Whidbey Weekly, March 29, 2018

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March 29 through April 4, 2018

The Glass Menagerie by

Tennessee Williams directed by Tristan A.B. Steel

April 6 - 21 360.221.8268 wicaonline.org Whidbey Island Center for the Arts

565 Camano Ave. Langley, WA More Local Events inside

Harvest Fest Races Coupeville Green Coupeville Page 6

Zumba & Hula by Ate Flo Knights of Columbus Oak Harbor Page 6

SW Syrian Refugee Project Langley United Methodist Church Langley Page 9


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MARCH 29 - APRIL 4, 2018

Whidbey Weekly

LOCALLY OWNED

Bits & Pieces season begins on Sunday, April 29 at 11:00am to 2:00pm. The meeting is in Grigware Hall in the annex of Trinity Lutheran Church, 18341 State Route 525 in Freeland. To download the policy and agreement, visit www.southwhidbeytilth.org/market.html. For more information, contact market@southwhidbeytilth.org or call (360) 321-0757. [Submitted by Susan Prescott]

Letters to the Editor

Organic Farm School Welcomes New Crop of Students

Editor, A shortage of housing coupled by the rise in rents and the new rise in AirBnB market for in home apartments has left many of our local workers and support staff without housing. The question is, what can we, as a community do to keep these very necessary workers here so the businesses we rely on stay open? The new nonprofit, thincwhidbey.org, wants to build a little community of tiny houses that will rent on a sliding scale, dependent upon a person’s income. A board composed of members from 7 South Whidbey churches plans to start with each church building 1 house with their funds and volunteers. Please help get the word out that we are looking for land for sale in Langley. At this time, only Langley has authority to make this happen and it’s a huge advantage to have both city sewer and water. We need at least 1/2 acre on which to put 7 houses of 220 sq. ft. each. This would be a total of 1,500 sq. ft., about the size of just one average house. If a house is already on the property, it could be well served as the meeting house and also to house computers and a laundry room. We have just begun to raise funds, collecting $50,000, plus a $50,000 pledge for a matching contributions. If someone would want to donate the land, it would be named after them as a perpetual memorial. Their benevolence would be clear on the sign bearing their name. Donations can be made through participating churches, or to our nonprofit directly at PO Box 974, Langley, WA 98260 For more info check our website (thincwhidbey.org) or call Coyla at (360) 969-9444. Coyla Shepard Clinton, WA

Editor Go raibh maaith agat (Thank you in Gaelic) to Whidbey Weekly for their front page coverage, their informative story, the parade posters, and sponsorship of both the St Patrick’s parade and the Pub Crawl. A special thank you to the enthusiastic attendees of the St Patrick’s parade on March 17, 2018. The Irish Wildlife Society of Oak Harbor wishes to thank the parade’s other sponsors: Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce and Oak Harbor Main Street Association. Thanks also go to the UPS Store and the Oak Harbor Café and Grill for their contributions. And the City of Oak Harbor has our sincere gratitude for all their help in staging the parade and allowing the parade to march the wrong way on the one way Pioneer Way. Go raibh maaith agat! Barbara Jean Thelen Oak Harbor, WA

Vendor Orientation to Tilth Market Calling new and established vendors to an orientation to the South Whidbey Tilth Farmers Market at 4:00pm on Saturday, March 31. Review the 2018 market policy, agreement and rules, meet other vendors, discuss health and safety regulations and claim your space. Regular vendors pay $35 for a 24 week season, but $25 if signed up by April 7. The

Left to Right: Mustafa, Emily, Ovini, Raelani, Parker, Mike, Pauline, Aaron (standing tall), Jodi, Corbin, and Mark.

The Organic Farm School recently welcomed its ninth class to the Maxwelton Valley on Whidbey Island. For the next eight months, nine students will be fully immersed in all facets of farming. The intense, hands-on curriculum is focused on practical applications, designed to prepare graduates to successfully manage a small scale farm. “The 2018 crop of students comes from a wide variety of backgrounds and careers ranging from anthropology to medicine,” said Judy Feldman, the school’s Executive Director. “It’s a great bunch, including a Yale graduate, a social worker trained in the Bronx and a premed graduate who is opting for preventative health care via food, rather than medical treatment of disease.” One local graduate is Nathanial Talbot. He and wife, Annie, own Deep Harvest Farm on Whidbey Island. He attributes much of the success of their vegetable and seed farm to the education he received from the coursework over seven years ago. He described the program as an asset to Whidbey Island.

Seattle. Each have written books on the subjects they preach, through illusion and not. Whether it is a workshop exploring hidden realms of experience; or a concert hall filled with laughing patrons; Robinson and Soule deliver wonder, fortitude and hope. Audiences inhale a positive message and prosper. Both fresh from touring North America, they join together for these special appearances that will make you feel empowered.

Join them for a free, all ages performance on Saturday, March 31, 1:00pm, at the Coupeville Public Library and at a benefit show for Good Cheer’s Grow Whidbey Garden Apprentice program on Sunday, April 1 at Bayview Hall. Tickets are $10 each and can be purchased at all Good Cheer locations or email shawn@ goodcheer.org.

“While there is great interest among the younger generation to connect with the land and grow food for their community, it can be incredibly challenging for them to develop the field, marketing, and business skills necessary to make this a reality,” continued Talbot. “With its professional staff, excellent educational and infrastructural resources and connections to the Whidbey community, the Organic Farm School is well prepared to help these young farmers achieve success.” Earlier this month the Port of South Whidbey also recognized the program’s contribution to local economic development, and awarded a $3,000 grant to help the school develop its own marketing plan. The public is invited to meet the new class at a community potluck, March 29 at the Whidbey Institute from 5:30pm to 8:00pm. RSVP is appreciated at https://commitchange.com/nonprofits/4441/events/1262 [Submitted by Judy Feldman, Organic Farm School]

Mindful Magic East &West Magicians Become One A dynamic program of mindfulness demonstrated by two Master Magicians, Ben Robinson from New York and Steffan Soule of

LOCALLY OPERATED The Carl Simmons Officer of the Year was presented to Marie St. Amand. District Firefighter of the Year was Travis Zimmerman. Other Station Firefighters honored were Sean McDougald, Station 36; and Jeff Simmons, Station 31. For the second consecutive year, AJ Agnew was named District EMT of the year. One Station EMT recognized was Naomi Blair, Station 36. She was also named both District Recruit and District Rookie of the Year. Chief H.L. “Rusty” Palmer also presented several special honors this year. “These individuals have displayed great integrity, service and trust, which exemplify the values we aspire to provide to our community,” he said. “Significant actions must be taken by first responders in order to receive these high honors.” The Lifesaver Medal is one of the five highest awards presented by South Whidbey Fire/EMS. Jon Gabelein and Deputy Chief Wendy Moffatt were presented the awards for two different, and difficult, scenarios in which their actions saved lives.

[Submitted by Steffan Soule]

Twenty- eight Unit Citations went to:

America’s Boating Course

Toxic Mushrooms Rescue – Christina TurnbullAgnew, and Carmen Guerra-McAdams;

Presented by the Deception Pass Sail & Power Squadron in partnership with the Oak Harbor Yacht Club, this two-day, introductory boating class will cover basic boat handling, safety considerations, federal and state equipment and safety requirements and nautical rules of the road. Successful completion of the course will qualify individuals for the Washington State Boater Education Card now required for most boaters. The cost of the class, payable to the Deception Pass Sail & Power Squadron, is $55 per student. Spouses or partners sharing a book, their fee is $20. The course will be held Saturday, April 7 & 14, 9:00am to 3:00pm, at St Stephens Episcopal Church, 555 SE Regatta Avenue, Oak Harbor. Please make reservations for this class by emailing Pat Waters at frenchsailor@comcast. net no later than Monday, April 2, 2018. [Submitted by Pat Waters]

Volunteer Fire Fighters and EMTs Honored at Awards Banquet

Marine Rescue – Tom Peterson, Anne Collins, Tom Gideon, Christina Turnbull-Agnew, AJ Agnew, and Sean McDougald; Putney Woods Rescue - Brent Davison, Robert Husom, Carlee Mills, Marc Swenson, Terry Welch, Jon Gabelein, and Travis Zimmerman; and CPR Rescue – Jon Beck, Brent Davison, Robert Husom, Terry Welch, Travis Zimmerman, Anne Collins, Sean McDougald, Tony McNair, Rebekah Pomeroy, Ken Starkweather, Brian Boyd, Al Charat, and Jim Towers. Twelve Letters of Merit went to: Christina Turnbull-Agnew, Anne Collins, Tom Gideon, AJ Agnew, Sean McDougald, Brent Davison, Robert Husom, Terry Welch, Wendy Moffatt, Naomi Blair, Marie St. Amand, Herschel Rostov. Years of Service Awards were presented to Terry Welch for 15 years; Marie St. Amand for 10 years; and Billy Piepenbrink, James Dobberfuhl, Jeff Cravy, Herschel Rostov, Brent Davision, Anne Collins, and Marc Swenson for five years. South Whidbey Fire/EMS has provided fire suppression, emergency medical service, marine, and rope rescue to residents and visitors since 1950. Volunteers and staff responded to 2,525 calls in 2017.

“As our island, and greater region, experiences the aging out of our farming community, it is becoming increasingly important for organizations like the Organic Farm School to identify, train and empower young farmers to fill these vacating fields and rebuild our vibrant agriculture system,” he said. National media has recently reported a new breed of young, urban Americans are discovering farming as a viable career option. According to the USDA, for only the second time in the last century, the number of farmers under 35 years old is actually increasing.

www.whidbeyweekly.com

[Submitted by Sherrye Wyatt]

Pouring Poetry Wine and Beer Tasting with Poetry Reading Photo credit Sherrye Wyatt

South Whidbey Fire/EMS honored volunteer fire fighters, Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs), and their families, at its annual awards dinner on Saturday, March 10 at Useless Bay Golf and Country Club. The event opened with a presentation of the colors by the Navy Sea Cadets Honor Guard, accompanied by Snohomish County Firefighters Pipes and Drums. Special guest speaker was John Graham, founder of the Giraffe Heroes Project, whose world headquarters is based in Langley on Whidbey Island. The project’s mission is to move people to “stick their necks out” to get involved in solving public problems of all kinds, while giving them tools to succeed. Graham shared his dramatic life story, which included work in the Foreign Service. While at the United Nations he was deeply involved in U.S. initiatives in South Africa, South Asia and Cuba. “A full life demands passionate involvement, and that often means taking risks. The most significant risks challenge not just the body, but the soul,” Graham said. “Like many of you, I have found the meaning of my life in service. I challenge each of you to find what makes your life truly meaningful and then go for it with everything you have.”

Whidbey Island Center for the Arts (WICA) invites patrons to an evening of local wines and brew tasting, with regional poetry by Anastacia-Renee on April 18 at 7:30pm. Engage your palate and your mind at WICA’s first wine/brew tasting and poetry event. While you sample and sip local wines and beer, Seattle poet Anastacia-Renee will give a reading of her moving recent works. The event features delicious wines from Dancing Fish, Comforts, Blooms Winery, and beers from Double Bluff Brewery. Anastacia-Renee is the current Civic Poet of Seattle, recipient of the 2017 Artist of the Year Award, and former 2015-2017 Poet-in- Residence at Hugo House. She is the author of five books and has received writing fellowships from Cave Canem, Hedgebrook, VONA, Artist BITS & PIECES

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MARCH 29 - APRIL 4, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED

ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

Just because Bud Light is the number one selling beer in America, does that give them the right to say “Dilly, Dilly” every time I turn on the television?

If you are not watching the NCAA b-ball tourney, you may have avoided the overworked, over-run, Bud Light Dilly Dilly heavy television commercials with scantily clad, sword bearing Vikings screaming silliness. Hopefully, this summer I will still be able to enjoy a Dilly Dilly ice cream bar from the gas station. And then there's the song, “Lavender Blue, dilly dilly.” Oh my. Someone please turn off the lights in my memory bank so we can get out of here. The Dope Show Looking for a new way to celebrate after filing your income tax, but before paying your property tax? The Historic Everett Theatre (www.historiceveretttheatre.org) has just the tokeit, or ticket – The Dope Show, 4/20, at 8pm. At this historic location, on that now historic date and time, one can enjoy comedians who will first perform a sober set, then take a short intermission to get stoned, before trying to find their way back on stage. A variety of nationally touring comics, many of whom have allegedly never indulged before, will be on the show. Talk about a One Night Stoned. Word has it armed security guards will man the candy counter, both during and after intermission. I bet they run out of Milk Duds. Criminal slang Given the proliferation of cop and robber and/ or bad boy re-enactment crime shows, I have had to break out my 1959 copy of The Hardy Boys Detective Handbook to verify the meanings of some of the terms. Amazingly enough, many of these crime terms are also used in our grocery stores. Bag—To steal. In police language, to arrest. In narcotics slang, heroin. In the grocery biz, paper or plastic. Berries—Dollars. In grocery slang, time off, or something good, as in “that's the berries;” also, what is colorful and often found in produce. Bit—Term in prison. In grocery slang, a small bite, as in “I just took a bit.” Blast—Shoot. In grocery slang, having fun at work, or leaving work early, as in “what a blast we are having” or “let's blast outta here.” Box man—A safe cracker. In grocery slang, the guy with the Xact-o knife. Bull—Police officer or detective. In grocery slang, talking to the boss. Can—Prison. In grocery slang, bathroom. Kickback— Payoff to police officers to overlook criminal operations. In grocery slang, going to the break room. Wet goods—Stolen goods. In grocery slang, clean up, aisle 5. Pineapple—A bomb, generally a small bomb similar to a hand grenade. In grocery slang, not in season, or maybe next week. There are several more pages to analyze, but right now I am beginning to feel like a herder, or a guard in a penal institution. In grocery slang, the guy or gal who locks up. Thanks to Franklin W. Dixon and FBI Special Agent William F. Flynn, who retired in the early 70s, for sharing this valuable information. One never knows when his or her next citizen's arrest might be. Just one more One more time That's what we often say We all want closure Before our loved one's final day I should have said this

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Whidbey Weekly I should have done that She was gone before I asked her Are we good where we are at? Did she know how much I cared? Did I ever tell her so? When did we last talk? Not sure I even know Way too much of me Not so much of others A beautiful sister gone To join the heavenly mothers Of which our dear Linda Well she is surely one “Don't call me, Shirley!” We surely had great fun Memories shall linger But not the “just one more” That we could and would have had At sister Linda's Goodwill Store Facial fears My dear friend Dria called the other day to let me know my speculation of having a facial may not be worth speculating. “Hi. This is Dria. I'm just calling to say I was reading your article about your possible, maybe, per chance, doing a facial. Have you ever watched the movie, Miss Congeniality? I don't know if you want a facial or not, but, anyway, they can be fun, but I've heard that they can be painful if done right. Anyway, I also have a joke for you. Why did Beethoven get rid of his chickens?... Why did Beethoven get rid of his chickens? Because they kept saying 'Bach, Bach...Bach, Bach, Bach!'

www.whidbeyweekly.com MARCH 29 - APRIL 4, 2018 LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TEDTED

Celebrating Our 40th COUPEVILLE Consecutive FARMERS Season in 2018! MARKET Saturdays 10am-2pm April 7 through GROWING SINCE 1979 October 12

PHONE: (360)682-2341

FAX: (360)682-2344

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Whidbey Weekly LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw

Ha ha. I'll talk to you later, Jim. Bye, bye.”

Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala

Your voice mail message is a keeper, Dria. So, I am keeping it.

Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Thanks for making me smile, and the rest of the folks who joined us. By the way, Dria. You are a keeper, too. Learned this week While reading David Fisher's companion volume to Bill O'Reilly's Fox DocuSeries Legends & Lies, The Real West, based on their research, and the teachings of O'Reilly in 1971 at Pace High School in Miami, I have been amazed, chapter after chapter. Thanks to Sno-Isle library in Freeland which had the book displayed, I have learned Texas is an Indian word for friends, the first proposed name of Texas was Fredonia (no relation to Groucho's Freedonia in Duck Soup), and the Lone Ranger could have been based on the heroics of a real African American lawman named Bass Reeves. The twelve chapters tell the real stories of Daniel Boone, David Crockett (he preferred being called David, not Davy), Kit Carson, Black Bart, Wild Bill Hickok (assassinated at the age of 39), Bass Reeves, George Armstrong Custer, Buffalo Bill and Annie Oakley, Jesse James, Doc Holliday, Billy the Kid, and Butch Cassidy. My appreciation again to Billie Barb for getting me in the Freeland library more frequently this month to enjoy her Valentine card collection display in the lobby. A show stopper.

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

Volume 10, Issue 13 | © MMXVIII Whidbey Weekly

PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Good Cheer Presents

Mindful Magic Show Sunday, April 1st

4pm-6pm ~ Bayview Hall $10 Ticket

Featuring two world-class magicians in a benefit for the Grow Whidbey Garden Apprentice Program

By the way, Walt Disney left a word out of Davy Crockett's motto. Walt had Fess Parker say, “Be sure you are right, then go ahead.” Crockett's credo was actually part of his two lines of prose–“I have this rule, for others when I am dead, Be always sure you are right, then go ahead.” Always, Mr. Crockett, always. In 1827, when newly elected Congressman Crockett from Tennessee was confronted by a staunch supporter of President John Quincy Adams during Davy's first visit to Washington, D.C., the Adams man asked Crockett who he was. “I'm that same David Crockett, fresh from the backwoods, half horse, half alligator, a little touched with the snapping turtle; can wade the Mississippi, leap the Ohio, ride upon a streak of lightning and slip without a scratch down a honey locust; can whip my weight in wildcats and, if any gentleman pleases, for a ten dollar bill he may throw in a panther...” Sounds like a county commissioner to me. To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

Steffan Soule

Ben Robinson

Care to donate tickets to Good Cheer Food Bank Families? Contact shawn@goodcheer.org or purchase from any Good Cheer Location and tell them to “Pass them on to a Good Cheer Family.”

Buy tickets from all Good Cheer Locations, Tilth Board Members and SW School Farm

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MARCH 29 - APRIL 4, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

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Whidbey Weekly BITS ‘n’ PIECES

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LOCALLY OPERATED 2

Trust, and Jack Straw, as well as a writing residency from Ragdale. Her cross-genre writing has appeared in many anthologies. She teaches poetry and creative writing at Hugo House and Seattle University and lives as a superhero in Seattle with her wife and dog.

Welcome, Dawn, to the Gene’s Art & Frame Family!

All Seats $15, wine and beer sampling additional.

Big or Small…We Frame it All!

Tickets available at the WICA Box Office: (360) 221-8268 or online at https://tickets.wicaonline.org

currently serves as president of the Theta Upsilon chapter. He maintains a 3.83 GPA. In addition to being named to the 2018 AllWashington Academic Team, Mejak Jones is one of only 50 students nationwide to be selected as a 2018 Coca-Cola Academic Team Bronze Scholar and will receive a $1,000 scholarship. Students are nominated for the academic team by their college for their academic achievement, leadership, and engagement in college and community service.

[Submitted by Fritha Strand, WICA]

Whidbey Playhouse Presents Agatha Christie’s Classic: The Hollow Director Kevin Wm. Meyer announces the April 2018 production of the classic Agatha Christie thriller The Hollow at the Whidbey Playhouse. In the mystery/thriller by Agatha Christie, the action takes place at the Virginia home of Col. Henry Angkatell and his wife, “Miss” Lucy. The visitors of the Hollow all have secrets in this romantic jigsaw puzzle. The missing piece is a new neighbor who used to be involved with one of the guests, and desperately wants to rekindle the relationship at any cost, despite the fact that he is married. When he is found dead, the neighbors and the visitors had a reason and the means to have committed the crime. In true Agatha Christie style, the ending keeps you guessing to the bitter end.

GENE’S ART & FRAME SINCE 1967

The Hollow runs April 13-29, 2018, at the Whidbey Playhouse, 730 S.E. Midway Blvd in Oak Harbor. Tickets are $18.

Whidbey’s Largest Selection of Fine Art Supplies

Call the box office at 360-679-2237 for further information, show dates, discounts, and reservations, email office@whidbeyplayhouse.com or visit www.whidbeyplayhouse.com

www.genesartframing.com

[Submitted by Whidbey Playhouse]

360-675-3854 • 250 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor 9:30-6 Monday-Friday • 10-5:30 Saturday • Closed Sunday

Two Outstanding Students Represent Skagit Valley College on the All-Washington Academic Team 2018 Two outstanding Skagit Valley College (SVC) students, Mejak Jones (of Anacortes) and Christopher Leyva Vera (of Coupeville), were named to this year’s All-Washington Academic Team. Both were honored at the annual ceremony at South Puget Sound Community College on March 22. The All-Washington Academic Team ceremony provides an opportunity for community and technical college students to be recognized for their academic achievements and community involvement. This year’s team is made up of 78 students representing 33 community and technical colleges in Washington. Joining the annual ceremony to honor the student scholars were their families and friends, along with many legislators, and college trustees and presidents. The students were congratulated by Governor Inslee’s office and each student received a medallion from his or her college president. Mejak and Christopher received their medallion from SVC President Dr. Thomas Keegan.

Christopher Leyva Vera is 24 years old and is a student at SVC’s Whidbey Island Campus where he holds the position of student body president of the Whidbey Island Campus, along with positions in other clubs and committees. Christopher is a DACA beneficiary and a first-generation college student. He plans to earn a degree in social work to help marginalized communities. He maintains a 3.96 GPA. KeyBank of Washington has served as a major sponsor of the All-Washington Academic Team for 22 years. KeyBank is providing scholarship support to each member of the All-Washington Academic Team with a $250 scholarship. [Submitted by Arden Ainley, Chief Public Information Officer, SVC]

Welcome the Whales Festival On Saturday and Sunday, April 14 and 15, don’t miss the annual “Welcome the Whales Parade and Festival” in Langley to honor and celebrate the arrival of Gray whales to Whidbey Island. Welcome the Whales Festival is sponsored by Orca Network and the Langley Chamber of Commerce. Saturday, April 14, 11:00am at the Langley United Methodist Church (3rd/Anthes) there will be hands-on educational displays, costume-making, and children’s activities, followed by the Whale and Critter Parade in downtown Langley, beginning at 1:30pm at the US Bank parking lot (2nd/Anthes). The parade will end at the Waterfront “Whale Bell” Park on First Street with a blessing for the whales, music, and celebration on the beach, while watching for Gray whales in Saratoga Passage. The Langley Whale Center at 105 Anthes will be open from 11:00am to 5:00pm, with special activities and displays about Gray whales and staffed by Orca Network/Whale Center docents. In the afternoon, presentations will begin at 3:00pm back at the Langley Methodist Church as Orca Network welcomes Senior Ecologist Russ Holmes, who will discuss Ghost Shrimp Monitoring on Camano Island, and John Calambokidis of Cascadia Research Collective with an update on tag data analysis and new photo ID results. Sunday, April 15 – Help protect important gray whale feeding habitat and join Orca Network for a Langley beach cleanup from 10:00am to 12:00pm. Then, browse the Langley Whale Center’s exhibits, displays and gift shop from 11:00am to 5:00pm and join them for a Meet the Artist event with Sue Coccia from 11:00am to 2:00pm.

​​ Mejak Jones is 21 years old and is pursuing an associate’s degree in physics/engineering at Skagit Valley College’s Mount Vernon Campus. After graduating, Mejak will transfer to a fouryear university to complete his degree. He

In the afternoon, from 3:00pm to 5:00pm, take to the water to see the Gray whales, on Orca Network’s Gray Whale Fundraising Cruise on board the Mystic Sea whale watch boat. Tickets are $75 and must be purchased in advance at http://shop.orcanetwork.org/product_p/ whalewatch.htm. For more information, please contact Cindy Hansen at cindy@orcanetwork. org.

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MARCH 29 - APRIL 4, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED For more information about Welcome the Whales weekend or Orca Network’s Whale Sighting Network, visit www.OrcaNetwork.org [Submitted by Cindy Hansen, Education and Events Coordinator, Orca Network]

Coupeville United Methodist Church Celebrates 165 Years

and his wife Rebecca. The first minister to the new church, Reverend W.B. Morse, trekked hundreds of miles on foot, horseback, and by Indian canoe to reach people of his waterbound district. The first church building was erected in 1859. The current Coupeville Methodist Church building on North Main Street was constructed in 1894, after a fire destroyed the previous building. [Submitted by Robin Hertlein]

56th Annual Trash & Treasure Sale

On April 22, the Coupeville United Methodist Church will celebrate it’s 165 year anniversary, and the public is invited to participate in this historic event. As part of Sunday’s worship service at 11:00am, the History Committee will describe aspects of the Coupeville church from its beginnings in the 1850s. A potluck lunch will be available immediately after the service in the fellowship hall. Bishop Elaine J. W. Stanovsky will be an honored guest at the anniversary celebration. Bishop Stanovsky offers episcopal leadership and missional vision for the people and churches of the Greater Northwest Area of The United Methodist Church, inclusive of the Alaska, Oregon-Idaho, and Pacific Northwest Conferences. Her current assignment to the Greater Northwest follows eight years with the Mountain Sky Area, and 27 years of ministry in the greater Seattle area as a local church pastor, ecumenical officer, district superintendent and director of connectional ministries. On Sunday, April 24, 1853, the first Protestant sermon was delivered at the homes of settlers on Whidbey Island. The two ministers who traveled to the island enrolled members into the Whidbey Methodist Episcopal Church, which later became Coupeville United Methodist. The church at Coupeville was the first church organized north of Olympia in the Washington Territory. Among the church’s earliest founders were Colonel Isaac Ebey

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Whidbey Weekly

The 56th annual Trash & Treasure sale will be held Saturday, April 21 from 9:00am to 2:00pm by St. Augustine’s in-the-Woods Episcopal Church at 5217 South Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland. Since 1962, St. A’s Trash & Treasure sale has raised approximately a quarter of a million dollars for Whidbey charities. Stop by to find housewares, jewelry, art and artifacts, craft and office supplies, linens, toys and sporting goods, furnishings and small appliances, tools, garden items and plants, and more! Don’t miss the Treasure Shop with antiques, silver and crystal, fine arts and collectibles, and many wonderful surprises at astonishing prices. All profits go to local charities. This year’s beneficiaries are Healing Circles (Langley), the Soup’s On soup kitchen in Langley, Time Together Adult Day Program’s Scholarship Fund (a program within Island Senior Resources), and WAIF. Donations may be brought to the church Tuesday through Thursday between 9:00am and 3:30pm. They do not accept clothing, books, computer or exercise equipment, TVs (unless flat-screen), large furniture, anything broken or stained or not in working order. [Submitted by Mary Laissue]

NAS Whidbey Island Encourages Drone Safety Recreational drones have become increasingly common in our national skies, for several

www.whidbeyweekly.com MARCH 29 - APRIL 4, 2018 LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TEDTED

different reasons. Flying drones for recreational purposes can be a lot of fun and have many beneficial uses. However, they can also be dangerous. Officials at Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island want drone operators in the local area to thoroughly understand the rules and safety precautions where they fly in order to prevent collisions with military and civilian aircraft.

- Report suspicious activities to NAS Whidbey Island base security at (360) 257-3893, or call 911. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has published guidelines regarding recreational drone use at https://www.faa.gov/uas/. If you have a smartphone, you can download the FAA’s B4UFLY app for approved flight zones and for flight planning.

“Safety is our number one priority,” said Capt. Geoff Moore, Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. “Unmanned aircraft systems are becoming increasingly important, not only as recreational devices, but their use also has many potential practical applications for local businesses and our national economy. We have to find the balance between safety of their use and the role they play in our society.” All drone activities within the United States must follow the appropriate Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations and guidelines. Operating drones outside FAA rules and guidelines is considered unauthorized activity and could be subject to penalties under the law. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) also administers the Small Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Rule. To fly under the Small UAS Rule you must get a remote pilot certificate from the FAA and register your UAS as a “nonmodeler.” To find information on flying under Small UAS Rule go to: https://www.faa.gov/uas/getting_ started/part_107/.

[Submitted by Mike Welding, Public Affairs Officer, NAS Whidbey Island]

Local Business News Coupeville Chamber Business Excellence Awards and Board Installation

President, Janet Burchfield, Front Street Realty; Vice President, Chris Renfro, Edward Jones; Financial Officer, Dawn Hesselgrave, Branch Business Services; Secretary, Jennifer Roberts, Windermere Real Estate Directors: Matt Iverson, Iverson Insurance; Mary Alice Sterling, Community Volunteer; Chris Michalopoulos, Port of Coupeville; Lisa Bernhardt, Pacific Northwest Art School; Erick Harada, Harada Physical Therapy; Eric Marshall, Whidbey Weekly.

While flying drones in designated areas, pilots are reminded to adhere to other safety measures such as: - Never fly near other aircraft or ships. - If you plan on flying within 5 miles of Ault Field call Air Traffic Control at (360) 257-2887. - Stay informed of policies and rules. - Never fly over groups of people.

Sponsors of the Event: Business Excellence Awards - Whidbey Island Heritage Bank Chamber Member Dinner - Chris Renfro, Edward Jones and Front Street Realty

DONATIONS NEEDED! FREE PICK UP! Your donations are tax deductible! Support Habitat For Humanity With Your Gently Used Appliances & Furniture

20%

of Island County

New mattresses at Both Stores!

! S T A E S E V O L & S A F O S L L OFF* A

Your Support Helps Place Families In Homes

*Blue Price

2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU! FREELAND • 1592 Main Street

OAK HARBOR • 290 SE Pioneer

southstore@islandcountyhabitat.com

store@islandcountyhabitat.com www.habitatfurnitureandmore.info

360.331.6272

FREELAND STORE ONLY We carry building materials: Cabinets, hardware, doors and flooring. (Bring donations of building supplies to Freeland location)

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Thursday, March 22, the Coupeville Chamber of Commerce held their annual Membership Dinner and Business Excellence Awards Ceremony in the Coupeville Rec Hall. Mayor Molly Hughes installed the 2018 Board of Directors:

Awards were presented by Marcia Marks of Whidbey Island Heritage Bank, Janet Buchfield and Mayor Molly Hughes and were awarded to: Knead & Feed - Business of The Year; Sarah Richards of Lavender Wind - Business Person of The Year; Penn Cove Tap Room - Entrepreneurial Spirit; Penn Cove Water Festival - Arts & Culture; Jan and Marshall Bronson - Lifetime Achievement Award.

To register your drone go to https://faadronezone.faa.gov

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360.675.8733

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED AT BOTH STORES!

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MARCH 29 - APRIL 4, 2018

Whidbey Weekly

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www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED All are welcome to St. Hubert to reflect on the Passion of Christ at this re-creation of the betrayal, the abandonment, and the agony leading to Easter. Deepen your spiritual journey this Holy Week. For additional information, call (360) 221-5383.

Community Easter Sunrise Service Sunday, April 1, 6:30am Gazebo in Windjammer Park, Oak Harbor All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

tunities with the Easter Bunny and an Easter Basket Raffle prior to the Hunt. Come early to get your raffle tickets.

Lions Club Blood Drive

Everyone is invited to join for a special Easter Egg hunt, photos with the Easter Bunny, and some delicious cookies. To participate, guests are asked to bring one non-perishable canned food item per hunter to contribute to the Charity of the Year for 2018: North Whidbey Help House. Located at 100 E Whidbey Ave, call (360) 675-2569.

Thursday, March 29, 10:00am-4:00pm Coupeville United Methodist Church Sponsored by the Coupeville Lions Club. One pint of blood can save 3 lives and together we have helped save hundreds of lives in our community hospitals throughout Western Washington. To donate, just drop in or you may schedule an appointment: DonorSched@ bloodworksnw.org or call 800-398-7888. For more info call Deanna Rogers at (360) 678-7727. The church is located at 608 N Main St.

Easter Egg Hunt for the Kids Saturday, March 31, 10:00am Harbor Tower Village

Bunny Daze Rabbit Hunt Saturday, March 31, 11:00am Boy & Dog Park, Langley

Free tax return preparation and e-filing for taxpayers with low and moderate income. Supported by AARP Foundation. Call (360) 678-3000 to schedule an appointment. https://senior-resources.org

Mayor Tim Callison will make an official proclamation, a special bunny guest, Hare Rabbit, will be welcomed, spring flowers and treats will be handed out, and everyone is invited to wear their bunny ears. Then the kid’s Bunny Hunt begins with an abundance of gentlyloved bunnies, hidden in plain view around town, for kids to find and take home (the stuffed ones, not the real bunnies). There are even several hop-scotch courts around town for a bit of bunny-like bounding.

“Annoyance”

Easter Egg Hunt

AARP Tax Aid Thursday, March 29, 1:00pm-7:00pm Island Senior Resources Center, 14594 WA-525, Langley

Thursday, March 29, 7:30pm Friday, March 30, 7:30pm Saturday, March 31, 7:30pm Outcast Theater, Island County Fairgrounds, Langley In this comedy by Sam Brobick, directed by Sandy K. O’Brien, a very annoying man goes to see two therapists with the hopes of becoming less annoying; he ends up driving them both over the edge. Tickets are $18 for adults; $14 for students and seniors, and a special $12 performance on March 29. Order online from www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3346537, or email Outcast Productions at ocp@whidbey. com to reserve tickets and pay at the door by cash or check.

Meet George Fant Friday, March 30, 4:00pm Louie-G’s, 31359 SR 20, Oak Harbor Come meet Seattle Seahawks offensive tackle George Fant. For more information, call (360) 240-8999.

Comedy Showcase #6 Friday, March 30, 8:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Whidbey Audubon Society Field Trip Saturday, March 31, 7:40am Edmonds resident and bird photographer Bev Bowe will meet the group in Mukilteo and lead them to some of her favorite Edmonds birding spots for both water and land birds. Potential places to visit include Edmonds Fishing Pier, Brackett’s Landing Shoreline Sanctuary, Edmonds Marsh, Pine Ridge Park and Yost Park. Bring a lunch and meet at Bayview Park & Ride to carpool to the 8:30am ferry to Mukilteo. To register, contact Sarah Schmidt at (360) 929-3592 or 4bats@ixoreus.com. There is no participant limit.

Campfire Kids Spring Craft Bazaar Saturday, March 31, 9:00am-3:00pm Oak Harbor Elks Lodge, 155 NE Ernst St.

Saturday, March 31, 11:00am Dan Porter Park, Clinton Join the Clinton Chamber of Commerce for this FREE and FUN event every year—with thousand of eggs, candy prizes, and the Local Fire Dept. staff and their big trucks, too. More information at info@discoverclintonwa.com.

Live Music: The 3 of Us Saturday, March 31, 6:00pm-9:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Great Jazz, Latin Jazz, and other favorites live one sate with The 3 of Us (Doug, Fabi & Roz). No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Easter Egg Hunt Sunday, April 1, 12:00pm-1:00pm VFW Post 7392, Oak Harbor The public is welcome to join a kids 12 & under Easter Egg Hunt. VFW Post 7392 is located at 3037 Goldie Road.

Live Music: Arielle Deem Monday, April 2, 6:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Arielle Deem is a Los Angeles based vocalist, composer and visual artist, advocating for social change through original music and art. Her warm presence and transformative voice invite communities to actively listen and recognize the similarities in all of us, as her music blends progressive jazz, soul, vocal looping/fx and spoken word. No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Dine Out for Kids Thursday, April 5, lunch or dinner Christopher’s Restaurant, Coupeville

Experience a riveting and inspiring true-life adventure aboard the high tech sloop Morning Light. Everyone is welcome. Caring for your Personal Ephemera Monday, April 2, 1:30pm-3:30pm Coupeville Library Learn how to care for personal ephemera, from photos to documents, books and more. Presented by Sarah Aldrich, Archivist, Island County Historical Society. Discuss the Classics with Rita Drum Monday, April 2, 1:30pm Oak Harbor Library Please join us as we discuss Jane Austen’s “Sense and Sensibility” in preparation for the Classic Novel that will be presented the summer Island Shakespeare Festival. We would so enjoy your input as we discuss this memorable work. For further information, please contact Rita Bartell Drum at ritadrum777@ gmail.com or (631) 707-5980. Whidbey Reads Presents - Coupeville Maritime Heritage Foundation: Sail Back in Time Monday, April 2, 5:30pm-7:00pm Coupeville Library The Suva is now the proud flagship of the Coupeville Maritime Heritage Foundation. Find out about upcoming sailings and events aboard this historic craft. LEGO in the Library with The LEGO Movie Tuesday, April 3, 2:00pm-4:00pm Coupeville Library Build your best with LEGO by yourself or with a building buddy while we watch “The LEGO Movie.” Popcorn included! For ages 5 and up. AARP Tax Aide Wednesdays, April 4 & 11, 10:00am-4:30pm Coupeville Library Free tax return preparation and e-filing for taxpayers with low and moderate income. Call (360) 678-3000 to schedule an appointment. Whidbey Reads Presents - Boating Fun on Whidbey Wednesday, April 4, 2:00pm-3:30pm Freeland Library Members of the South Whidbey Yacht Club will present information on boating opportunities for all on Whidbey Island. Wednesday Night with the Stars: “Coco” Wednesday, April 4, 5:30pm-7:30pm Coupeville Library Join us for popcorn and a movie! This month we are showing Pixar’s “Coco.” Rated PG. Open House - Information about the library levy election Thursday, April 5, 10:30am-11:30am Freeland Library

Enjoy a delicious lunch or dinner at Christopher’s and a portion of the proceeds will benefit the Community Foundation for Coupeville Schools.

Join us at an open house to learn more about the library levy election on April 24. Staff will answer your questions and share information about library funding and what will be on the ballot.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events

Religious Services

See schedule below Cost: Free

28th Annual Easter Egg Hunt

Brain Care as We Age Thursday, March 29, 1:00pm-2:30pm Oak Harbor Library

Saturday, March 31, 10:00am Coupeville Town Park

Monday, April 2, 2:00pm-3:30pm Freeland Library

Sponsored by Soroptimist International of Coupeville and open to Toddlers through 5th graders. As a voluntary admission please bring a nonperishable food item for Gifts from the Heart Food Bank. There will be photo oppor-

What happens to the brain as we age, and what can we do to maintain a healthy brain? Discover how to recognize normal brain changes, and assess ways to keep your brain healthy.

Handmade/Crafters items and local businesses.

Whidbey Reads Presents - Movie: “Morning Light” Friday, March 30, 2:00pm-4:00pm Freeland Library

Tenebrae Wednesday, March 28, 7:00pm St. Hubert Church, 804 Third St, Langley The choir of St. Hubert Catholic Church will present the Office of Tenebrae for Holy Week. Tenebrae, Latin for shadows, is a service of scripture readings, solemn hymns, and the gradual diminishing of light as candles are individually extinguished during the service. Tenebrae is centuries old and based on Matins and Lauds of the last three days of Holy Week (the Triduum).

Everyone is invited to join many churches and community friends from the greater Oak Harbor area as we gather for a special community-wide Easter Sunrise service. The service will be a brief gathering of song, scripture and celebration of Jesus’ death and resurrection. A love offering will be taken to support The Haven emergency homeless shelter of Oak Harbor. Warm refreshments and friendly conversations will follow.

Galleries & Art Shows Whidbey Allied Artists Show & Sale Friday, March 30, 10:00am-6:00pm Saturday, March 31, 10:00am-6:00pm Sunday, April 1, 10:00am-5:00pm Coupeville Rec Hall, 901 NW Alexander St. Whidbey Allied Artists, a collaborative group of artists from throughout the island, will welcome spring in their next art and gift show. More than twenty artists from throughout the island will show and sell a wide variety of their traditional and non-traditional art. Admission is free. For questions, please email WhidbeyArtists@gmail.com.

Garden Show Opening Reception: Saturday, April 7, 5:00pm-7:00pm Show continues through April Museo, Langley Bringing together more than 30 talented artists, the Museo annual Garden Show artfully celebrates new beginnings, growth and the blossoming of art. Join new Museo owners Nancy Whittaker and Michael Dickter as they usher in an exciting new season.

Meetings & Organizations Bats: Why You Want Them, and How To Keep Them Thursday, March 29, 6:00pm Coupeville Rec Hall, 901 NW Alexander St. Everyone is welcome to join the Island County Master Gardener Foundation at their monthly general meeting to learn about these useful mammals. Bats are among a gardener’s best friends and help maintain a healthy ecosystem. Learn how to create an attractive environment for them so they can do their best for you. The social part of the meeting begins at 6:00pm, followed by a brief general meeting. The continuing education class about bats starts at 7:00pm. These meetings are open to the public at no charge.

Greenbank Garden Club Thursday, April 5, 9:30am Greenbank Progressive Club, Greenbank Doors open at 9:30am for a social time followed by a short business meeting starting promptly at 10:00am. Our speaker is Gary Ketcheson WSU EXT Island County Master Gardener he will be speaking on Soils and Soil Building. Guests and new members welcome. The Greenbank Progressive Club is located on the corner of Bakken and Firehouse Roads.

Whidbey Island Weavers’ Guild Thursday, April 5, 10:00am-2:00pm Pacific Rim Institute, Coupeville Program begins at 1:00pm with Judith MacKenzie McCuin speaking on identifying Lichens and their use in natural dyeing fibers and textiles. Judith is the ultimate textile artist and teacher. She has an in-depth understanding of every aspect of spinning, weaving, knitting and dyeing. Her international teaching career spans the globe from the Arctic Circle all the way to Turkey. Bring a brown bag lunch and your own beverage cup. For more information, visit www.whidbeyweaversguild.org For a list of continuous Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com WHAT'S GOING ON

continued on page

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Whidbey Weekly

NEWS www.whidbeyweekly.com

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Earth Day Celebration p. 10 MARCH 29 - APRIL 4, 2018

WICA tackles Tennessee Williams By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

Taking on an iconic play by one of America’s most famous playwrights could be considered both daunting and exhilarating at the same time. But that is exactly the sort of challenge at which Whidbey Island Center for the Arts excels, and island audiences will have the opportunity to enjoy performances of the Tennessee Williams classic “The Glass Menagerie,” beginning Friday, April 6 and running through April 21 in Langley. “The Glass Menagerie,” written in 1944, catapulted Williams to the forefront of 20th century American playwrights. The play is highly autobiographical and tells the story of the Wingfield family – a single mother and her two adult children – who live in poverty in St. Louis. It is written as a “memory play,” with Tom Wingfield narrating in hindsight. The small cast is directed by Tristan A.B. Steel and features

Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Island Center for the Arts Nichole Morell and Connor Kinzer play Laura Wingfield and Jim O’Connor in Tennessee Williams’ “The Glass Menagerie,” opening Friday, April 6 at Whidbey Island Center for the Arts in Langley.

Bob Downing as Tom Wingfield, Patricia Duff as mother Amanda, Connor Kinzer as the gentleman caller Jim O’Connor, and Nichole Morell as daughter Laura. Family dynamics and relationships take center stage in this production. “I think families are fascinating to watch,” said Kinzer. “There is so much history and love and frustration. You want the best for one another, but it’s hard to express that sometimes. “This family has had to deal with their husband/father abandoning them and then subsequently the Great Depression,” Kinzer continued. “In telling the family’s story, Williams is unapologetically honest, which I think makes it something people will always be able to relate to.” It’s not often actors get to tackle a work by Tennessee Williams, so cast members said they were thrilled to have this opportunity.

Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Island Center for the Arts Bob Downing serves as the narrator and Tom Wingfield – one and the same – in the classic “The Glass Menagerie,” play April 6 -21 at Whidbey Island Center for the Arts in Langley.

REGISTER TODAY!

RUN THE BRIDGE

“I jumped at the chance to play Amanda Wingfield, one of the great parts for middle-aged women in the American canon,” said Duff. “So yes, it is a passion project for me. Just being able to speak such beautifully poetic language is a pleasure for me and I imagine for any actor who plays this part. It is also an absolute challenge; so satisfying if I can get it right.”

Run the famed Deception Pass Bridge!

“I’ve loved this play since I first read it in high school,” said Downing. “I immediately identified with Tom and I always wanted to play him, so this is definitely a dream project for me.” Downing, as it happens, grew up in St. Louis, where the play is set, and his own mother is a southerner, like Tom’s mother Amanda. Tennessee Williams, who also wrote the classic “A Streetcar Named Desire” and “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof,” may have achieved acclaim with his writing, but he was not immune to his own struggles, succumbing to alcohol and drugs later in life. But perhaps it was his own imperfections that gave him the ability to create the deeply nuanced characters that grace his work, enabling actors to dig into their roles. “Williams is a creative master at creating characters,” said Duff. “Often an actor must find the layers of a character through her creation of a history for the person and also with the help of the director’s vision. However, in this play, the layers are written deeply into each character.” “Amanda’s expectations for her children are so self-serving that she fails to see their most tender talents,” said Laura

See GLASS continued on page 10

- Tech Shirts for All Participants - Customized Finisher Medals for All Events - Personalized Participant Bibs - Free Race Photos - Finish Line Celebration with Live Music

Sunday, April 22, 2018 Oak Harbor, WA Register Now at

www.runwhidbey.com Run for a day, play for a weekend!

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MARCH 29 - APRIL 4, 2018

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Whidbey Weekly

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EASTER SERVICES & Egg Hunt (@1015am)

A P R I L 1 S T // 9 A M & 1 1 A M OAK HARBOR HIGH SCHOOL

Childcare Available (ages 0-5)

LOCALLY OPERATED

EASTER IS APRIL 1

Sunday, April 1

Sweet Mona’s has a nice selection of Easter goodies. Imported German Hazelnut Eggs with a real shell, Easter Marzipan, Truffle Easter Eggs and so much more.

Special Easter Brunch Menu 10am-3pm Live Music with Skinny Tie Jazz 11am-1pm

Sweet Monas

Dinner Specials 5pm to close Family Friendly Dining Reservations Highly Recommended 360.675.4053

Chocolate Boutique

www.SweetMonas.com

670 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor rusticacafe.com

221 2ND STREET STE 16 • LANGLEY • 360-221-2728

Hop On In For The Best Savings In Town At

See Us For Your Easter Event & Party Decor! • PLATES • NAPKINS • TABLECLOTHS • CENTERPIECES Whidbey Party Store Party Supplies For Every Celebration

The Store with the Big Heart All proceeds donated to community programs

Great Customer Service 270 SE Cabot Dr #2 Oak Harbor 360-544-3068 whidbeypartysupplies.com

(360)675-1133 600 SE Barrington Drive • Oak Harbor

EASTER EGG HUNT! VFW POST 7392 • 3037 GOLDIE RD • OAK HARBOR

Sunday April 1 Promptly At Noon Open To The Public

Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-5:30pm Donation Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-4pm

EASTER BRUNCH ISLAND STYLE!! Sunday, April 1 Brunch & Breakfast Menu 9:00am - 1:00pm Prime Rib, Eggs Benedict, Kalbi Ribs, Loco Moco, Huli Huli Chicken & Lots, Lots More!!! Lunch Menu 11:00am – 4:00pm Dinner 4:00pm – Close Specials: Prime Rib, Lamb Burger, Lamb Chop

Easter Egg Hunt is for kids under 12 Event is co-sponsored by the auxiliaries of Veterans of Foreign Wars and American Legion

RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED 360-675-5858 • 32295 SR 20 • Oak Harbor • www.eatatflyers.com

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MARCH 29 - APRIL 4, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED

April is for Tulips: Enjoy a month-long spring celebration featuring a parade in La Conner (April 14, 2 PM), street fair (Downtown Mt. Vernon, April 20-22), salmon barbecue and fields of beautiful colors.

LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TEDTED

Garage Sale, Antiques & More at Skagit County Fairgrounds: More than 140 vendors, food, and live music. April 13-14, $3 Admission, $3 Parking. Skagitcounty.net/ garagesale.

by Amy Hannold

Discover your Washington State Parks: Saturday, April 14, for “Spring Day” and Sunday, April 22, for “Earth Day” are “Free Parks Days” in Washington. Whidbey Island has five Washington State Parks to explore, and several more are within a short drive from the island. Get outdoors! Park events and information at Parks.state.wa.us.

www.whidbeyweekly.com MARCH 29 - APRIL 4, 2018

Whidbey Island Comicon: From youngling to sith lord, kohai to senpai, muggle to wizard, average to Super, join the FREE geek-fest at the Oak Harbor Library, Saturday, April 7, 10 AM–5 PM. All ages and fandoms will find something of interest with panels, workshops, Geek Training Room, gaming room, scavenger hunt and costume contest. Sno-isle.org/locations/oakharbor.

Family Guide Safer Kids Opportunity: “Safe Kids 101” will be offered for youth ages 9 to 12, hosted by North Whidbey Parks and Recreation, Friday, April 6, 12:45–4 PM. The “Safe Kids 101” program trains and equips your child with the skills they need to be safe at home and in the community. Topics Include: Responsibilities when staying home alone, simple first aid, understanding safety in unfamiliar scenarios, knowing the truth about abuse, abduction, and stranger danger, and how to safely navigate the online world. The class fee is $30. Register with the North Whidbey Parks and Recreation District, Monday-Friday 10 AM–1 PM and 3–5 PM or by calling 360-675-7665.

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Whidbey Weekly

Tulipfestival.org for bloom forecasts, events, and touring maps. Be Prepared with The Pillowcase Project for Kids: The Pillowcase Project, a program of the American Red Cross, teaches children ages 5 to 9 coping skills to help them deal with an emergency situation. Pillowcase and decorating materials provided. This free event is at the Oak Harbor Library, Thursday, April 5, 10:30–11:30 AM. Pre-register to reserve your seat: Sno-isle.org/locations/oakharbor. The “Noiseguy” Comes to Coupeville: Charlie tells stories using an array of realistic sound effects, funny voices and zany humor. Kids will learn there are many different voices for storytelling. It’s okay to tell it your way. Hear the noisy tales at the Coupeville Library Thursday, April 5, 2–3 PM. Discover Camano Island’s Historic Sites: This free self-guided tour, fun for the whole family, is open April 6–8. See 100+ year-old buildings, barns, schools and churches. Each site will have activities including interactive exhibits, guided walking tours, butter churning, big band dance, pipe organ concert, pancake breakfast, spelling bee, and special presentations. A map and schedule of events at Camanohistoricsites.com

See the Warbirds “Knock the Rust Off:” The Heritage Flight Museum in Burlington begins its season of monthly “Fly Days” Saturday, April 14. Tour the museum and see the warbirds take to the skies. Heritageflight. org. “Spring Fling at the Fair: A Home & Garden Sale:” Local crafters and gardeners will come together Saturday, April 14, 10 AM –4 PM, at the Island County Fairgrounds, selling one-of-a-kind items for your home or garden. This is the event to fill your surroundings with unique and colorful treasures. Bring the kids, they’ll create a spring craft while you shop. Free admission. Cheer on Whidbey’s Talented Youth: “Whidbey Has Talent” celebrates the talented students ranging from K-12, who reside in the school districts of Whidbey Island. Mark your calendars for their “Show Time” performances April 15, at Oak Harbor High School. Performers, in divisions by age, take the stage between 2 PM and 6:30 PM. Your $5 ticket gets you into the show, all day long. Meet the contestants at WhidbeyHas Talent.com, event updates at Facebook.com/ whidbeyhastalent. Chickens Galore: The Whidbey Coop Tour is 10 AM–4 PM Saturday, April 21. The tour, hosted by the Rock’n Doodle 4-H Poultry Club, includes seven stops between Oak Harbor and Clinton. This self-guided tour will offer visitors a look into some of Whidbey’s most clever coops and enclosures. Coop

Let Us Help You Fill Your Easter Basket!

Just in time for Easter

Beautiful Easter Lilies

Freeland

List some items here... Jelly Beans Truffles Bunnies Chocolate Eggs Etc

On Sale March 27-April 1

$9.99 Reg $14.99 SKU100397

Tour tickets are $15 per car, which admits all children and up to four adults. Purchase your tickets at Bayview Farm & Garden, Skagit Farmers Supply Country stores, Tractor Supply in Oak Harbor, Metcalfe Hay and Feed, and Diamond Rentals. For information or to purchase your tickets online: rockndoo dle4hpoultryclub.org. Junior Ranger Day: Saturday, April 21, 10 AM–2 PM. Pick up a copy of the new Junior Ranger Activity Book, "Discover Ebey's: Farms and Farming in Ebey's Reserve” at the Coupeville Farmer’s Market. Designed to give children ages 6-12 a better understanding of where food comes from and how it's grown, they can plant a seed, complete the book and earn a Jr. Ranger Badge. Nps.gov/ebla. Whidbey’s Great Cloth Diaper Change: Whidbey Island Babywearers and Island Birth Association are hosting the “Whidbey Island Great Cloth Diaper Change” April 21, in Oak Harbor. Join other cloth diaper users who want to encourage more families to use cloth diapers and educate them about why many people are using reusable cloth diapers successfully. Following the diaper change, there will be a “sell & swap” of cloth diapering items. Facebook.com/IslandBirth. Kid Gear & Children’s Items, For Less: “Just Between Friends” is a children's consignment marketplace where you can buy and sell everything needed for your children, at a discount. April 26-29, at the Skagit County Fairgrounds, choose from a huge array of clothes, furniture, strollers, play sets, nursery items, toys, and books. Teachers, expectant parents, military families, and first-time parents qualify for pre-sale FREE admission Wednesday, when you register to attend at MarysvilleMountVernon.jbfsale. com. Free admission for everyone Thursday with pre-registration, Friday is free admission (no pre-registration required), Saturday is “Half Price Day” and Sunday, remaining items are up to 75-percent off. Find local Easter Egg Hunts, Spring Break activities and all sorts of family fun at WhidbeyIsland.MacaroniKid.com.

COMMUNITY

SUNRISE SERVICE All are welcome

Sunday, April 1 6:30am Windjammer Park by the gazebo

Hardware

1609 E. Main Street • Freeland • 360-331-6799 • acehardware.com • Monday-Saturday 8am-7pm • Sunday 9am-6pm

851 SE Pioneer Way, Suite 101 (360)240-8937 • Open Daily: 11am-6pm

A love offering will be taken to support The Haven emergency homeless shelter of Oak Harbor. Warm refreshments and friendly conversations will follow.

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Whidbey Island celebrates Earth and Ocean Month

LOCALLY OPERATED

By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

Anyone can celebrate Earth Day. But on Whidbey Island, we celebrate all month long with a variety of activities and events aimed at helping us “connect with, respect and protect our island home,” as the poster for this year’s Whidbey Earth and Ocean Month proclaims. The theme for 2018 is “Get Outside & Take Action” and organizers have worked hard to provide a mix of activities aimed at encouraging people to get out and get involved. “We have a lot of really great events all across the island; there’s really something that appeals to everyone,” said Sami Postma, Earth Day Festival coordinator and events and education coordinator for Goosefoot, which helps facilitate and coordinate all the various events and activities. “There are trips, work parties, movies; it all culminates festival weekend,” Postma said. “None of these events are competing, they are all playing into each other.” The Earth Day Festival will be held from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, April 21 at the Goosefoot campus at Bayview Corner in Langley. Activities for the festival alone include a keynote speaker at noon, a community “peace” picture at 12:30 p.m. in which everyone arranges themselves into the “peace” symbol

Photo Courtesy of Goosefoot The artwork by Katrine Hude and Melissa Kock will be in this year’s Earth and Ocean Month art show “Rags, Rubbish, and Refuse: Artists Who Get Dirty.” Artists were asked to contribute work made entirely from recycled materials. The work will be on view April 20 through May 6.

David Welton Photo Courtesy of Goosefoot Even Whidbey Island’s churches band together for Earth Day. The Greening Congregations will also be offering activities throughout Whidbey Earth and Ocean Month in April.

and several displays and exhibits in keeping with this year’s theme.

tradition has continued and there is a fun twist to this year’s display.

“The theme this year is “Get Outside & Take Action,” so all exhibitors have been asked to have something active that people can sign up for and get involved in, not just handing out information,” Postma said. “We have a total of six speakers and presentations on a number of different topics.”

“This year’s show is all recycled art and mixed media pieces. It’s called ‘Rags, Rubbish and Refuse: Artists Who Get Dirty,’” said Marian Myszkowski, Goosefoot’s director of program and fund development. “We already have 12 artists (as of press time) that are showing their work. It will be a great show.”

When Goosefoot got involved in Earth Day in 2006, it all began with an art show. That

The art show will be on display beginning at 11 a.m. Friday, April 20 through 5 p.m. Sunday, May 6 and will feature all kinds of art from recycled and repurposed materials.

The Reifel Bird Refuge trip is schedule from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Wednesday, April 18. Those interested must possess a valid passport or enhanced driver’s license. Please contact Kim Shepard at 360-720-1711 for more information and to RSVP. The spring migration cruise to Protection Island will leave from the Coupeville ferry dock at 9:45 a.m. on Saturday, April 21. Space is limited for this excursion and all those interested must contact Sharon Gauthier at 425-466-2460 or via email at sharongauthier88@gmail.com no later than Sunday, April 1.

While the Earth Day Festival is one of the major events of the month, there are plenty of activities going on all month long, such as a number of films and documentary presentations, work parties and tours. A complete list and description of events can be found online at www.whidbeyearthday.org. There are also a couple of other major events that take place during Whidbey Earth and Ocean Month, such as the Welcome the Whales Parade and Festival which will be held April 14 and 15 in Langley; and Prairie Days at the Pacific Rim Institute in Coupeville, which takes place over two weekends – April 27-28 and May 11-12. For those who enjoy following our feathered friends, there a couple of trips planned as well.

Photo Courtesy of Goosefoot Whidbey Earth and Ocean month attracts a good crowd, as evidenced by a 2016 standing room only performance by South Whidbey High School’s “Climate Art Project.”

“The Whidbey Audubon Society has a couple of really cool trips,” said Postma. “One is a trip to the Reifel Migratory Bird Refuge in Delta, British Columbia and one around Protection Island.”

Organizers say the abundance of activities planned for the month speaks volumes about the love Whidbey Islanders have for our surroundings. “It’s been going on for so long I think a lot of us who live here are very active, involved and concerned about the environment and our footprint,” said Myszkowski. “The collaborative effort of what we have been able to do together, that’s what is exciting to me. It’s definitely community-building. We’re bringing the community together to learn, network and share.” “It really shows that the people who live on Whidbey are educated, aware of the issues and they care,” Postma said. “This is the year of taking action, so if you’re tired of sitting around, find out what you can do in your life to have an impact on something that affects all of us.” Again, a complete list of all the events, activities, field trips, tours and festivals can be found online at www.whidbeyearthday.org.

GLASS continued from page 7 Berkley Boram, stage manager for the production. “Anyone that has had to wriggle away from a loved one in order to thrive will be deeply moved by this play.” “Technically, I’m enjoying playing both the narrator and a character, because Tom is both,” said Downing. “As the narrator I get to break through the fourth wall a little bit, and that’s always fun. “I love those moments when I can directly address the audience and we can recognize each other – like yes, theater is artificial, but by sharing it together we can arrive at moments of truth and clarity. Tennessee Williams has written Tom to be so playful about recreating the world of his youth; is it how it happened, how Tom thinks it happened or just how Tom wants it presented?” “By making it a ‘memory play,’ that is, by having Tom tell the audience what he remembers of that time, Williams is able to play with the selective memory of Tom and give us the emotional context in which he remembers his mother and sister,” added Duff. “It’s interesting how Williams wrote such in-depth character descriptions for everyone except Jim,” said Kinzer. “For Jim, all he wrote was, ‘a nice, ordinary young man.’ So it’s been fun to think about what was meant in doing that. People are always complex, no matter how they are described and Jim is written with so much passion and enthusiasm for life. It made

me think about what it’s like to think of yourself as extraordinary when the rest of the world only sees you as ordinary.” Tickets to “The Glass Menagerie” are $22 for adults, $18 for senior citizens and military, $15 for youth and matinee performances. Performances take place at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and at 2 p.m. Sunday beginning April 6 and running through April 21. The Piano Bar opens one hour before each performance. Tickets are available at the WICA box office by calling 360-221-8268 or online at www.wicaonline.org. Cast members say there are many reasons to check out this production. “You don’t get a lot of chances to see “The Glass Menagerie” – honestly, I’ve never seen it on-stage myself,” said Downing. “The quality of the cast, the set and the direction is going to make this a very special, memorable evening. I can’t wait!” “The set is gorgeous, the wardrobes are lively and the story is an absolute classic,” said Kinzer. “Whenever we have the opportunity to see or hear great art, art that may not always be available to us, I think it’s smart to seize that moment,” said Duff. “But besides that, the play is not only a classic and full of the most beautiful language that will cross any stage, it is also extremely funny and tragic all at once. It’s rich and I think people around here will be very much entertained by it.”

Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Island Center for the Arts Laura Wingfield, played by Nichole Morell, is the delicate and shy sister of Tom Wingfield, both of whom live in poverty with their mother, Amanda. Their complicated relationships are at the heart of “The Glass Menagerie,” the Tennessee Williams classic opening April 6 at Whidbey Island Center for the Arts in Langley.

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Whidbey Weekly

LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED

Film Shorts Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

www.whidbeyweekly.com MARCH 29 - APRIL 4, 2018 LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TEDTED

FARAWAY ENTERTAINMENT YOUR LOCAL MOVIE THEATER

PACIFIC RIM UPRISING PG-13 SHERLOCK GNOMES PG READY PLAYER ONE PG-13

By Carey Ross 7 Days in Entebbe: The reason you probably have never heard of this dramatization of the 1976 hijacking of an Air France flight, despite the fact it stars Rosamund Pike and Daniel Bruhl, is it is so bad nearly every critic who has seen it, has savaged it. ★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 46 min.) Black Panther: This movie just blew by $1 billion in worldwide box office. Between this and "Wonder Woman" (the other top-grossing superhero origin story of all time), looks like the age-old Hollywood belief that it takes a white male to anchor a successful bigbudget blockbuster franchise is like so many other age-old beliefs: untrue and outdated. Get with the times, Tinseltown. Representation = $$$.★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 14 min.) God’s Not Dead: A Light in Darkness: I feel like the title is really giving it all away up front here. ★★ (PG • 1 hr. 45 min.) I Can Only Imagine: I can only imagine how this true-life story behind the Christian megahit “I Can Only Imagine” was green-lit. I can only imagine how Trace Adkins, of all people, came to be cast in this thing. Actually, I can’t imagine any of it. But your imagination might be better than mine. ★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 50 min.) Love, Simon: A tender coming-of-age coming-out story that puts a gay (albeit closeted at the beginning of the film) teenager at the center of the story rather than relegating him to wisecracking sidekick. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 49 min.) Midnight Sun: Bella Thorne plays an impossibly beautiful teenager with a deadly allergy to sunlight who just needs the love of a cute boy to venture outside and put her life in danger. Oh, the romance. ★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 31 min.) Pacific Rim Uprising: The first installment of this now-franchise had two things going for it: 1. It was written by Guillermo del Toro. 2. It was directed by Guillermo del Toro. The second chapter has neither of those. Use at your own risk. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 51 min.)

Paul, Apostle of Christ: Easter is almost here, and with it comes movies about all things Biblical. Spoiler alert: The Easter bunny does not make an appearance, so I’m a little skeptical about this story being based on actual events. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 48 min.)

COMING SOON: I CAN ONLY IMAGINE, LOVE SIMON, 4/27 AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR Movie Hotline 360-279-2226 Book A Party or Special Showing 360-279-0526 1321 SW Barlow St • Oak Harbor

Ready Player One: After a long run of Serious Films, Steven Spielberg is back in the cinematic comfort zone he created: fantastical stories in which young people are the heroes rife with nostalgia and good, old-fashioned teamwork. This time, he has Ernest Cline’s bestseller and a $175 million budget to work with and the results are predictably popcornworthy. ★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 20 min.)

Unsane: Steven Soderbergh, no longer retired, set this mind-bending thriller in an insane asylum, had the good sense to cast Claire Foy in the lead role and shot the whole thing on an iPhone because making everyone else look bad by making everything look easy is evidently his thing. ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 37 min.)

Friday, March 30, 10am - 6pm Saturday, March 31, 10am - 6pm Sunday, April 1, 10am - 5pm Coupeville Recreation Hall

(corner of Coveland and Alexander Sts.)

Free Admission

Visit us at whidbeyalliedartists.com and follow us on Facebook More than 20 artists will show and sell a wide variety of both traditional and nontraditional art.

www.farawayentertainment.com

Now Showing! Thursday, March 29 thru Sunday, April 1

Sherlock Gnomes: The initial chapter of this animated series featuring garden gnomes gone wild was "Gnomeo and Juliet." What’s next? A Christmas movie called "Gnome for the Holidays?" "Sweet Gnome Alabama?" "A Prairie Gnome Companion?" "Gnomeward Bound?" "Gnome is Where the Heart Is?" The possibilities are endless. ★ (PG • 1 hr. 26 min.) Tomb Raider: Finally, a female-fronted action-adventure movie that doesn’t trade on the main character’s sexuality and instead focuses on her other attributes. Just kidding. Sorry if I got your hopes up. Alicia Vikander, capable of more, picks up where Angelina Jolie left off. I’m sure you can fill in the rest. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 58 min.)

Art & Gift Show

READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) SPECIAL: $2.50 CORNDOGS Box Office & Snack Bar Opens At 4pm • 1st Movie Begins At Dusk 11 & Over $6.50; Kids 5-10 $1.00; 4 & Under Free GO KARTS OPEN Saturday 11am - Dusk & Sunday 4pm - Dusk *Cash prices

1403 N Monroe Landing Rd • Oak Harbor • 360-675-5667 www.bluefoxdrivein.com

For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page.

Like us on:

360-679-4003 877-679-4003 www.seatacshuttle.com

360-682-2341 • www.whidbeyweekly.com

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MARCH 29 - APRIL 4, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

THE EASTER BASKET AND THE BUNNY TRAIL IN IT! I often talk about foods associated with certain events or holidays and how they came to be, how they evolved over time into what we have today. I don’t speak nearly as much about how we can “DIY” edible gifts and arrangements and with Easter coming up, I thought why not share some ideas on how we can make it tasty in a different way? Sure, we can go to the store and buy any number of different chocolate eggs, the fillings as numerous as the kinds of eggs they fill. It is most definitely easier and I always make sure to buy a few of these for those people most special to me who really enjoy them (which is most people). What I thoroughly enjoy doing however, is making Easter baskets from as close to scratch as possible and THEN add in a store-bought egg or two. The best way to make these baskets a truly personal gift is to consider the personality of the person for whom you’re making it. Are they funny? Maybe they’re a car enthusiast or they may really love animals. Whatever their unique character traits, loves, idiosyncrasies, use them as a spring board and leap into creative oblivion to make their basket something they will really appreciate. If you’re making these Easter baskets for children, the amount of fun to be had with this is endless. Since it’s spring, there is bound to be a shower or two - or three or more. What about turning a pair of rain boots into an ‘Easter Basket’? Many a person, whether young or old, takes pleasure in walking through, skipping or jumping in small puddles; what better way to equip these people for the sometimes-unpredictable wet weather we have in the Pacific Northwest than with a pair of rain boots, a raincoat, an umbrella and maybe some snacks to replenish the energy expended in any puddle-jumping pursuits? Some trail mix might go a long way (I wrote about some different kinds that could be made at home a few

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Whidbey Weekly

months ago) and an Easter ‘basket’ wouldn’t be complete without a couple of chocolate eggs as well. While this seasonal holiday receptacle mightn’t be completely do-it-yourself, it is just one way in which we can use the seasons, the weather, what’s in stores – all of it - to our advantage to be creative and make something wonderful for our special someones. If you want truly DIY edible from scratch, why not fashion an Easter basket from cereal? Kind of like a puffed rice cereal bar, only in this case, we mold it into a basket shape. And you don’t have to pair marshmallow fluff with JUST puffed rice cereal. You could use Fruity Pebbles, or even Cheerios (though those might be a little more difficult to work with). It’s a similar concept to the bars – 6 tablespoons butter, 2 bags (10-oz. each) of marshmallows, 2 boxes puffed rice or Fruity Pebbles cereal (11-oz. boxes) and begin your basket molding. In a large saucepan over medium heat, melt the butter, stir in the marshmallows and cook, stirring continuously, until completely melted. Remove from heat and stir in cereal, folding until all of it is coated. Grease hands with a little butter and press the cereal mixture into the bottom of a greased and foiled deep, round dish, pressing up the sides. Remember to reserve a little for the basket handle (about two cups). Form the remaining cereal into a handle by pressing and holding until it is an inch or so thick and very firm and attach to the base with more marshmallow fluff and artistic handwork. Allow it to set and then gently lift the basket out of the dish using the foil to assist and place it on a paper plate inside some cellophane wrap. Fill the basket with edibles of your choosing; cookies, candies, licorice, a chocolate bunny or egg and gift to the person most likely to enjoy it! Yes, making an Easter basket from scratch can be tedious work, but if you’re doing this in the company of loved ones, then it can make for epic adventures of the edible kind, because you have to taste test as you go, you know! But who said Easter baskets have to be made

LOCALLY OPERATED

from sugar and sweetness only? If you want to keep your Easter treats on the healthier side, why not try including wheat crackers, cheeses, fruit and nut butter with some wine, or if you prefer something non-alcoholic, some sparking water. Remember to refrigerate the things that need to be refrigerated! Certainly, this could become a picnic of sorts if you so choose and if that’s the case, making a large Easter Basket a whole family can enjoy might be something to consider! Of course, you could use any basket you like. Or maybe you don’t even want to use a basket at all. Maybe you want to use a beautiful tea cup, placed ever so elegantly in its saucer right next to some gourmet tea and an ornate teaspoon (all of which – except for the chocolate – can be found at a thrift store and re-purposed) then expertly place a Cadbury caramel or crème egg right inside the teacup. Wrap it up with some clear cellophane and tie with some gorgeous ribbon and as a small gesture with big meaning, gift it to someone who loves a cuppa from time to time. It gives an Alice in Wonderland feel to it and wouldn’t you know, a large talking rabbit happens to feature somewhat prominently in that story as well! Dear Readers, I hope your Easter is a lovely one, filled with fun, family, friends and the reason behind the celebration for you all, whatever it may be. There are so many ways to make Easter baskets about giving, and personalizing the giving makes the gift even more special. It’s the thought that counts, remember. I’m including a recipe for bunny trail mix. It’s a little something the Easter Bunny includes in baskets for people he knows prefer something salty! I hope you enjoy it as much as I do and if you have any comments, information, questions or recipes you would like to share, please send those to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and Lets sit down together and Dish! Easter Bunny Trail Mix 3 cups corn cereal (Corn Chex, for example) 3 cups pretzels 3 cups Goldfish (your flavor choice – I prefer parmesan) 1 cup cheese crackers 1 cup peanuts ¼ cup butter, melted 2/3 of a package of sour cream and onion or ranch dip mix In a large bowl, combine the dry ingredients. Add the dip mix to the melted butter and pour over dry ingredients. Mix to coat well and put into resealable snack bags to include in an Easter basket, or simply as a snack at home or for a party and enjoy! www.goodhousekeeping.com/holidays/easterideas/a19127/cereal-easter-basket/ To read past columns of Let's Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

WHAT’S GOING ON

continued from page

Classes, Seminars and Workshops Learn to Dance at Dan’s Classic Ballroom.Com! Ballroom, Latin, Swing, Club Dances Groups, Privates, Wedding Prep (360) 720-2727 - dcb601@comcast.net

“Right Brain Numerology Charting” Friday, April 6 & Friday April 13, 12:00pm-5:00pm Individual Sessions at Llynya’s Crystals & Healing Center, 1679 Main Street, Freeland, with Sandra H. Rodman, Founder/Right Brain Aerobics, former Fortune 500 Exec. Full Numerology Charts and intuitive interpretation reading/ review. Surprising meanings and potential hidden in numbers/letters for birth dates, birth names, for personal life, business, naming projects --books, art, baby names, changing names, addresses. $60 for Full Chart, 60 to 90 minutes. Reserve: Sandra@RightBrainAerobics. com – 425-214-2926. Bio www.RightBrainAerobics.com.

AARP Driver Safety Class Saturday, April 7, 8:30am-4:00pm Saturday, May 5, 8:30am-4:00pm Island Senior Services, Bayview Senior Center, Langley Cost: $15 AARP members; $20 for nonmembers This class can save you money, but more importantly, you learn safety strategies and basic vehicle maintenance. Preregister by calling (360) 321-1600.

America’s Boating Course Saturday, April 7 & 14, 9:00am-3:00pm St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Oak Harbor Presented by the Deception Pass Sail & Power Squadron in partnership with the Oak Harbor Yacht Club, this two-day introductory boating class will cover basic boat handling, safety considerations, Federal and State equipment and safety requirements and nautical rules of the road. Successful completion of the course will qualify individuals for the Washington State Boater Education Card now required for most boaters. The cost of the class, payable to the Deception Pass Sail & Power Squadron, will be $55 per student. Spouses or partners sharing a book, their fee is $20. Please RSVP by emailing Pat Waters at frenchsailor@comcast. net by Monday, April 2, 2018

Dining Guide

We will be closed Easter Sunday, April 1 to celebrate with our families.

We Cater!

360-679-3500

601 NE Midway Blvd Oak Harbor Follow us on Facebook & Twitter

JOIN THE FUN! Friday, March 30, 6pm Hard Cider Brewers Night Come sample a Whidbey Island premier! Friday, March 30, 8pm Comedy Showcase #6 Saturday, March 31, 6pm Live Music w/ Three of Us Featuring Local Craft Beer, Wine & Ciders 103 S. Main • Coupeville • 360.682.5747 Monday, April 2, 6pm www.penncovebrewing.com Live Music w/ Arielle Deem

HAPPY HOUR MONDAY-FRIDAY 3-6PM

Breakfast & Lunch on the Water - Daily Fresh Baked Treats Homemade Soups & Sandwiches 360.678.5431 • 4 Front Street • Coupeville

6

See us for your Hot Cross Buns, breads, cupcakes and other goodies for Easter! 1191 SE Dock St, #2 • Oak Harbor 360-675-6500 chrisbakeryonwhidbey.weebly.com

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Whidbey Weekly

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to your aid on the 31st. Be ready to put your perfectionism aside for the sake of getting the job done.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Don’t hesitate to take the lead in your social activities this week. Your calendar of activities may require some last minute juggling around unplanned meetups with people who appear as if out of nowhere. There is method and meaning behind these meetings that won’t be apparent until afterward, so don’t let shyness or hesitation on your part allow them to slip by you. Be ready to act on the 31st. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Guard your privacy this week, lest you see yourself and your activities exposed to the kind of scrutiny you’d rather avoid. People have a way of turning the most innocent of undertakings into things they are not. Proper safeguards before hand may save you much explanation down the road. You stand to profit most from organized events that keep you in the public eye on the 31st. Be ready to put your best foot forward. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) Relationships may seem to be taking more out of you than you have to put into them at present. If you’re feeling spread too thin, business worries may be the ultimate cause. Juggle what you must in order to get everything done, and know that it’s your future that you are investing in. Take your comforts as they come on the 31st and remember that anything worth having is going to require some effort. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Now is the time when you can muster the necessary drive and discipline to accomplish extraordinary feats in the area of your choice. Health, self-improvement and basic vocational skills all respond well to your efforts to advance yourself. The right people are likely to notice you and are more than willing to meet you halfway. Go about your business on the 31st and watch the opportunities for growth stack up. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Your present serious-minded state may be taking a toll on your creativity. Seize every opportunity to break up your routine this week. Children may offer an easy avenue to spring you out of your rut. Finances and relationships also rate extra attention and are the first to suffer the adverse effects of a too-narrow focus. Tunnel vision is especially crippling on the 31st. Keep one eye peeled for the elusive obvious. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Any discontents you’re feeling with regard to your home are likely to be magnified this week. The solution is to stop procrastinating and face up to your problems. Hands-on solutions are particularly supported, so don’t hesitate to roll up your sleeves and get to work on whatever is bothering you. Helpers may come

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Optimism and joyful exuberance gains you attention from some possibly unexpected quarters this week. It’s probable that the natural rhythm of things has you projecting more of those qualities than you realize. Don’t be surprised, therefore, at how the turn of events works in your favor without any added effort on your part. Do what you must on the 31st and take everything in stride. It’s ultimately all good. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) The focus this week is on finances and how they impact your ability to reach your long-term goals. If your responsibilities presently seem to outweigh the possible future rewards, that is largely due to the tunnel vision that naturally surrounds any serious discipline. Stay faithful to your plan. Possibilities that you don’t see now are sure to arise. Welcome the little diversions that break the routine on the 31st. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Your willingness to defend your beliefs against all challengers is good, but take care not to carry things to extremes this week. An easy attitude of live and let live may be a better approach, given the evangelical stance assumed by some. There is something to be learned from everyone, and you won’t get the message if you’re too busy talking. Step lightly on the 31st and be ready to let your actions speak for you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Your dedication and commitment to living up to your responsibilities is probably your most obvious trait this week. That can mean squaring up unfinished business and closing the ledger in preparation for new and exciting projects to come. The logistics of both the old and the new must be considered as one here. It’s no use moving forward on the 31st until you’ve accounted for how you got where you are. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) Friends that you’ve been close to may not feel so close this week. It’s perfectly natural for you to want to be alone now. Disagreements are a sure sign it’s time to move back and regain perspective. This is a productive time to evaluate your goals and ambitions, especially those held in common with others. All of these are subject to change. If all is well in that regard, the 31st is a day of renewed dedication. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) This is a good time for you, career wise, provided you harbor no delusions about what you do and why you do it. If there is any confusion in this regard, this may be the week it comes out. Any blind spots in your professional or vocational activities may surface as challenges for you to overcome. If all is on track in a healthy way, expect solid growth to be the result. Watch the 31st to deliver obvious clues. © 2018, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock, as a professional astrologer, looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

CLUES ACROSS

shared interests 55. Part of warming headgear 56. Woolen cloth 57. Snag 59. Central American fruit tree 60. Woman (French) 61. The 22nd letter of the Greek alphabet 62. Type of bed 63. Soviet Socialist Republic 64. Consume 65. Japanese freight company (abbr.)

1. Chop or cut 4. Green veggie 7. Bar bill 10. Doctors’ group 11. One who buys and sells securities (slang) 12. Be in debt 13. Lively ballroom dance 15. Singer Charles 16. Polish city 19. Former 21. Dismissing from employment 23. Minerals 24. Plotted 25. Consult 26. After a prayer 27. Agents of one’s downfall 30. Leaseholders 34. Supervises flying 35. Voodoo god 36. Alfalfa 41. Apply another coat to 45. Witnesses 46. Jai __, sport 47. Ones who proof 50. Recant 54. Small group with

CLUES DOWN 1. Czech monetary unit 2. Able to arouse intense feeling 3. Elk 4. Muscular weaknesses 5. Geological time 6. Depths of the ocean 7. Burns to the ground 8. Becomes cognizant of 9. Cause to shade 13. US political party 14. Refers to some of a thing

17. Single 18. Type of beer 20. Ancient Iranian people 22. Grocery chain 27. Gridiron league 28. English river 29. __ and cheese 31. Peyton’s younger brother 32. Long time 33. High schoolers’ test 37. Respects 38. Organize anew 39. Filippo __, Saint 40. Intrinsic nature of something 41. Cheese dish 42. Ancient Greek City 43. Patron saint of Ireland 44. Produced by moving aircraft or vehicle 47. Shock treatment 48. __ Jones 49. Things 51. Having wings 52. Panthers’ QB Newton 53. Third-party access 58. Satisfaction Answers on page 15

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Thurs, March 29

Fri, March 30

Sat, March 31

Sun, April 1

Mon, April 2

Tues, April 3

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-52°/L-44°

H-53°/L-40°

H-53°/L-39°

H-48°/L-40°

H-54°/L-41°

H-54°/L-42°

H-54°/L-44°

Mostly Cloudy

Rain

Showers Possible

Cloudy with Rain Possible

Cloudy

Chance of Rain

Wed, April 4

Rain Possible

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-50°/L-44°

H-52°/L-40°

H-51°/L-39°

H-48°/L-37°

H-52°/L-39°

H-54°/L-41°

H-54°/L-44°

Mostly Cloudy

Rain

Showers Possible

Rain Possible

Cloudy

Rain Possible

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

Rain Possible


14 MARCH 29 - APRIL 4, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

YOUR EYES. YOUR VISION. OUR SPECIALTY. MEDICAL | OPTICAL | SURGICAL Book an appointment today: We take VSP, Davis Vision, Tricare, Kaiser, + many more

Alyssa in CE “Andrea,” Locally designed

www.CascadiaEye.com | 109 NE Birch St., Coupeville • Complete all-ages eyecare • Medical ophthalmology

| 360.678.2020

Jeffery Adkins, MD C. Dan Siapco, MD

5

8

6

3

8

4

9

5

1 4

1

6 2

3

7

3 7

Answers on page 15

1

9

7

On a scale from 1 to 10...3.3 Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9

2

9

6 2

2

8 4

6

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Wed Feb 21 21:10:27 2018 GMT. Enjoy!

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up!

1:47 pm, Wells Way Reporting two pigs walking in and out of roadway and across the street.

Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.33)

4

LOCALLY OPERATED

TUESDAY, JAN. 16 11:40 am, SE Barrington Dr. Caller advising her daughter owns a business on Pioneer Way and was told she cannot park on Pioneer Way.

• Frames $50 to $100 • LASIK, cataract surgery +

1

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1:51 pm, N East Camano Dr. Female in custody for theft of cleaning items and doughnuts. 4:23 pm, Wells Way Reporting two pigs running loose; advising Island County Sheriff's Office locked them in her yard but owner has not come home. Reporting party upset they're now damaging her yard. 5:05 pm, Walker Ave. Caller reporting “BB marks” over her windshield, has also noticed several dead birds and less overall bird volume in her area. Suspects neighbors may be shooting from their roof to her vehicle. 7:30 pm, SR 20 Reporting subject walking in middle of roadway with a cart, northbound SR 20. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 17 9 am, Franklin Rd. Reporting party advising daughter's boyfriend needs to be removed; advising earlier this morning was eating everything in house, was asked to leave, male refuses.

7:35 am, Hultman Rd. Horses loose in caller's front yard; does not know where they belong. States they just ran across street to empty field. 10:38 am, Awa Lane Requesting call referencing ongoing problems with neighbor across the street; neighbor owns pigs who constantly get out and run the neighborhood. 3:16 pm, SE Pasek St. Requesting to speak with officer about juveniles ringing doorbell and running off. SATURDAY, JAN. 20 10:33 am, SW Barlow St. Caller advising homeless male is in middle of the street, screaming. 7:44 pm, NW Upsala Dr. Advising teens in neighborhood said they were playing but caller thinks they were trying to break into her house. SUNDAY, JAN. 21 12:17 pm, SE City Beach St. Party advising the flag is pissing. 4:20 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising disorderly customer was yelling at caller due to coupon not being honored.

9:35 am, SR 20 Reporting party advising parents are harassing her by calling police.

TUESDAY, JAN. 23 11:02 am, NE Goldie Caller advising two females sitting in street causing traffic hazard.

11:33 am, SR 532 Advising male subject laying on side of road is in dangerous location, three feet from white line on shoulder.

2:45 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising disorderly male shaking fist and yelling at location.

3:08 pm, SR 525 Advising customer hired someone to help clean storage unit and person put locks on units that don't belong to him. THURSDAY, JAN. 18 12:06 am, SR 20 Party requesting patrol checks referencing male who came into building, walked in a circle and then walked off.

BE A HERO IN YOUR COMMUNITY! YOU AND 4 FRIENDS CAN SIGN UP TO BOWL FOR KIDS' SAKE

to break into apartment; went outside to smoke and saw male trying to break into house, was right in reporting party's face.

5:25 am, N Oak Harbor St. Reporting party advising male just tried

3:47 pm, SW 6th Ave. Party advising male subject spreading rumors about daughter. Wednesday, Jan. 24 10:40 am, Wildcat Way Reporting party advising all of her social media accounts have been hacked. 5:43 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising when calling a business, line keeps disconnecting. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

your local specialists in ductless heating and cooling

Teams and sponsors are gathering now for this exciting and fun-filled event. Businesses are lending their support to community youth in a BIG way by ecoming Lane, Strike and Perfect Game Sponsors at the $250, $500 and $1000 levels. Sponsors must submit payment by April 9th to be recognized on promotional materials.

Not all heroes wear capes. Some wear bowling shoes.

ASK ABOUT FINANCING! Serving WhidBey & Anacortes www.islandheatpumps.com 360.321.4252 Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


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MARCH 29 - APRIL 4, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Property Management You Can Count On!

Whidbey Residential Rentals, Inc. We Manage Your Home As If It Were Our Own. 360-675-9596 • www.whidbeyres.com 285 NE Midway Blvd • Suite #2 • Oak Harbor GARAGE/ESTATE SALES

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES

Annual Marine Swap Meet: Saturday, April 21, 8am–3pm, Oak Harbor Marina parking lot. Hosted by the Deception Pass Sail & Power Squadron. For reservations and information, please contact Mark Casteel, (360) 240-1546 or George Smith, (360) 929-7651 (3)

Looking for Board Members to join the dynamic Board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

ANNOUNCEMENTS

JOB MARKET

Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call (360) 221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child's life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. (425) 923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin' Alive team. Our team's mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: https://www. facebook.com/NorthPugetSou ndDragonBoatClub?ref=hl Medical Marijuana patients unite; If you need assistance, advice, etc. please contact at 420patientnetworking@gmail. com. Local Whidbey Island help. If you or someone you know has been a victim of Homicide, Burglary, Robbery, Assault, Identity Theft, Fraud, Human Trafficking, Home Invasion and other crimes not listed. Victim Support Services has Advocates ready to help. Please call the 24-hr Crisis Line (888) 388-9221. Free Service. Visit our web site at http://victimsupportservices.org

PART TIME EVENING JANITORIAL–FREELAND/CLINTON: Hiring IMMEDIATELY for part-time evening janitor, Monday-Saturday, 6 hours per week (one hour per shift) in Freeland, half hour per visit, 2x per week in Clinton. Start time flexible (after 6:00pm/ earlier on Saturday); $12 per hour. Must have valid DL, cell phone, pass background/ drug screening and E-Verify (USCIS). Please provide name and phone number. Resumes welcome. E-mail: susan.valenzuela@ybswa.net (2) PART TIME DRIVER: The Freeland Habitat for Humanity Store is currently looking to fill a part time driver position. Individuals with past driving experience and ability to lift 70-lbs unassisted preferred. Positive attitude & team player required. Submit your resume to southstore@islandcountyhabitat.com or in person at 1592 E Main St, Freeland (1) PART TIME BAKER: Meals on Wheels/Senior Meals has an immediate opening for a part time baker at the Langley Central Kitchen. Quantity Cooking Experience Preferred & Team player. Able to lift 35 lbs. Submit your resume at Island Senior Resources: 14594 SR 525, Langley, WA 98260. Closes March 21 or until filled. For details, call Debbie (360) 321-1621. ISR is an EOE (0) Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.33)

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FULL TIME AUTO TECHNICIAN: Martin’s Auto in Oak Harbor is seeking a full time auto technician, Monday thru Friday. Apply in person at 152 NE Midway Blvd (1) ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE: We are looking for a dynamic Account Executive. Applicant has to be able to work autonomously and be self-motivated; must possess exceptional customer service and organizational skills; marketing or advertising background desired. If you want to join a successful, growing organization and have a strong work ethic, we want to talk to you. Email your cover letter and resume to info@ whidbeyweekly.com DRIVERS: Drivers wanted for Whidbey SeaTac Shuttle. CDL/ P2 Preferred, Training available for those without. Full Time, Part Time and weekend openings available. Details at www. seatacshuttle.com or call (360) 679-4003

JEWELRY Wide silver cuff bracelet with a 1-1/4" square blue green dichroic glass and wire wrapped beads, $49 OBO; Multi-stone (moss agate, chalcedony etc.) stretch bracelet, $20 OBO; Chrysoprase pendant with interesting silver chain, $75 OBO; Beautiful sterling silver and sapphire earrings, $49 OBO; Glass tube bead (blue/ purple tones) bracelet, $25 OBO; Interesting glass pin in shades of blue, $5. Call (360) 331-1063 (1) No Cheating!

Oval amethyst ring set in sterling silver, $45 OBO; White button pearl earrings 8mm, $29 OBO; Pale blue Baroque pearl earrings 9-10mm, $39 OBO. Call (360) 331-1063 (1)

HOME FURNISHINGS Solid hardwood futon with mattress. Excellent condition. Perfect for couch or guest bed, $50. South Whidbey, you haul, (425) 359-5934 (1)

LAWN AND GARDEN 25 aluminum silver deck post caps, $3 each; 200 feet new 8” heavy waterline, $4 a foot, obo. Can be used for waterline or drain line. (360) 321-1624 Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for gardens, flower beds, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard loads, $225 delivered. South Whidbey (360) 321-1624

MISCELLANEOUS Fujinon binoculars, 10 x 70 fmt-sx with case, mint condition, $400. Call (360) 240-0921 (1) Over 50 LP (vinyl) albums for sale, various artists, pristine condition, $3 each. Call (360) 331-1063 (1) Craftsman 16” Scroll Saw. Excellent, $85. (360) 5794643 (1) Blonde sofa set: sofa, matching chair and ottoman, comfortable, some minor cosmetic spots, $25; Hitachi Ultravision, 42-inch TV on 20-inch base, great picture and stereo sound, $45; Utility table, metal legs and laminate top,

LOCALLY OPERATED

Foster Homes Needed! Family Tails Dog Rescue needs foster homes! We can't save dogs from high kill shelters without homes for them to stay at while they wait to find their forever home. 1 week to 3 months, a fun and rewarding way to be involved with rescue and also have a dog without the full time commitment. We pay for everything, you just provide the love and the home. Please call 360-969-2014 for more info or for an application.

$15; Cherry wood kitchen/ dining room table, oval, 40x54 with 16-inch leaf, $10. (360) 678-7591 (1) We are in the process of a making a serious downsizing effort, and we have items for sale in the following categories: costume jewelry; furniture; garden tools; hand tools; kitchen items; luggage (including duffel bags, tote bags & backpacks); puzzles and toys; sports items; storage racks; yard equipment (Lawn Boy mower, boat trailer winch, and 30 gallon sprayer); and other yard items. If you are interested in seeing what we have available, please call (360) 678-1167 to make an appointment. World Book Encyclopedia. 22 volume set, ©1991. Excellent condition, $85. Call (360) 914-4304 (0) Looking for Xmas, Bday, Father's Day, or just Gifts in general? These are LOCAL made crafts, I have about 50-60 of these available. They are $16.00/ea, plus shipping if you want them mailed. CASH preferred. Dimensions are: 5-6"W X 17”L. Contact me at ljohn60@gmail.com.

LOST/FOUND Found: 14-karat gold woman's ring on road in front of Langley Library around March 12. May be a promise ring; has been run over by a car. Please call (360) 321-6031 to describe and claim (0)

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES Straw Hay for Sale: Good for bedding, erosion control, mulch, etc. $3 per bale, 10 bale minimum. (360) 321-1624 If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

WANTED Harmonica player needs guitar player for jams. Call Scott at (360) 672-9098 (1) Collectibles, Art & Antiques. Cash paid for quality items. Call or Text (360) 661-7298 (1)

DID YOU KNOW MOST CLASSIFIED ADS ARE FREE? Contact us for more info! classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


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95

Basic Oil & Filter

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Includes 4X4 & SUV

4295

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Most cars up to 5 qts. 5W20, 5W30, 10W30. Other grades extra. Some ďŹ lters cost extra. Vehicles with Skid Plates may be extra. Plus $1 Environmental Disposal Fee.

WE CAN SAVE YOU UP TO $250 ON BRAKE SERVICE VERSUS OUR COMPETITORS. WARRANTIED AT 30K LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE.

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At Hilltop Service Center we only repair and replace parts that are needed. We will not oversell or install unnecessary parts. We are highly trained brake technicians, not high pressure sales people.

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