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WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

WHISTLER’S PREMIER P U B L I C AT I O N S I N C E 1980

M AG A Z I N E

40TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE! Join us as we look back at four decades of fun

COMPLIMENTARY MAGAZINE For safety (and your future reading pleasure) please take this copy with you

SHOPPING | HOMES | PEOPLE | GALLERIES | DINING | MAPS & MORE


MOUNTAIN GALLERIES PRESENTS EXHIBITION & SALE OF NEW WORK BY TOP CANADIAN ARTISTS

Shannon Ford

VISIT US IN THE UPPER VILLAGE Fairmont Chateau Whistler | Open Daily | 604.935.1862 Worldwide Shipping

Mountain

@MntGalleries

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

Galleries at the Fairmont

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Best New Restaurant - Where Whistler Magazine

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contents DEPARTMENTS

ARTS SCENE: Art in the Time of Covid, 19 BY ALYSSA NOEL

Editor’s Greeting, 6

COVER STORY: Four Decades of Telling

Fresh Tracks:

Whistler’s Stories, 22

19 Things to Do During a Global Pandemic, 10

BY ALISON TAYLOR

FACES OF WHISTLER: Long-Term State of Mind, 27

Mountain Roots, 16

BY BRADEN DUPUIS

Shopping Whistler, 58

OUTDOOR ADVENTURE: Backcountry Bounty, 30

Services Directory, 65

BY VINCE SHULEY

Maps, 66

WHISTLER HOMES: True to its Past, 36 BY ALISON TAYLOR

WHISTLER FASHION: The Evolution of Ski Style, 42 BY ALLYN PRINGLE

CASUAL DINING: Safe and Cozy, 46 BY GAIL JOHNSON

FINE DINING: Comfortable Food for

COVER PHOTO BY MIKE CRANE LOCAL SKIERS LUIS MI DEL CORAL, KAYAKO SHIRANE AND HAILEY JACKSON CRUISE THE EMERALD ZONE ON ANOTHER PERFECT DAY IN THE MOUNTAINS, JUST LIKE THOSE 40 YEARS BEFORE THEM.

Uncomfortable Times, 53 STOCKSTUDIOX/GETTY IMAGES

BY BRANDON BARRETT

WINE: Classic Comforts, 56

THE SKIERS ON THE 1980 COVER ARE, FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, CHRIS BLAYLOCK, PAT GRIFFITH, CATHY LEITERMAN AND GORDY HUXTABLE. PHOTO BY GREG GRIFFITH.

BY SAMANTHA RAHN

CONTRIBUTORS

Originally from Alberta, ALYSSA NOEL is Pique Newsmagazine’s assistant editor. She has an M.A. in arts and culture reporting, and her work has appeared in SPIN magazine, The Province and OnEarth. 4

BRANDON BARRETT is features editor for Pique Newsmagazine. He is the 2018 recipient of the John Collison Investigative Journalism Award. In his free time, he is a theatre producer, performer and playwright.

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

BRADEN DUPUIS is a transplanted Saskatchewan flatlander lost in the Whistler mountains. He spends his days working as a reporter for Pique Newsmagazine. His mom thinks he is brilliant.

GAIL JOHNSON is an award-winning journalist who writes regularly for the Globe and Mail, Yahoo Canada and the Georgia Straight and is a food columnist for CBC Radio.

ALLYN PRINGLE works at the Whistler Museum & Archives Society and often shares stories of Whistler's history in the Pique Newsmagazine column “Museum Musings.”

VINCE SHULEY is a freelance writer and photojournalist who too often finds excuses to leave his home office to go play in the mountains. He also enjoys creature comforts and managing deadlines.


FULL RESORT AMENITIES, TRUE MOUNTAIN EXPERIENCES

A WINTER WONDERLAND, IN YOUR OWN BACKYARD

Image: David McColm

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editor’s message

PHOTO: GREG GRIFFITH

CELEBRATING FOUR DECADES OF WHISTLER’S STORIES WHISTLER MAGAZINE PRESENTS ITS MILESTONE 40TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

PHOTO: INSIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO: PAUL MORRISON

F Winter 2010 – 3 0 t h A n n i v e r s A r y i s s u e

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Whistler’s Games The Resort welcomes the 2010 Winter Olympic & Paralympic Games

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2010 games scheduLes & info LocaL contenders WhistLer dining guide SpaS • GallerieS • ShoppinG much, much more >>>

vi LL A Pa G g e

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

O R T H E L A S T 4 0 Y E A R S, Whistler Magazine has been documenting the unique evolution of our ski town and its growing place in the world. This magazine, first published in the winter of 1980, has been a trusted record of our collective experience from those early days—living on a dream and not much else— to our transformation into an international fourseason resort, good enough to take its place on the world stage for the 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games. Truth be told, this little town has made for some compelling storytelling over the last four decades. Whistler has always been a place full of characters—the unapologetic ski bums, the elite athletes pushing the limits, the everyday families. It’s a town of entrepreneurs, creative and fearless individuals who start businesses here and go after opportunities despite great odds often stacked against them. Read our story “Long-Term State of Mind” to get a little slice of life and the people who have called this place home for 40 years or more. Whistler is also a place of indulgence and pleasure, a place to escape the ordinary and everyday mundane trivialities of life. Read more in our fine dining section, this issue all about comfort food in uncomfortable times. And, perhaps most of all, Whistler is a place of grand adventures in the mountains and that feeling you get after a day spent skiing or snowboarding, hiking or

ALISON TAYLOR Editor

snowshoeing, or simply finding a way to be a part of the natural environment. In this day and age, we know more than ever that celebrating 40 years in the publishing business is no mean feat. We owe it to you—our loyal advertisers, distributors and readers. Together, you make up this special combination of locals and tourists who share a passion for our mountain town. This issue we celebrate how far we’ve come. And yes, there are challenges ahead, challenges the likes of which we have never seen before as we, along with the rest of the world, grapple with the continued fallout of the global COVID-19 pandemic. It feels, however, that Whistler is up for the challenge—both in the long-term and the short-term, as we navigate a winter season like no other. Whistler has weathered this recent storm to date with strength, resolve and grace. And this, ultimately, is how we will move forward together. Enjoy this season with safety and kindness and make some wonderful memories creating your own Whistler story.

Alison


WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

“What does Whistler Magazine mean to you?” GENERAL MANAGER, ADVERTISING/OPERATIONS

Catherine Power-Chartrand EDITOR

Alison Taylor ART DIRECTOR

Shelley Ackerman

I have been designing the Whistler Magazine since 2000, CONTRIBUTING WRITERS and it’s always my favourite Brandon Barrett project to work on. Braden Dupuis The abundance of amazing Gail Johnson Whistler photographers make Alyssa Noel my job so easy! I’m particularly Allyn Pringle grateful to Dave Buzzard, Samantha Rahn Logan Swayze, Mike Crane, Vince Shuley Justa Jeskova and, of course, PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS Bonny Makarewicz. David Buzzard Mike Crane Justa Jeskova Chris Rollett Logan Swayze Getty Images Tourism Whistler

I've been part of the WM team since the 2010 Olympics; just one of four decades in our magazine's history. PRESIDENT, WHISTLER PUBLISHING LP Sarah Strother It was, is and always will be about sharing our love ACCOUNTING of Whistler to locals Heidi Rode and tourists alike. CIRCULATION/DISTRIBUTION What could be more fun? Denise Conway

I am proud to be a part of Whistler’s best visitor mag for 25 years. I love where I live, love what I do and who I have worked with. Shelley makes the mag gorgeous and keeps me in line, Sarah keeps us empowered, Alison is brilliant… and I will always miss Bonny! Huge thanks and respect to my many wonderful clients and distributors. Hope to see you all in person again soon! I started in May 1999 and have watched this magazine evolve into the outstanding publication that it is today. The staff has always been super fun to work with! I have enjoyed contributing in a small ways over the years, and look forward to many more.

Whistler Magazine (ISSN-0835-5460) is published twice annually by WHISTLER PUBLISHING LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, a division of GLACIER MEDIA GROUP 202-1390 Alpha Lake Road, Whistler, B.C., Canada, V8E 0H9 Phone 604-938-0202 | Fax 604-938-0201 | Toll-Free 1-877-419-8866 Email: cpower@whistlermagazine.com Also publishers of Pique Newsmagazine, weekly on Thursdays. piquenewsmagazine.com PRINTED IN CANADA One-year (2 issues) subscription: $20 within Canada, $30 to the USA, $45 overseas. Call to charge to VISA, MasterCard or American Express. Copyright © 2020, by Glacier Media Group. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission of the publisher.

2020 WINNER SPECIAL PUBLICATIONS

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SNOWMOBILE ADVENTURES

B L AC KC O MB & CALL AG H AN

604-938-1616 CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM CARLETON LODGE, MOUNTAIN SQUARE

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

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FRESHTRACKS

BY ALISON TAYLOR

TOURISM WHISTLER/MOMENT FACTORY

19 THINGS TO DO [ DURING A GLOBAL PANDEMIC ] W I T H S O M A N Y ACT I V I T I E S A N D O U R WAY O F L I F E G E A R E D A R O U N D the outdoors, Whistler is well positioned, comparatively speaking, to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic. Many things have changed in the resort in recent months, with most businesses now requiring masks or face coverings. To truly get the most of your stay, Tourism Whistler recommends making reservations, planning ahead and respecting the COVID-19 protocols that have been put in place to keep everyone safe. Check out Tourism Whistler’s Doors Open Directory—whistler.com/doors-open—for the most up-to-date information on local businesses. In the meantime, check out our 19 “socially distanced” suggestions for things to do in Whistler during your time here.

A MAGICAL NIGHT WALK

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H E W I N T E R J O U R N E Y B E G I N S AT Vallea Lumina on Nov. 27, open for weekends only until the season really gets into full swing. Vallea Lumina is a delight for the senses, a magical multi-media night walk in the forest, with talking trees and flying fish and a journey of discovery. The outdoor tours begin at sundown, every 30 minutes, allowing guests to space out and maintain physical distance. Check out vallealumina.com

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SUPPORT LOCAL c After enjoying your day in the mountains, don’t miss out on the local shops where you can find a little piece of Whistler to take home with you, whether it’s local soap and jewellery, or local beer and chocolate. Whistler businesses—from Whistler Village to the cool spots in Creekside to the eclectic mix in Function Junction—are all doing their part to provide safe environments amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

STEP BACK IN TIME

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E T I N T O N A T U R E T H E O L D - F A S H I O N E D W AY B Y S N O W S H O E I N G your way around the mountains and forests. Snowshoes have come a long way since they first hit the snow. There are snowshoeing trails at Lost Lake Park and at Whistler Olympic Park in the Callaghan Valley. Or, make your own adventure. Check out whistler.com or canadianwilderness.com for tours and rentals.

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THE PUCK DROPS HERE

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TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

OT H I N G B E AT S A G A M E O F S H I N N Y O N A F R O Z E N Whistler lake on a crisp winter’s day. With five lakes scattered through the valley, there’s no shortage of places to ice skate in Whistler when the conditions are just right. If the natural scene isn’t your thing, head to the outdoor skating rink at Whistler Olympic Plaza in the Village where you can rent skates and glide under the spinning disco ball.

4 MAKE THE CONNECTION c The Whistler Cultural Pass is the best way to make the most of Whistler’s

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ZIP ACROSS THE SKY

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INTER ZIPLINING IS another classic Whistler activity to get the adrenalin flowing. Tours take you through stunning old-growth forests and high over rushing creeks where you can learn a little about Whistler’s natural world and get a spectacular bird’s-eye view. Check out ziptrek.com and superflyziplines.com.

guests making a concerted effort to stay away from crowds, the bountiful backcountry is sure to beckon to many this season. Know what your plan is before you head into the backcountry. Charge your phone. Know how to use it for things like dropping pins. Be avalanche aware—do your safety courses and have the proper gear. Dress in the proper layers. Be prepared for selfrescue. Have a healthy respect for the power and the fickleness of Mother Nature. >>

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TOURISM WHISTLER/MIKE CRANE

TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

two main cultural attractions—the Audain Art Museum and the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre. Save up to 20 per cent when you purchase tickets as a dual admission pass. Both stunning facilities offer large indoor spaces to celebrate some of the finest art and culture in B.C. Check out audainartmuseum.com and slcc.ca for more information.

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FRESHTRACKS

19 THINGS TO DO THROW AN AXE

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c With staggered start times and limited tour capacity, Forged Axe Throwing is doing its best to keep guests as safe as possible while they throw axes. At Forged you’ve hit the bullseye of fun. Check out forgedaxe.ca

TOURISM WHISTLER/DESTINATION CANADA

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ROSS-COUNTRY SKIING COULD EXPERIENCE A RENAISSANCE THIS winter as more people look for fun things to do outside. And there is no better place than Whistler to enjoy Nordic skiing. There are three main facilities: Lost Lake Park, close to Whistler Village, and two facilities in the Callaghan Valley—Whistler Olympic Park and Callaghan Country. There are trails for every level from beginner to expert. This is one of the best ways to experience Whistler’s natural surroundings and get your heart pumping. Check out crosscountryconnection.ca and whistlersportlegacies.com.

ER/JUST A JESKOVA

GLIDE ON SNOW

VIEW THE BALD EAGLES c Between late November and March, it’s prime bald eagle viewing times in Sea to Sky. Enjoy the bald eagles in their winter habitat in Brackendale, close to Squamish, south of Whistler, home to one of North America’s largest congregations of wintering bald eagles.

TOURISM WHISTLER/MIKE CRANE

TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

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APRÈS WITH THE FAMILY

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PRÈS ISN’T JUST FOR ADULTS. IN WHISTLER, KIDS CAN GET IN ON ALL THE FUN TOO! Just head to Whistler Olympic Plaza from 3-6 p.m. on select dates for Family Après and dive in to the outdoor activities, the entertainment and the hot chocolate. Check with the friendly Village Hosts on the Village Stroll for the latest information on dates and times as these are subject to change.


TOURISM WHISTLER/MIKE CRANE

12 PLAN YOUR RETURN

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H I ST L E R I N T H E S U M M E R I S A W H O L E N E W experience, a time when the resort shines. Whistler boasts the biggest and best mountain biking park in the world. It has four championship golf courses, pristine lakes for swimming and hiking trails for all. The list goes on. Plan your return for summer 2021.

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bctransit.com/nextride

TOURISM WHISTLER/BLAKE JORGENSON

Use NextRide to plan your journey and experience Whistler your way.

SOAR TO NEW HEIGHTS c What better time to face any fears and put your mettle to the test by jumping off a bridge over the Cheakamus River? Whistler Bungee takes you to new heights—50 metres above the river to be exact—where you’ll jump above the rushing waters in the heart of the forest. As far as scenic spots for a bungee jump go, this is one of the best! Check out whistlerbungee.com. >>

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Transit Info 604·932·4020 bctransit.com/whistler

@WhistlerTransit

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FRESHTRACKS 19 THINGS TO DO

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N E O F T H E B E S T W AY S to get into Whistler’s renowned backcountry is by snowmobile. The Sea to Sky corridor is a haven for snowmobilers with so much area to explore and adventure. Get in on the action with a guided tour. There are tours for all levels. These will take you places that you’ve only dreamed about. Check out canadianwilderness.ca and blackcombsnowmobile.com.

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HEAD INTO THE BACKCOUNTRY

FIND A LOCAL c If you want the inside scoop, from the best powder stashes to the finest restaurants, find a friendly local. Granted, they may not tell you where to find the powder, but they’ll share almost everything else with you. Pick up our sister publication Pique Newsmagazine, Whistler’s weekly newsmagazine which is on stands every Thursday, to get a sense of what’s going on around town.

RIDE LIKE AN OLYMPIAN

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TAKE IN THE ALPENGLOW c With so much happening in the world around us, it’s worth it to take a quiet pause to reflect. There’s no better time to do that than as the sun begins to dip behind the mountains in the afternoon, leaving the peaks bathed in pinks, yellows and oranges. Stopping to enjoy the alpenglow is time well spent.

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X P E R I E N C E W H AT T H E O LY M P I A N S O F 2 0 1 0 F E LT W H E N they were hurtling down one of the fastest sliding tracks in the world. With a trained pilot at the helm, navigate the twists and turns at the Whistler Sliding Centre via bobsleigh. You will reach speeds of more than 125 km/hr along with the G-forces. Check out whistlersportlegacies.com.


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YET ANOTHER WAY TO SLIDE ON SNOW Whistler’s tube park is a great family-friendly way to make the most of a winter’s afternoon outside. The tube park is located on Blackcomb Mountain with multiple lanes ranging from easy green runs to the fastest black runs.

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BE LIKE BONNIE

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N ADDITION TO WEARING A MASK AND PLANNING AHEAD, Tourism Whistler is also asking guests to enjoy Whistler responsibly. “We ask all visitors to be kind, patient and understanding, and to respect the COVID19 protocols Whistler has implemented across the resort to help keep local residents, staff and guests safe.” In other words, channel your inner Dr. Bonnie Henry, B.C.’s provincial health officer. W

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FRESHTRACKS

MOUNTAIN ROOTS

BUY LOCAL, BUILD COMMUNITY

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STANE PRODUCTIONS

ith no shortage of people willing to push the limits both on and off the slopes in Whistler, it comes as no surprise that entrepreneurialism is alive and well in this part of the world. Check out these locals living by the philosophy “go big or go home” as they invest in their business and creative dreams.

UP YOUR GAME

I T B E G A N S I M P LY E N O U G H F O R Carly Fox—crocheting a toque with a friend on a dreary spring day. That was 11 years ago. Fox still has that toque, one of her favourites, and her husband still wears the second toque she made. And that’s how Fox and Ivy Creations began. Her best-selling style is what she calls a “hodgepodge” of designs that she has customized over the years, using soft yarn in an acrylic wool blend that doesn’t itch. Fox often uses rich, earthy colours as well as neutral tones like soft blue and beige. But that’s not to say there aren’t creations with a little sparkle. “There’s always room for sparkle,” she says. All of her pieces are handmade, from the optional faux-fur pom-poms to the soles of the baby booties. Find Fox and Ivy creations online at foxandivycreations.com or at Home Hardware in Function Junction. The hat and bootie sets are also available at Mountain Kids Outfitters.

A L L G R E AT S K I E R S A N D S N O W B O A R D E R S C A N AT T E S T: Y O U N E V E R stop learning or striving to improve your game. Enter Snowboard Addiction. This Whistler-based company has been keeping freestyle skiers and snowboarders on their toes for more than a decade, providing online tutorials and products for dryland training. At the heart of the business is the idea of improving muscle memory so that when you hit the slopes, the moves are second nature. Products include jib training boards to perfect your rail tricks or tramp boards to learn air awareness. Online progression plans are also available and suitable for riders who are new to the sport as well as those that want to take their riding to the next level. Check out snowboardaddiction.com.

COURTESY WOOD STREAMS

COZY CROCHETING

COURTESY FOX AND IVY CREATIONS

THE WAY OF WOOD

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

W H I L E N A T U R A L S U R R O U N D I N G S D E F I N I T E LY P R O V I D E I N S P I R A T I O N to custom furniture maker Olivier Godbout, founder of Wood Streams, the real key to many of his pieces is listening to his clients. Typically, clients come to Godbout with a concept of what they would like to see in a dining table or chair or coffee table and he then translates that vision into functional and artistic reality. He works with the “tree to table” philosophy, starting with a tree trunk and drying it over several years before transforming it into custom furniture. While wood is the essence of his work, Godbout often pairs it with other raw materials such as copper, steel, brass. Wood Streams is based in the Pemberton Industrial Park. Check out woodstreams.com and on Facebook and Instagram.


CHAD CHOMLACK

FIRED UP F O R T H E PAST 1 8 Y E A R S, ceramic artist Kathleen Tennock has been firing up her kiln and creating distinctive works of art from her home-based studio. She finds inspiration from the world around her, particularly the rocks and pebbles found in riverbeds. It’s their colour and texture in particular that she then recreates in her ceramics. Tennock’s technique is called “naked raku” which leaves a distinctive pattern on the clay during the firing process. The result gives her pieces that natural stone-like quality. You can find Tennock’s work in the gift store at the Audain Art Museum and at kathleentennock.com.

EXPERIENCE WHISTLER DIFFERENTLY THIS SEASON

COURTESY SIXHATS SUPPLY CO.

In Whistler, we wear masks to help protect our vulnerable community members and front line workers and to help keep Whistler open.

LOFTY LIDS MORE THAN 82,000 PEOPLE have clean drinking water every year thanks to the efforts of two local entrepreneurs and their vision for a hat company with a mission. A few years ago, Brendon Edgar and Kyle Cuthiell created SixHats Supply Co. born of their love of custom snapback hats. SixHats partnered with The Thirst Project with a simple mandate: For every hat sold, the company would provide clean water for six people for a year, in some of the most remote and poorest parts of Africa. Let’s not forget the fact that the hats are pretty cool too. Check out the latest designs at sixhats.ca. W

Practice physical distancing, wash your hands often, and avoid touching your face Be kind, be calm and be safe

whistler.ca/covid19

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

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SLCC

DUAL ADMISSION CULTURAL PASS Whistler’s Essential Arts + Culture Experience

Purchase pass at whistler.com/arts | Plan your visit at slcc.ca and audainartmuseum.com

Robert Davidson, Dogfish Mask, 1999/2013, red cedar with pigment, Audain Art Museum Collection, Purchased with funds from the Audain Foundation, photo by Michael Elkan


arts scene

LIFE IS BUT A DREAM BY CORRINNE

ART IN THE TIME OF COVID STORY BY ALYSSA NO E L

“WHAT WE’RE SEEING IS OUR CLIENTS ARE DRAWN TO LANDSCAPES THAT ARE A LITTLE MORE MEANINGFUL TO THEM OR HAVE THAT FEELING OF HOME.” – Liz Peacock

LOCAL GALLERIES SHARE WHAT KIND OF ART IS SELLING, HOW PEOPLE ARE BUYING IT, AND WHY SOME ARTISTS HAVE BEEN FARING WELL DURING THE PANDEMIC

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HEN THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC first hit, Mountain Galleries wasn’t sure what to expect. Would anyone come out to buy art? Would visitors return to Whistler? “It’s been better than we expected, honestly,” says Liz Peacock, co-director and gallery manager. “We all thought we wouldn’t see anyone. Nobody would come. It was so unknown.” Even though international visitors haven’t returned, there have been plenty of people from the Lower Mainland and around Canada who have been in search of art.

WOLCOSKI, AVAILABLE AT MOUNTAIN GALLERIES AT THE FAIRMONT.

“We have been limited to Canadian visitors,” she says. “What we’re seeing is our clients are drawn to landscapes that are a little more meaningful to them or have that feeling of home.” One example: some clients who take an annual trip to Hawaii had to forgo the trip this year and instead, decided to buy a couple paintings inspired by that location to commemorate all the past vacations. “Another example was some clients that visit Lake Louise every year,” Peacock says. “They bought a beautiful painting [of it] to have on their wall as this year they didn’t have a chance to go.” Similarly, people have been enticed by Corrinne Wolcoski’s paintings of Howe Sound. “People have really been drawn to those because it is that feeling of home and that feeling of coming up the highway to Whistler,” she says. “They’re very calm, serene paintings. That’s something people have wanted in their lives.” For Wolcoski, the goal is to capture and convey the emotion you feel when you look at a real-life landscape. >> WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

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COURTESY BEN MCLAUGHLIN

TOP: RISING TO THE SKY BY STEPHANIE RIVET, AVAILABLE AT THE ADELE CAMPBELL FINE ART GALLERY. ABOVE: LIVE-EDGE WOOD AND RESIN FURNITURE PIECES CREATED BY BEN MCLAUGHLIN, AT MOUNTAIN GALLERIES AT THE FAIRMONT.

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“WHEN A CLIENT SEES THE WORK AND they respond to it, it’s really meaningful to me because it means they get it,” she says. “Somehow, I was able to capture that moment, and they can see it too. For me, that’s amazing (that) I can share that with people.” In typical years, Wolcoski, who lives in Vancouver, travels up and down the West Coast, taking photos or doing quick oil sketches of scenes then heads back to her studio to paint them. The pandemic, however, has forced her to explore a little closer to home—which has been a blessing in its own way. “Instead of going way up the coast to Alaska and back, I’ve gone 10 minutes from my house and found the same beauty,” she says. “I’m finding these hidden places of inspiration. That’s been a new adventure for me.” Serene landscapes aside, the other thing people have been drawn to during this time— after months and months of spending more time at home—has been making their living space as appealing as possible. To that end, Ben McLaughlin, designer and director of communications with the gallery, has seen his wood furniture gain popularity. “He’s been really busy this summer,” Peacock adds. “People are spending so much more time at home. They’re spending that time revitalizing their living spaces, surrounding themselves with something meaningful, of high quality, and something that gives them pleasure.” Mountain Galleries has a few options to help clients find the best art for their homes. One practical one that was popular at the beginning of the pandemic when life—and jobs—were uncertain, was the lease-to-own option. Another was the gallery’s 30-day guarantee. “It allows them to live with the artwork for 30 days and get a full refund,” Peacock says. “That’s working a lot better for clients at the moment.” Another tool is their virtual installation in which people send them a photo of their living room with wall dimensions and they provide an image of what the art would look like in their home. “We try to make it as easy and accessible as possible for people,” Peacock says. At the Adele Campbell Gallery, they’ve also been offering a digital mock-up service for people—and have seen huge uptake. “It is a really useful technique, which allows clients to digitally ‘try before they buy,’ so to speak, or to help narrow down choices,” explains Charlotte Webber, assistant gallery director. “Some clients aren’t sure what they are looking

for, but know they need something; in these cases, we are happy to provide suggestions and work with the client to find their perfect piece. Our digital mock-up service is open to all and is free of charge.” Unsure of what might look best on your wall? They can help with that too—all from the comfort of a laptop via email. “Some people don’t know what they want,” Webber says. “They say, ‘I want something colourful or wildlife or abstract. This is the space. Can you make some suggestions?’ We’re happy to come up with suggestions and give ideas.” Their clients haven’t been drawn to one style of art—it’s been all over the map during the pandemic, she adds. “Rather than one specific style being our most popular, all of our artists and their varying techniques and subject matters have been receiving a lot of love,” Webber says. “Throughout COVID, we’ve found homes for a really diverse range of paintings, which is wonderful.” Still, the fact remains that many of the gallery’s more than 40 Canadian artists create work inspired by the landscape and wildlife in their home country. “As we’ve all had to stay a little ‘closer to home’ this summer, it’s allowed people to appreciate the beauty of Canada and the artworks it inspires,” Webber says. Those artists, meanwhile, have arguably been better suited than most people to weather the pandemic. “We’re always in touch with our artists,” Webber says. “At the beginning of COVID, like lots of people, … they felt apprehensive about things. It feels they almost retreated to their studios. They’ve all been painting—and we’ve received lots of new work. I don’t think anybody’s style has changed, but lots of the artists said they had more time to spend on their art and they enjoyed spending a bit more time painting; they didn’t have as many other commitments.” In the end, Peacock says, people are still interested in supporting local artists, and local businesses. “We found that people have really been supportive of the local artists, Canadian artists and the galleries,” she says. “It’s like everyone has been wanting to support local business to keep people going in any way they can.” To see pieces by each of the galleries’ artists—or learn more about how to buy art from either afar or in person—head to mountaingalleries.com and adelecampbell.com, and check out the list of Whistler galleries on the next page. W


WHISTLER GALLERIES AUDAIN ART MUSEUM 4350 Blackcomb Way

A AD DE E LL E E C CA AM MP PB BE E LL LL F F II N NE E A A RT, RT, W WH H II SS T T LL E ER R

604-962-0413 audainartmuseum.com ADELE CAMPBELL FINE ART GALLERY In the Westin Resort & Spa 604-938-0887 adelecampbell.com ART JUNCTION GALLERY & FRAME STUDIO 1068 Millar Creek Road, Function Junction

pa i n t i n g s

sculpture

j e w e l l e ry

604-938-9000 artjunction.ca MOUNTAIN GALLERIES AT THE FAIRMONT In the Fairmont Chateau Whistler 604-935-1862 www.mountaingalleries.com THE PLAZA GALLERIES 22-4314 Main Street 604-938-6233 plazagalleries.com

c l a s s i c & c o n t e m p o r a ry c a n a d i a n a rt s i n c e 1 9 9 3

THE GALLERY AT MAURY YOUNG ARTS CENTRE 4335 Blackcomb Way 604-935-8410 artswhistler.com SQUAMISH LIL’WAT CULTURAL CENTRE 4584 Blackcomb Way 1-866-441-SLCC (7522) slcc.ca VINCENT MASSEY STUDIO

v i s i t u s at t h e w e s t i n, w h i s t l e r

8605 Forest Ridge Drive 604-905-8363 vincentmasseypottery.com WHISTLER CONTEMPORARY GALLERY In the Hilton Resort 604-938-3001 (main) In the Four Seasons Resort 604-935-3999 whistlerart.com

ADELECAMPBELL.COM 604-938-0887

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

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PHOTOGRAPHER GREG GRIFFITH

STORY BY A L I S O N TAYLOR

F

OR A WHISTLER PHOTOGRAPHER, few things beat landing the coveted front cover of a ski magazine. Greg Griffith knows. SKI, Skiing, Powder—he’s been on them all over a career spanning 30 plus years, selling the dream (and by extension the magazines) of life in the mountains. Forty years ago this winter, Griffith also made the cover of the inaugural issue of this magazine with a pristine shot of four skiers swooshing down Gandy Dancer (now Ross’s Gold) on Blackcomb Mountain. It’s a prescient image, a photo full of potential and promise, of untold adventures yet to come. The nascent Whistler Village sits in the valley below, a mere outpost compared to today. Only two years before this shot was taken, this had been the site of the town’s garbage dump! The Coast Mountains sit majestically in the background, stretching on endlessly, timelessly, across the horizon. >>

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

DAVID BUZZARD

cover story

FOUR DECADES OF TELLING WHISTLER’S STORIES WHISTLER MAGAZINE— DECEMBER 1980 TO 2020 AND BEYOND

MAIN PHOTO: WHISTLER, CIRCA 1980s. INSET: THE INAUGURAL ISSUE OF THE WHISTLER MAGAZINE, 1980, AND THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE.


WINT

ER/S

PRIN G 2020 /21 WHIST LER’S PREM PUBLI IER C AT I O N SIN C E 19

M AG A

80

ZINE

ANNIVERS40TH ARY ISSUE! COMPLI MEN MAGAZ TARY INE

For safe ty (and future re your ading pl easure) please take th is copy wit h you

SHOPP ING | H OMES | PEOP LE | GA LLERIE S | DIN ING | M APS & MORE

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

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WHISTLER MUSEUM & ARCHIVES/GREG GRIFFITH COLLECTION

Join us a s at four d we look back ecades of fun


WHISTLER MUSEUM & ARCHIVES, WHISTLER QUESTION COLLECTION

BLACKCOMB MOUNTAIN OPENED FOR SKIING ON DECEMBER 6, 1980. HERE, MAYOR PAT CARLETON, LEFT IN THE COWBOY HAT, AND BLACKCOMB PRESIDENT HUGH SMYTHE, FAR RIGHT, HELP LOAD SKIERS ONTO THE FIRST TRIPLE CHAIR OF LIFT 2.

Blackcomb’s favour—steeper fall-line skiing and longer runs were enough to pique an interest. Still, they needed more. Service would have to set them apart— friendly outgoing staff, perks like cleaning car windshields. And, they had to sell the dream to the magazines. Smythe muses that he likely spoke to Paul Burrows, editor of Whistler Magazine in 1980 and founder and editor of Whistler’s first newspaper The Whistler Question, every week. There was a lot to talk about of course. In addition to Blackcomb, development of Whistler Village, under the Whistler Village Land Co., was simultaneously under way. In the opening pages of that first magazine, the president of the Whistler Village Land Co. Ltd, Terry Minger, apologizes. He writes: “Please excuse our incompleteness and rough edges—we’ve all been working very hard but the likes of St. Moritz, Sun Valley or Chamonix wasn’t built in a day!”

COMING OF AGE

BEGINNINGS – 40 YEARS AGO Little did anyone realize at the time the role magazines like Whistler Magazine would play in “selling the dream.” It turns out there was a huge appetite for glossy spreads showcasing fun in the mountains. Readers wanted to feel for themselves what they read and saw in the pages within. “Local journalism has always been incredibly important for Whistler because it is about telling the stories that really make up the essence of our community and who we are,” says Tourism Whistler President and CEO Barrett Fisher. 24

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

Griffith remembers in 1979 he was hired by Tourism BC to take photos of skiing, particularly as it related to the fanfare around the muchtalked-about Blackcomb Mountain that was set to open the following year. He remembers they enlisted a snow cat for several laps to get the perfect shot. He found it on Gandy Dancer. “Blackcomb had this view, looking straight down (to the Village),” says Griffith. “That was a very new shot as far as the look of the ski area.” And that was the name of the game for Blackcomb Mountain: Trying to set itself apart if it was to have any chance at competing with the established Whistler Mountain, which had been up and running since 1966. As Hugh Smythe, the man tasked with opening the new resort, recalls the eternal question of the time was: What can we do to differentiate ourselves? “Blackcomb was under the shadow of Whistler Mountain,” he says. “We were the underdog and the new kid on the block.” Just imagine 40 years ago: Blackcomb had five lifts and no alpine skiing on opening day in 1980. Whistler Mountain, by comparison, had 13 lifts and 12 new runs that year alone. As its half-page ad in that first issue of Whistler Magazine boldly states: “We have it all.” Smythe decided to go head-to-head: They would charge the same to ski at Blackcomb as on Whistler—$300 for a season pass, $15 for a day pass. As it turns out, geography worked in

Indeed. Whistler Village almost wasn’t built at all. As Minger penned those words in 1980, the world was at the beginning of a severe economic recession that would last until early 1983. Interest rates hit a staggering 22 per cent and the Whistler Village Land Co was teetering on the edge of bankruptcy by late 1981. With unfinished buildings and a new resort hanging in the balance, the provincial government was called in to help…to the tune of $21 million to get Whistler back on track. Clearly there was a sense of the untapped potential lying in the mountains. Whistler Magazine reported in its first issue that: “Last year (1979), with 10 chair lifts, Whistler

WHISTLER MUSEUM & ARCHIVES, WHISTLER QUESTION COLLECTION

A N D Y E T, F O R T H O S E F O U R T W E N T Y something-year-old skiers in the foreground, you can tell it’s all about the moment: there’s just something about the freedom in their movement, a bluebird day, knee-deep fresh powder under foot, an entire mountain to themselves. “We had no idea that the resort was going to grow as big as it did,” laughs Griffith, of that carefree, living-in-the moment, time of life. In the 40 years since, Whistler has transformed into a four-season international destination. Along the way, Whistler Magazine has been there, telling the stories and documenting the journey. At our 40th anniversary, we are taking time to reflect on how far we’ve come and where we might be going as Whistler faces unprecedented challenges in the months, and quite possibly, the years ahead.

JANE AND PAUL BURROWS OUT FOR A SKI IN FEBRUARY 1979.


A LOOK AHEAD It hasn’t always been easy. Throughout it all, Whistler has weathered the peaks and valleys of a resort existence—the lows of global recessions and tourism droughts, the highs of the 2010 Olympic Games and showing off to a global audience. The challenges of today, however, aren’t like the challenges of the past. The COVID-19 pandemic has brought a new era of global uncertainty and worry for the future. As in the past however, Whistler looks to its natural assets to shape its future. The resort saw stronger results in the summer than most destinations, Fisher says, reaching 60 per cent hotel occupancy in August, as people looked to spend

JOHN SNELGROVE

was one of the most popular ski mountains in Canada, attracting 400,000 skiers in the winter months.” It was simply too good to let it go belly-up. Whistler and Blackcomb, though separate entities at the time, together made up one of the largest ski areas in North America, boasting the two longest vertical drops of any ski area. Skiers were taking notice; it wasn’t long before more followed suit. In 1992, Snow Country Magazine, one of North America’s most prominent ski magazines, voted Whistler Resort the Number One Ski Resort in North America, ushering in a new era of being on top. Ralph Forsyth, who moved to Whistler 30 years ago to be a ski instructor, remembers the annual rankings well. It always seemed as though Whistler or Blackcomb was on top and every autumn, a buoyant mood permeated the town when the rankings were released. “Everybody had a spring in their step. You could feel it,” he says. It was the ’90s in Whistler; it was the wild west, there was a boundless energy in town and a feeling that Whistler knew it was No. 1. It certainly behaved as though it was No. 1. There was the World Ski and Snowboard Festival and Winterfest and the Fire and Ice show, so many things pushing the boundaries all the time. “We were doing such cool stuff,” says Forsyth, now a municipal councillor. When Blackcomb and Whistler merged in 1998 under the banner of Intrawest, the party just kept going; the No. 1 ranking remained.

FOR A TOWN BUILT ON THE LOFTY GOAL OF HOSTING A WINTER OLYMPICS, THE 2010 OLYMPIC AND PARALYMPIC WINTER GAMES WERE A DREAM COME TRUE.

more time outdoors. Part of the success is the community— banding together, working as one, with one common goal to be the best it can be. “We as a community have always come together in a spirit of collaboration,” says Fisher. “It might sound old fashioned but it truly is a reality. “A lot of that is based on that entrepreneurial spirit that Whistler was founded on.” With safety and COVID protocols top priority this season, Tourism Whistler is keeping its eye on the future. “I do believe there are always opportunities for growth coming out of challenges,” says Fisher. In the years to come, it’s crucial to understand how to balance resort visitation in the future and sustain a year-round tourism economy, says Fisher. What does “responsible tourism” look like going forward? How do we educate our guests about our fragile mountain environment that we want to protect and enjoy for decades to come? “Our purpose is to honour and celebrate the magnitude of Whistler’s rugged environment and the bold and adventurous spirit of the people who love it,” she adds. For Whistler Magazine that, in turn, means many more stories about the people who live and visit here and the special place they call Whistler. W

WHISTLER THEN AND NOW 1980-2020

1980

2020

Mayor

Pat Carleton

Jack Crompton

No. of Lifts

19

38

Skiable Terrain on Whistler

690 acres

4,757 acres

Skiable Terrain on Blackcomb

350 acres

3,414 acres

Season Pass

$300 (for one Mountain)

$1,449 (unlimited)

Number of Skiers

400,000 (Whistler 1979)

3 million/ year**

Dining Options

A handful

100+

Hot Debate

Logging vs. tourism

COVID-19

Sunday Night Movie

Animal House

Binging Netflix

Monthly Rent for a One-bedroom Suite in Emerald

$220

Are any available?

*10 year average ** This is this annual visitation to Whistler (45 per cent are winter guests)

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

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Whistler’s Premier Shopping Centre

Whistler Kitchen Works The Royal Taste of India

EXPERIENCE WHISTLER’S PREMIER SHOPPING CENTRE. OFFERING A VARIETY OF SPECIALTY BOUTIQUES, RESTAURANTS AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICES. Owned and Managed by

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

www.headwaterprojects.ca


faces of whistler

ARTIST AND MUSICIAN STEPHEN VOGLER KEEPS WHISTLER’S CREATIVE FIRES BURNING AT THE POINT ARTIST-RUN CENTRE

DAVID BUZZARD

ON ALTA LAKE.

LONG-TERM STATE OF MIND LOCALS REFLECT ON PUTTING DOWN ROOTS IN WHISTLER FOR MORE THAN 40 YEARS STO RY BY B R A DEN DU P U I S

COURTESY STEPHEN VOGLER

T A YOUNG VOGLER DOING A BACKFLIP OFF THE WATER RAMP AT LOST LAKE IN SEPTEMBER 1981. THIS PHOTO MADE THE FRONT PAGE OF THE WHISTLER QUESTION NEWSPAPER.

H E R E ’ S A N A G E - O L D D E B AT E I N W H I S T L E R A B O U T W H AT, E X A C T LY, constitutes a “local.” Does it refer to the number of years spent living in these mountains? Do you have to ski a certain amount of seasons, or conquer a defined range of double blacks? “The way I see it is, some people arrive here, whether it was 40 or 50 years ago, or last month, and the place gets its hooks into them, and they just feel at home,” says Whistler author and musician Stephen Vogler, a longtime Whistler local if there ever was one. Vogler doesn’t pretend to be the authority on localism, but he really does believe the term is derived from a certain state of mind—an unspoken bond forged on a deeper level than time alone. He has a unique perspective, having moved to Whistler with his family in 1976 at just 12 years old. More than four decades later, he’s still here writing (check out his book Only in Whistler for some of the more off-beat stories from years gone by), playing gigs, and hosting local arts events at The Point Artist-Run Centre on Alta Lake. “If we had stayed in the Lower Mainland, where would I have gone?” he says, when asked how growing up in such a unique environment shaped him. >>

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WHISTLER MUSEUM & ARCHIVES, WHISTLER QUESTION COLLECTION

DAVID BUZZARD

“I DO KNOW THAT BECAUSE THERE was nothing here—like, there was no pool, no rink, no community centre, barely any TV—I’d have to find things to do, and I think that’s how I got into learning how to play guitar, and maybe reading a lot, because you had to keep yourself occupied.” Vogler’s connection to Whistler runs deep, bound purposefully to the mountain ranges and riverbeds—and even the nowclosed dive bars—by the inescapable pull of nostalgia. But that doesn’t make it any more genuine than yours, he says. “I really do believe that, yeah, it’s more a state of mind. It’s more just your connection to the place,” he says. “It doesn’t matter how many years you’ve lived here. That doesn’t make you more or less local.” This being the 40th anniversary issue of Whistler Magazine, we thought we’d catch up with a couple more long-term locals who have helped shape the resort into what it is today.

TOP: AS THE OWNER OF THE WHISTLER REAL ESTATE COMPANY SINCE 1999, PAT KELLY UNDERSTANDS THE UNIQUE NUANCES OF THE RESORT REAL ESTATE MARKET. ABOVE: PAT KELLY IN 1982.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

PAT KELLY When Pat Kelly arrived in Whistler 40 years ago, Tapley’s Neighbourhood Pub had just opened its doors and the town counted about 1,500 people amongst its permanent ranks. “The resort was really a vision to be achieved; it was a goal,” he says. As a young man in the real estate game (today Kelly is president and owner of the Whistler Real Estate Company), Kelly was privy to much of the policy-making decisions taking place in the upstart resort. “It wasn’t without its struggles over the ’80s and ’90s and 2000s,” he says, of Whistler’s eventual trajectory towards a world-class, four-season mountain resort. “Right now if you look at Whistler you say, ‘well it’s a sure thing.’ It wasn’t back then.” It’s all about perspective, Kelly says, and as a member of Whistler’s prestigious 40-year club, he’s earned his share of it. Making a long-term go of it in Whistler is not an easy task for anyone, he says. “It’s the path less chosen. But if you love it, you invest yourself in it, and you make something out of it; the first challenge isn’t a reason to just give up and go home,” he says. While much is made of Whistler’s natural beauty, and the irresistible pull it has over so many, for Kelly, it was the

people who kept him fighting it out in the trenches. His involvement in real estate led to “fabulous friendships,” he says, adding that he met his wife here, had his children here, invested in the community and volunteered with the fire department, chamber of commerce and various advisory committees. “Your life becomes the experiences you have,” he says. “It’s a hard thing to walk away from, because in some small way you think you contributed to whatever it is we are now. So when you’ve got some skin in the game, whether it’s financial or whether it’s psychological, it makes you want to stay and be part of it. “And being one of the most beautiful places in the world doesn’t hurt either.”

NANCY WILHELM-MORDEN Nancy Wilhelm-Morden, local lawyer, former Whistler mayor and the longestserving female elected official in Whistler’s history, arrived in the resort in the summer of 1973 for a two-week holiday at 18 years old. She had come to visit her now-husband Ted, who was working at a logging camp for the summer. “He said he was staying for the winter to ski; I thought that sounded like a great idea, so I called my parents the day before I was supposed to come home— two days before I was supposed to go to university—and said I wasn’t coming home,” Wilhelm-Morden says. The rest, as they say, is history. Wilhelm-Morden lived the ski-bum life to the fullest in those first years in Whistler (her time living as a squatter is the stuff of local legend), but it wasn’t long before she and Ted began to set down real, tangible roots in the community. The couple purchased a lot in Alpine Meadows in 1977 for $17,000, she recalls. “We built on it ourselves, and used recycled materials and re-used materials, because we were young and broke, and then we renovated it,” she says. The home has been renovated six times since 1980, in fact, and was even used to host the wedding of one of Wilhelm-Morden’s two daughters in 2019. The plan is to pass it to one or both of the girls so it stays in the family. Through her 17 combined years behind the council table, Wilhelm-Morden


SNOWSHOE

WHISTLER MUSEUM & ARCHIVES, WHISTLER QUESTION COLLECTION

DAVID BUZZARD

THE MEDICINE TRAIL

contributed much to local public life in Whistler. She lists the creation of the Whistler Housing Authority, saving the Emerald Forest and the launch of the Audain Art Museum as just a few of her proudest moments. But she always kept the Whistler locals at the heart of her decisionmaking, she says. “It’s always wonderful to go to a community event and see people who have been living here for as long as I have, or longer,” she says, noting that Whistler has never been an easy place to make a go of it. Even now, it’s tough, she adds. Many forego bigger salaries in urban centres to live the Whistler lifestyle. “So to see people who have been here for a long time, who have invested not just money to stay here, but their personal energies, and they’re still here, and they’ll be here forever [is inspiring],” she says. Whistler, it seems, simply finds a way of getting into your soul. W

TOP: NANCY WILHELMMORDEN AT HOME IN WHISTLER. ABOVE: WILHELMMORDEN, FAR RIGHT, IS SWORN INTO HER FIRST TERM IN OFFICE IN 1984.

604-938-1616 CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM CARLETON LODGE, MOUNTAIN SQUARE

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

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outdoor adventure

BACKCOUNTRY BOUNTY MORE SKIERS AND SNOWBOARDERS ARE EXPECTED TO EXPLORE THE BACKCOUNTRY THIS SEASON

STO RY BY V I N C E S H U LEY

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21


WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

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TOURISM WHISTLER/DESTINATION BC/RANDY LINCKS

W

HISTLER IS BRACING FOR A BUSY SEASON BEYOND THE SKI AREA boundaries. The backcountry is beckoning like never before as skiers and snowboarders look to escape the crowds and keep their social distance. Never mind the peace and solitude, the connection to nature, that the backcountry provides in these uncertain times. And so, the backcountry, once the bastion of a small, select group of skiers, is now becoming accessible for all, helped along by advances in equipment and training. Just ask industry insiders. “We had a mad panic of backcountry gear sales when (Whistler Blackcomb) closed early last winter,” explains Larry Falcon, manager of the Escape Route backcountry store, located in Whistler’s Marketplace. “With people wanting to ski socially distanced around COVID-19, and a reservation system in place for skiing in the resort this winter, we’re seeing a big growth in sales with novice and intermediate backcountry skiers.” And Whistler is where many will choose to take their first steps into the winter wilderness. All who venture out however, should be prepared with the equipment and skills to keep them safe, warm and dry; and all those that do, will undoubtedly attest that it’s worth the effort. >>


KNOW BEFORE YOU GO Have a plan before you head into the backcountry. The area beyond the ski area boundary is not avalanche controlled. It is critical to be aware of the avalanche conditions at the time. Be prepared for self rescue. You must have the proper tools with you—probe, transceiver, shovel—and you must know how to use them. Have some prior knowledge of what to expect out there: Take the two-day Avalanche Skills Training (AST) Level 1 course before venturing out. Whistler has several guide bureaus and outfitters that hold this course on most weekends throughout the winter.

A SPLITBOARDER ASCENDS THE SPEARHEAD TRAVERSE, STOCKSTUDIOX/GETTY IMAGES

Make sure your phone is fully charged and you know how to use the technology such as dropping pins.

TOURISM WHISTLER/MIKE CRANE

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

BACKCOUNTRY BEYOND WHISTLER BLACKCOMB’S BOUNDARIES.

THE SPEARHEAD RANGE

For more information on safe winter backcountry travel, head to avalanche.ca

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HEADING INTO THE

In Whistler, the most popular ski touring area is by far the Spearhead Range, accessible from the Blackcomb Glacier gate on Blackcomb Mountain. In less than 45 minutes of climbing a skin track, a pathway in the snow made by previous tourers, skiers can leave whirring lifts and throngs of people behind to access untouched powder slopes, steep couloirs and stretching glaciers. There are routes that conveniently loop back to the Blackcomb in-bounds ski runs and plenty of options to stay out for multiple descents before returning back to Whistler Village via Lakeside Bowl. Those tackling the coveted Spearhead Traverse (a two- to three-day ski touring expedition requiring winter camping) begin their journey in the Spearhead Range before looping approximately 30 kilometres of glaciers and mountain passes back to Whistler Mountain. This expedition requires strong physical fitness, advanced ski ability to tackle the steep terrain, glacier travel experience, and both equipment and skills for self-rescue. Hiring a guide is highly recommended. Navigation without proper maps (and experience reading them) can lead to parties getting lost or stranded. Make smart choices taking avalanche conditions and weather into account.

From the Whistler Mountain side of the Spearhead Traverse, ski tourers can hike up to the Flute Summit and exit into an area known as the Musical Bumps in the Fitzsimmons Range. This is the most moderate backcountry terrain accessible from Whistler Blackcomb and is a popular spot for beginner ski tourers. At the far end of the Musical Bumps, overlooking Russet Lake, the recently completed Kees and Claire Hut provides skiers with an option to sleep in the backcountry. Modest bunkstyle beds and self-catering kitchen facilities allow for up to 38 people to stay at the hut during normal operations, when COVID-19 protocols are not in place. From here ski tourers can climb and ski the nearby mountains of Fissile and Whirlwind, the slopes of the Overlord Glacier and the adjacent Cowboy Ridge. This is the first of three huts planned for the Spearhead Traverse. "The continuing rise of popularity in backcountry skiing, evident throughout the world, has only accelerated from the COVID-19 impacts,” says Jayson Faulkner, chair of the Spearhead Huts Society. “The backcountry in Sea to Sky will likely be busier than ever. The demand for backcountry huts and infrastructure will in turn be bigger than ever and arguably, more important than ever for safety and management.”


CALLAGHAN COUNTRY If you are looking for a more luxurious backcountry experience, the Journeyman Lodge in Callaghan Country provides a more comprehensive accommodation with meals and amenities such as a secluded traditional Finnish sauna. The ski terrain in Callaghan Country has a variety of options with plenty of tree skiing, perfect if your stay coincides with stormy weather. The Callaghan Valley is known to receive up to 30 per cent more snow than Whistler Blackcomb, making it a backcountry powder paradise. “You could consider ‘Callaghan Country’ Whistler’s secret snow stash,” says Callaghan Country President Brad Sills. “Over the past four decades, we have sculpted small scale wilderness experiences to fit into this special landscape. We consider the Journeyman Lodge a testimony to the roots of Whistler's early ski community and their passion for wilderness and backcountry skiing.” Access to the Journeyman Lodge is by snowcat shuttle or by Nordic skiing from the carpark area in the Callaghan Valley, approximately 20 minutes south of the Village. W

cross country connection “WE CONSIDER THE JOURNEYMAN LODGE A TESTIMONY TO

snowshoe & XC ski rentals discover package $119 Lost Lake PassivHaus

THE ROOTS OF WHISTLER'S EARLY SKI COMMUNITY AND THEIR PASSION FOR WILDERNESS AND

Rentals Skills Tours

BACKCOUNTRY SKIING.”

whistler • 604.905.0071 • crosscountryconnection.ca

DOGSLED ADVENTURES Cross Country Connection Advertisement Winter 2020-2021 season Ad # CXC-W2021-Ad-2 IN THE CALLAGHAN Publication: Whistler Magazine, Unwind Recreation Guide ad size: 3.8” wide x 4.7” tall (1/4 pg) (was 1/6 page last year, 3.8 W x 2.8 H) Date: November, 2020

VALLEY

Files in PDF format, greyscale or CMY confirmation: 604.905.0071

technical concerns: Brian Hydesmith design@hydesmith.com or call 204.487.

604-938-1616 CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM CARLETON LODGE, MOUNTAIN SQUARE

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whistler home

TRUE TO ITS PAST A WEST VANCOUVER FAMILY BRINGS A 40-YEAR-OLD LOG CABIN INTO THE FUTURE

STORY BY ALISON TAYLOR PHOTOS BY C HRIS R OLLETT

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HE ROMANTIC AND ROUNDED FORM OF THE traditional log cabin, once a staple in Whistler’s architectural landscape, has seen its heyday come and go. With its passing, a little slice of Whistler’s neighbourhood charm has gone too as the resort firmly ushers in an era of contemporary, sophisticated and sleek West Coast design. Keeping a little piece of Whistler’s old-school appeal however, is exactly what drew the West-Vancouver based Yamaoka family (affectionately known as “The Yam Fam”) to their log home in the mountains. And, it’s why they were determined to retain the original form and character of the home, which was built in 1979, when they took up a recent renovation. “Whistler is losing a lot of that character,” says Elsa Yamaoka a little wistfully, the new contemporary builds on her street highlighting that point. “It’s nice to keep some of the character that made Whistler what it was.” >>

MAIN PHOTO: WITH LIGHT FLOODING FROM THE WINDOWS, AND WHITE ACCENTS, THIS ONCE DARK LOG CABIN IS NOW FILLED WITH BRIGHTNESS. LEFT: A “BEFORE” PHOTO OF THE ORIGINAL LOG HOUSE. ABOVE: AMONG THE UNIQUE AND FAMILY-FOCUSED PARTS OF THE GOURMET KITCHEN IS A GLASS BACKSPLASH WHERE THE FAMILY CAN WRITE NOTES, QUICK RECIPES AND MESSAGES TO ONE ANOTHER.

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TOP LEFT: THE WEST COAST MODERN AESTHETIC BRINGS THE TRADITIONAL LOG HOME INTO THE FUTURE. TOP RIGHT: WITH A CUSTOM FIRE PIT AND A NEW ROOF, THE OUTDOOR COVERED LIVING AREA IS ONE OF THE FAMILY’S FAVOURITE SPOTS TO GATHER AND ENTERTAIN. BOTTOM LEFT: UNIQUE ART PIECES, LIKE BRENT COMBER’S "LOG JAM" TABLE PICTURED IN THE CENTRE OF THE LOFT, ARE DOTTED THROUGHOUT THE HOME. BOTTOM RIGHT: THE BATHROOM RENOVATION BROUGHT IN CLEAN LINES AND COOL FEATURES LIKE THE AGAPE SINK WHICH LOOKS LIKE AN OIL DRUM.

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THIS CAMP COTT PILLOW MAKES THE LOFT SPACE COMFORTABLE AND WELCOMING.

FOR THE YAM FAM, WHISTLER IS A HOME away from home, with three kids coming of age through the Whistler Mountain Ski Club over the last decade. They bought their log home in 2008 and fell in love with it—the coziness, the sound of Fitzsimmons Creek in their backyard, the mountain playground calling from their windows. Two years ago, an arguably fortuitous leak in the house took them on a journey to renovate and bring the 40-year-old log home into the future, all while keeping true to its past. “We were adding West Coast modern elements and preserving the structure,” explains designer Lynn Gentile who led with renovation with her team at the locally based Cabin Fever Interiors. The essential form and character was to remain. But the small “postage stamp” kitchen was due for an overhaul and expansion, particularly because the family loves to cook together; the kitchen is the heart of their house. Gentile calls it a “gourmet chef-style kitchen” complete with a monogramed Fulgor Milano stove with “The Yam Fam” etched into a plaque on the front. In a dramatic change, a portion of the exterior logs was cut out to allow for a floor-to-ceiling window in the newly designed kitchen. “It made the renovation just so stunning,” says Yamaoka, of the light flooding into the new kitchen. This connection to the outdoors was a key part of the renovation; it’s no surprise that there is no TV in this mountain retreat. “When you go to the mountains, it’s better to look out the windows,” says Yamaoka. And so, the renovation included a new covered front deck, keeping true to the original lines of the cabin. This indoor/outdoor room has a custom fire pit and seating area, connecting the family to fresh air and trees and space. “It has created a beautiful outdoor living space for us that we use all year round,” she adds. “It’s like glamping!” Another key part of the renovation was updating the main bathroom with a show-stopping Italian Agape sink. The rounded sink looks like an old oil drum, once again incorporating new and contemporary with the old. “We turned that into a feature bathroom for them,” adds Gentile, who used Vancouver-based Cantu Bathroom and Hardware for all the fixtures to bring in that modern look. >>

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THIS LOG HOME, LOCATED IN WHITE GOLD AND BACKING ONTO FITZSIMMONS CREEK, WAS THE PERFECT HOME FOR THE YAMAOKA FAMILY WHO TREASURED ITS HISTORY AND PLACE IN WHISTLER’S UNIQUE ARCHITECTURE.

Kitchen, Bathroom, Lighting, Door Hardware, Cabinet Hardware, Custom Wine Storage & much more.

THE FAMILY THEN CALLED ON NORTH SHORE visual artist and custom furniture designer Brent Comber to repurpose those exterior logs that were removed for the kitchen window. Under Comber’s expert hands, the logs transformed into a beautiful coffee table. It’s called “Log Jam.” There was enough wood leftover for Comber to make a second table that was donated to Habitat for Humanity. “Log Jam” sets the scene for the cozy loft space, perfect for lounging in with “West Coast modern pieces and natural grey wool,” explains Gentile. Take the grey floor cushions as an example. Called Camp Cotts, these pillows are designed by the team at Cabin Fever and are available at Camp Lifestyle & Coffee in Function Junction. This use of local artisans is distinctly felt throughout the home with chandeliers from Whistler designers and the dining table and benches designed by Kate Duncan. The end result is a family home of balance and functionality, a perfect mountain retreat. Gentile adds: “We had lots of fun introducing the old and the new.” W

Experience Our Fully Functioning Showroom In Person Simply peruse in peace or have one of our expert team members guide you through our extensive collection of bathroom, kitchen, lighting and hardware fittings.

You Dream It, We’ll Find It. Cantu Bathrooms and Hardware Ltd.

8351 Ontario St. Vancouver BC V5X 3E8 Tel 604.688.1252 | www.cantubathrooms.com copyright © 2020 Cantu Bathrooms and Hardware Ltd.

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THE EVOLUTION OF SKI STYLE C OMPILED BY ALLYN P R INGLE, WHISTLER MUSEUM & AR CHIVES

In homage to Whistler Magazine’s 40th anniversary, we’re taking a step back through the ages to look at some of the highlights of ski fashion through the years. Though the styles and the colours have changed wildly over the years, one thing has always remained the same: Check out the smiles in every decade!

THE ’60 S

COLLECTION

TOP RIGHT: In the ’60s, a warm spring day’s skiing required only a light shirt, Alpine Joe stretch pants, and perhaps some Nordic patterned socks. Before goggles, sunglasses protected skiers from the bright glare off the snow. RIGHT: Skiing Whistler Mountain in lace-up boots was fun for the whole family!

WHISTLER MOUNTAIN SKI CORPORATION COLLECTION

whistler fashion

ABOVE: Bright yellow, colourful suspenders and a coordinated kerchief stood out on Whistler Mountain in the 1970s while lift company president Franz Wilhelmsen chose a more muted approach. RIGHT: Rainbow gloves and coloured pants were easy to spot against the snow while sunglasses remained an essential accessory for blue-sky days.

WHISTLER MOUNTAIN SKI CORPORATION COLLECTION

WILHELMSEN

COLLECTION

WHISTLER MOU NTAIN SKI COR PORATION

THE ’70 S


GREG GRIFFITH COLLECTION

BLACKCOMB MOUNTAIN COLLECTION

BLACKCOMB MOU NTAIN COLLECTION

WHISTLER MOUNTAIN SKI CORPORATION COLLECTION

THE ’80 S

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Mirrored glasses helped this Whistler Mountain staff member relax in the sun with no worry of being caught with her eyes closed!

BLACKCOMB MOUNTAIN COLLEC TION

Bright colours remained popular and got even brighter throughout the 1980s. One piece suits and matching pants and jackets created a cohesive look, especially when paired with complementary equipment. White, whether as an accessory, a pole, or snow stuck in the buckles of a boot, was everywhere on Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains. A quick break on Blackcomb Mountain was not complete without a skier’s most important and fashionable accessory: a giant cookie. Earlier wooden skis and leather boots gave way to skis, boots, and poles of almost any colour imaginable as plastics became more and more popular, though helmets were nowhere to be seen. >>


ABOVE: Snowboarding had truly arrived in Whistler by the 1990s. Racing suits could express as much personality as the rider’s board, though most riders preferred baggier styles when not on a course. RIGHT: Geometric patterns could be found on everything from sleeves to headbands while visible snaps down the front of a jacket ensured the zipper was protected from snow, rain and wind. And polar fleece, of course, became ubiquitous!

GREG GRIFFITH COLLECTION

GREG GRIFFITH COLLECTION

THE ’90 S

ABOVE: The new millennium saw all kinds of fun patterns, in both jackets and pants. As the decade progressed, plaid became enormously popular, and helmets became a regular part of skiers’ and snowboarders’ gear. RIGHT: Colourful shells layered over down liners became de rigueur in the 2010s, and are still popular today for their practical, as well as aesthetic qualities. W

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LOGAN SWAYZE

PHO MIKECRANE

TOGRAPHY.CO

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THE 2000 S


THE MALLARD

PORTOBELLO

THE CHALET

THE WILDFLOWER

While Whistler’s year-round alpine playground caters to every desire for outdoor adventure, Fairmont Chateau Whistler’s unique selection of dining options are equally-inspiring. From contemporary and fine dining cuisine to gourmet meals on-the-go, here you will find only the finest ingredients and warm, Canadian hospitality. Savour a magical, winter fondue experience at The Chalet, or discover The Mallard’s legendary après—complete with fireside, handcrafted cocktails and live entertainment nightly. Delight in delicious breakfast bowls, made-to-order gourmet sandwiches, and our signature, smokehouse-inspired dinner menu at ‘the locals favourite’: Portobello. Experience the wild, local flavours of BC at The Wildflower, open for breakfast and evening dining. For more information on opening hours, menus, dining specials and more, please visit chateau-whistler.com/restaurants.

A UNIQUELY WHISTLER DINING EXPERIENCE

AT FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER

VISIT CHATEAU-WHISTLER.COM/RESTAURANTS FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 604 938 8000 OR BOOK ONLINE WITH OPENTABLE.COM WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

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casual dining

SAFE AND COZY

WHISTLER’S RESTAURANTS ARE GETTING CREATIVE AND NIMBLE IN CHALLENGING TIMES STORY BY GAIL J O HNS O N

E

V E N W H I S T L E R ’ S F I N E S T R E S TA U R A N T S O F F E R A more casual vibe; such is the nature of ski resort dining where guests are often keen to top off a day on the mountains with food that’s as great as the surrounding scenery.

This season local restaurateurs have pivoted to meet the

challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic and keep the lights on safely all while staying true to their long-established standards.

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>>


PLEXIGLAS DIVIDERS ALLOW GUESTS TO ENJOY A COCKTAIL AND A BITE TO EAT AT THE

DAVID BUZZARD

ARAXI LOUNGE/BAR.


BASALT IS KNOWN FOR ITS CLASSIC CHARCUTERIE DARBY MAGILL

BOARDS FEATURING B.C. PRODUCTS.

H “IN TRUE 2020 FASHION, WE ARE SEIZING THIS MOMENT TO BE CREATIVE AND TO TAKE CARE OF OUR STAFF AND GUESTS. HOSPITALITY AND SAFETY ARE OUR TOP PRIORITY.”

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E R E A R E T H R E E S TA N D O U T S K N O W N for top-notch dining that also offer more casual experiences, taking relaxed meals to seventhheaven heights. Despite these most trying of times, they continue to shine with a commitment to top-quality products and warm welcomes. Be sure to check websites for the latest COVID-19 updates.

concoct the cocktail using more basil and hot peppers as well as orange wedges, fresh lime juice, and Cointreau, served in a glass with a smoked-sea-salt rim. “In true 2020 fashion, we are seizing this moment to be creative and to take care of our staff and guests,” says Walt, author of Araxi: Roots to Shoots: Farm Fresh Recipes. “Hospitality and safety are our top priority.”

ARAXI RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR

BASALT WINE & SALUMERIA

As it approaches its 40th anniversary next year, Araxi remains a Whistler culinary cornerstone. Long before “farm-to-table” was a catchphrase, Executive Chef James Walt was cooking with local, seasonal, sustainable ingredients in the most tantalizing ways. Quick to meet the challenges of the pandemic, Araxi’s staff are wearing masks, the restaurant tables are spread out and new Plexiglas partitions between tables are unobtrusive. Besides, the focus is on what’s on the plate, not what’s keeping you in your bubble. Take Araxi’s classic cheese fondue: Emmenthal and Gruyere melted in a little pot with white wine, herbs, and garlic; to dunk into that gooey goodness are chunks of fresh bread, slices of Granny Smith apple, crunchy gherkins, and chewy cubes of sausage or ham. It is perhaps the perfect way to top off a day in the mountains. If the fondue warms you up, why not crank the heat with a Firecracker Margarita, a mainstay on Araxi’s cocktail menu. Araxi infuses Silver Tequila with jalapeno peppers (complete with seeds, which fuel the fire) and basil, then

Here’s a cozy place to watch the wintery world go by: Basalt’s heated, covered patio on the Village Stroll is especially magical with its glowing fire pit. Look for additional awnings this season so you can stay dry while giant snowflakes fall from above. “We really look forward to surprising our guests with our unobtrusive, yet knowledgeable and fun service style, along with the cocktails, wine, and food,” says Michael Guy, director of food and beverage operations. “We wish everyone who joins us to feel like they are at the home of friends. Guests can choose from a simple après experience with charcuterie, cheese, and a glass of wine or a full meal—anything is possible when it comes to patio time.” Perfect for sharing, beautiful charcuterie boards highlight B.C. products like Little Qualicum Cheeseworks’ Mt. Moriarty, Poplar Grove Cheese’s double cream camembert, and Farm House Natural Cheeses’ gouda alongside prosciutto di Parma, fennel salami, soppressata, and juicy Mediterranean olives. >>

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21


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NEW IN THE HILTON WHISTLER RESORT Overlooking Mountain Square, Whistler Village | 604-932-9900

www.indianmasalabistro.com

DAVID BUZZARD

Indian cuisine that uses a palette of flavours ~ you’ll feel as if you’re halfway around the world! Open 7 days a week for Lunch & Dinner

THE BEARFOOT BISTRO HAS HAD A RESIDENT PROFESSIONAL OYSTER SHUCKER ON STAFF FOR MORE THAN TWO DECADES.

“SINCE REOPENING EARLIER THIS YEAR, like all restaurants, it took some time to adjust,” Guy says. “But with a properly laid out safety plan and engaged team members, it seemed easier than it appeared. We put in the effort to improve even the smallest aspects of the business to give the freshness that our guests are looking for.” Call ahead if you can: “With additional COVID procedures in place, reservations truly allow us to best prepare for our guests at any time of day,” Guy says.

BEARFOOT BISTRO Bearfoot Bistro is as quintessential to Whistler as the skiing itself. Celebrating its 25th anniversary, the restaurant may be best known for sabering bottles of Champagne, the largest wine program in B.C., one of the largest cellars in western Canada, and the Ketel One Ice Room, the world’s chilliest vodka-tasting space. This season, the celebrated restaurant founded by André SaintJacques (who broke the Guinness World Record in 2005 for the most Champagne bottles sabered in a minute) and helmed by Executive Chef Melissa Craig is looking to extend its après-ski offerings and bar bites. Late lunch will be on the menu—meaning you can skip the grab-and-go on the mountain and ski straight to Village Green to replenish. The oysters at the Bearfoot, from Sawmill Bay Shellfish, are delivered from the ocean within 24 hours from being harvested. “They can’t really be any fresher,” says Executive Chef Melissa Craig. “It’s the perfect time of year for oysters with the cold water.” The Bearfoot also has a resident professional oyster shucker. W 50

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fine dining

COMFORT FOOD

FOR UNCOMFORTABLE TIMES WHISTLER RESTAURATEURS AND CHEFS PREPARE FOR THE COMING SEASON WITH CLASSIC DISHES

STORY BY B RANDO N B ARRE T T

I

N A YEAR IN WHICH OUR LIVES have been completely upended, it’s often the simple things that manage to bring the most comfort. All of a sudden, the smallest pleasures take on an even greater significance: a walk shared with a friend, a good book next to a roaring fire, and the many opportunities for quiet contemplation that have been one of the major silver linings of this globe-altering pandemic. But it is perhaps food and its many nostalgic powers that have been the most consistent source of solace through these strange, trying times— just look at the surge in home baking that left countless grocery stores out of flour at the dawn of the pandemic as proof. And even though this winter is bound to look different for Whistler’s tourism and restaurant sectors, you will find that the restaurateurs, chefs and servers that make this resort town tick have upped their game even more to satisfy the needs of their guests. With that in mind, Whistler Magazine caught up with three of our favourite local restaurants and asked them to highlight their most tried-andtrue comfort dishes as they look ahead >>to a winter season that will be unlike any other. >>

PASTURE CHICKEN FROM SPRAY SUNCHOKE BROWN BUTTER, GLAZED CARROTS, TURNIPS AND SPINACH, FROM THE WILDFLOWER AT FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER. WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2020/21

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BRAD FLOWERDEW

CREEK RANCH—SERVED WITH


THE WILDFLOWER RESTAURANT AT THE FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER

I

t’s a trend that was already well underway at The Wildflower before COVID-19, but it took a global pandemic for the team at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler’s award-winning mountainside restaurant to kick their emphasis on ethically grown, local ingredients into high gear. “[Executive sous chef] Derek [Bendig] made a commitment when we reopened the Wildflower this past June that everything on the menu was going to be from here,” explains Executive Chef Isabel Chung. “We’ve been really focused on the best of B.C.” In what is a rarity for a multi-national luxury hotel chain, the Fairmont has gone to great lengths to forge relationships with small-scale local suppliers that share Bendig’s passion for high-quality local products. That means sourcing grass-fed beef from the Hanceville Cattle Company in the Chilcotins, sustainably grown rainbow trout from the N’Quatqua First Nation in D’Arcy, and pasture chicken from the homesteading farmers at Spray Creek Ranch in Pemberton. It’s the pasture chicken from Spray Creek Ranch—served with sunchoke brown butter, glazed carrots, turnips and spinach—that Chung selects as a simple yet eminently comforting dish that she keeps coming back to in turbulent times. “Roast chicken is the most comforting thing across a widespread group of people,” Chung says. “Across cultures, this is a dish that plays for almost everybody.” Chung also credits Spray Creek Ranch for adopting a regenerative approach, processing everything they grow right on the farm; young ranchers Tristan and Aubyn Banwell even installed an abattoir on the property for other farmers to make use of. “Basically, everything that is hatched on that farm is processed on the farm. So the baby piglets are born there and the bacon is also smoked there. The eggs are laid there and the chickens are processed there as well,” says Chung. “We use their chicken at the Wildflower, and what I think is super exceptional about that is how rare it is to see hotel restaurants behaving like restaurants. We don’t want to serve commercial-grade chicken. We believe that they are ranching a much better product.” With COVID disrupting global food supply chains and exposing our over-reliance on imported goods, the importance of staying local has become even clearer to Chung. “We want to make sure our young farmers, our local suppliers, those that we’ve had partnerships with for years and years will also survive this uncomfortable time.”

ROYAL TASTE OF INDIA

B THE ROYAL TASTE CHICKEN, SERVED WITH PULAO RICE AND NAAN.

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COURTESY ROYAL TASTE OF INDIA

OF INDIA’S BUTTER

utter chicken is almost a cottage industry unto itself within the world of Indian cuisine. First created by happenstance in 1947 when the chefs at a Delhi restaurant mixed leftover chicken into a rich, tangy sauce of tomato, butter and cream, today you can’t walk into any selfrespecting Indian restaurant without it listed high on the menu. Nowadays, the dish has become more popular in North America, the U.K. and Australia (where it’s commonly eaten as a pie filling) than in its native India, where the majority of the population is vegetarian. According to Jinder Nijjar, the owner of Whistler’s Royal Taste of India, there is a simple reason for butter chicken’s appeal in the West that speaks to what makes comfort food so damn, well, comforting. “The first bite when you are eating butter chicken, many Westerners feel like they are eating something else. It reminds them of something they used to eat as kids, like maybe tomato Bolognese,” he explains. Like a lot of Indian curries, butter chicken is easily modified to a diner’s


BEEF BOURGUIGNON .

specific tastes, Nijjar says, another factor explaining its popularity, particularly with people who may be new to Indian food. “It’s made with other people’s taste in mind, with creamy tomato sauce, and our chefs, they modify it to how people like it,” Nijjar notes. “They use cream and tomato sauce, but they put in other Indian ingredients, like garam masala and other spices to make it more delicious depending on someone’s experience with Indian food.”

COURTESY RED DOOR BISTRO

THE RED DOOR BISTRO’S

A taste of

MEXICO In the heart of Whistler Village

Follow us on @themexicancorner At the Base of Whistler Mountain in the Sundial Hotel 604.962.4450 www.themexicancorner.ca

RED DOOR BISTRO

R

ed Door Bistro, Whistler’s revered French fusion kitchen, was always a hot ticket in town, with only 40 seats in its cozy environs. So if you thought landing a reservation was difficult before, “It’s even harder now!” exclaims Executive Chef RD Stewart. A local hidden gem tucked into an unassuming space in Creekside, Red Door Bistro’s relatively small space has presented numerous challenges with COVID capacity restrictions in place. But that doesn’t mean Stewart is ready to throw in the towel. Far from it. “My mindset is: I’m not giving up. I’m not going to fold,” he says. “We’ve worked hard enough to open this business and get our reputation to where it is, and getting all doomy and gloomy about it isn’t going to help. We’re going to do the best we can.” After being forced to close for several months and streamlining the menu to allow for quicker turnaround times, Stewart and his crew could use some culinary comfort, and he points to one dish in particular that he serves both at home and in the restaurant to do the trick: his modern take on a classic French staple, beef Bourguignon. “It’s my version of beef Bourguignon, but it’s not a true Bourguignon in away,” he explains. What separates Stewart’s dish from the French classic is, after marinating the angus beef in herbs and red wine for two days and braising it until it’s “fork-tender,” he cooks his fingerling potatoes, carrots and French green beans in a separate pot, giving the usually soft, hearty stew a distinct texture that adds a level of elegance to the plate. “There’s no refinement in just scooping it on the plate,” he says, of the traditional stew. “We’re trying to elevate it a little bit—like everything we do.” W

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OUR SOMMELIER PICKS THREE WINES TO ENJOY WITH A HEARTWARMING MEAL

The Nijjar family is pleased to introduce you to the Royal Taste of India. Our chefs provide the essence of traditional Indian Cuisine with a modern touch, preparing each dish to your specifications. Our sister company Kismet Estate Winery, located in Oliver BC, produces VQA quality red & white wine to pair with our exotic menu.

Fine Dining & Take Out WHISTLER MARKETPLACE

604-932-2010 Open ALL DAY from 11am to late

WWW.THEROYALTASTEOFINDIA.COM

french at heart

2129 Lake Placid Road www.reddoorbistro.ca

604.962.6262 56

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west coast soul

M

BONNY MAKAREWICZ

CLASSIC COMFORTS

PERFECT PAIRING BY SAMANTHA RAHN

ANY OF US HAVE FOUND COMFORT during these strange times with a glass of wine. Whether you venture out to one of our outstanding restaurants, order in, or make your favourite comfort foods at home, enjoying some fantastic wines can make the dining experience that much better. It’s no secret that I love Riesling. Though I often feel alone in this love affair, there is no denying just how delicious it is. It’s lower in alcohol than most other wines, and very versatile in pairing with food, including sushi and curry. Dr. L Riesling, from Germany’s Mosel region, is a true classic, very affordable, and consistently yummy. I keep a bottle in the fridge at all times. A classic comfort meal like roast Pemberton chicken at the Fairmont’s Wildflower Restaurant calls for a light to medium red wine all winter long. I love to pair with something “grenachey”—spicy and soft— like a wine from France’s southern Rhône Valley. Ogier Héritages Côtes du Rhône blends Grenache with Syrah to showcase juicy red fruits and hints of peppery spice to accompany any light meats, especially with loads of savoury herbs and roasted local vegetables. If you feel like treating yourself, sister winery Clos de L’Oratoire des Papes’ Chateauneuf du Pape is a worthy upgrade splurge. Canadians, especially in winter, have a love affair with Amarone. It may very well be THE classic comfort wine, with rich flavours from partial drying of grapes after harvest. This adds a little kick to the alcohol content, intensifies the ripe, raisiny notes in the wine, and accentuates the spice box character too. Tedeschi Amarone is a long-time favourite, vintage after vintage, from one of the “first families of Amarone.” It transports you to Verona, while you dream of visiting someday. I’m sure my friend, winemaker Riccardo Tedeschi is dreaming of visiting us in Whistler again soon, too. Cheers to the joys of everyday: snuggling up to the fire after a heartwarming meal with some great wine and company, dreaming of sunny powder days, and being together again soon. —Samantha Rahn is the Fine Wine Ambassador for Select Wines, 2013 VIWF Sommelier of the Year, and longtime Whistler/Pemberton local. W


STEAK NIGHT BY SNOWMOBILE SPROATT CABIN, CALLAGHAN VALLEY

604-938-1616 CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM CARLETON LODGE, MOUNTAIN SQUARE

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shopping whistler

TRINKETS & TREASURES There is no better time to take pleasure in things that make us feel better about ourselves. Have you had your eye on some jewellery? Do you need a new winter jacket to stay warm and cozy? Whistler is full of great shopping spots throughout the Village, Creekside and Function Junction. Find a little Whistler treasure to take home with you this season.

SIMPLE TOTE SUEDE GRETA STRIPES BAG Clare Vivier adds her signature minimal aesthetic to the camel suede simple tote with black and white stripes which makes everyday sophistication effortless. Available at Bach & Co for $799.

STERLING SILVER RINGS Squamish’s Treeline Collective collaborates and design products that encourage a deeper connection. They work with a large network of individuals to make and curate quality products from around the world. These sterling silver rings are available in sizes 6-10 at Ruby Tuesday Accessories, from $59.95-$64.95.

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14K CANADIAN DIAMOND SNOWFLAKE PENDANT Round and princess cut natural Canadian Maple Leaf diamonds and marquise-cut blue topaz set in Canadian gold, designed in Canada by Shelley Purdy. All Maple Leaf Diamonds are laser inscribed with a tracking number and come with a certificate of origin. Available from Keir Fine Jewellery for $4,850.


SONGS FROM OUR NATIONS CD Songs From Our Nations Volume 3 is a compilation of 12 traditional hand drum songs recorded by the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre Ambassadors. Building on the success of Songs From Our Nations Volume 1 and 2, this project fosters Skwxwu7mesh Snichim (Squamish language) and Ucwalmicwts (Lil’wat Language) reclamation efforts, connecting nation members to language and culture and promoting healing through the celebration of song, drumming and language use.  Available at the Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre for $15.

Shopping Areas Nesters

UPPER VILLAGE

Village North

WHISTLER VILLAGE

WHISTLER CREEKSIDE

FUNCTION JUNCTION

To Va n

cou

ver

HOLEBROOK SWEDEN MARTINA KNITTED WINDPROOF SWEATER This bestselling classic is knitted in a wool blend with a stretch windproof lining. Featuring a funnel collar with a short zip, casing in the hem and ribbed cuffs with thumbholes, it’s sure to keep you warm. Available at Open Country for $275.

Whistler Village is the hub of

activity at the base of the mountains. A pedestrian-only paradise, it offers over 200 stores, galleries, restaurants and bars.

Village North is centred around

Whistler Marketplace, which offers a supermarket, liquor store and many fine shops and amenities.

SPYDER GIRLS' ATLAS SYNTHETIC DOWN JACKET Combining synthetic down insulation with a recycled Repreve® polyester outer, the Atlas is optimized to keep girls warm and dry when mountain weather moves in and temperatures drop. A removeable hood with detachable faux fur and hologram vislon® zippers are the Spyder extras that will pop on the podium. Available from Mountain Kids Outfitters for $239.

Upper Village, situated at the

base of Blackcomb Mountain, is another walking-only area with many wonderful stores, restaurants and galleries.

Nesters is just two minutes north of Whistler Village and offers a variety of shops and restaurants, with a liquor store, grocery store and restaurants.

Rainbow Plaza, a five-minute

drive north of the Village, has a grocery store, liquor store, coffee shop, gas station and more.

Whistler Creekside, a

five-minute drive south of the Village, is a shopping area near the base of Whistler Mountain.

Function Junction is just 10 >>

minutes south of Whistler Village and offers hardware, organic groceries, breweries, bakeries and many more shops and services.


shopping whistler MUZEN BLUETOOTH SPEAKER ORIGINAL II The Muzen Original series is made for a generation inundated by an endless fast-paced life, but dreaming of slower and simpler times. The design is reminiscent of the Americana period dating back to the 1950s and 1960s. This bluetooth speaker and FM/AM radio is handcarved and tailor-made with real walnut wood to accentuate timbre and warmth. Available from Get the Goods for $850.

CAMP CERAMIC MUG A staple on the shelves at Camp—these are the perfect mugs for your morning coffee! Camp mugs are made with high quality ceramic in California. The mugs' off-white matte glaze and chunky handle inspire comfort and ergonomic use. Available from Camp Lifestyle & Coffee for $30.

MEN’S WATERPROOF BOOT BY BULLE Bulle designs winter boots made in Canada and Portugal. These mens’ boots have hand-finished vegetable-tanned leathers and suedes, polar wool lining and a BulleTEX waterproof membrane. Available in cognac (shown) or grey. Available at Soles Nail Lounge & Footwear for $230.

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PEAK PERFORMANCE HELIUM HYBRID JACKET Lightweight and packable, this hybrid down liner combines warm down padding on front and back with stretchy jersey panel sides and sleeves for the perfect combination of core warmth and comfortable layering. Wear it alone for dry conditions or layer under a shell for extra warmth. Made using responsibly sourced down that is traceable through the Track My Down® program. Available at Peak Performance for $270. >>


Creekside

Treat Yourself !

in Creekside Village

IN CREEKSIDE

MEN, WOMEN & LIFESTYLE

221-2063 Lake Placid Road, Whistler, BC

Artisan Pizza

Best

Breakfast Sandwich

GreenLake Station.com STOP at Whistler Chevron, Café & Store 8110 Crazy Canuck Drive Hippest little gas station yo u ever did see

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EAST VAN BEES BEESWAX FOOD WRAPS Still using plastic wrap to wrap food for the fridge? This is the alternative—zero waste, reusable, antibacterial, compostable and plastic free, made in Canada by real beekeepers! Handmade from 100 per cent cotton muslin fabric and pure Canadian beeswax, tree resin, propolis and organic jojoba oil, the wax and the resin create a breathable fabric that molds to the shape and sticks to itself. These wraps will last six to 12 months with regular use and then can be tossed in your compost to return from whence they came. They can be used in the freezer too. Various packages and sizes are available at Portobello in Fairmont Chateau Whistler.

1066 Millar Creek Road, Whistler BC camplifestyle.ca

EMILY CARR LE PAYSAGE FACE COVERING This non-medical face mask is available in three sizes, with an internal sleeve pouch for a filter and stretchy ear loops. It‘s made in Canada, of 100 per cent polyester and is machine washable. The image is Le Paysage, 1911, oil on board by Emily Carr (1817-1945). Available at the Audain Art Museum for $20.

>>

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accessories ltd.

Proudly supporting local designers FRESH PRODUCE FRESH BAKERY ORGANIC FOOD DELICIOUS SEAFOOD

TREELINE COLLECTIVE

SPECIALTY MEATS BULK FOODS DELIVERY SERVICE Located in the Town Plaza next to the Beach

604.905.6290

FRIENDLY PHARMACIST NUTRITIONAL ADVISORS

FROM:

Catherine Power-Chartrand

HEALTH FOODS

GENERAL MANAGER

IMPORTANT PROOF!

PLEASE RESPOND WITHIN 24 HOURS.

ADVERTISING PROOF FOR

WHISTLER MAGAZINE

2019

WINTER/SPRING 2020/21 ISSUE.

Please check this proof very carefully and indicate any corrections to be made. RESPOND BY EMAIL TO cpower@whistlermagazine.com

Where the Locals Shop!

OK to print as per this proof. NEW PROOF needed with changes/corrections as indicated Cell: 604-932-1672

OPEN EVERY DAY

8am-9am Only for Seniors/People at Risk 9am-10pm for Everyone | 8am –6pm Pharmacy Located 1km north of Whistler Village at 7019 Nesters Rd. Phone: 604-932-3545 Pharmacy: 604-905-0429

Located at the base of the Whistler Village Gondola 604.932.4100 O P E N

L A T E

Save time by shopping online:

www.nestersmarket.com

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A Charming & Unique Selection of Gifts & Kitchenware Dinnerware • Linens • Gadgets Candles • Glassware Practical Kitchen Accessories & More

en& VisWitoorrsks stvoleriter ofKitLoch Whi cals A Fa Since 1994

lace 604-938-1110 ated in Whistler’s Marketp

Loc

IN T H E SO U L O F T H E V I L L A G E , O P P O SIT E TAP L E Y’ S . 12-4122 Village Green 604 905 0036 solesofwhistler.com

TRUDEAU MANUAL FOOD PROCESSOR Eating fresh food every day is now easier than ever with the Trudeau Manual Food Processor—a handy tool that delivers maximum results with minimal effort. The sharp blades make prepping your salsas, guacamole or fruit salads a breeze. A built-in funnel lets you add ingredients easily while preparing your recipes, and there's a paddle whisk for dips, mayonnaise and whipped cream. Plus, the anti-slip base and blade protector ensure safe use. With its large seven-litre container, you can feed the whole family! In addition, all the pieces fit inside the container for compact storage. Once finished, just put everything in the dishwasher. Now that’s convenience! Available at Whistler Kitchen Works for $35.95.

HUGGING TREE MOONCHILD MERLOT From the Similkameen Valley, the Hugging Tree boutique winery brings you the exquisite 2016 Moonchild Merlot. Former Whistler locals and retired pro snowboarders, brothers Brad and Wes Makepeace now continue their family business of winemaking in the South Okanagan. There is a lot of dark stone fruits on the palate of this merlot. With minimal oak, the brightness of the fruit shines through. This is the ultimate curl-up-with-a-blanket-anda-good-book glass of wine— a B.C. favourite with local roots. Available at Blackcomb Liquor Store for $31.

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services Directory

To advertise in Whistler Magazine, call Catherine Power-Chartrand at 604-932-1672

PROVEN RESULTS –

Rentals Skills Tours

cross country connection

I’m with you every step of the way Specializing in Residential and Investment property in Whistler

Carolyn Hill, ASSOCIATE BROKER PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

Delivering the Dream – Whistler cel: 604-907-0770

email: chill@whistlerbuyer.com www.whistlerbuyer.com Voted Whistler’s Best Realtor

whistler • 604.905.0071 • crosscountryconnection.ca

Everything you need for your Health, Beauty and Convenience, right in the heart of Whistler Village Prestigious Beauty Boutique Full Service Pharmacy offering Travel Vaccinations & Medication Reviews Prescription Deliveries and much more Whistler Village (near The Keg & Movie Theatre)

604-905-5666 www.shoppersdrugmart.ca

Whistler’s In Resort Specialists

nection Advertisement

Vacation RentalFiles Services forformat, Homeowners in PDF greyscale or CMYK

VACATION RENTAL SERVICES

Private Whistler and Vancouver Transfers and Tours

SEASONAL HOME SERVICES

d-5 confirmation: • Check-in • Monthly 604.905.0071 Inspections • Housekeeping & Maintenance • Housekeeping g Services Directory • Owner Direct Website Admin • Maintenance (3.8W x 2.1H) • In-Resort Contact and Guest Service technical concerns: • Owner Concierge Brian Hydesmith design@hydesmith.com or call 204.487.0067 @luxurytransport LOCAL KNOWLEDGE  EXPERT ASSISTANCE  RELIABLE RELATIONSHIPS

www.whistlerreception.com | info@whistlerreception.com

604-966-0999

www.luxbus.com 604.522.8484

Whistler Museum AVIS RENT A CAR - WHISTLER Wide variety of mid and full size cars for exploring Whistler and area! MINI VANS, 4x4s, 10-Passenger Vans, CARGO & 16' CUBE VANS ONE WAY RENTALS AVAILABLE TO VANCOUVER OR FROM YVR AND DOWNTOWN VANCOUVER TO WHISTLER

Cascade Lodge Lobby | 604.932.1236 sheri.warm@abglocalmarket.ca | Avis.com

come experience Whistler’s unique history! Open year-round 4333 Main Street, 604 932 2019

www.whistlermuseum.org whistlermuseum

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Whistler Village & Upper Village Map A

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ADVENTURES POWERED BY

Best experience ever! Booked this last minute and couldn’t be happier, such an amazing experience and well priced. Flying high above the Whistler/ Blackcomb mountain peaks and landing on rainbow glacier was absolutely amazing. The whole experience was so easy with a free shuttle service from whistler village. - Amie Q, Peterborough, United Kingdom

Carbon Neutral tourism flights since 2017

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Profile for Whistler Publishing

Whistler Magazine Winter 2021  

Whistler's premier publication since 1980. 40th Anniversary Edition.

Whistler Magazine Winter 2021  

Whistler's premier publication since 1980. 40th Anniversary Edition.