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WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA CONTENTS

WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA Editor/Publisher:Vic Attard Art Director:Jacque Attard Contributing Writers: Neil Many, Ian Collie, Rob Murton and Gary Hall.

Advertising Enquiries: Contact Vic Attard Mobile: 0401 014 592 Email: wildboar@easynet.net.au Mailing Address: PO Box 10126, Mt Pleasant, Mackay, QLD 4740. ACN:091403851 ABN:15091403851 No picture or any part of the contents of this publication may be scanned or reproduced in any way without prior written consent from the publisher. Pig hunting is a dangerous sport, Wild Boar Australia accepts no responsibility for any damage and/or injury suffered by readers. Further, the editor/publisher accepts no responsibility for the accuracy of statements or opinions expressed by freelance writers. Printed by Graphic Impressions. Distributed by RDS.

4 6 10 15 16 18 22 25 26 34 41 42 46 52 61 62 67 68 80 82 87

IN THIS ISSUE OF WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA

EDITORIAL BOARS TALES HUNTERS TROPHIES ROSSI GUN COMPETITION CATCH-A-HOG FOR CHARITY FULL MOON MADNESS Story by Neil Many PIG DOGS Muscle of the Pack TRADING POST ACCESSORIES Gear for the Hunter HUNTING BLACKBERRY IN THE WILD GREAT CRATES NORTHERN TOUR Story by Kate Horkings DRESSING APIG FOR A SPIT PHOTO COMPETITON BLOODLINES DOG CARE ISLAND HOGS Story by Rob Murton F@#KIN’ BOGGED & other road capers. ARCHERS CORNER PRIZES Frontcover: Neil Many, Central QLD Story on page 18

Advertising Enquiries: Contact Vic Attard - Mobile 0401 014 592


EDITORIAL

EDI TORIAL

EDITORIAL Hi to all...

Here is our third issue and I have to say, the standard of photos and stories coming through to us have been tops. Thanks to all for sending your material in, which is what makes this magazine so great, from 'hunters to hunters', there is no better way. If you have a couple of good photo's and a tale to tell, get in and write about it. Wild Boar Australia is a down to earth magazine where we can share our thrills and spills on hunting, what I believe, is the most exciting and explosive animal on earth…the wild boar. So give it a go and keep it all coming in. The team who puts Wild Boar Australia together are myself, my wife and you guys. Without your con- Good old stinker, caught on silk sorghum just on day break. tribution, there would not be a magazine. Your letters of appreciation to the maga- have to BE IN IT, TO WIN IT! zine, and comments on what you would like to Finally, on a hunting note, 2003 has been a dry see in the mag, is all great…keep it coming in as year all over Australia. The comment by most it gives me drive and lets me know that we are hunters, and by what I saw in the field, was a heading in the right direction. Also, Wild Boar drop in numbers and size of pigs. Pigs adapt Australia is printed in Australia, not overseas, quickly to the season, dropping litter sizes to because I think it is important to look after our compensate for lack of food etc. from the own back yard, keeping jobs and money in drought. This was evident, when out hunting, and a sow was taken, they would only have two Australia, 100% Aussie! Competition Mania! A big thanks goes out to to four suckers. So with hunting pressure up Titley Electronics, Animal Training Systems and and the country still in drought, it all has an Hound Connection for donating terrific and effect on the sport. I'm not saying there were not expensive prizes. Prizes include a tracking col- big pigs taken, or good loads caught, but in lar system to the value of $2800 (Titley comparison with previous years, the dry has Electronics), a Remote Training System worth definitely taken its toll in 2003. So let's keep our $2000 (Animal Training Systems) and a Bull Arab fingers crossed that 2004 will see a big wet seaPup worth $500 (Hound Connection). So check son all over Australia to get things back to where out the Competition Details on page 40. These they were…HEAPS OF PIGS! are awesome prizes and would not be possible Well, that’s enough from me, enjoy the mag and without the support of these three sponsors. drop us a line to let us know what you think of This year, Wild Boar Australia will give away a this issue. So until next time, from me and the total of $ 11 000 in prizes, so don't delay…get hounds, Good Hunting! ...Vic Attard your entries & photos in now….remember, you

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BOAR TALES

“FULL ON�!...

Wayne and I were still telling jokes in the cab of the old Toyota as we cruised to a halt, near a large expanse of wetlands. My son Matt, and Wayne's cousin, Trevor, had somehow made room in the back, crammed between Wayne's large, well-stocked portable beer fridge and five dogs of various breeds,shapes and sizes.Wayne's dog Scooter 'The Enforcer' is the largest dog of the team, a solid Pit Bull that never takes a back step no matter how mean and nasty the situation gets. Our two Jack Russell's also mean business, but at a different level. What they lack in size they make up for in guts and tenacity. Nip a short haired male thinks nothing of getting in (or even on) the face of extremely bad tempered 90kg plus boars. Peggy (a long haired female) shows a little more caution, keeping away from the sharp end, but her incessant barking once the chase begins, (and after) is invaluable. Also along for the ride; our two L plated pig dogs. Jed and Ace a brother and sister act under training. No sooner had Scooter's feet touched the ground and he was off. The barking, squealing and mayhem started a 6

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short time later. The hog hadn't even got into top gear when Scooter nailed it; and nailed it hard. With Scooter holding a big chunk of the hog's ear, Nip going ballistic and Peggy giving plenty of verbal support, the pig was quickly dispatched. Twenty minutes later, Nip's faint barking in the distant scrub line attracted our attention. The 'Pocket Hercules' had a 60 kg sow cornered and bluffed, waiting for his bigger tag team partner to arrive on the scene. The instant Scooter got into the fray the hog's days were numbered. Wayne had only just got the words out of his mouth "this sign looks bloody fresh" when a good solid black boar with it's head down bum up bolted from the high grass, near a well-used wallow. Its powerful broad shoulders got it into full stride almost instantly and it powered over a small rocky outcrop and disappeared out of sight. The chase was on. Two outcrops later, the pace, rugged terrain, waist high spear grass and Jed, one of our two L plated hunters, had lost interest. Not even the occasional glimpse of the boar's big bum as it raced through the scrub could excite him.


Grabbing him up on the run I headed towards the sound of the dogs. 80m ahead I noticed an energetic Matt with Ace cradled in his arms sprinting through the dry stalks of spear grass towards the uproar. Not far ahead the confrontation had started. The large boar, hackles up, bad tempered and aggro was in no mood to play, but no matter what it threw at Scooter and the two smaller canine combatants they were up to the task.

With Wayne yelling, Peggy barking like a banshee, Scooter hanging off one ear, Nip hanging off the other like a fashion accessory it was 'bloody' pandemonium. Not to be out done Trevor and Matt dived into the chaos. The large brute was tipped, stuck and finally went down for the count. "I think this deserves a beer." "When did you ever need an excuse, Wayne?" - GARY HALL, Katherine, NT.

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FIRST TIME LUCKY The best crop raiders are usually the biggest, and they get very good at their jobs. They know never to come at the same time every night, don't eat too long, and come into the paddock from different ways each time. It amazes me how cunning some of these big boars can get, and by the look of the tracks, this pig was all of the above. A call from a farmer had us out to look at the damage done to his cane and to do something about the pigs, 'or pig', that was causing it. Surrounding the farm was granite hills and gullies. All around the base of the granite hills were cane farms, peanuts, corn and vegetable crops. A large boar had been seen on nearly all, as usual no one ever had a rifle with them at the time. A few local dog hunters had a go at him, but he always managed to beat them, and from the tracks and damage, he was a big fellow. We reckoned he had been in the night before. Turning over stools of cane to get to old peanuts underneath, which had been last years crop, and what a mess he'd made. My mate, Irwin Reid, was keen to have a go at him, so we decided on 3am the next morning. Irwin picked me up at about 2:40am and a twenty minute run out to the cane farm had us there right on 3am. It was a cool morning by North Queensland standards, when we started slowly around the cane with our four best dogs loose on the back, Ginger, Patch, Boof & Barney. All good nose dogs and hard hangers. We'd only gone half a kilometer and all dogs had their noses up in the air when… that sound every dog hunter loves to hear…one YIP, and all four dogs flew off the Toyota together, straight into a block of cane. We kept driving, and lucky we did, just as we rounded a corner, the dogs came out of the cane, across the headland and straight up the hill, amongst the rocks. We decided to wait a bit to see what happened….they didn't come back. So we grabbed the torches, and up the hill we went. After about ten minutes climbing, we heard them and it sounded like a good pig. We hoped that it was our big crop raider, but we were soon disappointed. Patch and Ginger had a good boar, but not the one we wanted. Irwin got in around him and soon had him over and knifed, we reckoned he was about 55 to 60 kg. After checking that both dogs were OK, we were still missing two, so we waited and listened, but nothing. We picked up our pig and headed back down to the car, we only went about 200 meters when Patch and

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Ginger took off down the hill. Then we heard them as well. Boof and Barney had another pig and by the time we got there, all four dogs had an ear or a cheek, and it was just as well, because when we shone the torch on him, we couldn't believe the size of him. It took the two of us to tip him over and the knife did the rest. It seemed the dog's had split up, Patch and Ginger going straight up on the smaller boar and Boof and Barney must have picked up the big fella trying to double back into the cane, as they were only 100 meters from the paddock when they got him. By the time we checked the dogs and loaded the pigs, the sun was coming up, so back to town to the Chiller. Those two pigs went 61kg and 147 kg dressed. Not a bad morning…with a carton of 4X each from the farmer and another legend crop raider gone for good! DENNIS PATON, MAREEBA, NTH QLD


Sugar Addict With the Cane slowly being harvested, the opportunity of catching a good boar was definately increasing. The reason being, that the large Cane paddocks become smaller and the boars do not have as much cover to hide once the dogs are alerted to their presence. The harvesting that is done predominantly during the day light hours does not really interfere with the boars' routine, as soon as the sun disappears over the horizon the boars are already thinking about making their journey to the crop. Brett, Adrian and myself knew this and had decided that we would hit the small blocks twice a week until we were successful. We had managed some good sized sows and taken a couple of good boars that weighed around 60 kilos dressed a few weeks earlier, but had not hit the magical 100 kilo as yet. We were hoping that would soon change. Adrian had been working Chiller, Buster and Blacky, all heavily built dogs of Mastiff/ Wolfhound/Pit origin, Chiller was the better dog of the group, with a good nose. My own dogs consisted of 3 Greyhound/Bull Terrier crosses, although the Greyhound lines were very pronounced, Brin was the better dog also with a good nose. It was about 9 O'clock, when we departed for our hunting grounds, the drive was about 20 minutes. It was a nice warm night, the moon passing through the clouds turned the dark night into an eerie illuminated place, it was quiet as well, and the dogs could be heard poking around inside the Cane. We had checked 2 blocks with no luck. So we headed back to the car for a further look at another 2 blocks North of our position. Ten minutes later we were back at it, the dogs were keen, their glow sticks could be seen darting around as they checked for fresh scent. Brett decided to

walk up one side while Adrian and myself walked the other, at least if a good pig decided to quickly slip away we would have a chance of seeing them. We had gone approximately half way when all 6 dogs took of into the Cane, and as any hunter knows this is definitely a good sign. All dogs were together, so that enhanced our chances of success. The pig that was in the Cane was a large black/white boar over 100 kilo, when the boar was alerted to the dogs he legged it out the opposite side where Brett was waiting. As the boar quickly galloped out of the Cane block Brett caught sight of him, he then directed his torch light to the spot that he had come out to see, if a dog was in hot pursuit. No dog was visible, so Brett quickly swung the beam onto the boar and noticed that Toa my Pit/Greyhound had exited the Cane along side him. Toa had done an excellent job for a dog that was not much chop hunting Cane, he had plenty of pace so overtaking the boar in an open paddock was no problem. His first attempt at holding the boar failed, he was thrown clear, and missing 2 eyeteeth does not help either. His second attempt failed and copped a hard hit, which resulted in a loud wail. The third attempt was successful and the boar pulled up, Toa had a firehose breastplate on so most of the boar's aggression was taken out on that. The boar had not travelled that far thanks to Toas speed. Brett was the first to reach the action and with him came a couple of the other dogs to lend a hand. Finally we had our 100 kilo boar with a nice set of tusks as well, which Brett took home with him. We were all extremely pleased with the result. The boar was weighed the next morning and came in at 83 Kilo dressed.- R.VANDERVEEN

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HUNTER’S TROPHIES R.Vanderveen - Cairns

D.Hague - NSW

Matt Hall - NT

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Matt -Coonamble NSW


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Chris Shaw - Cape York

Daryl Vogler - Fernvale

Matthew Glasziow-QLD

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Scott McColl. Solid boar caught in sorghum stubble- Fernvale.

D.Hague

W.Muscat/ Egypt Bull Mastiff X- Nebo

Gary Hall- NT M.Ward - NSW / Staghound X.

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Jade McDonald -QLD with swag of boars.

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Theo with two good boars from the NT. R.Vanderveen - Cairns

Chris Zammit - NQ The Crew from NSW

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Glen Baker & Herc - QLD

ALL PHOTOS ARE RETURNED

Darren Hoffman- QLD

J.Leadbitter & D.Hague- NSW Another catch for Jess- J.Mc Donald

S.Bandes - Solid Boar NT.

Graham -Mt ISA

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STORY COMPETITION SEND IN YOUR BOAR TALE/ MAIN STORY TO WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA AND YOU WILL GO IN THE RUNNING TO WIN A .44 MAGNUM FROM ROSSI FIREARMS. COMPETITION DETAILS: When you send a Boar Tale or Main Story to Wild Boar Australia, you receive an entry into the Rossi Firearms Gun Competition. For each Boar Tale sent you recieve one entry, and for each Main Story sent you recieve three entries into the competition. All Boar Tales/ Main Stories must be recieved before the 1st of September 2004. Competition closes 5:00pm 1st September 2004. The winner will be announced in the November 2004 issue. All tales/stories receive the relative entries into the competition, regardless of being, or not being, published in Wild Boar Australia Magazine.

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Mackay

CATCH-A-HOG for Charity

After a few phone calls and a couple of quick meetings, and Mackay was shaping up for its first 'Catch-A-Hog for Charity'. On the Friday afternoon, pig hunters could be seen heading west, trying to catch the biggest porker for the inaugural event. Competition started at 7am on Friday morning, and last pigs to be weighed in at 11 am on the Sunday morning with activities and competitions being held throughout Sunday, at Bakers Creek Hotel. I decided to wait at the Pig Box from Saturday lunchtime onwards to get a few photos of hunters returning with their spoils. By the afternoon, the rigs started rolling in and it was obvious by the mudencased vehicles that they had hit some wet weather. A quick chat to the guys, and all

was revealed, "As soon as we got out west, around 7pm, down the rain came in buckets. We couldn't believe it, we hadn't even started to hunt and down it poured!" Some of the guys said they couldn't even get off the main road‌it was just too wet. They made the best of what they could and all still managed to bag good loads for the events. Sunday morning I was back at the box to see the last of the blokes come in to meet the cut off time. There were some good tallies, loads of 10 to 15 pigs came in despite the rain. All commented that numbers and sizes were down this year due to the drought, with only three to four suckers seen with individual sows. With all pigs weighed in, it was off to the pub for the festivities and competition results.

Left & Top Left: Competitors at the box, weighing the loads caught over the weekend. Above: Event Organisers, Melissa & Michelle, with the biggest boar.

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judges finalized, the 'CatchA-Hog for Charity' Competition Results were Inside the pub the big screen replayed ready to be announced. With the weekend's activities at the pig box, while a total of 80 pigs being brought into the box, outside there were pig rigs of all shapes and there were trophies, cash and prizes given for sizes with dogs and crates to match. First the following categories: event, 'The Ugliest Dog Competition' was won hands down by Mick's Wolfhound x Biggest Boar Bullmastiff (Don't take it to heart 98 K G W AYNE M USCAT Mick!).Then, 'The Fastest Eating Dog Biggest Sow Competition', which was a bit slow since 72 K G T RENT P ATRONI most of the mutts were tired from the weekLongest Tusk ends hunt, but eventually was won by Paul 3 1/4” P AUL M C F ARLANE McFarlaine's dog 'China', with a bit of help Mystery Weight from Paul himself! With the tallies in and the G LEN S LACK

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Most Kilo’s KG W AYNE M USCAT

Best Set-up B RETT V ELLA

It was a day for the pig hunters and enthusiasts. With a total of $3000 raised for local Homebush State School, a great time was had had by all.

Top Left: One of the winners. Top Right: ‘The Ugliest Dog’ Winner. Left: One of the sponsors of the day, Mackay Off Road ARB. Below Left: A good sized boar, one of many caught throughout the competition. Below Right: Wayne Muscat, double winner of biggest boar and biggest load.

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U L L F

MO O N MADN ESS STORY BY NEIL MANY

As regular as clockwork the moon was coming to it's fullest again and so was our anticipation to go hunting...

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ABOVE: Author with Josie.

As regular as clockwork the moon was coming to it's fullest again and so was our anticipation to go hunting. I had been hunting a large patch of forage sorghum that had been getting used extensively by pigs. Upon arriving at our destination I would unload dogs and carry a torch and knife and walk the edges of the forage in the full moon light. There were plenty of signs of large boars present by the rubs and the tusk marks on the trees in the area. I was hunting towards one of the many dams that fringed the forage when the two dogs, Red Dog a pit bull terrier and Sandy, a mastiff x ridge back, started working harder, then they were off. It was close to midnight and deadly quiet for my liking. I waited 15 to 20 minutes and Sandy came back, but

no Red Dog. I walked and whistled and I knew something was very amiss. Red Dog was a seven year old veteran of many hunts. I kept looking for three to four hours and decided to head back to the vehicle, roll out my swag and continue the search in daylight. On the way back to the vehicle, I encountered another boar foraging around in the open so I sent Sandy in. The boar didn't run but just stood his ground and sent the dog cart wheeling back. In she went again for another hammering. The boar gave her three to four good hits then flicked her off and headed straight past me. I just stepped out of the road and pulled her off as she had taken some heavy hits. She had three rips, Isewed her up, gave her some antibiotics and anti-

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LL U FMO O N MAD N ES S inflammatory and left her to rest in the back of the truck. I then rolled out my swag and got a bit of shuteye until dawn. Dawn came. Still no Red Dog. I continued to search until midday and then went home to break the news to my family because Red Dog was my 7 year old daughters dog that she'd had since her birth. Sandy survived and came good in a couple of weeks. When I got home and broke the news to my wife and children, they were upset but had hopes of finding him. Deep down I knew he had met his fate, but how, and why? Everyday I walked and called out, looking for signs of crows, anything to point me in the right direction. But nothing. Then 10 days after Red Dog had disappeared we were walking onto one of the 3 dams in the area and I could see something in the water on the Above: Author with boar caught on the Dawson other side of the dam. The closer we got I River near Duaringa. could see the outline of a dog and the buckles of the forage, when both dogs worked into the shinning on the back of the chest plate con- edge of the crop hunting hard. Seconds later firmed that we had finally found Red Dog. I there was a woof from a mature pig breaking waded out and brought him back to the bank, away and then total silence. Walking along the the search was finally over. The chest plate edge of the crop listening, I heard nothing. The when I took it off him was shredded with rips all moon was high and there was dead silence. It over but none on the dog himself. We think the brought back memories of when we lost Red boar couldn't shake him, so he took Red Dog to Dog. I picked up the pace walking in the generthe water and drowned him and being the mid- al direction I last heard them. Then way ahead, dle of winter, the icy cold water slowed the bloat- up in the distance, I could hear an almighty coming process that brought him to the surface. The motion of dogs going off, and then I clicked. worst part was to come, to break the news to my There was a dam about 1km ahead in that direcdaughter, she was devastated and I wasn't very tion. I thought could this be the same pig that popular at all. The next full moon came around got Red Dog? I couldn't get there quick enough and with sweet revenge on my mind, back I went and sure enough out in the middle of the dam to the same spot with two different dogs. This were Josie and Freddie and a big boar. I time with Josie, a tiny 17 kilo pit bull bitch, and switched on the torch in time to see the big boar Freddy who wasn't much bigger, about 19 kilos. grab Josie by the chest plate and take her under They worked excellent together and both hung the water. Seconds seemed like minutes, bubon the nose. We were hunting along the edge bles emerged but no dog, Freddy was swimming 20 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


around looking for his quarry. Then they sur- in behind the boar I slipped on something and faced with a gasp. Josie had chewed the boar landed on my arse right next to the boar. I off by the nose. I took my boots off and swam thought I was a goner, but Josie had the boar out to assist the dogs. Freddy and Josie had the secured by the cheek on the other side where I head and I grabbed the tail and swam toward couldn't see her. For what it was that I slipped the bank, pigs and dogs in tow. That was a feat on, it was a stick on the ground. I grabbed the in itself. When I could stand up, I grabbed my boar by the back leg and dispatched him quickknife and stuck the boar and put an end to the ly, then bundled up Freddy, who had been hit battle. Exhausted, I sat atop the boar, hard, and headed for the vehicle, which luckily drenched. I glanced at my watch and it was just was only a couple of hundred metres away. I past midnight. I was cold but had a warm sense got the water bottle, washed his wounds down of satisfaction that I had captured the boar that and put a couple of stitches in, along with an had killed Red Dog. Walking back to the vehi- antibiotic shot of Nurocillin. It was touch and go cles, Josie and Freddy caught another boar in for two weeks though, but he beat the infection. the edge of the forage. He was slightly larger The boar I caped out and sent to Mario Carnesi, than the last boar dressing out at 90 kilos, but a Melbourne taxidermist. His work is second to not as mature, the boar in the dam went 87 kilos none. Now as the full moon rolls around and the dressed. Two nights later, the moon was still full nights get brighter, Josie and Freddie start howland bright. We were back at it again. We did a ing to return to that full moon madness. lap of the forage on foot, with no success. We were 200 metres from where we had left the vehicle when I heard a snort of a pig testing the air. I stopped to look and listen and sure enough the telltale sound of a pig testing the air could be heard clearly in the quietness of the night. Josie and Freddy homed in on the noise and in the moonlight I could see the bulk of a large pig moving off with dogs in pursuit. There was an almighty ruckus and then silence. He had blown the dogs. I slowly walked to where the commotion was last heard and there he was not 15 metres in front of me, standing still, listening and watching for the dogs. In the full moonlight, I could see Josie and Freddie homing in on him. The boar didn't flee. He stood his ground and waited for the dogs to come to him. Then all hell broke loose. I moved in quickly to dispatch the irate boar. The fury he released in those next moments had to be seen to be believed. Just as I moved in to grab his back leg, Freddy and Josie had the boar secured by the nose one second. Next minute, dogs were getting flicked in all directions and I was standing next to one very irate boar. As I moved ABOVE: Author & Josie with mounted boar. 21


I G D O G S P muscle of the Pack

Major-Bully/Greyhound

Sako-Bull Arab X

Sarge- Bully/ Greyhound/ Bull Arab 22 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


Harlequin/Dane/Mastiff X Wolfhound 54kg

Bundy-Bull Arab

23


IG DOGS P muscle of the Pack

Wolfhound X - 37kg

Slade & Decan-English Mastiff/Pitbull

Duke - Bully/Dane 24 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


PIG DOG SUPPLIES

Hanging Racks, TRACKING COLLARS Dog Boxes, Spotlights, Receiver, Yagi Antennae Remote's, Glowsticks, & Collar from $700 Flasing Lights, FDicks, Large First Aid Kits/ Bum Bags, make your own first aid kit or stock up your existing kit over the phone.

C/Plate with Shoulders $140 Full Plate $140

Chestplate $95

Wildlife Materials Int TITLEY ELECTRONICS

Leg Hole Plate $130

Rip Collar $45

Also available:Glow tags $10/pair. Rechargable. BUY COLLARS DIRECT FROM WHOLESALER/ MANUFACTURER. NO MIDDLEMAN PUPPIES AVAILABILITY ONLINE ONLY

www.pigdogsupplies.com

P h: 02 6365 8432 PO Box E381 EAST ORANGE POST OFFICE 2800

TRADING POST PIGDOG PUPS: Bull/Boxer Cross Purebred Wolf hound Pups, ready to go Phone: (07) 49595350 WANTED TO BUY: Under/Over 12 Guage Shotgun, Berreta SO4, Phone: 0401 014 592 TWO & A HALF YEAR OLD: Purebred Wolfound with papers. Phone: (07) 49 595350 LOST DOG: Brindle Mastiff Cross bitch lost in the St Lawrence area. Please ring 41598352 WANTED: PHOTOS & STORIES FOR UP AND COMING ISSUES.

BANDOG PUPS: $300. FOR SALE: Water Contact Neil (07) Aquapac, dog leads and 49357202 collars, leather belts. Ring Beau on 0423 STAGHOUND PUPS: 7 81816 months old. Parents fast, strong pig dogs. FOR SALE: Suzuki Parents can be viewed. 250cc quadrunner 4x4, $100 each. Phone: in good condition. 0409427438 $2500.Ph:(07)47886700 WANTED: Pig Hunters or 0419 679 558 with Dogs in Port Macquarie Area. Please ring Glen on 65826148. MOTORBIKE & TOYOTA SEATCOVERS Seatcovers for AG, Trail Bikes & Quads $25 plus $5 postage. Seatcovers for Toyota Landcruisers, Hilux 4X4 and Holden Rodeo Designed for farm & work utes. $75 plus $8 postage. Seatcovers are made from Australian made stretch denim Hardwearing and fully washable.

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25


ACCESSORIES

GEAR FOR THE HUNTER

CHEROKEE ADVENTURES This is a video that deserves a spot in your hunting collection. Produced by David Kirtman, the video is filmed in the top end of the Northern Territory while hunting wild boar and Australia's big buffalo. Hunting takes place in the paper bark swamps to the lush green marshlands. Some of the fine, heavy-bodied boars and trophy-horned buffalos taken in this video are sure to impress you. One particular scene gets extremely close up on a buffalo int the wild, and you see how massive these animals truly are. David adds a bit extra on the video with a touch of fishing. The video sells for $35.00 and is definitely worth it. After watching the video, I wanted to get straight up to the Northern Territory and watch the pigs roam in their glory. To order your video, see order form on page 79.

GULF COUNTRY We all know how important our pig truck is to us and the last thing we need is for it to break down in the bush. Stuck in the middle of nowhere! If your Diesel Engine is not running as smooth as it should, ring Peter Cox from Diesel Tune Mackay. Peter is backed up by 30 years experience and knows the ins and outs of diesel engines. With a mobile workshop, onsite jobs are not a problem, Pete will sort it out and keep your rig reliable for those long journeys out West. Peter can be contacted on (07)49588190 or 0428587607

FDICKSPECIAL SPECIAL

Available from pig dog supplies, the knife is quality made and manufactured in Germany. The blade is made from high grade stainless steel, with a blade length of 200mm. The overall length of the Fdick knife is 335mm. Les is running a special on Fdick knives for this issue, for $100 you receive the knife and a sturdy leather sheath. Call Les on (02) 6365 8432.

26 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA

BREASTPLATES Dennis Paton has been pig hunting for over 40 years and makes a range of collars and breastplates made from leather and fire hose. His breastplates are double layered in the front with a bibbed under jaw. Dennis lives in Mareeba, North Queensland, and sends collars all around Australia. Talk more about your needs with Dennis on (07) 40933080.


SELVITA

Like us, dogs can lack important vitamins & minerals which can greatly reduce their performance at home and at work. Selvita is a supplement for dogs which can improves the overall health of your dog. Improvements seen from using Selvita are better endurance when training and hunting, less fatigue and stiffness after work, faster healing time after injury with the bonus of a better coat and healthier teeth. Healthier, Fitter, Stronger dogs means they can hunt longer and gives you more time out in the field. For more information call Jason at J.S. ENTERPRISES on Ph/Fax:(02)48224591+Mob:0402240463

MACKAY Shooters

Supplies

The shop that has it all! Stocking everything for the shooter, right through to gear for the archery guys. They stock a wide range of hunting knives, guns, ammunition and spotlights‌you name it, Ian and Dianne will have it. If they don't, they'll try there best to get it for you. They also stock an awesome display of swords.

Phone (07)49 511634 or email mackayshooter@hotmail.com.

PIG DOG PUPS

If your in the market to add another pup to your hunting pack, Hound Connection breed various ranges of hunting dogs. They breed bailing dogs through to hunting dogs, such as the Bull Arab. Sires are also available if you have your own bitch that you would like to breed from. Hound Connection also provide dog training for stock proofing, to eliminating 'bad habits'. Pups are available all year round, for more information contact Peter (02) 4262 2853 0405247149 or Brian 0415784329.

TUSKPROOF PROTECTIVE ACCESSORIES V.I.P MEMBERSHIP. Why should you be a V.I.P member? Well, after you have purchased your first breast plate you are then entitled to your free numbered key ring and ten percent off every breast plate ordered. Also their will be a V.I.P special in every issue of Wild Boar Australia. For example, in this issue, members only will be able to purchase 100 worming tablets for $57.00, normally $72.00. Being a Tusk Proof V.I.P member is something you will have for life, this is our way of giving back something to our very loyal customers in the past and present, you will be insuring the future of this company supplying you with our top quality service and products for many years to come. V.I.P, Very Important Pigger, that is our motto, phone for your free brochure and price list (07) 55331424 or 0412 355 774.

BOORIMAH CHESTPLATES Mick Landford lives in Armidale, NSW, and manufactures Boorimah Chestplates. On one of Micks new styles, he fixes brass or steel eyelets in the main body of the plate, this is to help keep down the dogs body temperature. Mick says the system works even better when the dog is wet. The materials used to make Boorimah Chestplates are even waterproof, but if you want to know more about this new style Mick has to offer, give him a call on (02) 67752054.

27


HUNTER’S

TROPHIES Paul & Dirk

WIN COLLAR

Matt & Wayne NT Ruslan - NT

WIN

SHIRT

A.Raines - Mareeba

28 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


WIN

V IDEO

Ashley & Shartai -Daringa with 120kg boar.

G.Kala - NT

Wally & Hitler - Mt ISA

Jed & Josh - Longreach

Luke & Matt Mc Grath-Yeoual NSW

29


Matt Boch & Crew

Gary Hall - NT

Kallon & Tahwee Shaw-Moranbah

WIN $150 OPEN ORDER TUSKPROOF

Graham Campbell- WA

Matt Dennis - Ardlethan

30 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


Darren Winbank- Barnsley NSW

WIN

SHIRT

Matt Dennis

Glen Wallis

Dirk & May - QLD

Chris Zammit- NQ

31


WIN

SHIRT

Matt Hall - NT. Using a double barrell shotgun on an early mornings hunt. Noel Wilkie -WA .270 Win.

Graham - Mt ISA

Wayne - NT

Joel - Wogga

32 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


ATS ANIMAL TRAINING SYSTEMS


HUNTING

BLACKBERRY ARTICLE BY IAN COLLIE

I don’t know the full story of how the Blackberry arrived in Australia, but I assume it would be something to do with our english forebears missing grandma’s Blackberry pies... But for sure and certain the pest has adapted to life in Australia and has established itself over vast areas. Classified as a noxious weed, considerable amounts of money are spent each year trying to reclaim large areas of country rendered virtually useless by this plant. The bushes themselves grow to varying heights with the highest being around the 4 meter mark, and continue to spread out each year by new shoots emerging from the existing root system via suckers and new plants germinating from fallen fruit. If left unchecked, they eventually cover huge areas completely and are virtually impenetrable to stock and people. The bushes are similar to the common rose bush and unfortunately have the thorns to match. My association with this pest goes back to my childhood days spending hours picking fruit for Nan's pies. However my obsession for hunting pigs soon gave me an entirely different reason to renew my acquaintances with this plant. When hunting for property access to hunt pigs a local told me of a property that held large numbers of feral pigs. When I suggested that the only thing that property supported in large numbers was blackberry bushes his reply was "just throw a rock into one of them and see what comes out". Access to the property was duly arranged and he was dead on. The blackberry provided the cover needed to make the local swine population comfortable when camping up during the day, offering both shelter from the elements and most importantly being concealed from prying eyes. Over the next 30 years the numbers of pigs I caught in blackberry would number in the thousands.

Above: The Blackberry bush spreads out each year by suckering shoots and fallen fruit. Right: ‘Rose-like’ Thorns of the Blackberry bush. Below: Fruit of the Blackberry bush.

So how do you hunt Blackberry? To work out if there are pigs in the area, all the normal indicators apply, the cocky has been seeing them, rooting, tracks, wallows etc. Once you know pigs are living in the area how do you know if they are camping in the bushes? The easiest way is to look for tunnels, or runs going into the bushes. If they are being frequently used you will be able to see the tracks if the soil is soft, or trampled grass etc will give away all current activity. Once these signs have been found it is just a matter of letting the dogs do their thing. Bushes with large dead logs in them or trees growing through them are favourite spots, allowing the pigs the extra benefits of something to scratch themselves on while being completely concealed. In the summer, bushes in deep gullies with water laid on are also favourites. In the winter however, when Jack Frost pays a nightly visit these low lying bushes are too cold, the pigs then prefer a bush that gets the sun during the day and shelters them from any cold wind. But, as with most pig hunters the big old cunning boars are the primary targets. The low lying bushes in gullies etc are normally occupied by mob pigs, with the large boars being in attendance only when the sows are in season, but as always there are a few exceptions to the rule. I have found that the majority of, not only large boars, but the real old cunning buggers, like to camp up high on the ridges or just on the lip of the ridges. Concentrating on the gullies will pay off, especially if hunting pressure is light and feed is handy, but if you're looking for the big old rough fellas a higher success rate is to do a bit of lung busting and get to the tops of the ridges and hills. Blackberry bushes growing right on top or near the top of these ridges and hills should be checked thoroughly.

34 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


The Dogs Probably the most important part of hunting blackberry is a good team of dogs. Some pigs will not leave the sanctuary of the bushes regardless of what you try and it will be necessary for the dogs to actually get into the bushes to flush them out or catch them in the bush for you. Everyone that hunts blackberry regularly will have their favourite breeds, but my preference is a medium sized dog that will have no trouble accessing the pig runs. You will find larger dogs get caught and tangled in the bushes making it much more difficult for them to catch a fleeing porker. I always tend to hunt one or two finder/bailers and a hard dog to hold. The finders should be of the busy type, and I would recommend a dog that will check through each bush without you having to throw rocks etc into the bush to try and get the dog to go into them. If you are running all hard dogs you will find that in most cases you will only catch one pig, mostly in the middle of the bushes, and it will be necessary to get the dogs off the hard way if you want them to run on after the mob. If the pig happens to be in a large bush, this takes a bit of time and the other pigs are long gone. A good bailer that can be called off with a quick verbal command or whistle will greatly increase your chances in catching more than one pig from a mob. Another good way to get those runners is having one or two dogs on leads to be let go when the pigs break from the cover of the bush. If you use a rifle when hunting with dogs you will get lots of opportunities to pop off a few as they break from the cover of the bushes. One problem you may encounter with inexperienced blackberry dogs is that some dogs don't like going into the bushes because of the thorns. Be patient with these types of dogs, they will soon get the idea that if they want to catch the pigs; in the bushes is where they need to be.

Getting the pigs out.... This is when the fun starts and will test the faith you have in your holders. I find that wearing overalls is the best protection I can get from the thorns. The weave helps prevent the thorns catching the material, and makes progress easier, not much easier in some cases though. As a comparison say, if wearing track pants you will spend most of your time untangling the thorns from the material and digging the thorns out of your legs. Also a good pair of leather gardening gloves will help protect your hands if you think it necessary. One of the easiest ways to get to the pigs is to crawl into the tunnel either on your hands and knees or on your stomach. Be prepared though, when the pig spots you they normally lose all interest in the dogs and focus their attention on you. It is advisable to wait until the pig is facing away from you and then grabbing the back leg and hanging on. This gets very interesting sometimes especially when lying on your stomach trying to hold 80kgs of irate pork. This is when holders should hold no matter what, the time for powdering has long since passed. The other way to get to the pig is over the top of the bush. A large branch is used to knock the bush down until the pig is reached. This can get frustrating at times with the pig moving around once it sees or hears you coming. I have also tried machetes a few times trying to cut my way into the bushes similar to the branch theory, but finally gave them away. The canes on the bushes tend to move away from the machete with each slash and you will knock up quickly without making much progress. If using this method make sure the machete is sharp, this will make the job a lot easier. I have also driven a four wheel drive into a bush to clear a path. If using this technique, make sure that you know where your dogs are so you don't run over them. Secondly try and make sure there are no large gullies or logs in the bush that you can't see, you can do some major damage if not careful.

Best time of year to hunt. If pigs frequent the area most times of the year is a good time, but if you are limited to hunting once or twice a year, when the fruit is on would be the optimum time. The old hogs can't resist a good feed of blackberry and any examination of their droppings at this time of year will prove the point. You will find in areas where pigs travel a lot they will always turn up when the Blackberries are ripe no matter where they range. The added bonus when hunting during this period is you can grab a feed yourself. In my particular area of the New England in NSW the bushes bear fruit around late January through February. Now, all you need to do is find a good patch of blackberry, occupied by a couple of pigs and you are in business. If you are lucky enough to live in an area with no blackberry, all I can say is half your luck, but everyone should try it at least once to find out exactly what you are missing out on.

Top & Bottom Left: Pigs caught in the Blackberry Bushes. Above: Look for tunnels, or runs going into bushes.

35


The sky was just getting light as I closed the last gate heading into one of our favourite spots on the property. We had arrived at the place the night before, and had a dry run on half a dozen or so mills that we hunted. This was the first time on this place we had not caught pigs on a hunt, we ran into the problem later on‌Like a lot of properties this one had its poachers. Most of the good spots have to be hunted on foot, so we parked the Ute, and started down the hill towards the swampy flat. A creek borders the southern end of the property, the southern bank in most parts is bordered by the basalt wall which in a lot of places is heavily covered in rubber vine. The northern end is heavily timbered and has large areas of thick mimosa. As soon as we hit the flat, the dogs got keen, headed off and disappeared into the scrub at the northern end. The dogs we were hunting with were my two young Bull Arabs, Jake and 36 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA

I spotted him about the same time but the dogs had not. However when the boar went into top gear they picked up the movement and within a few strides were flatout after him. The boar arced around our front, heading, I would say, for the mimosa, a couple of hundred meters away. This is where having quick dogs comes in handy. They had just disappeared from sight, a couple of faint yips from Jake and they had him. We knew he wasn't overly big, and Sars. Paul's young bitsa, when arriving on the scene we Oscar, and, the experience in guessed his weight to be, the pack, coming from Paul's 5 maybe, the high fifties and in year old boxer/ridge cross, poor condition. But you couldGrub. This dog has nailed n't help noticing his hooks. heaps of top pigs on this place, Most of the boars in this area the numerous scars on his have good ones, but this shoulders, chest, neck and bloke's were better than any head show that his experience before from this area. Another is hard won. We headed in the bonus was that the dogs didn't direction of the dogs, expecting have a mark on them. After the a bark any moment, although standard photo session, we they worked their arses off for called it a morning. A severe the next hour, they came up bout of the rum flu cancelled empty handed. It was decided the afternoon session, but next to change direction and we morning we were up bright pushed the dogs into the eyed and bushy tailed (not). mimosa, once again they were After walking into another good keen, but their progress was lily swamp we picked up four hampered by the many lone more pigs and another tusky cows with newborn calves. It boar, which stood his ground was good to watch the dogs, as old Grub flew in and nailed more so the younger ones, pick him. After that it was the two their way through and around hour drive home, during which them. We broke clear of the the next run had been planned, mimosa and threaded our way however the dog baits were through small patch's of rubber getting laid next day so this vine, when out of the blue, place would not see us for a about fifty meters to our right, a while.-MH. boar stood up from where he was laying under a tree. Paul &

Boar Tales


t h g i l n o o M SHOO TING I'm what you would call an avid pig hunter; I see them, I want to hunt them…In August 2001, I went up north to visit a friend of mine, Paddy, who has a cattle property near Coen, about 500 km's North of Cairns. He picked me up from the air- strip (believe me this does not qualify as an airport) and we drove to his place in his ancient but reliable 4WD. His homestead is a rustic traditionally styled abode. The pump-supplied water is obtained from a small river running about 700 metres down from the house. We initially made a small detour to the river where he showed me the carcass of a cow, which was nearly decomposed. Paddy mentioned that a few nights previously there were at least 30 pigs dining out on this particular carcass. This is what I wanted to hear…We then made another detour to a different carcass also in the vicinity which was so far unmarked, but the possibilities of pig feasting were highly probable. I observed the carcass over the next few days deteriorating to the point where it was getting quite 'on the nose'. It was definitely ripe for the picking…On this particular night, we decided to do some late-time investigations. At around midnight we headed off with one of the station hands, Wadley (as in "What'll he Do Next!") to check out if there was any action. As we approached the fence line, which was about 50 metres from the carcass, a mob of about 20 to 30 pigs were startled away by our presence. It was a variable clan of suckers: perfect for hunting. With the pigs vanished, it was back to the homestead. A few restless hours later, the urge to hunt overtook me. I packed up my gear, grabbed my Ruger 220 Swift with 9/24 x 24 scope, and made tracks back to the 'scene of the crime'. Fortunately I had a full moon about a third high, so the way was paved in a luminescence that ensured I wouldn't get lost or need unnatural light. On the way I took the opportunity to adjust the scope using one of the cattle in the holding yard. This accomplished, I was on my way…When I got near the fence, I could make out dark shapes and movement near the carcass. They sounded like the rutting around of pigs, but you can never be too careful. I had to make sure they were not Paddy's working dogs having their own private moonlight feast, so I looked down my scope and sighted what I had been hoping for; the mob from earlier. The adrenaline rush was intense; my heart just went into overdrive. The anticipation and excitement of the hunt was over stimulating. I had to take a deep breath and compose myself, gathering my skills and steadiness to start the task at hand. There was no way I was about to miss a shot and stuff this baby up. The choice between the pigs was difficult, the small porkers or the real stompers; decisions, decisions? One caught my attention, so I took aim, stilled myself, and fired. It was a direct hit. The others took off in a mad panic and during the commotion, this enabled me to get under the fence and take a better position next to a tree about 40 metres from the carcass. Let me tell you, at this vicinity the

smell was putrid. Within a short period of time, two or more of the bolder (or hungrier) beasts decided to risk it and come back for more sampling. I picked the biggest one out. Lined him up and fired. Success! He was down for the count. I have to say that at this point I was pretty elated. This type of shooting is something that doesn't come around that often, but is something I've always wanted the opportunity to have a hand at. Caution is always something skill ed hunters should possess, so when I then assessed my perimeter I noticed a big fellow coming straight towards me from along the fence line; all 60kgs of feral pork. I put the scope on him and could see clearly that this one was a prime boar. He was walking along without a care in the world, not realizing his fate as I put the cross between his eyes and let it rip. One more down, a smorgasbord to go…it certainly doesn't get any better than this, I thought. As I was enjoying the ease of pickings off my targets, I decided to settle down to see if more action would come way. I stayed near my tree and kept a good eye out, listening also for any telltale noises. Another pig came out of the tall grass making a beeline for the carcass. He didn't last long. My Ruger 220 Swift was making short work of these guys. This basically went on until dawn. As the sun came over the horizon, I could count the bodies of the six pigs from the six shots that were fired. Not a bad night out at all. I went back to the homestead for a huge breakfast and a well-deserved rest. The few photos' I took of that night will forever remind me of my supremely fantastic visit to Coen. -PERCE SPYCHIGER, DECEPTION BAY. 37


ONE LAST TRACK

WIN

COLLAR

The wind was blowing like hell and snow was falling heavy as we topped the range on our way home from an overnight hunt. Kingo and I had caught two good pigs and were looking forward to a hot shower and getting out of the cold. I suggested we drop into a block of pines on the way home to see if we could round up a good boar, which I knew was in the area. Kingo wasn't keen to say the least but I convinced him to hunt the main track through the block and if we didn't catch anything it would only put one hour extra on the drive and he agreed. We travelled in and put out a couple of hounds, within half a kilometre the dogs were off a hundred miles an hour heading deep into the forest with wind blowing and snow falling heavily it was difficult. The dogs had been missing for about twenty minutes. Then I thought I heard a bark in the distance, so we drove around the block to find the dogs with the big black and white spotted fella, bailed up on the side of the track. He was giving the dogs hell with four out of 38 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA

the six dogs being big pups, they had their work cut out for them. While running over to them, the big bugger spotted me and came straight at me, making me step and run around a few trees until putting his efforts into giving Kingo the run around. Then Jinny lugged up as did the others about the same time, and the fight was on. There were dogs getting thrown into the air, ripped and charged into trees, until I got the firm grip on his leg and along with Kingo, tipped and stabbed him. After a minute breather and dog check, Kingo looked at me and said," This beats the shit out of a hot shower any day." The big bloke who'd had a run in with dogs before, looking at his one ear gone and half the other one missing, stuck it to us. All the dogs were ripped in one place or another, but all in all, the big mountain boar put in his best on the day, but unlike us, his luck had run out. Making one 'last track' pay on the day. -CRAIG COLLIE,ACT.


BAIL ‘EM UP This hunt took place in the NT in late June, with a good friend of mine, Warren. We used four dogs on this trip, two bailers finders and two young holders. The bailers consisted of a Pointer cross bitch and a Border Collie. The holders were both around 8 months old, a dog and a bitch ,both Mastiff cross. This time of year there is ample water and its mostly green, most of our hunting was done in early morning or late afternoon. One morning, we left camp around 6:30am and decided to do a few old grass covered roads in the Land Cruiser. We ended up leaving the truck on the side of a large swamp line with paper bark trees. After a short time, we had already caught a few smaller-sized pigs, when one of the dogs started to circle wider and wider, then finally disappearing. Waiting only a few minutes we heard one bark, then two, we had a bail. We took about three steps in the direction of the dogs, then silence‌ the bail was broken and the chase was on. The dogs bailed, then two to three times more in the paper barks and then across the other side of the swamp. This time the pups had him, but not a squeal or sound came from

the pig, but the bailers kept the noise up. We ran through some tall reeds, then in water up to our knees, the whole time I was thinking 'Where's the croc?' Warren had his .308 and I made sure I was right next to him all the way across to the other side. The timber broke and turned into scattered Pandana Palms, with the tall underlying grass, I still could not see the dogs, but the barks were still plentiful. Then suddenly, Warrens dog was up in the air only fifteen metres to the right of us. I quickly gave Warren the video camera, but that was more like a half-arsed football pass. Luckily he caught it. Getting in to the dogs, I could see that the pups had a ear each and there was a clean circle of grass laid down, from the twenty legs going around and around. I grabbed two legs, and two big handfuls of dead grass as well, I quickly tipped him and put him away. We then checked all the dogs and all were fine. A couple of quick pics as Warren and I were both all teeth (big smiles), this boar later dressed at 77kgs and by the time this story goes to print, his head should be on the wall in the workshop.- LES LOVEGROVE, ORANGE. For more stories & photos get onto www.pigdogsupplies.com

39


THE ULTIMATE PIG HUNTERS PACK WORTH $4300

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Fill in your details on the entry form below and send in, with your PIG HUNTING PHOTOS to:

Wild Boar Australia PO Box 10126,Mt Pleasant,Mackay Qld 4740.

ENTER AS MANY TIMES AS YOU LIKE

Entry form must be included with Photos.All photos entered in the competition will be returned. ENTRY FORM ENTRY FORM ENTRY FORM ENTRY FORM ENTRY FORM ENTRY FORM ENTRY

I WANT TO WIN THE ULTIMATE PIG HUNTERS PACK WORTH $

NAME:_______________________________________________________________________ ADDRESS:____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ P/CODE:_________PHONE:_________________________MOB:__________________________ Send this entry form, along with your pig hunting photo/s to Wild Boar Australia PO BOX 10126 Mt Pleasant Mackay 4740 before the 30 May 2004 for ATS Early July Draw and before 30 September for the Ultimate Pig Hunters Pack.


WIN

COLLAR Above: Every hunters dream! A good mob of pigs with some good sized pigs amongst it. Left: Caught Out!...Pigs rooting in the early hours of the morning.

ALL PHOTOS WERE TAKEN IN THE NORTHERN TERRITORY.

BAIL & LIVE PHOTOS WANTED 41


G R E AT C R AT E S PIG RACK THE HANGING SECTION Shown here is the hanging section of the crate. Galvinised sheet is fixed to the outside of the crate, with the above rack housing removable pins when needing to hang pigs. The slide door, shown open in picture, is easily slid open to move pigs from one compartment to the other. Note: A Locking device, for slide door, is advisable for when driving over rough ground, so door does not rattle out. DOORS & DIMENSIONS The doors are mounted on hinges and simply open outwards. Dimensions of crate are: 1100mm long 1750mm Wide 1000mm High 600mm Width of small compartment.

T H E H A N G I N G B A R The hanging bar is made up of nuts, spaced apart and welded into position along the top frame of the crate. Pins with threaded end can be inserted when needed.

42 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA

HANGING PINS The removable pins are stainless steel, and made from threaded rod turned down on a lathe, leaving enough thread for attachment and also enough thread to place on a stainless steel nut. This nut acts as a lock when the pin is fitted onto the hanging rack. Apart from easy to use, the best factor about this set-up is safety, no pointy objects poking up on the crate when they are not needed.


W I N C H & P I N S TO R A G E The winch is a simple boat trailer winch, mounted onto a steel bar. In each corner of the crate, pipe is welded so that the winch can be moved to any corner of the crate that you need to lift from. A B O V E : O V E R A L L C R AT E & P I G HANGING RACK SET-UP All racked up and ready to go...where’s the pigs?! The pins are stored in a PVC container which is mounted to the crate. It has a screw on PVC lid with sterilising solution inside.

TRACKERS GALORE!

Tom’s TARPS

TITLEY ELECTRONICS

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NECK COLLARS & CUT DOWN VERSION CHESTPLATES

Receiver, Yagi Antennae and collar from $700 A Radio Unit helps an owner find a dog after a hunt. It saves time, fuel, money and worry by helpng to locate a valuable animal, a receiver to pick up the collar’s signal, and a Yagi 3-element handheld antenna to directionalise and magnify that signal. Dog owners get the benefit of Wildlife Materials’ 30 year manufacturing experience for wildlife research.

Complying with AUSTRALIAN COMMUNICATION AUTHORITY For more information contact HUNTING CONNECTION

MAIL ORDER: (02)4262 2853 SHOP: (02) 4628 3522 MOBILE: PETER 0405 247 149 jago02@ozemail.com.au www.huntingconnection.com.au STORE OPEN IN CAMPBELLTOWN N.S.W.

Flexible, Breathable Fabric Q Adjustable & easy to fit Q Fluoro Markers sewn into Collar to assist location of your animal Q Weather Resistant Lightweight Materials Q Comfortable design allowing for ease of stride when running Q Already proven in the field Q Small investment that soon pays for itself. Q

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PH: (07) 4671 2634 Fax: (07) 4671 3196 9 Boodle Street, Goondiwindi QLD 4390 email: tarps@bigpond.com.au web: www.tomstarps.com.au

43


WILD BOAR

AUSTRALIA GEAR MEN’S COTTON SHIRTS

White print on Black

NEW COLOURS!!

Mustard print on Black Red print on Black

$29 P O S TA G E INC.

TOP QUALITY Men’s Shirts 100% Cotton 190 grms

White

Royal Blue

Red

OUR GUARANTEE If your not 100% satisfied with the quality of our shirts, then return them within seven days for your full money back.

EMBRIODED $ 2 2 CAP

P O S TA G E inc.

STICKER

Large glossy 16cmx 16cm

$4

P O S TA G E inc. INC.


MEN’S POLO SHIRTS

$35

QUALITY DRESS SHIRTS

P O S TA G E INC.

AVAILABLE COLOURS White Polo with Black Print Black Polo with Mustard Print

Top Quality Pique Polo Trimmed Shirt Satisfaction If you are not 100% satisfied with the quality of our shirts, then return them within seven days for your full money back.

ORDER FORM Name:______________________________________________________________________________________ Address:____________________________________________________________________P/Code:__________ Phone:_________________________ Yes, I would like to order the following Wild Boar Merchandise... MENS COTTON SHIRTS Sizes available S,M,L,XL,XXL $29 BLACK with White print BLACK with Gold print

BLACK with Red print

Sizes Qty:

Sizes Qty:

Sizes Qty:

WHITE Sizes Qty:

RED

BLUE Sizes Qty:

Sizes Qty:

CAP One size fits all. $22 Qty:

MENS POLO SHIRTS Sizes available S,M,L,XL,XXL $35 WHITE Sizes Qty:

STICKER $4 Qty: 16cm x 16cm

BLACK Sizes Qty:

Included is a Cheque/Money Order for $_________. or Please Charge $_____________to my Credit Card. ____ ____ ____ VISA† MASTERCARD† BANKCARD† Card No._ _ _ _ Expiry Date: _ _ / _ _ _ _ Card Holders Name:________________________________________________ Signature:_________________________________________________ Please make Cheques and Money Orders out to WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA and send to: WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA PO BOX 10126 MT PLEASANT MACKAY 4740. PLEASE ALLOW 14 DAYS FROM PAYMENT FOR DELIVERY.

PHOTOCOPIES OF THIS ORDER FORM WILL BE EXCEPTED

45


NORTHERN

46 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


TOUR

STORY

My fiancĂŠ, Jack, and I couldn't wait to head off on our holiday, and hunting trip for pigs, to Cape York and the Gulf. A trip we had dreamed about for years. Before we could go, Jack was busy organizing a new dog cage. Mechanically, Jack knew the 4WD had to be ready for the roads up the top end, so he did as much work as he could to get it running perfectly and then we were set. Our team of dogs consisted of Major, a tan Bullmastiff cross, one and a half years old. His nephew Ned, a Mastiff pointer cross, four and a half months old, and Mitsy, a Bull Terrier cross, five and a half months old. A very young team, to say the least, unfortunately, Jacks two experienced dogs died within two weeks of each other. Although, Jack's confidence in his experienced dog, Major, would go on to prove a trip of huge success. On our

BY

KATE HORKINGS

way to Cape York, the dogs managed to catch seven pigs, mostly sows, so Jack could train his two pups Mitsy and Ned, to give them a taste of what was to come. We drove through Laura, here Jack thought it was time to have tea and roll out the swags for the night. We had parked close to a small dam, which had a lot of rooting up and wallows. We woke early, collared the dogs up and we were off on our first top end hunt. After fifteen minutes of walking, the dogs started showing a lot of interest around some Pandana trees. Then we saw a black boar get up and make a run for it, the dogs took off after him and pulled him up quickly. He was a nice sized boar of around 60kgs. Jack dispatched him quickly while I took some video footage of the dogs' encounter with their first top end boar. He had an excellent set of ivory protruding from the jaw, which Jack later measured and were three inches long. Not bad for our first top end boar. We had breakfast, then around 11am Jack decided we would go for a hunt on the opposite side of the road to where we had caught our first boar. We walked a while, when, what seemed like out of nowhere a boar made a run for it, giving up his position. Major and Mitsy were in hot pursuit and it wasn't long before they had pulled him up and we had our second boar of around 65kgs with 1.5 inch tusks. The next day we drove the river

47


NORTHERN TOUR and got out of the 4WD to have a hunt near a small dam which had plenty of sign on it. Major was on a scent, and after following him a few hundred metres out, Major then took off, headed back toward the direction we had parked. He was into a sprint, with Mitsy and Ned close behind. Jack was running about fifty metres in front of me when I heard a lot of commotion and grunting ahead. I then heard Jack yelling,"Yah, Yah". I soon arrived and found out Jack had to scare a mob of about ten pigs away, because they had stayed around to fight after the dogs had pulled up a boar out of the mob. At the time, I was

48 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA

fifteen weeks pregnant and I was disappointed I'd missed the action, and wasn't able to keep up with the video camera to get the action on tape. Jack cut out the boar's jaw, which had a descent pair of tusks for a young boar of his size, then we headed back to the 4WD, which turned out to be only 150 metres away on the GPS. That afternoon we decided to check some watering holes, only to meet some aboriginal men in a 4WD, which had checked them before us. So Jack thought we'd get out and have a walk at the next water hole that the men had just been at. After a short walk, not far from the dam, we saw three pigs resting. They started to make a run for it. Major pulled up a boar out of the three, with Ned and Mitsy helping him out again. They were soon getting the hang of what their future was‌hunting for pigs. After a two week stay in Weipa, and a successful time fishing, it was time to hit the road. After travelling to the tip of Cape York and having a brief stay in Seisea, it was time for some more hog hunting. Travelling back down the Telegraph Track, Jack thought he'd stop for a toilet break and to let the dogs out for a stretch. Within minutes, we heard Ned let out a yelp, Major had a boar about fifty metres from the 4WD. Jack was yelling to me to get the knife. When I got to the pig, Jack had lost his boot in the mud that the boar had been rooting up and wallowing in. After a bit of a fight, Jack killed the trophy size boar. We inspected the dogs immediately and noticed Ned had some small gashes, but he was OK. The boar was a beauty at over 80kgs live weight, he had the best set of tusks we had got to date, measuring 3.2 inches and being very thick, we were wrapped! We drove to the nearest river, where we washed and had some lunch, then we were back on our way, down the Telegraph Track. We were getting towards the end of the track when I spotted a big mob of pigs to the right of us, the 4WD came to a quick holt and the pigs ran across the track, 50 metres ahead of us, the dogs bolted after the mob. Jack took off and I gave chase after grabbing the video camera and the knife. The dogs had pulled up a small boar out of the


NORTHERN TOUR

got dark. Then Jack spotted another nice size boar making a quick exit as soon as he heard the 4WD.

I T A WM

DOGARMA by

SE

X

mob and Jack had him by the back legs. When I got to the action I turned the video camera on and was trying to get the knife out of the pouch, which had become stuck with the dry blood inside it. I heaved it out and as I was filming I got my wish on camera, the mob had come back to fight the dogs and I got it all on tape. What a rush, my heart was pounding and to say I didn't use any obscenities on camera would be lying. This time I got my first opportunity to yell,"Yah, Yah!" to scare a mob of pigs away. What a high! We were so lucky to have caught seven boars in a row in Cape York, all having good ivory. We were headed towards the Gulf when I spotted a boar and Jack said, "Kate, quick! Shoot it!" So I quickly got the single barrel and S6's and I had my first pig I'd ever shot. He wasn't huge but I was happy. We drove on to a lagoon, where we decided to have an afternoon nap. I was asleep when Jack woke me and said, "Sshh, look there's a pig wallowing over there." I turned the video camera on and filmed the pig for a while, then we got the dogs off the 4WD and walked around the lagoon, taking no chances going through the lagoon, in case of crocodiles. We got around the opposite side and stalked in catching the pig off guard. I stayed back about thirty metres in between some trees, so I could film the boar as he made a run for it. He saw the dogs coming and made a run for it straight past me, with Mitsy on his tail, Major and Ned not far behind. They soon pulled him up, no worries. He was a fat healthy pig with tusks that were good for his size. After a few more photo's we headed back to the 4WD and drove on a bit further hoping to get another pig in before it

Dogarma vests are made with the highest quality materials : Stainless Steel Hardware Marine Grade Polyester Thread Strong Webbing Straps Binding Finish on all Edges.

The plate is made of 2 layers of tough, lightweight, high quality conveyor belting & finished with high quality cordura, & quilted together for extra strength. After a couple of uses, they mould to the shape of your dog.

Reflective strips. Metal ‘D’ Ring Do not absorb water. Adjustable straps or made to order.

Contact Lynette on (07)47886700 or 0416 079 118 email: sewmatix@hotmail.com 49


NORTHERN TOUR Mitsy was off quick as a flash grabbing him, Major went on, with Ned, not far behind. This boar was very fiery, so Jack killed him quickly to minimize any gashes to the dogs. I would estimate him around 65kgs with good ivory. Jack and I decided to camp for the night, as it was now dark and we wanted to leave early in morning for Normanton. Rising early, we were on our way when Jack spotted a mob of pigs wallowing on two small dams, it was around 9:30am now and it was starting to heat up. We walked towards them with the dogs and Jack took the shotty with him. I was filming and watching the mob make a run for cover, though one loan sow didn't realize the mob had run off, the dogs took off and Jack wasn't far behind them. I heard the gun go off once and as I ran over to the action, I saw the dogs on the sow and Jack had shot a trophy size boar once through the head. The boar had doubled back to help the sow try and fight the dogs. Jack shot him at about one metre away. Jack doesn't like to shoot the pigs normally because he loves to use the dogs instead, though this way you can often choose a trophy from the mob that sometimes the dogs won't pick or they have left long before you get there. On

our holiday we scored 33 pigs, 23 boars, 10 sows and a lifetime of good memories we will never forget…because we have it all on film.

YOU DON’T HAVE TO GO ALL THE WAY TO QLD FOR EXCELLENT NUMBERS OF PIGS AND TROPHY BOARS HUNT HOGS WITH DOGS IN N.S.W WITH

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FDICKNIVES WEIGH SCALES A.P.F.E HUNTING SAFARIS OUTFITTER - Hunt Hogs with Dogs, Bring along man’s best fried. BIOTELEMTRY TRACKING SYSTEMS AUSTRALIA - Keep track of your dogs! INNOTEK AUSTRALIA PTY LTD TRAINING COLLARS - Lowest Prices HARNESS WEBBING CHESTPLATES & COLLARS - On Special QUALITY LEATHER PIG DOG PROTECTION BREASTPLATES & COLLARS DICK SKINNER LEATHER DRESSING - Waterproof your leather plates. BLAZALIGHT AUSTRALIA -Spotlights & handles etc. WILD GAME HARVESTING EQUIPMENT - FDick & Knife Co Knives, Diamond Steels, Ultimate Steels, Plactic Knife Containers, Meat Saws & Weighing Scales. PANORAMA SWAGS - Best swags in the country, Double rip stop canvas, Fully waterproof, Heavy duty zip, Double stitched, 50mm Mattress. CAMELBAK HYDRATION SYSTEMS - Big Drinkers make better hunters CUSTOM BUILT RACKS & CAGES - New Designs SELVITA - Vitamin Supplement VETERINARY MEDICAL KITS - From rehydration to reusable staple gun. GRAZIERS EQUIPMENT - Livestock identification through to dehorning equipment. OMNIGLOW GLO STICKS - Lowest Prices COLLARS, LEADS, PANIC SNAPS & LOTS MORE FOR OUR DOGS J.S ENTERPRISES - Poloshirts, Tshirts, Caps, Wallets, Stubbie Coolers, Badges & Bumper Stickers.

email: j sent@bigpond.com o r v isit o ur w eb s ite a t: w ww.jsenthunting.com.au 50 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


Titley Electronics

PTY LTD.

TRACKING SYSTEMS FOR HUNTING DOGS

Titley Electronics Pty Ltd Animal Tracking Systems involve a high quality system which not only runs on legal frequencies, but have a range of 30 kilometres in mountainous terrain. This range increases to 50 kilometres on flat terrain, and up to 100 kilometres by air. Up to 14 Decibels.

Quality System

MODEL AY/C Three element Yagi antenna, lightweight, 730 grams, pistol grip handle and extremely robust. Long range detection even in the thickest of forests

Quality Endorsed Company ISO9002 Lic.number 5484 Standards Australia

Made in Australia

REGAL 2000 TELEMETRYRECEIVER Lightweight, portable receiver, simple to operate, with many added features. Press button frequency selectors, Illuminated field strength meter, Frequency selectors for night time use. Separate Volume & Gain controls. Battery test function. Strong aluminium case. Heavy leather carry case.weight 845g, AUSTRALIS 26K SCANNING RECEIVER Graphic type liquid crystal display, LED back lighting for night viewing. 16 membrane keys incorporated in front panel.Headset audio outputs, standard connector provided for plug pack or other charger or external power supply (fast charge 4 hours).Low battery indicator. Case design minimises intrusion of dust, dirt or spray. Titley Electronics Pty. Ltd. is a small, family owned & operated company. With twenty years experience, the company operates under a Quality System certified to the International Standard ISO 9002

Contacts -PETER JAGO Ph: (02) 4262 2853 Mobile: 0405 247 149 LES LOVEGROVE Ph: (02) 6365 8432 Titley Electronics Pty Ltd. PO Box 19 BALLINA NSW 2478 AUSTRALIA Phone: (02) 6681 1017 Ph/Fax: (02) 6686 6617 International Phone/ Fax: 61 6686 6617 Email: titley@nor.com.au - website: www.titley.com.au


A step-by-step guide to dressing a pig out, ready for a spit roast or hungie. SHARP KNIVES

Step 1

Have your dressing knives razor sharp. The sharper the knife, the easier the cut. Also you will have less chance of busting internal organs, and less chance of cutting yourself.

BLEEDING Pork needs to be bled well, so make a cut down along the throat, this is where one of the main arteries runs along. By cutting here, it will ensure a proper bleed of the pig. When the pig has stopped bleeding, cut out and remove the windpipe.

Step 2

BOTTOM Cut approximately a 2 " circle around the rectum at a depth of about 5 " deep. When this cut has been made, leave it for the moment. Later, when cutting inside the body, the rectum will be pulled through and removed.

Step 3

Run the blade of the knife down the pig's stomach, all the way down to the bottom of the rib cage. When cutting down the stomach, you will see the skin peel out, also, you will notice the fat lining. To avoid busting any internal organs when cutting open the stomach, run your two fingers down along the inside walls of the stomach, with the knife in the middle of your fingers. Gently slice down letting your fingers be the guide. You should finish with a cut going from the lower abdomen to the rib cage which will expose the inside of the body, seeing the intestines etc.

52 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


Step 4

Putting your hand up and inside the body cavity, grab the muscle that you cut first up around the rectum, and pull it down and through to the outside of the body. Also, pulling the intestines and stomach out and leave it all to hang outside the body. When the intestines and stomach are in this position, find where the stomach starts, and cut, this will free the intestines and stomach from the rest of the body.

Step 5 Heart & Lungs: When looking inside the body, you will notice a white skirt of skin going around the inside of the rib cage. Cut this skin by running the knife around the inside of the rib cage, which will then expose the heart and lungs. Remove heart and Above: The rectum (being held) has lungs from the body. Clear the throat been removed and is still attached to of blood clots, then any remaining Top: Clean Body Cavity Above: Heart & lungs the intestines which are both now removed from body. blood inside will be able to drain free. outside of the body.

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‘30/30 ACTION’ WIN WYOMING SAW

After a long chat and a brew with the property owner and his wife. Shannon and I decided it was time to head out and put a dent in the property's thriving hog population. With Shannon's two dogs Bonnie and Billy and my two Jack Russell's Nip and Peggy jostling for space, the back seat of the Suzuki looked and sounded like a dogcatcher's van after cracker night. Twenty minutes later and the thriving hog population remained un-dented. We had covered most of the likely stomping grounds and come up with a big fat zero. Suddenly, all hell broke loose; unfortunately the action was confined to the rear seat of the Suzuki. When Nip started to spar with Billy over seating arrangements. "Did you see the size of that big bastard?" As I'd been preventing Nip from killing Billy. (Nip could have got caught in his throat and choked him) I hadn't seen 54 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA

a thing. "What pig?'' I replied. By this stage Shannon was almost out the vehicle lugging the thing himself. Once the vehicle was parked in the shade we walked towards the swamp like two men on a mission. When the solid dark shape finally stepped cautiously from the shadows, partially highlighted by streaks of sunlight my initial reaction was 'that's not a pig it's a baby buffalo'. (Shannon was 100% convinced, I must admit I still needed a bit of persuading). So with the 30/30 Marlin lever action clutched in my hands ,we moved quietly through the light scrub towards, a young buff, or the hog from hell. "How could anything that big just vanish?" Shannon whispered. It seemed unnaturally quiet, and with little breeze to speak of, it was starting to get bloody hot as we crouched behind a wall of fallen timber pondering our next move. Luckily, for us the dogs knew

what to do and when they reacted to a slight breeze change the hunt was back on. Then it finally showed itself. I was totally stunned by the size of the big brute as it casually sauntered out from behind a patch of high grass. "Stuff me!" (Or words to that effect.) "It's a bloody Hippo; do you think I've got enough gun?" Shannon just grinned. "Thanks for your support". Looking down at the little lever action nestled on my lap I wasn't sure. "Should I shoot it or throw a saddle on it?" It was certainly too much hog for the dogs. I was just squeezing the trigger when the hog sensing danger leapt forward. The shot stung it, but didn't slow it. Shannon couldn't restrain the hounds any longer and they were off. It had only covered a short distance when it turned to face the dogs. When a safe shot presented itself, the Marlin nailed it.-G.HALL KATHERINE NT

BOAR TALES


SCHOOL HOLIDAYS On the first week of the September holidays, Dad took us pig hunting for a few days. After a few hours of driving, we unloaded our gear at the quarters and took the quad off the trailer. I was keen for a hunt, but Dad said it was still a bit too hot and the sun was still high. However, he wanted to check a new spot in the daylight. Not to look for pigs, but so we would know where to go and could return later in the night, because this is when Dad mostly hunts. He says in an area where there is a fair bit of hunting pressure good boars only start moving around very late. We collared up our three dogs, Whiskey, a Deerhound Bullarab, Jackson, a Harlequin Dane Cross and Boon, a Boxer Bullmastiff. We got to the gate, I opened it as Dad drove through, I already saw the dogs sniffing in the wind looking very keen. A bit further up the track they flew off the Ute and headed out in a heavily grassed paddock, I hopped up on top of the crate. Way out in front of the dogs I saw the backs of four pigs. Dad had already started running and yelled back to me to grab the rifle. So I grabbed the 30/30 and followed as fast as I could. Dad ran past Jackson and Boon who had a small ginger pig, one we did not see from the vehicle. He told me to stick it, get the dogs off and come with him as he ran past after the rest of the mob. Once I had killed the pig, Jackson and Boon took off in the direction that Dad went. That is when I noticed Whiskey in the opposite direction, after a young, sneaky boar, which had peeled from the

BOAR TALES rest of the mob. Once she had ran out of sight, I had to rely on her barking. I started heading in the direction of her deep, echoing barks. Once I had ran about 1km, I came to where Whiskey had bailed the exhausted boar in a dry creek bed, I quickly steadied myself on a tree close by and shot the pig in the head, dropping him on the spot. I called Mum on the hand held UHF to bring the Hilux over to me. We dragged it out of the creek and winched it up onto the Ute. By that time, Dad arrived back, he had also caught a black and white boar, with Jackson and Boon, around the same size.C.CRONIN, BUNDABERG QLD.

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For Quality products at a price that won’t be beaten Phone: (02) 4262 2853 or Mobile: 0405 247 149 55


HUNTER’S TROPHIES WIN

COLLAR

D.Loyd-Nebo Craig Collie- ACT

Nigel Gluszek-Shell Harbour

Brad & Matt-ACT A good mornings hunt.

56 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


Russell ‘The Magic Muscle’

Andy Tabucco-Mareeba

WIN

COLLAR

Daniel-Gulf

Malcolm Price-NSW

WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA

57


WIN

SHIRT

Mark & Beck (Bull Arab/Wolfhound) The Boys from N.T

A.Rose-Grawin Mick & Matt-NSW Ben Fitz-NSW

58 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


Mark Pulfreyman-Caught this solid boar with his young bitch in the Gulf.

WIN

SHIRT

S.Bandes-NT.

Shane & David-Tambo

Noel & Dave-WA

Craig Collie-ACT

59


Paul McFarlaine-NQ

Darren Hoffman-QLD

WIN COLLAR

Leigh Jones- Hoppers Crossing

WIN COLLAR

Jayden Armstrong-QLD 60 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA

Trace Cronin-Bundaberg


MEG A COMPETITIONS $ 7 0 0 0 I N P R I Z ES T O B E W O N 2004 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA COMPETITIONS

HAVE YOU GOT YOUR ENTRIES IN? DON’T MISS OUT!

WIN

A Tracking System with 2 Collars from Titley Electronics valued at $2800.

A Bull Arab N W I Pup from

Hound Connection valued at $500

WIN

A 44 Magnum Lever Action Rifle from Rossi Firearms

One of 3 Dog Training Systems from Australian Training Systems valued at $2000.

WIN

WIN

A Headmount from Thompson Taxidermy valued at $700. Prize may differ from one shown

YOU HAVE TO BE IN I T , TO WIN IT! See the following pages for competition details: Dog Training System: Page 40 -Tracking System with Collars: Page 40 - 44 Magnum Lever Action Rifle: Page 15 - Bull Arab Pup: Page 40 - Headmount: Page 73 61


BLOOD LINES The Boxer

The Boxer originated in the 1800 from Germany, where it was used to hunt boar and deer. Later, when the breed spread through Europe, it was also used for bear hunting and fighting. The Boxer is a breed that hunters have great success with in the field. Bred with the bull terrier, mastiff, staghound...and with some good training... you'll have yourself a good hunting dog. ‘Boxers’ are well boned, with thick muscles in the front chest and shoulder areas which tapers off lean, to the hind legs. Making it a perfect body to breed from. When cross breeding the Boxer, you will often see these characteristics come through the litter. If breeding straight crosses eg. Boxer and Bull Terrier, it may pay to have the boxer as the bitch and the bully as the Sire. Reason being, more often the pups will throw mostly back to the mother, therefore, you hopefully will get pups with the good height and body shape. NB: In the purebred form, you can get

large and small boxer b r e e d s . With the large breed standing at 53 - 63 cm, it may be best to use the larger breed. When breeding purebred straight cross, a downside some hunters have commented on, is that the Boxers teeth have a tendency to wear thin and occasionally break off, at three to four years of age. Some hunters believe, that, the undershot jaw of the Boxer does not hold as strong as a normal jaw. However, the English Bull Dog, Boxer and the Neopolitan Mastiff were all bred with an undershot jaw to give the them just that...a stronger hold than other dogs. Left: Bitch Harlequin Dane X Boxer, weight 35kg. Below: Male, Straight Bully / Boxer X, weight 32kg.

62 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


Dogs are generally smart, and the boxer is one of the higher intelligent breeds of dogs, with the addition, of not being 'strong headed'. The boxer cross is a quick maturing dog and with the right amount of work can be a good working dog by ten to twelve months of age. When training, there intelligence can allow you to use only a strong deep voice when disciplining them. They will listen to you and react to the sound of your voice, unlike some breeds which also need a firm hand to correct them. The Boxer is an energetic breed, with only Above: Male, Boxer/Bull Mastiff. Eight years old but still in good regular light exercise, shape., weight 36kg. they can maintain the level of fitness needed to hunt all night hunters, tough, and a dog that earns it’s for you. They are as gutsy as any of the place in the pack.’ other breeds and will mix it with the best I don’t have a preference on breeds, I of boars. I have had a fair bit to do with love them all. It does not bother me what boxer x's and have always used them for breed a dog has in it, as long as it hunts hunting. They work brilliantly, from ute well....then I’m satisfied. What some finding to ground hunting, they ‘catch on hunters say, and I strongly believe, is quickly’ to the game of pig hunting from when you introduce the boxer to your an early age, with minimal training. pack you add nose and a dog that hunts. Where as, some other breeds I have Over all the years of hunting and using needed to put more work in, to get them different breeds, the boxer would be up there with some of the best I’v seen and to the same level. When training them to hunt, take them used. A breed that hunts, and uses it’s out with a couple of good working dogs, nose to it’s ability. Whether the reason as soon as you see them taking to the for that is due to the dogs I trained it with, game and using their nose, take them out the breed itself or the year’s of line breedby themselves. After a short time, they ing it came from. They are all reasons to think about. We all have different views will start to catch their own pigs. I speak to alot of hunters around and thoughts about it all and different Australia and when talking about hunting experinces with the breed. breeds, the old Boxer X Bully comes into In the end it’s what gets you results and the conversation quite alot. They are a suits the style in which you hunt. popular breed and have been used for Good Hunting! hunting pigs for a long time. The most common report I hear is...’there fantastic 63


IG DOGS P muscle of the Pack

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64 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA

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DOG CARE Keeping the MUSCLE in your pack Kennel Cough for your dog and will effect their performance. Kennel cough (also known as Canine Cough) In addition, the highly contagious manner of this is a highly contagious upper respiratory disease makes it a serious problem for dog owners, especially for pig doggers. With numerous tract infection in dogs. dogs being housed in close proximity when at home or on hunting trips, Kennel Cough has the SYMPTOMS: potential to spread throughout a group of pig a) Persistent dry cough (may sound like dogs very quickly, that is why it is important to your dog is trying to 'bring something up' take preventative measures against the disor has something caught in their throat). ease. b) Dog expels large amounts of phlegm An important measure to take, when a dog has c) Dog may have fever. become infected, is QUARANTINE.

WHAT IS IT?

d) Sometimes, discharge from eyes and nose CAUSES: Kennel Cough is a complex disease, which may be caused by numerous viruses and bacteria. The two main causes: 1. A bacteria -Bordetella bronchiseptica. 2. A virus - Parainfluenza type II. Dogs may become infected with the disease if they have been exposed/ in contact with a dog who is already infected, or the infected dogs area. The disease is spread similar to that of the common cold, when a dog 'coughs' it expels droplets (like a human sneezing), which then travels in the air and may infect other dogs in close confinement. Generally, dogs may show clinical signs from about three to five days after it has been exposed to the disease (This time frame can vary). In serious cases, Kennel Cough may lead to secondary infection, such as Pneumonia. TREATMENTS: Although, antibiotics and anti-inflammatorys can be used in the relief of symptoms, there is no cure for Kennel Cough. Some experts say that the disease is self-limiting and will generally clear up in a couple of weeks. However, intense and continuous coughing can become painful

QUARANTINE: Remove them from areas where they can be accessed by other dogs. (This is especially important for hunting dogs which may be housed or travel for periods of times with other hunting dogs). Clean areas where the infected dog has bedded or frequented, this can be done most effectively with household bleach. Dogs generally keep up their normal activities and may not appear to be too sick, however, the more they move around, the more they may cough. Keep your dog in a confined area where they can rest to reduce bouts of coughing. VACCINATION: Vaccination is available, and most vets recommend vaccinating your dogs against Kennel Cough. There are two forms of Vaccine: 1. Intranasal Vaccine Inhaled through the nose, this vaccine is fast acting and is best for quicker results. 2. Injectable Vaccine Canine 4 (Viral) and Canine 5 (Bacterial). Opinions on vaccination measures and times vary, so it is recommended that you speak with your local veterinarian on what best suites your dogs and their situation. 67


ISLAND HOGS Story by Rob Murton

I HAVE SHOT COUNTLESS PIGS OVER THE YEARS, AND NEVER TIRE OF HUNTING THEM, ESPECIALLY THE BIG CUNNING BOARS. ALTHOUGH THEY ARE A FERAL PEST, YOU CAN’T HELP BUT ADMIRE THE PIGS ABILITY TO SURVIVE & THRIVE ON AN ISLAND THEY WERE RELEASED ON OVER ONE HUNDRED & FIFTY YEARS AGO... Kangaroo Island lies off the southern coast of South Australia, about half an hours plane flight from Adelaide. It is 156 kilometres long and 57 kilometres wide, with a total land area of 3890 square kilometers. The English explorer and geographer Mathew Flinders discovered the island in 1802. The French sea captain Nicolas Baudin was in the same waters about the same time. In fact, on April 8th 1802 at Encounter Bay just east of Kangaroo Island off the South Australian mainland, Flinders in his ship the Investigator and Baudin in the Le Geographe met by chance and exchanged notes and maps. Flinders informed Baudin that he had discovered the island and named it "Kangaroo Island". Nicolas Baudin then circumnavi68 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA

gated the island, and it is believed that it was he who released pigs there. In fact the inlet where the Le Geographe anchored and obtained fresh water from a spring is called ‘Hog Bay’. It was a worldwide practice back then to release pigs and goats on uninhabited islands as a source of food for shipwrecked sailors. Many other islands around the globe can claim that passing ships in the 17th and 18th centuries placed the now undesirable ferals there. Yankee whalers and tough seal hunters also visited the island in the early years after discovery, and these mariners could also be responsible for the spread of feral pigs across the island. Local families have farmed on the island for many decades. In the 1950s returned servicemen from the Second


Far Top: Author’s brother, Craig, waiting at a pig wallow. Above: Checking pig diggings on K.I.

World War began to open up the western end of K.I (as the locals call it). The soldier settlement scheme was a huge plan, but the determined diggers logged, burnt, stump raked and finally ploughed and seeded the land, and each worker and his Family was eventually able to make a living from their property. I've hunted on many soldier settlement blocks and yarned with the landowners. Many are no longer living, and the land has been passed down to the sons or sold. Ron was a war veteran and a farmer in pig country. He told me that in the early years, the hogs weren't afraid of man, and aggressively defended their territory. The old fellah had to seek safety in a tree on more than one occasion, when an encounter with a bristled up feral pig turned nasty. I was born on K.I. As my three brothers and I grew up, we hunted wild goats on the steep coastal cliffs and pigs in the thick scrub along the creeks and on the edges where rich grazing land met the bush. I've chased the ferals with rifle shotgun and bow and arrow. I've stalked them digging up the ground, feeding on a rotten carcass and gorging on ripened crops. Frosty mornings and windy late afternoons have seen me out in the paddocks. Moonlit nights and those that were dark as a dogs guts were hunted on foot with a portable spotlight, where an encounter with a big boar is all action. About fifteen years ago I decided to give dogging a go. While in Adelaide with my wife and two sons, I located and purchased a male bull terrier pup. We named him Buck. With a sturdy body and one black eye, he looked like a pig hunter, even if the pup was a city slicker. His first meal with us was a McDonalds 69


hamburger. Didn't mind it either. I didn't the dog started to bawl. He'd bailed up on have much of an idea on how to train a a hog. I didn't think a small piglet would pig dog, but gave it a go. While the pup stand its ground, so the dog was holding spent his early days in the backyard play- something a bit bigger than that.. We ing with the kids, I occasionally brought a took off into the scrub, hurdling bushes piece of fresh pig skin back from one of and dodging trees on our downhill run. our hunts for Buck to get used to. The Craig wasn't in sight when Steve and I dog was stirred up by teasing him with came out into a semi cleared area of the hide, and once he locked those pow- once burnt scrub. Below me Buck was erful jaws onto the skin he wouldn't let go. latched onto the hairy ear of one very big I took the dog out duck hunting to get him and irate Sow. The little bugger was used to the sound of gunfire. Buck didn't being tossed around like a feather, but he flinch the first time I fired the shottie at a hung on like a tick. "Don't shoot Steve, rising bird. When I looked down, he was the dog's in the way" I called. Yelling at standing between my legs, keen to see Buck, he let go and backed off. The spotwhat all the fuss was about. When Buck ted sow turned to face us, and Steve was about a year old, I decided to take him pig hunting. I wanted to control the situation if it did arise. I didn't want him tangling with a tusker at this vulnerable early stage. My brother Craig and I had been having a lot of success on one particular property, so early one morning Craig, my cousin Steve and I were again prowling the bush edge. The dog was on a leash at my side. In a scrubby corner of the block, Craig spotted a couple of piglets dart into the thick bush up ahead. Perfect for an up and coming pigdog to start out on. I wasn't sure what Buck would do, he'd never seen a live grunter before. Quickly I released the dog, which had seen the movements in the scrub. Without a seconds hesitation Buck was off after the little squealers. Steve, Craig and I waited on the bushedge for some sound of the dog who had charged down into a steep creek. Way down in the gully, Above: Buck’s first pig, a big sow. 70 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


Above: The print of a big boar on K.I. Right: This sow went over 300 lbs.

raised the 30-30 and placed a slug in the pigs chest. The tenacious terrier flew back in and locked onto the sow's ear again. Slowly the pigs strength ebbed away and it lay kicking on the ground. The dog released his grip and sat there panting and drooling with a big smile on his dial. What a way to start a pig hunting career. The bully had shown me that he had what it takes, finding and holding the biggest pig in the mob, then having the sense to get out of the way when the rifle came up. Craig called from up on the hill, and I went to see what was going on. My brother had stepped in a hole while running and cracked his ankle, but managed to get back to the vehicle. Old Buck is long gone now, but I often think about our hunts together. I never got another pigdog, preferring to stalk the grunters. The feral pigs aren't in large numbers on the island. Sometimes you can hunt every weekend for a month and not see a pig. At other times it seems like they're behind every bush. Nowadays there is a lot of cropping done, and after reaping is a good time to find pigs. They travel for miles to get a feed of grain. The pigs grow pretty big on K.I., there is plenty of tucker, water and shelter to allow a boar to reach 150 kilos. I've seen a few that size, but your average tusker is around

WIN

SHIRT 90 kilos. Sometimes you can shoot a big pig but its tusks aren't huge. I've been disappointed more than once by small or broken tusks on a big animal. The hogs live in thick scrub. They make their camps in a sheltered spot, and scrape out a hollow, lining it with grass, bracken or yakka fronds. Usually there is a creek nearby for drinking and wallowing. These creek systems meander through some of the properties, and are used by the pigs as a highway to get to the pasture. They can move out into the open ground and plough up the paddocks, but the safety of the scrub is never far away. During winter they can cause a lot of damage to the rain softened soil. Like pigs everywhere, Island hogs eat just 71


Above Left: Craig and a tusky island boar. Above Right: A couple of less paddock diggers to worry about.

about anything. Worms and nutgrass bulbs are the main subterranean food. They will scoff clover, eat rotten sheep and cattle carcasses, and sometimes the bloated bodies of their own kind. As I said before, they love cereal crops, and in the dry times will shovel in the leaf litter and break open or overturn logs and stumps searching for bugs, lizards

or other critters. I have shot countless pigs over the years, and never tire of hunting them, especially the big cunning boars. Although they are a feral pest, you can't help but admire the pig's ability to survive and thrive on an island where they were released over one hundred and fifty years ago.

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SEND IN YOUR BEST PIG HUNTING PHOT O & YOU CAN BE IN THE RUNNING FOR THIS GREAT PRIZE. COMPETITION STARTS FROM OCTOBER 2003 ISSUE AND CLOSES 1ST SEPTEMBER 2004. HOW IT WILL BE JUDGED: Five Photos from each of the next Three Issues of Wild Boar Australia (Ocotober 2003, March 2004 and July 2004) will be selected by the editor. The selected Photos will be given to a panel of Four Judges for scoring. Each Photo will be given a score out of ten by each Judge, then the scores will be tallied. The Photo with the Highest Score Wins. There will be only one winner. No entries accepted after 5:00pm , 1st September 2004. THE WINNER WILL BE NOTIFIED BY MAIL/PHONE AND WILL BE PUBLISHED IN THE NOVEMBER 2004 ISSUE.

EDITORS SELECTION FOR PREVIOUS ISSUE.

ALL PHOTOS FROM HUNTERS TROPHIES, BOAR TALES AND MAIN STORIES ARE INCLUDED IN COMPETITION. To ensure the return of all photos, please supply a self addressed envelope.

EDITORS SELECTION FOR ISSUE 3 Page 75 Page 76

Page 9

Page 38

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Page 8

73


HUNTER’S

Luke Antaw

TROPHIES B.Ridley-NSW

J.Lloyd-Nebo

Gary & Matt Hall-NT

Ash Reynolds -ACT

74 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


WIN

Gazza Kelly -ACT

A.Raines-Nebo

SHIRT

Nigel Gluszek

Wayne -NT

WIN

COLLAR Julie Wilkie- TIKKA .243

Rob McMurtrie -Dysart 75


WIN

CAP

Codie Cronin with Jackson

R.Vanderveen

Dave Wilkie-WA

Paul Mc Farlaine-NQ 76 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


Steve Hall -NT

WIN VIDEO

Brian Shorey

Trace & Wayne-Bunderberg Shane Littlechild -Hornet Bank

Paul McFarlaine -NQ

WIN

SHIRT

77


Tyrone & Steve - NT

Dave Wilkie-WA Tyson & Carissa Cronin

Craig Collie -ACT

ALL PHOTOS ARE RETURNED 78 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


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Above & Below: Photo sent from the ACT...still waiting for the dogs to land.

80 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


Top Left: Rolled over two times on River Road, St George Sth Central QLD Bradon. Top Right: C.Farrell Right: Name withheld to protect the guilty...they say cruisers don’t get bogged!? Bottom: After crashing into a washout in the Gulf area at 5am, I blew two tyres , cracked the fuel tank and damaged the right hand rear spring R.Van der veen

81


ACORNER rchers

Neville Ashton-Hunting in the Gulf

Brett Verco- The Gulf

Ian Caldwell - Rosebud West Victoria.

WIN

CAP

82 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA

Evan Scott


Danny Baitz - The Gulf.

Above & Right: Pedro Lever. The ginger boar (right) was shot from five metres and the above black boar was shot from four metres and went 28 6/8 Douglas Points. Shot in Cobar, NSW.

WANTED ARCHERY & CROSS BOW PHOTOS 83


Hard

The

Yards

After a successful Bowhunting trip to the cape in 2001 it was time to head out west again to our usual hunting area. After arranging the details with the property owner we were informed the place was as bad as ever with the drought still having a firm grip on the country. Not to be discouraged we loaded the Troopy and we were off. On the way out all sorts of ferals were encountered, from foxes, cats, pigs and goats, this was encouraging and the vibe picked up amongst the boys with talk of what the week would bring. On our arrival we had a yarn to the property owner and headed off to the quarters to unload. The place was as dry, as I've ever seen it. There were dead roo's and emu's everywhere and as you know when the emu's start dying the pigs are usually long gone. There was plenty of water on this place so we thought we were still in with a chance. This property has produced

84 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA

some big boars in the past so we were still optimistic. After unloading our gear into the quarters we were off for a drive around the place to check out some dams and a few spots the owner had told us we might get a boar or two. Nothing was spotted so it was back to camp for some tucker and a beer or two around the campfire to discuss the plan for the next day. We had a feeling we were going to do it tough this week but it wouldn't be the first time we have walked for miles and not seen anything. That can happen when your bowhunting. The plan of attack would be to head down to a swamp that fed into a black soil plain dotted with cover. It looked like it had porker written all over it. All the signs were there, the telltale rooting and the beds under every second tree. It was pig heaven but surprise, surprise, no bloody pigs. After calling the boys on the UHF it was decided we would keep walking and meet back at the car on dark. It had been a long day. About an hour before dark as I was heading for a stand of mulga to look for some goats I spotted a pig under a tree about 30 meters in front. A quick check on the wind direction and I nocked an arrow. I slowly closed the gap to 10 meters, came to full draw and released, slipping a carbon shaft tipped with a razor sharp Tusker broadhead into the boar behind the back rib, angling forward with the arrow smashing him in the front shoulder. The boar jumped out of his bed, did a few 360's and made a 20meter dash to his death leaving a trail of claret Stevie Wonder could follow. I was wrapped. The arrow had stayed inside the boar the full length of his body and was not visible at all. Any wonder he didn't go far. After walking all day, finally I had a boar on the deck. He wasn't huge in the tusk department but he was a good solid boar with the crusty mud to boot. And a pig is a pig as the saying goes. A call to the boys and a few GPS marks and they were on their way over to take some pics. Alan and Mark left me to remove the jaw and headed off to try their luck as the sun went down. After removing the jaw and some meat for the yabbie pots I checked the GPS to see how far I had to walk back. As it turned out I was still 4.5 ks out so I knew I would be arriving just on dark. The winter days sure cut into your hunting time. Back in camp we were all pumped up for a big week after downing a boar on the first day but it was not to be. It seems the pigs were not as thick as we had hoped. Mark shot a boar, only to have it swallowed up by the thick, pulled country, after it made a quick bolt. I missed an opportunity on another pig thanks to the keen eyes of a little slip. Alan had no luck on a good pig as well, but Mark took a good feral cat to round out the week. We walked all over the best spots we could find and even went to a couple of neighboring blocks. Pigs were seen everyday, not in big numbers and not all boars. Anyone who bowhunts knows that sometimes it doesn't all go your way and every now and then you have to do "The Hard Yards."Kel Salta


PIG ENCOUNTERS

‘Of a Close Kind’

Sneaking slowly around the edge of the great swamp, we could hear the pigs which were in abundance amongst the tall reeds. They would squeal and snort with the occasional whuff, whuff, of a couple of boars fighting over the sows, but no, they wouldn't come out where we could see them. It was frustrating, to have heaps of pigs so near, yet so far. We tried calling them with squeals and snorts at which they quietened down a bit. Then they were back at it again. Deciding to move on, Bill and I sneaked slowly further around the edge of the swamp. A few minutes later, we came upon a small mob of sows that were busy walking and talking and digging up the odd tasty bulb or mussel. They walked right past us and only then did they scent us and take off hurriedly into the safety of the long reeds. Smiling we continued on until a flicker of movement ahead caught our eye. It was a large bodied boar, obviously following up the sows. Randy barstard, he was going to find out just what trouble women can get you into. He was ambling slowly along, scenting the ground and stopping now and then to scratch an itch on a log or tree. Setting ourselves up, Bill with the crossbow and me with the camera just behind and to one side, we waited. The boar got to within 25 yards then went into the reeds. We thought that luck was against us until he came back out again. Travelling slowly sniffing the ground, he got to within 20 yards of Bill, then scratched his arse on a log. Then he turned side on presenting an easy shot. The Wasp tipped shaft made a thump as it tore through the boars vitals and continued on to be lost forever in the reeds behind. The boar then ran about 30 yards, turned around, gave a bit of a wobble and started to head straight for me. He was only coming in slow, wobbling all the way. But never the less on a collision course straight for me. At 50 feet, 40 feet then 30 feet, watching through the view finder, those slavering jaws with sharp tusks protruding, coming straight for me had me worried. Realising he didn't know I was there, but also knowing that if he did realise I was there he could put on a spurt and do me a great mischief. The closer he came the more worried I got, but being a good camera man I kept the film

rolling. I knew I could throw some shit at him at the last minute if he didn't stop soon, as there would have been some readily available I'm sure. At 15 feet I was willing Bill to shoot again. Little did I know that Bill, having not recocked his bow was reaching for his knife, because he was starting to panic too. Naturally he couldn't find his knife because it was back on the front seat of the truck. When the boar was just ten feet away I was getting ready to evacuate my position quickly. Then, as he tried to step over a small log, he stumbled and fell just eight feet in front of me. Bill was rapt and said that I did well to keep the camera on him all the time, as I got some excellent footage. Naturally I played it cool and just smiled, because if I had spoken straight away he would have picked up the tremor in my voice for sure as I still had the shakes a bit. Boy, I don't mind telling you. That was one of the most exciting and worrying times ever experienced by me while hunting the mighty hogs of the north. But I would do it all again at any time. Well, maybe. - T.MITCHELL

85


PIGHUNTERS WANTED: PHOTOS, HUNTING STORIES, ARCHERY STORIES & ARTICLES

PHOTOS Send us your Pig Hunting Photos and you could win one of the many prizes on offer in each issue.

BOAR TALES (approx 400 - 600 words)

If your Boar Tale is published you will receive $$$ for your story and also receive a Wild Boar Australia Shirt.

MAIN STORIES (approx 1000 - 1500 words)

If your Main Story is published you will receive $$$, plus a swag and a Wild Boar Australia Shirt. Supply as many photos as possible to compliment your main story.

ARCHERY WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA WANTS YOUR PHOTOS FOR ARCHERS CORNER & YOUR ARCHERY & CROSS BOW STORIES.

All Photo’s published in Hunter’s Trophies, Boar Tales and Main Stories go into the running to win prizes on offer for each issue.

ALL MATERIAL RETURNED AFTER PUBLISHING. TO BE IN TIME FOR THE NEXT ISSUE, ALL MATERIAL TO BE IN BY 30TH APRIL 2004.

WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA PO BOX 10126 MT PLEASANT MACKAY 4740 86 WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA


28

PRIZES TO THE VALUE OF $1350 GIVEN AWAY THIS ISSUE.

Hunting Videos

FDick Knife from J.S. Enterprises

Wild Boar Australia 10 Shirts & 2 Caps $150 OpenOrder from

10 Pitbull Collars from Pig Dog Supplies.

Chestplate from Gulf Country Chestplates.

TUSKPROOF PROTECTIVE ACCES SORIES

Wyoming Saw

ALL PHOTOS ARE RETURNED ONCE PUBLISHED 87


WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA

Next Issue in Newsagencies

JULY 2004

wildboar@easynet.net.au PO BOX 10126, MT PLEASANT, MACKAY QLD 4740

WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA ISSUE 3 - MAR 04 'Old School Series'  

Pig Hunting, Pig Racks, Blackberry Boars, Pigs Dogs, Hunting Gear, Archery, Hunters Stories and Images.

WILD BOAR AUSTRALIA ISSUE 3 - MAR 04 'Old School Series'  

Pig Hunting, Pig Racks, Blackberry Boars, Pigs Dogs, Hunting Gear, Archery, Hunters Stories and Images.