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Six Reasons Food Plots Fail

By addressing these six problem areas, you can drastically improve your food plotting results. By Bob Humphrey Photo by Charles J. Alsheimer

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stablishing and maintaining productive food plots is not a casual undertaking, unless you’re not too concerned with results. But if that’s the case, why bother? Most folks who plant plots want optimum performance and benefit and knowing why their efforts sometimes fall short can go a long way toward seeing that they don’t. What follows are some of the most common problem areas and how to address them for better results. Planting P’s

We’ll begin with the general and then move to specifics. This first one is perhaps the most important because it incorporates the others. Just remember the five Ps, or in this case, six: Proper planning prevents poor plot performance. If you attend to that, remaining issues are largely beyond your control — such as weather. The first step in any food plot program should be planning. Start with a comprehensive short and longterm plan rather than simply striking out with a tractor and bag of seed. You can always modify the plan as

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