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WALPOLE HIGH SCHOOL

JUNE 2017

VOLUME XX, VI

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Class of 2017 graduates from WHS M a r i a H a l l Walpole High’s 143rd class honors Tommy Quinn at annual graduation ceremony By Brynne Bergen Staff Writer The 143rd Walpole High School Graduation Ceremony was held on Sunday, June 4 to honor Walpole High School’s Class of 2017. The event began with the procession of graduates at 1 p.m. followed by a greeting by Principal Stephen Imbusch. After the the chorus performed the national anthem, senior class president Nathaniel Kelley presented the class gift: two new picnic tables. Next, Salutatorian Emily Hurwitz and Valedictorian Emily Martin spoke both referenced movies in their speeches. Hurwitz quoted “Mean Girls” and told her fellow classmates “the limit does not exist.” Martin referenced “Forrest Gump” and told the audience “life is like a box of chocolates.” After the presentation of the speeches, Imbusch inducted three former students into the Walpole High School Hall of Fame, including the current assistant field hockey coach at Princeton University, Dina Rizzo. Rizzo won three state titles with Walpole Field Hockey before graduating in 1998. Rizzo earned 157 caps with the United States national field hockey team and competed in the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Along with Rizzo, Jim Brady was inducted for his civics work. Brady serves as an attorney in Walpole and has also brought in money for many charities in Walpole.

Photo/Caroline Pitman

Maria Hall will be recognized at a national conference for her work By Emily Ball Lead Reporter

Senior Natasha le School Committee

Rodriguez receives Chair Nancy Gallivan

Lastly, Todd Collins was inducted into the hall of fame. Collins, a quarterback, led the Walpole High School Football Team to a state title during his senior year before attending the University of Michigan. After a career in the NFL, Collins is now the quarterback coach at Walpole High School. After the inductions, Principal Imbusch and other community members commended students with a number of scholarships and awards. One was the Thomas W. Quinn Scholarship. Tommy’s family members gave this scholarship to a number of seniors and white balloons were re-

her at

diploma from Walpole’s graduation

Walpoceremony.

leased in memory of Tommy. Before the awarding of diplomas, Imbusch awarded Tommy Quinn’s parents with an honorary diploma in his memory. “We were happy that we were able to honor Tommy in the way that we did,” said Assistant Principal Lee Tobey. To conclude the annual graduation, Superintendent Dr. Lincoln Lynch and School Committee Chair Nancy Gallivan handed out the diplomas. The ceremony ended with the recession of graduates. “The graduation ceremony was great,” senior James Randall said. “Everyone felt important on a special day.”

Student Council holds second annual Senior Walk

Walpole High’s graduating class visits their elementary schools Photo/Elizabeth Foley

The class of 2017 visits Boyden Elementary School and poses with third grade teacher Mrs. Galvin

By Elizabeth Foley Staff Writer The second annual Senior Walk took place on May 22, where WHS seniors walked through the halls of the four Walpole elementary schools. Prior to the event, Student Council organized a sign-up for the seniors. The Student Council then sent over

Film

Festival

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named School Nutrition Director of the Year

200 seniors to their former elementary schools, where they reminisced with old teachers. Elementary students lined the hallways and clapped as seniors walked through their old hallways dressed in graduation gowns. What made the event unique was that both Walpole High seniors and the elementary school teachers and students were able to enjoy the event together.

“This new tradition is a wonderful way for the elementary teachers to reconnect with students and a way for the elementary students to see what hard work can accomplish. We enjoyed it just as much as the seniors did,” said Boyden Principal Brendan Dearborn. This may only be the second annual Senior Walk for Walpole Public Schools, but according to the Student Council Advisor, it is still one of the most successful events for the seniors. “About 230 seniors attended the senior walk, and it was awesome to see how even on a Monday morning a ton of the seniors still turned up,” said Student Council Advisor Kerry McMenimen. Following this year’s event, the Student Council hopes to continue this tradition for all future seniors. “I loved the Senior Walk,” said senior Morgan Fontana, who attended Boyden Elementary School. “It was a great experience and I was nostalgic to see my old school and old teachers.”

First Job Advice

Weber’s Varsity Career

Class of ‘17 College Map Page 10-11

The School Nutrition Association honored Maria Hall, Walpole Public School’s Director of School Nutrition, as the Massachusetts’ School Nutrition Director of The Year for the 2016-2017 school year. Hall received her award in April at the School NutritionAssociation Legislative Action Conference in Washington, D.C. “I feel truly honored to have been selected for this award,” said Hall. As the Massachusetts winner, Hall will be recognized at the School Nutrition Association of Massachusetts’ Fall Conference in Worcester on October 17. Hall will also be recognized at the Annual National Conference in Atlanta, Georgia this summer. At this ceremony, Hall will receive a certificate and a ribbon and will walk at the Red Carpet Awards Ceremony. Hall will also be considered for both the Northeast Regional and National awards. In order to receive the award, the nominee must have at least five years of experience as the Director of School Nutrition and be a certified member of the School Nutrition Association. Further, they must serve in a position on the state or national board, or be a member on the state or national committee. “I am actively involved with many of the associations and committees that support School Nutrition Directors,” said Hall. Hall has been working as the School Nutrition Director in the Walpole Public School system for six years and continuously works to improve the nutrition program. “[Hall] implemented an annual Iron Chef Junior Competition and Wellness Fair which allows students the opportunity to work with local professional chefs,” said Michael Friscia, the School Business Administrator. “In an effort to engage community members, [Hall] also created monthly senior citizen dinners.” Hall plans to uphold this honor by continuing to work with the Walpole public schools. “I will continue to work collaboratively with our school community to help drive and implement healthy initiatives for our community,” said Hall.

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June 2017

The 15th Annual Walpole High School Film Festival Sophomore independent crew sweeps Film Festival award show their first year in the film Program By Tara Gordon Editor-in-Chief Walpole parents, friends and students lined up outside Walpole High School on Thursday, May 18 to cheer on the 12 crews of the 15th Annual Walpole High School Film Festival, as they arrived to the school in limousines to walk the red carpet and answer questions about their films. The evening included a moving tribute to Anthony Conti and a surprise win for the Best Film award. The night’s biggest winner was “The Promposal,” a comedy about one student’s struggle (Griffin Wilkins) to ask his girlfriend (Jenna McDonald) to the prom. The movie took home the awards for Best Film, Best Director, Best Supporting Actor and Best Screenplay. “The Promposal” is the first sophomore independent movie to win the Best Film award in the festival’s history. “Working with Guanabana Crew was so much fun! I absolutely loved the filmmaking process, and I’m just happy that people enjoyed watching our movie just as much as we enjoyed making it,” said director and actress Ava Straccia. Other winners of the night included the film “Contra” for Best Cinematography, the musical “Alice” for Best Art Direction, “Elsewhere” for Best Editing, Mia Straccia for Best Actor, Jake Witherell for Best Music and Conor Cashman for Best Faculty Performance. “It was really nice getting recognized for the cinematography because it was something that we put a lot of effort into, and it was one of the most important things to us about our movie,” said senior Gayle McAdams, one of the directors of “Contra.” Walpole Film Festival Awards Night also featured the four films nominated for Best Film on the final night: “Contra,” “Elsewhere,” “Jane” and “The Promposal.”

“Getting all dressed up, being together with my crewmates, and seeing the culmination of countless hours of planning, filming, and editing, playing up on the big screen in front of a packed auditorium, is frankly an indescribable feeling,” said Dan Mullen, director of “Elsewhere.” “You not only feel like you’ve accomplished something huge by finishing your movie and getting nominated, but now you get to revel in your accomplishment for a second time as a part of the audience.” Aside from the four nominated films, the awards show started off the night by showing eight brief clips of the movies that were not shown. One of these films included the festival’s only short film, “The Spice Boys,” a five minute story about two brothers’ (Joey and Jimmy Haskins) quest to retrieve their concert tickets in the school after they are locked outside. The festival also showed clips of this year’s two documentaries: “Out,” a documentary about Walpole High School’s LGBTQ community and “172,” which investigated Norfolk County’s current opioid epidemic. “I loved making a documentary this year,” said Annie Dolan, director of “172.” “It is so fun to make something that can not only be entertaining, but a piece that is informative for the audience as well.” This year’s awards night varied from past years’ festivals, as Tamika Larson, founder of the Make A Film Foundation, took the stage to introduce “The Black Ghiandola,” the eleven-minute movie made by the foundation and Anthony Conti. Along with the movie itself, the audience also watched a behind-the-scenes video of Conti’s experience working on the movie with notable actors such as Johnny Depp and J.K. Simmons before Conti’s death in January, 2017. “Anthony had always dreamed of being a director and playing his movies for his family and friends.

To see the fulfillment of that dream play out on Awards Night was extra special for everyone. We felt that it was important that his movie play like any other student film because Anthony was a part of our film community at Walpole High,” said Film Festival Executive Producer Michael Alan. “I also feel that seeing his work on screen inspired these young filmmakers to follow their dreams no matter what obstacles may be in the way.” Following the viewing of Conti’s film, Larson presented senior Jake Witherell the first ever Anthony Conti Scholarship, a $1000 scholarship given to students pursuing film in their post-secondary education. “When I heard them announce my name, I was definitely honored. It’s a great feeling to be able to take the kindness and generosity of so many people and turn it towards my education,” said Witherell. “Because of this scholarship, I’m better able to go off and make the art that I want to make, and I know that Anthony would be overjoyed to be able to help somebody out like that.” At the conclusion of the night, Michael Alan, James Connolly and Mary Ellen O’Malley, the Executive Producers of Walpole High School Film Festival, and Dan Mullaney, the host of the festival, congratulated the crews for their hard work and thanked the audience for attending. “The 15th Annual Film Festival was a special one. It is amazing to see the dedication, passion and hard work that the students put into each of their films year after year. The Film Festival has always been an event that can bring the WHS community together and this year was no exception,” said producer James Connolly. “My favorite moment had to be the standing ovation for Anthony Conti’s movie “The Black Ghiandola,” for it showed not only the power that film can have, but also a young man’s dream come true.”


June 2017

The Rebellion

DEDHAM SAVINGS

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is pleased to present

THE WALPOLE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS AND CLASS OF THE MONTH MARCH

SENIOR Andrew Madden Andrew has shown a passion for the subject matter and creativity in his most recent project exceeding the expectations in all aspects including design, assembly and finishing. He is respectful, mature and a pleasure to have in class. He is constantly on task and asking the right questions as well as helping any other students who may have questions. -Mr. Reale JUNIOR Brian Murphy Brian is a student in the Career Ed Program and is in my Adapted PE class. Brian has developmentally made more gains this year than any other student I have ever had in an Adapted PE class (12 years of teaching students with special needs). Brian not only has improved his loco-motor and fine motor skills this year but he has also made cognitive improvements. Brian is the most engaged in all of our activities than he has ever been. Brian deserves the student of the month more than any other student on my roster including both semesters. -Mr. Geary SOPHOMORE Sara Stranahan Sara is an outstanding student. She consistently has her work done on time and with extreme detail, and has incredibly high standards for herself. When she turned in her last essay, she apologized that it was not her best work. However, she earned the highest grade in not only her class, but out of the two honors classes I teach. She also earned one of the highest grades from the two classes on their last test. Not only does she perform well on essays and tests, but she also has the highest average for all 3 terms in the two classes. She has no problem participating and offers valuable insight during class. She does not see herself as a history scholar; however, Sara is extremely high achieving and deserving of student of the month. -Ms. Rafferty FRESHMAN Reina Beato Reina is a diligent young lady who is helpful and kind. She has a beautiful French accent and loves to speak French. I appreciate that she helps others in the class when they struggle. Reina brings her enthusiasm for life to my class every day and this makes our class fun. I am impressed that she wants to learn and asks interesting questions. She never wastes class time. Reina, if I do not tell you enough, I think that you are amazing! Merci! -Mrs. Frattasio

APRIL

SENIOR Elizabeth Duseau Elizabeth has shown tremendous improvement throughout the school year in calculus. I know she was disappointed with her first term grade, but she never whined or complained. She continued to give it her best effort every day in class. As a result, her grade steadily climbed... increasing by 14 points from first term to third term. She has had a great attitude all year, even when her grade did not reflect her effort. Elizabeth’s improved results in calculus are a reflection of her hard work and willingness to stick with it. I believe she is an excellent candidate for student of the month. -Ms. Lerner JUNIOR Brandon Stanley Brandan works harder than most students despite the many family obligations he has. Even with other obligations, Brandan still finds time to stay after school to stay on top of his work. Brandan is mature, kind to his classmates, and extremely respectful to those around him. He consistently completes his assignments, stays on task and works hard for each high mark that he receives. -Ms. Campbell SOPHOMORE Samantha Teixeira I nominate Samantha Teixeira as my Student of the Month because she has become the student so many teachers dream of having. Samantha was in my French 2 Honors class last year and struggled to make sense of this language and she could not share my enthusiasm. This year, Samantha had a breakthrough. We had a conversation in November and although French is not her passion, she gets it. Samantha does not miss any assignments and is the first to raise her hand in class. She is confident that no matter what, I will support her effort. I am so excited that she feels comfortable now and comes to class eager to learn. She impresses me everyday. Thank you for being honest and determined, Samantha. I appreciate you. -Mrs. Frattasio FRESHMAN McKayla Preto Best Mandarin I student by far. Dedicated, focused, humble, and nice. Scores 100’s on hard tests. Gave the best recent presentation I have seen on an aspect of Chinese culture. -Mr. Strick

ACTIVITY AWARD

CLASS OF THE MONTH

EMILY TOMASETTI SPEECH TEAM Emily is definitely the MVP of the freshman class on our team. She is the only freshman who qualified for the state tournament and is our only state champion this year. Emily is extremely humble and grateful for her speech team experience. She is so complimentary and kind to other students and has been very dedicated to her team by competing at most tournaments and attending most events and fundraisers. Emily will serve as our judge coordinator next year on our executive board. I can see her being a very helpful and strong leader and inspire many students in the next three years. Without a doubt, Emily should be the Extra-Curricular Student of the Month! - Mrs. Murray

CITIZEN OF THE MONTH

FRESHMAN HONORS PERIOD 7 This class is obviously special; they are a friendly group of students who work very hard and go beyond my expectations. We truly bond as a group and treat each other with the utmost respect. I think most students in this class would agree that they enjoy coming to this room every time we meet, and I feel the same way. They have all been a pleasure to teach, and I will miss them next year. I really hope they are picked as class of the month! -Mrs. Murray

ACTIVITY AWARD

CHRISTOPHER WOOD SCIENCE OLYMPIAD Chris has been an integral part of the Science Olympiad team. Chris really did do it all, from organizing and scheduling student events to scheduling carpools. He has shown great leadership and responsibility. He led every meeting and competition with eagerness and enthusiasm. -Mrs. Schwartz

SPANISH V PERIOD 3 This class has kept me on my toes all year long...in a good way of course. They are a group of socially tolerant students and have grown even more so throughout the course of the year. I can confidently say that they will all be able to “hold their own” when traveling to a Spanish speaking country and I will most definitely miss them all when they leave in a few weeks. - Mrs. Bacon MEREDITH LORUSSO MS. RAFFERTY Meredith is the ultimate classroom leader. She was assigned to my US2 class and has been a phenomenal help the entire year. She helped lead the class when I was out two days for a conference one week and out sick the week after. Whenever I write sub plans, I include that she can run the class, because I have complete faith that she will. She helps some students, on her own time, complete missing assignments and study for tests. She also helps me organize all my paperwork and assignments for other classes by organizing it into folders for each individual student. I would be lost without her!

CLASS OF THE MONTH

CITIZEN OF THE MONTH

ROY BROUWER MRS. KATHLEN MILNE Roy was standing in the lobby one morning when I walked in carrying several large bags. He said hello to me and asked if I needed help. When I asked if he could carry one of the bags up to my classroom, he said sure. Roy carrying the bag up to my room was a big help to me, and I appreciate that he volunteered to assist when he saw how many things I was carrying. I proudly nominate Roy for Citizen of the Month for his act of kindness.


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June 2017


Opinion Valedictorian Emily Martin delivers speech at graduation

June 2017

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Photo/Ciara Healy

At the 2017 Graduation ceremony, Emily Martin addresses the Senior Class, faculty, friends,

By Emily Martin Valedictorian

So… Chipotle? I know, too soon. Anyway, I wanted to express how honored I am to be graduating with this class. I know that everyone here is incredibly talented and ready to move on to the next chapter of his or her life. And we’ve been through a lot together, whether it includes snapchat, sewer leaks, dances, or those days at Duffy’s. But while I’d like to reflect on our high school years, I know that I would not be able to include all the memories that mean the most to each person. So instead, I would like to shed light on something that we can all relate to—the future. Now I know that I’m not perfect, and that I haven’t been around any longer than you guys, but I would like to share some of my own advice that I learned as a student at Walpole High as we all move

and family.

on to a new stage of our lives. And to do so, I will use help from one of my favorite people of all time—Forrest Gump. Now you all know the first: “Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re gonna get.” None of us know what the future holds, what we’re going to be, or who we’re going to see. We may see each other in passing on the street, or even on the big screens in Hollywood. But wherever we end up, I encourage you to question yourself as you get there: Are you happy? Is this what you want? And if the answer isn’t yes, make a change. We don’t know what life is going to give us, but we do have the ability to make our own choices and steer our own paths in whatever direction we choose, towards whatever passion calls our name. Just remember to always go after your passion and what you want—not what anyone else wants. This

is your life, and you get to call the shots. Now for the second one: “Stupid is as stupid does.” Now give me a second to explain this one—it sounds bad, I know. But the truth is, we are young adults, and we don’t know a lot about the world yet. So don’t be discouraged if you make a stupid mistake. We are going to make plenty, I assure you. We need to make sure we take these mistakes in stride and learn from them, not let them set us back. And I know that we will be there for each other when we do make these mistakes, ready to help each other up and send us on our way. Okay, I’m done with the Forrest Gump quotes for now, but I still have a few more thoughts that I would like to share before we receive our diplomas and toss our caps in the air. One important thing I learned in high school, probably the most important, is to be kind. I know you’ve heard it before. But in the world we live in today, we are surrounded by and witness a superfluity of hatred everyday. It is essential that we do our part in this world, wherever we may end up, to promote kindness. It is what brings people together and helps us accomplish new and amazing things. Many of us saw this in our dear classmate, Tommy Quinn, who would have been graduating with us today. Although I did not know Tommy very well, I could tell that his kindness was infectious, and something that all of us should aspire to look up to. Thank you Tommy for showing us how kindness is what helps us not only make incredible friends, but also make a difference in someone’s life. Another thing I’d like to shed light on

is how although we have our whole lives ahead of us, we in fact have very little time. If high school went by this fast, just imagine how quickly our lives will pass us by. Like I mentioned before, I urge all of you to go after whatever dreams or passions that you have, because we cannot waste time in life. Again, I know it’s a cliche, but it’s true. Many of us this year witnessed a true miracle of how Anthony Conti fought for not only his life, but his passion in the time that he had left. This is someone who, while battling cancer, found a way to bring his talents to life and become an accomplished filmmaker. He showed us how important it is to accomplish our dreams before it is too late, and to never take our lives for granted. And it is for this reason that I leave you with this—a quote from the longtime music teacher at Walpole High School, Mr. Falker. In one of his last notes to his students before his retirement, he wrote the following: “I hope you all eventually find true personal happiness. Nothing else really matters.” And he was right. And I wish you all the same. So class of 2017, follow your dreams and find happiness. I look forward to seeing all of you later in life, whether you’re on the big screen, running a multi-million dollar company, working in the operating room to save someone’s life, or fighting for our freedom to live our lives the way we choose. I know that we have great things to offer the world, and with passion driving us every step of the way, I know that our generation will leave its mark on the world. To read the speech from Salutatorian Emily Hurwitz visit www.whstherebellion.com.

Walpole High School’s Chemical Heath Policy must be revised

As School Committee reviews policy, Walpole needs to focus on student safety By Andrea Traietti Editor-in-Chief

Currently, the Walpole School Committee is reviewing Walpole High School’s Chemical Health policy. The School Committee is seeking the input of community members with the ultimate goal of making sure that the policy’s main purpose is to protect students and keep them safe. As the Walpole High School chemical health policy currently stands, administration has adopted the basic guidelines of the MIAA policy, with the exception of the “in the presence of” clause, which is not included in MIAA rules. In regards to this clause, the Walpole High School handbook states that “Walpole High School follows a stricter standard than the MIAA with respect to determining and defining possession” and explains that “possession means being ‘in the presence of’ and shall include being or remaining at a site, or in a building, residence, or vehicle in which a controlled substance or alcohol is being used, consumed, or possessed.” In order to really keep students safe, the policy needs to accomplish two things: first, it has to deter students from drugs, alcohol and situations where they could be in danger; second, it needs to provide a standardized procedure for when students are in dangerous situations. Right now, the Chemical Health policy does not fully accomplish either. So how do we make sure that the changes to the policy will accomplish both? First, changes to the policy need to outline more specific consequences for students who receive a chemical health violation. Since Walpole High adheres to many of the rules created by

the MIAA, with the exception of the “in the presence of” clause, the WHS policy seems to be designed with athletics in mind. While the WHS policy does mention that students who do not participate in a sport will have to sit out of their extracurricular activities, it attempts to extend the same punishments that athletes face to extracurriculars, and leaves a lot up to administrative, case-by-case discretion. Athletes are not the only students who receive chemical health violations, yet often they end up facing the harshest punishments because of the nature of the policy. Moreover, shouldn’t the student face some sort of punishment outside of a sport or activity that provides the structure and focus in life that actually keeps kids away from drugs and alcohol? There needs to be a stricter and fairer rule in place—all students should face a similar punishment, or at least one that is equal in terms of severity. Additionally, whatever rule is in place absolutely must be enforced. Rules that do not carry consequences do not deter kids from drinking or doing drugs; strict rules with strict and consistent follow-through do. The current policy and loose follow-through does not convince students to stay away from drugs and alcohol. However, when the school sets a precedent that drinking and drug use will not be tolerated, students will be more motivated to stay away from dangerous situations in the first place. But sometimes students do get into trouble. If our school policy is really aimed at student safety, it should protect students first and punish them later. The second change to the Chemical Health Rule needs to be one that relates specifically to when students

are in dangerous situations. The first and most important step to safety is eliminating the “in the presence of” clause in the school handbook. With this clause in place, students who are merely in an unsupervised environment where there is alcohol or drugs will be punished the same as the students who are actually under the influence. The idea that students who haven’t done anything wrong will get into trouble is absurd. Moreover, the clause contradicts the Good Samaritan Law that provides legal protection to people assisting another person in danger. Students are hesitant to call for help because they are afraid they will be punished, even though they themselves aren’t drinking or doing drugs. The pol-

icy needs to explicitly outline a more specific procedure for identifying and protecting students while they are in a dangerous situation, not just after. In a life or death situation, students should feel safe calling for help if a classmate is in danger, and they shouldn’t have to fear that helping a friend will earn them a chemical health violation or a more serious legal consequence. Overall, the Walpole School Committee and the Walpole High School community are moving in the right direction. The policy needs to be reviewed and updated. When we prioritize student protection first and punishment later, Walpole will become a safer place for students and the community on the whole.

REBELLION

Staff

Walpole High School’s newspaper is committed to informing the public, reflecting the students’ views, creating a public forum and serving as an educational medium.

Check out our website whstherebellion.com

Send a Letter to the Editor. Letters Should be 200 Words or fewer, and can be emailed to walpolerebellion@gmail.com

Editors-in-Chief Emily Martin Andrea Traietti News Editor Devin Mckinney Assistant News Editor Tara Gordon Editorial Editor Daanya Salmanullah Assistant Editorials Editor Lindsey Sullivan Entertainment/Lifestyle Editor Rebecca Boyajian Sports Editor David Moser Lead Reporter Emily Ball

Business Manager Meghan Foley Assistant Business Manager Grace Sewell Layout Editor Abigail Hile Social Media Editor Kayla Frost Photo Editor Maeve O’Connor Graphic Editor Danielle Borelli Staff Photographers Ciara Healy Lillian Hunter Cameron Johnson Julia Kane Caroline Pitman

Mandy Scully Staff Writers Breanna Andreassi Brynne Bergen Megan Brigham Emily Butler Aidan Chariton Craig Cieplik Eva Clarke Lindsay Cordopatri Gabriella Donahue Michaela Donato Grace Donovan Jessica Ferguson Elizabeth Foley Sophia Giovaniello Tanya Gupta Catherine Hurwitz Hope Jordan

Caitlin Kahaly Emily Linclon Kelsey Mazzocca Katherine Mazzotta Abigal McLaughlin Brendan Moser Delaney Murphy Molly O’Connell Olivia O’Connell John O’Meara Kevin Quinn Alexis Rodia Callie Ross Samantha Simons Emily Smith Nicole St. Germain Rachel Tetreault Melanie Weber Sydney Weinacht Thomas Wilber


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June 2017

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June 2017

Features

Senior Reflections

Fisher Elementary School

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Externally, my journey from kindergarten to freshman year was pretty bland. As a five year old, I wore striped collared shirts, jeans, and sneakers while sporting Bieber hair (before it was known as such). As a freshman, I wore striped collared shirts, jeans, and sneakers...while sporting Bieber hair. I try to forget my days of sweatpants and masculinity at JMS every day, and I seriously blame Ned’s Declassified School Survival Guide for my forced efforts to fit in. After watching that show, I thought I finally had something that allowed me to look into the future and know what to expect. In retrospect, that preparation yielded nothing but a fake version of Padraic Curran. Basically, the ambiguity of High School (and elementary school) turned out to be beneficial. Finally, I could express who I really was. I could stop listening to strictly Kiss 108 and substitute it for blaring some angsty Falker Legends in the car with my forch buddies. More importantly I kissed sports goodbye (except swimming but I have been informed that it does not count) and warmly welcomed the company of Drama Club, where Johnson Middle School I met some of my favorite people to be around. Walpole High School I’d have to say that high school was a great time for me, and I met a ton of new people that I earnestly think I’ll stay in contact with for a very long time. I maintained a lot of my friends from elementary school, and had a great time there too, but high school is where I reached my true potential, joining all the clubs I could, and making some too (R.I.P.). If you’re reading this: thanks b.

Padraic Curran I have always enjoyed school. I liked learning and I loved seeing my friends everyday. In elementary school I wanted to be the best, and that day came when I got to be the line leader as we marched to gym class. Finally, I had all the power! It’s funny how just being at the front of the line could be one of your greatest achievements for elementary school but the second you cross the threshold of Bird Middle you do not dare to walk in a line. Just like in elementary school, I also wanted to be the best in middle school; I strived to get good grades and be on the teacher’s good side. But there were new kids who were smarter than me which meant I had to work harder. Although I tried to do my best I was always that little awkward middle schooler who never could figure out where I belonged. Like most other people I don’t really think I figured out who I truly was until I entered high school. I didn’t want to just go through the routine of going to class, going home, going to bed, then repeat. I wanted someBoyden Elementary thing new. So my friends talked me into playing lacrosse freshman year. It was a way for me to hang out with my friends and meet new friends while doing something new and exciting! I think I had touched a lacrosse stick like twice before tryouts began. Lacrosse really did it for me! I loved the sport and I loved the girls on the team every year I have played. It was amazing how much a sport can impact school as well. I knew more people in the hallways and classrooms and we always had something to talk about. I also think being a goalie in a sport like lacrosse also gave me that leadership I have liked since I led the line in Boyden. Long live my REBLAX family <3

Mia Straccia

Boyden Elementary School

Page Design/ Lillie Hunter

School

Bird Middle School Walpole High School

Morgan Fontana

As my high school experience comes to a close, I can’t help but realize that I’ve changed. A lot. Walking into Walpole High School the first day of freshman year, I was overwhelmed. Taking in the sights and sounds of a new school can definitely flood your senses, and I was drowning. I got lost looking for my English classroom, I stuffed my backpack with every school supply imaginable, and I believed that there was a pool on the fourth floor. Needless to say, I was not used to a fast paced high school environment. But day by day, I adapted to my surroundings. I stopped carrying a map around, I learned to make use of my locker, and I was disappointed to discover that there is no pool or fourth floor. I also quickly discovered that there were many opportunities for me to meet people who were similar to me. The Drama Club, the Speech Team, and the Film Festival are just a few of the countless outlets that people like me have used to exercise the right side of my brain. It sounds cliche, but I have met my best friends in these clubs and activities, and I’m definitely going to miss seeing them every day in the halls, classrooms, and auditorium of Walpole High. With graduation approaching, I’m experiencing many things for the last time. My last Chorus class, my last Bird Middle School Speech Team tournament, and my last Drama Club show Walpole High School are just a few of the many bittersweet goodbyes that I’ll have to make in the weeks ahead. But these goodbyes will quickly be followed by hellos and new beginnings in college. Although I will greatly miss hanging out in the auditorium before rehearsal, or sitting and laughing with my friends at lunch, I know that life continues after high school, and I can’t wait to see where this life takes me and the rest of the Class of 2017.


Features

Page 8

June 2017

SENIOR PROFILES

The year

Rebellion shares 12 survey sent out to

responses to the 2017

an Senior

end-ofClass.

ANNA HEBNER

CLAIRE SCHMITT

DAVID MOSER

What is your most embarrassing moment from high school? Falling down half a flight of stairs with the only witness being none other than Mrs. Terri Thornton. What is your favorite teacher quote? “Touch the drums and you die!” -Mr. Falker If you could say one thing to your freshman self, what would it be? Maybe try studying at least once or twice. Which faculty member had the biggest impact on your life and why? Mr. Falker due to his lengthy life talks, exceptional fashion sense, and unique sense of humor. Describe your high school experience in six words. The history wing stairs killed me. On a typical school night, you can be found... Plotting against the patriarchy.

What song best describes your high school experience? “Closing Time” by Semisonic. What is your favorite high school memory? Badminton in gym senior year. I don’t think I’ve ever laughed so much in my entire life. Which faculty member had the biggest impact on your life and why? Mrs. Tobey because she inspired me to want to teach history. You get home and there is no food in the fridge. Where do you go? Chipotle. What is the best club/activity you participated in? Drama Club. Favorite Netflix show to watch while procrastinating: Shameless.

What is your favorite teacher quote? “All the crazy people are drawn to each other, and then they meet, and its crazy.” - Ms. Mac What is your favorite high school memory? Singing One Direction through the hotel halls and off the balcony at MASC with all the other Student Council kids. Which faculty member had the biggest impact on your life and why? Cashman and Ms. Mac equally. I really found my passion and what I was good at and wanted to do in life in journalism; Ms. Mac with all her quips and life lessons showed me what it means to be a leader and how to lead others, and also to live life the way that I want to, not by the rules of others. What was the dumbest reason you got in trouble? Never got in trouble. One time I got the evil eye from the lunch lady for going in the cafeteria the wrong way.

EMILY O’CONNELL

GREG BOND

HANNAH MOURADIAN

If you could say one thing to your freshman self, what would it be? Enjoy it while it lasts. What is your favorite high school memory? Going to Keene State with my soccer team. Which faculty member had the biggest impact on your life and why? Ms. Mac 100%, she was not just a great teacher but she taught me along with many others life lessons that I will never forget. What was the dumbest reason you got in trouble? Drinking my water in the library and getting yelled at because the bottle crinkled. Favorite Netflix show to watch while procrastinating: Prison Break.

What is your favorite high school memory? Hiding a time capsule with the Drama Club. Which faculty member had the biggest impact on your life and why? Mr. Mullaney because his cookies are BOMB! You get home from a long day at school and there is no food in the fridge. Where do you go? Chipotle. What is the best club/activity you participated in? Drama Club. Favorite Netflix show to watch while procrastinating: Stranger Things. On a typical school night, you can be found... Probably in the auditorium still at rehearsal.

If you could say one thing to your freshman self, what would it be? Be hopeful and stay positive What song best describes your high school experience? “Young Dumb & Broke.” - Khalid Which faculty member had the biggest impact on your life and why? Mrs. Hogan, she helped me realize that being passionate about what you do in life is the most important part of doing what you do. Describe your high school experience in six words. I still feel like a freshman. What is the best club/activity you participated in? Mock Trial, Film, The Fire Within—too many to choose.


Features

June 2017

Page 9

CLASS OF 2017

BOBBY WATERS

What is your favorite teacher quote? “The truth there, it’s minimal.” - Mr. Cashman If you could say one thing to your freshman self, what would it be? Be active in the high school community. What song best describes your high school experience? Я очень рад, ведь я, наконец, возвращаюсь домой or Freeze Frame. What was the dumbest reason you got in trouble? When I cut an eraser in half. You get home and there is no food in the fridge. Where do you go? To sleep. What is the best club/activity you participated in? Drama Club. Describe your high school experience in six words. It will get better but faster.

CAM MARTIN

What is your most embarrassing moment from high school? Falling asleep last block and realizing I was the only person left in the school when I woke up. What is your favorite teacher quote? “All In...Do Your Job.” - Coach Dowd What song best describes your high school experience? Good Life by One Republic. What is your favorite high school memory? Hockey team beating Catholic Memorial to get into Super 8. You get home and there is no food in the fridge. Where do you go? Chipotle. Favorite Netflix show to watch while procrastinating: Friday Night Lights.

KAYLA FROST

JACK BUSHWAY

What is your favorite teacher quote? “Life sucks then ya die.” -Mr. Kim I could not make it through a school day without... Meghan Foley and a medium iced regular coffee. What song best describes your high school experience? Shawty wassup by Yung Nation or Ironic by Alanis Morissette. What is your favorite high school memory? Oregon with StuCo or Costa Rican exchange, also all volleyball, Dance Company, film festivals idk I love this school.. lotta great mems. What was the dumbest reason you got in trouble? I was tardy to homeroom literally every day and got detention for it. Describe your high school experience in six words. Together fight, together win #RollRebels.

What is your favorite teacher quote? “Don’t complain about the weather.” - Giblin I could not make it through a school day without... Water...sorry. If you could say one thing to your freshman self, what would it be? Don’t take running in high school for granted. What song best describes your high school experience? All Star by Smash Mouth. What was the dumbest reason you got in trouble? I’ll admit that I don’t think I’ve ever gotten in trouble. You get home and there is no food in the fridge. Where do you go? Panera: chicken frontega panini, extra tomato. What is the best club/activity you participated in? XC/Indoor/Outdoor track.

MEREDITH LORUSSO

VASILI BOUSTRIS

What is your favorite teacher quote? “You guys are all Mr. Alan’s minions.” -Mrs. O’Leary If you could say one thing to your freshman self, what would it be? Scam harder. What is your favorite high school memory? Poopgate. What will you miss most about Walpole High School? Music Trivs. Which faculty member had the biggest impact on your life and why? Ms. Walleston, who taught me not only how the heart functions, but that following your heart matters in all aspects of life. What was the dumbest reason you got in trouble? Accidentally setting off the school alarms at 10:03 pm for film.

What is your favorite teacher quote? “Your voice is just so loud.”- Ms. Tighe If you could say one thing to your freshman self, what would it be? Savor every moment. What song best describes your high school experience? Keep the Family Close by Drake. What is your favorite high school memory? Rebel Hockey making it to the Super 8 You get home from a long day at school and there is no food in the fridge. Where do you go? Starbucks 100%. Describe your high school experience in six words. Absolutely lit. On a typical school night, you can be found... Driving around blasting rap music.


Page 10

The Rebellion

ALABAMA (2):

MAINE (12)

University of Alabama: Michaela Redmond Ryan Gray

Bowdoin College: Devin McKinney Husson University: Jessica Giffen Maine Maritime Academy: Colin Seastrand University of Maine: Kelly Fogarty Myles Kraus Elyse Good Craig Cieplik Liam Parquette University of Maine, Orono: Timothy Fraone Danielle Healy Kaitlin Wolfe University of New England: Eric Lederman

CALIFORNIA (3): Los Angeles College of Music: Erin Donahue University of California, Los Angeles: Abigail Hile University of San Francisco: Madeline Herlihy

COLORADO (2): Colorado State University: John Egan Sam Tudor

CONNECTICUT (8): Fairfield University: Katherine Mazzotta Madeline Warley University of Connecticut: Emma Flynn University of Hartford: Brian Conneely Ryan Merrikin Jake Kral University of New Haven: Christopher Hughes Quinnipiac University: Delaney Murphy

DELAWARE (1):

MARYLAND (1): Salisbury University: Courtney Brigham

MISSISSIPPI (2): University of Mississippi: Meghan Foley Graham Rinne

MISSOURI (1):

University of Delaware: Catherine Erwin

Saint Louis University: Liam Stover

FLORIDA (1):

NEW HAMPSHIRE (9)

Full Sail University: J Carter Laronde

GEORGIA (1): Georgia Institute of Technology: Henry Rose

INDIANA (1): University of Notre Dame: Michael Roche

ILLINOIS(1): McKendree University: Francesca Bonanno

Franklin Pierce University: Jordan Washburn Patrick Glebus Coleman Lydon Plymouth State University: Nathaniel Kelley Nicole Hay Saint Anselm College: Bridget Murray Jillian Sweeney University of New Hampshire: Aileen Coen Mandy Scully

June 2016

The Rebellion

COLLEGE MAP

College with Most WHS Graduates Attending Next Fall

*This list includes only students who responded to the Rebellion survey.

UMASS AMHERST 8 students

Four graduates will be joining the military

NEW JERSEY (3): Drew University: Karishma Patel Seton Hall University: David Moser Kelsey Mazzocca

NEW YORK (11) Ithaca College: Jacqueline Agahigian Olivia Dipasca New York University: Olivia Pratt Pratt Institute: Mitchell Kelley Rochester Institute of Technology: Gayle McAdams Michael Nee Meghan Sicard Daniel Mullen Syracuse University: Kayla Frost Sean Lynch University of Rochester: Emily Hurwitz

NORTH CAROLINA (2): East Carolina University: Emma Kane Meredith College: Kelly Cimeno

PENNSYLVANIA (2): Drexel University: Gregory Langenhorst Grove City College: Mary Cambell

RHODE ISLAND (10) Bryant University: Grace Sewell Providence College: Cameron Martin Jacqueline Buckley Paul Heffernan Andrea Traietti

Roger Williams University: Stephanie Applin Summer Blume Madelyn Foley Madison Savary Olivia Sheehan

SOUTH CAROLINA (6): Clemson University: Taylor Petrucci Emily Martin Coastal Carolina University: Courtney Redmond College of Charleston: Erika Golden University of South Carolina: Paige Cullen Luke Donovan

VERMONT (2): University of Vermont: Mikaela McSharry Padraic Curran

Popular Majors

Undecided - 8.8% Nursing - 8.2% Business - 7.1% Biology - 5.5% Criminal Justice - 4.9% Psychology - 4.9% Political Science - 4.4% Marketing - 3.3% Finance - 3.3% Communications - 3.3% Pre-med - 2.2%

VIRGINIA (3): George Mason University: Elizabeth Duseau Roanoke College: Avery Smith University of Richmond: Craig MacDonald

WASHINGTON (1): Digipen Institute of Technology: Kaitlyn Frank

WASHINGTON DC (2): American University: Hannah Mouradian George Washington University: Jeffrey Clapp

Page 11

Fa rt h e s t From Home (2,891 miles) GALWAY, IRELAND (1) National University of Ireland, Galway: Deirdre McCabe

MAssachusetts (76) Assumption College: Jake Hurley Alison Foley James Randall Bentley University: Charlie Auditore Richard Crowley Owen Hunter Stathis Kalemkeridis Boston College: Natasha Rodriguez Boston University: Sarah Bredy Justin Walsh Gregory Bond David Xia Haley Dimartino Bridgewater State University: Robert Burke Natalie Carley Emma Kerns Claire Schmitt Curry College: Vasilios Boustris Kristen Mulrey Dean College: Brendan Sheehan Emmanuel College: Mia Straccia Rebecca Whearty Stephanie Forester Maeve O’Connor Anna Hebner Empire Beauty School: Jessica Sampson

Endicott College: Brigid Ford Kayla Eldayaa Isabelle Nee Kristen Dwyer Harvard College: Michaela Donato College of the Holy Cross: Audrey Lynch Massachusetts Bay Community College: Robert Waters Massachusetts Maritime Academy: Kyle Barry Chris Donnelly Ryan Morris Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences: Brandon Kilroy Melissa Mutrie Merrimack College: Jake Christy Nichols College: Brianna Gill Northeastern University: Melanie Weber Michael Timson Regis College: Bridget Gill Simmons College: Cameron Johnson Stonehill College: Theresa Erwin

Katherine Griffin Meredith LoRusso Suffolk University: Margaret Conley Brittany Russo Emily Witham Tufts University: Daanya Salmanullah University of Massachusetts, Amherst: Sophia Giovaniello Lauren Bean Mahika Saxena Kerri McLean Andrew Henderson Morgan O’Brien Luke Berardinelli Christina Boyajian University of Massachuetts, Boston: John Bushway Margaret McMenamy Thomas Wilber

University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth: Devin Aikens University of Massachuetts, Lowell: Patrick Donovan Jackson Kelley Megan Fisher Wentworth Institute of Technology: Kacey Russo Evan Lawlor Alec Horton Nicholas Portanova Westfield State University: Kimberly Carter Trevor Grady Emily O’Connell Stephanie Reinert Worcester Polytechnic Institute: Abigail O’Sullivan Worcester State University: Morgan Fontana

Closest to home Dean College Franklin, Ma 10.1 miles

Page Design/Abby Hile


Page 10

The Rebellion

ALABAMA (2):

MAINE (12)

University of Alabama: Michaela Redmond Ryan Gray

Bowdoin College: Devin McKinney Husson University: Jessica Giffen Maine Maritime Academy: Colin Seastrand University of Maine: Kelly Fogarty Myles Kraus Elyse Good Craig Cieplik Liam Parquette University of Maine, Orono: Timothy Fraone Danielle Healy Kaitlin Wolfe University of New England: Eric Lederman

CALIFORNIA (3): Los Angeles College of Music: Erin Donahue University of California, Los Angeles: Abigail Hile University of San Francisco: Madeline Herlihy

COLORADO (2): Colorado State University: John Egan Sam Tudor

CONNECTICUT (8): Fairfield University: Katherine Mazzotta Madeline Warley University of Connecticut: Emma Flynn University of Hartford: Brian Conneely Ryan Merrikin Jake Kral University of New Haven: Christopher Hughes Quinnipiac University: Delaney Murphy

DELAWARE (1):

MARYLAND (1): Salisbury University: Courtney Brigham

MISSISSIPPI (2): University of Mississippi: Meghan Foley Graham Rinne

MISSOURI (1):

University of Delaware: Catherine Erwin

Saint Louis University: Liam Stover

FLORIDA (1):

NEW HAMPSHIRE (9)

Full Sail University: J Carter Laronde

GEORGIA (1): Georgia Institute of Technology: Henry Rose

INDIANA (1): University of Notre Dame: Michael Roche

ILLINOIS(1): McKendree University: Francesca Bonanno

Franklin Pierce University: Jordan Washburn Patrick Glebus Coleman Lydon Plymouth State University: Nathaniel Kelley Nicole Hay Saint Anselm College: Bridget Murray Jillian Sweeney University of New Hampshire: Aileen Coen Mandy Scully

June 2016

The Rebellion

COLLEGE MAP

College with Most WHS Graduates Attending Next Fall

*This list includes only students who responded to the Rebellion survey.

UMASS AMHERST 8 students

Four graduates will be joining the military

NEW JERSEY (3): Drew University: Karishma Patel Seton Hall University: David Moser Kelsey Mazzocca

NEW YORK (11) Ithaca College: Jacqueline Agahigian Olivia Dipasca New York University: Olivia Pratt Pratt Institute: Mitchell Kelley Rochester Institute of Technology: Gayle McAdams Michael Nee Meghan Sicard Daniel Mullen Syracuse University: Kayla Frost Sean Lynch University of Rochester: Emily Hurwitz

NORTH CAROLINA (2): East Carolina University: Emma Kane Meredith College: Kelly Cimeno

PENNSYLVANIA (2): Drexel University: Gregory Langenhorst Grove City College: Mary Cambell

RHODE ISLAND (10) Bryant University: Grace Sewell Providence College: Cameron Martin Jacqueline Buckley Paul Heffernan Andrea Traietti

Roger Williams University: Stephanie Applin Summer Blume Madelyn Foley Madison Savary Olivia Sheehan

SOUTH CAROLINA (6): Clemson University: Taylor Petrucci Emily Martin Coastal Carolina University: Courtney Redmond College of Charleston: Erika Golden University of South Carolina: Paige Cullen Luke Donovan

VERMONT (2): University of Vermont: Mikaela McSharry Padraic Curran

Popular Majors

Undecided - 8.8% Nursing - 8.2% Business - 7.1% Biology - 5.5% Criminal Justice - 4.9% Psychology - 4.9% Political Science - 4.4% Marketing - 3.3% Finance - 3.3% Communications - 3.3% Pre-med - 2.2%

VIRGINIA (3): George Mason University: Elizabeth Duseau Roanoke College: Avery Smith University of Richmond: Craig MacDonald

WASHINGTON (1): Digipen Institute of Technology: Kaitlyn Frank

WASHINGTON DC (2): American University: Hannah Mouradian George Washington University: Jeffrey Clapp

Page 11

Fa rt h e s t From Home (2,891 miles) GALWAY, IRELAND (1) National University of Ireland, Galway: Deirdre McCabe

MAssachusetts (76) Assumption College: Jake Hurley Alison Foley James Randall Bentley University: Charlie Auditore Richard Crowley Owen Hunter Stathis Kalemkeridis Boston College: Natasha Rodriguez Boston University: Sarah Bredy Justin Walsh Gregory Bond David Xia Haley Dimartino Bridgewater State University: Robert Burke Natalie Carley Emma Kerns Claire Schmitt Curry College: Vasilios Boustris Kristen Mulrey Dean College: Brendan Sheehan Emmanuel College: Mia Straccia Rebecca Whearty Stephanie Forester Maeve O’Connor Anna Hebner Empire Beauty School: Jessica Sampson

Endicott College: Brigid Ford Kayla Eldayaa Isabelle Nee Kristen Dwyer Harvard College: Michaela Donato College of the Holy Cross: Audrey Lynch Massachusetts Bay Community College: Robert Waters Massachusetts Maritime Academy: Kyle Barry Chris Donnelly Ryan Morris Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences: Brandon Kilroy Melissa Mutrie Merrimack College: Jake Christy Nichols College: Brianna Gill Northeastern University: Melanie Weber Michael Timson Regis College: Bridget Gill Simmons College: Cameron Johnson Stonehill College: Theresa Erwin

Katherine Griffin Meredith LoRusso Suffolk University: Margaret Conley Brittany Russo Emily Witham Tufts University: Daanya Salmanullah University of Massachusetts, Amherst: Sophia Giovaniello Lauren Bean Mahika Saxena Kerri McLean Andrew Henderson Morgan O’Brien Luke Berardinelli Christina Boyajian University of Massachuetts, Boston: John Bushway Margaret McMenamy Thomas Wilber

University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth: Devin Aikens University of Massachuetts, Lowell: Patrick Donovan Jackson Kelley Megan Fisher Wentworth Institute of Technology: Kacey Russo Evan Lawlor Alec Horton Nicholas Portanova Westfield State University: Kimberly Carter Trevor Grady Emily O’Connell Stephanie Reinert Worcester Polytechnic Institute: Abigail O’Sullivan Worcester State University: Morgan Fontana

Closest to home Dean College Franklin, Ma 10.1 miles

Page Design/Abby Hile


Sports

Page 12

June 2017

College Commits In the Class of 2017, 25 students are committed to play sports in college. These athletes will be attending a variety of schools across the country. They will be playing field hockey, lacrosse, basketball, baseball, soccer, hockey, football, swimming, track and field and tennis. Students Megan Fisher (UMass Lowell; Field Hockey), Melanie Weber (Northeastern; Field Hockey), Kelly Fogarty (University of Maine; Basketball) and Catherine Erwin (University of Delaware; Swimming) will all play at Division I schools in the fall. Six students will compete at Division II schools, 14 students will compete at Division III schools and one student will compete at a college preparatory school.

Charles Auditore Francesca Bonanno Courtney Brigham

Bentley University Sport: Baseball

McKendree University Sport: Hockey

What advice would you What is your favorite give to other high school part about playing high athletes? school sports? Work hard every day and Being able to see my best reach out to coaches early friends (my team) evif you have aspirations to eryday and team dinners play in college. twice a week.

John Bushway

Justin Burns

What coach inspired you most? The coaches that inspired me most were my aunt and my dad. Both of them taught me at a young age that I should never give up.

UMass Boston Sport: Cross Country & Track

Massachusetts Maritime Academy Sport: Soccer

What advice would you give to other high school athletes? Do not take running for Walpole High School for granted. It goes by too quickly.

What is your favorite high school sports memory? Making it to the state championship tournament my freshman year.

What coach inspired you most? Coaches Giblin, Coogan, Ganshirt, and Flaman have all inspired me in monumental ways and have shaped my running career.

Salisbury University Sport: Basketball

What is the hardest part about playing high school sports? Being able to balance sports, school, and a social life is definitely the hardest part about playing sports in high school; however, it is worth it.

What coach inspired you the most? Coach Tom Connor What is your favorite high school sports memory? Making it to quarter finals senior year.

What advice would you give to other high school athletes? It goes by incredibly fast, next thing you know it will be your senior night so do not take a second for granted.

Zach Conrad

James Corcoran

Catherine Erwin

Tess Erwin

Megan Fisher

Plymouth State University Sport: Football

The Winchendon School Sport: Hockey

University of Delaware Sport: Swimming

Stonehill College Sport: Soccer

UMass Lowell Sport: Field Hockey

What will you miss most about Walpole sports?

What is your favorite high school sports memory? Beating Catholic Memorial in the Super 8 play-in game.

What advice would you give to other high school athletes? Use your failures as motivation to succeed and keep pushing yourself because your hard work will pay off eventually.

What is your favorite high school sports memory? My favorite high school sports memory was when my team and I won the Herget division.

What is the hardest part about playing high school sports? Playing your last game ever.

Running out onto the football field, and being able to call myself a Rebel and being part of the legacy of the Walpole sports programs. What coach inspired you most? Coach Abate definitelty inspired me throughout my football career.

What is the hardest part about playing high school sports? Keeping your grades up and managing your time. What advice would you give to other high school athletes? Work hard during the off season: it will pay off.

What coach inspired you most? My club coach, Carl Cederquist. He has always supported me and helped me get to where I am today.

What coach inspired you most? My high school coach, Erin Kearney, inspired me the most and was a definite factor in improving my soccer career and my career in general. I am glad I had a coach as good as her.

What will you miss most about Walpole sports? Spending time with my team. What coach inspired you most? Coach Delaney

What will you miss most about Walpole sports? My Porker sisters. What advice would you give to other high school athletes? To cherish every sprint you do because one day I guarantee youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll actually miss it.


Page 13

Sports

June 2017

Alison Foley

Kelly Fogarty

Jessica Giffen

Owen Hunter

Jake Hurley

Assumption College Sport: Lacrosse

University of Maine Sport: Basketball

Bently University Sport: Lacrosse

Assumption College Sport: Lacrosse

What advice would you give to other high school athletes? Always give 110% because you will never regret working hard.

What is your favorite high school sports memory? Beating Falmouth to advance to South Sectional Semi Finals

Husson University Sport: Track and Cross Country

What is your favorite high school sports memory? Being a part of the super eight team.

What advice would you give to other high school athletes? Make sure to work hard during the off season.

What is the hardest part about playing high school sports? Balancing sports, school and a social life.

What advice would you give to other high school athletes? It’s not all about winning even though it’s nice. Just have fun with your sport. It’ll be over before you know it. What will you miss most about Walpole sports? What coach inspired Playing our rivals in the you the must? Bay State Coach Coogan

Whart will you miss the most aboutWalpole sports? The community of athletes and the support of the entire town.

What is your favorite high school sports memory? Everytime we beat Xaverian.

Eric Lederman

Alexandre Lucas

Mark Nickolson

Abigail O’Sullivan

Tayla Randall

Univeristy of New England Sport: Football

Massachusetts Maritime Academy Sport: Lacrosse

Curry College Sport: Football

Worcester Polytechnic Institute Sport: Field Hockey

Curry College Sport: Soccer

What is your favorite part about playing high school sports? The great memories and the brotherhood of teams.

What advice would you give to other high school athletes? Hard work will get you where yu want to be.

What will you miss most about Walpole sports? The town pride towards sports.

What coach inspired you most? Coach Costi

What is your favorite high school sports memory? The Thanksgiving game. What is your favorite part about playing high school sports? The atmosphere.

What coach inspired you most? In all aspects, Jenn Quinn has inspired me the most

What is your favorite part about playing high school sports? All of the team dinners, and bonding with all of the girls on my team throughout the season.

What coach inspired you most? Coach Greener

What is your favorite part about playing high school sports? All of my teammates.

What will you miss most about Walpole sports? Being a part of the Rebel culture.

What is the hardest part about playing high school sports? The hardest part about playing a high school sport is balancing your time with school work and friends.

Avery Smith

Matthew Tosone

Melanie Weber

David White

Thomas Wilber

Plymouth State University Sport: Football

Northeastern University Sport: Field Hockey

Westfield State University Sport: Football

University of Massachusetts Boston Sport: Lacrosse

What is your favorite part about playing high school sports? The fact that I grew up looking up to these athletes, and now I am the one that little kids are looking up to. It feels good being part of something bigger than myself. Also, I will miss the friendships that I made along the way and the community of the team.

What coach inspired you most? Coach Tosone

What is your favorite high school sports memory? Always being able to play with my best friends.

What is the hardest part about playing high school sports? Being so close to winning a trophy in past years and not being able to win it. Although, this has motivated me to be the best person I can be on and off the field.

Roanoke College Sport: Tennis What is your favorite part about playing high school sports? There’s not as much pressure as there is when you play club. Of course you want to win, but the emphasis is on having fun. What will you miss most about Walpole sports? All the girls I played with.

What is your favorite part about playing high school sports? The friendships, the competitive atmospheres, rivalry games, teammates, bus rides, team dinners and state championship games.

What advice would you give to other high school athletes? Slow down and live in the moment. Enjoy it because it will go by quickly.

What is the hardest part about playing high school sports? Definitely staying in shape and all of the running, but it is definitely worth it.

What coach inspired you most? Coach Whittemore


Page 14

How Easy

to

ways

to

By Emily Butler Staff Writer

Lifestyle eat clean this

create

an

appealing

With summer quickly approaching, high school teens are beginning to regain that sense of freedom that the warmer months bring. It is easy to slip out of a regular eating routine during the summer as going out to get ice cream with friends, making late night McDonalds runs, and snacking beach or poolside become seasonal staples. If this sounds like you, The Rebellion is here to help. Maintaining a healthy diet during the summer months can be daunting but is essential. If you are planning on being active this summer, keep a diet rich with nutrients and minerals in mind. A healthy diet can be as simple as swapping out sugary treats for something a little healthier. Replace your typical beach snacks like potato chips with fresh fruit and consider ditching the sugary drinks and the iced coffees you were reliant upon during the school year for freshly squeezed lem-

onade or hydrating coconut water. Breakfast is a meal that tends to get more attention during the summer months than during the morning rush of the school year. Use this extra time to make a healthy breakfast that will help you sustain a high level of energy throughout active summer days. If you want to shake up your typical breakfast foods, try replacing your Eggos for avocado toast or a greek yogurt. Healthy options can even be taken on the go. Nutritious snacks that are easy enough to pack in your beach bag include plantain chips, kale chips, granola, watermelon slices, or fresh fruit. Fresh salads make for delicious and easy portable lunches. If salads tend to bore you try adding heirloom tomatoes, grilled peaches, dates, or almonds. Summer allows for more time for meal preparation so have fun experimenting with new ideas. For dinner, check out local farm stands and restaurants that prepare food with fresh ingredients to grab

Stay

healthy

and

June 2017

summer

healthy

a tasty bite in place of fast food. Summer grilling is not just for hamburgers! Alternatives include grilled eggplant and vegetables. Pasta with pesto, and zesty tacos can also add a summery flavor to your diet. In the summer months, it is im-

summer

diet

portant to keep in mind everything is best in moderation. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be shy to treat yourself to the occasional fro-yo and pizza on a Friday night. Having a healthy outlook and making your best efforts to eat clean will greatly impact your summer lifestyle.

The Rebellionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s picks for fresh summer recipes cool

and

by

making

these

quick

and

easy

snacks

Wild Berry Smoothie

Berry & Mint Ice Pops

Roasted Squash

Fresh Green Smoothie

By Grace Donovan Staff Writer

For a refreshing summer snack (that is not ice cream!), try making your own berry and mint ice pops to cool down in the summer heat.

Try a new vegetable this summer! Whether you like your squash in the form of spaghetti or roasted, like in this recipe, squash is a summer staple never disappoints.

Swap out that sugary Starbucks iced green tea for a cleaner green drink this summer: try blending your own trendy green smoothie.

After a grueling workout or simply when you are in need of some extra protein, try this wild berry protein smoothie to help your body bounce back.

Ingredients:

-15 blueberries -4 strawberries -8 raspberries -2 cups of nonfat milk -2 scoops of protein powder -Ice

Add as much ice that fits your preferred consistency. Blend on a high speed and enjoy a refreshing smoothie after an exhausting workout. The fruit and the protein will work together to replenish your aching muscles. Spice things up with your favorite protein powder flavor anywhere from chocolate to vanilla. Freeze the fruit for a more frosty texture. To create a creamier and more flavorful smoothie, replace the ice with frozen fruit. This way, if your smoothie melts in the summer sun, then it will not become watered down.

Ingredients:

Ingredients:

Ingredients:

-1 cup of raspberries -1 cup of blackberries -1 cup of sliced strawberries -1/3 cup of sugar -1/3 cup of water -2 tbsp of lemon juice -2 tbsp of finely minced mint

-1 medium pattypan squash (do not peel) -Olive oil -Salt and Pepper -Other spices or ingredients of your choice

-1 peach -1 cup of strawberries -1 cup of pineapple -1 cup of almond milk -2 cups of spinach -Optional: 1 tbsp of chia seeds or your other favorite add-ins

Start by combining the berries , lemon juice, and mint in a bowl. Mash the berries and let the mixture sit for half an hour to macerate. Combine the sugar and the water in a separate small saucepan and simmer until the sugar is dissolved. Let the sugar cool and combine it with the berry mixture in a measuring cup. Pour your new mixture into three ounce popsicle molds to make eight popsicles. Let the molds freeze for six hours and you have fun, fresh summer ice pops. Bon Appetit!

First, slice off the stems of the squash and lay them flat. Cut the squash into one-quarter to one-half inch thick, round slices. Coat both sides with a drizzle of olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Add spices from garlic power to lemon thyme, rosemary, or oregano for extra flavor. Cook the squash rounds flat on the grill on medium heat. Once one side browns, flip and continue cooking until squash is tender. One squash serves two people as a side.

Combine your ingredients and blend on high speed to enjoy a green smoothie that will leave you feeling cool and refreshed on a hot summer day. Depending on how thick you like your smoothie, you can add more or less of your favorite yogurt to match the consistency you like. Your smoothie is complete here, but if you want to bring it to the next level, try adding almond flour, frozen kale, avocado, matcha powder, mint, or coconut water. Bring your smoothie out by the pool with your favorite book and enjoy.


A&E Hilarious "Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2" kick-starts summer blockbuster season June 2017

Page 15

James Gunn brings Star Lord and friends back to the screen with an even more dynamic cast and another iconic soundtrack By Rebecca Boyajian Entertainment Editor Providing audiences with an unconventionally fun and humorous story that differs from traditional superhero movies, Disney and Marvel join forces to bring the beloved team of ragtag galactic saviors back to the big screen in “Guardians of the Galaxy Volume 2.” The underdog outcasts have not graced audiences with their bizarre hilarity since 2014 and fans were unquestionably getting antsy anticipating their return. While at times the sequel’s engaging plotline feels slightly clouded by the film’s explosive blockbuster quality, fans will likely agree that the sequel is as hilarious as the original. All is going smoothly when Star Lord (Chris Pratt) and his fellow guardians are tasked with protecting a massive battery on a Sovereign planet. Things go sour relatively quickly following the guardians departure from the planet as they narrowly escape death after a stranger, whose identity is later revealed as Star Lord’s long lost father Ego (Kurt Russell), saves them from an ambush. Director James Gunn reveals the shocking origin of Ego, Star Lord’s father, a story fans have been anticipating since the first film. Most of the movie’s plot revolves around Star Lord tracing back his story line and piecing together exactly where he came from. Star Lord is finally able to meet his father and while at first he meets and even supercedes all of Star Lord’s expectations, Ego is not exactly who he seems to be. As the main addition to the cast, Russell’s comedically selfish persona blends in smoothly with the other actors. Staying true to the character’s original personalities displayed in the comics,

the entire gang returns for the sequel and their iconic personalities avoid being engulfed by over-the-top graphics. In addition to the classic quartet of Star Lord/Peter Quill, Gamora (Zoe Saldana), Rocket (Bradley Cooper), Groot (Vin Diesel), and Drax (Dave Bautista), Gunn also reintroduces some secondary characters from the first film—such as Nebula (Karen Gillan), Kraglin (Sean Gunn) and Yondu (Michael Rooker)— and an abundance of new characters from the comic books. While there’s a myriad of things in the film that audiences could mark as

their favorite component, it’s safe to say the majority of audience discussion will be centered around the undeniably adorable presence of baby Groot. The simplistic yet caring tree in the first movie successfully captured viewers’ hearts and manages to steal the show in the sequel, especially when working alongside his best friend Rocket. At the end of the first film, Groot sacrificed himself for the lives of his fellow guardians, but Rocket salvages a root to replant, so his friend can begin his life cycle over again and thus we are blessed with the adorable

baby Groot in “Volume 2”. The only lines uttered in both films by Groot is simply: “I am Groot.” Despite only have one line repeated over and over again, Vin Diesel says each line with the appropriate emotion and delivery. While Baby Groot may be the biggest audience highlight, the captivating soundtrack will be a close second. People were enchanted by the first movie’s “Awesome Mix-Tape #1,” which was the first film soundtrack absent of original music to gain the top spot on Billboard’s Top 200. The sequel had only one choice when it came to compiling “Awesome MixTape #2,” to make the music equally as iconic and joy-inducing as the first. The brilliant soundtrack features a grab-bag of recognizable feel good tunes and serves as an enhancing accompaniment to nearly every segment of the film. Songs like “Surrender” by Cheap Trick flood over the action, and others like “Brandy (You’re a Fine Girl)” performed by Looking Glass serve as a comedic timer. The use of post-credit teasers has evolved into a normality for Marvel to foreshadow what is to come in upcoming films and Guardians takes it wonderfully, like nearly every aspect of their film, to an extreme. After “Guardians of the Galaxy will return,” flashes on screen promising fans another installment of the franchise, five additional scenes scattered during and after the credits proceed. The scenes range from foreshadowing the introduction of Adam Warlock, a key character in the comics, to a scene with a moody adolescent Groot. Any moviegoers who loved the music and the hilarious cast of the first or second film will definitely want to stay tuned—they’re worth the wait.

Halsey drops sophomore release with "hopeless fountain kingdom" Halsey blends rap and pop with a

modern

twist

By Gabriella Donahue Staff Writer

It’s been almost two years since 22-year-old Halsey’s debut indie album “BADLANDS” scored the number two spot on Billboard’s Hot 200. Similar to her first album, her new album titled “hopeless fountain kingdom” follows the same theme by documenting the tragic ups-and-downs of a youthful dystopian-esque romance. By smoothly blending both pop and alternative genres for a wider variety of fans, Halsey's follow-up does not disappoint. Unlike “BADLANDS” which featured no guest artists, the alt-pop album features cameos from rapper Quavo, Cashmere Cat and the pop sensation and former Fifth Harmony member Lauren Jauregui, all adding vocal variety to the album and giving it broader appeal. The first song of “hopeless fountain kingdom,” plainly titled “The Prologue” sets the album’s “tragic ro-

on

Shakespeare

mance” theme with an opening passage from Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet”. Following the excerpt, Halsey melodramatically drones on in a speaksing voice about her seemingly perfect yet devastating life. The song introduces a refreshing take on the age-old Shakespearean love story and sets the basis for the rest of the album's tragic tone. Halsey’s single “Now Or Never” is thus far the most popular song in the album. The track is centered around a wishy-washy relationship where Halsey urges her lover to take action now, or it will soon be too late. The chorus, which utilizes repetition, is extremely catchy, leaving the audience wanting to listen again and again. While Halsey undoubtedly has a few radio-hits on her new album, some tracks definitely lean more towards the alternative side of "alt-pop" and will probably remain within the ear-buds of the hard-core Halsey followers rather than roaming through stations like Kiss 108.

Graphic / Danielle Borelli


Feature

Page 16

June 2017

Moments to Remember e yH ell

nan ffer

Boys Hockey breaks into Super Eight

Phot

oC our t es

yo

fK

WHS Students look back on a few noteworthy events from the 2016-2017 school year

“The Catholic Memorial game will always be a special memory for me. I’ll never forget the feeling of winning that game and the picture of my brother Luke, Cam and Colin captures that moment.” -Pat Donovan ‘17

P h ot o

Cou r

tesy

oto Ph

/

t

“This season the Robotics team won an engineering award at our first three competitions. This was the first time the team had won three engineering awards in a single season, and the first time the team won an engineering award at the district championship level.” -Henry Elmhurst ‘18 e Pitm olin Car

uli e

urs mh El

RoboRebs awarded for Engineering

of J

an

Porkers win State Title “We were so excited to have been able to extend our season for those three extra weeks. We worked really hard throughout the season and it was great that it all paid off.” -Melanie Weber ‘17 Ph oto

y tes ur Co mily of E

Tomasetti becomes State Champion in Play Reading

y Murph

“The moment when they announced my name was almost unreal to me: I was in so much shock. I remember getting off the stage in a state of disbelief as my team cheered and hugged me.”-Emily Tomasetti ‘20

r unte

P

to/ ho

H lir L il

Girls Cross Country makes history

I’m very proud of what our team has accomplished this year [winning Division III State Championship for the first time]. I know next year’s team will work as hard as they did this year to accomplish their goals again. I’m excited to hear what great things next year’s team will do. -Stephanie Forester ‘17

Page Design/ Lillie Hunter


June 2017

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Page 17


Page 18

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June 2017


Sports

June 2017

Page 19

Melanie Weber graduates Walpole High after earning 12 varsity letters Weber captained five separate teams and was a part of two state championships By Aidan Chariton Staff Writer

Photo/ Caroline Pitman

Melanie Weber advances the ball towards Dedham’s goal in 10-0 win on October 18. Photo/Maeve O’Connor

Weber fights through Foxboro’s defense in a 8-7 win over Foxboro April 10.

Walpole Rebels

lose

Softball

By Kevin Quinn Staff Writer For the first time in seven years, a softball team other than Norwood won the Herget division. After defeating Norwood 9-3 on Wednesday, May 24, the Rebels officially clinched the Herget Division. However, in the Division 1 South MIAA Championship Tournament on Saturday, May 3, #10 Norwood eliminated #7 Walpole by a score of 13-10. “At the beginning of the season, we set the goal to win the Herget and from that day forward, we fought really hard every day to make that goal a reality. We had some tough games that brought us together as a team and I am really proud that this season was one of the best seasons Walpole Softball has ever had,” said senior Tess Lawlor. The Rebels went 13-3 in the Bay

in

Playing on a varsity team for 12 seasons, selected as captain for five seasons (two of them being during junior year), winning two state championships — all of these prestigious accomplishments are rarely achieved by a single person. However, one Walpole High School athlete can claim all of them as her own: senior Melanie Weber. At the start of her high school career, Weber immediately showed that she was not just an average athlete, as she made the varsity field hockey team as a freshman. Making a varsity team is impressive in itself, but making the WHS varsity field hockey team is exceptionally impressive, since the program is nationally ranked. “At first it was scary,” said Weber. “That was my first season and I was playing alongside some Division I players, but once we got into the season it was a lot of fun.” In her four years as a field hockey player at WHS, Weber contributed to two state championship wins — one in 2013 and one in 2016. Additionally, the Boston Globe awarded the Field Hockey Player of the Year Award to Weber for her performance in the 2016 season. “She is a fantastic player who improved on her skills over the last 4 years,” said former WHS head field hockey coach Marianne Murphy. “She always gave 110% both in practice and games, [and] she is definitely one of my top 10 players.” After she is done with high school, Weber will attend Northeastern University where she will continue to play field hockey at the Division 1 level. “I hope to make a lot of friendships” said Weber. “My goal [in field hockey] is just to become the best possible player that I can be.” Following the field hockey season, Weber spent her winter seasons playing on WHS’ varsity girls basketball team. In the 2016-2017 season Weber lead the Rebels to the Sweet Sixteen of the Division 2 State Tournament, in which they — the 11 seed — upset sixth seed O’Bryant and third seed Falmouth. “For my money, Mel was the best perimeter defender in our league...[and] she is the best conditioned athlete I have

Takes

the

State Conference. However, their toughest game was their non-league game against King Philip where Walpole lost 11-8 on April 19. “The game against KP was really important. It was very early on in the season, and we were already working so well together as a team. We battled back against one of the best teams in the state and almost came out with the win — it showed us that we can battle with anyone going forward,” said Head Coach Rachael Sprague. Sprague contributed this season’s success to a return to fundamentals, especially offense in the preseason. “I think we always approach [each season] the same — focusing on sound mechanics and working on communicating well on and off the field. I wanted to pick up where we left off at the end of last year which was with really

first

Home

round

ever worked with,” said WHS Girls Basketball head coach David Wall. “Mel did a great job as a captain for us. She is an incredibly hard worker and that type of leadership sets a great example.” As the snow began to melt and the flowers began to grow due to the arrival of spring, Weber began her third and final high school sport: lacrosse. During her junior year, Weber was a key player in the team’s journey to the state championship, where the team placed second after a loss to Norwell “Making it to the D2 Lacrosse State Finals was a huge highlight [in my career]. That was an incredible ride,” said Weber. Only three seniors graduated from last year’s varsity girls lacrosse team, leaving them with high expectations for Weber’s senior year. Thus far, the girls have been dominating, as their record currently stands at 18-2, and they believe that they can return to the State Championship under the leadership of Weber. “Mel is truly one of the best athletes I have coached, regardless of the sport, the level, or the gender. [She has been] a goal scorer, a force on the circle with regards to draw controls, and a shutdown defender,” said WHS girls lacrosse head coach Mike Tosone. “I feel extremely lucky to have had Mel, and Walpole High School lacrosse has been equally as fortunate. I am going to miss the heck out of her.” Weber believes that sports have had a massive impact on how she developed as a person, and her life as a whole. “Sports have been a huge part of my life since I was little. I love working and being in a competitive environment while also getting the chance to socialize with my friends” said Weber. “Sports have taught me lessons that you can’t learn anywhere else such as teamwork, facing adversity, and pushing yourself as hard as you can.” Numerous extremely gifted athletes have come through Walpole High School, some of who went on to play at the most elite division one colleges and then in professional leagues. Todd Collins, Chris Costello, Nicole Wolfe, Sean McDermott, Ryan Izzo, and Johnny Adams are just a few of WHS’ greatest athletes ever. After 4 years of hard work and countless accomplishments, Melanie Weber has cemented her place in this group of top notch WHS athletes.

the to

Herget Norwood

Photo/Caroline Pitman

Sophomore Jada Dingle-Brown winds up for a swing on the June 3 loss against Norwood. strong offense, so we did a lot of hitting “Honestly, losing to Norwood afindoors before the fields were ready and ter an incredible season was a slap I think it really paid off,” said Sprague. in the face. If we had lost the way In the second round of the state we did to any other team, I wouldn’t tournament, the #7 Walpole lost to be as upset, but since it was our ri#10 Norwood by a score of 13-10. val, it really stung,” said Lawlor.


Feature

Page 20

June 2017

Fi rst J o b A DVI CE LARA Walleston

What was your first paying job?

I was a line cook and dietary aide at a nursing home.

Science Teacher

Summer selor at sleep-away

camp counan overnight camp in NH.

What was the job description? Supervise and lead campers in daily and evening activities and live in a bunk with about a dozen campers.

What is your best memory from this job?

What did you learn from this job?

What is your worst memory from this job?

Each counselor is assigned to a n activity staff. I was on the riflery staff. I taught target shooting (.22 caliber rifles). After dinner we accompanied our bunk to the evening activity.

Absolutely cy. Ever.

What is your best memory from this job?

Whatever it is, do your best at it. It's okay if you don't love your first job... it will be helpful in the long run knowing what you don't like doing.

The friends I made. I am still in touch with my coworkers from 30+ years ago.

Jim Erker Substitute Teacher/ Retired

no privaFor 8 weeks.

Working the counter at the Bubbling Brook Restaurant in Westwood

What was the job description?

Serve customers at the counter and the take out windows.

What did you do on a dayto-day basis?

Served ice cream, made sun-

What was your first paying job?

What is your best memory from this job?

Did this job move you toChecking out all the old- wards or away a certain career in the future? Teaching swimming lessons er boys hanging out at the

What was the job description? Teaching kids enrolled in the

town

summer

recre-

ation program how to swim.

beach, who were in swimming

NOT lessons

What is your worst memory from this job?

Teaching the kids on cold, windy days when the last thing you want to do is be in the water

LAUREN CULLITON

English Department head

Yes, I learned that I liked teaching people new skills

It's ey,

What was your first paying job?

I was a tour guide at the House of Seven Gables in Salem, MA

What did you do on a day-to-day basis?

I had to have knowledge of Nathaniel Hawthorne (his life and works), the history of Salem, period furniture, and the architecture of the house. I gave tours and

Portuguese

marching

band

What was the job description?

The band played in various festivals and parades around New England.

What is your best memory from this job?

Free food and an all expenses paid trip to play in Ottawa.

Waking up early for Saturday morning practices.

What did you learn from this job?

I experienced a lot of new culture and I learned to fend for myself seeing as there was often a language barrier.

EVERYBODY starts at the bottom. Distinguish yourself, work hard and you will move up in position and pay. Feel pride for your hard work - you'll value what you pay for with your own money even more!

SHERYL Lerner MATH Teacher

daes and banana splits, served hot dogs, burgers, clam plates .

What is your best memory from this job?

Also having kids stand in line for 20 minutes and then not know what they want when they get to the front of the line.

What is your worst memory from this job?

What advice do you have for a student about to start his or her first job?

Making little kids happy with an ice cream cone

Seeing a busload of kids show up 10 minutes before closing.

Be on time, be positive, and plan for your next job.

HEIDI Hawkins Speech pathologist

not about the monbut the experience.

I had to dress in period costume (hoop skirt) and give tours of the House of Seven Gables

What is your worst memory from this job?

What advice do you have for a student about to start his or her first job?

What advice do you have for a student about to start his or her first job?

What was the job description?

What was your first paying job?

Responsibility, timing items

when cooking, ordering, customer service, dietary restrictions, compassion, hard work.

What advice do you have for a student about to start his or her first job?

What was your first paying job?

Athletic Director

What is your worst memory from this job?

Plan meals, cook, serve, clean up, wash dishes, prep food, place orders, miscellaneous chores around the kitchen.

Eating whatever I wanted! I

What did you do on a day-to-day basis?

hit the chicken tenders hard

The steamy, hot dishwashing room and scraping people's half eaten food from their plates, dropping trays of food in public spaces - I'm not gifted with grace of movement

What did you do on a day-to-day basis?

What was your first paying job?

r Teache n Ed itio

What advice do you have for a student about to start his or her first job?

Try to find a job that requires a skill you will use later in life, not necessarily connected to a career. Ex. The skill you learn from working in landscaping could be skill you need when you have your own yard as an adult. Also even if you hate a job, there is value in learning what jobs you know you do not want to do as a career.

talked with tourists - answering questions about the house, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Salem

What is your best memory from this job?

Sneaking naps between tours in the secret room at the top of the secret staircase.

What did you learn from this job?

Tons!!!! Aside from all of the content, I learned to be comfortable speaking in front of groups. I learned quirky things, such as, nails in a front door were a sign of wealth, and I can still recog-

nize a hepplewhite chair. I can even still give parts of the tour

Did this job move you towards or away a certain career in the future?

Interesting - I did like reading Hawthorne's books and talking about them, so I guess yes.

What advice do you have for a student about to start his or her first job?

Find something interesting - not just something that will look good on a college application.

QUINN GEARY

Physical Education Teacher

Page Design and Graphics/Abby Hile

June 2017  

Volume XX, Issue VI

June 2017  

Volume XX, Issue VI

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