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FIFTY50 THE WASHINGTON INFORMER CELEBRATES Fifty Years of News Excellence; 50 Years of Service

DC Tax Sale Report Inside •

C e l e b r a t i n g 4 9 Ye a r s o f S e r v i c e

Serving More Than 50,000 African American Readers Throughout The Metropolitan Area / Vol. 49, No.36 June 19 - June 25, 2014

U.S. Breaks

Ghana’s Heart!

Patrons at Bukom Restaurant in Northwest focused their full attention on a thrilling and entertaining football match that saw an underdog American team beat Ghana 2-1. The game, played in Brazil, took place on Monday night, June 16. See Story on Page 34. /Photo by Khalid Naji-Allah

Garden Expands Healthy Food Options in Northeast Community By Sam P.K. Collins WI Contributing Writer @sampkcollins The debate about obesity has long focused on individual eating habits. In recent years, national programs and initiatives, such as first lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move!

campaign, have encouraged Americans to adopt healthier lifestyles. While some people, like Xavier Brown, don’t question these efforts, they say that eating fresh fruits and vegetables often proves difficult for District residents that live in food deserts, neighborhoods where

few, if any, nutritional food options exist. “The discussion about healthy eating is null and void if people do not have adequate choices,” said Brown, 28, director of urban agriculture at The Green Scheme, a nonprofit that promotes environmental sustainability, health awareness,

and social justice in communities east of the river. “Residents in Wards 7 and 8 don’t really have an opportunity to eat healthy food. They only see carry-outs and fast food restaurants. For some people, the closest grocery store is miles away. If you don’t have a car or bus fare, that’s a

Visit us online for daily updates and much more @ www.washingtoninformer.com HU Students Connect with Community Page 4

Schwartz Prepares for Mayor’s Race Page 12

long walk. Even if you can take the bus, you might not want to because you’re tired after a long day at work.” That’s why The Green Scheme teamed up with members of the Lincoln Heights Resident Council in 2012 to

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See GARDEN on Page 8 and on DCTV 95 & 96


The CoLumn

Is Everywhere!

Marriott Marquis Ribbon Cutting

The “Grand Opening” of the Marriott Marquis was celebrated with an offical ribbon cutting ceremony on Tuesday June 10, 2014 in Washington DC. Dan Nadeau (General Manager) was the master of ceremonies for a host of city officials who performed the ribbon cutting at the luxury hotel. DC Mayor Vincent Gray, Norm Jenkins (Pres. Capstone Development), Arne Sorenson (Pres. & CEO Marriott International), Yvette Alexander (Ward 7 Council Member) Greg O’Dell (Pres. & Ceo Events DC), Jack Evans (Council MemberWard 2), Muriel Bowser Hon. Anita Bonds, Yvette Alexander, Muriel Bower, Jack Evans, JW Marriott Sr. (Council MemberWard 4), Elliott Ferguson (Pres. & CEO Desti- Mayor Gray & Vincent Orange - Cutting the Ribbon for new Marquis Marriott nation DC), Anita Bonds & Vincent Orange (CouncilMembers At-Large) Christopher Gladstone (Pres. Quadrangle Development) & JW Marriott Sr. and David S. Marriott (Ex. Chair. Marriott International) along with the Marriott Family were present.

Arne Sorenson (L-R)Ibrahim Murrin with Dan (Pres. & CEO Marriott International) Nadeau (Marriott General Mgr.)

Family Affair - Mr. Norm Jenkins with his family at the grand opening of the Marquis Marriot Washington DC

Presenting “Special Award” to their Father & Mother - by the Marriott

Atty. Denise Rolark Barnes (Publisher of the Washington Informer Newspaper

(Right Photo Below)“Mickey” Thompson (Publisher Social Sightings-The CoLumn & The MagaZine) & David S. Marriott >

Christopher Gladstone (President, Quadrangle Development) with DC Mayor Gray

(L-R)Victor Hoskins (DC Depty. Mayor of Plan. Econ. Devel) Susan Norton, Tiffany Rose, Harry Wingo (Pres. & CEO DC Chamber of Commerce) & Rev. Dr. George Holmes (Pres. DC Democratic State Committee)

(Third from the Left) Elliott Ferguson, III (Pres. & CEO Destnation DC) with some of his team from Destination DC

(L-R) Above - Willie Jollie with Wendy Rieger(News4 Achor)

(L-R) Samuel Thomas, Jr. , (Sr, VP & Govt. Mgr. Convention Events DC) & guest

Social Sightings -the MagaZine

(L-R)Norm Jenkins, Mayor Gray, Anita Bonds & Solomon Keenes, Jr. (Pres. DC Hotel Assoc. & Bd. Memb. Events DC)

(Fourth from the Right) Greg O’Dell (President & CEO Events DC) and some of his team

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Kurt Pommonths, Sr, Photographer * Graphic Designer Mid-City, East of the River Journals, The Washington Informer Newspaper and in the Fairfax, Alexandria, Arlington, Loudoun Woman Magazines 2003 © SOCIAL SIGHTINGS ALL RIGHTS RESERVED — DUPLICATION IN ANY FORM REQUIRES WRITTEN PERMISSION | E-mail SocialSightings@aol.com

2 June 19 - June 25, 2014

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FLASHBACK

6/19/2014 – 6/25/2014 AROUND THE REGION Black Facts Page 6 PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY Page 13 BUSINESS William Reed’s Business Exchange Page 16 COMMENTARIES Pages 26-27 SPORTS HIGHLIGHTS Pages 34-38 In recognition of The Washington Informer’s 50th Anniversary in October 2014, we are looking back at some of the newsworthy moments we covered in D.C. history. Mayor for Life Marion Barry returned to the District “a changed man” after spending six months in prison for drug use. Family members including his wife, Cora Masters Barry (center) and his mother, Mattie Cummings, (right) joined a host of supporters who celebrated Barry’s decision to run for a fourth term which he won in 1994. Barry’s accomplishments and downfalls are the subject of his new autobiography: Mayor for Life: The Incredible Story of Marion Barry, Jr. released this week. He will join Washington Informer publisher Denise Rolark Barnes for a conversation about his “incredible life” at the Old Congress Heights School in Southeast on Monday, June 23. /WI Archives

RELIGION Lyndia Grant’s Religion Column Page 39

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around the region

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with Community By Tia Carol Jones WI Staff Writer

By Sam P.K. Collins WIWhen Contributing Writer L.Y. Marlow's 23-yearVisit our updated Web site old daughter told her the father @sampkcollins and give us your comments of her daughter threatened her for a chance to win a gift from life, of theirleftchild, A and grouptheoflife students the The Washington Informer she knew something hadcollege to be safety and comfort of their done. Out of her discussions frustration campus and sparked with local law enforcement's handling with residents last weekend Email comments to: of an theeffort situation, she decided to in to strengthen ties with rburke@ start the Saving Promise camthe community. paign. washingtoninformer.com More than 30 students from “It seems to be a vicious Howard University (HU)cycle in that won't turn my family Northwest knocked on doors loose,” Marlow said. Marlow with clipboards and pens in hand shared her story with the audiand chatted with residents of the ence at the District Heights Pleasant Domestic Plains Violenceneighborhood Symposium throughout of Saturday on May 7 at much the District Heights morning as Center. part of aThe monthlong Municipal sympoprogram known as the Howard sium was sponsored by the University Summer Family and YouthCanvassing Services Project. Center of the city of District “We want the gap beHeights andto thebridge National Hooktween Howard University and the Up of Black Women. community,” saidwritten Leighton WatMarlow has a book, son, 21, Me president of thewhich Howard “Color Butterfly,” is a University Association story aboutStudent four generations of (HUSA). domestic violence. The book is “It hasbybeen eye-opening for inspired her own experiences, students often and thosebecause of her they’re grandmother, her to mother andabout her daughter. told be careful how they She saidwith every time she reads interact the community. We excerpts frommisconceptions her book, she and still broke down In Memoriam Dr. Calvin W. Rolark, Sr. can not believe theresidents words came now we know what care Wilhelmina J. Rolark from her. “Color Me who Butterfly” about,” said Watson, hails The Washington Informer Newspaper won Grand the 2007 National “Best from Rapids, Michigan. THE WASHINGTON INFORMER InPUBLISHER Memoriam Books” Award. Howard University sits in the NEWSPAPER (ISSN#0741-9414)Dr.isCalvin Denise Rolark Sr. Barnes W. Rolark, “I wasofjustthe16-years-old when middle Pleasant Plains published weekly on each Thursday. Wilhelmina J. Rolark my eye first blackened and and my STAFF Periodicals postage paid at Washingneighborhood, LeDroit Park, THE WASHINGTON INFORMER (ISSN#0741-9414) is published lips bled,” Marlow said. ton, D.C. and additional mailing of- NEWSPAPER the Shaw and U Street corridor. Denise W. Barnes, Editor weekly Thursday. Periodicals Elaine fices. Newsonand advertising deadlinepostage paid at Washington, D.C. and additional More than Davis-Nickens, 40 percent of HUpresistumailing offices. News and advertising deadlineY.isSherman, Monday prior to publication. Shantella Assistant Editor is Monday prior to publication. Andent of the National Hook-Up dents live in three off-campus dorAnnouncements must be received two weeks prior to event. Copyright 2000 by The nouncements must be received two of Black and Women, saidhouses there isand no RonPOST Burke,MASTER: Advertising/ Marketing Director Washington Informer. All rights reserved. Send change of addressmitories nearby weeks event. Copyright 2013 consistency In in the wayyears, domestic es toprior The to Washington Informer, 3117 Martin Luther King, Jr. Ave., S.E. Washington, Lafayette Barnes, IV, Assistant Photo Editor apartments. recent resiby D.C. The 20032. Washington Informer. All No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permisviolence issues are dealt with by dents have raised concerns about rights POSTMASTER: sionreserved. from the publisher. TheSend Informer Newspaper cannotStaff guarantee the return of Khalid Naji-Allah, Photographer change of addresses to The rates Washphotographs. Subscription are $30 per year, two years $45. Papers will be received noise from parties, a scarcity of John De Freitas, Sports Photo Editor not more than 3117 a weekMartin after publication. MakeE.checks payable to: ington Informer, Luther parking spaces during major uniKing, Jr. Ave., S.E. Washington, D.C. Dorothy Rowley, Online Editor versity events and a lack of events THE WASHINGTON INFORMER 20032. No part of this publication may for community members. Young, Design & Layout 3117 Martin Luther King, Jr.Brian Ave., S.E. • Washington, D.C. 20032 be reproduced without written permisPhone: 202 561-4100 • Fax: 202 574-3785 Students representing a host of sion from the publisher. The Informer Mable Neville, Bookkeeper E-mail: news@washingtoninformer.com campus groups and black Greek Newspaper cannot guarantee the return www.washingtoninformer.com Mickey Thompson, Social Sightings columnist of photographs. Subscription rates are letter organizations gathered at the $45 per year, two years $60. Papers will Stacey Palmer, Social Media Specialist flag pole on the HU campus quad, PUBLISHER be received not more than a week after consulted with one another, and Angie Denise RolarkJohnson, Barnes Circulation publication. Make checks payable to: gulped cold water before splitting STAFF REPORTERS into small groups. Throughout THE WASHINGTON Brooke N. Garner INFORMER Managing REPORTERS Editor Tia C. Jones, Ed Laiscell, Carla PeayLuther King, Assistant Managing Editor Odell B. Ruffin, Larry Saxton, much of the morning and early 3117 Martin Jr. Ave., S.E Ron BurkeD.C. 20032 Advertising and Marketing MarySam Wells, Joseph YoungMichelle Stacy Brown, P.K. Collins, Washington, afternoon on June 14, volunteers Mable Whittaker Bookkeeper Phipps-Evans, Eve Ferguson, Gale Horton Phone: 202 561-4100 interviewed residents on their LaNita Wrenn Administration Gay, EltonPHOTOGRAPHERS J. Hayes, Njunga Kabugi, Stacey Fax:John 202 574-3785 E. De Freitas Sports Editor Lafayette Barnes, IV, porches and stopped neighbors as Rowley, Barrington Salmon, news@washingtoninformer.com Victor Holt Photo Palmer, Editor Dorothy John E. De Freitas, Maurice Fitzgerald, they walked down the street to ask Margaret Summers, Charles E. Sutton, James www.washingtoninformer.com Zebra Designs, Inc. Layout & Graphic Design Joanne Jackson, Roy Lewis, Robert about their experiences with HU Ken Harris /www.scsworks.com Webmaster Wright Ridley, Victor Holt students. CIRCULATION Some residents like Patrick Paul Trantham PHOTOGRAPHERS Nelson described instances when John E. De Freitas, Roy Lewis, rowdy students loitered in front Khalid Naji-Allah, Shevry Lassiter of a house across the street from his residence for hours after a party ended. He said that while 4 / May 15 - 21, 2008 The Washington Informer / www.washingtoninformer.com his previous encounters with HU students have been less than am-

4 June 19 - June 25, 2014

The Washington Informer

law enforcement. She said they threat,” she said. had come together to bring a Among the programs Marlow sense of uniformity in the way wants to see implemented are domestic violence victims and stricter restraining order policies, survivors are treated. more rights for victim's families “She's using her own personal to intervene on behalf of a vicstory, her own personal pain to tim, a domestic violence assesspush forward,” Davis-Nickens ment unit coupled with further said about Marlow. training for law enforcement Davis-Nickens said anyone agencies, a Child's Life Protecwho reads Marlow's book will tion Act and mandatory counsel“get it.” She said she “puts the ing for batterers. case in such a way, the average “If we are ever going to eradiperson can get it.” She said at the cate domestic violence, we must end of the day, the book will look at both sides of the coin. help people begin to have a dia- We need to address both the viclogue about domestic violence. tim and the batterer,” Marlow Also present at the event was said. Mildred Muhammad, the exMarlow would also like to see wife of John Allen Muhammad, programs designed to raise who was sentenced to six consec- awareness among children in utive life terms without parole public and private schools. She by a Maryland jury for his role in feels children need to be educatthe Beltway Sniper attacks in ed about domestic violence. 2002. Mildred Muhammad is “We have to stop being pasthe founder of After the Trauma, sive-aggressive with Association, poor chilLeighton Watson, president of the Howard University Student an organization that helps the of dren about Plains domestic violence,” talked with Patrick Nelson, a resident the Pleasant neighborhood survivors violence in Northwestoffordomestic 21 years, on Saturday, Marlow June 14. said. /Photo courtesy of Jordan and their children. Marlow has worked to break Shanks “I lived in fear for six years. Six the cycle of abuse in her family, years in fear is a long time. It is and is confident the policies she not anheeasy thing tothe come out is Andreas, pushinga sophomore, for will start that icable, appreciated group’s said that of,” she said. process. recent overture. participating in the summer canMildred Muhammad said “I plan to take these policies to “I’ve lived here for 21 years and vassing project has changed her people who want to help a Congress and implore them to this is the first time that students that domestic violence victim must perception change our about laws,” residents Marlow said. have tried toof reach to me,” said live in the be careful howoutthey go into “I will notNorthwest stop untilcommunity. these poliNelson, 57. life, “It’sand longunderstand overdue. cies “Our peers always tell us to the victim's are passed.” They should have done more to watch out when walking that she may be in “survival Tia Carol Jones can bearound,” reached interact Andreas, 18. “I was initially mode”. with the community. The said at tiacaroljones@sbcglobal.net house parties have worse in nervous but the people I talked “Before you getgotten to 'I'm going the pastyou,' year.itI’m very asinterested to kill started a verbal to WI told me that they loved Howto see what will come out of this ard University. That shocked me. project,” said Nelson, a retired ac- I’m realizing that we have to make countant. an effort if we want to feel comAlex Venzor, a Pleasant Plains fortable in this community,” said resident since 1992 and gradu- Andreas, who lives in Rockaway ate of Banneker Academic High Township, N.J. School in Northwest had no comPlans for the Howard Univerplaints about HU students. How- sity Summer Canvassing Project ever, he said that the university jelled last month during meetshould increase efforts to mentor ings between Watson, Amanlocal teenagers. da Bonam, HUSA’s community “There has been a schism beoutreach coordinator, Anthony tween Howard University and Driver, HUSA’s director of exterthe neighborhood for years,” said nal affairs, and Allyson Carpenter, Venzor, 32. “I think some students should take the time to learn about ANC commissioner for Single the neighborhood and become Member District 1B10. Once the summer canvassing project wraps more involved.” HU student Adriyana Andreas up at the end of June, students will said she has seen firsthand the plan outreach programs for the merits of connecting with her upcoming academic year. “I wanted to connect neighbors neighbors. Andreas and her friend, with the students,” said Carpenter Andrea Bush, knocked on doors L.Y. Marlow who also attends HU. “This profor the second consecutive Saturday. They later attended a commu- gram gives us an opportunity to nity meeting at Banneker Recre- talk to the people and get students ation Center in Northwest where into the streets,” said Carpenter, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton 18, a Cleveland native.WI (D-D.C.) outlined her legislative accomplishments before a group Capricia Galloway contributed to this report. of residents.

We have to stop being passive-aggressive with poor children about domestic violence. I plan to take these policies to Congress and implore them to change our laws. I will not stop until these policies are passed.

SOMETHING NEW EVERYDAY

AROUND THEBreak REGION the Cycle of Women HU Students Connect Domestic Violence

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Youth Summit Targets Alcohol, Drug Abuse

Partnership Seeks Ways to Keep Young People Safe

AROUND THE REGION

You Can Say It Like A Pro! Let us help you develop the communication skills to compete and win!

By D. Kevin McNeir WI Contributing Writer

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The challenges facing today’s youth can sometimes be overwhelming particularly for those living in America’s fast-paced concrete jungle. However, through creative partnerships, many young adults are discovering effective methods to steer clear of crime, drugs, alcohol and premature sexual activity. “The youth who attended this year’s summit said that the workshops and entertainment were positive, rewarding and a great start to their summer,” said Rosalind M. Parker, director of the Wards 7 & 8 DC Prevention Center in Northeast. “It’s the first time we’ve combined previously separate events that kickoff summer vacation for young adults and this time the youth chose the topics for discussion,” said Parker, 45, a third-generation Washingtonian. The No Time for Crime, Drugs or Alcohol Youth Summit took place at Savoy Elementary School in Southeast on May 24, Memorial Day weekend. About 100 youth and 50 adults, including parents, participated in the daylong event, now marking its ninth year. Workshops for the summit, planned and developed by the youth, included: Who You Rep? – Violence, Bullying and Gang Involvement; Getting Buzzed and Killing Your Brain Cells – Underage Drinking, Marijuana and Other Drugs; Hygiene, Appearance and Nutrition; Empowered Parents; and Sex, Sexual Health and Sexuality. One youth, with her high school diploma in hand, said that while the day provided numerous opportunities to have fun, the summit, and other similar programs, must help change the way the Southeast community views itself. “We got great positive feedback from the youth that came out and they all got a lot more than they expected,” said Simone Banks-Mackey, 17. “Drugs, alcohol and especially smoking are still problems for youth. But at least we’re talking about these challenges more. Change can come in a variety of ways so every outreach effort helps.” D.C. native Anwan “Big G” Glover from 93.9 WKYS-FM served as the keynote speaker for the event. Glover, a featured actor on the popular HBO series “The Wire,” also addressed the importance of find-

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Jemma Harris of A’Ben Institute & Associates hosted a youth workshop on money matters and financial responsibility at Savoy Elementary School in Southeast on May 24. The workshop was part of the No Time for Crime, Drugs or Alcohol Youth Summit. /Photo by Capricia Galloway

ing alternative methods for conflict resolution other than violence. Performers included T.O.B Band and Show, Main Girl and Young Motive. A senior who attends Ballou High School said many of his friends that showed up seemed surprised to have learned so much. “Some kids are having sex and so they need to protect themselves from HIV or STDs so I helped pass out condoms,” said Damone Nickens, 17. “For some this was the first time they could get tested and as a prevention outreach worker at Sasha Bruce, I encourage my peers to see a doctor every three to six months. This is part of our reality.” Sponsors for the summit included: the Metropolitan Police Department; the Far Southeast Family Strengthening Collaborative, Inc.; the Ward 8 Drug-Free Coalition; and the Wards 7 & 8 DC Prevention Center. “We had some dedicated sponsors that are leading the way in crime prevention, drug and alcohol awareness and safe sex initiatives in Wards 7 and 8,” Parker said. “We hope that we can one day make this a citywide summit.” Parker also pointed to a recent poll of 400 high school youth from Ward 7 indicating the ease with which minors can access marijuana or alcohol. One of the summit’s sponsors representing the Ward 7 Safe and Drug Free Communities said efforts must continue to make life safer for Southeast youth. “Youth can become advocates for themselves when given the proper tools but it requires training and

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outlets like this where they can freely discuss what’s happening around them,” said Morris Redd, project coordinator. “Many want to choose healthier alternatives but at the same time they want to save face in their communities. It boils down to raising their self-esteem.” Another sponsor that works with youth east of the river said perceptions that paint Southeast youth in a Denise Rolark Barnes negative light don’t tell the real story. Independent Beauty Consultant “We had 12 kids, including sevwww.marykay/drolark-barnes.com eral from Ballou High School, that 202-236-8831 were either working on their service hours or were leading discussions on HIV prevention,” said Vera Johnson, managing director, Sasha Bruce Youthwork in Southeast. “We’re making a difference because we listen first and hear what young people say are their greatest obstacles. These kids come from all kinds of settings but they all agree that having adults to support and to mentor them is what they need most,” said Johnson, 57. (301) 864-6070 Lois Callahan, a 30-year District veteran in substance abuse prevention, said the summit illustrated how a number of organizations can colMCCOLLUM & ASSOCIATES, LLC laborate on life-altering issues. ADA, Age Discrimination, Benefits, Civil Rights, “We all care about kids and realCOBRA, Contracts, Deaf Law, Defamation, Disability Law, ize that in their culture, drugs and Discipline, Discrimination, FMLA, FLSA, FOIA, alcohol have become normative,” Callahan said. “That’s why we must Family Responsibility, Harassment, HIPPA, OSHA, continue to work with community National Origin Discrimination, Non-Compete, leaders, whoever they are, to change Race Discrimination, Rehabilitation Retaliation, ‡ Please set all copy in upper and lowercase, flush left as indicated on artwork at these point sizes:Act, Consultant name in 11-point Helvetica Neue Bo the behavior.” Beauty Consultant in 9-point Helvetica Neue Light; Web site or e-mail address in 9-point Helvetica Neue Light; phone number in 9-point Helvetica ® Personal Web Site program may To the Independent Beauty Consultant: Only Company-approved Web sites obtained through the Mary KayTorts, Severance Agreements, Sexual Harassment, Redd said changing the mindset Whistleblowing, Wage-and-Hour, Wrongful Discharge remains the best way to improve the quality of life for youth. SERVING MARYLAND, DC, & NORTH CAROLINA “Drug free, sex free, influence www.jmlaw.net (301) 864-6070 jmccollum@jmlaw.net free – they are the new cool.” WI The Washington Informer June 19, - June 25, 2014 5

EMPLOYMENT LAWYERS


WEEK OF JUNE 19 TO JUNE 25

Black Facts June 19 1865 – The Juneteenth Celebration begins. June 19, 1865 marks the day that many Blacks in Texas were emancipated. Even though the Emancipation Proclamation freed all slaves in 1863, Texans refused to release them until the end of the Civil War. 2009 – The U.S. Congress issues a formal apology to Black Americans for the slavery of their ancestors. The resolution acknowledged the “fundamental injustice, cruelty, brutality and inhumanity of slavery and Jim Crow laws” which followed slavery. However, the resolution specifically rejected paying Blacks reparations for past discrimination, mistreatment and brutality. June 20 1967 – Boxing champion Muhammad Ali is convicted in a Houston, Texas federal court of violating the Selective Service Act by refusing to be inducted into the armed forces. He was fined $10,000 and given five years in prison. The United States Supreme Court would later overturn the conviction. Ali’s refusal to be inducted was based, in part, on his opposition to America’s war in Vietnam. He often said, “No Vietnamese ever called me nigger.”

BUYING RECORDS

June 21 1832 – Joseph Haynes Rainey, the first African American to serve in the United States House of Representatives, is born in Georgetown, South Carolina. He was elected in 1870 from the state of South Carolina. He served five terms in Congress and died in 1887. In 2005, a portrait of Rainey was finally hung in the U.S. Capitol Building. 1859 – Henry O. Tanner, the first African-American painter to achieve international acclaim, is born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to a middle-class Black family. His most notable work was “The Banjo Lesson” which he painted in 1893. Tanner would later teach at Clark University in Atlanta, Georgia. Tanner was considered a formalist –

meaning his paintings tended to be beautiful depictions of reality. He died in May 1937. June 22 1909 – One of this nation’s major pioneers in Black theatrical dance, Katherine Dunham, is born on this day in 1909 in JoMuhammad Ali liet, Illinois. Dunham was one of the century’s most multi-talented Black artists. She was a dancer, choreographer, and voodoo priestess with a degree in anthropology from the University of Chicago. Dunham’s heyYouth Administration. The agency day in dance was from the late 1940s to the early 1960s. was one of President Franklin D. She was also a political activist. One Roosevelt’s “New Deal” programs of her last acts was a 47-day hun- designed to combat the lingering efger strike to protest U.S. treatment fects of the Great Depression. of Haitian boat people. She died in May 2006 at 97. June 25 1941 – President Franklin D. 2001 – Actor Whitman Mayo dies of a heart attack in Atlanta, Roosevelt issues Executive Order Georgia. He was 70. Mayo is best #8802 banning racial discrimination known for his role as “Grady” on in the nation’s war industries on the the hit television series “Sanford eve of America’s involvement in and Son.” World War II. The order came as a June 23 result of pressure from Black labor 1940 – Childhood polio victim leader A. Philip Randolph who had Wilma Rudolph is born in Clarks- threatened a massive “March on ville, Tennessee. Rudolph would go on to become one of the greatest Washington” to protest discriminaOlympic athletes America has ever tion by the military and the military produced. She actually competed industry. in her first Olympics at the age of 16. But it was in 1960 at the Rome 2009 – Pop music superstar MiOlympics where she distinguished chael Jackson dies of cardiac arrest herself by winning three gold medals in track and field events. Rudolph in his Los Angeles home after rewas the 20th of 22 children born to portedly being given a powerful sedEd and Blanch Rudolph. She would ative (propofol) to help him sleep. die young – at the age of 54 – of Jackson was 50 years old and was brain cancer. in the process of preparing a major comeback tour. June 24 1936 – One of the nation’s foremost Black educators Mary McLeod Bethune is appointed director of Negro Affairs of the National

1968 – Lincoln Alexander becomes the first Black member of the Canadian parliament.

Buying Vinyl Records from 1950 to 1986, Jazz, Rock-n-Roll, R&B, Disco, Soul, Reggae, Blues, Gospel, and record format 33 1/3, 45s, and some of the older 78s. Prefer larger collections of at least 100.

CALL JOHN @ 301-596-6201 6 June 19 - June 25, 2014

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AROUND THE THE REGION REGION AROUND INTERVIEWS AND PHOTOS BY TIMOTHY LINDEN

VIEWP INT Sunshine Muse Washington, D.C.     I support the Obama administration in bringing Bergdahl home with the exchange. I think the country needs to move in the direction of having a more humane way of dealing with individuals. I think it’s good that we were able to bring Bergdahl home, and to a safe environment. I applaud the administration for a successful negotiation that brought an American soldier home.           

Gerald William McDuffie Silver Spring, Maryland I’m glad they were able to bring him back home. A lot of the politicians who have [objected] to the negotiation aren’t considering the fact that [Bergdahl] is someone’s child. A lot of them come from backgrounds that aren’t necessarily the same as the majority of Americans. The Bergdahl family has been without a son for years, and not having him there with them has been very unfortunate. I think the administration made the right call.           

h s a C Need

AFTER FIVE YEARS OF CAPTIVITY AS THE COUNTRY’S LONE PRISONER OF WAR, SGT. BOWE BERGDAHL, WHO SOME BELIEVE DESERTED HIS POST IN AFGHANISTAN, WAS RELEASED IN EXCHANGE FOR FIVE TALIBAN DETAINEES. WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THE EXCHANGE?

Michael Syphax Washington, D.C. I think the exchange was fine. As far as Bergdahl’s other behavior, we won’t really know the truth until he’s willing to talk. I don’t have a problem with the exchange as I see it as a routine prisoner exchange. I think the press has overblown the importance of the five detainees who were released. You don’t leave a soldier behind, and if Bergdahl did desert his post, we will eventually find that out.   

Robert Goo Takoma Park, Maryland I have been concerned about the prisoner exchange because from what I have read, the circumstances surrounding Bergdahl’s disappearance have been very unclear. I am also concerned about the soldiers who were killed looking for him, and about the soldiers who were involved in the exchange whose lives were at risk during the recovery effort.      

Sean Sanders Washington, D.C. I don’t think we know the real story surrounding the exchange, and there’s probably a lot more to it than what’s currently being released by the press. I’m sure there’s a lot more information that the Army cannot release, as well. I am going to withhold judgment on whether it was a good decision or not until I hear what Bergdahl has to say. It sounds like he had some mental health issues himself, and it sounds like there were some possible issues with the command he was under.  

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AROUND THE REGION

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA HOUSING AUTHORITY

HCVP 4th ANNUAL

BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT & LIFE SKILLS WORKSHOP

Dunbar High School

101 N St. N.W., Washington, D.C., 20001

• Celebrity Guests • Prizes • Awards • Entertainment

Saturday, June 28, 2014 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Trophy Presentation @ 4:00 p.m.

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The Washington Informer

(L-R) Donte Woodyard, 7, and Deonte Harrison, 6, proudly displayed the beets that they harvested from the community garden at Lincoln Heights in Northeast on June 4. /Photo by Sam P.K. Collins

GARDEN continued from Page 1

develop a sustainable healthy food source for Lincoln Heights residents: a community garden. This summer, novice gardeners will harvest several pounds of crops including apples, beets, lettuce, kale, oranges, peaches, strawberries, and snap peas, most of which they cultivated in flower beds shaped in the form of “LH,” Lincoln Heights’ initials. Volunteers from The Green Scheme guided residents of various ages along a process that included testing soil for lead, building flower beds, planting seeds, watering plants, removing weeds, and harvesting fruits and vegetables on a plot of land overlooking townhouses and low-rise apartment buildings in the Northeast neighborhood. Gregory Hill, a Lincoln Heights resident of 10 years, said that his neighbors have increasingly recognized the potential of the garden, now in its second harvest, as a viable food source. “Many of us living in Lincoln Heights have a fixed income,” said Hill, 60. “People have realized that they can use what grows out of the garden to save some money. We’re all learning as we go. We work as a team and build trust with others. Our efforts have motivated other residents to join us,” said Hill, who also serves as treasurer of the Lincoln Heights Resident Council. Future horticulturalists like Donte Woodyard, 7, often rake grass and pull weeds to ensure that the crops stay healthy. A gathering of The Green Scheme

volunteers and Lincoln Heights residents at the garden three years ago piqued Donte’s interest in urban farming. “I help plant the seeds and make sure that the crops are healthy,” said Donte. “I’m out here every day. This is good for me because I get to take care of the plants and take cooking classes. I love seeing the crops grow. My mother and stepfather do not have to worry about me being bored in the house or [running around] outside,” said Donte. A 2013 report by DC Hunger Solutions, a Northwest-based program funded by the Food Research and Action Center, found that 30 percent of households with children in the District could not afford to purchase food. Each week, a steady stream of parents and children visit the Lincoln Heights Family Enhancement Center where chefs prepare a variety of meals and snacks using the fruits and vegetables grown in the garden. More than 20 residents filed into a common area at the center on June 4 and learned how to make fruit smoothies. Children later nibbled on broccoli and carrots dipped in hummus. Lincoln Heights resident Shyrie Forney watched as Darryl Perkins, vice president of local nonprofit Broccoli City Lifestyle Group chopped strawberries, kale, and pineapples before tossing them into a blender during a recent demonstration. Forney, who has lived in Lincoln Heights for nine years, said she often brings some of the children living in the neighborhood along

See GARDEN on Page 9

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AROUND THE REGION GARDEN continued from Page 8 with her to the weekly meetings on nutrition along with the chefs’ demonstrations. “Gardening’s different from what the children usually do,” said Forney, 35. “The older ones aren’t too interested but I always grab the little ones with their parents’ permission. This garden has been a breath of fresh air. It’s something that they get to enjoy and it costs little to nothing,” said Forney, a cosmetologist. Since Ronnie Webb, a community organizer, and Joelle Robinson, a public health professional, founded The Green Scheme in 2011, it has helped residents in five communities east of the Anacostia River, including Benning Terrace and Wheeler Ter-

race in Southeast, start their own gardens as part of a project touted Code Green. In 2013, The Green Scheme secured a $114,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and received 17 fruit trees compliments of the Northeast-based nonprofit Casey Trees. Webb, president of The Green Scheme, said that he hopes that residents will use the skills they learned long after volunteers leave. “The people of Lincoln Heights built these gardens,” said Webb, 28. “When we eventually leave the community, their garden committee can keep it going. We don’t just educate them about the merits of healthy eating. We also show them how to self-advocate,” said Webb who lives in Northeast. WI

PASTORAL VACANCY Rehoboth Baptist Church is accepting Pastoral Application Packets. Please call the church office to obtain the packet. 202-561-1111. Deadline, June 30, 2014. Rehoboth Baptist Church, 621 Alabama Avenue, SE Washington DC 202-561-1111

Darryl Perkins, 30, talks to a group of children and adults about how to make nutritious fruit smoothies during a weekly meeting at the Lincoln Heights Family Enhancement Center in Northeast on June 4. /Photo by Sam P.K. Collins

GUESS WHO’S

TURNING 50? The late Dr. Calvin W. Rolark, Sr. with daughter and publisher, Denise Rolark-Barnes.

Founded in 1964 by Dr. Calvin W. Rolark, Sr., The Washington Informer has a rich legacy of uplifting our community. 2014 will be a landmark year for the Informer and we want you to be part of it! In anticipation of our upcoming 50th Anniversary Celebration in October 2014, we’ll be hosting events throughout the year. Stay connected with us for details on exciting sponsorship opportunities and ways you can get involved.

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AROUND THE REGION

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D.C. Political Roundup By James Wright WI Staff Writer Perdomo Wants to Improve District Schools Lillian Perdomo spent years in the trenches of District grassroots politics and community activism, and cut her teeth working with Carol  Schwartz on the D.C. Council along with a host of nonprofits. So, it comes as no surprise that Perdomo wants to take the next step in local leadership – she’s ready to represent Ward 1 on the D.C. State Board of Education. “I am running because I am committed to strengthening educational opportunities for the children of  the District of Columbia,” said Perdomo, 53. “I want to ensure that every student is enrolled in a high-quality institution with high-quality teachers.” Patrick Mara, the Ward 1 Board of Education member, decided not to seek another term. There are also board races in Wards 3, 5, and 6 in the November general election. (A special election to fill the vacant Ward 8 seat will be held on Tuesday, July 15.) Perdomo knows firsthand the challenges school administrators and students face. She has a son who graduated from D.C. public schools and a daughter who attends the Duke Ellington School of the Arts in Northwest. She wants to help students who are struggling academically, many of whom are black or Latino, by putting in place a highly-regarded community schools concept in the District. “A community school will serve as a hub for community services for not only the students but for families,” she said. “At these community schools, we can provide additional services such as tutoring for the children and social services support for family members. While the family’s social services needs are being met, the child [can] focus on learning.” Perdomo said preparing a child to learn involves getting them into a classroom as early as possible. “As a member of the board of education, I will work to see that low-income students are enrolled in pre-kindergarten while they are either three or four years old,” she said. “Students at those ages can learn how to function in a structured learning environment early.” Perdomo, a Latina, recognizes that the District has become an international city in the truest sense The Washington Informer

Lillian Perdomo is a political activist in Ward 1. /Photo by Nancy Shia

Robert Turner serves as the executive director of the District of Columbia Republican Party. /Courtesy Photo

and she believes that the educational curriculum should reflect that diversity. She supports bilingualism, the ability to speak two languages fluently. “In the District, we have [more than] 100 languages and dialects that are spoken,” she said. “Our children are exposed to an international world and they need to have the skills to be able to compete in that world.” If elected in November, Perdomo will be one of  the two elected Latino officials in the District. A veteran of District politics, she has served as a Barack Obama delegate to the 2012 Democratic National Convention in Charlotte; a six-year member of the D.C. Democratic State Committee; working as Vincent Gray’s Ward 1 coordinator in the 2010 mayoral election and has clout as a member of the D.C. Latino Caucus. Perdomo wants to use her experience, contacts and perspective to benefit the District’s school children. “Our children are creative, capable and smart,” she said. “I want a fully-equipped school in every neighborhood so that every child

can reach their potential.” D.C. Republicans Respond to Schwartz Mayoral Bid Ron Phillips, the chairman of the D.C. Republican Party, said that he spoke with former D.C. Council member Carol Schwartz about carrying the mantle for a 2014 mayoral run several months ago. Schwartz ran for mayor as a Republican in 1986, 1994, 1998 and 2002. “The Republican Party approached me about running for them, but I politely declined,” Schwartz, 70, said on WJLA’s “NewsTalk with Bruce DePuyt” show on June 10. Phillips said the party’s leadership, that includes Executive Director Robert Turner,  respects Schwartz’s decision to run as an independent. “She declined [our offer] and that is her prerogative,” Phillips said. “We wish her well.” Phillips said that he hopes to find Republicans who will run for political office. “At the end of the month, we will vote on nominating our own Republican candidate to run for mayor in the November election,” he said. WI

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June 19, - June 25, 2014

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AROUND THE REGION

Schwartz Upsets the Status Quo By Barrington M. Salmon WI Staff Writer@bsalmondc

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Game Changer. That’s the description offered by one D.C. resident and echoed, she said, by countless others she knows, following Carol Schwartz’s announcement that she plans to run for mayor. “As soon as I heard she was coming into the race, I contacted her representative. She’s a game-changer,” said longtime Ward 7 resident, writer and activist Jeri Washington. “People have been extrapolating who she’ll take votes from and she’ll take votes from both (Council members Muriel Bowser and David Catania).” “I saw Muriel recently and told Muriel I’m glad Carol entered the race. She asked why and I said she’ll make them work harder. With Carol in the race, the issues will be talked about. There has been talk that Muriel didn’t want to debate Catania. Now she may have no choice.” During the April 1 primary, Mayor Vincent C. Gray lost his bid to serve a second term to Bowser, the Ward 4 council member and until last week, she and Catania, himself an At-Large council member, battled to replace Gray. Schwartz, 70, served on the D.C. Council for 16 years as a Republican who held an At-Large seat. She’s been out of the public eye for fiveand-a-half years and changed her party affiliation to independent last year. She said she felt compelled to enter the race. In a statement released on June 6, Schwartz explained her motivation. “During this five-year break from political life … I have watched closely from the sidelines and have been concerned about what is happening in our city’s present and what its future will look like. While I have been extremely happy to see our town develop and thrive – the groundwork which I helped lay during my years in elected office, along with many others then and since – I have become more and more troubled as many of our longtime fellow residents are being left behind or pushed out. In fact, our glorious diversity is being threatened.” Schwartz, who has lived in D.C. for 48 years, said she is equally upset about local elected officials whose greed and acts of corruption have tarnished the District’s good name. “Any corruption is too much – and D.C. has gone beyond the pale,” she said. “And it concerns me that my former body, the D.C. Council, created the circumstances that opened the door for some of these unethical shenanigans to take place, circumstances I tried to stop when The Washington Informer

1/21/14 11:12 AM

Carol Schwartz recently picked up her petitions from the Board of Elections in Northwest. The former D.C. council member has announced that she plans to run for mayor. /Photo by Roy Lewis

I was on the council. For example, a few officials did severe wrongdoing using earmarks and their Constituent Service Funds. Earmarks are sole-source contracts that council members gave out to favored groups. And a now-imprisoned former council member raided his Constituent Service Fund for personal use.” Schwartz said deciding whether to run had occupied her mind for the past several months, but she firmed up her decision about 10 days before her official announcement. Local Republican officials courted Schwartz, trying to convince her to run under the GOP banner but she declined. “I’m an independent now,” she asserted. “I actual say they left me – they have become far too conservative. The good thing is that people know me. I met them half-way (by switching to independent) and I hope they’ll do the same.” Ron Turner, executive director of DCGOP, said Chairman Ron Phillips met with Schwartz earlier this year but couldn’t persuade her to run as a Republican. On June 9, Phillips issued a statement welcoming her into the mayor’s race. “She represents a lot of history that is in this city … We wish her well.” Phillips said at the end of the month, GOP officials will vote on nominating a Republican candidate to run for mayor in the November elections. Turner said anyone running as a Republican faces a daunting battle with the margin of Democratic to Republican voters standing at 11-1. He said it’s important to nominate people who won’t be mistaken for

Democrats. “We plan to run a Republican candidate, not a Democrat-Lite,” he said. “It will be a person who stands on Republican standards and ideals in a Democratic environment. (Too often), we’ve had Republicans who shift and move toward Democratic positions.” The Republicans the party favors advocates limited government, lower taxes and increased responsibility and accountability from elected officials, Turner explained. Schwartz has name recognition, people like her and she’s remembered for putting forward and shepherding through passage of legislation that benefited all colors and classes in the city. Her biggest challenge, she acknowledges, is the fact that she’s not a Democrat, but she said she has a strong legislative record to run on. She said she’s been very surprised at the support she’s gotten, especially from people she never expected. Washington reveled in the shakeup. “There are a lot of Democrats who still support Carol. I think anything is possible,” she said. “If we have a low voter turnout, anything’s possible. I told Muriel that it’s going be an aggressive summer of campaigning and now with Carol in the race, the question will be how many of them will be supporting her. Everyone’s trying to pull Democrats but who’ll pull independents? It will be musical chairs.” “I’m excited, I love a good fight.”WI

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PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY

Lillian Childress has been honored as a Suitland High School “Scholar of the Week.” /Photo courtesy of Prince George’s County Public Schools

Compiled by Dorothy Rowley WI Staff Writer “MySchoolBucks” Payment Program In an effort to provide an improved system of payment options, school officials are launching an electronic service that becomes effective on Tuesday, July 1. Once the “MySchoolBucks” online payment program begins, the Department of Food and Nutrition Services will no longer accept personal checks. “MySchooBucks” provides parents the ability to securely pay for meals, monitor student cafeteria purchases and make tuition payments for Before and After School Extended Learning programs. With “MySchoolBucks” payments can be made at any time using a Visa, MasterCard, Discover credit card or a debit card. Parents receive email notifications when account balances are low. New Playground at Seabrook Elementary The Seabrook Elementary School community in Upper Marlboro, Maryland has been revitalized with a new playground recently built on the school grounds. More than 200 volunteers from Seabrook teamed up with staff from “KaBOOM!” a nonprofit organization in the District that ensures that children are provided with an active play area in their community and Foresters, a life insurance provider, credited for building the playground. The new play space will serve more than 15,000 children and their families in the local

CALL (202) 670-7495 The Seabrook Elementary School community came together to help build the school’s new playground. /Photo courtesy of Prince George’s County Public Schools

community for years to come. “We are thrilled to partner with Foresters and “KaBOOM!” to provide children in this community with the opportunity to have the childhood they deserve, because play matters for all kids,” said Kevin Maxwell, schools CEO. “In building this playground together, we are providing a safe and enjoyable environment to help them grow and thrive.” The playground’s design resulted from drawings created by Seabrook students during a special Design Day event held in March. Since 2006, Foresters has invested more than $10 million with “KaBOOM!” to build nearly120 playgrounds across the country and in Canada. Scholar of the Week Lillian Childress recently joined a list of her peers at the county’s high schools as a “Scholar of the Week.” Lillian recently graduated from Suitland High School in Forestville, Maryland, with a 4.12 grade point average, and among an extensive list of subjects she has excelled in, are world literature, chemistry, math, Spanish,

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psychology and physiology. Lillian’s extracurricular activities included membership in the National Honor Society where she served as vice president, and the Young Innovators Club, where she served as secretary. She has more than 500 community service learning hours, and in February had the honor of being recognized by the Rotary Club as the “Young American of the Month.” Lillian, a Posse Scholar, hopes to pursue a career in forensic chemistry and law. In the fall, she will attend the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Four-Day Work Week School system officials launched a 4-day work week schedule on Monday, June 16, with the schedule ending at the close of business on Friday, Aug. 8. However, the week of June 30 – July 4 will be a 3-day work week in observance of the July 4 holiday. Otherwise, schools and offices will be open Monday through Thursday with more flexible hours during the summer months, with core business hours being 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.WI The Washington Informer

June 19, - June 25, 2014

13


NATIONAL

New Orleans Students Donate Time, Resources to Philippines By Barrington M. Salmon WI Staff Writer@bsalmondc The young survivors in New Orleans could be excused if they looked inward as they continue to move beyond the devastation of Hurricane Katrina. But on August 22, 20 students from McDonogh 35 Senior High School will travel to the Philippines to offer support to fellow students. Last November, super Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms in history, slammed into the Central Philippines. The storm killed more than 6,200 people amid the devastation. The students, aka the ’Reke

Allstars, will spend 10 days to assist in building a pre-fab shelter for a needy family, participate in a basketball camp, attend school and help in the recovery. The teens have the opportunity because of a unique collaboration with Operation Hoops Cares; the Embassy of the Philippines; Industrial Bank; the USPhilippines Society; New Orleans Pelicans guard Tyreke Evans and several of his brothers. “The typhoon was the Philippines’ worst,” said Jena Ferguson, creator of Operation Hoops Cares. “It’s a natural connection. It’s so crazy. People were living in [a stadium] and 80 percent of the schools were damaged. It

was the same in New Orleans. The kids will go to school there for one week and those kids will take supplies and they’re learning construction and will help build pre-fab structures.” Ferguson, founder of non-profit Knowledge Speaks and a Manhattan resident, said she just returned from the Philippines. “It’s bad, really bad,” she said. The students, many of whom traveled by air for the first time, visited New York City before arriving in the District for the June 3 embassy event. Ferguson said group members met with

See STUDENTS on Page 15

Reggie Evans, the older brother of New Orleans basketball player Tyreke Evans, told guests at the Philippines Embassy in Northwest that he and his family relish any opportunity to give back especially when it comes to education. /Photo by Roy Lewis

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14 June 19 - June 25, 2014

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NATIONAL STUDENTS continued from Page 14 Louisiana Sen. Mary Landrieu, who promised to expedite the process so that students who lost their birth certificates in the hurricane can get replacements to travel overseas in a couple of months. The students wouldn’t be able to make the trip at all without the generous help of Industrial Bank, which offered a $45,000 grant for travel and accommodations. “We received a Bank Enterprise Award and we committed 20 percent of that on a persistent poverty community. There are none in D.C. So we got in touch with Operation Hoops Cares through Amos Greene,” said B. Doyle Mitchell, grandson of the bank’s founder and its president and chief executive officer. “Jena told us about this project with natural disasters and the love of basketball. They even have a team named the Pelicans.” “When God puts it all together, this is what you get. … Our real job is helping people. We’re a community bank where half of our assets are invested in low- or moderate-income communities. We’re proud to support students doing fantastic things.” “This is an excellent opportunity to strengthen the ties of the Philippines and the U.S. and New Orleans and the Philippines,” said Philippines Minister and Consul Elmer G. Cato. “Basketball is the most popular sport in the Philippines despite our height.” Retired Ambassador John Maisto agreed with a hearty chuckle. “They follow basketball in a serious way in the Philippines,”

said Maisto, president of the USPhilippines Society which was asked to partner on the project. “Americans who go would be surprised to see how popular the game is. The beauty of what’s going on now is that it involves hurricane survivors. It’s kids, it’s basketball, it’s reconstruction, it’s education. This brings everything together beautifully.” Bill Kealey, an instructor in the ACE Mentoring Program – which in addition to introducing the teens to career opportunities in architecture, construction and engineering – will help them build 23 pre-fabricated homes to be sent overseas once they procure the money. Reggie Evans, Tyreke’s brother and manager, told guests at the Philippines Embassy in Northwest he and his family relish any opportunity to give back. Brothers Eric and Dahz stood in the back of the room until they joined other guests to take pictures. “Thank you all for coming out,” he said. “We’re grateful to be a part of anything related to education. This will help the kids take a break from the stress. The struggle in the Philippines and New Orleans breaks our heart. We wanted to help and we’re going to help.” Tyreke Evans wasn’t at the press conference because he’s recovering from knee surgery. “I wish my brother was here,” Reggie Evans said. “He wants to be a huge part of this. He’ll have his face in the Philippines at the camps.” Evans, 41, recalled the difficult circumstances his family endured while living in Chester, Pennsylvania, saying sports provided the outlet he and his brothers needed to succeed and rise above the myriad challenges.

Since becoming a professional athlete, Evans said, his brother has attached himself to a number of notable projects such as donating $2 million to provide eye care to the needy, working with Doctors Without Bor-

ders, and sponsoring basketball camps. Malik Collins, 17, recalled his first airplane ride after reading a poem about his Katrina experience. “I was so nervous. It was tense

and overwhelming. There was excitement and a lot to take in but I really, really enjoyed it. The whole trip has been a learning experience.” WI To read this story in its entirety, go to www.washingtoninformer.com

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June 19, - June 25, 2014

15


BUSINESS EXCHANGE Money Matter$ By Douglass F. Dillon

Industrial Bank www.industrial-bank.com

Industrial Strong

SVP/Commercial Lending Member FDIC

What You Need to Know About the SBA If you have ever started (or considered starting) your own business, chances are you have heard about or used the services of the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). If however, you are a small business owner and you have not utilized the services of the SBA or one of its partners, you really should familiarize yourself with this critical resource. The SBA was created, “to be an independent agency of the federal government to aid, counsel, assist and protect the interests of small business concerns, to preserve free competitive enterprise and to maintain and strengthen the overall economy of our nation.” President Obama has often referred to the importance small businesses play in driving the U.S. economy and the purpose of the SBA is to help Americans start, build and grow businesses - and its impact has been quite profound. The SBA has delivered millions of loans, loan guarantees, contracts, counseling sessions and other forms of assistance to small businesses. How? The SBA provides assistance primarily through its four programmatic functions: 1. Access to Capital: The SBA indirectly provides financing for small businesses via microlending, as well as in the form of investment capital (venture capital). 2. Entrepreneurial Development (Education, Information, Technical Assistance & Training): The SBA provides FREE individual face-to-face, and internet counseling for small businesses, and low-cost training to budding entrepreneurs as well as established small businesses in locations throughout the United States. 3. Government Contracting: The SBA’s Office of Government Contracting sets goals with other federal departments and agencies to reach a prime contract goal for dollars being awarded to small businesses and also provides small businesses with subcontracting procurement opportunities, outreach programs, and training. 4. Advocacy: The SBA reviews Congressional legislation and testifies on behalf of small businesses.

Great! But how does that help you? Of primary importance to most small business owners is access to capital. While SBA generally does not lend directly to small businesses, it assists banks and other private-sector financial institutions in making credit more widely available. Through its 7(a) program, SBA can authorize the guarantee of a significant portion of a bank loan, usually 50% to 75%. This means that if the small business becomes unable to repay the loan, the SBA will repay the Bank itself. This does not release the business owner from his or her obligation to repay the loan to SBA. But the benefit to you, the small business owner, is that such a guaranty provides peace of mind to your lender, which in turn makes it a bit easier to obtain an initial loan approval from a bank or other financial institution. Another means by which SBA supports bank lending to small businesses is its 504 program. This program is typically used to finance the acquisition and renovation of real estate by eligible small businesses which will utilize at least 51% of the acquired space for their own operations. Unlike 7(a), the 504 program is not a guaranty program. Instead, participating banks and SBA share the risk of lending to the small business, with the bank taking a first mortgage lien position on the real estate and SBA taking the riskier second lien. The SBA’s portion is funded through the public sale of debentures which are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. A typical 504 structure calls for 50% bank financing, 40% SBA financing and a 10% equity injection by the small business owner. Business people find this program attractive because of the limited cash they are required to provide (as little as 10% of the total project cost), and because the interest rate on the SBA debenture is generally quite low. If you are in the market for a bank partner, one that is willing to help you take advantage of the resources available through the SBA, know that Industrial Bank is ready to support you as you look to invest in yourself, invest in your dreams, and invest in your future.

16 June 19 - June 25, 2014

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Koch Brothers Support UNCF You probably haven’t heard the one about the billionaire industrialist Koch brothers giving a $25 million grant to the United Negro College Fund (UNCF). The money will come from Koch Industries Inc. and the Charles Koch Foundation, both of which are headed by the brothers. Most of the money ($18.5 million) will go toward a scholarship program. The other $6.5 million is provided for general support to the nation’s historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and the UNCF, $4 million of which will be set aside for loan assistance. The gift helps bolsters beautiful minds and the future of African-American communities. UNCF is the nation’s largest, oldest and most successful minority higher education assistance organization. The universally recognized motto for UNCF is: “A mind is a terrible thing to waste.”  A part of the HBCU network, the UNCF was founded in 1940 by Frederick Douglass Patterson, an African-American educator who was president of Tuskegee University from 1935 to 1953. Since its start UNCF has raised more than $3.6 billion to help more than 400,000 students receive college degrees at UNCF-member institutions.  Each year UNCF enables more than 60,000 students to attend college and get the education they need to launch careers and contribute to their communities. The UNCF provides operating funds for 40 member colleges and administers programs that allow students from low- and moderate-income families to afford college tuition, books and room and board. UNCF’s current president and chief executive Michael Lomax said, “UNCF is proud to announce this new scholarship program that will help motivated and deserving students not just get to and through school, but to become our next generation of innovators and entrepreneurs … are enormously grateful to Koch Industries and Foundation for long-standing support of UNCF and helping create new opportunities for success and a better future for our students.”  Over the last 70 years, UNCF has raised more than $4 bil-

By William Reed lion and helped more than 430,000 students earn a college degree. Lomax adds that, “I’m hopeful that this commitment will spur others to come forward and invest in our students so that they can create a better future for themselves and their communities.” The donation comes as Democrats have been actively seeking to vilify Charles and David Koch in hopes of turning them into midterm electoral bogeymen. Senate Majority Leader Harry M. Reid (D-Nev.)  has lambasted them  on the Senate floor, while Democratic groups have been running ads that cast the family and their businesses in a negative light. In their donations, the Koch brothers have done more for Black youth than Barack Obama and Harry Reid combined. Many Blacks are mouthing the political mantra that “The Koch [brothers] will put $125 million into November’s elections – backing candidates who will vote to decimate Social Security, overturn voting rights … and make it impossible to get health care or earn a decent wage.” Most Blacks don’t know beyond politics that for decades the Koch family has been generous philanthropists, with contributions among African-American institutions in education, health care, and the arts. Through scholarship and academic initiatives, the Charles Koch Foundation currently supports 340 programs at more than 250 colleges and universities across the country, including HBCUs such as Albany State University and Fayetteville State University. Actually, Koch Industries has a history of supporting UNCF dating to 2005, when it acquired the company Georgia-Pacific, which has supported UNCF going back four decades. Since 1995, Georgia-Pacific and Koch have donated tens of millions of dollars to UNCF. It’s time Blacks stop championing mediocrity and stop the parti-

See REED on Page 17

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AROUND THE REGION

Students Develop Apps, Solve School Problems By Denise Rolark Barnes WI Staff Writer With only two weeks before the end of the school year for D.C. public school students, a group of seventh graders at Hart Middle School in Southeast accepted an end-of-the-year academic challenge that almost stumped them. They had to agree upon the biggest issues they faced during this school year, and then answer the question, “What if there was an app for that?” Homework, school lunches and bullying ranked highest on their lists. Designing an app – short for application, a software program that runs on computers, smart phones and other digital devices – to solve such problems excited the 120 students that participated in the exercise. The results surprised the dozens of volunteers from Deloitte LLC, an international public accounting firm, which partnered with the William O. Lockridge Foundation to create the challenge for its 14th Annual Impact Day on June 6. “I was blown away by the students, their engagement and the creativity they displayed,” said Wanda Lockridge, founder of The Lockridge Foundation, a non-profit education-based organization named in honor of the late Ward 8 school board member William Lockridge. “They came in with no knowledge of the project and thanks to the Deloitte volunteers, they quickly understood the mission. It was really phenomenal to see.” Kim Corley, associate director in Deloitte’s Global Technology Services Practice, said every year the company shuts down for one day so that its officers

REED continued from Page 16 san politics, to see the long-term impact the Koch brothers and UNCF scholars have made in our communities helping aspiring African-American students better understand how entrepreneurship,

Nearly 30 volunteers spent the day teaching students brainstorming and problem solving techniques by developing apps to solve school problems during the 14th Annual Impact Day sponsored by Deloitte and the William O. Lockridge Foundation on Friday, June 6 at Hart Middle School in Southeast. /Photo by Denise R. Barnes

and employees “can step out into their communities and make an impact. The work we do varies,” Corley said, “including beautification and gardening projects in nearly 80 communities across the US.” “The goal of today’s program is to teach kids about creative brainstorming,” Corley said. “We are helping them to think differently about problems. Don’t just think about the problem but start thinking of creative ways to solve the problem.” By 9:00 a.m. the first half of the seventh grade class sat attentively in the math lab. A second group would follow. The group, then spread throughout an open space classroom that teachers agree isn’t the most conducive environment for learning. Students tend to be distracted, one teacher explained, and unable to focus on their lessons. However, Impact Day proved otherwise. Two to three volunteers worked with teams of six students at tables scattered throughout the room. In short order, students appeared energized and focused as they brainstormed and developed solutions to apply to their apps. Winners would naturally have bragging rights and receive a prize, but that didn’t seem to matter to the future application developers. Instead, choosing the best icon to report incidents of bullying far outweighed a certificate and a $10 iTunes card. Groups debated over how their

app could improve the school lunch experience, by allowing students to vote for menu items, critique food choices and grade the daily lunchroom experience on their phones. The app, “Homework Helplication,” drew the loudest oohs and aahs for the winning team that created an application to allow students to receive and turn in homework assignments to their teachers. A single tap on a friendly face icon and students could share assignments with one another or save materials for future reference, all on a smart phone or other mobile devices. Seventh grade team member Antwon Harris couldn’t contain his excitement. “Homework Helplication helps people who struggle with homework not to struggle any more. I like to help people that struggle not to struggle any more. If this activity was a real program, I’d love to be in it,” he said. Hart Middle School Principal Billy Kearny said he looks forward to hosting Impact Day at Hart annually. “It’s important for our kids to get an idea about the future. Because so many of them are socially media savvy, this is fitting because it will grab their attention and will give them a glimpse into the future. We hope this will help to continue to promote the value of education and will inspire the entrepreneurial spirit in all of them.” WI

economics, and innovation contribute to the well-being of individuals, communities, and society. A key component of the scholars’ program is based on research from UNCF’s Frederick D. Patterson Research Institute. The donation will support staff – to be hired by UNCF – who will work close-

ly with the UNCF/Koch Scholars Program in providing support to students and administering program components.WI William Reed is publisher of “Who’s Who in Black Corporate America” and available for projects via the BaileyGroup.org

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HEALTH

Men’s Health Month Focuses on Prevention

African-American Males Face Various Challenges By Stacy M. Brown WI Contributing Writer Many men typically notice when their automobiles don’t perform properly, but they rarely listen when their bodies tell them that it’s time to visit a doctor. That observation from a local physician remains an important theme of Men’s Health Month, which takes place in June each year with a goal that all males carefully examine their bodies and stay healthy. “Men’s Health Month is a call to action for all men and their families to take ownership of their health and well-being,” said Dr. Salvatore Giorgianni, a science advisor to the Men’s Health Network in Northeast. “All dads out there [should know] how much their family needs them, and how important it is for them to take care of themselves,” Giorgianni said. While the Men’s Health Network (MHN) has planned several activities in Washington, D.C., throughout the month, officials at the National Black Men’s Health Network in Atlanta said it’s also a time to reflect on issues affecting African-American males. They said the death rate from cancer among African-American men remains twice that of white males and the mortality rate for black men as a whole ranks higher than any ethnic group. “The average black man barely lives long enough to collect his Social Security,” said Dr. Jean J.E. Bonhomme, founder of the National Black Men’s Health Network. HIV/AIDS remains among the most pressing health issue facing black males in Washington, D.C., but despite those concerns there are alarming disparities that disproportionately affect racial and ethnic minorities, said officials who are shining a spotlight on prevention as a key strategy for achieving health equity. “Failure to address the health challenges facing minorities diminishes the health of the nation as a whole,” said Bonhom-

18 June 19 - June 25, 2014

The Washington Informer

me, 63, who also serves on the board of directors for the MHN. “The U.S. has one of the most expensive health care systems in the world, yet our life expectancies, infant mortality rates and other health care outcomes are often middle of the road at best. This situation exists in large measure because many of our advanced and effective health care interventions are not reaching minorities.” Equally important, Bonhomme said studying minorities who suffer the highest known rates of many life limiting conditions provides unique opportunities to identify real causes and effective prevention of disease. He said increased attention to minority health could be a significant benefit to everyone. “We have numerous problems when it comes to health care and health insurance,” said Ian Franklin, a retired postal worker who lives in Northeast. “Finding the right doctor, getting to the doctor and having enough money to pay our premiums and even our co-pays present problems for us at times,” said Franklin 67. “So, it becomes easy for us as black men to not pay attention to the slightest ache or the smallest [pain]. We just don’t have the time, energy or resources.” Officials said the goal of Men’s Health Month continues to center on methods to heighten the public’s awareness of the many preventable illnesses affecting men, young and old. MHN officials have organized screenings, health fairs, and other education and outreach initiatives. Throughout the District and the rest of the country, MHN officials said they’re committed to spreading the word that, “prevention is power,” and to inspire everyone to talk about focusing on keeping families and communities healthy. MHN officials said seven of the top 10 causes of death in the U.S. are from chronic diseases and men of color are disproportionately affected by conditions

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HEALTH

The goal of Men’s Health Month centers on methods to heighten the public’s awareness of the many preventable illnesses affecting men, young and old. /Courtesy Photo Seven of the top 10 causes of death in the United States are from chronic diseases and men of color are disproportionately affected by conditions such as heart disease, stroke, cancer and diabetes, all of which can be prevented. /Courtesy Photo

MEN continued from Page 18 such as heart disease, stroke, cancer and diabetes, all of which can be prevented. “At this time in history, we have unprecedented opportunities such as those created by the Affordable Care Act and the Department of Health and Human Services’ Action Plan to Reduce Racial and Ethnic Disparities. We have an opportunity to implement measures to move the needle on health disparities and achieve health equity for all Americans,” said Dr. J. Nadine Gracia, deputy assistant secretary for minority health and the director of the Office of Minority Health in Rockville, Maryland.

Additional health screenings and programs will be offered to residents in the District and a number of care providers, physicians, insurance representatives and others will participate in activities throughout the month, officials said. “These efforts reach men where they live, work, and play and pray,” said Ana Fadich, vice president of MHN, which organizes events nationwide. “They’re a great way for health care providers, policymakers, the media, and individuals to educate men, their families, and the public on a wide range of men’s health issues, including cancers, cardiovascular problems, sexual and mental health concerns.”WI

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June 19, - June 25, 2014

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EDUCATION Compiled by Dorothy Rowley WI Staff Writer Junior Solar Sprint Hundreds of students, teach-

ers and families gathered late last month at Friendship Public Charter School’s Blow Pierce campus in Northeast to watch some of the brightest students in grades 4-8 who live in the

District, Maryland and Virginia compete in the regional Junior Solar Sprint race. The annual event tests students’ ability to use scientific know-how, creative thinking, ex-

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Students from all six campuses of Friendship Public Charter School participated in the recent Junior Solar Sprint competition held at the Blow Pierce campus in Northeast. /Photo courtesy of District Public Charter Schools

perimentation and teamwork to design, build and race high-performance solar electric vehicles. The event also marked the launch of Friendship’s “Summer of STEM” initiative, which offers more than 10 new enrichment clubs for students at all six of its campuses. Mayoral Candidate to Keep Chancellor It looks like Chancellor Kaya Henderson will be retaining her post if Ward 4 Council Member Muriel Bowser (D) wins the November mayoral election. Bowser, 41, said during a January debate that she had made no commitment as to whether she would keep Henderson, 43, on as the schools chancellor. But she confirmed during a recent public gathering that she plans to retain the chancellor.

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Celebrating Success School officials are celebrating the Class of 2014 with a series of photos and videos highlighting some of the students who refused to quit when the going got tough. Ashley Brown, who graduated on June 17 from Luke C. Moore Academy in Northeast, counts as one of the students who persevered despite myriad challenges. Ashley dropped out in the 10th grade but returned to school in 2012. She wanted to attend college so that she and her son Isaiah could have a better quality of life. “Isaiah is my inspiration. I know he’s here for a purpose,” Ashley said. “Before I had him I wasn’t going [down] the right road. When I had him I thought, ‘what am I going to do if I don’t finish high school? How am I going to support my child? My son is all I have.’ And if something is that important to you, you will [strive] for success.” Family members, friends and

other supporters of this year’s graduates can read their personal stories by using #DCPSgrads. Free Summer Meals Program Hunger doesn’t take a summer break. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Summer Food Service Program (SFSP), known in the District as the DC Free Summer Meals Program (FSMP), reimburses schools and other organizations that provide free nutritious meals and snacks to children 18 and younger. These meals help children in low-income areas get the nutrition they need to learn, play, and grow throughout the summer months when school’s not in session. When schools are closed for summer vacation, the meals served as part of the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program aren’t available, and due to families’ limited budgets and other circumstances, children will often miss wholesome meals. The FSMP fills this gap and parents benefit from help in stretching their food dollars and knowing that their children are receiving healthy meals in a supportive environment. The Office of the State Superintendent of Education can provide the names of agencies that sponsor the SFSP in the District, and the contact person for when and where meals are served. Interested parties can also visit the Find a DC Free Summer Meals website for information.WI

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F

or years, Ward 8 Council member Marion S. Barry, Jr. says, journalists and authors have written stories about him, personal and professional. Having lived life on his terms, the former four-time mayor decided now would be the appropriate time to tell his story. The journey from the rural Mississippi Delta town of Itta Bena to the civil rights movement, becoming chief executive of the nation’s capital, his successes, failures, victories and shortcomings are laid out in his book, “Mayor For Life: The Incredible Story of Marion Barry, Jr.” The 325-page book, co-authored by New York Times best-selling writer Omar Tyree and published by Strebor Books, is now on sale. “Everybody and his mother has written about Marion Barry – thousands of articles. As long as the lion is King of the Jungle, we’ll always hear his story,” Barry quipped. “It’s an honest book, truthful, the good, the ugly, the bad. If you’re to be believed, you have to tell the truth.” Barry, 78, said he hopes the book inspires young people, those enduring challenges, and others involved in or contemplating a career in politics. During a June 16 interview, a relaxed Barry reflected on the arc of his life. A recurring theme centered on redemption, second chances and rising like a phoenix out of the ashes of adversity. “Even if the FBI set me up, I had no business going into that room,” he said of the infamous incident at the Vista Hotel. “I apologized to Rasheeda (Moore), her family, Effi and Christopher and D.C. residents. I’ve put all that behind me. America is the land of second chances and we all fall short.” Novelist and author Zane, owner of publishing house Strebor Books, a division of Simon & Schuster, called snagging the Barry autobiography a coup. “I’ve known Mr. Barry for many years and it (the book) never came to fruition,” Zane recalled. “I met him at a friend’s house. He was playing bid whist and I told him he should do the story. Even-

tually, I had lunch with him and we worked out the deal. It’s important for him to tell his story. He truly is caring and compassionate about the people in D.C. When he talks about the people, he wants to help. It’s very important to him.” “When people need help, he’s always been there. He’s a great man, who has done great things for the city. He gave a lot of people an opportunity. I know many people who he gave a job to.” “People with a narrow focus on Marion Barry are robbing themselves of a rich experience. There’s nothing we can do about people who hold a negative view. I would call it life. He’s significant to me. If he wasn’t significant, there wouldn’t be people spending their time trying to put him down.Unfortunately, people try to define him by one moment.” Tyree, 45, said Zane brought him into the project and the author of 27 books said it took 11 months to complete. “She called me and asked if I wanted to do the autobiography. I said ‘Are you kidding me?’” said Tyree, a Philadelphia native and Howard University grad. “I had a first interview at his office and I wrote a four-page outline that I showed him. He was very impressed.” He said health and time issues, and Barry’s insistence that they talk face-to- face lengthened the process. Tyree said he’d only interviewed Barry once before when he worked as a writer for Capital Spotlight. But in the months they worked together his appreciation for Barry’s intellect, courage and accomplishments heightened the respect he has for the former mayor. Often, one never knows from where Barry might draw inspiration or the connection made to some aspect of his life. On Sunday night, after the season finale of Game of Thrones, Barry tweeted his support for Tyrion Lannister, a character who has suffered a great deal and faced death because he’s a midget. “He had a hard time in his life. Other people have too, but midgets are short and have other deformities. I identify with him,” Barry said. He likened Lannister’s challenges to those African Americans

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MARION BARRY: S T I L L D O I N G I T H I S WAY

By Barrington M. Salmon WI Staff Writer@bsalmondc

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June 19, - June 25, 2014

21


THE EVIDENCE OF THINGS NOT SEEN It’s difficult for people who do not know Marion Barry’s long and storied legacy of racial and social activism in the District to celebrate him for any reason. It is not uncommon, in fact, to have new supplants arbitrarily reduce Barry to a mumbling, aged relic of progress, whose continued presence in politics is of no more value than his choppy news soundbytes. It would seem then, hardly beneficial to acknowledge Barry beyond his occasional offending comments and unpopular social positions. So why does Barry continue to be as dangerous to some as he is popular to others? While his heart tends to be in the right place, Barry’s methods have never been orthodox. Consequently, Barry has the ability to rally the hopeless, raise the stakes, and all but raise the dead. For instance, as a leader of the Free D.C. Movement, Barry founded a jobs program, Pride Inc. for unemployed Black men who otherwise would have fallen into an almost predictable cycle of unemployment, crime, and prison. Barry spoke truth to power – loudly, defiantly, and unabashedly. After being shot when Hanafi Muslims took over the District Building in 1977, Barry’s reputation as a fearless, an-

BARRY continued from Page 21 continue to face. Both Barry’s parents, each with third- or fourth-grade educations, labored as sharecroppers with them working long hours for little pay. “They probably made $1,000 a year – it was a rough life.” As a child, Barry chopped cotton, collected bottles, delivered groceries and morning and evening newspapers and hustled

QUICK FACTS & QUOTES

MARION S. BARRY, JR.

gry, and formidable leader, took root. In addition to ending generations of marginalized economic advancement undergirded by the popular belief that D.C. remained populated by former slaves and federal government nannies, Barry offered many Blacks the ability to exercise full citizenship through financial security, homeownership, and access to decent education. Anyone fourteen years old and older had access to summer employment and a livable wage. In addition to building financial responsibility, Barry endeavored to build character and civic responsibility among the young workers. Imagine inspiring young people that D.C. has ignored, forgotten, or paternalistically filed into a perma-

nent underclass to straighten their posture, demand full access, and strengthen their own communities. Imagine watching a new generation of Marion Barrys shake off the stereotypes, challenge the system from its base, and with solid purpose redefine how politicians, corporations, and the federal government interact with the city. Barry’s legacy also included improving the city’s financial buoyancy by ushering the District into the bond market with the highest credit rating possible, allowing the city to borrow money on the open bond market, independent of the U.S. Treasury. The danger of a Marion Barry is yanking back the Wizard’s curtain to find no smoke or mirrors, no rabbits up sleeves, no magic elixirs or dust from the Crossroads. Instead, one finds is a battle-weary Black man from Mississippi who got fed up with the system and kicked a-- to change things for himself and the people around him. No person is all one thing. While the women, substance abuse, and grainy black and white surveillance footage from his 1990 arrest and the infamous “the b---- set me up” soundbyte have come to define his fifty-year career for some; it was a mere unfortunate

blip on the screen of an otherwise brilliant career to others. It’s not personal – necessarily, the revisionist history that creeps about labeling wise men fools and defining them by their Achilles’ heel. Barry is among many of its victims, and even at 78, he can handle it. The danger of Marion Barry has nothing to do with his current frailty, some of the seemingly foolish things he utters, or his past indiscretions; and everything to do with those who have named him Mayor for Life in spite of it. The Washington Informer partnered with students at The Richard Wright Public Charter School for Journalism and Media Arts in Southeast to discuss Barry’s philosophies, his early civil rights mission, his continued commitment to the disenfranchised of the city, and the major economic strides he made for the District. The goal was to introduce Barry’s political and social activism to students who would otherwise see only what they’re told to see. A few of the essays from the Richard Wright Public Charter School for Journalism and Media Arts students follow.

tirelessly to make extra money. Crammed in the one-room schoolhouse he attended sat children in grades one through six. “It was awful. I don’t know how I learned to read,” Barry said. “I could read really well. God gave me the gift of my mind, charm, charisma and intelligence. I almost earned a Ph.D. It means something was going right.” Barry said he’s not sure what accounts for his drive but credits God and his mother Mattie, who brooked no disrespect from those

seeking to demean or belittle her. Barry has always been the lightning rod for controversy but he’s never shied away. The strength of his first term, the promise, growth, and also the corruption, cronyism and other problems are well documented. While acknowledging some of the problems, he also spoke of his role in spurring development in a moribund downtown D.C., creating the Office on Aging and summer jobs for young people. Billionaire Bob Johnson and local real estate magnate R. Donahue Peeples benefited from their ties to Barry. He is also credited with creating D.C.’s middle class and contributing to the growth and development of communities in Prince George’s County. “He’s a giver with no expectation of getting anything back,” Zane said. “For all the millionaires he created, he should be living in a 15,000-square-foot house. A lot of people, if no one helped them they’d stop giving. He’s internally motivated and externally focused.” Even some of his harshest critics acknowledge Barry’s contributions. At an event last week marking the 20th anniversary of the book “Dream City,” co-author Tom

Sherwood acknowledged Barry’s work. “Barry has a record of things that people care about. They don’t just like him because he’s Marion Barry and the prosecutors chased after him,” he said. “If you had a senior citizen in this city who got a place to live finally and meals to eat, Barry did that. Summer jobs for kids. A lot of it was wasted money but tens of thousands of kids, 13-21, got jobs,” he said in a Washington Post story. “Some of them worked and didn’t get paid and some didn’t work and got paid, but many of them worked and got paid. He opened up the police department to African Americans who were shut out, something he had been fighting back in the 1960s.” “Here’s the thing. It’s better to criticize Barry for what he didn’t do if you understand what he did do and why people were not blindly loyal to him. So your description of him having not done anything is not accurate. And that’s why people care about him. Because the other people didn’t.”WI

22 June 19 - June 25, 2014

Dr. Shantella Y. Sherman Editor, Special Sections

The Washington Informer

OCCUPATION Civil Rights Activist, Former D.C. Mayor, DC City Council (Ward 8) BIRTH DATE March 6, 1936 (age 78) EDUCATION Fisk University Le Moyne Owens College PLACE OF BIRTH Itta Bena, Mississippi PARENTS Marion & Mattie (Cummings) Barry CHILDREN Marion Christopher Barry Tamara Masters Wilds (stepdaughter) Lalanya Masters Abner (stepdaughter) FRATERNAL AFFILIATION Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated

BARRY QUOTES “My greatest work comes in the community.” “When you know more, you can do more.” “I have to admit I didn’t do as much as I should have back when I was mayor, but now we’re getting it done. It’s not where you’ve been but where you’re going.” “I’ve gone through the Civil Rights Movement. I’ve seen courts and mayors and white people do things, you turn your back and they undo it. And we don’t need that ... so I speak a little different about it. I’ve experienced this kind of doubledealing, and I’m not going to take it anymore.”

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BY JUWAN BUGGIE Elected four-time mayor of Washington D.C., Marion S. Barry was not only a mayor, he was and still is a major civil rights activist. Mayor Barry was the most well-known, successful and, perhaps notorious mayor of Washington, D.C. He was notorious due to legal issues and scandals. Despite all the issues Marion Barry faced, he still ran for mayor and won again. He was confident in his ability to help the residents in D.C. He created summer jobs for the teens of D.C. and fixed up Ward 8 neighborhoods. He cared about issues affecting the residents and liked working with people in the community. With his great personality and genuine care for people he became Mayor for Life. Barry was born in Itta Bena, Mississippi. His childhood was not the easiest, His father worked as a sharecropper. Later on his mother moved to Memphis, Tennessee because of the death of his father. Barry had to get a job as a cotton picker so he could support his family. In 1958 he attended Le Moyne College where he received his Bachelor’s degree; later, he received his Master’s degree in chemistry for Fisk University. After that he was looking forward to getting his doctorate but he never did complete his goal of getting it. He was busy with civil rights and joined the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). The work of SNCC is still remembered today and its many members are honored. In 1971 Barry began his career in politics. He was elected to D.C.’s first independent school board. After he served as president on the board he was elected onto city council. Marion Barry was elected mayor in 1978. The philosophy that defined his work in advancing in social justice began with SNCC and his work with the civil rights movement. He believed that there should be equality for everyone and he also believed that the perception of Blacks in D.C. should change. He was the co-founder of Pride, Incorporated, an organization that became an employment program for Black men. He helped the youth of the District get summer jobs as well. The way I would adopt and use this type of philosophy is by exceling at everything that I do and working my way up just like Marion Barry did. He showed that even when there are struggles in your life, you can overcome them and keep moving forward. Sometimes you make bad choices in your life, but you don’t give up.

THE MAYOR FOR LIFE: MARION BARRY’S LIVED PHILOSOPHY

MAYOR FOR LIFE

Marion Shepilov Barry Jr. has lived an incredible life. He was born March 6, 1936 in Itta Bena, Mississippi, the third of ten children. After his father died, his mother moved the family to Memphis, Tennessee. As a child, Marion had many jobs including delivering newspapers, bagging groceries and picking cotton. He was a Boy Scout and earned the Eagle badge. At an early age he noticed racism while walking to school while white kids rode the bus. Education was very important to him. He attended LeMoyne-Owen College and also Fisk University where he earned his M.S. in Organic Chemistry. While working on his doctorate he made the decision to become a politician to face discrimination since he had personally come in contact with it. He was Mayor of Washington, D.C. from 1979-1991 and again from 1995-1999. He was a four-term mayor. He still remains a D.C. Council member for Ward 8. Fighting against racism is the philosophy that has defined his work in advancing social justice. In the 1960’s he was involved with the African American Civil Rights Movement. In 1965 he became the first chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). In 1967 Barry co-founded Pride Inc., a jobs program for unemployed men. In 1971 he became president of the Board of Education. In 1990 he was arrested by FBI on a drug charge. He served six months in Federal prison. You would think that the situation would take a big toll on his career, but that did not happen at all. In fact he was elected council member after release in 1992, then mayor again serving 1995-1999. As a public politician in D.C. who had been a good person for so many years advancing social justice, it’s hard to think of him being involved with situations that are negative. A social justice philosophy that I feel very strong about is to eradicate poverty. If anyone who had the money to give 100 dollars to a shelter or a kitchen would, then it would feed a lot of people. Here in D.C. I see all these fancy houses, hotels and restaurants, and other establishments that are very wealthy and in those same neighborhoods, I see homeless people. It honestly makes absolutely no sense. I volunteer at a charity called Martha’s Table at both the kitchen and the clothing store. The kitchen feeds many homeless and low-income people daily. The clothing store receives donations from the public and the sales help provide meals for the needy. I plan to help the needy throughout my life in various ways such as doing charity walks raising money things of that nature. I realize that poverty leads to other issues such as health problems as well as violence which can affect all of us. On Marion Barry’s official D.C. Council website it states “Marion Barry Jr. has dedicated 40 years of his life to public service living the motto ‘always fighting for the people.’” His new memoir, Mayor for Life: The Incredible Life of Marion Barry Jr., tells about his lifelong service. It is published by New York Times bestselling author Zane and her company Strebor Books. Even though I wasn’t around long enough to know what he was like as mayor, I’ve done enough research and had talks with enough people to know and understand how great he was. With over 40 years of public service and the determination to persevere, D.C. Councilman Marion Barry Jr. is truly “Mayor for Life.”

Photos by Shantella Y. Sherman

BY ARIANNA E.D. MARSH

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The Washington Informer

June 19, - June 25, 2014

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24 June 19 - June 25, 2014

BY TIARA STITH

Marion Barry was born in Itta Bena, Mississippi March 6, 1936 to Marion and Mattie Barry. His father was a sharecropper but he died when Marion was four years old. As a young boy Marion took on multiple jobs to help support his family. In 1958 he earned his bachelor’s degree from Le Moyne College and in 1960 he earned his master’s degree in chemistry from Fisk University. He could not fully get his doctorate degree because of his passion for the civil rights movement. Marion Barry was the first national chairman for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. In 1965 he moved to Washington D.C. In 1967 he co-founded a jobs program for unemployed black men. In 1972 he became a part of D.C school board two years later he was elected for city council. When Hanafi Muslims took over the district building in 1977 Barry was shot. He was the second elected mayor of Washington, D.C from 1979-1991. He was again elected as the fourth mayor 1995-1999. He’s been a Ward 8 Council Member since 2005. Marion was also named the “Mayor for Life.” To me this means that there are always other mayors but you-Marion Barry are the most memorable one of them all. The Washington Post said “to understand the District of Columbia, one must understand Marion Barry”. To me, Marion Barry’s philosophy was to make D.C a better place for everybody and to promote equality. This is explained in the things he did for D.C and the things he is still doing now. When he was mayor, he created the Summer Youth Employment Program, which has continued from the 80s through today. He also worked to make D.C a safer place for its residents along with cleaning up the streets of D.C. The work he started is incomplete because some people in D.C are still being unfairly treated. Even with the employment program he started for Black men, Pride, Incorporated, many Black males don’t even try to help themselves. Mr. Barry worked hard to get some of the resources we have today and some people are either misusing these resources, or not even trying to use them to help. However, not all of his work went to waste. Some people do work with each other rather than against each other. The things he did and still do for D.C. are great because he actually is trying to help create a better place for the present and the future. I would use Marion Barry’s philosophy of promoting equality in D.C. every day because it’s something I want to do. I would like to be able to help people while still giving them a fair chance at living great and meaningful lives. I want to help make a difference in someone else’s life. I want to be a person like Marion Barry, a person who can make a huge difference that helps every one. His philosophy will help me to become a better person and it has pointed me in the direction of helping people. The philosophy of Marion Barry is simple and powerful. It is something that anyone can follow if they are willing to put in the time and work. Marion Barry seems to be a really good person with a great heart. He really cares about people more than he actually has to. We appreciate him.

The Washington Informer

MADE FOR LEADERSHIP: HOW MARION BARRY’S LEGACY SHAPES OTHERS FOR SOCIAL ACTIVISM

Does the name Marion Barry ring a bell by any chance? Because it should. There aren’t many people who have had a career in social justice who have also been referred to as “Mayor for Life.” According to his former staffers, Barry, the man behind the Summer Youth Program helped employ hundreds of thousands of D.C. youth and teenagers, dedicated his life to public service living by the philosophy “always fighting for the people.” Just like Barry, we all have the power to see hope and change in one another. His passion for social justice is very esoteric to a nation that displays public mistakes as entertainment. It was his mistakes and the ability to move pass them that have proven him to be a fighter. Barry has supported social justice by helping people realize their potential in society, community and life. One example is being an active contributor to his community in Ward 8 and throughout the District. When I consider the question “what specific social justice endeavors would I adopt” or what would you bring to your community, it would be to improve my community overall. I’ve thought of numerous ways I can help improve my community, but most of the ideas have already been done, so the only thing I would do is think of different ways to improve it. Social causes like mentoring programs where the mentors are the teenagers of the D.C area, who create a positive environment and serve as role models by helping children alleviate stress they might have from home or school is my interest. I’d also like to start a media arts program at a local church that teaches children about how to make their own fictional character viable to viewers and grab their attention. But, there’s this one idea that I think is also able to help communities and it deals with grooming young people for leadership by developing their potential. It’s so rare that our quiet, young adults get a chance to have their time in spotlights and get the attention they deserve. This is especially true when the misbehaving youth are constantly recognized for all the wrong reasons. Simple recognition of the bright young person can make them feel better about themselves, and isn’t that what real social justice is? Helping the youth, tomorrow’s leaders, find themselves and their passion, is providing equal opportunities for all. So my work would be to recognize all deserving kids for their good and not their bad, giving someone a complement to make their day better without regard for their sexuality, age, or ethnicity. “Always fighting for the people” doesn’t mean a person has to begin with a big advertisement for their works because that’s not how Marion Barry did it. You can always start off small because it gives you a chance to expand and improve your efforts. To be the type of person who cares about others’ well-being and fight to strengthen those who cannot fight for themselves is how I would utilize Marion Barry’s philosophy of always fighting for the people. That is also how I will choose to be a better me and work to help out others in any way possible.

Photos by Shantella Y. Sherman

MARION BARRY: A LIFE OF SOCIAL JUSTICE

B Y TA O N E W A L K E R

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MONDAY, JULY 14, 2014

GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER OFFICE OF TAX AND REVENUE NOTICE OF REAL PROPERTY TAX SALE Notice is hereby given that all real properties described on the list below, for which real property taxes or vault rents (including penalties and interest, if applicable) were levied and in arrears on October 1, 2013, for which business improvement district taxes (including penalties and interest, if applicable) were levied and in arrears on September 1, 2013, or for which any other tax certified to the Office of Tax and Revenue (OTR) for collection hereunder remains unpaid, shall be sold at public auction to the highest bidder at the 2014 Real Property Tax Sale (Sale). The Sale shall be held pursuant to D.C. Official Code § 47-1330, et. seq. The Sale shall begin on Monday, July 14, 2014, and continue, except Saturdays, Sundays and legal holidays, until all the real properties available for sale are sold. During each day, the Sale shall be conducted from 8:30 a.m. until 12 noon and from 1 p.m. until 4 p.m., or until all the real properties scheduled for sale for that day are sold. The Sale shall occur at OTR located at 1101 4th Street, SW, West Building - 2nd Floor, Room W250, Washington, DC 20024. All real properties are listed in square, suffix and lot, or parcel and lot, number order. The name of the owner of record of each real property is stated. Certain real properties on this list do not have street or premise addresses; therefore, none can be provided. A real property without a street or premise address number is generally stated on the below list as having a “0” as a street or premise address number. Street or premise addresses for real properties are provided where available and strictly as an accommodation; the only description upon which you may rely is the square, suffix and lot, or parcel and lot, numbers. The list states the amount for which each real property may be sold at the Sale, and an additional $200.00 Tax Sale Fee shall be added at the time of the sale. The stated amount for which a real property may be offered for sale can be lower than what an owner would have to pay in order to prevent the real property from being sold. Owners must contact OTR to determine the amount that must be paid in order to avoid the sale of their real properties. Purchasers must be aware that additional liabilities, which are not reflected in the total amount for which the real properties are offered at the Sale, may be due and owing on real properties and such additional liabilities may include liens previously sold to a third party. A purchaser at the Sale acts at his or her own risk, must exercise due diligence in selecting real properties upon which to bid, and must bid in good faith. At the Sale, the purchaser acquires a certificate of sale to the real property that may ripen into title if the owner (or other party with an interest) fails to redeem. The owner (or other party with an interest) has a statutory right to redeem the real property until his or her equity of redemption has been foreclosed by the purchaser’s lawsuit. If the owner (or other party with an interest) fails to redeem the real property, the Superior Court of the District of Columbia may order that a deed be issued to the purchaser after the purchaser pays all taxes, costs and expenses. The purchaser shall monitor tax payment schedules provided by OTR on its Web site, www.taxpayerservicecenter.com, and shall surrender the certificate of sale to receive a refund if the property shall have been redeemed. A certificate of sale may be canceled if, inter alia, it is later determined that the delinquent taxes, including accrued interest and penalties, were satisfied before the end of the last day of the Sale. The date of sale of any real property shall be deemed to be the last day of the Sale, regardless of the actual day of the Sale during which the real property was offered and sold. The certificates of sale shall indicate the date of sale as being the last day of the Sale. Purchasers shall have filed Form FR-500, Combined Business Tax Registration Application, prior to registering. This form may be filed online by visiting OTR’s Web site, www.taxpayerservicecenter.com, or in person at OTR located at 1101 4th Street, SW, 2nd Floor - Customer Service Center, Washington, DC 20024. A potential purchaser, including a natural person or business entity, delinquent in the payment of in rem taxes (e.g. real property taxes) to the District, or who has been convicted of a felony involving fraud, deceit, moral turpitude, or anti-competitive behavior, may not bid at the tax sale or otherwise acquire an interest in real property sold at the tax sale. A potential purchaser, including a natural person or business entity, must certify that such purchaser: 1) is not more than one year in arrears in any jurisdiction in the payment of in rem taxes not being contested in good faith; and 2) has not been convicted in any jurisdiction of a felony involving fraud, deceit, moral turpitude, or anti-competitive behavior. Registration for the Sale is mandatory and begins on Monday, July 7, 2014. Registration shall continue until the final day of the Sale. Purchasers must register for the Sale at OTR’s Customer Service Center, located at 1101 4th Street, SW, 2nd Floor - Customer Service Center, Washington, DC 20024. Prior to bidding at the Sale, a purchaser of real property must have made a deposit of at least 20% of the total purchase price. ALL PAYMENTS MUST BE MADE TO THE D.C. TREASURER BY CASH, CERTIFIED CHECK, CASHIER’S CHECK, OR POSTAL MONEY ORDER. OTR will conduct four public seminars to explain tax sale procedures. Because of recent statutory changes to the tax sale, purchasers are especially encouraged to attend. The seminars will be held at 1101 4th Street, SW, 2nd Floor – Room W250, Washington, DC 20024, on Wednesday, June 25, 2014, and Thursday, June 26, 2014. During each day, a seminar will take place from 9:30 a.m. until 12:00 p.m., and another seminar will take place from 2:00 p.m. until 4:30 p.m. During each of the four seminars, OTR will explain the entire sale process and follow-up with a question and answer period. OTR strongly encourages all potential purchasers to attend one of the seminars. The seminars are free and all are welcome. To enroll in a seminar, please call OTR at (202) 727-4TAX (4829), or visit its Customer Service Center at 1101 4th Street, SW. Enrollment is mandatory for anyone planning to attend one of the seminars. Enrollment will be granted on a first-come/first-served basis, and will continue until all available slots are taken.

Stephen M. Cordi Deputy Chief Financial Officer Office of Tax and Revenue

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Taxable Owner’s Name 2nd Owner’s Name TX ROBERT L HAMM TX 2501 A HOLDING LLC TX 2501 B HOLDING LLC TX GHANA GROWTH FUND LIMITED TX 2501 B HOLDING LLC TX SIKE SHARIGAN NANCY SHARIGAN TX M R YAGHEFI SIMIN B YAGHEFI TX DAVID P SNIEZEK EDWINA T SNIEZEK TX ANDREA LIU TX BRADFORD A JEWETT TX RAFID FADUL TX CAYADA LLC TX GEORGE P MALLIOS JENNY H MALLIOS TX MARGARET E RAND TX PASUR S SENGOTTAIYAN TRUSTEE NORMA L SENGOTTAIYAN TRUSTEE TX JOHN E. BRYSON, TRUSTEE LOUISE HENRY BRYSON, TRUSTEE TX BELINDA KEISER ARTHUR KEISER TX EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR GAMMA ETA INC TX FRANCISCO GUZMAN TX FRITS JACOBSE TX NOREEN V BANKS TX ABDULRAHMAN H AL-SAEED TX AHMED H AL SAID TX AJNERG LLC TX INDU M JOHN TX EPSILON HOUSING TRUST INCORPORATED TX THE MERRIETTA LLC TX THE MERIETTA LLC TX T G BOGGS J H SCHWARTZ TX MELINDA LIU TX REID A DUNN ELEANOR B DUNN TX GEARY STEPHEN SIMON TRUSTEE TX 1816 19TH STREET LLC TX NATIONAL ITALIAN AMERICAN FOUNDATION INC TX THOMAS GOLDEN TX METROPOLITAN CIRCLE ONE LLC TX MOLLIE H TAYLOR TX DAVID AND SANDRA FOLEY LLC TX LEROY N BARLEY PATRICE A BARLEY TX TADAHIKO NAKAMURA TX KENNETH FAIRBAIRN TX BARBARA THOMPSON TX MANUEL G SMITH TX JOHN F PETERSON TX GLORIA C BROLAND TX MCDM PARTNERSHIP TX LEE R GRANADOS KEVIN R KLYNN TX WASHINGTON H STREET ASSOCIATES LLC TX WASHINGTON H STREET ASSOCIATES LLC TX WASHINGTON H STREET ASSOCIATES LLC TX WASHINGTON H STREET ASSOCIATES LLC TX WASHINGTON H STREET ASSOCIATES LLC TX ERIC ZILBERKWEIT ERIC M ZILBERKWEIT TX ERIC ZILBERKWEIT ERIC M ZILBERKWIET TX METROPOLITAN CIRCLE ONE, LLC TX JOHN C SCOTT III SUSANNE M SCOTT TX 1 P ST NW LLC TX CHARLES M SHUEY SECOND TX 1128 16ST DCIB LLC TX WILLIAM F JONES TX EDWARD T GREEN SR IRIS GREEN TX LUZ D LOPEZ LOPEZ HUMBERTO TX PARMINDER S BEESLA POONAM BEESLA TX LOFORD LLC TX GABRIEL SILVA TX VALOR 1634, LLC TX DAVID V BLOYS TX PARI M GHODSI TX 1336 14TH ST LLC TX ROSS J HEIDE TX SUSAN E MALONEY TX HENRY B MCCALL TX HENRY B MCCALL TX DANIELLE A INSETTA TX LARRY J MCADOO KAREN E HARDY TX 1333 14TH ST NW LLC TX JOHN P MADEI TX SUSAN K POWELL TX HELENA J SEEGERS TX VIKTOR A SIDABRAS TX FRED L GUNTER C M GUNTER TX EVELYN SEIGEL TX PATRICE M DICKERSON TX ARMOND W SCOTT TX 1610 11TH ST LLC TX 1610 11TH ST LLC TX 1610 11TH ST LLC

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Street PENNSYLVANIA 25TH ST 25TH ST 25TH ST 25TH ST QUEEN ANNES L L ST NEW HAMPSHIRE 23RD ST WASHINGTON CI WASHINGTON CI 22ND ST 22ND ST 22ND ST L ST 23RD ST WASHINGTON CI 22ND ST P ST 22ND ST 21ST ST 22ND ST 22ND ST 22ND ST I ST F ST F ST F ST HILLYER PL HILLYER PL MASSACHUSETTS NEW HAMPSHIRE 19TH ST 19TH ST 18TH ST 19TH ST RIGGS PL M ST FLORIDA AV 17TH ST T ST WILLARD ST S ST S ST CORCORAN ST 18TH ST CHURCH ST H ST H ST H ST H ST H ST 16TH ST 16TH ST CORCORAN ST Q ST Q ST Q ST 16TH ST 16TH ST 15TH ST 14TH ST BISHOPS GATE 14TH ST 14TH ST 14TH ST Q ST RHODE ISLAND 14TH ST N ST N ST U ST U ST T ST WALLACH PL 14TH ST 13TH ST 14TH ST 12TH ST T ST RHODE ISLAND 12TH ST 13TH ST 11TH ST 11TH ST 11TH ST 11TH ST

Quad NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW

Taxes Owed $2,409.99 $3,096.50 $2,948.07 $22,435.28 $19,833.76 $8,975.03 $8,201.41 $2,309.58 $2,997.11 $2,717.21 $2,855.53 $2,971.16 $5,136.26 $2,840.35 $3,211.11 $12,797.24 $14,193.94 $14,079.63 $2,290.03 $4,135.74 $2,196.48 $6,134.74 $5,991.97 $6,080.15 $2,036.25 $5,841.70 $3,126.92 $5,506.51 $15,125.82 $6,724.41 $16,995.51 $5,104.11 $7,263.80 $27,586.51 $4,137.01 $10,540.01 $2,119.86 $14,851.58 $29,821.91 $16,245.80 $5,708.97 $2,780.69 $4,699.46 $5,783.32 $2,081.15 $7,809.88 $4,166.83 $144,954.42 $52,851.42 $40,287.89 $36,833.52 $577,901.20 $4,523.08 $4,469.57 $6,146.00 $2,002.60 $6,694.09 $2,272.79 $106,620.97 $2,269.67 $3,615.72 $17,269.04 $5,275.78 $54,105.15 $3,522.43 $5,929.85 $2,924.45 $5,405.43 $12,878.48 $5,786.37 $3,714.37 $86,024.28 $33,627.26 $4,063.48 $2,012.38 $14,728.21 $3,700.53 $3,358.27 $2,693.23 $7,253.77 $2,764.82 $21,042.07 $3,036.66 $6,215.93 $5,169.64 $3,083.35 $3,050.20

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2014 Tax Sale Report

June, 2014

TAX 1


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FIRST GENESIS BAPTIST CHURCH FAYE SWANN NATALIE HAWWA RETSAM INC ANITA CHOPRA KAILASH C CHOPRA CATHERINE O’ DONNELL EARLE H O’ DONNELL ANGELA F WILLIAMS RODERICK N WILLIAMS JAMES C WILLIAMS LISA L WILLIAMS GLADSTONE DAINTY GLADSTONE A DAINTY GLADSTONE A DAINTY NEW COLUMBIA COMMUNITY LAND TRUST, INC., SIDNEY NORA 1320 9TH STREET NW LLC JAMES B DRENNAN THE BALLERO TRUST DONALD E WOLPE JOHN S D EISENHOWER TRUSTEE ALLAB N KHAN HARI R CHOPRA ALEXANDER A YEC LAY GLADYS C SCOTT WILLIAM H SCOTT JOHANNES C COOKE WILLIAMS SEVEN STREET LLC DONNIE L LEWIS JACOB P GRIER PARAMOUNT DEVELOPMENT LLC & BLUE SKY HOU OSCAR BARTON JR WILLIAM J AMAN BEVERLY BAKEIR BEVERLY BAKEIR RICHARD MYLES BRANTLEY R COOK NATALIE P WYETH THE DANSIESMITH LLC ANDREW M GOMER CAM MARINA VIEW LLC RELATED MARINA VIEW LLC CAM MARINA VIEW LLC RELATED MARINA VIEW LLC CAM MARINA VIEW LLC RELATED MARINA VIEW LLC TIBER LLC ELIAS ENDALE KAVOOS RAD LSER LLC LSER LLC TONYA L GONZALEZ JAMES D SUMNER LEE ARK KEE BRIAN WESTBROOK ANTHONY C CHENG YUN L CHENG BELAY ABERE DONATO SPINACI WILLIE F JONES JR ANFIELD LLC DAVID J BROWN AV CAR AND HOME LLC DELPHINE M ANGE N DIA YHF LLC WATERFRONT 425 M STREET LLC 213 BATES LLC BATES STREET TOWNHOUSES COOPERATIVE INC MARIAN C CARRICK TANYA R CURTIS JACQUELINE L HAIRSTON EQUITY TRUST COMPANY CUSTODIAN FBO RAMZY IMAR HUTCHINS 1510 N CAPITOL LLC CAMERON PROPERTIES OF DC INC DAVID DAVIS JOYCE T DAVIS ERIC M JONES KAMLESH GLATI KAMLESH GULATI MAURICE MATTHEWS SR S MATTHEWS EDDY G LEE LOUIS BARNETT S A BARNETT BROWN SANDRA SHEILA M SAMADDAR ALVIN SIMON TRUSTEE ROBERT STERN TRUSTEE CAPITOL 801 CORPORATION CHAD W GOSSELINK MARC K ULEP GRETA SILVERMAN SILVERMAN JEROME RAJNIKANT SHAH JOE BURGESS MARY L BURGESS FLORIDA HOUSE WASH DC INC VIRGIL B MARTIN ROBIN B MARTIN THE NEW YORKER, LLC CARDELL RICHARDSON J RICHARDSON LOIS A JONES ELISEO CIDRE JR CLARENCE FOGELSTROM SUZANNE S FOGELSTROM JANET L SCHMIDT WILLIAM J KIRK II KEITH A KEGLEY NATIONAL ALLIANCE BLACK SCHOOL EDUCATORS ALLEN J CARROLL GABRIEL KADER GREATER PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH RODNEY G CURRY LEONARD FREEDMAN LEAH FREEDMAN HARRY G LAYCOCK SARAH K ULLAH MUHAMMED K ULLAH TAJA INVESTMENTS LLC CARL WILLIAMS ASHLEIGH EDWARD DEVELOPMENT LLC 652 L STREET NE LLC HORACE CARRINGTON JACQUELINE ELLISON ZUCKERMAN STUTMAN STARR LLC RENEA CARPENTER-FITCHETT BRENT A HERNDON WARREN FRIEDMAN DIANE STOLZ 645 MARYLAND AVENUE LLC

2 TAX June 2014

1527 1318 1229 1011 1510 1010 2120 909 1943 1949 924 905 915 1320 1117 915 64 701 0 751 1805 1537 1547 700 1720 501 1516 0 509 509 1416 555 555 406 506 0 1000 0 472 1425 1605 1544 1544 447 1133 460 925 1710 318 0 309 811 725 425 213 230 108 115 1224 30 22 1510 45 72 0 85 79 28 34 22 1233 1313 1222 0 458 37 1025 510 1 1122 1111 1151 337 301 322 14 6 308 0 1101 1105 810 0 0 936 507 523 535 652 612 908 614 642 644 645

12TH ST 11TH ST 12TH ST U ST 10TH ST MASSACHUSETTS VERMONT AV U ST VERMONT AV VERMONT AV U ST R ST R ST 9TH ST 10TH ST E ST Q ST PENNSYLVANIA T ST P ST WILTBERGER ST 7TH ST 7TH ST 7TH ST 5TH ST RHODE ISLAND 5TH ST 6TH ST O ST O ST 5TH ST MASSACHUSETTS MASSACHUSETTS 5TH ST H ST M ST 6TH ST K ST M ST 4TH ST NEW JERSEY AV NEW JERSEY AV NEW JERSEY AV M ST 5TH ST L ST 5TH ST 3RD ST M ST 4TH ST H ST 4TH ST DELAWARE AV M ST BATES ST BATES ST BATES ST P ST KIRBY ST Q ST Q ST NORTH CAPITOL BATES ST P ST 1ST ST HANOVER PL HANOVER PL N ST K ST K ST CARROLLSBURG SOUTH CAPITOL 1ST ST H ST NEW JERSEY AV L ST 1ST ST 1ST ST 2ND ST ABBEY PL 3RD ST 3RD ST H ST G ST MARYLAND AV 4TH ST LIBRARY CT PENNSYLVANIA L ST 4TH ST 4TH ST 5TH ST G ST 5TH ST 4TH ST K ST H ST 6TH ST L ST M ST 7TH ST G ST F ST D ST MARYLAND AV

NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW SW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW SW SW SW SW SW SW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW SW SW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW SW SW NE NE SE SE SE SE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE SE SE SE SE NE NE NE NE SE NE NE SE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE

$11,753.44 $2,057.42 $4,817.19 $3,992.66 $2,721.74 $5,005.93 $2,375.73 $8,542.06 $16,127.00 $3,406.23 $5,881.15 $20,677.29 $3,352.82 $14,166.54 $4,630.80 $2,723.21 $2,127.94 $3,631.66 $3,748.46 $2,877.89 $3,619.88 $10,932.89 $71,809.10 $2,142.55 $3,734.62 $2,463.23 $4,631.49 $8,892.66 $30,152.93 $74,463.15 $4,448.02 $2,193.22 $2,244.54 $23,381.36 $12,489.26 $4,058.86 $12,477.10 $4,062.97 $4,274.29 $2,158.01 $2,191.30 $2,224.94 $2,189.20 $5,653.78 $30,354.57 $2,535.35 $119,882.77 $2,046.42 $14,527.60 $7,093.00 $8,072.41 $3,420.31 $2,997.62 $105,021.83 $9,542.15 $11,710.61 $2,529.75 $2,082.92 $2,798.84 $19,378.80 $11,512.42 $2,187.63 $9,389.57 $20,620.24 $4,262.84 $5,007.60 $4,047.98 $2,195.14 $36,628.39 $12,688.47 $2,403.03 $8,439.78 $7,351.49 $26,210.31 $3,615.75 $36,312.91 $5,020.14 $6,586.95 $21,015.79 $115,112.91 $3,755.55 $2,284.10 $13,006.76 $3,065.39 $5,905.11 $2,224.90 $2,140.60 $24,155.12 $2,748.63 $5,088.22 $18,729.39 $3,493.25 $4,650.28 $3,103.94 $2,274.65 $3,939.15 $3,896.46 $2,577.14 $3,936.05 $44,448.73 $2,689.13 $4,303.21 $2,485.94 $3,293.33 $2,474.52

0864 0072 0869 0027 &IMP 0871 0810 &IMP 0886 0036 &IMP 0889 0038 &IMP 0893S 0816 &IMP 0903 0840 &IMP 0908 0049 &IMP 0909 0807 &IMP 0910 0048 &IMP 0914 0030 &IMP 0930 0021 &IMP 0930 0812 &IMP 0931 0011 &IMP 0939 0025 &IMP 0939 0082 &IMP 0939 0083 &IMP 0943 0046 &IMP 0952 0024 0956 0045 &IMP 0958 0034 0959 0021 &IMP 0959 0039 &IMP 0959 0063 &IMP 0972 0051 &IMP 0985 2048 &IMP 0988 0017 &IMP 1002 0018 &IMP 1003 0030 &IMP 1003 0145 1003 0805 &IMP 1004 0283 &IMP 1005 0036 &IMP 1007 0831 &IMP 1007 2003 &IMP 1007 2012 &IMP 1009 0804 &IMP 1013 0026 &IMP 1017 0045 &IMP 1017 0087 &IMP 1021 0034 &IMP 1021 0036 &IMP 1023 0064 &IMP 1026 0138 &IMP 1026 0164 &IMP 1026 0173 &IMP 1026 0175 &IMP 1026 0177 &IMP 1026 0829 &IMP 1027 0089 &IMP 1027 0837 1029 0114 &IMP 1033 0127 &IMP 1033 0837 &IMP 1034 0807 &IMP 1035N 0013 &IMP 1036 0094 &IMP 1042 0809 1043 0110 &IMP 1043 0836 &IMP 1043 0849 &IMP 1046 0019 &IMP 1046 0843 1046 2005 &IMP 1046 2006 &IMP 1047 0064 &IMP 1049 0808 &IMP 1050 0010 &IMP 1050 0015 1051 0197 &IMP 1057 2017 &IMP 1059 0093 &IMP 1059 0807 1060 0027 &IMP 1060 0044 &IMP 1060 0047 &IMP 1065 0093 &IMP 1065 0817 &IMP 1065NE 0028 &IMP 1068 0818 &IMP 1072 0044 1072S 0019 &IMP 1077 0805 &IMP 1079 0040 &IMP 1083 0059 &IMP 1088 0804 &IMP 1089 0135 1090 0060 1090 2002 &IMP 1092 0046 &IMP 1097 0063 &IMP 1102 0070 1102 0108 1112 0047 &IMP 1125 0026 &IMP 1173 2017 &IMP 1184 2023 &IMP 1184 2034 &IMP 1187 2332 &IMP 1187 2338 &IMP 1189 2004 &IMP 1189 2012 &IMP 1189 2013 &IMP 1194 0811 &IMP 1200 2080 &IMP

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2014 Tax Sale Report

645 MARYLAND AVENUE LLC W BICKFORD HUBER CO MAKAN DELRAHIM WANDA C HARRIS EDITH STEVENS TS OF THE PILGRIM BAPTIST CH INC JOHN L SLACK AJC II LLC LEROY DAWKINS ANNIE M DAWKINS AMERICAN SECURITY LLC MARIE R LITTLE A MALISON L WILSON DAIVD J LEWIS DAVID J LEWIS MARY J SMITH DANNY R WILLIAMS JOHN ATWATER CYNTHIA B KEIL DAVID W SANFORD HALLBROOK HOMES LLC O P M LLC ROBERT ROACH ANWAR S SALEEM SHEILA C HANSEN MARGARETA G WILLIAMS ANWAR SALEEM DEBRA MCKERN PETER A SNYDER SUSAN B TAYLOR 135 11TH STREET NE LLC 1231 FLORIDA B AND B LLC 1224 H ST LLC MOSES H KARKENNY 1234 H STREET LLC JEROME SIMMONS BETTY SIMMONS-JONES G LOMAX R L NORTH EBONY FARRAR BARBARA GOODSON WASHINGTON HOUSE INC SARAH B ADAMS RALPH E SCHNEE E SCHNEE SEAN K HANLEY BRONAGH M HANLEY MARY VEHLOW S HESSLER 1200 POTOMAC AVENUE LLC L M GREEN TRUSTEE MANUEL F ARIAS MARTHA S ABREAU-ARIAS LIBERTY DEVELOPMENT GROUP LLC 1350 CAPITOL HOUSING AND RESTORATION LLC ARTIS PROPERTIES LLC MARTHA A AKERS ARTIS PROPERTIES LLC JOY T ARTIS BIG CITY DEVELOPMENT LLC SPELL THOMAS B MINNIE L WHITE CATHY J WASEM PETER C SHIN EUN J SHIN ROBERTO G COFINO SR DENNIS MOELLMAN JESSIE MOELLMAN EVANS KAREN L B BERNICE R DANIEL MOHAMMAD B MOADDAB KOUROSH OSTAD JOEL R PEEBLES 1323 E STREET SE LLC CAPITOL HOUSING & RESTORATION, LLC A H RESSING DEAN STREET MEWS LLC DEAN STREET MEWS LLC WILLIAM T SHADE 1433 H STREET LLC 1443 MARYLAND AVENUE LLC MOSES H KARKENNY JOSEPH MARIA V HELEN DAVIS PETER SHIN SUE VITTAS LEONARD CUSIMANO TOWNE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION FRANCES L YOUNG RED SPRINGS LLC DOLORES PADULA DONATO PADULA ANN WARDLAW WALTER VENEY INCLUSION INCORPORATED HOME MASTERS LTD GAIL SIRMANS LUY G PHAM JAMES C YOUNG 1621 CAPITOL HILL LLC 1621 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE SOUTHEAST LLC VALENA INVESTMENTS INC FABCO INVESTMENT CORPORATION TEWOLDE TEFERI EVELYN C GOGGANS PARESH GAJJAR ARCHDIOCESE OF WASHINGTON ARCHDIOCESE OF WASHINGTON ESTATE OF NORMAN E HAWKINS JENNIFER D HALL PETER G BERNAD EDWARD P FREDERICK 8F WATER STREET HOLDINGS LLC DAVID HALL DAVID M HALL 2R LLC GLOBAL COMODITY TRADERS PTE., LTD GLOBAL COMMODITY TRADERS PTE LTD ABC AUTOMOTIVE LLC MAURICIO R BARROS RICARDO E DE OLIVEIRA

0 MARYLAND AV NE 629 EAST CAPITOL SE 604 NORTH CAROLIN SE 1127 7TH ST NE 820 8TH ST NE 703 MARYLAND AV NE 525 8TH ST SE 812 L ST NE 1012 9TH ST NE 824 I ST NE 515 8TH ST NE 1102 8TH ST SE 811 L ST SE 902 K ST NE 244 10TH ST NE 239 9TH ST NE 241 9TH ST NE 111 10TH ST SE 1107 10TH ST SE 1020 11TH ST NE 1005 I ST NE 1017 H ST NE 705 10TH ST NE 1005 H ST NE 406 10TH ST SE 440 12TH ST NE 135 11TH ST NE 1231 FLORIDA AV NE 1224 H ST NE 824 13TH ST NE 1234 H ST NE 1226 G ST NE 1235 G ST NE 1216 E ST NE 513 12TH ST NE 513 12TH ST NE 0 13TH ST NE 1221 MASSACHUSETTS SE 325 13TH ST SE 1230 D ST SE 1200 POTOMAC AV SE 1217 I ST SE 1249 K ST SE H ST NE $61,737.25 1385 FLORIDA AV NE 808 14TH ST NE 1368 H ST NE 816 14TH ST NE 1374 H ST NE 1311 H ST NE 0 H ST NE 524 14TH ST NE 227 TENNESSEE AV NE 1342 CONSTITUTION NE 1344 NORTH CAROLIN NE 1383 NORTH CAROLIN NE 1316 MASSACHUSETTS SE 0 1318 PENNSYLVANIA SE 509 14TH ST SE 1323 E ST SE 963 14TH ST SE 0 IVES PL SE 961 14TH ST SE 961 14TH ST SE 1308 L ST SE 1431 H ST NE 1443 MARYLAND AV NE 0 15TH ST NE 619 14TH PL NE 56 15TH ST NE 1428 INDEPENDENCE SE 1429 A ST SE 242 14TH ST SE 1447 SOUTH CAROLIN SE 201 15TH ST SE 1445 PENNSYLVANIA SE 0 PENNSYLVANIA SE 1435 POTOMAC AV SE 1520 NORTH CAROLIN NE 0 15TH ST SE 0 INDEPENDENCE SE 803 KENTUCKY AV SE 1527 K ST SE 122 17TH ST NE 1621 MASSACHUSETTS SE 0 0 403 17TH ST SE 1627 G ST SE 1751 A ST SE 0 0 1841 INDEPENDENCE SE 209 20TH ST NE 3030 K ST NW 3303 WATER ST NW 3303 WATER ST NW 3299 K ST NW 3299 K ST NW 3150 SOUTH ST NW 3150 SOUTH ST NW 3150 SOUTH ST NW 2715 PENNSYLVANIA NW 1080 WISCONSIN AV NW

$2,870.54 $12,736.14 $3,182.18 $2,675.82 $130,224.46 $4,014.38 $26,456.76 $4,033.00 $9,295.95 $17,463.85 $6,960.36 $42,583.62 $13,170.02 $3,055.89 $3,794.99 $3,147.15 $2,295.09 $10,717.44 $3,045.07 $2,098.21 $6,214.55 $7,591.75 $2,443.47 $15,644.70 $3,282.36 $2,144.10 $3,267.14 $14,006.50 $5,524.44 $46,081.75 $15,208.84 $17,298.02 $11,471.19 $4,096.24 $3,448.90 $3,860.75 $20,022.34 $3,796.06 $2,885.86 $3,356.64 $44,541.75 $2,355.68 $2,201.35 $3,532.94 $2,383.58 $3,017.50 $4,841.05 $9,193.84 $2,930.85 $4,811.08 $4,293.03 $4,844.43 $5,129.61 $2,956.20 $3,352.10 $3,425.13 $2,581.05 $36,833.72 $2,667.09 $38,111.96 $3,747.06 $2,848.67 $5,006.38 $2,983.18 $244,530.88 $21,779.50 $2,352.70 $31,282.88 $2,482.39 $5,307.44 $2,603.75 $3,598.03 $43,228.16 $4,092.72 $19,305.57 $5,413.28 $2,754.13 $3,446.98 $2,631.33 $39,579.05 $5,583.76 $74,419.68 $2,092.40 $6,265.60 $4,305.55 $2,554.66 $3,199.94 $4,688.11 $2,533.52 $11,634.18 $3,138.57 $34,627.85 $2,044.88 $14,689.11 $7,744.32 $4,790.49 $34,813.46 $3,700.25 $2,734.14 $11,837.87 $16,383.13 $39,751.90 $2,642.52 $2,137.91

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ANNE F DOYLE 1236 28TH ST NW FRANCIS A LAUW 3251 PROSPECT ST NW CALIXTE STAMP CHRISTOPHER STAMP 3251 PROSPECT ST NW THOMAS P HECHL GERTRAUD HECHL 3415 PROSPECT ST NW RALPH C TAYLOR JR NANCY H TAYLOR 3425 PROSPECT ST NW JOYCE SAID 1318 35TH ST NW NETIS LTD 3333 N ST NW ROBERT H NIXON SARA G NIXON 3033 N ST NW MARTIN MORAD 3019 N ST NW LAURA R TAYLOR 2907 N ST NW CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPEAN ART FOUNDAT 1319 30TH ST NW JULIE G ST JOHN TRUSTEE 3022 O ST NW KENNETH DELASKI 3343 P ST NW DARIA FANE 2607 O ST NW ERIC M DICKMAN 2623 O ST NW PASUR S SENGOTTAIYAN TRUSTEE NORMA L SENGOTTAIYAN TRUSTEE 2500 Q ST NW CHRISTOPHER D HOMS 2500 Q ST NW NEELIMA GROVER 1563 33RD ST NW DEYI S AWADALLAH 3324 DENT PL NW VIKRAM RAILAN VEENA RAILAN 1608 WISCONSIN AV NW MARIO I BLEJER 3022 R ST NW 2R LLC 3556 RESERVOIR RD NW 1501 MORAN ROAD LLC 3312 R ST NW AE TOWER LLC RE OPAL LLC 2140 WISCONSIN AV NW BARBARA J SCHARAGER 3760 BENTON ST NW KAREN M SPRECHER 3725 W ST NW JOSEPH M GOLIAN B M GOLIAN 3725 S ST NW KIRA S LIEBERMAN 4010 MANSION DR NW KRISTEN M MEYER 4009 HIGHWOOD CT NW ATTLAS O STREET LLC 2207 FOXHALL RD NW PETER J CLARE TERESA M CLARE 4400 W ST NW PETER J CLARE TERESA M CLARE 4400 W ST NW PHILLIPS PARK LLC 4428 CHESTNUT LN NW PPL33 LLC 2158 DUNMORE LN NW PHILLIPS PARK LLC 2150 DUNMORE LN NW THOMAS J CIRRITO 4402 RESERVOIR RD NW BURTON FINKELSTEIN INA FINKELSTEIN 1405 RIDGEVIEW WAY NW 4640 KENMORE LLC 4640 KENMORE DR NW MELINDA A HERNANDEZ 4900 ASHBY ST NW KEVIN WREGE ELIZABETH K WREGE 4841 W ST NW JOHN KIRKPATRICK CHRISTIANA KIRKPATRICK 4611 FOXHALL CRESC NW NAOMI R GOLONKA GLENN GOLONKA 0 DEXTER ST NW 3030 CHAIN BRIDGE ROAD HOME TRUST 0 CHAIN BRIDGE NW THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUSTEE 5721 POTOMAC AV NW THE HAT HOUSE LLC 3816 49TH ST NW DUPONT DEBORAH 4917 48TH ST NW IRINA B ORAZOVA 4359 WESTOVER PL NW ALI HEKMATPANAH TRUSTEE HORMOZ HEKMAT TRUSTEE 4216 EMBASSY PARK NW JOSEPH A BELLO IRENE BELLO 4200 MASSACHUSETTS NW JEROME H HECKMAN ILONY E HECKMAN 4200 MASSACHUSETTS NW PARVINDOKHT VASEGHI 3287 SUTTON PL NW MARGARET T MOORE 4201 CATHEDRAL AV NW BARBARA FARISHIAN 4201 CATHEDRAL AV NW ISHAN A BADR GWYNETH M BADR 3101 NEW MEXICO AV NW FLORENT AGUEH TRUSTEES 4000 TUNLAW RD NW SUSAN F MCGEE 4101 ALBEMARLE ST NW CHERYLE BAPTISTE-KING 4839 WISCONSIN AV NW PAUL C AMORUSO AND SALLY K AMORUSO TRUS 5226 39TH ST NW LINDSAY MUCKA 3840 39TH ST NW MONA MAKRAM-EBEID 2801 NEW MEXICO AV NW ANNA COHN 2801 NEW MEXICO AV NW MARY D ELLIS 2801 NEW MEXICO AV NW STEPHEN M YOUNG 2236 39TH PL NW ZP CATHEDRAL 3, LLC 3835 CATHEDRAL AV NW VICTORIA C SAPER 3051 IDAHO AV NW SIKH CULTURAL SOCIETY 3801 MASSACHUSETTS NW A SCHIAVO RICHARD WONG 3856 PORTER ST NW DONALD C HOLMES III 3823 VEAZEY ST NW MICHAEL J FEUER R B FEUER 5126 CHEVY CHASE P NW ROBERT J SAVAGE SYLVIE SAVAGE 3643 TILDEN ST NW ABEY FEKADE-SELLASSI BODIL FEKADE-SELLASSIE 3010 WISCONSIN AV NW ALEX AMURRIO 2835 WISCONSIN AV NW GUINEVERE L GRIEST REVOCABLE TRUST C JEANNE GRIEST REVOCABLE TRUST 2710 35TH PL NW ZP ORDWAY LLC 3528 ORDWAY ST NW CANDICE H BEVERLY LORALEE HUTCHESON-BADGETT 4429 35TH ST NW ISIDORA L HELFGOTT MAXWELL A HELFGOTT 4740 CONNECTICUT A NW 5109 CONNECTICUT LLC 5109 CONNECTICUT A NW DAVARAJAN THIRUMALAI CYNTHIA THIRUMALAI 3404 LEGATION ST NW SUZANNE NEEL 3307 NORTHAMPTON S NW FULTON R GORDON 0 BRUCE YAMANGA 2939 VAN NESS ST NW JESSICA BINDER 2939 VAN NESS ST NW DARRELL L PHILLIPS 3413 QUEBEC ST NW 3026 PORTER ST NW INC 3026 PORTER ST NW SAEED ABU-EINAJ DINA ABU-GHAIDA 2964 NEWARK ST NW JAMES S KURTZ MARGARET K VERNON 3223 CATHEDRAL AV NW AMEER PAUL PAUL G AMEER 2637 GARFIELD ST NW G PACHECO JR L HANTEN 2640 GARFIELD ST NW J E MARANS 2901 GARFIELD TR NW PIERRE P BARKATS R W BARKATS 3232 GARFIELD ST NW NECIP K KOCACOGLU 2501 CALVERT ST NW RAJ KUMAR 2501 CALVERT ST NW 2623 CONNECTICUT AVENUE PARTNERS 2623 CONNECTICUT A NW BIJIAO LI 2749 MACOMB ST NW THERESA LEON BENJAMIN LEON 2732 ORDWAY ST NW W KEVIN UPTON WILLIAM UPTON 3310 27TH ST NW NICHOLAS A VANDONGEN ALEXANDRA M JOHNS 3060 ELLICOTT ST NW MARSHALL N WILLNER BRIGETTE L WILNER 2905 ELLICOTT ST NW K W HATHAWAY HATHAWAY DALE E 2831 ELLICOTT ST NW ROCHELLE R CARROLL 2975 MCKINLEY ST NW EVELYN M WHITE 5860 OREGON AV NW PHILIPPE L AHOUA 2715 UNICORN LA NW FREDERICK R SCARBORO CHERYL SCARBORO 3011 OREGON KNOLLS NW EMBASSY ROW LLC 2209 MASSACHUSETTS NW JANE BOSWELL 2201 MASSACHUSETTS NW

$4,109.30 $5,764.07 $3,383.29 $6,592.17 $58,685.09 $3,281.42 $7,808.30 $53,642.00 $11,567.08 $4,890.24 $9,283.16 $27,323.06 $20,308.39 $4,253.96 $12,698.28 $2,262.25 $4,663.06 $14,516.57 $406,487.66 $4,928.58 $2,833.01 $10,882.51 $7,605.86 $3,687.82 $38,340.49 $2,128.40 $6,220.68 $7,015.43 $2,672.53 $2,623.86 $51,031.11 $10,055.84 $7,404.94 $4,952.77 $5,358.18 $4,568.88 $8,241.22 $7,464.14 $7,041.97 $9,878.52 $9,049.26 $2,936.71 $9,318.27 $10,251.65 $5,081.10 $6,777.77 $4,875.14 $3,154.55 $6,176.74 $3,855.20 $2,700.74 $5,521.73 $2,120.00 $2,197.41 $3,742.89 $2,534.02 $9,752.31 $10,572.77 $2,224.94 $2,657.79 $4,241.17 $2,777.68 $7,007.16 $2,619.76 $3,020.35 $10,875.26 $2,361.72 $3,360.84 $5,656.15 $10,779.26 $2,937.58 $5,753.78 $4,200.29 $3,618.28 $6,612.65 $2,888.42 $3,454.30 $2,710.41 $9,831.40 $35,626.24 $3,155.38 $2,232.22 $6,964.03 $12,009.99 $4,007.36 $5,868.05 $5,820.34 $3,458.46 $32,473.37 $35,221.87 $2,117.72 $2,261.32 $20,846.51 $162,886.65 $3,630.77 $2,013.02 $2,184.68 $6,620.00 $6,985.66 $7,007.04 $3,736.54 $3,689.76 $8,641.61 $22,026.45 $2,928.85

2529 2072 &IMP 2541 2160 &IMP 2547 0806 &IMP 2551 0030 &IMP 2551 2026 &IMP 2551 2075 &IMP 2553 0826 &IMP 2553 2049 &IMP 2556 0017 &IMP 2560 0088 &IMP 2560 0089 &IMP 2560 0827 &IMP 2560 5017 &IMP 2563 2005 &IMP 2566 0818 &IMP 2588 0169 &IMP 2594 2077 &IMP 2595 0688 &IMP 2595 0831 &IMP 2596 2042 &IMP 2600 0127 &IMP 2602 0071 &IMP 2602 0084 &IMP 2609 0856 2612 2004 &IMP 2612 2018 &IMP 2615 0037 &IMP 2617 0095 &IMP 2618 0146 &IMP 2622 2015 &IMP 2622 2082 &IMP 2629 0800 &IMP 2630 0815 &IMP 2631 0809 &IMP 2635 0003 &IMP 2659 0858 &IMP 2660 2123 &IMP 2661 0824 2668 0822 &IMP 2670 2056 &IMP 2675 2012 &IMP 2675 2016 &IMP 2676 0457 &IMP 2692 0016 &IMP 2692 0043 &IMP 2702 0028 &IMP 2709 0012 &IMP 2718 0040 &IMP 2721 0859 &IMP 2722 0845 &IMP 2726 0820 2731 0076 &IMP 2732 0079 &IMP 2736 0070 &IMP 2745A 0004 &IMP 2748 0809 &IMP 2753 0007 &IMP 2753 0012 &IMP 2756 0009 &IMP 2763 0023 &IMP 2773 0012 &IMP 2785 0037 &IMP 2788 0027 &IMP 2788 0045 &IMP 2789 0102 &IMP 2790 0065 &IMP 2790 0088 &IMP 2790 0813 2794 0011 &IMP 2796 0831 &IMP 2797 0064 &IMP 2822 0014 &IMP 2827S 0113 &IMP 2831 0123 &IMP 2832 0828 &IMP 2832 2004 &IMP 2834 0146 &IMP 2835 0099 &IMP 2838 0043 &IMP 2839 0839 &IMP 2839 2005 &IMP 2841 0110 &IMP 2842 0084 &IMP 2844 0076 &IMP 2853 0052 &IMP 2853 2065 &IMP 2854 0080 &IMP 2855 0074 &IMP 2859 0830 &IMP 2859 0841 2861 2032 &IMP 2863 0051 &IMP 2868 0817 2882 0753 &IMP 2884 0093 &IMP 2884 0118 &IMP 2888 0051 &IMP 2888 0140 &IMP 2888 0205 2891 0092 &IMP 2891 0803 &IMP 2891 0804 &IMP 2892 0102 &IMP 2892 0103 &IMP 2892 0104 &IMP

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THEODORE S SIMS NICHOLAS M BROWN GST LLC JOHN QUIGG JOHN H HARRIS DBL HOLDINGS 2424, LLC JOHN R GARRISON KALORAMA 8308 ASSOCIATES LLC MADHAVAN CHAKRAVARTHI MALAN CHAKRAVARTHI MR LLC MAHARY WOLDEMARIAM ROMA BEREKET AMOS C STANFORD J M STANFORD STEPHEN A BLOOM REVOCABLE TRUST PHILIP L SHEN JUBILLEE HOUSING LIMITED PARTNERSHIP 1757 HARVARD ST LLC ZELMA H FORTNER OSWALD I CAMERON MERIDIAN HILL BAPTIST CHURCH DAPHNE RETTER RONALD AUSBROOKS SYLVIA J HOLLIE KATHERINE M AUSTIN MARIA D LAWSON CUSTOM DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION PARK ROW MILENA M STANEVA MICHAEL D MOORMAN DORIEL I MOORMAN MOAYEDI FAMILY LLC EDWARD A TIRAJOH L H TIRAJOH PETER H LEDDY AASIYA S MANSURI MICHAEL J AND KATHY J CALHOUN, TRUSTEES HARRY MELONE DOMNICA MELONE ANNA H LANEY TRUSTEE FREDERICK J LANEY TRUSTEE LARGESS GEORGE J & ZOE M ZOE M LARGESS ZOE M LARGESS F D WASHINGTON W F WASHINGTON SD HOLMES LLC MARIA L JIMENEZ-QUICENO WORLDWIDE CAPITOL INVESTMENTS IRREVOCABL ALLANTHUS CO0PERATIVE INC MOHAMMED L RAHMAN KOHINOOR RAHMAN UNION ARCH DEVELOPMENT LLC UNION ARCH DEVELOPMENT LLC GERALD S DORY JOAN DORY JUAN MIRANDA NUBIA MIRANDA ESTEBAN RAMIREZ AMIEL DUNN ANTHONY DUNN KIRK W BETTON VALDA B BETTON SHIRLEY Y WILLIAMS CASSANDRA E BRISCOE RUTH D JACKSON GEORGETOWN CABINET & FINISHING COMPANY I RAYMOND L BRANCH DUANE J JACKSON JEAN W HUMPHREY JENNIE M WALBURG JAMES A BOGLE DIETLIND MATIN ROBERT C WALKER LAUREN V PEARSON KERRY S PEARSON KAREN ELIZABET MITCHELL STARIKA 1817 SEVETLANA HETRICK BETTY MURCHISON-JOHN II CHRISTOPHER A JOHN HORACE E COCROFT HARACE E COCROFT JR VIRLETTA BRYANT JAMES T WRIGHT O C WRIGHT CARRIE SMITH C E LYNCH MINNIE M WASHINGTON RODNEY C JACKSON WILLIAM A BEST E P BEST CENTRAL UNION BAPTIST CHURCH OLGA E JAMES PHYLLIS A MCCORMICK SHARON D GIVENS RONNIE GIVENS CATHERINE L JOHNSON 3517 14TH LLC JOSEPH CALLISTE JOHN A CRUEL JR VONCIE CRUEL TERRANCE E JOHNSON 3542 13TH STREET NW LLC MILAGRO D MOREJON GAREDEW ATNAF-SEGED SENEDU ZEWDIE ALBERT M DUNCOMBE 1103 PARK ROAD LLC & 1105 PARK ROAD LLC ALBERT M DUNCOMBE MAURICE E TURNER JOHN R CHAMBERS JOHN D SMITH IRIS G CRUZ EDWIN LAZO HOBART VENTURES, LLC GEORGE W MITCHELL MARSHALL N OPIE LUIS R MARROQUIN PLTINUM LLC INSUN HOFGARD JEFFERSON HOFGARD WARDMAN COURT LP GARY SHAY LYNN A SHAY TUNESHA G JOHNSON EVA T HONESTY REGINALD DAVIS BI J LI GEORGIA HOBART LLC VONCIE CRUEL NORMA J FOWLER JOHN ROXBOROUGH AMOS C STANFORD J M STANFORD ZP GEORGIA, LLC ZP GEORGIA, LLC ZP GEORGIA, LLC

2230 CALIFORNIA ST NW 2032 BELMONT RD NW 1963 CALVERT ST NW 1828 COLUMBIA RD NW 1844 COLUMBIA RD NW 2424 18TH ST NW 1836 KALORAMA RD NW 1816 KALORAMA RD NW 1804 VERNON ST NW 2325 18TH ST NW 2327 18TH ST NW 2384 CHAMPLAIN ST NW 2328 CHAMPLAIN ST NW 2363 CHAMPLAIN ST NW 2418 17TH ST NW 1757 HARVARD ST NW 3060 16TH ST NW 3165 MOUNT PLEASAN NW 3146 16TH ST NW 1615 KENYON ST NW 1717 KENYON ST NW 3162 17TH ST NW 3171 18TH ST NW 0 PARK RD NW 1708 NEWTON ST NW 3350 14TH ST NW 1827 MONROE ST NW 2011 PARK RD NW 2016 PIERCE MILL R NW 3420 16TH ST NW 3426 16TH ST NW 1834 SHEPHERD ST NW 1908 QUINCY ST NW 4018 ARGYLE TR NW 1613 SHEPHERD ST NW 4516 BLAGDEN AV NW 2201 15TH ST NW 1417 BELMONT ST NW 1468 HARVARD ST NW 1458 COLUMBIA RD NW 3240 HIATT PL NW 3240 HIATT PL NW 1520 MONROE ST NW 1402 QUINCY ST NW 3700 14TH ST NW 4510 15TH ST NW 1408 DELAFIELD PL NW 5208 COLORADO AV NW 5610 14TH ST NW 1427 MADISON ST NW 0 14TH ST NW 6510 LUZON AV NW 6600 14TH ST NW 7031 16TH ST NW 7523 17TH ST NW 1750 POPLAR LA NW 1800 PLYMOUTH ST NW PARKSIDE DR NW 1860 REDWOOD TR NW 1737 VERBENA ST NW 7805 MORNINGSIDE D NW 1316 VAN BUREN ST NW 1387 SHERIDAN ST NW 1377 SHERIDAN ST NW 1327 RITTENHOUSE S NW 6109 14TH ST NW 1380 RITTENHOUSE S NW 0 1353 NICHOLSON ST NW 1345 MADISON ST NW 5735 COLORADO AV NW 1329 TAYLOR ST NW 0 14TH ST NW 3616 ROCK CREEK CH NW 3541 11TH ST NW 1017 MONROE ST NW 3542 13TH ST NW 3461 14TH ST NW 3400 13TH ST NW 3414 11TH ST NW 1103 PARK RD NW 1014 PARK RD NW 3303 13TH ST NW 3222 11TH ST NW 1134 COLUMBIA RD NW 1108 COLUMBIA RD NW 2910 13TH ST NW 1340 HARVARD ST NW 1221 FAIRMONT ST NW 0 FAIRMONT ST NW 1304 FAIRMONT ST NW 1021 EUCLID ST NW 0 CLIFTON ST NW 2323 SHERMAN AV NW 903 EUCLID ST NW 740 FAIRMONT ST NW 2902 GEORGIA AV NW 773 HOBART PL NW 2920 GEORGIA AV NW 755 IRVING ST NW 705 IRVING ST NW 3101 SHERMAN AV NW 3216 GEORGIA AV NW 3214 GEORGIA AV NW 3212 GEORGIA AV NW

$2,230.26 $4,700.34 $15,545.25 $37,113.94 $4,540.84 $21,142.51 $232,849.63 $2,319.68 $4,546.26 $7,466.21 $19,587.46 $15,696.86 $4,971.96 $2,238.36 $17,034.18 $12,662.59 $2,272.14 $3,136.79 $477,765.16 $3,734.97 $6,060.77 $7,419.67 $2,693.97 $3,630.41 $2,352.25 $2,395.20 $4,512.08 $3,296.91 $3,086.44 $3,333.27 $2,074.91 $3,074.93 $3,971.63 $7,619.49 $2,803.88 $2,953.95 $2,907.57 $289,219.47 $8,363.52 $2,665.45 $8,885.34 $2,279.94 $4,247.12 $3,547.89 $11,222.55 $2,926.26 $2,959.72 $10,637.65 $4,991.51 $4,744.61 $16,656.46 $4,374.83 $4,907.22 $7,814.70 $3,519.52 $4,959.40 $3,813.21 $3,047.51 $2,864.08 $4,951.56 $2,228.86 $2,282.16 $22,037.13 $3,330.74 $10,331.72 $10,174.37 $46,958.54 $5,296.18 $4,989.58 $2,804.77 $2,690.30 $12,204.43 $3,081.61 $22,249.73 $5,896.72 $2,019.46 $2,471.16 $13,306.86 $8,627.78 $7,912.41 $2,175.36 $169,848.87 $4,333.77 $5,533.21 $2,894.37 $6,709.62 $5,363.12 $4,885.96 $2,115.15 $5,873.50 $3,685.62 $9,349.57 $5,226.08 $30,627.29 $3,459.07 $19,260.45 $9,376.55 $23,783.40 $9,579.05 $2,043.54 $6,535.19 $7,099.30 $9,859.62 $10,106.62 $3,433.20

www.washingtoninformer.com

2014 Tax Sale Report

June, 2014

TAX 3


2892 2892 2895 2895 2906 2909 2910 2910 2910 2914 2914 2917 2920 2926 2929 2935 2956 2956 2957 2961 2964 2971 2975 2976 2989 2989 2990 2991 2992 2992 2993 2993 2994 2995 2995 2996 2997 2997 3001 3002 3002 3010 3011 3015 3027 3028 3028 3030 3030 3032 3037 3038 3041 3043 3045 3047 3049 3051 3054 3070 3070 3080 3093 3096 3100 3102 3105 3109 3109 3116 3121 3123 3123 3124 3127 3131 3136 3148 3149 3151 3153 3153 3154 3155 3157 3157 3160 3161 3161 3167 3174 3177 3180 3188 3189 3194 3198 3201 3201 3201 3203 3208 3212 3214 3215

0891 &IMP 0916 &IMP 0136 &IMP 0137 &IMP 0087 &IMP 0038 &IMP 0033 &IMP 0034 &IMP 0805 &IMP 0022 &IMP 0024 &IMP 0804 0052 &IMP 0008 &IMP 0012 &IMP 0043 &IMP 0046 &IMP 0056 &IMP 0021 &IMP 0055 &IMP 0060 2001 &IMP 0008 &IMP 0075 &IMP 0121 &IMP 0153 &IMP 0047 &IMP 0076 &IMP 0075 &IMP 0087 &IMP 0062 &IMP 0800 0027 &IMP 0042 &IMP 0045 &IMP 0052 &IMP 0097 &IMP 0120 &IMP 0070 &IMP 0044 &IMP 0046 &IMP 0165 &IMP 0074 &IMP 0020 &IMP 0078 0051 &IMP 0052 &IMP 0015 &IMP 0805 &IMP 0037 &IMP 0073 &IMP 0065 &IMP 0053 &IMP 0042 &IMP 0081 0124 &IMP 0088 &IMP 0174 &IMP 0041 &IMP 0065 &IMP 0068 &IMP 0077 &IMP 0807 &IMP 0147 &IMP 0016 &IMP 0082 &IMP 0066 &IMP 0031 &IMP 0032 &IMP 0029 &IMP 0065 &IMP 0031 &IMP 0074 &IMP 0148 &IMP 0141 &IMP 0032 0046 &IMP 0085 &IMP 0110 &IMP 0055 &IMP 0033 &IMP 0822 &IMP 0040 &IMP 0043 &IMP 0068 &IMP 0069 &IMP 0101 &IMP 0022 &IMP 0047 &IMP 0064 &IMP 0827 &IMP 0006 &IMP 2046 &IMP 0013 &IMP 0800 &IMP 0811 &IMP 0101 &IMP 0100 &IMP 0120 &IMP 0128 &IMP 0083 &IMP 0812 &IMP 0085 &IMP 0067 &IMP 0050 &IMP

TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX

SHERIDAN REHABILITATIVE AND WELLNESS CEN NATIONAL CAPITAL DEVELOPMENT ENTERPRISE 3232 GEORGIA RETAIL LLC DARRELL ALLEN DARRELL ALLEN THE FIVE LLC CAMILLE A CLAY EDWARD L COATES ELBERRY NABIL H ELBERRY NABIL H ELBERRY NABIL H ROSIE FORD FORD CHARLES PAULINE H BROWN JOHN R GARRISON LAMA ABU-ODEH ANIL MIGLANI LIDIA B ROSERO ROSA G ROSERO MARY E CAIN ANN DIXON ROBERT DIXON SAM HOMES LLC CHRISTINE N WILLIAMS 7700 GEORGIA DEVELOPMENT LLC COMPTON G VYFHUIS EILEEN K VYFHUIS 7237 GEORGIA AVENUE LLC DELPHINE M ANGE KATHERINE CALOMIRIS-TOMPROS JENIFER CALOMIRIS HELEN G RANDOLPH NATHANIEL G RANDOLPH JR PRESTON L ROSS SAM HOMES LLC SIOUX BARRY PROSPECT HOLDINGS LLC JAMES F HOLDER ANTHONY E CHUUKWU SHARON D TOMILINSON EDNA MAE CHATMON W & D LLC VIRGINIA R KING MOHAN & SINGH PROPERTY PARTNERSHIP HOMES FOR THE HOMELESS AND LOW INCOME IN TREVOR SELMAN JENNIFER SELMAN LUCILLE W BARBOUR DIANAND JAGDEO JAGDEO KAMLA GERALDO M KING TRUSTEE LUIS REYES LUIS A REYES THERESA B PERKINS LUIS REYES CHINENYE NJOKU NATCO DEVELOPERS INC 3800 STORE FRONTS LLC 3800 STORE FRONTS LLC INEZ P DADE A & J REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT LLC 3709 NORMA WILLIAMS BABATUNDE OYEWAMIDE BODDIE JOHN W T AND G URBAN DEVELOPMENT LLC 3215 ERNESTO NUNEZ PEDRO NUNEZ KENYON HOUSE COOPERATIVE CHRISTOPHER A TIMI ANN O TIMI BETTY NORTH ARNOLD NORTH BARBRANDA L WALLS HOWARD S WALKER MICHAEL A ASHLEY HOLLY G ASHLEY OLAR V CAMPBELL TITO CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LINUS UDORJI GINA UDORJI LONNIE STEWART L R STEWART HOWLING WOLVES LLC JOSEPHINE LEWIS RALPH LEWIS COLUMBUS A RICH JR M Q RICH BRS HOLDINGS LLC BRS HOLDINGS LLC WASHINGTON RAY JR ELIZABETH S RAY IRIS MCCOLLUM GREEN, TRUSTEE JAMES E LIGHTFOOT JOHN J PHELAN II HAZEL A ARNOLD WARREN C SHERROD 36 CHANNING STREET LLC JACK MASSENGALE TRUSTEE AVAMERE 723 UPSHUR LLC WILLIAM R DOUGLASS BENNIE L DOUGLASS ANTHONY FRANCIS IVY FRANCIS E L CATLETT ANNIE CATLETT 717 KENNEDY STREET LLC ROBERT SMILEY JOANNE SMILEY BRITA M KEMP RICARDO HERNANDEZ STEPHEN A COOKE JOSEPH C COOKE JR CHARLES ADAMS EVELYN ADAMS GEORGE A RUSSELL B J RUSSELL V W GARNER W ALDRIDGE ELAINE W SAWYER ROBERT L HOWARD ELIZABETH HARRIS ELIZABETH W BARTON 6925 BLAIR ROAD LLC DANIEL W FIELDS JR L G GULLANTTEE A C GULLANTTEE 522 TUCKERMAN ST LLC CLARK ASSOCIATES LLC ALFRED S HUNTER OLA S HUNTER TYRONE WHITFIELD PARIS S PURCE III HENRY KNIGHT EDDIE BUTLER NANTUCKET HOLDINGS LTD VICTOR A PENWICK WUANISHA SCALES

4 TAX June 2014

3207 SHERMAN AV 3232 GEORGIA AV 3530 GEORGIA AV 3528 GEORGIA AV 921 RANDOLPH ST 4014 GEORGIA AV 4130 GEORGIA AV 4128 GEORGIA AV 4132 GEORGIA AV 4326 GEORGIA AV 4315 IOWA AV 1106 ALLISON ST 1238 CRITTENDEN ST 1213 EMERSON ST 1223 GALLATIN ST 5739 13TH ST 7410 GEORGIA AV 1120 GERANIUM ST 7700 GEORGIA AV 7622 9TH ST 7237 GEORGIA AV 6645 GEORGIA AV 6431 GEORGIA AV 812 TEWKESBURY PL 5727 9TH ST 5722 8TH ST 834 MADISON ST 5620 9TH ST 5519 ILLINOIS AV 929 KENNEDY ST 833 KENNEDY ST 809 KENNEDY ST 5417 9TH ST 900 KENNEDY ST 5416 9TH ST 5409 GEORGIA AV 5310 ILLINOIS AV 5327 GEORGIA AV 5223 GEORGIA AV 5115 GEORGIA AV 5119 GEORGIA AV 817 DELAFIELD PL 4803 GEORGIA AV 4615 GEORGIA AV 0 RANDOLPH ST 3813 GEORGIA AV 3815 GEORGIA AV 805 ROCK CREEK CH NEW HAMPSHIRE 750 PRINCETON PL 544 NEWTON PL 3505 GEORGIA AV GEORGIA AV 511 LAMONT ST 429 KENYON ST 3115 GEORGIA AV 434 KENYON ST 585 COLUMBIA RD 640 HOBART PL 2122 2ND ST 2116 2ND ST 438 5TH ST 501 FLORIDA AV 1840 2ND ST 25 FLORIDA AV 38 RANDOLPH PL 16 S ST 1832 1ST ST 1830 1ST ST 124 V ST 144 ADAMS ST 2213 1ST ST 61 W ST 2314 NORTH CAPITOL 36 CHANNING ST 3801 NEW HAMPSHIRE 723 UPSHUR ST 5010 7TH PL 5124 7TH ST 713 INGRAHAM ST 717 KENNEDY ST 0 7TH ST 5629 8TH ST 718 MARIETTA PL 729 NICHOLSON ST 731 NICHOLSON ST 6122 7TH ST 6211 8TH ST 719 ROXBORO PL 719 WHITTIER ST 7125 7TH ST 7302 BLAIR RD 523 BRUMMEL CT 6925 BLAIR RD 7100 BLAIR RD 529 VAN BUREN ST 522 TUCKERMAN ST 537 PEABODY ST 502 QUACKENBOS ST 501 POWHATAN PL 518 OGLETHORPE ST 515 JEFFERSON ST 5009 7TH ST 607 DECATUR ST 4821 KANSAS AV

NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW

$21,533.44 $8,260.83 $12,225.91 $14,598.79 $5,039.55 $3,624.07 $3,837.99 $6,819.83 $7,527.10 $9,149.43 $19,159.44 $3,071.58 $6,248.49 $4,432.82 $2,807.90 $3,377.81 $5,805.97 $2,040.11 $10,155.55 $3,035.50 $3,515.10 $2,062.81 $13,250.98 $2,732.73 $2,888.95 $79,043.47 $6,900.64 $2,094.20 $3,258.11 $347,871.41 $5,145.27 $9,095.34 $16,683.49 $6,636.10 $163,930.39 $6,093.49 $14,617.12 $3,697.35 $3,088.00 $4,339.90 $4,511.27 $2,907.34 $4,700.38 $3,079.60 $2,432.79 $5,699.30 $10,626.15 $3,923.04 $103,062.01 $3,595.78 $2,455.58 $8,498.96 $3,927.66 $3,319.60 $3,440.60 $10,372.72 $65,378.94 $3,855.47 $17,157.96 $2,138.90 $2,043.22 $8,515.45 $13,401.42 $2,525.80 $11,331.30 $9,803.32 $4,250.58 $3,498.59 $4,840.49 $4,269.85 $3,671.87 $3,974.24 $26,895.62 $3,819.21 $4,228.40 $4,507.47 $2,562.88 $3,656.62 $34,722.12 $7,321.89 $4,978.82 $5,464.72 $2,369.17 $12,617.75 $2,103.48 $2,627.99 $3,270.13 $2,447.78 $2,524.26 $4,471.06 $5,364.24 $2,612.14 $2,822.18 $4,059.82 $4,502.49 $3,690.31 $15,139.21 $4,184.45 $6,853.85 $9,763.23 $3,897.24 $3,089.30 $8,087.09 $5,499.94 $2,088.21

3218 0812 &IMP 3220 0028 &IMP 3226 0089 &IMP 3228 0041 &IMP 3232 0093 &IMP 3232 0096 &IMP 3247 0015 &IMP 3247 0024 &IMP 3249 0096 &IMP 3256 0073 &IMP 3258 0074 &IMP 3259 0048 &IMP 3260 0030 &IMP 3260 0054 &IMP 3267 0802 &IMP 3304 0031 &IMP 3308 0041 &IMP 3309 0073 &IMP 3310 0068 &IMP 3313 0077 &IMP 3314 0039 &IMP 3321 0047 &IMP 3326 0087 &IMP 3328 0018 &IMP 3337 0065 3337 0101 &IMP 3337 0127 &IMP 3338 0039 3342 0810 3344 0808 3370 0003 &IMP 3383 0826 &IMP 3388 0067 &IMP 3390 0810 &IMP 3391 0017 &IMP 3402 0024 &IMP 3404 0004 &IMP 3502 0055 &IMP 3509 0045 &IMP 3513 0800 &IMP 3516 0071 &IMP 3516 0072 &IMP 3520 0081 &IMP 3523 0014 &IMP 3530 0113 &IMP 3530 0114 &IMP 3533 0106 &IMP 3533 0808 &IMP 3535E 0138 &IMP 3541 0009 &IMP 3551 0001 &IMP 3551 2001 &IMP 3551 2004 &IMP 3554 0051 3555 0013 &IMP 3557 0035 &IMP 3565 0047 &IMP 3569 0058 &IMP 3572 0068 &IMP 3584 0808 3589 0034 &IMP 3638 0802 &IMP 3639 0823 &IMP 3640 0044 &IMP 3642 0060 &IMP 3665 0051 &IMP 3668 0093 &IMP 3674 0009 &IMP 3674 2012 &IMP 3707 0101 &IMP 3707 0105 &IMP 3711 0078 &IMP 3711 0079 &IMP 3713N 0003 &IMP 3715 0802 3725 0007 &IMP 3732 0838 &IMP 3732 0871 &IMP 3742 0034 &IMP 3742 0087 &IMP 3746 0841 &IMP 3760 0013 3777 0035 &IMP 3784 0040 &IMP 3788 0008 &IMP 3796 0032 &IMP 3810 0062 &IMP 3811 0045 &IMP 3811 0076 &IMP 3817 0021 &IMP 3830 0016 &IMP 3846 0852 &IMP 3870 0054 &IMP 3871 0059 &IMP 3876 0025 &IMP 3876 0051 &IMP 3890 0809 3891 0142 &IMP 3894 0812 3932 0042 &IMP 3937 0054 &IMP 3983 0030 &IMP 4011 0002 &IMP 4019 0802 &IMP 4044 0031 &IMP

TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX

2014 Tax Sale Report

GARLAND A DUKE JR ROBERTO DUKE J BARBOUR M BRYANT FANCIE M RIDDICK TRIAD INVESTMENTS LLC J M ALBRITTON W P ALBRITTON OZIE B FORTUNE JOHN R GARRISON THADDEUS CARRINGTON SR M K WHITAKER HENRY WHITAKER JR FRANK S TAYLOR DENNIS A HUIE SUN Y YANG RONALD E DAVIS D C DAVIS KENNEDY PARTNERS LLC LANCELOT HOLDER ANDRE L WOODS REUBEN WOODS MARY E MASON BI J LI YVONNE STRONG DONALD STRONG EUGENE R HUGHES B HUGHES SARAH E CARTER C E WILLIAMS MARGARET WILLIAMS STANCIL RUFUS AUDRINE C DAVIS ANDRE REVELEY DAVID O GREEN JO ANN I ARTIS MELISSA B LITTLEFIELD ARCHIE L JONES NATCO DEVELOPERS INC SUITE 214 LEONARD D BELL C T BELL MARYNELLA C QUARLES LENARD Z COLES RICARDO RIVERA KENTUCKY-SCOTT LLC LIFELINE INC LE’ANNE S RUTHERFORD VICURTIS D MOORE HERBERT E ROBINSON G M ROBINSON JACKIE GRANT AMULFO J VILLATORO S G PROPERTIES INC THERSA O JORDAN VIRGINIA ROBERSON HERBERT BEVERLY HAL K SAADAT LILLIAN A THOMPSON J THOMPSON ANDREA T WALKER TRUSTEE SHANNON TRAVIS MAURICE SCOTT BAKARY SANOGO DANIEL FIELDS III FAIRFAX HOMES INC FAIRFAX HOMES INC GLORIA M HAYNIE JAMES E ALDRIDGE JR I ALDRIDGE HATTIE M FREEMAN 1905 2ND ST NE LLC BERNARD ROBINSON W M ROBINSON GEORGIA M TUCKER ROBERT N WILEY JERRY LYLES DAVID JUNG YEN C JUNG JAMES NORRIS JAMES M LONG SHARON P LONG ANNIE M BROOKS TREETOPS LLC ALLAN R CRAIG JACQUELINE PLUMMER DUGUNA H GEDA SASR HOLDINGS LLC WALKER ENTERPRISES LLC ATLANTIC CAPITAL SERVICES LLC GRACE T OLIVER MEMORIAL TRUST LINDA H DIXON JOSEPH J DIXON JUANITA W PEARSON LILLIE SMITH NATCO DEVELOPERS INC SUITE 214 LUCRETIA J JONES SPICER & SPICER LLC WILMA J COATES DAVE BARBOUR JR M R BARBOUR BRADLEY CHRISTOPHER T DEBRA A KNIGHT L BUNDY SIMON REED GENORA REED DAWN SCOTT JAMES S JONES CORA L JONES IKE AGBIM BENJAMIN F PEASANT DIANAND JAGDEO LAWRENCE R KEYS ERNESTINE W LEWIS COLONIAL W ROBINSON JR M N REAL ESTATE ENTERPRISES LLC 720 RICHARD C MEADOWS BESSIE MEADOWS MARTA POWERS FLORINE A BROX 12TH STREET REAL ESTATE LLC KENNETH BRAXTON MICHELLE CASH GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY GERALDINE DESPERTT ISLE OF PATMOS BAPTIST CHURCH INC JESSE BAKLEY JR JULIA BLAKEY M WITHERSPOON PERCY D WITHERSPOON BAKARA YAKUB YAKUB YAKUB GODWIN MADUEKE

7 SHERMAN CIR 4513 7TH ST 508 VARNUM ST 4124 5TH ST 3910 5TH ST 505 RANDOLPH ST 4409 5TH ST 4427 5TH ST 418 CRITTENDEN ST 5124 KANSAS AV 5304 4TH ST 440 KENNEDY ST 5514 4TH ST 5505 5TH ST 429 QUACKENBOS ST 332 EMERSON ST 4505 NEW HAMPSHIRE 333 WEBSTER ST 320 WEBSTER ST 4010 MARLBORO PL 3922 3RD ST 7 ROCK CREEK CH 220 HAMILTON ST 245 INGRAHAM ST 0 2ND PL 201 OGLETHORPE ST 249 OGLETHORPE ST 0 QUACKENBOS ST 0 NORTH DAKOTA 0 TUCKERMAN ST 13 TUCKERMAN ST 45 NICHOLSON ST 33 LONGFELLOW ST 135 KENNEDY ST 116 KENNEDY ST 4907 NEW HAMPSHIRE 24 GALLATIN ST 19 EVARTS ST 26 TODD PL 1712 LINCOLN RD 26 FLORIDA AV 24 FLORIDA AV 53 QUINCY PL 132 R ST 33 T ST 35 T ST 1937 SUMMIT PL 118 TODD PL 179 V ST 2404 2ND ST 2600 4TH ST 2625 3RD ST 2625 3RD ST 2508 4TH ST 313 CHANNING ST 216 ADAMS ST 1905 2ND ST 228 S ST 204 RANDOLPH PL 0 NEW YORK AV 1263 4TH ST 517 MONTANA AV 2817 4TH ST 2817 5TH ST 622 GIRARD ST 4331 1ST ST 106 VICTOR ST 93 HAWAII AV 90 WEBSTER ST 5515 BLAIR RD 38 KENNEDY ST 5721 2ND ST 5725 2ND ST 342 NICHOLSON ST 0 OGLETHORPE ST 6401 KANSAS AV 338 PEABODY ST 311 QUACKENBOS ST 664 MADISON ST 737 NICHOLSON ST 835 KENNEDY ST 0 4TH ST 643 GALLATIN ST 5072 10TH ST 635 EMERSON ST 4715 6TH ST 901 VARNUM ST 608 ALLISON ST 4512 6TH PL 4041 7TH ST 3317 9TH ST RHODE ISLAND 2420 12TH ST 1008 RHODE ISLAND 3006 12TH ST 3000 12TH ST 0 TAUSSIG PL 1125 URELL PL 0 BUCHANAN ST 3119 12TH ST 2601 12TH ST 5003 13TH ST 1437 LAWRENCE ST 1427 HAMLIN ST 1842 PROVIDENCE ST

NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE

$10,038.12 $2,393.06 $10,752.67 $20,523.65 $3,396.74 $3,079.71 $99,996.05 $3,416.89 $76,500.14 $3,327.72 $11,300.92 $3,783.19 $3,068.37 $31,381.83 $12,660.82 $2,442.01 $75,866.95 $19,205.67 $3,034.08 $10,022.96 $9,792.05 $3,308.58 $25,972.58 $2,105.25 $2,154.26 $3,652.53 $7,435.52 $5,005.40 $2,246.54 $5,339.70 $2,715.32 $10,362.99 $2,728.03 $100,957.99 $5,911.92 $10,344.25 $3,044.60 $32,055.02 $2,863.45 $2,349.34 $44,060.48 $19,754.35 $3,260.63 $3,402.73 $3,083.08 $5,197.94 $2,699.39 $2,737.41 $2,934.25 $5,836.70 $3,334.33 $3,713.67 $6,018.44 $4,637.31 $2,228.48 $7,049.64 $8,598.16 $2,074.35 $3,058.48 $43,824.23 $5,933.31 $7,112.56 $2,765.55 $3,617.73 $4,446.91 $2,226.16 $2,600.21 $6,356.46 $2,099.59 $9,277.41 $7,959.88 $2,400.68 $2,213.63 $2,200.58 $7,861.80 $20,267.06 $6,031.67 $10,204.23 $2,200.34 $8,791.42 $2,446.53 $5,011.45 $7,494.29 $2,503.96 $127,959.63 $4,277.69 $7,029.19 $2,336.95 $2,531.39 $9,978.43 $2,947.13 $12,986.38 $2,922.60 $2,006.80 $3,660.47 $25,828.83 $81,341.99 $3,802.02 $3,511.83 $2,538.02 $27,559.27 $5,701.05 $2,588.28 $4,421.30 $2,744.17

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0812 0030 &IMP 0033 &IMP 0813 &IMP 0823 &IMP 0021 &IMP 0025 &IMP 0039 &IMP 0017 &IMP 0092 0096 &IMP 0025 &IMP 0040 0840 &IMP 0191 0204 &IMP 0048 &IMP 0115 &IMP 0134 &IMP 0184 &IMP 0809 0844 &IMP 0106 &IMP 0198 &IMP 0201 &IMP 0114 &IMP 0800 0809 &IMP 0039 &IMP 0073 &IMP 0093 &IMP 0801 0803 0057 &IMP 0092 &IMP 0114 &IMP 0012 &IMP 0029 &IMP 0030 &IMP

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JAMES PARKER SR ROBERT PARKER ERIE HOMES INC ALESIA M WASHINGTON EVELYN B WASHINGTON PNC BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 1831 GEORGE ADAMS EULA ADAMS GARY DICKERSON VASELIA E THOMAS WILBUR L PARKER KENRICK L FEALING NIPPER THOMAS L MOHAMMAD SIKDER ANNA M GLOVER KARY ADKINS THOMAS P BROWN INCORPORATEDBENJAMIN F ROSSNER MANCHESTER CONDOS LLC CATALYST R E DEVELOPMENT LLC KHADIJAH BRONSON CYNTHIA D WARREN SANDRA A DARDEN 1113 QUEEN STREET LLC MAMIE WASHINGTON VIOLET WORMLEY GERTRUDE MILLER 1230 OWENS LLC JOYCE D MCLEAN EDWARD DOGER ROBERT WALKER ZION GROUP LLC STEFAN RAHIMIAN J A BROWN REBECCA BROWN EDWARD CLARK CLAUDETTE CLARK ALLEN GIBSON CLOIE GIBSON ESTHER M WIRE MICHAEL R READY STONIE RUSSELL M M RUSSELL CALANDRA DIXON EDDIE W JOHNSON JOHN P HILL CLIFFORD UTLEY BARBARA URLEY CLIFFORD UTLEY BARBARA J UTLEY

0 PROVIDENCE ST NE 1915 CAPITOL AV NE 1916 WEST VIRGINIA NE GALLAUDET ST NE 1825 KENDALL ST NE 1703 CAPITOL AV NE 1711 CAPITOL AV NE 1703 WEST VIRGINIA NE 1656 MONTELLO AV NE 0 11TH PL NE 1641 11TH PL NE 1667 MONTELLO AV NE 0 MONTELLO AV NE 1264 HOLBROOK TR NE 1251 HOLBROOK TR NE 1226 PENN ST NE 1113 HOLBROOK TR NE 1609 WEST VIRGINIA NE 1113 QUEEN ST NE 1107 OWEN PL NE 1410 MONTELLO AV NE 1126 OATES ST NE 1230 OWEN PL NE 1263 OWEN PL NE 1269 OWEN PL NE 1401 TRINIDAD AV NE 1325 MONTELLO AV NE 1215 OATES ST NE 1316 MONTELLO AV NE 1182 MORSE ST NE 1181 NEAL ST NE 0 NEAL ST NE 0 1286 MORSE ST NE 1219 TRINIDAD AV NE 1227 STAPLES ST NE 1260 FLORIDA AV NE 1010 FLORIDA AV NE 1008 FLORIDA AV NE

$2,595.46 $3,958.02 $13,034.04 $5,187.18 $6,924.21 $4,445.03 $6,986.15 $9,651.32 $77,029.99 $2,907.00 $2,823.39 $2,563.55 $3,031.29 $79,511.23 $7,709.11 $8,515.35 $67,609.53 $6,121.90 $7,666.92 $9,006.22 $150,026.79 $5,566.42 $2,158.36 $6,492.98 $23,007.71 $2,538.02 $22,101.67 $12,561.93 $2,629.30 $36,320.01 $129,213.24 $52,666.20 $15,313.79 $2,380.22 $2,293.63 $2,358.82 $101,173.84 $2,815.66 $4,842.76

TUESDAY, JULY 15, 2014 4070 2006 &IMP 4074 0156 &IMP 4074 0157 &IMP 4076 0811 4076 0821 &IMP 4076W 0815 &IMP 4078 0209 &IMP 4112 0859 4118 0048 &IMP 4119 2008 &IMP 4121 0023 &IMP 4129 0001 &IMP 4131 0044 &IMP 4131 0045 &IMP 4132 0004 &IMP 4140 0007 4146 0019 &IMP 4146 0038 &IMP 4146 0805 &IMP 4146 0807 &IMP 4150 0021 &IMP 4150 0026 &IMP 4167 0063 &IMP 4175 0009 &IMP 4201 0057 &IMP 4204 0075 4208 0007 &IMP 4214 0819 &IMP 4214 0820 &IMP 4221 0041 &IMP 4225 0007 4242 0013 4246 0016 &IMP 4247 0061 &IMP 4248 0023 &IMP 4250 0025 &IMP 4255 0830 &IMP 4258 0138 &IMP 4258 0140 &IMP 4258 0143 &IMP 4258 0145 &IMP 4258 0824 &IMP 4259 2003 &IMP 4259 2004 &IMP 4265 0817 4265 0824 4282 0001 4284 0843 4287 0045 &IMP 4296 0003 &IMP 4305 0811 &IMP 4307 0072 &IMP 4310 0030 &IMP 4311 0017 &IMP 4317 0065 &IMP 4325 0019 &IMP 4325 0951 &IMP 4325 0997 &IMP 4325 2008 &IMP 4325 2040 &IMP 4325 2341 &IMP 4326 2274 &IMP 4326 2307 &IMP

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GEORGE FAULK III MARCUS E LITTLE MARCUS E LITTLE NATCO DEVELOPERS INC STARKS W R STARKS & P GLASCO LES ENTERPRISES INC OTIS CUNNINGHAM CARRIE CUNNINGHAM BRYANT MEWS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION STEPHEN ADEGOKE MONIQUE C SMITH MICHELLE WAKEFIELD ROY E LEE JR 1617 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, LLC 1617 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, LLC KING SOLOMON TEMPLE OF TRUTH, INC THEODOSIA MURRISH MORRIS MORRIS ETHEL MORRIS PAUL ANDERSON ELAINE ANDERSON INEZ WHITNEY INEZ MITCHELL CAROLYN N GRAHAM E WILLIAMS WILLIE WILLIAMS SALLIE D ARCHIE R ARCHIE JR CHRISTINE M MATTHEWS LOUIS A WATTIES ABE M DRAISNER E J DRAISNER KATRINA D MOON JAMES S GRAYTON IOLA L HALL LENORA C HALL IOLA L HALL LORRAINE ELLOITT BENJAMIN ROSENBORO A ROSENBORO LAVITA HUFF HUFF HERBERT J WILLIAM L MINTER MAE D FRANKLIN GAY B THOMPSON LINDA MCALLISTER MOST WORSHIPFUL KING SOLOMON GRAND LODGE SHAHID Q QURESHI 2146 24TH PL B&B LLC VALOR 2122 24TH LLC RF HOLDINGS LLC WFJ LLC RF HOLDINGS LLC MPAC SOUND LLC MPAC SOUND LLC JOHN B RUBINO M C RUBINO ARNITA B PARHAM FIROZ K LAHRODI AOURI A RAZJOOYAN VICTORIA PATRICK NEW CENTURY MORTGAGE CORPORATION SYBLE O CALDWELL MARSHA A ECHOLS GLORIA G HOOKS VICTOR A NELSON 2900 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE INC CARL A JONES GEORGE F MCKOY E M MCKOY YENICIA E MONTES RENEE T COLEMAN JOCELYN F PERRY WILLIAM RILEY RUTH A RILEY ERIC BUNN DEBRA BUNN SHELIA G HANDY ELIZABETH M CLANTON

1014 FLORIDA AV NE 1019 16TH ST NE 1023 16TH ST NE 0 1528 LEVIS ST NE 1363 CHILDRESS ST NE 1223 16TH ST NE 0 CHANNING ST NE 2202 15TH ST NE 1714 MONTANA AV NE 1511 MONTANA AV NE 1734 EVARTS ST NE 1617 RHODE ISLAND NE 1617 RHODE ISLAND NE 1602 RHODE ISLAND NE 0 17TH ST NE 3409 17TH ST NE 3426 18TH ST NE 3418 18TH ST NE 3414 18TH ST NE 1710 NEWTON ST NE 3609 17TH ST NE 1658 VARNUM PL NE 4833 QUEENS CHAPEL NE 3725 18TH ST NE 0 1818 RHODE ISLAND NE 2730 22ND ST NE 2728 22ND ST NE 2004 KEARNEY ST NE 0 SOUTH DAKOTA NE 0 22ND ST NE 2204 LAWRENCE ST NE 2232 KEARNEY ST NE 2214 RHODE ISLAND NE 2245 RHODE ISLAND NE 2216 CHANNING ST NE 2146 24TH PL NE 2122 24TH PL NE 2127 QUEENS CHAPEL NE 2145 QUEENS CHAPEL NE 0 QUEENS CHAPEL NE 2221 ADAMS PL NE 2221 ADAMS PL NE 0 MILLS AV NE 2429 FRANKLIN ST NE 0 24TH ST NE 0 EVARTS ST NE 2804 26TH ST NE 2414 PERRY ST NE 3727 26TH ST NE 2831 OTIS ST NE 3115 NEWTON ST NE 2900 RHODE ISLAND NE 2850 MYRTLE AV NE 3109 35TH ST NE 2631 PATRICIA ROBE NE 3291 FORT LINCOLN NE 2815 31ST PL NE 2707 31ST PL NE 3403 SUMMIT CT NE 3143 CHERRY RD NE 3126 CHERRY RD NE

$2,307.54 $2,987.66 $3,000.02 $6,118.98 $3,558.43 $7,007.00 $2,049.12 $4,764.12 $2,246.07 $2,354.30 $6,038.02 $2,116.82 $3,751.44 $3,076.79 $4,987.98 $28,549.70 $2,235.37 $10,712.05 $4,119.08 $4,721.20 $2,036.43 $3,667.84 $12,189.07 $3,558.00 $16,304.01 $9,107.29 $2,115.40 $6,366.85 $4,993.02 $2,190.16 $3,368.14 $2,824.80 $3,451.46 $8,177.55 $4,533.32 $2,805.45 $2,289.80 $44,944.29 $51,524.31 $14,130.18 $38,496.61 $16,418.40 $5,662.19 $5,660.94 $6,393.45 $4,013.12 $18,556.02 $12,716.98 $3,249.57 $2,703.36 $3,584.95 $2,968.43 $9,763.38 $10,668.13 $2,532.33 $6,868.62 $2,012.42 $10,238.89 $2,594.22 $2,551.68 $3,979.37 $2,106.09 $2,086.31

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FORT LINCOLN RETAIL LLC 0 FORT LINCOLN NE FORT LINCOLN RETAIL LLC 0 FORT LINCOLN NE JORGE PUMA 3003 EARL PL NE R W WALLACE WANDA WALLACE 2927 26TH ST NE MENGSTAB GHEBRETINSAE TSIGEREDA GHEBRETINSAE 2615 EVARTS ST NE S Q B LLC 2612 28TH ST NE BOBSON AKINULI 0 ADAMS ST NE DANIEL AULTMON 3013 CHANNING ST NE FREED C KING ASTRA P KING 3116 CHANNING ST NE ANNIE M DAWKINS 2330 31ST ST NE BRIAN E AGARD 1214 18TH PL NE JENNIFER D HALL 1244 18TH ST NE PHILIP L RUCKER MARY B RUCKER 1636 LANE PL NE WONDWOSENG KETEMA 1111 BLADENSBURG R NE EBEN F KING 1020 17TH PL NE 1039 OFFICES LLC 1037 BLADENSBURG R NE 1039 OFFICES LLC 1035 BLADENSBURG R NE 1039 OFFICES LLC 1033 BLADENSBURG R NE 1039 OFFICES LLC 1039 BLADENSBURG R NE RICHARD SPINNER 1731 L ST NE EMMA WALTER 0 H PL NE THERON HASKINS 1821 I ST NE KATHERINE FOX 802 21ST ST NE BENJAMIN H PARKER 0 16TH ST NE DWAYNE HUBBARD DARRYL HUBBARD 1616 GALES ST NE THEOPHILUS LLC 737 18TH ST NE JOHN JOHNSON ROBERTA JOHNSON 0 BENNING RD NE JOHN F GRAY DELORES F GRAY 1805 BENNING RD NE LORENZO MILNER 2013 BENNING RD NE PATRICIA BARBOUR 536 24TH ST NE STEPHEN H TANCIL 556 23RD PL NE PEARL CHASE 516 23RD PL NE JAMES H JONES TRUSTEE 536 OKLAHOMA AV NE AEEYSHA GOODWIN 414 OKLAHOMA AV NE LEON LILLY 2011 GALES ST NE SHIRLEY KAUFMAN 0 ROSEDALE ST NE MORTGAGE BANKING TRUST 1913 GALES ST NE MONICA GIBBS 1737 F ST NE FABCO INVESTMENT CORPORATION 0 E STREET NE LLC 1616 E ST NE J HERNDON A SHEPPARD 1655 ROSEDALE ST NE KATRIDGE BROWN 1659 GALES ST NE NATCO DEVELOPERS INC SUITE 214 0 F ST NE FABCO INVESTMENT CORPORATION 0 F ST NE POMEROY MEWS INC 625 15TH ST NE E STREET ASSOCIATES LIMITED 0 D J COLISH COLISH JOSEPH S 1832 D ST NE BRILEY INCORPORATED 429 18TH ST NE BRENDA M SAYLES 438 21ST ST NE COLUMBUS CIRCLE LLC 1811 D ST NE JAMES E GALLMON ELIZABETH GALLMON 1608 C ST NE OLIVER L MURRAY 0 JOSE H MARTINEZ 3346 ALDEN PL NE MARIE B WARE 208 34TH ST NE ERNEST TALFORD TOMMIE TALFORD 3322 BLAINE ST NE B A PENN HELEN L PENN 329 35TH ST NE MARJORIE G BATTLE J L BATTLE 303 34TH PL NE PARKSIDE TOWNHOMES CONDO ASSOCIATION INC 645 BARNES ST NE ANNETTE BOONE 177 36TH ST NE 3780 MINNESOTA AVENUE ASSOCIATES LP 3780 MINNESOTA AV NE GREENTREE ORPORATION 3732 MINNESOTA AV NE JOAN MOTLEY 204 35TH ST NE IVAN BATTLE LAVINIA C BATTLE 148 35TH ST NE CAPITOL 2 DC, LLC 3625 AMES ST NE JEONG S PARK YOUNG C PARK 4001 GAULT PL NE MARION LESTER 0 GAULT PL NE NEW JERUSALEM TEMPLE OF OUR LORD JESUS C 4030 GAULT PL NE 4106 GAULT PLACE LLC 4106 GAULT PL NE JAMES R BURRESS 0 BENNING RD NE JAMES R BURRESS 0 BENNING RD NE GEORGE C MORRIS CHESTER G MORRIS 4030 CLAY PL NE ODELL H SHUMATE L W SHUMATE 4244 BENNING RD NE ROBERT J MUDD RUTH MUDD 4235 DIX ST NE ROBERT J MUDD RUTH MUDD 0 DIX ST NE PURLL PROPERTIES LLC 0 DIX ST NE ANWAR HUSSAIN 0 DIX ST NE MILDRED WILLIAMS 4226 DIX ST NE GEORGE WALKER MILDRED WALKER 0 DIX ST NE CHINUA J NICOLLS 4229 EDSON PL NE QIVAO YUAN VIVIAN KWOK 4265 EDSON PL NE WEST EBD REO 2382 LLC 4203 EDSON PL NE STEPHANIE R LEE 4251 EDSON PL NE JIMMY R SCRUGGS TRUSTEE 4269 EDSON PL NE HELEN HARRIS 4350 EADS ST NE CLARK H BROWN JR 4256 FOOTE ST NE DOGWOOD LLC 4214 HUNT PL NE RUTH A JACKSON 4301 JAY ST NE UIMSC 917 43RD PL NE RANA JOHNSON MERCELLE DAVIS 4321 MINNESOTA AV NE SANDY BRADLEY PEARL L BRADLEY 4421 KANE PL NE WILLIAM A COOK 4406 KANE PL NE VERONICA G AWKARD 4328 SHERIFF RD NE SANDY L BULLOCK 0 MINNESOTA AV NE NEW SYSTEM DEMOLITION & EXCAVATION INC 0 SHERIFF RD NE SHIRLEY T LANGLEY 4204 MEADE ST NE NEW SMYRNA MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH AND 0 ANACOSTIA AV NE WILLIAM R PRUE JR F Y PRUE 4336 POLK ST NE NEW SMYRNA MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH AND 0 ANACOSTIA AV NE GEORGE M JOHNSON 4335 DOUGLAS ST NE RAYMOND WARRENNER 0 NEW YORK AV NE GEORGE M JOHNSON 0 DOUGLAS ST NE NEW SMYRNA MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 4409 DOUGLAS ST NE GOOD SUCCESS CHRISTIAN CHURCH 1044 44TH ST NE GOOD SUCCESS CHRISTIAN CHURCH AND MINIST 0 LEE ST NE GOOD SUCCESS CHRISTIAN CHURCH AND MINIST 0 LEE ST NE

$354,795.81 $19,969.23 $4,368.85 $2,244.43 $14,455.37 $24,606.55 $2,457.83 $5,718.05 $2,349.31 $2,542.78 $13,256.33 $2,376.01 $110,310.79 $15,765.09 $20,612.66 $6,145.66 $5,641.77 $5,680.36 $7,691.26 $8,113.64 $4,520.11 $16,041.49 $10,524.66 $13,590.30 $3,406.94 $2,138.90 $6,327.98 $3,782.65 $7,917.59 $2,797.71 $2,570.69 $9,890.96 $9,195.56 $2,223.78 $13,597.54 $3,312.42 $3,799.38 $3,037.78 $2,849.95 $5,808.61 $2,345.61 $49,805.16 $6,940.49 $2,617.31 $5,234.25 $7,274.82 $23,591.52 $30,776.29 $2,798.55 $2,389.42 $3,459.71 $9,794.03 $2,963.65 $19,897.46 $41,157.61 $3,756.85 $14,049.72 $6,419.92 $2,376.84 $16,932.90 $7,361.03 $11,879.20 $11,153.80 $3,191.95 $6,955.97 $6,544.23 $4,219.98 $13,413.47 $4,035.51 $4,035.51 $23,836.53 $2,825.85 $58,051.68 $3,378.09 $2,196.57 $3,929.44 $42,870.99 $2,369.90 $5,156.88 $25,509.09 $3,517.18 $5,290.35 $19,902.88 $2,431.34 $4,221.79 $3,768.93 $45,197.39 $79,019.34 $7,226.65 $35,506.30 $18,472.59 $4,331.97 $5,151.46 $9,179.74 $2,902.08 $58,437.23 $6,515.07 $134,165.81 $56,938.31 $3,949.06 $2,785.62 $14,265.08 $3,425.46 $5,805.38 $7,574.27

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2014 Tax Sale Report

June, 2014

TAX 5


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CAPITALSOURCE BANK FBO AEON FINANCIAL, L CARRIE M PARKER TRUSTEE VICTOR M ROBINSON SR E M JORDAN F M JORDAN GRANITE FINANCE LLC BERLINE A JACKSON EDWARD S HOLMES 500 EASTERN AVENUE LLC RUPSHA 2012 INCORPORATED JEFFERSON L SPEARS DEANWOOD ENTERPRISES LLC JEFFREY BARNES JOHN E WHITMYER GLORIA EDWARDS FRANK JOYNER SR JOSEPH JOYNER BANANA ENTERPRISES INC OLALEKAN O OGUNGBAIGBE IKECHUKWU R AGBIM JOSEPH A DANIELS SHAWN PEARSON JAMES B THOMAS JACK MERWIN CARLETTA MCNEELY TOUJA BOWMAN DARLENE D BOWMAN HORACE JOHNSON ELIAS BROWN HAVILAH REAL PROPERTY SVCS, LLC 0 JUAN ANN COBB AND ASSOCIATES INC SHERIFF ROAD I LLC DENISE K SHEARIN ISI REALTY LLC NATHAN FISHKIN CARE HENRY PARKER QIYAO YUAN VIVIAN E FISHER JARVIS CLARK ANTHONY R BOLLINGS K L WASHINGTON GEORGE W TE MABEL W TE VIRGINIA G LONG C A MONTAGUE J M MONTAGUE BARBARA J DINKINS JEOFFREY GRAHAM FIKRU BEKELE WILLIAM J REAVES WILLIAM J REAVES WILLIAM J REAVES WILLIAM J REAVES BENNIE L SHARP L O SHARP CATHERINE I MATHEW HARPER VENTURE GROUP LLC 5002 LEE LLC TERENCE ROBERSON J F ROBERSON MM&G INC BETTY SMITH JENNY NGUYEN-DINH CANARY L TILLIE JOHN TILLIE JR SURJIT S BIAN SURJIT S BIAN HOLY CHRISTIAN MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH ADRIENNE WOLF SURJIT S BIAN SARAH CHASE GEORGE W CHASE LARRY W PRATT BEVERLY A GREEN INETTA B JAMES GLORIA M SHERMAN WASHINGTON METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY DEVELO JOSE STRICKLAND YVETTE STRICKLAND JOHN LP LINBERRY CARE ROSA L CLIFFORD ALEASE B STEWART HELEN O PICKETT REGINALD ROWE REGINALD ROWE FREDERICK B INCE FREDERICK B INCE PATRICIA A TARRANCE KENNETH A OSUJI ERIC FLOYD ESTHER G WEISS ESTHER G WEISS LBM DEVELOPMENT CORP TOMBSTONE LAND COMPANY TOMBSTONE LAND COMPANY GRAY CAPITAL PROPERTIES WALGBOW MANAGEMENT HOUSING PARTNERSHIP AMERICAN SECURITY INVESTMENT WILLIAM M STROMAN R V STROMAN RODNEY SIMMS RODNEY D SIMMS ISAAC SMITH JR ALBERTA M SMITH TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH TABERNACLE CHURCH SEVENTH DAY ADVENTISTS HERMAN L HUFFMAN HERMAN L HUFFMAN TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH GEORGIA BRODNAX MONIQUE BANKS ELSIE PRATT BRADIE GASTON RAYMOND ONLEY CLAUDE ONLEY ROCHELLE E EUBANKS HEERAN LEE TARO G GEHANI PROFITABLE PROPERTY FUNDING LLC 5705 SM PROPERTIES LLC FALCON CONSTRUCTION COMPANY

6 TAX June 2014

4401 SHERIFF RD NE 4505 SHERIFF RD NE 805 44TH ST NE 4560 NANNIE HELEN NE 4435 HAYES ST NE 4445 NANNIE HELEN NE 4517 GAULT PL NE 4501 GRANT ST NE 4519 FOOTE ST NE 4712 BLAINE ST NE 4715 CLAY ST NE 4710 EADS ST NE 4605 GRANT ST NE 0 NANNIE HELEN NE 0 48TH PL NE 4813 JAY ST NE 804 48TH PL NE 824 48TH PL NE 831 46TH ST NE 4724 JAY ST NE 912 47TH ST NE 4727 SHERIFF RD NE 4707 SHERIFF RD NE 4700 KANE PL NE 0 SHERIFF RD NE SHERIFF RD NE 0 SHERIFF RD NE 0 SHERIFF RD NE 4502 LEE ST NE 1122 46TH ST NE 4600 SHERIFF RD NE 4551 MINNESOTA AV NE 0 48TH ST NE 4623 MINNESOTA AV NE 4615 POLK ST NE 4619 QUARLES ST NE 1614 EASTERN AV NE 1610 EASTERN AV NE 1625 OLIVE ST NE 1436 EASTERN AV NE 4904 QUARLES ST NE 0 QUARLES ST NE 0 QUARLES ST NE 0 QUARLES ST NE 4920 NASH ST NE 1323 49TH ST NE 1208 49TH PL NE 5002 LEE ST NE 0 49TH ST NE 1014 50TH ST NE 5149 SHERIFF RD NE 5038 JAY ST NE 808 51ST ST NE 743 50TH ST NE 745 50TH ST NE 721 50TH ST NE 0 HAYES ST NE 737 50TH ST NE 4926 FOOTE ST NE 4925 NANNIE HELEN NE 616 50TH ST NE 616 49TH PL NE 4952 BLAINE ST NE 5127 NANNIE HELEN NE 732 51ST ST NE 0 52ND ST NE 849 51ST ST NE 5215 JUST ST NE 1021 50TH ST NE 0 50TH ST NE 5212 SHERIFF RD NE 1102 EASTERN AV NE 1103 51ST PL NE 0 EASTERN AV NE 5040 LEE ST NE 0 EASTERN AV NE 0 EASTERN AV NE 5046 MEADE ST NE 5040 MEADE ST NE 5038 MEADE ST NE 1221 DIVISION AV NE 0 PORTER ST NE 5243 KARL PL NE 0 JAY ST NE 5304 JAMES PL NE 5341 HAYES ST NE 5341 HAYES ST NE 5316 GAY ST NE 0 GAY ST NE 5315 GAY ST NE 0 GAY ST NE 0 GAY ST NE 0 GAY ST NE 709 DIVISION AV NE 5400 JAMES PL NE 5706 NANNIE HELEN NE 0 EASTERN AV NE 620 58TH ST NE 701 DIVISION AV NE 515 55TH ST NE 5721 FOOTE ST NE 508 58TH ST NE EADS ST NE 401 56TH ST NE 0

$2,371.00 $2,279.29 $2,859.74 $82,617.72 $12,785.34 $6,158.05 $8,074.80 $3,428.79 $11,511.76 $3,292.80 $4,109.38 $90,627.25 $10,806.04 $4,035.51 $5,598.32 $30,484.97 $30,823.25 $3,215.90 $27,658.03 $137,750.55 $3,293.16 $8,801.98 $10,410.22 $7,424.63 $45,518.60 $41,907.49 $6,444.14 $3,207.62 $10,493.51 $11,699.09 $2,003.97 $5,655.65 $4,878.26 $15,405.47 $3,449.37 $93,910.81 $17,425.93 $73,470.06 $100,238.66 $26,388.18 $3,336.12 $2,775.84 $4,428.56 $4,902.82 $3,923.50 $4,921.04 $8,116.69 $10,345.57 $3,623.42 $8,347.86 $10,554.71 $4,579.99 $93,026.10 $4,938.75 $4,969.43 $4,203.13 $6,623.24 $65,343.82 $73,125.14 $9,059.71 $64,433.07 $71,189.69 $92,371.61 $92,905.35 $40,325.18 $10,600.63 $18,644.31 $15,586.66 $5,096.08 $6,571.45 $2,271.86 $4,518.17 $70,341.69 $8,577.93 $6,416.96 $5,523.83 $27,686.13 $18,072.44 $9,125.42 $9,125.42 $10,846.32 $6,255.10 $40,794.55 $5,274.41 $8,702.29 $11,459.47 $24,335.88 $33,565.22 $32,703.74 $32,703.74 $37,095.55 $3,400.48 $3,400.48 $38,167.46 $4,998.66 $3,487.69 $2,283.03 $2,146.28 $2,745.69 $3,658.90 $2,057.82 $3,510.91 $30,786.54 $3,486.98 $2,427.86

5233 5233 5234 5239 5242 5242 5243 5243 5243 5246 5247 5248 5249 5249 5249 5250 5250 5250 5250 5251 5252 5256 5256 5258 5260 5260 5260 5261 5261 5261 5261 5262 5262 5262 5263 5263 5264 5267 5267 5267 5268 5269 5278 5282 5284 5285 5285 5290 5290 5290 5293 5293 5294 5296 5298 5299 5299 5300 5300 5304 5306 5309 5309 5309 5310 5310 5310 5311 5313 5314 5314 5317 5317 5321 5325 5325 5326 5326 5326 5326 5327 5327 5327 5328 5329 5329 5332 5338 5341 5341 5341E 5342 5342E 5350 5350 5350 5350 5350 5351 5351 5352 5352 5359 5359 5359

0806 0807 0027 &IMP 0002 0887 &IMP 0907 &IMP 0073 &IMP 0074 &IMP 0075 &IMP 0104 &IMP 0805 &IMP 0114 &IMP 0092 0105 &IMP 0117 &IMP 0056 0058 0097 &IMP 0808 0059 0032 0027 &IMP 0056 &IMP 0031 0808 &IMP 0812 &IMP 0857 &IMP 0025 0026 0027 0030 0031 0811 &IMP 0821 0814 0815 0015 0004 0005 0036 0807 &IMP 0017 &IMP 0024 &IMP 0029 &IMP 0835 &IMP 0227 &IMP 0237 &IMP 0077 &IMP 0123 &IMP 0133 &IMP 0003 &IMP 0014 &IMP 0807 0809 &IMP 0805 0012 0017 &IMP 0004 0027 0031 0019 &IMP 0034 &IMP 0040 &IMP 0041 &IMP 0019 0028 &IMP 0029 0012 0048 0015 0802 &IMP 0001 &IMP 0009 0027 0012 &IMP 0013 0016 0017 0025 0028 0001 0005 0026 0022 0008 &IMP 0009 0008 0007 0014 &IMP 0805 &IMP 0026 &IMP 0018 0013 &IMP 0012 0023 &IMP 0038 0102 &IMP 0107 0861 0893 0037 &IMP 0814 0335 0337 0349

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2014 Tax Sale Report

MARY F COLEMAN MARY F COLEMAN DEVINKA D PUSHWELLA MARGOLD ZEMEL CARE ZEMEL & KAUFMANN JOSEPH A CARTER JR C B CARTER 311 E STREET ASSOCIATES LLC HARRY E POLK JR RUSSELL C HUGHES MARIE HUGHES RUSSELL C HUGHES MARIE HUGHES MICHAEL JAMES TAKIA S HAWKINS CAROLYN CREWS GORDON BANNISTER BEN BIAS MAURICE HUNTER A HEARD A MURPHY IKECHUKWU AGBIM NATCO DEVELOPERS INC SUITE 214 0 HELEN S HENSON ERNEST W HENSON BESSIE M CROCKETT STAFFORD BLAKE ABNER M SAMPSON DESIREE M CAMPBELL RAWLE CAMPBELL JBN REALTY INVESTMENT INC QIYAO YUAN DIX STREET CORRIDOR REVITALIZATION PARTN DIX STREET CORRIDOR REVITALIZATION PARTN FRANCIS J FABRIZIO JR SARAH W FABRIZIO HAVILAH REAL PROPERTY SVCS, LLC 0 HAVILAH REAL PROPERTY SVCS, LLC 0 MARY E QUEEN BOYCE C TRUESDALE CARE NAOMI H PERRY FRANCIS L MARSHALL A E MARSHALL VCRT TRUST MICHAEL J DAVIS ROWENA T HANSFORD DONALD JACKSON BERTHA JACKSON J BROWN ALBERT BROWN ARJAY CORPORATION E LEVIN IRVIN E MORGAN P C MORGAN VERONICA A BANWO VICSURA HOLDINGS LLC U G POLLY M POLLY 11 61ST STREET NE COOPERATIVE INC CHARLES J SMITH JACQUELINE SMITH A T ROBINSON W H ROBINSON BEATRICE S MILLS ROBERT A BROWN JR CLEMENTINE B BROWN VICTORIA COLE-ROLON FRED C LEWIS T L LEWIS SOUTHEAST CENTRAL AVENUE LLC 5571 CORNELIA R SPURGEON EXPRESS HOMEBUYERS DC LLC COLE BROTHERS ENTERPRISE EMMA JOHNSON MCGEE HARRY MARY D ALLEN ROBERT LAMBERT HARRIET BUTLER LUTHER BUTLER WILBUR L GRAY JR HMP JOINT VENTURE CLYDE S HALE ESTATE OF LOUIS O’BRIEN EDMONDS IRMA L KRISTAL C OWENS ROBERT W CLARK HELEN BALLARD MILDRED K WHITE JEWELL L GARNER JUDY E WILLIAMS CLAUDIUS D MAJOR EUGENE A HARRIS EDNA H WASHINGTON JOHN E WESLEY MARY A WESLEY MISSION FIRST DEVELOPMENT LLC S GILMORE IDA GILMORE ANDREW STATION LLC MAR-JAC, LLC NEWTON REED NEWTON REED CRYSTAL F WILLIAMS ROY W HICKS SR NORMAN SAUNDERS DANIEL CROSBY SICHESTER JONES YOUR COMPLETE HOME IMPROVEMENT AND MANAG CENTRAL AVENUE DEVELOPMENT LLC RENTAL ASSOCIATES INC HAVILAH REAL PROPERTY SVCS LLC BARBARA Y SEYMOUR SIMONE REED-LAFORTUNE SIMON REED III QIJUN WANG YVONNE B MUKASE CLARENCE E WASHINGTON EVELYN C BROWN TRUSTEES JUNE F BEYERLY RUFUS MOORE EDITH E MOORE MABEL T YOUNG DOROTHY E DORSEY A STREET LLC C V KOONS DORIS C KOONS DIANE L FARQUHAR NORMAN J FARQUHAR LOTTIE TOLIVER ARJAY CORPORATION MARSHALL HEIGHTS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT MARSHALL HEIGHTS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT O MARSHALL HEIGHTS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

0 EADS ST NE 0 EADS ST NE 226 DIVISION AV NE 0 BANKS PL NE 120 53RD ST NE 5206 EAST CAPITOL NE 5344 AMES ST NE 5342 AMES ST NE 5340 AMES ST NE 5752 BLAINE ST NE 5716 BLAINE ST NE 256 57TH ST NE 0 56TH ST NE 307 56TH ST NE 235 56TH ST NE 0 55TH ST NE 55TH ST NE 328 56TH ST NE 233 55TH ST NE 0 CLAY PL NE 0 54TH ST NE 5825 FIELD PL NE 5822 FOOTE ST NE 5923 FOOTE ST NE 474 EASTERN AV NE 466 EASTERN AV NE 405 61ST ST NE 61ST ST NE 61ST ST NE 414 61ST ST NE 0 61ST ST NE 5913 EADS ST NE 422 60TH ST NE 5916 DIX ST NE 0 59TH ST NE 0 59TH ST NE 0 58TH ST NE 0 CLAY ST NE 0 CLAY ST NE 0 62ND ST NE 354 EASTERN AV NE 302 EASTERN AV NE 11 61ST ST NE 5500 CENTRAL AV SE 56 53RD PL SE 65 55TH ST SE 95 55TH ST SE 5426 B ST SE 5543 CENTRAL AV SE CENTRAL AV SE 5411 C ST SE 5509 C ST SE 0 SOUTHERN AV SE 5412 E ST SE 0 E ST SE 5341 DRAKE PL SE 5304 E ST SE 5313 D ST SE 5346 DRAKE PL SE 0 53RD ST SE 5325 CENTRAL AV SE 137 53RD ST SE 5135 ASTOR PL SE 5137 ASTOR PL SE 0 BASS PL SE 5220 BASS PL SE 5220 BASS PL SE 5221 BASS PL SE 0 D ST SE 0 53RD ST SE 5118 DRAKE PL SE 5101 F ST SE 5135 F ST SE 5046 DRAKE PL SE 5055 B ST SE 0 B ST SE 0 50TH ST SE 134 50TH ST SE 0 B ST SE 5050 B ST SE 0 A ST SE 5019 A ST SE 0 ASTOR PL SE 5024 A ST SE 5035 CENTRAL AV SE 0 CENTRAL AV SE 0 A ST SE 0 D ST SE 5001 HANNA PL SE 5021 HANNA PL SE 726 51ST ST SE 0 BENNING RD SE 5102 HANNA PL SE 0 B ST SE 4416 B ST SE 0 A ST SE 4437 A ST SE 4427 A ST SE 0 0 C ST SE 4479 C ST SE 0 C ST SE 4645 G ST SE 4649 G ST SE 4648 HANNA PL SE

$56,488.15 $66,015.54 $10,435.01 $3,559.09 $37,311.13 $2,353.90 $2,239.74 $4,927.61 $24,872.65 $2,882.74 $10,548.31 $14,467.19 $18,405.01 $4,442.37 $8,321.59 $3,282.80 $10,309.55 $29,869.11 $3,226.17 $10,795.38 $7,045.76 $21,297.00 $5,825.35 $3,578.76 $3,110.18 $3,171.32 $10,333.46 $4,562.36 $4,562.36 $4,562.36 $4,562.36 $20,482.44 $40,923.96 $3,056.94 $5,325.89 $3,002.37 $11,490.08 $4,961.50 $6,422.42 $2,445.47 $2,170.51 $39,446.53 $2,538.01 $7,223.46 $5,345.28 $49,823.14 $38,156.73 $3,297.36 $3,665.62 $4,577.91 $22,826.14 $49,367.97 $21,504.14 $9,860.65 $7,002.79 $21,402.40 $59,218.38 $3,586.20 $3,586.20 $29,035.69 $11,693.94 $2,026.94 $2,040.57 $21,184.40 $13,393.00 $5,107.44 $15,503.27 $2,895.12 $70,282.33 $2,776.61 $10,894.49 $126,497.39 $3,586.20 $81,750.30 $10,953.97 $69,722.70 $2,776.61 $2,776.61 $2,776.61 $2,895.12 $2,776.61 $2,895.12 $2,776.61 $3,426.72 $3,287.83 $3,808.71 $2,776.61 $22,352.72 $7,781.10 $114,284.33 $2,065.39 $42,781.99 $41,243.39 $2,388.69 $20,335.40 $3,270.40 $7,403.28 $25,748.81 $3,714.28 $2,845.25 $2,210.28 $8,633.94 $3,692.71 $3,692.71 $3,692.71

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0352 0353 0354 0355 0855 &IMP 0062 &IMP 0063 &IMP 0082 &IMP 0137 &IMP 0150 &IMP 0113 &IMP 0881 0816 0160 &IMP 0803 &IMP 0056 &IMP 0045 &IMP 0032 &IMP 0831 &IMP 0023 0824 2014 &IMP 0088 &IMP 0112 &IMP 0037 &IMP 0051 0053 0809 0001 0071 &IMP 0020 &IMP 0021 &IMP 0024 &IMP 0806 0812 0013 0080 &IMP 0808 0057 &IMP 0811 &IMP 0811 &IMP 0039 &IMP 0037 0064 0002 0009 &IMP 0073 &IMP 0086 0812 0002 0816 0048 &IMP 0062 0806 &IMP 0852 &IMP 0013 &IMP 0800 &IMP 0813 &IMP 0006 &IMP 0819 &IMP 0048 &IMP 0806 &IMP 0812 0820 &IMP 0034 &IMP 0805 &IMP 0008 &IMP 0806 0817 &IMP 0024 0026 &IMP 0005 0804 &IMP 0824 &IMP 0828 0030 &IMP 0006 &IMP 0021 &IMP 0802 &IMP 0816 0098 &IMP 0818 &IMP 0024 &IMP 0026 &IMP 0005 &IMP 0028 &IMP 0817 &IMP 0032 0060 0062 0094 0805 0821 &IMP 0011 0038 0054 &IMP 2027 &IMP 0043 &IMP 0043 0844 0004 &IMP 0808 &IMP 0156 0157 0001

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MARSHALL HEIGHTS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT MARSHALL HEIGHTS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT MARSHAL HEIGHTS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OR MARSHALL HEIGHTS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT O CHRISTINA Y ADAMS ALMON TAYLOR REGINA SANDERS GREGORY SANDERS MARVIN SEAGRAVES GEORGE P FOREMAN SR NATHANIEL SPINNER JEFFREY J WARREN FREE GSPL CHRCH OF THE APSTLE DRTNE INC HERMAN OWENS JOAN S OWENS GREENWOOD REALTY 1 LLC COLUMBUS CIRCLE LLC V KIMBERLY BALDWIN LOUIS G FORD B I FORD ESTATE OF DOLORES B FREEMAN VICTORIA CARMON-BROWN NELLIE P PARKER GREATER WASHINGTON MUTUAL HS ASSN INC BESSIE B BARBOUR WILLIAM A BAKER JR CHRISTOPHER W BAKER ERNESTINE WHITING VINCENT D CARTER SE D LLC LOAN SERVICES LLC GENEVA B MASSEY CHARLES T FINLEY REALTY INC BEVERLY ROBERTS RONAUN L PEREZ RONAUM L PEREZ CHAPPELLE DEVELOPMENT CO LLC RUTH STEIN JOYCE E LEWIS AARON RISKIN SALLY RISKIN OLUGBENGA A OLUOKUN CHARLES BURNEY JR ERIC ARCHERY RICHARD ARCHERY AVAMERE 313 ANACOSTIA LLC VICTOR OLANUBI OLADIJI AMERICAN SECURITY LLC NATCO DEVELOPERS INC SUITE 214 NATCO DEVELOPERS INC SUITE 214 ARCH HOUSING CORPORATION EDNA E SPANN SABRINA A WOODARD J CAMPBELL CHARLES CAMPBELL NATCO DEVELOPERS INC SUITE 214 DONALD CAPLAN TRUSTEES HENRY BROCK MABEL D BROOK JAMES H BANKS G G BANKS ROBERT GLISPERY RANDERY J DOCKERY WALTER L PEACOCK JANICE L THOMAS BETTY J EDMUNSON MELVIN HUMPHREY SR C CALDWELL T CALDWELL VERA M BELL JEROME B TREADWELL LEROY BARLEY ANDREW L MCGUIRE N L MCGUIRE ANACOSTIA RISING LLC THOMAS MASON JR NICOLA MASON COMMERCIAL EQUITY PARTNERS LTD 2007 1941 NAYLOR ROAD LLC P Q GROSS W L GROSS H SHROPSHIRE C SHROPSHIRE ALICE L DENNIS K E WILLIAMS WILLIAMS OTHO H HEZEKIAH WILLIAMS JR A M JACKSON JAMES E JACKSON ALPHONZO DAVIDSON FAITH ANN DAVIDSON 1613 29TH ST LLC JUANITA GRAY PHYLLIS V DYSON MICHAEL P DYSON NICOLE S DANEIL PAMELA LOPES CARL V ALLEN ASSEFA G FELEKE RAM NARANJAN GENE E ASHE HARVEY W DOCKERY A A DOCKERY WILLIAM R WEBSTER SUSAN R WEBSTER ERIE HOMES INC SABRINA WOODARD HAZEL D WOOD ROBERT I WOOD ALICE L DENNIS ALVETA C DENNIS RENEE OKON HAVILAH REAL PROPERTY, LLC HAVILAH REAL PROPERTY, LLC ROLAND H COLEMAN QUINTON B BATEMAN NAYLOR ROAD SCHOOL CORPORATION FREDERICK D HOUSE BROOKLAND ENTERPRISES 2411 S STREET SE LLC STEVEN O WHITLEY D ELLIOTT LLC GRAY CAPITAL PROPERTIES INC SUITE 214 J D NIEDERGESES SGI LLC BRODIE D JACKSON C JACKSON EMORY J WEST VERMONT INVESTMENTS INC VCRT TRUST

4654 HANNA PL SE 4656 HANNA PL SE 4658 HANNA PL SE 4660 HANNA PL SE 4531 ALABAMA AV SE 4662 HILLSIDE RD SE 4660 HILLSIDE RD SE 4602 HILLSIDE RD SE 1185 46TH PL SE 1159 46TH PL SE 4639 HILLSIDE RD SE 4600 SOUTHERN AV SE 0 46TH ST SE 1322 45TH PL SE 4327 BARKER ST SE 4241 FORT DUPONT T SE 1506 FORT DAVIS PL SE 731 HILLTOP TR SE 930 BURNS ST SE 0 ALABAMA AV SE 0 E ST SE 428 RIDGE RD SE 312 BURBANK ST SE 4403 C ST SE 343 BURNS ST SE 4000 D ST SE 0 0 CROFFUT PL SE 0 36TH ST SE 3325 CROFFUT PL SE 3214 DUBOIS PL SE 3212 DUBOIS PL SE 3206 DUBOIS PL SE 0 D ST SE 0 DUBOIS PL SE 0 D ST SE 3357 DUBOIS PL SE 3305 DUBOIS PL SE 3310 DUBOIS PL SE 313 ANACOSTIA RD SE 3331 ELY PL SE 715 31ST ST SE 0 M ST SE 0 LOUD PL SE 1326 ANACOSTIA RD SE 1205 30TH ST SE 3013 NELSON PL SE 0 ANACOSTIA RD SE 0 M ST SE 0 POPE ST SE 0 3228 O ST SE 0 N ST SE 2920 PENNSYLVANIA SE 2918 P ST SE 2904 O ST SE 2720 O ST SE 2508 N ST SE 2232 NICHOLSON ST SE 2318 NICHOLSON ST SE 1427 22ND ST SE 1435 22ND ST SE 1401 22ND ST SE 2106 YOUNG ST SE FAIRLAWN AVE SE 1941 NAYLOR RD SE 1428 18TH PL SE 0 18TH ST SE 1525 19TH ST SE 0 1516 23RD ST SE 0 28TH ST SE 2811 PENNSYLVANIA SE 1613 29TH ST SE 1645 29TH ST SE 2219 NAYLOR RD SE 1704 R ST SE 1608 16TH ST SE 1601 17TH ST SE 0 FAIRLAWN AVE SE 1524 S ST SE 1528 S ST SE 1410 GOOD HOPE RD SE 1609 T ST SE 1721 MINNESOTA AV SE 1917 T PL SE 2115 R ST SE 0 S ST SE 0 24TH PL SE 1715 24TH PL SE 0 R ST SE 0 22ND ST SE 2306 NAYLOR RD SE 2400 T ST SE 0 S ST SE 2411 S ST SE 2311 ALTAMONT PL SE 1720 27TH ST SE 0 28TH ST SE 0 28TH PL SE 2859 DENVER ST SE 2214 32ND ST SE 0 32ND ST SE 0 32ND ST SE 0 WESTOVER DR SE

$3,692.71 $3,692.71 $3,692.71 $4,077.68 $2,214.42 $6,825.92 $9,568.57 $48,965.81 $2,127.45 $6,971.87 $70,688.82 $10,471.71 $2,341.00 $15,690.60 $2,490.96 $3,623.83 $8,760.39 $2,526.12 $25,775.47 $3,261.67 $84,779.28 $2,423.03 $4,942.91 $14,091.25 $102,079.23 $20,257.85 $26,716.20 $25,715.12 $52,917.48 $5,278.81 $2,378.20 $2,573.53 $110,153.05 $2,746.51 $3,174.06 $9,524.21 $3,703.36 $5,221.22 $3,321.13 $9,446.71 $2,286.44 $54,411.15 $4,649.23 $4,649.23 $10,809.26 $9,683.00 $3,681.38 $6,439.15 $6,278.48 $4,140.85 $6,314.42 $3,182.82 $3,442.32 $9,590.19 $12,035.92 $2,221.75 $4,104.22 $14,401.45 $6,967.58 $2,152.99 $114,945.54 $51,858.49 $12,915.12 $3,619.25 $17,827.89 $31,861.34 $5,997.97 $3,232.15 $4,627.30 $3,062.28 $31,785.59 $6,266.53 $17,981.08 $8,005.48 $3,789.47 $2,354.11 $6,820.35 $3,486.22 $2,884.35 $73,437.40 $163,062.67 $11,835.50 $3,055.11 $4,282.81 $10,862.56 $7,097.45 $3,757.58 $2,755.59 $5,421.13 $4,560.80 $3,684.95 $7,333.03 $16,736.33 $94,638.87 $5,328.93 $2,489.67 $2,547.96 $3,396.76 $28,369.70 $9,890.48 $2,745.88 $2,688.96 $4,002.46 $10,808.26 $20,845.43

5663 0002 5663 0075 5670 2137 &IMP 5670 2174 &IMP 5672 2031 &IMP 5673 0802 &IMP 5684 0024 5684 0846 5691 0007 5691 0016 &IMP 5691 0026 &IMP 5710 0802 &IMP 5722 0042 &IMP 5722 0075 &IMP 5724W 0001 &IMP 5724W 0008 &IMP 5724W 0025 &IMP 5724W 0031 &IMP 5725 0008 &IMP 5727 0149 5727 0150 5727 0151 5727 0152 5727 0153 5727 0154 5729 0071 &IMP 5729 0074 &IMP 5729W 0002 5729W 0008 5730 0889 &IMP 5730 0920 5740 0225 &IMP 5740 0349 &IMP 5742 0808 5753 0056 5753 0073 5753 0074 5753 0075 5753 0076 &IMP 5753 0077 5755 0050 5755 0051 5755 0107 5755 0119 &IMP 5755 0136 &IMP 5765 0879 &IMP 5766 0828 &IMP 5767 0311 &IMP 5767 0313 &IMP 5772 0831 &IMP 5777 0530 &IMP 5777 0806 5778 0084 5778 0111 &IMP 5778 0117 5778 0833 5778 0837 5780 0810 5780 0974 5781 0801 &IMP 5782 0833 &IMP 5788 0821 &IMP 5790 0016 &IMP 5790 0024 &IMP 5790 0802 5792 0816 &IMP 5793 0158 5799 0836 &IMP 5801 0273 &IMP 5803 0800 &IMP 5803 0867 &IMP 5803 0883 &IMP 5803 0891 5804 0195 &IMP 5804 0802 &IMP 5806 0242 &IMP 5806 0244 5807 0922 &IMP 5807 0978 &IMP 5809 0036 5809 0037 5809 0045 5809 0051 5809 0169 &IMP 5810 0006 5811 0042 &IMP 5812 0009 5812 0010 5813 0007 &IMP 5813 0020 5814 0039 5814 0040 5814 0041 5821 0034 &IMP 5822 0071 &IMP 5822 0831 5827 0004 5827 0005 5828 0019 5832 0803 5835 0031 5840 0002 5840 0003 5840 0004 5840 0005

TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX

NATCO DEVELOPERS INC DUANE MCKINNEY IDAMAE J BARBOUR DERRICK SMITH NATALIE L SMITH KATHARINE S DOUGBERY LAKEISHA N WILSON HEINRICH M ROSSER JOSEPH F WASHINGTON C J WASHINGTON MUNDELL ANDERS MARY ANDERS JESSIE W LITLEFORD ROSCOE HEMSLEY WILLIE J NASH FLORA NASH EARNEST E CURETON G L CURETON EARL BOYKIN VIZION REALTY DC, LLC CARALENE W MCCLAIN WILBERT A PETERS JR THE ESTATE OF LOUIS O’BRIEN JONATHAN D WATTS RALPH M COOKE KNOX HILL VILLAGE LP KNOX HILL VILLAGE LP KNOX HILL VILLAGE LP KNOX HILL VILLAGE LP KNOX HILL VILLAGE LP KNOX HILL VILLAGE LP C J MARSHALL MICHAEL J MARSHALL VINCENT PHILLIPS LINDA E CARLOS VINCENT PHILLIPS LUTHER WASHINGTON WILLIAM W TAYLOR GLORIA STEWART OLA FRANKS M L FORD LLEWELLYN FORD GREATER SHAW COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORP FAR SOUTHEAST COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FAR SOUTHEAST COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FAR SOUTHEAST COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION ERNEST BOLDEN ERNEST BOLDEN ARJAY CORPORATION ARJAY CORPORATION STEPHANIE MERWIN BRYAN E BOLDEN 1679 W STREET LLC PAUL PARKER KIMBERLY M PARKER NASAR R HAIDER JOHN A BROWN D BROWN BEBECCA R D BROWN JOHN A BROWN H S WHITE T A WHITE JOE ALLEN SR B BROWN CLARENCE A HANDY B G HANDY SAGE W STREET LLC FRANCES M SANDERS DELORES B HARRIS-PERKINS NATCO DEVELOPERS INC JOSEPH D SAMS DEBORAH M LYLES DIAMOND HOUSING CORPORATION U S LIENS LLC WACHOVIA EQUITY SERVICING LLC FEDERAL PRINTING WORKERS LOCAL CECIL HOWZE CHARLES S SCOTT P V SCOTT LAURA E JOHNSON THOMAS J JOHNSON MATTIE M DIXON JOHN DUPREE COMMUNITY ACTION INCORP JAMES BRYANT JANET BRYANT DOUTY GARDNER LEROY BARLEY ETHELENE PRATT AFRICAN CULTURAL FOUNDATION INC 1311 ALVIN E GOINS JR KEYSTONE PLUS CONSTRUCTION CORPORATION WAA DEVELOPMENT LLC PATRICA A JONES ARJAY CORPORATION CYNTHIA M MARROW STANTON VIEW DEVELOPMENT LLC JAMES G PATTERSON JAMES G PATTERSON NATCO DEVELOPERS INC SUITE 214 W D NAYLOR MARY M NAYLOR C C TURNER KATHERINE TURNER JANSAR LTD INC WILLIE MAE BLACKWELL JAMES P HOLLOWAY FABCO INVESTMENT CORPORATION EMORY J WEST SAMUEL A BROOKS BANGOR DEVELOPMENT COMPANY PAUL J DUCLOS TRUSTEE PAUL J DUCLOS TRUSTEE PAUL J DUCLOS TRUSTEE QUINTON FRANCIS SR ANGELIA M BODDIE HELEN B PRUDEN ALVIN E GOINS JR ALVIN E GOINS JR ALVIN E GOINS JR HAVILAH REAL PROPERTY SVCS, LLC HAVILAH REAL PROPERTY SVCS, LLC PETER DESILVA PETER DESILVA PETER DESILVA PETER DESILVA

0 WESTOVER DR SE 3125 PENNSYLVANIA SE 2057 38TH ST SE 2024 37TH ST SE 3920 SOUTHERN AV SE 0 ALABAMA AV SE 0 SOUTHERN AV SE 0 SUITLAND RD SE 0 33RD ST SE 2505 BRANCH AV SE 2517 BRANCH AV SE 3209 GAINESVILLE S SE 3043 30TH ST SE 2809 JASPER ST SE 2418 SOUTHERN AV SE 2400 SOUTHERN AV SE 3440 24TH ST SE 3428 24TH ST SE 2727 JASPER ST SE 0 HARTFORD ST SE 0 HARTFORD ST SE 0 HARTFORD ST SE 0 HARTFORD ST SE 0 HARTFORD ST SE 0 HARTFORD ST SE 2847 GAINESVILLE S SE 2913 30TH ST SE 2812 GAINESVILLE S SE 2814 28TH ST SE 2551 ALABAMA AV SE 0 GAINESVILLE S SE 2429 SKYLAND PL SE 2340 AINGER PL SE 0 RAYNOLDS PL SE 1612 FORT STANTON SE 0 16TH ST SE 2306 16TH ST SE 0 16TH ST SE 2304 16TH ST SE 0 16TH ST SE 0 W ST SE 0 W ST SE 1612 GALEN ST SE 1625 W ST SE 1679 W ST SE 1604 U ST SE 1517 GOOD HOPE RD SE 1421 GOOD HOPE RD SE 1429 GOOD HOPE RD SE 2025 MARTIN LUTHER SE 1608 V ST SE 0 V ST SE 0 W ST SE 1612 W ST SE 0 V ST SE 1619 V ST SE 0 0 W ST SE 0 15TH ST SE 1338 W ST SE 713 1216 W ST SE 2421 SHANNON PL SE 1131 CHICAGO ST SE 2314 SHANNON PL SE 2322 SHANNON PL SE 1321 W ST SE 2242 CHESTER ST SE 2330 HIGH ST SE 2266 MOUNT VIEW PL SE 1382 MORRIS RD SE 1333 MAPLE VIEW PL SE MAPLE VIEW PL SE 0 MAPLE VIEW PL SE 2321 HIGH ST SE 1348 MAPLE VIEW PL SE 2410 MARTIN LUTHER SE 0 MARTIN LUTHER SE 1350 DEXTER TR SE 1260 TALBERT ST SE 0 HOWARD RD SE 0 WEST ST SE 0 WEST ST SE 0 WEST ST SE 1503 MORRIS RD SE 1420 MORRIS RD SE 1433 BANGOR ST SE 0 HUNTER PL SE 0 HUNTER PL SE 1434 BANGOR ST SE 0 BANGOR ST SE 0 BANGOR ST SE 0 BANGOR ST SE 0 BANGOR ST SE 2418 18TH ST SE 1717 FRANKFORD ST SE 0 GAINESVILLE S SE 0 ERIE ST SE 0 ERIE ST SE 0 ERIE ST SE 0 R ST SE 0 GAINESVILLE S SE 0 HARTFORD ST SE 0 HARTFORD ST SE 0 HARTFORD ST SE 0 HARTFORD ST SE

$17,677.73 $183,479.50 $3,521.05 $2,693.79 $3,184.28 $7,057.05 $7,872.75 $11,405.52 $2,709.52 $2,529.59 $3,306.76 $2,014.91 $2,139.51 $3,865.37 $15,004.25 $110,416.77 $2,689.33 $52,930.94 $3,947.99 $32,823.33 $38,717.71 $34,226.05 $36,253.23 $39,745.67 $55,925.33 $7,146.87 $13,112.40 $2,211.95 $68,817.33 $7,486.88 $2,620.49 $13,762.72 $3,664.28 $2,946.73 $28,387.38 $22,825.85 $49,828.39 $22,845.30 $25,657.31 $2,886.08 $9,938.33 $11,577.96 $28,711.09 $18,681.28 $6,789.33 $3,450.57 $2,897.46 $4,827.01 $12,660.21 $2,844.17 $12,746.59 $2,752.71 $5,981.17 $30,348.14 $2,890.21 $2,983.34 $7,642.76 $7,014.23 $4,588.59 $2,659.39 $3,386.69 $7,540.58 $12,377.26 $99,204.21 $31,750.88 $3,343.59 $42,114.31 $3,570.45 $34,369.55 $70,616.70 $13,053.16 $48,157.67 $35,274.90 $25,717.26 $3,716.90 $5,672.51 $78,619.64 $36,492.93 $11,012.81 $29,675.50 $4,210.10 $4,187.69 $105,040.91 $10,240.68 $5,685.90 $5,458.24 $62,624.97 $62,624.97 $32,470.32 $3,253.14 $3,687.39 $3,377.93 $4,435.41 $6,525.65 $4,278.93 $25,340.76 $19,250.62 $19,933.67 $24,019.53 $15,043.49 $15,060.06 $26,940.94 $27,323.40 $9,790.51 $9,377.27

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2014 Tax Sale Report

June, 2014

TAX 7


5844 5845 5846 5860 5860 5860 5860 5865 5865 5865 5867 5867 5867 5869 5869 5869 5869 5869 5869 5869 5869 5869 5869 5869 5870 5870 5871 5871 5872 5872 5873 5873 5873 5873 5873 5873 5873 5873 5873 5873 5873 5874 5874 5874 5875 5875 5875 5875 5875 5876 5876 5877 5880 5880 5889 5892 5892 5892 5897 5914 5917 5917 5921 5922 5923 5924 5924 5938 5938 5939 5943 5946 5950 5951 5951 5952 5953 5954 5960 5969 5969 5969 5969 5969 5969 5969 5969 5969

0822 &IMP 0072 &IMP 0010 &IMP 1025 &IMP 1026 &IMP 1036 &IMP 1037 &IMP 0283 &IMP 0892 0926 0170 0237 &IMP 0857 0886 0940 0959 &IMP 1016 1028 1032 1036 1081 1082 1083 1103 0826 0846 0854 0857 0120 0936 0049 0855 0860 0871 0881 0883 0889 &IMP 0893 0906 0908 &IMP 0910 0849 0941 0943 0022 0907 0909 0918 &IMP 0924 0849 0935 0101 0027 &IMP 0031 &IMP 0046 &IMP 0049 &IMP 0082 &IMP 0095 &IMP 0006 &IMP 0007 &IMP 0807 0808 0878 &IMP 0097 &IMP 0052 &IMP 0050 0112 &IMP 0804 &IMP 0849 &IMP 0800 &IMP 0031 &IMP 0030 &IMP 0011 &IMP 0030 &IMP 0036 &IMP 0044 &IMP 0050 &IMP 0808 &IMP 0017 &IMP 0169 0170 0171 0172 0173 0174 0175 0176 0177

TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX

BRUCE GARDENS LLC LELAND N BURTON WILLIAM A CORLEY GLOBAL ANACOSTIA LLC GLOBAL ANACOSTIA LLC GLOBAL ANACOSTIA LLC GLOBAL ANACOSTIA LLC F W DEWS M M DEWS NATCO DEVELOPERS INC EDWARD SHPIRO MINNIE SHPIRO ALVIN T SMITH ERIC M JOSEPHS MICHELLE Y JOSEPHS NATCO DEVELOPERS INC LAWRENCE AGBU HAVILAH REAL PROPERTY SVCS LLC ALLEN LORD JANET LORD CORA W WILKINSON CARE MRS GLADYS FAIRLEY ALVIN E GOINS JR ALVIN E GOINS JR ALVIN E GOINS JR ALVIN E GOINS JR ALVIN E GOINS JR ALVIN E GOINS JR ANACOSTIA ECONOMIC HAVILAH REAL PROPERTY SVCS, LLC GRAY CAPITAL PROPERTIES INC STANTON GARDENS INC STANTON GARDENS INC POMEROY LLC GEORGE W GILES JOHN G ROBINSON HAVILAH REAL PROPERTY SERVICES LLC HAVILAH REAL PROPERTY SVCS, LLC HAVILAH REAL PROPERTY SVCS, LLC JAMES WILSON HAVILAH REAL PROPERTY SVCS, LLC E LEVIN LONG EDDIE HAVILAH REAL PROPERTY SVCS, LLC 2433 TIMILON DEVELOPMENT GROUP LLC LUCIE ADAMS HAVILAH REAL PROPERTY SVCS, LLC ELLA B PEARIS HAVILAH REAL PROPERTY SVCS, LLC HAVILAH REAL PROPERTY SVCS, LLC GEORGE E LYONS SUSIE LYONS NORMAN GROLMAN DANIEL MARTIN LARRY M JOHNSON ELIZA B WEEMS W H WEEMS JOHN T STEWART JOHN T STEWART STANTON VIEW DEVELOPMENT LLC BARRY D ROBINSON WILSON LIRIANO LEROY BARLEY CHERYL JONES R E BAILESS HELEN G BAILESS BARBARA L GASTON BETHUNE DEVELOPMENT LLC 3200 THIRTEENTH ST, LLC BDS INC BDS INC LAWRENCE COLE LESSIE M COLE VICTORIA WILSON MARY C SMITH 5924 ASSOCIATES AEGM INC EVELYN ARNOLD ELIJAH MICKEL W M MICKEL REDSHIFT LLC THEODORE NEWKIRK JR TAMA GILLIS DOROTHY SMITH FRED SMITH JOHN F DAVIS D R DAVIS MLK PROPERTY LLC SOOK J LEE BYOUNG KIE LEE MD P A RUTH H LAWRENCE CHARLES J FAREWELL ROBERT H BREW EMMA E BREW CLINTON E GOLDEN SW CHURCH OF CHRIST SW CHURCH OF CHRIST SW CHURCH OF CHRIST SW CHURCH OF CHRIST SW CHURCH OF CHRIST SW CHURCH OF CHRIST SW CHURCH OF CHRIST SW CHURCH OF CHRIST SW CHURCH OF CHRIST

8 TAX June 2014

2936 KNOX PL SE 2422 ALABAMA AV SE 2309 IRVING ST SE 764 HOWARD RD SE 760 HOWARD RD SE 822 HOWARD RD SE 822 HOWARD RD SE 2717 WADE RD SE 0 STEVENS RD SE 0 SUMNER RD SE 2816 WADE RD SE 2601 MARTIN LUTHER SE 0 WADE RD SE 0 2510 SHERIDAN RD SE 2608 BOWEN RD SE 0 MARTIN LUTHER SE 0 HOWARD RD SE 0 HOWARD RD SE 0 HOWARD RD SE 0 HOWARD RD SE 0 HOWARD RD SE 0 HOWARD RD SE 0 TALBERT TR SE 0 CLAY ST SE 0 0 DOUGLASS RD SE 0 STANTON RD SE 2547 POMEROY RD SE 0 DOUGLASS PL SE 2419 ELVANS RD SE 0 ROCK CREEK CH SE 0 ELVANS RD SE 0 ELVANS RD SE 0 STANTON RD SE 0 STANTON RD SE 2501 ELVANS RD SE ELVANS RD SE 0 POMEROY RD SE 2913 STANTON RD SE 0 ELVANS RD SE 0 ELVANS RD SE 0 KILBOURNE PL SE 0 B ST SE 0 ROBINSON PL SE 2627 12TH PL SE 2631 12TH PL SE 2607 12TH PL SE 0 12TH PL SE 0 13TH ST SE 0 13TH ST SE 0 STANTON RD SE 1827 BRUCE PL SE 1835 BRUCE PL SE 1421 CONGRESS PL SE 1921 ALABAMA AV SE 1900 SAVANNAH PL SE 2026 SAVANNAH PL SE 3487 23RD ST SE 3200 13TH ST SE 0 0 1100 BARNABY TR SE 4304 WHEELER RD SE 1301 BARNABY TR SE 0 BELLEVUE ST SE 911 BELLEVUE ST SE 1005 SAVANNAH ST SE 1003 SAVANNAH ST SE 3339 10TH PL SE 3220 9TH PL SE 1233 SAVANNAH PL SE 2914 7TH ST SE 2918 MARTIN LUTHER SE 2906 MARTIN LUTHER SE 3006 MARTIN LUTHER SE 3020 7TH ST SE 646 ALABAMA AV SE 767 UPSAL ST SE 0 TRENTON ST SE 0 TRENTON ST SE 0 4TH ST SE 0 4TH ST SE 0 4TH ST SE 0 4TH ST SE 0 4TH ST SE 0 4TH ST SE 0 4TH ST SE

$5,622.78 $30,846.92 $37,015.24 $20,385.29 $9,575.55 $23,671.10 $133,373.65 $19,598.55 $9,759.28 $5,301.22 $4,509.58 $54,919.51 $2,485.35 $8,659.74 $57,644.96 $3,284.86 $7,813.61 $9,179.07 $7,481.13 $9,455.22 $2,339.81 $2,257.57 $2,276.85 $201,095.74 $21,944.82 $7,485.62 $25,069.23 $29,198.69 $4,284.51 $46,435.27 $17,879.51 $25,394.49 $112,558.00 $7,281.42 $43,290.52 $6,902.40 $6,999.64 $7,984.79 $21,509.33 $47,251.14 $11,943.65 $9,800.73 $8,238.80 $57,780.66 $82,778.42 $4,198.87 $24,372.92 $4,793.65 $8,718.08 $246,795.93 $28,893.09 $4,846.91 $16,304.65 $2,740.46 $29,080.34 $6,977.94 $12,729.10 $2,505.87 $5,254.62 $27,249.96 $7,486.03 $50,306.60 $3,306.24 $6,568.18 $2,266.05 $13,022.39 $4,416.66 $45,989.57 $63,869.39 $62,083.68 $15,523.70 $3,662.52 $6,459.90 $2,563.22 $2,301.13 $19,822.64 $199,642.56 $2,481.60 $4,415.74 $45,337.76 $45,686.19 $26,790.98 $27,095.05 $26,701.50 $27,578.08 $30,192.03 $40,413.00 $34,499.27

5969 0178 5969 0179 5969 0181 5969 0182 5969 0183 5969 0184 &IMP 5969 0185 5969 0186 5969 0187 5976 0021 5982 0029 &IMP 5988 0078 &IMP 5991 0800 6001 0030 &IMP 6003E 0060 &IMP 6006 0803 6070 0048 &IMP 6070 0815 &IMP 6090 0042 6090 0814 &IMP 6091 0003 &IMP 6117 0046 &IMP 6118 0005 6118 0803 6123 0064 &IMP 6125 2004 &IMP 6126 0026 &IMP 6128 0079 6128 0815 &IMP 6129 0817 6129 0826 &IMP 6153 0068 6153 0070 6157 0806 6157 0825 6157 0833 &IMP 6158 0075 &IMP 6159 0099 6159 0956 6160 0086 &IMP 6163 0125 &IMP 6163 0127 &IMP 6166 0800 &IMP 6167 0800 &IMP 6168 0044 &IMP 6170 0043 &IMP 6170 0044 &IMP 6170 0807 &IMP 6171 0804 &IMP 6207 0046 &IMP 6208 0055 &IMP 6208 0057 &IMP 6214 0001 &IMP 6223S 0100 6223S 0103 6239 0071 &IMP 6239 0804 &IMP 6239S 2011 &IMP 6239S 2021 &IMP 6239S 2022 &IMP 6240 0056 &IMP 6240 0815 6249 0816 6249 0817 PAR 00790037 &IMP PAR 00870433 PAR 00870462 PAR 01420103 &IMP PAR 01430080 PAR 01510062 PAR 01520037 PAR 01550261 PAR 01650069 PAR 01660048 PAR 01770078 PAR 01770084 PAR 01830027 PAR 01850038 PAR 01850040 PAR 02180068 PAR 02190142 PAR 02260024 PAR 02260026 PAR 02260037 PAR 02290153 &IMP PAR 02290161 &IMP PAR 02350062

TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX

2014 Tax Sale Report

SW CHURCH OF CHRIST SW CHURCH OF CHRIST SW CHURCH OF CHRIST SW CHURCH OF CHRIST SW CHURCH OF CHRIST SW CHURCH OF CHRIST S W CHURCH OF CHRIST S W CHURCH OF CHRIST SW CHURCH OF CHRIST AMO L SUMMERS ANGELA M PLATER WILLIAM MOTEN SYLVIA MOTEN RANDLE ESTATES INC LAUREL J GRAYSON ALMARIA GASRON BERNIE D BACCHUS JANIS A STEWART FRANK C UKOH FRANK S TAYLOR TABERNACLE CHURCH SEVENTH DAY ADVENTISTS TABERNACLE CHURCH SEVENTH DAY ADVENTISTS TERRY DAVIS MICHAEL C MCKNIGHT NATIONAL CAPITAL BUILDING & SUPPLY COMPA NATIONAL CAPITAL BUILDING & SUPPLY COMPA VIVIAN JACKSON RONALD JACKSON RENEE A OLIVER JEROME L TILGHMAN DAVID J BROWN NELLIE L CATHCART JENNETTE RECTOR UNFOLDMENT INC MILTON PROPERTIES INC INTERNATIONAL BUILDING INC MARIE V GRAHAM DONALD CAPLAN TRUSTEES RENAISSANCE PROPERTIES LLC MAETEE GRAY WILLIAM D HOLLAND BEATRICE R HOLLAND WALTER E WASHINGTON ESTATES INC 810 CHESAPEAKE STREET DEVELOPMENT LLC BRANDYWINE STREET ASSOCIATION 700 SM PROPERTIES LLC MERRICK DIXON SYLVIA DAVIS POOL KEVIN GREEN 4020 S CAPITOL LLC 4020 S CAPITOL LLC DORA MURPHY LUZ R BONIFACIO JO ANN I ARTIS STEWARD INVESTMENTS LLC STEWARD INVESTMENTS LLC JOSEPH H JUPITER STRATEGIC ASSET HOLDINGS LLC STRATEGIC ASSET HOLDINGS LLC MAURICE HODGE SEQUAN DEVELOPMENT LLC TIFFANY L RAYCROW MARTHA HOWARD MICHELLE D MOORE M AND M HOLDINGS LLC GANA ENTERPRISES ALMA M LEWIS FOXHALL TOWNHOUSES INC ELSIE W MITCHELL LENA E EICHENLAMB NATCO DEVELOPERS INC IMPULSE LLC GB MULLIN COMPANY INC JOINT INC STANLEY L ARMENTROUT EMPIRE BUILDERS CORPORATION E L STURNER NATCO DEVELOPERS INC WILLIAM S HARDY MAC A WALKER SAMUEL HOWARD PEARL HOWARD KENILWORTH PARKSIDE RESIDENT MANAGEMENT KENILWORTH PARKSIDE RESIDENT MANAGEMENT WILLIAM S BOWLING WOODMONT HOMES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION IN MARY C MCELDERRY JACOB MCELDERRY CHARLES L HARPER SR ARCHDIOCESE OF WASHINGTON BERNARD J YOUNG 1309 ALABAMA AVE LLC BESSIE SPENCE HARTMAN SPENCE

0 4TH ST SE 0 4TH ST SE 0 4TH ST SE 0 4TH ST SE 0 4TH ST SE 3428 4TH ST SE 0 4TH ST SE 0 4TH ST SE 0 5TH ST SE 0 6TH ST SE 564 LEBAUM ST SE 355 PARKLAND PL SE 0 RALEIGH ST SE 509 OAKWOOD ST SE 3347 BROTHERS PL SE 3401 BROTHERS PL SE 3715 MARTIN LUTHER SE 3606 BROTHERS PL SE 3600 MARTIN LUTHER SE 3602 MARTIN LUTHER SE 156 UPSAL ST SE 3782 1ST ST SE 0 WILMINGTON PL SE 0 840 XENIA ST SE 450 XENIA ST SE 502 FOXHALL PL SE 0 1ST ST SE 130 YUMA ST SE 0 HALLEY TR SE 3825 SOUTH CAPITOL SE 0 ATLANTIC ST SE 0 ATLANTIC ST SE 840 BARNABY ST SE 840 BARNABY ST SE 851 YUMA ST SE 849 XENIA ST SE 0 BELLEVUE CIR SE 0 BARNABY ST SE 810 CHESAPEAKE ST SE BRANDYWINE ST SE 639 ATLANTIC ST SE 413 ATLANTIC ST SE 4135 4TH ST SE 4023 3RD ST SE 4018 SOUTH CAPITOL SE 4016 SOUTH CAPITOL SE 4019 1ST ST SE 4116 MARTIN LUTHER SW 4263 6TH ST SE 4236 6TH ST SE 4232 6TH ST SE 4301 HALLEY TR SE 4290 SOUTH CAPITOL SW 4296 SOUTH CAPITOL SW 27 GALVESTON PL SW 76 FORRESTER ST SW 22 GALVESTON PL SW 44 GALVESTON PL SW 44 GALVESTON PL SW 41 FORRESTER ST SW 17 FORRESTER ST SW 0 BONINI RD SE 0 BONINI RD SE 2023 SPRUCE DR NW 0 14TH ST NW 0 14TH ST NW 1350 OKIE ST NE 0 BRENTWOOD RD NE 0 0 0 THAYER ST NE 0 CENTRAL AV NE 0 RHODE ISLAND NE 0 KENILWORTH AV NE 0 KENILWORTH AV NE 0 0 KENILWORTH AV NE 0 KENILWORTH AV NE 0 MINNESOTA AV SE 0 GOOD HOPE RD SE 0 FORT STANTON SE 0 FORT STANTON SE 1498 MORRIS RD SE 1331 ALABAMA AV SE 1309 ALABAMA AV SE 0 ALABAMA AV SE

$26,600.25 $26,600.25 $26,600.25 $26,600.25 $26,600.25 $25,841.29 $26,600.25 $35,065.61 $178,305.64 $5,165.06 $2,411.77 $8,740.77 $3,325.99 $3,740.81 $13,643.94 $58,588.62 $7,782.54 $2,561.23 $19,302.00 $51,241.98 $12,325.55 $6,171.56 $12,675.90 $41,498.67 $48,788.89 $2,209.40 $6,816.21 $6,104.50 $140,712.10 $3,807.63 $6,231.53 $7,566.11 $11,476.29 $9,885.53 $50,107.10 $173,234.81 $31,877.59 $9,172.38 $2,491.51 $7,184.61 $59,036.40 $8,044.10 $7,905.61 $3,457.69 $26,544.39 $9,131.59 $18,944.00 $2,782.38 $6,700.33 $2,030.40 $104,553.04 $100,491.66 $2,108.32 $47,672.51 $45,143.43 $4,069.97 $11,805.41 $22,493.08 $2,641.60 $9,903.00 $9,246.06 $10,723.94 $21,217.45 $20,991.05 $7,563.79 $2,596.58 $2,983.08 $63,218.63 $2,740.50 $27,516.16 $27,511.23 $15,810.12 $3,497.30 $2,240.01 $4,488.65 $7,229.25 $5,172.33 $14,488.94 $263,600.49 $45,614.93 $6,010.12 $46,145.04 $8,717.58 $50,431.63 $7,598.61 $3,959.60 $8,051.40

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Editorial

OPINIONS/EDITORIALS

Ruby Dee 1922-2014

America lost another one of its brightest lights last Wednesday when actress, civil rights activist and humanitarian Ruby Dee died at the age of 91. She burst onto the national scene when she appeared in “Raisin in the Sun” and for 70 years, Dee painted an exquisite portrait of work on a palette that bled from art to life and back. She began acting in the 1940s and over the years cemented a body of work on myriad platforms that illustrated her depth, artistry, complexity and range as a performer in Hollywood and on Broadway. Dee won a Golden Globe and secured an Oscar nomination for “American Gangster,” and won a Grammy for a spoken word album, an Emmy in 1991 for “Decoration Day,” and a 1972 Drama Desk award for “Wedding Band.” Equally important, along with her late husband Ossie Davis, remains her devotion to civil rights and humanitarian causes. They battled vigorously against discrimination in the arts, opposed lynching, spoke out forcefully and protested against the Vietnam War, stood up to Sen. Joseph McCarthy and his witch hunt against progressives and supposed Communists, protested South Africa’s apartheid policies, and pushed white-owned banks to provide business loans to Harlem’s black residents. They befriended the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., served as MCs at the 1963 March on Washington and were close friends of Malcolm X. Davis offered a stirring eulogy for Malcolm following his assassination in 1965. Film director Spike Lee captured the essence of this power couple, who had one of Hollywood’s most enduring love stories and who were married for 56 years. “They were strong and brave at a time when many Negro entertainers stood on the sidelines,” he told movie critic Roger Ebert during an interview. “Ruby and Ossie were by Malcolm’s side, they were with Dr. King in Birmingham, Selma, and the March on Washington, and never worried about the negative impact it might have on their careers.” May she rest in peace.

Schwartz Shakes up Mayor’s Race Former D.C. Council member Carol Schwartz has shaken up the mayor’s race with her announcement that she intends to pursue the top job. This foray into the race is her fifth, after runs in 1986, 1994, 1998 and 2002. The announcement has generated surprise and growing excitement from an electorate that no longer trusts its local politicians and who seek people representing them that they can trust. Though they have done nothing politically to earn the opprobrium of voters, mayoral candidates Muriel Bowser and David Catania are seen as being guilty by association. Several of their colleagues have been embroiled in scandal and a weary electorate voted with its feet during the April 1 primary. Schwartz has lived in the District for 50 years and served on the council for 16 years as a Republican. She endeared herself to D.C. residents by her positions and legislation that indicated her love for her adopted community. In a statement released last Monday, Schwartz said she’s watched closely from the sidelines and has been concerned about what’s happening in the city now and what it will look like in the future. Schwartz hit out at the political establishment for the corruption that has sullied Washington’s image. Her greatest concern, she said, stems from many longtime D.C. residents being left behind or pushed out of the city. “In fact,” she said, “our glorious diversity is being threatened.” Schwartz said she wants to give voters a clear choice over Bowser and Catania. People she’s talked to around the city seek someone they can comfortably vote for, Schwartz said, and she feels she’s that person. The next few months will be quite interesting.

Mayor for Life!

It’s true: Marion Barry is our mayor for life! There has not been nor will there ever be another politician who will be able to do what Marion Barry did for this city. That’s why I thoroughly enjoyed the article, “Barry’s Life Takes Center Stage,” by Barrington Salmon that appeared in the June 12 edition. Most of the new residents of the District of Columbia don’t have a clue as to why Marion Barry is so loved by so many. They probably only know of his highly publicized struggles with the law, and can’t understand why anyone would hold him in such high esteem. Those who know him know what he did for this city and love him for it. He gave so much to so many and took nothing for himself. He proved to the world that African Americans could run a major city, and run it well. A black police chief, a black fire chief, a black school superintendent, and a black city administrator – Barry gave them all a chance to show what they could do. And in the summer, if a young person wanted to work, his administration provided jobs for them. Marion Barry was bold and very determined to see that the residents of the District got everything they deserved, and when he was challenged he didn’t back down. He gave the residents a sense of pride in our city and we finally felt that we were an important part of the District. Washington D.C. would not be what it is today if it were not for Marion Barry, period! Dennis Ward Washington, D.C.

Go-Go Meets Classical!

What a fantastic article “District Orchestra Unlikely Mix, Excites Audiences” in the June 12th edition of The Informer by Stacy Brown. Who would have ever thought, a Go-Go Symphony! This is creative music at its best, the hard beating sounds of the streets of D.C. mixed with the symphonic sounds of an orchestra. I haven’t had the chance to hear this wonderful form of music, but I can’t wait to catch them at the Atlas Performing Arts Center in Northeast Washington. I grew up listening to go-go and still dance to it whenever I hear it. To me it’s the equivalent of my parents talking about listening to Motown when they were growing up. Well, go-go music is my Motown. Music is an art form that’s constantly changing. When a certain style of music is adopted by and identified with a community, it’s legitimate and therefore should be studied, taught, and expanded upon. The Go-Go Symphony seems to be a great example of this. Thanks for letting the community know about this new and exciting pairing and, as usual, The Washington Informer does a great job of bringing us “the good stuff.” Barry Faulk Washington, D.C.

Parental Involvement Needed

The article, “Parents Protest Ouster of PTSA President,” by Sam P.K. Collins in the June 12-18 paper, is just the kind of catalyst needed in the black community for getting more people to recognize the importance parental involvement plays in the education of our children.

For too long, too many parents have used the lame excuse of having to “go to work” or that “no one listens to our opinions,” to keep from developing a vested interest in what’s really going on with the District’s public schools. With those kinds of excuses, these “absentee parents” have chosen instead to strengthen apathetic attitudes that have enabled city and school officials to forge ahead with plans that benefit them more than the youngsters who count on them for acquiring the best possible free education they can get. While many parents chose not to get involved in the PTA or community meetings and public hearings where they have the ability as individuals or as a group to offset or challenge decisions made without their input and consent, they’re usually the very ones who sit home in front of a TV screen, calling for an ouster once those changes – such as the school closings last year – become final. I want to thank all the parents – even though their numbers were small –and the members of Empower DC – who sometimes have been the lone voice in the fight for our students’ right to a quality education – for caring enough to take the time on June 2 to organize and participate in the rally at McKinley Technology Education Campus in protest of the PTSA president’s dismissal. It’s these kinds of parents, community members and activists who can repeatedly hold school officials’ feet to the fire to produce better outcomes for all children enrolled in public schools in the District. Margie Lawrence Washington, D.C.

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The Washington Informer

June 19, - June 25, 2014

25


OPINIONS/EDITORIALS

Guest Columnist

By George E. Curry

Hollywood Gets a Low Diversity Rating The first detailed study of the relationship between diversity and the bottom line in the Hollywood entertainment industry has found that although diversity pays – literally –people of color and women are still woefully underrepresented throughout film and television. The study titled, “2014 Hollywood Diversity Report: Making Sense of the Disconnect,” was conducted by the Ralph J. Bunch

Center for African-American Studies at UCLA. It looked at 172 theatrical films released in 2011 and 1,061 television shows that aired during the 2011-12 season. It looked at race and gender and key production roles, including cast diversity, the show’s creator, the writer, the director, awards and domestic and international box offices. Frequent moviegoers represent just 10 percent of the population, but purchase half of all movie tickets, the report stated. “It is important to note here

that minorities are overrepresented among the ranks of frequent moviegoers, those who contribute most to overall box office,” it said. “In 2011, minorities accounted for 44.1 percent of frequent moviegoers, a figure that exceeded their 36.3 percent share of the overall U.S. population.” But you wouldn’t know it by the roles people of color play in the industry. “Historically, there has been a death of gender, racial, and ethnic diversity in film and tele-

Guest Columnist

vision – both in front of and behind the camera,” the report stated. “This reality has meant limited access to employment for women and minorities and to a truncating of the domain of media images available for circulation in contemporary society…Media images contribute greatly to how we think about ourselves in relation to others. “When marginalized groups in society are absent from stories a nation tells about itself, or when media images are rooted primarily in stereotype, inequity is

normalized and is more likely to be reinforced over time through our prejudices and practices.” The report found that although people of color represent 36.3 percent of the population, in film: Of the 172 films examined for 2011, only 10.5 percent of the lead roles were played by people of color and most of them were in such Black-targeted movies as “Jumping the Broom” and Tyler Perry’s “Madea’s Big Happy Family.”

See CURRY on Page 45

By Julianne Malveaux

Did the UNCF Make a Deal with the Devil? When the Koch Foundation gave the United Negro College Fund $25 million, it set off a maelstrom of comments in cyberspace and real time. How dare the UNCF take money from the Koch brothers, some asked.  They ought to send it back, said others.  What’s wrong with this picture? Koch scholarships will be awarded to students with good

grades, financial needs, and an interest in studying how “entrepreneurship, economics and innovation contribute to well-being for individuals, communities, and society.” Sounds like conservative free markets to me.  More than that, it sounds like granting scholarships to further the Koch government-reducing, free market focus.  Koch protects its interest by having two seats on the five member scholarship committee, with the other three from the UNCF.  While

non-Koch interests are the majority, it will be interesting to see if a donor can sway a committee. What else? The Koch brothers are making the most of this gift in the media. Rarely have I seen so many headlines generated by a gift of that size. $100 million, maybe.  $250 million, surely.  But while $25 million will mean a lot to the UNCF, schools such as Harvard would likely consider it nothing more than a modest behest. The Koch brothers must think they’ll get some

Guest Columnist

positive publicity from their gift, and they obviously have the PR team to pitch it. Furthermore, these are the very Koch brothers who have supported voter suppression efforts. They would reduce the size of government, which means the Pell grants that so many students depend on would shrink in size. What one hand gives, in other words, the other takes away. If the Koch brothers would fight to maintain or increase the size of the Pell grant, fewer would look

askance at their gift. Instead, many see this as the cynical manipulation of a deep-pockets donor who gets much publicity from their gift. It kind of reminds me of the Donald Sterling gift to the Los Angeles branch of the NAACP. After Sterling’s racist rant, his donation was returned. Still, the NAACP was in the process of giving him a second lifetime achievement award prior to his

See MALVEAUX on Page 45

By Raynard Jackson

Republicans Should Learn from Cantor’s Mistake Last week’s defeat of House Republican Majority Leader Eric Cantor sent shock waves throughout D.C. like I have never seen before. But, in Cantor’s defeat, I see great opportunity for the Republican Party to make inroads into the Black community. Cantor represents Virginia’s 7th Congressional District, which is a suburb of Richmond.  According to the 2010

26 June 19 - June 25, 2014

U.S. Census, it has a population of 757,917 (74.3 percent White, 17.1 percent Black), median income of $ 64,751. In other words, it is the definition of a middle-class district.  The district is rated as a solid Republican (R+10). Before we can understand how Republicans can learn from this, we must understand why Cantor lost. It was a total repudiation of the lack of leadership and vision within the Republican congressional leadership. How could Cantor justify

supporting amnesty for illegals when there are 50 million Americans out of work? How could he justify giving in-state tuition to illegals when American-born Americans can barely afford college? How could Cantor justify illegal children getting accommodations at a 5-star military base when American children are being moved from homeless shelter to homeless shelter? Cantor’s constituents (Black and White) were asking him some very simple questions: Who is looking out for me and The Washington Informer

my interests? With 17.1 percent of Cantor’s constituents being Black, he should have known that he was on the wrong side of the amnesty issue.  Blacks are the single largest demographic group that opposes amnesty, despite support from such Black groups as the NAACP, the National Urban League, and the Congressional Black Caucus.  If Cantor had some credible Blacks around him, he would have known that Blacks are thoroughly disillusioned with Obama

and his policies and they are willing to look at supporting a “viable” Republican alternative. Republicans fail to see that immigration is a cross-over issue that unites both Blacks and Whites. Paul E. Peterson, professor of government at Harvard University, wrote in the Wall Street Journal, “Gains under the Obama administration by all students range between minimal and nonexistent, and the black-white gap

See JACKSON on Page 45

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OPINIONS/EDITORIALS

Guest Columnist

By Marian Wright Edelman

Return of the Unjust Greedy Weasels This column is not about the recent story making headlines in New York City on Mayor Bill de Blasio’s proposal to lift a ban on pet ferrets. But it is about weasels. Age-old weasels still causing Americans pain and suffering and blocking progress towards a better, safer America for all. Sojourner Truth was a brilliant but illiterate slave woman, a great orator, and a powerful presence who possessed great courage.

She challenged the racial and gender caste system of slavery by suing for the return of a son sold away from her. She got thrown off Washington, D.C. streetcars but kept getting back on until they changed the rules and let her ride. She stood up with fiery eloquence to opponents and threatening crowds who tried to stop her from speaking. When a hostile White man told her that the hall where she was scheduled to appear would be burnt down if she spoke, she replied, “Then I will speak to the ashes.”

When taunted while speaking in favor of women’s rights by some White men who asked if she was really a woman, she bared her breasts and allegedly famously retorted, “Ain’t I a woman?,” detailing the back-breaking double burden of slavery’s work and childbearing she had endured. When heckled by a White man in her audience who said he didn’t care any more about her antislavery talk than for an old flea bite, she snapped back, “Then the Lord willing, I’ll keep you scratching.” And when decrying

Guest Columnist

her exclusion from America’s life and professed freedoms during a religious meeting where another speaker had just praised the Constitution, she said: “… Now I hears talkin’ about de Constitution and de rights of man. I comes up and I takes hold of dis Constitution. It looks mighty big, and I feels for my rights, but der aint any dare. Den I says, God, what ails dis Constitution? He says to me, ‘Sojourner, dere is a little weasel in it.’” The version captured here in an 1863 edition of the Nation-

al Anti-Slavery Standard shares a flaw with many existing accounts of her speeches—they were often written down in the mock Southern dialect that 19th-century readers identified with all slaves, despite the fact that Sojourner Truth was born and raised in rural New York as the slave of a Dutch-speaking family, spoke Dutch as a child, took pride in speaking correct English as an adult, and reportedly sounded like White New

See EDELMAN on Page 46

By William Spriggs

Perceptions of Equality A recent interview of Morgan Freeman by CNN host Don Lemon lit a firestorm of conversation. Freeman argued that his personal success, and that of Lemon’s, made it clear that racism was not a factor in closing America’s growing problem of inequality. Freeman argued that inequality was a crisis because a vibrant middle class was needed for the growth of the economy and stability of society, and the

current chasm between the 1 percent and the 99 percent was unhealthy. Clearly, Freeman’s views on inequality are incontrovertible, so why the storm about his statement on the role of race? Recent work by business school professors Clayton Critcher, of the University of California-Berkeley, and Jane Risen, of the University of Chicago, note that people’s views about the role of racism in America’s inequality is shaped by their knowledge of African

Americans who succeed outside the realm of current Black success, like professional sports or music. When shown pictures of African-American business leaders, for instance, even in the context that the individual is an exception, the respondents become less sympathetic toward the racial polarization of American life and its role in holding down African-Americans. But the narrative used to explain high poverty, high unemployment and low wealth among African Americans is important,

ASKIA-AT-LARGE

not just to race relations, but because the story line Americans buy in accepting the tenuous economic position of African Americans is integral to the story line of accepting American inequality broadly. How does one explain how America alone as a democracy is so accepting of levels of inequality that are closer to Mexico and Turkey than to France, Canada or Denmark? How do we elect politicians that benefit the 1 percent to such extremes, and are in the process of destroying

class mobility-once the key to America’s core identity? Despite moments of exceptions like for their geo-political role in sports victories when Jessie Owens won at the 1936 Berlin Olympics and Joe Louis knocked out Max Schmelling in 1938, America held fast to denying African-Americans access to the American dream of social mobility. Southern Democrats in Congress are included in shaping the New Deal to limit Afri-

See SPRIGGS on Page 46

By Askia Muhammad

Don’t Forget Juneteenth: Holiday Declared by Slaves All hail Juneteenth, the holiday that was declared by enslaved Africans in America. Africans were not “slaves” even though they were enslaved. They never accepted the condition. They were never comfortable with it. Juneteenth is June 19, 1865, the day a column of Union troops arrived at Galveston, Texas and read the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing the enslaved persons in Texas two

years and six months after it was proclaimed, and one year and two months after the conclusion of the Civil War which presumably decided the issue of slavery permanently. After many, many slave rebellions and a virtual “industry” of runaways via the Underground Railroad and other means, more than 200,000 Africans fought bravely for their own freedom in the Civil War and were the deciding force in the victory which preserved the Union, the United States of America.

What makes Juneteenth special is not that Gen. Gordon Granger and his troops declared those who had been enslaved to be free, or even that it was way late in coming to the them in Texas, but rather that without consultation with any authorities, without waiting to be told what to do, the Africans knew exactly what to do – desist from slaving! The enslaved Africans in Texas did not get a chance to run away to safety behind Union lines during the war, where they

could then join the U.S. Colored Troops and fight for their freedom against the Confederate traitors who wanted to keep Black folks in bondage forever. The celebration was short lived however. Just 12 years later, the infamous Hayes-Tilden Compromise was negotiated in order to elect Rutherford B. Hayes president after the 1876 election was deadlocked, and a wholesale betrayal of Black people and their interests was engineered, returning the Johnnie Rebs back to power, and remov-

ing federal troops which had protected Black people from the lynch-mob’s rope in the former Confederate states. But the Juneteenth celebrations continue to this very day. Jim Crow segregation became the law of the land in the slave states, Blacks were powerless to resist, and the White folks in the rest of the country looked the other way as the Ku Klux Klan was born, and what eventually became 100 years of lynching

See MUHAMMAD on Page 46

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The Washington Informer

June 19, - June 25, 2014

27


LIFESTYLE

Saxophonist Tia Fuller will perform during this year’s Jazz Festival which begins Tuesday, June 24 to Sunday, June 29. /Courtesy Photo

Talking All that

JAZZ in DC 28 June 19 - June 25, 2014

By Stacy M. Brown WI Contributing Writer Pack a bag; grab a blanket and take some time off from work, that’s the advice from Sunny Sumter, the executive director of the DC Jazz Festival which celebrates its 10th anniversary this year. “I’m serious. It’s a family affair and if it’s your first time, you should grab a brochure, take out a calendar and plan some activities. I think it’s a great time to take off from work, take a vacation because it’s a lot of fun and

The Washington Informer

it’s also exhausting,” said Sumter, who’s responsible for activities surrounding the festival. In the previous nine years, those who have attended the jazz fest have been treated to some of the most electric names in jazz and for the 60,000-plus who visit each year, organizers have consistently succeeded in adding unique features including the popular, “Jazz in the Hoods,” program where more than 80 performances take place in 40 neighborhood venues in each quadrant of the District. “We have so many people who come to D.C. from all over the world and the idea is that no mater where you live in the District, you can come outside your home and hear jazz and see jazz musicians,” Sumter said. This year’s festival, which begins Tuesday, June 24 to Sunday, June 29, will have a diverse group of established and emerging artists, including Grammy nominee Gregory Porter, Trombone Shorty, Yasiin Bey whom many know as Mos Def, Cyrus Chestnut, the Dizzy Gillespie

Afro-Cuban Experience, and the Brass-A-Holics. “We’re ecstatic to have reached this milestone and are delighted to have attracted jazz lovers from around the world to enjoy our nation’s original art form,” said Michael Sonnenreich, chairman of the festival’s board of directors. Among this year’s attractions, “Jazz at the Hamilton Live,” a production that will consist of 10 nights of performances and a broad representation of the genre’s finest artists, Sumter said. Roy Hargrove, Paquito D’Rivera and Snarky Puppy are among those scheduled for the main stage while Sumter said she’s particularly excited about up and coming artists like Helen Sung and Tia Fuller. “This is a tribute to the rising young women of jazz. Tia Fuller is a fabulous young saxophonist who’s played for Beyonce and then you have Helen Sung, who’s wonderful,” Sumter said. “Jazz at The Hamilton Live” will also host a, “Prelude Kickoff Concert,” on Saturday, June 21 with a performance by Hargrove, a two-time Grammy Award winner, and his hard-bop quintet. “The ‘Hamilton Live’ is thrilled to host [10] nights of vivacious jazz this month,” said Tom Meyer, president of Clyde’s Restaurant Group. “We are excited to join the festival in celebrating its 10 years of success with some of the best jazz artists on the music scene.” Additionally, in partnership with the Phillips Collection, “Jazz ’n Family Fun Days,” returns this year and Sumter said it will be a celebration of the synergy between jazz and the visual arts with performances by more than a dozen regional artists and youth ensembles in the Phillips Collection’s music room and auditorium in Northwest. The two-day free event will See JAZZ on Page 29

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Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews, a trombone and trumpet player, will perform during the upcoming Jazz Festival which begins on Tuesday, June 24 to Sunday, June 29. /Courtesy Photo

Yasiin Bey whom many know as Mos Def will perform during this year’s Jazz Festival which attracts thousands of visitors to the nation’s capital each year. /Courtesy Photo

JAZZ

continued from Page 28 also include storytelling and a petting zoo with jazz instruments. Organizers said another added bonus to this year’s event will be the East River Jazz Festival series, with artists who are exclusively from the Greater Washington, D.C. area, who are making a name for themselves nationally and around the world. Five programs featuring local talent will be held during the East River Jazz Festival series and include artists such as Marc Cary, Kush Abadey, Ron Sutton, Corcoran Holt, Cherie Mitchell-Augers, Lyle Link, Jabari Exum, and Alan Palmer. Events for the East River series will be held at the Anacostia Playhouse in Southeast, the Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens in Northeast, Jazz@Wesley Uptown in Northwest, and

THEARC in Southeast. Festival organizers will also host a DC Jazz Loft Series which will present some of the most ambitious programming, including three nights of music and an all-evening block party. The series, which begins Thursday, June 26 to Saturday, June 28, will pit pianist Orrin Evans against Lafayette Gilchrist and Allyn Johnson in a “cutting contest” based on the informal, late-night competitions where piano greats such as Duke Ellington and James P. Johnson earned their earliest bragging rights. Also, the, “Jazz at the Riverfront,” event returns and it will be held at the Capitol Riverfront, located along the Anacostia River and south of the U.S. Capitol Building. Frederic Yonnet, Akua Allrich, Porter, Orleans Avenue, Bey, the Rebirth Brass Band, and Irma Thomas will be included in what organizers are calling a

three-day blowout that will also have a marketplace, a food and beverage tasting, a chef demonstration and a host of family-friendly activities. “This remarkable all-star lineup represents the best in jazz and exemplifies the richness and soulfulness of the genre,” said Charles Fishman, the festival’s artistic director. “We couldn’t ask for a better way to kick off jazz in June and celebrate the past decade, which has been filled with unforgettable moments that have helped shape D.C. into the international jazz hub that it is today.” WI For tickets and information about the DC Jazz Festival, visit www.dcjazzfest.org. Also, for more details and ticket information about the East River Jazz Festival, visit www.eastriverjazz.net.

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In 1963, Dee emceed the historic March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. /Courtesy Photo

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Ruby Dee

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By Stacy M. Brown WI Contributing Writer Plans have yet to be finalized for the private funeral of legendary actress and activist Ruby Dee and details of a public memorial are still being discussed. It only stands to reason that such arrangements require substantial time as Dee, who died on June 12, at her home in New Rochelle, New York, had quite the fan base and many admirers around the world. Any memorial service, public or otherwise, would certainly rival that of a head of state or decorated war veteran. “We lost a jewel, Mrs. Ruby Dee. So great, so loved,” said actor Samuel L. Jackson, who worked alongside the Emmy, Grammy and Spingarn Medal recipient in director Spike Lee’s 1991 film, “Jungle Fever.” Lee, who also directed Dee in his 1989 film, “Do the Right Thing,” said the actress left a lasting and uncompromised legacy in film, spoken word, and activism. “It has been one of my great blessings in life to work with two of the finest artists and activists, Ruby and Ossie Davis, who were in the battlefields with Paul Robeson, Malcom X, and

Dr. Martin Luther King,” the filmmaker said. “Ruby and Ossie served as a living example that one could be an artist and still deal with what it means to be a black woman and a black man in these United States.” President Barack Obama, talk show host Oprah Winfrey, and Attorney General Eric Holder also counted among the myriad politicians and celebrities to offer remembrances of Dee. Locally, fans of the elegant superstar and others around the District took time out of their hectic and harried lives to express their appreciation for Dee’s unwavering commitment to the common man. “When you understand that she lived 91 years, you get a better appreciation that the good does sometimes outlast the bad because Ruby Dee not only stood for what was good, but she fought for it and did so openly when it could have cost her an acting career and millions of dollars,” said Charles Smith, a Potomac, Maryland resident who attended a Washington Redskins educational seminar and football camp with his son, David on Saturday, June 14. “You won’t find many who would be willing to sacrifice what

See DEE on Page 31

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LIFESTYLE neral in 1965. “She and her husband are legends for the right reasons,” said Angela Cromartie, a school aide in Northwest. “They cared and they showed that they cared and you never got the impression that they stuck their chests out in any way.” The couple’s activism continued long after the civil rights movement. In 1999, Dee and Davis landed in a New York jail for protesting the police shooting of the unarmed African immigrant, Amadou Diallo.

In 2005 Dee and Davis received the Lifetime Achievement Freedom Award from the National Civil Rights Museum located in Memphis, Tennessee. The two also shared a home in Mount Vernon, a New York neighborhood comprised primarily of African Americans. Hollywood actors, music stars and athletes, including Poitier, Denzel Washington, Ben Gordon, Ralph Branca, “P. Diddy,” and the late E.B. White, Art Carney, Dick Clark, and “Heavy D,” also hailed from Mount Vernon,

a 4.4 square-mile city located just above the Bronx. Dee leaves behind her three children, Guy Davis, Hasna Muhammad Davis and Nora Day Davis. “Through her remarkable performances, Ruby paved the way for generations of black actors and actresses, and inspired African-American women across our country,” Obama said. “Through her leadership in the civil rights movement, she and her husband, Ossie Davis, helped open new doors of opportunity for all.” WI

Ruby Dee, Ossie Davis, and their three children at a Congress of Racial Equality peace demonstration. /Courtesy Photo

“When you understand that she lived 91 years, you get a better appreciation that the good does sometimes outlast the bad because Ruby Dee not only stood for what was good, but she fought for it and did so openly when it could have cost her an acting career and millions of dollars.”

-Charles Smith

DEE continued from Page 30 they have for the betterment of strangers, people she couldn’t have known,” said Smith, 48. Dee grew up in Harlem, New York and, in 1941, she joined the American Negro Theatre, a repertory company best known for launching the careers of Harry Belafonte and Sidney Poitier, whom she’d later appear opposite in the groundbreaking Broadway play, “A Raisin in the Sun,” in 1959. She earned the National Board of Review Award for Best Supporting Actress in, “A Raisin in the Sun,” an original production by Lorraine Hansberry. Dee appeared in more than 100 films and television shows, earning numerous awards and recognition.

She and Ossie Davis, her husband of 57 years, stood tall during the civil rights movement, working for the ideal of racial equality and freedom for all. The couple stood shoulder-to-shoulder with King and others during the many marches and demonstrations of the 1950s and 1960s. Dee served as a member of the Congress of Racial Equality, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. In 1963, Dee emceed the historic March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom and she and Davis, who died in 2005, proved to be close friends of King and Malcolm X, with Davis giving the eulogy at Malcolm X’s fu

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By Stacy M. Brown WI Contributing Writer Whether an ardent supporter or a detractor, there’s one thing unmistakable about Michael Jackson: He’s still the undisputed “King of Pop.” Five years after his death, Jackson remains the most talked about star in music. His estate has ballooned in value, with some estimates placing its worth at between $600 million and $2 billion. “There’s only been one Michael Jackson and what we’ve been able to see after his death was a groundswell of people who wanted to get reacquainted with what made him so special,” said Arthur Moore, a sound engineer who lives and works in Northeast. Last month, Jackson’s estate executors released a new posthumous album, “Xscape,” which hit the top spot on music charts in 50 countries. A hologram of the late “Thriller” singer appeared at the Billboard Music Awards in Las Vegas, bringing a standing-room-only crowd to its feet with many of them weeping over their fallen idol. Earlier this month, court filings showed that Jackson’s three children, Prince, 17, Paris, 16, and Blanket, 12, receive a hefty $8 million annual allowance because of their father’s vast earnings since his death on June 25, 2009 at the age of 50.  «It›s a shame that they don›t have their father, but I›d imagine that the consolation is that he left his children in a great financial position and he left his fans some good material that will keep his voice and talent alive for them,” Rochelle Ledbetter, a Southeast resident whose been a fan of Jackson since the legend and his brothers joined Motown Records in the late 1960s. Ledbetter, 58, and other fans can expect much more music from the late superstar who officially earned the title, “King of Pop,” after his 1982, “Thriller,” album sold more than 50 million copies worldwide and became

The late Michael Jackson officially earned the title, “King of Pop,” after his 1982, “Thriller,” album sold more than 50 million copies worldwide and became the bestselling record in history. /Courtesy Photo

the best-selling record in history. Jackson’s estate executors, fronted by attorneys John Branca and music producer John McClain, said his most recent release, “Xscape,” will prove to be a prelude of what’s to come. They said there are ambitious plans to include as many as eight more albums culled from outtakes and repackaged material. “We’ve got more surprises coming,” producer Rodney Jerkins told Rolling Stone magazine. Jerkins worked with Jackson on his 2001, “Invincible,” album and “Xscape.” Also, fans can enjoy the “Jackson Experience,” on video games of the singer that continue to be successful and a Cirque du Soleil tour that began in Las Vegas and has proved popular all around the country. “The estate has done a very good job and you think of  how dysfunctional it could be,” said Dan Beck, a former Epic Records executive who worked closely with Jackson. “We may not like particular elements of it, but Michael made the music, and they’ve kept that going.” Jackson’s career spanned five decades with hits such as, “I Want You Back,” “The Love You Save,” “Off the Wall,” “Beat It,” “Billie Jean,” “Bad,” and “Man in the Mirror,” propelling him as arguably the greatest pop star in music history. His posthumous albums, “Michael,” and “Xscape,” have featured previously unreleased songs Jackson held over from al-

See JACKSON on Page 33

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Horo scopes

Griot

“The Man from Essence: Creating a Magazine for Black Women”

TAURUS It’s not like you’ve been rubbing your socks against the carpet, but there’s a lot of static electricity in the air. Expect your interactions with others to be charged (so, therefore, if someone ends up barking at you, or you at them, chalk it up to the stars). Spend arm-inarm time with someone who understands you intuitively, the way a fish understands water; you’re destined to be fraught with dilemmas no matter what you do, dilemmas of the small but vexing variety. Take all the time you need, relief is on the way.

by Edward Lewis with Audrey Edwards, foreword by Camille O. Cosby, c.2014, Atria $25.00 / $29.99 Canada 311 pages By Terri Schlichenmeyer WI Contributing Writer

It’s never been done before. It’s never been done, it’s never been tried. Maybe it’s never been thought of, either, but that hasn’t stopped you. Once a valid idea pops into your head, it’s not long before the idea becomes more. You’ve been around long enough to know, however, that the road to success can be paved with spikes and nothing ever happens smoothly. In “The Man from Essence” by Edward Lewis (with Audrey Edwards), you’ll see that that phenomenon crosses all industries. By age 28, Edward Lewis had already endured his share of awkwardness: he’d lost a football scholarship at one college and had flunked out of law school at another. He was, however, able to find and keep a good job at a major bank in Manhattan, which led to an opportunity that would “transform” his life. The vice president of a New York investment firm invited a “bunch of … young bloods” to a think-tank meeting, promising them financing if they came up with a business idea that would work. One of the attendees mentioned that his mother always dreamed of a magazine specifically for “Negro” women and, offhandedly, the investment VP paired him and two others with Lewis, who knew “something about finance.” Eager to own their own business, the four men – Clarence Smith, Jonathan Blount, Cecil Hollingsworth, and Lewis – set up a partnership in March 1969, and began looking for an editor for their new maga-

JACKSON continued from Page 32 bums such as “Thriller,” and “Dangerous.” Rolling Stone reported that fans should expect an even deeper excavation of Jackson›s song vaults in the coming years. «It was frequent that Michael would record songs and put them on the shelf,» said Matt

JUNE 19 - JUNE 25, 2014

ARIES The clean slate is refreshing, isn’t it? The future is indeed bright. You are walking proof that hard work, with or without luck, is the key to success. Hard work must be done ‘getting through frustrating times with a smile on your face’ variety, but you are a pro at this. What’s frustrating may simply be that so much is up in the air; focus instead on relieving someone else’s frustrations and yours will vanish.

zine, even though they “knew a little more than zip about Negro women and the consumer market … they comprised.” There was, of course, a learning curve – including a disastrous almost-name of the magazine, staffing problems and many wars of words – but in the spring of 1970, Essence  magazine debuted. Despite an initial problem with funding, a revolving editorial door, plenty of in-fighting, lawsuits, ousting of partners, and “out-of-control behavior,” the magazine thrives with a readership that today “remains ever faithful.” And of the original four partners, Lewis was the “last man standing” when Essence Communications Inc. was sold to Time Warner in 2008. This story of a magazine as told by “The Man from Essence” is a good one. It’s filled with advice, insight, and hot-button gossip, but that’s not all. It also includes stories about people who probably won’t like those stories told. Indeed, author Edward Lewis (with Audrey Edwards) leaves nothing unsaid in this business memoir and I found that completely irresistible.  Here, readers learn a bit of background on what it takes to launch a successful magazine – what to do and definitely what not to do – and we get a behind-thescenes taste of a business like this. Along the way, Lewis gives us a sense of the times and attitudes in which this iconic magazine was launched and incubated, which is both entertaining and informative. That makes this book a nice surprise, and not just for fans of the magazine. If you’re up for an advice-dispensing business biography that also dishes dirt, in fact, “The Man from Essence” is a book to try.WI

Forger, Jackson›s longtime engineer. Reportedly, Jackson had an additional 20 to 30 songs per album that weren’t released, making it possible that those tracks comprise several new albums in the future. “I’m sure there are a few more great things out there,” Jerkins said. “Hopefully, we’ll all have a chance to hear them.”WI

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GEMINI A caterpillar, given the right resources and a certain amount of time, becomes something unrecognizable. You’re going to learn a few things about transformations. The radical change you experience will almost surely be intellectual and/or political, but it will alter everything. The change is affecting you in funny, unpredictable ways; but good friends and old standbys dominate your weekend. Nice that while some things change others stay the same. You’ll be overwhelmed with new information. CANCER Money matters are muddled and it’s hard to figure out how much you have, and what you want to spend it on. If you’ve had your heart set on something that you might not be able to afford after all, then it’s time to teach your heart some flexibility. Money is not much of an issue because it doesn’t cost anything to daydream (which is what you’ll do just about all day long for two days straight). The most pressing challenge involves an authority figure. LEO You have enough self-respect to stand up for yourself in a social situation, and even though some may interpret this as arrogance, the wisest among your friends know better. That said, you’re always better off getting other people to talk rather than listening to your own voice. Patience is a beautiful quality. Decision-making is not a snap, and decision-making around money is a bad idea period. Your frame of mind is more suited to creative endeavors. Be spongelike, ready to receive ideas from everywhere, including from people who rarely speak up. VIRGO Be careful of impulse buying. A discussion about values with a good friend will set you on the right track and, hopefully, dissuade you from splurging on that pair of pants in a store window that, while they seem incredible on display, will just seem like another pair of pants once you buy them. Don’t do it! Your curiosity leads to some deep intellectual digging that turns up all sorts of interesting, emotional artifacts. Interaction with family will seem tumultuous. But romance and fun is in the horizon. LIBRA Your world is full of people with whom you feel a deep, startling connection. Plus, everything is insanely funny. Some of your friends should be considered national treasures. Helping other people cope with their stress is a deft way of handling your own. A relatively stress free, although intense one-on-one relationship (either business or romantic) dominates. Matters that seem outside of your hands are, in fact, very much in your hands. So no excuses! SCORPIO Your domestic life is something of a volcano and an eruption seems imminent. But, as you are in no mood to be scalded by projectile lava, you’re willing to negotiate; compromise suddenly seems like a good option. If the problem persists, apply your imagination toward solving it. A solution you haven’t thought of, but that would make everyone happy, might be at hand. Drop everything to help someone else. If you find yourself lugging a television out of a moving truck, consider it exercise. SAGITTARIUS You receive new ideas the way the earth receives light from the sun – fully, warmly, gratefully. New trees of thought are taking root in your brain. No wonder your hair looks funny! Seriously, kick vanity to the curb this week and focus on things that actually matter. Seemingly, the second you’ve found your keys you’ve lost your cell phone; your mind is simply elsewhere. Games, productivity and men figure strongly. The beach may or may not figure in, depending on your proximity to it. Some details need your attention. CAPRICORN You are aiming for the right goals, but your strategy for accomplishing them needs some work. Think about making a change, but only a small change. The big picture is right on. Putting your thoughts in writing not only makes them clear to everyone else; it also makes them clearer to yourself. Your family is tugging on your sleeves for attention. To give them the time they deserve, you might have to postpone something else. Get away to the woods, the beach, or a romantic restaurant – something like that. AQUARIUS Everything you see seems to fit your mood, as if the world is a projection of your inner beauty. Others find you attractive and exciting, and may tell you so. Lost in all this, you are hardly thinking about, say, money, which might pose a problem. If it does, you still won’t be thinking about it. You’ll be in one of your wide-eyed philosophical moods. PISCES You have a hard time focusing with all your plans for saving the world on your mind. Why people don’t think harder and better about the things that matter baffles you. On the other hand, you’re easily distracted yourself. Finding a balance is a struggle that won’t go away. You’ll be blessed with more energy than you know what to do with – and lots of time. Self-transformation might ensue. You will believe you’re onto something. But are you, really? Is it just a ruse? Pursue this.

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US-Ghana Game Excites Football Fans By Barrington M. Salmon WI Staff Writer@bsalmondc The third time proved to be the charm for the United States Men’s National Soccer Team after they beat nemesis Ghana 2-1 in a thrilling match decided in the last four minutes of the game. Ghana had beaten the Americans twice in their last two World Cup encounters and the vast majority of the standing-room-only crowd at Bukom Restaurant in Adams Morgan expected a similar result on the evening of June 16. Marcus Robinson, a 42-yearold D.C. entrepreneur clad in a red, white and blue T-shirt, delighted in being one of the few contrarians in the crowd and exuded ecstasy following the American victory. Throughout the game, he chanted for his team, exchanged friendly banter with opponents, wagged his fin-

ger or gestured at the television whenever a Ghana shot went awry and high-fived a compatriot bedecked in a large American flag. “Ghana could and should have won the game,” he said as the handful of American supporters and scores of disappointed Ghanaians trooped out of the Northwest restaurant into the cool Washington evening. The early goal made the Ghanaian team anxious and they tried to score too much. There were too many balls over the top.” “Today, the white stars beat the Black Stars but America needs to move on (to the next round).” The game, held at the Estadio das Dunas in Natal, Brazil, saw the U.S.’s Clint Dempsey score the first goal in the opening 29 seconds of the game. The game made Dempsey the fifth fastest scorer in World Cup history and the first American to score a goal

in three World Cups. The U.S. playing in Group G – also known as “the Group of Death,” – still have to tangle with traditional powerhouses Germany and Portugal. The stunning first-minute goal left the Ghanaian crowd stunned but as the game progressed, their enthusiasm jump-started again and cheers bounced around the establishment as the Black Stars dominated the run of play. The result would have been quite different if Ghana had just been able to convert on any of the 21 shots players took over the 90plus minutes of the game. Ghana players like Sulley Muntari, Asamoah Gyan, Michael Essien and Kevin PrinceBoateng threatened early and often but the U.S.’s stout defense kept then at bay. As U.S. goalie Tim Howard saved, parried and deflected shots, the crowd grumbled, sighed and groaned, ruing all the missed opportunities. Naomi Williams stood in a space between the front door and the bar watching the game intently. The Canadian native said she had planned to travel back to New York earlier in the day but put everything on hold

to stay and watch the match. “Oh course Ghana,” she said when asked who she supported. “Even though I’m not Ghanaian, it’s my favorite team. I’m a big soccer fan but there are probably bigger soccer fans here. They made it so far in the last tournament and they need to go further this year.” Williams, a Northwest resident who travels between New York and the District for her job, broke into smiles often as the game progressed. “It’s awesome to be here,” she said. “This is probably the best place to watch the game.” More than 250 revelers watched the game on several big screen TVs stationed around the bar, in the back of the establishment, in an upstairs section and in an alcove where diners sat and watched the game. Those up front stood five deep at the bar, eyes focused on one screen or the other. People chatted and socialized even as sweet Ghanaian music occasionally blared through massive loud speakers. Yao Odamttem, a 36-year-old brand developer and IT engineer, stood aghast when the U.S. scored. Throughout the match,

his face reflected the highs and lows of the game and like his Ghanaian comrades, anxiety replaced exuberance as the minutes ticked off the clock. “One of these years we’ll make it to the top,” the Northwest D.C. resident said. “To be honest, it was a shock. We played with purpose, sound execution and diplomacy. Ghana needs to toughen up. You see other teams get up and fight but not Ghana.” Ghanaian supporters like Anika Trahan enjoyed watching her team dominate the Americans and she fully expected a winning result after seeing Ghana pin the U.S. deep in their own half for long periods of time. “I am and will always root for African teams,” the obviously disheartened Trahan said after the game. “I’m disappointed. I wanted Ghana to win. I was befuddled when the goal scored. I was getting drunk – I was so shocked. I had hoped that that’s the only goal they scored.”WI To read this story in its entirety, go to washingtoninformer.com

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Washington quarterback Robert Griffin III held his inaugural “Friday Night Lights” football camp at Anacostia High School in Southeast on Friday, June 13. More than 270 children ages 6-18 joined Griffin III and a host of other local athletes and entertainers who assisted the quarterback throughout the evening camp. /Photo by Khalid Naji-Allah

Griffin III Brings Football Camp to Southeast Washington’s Quarterback Draws Crowd By Elton Hayes WI Contributing Writer Passersby who happened to stroll past Anacostia High School last Friday evening couldn’t help but notice that the scene in the school’s main parking looked different. Metropolitan Police Department officers in patrol cars and on motorcycles guarded the parking lot’s entrance like Fort Knox, as hundreds of people of all ages formed a line that started in front of the school’s gymnasium on 16th Street in Southeast, and snaked deep into the lot. Robert Griffin III, one of the National Football League’s most popular players, waited inside one of the school’s athletic building to kick off his “Friday Night Lights” football camp. “People told me when I first came [to the District] that nobody really does this type of stuff around here,” the Washington Redskins quarterback said. “D.C. has accepted me for who I am, so I have accepted everyone in D.C. for who they are. We could have easily held this camp somewhere else, but I felt that this was the most significant place for us to have it. We need these kids to realize that they’re not forgotten.” Griffin III, 24, enlisted the help of his teammates and en-

tertainers to bring his inaugural “Friday Night Lights” camp to the high school on June 13. DeSean Jackson and Kirk Cousins counted among a number of Redskins players and new Washington head coach Jay Gruden also showed up to support Griffin III. Hip-hop artists Wale Folarin, Shad Moss aka Bow Wow and Stanley Burrell aka MC Hammer attended the camp, as well. The overcast skies and scattered showers that doused the region for most of the day cleared for a few hours Friday evening, and more than 270 children ages 6-18 converged on Anacostia High School’s turf football field and donned new burgundy-and-white T-shirts emblazoned with the camp’s theme, “Catch Your Dreams,” compliments of Adidas. Walter and Belinda Moyer stood in front of a short, chainlink fence that separated the front row seats of the bleachers from the field. The couple watched their son, seven-yearold Donovan, bounce around the turf with a football that appeared supersized in his tiny hands. “We held back [the news] until it was time to come over here,” Walter Moyer, a 38-year-old Silver Spring, Maryland resident said. “We told him that we had

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a surprise for him today, and then a couple of hours before the camp, we told him what that surprise was.” The news stunned the aspiring running back. “[Donovan] became kind of bashful because it was a bit overwhelming for him. Robert Griffin III is his hero and his favorite player. This is a special day for him. He’s really excited,” his father said. Decked out in new Adidas football cleats, shirts and gloves, campers practiced with professional coaches under the lights, and received training in all areas of the game from how to properly tuck and clutch a football when receiving a handoff, to defensive back agility drills aimed to improve footwork. Griffin III offered hands-on instruction while he laughed and joked with campers, briefly stopping to toss the football to Washington Wizards starting point guard John Wall and Folarin. While conversation about football dominated the evening, Griffin III, who graduated from Texas’ Baylor University in three years with a degree in political science and a 3.67 grade point average, also stressed to campers that they must have the same

See CAMP on Page 36 The Washington Informer

Explore the diverse wonder of the land “down under”. Australia has so much to offer. Imagine mingling with the kangaroos and koalas on a wildlife farm, touring the famous Sydney Opera House, or watching the changing colors at mysterious Ayers Rock. Friendly smiles and wide-open spaces await you in Australia. In the land down under, breath-taking landscapes deliver the perfect backdrop for once-in-a-lifetime adventures, while bustling, cosmopolitan cities provide unforgettable, culture-rich experiences. Australia offers an abundance of reasons to visit. You name it, it’s probably there. Don’t miss this once in a lifetime experience to visit the land “down under.” Make your reservation today.

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Robert Griffin III practices drills with children and teenagers during his “Friday Night Lights” football camp at Anacostia High School in Southeast on June 13. /Photo by Khalid Naji-Allah

NEWSPAPER READING IS A HABIT DON’T BREAK THE HABIT!

More than 270 children participated in the “Friday Night Lights” football camp at Anacostia High School on June 13. /Photo by Khalid Naji-Allah

CAMP continued from Page 35

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passion in the classroom that they do on the field. “I wanted them know that it takes hard work for them to get to where they’re trying to go, and that’s not just exclusive to the football field, but also in the classroom with academics,” Griffin III said. “I just want to show them that they have to work hard to get to where they’re trying to go.” Last week’s “Friday Night Lights” camp may have been the first, but Anacostia High School principal Dr. Ian Roberts hopes it won’t be the school’s last as host. “This event definitely serves as an inspiration and it speaks volumes about what the Washington Redskins mean to the community. They’re not just about winning football games, The Washington Informer

but they’re showing the community east of the [Anacostia] River, particularly Robert Griffin III, that they are invested in what is happening over here,” Roberts said. “The fact that [Griffin III] decided to bring his camp to the Academies at Anacostia to support youth in Southeast, D.C, speaks volumes to who he is as a person. I think this one experience will definitely inspire a tremendous [number] of students.” Whether or not Griffin III’s camp will return to Anacostia High School next year remains to be seen, but campers’ delight as the evening drew to a close showed on their faces. “I liked the running back drill,” said an overly excited Donovan, who will enter second grade this year and plays in a local youth football league. “It was awesome. I talked to Robert Griffin III and asked him to

autograph my jersey and he did. He’s my favorite player.” Griffin III wants residents east of the Anacostia River to know that in him, they have a champion both on and off the field. To him, his presence in the D.C. area means more than just winning football games for the hometown team. “We want to give to this community. We want these kids to know that they are not forgotten. That’s why we’re here, that’s why we’re giving them so much stuff. We really want to be a blessing to them because they deserve it. They need this kind of influence to help them realize that their dreams and goals are attainable. They are not forgotten,” he said, as he flashed his trademark smile. WI

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Nearly 300 students participated in the Redskins’ sponsored “Driven By Our Ambitions Educational Seminar & Football Camp” at Coolidge Senior High School in Northwest on Saturday, June 14. /Photo by John E. De Freitas

Redskins Seminar Aids Local Students Team Sponsors Educational Event at D.C. School

By Stacy M. Brown WI Contributing Writer Subscribing to the theory that concentration means the ability to think of nothing at all, Kevin Proctor stared intently at personnel from the Washington Redskins, the NCAA, and recruiters as they spoke about the slim prospects of making it into professional football. For Kevin, a 17-year-old running back at Northwest High School in Germantown, Maryland, the message couldn’t have been clearer. “I’m focused and I’m just here with the hopes of becoming a better football player and going to Bowie State or another school and then, hopefully, to the NFL,” Kevin said. The teen’s father proved just as confident as his young son. “We are here for Kevin to show his ability. He’s a very focused young man with natural ability, a go-getter and this is in his blood,” said the elder Kevin Proctor Jr., noting the family’s relationship with former University of Maryland and Detroit Lions standout Kevin Glover. The father and son duo sat among the 280 students and others inside the gymnasium of

Coolidge Senior High School in Northwest on Saturday, June 14, for the Redskins’ sponsored, “Driven By Our Ambitions Educational Seminar & Football Camp.” With an array of educational and financial instruction already covered during the daylong event, students and many of their parents appeared most excited about hitting the gridiron where Redskins’ personnel eagerly awaited a chance to show the young hopefuls how it’s done on the field in professional football. Drills such as the 40-yard dash, where speed and explosive first steps are watched closely by recruiters and scouts and clocked by timekeepers, served to pump up the athletes, their parents and friends who came to support the high school students. “I’m hoping this gives my son more exposure. I want him to understand that we’re using sports as a tool to move forward academically and otherwise, but this is a great program,” said Thomas Riddick, Sr., whose son, Thomas Jr., attends Friendship Collegiate Academy Public Charter School in Northeast. Jeffrey Keane, a sophomore at Damascus High School in Mont-

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gomery County, Maryland, said he wanted to test his skills in a vertical jumping drill so that he could show off his ability to intercept passes thrown by some of the NFL’s best, including Redskins’ star, Robert Griffin III. “I’m a free safety and I want to be in the NFL one day and prove that I belong there and do well,” said Jeffrey, 16. Sponsored by the Redskins Foundation, team employees Daniel Sampson and Mike Adams conceived of the event as a tool to help instruct prospective college student-athletes about the importance of financial stability, eligibility rules, and the college recruiting process. They also stressed the significance of knowing the fundamentals of one of America’s favorite pastimes. “[Adams and I] decided that the best approach to showcase to student-athletes how important education is to the overall process of having the opportunity to continue playing on the field beyond high school was to have an educational seminar and football camp,” said Sampson, the team’s assistant director of communications. Sampson and Adams, the

See SEMINAR on Page 38 The Washington Informer

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June 19, - June 25, 2014

37


SPORTS SEMINAR continued from Page 37 Redskins’ assistant video coordinator, invited former New Orleans Saints and Baltimore Colts star Howard Stevens to the camp to help inspire and instruct the young athletes on what it takes to sack a quarterback, kick a game-winning field goal, and break a tackle and dash 80 yards up the sidelines for a critical touchdown. “I absolutely love working with the kids,” said Stevens, who now serves as a recruiting representative for NCSA Athletics in Chicago. “We want to help athletes and we want to make sure that the recruiting process is going appropriately. It’s important for me to convey to them that they should be focused on doing things to make them better, to prepare for the right college and understand that there will be distractions that could hinder their success.” Stevens also noted the importance of staying upbeat even if a student isn’t recruited by a college. He said he wasn’t recruited, mostly because of his small stature, but that didn’t stop him. “I never got involved in drugs or

Students and parents appeared excited about hitting the gridiron where Redskins personnel showed the young hopefuls how it’s done on the field in professional football. /Photo by John E. De Freitas

anything like that and, even though I wasn’t recruited and no college thought I was good enough for them,” he said. “I still made it to the NFL and I was good enough to play for five years.” Deena Gardner, the director of player engagement education at the NFL said it’s important that students understand there will be many who will try to take advantage of them. Gardner said student-athletes are particularly vul-

nerable to shady characters. “When somebody who you don’t know is trying to give you a car or a gym membership or training for free, that’s going to put you in a situation where you’re no longer an amateur,” she told the group during a seminar on the ethics of college and professional recruiting. “It’s not all about football,” Gardner said. “It’s about being successful.” WI

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We are a collection of smalls. Wells Fargo celebrates the non-profits and communities they support in their new advertising campaign “Small is Huge.” The campaign celebrates a number of individual actions that have a profound impact on the people involved. Whether it’s a conversation to save a home, a job for a home-bound veteran, or a grant to fund kitchen tools, Wells Fargo provides the building blocks to make things better. While there is no one-size-fits-all solution to our communities’ challenges, Wells Fargo’s small, focused efforts can have huge meaning for the individuals they serve. And little by little, they add up to some pretty huge numbers. Last year, Wells Fargo worked with over 18,500 non-profits and schools from the San Francisco Bay Area to Tampa Bay, donations that totaled more than $275 million. But offering a helping hand can also mean lending your own hand to a cause. So Wells Fargo Team Members volunteered 1.69 million hours in their local communities in 2013. The “Small is Huge” campaign demonstrates that there’s nothing so huge we can’t overcome one small measure at a time. Little by little, we can do a lot. Individual, by community, by neighborhood the effect can be huge. Visit www.wellsfargo.com/stories to see how big small can be.

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The Religion Corner

RELIGION

Think on These Things

Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just… things are of good report;… and if there be any praise, think on these things. Philippians 4:8 Sunday, June 8th marked the second anniversary of my new radio talk show, “Think on These Things.” Heard throughout the Washington metropolitan area on the first and oldest gospel radio station in the country, WYCB AM, 1340, A Radio One Station, it’s another milestone. I’m very thankful! Health has been the No. 1 priority for most of the two years; where we featured experts like Dr. Judith Fradkin, director of Diabetes and Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases at the National Institutes of Health; we enjoyed actress Della Reese, a type 2 diabetes survivor and speakers from the American Diabetes Association; health and nutritionist Dr. Lareece Gee Long and we heard from the last doctor who cared for my mother, Dr. Richard Merrill who shared how to live with type 2 diabetes. We talked with my first radio show sponsor, Attorney Jack H. Olender, founder of Jack H. Olender & Associates, P.C., now one of America’s most successful malpractice law firms; featured on “60 Minutes” and other major news shows. For Black History Month, we heard from three D.C. mayors; Mayor for Life, Marion Barry; Mayor Vincent Gray and Sharon Pratt, the first female mayor of the District; closing out the month with Dr. Barbara Williams- Skinner, a HistoryMaker and the first executive director of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation. On the anniversary of the death

of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. our guest included the Hon. Congressman John Conyers, who told the audience how he sponsored the legislation to create the King Holiday four days after King’s assassination. Thank you, Congressman Conyers. Karen Dale, executive director of AmeriHealth was my special guest for the Mother’s Day segment. She gave listeners 10 points to remember about taking care of themselves. The information proved impactful. We are very grateful to AmeriHealth, the sponsor of our health segment. Congresswoman Donna Edwards also one of my guests on the show; she talked about domestic violence and shared with us how she had a history of working with the domestic violence community more than a decade before becoming a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Today, she continues to support programs that benefit women. The Rev. Jesse Jackson another of my esteemed guests provided an update on the state of his son’s health, former Congressman Jesse L. Jackson, Jr. We heard the story of the Washington Informer Newspaper founded by Dr. Calvin W. Rolark from publisher Denise Rolark Barnes. Julianne Malveaux shared how she had just returned from a speaking engagement at the unveiling of a statute of Fannie Lou Hamer, who was “sick and tired of being sick and tired.” The unveiling took place on October 5, 2012 in Ruleville, Mississippi. Willie Jolley, world renowned inspirational and motivational speaker shared with listeners how they must make every minute count. He quoted Benjamin Mays “I have only

with Lyndia Grant

just a minute, only sixty seconds in it. Forced upon me, can’t refuse it, didn’t seek it, didn’t choose it, but it’s up to me to use it …” Dr. Frank Smith provided updates on the African American Civil War Museum, a national monument located in Northwest, sharing the plight of the 209,145 United States Colored Troops of the Civil War; plus we featured the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington. We featured ministers led by my pastor, the Rev. Dr. James Coleman. Dr. Gwendolyn Boyd talked about the 100th Anniversary of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, plus we were able to congratulate President Boyd, now the first female to serve at the helm of Alabama State University.WI

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39


RELIGION RELIGION BAPTIST

AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL

Pilgrim Baptist Church

Historic St. Mary’s Episcopal Church

Pilgrim Baptist Church

The Reverend Lyndon Shakespeare Interim Priest Foggy Bottom • Founded in 1867 728 23rd Street, NW • Washington, DC 20037 Church office: 202-333-3985 • Fax : 202-338-4958 Worship Services Sundays: 10 a.m. Holy Eucharist with Music and Hymns Wednesdays: 12:10 p.m. - Holy Eucharist www.stmarysfoggybottom.org Email: stmarysoffice@stmarysfoggybottom.org

Rev. Louis B. Jones II Pastor

Schedule of Services: Sunday School – 9:30 AM Sunday Morning Worship Service – 11:00 AM Communion Service – First Sunday Prayer Service/Bible Study – Tuesday, 6:30 PM www.blessedwordoflifechurch.org e-mail: church@blessedwordoflifechurch.org

Worship Sundays @ 7:30 & 11:00 A.M. 5th Sundays @ 9:30 A.M. 3rd Sundays: Baptism & Holy Communion Prayer & Praise: Wednesdays @ Noon & 6:30 P.M.

Schedule of Service Sunday Service: 8:30 AM & 11:00 AM Bible Study: Wednesday 7:30 PM Communion Service: First Sunday www.livingwatersmd.org

www.pilgrimbaptistdc.org

Covenant Baptist United Church of Christ Drs. Dennis W. and Christine Y. Wiley, Pastors 3845 South Capitol Street Washington, DC 20032 (202) 562-5576 (Office) (202) 562-4219 (Fax) SERVICES AND TIMES: SUNDAYS: 10:00 am AM Worship Services BIBLE STUDY: Wonderful Wednesdays in Worship and the Word Bible Study Wednesdays 12:00 Noon; 6:30 PM (dinner @ 5:30 PM) SUNDAY SCHOOL: 9:00 AM – Hour of Power “An inclusive ministry where all are welcomed and affirmed.” www.covenantbaptistdc.org

Twelfth Street Christian Church

Campbell AME Church Reverend Daryl K. Kearney, Pastor

(Disciples of Christ) 1812 12th Street, NW Washington, DC 20009 Phone: 202-265-4494 Fax: 202 265 4340

2562 MLK Jr. Ave., S E Washington, DC 20020 Adm. Office 202-678-2263 Email:Campbell@mycame.org Sunday Worship Service 10: am Sunday Church School 8: 45 am Bible Study Wednesday 12:00 Noon Wednesday 7:00 pm Thursday 7: pm “Reaching Up To Reach Out”

Sunday Worship Service 8:00am and 11:00am Sunday School 9:15am Holy Communion 4th Sunday 10:00am Prayer and Bible Study Wednesday 7;00pm TV Ministry –Channel 6 Wednesday 10:00pm gsccm.administration@verizon.net

Lanier C. Twyman, Sr. Bishop 5757 Temple Hill Road, Temple Hills, MD 20748 Office 301-899-8885 – fax 301-899-2555 Sunday Early Morning Worship - 7:45 a.m. Church School - 9:30 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship – 10:45 a.m. Tuesday – Thursday - Kingdom Building Bible Institute – 7:30 p.m. Wednesday – Prayer/Praise/Bible Study – 7:30 p.m. Baptism & Communion Service- 4th Sunday – 10:30am Radio Broadcast WYCB -1340 AM-Sunday -6:00pm T.V. Broadcast - Channel 190 – Sunday -4:00pm/Tuesday 7:00am

“We are one in the Spirit” www.ssbc5757.org e-mail: ssbc5757@verizon.net

Rev. Dr. Michael E. Bell, Sr., • Pastor 2498 Alabama Ave., SE • Washington D.C. 20020 Office: (202) 889-7296 Fax: (202) 889-2198 • www.acamec.org 2008: The Year of New Beginnings “Expect the Extraordinary”

Crusader Baptist Church

Sunday Morning Worship 11:00am Holy Communion – 1st Sunday Sunday School-9:45am Men’s Monday Bible Study – 7:00pm Wednesday Night Bible Study – 7:00pm Women’s Ministry Bible Study 3rd Friday -7:00pm Computer Classes- Announced Family and Marital Counseling by appointment E-mail: Crusadersbaptistchurch@verizon.net www.CrusadersBaptistChurch.org

“The Amazing, Awesome, Audacious Allen Chapel A.M.E. Church”

“God is Love”

Rev. Cheryl J. Sanders, Th.D. Senior Pastor 1204 Third Street, NW Washington, DC 20001 202.347.5889 office 202.638.1803 fax Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m. Prayer Meeting and Bible Study: Wed. 7:30 p.m. “Ambassadors for Christ to the Nation’s Capital” www.thirdstreet.org

Reverend Dr. Calvin L. Matthews • Senior Pastor 1200 Isle of Patmos Plaza, Northeast Washington, DC 20018 Office: (202) 529-6767 Fax: (202) 526-1661

Rev. Dr. Alton W. Jordan, Pastor 800 I Street, NE Washington, DC 20002 202-548-0707 Fax No. 202-548-0703

Sunday Worship Services: 8:00a.m. and 11:00a.m. Sunday Church School - 9:15a.m. & Sunday Adult Forum Bible Study - 10:30a.m. 2nd & 4th Monday Women’s Bible Study - 6:30p.m. Tuesday Jr./Sr. Bible Study - 10:00a.m. Tuesday Topical Bible Study - 6:30p.m. Tuesday New Beginnings Bible Study - 6:30p.m. Wednesday Pastoral Bible Study - 6:30p.m. Wednesday Children’s Bible Study - 6:30p.m. Thursday Men’s Bible Study - 6:30p.m. Friday before 1st Sunday Praise & Worship Service - 6:30p.m. Saturday Adult Bible Study - 10:00a.m.

Third Street Church of God

Isle of Patmos Baptist Church

Sunday Worship Services: 7:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Holy Communion: 2nd Sunday at 7:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Sunday Church School: 9:20 a.m. Seniors Bible Study: Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m. Noon Day Prayer Service: Tuesdays at Noon Bible Study: Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Motto: “A Ministry of Reconciliation Where Everybody is Somebody!” Website: http://isleofpatmosbc.org Church Email: ipbcsecretary@verizon.net

Greater Mt. Calvary Holy Church Bishop Alfred A. Owens, Jr.; Senior Bishop & Evangelist Susie C. Owens – Co-Pastor 610 Rhode Island Avenue, NE Washington, DC 20002 (202) 529-4547 office • (202) 529-4495 fax Sunday Worship Service: 8 AM and 10:45 AM Sunday Youth Worship Services: 1st & 4th 10:45 AM; 804 R.I. Ave., NE 5th 8 AM & 10:45 AM; Main Church Prayer Services Tuesday – Noon, Wednesday 6 AM & 6:30 PM Calvary Bible Institute: Year-Round Contact Church Communion Every 3rd Sunday The Church in The Hood that will do you Good! www.gmchc.org emailus@gmchc.org

ST Marks Baptist Come Worship with us... St. Mark's Baptist Church 624 Underwood Street, NW Washington, dc 20011 Dr. Raymond T. Matthews, Pastor and First Lady Marcia Matthews Sunday School 9:am Worship Service 10:am Wed. Noon Day prayer service Thur. Prayer service 6:45 pm Thur. Bible Study 7:15 pm

We are proud to provide the trophies for the Washington Informer Spelling Bee

Service and Times Sunday Worship Service 11:00 a.m. Communion every Sunday 11:00 a.m. Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Bible Study Tuesday 12Noon Pastor’s Bible Study Tuesday 6:30 p.m. Motto; “Discover Something Wonderful.” Website: 12thscc.org Email: Twelfthstcc@aol.com

Mount Carmel Baptist Church

Mt. Zion Baptist Church

5101 14th Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20011 202-726-2220/ 202-726-9089

St. Stephen Baptist Church

Allen Chapel A.M.E. Church

Reverend Dr. Paul H. Saddler Senior Pastor

Mailing Address Campbell AME Church 2502 Stanton Road SE Washington, DC 20020

Rev. John W. Davis, Pastor

4915 Wheeler Road Oxon Hill, MD 20745 301-894-6464

Blessed Word of Life Church

4001 14th Street, NW Washington, DC 20011 (202) 265-6147 Office 1-800 576-1047 Voicemail/Fax

Rev. Paul Carrette Senior Pastor Harold Andrew, Assistant Pastor

700 I Street, N.E. Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 547-8849

All are welcome to St. Mary’s to Learn, Worship, and Grow.

Dr. Dekontee L. & Dr. Ayele A. Johnson Pastors

Church of Living Waters

52 Years of Expert Engraving Services

Joseph N. Evans, Ph.D Senior Pastor 901 Third Street N.W. Washington, DC. 20001 Phone (202) 842-3411 Fax (202) 682-9423 Sunday Church School : 9: 30am Sunday Morning Worship: 10: 45am Bible Study Tuesday: 6: 00pm Prayer Service Tuesday: 7:00pm Holy Communion: 3rd Sunday 10: 45am themcbc.org

40 June 19 - June 25, 2014

The Washington Informer

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RELIGION BAPTIST

Advertise Your Church services here: call Ron Burke at

202-561-4100 or email rburke@washingtoninformer.com Zion Baptist Church

All Nations Baptist Church Rev. Dr. James Coleman Pastor 2001 North Capitol St, N.E. • Washington, DC 20002 Phone (202) 832-9591

Website: www.allnationsbaptistchurch.com All Nations Baptist Church – A Church of Standards

“Where Jesus is the King”

Israel Baptist Church

4850 Blagdon Ave, NW • Washington D.C 20011 Phone (202) 722-4940 • Fax (202) 291-3773

1251 Saratoga Ave., NE Washington, DC 20018 (202) 269-0288

Rev. Aubrey C. Lewis Pastor 1415 Gallatin Street, NW Washington, DC 20011-3851 P: (202) 726-5940 Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m. Sunday School: 9:15 a.m. Holy Communion: 11:00 a.m., 3rd Sun. Bible Study: Monday - 7:00 p.m. Prayer Meeting: Thursday - 7:00 p.m.

2324 Ontario Road, NW Washington, DC 20009 (202) 232-1730 Sunday School – 9:30 am Sunday Worship Service – 11:00 am Baptismal Service – 1st Sunday – 9:30 am Holy Communion – 1st Sunday – 11:00 am Prayer Meeting & Bible Study – Wednesday -7:30 pm

Rev. Dr. Morris L Shearin, Sr. Pastor

St. Luke Baptist Church

Rev. Daryl F. Bell Pastor

Sunday Church School – 9:30 AM Sunday Worship Service – 11:00 AM Holy Communion – 1st Sunday at 11:00 AM Prayer – Wednesdays, 6:00 PM Bible Study – Wednesdays, 7:00 PM Christian Education School of Biblical Knowledge Saturdays, 9:30 AM – 11:00 AM, Call for Registration

Rev. Keith W. Byrd, Sr. Pastor

Sunday Worship Service 10:15AM- Praise and Worship Services Sunday School 9:00am Monday: Noon Bible School Wednesday: Noon & 7PM: Pastor’s Bible Study Ordinance of Baptism 2nd Holy Communion 4th Sunday Mission Zion Baptist Church Shall; Enlist Sinners, Educate Students, Empower the Suffering, Encourage the Saints, and Exalt Our Savior. (Acts 2:41-47) www.zionbaptistchurchdc.org

King Emmanuel Baptist Church

Sunday Worship Service: 10:00 A.M. Sunday School: 8:30 A.M. Holy Communion1st Sunday: 10:00 A.M. Prayer Service: Wednesday at 6:30 P.M. Bible Study: Wednesday at 7:00 P.M.

Mount Moriah Baptist Church Dr. Lucius M. Dalton, Senior Pastor 1636 East Capitol Street, NE Washington, DC 20003 Telephone: 202-544-5588 Fax: 202-544-2964 Sunday Worship Services: 7:45 am and 10:45 am Holy Communion: 1st Sundays at 7:45 am and 10:45 am Sunday School: 9:30 am Prayer & Praise Service: Tuesdays at 12 noon and 6:30 pm Bible Study: Tuesdays at 1 pm and 7 pm Youth Bible Study: Fridays at 7 pm

Advertise Your Church services here: call Ron Burke at

202-561-4100 or email rburke@washingtoninformer.com

Advertise Your Church services here: call Ron Burke at

202-561-4100 or email rburke@washingtoninformer.com

Web: www.mountmoriahchurch.org Email: mtmoriah@mountmoriahchurch.org

Rehoboth Baptist Church

St. Matthews Baptist Church Rev. Dr. Maxwell M. Washington Pastor Worshiping Location Knights of Columbus - 1633 Tucker Road Fort Washington, MD 20744 (240) 838-7074 Order of Services Sunday Worship Services: 10:00 am Sunday School: 9:00 am Holy Communion 3rd Sunday Morning Prayer / Bible Study: 6:15 pm - 7:20 pm (Tuesday)

Salem Baptist Church

Emmanuel Baptist Church

Florida Avenue Baptist Church

Rev. Dr. Clinton W. Austin Pastor 2409 Ainger Pl.,SE – WDC 20020 (202) 678-0884 – Office (202) 678-0885 – Fax “Come Grow With Us and Establish a Blessed Family” Sunday Worship 7:30am & 10:45am Baptism/Holy Communion 3rd Sunday Family Bible Study Tuesdays – 6:30pm Prayer Service Tuesdays – 8:00pm www.emmanuelbaptistchurchdc.org

Dr. Earl D. Trent Senior Pastor

Rev. Dr. George C. Gilbert SR. Pastor

623 Florida Ave.. NW • WDC. 20001 Church (202) 667-3409 • Study (202) 265-0836 Home Study (301) 464-8211 • Fax (202) 483-4009

4504 Gault Place, N.E. Washington, D.C 20019 202-397-7775 – 7184

Sunday Worship Services: 10:00 a.m. Sunday Church School: 8:45 – 9:45 a.m. Holy Communion: Every First Sunday Intercessory Prayer: Monday – 7:00-8:00 p.m. Pastor’s Bible Study: Wednesday –7:45 p.m. Midweek Prayer: Wednesday – 7:00 p.m. Noonday Prayer Every Thursday

9:30AM. Sunday Church School 11:00 Am. Sunday Worship Service The Lord’s Supper 1st Sunday Wednesday 7:00pm Prayer & Praise Services 7:30pm. Bible Study Saturday before 4th Sunday Men, Women, Youth Discipleship Ministries 10:30am A Christ Centered Church htubc@comcast.net

Matthews Memorial Baptist Church

Sermon On The Mount Temple Of Joy Apostolic Faith

Christ Embassy DC

5606 Marlboro Pike District Heights, MD 20747 301-735-6005

Dr. C. Matthew Hudson, Jr, Pastor

6839 Eastern Avenue, R1 Takoma Park, MD 20912 (202) 556-7065

Elder Herman L. Simms, Pastor

2616 MLK Ave., SE • Washington, DC 20020 Office 202-889-3709 • Fax 202-678-3304

Kelechi Ajieren Coordinator

Early Worship Service 7:30a.m Worship Service 10:45a.m. New Members Class 9:30a.m. Holy Communion : 1st Sunday -10:45a.m Church School 9:30a.m. Prayer, Praise and Bible Study: Wednesday 7p.m Bible Study : Saturday: 11a.m. Baptism: 4th Sunday – 10:45a.m “Empowered to love and Challenged to Lead a Multitude of Souls to Christ”

Sunday Worship Service 10:00 A.M.

Sunday Apostolic Worship Services 11:00 A.M and 5:00 P.M Communion and Feet Wash 4th Sunday at 5:00 P.M Prayer/Seeking Wednesday at 8:00 P.M. Apostolic in Doctrine, Pentecostal in Experience, Holiness in Living, Uncompromised and Unchanged. The Apostolic Faith is still alive –Acts 2:42

New Commandment Baptist Church

Peace Baptist Church

Rev. Stephen E. Tucker Senior Pastor

Rev. Dr. Michael T. Bell 712 18th Street, NE Washington, DC 20002 Phone 202-399-3450/ Fax 202-398-8836

13701 Old Jericho Park Road Bowie, MD. 20720 (301) 262-0560

Sunday Morning Worship Service 7:15 am & 10:50 am Sunday School 9:30am Sunday Morning Worship Service 10:50am Wednesday Prayer & Testimonies Service 7:30pm Wednesday School of the Bible 8:00pm Wednesday - Midweek Prayer Service 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Services: Sunday Worship 11 AM Sunday School 10 AM Wednesday Mid-Week Worship, Prayer & Bible Study - Wed. 7 PM “A Church Where Love Is Essential and Praise is Intentional”

“The Loving Church of the living lord “ Email Address pbcexec@verizon.net

Shiloh Baptist Church

First Rising Mt. Zion Baptist Church

1864-2014

Rev. Alonzo Hart Pastor

Rev. Dr. Wallace Charles Smith Pastor

Rev. Reginald M. Green, Sr., Interim Pastor

621 Alabama Avenue, S.E. • Washington, D.C. 20032 P: (202) 561-1111 F: (202) 561-1112

917 N St. NW • Washington, DC 20001 (202) 232-4294

9th & P Street, N.W. • W. D.C. 20001 (202) 232-4200

602 N Street NW • Washington, D.C. 20001 Office:(202) 289-4480 Fax: (202) 289-4595

The Church Where GOD Is Working.... And We Are Working With GOD

Sunrise Prayer Services - Sunday 7:00 a.m.

Sunday Morning Prayer Service: 8:00 a.m. Sunday Church School: 9:15 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship: 10:40 a.m. Third Sunday Baptismal & Holy Communion:10:30 a.m. Tuesday Church At Study Prayer & Praise: 6:30 p.m.

Morning Worship: 8:00 a.m Church School : 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship: 10:55 a.m. Bible Study, Thursday: 6:30 p.m. Prayer Meeting,Thursday : 7:30 p.m.

150 Years of Service

Theme: “The Kingdom Focused Church” Matthew 6:33 and Mathew 28:18-20, KJV

Sunday Service: 10 am Sunday School for all ages: 8:30 am 1st Sunday Baptism: 10: am 2nd Sunday Holy Communion: 10 am Tuesday: Bible Study: 6:30 pm Prayer Meeting: 7:45 pm

Email: stmatthewsbaptist@msn.com Website: www.stmatthewsbaptist.org

Motto: : “Where God is First and Where Friendly People Worship”

Sunday Worship Services: 7:45am & 11:00am Sunday school For All Ages 9:30am Prayer Services Wednesday 11:30am & 6:45pm Bible Institute Wednesday at Noon & 7:45pm “Changing Lives On Purpose “ Email: Froffice@firstrising.org Website: www.firstrising.org

www.washingtoninformer.com

Holy Trinity United Baptist Church

The Washington Informer

Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 P.M. Friday Evening Service 7:00 P.M. ; Last Friday “…Giving Your Life a Meaning” www.Christembassydc.org Christ.embassy.dc@hotmail.com

Pennsylvania Ave. Baptist Church Rev. Dr. Kendrick E. Curry Pastor 3000 Pennsylvania Ave.. S.E Washington, DC 20020 202 581-1500 Sunday Church School: 9:30 A.M. Sunday Worship Service: 11:00 A.M. Monday Adult Bible Study: 7:00 P.M. Wednesday Youth & Adult Activities: 6:30 P.M. Prayer Service Bible Study

Mt. Horeb Baptist Church Rev. Dr. H. B. Sampson, III Pastor 2914 Bladensburg Road, NE Wash., DC 20018 Office: (202) 529-3180 Fax: (202) 529-7738 Order of Services Worship Service: 7:30 a.m. Sunday School: 9:00 a.m. Worship Service: 10:30 a.m. Holy Communion: 4th Sunday 7:30 a.m. & 10:30a.m. Prayer Services: Tuesday 7:30 p.m. Wednesday 12 Noon Email:mthoreb@mthoreb.org Website:www.mthoreb.org For further information, please contact me at (202) 529-3180.

June 19, - June 25, 2014

41


LEGAL NOTICES SUPERIOR COURT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PROBATE DIVISION 2014 NRT 15 Ethel P. Jones Name of Deceased Settlor

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

SUPERIOR COURT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Probate Division Washington, D.C. 20001-2131

SUPERIOR COURT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Probate Division Washington, D.C. 20001-2131

Administration No. 2014 ADM 518

Administration No. 2014 ADM 551

Karen Glass Shah aka Karen Leigh Glass Shah aka Karen Leigh Glass Decedent

Thomas Charles DeRocco Decedent

NOTICE OF EXISTENCE OF REVOCABLE TRUST Ethel P. Jones (Name of deceased Settlor) whose address was 3302 20th Street, NE, Washington, DC 20018 created a revocable trust on July 24, 2006, which remained in existence on the date of her death on July 4, 2013, and Leona Veronica Johnson, whose address is 6500 Eastern Avenue, NE, Washington, DC 20012 is the currently acting trustee, hereinafter the Trustee. Communications to the Trust should be mailed or directed to Leona Veronica Johnson at 6500 Eastern Avenue, NE, Washington, DC 20012. The Trust is subject to claims of the deceased settlor’s creditors, costs of administration of the settlor’s estate, the expenses of the deceased settlor’s funeral and disposal of remains, and statutory allowances to a surviving spouse and children to the extent the deceased settlor’s residuary probate estate is inadequate to satisfy those claims, costs, expenses, and allowances. Claims of the deceased settlor’s creditors are barred as against the Trustee and the trust property unless presented to the Trustee at the address provided herein on or before December 5, 2014 (6 months after the date of the first publication of this notice.) An action to contest the validity of this trust must be commenced by the earliest of (1) July 4, 2014 (One year from date of death of deceased settler) (2) December 5, 2014, 6 months from the date of first publication of this notice) or (3) Ninety days after the Trustee sends the person a copy of the trust instrument and a notice informing the person of the trust’s existence, of the Trustee’s name and address, and of the time allowed for commencing a proceeding. The Trustee may proceed to distribute the trust property in accordance with the terms of the turst before the expiration of the time within which an action must be commenced unless the Trustee knows of a pending judicial proceeding contesting the validity of the trust or the Trustee has received notice from a potential contestant who thereafter commences a judicial proceeding within sixty days after notification. This Notice must be mailed postmarked with 15 days of its first publication to each heir and qualified beneficiary of the trust and any other person who would be an interested person within the meaning of D.C. Code 20-101 (d). Date of First Publication: June 5, 2014

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Vineet Kalucha, whose address is 4345 Hawthorne Street, NW, Washington, DC 20016, was appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Karen Glass Shah aka Karen Leigh Glass Shah aka Karen Leigh Glass, who died on April 24, 2014 with a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment (or to the probate of decedent’s Will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., Building A, Third Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before December 5, 2014. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before December 5, 2014, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of first publication: June 5, 2014 Vineet Kalucha Personal Representative

Leona Veronica Johnson Signature of Trustee

TRUE TEST COPY

TRUE TEST COPY

Anne Meister Register of Wills Washington Informer

Anne Meister Register of Wills Washington Informer

SUPERIOR COURT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Probate Division Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2014 ADM 476 Warren Smith, Sr. Decedent James Larry Frazier, Esq. 918 Maryland Avenue, NE Washington, DC 20002 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Yvonne Bobbi Smith, whose address is 16821 Flotilla Way, Apt. 109, Woodbridge, VA 22191, was appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Warren Smith, Sr., who died on January 13, 2000 with a Will, and will serve with Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment (or to the probate of decedent’s Will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., Building A, Third Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before December 12, 2014. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before December 12, 2014, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of first publication: June 12, 2014 Yvonne Bobbi Smith Personal Representative TRUE TEST COPY Anne Meister Register of Wills Washington Informer

42 June 19 - June 25, 2014

SUPERIOR COURT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Probate Division Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2014 ADM 574

Peter D. Antonoplos, Esq. Antonoplos & Associates 1725 DeSales St., NW, Suite 600 Washington, DC 20036 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Emily S. DeRocco, whose address is 708 A Steet, SE, Washington, DC 20003, was appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Thomas Charles DeRocco, who died on March 13, 2014 without a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., Building A, Third Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before December 12, 20014. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before December 12, 2014, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of first publication: June 12, 2014 Emily S. DeRocco Personal Representative TRUE TEST COPY Anne Meister Register of Wills Washington Informer

LEGAL NOTICES

Albert Joseph Burgess Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Alberta Z. Burgess, whose address is 2212 Perry Street, NE, Washington, DC 20018-3058, was appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Albert Joseph Burgess, who died on March 12, 2013 without a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., Building A, Third Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before December 19, 2014. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before December 19, 2014, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of first publication: June 19, 2014

services here: call Ron Burke at

202-561-4100 or email

Alberta Z. Burgess Personal Representative TRUE TEST COPY Anne Meister Register of Wills Washington Informer

rburke@washingtoninformer.com

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301-769-6865 Where did you hear about that?

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CURRY continued from Page 26 Women, who make up 51.2 percent of the population, were cast as leads in only 25.6 percent of the movies. Over half of the films (51.2 percent) featured casts in which minorities were 10 percent or less. People of color directed 12.2 percent of the films studied, most directed at a targeted audience. Women directed 4.1 percent of the films. Minorities wrote 7.6 percent of the films, mostly ethnic-niche films; women wrote 14.1 percent. In television: People of color were in only 5.1 percent of the lead roles. Women accounted for 51.5 percent of the lead roles in comedies and dramas, matching their share of the population. People of color accounted for 15.4 percent of the broadcast reality shows. Of show creators, only one was a person of color – who created “Grey’s Anatomy,” “Private Practice” and

MALVEAUX continued from Page 26 verbal rampage. Indeed the 2014 outrage against Sterling had elements of class bias. The multi-million dollar players weren’t angry when he discriminated against African Americans and Latinos in the slum housing he owned – which cost him a couple of million dollars to settle with the Justice Department – but they were dismayed when he made negative comments about them. Their earlier silence equaled acquiescence to Sterling’s racism; their protest suggested that they would get angry only when rancid racism was directed at them. If the Koch brothers are the devil, then most of our organizations are making deals with the devil. Look at the list of sponsors for any African

JACKSON continued from Page 26 on test scores threatens to widen after having narrowed steadily over the previous nine years [the Bush years].” Obama has done everything in his power to sabotage Blacks having access to better educational opportunities. Just last year Obama’s Justice Department filed a lawsuit to block Louisiana’s tuition voucher program, which has produced significant improvement for Blacks and Hispanics. The Washington Post’s editorial board blasted Obama stating that he wanted, “to trap poor black children in ineffective schools.” Mixed messages coming from our congressional leadership is fueling the anger that was on display in the Cantor race: We Republicans claim to support the middle class, fight for Americans, support our troops, and

“Scandal,” all on ABC. The report proves that diversity pays. The report added, “If we consider return on investment, which factors a film’s budget into the analysis, we see a similar pattern.” In fact, the return on more diverse films was “significantly greater,” the report found. Yet, Hollywood continues to travel down the same old tired road. “The 2014 Hollywood Diversity Report has documented an apparent disconnect between the industry’s professed focus on the bottom line and actual staffing practices in film, broadcast television, and cable,” the report stated. “That is, while films and television shows with casts that reflect the nation’s racial and ethnic diversity were more likely to post high box office figures or ratings during the study period, minorities and women were nonetheless woefully underrepresented among the

corps of directors, show creators, writers, and lead actors that animates industry productions.” The report concluded, “This disconnect does not bode well for the future of the Hollywood industry. Women already constitute slightly more than half of the U.S. population, and more than a third of the population is currently minority and the population continues to diversify at a dizzying rate. “The bottom line for the Hollywood industry – theatrical film, broadcast television, and cable – would be advanced by implementing forward-looking project development and staffing practices that are in sync with these changes.”WI   George E. Curry is editor-in-chief of the National Newspaper Publishers Association News Service (NNPA.) You can also follow him at www.twitter.com/currygeorge and George E. Curry Fan Page on Facebook.

American organization or event. Sit through a board meeting, and listen to folks review possible sponsors, many corporate.  There are “good” corporations whose diversity portfolio is robust, and then there are those who need a little help.  The need for funds notwithstanding, are we for sale for the price of a table or a few salmon (used to be chicken) dinners? On the other hand, when the New York Times criticized the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation for its corporate support, Elsie Scott, the then-director said that if we spent money on certain products it was only right that we get their support.  Does this apply to the Koch donation? Unfortunately, too many African American organizations buy what we want and beg for what we

need. Many in the African American community have $25 million to give to the United Negro College Fund.  Many could spend the dollars to support our students.  The fact that we do not leaves us vulnerable to contributions like Koch, contributions that come with strings and, perhaps, a conservative agenda.  Should UNCF President Michael Lomax send the money back?  Only if someone steps up to replace it. The $18.5 million for scholarships represents 3,700 scholarships for students.  If the $4 million is divided equally among 37 schools, it means $108,000 per school, enough to hire back one of the people laid off and to support some programs.  Should Michael Lomax lay down with the devil?  Where is the angel?WI

represent “real America.” Last time I checked, America is a very diverse nation, but it is not reflected within our congressional leadership, their staffs, or their advisers. Cantor surrounded himself with his usual White consultants who had no one around them with a different perspective on any of the issues. This campaign was exhibit A in why diversity is necessary within our party. But, can someone explain to me how a national party leader in the 21st century doesn’t notice that he has no Blacks on his personal or leadership staff?  He’ll have plenty of time to think about it in coming years. Meanwhile, other Republicans need to take heed. Most Republicans are not aware that Mitt Romney received 20 percent of the Black vote from males between ages 20-30 (though he received only 6 percent nationally).  So

this notion about Obama having a stranglehold on the Black vote is pure fiction. Neither the Republican Party nor the Tea Party are racist. They both have been horrible in the area of communications.  They both have allowed the media and liberal to brand them as racists and have done nothing to counter the charges.  So, a lie oft repeated becomes the truth. If Cantor’s loss causes our congressional leadership to realize that they need to actively engage the Black community on substantive issues, then it will be a worthwhile loss.  If they continue what they have been doing; then they will become as the sounding brass or a tinkling cymbal, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.WI

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45


EDELMAN continued from Page 27

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York peers. But the point still comes across very clearly. Since Sojourner Truth’s day, Black and White and Brown and other excluded and marginalized women—and men—have been trying to ferret out the unjust and greedy weasels still eating away at the core of the Constitution and the promise of equal opportunity in our national life, gain the rights and freedoms they know they have been promised, and build a just America for themselves and their children. The struggle for a fair playing field for all Americans and their children must accelerate and

SPRIGGS continued from Page 27 can American access to the new safety-nets of labor standards, unemployment insurance and Social Security and the full benefits of increasing home ownership provided by the Federal Housing Administration and later the GI Bill. Melvin Oliver and Thomas Shapiro have laid out how various policies interacted with race to create the huge wealth divide between African-Americans and Whites. But in the era since the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, Medicare in 1966 (ending segregation in health care) and the Fair Housing Act of 1968, Americans have been forced to reconcile racial inequality with the American ideal of social mobility. Don’t we now have equal opportunity? Isn’t that enough to assure equal outcomes? One resolution is as ancient as the

MUHAMMAD continued from Page 27

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was the new order of the day. In the middle of the 20th century the Civil Rights Movement was born, and Blacks again aggressively asserted their demands for freedom, justice and equality inside the American society. Then somewhere near the dawn of the 21st century the Reparations movement was reborn, and that’s where we are today. Juneteenth then, Reparations now. No people who’ve ever lived deserve reparation payments – making amends; atonement; indemnity – from their former tormentors more than do Blacks in the United States of America, and that is an indisputable fact. Now there are many people who would and do dispute the claim by Black people for reparations. Some of them think Black people should be grateful for having been brought to America from Africa and that maybe The Washington Informer

reach a mighty roar today when these core values are so much under attack. America is still struggling to live up to its creed enunciated in the Declaration of Independence and overcome its huge birth defects built into the implementation of our political and economic system: Native American genocide, slavery, exclusion of all women and non-propertied men, including White men, from America’s political process. We have come a long way but these deep-seated cultural, racial, economic, and gender impediments to a just union challenge us still. We must remain vigilant in rooting them out and moving ahead as many attempt to move us backwards. As another July 4th approaches,

can we finally tell every child born in 2014 that he or she was created with an equal chance to realize America’s dream—or for tens of millions of children who are poor, illiterate, violence-ridden, hungry, and homeless will America’s promise still feel hollow at the core? Children have only one childhood, and that childhood determines much of what they grow up to accomplish. This means we adults have only a very short window in which to make sure that all children, regardless of the lottery of birth, are nurtured and fed, physically and spiritually, and are educated and supported to grow up to be the best they can beWI

forces that held slavery together – racism, an abiding belief that African-Americans are inferior in character and culture. The other is to understand the many layers of inequality and their interaction with the lack of wealth, income and employment with ongoing policies. A third is to understand that racism is still an ugly factor in American life. I think those who disagree with Freeman think his dismissal of race was an assumption that equal opportunity exists. If African Americans are not held back in moving up the class ladder, then how can anyone in America claim to be held back? If the economic game in America is fair and not rigged against African American success, which Americans can call foul? Just as the victories of Owens and Louis did not mean the end of segregation or discrimination, neither does the victory of President Barack Obama

mean the end of Donald Sterling’s sprawling Los Angeles real estate empire that discriminated against black and Latino tenants. The 1 percent benefit from a different set of rules, from lower marginal tax rates to bigger tax deductions for their homes, savings and health. Blaming African-Americans for not seizing the day and rising to the top is an indictment of the 99 percent. Racism is not an “excuse,” but a way to understand the rules are not fair, this is not a lack of will, but acknowledgement rules are rigged for multinational corporations to give away our jobs and Wall Street to steal our homes. It is an understanding that inequality is not a natural state, but is manufactured. WI   Follow Spriggs on Twitter: @ WSpriggs. Contact: Amaya SmithTune Acting Director, Media Outreach AFL-CIO 202-637-5142

Black folks should be taxed again for citizenship, beyond having built this country and creating its wealth with 310 years of free labor. First proposed to Congress in 1867 by Rep. Thaddeus Stevens (R-Pa.), then again in 1896, 1898, 1899, and 1903 before the call fell silent, the reparations demand has moved from the rhetoric of largely Black Nationalist organizations which sounded the call throughout the last half of the 20th century, to new prominence today. Actually Congress once approved taking land from the treasonous, slave-owners and re-distributing it to the freed Africans in the form of “40 acres and a mule.” But that legislation was vetoed by President Andrew Johnson and never came to be. Now, just as it should be, the call for reparations is one of the two primary legislative goals of the NAACP, as well as an important goal articulated by the National Bar Association, TransAfrica, the National Congress of Eco-

nomic Development Commissioners, as well as Delta Sigma Theta and Sigma Gamma Rho sororities. Black organizations such as the National Coalition of Blacks for Reparations in America (N’COBRA) have long maintained that “slavery was a grave injustice that caused and continues to cause African Americans to suffer enormous damages and losses, both material and intangible, including the loss of human dignity and liberty ... denying (them) the fruits of their own labor, and was an immoral and inhumane deprivation of life, liberty, citizenship rights, and cultural heritage.” It was the enslaved Africans desiring their freedom who struck the decisive blow, and nothing today symbolizes freedom more emphatically than Juneteenth. Happy Juneteenth. That’s the American holiday declared by the enslaved Africans themselves.WI

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