Page 1

APRIL 18, 2019 ISSUE 26.16

WWW.PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM

FREE SPEED DEMONS

WHISTLER MOUNTAIN SKI CLUB

MARKS 50 YEARS

Club has played essential role in developing ski-racing over half a century

16

HOUSING

Big changes

proposed for WHA

17

BACKCOUNTRY DEATH

Community

mourns the death of pro skier

84

BUSKIN’ OUT

Long-time local Jeremy

Thom takes music abroad


HAPPY EASTER LEADING REAL ESTATE EXPERTS SINCE 1978

1569 TYNEBRIDGE LANE SPRING CREEK

Beautifully constructed Whistler home breathtaking mountain views and sunshine.

Bedrooms:

4.5

Bathrooms:

4.5

HANNAH GARCIA* hannah@wrec.com 604-966-8941

with

Square Feet:

3,000

$3,100,000

#412C LEGENDS

#21 THE GLADES

This ski-in/ski-out quarter-ownership condo with vaulted ceilings is truly a unique Legends listing.

This spacious, freshly painted home on 3 levels is an ideal weekend retreat or family home.

Bedrooms:

Bedrooms:

2036 LONDON LN. WHISTLER CREEK

1

Bathrooms:

Square Feet:

589

1

JANE HEIM

jane@wrec.com 604-935-0802

$125,000

1530 TYNEBRIDGE LN. SPRING CREEK Bathrooms:

3.5

2.5

JEFF HUME* jeff@wrec.com 604-966-4058

Square Feet:

1,692

$1,399,900

#322 MARQUISEE

#245 GLACIER LODGE

#307 GRANITE COURT

Located just 150 meters from the ski-slope, this spacious condo is fully furnished and renovated.

This spacious one level suite has been completely updated and quipped with modern finishes.

Centrally located, and steps from the amenities of Whistler’s vibrant village.

Bedrooms:

Bedrooms:

4809 SPEARHEAD DR. BENCHLANDS

1

Bathrooms:

JIMMY SIMPSON jimmy@wrec.com 604-902-4002

1

Square Feet:

619

$739,000

4573 CHATEAU BLVD. BENCHLANDS

4

JON

Bathrooms:

CHAUDHARI*

jc@wrec.com 604-902-7875

3

Square Feet:

1,700

$2,999,000

4405 BLACKCOMB WAY, VILLAGE Bedrooms:

Bathrooms:

2

JOHN

2

RYAN*

johnr@wrec.com 604-932-7670

Square Feet:

1,079

$1,325,000 604 932 5538

WHISTLERREALESTATE.CA *Personal Real Estate Corporation


LANA BURTON KRIS ANDREASEN SONJA LYTTEK

ELIZABETH CARUSO ORTRUU SEGER

EGG HUNT Saturday April 20th, 9:30am - 12pm Myrtle Phillp School

DONATE YOUR POINTS TO YOUR LOCAL FOOD BANK

(Bring your Easter Baskets)

LAIKI

EARTH’S CHOICE

Gluten-free, Non-GMO, Assorted Flavours 100g

Assorted Varieties, 400ml

Rice Crackers

Organic Coconut Milk

2 $6

2 $6

FOR

Pharmacy & Wellness PRESCRIPTIONS WHILE YOU SHOP

2018

9am to 7pm. 7 days a week.

LOOK IN-STORE FOR EVERYDAY VALUE CARD SAVINGS!

FOR

Ester-C® Supreme • Enhanced with quercetin, a bioflavonoid and powerful antioxidant with anti-inflammatory and anti-histamine properties • Arabinogalactan is a type of polysaccharide that offers additional immune support during stressful times and the cold and flu season • Ester-C® has a clinically proven higher bioavailability and retention rate than other forms of vitamin C

604.932.3545 604.905.0429

Nesters Market Pharmacy

nestersmarket.com

7019 Nesters Road (Just 1 km north of Whistler Village)

Prices Effective At Whistler Nesters From: Thursday, April 18th to Wednesday, April 24th, 2019. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Sale limited to stock on hand. Some items subject to Tax, plus deposit, recycling fee where applicable.


THIS WEEK IN PIQUE

58

84

48 WMSC marks 50 years The club has played an essential role in developing ski-racing over half a century. - By Dan Falloon

16

WHA CHANGES

The Whistler Housing Authority

58

BACK ON TOP

Canada claims Whistler Cup for the

looks to refine its eligibility and enforcement guidelines, reflecting the

first time since 2013 while local skier Felix Shorter claims the U14 Dave

evolving housing needs of the community.

Murray Award.

40

78

DIGGING IT

The Village of Pemberton council

WRAPPING UP WSSF

A look back

instructed staff to look for funds for an archeological survey at its

on the big winners at the arts events at this year’s World Ski and

recent council meeting.

Snowboard Festival.

42

MEC UNIONIZES

The Broadway location of

84

MUSICAL ADVENTURE

Long-time

Mountain Equipment Co-op recently decided to join a union. The Whistler

Whistler musician Jeremy Thom shares his tales from busking all

connection: that union has also been trying to mobilize Whistler workers.

over New Zealand.

COVER After 40 years of skiing, I finally did my first race this weekend! It is so exciting to be a tiny little part of Whistler’s rich racing history! - By Jon Parris with photos courtesy of the Whistler Mountain Ski Club 4 APRIL 18, 2019


FFURTEUREE

LER help WHIST

achieve a

AG PLASTIC B

Freshness Selection Location 4

SAN PELLEGRINO

$ 99

Mineral Water

each

MEAT Certified Angus Beef Rib Steak

$33.05kg

Fresh Pork Sirloin Chops Boneless Family Pack $6.59/kg Fresh Boneless Skinless Chicken Drumsticks

6x330ml

$15.41kg

14.99/lb $ .99/lb 2 $ 99/lb 6 $

DELI

5

LESLIE STOWE

Raincoast $ Crackers

1 2 $ 49/100g 1

Cajun Chicken Breast

$ 99/100g

Seasoned Roast Beef

$ 49/100g

Potato Salad With Egg

99

BAKERY

each

Sourdough Rolls Baked Fresh in Store

6-pack, 360g

Rustic Green Olive Loaf Baked Fresh in Store

100g-150g

2 $ 99 each 4 $ 49 each

PRODUCE Green Grapes

HIPPIE SNACKS

3

each

Romaine Lettuce

SAPUTO

2

California

Shredded Cheese Parm/Remano Blend, Parmesan

Juice & Smoothies

TERRA BREADS Fresh

LAY’S

1kg

Bars Assorted Varieties

130g-230g

Potato Chips

RESTAURANTE Tortilla

each

CASCADES

170g

1.65l-1.75l

Granola

NATURE VALLEY Granola

$ 99

Select Frozen Vegetables

$2.18/kg

2 .99¢/lb $ 29 each 1 $ 99/lb

GROCERY OASIS

70g

GREEN GIANT

$6.59/kg

Bosc Pears USA

Avocado & $ 99 Cauliflower Chips

Chile

240g-255g

Chips

230g-310g

Bathroom Tissue

12 pack

CASA DI MAMA Frozen Pizza Deluxe, Hawaiian, Pepperoni, 3 Meat

395g-410g

3 2 $ 1099 each $ 2 FOR 6 $ 50 2 FOR 6 $ 49 each 3 $ 99 each 4 $ 99 each 4 $ 99 each

$ 99 each

Asian, Baby, California, Italian, Japanese 500g

Your Neighbourhood Food Store

WE ARE NOW HIRING for ALL POSITIONS

Available to start immediately. Apply in person.

*not valid when purchasing gift cards. *excluding tobacco products. EXPIRES April 18, 2019. Not valid with any other coupons. One coupon per customer, per day. Valid only at MarketPlace IGA Whistler at time of purchase only.

*not valid when purchasing gift cards. *excluding tobacco products. EXPIRES April 18, 2019. Not valid with any other coupons. One coupon per customer, per day. Valid only at MarketPlace IGA Whistler at time of purchase only.

All Prices Effective THURS. APRIL 18 - 24, 2019

We reserve the right to limit quantities.

Full-service deli, In-store bakery & Floral Department Not valid if combined with PLU 91911

91910

604-938-2850

www.marketplaceiga.com

Not valid if combined with PLU 91910

91911


THIS WEEK IN PIQUE

Opinion & Columns #103 -1390 ALPHA LAKE RD., FUNCTION JUNCTION, WHISTLER, B.C. V8E 0H9. PH: (604) 938-0202 FAX: (604) 938-0201 www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Founding Publishers KATHY & BOB BARNETT Publisher SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com Editor CLARE OGILVIE - edit@piquenewsmagazine.com Assistant Editor ALYSSA NOEL - arts@piquenewsmagazine.com Sales Manager SUSAN HUTCHINSON - shutchinson@wplpmedia.com Production Manager KARL PARTINGTON - kpartington@wplpmedia.com Art Director JON PARRIS - jparris@wplpmedia.com

08 OPENING REMARKS Spring is well underway and with the new season comes conversations about how best to manage the backcountry.

10 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Whistlerites are grateful for the generosity of the community in letters this week. From Balding for Dollars to supporting Whistler Adaptive Sports Program, locals have stepped up.

13 PIQUE’N YER INTEREST It’s easy to get sucked into the Whistler bubble—where pow days and party nights prevail. But what happens when the world’s woes start to seep in?

122

Advertising Representatives AMY ALLEN - aallen@wplpmedia.com TESSA SWEENEY - tsweeney@wplpmedia.com ANTHONY JOYCE - ajoyce@wplpmedia.com

MAXED OUT From goggle tans to quiet slopes, there are at least 10 reasons why you shouldn’t

pack away your ski gear just yet.

Sales Coordinator EMMA WILKINS - traffic@wplpmedia.com Digital Sales Manager FIONA YU - fiona@glaciermedia.ca

Environment & Adventure

Production production@piquenewsmagazine.com CLAIRE RYAN - cryan@wplpmedia.com LOU O’BRIEN - lstevens@wplpmedia.com WHITNEY SOBOOL - wsobool@wplpmedia.com

46 ECOLOGIC A group of new Canadians recently took part in a roundtable discussion ahead of their official

Arts & Entertainment Editor ALYSSA NOEL arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

47 THE OUTSIDER Mountains are mountains, but it turns out skiers in the East Alps do things a little

citizenship ceremony. Amongst the heartfelt stories and reflections, they tapped into the pull of the Great White North.

Sports Editor DAN FALLOON - sports@piquenewsmagazine.com Features Editor BRANDON BARRETT - bbarrett@piquenewsmagazine.com Reporters BRADEN DUPUIS - bdupuis@piquenewsmagazine.com BRANDON BARRETT - bbarrett@piquenewsmagazine.com JOEL BARDE - jbarde@piquenewsmagazine.com MEGAN LALONDE - mlalonde@wplpmedia.com

differently than we do in Whistler. In part one of his reflections on a recent trip, columnist Vince Shuley offers the highlights.

56 TRAVEL Karin Leperi headed to India in search of the elusive Bengal tiger. She reflects on what it felt like to finally spot the majestic animal.

Classifieds and Reception mail@piquenewsmagazine.com Circulation and Accounts LAURA PRIOR - lprior@wplpmedia.com Office and Accounts Manager HEIDI RODE - hrode@wplpmedia.com I.T. and Webmaster KARL PARTINGTON Contributors G.D. MAXWELL, GLENDA BARTOSH, MICHAEL ALLEN, FEET BANKS, LESLIE ANTHONY, ALLEN BEST, ALISON TAYLOR, VINCE SHULEY, LISA RICHARDSON President, Whistler Publishing LP SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of Whistler Publishing Limited Partnership, a division of Glacier Media) distributed to over 130 locations in Whistler and to over 200 locations from Vancouver to D’arcy. The entire contents of Pique Newsmagazine are copyright 2019 by Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of WPLP, a division of Glacier Media). No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the express written permission of the Publisher. In no event shall unsolicited material subject this publication to any claim or fees. Copyright in letters and other (unsolicited) materials submitted and accepted for publication remains with the author but the publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic or other forms. Letters to the Editor must contain the author’s name, address and daytime telephone number. Maximum length is 250 words. We reserve the right to edit, condense or reject any contribution. Letters reflect the opinion of the writer and not that of Pique Newsmagazine. Pique Newsmagazine is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please contact (edit@ piquenewsmagazine.com). If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the web site at mediacouncil. ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163 for additional information. This organization replaces the BC Press council (and any mention of it).

ISSN #1206-2022 Subscriptions: $76.70/yr. within Canada, $136.60/yr. courier within Canada. $605.80/ yr. courier to USA. GST included. GST Reg. #R139517908. Canadian Publications Mail Product Sales Agreement #40016549.

Lifestyle & Arts

74 VELOCITY PROJECT Columnist Lisa Richardson’s love of trees takes root as she delves deeper into their complex networks.

76 EPICURIOUS Whistler’s food-truck program is set to return with seven vendors ready to help parkgoers combat hunger this summer.

80 NOTES FROM THE BACK ROW From Avengers: Endgame to Beyoncé’s Homecoming, this week’s movie offerings have something for everyone.

82 MUSEUM MUSINGS It’s no secret that the rules in Whistler were a little looser back in the ‘70s. Read the story behind an unsanctioned ski jump on Lost Lake—and learn about the effort to collect more lakeside tales.

86 PIQUECAL Don’t miss the annual Whistler Community Easter Egg Hunt on Saturday at Myrtle Philip Community School. Then load up your basket on Sunday at Creekside’s Gingerbread House Easter Egg Hunt.

Two 8,712 sq. ft. fully serviced contiguous lots w. zoning potential to C-1 Commercial Residential

INGHAM R E A L

10 deals to date in 2019. how can I help you?

E S T A T E NEW Lower Londsdale The Atrium NEW 2 Lots 1 bd/2bth 167 E. Esplanade $749.9k Pemberton Industrial Park

Remodeled Summer Cottage LAND 156 Acres Birkenhead 2 bd/1 bth Thormanby Isl. $850k 969 Blackwater, Pemb. $1.2M

NEW

CONNECTING VANCOUVER, SEA-TO-SKY & PEMBERTON BUYERS & SELLERS

) 604 ) 230-8167

frank@frankingham.com

NEW 10 Acres with Ocean Views Thormanby Isl. Cottage $899.5k

COPPERDOME Pemb. Meadows

Parking Lot FOR LEASE 9,000 sq. ft. 1360 Aster St Pemb.

PEMBERTON B&B ZONED

NEW

W. Van. Beachside Condo 14th & Bellevue...A+ Views $2.195M

VIEW

CUSTOM HOME with Lake Views

LAND Legacy Ranch in Pemb. 387 acres, river frontage $2.65M

Lot 177 Lillooet Lake Estates $495k

F R A N K I N G H A M . C O M 6 APRIL 18, 2019

Outdoor Lodge 19 bdrms $1.995M 1357 Elmwood 9 bd/7 bth $2.599M Ridge Homesite Pemb. .65 acres 7508 Pebble Cr. $449k


EN OP

LY DAI

LOCAL OWNE LY DA OPERA ND TED

T0 M A 7 PM 10

OUR WEEKLY SPECIALS APRIL 18-24, 2019

604.938.9301

Feeding the Spirit of Whistler Since 1988 BC GROWN

LONG ENGLISH CUCUMBER

2 FOR $3

PEMBERTON GROW

SWEET NANTE CARROTS

99¢/LB

BC GROWN

YUKON GOLD POTATOES

3.99

5LB BAG

BC GROWN

ORGANIC AMBROSIA APPLES

4.99

3LB BAG

ROSSDOWN FARMS

SPLIT CHICKEN WINGS

4.99/LB

11.00/KG

CREEKSIDE'S OWN

SEAFOOD CAKES

2 FOR $6

455ML

CREEKSIDE'S OWN

HAWAIIAN AHI TUNA POKE

3.99

/100G

OCEAN MAMA

SHRIMP GYOZA

7.99

454G

BE HAVEN

TRIPLE CREAM BRIE

9.99

300G

FREYBE'S

LANDJAGER SAUSAGE

2.99

100G

HOT CROSS BUNS

9.99

6 PACK

APPLE VALLEY

APPLE PIE

8.99

1.1KG

NEW WORLD

ORGANIC SESAME TAHINI

7.99

500G

TINKYADA

BROWN RICE PASTA

3.99

454G

EMMA

PASSATA

2 FOR $4

HEINZ

PICNIC PACKS

5.99

3X 375ML

MRS. DASH

SEASONINGS

3.99

70G

PUREX

ULTRA BATHROOM TISSUE

6.99

12 ROLLS

BULLSEYE

BBQ SAUCES

2.99

425ML

PEANUT BUTTERS

6.99

750G

BC GROWN

JUMBO WHITE MUSHROOMS

2

$

.99/LB

6.59/KG

CREEKSIDE'S OWN

BBQ BEEF SLIDERS

Made Fresh Instore Daily from Certified Angus AAA Canadian Beef

1

$ .69

/100G

SUMMER FRESH

MEALS TO GO Bean Salad, Greek Salad or 7 Grain Salad with Hummus & Crackers

4.99

$

264G

COMPLIMENTS

FROZEN CHEESE STICKS Cheddar Bacon, Mozza or Mozza Jalapeno

4.99

$

325G

SUNFLOWER CAFÉ'S

Free Run- Antibiotic & Hormone Free

Crab or Lobster - Made Fresh Instore Daily

Made Fresh Instore Daily

Hand Made

Soft Ripened Cheese

Great Grab and Go Snack

A Holiday Treat!

The Easter Bunnies Favourite!

Raw or Roasted

Spaghetti, Lasagna, Penne, Elbows or Fusilli

Original or Basil

Ketchup, Mustard and Relish

Original, Garlic & Herb, Table Blend, Extra Spicy or Lemon Pepper

LIBERTE'S

GREEK YOGURT

2.18/KG

680ML

8 varieties to choses from

3

$

.49

4X 100G ISLAND NUT ROASTERY

Bold Original, Chicken & Rib, Guiness or Hickory

Smooth or Crunchy

COLOURING CONTEST Colour in & drop off at Creekside Market by Tuesday, April 23, 2019 for your chance to WIN!

NAME: AGE: PHONE: ALL KIDS WHO DROP OFF THEIR ENTRY GET A STAR WARS LIMITED EDITION KINDER SURPRISE


OPENING REMARKS

Still grappling with growth in the backcountry AH, SPRING. The days are longer, the air is warmer, and our thoughts are quickly turning from ski boots to hiking boots. But there’s another harbinger of the seasonal shift that seems to be just about everywhere at the moment: discussions on how to manage humans in the backcountry. While backcountry skiing, snowboarding and snowmobiling are certainly popular in the Sea to Sky during the winter months,

BY ALYSSA NOEL

arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

adventures in the mountains skyrocket when summer hits. The most famous example—which comes up so often most locals are tired of the topic—is Joffre Lakes Provincial Park. Once a treasured local gem, the park saw 170,000 visitors last year, even after the

The reason Joffre is so popular is that visitors park their car at a paved parking lot then hike up a well-marked, non-technical trail with quick access to stunning alpine lakes. The average person will not dig up a guidebook and risk a flat tire driving up a bumpy forest service road out of cell-phone service. Furthermore, funding is badly needed for our provincial parks. It’s enraging to think that the provincial government has advertised images of our wilderness to various tourism markets (don’t just blame Instagram users) and then, when their efforts were (a little too) successful, they still failed to provide proper funding to ensure those places remain intact. But Joffre is just one example of a backcountry location that’s become a victim of its own beauty. The Sproatt Alpine Trail Network—containing trails such as Lord of the Squirrels and Into the Mystic— saw an instant explosion the moment it was constructed. Between Aug. 4 and Oct. 12, 2017, for example, it hosted 6,200 visits. Last year, Claire Ruddy, executive

(I)t’s important to strike a balance between allowing access to everyone who wants to enjoy the wilderness in a responsible manner and protecting that wilderness to ensure it flourishes well into the future. province put a dog ban into place, arguing it would curb visits. Now, BC Parks is looking at instituting a day-use fee to potentially help pay for our underfunded park system and to cut down on visitors. As long as the fee remains reasonable—ensuring the park is accessible to people—it’s a great idea. Some park advocates argue that a fee will push hikers further into the backcountry to places without facilities, but that’s unlikely.

director of the Association of Whistler Area Residents for the Environment (AWARE), raised concerns about the lack of investment from the municipality in educating trail users on how to tread lightly on the sensitive alpine environment that the trail reaches. Furthermore, AWARE had a long fight to be able to join the Trails Planning Working Group, a municipal committee, as a full voting member.

In the past, it might have been hard to predict how popular new backcountry amenities would be, but it’s safe to assume now that the answer will be “very.” It’s important that we consider the impact backcountry users—and the trails themselves—have on the environment and wildlife. Even self-propelled activities fracture habitat, disturb animals and introduce human waste and trash. The vast majority of people who enjoy recreating deep in the mountains also care about the environment around them—and, sometimes, just taking in those surroundings can inspire new people to care more about the environment. To that end, it’s important to strike a balance between allowing access to everyone who wants to enjoy the wilderness in a responsible manner and protecting that wilderness to ensure it flourishes well into the future. Last Wednesday, a Quest Lecture Series tackled the topic of “Wildlife and Outdoor Recreation,” looking at human-wildlife conflicts and the impact of outdoor recreation on wildlife in the Sea to Sky corridor. Anticipating the interest, organizers moved the lecture from its typical location at the library to the Maury Young Arts Centre to accommodate more people. Using information gathered from other communities as well as remote-camera sampling, Dr. Kim Dawes shared her insight into how we can strike a better balance. It’s worth being cautiously optimistic that a better, less chaotic future is ahead for our relationship with the backcountry. While visitor numbers have been on the uptick for some time, this busy-ness is still a relatively new phenomenon that we’re grappling with. As residents and backcountry users, the best we can do is speak up, tread lightly, and remain open to change. n

1 BEDROOM WHISTLER VILLAGE TOWNHOUSE

7-1350 Cloudburst Drive $1,899,000

44-4388 Northlands Blvd Upgraded 1 bedroom townhome in the popular Glaciers Reach complex in Whistler Village. Walk to ski lifts, restaurants and shops. This two level home features open concept kitchen and living room area, gas fireplace and 2 private decks to relax on after a day on the slopes. The complex features pool, hot tub, exercise room and underground parking. Unlimited owner use permitted with nightly rental option.

A contemporary mountain home in Cheakamus Crossing. In-floor radiant heating throughout, gas range & fireplace, private hot tub and double car garage. Stunning views and unparalleled access to all of Whistler’s outdoor recreational activities. Under construction, completion 2019.

ASKING PRICE $749,000

Dave Brown

Personal Real Estate Corporation

davebrown@wrec.com www.davesellswhistler.com Cell: 604 905 8438 / Toll Free: 1 800 667 2993 ext. 805

8 APRIL 18, 2019

Steve Shuster

t: 604.698.7347 | e: steve@steveshusterrealestate.com www.steveshusterrealestate.com


V8E 1A9 V8E 1A9

$2,812,725 USD

(based upon a $1.34 rate)

$2,812,725 USD

(based upon a $1.34 rate)


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Bald is beautiful Bald is indeed beautiful, as is the very generous community of Whistler. The 17th annual Whistler Balding For Dollars event went down at the GLC on Saturday, April 6 and was another resounding success. While dollars are still coming in, the event has already raised more than $22,500 this year, bringing the running total since inception to more than $335,000. A huge thank-you to all our partners in the event, including: the GLC; Blackcomb Barber Shop; Pique Newsmagazine; Mountain FM; and the Crystal Lodge. Thanks also to all our participants, volunteers, and donors. We couldn’t make such a big impact on the lives of kids with cancer at BC Children’s Hospital without you. Our combined efforts make a HUGE difference! We look forward to doing it all again in 2020! Dave and Wendy Clark // Founders, Whistler Friends Society

The death of B.C. parks These days, people bring everything they have at home to their park holiday. Why do they do that? What’s the point? Why don’t they just drive down the road and stay in a friend’s driveway? Save on gas, avoid sitting in traffic jams or ferry lineups for hours. You could cook or order in your favourite food. Why not make this

accessible not only to people, but also all kinds of machines? Our parks are becoming real estate targets for developers. Our wilderness has more and more powerline roads, oil and gas roads, run of river, LNG roads. Look at the Northern Rocky Mountains Provincial Park. There are oil and gas service roads all throughout. B.C. does not need comfort and ease to every corner of our wilderness. Why is it that backcountry wildlife officers, safety protection, search and rescue, DFO are inadequately funded and staffed while millions for asphalt can be found—and with asphalt comes endless rules and regulations, fees and bills, service charges, taxes, tow trucks. Doesn’t look like a park holiday to me. It boggles the mind at our illusory protection of our parks, wilderness, and wildlife. And it doesn’t matter who’s in power—left, right or centre. It will not stop. The old parks magic is gone. Dave Bennett // Whistler the next craze? All wildlife in the parks would love that. Who will protect nature against the parks department development? Government and industry knew 100 years ago that industry and too many people would kill our parks. Where did that wisdom go?

Over the next 10 to 20 years, government and developers will pave more roads into our parks. Parks were not made for making money. Parks are made for protecting wilderness. How long until Cheakamus Lake Road is widened and paved. Why do government and developers want wilderness to be made fully

Generous support Whistler Adaptive Sports Program would like to give a big shout-out of appreciation to the Lift Coffee Company for its continued support to our program of helping children and adults who are experiencing learning or physical disabilities to get up on the mountain and learn to ski, snowboard or sit-ski on our wonderful mountains here in Whistler. The Lift Company has been helping us by offering Whistler Adaptive the opportunity

Write to us! Letters to the editor must contain the writer’s name, address and a daytime telephone number. Maximum length is 450 words. Pique Newsmagazine reserves the right to edit, condense or refrain from publishing any contribution. Letters reflect the opinion of the writer and not that of Pique Newsmagazine.

WHISTLER | PEMBERTON | SQUAMISH Local Expertise with Nationwide Exposure Whistler Creekside

Whistler

$459,000

$2,998,000

• Large 1 Bed & 1 Bath at 650 Sq. Ft. • Private Dock on Alpha Lake. • Perfect Weekender or Starter Home.

• Fabulous central location, ski home. • Immaculate 3,500 sq ft, 4 bdrm family chalet, fully furnished and equipped • Lovely 2 bdrm suite

C202-1400 Alta Lake Road

2617 Wolverine Crescent

Matt

Squamish

Whistler

Horizon Drive

Specializing in Whistler Ski-in Ski-out Real Estate

$1,098,000 • RARE SKYRIDGE VISTA DUPLEX with VIEWS to the Chief & Tantalus Range! • 2,300 sq ft, 3 bed/2.5 bath & rec room • Expansive south deck, north yard& double garage.

Viive

Jennifer

Personal Real Estate Corporation

Truu

Marion

604-966-8678

604-902-5222

604-938-3885

604-723-3525

mcallaghan@sutton.com

vvtruu@telus.net

marion@whistlerskiinskiout.com

Callaghan

suttonwestcoast.com

10 APRIL 18, 2019

|

LOCAL AGENTS

|

LOCAL KNOWLEDGE

Sale Personal Real Estate Corporation

Anderson

|

LOCAL EXPERTS

|

ph: 604-935-3380

js@jennifersale.com

|

tf: 1-866-978-8866


W NE

! ICE R P

3 FALCON RIDGE Spectacular views from this 4 Bed and loft townhome on Blueberry Hill. Offers double car garage, level access, vaulted ceilings and more!

$2,395,000

8400-37 ASHLEIGH MCIVOR DRIVE 3.5 BEDS I 3.5 BATHS I 1,950 SQFT Completed in 2017, Red Sky offers inspiring panoramic views of both Whistler and Blackcomb mountains. Blessed with all day sun, the complex includes a private resident’s club with a salt water pool, hot tub and fire pit. Viewings by appointment. 

WHISTLER’S #1 RE/MAX AGENT

$2,199,000

sally@sallywarner.ca 106-7015 Nesters Rd, Whistler

604-932-7741

propertiesinwhistler.com

Marshall Viner PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

PremieretoLifestyle Neighbourhood Register atWhistler’s marshallviner.com receive weekly real estate updates

2246 BRANDYWINE WAY 4.5 BEDS I 3 BATHS I 2,475 SQFT This classic Whistler ski chalet is set on the desirable high side of Brandywine Way in Bayshores. Features include open concept living space, vaulted ceilings, wood burning fireplace, double car garage, and mountain views. Viewings by appointment.   $1,999,000

SO

! LD

2154 Whistler Road • 4 bedrooms, 3 bathroom, Triplex end unit • Sunken living room with fireplace and large covered balcony • Three levels, gives nice separation • Newly reno’d kitchen, floors, paint, etc. • Short walk to Whistler Mountain Creekside

$1,599,000 T 604 .935.2287 E marshall@marshallviner.com

marshallviner.com

New Price | $5,999,000 4914 Horstman Lane, Horstman Estates Within close proximity to ski-in/ski-out access on Blackcomb Mountain, Lost Lake, Whistler Golf Course & the fabulous Valley Trail system - not to mention you are within a very short walking distance to the dynamic offerings of Whistler Village. This particular Horstman Estates home offers 5 bedrooms & 5.5 bathrooms across 3 levels and 3,270 sq/ft of interior living space. Notable features include; vaulted ceilings allowing for light to pour in and views to be abundant, private outdoor hot tub to relax in and take in the crisp mountain air & spacious 2 car garage - perfect for a family with toys. If location, privacy, views & ski-in/ski-out access are important to you then you absolutely must view this wonderful property!

Welcome to the Best Place on Earth!

Maggi Thornhill Personal Real Estate Corporation Mobile +1-604-905-8199 Maggi.Thornhill@evcanada.com

©2019 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.

APRIL 18, 2019

11


OPEN HOUSE APRIL 20TH 2-5PM

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 8621 Drifter Way, Alpine Meadows Find peace, sun and lovely views on a quiet street in Alpine. Five bedrooms, open kitchen, living and dining, large TV and games room. Hot tub views up Blackcomb and Armchair. Updated ensuite bath and private sitting area in the master. Plenty of flat parking plus a double garage. View the 3D Video http://rem.ax/8621drifter Offered for $2,695,000

Laura Wetaski

604-938-3798 laura.wetaski@evcanada.com

Whistler

to display Gogglesocs that are available by donation to anyone to protect their ski goggles. These Gogglesocs were provided by Josh Gray, co-founder of Gogglesoc, who generously helped us with the design and production of these wonderful ski goggle protectors. As we are a charity and depend on the generosity of others to run our program, the support and kindness of these two organizations over the past few years has enabled us to raise funds in order to help others.

modelled after my experience as a member of WORCA over the years. The goal is to help kickstart bike culture in the region so that they can someday soon welcome the world through tourism. But I was aware that this can’t be some outside imposition, that the only way for the community to see prosperity was if the culture grew from the ground up with the locals in charge. Getting access to good bikes was the logical first step. So I put the call out to the Sea to Sky community and the response was

“ ... I put the call out to the Sea to Sky community and the response was overwhelming. Just last night we collected

Nick Davies, Whistler local and experienced family lawyer practising across BC and Yukon.

the bikes and have nearly 20 trail-worthy steeds ready to ship overseas.” - STEVE ANDREWS

Call at 604-602-9000 or visit www.macleanlaw.ca Maclean Law is headquartered in Vancouver with offices across British Columbia.

Thank you very much, David Bell, Fundraising Committee // Whistler Adaptive Sports

Community support appreciated Last fall, I had the opportunity to travel to Karamoja, a remote corner of Uganda to teach trail building to some of the locals. We prepped more than 20 kilometres of trails for the Tour of Karamoja, an event spearheaded by the late Paul Sherwen, who grew up in Uganda before becoming a pro cyclist and later, the voice of the Tour de France along with Phil Leggett. The event was a success; however, the locals whom I helped teach these newfound skills were without the ability to ride the trails themselves. As a result, I helped them form a community bike organization that was

overwhelming. (Recently), we collected the bikes and have nearly 20 trail-worthy steeds ready to ship overseas. I’d like to take a moment to thank everyone who helped out, especially: Andrea Watson; Kathy Rose; Pat Montani; the Rey family; Jamie Drummond; Angie Nolan; Elanor Bushfield; Belinda Grant; Trevor Burton; the Whistler Bike Co.; and Howe Sound Brewing for their generosity. Also to the Pemby crew for helping to disassemble the bikes and get them ready for shipping overseas. It truly does take the efforts of many to see something of this scale happen, especially with no budget or any big corporate support. If you’d like to help you can find more information at karamojabike.org. As they say in Karamoja, Alakara Noi! Steve Andrews // Whistler n

Backcountry Advisory

Mountain Psychology and Neurofeedback Centre

Stephen L. Milstein, Ph.D., R. Psych. BC #765 - 604.938.3511 Dawna Dixx Milstein, OT. COTBC # AA0201 - 604.938.3523 Whistler: #107 - 4368 Main St, Whistler, B.C. V0N 1B4 Squamish: 38077 2nd Ave, Squamish, B.C. // 604.848.9273

Serving sea to sky for 18 years

12 APRIL 18, 2019

AS OF WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17 Backcountry conditions have been stellar in the past few weeks at higher elevations. We’ve been treated to some cold storms that have kept the conditions soft and playful, particularly on northerly alpine slopes. This trend may change slightly this weekend as a warm storm plows through the province on Thursday night. The freezing level is expected to rise to between 2,200 and 2,500 metres, bringing rain to many mountaintops. The higher peaks in the area may escape the rain and instead collect upwards of 30 cm of snow. A minor cooling trend is then expected for Saturday and Sunday, with some strong sunny periods. What does this mean for the avalanche danger? This will depend on many factors such as elevation, timing, and how powerful the storm turns out to be. The storm will likely

produce elevated avalanche danger due to the potential for loose, wet avalanches below the rain-snow line, and storm slabs or wind slabs above the rain-snow line. Once the weekend arrives, loose, wet avalanche activity may still be a concern on southerly slopes during sunny conditions and the wind slabs may remain a concern near the highest mountaintops. Where will the best riding be this weekend in the backcountry? Your best bet will likely be to travel as high as possible, above the rain-snow line from Thursday’s storm, and play on northerly aspects where the sun shouldn’t influence the snow. Use caution on slopes near ridgelines where the wind slabs may continue to be a problem over the weekend. Start and end your day early for the softest snow and to limit your exposure during daytime heating. There’s still plenty of fun to be had in the mountains! n

CONDITIONS MAY VARY AND CAN CHANGE RAPIDLY Check for the most current conditions before heading out into the backcountry. Daily updates for the areas adjacent to Whistler Blackcomb are available at 604-938-7676, or surf to www.whistlerblackcomb.com/mountaininfo/snow-report#backcountry or go to www.avalanche.ca.


PIQUE N’ YER INTEREST

Bursting the bubble EVEN THOUGH it’s called the World Ski and Snowboard Festival (WSSF), I always think of it as one of the best locals’ parties of the year. That might be because I always seem to run into everyone I’ve ever met in Whistler— give or take a few—at Intersection, or because after three years, I’m finally in on all the jokes.

BY MEGAN LALONDE Maybe it’s just because it’s one big celebration of all the things this community loves most. Who knows? Either way, this event always seems to encapsulate the very best parts about living in the bubble. That’s the thing—events like WSSF, fun as they are, serve as another reminder that Whistler really is a one-of-a-kind bubble. But every once in a while, something comes along to burst it. Last week, that something was a Facebook post by one of my university professors. I nearly scrolled past it in my rush to post a story to Pique’s account before running to meet friends at the gondola to catch a few WSSF events, but it caught my attention and made me pause. He was in Rwanda marking

the 25th anniversary of the genocide against the Tutsi, where an estimated 500,000 to 1 million people were killed. Five years ago, I was part of a group of Carleton University students that travelled to Rwanda with that professor to study the impact of the media before, during and after the horrific 100-day genocide. We visited memorials and sites of mass killings where evidence of the brutal violence was still clearly displayed, two decades later. We discussed the role local media played in inciting the violence, and how a lack of response from international governments

altering experience I’ve ever had. The Facebook post that caught my attention last week marked a more specific anniversary: our professor, Allan Thompson, was revisiting a street in Kigali where, 25 years ago to the day, the deaths of Gabriel Kagaba and his daughter Justine Mukangango were captured on video by British journalist Nick Hughes. They were some of the only killings during the genocide—out of nearly 1 million—captured on film. Years later, our professor managed to identify the victims and track down their surviving family members for a piece in the

(W)e had to starkly confront what humans are capable of doing to each other, while doing our best to figure out why and how.

and media contributed to its escalation. We studied alongside Rwandan journalists and students who endured the conflict themselves, and spoke with officials and a few members of the press who were on the ground in 1994. In other words, we had to starkly confront what humans are capable of doing to each other, while doing our best to figure out why and how. It was the most profound, perspective-

Toronto Star. They’ve remained close over the years. During our time in the country, we got to know that family a little, in particular their youngest son and brother. I remember bonding over tattoos and the music we listened to. My experience in Rwanda taught me about resilience, forgiveness, how susceptible we are to the influence of others, and how powerful media can be.

It also taught me how bad situations can become when we get so involved in our own lives that we turn a blind eye to what’s happening outside of our day-to-day interactions. In 1994, the world completely ignored signs of genocide in Rwanda, including the footage captured by Hughes, until it was far too late. Sitting at home, dressed in my snow gear, that Facebook post pulled me right back to my time in Rwanda and made me realize how rooted in the Whistler bubble I’ve become— how many of my priorities and habits have quietly shifted in the five years since I first travelled to Southeastern Africa; how working for a local newspaper (best job ever) means I’m constantly concerned about what’s happening within our boundaries; how long it’s been since I thought about Rwanda. I can remember the last conversation I had about snow conditions, but when was the last time I brought up a situation happening on another continent? It’s important to care about your community. There’s nothing wrong with being appreciative of all the insanely fun, unique experiences we’re lucky enough to have access to here in the Sea to Sky, just like there’s nothing wrong with being focused on the very real hardships and struggles many people face in the bubble. But there’s also something to be said for remembering that there’s life outside of it. n

APRIL 18, 2019

13


FIRST PIQUE

The Peak of Coastal Living

Seaside Village Life is Calling... ONLY 3 TOWNHOMES REMAIN!

» Luxury condominiums & townhomes with 180º ocean views, ranging from 1,250-2,400 sq. ft. » No foreign buyers tax, no speculation tax, no traffic! » Remaining homes start at $649,900.

Ray Longmuir BUYER’S AGENT ASSOCIATE BROKER CRB CELL 604-905-8464

Kindness Project poster has been shared on social media

OUR ONLINE CONVERSATION Last week, Pique’s Facebook followers were interested in hearing about one potential strategy aimed at curbing the number of visitors to Joffre Lakes Provincial Park. As BC Parks moves forward with the development of a visitor-use management strategy for the park, a survey is asking the public if they would be willing to pay a “day-use fee to enter the park if you knew the money was being reinvested back into the park” and if they “agree with limiting the number of day visitors in the park if it meant you’d encounter fewer visitors and you were guaranteed easier access.” Most were in agreeance, writing,

“Good way to pay for someone to clean up after them; should remain free to all First Nations though;” “Absolutely!” and ““Yes. From May 1 to October 1.”

303 The total number of employee-restricted rental units expected in Whistler once several WHA projects come online in 2019.

DID YOU KNOW?

While Alta Lake’s levels of copper and arsenic are on the decline, human-caused “nutrient loading” (i.e. poop and pee) is on the rise. That said the water quality of the local lake has been “excellent” in recent years. The message: locals need to be vigilant to keep it that way. For more, turn to page 39.

THROWBACK THURSDAY

Another said,

LiveAtEagleViewHeights.ca This is not an offering of sale. Offering of sale can only be made by way of disclosure statement. Pricing subject to change. Photos and renderings are artist interpretation only. E.&O.E.

Sure, good idea, but no one seems able to ticket and tow illegally parked vehicles presently so how will this be enforced? Is someone actually going to turn people away after they have driven for two and a half hours? Doubt it.

One follower supported the idea, but wrote,

I just hope it doesn’t lead to people loading up other parks in the area.

OF INTEREST

7

In this issue from 2012, Pique sent a reporter out to follow some of the filmmakers participating in the 72hr Filmmaker Showdown and chronicle their late-night, caffeine-fuelled effort to win the top prize at the World Ski and Snowboard Festival event. “There’s a definite sense of camaraderie amongst the teams as they congratulate each other, and as I make my way out, I pause and muse that perhaps that’s the underlying essence of the 72hr Filmmaker Showdown— work your butt off, lose sleep, but at the same time, share miraculous moments of creativity and hilarity, all the while showcasing this amazing mountain town with all its shifting moods and personalities.” It might have been seven years ago, but many of the same faces—such as Jonny Fleet and Rebecca Wood Barrett (who took People’s Choice that year)—also made films for this year’s showdown. n

2012 budget balanced P.14

Shred Show P.50

70

TWSSF music guide P.70

FREE PIPE DREAMS

The number of vendors taking part in this year’s RMOW foodtruck program

%

OFFICIAL RESOURCE

The percentage of the world’s tigers found in India

The number of times the

14 APRIL 18, 2019

19.16

1,200 April 19, 2012

|

WHISTLER’S WEEKLY NEWSMAGAZINE

| www.piquenewsmagazine.com


p: John Entwistle

WHISTLER BLACKCOMB SPRING OPERATING HOURS

Last day of Spring skiing on Blackcomb Mountain is April 22. Spring skiing continues on Whistler Mountain to May 27.

SPRING ON WHISTLER MOUNTAIN APRIL 23- MAY 27: Hours of Operations: 10 am - 4 pm Skiing: • Whistler Village Gondola access • Creekside open April 27/28 weekend Sightseeing: • Whistler Village Gondola only • PEAK 2 PEAK Gondola opens May 25 for the summer season

WHISTLER MOUNTAIN BIKE PARK OPENS FOR THE SEASON BEGINS MAY 17: Fitzsimmons Express: 10 am - 8 pm Whistler Village Gondola: 11 am - 5 pm

Visit Whistler Village Guest Relations for Lift Tickets Hours of Operation: 9 am - 5 pm *As of April 23, Guest Relations at Blackcomb Daylodge & Creekside will be closed

Visit whistlerblackcomb.com/open for details on open terrain


NEWS WHISTLER

WHA looks to refine eligibility, enforcement guidelines PROPOSED CHANGES AIMED AT ENSURING FAIR, EQUAL ACCESS TO NON-MARKET HOUSING

BY BRANDON BARRETT BIG CHANGES could be coming to the Whistler Housing Authority (WHA). Following extensive research into nonmarket housing models used in several other jurisdictions, the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) has proposed a number of changes that would refine the eligibility criteria and enforcement framework used at WHA, an independently run municipal corporation. The proposals emerged from a recommendation by the Mayor’s Task Force on Resident Housing, first formed in 2016 to help mitigate Whistler’s affordable housing shortage. The proposed changes are aimed at acknowledging how the community’s housing needs have evolved over time and addressing concerns in the community over the perception of the employee housing program being misused. “The desire is to ensure that current and future housing provided continues to reach those it was intended for (using) a fair, equitable and consistent approach,” said Toni Metcalf, the RMOW’s economic development officer, in a presentation at the Committee of

OVERHAUL Officials are considering several changes to the Whistler Housing Authority’s eligibility and enforcement guidelines to reflect the changing housing needs of the community. The WHA’s Chikyamesh Apartments are pictured. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WHISTLER HOUSING AUTHORITY

16 APRIL 18, 2019

the Whole on Tuesday, April 16. On the rental side, the RMOW and WHA have proposed implementing income categories that would peg rental rates to one’s ability to pay. The municipality is also recommending a move to a full-time work requirement of at least 30 hours a week to be eligible for the WHA waitlist. The previous minimum was 20 hours. If approved, the new system would require a WHA applicant’s employment to justify residing in Whistler, potentially making those who work remotely from the resort ineligible. “It’s about tightening the current definition of employment in Whistler,” Metcalf explained. A move to a single waitlist process has also been suggested, which would incorporate seniors, who, previously, had to be a member of the local Mature Action Community group in order to be placed on the waitlist. Currently, WHA applicants, or their spouses, must not own any real estate in order to be considered eligible, unless they are deemed to be “underhoused” (meaning they own a primary residence under a certain square footage), own a primary residence in Squamish or Pemberton, or the applicant qualifies under the WHA’s affordability criteria. The newly proposed system would expand on this to require eligible applicants to maintain no ownership of any property whatsoever. Officials are also considering the limiting of other, non-real estate asset classes as part of the potential eligibility requirements.

“It’s about equalizing things and considering the total investment and wealth of an individual and their capacity to have access to restricted housing,” explained WHA general manager Marla Zucht. Enforcement of WHA regulations would be tightened under the new regime as well; officials have suggested implementing a more “rigid” process for following up on WHA violations that would include “more punitive penalties,” according to the presentation. “I think it’s going to be a multi-pronged approach,” Zucht said in an information session with Pique prior to Tuesday’s presentation. “There’s still more work to be done on that, and that’s part of the research into the different housing providers and what they’re doing.” Zucht noted that the City of Vancouver is “probably the furthest ahead” in terms of enforcement measures. The city has, for instance, implemented an Empty Homes Tax that requires residential home owners to make annual statutory declarations that determine if a property will continue to be subject to the tax. Failure to submit a declaration results in an automatic one-percent property tax charge. Non-compliance results in another one-per-cent charge. “They’re obviously trying to get housing back into the market for residents working in Vancouver,” said Metcalf of the tax. The RMOW looked at five non-market housing models in its research, all with differing regulatory processes at play: BC Housing; the Banff Housing Corporation; the Aspen/Pitkin County Housing Authority; the Canmore Community

Housing Corporation; and the Vancouver Affordable Housing Agency. The proposed overhaul is a reflection of the shifting realities of Whistler’s economy and housing stock. According to WHA figures, Whistler’s employee-restricted inventory has seen very little change since 2005, when there were 165 employeerestricted units, compared to just 232 last year. (That number will increase to 303 in 2019 as several WHA rental projects come online.) Meanwhile, Whistler’s permanent population has exploded while demand for non-market housing has outpaced supply, increasing competition. “House prices have increased well ahead of wage growth,” noted Metcalf. Whistler’s average annual income in 2016, the most recent year available, was $114,000, compared to $106,000 in 2011. The median income for 2016 was $80,000, up from $71,000 in 2011. The municipality and WHA will now review which relevant changes to implement before formalizing the new eligibility and enforcement rules. Community engagement is planned at a future WHA open house. As part of its research, the WHA has also included additional questions around employment status, household size and family structure in its annual waitlist confirmation process. The deadline to return the form is April 29, and non-completion assumes the applicant is no longer interested in remaining on the waitlist. For more information, visit whistler.ca/ housing. n


NEWS WHISTLER

110 2109 Whistler Rd

Renovated fully furnished, nightly rental studio apartment with good AirBnB revenue already in place. Steps from Creekside lifts, lakes, restaurants and shops, the Highland Annex has low HOA fees and secure ski and bike lockers.

Pro skier Dave Treadway dies in Pemberton backcountry FREESKIER FELL 30 METRES DOWN CREVASSE NEAR RHODODENDRON MOUNTAIN, SAYS PSAR

Welcome to the best place on Earth!

Nick Swinburne

Personal Real Estate Corporation Mobile +1-604-932-8899 Nick.Swinburne@evcanada.com

BY BRANDON BARRETT

Happy Easter! 7294 Clover Road – Pemberton

IN MEMORIAM Local professional skier Dave

Rare Opportunity – 81.6 Acres

Treadway, who died in a fall down a crevasse near Rhododendron Mountain on Monday, April 15. PHOTO BY VINCE SHULEY

from taking major risks in recent years. Since Dave’s death, he has struggled to wrap his head around what he called a freak accident “that could have happened to anybody.” “It’s one thing when you lose someone who is doing really risky, crazy stuff,” Douglas said. “Dave was just super unlucky.” Douglas described his friend as a

“For me, being a family man myself, that’s the hardest thing: Knowing that he’s not there for them anymore.”

$4,250,000

224-4360 Lorimer Road Market Place Lodge - Whistler 1 Bedroom – 1 Bath $685,000

Mount Currie, BC

512 Painted Cliff Road

$1,160,000

Coast Blackcomb Springs - Whistler Studio – 1 Bath

4912 Fourth Avenue

$235,000

Smithers

#415A-2036 London Lane Legends - Whistler

8 Bedroom – 5 Bath home

1.5 Bedroom – 1 Bathroom

$995,000

$177,500

617-4295 Blackcomb Way Studio – 1 Bath

consummate family man who was “one of the nicest, most genuine guys you could meet.” Dave leaves behind his pregnant wife, Tessa, and a two-year-old and sixyear-old son. Dave and his wife had recently committed to buying a house in Golden. “For me, being a family man myself, that’s the hardest thing: Knowing that he’s not there for them anymore,” Douglas said. A GoFundMe has been set up to support Dave’s family. At press time, more than $100,000 had been raised in under a day. Donate at gofundme.com/support-for-thetreadway-family. Visit adventuresmart.ca for safety tips before heading out into the backcountry. n

10 E. Walkerville Road

4 Bedroom – 3 Bathroom

Whistler Peak Lodge - Whistler

- MIKE DOUGLAS

both Pemberton and Whistler crews attended. Local freeskiing icon Mike Douglas, who has known the Treadway family going on 15 years, believes climate change may have contributed to the conditions. “You don’t want to scapegoat this to climate change, but the glaciers are in bad shape, and in a low snow year like this, we’ve never had sketchy bridging like this in my 30 years here,” he noted. “There is a different level of risk in glaciated terrain that we just never had to experience before.” The Treadway family has a long history in local ski circles; brothers Dan and Darryl also skied professionally at various points in their career. Douglas said Dave had shied away

Whistler

FOR SALE

A WELL-KNOWN local pro skier has died after falling down a crevasse while skiing in the Pemberton backcountry on Monday, April 15, confirmed Pemberton District Search and Rescue (PSAR). Rescue crews had just finished attending a nearby call when they received word that a backcountry skier had fallen roughly 30 metres down a crevasse near Rhododendron Mountain and was unresponsive. A medical and extraction team attended the scene, but, unfortunately, the 38-year-old man had succumbed to his injuries. While officials have not released the man’s name, friends later confirmed it was local professional freeskier Dave Treadway. David MacKenzie, head of PSAR, said the “very experienced skier” was travelling with a group that happened to run into challenging terrain in warming conditions. “It was just an unfortunate incident going through unknown terrain,” he noted in a follow-up interview. “There are crevasses all over the backcountry and in the glacial area. Various ones may have an ice bridge over them or something, and some of them can be sight unseen.” MacKenzie called the effort to recover the skier “a very technical operation” that was backed by several members of Whistler Search and Rescue. In all, 14 members from

$379,000

$125,000

Vacant Lot 12 + Lot 26 The Ridge at Pemberton $379,900 I $459,900

RE/MAX SEA TO SKY REAL ESTATE M: 604-932-8629 O: 1-888-689-0070

www.morelrealestateteam.com Ursula

Melissa

Connect with us

LOCAL EXPERTS WITH GLOBAL CONNECTIONS Your Real Estate Matchmakers in the “Sea to Sky Corridor”

APRIL 18, 2019

17


Welcome to the Best Place on Earth!

4369 Main Street #303 | $459,000 New to Market

2230 Eva Lake Road #31 | $499,000 New to Market

4737 Spearhead Drive #26 | $1,539,000 New Price

6364 Easy Street | $2,499,000 New Price

5160 Nita Lake Drive | $2,999,000 New Price

2934 Heritage Peaks Trail | $7,999,000 New Price


Spring has Sprung! Wishing all our clients, friends, family, and visitors a happy Easter, and enjoyable start to the spring season!

Maggi Thornhill Maggi Thornhill - Personal Real Estate Corporation Mobile +1-604-905-8199 Maggi.Thornhill@evcanada.com


NEWS WHISTLER

Wide range of comments heard on OCP NEW STRATEGIC PLANNING COMMITTEE TO ADDRESS GROWTH MANAGEMENT

BY BRADEN DUPUIS WHISTLER’S UPDATED Official Community Plan (OCP) is in the homestretch now after a public hearing on April 16. With 14 people speaking at the public hearing and 11 more submitting written comments, Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) staff will go back to the drawing board to address any outstanding issues before bringing the bylaw back for third reading at an upcoming council meeting. The OCP amendment bylaw is slated for adoption later this year. Comments at the hour-long public hearing covered a wide range of topics, including a need to plan for the future of young adults in Whistler and the changing designation of Whistler’s “tennis resort lands” to “core commercial.” But for Matt Woods of Coastal

20 APRIL 18, 2019

Mountain Excavation (CME), the ask was straightforward. “We don’t need more committees or studies, we need action on affordable homes now,” Woods said, adding that of his 85 employees, only 17 currently live in Whistler. “Last year alone we lost 14 people to housing and affordability-related issues. My business could double tomorrow if we had the highly skilled people in this town to do the work.” The majority of CME’s employees are commuting from Squamish and Pemberton, which means higher costs for Woods and long days for workers (who sometimes have to leave at 2 a.m. for work and drive home in end-of-day ski traffic). “It’s a nightmare, and it’s killing my staff,” Woods said. “So whether it’s the (Whistler Housing Authority) or private developers that are going to build these affordable units … my

PLANNING PROCESS Director of planning Mike Kirkegaard addresses Whistler mayor and council ahead of a

public hearing.

PHOTO BY BRADEN DUPUIS

only hope is that this OCP moving forward gives us all a better, more relevant and nimble framework within which this town can make better decisions for the future.” For Lance Bright, the concern with the OCP is more fundamental. “I fear in some ways it may be built on sand, and perhaps may be flawed,” Bright said, pointing out that three members of Whistler council—Arthur De Jong, Cathy Jewett and Ralph Forsyth—are employed by Vail Resorts, which has significant expansion interests in the valley (which are supported by the OCP).

“Clearly this bylaw sanctioned by the Local Government Act involves your company, your paycheque and its significant partners ... A lawyer could ask, ‘How could they have possibly made impartial judgments, unbiased comments, and come up with a neutral opinion?’” Bright said, adding that it may be prudent for council to produce a legal document addressing the issue. “I ask you to address this because today I’m addressing it with you kindly—I’d hate

SEE PAGE 24

>>


n ema

Col son

: Ja

PC

Green Kids inc. www.greenkids.com

Celebrate Earth Day - April 22nd Ziptrek is contributing $20 for every guest on April 22nd to Green Kids. In what has become an annual tradition, Ziptrek recognizes and supports this wonderful non-profit live-theatre group dedicated to environmental education for young people through performance. Call now to book your Earth Day tour in support of Green Kids!

located inside the Carleton Lodge across from the Whistler Village Gondolas

604.935.0001 ziptrek.com


2016 Nita Lane

$12,900,000

The Chateau is an Old World Classic Estate fully equipped to start your new Whistler Adventure. The quality of construction will stand the test of time and compliments the practical design. Situated on 4.8 private acres overlooking Nita Lake, The Chateau invites you to relax the minute you walk through the door. Matterport 3D Showcase: rem.ax/2016nita

Ann Chiasson

5

604.932.7651

8468 Matterhorn Drive

$5,980,000

Those with an appreciation for quality & design will value the beautiful post & beam construction, vaulted ceilings w skylights, warm wood flooring w custom lighting, sound throughout, wood burning stone fireplace, media room, boot warmers, chef’s kitchen w walk-in pantry, glass wine showcase, expansive deck w fire table, patio furniture & BBQ.

Ann Chiasson

6

604.932.7651

#11 - 2211 Marmot Place

$949,900

3800 Sunridge Place

$8,450,000

Ann Chiasson

Ann Chiasson

604.932.7651

6

3452 Blueberry Drive Drive

$1,995,000

Sally Warner*

604.905.6326

#333 - 4800 Spearhead Drive

$749,000

1

604.905.6326

PRICE REDUCED

Ski home to your 2 bed/2.5 bath quartershare in the Horstman House. After a hard day on the slopes, enjoy all of the amenities offered by this beautiful lodge. In 2019 you will be able to enjoy, or rent out, 2 weeks over the Christmas holidays plus some other key long weekends.

Sally Warner*

604.905.6326

2

WHISTLER OFFICE 106 - 7015 Nesters Road, Whistler, BC V8E 0X1 604.932.2300 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070 *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

remax-whistler.com awarded best website 2018 by Luxuryrealestate.com

Property Management remaxseatoskypm.com

$1,299,000

Sally Warner*

Sally Warner*

$299,000

#207 - 3300 Ptarmigan Place

Located in the prestigious area of Blueberry Hill, this updated 3 bed townhome offers a spacious floor plan with vaulted ceilings, and stunning views of Blackcomb Mountain. GST not applicable. Buy in a quiet complex featuring underground parking and a well-run strata.Matterport 3D Showcase: bit.ly/207DeerRun

Matt Chiasson

#104 G4 - Horstman House

5

604.932.7651

One of the remaining lots available on the prestigious Blueberry Hill. Build your dream home up to 2630 sf on this 7,514 sf lot and take advantage of the spectacular views. Walking distance to the Village but away from the bustle. Stroll along the Valley trail around the Whistler Golf Course. GST is not applicable.

Ski in, Ski out renovated 1 bed condo in the Aspens on Blackcomb. Enjoy complimentary ski, snowboard and bicycle concierge services on site. Unlimited owner usage with a great opportunity to generate strong rental revenue. Available this weekend. 3D Showcase: http://bit.ly/333AspensMatterport

2

$7,795,000

This special 1.3 acre property generates $185,000 a year net to the owner. Walk to the creekside lifts and still enjoy the ambience of a unique enclave of estate properties. 5 bedrooms, generous family recreation space and fully furnished and equipped. Matterport 3D Showcase: rem.ax/5233Jordan

Beautiful 2 bedroom/2 bath corner townhouse located in Whistler Creek! These townhouses do not come on the market often. Located within walking distance to the Creekside Gondola, bike park, shopping & restaurants. This updated townhouse boasts a spacious master and second bedroom, new flooring throughout and an open concept kitchen and living area.

604.935.9171

5233 Jordan Lane

Stunning property designed by Stuart Silk Architects - nestled beside a creek for privacy with gorgeous mountain views, 5 bedrooms, theatre, office, gym, sauna and steam and a bright inviting family room. Boys and girls en-suited bunk bedrooms. Constructed to last with concrete and Corten steel and a copper roof. 3D Showcase: rem.ax/3800sunridge

6467 St. Andrews Way

604.938.2499

#312 - 7445 Frontier Street

2.5

$589,000

Top floor corner unit. This 1302 sq ft condo is located in the “tower” corner looking south east offering superior views of sunrises and Mount Currie. Essentially having two master bedrooms, each with 4 piece ensuite bathrooms, you will love the generous floor spaces, high ceilings, ample storage and in-suite laundry.

Patrick Saintsbury

604.935.9114

2.5

Open House Sat 2pm to 4:30 pm

$1,720,000

Fantastic, sunny mountain and golf course views from this quiet location in Whistler Cay Heights. This half duplex boasts three bedrooms and 2 and a half bathrooms with the third bedroom being large enough that it doubles as a TV and games room.The main floor BBQ deck and a lower hot tub deck both overlook the views.

Chris Wetaski

604.905.6326

3

8621 Drifter Way

$2,695,000

Serenity is found on a quiet street in Alpine. Parking for seven cars plus a dbl garage. Hardwood, slate and solid stone. Updated ensuite bath and private sitting area in master. Open kitchen, living and dining plus large TV and games room. Hot tub deck views up Blackcomb and Armchair. Suite rented at $2800 per month. 3DShowcase: rem.ax/8621drifter

Chris Wetaski

604.938.2499

4.5

PEMBERTON OFFICE 1411 Portage Road, Pemberton, BC V0N 2L1 604.894.6616 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070


G OOD N I L EW

S

L G SEAT WED

TH

WNDS LA NIO H G

EH

DID WE SAVE THE BEST FOR LAST?

You decide

CALL US FOR A PRIVATE TOUR WEDGEWOODSWHISTLER.COM

Building a Community ONLY 108 MOUNTAIN ESTATE PROPERTIES ON 600 ACRES FEATURING RIVER FRONTAGES, EXTENDED TRAIL NETWORK 350 ACRES OF PROTECTED ALPINE FOREST MINUTES FROM WHISTLER VILLAGE RECREATION CENTRE BUILDING

CONTACT ANN CHIASSON OR SALLY WARNER*

604.932.7651 / 604.932.7741 *Personal Real Estate Corporation

THE DISCLOSURE STATEMENT AND OTHER DETAILS CAN BE FOUND AT WWW.WEDGEWOODSWHISTLER.COM


NEWS WHISTLER << FROM PAGE 20 to think that some party in the future may throw all this hard work into jeopardy because of a simple oversight.” Caroline Lamont, a professional planner herself, praised the plan’s recognition of First Nations interests and the inclusion of maps and illustrations, but said a greater focus on monitoring is needed (“We monitor, we collect a lot of data, but I think we’ve seen in the last few years when it comes to affordable housing, we failed,” she said) as well as some conflicting policies—such as supporting infill housing while at the same time not supporting land uses that will have “unacceptable negative” environmental, social health or economic impacts. “You can see that gives a little fodder for neighbourhoods wanting to object to a project, and if I was them I would grab policies like that,” Lamont said. “So it just would be great to understand priorities.” For Emily Dicken, a provincial public safety worker, the chapter on health, safety and community wellbeing feels shortsighted. “It definitely addresses the status quo, but it doesn’t address anything aspirational and it doesn’t address where the field of practice is already headed,” Dicken said. “So I feel like this plan actually puts Whistler kind of behind the 8-ball of where public safety is going in terms of land-use planning, management and community and social planning.”

But for all the questions about the OCP, those concerning Whistler’s growth—and how exactly the RMOW plans to measure it—remain at the heart of it all. “Your methodology for visitation and capacity is only slightly addressed by bed cap, and I see nothing in your OCP in what your methodology is to measure these things,” said Milo Rusimovich.

“It’s all about encouraging long-term thinking to benefit the resort community,” she said in a presentation to council. “We already have community vision and goals. This is about the implementation of that.” While a staff report to council proposed that the committee be comprised of Mayor Jack Crompton, two Whistler

“I think there’s a number of different metrics that we’d be looking at to consider the implications for the resort.” - TONI METCALF

“And that’s why I’m not in favour of this OCP as it stands right now, because you have no methodology.” A new Strategic Planning Committee, the terms of reference for which were introduced on April 16, will endeavour to answer those questions. The committee will be tasked with providing strategic input on long-term community planning and land use, said economic development manager Toni Metcalf.

councillors, three community membersat-large, the president of Tourism Whistler, the executive director of the Whistler Chamber, the chief operating officer of Whistler Blackcomb and the RMOW’s chief administrative officer, general manager of resort experience and planning director, Coun. Duane Jackson suggested a more inclusive approach. The strategic partners are important, Jackson reasoned, but well represented through other committees and boards, and

the Strategic Planning Committee should make room for things like community services, healthcare, education, and arts and culture. “It’s a whole new concept of planning, and I don’t think there’s going to be any immediate, quick answers,” he said. “I’m sure there’s a lot of people in the community that are interested in what we may need to address.” The terms of reference will come back to council for adoption at an upcoming meeting. Does Crompton feel like the committee will address the community’s ongoing anxiety around growth management? “Definitely,” the mayor said after the meeting. “One of the primary focuses will be ensuring that our community deals well with the tourism that we are engaged in. Our goal is that we understand the impacts and we manage the impacts.” As for the question of Whistler’s ultimate carrying capacity, “I’m not sure it’s a magic number, or one number,” Metcalf said in response to a question from Coun. Cathy Jewett. “I think there’s a number of different metrics that we’d be looking at to consider the implications for the resort.” The full OCP public hearing can be viewed at www.whistler.ca/municipal-gov/ council/watch-council-meetings. Find more on the OCP at www.whistler. ca/ocp. n

SOL D

DAVE BURCH Personal Real Estate Corporation

Unique Ski Property With Rental Income 2309 Cheakamus Way • 4.5 bdrm ½ duplex with mountain views • Currently generating over $3,800/month Luxurious Log Home, Pinecrest • Close to highway, bus and Creekside

Lake

35 Retta Court, Pinecrest listed at

Rare Alta Lake Front Property! 5630 Alta Lake Road • Panoramic lake views • Ski run and mountain views Prime Alta Vista View Cabin • Existing 4 bdrm duplex cabin

on 1/3 Acre

3035 St Anton Way, Alta Vista

$725,000 $1,999,000

$949,000 listed at $1,599,000

UNDER OFFER Luxury Alpine Home 8373 Rainbow Drive

*based on 2012 MLS total sales volume

MARKETING WHISTLER’S WHISTLER’S TOP REALTOR FINEUNDER PROPERTIES 40* HAPPY EASTER! C: 604.935.7913 T: 604.935.7913 TF: 1.800.667.2993 E: daveb@wrec.com E: daveb@wrec.com

DAVEBURCH.CA

24 APRIL 18, 2019

Classic Whistler Cay Ski Cabin 6550 Balsam Way

SOLD!

SOLD!

• Completely updated & tastefully finished • 3,500 sqft with 5 bdrms, 4 baths Gorgeous Family Home Beside Park • Landscaped yard, private hot tub, large garage

• Central, quiet location in Whistler Cay • 3 bdrm, 2 bath with 2 bdrm rental suite Quintessential Whistler View • Spacious flat lot backs onto green space

6316 Easy Street, Whistler Cay

9491 Emerald Drive, Emerald Estates

$2,099,000 $1,999,000

listed at

listed at

Cabin

$820,000 $1,560,000


BOOK YOUR UNIQUE FAMILY EASTER EXPERIENCE WITH NO LIMITS HELI ADVENTURES

INTRODUCING NO LIMITS HELI ADVENTURES WHISTLERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NEWEST LOCALLY OWNED HELI TOUR COMPANY

More Helicopter, More Tours, More Value NOLIMITS-HELICOPTERS.COM

ICE CAVE EXPERIENCE 3.5 - 4 hours lunch included VOLCANO AND ICE CAVE ADVENTURE 4.5 hours lunch included STARTS AT

As owners of our fleet No Limits Heli Adventures offers you longer flight times and lower pricing.

$1299

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO BOOK YOUR ADVENTURE Contact us at www.nolimits-helicopters.com or 778-820-8888

In partnership with


DEALS ON WHISTLERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BIG GREAT DEALS ON EX-RENTALS

GT AVALANCHE 2018

$349

GT FURY FITZ 2018

$1,699

*

*

GIANT GLORY 2 2016

$1,499

CANNONDALE HABIT 4 2018

$1,999*

*

& NEW 2018 BIKES

NORCO RANGE A9.3

$2,549.99

*

NORCO SIGHT A9.2

$3,199.99

*

NORCO RANGE A9.2

$3,249.99

*

TREK SESSION 9.9

$6,999.99*

& PLENTY MORE! *Frame colours and components may not be as depicted above.

SAT & SUN, APR 20-21 SATURDAY 9AM-6PM | SUNDAY 10AM-5PM LOCATION: 18 BELOW AT BASE 2

Discount applied to the regualar marked price. Items limited to stock on hand, some sizes limited, we reserve the right to limit quantities. Offers valid April 20-21, 2019.


WHEELS!

GEST BIKE SALE! UP TO F OF % 0 4 IL A T E R 2018 ES BIK P: Justa Jeskova

SELECT TROY LEE DESIGN ITEMS UP TO

UP TO

50%

50%

O* F F

O* F F

ALL APPAREL

UP TO

60%

FOX APPAREL & ARMOUR O* F F

UP TO

50%

O* F F

5.10, IXS TRAIL & FULL FACE HELMETS, GIRO TRAIL HELMETS, MAXXIS TIRES & PLENTY MORE!

EX-DEMO SKIS AND BOARDS FROM $99.99

*Discount applied to the regualar marked price. Items limited to stock on hand, some sizes limited, we reserve the right to limit quantities. Offers valid April 20-21, 2019.


NEWS WHISTLER

Lift station, paving contracts awarded COUNCIL BRIEFS: THIRD READING FOR PUBLIC WASHROOMS; LIL’WAT HOUSING AGREEMENT BYLAW

BY BRADEN DUPUIS TWO MORE infrastructure projects are set to get underway with the awarding of two contracts at council’s April 16 meeting. The Spruce Grove Sewer Lift Station Project ($1.1-million contract awarded to Merletti Construction) will see Whistler’s largest lift station get a long-awaited upgrade. The project aims to extend the lifespan of the station—which handles about one third of the total sewer flows in Whistler— by installing a hydrogen sulfide resistant liner in the station’s wet well. Though Merletti’s bid was the lowest of two, it was still above the $800,000 the RMOW had originally earmarked for the project, meaning $450,000 must be reallocated from the Sewer Main Upgrade Project budget to the Sewer Lift Station Upgrade project. The lower estimate comes from a previous tender process for the project in which a proponent underbid for the work, said capital projects manager Tammy Shore. “So we did base our budget kind of around his estimate, but I’m confident that the work is fair market value. I think that

was just underestimated,” Shore said. The contract for Whistler’s 2019 paving work, meanwhile, was once again awarded to Alpine Paving Ltd. As in previous years, Alpine Paving submitted two bids for the work: one for $1,124,842 (if the asphalt for the project can be sourced from the Whistler asphalt plant in Cheakamus Crossing) and another for $1,185,015.50 (if the asphalt is sourced from Squamish, as it has been since council made it a requirement in 2011). The RMOW has long been publicly opposed to the plant, which nevertheless received a 10-year lease renewal from the provincial government in September 2017. Though RMOW staff recommended the lower bid, which represents about $59,000 in savings in 2019, council opted to go with the higher option. “I know it’s complex, but certainly I find it paining from a climate-responsibility perspective to be trucking asphalt from Squamish,” said Councillor Arthur De Jong. “So hopefully that changes soon.” The RMOW installed an air-quality monitoring station in Cheakamus in 2010, and operates it at an annual cost of about $25,000 a year. In 2014, a consultant’s analysis of four years of data found no correlation between the airborne particulate

604.932.9590

PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

tf: 1.800.667.2993, ext. 838 e: marika@wrec.com

COUNCIL CONTRACTS Mayor Jack Crompton watches a presentation in the midst of a packed agenda at the April 16 council meeting.

PHOTO BY BRADEN DUPUIS

matter measured and the days the asphalt plant was operating. The 2018 air-quality report is expected shortly, said general manager of infrastructure James Hallisey.

With two other air-quality monitoring stations in Whistler (at Meadow Park Sports Centre and Nesters, run by the provincial and federal governments, respectively), Coun. John Grills suggested the additional trucking costs could be offset somewhat by shutting down the Cheakamus station. “I think once we have the 2018 report in, if we’re not seeing any changes over the years, if the air is good, then I would suggest … that we look at shutting down that monitoring station and save the $25,000.” The 2019 paving work involves 22 different areas: six road segments, 10 trail segments, one tennis court, one basketball court, two Bayly Park locations and two parking lots. Some of the road segments were affected by a FortisBC as installation in late 2018, for which the energy company will pay the RMOW $264,000.

REZONING FOR BATHROOM PAVILION GETS THIRD READING A rezoning for a public washroom pavilion

SEE PAGE 30

Whistler Gingerbread House Closing Weekend Event

EASTER EGG HUNT

2176 KATHLEEN PLACE – WHISTLER CREEKSIDE Nestled at the end of this very private cul de sac, you will find this bright and spacious family chalet! Situated on a large 13000 sq. ft. lot this 4500 sq. ft. home boasts plenty of room to entertain your family and friends with 5 bedrooms, 8 bathrooms, 5 fireplaces, 2 living rooms and 3 separate sitting rooms and direct walk out access to a flat, landscaped yard which wraps around the property. A true four season destination, ideally situated just across from stunning Alpha Lake park and a short walk to the ski lifts at Whistler Mountain.

Offered at $3,800,000 Wishing you and your family a Happy Easter!

Sunday April 21 As a thank you to the community for their support, join us for a free Easter Egg hunt!

Creekside Village, Whistler Hunt Begins 2:00pm | Contact: (604) 388 8765

28 APRIL 18, 2019

>>


20th ANNIVERSARY!


NEWS WHISTLER << FROM PAGE 28 at the Gateway Loop is headed for adoption after receiving third reading at the April 16 council meeting. Though the project received six opposition comments during the public hearing process—mostly centred around the location, environmental impact and cost of the project—RMOW staff found that none of them required revision to the bylaw as proposed. Coun. Jen Ford noted there is “a lot of angst in the community” about the cost of the project ($3 million for three public washroom facilities in high-traffic areas in the village, to be paid for with provincial Resort Municipality Initiative funds). Even though the project is to be paid for with provincial funds, “It’s still money, and it’s still community money that can’t be spent on other things,” Ford said, adding that she’d rather see the Welcome Centre’s washrooms be better utilized. “It’s a resort municipality asset, that we do spend money on, and we as a community want the best experience for our guests as they arrive to the village—adding another building on green space where there is very little green space left, it’s just not hitting the mark for me.” The proposed design calls for the removal of five trees, while preserving eight mature trees closest to Village Gate Boulevard, and the proposed landscape plan is subject to development permit approval.

Designs for all three washrooms were reviewed and approved by the Advisory Design Panel, noted Coun. Duane Jackson. “I think, generally, it was well supported and the need is well recognized,” Jackson said.

HOUSING AGREEMENT BYLAW WITH LIL’WAT NATION GETS FIRST READINGS A Lil’wat Nation development in Function Junction is one step closer to fruition after council gave first three readings to a related housing agreement bylaw on April 16. The agreement will ensure that the development’s planned 48 housing units (which translate into about 184 beds) will be for Whistler employees only. The units will be 100-per-cent rental and managed by a third-party property management company, according to the Lil’wat Nation (the Whistler Housing Authority won’t be involved). The lands are owned by the Lil’wat Nation through the Legacy Land Agreement of the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. Plans for the 2.15-hectare site include a gas station and three mixed-use buildings containing office, commercial and residential space, (which has been increased from 18 to 48 units since the project received conditional approval in 2017). Under the RMOW’s Housing Charge

Bylaw (which requires developers to either build housing for employees generated by their projects, or pay fees in lieu of providing said housing), the commercial/ residential development was expected to create 58 employees, requiring 58 beds— meaning the proposed 184 beds go above and beyond the requirement. “The owner will include a clause in the tenancy agreement, so people are aware when they’re signing … that they need to comply with the restrictions of the housing agreement,” said planner Robert Brennan in a presentation to council. “And then the owners will monitor that their tenants are following that, otherwise their tenancy will be terminated.” The agreement is a “good news story,” said Councillor John Grills. “It’s three times (what) they were required to build under their project … There’s an additional 126 beds, and there’s obviously a strong demand for it,” he said. “So I think it’s a good news story, and badly needed beds.” The project is also a success story as far as mixed-use developments go, said Coun. Jen Ford. “It’s close to an existing neighbourhood, it’s close to transit, this is a hugely successful proposal so I’m very excited to see this one happen,” she said. Along with the housing agreement, the conditions required for approval include planning for localized improvements along the frontage of Alpha Lake Road

and consideration for intersection improvements at Highway 99. A long-awaited traffic impact study has yet to be made public (see Pique, April 3).

TAX BYLAWS GET FIRST THREE READINGS Also at the April 16 meeting, council gave first three readings to its 2019 property tax and utility rate bylaws. As revealed at the budget open house in February, the bylaws include a 2.9-percent property tax increase, two-per-cent increases to sewer parcel and water fees, and a 3.6-per-cent increase to solid waste user fees. “What does that mean for individual taxpayers? This year and every year, the relative change of the value of your property will determine the direction of your tax bill,” said director of finance Carlee Price at the open house on Feb. 4. “So for 2019, the average residential assessment in Whistler is up 16.3 per cent. What that means is if your property appreciated by less ... your tax bill may actually fall. If your property is up by a greater amount, your tax bill may actually rise.” The 2019-2023 proposed projects list includes 176 projects worth $42.6 million (including $5.3 million carried over from 2018). The total municipal budget is worth $87 million this year, up from $85 million in 2018. n

Happy Easter

DEFINE YOUR LEGACY BLUEBERRY, WHISTLER

BLACKCOMB BENCHLANDS

BRACKENDALE, SQUAMISH

3366 Osprey Place | $4,500,000

301-4591 Blackcomb Way | $429,000

41496 Meadow Ave | $1,798,000

4 Beds | 3.5 Baths | 4,000 sq ft Elegant and grand with captivating views MLS #R2334184

Deluxe King Studio | Balcony Sleeper Sofa | 5 Star Amenities Revenues | Renovation Under Way MLS #R2304404

3 Beds + Rec Room/4th Bed + Office 3 Baths | 3,150 sq ft Pioneer Log Homes Masterpiece Waterfront on Dryden Creek MLS # R2312986

Katherine Currall Real Estate Advisor whistlerlegacy.com Phone 604-966-1364 katherine.currall@evcanada.com

KATHERINE CURRALL Engel & Völkers Whistler

*Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed and subject to change. Any reference to square footage is approximate. Buyers are recommended to perform own investigations.

30 APRIL 18, 2019


Happy Easter!

Basalt Living

Whistler OVER 75% SOLD Units now available:

#7: 3 Bedroom + Flex Room, 3.5 Bathroom - $1,899,000 #17: 4 Bedroom, 3.5 Bathroom - $1,799,000 #18: 4 Bedroom, 3.5 Bathroom - $1,849,000 A collection of 24 contemporary luxury mountain homes located in Whistler’s newest community, Cheakamus Crossing. Enjoy in-floor radiant heating throughout, 10 ft ceilings in the main living area, gas range & fireplace, Lutron control system and double car garage. Features a Masterchef’s kitchen with Sub Zero fridge, Wolf stove, U-Line wine fridge and waterfall quartz countertops. Stunning views and unparalleled access to all of Whistler’s outdoor recreational activities.

Steam shower Large covered decks Private Jacuzzi hot tub Electric blinds in master bedroom and living area Charging station for an electric car Pre-plumbed for air conditioning Concrete demising wall DON’T MISS OUT ON ONE OF WHISTLER’S LAST NEW HOME DEVELOPMENTS.

Steve Shuster t: 604.698.7347 | e: steve@steveshusterrealestate.com


NEWS WHISTLER

First-quarter climate plan update presented WILDFIRE PREPAREDNESS DAY SET FOR MAY 4

BY BRADEN DUPUIS RECRUITMENT OF Whistler’s full-time climate change coordinator is underway, with the successful candidate expected to start in May, according to the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW). Having the new staff member on board will help carry out actions in Whistler’s Community Energy and Climate Action Plan (CECAP), on which council received a first-quarter update at its April 16 meeting. The update highlighted wildfire-fuelreduction work and second reading of the Official Community Plan as two more positives on the CECAP front in Q1, while noting that transportation issues continue to be a priority item moving forward. A municipal incentive program offering $2,000 to residential and business owners looking to upgrade from fossil-fuel heating systems to electric (in addition to a $2,000 rebate from Efficiency BC) has yet to be taken advantage of, noted environmental coordinator Amy Sefton. “To date, no one’s redeemed one of these municipal top-ups,” she said. “So we are considering alternating (it).” While work is progressing on some

STAY SMART The Resort Municipality of Whistler was presented with a FireSmart Community Protection

Achievement Certificate from FireSmart Canada for its work in 2018. From left: deputy fire chief Chris Nelson, Jen Ford, Heather Beresford, Scott Rogers, Jack Crompton, Ralph Forsyth, John Grills, Duane Jackson, Cathy Jewett, Arthur De Jong. PHOTO BY BRADEN DUPUIS

fronts, many CECAP action items remain unchanged from the last update to council in December, the report concluded— though the addition of the climate-change coordinator and a new full-time solid waste technician will help speed up progress on energy and emission reduction. One of the first tasks of the solid waste technician will be initiating a zero waste

committee, Sefton said. Evaluations are also underway for metered water rates for industrial, commercial and institutional properties in Whistler. The update was timely, as the April 16 council package also included a letter from Whistler Secondary School (WSS) student Matt Ogilvie Turner regarding the March 15

school strike for climate action. In his letter (accompanied by the signatures of the 138 WSS students who supported the strike), Ogilvie Turner asked council to take further action on climate change, and activate on the CECAP with more urgency. “Last October the (RMOW) signed a climate change action letter,” Ogilvie Turner wrote. “Even though you backed away from it out of fear of reprisals by the fossil fuel industry, we support its message and hope that Whistler fully introduces its (CECAP).” In the letter, Ogilvie Turner notes that Whistler’s total CO2 emissions have been increasing in recent years, and acknowledges that the resort relies on millions driving and flying to stay here, “but is there an opportunity to educate all these people from all over the world about climate change and sustainability while they are here? Can we create our own carbon-offset program? Can we at least save the old-growth forest in our Community Forest?” he wrote. “Whistler’s leaders need to make their voices heard at the local, provincial and federal level. You have a powerful voice—

A RA fresh. modern. lakeside.

join us for Easter Sunday Brunch DINE OUT AT AURA THIS SPRING

3-COURSE PRIX FIXE MENU

$35

daily from 5:30 - 9:30 pm complimentary village shuttle & underground parking

aura restaurant |nitalakelodge.com | 604 966 5711 2131 lake placid rd, whistler creekside 32 APRIL 18, 2019

april 21st 11:00 am - 2:00 pm call 604 966 5711 to reserve! $59 per adult $29 kids, 8-12 free ages 7 & under

SEE PAGE 34

>>


PEMBERTON PEMBERTON

Discover Sunstone

Discover Sunstone

Master Planned: a thoughtfully planned on a Masterneighbourhood Planned: a thoughtfully sunny, south facing forested planned neighbourhood on a hillside. sunny, south facing forested hillside.

Community: Green space, parks, Community: Green space, parks, community garden and access to community garden and access to hiking and biking trails from your hiking and biking trails from your backyard. backyard.

Access: Adjacent to recreational Access: Adjacent to recreational amenities and new Friendship amenities and new Friendship Trail. Trail.

Unique Offering: Various sizes of Unique Offering: Various sizes of single-family building lots, estate single-family building lots, estate lots, as well as multi-family home lots, as well as multi-family home options. options. Views: Amazing, Views: Amazing,elevated elevated views ofof Mount views MountCurrie Currieand andthe the Pemberton Valley. Pemberton Valley. South Facing: AllAllday South Facing: daysun. sun. Great Value: 2525minutes Great Value: minutesfrom from Whistler yet a fractionofofthe the Whistler yet a fraction price. price.

HOME SITES SITES HOME

ELEVATE ELEVATE YOUR YOUR LIVING LIVING

from$649,000 $649,000 from Spacious, elegant homes feature

Spacious, elegant homes feature

open-concept layouts and

open-concept layouts and

unobstructed views complete unobstructed views complete withwith expansive decks large garages expansive decks andand large garages thoughtfully designed for your thoughtfully designed for your active Pemberton lifestyle. active Pemberton lifestyle.

Now selling. Now selling.

ElevateSunstone.com ElevateSunstone.com Keith McIvor Keith McIvor

604-935-2650 604-935-2650

1-800-667-2993 1-800-667-2993

SUNSTONE PHASE 1B â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ROOM TO GROW from $279,000

SUNSTONE PHASE 1Blotsâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; ranging ROOM TO GROW $279,000 24 carefully planned from 8,900 sq ft to from 19,700 sq ft. Situated a sunny south-facing to trails, amenities and 24oncarefully planned lots hillside rangingadjacent from 8,900 sq ft to 19,700 sqrecreation. ft.

Situated on a sunny south-facing hillside adjacent to trails, amenities and recreation. Now selling. SunstonePemberton.com

Now selling. SunstonePemberton.com

Sales office open by Sales office open by appointment, call appointment, call 604-935-2650

604-935-2650

sunstonepemberton.com

sunstonepemberton.com

The developer reserves the right to make changes and modification to the project design, specifications and features without notice. E&O.E. This advertisement does not constitute offers of sale capable of acceptance without a Disclosure Statement.

The developer reserves the right to make changes and modification to the project design, specifications and features without notice. E&O.E. This advertisement does not constitute offers of sale capable of acceptance without a Disclosure Statement.


NEWS WHISTLER << FROM PAGE 32 use it to help us.” Ogilvie Turner was on hand for the April 16 meeting with a handmade sign from the March 15 strike, and was recognized by council for his efforts. “Matt, thank you so much for your leadership, and all the young people behind you,” said Councillor Arthur De Jong, who oversees Whistler’s environment portfolio and was in attendance for the strike. “Keep it coming.” Mayor Jack Crompton agreed. “There are exciting actions for us to take around climate,” Crompton said. “We very much appreciate being pushed.”

WILDFIRE PREPAREDNESS DAY SET FOR MAY 4 Also at the April 16 meeting, council proclaimed May 4 as Wildfire Community Preparedness Day in Whistler. The RMOW is encouraging homeowners to take a close look at their properties to see how they might be protected using FireSmart principles. Whistler’s efforts as a municipality last year didn’t go unnoticed, with the RMOW being presented a FireSmart Community Protection Achievement Certificate from FireSmart Canada for its work in 2018. “This is a kudos from the national standard that says, ‘you guys are now in

very good company.’ This is something that we are proud of,” said FireSmart coordinator Scott Rogers, in a presentation to council. “This says we’re looking at it from the fire department helping with the critical infrastructure, the landscapelevel planning, the higher level with our Official Community Plan, and working with

FireSmart program and improvements to policy and process. FireSmart community chipper days and strata work days are also returning this year, as is the adopt-a-trail campaign (which is looking for volunteer groups to help FireSmart sections of the Valley Trail). Anyone interested in either can email

“This says we’re looking at it from the fire department helping with the critical infrastructure, the landscapelevel planning, the higher level with our Official Community Plan, and working with community members.” - SCOTT ROGERS

community members. “This says we’re doing a lot of good things, and they’re saying great job.” But the work is never done, and Whistler’s wildfire protection program will target three key areas in 2019: wildfire fuel reduction (on Cheakamus Lake Road, near Kadenwood, in the Rainbow interface area and around priority critical infrastructure areas), public education and support for the

Rogers at srogers@whistler.ca. The RMOW’s 2019-to-2023 proposed project list includes $639,540 for wildfire protection in 2019 (plus another $591,000 from provincial grants), and $3,448,900 from 2020 to 2023. For its part, the Whistler Fire Rescue Service (WFRS) will FireSmart around seven critical infrastructure sites from May to October, and is now outfitted with a

Utility Transport Vehicle armed with a fast response pump/foam unit to allow access to narrow trails and unpaved roads not suited for larger vehicles. The WFRS will also continue to do campfire inspections on properties this year, offering education on safety and FireSmart principles in the process (residents are required to apply for a free campfire permit at municipal hall). While Whistler is in the second year of a two-year pilot program with a German company called FireWatch—which installed two fire detection cameras in the valley last year—“the verdict is still out” on the cameras, said deputy fire chief Chris Nelson. “They monitor smoke-like conditions, and the cameras can see 14,000 different types of shades of grey … unfortunately, we get 1,000 false positive per day, so it’s like Chicken Little calling that the sky is falling,” Nelson said. Further to that, there was an instance last year where a small fire ignited on the east side of Green Lake that was noticed by members of the public—but went undetected by the closest FireWatch camera. “So it’s an expensive program, and not likely we’re going to do it (after this year) … during those extreme months of fire, (WFRS) does campfire patrols throughout the valley until midnight,” Nelson said. “So we’re very vigilant, we’re very aware of what the conditions are, and even with very, very high smoke concentration in the valley, we’re able to see anything unusual.” n

HOLY WEEK SCHEDULE FOR ROMAN CATHOLIC PARISHES Our Lady of the Mountains - Whistler, 6299 Lorimer Rd St. Christopher’s - Mt. Currie, Main St at Hwy 99 St. Francis of Assisi - Pemberton, 1360 Pemberton Farm Rd West

HOLY THURSDAY OF THE LORD’S SUPPER, APRIL 18 St. Christopher’s at 5 p.m. Our Lady of The Mountains at 7 p.m. FRIDAY OF THE PASSION OF THE LORD, GOOD FRIDAY, APRIL19 St. Christopher’s Celebration of the Lord’s Passion at 3 p.m. Our Lady of The Mountains Stations of the Cross at 3 p.m. Celebration of the Lord’s Passion at 5:45 p.m. HOLY SATURDAY, APRIL 20 Our Lady of The Mountains Blessing of the Festive Foods at 11 a.m. and after Easter Vigil THE RESURRECTION OF THE LORD, EASTER VIGIL First Mass of Easter at 8 p.m. EASTER SUNDAY MASSES, APRIL 21 Our Lady of The Mountains at 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. St. Christopher’s at 11 a.m. St. Francis of Assisi at 12:30 p.m. Confessions ½ hour before Mass or by appointment, call 604-938-6643 For more info please go to www.whistlercatholicchurch.ca

34 APRIL 18, 2019


NEWS WHISTLER

Employer Health Tax having unintended consequences on small business BC, WHISTLER CHAMBERS SAY NEW TAX COULD HAMPER GROWTH OF SMALL-BUSINESS SECTOR

BY BRANDON BARRETT B.C.’S NEW Employer Health Tax (EHT) has only been in effect since Jan. 1, but small businesses are already warning of the potential unintended side effects it could have on their bottom line. The EHT is a 2.925-per-cent tax applied to employers whose payroll remuneration is between $500,000 and $1.5 million for the year. (Employers whose payrolls exceed $1.5 million are taxed at 1.95 per cent.) That payroll amount factors in the remuneration paid to employees belonging to separate incorporated businesses under a parent company, which is the case for Priyanka Lewis, who operates three local restaurants and bars: Brickworks, Three Below and Main Street Noodles. “For us, we’re a small, locally owned business, and the size of each of our companies isn’t huge,” explained Lewis. “They’re all individual businesses, but because the Employer Health Tax and income tax classes us as one relatable company, because we have common ownership, we’re affected massively by the

cap that has been put on our payroll.” Lewis expects her EHT contributions to be about $30,000 this year, which could make all the difference in a sector that already operates with razor-thin profit margins. “I’m not saying employers shouldn’t contribute at all. I think it’s a great system and it should be required, but I think the parameters for which the program was rolled out weren’t fully thought out for B.C.,” she added. What’s more is, because of the international makeup of Whistler’s workforce, Lewis estimated that only 10 of her 75 employees are actually eligible for extended medical coverage in B.C. “A lot of my employees are on a visa and come here with travel insurance for one year. We’re getting them on the tail end of their visas, so we’re getting them for six months, and they wouldn’t be eligible to get MSP,” she said. “But they are still included in my payroll number and there is no distinction between eligibility and non-eligibility.” Lewis voiced her concerns to Dan Baxter, director of policy development for the BC Chamber of Commerce, at a recent Whistler Chamber of Commerce Power Lunch. He said the issues showed why the provincial business

Join us for

Easter Brunch with Egg Hunt at the Hilton Whistler Sunday, April 21 Egg Hunt at 10am in the Hilton Whistler Courtyard – find the golden egg and win Brunch for 4 people! Brunch buffet served from 10:30am to 1pm - book on opentable.com

TAX TROUBLES Priyanka Lewis, owner-operator of Main Street Noodles, Brickworks and Three Below, pictured, says B.C.’s new Employer Health Tax will unfairly hamper small-business owners.

PHOTO COURTESY OF 3 BELOW

network had called for more discussion with Victoria before the tax was rolled out. “We appreciate what the government is trying to do, which is raise revenue for healthcare and other social programs they want to invest in, but there is obviously going to be an impact on small business

and what we don’t want to do is make it more challenging for small businesses that are the backbone of our economy,” he said. The BC Chamber has lobbied for the $500,000 payroll exemption to be increased to $1.5 million, which Baxter said would help ease the financial strain on small businesses in particular. “We are told that $500,000 is basically a five-person-or-less business, effectively what’s called a micro-business. Our members are saying that is too low when you think about how small business, under the B.C. definition, goes up to 50 employees,” Baxter said. “So what about those companies with between six and 50 employees? This could be a sizable impact on their bottom line.” The $500,000 limit could also force companies to curb their long-term growth, warned Melissa Pace, president of the Whistler Chamber of Commerce. “If I’m at $495,000 in payroll, why would I include another additional person and grow my business if I’m then going to have to pay 2.925 per cent on top?” she asked. “It is not really set up to incentivize small businesses to necessarily want to grow their business.” n

Reduce your environmental

Housing contributes 30% of all greenhouse gasses

A PASSIVE HOUSE uses up to 90% less energy than a normal house To learn more go to: SUMMERHILLCONSTRUCTION.COM

Maximize revenues, minimize headaches. Professional Operating in Whistler since 2004. Efficient Low expenses, high bottom-line revenues. Comprehensive Full-service unit care.

Adults $47 Children (6-12) $23.50 Children (5 & under) FREE 36 APRIL 18, 2019

Colouring contest during brunch

Consistently outperforming self-management. Call us at 604-932-3510


#ResurrectionOfCreekside

What’s going on Easter Weekend? All Weekend Long 6:00am Altitude Fitness $10 Classes $10 Drop In 9:00am Ed’s BRED Fresh Hot Cross Buns 9:00am Orb Clothing 50%-80% Off Women's Lifestyle Fashion

7:00am-10:00pm Creekside Market Colouring Competition (See page 7) www.creeksidemarket.com 9:00am Get The Goods Spot Sale on selected goods 10:00am 122 West 15% Store Wide Sale

Sunday 22 April 2:00pm Shauna O’Callaghan Family Photo Portraits

2:00pm Gingerbread House Free Easter Egg Hunt Around Creekside


NEWS WHISTLER

RMOW developing grizzly management plan for alpine trail network PLAN COMES AFTER GRIZZLY-BEAR ENCOUNTERS PROMPTED CLOSURE OF TRAILS LAST SUMMER

BY BRANDON BARRETT AS

WHISTLER’S ALPINE trail network is only set to grow busier after its first full year being open to the public, the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) is developing a plan to mitigate potential conflict with grizzly bears. The RMOW officially opened a series of hiking and biking trails on Mount Sproatt and Rainbow Mountain last July. By September, the province had temporarily closed the alpine trail network after two separate groups of hikers had a close call with a grizzly near Rainbow Lake. “Because there was no other plan in place, it was either all (the trails were kept) open or they were all closed,” explained Heather Beresford, the RMOW’s manager of environmental stewardship, in a presentation to mayor and council on Tuesday, April 16. “We decided it was necessary to put a plan in place … and even though the province has the ultimate authority to open and close trails, the

RMOW took the lead on developing an approach.” Part of the RMOW’s broader recreational trails strategy that is currently underway, the draft conflict-mitigation plan is focused on four specific initiatives: public education and communication; planning and trail modifications; enforcement and restrictions; and the municipality’s alpine trail ranger program. Beresford said the RMOW would be ramping up its public messaging around grizzly bears this year, with an emphasis on trailhead signage and social media. “We’ve been working on this for the last couple years and further back with black bears,” she noted. “Grizzlies weren’t really part of our thinking of the types of animals we have in this area … but we need to incorporate that type of messaging into our signs, social media, and on our website.” Last summer, the RMOW contracted the Wind River Bear Institute to undertake a bear-risk assessment on Sproatt’s trails. The recommendations that came out of that effort will be used for existing trails as well as any future trails that may be added to the

alpine network. “What could we do around sightlines? What could we do about berries? Information for the public. All those recommendations … have been folded into our conflict-mitigation strategy,” Beresford explained. Although the municipality does not have enforcement authority on Crown land, the RMOW has committed to gathering insights this year so that “we really understand clearly what the emerging issues are, where the hotspots are, and then really clarifying with the province and the Conservation Officer Service how all this is going to work,” said Beresford. A key element of that research will be the RMOW’s alpine trail ranger program, first introduced to Sproatt and Rainbow in 2017. Part of the rangers’ duties is to collect wildlife observation data and educate the public on proper wildlife practices. “Those people that are going to be out in the field this year will be really integral to collecting that information, talking with people, sharing information about what best habits are when you’re

George Mitchell Henry

EST.2006

May 12, 1937 December 29, 2018

Immigrating great people to a great country. We are experts in Canadian immigration law with an established reputation for delivering results. Our Roadmap Consultation identifies options for immigrating to Canada or hiring a foreign worker. Our clients agree this is a vital step to achieving their immigration objectives. Head Office in Whistler: 201 – 4230 Gateway Drive

out there,” Beresford said, adding that the data will be fed back to RMOW planning staff so that “we can adjust as we move forward.” Johnny Mikes of the Coast to Cascades Grizzly Bear Initiative, which has been consulted on the draft plan, is hopeful the final report will “emphasize the bear perspective.” “Now we’re seeing more of that emphasis (in the RMOW’s trail planning) and we really want to make sure that it’s looked at comprehensively from a wildlife perspective,” he added. Coast to Cascades has also asked Dr. Lana Ciarniello, one of Canada’s leading bear experts with the International Union for Conservation of Nature, to review the plan and provide recommendations. “We hope she looks at the plan and gives it a thumb’s up … but if there are some aspects of it that need a little bit of work, we look forward to Dr. Ciarniello giving us that information and passing it on to the muni, (which will) hopefully incorporate it into the plan,” he added. The RMOW expects the plan to be finalized this year. n

A tribute to George will be held on Saturday, May 4, 2019, from 2 - 4:30 p.m. At the Meadows at Pemberton Golf Course, Airport Road, Pemberton BC. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Pemberton & District Health Care Foundation

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4PM

(inside the Whistler Chamber of Commerce) -LUXURY REAL ESTATERENEECASANO.COM

Brooke Finlay, Partner & Managing Director, RCIC #514337 Authorized by the Government of Canada to represent applications to the Minister of Immigration. Brooke graduated top of her class from UBC’s Certificate in Immigration: Laws, Policies and Procedures program and was recognized by the Canadian Association of Professional Immigration Consultants for her academic achievements.

E:

Call us at 1-888-266-1161 info@whistlerimmigration.com w: whistlerimmigration.com

38 APRIL 18, 2019

$1,099,000

#32-6125 Eagle Drive, Whistler Cay Heights Private end unit on the quiet side of Smoketree (no highway noise!). 2BR+bunk room/2BA, open floor plan & updated throughout. Bright w/ vaulted ceilings, picture windows & mountain views. 2 parking at your door & storage. Rentals & pets OK.

CARLY CASANO

778 938 5516 carly@reneecassano.com


NEWS WHISTLER

Charting long-term change in Whistler lakes RESEARCHER SEEKS LOCALS’ STORIES ABOUT LOST LAKE, ALTA LAKE

5

BY BRADEN DUPUIS CALLING ALL LOCAL history buffs: your knowledge of Whistler’s lakes is needed— or, more specifically, your stories about the evolution of Lost Lake and Alta Lake. “The reason I’m doing this talk is because I need stories. I do a lot of science on lakes … but the science isn’t worth anything without the stories,” said Ian Spooner, head of the Department of Earth and Environmental Science at Acadia University, in a talk at the Whistler Museum on April 11. For several years now, Spooner has been doing paleolimnology work on some of Whistler’s lakes—taking core samples of lake sediment to understand both external and internal influences on the lakes. More recently, he’s taken to comparing Alta Lake and Lost Lake—the former a lake with a lot of development, and the latter a lake largely removed from those pressures. While all core samples will show signs of “natural variability”—impacts on the lake from the natural environment—it’s the less-standard deviations that Spooner is looking for. In the case of Alta Lake, recent core samples show copper and arsenic levels returning to normal background levels (good news), while productivity and human-caused “nutrient loading”—signaled by an increase in nitrogen—continue to increase (bad news). “With nitrogen, it’s a signal of human nutrient loading—so poop and pee,” Spooner said. “And it’s not going back either.” Many people have asked him what the cause might be, and “we think we see a strong signal of septic,” Spooner said. The Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) is still working to connect 33 lots on Alta Lake Road (on the west side of Alta Lake) to the municipal sewer system—the last remaining homes in the valley still using private septic tanks. The RMOW has budgeted $100,000 for the project in 2019, followed by $3,002,500 in 2020 and $500,000 in 2021, all from the sewer capital reserve. An RMOW spokesperson said staff have met with a resident representative and the municipality is “working with them to prepare a petition for a local area service. We expect that paperwork will be circulated to those residents in the coming weeks.” There have been many studies done on Alta Lake over the years, looking at everything from environmental impacts and the source of elevated coliforms to swimmer’s itch and ecosystem degradation, Spooner said, adding that recent water quality studies have shown the lake to have excellent water quality. But Spooner’s data shows a deviation

ANNIVERSARY MENU

37

FROM LOCAL FARMS TO YOUR TABLE FOR 37 YEARS

Begins April 22nd

Offered Sundays - Thursdays

Reservations recommended

apres daily in the lounge from 3-5 pm oyster specials & bar menu dinner from 5 pm

LAKE LORE Ian Spooner presents at the Whistler Museum on April 11. PHOTO BY BRADEN DUPUIS

from the long-term norm. “There’s always variability, whether it’s a little ice age or some climate events, but this is not within normal variability,” he said, adding that copper and arsenic returning to background levels is a positive, but “the carbon and nitrogen aren’t good, and they don’t seem to show a trend of returning. “So we should be very vigilant right now.” Consistent outbreaks of swimmer’s itch (more common with increased human nutrients) are “extremely hard to deal with,” he added. To get a better understanding of what’s happening in Alta Lake, Spooner turned his attention to the quieter shores of Lost Lake. “We did the work (at Lost Lake) because we wanted to see how much of the arsenic and the copper and the zinc and the things we saw in Alta Lake were geogenic, or geological, and how much of them might be associated with development,” Spooner said. “Because Lost Lake has got a different history, and I think people have been fairly careful about protecting that watershed from development.” But to get a more fulsome understanding of Lost Lake’s pressures, Spooner needs to hear from Whistler locals. “I’ve got to know where the water is coming from, because that’s where the minerogenic matter is coming from—the little clay, silt particles that carry the metal. I’ve got to know where the geology is, where the rivers are feeding that sediment into the lake from,” he said. “I need the history of water course development for Lost Lake, and I think the museum is going to help ... but I think people here might have stories.” Anyone with information to share is welcome to reach out to Spooner by email at ian.spooner@acadiau.ca. n

4222 village square

604 932 4540

www.araxi.com

Get your Tax Refund

IN CASH! ...with JustTax

Also lizing in specia ts esiden Non-R rk on Wo Visas

MONEY MART - WHISTLER Village Stroll (Eagle Lodge) 604.932.1620 Open 7 Days A Week

APRIL 18, 2019

39


NEWS PEMBERTON & THE VALLEY

Village of Pemberton to support archeological survey COUNCIL BRIEFS: BYLAW INTERPRETATION; PEDESTRIAN SAFETY

BY JOEL BARDE VILLAGE OF Pemberton (VOP) council instructed staff during its April 16 regular council meeting to move forward with a plan to commission an archeological study in an area slated for forest thinning. The area, which is being thinned as a wildfire mitigation measure, is on the hillside north of Pemberton. “We want to make sure that we work with Lil’wat (Nation) to ensure that if there are any historical sites, they get preserved,” explained VOP Mayor Mike Richman, following meeting. A number of ishkins (underground living structures, traditionally used to survive winter months) have been found in the Pemberton area, noted Richman. The VOP is looking for an additional $9,000 to cover the cost of the study, which was recently suggested by the contractor that will be carrying out the thinning project. Council therefore instructed staff to look into the budget for places where the money can be drawn from. During discussions, Councillor Ted Craddock suggested using money allocated towards an economic development strategy to pay for it, saying that Tourism Pemberton is currently undertaking two similar studies and the fuel-thinning project is of vital importance. Coun. Ryan Zant asked what the

THINNING PROJECT VOP council discussed procedure at its April 16 meeting.

PHOTO BY JOEL BARDE

40 APRIL 18, 2019

discovery of an ancestral site would mean to the overall thinning project, wondering if it could derail it. There would likely be a way to safeguard the ancestral site in question, and carry on with the thinning project if that were the case, said Nikki Gilmore, chief administrative officer of the VOP. The archeological study is slated to be undertaken by the Lil’wat Nation. Coun. Amica Antonelli suggested that another company should be contacted to

comes to decisions. The move comes after Antonelli questioned staff’s interpretation of a section that governs who can call an item back for reconsideration after it has been voted on. During a Feb. 19 regular council meeting, Antonelli contended that someone who votes in opposition to a majority vote has the right to call it back; the staff position is that only those councillors who vote with the majority can request to bring an item back. A decision was made to seek further legal

“We want to make sure that we work with Lil’wat (Nation) to ensure that if there are any historical sites, they get preserved. ” - MIKE RICHMAN

get a comparison on cost; she put forward a motion to “explore the costs of the survey” that was defeated. Gilmore said that going with another company for the study was inadvisable. “We did go to the contractor and say, ‘Is it typical that we go to Lil’wat to undertake this?’” she said. “He said it would be … His recommendation (was) that we go with Lil’wat.”

BYLAW INTERPRETATION VOP council also adopted new wording in its procedural bylaw, which governs how council

opinion on the matter at the time. During the April 16 meeting, Gilmore relayed that the legal opinion supported staff’s interpretation of the bylaw, while also recommending some clarifications to the wording. Antonelli again questioned the interpretation, saying that it is important for all councillors to have the ability to bring an item back for reconsideration. If the VOP wants the “highest and best” engagement it needs to empower all councilors with the right to bring items back, she said. “If we change this, it means that

members of the public will have to track down a council member, or the mayor, who is not in agreement with their view and try to convince them to take (the item) back to council,” she said. Coun. Ted Craddock supported the staff interpretation, saying that it is in line with other municipalities. “If I came back to the council table on every single issue that people approach me (about), we’d be here for a lot of days and months going over and over things,” he said.

PEDESTRIAN SAFETY VOP council also received a letter from MLA Jordan Sturdy calling on the province to enact measures to improve pedestrian safety in the Pemberton area. The letter, which was addressed to the Ministry of Transportation, calls on the province to install a “pedestrian-activated flashing amber light at the crosswalk on Portage Road in front of Signal Hill Elementary School,” as well as a “pedestrianactivated flashing amber caution light” crossing Highway 99, adjacent to the Creekside Village neighbourhood. In his comments to Pique, Richman said council would be meeting directly with Sturdy to discuss the letter and pedestrian safety. “There are certainly safety concerns crossing Highway 99, going towards One Mile Lake, especially as the community builds out, and that’s certainly something we want to address,” said Richman. Richman said that the VOP has “a couple thoughts” on safety concerns and will discuss it further before setting its top priorities. n


NEWS PEMBERTON & THE VALLEY

GOOD TIMES SSHS Health Director Rosemary Stager with Stl’atl’imx youth at the Kindness Project launch on Saturday, April 13.

PHOTO BY SIMON BEDFORD

Indigenous health initiative goes viral POSTER FOR A NEW PROGRAM AIMED AT SOUTHERN STL’ATLIMX COMMUNITIES GOES VIRAL

$39 - FOUR COURSE

PRIX FIXE MENU CELEBRATE SPRING FLAVOURS WITH CHEF WALT’S ITALIAN-INSPIRED SEASONAL CREATIONS.

BY JOEL BARDE BEFORE ITS OFFICIAL launch, the people behind the Southern Stl’atlimx Health Society’s (SSHS) newest health and wellbeing initiative knew they were on to something. A poster they created for the project— which is being called the Kindness Project—went viral on Facebook, resonating with Indigenous peoples in North America and beyond. “I’m getting comments and inbox (messages) from people around the world,” said Rosemary Stager, who serves as health director for the (SSHS). “It’s really (interesting) to read how much people are affected by colonization globally.” The poster—titled How to Live a Decolonized Life—provides a number of suggestions on how to live happier and healthier lives, such as “get outside and get to know your traditional territory,” “learn your language,” and “celebrate everyone’s success.” (It now has over 1,200 shares and has been viewed over 100,000 times, according to the SSHS.) “We decided to focus on where we want to be, rather than where we are,” said Stager, whose mother is white and from Pemberton, and father is a Lil’wat Nation hereditary chief. The Kindness Project was officially launched at the Xet’olacw Community School in Mount Currie on Saturday, April 13, with almost 200 people in attendance. According to Stager, entire families as well as chiefs from of the four communities that the SSHS serves—N’Quatqua, Samahquam, Skatin and Xax’sta (Douglas) First Nations—were on hand. The day began with a traditional ceremony and included listening to a fulllength CD, with cultural narratives and Ucwalmícwts songs that was released as part of the project. An important goal of the Kindness Project is to bring about a greater

understanding of lateral violence in Stl’atlimx communities, said Stager, adding that she was introduced to the concept through a First Nations Health Authority conference and feels it is vitally important to understand. Lateral violence seen in Indigenous communities traces back to residential schools, where kids were forcibly removed from their homes and traumatized on a daily basis, explained Stager. “They had no control of their oppressors,” she said. “They had no control over what the priests or nuns were doing to them, and they had all this energy built up, and they couldn’t give it to their perpetrators because they were too powerful.” That energy has too often been directed at other students and family “because that energy has to go somewhere,” she said. The effects can be profound. “You grow up in it. It’s all around you,” said Stager of lateral violence. “So we really want to change it, especially in an era where we are looking at rebuilding our First Nations governments … It’s a major barrier.” Stager added that there is strong desire within the lower Stl’atlimx communities to address issues through traditional ways. Things like the SSHS’s men’s groups— which have helped Stl’atlimx men build hunting cabins in their traditional territory and learn how to properly skin a deer— are viewed as important health-related initiatives, she explained. “We are really trying to bring back the knowledge on how to pick different medicines … and (learn) how to use them,” added Stager. Stager sees the Kindness Project as part of a broader effort to flip the paradigm of medicine altogether. “When you look at the stories traditionally, the way we approached medicine back in the day was preventative,” she said. “We really (want) to bring that other way back and increase our awareness of preventative (medicines)… (and) making better choices.” For more information visit:/ sshskindnessproject.ca. n

Begins April 22nd Offered Sundays through Thursdays

Dinner from 5:30 pm. Reservations recommended. 4242 VILLAGE STROLL

604 932 4442

ILCAMINETTO.CA

APRIL 18, 2019

41


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

Vancouver MEC store joins union UNITED FOOD AND COMMERCIAL WORKERS UNION 1518 HAS BEEN ORGANIZING IN WHISTLER OVER PAST TWO YEARS

BY JOEL BARDE A UNION that is actively courting Whistler workers recently added a significant Vancouver business to its ranks, persuading workers at the West Broadway location of Mountain Equipment Co-op (MEC) to join its ranks in a vote on Thursday, April 11. “There is a large group of workers that clearly want to have a strong voice at their work and fight for wages, benefits and job security there,” said Patrick Johnson, secretary treasurer for the United Food & Commercial Workers (UFCW) Union 1518. According to Johnson, staff at the popular store, which employs more than 200 people, largely led the unionization effort. “It was great to work on an organizing drive with such a strong inside committee of workers who were really committed to the effort,” he said. “They didn’t want the union to just come in and do it—but (rather to) be a part of it.” Pique asked to speak to one of the newly unionized MEC employees, but was told by the union that some are bound by confidentiality agreements and others were “uncomfortable” speaking to the

BIG DECISION Staff at the West Broadway location of the Mountain Equipment Co-op recently voted to join the United Food & Commercial Workers Union 1518. PHOTO BY DAREN VERES

42 APRIL 18, 2019

media at this point. Work to unionize the MEC store began in 2018 and was kicked into high gear over the last couple months, with workers signing union cards and the Labour Relations Board ordering the Thursday vote. There is a “very strong majority” in favour of unionization at the store, said Johnson. “There is a lot of support and solidarity,” he said. “It’s not a divided unit. They are ready to move forward.” According to a spokesperson for MEC, of the 121 staff members eligible to vote, 85 voted “yes” while 36 voted “no.” “Our preference is always to work directly with employees to resolve issues,” reads a statement put out by MEC on the vote. “However, we respect the decision of staff in our Broadway store in Vancouver to unionize. Our people are important to MEC’s success, and we strive to continue to reward and support them with a fair and competitive compensation package that is also sustainable for MEC.” Many of the issues the workforce is facing revolve around having “a voice” and “sticking together,” rather than issues related to pay, added Johnson. “It wasn’t as if everyone was saying, ‘We need better this or that,’” he said. “It was really everyone saying, ‘How do we stand together and have worker solidarity within a cooperative employer?” According to Johnson, the UFCW will be “happy to assist” any other MEC stores

across the country that may be looking to follow the path laid out by the Broadway store. “There have already been questions about whether we can organize in Langley or Kelowna,” said Johnson. For the last couple years, the UFCW has been attempting to unionize Whistler businesses under a group called the Whistler Workers’ Alliance. As reported by Pique (“Whistler Blackcomb ski instructors leading union push,” Feb. 22, 2018), last year, a group of Whistler Blackcomb ski instructors announced they had been meeting with representatives from the UFCW for about a year, with the aim of eventually organizing the ski resort’s entire workforce. At the time, the union also said it would like to unionize other businesses in the resort. According to Keith Murdoch, a UFCW organizer focused on Whistler, the union has been hosting weekly meetings at Hunter Gather. Murdoch describes it as a venue for people “to learn about their rights under (the) Employment Standards (Act) ... as well as being a venue for workers to go get their questions answered.” Attendance for the meetings has ranged, with some meetings drawing as few as one or two people, while others attracting between 15 and 20, he said. “We actually ended up getting more folks from the hospitality side of things coming out to those events than (from)

some other areas,” remarked Murdoch. “But all around, we had folks from a variety of workplaces coming out.” According to Murdoch, the union is still focused on the resort’s largest employer— Whistler Blackcomb—but the transient nature of Whistler remains an obstacle. “Another dynamic is that there are also a lot of retirees who are kind of settled in Whistler,” added Murdoch. “They may have their pensions and work for their pensions as well.” That said, the UFCW is making progress on the seniors’ front, he added. “Even with that group, we ended up getting some good traffic there, because people are recognizing that they are earning less than they ever have and that we are going the wrong way.” According to Murdoch, there are “a lot of similarities” in the type of people who work at MEC and choose to live in Whistler, with both groups looking for the income and flexibility to chase their passions. He feels that the union’s efforts in the community are becoming better known and that that will help with its efforts to unionize businesses. “I think there is a growing recognition of the work we are here,” he said. “You have to have good jobs to have good communities, and we are here to try and facilitate those things.” According to the UFCW, the last scheduled “Worker Wednesday” meeting (for the winter season) is scheduled for April 24. n


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

D

N KE

EE

NA

Mountain News: Steamboat plans plastic bag ban, but legality a bit murky BY ALLEN BEST allen.best@comcast.net STEAMBOAT

SPRINGS, Colo. – Steamboat Springs has decided to say no more to freebie plastic bags at four of its major stores come October. But can it legally do so? It seems late to ask that question. Twelve Colorado towns and cities, all but one of them located within the mountains, have banned or implemented a fee on single-use plastic bags. But the Colorado Sun points to one very basic problem: it may be against a state law adopted in 1993. The law preempts local jurisdictions from limiting what types of plastics can be recycled. It was created to incentivize people to recycle. The specific language may have been a compromise with the plastic industry, says Morgan Cullen, legislative and policy advocate for the Colorado Municipal League. In other words, the language was not intended to mean that towns and cities had no authority to ban plastic bags. But it’s hazy. In 1993 “no one was considering the prohibition of plastics,” Cullen told the Sun. “And now it’s 2019 and the general public has become more aware of the environmental costs of plastics and are beginning to petition their local governments about removing single-use plastics.” Petitioning the Steamboat Springs City Council by local high school students triggered the impending municipal ban. Steamboat Pilot & Today reports that students last November told the council members it was time for Steamboat to join its peers among mountain towns. The ordinance to be drafted will call for ban of single-use plastic bags at stores of more than 10,000 square feet. Paper bags can be provided but at a cost of $0.20 each. Three quarters of the revenue will go to the city. Smaller retailers can opt into the program and they can retain the fee. The four stores—two grocery stores, a Walmart, and a Walgreens—distribute 3.8 million plastic bags per year. A bag ban was first proposed in Steamboat in 1989 by a coalition called Environmental 2000. “It was a relatively new idea,” Steamboat resident Johnny Walker told the Steamboat paper. “It was decided to wait and see what other communities were doing before we really took the leap.” Telluride was the first municipality in Colorado to take the leap. That was in 2011. The adoption—applicable to the town’s two grocery stores, with the option of a $0.05 paper bag—followed a competition with Aspen to see who could produce the greatest reduction in bags based on voluntary efforts. That same competition was then expanded to other jurisdictions that were then part of the Colorado Association of Ski Towns.

LW

FI

Even then, Telluride was wary of the state law. Kevin Geiger, the town attorney, told the Sun that the 1993 law was pretty clear about local governments not preventing the recycling of plastics. But the provision has stopped Telluride from a longer reach, to ban disposable forks and straws, as some council members want. The 1993 law also thwarted Avon’s reach last year. It banned plastic bags but stopped short of polystyrene, foam containers, as some on the council wanted. The Colorado Municipal League’s Cullen has been working with state legislators on a proposal to clearly delegate to local jurisdictions authority to regulate plastic straws, containers, and other plastics.

AND IT’S ONLY PAPER BAGS FOR CUSTOMERS IN JACKSON JACKSON, Wyo. – It’s either BYOB—bring your own bag—or a paper bag at $0.20 per bag at six stores in Jackson. Come November, other merchants in Jackson—the only town in Jackson Hole— must similarly cease free distribution of plastic bags. The town began taking steps last year, wanting to allow the stores time to prepare. But one of the stores, Whole Grocer, phased out plastic bags in December. Reaction has been mixed, checkout staffer Caitlin Brooks tells the Jackson Hole News&Guide. “Some are upset about it and want us to tell the manager they want the plastic bags back,” she said. “Others say, ‘It’s about time.’” Some have protested that paper bags are not better than plastic. But paper bags can have a second life as cardboard, says Carrie Bell, waste diversion and outreach coordinator for Teton County. “Paper bags have high recyclability,” she said. “Plastics really don’t.” One of Jackson’s grocery stores, Smith’s, is operated by Kroger, the supermarket chain that has a similarly branded store in Park City and, in Colorado, a fleet of City Markets and King Soopers. By 2025, it plans to phase out use-once, throw-it-away plastic bags throughout its 2,764 supermarkets and multi-department stores.

d! e v i r r a s a h g n i r Sp

Let us do a seasonal or weekly clean up of your property.

Our team can provide: Spring & Fall Clean-up · Weekly Maintenance On Call Maintenance Renovations and Design Services EMAIL YOUR REQUESTS TO:

carolyn@mountainberrylandscaping.ca OR TEXT:

604-905-9600

FREE SKIING ENDS FOR THOSE 70 AND ABOVE AT WHITEFISH WHITEFISH, Mont. – It was another record year for skier visits at Whitefish Mountain Resort, the third in a row. Business is so good that the resort owners now plan to start charging those aged 70 and above $135 for an annual pass. Riley Polumbus, spokesperson for Whitefish Mountain Resort, said assessing the septuagenarians and their elders a

SEE PAGE 44

>> APRIL 18, 2019

43


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE << FROM PAGE 43 minimal charge was necessary as that age demographic grows. “This particular age demographic is healthier and more active than ever,” said Dan Graves, chief executive of the ski area. “We are very much in awe of these dedicated skiers. However, each year of growth has added to the demands of our facilities.”

Mountain and a trail across Vail Pass. Vail has been allowing use of e-bikes, both kinds, on its pathways since early 2018. However, it does not allow e-bikes that go up to 45 km/h. It’s possible to then continue down valley on a dedicated bike/ pedestrian trail hewing to the Eagle River and then at Dotsero, the Colorado River to Glenwood Springs.

E-BIKES ALLOWED ON PATH LINKING SUMMIT COUNTY

SNOWMAKING EXPANSIONS AT VAIL CONTINUES 40 YEARS LATER

BRECKENRIDGE, Colo. — Summit County has a 90-km asphalt trail that connects most of the county’s six towns with a link also to Copper Mountain and to Vail. It’s wonderful for bicycling—but not, so far, for e-bikes. County officials and Breckenridge both planned to begin allowing those e-bikes that operate only when the rider is pedaling and the motor cuts out when the e-bike reaches speeds of 32 kilometres per hour or greater. Another class of e-bikes has motors that are controlled by throttles and assist riders regardless of whether the rider is pedaling or not. Those, however, will not be allowed. Clearing the way for the new policy was a new state law in 2017 that permits both classes of e-bikes onto pedestrian pathways where bicycles are also allowed. But the law gave final say to local jurisdictions. That same path connects to Cooper

VAIL, Colo. – The armoring of Vail Mountain to the vagaries of weather and now climate change continues. The Vail Daily reports that Vail Resorts has received approval from the U.S. Forest Service to add about 106 hectares of snowmaking coverage to the mountain. When the snowmaking expansion is completed in several years, about 25 per cent of the mountain’s terrain—one of the largest in North America—will be covered. The goal, explains the Daily, is to deliver near certainty for Thanksgiving skiing. That’s a quest that Vail has struggled with since its opening in 1962. That inaugural year had a parched autumn that continued past Thanksgiving. In the resort’s early years, reliable snow was an iffy thing until Christmas. Beginning in 1978, after one of the worst droughts in recorded history, Vail

began investing robustly in snowmaking. Obviously, it hasn’t quit.

FEBRUARY COLD SNAP TOOK TOLL ON BEETLES IN JASPER JASPER, Alta. – It got cold enough in February in Jasper National Forest that by one estimate 90 per cent of bark beetles may have died. But the number of red trees in the park will expand this summer, reports The Fitzhugh, because of concurrent spread of beetles last year. A 2017 survey found that 93,000 hectares of the park’s 200,000-hectare pine forests had been impacted by bark beetles in this epidemic. The newspaper notes that extinguishing wildfire in the past has allowed the forests to become more dense and older, making them more vulnerable to the insects.

JUST WHO HAS THE BOTTOM RUNG OF THE RESORT LADDER? KETCHUM, Idaho – Ketchum and Sun Valley, the first deliberately created destination ski resort in North America, by the end of the 20th century had become something of a quasi-private ski area for locals. To remedy that, Ketchum—the town at the base of Bald Mountain—set out to revamp its development regulations to make them friendlier to new and taller

hotels. The most obvious result was the Limelight, which was built by the Aspen Skiing Co. The community also boosted its direct flight program. Still, Ketchum and Sun Valley lack the commercial vibrancy of other destination resorts, consultant Ralf Garrison told a recent forum at the Limelight in Ketchum. Local lodging properties have occupancy rates of 30 to 40 percent during December, January, and February, he said. Competing resorts average occupancy rates of 50 to 65 percent during those same months. During the winter of 2017-18, he told the Idaho Mountain Express, occupancy rates provided profitability for tourism-reliant businesses on just 62 of the 180 days of the winter season. Aspen, he went on to say, generates $30 million annually from lodging tax revenue, Jackson nets $27 million, Mammoth $20 million, and Steamboat Springs $10 million. “You’re going to be competing against Gunnison and Crested Butte for the bottom rung of the ladder,” said Garrison. Garrison began his career in the tourism sector in the late ‘60s at the new resort of Crested Butte, where he helped found the town of Mt. Crested Butte. Garrison was in Ketchum to make the case for boosted funding from Ketchum for marketing promotion. The Express did not identify who was paying him, although the clearest beneficiary of his remarks was Visit Sun Valley, the tourism promotion agency.

WALSH

RESTORATION Resort Municipality of Whistler

Free Yard Waste Drop Off USE A WALSH CUBE TRUCK FOR FREE TO MOVE YOUR POSSESSIONS TO WALSH STORAGE We Added More Containers!

WALSH STORAGE Pemberton Industrial Park - 1944 Stone Cutter Place Owner Residence On-Site

8 X 10 CONTAINERS

100

$

+tax per month

2 HOURS FREE TRUCK TIME

8 X 20 CONTAINERS

160

$

+tax per month

4 HOURS FREE TRUCK TIME

Call Mike Walsh

604 698 0054

mike.walsh@walshrestoration.ca 44 APRIL 18, 2019

April – November • Function Junction & Nester’s Recycling and Solid Waste Depots • 7 AM – 7 PM. Great reasons to drop off your garden waste: • It’s free! • Removing excess wood debris keeps your yard safer from wildfire. Learn more at whistler. ca/FireSmart • The collected organics will be composted. Acceptable yard waste: • Grass, leaves, branches, twigs, weeds and house plants. • Minimal dirt or sand. • Invasive plants accepted but please separate and collect in heavy duty bag for safe disposal in garbage compactor. • Residential (non-commercial) use only. Please do NOT drop off: x Plastic bags or pots x Wood with paint or glue x Rocks x Plywood and fiberboard x Loads larger than a small pickup truck. *Burning yard waste is not permitted. Call 604-894-8190 to learn more.

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca/yardwaste


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE CLIMATE VARIABILITY IS NORMAL, BUT WARMING SPRINGS ARE NOT WESTMINSTER, Colo.—In Pennsylvania, the groundhog known as Punxsutawney Phil saw no shadow this year. That is supposed to portend an early spring. In the Rocky Mountains, early springs have been coming no matter what. This was a cold winter in many places, but on average the climate has been warming for several decades. It’s sure to get much warmer yet. A case in point is Colorado’s North Park, headwaters of the North Platte River but a short distance from the headwaters of the Colorado River and also the Steamboat ski area. There, according to Dr. J.J. Shinker, an associate professor from the University of Wyoming, the temperature overall has increased 1.44 degrees Celsius (2.6 degrees Fahrenheit) since 1909. But warming during the spring months of March, April, and May has been disproportionate, rising almost 2.21 degrees C (four degrees Fahrenheit) on average since 1909. “That’s a lot of warming in a short period of time,” she told members of the Colorado Water Congress at a recent conference. She also pointed out that warming at high elevations has been disproportionately greater than the global average. This disproportionate spring warming then produces earlier runoff in the North Platte and other rivers. On average, runoff occurs five days earlier for every degree Celsius in warming. This matters to water managers, who try to ensure the irrigation ditches still have enough water come August and September. It also matters to mountain resorts as warming springs shrink the backend of ski season. But everybody should be concerned for two more reasons, said Shinker. First, the worst droughts we’ve seen, the worst on record since European settlement about 150 years ago, don’t come close in depth and intensity of those of the past. Forest fires of the past were also giant affairs. This was part of natural variability. But now there is the overlay of what might be called unnatural variability, this overlay caused by human forcing of the climate. “The warming that we are seeing is occurring at a rate that is outside the range of natural variability,” Shinker said in an interview after her talk to Colorado water managers. “And it’s occurring as a result of the greenhouse gases that result from human activity.” Paleoclimatologists can tell much about shifting climates of the past 12,000 years by studying high mountain lakes. Consider Emerald Lake, which is in Colorado’s Sawatch Range, near the trailheads to the state’s two highest mountains, Elbert and Massive. Scientists studying lake sediments and other clues have documented shorelines that a millennium ago were much lower. The droughts then lasted for decades, even hundreds of years, what are called megadroughts. Lake of the Woods, which is located in Wyoming along the Continental Divide south of Jackson Hole, also offers evidence deciphered by scientists of a megadrought

5,200 years ago. The point, said Shinker, is that natural variability has always occurred in the interior West. So, too have, extreme events, such as the wildfires that accompanied a megadrought in North Park about 2,000 years ago. In the Colorado River Basin, scientists have reached much the same conclusion. Undeniably, there have been several hard drought years since 2000. But Brad Udall of Colorado State University and other scientists have concluded that it’s not a drought as conventionally understood. Rather, rising temperatures have begun causing more evaporation and transpiration, resulting in less water getting downstream. That doesn’t mean conventional climatic forces don’t have swagger. From her post in Wyoming, Shinker studies what causes natural climatic variability in the interior West, such as movement of the polar jet stream north and south. But now there’s an overlay, one created by human activities.

IS ELECTRICITY FROM DAMS ‘CLEAN?’ KETCHUM, Idaho—Idaho Power, the electrical utility that serves much of Idaho, including Ketchum and Sun Valley, has announced a goal of getting to 100-per-cent clean energy by 2045. But in this, there is some disagreement about what constitutes clean. The utility has cut the intensity of carbon emissions from its energy mix by almost half in the last 14 years. And compared to the carbon footprint of electricity in much of the country, including Colorado, the utility is already light on carbon: just 24 per cent from coal and natural gas. This will affect Wyoming, as some of the power for Idaho comes from the Jim Bridger plant, which is near Rock Springs, roughly halfway between Jackson Hole and Park City. Idaho Power—like other Pacific Northwest states—is blessed with abundant hydroelectric power. But Ben Lzicar sees nothing clean about the hydroelectric power produced by building dams. Writing in the Idaho Statesman, he cites the threatened populations of steelhead salmon as well as orcas, plus the hundreds of kilometres of healthy and vital riparian habitat that were destroyed when the dams were constructed during the 20th century. “Moving the goalposts back by calling dams ‘clean’ isn’t doing anyone good,” he writes.

ONE WORD LEADS TO ANOTHER PARK CITY, Utah—Testosterone ruled in a case of two skiers at Deer Valley. Citing a police report, the Park Record reported a confrontation that started when one of the two men blocked the other from getting into a lift line. Why not wasn’t clear. This led to an argument, shouting top to bottom on the next ski run. At the next life line, one skier took off his skis, and the other skier tackled him and held him down. At least one punch was thrown. n

DOREEN WATTS

March 11, 1944 - April 4, 2019 On April 4th, 2019 Doreen Watts passed away, just weeks after her 75th birthday. Doreen celebrated each day as a gift because her kidney transplant, 8 years ago, gave her an “extended warranty”. She would cheerfully greet each bus or taxi driver with a story. She’d make everyone around her laugh on the bus or in a local cafe. Doreen was a school administrator in her hometown of Collingwood, Ontario and moved to Whistler in 2004 to be close to her family in BC. While in Whistler she endeared herself to all the staff while working at Tourism Whistler until 2016. More recently, she welcomed every customer while working at Creekside Market, insisted on hugging the “cute guys” and crouching down to chat with every child. She was everyone’s grandmother/mother, baking incredible treats and handing out hugs to all. She also volunteered her time for many years with Big Sisters, and since 2010 with the Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium, always putting others first and looking for ways, within her means, to help all causes. She attended Rotary meetings every week, and when guests arrived, she would introduce herself as “George” just to get them to smile. Doreen personified all the best qualities of a Rotarian. Doreen is survived by and will be sorely missed by her children: daughter Krista Watts and partner Shawn Cooper, her sons Jeff Watts and Kevin Watts and his wife Rachelle Watts. As well as her nephews James Brown, Brad Neville and his wife Jen. She will also be remembered by all of her beautiful grandchildren: Olivia, Liam, Jasmine, Jaxon, Ben, Carolyn and Aiden. Deep gratitude goes to the excellent caregivers at St Paul’s Hospital, Whistler Medical Clinic and Whistler Community Services Society as her health challenges had increased in the past few months. Many have asked what they can do to help in this time, and a GoFundMe has been created to help cover the costs of bringing family members to Whistler to share this time together. Any additional funds collected will be donated to St Paul's hospital's kidney clinic. Please join us at a Celebration of Life which will be held in Whistler on Monday, May 13, 2019 at the Whistler Conference Centre at 4pm. APRIL 18, 2019

45


ECOLOGIC

RE

D

E UC

DP

E RIC

Citizenship 101

!

THIRTY-FIVE new Canadians. Many family members. A few friends. Some officials. Ten tables. A room full of welcoming, hope, opportunity, arrival. The end of a long journey for most, the beginning of another for some. All gathered in the impressive and airy foyer of the Audain Art Museum where floor-toceiling windows provide the perfect wallpaper of a sun-drenched coastal forest. Welcome to Canada, fellow citizens. Last week, 20 Whistlerites including myself had the honour of facilitating roundtable discussions with new Canadians prior to their official citizenship ceremony organized by the Institute of Canadian Citizenship and generously hosted by

6307 LORIMER ROAD, Whistler Cay

$1,899,000

Nestled in desirable Whistler Cay, this 4 bedroom, 2 bathroom family home with a 1 bedroom suite places you within close proximity to the Village and the trailheads to Alta Lake and Meadow Park. A bright living area that opens onto a sunny south-facing deck with a view of Wedge and Rainbow, a flat backyard, and a heated workshop are just a few of the features of this update home. A flexible floor plan provides options for the number of bedrooms in the house/suite - up to a 5 bedroom home with an extra living space or a legal 1 or 2 bedroom suite.

604.902.1321 amber@wrec.com www.ambermann.ca

www.whistlerrealestate.ca

REUSE IT PEMBERTON STORE TO CLOSE APRIL 27 Unfortunately, Reuse It Pemberton (RUI) must vacate its current premises at 1343 Aster Street. Sea to Sky Community Services has not been able to find another suitable location so, with regret, we will be closing the Reuse It Pemberton store on April 27. Since RUI reorganized and reopened in November 2016, our community has worked so hard to make this store a success. We could not have done any of it without the endless help of our incredible volunteers, our loyal customers and the generous donations that have come through our doors. We would like to send a gracious thank you to everyone involved for your wonderful support. With your help, RUI was able to divert 81 percent of the goods we received from ending up in the landfill. That is a huge success in reducing waste from our community. Reuse It Pemberton is no longer accepting donations and everything in the store will be on sale until April 27. Please come by to check out the deals. RUI was a program of Sea to Sky Community Services (SSCS). SSCS remains committed to providing outreach services in Pemberton, including counselling, homeless outreach and prevention services, family and youth support programs, and the Pemberton Food Bank.

46 APRIL 18, 2019

BY LESLIE ANTHONY the Audain. This wonderful experience reaffirmed for me many key things about citizenship and democracy; it also restored some of my eroding faith in government with how well-organized and engaging it was. People were randomly grouped around tables to introduce themselves and exchange stories about how and why they came to Canada, what it means to be Canadian, and how to practice active citizenship, including various forms of citizen engagement. The discussions were lively and interesting—so many stories! So much laughter!—and fun to facilitate. At the end, one person from each table shared with the room a personal summary of their discussion. And it was these enthusiastic testimonies that really hit home. First to speak was a man who moved to Toronto from Australia with his husband, ended up on the West Coast, and ultimately relocated to Whistler. Others, of course, talked of coming to Whistler for a season and staying for many, getting married, starting families. One girl said she had hoped coming to Canada would make her a better ski instructor, and it did, but it also made her a better person after experiencing and wanting to emulate Canadians’ openness. All spoke of welcoming people, the environment, freedom from persecution, crime and military threats, and the Canadian penchant for apologizing. A woman originally from America largely seemed relieved. The formal proceedings were opened and closed in Monty Python-esque manner by an RCMP officer in red serge. The citizenship oath itself was short but anachronistic, pledging allegiance to “the Queen of Canada.” The presiding judge may have channeled unnecessary jingoism in calling Canada “the best country in the world,” undermining the pluralistic mood, but Audain director Dr. Curtis Collins smoothed it over by articulating the experimental reality of celebrating cultural differences. “O Canada” was sang, little flags waved, and strangers hugged and shook hands with fellow new citizens. Ultimately, it was stirring to hear from such a wide cross-section hailing from

Australia, Chile, Czech Republic, Egypt, France, Iran, Syria, Thailand, Tibet, the U.K., the U.S., Venezuela, and elsewhere about what it means to not only become Canadian, but to be instantly embraced as one. To hear how grateful they are for the opportunity, and to sense from all who attended how grateful we are to have them. This is why citizenship matters. Why diversity matters. Why immigration matters. Why open arms matter. And, most importantly, why we need to ensure—now more than ever—this remains the case. That’s because this crucible of goodwill, diversity and grassroots democracy is precisely what white nationalist and antiimmigration fringe groups would subtract from the Canadian experience, greatly impoverishing it. Make no mistake that such elements are gaining numbers and power here—emboldened in part by the failure of provincial and federal conservative parties to denounce and distance themselves for fear of offending what has clearly become an important segment of their base. And that should concern us all—including mainstream conservative voters who must demand their leaders stop dog-whistling, tolerating, and cozying up to such groups and individuals at anti-government protests and events. This winter, for instance, conservative leaders across the country openly supported an ostensible “economic protest” by Yellow Vests Canada that provided unchallenged cover for racist elements.

All spoke of welcoming people, the environment, freedom from persecution, crime and military threats, and the Canadian penchant for apologizing. The day before Whistler’s citizenship ceremony, Facebook banned Canadian farright political commentator Faith Goldy, white nationalist crusader Kevin Goudreau, and four groups actively promoting hate from all its platforms. This should send a loud warning to all of the current dangers posed to the ecology of Canadian democracy. In the end, if citizenship ceremonies encourage new Canadians to participate in our democracy, then we, too, must heed the call. It’s not enough to simply welcome people to the country; it’s our duty to fight to defend the values we are products of, advocating strongly and unflinchingly for new Canadians to enjoy the same experience and privileges as those of us with the incredible good fortune to be born here. Leslie Anthony is a science/environment writer and author who holds a doctorate in connecting the dots. n


OUTSIDER

An East Alps sojourn: part 1 HAVING NOW SPENT the majority of my life skiing in Whistler, I’ve become accustomed to how we tend to do things here. Early ups on powder days, a jostling race (and sometimes a gamble) for the fresh lines, minimal time spent in the lodge (save for pee breaks and inter-lap warmups when

BY VINCE SHULEY it’s cold) and après being mostly a ski day debrief of story one-upmanship over beers. It varies a bit from resort to resort, but all the North American freeride destinations tend to have more than a few common themes. People take their skiing seriously. They want the biggest bang for their buck, not only on the financial investment they’ve made (season passes, shiny new ski boots, etc.) but also the investment they’ve made in their time (getting up early, driving to the hill, waiting for the lifts to open). Europe, where ski culture began, tends to relax a bit more. Unless you’re competing, skiing is not a sport as much as a leisure activity. The fulfilment of a day of skiing isn’t measured in vertical metres or how big you went off those cliffs. It’s more about being up in the mountains, making some turns and enjoying some good food and drink. My girlfriend and I recently travelled to

VIEW FROM THE TOP The views from Hochgurgl’s Top Mountain Star bar (3,034m) while raucous partying takes place inside. PHOTO BY VINCE SHULEY

the Eastern Alps of Austria to see the Euro ski culture with our own eyes. We were lucky enough to be treated with a series of spring storms during our sojourn, which while satisfying our collective powder appetite, also came with a caveat of poor visibility and tricky mountain navigation some days. But on the whole it was a very much a fulfilling experience, one that I recommend everyone sample before their knees give out. Here are a few of the highlights. Off-piste skiing isn’t a thing, yet. I’d heard and read the stories about how Europeans don’t ski off-piste and prefer to keep things simple on the groomers. But I’d also read in Les Anthony’s ski culture novel White Planet that some time in the mid-

There were exceptions of course. We crossed paths with a pair of young freeriders kitted up with avalanche airbags who were also turning up at the chairlift covered in powder. But everyone else seemed to give us quizzical looks. One can assume this is partly due to the off-piste areas not having any avalanche control (we wore transceivers and self-rescue equipment all the time in the resorts for this reason), but even the safety of treed terrain was similarly scarce with tracks. All the more for us. Après is definitely a thing. In this corner of the Alps, it’s not the best skiers that get all praise at après. It’s the folks who know how to party. Knock back a few Weissbiers with a few sidecars of schnapps and all of a sudden

Knock back a few Weissbiers with a few sidecars of schnapps and all of a sudden people are dancing on the bars and rocking out like they’re at an AC/DC concert.

2000s, a migration of freeriding Swedes had come to pillage all the off-piste powder. I’ll have to return to ski in Switzerland to see if that’s true in the Western Alps, but it certainly wasn’t the case in Austria’s Tyrol region. Some chairlift rides we spent in complete disbelief as perfectly capable skiers and snowboarders would turn between the signed edges of the groomed runs—edges loudly scraping against the hard surface—with fields of untouched powder to either side.

people are dancing on the bars and rocking out like they’re at an AC/DC concert. To go the distance, get your stomach set up for success with some traditional Bavarian food such as bratwurst, schnitzel, goulash or Tiroler Gröstl (an Austrian fry up), or if you’re into the sweets, traditional apple strudel or kaiserschmarrn (shredded pancakes served with fruit compote). On-hill après starts getting going around 2 or 3 p.m. and will run sometimes as late as 8 p.m., at which point you can ski

down and continue to party at the base of the mountain. Austrian après really has to be seen to be believed. The lift systems are next level. Our own Peak 2 Peak Gondola is pretty impressive and stands out on the world stage, but pretty much every large resort in Austria feels like its lift system is off the set of a science fiction movie. While the modern technology helps with general peoplemoving and keeping lift lines down, it also lets some lifts keep running in highwind conditions that would send a regular detachable quad crashing into the pylons. Our group tested this theory on a brutally windy storm day at Stubai Gletscher resort. The eight-person Rotadl chairlift had such heavy, over-engineered chairs that not even the craziest wind gusts could make it teeter laterally. With the storm bubble down to shield us from said wind and electric seat heaters keeping our bums content, we skied powder around that zone all morning without having to retreat once into the lodge. And all for a walk up ticket window price of about 55 Euros ($85 CAD). Then there are all the little things you don’t expect. Like the smell of manure in a luxury resort at 1,900m elevation from all the barned cows. Or skiing over the roofs of rustic on-mountain chalets. Mainstream skiing in Austria may not be all that hardcore, but the experience was no less fulfilling. Stay tuned for An East Alps sojourn: part 2 when the author heads into Austria’s Stubaital backcountry. For questions, comments or suggestions for The Outsider email vince@vinceshuley.com or Instagram @whis_vince. n

APRIL 18, 2019

47


FEATURE STORY

STEVE WYSE 48 APRIL 18, 2019


FEATURE STORY

50

WHISTLER MOUNTAIN SKI CLUB MARKS 50 YEARS

Club has played essential role in developing ski-racing over half a century BY DAN FALLOON

PHOTOS COURTESY OF WHISTLER MOUNTAIN SKI CLUB

A

s the 27th edition of the Whistler Cup comes to a close, it also marks the end of another important milestone: the 50th season of the Whistler Mountain Ski Club (WMSC). Each element of the organization’s name has progressed in the intervening half-century: Whistler grew from a fledgling, hard-to-access mountain resort to a continental and world leader; the mountain itself changed ownership numerous times and eventually amalgamated with neighbouring rival Blackcomb Mountain to become Whistler Blackcomb; and, of course, the sport itself has undergone ebbs and flows in popularity, not to mention significant developments in what it takes to become one of the sport’s best. Here, Pique will look back at the club’s early years, and while not a comprehensive, blow-by-blow history, we’ll also chart some of the major events and successes along the way that helped grow WMSC into what it is today.

MANY THANKS TO ALL OUR SPONSORS,

A SIMPLE REASON TO START According to inaugural president Neville O’Sullivan, better known as Sonny, the Whistler Mountain Ski Club was formed for a simple reason: the roughly two-dozen young skiers who were training locally to compete against their peers at Mount Seymour. As they polished their skills under the guidance of Hungarian native Joe Czismazia, the developing skiers were eager to put them to the test. Though the skiers could initially claim membership in the Garibaldi Olympic Development Association, according to the club’s website, there was a clear need for a permanent club in the resort. “Our kids were all in the ski school and we wanted to take them to a race at Mount Seymour,” O’Sullivan says. “They said, ‘You’ve got to be a ski club so go to the race.’” It wasn’t as easy as hoped, as Sam Toy, who O’Sullivan describes as the best lawyer in Canada at the time, had to submit paperwork multiple times before

APRIL 18, 2019

49


FEATURE STORY

JOE CZISMAZIA

DAVE MURRAY

finally earning the necessary incorporation. One issue is the club sought to use the name Garibaldi Ski Club to recognize the legacy of Garibaldi Lift Co., which opened Whistler’s ski resort in 1966, and president Franz Wilhelmsen. However, a group of ski tourers operating in the Diamond Head region of Garibaldi Provincial Park already had claim to the name, forcing a change of direction. The club held its first functions in April 1968, hosting a family dance as well as the inaugural Garibaldi Spring Slalom, which attracted more than 100 skiers, including some who made the trek from Vernon and Mount Baker. Early in the club’s history, it was called on to hold national championships for

RBC Dominion Securities Inc.

both junior and senior racers, laying the groundwork to host World Cup races and, eventually, proving the resort’s viability as part of a second Olympic bid, for the 2010 Games, which this time was successful. “Everything was so good, they started to run all the downhills here,” recalls O’Sullivan, whose daughter Kathy was one of the first WMSC skiers and later made the Canadian national team. At those early contests, including the 1969 Canadian Championships, safety precautions were minimal, though O’Sullivan says there were only two injuries. “We had 60 bales of hay for safety; 30 up at the start, there was three at the bottom for the Weasel Workers to sit on, and the rest were at the finish line to protect the

timing setup,” he recalls. “Safety was the fear factor.” Club volunteers took on the bulk of the labour when major events would roll into town, and O’Sullivan feels it was “odd” that mountain management at the time wouldn’t insist on organizing. He reasons that the club had nothing to gain or lose, whereas the mountain itself had more opportunity for growth. Alongside O’Sullivan, a major player in those early years was Bob Parsons, who formed the Weasel Workers (named for the Weasel section of the downhill course). Parsons grew up skiing at Seymour and Grouse mountains, but became intrigued in the potential Whistler presented, procuring a plot of land for $500 in the

mid-1960s. His children were some of the ski club’s first members and he went allin on making the club a success for the racers, mobilizing parent volunteers for tasks such as bootpacking the moguls fields, arm in arm in waist-deep snow, into a safe downhill track. Parsons went on to serve as chief of course for Whistler’s major events throughout the 1970s. “He was all about making it safe so the kids could go fast, have fun,” Parsons’ daughter, Chris Leighton, says in an interview at the WMSC office in Creekside. “He was the ultimate volunteer,” Parsons’ son, Jim, adds in a phone conversation. “I just remember his work ethic and his hard work on the downhill so that we would be safe. “That’s his legacy—safety is still the

Let ’s Create Your Winning FinanCiaL game PLan

Integrated wealth management for individuals, families and business owners

■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

Create strong financial plans Align business and personal strategies Build investment portfolios to achieve goals Establish peace of mind through risk management solutions Plan for the long term through Will and estate consulting Make sound tax planning decisions

Don Brett, mBa, cim, cfp, clu Wealth Advisor 1-888-612-9566 | don.brett@rbc.com www.donbrett.com

Let’s start a conversation about your future. Contact Don today.

RBC Dominion Securities Inc.* and Royal Bank of Canada are separate corporate entities which are affiliated. *Member-Canadian Investor Protection Fund. RBC Dominion Securities Inc. is a member company of RBC Wealth Management, a business segment of Royal Bank of Canada. ®Registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada. Used under licence. © RBC Dominion Securities Inc. 2015. All rights reserved. 15_90805_VDW_001

50 APRIL 18, 2019


“He was the ultimate volunteer. I just remember his work ethic and his hard work on the downhill so that we would be safe. That’s his legacy— safety is still the biggest thing today.” BOB PARSONS

biggest thing today.” Leighton remembers her father being on the road for much of the summer as a carnival worker, but in the winter, he was primarily dedicated to the mountain. He would pick up odd jobs. including working as a liftie for a couple of winters in the mid‘70s to secure ski passes for his family, but remained focused on his role in the club. He accompanied the team to races all over the province, as well as in Alberta and as far away as Colorado. For Leighton, the most memorable races were the Back Bowl Downhill, then one of the season’s final events. “It gave you that taste of what speed was like. That continued with the Vancouver team,” she says. “Our coaches were from

France and their mission was to go to as many downhill races as we could. “(You got) that first feeling of going fast, tucking and going over some jumps.” Parsons passed away in 1979, and one of his most beloved races, that very same Back Bowl Downhill, was renamed in his honour for the following spring’s event. The winner of that first race? His son, Jim. “I didn’t really think about it. To me, it was just another race,” Jim says. “The further along I get in life, (I see) it was pretty special. It took me a while to realize that. “We go to every race trying to do the best we can, and that one worked out.” Jim adds that one of the biggest changes from then to now is in the equipment, as his poles were made of bamboo and his skis

- Jim Parsons

were shockingly long 223s. He still has a outline their designs for the course. pair of these lengthy sets as a memento. “A month before the race, we would be He says it is “tempting” to bust them out working on the track,” says Carney, who some time. served as chief of course for a quarter“I would probably just hurt myself now,” century. “I would send somebody up on a he says with a chuckle. Ski-Doo in the middle of the night to have Taking up Parsons’ torch in the Weasel a look and see what the conditions were. In Workers was Owen Carney, whose children the morning, you could tell the crew what got involved in the club in the late ‘70s. had to be done.” His son, Mike, was Canada’s top downhill finisher in the 1988 Olympics in Calgary, DEDICATION TO THE SPORT posting a 14th-place result. Carney says the club would have to Though the Sea to Sky Highway has its wrangle 500 volunteers to put on World Cup hairy sections to this CAMPS, day, it’s still a stark JOIN WMSC SUMMER MAY-JUNE VISIT WMSC.INFO FORthose DETAILS events to make them successful. The club improvement over what early skiers had oversight in the early years, though the traversed for their shot on the mountain. International Ski Federation (FIS) started Coming up from Vancouver, the Parsons sending professionals in the mid-‘80s to children recall some of the more harrowing

MANY THANKS TO ALL OUR SPONSORS, WHISTLER BLACKCOMB, THE DAVE MURRAY NATIONAL TRAINING CENTRE AND THE COMMUNITY OF WHISTLER FOR ALL OF THE ONGOING SUPPORT OF OUR VISION.

APRIL 18, 2019

51


FEATURE STORY

MANY THANKS TO ALL OUR SPONSORS, WHISTLER BLACKCOMB, THE DAVE MURRAY NATIONAL TRAINING CENTRE AND THE COMMUNITY OF WHISTLER FOR ALL OF THE ONGOING SUPPORT OF OUR VISION.

JOIN WMSC SUMMER CAMPS,

MAY-JUNE VISIT WMSC.INFO FOR DETAILS

MANUEL OSBORNE-PARADIS

JULIA MURRAY

points on what Leighton remembers to be a roughly three-hour trek. What stands out in Jim’s mind is how the highway bottlenecked into a single lane to cross the Daisy Lake dam, while Leighton says the journey, with several logging bridges, was “horrible.” The 1969 Canadian Championships faced an even tougher test: a rockslide near Squamish that made vehicular access impossible, forcing competitors to arrive by train. Jim says that even though there were myriad issues—weather included— involved in getting to their new home mountain of Whistler, it was worth the extra effort. “Every day, you wanted to go back the next day. The coaches made it fun. It wasn’t easy—we had some challenges—but it was still fun,” says Jim, who is now a coach with

52 APRIL 18, 2019

MIKE JANYK

the club himself. “(There was) challenging training. It’s still the same way here now with the weather we have in Whistler.” “There was a sense of community in the ski-racing world. You had to be dedicated to come up here,” adds Leighton, who served on the WMSC’s board of directors when her children started skiing in the 1990s and currently works as the club’s administrator.

DAVE MURRAY AND THE CRAZY CANUCKS WMCS’s first homegrown superstar came in the form of Dave Murray, who didn’t start racing seriously until he was 16, but came through in a big way, claiming his part in alpine history as part of the Crazy Canucks. Murray, who competed at the 1976 and 1980 Olympic Winter Games and hit three

World Cup podiums, passed away in 1990 at circumstances, but it was a situation that just 37 years old. However, his fingerprints she adapted to and made work for her. on the club are still clear, according to his “People always asked if it was too much daughter, Julia, who hadn’t yet reached her pressure, being a ski-racing daughter of a second birthday when he died. Crazy Canuck. I always replied, ‘Yes, but “My dad will always be a hero to the it’s amazing pressure!’ I always felt like he kids coming through the club, and that is had such an impact on everyone he spoke a great legacy. He’s one to look up to! From with and always felt he was looking down the stories I’ve heard, he was philosophical, on me, especially when I was freaking out competitive, and always gave the undivided at the top of a downhill race,” Julia writes. attention and time to the person he was Julia grew up racing alpine, but as she talking to in that moment. Something I try progressed in the sport, she gradually felt her to do every day,” she writes in an email. drive diminishing. However, when she felt The younger Murray, who went on done with alpine, Julia got an opportunity to represent Canada as a ski-cross racer to try ski-cross at a camp at Cypress in the 2010 Winter Olympic Games, won Mountain and her passion was rekindled. silver at the 2011 World Championships “Ski cross was so different, with so many and has hit the World Cup podium elements,” she writes. ”After that camp, three times, explains that she grew I was invited to multiple other ones as up in the club under a different set of the qualifying camps for the national team,


“We had this whole blocked-off part of the mountain that we could really just do whatever we wanted to and you didn’t have to worry who was on the best side of a roller. It was only us who were there.”

FEATURE STORY days, as well as the amazing feeling of accomplishment. All of this helped me grow as a competitor, yes, but more so as a person and an entrepreneur.”

CANADIAN COWBOYS

While WMSC’s graduates had enjoyed steady success on the international level, in the mid2000s, a new generation of skiers dubbed the “Canadian Cowboys” (boasting a pair of Whistler grads in Manny Osborne-Paradis and Mike Janyk), followed in the Crazy Canucks’ footsteps. The Canadian Cowboys title was initially reserved for the six men who won World Cup medals in the 2006-07 season. Numerous other WMSC grads were on the national team at the time, though without the Wild West label: Robbie Dixon; Janyk’s sister, Britt; Dave Barr; and, in ski-cross, Murray and 2010 Olympic gold medallist Ashleigh McIvor. “Those are just the people that could pursue it. There were so many good racers coming out of the Whistler ski club at that time. We were just on fire,” says OsborneParadis. “It was just a mix of a lot of good skiers, a lot of schools (including) the Whistler school understanding what we needed … how much time we needed to spend away and the extra help we would need in our curriculum.” Osborne-Paradis, who is still active but missed the 2018-19 season after injuring himself in a harrowing crash training for the first races of the season, credits the club for developing him into the fierce competitor he is now. “I couldn’t have asked for a better ski club to grow up in. We talk about the history of the ski club, with the whole club being built on volunteers during that time with the World Cups coming to Whistler and ending in Creekside … (and) all the volunteer work, it really showed a huge sense of community to all of us kids,” he says. “Anybody could be a part of the ski club at that time. You had families that were just getting by up in Whistler and families that could afford two homes, but everybody gave a lot of sweat equity to that club and to ski racing.” In hindsight, Osborne-Paradis, who has represented Canada at four Winter Olympic Games and has hit the World Cup podium 11 times, appreciates his early instruction even more after realizing the commitment and eventually named to the team as one his coaches put in to lead him and others. It of the very first members of the Canadian started from the top down, he says, praising National Ski Cross team. I’m so grateful the program director Joze Sparovec, who timing worked out how it did!“ served in the role from 1989 to 2006. Murray retired in 2012 at the age of 23 “Ski coaching at that time wasn’t a fullafter suffering several knee injuries over the time gig. You did it as a winter job between course of her career. However, she’s jumped banging nails in the summer. I had another headfirst into several other fields, including ski coach who dug ditches and a ski coach helping to start Whistler Blackcomb’s Ski who owned a clothing company,” he says. With an Olympian program, becoming a “They were just very passionate coaches and nutritionist and starting her own cereal I feel like for each level … that was the start brand, Jules Fuel. She credits her ski-racing of, ‘Oh, I want to be a ski racer.’ They made upbringing with helping her prepare for her ski racing super fun.” still-hectic post-retirement life. A big part of what made training “Growing up racing taught me all about enjoyable, according to Osborne-Paradis, time management,” Julia notes, adding was that coaches didn’t put their young that though she missed school to race, she charges in an alpine box. He says that was still expected to have all her work while, obviously, race training was the done. “I’m all about pushing my limits, focus, the racers were afforded numerous and all about the how to deal with bad opportunities to freeski, striking a balance

- Manuel Osborne-Paradis

OPEN HOUSE

Saturday, April 20 12 pm to 4 pm

26 - 6127 Eagle Ridge Crescent | $1,500,000 • • • •

2.5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms 1,368 sf (on only 2 levels) Renovated townhouse in Whistler Cay Spacious living area

• • • •

Whistler Mountain views 2 under-cover parking spaces Real wood fireplace Walking distance to Whistler Village

40 - 4388 Northlands Boulevard | $765,000 Glaciers Reach • • • •

Newly renovated Great location Nightly rental 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom townhome

Alexi Hamilton 604 935 0757 alexi@realwhistlerliving.com

• • • •

2 patios Hot tub, pool, exercise room Bike storage Great mix of mountain and city

Pierre Eady 604 698 6748 pierre@realwhistlerliving.com

SALES ASSOCIATES WITH RE/MAX SEA TO SKY REAL ESTATE 106-7015 Nesters Road Whistler, BC V0N 1B7 Canada

Denise Brown, PREC LEADING EDGE REAL ESTATE TEAM O: 1-604-935-2013

Whistler-RealEstate.ca

APRIL 18, 2019

53


FEATURE STORY between nailing down their training and exploring both their own abilities and the mountain. With the Olive and Red chairs being high-speed lifts at the time, Osborne-Paradis and his cohorts enjoyed the relative seclusion afforded by the Orange Chair on Whistler. “We would all do our race runs on Dave Murray and then we would all go and jump in Goat’s Gully and have races down the mogul pitch. That was like our little area of the mountain that no one really ever came to,” he says. “It was a really freeing time. We really didn’t know how good we had it—and still have it.” Osborne-Paradis had a reference point to compare ski clubs across the region, as he lived in Deep Cove and came up to Whistler to train on weekends. During the week, he would do dryland training and go night skiing with the Cypress and Seymour clubs. “I was getting the best of both worlds. I was skiing a lot as a young kid,” he says. “The one thing that Whistler had that the ski clubs in Vancouver didn’t is they didn’t have Rob Boyd.” Though Boyd, the first Canadian man to win a World Cup on home snow when he claimed the 1989 championship in Whistler, was never officially a racer in the WMSC— he grew up in Vernon and joined the provincial team after moving to Whistler— his association with the community was integral to Osborne-Paradis’ inspiration. “I never questioned if you could or couldn’t be a World Cup skier. People say, ‘You have to believe in it before it can happen.’ I never even considered it not to be an option. Not that that was my end goal, but the fact that somebody else from Whistler was on the World Cup (circuit) and had won races, it just seemed so close to home that you just kept on this path, you worked hard, and good things came,” he says. Janyk, meanwhile, started in the J4 program and progressed through the ranks, eventually becoming a threetime Olympian and hitting the podium on the World Cup and at the World Ski Championships. It wasn’t, however, the pursuit of international success that has stuck with Janyk, but the sense of camaraderie the club fostered. “It was a second home,” he says over coffee at BReD. “We wanted to be there in the club cabin in Creekside. It was our hangout spot afterwards. It was a place where we felt safe, we felt comfortable and we pushed ourselves. We had tons of freedom as kids … You could do the course and then you could go play in the trees.” Boyd was a clear inspiration to a young Janyk as well, as his historic World Cup win here helped flip a switch in the soon-to-beseven-year-old. “It was really magic. It helped me,” says Janyk.

INSPIRED TO GIVE BACK Early in his World Cup career, OsborneParadis looked to give back to the community and inspire the next generation of ski racers. In 2006, he started out with the Get Up and Go Bursary, a $500 award to a young ski racer, and then inspired Janyk to get on board the following year. In 2007, they

54 APRIL 18, 2019

successes. It was great that we were able to give back to athletes that excelled in our sport and that were able to continue on with it,” he says. “I’m happy to be part of the journey, but by no means take any credit for how good they are … If they enjoyed their time and we enjoyed our time, we all won.” Janyk, meanwhile, says he follows the careers of graduates who still compete and also will occasionally cross paths with them. “You know the ones that are still in the sport and the other ones pop up here and there,” he says. In the 10 years they ran, the Mike & Manny Camps brought through more than 140 athletes.

BRINGING IT BACK TO THE COMMUNITY

decided to organize the first Mike & Manny Ski Camp for the following spring. The four-day, all-inclusive camps brought young skiers to Whistler Blackcomb who fit the criteria of the Get Up and Go award: a deep love for ski racing. “We never picked any of the kids coming to the camp (based) on how good they were at skiing. Our whole premise was that it started with the Get Up and Go bursary, which was for the most enthusiastic. We prided ourselves on giving back to the kid that really was the most enthusiastic, really

Janyk is now the program director at North Vancouver’s Grouse Mountain Tyee Ski Club, a role that sees him guiding athletes who are in direct competition with WMSC’s rising stars. Though the clubs see each other regularly, Janyk doesn’t feel any major rivalry between them. (In fact, Mike’s Olympian sister, Britt, is married to WMSC executive director Mark Tilston.) Each club has its own philosophies, approaches and intricacies, but at their very heart, both are trying to turn athletes into productive men and women by developing not just their skiing, but their life skills as well. Volunteers make much of that progression possible, and Janyk is grateful for all the hard work they have done. “I know the value that clubs have in communities because of the role it had in my life. For me, I don’t see much rivalry because we’re doing the same thing. We’re adding value to the community,” he says. “You think that so much of it is you—‘I worked hard. I did all my dryland, I did all my goal-setting, all my visualization.’ You did everything you can and you think, ‘That’s why I made it.’” With that in mind, Janyk recalls bringing home his slalom bronze from the World Ski Championships in Val d’Isere, France in 2009. Even more than winning it, Janyk was heartened to share it with those who supported him in his younger years. “It’s a really good feeling to bring it back and share with the community who helped you all the way,” he says. “To be on the other side, I realize that the work towards that was the reward, for sure. “It’s almost a relief to feel that you have something to say ‘Thank you’ with … You always want to show people who support you that your efforts were worth it, that we amounted to something.” picked up their team’s spirits,” OsborneIn addition to Osborne-Paradis, Paradis says. “Through those qualifying WMSC continues to have numerous athletes, I’m glad that there were a lot who representatives on the World Cup stage, were really good and keen, but that wasn’t including 2014 Olympic ski-cross champion the goal in our camps at all.” Marielle Thompson; 2018 Junior World skiCamp alums include current national cross champion, Mikayla Martin; Broderick team members Sam Mulligan and Broderick Thompson; Jack Crawford; Brodie Seger; Thompson, as well as NCAA veteran Charley Cameron Alexander; Stefanie Fleckenstein; Field. While he and Janyk were pleased to and para-alpine breakout star Mollie play a role, Osborne-Paradis downplays the Jepsen, who won four medals including effect they had on their students’ ultimate gold in the super combined at the 2018 career arcs. Paralympic Winter Games in PyeongChang, “We played a very small part in those South Korea. n


a u o Y Are

? r e t s n o M ty

r a P

#trenchmouth

Most dentists might see one, maybe two cases of trench mouth over their entire career. Yet at Whistler Dental, we see this on a shockingly regular occurrence - as often as several times a week!

You would never expect it looking up at the beautiful peaks hovering above town, that a disease so common during WWI, and so rare to most dentists, is a weekly occurrence in Whistler. Acute Necrotising Ulcerative Gingivitis (ANUG) or more commonly known as Trench Mouth, is an aggressive infection of the gums that millions of young soldiers suffered from during the Great War. Poor diets, severe psychological stress, smoking habits, little sleep, and lack of routine oral care took its toll on the soldiers bodies and their mouths showed it.

NEGLECTING UR DENTAL H E A LTH CAN LEAD TO CRAZY

While Whistler can be a mecca for the Party Monster, people who often partake must be extra aware of their health and body. The consequences of ignoring the signs can be catastrophic and in some cases, irreparable.

SIGNS OF TRENCH MOUTH • Acutely painful and bleeding gums • Excessive salivation • Sometimes overwhelmingly foul breath • Ulcerations

Fast forward one hundred years and we are seeing this archaic infection again in Whistler. With Trench Mouth, the gums start to ulcerate, bleed, and erode away- painfully, and often aggressively. It can look like someone has taken a hole puncher to the gums, leaving a white rim around the edges. This infection can have a very sudden onset, and if left untreated, can lead to severe and irreversible damage to the gums and supporting bone around the teeth. Most dentists might see one, maybe two cases of Trench Mouth over their entire career. Yet at Whistler Dental, we see this on a shockingly regular occurrence - as often as several times a week!

Contributing factors to Trench Mouth include: emotional stress, illness or disease, hard drugs, inadequate sleep, smoking (cigarettes & pot), excessive consumption of alcohol, and poor nutrition. April is Oral Health Month, so if it’s been more than a year since you have seen a dentist, do yourself a favour, invest in your health, call Whistler Dental TODAY to book your appointment. Advertorial by Whistler Dental / Written by Dr. Heidi North


TRAVEL & ADVENTURE

A Wildlife safari through India’s national parks By Karin Leperi

I

grew up on a healthy yet magical dose of Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book. You know the story and setting—dreams of emerald green jungles, birds with kaleidoscope colours and fearless tigers with camouflage stripes and golden coats that blend in with high grasses. Little did I know at the time that the book was based on the Kanha Tiger Reserve—the largest national park in Central India—as well as other national parks within India that protect the Royal Bengal tiger. With 166 national parks, 515 wildlife sanctuaries and 50 tiger reserves carved out in India, the nation has become the world’s leader in the protection of the tiger. After all, more than 70 per cent of the world’s tigers are found within India’s borders. It is only fitting that the tiger is India’s icon of conservation. To many, it’s an icon of hard-won success. Last month, I travelled to this majestic land as part of a photo tour, searching for the elusive Bengal tiger. My journey took me to two of India’s best national parks for the tiger: Kanha Tiger Reserve and Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve. However, it’s important to know that there’s plenty of other wildlife as well such as leopards, gaur, chital, langur, sambar, muntjac, caracal cat, sloth bear and more than 1,230 species of birds within India. One important thing to keep in mind is that a wildlife safari to India is not like an African safari. First of all, the terrains are vastly different, with Africa presenting huge swaths of open plains—ideal for capturing images. Lighting is more even. Plus, wildlife is just more plentiful. For example, Africa hosts about 20,000 lions while India has just a tad more than 3,000 tigers. And whereas lions tend to

Above: Bengal Tiger. Photo by Kerin Leperi

56 APRIL 18, 2019

linger in the open, tigers are more secretive, emerging from their dense cover when they need to find water or hunt for prey. Or sometimes, to cross the road. Normally, you won’t find these magnificent cats in open, unobstructed land unless they are blending in with tall grasses. Then they are difficult to spot. The tiger tends to hide deep in forest foliage and tangled understory, giving a supreme advantage to the trained eye of a professional guide. Not once did I find a tiger independently, and believe me, I tried. It was always the guide. But when you spot the Bengal tiger, your world instantly changes. There is something quite magical about the moment. It’s easy to forget to breathe as you unwittingly hold your breath in excitement, wanting to cherish each second with this royal cat. From a practical standpoint, India can be difficult to negotiate for an independent traveller because of language and customs, so it’s best to use a professional tour operator. During my time, I stayed at Kanha Jungle Lodge, where you’ll have the best Indian food in Central India, and Bandhavgarh Jungle Lodge, where you’ll experience cultural dancing and singing as part of a scrumptious evening barbecue. Both are owned by Amit Sankhala, a progenitor of the legendary Kailash Sankhala, who had the vision more than 50 years ago to preserve and protect India’s tigers, forming “Project Tiger.” As the managing director of Tiger Resorts Pvt Ltd. and Encounters Asia, Amit continues his grandfather’s legacy by focusing on conservation and responsible tourism, all the while working to save the tiger. (Amit was featured in

the Discovery Channel documentary Tigerland, which aired on March 30, 2019. It was also released at the Sundance Film Festival earlier in the year.) I had the pleasure of meeting Amit while staying at Bandgarvah. Ever so curious, I asked him why the legacy of the Bengal tiger in India is so important to him. “The tiger is one of the most majestic animals in the wild,” Amit responded. “Three generations of my family have been in the field of conservation. It is important to remember, that the tiger is just a poster boy to save our vanishing jungles. We protect the tiger, we protect its habitat and all inhabitants within it.” In the process, he is hoping to draw more attention to wildlife conservation, especially by addressing the humananimal conflict issues. “I feel that community involvement is an essential tool, and we should be looking at an inclusive strategy rather than excluding them,” he said. For those looking to advance beyond the African safari, a planned excursion to see tigers of India is both challenging and yet exhilarating on so many levels. Though the Royal Bengal tigers are more elusive than wildlife on the plains of Africa, the jungles of India deliver moments of sheer elation and joy, reflecting the absolute majesty, power and mystique of incredible India. n

IF YOU GO: Encounters Asia—Amit Sankhala, email: info@encountersasia.com


TRAVEL & ADVENTURE

ASK ABOUT OUR FREE WHISTLER PICKUPS MARCH 30, APRIL 13 + 27, MAY 11 + 25, JUNE 15

Gray langur (old world monkey). Photo by Kerin Leperi

Gaur (Indian bison). Photo by Kerin Leperi

Your one Stop Car raCk & HitCH SHop

324 East Esplanade N Van 604.987.7474

Bengal Tiger. Photo by Kerin Leperi

APRIL 18, 2019

57


SPORTS THE SCORE

Canada captures Whistler Cup FORGET HELPS NATION TO FIRST U16 TITLE SINCE 2013

BY DAN FALLOON IN RECENT YEARS at the Whistler Cup, Canada had always been more than accommodating as hosts. After winning five of six overall titles between 2008 and 2013, Canada hadn’t been able to pull off the U16 overall title as visitors from Austria, Norway and Switzerland brought it back to Europe. However, led by Arianne Forget on the women’s side and a selection of impressive showings on the men’s side, the Canadians finally reclaimed the trophy on April 14. Head coach Jenni Stielow was thrilled to lead the team of a dozen ski racers from all over the country to the victory. “It’s absolutely fantastic to bring it back for Canada,” she said. “The athletes really put their full effort into competition here, which was fantastic. They were all attentive. They were very competitive and they paid attention to small-scale details, which I really think paid off in the long run.” Stielow was proud of the team’s gusto from Day 1, as all racers were encouraged to leave nothing on the track. Even if it didn’t result in the placements they were

MAPLE LEAF FOREVER Canada captured the Whistler Cup for the first time since 2013. PHOTO BY DAN FALLOON

58 APRIL 18, 2019

hoping for, the effort and the process were enough to topple Norway and every other challenger. “We just went out and did our best,” she said. “Our motto from the very get-go, from the very first team meeting was to go out and do your best, work hard in the gates, and enjoy it.” The United States, meanwhile, claimed the U14 Festival Cup.

“It felt really good. It was a goal from my first day in U14. I wanted to get that award and get my name on the plaque,” he said. “I was thinking about it a bit, but then let go of it on the second day because I wanted to perform instead of mess up because I’m thinking about something.” Shorter certainly did perform, winning the giant slalom on April 12 and placing third in the slalom on April 13. As one of

“It’s absolutely fantastic to bring it back to Canada.” - JENNI STIELOW

Locals excelled in the four-day festival, though none shone brighter than Felix Shorter, who took home the U14 Dave Murray Award winner on Sunday. Shorter’s case was strengthened by a third-place finish in the slalom earlier in the day. Ontario’s Madison Donnelly took home the U14 Nancy Greene Award. As for the U16 winners, Forget took home the Nancy Greene Award while Aleksas Valadka won the Dave Murray Award. Shorter said his goal for the season was to win the award, so it was a relief to pull it off.

to secure the Dave Murray crown, though he admittedly skied somewhat conservatively on his second run. “When I crossed the finish line, I was thinking, ‘Hopefully that makes it onto the podium,’” he said. Though Shorter feels the award will give him a boost heading into 2019-20, he acknowledged the cachet that goes along with it will require an adjustment as well. “It gives me a lot of confidence but it also puts a lot of pressure on me because when I go to my first race, everybody is going to be expecting me to do well,” he said.

CANADIANS, LOCALS SHINE just a few locals to win at the Whistler Cup, Shorter appreciates his accomplishment. “It means a lot because it’s on home soil,” he said. “On the first run, I had a really good run and I was leading by a second, which was a lot. “On the second run, I just messed up a couple times but because I was thinking, ‘I have a second to play with,’ at the bottom of the course, it was really tight and I didn’t want to mess up. That was a really key part of the course.” Heading into the slalom on the final day, Shorter was aiming for a podium finish

Canada claimed the Whistler Cup crown on the backs of numerous strong performances, while Whistler Mountain Ski Club (WMSC) skiers also shone on their home mountain. The U16s kicked off competition on April 11 with the super-G. Norway put two on the podium with Johs Herland taking the victory and Haugen placing third to sandwich Canadian Alexis Barabe in second. Burns was the top local in 11th, while Matthias Shorter was 15th, Nicolls took 21st, Ross was 28th and Fuller wound up 30th. As for the women, Canada’s Arianne Forget was the winner, topping Israel’s Noa


SPORTS THE SCORE

!     !  

Looking Lookingfor forone oneplace place Looking for one place Looking Looking for for one one place place to toease easethose thoseaches aches to ease those to toand ease ease those thoseaches aches aches and pains? pains? and pains?

 

!  

and andpains? pains?

We Wekeep keep you youand playing playing with withboth both physiotherapy physiotherapy and and massage massage Sports manipulative physiotherapists to keep you playing  

We Wekeep keepyou youplaying playingwith withboth bothphysiotherapy physiotherapyand andmassage massage !  

www.backinactionphysiotherapy.com

www.backinactionphysiotherapy.com www.backinactionphysiotherapy.com www.backinactionphysiotherapy.com www.backinactionphysiotherapy.com 604 962 0555

604 604962 962 0555 0555 604 604 962 9620555 0555

BIG MAN Felix Shorter raised the U14 Dave Murray Award in Skier’s Plaza on April 14. PHOTO BY DAN FALLOON

Szollos and Norway’s Emilie Bakkevig. Sara Stiel led the local contingent in 14th with Emeline Bennett (16th), Jaden Dawson (19th) and Fiona McInnes (23rd) all cracking the top 30. In the April 12 U16 women’s giant slalom, Forget dominated the field, holding off Szollos and fellow Canadian Britt Richardson for the win. Whistler Mountain Ski Club representatives suiting up for

Kirwood for gold. Matthias Shorter was the top local, taking eighth, while Hayden Harley (14th), Adam Usher (15th), Benjamin Neeves (18th), Kian Gottfried (23rd), and Logan Sadan (27th) made the top 30. The U14s, meanwhile, kicked off their action on April 12, with Madison Donnelly of Ontario 2 earning the women’s slalom victory over New Zealand’s Mikayla Smyth and Quebec’s Noémie Longchamps. Two

“It felt really good. It was a goal from my first day in U14. I wanted to get that award and get my name on the plaque.” - FELIX SHORTER

Team BC were: Stiel (15th); Dawson (20th); Bennett (22nd); and McInnes (30th). In the men’s GS, Norwegians took the top two spots on the podium as Tollef Jostein Haugen bested Hermann Fjeldaville Linberg, while Chile’s Manuel Horwitz took third. WMSC athletes in the top 30 were: Chase Burns (12th); Sam Fuller (14th); Adam Usher (20th); John Nicolls (24th); and Duncan Ross (28th). In U16 competition on April 13, Canada claimed the top two spots in the women’s race as Richardson nicked Forget for gold while Bakkevig scored a second bronze. Locals dotted the top 30, including: Stiel (18th); Dawson (19th); Bennett (20th); Isabella Cross (21st); Holly Clarke (23rd); Sierra Haziza (26th); Laura Keogh (27th); and Amanda Miller (29th). In the men’s contest, Hungary’s Tamas Trunk topped Haugen and American Nick

DAVE TREADWAY 1984-2019

Chase Life A Celebration of Life for Dave will be held at Pemberton Secondary School this coming Monday April 22, 2019 at 2PM. In lieu of flowers please consider donating in support of the immediate family here: gofundme.com/support-for-the-treadway-family Or to the memorial fund that has been created with Young Life “The Dave Treadway Memorial Fund / Golden YL” https://donate.younglife.ca/funds/488

locals on Team BC, Alexa Brownlie and Erin Husken, cracked the top 10 in sixth and ninth, respectively. In the men’s giant slalom on April 13, Shorter bested New Zealand’s Alec Jackson and Japan’s Reon Satoh for the top spot. Alec Waldrum (13th) and Dylan Boyd (26th) also hit the top 30. In the men’s slalom on April 14, in which Shorter was third, American Daniel Ferucci earned the win while Japan’s Neo Kamada was second. Local Milan Novak took 10th while Alec Waldrum took 28th. As for the women’s giant slalom, New Zealand’s Mikayla Smith topped American Ava Schweiger and WMSC’s Brownlie. Other locals in the top 30 were: Husken (sixth); Isabelle Bexton (12th); and Ella Kaufmann (22nd). Full results are online at www. whistlercup.com. n

APRIL 18, 2019

59


SPORTS THE SCORE

Freestyle skiers look back on Jr. Worlds THREE TOP-10 RESULTS FOR LOCAL COMPETITORS IN SWEDEN, ITALY

BY DAN FALLOON FREESTYLE WHISTLER ALUMS had a banner year on the junior world stage, as five athletes competed at their respective championships recently. Firstly, Skye Clarke and Josephine Howell were in Klaeppen, Sweden for the FIS Junior World Ski Championships for slopestyle and big air. Clarke posted a fifth-place finish in slopestyle on April 7 and was 12th in big air on April 11 while Howell took a 16th in slopestyle and eighth in big air. “It was my first time competing at a world level, so it was pretty special to be able to represent Canada,” Clarke said. Clarke, 16, explained that she was able to tackle the course smoothly while showing off considerable skills for the judges. “I was pretty consistent. I grabbed my tricks well and I thought I landed pretty clean,” she said. “The fact that I spun to the left and the right, and I had a switch move, definitely helped. On the rails, I had a right spin and a left spin … I had some variety.” Clarke added that while she performed well, she thinks she could do better in a future year, as she had some nerves going into her first-ever international competition. “It was such a great experience but I think the one thing that I take away from it is skiing and having fun. I felt there was more pressure this contest because it was a world competition,” she said. “If I could go into it just skiing and having fun, that would be a bit better. I got a little bit stressed, which I think affected my skiing.” Howell, meanwhile, acknowledged being a little bit baffled by the scoring, as she didn’t land any of her runs the way she had envisioned. “It was kind of funny. I fell on all my runs,” she said. “I was surprised that they gave me a good result, so it was cool. “My jump was good, but I just had a

ON THE CHASE Chase Capicik excelled at the FIS Junior World Ski Championships in Italy. PHOTO BY ANTON VANDER MERWE/ACTION SPORTS MEDIA COURTESY OF TAMI BRADLEY

weird landing. I think they didn’t take away too many points for the landing.” Howell, 17, didn’t blame the course, though, calling it one of the best she’d ever skied. While she was initially taken aback by the international flavour, she was soon able to settle in. “It was a little intimidating. The first day, it was a little scary, but the next day, I got to know everybody,” she said. Howell was excited because Estonia’s Kelly Sildaru, who she called the world’s best women’s skier, junior or not, was in attendance. Sildaru, who has been winning X Games gold medals since she was 13, ran away with both gold medals at Junior Worlds as well. “It was pretty cool to meet her and compete against her,” Howell said. Like Clarke, Howell feels better prepared to tackle similar events should she qualify in the future. “I feel more prepared to compete at that level now,” she said. “I only knew about five people there, so it was more of a feel-it-out situation so I think in the future, it’ll feel more comfortable.”

THREE COMPETE AT MOGULS EVENT Three other skiers competed at the FIS Junior World Ski Championships for moguls and dual moguls on April 5 and 6 in Chiesa in Valmalenco, Italy. On the women’s side, Jessica Linton took 10th in moguls and 20th in dual moguls while Chase Capicik was 14th and 19th, respectively. As for the men, Sam Cordell was 20th in moguls and 18th in dual moguls. Linton, 17, said she exceeded her expectations by sneaking into the top 10. “It was really cool. I would have just been stoked doing a top-to-bottom run with my tricks, but I ended up doing a lot better than I thought I was going to do,” she said. “Making finals itself was a great feeling and ending up in 10th, it was really cool to be the top Canadian girl.” One element that benefitted Linton was a massive snowfall that transformed the course to the point where it started to feel homey. “The course had changed quite drastically to a really awesome West Coaststyle course, which was definitely good for me. That’s what I’ve trained on all my

life,” she said. “My runs were really good. I stuck with a 360 to a backflip just to make sure I got the solid run down, which I did. “It was clean, it was quick, it was good. I was really proud of it.” Linton took her results as proof that she is on the right path, and is further emboldened to pursue her passion. “What I brought from this competition is if I really focus and put the work down, I can really get it done. This experience has made me realize that hard work really does pay off,” she said. Meanwhile, Capicik, at just 14, was the youngest of the locals attending either event. She’s made the jump from Timber Tours to her first NorAm Cup contest to Junior Worlds in the course of a season. “This year, I had started skiing some of the bigger comps, so I was really excited to be named to the team at a big event like that,” she said. “It’s fun, because I have a lot of friends and a lot of people along the way supporting me.” Capicik said she fell ill almost immediately after landing in Italy and wasn’t able to train, putting her behind her competitors. However, going in without major expectations, Capicik was thrilled to crack the top 20 in an event where she was going primarily to soak it in. “I had to work on speed. I was there just for experience, not to go out there and win,” she said. “I got the experience to see what it’s going to be like in the future. “I skied my best, put down a top-tobottom (run).” Cordell, meanwhile, was also happy with the course change resulting from the 100-centimetre snow dump preceding the competition. “They ended up rebuilding the course before the competition, which added a bit of a surprise,” he said. While Cordell, 18, felt he could have placed higher, there were still several positives he took from the experience. “I landed my run but didn’t do as well as I thought I could have,” he said. “I messed up in my jumps a bit, but overall, my skiing was pretty good and my time was fast, so I was happy with that.” n

Have you got a spare room? Tamwood International is looking for warm and welcoming homestay families in Whistler to provide a nice room, meals, and positive experiences to our motivated students, aged 16+ from all over the world. Host families are required the whole year round. For more information, please contact homestay@tamwood.com or call 1.866.533.0123

60 APRIL 18, 2019


1200 ALTA LAKE ROAD

$1,395,500

Spacious 2 bedroom townhome with fantastic amenities including tennis courts, swimming pool and private beach access to Alpha Lake.

WHISTLER CAY 6427 BALSAM WAY

LI ST IN G NE W

LI ST IN G NE W

100 TWIN LAKES

408 BLUEBERRY LYNX

$2,395,000

Bright and comfortable 3.5 bedroom home with a large 1or 2 bedroom suite. Great location for families with young children.

ELIZABETH CHAPLIN

3201 BLUEBERRY DRIVE

$1,299,000

WHITE GOLD

7204 FITZSIMMONS ROAD S.

$2,495,000

Top floor condo in the small and exclusive Lynx complex on Blueberry Hill offers a functional layout all on one level, including 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, cathedral ceilings, feature wood fireplace and large (125sqft) deck with mountain views, providing a feel bright and spacious feel.

Great opportunity to purchase a large 5 bedroom family home plus 1-bedroom revenue suite in the popular sub-division of White Gold. Enjoy magnificent mountain views from the vaulted living room, the deck, and hot tub.

105 MOUNTAINS EDGE

PEMBERTON

elizabeth@wrec.com | 604 932 1311

D9 SUNSTONE PEMBERTON

$425,000

One of the most desirable lots in Sunstone offering gorgeous views of the valley and Mount Currie and opportunity to build a home with suite and additional out buildings.

DANIELLE MENZEL

1411 PORTAGE ROAD

$310,000

Enjoy gorgeous mountain views and lots of morning sunshine from this cute, well cared for, one bedroom condo. The bright, open living space is accentuated by high ceilings and the unit is energy efficient and well sound proofed due to the building’s R2000 energy rating.

7582 TAYLOR ROAD

$698,000

Excellent starter home property close to sporting fields and with stunning Mt. Currie views. Almost 1/3 acre fenced property with view and a great little 3 bed home with wood burning fireplace and open layout of kitchen, dining & living room. Great investment or first home opportunity on a family street.

danielle@wrec.com | 604 698 5128

SPRING CREEK

1553 TYNEBRIDGE COURT

WENDI WARM wendi@wrec.com | 604 916 4898

$3.199,000 + GST

This beautiful new BONE structure home is tucked away on a private cul-de-sac and is just minutes to Whistler’s Creekside Village and base. This property is blessed with sunny southwest exposures and designed around natural outlooks from plentiful windows and decks. Inside the timeless design and details will WOW you from the moment you enter. Your family will love having three large bedrooms upstairs with wonderful outlooks. The master suite is complete with 5 piece ensuite and generous walk-in. Below is another bedroom and enormous family/rec room ready for your imagination for a media room, or gym. This energy efficient and beautifully designed and built custom home is the perfect place to call yours in Whistler! Listing agent: Rob Palm


9209 PEMBERTON PORTAGE ROAD

$235,000

This property is located within minutes of gates lake with stunning mountain views. Perfect for an experienced builder or contractor, contact for more information.

5 PEMBERTON VILLAGE 1470 LAUREL STREET

$439,000

Looking for a 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom town home in Pemberton’s Glen? Look no further! Pine floors on the main level, stainless steel appliances, and an updated bathroom.

LISA HILTON

LI ST IN G NE W

LI ST IN G NE W

LI ST IN G NE W

LI ST IN G NE W

BIRKEN

LOT 7

SUTHERLAND ROAD IN BIRKEN

$430,000

This flat 6.2 acre acreage is located 5 minutes from Gates lake. Lots of sunshine with beautiful mountain views, and tucked away off the main road. Zoning is RR-1 which allows for 2 dwellings on this property.

Personal Real Estate Corporation

lisah@wrec.com | 604 902 4589

PEMBERTON MEADOWS 7903 RYAN CREEK ROAD

$1,695,000

Location Location Location! This beautiful 36-acre property is situated in the coveted Pemberton meadows area. A 5 minute commute from the Village of Pemberton and you have arrived at your private 36 acre farm. Ryan creek is adjacent to this property as well as access to many different mountain ranges for all year back country activities. Contact to Book a Showing.

2222 CASTLE DRIVE

$1,229,000

A lovely natural trail places this mountain townhome within walking distance of all the Creekside amenities and Whistler Mountain. In the summer, the parks at nearby Alta Lake are a perfect place to spend relaxing days. The well-designed layout over 3 floors offers ground level entry, a bright, open concept main floor, and 3 covered decks with pleasant mountain and forest views. This stunning townhome is ideal for full time family living or as a spacious weekend retreat.

LINDSAY GRAHAM

3 HIGHPOINTE

212/213 GLACIER LODGE

A perfect rental or full time living property! Located in Creekside, just steps to the Creekside Gondola, this updated 1.5 bedroom condo offers a peaceful treed outlook from the spacious deck. The welcoming entry with storage flows through to a bright, open living space with ample windows and a fireplace. A loft provides bonus space. No GST.

Situated at the base of Blackcomb, this 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom condo has been fully renovated to create a restful and relaxing Bali-inspired oasis. With a spacious open concept living area it is an ideal option for groups and families alike. It is easy walking distance to everything, including the base of Blackcomb. There are no restrictions on personal use or rentals.

2101 WHISTLER ROAD

4573 CHATEAU BOULEVARD

$1,999,000

248 DEER LODGE 4314 MAIN STREET

T

OP SA EN

13

HO U PM S E

lindsay@wrec.com | 604 935 9533

SO LD

110 CASTLE ESTATES

$745,000

Deer Lodge is located close to all gondolas, recreation and restaurants! Fully furnished bright second floor suite offers in-suite laundry. New stainless steel appliances and a sofa bed with storage have just been added to this make this the perfect property. Town Plaza offers a common hot tub, exercise room, a ski locker and underground parking. Strata fees include hot water, electricity, cable, internet, gas fireplace and optional front desk. This property allows for unlimited owner use or ability to generate revenues.

ALLYSON SUTTON Personal Real Estate Corporation

allyson@wrec.com | 604 932 7609

218A LEGENDS

2036 LONDON LANE

$118,800

Bright second floor 1 bedroom with beautiful views of the Mountains. This Quarter Ownership property offers ski-in/ski-out, an outdoor pool and hot tubs, activity room, theater room and workout facility. This is a great opportunity for owners looking for 1 week of use per month with 2 weeks over Christmas/New Years, every 4th year. Use your weeks, rent them out through Lodging Ovations, or trade them to travel to other locations.


4853 B MONTEBELLO CASEBELLA CRESENT

$450,000

Luxurious Quarter-Share ownership opportunity in the ever-popular Montebello complex. Summer or winter the Montebello complex has one of the best locations in Whistler. This spacious townhouse offers 3 bedrooms and a den, 3.5 baths, an ample sized living/dining kitchen area, and, a private hot tub and private garage. During the next 2 years the calendar for this “B” week townhouse offers many holidays (including Christmas) and long-weekend weeks for you to enjoy with your family.

Reserved for your property

ARE YOU THINKING OF SELLING? Timing in real estate is critical. Currently, the listing inventory is still low and sales remain steady. Now is still a good time to sell your property.

KAREN VAGELATOS karen@wrec.com | 604 902 2520 3 GONDOLA VILLAGE 2227 SAPPORO DRIVE

$549,000

Located on the most desirable street in the Gondola Village neighbourhood. Tastefully decorated, cozy wood fireplace and is being sold fully furnished and equipped including a dishwasher. You will enjoy the morning sunshine in the spacious bedroom and afternoon sunshine in the living room. Located just steps away from the Creekside Gondola, restaurants, shopping. Valley Trail system and more. Excellent year-round location!

$1,210,000

901 ALTA VISTA POINTE 3050 HILLCREST DRIVE

Spacious ground level townhome with newer appliances, sink, counters, and backsplash with tastefully updated bathrooms. Enjoy hardwood and heated slate flooring plus French doors into office and/or 3rd bedroom. Bonus is the covered wrap-around patio for yeararound enjoyment allowing access to lovely patios and plenty of outdoor green space. Two private storage sheds provide extra secured space for all your seasonal toys.

TRACEY CRUZ tracey@wrec.com | 604 905 9552

GATES LAKE

9201 PORTAGE ROAD

5 EXPEDITION STATION

$699,000

Fantastic opportunity for full time living or your weekend getaway! This 4.5 bedroom/3 bathroom chalet on 6.45 acres is set up to house your horses and recreational toys.

7450 PROSPECT STREET

$514,000

With high ceilings and incredible natural light, this spacious 2 bedroom/2 bathroom top floor end unit with private garage checks all the boxes as a starter home.

DAN SCARRATT Personal Real Estate Corporation

dan@wrec.com | 604 938 4444

PEMBERTON

7374 PEMBERTON FARM ROAD E.

$3,499,000

Rezoning potential in the Village of Pemberton! Located adjacent to Pemberton’s newest housing developments, this property has the incredible opportunity to be rezoned and developed into valuable building lots. Purchase to plan your redevelopment now!

LOT 23

URDAL ROAD

$1,125,000

Incredibly Rare Offering! 10 acres of sun drenched Pemberton farmland located on the Village boundary with just a short walk to all amenities. This large, flat acreage is cleared and offers stunning Mount Currie views, not to mention the rest of the beauty completing your 360 degrees of serenity. Call to view and plan your dream home today!


SO LD

Happy Easter!

18 TELEMARK

2200 EVA LAKE ROAD

JILL NOTMAN COLPITTS jill@wrec.com | 604 932 1372

Congratulations to the new owners of this classic Creekside town home! Wishing them many years of fun and adventures in the mountains. This home had the weekend cabin feel that they were looking for, while offering great living space, beautiful kitchen and plenty of bedrooms to enjoy it with family and friends. Located in a quiet neighbourhood with access to trails and the mountain base within minutes, not to mention everything else you need.

PEMBERTON MEADOWS

7604 PEMBERTON MEADOWS ROAD

ERIN MCCARDLE STIEL erin@wrec.com | 604 902 0520

$1,949,00

Experience everything Pemberton has to offer from this custom estate home. Cathedral ceilings and expansive windows fill the home with natural light while a wood-burning fireplace framed by windows, is a natural centerpiece of the open concept living area. The bright kitchen is a delight with stainless steel appliances and a large island. Soaring ceilings and a luxurious ensuite make the master bedroom a spa-like oasis, while 3 additional bedrooms, an office, and a large basement provide plenty of space for sleep, work, and play. A large patio, gives way to perennial gardens and a salt water swimming pool. Backing onto 100 acres of farmland, you will enjoy ultimate privacy while having all the amenities a quick walk or bike away.

LI ST IN G

EMERALD

9270 EMERALD DRIVE

NE W

$1,575,000

This cottage in popular Emerald Estates has been completely reinvented with a modern casual design that you and your family will love. The home sits on a sunny and bright lot surrounded by mature trees and mountain views. Inside you will find open concept living on the main floor with a brand new kitchen, opening to generous dining and living spaces with natural elements throughout. Enjoy it as it is or expand to as much as 3300 square feet with expansion concepts available.

ROB PALM

Personal Real Estate Corporation

rob@wrec.com | 604 905 8833

14 FITZSIMMONS WALK 7124 NANCY GREENE DRIVE

$3,850,000

This 4 bedroom luxury townhome, with mountain views, is centrally located walking distance to Whistler Village, Lost Lake and so much more! The fresh alpine contemporary interior includes all the usual elements reorganized into clean lines and comfortable spaces. Features include steam shower, built-in BBQ, outdoor fireplace, hot tub and double garage.

204 PODIUM

1025 LEGACY WAY

$839,000

Welcome to Podium-where contemporary living meets functionality and innovation. This bright, open 2 bedroom property has 9 ft ceilings and exceptional southwestern exposures with views forever. The generous deck is the perfect place to enjoy a summer. Enjoy countless recreation opportunities including biking/ hiking trails and community parks.


SPORTS THE SCORE

Baird, MacDougall earn Halaw wins YOUNG SNOWBOARDERS BEAT OUT VETERANS IN SKIER’S PLAZA WHILE OLYMPIANS WIN SP’AKWUS SKI EVENT

BY DAN FALLOON WITH DIFFICULT SPRING conditions challenging snowboarders during the Halaw Snowboard Invitational in Skier’s Plaza on April 12, competitors were finding it difficult to land two scoring runs in the five attempts they were afforded. Men’s champ Jack MacDougall, however, landed all but his last one as he held off early favourite Mark McMorris to secure the win on a slushy hill. MacDougall, a native of Grande Prairie, Alta., saw his first and third runs stand for a combined score of 179.50. McMorris, meanwhile, failed to land his first two tries, put down the day’s best attempt (94.25) in Run 3, but couldn’t find a complementary second score as he finished as the runner-up with a 174.50. Francis Jobin was third with a 171.75. MacDougall has excelled at World Ski and Snowboard Festival big air events in the past, placing second to Max Parrot in 2018. Facing a similarly stacked field this time, the 18-yearold topped not only McMorris, but national team athletes in Darcy Sharpe and Mikey Ciccarelli to snare the $20,000 first prize. “It feels so good. Riding with my idols, Darcy and Mark, it feels so good to be on a similar level as them,” he said. “(Taking second last year) helped me with confidence a lot. I knew the jump and I knew what I wanted to do on it. I knew what I could do on it, so it helped me out.” MacDougall’s best-scoring run, his third, included a back 1440, which he was admittedly nervous to bust out, but the 92.75 score proved to be worth it in the end. “I just kept getting good spots to land in,” he said. “The landing was getting really soft and really choppy, but somehow, I just kept getting the good spots.” On the women’s side, youth was again served as Jasmine Baird of Georgetown, Ont. eked out a win over defending champion Julia Marino of the United States. The 19-year-old Baird steadily grew her score in each of her first four runs, with her third and fourth attempts combining for a 142.00. Marino only landed one of her first four tries, saving her best for last. However, her fifth-run score of 75.25 gave her a combined score that placed her 0.25 points behind Baird. Third-place finisher Laurie Blouin came out blazing, landing the top run out of all the women with an 80.75 on her first attempt. However, none of her remaining attempts could match it as she ultimately tallied a 131.25. Baird explained that she wasn’t feeling particularly confident coming into the competition, as she struggled to put down runs in practice with constantly shifting conditions. However, she found her groove when it mattered, earning herself a $20,000 payday. “The jumps changed twice since

yesterday’s practice, so it was hard but I’m really happy with how it turned out,” Baird said after Friday’s victory. “The first change was a bit scary. It was kicky, so that was a bit of a nightmare. After that, it was a lot better. “The hardest part was getting through the landing and making it all the way down. It was really slushy and there were a lot of holes in there, but the run in was good and the take-off was pretty solid.” Baird said when her cab underflip impressed the judges on her third attempt, she started to feel as though a victory could be within her grasp. “I got a decent score and thought, ‘Oh! Things might be looking up here,’” she recalled.

OLYMPIC SKIERS END UP ON TOP At the following day’s Sp’akwus Ski Invitational on April 13, the familiar names took the wins. On the women’s side, Olympic slopestyle gold medallist Sarah Hoefflin of Switzerland ran away with the victory, scoring a combined 170.00 to top defending champion Elena Gaskell (149.75), who made it onto the podium after nailing her last run, and Whistler’s Yuki Tsubota (144.75). “It’s always such a pleasure to end the season with such a great result,” said Hoefflin, who landed all but one of her runs. “It’s good for the morale. It gives me confidence and it just makes me want to do better tricks.” Despite being the clear class of the field on comp day, Hoefflin felt she had plenty left to give. Hoefflin genuinely felt her best run of the day came on the one she failed to land, as her switch 720 was clean but she just lacked the speed to finish it, which she said was a common problem toward the end of training runs as well. “Today was nowhere near as clean as I wanted my tricks to be. There’s still so much room for improvement,” she said. “I know I’m going to get there and I’m super excited about the future.” As for the men, three heavyweights were all in the money as Alex BeaulieuMarchand landed four of five runs en route to a 186.50 score to down up-and-comer Philippe Langevin (176.50) and Whistler resident Teal Harle (170.00). “I’m super happy, for sure. To get the win, it’s unreal. It’s always good to end the season with a first win on the pro tour,” said the 2018 Olympic slopestyle bronze medallist. Beaulieu-Marchand started quickly with two high-scoring runs and built a buffer, and eventually increased his score further with his fifth and final attempt to put the victory out of reach. “I just wanted to build off what I was doing, so I went for hard tricks in the beginning, then maybe a little easier, then trying a different grab. That ended up working out, giving me a good score,” he said. Full results are online at www.wssf.com. n

THANK YOU! S H O W C A S E WA N T S T O T H A N K T H E COMMUNITY OF W HISTLER FOR COMING OUT TO OUR 2 2 ND ANNUAL SHOWCASE SHOW DOW N! While everyone walked away with an awesome prize, we had 4 overall winners: Top rider: Top Grom (U16): Best Bail: Best Trick:

Jadyn Chomlack Amalia Pelchat Kazuki Nakamura Chase Baincs

Find all the photos on our Facebook page @ showcaseshop

APRIL 18, 2019

65


SPORTS THE SCORE

Norris and Benbow take top spots in Saudan race NORRIS INCHES OUT ROBBIE DIXON FOR FIRST PLACE, WITH IDEAL RACING CONDITIONS

BY JOEL BARDE THERE WERE IDEAL conditions for the Saudan Couloir Race Extreme on Friday, April 12, with bluebird visibility and snow that was just soft enough to dig an edge into. Jordy Norris and Brynne Benbow took top spots in the men’s and women’s pro categories, respectively. Norris said he felt he took a good line through the top of the course, which flows down Blackcomb’s iconic double-black diamond ski run, the Saudan Couloir. “I was kind of staying really high, and then cutting close to the gate, and going through the softer snow instead of the really chunky snow that had already been slipped out by everybody inspecting,” he said, moments after learning he’d won. Norris’s unofficial finishing time— 2:08.70—was a mere 0.23 seconds faster the second-place finisher Robbie Dixon, who finished with a time of 2:08.93. Kole Harle rounded out the top three in the men’s pro category with a time of 2:11.06. Norris added that he sat on the back of his skis, rather than doing a tuck, for the flat sections of the race. “I would just sit on the back of my skis

and just hug my skis,” he said. “It’s kind of more aerodynamic, I guess—and a bit of a rest.” Benbow finished with a time of 2:26.43, beating out second-place finisher MariePier Prefontaine (2:28.41) and third place finisher Erika Thomson (2:29.81). “It was pretty awesome,” said Benbow of her race experience. “I woke up this morning with a beautiful bluebird day and fresh, fresh corduroy … It couldn’t have been more perfect, and it was pretty fun.”

BRENNEMAN, FAGAN WIN BOARDERSTYLE WORLD CHAMPS Up in the Blackcomb Terrain Park on April 13, Carle Brenneman and Robert Fagan claimed the Monster Energy Boarderstyle World Championships. Brenneman bested Brooke Voigt and Audrey Hebert for the women’s title while Fagan emerged over Felix Dallaire and Charles Reid for the men’s crown in a competition where both speed and tricks were considered. Fagan, a former World Cup snowboardcross racer who has since transitioned into coaching for smaller nations like South Korea and the Netherlands, was thrilled to

BIG WIN Brynne Benbow was all smiles after winning the women’s pro category of the Saudan Couloir Race Extreme on Friday, April 12.

PHOTO BY JOEL BARDE

be speedy enough for a smaller-but-wellexecuted trick to be enough. “There were definitely some super good riders up there. In boarderstyle all this year,

there’s been a different winner every time and all those winners were in that final,” said Fagan, the fifth-place snowboard-cross finisher at the 2010 Winter Olympics. “It was a little bit of a challenge, so I was lucky to get a run away and that my trick (cork 360) was good enough for the judges.” Brenneman, meanwhile, knew she’d be neck-and-neck with Voigt. In a similar vein, she knew her speed would be the defining factor in a win. “It was super fun. I think my boardercross background helps me create lots of speed. I was just trying to get ahead of Brooke, the slopestyle master, so that I didn’t have to do any crazy tricks on the last jump,” she said. Brenneman added that while finals threw a plethora of wild conditions at the competitors, she was more than prepared by virtue of living in the Sea to Sky. “Friday was a beautiful, sunny spring day and Saturday, I think we had every condition possible, which I’m used to, being from Whistler and North Vancouver,” she said. “The course was pretty fast for a boarderstyle course. It had different options during it, so it was super fun to be able to ride both lines and figure out which one was faster.” - Dan Falloon n

THE BEACH WHISTLER AKA BEACH OR BUST Celebrates our 25th year with a SALE

2018

the beach whistler SA L E

25 - 5 0% O FF S E LE CT E D M E N'S AND W O ME N 'S W IN TE R CL O T H I NG *

* S O M E C O ND I T I O NS A PPL Y

Look for great deals throughout the year

NEW SPR ING SWIMWEAR H AS AR R IVED

Located near the Olympic Rings on the Village Stroll. Follow us on Instagram @thebeachwhistler 66 APRIL 18, 2019

604-932-7505 *S OM E C ON DI TI O NS A PPL Y S E E I N S T O R E F O R D E T AI L S


Sea to Sky ICBC & INJURY CLAIMS • Injury claims of all kinds • Minor to catastrophic injuries • slip and fall injuries

WE DON’T WANT YOUR NAME...

• wrongful death claims

just your information!

FREE CONSULTATION In person or by phone

1-800-222-8477 (TIPS)

PERCENTAGE FEE

604.932.3211

No fee until you collect

332-4370 lorimer road n.wilhelm-morden@raceandco.com

Visit us on facebook Sea to Sky Crime Stoppers NANCY J. WILHELM-MORDEN

R A C E A N D C O M PA N Y. C O M

3827 Race&CoNancy 3x3.2.indd 1

14-07-03 3:20 PM

Whistler’s favourite golf passes are back ON SALE NOW

Palmer Pass

Standby Pass

Junior Pass

The InsiderS’ Guide to Whistler Winter edition out now

A “Perfect 10” Pass

Corporate Pass

$2095

• • • • • •

Unlimited golf all season 30 day booking privilege weekdays 24 hour booking privileges weekends and holidays Preferred guest rates 50% off power cart rental Save $200 on a Range Pass

$1695

• • • • • •

Unlimited golf all season 24 hour booking privilege weekdays Walk-on privileges weekends and holidays Preferred guest rates 50% off power cart rental Save $200 on a Range Pass

$399

• • • •

Unlimited golf all season Book after 5pm for next day’s play, Monday to Thursday Walk-on privileges Friday to Sunday and holidays Save $495 on a Range Pass – Pay only $100

• • • •

Purchase by May 1 and receive 2 extra rounds 10 rounds of golf anytime 7 day booking privileges Restrictions apply, call for details

$899 $999* $1099**

* Couple transferable ** Fully transferable Call Ro Davies, Sales Manager, for details 604.938.5886 ro@whistlergolf.com

Purchase any pass online now. whistlergolf.com/rates

Fit it in your pocket. Take it everywhere. Free.

whistlergolf.com | 604.932.3280 | APRIL 18, 2019

67


SPORTS THE SCORE

Ho wins NorAm crown in Golden WHISTLER FREERIDE CLUB CLAIMS FOUR PODIUMS

BY DAN FALLOON WHAT A TIME for Wei Tien Ho’s first win of the season. The Whistler Freeride Club (WFC) member came through in a big way at the IFSA North American Junior Freeride Championships in Golden on April 12. Ho gained momentum by qualifying first in the ski men’s 12-to-14 category and carried it into the finals, where he scored a combined 69.27 to nick teammate and overall season champion Marcus Goguen’s 67.60. “I was pretty nervous. For (qualifiers), not so much, but then after I qualified first, I hadn’t been that nervous in awhile at the top for finals,” Ho said. “I dropped in and had an OK run … After that, my nerves went away and I was super happy to be there. Watching my friends throw down after was super sick, too.” Ho sought to put down two steady runs, which helped him put up two very good and consistent scores. Even though Goguen put up the best single run of the contest with his second attempt, it wasn’t quite enough

to topple his teammate. “For my finals run, I wanted to put down a solid run. It was a really wide face and we only had one inspection, so I had a bit of trouble picking a line,” Ho said. “Once I picked a line, I was a bit nervous for some sections. “(For the second run), my plans were to keep it solid, keep it clean to hold my spot.” Over the course of the week, Ho tamed two different faces to qualify first and to win the event. He also bested a plethora of new competitors, as there were plenty of talented American skiers he’d never seen before, in addition to stiff competition from B.C. and Alberta skiers with whom he was familiar. “At NorAms, it’s all the top guys, so it’s a big deal,” he said. Ho also praised teammate Goguen, who had an excellent season and was strong throughout the contest. “To be on the podium with him, I love it. It was super fun being with him. He had a sick run, so I’m stoked for him,” Ho said. Over the course of the season, Ho explained that he had some occasional struggles, especially in qualifiers, but

NORAM CHAMP Wei Tien Ho (centre) topped the IFSA North American Junior Freeride Championships in Golden on April 12 while teammate Marcus Goguen (second from left) was the runner-up.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

regained confidence when he recovered in finals. “There were a bit of ups and downs. My line still wasn’t there the whole time, so I qualified, sometimes, low and had bobbles in (qualifiers),” he said. “I made a couple comebacks, which is nice, in finals.” Next season, Ho will graduate to the 15-to-18 category, and though he takes a boost in leaving the younger category on top, he knows he needs to put in work before making the jump for 2019-20. “Watching the older boys, they’re a lot stronger, so I’ve got to train harder. The

runs they throw down are insane, so we’ll see,” he said. Several other WFC riders did well, as Squamish resident Kayley Sherlock captured the ski women’s 12-to-14 title while Sofia Guy and Drea Dimma were third and fourth, respectively. In the 15-to-18 categories, no WFC riders podiumed, though there were top 10s on the men’s side from Leif Gascoigne (fifth) and Ryder Bulfone (sixth), and on the women’s side from Amber Mullings (sixth). Full results are available online at www. freeskiers.org. n

NEW MANAGEMENT Chris Power’s 20th year in Chinese Medicine! Come celebrate with us! This Wednesday April 24th marks the 20th anniversary for Chris Power’s career in Traditional Chinese Medicine. Please feel free to stop by and congratulate him on this amazing accomplishment. Stay and enjoy refreshments, cake and even enter to win some great prizes.

www.whistlerintegrative.com EMAIL:

#208-4368 Main St, Whistler info@whistlerintegrative.com

68 APRIL 18, 2019

PHONE: HOURS:

604-962-8828 Mon-Sat 10:00am - 6:00pm

THE OWNERS OF THE BLACKCOMB LODGE ARE PROUD TO ANNOUNCE OUR NEW HOTEL MANAGEMENT CONTRACT WITH COAST HOTELS


SPORTS THE SCORE

Warm helps Oil Kings to WHL’s Final Four WHISTLER DEFENCEMAN ALSO EARNS EASTERN CONFERENCE HUMANITARIAN OF THE YEAR HONOURS

BY DAN FALLOON WHEN WILL WARM went down with the knee injury that kept him out of the Edmonton Oil Kings’ lineup for three months, his season could very well have turned into a write-off. But while the Whistler-raised defenceman worked hard in preparation for a return to action, Warm started an initiative called Will Warms the Community, where he worked closely with the local Ronald McDonald House, while also visiting the Glenrose Rehabilitation Clinic and Stollery Children’s Hospital. He also packaged teddy bears for delivery within the community after the Oil Kings’ annual Teddy Bear Toss Game, and organized a team visit to Canadian Blood Services after an Oil Kings staffer’s family member was in a serious car accident. For his efforts, he was named as the Eastern Conference’s Humanitarian of the Year and is up against Western Conference nominee Jared Dmytriw of the Vancouver Giants for the Doug Wickenheiser Memorial Trophy, which will be presented May 1. “I was a little bit surprised when I found out, but it’s a huge honour. I’m really proud and excited to receive that award,” he said. Warm’s most consistent work was with the Ronald McDonald House, which hosts families of sick children who are in town for medical treatment. Warm was most commonly found at the home’s Thursday craft nights, which he attended eight times throughout the year, while also attending a Christmas celebration in December. “It started early in the season when I was out with a long(-term) knee injury,” he said. “I got together with the team and we decided it would be a good idea for me to do something else when I’m not playing. With the team, I landed on Ronald McDonald House. I’d heard of their work before. They do amazing work, so I wanted to see what it was like.” Warm held a discharge party for a young boy named Carter who underwent three spinal surgeries. As well, he and his teammates also put aside six tickets to each home game for a family to come cheer on the Oil Kings. After each game, Warm held a meet and greet with the families and autographed swag for the children. “I wanted to do more for them,” he said. “They’re able to get a break from what’s going on in their lives. I learned so much working with the Ronald McDonald House. There are a lot of amazing people there.” Additionally, Warm and his teammates started rounding up their broken sticks to donate to Peyton’s Project, founded by a young boy who has had three brain surgeries. On the ice, the Oil Kings have enjoyed a bounce-back season. A year after finishing last in the Central Division, missing the playoffs

Wellness Talks Nesters Market and Pharmacy offers wellness talks at its Whistler location. Join RHN and Certified Plant Based Chef Sarah Uy, Carissa Beu, RHN and Post Partum Doula Da-na Lemmon and Jasmin Wong each week for inspirational whole health ideas.

HEATING UP Whistler’s Will Warm has been a major

contributor for the Western Hockey League’s Edmonton Oil Kings on and off the ice this season. PHOTO BY ANDY DEVLIN/EDMONTON OIL KINGS

by 25 points, Edmonton won the division and stayed hot in the postseason, defeating the Medicine Hat Tigers in six games before sweeping the rival Calgary Hitmen in four straight games. They’ll face the Prince Albert Raiders starting on April 19. “Us and Calgary is a huge rivalry, so being able to play them in the second round, we were all really excited. We went out and played hard every night,” he said. Warm’s role on the blue line had shifted in his three years with the team. After scoring nine goals as a rookie, he tallied just one last season and was limited to just two assists in 33 games this year. However, his increasing defensive prowess has made him an invaluable part of a stingy Edmonton back end. “One of the strengths of our team is our D corps, and we have six defencemen that can play huge minutes. That’s been interesting for all six of us, trying to figure out what our role is and how we fit in,” Warm said. “We’ve got a good thing going right now where we’ve got a couple guys on the power play, a few of us penalty killing and the rest of us all know that we can play five on five.” With new head coach Brad Lauer, Warm said defencemen are encouraged to jump on the rush, so long as it’s done in a defensively responsible way. Warm, who turns 20 on April 22, said it was difficult to be away from the rink when he was hurt, missing all of October, November and December. His transition back to the team, though, was as smooth as possible. “Injuries are a huge part of sport. Being out for so long, I had to work really hard physically and mentally to make sure I was ready to come back,” he said. “But we’ve got a great group of guys in Edmonton that really helped me out and supported me the whole time.“ n

Oodles of Noodles THURSDAY APRIL 25, 10:30 �.�. with Sarah Uy, RHN

RHN Dana Lemmon as she demo’s raw noodle salads using a spiralizer and fresh vegetables. Inspiring fun creations using fresh vegetables soon to be in abundance for spring and summer seasons.

Dana is originally from Ontario, with a passion for the outdoors, Dana decided to move to Whistler, and has made a home here for the past 7 years. Dana is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist and Postpartum Doula, currently taking clients at Nesters Market Wellness Centre. Her passion for living a healthy, happy lifestyle shines through in her daily practices.

Wellness Desk 604-932-3545 Ext 322

7019 Nesters Rd. Whistler, B.C.

APRIL 18, 2019

69


SPORTS THE SCORE

Armistead wins age group in Utah WHISTLER RUNNER PLACES EIGHTH OVERALL AT ZION 100 ULTRA MARATHON

BY DAN FALLOON WHISTLER ULTRA-RUNNER Peter Armistead posted an outstanding result at Utah’s Zion 100, but admittedly, he didn’t know quite how excellent until a day later. After being the eighth runner across the line in the 100-mile (160-kilometre) contest with a time of 22 hours, eight minutes and 43.9 seconds (22:08:43.9), Armistead was also the top finisher in the men’s 45-to-49 age group in the race that ended on April 13. “My wife actually told me,” Armistead said with a laugh. “Getting a win was absolutely brilliant, I’m over the moon.” The 46-year-old, who is originally from the United Kingdom, had never been to Utah before, but after hearing from friends and doing his homework, he quickly learned what he was in for. “I’d done my research and knew what it was going to be like. You’re racing in a desert and canyons. I knew that there wasn’t a lot of elevation, but that the terrain … was a bit tricky to run on,” he said. “There was lots of slick rock and lots of roots, which made it fairly unrunnable, even though it was quite flat.” An additional challenge for Armistead was that he competed solo, whereas he

70 APRIL 18, 2019

DIVISION WIN Peter Armistead captured the men’s 45-to-49 age group at the Zion 100 in Utah on April 12 and 13. PHOTO SUBMITTED

usually travels with his wife, a crew or a pacer. Having that need for self-sufficiency altered Armistead’s approach to the race. “Being by myself, I was very, very clinical about everything. I didn’t have many ups and downs,” he said. “If you’re by yourself and you get down in a bad mood, you really need to be on your game, basically, or else it could end your race. “I took things slower than I normally would. I deliberately went out very, very slow in this particular race. I think within the first hour, 60 people overtook me,

which was a bizarre experience.” From there, Armistead settled into a slow and calm groove, and by halfway through the race, had put himself into the top 10, a placement he maintained the rest of the way. Another offshoot of racing on his own is that coach Gary Robbins suggested that Armistead leave drop bags at every aid station to prepare for worst-case scenarios. While one didn’t make it to where it was supposed to be, the camaraderie of the ultrarunning community shone through. “I wanted to do my various things—

change my socks and put some lube on. I just stood there and there was nothing for me,” he said, “but it was all good. We worked it out on the spot. There were other people there and I just said, ‘I’ve not got a drop bag. Can anyone help me out?’ “A couple people stood up and sorted me out for a few minutes, so it was fine in the end.” Under the watchful eyes of Robbins and co-coach Eric Carter, Armistead prepared for the early-season race in brutal outdoor conditions and on the treadmill. “It’s always hard, and we had a long, cold winter in Whistler,” he said. “I just had to really get my head down. I must admit it’s not been the most enjoyable few weeks of running but I’m a very goal-focused person. “When I went into the race, I was in absolutely as good of shape as I could be in.” Armistead, who completed the Rio Del Lago 100 in California last November, said the Zion 100 was his first race for charity. He ran in support of Operation Smile, which performs facial reconstructive surgery for children in developing nations. As of April 15, he had raised nearly $1,900, though Armistead pledged that since he completed the race in under 24 hours, he’d match the total. There is still time to donate at www. justgiving.com/fundraising/peter-armistead2. n


SPORTS THE SCORE

SMART GUY Luke Smart hit the podium at the final Step Up Tour event of the season at Le Relais, Que. on March 31. PHOTO SUBMITTED

Smart second in NorAm standings SPORTS BRIEFS: SKI-CROSS RACERS EXCEL; FLANN HELPS GRIZZLIES TO TITLE; GYMNASTS SHINE AT PROVINCIALS

BY DAN FALLOON FREESTYLE WHISTLER alumnus Luke Smart capped a strong slopestyle season at the Step Up Tour at Le Relais, Que. on March 31. In the final weekend of the season, Smart placed fourth in a hotly contested NorAm Cup competition on March 30, as his score of 89 was just one point back of winner Hunter Henderson of the United States. He then won the Step Up Tour finale to clinch second place in the NorAm Cup standings.

SKI-CROSS RACERS EXCEL AT NATIONALS Two young Whistler Mountain Ski Club skicross racers tested their mettle against the best in the land at Alberta’s Sunshine Village on the weekend. With Olympic champions like fellow Whistlerite Marielle Thompson, Brady Leman and Kelsey Serwa in attendance, Jack Macdonald and Jack Morrow had the chance to rub shoulders with some of the world’s best. In the U19 championships on Sunday, April 14, Macdonald and Morrow ended up back to back in third and fourth place, respectively. In the senior nationals races, Serwa nicked Thompson and Abby McEwen for gold, while the men’s race saw Leman hold off Reece Howden and Ryan Webster in the men’s contest.

FLANN HELPS GRIZZLIES TO CYCLONE TAYLOR CUP Whistler’s Cody Flann helped the Revelstoke Grizzlies to the 2019 Cyclone Taylor Cup as provincial Jr. ‘B’ champions. The Grizzlies claimed the trophy in Campbell River with a 5-1 victory over the Victoria Cougars on April 14. Flann scored a power-play goal and added two assists in three games for the Grizzlies, who were 2-1 in round-robin play, losing only to the Cougars. In the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League regular season, in which the Grizzlies won 42 of 49 games, Flann tallied 22 goals and 33 assists before adding another eight goals and seven assists in the playoffs.

WHISTLER GYMNASTS SHINE AT PROVINCIALS Whistler Gymnastics sent a small but strong contingent of athletes to the provincial championships in Coquitlam on the weekend. In the Level 6 (2005) event, Sophie Firth won the balance beam event en route to a fourth-place finish all-around. Teammate Gabbi Collins was fifth all-around after two podium performances, second on the floor and third on the balance beam. In the Level 6 (2006) competition, Georgia Eccles took a best result of 10th on the vault. Lastly, in the Level 7 (2007) contest, Sofia Wright took a pair of top 10s, placing fifth on the bars and sixth on the floor. n

APRIL 18, 2019

71


SPORTS THE SCORE

2

1

4

5

6

1 Jack Hunter of Georgian Peaks Ski Club races during the U14 men’s slalom on April 14. 2 A racer prepares for a team event during the weekend. 3 A racer is spotted on course. 4 An RCMP member carries the Whistler Cup trophy during the Parade of Nations on April 11. 5 New Zealand’s Mikayla Smith blazes through the giant slalom course en route to victory on April 14. 6 Canada’s Arianne Forget, the U16 Nancy Greene Award winner, prepares to drop into the super-G course on April 11. It was first of two wins for Forget. 7 Ontario’s Madison Donnelly accepts the U14 Nancy Greene Award in Skier’s Plaza on April 14. PHOTOS BY EVENTS BY COAST MOUNTAIN PHOTOGRAPHY. OFFICIAL PHOTOS CAN BE VIEWED AT: WWW.COASTPHOTOSTORE.COM/ EVENTS/WHISTLER-CUP-2019

PLAN NOW AND ENJOY WHISTLER FOR 2 WEEKS OVER CHRISTMAS 2019!!

Evolution in Whistler Creekside features ski in/out 1/4 ownership opportunities. Modern 1 bedroom floor plans available in various building locations. Contact me for more details about this popular Whistler home ownership style. 13 weeks throughout the year to use yourself, lend to family members or earn revenue. 

305 FIRST TRACKS LODGE 1.5 Bed

Ownership opportunities for as low as $122,000

Dave Beattie

RE/MAX Sea to Sky Real Estate Whistler PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

72 APRIL 18, 2019

Search available homes in the Whistler and Sea to Sky Country area at www.DaveBeattie.com

2 Bath

$1,359,000

With 3 awards from Trip Advisor, First Tracks Lodge offers a true ski-in/ ski-out slopeside location in Whistler Creek. Entertain friends and family in the gourmet kitchen, open design living area with massive stone fireplace, and generous deck. Amenities include in-suite laundry, heated outdoor pool and hot tubs, fitness facilities, BBQ area, and oversized storage lockers.

Suite 108 - $145,000 | Suite 307 - $138,000

604-905-8855 1-888-689-0070 Dave@DaveBeattie.com

|

604-905-2827 Sharon@wrec.com 1-800-667-2993 Sharonaudley.com


SPORTS THE SCORE

THANKYOU!

THE WHISTLER CUP ORGANIZING COMMITTEE WOULD LIKE TO THANK ALL OF OUR SPONSORS, PARTNERS AND VOLUNTEERS FOR HOSTING THE WORLD’S BEST JUVENILE SKI RACERS AND PUTTING A SMILE ON THEIR FACES!

3

SEE YOU ALL IN 2020! CONGRATULATIONS TEAM CANADA!

www.coastphoto.com

7

Support Community Learn how to make the gift of a lifetime.

whistlerfoundation.com Cascades Haywood Securities PI Financial Group Regal Logistics Vancouver Ski Foundation Xerox Canada

Century Signs & Awnings Clif Bar & Company Coast Mountain Photography Imprint Plus Mabel’s Labels

Macdonald’s Whistler Toad Hall Studios Creekside Market Hilton Resort and Spa Milestones Whistler Collective Kitchen

APRIL 18, 2019

73


VELOCITY PROJECT

Are you smarter than a tree? IT DIDN’T WEIRD Dr. Suzanne Simard out when I told her I talk to trees. Dr. Simard is a professor of forest ecology with the University of British Columbia and the researcher behind the viral TED Talk that introduced the general public to the idea that trees communicate with other trees, and share information, carbon, and energy in collaboration with each other through a vast underground network of mycorrhizal fungi.

BY LISA RICHARDSON It’s impossible to hear her research findings and look at a forest in the same way again—which might be why she’s been such a flashpoint for industry, government and reductionist scientists, bent on seeing forests in quantifiable harvestable board feet or a major input in GDP or an aggregation of carbon atoms. Featured in Treeline, Jordan Manley’s most recent film, Dr. Simard says, “Intelligence is a word that we ascribe to humans and animals and we tend to associate it with nervous systems and brains. Plants don’t have nervous systems or brains like we do, with neurons and axons. But when we dissect the pattern of the mycorrhizal network mathematically, it’s the same pattern as the neural network, evolved for efficiency of communication, kind of like a brain. When we look at the actual compounds moving through the

TREE TALK B.C.’s Dr. Suzanne Simard spent 30 years researching forests to establish what Indigenous people have asserted for centuries: there was a web before the Web. PHOTO SUBMITTED

74 APRIL 18, 2019

network, some of them are exactly the same as neurotransmitters in our brains. Plants do have intelligence in a broader sense, in that they are perceptive and they receive information, they make decisions, they have memories, they can learn. These are all attributes and skills that we ascribe to intelligence. And they’ve been evolving those skills for hundreds of millions of years, far longer than the humans or the animals that came much later in evolutionary history.” Having barely digested this radical interpretation of “intelligence,” I trundled down to the remnant strip of trees between my house and the road, and began sending

True wilderness, frankly, scared the shit out of me. But suddenly, that day, I was pulled into noticing incredible details. Names I used to fumble for, attached, lodged. It struck me that, having finally acknowledged the trees as “beings” that morning, they had reciprocated by shrugging off the green veil between us, allowing me to see the kind of details one needs to get oriented, enter a relationship, and interact, instead of stumbling around, dazed and lost. Could coming into harmony start with a simple act of acknowledgement? (Consider the implications for human relationships— so simple! So radical!)

“What is not as known is that trees actually respond to how we’re interacting with them.” - DR SUZANNE SIMARD

my thought-waves out into the forest, acknowledging this exchange of air between us, the complexity and relationships and sub-surface whispering that I hadn’t really considered. That afternoon, as my work day wrapped up, I walked dreamily down the drive to pick up my son, and the world suddenly came alive. I’ve been a poor observer all my life, so much in my head that I’m hardly in the physical world. Being what the best poets do, I always wanted to see the forest and name its intricacies with specificity and lyrical intent. I wanted to be able to forage, and wayfind and not get lost or eaten, but basically, all I ever saw was green—a great big swath of impenetrable, monotonous, homogenous nature.

Dr. Simard’s research, once groundbreaking, now widely reinforced, has helped establish that trees communicate with each other. The next line of inquiry is to ask: what might they communicate to us? “It’s kind of a fraught topic,” she acknowledges. “From the point of view of Western science, we interact with the world, but the forest doesn’t interact with us.” The scientific and health benefits of “forest bathing” are now well documented. Interacting with the forest is good for us two-leggers. “What is not as known is that trees actually respond to how we’re interacting with them. People have accepted that trees communicate and interact with each

other—they respond, emit chemicals, send messages. But we haven’t gotten to the step of accepting that they’re actually responding to us, because then we have a responsibility, to pay attention and respect those responses from the trees.” That, of course, would mean, we don’t clear-cut them. We don’t treat the forests like a personal Wal-Mart. We don’t take without asking. We don’t take if the answer is no. Establishing this hypothesis was the next step in Dr. Simard’s trajectory of inquiry, but she’s been busy writing a book, and frankly, she’s gun-shy of the blowback. It wasn’t easy being a pariah for the years when she first shared her discoveries. “I’m getting kind of tired,” she admits. “I’m very passionate about forests. It’s so visceral for me. I grew up in the forest. And here we are introducing our children into this very difficult predicted future. There’s going to be tough times ahead. And the crux is that we need to get people back to realizing that we are all part of the ecosystem. We’re not some superior race, or something different. We need to get back into the forest, relating to the forest as an equal. An equal to the trees. An equal to the whale.” Dr. Simard laughs ruefully at her “radical” discoveries. “Everything I’ve discovered has pretty much been said and known for a long, long time. It’s just that I took these little isotopes and counters and measured it and published it in a journal and suddenly it’s credible. Aboriginal people have been waiting patiently for us to get this, for years: respect and reciprocate with the tree, and show it thanks.” So what are you waiting for? The trees are literally waiting for you to step into their embrace and say, “Thank you.” The Velocity Project: how to slow the f*&k down and still achieve optimum productivity and life happiness. n


MEADOW PARK SPORTS CENTRE SWIM • SKATE • SWEAT • SQUASH

Meadow Park Sports Centre is located 4 km north of Whistler Village. OPEN DAILY: 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Last entry by 9:30 p.m.

GROUP FITNESS SCHEDULE THU 18 Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m. Cardio Core Workout 9-10a.m. Aqua Fit Shallow 9:30-10:30a.m. Low Impact Aerobics 10:30-11:30a.m. Zumba 12:15-1p.m.

FRI 19

G O O D

SAT 20

Total Body Conditioning 7:30-8:30a.m.

SUN 21

Low Impact Circuit 9-10a.m.

Family Yoga* Ages 4-7 11:40-12:25p.m.

E A S T E R

Classes with * are registered or flexible registration (flex reg) programs and require registration of at least 5 people to start.

M O N D A Y

F R I D A Y

Zumba 10:30-11:30a.m.

No Classes 20/20/20 5:30-6:30p.m. *Spin 6-7p.m. Box Fit 6:45-7:45p.m.

MON 22

All other classes are included in the price of admission.

See exact schedule of classess at the sports centre or online at:

Mind Body Stretch 8-9 p.m.

No Classes

whistler.ca/recreation

TUE 23

*Runner’s Dryland 7-8a.m.

Low Impact Circuit 9-10a.m.

WED 24

Low Impact Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m Total Body Conditioning 9-10a.m.

*Barre Aqua Fit 11:45-12:45a.m. Deep 9:30-10:30a.m. *Strong Hearts 12-1p.m. Zumba 12:15-1 p.m. *Gentle Fit for Seniors 1-2p.m. Grrls Bootcamp 4-4:45p.m.

*PWR! Moves 1:15-2:15p.m.

*Can Active Strong 2:30-3:30p.m. by Zumba 5:30-6:30p.m *Spin 6-7p.m.

TRX Mixer 5:10-6:10p.m.

*Pilates Mat Class 6:45-7:45p.m.

Zumba 6:20-7:20p.m.

Stretch & Restore Yoga 8-9 p.m.

Stretch & Roll 7:30-8:30p.m.

ARENA SCHEDULE THU 18

W&OT Drop-In Hockey

8:15-9:45a.m. Drop-In Hockey 10-11:30a.m. Public Skate 12-3p.m.

FRI 19

Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

SAT 20

SUN 21

MON 22

55+ Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

TUE 23

WED 24

Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

Drop-In Hockey 10-11:30a.m. Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Red Cross Babysitting Course May 10, 2019 8:30a.m. - 5:30p.m. Open to 11-14 year olds For more information, call 604-935-PLAY (7529)

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

POOL SCHEDULE THU 18

FRI 19

SAT 20

SUN 21

MON 22

TUE 23

WED 24

LEISURE POOL 9a.m. - 9p.m. LAP POOL, HOT TUB, SAUNA, STEAM ROOM 6a.m. - 10p.m.

whistler.ca/recreation | whistler.ca/notices | 604-935-7529  @RMWhistler |  @rmwhistler |  @rmowhistler

whistler.ca/recreation


EPICURIOUS

Seven vendors slated for Whistler’s summer food-truck program RMOW PROGRAM LAUNCHES JUNE 29 WITH BLOCK PARTY IN UPPER VILLAGE His third year vending in Whistler’s parks, Ijima called it “a dream” to be able to dish out his distinct brand of Japanese street food in his second home. Specializing in its namesake teriyaki, the truck also serves other classic Japanese pub staples, such as the popular buckwheat noodles, yakisoba, as well as Ijima’s Far East take on a quesadilla. Ijima will be on a busy schedule this summer, appearing at the Squamish Constellation Festival, the Squamish Street Market, and at several Vancouver events.

BY BRANDON BARRETT THE RESORT MUNICIPALITY of Whistler (RMOW) has unveiled the lineup for this year’s food-truck program, which will kick off in late June with a block party featuring a mix of new and returning vendors. For the fourth year running, there will be a food truck onsite daily in select Whistler parks from June 29 to Sept. 2, usually from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Rainbow and Lost Lake parks will serve as the main locations, with Lakeside Park used as an alternate site when necessary. A block party on June 29 in the Upper Village will serve as an introduction to this year’s vendor roster. The party gets underway at noon. Seven food trucks will be featured this summer, including three returning and four new vendors. Here’s a rundown of all the tasty eats and refreshing bevvies on offer:

CARTE DIEM-SEIZE THE SOUVLAKI www.cartediem.ca The only vendor to have taken part in every year of Whistler’s food-truck program, Squamish-based Carte Diem is the Sea to Sky’s only purveyor of homemade Greek fare. Known for its signature souvlaki, the food truck has earned a loyal following in Squamish, and also appears at several events a year in Vancouver. “It is fun going up to the parks and people are really happy that you’re there because there’s no food around,” said owner-operator Karin Shard. “The program itself is kind of fun having all the different food trucks going to the different locations. Tourists seem to really enjoy it.”

CRAVINGS KETTLE CORN www.cravingskettlecorn.com Owned and operated out of Port Coquitlam, Cravings Kettle Corn offers a range of sweet

JUICED UP Mountain Squeeze cold-pressed mobile juicery is one of seven vendors participating in the RMOW’s food-truck program this summer. Pictured are owner-operators Ami Massey and Erin Stansa.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

and savoury gourmet kettle corn flavours, including its signature caramel corn, its platinum white cheddar and its aged orange cheddar popcorn. Cravings also offers a number of adventurous special flavours, including coconut crunch, whiskey and Sriracha, cranberry caramel corn, and more.

FOLIE CRÊPES Folie Crêpes French Food Truck on Facebook A newcomer to Whistler’s food truck scene, Folie Crêpes is the brainchild of Leslie Trompeaux and Bach Souayah, formerly of Il Caminetto. Dishing out a range of sweet and savoury crêpes, Trompeaux and Souayah want to bring an authentic taste of their native France to the resort community. “We will come back from France on May 8 with some ideas from Paris and everywhere around France,” said Souayah. Folie Crêpes will appear at the Squamish Farmers’ Market this summer, and has also applied to the Whistler Farmers’ Market. Souayah said the goal is to open a brickand-mortar restaurant in Squamish over the next few years.

JUICE NATION Juice Nation is the only vendor on the list without social media or a website. In an

� Vista Place LIVE, WORK, PLAY

Residential, Office

Commercial Space and Commercial Available Now! Rental Spaces info@vistaplacebc.com 76 APRIL 18, 2019

email, a spokesperson for the RMOW said the municipality did not have any additional information on the food truck.

MOUNTAIN SQUEEZE www.mountainsqueeze.com Another Squamish vendor, Mountain Squeeze is a vegan-friendly mobile juicery specializing in cold-pressed juices, smoothies, and salad and acai bowls. This is the third year Mountain Squeeze will be part of Whistler’s food truck offerings. “We really like the fact that we get to be in these random little parks,” said co-owner Ami Massey, who runs Mountain Squeeze alongside Erin Stansa. “We get to be a part of the local community and the tourist (community), but in a way that’s in an outdoor environment.” You can also pick up Mountain Squeeze cold-pressed juices at several retail locations in Squamish, or have them delivered throughout the Squamish area.

TERIYAKI BOYS www.facebook.com/Teriyaki.Boys.Squamish Mamo Ijima splits his time between Whistler’s only Japanese steakhouse, Teppan Village, in the winter, and his own food truck, Teriyaki Boys, in the summer.

NOW ACCEPTING Lease Applications

www.VistaPlacePemberton.com

THE TURMERIC TRAILER www.facebook.com/TheTurmericTrailer A brand-new player on the scene, The Turmeric Trailer is a 100-per-cent plant-based food truck that serves up tasty, health-conscious food inspired by owner-operator Clare StenhamBrown’s travels around the globe. After switching to a plant-based diet two years ago, Stenham-Brown was motivated to create a truck that would be “an ambassador for vegan food.” “I know it can be boring and unflavourable, but it doesn’t need to be like that,” she said. “I just wanted to showcase what vegan food can do.” The food truck runs out of a custombuilt, yellow Boler trailer, and will primarily specialize in hearty bowls, such as a vegan poke bowl made from dehydrated and marinated watermelon that mimics the flavour and texture of tuna, a deconstructed Vietnamese banh mi bowl, and a number of vibrant summer salads. “I really want to just cook what I eat through the summer, which is really funky salads and whatever is fresh and seasonal,” Stenham-Brown explained. The Turmeric Trailer will also offer a number of plant-based ice creams made with a banana base, and its signature cold-brew turmeric latte, made with coconut cream. For more information on this summer’s food truck program, visit whistler.ca/ culture-recreation/parks/food-trucks. n

We’ve got you covered. Pick up the latest issue of your favourite read in Whistler.


$26 SPRING SPECIAL MENU

DAILY

DRINK SPECIALS

4 COURSES STARTS

TUESDAY, APRIL 23RD *AVAILABLE FOR GROUPS OF 14 OR LESS AVAILABLE SUNDAY TO THURSDAY (EXCLUDING HOLIDAY SUNDAYS)

SUSHIVILLAGE.COM 604-932-3330

MONGOLIEGRILL.COM

Resort Municipality of Whistler

Canoe, kayak and SUP storage rack rental spaces at Whistler Parks Racks spaces will be available to rent from April 30 to November 14 and online registration will open, on a first come first serve basis on April 25 at noon. See Canoe, Kayak and SUP Storage Rental at: whistler.ca/SUPstorage

SPRING FEATURE 3 COURSE VILLAGE SPECIAL DINNER $35

$5 ASAHI BEER & 1/2 PRICE HOT SAKE Add a side of Prawns, Salmon or Scallops to any entrée for $10

SUNDAY - THURSDAY We will be closing April 29 and reopen May 16 Located in the Hilton Resort & Spa | 5:30pm – close | reservations recommended overlooking the Village Stroll

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca /parks

teppanvillage@shaw.ca • 604.932.2223 • teppanvillage.ca

APRIL 18, 2019

77


ARTS SCENE

Stop-motion film wins 72Hr Filmmaker Showdown PRO PHOTOGRAPHER SHOWDOWN, INTERSECTION CROWN WINNERS FOR 2019 WSSF ART EVENTS

BY ALYSSA NOEL IT’S NOT A STRETCH to say that the 72hr Filmmaker Showdown has had a big impact on Kyle James’ life. Back in 2015, the Squamish resident’s stop-motion film about a stray sock, called It Socks to be Lonely, made it to the finals of the World Ski and Snowboard Festival (WSSF) event. “It was my first time doing stop motion,” James says. “Because of that film, I decided to go back (to school), study, get a degree, and educate myself and come back.” Come back he did—winning top spot, and a $7,000 cheque—at this year’s showdown. His film, Kevin, chronicles the journey of an adorable, bespectacled puppet as he attempts to break out of a house. It didn’t hurt that Kevin also had to contend with James’ three-and-a-half-month-old puppy (who earned several audible “awws” from the crowd at the Whistler Conference Centre at the event last Friday, April 12). “I was really wanting to push stopmotion filmmaking for a while, so the last year I’ve been doing whatever I can to see what I can do,” James says. “I’m pretty

FEST FUN The team behind Kevin celebrates their win at the 72hr Filmmaker Showdown.

PHOTO BY MITCH WINTON/ WSSF

78 APRIL 18, 2019

ecstatic. It’s a turning point.” In total, 10 filmmaking crews made it to the finals after spending three long days shooting, editing and producing a short film. While James took home Best in Show, Whistler crew Two Dontas, One Proctor

“This was my vision of freeride, from hanging out with friends at competitions, to hanging out with friends on big mountains,” Di Lullo says in a press release. “It was about pushing the limits of the sport, like any extreme sport aims to do.”

“I was really wanting to push stop-motion filmmaking for a while, so the last year I’ve been doing whatever I can to see what I can do.” - KYLE JAMES

Productions earned the People’s Choice award for their dark comedy, Benched. To check out James’ work, go to huskyfilms.com.

PRO PHOTOGRAPHER SHOWDOWN Italian freeride mountain bike photographer Ale Di Lullo won the 2019 Pro Photographer Showdown on Thursday, April 11. The title of Best in Show came with a $10,000 prize.

His nine-minute slideshow took the audience through the last 15 years of his career and was set to a soundtrack by Nine Inch Nails. “It’s amazing,” Di Lullo says. “I’ve been looking at this contest forever. I thought I would never be able to even get invited. For some lucky alignment of planets, I got invited in, and I even won it. I’m speechless.” The WSSF event also featured careerspanning slideshows by surf photographer Marcus Paladino; Tal Roberts, who focuses on skate, snow and adventurebased photography; Hawaiian surf and

sea photographer Zak Noyle; and Whistler outdoor lifestyle and action photographer Robin O’Neill. O’Neill took home the People’s Choice award.

INTERSECTION Wrapping up the festival’s art offerings, Intersection—which was presented in conjunction with the environmental organization Protect Our Winters Canada— took place on Sunday, April 13. This year’s winning crew took home both the $10,000 Best in Show prize and the People’s Choice award. The event sends six groups of filmmakers and athletes out for seven days to shoot a five- to seven-minute film within 100 kilometres of Whistler. After their win, The Los Amigos—which first formed in 2016 as a group of UBC roommates—told the sold-out crowd that one line featured in the short ski film didn’t end so well. Morgan Tien launched off the rock that makes up Chopsticks Face off Peak Chair in the film and “I shattered my clavicle,” he told the crowd from his wheelchair. “I fractured my tibia and I broke three toes in my left foot.” He adds, in the press release, that the win was still “one of the most incredible feelings I’ve ever had.” n


ARTS SCENE

WHAT’S ON @ THE AUDAIN FREE ADMISSION FOR AGES 18 & UNDER Including regular events & programs Art After Dark Fridays | Photography | Apr 19 3:30 – 5:30pm (youth-specific art making) Family Studio Sundays | Photography | Apr 21 12 – 4pm presented by

WEEKLY EVENTS Free for members or with purchase of admission

NEW FUNDING Mo Douglas, executive director of Arts Whistler, is celebrating a new grant to help support local

musicians and content creators.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Arts Whistler awarded new grant to help musicians and content creators PROJECT WILL PRODUCE MORE THAN A DOZEN PROMOTIONAL VIDEOS FOR SEA TO SKY MUSIC ACTS

BY ALYSSA NOEL ARTS WHISTLER is preparing to launch a new initiative for local musicians and content creators after receiving an $80,000 grant from an unlikely source. The BC Rural Dividend fund—from the provincial Forest, Lands, Natural Resources Operations department—aims to support economic development in rural B.C. “In reality, it’s not an arts grant,” says Mo Douglas, executive director of Arts Whistler. “It’s so interesting to me. This grant for us was a real exercise in, ‘You never know what might happen, so it’s worth doing.’” The grant required proposed projects to somehow increase employment in a rural area in a field with underemployment. To that end, Arts Whistler’s proposal was dubbed the “Employment Diversification and Resilience Project.” With the funding, the organization will pair up local content creators— including directors, videographers and photographers—with musicians to create promotional tools for them. “So the content creators get some work creating content for their portfolios and the music act gets a promotional tool—like a video—to promote themselves and, ideally, get better gigs,” Douglas says. “As it says in the grant, our purpose is to make Whistler a more viable and sustainable place to work.” In total, they expect to be able to create 12 different promotional videos for 12 different musical acts from the Sea to Sky corridor, spanning from Squamish to Pemberton. “We have a 16-to-18-month program,” Douglas says. “It gives us time to have this work done and have it done well … This (grant) is actually quite practical and (has) a realistic timeframe.”

While they’ll spend the next month firming up details before doing outreach for applications, Douglas says they expect to hire 14 professionals for the project, ranging from marketing roles to directors and A/V providers. Their goal is to find people who have some experience in their field, but could use a boost to round out their resume. “The content creators are working professionals, but could use more opportunities and tools in their toolkit. The bands have been around a while, are tight, doing great performances. They’re busy and committed to staying

“It gives us time to have this work done and have it done well ... ” - MO DOUGLAS

together long-term and they’re creating original music. Those are some things folks should think about,” Douglas adds. Arts Whistler also stands to benefit from the influx of professional promotional videos as well. “We’re working on upgrading our member profiles portal anyway, but this will allow us to elevate the content for people ready to produce it at that level,” Douglas says. “That’s super exciting too; we can showcase this (before) our shows and on our screens in the building. Ultimately, this kind of thing is exponential.” For more information on how to apply, stay tuned to artswhistler.com or sign up for Arts Whistler’s newsletter. n

Art After Dark Fridays | Photography | Apr 19 6:30 – 8:30pm (adult-specific art making) Yoga @ the Audain | Fridays 6:30 – 8:00pm | Instructor Laura Davies Public Walk & Talk Tours Wednesday through Sunday | Scheduled Times Visit audainartmuseum.com/events for details Open Daily 10am – 5pm Open Friday 10am – 9pm (Closed Tuesday)

4350 Blackcomb Way, Whistler audainartmuseum.com

Resort Municipality of Whistler

Lot A Waterproofing Replacement Project Mid April to September 30, 2019 The Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) will be repairing water-damaged areas of the Lot A parking lot next to the Whistler Conference Centre. Work includes the removal of asphalt, the installation of a waterproof membrane and repaving and landscaping. The work will be phased to limit interruptions to the public and businesses as much as possible. Some restrictions to deliveries, parking and access will occur.

APRIL 18, 2019

79


NOTES FROM THE BACK ROW

The Endgame is near THAT CALM BEFORE THE STORM you feel right now is because everyone’s waiting to see how Avengers: Endgame is gonna crash-bang out of the corner they painted themselves in when they killed half

BY FEET BANKS their cast (and the world) at the end of the last movie. Endgame hits the screens at the trustworthy Whistler Village 8 on Thursday, April 25, although there is apparently a fiveminute “leak” video circulating the internet (and no, it’s not just a clip of Thanos urinating) but other than that, directors Joe and Anthony Russo have worked tirelessly to attempt to bring at least some element

HORROR STORY The Curse of La Llorona is set to bring Latin American horror mythology to the big screen this week.

COURTESY OF WARNER BROS. PICTURES

of surprise back to the movies. So good on them; the Avengers have never really done it for me but I appreciate their efforts. With that on the horizon, the only new flick in town this week is a child-snatching, haunted-house creeper called The Curse of La Llorona. For those unfamiliar with any Latin American horror mythology beyond the Chupacabra, La Llorona was a poorbut-beautiful young Mexican woman who caught the eye of a rich nobleman passing though her town. They were married and quickly pumped out some kids, then the nobleman ditched her after his extremely wealthy father eschewed him for “marrying down.” Enraged, La Llorona drowned her children in a river, then changed her mind, but it was too late. She threw herself into the water but was cursed to roam the Earth until she finds her kids and can accompany them to heaven. In the meantime, La Llorona will make life miserable for all who see or hear her wails of anguish and doom. Mexican parents used to use this tale to scare their kids into coming home before curfew, “If you’re not back by 12, La Llorona

LIVE MUSIC! TUESDAY

BLACKS AND BLUES with Sean Rose

WEDNESDAY

5 NIGHTS LIVE @ $5 LIVE MUSIC WITH HAPPY HOUR PRICES TUESDAY TO SATURDAY

JAM NIGHT

with Kostaman

THURSDAY

BAND CAMP

FRIDAY

KARAOKE

SATURDAY

HAPPY HOUR 9am-12pm & 9pm-1am

80 APRIL 18, 2019

with Juan

LIVE LOCAL INDIE ROCK AND SKA with Stephen Vogler

will get you.” (There are other versions of the legend but to hear her call is always a bad omen, or worse.) With a backstory like that, it’s too bad the movie isn’t better. Expect plenty of shadows and lots of producer James Wan’s now-commonly recognizable jump-scare style, but first-time director Michael Chaves never brings enough depth, mood, character or originality to the rest of the film. This one watches like a second-tier Conjuring movie (and that franchise is already second tier). La Llorona deserves better. There’s lots of action on the small screen this week, however. Game of Thrones’ new season just hit HBO, cementing the show as the high king of serialized “Swords & Sorcery” stories (sorry Covington Cross). Are we willing to admit yet that much, so much, of that show’s popularity comes from its open embrace of sex, nudity, and super old-fashioned whoring? Or is everyone still pretending it’s the super convoluted politicking that keeps us coming back? Beyoncé just dropped her latest concertdoc Homecoming on Netflix late Tuesday night (with a new live album to boot). In

today’s media-saturated environment, few people (if anyone) can match Beyoncé’s talent for generating hype and then backing it up, and Homecoming, the film, written, directed and executive produced by the star herself, is a much-better-than-average concert doc with solid glimpses into the working life of one of the planet’s biggest, smartest and savviest stars. And that marching band horn section ain’t bad either. This week’s “Download of the Week” kicks off a mini-series of featured documentaries about how depraved, dangerous and downright crazy humanity can be. This week we’re kicking things off with Mommy Dearest, Mommy Dead, a doc about a mother who convinces the world (and herself) that her daughter is sick with a litany of debilitating diseases so that they can defraud various charities and get free trips to Disneyland. This one is bonkers before you toss in the fake wheelchair, a festering feeding tube, murder and some BDSM Disney Princess memes, expect the unexpected and catch it on Crave/HBO. Welcome to the “Bottom of the Barrel” series. There’s lots more to come. n


ARTS NEWS

Music lineup announced for Whistler’s Great Outdoors Festival

VILLAGE 8 SHOW SCHEDULE FRIDAY, APRIL 19TH – THURSDAY, APRIL 25TH

ADVANCED SCREENING THURSDAY, APRIL 25TH AVENGERS: END GAME (NR) 6:45, 6:50, 6:55, 7:00

CORB LUND, SAID THE WHALE AND LAZY SYRUP ORCHESTRA AMONG ARTISTS SLATED FOR MAY LONG WEEKEND CELEBRATION

THE CURSE OF LA LLORONA (14A)

DAILY 4:15, 7:15 MATINEES FRI – MON 1:15 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT, SUN & TUES 9:40

BY BRANDON BARRETT THE MUSICAL LINEUP for Whistler’s Great Outdoors Festival has been unveiled, and will feature headliners Corb Lund, Said the Whale, and Lazy Syrup Orchestra when the sixth annual event returns to the resort on May long weekend. Juno-winning alt-country singersongwriter Corb Lund will kick off the free outdoor concert series held at Village Square on Friday, May 17 at 7:30 p.m. On Saturday, May 18 at 3 p.m., Victoria’s own blues rocker Jesse Roper will hit the stage, fresh off the release of his most recent album, Access to Infinity. He will be followed by another Juno-winning act, Vancouver indierock trio Said the Whale, at 7:30 p.m. Frequent visitors to Whistler, the band is unapologetically West Coast, drawing on rich harmonies from California pop and crunchy guitars rooted in the history of the Pacific Northwest’s rock scene. On Sunday, May 19 at 3 p.m., catch the soulful R&B and roots stylings of Vancouver’s Buckman Coe, supported by harmonies from Tonye Aganaba, a social justice advocate and Much More Music Video Award recipient. Coe’s latest release, Gathering Storm, is about “taking a stand for what you believe in and for who you love,” dancing “between the revolutionary and the romantic,” according to Coe’s homepage. Closing out the festival at 7:30 p.m. will be Shambhala and Bass Coast veterans Lazy Syrup Orchestra, also out of Vancouver. The orchestra blends mellow vibes with live instrumentation, MCing and a diverse selection of dance music from around the world. Produced by the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW), GO Fest was originally conceived as a celebration of the convergence of winter and spring and all the outdoor activities on offer at this transitional time of year. It was also designed as a family-appropriate alternative to the nightlife offerings over the May long weekend, historically a popular weekend for young revellers from the Lower Mainland that has been marked in past years by property damage to village businesses and, in rare cases, violence. The three-day event also features a range of outdoor activities suitable for all ages and abilities, including the Whistler Parkrun, the VANS skate ramp, tennis clinics, a road cycling group ride with the Whistler Cycling Club, beach volleyball, stand-up paddleboarding, canoeing, and the GO Green Nature Scavenger Hunt, among others. There are also a number of offerings intended to stoke creativity, including a digital camera photography workshop, DJ

WHISTLER'S NEWEST RESTAURANT & COCKTAIL BAR located in The Pan Pacific Whistler Village Centre

SERVING FOOD & DRINKS 3-MIDNIGHT DAILY

SPRING SPECIALS SUNDAY - THURSDAY

$33 MUSIC LINEUP Alt-country singer-songwriter Corb Lund will kick off Whistler’s Great Outdoors Festival.

YOUTUBE SCREENGRAB

lessons, the Adventure Film Series, and other workshops at The GO Fest Haven, which will be located in Olympic Plaza.

3 COURSE DINNER 5:30-10PM

& ALL DAY HAPPY HOUR

menu & group booking details WWW.THERAVENROOM.CA

MISSING LINK (PG)

FRI – WED 4:10, 7:10; THURS 4:10 MATINEES FRI – MON 1:10 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT, SUN & TUES 9:25

LITTLE (PG)

FRI – WED 4:05, 7:05; THURS 4:05 MATINEES FRI – MON 1:05 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT, SUN & TUES 9:35

AFTER (PG)

FRI – WED 4:00, 7:00; THURS 4:00 MATINEES FRI – MON 1:00 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT, SUN & TUES 9:25

HELLBOY (18A)

FRI – WED 3:50, 6:50; THURS 3:50 MATINEES FRI – MON 12:50 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT, SUN & TUES 9:45

PET SEMATARY (PG)

LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT, SUN & TUES 9:45

SHAZAM

(18A) DAILY 3:40, 6:40 MATINEES FRI – MON 12:40 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT, SUN & TUES 9:35

DUMBO (G)

DAILY 3:55, 6:55 MATINEES FRI – MON 12:55 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT, SUN & TUES 9:30

CAPTAIN MARVEL (PG)

DAILY 3:45, 6:45 MATINEES FRI – MON 12:45 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT, SUN & TUES 9:40

www.imaginecinemas.com Li e mu ve 6- ry F sic 9p rid m ay!

Ev

ANONYMOUS ART SHOW SELLS $10K WORTH OF ART ON OPENING NIGHT For the second year in a row, the opening night of the Anonymous Art Show, Arts Whistler’s largest annual fundraiser, has proven to be an enormous success. The exhibit asks local artists of all experience and ability levels to submit a one-of-a-kind, eight-by-eight-inch artwork. But here’s the catch: artists’ identities are hidden, so eager buyers have no idea who produced each work. The exhibit’s opening night, held on April 5 at the Maury Young Arts Centre, saw nearly half of the 370 works on offer sold, garnering roughly $10,000 in sales. “It’s so impactful,” says Mo Douglas, executive director of Arts Whistler. “That much art, the way it’s displayed, the diversity of images on the walls is this great example of just how talented and enthusiastic our community is. That’s something everyone in Whistler really loves.” Douglas says the funds raised this year will go towards Arts Whistler’s community programming. “What we want to do is ensure we have a diverse array of accessible and affordable programs,” she notes. “We’re going to move to a … weekly community arts night, where you can do a drop-in class, check out a band rehearsal—check out something in arts you’ve never done.” For those who missed opening night, there’s good news: this year, the exhibit will stay open until May 1, with all remaining artwork on sale for $50. Learn more at artswhistler.com/ anonymous. n

HOPPIEST HOUR! 4-7pm Mon-Thurs

$15 PITCHERS & $2 OFF NACHOS

BREWERY TOURS Everyday at 2:30 & 4pm

$15.95/pp includes a tour of our craft brewing facility & tasting flight CALL 604 962-8889 or email tours@whistlerbeer.com to book!

1045 Millar Creek Rd, Whistler, BC V0N 1B1

Proudly supporting local designers.

10% TUESDAYS mention this ad and receive 10% off of all products on Tuesdays L o c a t e d i n t h e To w n P l a z a a c r o s s f r o m T h e G a p 6 0 4 . 9 0 5 . 6 2 9 0

APRIL 18, 2019

81


MUSEUM MUSINGS

NEXT SESSION STARTS TUESDAY APR 30

CONCUSSION SUPPORT GROUP Sponsored by Headwound Productions.

Whistler Community Services Society in partnership with Back in Action Physiotherapy & Massage and Vancouver Coastal Health will be offering a recurring 8 week concussion support group. The aim of this group is to support those who have persistent post-concussion symptoms through community resources, education, and deliberate and targeted self-help strategies. The group is open to any residents 16 and older living in the Sea to Sky Corridor. There is no charge for this program, but PRE-REGISTRATION is required.

For more information and to register, please contact a WCSS Outreach Worker at 604.932.0113 or send an email to info@mywcss.org.

TITLE SPONSOR

Call 604-932-0113 or visit myWCSS.org/ConsussionSupport

AP

NER N I W 9 1 0 2 RIL 18TH,

Two Stroke

PET of the

week

Name: Two N T Stroke S k This is Two stroke, the fastest dog in Whistler! She is a 3-year old Mount Currie special and the best dog in the world!

Visit a Whistler Happy Pets store to pick up your prize. Function Junction: #101-1085 Millar Creek Rd. Bring a copy of this ad to redeem your prize.

YOUR PET COULD BE NEXT!

Email your pet photo with name & details to tsweeney@wplpmedia.com

82 APRIL 18, 2019

The history lurking in Whistler’s lakes BY ALLYN PRINGLE LAST THURSDAY, April 11, the museum had the pleasure of hosting Dr. Ian Spooner of Acadia University for his presentation on environmental change in Alta and Lost Lakes. The head of the Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Spooner and his students, working with Cascade Environmental Resource Group, have been using lake sediment cores to study Alta Lake for the past five years. Last year, Spooner also took a core from Lost Lake. Sediment cores provide a record, not entirely unlike tree rings, of minerals and organic matter found in the lake sediment. The core taken from Alta Lake was about 40 cm long and went back about 500 years. By dating the different layers, Spooner and his student Dewey Dunnington were able to tell a lot about how the lake has changed over time, and by connecting the dates to historical records and stories told by locals, what might have contributed to these changes. During his talk, Spooner highlighted the changing presence of copper and arsenic in Alta Lake. Though there is always some change over time, the presence of both copper and arsenic increased considerably from the 1880s, as the Pemberton Trail and PGE Railway were built and the area became more settled. While both have shown a decrease in more recent years, a spike in copper sometime around the ‘60s illustrates how important stories are to adding context to this data. From the data and records, it had been assumed that the spike in copper was part of the increasing and continued development around the lake. However, during a talk Spooner did at the museum in 2016, one audience member offered a different reason. The man stood up and informed Spooner, “No, you’re wrong. We dumped that copper in the lake, back in the ‘60s. We wanted to get rid of an invasive species.”

“The science isn’t worth anything without the stories.” (Copper is used in some places as a biocide as it effectively kills parasites such as those that cause swimmer’s itch. It also, however, will kill all the fish.) When asked where one might find records of or a permit for this action, the man told Spooner there was none. They “just did it.” There is no doubt that as stories are collected to add context to the core taken from Lost Lake, this attitude of “just do it” will come up again. After all, we already know of some

JUMP UP The Lost Lake ski jump in 1980. PHOTO SUBMITTED

such cases. In 1977, a group of Whistler freestyle skiers made plans to build their own ski jump on the shores of Lost Lake. With no development permit or any official permission from the district, Lost Lake offered an inconspicuous, out-of-the-way site. The ski jump also had no funding for materials or labour. Timber was scrounged from a number of sources and the plastic grass ski out from the Olive Chair was taken from the dump and given a second life as the ski jump’s new surface. Once the materials were gathered, construction took only two weeks. The finished ramp projected out six metres over the lake (not too far from where the sediment core was taken) and willing skiers could launch themselves up to 12 metres above the water. According to David Lalik, one of the original workers on the ramp, “Injuries were commonplace but (an) acceptable risk in the sport and environment of the day.” In 1981, the ski jump began hosting competitions and the next summer saw the first Summer Air Camp at Lost Lake. Freestyle skiers came to Whistler to train with Peter Judge, the national team coach. Far from being inconspicuous, film crews arrived to record events for television broadcasts. Stories like these aren’t always included in the official records (permits weren’t always applied for in the ’60s and ‘70s) and so contributions from people who have been in the area are incredibly important for explaining the data. As Spooner puts it, “The science isn’t worth anything without the stories. We get it wrong.” If you have your own stories to add, you can send them to Spooner at ian.spooner@ acadiau.ca or come visit us at the museum and we can pass them on. n


PARTIAL RECALL

2

1

4

3

5

6

1 SLUSH CUP One brave contestant lands face-first in the icy waters on top of Emerald Chair during the Twisted Tea Slush Cup on Friday, April 12. PHOTO BY MITCH WINTON, COURTESY OF WSSF. 2 BIG AIR Mark McMorris gets an upside down during the Halaw Snowboard Invitational big air contest in Skier’s Plaza on Friday, April 12. PHOTO BY MITCH WINTON, COURTESY OF WSSF. 3 JOE TRIO There was a lot of foot-stomping and serious audience interaction when Vancouver musicians Joe Trio performed at Our Lady of the Mountains Catholic Church on Sunday, April 14 as the final show of the Whistler Chamber Music Society’s concert series. PHOTO BY LEN VAN LEEUWEN. 4 EVERYBODY ONA MOVE: Michael Franti and Spearhead kept the Skier’s Plaza crowd moving with their headlining performance on Wednesday, April 10. PHOTO BY MITCH WINTON, COURTESY OF WSSF. 5 SAUDAN STEEP Racers peer over the edge to watch one of the competitors round the gates during the Saudan Couloir Ski Race Extreme on Friday, April 12. PHOTO SUBMITTED. 6 LOS WINNERS ‘Los Amigos’ celebrate after putting their UBC film school education to the test—and acing it—with their Friends-themed Intersection win on Saturday, April 13. PHOTO BY MITCH WINTON, COURTESY OF WSSF.

SEND US YOUR PHOTOS! Send your recent snaps to arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

Peel to reveal

Now offering a complimentary ZO Stimulator Peel after 3 cosmetic procedures such as Botox, Fillers or IPL

We only use the best:

ZO peel is suitable for all skin type/condition with no downtime. Offer starts December 2018 | Book your peel at: 604-902-9200 or info@beautybyemily.ca

Also offering over 20 years experience with Botox and Fillers • IPL Photofacial treatments • ZO Skin Health • ZO Medical Yourself but refreshed. Subtle and flawless.

• Latisse • Otolaryngology services with special interest in pediatric ENT

• ENT allergy consult and testing • FREE Sleep Apnea testing

Unit 30 - 1040 Legacy Way | 604.905.1500 APRIL 18, 2019

83


MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

On the road again FORMER WHISTLERITE JEREMY THOM MAKING IN-ROADS IN NEW ZEALAND MUSIC SCENE

BY BRANDON BARRETT JEREMY THOM wasn’t sure how receptive the Kiwi crowds would be when he packed up his guitar case and made the move to New Zealand last year. But judging by the response he got from the patrons of a dingy, dimly lit heavy-metal bar one night in Wellington, chances are he’s going to do just fine. “It looked like a dungeon. You go down this dark stairway … and the bands playing were raging loud and really heavy. I was like, ‘Oh man, this could be weird,’” he recalls. After jumping onstage, Thom pulled out his acoustic guitar and started playing his distinctly West-Coast brand of laidback rock and reggae. “They were actually really into it! The sound guy gave me a high five,” Thom adds. “The metalheads were a lot

MAKING MUSIC Former Whistlerite Jeremy Thom

has been earning crowds around New Zealand since moving there last year. PHOTO SUBMITTED

84 APRIL 18, 2019

nicer than they looked.” The singer-songwriter decided to take a leap of faith and relocate to New Zealand last year after spending the better part of the past two decades playing in Whistler. Since then, he’s been making in-roads in the local music scene of several Kiwi tourist hotspots,

regular performing gig almost instantly. “I ended up getting a gig the very first day I got there,” he says. “I met the owner of (a bar) and he was like, ‘You want to play tomorrow night?’” Thom noticed distinct similarities between Whistler’s music scene and the

“I ended up getting a gig the very first day I got there. I met the owner of (a bar) and he was like, ‘You want to play tomorrow night?’” - JEREMY THOM

landing regular gigs almost everywhere he’s gone under his new stage name, Lit Sky. He started by busking on the streets of Auckland, performing to rowdy latenight crowds who paid for the privilege of singing some “Sidewalk Karaoke” with Thom accompanying on guitar. He then travelled to the surf town of Raglan, where he secured a

New Zealand tourist towns, such as Mount Manganui, that he’s visited. “Mount Manganui is a tourist town with lots of international people and lots of music venues. It’s actually quite similar. There are a lot of musicians in both places,” he says. “I was surprised at how easy it was to get gigs, being from out of the country, but everyone

is very supportive of live music in that area.” Another key similarity has to be the cosmopolitan makeup of New Zealand’s tourist hubs, where Thom was able to connect with a number of fellow travellers that wound up lending a hand filming his latest music video. Shot for the single, “When You Open Up,” the video is a truly international affair, having been shot by a Filipino, and featuring a German, a Scot, and, of course, Thom, who is Canadian. “I’ve made so many connections and it’s really encouraging to have such a positive experience with my music here,” he says. With his work visa expiring in the fall (he also works on a kiwi farm—what’s more New Zealand than that?), Thom says he’d like to take his roadshow to other countries—but he’s not sure he’d have quite as promising an experience. “New Zealand’s a special place,” he says. “Because it is a fairly small population, word gets around very fast and if you impress one person, it just sort of snowballs. I don’t know that it would be the same anywhere else.” Check out more on Thom’s Facebook and Instagram feeds, Lit Sky Music. n


Fine Italian Cuisine

SPRING SPECIAL

COMING SOON!

A WHISTLER

ORIGINAL HOME OF THE

FAMOUS

SPAGHETTI

QUATTRO

SPRING SPECIALS AVAILABLE 7 DAYS A WEEK

3 40

Course Dinner

for

ITALIAN

FOOD AT ITS BEST

CELEBRATING

OVER 20 YEARS IN WHISTLER

THREE COURSE DINNER WITH CHOICES FROM OUR ENTIRE MENU

3 29 Small Plates

for

Reservations Recommended menus are available for viewing/ download on our website.

$

$

ONLY IN ...

The Attic

quattrorestaurants.com

Last Day

THURSDAY 27TH JUNE.

Choice of one plate

Grilled Chicken Caesar Salad

Marinated chicken thigh, low fat yogurt dressing, capered focaccia croutons, Grana Padano crisp

2 Baja fish Taco

House slaw, avocado salsa verde+cilantro sour cream served in a flour tortilla

Johnny Mac Pizza

Capicolla, mushrooms, mozzarella, provolone

Beef Burger

Ground chuck, fried onions, lettuce, tomato

Mac and Cheese

Macaroni, 4 cheese sauce, light panko crust +garlic toast

ABOVE 21 STEPS

4319 Main Street 604.905.4844

Quattro at Whistler

5 DAYS

Plus one craft beer Grizzly Brown Ale • Lifty Lager •Alta Lake Ale • 5 Rings IPA

ONLY

FOR RESERVATIONS CALL

604-966-2121 w w w. 2 1 s t e p s . c a

14.99

$

EACH

SUNDAY TO THURSDAY EXCEPT HOLIDAYS

APRIL 18, 2019

85


PIQUECAL

YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL EVENTS & NIGHTLIFE For a complete guide to events in Whistler, visit piquenewsmagazine.com/events

THU

4.18

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES

Docents will provide visitors with an introduction to the Audain Art Museum and its permanent collection. Visitors will be encouraged to explore the galleries afterwards. These drop-in tours are free with the purchase of admission or museum membership. 604-962-0413. > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

ROTARY CLUB OF WHISTLER MILLENNIUM

Join the Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium to learn about what the club is doing to support your local community and international projects. Lunch is available for $20. Everyone welcome. > 12:15 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side

DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB

The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For a partner, please call Gill at 604-932-5791. > 1-5 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

BNI provides a positive and structured environment for the development and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by helping you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing David Livesey at david_livesey@cooperators.ca. $20. > 6:45-8:30 am > The Venue

ACTIVATE AND CONNECT FOR SENIORS 50+

Connect with friends, new and old, through weekly activities. Meet at Whistler Community Services Society. In partnership with Mature Action Community. > 9:30-11 am > Whistler Community Services

LUNA PRESENTS THURSDAY NIGHT YOGA

Come shake your shanti in a 90-minute Hatha Flow yoga class. Get in the flow with an emphasis on breathing and movement. Eighteen-to-35-year-olds only, free positive vibes for all in attendance! $3 for non-members, free for Luna members. > 5:30-7 pm > Maury Young Arts Centre

MUSIC

PARENT INFANT DROP-IN

An opportunity to develop a supportive social network with other parents of young babies. Speakers and a public health nurse are often in attendance. Free. > 11 am-12:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

COCKTAIL DANCE PARTY

Start your weekend early with a handcrafted cocktail. Then hit the dancefloor or rock our legendary dancing cage with help from DJ Peacefrog. > 7 pm > Buffalo Bills

The team at Whistler Blackcomb’s Club Shred are bringing the party back to Merlin’s Bar & Grill all season long! Rotating between Whistler local favourites Red Chair and Joni Toews (from Case Of The Mondays). > 7 pm-midnight > Merlin’s Bar & Grill

LOCALS’ NIGHT

Party at Whistler’s longest-running locals’ night. Specials all night long. For VIP table bookings or guest list, email info@garfinkels.com. > 7:30 pm > Garfinkel’s

COAST MOUNTAIN THURSDAYS!

Venture on out to Function Junction for the most sophisticated après of the week! Funk, soul, jazz, blues, rare groove, disco and other rare beats curated by Stache, paired with the best beer and service in Whistler! Free. > 3:30-7:30 pm > Coast Mountain Brewing

WOMEN’S KARMA YOGA

Drop-in for weekly yoga classes led by an all-female team of certified, 200-hour yoga instructors. Includes mat use and childminding. All women, all ability levels welcome. This program is made possible by yoga instructors and childminders donating their time. Contact us to join the team. Free. 604-962-8711. > 9:30-10:30 am > Whistler Women’s Centre

Let the trumpets sing! The Whistler Youth Band is a beginner band for youth ages 10 and up. Grab an instrument and make music with friends. > 6-7:30 pm > Myrtle Philip Community School

CLUB SHRED THURSDAYS

COMMUNITY

BNI MOUNTAIN HIGH

WHISTLER YOUTH BAND

#TBT WITH THE SOUNDS OF STACHE

Stache has been on a nomadic musical adventure for almost a decade, travelling to more than 50 countries and sharing his passion for music with others. Drawing influences from all four corners of the globe, his appetite, understanding and energetic delivery will guarantee a funky smorgasbord of beats. Free. > 9 pm-1 am > Three Below

SHUT UP AND PARTY

Start your weekend off one night early and come get wild with Whistler’s loosest bar staff. With music from Fidel Cashflow and DJ Shearer. Email info@maxxfish. com for VIP and other special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

WHISTLER BARTENDER CHALLENGE AT TOMMYS

Come in and watch bartenders from around Whistler battle each other at 2019 Bartender Challenge! MC Adam playing all the tunes for the evening. Competitors: Stan from El Furniture Warehouse, Rory from El Furniture Warehouse, Mia from Aritzia, Jimbo from IGA, Donny from Basalt, and Emily from the GLC /Earls. > 9 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler

DAVE HARTNEY

Canadian country music singer from North Vancouver, B.C. The past few summers Dave has played one of B.C.’s largest music festivals, Sunfest, along with headliners Dallas Smith, Carrie Underwood, Toby Keith, and Dierks Bentley. > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

THE BLOWFLIES

A broad and curious selection of rock, blues, folk and country—toe tapping fun for all! > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

MARC CHARRON

One-man band on the run, songwriter, world traveller, original van-lifer. > 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

CONOR FITZPATRICK KARAOKE WITH JACK-QUI NO

Put it on the rocks and call it a show! Hosted by Jack-Qui No. > 8-11 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

RUCKUS DELUXE

Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy-nominated violinist Ian Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle and electric guitar. > 4 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

Remaining Dates for the First Nations Winter Feast & Performance:

Conor Fitz is an Irish singer/songwriter who spent the past few years performing his music in bars around the world. Conor plays a mixture of pop, folk, rock and sing-along classics. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

LEVEL UP - HOUSE & TECHNO For more information on featured events find us online at WWW.PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM

Featuring a rotating selection of DJs playing some of the best underground electronic dance music in house and techno, the “Level Up” nights are set to up your dance game. Hosted by DJ Miss KosmiK. > 9:30 pm-2 am > Moe Joe’s

Now ng! Hiri

Thursday, April 18 Friday, April 19 (date added for Easter weekend) Saturday, April 20 (date added for Easter weekend) Book online at SLCC.ca/feast or call 604.967.1281 Huy Chexw / Kukw’stumc’kalap for a wonderful season! If you missed the Winter Feast, visit SLCC.ca/events to see what else we have coming up.

86 APRIL 18, 2019

OPEN 10-8

WE CUT & COLOUR • NOW HIRING OPEN UNTIL 8PM • SINCE 1994


PIQUECAL

SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

ONGOING & DAILY ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WHISTLER MUSEUM

Learn more about Whistler’s culture and history. Now open by donation. > Daily 11am-5pm, Thu until 9pm > Whistler Museum

THE CULTURAL CONNECTOR: A JOURNEY OF ADVENTURE AND DISCOVERY

Grab a Cultural Connector guide and explore Whistler’s world of culture. As you follow the Cultural Connector route, you’ll discover the stories that enrich Whistler’s culture, the venues that celebrate it and the milestones that we’ve achieved along the way. The pathway will lead you through beautiful surroundings and six cultural institutions: Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre, Whistler Museum, Whistler Public Library, Maury Young Arts Centre, Lost Lake PassivHaus, and Audain Art Museum. Free. > Ongoing > Maury Young Arts Centre

COMMUNITY

GAMES CAFE

Come in and enjoy a massive selection of popular games. Sunday to Thursday. > 4-8 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD APRIL 19 MEADOW PARK SPORTS CENTRE

SEA TO SKY

MUSIC

COMMUNITY

WORKBC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES DROP IN

Drop in to the Pemberton Public Library every Thursday afternoon and learn how WorkBC can assist you in your job search and career planning. All services are free. For details, call 1-877-932-1611. > 1-5 pm > Pemberton Library (Pemberton)

FRI

4.19

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME

Books, songs and rhymes for preschool-aged children, accompanied by a caregiver. Registration is not required. > 10:30 am > Whistler Public Library

WALK AND TALK SERIES

Treasure hunt

Find the Beaver and WIN a Snowmobile Tour for TWO with Canadian Wilderness Adventures! Blast through rolling hills of powder for a real CANADIAN big mountain adventure!

More info at “Find the Beaver” on Facebook. Must be 18-35 to play!

WHISTLER COMMUNIT Y SERVICES SOCIETY

For ages 13 to 18. We offer ping pong, a skateboard mini-ramp (skateboards and helmets to borrow), free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, guitars, board games, a projector and widescreen TVs. Free. 604-935-8187. > 3:30-11 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

Win big!

Born and raised in Hamilton, Ont., Will has been making music since the age of 10. He is a multiinstrumentalist, live-looping artist. He is currently based out of Squamish, B.C. > 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

RUCKUS DELUXE SPORTS

Triathlon-focused swim squads. Full details at whistlertriclub.com/training-sessions. Free to members

whistler’s Safe-Sexy

Real treasure hunt! Beaver hidden somewhere in Whistler!

WILL ROSS

WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 3, 5:30 & 7 pm > Audain Art Museum

for fall (includes entry into Meadow Park). Nonmembers $8 drop-in (includes entry into Meadow Park). > 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy-nominated violinist Ian Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle and electric guitar. > 4 & 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

Recycle? Yes or no?

Get the BC RECYCLEPEDIA App

www.rcbc.ca RECYCLING COUNCIL OF B.C. MEMBER APRIL 18, 2019

87


PIQUECAL SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

10TH ANNUAL WHISTLER COMMUNITY EASTER EGG HUNT APRIL 20 MYRTLE PHILIP COMMUNITY SCHOOL

CONOR FITZPATRICK

LADIES’ NIGHT

WEEKEND GETAWAYS AT TOMMYS FEEL GOOD FRIDAYS

LIVE MUSIC

CHAMPAGNE FRIDAY

KAL MOLLINSON

Once the word gets out, everyone is going to want to see this guy play. He is already one of Cranked’s favourites. On warmer days, he will be playing outside on the patio. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

We have a gift for all ladies. Enjoy a glass of champagne then hit the dancefloor and dance the night away with DJ Peacefrog. Info@buffalobills.ca for guestlist or table bookings. > 7 pm > Buffalo Bills

Let’s send it on and off the mountain this weekend! DJ Dre Morel spinning rock, pop and hip hop all night! For VIP reservations and guest list inquiries, please visit tommyswhistler.com. > 9 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler

Start the weekend off right with music by B.C.’s finest party DJs mixing the best in hip hop, rap, R&B and party anthems. Whistler’s most-energetic dancefloor. > 9:30 pm > Moe Joe’s

FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE Solo artists perform every week, except on the first Friday of every month when they swap out for a full band. No cover, no lineups. > 6-9 pm > Whistler Brewing Company

Kick off your weekend at Garf’s. Get on the guest list and join the party: info@garfinkels.ca. > 7:30 pm > Garfinkel’s

Planning your perfect Whistler wedding?

NEW ISSUE OUT NOW!

88 APRIL 18, 2019

Kal Mollison, frontman of acclaimed Canadian indie band Sandcastle Theory, builds on-the-fly vocal and instrumental arrangements, mixing solo acoustic renditions of classic pub and college rock tunes with live loops and beats. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

Live music by Whistler favourites Red Chair. > 9:30 pm > Tapley’s Pub


PIQUECAL RUCKUS DELUXE

SAT

4.20

> 4 & 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 1 & 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

SUN

4.21

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

CLARA SWAN

She is a singer songwriter from Kelowna, B.C., now living in Whistler. She plays a mix of her own originals and pop covers. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

COMMUNITY

$689,000

WALK AND TALK SERIES See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 1 & 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

OUTSTANDING! PAN PACIFIC MOUNTAINSIDE

COMMUNITY

SATURDAY NIGHT SHAKER SINGING WITH THE BABIES

Learn songs and rhymes to soothe and entertain baby while encouraging early language development. For kids up to walking age. Free. > 11-11:30 am > Whistler Public Library

With music from Fidel Cashflow and DJ C Stylez, two of Whistler’s hardest-working and most-loved DJs spinning the best in Top 40, mash-ups, electro, hip hop and party anthems that will keep your booty shakin’ all night long. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP and other special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

GINGERBREAD HOUSE EASTER EGG HUNT

Located at 204-2067 Lake Placid Rd, come sign in and get a basket, head around Creekside Village to find eggs, prizes and more. > 2 pm > Creekside Village

• Fully equipped one bedroom • Ski in ski out from both mountain gondolas • Views of Blackcomb ski runs • Balcony, storage, parking percs! • Pool, hot tubs, overlooking Village action • Excellent Income; Phase II

FAMILY TOGETHER TIME

A parent-directed hour with board games, crafts and a story corner with felt puppets. A drop-in program for families of all ages. Free. > 3:30-4:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

WEEKEND GETAWAYS AT TOMMYS GAMES NIGHT AT PANGEA > 9 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler

BROTHER TWANG WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

See Friday’s listing for more info. > 6-10 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

EVENTS + FESTIVALS

Come wind down your ski day or ramp up your Saturday night festivities with the boys from Brother Twang. > 9 pm-midnight > FireRock Lounge

MUSIC

ARI NEUFELD

Ari is a multi-faceted Canadian artist, who creates a flourish of interactive music with hands, feet, mouth and heart. > 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

MUSIC

$870,000

ARI NEUFELD LIVE @ BLACK’S

Every Friday and Saturday, party with local and touring musicians at Black’s Pub. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

10TH ANNUAL WHISTLER COMMUNITY EASTER EGG HUNT

Doors open at 9:30 a.m. and the hunt begins at 10 a.m.! Entertainment includes a visit from the Easter Bunny, music and dancing with Ira Pettle, face painting, crafts, raffle prizes and more! Bake/coffee sale and barbecue available for purchase. Suggested $10/family donation appreciated. > 9:30 am-noon > Myrtle Philip Community School

Challenge your crew: Cards Against Humanity, Jenga, Settlers of Catan, HedBanz, and many more. Drinks and food specials all night long. > 4 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

LADIES’ NIGHT

It’s Whistler’s No. 1 stop for stag and stagette parties. DJ Turtle and friends mix up everything from hip hop, R&B, new rap, dance hall and Top 40 bangers. Email guestlist@moejoes.com for VIP and group perks. > 9:30 pm > Moe Joe’s

> 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

GYPSY RONGOAKEA

Gypsy is quickly becoming one of Cranked’s favourite musicians. > 4:30-7:30 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

JERRY’S DISCO

Dust off your Gaper Day getup, from backwards helmets to gorby gaps, ‘cos the best Jerry outfit gets a free bottle of prosecco! > 7-10 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

SUPREME SATURDAY

DJ Nikky from Vancouver brings the Whistler’s biggest weekend party and best vibe. VIP champagne parades along with the hottest hip hop and remixes! For VIP and guest list, email info@garfinkels.ca. > 10 pm > Garfinkel’s

SEND IT SUNDAYS

With music from T-Zen and DJ Shearer. Keep your weekend alive, and join us on Sunday nights for one of Whistler’s wildest industry nights. Email info@ maxxfish.com for VIP plus special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

424/426 HILTON WHISTLER RESORT & SPA • Renovated two bedroom, two bath lockoff • Sunny, southeast mountain views • Kitchen, balcony, fireplace, in-suite storage • King bed, 2 double beds, pull out sofa • Rental income & unlimited owner use • Hotels offers pool, hot tub, spa, tennis, restaurant

JUDY SHAW WWW.JUDYINWHISTLER.COM LOC A L E X P E RTI S E

.

GLOBAL CONNECTION S

604.902.0357

jshaw@sothebysrealty.ca

Good Friday Service Good Friday Service April 19, 4:00 PM April 19, 4:00 PM

Resurrection SundayService Good Friday Resurrection Sunday April 21, 10:00 AM April 19, 4:00 PM April 21, 10:00 AM

whistlerchurch.ca

Myrtle Philip Community School Myrtle Philip Community School 6195 Lorimer Rd. 6195 Lorimer Rd. Myrtle Philip Community School 6195 Lorimer Rd.

Resurrection Sunday April 21, 10:00 AM

APRIL 18, 2019

89


PIQUECAL PHOTO SUBMITTED

SOUL SESSION SUNDAYS WITH NIGHT OWL

Come join us for our second Soul Session Sundays event! We’re excited to announce our special guest DJ’s for the evening will be WOODHEAD and J.O.B. and of course your host(s) Night Owl. For VIP reservations and guest list inquiries, visit tommyswhistler.com. $15. > 9 pm-1 am > Tommys Whistler

SOULFUL SUNDAYS

Soul Club Whistler spinning that funky soul soundtrack. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

THE SUNDAY GLOW PARTY

Moe Joe’s is transformed into a psychedelic UV-infused rave cathedral, as Fidel Cashflow, Zapps and La Dooda cook up an aural feast of house and electro beats. > 9 pm > Moe Joe’s

OPEN MIC JAM NIGHT

An open stage invitation for all who can sing, perform or even just wanna jam out with our house band. Whistler’s longest-running jam night every Sunday at Crystal Lounge. All instruments are provided. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

RED CHAIR

Red Chair is a local Whistler rock band with an impressive and versatile set list. They have become a hometown favourite with their selection of bar classics, high-energy performances and great musicianship. > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

SUNDAY SESSIONS

The best locals’ party in Whistler. > 9 pm > Tapley’s Pub

SEA TO SKY

OPEN MIC

Come join in with this afternoon of music. Bring your instruments and come early to sign up. > 12-2 pm > Grimms Deli (Pemberton)

SOUL SESSION SUNDAYS WITH NIGHT OWL APRIL 21 TOMMYS WHISTLER MUSIC

EVAN KENNEDY

MON

4.22

COMMUNITY

Evan creates a unique live performance mixing in lesser-known album songs with the songs of today. > 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

MONDAYS IN MUSE LAB

Stop by and repair ripped seams, sew on the loose buttons, patch the jeans! With love for community Whistler Sewing Services is opening the Muse Lab - new creative space in Function. Six sewing machines and all the supplies are ready to fix, mend and create. Visit your creative universe! $10 per hour. 604-967-2422. > 12-9 pm > Muse Lab

MARVELLOUS MONDAYS WITH MONTY

Local legend Monty Biggins offers hits of the eras in an Americana swing sound. His soulful voice has been described as a journey of the heart. An entire rat pack in one man, he’ll tip his glass to you with that jazzy swagger. > 4-7 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

SPORTS

OPEN MIC WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

See Friday’s listing for more info. > 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

90 APRIL 18, 2019

Open Mic night at Cranked Espresso Bar with host Caleb Mckenzie. Cranked is the perfect place to play without the intimidation of being on a big stage and huge audience. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

MARTINI MONDAY > 7:30 pm > Buffalo Bills

MEATY MONDAY

Sport and beer what more do you need? How about a chance to win our famous Meat Raffle? Proceeds donated to charity. > 9 pm > Tapley’s Pub

TOMMYS & WHISTLER JUNGLIST PRESENTS PHIBES

Whistler Junglists brings back Phibes for a season ending DnB show not to be missed! Opening sets by: special guest DEEPS from Nelson, Future Beny, Infectious, and Kimmy T. > 9 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler

TRIVIA NIGHT

The Crystal Lounge hosts trivia every Monday night! Bring your friends and test your knowledge for a night of fun, laughs, prizes and the chance to “burn your bill.” Conditions apply. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

MONDAY MADNESS

Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley and Billy The Kid throw down all the hottest deep and dirty beats you know and love. Deep tech, bass, house, trap, plus more. > 9:30 pm > Maxx Fish

FVCK MONDAYS

The wildest party in Whistler on a Monday night continues with music from Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley, The Rogue Killers and DJ Shearer. Throwing down all the hottest tunes you know and love. Deep, tech, bass, house, trap, hip hop and more. Email info@maxxfish. com for VIP plus special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

SEA TO SKY

ACOUSTIC COFFEE HOUSE

The Acoustic Coffee House is back! Come join in with this afternoon of music. > 4-6 pm > Grimms Deli (Pemberton)


Great Deals!

Your One-stop Shopping For Wine, Spirits & Beer

3

SAVE $ Reg. $37.49

$

00

Reg. $24.99

3449

Reg. $32.99

3

00

2999

$

KETEL ONE VODKA Netherlands 456095 750 ml

Reg. $27.49

00

* While supplies last. Inventory by store will vary. Prices are subject to change without notice. In the event of a change, the product description and display price in the liquor store will prevail. Prices do not include taxes.

Reg. $10.99

1

50

949

$

LINDEMAN'S BIN 65 CHARDONNAY Australia 142117 750 ml

2

SAVE $ Reg. $15.49

1349

$

STRONGBOW ORIGINAL DRY CIDER United Kingdom 106054 8 x 440 ml

00

2199

$

SAVE $

CAPTAIN MORGAN SPICED RUM Canada 500512 750 ml or 640136 750 ml (PET)

2

SALE ENDS APRIL 27th

00

2549

$

1749

$

Reg. $28.99

MEIOMI PINOT NOIR USA 278937 750 ml

2

SAVE $

7

SAVE $

CAROLANS IRISH CREAM Ireland 108357 750 ml

SAVE $

Reg. $19.49

00

2299

$

MOLSON CANADIAN Canada 905844 24 x 355 ml

SAVE $

2

SAVE $

APOTHIC RED USA 125617 750 ml

00

YOUR PURCHASE CONTRIBUTES TO VITAL BC PUBLIC SERVICES

SAVVY SAVINGS

Pemberton Whistler Marketplace 7445 Frontier St 4360 Lorimer Rd

Whistler Creekside 2071 Lake Placid Rd

Whistler Village Squamish 4211 Village Sq 40204 Glenalder Pl

April 18, 2019 – Whistler Pique Full Page – BC Liquor Stores


PIQUECAL SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

KARAOKE NIGHT APRIL 24 CRYSTAL LOUNGE

SPORTS

TUE

4.23

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

RHYME & SONG

This program gives toddlers, parents and caregivers the opportunity to learn songs, rhymes and finger plays together. Movement is encouraged and your preschooler’s early language and literacy development is supported. For more information, please come to the library, call 604-935-8436 or email youthservice@ whistlerlibary.ca. Free. > 10:30 am > Whistler Public Library

COMMUNITY

THE MOUNTAIN VILLAGE SOCIAL GATHERING AND MEETING

What if housing wasn’t just a place to live, but rather, a way of life? The Coastal Village is connecting people who want to live in community with others who have similar values for the betterment of our health, happiness and well-being. Research shows that both men and women thrive in community. Free. 778-840-1529. > 5:30-8:30 pm > The Mountain Village

TENNIS LOCALS’ NIGHT

All levels are welcome to join in the Locals Night. Clinic for beginners and casual play for intermediate and advanced. Free racket rental, snacks and beverage included! $20. 604-932-1991. > 6:30-8:30 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

MUSIC

BINGO

Channel your inner granny and dominate bingo at the locals’ living room. > 8 pm > Tapley’s Pub

BLACK ‘N’ BLUES

Blues night with Sean Rose. > 8 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

With live music from Neverland Nights and guests, playing all your rock, alternative and party jams all night long. Plus DJ sets from Fidel Cashflow. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

CHAD OLIVER

Ruckus Deluxe frontman and former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver sings Celtic, rock, pop and originals. > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

KARAOKE NIGHT

“I Will Survive” won’t sing itself, so come over to Whistler’s longest-running karaoke night and belt out all your favourite hits. Arrive early to avoid disappointment. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

Group run for intermediate runners and above. Two distance options: approximately 5 km and 10 km. Check our Facebook page, facebook.com/groups/ werunwhistler for weekly updates. #werunwhistler rain or shine … Free. > 5:55 pm > Lululemon

> 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

92 APRIL 18, 2019

ALLSORTS

Bringing a wide variety of sounds to your Tuesday evening, ED:WIN will be playing “AllSorts” of music to get you dancing down at Three Below every Tuesday night. Listen to hip hop, R&B, house, garage and disco! Free. > 9 pm-1:30 am > Three Below

High Mountain Brewing Company celebrates the end of each month by ceremonially tapping a cask on the last Wednesday of the month. Come and celebrate fresh brewed beer! > Last Wednesday of every month, 8 pm > The Brewhouse Pub

SPORTS

INDOOR PICKLEBALL

Have fun with others playing the fastest-growing sport in North America! All levels welcome. Free paddle rental. $10. 604-932-1991. > 10-11:30 am > Whistler Racquet Club

COMMUNITY

We reserve the prime family-style table by the Ola Volo mural for our LGBTQ2+ family. Get your game (or gay’m) on. > 5-8 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

EVAN KENNEDY

Tommys Tuesday with resident DJ Dre Morel and guests bringing you all the best of the best every Tuesday evening! > 8 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler

CASK NIGHT

QUEER WEDNESDAYS

TOMMY TUESDAYS WE RUN WHISTLER: WEEKLY GROUP RUN

FOOD + DRINK

CELLAR SESSIONS

WED

4.24

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

THE PATH TO RESILIENCY

It’s inevitable that life will throw you a curveball. It’s hard to plan for the unexpected but if we are aware of what tools are available, we can be better prepared. Join us as three members of Whistler’s business community share their stories of resiliency. By donation. 604-838-4234. > 6:30-8:30 pm > Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre


Are you passionate about Whistler? Volunteer with the Resort Municipality of Whistlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Village Host program. Apply this summer if you are a local and you want to: Share what you know and love about Whistler

EAT WELL IN 2019

Connect with visitors Do fun and meaningful work in your community Receive great rewards To apply or receive more information, contact: Cathie Coyle at ccoyle@whistler.ca or call 604-935-8478 and visit: whistler.ca/volunteer.

BUY IT TODAY AT:

Deadline for applications is Wednesday, May 8, 2019

ARMCHAIR BOOKS, NESTERS MARKET + WHISTLER KITCHEN WORKS APRIL 18, 2019

93


NOTICE OF ALTERNATIVE APPROVAL PROCESS

PIQUECAL FILE PHOTO: COAST MOUNTAIN PHOTOGRAPHY

PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given in accordance with the Local Government Act and the Community Charter that the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District (“SLRD”) has proposed Bralorne Sewer System Local Service Conversion and Establishment Bylaw No. 585, 1995, Amendment Bylaw No. 1614-2019 (the “Bylaw”). The Bylaw relates to the Bralorne Sewer Local Service Area, which consists of a portion of the community of Bralorne in SLRD Electoral Area A as the participant (the “Service Area”) and identified in the map below:

FOXY GET FUNKY APRIL 24 PANGEA POD HOTEL

The Bylaw increases the maximum annual tax requisition amount for the Service Area from $31,250 to $80,250, the purpose of which is to allow the SLRD to tax requisition the additional funds necessary to pay the debt servicing costs associated with a short-term (5 year) loan of $300,000 (the “Loan”). The purpose of the Loan is to address a funding shortfall in respect of the construction of Bralorne’s new wastewater treatment system (the “System”). Construction of the System is mainly funded via a Federal Gas Tax Agreement Strategic Priorities Fund Tax Grant of $1,999,530. Repayment of the Loan is to be borne by the taxable properties within the Service Area. After applying funding from the Area A Northern Area BC Hydro Payment in Lieu of Taxes Funds Reserve of $20,000 per year (for 5 years), the annual debt servicing for the Loan is estimated to be $49,000. Per parcel, this is $543 per year (inclusive of a 5.25% mandatory provincial fee). Current Maximum Annual Tax Requisition

Estimated Debt Servicing Cost

Proposed New Maximum Annual Tax Requisition

$31,250

$49,000

$80,250

Current Maximum Annual Tax Requisition

Estimated Debt Servicing Cost

Proposed New Maximum Annual Tax Requisition

$346 per parcel

$543 per parcel

$889 per parcel

INTERACT CLUB OF WHISTLER

Interact is a club for young people ages 12 to 18 who want to make a difference in their community, mentored by the Rotary Club of Whistler and Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium. The club includes students from Whistler Secondary School, Waldorf, Spring Creek and Myrtle Philip who want to join together to tackle the issues in their community they care most about. > 4-5 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

MUSIC

CONOR FITZPATRICK

Once the word gets out, everyone is going to want to see this guy with his incredible guitar shedding vocals. He is already one of Cranked’s favourites. On warmer sunny days, Conor will be playing outside on the patio. > 4:30-7:30 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

FOXY GET FUNKY MOUNTAIN SPIRIT WHISTLER TOASTMASTERS

Build communication, public speaking, and leadership skills with Mountain Spirit Whistler Toastmasters. Everyone welcome. > 5:30-7 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side

Whether you know her as DJ Foxy Moron or just Ace, you know she kills it on the vinyl. Join us as this homegirl legend spins you silly. > 5-8 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

INDUSTRY NIGHT

The SLRD Board is seeking participating area approval of electors by way of Alternative Approval Process for the Service Area. The number of eligible electors in the Service Area has been determined to be 82 and the number of elector responses required to prevent the SLRD Board from proceeding without the further assent of electors is 8. The deadline for elector responses in relation to this Alternative Approval Process is 4:30 p.m. on May 21, 2019. The SLRD Board may proceed with this matter unless, by the stated deadline, at least 10% (being 8) of the electors of the Service Area indicate that the SLRD Board must obtain the elector approval by assent vote. Elector responses must be given in the form established by the SLRD Board. Elector response forms are available at www.slrd.bc.ca/BralorneSewerAAP and at the SLRD office (1350 Aster St., Pemberton, BC). The only persons entitled to sign the forms are the electors of the area to which the Alternative Approval Process applies, being the Service Area. For more information about elector qualifications, see www.slrd. bc.ca/BralorneSewerAAP. Public inspection of copies of the Bylaws can be made at the SLRD office (1350 Aster St., Pemberton, BC) from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (Monday-Friday, except holidays). For more information, please contact SLRD Corporate Officer K. Clark at (604) 894-6371 (ext. 230) or kclark@slrd.bc.ca.

94 APRIL 18, 2019

COMMUNITY BOOK CLUB

Join Whistler Public Library and Armchair Books on the fourth Wednesday of every month for this community book club. Free and open to all. Pick up the book at the library or mention the book club to buy it for 15-percent off at Armchair Books. Free. > Last Wednesday of every month, 7 pm > Whistler Public Library

Live music from Neverland Nights. > 6 pm > Buffalo Bills

DAVE HARTNEY

> 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

JAM NIGHT LET’S GET QUIZZICAL

Are you smarter than the average fifth grader? Let’s hope so as Stache brings you trivia with a Whistler twist. All the regular rounds plus our weekly degenerate round full of public and celebrity scandals. Great banter and awesome prizes! Free. > 9-10:30 pm > Three Below

Jam Night with Kostaman and Friends every Wednesday night. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

LIP SYNC BATTLES

Can’t sing but know all the words? Compete and show us your best performance for the chance to win $100 in gift cards. Props and costumes. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR COLLIER COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 18-DR-1911 IN THE MATTER OF THE ADOPTION OF O. R. H and S. R Hester, Adoptees. / NOTICE OF ACTION FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS AND STEPPARENT ADOPTION TO: Alexander Flavio Getta, 3832 Sunrise Drive, Whistler, British Columbia, Canada, CDV01B3. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Joint Petition for Adoption by Stepparent has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on: E. James Kurnik, II, Esq. Kurnik Law 700 Fifth Avenue South Second Floor Naples, Florida 34102 Primary Email: service@kurniklaw.com Secondary Email: jkurnik@kurniklaw.com on or before May 6, 2019, and file the original with the clerk of this Court at 3315 East Tamiami Trail, Naples, Florida 34112, before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. The minor children are identified as follows: Date of Birth Place of Birth May 15, 2009 Halifax, NS Canada January 27, 2011 Naples, Florida Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office notified of your current address. (You may file Designation of Current Mailing and E-Mail Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed or e-mailed to the addresses on record at the clerk’s office. Dated: CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: ___________________________________________ {Deputy Clerk}

WMSC Ski Up For all strong skiers, 10 years and older from RDP and any program who are interested in taking their technical skiing to a new level and try out ski racing. The ski up day is an opportunity to experience the Whistler Mountain Ski Club, training on the Dave Murray National Training Centre and work with our professional race coaches. This day gives potential new Whistler Mountain Ski Club athletes an opportunity to get a feel for ski racing and determine if they wish to join the program next year. It also provides parents an opportunity to meet some of the staff and learn about the program. Bring a race / carving ski along with a keen attitude to ski some GS and freeski the whole mountain. All candidates should be able to comfortably ski black diamond runs. Bring snacks (granola bars, fruit, nuts, etc.) and refreshments in your backpack as we will ski through until 1pm. Parents Information Session Saturday, April 20th | 9 am to 10 am Location: Pika Restaurant (downstairs of the Roundhouse)

APRIL 18, 2019

95


ASTROLOGY

Free Will Astrology WEEK OF APRIL 18 BY ROB BREZSNY

Stories and Songs

From choir girl to country troubadour

FRIDAY MAY 10

MAURY YOUNG ARTS CENTRE DOORS 7PM | SHOW 8PM | 19+

$15 $20 day-of

BUY TICKETS: ARTSWHISTLER.COM/LIVE

?

DO YOU HAVE A DIGITAL ROADMAP

CONFUSED BY DIGITAL ADVERTISING AND NEED HELP?

Glacier Digital Services in partnership with Pique Newsmagazine offers solutions in website design, SEM, SEO, social media and so much more. Call your sales representative today.

604-938-0202

ARIES (March 21-April 19): French writer Simone de Beauvoir sent a letter to her lover, Aries author Nelson Algren. She wrote, “I like so much the way you are so greedy about life and yet so quiet, your eager greediness and your patience, and your way of not asking much of life and yet taking much because you are so human and alive that you find much in everything.” I’d love to see you embody that state in the coming weeks, Aries. In my astrological opinion, you have a mandate to be both utterly relaxed and totally thrilled; both satisfied with what life brings you and skillfully avid to extract the most out of it; both at peace with what you already have and primed to grab for much more. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The Beat Generation of American poets arose in the late 1940s as a rebellion against materialistic mainstream culture and academic poetry. It embraced sexual liberation, Eastern spirituality, ecological awareness, political activism, and psychedelic drugs. One of its members, Jack Kerouac, tweaked and ennobled the word “beat” to serve as the code name for their movement. In its old colloquial usage, “beat” meant tired or exhausted. But Kerouac re-consecrated it to mean “upbeat” and “beatific,” borrowing from the Italian word beato, translated as “beatific.” I bring this to your attention, Taurus, because you’re on the verge of a similar transition: from the old meaning of “beat” to the new. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Scattered through the ordinary world, there are books and artifacts and perhaps people who are like doorways into impossible realms, of impossible and contradictory truth.” Argentinian author Jorge Luis Borges said that, and now I’m passing it on to you—just in time for your entrance into a phase when such doorways will be far more available than usual. I hope you will use Borges’ counsel as a reminder to be alert for everyday situations and normal people that could lead you to intriguing experiences and extraordinary revelations and life-changing blessings. CANCER (June 21-July 22): The Free Will Astrology Committee To Boldly Promote Cancerian’s Success is glad to see that you’re not politely waiting for opportunities to come to you. Rather, you’re tracking them down and proactively wrangling them into a form that’s workable for your needs. You seem to have realized that what you had assumed was your fair share isn’t actually fair, that you want and deserve more. Although you’re not being mean and manipulative, neither are you being overly nice and amenable; you’re pushing harder to do things your way. I approve! And I endorse your efforts to take it even further. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Many experts who have studied the art and science of running fast believe that it’s best if a runner’s legs are symmetrical and identical in their mechanics. But that theory is not supported by the success of champion sprinter Usain Bolt. Because he has suffered from scoliosis, his left leg is a half-inch longer than his right. With each stride, his left leg stays on the track longer than his right, and his right hits the track with more force. Some scientists speculate that this unevenness not only doesn’t slow him down, but may in fact enhance his speed. In accordance with current astrological variables, I suspect you will be able to thrive on your asymmetry in the coming weeks, just as your fellow Leo Usain Bolt does. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo adventurer Jason Lewis travelled around the world using transportation powered solely by his own body. He walked, bicycled, skated, rowed, pedalled, and swam more than74,000 kilometres. I propose that we make him your role model for the next four weeks. You’re primed to accomplish gradual breakthroughs through the use of simple, persistent, incremental actions. Harnessing the power of your physical vitality will be an important factor in your success. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Curcumin is a chemical found in the plant turmeric. When ingested by humans, it

may diminish inflammation, lower the risk of diabetes, support cardiovascular health, and treat digestive disorders. But there’s a problem: the body is inefficient in absorbing and using curcumin—unless it’s ingested along with piperine, a chemical in black pepper. Then it’s far more available. What would be the metaphorical equivalent to curcumin in your life? An influence that could be good for you, but that would be even better if you synergized it with a certain additional influence? And what would be the metaphorical equivalent of that additional influence? Now is a good time to investigate these questions. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “I have the usual capacity for wanting what may not even exist,” wrote poet Galway Kinnell. How about you, Scorpio? Do you, too, have an uncanny ability to long for hypothetical, invisible, mythical, and illusory things? If so, I will ask you to downplay that amazing power of yours for a while. It’s crucial for your future development that you focus on yearning for actual experiences, real people, and substantive possibilities. Please understand: I’m not suggesting you’re bad or wrong for having those seemingly impossible desires. I’m simply saying that for now you will thrive on being attracted to things that are genuinely available. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Sometimes I have kept my feelings to myself, because I could find no language to describe them in,” wrote Sagittarian novelist Jane Austen. I’m guessing you’ve had that experience—maybe more than usual, of late. But I suspect you’ll soon be finding ways to express those embryonic feelings. Congrats in advance! You’ll discover secrets you’ve been concealing from yourself. You’ll receive missing information whose absence has made it hard to understand the whole story. Your unconscious mind will reveal the rest of what it has thus far merely been hinting at. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): All over the world, rivers and lakes are drying up. Sources of water are shrinking. Droughts are becoming more common and prolonged. Why? Mostly because of climate change. The good news is that lots of people are responding to the crisis with alacrity. Among them is an engineer in India named Ramveer Tanwar. Since 2014, he has organized efforts leading to the rejuvenation of 12 dead lakes and ponds. I propose we make him your role model for the coming weeks. I hope he will inspire you to engage in idealistic pursuits that benefit other people. And I hope you’ll be motivated to foster fluidity and flow and wetness everywhere you go. The astrological time is ripe for such activities. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): A blogger named Caramelizee offered her definition of elegance: “being proud of both your feminine and masculine qualities; seeing life as a non-ending university and learning everything you can; caring for yourself with tender precision; respecting and taking advantage of silences; tuning in to your emotions without being oversensitive; owning your personal space and being generous enough to allow other people to own their personal space.” This definition of elegance will be especially apropos and useful for you Aquarians in the coming weeks. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You Pisceans have been summoning heroic levels of creative intensity. You’ve been working extra hard and extra smart. But it seems that you haven’t been fully recognized or appreciated for your efforts. I’m sorry about that. Please don’t let it discourage you from continuing to express great integrity and authenticity. Keep pushing for your noble cause and offering your best gifts. I’m proud of you! And although you may not yet have reaped all the benefits you will ultimately sow, three months from now I bet you’ll be pleased you pushed so hard to be such a righteous servant of the greater good. Homework: Imagine your future self sends a message to you back through time. What is it? Freewillastrology.com.

In addition to this column, Rob Brezsny creates

EXPANDED AUDIO HOROSCOPES

In-depth weekly forecasts designed to inspire and uplift you. To buy access, phone 1-888-499-4425. Once you’ve chosen the Block of Time you like, call 1-888-682-8777 to hear Rob’s forecasts. www.freewillastrology.com

96 APRIL 18, 2019


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

ADULT SERVICES

ADULT SERVICES

ADULTS ONLY

ADULTS ONLY

RENT SELL HIRE

Beautiful Hot Blonde - Cherry Double D Delicious. Tight & pristine, extremely blessed, gorgeous girl. She loves to be watched, loves attention & wants to entertain you with her lust crusade. Duos & Stags. 24Hrs. 1-604-902-1112. Clean, classy & discreet.

Classifi eds

ITALIAN BARBIE ABIGAIL 100% REAL IN WHISTLER NOW! DEBIT/CREDIT AVAIL 24/7 GORGEOUS FACE, TINY WAIST. DD 34/DRESS SIZE 4 / 25YR OLD CLEAN & SAFE ONLY. AVAIL. 24/7 587-778-7774 OR 604-901-6391

Where locals look

PRINT & ONLINE SELF-SERVE CLASSIFIEDS.PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM

DISPLAY ADS

   

Spectacular View Spectacular View - 3 bdrm , 2 bath completely equipped n/s, n/p - ample parking - pls text your phone no & email or leave message 604-889-5718 604-889-5718

1Bdrm unit avail at Eagle Lodge (mountain facing). $2000/mth all incl. Avail May-Nov. Fully furn, linens provided. Free internet, access to gym & h/t. Pls email jason@ mountain-hideaways.ca for more details and viewing appointments.

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS

• • • • •

Tuesday 4pm 

VILLAGE

MARKETPLACE FURNITURE

Your gentleman’s concierge for…

FOR PRINT ADS

Secure & scamless Fully searchable Targeted online community Categorised listings No reposting Trusted by locals Make your listing stand out with featured locations

ALPINE MEADOW

持持持持持持持持持持 THEBACHELORPLAN.COM

D E A D L I N E

Foxy, sexy, raven haired, olive skinned Mediterranean beauty available for sensual massage sessions. Enquire for further information, availability and rates text/call: (604)262-5183

WHISTLER FURNITURE CO

Adrenaline-fueled adventures Customized nightlife itineraries Luxury transportation Awesome chalet parties Unique female entertainment

PERSONALS WHISTLER

List your accommodation rental in print & online * a week from only

BEDS IN STOCK! SAME DAY DELIVERY! MATTRESSES-BUNK BEDSSOFA BEDS-CUSTOM SOFAS

long term rental management services Property Owners seeking Annual or Seasonal Rental Income from screened Tenants, please contact one of our 6 Rental Agents to discuss revenue, services & fees.

licenseD rental agents:

$5

FOR SALE - MISC

Helene Huang 604-902-0608

Advertising Options 

 

Long Term Rentals

Packages start with 4 lines of text. Additional text .....$1/line Add one image in print and up to three online as per package level. Bolding .............50¢/word Border .......................... $2

* Rates are based on using Pique’s self-serve online application at classifieds. piquenewsmagazine.com

Get the added punch to make your business ad standout with a classified display ad. Free ad design, colour options, incentives for ad frequency. Contact a sales rep today.

604-938-0202 piquenewsmagazine.com

Monthly rental accommodation that is available to local renters for a minimum of 12 months.

Short Term Rentals ALWAYS HIRING ALWAYS HIRING

STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! DEALERS AND BIKINI CLAD CADDIES. ESCORTS MAKE ANY PARTY AMAZING!! STRIPPERS TOPLESS BLACKJACK DEALERS 6 0SEXY 4 -SKI9 INSTRUCTORS! 38-6456 For the Time of Your Life! MAKE ANY PARTY AMAZING!

Monthly or seasonal rental accommodation that is available to local renters for less than 12 months, or where the rental price varies throughout the year.

Vacation Rentals

Nightly and/or weekly rental accommodation, available to visitors over a short period of time.

helene@WhistlerProperty.com Duane Kercher 604-932-7849 duane@WhistlerProperty.com

VIEW AVAILABLE RENTAL LISTINGS AT:

WhistlerProperty.com

Come and visit Whistler’s funkiest thrift store and get (almost) everything you need for your EPIC season! Winter clothes, skis, boards, boots, bindings, goggles, toques and more! As well as all the usual stuff to make that rented closet feel like a palace. You may even find some hidden treasure you never knew needed. Shopping and Donation hours: 11am - 6pm, 7 days a week 8000 Nesters Road 604-932-1121

THE GLEN (PEMBERTON) 1 bedroom suite (The Glen) private entrance,+ own sunny patio, parking, share w/d, hydro included, No smoking, NO PETS, NO PARTY $1000/m, avail.May 1, ref. required text Elise/604-902-2107

Re-Build-It Centre Furniture, appliances, kitchen cabinets, doors, plumbing, tools, flooring, hardware, lumber, lighting and more!

Open 10am-5pm, 7 days a week 1003 Lynham Road, Function Junction 604-932-1125 Recycle, Re-build and Re-invest in your community. All proceeds support 28 programs and services such as the food bank, outreach services, and counseling assistance offered by Whistler Community Services. www.mywcss.org

www.roxysinwhistler.com

604 -938 - 6 4 56

Like us on Facebook @ Whistler Community Service Society

For the Time of Your Life!

roxysinwhistler.com roxys_in_whistler

2-1020 Millar Creek Road

Forrest chittick 604-902-7178 forrest@WhistlerProperty.com

online print only & online

A c c o m m o d at i o n listings, defined:

NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

whistlerfurniture.ca

604.938.4285

rosie Blaser 604-932-8864 rosie@WhistlerProperty.com

* $11 per week

Queen mattresses from $289.99 Bunk Beds from $699.99 Sofa beds from $1099.99

simon Westwood 604-967-1195 simon@WhistlerProperty.com

Sell your stuff * Free for 30 days

Accommodation

SHORT-TERM RENTALS

FAQwhistler

CALL OR PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED WITH OUR ONLINE SERVICE FOR EITHER PRINT OR ONLINE...OR BOTH!

Accommodation

LONG-TERM RENTALS

piquenewsmagazine.com/events

April 18, 2019

97


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

Services

Services

HOME SERVICES

HOME SERVICES

HOME SERVICES

HEALTH & WELLBEING

HEALTH & WELLBEING

BUILDING AND RENOVATIONS

MOVING AND STORAGE

MOVING AND STORAGE

SALON & SPA

SALON & SPA

Wiebe Construction Services

WALSH

ReStoRAtion

Serving Whistler for over 25 years

USE A WALSH CUBE TRUCK FOR FREE TO MOVE YOUR POSSESSiOnS TO WALSH STORAgE

• Kitchen and Bath • Renovations & Repairs • Drywall • Painting • Finishing • Minor Electrical & Plumbing

Ray Wiebe 604.935.2432 Pat Wiebe 604.902.9300 raymondo99.69@gmail.com FLOORING

SHAW CARPET & FLOOR CENTRE

Family owned & operated

Open Monday through Friday 8:30 - 4:30 Saturday 10:00 -4:00 Sundays and Evenings by appointment only. 3-1365 Alpha Lake Road Whistler, B.C, V0N1B1 Phone 604-938-1126 email shawcarpet@shaw.ca

WALSH StoRAge

8080 NESTERS STORAGE 8080 Nesters Road Whistler, BC

SPACE NOW AVAILABLE!

+ Central Location,

5 Minutes North of Whistler Village + 20’ (one-trip) Shipping Containers + Insulated With 1.5” Foam Ceiling, Walls and Doors + Pre-wired 20-Amp Service With Overhead Light, Duplex Plug and Heater on Shelf + Limited Number Overhead Doors, Light, No Heat now available + Paved, 24/7

Housekeeping - daily, weekly monthly Move in/out & Construction Cleaning IICRC Professional carpet cleaning Caretaker Services FRIEND US ON:

CALL SARA

604.848.8987 sara@goldmedalcleaning.ca goldmedalcleaning.ca

MOVING AND STORAGE

100

$

2 hRS fRee tRuCk tIMe

8 x 20 COntAIneRS

160

+ tax per month

$

4 hRS fRee tRuCk tIMe

Call Mike Walsh

604 698 0054

mike.walsh@walshrestoration.ca

HIGH AND DRY

STORAGE LOWEST PRICES IN THE CORRIDOR GAURANTEED UNITS STARTING AT

65

$

per month

Outdoor storage for RV’s, Boats, Campers, Vehicles etc $2 per LFT. Call 604.935.9370 or email gphare@shaw.ca

lionsgatelaser.com sally@lionsgatelaser.com 778.835.5556

located at Nita Lake Lodge free parking and village shuttle

604 966 5715

www.nitalakelodge.com

FAQwhistler COUNSELLING

FREE consultations

BLUE HIGHWAYS MASSAGE & SPA

massage clinic & spa

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE Serving Whistler for 25 years in:

Emotional distress can be difficult to manage on your own. The goal of Ashlin Tipper Counselling is to promote health and happiness by providing welcoming, kind, supportive, non-judgmental, goal-oriented, practical, clinically-based emotional support.

Website: ashlintippercounselling.com Email: ashlintippercounselling@gmail.com Phone: (604) 916 8979

available on request

Registered Massage, Registered Counselling & Registered Chiropractic

SPORTS & ACTIVITIES

RMT specials on request

604-938-0777 #206 - 4368 MAIN ST. 2ND FLOOR, MARKET PAVILION

STORAGE SPACE

OUT NOW! Whistler’s only dedicated wedding magazine.

98 April 18, 2019

@TheSpaAtNitaLakeLodge

2131 lake placid road

Lionsgate Laser Clinic 202-38142 Cleveland Ave, Squamish

Registered Therapists

STORAGE

WHISTLERWEDDINGMAGAZINE.COM

604.932.1968

Techniks Hair Salon 2120 Dollarton Hwy, N. Van

Deep Tissue Massage, Relaxation, Thai & Shiatsu, Therapeutic Massage, Reflexology, Aromatherapy & Hot Stone Massage

BEST PRICES IN WHISTLER FURNITURE, CARS, BOATS & MOTORCYCLES ETC STORAGE AVAILABLE

Call 604-902-MOVE www.alltimemoving.ca

Lionsgate Laser Clinic 4338 -124 Main St (behind Bell) Whistler

locals discount available for all regular priced spa treatments

24 HR ACCESS,

AVAILABLE

big or small we do it all!

SPECIAL! 3 + 2 FREE PACKAGES

electronic monitoring

NORTHLANDS

BEST

ask about our RMT locals rate

+ tax per month

604.966.8080 8080Nesters@telus.net www.nestersstorage.ca

PRICES

valid april 1st- 30th, 2019 not valid with RMT, any other offer or discount can only be used on day of treatment. No cash value

8 x 10 COntAIneRS

CONTACT

IN WHISTLER

enjoy a $25 credit towards retail products when you spend $150 or more on spa treatments

Pemberton Industrial Park 1944 Stone Cutter Place Owner Residence On-Site

fenced & gated access.

VACATION RENTAL CLEANING & PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

Retail Therapy

We Added More Containers!

10’x8’ Containers,

CLEANING

LASER HAIR REMOVAL

TRY THESE FOR $5 EACH!

Mobilize it! Friday April 26 12-12:45 pm Restore, stretch, soften, and align your body with this lengthening class, aiming to keep your body soft and supple. Stabilize it! Monday April 29 12-12:45 pm This class will focus on core strength, as well as single arm and leg stability, think Pilates meets functional movement patterns. www.whistler.ca/recreation 604-935-PLAY (7529)


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Buy

Services

Work

Fix

Drive

Sell

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

HEALTH & WELLBEING SPORTS & ACTIVITIES

Rent

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

32ND CANADIAN HORSE ARCHERY CHAMPIONSHIP EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES APPLY TODAY! Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

THE BEST KIDS STORE EVER Our team selection for International Competitions in 2019 & for the 2020 4th World Nomad Games in Turkey

TRAINING CAMP May 18-23 2019

KASSAI OPEN HORSE ARCHERY WORLD CUP May 24-26 LOCATION: Mt. Currie B.C.

SPONSORS WELCOME! CONTACT: Robert at borsostorzs@gmail.com

HORSEBACKARCHERY.CA

NOW HIRING GOOD PEOPLE

RETAIL SALES HOST

GREAT PERKS & BENEFITS APPLY NOW: LAURA@ thecirclewhistler.com

Full Time Front Desk Agent Eligible successful candidates may receive*: • Extensive benefits package which may include; ski pass or wellness allowance, disability coverage, travel insurance and extended health and dental. • Travel allowance. • Discounted employee rates at any Diamond Resort International resort. • Full-time work year round and a FUN work environment. *eligibility and conditions based on DRCL policies and practices set out in general terms and conditions of employment.

Email your resume with the position you wish to apply for to: Chantelle.Martens@diamondresorts.com

Community

NOTICES

GENERAL NOTICES ROTARY CLUBS OF WHISTLER & PEMBERTON

HOT TUB SERVICE TECHNICIAN FULL TIME

Tuesdays at 7:15 a.m. BG Urban Grill: 604-905-5090 & Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. at the Pan Pacific, Mountainside. www.whistler-rotary.org Pemberton Rotary Club at the Pemberton Community Centre, Wednesdays at 7:15am www.pembertonrotary.ca

U.S.

Exchange Rate

29%

Dub Tubs - Quality Pool and Hot Tub Services is currently looking for a Full Time Service Technician; no previous technician experience necessary, as training is provided.

Looking for construction

landscapers/ small excavator operator,

airbrake license an asset, experience w/paving stones, masonry skills, skid steer, small excavator & other landscaping or construction experience. Wage negotiable.

Become part of a dynamic team and surround yourself with art. The Audain Art Museum is currently seeking:

MEETING PLACE

VOLUNTEERS Big Brothers, Big Sisters Sea to Sky Volunteer to Mentor- just 1hr/week - and make a difference in a child's life. Call 604892-3125.

Wage: $16.00-$18.00/hour Please send resume to info@dubtubs.com

cmac.cont@gmail.com

as recommended by:

Welcome Centre at Whistler Public Library - Information, support, community connections and ESL practice groups for newcomers and immigrants. Meet people, make connections, volunteer, build your communication skills in English. Multicultural Meet Up every Friday 9.3012pm.604-698-5960 info@welcomewhistler. com FB: WhistlerWelcomeCentre

Service Technician positions involve driving from home to home maintaining private property hot tubs. The selected candidate will have great customer service skills and the ability/maturity to work alone. Valid BC drivers licence and cell phone is required. Position available to begin immediately.

N ’T YOU CA

DO

THIS N

T O WT I T WITHO

U

FREE

PICK IT UP EVERYWHERE

FAQwhistler

Guard Full time and part time positions available Guards provide security for the art and educate visitors ensuring protocols are upheld and enforced adhered to by both the staff and public. No experience required. For complete job descriptions please visit: audainartmuseum.com

To apply, please email your resume to bbeacom@audainartmuseum.com Photo: Tourism Whistler/ Justa Jeskova

April 18, 2019

99


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

ARTS & CULTURE Arts Whistler - Full arts & culture listings. Comprehensive artist directory & programs, events & performances year-round. For info 604-935-8410 or visit www.artswhistler.com

Blackcomb Peaks Accommodations Basalt Wine + Salumeria are currently looking to fill the roles of:

seeks a

ASSISTANT MANAGER

MAINTENANCE PERSON

LINE COOKS

The successful candidate will need to be able to shift

for a Full-Time position. between duties rapidly, be very organized, and lift 25+ lbs. Tools are provided. Good time

DISHWASHERS

management skills are very important, and after

Please send your cover letter and resume to skeenan-naf@crystal-lodge.com

starting wage provided to the successful candidate.

Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Full and Part Time positions available. Come join the best team in Whistler!

Please contact admin@blackcombpeaks.com

3 months; benefits will be offered. Competitive

The Bearfoot Bistro, Whistler’s premier fine dining restaurant is growing its team.

Serving & bartending experience required, must have Serving It Right Certification. Salary negotiable and based on experience. Benefits will include Extended Medical & Dental, tips, staff meals, staff discounts, ski pass, and gas allowance. This is a full-time, year-round position. Apply in person or email resume to info@rolandswhistler.com

Pemberton Writers - Meet with other writers to review and critique monthly. Opportunities for writing in a comfortable and creative setting. Email crowley7@telus. net Sea to Sky Singers - Invites new & former members to join us for an exciting new term, the spring & fall terms culminate with a concert. Choir meets Tues, 7-9pm at Squamish Academy of Music, 2nd Ave. Veronica seatoskysingers@gmail.com or 604-892-7819 www.seatoskysingers.net Whistler Community Band - Rehearsals on Tuesdays 7 - 8:15 pm CONTACT whistlerchorus@gmail.com FOR LOCATION

with your resume to apply.

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS

Roland’s Pub is looking for an Assistant Manager.

Pemberton Arts Council - Connect with other artists, writers, artisans, musicians & help make Pemberton a vibrant arts community. Call 604-452-0123 or visit www. pembertonartscouncil.com

Be part of the action to deliver exceptinal fine dining experience to guests in an award-winning and high volume dining room. We are hiring for the following position:

Dishwashers We offer year-round or seasonal employment, industry leading wages, medical services plan, staff meals, staff discounts and more... Please send your resume to info@bearfootbistro.com or apply in person between 3-5pm. 4121 Village Green | Adjacent to Listel Hotel 604 932 3433 | bearfootbistro.com

Whistler Singers - Resumes September 11th, 2018 for the fall/winter season. Rehearsals are Tuesdays from 7 to 9pm at Myrtle Philip School in the Toad Hall room. Everyone is welcome! Inquiries can be sent to whistlersingers@gmail.com For more info, visit: https://www.facebook.com/ whistlersingers/

CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS Donate Used Clothing & Household Goods- To be distributed to local charities by Sharon 604-894-6656 for pick up. Playground Builders: Creating Play Building Hope - Playground Builders is a registered charity that builds playgrounds for children in war-torn areas. Learn more, volunteer or donate at www. playgroundbuilders.org Sea to Sky Community Services - running dozens of programs in Whistler to help people through times of crisis and with everyday challenges. www.sscs.ca 1-877892-2022 admin@sscs.ca Stewardship Pemberton Society and the One Mile Lake Nature Centre- Connecting community, nature and people through education, cooperation, and community involvement. www.stewardshippemberton. com

Locally owned & operated since 1986. is seeking

2ND COOK

MIN. 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE COMPETITIVE WAGES, TIPS AND DINNER Call 604-932-5565 in the afternoon and ask for Rolf or Jeff or email resume to info@rimrockwhistler.com 100 April 18, 2019

Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub is hiring:

LINE COOKS

Whistler Health Care Foundation raises funds for improving health care resources and services. New board members welcomed. Contact us at info@ whistlerhealthcarefoundation.org or call Karen at 604-906-1435.

SPORTS & RECREATION Work at Whistler’s best location! Refine or jump-start your culinary career in our fast-paced and busy kitchen. We offer competitive wages, tips and a season ski pass. Please stop by the pub between 10am and 5pm with a copy of your resume. You can also submit your resume via email to careers@dubhlinngate.com.

Alpine Club of Canada Whistler Section - Outdoor club focused on ski/split board touring, hiking, mountaineering and skills training. More info: accwhistler.ca Trip Schedule: accwhistler.ca/trips/


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Buy

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

Rent

Work

Fix

Drive

Sell

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

SPORTS & RECREATION

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Griffin Squadron Squamish Air CadetsOpen to youth 12-18yrs at Don Ross Secondary School on Tues at 6:30pm. Pemberton Valley Trails AssociationMeets the second Wed of each month. 7pm at the Pemberton Recreation Centre. Call 604-698-6158

the fix. bicycle products inc

PAINTERS & PAINTER HELPERS

Sea to Sky RC Flyers - Model Aeronautics Association of Canada Club active in the Sea to Sky Region flying model airplanes, helicopters and multi-rotors. Contact S2SRCFLY@telus.net Whistler Adaptive Sports Program Provides sports & recreation experiences for people with disabilities. Chelsey Walker at 604-905-4493 or info@whistleradaptive. com Whistler Martial Arts offers - Kishindo Karate for kids age 4 and up, Capoeira and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu for kids and adults. Also Kickboxing, Judo, Yoga and Bellyfit for adults. Call Cole 932-2226

Full Time & Part Time If you....

EXPERIENCED BICYCLE TECH WANTED Want to advance your bike industry career?

Learn ALL aspects of the trade from Whistler’s best bike mechanics. 2+ years experience required. Competitive wage. Staff & supplier discounts. Part-time or full-time available.

Send CV, references & cover letter to Women's Karma Yoga - Thursdays, 9:30-10:30, ongoing by donation and childminding provided. Whistler Women's Centre: 1519 Spring Creek Drive. Drop-in for weekly yoga classes led by an all female team of certified yoga instructors. All women, all ability levels welcome. hswc.ca | 604-962-8711

info@thefixinc.com

Whistler Children's Chorus Rehearsal Tuesdays at MILLENNIUM PLACE (4 - 5:30 pm) contact whistlerchorus@gmail.com Whistler/Pemberton Girl Guides Adventures for Girls age 5 & up. Sparks & Brownies (Gr K,1,2,3) Guides (Gr 4,5,6) Volunteers always welcome. coastmountaingirlguides@gmail.com Whistler Youth Centre - Drop - in: Fridays 3:30 - 11 PM & Saturdays 6 - 10 PM for ages 13 - 18. Located downstairs in the Maury Young Arts Centre (formerly Millenium Place). We offer: a Ping pong table, Pool table, Skateboard mini ramp w. skateboards and helmets to borrow, Free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, Guitars, Board games, Projector and widescreen TV's. Facebook THEYC Crew, www.whistleryouthcentre. com or call 604-935-8187.

LEISURE GROUPS Duplicate Bridge Club- Whistler Racquet Club reconvenes in late fall. The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For partner, please call Gill at 640-932-5791. Knitty Gritty Knit Night- Held every Tues 6-8pm. Free evening open to everyone with a love for knitting/crocheting. Beginners welcome. For location and further details email knittygrittywhistler@gmail.com or find us on facebook.

*like working with fun and chill co-workers *are a hard worker with a relaxed attitude *like flexible bosses & schedules *want steady work from now till the snow flies (or year round) Starting pay $16-25 depending on experience. Benefit packages available for year round/long term employees

PLEASE EMAIL YOUR RESUME AND DETAILS TO:

JOBS@PERFORMANCEPAINTING.CA

Veterinary Technician

YOUTH ACTIVITIES 1st Whistler Scout Group - outdoor & adventure program for girls and boys aged 5-17. Times and locations vary. More info: http://1stwhistlerscoutgroup. webs.com. Contact scoutsatwhistler @gmail.com or 604-966-4050.

*are an painter with a minimum of one year experience

Pemberton Veterinary Hospital is seeking a full time veterinary technician to add to our busy team. Ideal candidate will be RVT (registered veterinary technician) or equivalent; 1+ year clinical experience is preferred. Technical skills to be utilized daily; tasks include anesthetic monitoring in surgical and dental procedures, operating x-ray and lab equipment, and so much more. Must be reliable, able to work independently, and provide compassionate care to our animal patients and excellent customer service to our human clients! We are a small team, and the right person may take priority over clinical experience. Suitable candidates can please submit a resume and cover letter to employment@pembertonvet.com. WE ARE LOOKING TO HIRE:

BUSSERS HOSTS SERVERS Full-time and year round. We feature evening work only, staff meals, competitive wages and a great work environment. So if you’re looking for a change or some extra hours, come by and see us. Flexible schedules are available.

EARLY RISERS JOIN OUR SUMMER TEAM INCLUDING CLEANING SERVICES FOR: WHISTLER GOLF CLUB . . . . and golfing perks!!! • $20.00 per hour starting wage. • Must have a valid Driver’s License Send resume to: teamcwhistler@telus.net Or call: 604 935 8715

Whistler Waldorf School Inspiring a Genuine Love of Learning Currently Seeking Teachers: - Early Childhood - Grade School - High School (Fine Arts; Drama; Math & Science) For more information and to apply visit our website. whistlerwaldorf.com

REPLY IN PERSON WITH RESUME BETWEEN 3-5 AT QUATTRO 4319 Main St. in the Pinnacle Hotel

April 18, 2019

101


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Red Door Bistro & Roland’s Pub are looking for full time line cooks. Wage based on experience. Extended Medical & Dental Benefits, tips, staff meal, and staff discounts. Apply in person or email resume to info@rolandswhistler.com

We offer competitive wages, a unique environment, seasonal bonuses, staff discounts and benefits. Ask about accommodation.

Come Grow Sport with us at our Whistler Olympic Legacy Venues We are recruiting for:

Whistler Athletes’ Centre (High Performance Training and Accommodation) Lead, Lodge Attendant Kitchen Porter / Lodge Attendant Lodge Attendant

Whistler Sliding Centre (Bobsleigh, Luge & Skeleton) Positions for this venue are currently filled

Whistler Olympic Park (Nordic Skiing, Snowshoeing and Outdoor Activities)

Facilities Maintenance Associate

Visit our website to view current postings and to apply: www.whistlersportlegacies.com/careers

LEISURE GROUPS Mountain Spirit Toastmasters- Builds communication, public speaking, and leadership skills . Wednesdays at the Pan Pacific Mountainside - Singing Pass Room, 5:30-7pm. Email contact - 8376@ toastmastersclubs.org www.whistler. toastmastersclubs.org

Pemberton Women's Institute - Meets the third Mon of each month in the activity room at St. David's United Church at 7:30pm. New members welcome. Linda Ronayne at 604-894-6580

Rotary Club of Whistler - Meets Tuesdays at 7:15 a.m at BG Bread Garden Urban Grill 604-905-5090

Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium Meets every Thurs at 12:15pm at Pan Pacific Mountainside. 604-932-7782

Shades of Grey Painters Meets twice a week - Tuesdays, Watercolour, 11.00am-2.30pm @ The Rec, Pemberton. Thursdays, Acrylic, 1.00pm-3.30pm @ The Amenities Building, Pioneer Village, Pemberton. We are like-minded people that get together & paint. Gretchen is the painting coach. $5 to attend.

Whistler Reads - Meets to discuss a new book every eight weeks. Go to bookbuffet. com & click on Whistler Reads for the latest book/event. Paula at 604-907-2804 or wr@ bookbuffet.com

The Sea to Sky corridor’s top civil construction company.

Whistler Vacation Club and Elevate Real Estate Management is currently hiring for a range of positions!

Front Desk Agents, Housekeeping and Houseperson:

We are currently recruiting professionally minded people to join our team.

What do we offer for all positions?

Maury Young Arts Centre - Whistler's community centre for arts, culture & inspiration. Performance theatre, art gallery, daycare, youth centre, meditation room, meeting facilities. www.artswhistler.com or 604-935-8410

What do we need from you?

Pemberton & District Community Centre - Located at 7390 Cottonwood St. Fitness Centre, facility rentals, spray park, playground, children, youth, adult & seniors programs. For more info 604-894-2340 or pemrecinfo@slrd.bc.ca

Experience is preferred but not necessary, full training will be provided

Required are:

Labourers Class 1 or Class 3 Truck Drivers

• $18 per hour starting wage • Pay review after 3 months based on performance • Retention bonus - details upon application • Staff accommodation - details upon application • Eligibility for medical benefits • No reduction in hours during ‘dead season’ • Friendly working environment

Please send resume to: Email: info@whistlerexcavations.com Fax: 604-932-8748 Mail: Box 1145, Whistler, BC V0N 1B0. Drop off @ Suite 202, 1400 Alpha Lake Road, Whistler (Function Junction)

• Must have good attention to detail • Be able to use initiative • Be comfortable working as part of a team and an individual • Must be reliable and punctual • BC driving license an asset • Preferably looking for long-term candidates

www.whistlerexcavations.com

Positions available starting immediately for the right candidates. Please visit us in person at the Twin Peaks resort or email your resume to: hskp@thewhistlervacationclub.com

Last modified by:

KP

ESTIMATOR / PROJECT MANAGER (PEMBERTON) SEEKING STRONG, ACTIVE, RELIABLE AND NATURE-LOVING F/T & P/T STAFF FOR OUR 21st SEASON! WORK OUTSIDE THIS SUMMER: • STARTING WAGE OF $18.00/HOUR • PERFORMANCE & END OF SEASON BONUS • POSITIVE, ENCOURAGING TEAM & LEADERS • SEASON RUNS APRIL 15 - OCTOBER 31

APPLY NOW: Send your resume and availability to carolyn@mountainberrylandscaping.ca

102 April 18, 2019

COMMUNITY CENTRES

Wide Open Welding Ltd is looking for a full-time Estimator / Project Manager. The candidate will need to possess the following skill set: This is a multi-faceted position. The ideal candidate will be highly organized and detail oriented. Strong interpersonal skills, the ability to express ideas clearly in both written and oral communication and strong presentation skills. Must have the ability to analyze issues and determine priorities in an environment of tight and conflicting deadlines. Proficiency in planning, scheduling, execution and management of projects. An ability to read drawings and perform take-offs is a must. Our office is located in Pemberton and the job will entail travelling to and from job sites in the corridor to conduct site measurements, layouts and verifications. Candidate MUST have a commitment to excellence and the production of high quality end results.

Please email your resume to:

contactus@wideopenwelding.com

MUSEUMS Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre Explore First Nations Art Galleries, and Interactive Exhibits. Gift Shop & Cafe are in our admission free area. Open Tuesday'sSunday's per week. 10am-5p.m..

Whistler Museum & Archives Society Explore interactive exhibits, listen to local stories & discover Whistler's journey. Open daily 11am-5pm, 4333 Main St. www. whistlermuseum.org or 604-932-2019

PROFESSIONAL NETWORKING BNI Mountain High - Meets at 6:45-8:30am every Thursday at The Venue. BNI provides a positive and structured environment for development and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by helping you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing blair@blairkaplan.ca


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Buy

COMMUNITY LISTINGS PROFESSIONAL NETWORKING

Rent

Work

Fix

Drive

Sell

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Whistler Chamber of Commerce - Is the leading business association in Whistler that works to create a vibrant & successful economy. Learn more about the programs & services at www.whistlerchamber.com

Women of Whistler - Group that provides opportunities for Whistler businesswomen to network, gain knowledge & share ideas in a friendly, relaxed environment. Learn more at www.womenofwhistler.com

Be a part of our dynamic team at one of Whistlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s busiest spots! At The High Mountain Brewing Company, Whistler Brewhouse, we take pride in our product and service - From the busy patio to the cozy two-sided fireplace, from our exceptional pizzas to our hand-crafted beer.

FOR SENIORS Activate & Connect - Come join us Thursday mornings 9:30am to 11:00am at Whistler Community Services for a weekly drop in program for seniors 50+. Everyone welcome, in partnership with Mature Action Community. www.mywcss.org

Mature Action Community (MAC) - Represents seniors in Whistler and welcomes new members. MAC meets for fun and interaction with local seniors and those just visiting on Thursday mornings from 9:30 to 11:00 a.m. at the Whistler Community Services Community Room for Activate and Connect. Come join us for coffee and socializing while engaging in fun activities. Check us out at www.whistlermac. org or view our schedule on Facebook Whistler Mature Action Community Group page.

Outreach Services - Free confidential support for adults dealing with the challenges of social wellness. Please call our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker.

Pemberton Men's Shed - Weekly social meetings WED. 11-2 in the Seniors/youth Rec. bldg. beside library. Social meeting with BYO Bag lunch, card games and pool/ snooker. Help out in YOUR community, operating the Pemberton Tool Library.

Senior Citizen Organizations - Is an advocacy group devoted to improving the quality of life for all seniors. Ernie Bayer 604576-9734 or ecbayer2@gmail.com

JOIN THE MONGOLIE CREW! We are hiring for:

FULL & PART TIME GRILL CHEFS Hourly wage + tips, flexible schedule, fun & fast-paced work environment, staff meals. Learn how to cook with flair!

We are currently looking for

Front of House Manager Dishwasher Line Cook We offer comprehensive benefits packages after a probationary period, as well as competitive wages. Please come by with your resume or apply via email to adam@mjg.ca

Send your resume to careers@mongoliegrill.com Or drop off your resume in person before 5pm!

4355 BLACKCOMB WAY WHISTLER, BC, V0N 1B4

Turf Maintenance Equipment Operators Guest Hosts FREE golf, more perks Team Member housing Great culture, career path options, competitive wages, so much more! Inquires: info_nicklaus@golfbc.com

ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY Earthsave Whistler - Providing info & support to people who are interested in making healthier, greener, more peaceful food choices. earthsavewhistler.com

Healthy Home, Healthy Planet - Expert in green cleaning offers tricks, info & advice on the best way to green clean your home or work space! Call France 604-698-7479. Free private presentation on request. www. healthylivingwhistler.com

Re-Build-It Centre - Daily 10:00am to 5:00pm. Accepting donations of furniture, quality used building supplies & new items. Deliveries and pickups available for $35. Call 604.932.1125, www.mywcss.org, rebuildit@ mywss.org

Regional Recycling - Recycle beverage containers (full deposit paid) electronics, appliances, batteries, Lightbulbs, drop-off times are 9am-5pm on Nesters Rd. Pick up service 604-932-3733

BIKE MECHANIC

FULL & PART TIME SUMMER POSITIONS AVAILABLE

NOW HIRING: Full Time Bakery COMPETITIVE WAGES, BENEFITS AND FLEXIBILITY email jobs@pembertonsupermarket.com online application at pembertonsupermarket.com fax (604) 894-1107 or apply within!

Premium Rentals is looking for experienced, enthusiastic and outgoing bike mechanics to join our team to service Premiumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rental fleet as well as customer maintenance and repairs. Superior Wage | Bike Servicing Commission Structure Bike Park Pass | In Store Discounts To apply, please email: peter@premiummountain.ca

April 18, 2019

103


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY Re-Use-It - Daily 11:00am to 6:00pm, Donate all household goods in good shape. Accepting bottles & cans, old electronics, anything with a cord, and light fixtures for recycling. All proceeds to WCSS. Call 604.932.1121, www.mywcss.org, reuseit@ mywcss.org.

Is looking for a

SALES ASSOCIATE Snowflake, a Canadian retailer specializing in Great Canadian Design is looking for a sales associate to join our team.  Great wage + incentives (including fitness pass) Opportunity for advancement  Must be enthusiastic, fluent in both written and verbal English and able to work days/evenings/weekends. Sales experience and asset but not required.  Please send your resume to kathleen@snowflakecanada.com  Snowflake, Fairmont Chateau Whistler 4599 Chateau Blvd (Upper Village)

PUT YOUR CAREER ON A FRESH TRACK

ASSOCIATE, CONFERENCE SALES FULL TIME, YEAR ROUND

Reporting to the Conference Sales Manager, the Sales Associate’s main responsibility is to support the fulfillment of Tourism Whistler’s goals and objectives through the building of relationships with our clients. Through the use of outstanding communication, interpersonal skills, a high level of enthusiasm and initiative, the Sales Associate will deliver superior service to our clients with a strong passion for our industry and purpose. The ideal candidate is extremely organized, motivated and an excellent team player with two years of sales experience, preferably in a hotel or tourism setting.

Ask us about flex Fridays. For a complete job description and to apply, visit us online at whistler.com/careers.

SNOWFLAKECANADA.COM

The Association of Whistler Area Residents for the Environment (AWARE) Whistler's Natural Voice since 1989. Regular events, project and volunteer opportunities. www.awarewhistler.org info@awarewhistler.org

The Mountain Village Social Gathering Join us at one of our regular social gatherings on the last Wednesday of every month. There is a group of us at The Mountain Village who are forming a sustainable, multi generational neighbourhood based on the co housing model. WHAT IF... Housing wasn't just a place to live, but rather, a way of life? To find out more, visit our Facebook page @themountainvillage or go to our website www.themountainvillage.ca

FAMILY RESOURCES Baby/Child Health Clinics - Free routine immunizations & newly licensed vaccines for purchase, growth & development assessments & plenty of age appropriate resources avail. By appointment 604-9323202

Camp Fund - Provides financial assis-tance to enable children of financially restricted families to attend camp. Call WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org

Families Fighting Cancer In The Sea To Sky - We are a non profit partner with Sea to Sky Community Services. We provide financial and practical support to children and parents with dependants diagnosed with cancer. Please contact us on our confidential email: ffcseatosky@gmail.com, visit our Facebook Page or website www. familiesfightingcancer.ca

We are hiring journeymen & apprentices for the following trades:

Plumbers, Gas Fitters, HVAC, Refrigeration, Skilled General Labour We are a seven-day-a-week service and repair company working from North Vancouver to Pemberton. We provide flexible steady employment, good wages, benefit package, service vehicle, cell phone and more. The successful candidate will be a professional tradesman both in appearance, skill and attitude that is able to work independently and as part of a team.

 THINGS.  TO DO.

Send resume in confidence to:

spearhead.plumbing@gmail.com www.spearheadplumbing.com

Sundial Boutique Hotel at 4340 Sundial Crescent, Whistler BC V0N 1B4 is currently hiring for a

Housekeeping Supervisor Kaze Sushi is looking for Experienced Sushi Chef

Must be able to create rich sushi menu including maki, nigiri and sashimi with various ingredients such as raw fish, fresh fruits & vegetables. Minimum one year as a sushi chef experience required. Wage: $14.50 per hour, FT, to work at Kaze Sushi in Westin Whistler. Please apply in person with resume at the Whistler restaurant from 5:30pm onwards

Call or email Tom on 604-938-4565 or tokyotom111@hotmail.com

104 April 18, 2019

This position is FT year around. Wage is $21.75/hr + benefits. Job duties include: Supervising dept duties, inspection of work, administration, assist with recruiting, perform training and cleaning duties. Skill requirements: 1 year’s prior experience as a housekeeping supervisor”, tourism, administration and customer service. Please fax or email your resume with attention to “Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com

KidsArt - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restricted families to participate in arts and culture education. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www. mywcss.org.

Kids on the Move - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restricted families to participate in sport programs. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www. mywcss.org.

Outreach Services - Free confidential support for adults and families experiencing challenges with mental health, food insecurity, housing insecurity, substance use, misuse or addiction, employment, eating disorders, violence in relationships, roommate conflict or homesickness. Contact our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker or visit www. mywcss.org.

Pemberton Parent Infant Drop-In Facilitated by Capri Mohammed, Public Health Nurse. Every Mon 11am-12:30pm at Pemberton Public Library.


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Buy

COMMUNITY LISTINGS FAMILY RESOURCES

Rent

Work

Fix

Drive

Sell

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Pemberton Strong Start Family Drop-InA play group for you and your under-5 child. Signal Hill Elementary, Mon, Tues, Wed & Fri, 9am-12pm. Thurs only 12pm-3pm. Call 604894-6101 / 604-966- 8857

Whistler Public Library - Open Mon-Thurs 10am-7pm, Fri 10am-6pm, Sat & Sun 11am5pm. Music & Words, Mon 10am. Rhyme & Song, Tues 10:30am. Parent & Infant dropin, Thurs 11am. Preschool Story Time, Fri 10:30am. Singing with the babies, Sat 11am. Call 604-935-8433

Demi Chef de Partie Overnight Steward Steward

SOCIAL SERVICES Access to Justice - Need legal advice but are financially restricted? Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to find out more or visit www. mywcss.org.

Counselling Assistance Available - WCSS subsidizes access to a private counselor for $35-$50/hr depending on financial need. Contact an outreach team member at 604932-0113 www.mywcss.org

Counselling Assistance - WCSS subsidizes access to a private counsellor depending on financial need. Contact an outreach worker at 604.932.0113 or visit www.mywcss.org.

ESL Volunteer Tutor Program - Volunteer one-to-one tutoring for new immigrants & Canadian citizens. For more information or to register, contact the Whistler Welcome Centre info@welcomewhistler.com or call 604.698.5960

Front Desk Agent Overnight Front OfďŹ ce Supervisor The Four Seasons team is looking for these roles to start immediately. $500 signing bonus available for all hires

Details: Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com For possible same day offers, please come to our drop-in hours every Tuesday between 1pm-4pm. Please bring your resume and two references in order to be considered!

PUT YOUR CAREER ON A FRESH TRACK

TRAVEL CONSULTANT

FULL TIME, YEAR ROUND 4X10 HOUR DAYS PER WEEK, WITH BENEFITS Travel Consultants have a passion for ensuring that guests have the best possible vacation experience in Whistler. The main goal of Travel Consultants is to sell an entire Whistler vacation package, including accommodations, activities and transportation to guests worldwide. This position requires an enthusiastic individual who can share their passion for Whistler and close the sale. Previous experience in travel reservations and / or travel agent sales is helpful; a strong knowledge of Whistler is essential. We are also hiring: Coordinator, Travel Media and Visitor Centre Agent. To view the full job descriptions and to apply, please visit our website: whistler.com/careers

Food Bank, Pemberton - Run by Sea to Sky Community Service. Open every second Monday. 604 894 6101

Food Bank Whistler - Located at 8000 Nesters Road, every Monday from 10am to noon. For emergency food bags, please call 604.935.7717 for as-sistance. www.mywcss. org, food-bank@mywcss.org

Healthy Pregnancy Outreach ProgramLearn how to prepare healthy affordable meals at this outreach program. Sea to Sky Community Services 604-894-6101

Meadow Park Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $131.20 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org.

North Shore Schizophrenia Society Services for family, friends & community. Mental illness info, support & advocacy. Call Chris Dickenson at 604-966-7334

Outreach Services - Free, confidential support for youth experiencing challenges with mental health, food insecurity, housing insecurity, substance use, misuse or addiction, employment, eating disorders, violence in relationships, roommate conflict or homesickness. Contact our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker or visit www.mywcss.org.

RMOW Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $127.60 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 www.mywcss.org

is now hiring for the following position:

Guest Service Agent Night auditor Room Attendant* Houseman Full-time and Part-time Seasonal incentives available *Short-term accommodation available Please email resume to hr@listelhotel.com

Restaurant Floor Manager Event Floor Manager Daytime Dishwasher FREE golf, more perks Team Member housing Great culture, career path options, competitive wages, so much more! Inquires: info_nicklaus@golfbc.com

Thank you for your interest. Only those applicants being considered for an interview will be contacted.

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES APPLY TODAY! Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

In House Marketing Concierge (part time) Email your resume with the position you wish to apply for to: tara.ryan@diamondresorts.com

WEST ELECTRIC IS HIRING:

Service Electrician and Apprentices email resumes to: office@westelectric.ca April 18, 2019

105


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

SOCIAL SERVICES Pearl's Safe Home - Temporary shelter for women & children experiencing abuse in relationships. Locations in Whistler & Pemberton avail 24/7. All services are free. 1-877-890-5711 or 604-892-5711

Housekeepers Needed

-Signing Bonus & Great Benefits!-

We are currently interviewing:

The Four Seasons Housekeeping team is looking for Guestroom

Carpenters

Attendants for contracts starting immediately or for summer hire!

Carpenters Helpers

Guaranteed housing, one meal per working shift, health&

Candidates will receive a $500 signing bonus. Benefits include

Please submit resume to: info@evrfinehomes

Whistler’s Premier Estate Builder

Victim Services - Assists victims, witnesses, family members or friends directly affected by any criminal act or traumatic event. Call 604-905-1969 Whistler Community Services Society Outreach Services Now Available Monday to Saturday at our new location - 8000 Nesters Road (next to WAG) 604.932.0113 www. mywcss.org

medical after 90 days, a winter leisurepackage, and more! Whistler Food Bank - Located in the Whistler Blackcomb Foundation Social Services Centre, 1519 Spring Creek Dr. Every Mon 10am-12pm. For emergencies call 604935-7717 www.mywcss.org foodbank@ mywcss.org

Labourers Level 2 First Aid Attendant

Support Counselling - For women regarding abuse & relationship issues. No charge. Call 604-894-6101

Details: Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com For possible same day offers, please come to our drop-in hours every Tuesday between 1pm-4pm. Please bring your resume and two references in order to be considered!

Whistler for the Disabled - Provides info for people with disabilities on what to do & where to go. Visit www. whistlerforthedisabled.com Whistler Housing Authority - Long term rental & ownership housing for Whistler residents. Visit www.whistlerhousing.ca

Whistler Mental Health & Addiction Services - If you or someone you know needs help with a mental health issue or substance misuse or addiction problem, we can assist. Mon-Fri 830am-430pm. 604-6986455 Whistler Multicultural Network Settlement information, social support and programs for newcomers and immigrants living/working in Whistler. 604-388-5511 www.whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com

Delish Cafe in Function Junction is expanding! We are currently hiring both part time & full time positions:

Whistler Opt Healthy Sexuality Clinic - Professional sexual health services at a reduced cost. Free HIV testing. Clinics at Whistler Health Care Ctr, 2nd floor on Tues 4:30-7:30pm. Winter hours Thurs. 5:00pm7:00pm. Confidentiality assured.

Barista/Cafe Servers Apprentice Bakers No experience necessary, we are happy to train great people on the job!

Whistler Women's Centre - Provides confidential support, resources, referrals and advocacy for women living in the Sea to Sky corridor. All services are free of charge and include access to emergency safe housing, child/youth counselling, play space and computer access. Drop-In Centre open Mon 12-230, Tue-Thu 12-5. 1519 Spring Creek Drive. You can also access our services at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 p.m. www.hswc.ca or call (604)962-8711. 24 HR Crisis Line: 1-877-890-5711

Must have a work hard - play hard attitude! Employee housing available for the right candidates. Send your resume to ian@whistlergrocery.com

HOUSING AVAILABLE FOR FULL TIME EMPLOYEES, IT’S CHEAP!

QUANTUM HEALTH Quantum Health

We’re Hiring

Nutritionist with retail experience Sales Associates with a passion for health and nutrition

Please send resume and cover letter to info@quantumvitamins.ca or in person at 117- 4368 Main St.

106 April 18, 2019

We are currently hiring Full and Part Time Sales Representatives with personality! We have staff accommodation available for full time, starting in May Please stop by our Whistler Village location with your resume to fill out an application and say Hi to Michelle or Tina. (4154 Village Green)

Whistler WorkBC Employment Services Centre - Provides free one-stop employment services to job seekers and employers. Drop in services at the Pemberton Library Thursdays 1-5 PM, and at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 PM. For more information visit www.WhistlerESC.com or call us at 604-932-1600


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Buy

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

Rent

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

Immigrant Peer Educators - Immigrants providing support and information for those who may be experiencing challenges adjusting to a new culture. 604-388-5511 info@whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com

Pregnancy and Infant Loss - Facilitated by a registered counsellor, this program is designed for couples and individuals who have experienced loss of a child, either before or after birth. Please call WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak to an outreach worker for more information or visit www. mywcss.org.

SMART Recovery Pemberton - (SelfManagement and Recovery Training) A Cognitive-Behavioural group for individuals with substance abuse con-cerns. Pemberton Health Centre (Board Room) January 17th, 24th, 31st, and February 7th 2019 4:30-6:00pm **drop in welcome.

HR ADMINISTRATOR Come be part of a passionate and dedicated team! We are looking for an HR Administrator to support our most important resource – our employees. If you are a positive, compassionate HR professional, who loves a challenge, we want to hear from you! Please go to www.mywcss.org for a more detailed job overview and how to apply. Deadline to apply is April 22nd, 2019.

Photo Credit: Robin O’Neill / Whistler Golf Club

SHARE YOUR PASSION

Jesus Rock Of Ages Ministry- A bible based church that holds services at Millennium Place's main floor theatre at 4:30pm. www. jesusrockofages.com

Sea to Sky Healing Room - For Blessing/Prayer/Encouragement In the Community Church building, 7422 Dogwood Street, Pemberton. Every 1st and 3rd Wednesday: 4-6 PM Whistler Church- Join us for worship and fellowship around Jesus. Sunday 10 am at Myrtle Philip Community School, 6195 Lorimer Rd. Nursery, Sunday School to gr. 6, Youth gr. 7 and up. Call Pastor Jon 604-7983861 / Kelvin 204-249-0700 or www.whistlerchurch.ca

FUR & FEATHERS Get Bear Smart Society - Learn more about coexisting with bears. To report a conflict, garbage or attractant issue call 604-905BEAR (2327) www.bearsmart.com

Sell

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: GRADE ONE TEACHER

WHISTLER COMMUNIT Y SERVICES SOCIE T Y

RELIGION

Roman Catholic Church- Come celebrate mass at Our Lady of the Mountains, Whistler on Saturday 5pm, Sunday 9am, Tuesday 5:45pm, Wednesday 7pm, Thursday/Friday 5:45pm. St. Francis of Assisi, Pemberton on Sunday 12:30pm and Friday 9am. St. Christopher's, Mt. Currie on Sunday 11am. 604-905-4781

Drive

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Birth, Baby and Beyond - Join a registered counsellor and meet other moms with the opportunity to ask questions and share experiences in a safe, welcoming and nonjudgmental setting. Call 604.932.0113 for more information or visit www.mywcss.org.

Epilepsy Support Group- For individuals & families seeking guidance or support. Contact eswhistler@gmail.com

Fix

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

SUPPORT GROUPS

Concussion Support Group - WCSS is offering a recurring 8 week program to support people living with persistent postconcussion symptoms. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak with an outreach worker about upcoming sessions or visit www.mywcss.org.

Work

IRRIGATION TECHNICIAN FULL TIME, SEASONAL (THROUGH TO LATE OCTOBER) Competitive Wage ∙ Complimentary Golf ∙ Great Team Under the direction of the Golf Course Superintendent, the Irrigation Technician is responsible for the programming, operation and maintenance of the golf course irrigation system at the Whistler Golf Course. The ideal candidate has two years of work experience related to golf course maintenance practices, with an understanding of agronomy, turfgrass science and the rules of golf. Toro irrigation experience is an asset. To view job descriptions, and to apply, please visit our website: whistlergolf.com/careers

Position Type: Categories: Location: FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

Grade One Teacher Elementary Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Principal As per the Teaching Salary Grid March 15, 2019 Posted until position is filled August 26, 2019

Details: Xet’olacw Community School is a Lil’wat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Applicants need to be willing to work in a collaborative environment including involvement in an aboriginal student achievement program, which includes First Nations School Association coaching that improves student and teacher performance. This position provides an opportunity for high quality Professional Development Key Deliverables: • Experience with Read Well, DIBELS and Six Minute Solution an asset/willingness to attend professional development • Ability to work collaboratively. Must be cooperative in strategies with Professional Learning Communities under direction of First Nations School Association • Experience with Saxon Math an asset/ willingness to attend professional development • Experience and/or education in special needs an asset • Can use data to drive classroom/school wide improvement initiatives • Maintain open and consistent communications with students and their families about academic progress • Be a positive team player committed to the belief that all children can learn at high levels • Commitment to ongoing professional development including willingness to be coached by the Elementary Supervisor and Regional Principal via school visits, video teleconference call and joining Provincial Professional Learning Community model (in Vancouver) and a School-Wide PLC model on site • Enjoy participating in school event days such as Sports Day, Eagle Run, and Flake Rodeo etc. • Implement strong classroom management strategies Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of or eligibility for a BC Teaching Certificate • Membership in the Teacher Regulation Branch • Ability to work with First Nations students in a First Nations community • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on essential skills and engaging for students • Teaching record of success an asset. • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to build positive student relationships • Reflective practices • Familiarity with BC’s new curriculum • Have a desire to learn and grow professionally Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, including reference, transcripts, copy of degrees and TQS Category, prefer by fax. Contact Information:

Glenda Gabriel Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604 Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

April 18, 2019

107


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

COMMUNITY LISTINGS FUR & FEATHERS Pemberton Wildlife Association Advocates for the conservation of fish, wildlife & wilderness recreation. Also offering target shooting & archery facilities. www.pembertonwildlifeassociation.com

GENERAL HAND - $15.25/hr Part -Time and Full-Time Whistler Brewing Co. is looking for a motivated and energetic General Hand to fulfill duties in production and distribution departments, such as but not limited to: • Assisting on Packaging Lines • Assisting in Cellar Duties • Cleaning and Sanitation – indoors and outdoors, including some snow maintenance • Assisting with keg deliveries as required REQUIREMENTS: • Technical Aptitude • Capable work in wet working environment, plus outdoors in all weather conditions • Capable work with Corrosive Chemicals • Able to move 60kg • Willing to learn to operate a Fork lift • Quick learner • Team Player • Punctual • Must own safety boots Join an awesome, fun, small hardworking team. Good hours & beer perks! Apply within!

ResortQuest Whistler is currently hiring:

WAG - Whistler Animals Galore - A shelter for lost, unwanted, and homeless cats and dogs. Let us help you find your purrfect match...adopt a shelter animal! For more info 604-935-8364 www.whistlerwag.com

Owner Relations Coordinator Maintenance Accounts Receivable Benefits include - activity allowance, extended medical, RRSP match, opportunities for growth and more. To apply for this opportunity, please specify the position and email your resume and cover letter to: beth.fraser@resortquestwhistler.com We thank all applicants for their interest but only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

ASSISTANT RESTAURANT MANAGER Seeking a full-time Assistant Manager to help inspire, develop, oversee and manage our front-of-house team. The Assistant Manager will help oversee day-to-day operations and uphold Araxi Restaurant’s exceptional levels of hospitality.

OUT NOW!

Qualifications • Previous restaurant leadership experience is required • WSET Level 2 or equivalent is an asset Excellent training and growth opportunities available within an award-winning restaurant group. We offer year-round full hours, competitive wages, gratuities, extended medical & dental, accommodations, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants. Please email your resume & cover letter to:

careers@araxi.com

HIGH COUNTRY LANDSCAPING

is hiring for full time positions in our

maintenance and construction departments.

We are also looking for individuals to fill both part time and full time positions in our Whistler garden center. Please send your resume to highcountrylandscape@telus.net 108 April 18, 2019

We are

Whistler’s only dedicated wedding magazine. WHISTLERWEDDINGMAGAZINE.COM

Bike techs • Sales staff • Full and Part time Apply info@fanatykco More info www.Fanatykco.com/Employment


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Buy

Rent

Work

Fix

Drive

Sell

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Construction Manager Position Seeking employee with highly refined carpentry and organizational skills. Minimum 10 years experience in construction required and minimum 5 years in a management position. Duties include supervising employees, coordinating sub-contractors, ordering material, liaising with clients and project estimating. info@macdougallconstruction.com www.macdougallconstruction.com Get Paid to Explore Western Canada Hiring now for start dates in May. Based out of Squamish, AmeriCan Adventures Group Leaders are paid to camp, road trip, explore and share Canada’s National Parks and cities with small groups of foreign passengers. Pay is 830$/week plus tips and commissions. Housing, company vehicle, commercial license reimbursement and paid training is provided. amadjobs@americanadventures.com www.americanadventures.com/workfor-us Labour wanted April - Dec. $20p/h to start. Reliable. BC driver's license required. Email Mike at blackcombchimney@yahoo.ca

Stark Contracting & Management LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION TEAM MEMBER Stark Contracting & Management is looking to add members to our Landscape Construction Team for the 2019 Summer season. Seeking energetic and motivated individuals capable of working outdoors in all weather conditions and willing to learn new skills such as machine operation. Starting wage is $20/hr plus a Bike Park pass incentive or similar benefit for a full summer commitment. Hours are varied with plenty of time to play and enjoy the mountains. Room to grow within the company and year-round work is available for suitable candidates. markjohnson@hotmail.ca

Whistler Personnel Solutions Full & Part- Time and Temp Work! www.whistler-jobs.com 604-905-4194

piquenewsmagazine.com/events

CNC Machinist Whistler CNC shop requires Machinist / Operator for the manufacture of bicycle products. Metal working experience minimum requirement for applicants. FT permanent position. 40hrs per week, day or afternoon shifts available. Email resume to

sales@northshorebillet.com

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: HIGH SCHOOL CAREER AND PLANNING/ENGLISH TEACHER 1.0 FT

LOVE YOUR JOB AND YOUR LIFE COORDINATOR, TRAVEL MEDIA FULL TIME, YEAR ROUND

The Coordinator, Travel Media supports the departmental goal of generating positive editorial exposure for the destination of Whistler and Tourism Whistler’s members. This position is responsible for the development and management of the media relations tools inventory, online media room, database management and related administrative duties. We are looking for an individual with excellent communication skills who is a self-starter with the ability to work on multiple projects with competing deadlines. The ability to be flexible in a dynamic, changing environment is key and necessary when working with a large number of stakeholders. Experience working with traditional, influencer or broadcast media a strong asset and a passion for the Whistler lifestyle is essential. To view the full job description and to apply, please visit our website: whistler.com/careers

NOW HIRING:

ATV & BUGGY GUIDES CANOE GUIDES JEEP GUIDES E-BIKE GUIDES SHUTTLE DRIVERS MECHANIC We offer a fun, outdoor work environment with a great team of like-minded individuals. An always changing, always challenging work day with the opportunity to connect with people from all over the world. Flexible schedules and amazing staff parties are definite perks of the job. PERKS INCLUDE: FLEXIBLE SCHEDULE – FRIENDS & FAMILY DISCOUNTS – EPIC STAFF PARTIES - FREE ACTIVITIES FOR STAFF Full job descriptions at: www.canadianwilderness.com/employment/

If you are interested in joining our team, please submit your resume to employment@canadian01.com

WITHOUT IT

Categories: FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Start Date: Posting Date: Closing Date:

FAQwhistler

High School Career and Planning/English Teacher 1.0 FT High School 1 1 Principal and Administration Coordinator As per the Xet’olacw Teaching Salary Grid August 26, 2019 April 10th, 2019 April 18th, 2019

Details: Xet’ólacw Community School is a Lílwat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Applicants need to be willing to work in a collaborative environment including involvement in an aboriginal student achievement program, which includes coaching that improves student and teacher performance. This position provides an opportunity for high quality Professional Development Key Deliverables: • Teach Career Education 8, 9, 10, Career Life Education 11/12, and English 10. • Implement strong classroom management strategies. • Is committed to excellent instructional preparation and consistent record keeping. Timely reporting to administration when necessary e.g. report cards, attendance records and data request • Can use data to drive classroom/school–wide improvement initiatives • Maintain open and consistent communication with students and their families about their academic progress • Can operate and teach numeracy and literacy in collaboration with others according to the school’s strategies for improving academic outcomes • Be a positive team player committed to the belief that all children can learn at high levels • Commit to ongoing professional development including willingness to be coached by the Administration Coordinator, Principal and Regional Principal via school visits, video teleconference calls etc. and joining Provincial Professional Learning Community model (in Vancouver) and a School-Wide PLC model on site. • Prepare and prep students for English 10 Provincial Assessment • Experience and/or education in special needs an asset • Enjoy participating in school event days such as Sports Day, Eagle Run, and Flake Rodeo etc. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of or eligibility for a BC Teaching Certificate • Membership in the Teacher Regulation Branch • Ability to work with First Nations students in a First Nations community • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on essential skills and engaging for students • Teaching record of success an asset. • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to build positive student relationships • Reflective practices • Familiarity with BC’s new curriculum • Have a desire to learn and grow professionally Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, including references, transcripts, copy of degrees and TQS Category, prefer by fax. Contact Information:

YOU CAN’T DO

THIS TOWN

Position Type:

Glenda Gabriel Receptionist/Secretary Xet’ólacw Community School PO Box 604, Mount Currie, BC, V0N 2K0 Tel: 604-894-6131 Fax: 604- 894-5717

We thank for your interest; however, only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

April 18, 2019

109


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

WHISTLER’S RE-IMAGINED ITALIAN RESTAURANT

The storied restaurant offers a modern taste of Italy to bring a fresh, contemporary style of dining to the mountain.

CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES FRONT-OF-HOUSE Experienced Dining Room Server Server Assistant Bar Back

BACK-OF-HOUSE Line Cooks (1-2 years experience) Dishwashers

Staff Housing Available! Competitive Wage + Benefits Package WE’RE HIRING

LINE COOKS 1-2 year(s) experience is an asset Extensive on-the-job training offered APPLY TODAY! We offer year-round full and part-time hours, gratuities, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants. Please email your resume & cover letter to careers@ilcaminetto.ca

Great Retail Opportunity. Snowflake in Fairmont Chateau Whistler is looking for a manager. We specialize in Canadian made or designed outerwear and accessories, and have been in Whistler for almost 30 years. Good base salary; commissions on every sale, incentives, bonuses, staff discount, underground parking nearby, on the job training, and access to Health Club at the Chateau. Check list… Retail experience. Love to sell. Team leader and team player. Organized. Energetic. Enthusiastic. Good time management. Able to motivate others. Fluent in both written and spoken English.  Flexible regarding shifts worked.         

Please email resume to megan@snowflakecanada.com

DIVERSE CONSTRUCTION COMPANY WITH

Residential/Commercial projects ACROSS THE SEA TO SKY CORRIDOR

FINE FINISH PAINTING HIRING ALL PAINTERS NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY COMPETITIVE WAGES AND BONUSES FUN CREW TO WORK WITH AND FLEXIBLE HOURS Send resume to: finefinishpemberton@gmail.com

110 April 18, 2019

WE ARE CURRENTLY HIRING

Site Supervisors Carpenters Labourers We offer; employee benefits and full time employment year round. TO APPLY: CALL 604.935.2683 or EMAIL DCOTE@COASTCONSTRUCTION.CA


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Buy

Rent

Work

Fix

Drive

Sell

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: GRADE SIX TEACHER Position Type: Categories: Location:

We’re Hiring! Great Perks!

HOTEL: Front Office Supervisor Catering & Events Manager Summer Amenity Attendant Bell Attendant Reservations Coordinator Guest Services Agent Night Audit

PIQUE NEWSMAGAZINE

SUBSCRIPTIONS

52 ISSUES

F&B: Restaurants Manager Barista Sous Chef 1st cook - PT Breakfast Cook - PT Server Assistant Expo Host Casual Banquet Server

Ask about our staff housing opportunities contact us today

careers@nitalakelodge.com www.nitalakelodge.com I @nitalakelodge

$76.70/YEAR

REGULAR MAIL WITHIN CANADA

$136.60/YEAR

COURIER WITHIN CANADA

$605.80/YEAR

COURIER WITHIN USA

PAY BY MASTERCARD, VISA OR AMEX TEL. 604-938-0202 FAX. 604-938-0201

Earls is starting to build our team for Spring and Summer Servers, Cooks, Hosts, Expeditors, Bartenders & Shift Managers Visit us at the restaurant anytime to apply in person or via email at apply.whistler@earls.ca

FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

Grade Six Teacher Elementary Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Principal As per the Teaching Salary Grid March 15, 2019 Posted until position is filled August 26, 2019

Details: Xet’ólacw Community School is a Lílwat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Applicants need to be willing to work in a collaborative environment including involvement in an aboriginal student achievement program, which includes coaching that improves student and teacher performance. This position provides an opportunity for high quality Professional Development Key Deliverables: • Teach all subjects in the Grade 6 class with Physical Education, Ucwalmícwts (traditional language), and a library time supervised by other teachers or staff. • Implement strong classroom management strategies. • Is committed to excellent instructional preparation and consistent record keeping. Timely reporting to administration when necessary e.g. report cards, attendance records and data request • Can use data to drive classroom/school–wide improvement initiatives • Maintain open and consistent communication with students and their families about their academic progress • Can operate and teach numeracy and literacy in collaboration with others according to the school’s strategies for improving academic outcomes • Be a positive team player committed to the belief that all children can learn at high levels • Commit to ongoing professional development including willingness to be coached by the Elementary Supervisor and Regional Principal via school visits, video teleconference calls etc. and joining Provincial Professional Learning Community model (in Vancouver) and a School-Wide PLC model on site. • Working in Reading Mastery Program (platooned) as well as Literature program and centers. • Work with Jump Saxon Math in collaboration with other Intermediate teaching staff • Experience and/or education in special needs an asset • Enjoy participating in school event days such as Sports Day, Eagle Run, and Flake Rodeo etc. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of or eligibility for a BC Teaching Certificate • Membership in the Teacher Regulation Branch • Ability to work with First Nations students in a First Nations community • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on essential skills and engaging for students • Teaching record of success an asset. • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to build positive student relationships • Reflective practices • Familiarity with BC’s new curriculum • Have a desire to learn and grow professionally Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, including reference, transcripts, copy of degrees and TQS Category, prefer by fax. Contact Information:

Glenda Gabriel, Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C., V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

April 18, 2019

111


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

3 5 9 7 4 1 9 6 Pan Pacific Whistler is currently hiring for: 8 9 3 2 5 Guest Services Agent 3 2 Night Auditor Preventative Maintenance Technician 6 1 Maintenance Associate 6 4 Room Attendant 3 8 2 5 6 Overnight Houseperson Breakfast Cook 2 9 3 1 Breakfast Dishwasher 6in Hospitality4 3 8 Discover new opportunities to embark on a career PIQUE NEWSMAGAZINE with Pan Pacific Whistler, located atEASY Whistler’s best address. We offer competitive wages, ski pass, and staff accommodation. Detailed job postings can be viewed by selecting “View all jobs” and “Pan Pacific Whistler Mountainside” on our Careers page at www.panpacific.com/en/careers.html To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

7

# 25 SUBSCRIPTIONS

52 ISSUES $76.70/YEAR

REGULAR MAIL WITHIN CANADA

3

6 $1369.60/YEAR

COURIER WITHIN CANADA

1 2 9 8 $605.80/YEAR 5 4 1 8 COURIER WITHIN USA 3 6 1 2 PAY BY 1 9 7 MASTERCARD, 4 VISA OR AMEX 6 2 TEL.3604-938-0202 7 FAX. 604-938-0201 4 9 8 6 EASY

STORE CLERKS

- competitive wages and shopping discounts

COOKS, BAKERS, BARISTAS AND DISHWASHER/ SANDWICH MAKER - competitive wages, meals and benefits

Experience an asset but not essential Full time and part time positions available Contact in person or email catering@alpinecafe.ca 112 April 18, 2019

The Beacon Pub and Eatery is currently looking for: LINE/ PREP COOKS (FULL-TIME & PART-TIME) HEAD CHEF # 25 6 3 2 5 4 9 8 DISHWASHER 5 4 1 2 8 7 9

7 1 6 3 8 9 7 1 3 6 4 2 5 Wages are very competitive 9(based on experience), 1 8 3 5 2 6 4 7 great perks and4 benefi 5 6 ts. 7 9 8 1 3 2 2 7 in3 Whistler! 6 1 4 5 9 8 Come join the best team 8 4 your 9 2 1 7 5 6to Interested applicants please3email resume 7 2 9 8 6 5 3 1 4 skeenan-naf@Crystal-Lodge.com 1 6 5 4 7 3 2 8 9

www.sudoku.com

# 27

# 26

8 7 9 6 4 1 3 5 2

Answers 5 4 3 9 2 8 6 7 1

1 6 2 7 3 5 9 8 4

6 5 1 2 9 3 8 4 7

3 9 7 8 1 4 5 2 6

4 2 8 5 7 6 1 3 9

2 3 6 1 5 7 4 9 8

9 8 4 3 6 2 7 1 5

7 1 5 4 8 9 2 6 3

# 27

Page 7 of 25


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Buy

Rent

Work

Fix

Drive

Sell

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: GRADE SEVEN TEACHER

FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

Grade Seven Teacher Elementary Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Principal As per the Teaching Salary Grid April 3, 2019 Posted until position is filled August 26, 2019

Details: Xet’ólacw Community School is a Lílwat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Applicants need to be willing to work in a collaborative environment including involvement in an aboriginal student achievement program, which includes coaching that improves student and teacher performance. This position provides an opportunity for high quality Professional Development Key Deliverables: • Teach all subjects in the Grade 7 class with Physical Education, Ucwalmícwts (traditional language), and a library time supervised by other teachers or staff. • Implement strong classroom management strategies. • Is committed to excellent instructional preparation and consistent record keeping. Timely reporting to administration when necessary e.g. report cards, attendance records and data request • Can use data to drive classroom/school–wide improvement initiatives • Maintain open and consistent communication with students and their families about their academic progress • Can operate and teach numeracy and literacy in collaboration with others according to the school’s strategies for improving academic outcomes • Be a positive team player committed to the belief that all children can learn at high levels • Commit to ongoing professional development including willingness to be coached by the Elementary Supervisor and Regional Principal via school visits, video teleconference calls etc. and joining Provincial Professional Learning Community model (in Vancouver) and a SchoolWide PLC model on site. • Working in Reading Mastery/Corrective Reading Program (platooned) as well as Literature program and centers. • Work with Saxon Math in collaboration with other Intermediate teaching staff • Experience and/or education in special needs an asset • Enjoy participating in school event days such as Sports Day, Eagle Run, and Flake Rodeo etc. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of or eligibility for a BC Teaching Certificate • Membership in the Teacher Regulation Branch • Ability to work with First Nations students in a First Nations community • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on essential skills and engaging for students • Teaching record of success an asset. • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to build positive student relationships • Reflective practices • Familiarity with BC’s new curriculum • Have a desire to learn and grow professionally Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, including reference, transcripts, copy of degrees and TQS Category, prefer by fax. Contact Information:

• Busser

• Overnight Security Agent

• Banquet Server (FT/Casual) • Cook • Guest Services Agent

• Dishwasher

• Bell Attendant

• Room Attendant

• Pool Attendant

• Housekeeping Coordinator

• Maintenance Engineer

• Accounting Manager

• Shipper/ Receiver

• Banquet Captain

STAFF ACCOMMODATION AVAILABLE FOR AS LOW AS $300.00 per month DELICIOUS STAFF MEALS FOR ONLY $4.00 per shift EXPLORE DISCOUNTED HOTEL STAYS AT ANY MARRIOTT HOTEL A great career has always been a great adventure. Email your resume to work@westinwhistler.com or visit us in person Monday to Friday 9am - 5pm.

Employment Opportunities:

DO YOU LIVE IN PEMBERTON? THEN WHY COMMUTE TO WHISTLER?

Full Time Guest Services Agent Staff Accommodation is available with this position.

Apply to: jobs@pembertonvalleylodge.com

Competitive wages, health benefits, casual environment

Glacier Media Group is growing. Check our job board regularly for the latest openings: www.glaciermedia.ca/careers

Glenda Gabriel, Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C., V0N 2K0

R001408475

Position Type: Categories: Location:

Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

April 18, 2019

113


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

N’QUATQUA 21 Lakeshore Dr. P.O. Box 88, D’Arcy, BC V0N 1L0 Phone (604) 452-3221 Fax (604) 452-3295

JOB POSTING:

FINANCE MANAGER N’Quatqua is a First Nations community which is located at the head of Anderson Lake and at the mouth of the Gates River in D’arcy British Columbia, approximately 45km northereat of Pemberton and 75km northereat of Whistler. N’Quatqua is seeking a Financial Manager to help manage the finances/operations and programs within it’s organization. JOB DESCRIPTION: The Finance Manager will play a vital role in improving and maintaining the financial standing of our organization. The ideal candidate will help determine financial strategy and policy, arranging the appropriate funding and managing financial risks in the organization. The Finance Manager will be an official point of contact for all financial matters. THE FINANCE MANAGER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR: • Managing daily cash balances; • Forecasting cash payments and anticipating challenges arising from limited cash flow; • Maintaining our accounts system; • Preparing and presenting financial reports for meetings and Chief & Council; • Working with management heads to prepare budgets.

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Medical Office Assistant t Are you a Consummate Professional? We are a small group of medical specialist offices in Whistler and Squamish, that require an extraordinary medical office assistant. Is that you? Your attention to detail is legendary! When combined with your precision in completing administrative tasks associated with the logistics to support our patients, people are simply in awe. You really know how to strike that unique balance between competing priorities, whether it is juggling the day to day operation tasks of the clinic, completing appointment scheduling, or data entry. None of this phases you.

Currently has the following positions available:

FRONT DESK AGENTS Full Time

With at least 2 years experience in a professional office environment, you are best known for your excellent care of people and all-star customer service skills, whether it is with patients, referring medical practitioners, hospital administrators, fellow staff, or professional colleagues.

NIGHT AUDITOR

If you live north of Lions Bay, and would like to explore further, we would like to hear from you.

ROOM ATTENDANTS

Please submit your detailed resume, as well as a cover letter that describes the biggest office challenge you have faced to date, and how you won the day.

Full Time

Please send to rheppner@seatoskyorthopaedics.com

MAINTENANCE Competitive wages and benefits

YOU CAN’T DO

THIS TOWN

Full Time or Part Time

FAQwhistler

WITHOUT IT

Resumes can be submitted to karen@wvis.ca

• Liaising with other departments and business units on a range of issues; • Providing advice on financial matters impacting on the company as a whole; • Preparing financial reports and submissions to relevant government entities; • Arranging financial audits and reviews as required; • Banking money and cheques received and issuing receipts as requested or needed; • Maintaining and transferring money between bank accounts as required; • Payment of invoices and fees as required or otherwise instructed; • Recommend and maintain a system of policies and procedures that impose an adequate level of control over Finance Department activities • Bi-weekly Payroll and weekly Accounts Payable, Reconciliation of Accounts Receivable. DESIRED QUALIFICATIONS: • Bachelor’s degree in finance or accounting plus 3+ years of progressively responsible finance. • Must maintain confidentiality and discretion in all aspects and be comfortable with flexible working schedule to meet the needs of the Company and its executives Application Procedure: Please send resume & cover letter to Lucinda.phillips@nquatqua.ca by April 26h, 2019.

114 April 18, 2019

& MOUNTAIN SIDE HOTEL

PUT YOUR CAREER ON A FRESH TRACK

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT & CEO YEAR ROUND, PART TIME (MINIMUM OF 24 HOURS PER WEEK)

Reporting to the President and CEO, the Executive Assistant is responsible for a variety of administrative responsibilities, such as: acting as the point of contact between executives and internal/ external clients and key stakeholders, preparing presentations and reports, collating information for Board and Committee meetings, coordinating meeting schedules, organizing meeting set up and taking meeting minutes. This role requires someone with executive administrative experience and the ability to work in a professional and confidential manner; within a flexible environment. With exceptional verbal and written communication skills, along with digital proficiency, the successful candidate will be extremely organized, with strong attention to detail and time management. To view the full job descriptions and to apply, please visit our website: whistler.com/careers

WE’RE HIRING:

FRONT DESK AND HOUSEKEEPING ASSOCIATE earn $18 per hour* benets/housing** Submit resumes to: gm.whistler@executivehotels.net

*upon completion of probationary period ** subject to availability


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Buy

Rent

Work

Fix

Drive

Sell

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: MILE 33 BUS DRIVER Position Type: Categories: Location:

Mile 33 Bus Driver Bussing Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Supervisor of Facilities and Services As per the Bussing Salary Grid April 4, 2019 Posted until position is filled Immediately

FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

HOUSEKEEPERS/HOUSEMAN PART-TIME AND FULL-TIME HOURS AVAILABLE

Details: Under the supervision of the Head Bus Driver and the Supervisor of Facilities and Services the Bus Driver will drive the Mile 33 Bus Route. (Lower Lake Band Area). Key Deliverables: • Pre-trip inspection of bus and proper warm up • Mile 33 to Xet’olacw Community School and Signal Hill Elementary and Pemberton Secondary School • Arrive at School for drop-off • Other bus runs as requested • Clean and fuel up if required • Routes are subject to change by the Supervisor of Facilities and Services if required. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Must have minimum Class 2 • Driver’s Abstract • Criminal Record Check • Ensure all busses are inspected for SAFETY required • Make sure insurance for bus is up to date • Ensure log books are kept up, including mopping and washing seats once a week • Review fuel bills when requested • Other duties as required • This route is on Forestry Road. Driver needs to be capable and confident on unpaved road. Driver needs to be strong and in good health Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, and driver’s abstract and criminal record check by fax. Contact Information:

Glenda Gabriel, Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C., V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Delta by Marriott Whistler Village Suites Is currently recruiting for the following positions:

- Executive Housekeeper

- Bellperson

- Accounting Manager

- Housekeeping Room Attendant

- Front Desk Manager

- Houseperson/Public Area Attendant

- Guest Service Agent

- Property Maintenance Associate

Start your journey today with: competitive wages, growth opportunities, a positive team environment, medical benefits, play money (ski pass, etc), 100% provincial health care coverage. To Apply: either submit an application online at Marriott.com/careers or send your resume to barbara.fraser@deltahotels.com

www.whistlerwag.com

Dogs and pick-up trucks don’t mix! The Pinnacle Hotel Whistler has the following positions available:

HOUSEMAN ROOM ATTENDANTS Please reply by email: parmstrong@pinnaclehotels.ca

Dogs who are riding in the backs of pickup trucks may look like they’re having fun, but they are not safe. When you transport your dog in the open bed of your pickup, you endanger both your dog and other motorists. If your truck hits a bump or if you step on the brakes suddenly or swerve to avoid an obstacle, your dog can easily be thrown from the truck bed and onto the road. Even with a restraint your dog may be seriously injured or killed riding in the back of a pickup. Why risk your dog’s life? Put him in the cab with you in a travel crate, or if you have an extended cab, have your pet ride in the back portion of the cab where he will be away from the front windshield.

April 18, 2019

115


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

WHISTLER BLACKCOMB

Love what you do! Because that’s what we’re all about. Whether you’re looking for a seasonal job or wanting to build an exciting career, we’ve got you covered. We are hiring for a variety of full time, part time and volunteer opportunities.

FEATURED ROLES: THE BARS – SERVERS/BARTENDERS/DOOR HOSTS/DISHWASHERS/COOKS – SUMMER SEASONAL SUMMER TOUR GUIDES – SUMMER SEASONAL TRAIL PARK CREW – SUMMER SEASONAL MOUNTAIN TOP RETAIL STORE MANAGER – YEAR ROUND PARTS ROOM CLERK – WAREHOUSE – YEAR ROUND BASE AREA OPERATIONS CLEANERS – SUMMER SEASONAL

Please visit whistlerblackcomb.com/jobs to find out more and apply!

/

/

/

/

Sales Coordinator Pique Newsmagazine is looking to fill a focal role of sales coordinator in our advertising sales department. The chosen candidate will possess uncompromising customer service and work well under pressure while thriving in a fast-paced deadline driven news media environment. The ideal applicant will have previous experience working with a print/digital media sales team. Strong administrative and communication skills are essential in this role, and attention to detail is a must. You will be highly organized and able to act as a liaison between departments, as well as possess a high level of professionalism when dealing with clients. We offer an excellent remuneration package as well as a benefits plan. Located in the mountain resort town of Whistler, British Columbia, Pique Newsmagazine is the unequivocal leader in reporting, interpreting and understanding the culture of the Coast Mountains and what it means to those who live, work and play in Whistler. Established in 1994, Pique’s success is derived from hard work, quality design, insightful editorial and an impressive list of regular advertisers. Our readers are informed, enlightened and entertained, and our advertisers receive the exposure and the results they expect. It is part of Glacier Media, one of Western Canada’s leading community media publishers, with more than 75 weekly, bi-weekly and daily community newspapers. Pique has been chosen by both the BCYCNA and News Media Canada as the top newspaper in its circulation category in 2017. Interested candidates should forward their resume and a cover letter to: Susan Hutchinson at shutchinson@wplpmedia.com Deadline: April 26th, 2019

WHISTLER PUBLISHING Limited Partnership

116 April 18, 2019

The Fairmont Chateau Whistler is seeking Room Attendants and Stewards! $500 SIGNING BONUS *For all hires between now and May 1st, 2019* Our Benefits Include: Health Benefits | Staff Housing | Leisure Package Staff Meals | Hotel Stay Discounts Staff Events & Recognition | Opportunity for growth

APPLY TODAY AT FAIRMONTCAREERS.COM


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Buy

Rent

Work

Fix

Drive

Sell

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

NESTERS MARKET & WELLNESS CENTRE

NOW HIRING AT OUR WHISTLER LOCATION

Join our team!

If you are a student 15 years or older, we have flexible hours and we want you!

The Blackcomb Lodge offers wages starting at $17/hour, and a variety of benefits, including competitive wages and benefits, employee discounts, training and development, career advancement opportunities and more!

Grocery Clerks Produce Clerks Deli Clerks Meat Clerks

Front Office

Housekeeping

Night Audit

Maintenance

Full-time, part-time, flexible work schedules

E-mail or drop in your resume to: bruce_stewart@nestersmarket.com please cc ian_fairweather@nestersmarket.com or call us at 604-932-3545

Visit us at the hotel for our career fair. April 30, 2019 from 2pm to 6pm. Prizes, hiring/ signing bonuses available!

PERKS • Competitive wage – Depending on expereince • Access to medical and dental benefits for full time applicants • Percentage discount from store bought goods • Flexible and set schedule • Relative training

questions? let’s chat 604.932.4155 hr@coasthotels.com

Let us take care of you! • • • • Dubh Linn Gate is hiring:

BAR MANAGER Dubh Linn Gate is seeking an experienced bar manager. Areas of expertise include ordering and inventory, menu design and costing, managing an experienced bar team, providing exceptional leadership and delivering good craic. A minimum of 2 years’ management experience in a high volume bar or pub, and a minimum of 3 years’ bartending experience are required. We offer a competitive salary, tips, a ski pass, housing if required, a flexible schedule and a great working environment. Drop by the pub to speak with Diane or Louise between 9:30am and 3pm Monday to Saturday.

Staff housing available Competitive wages Full time hours year around Free staff parking in Whistler Village

Come be our: • • • • •

G Guestt S Services i R Representative t ti Night Audit Representative Maintenance Representative Room Attendant Houseperson

apply online at coastcareers.ca

6 REASONS L: TO WORK AT SUNDIA Place to sleep + $ for activities es + more $ for activiti + convenience + security + Free Ski Pass

Whistler = A good life in

Please fax or email your resume with attention to “Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com We thank you for your interest. Only candidates chosen for further consideration will be contacted. April 18, 2019

117


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS

Our outstanding team is looking to add individuals with a variety of skill sets and experience. Friendly, hard working candidates are invited to apply.

CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES

Be part of the action to deliver exceptional fine dining experience to guests in an award-winning and fast-paced dining room. The Bearfoot Bistro, considered one of Canada’s top restaurants, featuring an inventive and sophisticated fine dining menu and one of the country’s most complete wine lists looks for people like you to offer that unique experience to our guests.

We are hiring for the following positions:

Catering Chef Sommelier Catering Chef qualifications: 5+ years experience in a hotel or restaurant kitchen or a catering operation

Sommelier qualifications: Previous experience as a sommelier ISG or WSET certification or equivalent an asset.

FRONT-OF-HOUSE Host / Hostess Server Assistant Expeditor BACK-OF-HOUSE Pastry Cooks Line Cooks (1-2 years experience) Dishwashers

Staff Housing Available! Competitive Wage + Benefits Package We’re Hiring

LINE COOKS 1-2 year(s) experience is an asset Extensive on-the-job training offered

APPLY TODAY!

We are looking for candidates with the following skills: Ability to focus attention on guests needs Excellent communication skills Strong interpersonal skills Highly responsible and reliable Ability to work well under pressure Ability to work without supervision

The Bearfoot Bistro offers year-round employment, industry leading wages, medical services plan, staff meals, staff discounts and more…

If you are interested with any of those positions, please submit your resume and cover letter to Colin Schira at colin@bearfootbistro.com 4121 Village Green 604 932 3433

I I

Adjacent to Listel Hotel bearfootbistro.com

Reservations Manager

• Minimum 2 years experience required • Familiarity with OpenTable is an asset

Assistant Bar Manager

• A strong knowledge of spirits and cocktails • Previous experience in a premium food and beverage operation is an asset • A professionally recognized wine certificate is an asset (WSET or equivalent) Please email your resume & cover letter to careers@araxi.com or present in person at Araxi between 3-5 pm daily. We offer year-round full and part-time hours, gratuities, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants.

Resort Municipality of Whistler

Employment Opportunities:

DO YOU LIVE IN PEMBERTON? THEN WHY COMMUTE TO WHISTLER?

• Room Attendants

Apply to: jobs@pembertonvalleylodge.com

Competitive wages, health benefits, casual environment

118 April 18, 2019

MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Employment Opportunities · Program Leader - Myrtle Philip Community Centre · Lifeguard/Swim Instructor · Student Computer Systems Technician – GIS · Recreation Cashier/Receptionist

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca/careers


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Buy

Rent

Work

Fix

Drive

Sell

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

We are the Spa for you If you are looking for a new place to call home: • We manifest positive energy • We have a long term and loyal team • We treat you fairly and look out for your wellness • You are listened to • We give you proper breaks and time to set up between services • We offer extended medical benets • We have potential staff housing at affordable rates • You can enjoy $5.00 cafeteria meals • You have the opportunity to work for other Vida locations in slow season We are here for you. Vida Spa at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler is currently recruiting: REGISTERED MASSAGE THERAPIST SPA PRACTITIONER • SPA CLEANER ESTHETICIAN GUEST SERVICE AGENT To join our unique Vida family, email Bonnie@vidaspas.com Vida Spas - Vancouver & Whistler Live well. Live long. vidaspas.com Thank You for applying Only those considered will be contacted.

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

CREATIVE AND COLLABORATIVE? WORK WITH US! We are currently recruiting amazing people to be part of our team.

Client & Event Services Coordinator Full-�me posi�on | Applica�ons considered as received

Summer Programs Opera�ons Team Whistler Street Entertainment & Arts Whistler

Full-�me seasonal posi�on | Applica�ons considered as received

Cra� Facilitator

Whistler Street Entertainment & Arts Whistler Casual | Applica�ons considered as received

Summer Marke�ng & Communica�ons Assistant Full-�me seasonal posi�on | Applica�on deadline: April 26, 2019

Summer Program & Events Assistant

Full-�me seasonal posi�on | Applica�on deadline: April 26, 2019

Community Promo�ons Assistant Casual | Applica�ons considered as received

APPLY TODAY!

artswhistler.com/careers

Apply to: getinvolved@artswhistler.com | attn: Susan Holden Maury Young Arts Centre | 604.935.8410

April 18, 2019

119


Call the experts

Want to advertise your service on this page? automotive

Call Pique at (604) 938-0202, or email sales@piquenewsmagazine.com

BLINDS etc.

BLINDS etc.

FIX AUTO PEMBERTON • Certified Insurance Collision Repair Facility • Insurance & Private Auto Body Repair • Courtesy Vehicles on Site

Visit fixautopemberton.com to schedule an appointment or call 604-894-6767

SUNCREST WINDOW COVERINGS Custom Blinds • Shades • Draperies

Tel: 604-935-2101 Email: windowcov@shaw.ca www.whistlerwindowcoverings.ca

CARPET CLEANING

WINDOW COVERINGS

BLACK BEAR CARPET CLEANING LTD.

David Weldon david@summersnow.ca 604-938-3521

• Wood blinds • Sunscreens • Shades • Motorization

www.summersnow.ca

Summer Snow Finishings Limited

• SHUTTERS • DRAPERY

Connie Griffiths

BLINDS etc. Whistler’s Source for Blinds since 1989

• BLINDS • SHADES

• CARPETS • UPHOLSTERY

Custom Window Treatments Contact us today for a free quote or consultation info@suncrestwindowcoverings.com

604.698.8406

CARPET CLEANING

• TILES • CAR INTERIORS

100% ECO FRIENDLY CERTIFIED www.blackbearcarpetcleaning.ca • 604 698 6610

PROUDLY SERVING WHISTLER FOR OVER 25 YEARS

CHIMNEY

Glass

BLACKCOMB CHIMNEY PATROL LTD.

TIRED OF THOSE OLD CONDENSATED, MOLDY WINDOWS AND DOORS?

Serving Whistler since 1986

Specialized in cleaning

Wood Energy Technology Transfer Inc.

Chimneys, Furnace & Airducts, Dryer vents.

604.932.5775 / 1.877.932.5775 blackcombchimney@yahoo.ca

Glass

WINDOW REPLACEMENT

Want to advertise

your service here?

Take advantage of the benefits and savings you will receive from new windows and doors.

Call Pique at (604) 938-0202, or email sales@piquenewsmagazine.com

Call Whistler Glass for your onsite consultation

mortgages

paint

604.932.1132 whistlerglass.com

MORTGAGE BROKER SERVICES Residential & Commercial • First-time Home Buyers Non-residents • Pre-Approvals • Reverse Mortgages

AUTO GLASS SPECIALISTS · Frameless Shower Enclosures · Complete Window/Door Packages · Custom Railing Glass Systems · Fogged/Failed Window Replacements

mountainglass.ca | info@mountainglass.ca

604-932-7288

Annie de la Chevrotiere | Mortgage Broker www.peaktopeaktmortgage.com annie@peaktopeakmc.com 1328 Main Street, Squamish, BC, V8B 0R2

604.905.8483

THE COMPLETE GLASS CENTRE

SURVEYING

SURVEYING

BUNBURY & ASSOCIA

Surveys Surveys

▪ ▪ ▪

Surveys Plans

Surveys

www.bunbury-surveys.com

Phone: 604-932-3770

120 April 18, 2019

SQUAMISH OFFICE #207 - 38026 Second Avenue Phone: 604-892-3090 email: squamish@bunbury-surveys.com

604-894-6240 7426 Prospect St, Pemberton

SURVEYING DOUGLAS J BUSH AScT, RSIS

Serving the Sea to Sky Corridor Since 1963 ▪ ▪ ▪

Book your in-home leen Consultation with Col today!

DOUG BUSH SURVEY SERVICES LTD

BC LAND SURVEYORS North Vancouver to Lillooet

Our paint team has over 25 years combined paint sales experience, and we can help you get things right the first time. Now offering In Home Paint Consultations! Pemberton Valley Rona. Let us help you love where you live.

THE RIGHT TOOLS. THE RIGHT PEOPLE. Surveying | Mapping | Engineering | Environmental | Landscape Architecture | Planning To learn more visit: www.mcelhanney.com

p: 604-932-3314 c: 604-935-9515 Engineering & construction layout Topographic & site improvement surveys Municipal, volumetric & hydrographic surveys GPS - global positioning systems www.dbss.ca // dougb@dbss.ca


puzzles ACROSS

76 78 80 81 83 85 86 87 88 90 92 95 97 98 102 103 105 107 108 111 113 115 116 118 120 122 123 124 126 127 128 130 132 134 138 140 142 146 147

1 Quotes 6 Palette adjunct 11 Type of varnish 16 Fire starter 21 Nebraska city 22 “Walk Away --” 23 Column order 24 Inert gas 25 Cattail locale 26 Clock watcher 27 Drizzling 28 Telegraph code 29 I, to Caesar 30 Part of GPA 32 High standard 34 Feedbag tidbit 35 Mr. Diamond 36 Call it a night 38 Antoinette lost hers 39 Last degree 40 FBI member 41 Not as strict 44 Eat hearty (2 wds.) 47 Take ten 49 Theater box 52 Arab prince 54 Noisy insect 56 Equipped 61 Belt-maker’s tool 62 Conduits 64 Fizzy soft drink 65 Knickknack stand 66 Frolics 69 Straw bundle 71 “The Moon Is Blue” star 73 -- Kea volcano 74 Petty scholar

Composition Cowboy’s rope -- vous plait Trustees Nature’s bandage Math course Assemble Fencing weapon Large snakes Not green Crushed grapes “Fernando” band Fly alone Up on literature (hyph.) Sutton of golf Headpiece Mink cousin Time of the mammals From Donegal Reserved Piece of fabric Scottish daggers Discloses Make -- -- for it Aspired Sort Gloomy “I, Robot” writer Certain Tie-dyed garments Untidy condition Dwindled Irk Fall guys Authorizes Composer -- Satie Center Singer -- James Salary limit

148 149 150 151 153 155 157 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166

Nonchalant PC bailout key Above, to poets Low grower Desensitize Pram pusher Sacred place Fishing net Bitterly pungent Laundry appliance Shortstop Pee Wee -Give a speech Advances Surprise greatly Joined with

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 31

Possible star-to-be Mind’s picture 22-card deck Codgers’ queries Largest desert Ship’s hoosegow Alert color Dark Put in a lawn Dissenter Miss Long, in Hawaiian Burger topper Rat Pack member Reaper’s tool Well-known uncle Tine Be in accord Gymnast’s stickum Paid homage Distressed

33 37 40 42 43 45 46 48 49 50 51 53 55 57 58 59 60 63 65 67 68 70 72 75 77 79 82 84 86 88 89 91 92 93 94 96 98 99 100

Sponsorship Land in “la mer” Varsity (hyph.) Nonflying birds Wealth Computer graphic Lowest point Army off. Reindeer herders Young raptor Clearing in a forest 101 and I-70 Boat cranes Turkish official Be frugal Els or Kovacs Started a bridge game Full of back talk Complete Wobbled, as a rocket Speak irritably Almanac contents Listener’s need Take out to dinner Internet searcher Sprightly Red-ink entries Fabric rolls Polite word in Grenoble Goose down jackets Gunslinger’s tally Walk heavily Baseball’s hot corner More unusual Relish tray item Ewe’s plaint Final report (hyph.) Strange Shin neighbor

101 104 106 109 110 112 114 117 119 121 124 125 127 129 131 133

Office furniture Eagle’s nest Love god Dolphin’s home Injures Without feeling Dijon dad Strong soap Coveted prize Considers With suspicion Porch Koppel or Knight Mixer Charm Deputies

134 135 136 137 139 141 143 144 145 148 149 152 154 156 158

Artist’s plaster Different Posh hotel lobbies Jeer at Rebuff African country Was too fond Rent out Did the wrong thing Fourposters Bronte’s Jane -Stinging insect Eliminate -- Perce tribe Garland

Last Weeks’ Answers

Enter a digit from 1 through 9 in each cell, in such a way that: • Each horizontal row contains each digit exactly once • Each vertical column contains each digit exactly once • Each 3x3 box contains each digit exactly once Solving a sudoku puzzle does not require any mathematics; simple logic suffices.

Level of difficulty: EASY

8 5

6

6 4 2 1 2 1

8

1 2 9 3 8

9

2

8 5 7 6 1

3

9 7 4 6 8 9

9

5 3

EASY Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com# 26

Answers on page 112

April 18, 2019

121


Maxed out

Embrace the silly season It was a week I wish I’d worn another layer—skiing on what looked like a warm day but wasn’t. I had been surprised by snow that was almost hail when I could barely find a cloud in the sky, basked in the heat of such ozone-challenged intensity I could actually hear pallid, winter skin start to sizzle like bacon on a griddle, skied shallow freshies and spring sandpaper crud...on the same run. I’d been rained on, blown on, snowed on and shone on, so I can’t help being amused when I hear someone ask, “What’s the weather going to be like for the next few days?” In Tiny Town, that’s practically like asking about the sound of one hand clapping—a Zen inquiry with no meaningful answer. Nonetheless, I feel compelled to answer, being the friendly local I am.

By G.D. Maxwell “Biblical” often comes to mind. Old Testament, of course, since a plague of locusts or a flood would pretty neatly round out the weather offerings. “Does it really matter?” is probably too glib. But for someone who has travelled several thousand miles and dropped a couple thousand bucks to come slide here, it undoubtedly comes closer to capturing their reality—they’ll make merry regardless of the day’s weather...weathers. “Epic” is a favourite dodge. Being a word that has lost any original meaning through commercialization and overuse, it captures their hopes and dreams and makes the inquisitive feel good about having a pass that works in so many places. “The weather is a sinister and unknowable plot controlled by militaryindustrial terrorists. If I told you what it was going to be like, I’d have to kill you,” seems too delusional even though it plays into the spirit of these troubled times. Breaking into the song from Annie about the sun shining tomorrow just plain scares people. I think it’s my voice. They get that look on their faces; you know the one. The look you get when a crazed street person won’t stop following you. What can a helpful local do? The only real answer is “Beats me. Whatever it is, enjoy it.” Because regardless of what the calendar says, regardless of the telltale metallic warble of varied thrushes and frantic buzzing of the first hummingbirds, regardless of the Easter pilgrims, regardless of the throngs of post-WSSF revellers, spring, in Whistler, is a state of mind, not exactly a time of year. As a state of mind, spring works in explicable and profound ways on those who ski and board. It is the Silly Season. For example, people suddenly show up at the resort who haven’t been here all

SPRING HAS SPRUNG Spring in Whistler is a state of mind, not exactly a time of year.

photo from shutterstock

122 April 18, 2019

season long. I’m not referring to tourists who pop in for their annual visit. I mean folks from nearby, just down the hill and around the sound, semi-locals as they like to think of themselves, who bought some sort of pass and actually own skis manufactured sometime in the last decade but who haven’t managed to show up until April, frantic to get their days in and justify both the pass they purchased last year and the one they’re about to buy for next season. Silly Season Redux. It’s true. Spring, or perhaps the change to daylight saving time, has a negative intelligence effect on people. The dumbing of spring explains why people who have passionately slid down the mountain all season long suddenly stop coming and start swinging golf clubs, of all things. It explains why people who are smart enough to cover their skin to protect it from frostbite for three months can’t remember to slap on sunscreen to avoid third-degree sunburns. For those of you—OK, mostly tourists but some locals I know will recognize themselves—who are suffering from the dumbing of spring, here’s the top 10 reasons to keep on doing what you’ve been doing since December. No. 10: It’s not golf. Say what you will, golf’s still a stupid game. Mark Twain pegged it when he referred to the “sport” as a fine way

to ruin a perfectly good walk. That being said, golf, like skiing, is a dying sport and one so off the sustainability-o-meter it does seem to go hand-in-hand with skiing. no. 9: You get to wear fewer clothes. Spring skiing means T-shirts under fleeces, shorts under ski pants, sunglasses instead of goggles, the occasional helmet-less spree, light gloves instead of mitts. The freedom of movement—not to mention the refreshing feeling of unzipping pant legs and letting the breeze play over bare skin—is definitely worth the wait. no. 8: Transitional snow. Warming days morph snow from ice to cream to corn to schmoo. Unless you’re a rank beginner, most of those changes are easier to ski than fresh snow and way easier than ice. Yeah, it ain’t powder but it sure is forgiving. Ski steeper slopes, carve faster turns, generally hit over your weight. It’ll make you feel like a local politician in that regard, hitting over your weight, that is. no. 7: Late powder. You can make book on it. Well, maybe not this year. There will be late dumps and powder days in April, maybe even May. But maybe not this year. no. 6: Goggle tans. Or sunglass tans, your choice. Until you take the rest of your clothes off, you’ll look like you’ve spent lots of idle time on some exotic beach. Best not to undress in front of a mirror though. The glare may be blinding.

no. 5: Weather. There’s something really satisfying about ignoring the light drizzle falling in the valley and getting up through low clouds into blazing, warm sunshine for a day’s skiing. It makes you feel god-like. And the views are psychedelic. Or was that the mushroom omelette? no. 4: Bikinis. Yep, sooner or later you just know you’re going to see one. Hopefully, it won’t be on someone who has taken a highspeed fall and discovered what corn snow has in common with sandpaper. no. 3: The Roundhouse deck. Or now, the Umbrella Bar. Since, this year, Blackcomb is closing first—wonder why?—the best sunning, people watching and wasting away an afternoon spot will be the deck looking out over Whistler and Glacier bowls. Where would you rather be on a sunny day? And the ultimate payoff has to be sliding down spring snow just ahead of sweep. no. 2: An ice-cold beer. Sure it’s refreshing during the winter, but oh baby, does it taste good in the hot sun-cool snow of spring. Après anywhere to reprise the experience. no. 1: No crowds. Regardless of the persuasive validity of the previous nine reasons, you’ll own the mountain. Habit is a hard thing to overcome and as sure as spring follows winter, most skiers will put their boards away and do something other than what they love by the time April turns into May. Their loss; your gain. n


Wishing you a Happy Easter! Engel & Völkers Portfolio of Fine Homes

VILLAGE

ALPINE MEADOWS

BLACKCOMB BENCHLANDS

BLUEBERRY

Ground floor studio suite; walk out your patio door to the pool/hot tub deck, gym or spa. Enjoy unlimited owner usuage or rent it through the Hilton management team. Good revenues! $249,000

5 bedrooms / 5.5 bathrooms – spacious floor plan. Revenue suite, 2 car garage, level entry. Custom build, large deck areas, hot tub, fireplace, in-floor heating, 4 bedrooms c/w ensuite bathroom $2,995,000

Powderhorn slopeside 2.5 Bed / 2 Bath Condo with Balcony. Great size for the whole family, sleeping up to 8 people. Gas fireplace, in-suite laundry, Rooftop hot tub. Secluded, forested setting. No GST! $1,275,000

Penthouse condo with the views you’ve been waiting for! Featuring 2400+ sq ft, 4.5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, gas fireplace, formal dining room, open concept living, moments to the slopes or golf course! $1,949,000

Rob Boyd

Bob Daniels

Nick Swinburne *prec

Kerry Batt

169 – 4050 Whistler Way

8228 Valley Drive

604-935-9172

211-4821 Spearhead Drive

604-932-7997

309-3212 Blueberry Drive

604-932-8899

604-902-5422

CHEAKAMUS CROSSING

ALTA VISTA

SUNRIDGE PLATEAU, BRIO,

WHISTLER CAY HEIGHTS

Like New! This contemporary, ‘Junior Executive’ style home has been lightly used since its completion in 2017. Architecturally designed and built to exacting standards by award winning Vision Pacific, no cost has been spared. $2,225,000

Meticulously kept, spacious 2 bedroom plus large loft, 3 bathrooms in Alta Vista Pointe. Tastefully renovated with granite counter-tops, SS appliances, wood doors, and heated tile floors in baths and foyer. $1,379,000

An expansive home with stunning views perched in the exclusive Sunridge Plateau. The home has ski in access, yet within walking distance of Whistler Village center. It is thoughtfully designed to have an open concept for a big family with friends. $5,690,000

Beautifully renovated 5 bed/3.5 bath chalet in prestigious Linkside in Whistler Cay Heights. Extremely private with SW exposure & views of Whistler Mountain, just steps from Whistler Village. $3,999,000

Jane Frazee

Rachel Edwards

Ruby Jiang *prec

Janet Brown

1057 Madeley Place

1503-3050 Hillcrest Drive

604-935-2135

3807 Sunridge Place

604-966-4200

6412 Linkside Road

778-834-2002

604-935-0700

EMERALD ESTATES

BLUEBERRY HILL

VILLAGE NORTH

WHISTLER VILLAGE

Inspiring views, sun and exceptional privacy from this craftsman style post and beam 4 bdrm, 4.5 bath chalet. Features media room, den, hot tub, decks, garage and easy care gardens. OPEN HOUSE Sat. April 20th 2-4:30. $2,695,000

Offering breathtaking views of both Whistler and Blackcomb, this spacious 4.5 bedrooms, 3 bathroom is fully furnished and turn key ready to be your perfect mountain getaway! Flexible zoning allows for nightly rentals. $1,899,000

The Hideout is a newly renovated, cozy & spacious 1 bed apartment conveniently located within the heart of Whistler Village, yet it enjoys a peaceful, private setting within a wooded area. $799,000

Location, location, location! The Four Star Westin Hotel by Marriott. Enjoy an amazing lifestyle in the number one rated ski resort in North America. Instant gratification on a snowboard, pair of skis or a mountain bike is only steps away.. $525,000

Laura Wetaski

Jocelyn Cseff

Peter Lalor

Ken Achenbach

9483 Emerald Drive

204-3212 Blueberry Drive

604 938 3798

53-4355 Northlands Blvd

604-907-2074

863-4090 Whistler Way

604-902-3309

Whistler Village Shop

Whistler Creekside Shop

Squamish Station Shop

36-4314 Main Street · Whistler BC V0N 1B4 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

325-2063 Lake Placid Road · Whistler BC V0N 1B2 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

150-1200 Hunter Place · Squamish BC V8B 0G8 · Phone +1 778-733-0611

whistler.evcanada.com

whistler.evcanada.com

whistler.evcanada.com

Engel & Völkers Whistler *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION ©2018 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage is independently owned and operated. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified.

604-966-7640


9145 Wedge Creek Rise

$789,000

6471 Balsam Way

$2,599,000

Beautiful estate lot in WedgeWoods where you can start building right away! Build up to 5920 sq ft plus auxiliary building on this 1.112 acre lot. The lot is on a quiet cul-de-sac and offers easy level access, sloping down to Wedge Creek that runs through the bottom of the property.

If you’re looking for a spacious family home with lots of social spaces to gather friend and family, this is it. This lovely home has 4 bedrooms+office+family room. The yard offers privacy with lots of room to play and garden, is fully irrigated & backs on to green space and a gently flowing creek. Matterport 3D Showcase: rem.ax/6471balsam

Sally Warner*

Sherry Baker

604.905.6326

#224 - 4360 Lorimer Road

$685,000

604.932.1315

5

9096 Corduroy Run Court

$2,999,950

#22 - 2101 Whistler Road

$389,000

Roomy studio townhome walking distance to the Creekside ski lift. This garden level home was redone with new kitchen, bathroom, flooring and cabinetry throughout. Great opportunity for the first time buyer.

Ted Morden

.5

604.938.3606

#205B - 2036 London Lane

$123,500

Backing onto the Whistler Olympic Plaza this 548 square foot, 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom, fully furnished and equipped condo is ready for rental or weekend fun. Enjoy northwest views from the covered balcony; soak in the covered common hot tub all year-round or stroll into one of the many shops below. No GST applicable.

Stunning new contemporary home by Heritage West Homes offering 4600 square feet of living space with a stunning main floor of 3500 square feet and 1100 sq ft finished lower level to accommodate guests and family gatherings. 5 bedrooms and 4.5 bathrooms, a delightful chef’s kitchen with ample sunshine. Easy to show.

This quarter ownership unit faces the ski slopes, so you can do your own weather & snow conditions check in the morning. Highlights include a gas fireplace, recently renovated kitchen & a pull out sofa. Swim in the outdoor pool or soak in hot tub after a great day on the slopes.

Ursula Morel*

Ann Chiasson

Bob Cameron*

1

604.932.8629

4

604.932.7651

1

604.935.2214

Open House Sat 2 pm to 4:30 pm

2578 Snowridge Crescent

$6,200,000

Enjoy the views of Whistler Peak and the Dave Murray Downhill from your patio Hot Tub. Picture your family skiing or riding home for lunch. Walking down to Dusty’s or shopping without having to get into your car. In the summer the bike park is right there as well. Fine dining is a short walk, as are the two lakes in the Creekside Area.

Bruce Watt

5

604.905.0737

9024 Riverside Road

$1,350,000

9483 Emerald Drive

$2,695,000

Looking for a special property? Now offered for sale, is this solid log post and beam Artisan quality chalet set on a private view lot! Large living spaces include four bedrooms, an office, 4.5 baths, media room with Bose surround sound, family room, as well as a piano area. Matterport 3D Showcase: rem.ax/9483emerald

604.938.2499

3

10300 Gun Lake West Road

$599,000

Chris Wetaski

#205 - 7445 Frontier Street

$389,000

Welcome to an immaculately kept 1 bedroom plus den in the highly sought after complex, Elements. This End Unit has a flowing layout with a large pantry/storage plus in-suite laundry, underground parking, and a fabulous rooftop deck to enjoy all this Sunshine! This complex is in the heart of Pemberton so you are close to EVERYTHING!

Dana Friesen Smith

604.902.3878

#6 - 4636 Blackcomb Way

1

$197,000

Build your dream home up to 4,628 square feet plus a separate auxiliary building of 2,152 on this 1.88-acre property. Lot 7 on Riverside in Phase 1 of Wedgewoods is a short drive from Whistler. Appreciate the privacy and depth of this lot, surrounded by majestic mountains, while remaining peaceful with the Green River running along the back of the property.

Featuring a 4.5-acre lakefront property with spectacular lake and mountain views, over 330 feet of lakefront and a rustic Pan Abode cabin, which is fully serviced and accessible by road year-round. This large flat acreage has a very private treed setting, your own creek running down one side and a beautiful beach complete with dock.

Adjacent to the Fairmont Chateau golf course, this rarely available, 1/5th interest in an immaculate 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom townhome boasts a spacious open layout , heated slate floors in bathroom. A cozy wood burning fireplace, large master bedroom with sitting area, and plenty of secure parking are among the many amenities.

Dave Beattie*

Dave Halliwell*

Dave Sharpe

604.905.8855

WHISTLER OFFICE 106 - 7015 Nesters Road, Whistler, BC V8E 0X1 604.932.2300 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070 *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

remax-whistler.com awarded best website 2018 by Luxuryrealestate.com

Property Management remaxseatoskypm.com

604.932.7727

1.5

604.902.2779

2

PEMBERTON OFFICE 1411 Portage Road, Pemberton, BC V0N 2L1 604.894.6616 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070

Profile for Whistler Publishing

Pique Newsmagazine 2616  

Pique Newsmagazine for April 18, 2019

Pique Newsmagazine 2616  

Pique Newsmagazine for April 18, 2019

Advertisement