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November 29 through December 5, 2018

HOLIDAY DOUBLE HEADER!

Adapted by Jane Jones and Myra Platt From John Irving's novel "A PRAYER FOR OWEN MEANY" Directed by Phil Jordan Musical Direction by Myra Platt

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ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

Last Monday’s Seattle Times featured the reprint of an article by Cade Metz in The New York Times regarding the work being done in Seattle by the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence.

Is their acronym AIAI or AI2? Maybe I need more artificial sweetener to figure it out before I ask Siri or Alexa. Surely the AI ladies can explain their world of artificial intelligence to a guy like me who has been accused of having artificial intelligence. At least that is what my chemistry teacher told me at Ohio Wesleyan University in 1966 when I got my walking papers after getting a D in his class. An F on my Chemistry final did not help, but, by then, what did I care? Summer was coming. I could go back home to Oil City to work for Continental Can Company loading boxcars and semis while ruminating over my forced departure from a Methodist school which had challenged my Presbyterian memory. None of the guys in our plant #65 Continental Can lunch room cared whether my intelligence was artificial or parentally induced. All these men cared about was keeping the line running.

Imagine giving Alexa or Siri a pop quiz in English. “Siri, what does the speaker mean when using the command, ‘Get a grip?’” A. Go get my suitcase. B. Change the way you are holding your violin. C. Use your batting glove. D. Get it together, dude. In today’s world, Siri might say, “I am not programmed for multiple choice” or “I don’t multi-task for free.” With the new technology, BERT, developed by Google’s Jacob Devlin, the answer would be obvious—all of the above. BERT is an acronym for Bidirectional Encoder Representations from Transformers. Whoever thought of that should get a day off, or at least a longer lunch hour. Maybe the acronym of the month award? It took me many, many years of study, plus three long years in law school to be able to command the use of such words as heretofore, nonetheless, towit, moreover, ibid, op cit and supra.

Column write, harch While I have yet to talk to our publisher Eric Marshall, I plan to after he gets settled in our new offices on Barrington and Ely, down from the Oak Harbor Post Office, where Christmas shoppers are already in line to mail Black Friday bonus items.

Kinda like Disneyland, only without having to listen to “It’s a small, small world.”

I plan to talk to Eric about being the first artificially intelligence induced columnist on Whidbey.

Shift gears I learned early on in the summer of ‘66 there was a big difference between working afternoon shift or graveyard shift.

Think of the possibilities.

Few of us summer guys got morning shifts unless our parents knew someone.

My word selection would broaden to include those I do not know because BERT knows everything.

Morning shifts were for the lifers who had 30 years or more under their belts. The morning shift also gave the company men an early start for more belts Friday afternoon at 3:30 p.m. when the whistle blew. Sometimes the early birds would give me their time card to clock them out as I was clocking in so they could hit the parking lot first. We second shifters had just as much work to do as the morning team, but most of us did not have hangovers. The graveyard shift, an ominous phrase, was not only a piece of cake, it was a slice of pizza. Guys would use the ovens to cook pizza in the early morning when our foremen were either asleep or smoking cigarettes by the rail cars in the back.

With BERT at the helm, my sentences would be shorter and easier to diagram.

In today’s world, that question may get a guy slapped. AI or A1? The studies at the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence do not include cigars, cigarettes, or Tiparillos. These folks are working with computer technology that does and will enable computers to understand and learn “the vagaries of language in general ways and then apply what they have learned to a variety of specific tasks.” Not only will Alexa and Siri be old school someday, but their replacement models will be able to automatically analyze “documents inside law firms, hospitals, banks and other businesses.”

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Whidbey Weekly LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Shall we all join hands and perform Spoon River Anthology? I wonder if those Google guys can teach BERT sarcasm with stream of alleged consciousness. We’ll see. Until then, root for your favorite athletic team to win while I go back to programming my intelligence with the help of the AI Sisters, Sucrose, Fructose, and Glucose. Have a sweet week! To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

Volume 10, Issue 48 | © MMXVIII Whidbey Weekly PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

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Like life, I will surprise you when this column shifts to artificial intelligence. In fact, neither of us may know when it happens.

Imagine when we get to the fork.

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Once I was old enough, I got Mom’s handwriting down so I was able to go on all the field trips to sell cigarettes to the kids.

Just in case, I am making colored name tags to post throughout the caboose should any of my visitors forget who they are talking to. Given the advances in technology with facial recognition, voice recognition, and the last four digits of my social, it will be great down the road.

If you are old enough, do you remember the 1960s tag line, “Should a gentleman offer a Tiparillo to a lady?”

1091 SE Hathaway St Oak Harbor

Of course, it reminds me that Mom used to write a note on a piece of paper which said, “Please sell Jimmy a pack of Salem cigarettes for his mother...thank you, Mrs. Lucile Freeman.”

Just one long gray piece of ash. At least I think they were cigarettes. Maybe they were Swisher Sweets or Robert Burns’ Tiparillos.

canned cranberries canned olives chicken broth NORTH canned yams/ WHIDBEY sweet potatoes HELP stuffing HOUSE

BERT goes places I could never go, even with a note from Mom.

I often wonder how bad my memory is getting. How will I know if I have forgotten what I cannot remember?

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We could use your help with donations of:

BERT has read all of the English dictionaries, all of Wikipedia, and all of the blogs done by other robots.

Some of our forklift operators could smoke an entire cigarette while moving pallets without ever losing their ashes.

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Then I had to unlearn many other words, like fairness, reasonableness, and justice. BERT won’t have that problem.

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NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Bits & Pieces organizations of Goosefoot. As such, each group appoints two members to the Goosefoot board of directors to contribute valuable experience on how to best direct the organization’s philanthropy to fulfill its mission on South Whidbey.

Goosefoot Community Fund Donates a Total of $263,400 in Grants to South Whidbey NonProfits in 2018 Goosefoot is pleased to have distributed a total of $263,400 this year to 22 local non-profits working on behalf of the South Whidbey community. This month, a total of $99,400 was distributed through Goosefoot’s annual Community Grant Program, through which funding proposals are accepted and considered from organizations that are in alignment with its mission to build a sense of place and community, preserve rural traditions, enhance local commerce, and help create a healthy, sustainable future for South Whidbey Island. “We can’t thank the community enough for shopping at the Goose Grocer and making our grant program possible,” says Mark Gappa, Goosefoot board president. “Our board members worked very hard evaluating each of the 32 funding proposals received via our community grant program. At each step in the evaluation process, we were impressed and humbled at the amazing amount of good work being done on behalf of our South Whidbey residents.” Goosefoot awarded $99,400 to the following 16 organizations: CADA – to create a pilot youth assistance program. Civility First – for grant writing assistance. Friends of Friends for assistance with dental costs to those struggling to meet dental expenses. Good Cheer – to develop tools to assess the health and nutritional needs of the South Whidbey community. Helping Hand – to assist South Whidbey residents with payment of heating bills. Island County Fair Association – to assist with purchase of an automated ticketing system. Island Senior Services – to support its Aging and Disability Resources programming. Mother Mentors – to assist with an increased demand for its services by building administrative capacity. Queer Pride – for a survey to measure community needs. Mobile Turkey Unit – for turkeys to provide dinners on Thanksgiving Day. Readiness to Learn – to expand its services and ability to respond to community needs at the South Whidbey Community Center. South Whidbey Commons – to provide workforce training to students in the South Whidbey School District. South Whidbey Tilth – to assist with building a new farm stand. Whidbey Homeless Coalition – to fund resources and services that will allow clients to seek jobs and housing. Whidbey Island Grown – to support efforts to market local farmers and producers. Whidbey Island Waldorf School – to fund its after-school programs for children in grades 1 to 5. In addition to its Community Grant Program, Goosefoot donated $164,000 to six other non-profit organizations earlier this year. The Organic Farm School and South Whidbey School Farm received monies from multi-year grants given before Goosefoot’s charitable giving program was formalized in early 2017. South Whidbey at Home, Whidbey Camano Land Trust, Whidbey Island Nourishes and Whidbey Watershed Stewards all receive annual funding in their capacity as supported

“In partnership with the Goose Community Grocer and its dedicated shoppers, Goosefoot is pleased to offer resources that will directly impact the lives of our community for the better,” states Sandra Whiting, Goosefoot’s executive director. “I can’t repeat often enough that Goosefoot was built on the idea that a thriving South Whidbey takes each of us working together to make it happen!” [Submitted by Marian A. Myszkowski, Director of Programs, Goosefoot Community Fund]

Whidbey Island Film Festival Announces Short Film Competition Early Bird Deadline is November 30 Whidbey Island Film Festival, a program of Whidbey Island Center for the Arts (WICA), is proud to launch its inaugural season with “Femme Fatales of Film Noir” – a two-day celebration of the bold, brash, and smart actresses that lit up movie screens in post-war America and offered generations of women an alternative model of femininity. “Femme Fatales of Film Noir,” featuring four films, panel discussions, a ShortsFest competition, and special events, runs January 12-13, 2018. Filmmakers are invited to submit Noir-inspired short films (5 mins or less) to the WIFF ShortsFest. Selected films will screen before the feature presentations and be eligible to receive jury-selected awards and prizes. Details about rules, terms, and awards/prizes are found at www.WhidbeyIslandFilmFestival.org. EARLY BIRD SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Nov. 30, 2018. Deadlines: Regular Deadline: Dec. 20, 2018 Late Deadline: Jan. 9, 2019 Notification Date: Jan. 9, 2019 [Submitted by Jason Dittmer, Whidbey Island Film Festival]

Christmas Activities at Coupeville United Methodist Church December will be filled with Christmas activities at Coupeville United Methodist Church. Saturday, Dec. 1, the United Methodist Women will hold their annual Christmas Bazaar and Lunch from 9:30am to 2:00pm. In addition to a large variety of handmade items for sale, a lunch of homemade chicken casserole, cranberry jello salad and a piece of pie will be available for purchase from 11:00am-1:00pm. Advent Sundays start Dec. 2, at the regular 11:00am worship service. Dec. 9, the church’s handbell ensemble will provide music to accompany the service. Sunday, Dec. 16, the public is invited to a special Christmas music celebration featuring the choir, entitled “Carols Old, Carols New From Madrigal to Modern.” The 30-voice sanctuary choir will be accompanied by Brian Haight on the violin, duo-pianists (Beth Haight and Cheryl Waide), and the handbell ensemble. Christmas Eve, Dec. 24, the “Come to the Manger” service at 5:00pm focuses on families with children. The popular candlelight service will start at 7:00pm, with seasonal music by the organist, choir, and familiar carols sung by the congregation. The service concludes in candlelight with the singing of “Silent Night.” All activities take place in the historic church at the corner of North Main and 6th Street. For information see the church website at www. coupevilleumc.com. [Submitted by Robin Hertlein]

Free Community Talk, “The Ancient Fruitcake: What Really, Really Old Food Tells Us About History, Culture, Love And Memory” The Oak Harbor Library and Humanities Washington invite the community to an engaging conversation with Harriet Baskas, a member of the 2018 Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau. This free event takes place Tuesday, Dec. 4 at 3:00pm at the Oak Harbor Library. This talk is not about the old leftovers in the fridge. It is about food that is so old, so unusual, or so meaningful, that no one dares throw it away. Discover the foods archeologists have found buried with mummies, the petrified banana so appealing it sparked a Banana Museum, the 350-year-old fruitcake handed down through generations, 2000-year-old bog butter; and the pickle that has been in a jar since the 1860s. During this “chew and chat,” author and broadcaster Harriet Baskas explores how and why these and other formerly fresh foods may have been forgotten, intentionally tucked away, or preserved due to unusual or peculiar circumstances. And, more importantly, we’ll talk about how these and other vintage vittles can and do hold memories, tell stories, and connect us with family, with culture, and with history. About Harriet Baskas Harriet Baskas has a Masters in Communications from the University of Washington, and has served as the general manager for three community radio stations in Oregon and Washington. She is the author of seven books, including Hidden Treasures: What Museums Can’t or Won’t Show You, and has created award-winning radio programs on topics as varied as cowgirls, unusual museums, aging boomers, and the Seattle World’s Fair for National Public Radio and regional public radio stations. Seattle based, she currently writes about airports, air travel, museums, and other topics for NBC News, CNBC, USA Today, and other outlets. Baskas lives in Seattle. [Submitted by Mary Campbell, Oak Harbor Library, Sno-Isle Libraries]

Songs for the Holiday Road Join the Whidbey Community Chorus in celebrating the advent of Christmas at its annual holiday concerts. “Songs for the Holiday Road,” under the direction of Darren McCoy, will include a wide range of religious and secular songs, including pieces from “The Grinch,” “Home Alone” and “Polar Express.” and “Betelehemu,” a Christmas carol from Africa. Oak Harbor High School’s Harbor Singers will also perform Friday. Performances are Friday, Dec. 7, at 7:00pm and Sunday, Dec. 9, at 4:00pm at the First Reformed Church, 250 SW 3rd Ave, Oak Harbor. Admission is free, but donations are very gratefully accepted. For more information call Kay at 360-678-4148 or check the chorus website at https://sites.google.com/site/whidbeycommunitychorus/home. [Submitted by Kay Foss]

Pause in Service Scheduled to ‘Refresh’ Freeland Library How does new carpeting and furniture, more space for favorite things and a comfy spot to use your laptop sound? It sounded pretty good to the Freeland Library, too. Sno-Isle Libraries will start sprucing things up next month. The downside is that means the library will be closed for 18 days starting Sunday, Dec. 16. The library is scheduled to reopen Wednesday, Jan. 2.

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED

Three Factors to Consider When Making Charitable Gifts

The holiday season is here, which means gift-giving is probably on your mind. In addition to making gifts to your family and friends, you also may be interested in contributing to charitable organizations. But before you donate financial assets, such as stocks, you will need to consider several factors, including taxes, your portfolio balance and the reputation of the charity. Let’s look at these areas:

Taxes – Your donations to qualified charities (those that are considered 501(c)(3) organizations by the Internal Revenue Service) can give you tax deductions – if you itemize deductions on your tax return. However, due to recent tax law changes, the standard deduction for 2018 has almost doubled, to $24,000 for married couples, and to $12,000 for single filers. As a result, you may be less likely to itemize deductions, so you could have less incentive, at least for tax reasons, to make charitable gifts. However, if you give appreciated stocks, you may be allowed a charitable deduction for the full fair market value of the gift on the date of the transfer, even if your original cost was only a fraction of today’s value. Plus, you may not be subject to the capital gains tax you might have to pay if you eventually sold the stocks. Also, depending on your age, you might be able to use your traditional IRA as a charitable-funding vehicle. Once you turn 70-1/2, you generally must begin taking withdrawals – called required minimum distributions or RMDs – from your traditional IRA. (Roth IRAs are not subject to RMDs during your lifetime.) These RMDs from your traditional IRA are taxable, but you may be able to exclude up to $100,000 of RMDs per year from your taxable income if you transfer the funds directly to qualified charitable organizations. In any case, consult with your tax advisor before donating appreciated assets to a charity.

Portfolio balance – When you donate financial assets to a charity, you are also taking them away from your portfolio. This could be an issue, especially if you repeatedly donate the same types of assets. For example, if you’re donating some growth-oriented stocks, will you lower the overall growth potential of your portfolio? You may want to consult with a financial professional to ensure your charitable gifts will still allow you to maintain a portfolio balance appropriate for your goals and risk tolerance.

Reputation of the charity – You may want to do some homework to make sure you are giving to a reputable charity. Many experts on charitable giving say that a worthwhile charity should spend at least 75 percent of its income on programs, rather than administrative costs. You may be able to find this type of information on a charitable group’s annual report and its website. You can also browse the web for the names of agencies that evaluate charitable groups.

By considering the aspects of charitable giving described above, you can get more satisfaction from your generosity – because you’ll know that your gift not only supports a good cause, but also fits well into your overall financial picture.

Edward Jones, its employees and financial advisors cannot provide tax or legal advice. You should consult your attorney or qualified tax advisor regarding your situation. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Jeffery C. Pleet, CLU®, ChFC®

Financial Advisor 630 SE Midway Blvd. Oak Harbor, WA 98277 (360) 679-2558 jeffery.pleet@edwardjones.com

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

“We’re calling it a ‘refresh’ and are very excited, but we need to be closed during the work,” Library Manager Betsy Arand said. The project will include new carpeting, furniture, added space for popular collections and a “laptop bar” much like those found in some coffee shops.

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www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED Not strictly part of the refresh, but also new for the library will be a new projection system for the meeting room. The separate non-profit Friends of the Freeland Library group is funding the new equipment. During the closure, requested library materials will be available for pickup at the Langley Library. Customers may also choose any other community library as the pickup location when requesting materials. For item returns, the outside return slots at the Freeland Library will be open while the library is closed. Items may also be returned to any other Sno-Isle Libraries community library. Library service is available at nearby libraries: Langley Library, 104 Second St., Langley Clinton Library, 4781 Deer Lake Road, Clinton Coupeville Library, 788 NW Alexander, Coupeville Oak Harbor Library, 1000 SE Regatta Drive, Oak Harbor All Sno-Isle Libraries locations [Submitted by Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, Sno-Isle Libraries]

tion), whether in college, conservatory or through private training. These funds may be used for such things as private lessons, music scores, instrument maintenance, masterclasses or summer workshops, paying professional accompanists for support in auditions/recordings, etc. Eligibility Requirements–Applicants for this grant must: Be a high school junior or senior in high school, or a college freshman or sophomore Demonstrate significant musical accomplishment and commitment Be able to provide evidence of musical contribution to the Whidbey community Be able to prove music degree work in process -OR- alternative training/experience (for those still in high school) Live on Whidbey Island or—if in college— have lived on Whidbey for at least two years prior to application deadline and maintain Whidbey connection (i.e. family still lives on Whidbey while applicant attends school elsewhere) Demonstrate financial need

Soroptimist International of South Whidbey Seeking Grant Applicants

$500 will be given to the award recipient.

The Soroptimist International of South Whidbey Island is now accepting applications for grants to fund local community non-profit organizations. Please submit your request in writing by Nov. 30, 2018. Submit requests to: SISWI, Attention: Grants and Awards, PO Box 633, Freeland, WA 98249.

For more information or to apply, visit https://www.islandconsort.org/young-musicians-award

[Submitted by Marlane Harrington, Soroptimist International of South Whidbey]

[Submitted by Sheila Weidendorf, Director, Island Consort]

Young Musicians Award 2019

South Whidbey Garden Club Grants 2018

Application Deadline: Jan. 15, 2019 Award Announced: Feb. 1 , 2019

Island Consort is accepting applications for the 2019 Young Musicians Award. This award is intended to encourage promising young musicians—Instrumental, vocal, choral composition—in the pursuit of classical music performance studies and experience beyond high school (including classical music educa-

Island Consort is an umbrella program of Whidbey Island Arts Council, a 501C3, not-forprofit organization.

Every year the South Whidbey Garden Club is excited to use the proceeds from its annual May plant sale to give back to the community through a grant process. Over the past several years, theSWGC has awarded over $20,000 in grants and is currently accepting applications

NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018

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from non-profit or educational organizations for projects that will enhance the South Whidbey Island community. The club is seeking grant applications from organizations interested in pursuing funding for projects that foster or demonstrate the following outcomes: Environmental stewardship Horticultural education Community beautification The South Whidbey Garden Club requires the grant be given to nonprofit or educational organizations. Funds should be earmarked for the purchase of supplies or to provide educational services. No more than 10-percent of the amount awarded can be used for administrative costs. Funds from this grant can be used as matching funds for larger funding proposals. The grants awarded are in the range of $500. Proposals must be submitted by Friday, Feb. 1, 2019. For application or more information, please contact: Nancy Rowan at 360-821-9319 or SWGCAwards@gmail.com. [Submitted by Jeanne Beals, South Whidbey Garden Club]

Local Business News Whidbey Wonders Now Open in Clinton Whidbey Wonders opened its doors last week, bringing together more than 50 local producers and makers from Whidbey Island. The store features local foods, glassblowers, woodworkers, artists, jewelry, clothing, fiber goods, pottery and more. Whidbey Wonders wants to champion our island economy, and partner with farmers, ranchers, artists, and producers to deliver the best Whidbey has to offer. The following are just a few of the many local makers who are featured at Whidbey Wonders:

Knead Bread - locally made baked goods North Star Trading - leather goods Bart’s Better Foods - plant based foods Wellborn Farms - locally raised pork West Beach Soap - artisan soap Wood Bee Jewelry - unique one-of-a-kind items Hoffelt & Hooper - beginner embroidery kits

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The store is located at Ken’s Korner next to Island Drug in Clinton. Holiday hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 10:00am to 6:00pm. For more information, call 360-632-6995, email whidbeywonders@gmail.com or visit whidbeywonders.com

12 Days of Whidbey is Back December 1-12 is a special time of year on Whidbey Island. Island Senior Resources is holding its second annual 12 Days of Whidbey raffle, which supports essential programs for seniors, adults with disabilities, and those who care for them. Tickets are available for purchase at Island Senior Resources (Bayview), at Senior Thrift, and at Oak Harbor Senior Center (Mon., Wed., and Fri. at lunchtime). Other purchase locations will be announced at www.senior-resources.org and on Facebook at facebook. com/islandseniors. Tickets are $5 each and each ticket enters the purchaser into all 12 drawings for fabulous prize baskets worth $250 - $1,000 each. The basket for each day has a different theme: Wine and Chocolate Covered Island, Cook It Up in the Kitchen, Golf on the North End, Family Night in Oak Harbor, Family Fun on the South-End, Caffeinated Whidbey, Reader’s Treasure, Spirits of Whidbey, Beautify for Winter, Garden Dreaming, Holiday Cheer, and That’s Italian. A full list of prizes is available at www.12daysofwhidbey.com For more information call Skye Dunn at 360-331-5720.

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NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

What’s Going On All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Pasajera, an evening of Flamenco

Live Music: Mussel Flats

Wildcat Holiday Bazaar

Friday, November 30, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville

Saturday, December 1, 10:00am-4:00pm Oak Harbor High School, #1 Wildcat Way

Mussel Flats is a classic rock/blues band living and playing music on Whidbey Island. No cover. For more information, call 360-6825747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

An Oak Harbor Athletic Department Fundraiser. For more information, email jwichers@ ohsd.net or call 360-279-5850.

Teddy Bear & Character Breakfast

Saturday, December 1, 11:00am-2:00pm St. Peters Church, 6309 S Wilson Pl, Clinton

Thursday, November 29, 8:00pm Bayview Community Hall, Langley

Saturday, December 1, 9:00am & 10:30am Oak Harbor Elks Lodge, 155 NE Ernst St.

Seattle-based Flamenco dancer Savannah Fuentes brings her latest show, Pasajera, an evening of Flamenco, to the Bayview Community Hall, 5642 Bayview Road. Savannah will be joined by two exceptional Spanish Flamenco artists; acclaimed Spanish-Romani guitarist Pedro Cortes and singer/percussionist/dancer Jose Moreno. Tickets: general admission $22, VIP seating $34, child $8, student $15 available at www.brownpapertickets.com

Two seating times available. Tickets can be purchased at Alaska USA Mortgage Company, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, or online at bbbsisland county.org. $5 for 10 years and younger. $15 for 11 years and older. Bring a new stuffed animal to donate to a child in a crisis situation.

Country Christmas at the Fair Friday, November 30, 12:00pm-7:00pm Saturday, December 1, 10:00am-3:00pm Sunday, December 2, 10:00am-3:00pm Island County Fairgrounds, Langley Come shop for unique, handcrafted gifts, collectibles and art from local vendors. Enjoy some refreshments, holiday music and kids’ crafts. Located in the Coffman Building at 819 Camano Ave. For more information, call 360-221-4677.

Island Herb Vendor Day Friday, November 30, 2:00pm-5:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Rogue Raven will be on site with product displays and information. Must be 21 or older. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call 360-331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb. com. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Keep out of the reach of children.

9th Annual Talent Show & Dessert Auction

Christmas for Kids Saturday, December 1, 9:00am-3:30pm Concordia Lutheran Church, Oak Harbor Children ages 3-10 are invited to make projects, sing songs, play games, celebrate Christmas, make and eat snacks. Pre-registration is required by Nov. 28. Children attending must be at least 3 years old and potty trained. For more information and to register visit concordiaoakharbor.org.

Christmas Bazaar and Lunch Saturday, December 1, 9:30am-2:00pm Coupeville United Methodist Church Homemade items include crafts, wreaths, and baked goods. Hot lunch featuring a piece of pie will be available for purchase from 11:00am to 1:00pm. The church is located at 608 N Main St. For more information, call 360-67-4256 or visit www.coupevilleumc.com

Bayview Farmers Holiday Market Saturdays, December 1, 8, 15, 22, 10:00am-2:00pm Bayview Hall, Langley Featuring fresh food, holiday greens, gifts, art, and baked goods.

Jingle Trail 5k Run/Walk

Free Family Christmas Craft Event

Come make your own ornaments and craft items for the holidays. For more information, call 360-321-0307.

Holly Jolly Parade Saturday, December 1, 1:00pm Downtown Langley Cheer on as elves, floats, marching bands, bagpipers, and Santa parade by on First and Second Streets of downtown Langley. All are welcome to participate. Go to www.visitlangley.com/parade to sign up.

Christmas Carol Sing Along Saturday, December 1, 2:00pm Little Brown Church, Clinton Come help sing in the Christmas season with many traditional carols. Hosted by George & Lila Mills. The church is located at 7041 Maxwelton Rd. For more information, call 360-579-2007 or email gwmills@comcast.net

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED Unique Open Studio Tour Thursday, December 6, 10:00am-6:00pm Friday, December 7, 10:00am-6:00pm Saturday, December 8, 10:00am-6:00pm Basket Works NW by Reggie, Oak Harbor Come meet local artists at work. Basket Works NW by Reggie is located at 2459 Cahill Place. For more information, call 206-310-8142, email bwnwbreggie@comcast.net or visit reggiebasket.blogspot.com

8th Annual Coupeville Holiday Gift Market Friday, December 7, 10:00am-5:00pm Saturday, December 8, 10:00am-5:00pm Sunday, December 9, 10:00am-4:00pm Coupeville Rec. Hall, 901 NW Alexander St. Featuring the work of 16 Whidbey Artisans. Shop for unique gifts: textiles, pottery, jewelry, photographs, glass, paper, rock art, wood, tile, baskets, seasonal greenery and more. Cider & cookies provided. For more information, email sweetbriartile@gmail.com

Star Party Friday, December 7, 6:30pm Fort Nugent Park, Oak Harbor Explore the night sky and view distant galaxies, planets and nebulas at this free public Star Party hosted by the Island County Astronomical Society (ICAS). No telescope is needed and people of all ages are welcome to attend. Be sure and dress warmly and note that the event will be canceled if the weather is cloudy. For more information, contact Bob Scott at ICAS_ President@outlook.com or visit www.icas-wa. org.

Songs for the Holiday Road Friday, December 7, 7:00pm Sunday, December 9, 4:00pm First Reformed Church, Oak Harbor

Parade Route: Parade starts at 1st and North Main and continues down N. Main to Front Street onto NW Alexander across Coveland to NE Alexander. Be sure to welcome Santa to town, and the many decorated community floats with holiday lights, walkers, and more.

Presented by Whidbey Community Chorus. “Songs for the Holiday Road,” under the direction of Darren McCoy, will include a wide range of religious and secular songs, including pieces from “The Grinch,” “Home Alone” and “Polar Express” and “Betelehemu,” a Christmas carol from Africa. Oak Harbor High School’s Harbor Singers will also perform on Friday. Admission free, but donations gratefully accepted.The church is located at 250 SW 3rd Ave.

Home for the Holidays

Live Music: The 3 of Us

The Greening of Coupeville Christmas Parade Saturday, December 1, 4.00pm Downtown Coupeville

Saturday, December 1, 4:00pm-7:00pm Pioneer Way, Oak Harbor

Friday, December 7, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville

Vote for your favorite toy soldier, visit the holiday market, enjoy tasty treats, strolling carolers and musicians, Santa on a fire truck around 5:00pm, and a tree lighting to follow.

Great Jazz, Latin Jazz, and other favorites live on stage with The 3 of Us (Doug, Fabi & Roz). No cover. For more information, call 360-6825747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Friday, November 30, 6:30pm Oak Harbor Christian School Gym

Saturday, December 1, 10:00am Camp Casey, Coupeville

North Whidbey Christian High School presents its 9th annual Talent Show & Dessert Auction, featuring the drama class’ presentations of “Sherlock Holmes and the Christmas Goose Chase” and “The Ant and the Elephant.” Join the staff and students of NWCHS for an unforgettable evening of fun for the whole family. Bid on delicious desserts and enjoy uplifting and hilarious entertainment while supporting the school. Pre-sale tickets are $7 per person or $20 per family. Tickets at the door are $9 per person or $25 per family. Call 425-8762246 for information and questions.

Run, walk or stroll the five-kilometer route through the unique and scenic trails of Camp Casey and Fort Casey State Park. Sweeping ocean vistas, evergreen and salal canopies, crisp winter air, and very likely an eagle or deer sighting. At the end of your adventure, enjoy some light refreshments. All ages are welcome to participate and costumes are encouraged. On site registration begins at 9:00am. Entry forms available at www.jingletrailrun.com

Holidays in the Vineyard

Holiday Lights & Photography Tour

Saturday, December 1, 5:30pm Dancing Fish Vineyards, Freeland

Saturday, December 8

Holiday Faire

Live Music: Tom Mullin


Saturday, December 1, 10:00am-1:00pm Whidbey Island Waldorf School, Clinton Free Admission

Saturday, December 1, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville

“Treaty Talks: A Journey up the Columbia for People and Salmon” Friday, November 30, 6:30pm UUCWI, 20103 SR 525, Freeland In 2013, an epic 1,200 mile journey from Astoria, Ore. to the headwaters of the Columbia river in Canada was undertaken in five canoes carved by Native American students. The canoes represent the five species of salmon that had returned annually to the upper Columbia, but no longer do because of the Grand Coulee Dam. Like dams elsewhere, this impoverished the many tribes along the river. Many sacred sites were flooded. This is the story of salmon, culture, treaty rights and ecosystems. Following the film there will be a presentation on the plight of the southern resident orca and the campaign to remove the Snake River Dams. This event honors salmon, orca and is in recognition of November as Native American Awareness Month. There is no charge. Donations appreciated. Sponsored by UUCWI Social Environmental Justice Committee.

Join Whidbey Island Waldorf School for a fun-filled family day that includes children’s craft-making, a holiday craft shoppe, Pocket Wizard, Puppet Play, music, a holiday café, and more! Holiday fun for the whole family. Cash and checks accepted. WIWS is located at 6335 Old Pietila Road.

Shop Clinton Events Saturday, December 1, see times below Sunday, December 2, see times below Various Locations, Clinton Saturday events include the Clinton Winter Market and Makers Tour from 10:00am-4:00pm, the Waldorf Holiday Faire from 10:00am-1:00pm, Santa photos from 11:00am-2:00pm, Christmas tree lighting from 6:00pm-7:30pm. Sunday events include the Clinton Winter Market and Makers Tour from 10:00am-4:00pm, Santa photos from 11:00am-2:00pm. For more information, visit discoverclintonwa.com or call 360-341-3929.

You are invited to a fun filled evening with heavy hors d’oeuvres, sweet treats, and wine to benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of Island County and Soroptimist International of South Whidbey. Tickets $100 per person. Call 360-279-0644 or visit www.bbbsislandcounty. org

Playing acoustic favorites of the Woodstock generation. No cover. For more information, call 360-682-5747 or visit www.penncove brewing.com

11th Annual Elf Chase Sunday, December 2, 10:00am South Whidbey Community Park, Langley A 5K fun walk/run presented by Saratoga Dental & Orthodontics and South Whidbey PTSA. Chase an elf and get a prize! Costumes are encouraged. Hot chocolate and snacks available. Register online at https://swhsptsa. weebly.com or day of event at 9:00am.

Festival of Lessons and Carols Sunday, December 2, 7:00pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley The public is invited to join a meditative service of readings, hymns, and anthems proclaiming the coming of Christ. This is a free program. Donations of nonperishable food items for the Good Cheer Food Bank are appreciated. The church is located at 804 Third St.

Photograph historic downtown Coupeville and Langley in their holiday splendor. Capture the spirit of the season with tips from photographer Holly Davison. Warm up with lunch at a waterfront café. Island Transit will take you there. To get additional details and RSVP call 360-678-9536 or email travel@islandtransit.org

Holiday Bazaar Saturday, December 8, 9:00am-2:00pm Oak Harbor Senior Center, 51 SE Jerome St. Holiday gifts, multiple vendors, and bake sale.

Shutdown Open House Saturday, December 8, 3:00pm-5:00pm Captain Whidbey Inn, Coupeville Live music, happy hour + presentation of plans and renovations for the next 111 years. The Captain Whidbey Inn will be closing down for 3 months starting January 1. In the spirit of sharing some of the future plans for Captain Whidbey, the public is invited to a Shutdown Open House. For more information, call 360-678-4097, email events@captainwhidbey. com or visit captainwhidbey.com

Open Skate Fridays Every Friday, 6:00pm-8:00pm Roller Barn, 98 NE Barron Dr, Oak Harbor Proceeds support Boys & Girls Club. $5 per skater and $3 for general admission. Last Friday of the month, skate with the Whidbey Island Roller Girls! Sorry, checks not accepted, credit card fees apply. For more information, call (360) 240-9273. WHAT'S GOING ON

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NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018

Holiday double header features a little naughty, a lotta nice WICA shows open Friday By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly Photo Courtesy of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Island County Polly and Piper are a just one of many successful matches through Big Brothers Big Sisters of Island County. The two will share their story Saturday evening at Holidays in the Vineyard at Dancing Fish Vineyards in Freeland, a fundraising event that will benefit BBBSIC and Soroptimist International of South Whidbey.

Make a big difference in a little’s life Holiday events support Big Brothers Big Sisters of Island County By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly It takes surprising little to make a big difference and this is the perfect time of year to think about giving one of the greatest commodities there is – your time. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Island County is offering a few ways for you to contribute time and/or money this holiday season. The 20th annual Teddy Bear and Character Breakfast will be held Saturday at the Oak Harbor Elks Lodge, part of the annual Festival of Trees Fundraiser for the organization. Two different seatings are being offered at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Venture a bit further south Saturday for Holidays in the Vineyard, which will be held at 5:30 p.m. at Dancing Fish Vineyards in Freeland. The evening benefits both Big Brothers Big Sisters as well as Soroptimist International of South Whidbey. These events are the organization’s main fundraisers for the year, and proceeds go directly to support Big Brothers Big Sisters of Island County and its mission to provide one-to-one relationships to children facing adversity. “All funding goes toward making sure we are matching effectively, supporting those matches, and supporting the children’s needs,” said Jennifer Paddock, executive director of BBBSIC. “The money goes directly to funding our matches between Bigs and Littles. Our children and adults are professionally matched, we do extensive background checks and look at literally hundreds of different areas to match our Bigs and Littles up together, based on what the child’s needs are.”

Have you been naughty or nice? That’s the question Santa asks every year, and now Whidbey Island Center for the Arts is giving audiences a similar choice, as it offers two very different holiday productions, both of which open Friday at the Langley theater. First up is the very nice, family-friendly, delightfully funny “Owen Meany’s Christmas Pageant,” an adaptation of the John Irving novel, “A Prayer for Owen Meany,” by the Seattle Book-It Repertory Theatre. Then there is the decidedly naughty, wickedly amusing David Sedaris satire, “The Santaland Diaries.” Performances of “Owen Meany’s Christmas Pageant” will run Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. through Dec. 15. “The Santaland Diaries,” an adults-only show, will be performed at 9:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, also through Dec. 15. “‘Owen Meany’s Christmas Pageant’ is a hilarious and slightly irreverent comedy about two 11-year-old boys who discover the meaning of friendship in a 1953 Christmas pageant,” described Phil Jordan, who is directing both productions. “‘The Santaland Diaries’ is David Sedaris’ reminiscences about his time as an elf in Macy’s Santaland. Told as only David Sedaris can, the play provides nonstop laughs while it lampoons the ‘business’ of Christmas.”

See HOLIDAYS continued on page 15

With enough sweet and tangy parts tossed together, WICA seems to have generated a recipe for a double batch of holiday cheer.

“We’ve wanted to do ‘The Santaland Diaries’ for many years but needed a shorter piece on the main stage to make it work,” said WICA Artistic Director Deana Duncan about the choice to do two very different holiday shows.

“I think a lot of contemporary films and stage productions have changed what an audience expects of a Christmas show,” Sievers said. “From ‘The Best Christmas Pageant Ever’ to adaptations like ‘Scrooged’ or ‘A Christmas Story,’ I think people are looking to laugh more than they look for solemnity in a holiday show.”

“We started calling this the Naughty or Nice ticket, depending on what show you went to, and decided to give it a shot,” she continued. “The naughty ticket with ‘The Santaland Diaries’ is only $5, the bar will be open and it’s going to be a lot of fun. The nice ticket is ‘Owen Meany’ and is the perfect holiday show for the whole family.”

“Both these plays are wildly original - that is both a challenge and opportunity for theater artists,” said Jordan. “Both shows are chockfull of laughs, so audiences will definitely enjoy that. ‘Owen Meany’ is a touching look at friendship and loyalty as well as a comedic gem. ‘Santaland Diaries’ is edgier and laugh-out-loud funny.”

“They just seemed to fit together,” agreed Jordan. “‘Owen Meany’ is relatively short for a main course, running at one hour and 15 minutes, leaving enough time to have a David Sedaris dessert!” While neither of these productions could be called traditional Christmas stories, they do ring true to life, said cast members. “‘Owen Meany’s Christmas Pageant’ is great because it manages to take a traditional concept, the nativity play, and give it this fresh setting within an American classic,” said Bridget Sievers, who is in the ensemble and plays the role of Harold Crosby. “There’s a real chaos to the plot that resonates with ideas of the holidays and childhood that sort of require a certain ‘outside the box’ approach, and we’re better for it.” “Most of us have figured out long ago that the Norman Rockwell, Currier and Ives, Opie, Andy and Aunt Bea holiday portrayals aren’t all that realistic,” said Teresa McElhinny, part of the ensemble cast. “Life is messy and stuff happens every day, so why shouldn’t it be the same during the holidays? So although there are certainly a few warm fuzzies in ‘Owen Meany’s Christmas Pageant,’ it is mostly a bizarre and unusual deviation from the traditional holiday fare typically seen this time of year.”

Those interested can choose to see one or both of these productions. Tickets to see “Owen Meany’s Christmas Pageant” on the main stage are $22 for adults, $18 for senior citizens and military and $15 for youth or matinee performances. Shows are at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets to “The Santaland Diaries,” which stars David Gignac and takes place at 9:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday in Zech Hall, are $5 for all seats. Go to www.wicaonline.org to purchase. Both shows run through Dec. 15. “I have always loved that Christmas time challenges us to be good friends and family members amidst the more commercial aspects of the holidays,” Jordan said. “As a kid I listened to Stan Freburg’s ‘Green Christmas,’ which deals with the commercialization of Christmas just as David Sedaris does in his play. In many ways, bringing this play to South Whidbey audiences is a return to my childhood and my love for comedians like Freburg and Sedaris. “And I can’t forget to thank Seattle’s Book-it Repertory Theatre,” he continued. “Their artistic directors adapted ‘Owen Meany’s Christmas Pageant’ from the John Irving novel, and one of them, Myra Platt, is our music director and has been incredibly supportive. It has been great to collaborate with such a wonderful theater company like Book-it.” “This isn’t like anything we’ve done before, literally bringing the words off the page to the stage in a theatrical way,” said Duncan of the collaboration with Book-It. “This cast and crew have worked so hard to create this special holiday double header,” she continued. “‘Owen Meany’ really is the perfect family conversation play with themes around family, the holiday, growing up and the beauty of friendship. ‘Santaland’ would be a great group night – grab your friends or co-workers, grab a drink at the WICA bar and enjoy the comedy.”

Once matched, BBBSIC continues to provide support to these matches. “Every month our match support coordinators contact the Bigs, the Littles and their parents to make sure we are meeting our developmental goals and the plan for each child to ensure we are bringing them along

Zachary Schneider Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Island Center for the Arts Molly “Mouse” Quade plays the title role in “Owen Meany’s Christmas Pageant,” opening Friday at Whidbey Island Center for the Arts in Langley. Also opening Friday is the one-man show “The Santaland Diaries.” Both shows will run through Dec. 15.

Zachary Schneider Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Island Center for the Arts The slightly irreverent “Owen Meany’s Christmas Pageant” is one of two holiday shows opening Friday at Whidbey Island Center for the Arts in Langley. Performances will continue through Dec. 15.

“I think it is good to see theater which goes outside the box from time to time,” said McElhinny. “I believe the audience will come away with some ideas for stimulating conversation over their holiday dinners.” But perhaps Jordan offers the best incentive to check out these productions: “If you hate to laugh, don’t come.”  

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NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

WHAT’S GOING ON

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Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free Used Book Sale Saturday, December 1, 10:00am-2:00pm Freeland Library Large selection of great books for all ages at bargain prices. Proceeds support Friends of the Freeland Library. The Northwest Twelve Days of Christmas Saturday, December 1, 1:00pm Coupeville Library Come listen to a refreshing recreation of the classic Twelve Days of Christmas carol with a Northwestern vibe by local children’s book author Gina Marie Mammano! Book sales and signing to follow. Holiday Card-Making Northwest Style with Kristi O’Donnell Saturday, December 1, 1:30pm-3:00pm Coupeville Library Have a holly jolly time making Northwest wintery holiday themed cards, painting the scene with paper and embellishing your creation with natural materials. Space is limited to first 45 participants Whidbey Island Earthquakes: What to Expect, How to Prepare Monday, December 3, 2:00pm-3:30pm Freeland Library Find out about local earthquakes in this popular documentary produced by Whidbey Island’s

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4-HD Video Editing Club for the local American Red Cross. Everyone is welcome. Followed by a question and answer session with Robert Elphick and the American Red Cross. Dewey Decimal Cupcake Challenge Tuesday, December 4, 4:00pm-5:30pm Coupeville Library Learn about the Dewey Decimal system while making tasty cupcake creations! Space is limited and preregistration is required! For students in all grades, but kids in grades K-3 with a caregiver. Demystifying Hospice Wednesday, December 5, 2:00pm-4:00pm Freeland Library Learn about hospice care and receive information to help assist you in making sound end-of-life care decisions. Presented by Karen J. Clayton, author of “Demystifying Hospice.” We all need information about end-of-life issues. It is likely most people will eventually become a caregiver to someone: a child, parent, spouse, sibling, or friend. Learn about hospice care and information to help assist you in making sound end-of-life care decisions. An Afternoon of Poetry with Claudia Castro Luna, Washington’s Poet Laureate Wednesday, December 5, 3:00pm-4:00pm Oak Harbor Library Meeting Room ​ ashington State Poet Laureate Claudia W Castro Luna is building awareness and appreciation of poetry through public readings, workshops, and presentations throughout the state. Having fled war-torn El Salvador for the United

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States at the age of 14 with her family, she went on to earn an MFA in poetry and an MA in urban planning. After working as a K-12 teacher, she became Seattle’s first Civic Poet, a position appointed by the mayor.

preregister. Any unfilled spaces will be first come, first served on the day of the program.

Building & Decorating Gingerbread Houses Saturday, December 8, 2:00pm-3:30pm Clinton Community Hall, 6411 S Central Ave.

Drop by and enjoy refreshments and making holiday cards and seasonal music with guitarist Quinn Fitzpatrick. Join in the holiday spirit!

We’ll supply the graham cracker house components, royal icing galore for assembling and decorating, and enough candy to make Willy Wonka jump for joy. Limited space. Please preregister. (One registration for each gingerbread house built). Please feel free to bring decorating items to share: pretzels, cereals, candy, cookies-vanilla wafer, etc. While Supplies Last Crafternoon Saturday, December 8, 2:00pm-4:00pm Freeland Library It is time to clean out our crafting closet. We have leftover supplies from Made by Hand and other craft programs. Come and make a project for yourself or to give away. First come, first create. Minecraft Tuesday, December 11, 3:30pm-5:00pm Freeland Library Play Minecraft with your fellow tweens and work together or on your own to build the greatest Minecraft structure! Space is limited to first 10 participants. For grades 4-12. Please

Clinton Library Holiday Open House Saturday, December 15, 1:00pm-3:00pm Clinton Library

The Musicians of Bremen Presented by Last Leaf Productions Thursday, December 27, 11:00am Coupeville Library Based on the old German folktale, this musicfilled program reminds us that no matter how young or old we are, we can always find joy and companionship through common passions like music. Build with Duplo & Lego Friday, December 28, 1:00pm-4:00pm Clinton Library Come build your own creations with Duplo and LEGO. Work together or independently. Drop in and stay for ten minutes or an hour.

Religious Services South Whidbey Community Church Sundays, 9:00am-9:45am Adult Bible Study 10:00am-11:00amWorship Deer Lagoon Grange, 5142 Bayview Rd, Langley Sunday, Dec. 2: Pastor Darrell Wenzek, “We Need a Messiah” WHAT'S GOING ON

Looking for unique, beautiful gifts?

Callahan’s Firehouse Studio is the place to go. • Unique Gifts of hand-crafted glass • 50% OFF Christmas balls & more!* • Blow-Your-Own Glass Experience • Gift Certificates Select beautiful, locally blown decorative glass Or give the experience of a lifetime – blow your own glass! *Expires 1/1/19

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Open 9-5 daily 179 Second St Langley 360-221-1242

www.callahansfirehouse.com

Are you looking for a unique way to honor a special pet, friend or loved one this holiday season?

Give a Gift

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See Us For Your Christmas Party Decor!

of Ught.

This holiday season, a tree at WAIF's Coupeville Shelter will be covered in lights in honor of companion animals and those who love them. With a $25 donation, you can sponsor a light in memory or honor of a special person or pet in your life. Your Gift of Light will help fund vital programs and help us light the way to forever homes for Whidbey Island's homeless companion animals.

A great way to honor the animal lovers in your life!

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Sweet Home for the Holidays Handmade chocolates, peppermint bark and gifts. 221 2nd Street Ste 16 • Langley 360-221-2728

SANTA HATS BALLOONS CUPS • PLATES NAPKINS TABLECLOTHS CAKE PANS GIFT BAGS • TISSUE CARDS • STREAMERS CONFETTI & MUCH MORE! 10% Off Christmas Party Supplies Through December 31 270 SE Cabot Dr #2 Oak Harbor

Please send your gift to:

360-544-3068

Gift of liaht c/o WAIF PO Box f108 Coupevile, WA 98239 or donate onlne at www.waifmlanals.org/GOL

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Holly Farm • Family Fun • Gift Shop

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: Payment details: 0 Check or money order (payable ta WAIF) 0 Visa O MC O Amex O Discover

November 10 thru December 24

FREE Draft Horse Rides & Carolers Saturday & Sunday ONLY

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Fresh-Cut Christmas Trees (2-15 ft) Credit Card Number: _____________ Exp. Date ____ Noble, Fraser, Silver & Grand Fir ; CW #: ___Signature __________________ . Fresh Holly Wreaths • Bulk Holly • Centerpieces • Swags Your Name ______________________

Soaps & Sachets • Herbs • Home & Holiday Décor • Local Products

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360-240-1216 or 360-298-0443 www.aknotinthyme.com • aknotinthyme@frontier.com

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Island Angler

NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018

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Be Prepared for Winter Fishing Be ready for the winter fishing season. We have everything you need in store lifejackets, fire extinguishers, waders, nets, tackle, licenses, Discover Passes, and more!

By Tracy Loescher

THE CHUM SALMON Chum salmon may not sound that appealing when you first say their name but these unappreciated fish, if caught at the right time and the right places, can be very delicate and tasty as table fare. But an alder-smoked batch of chum caught during their first few days in the river could be the best way to enjoy eating these powerful fish. The word chum means “spotted” or “marked;” other common names for chums are Keta and Dog salmon. Chum salmon sold in the market will be displayed as “Silverbrite.” Chum return to our local rivers in late November through January; because of this time frame, we do not get much of a chance to hook into them in the saltwater. In years past, Marine Area 7 was open year round for salmon and Area 8-1 and 8-2 winter salmon season opened in the month of November - this gave us a chance to catch them when they would be at their best from saltwater to table. Since 1995, when I began fishing for salmon in the Puget Sound, I’ve only caught two chum salmon in saltwater. Most of the chum I have hooked and landed have come from rivers. As adults, chum feed on forage fish such as Herring and other small schooling fishes; for this reason, they can be caught with typical salmon lures and baits while still in the salt. Once these fish enter the rivers, they will attack spinners, cured salmon eggs fished under a float, and twitching jigs. Chinook salmon grow to be the largest of the salmon species, with chums coming in second. The largest chum on record was caught in British Columbia and weighed in at 42 pounds. When you hook into a chum salmon in the river, the first thing you will notice is how strong and tenacious they are. They will pull hard and stay down in the deep water and at the same time sprint towards any swift current that is nearby. With their incredible power, if you are unable to slow or stop them from reaching the river’s fast current, you are at their mercy; they will not stop running and they will probably spool you. The rivers are where they get their “chum” namesake - they quickly lose

Zachary Loescher with a beautiful Skagit River Chum Salmon, caught and released

150 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor • 360-679-3533

Check out our new & improved website! A chrome bright Coho caught and released from the Bogachiel River

their shiny chrome appearance and transform into their fitting chum or Dog Salmon colors. Beautiful purple and black vertical stripes start to appear down the sides of their large, bulky body. Their large, handsome heads lengthen and their upper and lower jaws push forward slightly and at the end, large canine teeth protrude upward and outward. The male chum use these canine-like teeth to intimidate and discourage egg thieves, and also to rub and stimulate the female salmon to release her eggs. If you want to target chums in the rivers for their fighting ability and catch a couple to smoke for Christmas, you need to get after them early. Chum fry only spend approximately 60 days in the river system after they hatch from the Redd and then they swim for the ocean. Because of this short freshwater time span as juveniles, they do not survive long as adults once they leave the saltwater and re-enter the rivers. They quickly spawn and expire, leaving their rich nutrients in the river. Other salmon species like Chinook and Coho juveniles spend up to 18 months in the rivers before heading out to sea; this long time period in freshwater is part of the reason they stay brighter longer once they return. Chum salmon do not get the same praise as good eating salmon mainly because the fillets do not have quite as much natural rich fat and oils as other salmon, plus the flesh does not always have the bright pink to red coloring we have all come to expect. Chum fresh from the saltwater or caught early in the river will have firm flesh with a steaklike texture; they pan sear nicely. If you decide to hot-smoke a chum, their flesh really soaks up the flavors of your favorite brine very well. My family has told me my smoked chum is like eating smoked chicken. Bottom line, don’t let the name “chum” keep you from fishing for these incredibily powerful fish or trying these wonderful fish for dinner. If you are not fishing this winter, take this time to clean and lightly oil your reels and check the eyes on your fishing rods for corrosion. Rinse the spooled line with fresh water thoroughly, or remove it so corrosion cannot begin. Prepare for cold weather conditions if you are out fishing this time of year. Stay warm and safe out there and GOOD LUCK FISHING!  

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OHHS Athletic Fundraiser

Wildcat Holiday Winter Bazaar

Christmas Bazaar Saturday, December 1 9:30am-2:00pm

Saturday, December 1st 10-4 pm Oak Harbor High School Fieldhouse

Hand-made items include crafts, wreaths, and baked goods. Hot lunch featuring home-made pie will be served from 11:00am-1:00pm

Coupeville United Methodist Church

www.coupevilleumc.com 608 N Main Street, Coupeville Coupeville For more information call 360-678-4256

#1 Wildcat Way, Oak Harbor, WA 98277

Country Christmas at the Fair Stocking Stuffers! Home Décor! Gifts Galore!

Country Christmas’ boutique will be filled with unique gift ideas for everyone! Come and enjoy some refreshments, holiday music and kids crafts! Free admission.

Weekend 2: Fri, Nov 30, 12-7pm, Sat, Dec 1, 10am-5pm, Sun, Dec 2, 10am-3pm

Island County Fairgrounds Coffman Building 819 Camano Ave Langley 360-221-4677

Home fo� �he Holidays December 1st • 4PM to 7PM Pioneer Way, Oak Harbor

4:00 4:00-4:25 4:30-4:55 5:00-5:30 4:30-5:30 5:30

Sign up to see Santa at Harborside Village Garage of Blessings Carolers Oak Harbor and Olympic View Elementary Children Perform Santa parade and tree lighting OHHS Choir Carolers Santa begins visiting with children at Harborside Village 5:30-5:40 OHHS Drumline Performs 5:40-6:00 Worship Brass Performs 6:00-6:30 Grace by the Sea Choir Performs 6:30-7:00 United Methodist Choir Performs Come downtown, enjoy tasty treats & cocoa vote for your favorite toy soldier, shop & earn your green tickets!

Saratoga Dental & Orthodontics and SW PTSA present the

ELF CHASE 5k Fun Walk and Run DECEMBER 2, 2018

10AM AT THE SOUTH WHIDBEY COMMUNITY PARK Chase an Elf & get a prize • Wear a Crazy costume Run Through Candy Cane Lane Fun Prizes & General Merriment Coffee, Hot Chocolate & Snacks Registration form available online at https://swhsptsa.weebly.com/ or day of event at 9am

Benefitting Island Senior Resources

Raffle tickets $5 Each

December 1-12, 2018

12 DAYS OF WHIDBEY 1 Ticket = 12 Chances to Win Themed prize packages each day valued from $250-$1100 Day 1 - Wine & Chocolate Covered Whidbey Day 7 - Readers Treasury Day 2 - Cook it up in the Kitchen Day 8 - Spirits of Whidbey Day 3 - Golf on the North End Day 9 - Beauty for Winter Day 4 - Oak Harbor Family Night Day 10 - Garden Dreaming Day 5 - Family Fun Day 11 - Holiday Cheer Day 6 - Caffeinated Whidbey Day 12 - That’s Italian Tickets Available At Oak Harbor Senior Center (Mon., Wed., Fri. at lunchtime) Bayview - Island Senior Resources, Freeland - Senior Thrift, More locations to come!

Winners will be posted online at: www.facebook.com/island senior *Winner’s will be notified and need not be present to win.

oakharbormainstreet.com

www.12daysofwhidbey.com


Holiday Faire Saturday, December 1, 2018 10am - 1pm Children's Craft-Making Music Holiday Café Pocket Wizard Holiday Craft Shoppe and more

Holiday Fun for the Whole Family! Cash and Checks accepted Credit Card in Shoppe only

Whidbey Island Waldorf School

FREE Family Christmas Craft Event Saturday, December 1, 11am-2pm Come make your own ornaments and craft items for the holidays. For more information, call 360-632-4930

Saturday Dec. 1st Tavern Talk with the founders of Orca Network and Langley Whale Center. Captain Whidbey is hosting the founders of the Orca Network and Langley Whale Center. Join us during happy hour Saturday 3-6pm for an educational talk and stories on the history of Penn Cove and resident orcas. Live music to follow at 6pm!

Looking to do a holiday/company party? Contact us at events@captainwhidbey.com

6309 S Wilson Place, Clinton

Christmas Day Dinner

5-9pm, Tuesday, December 25 Four course plated dinner $55 per person $19 for kids under 12

St. Peters Church

Sns o h Hldy Ra 6335 Old Pietila Rd • Clinton 360-341-5656 • wiws.org

Live Music Every Saturday Night At 6pm through the end of the year.

Reservations can be made at captainwhidbey.com

2072 Captain Whidbey Inn Road • Coupeville 360-678-4097 • captainwhidbey.com

The Giving Tree

Whidbey Community Chorus Friday, December 7 7 pm Sunday, December 9 4 pm

Support local non-profits by buying ornaments for your own tree or as gifts!

First Reformed Church 250 Sw 3rd Ave, Oak Harbor

Bayview Cash Store 5603 Bayview Road Langley

Admission free, but donations gratefully accepted.

Island Athletic Club 5522 S Freeland Ave Freeland www.goosefoot.org

working for a thriving South Whidbey

Historic Coupeville Events

DECEMBER

Saturday, December 1st

Neighborhood Christmas Party 11:00 am - 2:00 pm Take your picture with Santa! Well behaved pets are most welcome. Cookies & Cider, Demos, Giveaways & More

Monday, December 24th Store closes 1 hour early. Open 8:00am - 6:00pm

Tuesday, December 25th

MERRY CHRISTMAS!

Store is closed so that we may spend the holiday with our families.

DECEMBER 1st: Greening of Coupeville Parade & Tree Lighting - Town of Coupeville 1st: Jingle Trail 5K Walk & Run - Coupeville Chamber 8th: Music on the Streets - Historic Coupeville 15th: Photos with Santa - Island County Museum 22nd: Caroling in Coupeville Contest - Historic Coupeville 23rd: Red Ticket Drawing 1:00pm - Steps of the Museum Hot cocoa, music and drawings for merchant gifts starting at 12:30pm ENJOY IN-STORE SPECIALS AND EVENTS EVERY WEEKEND OF DECEMBER!

$1500, $500 & 2 $100 PRIZES!

Each $20 Purchase = 1 Red Ticket!

Red 1609 East Main • In Freeland • 360.331.6799 Monday - Saturday 8 am to 7 pm Sunday 9 am to 6 pm Visit us at www.freelandacehardware.com

2018

T i ck et

S h op L o c a l l y Drawing to be held Sunday, December 23rd at 1:00 pm at the Island County Historical Museum. Hot cocoa, music and drawings for merchant gifts starting at 12:30pm. Must be present to win. Must be 18 years old or older. Must love Coupeville.

CoupevilleHistoricWaterfront.com 360.682.6400 • CoupevilleChamber.com 360.678.5434


12

NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018

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Whidbey Weekly

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Teaching Through God’s Word

First Church of Christ, Scientist

Fine Art in the Season of Light

A light lunch will follow the service. Join us for great fellowship.

Sundays, 9:00am& 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton

Prayer Group

For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

Every Tuesday, 4:00pm-5:30pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley

Holiday Reception: Saturday, December 1, 5:00pm-7:00pm Show continues through December Rob Schouten Gallery, Langley

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service

Worship, 10:00am Sunday School to age 20, 10:00am Wednesday Testimony Meeting, 2:30pm Christian Science Reading Room Tuesday & Friday, 11:00am-3:00pm Wednesday 3:30pm-5:30pm

WHAT’S GOING ON

continued from page

8

Charismatic Prayer and Praise group. Everyone welcome. For more information, call Bill at (360) 222-4080 or email Sobico@comcast.net.

Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Filipino Christian Fellowship Sundays, 2:00pm Meets at Church on the Rock, 1780 SE 4th Ave., Oak Harbor. www.ohcfellowship.com

Healing Rooms Every Thursday, 6:30pm-8:30pm 5200 Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland

Unity of Whidbey

The Healing Rooms are open to anyone desiring personal prayer for physical, emotional, or spiritual needs. There is a team of Christians from several local churches that are dedicated to praying for healing the sick in our community. All ministry is private, confidential, and free. Teams are available to pray for individuals who drop by on a first-come, first-serve basis.

If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit our website: unityofwhidbey.org

For more information, contact Ann at (425) 263-2704, email healingwhidbey.com, or visit the International Association of Healing Rooms at healingrooms.com.

Concordia Lutheran Church Sunday service, 9:30am Bible Study & Sunday School, 10:4 5am 590 N. Oak Harbor Street For more information, visit www.concordiaoakharbor.org or call (360) 675-2548.

Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley

Whidbey Quakers Sundays, 4:00pm-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and community, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www. whidbeyquakers.org.

The church and Reading Room are located at 721 SW 20th Court at Scenic Heights Street, Oak Harbor. Call (360) 675-0621 or visit christianscience.com Services and Sunday School are also held at 10:30amon South Whidbey at 15910 Highway 525, just north of Bayview and across from Useless Bay Road; testimony meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30pm.

Galleries & Art Shows Featured Artist: Gary Leake Meet the Artist: Friday, November 30, 10:00am-5:00pm Penn Cove Gallery, Coupeville Woodworker artist Gary Leake will be at the gallery with some of his woodworking tools. Gary’s passion is to search the countryside for a special, one-of- a-kind, piece of timber that has character. He then turns it into a finely engineered, beautiful piece of furniture that is a true work of art.

Featured Artists: Sam Griffith and Marie Thornton Garry Oak Gallery, Oak Harbor Sam works in wood creating pictures using the technique of Intarsia. Marie’s works are landscapes and waterscapes painted in oils, acrylics, charcoal and pastels.

Unique Open Studio December 6th, 7th & 8th 10-6pm Come meet Local Artists at Work!

Basket Works N.W. by Reggie

This holiday season enjoy finding the perfect gifts created by over thirty of your favorite local and regional artists. Celebrate those you love with a one-of-a-kind piece chosen especially for them. Included in the gallery’s beautiful displays are fabulous jewelry by three talented Whidbey jewelers, stunning sculptures in bronze, stone, wood and steel, original paintings in a variety of styles and mediums, and some extraordinary fine art glass including handblown, sculpted and fused. You’ll also find elegant woodwork, charming encaustics, ceramics and fiber art, fresh witty assemblages, and a wonderfully wide array of beautiful art objects sure to delight. During the reception many of our gallery artists will be in attendance and light refreshments will be served.

Small Works and Small Treasures Art Walk: Saturday, December 1, 5:00pm-7:00pm Whidbey Art Gallery, Langley Come by and select from a wide variety of fine art pieces that will be easy to wrap and ship. You will find answers to all of your gift giving needs in this show, whether it be jewelry, photography piece, pottery, paintings, sculptures, mixed media work or calligraphy. You’ll find many unique gifts by talented artists. Come meet the artists, chat with friends, and enjoy live music and light refreshments. WHAT'S GOING ON

TEDDY BEAR

& CHARACTER

BREAKFAST

1/8-Page $75, 1/16-Page $40, 1/32-Page $25 ADD FULL COLOR TO ANY SIZE AD FOR ONLY $25! This section will publish every Thursday through December 14. Deadline is the Thursday prior to publication.

To learn more about advertising in Whidbey Weekly Call: 360-682-2341 or email: publisher@whidbeyweekly.com

Shop Clinton December 1 & 2, 2018 SATURDAY Clinton Winter Market 10am - 4pm Waldorf Holiday Faire 10am - 1pm Makers Tour 10am - 4pm Santa Photos 11am - 2pm Christmas Tree Lighting 6 - 7:30pm

SUNDAY Clinton Winter Market Makers Tour 10am - 4pm Santa Photos 11am - 2pm

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1 OAK HARBOR ELK’S LODGE TWO SEATINGS: 9 & 10:30 AM PLEASE BRING A NEW STUFFED ANIMAL TO DONATE TO A CHILD IN A CRISIS SITUATION.

5 10UNDER& $15 11OVER&

$

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: ALASKA USA MORTGAGE COMPANY BIG BROTHERS / BIG SISTERS ONLINE: WWW.BBBSISLANDCOUNTY.ORG

The Festival of Trees is a benefit for Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Island County. For more information, please call 360-279-0644.

FESTIVAL OF TREES GALA FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30

16

Promote your holiday events and bazaars island wide with Whidbey Weekly!

Regina A. Kastler Owner//Weaver 2459 Cahill Place Oak Harbor, WA 98277 Cell: 206.310.8142 BWNWbReggie@comcast.net reggiebasket.blogspot.com

2018

continued on page

www.discoverclintonwa.com • 360-341-3929

6335 Old Pietila Rd Clinton

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Whidbey Weekly

13

NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018 LOCALLY OPERATED

need of adjustment. The good news? The fix is built in. Conscious observation should tell you how to make things better. Be alert on the 3rd.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Choppy waters this week will definitely keep you on your toes as you navigate the rough seas, but take heart. The waters soon moderate, and by contrast, the 3rd and after will seem absolutely boring. Calmer heads than your own are the blessing that lifts you in times of crisis. Similarly, the same level-minded ones will be with you to savor the quiet time to follow. Ups and downs are the norm and should be expected. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) This is your week to keep your cool when all around you are losing theirs. It is an important role. In the grand scheme of things, you are the counterbalance in situations that would otherwise trend toward imbalance and spin quickly out of control. Sounds like a tall order, but you are by nature equipped to handle it. If anyone can keep the bus running on time, it is you. Your impact is widespread, making for a tranquil 3rd. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) The decision of where to draw the line falls to you this week. In whatever context that is true for you, expect someone to push for more than you may be willing to give. The ensuing back-and-forth could be quite exciting, to say the least. Coercion and persuasion are par for the course. In that regard, you may lead the pack in your willingness to fight for what you want. The 3rd sees at least a truce, if not outright peace. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Yours to enjoy this week, perhaps on the 3rd, may be a calm and enviable serenity. Certainly this will puzzle the more excitable types around you. In their agitation, they’ll wonder, how can you be so at peace with the world? But yours is not to question. When the mood comes over you, one of those rare and fleeting times when all feels perfect as it is, don’t ask why. Just savor it as you would a rainbow. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) The quality of your week depends largely on how well you tolerate competition. Friction with someone close over your differences is likely. Ideas that clash, goals that diverge--anything you choose to perceive as a challenge or a threat could ignite a spark that rapidly becomes a flame. All unfolds so quickly, you won’t know what’s happening until it’s too late. Make sure of your inner smoke alarm on the 3rd. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Some part of your life needs your special attention. Others could probably name it without thinking. It’s the mediocre in your routine that would fairly prosper if you just tried a bit harder. Still clueless? Events this week will point you unerringly to the place in

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Adornments play a prominent role in your week. Colors, sparkle, anything that makes life pretty--all rate highly on the scale of importance, for reasons that need not concern you. Just heed your attractions, indulge yourself in foo-faws when the mood hits, and see where it takes you. If that happens to be nowhere, but pleases you just the same, perfect! Enjoy life for what it is, especially on the 3rd. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Do not underestimate your own drive and strength in this, a highly powerful week for you. Periodic outbursts of concentrated activity are the norm. Spaced in between are the quiet times in which you consolidate your energy. Do not begrudge yourself of the latter. In them are rooted your peak accomplishments, and you are much less effective without the quiet. The 3rd is by turns both active and passive. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) An accomplished and highly satisfying week is in line for you, at least inwardly, and perhaps outwardly, as well. Wherever you choose to expend your time, energy and money, that is where you will shine. At the end of it, no one save you may know the extent to which you have poured yourself wholeheartedly into your task. Since it’s not accolades that you work for, anonymity is fine on the 3rd. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) The high point of your week may well be measured in the satisfaction of accomplishments past. By focusing on what you have done, rather than on what you plan to do, you arrive at a better sense of where you are now. Later will come the natural extension of this to include your ideas of where you are going. On the 3rd, a long pause to reflect is not laziness. It is your first step forward to the future. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) Whatever your target, you will be calling the shots this week, and woe to any and all who object. Not that you are stubborn or on an ego trip. No, In the current scheme of things, it’s just the way you roll. Chances are good that your way, your idea, is the right one. Failure is unthinkable. Win or lose, your satisfaction quotient is set to soar. The 3rd is not without surprises, sweetening your game even more. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Your confidence level should be on the rise this week, owing not a little to a recent victory or milestone you scored. The hills are no less steep, but given the new spring in your step, they’re more easily climbed. Now, before the effect wears off, is the time to tackle the thing you always wanted, but never dared. Think big and don’t limit yourself on the 3rd. Believing you can is halfway to reaching your goal.

CLUES ACROSS 1. Boat structure

48. Type of investment account

23. Indie record label (abbr.) 25. Fellow

49. Songs

5. Affirmatives

26. Strong tree

52. Type of sword

10. From end to end 14. Ancient Syrian city 15. Plant parts

55. __ King Cole, musician 56. Type of vaccine

27. Drenches 28. Spindle 29. North Dravidian language

60. Site of the Taj Mahal

32. Lounges about

16. Anatomical feature of worms

61. Languished

17. Invests in little enterprises

63. Ethnic group in South China

18. Cuts the skin off

64. Prevent from seeing

36. Afternoon beverage

19. Noted child psychiatrist

65. Word of farewell

37. 007’s creator

20. Satisfies

66. Charity given to the poor

38. Founder of Babism

22. Take by sips

67. Chops

40. Music played in open air

23. Matched

68. Swiss capital

41. Profoundly wise men

24. It changed the world

69. One point east of southeast

43. Disfigure

CLUES DOWN

44. Unhappy

27. U.S. Founding Father Adams

33. Preamble 34. Essential for nachos

46. Prefix denoting “in a”

30. Father

1. Type of hall

31. Swiss river

2. Swedish rock group

32. They hold music

3. Long, narrow cut

35. Spoke

4. Indicating silence

37. Used to write

5. Talk at length

38. Cold wind

6. Wiped away

39. More competent

7. Sweet substance (alt. sp.)

53. Phil __, former CIA

40. Test for high schoolers

8. Babar is one

41. Mild analgesic

9. Soviet Socialist Republic

54. Fermented rather than distilled

42. Indian industrial city

10. French avant-garde composer

43. Fellas 44. Short-tailed martens 45. No seats available 46. Golf score

47. Cotton fabric; satiny finish 49. Closes tightly 50. The lowest point 51. Semitic sun god 52. Grads wear one

58. Unstressed-stressed

11. Commoner

59. Body part

12. Swiss river

61. Wonderful

13. A single-minded expert

62. Expected at a certain time

21. Passover feast and ceremony

47. A way to sink

57. Aids digestion

Answers on page 19

© 2018, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Thurs, Nov. 29

Fri, Nov. 30

Sat, Dec. 1

Sun, Dec. 2

Mon, Dec. 3

Tues, Dec. 4

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-50°/L-42°

H-49°/L-42°

H-48°/L-37°

H-46°/L-32°

H-44°/L-31°

H-46°/L-33°

H-46°/L-35°

Mixed Clouds and Sun

Rain

Mostly Sunny

Sunny

Mostly Sunny

Mostly Cloudy

Wed, Dec. 5

Cloudy Chance of Rain

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-49°/L-41°

H-48°/L-40°

H-45°/L-35°

H-44°/L-31°

H-43°/L-30°

H-43°/L-32°

H-46°/L-34°

Cloudy

Cloudy

Mostly Sunny

Mostly Sunny

Sunny

Mostly Cloudy

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Cloudy


14 NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! THURSDAY, NOV. 1 9:13 am, SR 20 Patrol vehicle versus other vehicle. 12:43 pm, SR 525 Reporting items stolen from “honor table” out front of location. 6:58 pm, 6th St. Reporting party advising got home and neighbor is running an extension cord from reporting party’s house to his for electricity. Requesting law enforcement tell him to stop; reporting party states doesn’t want to confront neighbor. FRIDAY, NOV. 2 10:09 am, SR 525 Advising truck disabled at location Oct. 30. Reporting party returned for truck, which is no longer there; contacted tow companies, no information about towing. States may have left keys in vehicle. 11:29 am, SR 20 Party requesting phone call referencing van pool group with Island Transit vehicle; advising they are in violation of Island Transit protocol. Reporting party has been attempting to contact group and is getting no response. Requesting call regarding what steps to take next. 1:12 pm, Bayview Rd. Caller advising customer who was asked not to return has returned and started yelling at caller when asked to leave. 5:45 pm, NW Alexander St. Reporting a pile of feces near clump of trees near library; reporting party advising believes it’s human, since there is toilet paper near it. Someone sitting in vehicle who is possibly associated. 10:26 pm, Wintergreen Dr. Male caller on line advising “I think I heard something bad go down;” gave an intersection that was unintelligible; caller went silent. SATURDAY, NOV. 3 8:45 am, SR 20 Reporting loose alpacas south of Jones Road. 3:46 pm, Ault Field Rd. Advising SUV just hit pole and continued, heading westbound; rolling to a stop. Reporting party states front axle is destroyed so vehicle won’t make it far. SUNDAY, NOV. 4 6:45 am, Cornet Bay Rd. Reporting party advising is stuck in camper, cannot get out, door is stuck; states friend locked door when left for work, told reporting party how to open it, but it is not working. 9:32 am, Patmore Rd. Reporting white male subject walking in middle of roadway. 10:34 am, Main St. Caller screaming about city council following her and law enforcement should leave her alone. States people driving by her doctor is illegal. Caller disconnected. 7:03 pm, Mitscher Dr. Advising has called twice today regarding being stalked everywhere reporting party goes; requesting Island County as a whole stop stalking reporting party.

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MONDAY, NOV. 5 4:06 pm, SR 20 Reporting loose alpaca about to go in road.

Life Tributes Rodney Richard Hubbard Rodney Richard Hubbard, age 65, passed away Friday, Nov. 23, 2018, at his home in Oak Harbor, surrounded by his immediate family. Rodney was born Nov. 26, 1952 in Hamilton, Ohio to Richard and LaVerne Hubbard. He attended St. Joseph’s Elementary School, Wilson Junior High School and graduated from Taft High School in 1971 (all in Hamilton). He attended and graduated from Denver Automotive and Diesel College in 1972. He worked as a mechanic in Hamilton for two years. Rodney married Mary Wocher of Hamilton Nov. 30, 1973.

4:34 pm, East Harbor Road Caller advising daughter is home alone, strange man just walked into her home. 6:18 pm, NE Lasalle St. Advising neighbor adjacent to reporting party is throwing things against the fence and putting glass bottles in cement mixer; screaming things to himself. 7:17 pm, NE Lasalle St. Reporting party advising male was in back yard and said “I know you can hear me, I’m the one that is going to burn your f***ing house down;” reporting party has weapons, no ammunition, though. TUESDAY, NOV. 6 12:11 am, Emil Rd. Caller rambling “Advising light the f***in’ house up. I’m martial arts trained, I can mess with thugs. You got that Cinderella?” Reporting party stating does not need law enforcement to show up. 8:41 am, Emil Rd Requesting call referencing getting restraining order against the mod squad; states he has already talked to Bothel Police Department, who called him names. 9:22 am, E Fakkema Rd. Caller advising 45 minutes ago, male came out of woods on bike pulling some kind of small trailer with a skeleton laying in it. 10:09 am, East Harbor Rd. Goat running in middle of road, brown in color. 11:02 am, Emil Rd. Reporting party advising put some kind of “jelly” on his arm and it is burning; very hard to understand, rambling about different things, now talking about something on his bicycle. 11:44 am, Harbor Sands Lane Ram seen walking across East Harbor onto Harbor Sands Lane; several previous reports, all in same area. Law enforcement unable to locate. 1:40 pm, Childrens Ave. Reporting party advising ongoing problem with person sitting outside of her residence. Occurs at all hours; subject associated with a beat up Honda Civic with different colored rims. 3:48 pm, Basswood Rd. Advising loose ram has been walking on Basswood Road; reporting party was following sheep, but has now lost it. Last seen southbound on Basswood toward Beverly Beach. 8:17 pm, SR 20 Caller stating male is sleeping with his legs in road. 10:22 pm, SR 20 Reporting party stating male subject wearing reflective shirt is dancing on side of SR 20; subject is right on fog line. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

LOCALLY OPERATED

Rodney joined the United States Navy in January of 1975. He served in that capacity for 24 years, retiring as a Senior Chief in 1999. He continued working in the field of naval aviation for private contractors supporting the mission of VAQ-129 at NAS Whidbey Island until his death. He is survived by his wife of 45 years, Mary Hubbard, of Oak Harbor; his daughter Kathryn and her husband Sean Coleman, grandchildren Madeleine and Finnegan Coleman of Waldwick, N.J.; daughter Elizabeth Hubbard of Oak Harbor, and son Joshua and his wife Rebekah Hubbard, and granddaughter, Raegan Hubbard of Oak Harbor. A Celebration of his life will be held at Life Church (1767 NE Regatta Dr) in Oak Harbor Friday, Nov. 30, 2018 at 11:30 a.m. Military Honors will be presented under the auspices of NAS Whidbey Honor Guard. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.whidbeymemorial.com.

Chief Warrant Officer, W-4, Clarke L. George, U.S. Navy (Ret.) CWO-4 Clarke Lee George, U.S. Navy, retired, 77, died Nov. 20, 2018, surrounded by loving family and friends at his home on Whidbey Island, Wash. He was born in Kent, Wash. January 10, 1941. He is a graduate of Kent-Meridian Sr. High School class of 1959. He retired April, 1986 after 24 years in the Navy. He was a Master Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Technician. Clarke is survived by his wife, whom he loved so deeply, Margaret “Margie.” Together they had a daughter, Chris; son, Wes, and daughter-in-law, Erin; grandchildren Jolene and Sydney; and sister Arlene Land. He was preceded in death by his parents, Roy and Rachel George and sister, Eleanor Harvell, of Enumclaw, Wash. He was a loving husband, dad, grandfather, uncle, and brother. A Celebration of Life will be held at the VFW in Oak Harbor Dec. 1, 2018 starting at noon. Dec. 3, 2018, a graveside service will be held in Kent at Hillcrest Burial Park at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, please make memorial contributions to the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America or the EOD Warrior Foundation. For a full life story, please see the full obituary at www.wallinfuneralhome.com.

Neil Scott Hill Neil Scott Hill, age 80, passed away Monday, Nov. 12, 2018 with his family by his side. Neil was born Aug. 5, 1938, in Oakland, Calif., to James and Margaret Hill, along with his twin brother Norman. Neil enlisted in the service shortly after high school and served in the Air Force as a ground radio operator in Tripoli, North Africa. He served three years and was honorably discharged. He attended school at California Baptist College for two years and met his future wife, Martha. They were married in 1964, and had two children, Glen and Wendy. Neil returned to college several years after they were born and received his bachelor’s degree in Religious education. Neil worked for a radio station close to Riverside, Calif., and transferred to a christian radio station in Washington State. In Washington, he and his wife raised many foster children from Vietnam. After their children moved out, they sponsored Ukrainian refugees. In his later years, Neil helped create airports for Microsoft Flight Simulator. Neil is survived by his wife of 55 years; his children; grandchildren, Scott, Sarah, and Cheryl; his siblings, Norman, Robert, Martin, and Melanie; and many, many friends. He was preceded in death by his father, James. His memorial service will be held Friday, Dec. 14, 6:30 p.m. at Alderwood Baptist Church. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the MDS Foundation. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www. whidbeymemorial.com.

Carolyn Jane Christensen Carolyn Jane Christensen, of Coupeville, Wash., was born April 23, 1944 in Stockton, Calif. to Virginia and Everest Christensen. She passed away at age 74 with her family at her side Nov. 4, 2018 in Coupeville. Carolyn graduated from Oak Harbor High School in 1962 and the University of Washington in 1966. She was an International tax treaty negotiator with the United States Department of the Treasury until retiring in 2001. She was assigned to notable locations including Washington, DC; Ottawa, Canada; Saigon, Vietnam; Manila, Philippines; and Paris, France. Carolyn is survived by her brothers, Orson Christensen and John Christensen; her twin sister, Marilyn Huemer; nieces, Cindy Thompson and Kristine Buffum; and nephews, Gerry Christensen and Christopher Huemer. Carolyn liked to travel, including several safaris in Africa; cruises to Alaska, Australia, and Southeast Asia; and land tours throughout Europe. The Christensen family would like to thank Nancy Sharma, M.D. and her staff at WhidbeyHealth for their compassion and professionalism. Memorials in Carolyn’s name are suggested to The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Donor Services, PO Box 98018, Washington D.C. 20090-8018 or Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Attn: Donations, PO Box 19023, Seattle, WA 981091023. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.whidbeymemorial.com.

Life Tributes can now be found online at www.whidbeyweekly.com

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NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018

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Enjoy a double gift from Oak Harbor’s Playhouse By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

The Whidbey Playhouse in Oak Harbor wants to add even more fun to your holiday season and has prepared a couple of special gifts for the community: performances of “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever” and “Jingle Bell Jukebox” begin Friday and will continue at 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and at 2:30 p.m. Sunday through Dec. 16. “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever,” written by Barbara Robinson, tells the story of the Herdman children, a.k.a. “the worst children in the world,” who crash the annual church Christmas pageant in hopes of getting some free snacks. Much to the dismay of several church members as well as some of the other children, the Herdmans turn the pageant upside down – or do they simply provide a new lens through which to see the Christmas story? It’s a delightful story filled with plenty of laughter as well as a touching taste of tradition as the story unfolds. Then there’s the toe-tapping romp through some holiday musical favorites – and maybe some hits you’ve never heard before - with “Jingle Bell Jukebox,” set in a 50s-style soda shop. Break out the saddle shoes, the poodle skirts and the leather jackets and enjoy watching a cast of kids twist and jive through the seasonal tunes, with a little help from special guests Frosty the Snowman, the Grinch and jolly old St. Nick himself. Both shows are directed by Sue Riney, with help from assistant directors Shelby Montoya and Andrew Pierzchala. “‘The Best Christmas Pageant Ever’ is a funny, touching story that demonstrates how the bullying ways of the Herdmans can be changed when they learn the meaning of Christmas,” said Riney. “And ‘Jingle Bell Jukebox’ is a holiday musical treat as sweet as the hot chocolate and milkshakes Ruby serves up in her soda shop.” “It gives you a little taste of a Hallmark movie, where there’s a big mess in the middle but it all turns out just fine in the end,” Montoya said of “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever.” “What I love about ‘The Best Christmas Pageant Ever’ are the characters,” said Eric George, who plays Reverend Hopkins. “Having grown up in church, I can relate to all the ‘church ladies’ as well as the Christmas pageants. What I love about ‘Jingle Bell Jukebox’ are the songs – the re-imagination of Christmas carols is so well done.” There are about 38 cast members between the two productions, many of them children. About 10 are in both shows. “Kids have such quick memories,” Riney said. “I’ve been impressed at how easily they learned their lines and remember their movements in ‘Best Christmas Pageant Ever.’ And in ‘Jingle Bell Jukebox,’ they have

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly ABOVE: The Herdman kids wreak havoc on the church Christmas pageant in “Best Christmas Pageant Ever,” even fighting over the baby Jesus. The play opens Friday at Whidbey Playhouse in Oak Harbor and runs through Dec. 16. AT RIGHT: Longtime Christmas pageant director, Mrs. Armstrong (Geri Thomas), gets the scoop from other ladies in the church on how the pageant is going as she recuperates from a broken leg in “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever,” opening Friday at the Whidbey Playhouse in Oak Harbor.

loved singing the Christmas songs since we began practicing them in September, and they continue to bring that ‘childlike’ excitement about Christmas to all the numbers.” Despite having such a large cast, Riney said there were minimal challenges. “The shows are so different it gave the opportunity for the casts to work on and learn different things in each of them,” she said. “I think the only challenge we had was in making sure the families knew which days each of the shows had their rehearsals.”

Light ‘em up! Photos Courtesy of Rotary Club of North Whidbey -Sunrise Volunteers with Rotary Club of North Whidbey-Sunrise got a little assist from Puget Sound Energy in hanging holiday decorations on light poles along Midway Blvd. Saturday morning. The club has been working with PSE for years to add this festive touch along the street, stretching from Pioneer Way to Highway 20. It takes approximately oneand-a-half hours for the volunteers to add the decorations, which will be lit up through the holiday season. And speaking of lighting things up, there are several tree-lighting ceremonies scheduled for this weekend:

Christmas Parade and Tree Lighting

4:30 p.m. • Downtown Coupeville

Santa Parade and Tree Lighting 5 p.m. • Downtown Oak Harbor

Clinton Holiday Lighting 6 p.m. • Clinton Community Hall

This was Montoya’s first foray into directing, although she has done just about everything else at the Playhouse, including lights, sound and serving as stage manager. At just 18 herself, she easily could have been part of the cast, but found herself enjoying the challenge of directing. “I loved working with the kids,” she said. “I liked it more than I thought I would. They were all very cooperative and easy to work with.” Montoya said she felt the experience she’s gained through volunteering for the Playhouse over the years made it easy for her to relate to the young cast members, since she has shared many of the same nerves and excitement. The opportunity to introduce acting and all that goes into a production to younger people is something that appeals to Riney.

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Enjoy an upbeat romp through some holiday classics in “Jingle Bell Jukebox,” which opens Friday at Whidbey Playhouse in Oak Harbor. Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly The Grinch makes a special appearance in “Jingle Bell Jukebox,” as do Frosty the Snowman and Santa Claus. The show is part of a holiday double feature that starts Friday at Whidbey Playhouse in Oak Harbor.

“It’s great to see the potential in the next generation that will be part of helping ensure the future of the Playhouse,” she said. “I’ve enjoyed being a part of introducing some of our first-time performers to the stage and seeing how they have grown in their confidence along the way.” “It’s nice to have a mentor teaching the next generation of actors and directors,” Montoya said. “I know I would love to keep doing it.” Unwrap the gift of theater this holiday season and take in two shows for the price of one at the Whidbey Playhouse. Tickets are on sale now and can be purchased at the box office or online. Go to www. whidbeyplayhouse.com for information. “It’s always fun to be reminded of the magic of the holidays through the eyes of kids,” said Riney. Check out more photos from both shows on Whidbey Weekly’s Facebook page.

HOLIDAYS continued from page 7 in their goal of becoming more successful in their lives,” Paddock said. “And then twice a month there are activities that could be indoor craft activities like painting a tile, decorating cupcakes or making wreaths and we’ll do something outdoors, like a hike to the ice caves or going to a pumpkin patch.” If someone can’t afford to attend these fundraising events, donating time as a big brother or big sister is every bit as important, according to Paddock. There is currently a waiting list of 33 Littles who are hoping for a Big. “When kids connect with an adult who cares about them, it’s so rewarding,” Paddock said. “I had one of our Bigs who has been doing this for three years tell me ‘I don’t know if I made much of a difference – I just listened.’ People don’t realize how important just listening is – kids feel so worthy when an adult listens to them. It sounds simple, but it’s really profound.

“Big Brothers Big Sisters has been around since 1906,” she continued. “It is evidence-based proof. We know we make a difference in children’s lives, we see it every day. And it’s as rewarding for our Bigs as it is for our Littles. If we’d all had a mentor growing up, somebody who was just there for us, we’d all be the better for it.”

A prime example of that are Polly (Big Sister) and Piper (Little Sister), from south Whidbey, who have been a match for six months. This Big and Little will share the story of their experience with those attending Holidays in the Vineyard.

Paddock said they are always looking for volunteers who can commit to a year in the program, as it takes that long to develop a relationship – for some pairs, the friendship extends far beyond the required first year.

Cost to attend the Teddy Bear and Character Breakfast is $5 for those age 10 and under, $15 for those age 11 and over. Tickets are available at Alaska USA Mortgage Company or online. Those attending are asked to bring a new stuffed animal to donate to a child in a crisis situation.

“Many of our matches have lasted far beyond,” she said. “I have Bigs who are now in their 60s attending the weddings of their Littles. People just have to commit to spending four to five hours a month with a child. They can just hang out, do homework. We try to match people up based on their interests.”

Tickets to Holidays in the Vineyard are $100 per person and include entertainment, heavy hors d’oeuvres, sweet treats and complimentary wine. Those interested in attending either event, or who are interested in volunteering with BBBSIC may call 360-279-0644 for information and reservations or go to www.bbbsislandcounty.org.

Photo Courtesy of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Island County Events like the annual Festival of Trees in Oak Harbor or Holidays in the Vineyard in Freeland are the major fundraisers for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Island County. All funds are used to help professionally match adult volunteers with children and youth who can benefit from a mentor in their lives.

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NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

A NOT SO FRENCH TOAST Maybe we’ve talked about French toast, albeit not in depth, but whatever the case, I find it is a relatively under-utilized breakfast dish. When I think about it, what isn’t to like about French toast? It’s so many things in one and yet, a thing all its own! French toast deserves its moment in the spotlight for a couple of reasons: First, Nov. 28 is National French Toast Day; and second, because I was recently in France and I didn’t find French toast anywhere! It wasn’t surprising, then, to find French toast has its origins rooted not in France, but according to the Apicius (a large and very, very old collection of recipes), what we know as French toast today did indeed exist as far back as the Roman Empire era. It was also known as pan dulcis, which is basically bread soaked in milk and/or egg and then fried to golden perfection. Et voilá, Roman French toast! The practice of soaking bread in milky egg mixture became popular and spread across Europe and in the middle ages, it was dubbed ‘pain perdu’ or ‘the lost bread.’ I wondered, “Why is it called the ‘lost bread?’” I assume it’s because it required soaking stale bread in the milky mix to lose its bread-like consistency. In any event, pain perdu is French toast. Some might argue that while these age-old recipes and traditions are almost exactly like basic French toast today, someone else is to be credited with inventing the ‘modern version.’ History suggests it was an innkeeper in the early 1720s who devised this magnificent dish, and this innkeeper’s name was Joseph French. Originally wanting to name the dish ‘French’s Toast,’ he was not very literate and punctuation was left out and so ‘French Toast’ was born in Albany, New York. Today, there is no end to the ways in which French toast can be made and served. It’s a seasonal fare, too. At this time of year there is always, always, always pumpkin spice French toast on many a diner’s menu, and that’s not all. The toppings that go with the eggy-bread have evolved out of nothingness, through sheer imagination and a desire to delight the tongues of all who eat it, into the wealth of toppings we have today. Typically, butter and syrup are the delicious staples, the easy go-to for most French toast lovers. But there’s more. Far more!

How about creamy peanut butter with slices of banana, drizzled with honey and served with a side of whipped topping? There’s always whipped butter, cream and berry preserves for a light, fruity pickme-up and if you prefer your fruit served INSIDE the French toast, you could always sandwich raspberries with cream cheese and make yourself raspberry cheesecake French toast. And for the chocolate fans out there, Nutella spread across the top of golden, crispy French toast slices is an option with which you can’t go wrong.

consist of just a quick dip of the bread in a plant-based milk, and that’s just not the same for me. Luckily, I found a recipe that uses a similar custard-base concept as nonvegan French toast. It consists of mixing tofu into the nut milk with a little sugar, cinnamon and pinch of salt and then blending it until smooth. Therein lies the difference in all others I have seen thus far! Dear readers, with National French Toast day upon us, I hope you will observe it in due style and make some for yourself and your loved ones. The ways in which you can create delicious breakfast traditions with this dish are only as limited as the bounds of your imagination! I’m including a recipe for a basic but oh-so-yummy French toast and if you try it, please do let me know how you like it! Send any comments, questions and certainly recipes you’d like to share to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and we can definitely Dish!

And for my vegan friends out there whom I find to be endlessly resourceful, there are a wealth of vegan French toast recipes. I marvel at how we humans always find a way to make new and delicious things with what we have available to us. While I’ve come across many mouth-watering recipes for vegan French toast, many of them

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Meetings & Organizations W.I.G.S. (Whidbey Island Genealogical Searchers) Tuesday, December 11, 1:00pm Heller Road Fire Station #25, Oak Harbor Holiday Potluck and Show & Tell. Members and friends are invited to share stories of their genealogical research or interesting ancestors or show and tell about a family heirloom. Please bring a favorite food to share. For more information about W.I.G.S. go to www. whidbeygensearchers.org. All are welcome to attend.

Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACA or ACOA) Meeting Every Wednesday, 7:00pm-8:00pm Trinity Lutheran Church annex, Freeland A meeting dedicated to dealing with the problem and solution for recovering from the effects of growing up in an alcoholic or otherwise dysfunctional family. For more information, contact Clay at 360-989-4248 or Dooleydolly@ hotmail.com. Or visit www.adultchildren.org

Al-Anon Every Wednesday, 9:30am-10:30am 432 2nd St., Langley If a friend or relative has a problem with alcohol, you can find solutions for yourself at Alanon.

But it isn’t just the toppings that make the dish what it is. It’s the bread. We have countless kinds of bread available with which to play and be inventive in pursuit of creating the perfect pain perdu! There’s a technique of sorts to making the perfect slice of French toast and it lies in the bread. You generally want a bread that will hold its shape, not crumble into the egg mixture and really become ‘lost bread.’ For this reason, many people suggest using brioche to make French toast. It is not only a rich, thick type of bread, it’s able to soak up all the eggy goodness so when you fry it, your masterpiece is crispy on the outside, soft and fluffy on the inside. Brioche isn’t the only ‘good bread’ to use, though. Challah works very much the same as brioche and your creamy, tasty French toast insides are perfectly enveloped by crunchy golden outsides. A win! Sandwich bread is next up, and while also a very good option for French toast, it doesn’t need to soak, as its crumb isn’t packed as dense as challah or brioche, so just a quick dip on either side in the egg mixture should do it. I prefer to buy bread I can slice myself, as it allows me to dictate how much or little mixture I want soaked up and I can avoid the dreaded crumbing into the egg mix! Now, I’d be doing a disservice to the namesake of the dish if I didn’t mention that French bread is one of the better breads to use for any French toast recipe. If it’s a little stale, that’s okay, soak it a bit longer, and you’re going to be left with a delicious French toast that has a bit of a bite. Nothing wrong with that!

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Al-Anon Group Oak Harbor Are you troubled by someone’s drinking? Al-Anon group can help. Call Laurie at 360-6754430 for meeting information.

Alcoholics Anonymous Every Day, 12:00pm& 8:00pm 432 2nd Street, Langley For more information, call 360-221-2070 Amazing French Toast Bake ½ cup milk or half and half 6 eggs 1 loaf French bread, cut into 2-inch-thick slices Cinnamon 4 tablespoons vanilla extract

Mix together eggs, milk or half and half, cinnamon and vanilla. Whisk well. Cut the French bread into 2-inch-thick slices. Pour the egg mixture into a casserole dish and lay slices of bread into the egg mixture. Allow the bread to soak up the mixture as much as possible. Then heat a tablespoon of butter in a large skillet on medium high heat (adjust as necessary) and lay a couple slices of soaked bread into the pan. Cook for about 3 minutes per side, or until golden and crispy outside and cooked through inside. Plate with toppings of your choice (berries, whipped topping, clotted cream, syrup, Nutella, anything you like!) and enjoy! www.justapinch.com/recipes/breakfast/ other-breakfast/french-bread-french-toast. html www.neatorama.com/neatolicious/2013/10/17/French-Toast-Isnt-FrenchHeres-How-It-Got-Its-Name/ To read past columns of Let’s Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

American Rhododendron Society Fourth Wednesday, 7:00pm Coupeville Firehouse, 1164 Race Rd., Coupeville For more information, call Stephanie at 360-678-1896.

Breastfeeding Support Group Third Thursday, 10:30am-11:30am Pregnancy Aid, 816 Camano, Langley You can bring your own lunch if you’d like, tea and muffins are provided. Pregnant Moms welcome. Call Pregnancy Aid at 360-221-4767 for more information.

Bingo Every Monday, 7:00pm Elks Lodge, Oak Harbor Open to the public. For more information, call 360-675-7111.

Blind Support Group Fourth Tuesday, 2:00pm Oak Harbor Senior Center A support group for people with impaired vision. Learn and share techniques to be more mobile. For more information, call Paul Bovey at 360-544-2561 or (360) 679-8293.

Coupeville Chess Club Second and Fourth Fridays, 6:45pm-9:00pm Coupeville Library All skill levels welcomed. Please bring a board if possible. Spread the word and come down for some leisurely play. For information, call 631-357-1941.

Coupeville Lions

Dining Guide

Who Has The Best Pies, Cakes, Cookies, Breads & Rolls for Holiday Parties and Christmas? THE HOLIDAYS ARE QUICKLY APPROACHING, ORDER EARLY! GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE!

Call Now To Order 360-675-6500 1191 SE Dock St, #2 • chrisbakeryonwhidbey.weebly.com

Every Wednesday, 6:30pm Coupeville Methodist Church, Coupeville

Debtors Anonymous Every Sunday, 6:00pm WGH Board Room, Coupeville If you are having problems with money and debt and think that you may be a compulsive debtor, the program of Debtors Anonymous can help you. No situation is hopeless. Find the solution that leads to solvency and serenity. Debtors Anonymous is a 12-step program based upon the 12-steps first developed and used by Alcoholics Anonymous. Call 515-451-3749 for directions to location or for more information. WHAT'S GOING ON

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Whidbey Weekly

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED

Film Shorts Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

By Carey Ross Bohemian Rhapsody: We all wanted this long-gestating Queen biopic to be worthy of its subject. It’s not, but probably still worth seeing to watch Rami Malek as Freddie Mercury pumping out all those righteous stadium jams. ★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 14 min.)

Like us on:

360-682-2341 • www.whidbeyweekly.com

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald: Sure, it’s not the best film in the J.K. Rowling canon, but it’s gorgeously shot, has enough references to the Harry Potter universe to keep fans happy and features reliably good performances by its reliably star-studded cast. ★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 14 min.) The Front Runner: This movie about Gary Hart’s infamous and ill-fated bid for the presidency has a lot of things going for it: Hugh Jackman as the charismatic Hart, Oscar-nominated director Jason Reitman and a story that

Widows: If Hollywood is a mirror for what’s going in on society, I predict we are about to see a whole bunch of movies about women who are pissed off and not taking it anymore, beginning with this heist flick directed by Steve McQueen and starring Michelle Rodriguez, Elizabeth Debicki, Cynthia Erivo, and the inimitable Viola Davis. ★★★★★ (R • 2 hrs. 8 min.) For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page.

Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.48)

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6 On a scale from 1 to 10...4.8 Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9

Answers on page 19

Special: Free $5 Arcade Card with every $20 spent in the Snackbar (must be made in a single purchase)

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360-675-5667 • www.bluefoxdrivein.com 21+ RECREATIONAL & MEDICAL MARIJUANA

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WHIDBEY ISLAND NATURAL MEDICINE

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Box Office & Snack Bar Opens At 4pm, 1st Movie Begins At 7pm Fri; 6pm Sat & Sun • 11 & Over $6.50; Kids 5-10 $1.00; 4 & Under Free GO KARTS ARE CLOSED FOR THE SEASON. ADVANCE RESERVATIONS ONLY

55 & Over receive additional

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RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET (PG) FANTASTIC BEASTS: THE CRIMES OF GRINDELWALD (PG-13)

Ralph Breaks the Internet: The continuing adventures of “Wreck-it Ralph,” animated cinema’s most heartwarming and lovable hero, as he ventures out of the arcade and into the wilds of the World Wide Web. ★★★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 54 min.)

Venom: A rare Marvel miss that I will still probably see on account of how Tom Hardy’s presence can make up for a variety of cinematic ills. ★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 53 min.)

Movie Hotline 360-279-2226 Book A Party or Special Showing 360-279-0526 1321 SW Barlow St • Oak Harbor

Friday, November 30 thru Sunday, December 2

The Possession of Hannah Grace: An attractive young woman working a graveyard shift in a creepy morgue with a possessed dead body. What could possibly go wrong? ★★ (R • 1 hr. 25 min.)

Creed II:~ I will watch Michael B. Jordan in just about anything, especially this continuation of the rebooted and revitalized “Rocky” franchise that sees Dolph Lundgren reprise his role as Ivan Drago from “Rocky IV,” aka the greatest “Rocky” movie of all time. ★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 10 min.)

RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET PG FANTASTIC BEASTS: THE CRIMES OF GRINDELWALD PG13 INSTANT FAMILY PG13

Now Showing!

The Nutcracker and the Four Realms: This movie is now seasonally appropriate, if not terribly watchable. ★★ (PG • 1 hr. 39 min.)

Robin Hood: Why is Hollywood so bad at making Robin Hood movies? Seriously, when the best Robin Hood movie of the past 25 years was a spoof that came courtesy of Mel Brooks, someone has some explaining to do. ★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 56 min.)

FARAWAY ENTERTAINMENT YOUR LOCAL MOVIE THEATER

COMING SOON: WIDOWS, CREED II, ROBINHOOD

Instant Family: Mark Wahlberg and Rose Byrne are a married couple looking to adopt one foster child and somehow end up with three. Presumably hijinks ensue until they become one big, happy family. ★★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 57 min.)

Can You Ever Forgive Me?: Melissa McCarthy finally, “finally” nabs a role worthy of her acting ability in this based-on-actualevents account of onetime bestselling author Lee Israel, who managed to fool some of the people all of the time as a literary fraudster writ large. ★★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 46 min.)

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360-679-4003 877-679-4003 www.seatacshuttle.com

has somehow become topical again. Despite all of that, everything sort of falls apart, much like Hart’s campaign. ★★ (R • 1 hr. 52 min.) The Grinch: Nice try (again), Hollywood. But we all know that the only true Grinch movie is the 1966 television special “How the Grinch Stole Christmas,” directed by Chuck Jones in which the Grinch is voiced by Boris Karloff. Step off, other lesser Grinches. ★★ (PG • 1 hr. 26 min.)

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CANNABIS

ANACORTES NATURAL MEDICINE

AnacortesCannabis.com FreelandCannabis.com

7656 State Route 20, Unit A, Anacortes (at Sharpes Corner) 360-588-6222

This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Keep out of reach of children. Marijuana products may be purchased or possessed only by persons 21 years or older.

MMCWS MEDICAL • Naturopathic Physician Dr. Lori Olaf, ND Specializing in Chronic Pain / Opioid Reduction / Multiple Sclerosis Epilespy / Seizure Disorder / Stroke / Fibromyalgia Migraines / Neuropathy / Arthritis / PTSD Muscle Spasms / Cancer / Glaucoma / HIV/AIDS Parkinson’s Disease / Crohn’s Disease / Hepatitis C Medical Marijuana Authorization & Primary Care BY APPOINTMENT ONLY • For Ages 21+

MMCWS.com

7656 State Route 20, Unit B • Anacortes • 360-422-3623

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Thu Oct 25 18:48:42 2018 GMT. Enjoy!

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18

NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Whidbey Weekly

LOCALLY OWNED

Look Who’s Growing! In addition to being your favorite source for news and events on the island Whidbey Weekly is now your source for:

Printing Copying Graphic Design Comb Binding Folding Laminating Cutting Faxing Direct Mail Services Notary Public

WHAT’S GOING ON

LOCALLY OPERATED continued from page

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Divorce Care and DC4kids Every Sunday, 5:00pm Living Word Church, Oak Harbor A support group for people dealing with separation and divorce. For more information, call Larry at 360-969-0552 or Lisa - DC4kids at 360-672-4239. Living Word Church is located at 490 NW Crosby Ave.

Duplicate Bridge Club Every Tuesday, 10:30am Sierra Country Club Clubhouse, Coupeville
 The club is ACBL sanctioned and we encourage anyone interested to come with or without a partner. For more information, contact one of the directors: Mardi Dennis at 360-675-5044, Sue Thomas at 360-678-7047, or Peter Wolff at 360-678-3019.

Gamblers Anonymous Every Friday, 7:00pm St Augustine Catholic Church, Oak Harbor The church is located at 185 N. Oak Harbor St., the meeting is held in the north end of the building. Enter through the double doors next to the parking lot. For more information, email OakHarborga@gmail.com Washington GA hotline: 855-222-5542

Gastric Surgery Support Group Second Monday, 7:00pm Oak Harbor Lutheran Church

Whidbey Weekly & Printing

SE City Beach St

SE Ely St

SE Dock St

Barrington Dr

Oak Harbor Post Office

North Whidbey Coupon Club Every Friday, 10:00am-11:30am Christian Reformed Church, Oak Harbor Cost: Free All are welcome. Coupon-clipping, money-saving conversation and new friends. Our motto is “Eat Better, For Less”. Kids welcome. Money-saving classes are available. Find us on Facebook :”Whidbey Coupon Club” and via email: nwcouponclub@comcast.net. The church is located at 1411 Wieldraayer Rd. For further information, please call 360-675-2338.

North Whidbey Island Rotary Sunrise Every Wednesday, 7:00am Whidbey Golf Club, Oak Harbor Come join us anytime! We support local and international projects. Contact Janis Powell at 360-679-2132 for more information.

NWCA Whidbey Island #150 First Tuesday, 6:00pm Building 22, Seaplane Base, Oak Harbor We are a national Navy Wives club that has been doing charity and volunteer work in this community for over 50 years. For more information, call 360-679-5115.

Oak Harbor Rotary Club

Supporting anyone who’s a pre-, post-, or possible weight loss surgery patient through the process and the recovery. We are not affiliated with any specific surgical technique or insurance program. For more information, call Pat Baldridge at 360-675-8871.

Every Friday, 12:00pm Oak Harbor Yacht Club

Genealogical Society of South Whidbey Island

Every Monday, 4:30pm Bayview Community Hall, Langley

Second Monday, 1:00pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Community Bldg., Freeland Visitors always welcome. For more information, call Ann Wright at 360-597-2352 or visit www. rootsweb.ancestry.com/~wagsswi

International Order of the Rainbow for Girls First & Third Mondays, 7:00pm-8:30pm Masonic Hall, Coupeville The Coupeville assembly of the International Order of the Rainbow for Girls would like to invite all girls ages 11-20 to attend meetings. Rainbow Girls is a service organization that teaches girls leadership and life skills. For more information, contact Naomie Robinson at robinsonnaomie32@gmail.com or visit www.nwrainbow.org. The Mansonic Hall is located at 804 Main Street.

La Leche League of Oak Harbor Second Tuesday, 6:45pm Oak Harbor Lutheran Church, Oak Harbor Interested mothers and mothers-to-be are encouraged to attend and babies are welcome. For more information, please call Julie at 360-679-3562, Lisa at 360-679-0307, or Sue at 360-240-8604.

Meet Feet Co-Ed Hiking Group Every Saturday, 10:00am-12:00pm Locations and terrain vary Occasionally the group goes to the mainland so times can change. The current schedule is available at http://maxxeon.com/meetfeet/. To join the email list for weekly detailed walk notices and car pool locations, send an email to meetfeetonwhidbey@gmail.com.

1131 SE Ely Street • Oak Harbor 360-682-2341 advertise@whidbeyweekly.com

St. Peter’s Lutheran Church is located at 6309 Wilson Place.

National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Whidbey Island Fourth Thursday, 7:00pm-8:30pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Freeland NAMI is the largest grassroots organization dedicated to making life better for people with a mental illness and their friends and loved ones. The group is nonreligious but meets at Trinity Lutheran Church, 18341 State Route 525. It isn’t necessary to preregister. Please contact Kathy Chiles, 206-218-6449 or k.chiles22@live. com for more information.

NAR-ANON Every Tuesday, 7:00pm-8:00pm St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, Clinton NAR-ANON family groups are world-wide for those affected by someone else’s addiction.

For more information: www.clubrunner.ca/CPrg/ Home/homeE.asp?cid=806

Occupy Whidbey Island

Occupy Whidbey Island is a non-partisan, non-hierarchical, non-violent group of the 99% taking action in support of the Occupy Movement. For more information, you may email us at occupywhidbeyisland@gmail.com, or visit our facebook site, www.facebook.com/pages/ Occupy-Whidbey-Island/299820386727

Open Meditation Group Every Wednesday, 7:30pm-8:00pm Alexander Counseling, 221 2nd Street, #10, Langley Find refuge from the stress of a nervous world. Join for a weekly meditation and cultivate a deeper sense of tranquility and share the joys of peace. For a list of continuous Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Classes, Seminars and Workshops Tavern Talk Featuring Orca Network Saturday, December 1, 3:00pm-6:00pm Captain Whidbey Inn, Coupeville The Captain is hosting the founders of Orca Network and the Langley Whale Center. Join us during Happy Hour for an educational talk and stories on the history of Penn Cove and resident orcas. For more information, call 360-678-4097, email events@captainwhidbey. com or visit captainwhidbey.com

Medicare Open Enrollment Workshops Tuesday, December 4, 2:00pm Thursday, December 6, 10:00am Oak Harbor Senior Center, 51 SE Jerome St. Open enrollment deadline for 2019 plans is December 7. Make sure that you are in the best plan for your healthcare and prescription needs. Workshops are offered by SHIBA, State-wide Health Insurance Benefits Advisors, a program of the WA State Office of the Insurance Commissioner. No registration required. Questions? 360-279-4580

Back Pain & Sciatica Workshop Saturday, December 15, 11:00am Rue & Primavera, Oak Harbor This is a free informational workshop. Rue & Primavera is located at 785 Bayshore Dr, Ste 102. For more information or to register, call 360-279-8323

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Foster Homes Needed!

Experienced Barbers wanted!

Family Tails Dog Rescue needs foster homes! We can't save dogs from high kill shelters without homes for them to stay at while they wait to find their forever home. 1 week to 3 months, a fun and rewarding way to be involved with rescue and also have a dog without the full time commitment. We pay for everything, you just provide the love and the home. Please call 360-969-2014 for more info or for an application.

ANNOUNCEMENTS Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call 360-221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child’s life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. 425923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin’ Alive team. Our team’s mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: https://www. facebook.com/NorthPugetSoundDragonBoatClub?ref=hl Medical Marijuana patients unite; If you need assistance, advice, etc. please contact at 420patientnetworking@gmail. com. Local Whidbey Island help. If you or someone you know has been a victim of Homicide, Burglary, Robbery, Assault, Identity Theft, Fraud, Human Trafficking, Home Invasion and other crimes not listed. Victim Support Services has Advocates ready to help. Please call the 24-hr Crisis Line 888-3889221. Free Service. Visit our web site at http://victimsupportservices.org

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Imagine Oak Harbor’s 1st Food Forest, Saturdays 11am-3pm, at 526 Bayshore Drive. Each week, we have volunteer opportunities available to help care for our community garden, share organic gardening tips, and learn Permaculture principles. All ages and skill levels welcome. Schedule can change due to adverse weather conditions. If

The Side Door Barbershop is seeking experienced barbers for booth rental opportunities in a new location. For more information, call Sue Johnson at 360-672-8622

you have any questions, please contact us at: imagineapermacultureworld.gmail.com Mother Mentors needs volunteers! Oak Harbor Families with young children need your help! Volunteer just a couple of hours a week to make a difference in someone’s life! To volunteer or get more info, email wamothermentors@ gmail.com or call 360-3211484. Looking for Board Members to join the dynamic Board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET Orca Network is Growing! We are recruiting to hire an Education Program Assistant to assist with Education, Events and the Langley Whale Center. Job Responsibilities: Assisting with Orca Network education, outreach and events; Assisting with Langley Whale Center programs, volunteers/docents, education; help fill in to docent at Whale Center when needed; Coordinate between other staff and volunteers to accomplish program goals and scheduled activities; Assists with posting to Social media sites. Qualifications and Skills: Bachelors degree or equivalent experience; Excellent project management skills; Ability to operate a personal computer and use standard business software applications; Excellent interpersonal/ communications skills; Good decision making ability; Self starting, motivated, creative; Willingness to learn about and work for several different programs within Orca Network; How’d youdifficulty do? rating 0.48) Puzzle 1 (Medium, 5

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Experience with social media; Successful candidate will be available for work on Whidbey Island, which could include evenings and weekends. This is a part time position (15-30 hrs/week depending on season/event schedule), pay rate based on applicant’s experience, and funding available. Mileage is reimbursed at the Federal mileage rate. To apply, send a letter of interest and a resume with your work experience, skills, and references, to: Susan Berta, Orca Network, 485 Labella Vista Way, Freeland, WA 98249 or email to: info@orcanetwork.org (3) Whidbey SeaTac Shuttle is seeking an office administrator to oversee busy front office operations. Previous office management, clerical and computer/social media skills. Full time. Salary DOE. Send resumes to james@seatacshuttle.com (2) Help needed with grafts. I have two apple trees I grew from seed that need grafts; in Coupeville. Hank, 360-6787591 (2) Sound Water Stewards of Island County: Now hiring part time Executive Director. Degree in field related to marine environment; 3 years successful experience: management, technical (web) proficiency, grant success, volunteer coordination, communications, PR, agency collaboration. Contact: board@soundwaterstewards. org (1) No Cheating!

HOME FURNISHINGS Walnut occasional table, with beveled glass top, $30 or best offer; Stained glass terrarium, with matching cover, plus wood stand. 26-1/2” tall x 101/2” diameter of cover x 14” diameter of base. $50 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. Fireplace tool sets: brush, shovel, and poker, in a sturdy stand. One set is 30” tall, the other set is 21” tall, $15 ea. obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

MISCELLANEOUS Wind chimes, 21”, $15. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525 Looking for Xmas, Bday, Father’s Day, or just Gifts in general? These are LOCAL made crafts, I have about 50-60 of these available. They are $16.00/ea, plus shipping if you want them mailed. CASH preferred. Dimensions are: 5-6”W X 17”L. Contact me at ljohn60@gmail.com.

RECREATION 12 volt boat winch, $25 obo; Small anchor, weighs only about 3 pounds, but has a design that will keep your small boat on the beach where you left it. $5 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360320-0525. Camping items: Brookstone waterproof floating lantern, for camping, patio, poolside, or emergencies, new, $15 or best offer; Old (but clean)

The Side Door Barbershop Thermos 1-gallon jug, $5; Vintage Coleman stove, with protective denim cover, $15 or best offer; Versatile backpack, the two parts can be used separately, or (for more serious backpacking) together, $15 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. Sports items: Bag Boy golf cart, $15 obo; Golf umbrella, $5; Men’s wet suits, size L, $10 per item; Neoprene gloves and hats, size L, $5 each; Water skis: Terry Competition slalom ski, with carrying bag, $30 obo; O’Brien Competition slalom ski, Kevlar/Boron, $30 obo; Wiley wood water skis, $25 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES Excellent Grass Hay, good for horses, $7 per bale, 20 bale minimum. 360-321-1624 If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland

(1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

WANTED Looking to buy an older Campervan that has been maintained, not a Class B Motorhome. If you have one or know of where one is please contact jad.rd63@yahoo.com or 632-2179 (1) Art, Antiques & Collectibles. Cash paid for quality items. Call or text 360-661-7298 (0) DRUMMER: Need experienced, solid rock drummer with great meter. Practice weekly in Oak Harbor in fully equipped rehearsal/recording studio. Mostly rock, blues and acoustic originals plus some covers. Plan to play concerts/ festivals and work on CD. Rich at rswitzer55@netzero.net or 360-675-5470 before 9 pm. Was your Dad or Gramps in Japan or Germany? I collect old 35 mm cameras and lenses. Oak Harbor, call (970) 823-0002

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

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20 NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

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Whidbey Weekly

LOCALLY OPERATED

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4295

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Most cars up to 5 qts. 5W20, 5W30, 10W30. Other grades extra. Some filters cost extra. Vehicles with Skid Plates may be extra. Plus $1 Environmental Disposal Fee.

WE CAN SAVE YOU UP TO $250 ON BRAKE SERVICE VERSUS OUR COMPETITORS. WARRANTIED AT 30K LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE.

STARTERS ALTERNATORS TIMING BELTS SERPENTINE BELTS

BRAKES TIRES TUNE-UPS EXHAUST

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Whidbey Weekly, November 29, 2018  

WICA Whidbey Playhouse Bits & Pieces What's Going On Whidbey Weekly News Island 911 Let's Dish Chicken Little & The Astrologer Holiday Baza...

Whidbey Weekly, November 29, 2018  

WICA Whidbey Playhouse Bits & Pieces What's Going On Whidbey Weekly News Island 911 Let's Dish Chicken Little & The Astrologer Holiday Baza...