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FEATURES

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74

A Day in the Life

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Julia & The New Kid

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Portrait of a Chef: Stephanie Izard

Portrait of a Chef: Guiseppe Tentori

Bison is Back

54 72

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The Cow and the Turkey

In Season: Sweet Shades of Gold

CONTENTS

Tally Ho!

The Art of the Champagne Cork Pop

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Food Porn


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CONTENTS

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118

Portrait of a Chef: Rodelio Aglibot

Mustard Valley: Photo Essay

Stone Soup: Glamgaiting

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Contributors

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Letter from Steve

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A Day in Life

18

Portrait of a Chef: Stephanie Izard

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Bison is Back

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In Season: Sweet Shades of Gold

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Julia & The New Kid

54

Tally Ho!

72

The Art of the Champagne Cork Pop

74

The Cow and the Turkey

86

Portrait of a Chef: Guiseppe Tentori

88

Food Porn

102

Portrait of a Chef: Rodelio Aglibot

104

Mustard Valley: Photo Essay

118

Stone Soup: Glamgaiting

136

Recipe Index

CONTACTS media inquiries Judith Mara | marabeach@sbcglobal.net Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

sponsorship opportunities Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

representation Schumann & Company | www.schumannco.com patti@schumannco.com | 312.432.1702

stephen hamilton 1520 W. Fulton | Chicago, IL 60607 www.stephenhamilton.com

CONTENTS

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contributors

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kathryn o’malley |

deirdre o’shea | Production Director

Editor and Writer

Kathryn’s love of food is matched only by her passion

If you have worked with Stephen Hamilton,

for writing about it; as part of the Who’s Hungry? ™

you’ve worked with Deirdre. Drawing on 15 years

editorial team, she indulges in a bit of both and has

of experience in managing photography studios,

contributed various pieces of work for the magazine.

Deirdre has a hand in nearly every aspect of

Her popular food blog, dramaticpancake.com, garners

Stephen’s business. She’s been instrumental in

more than 40,000 unique viewers per month and highlights the people and

organizing the magazine’s shoots, sourcing ingredients, and always keeping

stories behind great recipes.

production on schedule.

judith mara | Editor and Writer

ian law | Design

Judith has worked with Stephen for almost seven

Ian designed every aspect of Who’s Hungry?™

years and helps to lead the editorial concept and

magazine with meticulous attention to detail and

execution of Who’s Hungry? ™ Magazine. An

typography, and helped turn static images into an

award-winning former creative director for major

interactive experience. His award-winning design work has been featured in the pages of Print,

ad agencies such as Leo Burnett and J. Walter Thompson, Judith sweats the details, pens Weather Permitting and literally

Creativity, How, PDN and Graphic Design USA.

hand writes How We Did it.

Molly Sorge |

Sara Moulton |

Writer

Chef, Cookbook Author, Television Personality

A lifelong lover of all things equine, Molly Sorge found a way to unite her greatest passions when she began

One of the hardest-working women in the food

writing and photographing for the weekly equestrian

biz, Sara has hosted multiple Food Network shows,

magazine The Chronicle of the Horse sixteen years ago.

served as Gourmet magazine’s executive chef for 23 years, and balanced it all with family life. She

When she isn’t traveling or scooping up a story, Molly can be found galloping across the countryside on her own steed, the inimitable

has written three cookbooks, and hosts her own PBS show, Sara’s Weeknight

Elf. For Who’s Hungry? ™ Magazine, she recounts the thrill of a Virginia foxhunt

Meals. For Who’s Hungry? ™ Magazine, Sara reflects on her long relationship

and the delectable breakfast that follows.

with Julia Child.

Todd Womack |

Comedian and Writer

Bryan Olsen |

Writer and Performer

Todd Womack is a Brooklyn-based comedian who

Bryan Olsen is a writer and performer for Barely

has been a writer/performer on the gigantic YouTube

Political’s “The Key of Awesome.” Additionally, he wrote

series The Key of Awesome, since 2010. The series has

for Comedy Central’s Roast of David Hasselhoff, and

over 1 billion views to date, and can be found on the

sold a screenplay to Paramount Pictures and Ivan

YouTube channel “Barely Political.” His credits include

Reitman. As an actor, Mr. Olsen has appeared on

Good Morning America, 20/20, Chappelle’s Show; and appearances on Bravo,

several episodes of Comedy Central’s Chappelle’s Show. For Who’s Hungry? ™

VH-1, TNT, and in Esquire magazine. For Who’s Hungry? ™ Magazine, Todd

Magazine, Bryan gets dirty with some tantalizing food porn.

gets dirty with some tantalizing food porn.

kate bernot |

Editor and Writer

A freelance food writer and editor, Kate Bernot has contributed to NBC’s The Feast, Chicago Sun-Times, Conde Nast Traveler, Serious Eats Chicago, and BlackboardEats. She helped develop the editorial vision of Who’s Hungry? ™ Magazine and wrote about mustard plants and Chef Giuseppe Tentori’s clam chowder for this issue.

David Sedaris | Humorist, Writer, and Radio Commentator One of America’s greatest humorists, David Sedaris is a master of satire and the bestselling author of Barrel Fever, Me Talk Pretty One Day, Holidays on Ice, and many more. He is also a playwright and regular commentator for National Public Radio. For Who’s Hungry? ™ Magazine, David treats us to a holiday fable in which barnyard animals take on suspiciously human traits.

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CONTRIBUTORS

Inga Witscher | Dairy Farmer and Host of Around the Table As a fourth generation dairy farmer, Inga isn’t afraid to get her hands dirty. Tending cattle, plucking vegetables from the garden, baking break, and making cheese: Inga does it all, and makes it all look easy. Her new PBS series, Around the Farm Table, focuses on the work of local farmers, seasonal ingredients and what to do with them. For Who’s Hungry? ™ Magazine, Inga shares her daily adventures from a bustling farm, where the sound of cows in the morning is the only alarm clock she needs.


LETTER FROM STEVE Since inception I’ve pushed the photography to reach higher levels of food related “experiences”. I’ve been swarmed by bees, participated in a Virginia fox hunt, stood on a vast plain in Wyoming with a herd of buffalo, seen the fabled golden corridors of mustard in Napa Valley planted by a 19th century priest, and photographed dairy cows at dawn then drank their milk in my coffee. Some other memorable moments were spent working with amazing chefs. There are few chefs more delightful to spend time with than Stephanie Izard, Guiseppe Tentori and Rodelio Aglibot. I also got a kick out of the story by famed chef and TV personality, Sara Moulton, about her years as Julia Child’s assistant. And no one writes a holiday tale better than humorist David Sedaris. These are the type of images and stories we are committed to in WH? magazine. Which is why we

As we slip closer to the New Year many people think back and reflect on the past year’s highlights. I took a similar

have taken a short hiatus in order to regroup and to renew the creative juices for a fresh start in 2015. Who’s Hungry™ for more? Happy New Year! Stephen Hamilton

approach with this issue of WH? and looked back through all 11 issues to select my favorite stories.

LETTER FROM STEVE

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P O R T R A I T B Y AV E R Y H O U S E

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A D AY I N T H E L I F E


ORE’S M

EAD

ST. IS I

D

Wisconsin

A Day in the Life by INGA WITSCHER

“Red Sky in the morning sailors takes warning”…. That’s ok! We need the rain. This time of year our pastures can benefit from all the moisture they can absorb. With my overalls tucked into my barn

There’s clover and plantain, crows foot

boots, I head out into the field as the sun

trefoil and a few pesky thistles ready to

rises over Wisconsin. Dragging my feet

bloom. Overall it looks good. We will be

through the morning dew, I take a mental

able to move the cows into this pasture

note of what’s growing in the pasture.

after the weekend.

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On our farm, St. Isidore’s Mead, we

They spend that time eating a diverse diet

practice Managed Intensive Grazing,

of native grasses and wild herbs which

which means we move the cows to a

give their milk a clean, grassy flavor. The

fresh strip of grass every 12 hours. The

cows in turn fertilize the ground behind

cows are turned into a new pasture

them, improving the soils for the future.

after the morning and evening milkings.

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A D AY I N T H E L I F E


St. Isidore’s Mead P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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“Ca-boss, Ca-boss, come on ladies, let’s go,”

“Ca-boss, Ca-boss, come on ladies, let’s go”

I call out to our 15 Jersey cows as, one by one, they begin to rise. First is Hannah; she stands up and immediately whips her long brown tail across her back before going into a downward dog-like stretch and then heads off to the water tank. Next Jenny and Mae stand up, arch their backs and file into the line of cows heading towards the barn.

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A D AY I N T H E L I F E


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A D AY I N T H E L I F E


Back at the barn, my husband Joe sanitizes

gentler on the cows’ udders, and also on

all the milking equipment. Producing high

the milk. In a conventional/factory farm

quality milk is extremely important to

system, milk is pumped dozens of times.

us. We will never produce a large amount

That pumping shatters the fat globules

of milk, but we work to produce the best

of the milk. When handled gently, the

quality. To ensure that high quality, we

milk stays in its truest form, creating a

milk the old-fashioned way, using a bucket

fuller flavored milk, perfect for making St. Isidore’s cheese.

milking system. The bucket milkers are

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A D AY I N T H E L I F E


At the age of 61, my father, a third generation dairy farmer, became a licensed Wisconsin State cheese maker. Now, when the cows are eating grass as the seasons allow, we transform our grass-fed, organic, high quality milk into a farmstead raw milk cheese. Today is one of those days when we can deliver the milk to him, still warm from the morning’s milking.  

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After 8 hours of stirring, then adding

guarantees even moisture throughout

the rennet and cultures, the curd comes

the truckle. Mold will grow on the cheese

together. The cheese is then pressed and

which will provide flavor.

wrapped in butter-soaked cheesecloth,

then pressed again to form 20-pound

After the evening milking, Joe follows the

round truckles. A label is sewn into the

cows to the field and I make a pit stop

cheesecloth with the date, the name of

to make martinis and grab some curds

the pasture the cows were grazing in,

out of the fridge from this morning’s

a description of the weather and the

cheese make. Sitting with Joe in the clover,

names of the cows who produced the

cocktails in hand, we listen to the cows

milk. The cheese is then moved into a

graze—this is a tradition my father started

cave with the correct temperature and

when we first moved to St. Isidore’s Mead.

humidity. The truckles are turned and

With the last sip of gin, the rain starts

brushed continuously throughout a

to sprinkle, and we head for home.

one-year hibernation in the cave. This

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A D AY I N T H E L I F E


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PORTRAIT OF A

CHEF STEPHANIE IZARD

b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

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PORTRAIT OF A CHEF: STEPHANIE IZARD


Stephanie Izard knows success. She is the first female winner in

worthy flavors draw flocks of

what would you do if you weren’t a chef?

hungry fans and food lovers from

Scuba instructor.

Izard’s laid-back style and swoon-

Top Chef history, owner of one

across the country. Her cooking is

of Chicago’s hottest restaurants,

bold and complex, yet completely

what’s one of your funniest

unpretentious–much like the chef

moments in a kitchen?

Girl & the Goat (inspired by the

herself. Izard’s infectious enthusiasm

Not sure if it was funny, but it was

Izard surname, which is French

and warm, no-fuss personality makes

awkward: When a guest started talking to

her one of the most likeable culinary

one of the male line cooks, thanking him

rock stars you will ever meet.

for the meal, convinced it was me. Do I look

for a Pyrenean goat-antelope), and is about to launch a

that manly? Hmmm. We invited Giuseppe Tentori, the

spin-off restaurant-diner,

subject of last issue’s “Portrait of a

Little Goat, this October.

Chef,” to submit questions he was

what do you look for in chefs who apply to work

curious to ask Stephanie…and it

in your kitchen?

seems they both have a great sense

We like line cooks that love what they do

of humor.

and are also fun. 12 to 14 hours is a long time to spend with people that are not fun.

what’s one ingredient that you’d rather not ever cook with? why? Green bell peppers. For no other reason than they just do not taste good.

what do you miss the most about your days on the line? When I start to miss it I just go back there and cook.

Quite possibly the most popular item on the Girl and the Goat’s menu is Stephanie’s Sautéed Green Beans with fish sauce vinaigrette and cashews.

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b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

BISON is back

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BISON IS BACK


“This scenery already rich pleasing and beautiful was still farther heightened by immense herds of buffalo, deer, elk and antelopes which we saw in every direction feeding on the hills and plains. I do not think I exaggerate when I estimate the number of buffalo which could be comprehended at one view to amount to 3000.”

— Meriwether Lewis, September 17, 1804, near present-day Chamerlain, South Dakota

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BISON IS BACK


Once upon a time, the great American bison—often mistakenly called buffalo—flourished in the tens of millions and covered the Great Plains in a blanket of shaggy brown. By the late 19th century, however, settlers had killed some 50 million bison for food, sport and to deprive Native Americans of their most valuable natural resource. Enormous herds were reduced to near extinction.

BISON FACT Bison are the heaviest land animals in North America, often weighing a ton or more and standing 5 to 6 feet tall at the shoulders. They have large heads, massive humps and sharp curved horns that can grow up to 2 feet long. Despite their formidable size and bulk, bison can sprint at speeds up to 40 miles per hour.

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BISON IS BACK


Propelled by the efforts of early

has only quickened their resurgence.

conservationists, the bison population

Today, bison can be found at parks,

began a slow bounce back in 1905.

reserves and ranches around the

Recent interest in the animals as a

country, as well as on the plates of

healthy, sustainable alternative to beef

adventurous eaters.

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Joe Ricketts, entrepreneur and philanthropist, has played a powerful role in returning the meat to our menus. In 2003, Ricketts founded High Plains Bison, a retailer of natural bison meat and the official bison vendor at Chicago’s Wrigley Field. At Ricketts’s quiet Wyoming ranch, his bison graze in lumbering herds, heads bowed, with shoulders as broad and jagged as the mountains that stand in the distance. Though much has changed since the days of Lewis and Clark, one thing remains the same: the undeniable thrill at seeing these majestic creatures at home in their natural habitat.

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BISON IS BACK


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BISON IS BACK


BISON FACT Bison has a delicious, delicate flavor—lighter and somewhat sweeter than beef—and an impressive nutritional profile. Bison-industry regulations require that bison raised for their meat are never treated with artificialgrowth hormones, chemicals or unnecessary antibiotics. Moreover, bison meat contains far less fat, calories and cholesterol than beef, but higher levels of iron, omega-3’s and other nutrients.

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BISON FACT Because bison is so lean, its preparation requires a little extra care to ensure it doesn’t dry out. This means that steaks should never be cooked beyond medium, and tougher cuts (such as chuck, brisket and short ribs) are best cooked low and slow for the most tender and flavorful results.

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BISON IS BACK


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IN SEASON

SWEET SHADES

OF GOLD B Y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

My mom’s brother was an accountant by day and a mad scientist by night. He and his son conducted chemistry experiments as entertainment, and their small Oklahoma garage doubled as a sewing room for my uncle’s most prized invention, a ventilated beekeeping suit. He was relentlessly curious and endearingly quirky, and after years of backyard beekeeping, he created and marketed the kind of bee suit he himself wanted to wear: one that was durable, protective, and breathable—even at the height of an Oklahoma summer. When my uncle passed away unexpectedly,

I realized how little I knew of their secret,

my mother took over the bee suit business

mysterious lives—and the remarkable

and has been running it ever since. Thanks to

effort involved in creating just a single

a gift from my uncle, I also grew up sharing a

spoonful of honey.

backyard with some 30,000 Italian bees. And

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though the yellow-streaked stunners have

Stock your pantry with different varieties,

been circling my family for a while now, it

and let the following recipes help guide you

wasn’t until I set out to write about them that

to your favorites.

IN SEASON: SWEET SHADES OF GOLD


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IN SEASON: SWEET SHADES OF GOLD


HUMBLE WORKERS Bees work hard. Really hard. To make just one pound of honey, bees must visit some 2 million flowers. We depend on them for one of our favorite sweeteners, but they are also responsible for over $16 billion worth of agricultural product through pollination. Our supermarkets would look much different had honeybees not appeared on the scene more than 100 million years ago.

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IN SEASON: SWEET SHADES OF GOLD


Raw comb honey, courtesy of Heritage Prairie Farm in Elburn, Illinois

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FROM NECTAR TO HONEY

A forager honeybee stores nectar in a special region of its gut called a crop. When fully loaded, the bee returns to the hive and transfers the nectar to the aptly named receiver bees that are waiting on the front porch for delivery. The receiver bees take the nectar, now mixed with enzymes from the forager’s special stomach, to the honeycomb, where they complete the process of transforming nectar to honey.

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IN SEASON: SWEET SHADES OF GOLD


honey nougatine by geovanna salas View recipe on page 136 Âť

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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milk honey pudding by meg galus View recipe on page 137 Âť

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IN SEASON: SWEET SHADES OF GOLD


A Seasonal TREAT

It’s easy to forget that honey is a seasonal food since it lasts indefinitely. But honey is entirely dependent on local climate and the nectar of blossoming flowers, which influence the color, flavor and aroma of honey much like the sea shapes an oyster or a barrel impacts wine. As a general rule of thumb, light honeys are faintly sweet (clover), amber honeys are richly mellow (blueberry), and dark honeys are bold and robust (buckwheat).

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honey mandeleines by sarah kosokowski View recipe on page 138Âť

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IN SEASON: SWEET SHADES OF GOLD


honey vanilla ice cream by sarah kosokowski View recipe on page 139 Âť

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milk chocolate honey ganache by sarah kosokowski View recipe on page 140 »

endless applications

One of the simplest and easiest ways to enjoy honey is on its own—scooped up by the spoonful—or stirred into a hot cup of tea. The sweet, molten gold can also be spread over buttered toast, drizzled atop oatmeal and baked into breads. Or it can be used to more decadent effect, as evidenced in these desserts.

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IN SEASON: SWEET SHADES OF GOLD


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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JULIA &the new kid S T O RY & R E C I P E S b y S A R A M O U LT O N

ll by Bi photo

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Adler

J U L I A & T H E N E W K I D | S T O R Y & R E C I P E S B Y S A R A M O U LT O N


Think you’ve read or seen everything there is to know about Julia Child? Well, there’s always something new. Sara Moulton looks back on her long relationship with Julia and how she will always be influenced by Julia’s natural thirst for new ways, ingredients and gadgets.

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rhubarb potstickers View recipe on page 141 Âť

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J U L I A & T H E N E W K I D | S T O R Y & R E C I P E S B Y S A R A M O U LT O N


How did I dream up these

Pratt, one of my teammates, about Julia’s method

spring desserts, presenting

them). Berit mentioned that she was a volunteer

seasonal fruits in unusual

of cooking hard-boiled eggs (which is not to boil on Julia’s PBS TV show. I wondered if Julia might ever need another volunteer (namely me), and

new recipes?

Berit said that they were just about to tape

I’m inspired by many things and many people:

The next day Berit told me that she’d talked to

eating out, traveling, cookbooks, online

Julia, and that Julia wanted to hire me. I was

information, and my family and friends… not

astonished that Julia Child would even consider

to mention my own personal lifetime of taste

offering me a paid job without having met me.

memories. But nothing and no one was more

So I trotted down to the corner pay phone and

important to me than Julia Child, the first

dialed her right up. She picked up the phone

person who taught me how to develop a recipe.

herself, said she’d heard all about me, and asked

another season and she’d ask Julia.

if I “food-styled.” In truth, I didn’t really have As the chef/manager of a catering operation in

any professional experience in food styling, but

Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1979, I happened

I figured, heck, as a chef, I certainly take care to

to be in the right place at the right time. One

land my food attractively on a plate. So what did

day I was peeling a lifetime’s supply of hard-

I say? “Yes, Julia. I’m very good at food styling.”

boiled eggs when I started chatting with Berit

And I got the job.

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That was the beginning of the most important

way Julia worked. We were all in it together.

relationship of my career. I worked with Julia

Recipe development was a group effort,

on that show, Julia Child and More Company,

although Julia of course always had the

and on the cookbook that was published

last word.

with it. Afterwards, I assisted her at various industry events. In the mid-eighties, I became

She was endlessly curious about everything

Julia’s prep cook/food stylist whenever

culinary, including all new gadgets. When

she appeared on Good Morning America. We

Carl Sontheimer was developing the original

remained friends until she died, and I was

Cuisinart in the late seventies, Julia made a

lucky enough to host a special on her for the

point of using it on air so that home cooks could

Food Network in the last year of her life.

learn more about it. I don’t know who first put a blow torch in Julia’s hands, but it became her

But back to JC and More Company, for which

weapon of choice for crème brûlée. She was

I was supposedly the food stylist. I learned

reliably fascinated by new ingredients, too. The

a ton on the job, mostly from Julia, but also

first time any of us tasted a sugar snap pea

from the executive chef, Marian Morash. I

was when someone brought it to Julia on the

thought we’d just sit at the feet of a master

set of her show. The same was true of spaghetti

and be told what to do, but that wasn’t the

squash and string cheese.

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J U L I A & T H E N E W K I D | S T O R Y & R E C I P E S B Y S A R A M O U LT O N


ORANGE JELLIES View recipe on page 142 »

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Julia was also on a mission to introduce her viewers to all of the wonderful ingredients to which she’d first been exposed in France, including monkfish, rabbit, and celery root. I’d never cooked with any of them before and each one was a real eye-opener. Julia never hesitated using hard-to-find ingredients as long as they were worth it. She encouraged home cooks to become activists in pursuit of better eating. I can still see her looking dead into the camera and saying, “Tell your produce man you need leeks and shallots, and he must carry them. Tell your fishmonger that monkfish is a

Don’t take things for granted. Keep searching for better techniques, new applications, new ways of combining flavors. Try things out. One’s imagination can play one false—the only real test is to taste.

delicious alternative fish to the usual options.” I took that advice to heart a generation ago and This isn’t to say that Julia was merely trendy.

it continues to guide me today. It happens to be

She always tempered her curiosity with a

spring again, the season of renewal. Why not try

strict reliance on the scientific method. Here’s

something new in the kitchen?

how she boiled it all down in Julia Child and More Company:

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J U L I A & T H E N E W K I D | S T O R Y & R E C I P E S B Y S A R A M O U LT O N


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TA L LY HO! b y M O L LY S O R G E

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T A L LY H O ! B Y M O L LY S O R G E


Molly Sorge, an equine journalist from

Stephen Hamilton recently traveled

Ruther Glen, Virginia and her horse, Elf,

to Middleburg, Virginia to photograph

often spend autumn mornings on a fox

and experience first hand a traditional

hunt. Molly shares with us a story that

fox hunt and all its trimmings. By his

transports us into her world of hunts,

photos you’ll see he didn’t go hungry.

horses, hounds and a hunt breakfast.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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RECIPES BY JOSEPHINE ORBA & MICHAEL MARTIN

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Hunting mornings start early, drenched

The air has a piercing chill. We’ve stopped

The 20 or so riders of the hunt field all

in fog and spiked with light as the sun

at a check, which means we are waiting for

standing, waiting, listening. A friend hands

makes its way through the trees. As I ready

the hounds to pick up the scent of a fox. I

me a flask filled with liquid warmth and

my horse, I chat with friends, catching up

lay my hand quietly on my horse’s neck,

courage. The huntsman in charge of the

on all the news and sharing stories. After

murmuring, seeking to calm him because

pack of hounds urges them on with a

swinging a leg over my horse and setting

he lives to chase the pack. He chews on his

soft voice and short blows of his horn.

off amidst the field of riders, I pause a

bit excitedly, creating a metallic music of

They’re looking for the fox.

moment and close my eyes, smelling the

his own.

sharp, tangy sweat of my horse and the smoky musk of the leaves underfoot.

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The huntsman in charge of the pack of hounds urges them on with a soft voice and short blows of his horn.

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The joyous voices of the hounds draw us dashing through the woods and leaping over stone walls, the thrill of the chase giving wings to our horses’ feet.

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A melodic cry splits the air—a hound has

The hunt flies by, hours of mad gallops

caught the scent. The crisp fall air echoes

interspersed with quiet checks as the

as the pack of hounds gives voice in tune

hounds alternatively discover the fox’s

like a choir—not barking, but literally

scent, then lose and have to search for

singing their delight at giving chase. The

it again. The cry “Tally ho!” reverberates

horses swing their heads high and pull

across the field as a sleek, crafty fox darts

on the reins. We’re off, galloping over

through the meadow, circling back on his

the fields. My horse’s hooves beat out a

tracks in full view of all of us, but giving

staccato rhythm as the wind whistles in

the hounds the slip.

my ears and blood races through my veins. The joyous voices of the hounds draw us dashing through the woods and leaping over stone walls, the thrill of the chase giving wings to our horses’ feet.

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At the end of the day, the fox merrily

As hungry as foxhunters are for thrills,

finds his way home, having given us

they’re just as ravenous for a fulfilling repast

grand adventures, and we walk back

after a hard gallop. One by one each of us

to the gathering of trucks and trailers,

takes a turn scraping the mud off our boots

sweaty, sated, and hungry. Sometimes

on the cast iron boot scraper. Then we clomp

we eat right outside the trailers, but

loudly as we walk up the steps of our host’s

today we will be at a beautiful home

large frame farmhouse. The door swings open

in the hills. I untack my horse and

and a gush of warm air touches our cheeks

tie him to the trailer, leaving him to

and our fingers as we peel off damp leather

contented hay-munching. It’s time for

gloves. We rub our hands together to relieve

the hunt breakfast.

the numbness and in anticipation.

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assorted artisan cheeses & fruit

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Across from the stone fireplace an antique table creaks under the platters of ham biscuits—a must on any Virginia menu, quiches, baked apples and a marvelous cheese and fruit plate. It’s a feast fit for a king, and our hosts have also included a steaming hot stew and roasted vegetables from their fields. The beguiling scent of autumn and tradition surrounds us.

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boeuf bourguinonne View Josephine Orba’s recipe on page 143 »

No hunt breakfast is complete without a

“That was quite a leap over that wall!

few sips from the flask; each foxhunter

Did you need a parachute to land?”

has his or her own personal concoction for

jokes a fellow hunter. I wink at him

the day. I am soon balancing a plate full of

and ask how he’d been able to see me,

decadent morsels on my lap, feeling the

since his horse had been accelerating

adrenaline of the chase fade and a deep

rapidly, which looked unintentional.

sense on contentment flood over me.

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baking powder biscuits (cat head biscuits) View Michael Martin’s recipe on page 144 »

ham biscuits Make biscuits according to your favorite recipes. Heat and slice the ham. While still warm, spread a split biscuit with whole grain Dijon mustard, watercress and sliced Virginia ham. Serve with cornichons.

Recipe courtesy of Josephine Orba

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roasted vegetables View Josephine Orba’s recipe on page 145 »

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This breaking of bread is much like a family dinner, with teasing and congratulations flung about against the background of camaraderie. The end-of-day banter lets us relive each moment, laugh at each other, and soak the experiences into our bones.

baked apples Baked apples are stuffed with chopped dates, raisins, chopped pecans, butter, brown sugar, and sweet spices (cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves).

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panna cotta with jelly View Josephine Orba’s recipe on page 146 »

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The Virginia hunt breakfast is

hunt breakfast buffet menu

actually served later in the day after

- assorted artisan cheeses and fruit

a full morning of fox hunting. By that

- classic quiche lorraine

time, guests are ravenous and the

- baked virginia ham and ham biscuits

“breakfast” more closely resembles a

virginia hunt breakfast

hearty feast. On our menu you’ll find delightful autumn dishes from ham to roasted vegetables to baked apples to panna cotta. And of course, there has to be some eggs.

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- baking powder biscuits - baked apples - boeuf bourguinonne - egg noodles, not shown - roasted vegetables - panna cotta with jelly

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THE ART of the

CHAMPAGNE

CORK POP by K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

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The pop of a champagne cork

split-second of action requires

often signals one thing, and one

careful planning, precision

thing only: the celebration has

timing, and a complex set-up

begun and it’s time to let loose.

from special effects guru Geoff

And yet, photographing a cork

Binns-Calvey. Needless to say,

pop is a different story entirely.

this isn’t your average bottle of

The shot needs to look natural,

bubbly. Click the bullets to the

but controlling and capturing a

right for more on our methods.

T H E A R T O F T H E C H A M PA G N E C O R K P O P


THE SPRAY Although you can’t see it here, the bottom of the champagne bottle is connected to an elaborate set of pipes and tubes. With the push of a button, compressed air sends champagne rushing through the bottom of the bottle and up through the neck, erupting in a splash of bubbles and vapor.

» » THE FLYING CORK A thin, stiff wire holds the cork in a fixed place a few inches from the bottle opening, ensuring it doesn’t budge (and that no one loses an eye!). The wire eventually disappears behind the spray of champagne so it isn’t visible in the final shot.

THE DROPLETS Take one part water, one part glycerin,

»

mix them together…and spritz! The drops of liquid look just like beads of champagne, but they don’t evaporate as quickly or trickle down the bottle.

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The Cow and the Turkey b y D AV I D S E D A R I S intro and captions by Kathryn O’Malley

In this allegorical tale from famed humorist David Sedaris, an innocent turkey has the last laugh over the selfish, greedy cow who didn’t get him anything for Christmas. But as most of us (hopefully) know, the holiday season is less about taking and more about sharing, connection and generosity. That means if you’re serving dinner for family and friends, you’re probably going to plan for too much food. And that, of course, means plenty of leftovers just waiting to be reinvented.

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The cow was notoriously cheap. So it

“First you ask me to give someone a

“The point is that I’m a little tired of being

surprised everyone when she voted, yes,

Christmas present,” the cow continued,

pushed around,” the cow said. “I think a lot

for the secret Santa program. It was the

“And then you tell me it has to be done

of us are.” This was her all over. So rather

horse’s suggestion and she backed it

your way. Like, oh, I have four legs so I’m

than spending the next week listening to

immediately saying, “I choose the turkey.”

better than everyone else.”

her complain, it was decided that the cow

“That’s not exactly the way it works,”

“Don’t you have four legs?” the pig asked.

the pig explained. “It’s secret, see? So we each draw a name and keep it to ourselves until Christmas morning.” “Why do you have to be like that?” the cow asked. And the duck sighed, “Here we go.”

“All right, just because you have a curly tail,” the cow said. The pig tried looking behind him. But all he could see were his sides.

would give to the turkey and that everyone else would keep their name a secret. There were, of course, no shops in the barnyard, which was a shame as all of the animals had money—coins mainly, dropped by the farmer and his children as

“Is it curly, curly?” he asked the rooster,

they went about their chores. The cow once

“Or curly, kinky?”

had close to $3 and gave it to a calf the farmer planned on taking into town.

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“I want you to buy me a knapsack,”

that would belong only to her. When it no

she told him, “Just like the one that the

longer made sense to hope, she turned

farmer’s daughter has, only bigger and

to self-pity then rage. The calf had taken

blue instead of green. Can you remember

advantage of her, had spent her precious

that?” The calf had tucked the money

money on a bus ticket and boarded

into his cheek before being led out of the

thinking, so long, sucker.

barn. “And wouldn’t you know it,” the cow later complained, “Isn’t it just my luck that he never came back?”

It was a consolation then to overhear the farmer talking to his wife and learn that taking an animal into town was a

She’d spent the first few days of his

euphemism for hitting him in the head

absence in a constant, almost giddy,

with an electric hammer. So long, sucker.

state of anticipation. Watching the barn door, listening for the sound of the truck, waiting for that knapsack, something

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Milking put the cow in close proximity to humans, much closer than any of the other animals. And she learned a lot by keeping her ears open—local gossip, the rising cost of fuel oil, and countless little things, the menu for Christmas dinner, for instance. The family had spent Thanksgiving visiting the farmer’s mother in her retirement home and had eaten what tasted like potato chips soaked in chicken fat. Now they were going to make up for it. “Big time,” the farmer’s wife said. And with all the trimmings.

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The turkey didn’t know that he would be killed on Christmas Eve. No one did, except for the cow. That’s why she’d specifically chosen his name for the secret Santa program. It got her off the hook and made it more fun to watch his pointless, fidgety enthusiasm. “You’ll never in a million years guess what I got you,” she said to him a day after the names were drawn. “Is it a bath mat?” the turkey asked. He’d seen one hanging on the clothesline and was obsessed with it for some reason. “It’s a towel for the floor,” he kept telling everyone. “I mean really, isn’t that just the greatest idea you ever heard in your life?” “Oh, this is a lot better than a bath mat,” the cow said, chuckling as the turkey sputtered, “No way,” and “What could possibly be better than a bath mat?” “You’ll see come Christmas morning,” she told him.

twice baked potatoes View recipe by John-Gustin Birkitt on page 147 »

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TWICE BAKED POTATOES This isn’t your mother’s baked potato. Chef John-Gustin Birkitt incorporates everything good into these stellar, twice-baked spuds: crème fraîche, ricotta, eggs, bacon and freshly grated Parmesan cheese.

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new mexico green chile turkey NEW MEXICAN GREEN CHILE TURKEY Justin Brunson drew on flavors like chile, cumin and lime to create this Southwestern spin on turkey, perfect for nestling into warm tortillas and topping with cheddar, sour cream and cilantro.

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View recipe by Justin Brunson on page 148 Âť


Most of the animals were giving food

anything. How could they be so corny? She

with the axe.” The turkey laughed, thinking

as their secret Santa gift. No one came

looked at the pig who sat smiling in his pen

it was a joke. But then he saw the pleasure

out and actually said it, but the cow had

and then at the turkey who’d hung a sprig

in the cow’s face and knew that she was

noticed them setting a little aside. Not

of mistletoe from the end of his waddle

telling the truth.

just scraps, but the best parts—oats from

and was waltzing across the floor saying,

the horse, thick crusts of bread from

“Any takers?” Even to other guys. It was his

the pig. Even the rooster—who was the

cheerfulness that irritated her the most.

“A few weeks,” the cow told him. “I meant

biggest glutton of all—had managed to

And so, on the morning of Christmas Eve

to tell you earlier, but what with all the

sacrifice and had stockpiled a fistful of

she pulled him aside for a little talk about

excitement, I guess I forgot.”

grain behind an empty gas can in the far

the future.

corner of the barn.

“How long have you known?” he asked.

“Kill me and eat me?” The cow nodded. The “The farmer will be cutting your head

turkey removed the mistletoe from the end

He and the others were surely hungry,

off at around noon,” she said. “His son

of his waddle. “Well, golly,” he said, “Don’t I

yet none of them complained about it.

wanted him to use a chainsaw, but he’s a

feel stupid?”

And this bothered the cow more than

traditionalist so we’ll probably be sticking

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Not wanting to spoil anyone’s Christmas,

goodbye except for the cow, who lowered

the turkey announced that he would be

her head toward her empty trough. She

spending the holiday with relatives, “The

was just thinking that a little extra food

wild side of the family,” he said, “Just flew in

might be nice when a horrible thought

last night from Kentucky.”

occurred to her.

When noon arrived and the farmer showed

The rooster was standing in the doorway

up, he followed him out of the barn without

and she almost trampled him on her

complaint saying, “So long everyone,” and

way outside shouting, “Wait, come back.

“See you in a few days.” They all waved

Whose name did you draw?”

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“Say, what?” the turkey said. “I said, whose name did you get? Who’s supposed to receive your secret Santa present?” “You’ll see,” the turkey said, his voice a little song that hung in the air long after he disappeared.


THANKSGIVING PUDDING Chef Tim Havidic is used to pushing the boundaries at Chicago’s renowned restaurant iNG—short for “imagining new gastronomy.” But when it comes to Thanksgiving comfort food, his approach is a bit more relaxed; all you need are a few simple ingredients to totally transform your leftover turkey and dinner rolls.

thanksgiving pudding View recipe by Tim Havidic on page 149 »

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P O R T R A I T OF A

CHEF g iuse ppe t e n tori

b y K AT E B E R N O T

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PORTRAIT OF A CHEF: GIUSEPPE TENTORI


From a childhood spent on his grandmother’s farm in Italy to a career at the helm of Chicago’s BOKA and GT Fish & Oyster,

what’s your most embarrassing kitchen moment?

what’s the secret ingredient in your legendary clam chowder?

My most embarrassing moment happened

Really, Sarah? Okay. It’s bacon and

when I was working at Charlie Trotter’s in

cornstarch.

1998. I was working the vegetable station, and I was using white truffles. I just put

Giuseppe Tentori has always

two pieces of shaved white truffle on a dish,

let his passions guide him.

because they’re very expensive. I thought I

An obsession with seasonal ingredients, Italian technique, and fresh seafood has earned him a Michelin star and the title of Food & Wine’s Best New Chef 2008.

was doing the guy a favor. And I remember Charlie yelling at me: “Are you Italian or what?” I learned that if you’re going to use something, you better really use it.

when mentoring, what’s the trait you most look for in a young cook? Their care and passion. The other night, I had to yell at one of my guys on the line because he put a dish up for the server and he knew it wasn’t cooked right. I pulled him aside and explained to him, it’s very

what ingredient do you cook with that would surprise people?

important that you do this right, because at

But it’s his warm hospitality that makes each meal at his restaurants especially

Licorice. At BOKA I used to do short ribs

what you do. And he understood that.

memorable. We invited Sarah Gruene-

braised in licorice—not even fennel, just

berg, the subject of last issue’s “Portrait

regular black licorice.

of a Chef”, to submit the questions she’s been dying to ask Giuseppe…. and forced him to answer them.

the end of the day, you have to be proud of

if you were going to open another restaurant, what would the concept be? An Italian steakhouse. That’s my dream.

AT GT Fish & Oyster, Giuseppe Tentori serves seasonal King Crab legs with clarified butter and aromatic citrus wedges.

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FOOD PORN Captions by Bryan Olsen and Todd Womack of the amazing web series The Key of Awesome. Find it at www.youtube.com/barelypolitical.

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RAW Chicken Trent Reznor’s Thanksgiving turkey, pictured here, was also featured in the film Saw 3.

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Oh, god. This place is a total sausage fest.

RING BOLOGNA

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BUTTERED Rolls Enough with the tantalizing pictures! Can someone develop a machine which teleports that shit to the empty plate I have sitting in front of me already?? I mean, mmm, wow, those looks good.

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CREAMED CORN

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This is the hottest soft corn food porn we’ve ever seen.

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Prosciutto Mozzarella Sweet. This is a total FMS. ( Folded Meat Sanctuary )

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Sashimi Sally sells sashimi by the seashore, so send seven sheckles to Sally C. Shore for a sample.

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POMEGRANATE

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Oh, pomegranate, so intensely flavorful. If it did not take an entire sweatshop’s worth of work to separate the seeds from the good stuff, I would you eat you every day. Unless of course on that day I am wearing my white pants.

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Rodelio Aglibot PORTRAIT OF A

CHEF b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

102 102

PORTRAIT OF A CHEF RODELIO AGLIBOT


Born in the Philippines and raised in Hawaii, chef Rodelio

Aglibot, aka “The Food Buddha,”

do you have a culinary mentor and, if so, how has that person influenced you as a chef? My parents have both been instrumental in developing my style

has opened over 40 restaurants across the

and palate. My father was a cook in the U.S. Navy and he taught

country, including Chicago’s acclaimed Earth +

kitchen. My mother is also an amazing cook. She taught me that

Ocean and the stylish hotspot Sunda. Now, he’s putting his passion for flavor and appetite for innovation toward yet another delicious project:

me at a young age how to handle a knife and get around in the to cook for someone else is a gift—sort of like an edible kiss or an “I love you.”

how would you describe your cooking philosophy?

a dim sum restaurant called Yum Cha, slated to

I draw a lot of inspiration from the Buddhist monastery, where

open early this April in Lakeshore East. We hear

of the monks known as the tenzo (which translates to “heavenly

the menu will offer an eclectic mix of traditional Cantonese dishes—like sweet and sour pork and shrimp with lobster sauce—in addition to more playful, modern twists—such as coconut-stuffed fried taro balls and crispy pumpkin fries with salted duck egg.

there is a person responsible for the cooking and nourishment monk”). The tenzo accepts food and products with gratitude and respect, nothing is ever wasted (even the water to wash rice is used to water plants) and nothing is ignored. He cooks with intention and is connected to each ingredient, and his hands—not a machine—are used to prepare every dish. 

what has been your best street food experience? Too many to share, but the one that stands out most was in Cambodia on my visit to Angkor Wat in 2006. It was dawn and 100 degrees out with humidity to match. My friends (also chefs) and I were about to start our hike through the temples but decided to

Hungry for more details? Dive into Aglibot’s interview led by our

eat first.

previously featured chef, Lars Kronmark. We were warned the evening before to carry small bills, since the kids from the village tend to ask for money or sell trinkets as their way to help their families. So, we obliged and took out 100 onedollar bills. As we approached the food stalls, we were mauled by some 30 to 40 kids asking for money. But, instead of handing out cash, we decided to feed them. We approached a street vendor, who let us take over his makeshift kitchen of propane burners, warped sauté pans and tray of seasonings. And we killed it. I made eggs scrambled with noodles and vegetables, enough to feed the whole crowd. Definitely a great day.   

where is your dream food location? Or, where would you go if you had one week to eat whatever you wanted? I’ve been fortunate to travel the world and have visited over 50 countries and counting—eating, learning and most of all living. More travel to South America is in my near future, but quite frankly, anywhere new is a dream location.

tell us about your new restaurant, Yum Cha. What was your inspiration? I’ve always loved going out for dim sum and, as a chef, have

Aglibot’s signature dessert Avocado Mousse.

been inspired many times by my experiences. So very I’m excited to bring a refreshing and “food buddha” take on dim sum and Cantonese cuisine.

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b y K AT E B E R N O T

MUSTARD VA L L E Y While the grapevines sleep and the days gradually become filled with more sunlight, the vineyards of Napa unfurl a blanket of lush greens and golden yellows. It’s early spring, and it’s mustard season in the Valley.

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The Biblical parable of the mustard seed speaks to the enormous power of one of the world’s smallest seeds. From a dot the size of a pinprick, a mustard plant can grow nearly nine feet tall, cascading down the mountains

Three months after the last of the autumn’s rains, long after the last grapes have been plucked from the vines, the first shoots of mustard spring from between the rows of brittle, empty grape branches. Winemakers know

and hills of Napa in a blaze of brilliant yellow. But no one

that these plants are as crucial to their

understands the potential of the mustard plant like Napa’s

grapes’ health as proper rainfall or rich

winemakers, who rely on the black mustard plant for much

nutrients and water, repel damaging

more than just its chartreuse blooms.

nematodes, and prevent soil erosion.

soil; they help the grapevines absorb

While the grapevines slumber, the unseen roots of the mustard plants work quietly beneath the earth.

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While the grapevines slumber, the unseen roots of the mustard plants work quietly beneath the earth.

California vineyards began to plant mustard as a cover crop at the turn of the 20th century, but the plant has an even longer history in The Golden State. Locals tell the story of Father Junipero Serra, a Spanish priest who came to the coast in the 19th century as a missionary. As he traveled north across the sparsely populated expanse, he scattered Spanish mustard seeds behind him on the path. When the Franciscan made his return trip the following year, he needed no map, simply following the bright swath of the blooming mustard flowers. (continued on page 22)

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Most of you don’t think about making your own mustard from scratch. Why not? It’s actually easy if you are willing to wait a couple days. The main ingredients are mustard seeds or powder and liquid (water, beer, wine, cider, vinegar). You let that soak for a day or two, then add your seasonings. Done.

mustard seeds There are three primary types of whole-grain mustard seeds: yellow/ white is the mildest and used mainly in American-style mustards and for pickling; brown, which is zestier and used in European-style mustards, for pickling, and in Indian cooking; and black, which is also used in Indian food. (Black mustards seeds are

whole-grain beer mustard (makes 16 oz.)

interchangeable with brown.) 1/2 cup brown or black mustard seeds, 1/4 cup yellow mustard seeds, 3/4 cup dark beer, 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar,

mustard powder

2 tablespoons packed brown sugar,

Is nothing more than ground mustard

1 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon black pepper

seeds. The most common brand is Colman’s and is a blend of brown and white seeds.

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Click to view complete recipe »


dijon-style mustard (makes 10 oz.)

2 cups dry white wine (such as Sauvignon Blanc or Chablis), 1 large onion, finely chopped, 2 cloves garlic, minced, 4 ounces mustard powder, 2 tablespoons honey, 1 1/4 teaspoons salt

Click to view complete recipe Âť

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Now, those blooms guide not Spanish priests but tourists and photographers, who flock to wine country in January, February, and March to witness the hills’ transformation. For vineyards, the mustards’ annual arrival is a sure portent of spring, enriching the soil before the Merlot and Malbec vines snap to life for another season. The mustards’ deep roots cling to the earth, preventing soil erosion while improving water penetration.

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duck breast salad with mustard vinaigrette (makes 2 servings) mustard vinaigrette

salad

3 tablespoons minced shallots (about 2 medium shallots),

1 tablespoon white vinegar, 2 quail eggs, 4 cups baby

2 1/2 tablespoons Dijon or whole-grain mustard,

spinach, 1 baby yellow beet, peeled and very thinly sliced,

2 tablespoons red wine vinegar, 2 tablespoons balsamic

8 ounces smoked duck breast, cut into bite-size pieces

vinegar, 1 clove garlic, minced, 3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, sea salt, black pepper

Click to view complete recipe Âť

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For organic and biodynamic winemakers especially, mustard is worth its weight in gold. The plants give nitrogen and other beneficial nutrients back to the soil, reducing the need for chemically-based fertilizers. The plants’ leaves and flowers also create an Edenic refuge for birds and insects that eat harmful species among the grapes. In a seemingly wild burst of vine and flower, an entire symbiotic ecosystem silently pulses, one plant supporting the other, each playing a natural role in a delicate relationship.

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A platter of cured meats, tiny spring vegetables, hard-boiled eggs and capers is the quintessential companion to just about any type of mustard.

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Of course, most people have no opportunity to witness this silent cooperation. Mustard reaches them in its edible form: the seeds left whole or crushed, bruised, or ground into a paste that adds a familiar tangy flavor.

More than likely, this mustard did not come from a vineyard, but it could have come from the same plant, the Brassica nigra. The raw seeds come to life with just the addition of salt, vinegar, and sugar, lending a spicy and sour counterpoint to richer meat dishes, and subtly coaxing the nuances out of lighter vegetables when whisked into vinaigrette.

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mustard & honey pork tenderloin (makes 3 to 4 servings) 1 pound pork tenderloin, 1/4 cup Dijon mustard, 2 1/2 tablespoons honey, 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt, 1/4 teaspoon black pepper, fresh rosemary sprigs

Click to view complete recipe Âť P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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two mustard cornish hen (makes 2 servings) 2 small lemons, 1 Cornish hen (about 1 1/2 pounds), 3 tablespoons apricot preserves, 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard, 1 tablespoon wholegrain mustard, 1/2 teaspoon salt, black pepper

Click to view complete recipe Âť

facts for cooks 1. Cooking mustard significantly reduces its pungency. 2. Mustard adds flavor to dishes without adding fat or sugar. 3. Mustard seeds can also be fried or toasted and added as a garnish. 4. All parts of the mustard plant are edible, not just the seeds. Mustard greens are exceptionally tasty.

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S T O N E S O U P | G L A M G AT I N G

glamgating

by JUDITH MARA


Glamgating is what happens when you add a dash of glamour to your traditional tailgate—with sensational results. It is also the latest twist on our Stone Soup feature, a semi-regular series based on the iconic tale of villagers coming together to create a grand meal that feeds the entire town.

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Rain and chilly weather was predicted,

some planning to get that “glam” part

but the Midwest likes its curveballs: The

in place—we wanted to make sure this

sun came piercing through the skyline

tailgate was unlike anything our guests

at the very last minute, and it turned out

had ever experienced. To that end, all

to be the kind of autumn afternoon that

the stops were pulled: a gleaming new

Chicagoans can’t resist. It was a great day

Airsteam trailer; a roasted pig infused with

for sporting newbies and football fans alike

aged maple syrup; an amazing guest list

to mingle together and enjoy the outdoors.

including eight of Chicago’s finest chefs; over twenty side dishes and desserts

Because it’s tailgating season, a

contributed by the chefs and other guests;

“glamgating” party seemed to be the

hot apple cider spiked with Buffalo Trace

perfect way to mix things up at our latest

Bourbon; and a surprise guest of honor––

Stone Soup gathering. Of course, it took

the venerable TV anchor, Bill Kurtis.

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1. Stephen Hamilton | 2. Tim Burton – Maple Wood Farm | 3. Giuseppe Tentori – Executive Chef GT Oyster & Boka Chicago | 4. Michael Shenfeld – Real Estate Consultant | 5. Kate Bernot – Nightlife Reporter Red Eye | 6. Mike Mech – The Bungalow Chef | 7. Carol Mackey – Living60010 Website | 8. Joe Campise | 9. Ashley Mastroianni – Buffalo Trace Brand Ambassador | 10. Chef Dale Levitski | 11. Linda Levy | 12.Yervant Chalkagian | 13. JuneElise Marsigan – Room 1520 Venue Manager | 14. Greg Burton – son of Tim Burton | 15. Chris Bishop | 16. Dave Mackey – Former Blackhawk Player | 17. Chrissie Mena | 18. Haley Lertola – Room 1520 Venue Manager | 19. Bryan Kendall – Airstream Repsentative | 20. Stan Revas | 21. Ina Pinkney – “Breakfast Queen”, Owner and Chef of Ina’s | 22. Doug Wilson | 23. Judith Dunbar-Hines | 24. Michael Fiddler – Executive Chef Trump | 25. Maggie Revas | 26. Deirdre O’Shea – Producer for Stephen Hamilton | 27. George Campise | 28. Rodelio Aglibot – The Food Buddha & Chef-Owner E+O Food and Drink | 29. Cliff Etters | 30. Ray Anguiani – Mixologist Atwood Cafe | 31. Derek Simcik – Executive Chef Atwood Cafe | 32. Bill Kurtis – Tall Grass Beef | 33. Karl Helfrich – Pastry Chef European Imports

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Friends of WH? came from far and near. First to arrive was Tim Burton of Burton’s Maplewood Farm. Tim came all the way from Medora, Indiana, bearing the gift of a 45-pound pig and his La Caja China (pronounced la caha cheena) pig roaster. With a three-hour head start on smoking the pig, Tim filled the parking lot with the warm, smoky scent of maple and pork. Meanwhile, Bryan Kendall of Airstream of Chicago in Joliet, Illinois, hitched up a new International Serenity RV trailer—a gorgeous silver backdrop for the feast that was about to unfold.

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We love to see the magic that happens when chefs, food ambassadors and regular cooks contribute a dish to the same table. As always, the results were astonishing: bulgur wheat and Brussels sprouts salads, fresh spinach and artichoke dip, hot beef and vegetable stews, red wine caramel glazed apples, oatmeal cookies, banana bread, baklava and a glorious apple, persimmon and cranberry crisp. Slowly, a fall food theme emerged that had nothing to do with typical football fare.

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Introductions were made as soon as dishes were handed off and cocktails were poured. Chefs enjoyed reconnecting with other chefs they don’t see very often. Everyone was happy to see chef Rodelio Aglibot (TLC, Food Buddha) and congratulate him on his newest restaurant. It was also fun to see chef Dale Levitski (Top Chef alum) the day after he returned from a cooking-filled summer in Montana. Plus, he brought the most gorgeous vegetable market salad ever seen in a concrete parking lot.

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Chef Ina Pinkney (Ina’s, Taste Memories) reigned over the crowd and treated everyone to pumpkin cheesecake and heirloom tomato bruschetta. New dad, chef Giuseppe Tentori (GT Fish & Oyster, BOKA), went super-casual with a creamy and very cheesy shrimp mac and cheese that appealed to the child in all of us. Chef Michael Mech (Bungalow Chef) outdid himself with his grandmother’s German potato salad.

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But the real showstopper—even in the eyes of the seasoned professionals—was the moment when Tim Burton and his son pulled the golden, glistening whole pig from its roasting box and carried it ceremoniously to the carving table. The pig was moist and juicy, the salted meat blending flawlessly with sweet maple syrup. Thirty pounds of tender pork disappeared fast––snout, cheeks, ears and all. We can’t do it every year—and at some point we’ll have to settle for beer and chicken wings—but that’s exactly what made this glamgate so special.

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GLAMGATING MENU WHOLE ROAST PIG Tim Burton (Burton’s Maplewood Farms) CHINESE ALMOND COOKIES Sam Jorden (graphic designer) MARKET VEGETABLE SALAD Chef Dale Levitski (Sprout, Frog & Tail, Top Chef runner up) BULGUR WHEAT SALAD Carol Hojem Mackey (The Suburban Epicurean, food editor Living60010) BUFFALO TRACE HOT CIDER Ashley Mastroianni (Buffalo Trace Bourbon) and Taylor Ortiz GERMAN POTATO SALAD RED WINE CARAMEL GLAZED APPLES Chef Michael Mech (Bungalow Chef) OATMEAL COOKIES Chrissie Mena (founder/president of Living60010) HEIRLOOM TOMATO BRUSCHETTA PUMPKIN CHEESECAKES Ina Pinkney (Ina’s Restaurant, Taste Memories) MINI BANANA BREADS Meg Saherlie (owner of In Stitches) MAC AND CHEESE WITH SHRIMP Chef Giuseppe Tentori (BOKA, GT Fish & Oyster) BEEF STEW & VEGETABLE STEW Doug Wilson (foodie groupie and HR professional) SPINACH AND ARTICHOKE DIP BRUSSELS SPROUT SALAD APPLE PERSIMMON AND CRANBERRY CRISP The Who’s Hungry? Kitchens

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honey nougatine by Geovanna Salas, Pastry Chef at Table Fifty-Two

ingredients:

Combine sugar and honey in a heavy sauce pot and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Stop stirring and bring syrup

·· 2/3 cup sugar

to 360°F. Remove from heat and stir in butter and nuts.

·· 1/2 cup honey

Scrape the mixture onto baking sheet lined with lightly oiled

·· 1 tablespoon butter

parchment paper. Spread evenly with an oiled spatula, or

·· 1 cup toasted almonds or pistachios

press into the pan with a lightly oiled piece of foil. Be careful, it’s hot! Let cool until set. Chop coarsely.

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milk honey pudding by Meg Galus, Executive Pastry Chef at Park Hyatt Chicago and NoMI restaurant

ingredients:

To bloom gelatin: Completely submerge gelatin sheets in ice water and wait until they soften, about 5 minutes.

·· Egg yolks | 120g ·· Local raw honey | 100g ·· Cream | 500g ·· Nonfat milk powder | 50g ·· Gelatin sheets | 8g

Bring the cream, honey and milk powder to a boil over high heat. Using a whisk, slowly temper the hot liquid into the egg yolks, making sure not to curdle the yolks in the process. Add to the cream mixture and cook until it reaches 82°C or nappe, when the liquid is thick enough that when you run your finger down the back of the spatula it holds a line. Remove from heat and strain the mixture into an ice bath (an empty bowl set over a bowl of ice). Add the bloomed gelatin after about a minute, and whisk. Chill in the fridge until set. Mix lightly and portion into cups.

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honey madeleines by Sarah Kosokowski, Corporate Pastry Chef at Valrhona, Inc, Eastern Region

ingredients:

Cream butter, sugars and honey until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, until incorporated. Mix in all sifted dry

·· Butter | 1440g

ingredients until just combined. Pipe into Madeleine molds

·· Sugar | 1200g

and freeze until ready to bake. Bake at 325°F for 10 minutes,

·· Light brown sugar | 160g

turn, then bake 4 more minutes until golden brown. Unmold

·· Honey | 240g

and dust with confectioners’ sugar.

·· Salt | 16g ·· Eggs | 1600g ·· Cake flour | 720g ·· All-purpose flour | 720g ·· Baking powder | 40g

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honey vanilla ice cream by Sarah Kosokowski, Corporate Pastry Chef at Valrhona, Inc, Eastern Region

ingredients:

Combine milk, cream, vanilla extract, vanilla bean, and honey in a heavy saucepan over high heat and bring to a boil. Combine sugar, glucose powder, milk

·· Milk | 2700g

powder, salt and stabilizer in a mixing bowl. Add yolks to the powdery mixture

·· Cream | 1430g

and temper into hot liquid. Over medium heat and stirring frequently with a

·· Vanilla extract | 25g

spatula, cook to nappe or until mixture thickens enough that when you run your

·· Vanilla beans | 3ea.

finger down the back of the spatula it holds a line. Remove from heat and whisk

·· Honey | 550g

in butter until melted. Strain with a fine strainer to catch any bits. Allow to chill.

·· Sugar | 200g ·· Glucose powder | 310g

*For orange ginger ice cream, to 3 liters of honey vanilla ice cream base, add:

·· Milk powder | 170g

·· 1 teaspoon orange extract

·· Salt | 8g

·· Ginger puree | 50g

·· Stabilizer | 12g

·· Fabbri mandarin delipaste | 170g

·· Egg yolks | 840g ·· Butter | 225g

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milk chocolate honey ganache by Sarah Kosokowski, Corporate Pastry Chef at Valrhona, Inc, Eastern Region

ingredients:

Boil cream, vanilla, and honey in a heavy saucepan over medium-high heat. Remove from heat and pour over milk

·· 1 cup sliced rhubarb

chocolate and mix until smooth. Add softened butter and

·· Cream | 1400g

burr ??? and mix again until smooth. Pour into two ½ sheet

·· Vanilla bean | 1 ea.

pans lined with silpat or aluminum foil, shiny side up; let set

·· Honey | 200g

overnight before cutting into small pieces.

·· Milk chocolate | 2kg ·· Butter, room temperature | 400g

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rhubarb potstickers by Sara Moulton Toss the rhubarb with the sugar and the orange rind in a medium bowl and let stand for 30

Serves 4

minutes. Drain and save the liquid separately from the rhubarb. Spread out the wonton wrappers on a work surface. Place a small mound of the rhubarb in

ingredients:

the center of each wrapper. Brush the edges of each wrapper with water; lift two opposite corners of each wrapper and press together above the center of the mound of rhubarb; bring

·· 1 cup sliced rhubarb

the other two opposite sides up and press them together. You should have shaped the wonton

·· 3 tablespoons sugar

into a little pyramid with the mound of rhubarb inside. Pinch the wrappers together very

·· 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated orange rind

tightly at the seams to make sure they are well sealed.

·· 12 wonton wrappers (3 ½ by 3-inches) ·· 1/2 tablespoon vegetable oil ·· 1/2 tablespoon unsalted butter ·· sweetened whipped cream or vanilla ice cream (optional)

Heat the oil and butter in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat until bubbly, then arrange the pot stickers, seam sides up, in the skillet. Cook them 2 to 3 minutes or until the bottoms are pale golden. Add 1/3 cup water, reduce the heat to low, cover the skillet with a lid, and cook 5 to 6 minutes, adding more water if necessary to cook the wonton wrappers through. Remove the lid and continue to cook until the bottoms of the pot stickers are crisp and golden. Gently loosen the pot stickers, and lift them out onto a serving plate. Stir 1/4 cup water into the reserved juice. Add the mixture to the skillet, bring it to a boil scraping up the brown bits at the bottom of the pan, and drizzle the liquid over the pot stickers. Serve hot with a spoonful of sweetened whipped cream or vanilla ice cream, if desired. RECIPE INDEX

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orange jellies by Sara Moulton serves 6

Cut the oranges in half crosswise and squeeze out the juice. Strain and measure. You should have about 1 ¾ cups juice. Add more juice if you have less than this amount

ingredients: ·· 3 navel oranges ·· 2 juice oranges ·· 1 envelope unflavored gelatin ·· 1 ½ ounces vodka (optional)

and remove juice if you have more. Carefully scrap out and discard the pulp from the navel oranges to form six half shells. In a small saucepan combine 1/4 cup of the juice with the gelatin and set it aside for 5 minutes to dissolve the gelatin. Heat the mixture over low heat, stirring occasionally, until the gelatin is dissolved and the mixture is clear, 3 to 4 minutes. Whisk in the remaining juice and the vodka, if using. Transfer the liquid to a measuring cup or small pitcher so it is easy to pour. Arrange the orange shells, cut side up, in muffin tins or ramekins and pour the mixture half way up the side of each shell. Put the muffin tin holding the shells in the fridge and finish filling them, carefully pouring the remaining orange mixture all the way up to the top of each shell. (Note: depending on how large the navel oranges were, you will be able to fill 5 or 6 shells.) Cover the filled shells with plastic wrap and chill until firm, at least 4 hours and preferably overnight. Cut each half in 3 wedges before serving.  

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boeuf bourguinonne by Josephine Orba makes 16 servings

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Pat beef dry. On the top of the stove, brown the meat

ingredients:

in a little olive oil in a large skillet. Place into heavy casserole dish and season with salt and pepper. Cook

·· olive oil

onions and carrots in same pan until lightly browned.

·· 4 - 5 pounds beef (top sirloin or top round) trimmed and cut into 2-inch cubes.

Add the garlic and cook a few seconds and add the

·· 4 carrots, peeled and thickly sliced

vegetables to the meat. Deglaze sauté pan with wine,

·· 2 cloves of garlic minced (optional)

then pour wine and stock over meat and braise in

·· 1 bag frozen white pearl onions

slow oven for 2 - 3 hours.

·· 1 - 2 cups beef stock ·· 2 - 3 cups red wine

While meat is braising, sauté mushrooms in a little

·· 1 pound button mushrooms, cleaned, cut in half if they are large

butter, set aside.

·· salt, pepper ·· Beurre Manié (equal parts flour mixed with soft butter, added to thicken the sauce, you’ll need 1- 2 tablespoons) ·· Chopped fresh thyme and parsley

After the meat is tender, remove from oven add the Beurre Manié to the pot. Stir well and return to oven. Add mushrooms and heat through. Check seasoning. Stir in fresh thyme and parsley.

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baking powder biscuits (cat head biscuits) by Michael Martin Michael Martin is an owner/rider/trainer from Franklin, TN. He has fox hunted for years in Virginia and Pennsylvania. They call these Cat Head Biscuits “Cause they’re as big as a cat’s head”.

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. In a large bowl combine

makes 12-15 biscuits

On floured surface, toss lightly until no longer sticky. Roll

flour, baking powder and salt. Using fork, cut shortening into flour until consistency of coarse meal. Add milk; stir with fork until mixture leaves sides of bowl and forms a soft, moist dough.

out to 1/2 inch thick, and cut with 2-inch round, floured cutter. Place on ungreased cookie sheet. Bake for 8 to 12

ingredients for brine:

minutes or until light golden brown. Makes about 12 to 15 biscuits.

·· 2 1/4 cups all purpose flour ·· 3 teaspoons baking powder ·· 1/2 teaspoon salt ·· 1/2 cup shortening ·· 1 cup milk

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roasted vegetables by Josephine Orba makes 16 servings ingredients: Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Scrub carrots and parsnips ·· 3 parsnips

(cut into 2-inch pieces if large). Slice red onion in rings.

·· 6 carrots

Peel and slice sweet potato into wedges. Trim Brussels

·· 1 red onion

sprouts and cut in half. Peel garlic cloves and toss all

·· 1 large sweet potato

vegetables in generous amount of olive oil. Add salt and

·· 1 pound Brussels sprouts

fresh ground pepper to taste.

·· 3 cloves garlic ·· olive oil, salt, pepper, fresh chopped parsley

Spread onto a large baking sheet and roast, tuning occasionally until cooked and browned, about 45 minutes. Sprinkle with fresh chopped parsley.

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panna cotta with jelly by Josephine Orba

ingredients for brine:

for the panna cotta Sprinkle gelatin onto 1/2 cup cream to soften. Heat 2 cups

·· 2 1/2 cups heavy cream

of cream with 1/2 cup sugar –do not boil. Combine hot

·· 2 teaspoons gelatin

cream and cream with gelatin and cream. Add vanilla

·· 1/2 cup sugar

and stir until thoroughly dissolved. Pour into small, clear

·· 1 teaspoon vanilla

serving containers. Cool and refrigerate until set.

·· 2 cups raspberry jello or fruit juice mixed with gelatin ·· fresh raspberries

for the jelly Make raspberry Jello or add 1 1/2 - 2 teaspoons gelatin to 2 cups fruit juice. Allow to cool but not set. Place single raspberry on surface of set cream and pour raspberry Jello or gelatin over it. Return to fridge to set.

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twice baked potatoes by John-Gustin Birkitt, The French Hound Chef and Owner makes 6 ingredients: ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ··

6 large Russet baking potatoes 1/4 cup crème fraîche 1/2 cup ricotta cheese 2 egg yolks 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese 2 teaspoons garlic salt 1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper Juice of half a lemon

garniture: ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ··

6 scallions, sliced 6 strips of bacon, cooked and chopped 2 ounces grated cheddar cheese, divided 1 tablespoon lemon confit, minced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon 1/2 teaspoon garlic salt

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Wash potatoes

bag fitted with a large star tip. Add all

well and pierce several times with a fork.

remaining ingredients: bacon, cheddar

Season with salt and freshly ground black

(reserving half an ounce), scallions,

pepper. Wrap in foil and place directly onto

tarragon, lemon confit & garlic salt. Fold to

oven rack for approximately 1 hour. When

combine.

potatoes are cooked through, you should be able to easily pass a pairing knife into the centers. Cut the top third off the potatoes, scooping out approximately 80% of the “flesh” and set aside. You should now have canoe-shaped potato shells. Pass potato flesh through a food mill into a mixing bowl.

Using a spoon, fill each cavity of potato shells a little past full. Now using the piping bag with reserved potato mixture, pipe the top of each potato. Sprinkle reserved grated cheddar cheese on top of each potato.

Add all ingredients from the crème fraîche

Baked stuffed potatoes for 15-18 minutes

to the lemon juice. Fold together until well

or until a thermometer inserted into the

combined but without over-mixing. Reserve

center reaches 155 degrees. Garnish with a

one third of mixture and place in piping

sprinkle of chives.

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new mexican green chile turkey

optional toppings:

by Justin Brunson, Old Major Executive Chef

·· 8 eggs, poached, over-easy or sous vide ·· 16 ounces grated cheddar or pepper jack cheese ·· 3 limes, quartered

makes 8

·· 1 cup cilantro, chopped ·· 3 jalapeño peppers, thinly sliced

ingredients:

·· 12 each corn and flour tortillas, warmed ·· 8 ounces sour cream

·· 1 ½ pounds New Mexico green chile peppers, roasted, peeled, seeded and diced ·· 2 tablespoons grape seed oil or other clean-flavored cooking oil ·· 4 pounds leftover turkey meat (dark meat is preferable)   ·· 3 cups yellow onion, peeled and diced ·· 8 cloves fresh garlic, peeled and sliced ·· 2 tablespoons ancho or other dried chile powder ·· 1½ tablespoons ground cumin ·· 12 ounces green tomatillos, husks removed and finely diced ·· 4 cups turkey or low-sodium chicken broth ·· 1 cup canned tomatoes, drained ·· 1/2 cup cilantro leaves, roughly chopped ·· 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice

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Shred turkey into bite-sized pieces. Pour the oil in a large, heavy pot; over medium heat sweat the garlic and onions until translucent. Add the tomatillos and continue to cook an additional 5 minutes before adding all remaining ingredients except the turkey and lime juice. Cook at a low simmer for 1½ hours. During the last ten minutes, add the leftover turkey and lime juice. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Place your favorite toppings in small bowls and serve alongside the turkey.


thanksgiving pudding

Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Make the custard base: In a

by Tim Havidic, iNG Executive Chef

yolks, eggs, and salt. Set aside.

large mixing bowl, whisk together the half and half, egg

In a small sauté pan, add the butter, onion, garlic and

makes 4

sage, and cook over medium-low heat until the onion softens and becomes translucent. Remove from heat and add the shredded turkey and cubed dinner rolls. Mix

ingredients: ·· 2 cups half and half ·· 4 egg yolks ·· 2 whole eggs ·· 1 tablespoon salt ·· 1 tablespoon butter ·· 1 small onion, diced ·· 4 cloves garlic, minced ·· 2 large sage leaves ·· 1 cup turkey leg meat, shredded

together and divide into tall ramekins (for individual portions) or a small hotel pan (for one large bread pudding). Pour the custard base over the bread pudding and press down. Let sit at least one hour, but preferably overnight. Cover with foil and bake in a water bath for 30 minutes. Remove foil and glaze the pudding with cranberry sauce. Return to oven and bake for an additional 10-15 minutes, until slightly browned. Serve with leftover gravy, if desired.

·· 4-5 small dinner rolls, cut into 1-inch cubes

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Profile for Stephen Hamilton Inc

Who's Hungry? Magazine | Best Of Issue | No 12  

Blending the worlds of food and photography, the magazine features travel stories and recipes from top food writers, as well as styling tips...

Who's Hungry? Magazine | Best Of Issue | No 12  

Blending the worlds of food and photography, the magazine features travel stories and recipes from top food writers, as well as styling tips...