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RMOW budget 2019

Joffre horror stories

P.14

P.34

Bison birthday bash P.67

FREE TO REPURPOSE

A

YEAR

OF

LIVING BET TER

26.06

WHISTLER COUPLE'S NO-SHOPPING EXPERIMENT OPENS DOORS TO MORE SUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION

February 7, 2019

|

WHISTLER’S WEEKLY NEWSMAGAZINE  

| www.piquenewsmagazine.com


6227 Eagle Drive

LEADING REAL ESTATE EXPERTS SINCE 1978

#G202 TAMARISK

#12 PEMBERTON PLATEAU

#3 HIGHPOINTE

This nicely updated end unit condo has a large sunny deck backing onto a forest.

With one of the largest floor plans in the complex, this townhome has a yard and Mount Currie views.

A perfect rental or living property, this condo has been beautifully updated.

Bedrooms:

Bedrooms:

1400 ALTA LAKE RD. - WHISTLER CREEK Bedrooms:

1

KRIS

Bathrooms:

1

SKOUPAS*

kris@wrec.com 604 932 7788

Square Feet:

650

$469,000

7360 PEMBERTON FARM RD. - PEMBERTON Bathrooms:

3.5

2.5

LANCE LUNDY lance@wrec.com 604 905 9975

Square Feet:

2,022

$675,900

2101 WHISTLER RD. - WHISTLER CREEK Bathrooms:

1.5

1

LINDSAY GRAHAM lindsay@wrec.com 604 935 9533

Square Feet:

597

$649,000

#417 VALE INN

6227 EAGLE DRIVE

#9 EAGLECREST

This top floor corner condo offers lots of windows and a spacious, open concept living area.

With amazing views, a central location, and a recent renovation, this mountain chalet checks the boxes!

Situated in a desirable complex, this updated townhome is perfect for full-time living.

2111 WHISTLER ROAD - NORDIC Bedrooms:

2

Bathrooms:

LYNNE VENNER lynne@wrec.com 604 932 8842

1

Square Feet:

630

$425,000

WHISTLER CAY HEIGHTS Bedrooms:

Bathrooms:

4

MARIKA

4

KOENIG*

marika@wrec.com 604 932 9590

Square Feet:

2,700

$3,398,000

2720 CHEAKAMUS WAY - BAYSHORES Bedrooms:

Bathrooms:

2

1

RAY LONGMUIR ray@wrec.com 604 905 8464

Square Feet:

915

$729,000

604 932 5538 WHISTLERREALESTATE.CA *Personal Real Estate Corporation


DAN WAUGH IIZE RUPHERS GD MAXWELL

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Nesters Market Pharmacy

nestersmarket.com

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Prices Effective At Whistler Nesters From: Thursday, February 7th to Wednesday, February 13th, 2019. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Sale limited to stock on hand. Some items subject to Tax, plus deposit, recycling fee where applicable.


THIS #103 -1390 ALPHA LAKE RD., FUNCTION JUNCTION, WHISTLER, B.C. V8E 0H9. PH: (604) 938-0202 FAX: (604) 938-0201

8 14 46 48 58 60 67 72 75

www.piquenewsmagazine.com Founding Publishers KATHY & BOB BARNETT

Publisher

SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com

Editor

CLARE OGILVIE - edit@piquenewsmagazine.com

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ALYSSA NOEL - arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

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Arts and Entertainment Editor

COVER STORY

Art Director

Week IN PIQUE Letters News Travel Sports Food Arts Music PiqueCal Classifieds

Our year of living better

Whistler couple’s no-shopping experiment opens doors to more sustainable consumption - By Leslie

Anthony and Asta Kovanen

COVER: I’ve been reducing a pile of stuff for sometime now and I strive for only things worth having and that last a long time—things you can easily take with you: experiences, frequent-flier points and a great set of noise-cancelling headphones - By Karl Partington

ALYSSA NOEL arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

Sports Editor DAN FALLOON - sports@piquenewsmagazine.com

WE E KLY FE A TURES

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Contributors

G.D. MAXWELL, COAST MOUNTAIN PHOTOGRAPHY, GLENDA BARTOSH, MICHAEL ALLEN, FEET BANKS, LESLIE ANTHONY, ALLEN BEST, ALISON TAYLOR, TOBIAS C. VAN VEEN, VINCE SHULEY, LISA RICHARDSON

President, Whistler Publishing LP SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com

Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of Whistler Publishing Limited Partnership, a division of Glacier Media) distributed to over 130 locations in Whistler and to over 200 locations from Vancouver to D’arcy. The entire contents of Pique Newsmagazine are copyright 2019 by Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of WPLP, a division of Glacier Media). No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the express written permission of the Publisher. In no event shall unsolicited material subject this publication to any claim or fees. Copyright in letters and other (unsolicited) materials submitted and accepted for publication remains with the author but the publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic or other forms. Letters to the Editor must contain the author’s name, address and daytime telephone number. Maximum length is 250 words. We reserve the right to edit, condense or reject any contribution. Letters reflect the opinion of the writer and not that of Pique Newsmagazine. Pique Newsmagazine is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please contact (edit@piquenewsmagazine.com). If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the web site at mediacouncil.ca or call toll-free 1-844877-1163 for additional information. This organization replaces the BC Press council (and any mention of it).

14

14

TAXES UP

48

GOLDEN GIRL

60

LAYER IT

67

BEAST MODE

72

PIQUECAL On Wednesday, don’t miss The Cornerstones of

Whistlerites can expect property and other taxes to go up, according to the RMOW’s proposed 2019 budget

Ski-cross racer Marielle Thompson wins first-ever World Championships gold in Utah

Laura Harris debuts new work in annual solo show at Adele Campbell Fine Art Gallery

Bison plays Squamish birthday bash

Physical Reality, the latest Quest Lecture Series at the library. Then grab your knitting needles and head to the library again every Thursday in February for Stitches in the Stacks

48

ISSN #1206-2022 Subscriptions: $76.70/yr. within Canada, $136.60/yr. courier within Canada. $605.80/yr. courier to USA. GST included. GST Reg. #R139517908. Canadian Publications Mail Product Sales Agreement #40016549.

4 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

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OPE NING

Remarks

It’s everyone’s budget

T

his is one of the most important times of the year for Whistler residents. I’m not talking about ski season, or getting ready for a ridiculously busy weekend later this month now that Family Day and the U.S. Presidents Day long weekends fall at the same time. I’m

Clare Ogilvie

By

edit@piquenewsmagazine.com

talking about municipal budget season. Now some may feel their eyes glaze over, or a slight panic at the idea of looking at row upon row of financial figures, but the reality is the Resort Municipality of Whistler’s (RMOW) budget touches everything in our lives from cycling down the Valley Trail to flushing toilets to enjoying the best tap water in the world (well, as far as Pique is concerned). And consider this: residents told the RMOW in its own survey that they were not that satisfied with opportunities to provide input into municipal decision making. So take the opportunity now to head to www.whistler.ca/budget and get informed. The budget open house this week was better attended than in previous years (I guess everyone was so content with RMOW spending they didn’t need

to come and voice any concerns [about our $6 million bus loop, for example], questions or even support?)—that’s a good thing. For those who took the time to take in the information boards, we learned that we are heading for a busy 2019 from an infrastructure-spending point of view. Indeed, millions of dollars will be spent—$42.6—to be precise, on works that many of us won’t see, but all of us use, over the next few years. Take the water system: 168

such as water and sewers, parks and playgrounds is the very essence of the work a good local government carries out. Planning is done over years with staff, if you are lucky, keeping a close eye on the degradation of infrastructure so that we are not hit with calamity. The war chest for many of the spends we see in this proposed budget is our reserves, helped significantly with money from the Municipal and Regional District Tax (MRDT) and the Resort Municipality Initiative (RMI).

...if you are not part of the process and fail to raise your concerns, you lose your chance to create change for the better of the whole community. kilometres of water main; 15 storage reservoirs; 14 ground-water wells; nine pump stations; 4,059 water service connections; 529 fire hydrants; and 1,932 mainline valves—approximately. Pipes, underground parking envelopes, buildings, trails, water facilities—many are reaching their endof-life cycle and need to be upgraded or replaced. It sounds boring, I know, but looking after key components of our community

(A quick refresher on those: The provincial RMI program pumps money into B.C.’s resort communities to enhance tourism offerings. Last fall, the government committed to it as an ongoing initiative. The 2019 funding amounts will be confirmed in the spring. Whistler gets three per cent of the MRDT, a tax on short-term tourist accommodation, including hotel rooms, on top of the eight-per-cent Provincial Sales Tax. It was established in 1987 to

fund tourism marketing and programs. MRDT funds are received by the RMOW and shared with Tourism Whistler. The funds are reinvested in the community, with expenditures approved by, and reported to, the provincial government.) After the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games, there was considerable concern about the state of our reserves, which were getting depleted, and this, in part, led to a 24.5-per-cent tax increase over three years. While with hindsight the tax hike was a prudent move, it was one of the reasons the entire council and mayor were ousted from office in the 2011 election. Currently there is about $84 million in reserves, down from a high of more than $100 million close to the end of 2014. In the past, it has been reported that about 20 per cent of property tax be “saved” each year into reserves in preparation for what, over time, will be hundreds of millions of dollars in upkeep of the resort’s infrastructure. As we move into this five-year financial plan, we should all be considering the RMOW’s expenditures and asking questions (does it really cost $3 million for three public washrooms?)—after all, a lot of this money is ours, and are our reserves able to pay for the necessities facing us? And remember, if you are not part of the process and fail to raise your concerns, you lose your chance to create change for the better for the whole community. n

SPACIOUS 1 BEDROOM WHISTLER VILLAGE APARTMENT

9-1350 Cloudburst Drive $1,999,000

306-4368 Main Street Top floor apartment with vaulted ceilings offering views of Whistler/Blackcomb Mountain. Centrally located in Village North, this spacious 592 square feet, 1 bedroom is steps away from all of the amenities that Whistler Village has to offer. Market Pavilion complex has secured underground parking, bike storage, roof-top hot tub and common laundry. Unlimited owner use with nightly rental option. GST not applicable.

A contemporary mountain home in Cheakamus Crossing. In-floor radiant heating throughout, gas range & fireplace, private hot tub and double car garage. Stunning views and unparalleled access to all of Whistler’s outdoor recreational activities. Under construction, completion 2019.

ASKING PRICE $699,000

Dave Brown

Personal Real Estate Corporation

davebrown@wrec.com www.davesellswhistler.com Cell: 604 905 8438 / Toll Free: 1 800 667 2993 ext. 805 6 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Steve Shuster

t: 604.698.7347 | e: steve@steveshusterrealestate.com www.steveshusterrealestate.com


Pricing from $3.9 million CAD Pricing from $3.9 million CAD

W W W. T H E P R O M O N T O R Y. C A W W W. T H E P R O M O N T O R Y. C A


Letters T O T HE ED I T O R An unsettling incident

source of transportation. I know there are a lot of good guys driving taxis here in Whistler who are working hard and assisting their customers in getting home

A PSA to all young women out there: Last week, my daughter and her friend shared a taxi home from another friend’s house in the late evening. After dropping her friend off, my daughter (who is in high school) continued on. During this portion of the ride, the taxi driver (allegedly) began making extremely lewd and inappropriate sexually suggestive comments.  This upset my daughter and she decided to ask the driver to let her out. She proceeded to walk the rest of the way and arrived home very upset and disturbed by the encounter.  I immediately notified the taxi company, which advised me to call back the next day after 4:00 p.m. to speak to a manager. In the morning, I notified the RCMP, which actually took the matter seriously and sent a constable to take a report. Thank you to the RCMP for its quick response and especially the constable for his consideration and follow up.  This matter is now in the hands of the RCMP and the company involved. Though it is likely not much will come of this particular incident, at least a report has been filed. Regardless of age, we should all have the peace of mind that taking a taxi home is a safe

inappropriate behaviour. Take good care of yourselves and each other. Karly Stephens Whistler

suspects, raccoons. I opened the door to find a freezing young woman on the staircase leading to my entrance. Freezing. At 4 a.m. At -20 C with wind chill. She was already hypothermic and completely disoriented. A 911 (call) later and I had half of Whistler (emergency services) in the mud room taking care of her. Thanks, guys and gals. You rock. People, don’t spend that last dollar on a drink. Save a $20 bill for a cab in a separate pocket. This girl was trying to get to Spring Creek. I live in Twin Lakes. Do the math. Patrick Smyth Whistler

“Regardless of age, we should all have the peace of mind that taking a taxi home is a safe source of transportation.” - KARLY STEPHENS

safely. We are grateful to each of them. This particular driver should be held accountable. Be safe out there, and please report any

GET HOME SAFELY

A few days ago at around 4 a.m., I heard a noise on the front stoop of the house that sounded louder than the usual masked

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Viner Personal Real Estate Corporation

Lewis david@davidlewisliving.com

suttonwestcoast.com

|

LOCAL AGENTS

8 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

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LOCAL KNOWLEDGE

Ashcroft

|

LOCAL EXPERTS

Nagel

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ph: 604-935-3380

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tf: 1-866-978-8866


WHISTLER WALDORF

KINDERGARTEN ENROLLING for 2019-20

207 DEER RUN Deer Run is located just 2km south of the Whistler Village - on Blueberry Hill. #207 is a spacious 2 bedroom and loft with 2 full bathrooms featuring stunning views of Whistler and Blackcomb mountains.

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Marshall Viner PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

PremieretoLifestyle Neighbourhood Register atWhistler’s marshallviner.com receive weekly real estate updates

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QUESTIONS? Contact:

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2154 Whistler Road • 4 bedrooms, 3 bathroom, Triplex end unit • Sunken living room with fireplace and large covered balcony • Three levels, gives nice separation • Newly reno’d kitchen, floors, paint, etc.

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• Short walk to Whistler Mountain Creekside

$1,599,000 T 604 .935.2287 E marshall@marshallviner.com

marshallviner.com

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 9


604.932.9590

tf: 1.800.667.2993, ext. 838 e: marika@wrec.com

PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

Letters TO TH E ED I TO R ALL PART OF THE PLAN

Your editor has drawn attention to the increasing age and affluence of the Canadian skier/boarder (see “What will the future hold?,” Pique, Jan. 31). She examined increasing costs as a cause (as exemplified by the cost of a day pass) but fails to note that the greying of the slopes is due to the business plan of the resort owners. That plan is to drive the industry up market. There are two issues here: firstly, the resort owners want to reduce the day-trippers and casual skiers and increase “destination”

NEW LISTING

6227 EAGLE DRIVE - WHISTLER CAY HEIGHTS Amazing views, central location, recently renovated, this 4 bed, 4 bath mountain chalet checks the boxes! Enjoy the flexible layout of this family friendly home, with an option to have a self -contained 1-bedroom suite. Featuring an open living space with soaring high ceilings, indoor/outdoor fireplace, large yard, Lutron Smart lighting system, electronic blinds, whole house audio system, mini-split HVAC with additional heating and A/C with individual zone control, and more. Within walking distance of the village, Whistler Golf Course, elementary school and daycare.

weatherproofing the place. They’ve got the money whether it snows or not. Secondly, the resorts have no wish to increase participation, as that would mean capital expenditure to increase skiable terrain. The resorts want to keep the numbers the same but drawn from a different demographic: greyer and richer. Vail Resorts spent, (it) claim(s), millions (of dollars) on “improvements” to Whistler Blackcomb, not on further skiable terrain but in making access for its increasingly elderly clientele easier.

“ ... the resorts have no wish to increase participation, as that would mean capital expenditure to increase skiable terrain. The resorts want to keep the numbers the same but drawn from a different demographic: greyer and richer.”

OFFERED AT $3,398,000

- SILVIA MCIVOR GLEN

tourists. (The latter are a much more lucrative demographic.) How better (to accomplish this) than to up the cost of a day pass? And there is the added advantage that if by the increase, they can move the day-tripper to a season pass, they have gone a long way to

experience makes the difference.

TRACEY CRUZ MAKING YOUR DREAMS A REALITY

Backcountry Advisory Conditions may vary and can change rapidly. Check for the most current conditions before heading out into the backcountry. Daily updates for the areas adjacent to Whistler Blackcomb are available at 604-938-7676, or surf to www.whistlerblackcomb.com/mountain-info/ snow-report#backcountry or go to www.avalanche.ca. AS OF WEDNESDAY, FEB. 6

#417 VALE INN Top floor SE corner suite with views, sunshine and walking distance to Creekside gondola, shops, restaurants – including The Rim Rock Cafe, plus Alpha lake and the Valley trail. This home offers two bright bedrooms, 1 full bath, vaulted ceilings and a generous layout for the kitchen, living and dining room. #417 is being sold furnished so you can move right in. There is shared laundry plus a ski locker, wax room and parking for the complex. A great way to own a piece of Whistler. The Vale Inn is a leasehold property with nightly rental zoning. NO GST. offered at

$425,000

And where does this leave the day-trippers from the Lower Mainland? They should hope Garibaldi at Squamish gets off the ground and it implements a business plan that caters (to those) Whistler Blackcomb (has) abandoned. Silvia McIvor Glen Whistler n

Conditions have changed dramatically in the Sea to Sky mountains since 40 to 50 centimetres of snow fell last weekend. Plummeting temperatures and cold outflow winds have forced the upper snowpack to stiffen. Wind slabs may still be reactive to human triggers this weekend making them the primary concern. As we approach the weekend we may see some unsettled weather as a surface low spins over the coast. The track of the system across the Eastern Pacific will determine the snowfall amounts. At best, we hope to see 10 centimetres. Natural avalanche activity has tapered off dramatically and I suspect there won’t be much change this weekend unless this storm surprises us with more snow than forecast. With that in mind, any new snow may bond poorly to the old snow surface, at least initially. You may also run into isolated pockets of reactive wind slabs or older storm slabs on sheltered northerly aspects at and below

treeline where buried surface hoar exists. Even though the weather pattern is benign and the hazard is moderate-to-low, we can’t go everywhere just yet. You need to think about appropriate techniques to manage the wind slab problem: Watch for key signs and obvious clues like snow cracking beneath your feet or skis, whumphing, visually wind-affected snow and a stiff surface slab overlying softer snow. Use good group-management strategies like spreading your group out when crossing avalanche paths and riding down a slope one at a time Be cautious as you transition into windaffected terrain, especially on convex slopes and wind-loaded pockets near ridgelines. Unsuspecting aspects (southwest) may show reverse loading from the atypical northerly winds. Don’t let your guard down and have a safe weekend! n

Pique Newsmagazine

T: 604-905-2853 | TF: 1-800-667-2993 | E: tracey@wrec.com

www.traceycruz.com 10 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Pique Newsmagazine


JUST W NE

! ICE R P

8400-37 ASHLEIGH MCIVOR DRIVE 3.5 BEDS I 3.5 BATHS I 1,950 SQFT Completed in 2017, Red Sky offers inspiring panoramic views of both Whistler and Blackcomb mountains. Blessed with all day sun, the complex includes a private resident’s club with a salt water pool, hot tub and fire pit. Viewings by appointment.  $2,399,000

1710 HIGHWAY 99, PEMBERTON

2 Homes on 3.29 Acres - $1,695,000

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NEW #211-159 West 22nd St. 1 br/1 bath condo N. Van $649,900

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969 Blackwater Rd., Pemberton Land 156 acres $1.2M

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Dude, hold my kombucha: the ongoing battle between Alberta and B.C.

T

Dave Beattie

604-905-8855 1-888-689-0070 Dave@DaveBeattie.com

Pique’n YO U R I N TER EST

he other day, I caught a glimpse of myself in a car window as I was exiting Olives in Function Junction. Double fisting vegan jerky in one hand and kombucha in the other, I thought, “Holy sh*t, conversion to B.C. hippie complete.” Our province takes a lot of ribbing from the rest of Canada. I like to think much of it stems from jealousy. As I write this, it’s

By

Alyssa Noel

arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

a balmy 3ºC in Whistler while the rest of Canada is suffering through a “polar vortex.” We are labelled tree huggers, lefties, piein-the-sky hippies. Torontonians in the midst of the rat race envision us clad in Lululemon running up and down mountains. Albertans think we’re singing “Kumbaya” at pipeline blockades. And, to be honest, while it might not be accurate for everyone, that sounds like a pretty good hang-10-cowabunga, West Coast life to me. Last week, an Angus Reid Institute study found that 54 per cent of British Columbians felt they had more in common with Washington state than the rest of Canada. It also found that the rest of Canada has mixed views on which provinces constitute “the west” of the country. The former finding fits with my informal polling of British Columbian friends. Most people I know feel the West Coast is a more cohesive region than Western Canada. Certainly, lifestylewise, we have more in common with Washington, Oregon and California than our neighbours in Alberta. Of course this doesn’t describe everyone, but in general, we value our relationship with the environment, adventurous spirits, and fulfilment in outdoor pursuits. Alternatively, Albertans (disclaimer— I’m allowed to weigh in on this since I was born-and-raised in Wild Rose Country) seem to value a comfortable life, economic stability, and the traditional path of marriage, home ownership and kids. And just in case there’s dispute on that last point, consider that nearly everyone I grew up with in rural Alberta (entering their mid-30s) have, at minimum, two progeny while most of my B.C. friends plan to squeak out one small, outdoorsy child under the wire, if at all. Yes, we are certainly different and this has created a massive divide in relations between the two provinces, particularly as

the ongoing saga over the Trans Mountain Pipeline continues. For example, I sent out close to a million text messages to friends and family in Alberta after reading a story in December about Albertans who organized a truck rally in Nisku, a town just outside Edmonton, to show their support for the pipeline. Like me, they found this redneck protest (dude, if you can’t be bothered to even get out of your vehicle, I doubt your commitment to the cause), equal parts hilarious and embarrassing. But the conversation that followed was the most eye opening. The people I’m closest to in Alberta—people I consider pretty left-leaning—questioned my anger about the government-purchased pipeline. Moral arguments on the grounds of climate change aren’t going to change the minds of people who put food on the table with oil patch jobs, they argued. Electric vehicles are the domain of the wealthy and we still need gas-powered cars, they said. But the one and only argument I could get on board with was that Rachel Notley and the NDP have done a whole lot of social good in the province that doesn’t get reported in B.C.—we just hear aggressive pipeline rhetoric. They are terrified, with good reason, of a Jason Kenney-led Alberta. Perhaps the most thought-provoking question, though, came from a family member who texted, “Would you care as much if you didn’t live in B.C., realistically?” I processed it thoughtfully. I had always cared about the environment, even while living in Alberta. But that care was kind of abstract in that I love animals, want to breathe clean air, and tear up at videos of turtles with straws wedged up their noses. In B.C., my love of the environment is more concrete, wholly tangible. I climb up mountains and touch glaciers, wander through old-growth forest and swim in the ocean. Intellectually, it is a realistic expectation that Albertans should care about clean drinking water, forest-dwelling animals and an intact ozone layer above personal profit. But, practically speaking, can we really expect them to care as deeply as we do living amongst the earth’s abundance? Therein lies the greatest divide between the two western-most provinces of “Western Canada.” I’m not sure how to work towards closing that gap—particularly given the tiny slice of time we have left to prevent climate catastrophe. But something tells me that considering the wildly different conversations each province is having might be a step in the right direction. n


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14 News

BUDGET SEASON Whistler Mayor Jack Crompton gives the introductory address at the Resort Municipality of Whistler’s budget open house on Feb. 4.

PHOTO BY DAVID BUZZARD/COURTESY OF THE RESORT MUNICIPALITY OF WHISTLER

Budget proposes 2.9% property tax increase PROPOSED PROJECTS TOTAL $42.6M Braden Dupuis

bdupuis@piquenewsmagazine.com

W

histlerites can expect another tax increase in the 2019 budget. The Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) is proposing a 2.9-per-cent property tax increase, two-per-cent increases to sewer parcel and water fees, and a 3.6-per-cent increase to solid waste user fees. “What does that mean for individual taxpayers? This year and every year, the relative change of the value of your property will determine the direction of your tax bill,” said Carlee Price, director of finance for the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) at a budget open house on Feb. 4. “So for 2019, the average residential assessment in Whistler is up 16.3 per cent. What that means is if your property appreciated by less … your tax bill may actually fall. If your property is up by a greater amount, your tax bill may actually rise.” The 2019-2023 proposed projects list includes 176 projects worth $42.6 million (including $5.3 million carried

over from 2018). The total municipal budget is worth $87 million this year, up from $85 million in 2018. “Throughout the year, council receives input from the community and makes

into looking at asset management, and stepwise reinvestment into our community’s infrastructure to remain sustainable into the future,” he said. “We’re paying special attention to reserves. Our reserves are critical for the

“This year and every year, the relative change of the value of your property will determine the direction of your tax bill.” - CARLEE PRICE

decisions on long-range plans,” said Mayor Jack Crompton at the open house. “This year we will have the benefit that everything is discussed from the municipal election in October, and so council has had the unique chance to listen to you provide input through the election process, which is extremely helpful.” Some of the priorities council decided on during its December retreat that are reflected in this year’s budget include wildfire protection, environmental performance, housing and transportation, Crompton said. “We’re also putting a lot of time

14 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

long-term success of our town, and as we have been making and will continue to make significant infrastructure investments, we need to take care that

T HI S SEC T I O N

By

those reserves are strong.”

INFRASTRUCTURE

On the surface, Whistler’s 2019-2023 budget is about the “nuts and bolts” of the municipality, with the biggest investments directed at infrastructure projects. Over the next five years, various municipal water mains are due for replacement, starting with White Gold in 2019 ($3 million is budgeted for that project in 2019, with another $400,000 in 2020). Work on replacing water mains in Alta Vista will also begin this year, with $120,000 budgeted for the project (and another $1.5 million in 2020). Sewers also factor prominently in the project list, including the long-awaited Alta Lake Road sewer project. The

6 V IEW FROM HERE B.C. business confidence slipping 1 18 F UNCTION Pedestrian path, Valley Trail upgrades planned 20 P OLICE BRIEFS Whistler police recover stolen car 22 B EARS Researcher Michael Allen presents 2018 update


News WH I S T L E R project—which will see the remaining 30 or so homes on Alta Lake Road connected to the municipal sewer system—has $3.6 million budgeted for it over the next three years. Other sewer-related projects include lift station upgrades ($1.325 million in 2019), replacement of a bridge that allows access to the municipal sewer main ($450,000) and sewer trunk lining, manhole repairs and other upgrades ($3.62 million in 2019). There’s also $3 million earmarked for three washroom buildings in Whistler Village (Whistler Olympic Plaza, Gateway Loop and Passive Haus), which will be paid for entirely by provincial Resort Municipality Initiative (RMI) funds. The Meadow Park Sports Centre will also get some love this year, with expansion of the cardio room ($1.089 million, assisted by a $200,000 private donation). Work on Whistler Village parkades will also be ongoing in 2019, with $2.3 million earmarked for waterproofing Lot A adjacent to the Whistler Conference Centre. Replacement of the municipal vehicle fleet in 2019 ($3.26 million budgeted) will include new fire vehicles and plow trucks.

ENVIRONMENT

There is a wide range of wildfire prevention activities planned for 2019, with the RMOW share of the budget (after provincial grants are factored in) set at $554,540. Fuel-thinning work will continue on the Callaghan Forest Service Road in 2019, along with above Rainbow and in other areas this fall. Planning work is also ongoing for future fuel-treatment projects. Sticking with wildfire, the 2019 budget also includes $135,375 for FireSmart activities. On the water front, the budget includes $1.134 million in 2019 to upgrade the Baxter reservoir on Gondola Way, $535,000 to plan and commission a new water metering program, and $358,500 for “several significant planning exercises” related to water (including Water Capacity Planning, and continuing work on the 21 Mile Watershed Source Water Protection Plan). On solid waste, the RMOW has budgeted $250,000 in 2019 for annual upgrades, as well as $105,000 to “push for compliance” with the new Solid Waste Bylaw. Whistler’s geopark pitch will also move forward this year, with $125,000 set aside for the project (followed by $50,000 each year from 2020 to 2023).

While there is no mention of funds for a designated “climate officer”— someone who will champion Whistler’s Community Energy and Climate Action Plan—in the proposed projects list, an RMOW spokesperson said the position is accounted for in the 2019 operational budget.

RECREATION

The RMOW’s acquisition of the 40-hectare Prism lands opens up a key access opportunity heading south, which the municipality will explore in 2019. The budget includes $840,000 for a Valley Trail connection from Alta Lake Road to Function Junction (and another $450,000 for the project in 2020)—all from RMI. Other Valley Trail improvements include connecting Rainbow Park with the existing Valley Trail ($100,000 in 2019 and $1.5 million in 2020, all RMI) and reconstruction at various areas ($160,000 in 2019). There is also $350,000 in 2019 (followed by a further $300,000 in both 2020 and 2021) for work on Whistler’s Alpine Trail Network, including completion of the Beverley trail, a focus on developing access from the southwest peak to the south flank trail and more. The budget also has $310,000 to construct new, and revitalize existing, recreational trailheads (the goal being to ease parking and congestion issues). There’s also $783,614 in 2019 for upgrades at Meadow Park Sports Centre (including underground pipe repairs, additional overhead LEDs and more) as well as $163,535 in 2019 for equipment replacement. The artificial turf field project will wrap up this year, with $630,000 set aside for it, and Whistler’s parks master planning project will also see significant progress, with $140,000 in the budget in 2019 (followed by another $75,000 next year). Tennis courts at Taluswood, Myrtle Philip and Alpha will get some attention this year and next, with $75,000 budgeted in each of 2019 and 2020 for surface repairs. The Five-Year Financial Plan Bylaw is tentatively scheduled for first three readings on March 26 and adoption on April 9, while the Tax Rate Bylaws are tentatively scheduled for first three readings on April 9. In 2018, property taxes went up 2.25 per cent, solid waste user fees went up 4.5-per-cent and sewer parcel taxes 1.1-per-cent, while there was no increase to water rates. Find the full project list, along with other budget materials, at www.whistler. ca/budget. n www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 15


News WHIST L ER Business confidence slipping: BC chamber WREC EVENT TALKS ECONOMY, HOUSING AND MORE By

T

Braden Dupuis

he “confidence meter” of B.C.’s business owners has taken a hit in recent years, according to the BC Chamber of Commerce. “One out of every two entrepreneurs is saying, ‘My confidence has declined,’” said BC Chamber of Commerce president and CEO Val Litwin, in a presentation at the Whistler Real Estate Company’s (WREC) View From Here event at the Maury Young Arts Centre on Feb. 2. Citing statistics from the Chamber’s MindReader platform—which allows the chamber to pull real-time info and data provided by its members—Litwin noted that, where 78 per cent of members agreed that the provincial government was “generally supportive of business” in 2016, that number fell to just 46 per cent in 2018. “We’re making sure that government is seeing this data, because as there is that declining level of confidence, (and in) feeling that the government is in

fact supporting business, there will be a ripple effect in terms of investment and growth,” Litwin said. “So government has seen these numbers, and we’re hopeful that in our February budget in a couple of weeks here we’re going to see some breaks for the business community.” Litwin was one of nine speakers at the WREC’s second View From Here event—an information-packed, all-afternoon affair. Other speakers included: Central Credit Union 1 chief economist Helmut Pastrick; Whistler Blackcomb COO Pete Sonntag; the Lil’wat Nation’s Maxine Joseph-Bruce and Kerry Mehaffey; Resort Municipality of Whistler Chief Administrative Officer Mike Furey; Tourism Whistler’s director of research and destination development Meredith Kunza; Sue Adams, director and board vice chair with the Whistler Learning Centre; and WREC president Pat Kelly. “Our current situation, we’re returning to historical levels of activity in our marketplace, which is somewhere between 500 and 650 transactions in

Whistler,” Kelly said in his presentation. “In Whistler, there is very strong interest in Phase 1 condominiums and things that can be rented—let’s call that the Airbnb impact.” Commercially, you’d be hard pressed to get into a Whistler Village space for under $45/square foot today, Kelly said, with most now over $75. In comparison with its mountaintown peers, Whistler provides solid real estate value, Kelly said, with an average transaction value of about $1 million and space going for about USD$850/ square foot. “In Vail, the average price of a singlefamily home is USD$2,150 a square foot; townhouses sell at $1,700 a square foot,” Kelly said, noting that in places like Beaver Creek and Baxter Gulch, or areas further from ski-in/out access, the prices are more in line with Whistler. “Aspen is a world to itself. It is a very small market, and the average price of a home in Aspen currently is running at $6.9 million. That is down from $8 million.

“So I guess the takeaways that I would offer you is all of these markets experienced much the same as we did—a slowing in activity but support for prices—and that our prime properties, our best properties in Whistler, continue to be good value and continue to compare favourably with our peers.” The afternoon concluded with a panel discussion featuring six of the speakers, with the first question posed to Sonntag about the future of WB’s “Renaissance” project (announced before Vail Resorts purchased the mountain operator in 2016). “When we announced our capital project for the past year a year ago, that kind of gave us the opportunity to reframe the Renaissance a little bit,” Sonntag said. “And so what we said was our focus was going to be on improving the on-mountain experience, and we were gong to prioritize that over basearea developments, waterpark, things like that.” n

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News WHIST L ER Municipality readies Function for improvements PEDESTRIAN PATH, VALLEY TRAIL IMPROVEMENTS ON TAP By

Braden Dupuis

H

aving been a resident of Whistler’s Cheakamus Crossing neighbourhood since it was founded 10 years ago, Michael Boehm has seen the community grow firsthand. And with that have come some serious safety concerns in Cheakamus and the neighbouring Function Junction. “It is still an industrial section, I understand that, but we also have people living and working down here, and there are many tourist attractions that are down here,” Boehm said. “I ride my bike and walk down here five, six days a week. The number of close incidents that I’ve seen with traffic—it’s not right.” Boehm was one of about 35 people at an open house on Tuesday, Feb. 5 at Art Junction in Function Junction to learn more about the Resort Municipality of

Whistler’s (RMOW) plans for the area. On tap for 2019 are a pedestrian path in Function and a Valley Trail connection to the neighbourhood from Alta Lake Road. The Valley Trail project has $840,000 earmarked for it in 2019 (all Resort Municipality Initiative funding), and underground infrastructure will be installed prior to paving to allow for future light installations. New bridges over Millar Creek and Sproatt Creek are also planned for the project. The pedestrian path project will include about 150 metres of at-grade paving (in key areas at the intersection of Alpha Lake Road and Millar Creek Road), seven more streetlights, two new crosswalks, new signage and the relocation of two bus stops. BC Transit’s 10 Valley Connector pilot project will also continue through the spring, with a passenger feedback survey

Expertise

planned for mid-spring. “It’s Phase 1 of many … from our perspective, we got some really good comments tonight,” said project manager Tammy Shore at the open house. Some of the comments from those in attendance focused on safety, the need for a raised-curb sidewalk rather than an at-grade path, and the fact that people sometimes park on the pedestrian path the RMOW created in Function last year. Shore said the RMOW would be using signage and a greater bylaw presence to ensure the path remains open for pedestrians. The project (which has $200,000 budgeted for it this year) only pertains to municipal roadways, Shore added— any storefront improvements on private property will have to be undertaken by the owners. Those in attendance were generally appreciative of what they saw, though safety both in Function and Cheakamus

Dedication

was a common theme from the crowd. For some, like Boehm, the at-grade pedestrian path doesn’t go far enough. While it’s better than nothing, the current paved pedestrian path is often not plowed properly, he said, and cars often drift over the line. Add in the Lil’wat Nation development underway at the entrance to Function (which includes plans for a gas station, as well as commercial and residential space), and the traffic pressures will only increase in the coming years, he added. “It seems to me it is just extremely reactionary and not fore-thinking. We need to, as planners, be proactive about things instead of reacting to the problems,” Boehm said. “I understand there is budgetary constraints, but I’ve also seen the gross misspending that the municipality does on particular projects in the village. “I feel we deserve a safe … area to walk and ride our bikes down.” n

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News WHIST L ER Whistler police recover stolen car POLICE BRIEFS: EIGHT DRIVING PROHIBITIONS LEVIED; YOUTH ALLEGEDLY VERBALLY HARASSED BY CAB DRIVER By

T

Dan Falloon

wo stolen cars wound their way across B.C. before being recovered in the last week. In one incident, a vehicle stolen from Whistler Village was later discovered in Kamloops. The grey 2002 Honda Civic was reported stolen to police on Jan. 31 at approximately 6:35 p.m. The car had been parked at a lot in the 4000 block of Whistler Way. It was found in Kamloops on Feb. 4 and is being examined for fingerprints by the Forensic Identification Section. Anyone with information on the theft is encouraged to contact Whistler RCMP at 604-932-3044 or Sea to Sky Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477. In the other incident, a Whistler RCMP officer stopped a suspicious vehicle with an Alberta licence plate at the intersection of Alpha Lake Road and Highway 99 just after 8:30 p.m. on Jan. 31.

After searching the licence plate number, the officer learned the car had been reported stolen from Red Deer, Alta. and that its vehicle identification number had been altered.

DRUNK DRIVERS RECEIVE PROHIBITIONS

Whistler and Pemberton RCMP took eight impaired drivers off the road last week. Police doled out six 90-day immediate roadside prohibitions as well

“Those who choose to drink and drive can expect no leniency. Avoid being in this situation by having an alternate way to get home after an evening’s celebration.” - RCMP

The 29-year-old Pemberton man driving the vehicle was arrested for possession of stolen property. He received a four-month driving prohibition for an unrelated Motor Vehicle Act offence. The man was released on a promise to appear and is due in court in North Vancouver on March 6.

20 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

as a three-day prohibition and a 24-hour suspension. “Those who choose to drink and drive can expect no leniency. Avoid being in this situation by having an alternate way to get home after an evening’s celebration,” stated an RCMP release.

YOUTH ALLEGEDLY VERBALLY HARASSED BY CAB DRIVER

Police were notified last month that a high school student was allegedly verbally harassed while getting a cab home at night. “(We) were notified about an incident that allegedly occurred on Jan 20, 2019,” said RCMP Staff Sgt. Paul Hayes in an email, adding that police were unable to provide any further information at this time. The young woman was sharing a cab from a friend’s house one evening. After the friend was dropped off the driver allegedly started making lewd and sexually suggestive comments to the youth, Pique was told by a family member in an email. The young woman asked to be let out of the car, and she walked the rest of the way home. After contacting the taxi company that night, the family notified RCMP the following morning and made a report. n


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News WHI STLER

FAMILY PHOTO A mother black bear pictured with her yearling daughter on Blackcomb Mountain.

PHOTO BY MICHAEL ALLEN

Bear researcher Michael Allen delivers 2018 update

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E&O.E: Not intended to solicit properties already under agreement. Sotheby’s International Realty Canada, Independently Owned & Operated. E&O.E: Not intended to solicit properties already under agreement. Sotheby’s International Realty Canada, Independently Owned & Operated.

22 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

WHISTLER’S BLACK BEAR POPULATION DROPS SLIGHTLY; SQUAMISH VALLEY BEARS HEAD TO DEN LATER THAN EVER By

W

Megan Lalonde

histler’s bear population might be cozy in its winter dens right now, but that doesn’t mean the community’s interest in its well-being has cooled down. Thankfully for the crowd that showed up to the Maury Young Arts Centre on Thursday, Jan. 31, neither has local bear expert Michael Allen’s. As Allen explained during his annual bear update—complete with statistics, captivating video clips and interesting facts about the local bear population he has been studying for the last quartercentury—he tracked a total of 63 adult black bears and 11 grizzly bears in 2018, using a network of remote, motionactivated cameras. Thirty-five of those black bears were located in Whistler, while 23 roamed the upper Squamish region encompassing the Squamish and Elaho rivers, and five remained near the Cheekye River. “(The) 35 adults in Whistler, that’s the lowest it’s been, and that continues to drop a little bit each year,” Allen, a professional bear-viewing guide, explained. “About 10 years ago, that (number) was almost 80 adults, but that was way too many bears in Whistler.” Last year, there were 37 black bears in Whistler. So why is it better to have fewer bears

in Whistler? “Just because Whistler can’t manage people or attractants, the kind of area it is with a big bear population,” he continued. “So it’s much easier on the bears, if that number even comes down a little bit more. It’s just kind of sad to see all the bears that got wasted away because of that.” Many of those bears have been lost due to Whistler’s “huge history of really high-conflict mortality,” Allen said. According to the expert, over 250 bears have been killed in the resort town in 25 years. “That’s not a great statistic Whistler probably likes to hear, but (Whistler) is one of the hot spots for a lot of conflict activity in British Columbia between black bears and people. It has gotten better—much, much better—but a lot of bears have paid the price for that.” In 2018, there were 13 reproducing females in the Whistler Blackcomb ski area. “There used to be 18, about five years ago. In all the places I’ve travelled in British Columbia … I’ve never seen that high a density of mother bears, ever,” Allen said explaining that, “It’s because of the over 200 ski slopes with grass, clover, sedge and dandelions on them.” Six of the 13 mother bears produced a total of 12 cubs last year, while four cubs were lost due to natural causes. In

_______________________________________________________ SEE PAGE 24>


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News WHIST L ER Free storefront parking down to 15 minutes at Whistler Marketplace DRIVERS NOW NEED TO REGISTER PLATES IF THEY WISH TO PARK FOR LONGER THAN 15 MINUTES By

Megan Lalonde

O

ver a year and a half after pay parking was first introduced in Whistler’s Marketplace, another change to parking-lot protocol has been made. Now, drivers in Marketplace are no longer able to park for 30 minutes for free, without registering their license plate, in the storefront stalls. Last month, fastPark dropped the time limit in the free storefront parking stalls to 15 minutes. The remainder of the lot’s parking spots still allow drivers one hour of free parking, but require each driver to register their licence plate. Drivers are also required to pay a fee if they wish to park for additional hours. “Over the Christmas holiday season we had a 44% increase in traffic at the Marketplace compared to 2017-2018.

The increase of traffic caused traffic jams and delays for customers trying to find parking, particularly in the (storefront) rows,” explained fastPark in an emailed statement. “Vehicles were driving around in circles waiting for a 30 minute stall. We wish to reduce idling vehicles and traffic.

The (storefront) area is more of a drop off and loading area. Our studies show that 80% of the vehicles stay less than 15 minutes in this area.” The company is asking customers to use the main parking area for longerterm visits. According to fastPark, over 80 per cent of Marketplace vehicle traffic

uses the free parking options. “Long term rates were increased slightly to help reduce demand. Economical long term parking is available in the Day Lots,” the statement continued. The maximum purchase is listed online as $8.50 for three hours of parking. n

the Squamish area, on the left side of Highway 99, have access to wilder food sources, like elk and salmon, and tend to be more wary of people—“the way they kind of should be,” said Allen. While his yearly update may have been focused on 2018, last year’s bear season unusually stretched into January thanks to poor returns of chum and coho salmon. Allen’s last listed date of activity for six grizzly bears and one black bear in the upper Squamish area range from Dec.

15, 2018 to Jan. 20, 2019. “This is really unusual,” Allen said, adding that bears typically head to den in mid-December. Oftentimes, Allen’s cameras also pick up other wildlife, including a curious cougar investigating the camera after feeding on a blacktail deer carcass. Another cougar was captured sitting patiently while a spotted skunk roams around scavenging—“nature forming an understanding,” noted Allen with a laugh. n

Bear update < FROM PAGE 22

addition, one small cub was transported to the Critter Care Wildlife Society in Langley last summer after its mother was electrocuted and killed on Whistler Mountain while climbing a power pole. In October, a second sow, known as Echo, died after falling from a tree while being tranquilized by a conservation officer. Her three cubs were released to the wild. As Allen explained, bears in Whistler tend to be more tolerant of humans. Comparatively, the bears he studies in

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News WHIST L ER Jury selection for Whistler Farmers’ Market delayed AS WFM BOARD PREPARES FOR SUMMER, RESIGNATIONS CONTINUE By

A

Braden Dupuis

s the Whistler Farmers’ Market (WFM) searches for a new market manager, two board members have now resigned. The resignation of one of the board members has resulted in the delay of the jury process for the wildly successful market, while contract negotiations with landlord Whistler Blackcomb won’t take place until May. First started in 1994, the market grew steadily over the past decade under former market manager Chris Quinlan, expanding from about 50 vendors a day in 2010 to 80 or 90 a day (along with adding Wednesday markets and Saturdays on long weekends).

Last summer the market, which welcomes between 5,000 and 7,000 people on a busy Sunday and regularly does more than $1 million in annual sales, came close to not operating after a dispute between Quinlan and the then board got nasty. But at the eleventh hour the parties worked out their differences and the market, which was identified as a major cultural asset in a municipal report in 2010, went ahead (see “A Tale of Two Farmers Markets,” Pique, May 16, 2018) But as the WFM tries to enact new governance structures ahead of 2019’s market, some still have concerns about the board’s past treatment of Quinlan and the future of the market. Some former directors say Quinlan’s exit was a coordinated effort by a handful of disgruntled vendors and board members,

FARM FRESH? As the Whistler Farmers’ Market works towards its 2019 season, some still have concerns about the way the board is operating.

PHOTO BY MIKE CRANE/TOURISM WHISTLER

and they remain concerned about the governance of a market that supports so many vendors and injects millions of dollars of spending into Whistler.

‘SOMETHING FUNKY GOING ON’

It began at an Annual General Meeting in October 2017, when the board was effectively doubled, explained longtime former director Renee Dupuis. “They’ll deny it to their grave that they treated him (Quinlan) poorly, but as soon as the AGM happened, everybody who was running had a hidden agenda, and I know of it,

because I’m part of the market and sat on the board for seven years so I was very informed—I knew who had quarrels with him, and it was the people who were running,” Dupuis said. The board had received complaint letters about Quinlan’s management style prior to the AGM, and was considering how to handle the situation when things ramped up. “We used to get six people at our AGM. There were 30 people (that) showed up (in October 2017),” Quinlan said. Those who wanted to see Quinlan

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News WH I S T L E R gone—including some board members— began soliciting vendors for further letters of complaint. An anonymous survey was also conducted. Pique spoke with three vendors that confirmed they had been approached to write complaint letters about Quinlan, including Steve Gourley of Goldstrike Honey. In Gourley’s case, he said he was approached multiple times. Gourley himself was elected to the board in November, before resigning the following month. “I don’t know what the agenda is. It confuses me,” he said. “I can’t really talk about the board stuff, but I resigned because of it … there’s something funky going on here with the existing board that’s on there, and I don’t know why people actually voted them back in.” Gourley added that he had his moments with Quinlan, too, “but you know what? He ran a great market, and he built it. I was there since he started it seven years ago, and I think he ran a good, clean market.” Another director, Carola Moore, also resigned from the board in January.

A NEW STRUCTURE

Asked about the board’s investigation into Quinlan—the WFM’s only employee— board chair Nathan Hawkins said he believed everything was done properly. “100-per-cent yes, “ he said. “It was done basically following a practice of WorkSafe BC, so basically all the allegations of misconduct that came through from those complaints, basically we just followed the legal proceedings and followed it through that way.” As for the allegation of vendors being solicited to write complaint letters, Hawkins said he couldn’t comment on that. “I don’t know who was doing that … I can’t control what people do and say,” he said. The board is trying to move beyond its past drama, instituting new bylaws, a code of conduct, guidelines for directors and a bullying and harassment reporting procedure. “We really do want to move on,” said WFM vice chair Alyssa Belter, who was elected to the board for the first time in November. “It feels that this conflict has really divided our membership, and we’re really trying to get over that, because we want to be a society where people get along, and where we can agree on things.” Belter said she’s been a vendor at the WFM for four years, and while she’s never had a problem with Quinlan, the

oversight is a necessary change. Having attended markets all throughout the Lower Mainland and Sea to Sky, she and her husband jokingly referred to the WFM as the “wild west” of farmers markets when they first began attending, Belter said. “There were definitely rules and regulations for the (Whistler) market, but there was a very different vibe to it, and there wasn’t that sort of oversight from the board,” she said. Throughout the human-resources process with Quinlan, the board still wanted to work with him, Hawkins said, noting that the board was ready to present recommendations at a meeting before Quinlan resigned. But by this point the relationship had become so strained that the two parties weren’t talking. Quinlan, feeling he had been “constructively dismissed” by the board, resigned on Feb. 26, 2018 (but stayed on to run the 2018 market).

A BOARD DIVIDED

Dupuis was one of three board members—along with Mihaela Boaru and Emma Sturdy—to sign a letter sent to members of the WFM society on April 20, calling for a Special General Meeting to vote on three resolutions: That the WFM cease all legal expenditures unless otherwise approved by the membership at a general meeting; the removal of chair Nathan Hawkins and vice chair Joanne Thomas (Hawkins’ wife) from the board; and for an election to appoint two new members. The letter drove a further wedge in the board, resulting in the three women getting “roasted pretty good” at a WFM board meeting, Boaru said. Both Boaru and Dupuis said they submitted official complaints about the alleged conduct at that meeting, and in other board dealings, without getting satisfactory responses. Dupuis resigned from the board in response. Like many others Pique reached out to for this story, Dupuis and Boaru are wary of speaking out, fearing rejection from the market or other consequences. Ultimately, though, Dupuis feels it’s important to speak her truth. “This is my whole perspective on the whole thing: they have made (Quinlan’s) life a living hell. What is it going to benefit me trying to make them look bad?” she said. “I just want to make it (known) Chris was not treated well, and whoever it was who did it, they need to take accountability.” n

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 27


News PEMBERT ON & T H E V A L L E Y

NEW LOOK The Village of Pemberton is proceeding with plans to place a 16-car parking lot on the back section of Fougberg Park, accessible by John Currie Lane. The trees and green space located at the front the park, nearest Prospect Street, will be retained. PHOTO BY JOEL BARDE

Pemberton council green lights parking in Fougberg Park COUNCIL BRIEFS: BICYCLE-INFRASTRUCTURE PLANNING; CANNABIS RETAIL AND PRODUCTION FEES By Joel Barde

T

he Village of Pemberton (VOP) council gave staff the go ahead to proceed with the development of a 16-car parking lot on a section of Fougberg Park at its Feb. 5 regular council meeting. “I never thought I would be taking away green space” from the downtown core, said Mayor Mike Richman, in an interview with Pique following the decision. “We’re trying to find a balance between having a walkable, safe downtown, and making sure our business owners—who are big taxpayers in our community—are given the opportunity to succeed as well.” The new parking lot will be located on the back portion of the park and be accessed by John Currie Lane. Green space, which will include the trees near Prospect Street and picnic tables, will be retained. The idea to develop the land was

introduced by VOP staff after members of Pemberton’s business community raised concerns about the downtown enhancement plan. Made possible thanks to a $5.3-million federal-government

Noble and Ted Craddock all voted in favour of the parking lot (along with Richman), Coun. Amica Antonelli—a land-use planner with the Resort Municipality of Whistler—dissented,

“I see this as us using our very limited resource—of Village of Pemberton land—to provide a private business with parking.” - AMICA ANTONELLI

grant, it will consist of essential upgrades to failing infrastructure and key improvements related to roads, sidewalks and street lighting. The new parking lot will reduce the number of parking spaces that will be lost because of the forthcoming changes, from 25 to nine. While Councillors Ryan Zant, Leah

28 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

saying that Pemberton doesn’t have an issue with lack of parking and the plan hasn’t identified any. In her remarks, Antonelli suggested Rona—which sits next to the park and is in discussion with the VOP to contribute to the construction of the parking—is the real beneficiary of the project. “I see this as us using our very limited

resource—of Village of Pemberton land—to provide a private business with parking,” said Antonelli, adding that other uses, such as a daycare, could be more in line with the VOP’s needs. “I don’t think surface parking is the best use at this time, when we do not have a parking problem,” continued Antonelli, who suggested a daycare might be a better option. In her response to Antonelli’s concern, Nikki Gilmore, chief administrative officer for the VOP, said that “the business owners repeatedly expressed that they felt that there was a lack of parking, although it was not quantified or proven that we had a parking issue.” In his interview with Pique, Richman stressed that it’s important to look at the big picture, explaining that the downtown enhancement plan is going to transform the downtown core, adding green space and trees and creating a far safer pedestrian experience. He also said that Rona stands to lose significant parking in front of its business


News PEMBERT ON & T H E V A L L E Y and along Prospect Street, as a sidewalk will be added and cars will be made to parallel park rather than park at an angle as is currently the case (meaning fewer can park in a given area). “I think it was felt by council that it was a bit of a give and take (with the business community,” said Richman, adding that the amount of usage the Fougberg Park gets is “pretty limited.” Staff indicated that the lot—which has already been designed—could go forward in coordination with the downtown enhancement plan, which is slated for completion in fall 2019. A tender for the construction project was awarded earlier in the day to Hazelwood Construction Services Inc. in the amount of $5,870,8587.74.

BIKEBC FUNDING APPLICATION

VOP council also decided to go forward with a provincial funding application to develop a cycling network plan for the Pemberton area. The provincial fund—known as the BikeBC Program—supports projects related to commuter cycling and improved safety for cycling. In order

He added that he hopes that the plan can involve dirt trails as well as paved ones. “I think there is a case to be made that commuter doesn’t have to (mean paved),” said Richman. “A lot of people commute on their mountain bikes.”

CANNABIS RETAIL

VOP council also updated its business licence regulations and fees related to cannabis retail and production businesses at the meeting. Council set the annual license fee at $5,000 for a cannabis retail operation, $5,000 for a standard producer, and $2,500 for a micro-producer. It also supported a non-refundable application fee of $1,000 for a cannabis retail business. Richman said the approach was informed by what other communities are doing, and noted that the legalization process has been involved when it comes to staff time and effort. “There has been a lot of staff time and resources spent setting up how we are going to accommodate retail cannabis,” said Richman, adding that the full scope

“We want to make sure that if this type of industry is causing cost to the community, then those costs are recoverable.” - MIKE RICHMAN

to apply for capital funding from the fund, communities are required to adopt cycling network plans. Under the terms of the grant, the VOP would be responsible for paying half of the cost of developing the plan. In its report to council, VOP staff said they have spoken with two consultants and it was indicated that the development of a plan would cost approximately $15,000, meaning the VOP would be required to contribute $7,500. (Council also supported the allocation of $7,500 from the 2019 budget for the contribution.) Gilmore said that the SquamishLillooet Regional District (SLRD) has indicated a willingness to contribute, as the cycling network plan would involve parts of Area C. Richman told Pique that it is simply a reality that many provincial grants require formal, high-level planning, and that staff already has a good idea of what projects should be supported when it comes to cycling infrastructure.

of what will be involved when it comes to policing is not yet known. This could put additional burdens on staff, including bylaw officers, he said. “We don’t know if there is going to be a bylaw or enforcement cost to it,” said Richman, explaining that every community is adjusting to the new reality of cannabis legalization in its own way. Richman added that the fees may be revisited its in the future—that they are not set in stone. “We want to make sure that if this type of industry is causing cost to the community, then those costs are recoverable,” said Richman. If it’s learned that “there aren’t a lot of additional costs then we can look at the bylaw and perhaps change them.” The VOP passed its recreational cannabis policy in October 2018— Whistler has yet to do so. The VOP has already given its seal of approval to one business operator (the owners of the Pemberton Hotel) to set up shop. n

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 29


News PEMBERT ON & T H E V A L L E Y SLRD sees ‘red flags’ in pipeline route STEELHEAD LNG EYES 2025 PROJECT COMPLETION By

Braden Dupuis

T

he Squamish-Lillooet Regional District’s (SLRD) board of directors is seeing some early “red flags” around a pipeline proposed to run through its territories. At the SLRD’s regular meeting on Jan. 30, the board heard a presentation from Steelhead LNG—a B.C.-based Canadian energy company currently floating two projects: an LNG plant on the West Coast of Vancouver Island, and an accompanying 1,000-kilometre natural-gas pipeline. The proposed routes for the pipeline—which would run from the northeast of the province down near Mount Meager and some sensitive grizzly habitat before transiting under the Salish Sea to Vancouver Island—sparked some discussion at the board table. “I know this is early stages, but for me, there’s some serious geography in there, a lot of unstable geography in there and a lot

of very important wildlife in there,” said Pemberton director Mike Richman. “So I know you have to go through your environmental assessment process and that will be addressed in that form, but hearing your presentation, sitting here, contemplating that, there’s a lot of red flags going off.” Chief Administrative Officer Lynda Flynn directed the proponents to the SLRD’s website. “As of the middle of December, there is a new study on there, which basically says any failure at Mount Meager is catastrophic and will wipe out the Pemberton Valley,” Flynn said. “So do take a look at that.” The terrain is definitely challenging, said Greg Cano, lead for project services with Steelhead. “I’ve worked all over the world in international pipelines, and (the Coast Mountains) are some of the most challenging terrain in the world,” he said, adding that the company has mitigations in place around slope stability, and that in

the case of Mount Meager, the plan would be to drill a tunnel rather than go into unstable areas. The proposed line is also supposed to have fibre-optic sensors for monitoring that would double as an early warning system, Cano said. “We’re very well aware (of the concerns) … that’s why we’re talking about multiple corridors and multiple ideas,” he said. “We may find it may not be technically feasible, because of those red flags you’ve raised.” Discussions for the project began in 2014, and over a three-year period Steelhead reached a relationship agreement with the Huu-ay-aht First Nation on Vancouver Island. In October 2018, the two parties submitted the Kwispaa LNG Project Description jointly to begin the environmental assessment process. The two projects—plant and pipeline— each require their own regulatory and environmental assessment processes. “At this point, (the routes) are not set in stone,” Cano said.

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604.932.5538 • whistlerrealestate.ca 30 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

“We want to see feedback from nations, from different groups, municipalities, regional districts, to see if we can develop something that is mutually beneficial. “We are open to any suggestions, and working with any communities as we develop these potential routes for the Steelhead pipeline.” The high-tech fibre-optic monitoring could also serve a different benefit for communities along the pipeline, Cano said. “One of the opportunities that we do have, too, as we develop this, is to provide fibre for communications in communities along the route that don’t necessarily have access to high-speed internet or high-speed communications,” he said. The pipeline project description has yet to be filed, Cano said, as Steelhead is still looking for input. If all goes according to plan, the project will be completed in 2025. For more on the project, head to www. steelheadlng.com. n


News PEMBERT ON & T H E V A L L E Y Are you UNHAPPY with your rental property revenue? The CONDITION of your property? Current PROPERTY MANAGEMENT COMPANY? If so, give us a call at BLACKCOMB PEAKS ACCOMMODATIONS to discuss what we can do for you! We can help with all of the above, and our team will treat your property as if it were our own, with expert attention to detail.

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NIGHTLY NUISANCE The board of the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District discussed illegal nightly rentals at its Jan. 30 meeting. PHOTO BY BRADEN DUPUIS

SLRD still grappling with nightly rentals BOARD AMENDS POLICY TO FOCUS ON COMPLAINT-BASED ENFORCEMENT By

T

Braden Dupuis

he Squamish-Lillooet Regional District (SLRD) is still grappling with how to address short-term rentals across each of its vast and varied electoral areas. At the SLRD’s regular board meeting on Jan. 30, zoning amendment bylaws related to bed-and-breakfast operations sparked a lengthy discussion about nightly rentals in general. Though the bylaws in question were in relation to traditional bed and breakfasts (requiring them to rezone, and removing Temporary Use Permits [TUP] as a “tool” to allow short-term rentals), Pemberton Mayor Mike Richman said he felt the SLRD’s approach was over regulated. “I think if we try to regulate it right out, then we just drive it underground completely … asking people to rezone to do a B&B, not allowing TUPs to do a shortterm rental, is highly regulated,” he said. “My point is I feel like we’ve gone a little too far with this and that people are going to react strongly, and we need to break it down and get some more input.” Richman said he thinks enforcement should be complaint-based, that the SLRD should consider whether removing TUPs is the “right tool,” and that the bylaws should be referred to stakeholders like the Pemberton Chamber of Commerce and Tourism Pemberton. But SLRD chair and Area D director Tony Rainbow said his constituents— particularly those in Britannia Beach—are anxious to address the problem. “I just recently attended their AGM, and they’re really anxious for something. They would like to bring in capital punishment for people that do Airbnbs,” Rainbow said, noting the problem in Britannia Beach is

mostly centred around absentee owners from the Lower Mainland, rendering complaint-based enforcement ineffective. “If you send a complaint in, by the time the complaint is received, the occurrence was two weeks ago, or last week, and then next weekend we’ve got the same thing,” Rainbow said. “So does it have to be a complaint every single time? … Can we find a way of actually policing it? In theory, we’ve got the noise bylaw we can use, but it’s not solving the problem.” What’s needed in Area D may be different than what’s needed in the rural parts of Area C, Rainbow concluded. The SLRD has $65,000 in the budget to address illegal rentals—a figure Squamish Director Doug Race said was intended to be used on legal fees. “It costs money to take on Supreme Court litigation, (and) at the moment, as far as I’m aware, that’s the only way we can enforce a zoning bylaw, whether it’s for Airbnb or any other zoning breach,” Race said. “(We should go after) one or two problem people a year, and try to get people to understand they have to follow our bylaws … these people are already breaching bylaws, so without enforcement, you’re nowhere.” Following the discussion, the board passed a motion to amend its policy around short-term rental enforcement, removing a reference to proactive enforcement in favour of complaint-based enforcement. The amended policy will be referred to chambers of commerce, tourism bodies and other relevant stakeholders before the bylaws are brought back to the board (likely at the March meeting). Public hearings will be held in each electoral area as part of the process. Stay up to date at www.slrd.bc.ca. n

Support Community Learn how to make the gift of a lifetime.

whistlerfoundation.com

Village of Pemberton

Council Considera�on of an Applica�on for a Non-Medical Cannabis Retail Store

Mee�ng to Consider Applica�on Tuesday, February 19, 2019 9am Council Chambers 7400 Prospect Street Pemberton BC

Public Welcome Subject Property

No�ce is hereby given in accordance with the Village of Pemberton Non-Medical (Recrea�onal) Cannabis Retail Policy that Council will consider an applica�on for a Non-Medical Cannabis Retail Store in the C-1 Zone at the Regular Council Mee�ng scheduled for Tuesday, February 19th commencing at 9am in Council Chambers, 7400 Prospect Street, Pemberton, BC.

What is the proposed loca�on and opera�ng hours? The Applicants, Mark Mendonca and Todd Mumford, have applied to the Liquor and Cannabis Regula�on Branch (LCRB) for a Non-Medical Cannabis Retail Store (CRS) licence proposed to be located in Unit 3-1366 Aster Street, Pemberton, BC. The proposed hours will be 9am to 9pm, seven days a week.

How can I provide feedback ?

You may provide comment in-person at the mee�ng in which the applica�on is being considered, or you may provide a wri�en submission to the a�en�on of Lisa Pedrini, Sr. Planner, Box 100, 7400 Prospect Street, Pemberton, BC V0N 2L0 or via email lpedrini@pemberton.ca prior to noon on Monday, February 18, 2019.

How do I get more info?

A copy of relevant background documents and the applica�on under considera�on may be inspected at the Village of Pemberton Office, 7400 Prospect Street from Tuesday, February 5th to Monday, February 18th during regular office hours (8:30am – 4:30pm), Monday through Friday (statutory holidays excluded) and also online at www.pemberton.ca. For more informa�on contact Lisa Pedrini, Senior Planner at 604-894-6135 (ext. 234) or lpedrini@pemberton.ca.

VillageofPemberton

www.pemberton.ca www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 31


WE L L , THAT WA S…

The dating scene is a weird and wonderful place. Whether you choose to swipe right, or stick to the good old-fashioned “Can I buy you a drink?” approach, the aim of the game is the same, secure that crucial first date! But what if you get the date and it all goes very differently than you expected? We want to hear about your weirdest, wackiest, mostunique dates. From the ones that made you cringe and shudder to the ones that blew you away and pulled on your heart strings. Dates with your one true love to dates with that creep you had to block on Instagram. W E WANT TO H E AR TH E M ALL TH E M ORE U NIQU E TH E BE T TE R!

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piquenewsmagazine.com/valentines or email traffic@piquenewsmagazine.com CONTEST DEADLINE MIDNIGHT, FEB. 10, 2019. WINNERS AND SELECT SUBMISSIONS WILL BE PRINTED IN THE FEB. 14TH EDITION OF PIQUE. BY ENTERING THIS CONTEST YOU AGREE TO HAVE YOUR WORK PUBLISHED IN PIQUE NEWSMAGAZINE AND ONLINE AT PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT, CONDENSE OR REJECT ANY CONTRIBUTION. PRIZES TO BE ACCEPTED UNDER MERCHANT CONDITIONS, NO CASH VALUE. WINNERS MUST BE 19 YEARS OR OLDER.


O U T O F R AN G E

34 Dispatches

PICTURE PERFECT Cpl. Mike Hamilton was overwhelmed by the crowds at Joffre Lakes Provincial Park when he tried to regulate parking on a chaotic morning in early August. PHOTO BY JOEL BARDE

BC Parks reacts to ‘driver anarchy’ at Joffre Lakes RCMP LETTER WARNS THAT SOMEONE WILL BE STRUCK IF ‘DRASTIC ACTION IS NOT IMMEDIATELY TAKEN’ Joel Barde

jbarde@piquenewsmagazine.com

F

or many Sea-to-Sky residents, trading horror stories about the overcrowding at Joffre Lakes Provincial Park is a form of sport. Few stories, however, measure up to the account given by Cpl. Mike Hamilton of the Pemberton RCMP in an Aug. 13, 2018 letter emailed to road contractor Mainroad Group, and shared with BC Parks. (The letter was made public thanks to a Freedom of Information request by local outdoor enthusiast Steve Jones.) In the letter, Hamilton recalled a visit to Joffre in August when his efforts to stop hikers from illegally parking on the shoulder of the highway were no match for the volume of visitors. “After approximately 2-3 hours, I was forced to completely abandoned this endeavor,” wrote Hamilton. “I experienced what I can only describe as driver anarchy and mass crowds.” Hamilton witnessed hikers standing and sitting in the “middle of the highway” snapping photos, and holding up traffic as they waited for parking spots to open up. His attempts to turn away people from the park were met with “anger and frustration,” and at one point he was “nearly struck head-on by an inattentive motorist.” Hamilton finished his letter on a foreboding note, saying that he is deeply concerned for the safety of park’s visitors. “If drastic action is not immediately taken,

I believe that a hiker and/or several parked (attended or unattended) cars … will be struck on this busy roadway.” According to Jennie Aikman, BC Parks’ regional director for the south coast, the agency is responding to the safety concerns raised in the letter. “We are diligently working on developing some strategies, including some strategies that we can implement in the short term, for this coming season,” said Aikman. “We want to ensure the public is safe when they’re coming and recreating in BC Parks.” Though unable to provide examples of any forthcoming management plans, Aikman said that there has been some “discussion” around setting up a shuttle system to service the park. “All concepts like that would be on the table, and it seems like that might be a reasonable option,” she said. Aikman added that BC Parks worked closely with the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure (MOTI) and Pemberton RCMP on a coordinated new approach to crowd management during the Labour Day long weekend last year. Anticipating heavy crowds, a flagging company was hired to tape off both shoulders of the highway and direct traffic, and BC Parks increased its communications efforts, placing electronic signs near Whistler and Mount Currie that told the public when parking was full. RCMP also set up an “information post” on the holiday Monday of that weekend to stop people from parking alongside the highway, she added. Aikman added that while some

34 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

elements of the effort—which was referred to as an “enforcement blitz” among the agencies—were successful, others “highlighted the need for some improvement.” A tow-truck contractor was also hired, but Aikman said that to her knowledge no vehicles were actually towed. “People don’t have a recourse to call in the event that their vehicle (is) towed, so we need to look at measures to address that going forward,” said Aikman, explaining there is no cell-phone service in the location. Local MLA Jordan Sturdy said that the situation at Joffre is emblematic of a growing demand for recreation throughout the Sea to Sky corridor. “Managing demand in the Sea to Sky is something we have to grapple with on a large-scale,” he said, adding that while there are no easy solutions, he doesn’t see the September 2018 enforcement blitz as an effective option in the long term. “That was something that was highly labour intensive,” he said. “It’s clearly not something that’s sustainable throughout the year.” Sturdy would like to see BC Parks improve its communications strategy with

T HI S SEC T I O N

By

visitors and highlight AdventureSmart and Leave No Trace principles. “We all have an obligation to steward our province and region,” said Sturdy, adding that programming should be offered in multiple languages. Aikman said that there is room for BC Parks to improve its communication strategy and signage, noting that Joffre Lakes has seen an influx of newbie hikers that might not “necessarily have the same awareness of backcountry ethics and stewardship” as longtime parks users. That said, she believes that the littering issues that many associate with Joffre are overblown. “There is garbage being left from time to time at the campground and on the trails, but (in) my experience, that it’s not as serious an issue as it’s made out to be in the media,” said Aikman. Moving forward, she hopes that forthcoming changes improve the visitor experience. “We want people to come to the park, but we want to ensure that it’s a quality visitor experience and that they’re safe,” said Aikman. “Those are the two things we’re really focused on.” n

5 M OUNTAIN NEWS Surviving avalanche burials 3 36 ECOLOGIC The “planned obsolescence” of modern products 37 O UTSIDER Early morning powder is worth the wait 38 FEATURE Our year of living better


Dispatches O U T O F R A N G E Mountain News: What snow scientists say about surviving snowslides Allen Best

allen.best@comcast.net

I

NNSBRUCK, Austria.—How long can you survive when buried under snow in an avalanche? The answer, according to several studies conducted by snow scientists, is that it depends. Shorter duration, obviously, is better—but not an assurance of survival. The first avalanche survival curve was assembled in Europe in 1992. More has been done in recent years, the latest study being reported last year at the International Snow Science Workshop in Innsbruck. That newest study examined reports of avalanche burials compiled during seven winters in Austria and Switzerland. To qualify, both the head and chest of the victim had to be buried. Survival was relatively high, 87 to 91 percent, if the person was unburied within seven to 10 minutes. Rates of survival dropped to 25 to 28 per cent for longer periods of about 35 minutes. Stated another way in the report by Giacomo Strapazzon and others, the death rate was 18 times higher when the person was buried 36 to 60 minutes. Beyond an hour, a person is 29 times more likely to die than the person buried for 15 minutes or less. Not all avalanche burials are equal, though. If the person ends up with a pocket of air, the odds improve. The more deeply a person is buried also matters, the report noted. An earlier study, released in conjunction with a snow science workshop in Banff in 2014, similarly defined 35 minutes as the outer limit of the curtain call. Beyond that, there’s just little chance of survival. A 2011 study led by Dr. Pascal Haegeli, now of Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, dived deeper, but with a comparison of avalanches in Europe and North America over the course of six winters. Again, the victims had to have their heads and chests covered. But as in the other studies, the odds of survival are reasonably good if the person is uncovered quickly. However, asphyxiation is only one way to die in an avalanche. Of the 143 deaths in Canada that were examined, nearly 19 per cent were due to trauma. How about the difference between mountain ranges? Haegeli and his colleagues compared three major ranges of Western Northern America (avalanche deaths occurring in the East are rare). 1)

The coastal maritime ranges, such as where Mt. Bachelor and Whistler mountain are found; 2) the transitional areas, Cariboos, Monashees, and Selkirks; and 3) the interior or continental Rocky Mountains. Survival curves for the transitional and maritime snow climates had “considerably” lower survival in comparable periods of immersion, they found. Denser snow and hence avalanche debris could result in fewer oxygen pockets, they theorized. In addition, “denser debris would apply greater compressive forces, thus preventing chest movement.” But again, while quick extrication matters greatly, avalanches altogether are nasty things. Airbags and beacons definitely improve your odds, but they fall well short of guaranteeing survival. For example, 33 per cent of all Canadian avalanche fatalities suffered major trauma. Only half of the trauma-related deaths involved people who had been completely buried. In addition, 44 per cent of those who had a trauma-related death had severe trauma, which likely resulted in death shortly after burial regardless of extrication time.

2018

By

DOES CLIMBING ICE NEED TO BE SUITABLE FOR LEMONADE?

OURAY, Colo.—The ice falls where climbers tested their chops and grit during the recent Ouray Ice Festival constituted a lot of water. But does the ice need to be potable water, suitable for chipping away into a glass of lemonade? That’s the question that was put before the city council in Ouray recently. The ice park uses up to 225,000 gallons of water a day to produce the frozen columns of ice, Peter Foster, vice president of Wright Water Works, told the city council. It currently comes from the city’s potable water supplies, meaning it’s been treated and is suitable for human consumption. The Ouray County Plaindealer reported that the idea of alternatives to potable water was to be discussed at further meetings.

STILL OK TO RIDE OVER COYOTES

JACKSON, Wyo.—Some people consider it good sport to get on snowmobiles and chase down coyotes, killing or maiming them by running over them. Apparently, this is common enough that some YouTube videos have been made. A Wyoming state legislator from Teton County wanted to introduce a bill that would have outlawed the practice. But the ideas didn’t make it into a committee hearing, so will not move forward this year, reported the Jackson Hole News&Guide. n

REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT

MANAGEMENT SPECIALISTS FOR SHARED OWNERSHIP GROUPS elevatevacations.com 1 888 788 (STAY) 7829 #NOalarmclockneeded #passionate #purpose #lovewhistlerlife www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 35


NOTICE

2019 COMMUNITY ENRICHMENT PROGRAM The Resort Municipality of Whistler will be accepting Community Enrichment Program (CEP) applications from community groups looking for financial assistance for 2019. The application period runs from Friday, January 25 until Friday February 15, 2019. The CEP provides funding to not-for-profit organizations or societies based within Whistler that are considered by Council to be contributing to the general interest and advantage of the municipality. The categories include ‘Environment’, ‘Community and Social Sevices’, ‘Recreation and Sport’ and ‘Arts and Culture’. Each interested community group will be required to complete a Grant Application Form and present to Council at a Committee of the Whole Meeting on March 12, 2019. All approved funding will be issued no later than April 30, 2019. Grant Application Forms will be available at www.whistler.ca/cep or at the reception desk of the Whistler Municipal Hall, 4325 Blackcomb Way, Whistler, B.C., Monday to Friday, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., excluding holidays. Please submit applications to:

ATTN: Lucy Wyn- Griffiths Legislative Services Department Resort Municipality of Whistler 4325 Blackcomb Way Whistler, BC V8E 0X5 Phone: 604-935-8117 Fax: 604-935-8109 Email: corporate@whistler.ca

Completed applications must be received by 4 p.m., February 15, 2019. No late applications will be accepted. Community organizations wanting to learn more about the CEP application and granting process are invited to contact the Legislative Services Department.

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca

NOTICE APRIL 2019 COUNCIL MEETING DATE CHANGE Please note that the date of the Council Meeting scheduled for Tuesday, April 30, 2019 has been changed to Tuesday, April 23, 2019. Council will meet in the Franz Wilhelmsen Theatre at Maury Young Arts Centre, 4335 Blackcomb Way, Whistler, British Columbia, commencing at 5:30p.m.

Here is the Revised 2019 Council Meeting Schedule: January 8 January 22

February 12 February 26

March 12 March 26

April 9 April 23

May 14 May 28

June 11 June 25

July 9 July 23

August 13

September 3 September 17

October 8 October 22

November 5 November 19

December 3 December 17

Notice of the change in meeting date is given in accordance with sections 94 and 127 of the Community Charter.

Brooke Browning Municipal Clerk

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca/council 604-935-8114 36 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

EcoLogic An evil plan? L

ast year, my partner and I committed to a no-shopping year whose details are outlined in this week’s feature (p. 38). The idea was to make do with what we had and not buy anything new (or used) unless it was essential (e.g., required for work). As the year progressed and things in our lives broke down or wore out, it became apparent how many we might have unconsciously replaced without thinking. As a result, one of many issues our exercise brought into sharp focus was the quality and durability

By Leslie Anthony of our typical consumer purchases. Some things died after remaining serviceable longer than expected, but most—mainly clothing items—failed far earlier than they should have given the original price and/ or amount of use. The old adage “you get what you pay for” was suddenly writ large—but was there something else at play as well? I don’t remember which elementary school grade it was, but I do recall my incredulity when, back in the 1970s, our teacher explained something called “planned obsolescence” to the class. It must have been at a time when my childhood notions of nobility in the adult world were already collapsing, because I was agog, aghast and angry at the entire concept, feeling it must be the cynical and avaricious nadir of humanity to actually engineer something to prematurely quit functioning or purposely become unfashionable, forcing its replacement. In those days, better-engineered vehicles and electronics from Japan and Europe were becoming commonplace in the North American market, requiring manufacturers here to shelve the idea of artificially induced lifespans and make more durable products. Nevertheless, planned obsolescence would become unavoidably entrenched in the landscape of consumerism— particularly among the oligopolies of the digital world—and is here to stay. While shamelessly contributing to accelerated destruction of the planet, the idea’s history is a fascinating drama featuring a cast of both friends and foes. While “planned obsolescence” is often attributed to auto magnate Alfred P. Sloan Jr. of General Motors, who appropriated the bicycle industry’s idea of annual cosmetic changes to drive new purchases in the late 1920s, he didn’t actually coin the term, preferring “dynamic obsolescence” instead. Thus, the phrase’s first real use came in the title

of a 1932 pamphlet essay by economist Bernard London, “Ending the Depression Through Planned Obsolescence,” in which he argued that governments should consider imposing legal obsolescence on consumer goods to stimulate the economy (can you imagine?). However, London’s treatise was obscure, and it was industrial designer Brooks Stevens who turned “planned obsolescence” into a catchphrase with a definition while speaking at an advertising conference in 1954: “Instilling in the buyer the desire to own something a little newer, a little better, a little sooner than is necessary.” Fortunately, this hubristic spin was soon reversed by the public and the term used as a derision for things that broke easily or went out of fashion in record time. Planned obsolescence was now picked apart as a systematic attempt by business to handcuff consumers to a lifestyle of waste, debt, and permanent discontent in the 1960 exposé The Waste Makers by cultural critic Vance Packard. Even then, Packard imagined the concept as subdivided, and today several categories are recognized with familiar examples: contrived durability (designing something to deteriorate); repair prevention (via proprietary hardware and prohibitive costs—think iPhones); perceived obsolescence (new styles that decrease the desirability of “unfashionable” items); systemic obsolescence (altering a system in such a way as to make items tied to it difficult or impossible to use—e.g., software updates); programmed obsolescence (items programmed to stop working far before they actually wear out). If this all seems a bit insidious, it is. If you think you’re getting screwed by cellphone and computer manufacturers, you are (e.g., a few years ago both my $4,000 slide scanner and an expensive script-writing program became obsolete when I unknowingly updated the operating system of my laptop). If you think your jeans wear out, shoe soles delaminate, and sunglasses break faster than they used to, you’re also right. And it’s not being ignored. In 2015, France passed legislation on certain product lifespans that essentially creates a minimum two-year warranty, and the EU is examining a similar move. The lessons of quality are clear: eschew unnecessary style and fashion changes, buy well-made products that will last. You’ll save money in the end, and you may help save the planet. Leslie Anthony is a science/environment writer and author who holds a doctorate in connecting the dots. n


The Outsider 37

EARLY BIRD Pique columnist Vince Shuley knows knows that the wait is worth it.

PHOTO BY VINCE SHULEY

The morning routine

T

he sun has barely risen, but the usual suspects are already milling around the front of the corral. The ex-racer, dressed in slim and obnoxiously bright outerwear, stamps

Vince Shuley

By

too-tight plug boots and shakes out cold from armoured hands. A sleepdeprived local quietly suffers through a hangover, earbuds blasting something resembling drum and bass. A couple of young seasonal-worker roommates jabber about the gnarly line they so deftly skied the previous day, oblivious to eyes rolling around them. Still uncaffeinated, the rest of the early birds stand content in their silence. With 25 centimetres of fresh snow overnight, the wait will be worth it. Groups begin to appear, taking turns for toilet breaks and coffee runs. A lone anxious skier keeps checking her phone to see why her friends aren’t there yet. Bodies now bursting from the corral, new arrivals curse their own tardiness before sauntering to the end of the line. Loud greetings, fist bumps and small-talk conversations begin to hum over the crowd of hundreds. Two friends spot one another over the

swelling sea of helmets and quietly salute, acknowledging each other’s ditching of work this powder morning. Realizing his own mistake of sleeping in, a snake lurks on the flank, scanning for prime lift-line real estate. His first attempt is deflected by a trio of stubborn locals intent on maintaining ski-town canon. A second attempt succeeds and the snake wriggles into the line while distracting surrounding parties with his best impression of a Jedi mind trick. The lift operator nervously pretends to look busy, well aware of the hundreds of eyes constantly glancing in his direction. A loud beep emanates from the lift shack and the vanguard stirs. The action ripples throughout the mob, conversations halting as everyone panics and clicks into their skis. False alarm. The throng collectively groans like a slumbering beast, patience wearing thin by the moment. Boredom sets in. A dissident lobs a snowball towards the front, provoking swift retribution. A hailstorm of snowballs ensues. The rank-and-file snoweaters lower goggles and raise hoods, keeping one eye on the sky as they wait for the barrage to subside. Ski patrollers arrive covered in powder, ignoring friendly jeers as they upload for one more round of avalanche control. It can’t be long now.

The cold has bitten into fingers and toes, a painful numbness spreading throughout the extremities. (Should have worn that extra layer.) Hoots and hollers sound again, this time with more conviction. The lift operator proudly lifts the barrier and the vanguard triumphantly loads the first chair. A frustrating, frigid morning of discomfort evaporates instantly. The gridlock releases and conversations immediately turn toward second and third run strategy. The ride up couldn’t feel any slower, but the unload station is in sight. The first-chair champions speed under the still-ascending audience, waves of powder washing into the air with every turn. Cheers erupt down the line from quad to quad. Well earned. Finally we’re at the top. The crew gives a smiling nod to the waiting lifty as they stand and slide down the unload ramp. Final gear checks. One crew member yells at the rest to hurry up, conscious of encroaching riders that threaten to plunder the fields of white gold for themselves. The procession falls in, picking their way down the ridge where gnarled chutes await full of snow. Two chutes, four skiers. There’s no time for debate, so a single round of rock, paper, scissors ensues for each pair. The victors bellow in glee as they drop in, their runner-up

friends not far behind. Powder-covered pie holes greet each other at the bottom of the chutes. More gloved fist bumps before the group carries on to the next set of terrain features. She’s never gone this big, but if there were ever a day to try, it’s this one. The remainder of the crew—one who launched the cliff and two that didn’t— stand off to the side with phones out and gently offer their encouragement. “You got this,” she says to herself, echoing her friends before taking a deep breath and sliding off the cliff. For a split second, time seems to slow down. But it’s over in a blink. She touches down on her feet, snow from the soft landing bursting into the air. She holds it together for a few metres before succumbing to her minute imbalance tumbling through the powder. Her friends let out a collective gasp. Before they can slide over to pick up the pieces, her dusted helmet surfaces with an ecstatic screaming laugh. The crew surrounds their hero of the day, high fives making the rounds. “Again?” Vince Shuley wrote this story after an exemplary powder day in Whistler. For questions, comments or suggestions for The Outsider email vince@vinceshuley.com or Instagram @whis_vince. n

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 37


STO RY

38 Feature

A

YEAR

OF

LIVING BET TER WHISTLER COUPLE'S NO-SHOPPING EXPERIMENT OPENS DOORS TO MORE SUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION By Leslie Anthony and Asta Kovanen

38 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Feature S T O RY He who is not contented with what he has, would not be contented with what he would like to have. -SOCRATES

n December 2017, I happened upon an opinion article in The New York Times entitled “My Year of No Shopping.” It concerned an intriguing personal project during which the author, Ann Patchett, self-imposed guidelines to limit her purchases for an entire year. I may have been joking when I started the ball rolling by suggesting to my girlfriend, Asta, that we try something similar, but when she took me up on it, we had no recourse but to commit. We may have agreed so easily because the idea wasn’t as “out there” as it initially sounded. Being curious people by nature, here was an experiment that didn’t require time or money, but a subtle reshaping of thoughts about, and approach to, our relationship with things. We knew that even for people of comparatively modest means in a relatively affluent area, it was still easy to overlook how much we actually consumed. Neither of us was an avid shopper. Nevertheless, being someone who otherwise prefers to obtain necessary items as quickly and painlessly as possible, I can also engage in collecting, while Asta is prone to occasional spontaneous purchases and “creative” browsing. Thus, like most folks, we experience a constant accumulation of items— an extra shirt here, the odd book there, more paintbrushes than an art class could ever use—leading to significant time spent purging ourselves of extraneous items that simply aren’t being used. Already advocates of the Reject (don’t buy), Reduce (buy less), Re-use (preowned), Recycle (life after use), and Re-imagine (is there another way?) ethos, there were plenty of environmental, cultural and personal reasons to sign on to such a quest. At its core, this was a sustainability exercise ultimately aimed at making wiser decisions around consumption. Thus, around Christmas 2017—perhaps in part because of it—we found ourselves committing to a Jan. 1 start date. It was a quiet decision: no preparations, no inventory of needs, no pre-purchases, no thinking ahead, no firing a start gun. As of New Year’s Day, there would be no non-essential material purchases (keep reading to see what this meant) for 365 days. A few days into January, our CD player/radio of a decade bit the dust, a first pair of underwear fatally failed, an arm snapped off Asta’s eyeglasses, and the zipper on my daily-use laptop case unravelled into unrepairable chaos. We had decided to go for a swim in a pool of uncertain consequence. It was going to be a long year.

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Feature ST ORY DUG OUT OLD TOQUES and ball caps from storage bins, accepted no new ones

WADING IN

It’s not as if I kept a ledger and took the money I didn’t spend on perfume and gave that money to the poor, but I came to a better understanding of money as something we earn and spend and save for the things we want and need. Once I was able to get past the want and be honest about the need, it was easier to give more of my money to people who could really use it. For the record, I still have more than plenty. I know there is a vast difference between not buying things and not being able to buy things. -ANN PATCHETT, “MY YEAR OF NO SHOPPING,” THE NEW YORK TIMES, DEC. 15, 2017

When, following a friend’s lead, Patchett began her quest, she’d laid out an arbitrary set of rules: “I wanted a plan that was serious but not so draconian that I would bail out in February, so, while I couldn’t buy clothing or speakers, I could buy anything in the grocery store, including flowers. I could buy shampoo and printer cartridges and batteries but only after I’d run out of what I had. I could buy plane tickets and eat out in restaurants. I could buy books because I write books and I co-own a bookstore and books are my business.” Cait Flanders, an author formerly based in Squamish, embarked on her own shopping ban in 2014, turning it into a two-year project. She documented her experiences online, blogging about finances, emotional triggers for spending, and pursuing a more sustainable lifestyle. Her site gained a substantial following and she turned her experiences into the 2018 self-help memoir, The Year of Less, which became a Wall Street Journal bestseller. At the end of her challenge, she distributed a survey to readers, 379 of whom turned out to have been inspired to begin their own shopping ban. While results varied—some lasted weeks, others the full year—no one regretted the decision to try a shopping ban. Top reasons cited were a desire to: 1) become a more conscious consumer; 2) save money, and; 3) learn to enjoy what they already owned. Almost 70 per cent of respondents found the ban relatively easy to adhere to. When we finally set down the parameters of our own effort (at about 11:55 p.m. on New Year’s Eve), our blueprint was similar to Patchett’s ad hoc rules, but slightly more restrictive, demanding more creativity on our parts: 1) the purchase of clothing, hardware, books or electronics was not allowed— including previously owned items—unless specifically

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Leslie

T’S – HAS DOZENS; wore many that hadn’t been worn and donated more than 20 to the Re-Use-It Centre

ONE WEEK’S GARBAGE FOR TWO: we filled a bag approx. every month

HIKING BOOTS: single necessary purchase, fit was the primary criterion but chose Vietnam manufacture over Pakistan because of better working conditions

UNDIES: Started with six pair, ended with two functional pair

Repaired and repurposed old indoor FLIP-FLOPS for outdoor use

STARTED WITH 3 PAIR OF SHORTS: one ripped in half and then turned remaining two pairs into this pair, using material from one to patch the other; stitch patches on front and rear

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40 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Feature STO R Y

Asta

BAMBOO TOOTHBRUSH: no plastic, no replacement TOWEL: Found along trails in Rainbow Park

CLEANING AND DISHRAGS: made from torn-up flannel sheets discarded by local hotels

required for work (as determined through a needs test); 2) replacements for failed items deemed luxuries (i.e., that could be done without) were not allowed; 3) batteries could be replaced, but first with those from other items not in use, until options ran out; 4) exceptions to item/battery replacements were health and safety equipment; 5) travel (transport, accommodation), eating out, ticketed events, and virtual products (i.e. apps, eBooks, software, etc. with an applied use—no gaming or entertainment) were OK; 6) toiletries (within reason) and items related to alimentation (e.g. food, drink, plants, seeds) were allowed; 7) donations were OK and encouraged (with provisos) and; 8) anything that seemed like an exception would require discussion and agreement on a case-by-case basis. We didn’t imagine we’d be consulting this litany for a while. Of course, we were wrong.

THE SHALLOW END ZIPLOC BAGS: washed and reused dozens of times

BATHING SUIT: Single necessary purchase for the year; locally sourced and made in Vancouver

Our enormously productive economy demands that we make consumption our way of life, that we convert the buying and use of goods into rituals, that we seek our spiritual satisfaction and our ego satisfaction in consumption. We need things consumed, burned up, worn out, replaced and discarded at an ever-increasing rate. -VICTOR LEBOW, COUNCIL OF ECONOMIC ADVISERS

PANTS: Multiple knee repairs. patches on legs, re-sewn seams on inside of legs and backside

WOOL SOCKS: darned multiple times

GUMBOOTS: Eight years old, Replaced footbed, leaking from cracks but usable

TO U.S. PRESIDENT DWIGHT EISENHOWER, 1955

Before we got too far into it, conversations led us to acknowledge a few uncomfortable things. First, there was inherent privilege in voluntarily choosing not to shop. We have a safe place to live, are both self-employed, older, white, and own many things that can be used. In my case, 30 years as an outdoor and adventure travel writer has meant the accumulation of review clothing and outdoor equipment, enough that I have a choice on any given day. Rather than handicap that privilege, however, we chose to see it as even more reason for actively lowering consumption—after all, gifted items still bear an environmental cost. Taking on a project like this (and, though unplanned, eventually writing about it) wasn’t intended to come across

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 41


Feature ST ORY

Reduce Reuse REcycle Repair Repurpose as a crusade or recommendation; it was understood that everyone lives and works in different circumstances— some dire, some affluent—that create the context within which they can act. Instead, talking about what we were doing was more about sharing the spirit of a year-long personal experiment; an adventure, if you will—and Whistlerites can relate to adventure. Practically speaking, we had enough stuff to stop buying, but it also made emotional sense to take a pause and meet the reality of the life that was already here. With this came the implicit need to identify items already purchased and reconcile whether they were or weren’t playing helpful roles in our lives. In effect, rethinking owned items built a case for not obtaining more, and for significantly culling what was there and might be more useful to others—a double win. The first hurdle was breaking the habit of impulse or unconscious buying, even to support a good cause. Our first discussion was over my desire to support a Kickstarter campaign for an innovative musical accessory; I argued it was a donation, but that was a weak argument if one received a physical product, so it was out. On the other hand, when our radio went down in early January, there was no discussion. This was exactly the kind of test we expected; all music/ broadcasts for the rest of the year were played through phones, laptops and Bluetooth accessories fortuitously already owned (privilege check); we couldn’t listen to our CDs, but it wasn’t hard to do without. Gifts to others were either handmade, repurposed, consumable (wine, home canning, garden produce), or monetary—cash to start an RESP, the cost of a birthday dinner, airline points, gift cards, donations to a charity, etc. Both avid readers, we read (and re-read) many of the books languishing on our shelves, and the Whistler Public Library saw frequent visits. I was lucky to also receive books to review for magazines and as part of my work for the Whistler Writers Festival. 42 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

The details around our own personal purchase predilections were more specific. Asta wears a uniform while working as an RMT, a job typically hard on such clothing; fortunately, while minor repairs were made, none wore out fully during the year. Her biggest challenges were resisting the urge to purchase art supplies and workshops, or swing by the Re-Use-It Centre to see if there was anything interesting on the shelves. With the help of the Whistler Eye Clinic, she eventually had her glasses (broken in early January) welded back together in Vancouver, and so was only forced to wear one-armed glasses for six months. None of our restrictions felt drastic until her swimsuit bottoms were lost. Being in the midst of a quest for a daily swim, this was serious. Following discussion, it was clear that after two weeks of substituting underwear as bathingsuit bottoms, this wasn’t a suitable (or appropriate) permanent solution and so it was agreed that a bathing suit should be purchased. She chose a single-piece from a progressive Vancouver company (Nettle’s Tale) that designs and produces their own suits in the city. Although I was encumbered by the ban on books (used as research for my own writing), less troublesome was the ban on things I bought more regularly: t-shirts (I have plenty), and flip-flops (old pairs were dragged back out and “refurbished”). But other items started to go awry at an unrecognizable rate—or perhaps at the same rate, except we were now more conscious of it. The broken zipper on a laptop case was easily solved with a flap of duct tape that could last a month or two before having to be replaced. A bedside lamp broke but instead of buying anew, was replaced with one from the living room—rendering that space a shade darker the remainder of the year. My only purchase exception also required discussion, but unlike Asta’s swimsuit dilemma, it was work-related. A story assignment involving a six-day trek along the Jordan Trail last May required hiking boots, and I hadn’t owned a pair for a year and a half since donating my last

A mountain of donations at the Whistler Re-Use-It Centre -PIQUE FILE PHOTO BY ALISON TAYLOR

to a trekking guide in Myanmar; an old pair of beat-up runners that had been a substitute for hiking around Whistler wouldn’t cut it for what research showed to be a difficult hike across a scorching moonscape of broken rock and friable soil. The question: Were hiking boots a legitimate work purchase? We decided that rather than me travelling halfway around the world to find out we were wrong, the answer had to be yes; there was a safety aspect, and boots would doubtless be required for other workrelated assignments and would also make a significant difference in planning recreational options over the coming years. This was a long-term strategic replacement. Nevertheless, as the year wore on, so did clothing and other items. All were managed and only a few lamented. Someone mentioned to Asta how the stitched knee patches of her pants were currently fashionable, but after hand-mending failed seams multiple times, it began to feel like a strong wind could tear them off. Wool socks were darned, and then re-darned. Her old rain-and-winter gumboots developed a seam crack that resulted in either a wet foot or game of puddledodging when walking to work. For Asta, things were also starting to feel stylistically sloppy. My hiking shorts blew out completely and had to be discarded; other shorts and pants developed holes and threadbare parts but were similarly repaired or worn as was. A limited supply of underwear began to show signs of collective breakdown midway through the year—it seemed a pair had to be disposed of almost monthly, and a pack of three purchased a few years earlier all started to wear down in the same way and in the same embarrassing places. By the time our year was over, I was down to two reasonably functional pairs, with intact waistband and no personal bits hanging out. In the end, frugal folks would be correct to say none of this was a big deal, just the normal pattern when you fully utilize an article of clothing, but it was a bit of an adjustment for people used to replacing goods before they became completely ragged.


Feature S T O R Y EST.2006

GOING DEEPER An economic conversation dominated by continuous growth fails to take account of our understanding of what motivates and enriches people, and the ‘safe operating space for humanity’ that we might carefully carve out within planetary boundaries. A different vision of economics is called for, where economies grow less or very differently, one that develops a more integrated picture of social and material aspects to facilitate holistic health. Such a shift is also essential for human well-being. Beyond the point at which basic needs are met, a growth in levels of consumption adds little to well-being, and even undermines it. Not only that, but a materialistic mindset has been shown to work against two hallmarks of psychological health and high quality of life: closer interpersonal relationships and connection with others.

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We had approached the project simply as something interesting to attempt. It felt important not to view it as a form of punishment, denial or environmental penance, but an experience of curiosity— like embarking on a trip. In the end, the routine of making do with what we had was easier to accept than either of us had thought. Perhaps because we weren’t big consumers to start, or, more likely, because it wasn’t hard, didn’t interfere much with life, and just plain made sense. But there were several other added, unexpected benefits. When we started to see clearly what we did and didn’t use, it encouraged us to purge even more than usual, and we were soon making weekly donations to the Re-Use-It Centre. More importantly, underneath the experience rippled the realization that no purchase, home-improvement project, or gear update would fundamentally change our lives; we had to do the personal work and create an attitude shift in ourselves in order to relax and enjoy what was already in front of us. It can be pricey to participate in Whistler culture, but our beautiful town and wilderness is also full of simple pleasures that are often overlooked; once you have shoes on your feet, hiking is free, and jumping in a cold lake is the ultimate summer (or winter) rush. Because paying for experiences was OK, we spent more time optimizing those: a hiking trip to the Sunshine Coast, a rafting trip in the Chilcotin; if there was a need to buy or rent something for trips, we simply borrowed it. Another change: Suddenly, more important than the mechanics of not buying anything was the ethos engendered around those things we did buy. It wasn’t exactly a hundred-mile diet, but we came close buying fruits and vegetables largely from B.C., with a particular focus on Pemberton. There were farmers’ markets, Local Goods Company, and SPUD.ca to help; we bought our beer from Coast Mountain Brewing and preferentially drank B.C. wine and spirits. We got an extra plot at the community garden and doubled our food output. House plants weren’t allowed but we propagated more from what we had, greening our house. Like many Whistlerites, we already took our own shopping bags to the store, but we’d added washable cotton mesh bags for loose vegetables and herbs, eschewing the plastic bags on a roll that grocery stores provide (they could provide compostable bags like

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Feature ST ORY the ones Carney’s provides for collecting organic waste in homes). Two years before, we’d also purchased reusable beeswax wraps for fruit, vegetables, and unfinished food stored in the refrigerator. We re-used Ziploc bags over and over (easy to wash). We rarely touched regular “wraps,” and boxes of Saran wrap and aluminum foil in our cupboard are now three years old. Thanks to the Resort Municipality of Whistler’s new waste streams and organic collection, we recycled and diverted even more, to the point where we were throwing out a grocery-store sized garbage bag only every three to four weeks. Confronting your own consumerism is gaining momentum, with a variety of similar challenges occurring worldwide. Some are personal, others communitybased. Perhaps best known is “Buy Nothing Day,” which was started in the early 1990s by Vancouver artist Ted Dave and promoted widely by Adbusters as a way to challenge the Black Friday shopping frenzy (it was renamed “Occupy Xmas” in 2011). While that particular campaign is a seasonal challenge, some online communities are looking for longer-term engagement. Movements like the #ByeBuyChallenge now sweeping the ethical fashion community on Instagram encourage people to commit to a timeframe of no-shopping and engage in a certain level of self-reflection about their habits. Sites such as buynothingproject. org are dedicated to connecting members through what they call “hyper-local gift communities” where the ethos “Buy Nothing, Give Freely, Share Creatively” is encouraged. By plugging people into their town or neighbourhood through Facebook groups, gifts of talent, time or material items can be donated or requested. Whistler doesn’t have a formal group yet, but perhaps soon. The popularity of the recently released Tidying Up with Marie Kondo series on Netflix has people examining their own home and belongings with renewed interest. Does this spark joy? Not everything needs to, but it’s an interesting lens through which to try and view our lives with a slightly altered perspective.

Think about repurposing items for other uses before sending to the trash. -SHUTTERSTOCK.COM 44 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

THE WATER IS FINE—COME ON IN I keep imagining a tradition I’d like to invent. After you’re established in your career, and you have some neat stuff in your house, you take a whole year in which you don’t start anything new or acquire any new possessions you don’t need. No new hobbies, equipment, games, or books are allowed during this year. Instead, you have to find the value in what you already own or what you’ve already started. You improve skills rather than learning new ones. You consume media you’ve already stockpiled instead of acquiring more. -DAVID CAIN, WRITING ABOUT HIS “DEPTH YEAR” ON RAPTITUDE.COM

We are still reflecting on our many takeaways from this experience. To begin, despite what all our friends thought—What are you going to buy now that you have a chance?—the urge to rush out and buy  wasn’t there, or at least it is now more resistible. As of this writing, a few weeks into the year, only a Moleskin journal and a new book have been procured, both from local bookstore, Armchair Books (not Amazon!). The new Re-Use-It-Centre on Nesters Road was visited to replace Asta’s pants, and a trip to Squamish in the near future will take care of my notoriously irritating underwear.  Although we didn’t do this challenge for financial results, Asta’s savings rates grew to roughly 50 per cent of her annual income. Not shopping wasn’t as challenging as we (or others) expected, and, in fact, felt liberating. The desire to square up actions with values bled into other areas of life, and it all felt great. There’s a long way to go and always more to learn, but we are fully embracing the idea of conscious consumerism as we make future purchases, buying local when possible and supporting companies whose standards of practice we can stand behind. And we will go deeper into the questions and conversations this topic brings up for us. That might be the new theme. And it also seems to be gaining momentum. When raptitude.com writer David Cain posted an article about taking on a “Depth Year,” he wasn’t expecting the huge public uptake it engendered. Yet the guiding philosophy of “Go deeper, not wider”—drilling down for value and

enrichment instead of fanning out— seemed to hit a nerve that drew many to attempt their own challenge. With accountability, a full stop to buying was the easiest part of our own project, but browsing online and in stores also proved a habit that needed breaking. When Asta found herself filling up virtual shopping carts in mid-November and then dumping them for fun, it offered opportunity for introspection. Why do this after 10 months? Rainy-day boredom and a casual desire for something new? Hard to say, but it made one thing clear: By reducing your shopping, you naturally reclaim time spent making decisions, entertaining yourself, researching, physically shopping, and the occasional regret-return cycle. Tim Kasser, professor, psychologist and author of The High Price of Materialism, offers these tips to people wanting to shift away from a consumerist lifestyle: 1) limit exposure to advertising, unsubscribe to company catalogues and emails and unfollow personalities who are trying to sell you anything; 2) shift your viewpoint on advertising to acknowledge that their end goal isn’t necessarily to improve your life but to influence you to spend money; 3) focus on developing other values; materialism has been shown to suppress pro-social values such as altruism, sharing, volunteering, helping, caregiving and cooperation.  After all, regardless of what tradition we were each brought up in, aren’t those things that we’ve all been taught to aspire to anyway? n


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46 Travel

AND

Adventure

A colonial day in

MEXICO Story and photos by Teresa Bergen

46 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

T

he handmade ceramic vessel with the phallic spout was too big to take in my hand luggage, but I knew my husband would at least want a photo. As I tried to discreetly position the brown vessel to catch its best side, Felipe Piña, the artisan, hurried up behind me. “No, no, no!” he cried, snatching the pitcher from my hands. Had I accidentally offended him? I’d heard the phallic container played a role in bachelorette parties, but could it have some deep cultural significance that precluded photography? Felipe grabbed a bucket of water and dumped it in the vessel. He gestured for me to relinquish my camera to a friend. Then he positioned himself beside me, and began pouring water through the phallus into the bucket. As the bucket filled, he


Travel & A D V E N T U R E crowed, “Mucho pee pee! Mucho pee pee!” We both cracked up, sharing an immature cross-cultural moment, a meeting of the minds with a mental age of approximately five. Ultimately, I bought a less conversationstarting sun and moon sculpture to give to my mother. But my muchopee-pee photos are a priceless memory of the characters you meet when touring colonial Mexican towns. According to tour guide Rodolfo Osuna, visiting colonial towns is the most popular day trip from Mazatlán. Pronatours, the company Osuna works for, partners with several tour companies and El Cid Resorts to expose Mazatlán beachgoers to some inland culture. Mexico’s colonial period began in 1521 when the Spanish conquered the Aztecs. Over the next 300 years, the conquerors built churches, administrative buildings, houses and town squares. Visitors soak up the mixture of old Spanish buildings and everyday modern Mexican life. Malpica, 38 kilometres east of Mazatlán, is the first stop on Pronatours’ popular three-town tour. The wonderful smell wafting through the quiet streets emanates from Panaderia Malpica. This bakery uses a mesquite-burning stove to make fresh sweet breads. I bought a sugary pineapple-filled bun, still warm from the oven, for 10 pesos. Across the street from the bakery, Jorge Ortega makes individual tiles using a 100-yearold press. His finished products are freeform abstracts of white with coloured swirls, which

he sells for three dollars each. Other sights along the main street of the small town include a church, a jewelry store where tourists haggle over fine silver, and a museum with an intriguing stone boasting 12 carved vulvas. This prompted a Google search, which opened up a whole new world of vulva stones. Turns out that since Paleolithic times, people have carved vulvas into caves, boulders and rock walls around the world, from Korea to Ireland to Mexico. Our next stop was Concordia. This town was originally called San Sebastian, but its name changed after a 19th century French invasion—the new name means “conquered.” The town holds onto its antipathy. A town hall mural includes the French torching Concordia in 1865, in addition to murals commemorating Mexico’s 1821 war of independence and the revolutionary war, which ended in 1920. Osuna gave us a quick Mexican history lesson, using the murals for illustrations. We had extra time in Concordia because our bus got a flat tire. Nobody in our group minded, as it was pleasant to wander, visiting San Sebastian Church and watching school children build Day of the Dead altars in the town square. The flat tire had exquisite timing. A downpour started immediately after it was repaired and we’d reboarded. Our bus climbed northeast up the mountain towards Durango, water sluicing down the roads. By the time we made it to Copala, the rain had subsided and the hilly colonial town was washed clean. Copala and Concordia were both founded in the 1500s as silver mining towns. But the French didn’t burn Copala, so its 500 inhabitants still live in beautiful fourcentury-old buildings. The cobblestone streets, brightly painted houses and statues inside the San Jose church all screamed out to be photographed. Even the chickens assembled together under a bush, as if posing for a group shot. It was just the sort of place I’d picture if I was thinking “colonial Mexican town.” While most tourists visit Mazatlán for beaches or pool-lounging at all-inclusive resorts, spending a day in the nearby colonial villages is a fun and interesting way to soak up Mexican culture as well as Mexican sunshine. n

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TH E SC O R E

48 Sports

MAGIC MARIELLE Whistler’s Marielle Thompson won her first FIS World Championships gold medal in Utah on Feb. 2.

PHOTO BY MATEUSZ KIELPINSKI/FIS

First Worlds gold for Thompson WHISTLER SKI-CROSS STAR TOPS FIELD IN UTAH Dan Falloon

sports@piquenewsmagazine.com

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ith Olympic gold, three FIS Crystal Globes and 20 World Cup victories under her belt, Marielle Thompson is no stranger to the top of the ski-cross podium. But until the FIS World Ski Championships race on Feb. 2, it had been a little while since she’d been there in beston-best competition, with her last World Cup victory coming in March 2017 at Blue Mountain. Thompson, who won a pair of preseason races in Austria after missing every 2017-18 race save for the Winter Olympic Games after tearing her ACL and MCL, held off Switzerland’s Fanny Smith and France’s Alizee Baron to win the FIS World Ski Championships race at Solitude Mountain Resort in Utah on Feb. 2. “The race was crazy. It was so tight and there was good skiing from everybody,” she said. “You really had to ski well.” At the outset, Thompson fell behind Smith and Baron, so she had to manoeuvre past them as the race progressed, culminating with a late pass of Smith—who had done the same thing to Thompson the week before at Blue Mountain, Ont. “I didn’t want to be behind, but once I was there, I just knew that if I was patient, I might be able to make a few passes,” she said. “After I was in second, going into the last turn, I thought ‘May as well go for it and try to go around the outside and at

least try to win rather than just be content with second.’ “I’m really glad it paid off. It was kind of risky. My coach said ‘What are you thinking?’” she added with a laugh. Thompson added that the inside line was bumpy and slow, so the outside line was her only chance at the victory. Also, it would give her the inside line for the next turn. The win was also Thompson’s firstever victory in her fifth trip to the World Championships; she had a previous best of second at Voss-Myrkdalen, Norway in 2013. “It was really, really exciting. It was something I’ve wanted for so long. I’ve come up just short a few times, so to actually do it was amazing,” she said. Thompson will enter the season’s final three races as the frontrunner for her fourth Crystal Globe, but holds a narrow lead of 45 points over Smith and 50 points over Sweden’s Sandra Naeslund. “I think I’ve been skiing really well all season, but it was a bit frustrating in Blue Mountain to ski pretty well the whole day and get passed in the finals. That gave me a bit of extra motivation to ski my best in the U.S.,” she said. “To be in the top four in every single race, I think it surpassed expectations, at least personally. “I knew I was skiing well, but I didn’t know what that would entail after not skiing for most of a year.” Thompson said her knee has held up well so far this season. She added she’s been thankful for the support she has enjoyed all year, with numerous

48 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

locals boosting her during her comeback campaign. “It’s really nice to have all that support,” Thompson said. It was an excellent day all around for Canadians, as three also made the small final: Kelsey Serwa and Brittany Phelan were back to back in fifth and sixth, while Whistler Mountain Ski Club alumnus Mikayla Martin placed eighth. A pair of Canadian men brought home medals, as Brady Leman and Kevin Drury were second and third, respectively, behind France’s Francois Place. Reece Howden, meanwhile, wound up 17th. Also at worlds, Canadian Alex BeaulieuMarchand took home bronze in the big air event on Feb. 2. His two best attempts added up to 183.25, just behind champion Fabian Boesch of Switzerland (186.00) and runnerup Henrik Harlaut of Sweden (184.00). Evan McEachran also made the final, taking ninth, while Philippe Langevin and Whistler resident Teal Harle ended up in 18th and 20th, respectively. Elena Gaskell was the lone Canadian on the women’s side, placing 15th. France’s Tess Ledeux ran away with the

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win over American Julia Krass and Great Britain’s Isabel Atkin. The FIS World Snowboard Championships are also underway in Utah. Canada’s Baptiste Brochu ended up sixth in the men’s snowboard-cross contest in which American Mick Dierdorff defeated Austria’s Hanno Douschan and Italy’s Emanuel Perathoner. Eliot Grondin and Kevin Hill were 27th and 30th, respectively. In the women’s event, Carle Brenneman also hit the top 10 with an eighth-place finish. Eva Samkova of the Czech Republic scored the win over Great Britain’s Charlotte Bankes and Italy’s Michela Moioli. The only other Canuck was Meryeta Odine in 13th. Canada held its own in the team event, with Brochu and Brenneman putting up a sixth-place finish while Grondin and Odine ended up 10th. The United States claimed the win over Italy and Germany. In the parallel giant slalom on Feb. 4, 43-year-old Canadian veteran Jasey Jay Anderson put up a ninth-place finish.

_______________________________________________________ SEE NEXT PAGE >

49 R ETURNING MAN Logan Pehota third at Kicking Horse 50 P UCK PRIDE Rogers Hometown Hockey coming to Whistler 52 N EW RACE Whistler X Off-Road Triathlon to debut in June 53 L OCAL FLAVOUR WMSC skiers set to compete at Canada Games


Sports T H E S C O R E Wild-card Pehota throws down to hit FWT podium

Russia’s Dmitry Loginov took the win over Slovenia’s Tim Mastnak and Germany’s Stefan Baumeister. Canadians Sebastian Beaulieu and Arnaud Gaudet hit the top 30 in 27th and 28th, respectively. As for the women, Megan Farrell posted the top Canadian result in 20th. Germany’s Selina Joerg nicked Russia’s Natalia Soboleva and Switzerland’s Ladina Jenny for the win. Other Canadians in the top 30 were: Katrina Gerenser (22nd); Kaylie Buck

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BACKCOUNTRY ADVENTURES

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ogan Pehota has spent much of this winter riding snowmobiles and jumping trains, but he proved he could still hold his own in Freeride World Tour competition on Feb. 5. In the competition at Golden’s Kicking Horse Mountain Resort, which he entered as a wild card, the 23-yearold Pembertonian took a third-place finish with a score of 91.00 behind New Zealand’s Craig Murray (93.00) and Italy’s Markus Eder (92.00). “Today, I would have been happy with any place but coming in third is definitely a bonus. It feels good because lots of people think I’ve been snowmobiling more than I’m skiing, but I’ve still got what it takes on skis,” he said. “My main goal today was to not get hurt so I get to focus on the rest of the season.” There were lower-snow conditions than when Pehota won the event last year. “There were lots of rocks and sharks out there, so I was just trying to play it a bit safe,” he said. “It was the same face as last year, so I definitely had an idea about how short and how fast everything comes up. The low tide and the low snowpack definitely plays a big role in your lines. “There were a lot of things that people were doing last year that you couldn’t even get close to doing this year.” Pehota busted out some tricks during his run, helping to boost his score and create some separation between himself and a field where the 10th-place score

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was a respectable 74.33. “I did 360s in both directions, which I’ve never done in a competition. I hit a decent-sized cliff at the bottom of my run—nothing quite like last year, when I was definitely going for the top of the podium,” he said. “For sure, if I was trying to do the same thing this year, I probably would have hit the same place as last year.” However, since he was just making a cameo on the tour this time instead of vying for the overall crown, Pehota felt less pressure to dazzle. It also helped that having a Canadian event on tour was no longer unprecedented. “For me, coming in this year, there was a lot less stress and pressure. Last year was the first year the tour had ever been in Canada and I had a lot of friends and a lot of people that I wanted to make proud,” he said. “I really, really wanted it last year. “This year, with the wild-card spot, I didn’t really have to worry about the rest of the tour or the overall points. I was coming in having already won it once, so people know I have what it takes.” While it felt nice to make it back onto the podium, Pehota said, he doesn’t have any immediate plans to return to the tour fulltime. “I have a different goal this year. I’m focused more on filming and shredding for myself, so I’m not going to change any of my plans,” he said. “I’m still young. I’ve still got lots of time. Also in action were Whistler Freeride Club alums Liam and Tom Peiffer, who were eighth and 18th, respectively. Full results are available online at www.freerideworldtour.com. n

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STEEP SKIING CLINICS

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PEIFFERS PLACE EIGHTH AND 18TH AT SECOND STOP

(23rd); and Jennifer Hawkrigg (28th). In the parallel slalom on Feb. 5, meanwhile, Darren Gardner posted the best Canadian result, finishing 17th. Loginov rolled to a second consecutive win over Italy’s Roland Fischnaller and Baumeister. Anderson took 23rd. As for the women, Buck and Farrell took 22nd and 23rd, respectively, as Switzerland’s Julie Zogg knocked off Ukraine’s Annamari Dancha and Germany’s Ramona Hofmeister for gold. n

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 49


Sports T HE SCORE Hometown Hockey coming to Whistler HOSTS RON MACLEAN, TARA SLONE EAGER FOR BROADCAST By

Dan Falloon

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fter decades as one of Canada’s leading sports journalists, Ron MacLean is no stranger to Whistler. But when he started his most recent gig as the co-host of Rogers Hometown Hockey in 2014, the resort wasn’t on the radar. Pucks and sticks weren’t on MacLean’s mind during one recent trip for a round at Nicklaus North Golf Course. “That (golf), I thought, made sense and I could imagine maybe going to do ski coverage, but I never dreamt that we would do a hockey show,” MacLean said. “It couldn’t be a prettier stage for the telecast, but I thought logistically it might have been out of reach. Financially or physically, it might have been a difficult stop for us, but it’s all coming together and we’re all thrilled.” When the show’s tour comes to the

resort on Saturday, Feb. 9 and Sunday, Feb. 10, culminating in a broadcast of the Toronto Maple Leafs and New York Rangers game at 3:30 p.m. on Sunday, MacLean and co-host Tara Slone will have plenty to talk about. Though Whistler may still be awaiting its first born-and-trained NHLer, with the Warm twins, Beck and Will, in the Western Hockey League and others like Garrett Milan who have managed to carve out a pro career in North America and Europe, our heritage is stronger than one might decipher at first glance. MacLean chipped in another Whistler-connected hockey tidbit: Nancy Greene-Raine received her giant slalom gold medal from the 1968 Grenoble Olympics during an intermission of a Canada-USSR game. “It’ll be nice to get away from the basic impression that it’s a great hill, which it is, and actually a great town,” he said.

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COMING TO TOWN Ron MacLean and Tara Slone are keen to bring the Rogers Hometown Hockey tour to Whistler on Feb. 9 and 10.

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There will be more than just the game on offer, with a festival taking over Whistler Olympic Plaza for two days as well as a youth tournament planned for Meadow Park Sports Centre. However, despite lining up ex-NHLers like Hockey Hall of Famer Paul Kariya and former Vancouver Canucks goalie Kirk McLean, as well as the Rutherford Creek Trio and the Hairfarmers performing, MacLean said it’s the locals that make the festival a success. “The real entertainment comes from the backbone of the game, the people in the communities we visit,” he said, noting that in the midst of the show’s fifth season, it has travelled 115,000 kilometres and hit 120 towns. “Everybody will be great and hospitable when we’re

there. We know that. Whistler always is.” MacLean particularly enjoys the British Columbia stops, not just because of the province’s beauty and potential of a reprieve from frigid Central Canadian winters, but also because of First Nations involvement in the telecasts, which always open with a land acknowledgement. “In Year 1, we really, truly appreciated that it was a time when Truth and Reconciliation was coming to the fore (with the) Idle No More movement. The whole Canadian awakening to our First Nations history was happening and it happened to coincide with our stops in British Columbia that I think we really learned the most,” he said. “We’re the guests. It will be their show and our honour just


Sports TH E SC O R E to have the lens through which to help them teach us, one more time, what a lucky history we have that someone took care of the land, Mother Earth.” Co-host Tara Slone also cited greater First Nations integration in our province as a plus. “That’s been really nice and that’s also been an education for Ron and me,” she said. MacLean generally enjoys British Columbian stops, but considers the best stop so far to be in Great FallsWinsdor, N.L. Slone, however, couldn’t pick just one. “Something magical and special happens in every place, whether it’s the people that we meet, our family, a Zamboni driver, or a story that we uncover that just melts our hearts,” she said. “From a physical beauty perspective, B.C. is quite unparalleled.” Slone has also been to town previously, hitting the slopes with her own instructor. However, she’s taking a different tack this year, exploring what one can do without strapping on a set of skis for her Hometown Musts segment with Whistler Blackcomb director of mountain operations Doug MacFarlane. “We’re going to take the gondola and

do the Peak 2 Peak. If the weather’s good, we can take a helicopter—and then do the après ski,” she said.

ON-THE-GROUND ORGANIZATION

Bringing the show to Whistler was the brainchild of Steve Neal, who has a long history in hockey as the founder of SportsMarketingInc.ca, which has worked with the Canadian Hockey League for the past two decades. It stemmed from a brief cameo on the show in December 2017. “Back last Christmas, when Alta Lake froze, it was just like glass. I woke up, looked at the lake, and went out to drill a hole in it to see if it was safe,” Neal recalled. “I went to my six-and-a-halfyear-old son and said ‘Let’s skate the lake.’ For me, that was just quintessential Canadian dream. “You could literally hear the puck hit the tape of a stick and hear your skates cutting the ice.” Neal’s wife happened to be recording video and pictures, which eventually made its way to the executive producer of Rogers Hometown Hockey, Alison Redmond. The video opened the broadcast of the Toronto-Vegas game on New Year’s Eve.

“That’s what then started, over a glass of wine, I asked ‘Alison, why haven’t you brought Hometown Hockey to Whistler?’” he said. According to Neal, Redmond said they just needed someone to take the lead within the community, and he stepped into those shoes. Neal connected with Resort Municipality of Whistler manager of strategic alliances (and one-time Chicago Blackhawks draft pick) Bob Andrea and both agreed it would be a good chance for a locals-focused celebration. With the Whistler Minor Hockey Association and its Squamish counterpart both on board, Neal hopes the event will provide a platform and fundraising opportunities for local hockey. Continuing with the province’s reputation as highlighting Indigenous issues, Neal said the local committee is working with Brady Smith from the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre and local First Nations will open the broadcast for the first time. As well, the SLCC will be featured during the broadcast, while the REDress Project, which raises awareness of missing and murdered Indigenous women and is organized locally by Linda Epp, will also be mentioned.

LOCAL LEAF FAN HOPES TO SEE BRETHREN IN ATTENDANCE

Long-time local Doug Ryan was happier than most when he first heard about the announcement last summer—and that his beloved Maple Leafs would be featured in the game. “I just thought it was awesome. It was about time that it came to Whistler,” he said. “I’ve been telling every Leafs fan to show up and support our team, so that got me excited.” Though Toronto’s Stanley Cup drought dates back to 1967 and has the team has endured its share of lean years, the Leafs have rebuilt with a young core and are threatening to bring the Cup back to Canada for the first time since 1993. Ryan, who grew up watching Leaf stars Borje Salming and Rick Vaive with his stepdad every Saturday night in London, Ont., is glad to have that level of talent in blue and white once again. “Everyone is talking about our team because of Auston Matthews and Mitch Marner the young kids. I guess fellow hockey fans are happy for us, too,” he said. “With Leaf fans, the passion just runs deep. There are Leafs fans everywhere.” For a full list of activities, visit www. hometownhockey.com. n

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Sports T HE SCORE Whistler to welcome new offroad triathlon WHISTLER TRIATHLON CLUB TO KEEP ROADWAYS FREE By

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Dan Falloon

new triathlon will take place in Whistler this June, but fear not, motorists—it’s all off-road. The Whistler Triathlon Club’s inaugural Whistler X Off-Road Triathlon and Relay is set for June 9 in and around Lost Lake. Race director Dale Tiessen recalled a pair of XTERRA events held roughly 10 and 20 years ago in Whistler and the club looked to bring those types of events back to the resort. “Myself and several others that were either directors of the triathlon club or members of the triathlon club were reminiscing about previous events in Whistler,” said Tiessen, who has BC Cup cycling race director experience. “At the same time, we were talking about what the goals of the triathlon club were for Whistler. “The triathlon club had run events before and we wanted to get back on that.”

The course plans, which are available on Trailforks.com or at www.whistlertriclub. com, are inspired by the first XTERRA race in the resort, which weaved its way through Lost Lake Park, Tiessen said. “We landed on running the race in the Lost Lake area versus running it out of Rainbow Park primarily for logistical considerations: egress and ingress (from and to) the park, not having to deal with roads and not having to deal with CN Rail to go over the tracks,” he said. “We built the courses trying to acknowledge that Whistler has a substantial amount of very technical terrain. We wants to sample good trails without creating too difficult of a course.” Tiessen surveyed the organizers of the Squamish event, who relayed to him that they had significant feedback regarding the course’s difficulty despite selecting Alice Lake Provincial Park’s least strenuous terrain. “It was good feedback. What I took from that is people are looking to race

KNOWLEDGEABLE ORGANIZER Dale Tiessen (centre) won his division at the Squamish Off-Road Triathlon in 2018.

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moderate trails and do so very fast,” he said. “They want a fast running course, not something that’s gnarly and technical that they feel like they have to put knee pads on or something like that.” Registration for the race’s 250 spots opened on Feb. 1 at www.whistlertriclub. com. Tiessen expects the slots to fill up sooner than later after consulting with other organizers of similar events in the region. “We expect to be close to or at capacity for the event,” he said. Tiessen added he hopes to see those who had never thought of doing a triathlon get inspired, as they are looking to appeal to trail runners and mountain bikers who might look to diversify from their respective specialties. However, with a relay also on offer, participants can create teams as well.

Exclusive

The individual race will be offered in either championship (1.5-kilometre swim, 26-km bike ride and 10-km run) or sport (half-length) distances while the relay is offered on the full championship course. Tiessen noted that the race will be held the same weekend as Thinkbike, the mountain-biking demo event spearheaded by Grant Lamont, which will return after taking a hiatus in 2018. Thinkbike will run from Friday, June 7 to Sunday, June 9 with tours leaving Day Lot 2 at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and at 10 a.m. on Sunday. On Friday night, BC Aboriginal Youth MTB Program director Patrick Lucas and Bicycles for Humanity (Uganda) founder Pat Montani will present at Whistler Museum at 7 p.m. Passes for one, two, or all three days are available at thinkbikewhistler.com. n

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Sports TH E SC O R E WMSC to be well represented at Canada Winter Games SEVEN MEMBERS, INCLUDING THREE LOCALS, BOUND FOR ALBERTA By

fourth day, I had to finish and I had to do well or else I wouldn’t have made the team. “We had a lot of people cheering us on in that last run. There were a lot of people that didn’t finish and they were just down the side. I completely zoned into my race mode. I didn’t hear anything. I was completely focused on that run.” Wood, who competed at nationals last year, took a lot from that experience, namely learning to ski much different conditions in Ontario. “I haven’t had too much experience competing on pretty much sheer ice, so being there for a week was very helpful for my skiing overall,” he said. Also joining Wood is Mount Currie’s Sara Stiel, who earned the U14 Nancy Greene Award as the top Canadian skier at last year’s Mackenzie Investments Whistler Cup. Stiel said she’s happy to be going with friends on the team. While she’ll draw on her Whistler Cup experience, she acknowledged that jumping up to the U16

Dan Falloon

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avid Wood went right down to the wire to qualify for Canada Winter Games. With his qualification on the line, the Whistler Mountain Ski Club member started out slow during the final qualifier at Sun Peaks in January. “I didn’t have my best race ever. I did pretty poorly in the (giant slalom). The first run, I hurt myself so I didn’t start the second run and then the next day, I was shaken up from the first day injury,” he said. “But then I pulled it together in the slalom and made the team, so I’m very happy about that.” Because of that, Wood will join six other WMSC teammates at the Games, which will run from Feb. 15 to March 3 in Red Deer, Alta. “It was the most pressure I’d ever skied under because I had to finish those two races and they’re two runs each,” he said. “That fourth run overall, the second run on the

level will be an adjustment. However, Stiel excelled in both the slalom and giant slalom events en route to punching her ticket. “I’m usually better at GS, so when I did well in the slalom, I thought ‘Oh, OK, good job!’” she said. “(The GS) has a little bit more flow to it so you can really charge and go fast.” It’s been a quieter season trainingwise for Stiel, who noted a late start at Whistler Blackcomb and more recently, first-semester exams, have kept her from skiing as much as she’d like. “It was a bit of a slow start in Whistler with the lack of snow so we had to travel to Sun Peaks a lot, but it was fun,” she said. As well, Matthias Shorter is set to attend the Games after an incredible qualifier at Sun Peaks where he not only finished all four events, but hit the podium once and finished no lower than eighth. “It was exciting that all my hard work paid off,” he said.

Looking back on his success, Shorter credited a good, thorough inspection and focus on his own process. “I was not really focusing on the results that I wanted to get in the race. I was more trying to ski my best,” he said. “I was putting everything out there and being happy with my performance.” The four other WMSC athletes set to go to Canada Winter Games are: Jaden Dawson, Fiona McInnes, and Adam Usher (all of North Vancouver); and Abbotsford’s Chase Burns. Whistler’s Drew Hetherington will join as a coach. Other locals set to go are: Michael Murdoch, Joe Davies, Ethan Hess, and coaches Chris Manhard and Maria Lundgren (cross-country skiing); Finn Finestone, Juliette Pelchat, Truth Smith, Maggie Crompton, Jadyn Chomlack, and coaches Meghan Hebert and Sam Weston (snowboarding); Gillian Gowling (biathlon); Kai Smart, Josephine Howell, and Maya Mikkelsen (freestyle skiing); and Finn Schroeder (judo). n

!

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Noches de la Havana is a centuries-spanning, fedora-demanding, flower-splashed fiesta. Come dance the rumba in old Havana, salsa in Hemingway’s rum bar and mambo into the glamourous Tropicana nightclub filled with delectable delights. Whistler’s most extravagant mountain top party of the year! To purchase tickets, please visit: WHISTLERBLACKCOMBFOUNDATION.COM

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 53


Sports T HE SCORE Bobsleigh duo glad to race at nationals CHIASSON, HULSE SLIDE ALONGSIDE CANADA’S BEST By

L

Dan Falloon

ong-time bobsleigh pilot Francis Chiasson realized a dream on Feb. 1. He finally got the chance to compete at Canadian Championships. “It’s pretty cool. It was a bucket list item for me, man,” said Chiasson, who turns 64 this year. “All the training that we do here, sliding down the track, led to the opportunity to slide with the national team in their competition. “I was firing on all cylinders, just so excited by being there.” Though Chiasson and brakeman Mitch Hulse ended up in last place among finishers, they still posted a solid time, finishing 7.89 seconds back of defending Olympic two-man champion Justin Kripps and his brakeman Cameron Stones. Chris Spring and Neville Wright were second and Nick Poloniato and Benjamin Coakwell placed third. Chiasson explained that, generally, the schedule would be prohibitive to his participation in the national event, so he was glad to get the opportunity this season.

“Typically, I wouldn’t be sliding at the beginning of the season. The Canadian team comes here and does some earlyseason training from early October through mid-October and then they get out on the World Cup circuit,” he said. “If we had a World Cup or events in the early season, I’d be operating as an official on the dock, usually the finish dock. “Come December, I’d probably start sliding … It would take a few sessions to get back in shape and form up to speed.” As a nine-year veteran, Chiasson is capable, though he’ll never challenge the top times put down by the champions. He noted that the starts he and Hulse put down were among their best ever—and were still over a full second back of Kripps and Stones. Though he often gets his practice in alongside the national-team athletes when they’re in Whistler, Chiasson said it still is a different feeling rubbing shoulders with them in competition. He added that he received a similar chance in a recent season when he served as a World Cup forerunner. “Whenever you drive, there’s always a bit of anxiety involved. It’s a competition

and you want to do your best,” he said. “You don’t want to crash. You don’t want to have trouble. You’d like to be able to perform half-decent. “And yet, it was pretty comfortable to be in the start house after having experienced the World Cup as a forerunner.” Hulse had slid with a different pilot toward the end of last season, but then approached Chiasson for this campaign. After struggling at times to lock down a consistent brakeman over the years, which can limit his ability to train properly, Chiasson was thrilled to team with Hulse. “This winter, he’s been very reliable,” he said. “For all of the fellas that drive up there, typically, there isn’t a big line-up of people standing there at the ready to go. You often have to find somebody that wants to slide. “If they don’t have any experience, or limited experience, jumping into the sled, you’re not really gaining any ground in the sport. You’re not training at your best.” Chiasson, who said he enjoys sharing the sport with new people, acknowledged that many athletes who might want to be brakemen often have other commitments

or recreational pursuits. Hulse grew up taking part in motorsports and developed a need for speed that he can satisfy on the bobsleigh track. “It’s a unique sport,” he said. “It gets a lot of folks from different stages of life involved. To me, it’s a lot of mental power involved, so you need to be in a really good headspace.” Hulse acknowledged that when he took up the sport, he didn’t foresee competing with Olympic champions alongside other developmental athletes. In the women’s bobsleigh event, Christine de Bruin and Kristen Bujnowski earned the win, sharing the podium with silver medallists Alyssia Rissling and Melissa Lotholz and bronze medallists Kori Hol and Dawn Richardson Wilson. Chiasson and Hulse were also crowned as one of three B.C. medallists along with the Hol-Wilson duo and the Stuart Chisholm and Clifford Crews team. As for the skeleton races, Elisabeth Maier topped Mirela Rahneva and Madison Charney for the women’s victory while Dave Greszczyszyn topped Mark Lynch and Patrick Rooney for the men’s gold. n

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to make an appointment today. 54 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Sports T H E S C O R E

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SPORTS BRIEFS: GRENIER HITS TOP 20 AT WORLDS By

T

Dan Falloon

he world’s top junior lugers got the opportunity to race alongside the best at Altenberg, Germany on the weekend with the FIL Junior World Championships taking place alongside Viessmann World Cup action. Whistler’s Natalie Corless had the best result among individual sliders, posting a 12th-place finish in the women’s event, 0.851 seconds back of champion Cheyenne Rosenthal of Germany. Italy’s Verena Hofer and Germany’s Jessica Degenhardt rounded out the podium in second and third, respectively. Fellow Whistlerite Caitlin Nash placed 24th. On the men’s side, Devin Wardrope placed 16th, 2.683 seconds off the pace set by winner Max Langenhan of Germany. Austria’s Bastian Schulte and Italy’s Lukas Gufler took silver and bronze, respectively. Whistler’s Garrett Reid, meanwhile, placed 21st. The doubles event was a co-ed affair, with Corless and Nash combining to place second among women and 14th overall, 2.232 seconds back of winners Hannes Orlamuender and Paul Gubitz of Germany. Russia took second and third, with Dmitriy Buchnev and Danill Kilseev earning silver and Andrey Shander and Semen Mikov claiming bronze. The second Canadian sled of Wardrope and Thomas Fassnridge placed 21st. Lastly, Canada took a top-10 finish in the team event, with Samantha Judson, Colton Clarke and the Corless-Nash doubles sled posting an eighth-place showing. Austria topped Germany and Russia for gold. In the World Cup event, Pemberton’s Trinity Ellis was the top Canadian singles sliders in her debut, posting a 16th-place finish, 0.715 seconds behind winner Sandra Robatscher of Italy. Germany’s Natalie Geisenberger and Russia’s Viktoriia Demchenko rounded out the podium. On the men’s side, Whistler’s Reid Watts took 17th, 1.337 seconds off German Felix Loch’s winning pace. Austria’s Reinhard Egger and Germany’s Johannes Ludwig placed second and third, in order. Finally, in the doubles event, Canadians Tristan Walker and Justin Snith slid to an 11th-place finish, 0.808 seconds behind champions Thomas Steu and Lorenz Koller. Germany’s Toni Eggert and Sascha Benecken took second while Latvia’s Andris Sics and Juris Sics were third.

GRENIER HITS TOP 20 AT WORLDS

Canada’s two entrants in the FIS World Ski Championships women’s super-G finished close together. Valerie Grenier and Marie-Michele Gagnon were 19th and 21st, respectively, at the race at Are, Sweden on Feb. 5. Grenier was 1.78 seconds back of winner Mikaela Shiffrin of the United States. Italy’s Sofia Goggia and Switzerland’s Corinne Suter were hot on Shiffrin’s heels and placed second and third. Gagnon had narrowly missed a top-10 finish in women’s giant slalom action at Maribor, Slovenia on Feb. 1. Gagnon was just 0.18 seconds out of 10th and 2.86 seconds back of co-champions Petra Vlhova of Slovakia and Shiffrin. Norway’s Ragnhilde Mowinckle ended up third. In the Feb. 2 slalom, Canadians Laurence St-Germain and Roni Remme took 17th and 20th, respectively. Shiffrin took the win without sharing, topping Sweden’s Anna Swenn Larsson and Switzerland’s Wendy Holdener.

WMSC RACERS TAKE TOP  10S AT KIMBERLEY

Whistler Mountain Ski Club racers posted strong results at the BC Cup Speed Series at Kimberley on the weekend. Gigi Kranjc put up a fifth-place finish in the women’s downhill on Feb. 1 and an eighth-place showing in the Feb. 3 downhill, while Maja Woolley was also fifth in the women’s slalom on Feb. 2. As for the men, Konstantin Petkovic was fourth in the slalom. Full results are available online at www.fis-ski.com.

FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER  GC HONOURED

The Fairmont Chateau Whistler Golf Club made an exclusive list this year. The local course was one of two B.C. sites to crack online golf reservation service golfscape’s list of the World’s Top 100 Courses, ranking 64th. Wrote the site: “Carved out of the slopes of the Coast Mountain range in British Columbia, this magnificent Whistler golf course allows nature to dictate the path without constraints of commercial influence. The mountain course traverses creeks, ponds, stands of ancient Douglas fir, and granite rock. Elevation changes of more than 400 feet overall create an impressive golf opportunity and a naturally spectacular BC golf experience.” n

Jenny Perez, Ivey MBA and Member in good standing of Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council (ICCRC), and her team, have been in Whistler for many years and have built a reputation for effective consulting services. Workers & Families

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Pavel Suchy 1948-2019 Pavel is loved and dearly missed by his wife Iveta, daughter Katerina and sons Martin and Pavel Jr. Remembered by family and friends in Czech Republic.

A celebration of Pavel’s life will be held at Nita Lake Lodge, Whistler. MARCH 1ST 4-8 PM

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 55


56 Velocity Project

DEEP BREATHS Edward Dangerfield has come to learn that a person can attain an altered brain state through intimate practice and the study of breath patterns.

PHOTO BY JAMIE LAUDER

The promise of a sober high

E

dward Dangerfield admits that he’s a little bit intense, probably in the way that many Whistler folk are. Type A. Overachiever. Dive in. Go deep. He’s working on that. He’s

By Lisa Richardson been exploring his pathologies and life path since getting caught in an avalanche and completely burning out from the restaurant business in 2014. “I totally burned out and had what can only be described as an awakening slash total nervous breakdown,” laughs the 38-yearold Englishman. What followed was The Gentleman’s Guide to Eat Pray Love, in which Dangerfield stumbled out of Whistler, and journeyed to Peru, Portugal and Poland, to variously contract altitude sickness and experience his first altered state, meditate in an offgrid stone cottage and churn up so much emotional history and trauma that he developed a daily drinking habit, and experienced an excruciatingly lonely fall in Poland. It was the year of rock bottom, and he genuinely considered ending it all—but instead, he flew back to Whistler, rented a bunk at the hostel, got a job bartending, and began to seek help. His plummet from the superstardom of founding and running a successful restaurant stunned friends, but, Dangerfield says, he finally felt free. And then he began seeking help in a wide

range of alternative therapies, including somatic experiencing, freedom tapping, biofield energy healing and breathwork. “I knew I didn’t want to go down the pharmaceutical route. I was tanked, but I knew that wasn’t going to help.” After several years of immersing himself in this journey of understanding himself, trauma, the body, and the nervous system, he has come full circle, from seeker to teacher, arriving all the way back at the beginning, to rediscover the most basic and comprehensive technology we humans have. The breath. And in the breath, he has found his life’s work and offering. Also, incidentally, a way to get high. “I do get really passionate about things and fully immerse myself into them,” admits Dangerfield. “And part of my journey is to try be a bit more balanced in my life. But I dived in because I knew I needed to. I was like: this is saving me. I wanted to save my life. And I needed to develop practices so I could regulate myself. So it’s been a super intense five years.” Dangerfield is now trained in Chinese massage, Qi Gong, yoga, meditation, and breathwork—a quantum shift from the straight-laced life he prepared for as an uppercrust English private schoolboy with an economics degree. (Parents, take heed. That’s what Whistler can do: Be the gateway to a parallel universe, if you walk all the way through.) Now at the helm of Orbit Healing, Dangerfield has spent the last two years

56 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

offering nervous-system regulation, through movement, breathwork and meditation, and facilitating retreats and men’s circles. Specifically, he “guides people on breath journeys into altered states of consciousness to release unprocessed emotions from the cells of the physical body.” The work can help treat addiction, depression, unresolved trauma, injury, low level sickness, or can be used simply to help process the garden variety of childhood dramas, that we’d like to imagine we can storm our way past into enlightened adulthood, but that in fact tend to remain lodged deeply and gunkily in our body’s cells and crevices, sabotaging us when we least expect it. Once Dangerfield starts talking about the breath, you will never look at the simple act of inhalation and exhalation the same way again. The breath is the bridge between the animal brain and the higher brain, the way to move a raw emotion into a completed story. The breath is the way of stimulating your endocrine system and your digestive system, of preventing stagnation in the body’s various organs and systems. The breath is an ongoing dance between effort and ease, between loss and grace, between matter and spirit. Through it, we draw energy from the planet all around us. 26,000 times a day. Inhaling and exhaling. A kind of prayer. Or not. Breathing happens subconsciously. Inadvertently. We can spend our entire lives doing it, without realizing that we’re sitting on the ultimate

technology and medicine. Dangerfield has come to learn, through intimate practice and the study of breath patterns, that a person can attain an altered brain state, or generate certain feelings, even get high, without any external substance. No drugs. Just the breath. “There’s a lot that’s percolating here,” says Dangerfield, of the growing interest in psychedelics, inspired in large part by Michael Pollan’s latest book, How to Change Your Mind. “For me, it’s really important that we realize that the external substance is not required to create the altered state. Mushrooms? Awesome, great. Peyote and ayuhuasca are wickedly powerful substances, and they will open up a lot of doors, and they’ll open them all at the same time, quite often. Breathwork doesn’t. It only opens up what’s ready to be opened. Really gently and steadily.” Dangerfield’s radical approach is, in many ways, the reclamation of ancient wisdom. “What I want to do is to honour the power and wisdom of the human body by listening really deeply to what it needs. I made a pursuit towards healing. That was my intention. I sat in my darkest time and said, I’m going to heal. And what that means is a return to the memory of wholeness.” And through the power of breath, he’s spreading it around. The Velocity Project: how to slow the f*&k down and still achieve optimum productivity and life happiness. n


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whistler.ca/recreation


Epicurious? Survey takes a look at preferences in eating out ACROSS THE PROVINCE, ALMOST HALF OF RESIDENTS SURVEYED GO OUT FOR DINNER ABOUT ONCE A MONTH By

A

Fiona Scrivens

t the end of a long ski day, there is nothing better than sitting down with friends and family and being served a meal, but what makes a restaurant memorable? Research Co. recently carried out a survey looking at the dining-out of British Columbians that offers some interesting insights into restaurant goers. Across the province, almost half of residents surveyed (48 per cent) said they go out for dinner about once a month or less—a proportion that includes 60 per cent of those aged 55 and over. And while 27 per cent of British Columbians dine out about once a week or more often, the number jumps to 35 per cent among those in the 18-to-34 millennial age group. In this world of technology, it’s no surprise that the internet and cell-phone use plays a role in dining. Technology

definitely impacts which restaurants consumers choose; about 47 per cent of the survey’s participants said they viewed an eatery’s website before deciding where to go. As well, one in five said they took a photograph of their meal—33 per cent of those snapping a photo were millennials. Despite the survey’s findings, Whistler’s Pangea Pod Hotel owner Russell Kling tries not to focus on social media for his restaurant.  “(Social media) is a very small portion of our business,” said Kling. “I’m guessing, but I would say that 99.99 per cent of our business is repeat customers or word of mouth.” The survey also revealed that the generation-X age group is more willing to speak up about any concerns they have to a manager while those who are 55 years old and over are more likely to compliment good service. Kerren Bottay has been the general

manager at Bearfoot Bistro for six years, and his experience has been that if millennials are not happy with the service, they wait until it is over then publicize their disaffection on social media. On the other hand, Bottay has observed that the older generation is more likely to confront the problem then and there, which is preferred as it gives staff a chance to remedy the situation and turn the meal into a positive experience. The Research Co. survey also found that 25 per cent of respondents said they sent back a dish because it was bad, while 28 per cent sent back a dish because it was cold. Women were more likely to send back a dish than men. “We try to do a few things really well versus a lot of average things,” said Kling, explaining how they work to keep complaints to a minimum. “We aren’t going to try and have an eightpage menu, we’ll tell you where you

think you should go and get those.” Good service doesn’t start and end with food. With Whistler’s restaurant scene a high-energy one, it’s important for restaurants to keep wait times to a minimum—though that can be a real challenge when the resort is at capacity. According to this survey, only 12 per cent of those aged 18 to 34 said they waited in line at the door for an hour or more. That number drops to two per cent for people 55 and over.  “We all have that same clock, like your stomach is telling your brain you’re hungry and there is a certain point you say ‘well, this is ridiculous,’” said Kling. If a restaurant provides great food but horrible service, only 36 per cent of customers would return, according to the survey. Interestingly, millennials (38 per cent) are much more likely to endure bad service than generation X (21 per cent) or baby boomers (14 per cent). According to Kling, to operate Li e mu ve 6- ry F sic 9p rid m ay!

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Epicurious?

SURVEY SAYS A new survey by Research Co. probed the dining habits of British Columbians. Pictured is Pangea Pod Hotel chef Juan Ibañez. PHOTO BY FIONA SCRIVENS

a restaurant that only focuses on one aspect—food or service—would be like having one hand. “If either is poor, you will not see a guest return,” he said. “If the product is poor, no one will come back, and if the service is poor, I don’t think people will come back either.”  The survey also found that 52 per cent said they would return to a restaurant where the food is expensive but good. “I think that (price point), especially for locals, is really important,” said Kling. “We all know Whistler is a super-

expensive place to live … but we want to provide something, especially to locals, that is pretty amazing value. “To me, a repeat customer is the best customer. The more repeat business we get the more satisfied we feel.” To both Kling and Bottay, the experience is what creates great memories and keeps the diner coming back.   “You have to offer something different because after a while things become stale,” said Kling. “Our guests are our gods, we are only as good as the last meal we serve or cocktail that we shake.” n

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SC EN E

60 Arts

Laura Harris plays with edges in her new solo show By

Alyssa Noel

arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

I

t’s not every day you get the chance to witness a painter and a musician collaborate on a piece together. But that’s exactly what Laura Harris and Will Ross plan to do on Saturday, Feb. 9 at the Adele Campbell Fine Art Gallery during the opening for Harris’ annual solo exhibit. “Will Ross plays a lot of the openings at the Adele Campbell gallery,” Harris says over the phone from Victoria, where she lives. “Every year we say, ‘We should do this together.’ I shouldn’t just paint to Ben Howard or Bon Iver like I usually do. So we’ve been collaborating. He’s going to sit beside me while I’m painting and play live.” The pair will spend 15 minutes working with Harris creating the first layer of a painting based on two of Ross’ original songs. “Together we decided we wanted to come up with a story, so I sent her some music that talks about a story of growth and transcendence,” Ross says. “The first song is sad and then it gets into the growth aspect of it all and turns into this pretty

loop that builds on layers that’s kind of happy. It tells a story of new beginnings.” The one common thread between their work: both use layers. Harris often creates up to 30 layers on any given painting while Ross uses looping to give his songs texture. “I’m somewhat prepared (for the event), but when it’s live, you never know what will happen,” Harris says. “It’ll be fun. I think it’ll be really emotional. I disappear into the process when I’m (live painting), but then I turn around and there are people who are emotionally moved. It’ll be really interesting with live music.” The collaboration is part of the opening party for She’s a Rock & a Waterfall, Harris’ solo exhibit at the gallery. The show marks her 17th annual solo show at Adele Campbell. “Every year I put the time aside,” she says. “I start working on the pieces well before Christmas and have a show ready to go with 24 or 25 pieces.” Her textured, abstract paintings have a “lighter feeling” this year, she says. After 18 years working in her cottage-style backyard studio, last year she decided to shake things up and move into a larger space in downtown Victoria. The impact

60 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

ABSTRACT LANDSCAPE Laura Harris works on a piece featured in her latest solo show called She’s a Rock & a Waterfall at the Adele Campbell Fine Art Gallery. PHOTO SUBMITTED

on her work was immediately apparent, she says. “This collection has a really different feel to it. It has a light feeling to it, lots of greys and whites and blues—a happy feeling to it that’s different. I’ve always painted in corners, so to speak … Now I have all this room to move and it comes through clearly in this collection,” she explains. Harris has also been recently inspired to play with the edges of her paintings. Her signature style in the past was to frame her work in black paint. “You know when you see artists work with … drips and splatters and gobs at the edge that they haven’t framed over? When I see that it’s storytelling at its finest,” she says. “You can actually see the process

T HI S SEC T I O N

VICTORIA ARTIST COLLABORATES WITH LOCAL MUSICIAN WILL ROSS DURING EXHIBIT OPENING AT ADELE CAMPBELL ON FEB. 9

of the artists. I’ve really honoured that whole concept in this show.” While Harris’ paintings fall outside the traditional landscape style favoured in Whistler, her abstract pieces are often similarly inspired by nature. “There are elements in my work that suggest snow and land and sky, but they’re mostly an abstract approach,” she says. “‘Abstract landscape’ has been used to describe my work. It maybe has that feeling that you feel in Whistler.” Catch a glimpse of Laura Harris’ new pieces at the opening for She’s a Rock & a Waterfall on Saturday, Feb. 9 at the Adele Campbell Gallery from 5 to 7 p.m. Her collaboration with Will Ross is expected to take place at 6 p.m. with Ross performing throughout the evening. n

62 N OTES FROM THE BACK ROW On love and Lego 64 M USEUM MUSINGS Toad Hall was all about rustic living 65 PARTIAL RECALL Photos from the past week 66 ARTS NEWS Whistler Multicultural Festival sets date


Arts S C E N E

WHAT’S ON @ THE AUDAIN Tales of an Empty Cabin: Somebody Nobody Was... Opening Soon! February 16 – May 6, 2019 A cutting-edge navigation of identity and self by Whitehorse-based contemporary Kaska Dena artist Joseph Tisiga. Presenting Sponsor:

Government Sponsor:

Generous Supporter:

Art After Dark: Contemporary Indigenous Art Practices Relief Sculpture Friday, Feb 8 | 3:30 – 5:30pm Youth* | 6:30 – 8:30pm Adult Use simple paper items like cups and plates to create relief sculptures, inspired by Brian Jungen. *Youth programs 18 & under. Youth under 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

Art After Dark: Yoga @ the Audain

BOLD MOVES The dance performance Wabi-Sabi Love takes place on Feb. 15 and 16 at the Mountain Movement Dance Collective in Pemberton.

PHOTO BY ELENA ARANGUREN

Wabi-Sabi Love puts modern dance centre stage GRUFF GOAT DANCE PRESENTS PAIR OF PEMBERTON PERFORMANCES ON FEB. 15 AND 16 By

J

Alyssa Noel

ust over five years ago, Trish Belsham and her husband were on a hunt to find their next home in B.C. after a stint on a ranch in the interior. When they visited Pemberton during their quest, Belsham was immediately struck by one observation. “I liked the way the women walked through downtown,” she says. For context, Belsham spent 20 years as a dancer with several Vancouver companies. She has a degree in performance and choreography in modern dance, alongside a long list of varied experience in everything from wellness to dance medicine and kinesiology. But at the time of the initial trip to Pemberton she was deep into studying feminine power through an online program. “It was life changing for me, for sure,” she says. “Studying feminine power and understanding the principles and practices of feminine power and what that was all about, it had a lot to do with my life as a performer. To build self-confidence and embody the truth of what (women) know about themselves, I saw that expressed here from the women walking down the street. They seemed like powerful women. When your work is about watching someone walk across the room, it gives you a lot of information about them.” Spoiler alert: Belsham and her husband chose to move to the valley. She started Gruff Goat Dance and began to teach both teens and adults modern dance. The company’s next performance is a big one. Called Wabi-Sabi Love, it’s set to take place on Feb. 15 and Feb. 16 at

Mountain Movement Dance Collective in Pemberton. For the production, Belsham tapped into her skills as a transformative coach and facilitator. She started out by asking her dancers three questions: 1. What do you most yearn for in your life? 2. What’s in the way of receiving that? 3. Do you wish to live your life this way? Then, based on their answers, she choreographed a dance for them. “It’s been really interesting for me because it’s given—as a pilot program— insight into what to do with coaching in terms of the work that I do as a transformative coach,” she says. “We’re embodying the answers to those questions and working them out that way.” In total, the show will include 14 dances—with nine dancers who range from highly trained to beginner— featuring everything from clowns to burlesque techniques. The dancers are all women, save for one number that features a cameo appearance by one of the dancer’s partners. It might sound like high-concept art, but Belsham thinks Pemberton—and the Sea to Sky corridor—is ready. “There are people that have been here for a long time finding their niche, there are people that are moving in from larger cities,” she says. “Sometimes I hear people say, ‘We’re here and we love it and the air is fresh and it’s affordable, but also where do we go to be entertained?’ … It’s always been a creative community. The population is growing enough so there’s enough like-minds to partner with one another.” Tickets for the shows—which both start at 7:30 p.m.—are $20 on eventbrite at https://bit.ly/2RAeSE2. For more information on Gruff Goat Dance visit gruffgoatdance.com. n

Friday, Feb 8 | 6:30 – 8pm Instructor Laura Davies will lead you through flowing sessions that centre on the confluence of art and yoga. Space is limited so arrive early to secure a spot.

Family Studio Sunday Every Sunday | 12 – 4pm Join the Museum for a unique and engaging art experience. Throughout the month of February the theme will be ‘sculptural assemblies’. This week create a paper sculpture exploring geometry and structure. Presented by:

All programming is free for members and with admission Open Daily 10am – 5pm NEW! Friday 10am – 9pm (Closed Tuesday)

4350 Blackcomb Way, Whistler audainartmuseum.com

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 61


Notes FROM T HE BA C K R O W On love and Lego H

ow do you feel about Valentine’s Day? Contrived pile of consumerismdriven Hallmark bullsh*t? Or is it a day to celebrate and honour that noblest of human emotions—love? The Whistler Village 8 is placing bets on both options this week and bringing in two special flicks for Valentine’s Day (which is Thursday the 14th so set an alarm in your phones). Isn’t It Romantic stars Rebel Wilson (Bridesmaids, Pitch Perfect) as a cynical New York professional who suffers a head injury and wakes up in an alternate

Feet Banks

By

universe where she is the star of her own romantic comedy. There were no prescreeners for this one but it looks super meta and comes from the screenwriters of How To Be Single, The Hottie & the Nottie, and a (well-reviewed) matchmaker comedy called Set It Up. That all sounds discouraging, but director Todd Strauss-Schulson has decent weed-smoker pedigree with A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas and directed a decent slasher flick called The Final Girls, which also featured a “trapped in a movie” plotline. Isn’t It Romantic appears to be a mostly snarky look at love and romance, but it’s the closest we get to a pro-Valentine’s Day option and it plays Feb. 13-14. The “Valentine’s hearts should be bloody” option is Happy Death Day 2U, the sequel you didn’t even know you wanted to a 2017 Blumhouse flick about a young woman forced to re-live the same day again and again while a masked slasher stalks and kills her. This time around, there’s more at stake, more people dying, and (presumably, there

BUNCH OF SQUARES The Lego Movie 2 opens this week at Village 8 in Whistler. were no pre-screeners) more blood, guts, witticisms, and spine-shuddering deaths. Like the first outing, this flick will live or die on star Jessica Rothe’s performance. She’s kick-ass though, so sign me up. Happy Death Day 2U also opens Wednesday, Feb. 13. On the small screen, the romance gets even grimmer with The Domestics, a terrifying post-apocalyptic love story starring Kate Bosworth (Blue Crush) and Tyler Hoechlin (Hall Pass) as two poor suckers who were in the midst of a divorce when the world ended and now have to try to work things out while driving across America avoiding savage gangs of rapists, murderers and psychopaths. World-building, creating a unique and interesting reality, is the bread and butter of post-apocalypse flicks and firsttime director Mike P. Nelson absolutely slays it with The Domestics, a finelyhoned film full of savagery, scares and surrealism that’s up there with Mandy as

LIVE MUSIC! MONDAY

GAME NIGHTat 8pm

TUESDAY

“NOW HIRING” LINE COOKS & DISHWASHERS WITH ACCOMMODATION AVAILABLE.

HAPPY HOUR 9am-12pm & 9pm-1am

JAZZ AND BLUES

WEDNESDAY

with Sean Rose

JAM NIGHT THURSDAY

with Kostaman

KARAOKE FRIDAY AND SATURDAY

with Monty

LIVE @ BLACKS

62 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

with our Local Band

one of the best love stories of 2018. Find this one on Crave/HBO (and thanks to my buddy Tricky for the heads-up on this gem). For the kids (or people who just want to go to a movie) The Lego Movie 2 opens this week and it has all the zaniness of the first instalment with just a teensy bit more self-congratulation (which is not a good thing but you’ll live.) The good news is that even five years after the original Lego Movie, all those flashy colours, overstuffed visuals, nostalgia and pop culture in-jokes still mix well enough to keep you entertained. This Lego story is dense, and putting Elizabeth Banks’ Lucy character front and centre doesn’t hurt. There’s also an interesting subplot about the actual kids playing with the Lego/Duplo that brings new layers of depth and meaning, thanks to the addition of a younger sister character/storyteller. The danger here is that cramming a double-helix of thematic resonance and high-concept

PHOTO COURTESY OF WARNER BROS. PICTURES

storytelling into a Lego movie might confuse younger audiences. In any case, you get about what you expect with this one—a kick-ass adventure, voiced by big stars, with some catchy tunes and enough double-sided humour to keep the kiddies (hopefully) enthralled and the adults amused. It’s great, but it sticks to the formula and avoids subverting your expectations in any way. On the other hand, few sequels ever do and The Lego Movie 2 would be considered a classic if it didn’t come after The Lego Movie. The final new flick this week is Cold Pursuit, a new Liam Neeson revenge flick about a father out for justice after his son’s mysterious death (think Taken in the snow). This one is cold-hearted and finds laughter in bleak pain and black humour. So, probably the best Valentine’s movie of the week. Pair it with some chocolate-covered strawberries from Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory and call it a Valentine’s home run. n

WIN HOCKEY TICKETS! VANCOUVER vs ARIZONA on FEB. 21st

(Transportation to and from Whistler included)

COME IN FOR BRUNCH ON SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS FROM 11am - 2pm TO ENTER TO WIN WIN A WHISTLER/BLACKCOMB GIFT CARD $350 SPONSORED BY SLEEMAN’S/OKANAGAN 604 932 5940 • 2129 LAKE PLACID RD


Arts S C E N E

Now ng! Hiri

VILLAGE 8 SHOW SCHEDULE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8TH – THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14TH

Banff Centre Mountain Film Festival showcases outdoor films

ALITA: BATTLE ANGEL (14A) THURS 3:50, 6:50

ISN’T IT ROMANTIC (PG)

CATCH JAM-PACKED SCREENINGS FROM FEB. 7 UNTIL FEB. 9 IN WHISTLER AND SQUAMISH By

Alyssa Noel

W

see but also on their evening preference— either a Friday or a Saturday. We have been fortunate to have all of our shows sell out for as long as I can remember. Whistler fits 240 people per night and Squamish has had a full house at 450 people for the past several years now! It’s so great.

hat better way to hide out during the current cold snap than in a cozy theatre watching other people brave the elements? The Banff Centre Mountain Film Festival is making a stop in Whistler and Squamish during its world tour from Thursday, Feb. 7 until Saturday, Feb. 9. The three shows will each feature a series of around nine different short films each night. Pique caught up with Nathalie White, who has been working with Escape Route to organize the event for the last eight years, over email to learn more about this year’s offerings.

NW: I’ve had the privilege to be given full control of film selection for all of the screenings for the past eight years. I get given short clips and a brief description of each film. I put together a draft of film selections that I find would best suit Squamish and Whistler and, with the help of our Banff host, we come up with a final set for each town.

PIQUE: Can you tell me a bit about

PIQUE: Which are you most looking

the format of the evenings? It looks like several short films screen back-to-back?

NATHALIE WHITE: The festival brings out a couple dozen films on their world tour. These are their top picks, the festival prize winners and biggest crowd pleasers.

“We mix it up to find a nice variety and flow of films to best suit each town.” - NATHALIE WHITE

They run from five-minute short films to one-hour-plus full features. We mix it up to find a nice variety and flow of films to best suit each town. This usually means about several films per screening with one intermission in the middle. Each screening lasts about two-and-a-half to three hours! PIQUE: Do people generally pick

the day with the most films that appeal to them or do you usually see people attending all the screenings?

NW: I think it varies. For Squamish, since we only have one screening, people will come no matter what and we have always had really good feedback about our film selections. Since Whistler has two different screenings, I believe some people choose a night depending on what they wish to

WED – THURS 4:00, 7:00

HAPPY DEATH DAY 2U (14A) WED – THURS 3:55, 6:55 OPEN 10-8

WE CUT & COLOUR • NOW HIRING OPEN UNTIL 8PM • SINCE 1994

NW: It’s hard to pick just one but one that I’ve been looking forward to is called This Mountain Life: Coast Range Traverse. It’s the story of a mother and daughter who ski across the entire Coast Mountain Range, from Squamish to Alaska! How bad*ss is that!?

DAILY 4:05, 7:05; MATINEES SAT, SUN & TUES 1:05; LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:50

THE LEGO MOVIE 2: THE SECOND PART (G) FRI – TUES 4:00, 7:00; DAILY 4:10, 7:10; MATINEES SAT, SUN & TUES 1:00, 1:10; LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:30, 9:35

VICE (14A)

FRI – TUES 3:55, 6:55; MATINEES SAT, SUN & TUES 12:55; LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:55

PIQUE: Do you help pick the films?

forward to?

COLD PURSUIT (14A)

GREEN BOOK (PG)

DAILY 3:40, 6:40; MATINEES SAT, SUN & TUES 12:40; LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:30

GLASS (PG)

FRI – WED 3:50, 6:50; MATINEES SAT, SUN & TUES 12:50; LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:50

AQUAMAN (PG)

DAILY 3:35, 6:35; MATINEES SAT, SUN & TUES 12:35; LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:40

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY (PG)

DAILY 3:45, 6:45; MATINEES SAT, SUN & TUES 12:45; LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:45

piquenewsmagazine.com/events

www.imaginecinemas.com

A AM MP PB BE EL LL L AD DE E LL E E C CA WHISTLER F F II N NE E A A RT, RT, W H I S T L E R

PIQUE: Is Squamish always part of

the tour as well, or is that new this year?

NW: Escape Route has been bringing the festival to Whistler for almost 20 years now. I started working on the project about eight years ago now and that was when we started showing it in Squamish as well. Our Squamish crowd has quadrupled and it has become such a community event. We partnered up (with) the Howe Sound Outdoor Leadership program and a portion of our ticket sales go to them. They have been a tremendous help to us over the past several years and we are so happy to be able to help them raise some funds for their program. Catch the Banff Centre Mountain Film Festival in Squamish on Thursday, Feb. 7 at Howe Sound Secondary, in Whistler on Friday, Feb. 8 at the Maury Young Arts Centre and again in Whistler on Saturday, Feb. 9, also at the Maury Young Arts Centre. The shows start at 7 p.m. with doors at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $21. To purchase them and to see the full line up of films visit escaperoute.ca/2018/11/banff-filmfestival/. n

She’s aa Rock Rock and and aa Waterfall She’s Waterfall A Solo Solo Exhibition Exhibition by A by Laura Laura Harris Harris Saturday, February February 9, Saturday, 9, 5-7pm 5-7pm

Laura will will be be collaborating collaborating with Laura with musician musician Will Will Ross Ross to to perform a live painting demonstration. perform a live painting demonstration. All are welcome at the Artist Reception. Refreshments provided. All are welcome at the Artist Reception. Refreshments provided. WHISTLER’S CANADIAN WHISTLER’S CANADIAN AT THE SHOPS AT AT THE SHOPS AT

adelecampbell.com adelecampbell.com

ART ART THE THE

DESTINATION DESTINATION WESTIN WESTIN

604-938-0887 604-938-0887

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 63


Museum Musings

The Power of Women in Canada PAULINA CAMERON CEO, Bestselling Author & Speaker

Wednesday

February

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

Women entrepreneurs as the drivers of our economy

Inspiring stories and observations from talking with 150 of Canada’s most influential women.

Tickets at womenofwhistler.com

Stories of conversations with champions, leaders and luminaries

Empowering the next generation (the future)

Early bird tickets until Feb 6.

ER N N I W 9 1 0 7TH, 2 FEBRUARY

Lou

PET of the

week

Name: Lou This is Lou the Yorkie doodle! We’re not sure if he loves playing in or eating the snow more! Visit a Whistler Happy Pets store to pick up your prize. Function Junction: #101-1085 Millar Creek Rd. Bring a copy of this ad to redeem your prize.

YOUR PET COULD BE NEXT!

Email your pet photo with name & details to tsweeney@wplpmedia.com 64 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS Though the living room may look cozy, winters could

be harsh.

BENJAMIN COLLECTION

Toad Hall was all about rustic living By

L

Allyn Pringle

ooking back at the early days of skiing in Whistler might make you long for a time when life seemed simpler and cheaper. Living in the valley in the 1960s, however, was challenging for residents, including those living in buildings like the original Toad Hall. The first Toad Hall was originally the home of Alf and Bessie Gebhart. They moved their family to Alta Lake in 1936 when Alf purchased a sawmill and lumber camp. After operating the mill for some years, Alf built a house by Nita Lake in the 1950s. Unlike many structures built around Alta Lake at the time, the Gebharts’ was more of a house than a cabin or cottage. It had four bedrooms (two downstairs and two upstairs), a living room, a kitchen, an adjoining breakfast room and it included a basement with thick walls of stone. Alf and Bessie remained in the house until their sawmill closed and they moved out of the valley. Their son Howard and his wife Betty then took up residence while Howard worked for the railway before they, too, left the valley. The house was then sold to Charles Hillman who rented it out through the 1960s. Without the mill, it’s not that surprising the Gebharts chose to leave the house by Nita Lake, especially over the winter. According to John Hetherington, an early resident of the house when it was known as Toad Hall in the late 1960s, the house could best be described as “cooold.” Fittingly for the owner of a sawmill, the house was built of wood and used sawdust for the insulation. Unfortunately, as Hetherington pointed out, “what happens with sawdust is it all settles down into the bottom, in between the studs, and provides no insulation whatsoever.” The old, single-pane

windows didn’t help retain heat either. Hetherington and three other Whistler Mountain employees, Jim Burgess, Drew Tait and Mike Wozniacki, moved into the house the winter of 1967-68. Luckily for the four, they got their firewood split and stacked the day before the snow came that year as the wood became their main source of heat. The house came with a woodstove, a furnace in the basement and a fireplace, all of which shared the same chimney. For their first winter in the house, the four covered the windows with plastic and slept in sleeping bags on cots in the large upstairs bedroom, which the chimney ran through providing some radiant heat. Though at first the woodstove was used mainly for heat, the four also began learning to cook on it. Food was kept in the walk-in fridge and freezer at the lift company in Creekside or else sat through the temperature fluctuations of the kitchen. In an effort to keep warm, they would throw occasional parties when, with most of the people in the valley inside the house and the fireplace and woodstove going, it would “get warm for a few hours,” said Hetherington. These parties also highlighted another challenge of life at Toad Hall—there was no electricity. Tait had a stereo system (a turntable and two speakers), but in order to use it a generator had to be borrowed and a mechanic friend had to be invited over to keep it running. Light was provided by kerosene-burning Coleman lamps. After a season or two, all four of these residents moved on from the house, leaving it to other residents until its owner decided to take possession. Despite needing “a sawmill to keep the place heated,” Toad Hall was considered a “sort of legitimate place to live” at a time when there were not many places to live in the valley, said Hetherington. n


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1. Whistler pride The Whistler Pride and Ski Festival injected a little colour into the post-holiday haze with skiing, parties, entertainment and music to celebrate its 27th installation, Jan. 20 to 27. Photos by Darnell Collins. 2. Skating stars Junior competitive group results from left to right: Nina Laferriere - Star 1 silver, Parker Watts - Star 1 gold, Danielle Bagnall - Star 1 silver. Photo submitted. 3. Dance for a cause A group of philanthropic Grade 7 students from Spring Creek Community School deliver all the proceeds from the winter dance they organized to BC Children’s Hospital. Photo by Helen Bradley. Students pictured left to right: Lyla Hirsh, Sofia Shortis, Charlie Bradley. Photo submitted. 4. Snow safety Altus Mountain Guides teach eager backcountry enthusiasts about snow science and avalanche safety during an Avalanche Skills Training 1 course in Whistler. Photo by Darren Veres.

Show us Send your recent snaps to arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

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Unit 30 - 1040 Legacy Way | 604.905.1500 www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 65


Arts N E WS

FEST FUN The Whistler Multicultural Festival showcased Whistler’s diverse community in 2018.

PHOTO BY BRANDON BARRETT

Whistler Multicultural Festival sets June date ARTS NEWS: THE COMIC STRIPPERS TO STOP IN WHISTLER; THE LIBRARY SCREENS THE HATE U GIVE By

Alyssa Noel

W

NEXT SESSION STARTS THURSDAY FEB 21

CONCUSSION SUPPORT GROUP Sponsored by Headwound Productions.

Whistler Community Services Society in partnership with Back in Action Physiotherapy & Massage and Vancouver Coastal Health will be offering a recurring 8 week concussion support group. The aim of this group is to support those who have persistent post-concussion symptoms through community resources, education, and deliberate and targeted self-help strategies. The group is open to any residents 16 and older living in the Sea to Sky Corridor. There is no charge for this program, but PRE-REGISTRATION is required.

For more information and to register, please contact a WCSS Outreach Worker at 604.932.0113 or send an email to info@mywcss.org.

TITLE SPONSOR

Call 604-932-0113 or visit myWCSS.org/ConsussionSupport

66 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

ould you like to share your culture with the rest of Whistler? Planning for the seventh annual Whistler Multicultural Festival is currently underway with organizers seeking locals who would like to showcase their cultural traditions. Set for June 7, the festival is run through a partnership with the Whistler Multicultural Festival, the Whistler Museum and the Whistler Public Library. “This grassroots festival is organized, and activities, performances and food are presented by immigrants who have chosen Whistler as their home in Canada,” say organizers in a release. The festival will run from 4 p.m. until 8 p.m. in the Whistler Public Library, on the library plaza and at the Whistler Museum. They also plan to include members of the Squamish and Lil’wat Nations and “encourage Whistlerites to come out and celebrate their own cultural traditions and heritage,” organizers say. In total, they hope to represent residents from more than 40 countries that call Whistler home. While you save the date for the June festival, organizers say locals should also stay tuned for a series of pre-festival music and dance cultural workshops where participants will be able to learn dances and songs led by local immigrants from another culture. For more information, visit facebook.com/WhistlerWelcomeCentre or welcomewhistler.com/programsservices/whistler-multicultural-festival/.

TICKETS TO THE STRIPPERS ON SALE

The Comic Strippers have announced a tour stop in Whistler at the Maury Young

Arts Centre on April 6. They might be oiled up and gyrating like exotic dancers, but the group of four men is actually part of an improv comedy group. Made up of Roman Danylo, who has appeared on comedy shows on CTV, Spike TV and HBO; David Milchard, who you can see on Netflix’s Altered Carbon and Haters Back Off; Ken Lawson from Health Nutz and Vancouver TheatreSports League, as well as Second City; and Chris Casillan, also from Vancouver TheatreSports and the sketch group Canadian Content, they do still pop their tops off to add another layer to their improv offerings. “Semi-undressed and completely unscripted, The Comic Strippers take off their shirts and take on your suggestions to create a whole new genre of comedy,” according to the press release. And, the group clarifies, there’s no extreme nudity, “just extreme hilarity,” for a show that’s for all genders, but strictly 19-plus. Tickets for the show are on sale now for $39 or $34 each for groups of six or more. Get them at showpass.com/ comicstrippers/.

FILM SCREENING AT THE LIBRARY

The Whistler Public Library is screening the film The Hate U Give on Feb. 12 at 7 p.m. The free event takes place the second Tuesday of each month with a fresh new Hollywood film. This month’s pick tells the story of Starr Carter, who splits her time between a poor, mostly black neighbourhood and a mostly white prep school that she attends. Her life is forever changed—and the balance of her two worlds thrown off course—when she witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood friend by a police officer. n


Music 67

MAKE METAL Bison makes their Squamish debut at Knotty Burl on Saturday, Feb. 9.

PHOTO BY VICTORIA BLACK

Bison makes hometown debut in Squamish THE FORMER VANCOUVER HEAVY METAL BAND PLAYS AT THE KNOTTY BURL ON FEB. 9 Alyssa Noel

arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

S

quamish might be known for many things—namely mountain biking, climbing and hiking—but its heavy-metal scene certainly doesn’t make the list. That’s why it might be surprising to learn that over the last six years, three out of four members of Vancouver metal veteran act Bison have moved to the Outdoor Capital of Canada. “It’s nice not to be in Vancouver,” says James Farwell, vocalist and guitarist for the band. “You come up there and there’s no heavy metal—that’s why I like it. I like trees and mountains and rivers. I like that my kids have that, too. I have two boys, so they’re outside playing in the dirt. It’s more close-knit and all my neighbours are so fantastic.” The impact of the move up the Sea to Sky even made it onto the band’s latest album, You Are Not The Ocean You Are The Patient, released in 2017. “I wrote the last record while living in Squamish and it was a completely different experience for me,” Farwell says. “I have space, I can work on music—then I have my family right here … I walk out of my house

and it’s somewhere really beautiful. It was comfortable, but not in a way that the music would suffer. The songs are about nature, but they’re about nature destroying us—it’s about nature exacting its revenge on us.” While they might live outside of Vancouver now, their rehearsal space is still down in the city—as are their jobs.

WHO: Bison WHERE: Knotty Burl WHEN: Sat. Feb. 9th birthday party. The show will also include local bands like Power Trip, Buster Jangles and Vancouver’s Surrounded by Idiots.

“The songs are about nature, but they’re about nature destroying us—it’s about nature exacting its revenge on us.” - JAMES FARWELL

(For his part, Farwell works with a nonprofit in the Downtown Eastside.) “The unfortunate thing is we can’t find any rehearsal space in Squamish,” he adds. “We have band practices in Vancouver… I work in Vancouver. We’re still tied to the fucking city, but we’re trying to get out.” Despite the fact that they made the move some years ago now, the band is making its Squamish debut at the Knotty Burl on Saturday, Feb. 9 for Johnny Thrash’s (who is best known in Whistler for his staring role in Ski Bums, a documentary from the early ‘00s) 49th

“I want to draw attention to Squamish and to the venue,” Farwell says. “If everything goes nicely, I’ve got lots of friends in the music world who might

T H I S SE C TI O N

By

come up and play Squamish.” While he might be new to Squamish’s music scene, Farwell has “been kicked out of Whistler plenty of times,” he says with a laugh. For Bison, the local gig—and sleeping in their own beds—will be a nice change from touring the country, as they’ve done over the last decade-and-a-half. “It’s a completely different thing now (touring Canada). For one, we’re not as wasted anymore, so there’s that,” he says. “You sort of remember things. I’m now maybe not quite as able to sleep on somebody’s floor. I can’t really do that anymore. It’s a little more—I wouldn’t say luxurious, but we probably get a hotel.” Catch Bison at the Knotty Burl in Squamish for Johnny Thrash’s Birthday Bash on Saturday, Feb. 9. Tickets are $15 at https://bit.ly/2S4bUNn. n

68 NIGHTLIFE LISTINGS Our guide to pubs, clubs and bars 71 HOROSCOPE More astrological musings from Rob Brezny 72 P IQUE’CAL Our guide to everything else 96 CROSSWORD Discover the answer to “Deep South” www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 67


Nightlife

THU.

BARS , C L U B S & P U B S d Moe

07

LADIES’ NIGHT

FEB

We have a gift for all ladies. Enjoy a glass of champagne then hit the dancefloor and dance the night away with DJ Peacefrog. Info@buffalobills.ca for guestlist or table bookings. d Buffalo Bills d 7 pm

Live Music

CLUB SHRED THURSDAYS The team at Whistler Blackcomb’s Club Shred are bringing the party back to Merlin’s Bar & Grill all season long! Rotating between Whistler local favorites Red Chair and Joni Toews (from Case Of The Mondays). d Merlin’s Bar & Grill d 7 pm-midnight

THE CURE LOUNGE SESSIONS Enjoy lake views while DJ Smokey sets the tone with a blend of soulful house tracks. d Cure Lounge at Nita Lake Lodge d 5 pm

SAT.

THE HAIRFARMERS Voted Whistler’s best band every year since 2001, The Hairfarmers combine uncanny vocals with innovative guitar and percussion covering all your favourite songs. A Whistler must-see! d Sidecut d 5:30-8:30 pm

Live Music

ARI NEUFELD

Come belt out your best covers at karaoke every Thursday night from 9 pm! d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 9 pm

Party at Whistler’s longest-running locals’ night. Specials all night long. For VIP table bookings or guest list, email info@garfinkels.com. d Garfinkel’s d 7:30 pm

MYC SHARRATT Armed with an arsenal of bluesy guitar licks that hit like old whiskey and a smoky sweet voice that should be bottled for backyard barbecues. d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

RUCKUS DELUXE Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy-nominated violinist Ian Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle and electric guitar. d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

Clubs/DJs #TBT WITH THE SOUNDS OF STACHE Stache has been on a nomadic musical adventure for almost a decade, travelling to over 50 countries and sharing his passion for music with others. Drawing influences from all four corners of the globe, his appetite, understanding and energetic delivery will guarantee a funky smorgasbord of beats. Free. d Three Below d 9 pm-1 am

COAST MOUNTAIN THURSDAYS! Venture on out to Function Junction for the most sophisticated après of the week! Funk, soul, jazz, blues, rare groove, disco and other rare beats curated by Stache, paired with the best beer and service in Whistler! Free. d Coast Mountain Brewing d 3:30-7:30 pm

COCKTAIL DANCE PARTY Start your weekend early with a handcrafted cocktail. Then hit the dancefloor or rock our legendary dancing cage with help from DJ Peacefrog. d Buffalo Bills d 7 pm

LEVEL UP - HOUSE & TECHNO Featuring a rotating selection of DJs playing some of the best underground electronic dance music in house and techno, the “Level Up” nights are set to up your dance game. Hosted by DJ Miss KosmiK. d Moe Joe’s d 9:30 pm-2 am

SHUT UP AND PARTY Start your weekend off one night early and come get wild with Whistler’s loosest bar staff. With music from Fidel Cashflow and DJ Shearer. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP and other special perks. d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

09

FEB

KARAOKE NIGHT

LOCALS’ NIGHT

Joe’s d 9:30 pm

d Mallard

Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

BROTHER TWANG

PAPAJOSH

Papa Josh is playing the Alpine Cafe’s 16th anniversary party on Friday from 7 to 10 p.m.

SOUL CLUB Soul Club is Whistler’s all-vinyl funk and soul party; playing a mix of the finest and funkiest 45 rpm records, from ‘60s rare gems right through to the newest modern soul jams. d Brickworks Public House d 8:30-11:30 pm

THROWBACK THURSDAYS WITH MR. TWITCH Enjoy a musical journey of nostalgia curated by Mr. Twitch. Disco-funk-hip-hop-house and whatever else. Old-school vibes, remixes mash-ups and new stuff to keep you on your toes. Free. d Three Below d 9 pm-midnight

THURSDAY LOCALS’ NIGHT Come join our legendary locals’ night every Thursday, kicking off the night with a game of skate at 9 p.m. followed by DJ Praiz and friends throwing down some dope tracks. Prizes to be given away each week include concert tickets, snowboards, electric sunnies and skateboards! Email info@garfinkels.ca for guest list and VIP options. d Garfinkel’s d 9 pm-2 am

FRI.

08

FEB

Live Music

FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE Live music by Whistler favourites Red Chair. d Tapley’s Pub d 9 pm

GREG NEUFELD Armed with a guitar, stompbox and one of the best, soulful voices you will ever hear. d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

THE HAIRFARMERS Voted Whistler’s best band every year since 2001, The Hairfarmers combine uncanny vocals with innovative guitar and percussion covering all your favourite songs. A Whistler must-see! d Merlin’s Bar & Grill d 3-7:30 pm d Longhorn Saloon d 9:30 pm-12:30 am

LIVE MUSIC

68 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Solo artists perform every week, except on the first Friday of every month when they swap out for a full band. No cover, no lineups. d Whistler Brewing Company d 6-9 pm

MATT HOYLES Matt Hoyles is a low down, wailing bluesman, hailing from deepest, darkest New Zealand. d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

MICHAEL BELANGER Michael is one of Cranked’s favourites playing a wide range of crowd-pleasing hits acoustically. d Cranked Espresso Bar d 6-9 pm

PAPA JOSH Papa Josh’s groundbreaking solo show bridges the gap between live funk and electronic dance music. Winner of the 2011 Roland Loop Competition, PJ performs, records, loops and sequences super funky, jazz-inflected, hard-rocking grooves on guitar, bass, keys, vocals, electronic percussion and effects to create an irresistible dance party experience. d Alpine Cafe d 7-10 pm

RUCKUS DELUXE Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy-nominated violinist Ian Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle and electric guitar. d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

Clubs/DJs CHAMPAGNE FRIDAY Kick off your weekend at Garf’s. Get on the guest list and join the party: info@garfinkels.ca. d Garfinkel’s d 7:30 pm

CRYSTAL APRES WITH DJ PAULY DEEP Straight from the mountain into the bar, playing all your deep house. Apres fix to get your weekend started right! d Crystal Lounge d 3-6 pm

FEEL GOOD FRIDAYS Start the weekend off right with music by B.C.’s finest party DJs mixing the best in hip hop, rap, R&B and party anthems. Whistler’s most energetic dancefloor.

Come wind down your ski day or ramp up your Saturday night festivities with the boys from Brother Twang. d FireRock Lounge d 9 pm-midnight

THE HAIRFARMERS Voted Whistler’s best band every year since 2001, The Hairfarmers combine uncanny vocals with innovative guitar and percussion covering all your favourite songs. A Whistler must-see! d Dusty’s Bar and Grill d 3-6 pm

LIVE @ BLACK’S Every Friday and Saturday, party with local and touring musicians at Black’s Pub. d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 9 pm

MONTY BIGGINS Monty Biggins performs toe-tapping, feel-good tunes in an Americana style, featuring modern hits and classic gems. d Brickworks Public House d 4-7 pm

RUCKUS DELUXE Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy-nominated violinist Ian Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle and electric guitar. d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

CHAD STORM Sexy blues tones and warm electric vibes; batten down the hatches, you’re in for a storm. All your favourite tunes stripped raw and served with soul. d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

Clubs/DJs LADIES’ NIGHT It’s Whistler’s No. 1 stop for stag and stagette parties. DJ Turtle and friends mix up everything from hip hop, R&B, new rap, dance hall and Top 40 bangers. Email guestlist@ moejoes.com for VIP and group perks. d Moe Joe’s d 9:30 pm

SATURDAY NIGHT SHAKER With music from Fidel Cashflow and DJ C Stylez, two of Whistler’s hardest-working and most-loved DJs spinning the best in Top 40, mash-ups, electro, hip hop and party anthems that will keep your booty shakin’ all night long. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP and other special perks. d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

SUPREME SATURDAY DJ Nikky from Vancouver brings the Whistler’s biggest weekend party and best vibe. VIP champagne parades along with the hottest hip hop and remixes! For VIP and guest list, email info@garfinkels.ca. d Garfinkel’s d 10 pm


Water Licence Renewal Process Update Bridge River and La Joie Facilities THE CURE LOUNGE SESSIONS Enjoy lake views while DJ Smokey sets the tone with a blend of soulful house tracks. d Cure Lounge at Nita Lake Lodge d 5 pm

SUN.

10

FEB

Live Music

ACOUSTIC SESSIONS Gather your pals and listen to some of Whistler’s best local musicians after treating yourself to our weekly homestyle Sunday roast. d Three Below d 8 pm

EVAN KENNEDY

Water licences that authorize BC Hydro to either store or divert water for power purposes at our facilities are issued by the Comptroller of Water Rights under the Water Sustainability Act. We are in the process of renewing seven water licences and one associated Permit over Crown Land (PCL) at the La Joie and Bridge River facilities to enable us to continue operating the facilities. The licences we are applying to renew, and the facility to which they apply, are shown on the figure below. We are not asking for changes to the current licence conditions or footprint as part of the renewals.

La Joie Generating Station Final Water Licence (FWL) 126259 (expires 2051) 5% of diversion from Downton Reservoir to Carpenter Reservoir

Gold Bridge

Evan creates a unique live performance mixing in lesserknown album songs with the songs of today. d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

THE HAIRFARMERS Voted Whistler’s best band every year since 2001, The Hairfarmers combine uncanny vocals with innovative guitar and percussion covering all your favourite songs. A Whistler must-see! d Garibaldi Lift Co. (GLC) d 3:30-6:30 pm

Bridge River–Carpenter Reservoir FWL 126281 (expires 2019) 2% of Carpenter Reservoir storage

La Joie Dam

Terzaghi Dam

La Joie–Downton Reservoir FWL 126279 (expires 2019) PCL 26551 100% of Downton Reservoir storage

OPEN MIC JAM NIGHT

Bridge River 2 Powerhouse FWL 126250 (expires 2051) 11% of diversion from Carpenter Reservoir to Seton Lake

British Columbia

An open stage invitation for all who can sing, perform or even just wanna jam out with our house band. Whistler’s longest-running jam night every Sunday at Crystal Lounge. All instruments provided. d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

Lillooet

6.2 MI 10 KM

Anderson Lake

RED CHAIR Red Chair is a local Whistler rock band with an impressive and versatile set list. They have become a hometown favourite with their selection of bar classics, high-energy performances and great musicianship. d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 9 pm

SUNDAY SESSIONS The best locals’ party in Whistler. d Tapley’s Pub d 9 pm

THE WHISKEY RICHARDS The Whiskey Richards are a group of Celtic Gypsy punk rockers who have spent the better part of a decade carving a reputation for themselves as “one hell of a good time.” d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 pm

Clubs/DJs

Seton Dam Bridge River 1 Powerhouse Diversion water licences from Carpenter Reservoir to Seton Lake: • FWL 126287–65% of diversion (expires 2019) • FWL 126288–31% of diversion (expires 2019) • FWL 126080–4% of diversion (expires 2051)

We are applying to renew the licences that expire in 2051, in addition to those that expire in 2019, so that all licences that currently require renewal at the La Joie and Bridge River facilities have the same licence term moving forward. We submitted our Water Licence Renewal Application to the Comptroller of Water Rights, as required by the Water Sustainability Act, in November 2018. We are continuing our consultation and engagement activities and will address any additional information requirements identified. Once this is done, the Comptroller will begin a formal referral and review process. More detailed information regarding the water licence renewals is available at bchydro.com/ waterlicencerenewal. If you have any questions or comments about the renewals, in general or in relation to your property or interests, please contact us at 1 866 647 3334 or wlrenew@bchydro.com.

GAMES NIGHT AT PANGEA Challenge your crew: Cards Against Humanity, Jenga, Settlers of Catan, HedBanz, and many more. Drinks and food specials all night long. d Pangea Pod Hotel d 4 pm

SEND IT SUNDAYS With music from T-Zen and DJ Shearer. Keep your weekend alive, and join us on Sunday nights for one of Whistler’s wildest industry nights. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP plus special perks. d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

SOULFUL SUNDAYS Soul Club Whistler spinning that funky soul soundtrack. d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 9 pm

THE SUNDAY GLOW PARTY Moe Joe’s is transformed into a psychedelic UV infused rave cathedral, as Fidel Cashflow, Zapps and La Dooda cook up an aural feast of house and electro beats. Arrive early to beat the line. d Moe Joe’s d 9 pm

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/whistlermagazine www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 69


Nightlife Follow your Heart...

MON. 11 FEB

Live Music

Evan creates a unique performance mixing in lesser-known album songs with the songs of today. d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

FVCK MONDAYS The wildest party in Whistler on a Monday night continues with music from Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley, The Rogue Killers and DJ Shearer. Throwing down all the hottest tunes you know and love. Deep, tech, bass, house, trap, hip hop and more. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP plus special perks. d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

Open Mic Night at Cranked Espresso Bar with host Caleb McKenzie. Cranked is the perfect place to play without the intimidation of being on a big stage and huge audience. d Cranked Espresso Bar d 6-9 pm

THE WHISKEY RICHARDS The Whiskey Richards are a group of Celtic Gypsy punk rockers who have spent the better part of a decade carving a reputation for themselves as “one hell of a good time.” d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

Clubs/DJs MEATY MONDAY

EAT WELL IN 2019

Sport and beer what more do you need? How about a chance to win our famous Meat Raffle? Proceeds donated to charity. d Tapley’s Pub d 9 pm

MEXICAN MONDAY Feel the heat by our fireplace and pretend you are back on the beach. d FireRock Lounge d 5 pm

Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley and Billy The Kid throw down all the hottest deep and dirty beats you know and love. Deep tech, bass, house, trap, plus more. d Maxx Fish d 9:30 pm

The Crystal Lounge hosts trivia every Monday night! Bring your friends and test your knowledge for a night of fun, laughs, prizes and the chance to “burn your bill.” Conditions apply. d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

TUE.

12

FEB

Live Music

BLACK ‘N’ BLUES Blues night with Sean Rose. d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 8 pm

CELLAR SESSIONS

ARMCHAIR BOOKS, NESTERS MARKET + WHISTLER KITCHEN WORKS 70 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

KARAOKE NIGHT “I Will Survive” won’t sing itself, so come over to Whistler’s longest-running karaoke night and belt out all your favourite hits. Arrive early to avoid disappointment. d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

THE WHISKEY RICHARDS The Whiskey Richards are a group of Celtic Gypsy punk rockers who have spent the better part of a decade carving a reputation for themselves as “one hell of a good time.” d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

Clubs/DJs ALLSORTS Bringing a wide variety of sounds to your Tuesday evening, ED:WIN will be playing “AllSorts” of music to get you dancing down at Three Below every Tuesday night. Listen to hip hop, R&B, house, garage and disco! Free. d Three Below d 9 pm-1:30 am

BINGO Channel your inner granny and dominate bingo at the locals’ living room. d Tapley’s Pub d 8 pm

WED.

13

FEB

MONDAY MADNESS

TRIVIA NIGHT

BUY IT TODAY AT:

The electric bass becomes an extension of his hands and his voice has developed a rhythmic centre of its own, Dino DiNicolo is a master musician with a groove so deep that it moves the mind, the body and the soul. d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

Grab your friends and come down to get up to perform on our open mic. d FireRock Lounge d 9 pm

Bills d 7:30 pm

OPEN MIC NIGHT

#110 - 4368 Main St. Whistler

Daniel Hughes is an up-and-coming acoustic artist that’s quickly turning into one of Whistler’s favourites to watch. He plays a crowd pleasing mix of jazz, R&B and pop classics. d Cranked Espresso Bar d 4:30-7:30 pm

LOCALS LIVE

MARTINI MONDAY

(604) 967-1214

DANIEL HUGHES

DINO DINICOLO

EVAN KENNEDY

d Buffalo

B AR S, C LU B S & P U B S

With live music from Neverland Nights and guests, playing all your rock, alternative and party jams all night long. Plus DJ sets from Fidel Cashflow. d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

CHAD STORM Sexy blues tones and warm electric vibes; batten down the hatches, you’re in for a storm. All you favourite tunes stripped raw and served with soul. d Brickworks Public House d 8:30-11:30 pm

Live Music

DINO DINICOLO The electric bass becomes an extension of his hands and his voice has developed a rhythmic centre of its own, Dino DiNicolo is a master musician with a groove so deep that it moves the mind, the body and the soul. d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

INDUSTRY NIGHT Live music from Neverland Nights. d Buffalo Bills d 6 pm

JAM NIGHT Jam Night with Kostaman and Friends every Wednesday night from 9 pm. d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 9 pm

MATTHEW HOLLAND Matthew is singer/songwriter from Fredericton whose sound can be described as country with a raspy rock sound. d Brickworks Public House d 4-7 pm

RUCKUS DELUXE Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy-nominated violinist Ian Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle and electric guitar. d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

STEPHEN VOGLER Stephen Vogler plays ska, reggae, blues and rock with a healthy mix of originals and covers. d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Week of  February 7th By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): Climbing mountains has been a popular adventure since the 19th century, but there are still many peaks around the world that no one has ever ascended. They include the 7,495-metre high Muchu Chhish in Pakistan, 7,221-metre Karjiang South in Tibet, and 3,840-metre Sauyr Zhotasy on the border of China and Kazakhstan. If there are any Aries mountaineers reading this horoscope who have been dreaming about conquering an unclimbed peak, 2019 will be a great time to do it, and now would be a perfect moment to plan or launch your quest. As for the rest of you Aries, what’s your personal equivalent of reaching the top of an unclimbed peak? TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Eminem’s song “Lose Yourself” was a featured track in the movie 8 Mile, and it won an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 2003. The creator himself was not present at the Oscar ceremony to accept his award, however. He was so convinced his song would lose that he stayed home. At the moment that presenter Barbra Streisand announced Eminem’s triumph, he was asleep in front of the TV with his daughter, who was watching cartoons. In contrast to him, I hope you will be fully available and on the scene for the recognition or acknowledgment that should be coming your way sometime soon. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): While enjoying its leisure time, the peregrine falcon glides around at 80 km/h. But when it’s motivated by the desire to eat, it may swoop and dart at a velocity of 320 km/h. Amazing! In accordance with your astrological omens, Gemini, I propose that we make the peregrine falcon your spirit creature for the next three weeks. I suspect you will have extraordinary speed and agility and focus whenever you’re hunting for exactly what you want. So here’s a crucial question: what exactly do you want? CANCER (June 21-July 22): Now and then the sun shines and rain falls at the same time. The meteorological name for the phenomenon is “sunshower,” but folklore provides other terms. Hawaiians may call it “liquid sunshine” or “ghost rain.” Speakers of the Tangkhul language in India imagine it as “the wedding of a human and spirit.” Some Russians refer to it as “mushroom rain,” since it’s thought to encourage the growth of mushrooms. Whatever you might prefer to call it, Cancerian, I suspect that the foreseeable future will bring you delightful paradoxes in a similar vein. And in my opinion, that will be very lucky for you, since you’ll be in the right frame of mind and spirit to thrive amidst just such situations. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A study by the Fidelity financial services company revealed that in 43 per cent of all couples, neither partner has an accurate knowledge of how much money the other partner earns. Meanwhile, research by the National Institute of Health concludes that among heterosexual couples, 36 per cent of husbands misperceive how frequently their wives have orgasms. I bring this to your attention in order to sharpen your focus on how crucial it is to communicate clearly with your closest allies. I mean, it’s rarely a good idea to be ignorant about what’s going on with those close to you, but it’ll be an especially bad idea during the next six weeks. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Torre Mayor is one of the tallest skyscrapers in Mexico City. When workers finished its construction in 2003, it was one of the world’s most earthquake-proof buildings, designed to hold steady during an 8.5-level temblor. Over the course of 2019, Virgo, I’d love to see you erect the metaphorical equivalent of that unshakable structure in your own life. The astrological omens suggest that doing so is quite possible. And the coming weeks will be an excellent time to launch that project or intensify your efforts to manifest it. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Multitalented Libran singer and actor Donald Glover uses the name of Childish Gambino when he performs his music. How did he select that alias? He used an online random name

generator created by the rap group Wu-Tang Clan. I tried the same generator and got “Fearless Warlock” as my new moniker. You might want to try it yourself, Libra. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to add layers to your identity and expand your persona and mutate your self-image. The generator is here: tinyurl.com/yournewname. (P.S.: If you don’t like the first one you’re offered, keep trying until you get one you like.) SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Leonardo da Vinci’s painting Salvator Mundi sold for US$450 million in 2017. Just 12 years earlier, an art collector had bought it for $10,000. Why did its value increase so extravagantly? Because in 2005, no one was sure it was an authentic da Vinci painting. It was damaged and had been covered with other layers of paint that hid the original image. After extensive efforts at restoration, the truth about it emerged. I foresee the possibility of a comparable, if less dramatic, development in your life during the next 10 months, Scorpio. Your work to rehabilitate or renovate an underestimated resource could bring big dividends. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): We can behold colours because of specialized cells in our eyes called cones. Most of us have three types of cones, but a few rare people have four. This enables them to see far more hues than the rest of us. Are you a tetrachromat, a person with super-vision? Whether you are or not, I suspect you will have extra powerful perceptual capacities in the coming weeks. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you will be able to see more than you usually do. The world will seem brighter and deeper and more vivid. I urge you to deploy your temporary superpower to maximum advantage. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): There are two kinds of minor, boring little tasks. One is when you’re attending to a detail that’s not in service to a higher purpose; the other is when you’re attending to a detail that is a crucial step in the process of fulfilling an important goal. An example of the first might be when you try in vain to scour a permanent stain on a part of the kitchen counter that no one ever sees. An example of the second is when you download an update for an existing piece of software so your computer works better and you can raise your efficiency levels as you pursue a pet project. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to keep this distinction in mind as you focus on the minor, boring little tasks that are crucial steps in the process of eventually fulfilling an important goal. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Can you sit on your own head? Not many people can. It requires great flexibility. Before comedian Robin Williams was famous, he spontaneously did just that when he auditioned for the role of the extraterrestrial immigrant Mork, the hero of the TV sitcom Mork and Mindy. The casting director was impressed with Williams’ odd but amusing gesture, and hired him immediately. If you’re presented with an opportunity sometime soon, I encourage you to be inspired by the comedian’s ingenuity. What might you do to cinch your audition, to make a splashy first impression, to convince interested parties that you’re the right person? PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Twitter wit Notorious Debi Hope advises us, “Before you diagnose yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you are not, in fact, just surrounded by assho--s.” That’s wise counsel for you to keep in mind during the next three weeks. Let me add a few corollaries. First, stave off any temptation you might have to believe that others know what’s good for you better than you do. Second, figure out what everyone thinks of you and aggressively liberate yourself from their opinions. Third, if anyone even hints at not giving you the respect you deserve, banish them for at least three weeks.

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Homework: What is the best gift you could give your best ally right now? Testify at https://FreeWillAstrology.com.

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 71


PiqueCal YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL EVENTS FOR EVENTS IN BARS, CLUBS AND PUBS, PLEASE SEE PAGE 68 For a complete guide to events in Whistler, visit piquenewsmagazine.com/events

O  NGOING & DAILY ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

PRENATAL CLASSES

This program helps support women and their partners in making informed decisions about their prenatal and birth experience. To sign up, please call Bev Nolan-Newsome, certified childbirth educator, internationally certified lactation consultant and registered doula at 604-894-5389. > Ongoing > Whistler COMMUNITY

GAMES CAFE

Come in and enjoy a massive selection of popular games. Sunday to Thursday. > 4-8 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

THE CULTURAL CONNECTOR: A JOURNEY OF ADVENTURE AND DISCOVERY As you follow the Cultural Connector route, you’ll discover the stories that enrich Whistler’s culture, the venues that celebrate it and the milestones that we’ve achieved along the way. The pathway will lead you through beautiful surroundings and six cultural institutions: Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre, Whistler Museum, Whistler Public Library, Maury Young Arts Centre, Lost Lake PassivHaus, and Audain Art Museum. Free. > Ongoing > Maury Young Arts Centre

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WHISTLER MUSEUM

Learn more about Whistler’s culture and history. Now open by donation. > Daily 11am-5pm, Thu until 9pm > Whistler Museum

THURSDAY FEB 7 COMMUNITY

BNI MOUNTAIN HIGH

FEB 7 WHISTLER PUBLIC LIBRARY

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

OWN A PIECE OF MOUNTAIN HISTORY

The Whistler Blackcomb Foundation and Whistler Museum & Archives Society are offering the chance to own a piece of Whistler’s mountain history this February with the sale of trail signs from both Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains. Signs range from $20 to $250, depending upon condition. Purchased signs will be available for pick up at the Whistler Museum on Feb. 9, 10 and 14 only. All proceeds from the sales go to support the work of the Whistler Blackcomb Foundation and Whistler Museum & Archives Society. Over 250 unique signs will be available for purchase online at whistlerblackcombfoundation.com Thursday, Feb. 7 at 10 a.m. > 10 am

COMMUNITY

BNI provides a positive and structured environment for the development and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by helping you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing David Livesey at david_livesey@cooperators.ca. $20. > 6:45-8:30 am > The Venue COMMUNITY 

ACTIVATE AND CONNECT FOR SENIORS 50+

Services Society. In partnership with the Mature Action Community. > 9:30-11 am > Whistler Community Services

STITCHES IN THE STACKS

Connect with friends, new and old, through weekly activities. Meet at Whistler Community

WOMEN’S KARMA YOGA

Drop-in for weekly yoga classes led by an all-female team of certified 200-hour yoga instructors. Includes mat use and childminding. All women, all ability levels welcome. This program is made possible by yoga instructors and childminders donating their time. Contact us to join the team. Free. 604-962-8711. > 9:30-10:30 am > Whistler Women’s Centre

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM For more information on featured events

COMMUNITY

PARENT INFANT DROP-IN

An opportunity to develop a supportive social network with other parents of young babies. Speakers and a public-health nurse are often in attendance. Free. > 11 am-12:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

Photo: SHUTTERSTOCK

COMMUNITY

your local community and international projects. Lunch is available for $20. Everyone welcome. > 12:15 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side COMMUNITY 

DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB

The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For a partner, please call Gill at 604-932-5791. > 1-5 pm > Whistler Racquet Club ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SFU WRITER’S STUDIO WRITING CONSULTS

Need an expert opinion on your writing? The SFU Writer’s Studio offers free one-on-one, 45-minute consultations. Register at least one week prior to the consultation time required. Seven pages of poetry or a prose manuscript must be submitted one week prior to your scheduled appointment. Doublespaced with title and your name on each page with the page number on the bottom. For more information and to register, call the library at 604-935-8435. > 2, 3 & 4 pm > Whistler Public Library

COMMUNITY

ROTARY CLUB OF WHISTLER MILLENNIUM

Join the Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium to learn about what the club is doing to support

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES

Docents will provide visitors with an introduction to the Audain Art Museum and its permanent collection. Visitors will be

ance

form r e P & t s a ter Fe

s Win t il A p r il 2 0 1 9 n o i t a N t s r n Fi Sundays u Thursdays

&

Join the SLCC for an unforgettable evening of indigenous-inspired cuisine, music, dance and storytelling. Seating is limited, book online at slcc.ca/feast or call 604.967.1281 72 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

piquenewsmagazine.com/events


PiqueCal encouraged to explore the galleries afterwards. These drop-in tours are free with the purchase of admission or museum membership. 604-962-0413. > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum COMMUNITY

LUNA PRESENTS THURSDAY NIGHT YOGA

Come shake your shanti in a 90-minute Hatha Flow yoga class. Get in the flow with an emphasis on breathing and movement. 18-to35-year-olds only, free positive vibes for all in attendance! $3 for non-members, free for Luna members. > 5:30-7 pm > Maury Young Arts Centre ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WHISTLER YOUTH BAND

Let the trumpets sing! The Whistler Youth Band is a beginner band for youth ages 10 and up. Grab an instrument and make music with friends. > 6-7:30 pm > Myrtle Philip Community School

FRIDAY FEB 8 SPORTS

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

Triathlon focused swim squads. Full details at whistlertriclub.com/training-sessions. Free to members for fall (includes entry into Meadow Park). Non-members $8 drop-in (includes entry into Meadow Park). > 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 

COMMUNITY 

ART AFTER DARK: CONTEMPORARY INDIGENOUS ART PRACTICES

FAMILY TOGETHER TIME

Many artists transform everyday objects into art. This week’s inspiration is Brian Jungen’s ‘Variant 1’ which turns Nike running shoes into an abstract sculpture. Use simple paper items like cups and plates to create relief sculptures. Handson Art Making: Youth 3:30-5:30 pm, Adult 6:308:30 pm. Free for members and with admission. > 3:30-8:30 pm > Audain Art Museum

COMMUNITY

WELCOME CENTRE MULTICULTURAL MEET-UP

Come and say, “hi” if you are new to Canada and Whistler! Everyone and every age is welcome. Casual meet-up, workshops, information about living in Canada. Check calendar at welcomewhistler.com for full details. Contact info@welcomewhistler.com or 604-698-5960. > 9:30 am-noon > Whistler Public Library

STITCHES IN THE STACKS

Calling all knitters! Join us at the Library on Thursdays in February for Stitches in the Stacks, our brand-new knitting group. This group is free to attend, but you’ll need to bring your own supplies. Let’s curl up by the fire and make something beautiful together. (Crochet lovers, you’re welcome too!) > 7-8 pm > Whistler Public Library

SQUAMISH + PEMBERTON COMMUNITY 

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME

Books, songs and rhymes for preschoolaged children, accompanied by a caregiver. Registration is not required. > 10:30-11 am > Whistler Public Library ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES

See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 3, 5:30 & 7 pm > Audain Art Museum

THE BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL

WORKBC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES DROP-IN

Join the Escape Route when the Banff Centre Mountain Film Festival World Tour brings the spirit of outdoor adventure to Squamish and Whistler on Feb. 7, 8 and 9, 2019! Tickets available at the Escape Route or online at escape route.ca $20. 604 892 3228. > 7-10 pm > Maury Young Arts Centre

SATURDAY FEB 9 COMMUNITY

SINGING WITH THE BABIES

Learn songs and rhymes to soothe and entertain baby while encouraging early language development. For kids up to walking age. Free. > 11-11:30 am > Whistler Public Library

Drop-in to the Pemberton Public Library every Thursday afternoon and learn how WorkBC can assist you in your job search and career planning. All services are free. For details, call 1-877-932-1611. > 1-5 pm > Pemberton Library (Pemberton)

MADE IN WHISTLER MARKET

WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

For ages 13 to 18. We offer ping pong, a skateboard mini-ramp (skateboards and helmets to borrow), free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, guitars, board games, a projector and widescreen TVs. Free. 604-935-8187. > 3:30-11 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

Pique in your pants

whistler’s Safe-Sexy

Treasure hunt

Find the Beaver and WIN a Super Fly Zip Trek AND Snowmobile Tour for TWO with The Adventure Group. Over $500 Value, blast through the forest and soar above it. Come on the adventure of a lifetime with The Adventure Group!

More info at “Find the Beaver” on Facebook. Must be 18-35 to play!

WHISTLER COMMUNIT Y SERVICES SOCIETY

See Friday’s listing for more info. > 6-10 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

Local artists and artisans sell their goods at the Made in Whistler Market. Free admission. > 12-6 pm > Westin Resort & Spa ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES

See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 1 & 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

THE BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL

See Friday’s listing for more info. > 7-10 pm > Maury Young Arts Centre

SUNDAY FEB10 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 

FAMILY STUDIO SUNDAY

Throughout the month of February the theme will be ‘Sculptural Assemblies’. The activities will be inspired by Contemporary First Nations works in the permanent collection. This week, create a paper sculpture exploring geometry and structure. Free for members and with admission. > 12-4 pm > Audain Art Museum ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES

See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 1 & 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

MONDAY FEB11 SPORTS

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

See Friday’s listing for more info. > 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

m.piquenewsmagazine.com on your smart phone

Real treasure hunt! Beaver hidden somewhere in Whistler!

WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

EVENTS & FESTIVALS

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT COMMUNITY 

COMMUNITY

EVENTS & FESTIVALS 

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT  ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 

A parent-directed hour with board games, crafts and a story corner with felt puppets. A drop-in program for families of all ages. Free. > 3:30-4:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

Win big!

Recycle? Yes or no?

Get the BC RECYCLEPEDIA App

www.rcbc.ca RECYCLING COUNCIL OF B.C. MEMBER www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 73


PiqueCal ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

MUSIC & WORDS

This drop-in program is for kids two to four years and it focuses on early literacy through music, rhyme, stories and movement. Free. > 10 am > Whistler Public Library

The Acoustic Coffee House is back! Come join in with this afternoon of music. > 4-6 pm > Grimms Deli (Pemberton)

TUESDAY FEB12

COMMUNITY

IMMIGRANT SETTLEMENT SERVICES

Information and support to help immigrants and newcomers living and working in Whistler as they adjust to life in Canada. Information about, and help with accessing Canadian government and local services, documents and application forms, Canadian immigration and citizenship processes. For more information, or an appointment, call 604-698-5960 or email info@welcomewhistler.com. FB: WhistlerWelcomeCentre. > 3-6 pm > Whistler Public Library COMMUNITY

WORKBC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES DROP-IN

SQUAMISH + PEMBERTON ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

RHYME & SONG

This program gives toddlers, parents and caregivers the opportunity to learn songs, rhymes and finger plays together. Movement is encouraged and your preschooler’s early language and literacy development is supported. For more information, please come to the library, call 604-935-8436 or email youthservice@whistlerlibary.ca. Free. > 10:30-11 am > Whistler Public Library COMMUNITY 

Get your resume reviewed, learn about the local labour market, job search tips, and more. All services are free. For details, call 1-877-932-1611 or go to WhistlerESC.com. > 3-6 pm > Whistler Public Library COMMUNITY 

FAMILY APRÈS

Whistler knows how to après and now the whole family can celebrate a great day on the slopes with even more fun at Whistler Olympic Plaza. Parents can share stories about their day with a warm beverage while the kids participate in a variety of outdoor, winter activities and entertainment each week. > 3-6 pm > Whistler Olympic Plaza COMMUNITY 

GAMES NIGHT

ACOUSTIC COFFEE HOUSE

Visit the Whistler Public Library for a free evening of board games, popcorn and Oreo cookies. Play strategy games such as Ticket To Ride, Settlers of Catan and Carcassonne or traditional favourites like Monopoly, Scrabble and Clue. Sponsored by The Friends of the Library. > 7-9 pm > Whistler Public Library

THE MOUNTAIN VILLAGE SOCIAL GATHERING AND MEETING

What if housing wasn’t just a place to live, but rather, a way of life? The Coastal Village is connecting people who want to live in community with others who have similar values for the betterment of our health, happiness and well-being. Research shows that both men and women thrive in community. Free. 778-840-1529. > 5:30-8:30 pm > The Mountain Village COMMUNITY

SPORTS 

TENNIS LOCALS’ NIGHT

All levels are welcome to join in the locals’ night. Clinic for beginners and casual play for intermediate and advanced players. Free racket rental, snacks and beverage included! $20. 604-932-1991. > 6:30-8:30 pm > Whistler Racquet Club COMMUNITY

WHISTLER SINGERS

Whistler’s community choir. No auditions and everyone welcome. 604-932-2979. > 7-9 pm > Myrtle Philip Community Centre

Group run for intermediate runners and above. Two distance options: approximately 5 km and 10 km. Check our Facebook page, facebook. com/groups/werunwhistler for weekly updates. Headlamps mandatory. #werunwhistler rain or shine… or snow! Free. > 5:55 pm > Lululemon

FILM SCREENING: THE HATE U GIVE

On the second Tuesday of each month, the library screens a hit movie, straight from Hollywood or fresh off the film-festival circuit! > 7-9 pm > Whistler Public Library

WEDNESDAY FEB13

INTERACT CLUB OF WHISTLER

Interact is a club for young people ages 12 to 18 who want to make a difference in their community, mentored by the Rotary Club of Whistler and Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium. The club includes students who want to join together to tackle the issues in their community they care most about. > 4-5 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre COMMUNITY 

BOOK & CRAFT CLUB

MOUNTAIN SPIRIT WHISTLER TOASTMASTERS

Drop in for this casual session, where preschool-aged children will enjoy a short story and then use different media to create a fun craft. A great opportunity for parents to connect with other parents of young children! > 10:30-11:30 am > Whistler Public Library

INDOOR PICKLEBALL DROP-IN

Have fun with others learning the fastest growing sport in North America or simply play a game! All levels welcome. Free paddle rental. $8. 604-932-1991. > 10-11:30 am > Whistler Racquet Club COMMUNITY

FAMILY APRÈS

See Monday’s listing for more info. > 3-6 pm

LIVE, WORK, PLAY

Residential, Office and Commercial Rental Spaces 74 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

COMMUNITY 

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 

� Vista Place

info@vistaplacebc.com

FEB 13 WHISTLER PUBLIC LIBRARY

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SPORTS

WE RUN WHISTLER: WEEKLY GROUP RUN

BOOK & CRAFT CLUB

www.VistaPlacePemberton.com

Photo: SHUTTERSTOCK

COMMUNITY

Build communication, public speaking, and leadership skills with Mountain Spirit Whistler Toastmasters. Everyone welcome. > 5:30-7 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side COMMUNITY 

QUEST LECTURE: THE CORNERSTONES OF PHYSICAL REALITY In this talk, Dr. Andrew Hamilton will explain how some of the phenomena around us come from these two theories of the natural world and present some of the ways these theories are being tested. > 7-8 pm > Whistler Public Library

We’ve got you covered. Pick up the latest issue of your favourite read in Whistler.


book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday:

classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

ADULT SERVICES

ADULT SERVICES

LONG-TERM RENTALS

Accommodation

LONG-TERM RENTALS

Accommodation

MARKETPLACE

ADULTS ONLY

ADULTS ONLY

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS

INDUSTRIAL PARK (PEMBERTON)

FURNITURE

Vista Place Pemberton

WHISTLER FURNITURE CO

Beautiful Hot Blonde - Cherry Double D Delicious. Tight & pristine, extremely blessed, gorgeous girl. She loves to be watched, loves attention & wants to entertain you with her lust crusade. Duos & Stags. 24Hrs. 1-604-902-1112. Clean, classy & discreet.

BEDS IN STOCK! SAME DAY DELIVERY! MATTRESSES-BUNK BEDSSOFA BEDS-CUSTOM SOFAS

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long term rental management services Foxy, sexy, raven haired, olive skinned Mediterranean beauty available for sensual massage sessions. Enquire for further information, availability and rates text/call: (604)262-5183

ALWAYS HIRING ALWAYS HIRING

STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! DEALERS AND BIKINI CLAD CADDIES. ESCORTS MAKE ANY PARTY AMAZING!! STRIPPERS TOPLESS BLACKJACK DEALERS 6 0SEXY 4 -SKI9 INSTRUCTORS! 38-6456 For the Time of Your Life! MAKE ANY PARTY AMAZING!

licenseD rental agents: simon Westwood 604-967-1195 simon@WhistlerProperty.com

rosie Blaser 604-932-8864 rosie@WhistlerProperty.com

For the Time of Your Life!

Helene Huang 604-902-0608

roxysinwhistler.com roxysinwhistler Accommodation

LONG-TERM RENTALS WHISTLER

helene@WhistlerProperty.com Duane Kercher 604-932-7849 duane@WhistlerProperty.com

VIEW AVAILABLE RENTAL LISTINGS AT:

Queen mattresses from $289.99 Bunk Beds from $699.99 Sofa beds from $1099.99

NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

whistlerfurniture.ca 2-1020 Millar Creek Road

604.938.4285 PETS

Accommodation

SEEKING

ACCOMMODATION WANTED Professional Family looking for a house to rent long term

Open 7 Days A Week Dental Focus Months!

Forrest chittick 604-902-7178 forrest@WhistlerProperty.com

www.roxysinwhistler.com

604 -938 - 6 4 56

THEBACHELORPLAN.COM

Property Owners seeking Annual or Seasonal Rental Income from screened Tenants, please contact one of our 6 Rental Agents to discuss revenue, services & fees.

Vista Place is a new, leading-edge residential and business rental complex minutes from downtown Pemberton and all the Sea-to-Sky Corridor has to offer. The development’s first phase, Vista Place I, will be completed in early 2019. Spacious contemporary apartments on the second storey feature stunning views - and have been designed with long-term livability in mind. Versatile secondfloor office spaces and groundfloor commercial spaces are ready to be customized to suit your small business vision. info@vistaplacebc.com https://vistaplacepemberton.com/

20% OFF DENTAL SERVICES

Family of three people looking for executive rental. Local Business owner in Whistler for 20 plus years. Willing to look after any property management. Minimum three bed required. Call to discuss renting your property to these ideal tenants. Shauna O’Callaghan 604905-9105 shauna@shaunaocallaghan.com

January and February Book Your Appointment NOW!

604-815-0057 Alpenlofts@gmail.com Alpenloftsvet.ca 106-40775 Tantalus Rd Squamish, BC

WhistlerProperty.com

Your gentleman’s concierge for… • • • • •

Adrenaline-fueled adventures Customized nightlife itineraries Luxury transportation Awesome chalet parties Unique female entertainment

THE GLEN (PEMBERTON)

Accommodation listings, defined:

Studio studio in the glen for one Walk to town avail now 800/m plus utilities include Cable, wifi, share laundry, must be employed, long term Rental, no smoking, no pets, text mess shirley 6049359421

Long Term Rentals

Short Term Rentals

Monthly or seasonal rental accommodation that is available to local renters for less than 12 months, or where the rental price varies throughout the year.

Vacation Rentals

Nightly and/or weekly rental accommodation, available to visitors over a short period of time. piquenewsmagazine.com/events

2019 Issue

OUT OF TOWN

on select stands and in Whistler hotel rooms.

AMAZING LAKE FRONT CABIN ON LILLOOET LAKE $265,000

Monthly rental accommodation that is available to local renters for a minimum of 12 months.

YOU CA

Winter

REAL ESTATE

PICK UP YOUR COPY TODAY!

N ’T D O

THIS N

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PICK IT UP EVERYWHERE

FAQwhistler

1 Acre, 100 Feet of Water Front, Dock, Wood Stove, Fireplace, Demand Hot Water, Propane Stove, Propane Heater, Solar Panel, 1 Bed Plus Loft, Shower and Tub. Crown Lease. Go to www.grandmanor.ca/cabin for Pictures. Email grandmanorguesthouse@gmail.com 604-812-2715 grandmanorguesthouse@gmail.com http://www.grandmanor.ca/cabin

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 75


book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday:

classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

MARKETPLACE

HOME SERVICES

HOME SERVICES

HOME SERVICES

HOME SERVICES

FOR SALE - MISC

CONTRACTING/SURVEYING

CLEANING

MOVING AND STORAGE

MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS

HIGH AND DRY

VACATION RENTAL CLEANING & PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

Come and visit Whistler’s funkiest thrift store and get (almost) everything you need for your EPIC season! Winter clothes, skis, boards, boots, bindings, goggles, toques and more! As well as all the usual stuff to make that rented closet feel like a palace. You may even find some hidden treasure you never knew needed.

STORAGE LOWEST PRICES IN THE CORRIDOR GAURANTEED UNITS STARTING AT

Housekeeping - daily, weekly monthly Move in/out & Construction Cleaning IICRC Professional carpet cleaning Caretaker Services FRIEND US ON:

65

$

CALL SARA

604.848.8987

Re-Build-It Centre

MOVING AND STORAGE

Open 10am-5pm, 7 days a week 1003 Lynham Road, Function Junction 604-932-1125

Marketplace

FREE STUFF FREE STUFF Five level homemade server stand with slatted sliding wire racks. Can also be an excellent storage unit for storing boots, shoes etc... Call 604-938-0202 to arrange pick up.

Services

HEALTH & WELLBEING

Call 604.935.9370 or email gphare@shaw.ca

SALON & SPA

BLUE HIGHWAYS MASSAGE & SPA

STORAGE STORAGE SPACE AVAILABLE

BEST PRICES IN WHISTLER FURNITURE, CARS, BOATS & MOTORCYCLES ETC STORAGE AVAILABLE

BUILDING AND RENOVATIONS

big or small we do it all!

Wiebe Construction Services

Call 1.7x6-Feb-Ad.pdf 604-902-MOVE 1 www.alltimemoving.ca

2019-02-04

10:30 AM

BEST

PRICES

IN WHISTLER

Serving Whistler for over 25 years

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE Serving Whistler for 25 years in: Deep Tissue Massage, Relaxation, Thai & Shiatsu, Therapeutic Massage, Reflexology, Aromatherapy & Hot Stone Massage available on request

• Kitchen and Bath • Renovations & Repairs • Drywall • Painting • Finishing • Minor Electrical & Plumbing

604.932.1968 WALSH

RESTORATION

Y

FLOORING CM

CY

CMY

K

Family owned & operated

Open Monday through Friday 8:30 - 4:30 Saturday 10:00 -4:00 Sundays and Evenings by appointment only. 3-1365 Alpha Lake Road Whistler, B.C, V0N1B1 Phone 604-938-1126 email shawcarpet@shaw.ca

604-938-0777 #206 - 4368 MAIN ST. 2ND FLOOR, MARKET PAVILION

WALSH STORAGE

nita makes scents

8 X 10 CONTAINERS

add an aromatherapy upgrade & receive a free travel-sized roller of your chosen blend

Pemberton Industrial Park 1944 Stone Cutter Place Owner Residence On-Site

MY

CARPET & FLOOR CENTRE

RMT specials on request

We Added More Containers!

M

SHAW

Registered Massage, Registered Counselling & Registered Chiropractic

USE A WALSH CUBE TRUCK FOR FREE TO MOVE YOUR POSSESSIONS TO WALSH STORAGE

C

76 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

massage clinic & spa

Registered Therapists

Ray Wiebe 604.935.2432 Pat Wiebe 604.902.9300 raymondo99.69@gmail.com

piquenewsmagazine.com/events

604-935-0994 snowburstwhistler@gmail.com

Outdoor storage for RV’s, Boats, Campers, Vehicles etc $2 per LFT.

NORTHLANDS

Recycle, Re-build and Re-invest in your community. All proceeds support 28 programs and services such as the food bank, outreach services, and counseling assistance offered by Whistler Community Services. www.mywcss.org Like us on Facebook @ Whistler Community Service Society

No Job Too Small Customized Services based on your needs

electronic monitoring

WHISTLER’S #1 NEWS SOURCE

Furniture, appliances, kitchen cabinets, doors, plumbing, tools, flooring, hardware, lumber, lighting and more!

All-around Handyman Services

24 HR ACCESS,

sara@goldmedalcleaning.ca goldmedalcleaning.ca

Shopping and Donation hours: 11am - 6pm, 7 days a week 8000 Nesters Road 604-932-1121

per month

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE & SERVICES

100 +

$

tax per month

2 HRS FREE TRUCK TIME

8 X 20 CONTAINERS

160 +

$

tax per month

4 HRS FREE TRUCK TIME

Call Mike Walsh

604 698 0054

mike.walsh@walshrestoration.ca

available February 1st - 28th. not valid with any other package or discount. certain conditions apply.

ask about our RMT locals rate locals discount available for all regular-priced spa treatments. ask our team for further details. @TheSpaAtNitaLakeLodge

2131 Lake Placid Road

located at Nita Lake Lodge above Loka Yoga free parking and village shuttle

FAQwhistler

604 966 5715 www.nitalakelodge.com/spa


there's no better way to buy and sell than Pique's online marketplace. Services

Community

NOTICES

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

MASSAGE

GENERAL NOTICES

ARTS & CULTURE

U.S.

Arts Whistler - Full arts & culture listings. Comprehensive artist directory & programs, events & performances year-round. For info 604-935-8410 or visit www.artswhistler.com

27%

Pemberton Arts Council - Connect with other artists, writers, artisans, musicians & help make Pemberton a vibrant arts community. Call 604-452-0123 or visit www. pembertonartscouncil.com

HEALTH & WELLBEING Luxury Mobile Massage Private & Group Bookings

604-388-4042

Exchange Rate

as recommended by:

www.deepflowhealing.co

Pemberton Writers - Meet with other writers to review and critique monthly. Opportunities for writing in a comfortable and creative setting. Email crowley7@telus. net

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES APPLY TODAY! Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

Full Time Maintenance/Pool Technician Eligible successful candidates may receive*:

COUNSELLING PERSONAL MESSAGES Sea to Sky Healing Room - For Blessing/Prayer/Encouragement In the Community Church building, 7422 Dogwood Street, Pemberton. Every 1st and 3rd Wednesday: 4-6 PM

MEETING PLACE

SPORTS & ACTIVITIES

Welcome Centre at Whistler Public Library - Information, support, community connections and ESL practice groups for newcomers and immigrants. Meet people, make connections, volunteer, build your communication skills in English. Multicultural Meet Up every Friday 9.3012pm.604-698-5960 info@welcomewhistler. com FB: WhistlerWelcomeCentre

Sea to Sky Singers - Invites new & former members to join us for an exciting new term, the spring & fall terms culminate with a concert. Choir meets Tues, 7-9pm at Squamish Academy of Music, 2nd Ave. Veronica seatoskysingers@gmail.com or 604-892-7819 www.seatoskysingers.net Whistler Community Band - Rehearsals on Tuesdays 7 - 8:15 pm CONTACT whistlerchorus@gmail.com FOR LOCATION

• Extensive benefits package which may include; ski pass or wellness allowance, disability coverage, travel insurance and extended health and dental. • Travel allowance and discounted employee rates at any Diamond Resort International resort. • Full-time work year round and a FUN work environment. *eligibility and conditions based on DRCL policies and practices set out in general terms and conditions of employment.

Email your resume with the position you wish to apply for to: embarc_hr@diamondresorts.com

Whistler Singers - Resumes Septem-ber 11th, 2018 for the fall/winter sea-son. Rehearsals are Tuesdays from 7 to 9pm at Myrtle Philip School in the Toad Hall room. Everyone is welcome! Inquiries can be sent to whistlersingers@gmail.com For more info, visit: https://www.facebook.com/whistlersingers/

WHISTLER COMMUNITY LISTINGS

Roll & Release Thursday 6:45-7:45pm • Decreased Pain • Increase Posture • Enhance Performance www.whistler.ca/recreation 604-935-PLAY (7529)

Made in Whistler Market- Saturday's from 12-6p.m. on December 15th, 22nd, 23rd, 29th & 30th. Then every Saturday, January 2019 through March 2019. Free Admission at The Westin Resort & Spa in Whistler.

VOLUNTEERS Big Brothers, Big Sisters Sea to Sky Volunteer to Mentor- just 1hr/week - and make a difference in a child's life. Call 604892-3125.

EDUCATION

CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS Donate Used Clothing & Household Goods- To be distributed to local charities by Sharon 604-894-6656 for pick up. Playground Builders: Creating Play Building Hope - Playground Builders is a registered charity that builds playgrounds for children in war-torn areas. Learn more, volunteer or donate at www. playgroundbuilders.org Sea to Sky Community Services - running dozens of programs in Whistler to help people through times of crisis and with everyday challenges. www.sscs.ca 1-877892-2022 admin@sscs.ca

PLAY HERE

FIRST AID AND SURVIVAL Stewardship Pemberton Society and the One Mile Lake Nature Centre- Connecting community, nature and people through education, cooperation, and community involvement. www.stewardshippemberton. com

Community

NOTICES

GENERAL NOTICES ROTARY CLUBS OF WHISTLER & PEMBERTON

Tuesdays at 7:15 a.m. BG Urban Grill: 604-905-5090 & Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. at the Pan Pacific, Mountainside. www.whistler-rotary.org Pemberton Rotary Club at the Pemberton Community Centre, Wednesdays at 7:15am www.pembertonrotary.ca

Avalanche Skills Training Courses - Level 1+ & Level 2

Whistler Health Care Foundation raises funds for improving health care resources and services. New board members welcomed. Contact us at info@ whistlerhealthcarefoundation.org or call Karen at 604-906-1435.

Glacier Travel / Crevasse Rescue Courses

SPORTS & RECREATION Guided Backcountry Adventures (WB Passholder discounts available)

extremelycanadian.com

604-938-9656

Alpine Club of Canada Whistler Sec-tionOutdoor club focused on ski/split board touring, hiking, mountaineering and skills training. More info: accwhistler.ca Trip Schedule: accwhistler.ca/trips/

» piquenewsmagazine.com/jobs www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 77


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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

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SPORTS & RECREATION Griffin Squadron Squamish Air CadetsOpen to youth 12-18yrs at Don Ross Secondary School on Tues at 6:30pm.

STORE CLERKS

Pemberton Valley Snowmobile Club Meets first Thurs of each month Dec - April, 7pm at the Pemberton Comm. Centre. BCSF/Rutherford trail passes & liability insurance available for purchase. Contact 604-894-1155 for info.

Basalt Wine + Salumeria are currently looking to fill the roles of:

- competitive wages and shopping discounts

COOKS, BAKERS, BARISTAS AND DISHWASHER/ SANDWICH MAKER - competitive wages, meals and benefits

Experience an asset but not essential Full time and part time positions available Contact in person or email catering@alpinecafe.ca

LINE COOKS DISHWASHERS Please send your cover letter and resume to skeenan-naf@crystal-lodge.com Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Full and Part Time positions available. Come join the best team in Whistler!

Marketing & Communications Manager (Half-Time)

Please forward cover letter and resume in confidence by February 15th, 2019 to principal@whistlerwaldorf.com Thank you to all applicants. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted. The Whistler Waldorf School is in its seventeenth year of operation with over 200 children from preschool to grade 12. We have an enthusiastic and hardworking parent body and a dedicated and passionate faculty committed to working in a collaborative environment.

We offer competitive wages, a unique environment, seasonal bonuses, staff discounts and benefits. Ask about accommodation.

The Whistler Waldorf School is looking to expand its administrative team. The role of the Marketing & Communications Manager is to oversee and implement an integrated communication and marketing strategy. See the full job profile here: http:/whistlerwaldorf.com/employment/

Come Grow Sport with us at our Whistler Olympic Legacy Venues We are recruiting for:

Whistler Athletes’ Centre (High Performance Training and Accommodation) Positions for this venue are currently filled

Pemberton Valley Trails AssociationMeets the second Wed of each month. 7pm at the Pemberton Recreation Centre. Call 604-698-6158 Sea to Sky RC Flyers - Model Aeronautics Association of Canada Club active in the Sea to Sky Region flying model airplanes, helicopters and multi-rotors. Contact S2SRCFLY@telus.net Whistler Adaptive Sports Program Provides sports & recreation experiences for people with disabilities. Chelsey Walker at 604-905-4493 or info@whistleradaptive. com Whistler Martial Arts offers - Kishindo Karate for kids age 4 and up, Capoeira and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu for kids and adults. Also Kickboxing, Judo, Yoga and Bellyfit for adults. Call Cole 932-2226 Women's Karma Yoga - Thursdays, 9:30-10:30, ongoing by donation and childminding provided. Whistler Women's Centre: 1519 Spring Creek Drive. Drop-in for weekly yoga classes led by an all female team of certified yoga instructors. All women, all ability levels welcome. hswc.ca | 604-962-8711

Whistler Sliding Centre (Bobsleigh, Luge & Skeleton) Track Worker

Whistler Olympic Park (Nordic Skiing, Snowshoeing and Outdoor Activities)

Snow Clearing Operator Ski Patrol

Visit our website to view current postings and to apply: www.whistlersportlegacies.com/careers

YOUTH ACTIVITIES 1st Whistler Scout Group - outdoor & adventure program for girls and boys aged 5-17. Times and locations vary. More info: http://1stwhistlerscoutgroup. webs.com. Contact scoutsatwhistler @gmail.com or 604-966-4050. Whistler Children's Chorus Rehearsal Tuesdays at MILLENNIUM PLACE (4 - 5:30 pm) contact whistlerchorus@gmail.com Whistler/Pemberton Girl Guides Adventures for Girls age 5 & up. Sparks & Brownies (Gr K,1,2,3) Guides (Gr 4,5,6) Volunteers always welcome. coastmountaingirlguides@gmail.com Whistler Youth Centre - Drop - in: Fridays 3:30 - 11 PM & Saturdays 6 - 10 PM for ages 13 - 18. Located downstairs in the Maury Young Arts Centre (formerly Millenium Place). We offer: a Ping pong table, Pool table, Skateboard mini ramp w. skateboards and helmets to borrow, Free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, Guitars, Board games, Projector and widescreen TV's. Facebook THEYC Crew, www.whistleryouthcentre. com or call 604-935-8187.

 THINGS.  TO DO. 78 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

LEISURE GROUPS Duplicate Bridge Club- Whistler Racquet Club reconvenes in late fall. The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For partner, please call Gill at 640-932-5791.


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COMMUNITY LISTINGS LEISURE GROUPS

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Knitty Gritty Knit Night- Held every Tues 6-8pm. Free evening open to everyone with a love for knitting/crocheting. Beginners welcome. For location and further details email knittygrittywhistler@gmail.com or find us on facebook. Mountain Spirit Toastmasters- Builds communication, public speaking, and leadership skills . Wednesdays at the Pan Pacific Mountainside - Singing Pass Room, 5:30-7pm. Email contact - 8376@ toastmastersclubs.org www.whistler. toastmastersclubs.org Pemberton Women's Institute - Meets the third Mon of each month in the activity room at St. David's United Church at 7:30pm. New members welcome. Linda Ronayne at 604-894-6580 Rotary Club of Whistler - Meets Tuesdays at 7:15 a.m at BG Bread Garden Urban Grill 604-905-5090 Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium Meets every Thurs at 12:15pm at Pan Pacific Mountainside. 604-932-7782

Roland’s Pub & Red Door Bistro Are Hiring

DISHWASHERS Start immediately!

Full and part time available, day and night shifts. Wage based on experience (minimum $14/hr), plus tips and staff meal each shift. Extended Medical & Dental benefits after 3 months full time employment. Staff discounts in Roland's Pub and Red Door Bistro.

Apply in person with resume to 2129 Lake Placid Road.

Whistler Premier Resorts, Whistler’s leading property management firm is currently recruiting! What We Offer You:

Competitve Wages Health & Wellness Benefits Full Time/Part Time Positions Supportive Team Environment Current Career Opportunities:

BELLMAN . ROOM ATTENDANT APPLY TODAY AT PEOPLE@WHISTLERPREMIER.COM

Shades of Grey Painters Meets twice a week Tuesdays, Watercolour, 11.00am-2.30pm @ The Rec, Pemberton. Thursdays, Acrylic, 1.00pm-3.30pm @ The Amenities Building, Pioneer Village, Pemberton. We are likeminded people that get together & paint. Gretchen is the painting coach. $5 to attend. Whistler Reads - Meets to discuss a new book every eight weeks. Go to bookbuffet. com & click on Whistler Reads for the latest book/event. Paula at 604-907-2804 or wr@ bookbuffet.com

COMMUNITY CENTRES Maury Young Arts Centre - Whistler's community centre for arts, culture & inspiration. Performance theatre, art gallery, daycare, youth centre, meditation room, meeting facilities. www.artswhistler.com or 604-935-8410 Pemberton & District Community Centre - Located at 7390 Cottonwood St. Fitness Centre, facility rentals, spray park, playground, children, youth, adult & seniors programs. For more info 604-894-2340 or pemrecinfo@slrd.bc.ca

JOIN THE MONGOLIE CREW! We are hiring for:

FULL TIME BARTENDER FULL & PART TIME GRILLERS Hourly wage + tips, flexible schedule, fun & fast-paced work environment, staff meals. Learn how to cook with flair!

Send your resume to careers@mongoliegrill.com Or drop off your resume in person before 5pm!

Certified Dental Assistant for busy family dental clinic

Located 20 minutes north of whistler in the beautiful pemberton valley.

Hours negotiable with competitive wage. Email “info@pembertonvalleydental.ca” or fax to 604-894-6934

MUSEUMS Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre Explore First Nations Art Galleries, and Interactive Exhibits. Gift Shop & Cafe are in our admission free area. Open Tuesday'sSunday's per week. 10am-5p.m.. Whistler Museum & Archives Society Explore interactive exhibits, listen to local stories & discover Whistler's journey. Open daily 11am-5pm, 4333 Main St. www. whistlermuseum.org or 604-932-2019

PROFESSIONAL NETWORKING Whistler Chamber of Commerce - Is the leading business association in Whistler that works to create a vibrant & successful economy. Learn more about the programs & services at www.whistlerchamber.com

Whistler Bungee are hiring:

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Applicants should have basic knowledge or have a strong interest in learning photography and love working outside Please send a copy of your cover letter and resume to: jobs@whistlerbungee.com

WE ARE HIRING: Foremen, Carpenters, Labourers, Apprentices (20cm rule applies) Please contact Marc@balmoralconstruction.com www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 79


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HOUSING AVAILABLE FOR FULL TIME EMPLOYEES, IT’S CHEAP!

Delish Cafe in Function Junction are expanding! We are currently hiring both part time & full time positions

Sandwich Ninjas & Bakers Must have a work hard - play hard attitude! Employee housing available for the right candidates. Send your resume to ian@whistlergrocery.com

COMMUNITY LISTINGS PROFESSIONAL NETWORKING BNI Mountain High- Meets at 6:45-8:30am every Thursday at The Venue. BNI provides a positive and structured environment for the develop-ment and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by help-ing you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing blair@ blairkaplan.ca.

is now hiring for the following position:

Front Desk Agent Room Attendant* Houseman Ski Concierge Full-time and Part-time Seasonal incentives available *Short-term accommodation available Please email resume to hr@listelhotel.com Thank you for your interest. Only those applicants being considered for an interview will be contacted.

Women of Whistler - Group that provides opportunities for Whistler businesswomen to network, gain knowledge & share ideas in a friendly, relaxed environment. Learn more at www.womenofwhistler.com

FOR SENIORS Activate & Connect - Come join us Thursday mornings 9:30am to 11:00am at Whistler Community Services for a weekly drop in program for seniors 50+. Everyone welcome, in partnership with Mature Action Community. www.mywcss.org Mature Action Community [MAC]- Is the voice of Whistler's 55-Plus community. MAC identifies, and advocates for seniors programs and services to improve the quality of life for those wishing to age inplace; MAC also provides opportunities for social interaction. Visit www.whistlermac. org or e-mail info@whistlermac.org Outreach Services - Free confidential support for adults dealing with the challenges of social wellness. Please call our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker.

Our outstanding team is looking to add individuals with a variety of skill sets and experience. Friendly, hard working candidates are invited to apply. FRONT-OF-HOUSE:

BACK-OF-HOUSE:

Experienced Cocktail Bartender

Pastry Cooks

(Araxi + Bar Oso)

Server Assistant

Pemberton Men's Shed - Weekly social meetings WED. 11-2 in the Seniors/youth Rec. bldg. beside library. Social meeting with BYO Bag lunch, card games and pool/ snooker. Help out in YOUR community, operating the Pemberton Tool Library.

Line Cooks

Senior Citizen Organizations - Is an advocacy group devoted to improving the quality of life for all seniors. Ernie Bayer 604576-9734 or ecbayer2@gmail.com

(2-3 years experience)

Dishwashers

ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY We offer year round full and part-time hours, competitive wages, gratuities, extended medical & dental, accommodations, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants.

Creating Community and Cohous-ingJoin us on our journey to creating REAL community through the cohous-ing model of building a neighbourhood community. Cohousing is NOT a com-mune, NOT a cooperative. Put your toe in the water and find out more by coming to one of our weekly meetings or regular social gatherings. For more information, visit our website at http://thecoastalvillage.ca/ or call Ja-ney Harper 778-840-1529.

Please email your resume & cover letter to careers@araxi.com or present in person at Araxi between 3-5pm daily.

WE ARE LOOKING TO HIRE:

BUSSERS HOSTS

Earthsave Whistler - Providing info & support to people who are interested in making healthier, greener, more peaceful food choices. earthsavewhistler.com

(FULL-TIME)

PREP COOK

(day shifts only, prep experience required)

DISHWASHERS Full-time and year round. We feature evening work only, staff meals, competitive wages and a great work environment. So if you’re looking for a change or some extra hours, come by and see us. Flexible schedules are available. REPLY IN PERSON WITH RESUME BETWEEN 3-5 AT QUATTRO 4319 Main St. in the Pinnacle Hote

80 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Kaze Sushi is looking for Experienced Sushi Chef

Please apply in person with resume at the Whistler restaurant from 5:30pm onwards Call or email Tom on 604-938-4565 or tokyotom111@hotmail.com

Healthy Home, Healthy Planet - Expert in green cleaning offers tricks, info & advice on the best way to green clean your home or work space! Call France 604-698-7479. Free private presentation on request. www. healthylivingwhistler.com Regional Recycling - Recycle beverage containers (full deposit paid) electronics, appliances, batteries, Lightbulbs, drop-off times are 9am-5pm on Nesters Rd. Pick up service 604-932-3733


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COMMUNITY LISTINGS ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Re-Build-It Centre - Daily 10:00am to 5:00pm. Accepting donations of furni-ture, quality used building supplies & new items. Deliveries and pickups available for $35. Call 604.932.1125, www.mywcss.org, rebuil-dit@ mywss.org

Re-Use-It - Daily 11:00am to 6:00pm, Donate all household goods in good shape. Accepting bottles & cans, old electronics, anything with a cord, and light fixtures for recycling. All proceeds to WCSS. Call 604.932.1121, www.mywcss.org, reuseit@ mywcss.org.

The Association of Whistler Area Residents for the Environment (AWARE) Whistler's Natural Voice since 1989. Regular events, project and volunteer opportunities. www.awarewhistler.org info@awarewhistler.org

FAMILY RESOURCES Baby/Child Health Clinics - Free rou-tine immunizations & newly licensed vaccines for purchase, growth & devel-opment assessments & plenty of age appropriate resources avail. By ap-pointment 604-9323202

Camp Fund - Provides financial assis-tance to enable children of financially restricted families to attend camp. Call WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org

Photo Credit: Tourism Whistler / Justa Jeskova

ResortQuest Whistler is currently hiring: Breakfast Attendants - Part time/Full Time Group Sales Coordinator Room Inspector Night Audit Benefits include - activity allowance, extended medical, RRSP match, opportunities for growth and more. To apply for this opportunity, please specify the position and email your resume and cover letter to: beth.fraser@resortquestwhistler.com We thank all applicants for their interest but only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

WHAT’S ON YOUR CAREER HORIZON SPECIALIST, EVENT MARKETING & PARTNERSHIPS FULL TIME, 12 MONTH CONTRACT

The Specialist, Event Marketing & Partnerships is responsible for working with third party event producers, resort partners and Tourism Whistler members to maximise opportunities to drive resort room nights and exposure from events. This position services contra partnerships to extend Whistler’s marketing reach and provides hands-on marketing support for Cornucopia. The Specialist is highly motivated, very organized and an excellent collaborator with the ability to exercise good judgement. This position requires an individual with a minimum of three years prior experience in marketing, sponsorship, event management or a related discipline. For the complete job description and to apply, visit whistler.com/careers.

Families Fighting Cancer In The Sea To Sky - We are a non profit partner with Sea to Sky Community Services. We provide financial and practical support to children and parents with dependants diagnosed with cancer. Please contact us on our confidential email: ffcseatosky@gmail.com, visit our Facebook Page or website www. familiesfightingcancer.ca

KidsArt - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restrict-ed families to participate in arts and culture education. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an out-reach worker. www. mywcss.org.

Kids on the Move - Provides financial assistance to enable children of finan-cially restricted families to participate in sport programs. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an out-reach worker. www. mywcss.org.

Outreach Services - Free confidential support for adults and families experiencing challenges with mental health, food insecurity, housing insecurity, substance use, misuse or addiction, employment, eating disorders, violence in relationships, roommate conflict or homesickness. Contact our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an out-reach worker or visit www. mywcss.org.

Pan Pacific Whistler is currently hiring for:

Breakfast Cook Breakfast Dishwasher Discover new opportunities to embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler, located at Whistler’s best address. We offer competitive wages, ski pass, and staff accommodation. To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

We are currently interviewing:

Project Managers Site Supervisors Project Coordinator Carpenters Carpenters Helpers Labourers Level 2 First Aid Attendant Please submit resume to: info@evrfinehomes

Pemberton Parent Infant Drop-In Facilitated by Capri Mohammed, Public Health Nurse. Every Mon 11am-12:30pm at Pemberton Public Library.

Whistler’s Premier Estate Builder

Pemberton Strong Start Family Drop-InA play group for you and your under-5 child. Signal Hill Elementary, Mon, Tues, Wed & Fri, 9am-12pm. Thurs only 12pm-3pm. Call 604894-6101 / 604-966- 8857

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 81


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FAMILY RESOURCES Whistler Public Library - Open Mon-Thurs 10am-7pm, Fri 10am-6pm, Sat & Sun 11am5pm. Music & Words, Mon 10am. Rhyme & Song, Tues 11am. Parent & Infant drop-in, Thurs 11am. Preschool Story Time, Fri 10am. Singing with the babies, Sat 11am. Call 604935-8433

Whistler Adventure School (WAS), located in Whistler’s Function Junction, is hiring

INSTRUCTORS FOR PHOTOGRAPHY, VIDEOGRAPHY AND EDITING.

COME WORK FOR CANADA’S #1 EMPLOYER!

Fairmont was voted Canada’s Top-Rated Workplace for 2018 by Indeed.com

Based in Whistler, this position is part-time. The successful applicant will be responsible for instructing and managing these courses.

CURRENT CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Reservation Agent Room Attendants Culinary Opportunities Royal Service Agent Overnights Night Cleaner – Stewarding Night Auditor – Front Office Night Janitor – Housekeeping Director of Banquets Summer Opportunities now posted!

Activities of the work include, but are not limited to, any/all the following: INSTRUCTING – Photography: Students gain various photography skills from learning how to analyze photographs to delivering professional products. Handson lab days shooting the Whistler valley are enriched with principles of small business management and marketing. Videography - This course educates students on the principles of filmmaking starting with the process of creating proposals to delivering a final product. Students can expect several lab days shooting and editing the best of Whistler with instruction from leading industry professionals. Editing (photo/video) - Students learn about the professional workflow for digital photography by using professional tools and techniques e.g. for shooting in RAW, conversion to digital negatives, professional editing techniques, importing, processing and managing large volumes of pictures. Requirements: A business, marketing or communications related degree with two years of photo, video or media experience. Fluency in spoken and written English is required. Please submit a letter of interest, a resume, and three professional references by email to admin@whistleradventureschool.com or fax to 604 962 2219. Email is preferred. No drop-ins or phone calls please.

Benefits | Meals | Housing

SOCIAL SERVICES Access to Justice - Need legal advice but are financially restricted? Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to find out more or visit www. mywcss.org.

Counselling Assistance Available - WCSS subsidizes access to a private counselor for $35-$50/hr depending on financial need. Contact an outreach team member at 604932-0113 www.mywcss.org

Counselling Assistance - WCSS sub-sidizes access to a private counselor depending on financial need. Contact an outreach worker at 604.932.0113 or visit www.mywcss.org.

ESL Volunteer Tutor Program - Vol-unteer one-to-one tutoring for new im-migrants & Canadian citizens. For more information or to register, contact the Whistler Welcome Centre info@welcomewhistler.com or call 604.698.5960

APPLY TODAY AT FAIRMONTCAREERS.COM Food Bank, Pemberton - Run by Sea to Sky Community Service. Open every second Monday. 604 894 6101

Only those selected for interviews will be contacted.

Food Bank Whistler - Located at 8000 Nesters Road, every Monday from 10am to noon. For emergency food bags, please call 604.935.7717 for as-sistance. www.mywcss. org, food-bank@mywcss.org

Healthy Pregnancy Outreach ProgramLearn how to prepare healthy affordable meals at this outreach program. Sea to Sky Community Services 604-894-6101

Shuttle Driver Security Officer Engineering Admin Assistant Intermediate Maintenance

Meadow Park Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eli-gible for a $131.20 municipal recrea-tion credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak with an out-reach worker. www.mywcss.org.

Guestroom Attendant The Four Seasons team is looking for these roles to start immediately. $500 signing bonus available for all hires

Outreach Services - Free, confidential support for youth experiencing challenges with mental health, food inse-curity, housing insecurity, substance use, misuse or addiction, employment, eating disorders, violence in relation-ships, roommate conflict or homesick-ness. Contact our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an out-reach worker or visit www.mywcss.org.

Details: Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com Housing is available for successful candidates as well!

SUBSCRIPTIONS - 52 $76 /YEAR .70

CANADA - REGULAR MAIL

ISSUES

$136 /YEAR .60

CANADA - COURIER

$605.80/YEAR USA - COURIER

PAY BY MASTERCARD, VISA OR AMEX. TEL. 604-938-0202 | FAX. 604-938-0201

82 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

North Shore Schizophrenia Society Services for family, friends & community. Mental illness info, support & advocacy. Call Chris Dickenson at 604-966-7334

Pearl's Safe Home - Temporary shelter for women & children experiencing abuse in relationships. Locations in Whistler & Pemberton avail 24/7. All services are free. 1-877-890-5711 or 604-892-5711

RMOW Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $127.60 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 www.mywcss.org


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COMMUNITY LISTINGS

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

SOCIAL SERVICES Support Counselling - For women regarding abuse & relationship issues. No charge. Call 604-894-6101

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: HIGH SCHOOL SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER

Victim Services - Assists victims, witnesses, family members or friends directly affected by any criminal act or traumatic event. Call 604-905-1969

Whistler Community Services So-ciety Outreach Services Now Available Monday to Saturday at our new location - 8000 Nesters Road (next to WAG) 604.932.0113 www. mywcss.org

Whistler Food Bank - Located in the Whistler Blackcomb Foundation Social Services Centre, 1519 Spring Creek Dr. Every Mon 10am-12pm. For emergencies call 604935-7717 www.mywcss.org foodbank@ mywcss.org

Whistler for the Disabled - Provides info for people with disabilities on what to do & where to go. Visit www. whistlerforthedisabled.com

Whistler Housing Authority - Long-term rental & ownership housing for Whistler residents. Visit www.whistlerhousing.ca

Whistler Mental Health & Addiction Services - If you or someone you know needs help with a mental health issue or substance misuse or addiction problem, we can assist. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm. 604-698-6455

Whistler Multicultural Network Settlement information, social support and programs for newcomers and immigrants living/working in Whistler. 604-388-5511 www.whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com

Whistler Opt Healthy Sexuality Clinic - Professional sexual health services at a reduced cost. Free HIV testing. Clinics at Whistler Health Care Ctr, 2nd floor on Tues 4:30-7:30pm. Winter hours Thurs. 5:00pm7:00pm. Confidentiality assured.

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Position Type: Categories: Location:

Teaching Position High School Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 FTE: 1 No. of Positions: 1 Reporting to: Education Director Salary: As per the Teaching Salary Grid Posting Date: January 23, 2019 Closing Date: Feb 6, 2019 Details: Xet’olacw Community School is a Lil’wat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Work in a collaborative environment with High School Teachers and the Elementary Special Education Coordinator. Will be responsible to teach various High School subjects. Involvement and could lead to overseeing High School Smart Goals, receiving support from FNSA (First Nations Schools Association)

Whistler WorkBC Employment Services Centre - Provides free one-stop employment services to job seekers and employers. Drop in services at the Pemberton Library Thursdays 1-5 PM, and at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 PM. For more information visit www.WhistlerESC.com or call us at 604-932-1600

SUPPORT GROUPS Birth, Baby and Beyond - Join a reg-istered counselor and meet other moms with the opportunity to ask ques-tions and share experiences in a safe, welcoming and nonjudgmental setting. Call 604.932.0113 for more information or visit www.mywcss.org.

We are dedicated to the highest quality of customer service, delivered with friendliness, individual pride, initiative, and retail passion! If you fit this description and you are prepared to work in a fast paced environment, we encourage you to apply to become a part of BC Liquor Stores. We are accepting applications for auxiliary sales associate positions in our Liquor Stores. To be eligible, applicants must meet the following qualification requirements: o o o o

Be at least 19 years of age Be able to work shift work and weekends Be able to perform physically demanding work, including lifting 20-25 kg boxes Have a valid Serving it Right Certificate

Rate of Pay: Seasonal Sales Associate - $16.54 per hour. Auxiliary Sales Associate - $17.81 per hour. For exciting and challenging retail seasonal opportunities, please visit http://bcliquorstores.prevueaps.ca/pages/openings/

Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of / or ability to apply for a B.C. Teaching Certificate • Member of the Teacher Regular Branch • Must complete a Criminal Record Check • Completion or in the process of attaining a Masters in Special Education or a diploma in special education. • Experience and/or education in special needs • Experience with and appreciation of First Nations culture is preferred. • Experience and education in secondary English • Ability to work within a cooperative environment • Innovative and energetic

Whistler Women's Centre - Provides confidential support, resources, referrals and advocacy for women living in the Sea to Sky corridor. All services are free of charge and include access to emergency safe housing, child/youth counselling, play space and computer access. Drop-In Centre open Mon 12-230, Tue-Thu 12-5. 1519 Spring Creek Drive. You can also access our services at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 p.m. www.hswc.ca or call (604)962-8711. 24 HR Crisis Line: 1-877-890-5711

Seasonal Sales Associate Positions Available! Whistler Area including Pemberton

• Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Ability to work in a collaborative culture • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on strengths and weaknesses of individual students • Background in relationship-based learning and discursive practices. • Corrective Reading experience an asset • Six Minute Solution experience an asset • Completion of an Educational Assistant program and/or experience as an Educational Assistant is an asset. Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter and resume including references no later than 4:30 p.m. on February 6, 2019 Contact Information: Verna Stager Education Director Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604 Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717 Preference will be given to Mount Currie Band Members. We thank for your interest; however, only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

SecurityPayable Systems Technician – Accounts / Office Facilitator BLACK Fire TUSK FIREand & SECURITY INC. Black Tusk Security Inc

WeBlack are looking to and fill aSecurity full-timeisAccounts / Office Facilitator role, Tusk Fire hiring forPayable the following positions: with an immediate start date in our Squamish office.

Security Systems Technician: JobPosition: Duties Full time Service/Installer working in and around Squamish/Whistler, •BCManage company finances, procedures duties area. The position offersoffice excellent hourlyand ratecoordinate with use administration of Company vehicle, • Develop systems to account for financial transactions by establishing a chart of accounts; lapdefine top, bookkeeping smart phonepolicies with full medical & dental benefits. and processes Knowledge and experience in the building industry an asset, •Qualifications: Prepare journal entries work with close CCTV,responsibilities Honeywell or DSC products desirable. Criminal •previous Handle month-end •records Remit and record sales tax GST/PST check, Clear driver’s abstract, basic hand tools required.

• Process credit card and cheque payments Guard / Office Assistant: •Alarm RecordResponse cash receipts and bank deposits Full time (Mon-Fri) •Position: Maintain general office flow office person required working in the whistler office. Clerical duties includeetc.) filing, data entry, and responding •head Uphold company assets (vehicles, withcollections, correct paperwork, insurance, maintenance torecords alarms throughout the Whistler area. Full medical & dental benefits and ride •sharing Communicate with customers via phone, email, mail or in person available. •Qualifications: Complete specialCriminal projects Record as required by management Check, Clear Driver’s Abstract, Security Licence for Alarm Response an asset. Candidate must be a Canadian Qualifications permanent resident or citizen. is hiring for the following positions: Fire and Security •Black ProvenTusk bookkeeping experience • Recognized ability to calculate, post and manage accounting figures and financial records Systemsdegree Technician: •Security University/College or certification in a related discipline considered 109-1330 Alpha Lakeworking Rd., Whistler, BC isV0N 1B1 an asset Position: Full time Service/Installer in and around Squamish/Whistler, (Education in Finance, Accounting or Bookkeeping) Whistler: 604.935.1140 | Squamish: 604.892.9793 area. The position excellent rate with use of Company vehicle, •BCComputer literate, withoffers strong data entryhourly skills and working knowledge of Vancouver: 1.877.657.1140 | effective www.BTFSI.com Office or relevant computer applications lapMicrosoft top, smart phone with full medical & dental benefits. •Qualifications: High degree of accuracy and attention to detail in the building industry an asset, Knowledge and experience •previous Capacitywork to communicate at alldesirable. levels of theCriminal company with CCTV,effectively Honeywellwith or individuals DSC products • Excellent time management skills with the ability to multitask and prioritize work records check, Clear driver’s abstract, basic hand tools required. • Motivated self-starter who is unafraid to take initiative and solve problems •Alarm Aptitude for improving systems and processes Response Guard / Office Assistant: Position: Full time (Mon-Fri) office person required working in the whistler Details Clerical duties include collections, and responding •head This office. is a full-time, year-round position;filing, Monday to Friday, data 8:30 entry, AM to 5:00 PM alarms throughout the Whistler area. Full & dental benefits and ride •toCompetitive wages based on qualifications andmedical experience available. •sharing Extended Benefits Package Qualifications: Criminal Record Check, Clear Driver’s Abstract, Security To apply, please forward a copy of your current resume to hr@btfsi.com, with reference Licence for AlarmWeResponse asset. Candidate be athose Canadian to the A/P position. thank all an interested applicants,must but only qualified will be permanent resident or citizen. contacted.

Security Systems Technician – Black Tusk Fire and Security Inc

109-1330 Alpha Lake Rd., Whistler, BC V0N 1B1 Whistler: 604.935.1140 | Squamish: 604.892.9793 Vancouver: 1.877.657.1140 | www.BTFSI.com www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 83


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COMMUNITY LISTINGS SUPPORT GROUPS Concussion Support Group - WCSS is offering a recurring 8 week program to support people living with persistent postconcussion symptoms. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak with an outreach worker about upcoming sessions or visit www.mywcss.org.

NESTERS MARKET & WELLNESS CENTRE

NOW HIRING AT OUR WHISTLER LOCATION If you are a student 15 years or older, we have flexible hours and we want you!

Grocery Clerks Produce Clerks Deli Clerks Meat Clerks E-mail or drop in your resume to: bruce_stewart@nestersmarket.com please cc ian_fairweather@nestersmarket.com or call us at 604-932-3545 PERKS • Competitive wage – Depending on expereince • Access to medical and dental benefits for full time applicants • Percentage discount from store bought goods • Flexible and set schedule • Relative training

Epilepsy Support Group- For individuals & families seeking guidance or support. Contact eswhistler@gmail.com

Immigrant Peer Educators - Immigrants providing support and information for those who may be experiencing challenges adjusting to a new culture. 604-388-5511 info@whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com

Pregnancy and Infant Loss - Facilitat-ed by a registered counselor, this pro-gram is designed for couples and indi-viduals who have experienced loss of a child, either before or after birth. Please call WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak to an outreach worker for more information or visit www. mywcss.org.

SMART Recovery Pemberton - (SelfManagement and Recovery Training) A Cognitive-Behavioural group for individuals with substance abuse con-cerns. Pemberton Health Centre (Board Room) January 17th, 24th, 31st, and February 7th 2019 4:30-6:00pm **drop in welcome.

RELIGION Jesus Rock Of Ages Ministry- A bible based church that holds services at Millennium Place's main floor theatre at 4:30pm. www. jesusrockofages.com

Roman Catholic Church- Come celebrate mass at Our Lady of the Mountains, Whistler on Saturday 5pm, Sunday 9am, Tuesday 5:45pm, Wednesday 7pm, Thursday/Friday 5:45pm. St. Francis of Assisi, Pemberton on Sunday 12:30pm and Friday 9am. St. Christopher's, Mt. Currie on Sunday 11am. 604-905-4781

Whistler Church- Join us for worship and fellowship around Jesus. Sunday 10 am at Myrtle Philip Community School, 6195 Lorimer Rd. Nursery, Sunday School to gr. 6, Youth gr. 7 and up. Call Pastor Jon 604-7983861 / Kelvin 204-249-0700 or www.whistlerchurch.ca

The Beacon Pub and Eatery is currently looking for:

HEAD CHEF LINE COOKS MORNING COOKS DISHWASHERS Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Come join the best team in Whistler! Interested applicants please email your resume to skeenan-naf@Crystal-Lodge.com 84 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

FUR & FEATHERS Get Bear Smart Society - Learn more about coexisting with bears. To report a conflict, garbage or attractant issue call 604-905BEAR (2327) www.bearsmart.com

Pemberton Wildlife Association Advocates for the conservation of fish, wildlife & wilderness recreation. Also offering target shooting & archery facilities. www.pembertonwildlifeassociation.com

WAG - Whistler Animals Galore - A shelter for lost, unwanted, and homeless cats and dogs. Let us help you find your purrfect match...adopt a shelter animal! For more info 604-935-8364 www.whistlerwag.com


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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

WHISTLER BLACKCOMB We’re Hiring Cooks, Shift Managers, Servers, Hosts, Setters and Dishwashers Visit us at the restaurant anytime to apply in person or via email at apply.whistler@earls.ca

ALREADY WORKING IN WHISTLER? HAVE A HOLIDAY HOME HERE? WORK PART TIME AND GET YOUR SEASON’S PASS AND A DEPENDENT PASS FOR ONLY $40!!! Stop by the HR Cabin at Base 2 and we will interview on the spot. WHAT: Whistler Blackcomb Hiring Event - bring your resume WHEN: Every Wednesday, 9am - 4pm WHERE: The Cabin, 4890 Glacier Drive

FULL & PART TIME POSITIONS AVAILABLE IN: FOOD & BEVERAGE, RETAIL RENTAL, LIFT OPERATIONS PRODUCT SCANNING & SERVICES Please visit https://jobs.vailresortscareers.com/whistler to apply!

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WHISTLER’S RE-IMAGINED ITALIAN RESTAURANT

Il Caminetto is the newest Whistler restaurant to join the Toptable Group famiglia! The storied restaurant offers a modern taste of Italy to bring a fresh, contemporary style of dining to the mountain.

FRONT-OF-HOUSE:

BACK-OF-HOUSE:

Food Expeditor

Line Cooks

Server Assistant

(2-3 years related experience)

Dishwashers

We offer year round full and part-time hours, competitive wages, gratuities, extended medical & dental, accommodations, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants. Please email your resume & cover letter to:

careers@ilcaminetto.ca

Delta by Marriott Whistler Village Suites Is currently recruiting for the following positions:

- Room Attendant (Housekeeper) - Houseperson/Public Area Attendant - Shuttle Driver (seasonal, part-time, class 4* license required) - Reservations Coordinator (1 year maternity leave coverage) - Human Resources Coordinator

STAFF HOUSING AVAILABLE! Start your journey today with: competitive wages, growth opportunities, a positive team environment, medical benefits, play money (ski pass, etc), 100% provincial health care coverage. To Apply: either submit an application online at Marriott.com/careers or send your resume to annie.jolliffe@deltahotels.com

SOLID CONTRACTING LABOURERS, CARPENTERS, FINISH CARPENTERS

Glacier Media Group is growing. Check our job board regularly for the latest openings:

We offer full-time/flex-time positons in a positive, safe work environment. Salary based on experience. Send us your resume or call Solidcontracting@gmail.com 604-966-7062

R001408475

is currently looking for

www.glaciermedia.ca/careers solid-homes.com www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 85


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LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: TEACHER ON-CALL Position Type: Location: Status: Reporting to: Wage/Salary: Closing Date:

Teacher On-Call Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 Full Time Education Director Commensurate with Experience February 6, 2019

LOVE YOUR JOB AND YOUR LIFE

The Specialist of Data Marketing & Analytics is responsible for working within a variety of digital platforms to execute paid search, paid social and paid display & video advertising. This position also assists in optimizing campaigns on a real-time basis as needed and provides support with a wide variety of advertising campaign analytics and reporting.

Temporary, Seasonal (Summer) Hiring now for start dates in May. Based out of Squamish, AmeriCan Adventures Group Leaders are paid to camp, road trip, explore and share Canada’s National Parks and cities with small groups of foreign passengers. Pay is 830$/week plus tips and commissions. Housing, company vehicle, commercial license reimbursement and paid training is provided. amadjobs@americanadventures.com www.americanadventures.com/workfor-us

With relevant marketing and data analytics experience, this position requires an individual who is data driven, with a targeted, audience-centric approach in the execution of Tourism Whistler’s paid marketing initiatives.

Career Roles & Temp Jobs -Whistler Personnel SolutionsFind your dream job or side hustle! 604 -905-4194 www.whistler-jobs.com

SPECIALIST, DATA MARKETING & ANALYTICS FULL TIME, YEAR ROUND

Summary: Xet’olacw Community School is a Lil’wat Nation School situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, B.C. in the Mount Currie Community. The school is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • The ability to teach various high school subjects • Member of the Teacher Regulation Branch • In possession of a degree in Education • Experience with and appreciation of First Nations culture • Ability to work within a Cooperative Discipline framework • Innovative and energetic

For the complete job description and to apply, visit whistler.com/careers

• Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Ability to work in a collaborative culture • Background in relationship-based, learning and discursive practices • Adventurous, versatile and a nature lover • Must complete a criminal record check. Send cover letter and resume including references no later than 4:30 p.m. on February 6, 2019. Contact Information: Verna Stager, Education Director Xit’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 Phone: 604 894-6131 Fax: 604 894-5717 glenda.gabriel@lilwat.ca We thank for your interest; however, only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted

ESTIMATOR / PROJECT MANAGER (PEMBERTON) Wide Open Welding Ltd is looking for a full-time Estimator / Project Manager. The candidate will need to possess the following skill set: This is a multi-faceted position. The ideal candidate will be highly organized and detail oriented. Strong interpersonal skills, the ability to express ideas clearly in both written and oral communication and strong presentation skills. Must have the ability to analyze issues and determine priorities in an environment of tight and conflicting deadlines. Proficiency in planning, scheduling, execution and management of projects. An ability to read drawings and perform take-offs is a must. Our office is located in Pemberton and the job will entail travelling to and from job sites in the corridor to conduct site measurements, layouts and verifications. Candidate MUST have a commitment to excellence and the production of high quality end results.

Please email your resume to:

contactus@wideopenwelding.com

Sundial Boutique Hotel at 4340 Sundial Crescent, Whistler BC V0N 1B4 is currently hiring for a

Housekeeping Supervisor This position is FT year around. Wage is $21.75/hr + benefits. Job duties include: Supervising dept duties, inspection of work, administration, assist with recruiting, perform training and cleaning duties.

We are hiring journeymen & apprentices for the following trades:

Skill requirements: 1 year’s prior experience as a housekeeping supervisor”, tourism, administration and customer service.

We are a seven-day-a-week service and repair company working from North Vancouver to Pemberton. We provide flexible steady employment, good wages, benefit package, service vehicle, cell phone and more. The successful candidate will be a professional tradesman both in appearance, skill and attitude that is able to work independently and as part of a team.

Please fax or email your resume with attention to “Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com 86 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Full Time Lifemark Whistler Physiotherapy is looking for a friendly PT/FT Customer Service Representative with excellent communication skills. We are interested in someone who is organized, punctual, attentive to detail, and good at prioritizing. Duties include: - answering phone calls - communication with patients - patients booking - collecting payments - insurance billing - keeping everything tidy Previous experience is preferred but not essential. marketplace@lifemark.ca

Plumbers, Gas Fitters, HVAC, Refrigeration, Skilled General Labour

Send resume in confidence to:

spearhead.plumbing@gmail.com www.spearheadplumbing.com

Reservations Coordinator Tyax Adventures is an adventure tour company specializing in mountain bike, hiking and floatplane wilderness tours. We’re seeking a Reservations Coordinator for a work from home position, to be based in Pemberton or Whistler BC, for a seasonal contract from March to October 3040hrs p/w as business needs dictate. More information and job description; www.tyaxadventures.com/ about/careers/ We thank everyone for their interest, but only those selected for an interview will be contacted. Email: careers@tyaxadventures.com

The Body Shop Customer Consultant The Body Shop in Whistler is looking for part-time retail superstars who want to work for a company that makes a difference. Are you in high school and want to make some extra cash after school while selling your favorite Body Shop product? Are you a ski instructor looking to make some extra $$ after your day on the hill? If you LOVE our product and want to know more, please go in and see Tanya our AMAZING Manager! or email: robyn.camley@thebodyshop.com


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35th ANNUAL PEAK TO VALLEY PRESENTED BY

Career Opportunities at the District of Squamish . . . . . . . . . . .

Director of Human Resources Engineering Services Clerk Recreation Facility Clerk Cashier Clerk 2 Economic Development Specialist Financial Services Specialist Recreation Program Leader – Biking Recreation Program Instructor – Biking Recreation Facility Attendant Lifeguard 1 Recreation Program Leader

Visit squamish.ca/careers to find out more!

FEBRUARY 22 ND & 23 RD

WE NEED YOU! Want to be involved but aren’t quite up to the challenge of racing? Why not volunteer! We are in need of Gate Keepers – No experience necessary! Your two day commitment gets you: • Lunch both days • An event t-shirt • Drink tickets for both days • Entry into to Prize Draw • 1 day lift ticket Feel free to contact Sabine Caruso with any questions or if you would like to register. Sabine Caruso 604-905-2032 Scaruso1@vailresorts.com

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GROUP SALES & EVENTS COORDINATOR WHISTLER, BC

Toptable Group is seeking a Group Sales & Events Coordinator in Whistler, BC. This individual will be responsible for coordinating all group bookings and events at our Whistler restaurants; Araxi + The Cellar by Araxi, Bar Oso, and Il Caminetto. EXPERIENCE & QUALIFICATIONS: • Previous experience in sales and customer service is required • Previous restaurant experience is an asset

We offer year round full time hours, competitive wages, gratuities, extended medical & dental, accommodations, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants. Please email your resume & cover letter to:

careers@araxi.com

ARE YOU A FOODIE? #DELI #PRODUCE

We can offer you flexible schedules, great wages, fun and friendly environment working with other foodies. Join our Community Whistler IGA store. Text us your resume 604.209.8893 Email your to Nadinej@georgiamain.com

Resort Municipality of Whistler

Employment Opportunities · ·Municipal Clerk Instructor Lifeguard/Swim · ·Supervisor, Skate HostBylaw · ·Lifeguard/Swim Instructor Wastewater Treatment Plant Process Supervisor · ·Parking Enforcement Officer Labourer I – Village Maintenance · ·Labourer I - Public VillageServices Maintenance Youth and Specialist

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca/careers

www.whistlerwag.com

Protect your pooch this winter! Antifreeze is highly toxic for pets – check for spills and keep safely stored away from pets. Ice melters can irritate paws – wipe off paws after walks to avoid dogs ingesting. White dogs are difficult to see in the snow – keep pets on leash as cars are not able to brake or react quickly in the winter weather. www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 87


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Owner Concierge Coordinator STATUS OF POSITION: Full Time 1 Year Maternity Leave Contract HOURS OF DUTY: Varied Shift Work

Currently has the following positions available:

RESPONSIBILITIES: • Develop and maintain strong owner relationships by providing exceptional service in a friendly and engaging manner • Direct housekeeping contractors to ensure standards are consistently maintained for homes • Conduct inspection of residences to assure Fairmont standards have been meet and set the home to the owner needs • Assists in owner accounting; including special handling of accounts, check ins/outs, processing of invoices, collection of dues, etc. • Provide shuttle service upon request to owners • Follow department policies, procedures and service standards • Follow all safety policies • Other duties as assigned

FRONT DESK AGENTS Full Time

NIGHT AUDITOR Full Time or Part Time

ROOM ATTENDANTS Full Time

QUALIFICATIONS: • Previous customer service related experience; property management or hotel experience preferred • University/College degree in a related discipline an asset • Solid computer skills and is adept in working with property management systems and MS Office including Word, Excel, Outlook, Powerpoint • Must possess a professional presentation • Outstanding guest services skills and sophisticated verbal & written communication skills required • Strong knowledge of Whistler community amenities including: activities, restaurants, shops, etc. • Ability to focus attention on guest needs, remaining calm and courteous at all times

MAINTENANCE Competitive wages and benefits Resumes can be submitted to karen@wvis.ca

Apply via email to Christie.scrase@fairmont.com or via Fairmont careers on www.fairmont.com/careers piquenewsmagazine.com/events

Tandoori Grill WHISTLER’S RE-IMAGINED ITALIAN RESTAURANT

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES APPLY TODAY! Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

Full & Part Time Housekeepers Eligible successful candidates may receive*:

• Retention Bonus Program of up to $1,200 for eligible candidates. • Extensive benefits package which may include; ski pass or wellness allowance, disability coverage, travel insurance and extended health and dental. • Travel Allowance and discounted employee rates at any Diamond Resort International resort.

Join an established management team at Il Caminetto - the newest Whistler restaurant to join the Toptable Group famiglia! The storied restaurant offers a modern taste of Italy to bring a fresh, contemporary style of dining to the mountain.

RESERVATIONS MANAGER Il Caminetto is seeking a full-time Reservations Manager. This individual will set the tone for the entire dining experience while overseeing the front desk team. The ideal candidate is well spoken, organized, confident, outgoing, and well-presented.

QUALIFICATIONS • Minimum 2 years experience in a fine dining or comparable environment is required • Post Secondary education is an asset • Familiarity with OpenTable is an asset

• Full-time work year round and a FUN work environment. *eligibility and conditions based on DRCL policies and practices set out in general terms and conditions of employment.

Email your resume with the position you wish to apply for to: Madiha.Hassan@diamondresorts.com 88 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

We offer year round full time hours, competitive wages, gratuities, extended medical & dental, accommodations, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants. Please email your resume & cover letter to:

careers@ilcaminetto.ca

Fine Indian Cuisine is hiring these positions:

DISHWASHER BARTENDER HOSTESS SERVERS WITH EXPERIENCE PREFERRED. Please email resume to tandooriwhistler2@yahoo.ca tandooriwhistler.com SKI PASS AVAILABLE

201-4368 Main Street, Whistler V8E 1B6


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2 5

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1

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MAINTENANCE WORKER

TOPTABLE RESTAURANTS & STAFF ACCOMMODATIONS - WHISTLER We are seeking a skilled maintenance worker in Whistler, BC. This individual will be responsible for the maintenance and general handy-work at our three restaurants and for staff accommodations. EXPERIENCE & QUALIFICATIONS: • Previous experience in a maintenance role • Basic knowledge of HVAC, plumbing, and electrical • Knowledge of general building systems and equipment • Experience with painting and carpentry

We offer year round full and part-time hours, competitive wages, gratuities, extended medical & dental, accommodations, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants.

roberto@aavawhistlerhotel.com

HARD

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Thank you for your interest. Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted

Please email your resume & cover letter to:

careers@araxi.com

PEAK PERFORMANCE Physiotherapy & Massage Therapy

YOU CAN’T DO

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Seeking a Part-Time or Full-Time

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WHISTLER BLACKCOMB

Looking for a job where you can ski during the day? Do you have a Class 2 BC Driver’s License? We’re currently looking for a Bus Driver to drive our newly introduced Shuttle Bus for our Mount Currie employees. Days: 4 days a week between Monday and Friday Hours: 6.30-9.30am and 3.30-6.30pm Wage: $24.75 per hour Did you know? For $40, eligible dependents of Part Time employees qualify for a season’s pass! Please visit https://jobs.vailresortscareers.com/whistler/job/Whistler-Bus-DriverMount-Currie-to-Whistler-BC/534199600/ to apply!

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Let us take care of you! • • • •

Staff housing available Competitive wages Full time hours year around Free staff parking in Whistler Village

G Guestt S Services i R Representative t ti Night Audit Representative Maintenance Representative Room Attendant Houseperson

Great Perks!

Food & Beverage Banquet Chef - FT 1st cook - PT Pastry Assistant - PT Steward - FT (AM) & PT Server Assistant Expo Host Casual Banquet Server

Hotel Reservations Coordinator Room attendant House Attendant Door/Bell Attendant Housekeeping Supervisor Spa Spa Receptionist

Ask about our staff housing opportunities contact us today

careers@nitalakelodge.com www.nitalakelodge.com I @nitalakelodge

6 REASONS L: TO WORK AT SUNDIA Place to sleep + $ for activities es + more $ for activiti + convenience + security + Free Ski Pass

Come be our: • • • • •

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We’re Hiring!

Whistler in e f li d o o g A =

Please fax or email your resume with attention to “Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com We thank you for your interest. Only candidates chosen for further consideration will be contacted.

Employment Opportunities:

DO YOU LIVE IN PEMBERTON? THEN WHY COMMUTE TO WHISTLER?

• Room Attendants

Apply to: jobs@pembertonvalleylodge.com

Competitive wages, health benefits, casual environment 90 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

www.whistlerwag.com

Looking for a dog to adopt? Look for WAG’s bright orange bandanas on dogs being walked by volunteers! These dogs are looking for their forever home. 604.935.8364 | www.whistlerwag.com


there's no better way to buy and sell than Pique's online marketplace.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Tourism Whistler is a member-based marketing and sales organization that actively promotes Whistler’s unique position as a world-class all season resort destination.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Tourism Whistler is having an Election of Directors for one (1) position in each of the following three (3) categories: • One (1) Single-Managed Lodging – Small • One (1) Multi-Managed Lodging – Benchlands • One (1) Commercial Director The primary responsibility of the Board of Directors is to foster the long-term success of Tourism Whistler on behalf of its members. The board provides governance oversight and approves Tourism Whistler’s strategic direction and priorities. The Board of Directors’ positions are volunteer. Expertise Needed • Must have knowledge of the tourism industry, with a solid understanding of the Whistler community. • A thoughtful leader with strong critical thinking and strategic analysis. • Effective interpersonal and communication skills. • Familiarity with budgets and financial statements. • Familiarity with strategic planning and business plans. • High ethical standards and integrity in personal and professional dealings. • Previous board experience and an understanding of board governance would be an asset. Commitment Required • The ability to serve a minimum 2 year term. • Active participation in 8 board meetings per year and the Annual General Meeting. • Active participation in at least 1 functional committee (governance, audit & finance, human resources) with 2-4 meetings per year. Individuals interested in being nominated for one of the above positions can visit members.whistler.com/agm to view the Nomination Package and obtain the Nomination Form. The Nomination Form must be received by the office of Tourism Whistler by 5pm on Thursday, February 21st 2019 or it will be invalid.

Here’s to the Journey At Westin, we recruit the brightest, most energetic people in pursuit of developing an exciting and rewarding career. Marriott International has 30 renowned hotel brands in 122 countries around the world, and we’re still growing. Opportunities abound! The next step in your career could lead to your greatest adventure.

• Cooks

• In-Room-Dining Server

• Housekeeping Coordinator

• AM / PM Server

• Sales Coordinator

• House Attendant

• Room Attendant

A great career has always been a great adventure. Email your resume to HR@westinwhistler.com or visit us in person Monday to Friday 9am - 5pm.

PLAY HERE

» piquenewsmagazine.com/jobs www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 91


92 Call The Experts Want to advertise your service on this page? automotive

Call Pique at (604) 938-0202, or email sales@piquenewsmagazine.com

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92 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

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Puzzles 93 ACROSS 1 6 10 15 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 32 34 36 37 40 41 42 44 48 49 50 53 55 56 58 59 61 63 64 65 66 67

Row of shrubs Secure a contract Package store buy Softball and tennis Do the trick Western Sign after Pisces Really go for Brass Ordinary language Jazz instruments Some eclipses Inexperienced Slopes Glitter Kind of tire Banal Canvas bed Parts of circles World Series mo. Tavern order Way of Lao-tzu Scatters seed Rock’s -- Fighters Annapolis grad Country cousin Establish TV knob abbr. One-celled animal Lucy Lawless role Smug smile Question starter Dupe No-goodnik Roll-call yell -- up (got ready) Fragrant stick

4

69 Like before 70 Earthenware pot 71 Chute material 74 Stop -- -- dime 75 Forces a bill through 78 Ran, as a current 81 Go quickly 82 Bugs Bunny and Elmer - 83 Protective shelter 84 “Blue Tail Fly” singer Burl - 86 Theta preceder 87 One or the other 89 Supports 93 Material at La Brea 94 First orchard? 95 Bird-feeder treat 96 Close relative 97 Musicians of old 100 Mannequins 102 Inch fractions 103 Roused up 104 Orlando attraction 108 Popped up 109 Orchestral instrument 110 Jug 111 Swiss lake 112 Recent 113 Captures a bronco 115 Smaller 116 Grain holder 117 Pat on 118 Anthem 120 Skim milk’s lack 121 Breach 123 Mongkut portrayer 124 Electric swimmers 125 Lib. section

2 5

1

7 8

1 9 2 1

5

3 4

6 4

5 9 7

7 7 8

127 129 131 136 138 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153

Young girl Fill with fizz Signature Strongman of myth Twist violently Atomic number 5 Gnat Diagram Comforter stuffing Courageous Colder Tuba and bugle Ms. Zellweger Wise ones Rises up on the hind legs Antacid brand Piece of mischief

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

4

Dangle Nonstop Have the courage Generous ones Helen, in Spanish Wrangler’s need Ring-shaped reef Tree house? Go formal Feudal tenant Apollo’s priestess Deep South Sharp Exec. aide Noted wine family Grown-ups “-- Lisa” Latin 101 word Desiccated

2

21 31 33 35 37 38 39 42 43 45 46 47 49 50 51 52 53 54 57 58 59 60 62 64 66 68 69 71 72 73 76 77 79 80 82 85 88 90

5 6 9 4 7 1 1

Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com

4 8

Answers page 89 # 21

HARD

Branch of physics Computer graphic Spanish title -- kwon do Some distance away Forum site Place for chickens Ran fast Diving bird Intimidated Put on Musher’s vehicle Poet’s black Tulip colors Subordinate to Reddish brown Discharged Lives Composer -- Satie “Kubla Khan” setting Didn’t hog Short note Moon ring Give a little Errand runners Trial locales Process ore Any miss Sequel’s sequel Disappoints (2 wds.) Maria Conchita -Kid watcher Monsieur’s summer Rather or Duryea Antenna Stuck-up Tints Buckets

9

4

91 92 94 98 99 100 101 102 103 105 106 107 109 111 114 115 116 119

Shuck peas Hits the brakes “NBA Friday” airer Hilo guitars Freshman, usually Occupies, as a post Hydrox rival Encounter Microscopic Yield territory Face sketcher’s start Boxtop pieces Books pro Large lizard Switch positions Records Spurts Good routine

121 122 123 124 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 137 139 140 141

Spice rack item Late-summer flowers Aches Weirder Fish-eating eagles TV and radio Luxury craft Make frightened Punk Recedes Director -- Ephron Boring person Mideast title Long-tailed animals A grand Best or Ferber Glimpsed Long, wearying journey

Last Weeks’ Answers

1 8 5 6

8

9

6

8 2

2 7

3 7 1 5

4 2

HARD

# 22

Enter a digit from 1 through 9 in each cell, in such a way that: ▪ Each horizontal row contains each digit exactly once ▪ Each vertical column contains each digit exactly once ▪ Each 3x3 box contains each digit exactly once Solving a sudoku puzzle does not require any mathematics; simple logic suffices. Level of difficulty: Hard

9

6

2

7

8

5 4 2 1 2 5 3 9 1 7 2 5 9 6 5 4 7 3 1 7 4 1 HARD

# 23

2 8

HARD

8 3

6

7 3 1 5

7 4 6 5 9 5 6 8 1 2 4 9 1 2 8 # 24

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | February 7, 2019 | 93


94 Maxed Out We have seen the future and it is Netflix

I

n the age of hyperbolic, socialmedia hysteria, it’s probably hardly noteworthy for the appointed head of the Canadian Broadcast Corporation (CBC) to compare Netflix to the cultural imperialism of the British Raj. After all,

By G.D. Maxwell we live in a world where there are people that equate all sexual intercourse with rape and creative expression that roams outside the immediate cultural markers of the person expressing it as cultural appropriation. Meh. The Raj lasted for nearly 90 years, from the middle of the 19th century to the middle of the 20th. It represented the last

WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

stand of the British Empire, upon which the sun never set, as they used to say. There was probably some good nationbuilding aspects to the Raj, but no one in their right mind would say that now, at a time where the world is black and white and no middle ground of grey is allowed. Whatever theoretical good was done has been relegated to the dustbin of history and a simple equation has replaced it: Raj = the Qissa Khwani bazaar massacre, Takkar massacre, etc. The Raj, motivated by mercantilism, the need for foreign resources to feed the industrial machinery of Great Britain and markets to purchase the goods produced, was paternalistic, brutal, condescending and exploitive. It subjugated a nation, albeit one at war with itself along religious lines, to the rule of another more powerful nation. Sounds just like Netflix, eh? Catherine Tait was appointed president and CEO of CBC last April. She’s worked in Canadian film and television for more than three decades. Stints at Telefilm Canada and as Canada’s cultural attaché to France, president of an independent film, television and digital

94 | February 7, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

content company based in New York and president of Salter Street Films more or less round out her resume. Based on her statements about Netflix one may wonder if her grasp of Anglo-Indian history goes much deeper than watching the film Gandhi. But she is in charge of defending the Canadian model of cultural content as it relates to television and radio and defending the CBC’s role therein. When the world was young and naive and television was in its infancy, a deal was struck. The nascent world of broadcasters would provide fuzzy, black-and-white content in exchange for bombarding viewers with commercials. Fair enough. Watch for free; tolerate dancing cigarette packs and hammering headaches. Cable changed all that. Instead of over-the-air, free signals, we got piped in content, more channels, a monthly fee and commercials. We paid for what had formerly been free and continued to be sold snake oil in undreamed of varieties. But Netflix once again changed that equation. If you so choose, you can pay a monthly fee and watch content devoid of commercial interruption. This has proven to be catnip to an audience of cats. People have signed up for Netflix, and other content providers, in droves. Many have cut their cable entirely, fed up with ever-increasing costs and ever-decreasing quality, not to mention the requirement to accept a lot of dreck they’re not remotely interested in just to get the few channels they might watch. I understand why CBC—and others— are freaking out. CBC isn’t what it used to be and what it’s become is almost— strike that—is entirely unwatchable. With the caveat my television consumption lies outside the bell curve, consisting almost entirely of news, movies and documentaries, I can’t remember the last time I watched an entire program on CBC. Hey, Catherine, it’s the commercials. There are too many. There are especially too many hyping other CBC shows. They seem to break up programming randomly and at inopportune times. Unless you need a lot of snack and/or bathroom breaks, I can’t imagine this is a winning model. Even more irksome, it means you are paying thrice to try and watch CBC. You pay first with your taxes, the federal government pumping nearly $700 million annually into CBC. You pay again when you are dinged monthly for your cable/satellite bill. You pay a third time being subjected to those commercials, the ones that seem to grow more voluminous each year.

Until recently, there were two reasons to watch CBC: Hockey Night in Canada and The National. HNiC is rapidly disappearing and The National has become an unwatchable mess of quasi news and non-stop victim porn. The chestnut of local news broadcasting used to be, “If it bleeds, it leads.” At CBC, that adage has been replaced with, “If it cries, it flies.” Unless, of course, we have some vacuous member of the royal family visiting the country on our tax dollars, in which case even the most heart-wrenching story is relegated to the back burner while we’re appraised of Princess Whomever’s darling dress and hat while she watches with soul-dead shark eyes as school children fawn about. Until a recent visit by my grandson, I’d never watched Netflix. I found the idea of hundreds and hundreds of movies and TV shows from which to choose overwhelming. I am, admittedly, not good with too much choice. Give me six things to choose from and I can make a choice. Six hundred? I’m toast. But with quasi-parental responsibility of a two-year-old for a week, one who reaches the calming state of alpha brain waves while watching a moralistic, talking train named Thomas, Netflix was mother’s milk while mom was away. At least until I introduced him to Donald Duck, who takes a more direct, self-help approach to life’s problems than Thomas. Where Thomas tries to be inclusive and nurturing, Donald simply takes a chainsaw to Chip & Dale’s tree when they get on his nerves. The boy thought that was pretty cool. I’d take a chainsaw to CBC and my satellite provider if it weren’t for the fact I can piggyback my low-rent package in both Whistler and the digitally-challenged wilderness of Smilin’ Dog Manor. So I can understand Ms. Tait’s freakout over Netflix and other internet content providers. She has seen the enemy. But she still fails to grasp it is herself. After most of the country had a good laugh over her Netflix-is-the-Evil-Empirethat-will-destroy-Canadian-content screed, the producers of that content jumped to her defence. Apparently the sun still rises in the East and Canadian cultural producers want the government to milk any cow that wanders into the field offering sweeter milk. But they are fighting a rear-guard battle much as the Raj fought theirs in India. If television is, indeed, the opiate of the masses, Netflix and its ilk is fentanyl. Whether it proves to be lethal to viewers of dinosaurs like the CBC remains to be seen. But people seem to be picking a winner in this fight and it isn’t the CBC. n


Welcome to the best place on earth Engel & Völkers Portfolio of Fine Homes

NORDIC ESTATES – TALUSWOOD

NORDIC

VILLAGE

BLUEBERRY HILL

Immaculate & spacious 4 bed/3.5 bath, slope-side lodge style townhome. Outstanding revenue generator - $185,000 in 2018!!! Private & pristine with over 2,250 sq/ft of living space with big views of mountains and Alta Lake. $2,490,000

Ski in, ski out of this beautifully appointed, fully furnished and equiped, 4 bed, 4 bath townhome on Whistler Mountain. With a 2 car garage, hot tub and updated appliances, this property is hard to beat. No Gst, zoned for nightly rentals. $3,299,000

Classic chalet feel in the rarely available Telemark townhomes. SKI-IN to your 3 bed, 2 bath, 1, 800+ sq ft townhome with GARAGE. Vaulted ceilings, wood-burning fireplace, jacuzzi tub, sauna & expansive deck with mountain views! $2,250,000

Spacious & renovated 2 storey Blueberry townhome. Main floor features an open livingroom with adjoining dining room, powderroom and large gourmet kitchen. Top floor has 2 large bedrooms both with private ensuite bathrooms. $1,424,900

Maggi Thornhill *prec

Jane Frazee

Katherine Currall

Nick Swinburne *prec

3-2250 Nordic Drive

604-905-8199

5 - 2500 Taluswood Place

15-4100 Whistler Way

604-935-2135

3106 St. Moritz Cresent

604-966-1364

604-932-8899

TALUSWOOD

CREEKSIDE

WHISTLER CAY HEIGHTS

NORDIC

SKI-IN / SKI-OUT! 2 bedrooms 2 bathrooms, open and spacious living plan all on one level, 1000 sqft, private, oversized windows capturing mountain and tree top views. Nightly rentals permitted. No GST! www.30thebluffs.info $1,300,000

Great location! Lake Placid Lodge One Bdr. Phase I nighlty rental zoning. Easy access to Creekside Gondola & shopping. Heated pool & hot tub. Comes fully furnished with gas fireplace, balcony, updated kitchen & bathroom. $699,800

Beautifully renovated 5 bed/3.5 bath chalet in prestigious Linkside in Whistler Cay Heights. Extremely private with SW exposure & views of Whistler Mountain, just steps from Whistler Village. $4,175,000

Stunning chalet in coveted Nordic Estates. Features include steam shower, state-of-the-art kitchen with top appliances, Lutron lighting, builtin entertainment system, vaulted ceilings, and loads of natural light. $2,595,000

David Wiebe *prec

Rachel Edwards

Janet Brown

Jeremy Fairley

30 - 2301 Taluswood Place

212 - 2050 Lake Placid Road

604-966-8874

6412 Linkside Rd

604-966-4200

2701 Rimrock Road

604-935-0700

604-935-9150

UNIVERSITY HIGHLANDS

WHISTLER VILLAGE

FUNCTION JUNCTION

SPRING CREEK

Custom built home in prestigious University Heights. Featuring 9ft ceilings throughout, chef’s kitchen, open concept living, hardwood floors & coffered ceilings. Unobstructed mountain views with a self contained 1 bedroom suite. $1,798,000

LOCATION LOCATION! Spacious One Bedroom Condo at Tyndall Stone Lodge. Centrally located in Whistler Village with mountain views, building pool & hot tub. Turn-key / Phase I zoning allows nightly rentals & owner use. $739,000 + GST – New Price

Landmark building at the gateway to Whistler’s Function Junction with over 9700 SF of commercial retail space. Great long-term tenant in place since 1995. Capture the future growth potential of this great location! $4,995,000

STUNNING new high efficiency 5br home by award winning architect. 4750sq.ft. on .67acre lot. Elevator, gourmet kitchen, fine appliances, amazing mountain views, fully furnished. Turnkey ready to become your new mountain home. $3,900,000

Angie Vazquez *prec

Kathy White

Jody Wright

Rob Boyd

2954 Strangway Place

207 - 4338 Main Street

778-318-5900

1/2 - 1005 Alpha Lake Road

604-616-6933

1558 Tynebridge Lane

604-935-4680

Whistler Village Shop

Whistler Creekside Shop

Squamish Station Shop

36-4314 Main Street · Whistler BC V0N 1B4 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

325-2063 Lake Placid Road · Whistler BC V0N 1B2 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

150-1200 Hunter Place · Squamish BC V8B 0G8 · Phone +1 778-733-0611

whistler.evcanada.com

whistler.evcanada.com

whistler.evcanada.com

Engel & Völkers Whistler *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION ©2018 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage is independently owned and operated. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified.

604-935-9172


#108D - 2020 London Lane

$145,000

Evolution is the ultimate ski in / ski out, pet friendly ¼ ownership in Whistler! This corner onebedroom suite offers everything you would wish for in a vacation property, at a fraction of the cost. The open floor plan features sophisticated design, a fully equipped kitchen, complete with granite countertops and Miele appliances, and an elegant living area.

Dave Beattie*

1

604.905.8855

4862 Casabella Crescent

$2,365,000

#238 - 4350 Lorimer Road

$699,000

This totally updated one bedroom and one bath condo is move in ready and zoned for unlimited nightly rentals or unlimited owner use. It features beautiful mountain views of Sproat and Rainbow, hot tub, underground parking, bike storage area, elevator access and a great location with easy access to shopping and amenities.

Dave Halliwell*

604.932.7727

8556 Drifter Way

#363 - 4800 Spearhead Dr.

$22,900

Own a great SKI in SKI OUT week in February with this deeded timeshare ownership. This 875 sq ft 2 bedroom 2 bath, single level condo has a fully kitted out kitchen, pool and 2 hot tubs deck have the best location in the valley. You are minutes from boarding Blackcombs newest Gondola!

1

$2,999,000

Dave Sharpe

2

604.902.2779

#203D - 2036 London Lane

$168,900

The Only 1,536 sf Luxury Montebello Towhome Available . The most popular plan where the views are enjoyed from all levels, and the master bedroom, open concept gourmet kitchen, living and dining area see the best of the best snowy peaks of Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains from all windows. Matterport 3D Showcase: bit.ly/4862MUB

Here is a $5million dollar plus view in Alpine, one of the most desired neighborhoods in Whistler. Close to high school, grocery store, Meadow Park and Nicklaus North golf course. Secluded, private chalet with an incredible opportunity for a Vancouver family to have it all in Whistler. One of the very few homes in Whistler with its own funicular.

Spectacular unobstructed views to Whistler peak from one of the best located 2 bedroom suites in Legends. 13 weeks of owner use or rental, unbeatable location and amenities! Ski in/out unit fully furnished and equipped. Access to amenities and storage locker anytime making it perfect for day trips. Whistler ownership can be affordable!

Denise Brown*

Doug Treleaven

James Collingridge

3

604.935.2013

#102 - 7350 Crabapple Court

$389,900

780 square foot 2 bedroom in Orion, Pemberton’s newest condo development. Great views, carport, storage, efficient state of the art design and construction, Orion is due to complete in early 2020. Beyond “passive” standard for energy efficiency and a focus on healthy living construction techniques.

Jane Heim

2

604.935.0802

2931 Stanley Road - Birken

$719,000

604.905.8626

2246 Brandywine Way

5

$2,399,000

604.902.0132

#1H - 2300 Nordic Drive

2

$197,500

This classic Whistler ski chalet is set on the desirable high side of Brandywine Way in Bayshores Estates. This 4 bedroom + den home is sure to keep the ambiance high with your family and friends. Walk to Creekside Village and the gondola, or bike to nearby Alpha and Nita Lake.

Exclusive slope-side Luxury Residence in 10th share fractional ownership. This 3 bedroom 2300 sqft. home offers the best ski in/ski out location in Whistler, coupled with unmatched luxury and simplicity. Your one tenth ownership offers 5 weeks per year in this beautiful, completely turn-key home.

Josh Crane

Matt Chiasson

604.902.6106

#H102 - 1400 Alta Lake Road

4.5

$439,000

604.935.9171

4817 Casabella Crescent

3

$2,390,000

Family home, weekend get a way, or investment property, take your pick. Built in 2004 on just under a half acre, the tranquil setting of this home is perfect for an active young family. Minutes away from Gates lake, and a quick walk to the bus stop for the kids ride to school. Separate shop that is heated for the handyman in your family, toy shed out back for sleds and storage.

One bedroom main floor property in desirable Tamarisk on Alpha Lake. This is an original unit and ready for the latest in interior upgrades. With 650 square feet and a large deck this is on of the best values in Whistler today. Lots of parking for owners and guests.

Enjoy owning this beautiful 3 bedroom, 3.5 bathroom town home with an absolutely great location and spectacular views of both Whistler and Blackcomb. After a hard day on the ski hill, you can enjoy relaxing in your own private hot tub. It’s just a short walk to all sorts of shopping, restaurants and the village square, yet far enough away for peace and tranquility.

Matt Kusiak

Michael d’Artois

Mike Nauss

604.935.0762

2

WHISTLER OFFICE 106 - 7015 Nesters Road, Whistler, BC V8E 0X1 604.932.2300 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070 *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

remax-whistler.com awarded best website 2018 by Luxuryrealestate.com

Property Management remaxseatoskypm.com

604.905.9337

1

604.932.9586

3

PEMBERTON OFFICE 1411 Portage Road, Pemberton, BC V0N 2L1 604.894.6616 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070

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