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December 28, 2017 through January 3, 2018

2018 Whidbey Island

POLAR BEAR DIVE Registration begins at 10:30am Jump happens at 12pm (Noon) Event cost $15 Includes: official event shirt, hot drinks and festive atmosphere.

All proceeds benefit Island County 4-H Teen Leadership Activities For more information: Facebook - Whidbey Island Polar Bear Dive Contact South Whidbey Parks & Rec 360-221-6788 swparks.org

January 1 Double Bluff Beach, Freeland Presented by the Island County 4-H Teen Leadership Club

More Local Events inside

St. Stephen’s The Episcopal Church on North Whidbey cordially invites you, your family & friends

Fest Races Zumba & Hula by Ate Flo A Harvest Celtic New Year’s Blessing Coupeville Green Knights of Columbus Coupeville OakNóirin Harbor With Owen and Moley O Súilleabháin and their mother, famed Irish singer Ni Riain Page1,62018 • 5pm • St. Stephen’s Episcopal Page 6 Monday, January Church

555 SE Regatta Dr • Oak Harbor • 360-279-0715 • No admission, donations accepted to support the Whidbey Homeless Coalition

SW Syrian Refugee Project Langley United Methodist Church Langley Page 9


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DECEMBER 28, 2017 - JANUARY 3, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Be Prepared for Winter Fishing Be ready for the winter fishing season. We have everything you need in store lifejackets, fire extinguishers, waders, nets, tackle, licenses, Discovery Passes, and more!

By Tracy Loescher

150 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor • 360-679-3533

This would be a much more exiting article for me if the five following conservancy groups would have put as much effort into getting gill nets out of the Puget Sound and our rivers as they did proposing, initiating, and threatening the State of Washington with lawsuits to stop hatcheries from raising steelhead. During 2014, The Conservation Angler, International Federation of Fly Fishers Steelhead Committee, Washington Fly Fishing Club, Wild Steelhead Coalition, and Wild Fish Conservancy pressured the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) that longtime established (some since 1950), well managed, hatcheryraised steelhead were heavily impacting wild steelhead returns, and used the Endangered Species Act as leverage to help push the lawsuits.  Scientific and biological studies proved the DNA of wild and hatchery fish are different, but the studies are not clear about what DNA traits are being effected. Others say there is very little mingling of genes between hatchery and wild fish.  

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Don’t get me wrong, I would like nothing more than to see all of our inland and coastal rivers jammed with wild steelhead - or better yet, “indigenous” steelhead, the ones the good Lord put there - but any gill net still allowed in an ESA-protected river “DOES NOT KNOW THE DIFFERENCE” and if only low numbers of “wild steelhead” are the only steelhead left migrating upstream, the end result is painfully clear.   I cut my winter steelhead teeth on the great Skagit River in the winter of 2005, a river well known for trophy size wild fish along with good numbers of hard fighting hatchery brats, as they are sometimes called. Unfortunately, the Marblemount hatchery located on the Cascade River that drains into the Skagit River was one of the hatcheries shut down by the lawsuit, and is no longer allowed to augment and balance out fish killed by gill nets.  Steelhead trout, to me, are the pinnacle of tough and impressive freshwater fish. We all know of the incredible journeys these salmon make returning to their spawning rivers; the trade-off is after the spawn cycle, they perish in the end, but for good reason - they give nutrients to the rivers. Hatchery steelhead trout make this same challenging swim, climbing and jumping to the captive hatchery waters where they were raised, helping keep the rivers alive for anglers, but this is where their journey ends.  Hatchery fish once traveled upstream through the Skagit River from late November to early January. This urge to go home early left the river open for the wild steelhead to enter the river and spawn from late January to early May. Wild spawning steelhead are the ones who set the bar for endurance, toughness, and being impressive. Wild fish will travel upstream moving from rock to rock, ripple to ripple, until they reach the same calm water behind a boulder or gravel bed they were hatched from, changing colors from a bright polished steel to a dark forest green, almost black with beautiful pink cheeks and a reddish lateral line that runs along their sides. But unlike the salmon, most of these majestic fish do not perish. Instead, steelhead dig deep and start feeding again, rebuilding their bodies and recharging their energy, then they turn down stream and head for the saltwater and are known to biologists as “kelts.” Think of the incredible stamina and power the run of steelhead have returning to the Clearwater River in Idaho, first navigating the mighty Columbia River, then swimming

the windy Snake River; getting there is already unbelievable, but to turn around and make the trip twice and sometimes three times, WOW! Most steelhead return to the rivers for the first time after 1-1/2 to 2 years of saltwater life and weigh an average of 8 pounds. With their second return, their weight has doubled to 16 pounds and they are referred to as a “two salt fish.” If the steelhead survives to be known as a “three salt fish,” this is where the trophies come from, with their weight ranging between 20 and 30 incredible pounds! And to think this is a trout! In May of 2015, during a camping trip on the Skagit near Rockport, WA, my son and I were pleasantly surprised by witnessing a massive steelhead surface twice right in front of us. Based on the length and girth of the fish, it was easily in the 16 to 20 pound range.  My experience fishing the Skagit for steelhead has been mostly from a drift boat, with the exception of getting out of the boat to drift salmon eggs under a float in a skinny channel or river braid inaccessible by boat.  Steelhead are not hard to catch because their bite is so aggressive. The challenge is finding them. Fishermen call steelhead “the fish of a thousand casts,” and it’s also been said 80 percent of the fish are caught by 10 percent of the fishermen. To me, this means the successful 10 percent have learned to read the water and have studied 5 or 6 drifts and know every inch of the water and what’s under the surface.  Most of the steelhead I have hooked and landed were taken by a technique known as “pulling plugs,” using “Hot shot #3 or #4,” “3-inch tadpoly’s,” and K-11 size “kwikfish” style lures in purples, greens and oranges, all with a metallic finish. They are my go-to plugs. Other fish I have caught were on 3/8-ounce leadhead jigs made with marabou feathers or rabbit fur or a combination of both, heavy wobbling spoons, pink rubber worms, and finally some form of bait, either row (eggs), shrimp, or night crawler suspended under a float. Keeping a wild steelhead from the Skagit has never been allowed since I’ve been fishing the river and why would I when the river had enough hatchery fish to bring home for dinner? The state has put a “mandatory keep rule” on all hatchery fish caught in the Skagit, so when the last dwindling returns of hatchery fish are gone, my son and I will surely miss this great winter steelheading opportunity. I hope for the sake of future generations the organizations that halted a very successful hatchery operation(s) will take head-on the long gill net-filled battles required to bring back great numbers of memorable Skagit River wild Steelhead. Washington’s coastal rivers still provide some great steelheading; the lures and tackle I mentioned above will work just fine for these fish as well. Setting up a float trip with an experienced guide is an excellent way to fish a new river and pick up some new techniques along the way. I simply love the fight in a steelhead and if you have ever caught one, you know what I mean. Winter Blackmouth (Chinook) season in Marine Area 7 is scheduled to open January 1. If the weather permits, this will be an opportunity to catch some fresh salmon for the table, and a chance to try out the new fishing rod you may have gotten for Christmas. Be careful out there, and Happy New Year!  Feel free to drop me a fish story at tlfishmonger@aol.com

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DECEMBER 28, 2017 - JANUARY 3, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED

ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

Welcome back from the Trifecta of Celebrations – Christmas, Kwanzaa, and Boxing Day.

Whether you left Whidbey or stayed home, only one more weekend to go for us locals to have to pay attention to the time of day that we head to the grocery store. Going postal One of the many benefits of the USPS tracking system and the information provided on priority mailing is the sender gets to see all of the places his or her envelope should not have gone. Talk about shooting one's self in the mail bag. My sister's December 12 two-day priority mailing from Atlanta to Freeland took seven days with the following non-AAA approved trip-tik. Even Lewis and Clark would chuckle at this route. December 12, 2:58 pm, USPS in possession of item, Atlanta, GA December 12, 10:18 pm, arrived at USPS Regional Origin Facility, Atlanta-Peachtree Distribution Center December 13, 12:18 pm, in transit to destination Freeland, WA December 13, 8:31 pm, arrived at USPS Regional Destination Facility, Seattle Network Distribution Center December 13, 9:43 pm, departed USPS Regional Destination Facility, Seattle Network Distribution Center

Whidbey Weekly

File purge Ever play Whack-A-Mole? That's how I go thru my files. A whack at this stack. A whack at another. A whack at the next. Before long, I have enough kindling to start a fire. Over the past week, I had plenty of time to not be in a hurry, so I went through all my monthly files labeled On Track. Like any columnist who fears waking up with no ideas, anytime I do get an idea, if pen and paper are near, I write it down and file it for later. Unfortunately, “later,” originally intended to be during the same month the file was labeled, became “a few days before the end of the year.” So, what kind of ideas did I have? What did we miss or not miss? Will last quarter's ideas still seem funny, or will they just be more fake humor? Excuse me while I try to read my handwriting. Sometimes I vibrate while the logging trucks and school buses pass the caboose. Here we go. Little pieces of paper, please. Share notes of the interview with the celebrity in Clinton who wants me to take over as author of his biography. Apparently, the celebrity who prefers to remain shameless is afraid of his present ghost writer. I have lived in the Northwest long enough to know not to be afraid of ghosts, whether they write or not. It helped to grow up in Columbus, Ohio. Our fave DJ was Spook Beckman on WCOL radio and WBNS TV. Spook was the master of the three to five minute 60 second radio/TV spot. We didn't care about the music. We just wanted to hear Spook ramble on about Lex Mayer Chevrolet, 2212 East Main.

December 15, 8:18 am, arrived at USPS facility Soap Lake, WA

Thanks to Chuck for his one-liner “there is nothing worse than a know-it-all with a smart phone.” That reminds me of Sister Mary of St. Mary Magdalene's in Everett. Her 2nd grade teachings, which I learned yesterday from Terry Greene, son of Paul Greene, Whidbey's first state trooper, were awesome:

December 15, 7:09 pm, arrived at USPS Regional Destination Facility, Wenatchee WA Distribution Center

“Pepsi-Cola came to town; Coca-Cola shut him down: Dr. Pepper fixed him up; Then they all drank 7-Up.”

December 15, 11:29 pm, departed USPS Regional Facility, Wenatchee WA Distribution Center

Even though I don't remember it, I miss second grade. Maybe I did not yet have a girlfriend, but I bet I had a neat lunch pail.

December 14, 12:43 pm, in transit to destination Freeland, WA

December 16, 12:29 pm, in transit to destination Freeland WA December 16, 6:23 pm, arrived at USPS Regional Destination Facility, Seattle WA Distribution Center Annex December 16, 9:57 pm, departed USPS Regional Facility, Seattle WA Distribution Center Annex December 16, 10:39 pm, arrived at USPS Regional Facility, Seattle WA Distribution Center December 17, 12:39 pm, in transit to destination Freeland WA December 18, 12:39 pm, in transit to destination Freeland WA December 19, 9:49 am, arrived at Post Office Freeland WA December 19, 12:39 pm, in transit to destination Freeland WA December 19, 6:02 pm, item delivered to a parcel locker in Freeland WA Because of post 9-11 postal fear, all mail routes involving southern Whidbey are zipcode controlled to Langley. So, in the interest of public safety, a letter from a Freeland local to a Freeland local goes from Freeland to downtown Seattle, then from Seattle to downtown Langley, then from Langley to downtown Freeland. Three days vs three minutes. From what I can tell, mailing everything through Langley and Seattle assures job security for the USPS employees in Wenatchee, Soap Lake, and beyond. Where else can you get that kind of bang for your almost a dollar investment? My sister's package involved eighteen separate tracking entries including the bonus side trip to Soap Lake and Wenatchee. My suggestion – a new slogan for us local Whidbey mailers. Instead of Think Global, Shop Local, how about Go Postal, Mail Local?

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DECEMBER 28, 2017www.whidbeyweekly.com - JANUARY 3, 2018

CASCADIA EYE COMES TO WHIDBEY ISLAND

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Whidbey Weekly LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

Volume 9, Issue 52 | © MMXVII Whidbey Weekly

PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Tidbits on the loose In the December 1 issue of Entertainment Weekly, at page 42, I noticed for 40 bucks, at www.alwaysfits.com, I could be the first in my non cul-de-sac to own a Golden Girls umbrella. “Brighten any rainy day with this cheerful Golden Girls umbrella adorned with the faces of Florida's beloved senior ladies.” Let a smile be your umbrella times four. A great gift for any fan. I wonder if they have umbrellas adorned (wrong word?) with cowboys? Gene, Roy, Hoppy, and the B-Western cowboy of your choice to finish the quad-wrangle(r). Of course, as good as those cowboys were at marketing, their umbrellas may already be in the corral. When you see the headline Man arrested after offering weed for SUV, it's tough for one's two eyes not to pull over. Apparently, a 39 year young entrepreneur from Vail offered to trade four pounds of pot for an SUV he saw advertised on Craigslist. Turns out the SUV belonged to a Teller County Sheriff. Make that an entremanure from Vail, which rhymes with jail. Congratulations to Kate McVay and the stellar South Whidbey High School Performing Arts Band Booster Club, hereinafter referred to as the SWHSPABBC, for an incredible fund raising effort in their annual poinsettia sale. Proceeds of $8,500 were netted after 1,300 poinsettia plants were sold by the club to raise money for band and choir programs. Such a result puts to bed the oft asked question, “What is the point of a poinsettia sale?” Have a safe and celebratory New Year. We here at Whidbey Weekly look forward to sharing more fun with you in 2018. To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

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DECEMBER 28, 2017 - JANUARY 3, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Bits & Pieces Alert for Annual Polar Bear Dive The following roads & locations may be affected by vehicles and pedestrians attending the Polar Bear Dive, on January 1, 2018, between 10:30am and 12:30pm: Double Bluff County Park, Freeland S. Double Bluff Road, between E. Shore Ave and Millman Rd, Freeland

Letters to the Editor Editor, This is an open letter I sent to our 3 glorious leaders, Larsen, Cantwell and Murray about their vote on tax cut bill: Thank you voting to keep the government confiscating money from me and my family. We wouldn’t want to take a chance on hurting congressional perks, touching your pork barrel projects, or the encouraging the corruption, we need to keep expanding government because us mouth breathers and knuckle draggers out here in Realville would just frivolously spend the tax break on stupid things like food, electric bills, or even, gasp, a new winter coat… It’s heartening to know you are watching out for the Democrats at the expense of constituents, we wouldn’t want to cross Chucky and Nancy, they might cancel your cafeteria card. Rick Kiser, Oak Harbor

Larsen Votes Against Republican Tax Conference Report Last week, Rep. Rick Larsen (WA-02) released the following statement after voting against the Republican tax conference report. “Once again, Congressional Republicans have put the interests of corporations and the wealthy ahead of what is best for hardworking American families. The latest partisan tax package will still drastically raise the deficit by $1.5 trillion, increase taxes on veterans and the middle-class, and deny vital comprehensive health coverage to over 39,000 Washingtonians in the district I represent. “The Republican tax conference report is nothing more than a permanent tax break for the wealthiest Americans at the expense of the middle class. Analysis from the Tax Policy Center found that the top one percent of Americans would receive an estimated 62 percent of the bill’s proposed tax cuts- that is more than double the George W. Bush-era tax cuts. In Washington state, the richest one percent will receive an average $7,750 tax cut under the GOP tax bill, while lower income Washingtonians face tax hikes – according to the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy. “I stand with my constituents who have called, sent letters, attended community coffees or otherwise made their voices heard about the harm this Republican tax bill would cause. Like the U.S. military retiree in Oak Harbor, who worries about how the GOP tax scam jeopardizes the retirement they have worked a lifetime for by raiding Medicare funds; the couple in Lynnwood who is concerned about the impact of the reduced mortgage interest and SALT deductions on their property value under the new bill and; the low- and middle income families throughout Washington state’s Second District who will struggle to make ends meet once the bill’s temporary, modest tax cuts end,” said Larsen. “Real bipartisan tax reform should simplify the tax code, support middle-class families and veterans, strongly invest in infrastructure, foster more well-paying jobs, and ensure access to affordable, high-quality health care. “I voted against this GOP tax scam and will continue to push for a better deal to benefit all Americans.” [Submitted by Erin Schneider, Rep. Rick Larsen’s Office]

No closures of roads are expected, but drivers should expect congestion and are asked to exercise caution along these routes. South Whidbey Parks & Recreation District apologizes in advance for any inconvenience the event may cause and appreciates the public’s patience during this annual event. The public is invited to attend this wonderful and fun event. Start the New Year off with a splash! Join a fun-loving crowd of nearly 200 jumpers for a bone chilling dive into 2018. A popular local New Year’s tradition since 2004. Registration opens at 10:30am. The big splash is at noon. Swim at your own risk; no lifeguard on duty. $15 includes shirt, hot drinks and festive atmosphere. While supplies last. Benefits Island County 4-H Teen Leadership Club. Visit www.swparks.org for information or contact South Whidbey Parks & Recreation District at (360) 221-5484. [Submitted by Carrie Monforte, SWPRD]

Skagit Valley College South Whidbey Center to Move to New Location

call for nominations for the 2018 Jan Holmes Island County Coastal Volunteer of the Year Award. This award is open to all volunteers, regardless of membership to any one organization or institution, participating in or supporting science and outreach efforts related to protecting or restoring the coastal resources of Island County. The purpose of this award is to recognize the achievement(s) of the many volunteers engaged in efforts to protect and/or restore the marine waters and coastal resources of Island County and the surrounding marine areas. Nominations are requested for any and all individuals who have demonstrated their dedication and involvement in the many services, science and outreach efforts relating to the health of Island County’s marine environment. The objective of this award is to recognize volunteer efforts by selecting and publicly recognizing one who best demonstrates the contribution of all. Any and all volunteer efforts, whether as an individual or as part of a team should be recognized as adding to the collective wellness of the marine environment and the knowledge base of our marine area. Start now by looking at the individuals with whom you volunteer. Take note of the contributions that they make to the total effort. Are they volunteers you enjoy working with? Are they dedicated, helpful and consistent in their approach and efforts to get the job done? If so, fill out the Nomination Form and nominate them for this prestigious award.

Skagit Valley College South Whidbey Center is moving to its new location at the South Whidbey Community Center, located at 723 Camano Avenue in Langley, WA. SVC’s South Whidbey Center will continue to offer day and night classes as students pursue their educational goals. The Winter Quarter starts 3 January 2018 in the new location. Students who are interested in attending at SVC’s South Whidbey Center can still register for classes at SVC’s Whidbey Island Campus in Oak Harbor. For more information, call (360) 679-5319.

Nomination forms must be received by 4:30pm Friday, January 19, 2018. Nomination forms and details for submission are available on the following websites:

[Submitted by Arden Ainley, Chief Public Information Officer, SVC]

For more information, contact Anna Toledo at (360) 678-2349 or a.toledo@co.island.wa.us

Living Voices, “The Right to Dream”

[Submitted by Anna Toledo, Island County Department of Natural Resources]

Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration Whidbey Island Center for the Arts (WICA) presents Living Voices, “The Right to Dream” on MLK Day January 12 at 7:30pm. Gather the entire family for a powerfully moving and educational Martin Luther King Jr. Day event at WICA. Seattle’s award winning historical theatre troupe, Living Voices, brings us a compelling story of the struggle and sacrifice for civil rights in America. “The Right to Dream” recreates a student’s coming of age as an African American in Mississippi during the 1950’s and 1960’s, leading audiences to understand how the fight against prejudice has shaped our history. Living Voices combines dynamic solo performances with archival film and sound, turning history into a moving and personal journey. This MLK Day experience will inspire and educate all ages. Adult $15 / 18 & under $10. Zech Hall Piano Bar opens one hour prior to the performance. For tickets or more information, call (360) 221-8262 or visit www.wicaonline.org Watch a video about Living Voices: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_ continue=122&v=al4l8ChAK_M [Submitted by Fritha Strand, Marketing Manager, WICA]

Coastal Volunteer of the Year Award Nominations Now Being Accepted The Island County Marine Resources Committee (MRC), Sound Water Stewards (SWS), and Washington State University (WSU) Extension Island County are pleased to announce the

Island County MRC website: http://www. islandcountymrc.org/projects/volunteer-of-theyear/ Sound Waters Stewards website: http://soundwaterstewards.org/ WSU Island County Extension website: http:// extension.wsu.edu/island/

Rebounding Economy Continues to Put More Drivers on State Highways As unemployment in Washington state approaches pre-recession levels, more drivers hit the road in 2016, and again followed the lead of the local economy. Between 2014 and 2016, commuters in urban areas throughout Washington saw increases in congestion and delay, due largely to the effects of drivers traveling more miles on alreadycrowded urban highways. The number of miles drivers traveled on state highways increased 6.4 percent from 2014 to 2016 (to a new high of 34.227 billion), according to the Washington State Department of Transportation’s 2017 Multimodal Corridor Capacity Report. In addition, 3.2 percent more passenger vehicles registered in 2016 than in 2014. During the same period, the number of licensed drivers increased by 4.3 percent. All these factors combined to add more drivers to Washington state’s already busy roadways. The number of people riding transit during daily peak periods increased 8 percent on urban commute corridors, from 88,150 in 2014 to 95,300 in 2016. As an example, transit moved 4.5 general-purpose lanes full of cars—equivalent to 52,887 people–on I-5 between Federal Way and Everett during morning and evening peak periods on average weekdays. Other highlights from the 2017 Report include: ·Of the five monitored freeway corridors in the central Puget Sound region, three (I-5, I-405, I-90) saw congestion increases of 76 percent, 33 percent and 117 percent, respectively, from 2014 to 2016. Tolling and carpooling

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED reduced congestion on SR 520 by 61 percent, while congestion on SR 167 experienced a 4 percent increase compared to 2007 pre-recession levels. ·Travel times are lower and person throughput is higher in High-Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes as opposed to the general-purpose lanes. An example of this is the HOV lane on I-5 at Northgate where travel times were up to 10 minutes more reliable and the movement of people was about 2.5 times higher than in the adjacent general-purpose lanes in 2016. ·HOV lanes accounted for 42 percent of person miles traveled on central Puget Sound region freeways in 2016 while accounting for 24 percent of the region’s lane miles. ·WSDOT Incident Response teams responded to 25.4 percent more incidents (58,235 total) in 2016 than in 2014, with average clearance times around 12 minutes for both years. Proactive work by Incident Response teams resulted in $88 million in economic benefit in 2016, an 18.1 percent increase from 2014. ·WSDOT Ferries annual ridership increased 4 percent from 23.2 million in 2014 to 24.2 million in 2016. ·Amtrak Cascades annual ridership increased 5 percent from approximately 700,000 in 2014 to 735,000 in 2016. To learn more about WSDOT’s performance or to review the 2017 Corridor Capacity Report, visit www.wsdot.wa.gov/Accountability/. [Submitted by Washington State Department of Transportation]

NAS Whidbey Island SAR Transports Two Cardiac Patients A Search and Rescue (SAR) team of six from Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island conducted a medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) from Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles, Wash. to the University of Washington Hospital in Seattle on Saturday, December 16, 2017. The SAR alert crew received an early morning call for help from Olympic Medical Center staff for an elderly male whose pacemaker was no longer functioning properly. The crew launched just before 3:45am and arrived at Olympic Medical Center to conduct patient turnover at 4:00am. After the turnover was complete the crew took off and proceeded directly to the University of Washington Hospital where the patient was turned over to a higher level of care. A Search and Rescue (SAR) team of seven from Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island conducted a medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) from Lopez Island Airport, Lopez Island, Wash., to the Skagit Valley Hospital in Mt. Vernon on Tuesday, December 19, 2017. The SAR crew was notified of an elderly male on Lopez Island suffering from congestive heart failure. The crew took off at 5:45pm and landed at Lopez Island Airport at 6:00pm. The ambulance met the helicopter shortly after and the air crew completed the patient turnover. The crew took off at 6:20pm and proceeded to the Skagit Hospital where the patient was turned over to a higher level of care. These Medical Evacuations (MEDEVAC) were the 20th and 21st of 2017 for NAS Whidbey Island SAR, which has also conducted seven Searches and 36 Rescue missions delivering 71 lives to a higher level of care. The Navy SAR unit operates three MH-60S helicopters from NAS Whidbey Island as search and rescue/medical evacuation (SAR/MEDEVAC) platforms for the EA-18G aircraft as well as other squadrons and personnel assigned to the installation. Pursuant to the National SAR Plan of the United States, the unit may also be used for civil SAR/MEDEVAC needs to the fullest extent practicable on a non-interference basis with primary military duties according to applicable national directives, plans, guidelines and agreements; specifically, the unit may launch in response to tasking by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (based on a Washington State Memorandum of Understanding) for inland missions, and/or tasking by the United States Coast Guard for all other aeronautical and maritime regions, when other assets are unavailable. [Submitted by Thomas Mills, NAS Whidbey Island]

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DECEMBER 28, 2017 - JANUARY 3, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED

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DECEMBER 28, 2017www.whidbeyweekly.com - JANUARY 3, 2018 LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TEDTED

“Playscape,” a facilitated learning and play group, meets in Oak Harbor and Langley. Parents, grandparents, and other caregivers of children ages birth to 5 are welcome. Infant and Baby/Toddler families gather to share the early childhood years with one another. At “Playscape,” participants engage in conversation and activities that foster healthy development. Volunteers are needed to help host “Playscape,” as well as individuals interested in working with one family for a term of encouragement. whidbeymothermentors.org.

Family Guide by Amy Hannold Take a Hike New Year’s Day: January 1 is a Washington State Park “Free Day,” no Discover Pass required. Two “First Day Hikes” are scheduled for New Years Day – Fort Ebey State Park and Deception Pass Park. Both begin at 10 AM. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, January 15, is also a “Free Parks Day.” For a list of 2018 “Free Days” and a calendar of upcoming park events, go to parks.wa.gov. Get Outdoors and See the Eagles: December and January is peak eagle watching season. Spend time in the outdoors, witnessing bald eagle migration, bird-watching and other wildlife in a gorgeous setting along the Skagit River. Guided hikes, eagle watching stations with viewing gear, informative presentations, a "Children's Corner," and a variety of exhibits are available at the Skagit River Bald Eagle Interpretive Center, located at Howard Miller Steelhead Park in Rockport. The center is open Saturdays and Sundays in December and January. skagiteagle.org. Scramble for Your Sea Float: Langley hosts the annual “Sea Float Scramble” Saturday, January 6, at 11 AM. Sponsored by Langley Main Street and Callahan’s Firehouse, this free event features one-of-a-kind floats created by glass artist Callahan McVay, hidden in plain sight for guests to find. visitlangley.com.

Run Whidbey’s Marathon: The Whidbey Island Marathon, April 22, features a marathon, half-marathon, 10K and 5K course, as well as a 1K Kids Run for youth in grades kindergarten through fifth grade. To receive your “Early Registration Discount,” sign up by December 31. RunWhidbey.com. Whidbey Has Talent: Whidbey Has Talent celebrates the young and talented students in kindergarten, through the 12th grade, who reside on Whidbey Island. Everyone is invited to attend the event at Oak Harbor High School, April 15, to cheer on the performers. For audition information and last year’s show highlights visit WhidbeyHasTalent.com. Saturday Youth Art Studio: Youth in grades 4 to 8 who are serious about art are invited to the Pacific Northwest Art School, in Coupeville, for a series of drawing classes in January. Classes will be held Saturday mornings, for two hours, January 6 to January 27. Materials for the course provided by the Whidbey Island Art Council. Tuition is $40, some scholarships may be available. pacificnorthwestartschool.org. Support for Parents and Caregivers: Mother Mentors of Whidbey Island nurtures mothers and caregivers of young children by providing practical and emotional support.

ongoing professional development) are open to parents and caregivers of young children. Required registration can be done through the Sno-Isle website or by contacting the library. These adults-only events include: ‘Beyond Happy, Mad & Sad’: Building Emotional Literacy in Young Children, Coupeville Library, Monday, Jan. 22, 5:30–7:30 p.m. Explore ways to help children identify, understand, and respond to emotions in themselves and others in a healthy way. ‘These Books Count:’ Thursday, Feb. 8, 6–8 p.m. at Oak Harbor Library. Discover books that combine math and reading.

Let’s Play Ball: It’s time to think about spring baseball and soccer season Registration for your sport may begin in January, so check with your local league (North Whidbey, Central Whidbey and South Whidbey) and look forward to joining the team. If you’d like to make a difference in the lives of young athletes, our local sports organizations are always looking for coaches.

Dance with Your Daughter: It’s South Whidbey’s social event of the year, the Dad & Daughter Dance hosted by South Whidbey Parks and Recreation. Tickets, while they last, are available for the March 3 evening of music and memories. swparks.org.

Explore Art, Germany and Family at Whidbey Waldorf School: “A Journey to Germany,” “Afterschool Art Explorations,” and a “Parent & Child Rosebud” program begin in January. The school offers a number of unique, educational and inspiring programs throughout the year. wiws.org. Would Be Players Youth Theater Program at Whidbey Playhouse: Theater training helps your child in many valuable ways. Experiences and skills learned include selfconfidence, critical thinking, problem solving, self-discipline, public speaking and teamwork. Winter session, for ages 6 to 18, meets twice a week, February 5 to March 28. The workshop is $100, scholarships are available. WhidbeyPlayhouse.com. Cupid Cookies & Cocoa: Grab your sweetheart and join the Cupid Cookies & Cocoa 5K and 1-Mile Kids Run February 10, at Coupeville Elementary School. With love in the air and cookies and cocoa at the finish, this is bound to be a magical morning. Get the details and register at active.com. “STARS” for Childhood Educators, Parents and Caregivers: Free classes (designed for

Winter Weekends with the Family: When it’s cold outside, take a short drive and learn something new! Parents will love the educational aspects of local museums, while their kids enjoy learning about history, science, and more. Local museums of note include the Flying Heritage & Combat Armor Museum (Everett), Skagit Children’s Museum (Burlington), Spark Museum of Electrical Invention (Bellingham), PBY-Naval Air Museum (Oak Harbor), Island County Historical Museum (Coupeville), and Imagine Children’s Museum (Everett). Get the kids moving: Check out Snohomish Aquatic Center, Trampoline Zone (Bellingham), Altitude Trampoline Park (Marysville), Lynnwood Ice Center, Oak Bowl (Oak Harbor) and Bellingham Sportsplex (ice skating). Visit your chosen attraction’s website for upcoming events and information. Get Connected, Make Memories: Don’t miss Whidbey’s best events and activities in 2018. Visit WhidbeyIsland.MacaroniKid.com, for an island-wide calendar to fill your new year with all sorts of fun!

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DECEMBER 28, 2017 - JANUARY 3, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

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What’s Going On All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Live Music: Original Jim Saturday, December 30, 7:00pm Rustica, Oak Harbor Forged from the vocal jazz and a cappella scenes, and honed on pop, rock, folk, country and blues, Jim sets up a solid foundation for his tunes with creative arrangements, tasty improvisation, a little keyboard, strong vocals, rhythmic guitars and a fresh approach to percussion. No cover.

New Year’s Eve Fireworks Sunday, December 31, 9:00pm Windjammer Park, Oak Harbor Presented by the Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce. For more information, call (360) 675-3755 or visit OakHarborChamber.com

New Year’s Day Guided Hike Monday, January 1, 10:00am-11:30am Ft Ebey State Park, Coupeville Start the New Year with a free guided hike at Fort Ebey State Park! Explore the interaction of the forest and what a “kettle” is and how they shaped the landscape. This is a moderate 2-mile hike with up and down hills and stops along the way. Recommend for adults and kids 8 or older. Meet at the Beach Access restroom. Look for sandwich board signs. Arrive at 9:30am to enjoy hot cocoa, cookies and a campfire provided by the Friends of Whidbey State Parks. It is a Discover Pass FREE day! For more information, email janet.hall@parks. wa.gov or call (360) 678-1186 or day of (360) 969-1340.

First Day Hike Monday, January 1, 10:00am-1:00pm Deception Pass State Park Enjoy a free day in the park with a First Day Hike on the Sand Dunes Interpretive Trail at West Beach. Park staff will guide hikers around the paved, ADA accessible loop. Along the way, find great views of the Salish Sea, dune forests, and sandy beaches. Afterwards, enjoy refreshments at West Beach Shelter provided by Deception Pass Park Foundation, Washington State Employees Credit Union, and Seattle RV and Puyallup RV shows. We will also take a walk to the newly finished amphitheater, with an appearance from Gracie the gray whale and views of the bridge. Dress in layers and wear hiking boots.

Polar Bear Dive Monday, January 1, 10:30am Double Bluff Beach, Freeland $15 Registration begins at 10:30am, jump happens at 12:00pm. Registration includes official event shirt, hot drinks and festive atmosphere. All proceeds benefit Island County 4-H Teen Leadership Activities. For more information, call (360) 221-6788 or visit swparks.org

Casting Call for The Vagina Monologues Sunday, January 7, 4:00pm-6:30pm Freeland Library, 5495 S Harbor Ave. Casting Call for the community production of The Vagina Monologues by Eve Ensler. Come be part of the production, the cast will be diverse and inclusive. Any person who lives the female experience is welcome to come. No auditions; no memorization. Performances are on Sunday, February 25 at 2:00pm and 7:00pm, WICA.

Open Skate Fridays

Teaching Through God’s Word

Every Friday, 6:00pm-8:00pm Roller Barn, 98 NE Barron Dr, Oak Harbor

Sundays, 9:00am & 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton

Proceeds support Boys & Girls Club. $5 per skater and $3 for general admission. Last Friday of the month, skate with the Whidbey Island Roller Girls! Sorry, checks not accepted, credit card fees apply. For more information, call (360) 240-9273.

For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free K’nex Dragsters Thursday, December 28, 2:00pm-3:30pm Oak Harbor Library We have a new k’nex energy, motion and aeronautics kit! We’ll be working in teams to build rubber band powered dragsters, and then we’ll race them! For ages 8-12. Please preregister for this event. Zambini Brothers Puppets & Clay Martin Present: King Arthur Friday, December 29, 2:00pm Oak Harbor Library Join us for a winter afternoon full of fun and adventure. A dozen puppets in a dazzling oneman show for the whole family! LEGO® in the Library Tuesday, January 2, 4:00pm-5:30pm Coupeville Library Build your best with LEGO® in this open session for creating by yourself or with a building buddy. For ages 5 and up. Recipes for Fun Thursday, January 4, 1:00pm-2:00pm Freeland Library Explore fun sensory activity stations and try our recipes for play dough bubbles kinetic sand and more. WIHHA Presents: Therapeutic Touch Thursday, January 4, 4:00pm-6:00pm Freeland Library As human beings we are made up of energy in the form of a “field.” When we are healthy that energy is freely flowing and balanced. Disease is a condition of energy imbalance. Karen Carbone will talk about the Therapeutic Touch process and how harmony and order are created and rebalanced in the human energy field. Everyone is welcome. For more information visit wihha.com

Religious Services Prayer Group Every Tuesday, 4:00pm-5:30pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley

Time is a Key Factor in Investing

With the arrival of the New Year, many of us will pause and ponder the age-old question: “Who knows where the time goes?” And, as is always the case, none of us really do know. However, wherever the time goes, it will usually be a key factor in your success as an investor. Time can affect how you invest, and the results of your investing, in different ways:

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Unity of Whidbey Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit our website: unityofwhidbeyisland.org

Whidbey Quakers Sundays, 4:00pm-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and community, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www. whidbeyquakers.org.

First Church of Christ, Scientist Worship, 10:00am Sunday School to age 20, 10:00am Wednesday Testimony Meeting, 7:30pm Christian Science Reading Room Tuesday & Friday, 11:00am-3:00pm Wednesday 5:30pm-7:00pm The church and Reading Room are located at 721 SW 20th Court at Scenic Heights Street, Oak Harbor. Call (360) 675-0621 or visit christianscience.com Services and Sunday School are also held at 10:30am on South Whidbey at 15910 Highway 525, just north of Bayview and across from Useless Bay Road; testimony meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30pm.

Galleries & Art Shows Featured Artist: Richard Nash Meet the Artist: Wednesday, January 10, 10:00am-5:30pm Thursday, January 11, 10:00am-5:30pm Penn Cove Gallery, Coupeville

Healing Rooms

Richard Nash will be at Penn Cove Gallery to discuss the methods and motivations behind his artworks. A Washington native and lifelong student of the visual arts, Richard holds a MFA and has completed lengthy studies in Japan and Europe. His 2-D work ranges from botanicals to abstracts, with 3-D sculptures of Cor-ten and stainless steel. His main focus is always composition. For his abstracts he draws inspiration from the play of light and shadows created by architectural forms. http://www. rjnashart.com/

Every Thursday, 6:30pm-8:30pm 5200 Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland

Meetings & Organizations

The Healing Rooms are open to anyone desiring personal prayer for physical, emotional, or spiritual needs. There is a team of Christians from several local churches that are dedicated to praying for healing the sick in our community. All ministry is private, confidential, and free. Teams are available to pray for individuals who drop by on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Disabled American Veterans Chapter 47

Charismatic Prayer and Praise group. Everyone welcome. For more information, call Bill at (360) 222-4080 or email Sobico@comcast.net.

Filipino Christian Fellowship Sundays, 2:00pm Meets at Church on the Rock, 1780 SE 4th Ave., Oak Harbor. www.ohcfellowship.com

For more information, contact Ann at (425) 263-2704, email healingwhidbey.com, or visit the International Association of Healing Rooms at healingrooms.com.

Growth potential – Contrary to myth, there’s no real way to “get rich quick” when investing. To build wealth, you need patience – and time. If you own quality investments with growth potential, and you give them years – in fact, decades – to increase in value, your perseverance may be rewarded. Of course, there are no guarantees, and you’ll need the discipline to withstand the inevitable downturns along the way. But in describing how long he likes to keep his investments, renowned investor Warren Buffet says his favorite holding period is “forever.” Targeted goals – To accumulate resources for retirement, you need to save and invest throughout your working life. But along the way, you’ll probably also have some shorter-term goals – making a down payment on a home, sending your children to college, taking a round-the-world trip, and so on. Each of these goals has a specific time limit and usually requires a specific amount of money, so you will need to choose the appropriate investments. Risk tolerance – The element of time also will affect your tolerance for risk. When you have many decades to go until you retire, you can afford to take more risk with your investments because you have time to overcome periods of market volatility. But when you’re on the verge of retirement, you may want to lower the risk level in your portfolio. For example, you may want to begin moving away from some of your more aggressive, growth-oriented investments and move toward more income-producing vehicles that offer greater stability of principal. Keep in mind, though, that even during retirement, you’ll need your portfolio to provide enough growth opportunity at least to help keep you ahead of inflation.

Thus far, we have looked at ways in which time plays a role in how you invest. But there’s also an aspect of time that you may want to keep out of your investment strategies. Specifically, you might not want to try to “time” the market. The biggest problem with market timing is it’s just too hard. You essentially have to be right twice, selling at a market top and buying at the bottom. Also, as humans, we appear to be somewhat wired to think that an activity – especially a long-running activity – will simply continue. So, when the market goes up, we seem to expect it to keep rising, and when the market drops, we think it will continue doropping. This can lead to big mistakes, such as selling after a major market drop even though that can be the time when it may be much smarter to buy because prices are low.

As we’ve seen, the way you interact with time can affect your investment efforts. So, think carefully about how you can put all the days, months and years on your side. Time is the one asset you can’t replenish – so use it wisely. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Jeffery C. Pleet, CLU®, ChFC®

Financial Advisor 630 SE Midway Blvd. Oak Harbor, WA 98277 (360) 679-2558 jeffery.pleet@edwardjones.com

Thursday, January 4, 7:00pm DAV, 3037 N Goldie Rd, Oak Harbor

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

Call (360) 682-2945 for more information.

Healthcare Enrollment Event Tuesday, January 9, 1:00pm-7:00pm Skagit Valley College, Oak Hall, Oak Harbor It is an open enrollment event for the Affordable Care Act health insurance. Certified navi WHAT'S GOING ON

continued on page

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Photo Courtesy of Nóirin Ni Riain Famed Irish singer Nóirin Ni Riain and her sons, Owen and Moley O Súilleabháin will perform a Celtic New Year’s Blessing at 5 p.m. Monday, Jan. 1 at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Oak Harbor. The concert is free, but donations will be accepted to benefit the Whidbey Homeless Coalition.

Celtic blessing offered this New Year By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Oak Harbor is offering special blessings to all for the New Year.

Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Island Polar Bear Dive Hundreds of people are expected to take part in the 15th annual Polar Bear Dive at Double Bluff Beach in Freeland on New Year’s Day.

Invigorate your New Year with a refreshing dip

The church is hosting a Celtic New Year’s Blessing by internationally known Irish musical artists Owen and Moley O Súilleabháin and their mother, singer Nóirin Ni Riain, at 5 p.m. Monday, Jan. 1.

By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

This is not the first time this talented trio has entertained Whidbey Island residents with their beautiful music.

If you happen to over-indulge on New Year’s Eve, there is a surefire way to wash away those pesky “day after” cobwebs and get 2018 off to a refreshing start: take a dip in some brisk salt water.

“This is actually the second time the Irish family has been here. The first was in 2015,” said Harry Anderson, a parishioner at St. Stephen’s and one of the event’s organizers.

The 15th annual Polar Bear Dive at Double Bluff Beach in Freeland will be held rain, snow or shine at noon on New Year’s Day. Registration and general merriment begin at 10:30 a.m., although participants are encouraged to preregister.

“There was standing room only,” he said. “They entertained and enthralled us with music for 90 minutes. We didn’t expect to have another opportunity, but a couple of months ago we got an email from Owen and Moley telling us they’d be on South Whidbey and said they had had a good time when they were here, remembered the crowd was just terrific, and offered to perform on New Year’s Day. How could we say no?”

Organizers say this is a “cool” event every year, sometimes drawing more spectators than participants.

The O Súilleabháin brothers are singers and composers who write their own music and perform many varieties of sacred songs. They began performing with their mother, Ni Riain, in 2004 as an acapella trio, but they also perform genres ranging from Gregorian Chant to traditional Irish hymns to rock and rap.

“It’s a tradition,” said Jon Gabelein, who’s helped put the dive together since its start in 2004. “A lot of people show up as support crew, to hold towels, take pictures. We can get 300 to 400 people that aren’t even in the water who just show up to watch. Because beyond jumping in the water, it’s a cool community event that brings together quite a crowd.” Whether folks brave the water or not, there is fun to be had. There will be coffee and hot chocolate to warm your insides, bonfires on the beach to warm your outsides, music to warm the atmosphere and a spirit of giving to warm your hearts. Cost to participate in the Polar Bear Dive is $15, which includes the aforementioned refreshments as well as an official 2018 T-shirt. But any proceeds from the event will be donated to the Island County 4-H Leadership Club.

The family travels to Whidbey Island occasionally to visit their friend, famed poet David Whyte, which is why they happen to be here to kick off the new year. To get a feel for the brother’s vocals and harmonies, it is worth listening to the video on their website owenandmoley.com.

See CELTIC continued on page 10

Gabelein said the location at Double Bluff Beach works well for the dive, as the water is shallow, making it safer for children, there are no barnacles in the area and it’s a pretty scenic stretch of beach. The overall goal of the event is to have fun, and maybe get folks to try something new for the New Year. “It’s an opportunity to do something outside your comfort zone,” he said. “You should do it to really get out there and live on the edge. I like to be part of that.” Whether you just dip your toes in the water or you go all-in, Gabelein encourages people to challenge themselves, no matter if it’s the first time or the 15th. “Some people start with just their feet and that’s as far as they’ll get,” he said. “I encourage everyone to go a little bit farther than previous years; if you went waist-deep last year, go a little farther. Run out there and enjoy it. Go for a personal best, whether that’s going to your ankles, your waist – let’s kick it up a level.” Anyone interested in participating can preregister online at swparks. org. Doing so means you can skip waiting in the day-of registration line and it ensures you will get the proper size T-shirt. Anyone can register starting at 10:30 a.m. the day of the event, but Gabelein said shirt sizes cannot be guaranteed. Organizers also have high praise for the sponsors that make the Polar Bear Dive possible every year. “It’s all local sponsors that help us put this on and we understand they get asked for a lot,” said Gabelein. “It’s great to have their support.” NORTH END PLUNGE If you can’t make the trek to Freeland, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island will be hosting a Polar Bear Plunge at the Rocky Point Recreation Area in Oak Harbor.

“When the three of them get together, the harmony is just gorgeous,” Anderson said. “I assume this concert will be a combination of serious pieces and their brand of Celtic music.” There is no charge to attend this concert. However, donations are encouraged and will benefit the Whidbey Homeless Coalition.

“Not only is this a really cool way to bring the island community together for some fun, it’s a great opportunity to raise funds to support youth leadership,” Gabelein said. “The funds raised will help pay for youth registrations for different leadership conferences and service projects.”

Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Island Polar Bear Dive People of all ages are encouraged to dive into 2018 by participating in the 15th annual Polar Bear Dive at Double Bluff Beach in Freeland on New Year’s Day.

Pre-registration ends today (Wednesday, Dec. 27), but those interested are encouraged to come even if they haven’t registered. Activities begin at 10 a.m. and the group plunge will take place at 10:30 a.m. Costumes are encouraged for this activity.

See POLAR continued on page 10

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DECEMBER 28, 2017 - JANUARY 3, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! MONDAY, NOV. 6 9:19 am, SE Bayshore Dr. Party advising subject with a stick is screaming “Someone has a bomb.” 9:28 am, SR 20 Party reporting subject harassing him for a cigarette. 10:51 am, NW 7th St. Requesting call; believes male subject is intentionally walking and standing by her residence to purposefully agitate her dogs that bark. Party states it has occurred several times over the past few weeks; same male subject. 12:51 pm, Day Rd. Reporting party advising female is running from driveway to driveway on Day Rd. screaming; no weapons seen. Female is yelling “get out of here, leave me alone” and obscenities.

5:52 pm, Goldie Rd. Reporting theft of an extractor machine in a 45-foot metal storage container. Container and machine are both gone; thinks it happened over the weekend; party does have security camera footage. 6:16 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising vehicle is off roadway and in field at location. Vehicle blew through light and flew over the edge of the road and out into the field. WEDNESDAY, NOV. 8 8:51 am, Waterloo Rd. Requesting call referencing ongoing problem with goats coming onto property.

9:16 pm, SW Erie St. Caller requesting male subject in bathroom refusing to leave be trespassed.

1:33 pm, Blackberry Ln. Requesting call. Wife Googled Apple to get her cell phone fixed and called a number from the internet who said they would send her an iphone 10 if she paid with itunes gift cards; wife bought the cards, re-called number and hasn't received a new cell.

TUESDAY, NOV. 7 1:48 am, SR 20 Reporting party advising subject became disorderly after hearing they had no vacancies.

1:53 pm, Lodgepole Ln. Reporting party advising mini horse loose in area; not there now, was there but left. Unknown name of horse owner, who lives around the corner on Fakkema.

6:52 am, Lyle Ridge Circle Requesting a call in reference to kitten under truck at location; caller has been trying to coax it out all night; would like to know what she can do with kitten.

2:03 pm, Northgate Dr. Requesting assistance. States she got in a stranger's vehicle after she thought a 14-year-old was missing and was told a storage unit was paid for. Now states “These people are taking everything.”

7:14 am, Deception Circle Caller states child is refusing to get up for school; caller entered home to assist wife who is on scene. 12:36 pm, Saratoga Rd. Caller states he is having problems with subject he met on internet. State he believes female is stealing from him. 12:58 pm, SR 20 Caller advising a bicycle drove in front of him while he was driving and he is not sure if he hit him or not. 3:38 pm, Fir Woods Pl. Caller states neighbor told her her yard was dangerous and it hurt her feelings. Occurred after friend was injured by walking through yard while neighbor was doing work at caller's residence.

4:52 pm, NE 3rd St. Requesting call. Advising she thinks tonight things might escalate and they're going to “do her in.” 8:48 pm, NW Lanyard Loop Caller advising neighbor is “out of her mind,” pushing and shoving garbage cans around and causing a disruption. 10:32 pm, Whispering Pine Ln. Requesting call. Caller has not made a report with local office yet in MO; states he was researching his name online and found out a subject at location is using his name with a business addressed out of location. Caller is certain this is fraud, as his name is unique. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

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Life Tributes DIANE MARY KOLVAS Diane Mary O’Hagan was born to James and Ann O’Hagan July 24, 1927 in Chicago, IL. The family relocated to southern California in 1941 and settled in San Marino, a quiet suburb of Los Angeles. Diane and her younger sister Joyce were raised in a loving home, eventually graduating from Mayfield School in nearby Pasadena. During the Korean War, Diane moved to Japan, where she worked as a secretary for the military. It was there Diane met her lifelong love, Angelo (Angie) Kolvas who served as First Lieutenant in the Army. The two were married in 1952 and began their lives together in West Covina, CA. Diane enjoyed a long and successful career with the Xerox Corporation in Pasadena, retiring in 1992. In the winter of 1993, Diane and Angie relocated to the beautiful town of Oak Harbor on Whidbey Island in Washington. Diane involved herself in the community, met many wonderful friends and spent time playing domino’s while Angie pursed his passion for fishing. The two spent many happy years in their home overlooking Polnell Point and Camano Island. Angie predeceased Diane in 2013. Having lived a long, rich and fulfilling life, Diane died peacefully December 9, 2017 at the age of 90-½. Diane is survived by her loving sister, Joyce Nores of Pasadena, CA, her Niece, Nancy Nores Snowden, Nephews, Jim and Brian Nores and many dear friends on Whidbey Island. Memorial contributions are welcome at Help House in Oak Harbor, WA.

DR. DAVID A. HILDRETH, DVM Dr. David A. Hildreth, DVM, Coupeville veterinarian, age 72, passed away Wednesday, December 20, 2017, at his home, surrounded by his loving family. Dr. Hildreth was born in Joplin, MO, June 23, 1945, to John W. and Lorene (Burger) Hildreth. He was raised in Carthage, MO, and graduated from Carthage High School. David attended the University of Missouri in Columbia, where he received a BS Degree in Agriculture Economics and a DVM. On September 7, 1968, he married Jacqueline Lee Harper in Dexter, MO. The couple made their home in Poplar Bluff, MO, Carlinville, IL, Auburn, and Issaquah, WA before moving to Coupeville in 2001. In 1974 Dr. Hildreth purchased the Lake Sammamish Veterinary Hospital in Issaquah. The Hildreths moved to Coupeville in 2001. David operated Hildreth’s House Calls for Animals. He was an active member of the Oak Harbor Church of the Nazarene. David is survived by his wife, Jacque; his three children: Sara Rogers (Chris) of Issaquah, Rebecca Holmberg (Glenn) of Puyallup and

Benjamin D. Hildreth (Rin) of Taipei, Taiwan; his brother, John F. Hildreth (Peggy) of Birmingham, AL; his six grandchildren: Andrew, Austin, Alissa, Anna, and Nate Rogers; and Brandon Holmberg; also, one grandchild soon to arrive, Harper Hildreth. He was preceded in death by his sisters, Mary Ann Laughlin, Dorothy Beatte, Katherine Heitmann, and Carol Whitworth. A Memorial Service will take place at Oak Harbor Church of the Nazarene, Wednesday, December 27, 2017, 1:00 PM, Pastor Benjamin Norris officiating. Memorials are suggested to the Oak Harbor Church of the Nazarene, 1100 W. Whidbey Ave., Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.whidbeymemorial.com.

PIPER NICOLE VIRGINIA TRAVIS Piper Nicole Virginia Travis born February 2, 1983 passed away peacefully December 16, 2017 - at Providence hospital in Everett, WA surrounded by family. Piper will be remembered as a compassionate, kind and wonderfully unique human being. Piper had a great sense of humor and was extremely intelligent and artistic and saw the best in everybody she met. Even though Piper experienced many difficult events throughout her 34 years, she always maintained her optimistic outlook on life and her fierce love for her family and friends. Piper enjoyed many adventures travelling the US and even visited Russia as a teenager with her grandpa Travis. Piper lived most of her life on Whidbey Island where she made many close friends. Piper is survived by her mother Paulette, father Greg, and sister Tamara and husband Floyd. She is also survived by nieces Emily, Melanie and husband Hunter and great nephew Clayton, grandfather Lanny, aunts Diane and Cecelia and her children, as well as her uncle Tom and Lee and their children. Although her life was short, Piper touched many individuals and was cherished by her family and will be missed dearly. Services will be held at Purdy and Walters at Floral Hills cemetery Friday, December 29. Viewing from 1-2 pm and service at 2 pm (409 Filbert Road, Lynnwood, WA 98036). Reception/ Celebration of Life immediately following at the same location. The family has designated Good Cheer Food Bank in Langley, WA for memorial contributions in lieu of flowers. Mailing address: South Whidbey Good Cheer, PO Box 144, Langley, WA 98260 Website: http://goodcheer.org/foodbankDiane Kolvas

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gators and insurance brokers will be available. This is a free event and walk-ins are welcome. The final deadline for enrolling in the Affordable Care Act health insurance for 2018 is January 15. Enroll online at healthcare.gov or call (800) 318-2596.

Improvisational Theatre Group Saturday, January 20, 1:00pm-2:30pm Whidbey Playhouse STAR Studio Interested in Improvisational Theatre? Whidbey Playhouse has a group forming and would like to invite you to join. There is an improvisational comedy group too. Contact the Playhouse office if you have questions: (360) 679-2237

Gamblers Anonymous

Whidbey Weekly

building. Enter through the double doors next to the parking lot. For more information, email OakHarborga@gmail.com Washington GA hotline: 855-222-5542 For more Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Classes, Seminars and Workshops Learn to Dance at Dan’s Classic Ballroom.Com! Ballroom, Latin, Swing, Club Dances Groups, Privates, Wedding Prep (360) 720-2727 - dcb601@comcast.net

Compass: A Course for Navy Life

Every Friday, beginning January 26, 7:00pm St Augustine Catholic Church, Oak Harbor

January 16-18, 5:30pm-9:00pm NAS Whidbey Island Chapel, Oak Harbor

The church is located at 185 N. Oak Harbor St., the meeting is held in the north end of the

A spouse to spouse mentoring program. Course topics include relocation/moving;

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

2018

See Us For Your New Years Party Supplies!

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deployment; LES/finances; benefits/services; Naval traditions; community; communication. A fun and interactive way to learn about the Navy lifestyle. Free to all Navy/USMC spouses. Free onsite babysitting. Register online at www.gocompass.org/whidbeyisland.html

NRA Basics of Pistol Shooting Course Friday, January 19, 6:00pm-9:00pm Saturday, January 20, 9:00am-5:00pm NWSA Range, Oak Harbor Cost: $35

pistol shooting activities. The Basics of Pistol Course will also help prepare the student for participation in other NRA courses. Students can register online at nrainstructors.org For questions or to register, call NRA instructor John Hellmann at (360) 675-8397 or email NWSA.Training@gmail.com Additional information can be found at www.northwhidbeysportsmen.org.

AARP Smart Driver Safety Class Wednesday, January 24, 8:00am-4:00pm Oak Harbor Senior Center, 51 SE Jerome St.

This course introduces students to the knowledge, skills and attitude necessary for owning and using a pistol safely. The pistol handling and shooting portion is completed at the NWSA range, located at 886 Gun Club Road, where students will learn about safe gun handling, pistol shooting fundamentals, and

Refresh your driving skills and know the new rules of the road. Learn research-based driving strategies to help you stay safe behind the wheel. Each class requires a total of 8 hour mandatory course hours. Cost is $15 for AARP members, $20 for nonmembers. For more information, call (866) 955-6301.

JOIN IN A LANGLEY SEASIDE TRADITION

SEA FLOAT SCRAMBLE 11AM • SATURDAY • JANUARY 6, 2018

Seawall Park, Langley Free fun for the entire family. Hunt for over 1,000 sea floats hidden in plain view. Party Supplies For Every Celebration Great Customer Service 270 SE Cabot Dr #2 Oak Harbor • 360-544-3068

Created by Callahan’s Firehouse Studio. Sponsored by Langley Main Street, City of Langley & Whidbey Weekly.

For more info www.visitlangley.com

St. Stephen’s The Episcopal Church on North Whidbey cordially invites you, your family and friends to enjoy

A Celtic New Year’s Blessing With Owen and Moley O Súilleabháin and their mother, famed Irish singer Nóirin Ni Riain

Monday, January 1, 2018 • 5pm St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church 555 S.E. Regatta Drive, Oak Harbor • 360-279-0715 No admission charge Cash or Check Donations will be accepted to help support he Whidbey Homeless Coalition

360.682.2341 www.whidbeyweekly.com

The Brothers O Súilleabháin began performing with their mother in 2004. Their repertoire includes everything from Gregorian chant, ancient Irish songs and hymns to rock and rap. They have performed with The Chieftains, Bobby McFerrin and English poet and Whidbey resident David Whyte. They have recorded three albums, including one devoted to Celtic sacred songs.

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POLAR continued from page 7 The event will include free S’mores and drinks, a free beach towel for those doing the plunge (while supplies last), a Penguin Plunge slide for kids and a prize for the best costume. Those interested can go to https:// myffr.navyaims.com/wbwsc/nrnwrec.wsc/ wbsearch.html?xxactivitynumber=610169 for online registration. Because this does take place on base property, it is open to all base access ID cardholders and their sponsored guests. DRY LAND ACTIVITIES If getting wet doesn’t appeal, there are a couple of scenic hikes you can do if you want to get your blood pumping.

Sprucing up Oak Harbor’s Smith Park Photos by Teresa Besaw/Whidbey Weekly A young Oak Harbor Boy Scout is proud to have had a hand in the recent dedication of a new sign at Smith Park in historic downtown Oak Harbor. William Ray, 15, installed stone pavers around the base of the new Garry Oak signs on the east side of the park on Midway Blvd. as part of his Eagle Scout project. An official ceremony to dedicate the park sign and interpretive display was held earlier this month. Ray, who has been involved in the Boy Scouts since he was 8, said it took him and a number of volunteers about a week and 65 man-hours to get the job done and is pleased his project will help the community in a lasting way. “Hopefully I can show my kids in many years’ time what I helped to accomplish,” he said. “I felt special for being part of something bigger, especially when the Mayor wrote me a thank you letter.” Three new Garry Oak trees were planted at the dedication in honor of former members of the Oak Harbor Parks Board. Wood from a 329-year-old Garry oak tree that stood next to the Oak Harbor Post Office was used in the new park sign and the interpretive display. Smith Park functioned as a “village square” at one point in Oak Harbor’s history.

There will be a New Year’s Day guided hike at 10 a.m. at Fort Ebey State Park in Coupeville. Participants will get to explore the interaction of the forest, discover what a “kettle” is and how they shaped the landscape. According to organizers, this a moderate two-mile hike with up and down hills and stops along the way. This outing is recommended for adults and children ages 8 and above. Those interested can meet at the Beach

Access restroom (look for signs). Folks are encouraged to arrive early to enjoy hot chocolate, cookies and a campfire provided by the Friends of Whidbey State Parks. Also, it is a Washington State Parks free day, so Discover Passes are not required. For more information, send an email to janet. hall@parks.wa.gov or call 360-678-1186 or day of, 360-969-1340. You can also enjoy the free day in the park with the First Day Hike at Deception Pass State Park from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Participants will hike the Sand Dunes Interpretive Trail at West Beach Park. Staff will guide hikers around the paved, ADA-accessible loop that features views of the Salish Sea, dune forests and sandy beaches. Refreshments will be served at the West Beach Shelter following the walk. The hike will also include a trip to the newly completed amphitheater, and will include an appearance from Gracie the gray whale and views of the bridge. Participants are encouraged to dress in layers and wear hiking boots. So get out there and get wet or stay dry, whichever you choose, and have a Happy New Year!

CELTIC continued from page 7

Photo Courtesy of Nóirin Ni Riain Irish singers and song writers Owen and Moley O Súilleabháin join their mother, famed Irish singer Nóirin Ni Riain, in the recording studio. The trio will perform a Celtic New Year’s Blessing at 5 p.m. on New Year’s Day at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Oak Harbor.

According to Anderson, events like this are aimed at community outreach and are a way of giving back to deserving organizations. “We’ve been involved in helping The Haven, the homeless shelter in Oak Harbor, both as volunteers and as monetary donors,” explained Anderson. “It’s important in an era when government can’t do everything that churches and community organizations step up,” he said. “This need cannot be ignored. It’s not getting any better, it’s getting worse. “Part of our mission is to help our neighbors,” Anderson continued. “That includes those that don’t have a place to sleep. It’s just part of our DNA and a lot of other churches believe that as well.”

HIP, HIP, HOORAY! Helen Chatfield-Weeks was surprised to find out she was one of three Oak Harbor residents to have a Garry Oak tree planted in her honor.

The Haven opened in Oak Harbor last April and has served an average of 25 people per night since it opened. The shelter operates from different churches, with Spin Café on Bayshore Drive serving as the check-in point. The Haven is open to adults and children with a parent every night from 7 p.m. to 7:30 a.m. The money donated from this concert will go towards operating expenses and helping to establish a permanent location for The Haven. “We have a long term strategic plan to have a permanent emergency shelter facility in Oak Harbor,” said Faith Wilder, board president of the Whidbey Homeless Coalition. “Currently the shelter location is moved every 90 days. Our future plan is to continue to grow all our programs so long as there is an urgent problem.”

Wilder agrees homelessness will continue to grow on Whidbey Island as it will in many other places across the country. On Whidbey, the problem has been exacerbated by a lack of affordable housing and low-paying, seasonal jobs, she said. “Particularly, there are no rental spaces and people are experiencing evictions as rental prices increase,” said Wilder. “Our next population that is the most vulnerable is those on a fixed income. That income is not going to serve them as rents rise and the cost of living goes up.” Wilder said she is grateful to St. Stephen’s for the opportunity for additional funds and also for the chance to share information about the Whidbey Homeless Coalition, “engage them in having compassion for those around us,” and perhaps generate volunteers and donations. “We’re very grateful to the church and I look forward to an absolutely delightful evening of Celtic blessings,” Wilder said. “It’s a great way to usher in a New Year and I hope all sorts of people be able to enjoy it.” “Especially at this time of year with all the hustle and bustle, this should be an hour and a half of uplifting fun and really good entertainment,” said Anderson. “These folks are not amateurs, they are fantastic musicians.” For more information, go to owenandmoley. com, whidbeyhomeless.org or www.ststephensofoakharbor.org. The Celtic New Year’s Blessing begins at 5 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 1 at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 555 SE Regatta Ave. in Oak Harbor.

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Film Shorts Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

By Carey Ross All the Money in the World: This will forever be known as the movie Kevin Spacey was edited out of during post-production (long live Christopher Plummer!), but it’s really a lively, taut recounting of the time one of the Getty grandkids was kidnapped and billionaire J. Paul Getty famously refused to pay the ransom to get him back.  (R • 2 hrs. 12 min.) Coco: As a creative filmmaking force, Pixar is unmatched. The unstoppable animation juggernaut rolls out another instant classic, this time centering its story on budding musician Miguel, who takes a stunning journey of sight and sound in the Land of the Dead in order to unlock the secrets of his family history. Bring a hanky–this one packs an emotional punch.  (PG • 1 hr. 45 min.)

Downsizing: Alexander Payne returns to the big screen with his first film since 2013’s excellent "Nebraska," this time with a more whimsical (at least on the surface) story of a couple (Matt Damon and Kristen Wiig) who decides to become small in order to live large.  (R • 2 hrs. 15 min.) Ferdinand: I guess this is the movie you take your kids to if they’re not old enough for "Star Wars."  (PG • 1 hr. 48 min.)

LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TEDTED

360-679-4003 877-679-4003 www.seatacshuttle.com

Like us on:

FARAWAY ENTERTAINMENT YOUR LOCAL MOVIE THEATER

STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI PG-13 PITCH PERFECT 3 PG-13 JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE PG-13

Coming: GREATEST SHOWMAN, FERDINAND, DOWNSIZING, THREE BILLBOARDS

360-682-2341 • www.whidbeyweekly.com

The Star: This is an animated adventure about the first Christmas (no room at the inn, the Star of Bethlehem, etc.) told from the point of view of the animals involved, including a brave donkey named Bo who yearns for a life of adventure. I know I said I wanted Hollywood to come up with original stories, so I guess this is what I get.  (PG • 1 hr. 26 min.)

Movie Hotline 360-279-2226 Book A Party or Special Showing 360-279-0526 1321 SW Barlow St • Oak Harbor

www.farawayentertainment.com

Now Showing!

Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle: How can anyone ever replace the inimitable Robin Williams in this now-franchise about a mystical board game that comes to life? The answer: One person cannot. However, four people–Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart, Jack Black, and Karen Gillan–can make a decent go of it.  (PG-13 • 1 hr. 52 min.)

Thursday, Dec. 28 thru Saturday, Dec. 30

JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13)

Pitch Perfect 3: It was cute the first time, it was less so the second. In this case, the third time is most definitely not the charm. This had indeed better be the “last call, Pitches.”  (PG-13 • 1 hr. 33 min.)

Darkest Hour: Marvel as Gary Oldman transforms into Winston Churchill, singlehandedly keeps Britain from surrendering to Nazis with great speechifying and is nominated for a Best Actor Oscar right before your very eyes.  (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 5 min.)

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DECEMBER 28, 2017www.whidbeyweekly.com - JANUARY 3, 2018

Closed New Year’s Eve & New Year’s Day

SPECIAL: Free Chili & Cheese on any Hot Dog *Cash prices

Box Office & Snack Bar Opens At 4pm • 1st Movie Begins 6pm Admission 11 & Over $6.50; Kids 5-10 $1.00; 4 & Under Free GO KARTS CLOSED FOR THE SEASON

360-675-5667 • www.bluefoxdrivein.com

Star Wars: The Last Jedi: Don’t worry everyone: Writer/director Rian Johnson totally didn’t blow it! Star Wars still rules.  (PG-13) Thor: Ragnarok: So much of the enormous success of the Marvel Cinematic Universe can be tied to savvy hiring practices. From taking a huge risk in choosing Robert Downey Jr. to anchor the franchise as "Iron Man" to tapping Joss Whedon to helm its first two "Avengers" movies, Marvel knows how to find and foster superheroes. They’re back at it again, picking "What We Do in the Shadows’" Taika Waititi to take some of the Shakespearean starch out of Thor and give him the sense of humor he’s been sorely lacking.  (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 10 min.)

The Greatest Showman: I can think of few people more equipped to portray P.T. For Anacortes theater showings, please see Barnum, i.e. the “showman” in question, www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak than Hugh Jackman, who is a bit like a charHarbor Cinemas showings see ads on this ismatic human circus himself. page.  (PG • 1 hr. 45 min.) Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.47)

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On a scale from 1 to 10...4.7 Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9

Answers on page 15

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Thu Nov 30 22:23:37 2017 GMT. Enjoy!

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Whidbey Weekly

Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

LOCALLY OPERATED

But gazpacho isn’t the only tummy-grumbling yummy, served-cold dish we can make – even in the chill that’s upon us. How about a potato salad? Perhaps a traditional macaroni or Italian pasta salad? Yes, all of these are perfect side dishes of any meal. In fact, one of the tastiest noodle salads out there, might be one inspired by the tastes of Thailand. With julienned carrots, sliced onions, bell peppers, cucumber bamboo shoots, cilantro, sesame seeds, mixed with rice noodles and a dressing of ginger, sesame oil, vinegar, soy sauce, lime juice, a dash of sugar, and a healthy portion of garlic, you instantly have an exotic flare in the midst of winter at your next lunch or dinner. Why not bring some tropical balminess to your winter-time fare!

CHILLED CHOW AND COLD WEATHER EATS – A LITTLE SOMETHING DIFFERENT I know the weather is cold outside, and a chill seems to be quickly acquiesced by an injection of warmth that can come in any way, shape or form. Whether a toasty blanket, a seat near the fire, or a warm meal to bring the temperature up from within, the key word here is “warmth.” However, I felt it would perhaps be appropriate to talk about some of the ways we can enjoy our food or drinks chilled. Yes, seemingly incompatible with cold weather from the outset, but upon closer inspection, not quite so incongruent a mix. I’m not necessarily talking about ice cream (which is wonderful, don’t get me wrong); I’m talking about the more off-the-beaten-path foods commonly served chilly. Those which sit on the back burner – or no burner at all. That said, it is prudent to begin with gazpacho. If you’re wondering what this is, I’ll tell you. It is a chilled soup hailing from Spain, whose history reaches far back in time. Its roots are diverse and it would seem many different cultures had a hand in forming this dish we now continue to vary and recreate today. I guess “too many cooks” don’t actually “spoil the broth.” Gazpacho now refers to any cold soup made from a fruit or vegetable base. From the Spaniards to the Ottomans, and a few other empires in between, everyone seems to have brought

something to this dish. Originally, it was a mixture of stale bread blended with garlic and olive oil and further thinned with water or vinegar (as these were apparently items commonly carried by Roman soldiers). Whatever vegetables were available were added, as well as almonds, and the whole lot was smashed together with a pestle and mortar. Sometime in the 8th century, the Ottomans overthrew Spain and the Moors from Morocco came across the Mediterranean Sea bringing with them a cold soup they referred to as Ajo Blanco. Andalusia, a primarily agricultural area, seemed to have picked up the Ajo Blanco/ cold soup thing likely due to the heat and a hard day’s labor farming the land - what better way to cool your core and intake nutrients at the same time than chowing down on a gazpacho? Nowadays we find gazpacho everywhere using a vast array of ingredients. Watermelon, cucumber mint, stone fruit (i.e. peach) and a whole lot more. Typically however, today a ‘true’ gazpacho base will be made from tomatoes - which is a fruit - but something seems to tell us while a fruit by name and class, we mightn’t like it as much in a fruit salad alongside bananas, pears, apples, grapes and strawberries. Yet in this form, it seems to work fabulously well with other fruity ingredients in addition to food stuffs such as garlic, jalapeno, olive oil, cucumber and vinegar. Sounds totally delicious, and completely different from what I’m used to for sure!

This would be a fantastic addition to a Christmas lunch with some friends and a very out of the ordinary dish to take to a potluck, for certain! And where salads are concerned, it’s of course totally fine to take a traditional leafy green one to a get-together or to serve at a meal. However, for the sake of being a little different, push the leafy greens to the side this once, and indulge in a rice salad. It makes for a delicious change and there are many ways this can be made. It’s easy and a set recipe isn’t a prerequisite for tasty turnout. Using cultural influences as themes for this dish, you can travel the world over serving a chilled portion of this salad. There’s a Mediterranean flare, a spicy Mexican flavor, country-time comfort food, simple English vegetable additions and more. Your base is rice, and any supplementary items you add are up to you and that’s the best part! As far as potlucks are concerned, a rice salad will do just fine, though I might add some of the quicker, easier-to-eat items we could take to events where people are going to be snacking on little bits of lots, are finger sandwiches and pinwheels, served cold of course, regardless of what the weather may be. They’re quick and easy and oh so very versatile – your creativity can run wild with any pinwheel recipes, so tweak it to your taste. Whether a vegetarian signature underlining the flatbread or wrap, using, oh I don’t know, some fabulous conglomerate like sun dried toma-

toes, spinach, cream cheese, garlic and basil or a meat-lovers lunch time lucky-strike with salami, banana peppers, parmesan, ricotta and cream cheese to bring it all together, a pinwheel is a can’t-go-wrong, chilled champion. Dear Readers, don’t let the chill in the air take a bite out of any foods you like to make just because they may seem unsuited to the weather. Make the meals you love, whatever those may be and turn your nose up at the frost; rebel and make a cold dish or two! I am including a recipe for rice salad, a truly scrumptious one, and I hope you enjoy it! Please send any and all comments, questions, information and recipes of your own you might like to share to letsdish. whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and we’ll get down to business and Dish! Country Time Comfort Rice Salad 2 to 3 cups cooked rice (long grain works very well) 1 jar drained pimientos ½ cup green onion, chopped ½ cup green pepper, chopped ¼ cup celery, chopped 1/3 cup diced tomatoes 2 to 3 hard-boiled eggs, diced Sweet pickle relish to taste Dressing ½ cup mayonnaise ¼ cup mustard ¼ teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon pepper A dash of celery salt or seed 1 teaspoon sugar In a small bowl, mix together the dressing ingredients and set aside. If you want a thinner dressing, add a couple tablespoons of milk. In a large bowl, combine salad ingredients, pour the dressing over and toss together until well blended. Chill for a few hours before serving, garnish with fresh, flat-leaf parsley and enjoy! www.atasteofhome.com www.spanish-food.org www.kitchenproject.com To read past columns of Let's Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

Dining Guide Forget Resolutions Join us at the Inn for:

1191 SE Dock St, #2 • Oak Harbor 360-675-6500 chrisbakeryonwhidbey.weebly.com

Big Train Chai • 70+ Flavors • Ice Cream Shakes Using Locally Roasted Honeymoon Bay Beans 960 NE Midway Blvd • Oak Harbor • 360-679-1065 (Located in Shell parking lot) Mon-Fri 6-5, Sat 7-5, Sun 8-4

Christmas Day Dinner Buffet Musical Cabaret New Year’s Eve

Call for details and to make reservations 2072 W. Captain Whidbey Inn Road • Coupeville 360-678-4097 • www.captainwhidbey.com

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Zanini’s Catering & Events

We create the event... ...You create the memories Catering by Design • 360-320-3168 www.zaniniscateringandevents.com

Breakfast & Lunch on the Water - Daily Fresh Baked Treats Homemade Soups & Sandwiches 360.678.5431 • 4 Front Street • Coupeville

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handled quickly and in an up-front fashion. This is especially true as it pertains to money. Finances can quickly become a sore point if you’re too timid on the 29th.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Relationships this week take on some subtle qualities that will enhance your interactions without being immediately noticeable. You and your partner may find yourselves communicating in ways that go beyond mere words. This is an especially good time in which to make appeals to the other’s nobility and sense of fair play. Favors asked are more likely to be granted now. Watch the 29th in this regard. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your burdens are easier for you to bear this week if you keep in mind that you can profit from the high standard of conduct presently being imposed on you. You may soon realize that the seemingly impossible requirements demanded of you are there for your own good. Being headstrong and resentful only works against you. Guard against impulsive actions on the 29th and think before you act. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) The limits of your ethical and philosophical beliefs are apt to be tested this week. Your standards of conduct will best serve you if they are high. If there are any weaknesses in your standards, those will become apparent, too. In that case, now is your chance to grow as a person. Your personal code of behavior is certain to have tangible and practical applications on the 29th. Be ready to step up and be counted.   CANCER (June 22-July 22) Most of your energy this week is likely to be channeled into serving others. You are likely to have a great deal of freedom to inject your work with originality and your own unique sense of style. Your activities early week are likely to subject you to a great deal of scrutiny. Don’t let it bother you that others are watching you on the 29th. They want you to succeed and are only looking for reasons to applaud you. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) This is your week to inject creativity and your own personal flair into everything that you do. A sense of the flamboyant and spectacular is exactly what you’re aiming to produce. If it’s a party you’re planning, make it an extravaganza. The extra effort required will pay you handsomely in the accolades it delivers. Transforming the ordinary into the extraordinary should be your concern at all times, but on the 29th, especially. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You will need to speak frankly and clearly at all times if you are to succeed this week. Now is not the time to leave anything unsaid and trust that matters will just work themselves out. They won’t. It’s your job to make them work. Disagreements must be

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) It’s time to take charge and come forward with your thoughts and ideas this week, especially regarding how your money is spent. Expect lots of input from others who will want to inject their two cents into the conversation. They are your unwitting allies. Original solutions are the natural result of such banter, so don’t begrudge anyone the right to speak. When it comes to ideas on the 29th, the more, the merrier. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Your ally this week is your innate sense of justice and fair play. Use it in all your planning and communications to head off possible problems later. Taking unethical shortcuts will inevitably catch up with you. Unexpected developments at work will need to be dealt with promptly. Do what you must, even at risk of coming across as bossy on the 29th. You can soothe others’ ruffled feathers after the crisis has passed. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) The help you need for success in your large scale goals comes as a direct result of your own resourcefulness this week. The best part is that you can expect inspiration and creativity when and where you need it. There’s nothing like an emergency to generate quick thinking, so should the alarm bells sound, rejoice. It’s your clue that brilliant inspiration is soon to follow. The 29th provides clues. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Matters in and around the home are likely to assume priority status at some point during the week. If you’ve grown lax in this area, a vigorous reminder of your duties is to be expected. Your best response will be to put aside lofty aspirations, at least long enough to deal with the requirements of the mundane. When all is said and done on the 29th, it’s not your actions that matter so much as the spirit in which you perform them.  AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) Your argumentative side is likely to be triggered at some time during the week. Threats to your pet theory or idea may arise from within your peer group, so be prepared. If you’re on soft ground, it’s going to be hard to defend yourself. In any case, if you don’t like what you hear on the 29th, don’t kill the messenger. Your challenger, rightfully viewed, serves mainly to help you back to a solid standing. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) New approaches to some thorny problems are possible this week. Emotional responses to the practical demands of career or business may not be the final answer, but anything that gets people talking is good. Solutions are apt to be the outcome. Working with others is more than ordinarily productive now, meaning group activity is a plus on the 29th. Spend lots of time listening and don’t be afraid to ask questions.

Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock, as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www.chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly. com.

CLUES ACROSS

45. Role of highlights

17. Tailless amphibian

1. Warm-blooded vertebrates

46. Fixed-radio access

18. Belonging to a thing

47. Partly digested food

22. Mars crater

48. “Lamb Chop” puppeteer Lewis

25. Most fair

8. Semitic peoples 13. Supervise

27. Citrus fruit

14. Historical German territory

49. In support of

15. Sweat 19. The Wolverine State

51. Reduction in value over time

30. Beloved late broadcaster Craig

20. China

55. Running events

32. All alone

21. Violent disturbances

57. Portuguese region

34. Copies

22. A way to commemorate the dead

58. Slovenly women

35. Poster

59. Strongly criticized

23. Midway between east and southeast

CLUES DOWN

36. Symmetrical

28. Awkward

50. Aluminum

29. Brews

37. Grew older

1. Wiped up

38. Makes tractors

2. Opposed to

40. Not the front

26. Disparaged

3. Macon, GA, university

41. State as fact

30. More coherent

4. Wife

31. Abnormal rattling sounds

5. Small viper

24. Bird genus 25. Trim

43. Worked hard for

32. Healthy appetizers

6. Polynesia garland of flowers

33. Partner to “shocked”

7. Saw-like

34. French pianist Pascal 35. Jokes 38. Marks to omit print

8. Maltese-Italian composer Girolamo 9. Moved faster than walking

40. Coverage 44. “A Death in the Family” author

45. Indicates position in a box score 48. Tax 51. “Lookout Weekend” singer Debbie 52. Unhealthy 53. Imam name __ Khan

11. Covered with mud

54. A woolen cap of Scottish origin (abbr.)

12. Marksmen

56. The Golden State

10. Commercial

39. Tall

42. Long, narrow cut

Answers on page 15

16. Buenos __

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Thurs, Dec. 28

Fri, Dec. 29

Sat, Dec. 30

Sun, Dec. 31

Mon, Jan. 1

Tues, Jan. 2

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-41°/L-33°

H-42°/L-32°

H-45°/L-35°

H-37°/L-34°

H-47°/L-36°

H-43°/L-32°

H-49°/L-35°

Rain and Drizzle Possible

Rain and Drizzle Possible

Mostly Cloudy

Mostly Sunny

Mostly Cloudy

Mostly Sunny

Wed, Jan. 3

Mostly Cloudy

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-38°/L-33°

H-42°/L-32°

H-45°/L-35°

H-36°/L-34°

H-42°/L-35°

H-46°/L-37°

H-44°/L-34°

Rain and Drizzle Possible

Cloudy

Cloudy

Partly Cloudy and Colder

Mostly Cloudy

Rain

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Mostly Cloudy


14 DECEMBER 28, 2017 - JANUARY 3, 2018 Whidbey Weekly

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15

DECEMBER 28, 2017 - JANUARY 3, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Property Management You Can Count On!

Whidbey Residential Rentals, Inc. We Manage Your Home As If It Were Our Own. 360-675-9596 • www.whidbeyres.com 285 NE Midway Blvd • Suite #2 • Oak Harbor REAL ESTATE/RENTALS 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath Townhouse/Duplex on large lot with garage and deck in Clinton. $1200 plus SD. (360) 341-2688 or (425) 308-1894 (0)

ANNOUNCEMENTS JEEPERS! Let’s start a new club! The inaugural meeting of the Whidbey Wranglers, an all Jeep vehicle organization, will be at the Oak Harbor El Cazador restaurant Saturday, February 24 at 5pm. Feel free to contact me at spillerr@ comcast.net for any questions or just show up! Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call (360) 221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child's life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. (425) 923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin' Alive team. Our team's mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: https://www. facebook.com/NorthPugetSou ndDragonBoatClub?ref=hl

Medical Marijuana patients unite; If you need assistance, advice, etc. please contact at 420patientnetworking@gmail. com. Local Whidbey Island help. If you or someone you know has been a victim of Homicide, Burglary, Robbery, Assault, Identity Theft, Fraud, Human Trafficking, Home Invasion and other crimes not listed. Victim Support Services has Advocates ready to help. Please call the 24-hr Crisis Line (888) 388-9221. Free Service. Visit our web site at http://victimsupportservices.org

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Looking for Board Members to join the dynamic Board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

WORK WANTED Caregiving services for all ages. 20 years experience in medical assistance and caregiving. CPR certified. Can do anything from cleaning to shopping to medical care. Also love to cook, owned a personal chef service. Please call Martha at (360) 320-4582 (0) Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.47)

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www.whidbeyweekly.com

Whidbey Weekly

JOB MARKET Langley Main Street program manager: Langley Main Street program manager should have education and/or experience in some of the following areas: architecture, historic preservation, economics, finance, public relations, design, journalism, administration, retailing, volunteer or nonprofit administration and/ or small business development. The program manager would be sensitive to design and preservation issues. The manager would understand issues confronting downtown business people, property owners, public agencies and community organizations. The manager would be entrepreneurial, imaginative and able to function independently. Excellent communication skills are essential including website and social media management. Knowledge of Quick Books accounting is required. Part time position, 20 hours No Cheating!

weekly. Please send resume to mainstreet@whidbey.com (2) DRIVERS: Drivers wanted for Whidbey SeaTac Shuttle. CDL/ P2 Preferred, Training available for those without. Full Time, Part Time and weekend openings available. Details at www. seatacshuttle.com or call (360) 679-4003

JEWELRY Oval amethyst ring set in sterling silver, $50 OBO; White button pearl earrings, 8mm, $35 OBO; Pale blue Baroque pearl earrings, 9-10mm, $45 OBO. Call (360) 331-1063 (0)

LAWN AND GARDEN 25 aluminum silver deck post caps, $3 each; 200 feet new 8” heavy waterline, $4 a foot, obo. Can be used for waterline or drain line. (360) 321-1624 Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for gardens, flower beds, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard loads, $225 delivered. South Whidbey (360) 321-1624

LOCALLY OPERATED

Foster Homes Needed! Family Tails Dog Rescue needs foster homes! We can't save dogs from high kill shelters without homes for them to stay at while they wait to find their forever home. 1 week to 3 months, a fun and rewarding way to be involved with rescue and also have a dog without the full time commitment. We pay for everything, you just provide the love and the home. Please call 360-969-2014 for more info or for an application.

MISCELLANEOUS Fujinon binoculars, 10 x 70 fmt-sx with case, mint condition, $450. Call (360) 240-0921 (0) Over 50 LP (vinyl) albums for sale, various artists, $3 ea. Call (360) 331-1063 (2) A Lehmann Gross Bahn electric “The Big Train” set. Includes train cars and tracks, in original box. Made in West Germany. Please call for details; we can send photos. Best offer. (360) 678-1167 (1) Terrarium: Stained glass (clear glass and green glass panels). 26-1/2 “ tall; diameter of bottom is approximately 16”; diameter of glass top is 10”. Please call for details; we can send photos. Best offer. (360) 678-1167 (2)

Looking for Xmas, Bday, Father's Day, or just Gifts in general? These are LOCAL made crafts, I have about 50-60 of these available. They are $16.00/ea, plus shipping if you want them mailed. CASH preferred. Dimensions are: 5-6"W X 17”L. Contact me at ljohn60@gmail.com.

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

DID YOU KNOW MOST CLASSIFIED ADS ARE FREE? Contact us for more info! classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com

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Business Spotlight Wishing You & Your Family A Happy New Year!

HARADA PHYSICAL THERAPY Your Hometown Therapists

• Sports Rehab • Post-Op Treatment • MVA/L&I Claims • Injury Screening • Concussion Rehab • BikeFit

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Oak Harbor

ENGAGE in YOUR Fitness for 2018

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After Christmas

Fitness is about working to make change in your life. Simply put, we were made to move and work, and when we don’t do that, we atrophy – we waste away.

Women’s Care in Oak Harbor! We are proud to announce the expansion of our OB/GYN and Midwifery services to our 1300 NE Goldie Street, Oak Harbor location. Call 360.240.4055 to schedule an appointment. www.whidbeyhealth.org

Coupeville

Fitness is not about pushing ourselves to injury, it’s about using what we have been given to urge our bodies to live to the best function possible. Life is more enjoyable when we function well, and we are, in turn, more able to enjoy our lives. Each of us is unique, and so our picture of fitness should also be unique. The demands of our lives will shape our needs to move and rest and breathe. Fitness is work, but it should be fun and enjoyable. Just watch the example of kids at play. Dare to explore your interests to move, and move beyond your comfort zone, but safely. This is where the good work is done. Thrive Community Fitness has an incredible variety of workout equipment, and a positive, friendly environment in which to use it. We have invested in the best group fitness programs in the world, LesMills. We offer personal trainers to help you achieve your goals in a state-of-the-art small group training environment through Eat the Frog Fitness, designed by world-class athletes. Our experienced trainers are also fully equipped to assist in your one-on-one needs on a personal level so that you achieve the specific results you desire.

ALL CHRISTMAS ITEMS

50% OFF while supplies last

We challenge you to engage in your very own unique picture of fitness, and our staff is here to help you find your best fit for activities. Realizing that we cannot ever outwork a poor diet, we are sharing a compilation of the latest in Nutrition. Start the ball turning in the right direction, focus on adding more “good” to your day. ENJOY!

150 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor • 360-679-3533

Top Nutrition Tips • Eat more whole plants! Beans, Lentils, whole grains, vegetables and fruits. • Combine your food! You will feel more full by putting carbohydrates and proteins together…fruit and nuts or yogurt, for example.

Mosaics - Art - Gifts Jewelry - Teas

• Make time to eat with those you love! It’s a great time for conversation and smiling. • Eat Mindfully! 30-40% of nutrients may not be properly absorbed if you are eating distracted. Put away work, TV, phone, and look at your food. • Have a plan! Monthly meal plan helps you keep the right food on hand.

Filled with fanciful art & gifts made by local & regional artisans Tea Tastings on Thursdays & Fridays In Historic Downtown Oak Harbor 830 SE Pioneer Way - 360-682-2468 HOURS: Tues-Sat 10am-5pm

• Prepare and Store Healthy Meals for the week! We are all busy. Take 3-4 hours once a week to prepare 4-5 healthy meals. • Get Real with your food! Learn the skills to grow, prepare and cook as much of your own food as you can. • Get to know your body! Learn to observe how your body reacts to the food you eat. • One meal wont “make” or “break” your health! Every meal is an opportunity, but look for overall trends that can be hurtful. • Increase Fiber! Have a goal of 5g of fiber per serving in a meal or snack. • Quality over Quantity! Focus less on calories, more on whole food quality. • Drink more water! Every cell in your body needs water. Optimize metabolism, boost energy levels, and promote good digestion. The list of water’s benefits goes on and on.

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Whidbey Weekly, December 28, 2017  

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