much, more!

33814 S. Meridian Rd. Woodburn • 800.711.2006 Info/Field Conditions: woodenshoe.com

Spring 2014 • Willamette Valley Life

7


ALL HAIL THE

Marionberry! When berry breeder George Waldo mixed a Chehalem berry with an Olallie at Oregon State University in 1945, he came up with the Marionberry...and the rest, as they say is pie, jelly and ice cream history.

Y

ou can go just about anywhere in the country today and find a product made with the Willamette Valley’s own Marionberry. This local delicacy’s popularity as an ingredient in ice cream, yogurt, jelly, pie and, yes, beer is no mistake. Distinctively sweet with just a hint of tartness, this “Cabernet of Blackberries” is now enjoyed worldwide thanks to George F. Waldo, a U. S. Department of Agriculture and Agricultural Research Service employee who created the berry at Oregon State University in 1945. Waldo formally introduced the berry which was named after Marion County where it was extensively tested, in 1956. The Marionberry almost became the

Oregon state berry in 2009. Raspberry, strawberry and blueberry growers supported the proposal, but in the end it was shot down by a Washington county blackberry grower who thought it would give the Marionberry and unfair advantage So, next time you dig into that slice of warm Marionberry pie, lift your fork and salute George Waldo—and don’t forget the ice cream. Quick Facts: • Fresh season typically July 2nd through July 24th. • Medium-sized (5.0g) dark red to black berry with a medium seed and central receptacle. • Known as the “Cabernet of Blackberries” for its complex, rich earthy flavor. • Bred at Oregon State University and raised primarily in Oregon. • Named after Marion County, Oregon. • Oregon produces 28-33 million pounds annually. Information courtesy of Oregon Rasberry and Blackberry Commission. Oregon-berries.com

Make it: Home-made Marionberry Pie CRUST: • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting • 1 tsp granulated sugar • 1/2 tsp kosher salt • 1/4 cup shortening • 4 tbsp cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces • 1/2 tsp apple cider vinegar • 3 to 4 tbsp ice water FILLING: • 5 1/2 cups Marionberries • 3/4 cup granulated sugar • 1 tsp lemon zest • 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice • 1/4 cup cornstarch TOPPING: • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour • 1/4 cup light brown sugar • 1/4 cup granulated sugar • Pinch kosher salt • 5 tbsp unsalted butter, cold, cut into small pieces Vanilla ice cream, for serving

8

Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2014

P H OTO : P G S V E N S K

Ingredients

Directions: For the crust: Put the flour, granulated sugar and salt in the bowl of a food processor. Pulse a couple of times to mix. Add the shortening and pulse to combine. Add the butter and pulse until the mixture is coarse and a few pieces of butter are still visible. Add the apple cider vinegar and 2 tablespoons ice water. Pulse to combine. Add more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the dough just comes together. Shape into a disk, wrap in plastic and refrigerate 1 hour or overnight. Roll the dough on a lightly floured surface about 11 inches in diameter and 1/8-inch thick, to fit a 9-inch pie plate. Place in the pie pan, trim and decoratively crimp the edges. Refrigerate while preparing the filling. For the filling: Preheat the oven to 400 degrees In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine 1 cup Marionberries with the granulated sugar, lemon zest and lemon juice. Bring to a simmer and cook until the berries begin to burst and the mixture is saucy,

5 to 10 minutes, depending on the ripeness of the fruit. Allow to cool slightly. Combine the remaining 4 1/2 cups Marionberries with the cornstarch in a large bowl. Add the cooled Marionberry mixture to the bowl and gently fold them in. For the topping: Combine the flour, brown sugar, granulated sugar and salt. Cut in the butter pieces using a pastry blender or your hands to form large crumbs. Pour the filling into the prepared pie shell. Sprinkle the crumbs over the filling. Place the pie on a baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees and continue baking until the crust is golden brown and the filling is thick, dark red and bubbly, 50 minutes to 1 hour. Cool completely before slicing. Serve with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. Sing along: Order the mp3 download of “Marionberry Pie” from The Oregon Valley Boys’ latest CD, Hey, Wait! on iTunes. Visit oregonvalleyboys.com


WILLAMETTE VALLEY LIFE SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

MID-WILLAMETTE VALLEY

DINING & SHOPPING GUIDE D A L L A S

I N D E P E N D E N C E

J

M O N M O U T H

R I C K R E A L L

ust minutes outside of Salem you’ll find dining and shopping destinations just waiting for you to discover! Wineries, dining, shops and businesses of every description await you in this beautiful section of the midWillamette Valley.

Mid-Willamette

Refer to this shopping guide over and over to help you find just the right business to meet any need you might have, from gift giving to pet care, education to getting your car repaired...We’ve made it easy for you to find just the right place.

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503.623.4943 967 Main Street, Dallas, Oregon Sunday-Thursday 11:00 A.M. - 9:00 P.M. • Friday-Saturday 11:00 A.M. -10:00 P.M.

Spring 2014 • Willamette Valley Life

9


WILLAMETTE VALLEY LIFE SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Independence The City of Independence is the third largest urban area in Polk County, Oregon. It is located twelve miles southwest of Salem, on the west bank of the Willamette River. It was known as the “Hop Capital of the World” from the late 1890s to the 1940s.

Independence was founded by pioneers who migrated from Independence, Missouri.

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2014 Summer Rickreall Gun Show Buy-Sell-Trade, Guns, Knives, Ammunition...Lots of Collector Items

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Adults $5 (Kids under 12, Free)•Free Parking Food Available On-Site

10

Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2014

• Laminating

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Sat. June 7 : 8 AM to 5 PM Sun. June 8: 9 AM to 4 PM

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• Faxes • Transparencies • Cutting & Folding • Binding - Spiral & Comb • Enlargements & Reproductions • Graphic Design • Rubber Stamps


WILLAMETTE VALLEY LIFE SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Dallas

S P EC I AL G R I D D L E B R E AK FA S T S

1 Pancake, 1 Egg, 2 Links $ 99 with coupon

5.

Dallas was settled in the

1840s on the north side of Rickreall Creek and was originally named “Cynthian” or “Cynthiana.” In 1856 the town was moved more than a mile south because of an inadequate supply of water.

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Rickreall

“Rickreal” post office was established in 1851

with Nathaniel Ford as postmaster. It was discontinued in 1857, but reestablished in 1866 with the spelling “Rickreall.” The office has continued to operate to the present day. Rickreall was often referred to as Dixie during the Civil War and for some time after, because of the Southern sympathies of the local populace. Dixie was never the official name of the community or the post office.

Spring 2014 • Willamette Valley Life

11


WILLAMETTE VALLEY LIFE SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Monmouth’s status as the last dry town

Monmouth

in Oregon was ended by a popular vote in the November 2002 election.

Monmouth was settled in 1853 by a group of

pioneers who made a point of allocating 640 acres to build both a city and a “college under the auspices of the Christian Church,” and proceeds from the sale of these lands were used to found Monmouth University. By the early 1880s the college fell on hard times. In 1882, ownership was transferred to the State of Oregon and it was renamed Oregon State Normal School at Monmouth, and later the Oregon College of Education. It is now known as Western Oregon University.

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Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2014


OP P OR T U N I T Y K N OC K S

Teardrop Trailers An interview with owner/entrepreneur Bill Coberly

B Y

R A N D Y

H I L L

Bill Coberly, is president and co-owner of Teardrops NW with his wife Linda. The company specializes in manufacturing custom teardrop trailers and is located in Salem, Oregon. Born and raised in Mt. Vernon, Washington, Bill moved to Salem in the 9th grade. He served seven years in the USMC, 30 months in Vietnam as a teletype operator, helicopter door gunner and combat photographer. He retired briefly four years ago and decided retirement was, “more like a death sentence and running a business is an addiction to excitement, creative satisfaction and self improvement.” What’s your business philosophy?

Exceed expectations; my customers are my future! And more than that, they are nice people. I like to make them smile. What would you consider to be three keys to your business success?

1. Choose to do something you really enjoy. Stay away from jobs – go on crusades. 2. Go the extra mile for your clients and customers. Word gets out. 3. Embrace challenges – they are the steps to personal growth. What motivates you to make your business a success?

Describe your biggest failure. What did you learn from it?

There have been times when I trusted someone I should not have trusted, but I didn’t learn from it because I prefer to trust people at their word. Why did you start your business in the Willamette Valley?

Because the prettiest girl in Salem married me and doesn’t want to move out.

There are as many reasons to have a business as there are businesses. Whatever your reason, have some genuine passion for it. For example, I love teardrop trailers and feel an evangelical zeal to share the simplicity and joy of teardrop camping and traveling. Designing them and building them is a creative expression. It’s not work to me, it’s my chosen crusade. I am the luckiest guy in the world to be doing this. If you feel like you are the luckiest person in the world to be doing what you’re doing, people will see that and be drawn to it. Where do you go locally to unwind?

I enjoy photographing birds at the Basket Slough and Ankeny bird sanctuaries. I also enjoy doing movies

with my 7-year-old grandson, Liam. What’s your favorite valley restaurant?

Gilgamesh Brewing. I love the ghost pepper Mac N’ Cheese. I also love to attend their “Meet a Scientist” nights. What’s your secret talent?

I love to collect and play ancient wind instruments of all kinds: Irish whistles, the shakuhachi flute, and Navajo and Anasazi flutes. The designs and capabilities of these flutes are an insight to the cultures they emerged from. Playing them is a way to converse with ancient cultures. For more information about Teardrops NW, visit teardropsnw.com.

What advice would you offer to people looking to go into business for themselves?

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Throughout my life, I have always dreaded having a boss. But when I am my own boss the vision is clear and my direction seems certain. I hardly ever mind the clock because [the work] is not a job, it’s a crusade. Crusades are 24/7.

I am the luckiest guy in the world to be doing this. If you feel like you are the luckiest person in the world to be doing what you’re doing, people will see that and be drawn to it.

Spring 2014 • Willamette Valley Life

13


P E OP L E / P L AC E S

Signs of the Times Willamette Valley Historical Markers

B Y

H E R B

S W E T T

I

t’s not hard to find areas important to Oregon’s history while driving around the Willamette Valley. These stories are told by historical markers, some of which are easier to find than others. In some places, only a sign marks the important events that took place there; in others, like Camp Adair, entire buildings that have been preserved. This guide, running roughly north to south, will introduce you to 14 markers south of the Portland area.

Willamette Post, at milepost 24 on state Highway 219 south of Newberg, was established by the North West Company in 1813 for fur trading and to take game. A flood destroyed its buildings in 1861.

Aurora, still a town, was founded by Dr. Wilhelm Keil as a Christian cooperative colony and made famous by local musicians. The cooperative dissolved on Keil’s death in 1877. The marker is in the town center on state Highway 99E. Boone’s Ferry was established in 1847 by Jesse Boone, a great-grandson of Daniel Boone. The ferry operated until 1954. The marker is in the rest area on Interstate 5 just south of Wilsonville. Boone’s Landing, in Wilsonville off I5, was established in 1846 by Alphonso Boone, father of Jesse, in preparation

HERB SWETT

Champoeg State Park, seven miles southeast of Newberg on state Highway 219, was established in 1913 to commemorate the 1843 meeting to set up a provisional government for the Oregon Territory.

for the ferry. The marker is in Boone’s Ferry Park, next to the Willamette River. The Dayton Blockhouse, on Third and Main Streets (state Highway 221) in Dayton City Park, was built in 1856 as part of Fort Yamhill near the present site of Sheridan and moved to Dayton in 1911. General Philip Sheridan was one of the Army officers stationed there. A 90-ton glacial erratic is the subject of a marker seven miles west of McMinnville on state Highway 18 in Erratic Rock State Park. An erratic is a rock transported out of place by a cataclysmic event. In this case, the erratic was moved by the Missoula floods at the end of the last ice age. The Grand Ronde Indian Reservation, one-quarter mile west of the intersection of state Highway 18 and Grand Ronde Road is the subject of a marker telling of the forced relocation of Native Americans to the area. The marker also explains the tribe’s plans to improve life for tribal members and achieve self-sufficiency. James Nesmith, one of Oregon’s early

14

Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2014

political leaders, is commemorated by a marker near his home. It can be found on state Highway 99W in Rickreall, just north of the Polk County Museum. Camp Adair was an Army training site during World War II. Four infantry divisions trained there. Camp Adair contains monuments as well as a marker off state Highway 99W, 13 miles north of Corvallis. Brownsville, still a town, contains a marker two blocks west of Main Street on state Highway 228. The area’s history goes back to the ancient Mound Builders, who were followed by the Kalapuya Indians. The first American settlers arrived in the 1840s. Santiam Wagon Road, a route for settlers to move livestock to central Oregon for grazing, is marked on U.S. Highway 20, milepost 52, east of Sweet Home. Formerly named Wiley Pass after pioneer Andrew Wiley, it became a toll road for wagons in 1868. A few miles east of the Santiam Wagon Road marker on U.S. Highway 20 is a sign that tells the story of America’s first transcontinental

automobile race. The race, part of the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, involved six vehicles that started in New York and finished in Seattle. They were the first automobiles to cross the United States east to west, first to cross the Cascade Mountains and first to negotiate the Oregon Trail. The Bristow Monument, east of Pleasant Hill at milepost 4 of state Highway 58, honors Elijah Bristow, a veteran of Andrew Jackson’s army and one of the first settlers at Pleasant Hill in 1846. Take your camera along! You’re sure to learn about the history of the Valley, see some beautiful sights, and feel the itch to check out the other parts of Oregon as well. Herb Swett is a longtime journalist, now a freelancer who lives in West Salem and writes regularly for the weekly newspapers in Sheridan and Keizer. He is also a medical transcriptionist. Having been a history major at Lewis & Clark College before going into journalism, Herb is especially interested in the history of Oregon.


E AT

Aspargus Quesadillas

I

S T O R Y

n my childhood, I sometimes felt spring cleaning came around every weekend. The list of chores that loomed each Saturday seemed insurmountable, as if I might never finish in time to ride my bike before dark. My memory exaggerates, of course, as vacuuming and dusting are quickly finished. But one task that never felt like a chore was harvesting provisions from my mother’s garden. I was sent out to the trellis to fill a bowl with green beans, or to glean strawberries from thickets, or to clip fragrant herbs in big bunches. I liked being out in the new sunshine of spring, and I liked interacting with the food in its natural habitat, which seemed to taste better than what came from the store. We kids loved to munch tender, fresh carrots brushed free of soil; we pulled up bulbous radishes in the same manner, and snapped crunchy cucumbers from their vines. Springtime on my family’s small farm meant chores, yes, but also an abundance of produce, daffodils in the garden, newly-hatched chicks wandering cautiously among the sprouting greens and mother hens clucking after them. Shaking loose winter’s chill from our hearts and taste buds, Mom would cook up something fresh and flavorful for dinner. I love greeting spring peas, asparagus, new potatoes and green garlic each year at local grocers and produce stands (apartment life has its limits; I don’t have a garden of my own). The flavors and textures remind me of my childhood and of the bounty of our green valley. This simple dinner lands on the table in minutes and shows off some of spring’s delights. I’ve shredded asparagus into delicate ribbons, paired it with tangy goat cheese and sandwiched it all in a

A N D

P H O T O

B Y

S O P H I E

H A W L E Y

crisp whole-wheat tortilla. The fresh asparagus is so tender it doesn’t need any par-cooking, and melted spring leeks lend their aroma to the mix. Everything is crisp and melty, and it comes together so quickly it won’t feel like cooking dinner is a chore at all. In spring, nature does all the work for us! Asparagus Quesadillas with Melted Leeks and Two Cheeses Start to finish: 20 minutes Serves: 4 4 10-inch whole-wheat tortillas 5 spears fresh asparagus 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided 1 leek, white and light green parts only Salt and pepper 5 ounces goat cheese, crumbled 5 ounces Gruyere, Fontina or

SOPHIE HAWLEY

Easy, crisp and melty

Montery Jack cheese, shredded Slice leek in half lengthwise and wash away dirt, peeling aside layers if necessary. Slice into half-moons about 1/4-inch thick. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add leeks and cook until barely beginning to brown, 7-9 minutes, stirring occasionally. Season with salt and pepper, remove from heat and set aside. Shave asparagus spears into ribbons with a vegetable peeler and set aside. Heat 1/2 tablespoon oil in a large

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skillet over medium heat. Divide crumbled goat cheese, shredded Gruyere, asparagus ribbons and melted leeks between the four tortillas, keeping filling on one half of the tortilla. Fold and place two at a time in the skillet, cooking until crisp and browned on each side. Add remaining oil to pan and repeat. Enjoy!

Sophie Hawley grew up in the Willamette Valley and loves the abundance of locally-produced ingredients: vegetables and cheeses, berries and herbs, wine and craft beer. A lifelong cook and food-lover, she writes and photographs a food blog featuring simple, tasty recipes for cooks of every skill level. Read more at dinnersforwinners.wordpress.com.

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1555 12TH STREET S.E.| SALEM, OREGON 97302 Spring 2014 • Willamette Valley Life

15


B E S T Y E A R S Y E T

Selecting the right retirement community Times are uncertain—plan ahead and do your homework

B Y

A N G E L A

S

electing the right retirement community is an important decision that involves many different options and choices. It is imperative that the community you select continues to meet your needs as they change. Below are my Big Five tips to finding the right retirement community for you or a loved one.

your tour showed you what really goes on behind closed doors. Anyone can type up an activities calendar or a menu; following through is a different story. Life enrichment, quality activities and meal choices are extremely important aspects of a retirement community.

2

Try the food in every community you are considering. Nutrition, choices and quality are extremely important. Know what you or your loved one will be served three times a day and make sure you are getting

RACHEL

1

Don’t let anyone talk you into buying what they are selling. If the marketer or sales representative is trying to rush you, that’s not a good sign. Selecting a unit in a retirement community is a huge, life-changing event. Take your time and tour several communities.

B O W E T E R

what you are paying for. Ask about alternative meal choices and how the communities cater to restricted diets (vegetarian, vegan, diabetic, low sodium, lactose free, etc.).

3

Once you have decided on a community, show up there unannounced during a scheduled activity or meal time to ensure that

4

Talk to the staff! Ask them questions like, “How long have you been working here? Do you like your job? Would you move your family member here?” Remember: the sales representative will not be caring for you or your loved one. Talk to the people that will actually be in the picture later on.

5

These are uncertain times. Ask your chosen communities what will happen if you or your loved one runs out of funding. What if the stock market crashes, health care costs or long term care insurance changes, or

your planning and saving don’t pan out? Things can happen; nobody knows the future. Will you be evicted after you have paid between $5,000 and $10,000 per month for two, three, or even ten years? Some companies have plans in place if their residents run out of funding or lose their long term care insurance. Others don’t. Where do you want to be? Plan ahead and retire on your terms. Angela Boweter is the Community Relations Director at Marian Estates. She is proud of what she does and enjoys serving the 55 plus community. Angela has worked in the field of retirement living and future planning for almost five years and consults community members as a courtesy.

Mennonite Village

Picture yourself living here... Mennonite Village is a nonprofit Continuing Care Retirement Community for people of all faiths and beliefs

Mennonite Village considers and admits people age 55 and older without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, gender, sexual orientation, or disability. 16

Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2014

5353 Columbus St. S.E., Albany, Oregon www.mennonitevillage.org www.facebook.com/mennonitevillage

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BES T YEA R S YET

Complete Retirement With No Buy-In

Sandwiched Part 2

SAL FALCO

Postives outweigh the negatives

S

andwich Generation is a term becoming nearly synonymous with our baby boomer generation. A term coined in the 80’s, it means that we’re the ones finding ourselves squarely in the middle of family demands—from our children and from our parents. The math is simple enough – we boomers are in our 40s, 50s, or 60s, our children are in their teens or 20s, and our parents are in their 70s or beyond. Whether conscious of it or not, more and more of us are joining the ranks of the sandwich generation. Our parents are living longer than prior generations, and our children (echo boomers) are taking longer to launch or returning to the nest (boomerangs). Our folks may have various health issues accompanying their advanced ages, and our children have their own sets of issues that prompt their return or make them stay home longer. Much like Webster defines “sandwich”, we now find ourselves “inserted or enclosed between two things of another quality or nature.”

Sandwich Generation – Statistics The sandwich generation is growing. According to the U.S. Bureau of the Census, the number of parents living with their adult children increased from 2.2 million in 2000 to 3.6 million in 2007 – a 63% increase. Studies conducted by the Pew Research Center indicate that one in every eight middle-aged Americans – that would be us right now – is currently caring for at least one child and a parent under the same roof. Other studies show that women (75%) are much more likely to be the care provider than men (25%). It’s estimated that at some point in their lives, 50-66% of all adult women in the US will provide care for an elderly parent or in-law.

The Positives Lest we think of our membership in the sandwich generation as more akin to a prison sentence, we remind ourselves of some real positives. First and foremost may be a renewed sharing of family values – remember reading about those from the 50s? Some of us even lived them! Our children might learn some family history from their own grandparents, not to mention some valuable life insights. In turn, our parents may no longer feel isolated or abandoned just because of age, in fact feeling more connected with day-to-day life and events. Everyone can celebrate family moments, and cherish them for a lifetime. Another positive could be the pooling of resources, whether by desire or economic necessity. The down economy in recent years has likely deflated the value of portfolios and property alike, for us as well as for our parents. And if we ourselves are struggling with wages lost from reduced work hours and furloughs, the pooling of remaining resources could make them stretch much further. In cases where the numbers are more favorable, it might make sense to add onto our own home or to relocate to new accommodations. Besides meeting an immediate need, dwellings that provide “in-laws’ quarters” may very well have an enhanced value in the future. After all, we may be the first generation to be sandwiched, but we’re certainly not going to be the last! The upshot here is that once again we find ourselves being the drivers of another major trend, based squarely upon life realities. Whether a bump in the road or even a detour, we can still reach our destination as long as we plan accordingly and appreciate the trip!

Independent Living – Assisted Living Skilled Nursing – Rehab – Memory Care No scheduled meal times in independent living. Choose from a full menu or order in home service. Homes start at $1700 with most utilities, amenities and transportation included. Assisted Living and Nursing residents enjoy 6 different Home Cooked meal options for lunch and dinner. Located in Sublimity on 38 acres.

MINUTES FROM SALEM

Call Angela for a tour at 503.932.4667 Visit MarianEstates.com

Adapted from baby-boomers-r-we.com

Spring 2014 • Willamette Valley Life

17


V I N EYA R D

Making the most of wine tasting in the Valley B Y

R Y A N

R E I C H E R T

I

recently took a group of colleagues on a wine tasting trip. The group had a range of experience with wine, a number of them here from overseas, and many had never visited a winery tasting room. So I put together a “cheat sheet” of pointers for everyone to refer to while enjoying their wine. This is not a required list of to-dos when wine tasting, but in terms of assessing a wine beyond simply liking or disliking it, these actions can go a long way. So try it out next time you’re visiting one of the many wineries in the Willamette Valley, and see how it changes your wine tasting experience.

2. Swirl it around Swirling wine helps to release aromas by introducing oxygen. Some people like to show off and swirl in the air, but it’s just as acceptable—and much easier—to swirl your glass on a flat surface, moving the base of the glass in small circles. The idea is just to get it moving around. 3. Stick your nose in Don’t be shy. Put your nose as far into your glass as you can and take a few good sniffs.

Then take your nose out and try to connect the aromas with things you already know. What comes to mind? It’s important to point out that our sense of smell becomes overwhelmed very quickly, dulling your ability to smell something. You can do an easy “reset”: simply smell your hand or your sleeve, and you’ll clear your aroma memory with a familiar scent. Smell the wine deep in the glass, but then smell it as you draw your nose away. You’ll often be able to pick up more delicate aromas just above the glass that you won’t get deeper inside.

SILVER LEAF

Many wineries in the Willamette Valley have adopted the Oregon Pinot Noir glass which has a large bowl and a slight curve at the rim. For white or more delicate wines, try a smaller glass. Both are designed to concentrate aromas or target a certain point on your tongue when you sip. Don’t ignore the color of your wine. Color can tell you a lot about a wine’s age, the type of growing conditions, or even wine making styles. As wines age, red wines go from purple to ruby to brick, and white wines move from clear or lemon to gold, or straw to brown. Most wines you’ll find in tasting rooms currently will be youthful, so check for a nice bright color.

WINE-ON-99

1. Examine your glass

4. Coat your palate Once you take that first sip, swish the

 

wine around your mouth a few times—yes, like mouthwash. This may seem silly, but it better exposes all parts of your tongue and other sensory areas of your mouth to the wine. Then you can get a good idea of how heavy the wine feels (is it like water or milk on your tongue?), how tannic it is (do your gums and tongue feel fuzzy?), and what kinds of flavors are present. As with aromas, just try to connect the flavor to something you’re familiar with. Usually your mind will start taking you other places and making flavor connections. 5. Open your mouth

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Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2014

Another moment where you may feel silly—but don’t, you’re just experimenting with your senses!—but after you’ve swallowed your sip, open your mouth wide.

This allows air to hit the inside of your mouth, and helps with a couple things. One, if your mouth waters like crazy then you know you’ve just had a high acid wine. Secondly, just like with aromas, the circulation of oxygen helps you taste more. Think about how bland things taste when you have a head cold, and you’ll understand how this works in the opposite manner. Ryan Reichert is a digital marketing professional in Portland who relocated from the Midwest in large part because of his passion for wine and food. He holds an Advanced certification from the Wine & Spirits Education Trust, is the Wine Ambassador for Travel Oregon, and is the managing editor for Palate Press. ryanreichert.com.


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recently took a group of colleagues on a wine tasting trip. The group had a range of experience with wine, a number of them here from overseas, and many had never visited a winery tasting room. So I put together a “cheat sheet” of pointers for everyone to refer to while enjoying their wine. This is not a required list of to-dos when wine tasting, but in terms of assessing a wine beyond simply liking or disliking it, these actions can go a long way. So try it out next time you’re visiting one of the many wineries in the Willamette Valley, and see how it changes your wine tasting experience.

1. Examine your glass Many wineries in the Willamette Valley have adopted the Oregon Pinot Noir glass which has a large bowl and a slight curve at the rim. For white or more delicate wines, try a smaller glass. Both are designed to concentrate aromas or target a certain point on your tongue when you sip. Don’t ignore the color of your wine. Color can tell you a lot about a wine’s age, the type of growing conditions, or even

Protecting & Preserving Our Planet

Spring 2014 • Willamette Valley Life

19


Cycle Country

AC Gilbert Discover what’s happen i n

g a t t h e Vi l l a g e !

Summer Camps start July 7! Pick up a Summer Camp Guide or visit our website for more information.

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Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2014

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Willamette valley life spring 2014 print final