Discover Squamish Summer 2022

Page 1

Summer 2022 | Free

On the

Rise

Inside our growth issue:

Climbing’s popularity ascends Growth brings diversity and variety More places to shop & eat Mountain biking participation explodes


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Contents 6 Here we

grow again!

8

22

Single Tracks: interesting facts that make Squamish unique

Squamish is a boomtown - what that means for those who live here

31

12

26

Mountain biking: popularity explodes during the pandemic

The dollars and sense of business in Squamish

Squamish's biggest festival is back and ready to party

Discover Squamish

33

16

28

Then and now: the explosive growth of Squamish climbing

This boomtown is a beer town

New dining options in town

Cover

Volume 9 / Issue 1 Summer 2022

publisher

Find us online at

Sarah Strother sstrother@wplpmedia.com

www.squamishchief.com published by

sales manager

Cathie Greenlees cgreenlees@squamishchief.com editor

squamishchief.com

Jennifer Thuncher jthuncher@squamishchief.com creative director / production

Amir Shahrestani ashahrestani@wplpmedia.com 4 | Discover Squamish Summer 2022

Adam Hart on Silver Surfer below Murrin Park, Squamish, British Columbia. Photo by Chris Christie.

All rights reserved, reproduction of any material contained in this publication is expressly forbidden without the prior consent of the publisher.


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grow

Here we

again!

BY EDITOR JENNIFER THUNCHER

Pop into any of our local cafés or eavesdrop on a trail and you are sure to hear a discussion of Squamish’s growth. Squamish is one of Canada’s fastest-growing communities. Our population is booming. From 2016 to 2021, the population of Squamish spiked to 23,819, up from 19,497. That’s a 22% population growth in five years. B.C.’s average population increase was 7.6% over the same period, and the national average was 5.2%. The number of private dwellings in town matches the population growth, with a 26% increase over five years. This growth has brought growing pains, there’s no question. Construction has been the soundtrack of locals’ lives for a few years now, and there are more developments planned. Old-time locals reminisce about a lake that was often free of others back in the day or of walking downtown and knowing every single person they pass. Those days are mostly gone. But what Squamish folks work hard at is staying the tight-knit, caring community it has always been. We are still a small-ish town. We take the time to say hi to you in our stores and we smile often at strangers (don’t be alarmed). And we know that growth brings with it many positives, such as more diversity — in people, yes, and also — in choices of where to eat, shop, be entertained and live. We also know that the tourism that bloats our numbers in the fine weather months is a boon for our local economy and visitors bring with them unique perspectives and backstories. Whether you lived here all your life, just moved here, are considering a move to town or are here for the day, we are glad you are here, in other words. This edition of Discover Squamish focuses on the many ways Squamish is growing, whether it is an increase in food choices, mountain biking, or our returning Squamish Constellation Festival. Unlike greed, growth can be good, and we are here for it. We hope you will take a stroll through our pages and our town. Welcome.

Photo by Laara Cerman / Leigh Righton, gettyimages.ca 6 | Discover Squamish Summer 2022


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Single Tracks small takes that make Squamish unique

Photo by Greg Norgaard, gettyimages.ca

Squamish – Where the Wild Things Are Squamish is home to a wide variety of wildlife due to its diverse landscape. While visiting, you may spot a bear, come across wolf tracks, see an elk along the highway, or even hear about elusive cougars being spotted. Here are some essential safety tips to prevent unnecessary harm to local wildlife and keep you, your family, and your pets safe: • Most animals prefer to avoid people. That is safest for them and us. • When recreating on trails, make noise by clapping your hands and using your voice. Travel with a friend or more, pay attention to your surroundings and don't wear headphones. Watch for fresh scat and other wildlife signs. Avoid travelling alone, especially at dawn and dusk when animals are most active. • Enjoy animals from a distance. Approaching wildlife interferes with their ability to forage for food and raise their young, and it can lead to dangerous situations. Always keep a respectful distance of at least 100 metres for bears and 30 metres for other non-predatory animals. If you cause an animal to move, you are too close. 8 | Discover Squamish Summer 2022

• Do not feed wildlife. Feeding wild animals may give you a moment of joy, but the costs can be tragic for that animal. Animals that are intentionally fed may become increasingly aggressive, seeking handouts. It is also illegal to feed bears, wolves, cougars or coyotes in all of B.C. • Keep a bare campsite and leave only footprints. Anything that has an odour can attract wildlife. Never leave attractants unattended, even for a moment. These include food, items used in food preparation, coolers (empty or full), garbage and wrappings, pet food and bowls, recyclables, and toiletries. They should all be stored in a hard-sided vehicle and never in your tent. • Do not throw anything out your car window, including organics, as this can draw wildlife to the roadside and risk a collision. • Always pack out what you pack in. • Keep pets on a leash in wildlife country. Over 50% of injuries inflicted on humans by bears have involved dogs. Wildlife see dogs as a potential threat or potential prey. For your safety and that of your pet, keep them close and on a leash. • Watch for wildlife. Many animals may graze along Highway 99 or try to cross it. If you see an animal along the roadside, do slow down but do not stop. Stopping along Highway 99 is unsafe and can put you, other motorists, and the animal at risk. • Do not run in a wildlife encounter. Running is a prey response, and the urge to chase will be strong in animals such as bears or cougars. Stay calm, speak in a low, calm voice and move away slowly without turning your back. Wildlife attacks on people are exceedingly rare. • Become informed. WildSafeBC provides many resources on their website, including information on local B.C. wildlife, ways to prevent conflict, safe use and transport of bear spray, and a free course on bear safety when recreating. Visit www.wildsafebc.com


White Water Rafting Sometimes lost among all of the outdoor adventures in Squamish is the bevy of world-class rapids located deep in the Squamish Valley. Fortunately for us, there are two companies that boast guided rafting trips so we can reinvigorate our sense of adventure through a splash of cold water. The Squamish Rafting Company hosts two types of summer trips with professional guides that have the highest certifications in safety for the visitors. The first trip is called the Elaho Whitewater Experience. During it, patrons can expect to see beautiful glaciers and mountains and experience paddling 20 kilometres through class three or four rapids. The trip also comes with a lunch on a private island and the choice to partake in a daring cliff jump! The second available trip from the Squamish Rafting Company is a more family-oriented paddle down the Cheakamus River. Families can expect to paddle and float through class two rapids and take in the views around them. Also offering white water rafting trips is Canadian Outback Rafting. They offer a trip down the exhilarating Elaho River for ages 13 and up with approximately three hours of rafting. Additionally, they offer a family-friendly oriented trip down the Cheakamus River for ages 5 and up and is approximately 1.5-hours long. Canadian Outback Rafting also offers a Squamish Scenic Twilight Float, which is perfect for families with children aged five and up. Starting and ending at Fisherman's Park, each raft enjoys the scenic views under the setting sun in this 45-minute to one-hour trip. Finally, for those feeling extra adventurous, Canadian Outback Rafting offers an overnight trip on the Elaho River. During it, visitors will experience 2.5-hours of rafting on day one with a dinner cooked to perfection in the pristine backcountry wilderness. On day two, visitors will have a two-hour float down to the take-out and will be bused back to their cars. For more information about white water rafting in Squamish, visit www.CanadianOutbackRafting.com or www.Squamish-Rafting.com. Skateboarding at Airhouse Sports Academy. PHOTO BY JENNIFER THUNCHER

Photo by Karl Weatherly, gettyimages.ca

Goat Yoga

Photo by Kat Peterson, gettyimages.ca

You might ask what exactly is goat yoga? But it’s actually as simple as it sounds: yoga with baby goats. This unique activity takes place in the Squamish Valley at Glacier Valley Farm. Baby goats are chosen for their “kind and gentle nature.” While they are untrained, the staff is on hand to ensure that people feel comfortable and safe during their visit. The yoga is designed to be playful as the goats will explore on and around visitors. Visitors will be challenged to engage in mindfulness as the goats become intrigued! There may be some poop pellets on the mat, just warning you now. It is all part of the experience. Goat Yoga has numerous offerings for a range of clientele. For more information visit www.GoatYoga.ca. Summer 2022 Discover Squamish | 9


Photo by Albert Pego, gettyImages.ca

Sea to Sky Gondola Opening in 2014, the Sea to Sky Gondola has become a stalwart of adventure in Squamish. In the summer, the gondola offers a wide variety of outdoor activities and food and beverage options at the Summit Lodge. Visitors can enjoy everything from scenic short walks to long backcountry adventures that explore the mountains. The 100-metre suspension bridge displays a scenic view of the 10 | Discover Squamish Summer 2022

surrounding mountains and forest all the way down to Howe Sound. Even if you’re scared of heights, the bridge is a must-do! The gondola also offers a unique adventure called the Via Ferrata during which visitors can explore the surrounding area atop the gondola through a series of ladders, catwalks and bridges. Outfitted with a climbing harness and attached to a cable, this adventure is fit for anyone who’s willing with no experience necessary. Additionally in the summer, the gondola will host weekly music on its patio from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. every Friday between June 17 and September 9. The series aptly titled Mountain Music will see a variety of musicians performing classic rock, indie, Celtic rock, acoustic, world and country-rock. Musicians range from local like Will Ross to Juno-nominated bands like Mazacote. For more information about the Sea to Sky Gondola, visit www.SeaToSkyGondola.com.


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Mountain Biking popularity explodes during the pandemic

Photo by Amir Shahrestani 12 | Discover Squamish Summer 2022


PAT JOHNSON

T

he pandemic put the brakes on a huge number of activities. Fortunately, many popular pastimes in Squamish are outdoorsy and so were less affected by health regulations. In the case of mountain biking, local enthusiasts are stunned at the explosive growth of their sport over the past two years.

The skyrocketing number of trail riders comes just as the group that oversees the area’s bike trails celebrates 30 years of representing the sport. SORCA, the Squamish Off-Road Cycling Association, was one of the first of its kind in the province, says Ian Lowe, the group’s new executive director and longtime member. Now, almost any community in B.C. with a sizeable off-road trail system has what he calls an “ORCA,” including North Vancouver, Pemberton and Whistler. The Squamish group works closely with stakeholders, including the Sk _wx _wú7 mesh Úxwumixw (Squamish Nation), the municipality, the province and private landowners and developers to advance the interests of riders. SORCA also organizes events and builds and maintains the trail system around town.

Photo provided by SORCA

Summer 2022 Discover Squamish | 13


Photo provided by SORCA

Photo by Amir Shahrestani

Electronic trail counters measured a massive uptick in users since the pandemic’s beginning. “Going back only three or four years, if we had a trail that got three or 4,000 [rides], that was a well-ridden trail,” said Lowe. “Now we’re seeing numbers surpass 10,000 in certain situations.” Limitations on indoor activities and the comparative safety of cycling during a pandemic are mainly responsible for the increase in traffic, he said. The physical and mental benefits of cycling also countered some of the stresses that have accompanied this unprecedented time. “People sought different ways to get their physical and mental wellness, and a lot of people turned to the outdoors … whether that was hiking or biking or kayaking – all the sports absolutely took off,” he said. There is also the “captive audience” factor, he said. Not only Squamishers, but Vancouverites and other British Columbians whose recreational options were limited, made the jaunt to explore some of the trails in the Sea to Sky. The giant leap in trail biking occurred even though SORCA cancelled all its structured events over the past two years. Because races, events and programs almost always culminate in some sort of social event — a barbecue or party — and because even outdoor events have been, at times, subject to limitations, the growth in the sport is especially notable. A 2016 study suggested that the trail network around Squamish was responsible for $9.9 million in visitor spending pouring into 14 | Discover Squamish Summer 2022

the community per year. Lowe says no more recent numbers are available, but he is certain that number has skyrocketed proportionate to the spike in trail users. SORCA also works to draw less represented groups to the sport, through programs like girlsBIKEsquamish, which has helped increase the number of female riders. Lowe said that watching riders on the trails suggests something close to gender parity, which is another big change from just a few years ago. The SORCA Mountain Bike Skills Park, located on the south side of Brennan Recreation Centre, is another gateway for new riders to gain experience. “It’s perfect for newer riders who are just trying to get that sense of being airborne for the first time,” Lowe said. “Kids love it because you can roll over all of the jumps.” A significant redevelopment of the skills park is among the big-ticket budget items on SORCA’s 2022 agenda. Another, which is awaiting approval, is the extension of Miki’s Magic, a newer trail that was created to honour Mikayla Martin, who died from a cycling accident in 2019, at age 21. “Making the extension will make it a very, very popular trail and area,” said Lowe. An event celebrating SORCA’s 30th anniversary will likely occur in early June. 


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Then and now:

e v i s o l p x e e th h t w o gr of Squamish climbing STEVEN CHUA

Adobe Stock 16 | Discover Squamish Summer 2022


I

n the not-too-distant past, it's probably safe to say that most folks considered climbing an extreme fringe sport for people with a death wish.

Much of what non-climbers knew about climbing was informed by over-the-top movies like Cliffhanger. That has changed. In the last decade, climbing gyms have sprouted up all over North America, making the sport far easier for the average person to access. It's no longer necessary to live in a place like Squamish to learn the sport. But many people who got their start in gyms travel here to test themselves in the outdoors. As a result, people from all over the Vancouver area — and the world — are flooding Squamish on sunny days. No longer do you have to learn the old way, which involved hanging around a crag or alpine club, hoping that the grizzled old mountain men or women who got their start by hammering old cat food cans into stoppers would mentor you. You can now just learn in a gym or take a course. Brian Moorhead, a longtime fixture in the Squamish climbing scene, got his start in Ireland in the early 1960s. "I was a fairly 'serious climber' in Ireland at the time, but that

Veteran Squamish climber Brian Moorhead chats with local climbers at Smoke Bluffs park in Squamish. Photo by David Buzzard

wasn't hard too because there weren't very many of us," Moorhead said with a laugh. However, he went off in search of new adventures, and around 1967, he moved to Canada. "Of course, the first time I saw the Tantalus Range running up the very primitive Sea to Sky Highway at that time…I looked at the Sea to Sky. It was a panorama of templates, and I said, 'Oh yeah, I think I made the right decision here,'" he said. Moorhead's interest would turn to alpinism, with his attention focusing on Squamish and the North Cascades. He took up sailing and his interest in climbing would ebb and flow, though he always had a hand in it. His son, Colin, would eventually take to the sport and spearhead his own guiding company. However, the elder Moorhead took a keen interest in the Smoke Bluffs, which took considerable effort on his and many others to turn into a park. "There I really saw the evolution of climbing," he said. He said he noticed a lot more immigration into Canada after Expo ’86, and though there were many new people coming to the country, that wasn't reflected in the climbing scene. Moorhead said that there were perhaps more pressing needs that new Canadians needed to have met rather than recreation. "I just came to conclusions as an immigrant myself. I knew that many of these people are struggling with a new country, a new language," he said. However, he said the advent of climbing gyms has increased accessibility to the sport, and he's since seen more and more climbers of different backgrounds get involved. Another thing that's changed is the gear, which has allowed Summer 2022 Discover Squamish | 17


Photo by Alex Ratson, gettyimages.ca 18 | Discover Squamish Summer 2022


Photo by David Buzzard

climbers to push the level of technical skill higher than before. Shoes with sticky rubber have replaced hobnailed boots, and ropes that may-or-may-not-snap have been phased out for certified ropes that people can fall on repeatedly without incident. "Good gear made the sport more accessible," Moorhead said. As far as the future of climbing, he said that it may involve more travel for people. "Squamish may have hit a critical mass in terms of livability or enjoyability," he said. Crowds have flooded the most prominent areas, and it's increasingly hard to find a place to climb. However, if people keep developing new routes, there may still be ways to accommodate the growing number of climbers, provided they're willing to hike further from the main areas. Moorhead said younger generations must take responsibility for maintaining and building outdoor climbing routes and access trails. This influx of people has forced the Squamish Access Society, the non-profit steward of local climbing routes and access trails, to adapt. Alex Ryan Tucker, a board member of the society, has observed

that it's required people to rethink the leave-no-trace philosophy. It's generally been accepted practice that recreationalists should leave the areas they play in exactly the way they found them. However, new questions about this arise. Is it better to develop more trails, thus tampering with the land's natural state, or is it better to leave things be? The former option creates the immediate effect of disrupting the land, but it controls the flow of crowds. The latter option does not immediately affect the land, but, in the long run, crowds could spread across the area unchecked, thus damaging more natural habitat. "I think one of the biggest things is if we just looked at leave-notrace, just the blanket absolutely-no-trace anyways — it's not going to be a realistic way of dealing with it," said Ryan Tucker. "What we need to be doing more often — and what we're aiming to do more of — is just where we do have these climbing areas, trying to kind of upgrade and reinforce the trails, and the base areas of the climbs." It's a matter of striking a balance between upgrading trail infrastructure while keeping with the area's natural character. Some areas, like the Smoke Bluffs, which are heavily developed, are more suited to big gravel pathways. On the other hand, there are more natural areas, and it's important to maintain that quality, he said. Murrin Park is one example of growth. Spearheaded by Moorhead, it started off as a climbers' access trail but has since become a very popular hike. "It's cool to see that climbers can have positive effects for other people in the community and give other people opportunities for getting outdoors," Ryan Tucker said. Both Ryan Tucker and Moorhead encouraged people to get involved in volunteering to help maintain climbing routes and trails, and, if they have $10 to spare, to join the Squamish Access Society. 

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Squamish is a

boomtown here's what that means for those who live here PAT JOHNSON

Photo by Alex Ratson, gettyimages.ca

22 | Discover Squamish Summer 2022


L

inda Simpson's roots in eastern Ontario are deep. Her family traces back to the United Empire Loyalists, who fled the American Revolution in the 18th century. Simpson was born and raised in Brockville, on the St. Lawrence, due south of Ottawa. But last November, Simpson pulled up stakes at age 72 and relocated to Squamish "with all flags flying," she says. With a son in Squamish and another in Whitehorse — and two grandkids in each town — Simpson was making frequent trips across the continent. "I would come here for a couple of weeks and then go to Whitehorse for a couple of weeks," she said, adding that the two communities share a similar vibe. Her first full winter on the West Coast was a joy that she tried not to rub in too badly with her friends back east. The Brockville demographic is 15 years older than Squamish, she said, and the difference shows. "The vibrancy in this town is exhilarating," she said. "There's an incredible openness in the town because everybody is from somewhere else." When not hanging out with family, the retired school teacher continues a relatively new writing career, focusing on topics of education, parenting and divorce. The rapid population growth in Squamish makes even newcomers like Simpson worry that the very things that attract people to come may be at risk. "Obviously, you're not here very long before you start to hear all the issues around development," said Simpson. "That is a worry. It's on the council and the District to make sure that it can keep as much of its flavour as possible because you can't stop development. I think it's really on them to make sure that they can keep at least most of the population of the town happy." While Simpson admits her hometown of Brockville is lovely, another former Ontarian has fewer fond memories. "We're heading back to Toronto in a month, just for a month, and we're dreading it," said Fiona Yu, a Squamish realtor and new mom. "We absolutely love our roots here."

Squamish realtor Fiona Yu with her nine-month-old baby Rose in the Squamish Estuary. Photo by David Buzzard.

Summer 2022 Discover Squamish | 23


In just seven years as a Squamish resident, Yu has already seen change in town, including more multicultural diversity. "When I first arrived, being Chinese-Canadian, there really weren't many Chinese people here," she said. "Now I'm seeing them here and there and they have little ones on scooter bikes and I'm seeing a bigger Filipino community. There's just more Asian people, I find. That's good to see." As a realtor, Yu has also seen lots of folks moving from Vancouver condos to townhouses in Squamish or young families graduating from Whistler's overheated housing market to settle down here. Like many, or most, newcomers, Yu immerses herself in the range of activities available. "We are avid rock climbers, so we're always either outdoors, or we visit the indoor climbing gym a lot," she said. Parents at the gym take turns entertaining the babies and toddlers while other parents exercise. "We visit the pool; we go to the library, we just take walks up and down downtown," she said. "I just absolutely love it here. Our careers are flourishing here — my husband is a massage therapist, I'm a new realtor. Both of our businesses have just taken off. We love the people and we just want the lifestyle and we really dread going back to the concrete jungle of Toronto." Despite having spent decades in Metro Vancouver and years living in North Vancouver, moving to Squamish was never really a consideration for Todd Wade and his family. "We were looking at moving to Nanaimo," he said, foreseeing a reasonable leap into homeownership for a couple that had been renting. "Then, just by fluke, I guess, my wife found a house in Squamish, and so we drove up, and we fell in love with it. We went from not having Squamish on the radar to owning a house in

probably five days." The family's budget is stretched a bit by the mortgage, but homeownership in North Van was not even a possibility, he said. There have been a few surprises — all good so far. "We were surprised at how easy it was to meet people here," said Wade. "We were in North Van, near Edgemont Village, for two years and we didn't really meet anybody. We would say hi, there would be things like that, but there wouldn't be any connections." He thinks that, because so many Squamish residents are new, they may be more open to meeting than people in longerestablished communities. The other delightful surprise was the restaurants — especially finding a top-notch sushi place downtown. Even newcomers understand that things are changing fast. "I'm curious where it's going to be in 10 years," said Wade. "Are there going to be 15-storey buildings? Is it all going to be multifamily lots? It definitely seems like it's on the cusp of something — but it's probably been on that cusp for a number of years." "For where we are in our lives, it's a great place to be," he said. Of all the newcomers in Squamish, few have come from as far away as Habib Ly. He came to Squamish in 2017, from Mauritania, in West Africa, by way of Grande Prairie, Alberta. Ly teaches English language learners at Capilano University, but before that he drove taxis in Whistler and Squamish. While he loves living here— "I felt right at home immediately," he said — Ly's story is not all roses like some others. "I used to run into people that were very racist to me," he said of his cabbie experience. "That's surprising from local Canadian people. But those incidents aren't frequent. They are just surprising

Photo by stockstudiox, gettyimages.ca 24 | Discover Squamish Summer 2022


when they happen." A more subtle experience is being stared at while walking around town. "It's a very awkward situation," he said. "I just point my face where I'm walking. If someone is staring at you and you catch them, you put them in a situation and you don't know what to do, whether to tell them, 'What are you looking at?' or 'Do you need my picture?'" Living in Whistler didn't feel like the real world to Ly, especially when people found out he didn't ski or snowboard. In Squamish, he finds more variety of activities, including soccer, one of his lifelong pursuits. He also does a five-kilometre run most days and has met people easily and built a wide network. One drawback is that he needs to travel to Vancouver's Middle

"There are legacy neighbourhoods that are attractive" Eastern food shops to find ingredients for familiar African dishes. Tight housing markets, high housing costs, transportation challenges —these are all issues facing Squamish residents. But perhaps there is nothing new under the sun, according to Eric Andersen. Andersen is a first-term District councillor and a longtime resident. "This isn't new," he said. "When my family came to Squamish in the early 1960s, there was a severe housing shortage. Enormous growth took place because of the opening up of new industries. A lot of the dialogue was the same back then, for different reasons. But this isn't a new thing for Squamish to be under growth management pressure." While ensuring adequate (and affordable) housing is critical, Andersen laments that huge swaths of the community have been rezoned over the years to residential or mixed residentialcommercial, resulting in the disappearance of much of the industrial lands or what the councillor calls "employment lands." Ensuring that there are adequate jobs, as well as amenities, for new residents is as important as finding them housing, he said. From both an environmental and a community-building perspective, Andersen said, reducing commuter traffic on Highway 99 is a priority. Alternatives should be available for those who do need to commute, he said, noting private ventures like Squamish Connector, the bus service that shuttles people north and south. Andersen said that rail infrastructure to Vancouver has been destroyed — tracks torn up, rail stations in Squamish, North Vancouver, Whistler and Pemberton torn down — making a West Coast Express-type commuter rail option economically unfeasible. But a Squamish-to-Vancouver ferry would require few infrastructural upgrades, he said, and such vessels between Seattle and its adjacent islands and in the San Francisco Bay area provide an excellent model. As growth inevitably brings density, Andersen warns against a cookie-cutter approach. "There are legacy neighbourhoods that are attractive environments and they play a role in our community," he said. "There is going to be a tailored solution to each neighbourhood. We can't apply the same growth density management strategy across the board." As an elected official, Andersen admits: "We don't have all the answers." What we do have, he said, is opinions and discussion. "We do have healthy dialogue, to put it mildly," he said. From this, he hopes, will emerge solutions and compromises that will, as new Squamish resident Simpson put it, "keep at least most of the population of the town happy." 

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WhiteHorse • William Prince Haley Blais • Hotel Mira Ashleigh Ball Lowdown Brass Band Hyaenas • Coastal Wolf Pack SUNDAY

SARAH MCLACHLAN Ocie Elliott Jarvis Church

Terra Lightfoot • Teddy Thompson iskwē • Daniel Wesley • Old Soul Rebel • Pharis & Jason Romero Miesha And The Spanks Skye Wallace • Out East Lineup subject to change. All sales final. Rain or shine.

CONSTELLATIONFEST.CA

Summer 2022 Discover Squamish | 25


The

&sense

dollars

of business in Squamish

Cory Crosbie of Black Diamond Tattoo Company at work on a customer. Photo by David Buzzard

L PAT JOHNSON

aunching a new business — or expanding an existing one — is a leap of faith at the best of times. Doing so amid an unprecedented global pandemic takes a special kind of brave or crazy person. 26 | Discover Squamish Summer 2022

One of the easiest openings may have been Cory Crosbie’s Black Diamond Tattoo Company, which opened at the very beginning of the pandemic in 2022. Tattoo shops require hyper-hygienic conditions always, so prepping the space for pandemic safety was easy, he said. The Montreal native has 15 years of tattooing experience, but his technique is different from most, using “stippling,” which is more commonly called “dot work.” “Instead of dragging the needle through the skin, I physically go up and down,” he said. “It’s a technique that would have been used way back when, when no machines existed, so I’m just taking that process and speeding it up with the machine.” Crosbie was desperate to get out of the big city and, while he does ski and take advantage of some of the other offerings in the Sea to Sky, the thing that drew him here was simple: “Just the beauty, the tranquility.” While stats are limited, more people of all ages seem to be


“People would ask where to buy the books and I would keep sending them out of town because we [didn’t] have a bookstore that has new books,” she said. Wilkins and her husband Paul soon retrofitted a travel trailer into what may be the world’s funkiest mobile bookshop. “It started as a mobile [store] just out of sheer terror of opening a business during a pandemic,” she admitted. “It just seems like a less risky way to start.” But public enthusiasm spelled success for the venture. At Christmas, they did a popup book shop and, with that additional success, they opted to open a permanent storefront. She credits Squamish’s Commercial Vendor Program for letting not just businesses like food trucks but ventures like hers operate on city streets. This summer, the trailer will be travelling further afield, as well as popping up around town. The Little Bookshop offers reading for all ages, but the children’s, young adults and “new adults” sections are particularly innovative. Wilkins stocks a line called A Kids Book About, which includes ageappropriate discussions of topics like cancer, anxiety, addiction and suicide. The concept of “new adult” readers is a recent innovation in publishing. There is a big difference in maturity of a 13-year-old versus a 19-year-old (generally speaking) and so a book aimed at “young adult” readers may not be right for the full span of ages.

Photos courtesy Alice + Brohm

getting skin art. “I pride myself in making the shop inviting to people of all different walks of life,” said Crosbie. “I’ve tattooed people from the late teens all the way into their 60s. It’s getting more and more accessible for everyone.” Like Crosbie, Jenn Foreman brought lots of experience to her new business. Unlike Crosbie, she didn’t cross the continent to do so. Foreman was born in town and has been a registered massage therapist for years. In February, she opened the doors of Anchor Health and Wellness. Opening at a possibly inauspicious time was not a huge concern for her as she views the new shop less as a new business than as a continuation of her decade-long practice. “It felt like the right step to take,” she said. “An opportunity presented itself, and I thought I’d take the chance and give it a go, see how it turns out — and so far, so good.” There is a lot of competition in Squamish, which has no shortage of massage therapists, yet all of them seem to be thriving, she said. “I think it’s because Squamish is a community where people are really proactive in taking care of themselves,” she said. Foreman particularly enjoys working with people to de-stress or to address depression, anxiety or other mental health issues, as well as orthopedics, like working on sports injuries. “That’s been my main drive with the clinic … it’s not just for super-athletes. It’s really geared for the full population of Squamish,” she said. Also targeting the full spectrum of Squamishers is the Little Bookshop, which Julie Wilkins opened not despite the pandemic but because of it. Wilkins is a brand strategist who works with large companies and, when the pandemic hit, her work slowed down. At the same time, world events made her recognize a need for resources to talk to kids, including her own two daughters, about some of these issues. “My best friend is gay and was having a baby with a surrogate and that was at the height of Black Lives Matter and the pandemic and all those things,” said Wilkins. “When we looked at our bookshelves, we realized that we didn’t actually have anything that would help us have those conversations. It started by me just wanting to bring those into my own home and then friends asking to borrow them.” From there, Wilkins created the Inclusive Culture Club, which is a lending library of 250 diverse books. Wilkins says the only new book store in town closed a decade ago.

“I think it’s because Squamish is a community where people are really proactive in taking care of themselves”

Even so, Wilkins acknowledges that targeting books by age is an imprecise science and she doesn’t have an easy response to parents who ask if a particular book is right for their kid. “That’s an impossible question to answer,” she said with a laugh. “All I can do is say this book is rated this age and you know the themes and … Godspeed.” Something that definitely has no age barriers is ice cream. Katie Youwe and Matt Harris, partners in business and life, opened Alice + Brohm Ice Cream on Mamquam Road in 2018. Last summer, they opened a second shop downtown. Like Wilkins opening her bookshop, the ice cream company’s expansion was not despite the pandemic but, again, a direct result. Also, like the Little Bookshop, Alice + Brohm had retrofitted a travel trailer, in this case as a mobile ice cream vendor. It was popular at weddings and other big events — which suddenly went from booming business to bust in March 2022. “The trailer just went back into the garage,” said Youwe, but demand for the product was still there and they decided that a permanent location in the heart of downtown made sense. Harris is from New Zealand, which has a unique ice cream culture, according to Youwe. The “swirl” style of ice cream at Alice + Brohm is all about perfect simplicity, with fresh berries swirled through ice cream — prepared in a machine manufactured in New Zealand. Grab-and-go pints are available in a wider range of flavours and the team – Harris is the brains behind the flavour mashups – makes special featured flavours, such as pumpkin in autumn, chocolate Easter egg in spring or blueberry-and-basil. Businesses that have opened or expanded during these extraordinary two years each have their unique stories, but they also have shared experiences of risk rewarded and dreams pursued. Together, they each also add to the ever-increasing variety of products and services available without leaving Squamish.  Summer 2022 Discover Squamish | 27


This boomtown is a

beer town Photo by Dave Buzzard 28 | Discover Squamish Summer 2022


PAT JOHNSON

C

raft beer was still an emerging trend when a trio of locals envisioned adding a beer festival to the Seato-Sky event lineup. This summer, at least 50 breweries and cideries will offer their wares to about 2,000 aficionados and adventurers on June 25 – reflecting the exponential growth of the craft in Squamish and beyond.

Scott McQuade is a Squamish real estate agent, but he used to be owner of Scotties Liquor Store in town. Over beers — what else? — with Trevor Magee, who was general manager at Howe Sound Inn and Brewing, they conjured the idea of the Squamish Beer Festival. When their friend Kathleen van der Ree, who owned Northyards Cider, introduced them to JP Tondreau, who has a wealth of experience in event planning, the dream became real. Among the many things the COVID pandemic has screwed up is basic arithmetic. This year’s festival is (sort of) the eighth annual, though having missed the past two years, it is really only the sixth event.

Photo by Kosamtu, gettyimages.ca

“We didn’t even pull the plug in 2020 until probably a month or so into the pandemic,” McQuade said. “We were like anybody else. We thought this thing will be over in a few weeks and we’ll be back to partying. We slowly realized this is not going to be a possibility.” He added with a doleful laugh: “For sure we’ll be back in 2021, right?” Over the years, the pioneering Howe Sound Brewing has been joined by A-Frame Brewing and Backcountry Brewing, as well as Cliffside Cider and Geo Cider, reflecting the growing passion for small-batch artisanal sips. Squamish may have been ahead of the curve and remains a muststop on the B.C. Ale Trail (bcaletrail.ca), but other communities are catching up. Brewers and cider makers from across the province (as well as food trucks) will show off their best at the event, which runs from 1 to 7 p.m. They will face some practiced palates. “People here know their beer, for sure,” said McQuade. The musical performers had not been firmed up by press time, but organizers promised a stepped-up level of entertainment. Among activities expected to return is axe-throwing, a nod to the town’s lumber industry roots. Traditionally, the beer fest took place the weekend after Canada Day. In the aftermath of the pandemic mayhem, a major craft beer festival in Vancouver shifted its dates to that weekend and so the Squamish team thought they would back it up to the weekend before the national holiday. “In all fairness to them, they didn’t realize that that was our weekend,” McQuade said. “At the same time, we want to make the brewers happy and the patrons, too.” Getting tickets in advance is a good idea. “There have been a couple of years in the past where we’ve sold out and unfortunately had to turn people away,” he said. “We hope that we never have to, but, at the same time, we’re happy that we sold out.” Summer 2022 Discover Squamish | 29


Returning after a two-year unwelcome break, the festival promises more of the same – only better. “It’s going to be a lot of the things that they remember from past events but we’re hoping that we can step it up to that next level and just get people together again enjoying craft beer outside,” McQuade said. Of course, if you miss Squamish Beer Festival, there is never a problem wetting your whistle in this town. Cork & Craft Tap House is a sort of year-round beer fest, with Squamish, Pemberton, Whistler and Vancouver craft offerings. Copper Coil Still and Grill offers an array of drinks to accompany their New Orleans-slash-West Coast menu. Located in the party-central Crash Hotel, the newest bars in town — The Cleveland Tavern

and One and a Half Ave offer plenty of sudsy options. The Backyard Pub has an impressive menu of beers, ciders and spirits to accompany a pub food menu that covers the bases. The Watershed Grill, magnificently perched above the river in Brackendale has a compendious menu of both food and drink. Norman Rudy’s Pub, in the Executive Suites Hotel, offers all the local drinks with superb pub fare. (The avocado fries are a glorious, bizarre surprise!) If you want to add gambling to the mix, Match Eatery and Public House, in Chances Casino, offers burgers, ribs and fish and chips alongside domestic and imported beers and a full list of bubbly or hard options. In other words … whenever you are in Squamish, there is no excuse to be thirsty.

Photo by Dave Buzzard 30 | Discover Squamish Summer 2022


y t r a p s big Squamish'

ready to d n a k c a b al is gest festiv

PAT JOHNSON

Bahamas at the 2019 Squamish Constellation Festival. Photo by Christopher Edmonstone Photography.

T

he Squamish Constellation Festival is back after a twoyear hiatus with one of B.C.’s longest and most diverse musical lineups.

The weekend event, slated for July 22 to 24, began in 2019 with a wildly successful premiere event. Organizers were all set for another blowout weekend in 2020 when the pandemic put the kibosh on almost everything. In 2021, things were still not back to normal and so another year was missed. That pent-up party vibe makes the planned 2022 event especially welcome, with the message of togetherness resonating perhaps more than it did when the festival was first imagined. “The gist behind Constellation is it’s about love, community and connection,” said Kirsten Andrews, one of a trio of creatives behind the festival. “We are all stars, so we shine brighter together, coming together as one. It’s really about creating positive energy, good vibes and being able to take that away after the weekend and fill your gas tank and live off of that for months and months to come.” Andrews is partners in the venture with familiar media personality Tamara Stanners and former Squamish mayor Patricia Heintzman. About 40 musical acts are booked for the three-day event. Friday’s headliners are Toronto grit-rockers July Talk, joined by nine other acts, including Dear Rouge, Lights, Yukon Blonde and Moontricks. Saturday is headlined by psychedelic soul duo Black Pumas, along with another 10 acts, including Andy Shauf, Black Pistol Fire and Whitehorse. Sunday’s showstopper features local

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legend Sarah McLachlan, along with Jarvis Church, Ocie Elliott, Terra Lightfoot, iskwē and others. The mix of emerging bands with seasoned acts is only part of the diverse nature of the festival. The variety of musical genres is also varied. “We have everything from Inuit throat singers that perform with beats and loops to alt-rock and pop-punk,” said Andrews. “William Prince might be a little bit in the country vein as an Indigenous singersongwriter from Manitoba but definitely crossing the line to all rock as well. Pharis and Jason Romero are two-time Juno Award-winners in the roots category and have a strong bluegrass feel. It’s very varied.” The Constellation Festival features primarily Canadian talent, with about half coming from southwest B.C., though there are some U.S. acts and Teddy Thompson is “from England by way of Nashville,” said Andrews. Cultural differences are also a key component of the event. “We are really strong promoters of diversity, so we take a really hard look at the acts that we book and make sure that we are representing female-identifying artists, LGBTQ+, Indigenous artists — we make an extra special effort to make sure that there is a really strong variety of representation in the artists that we book,” she said. Visual arts are also part of the festival. On-site painting will produce, Andrews estimates, six new murals. There will also be circus arts and other activities, possibly including Sḵwxḵwú7mesh Úxwumixw (Squamish Nation) carvers. A site-wide liquor license will allow guests to sip at their picnic blanket or while wandering the grounds, while a “weed garden” will allow those who want something smokier to enjoy that pastime without bothering those who don’t want to smell it.

Constellation Fest prides itself on being a “zero-waste” festival, minimizing singleuse items and reducing trash. In 2019, the event achieved a 94% waste diversion rate, said Andrews, easily exceeding standards for the term. “One of the bigger challenges of being in Squamish is land,” she added. Finding a place to have the festival but also having enough room for parking and for camping is a challenge. Working with the District, the festival has received permission for camping at Centennial Field in Brennan Park to supplement sites at the municipal campground. As many as 15,000 festival-goers are anticipated. Tickets are available at constellationfest.ca.

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2019 Squamish Constellation Festival. Photo by Christopher Edmonstone Photography.


PAT JOHNSON

New foodie options in Squamish

F

olks who wander into the new Peckinpah’s Carolina Style BBQ, located in the Crash Hotel, may be in for a surprise. There is no goopy, sticky sauce enrobing the meats — it is an eastern North Carolina-style joint that lets the meat shine, complemented by a simple chillivinegar sauce. “It’s just more a purist form,” says Tyson Reimer who, with Ryan Murfitt, opened the Squamish space in January. “It’s not about sauces; it’s more about the meat. Generally, Carolina is all about the pork.” The pair of restaurateurs had a decade of honing their craft in Gastown before the pandemic made that location a challenge. Reimer’s brother and his family live in North Carolina and that’s where he first encountered the style of simple, unadorned slowroasting.

Cordelia’s Locket's Kelly Ann Woods and Melissa Steacy. Photo by David Buzzard.

“Our brisket is just salt-and-pepper,” Reimer said. “The wood is white oak and whatever fruitwood we can get our hands on.” The meats then get 12 to 16 hours in the smoker. The menu is as straightforward as the recipes, emphasizing excellence in a niche seldom seen this far north or west. Choice of meats — beef brisket, pulled pork, pork ribs, chicken wings or fried chicken — can be accompanied by BBQ beans, coleslaw, potato salad or a couple of other add-ons. Hush puppies — deep-fried cornmeal balls — may be familiar to North Carolinians passing through, but the honey bourbon mayo dipping sauce is found only at Peckinpah’s. (Reimer and Murfitt chose the late Hollywood Western director’s name simply because they are fans.) As summer approaches, Reimer hopes to extend hours and maybe create a diner vibe on Sundays with a special brunch menu. Another new offering in town is Cordelia’s Locket, which is innovative in a whole bunch of ways. “It is the only oceanfront restaurant in Squamish,” said Kelly Ann Woods, who opened the space with Melissa Steacy in August

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2021. “It’s an anchor property in the downtown community … and it connects the new developments to downtown. We’re sort of at the new entryway of downtown.” Designated as a “café and wine bar,” Cordelia’s Locket boasts a Provençal flair, with fresh seafood, crab cakes, terrines and charcuterie boards. Woods has a theatre background and the restaurant’s name is a nod to King Lear’s favourite (then banished) daughter. Some of the things that do not immediately meet the eye (or the olfactory system) nevertheless set Cordelia’s apart. “It’s women-run, women-led,” Woods said. That signals more understanding and alternative work hours that recognize an employees’ multiple obligations, she said. “As women, we have responsibilities of being an entrepreneur and a mother and a business owner and so on and so forth,” she said. “We try to support people’s lives outside of the work environment.” Another unusual (but growing) trend is the way Woods and Steacy generated the funds to open the restaurant. They chose equity crowdfunding, which allowed virtually anybody to become part-owner in their new venture. This was due, in part, to the fact that only 2.1% of venture capital goes to female entrepreneurs, according to Woods, and so a novel approach to capital was welcome. Innovation continues in added revenue streams. Opening a restaurant is a notoriously arduous undertaking at the best of times. Doing so amid a global pandemic led the pair to create multiple revenue streams. In addition to prepackaged offerings of the kitchen’s wares, guests can also shop for locally produced ceramics, lavender sachets, skin products and other items that Woods said reflect the Mediterranean atmosphere the space is honing. Woods said Cordelia’s Locket is already a huge success — but

34 | Discover Squamish Summer 2022

Photo provided by Peckinpah

everything is relative. “It’s been wildly challenging, of course,” she said. “I’ve worked in hospitality for more than 30 years and I think just the [industry has] gone through an incredible transformation. It will get better, but there were the ‘before times’ for hospitality and then there is now. The entire industry has changed – overnight. I honestly don’t believe it will ever be the same again.” 


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R ADVENTURE

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DISCOVER Squamish

the ocean meets the mountains in Sea to Sky country. It is the home of incomparable outdoor recreation and unforgettable West Coast culture. hiking, mountain climbing, kitesurfing, sailing. Home of the famous Squamish Days Loggers Sports Festival, the epic Sea to Sky Gondola, o much more! Squamish has a unique arts & culture community and an unsurpassed variety of places to shop, dine & relax.

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SQUAMISH

Emergency: 911 RCMP: 604-892-6100 Squamish Municipal Hall: 604-892-5217 Squamish General Hospital: 604-892-5211 Dog Pound: 604-815-6866

Please visit the businesses below for friendly Sea to Sky customer service, and a bit of what makes Squamish one of the best places to be in BC! Whether you live or play here, you will experience what makes Squamish so special! ATTRACTIONS 1

14

Top Hat

26

The 55 Activity Centre

Britannia Mine Museum

40386 Tantalus Road

1201 Village Green Way

Sea to Sky Highway (Highway 99)

604-898-9191

604-848-6898

1-800-896-4044 britanniaminemuseum.ca

15

squamishseniorscentre.com

The Watershed Grill 41101 Government Road

RETAIL

AUTOMOTIVE

604-898-6665

27

2

thewatershedgrill.com

Triton Automotive and Industrial/Napa 1003 Industrial Way

16

604-567-4568

tritonautoindustrial.com

Backcountry Brewing

DISTRICT OF SQUAMISH

405-1201 Commercial Way

17

604-567-2739

38084 Cleveland Avenue 604-567-2665

5

squamish.ca

18

1200 Hunter Place

The Nest

604-815-0733

thenestrest.com

19

1301 Pemberton Avenue

40204-40282 Glenalder Place garibaldivillage.com

31

Joe’s Fireplace Products 38136 Second Avenue 604-892-9800 Seatoskyfireplace.com

32

Marks 40270 Glenalder Place marks.com

gibbonswhistler.com

REAL ESTATE

Panago Pizza

20

150-1200 Hunter Place

250-310-0001

778 318-5900

Peckinpah

www.angievazquez.ca

21

optomeyes.ca

34

604-892-5615 precisionoptical.ca

True Mobile Bike Mechanics

remax-squamish.com

pepeandgringo.net

604-682-2088

The Salted Vine Kitchen + Bar

rennie.com/neighbourhoods/squamish

23

saltedvine.ca

Subway 104-40147 Glenalder Place

24

604-229-2329

Rennie 38166 Cleveland Avenue

Precision Optical 1362 Pemberton Avenue

RE/MAX Sea to Sky Real Estate

604-898-3606

604-898-8393

604-892-5055

604-892-3571

22

Optomeyes Eye Care 101-40258 Glenalder Place

38261 Cleveland Avenue

Pepe Chophouse & Seafood

604-390-1910

33

Engel & Volkers

15-1347 Pemberton Avenue

37991 Second Avenue

truemobilebikemechanics.ca

SCHOOLS 35

School District 48 School Board Office

Royal LePage Black Tusk Realty

37866 Second Avenue

3-1900 Garibaldi Way

604-892-5228

604-898-5904

sd48seatosky.org

blacktuskrealty.com

VISITOR SERVICES

Stilhavn Real Estate Services

36

Squamish Public Library

subway.com

1396 Main Street

37907 Second Avenue

Subway

778-266-0150

604-892-3110

7D-1321 Pemberton Avenue

stilhavn.com

squamish.bc.libraries.coop

604-567-2011 subway.com

13

Garibaldi Village II

604-892-5855

40359 Tantalus Way

12

Squamish

30

saveonfoods.com/store/squamish/

peckinpahbbq.com

11

1339 Pemberton Avenue

40900 Tantalus Road

604-898-3447

10

Save-On-Foods

Chieftain Centre Mall

604-892-5976

38005 Cleveland Avenue

9

canadiantire.ca

29

Norman Rudy’s

panago.com

8

604-898-2227

nestersmarket.com

1-888-823-7932

7

Nesters Market

Canadian Tire 1851 Mamquam Road

GROCERY

41340 Government Road

6

Municipal Hall

2chillgelato.com

604-898-4444

28

604-892-5217

CAFÉS & RESTAURANTS 2Chill Squamish Gelato Spot

annasinteriors.ca

37955 Second Avenue

backcountrybrewing.com

4

604-892-6369

zephyrcafe.ca

BREWERIES & DISTILLERIES 3

38052 Cleveland Avenue

Zephyr Café 38078 Cleveland Avenue

1-800-790-6434

Anna’s Interiors

Taka Ramen + Sushi

RECREATION AND ENTERTAINMENT 25

Brennan Park Recreation Centre

37

Tourism Squamish 102-38551 Loggers Lane 604-815-4994

38065 Cleveland Avenue

1009 Centennial Way

1-877-815-5084

604-390-0077

604-898-3604

exploresquamish.com

takaramensushi.com

squamish.ca

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38 | Discover Squamish Summer 2022


LOCAL EXPERTISE A RLO D E TX HPEE W OI R OU CN AL RT SL ED . AROUND THE WORLD. LOCAL EXPERTISE

L OU CA E RET I W S EO R L D . ARO NLDE XTPH AROUND THE WORLD.

WE ARE ENGEL & VÖLKERS. WE ARE ENGEL & VÖLKERS. WE ARE ENGEL & VÖLKERS.

WE ARE ENGEL & VÖLKERS.

Because you deserve the best, Engel & Völkers combines passion, insight and exclusive Because you deserve the best, Engel & Völkers combines passion, insight and exclusive

expertise empower our and an exceptional ofinsight service when buying expertise empower our clientsdeliver and deliver an exceptional level of servicelevel when buying Becausetoyou deserve thetoclients best, Engel & Völkers combines passion, and exclusive Because you deserve theand best, Engel Völkers combines passion, insight and exclusive selling a home&anywhere in the world.

and selling a home anywhere in the world. expertise toexpertise empower our clients and deliver an exceptional service when buying to empower our clients and deliver an exceptional level level ofofservice when buying Engel & Völkers [Shop Name]

and selling anywhere theworld. world. . [City]a. home and [Street selling a home anywhere ininthe Address] [State Zip Code] . [Phone Number] Learn more at [website]

Engel & Völkers [Shop Name] & Völkers [Shop Name] . [City] . [State . [Phone Number] Engel &Engel Völkers [Street Address] ZipSquamish Code] . . Engel & Völkers [Shop Name] [Street Address] [City] [State Zip Code] . [Phone Number] 150-1200 Hunter Squamish V8B 0G8 more at [website] .Learn . [State Learn more at [website] [Street Address] [City]Place, Zip Code] .BC, [Phone Number]

(778) 733-0611 • Learn more Learn moreatatwww.squamish.evrealestate.com [website] ©2022 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.

©2022 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.

Engel & Völkers Whistler - Squamish

©2022 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Engel & Völkers and its independent LicenseitsPartners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully supportand the principles ofthe theprinciples Fair Housing Act. Engel & Völkers independent Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers support theits Fair Housing Act. ©2022 Engel and & Völkers. All rights License reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and fully operated. Engel & Völkersofand independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.


OUR LANGUAGE To find the perfect Squamish home to suit your luxury lifestyle, look no further than The RE/MAX Collection. RE/MAX markets and sells more luxury property than any other real estate company. Whether you are buying or selling, our agents know what luxury lives like.

Fine Homes & Luxury Properties | remax-squamish.com

38261 Cleveland Ave, Squamish, BC (604) 892-3571 ©2020 RE/MAX, LLC. Each Office Independently Owned and Operated.