Whidbey Weekly, March 22, 2018

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March 22 through March 28, 2018

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With multiple events, RUN there’sZumba fun for the Harvest Fest Races & Hula bywhole Ate Flo family! Coupeville Green Knights of Columbus CoupevilleTHE Oak Harbor Page 6 Page 6 BRIDGE

Sunday, April 22, 2018 Oak Harbor, SW Syrian RefugeeWA Project Langley United&Methodist SAVE MONEY REGISTERChurch TODAY! Langley Price increases $10 starting 4/1 Page 9

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MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

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Island Angler By Tracy Loescher

THE SPINY DOGFISH You know him, you fear him, he’s the lure thief, he’s the bait thief, and salmon fishermen who troll, mooch, or jig with herring hope he is nowhere near their location because of his voracious appetite - he’s the spiny dogfish shark. He is so named for the two characteristic sharp spines - one in front of each dorsal fin. These spines are slightly poisonous and are painful if not handled properly by the fisherman; however there are no recorded fatalities as a result of the poison.

Get ready fo r the field & fishing seas We have ever on. ything you n eed in store waders, vest s, nets, tack le, lures and more! 150 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor • 360-679-3533

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The Spiny Dogfish is considered to be a very persistent nuisance to most fishermen. My son, Zachary, and my fishing buddy, Kelly, will probably disown me after writing this column, but here goes. As summer approaches so do the dogfish. They will move into most areas of the Puget Sound to forage for food and hassle fishermen. Let’s assume for now we will get a good return of salmon, which in turn leads to wide open areas for fishing. We will, without a doubt, encounter the Dogfish. Like most sharks, the “doggie” has a great sense of smell and the lateral lines that run down his sides are extremely sensitive to vibrations and electrical frequencies (including low frequencies produced by the “black box,” an electrical salmon-attracting device). The doggies travel in packs; when attacking a herring ball for instance, they will do their best to corral the ball and eat their way through. In summers past I’ve seen large numbers of diving birds working the water, which usually means a bait ball of some sort, most likely herring, near the surface. I would slowly motor up to the bait ball and squawking birds and find five or six doggies right on the surface swimming among the birds and frantic herring. Bottom line, these guys are abundant and easy to catch, especially when you are trolling the waters targeting salmon. Here comes the part you deny to your salmon fishing friends: “I’m going to take some home to eat.” The dogfish is not really a new item on the menus of the world. Not widely accepted in North America, but in parts of Europe and the British Isles, the dogfish is a well known food source. In these parts of the country, the dogfish is known and sold as “rock salmon,” “rig,” “huss,” “sea-eel,” and most popularly, “flake.” Properly dressed, prepared, and processed, dogfish compares favorably with the finest Icelandic cod fillet. The food energy calories and grams of protein contained in a 100-gram piece of dogfish compares very closely to that of an equal size piece of King salmon. So why is it we shy away from eating this potentially wonderful-tasting fish? This is why: “Urea.”

After the white fillets are removed from the fish remember this, as a product of protein metabolism, the dogfish contains a small quantity of urea (ammonia), therefore a soaking process is a must before cooking or storing the flesh. The side effect of not soaking is a strong and disagreeable odor of ammonia. I know this to be true; my wife would not come in the house for two days after my first attempt to cook some. I did not complete the soaking process first. Treatment for this unfortunate event is very simple, a six-hour minimum - preferably overnight - marinade in a weak mixture of water and lemon juice or apple cider vinegar will neutralize the urea. The lemon juice soak worked the best for me and I like lemon on my fish anyway. This soaking process is absolutely essential before cooking. Another important thing to remember is to clean the fish as soon as possible and put the fillets on ice if they are not going directly into the soak; even fresh fish not properly cared for can taste bad. Place the fillets in a shallow dish (I use a casserole dish) and add just enough cold water to cover. Then add ½ tablespoon of fresh lemon juice or 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar for each pound of fish. Either of these simple solutions will neutralize the urea without greatly affecting the true flavor of the fish. This is the single most important step in the proper preparation of dogfish, and don’t rush the soak time by upping the amount of juice or vinegar - it will be unsuccessful. Your patience will be rewarded. Orange juice can also be used to neutralize the urea, but since the acidity is less, use 2 tablespoons of orange juice per pound of fish. Here is a traditional batter to try with your dogfish: 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup beer 1 cup flour ¼ teaspoon black pepper 1 teaspoon paprika Combine the batter ingredients in a good sized bowl, then drench the fish that has been cut into bite size strips through the batter and carefully slide the fish into 375°F cooking oil of your choice. Cook approximately 5 minutes or until golden brown. Okay the secret is out, along with summer Chinook salmon - I feed my buddies and family, yes, “rock salmon” (spiny dogfish). Our yearly fishing licenses will expire the end of March, so if you plan to renew, consider beating the rush and renew now. I wish I knew more about what kind of salmon seasons we will get this year, but Halibut, lingcod, Rock salmon and Kelp greenling make it worth the new license. Get on the water if the winds stay down and GOOD LUCK OUT THERE!!

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MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED

ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

Have you ever had a facial? I have been thinking about doing it, but, if successful, I may look too young to get my free senior coffee at Wendy's. That's a risk I am not sure I can take.

I enjoy driving from Freeland to Oak Harbor for a free coffee. It's the drive home that makes me wonder about myself. The coffee was free and hot. The truck gas was not. Lesson learned. Why drive to Oak Harbor for free coffee if the seventy five mile round trip gas expense costs more than all the tea in Greenbank? Cold cuts Sandwiched between a commercial for the nine things a senior needs to know about funerals, and a network promo for an eighteen year old Arnold Schwarzenegger movie about human cloning, there was an ad for ZappLight, a supersonic sounding little light bulb that emits really high decibel screeches which allegedly frighten mice. Imagine a kitchen full of tiny rodents with extreme tinnitus, being driven to their expeditious exits. Sort of a teeny tiny tinnitus trail of tails. Ugh. Sorry for the image. Even sorrier for the commercial. Surprise I should have known something was up when rock n' roll Tara was smiling while sorting mail last Saturday at the Freeland Post Office. Tara cranks the music of all kinds when Postmaster James is back in our nation's capital lecturing to postal wizards. Imagine a postal seminar. Topics like, “The Pressures of Politics, Parties, and Postal parking lots.” Hey, Postmaster James. What about lobbying for a drive up, mail drop off box for Freeland guys like me with old trucks? What if you can't roll down your window to drop off the mail? Opening the truck door requires a real technique without denting the mail box and the truck. Talk about forever stamps. So, Tara tells me to come back in an hour. There will be a “surprise” in my box. I remembered to come back the next day. A long hour. The one we lost last week. The surprise was a flash drive containing 2354 radio episodes of “The Lone Ranger.” At thirty minutes an episode, that would be over 1000 hours of audio stimulation, book ended by William Tell's overture. If I binge listen to the entire flash drive, I would have to be quiet for over 49 days, twenty-four/seven. Hi-yo flash drive, away! But, now that I think about it, how did Tara know it was a surprise? Maybe Postmaster James offers a psychic postal people seminar? Waiting room Thanks to Jarhead Jacobs for the following internet interruption: Those of us who spend much time in a doctor's office should appreciate this. Doesn't it seem more and more like physicians are running their offices like an assembly line? Here is what happened to Kevin. We'll call him Kevin since it's my neighbor's name and he doesn't read print this small. Kevin walked into a doctor's office and the receptionist asked Kevin what he had. Kevin responded, “Shingles.” So, the receptionist wrote down his name, his address, his medical insurance number and told him to have a seat. Fifteen minutes later a nurse's aide came out and asked Kevin what he had. Kevin said, “Shingles.”

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www.whidbeyweekly.com MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018 LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TEDTED

So, the nurse's aide wrote down his height, his weight, a complete medical history and told Kevin to wait in the examining room. A half hour later, a nurse came in and asked Kevin what he had. Kevin said, “Shingles.” So, the nurse gave Kevin a blood test, a blood pressure test, an electrocardiogram, and told Kevin to take off all his clothes and wait for the doctor. An hour later the doctor came in and found Kevin sitting patiently in the nude and asked Kevin what he had. Kevin responded once again, “Shingles.” The doctor asked, “Where?” Kevin said, “Outside on the truck. Where do you want me to unload them?” Re-boot When our girls were in grade school, they were annually visited by local firefighters to remind them of the safety precautions one needed to know. Basically, the biggie was to “stop, drop, and roll” if one were accidentally to catch on fire. In the computer world, we need to be aware of other precautions and corrections when the heat hits the fan. Like today, trying to send in my column from my laptop to my desk computer to TJ at Whidbey Weekly. For me, it involved hitting send on each of two computers. Only it would not send on either. Then I remembered UPS—Unplug, Plug-in, and Send on. Computer technicians call this Re-booting, but I was wearing my Dr. Scholl’s tennis shoes at the time. Re-booting solves 99 per cent of my computer issues. The other one per cent is solved by Rage. So, we take our R and R seriously here at the caboose.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Whidbey Weekly LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

Volume 10, Issue 12 | © MMXVIII Whidbey Weekly

PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Almost as seriously as the instructions on the shampoo tubes which indicate to “lather, rinse, repeat.” I called Procter and Gamble one time on their 800 line to ask why I had to rinse and repeat. “Procter and Gamble, may I help you?” “Yes, quite possibly. Unlike most men, I was reading the directions on the side of my shampoo. It says to 'lather, rinse, and repeat.' I was wondering if there was something wrong with my shampoo that I would have to use a second batch on what I would think would be an already clean head of almost hair. My follicles seem well dispersed, and quite available for repair, but my hair is as thin as dental floss on a windy day. Am I not damaging it by washing it the second time? Why do I need to repeat the process? Can I just rinse twice, like I do at the car wash?”

Help fight cancer by creating a team or becoming more involved in the Relay For Life of Whidbey Island.

“Sir, may I get the name of the product and the bar code? Then I will need your name, address, and location of the store where you purchased the shampoo.” “I'd ask you to repeat that, but repeating is my problem. Before I answer your questions, and I know you are recording this because of the recording at the beginning of my call, off the record, but on the recording, why do I have to rinse and repeat if I did a good lather?”

“So, it isn't that you are trying to sell more shampoo, but that we should just use more?”

Relay For Life is a chance to make the greatest impact in the fight to end cancer. Each new team brings us one step closer to saving more lives. Join a team or form a team. Learn more at:

“Sir, let me get my supervisor. Your inquiry is not on the suggested question and answer response sheet I am using.”

www.relayforlife.org/whidbeyislandwa Email: relaywhidbey@gmail.com

“No need, ma'am. I better go. The shampoo on my head is beginning to drip all over my phone. But, you know what, the numbers and letters on the rotary dial are beginning to glow. Tell Procter and Gamble their Head and Shoulders also works on ears, elbows and rotary dials. Have a great day.”

Facebook: www.facebook.com/whidbeyrelay

“Sir, you are correct. Our studies have shown that most people do not wash their hair properly. They hurry. They are not thorough. We suggest repeating the process.”

To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

UNITED FOR A CURE

Come join us and see for yourself what Relay For Life is all about!

RELAY FOR LIFE OF WHIDBEY ISLAND

June 1-2, 2018 North Whidbey Middle School

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MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

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Bits & Pieces the Growth Management Hearings Board dismissed a parallel challenge from Wright’s Crossing, LLC. A motion for reconsideration has been filed by the developer.

[Submitted by Debbie Thompson, Clerk of the Board, Board of Island County Commissioners]

South Whidbey Garden Club Scholarships Available

Letters to the Editor Editor IDIPIC Needs Help In 2017, IDIPIC presented our impact panels to 343 driver’s education students, 338 parents, 180 NAS personnel, and 159 offenders. We have been doing drug and alcohol prevention work, at no charge, since the year 2000. Court-ordered offenders pay a fee for panels. Our middle school substance abuse drug prevention program was given to 515 students in 26 classrooms in Oak Harbor, Coupeville, and Langley during 2017. We believe in giving young people factual information about drugs and alcohol so that they internalize those facts as they mature. The Impaired Driving Impact Panel of Island County (IDIPIC) has been able to do much of its prevention work with adults and youth thanks in large part to its dedicated Partners in Prevention. Partners in Prevention can make dollar donations, a donation of services or goods, or serve as volunteer helpers and speakers at our panels. Our greatest strength has come from our volunteers. We provide scheduled impact panels twice a month in Oak Harbor, and once a month in Freeland. At these panels we have helpers who assist our Facilitator/Educator, Alice Biddulph, by checking people in and managing support pieces for the panel. We also have guest speakers. Our speakers are people who live in Island County and who have been affected by impaired driving. They may be experiencing the loss of a family member, relative, or friend. The emotional cost is steep, yet they continue to volunteer at our panels to speak of their pain, loss, and grief. Their courage to speak out against driving under the influence of alcohol and drugs is no easy endeavor, and they do all of us a huge favor by supporting our mission: To deter driving under the influence and underage drinking in our communities through education and awareness.

The South Whidbey Garden Club is offering two $500 scholarships to graduating students at South Whidbey High School who are interested in future studies in agriculture, horticulture, ecology and related fields. Scholarship applications are due March 31. Application forms are available at https://www.sw.wednet. edu/Page/2524 Please send questions to rickivadset@gmail. com [Submitted by Jennifer Weimer]

Tenebrae Grieving Over Darkness – Reflecting on Redemption

County’s Wright’s Crossing Decision Upheld Skagit County Superior Court has dismissed the case brought against Island County, wherein Wright’s Crossing challenged the decision of the Board of Commissioners to exclude scheduling of an application to amend the Island County Comprehensive Plan. The Board is pleased that Superior Court upheld the authority of the County Commissioners to make a discretionary docketing decision in the best interests of the County. “Our docketing process was transparent and relied on public input,” said Helen Price Johnson, Chair. “The court’s decision will protect that process from unwarranted interference and threats of lawsuits.” The Skagit County Superior Court victory was the second in this case. Earlier this month

Overall awards: Royal Rose Award, Elizabeth Fitzgerald, 2017 2nd Princess; People’s Choice, Danielle Lonborg; Miss Congeniality, Danielle Lonborg; Miss Fitness, Danielle Lonborg; Miss All Around, Michelle Consolver; Miss On Her Way, Lydia Welch; Miss Service, Chloe Christian; Formal Wear Award, Emily Evans; Marketing Award, Danielle Lonborg; Style Award, Megan Hauter; Most Photogenic, Natasha Decker. Divisional Awards: Miss Scholar, Autumn Coker; Teen Miss Scholar, Emily Evans; Miss Personal Interview Award, Tia Miesle; Teen Personal Interview Award, Ella Langrock.

Tenebrae is centuries old and based on Matins and Lauds of the last three days of Holy Week (the Triduum). Matins and Lauds are the first two sets of prayers of the Divine Office. The Divine Office is the Church’s set of daily prayers sanctifying each part of the day. Together with Mass, the Divine Office constitutes the official public prayer life of the Church.

Teen Division Talent Awards: 1st Place, Jennifer Danielson; 2nd Place, Emily Evans; 3rd Place, Chelsea Lonborg.

All are welcome to join at St. Hubert to reflect on the Passion of Christ at this re-creation of the betrayal, the abandonment, and the agony leading to Easter. Deepen your spiritual journey this Holy Week.

[Submitted by Jes Walker-Wyse, Pageant Wyse]

St. Hubert Church is located in Langley at 804 Third Street. For additional information, call the church at (360) 221-5383.

Miss Division Talent Awards: 1st Place, Tia Miesle; 2nd Place, Shelby Montoya; 3rd Place, Megan Hauter.

Miss Division Speech Awards: 1st Place, Autumn Coker; 2nd Place, Gabby Harstad; 3rd Place, Danielle Lonborg. Teen Division Speech Awards: 1st Place, Lydia Welch; 2nd Place, Michelle Consolver; 3rd Place, Jaelyn O’Hara.

NAS Whidbey Island Earns 2018 Navy Installation Excellence Award By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Scott Wood, Navy Public Affairs Support Element West, Det. Whidbey Island

[Submitted by Debbie Batey]

Pageant Wyse Announces Results of the 2018 Miss Oak Harbor Scholarship Pageant

Have a safe and satisfying spring! Mike Diamanti, IDIPIC Director

Teen Miss Oak Harbor 2018, Emily Evans, Teen 1st Princess, Ella Langrock, Teen 2nd Princess, Savanneh Dahl.

The choir of St. Hubert Catholic Church will present the Office of Tenebrae for Holy Week at 7:00pm on Wednesday, March 28. Tenebrae, Latin for shadows, is a service of scripture readings, solemn hymns, and the gradual diminishing of light as candles are individually extinguished during the service.

Should you be willing to help IDIPIC as a guest speaker or guest helper, please contact Alice Biddulph at the IDIPIC phone number (360) 672-8219, or via our e-mail: idipic@idipic.org. We are also recruiting board members. Regards,

Teen Miss Oak Harbor Royalty 2018:

The Pageant Wyse Board of Directors would like to congratulate all of this year’s amazing contestants for putting on an incredible show. With the love and support of the community, family and friends, Pageant Wyse delivered over $16,000 in scholarships and awards on Saturday, March 10.

From left to right, Commander, Navy Region Northwest Rear Adm. Gary Mayes presents the 2018 Navy Installation Excellence Award pennant to Command Master Chief Shane Cardon and Capt. Geoffrey Moore, commanding officer of Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island, during an all hands call at the base chapel on Whidbey Island. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Scott Wood/Released)

Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island recently earned distinguished recognition with the 2018 Commander-In-Chief’s Installation Excellence Award for large naval installation. The Navy’s installation excellence award program recognizes the top three large and top three small installations based upon performance within the command’s strategic goals and also fitting the criteria established by the Office of the Secretary of Defense in regards to the award. Among this criteria, NAS Whidbey Island’s capacity for mission support managed to complete 87,300 radar operations and 9,800 flight plans in the largest airspace controlled by a naval air station.

Miss Oak Harbor Royalty 2018: Miss Oak Harbor 2018, Tia Miesle;1st Princess, Danielle Lonborg; 2nd Princess, Autumn Coker.

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Time for Financial “Spring Cleaning”

The days are longer and the temperatures are warmer – so it must be spring. For many of us, that means it’s time for some spring cleaning. But why stop with sprucing up your living space? This year, consider extending the “spring cleaning” concept to your financial environment, too. How can you tidy your finances? Here are some suggestions: “De-clutter” your portfolio. As you go through your home during your spring cleaning rounds, you may notice that you've acquired a lot of duplicate objects – do you really need five mops? – or at least some things you can no longer use, like a computer that hasn’t worked since 2010. You can create some valuable space by getting rid of these items. And the same principle can apply to your investment portfolio, because over the years you may well have acquired duplicate investments that aren’t really helping you move toward your goals. You may also own some investments, which, while initially fitting in to your overall strategy, no longer do so. You could be better off by selling your “redundant” investments and using the proceeds to purchase new ones that will provide more value. Get organized. During your spring cleaning, one of your key goals may be to get organized. So you might want to rearrange the tools in your garage or establish a new filing system in your home office. Proper organization is also important to investors – and it goes beyond having your brokerage and 401(k) statements in nice neat piles. For example, you may have established IRAs with different financial services companies. By moving them to one provider, you may save some fees and reduce your paperwork, but, more important, you may find that such a move actually helps you better manage your investments. You’ll know exactly where your money is going, and it could be easier to follow a single investment strategy. Also, with all your IRAs in one place, it will be much easier for you to manage the required minimum distributions you must start taking when you turn 70-1/2. (These distributions are not required for Roth IRAs.) Protect your family’s financial future. When cleaning up this spring, you may notice areas of concern around protecting your home – perhaps there’s a crack in your window, or your fence is damaged or part of your chimney is crumbling. Your financial independence – and that of your family – also needs protection. Is your life insurance sufficient to pay for your mortgage, college for your kids and perhaps some retirement funds for your spouse? Do you have disability insurance that can provide you with some income if you become ill or injured and can’t work for a while? Have you considered the high costs of long-term care, such as an extended nursing home stay? A financial professional can help you determine if your insurance coverage is adequate for all these needs. Consider putting these spring cleaning suggestions to work. They may help you keep your financial house in good shape for all the seasons yet to arrive. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Jeffery C. Pleet, CLU®, ChFC®

Financial Advisor 630 SE Midway Blvd. Oak Harbor, WA 98277 (360) 679-2558 jeffery.pleet@edwardjones.com

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

NAS Whidbey Island Search and Rescue (SAR) notably completed more Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) missions than any unit with 23% of total DoD and Coast Guard missions.

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MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED “NAS Whidbey Island SAR is an elite group of military professionals that love doing search and rescue. We pride ourselves on the level of knowledge and professional level of care that we provide to those in need and we train hard and realistically so that when we are actually faced with the mission of rescuing someone, we are able to confidently and safely do that.” Stated Lt. Mark Hlousek, public affairs representative and pilot for the SAR team. Hlousek commented that what enables the SAR team to perform successful rescue missions with such reliability and safety comes down to their dedication to training. “We train like we fight and we treat every flight like it is a real mission, that way, when we are faced with a real mission we will perform safely and professionally.” NAS Whidbey Island’s mission support capabilities, however, are not its only shining endeavor as the base clearly ensures all the avenues of managing an effective air station, especially in relation to energy conservation and the surrounding environment. NAS Whidbey Island was recognized as the 2016 Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Energy and Water Management Award winner, received the 8th SECNAV Gold Award for energy and water programs and reduced 37% in energy intensity and 41% in water intensity. The base was awarded the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Environmental Award for natural resources conservation, the Navy Community Service Award for environmental stewardship and Navy Whidbey Recycle earned the Solid Waste Association of North America’s Gold Excellence Award for composting systems. Quality of life for the Sailors and civilians stationed on base is also addressed with the MWR program earning its second consecutive 5-star accreditation, scoring in the top five for the Navy. MWR opened additional recreational activities such as a new 18-hole disc golf course and an 18-hole foot golf course. Community health and public communications

Whidbey Weekly

is also nationally recognized with the base receiving the Suicide Prevention Award and being chosen to film its state-of-the-art suicide prevention awareness training conducted by the Chaplain Religious Enrichment Development Operation (CREDO) detachment on base. “The CREDO detachment at Whidbey developed a 2017 Suicide Prevention and Awareness Program that was recognized by the DoD Suicide Prevention Office as the best in the fleet, which includes training, classes, awareness events and led to four known interventions.” Explained Lt. Zachary Juniper, chaplain and officer in charge for the CREDO detachment on Whidbey Island. Commander, Navy Region Northwest (NRNW) Rear Adm. Gary Mayes came out to NAS Whidbey Island and presented the award, handing Capt. Geoffrey Moore, commanding officer of NAS Whidbey Island, the 2018 Installation Excellence Award pennant. “It’s truly an honor to be recognized. Our Sailors and civilians work hard every day to ensure we support our operational tenant’s operational and training needs while striving to provide the best possible services for our military families.” Capt. Moore stated. When asked how the award represents the base and personnel on the base as a whole, Moore emphasized, “This award truly is a ‘team’ award, representing all the hard work of our assigned personnel, tenant commands, community, NAVFAC Northwest, and NRNW staff. I couldn’t be more proud of our Sailors and government civilians that sustain success through continuous procedural compliance and a desire to constantly improve every day.” [Submitted by Mike Welding, NAS Whidbey Island]

It’s Not Too Late to Register for Spring Quarter at Skagit Valley College Registration is going on now for Spring Quarter at Skagit Valley College. Classes begin April 3. Trending programs include: Arts; Basic Education for Adults; Bachelor of Applied

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www.whidbeyweekly.com MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018 LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TEDTED

Cameron Road, Freeland, WA 98249. Applications may be found at www.swfe.org. Additional information may also be found on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/#!/ SWFireEMS?fref=ts

Science in Environmental Conservation; Composites; Engineering; STEM; Sustainable Agriculture. Also, Business direct transfer (at Whidbey Island Campus) Or, if you would like to earn your bachelor’s degree, complete your first two years at SVC and then transfer to a four-year university. Study close to home and save money, compared to tuition at a four-year college.

[Submitted by Sherrye Wyatt]

AAUW Women in History Program 2018

For more information, visit www.skagit. edu/getstarted or call: Whidbey Island Campus, (360) 675-6656 or South Whidbey Center, (360) 341-2324. [Submitted by Arden Ainley, Chief Public Information Officer, SVC]

New EMT Academy Underway From L to R: Sheila Saul as Isabella Bird, world traveler; Ingrid Schwalbe as Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen of France, then England; Jan Gardner as Mary Anning, paleontologist; Judy Nicholai as Julia Morgan, architect; Sarah Mackaman as Marie Tharp, oceanographer; Clare Christiansen as Peggy Whitson, International Space Station Commander

South Whidbey Fire/EMS recently welcomed 6 members of the local community into the 2018 Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Academy. This is a joint academy with recruits from South Whidbey, Central Whidbey, and North Whidbey. The local candidates are Leang “Lenny” Peng, Leah Kalahiki, Dennis Batey, Rene Kinser, Annette Fly, and Couran Therien. Coursework starts with classroom instruction, including such things as medical terminology, communications and anatomy. It quickly moves into more hands-on scenarios. The academy is 15 weeks of study, training, and testing. Upon graduation in June, the new recruits will begin answering calls as EMT’s to local emergencies. They will also attend weekly drills and frequent trainings to keep their skills sharp. “This is an intense experience,” according to Deputy Chief Wendy Moffatt who is in charge of training. “We cover a lot of ground pretty quickly. It is always impressive and very gratifying to see how hard everyone works.” South Whidbey Fire/EMS volunteers have been responding to calls since 1950. To learn more about joining the next academy or how to volunteer in other ways with the department, contact Chief H.L. “Rusty “ Palmer at chief@swfe.org, (360) 321-1533, or 5535

March is Women in History Month. Each year the Whidbey Island Branch of AAUW (American Association of University Women) sends its members out to the elementary schools on the island to introduce fifth graders to women who have played a significant role in history. This year eight members portrayed the following women: Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen of France, then England (1122 – 1204) – played by Ingrid Schwalbe Emily Post, Etiquette Writer (1872 – 1960) – played by Alice O’Grady Isabella Bird, World Traveler (1831 – 1904) – played by Sheila Saul Julia Morgan, Architect (1872 – 1957) – played by Judy Nicholai Madeleine Albright, US Secretary of State (1937 - ) – played by Shirley Bennett Marie Tharp, Oceanographer (1920 – 2006) – played by Sarah Mackaman Mary Anning, Paleontologist (1799 – 1847) – played by Jan Gardner BITS & PIECES

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store@islandcountyhabitat.com www.habitatfurnitureandmore.info

360.331.6272

FREELAND STORE ONLY We carry building materials: Cabinets, hardware, doors and flooring. (Bring donations of building supplies to Freeland location)

360.675.8733

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED AT BOTH STORES!

DONATIONS ACCEPTED 7 DAYS A WEEK! Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

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MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

What’s Going On

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED changes, and assess ways to keep your brain healthy. Whidbey Reads Presents - Movie: “Morning Light” Friday, March 30, 2:00pm-4:00pm Freeland Library Experience a riveting and inspiring true-life adventure aboard the high tech sloop Morning Light. Everyone is welcome.

All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

AARP Tax Aid Thursdays, March 22, & 29, 1:00pm-7:00pm Island Senior Resources Center, 14594 WA-525, Langley Free tax return preparation and e-filing for taxpayers with low and moderate income. Supported by AARP Foundation. Call (360) 678-3000 to schedule an appointment. https:// senior-resources.org

Live Music: Saint John & the Revelations Saturday, March 24, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Apocalyptic romantic folk & funk band. And pretty and bluesy too. No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

2018 Local Artists Series Saturday, March 24, 7:30pm Whidbey Island Center For the Arts, Langley

Mussel Flats is a classic rock/blues band living and playing music on Whidbey Island. No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Soul Songs from the Heart and Bones of the World finishes off the series. Join local artist Julie Glover and world-renowned singer/songwriter Gina Sala on a magical journey into the music of many different ethnic traditions, and how they express joy, sorrow, celebration and mystery. Come prepared to be embraced by, and to participate in, a rich field of sound. Tickets available at (360) 221-8268 or online at www.tickets.wicaonline.org

2018 Local Artists Series

Lions Club Blood Drive

Live Music: Mussel Flats Friday, March 23, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville

Friday, March 23, 7:30pm Whidbey Island Center For the Arts, Langley

Thursday, March 29, 10:00am-4:00pm Coupeville United Methodist Church

Struggling with the issues of our times? Join Songs for Challenging Times in using the arts as a way forward through reflection, inspiration, humor, and community! Barbara Dunn, Marta Mulholland, and Dana Lyons bring their talents to the WICA Stage with original music, covers, dance/movement, and spoken word. An inspiration in these challenging times! Tickets available at (360) 221-8268 or online at www.tickets.wicaonline.org

Sponsored by the Coupeville Lions Club. One pint of blood can save 3 lives and together we have helped save hundreds of lives in our community hospitals throughout Western Washington. To donate, just drop in or you may schedule an appointment: DonorSched@ bloodworksnw.org or call 800-398-7888. For more info call Deanna Rogers at (360) 678-7727. The church is located at 608 N Main St.

“Annoyance” Fridays, March 23 & 30, 7:30pm Saturdays, March 24 & 31, 7:30pm Sunday, March 25, 4:00pm Thursday, March 29, 7:30pm Outcast Theater, Island County Fairgrounds, Langley

Comedy Showcase #6

In this comedy by Sam Brobick, directed by Sandy K. O’Brien, a very annoying man goes to see two therapists with the hopes of becoming less annoying; he ends up driving them both over the edge. Tickets are $18 for adults; $14 for students and seniors, and a special $12 performance on March 29. Order online from www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3346537, or email Outcast Productions at ocp@whidbey. com to reserve tickets and pay at the door by cash or check.

28th Annual Easter Egg Hunt

Family Freedom Festival Saturday, March 24, 2:00pm-4:00pm VFW Post 7392, Oak Harbor This free, family-friendly event is intended to celebrate the freedoms we enjoy and will include activities and entertainment for all ages. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/vfwpost7392

Never Give Up! Minoru Yasui and the Fight for Justice Saturday, March 24, 4:00pm UUCWI, 20103 SR 525, Freeland Suggested donation: $10 - $15 Come learn about Min Yasui’s fight for justice, and leave inspired by one man’s tireless spirit in defending the human and civil rights of Japanese Americans, and all people, during and after WWII. Filmmaker Holly Yasui, Min’s daughter, will be in attendance for a postscreening Q & A. Film web site: http://www.minoruyasuifilm.org/

Fabulous 50s Party Saturday, March 24, 6:00pm-9:00pm VFW Auxiliary, 3037 Goldie Rd, Oak Harbor Tickets: $15 single, $25 double Enjoy an evening of dancing, food and live music by Deception Connection Food includes 50s burgers, dogs, chips, and ice cream floats, while supplies last. Community invited, costumes encouraged.

Friday, March 30, 8:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com Saturday, March 31, 10:00am Coupeville Town Park Sponsored by Soroptimist International of Coupeville and open to Toddlers through 5th graders. As a voluntary admission please bring a nonperishable food item for Gifts from the Heart Food Bank. There will be photo opportunities with the Easter Bunny and an Easter Basket Raffle prior to the Hunt. Come early to get your raffle tickets.

Easter Egg Hunt Saturday, March 31, 11:00am Dan Porter Park, Clinton Join the Clinton Chamber of Commerce for this FREE and FUN event every year—with thousand of eggs, candy prizes, and the Local Fire Dept. staff and their big trucks, too. More information at info@discoverclintonwa.com.

Open Skate Fridays Every Friday, 6:00pm-8:00pm Roller Barn, 98 NE Barron Dr, Oak Harbor Proceeds support Boys & Girls Club. $5 per skater and $3 for general admission. Last Friday of the month, skate with the Whidbey Island Roller Girls! Sorry, checks not accepted, credit card fees apply. For more information, call (360) 240-9273.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free Lit for Fun Book Group: “Bilgewater” Thursday, March 22, 9:00am-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a discussion of Jane Gardam’s “Bilgewater” the joys and sorrows of adolescence as experienced by a young girl growing up in a boy’s boarding school. For adults.

Whidbey Reads Presents: The Shifty Sailors Thursday, March 22, 3:00pm-4:00pm Oak Harbor Library Tuesday, March 27, 4:00pm-5:30pm Freeland Library Join us for a rollicking good time as Whidbey Island’s own shanty-singing Shifty Sailors share interesting facts about nautical history, and sing songs inspired by Jim Lynch’s “Before the Wind.” Going Batty Learn All About Bats! Friday, March 23, 1:00pm Coupeville Elementary School MPR Bats are shy, gentle and beneficial mammals. Join Barbara Ogaard from Bats Northwest & Sarvey Wildlife Center to learn the truth about bats through props, slides and live bats! Dispel the myths. For ages 5 and up.

Religious Services Tenebrae Wednesday, March 28, 7:00pm St. Hubert Church, 804 Third St, Langley

The choir of St. Hubert Catholic Church will present the Office of Tenebrae for Holy Week. Tenebrae, Latin for shadows, is a service of scripture readings, solemn hymns, and the gradual diminishing of light as candles are individually extinguished during the service. Tenebrae is centuries old and based on Matins and Lauds of the last three days of Holy Week (the Triduum). All are welcome to St. Hubert to reflect on the Passion of Christ at this re-creation of the betrayal, the abandonment, and the agony leading to Easter. Deepen your spiritual journey this Holy Week. For additional information, call (360) 221-5383.

Carnivorous Terrariums Friday, March 23, 2:00pm-3:30pm Coupeville Library Meeting Room

Community Easter Sunrise Service

Make your very own carnivorous terrarium! Space is limited in this teen/tween program; please register by calling (360) 678-4911 or signing up on our website calendar.

Everyone is invited to join many churches and community friends from the greater Oak Harbor area as we gather for a special community-wide Easter Sunrise service. The service will be a brief gathering of song, scripture and celebration of Jesus’ death and resurrection. A love offering will be taken to support The Haven emergency homeless shelter of Oak Harbor. Warm refreshments and friendly conversations will follow.

Whidbey Reads Presents - Made By Hand: Boat Races and Nautical Flags Saturday, March 24, 10:00am-11:30am Freeland Library Design, build and decorate your own boat and race it against other sailors! Create colorful fabric nautical flags! All materials provided. For all ages. Registration is required. Life Changing Voyage: A Whidbey Reads Program Saturday, March 24, 2:00pm-4:00pm Clinton Community Hall, 6411 S. Central Ave. Join sailors and boat builders, Michael Colfer and Michael Kasten, to hear about their adventures at sea. If you’ve ever dreamed of sailing away, or building your own boat, this program is for you! North Sound Writers Group Sunday, March 25, 1:00pm-4:00pm Coupeville Library Meeting Room Join other writers to discuss, problem solve, share and receive feedback, and work on the craft of writing. Everyone is welcome. For more information about this group visit northsoundwriters.com Discuss the Classics with Rita Drum Monday, March 26, 1:30pm Oak Harbor Library Please join us as we discuss Jane Austen’s “Sense and Sensibility” in preparation for the Classic Novel that will be presented this summer at the Island Shakespeare Festival . We would so enjoy your input as we discuss this memorable work. For more information, please contact Rita Bartell Drum at ritadrum777@gmail.com or (631) 707-5980. Whidbey Reads Presents The Shifty Sailors Monday, March 26, 6:00pm-7:00pm Coupeville Library Meeting Room Join us for a rollicking good time as Whidbey Island’s own shanty-singing Shifty Sailors share interesting facts about nautical history, and sing songs inspired by Jim Lynch’s “Before the Wind.” AARP Tax Aide Wednesday, March 28, 10:00am-4:30pm Coupeville Library Meeting Room Free tax return preparation and e-filing for taxpayers with low and moderate income. Call (360) 678-3000 to schedule an appointment. Brain Care as We Age Thursday, March 29, 1:00pm-2:30pm Oak Harbor Library What happens to the brain as we age, and what can we do to maintain a healthy brain? Discover how to recognize normal brain

Sunday, April 1, 6:30am Gazebo in Windjammer Park, Oak Harbor

Galleries & Art Shows Whidbey Allied Artists Show & Sale Friday, March 30, 10:00am-6:00pm Saturday, March 31, 10:00am-6:00pm Sunday, April 1, 10:00am-5:00pm Coupeville Rec Hall, 901 NW Alexander St. Whidbey Allied Artists, a collaborative group of artists from throughout the island, will welcome spring in their next art and gift show. More than twenty artists from throughout the island will show and sell a wide variety of their traditional and non-traditional art. Admission is free. For questions, please email WhidbeyArtists@gmail.com.

Meetings & Organizations

PBY Memorial/Naval Air Museum Wednesday, March 28, 11:30am CPO Club, 1080 Ault Field Rd, Oak Harbor Lt.Cmdr. Evan Reese was just doing his job, bombing the Viet Cong supply line on the Ho Chi Minh trail in Laos, when his A6A “Intruder” was hit by enemy fire. What follows is an intriguing tale of injury during ejection, evading capture and jungle survival in getting back to friendly forces for rescue. The now retired Navy Captain will be telling his exciting story at the PBY’s monthly no-host luncheon. The public is invited. Call (360) 240-9500 for directions and more information.

Bats: Why You Want Them, and How To Keep Them Thursday, March 29, 6:00pm Coupeville Rec Hall, 901 NW Alexander St. Everyone is welcome to join the Island County Master Gardener Foundation at their monthly general meeting to learn about these useful mammals. Bats are among a gardener’s best friends and help maintain a healthy ecosystem. Learn how to create an attractive environment for them so they can do their best for you. The social part of the meeting begins at 6:00pm, followed by a brief general meeting. The continuing education class about bats starts at 7:00pm. These meetings are open to the public at no charge. For a list of continuous Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com WHAT'S GOING ON

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Whidbey Weekly

NEWS www.whidbeyweekly.com

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

Regional TKD Tourney p. 10 MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018

Photo Courtesy of Lunafest.org The film “Buttercup,” directed by Megan Brotherton of Seattle, is one of nine short films to be featured at this year’s Lunafest, to be hosted by Soroptimists International of Oak Harbor on Tuesday. In the film, Maggie, who is struggling with her mother’s death, gets a surprise visitor who helps her find joy again.

Oak Harbor Soroptimists celebrate female filmmakers By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

It’s a partnership that makes sense. Soroptimists International of Oak Harbor, an organization which focuses on improving the lives of women and girls, will host the 17th annual women’s film festival, Lunafest, at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 27 at the Elks Lodge in Oak Harbor. The fundraising event, created in 2000, celebrates films by, for and about women. Oak Harbor is one of 175 cities that will host Lunafest this year. This is the fourth time Oak Harbor Soroptimists have participated, and organizers said they felt from the first it was an event that fit well with the group’s mission. “We were looking for an event that would help bring something to bring attention to the betterment of women, because that’s what our purpose is. It fits our mission,” said event chair Marilee Paddock. “The films themselves are from around the globe, from so many different countries,” Paddock continued. “Some may have subtitles because they’re in another language, but the same messages come through in them. To see that from around the globe is unifying for women in general.” Nine short films from around the world are part of this year’s Lunafest program. They range from animated films to fictional drama. Topics include women’s health, body image, relationships, cultural diversity and breaking barriers. For the first time, the Soroptimists will be showing an awardwinning film by a student from Oak Harbor High School’s digital filmmaking/Wildcat TV Productions program. “We are featuring a local production by Anna Kate Fahey,” Paddock said. “To see the creativity of our local students is just wonderful. And that’s really what the festival is about, so showing a local work is a continuation of all that.”

Fahey, who has moved to Tennessee since her film was made, is currently a senior in high school. Her film, entitled “Travels with Cheerios,” follows OHHS student Emma Wezeman, who posted a series of photos of Cheerios cereal in different locations on social media, garnering the attention of the General Mills company. Fahey intends to pursue a media career in college, according to Wildcat TV advisor Chris Douthitt, who shared this link to Fahey's film: https://vimeo. com/173283792. All local proceeds from Lunafest benefit the nonprofit Soroptimists International of Oak Harbor, which in turn will help sponsor the Dream IT Be IT program for local high school students, giving girls access to professional mentors, career education and resources to help them reach their goals. The event also helps Lunafest sponsor Chicken and Egg Pictures, a nonprofit group which offers mentorship and financial support to female nonfiction filmmakers.

event, which features refreshments and light hors d’oeuvres starting at 5:30 p.m. with screenings beginning at 6:15 p.m. Cost is $12 per person for adults, $5 for students. Because of the nature of the films, parents should consider this a “PG” rated event; organizers discourage young children from attending. Tickets are available online at www.eventbrite. com/e/lunafest-oak-harbor-wa-tickets-43215998214, in Oak Harbor at Upscale Resale or Jones Accounting, or from Soroptimist members. More information about the festival is available at www.lunafest.org. “If people want an enlightening, entertaining experience, a chance to get a view of what’s happening around the globe, to see how creative and talented these women are – all the way down to local students – they shouldn’t miss this,” said Paddock.

“It’s about giving women the opportunity to tell their stories and opening the door for filmmakers who might not otherwise be given the chance to show their art,” Kit Crawford, owner of Clif Bar, is quoted as saying about Lunafest, which is the first all-female traveling film festival. Clif Bar makes Luna energy bars, the sponsor and namesake of Lunafest. To date, Lunafest has raised more than $4 million dollars, featured 145 filmmakers and had more than 1,600 screenings. Paddock said the variety of films featured every year make it an interesting evening. “The films are so different every year,” she said. “Some are extremely serious. There have been films about young women trying to escape slavery and then fun-filled ones like one about a group of senior citizens who did aqua dancing. So it can range from serious to light-hearted in one evening.” Organizers are hoping for a sell-out crowd for this year’s

Photo Courtesy of Lunafest.org Soroptimists International of Oak Harbor is hosting the Lunafest film festival celebrating short films by, for and about women, at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 27 at the Oak Harbor Elks Lodge.

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MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! Thursday, Jan. 11 12:58 am, N Main St. Caller reporting neighbors are harassing her with a “sound bar” they hook up to the stereo; hard to hear caller. 8:25 am, Fircrest Ave. Caller says woman standing at caller's door will not take no for an answer; female is there now. 9:38 am, SR 525 Reporting party advising stoplight was green, vehicle in front of reporting party was not going, so went around, saw maroon Subaru parked in southbound lane with no one inside, no flashing lights. People are honking at it. 10:50 am, NE Ernst St. Contact in lobby reporting he received a towing bill for a vehicle he does not own. 1:24 pm, Fir Lane Stating neighbor is harassing reporting party standing in yard yelling at reporting party. States she is going to “beat the s**t out of reporting party.” Ongoing issue. 2:21 pm, Fairway Lane Reporting boy throwing rocks at passing cars; reporting party stopped and boy ran off towards golf course. 4:43 pm, Quiet Lane Requesting call referencing video camera stolen off tree in front of caller's house. 7:07 pm, East Harbor Rd. Caller received message from subject stating caller's brother is being blamed for “all the s**t;” person doing it stays at Bible camp. Friday, Jan. 12 1:52 am, Taylor Rd. Reporting party upset neighbors are doing laundry; says they've been warned before. 4:44 am, SW Erie St. Reporting party advising subject in bathroom bathing in toilet water. 2:52 pm, N Camano Ridge Rd. Caller was checking bus route and observed a woman screaming and yelling to get off her private property; female is not in road. 5:05 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising transients using laundry facilities and taking people's mail. 8:45 pm, Cranes Landing Dr. Caller advising twice someone came around dressed in police uniform asking about caller getting insurance. Last occurred yesterday. Saturday, Jan. 13 6:51 am, East Harbor Rd. Requesting call referencing boat launch by Sandy Point says you have to be member to use and the number associated reaches ICOM; would like to know how he can join. Sunday, Jan. 14 12:24 am, N Oak Harbor St. Reporting party advising while letting car warm up, someone stole it. 2:33 pm, SR 20 Advising cats have been missing since November; caller received Facebook message last night referencing cat being seen in area; subjects feeding cat bleach and

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Whidbey Weekly

water; states was occurring on purpose due to multiple strays in area. 2:48 pm, Elm Place Reporting saw on doorbell video someone on front porch and heard voices; states is being stalked, law enforcement has been out there two times this week. 4:09 pm, Glacier Peak Dr. Advising white plane with red markings is flying low over houses; close to roofs. 4:27 pm, Walker Ave. Reporting husband took car keys out of vehicle, left her blocked in middle of road. 4:35 pm, E Dry Lake Rd. Advising dog ran through yard chasing chickens and now one chicken is missing; little white dog with brown spots. 5:36 pm, Main St. Advising subject in gravel lot playing with remote control cars; asked to leave and refused. Subject still in lot; told reporting party “unless it's illegal, I'm not leaving.” 9:01 pm, Elm Place Reporting party advising neighbor is stalking her. Advising large bar of light is shining into her home, believes it's sending the message that she's being watched; going insane. 11:37 pm, NE Regatta Case generated for vehicle vs. raccoons. Monday, Jan. 15 2:41 am, Elm Place Party advising she is being stalked. Flashlight turns on and off in her bedroom. Reporting party now in bathroom. 5:17 am, W Cross Island Rd. Caller states neighbor has vehicle with loud exhaust; vehicle just pulled into location which is his residence; caller is upset over noise, states vehicle will eventually leave location again. Caller requesting patrol be ready to search area. 8:26 am, NW Front St. Construction workers broke barricade to reporting party's apartment; states ongoing dispute between reporting party and construction company over egress to reporting party's apartment; states they are there now, she just heard the barricade. 10:16 am, SR 20 Reporting party advising hit a pot hole too hard and bent steering shaft; wants law enforcement to come and possibly escort to reporting party's home. 12:51 pm, N Harrington Lagoon Rd. Caller is concerned about friend who lives somewhere on location; wife told caller yesterday friend had cut his penis off due to severe pain and had to be taken to the hospital two days ago (no records from locals). 2:23 pm, Heller Rd. Party requesting call referencing wanting chaplain to assist her in contacting boyfriend who is in Island County jail and an order is in place preventing contact. 4:31 pm, Country Club Dr. Reporting “QUANTIS” Airline plane flying very close to land, also had a Navy plane escorting it. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

LOCALLY OPERATED

Life Tributes JACQUELINE MAY TUCKER FORTUNE March 2, 1938 - March 18, 2018

Jacqueline May Tucker Fortune passed away March 18, 2018. Jackie retired from the United States Post Office and spent many years working in home health care. Jackie is survived by children Shane Fortune and Faith Fortune Pitts, as well as ten grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by children Stevin K. Sartin and Tracy Sartin Bebee. A graveside service will be held Saturday, March 24, at 10:00 am at Maple Leaf Cemetery in Oak Harbor WA. Services were entrusted to Wallin Funeral Home. To leave condolences, please visit Jackie’s Book of Memories page on the funeral home website at www.wallinfuneralhome.com.

JOHN FIELDING, SR. John Fielding, Sr., passed away peacefully at his home Tuesday, March 12, 2018, at the age of 84. John Thomas Fielding was born in Pomona CA, September 12, 1933. He grew up in Oregon, near the Mackenzie River. John joined the Navy in 1951 and served for 22 years. He served as a corpsmen and a food service officer, with his last assignment at NAS Whidbey Island. John retired from the Navy in 1973, the same year he bought an 1865 farmhouse in Coupeville, on Ebey’s Prairie. Retirement for John included many activities. He took college courses and studied art under Tony Turpin. He became an accomplished watercolor artist and painted and sold several hundred paintings, primarily focused on the barns and prairie scenery of Ebey’s Reserve. John assisted and coached track and cross country at Coupeville High School where his son Jeff was a leader in the sport. John volunteered as a firefighter in Central Whidbey, and became an EMT. He was very involved in helping to train high school firefighters. John enjoyed fishing and boating, and graduated from an 11’ Boston Whaler to an 18’ Montauk he bought himself for his 50th birthday, to a Tiderunner he moored in Oak Harbor. He also built a wooden boat. John is survived by his children: John Fielding, Jr. and wife Anne of Oak Harbor, James Fielding of Texas, Janet Grabke of Ohio and Jeff Fielding of Oregon, as well as several grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his youngest son, Justin. A graveside service will be held Saturday, March 24 at 1:00 p.m. at Sunnyside Cemetary in Coupeville. John will be laid to rest overlooking the prairie where he lived the last 45 years.

Life Tributes can now be found online at www.whidbeyweekly.com

WHAT’S GOING ON

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Classes, Seminars and Workshops Learn to Dance at Dan’s Classic Ballroom.Com! Ballroom, Latin, Swing, Club Dances Groups, Privates, Wedding Prep (360) 720-2727 - dcb601@comcast.net

NRA Basic Pistol Shooting Class Saturday, March 24, 9:00am-4:00pm Sunday, March 25, 9:00am-1:00pm Central Whidbey Sportsman’s Association, Coupeville Firearms, safety gear, and ammunition are provided. Just come ready to learn and shoot. This course is a two day relaxed learning experience that allows students to take their time so they learn to be proficient with a revolver and semi-automatic pistol. To guarantee a slot please contact Mike McNeff at shamrockll@yahoo.com or (480) 620-3727.

Back Pain & Sciatica Workshop Saturday, March 24, 11:00am-12:00pm North End Fitness Center, Oak Harbor This free informational workshop, presented by Rue & Primavera Physical & Occupational Therapy, will offer 3 simple steps to quick and natural healing. To register, call (360) 279-8323. North End is located at 2800 Goldie Rd.

AARP Driver Safety Class Saturday, April 7, 8:30am-4:00pm Saturday, May 5, 8:30am-4:00pm Island Senior Services, Bayview Senior Center, Langley Cost $15 AARP members; $20 for nonmembers This class can save you money, but more importantly, you learn safety strategies and basic vehicle maintenance. Preregister by calling (360) 321-1600.

America’s Boating Course Saturday, April 7 & 14, 9:00am-3:00pm St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Oak Harbor Presented by the Deception Pass Sail & Power Squadron in partnership with the Oak Harbor Yacht Club, this two-day introductory boating class will cover basic boat handling, safety considerations, Federal and State equipment and safety requirements and nautical rules of the road. Successful completion of the course will qualify individuals for the Washington State Boater Education Card now required for most boaters. The cost of the class, payable to the Deception Pass Sail & Power Squadron, will be $55 per student. Spouses or partners sharing a book, their fee is $20. Please RSVP by emailing Pat Waters at frenchsailor@ comcast.net by Monday, April 2, 2018

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MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED BITS ‘n’ PIECES

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Peggy Whitson, International Space Station Commander (1960 - ) – played by Clare Christiansen The purpose of AAUW is to advance equity for women and girls through advocacy, education, philanthropy and research. Nationally AAUW is 150,000 members strong, 90 of them right here on Whidbey Island. If you would like to investigate joining the Whidbey Island branch, please contact Barbara Bland at barble@ comcast.net or Erlene Little at ErleneJoe@ earthlink.net. [Submitted by Meg Eisenbraun, Publicity Chair, WI Branch of AAUW]

Have a Hopping Good Time at Bunny Daze! Celebrate everything rabbit related during this Spring kick-off Spring has sprung, and so have the bunnies! Come celebrate the furry creatures at Bunny Daze held March 26 – 31, 2018 in Langley. Everyone is invited to Shop Hop throughout town all week and find creative bunny merchandise for sale in shops, just in time for Easter. On Saturday, March 31, starting at 11:00am at Boy and Dog Park, Mayor Tim Callison will make an official proclamation, a special bunny guest, Hare Rabbit, will be welcomed, spring flowers and treats will be handed out, and everyone is invited to wear their bunny ears. Then the kid’s Bunny Hunt begins with an abundance of gently-loved bunnies, hidden in plain view around town, for kids to find and take home (the stuffed ones, not the real bunnies). It is being dubbed a Stuffed Bunny Relocation Project. There are even several hopscotch courts around town for a bit of bunnylike bounding.

Short Story Smash Now accepting submissions Whidbey Island Center for the Arts (WICA) welcomes back Chris Spencer’s Short Story Smash on Wednesday, April 11 at 7:30pm. Calling all local writers! Ever dreamed of having your work read aloud on stage? Here’s your chance! Chris Spencer’s Short Story Smash is back, and bigger than ever. This year the semi-annual writing showcase will feature stories from 100 to 1,000 words in length, or six minutes of reading time on stage. The showcase is open to a wide array of genres, including fiction, essays, short plays, and poetry. Selected stories will be performed on the WICA stage. Whether or not you are a writer yourself, the Short Story Smash is an exciting opportunity to hear the work of talented local artists. All stories will be read by Chris Spencer, Jim Scullin, and Shelley Hartle. For more guidelines, email Chris Spencer at cspencer@whidbey.com.

Tickets available at the WICA Box Office: (360) 221-8268 or online at https://tickets.wicaonline.org [Submitted by Fritha Strand, WICA]

Let the Spirit Move, and Let the Community Sing!

This one day master class for singers and musicians celebrates African-American spirituals and community music, followed by a concert in which you can participate in the community choir, singing in celebration of unity. Whether you sing in a choir or have not sung at all, or if you are a musician, come out and raise your voice; you simply have to drop everything and be part of this event Sunday, April 22 at Camp Casey Conference Center, Seattle Pacific University, Coupeville.

The event is sponsored by Langley Main Street Association (LMSA), wanting to bring some whimsy and humor to the town’s bunny issue. The bunnies are pardoned for the day, kids invited to take a fluffy one home, and everyone is invited to wear bunny ears.

Even if you don’t think you know this man, you may have sung in his choir before. Dr. Stephen Michael Newby, a former Coupeville resident, is now a Seattle Pacific University professor, composer, conductor, singer, musician, and visionary. He may have led you as part of 40,000 fans when you sang the national anthem before the Seattle Sounders match. He’s traveled and appeared worldwide, performing at countless prestigious venues, stadiums and stages around the country as Worship Leader/Choir Director with Maranatha! Music™. He’s composed orchestral works, oratorios, and choral music. Newby brings his unique signature and energy to this event, through his hybrid classical/jazz/gospel musical presentation style. Experience his spirited enthusiasm, as he shares his musical gifts and graces with the Whidbey Island community! Come for the concert at 6:00pm where tickets are $15 in advance ($20 at the door), or be a part of this life-changing class for just $60 beginning at 1:00pm. This transformational workshop will include a brief lecture, intensive music workshop, catered meal, an original composition to bring home, and participation in the concert accompanied by a world-class crew of the finest musicians.

Veterans of Foreign Wars Auxiliary is seeking entries for the VFW Auxiliary’s Young American Creative Patriotic Art Contest. Any student in grades 9-12 who is enrolled in a public, private or parochial high school, or home study program is eligible and they do not have to be related to a VFW member to participate. Entries can be submitted anytime before March 31 to Post 7392 at 3037 Goldie Road, Oak Harbor. For full details and application, please visit https://vfwauxiliary.org/scholarships/youngamerican-creative-patriotic-art-contest/ [Submitted by Teresa Coe, VFW Post 7392 President]

Community Easter Sunrise Service Everyone is invited to join many churches and community friends from the greater Oak Harbor area as they gather for a special community-wide Easter Sunrise service on Sunday, April 1, at 6:30am at the Gazebo in Windjammer Park in downtown Oak Harbor. The service will be a brief gathering of song, scripture and celebration of Jesus’ death and resurrection. A love offering will be taken to support The Haven emergency homeless shelter of Oak Harbor. Warm refreshments and friendly conversations will follow. [Submitted by Jun Sapida]

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www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3353247 Senior Discount: Available to age 60 and over. Discounted Group Rates: Organizations/ Churches are encouraged to sponsor their singers, directors, musicians or members as a group. For group sales (five people or more), contact Libby Turner of Amber Octopus Entertainment directly, at (206) 733-3846, or libby@ amberoctopusentertainment.com. Interested persons and groups should book quickly, as this event is certain to sell out. [Submitted by Libby Turner Amber Octopus Entertainment] BITS & PIECES

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• Frames $50 to $100 • LASIK, cataract surgery +

| 360.678.2020 2

All seats $15. The Piano Bar will open one hour before the event. Those interested should send their story as a .doc or .docx file to cspencer@whidbey.com. But hurry, the submission deadline is April 4, 2018!

While the overpopulation of domesticated rabbits in town was featured on national and regional news programs a few years back, merchants decided to put a positive spin on this quickly-multiplying issue and began featuring many bunny-themed products—from chocolate bunnies, statuaries, home decor and novelty items to artists-created t-shirts, paintings, sculptures and posters. Visitors have become enchanted with the phenomenon and the week-long ode to those wascally wabbits!

VFW Seeking Art Contest Entries

LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TEDTED

Jeffery Adkins, MD C. Dan Siapco, MD

Puzzle 1 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.68)

Event Background

[Submitted by Michaleen McGarry, Langley Main Street Association]

www.whidbeyweekly.com MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018

“Anything that is written to please just the author is worthless.” (Blaise Pascal 16231663).

Lift up your voices and clap your hands during the First Annual Worship Outside The Music Box Transformational Workshop, led by worldrenowned Dr. Stephen Michael Newby.

For more information, go to www.langleymainstreet.org.

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Whidbey Weekly

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4 On a scale from 1 to 10...6.8 Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9

Answers on page 15

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1 3

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3

2

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Wed Feb 21 21:10:43 2018 GMT. Enjoy!

Welcome, Dawn, to the Gene’s Art & Frame Family! Big or Small…We Frame it All!

GENE’S ART & FRAME SINCE 1967

Whidbey’s Largest Selection of Fine Art Supplies

www.genesartframing.com

360-675-3854 • 250 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor 9:30-6 Monday-Friday • 10-5:30 Saturday • Closed Sunday

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10 MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Whidbey Island Grown brand looking to grow new members

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED

By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly The Whidbey Island Grown brand is reaping the benefits of a successful season, following the relaunch of the organization last year, and hopes to add to its membership harvest with its first ever networking and social event, set to take place from 3 to 5 p.m. Sunday at Greenbank Farm. The event has two goals: first, to connect WIG members with one another, to allow them to grow relationships and business networking opportunities; and second, to grow knowledge among those interested in learning about the brand and its goals. “This represents our first get-together, collectively, for our members,” said John Burks, chairman of the WIG steering committee. “The idea is for our members to identify each other, network among themselves and learn what everybody’s doing and to get people to start thinking about planning events and activities for the future.” Burks, owner of Kettle’s Edge Farm in Coupeville, said WIG has made tremendous progress over the past year, and hopes the upcoming event will allow everyone to see the organization’s vision, which far exceeds the preconceptions people may have.

Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Island Grown John Burks, chairman of the Whidbey Island Grown steering committee, says while Whidbey’s farms are a mainstay of the group, the organization seeks to help businesses all over the island connect with others to help promote all things grown and produced on Whidbey Island.

Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Island Grown Whidbey Island Grown is all about growing local – farms, businesses, goods and services. The group will be holding a social at Greenbank Farm Sunday from 3 to 5 p.m. to help members and those who are interested, make connections.

“It’s a matter of helping people understand what Whidbey Island Grown is all about; that we expanded the scope and base of what was originally kind of farm-centric,” he said. “We are still farm based and based on what is produced on the land on Whidbey Island, but we draw in other elements that tie into our farming community, our restaurants, wineries, breweries and other businesses that support locally grown, locally produced products. “We still have a good deal of work to do in that area,” Burks continued. “There’s still a perception that WIG has a farm-centric focus

and they don’t see the broader connection. That’s one thing we’ve discussed – when you think of the term “grown,” it doesn’t just mean grown from the ground. It could be growing a business, growing a community, growing partnerships. It’s another way to look at the word.” There are currently seven different membership categories to Whidbey Island Grown. Local farms is one, but others include local dining, local lodging and venues, local libations, locally made products, local markets and a category just for those who simply want to support local, Whidbey Island products. All categories have attracted attention, Burks said. “It’s been good across the board,” he said of the group’s growing membership, which stands at about 75 so far. “There are so many businesses within each category on Whidbey Island and there’s still a number we want to reach out to and draw in, but we want to try to do it synergistically, in a way that enhances what’s already going on.” Goals for this year include growing WIG membership to at least 100, which Burks feels is well within its grasp. The group is also hoping to move to a more formal structure, establishing a board of directors and bylaws.

Photos Courtesy of Whidbey Island Grown The Whidbey Island Grown brand is about all things produced on Whidbey Island, from wine, to mussels to one-of-a-kind works of art.

The group is also looking forward to its second Whidbey Island Grown Week, which will be held from Sept. 28 through Oct. 7.

“We’re in the early planning stages right now, but we hope it will be even bigger and better this year,” said Burks. “We had a lot of great farm-to-table events, farm visits and tours last year. We want to get people thinking more about it this year and ways to really enhance and build on it.” As Burks said, Whidbey Island Grown is about more than just Whidbey’s farms, it’s about the community of Whidbey as a whole. The group was originally started in 2009 and concentrated primarily on the island’s farms. It fizzled out after a couple of years and nothing much happened until a group of people took up the reins again in 2016 and began looking at ways to incorporate all facets of Whidbey Island products and services. WIG officially re-launched last summer and Burks said he is encouraged by what he has seen so far. “I think it’s just seeing people’s desire to really focus on locally-produced products with their businesses,” he said. “We have local chefs committed to sourcing from local farms; it’s of high value to local farms to sell to local chefs and get that recognition on menus or posting about local farms on social media. It’s rewarding and exciting. It’s great to see all the different types of businesses we have on Whidbey coming together to develop and support each other.” Anyone who is interested in attending Sunday’s networking event is invited and asked to please email info@whidbeyislandgrown. com. Anyone who would like more information on WIG can find it online at www. whidbeyislandgrown.com.

Woodward’s Taekwondo hosts UWTA Regional Tournament Woodward’s Taekwondo hosted the United World Taekwondo Association Regional Tournament at North Whidbey Middle School Saturday, March 17. Competitors from Washington and California competed in poomse (Forms), one-steps, point sparring, board breaking, padded weapons, and weapon forms. There was also a Black Belt testing, in which two students from Woodward’s Taekwondo tested for their 1st Dan Black Belt. To begin the tournament, Woodward’s demonstration team entertained the crowd with forms, choreographed fight scenes, board breaks, weapons demonstrations, and the grand finale, three brick breaks. Photos by Jamie Woodward and Heather Wonders

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11 MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED

Film Shorts Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

By Carey Ross A Wrinkle in Time: Even Oprah can’t save this movie. I know, I’m surprised too. ★★ (PG • 1 hr. 49 min.)

boy to venture outside and put her life in danger. Oh, the romance. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 31 min.)

Annihilation: Fresh off "Ex Machina" and with major studio backing, Alex Garland is back, this time with a sci-fi thriller about a mysterious and malevolent “Area X” and those who explore it, including Natalie Portman, Jennifer Jason Leigh, and my movie-star boyfriend, Oscar Isaac. ★★★★ (2 hrs. • R)

Pacific Rim Uprising: The first installment of this now-franchise had two things going for it: 1. It was written by Guillermo del Toro. 2. It was directed by Guillermo del Toro. The second chapter has neither of those. Use at your own risk. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 51 min.)

Black Panther: This movie just blew by $1 billion in worldwide box office. Between this and "Wonder Woman" (the other topgrossing superhero origin story of all time), looks like that age-old Hollywood belief that it takes a white male to anchor a successful big-budget blockbuster franchise is like so many other age-old beliefs: untrue and outdated. Get with the times, Tinseltown. Representation = $$$. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 14 min.) Death Wish: The father of torture porn, Eli Roth, re-imagines the 1974 NYC mean streets classic, this time with Bruce Willis dealing out vigilante justice instead of Charles Bronson. I could say something about how the world might not need a movie that glorifies gun violence and taking matters into one’s own hands, but I’m pretty sure we stopped taking Willis too seriously right around the third time he died hard. ★ (R • 1 hr. 47 min.) Game Night: A weekly couples game night goes awry when a murder mystery gets a little too real, and Jason Bateman, Rachel McAdams, and others must play sleuth to rescue a kidnapped Kyle Chandler. A comedy that should be terrible, but because of the gifts of Bateman and McAdams, it works. ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 33 min.) I Can Only Imagine: I can only imagine how this true-life story behind the Christian megahit “I Can Only Imagine” was green-lit. I can only imagine how Trace Adkins, of all people, came to be cast in this thing. Actually, I can’t imagine any of it. But your imagination might be better than mine. ★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 50 min.)

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Peter Rabbit: A rabbit reboot in which Peter is hip now, if hip and being voiced by James Corden are things that can coexist. I’m confused. Critics are confused. Leave Peter alone, Hollywood. ★★ (PG • 1 hr. 33 min.) Sherlock Gnomes: The initial chapter of this animated series featuring garden gnomes gone wild was "Gnomeo and Juliet." What’s next? A Christmas movie called "Gnome for the Holidays?" "Sweet Gnome Alabama?" "A Prairie Gnome Companion?" "Gnomeward Bound?" Gnome is Where the Heart Is?" The possibilities are endless. ★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 26 min.) The Strangers: Prey at Night: A family stops at a secluded mobile home park in the dark of night to stay with relatives. Despite the fact it is a deserted trailer park in the middle of nowhere, they elect to stay. They deserve whatever is coming to them. ★ (R • 1 hr. 25 min.)

www.whidbeyweekly.com MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018

360-679-4003 877-679-4003 www.seatacshuttle.com

Paul, Apostle of Christ: Easter is almost here, and with it comes movies about all things Biblical. Spoiler alert: The Easter bunny does not make an appearance, so I’m a little skeptical about this story being based on actual events. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 48 min.)

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Tomb Raider: Finally, a female-fronted action-adventure movie that doesn’t trade on the main character’s sexuality and instead focuses on her other attributes. Just kidding. Sorry if I got your hopes up. Alicia Vikander, capable of more, picks up where Angelina Jolie left off. I’m sure you can fill in the rest. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 58 min.)

Love, Simon: A tender coming-of-age coming-out story that puts a gay (albeit closeted at the beginning of the film) teenager at the center of the story rather than relegating him to wisecracking sidekick. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 49 min.)

Unsane: Steven Soderbergh, no longer retired, set this mind-bending thriller in an insane asylum, had the good sense to cast Claire Foy in the lead role and shot the whole thing on an iPhone because making everyone else look bad by making everything look easy is evidently his thing. ★★ (R • 1 hr. 37 min.)

Midnight Sun: Bella Thorne plays an impossibly beautiful teenager with a deadly allergy to sunlight who just needs the love of a cute

For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page.

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RUN THE BRIDGE

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Run the famed Deception Pass Bridge!

- Tech Shirts for All Participants - Customized Finisher Medals for All Events - Personalized Participant Bibs - Free Race Photos - Finish Line Celebration with Live Music

Sunday, April 22, 2018 Oak Harbor, WA Register Now at

www.runwhidbey.com Run for a day, play for a weekend!

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MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

A SAUCY SUBJECT INDEED! March is a month of many things. Beyond spring and all the adornments and celebrations that come with it, it is also National Sauce month. Which sauce? Well, I guess any sauce you want. Sauce is sauce, is it not? Oh, if only it were that easy. The complexity of food dictates there is always a history to anything we ingest, and sauce is no exception. So, with March being the month of the sauce (any sauce, I reiterate), it would be fitting we discuss the origins of this fantastic addition to just about any meal we make. First of all, what necessitated the invention of sauce? Food experts tell us it was borne of a need to tenderize food, to enhance the flavor of the food it was paired with and to help the actual process of cooking foods. Indeed, it has been said sauces were also used to mask the flavor of tainted ingredients which often spoiled due to a lack of refrigeration centuries ago. Dependent on culture, purpose and ingredients, sauce can be many things and its first mention can apparently be traced back to ancient Rome or Greece. A concoction of small fish such as sardines or anchovies were combined with the intestines of larger fish like tuna and were salted and left to ferment for a couple of months. After this time period, a salty, fishy liquid flowed from the dregs and this ‘sauce’ was called ‘liquamen.’ Sounds like it would make for a rather pungent kick when eaten with anything, but sometimes these ultrastrong flavors really pull certain dishes together. What’s funny here, is during my research of this topic, what happened between the ancient Romans and/or Greeks producing this very odorous sauce, is not very revealing in terms of the evolution of these liquid meal addends. In fact, it was the French who developed what are called ‘Mother Sauces,’ and there are said to be five of these. A ‘Mother Sauce’ is one from which a host of others are derived. These five are hotly debated but a general consensus shows these ‘Mother Sauces’ are béchamel, hollandaise, veloute, mayonnaise and tomato.

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Whidbey Weekly

I will start with béchamel. Like everything else in history, its origins are debated. There are several theories surrounding the birth of this white sauce, the most famous of which I think would be how inventor Marquis Louis de Béchamel happened upon the recipe by trial and error when attempting to find a way to make dried cod more palatable. Regardless of the exact origins, the fundamentals of this tasty sauce remain the same today; a roux of boiled milk, flour and butter. It is most commonly found served with white meats, eggs and vegetables. I happen to thoroughly enjoy eggs over easy on top of a slice of wheat toast, topped with a little béchamel, (though I just call it white sauce). It absolutely hits the spot! Now with the next sauce, Veloute, I can see why it would be termed a ‘mere’ sauce (or ‘mother,’ in French) because from this one culinary framework, a multitude of veloute can be made. It’s the foundation on which personal or regional predilection can be built in a variety of different ways and so the basics include bones (unroasted) such as chicken or fish, to form a liquid stock which is then thickened by using a light (or blond) roux. This is where we employ similar methods to form a béchamel roux, only, with veloute, we have to make absolutely sure we don’t brown the flour, butter and milk at all. The viscosity of veloute is fluid (pun intended) and is all up to the cook. Whether thick or thin, the finishing touches are something left entirely in the hands of whomever is preparing the sauce. Personally, I prefer fresh herbs (parsley and oregano) with some chopped garlic and a pinch of salt and pepper added. Because of how smooth and ‘velvety’ this sauce is (it is after all, named for the French word for velvet – ‘velour’) it pairs particularly well with chicken. I imagine steamed or baked chicken breast with a side of peas and carrots, smothered in veloute would make a very welcome dinner on a cool spring evening! Surprisingly similar to veloute is hollandaise, which supposedly got its name because of the apparent likeness it has to Dutch sauce. In the mid-1600s, a man by the name of Francois Pierre La Varenne spoke in his cook book of an eerily similar sauce to hollandaise and these are possibly one and the

LOCALLY OPERATED

same. His sauce was comprised of vinegar, salt, butter, nutmeg and egg to form an emulsion. The tang provided by the vinegar could be likened to the same one given by lemon, added to modernday hollandaise and as a result, it is best served with eggs and asparagus. I have family who eat hollandaise with salmon cakes, too, and I can attest to its deliciousness. Mayonnaise is next on this list and its origins as well are a matter of contention. Whether it was developed as a result of a victory in 1756 of the French over the Spanish Port Mahon, or as the result of residents of the same port teaching the head military chef this tasty ‘victory sauce,’ we won’t know with exact certainty. It is however, said to have earned its moniker from the place in which it was invented – and was called ‘mahonnaise.’ I know many people don’t like to use mayo as a dip for French fries like I do, but it is one among many ways in which it can be used. Try it, you might like it! With all these white sauces lending their arms to the branches of a very long and intricate family tree, what about something a little different? Tomato sauce, yes! A man by the name of Auguste Escoffier is said to have ensured it made the ‘Mother Sauce’ list. In addition to tomatoes, Escoffier’s recipe included carrots, onions, salt pork, garlic, veal stock, butter, roux and seasonings - flavor was key. In all fairness though, what more does a scrumptious tomato sauce need outside of that from which it comes and some seasonings? Dear readers, I know I could talk about anything else, but I just found this subject so fascinating and with the details being so sparsely mentioned in every day conversation, it makes an interesting topic to chit chat about. I hope you observe March in many ways and perhaps you can include a sauce or two to boot! I am including a recipe for a basic béchamel and I encourage you to try it over your favorite fish or some poached eggs. Please send all comments, questions and recipes to letsdish. whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and Lets Dish! Basic Béchamel Sauce 2 tablespoons flour 2 tablespoons butter 1 ¼ cup heated milk Salt Pepper In heavy saucepan, melt the butter. Stir in the flour and whisk for about two minutes until a paste forms. Don’t let it brown. Add the hot milk slowly and stir continuously, until the sauce thickens. Bring to a boil, add salt and pepper. Reduce heat and cook for 2 to 3 minutes stirring continuously. Remove from heat, allow to cool, serve as you desire and enjoy! www.epicurious.com/recipes/food.views/whitesauce-or-bechamel-sauce-40046 www.foodtimeline.org/foodsauces/html www.whatscookingamerica.net To read past columns of Let's Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

BITS ‘n’ PIECES

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Local Business News Wallin Funeral Home Opens Branch Office in Freeland

Seth Schoonover

Wallin Funeral Home of Oak Harbor is proud to announce the opening of its new branch office in Freeland, Wash. With the closing of Visser Funeral Home in the summer of 2017, the south end of the island has been without a funeral home to assist families in need. Wallin Funeral Home stepped in to fill the void and opened its new branch in January 2018. Anyone who has made previous arrangements with Visser Funeral Home need not worry, as Wallin Funeral Home was able to acquire all the files from Visser, including pre-need funded and nonfunded files, and move them to the Freeland location. Martha Wallin, owner of Wallin Funeral Home states “It is an honor to be of service to our south end families. And to make it easier to locate us, we were even able to acquire the former telephone number of the south end funeral home.” The Freeland location, while not as spacious as the Oak Harbor branch, still offers families full service options including cremation, burials, ship outs, green burials, headstones, and funeral merchandise such as caskets and urns. It also has a small viewing area so that south end families need not travel to Oak Harbor. A welcome addition to the Wallin Funeral Home staff is south end native, Seth Schoonover. Born and raised on Whidbey, Seth was the funeral director at Visser from 2012 until its closing in 2017. According to Seth he is “very much looking forward to continuing to serve the needs of my south end community.” The new branch location is located at 5533 East Harbor Road in Freeland. If you have concerns or questions about existing funeral plans or would like to begin your funeral planning process, please contact Seth at 360-2216600. Wallin Funeral Home is proud to be of service to you.

Dining Guide Thank You! To Our Customers & Supporters For A Successful 1st Year!

1191 SE Dock St, #2 • Oak Harbor • 360-675-6500

Zanini’s Catering & Events

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13 MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED

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www.whidbeyweekly.com MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018 LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TEDTED

without judging them too harshly will carry you far on the 22nd. Brush off any unintended slights and don’t take them too personally.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) You may be among those who understand that as good as it feels to be on the receiving end of favors, being a giver of same can feel even better. Events this week are set to drive that truth home to you. If you are still mastering the path of the selfless giver, important lessons may arise to be learned. If you already know the joys of giving, events have their satisfaction built in. Watch the 22nd in particular. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) It’s the kind of week when you know what you want, and even more, you know when you want it. Not that you need make demands. Quite the contrary. The stage is set for delivery of the right people and circumstances to satisfy your whims as they arise. If things go awry, it’s likely to be in the direction of too much of a good thing. But for a possible lone spoilsport, the trend on the 22nd is toward the lighter side. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) Attention to detail quite probably ranks well down on your list of priorities this week. In fact, lists of any kind are unlikely unless someone else writes them. Much more probable is that you’ll just wing it and hope for the best. How well this turns out for you depends in large part on the company you keep. Good results can come from freely going with the flow on the 22nd, provided you don’t abandon common sense entirely. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Authority figures may influence you with a light hand and a sense of levity at key moments this week. Given that you’re more prone than usual to stray from your agenda without realizing it, a light touch of guidance is exactly right for keeping you on track. In the bigger picture, it’s all part of getting you where you’re going. The goal is likely to change more than once as you go along. Flexibility is key on the 22nd. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) This week is made easier by not taking yourself too seriously in those oops moments that can happen to anyone. If you know how to laugh when life is proving that you’re not infallible, you’re way ahead of the game. You’re only human, after all, and admitting to the fact won’t undermine your authority. In the eyes of many, such an admission might even enhance it. Take events as they come on the 22nd. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Disappointment over others’ inability to live up to your standards is normal at this time, but it need not ruin your week. Opportunities abound by which you may bridge possible pits of despair without falling into them. Allowing others to be who they are

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Collaboration is an important part of your week, meaning that any problems you face will not be faced alone. Your skill set may in some cases leave something to be desired, but someone around you should be able to step in and take up the slack. Even onerous tasks will go much easier as a result and may even be fun. The line between work and play blurs on the 22nd, a day of effortless achievement. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Demands on your attention that center around family and finances could be quite heavy this week. Opportunities to escape those demands and indulge in extracurriculars will likely hold greater than normal appeal as a result. Fun and games are irresistibly attractive on the 22nd, possibly leading to overindulgence, if you’re not careful. Listen to the voice of reason that says enough is enough, and you’ll be fine. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Success in any and all endeavors begins with good communication, a fact that puts you at a major advantage this week. The stage is set for you to find the right audience and the right moment to communicate your heart’s desire, and most importantly, be heard and received. This is not something you need anticipate or rehearse. All will unfold naturally and spontaneously. Don’t be surprised if the 22nd unfolds in your favor.

CLUES ACROSS 1. Unpleasant substance 5. Oil group 10. One-time Yankees rookie sensation

48. Diego, Francisco, Anselmo

26. Paddle

49. Songs to one’s lover 52. Cattle’s mammary gland

27. Adjusted 28. Succulent plant 29. Forearm bones

55. Having ten

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Significant portions of your time this week will likely be devoted to giving the best you can give in terms of manual skill and dexterity. Even in the most sedentary of occupations, you are not immune to the sudden need for a hands-on solution, if only to unjam a jammed copy machine. Physical challenges undertaken for the sheer fun of it are possible on the 22nd, whether by plan or by chance.

15. Less easily found

56. Fencing sword

16. Southeast Nigeria people

60. Scarlett’s home

32. Belonging to Egyptian ascetic Apollo’s colleague

61. Hold valuables

33. Type of mental illness

17. Bridgeline Digital stock designation

63. Italian Seaport

34. One from Asia

64. Cain and __

36. 007’s creator

65. Bad places to live

37. Direct toward

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) A powerful hunger to grow and increase your material holdings is central this week. Reaching out to involve family and friends in your chosen project or process is a likely part of it. Emotional connections grow and solidify as a result, but it’s apt to be the material aspect that matters most at present. Significant joy is a likely spinoff on the 22nd, more so if you can really dig in and get your hands dirty.

27. Follows sigma

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Approach the week as you would a buffet style dinner and you’ll do well. Survey the big picture to form a plan, sample lightly and widely, and be open to experimentation if you would maximize your opportunity. You won’t know going in about everything that’s available to you, and therein lies the joy. Thinking you have the possibilities all nailed down limits you needlessly on the 22nd. Be flexible and be open. © 2018, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

14. Ireland

18. Play loudly 19. Elegantly fashionable 20. Open sore 22. Frozen water 23. Sacred Islamic site 24. “Kokomo” rockers 30. Cease to exist 31. Cool 32. Doctors’ group 35. Less attractive 37. Swiss river

66. Large, wading bird

38. Pie _ __ mode

67. Witches

40. Large terrier

68. Cover with drops

41. Hillsides

69. Props up the head

43. Patriotic women (abbr.)

CLUES DOWN

44. Connects words

1. Philippine province

46. For each

2. Shallow channel

47. Flower cluster

3. Type of acid

49. Closes a deal

4. Cygnus’ brightest star

50. Arabian desert

38. Greek sophist

5. One who buys and sells securities (abbr.)

39. Grandmothers

6. Ill will

40. Afflict

7. Plant of the goosefoot family

41. Russian pancake of buckwheat flour and yeast 42. Actress __ Rachel Wood 43. Not bright 44. Western Asia peninsula 45. Baseball speedster Gordon 46. Golf score 47. Transmits genetic information from DNA to the cytoplasm

51. Vaccine against poliomyelitis 52. American state

8. Intellectual

53. Religion practiced in China

9. Mineral

54. Type of sediment

10. Shiny silicate minerals

57. Hall of Famer Ruth

11. Ottoman civilian title

58. “Layla” singer Clapton

12. What you wear when eating BBQ (2 words)

59. Gamble

13. Soul and calypso song

61. Sino-Soviet block (abbr.)

21. Advises 23. “The Spanish Tragedy” playwright

62. Midway between south and southwest

25. Surrounds the earth

Answers on page 15

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock, as a professional astrologer, looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www.chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Thurs, March 22

Fri, March 23

Sat, March 24

Sun, March 25

Mon, March 26

Tues, March 27

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-55°/L-41°

H-53°/L-37°

H-53°/L-36°

H-52°/L-38°

H-52°/L-38°

H-51°/L-36°

H-47°/L-34°

Cloudy and Breezy

Cloudy with AM Rain

Cloudy with AM Rain

Mostly Cloudy

AM Rain Partly Cloudy PM

Cloudy Possible Rain

Wed, March 28

Cloudy

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-54°/L-39°

H-50°/L-36°

H-53°/L-34°

H-51°/L-38°

H-51°/L-38°

H-52°/L-39°

H-45°/L-34°

Cloudy

Cloudy with Chance of Rain

Cloudy with AM Rain

Mostly Cloudy

AM Rain Partly Cloudy PM

Cloudy Possible Rain

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

Cloudy


14 MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

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Most cars up to 5 qts. 5W20, 5W30, 10W30. Other grades extra. Some ďŹ lters cost extra. Vehicles with Skid Plates may be extra. Plus $1 Environmental Disposal Fee.

WE CAN SAVE YOU UP TO $250 ON BRAKE SERVICE VERSUS OUR COMPETITORS. WARRANTIED AT 30K LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE.

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15

MARCH 22 - MARCH 28, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Property Management You Can Count On!

Whidbey Residential Rentals, Inc. We Manage Your Home As If It Were Our Own. 360-675-9596 • www.whidbeyres.com 285 NE Midway Blvd • Suite #2 • Oak Harbor REAL ESTATE/RENTALS Baby Island Saratoga Club (BISC), Langley, WA is available for receptions, meetings, and parties. Newly renovated kitchen and wheelchair accessible bathroom. Extensive off street parking. Reasonable rates. Call (206) 775-9370 (0)

ANNOUNCEMENTS Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call (360) 221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child's life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. (425) 923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin' Alive team. Our team's mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: https://www. facebook.com/NorthPugetSou ndDragonBoatClub?ref=hl Medical Marijuana patients unite; If you need assistance, advice, etc. please contact at 420patientnetworking@gmail. com. Local Whidbey Island help. If you or someone you know has been a victim of Homicide, Burglary, Robbery, Assault, Identity Theft, Fraud, Human Trafficking, Home Invasion and other crimes not listed. Victim Support Services has Advocates ready to help. Please call the 24-hr Crisis Line (888) 388-9221. Free Service. Visit our web site at http://victimsupportservices.org

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Looking for Board Members to join the dynamic Board of

Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET PART TIME EVENING JANITORIAL–FREELAND/CLINTON: Hiring IMMEDIATELY for part-time evening janitor, Monday-Saturday, 6 hours per week (one hour per shift) in Freeland, half hour per visit, 2x per week in Clinton. Start time flexible (after 6:00pm/ earlier on Saturday); $12 per hour. Must have valid DL, cell phone, pass background/ drug screening and E-Verify (USCIS). Please provide name and phone number. Resumes welcome. E-mail: susan.valenzuela@ybswa.net (3) PART TIME DRIVER: The Freeland Habitat for Humanity Store is currently looking to fill a part time driver position. Individuals with past driving experience and ability to lift 70-lbs unassisted preferred. Positive attitude & team player required. Submit your resume to southstore@islandcountyhabitat.com or in person at 1592 E Main St, Freeland (2) PART TIME BAKER: Meals on Wheels/Senior Meals has an immediate opening for a part time baker at the Langley Central Kitchen. Quantity Cooking Experience Preferred & Team player. Able to lift 35 lbs. Submit your resume at Island Senior Resources: 14594 SR 525, Langley, WA 98260. Closes March 21 or until filled. For details, call Debbie (360) 321-1621. ISR is an EOE (1) FULL TIME AUTO TECHNICIAN: Martin’s Auto in Oak Harbor is seeking a full time Puzzle 1 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.68)

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auto technician, Monday thru Friday. Apply in person at 152 NE Midway Blvd (2) ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE: We are looking for a dynamic Account Executive. Applicant has to be able to work autonomously and be self-motivated; must possess exceptional customer service and organizational skills; marketing or advertising background desired. If you want to join a successful, growing organization and have a strong work ethic, we want to talk to you. Email your cover letter and resume to info@ whidbeyweekly.com DRIVERS: Drivers wanted for Whidbey SeaTac Shuttle. CDL/ P2 Preferred, Training available for those without. Full Time, Part Time and weekend openings available. Details at www. seatacshuttle.com or call (360) 679-4003

JEWELRY Wide silver cuff bracelet with a 1-1/4" square blue green dichroic glass and wire wrapped beads, $49 OBO; Multi-stone (moss agate, chalcedony etc.) stretch bracelet, $20 OBO; Chrysoprase pendant with interesting silver chain, $75 OBO; Beautiful sterling silver and sapphire earrings, $49 OBO; Glass tube bead (blue/ purple tones) bracelet, $25 OBO; Interesting glass pin in shades of blue, $5. Call (360) 331-1063 (0) Oval amethyst ring set in sterling silver, $45 OBO; White button pearl earrings 8mm, No Cheating!

$29 OBO; Pale blue Baroque pearl earrings 9-10mm, $39 OBO. Call (360) 331-1063 (0)

LAWN AND GARDEN 25 aluminum silver deck post caps, $3 each; 200 feet new 8” heavy waterline, $4 a foot, obo. Can be used for waterline or drain line. (360) 321-1624 Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for gardens, flower beds, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard loads, $225 delivered. South Whidbey (360) 321-1624

MISCELLANEOUS We are in the process of a making a serious downsizing effort, and we have items for sale in the following categories: costume jewelry; furniture; garden tools; hand tools; kitchen items; luggage (including duffel bags, tote bags & backpacks); puzzles and toys; sports items; storage racks; yard equipment (Lawn Boy mower, boat trailer winch, and 30 gallon sprayer); and other yard items. If you are interested in seeing what we have available, please call (360) 678-1167 to make an appointment. World Book Encyclopedia. 22 volume set, ©1991. Excellent condition, $85. Call (360) 914-4304 (1) Marriage sale – joining two households. Trundle bed, stylish curved wooden frame with two mattresses, one slides under, great for the guest room or as twin beds for kids, $65; Blonde sofa

LOCALLY OPERATED

Foster Homes Needed! Family Tails Dog Rescue needs foster homes! We can't save dogs from high kill shelters without homes for them to stay at while they wait to find their forever home. 1 week to 3 months, a fun and rewarding way to be involved with rescue and also have a dog without the full time commitment. We pay for everything, you just provide the love and the home. Please call 360-969-2014 for more info or for an application.

set – sofa, matching chair and ottoman, comfortable, some minor cosmetic spots, $25; Hitachi Ultravision, 42-in tv on 20-in base, great picture and stereo sound, $45; 30’ x 40’ x 28” high sturdy utility table, steel legs, $15; Glider exercise unit, $10; Longhandled fishing net, 9’ - 6-½ foot handle, $15; electric drill, $5; Ears for running outboard out of water, $3 each; Shower aid grip handle, suction cup mounting, $3; Foot powered bicycle pump, $2; Post hole digger, $10; Weller welding gun, new, in box, $10; Folding chaise lounge, $5; Cloth 2 x 5 x 12 with 4 shelves & plastic cover – greenhouse for starting seeds, $15; Stinger 2½-gal wet/dry vac, $15; Old-fashioned woven picnic basket w/ hinged cover, $5; Delta bench band saw, model28-185, make offer; Free glider/walker exercise machine. Coupeville (360) 678-7591 (0) Over 50 LP (vinyl) albums for sale, various artists, pristine condition, $3 each. Call (360) 331-1063 (0) Looking for Xmas, Bday, Father's Day, or just Gifts in general? These are LOCAL made crafts, I have about 50-60 of these available. They are $16.00/ea, plus shipping if you want them mailed. CASH

preferred. Dimensions are: 5-6"W X 17”L. Contact me at ljohn60@gmail.com.

LOST/FOUND Found: 14-karat gold woman's ring on road in front of Langley Library around March 12. May be a promise ring; has been run over by a car. Please call (360) 321-6031 to describe and claim (1)

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES Straw Hay for Sale: Good for bedding, erosion control, mulch, etc. $3 per bale, 10 bale minimum. (360) 321-1624 If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

WANTED I collect old 35 mm cameras and lenses, prefer German or Japanese. Oak Harbor, call (970) 823-0002 (0) Collectibles, Art & Antiques. Cash paid for quality items. Call or Text (360) 661-7298 (0)

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


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HARADA PHYSICAL THERAPY Your Hometown Therapists

Sound advice from a trusted source Gene Kelly Barner is a local Financial Advisor with Edward Jones who focuses onthe individual investor and small businesses. He first started his practice in Oak Harbor, July 2003, after leaving the U.S.Navy where he served as a Naval Flight Officer (NFO).Gene is active in the community as a member of the Police Community Advisory Board (CAB), a member of the Whidbey Health Foundation Board, and a member of the Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce. He is also a huge supporter of various local charitable organizations. Gene, and his team, provide individualized financial services that address long-term needs and goals, are dedicated to providing a very high level of client satisfaction. Gene and his Sr. Branch Office Administrator, Cynthia Mason, are focused on serving the community and pride themselves on interpersonal communications skills. Their primary goal is to help individual investors develop an investment strategy geared toward their unique, long-term goals. Whether you need to save for a child’s college education, plan for retirement or review insurance needs, they are there to help. The door is always open for new clients! Barner and Mason hope you will stop by their office today on Ernst Street, in the real estate business across from Flyers, or you may call (360) 675-8239.

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