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February 25, 2011

Walnut Hills High School

Volume CV, Issue 4


From the Editors

February 25, 2011

The Chatterbox

The Chatterbox Editoral Staff

Marshalla Eves, Co-Editor-in-Chief

Shiwani Kamath, Co-Editor-in-Chief

Mia Manavalan, Senior Managing Co-Editor

Mac Calvert, Photo Editor Serena Dugan, View Points Editor Simon Lazarus, Copy Editor JP Schmitz, Cartoon Editor Adam Wolf, Sports Editor

Letter From the Editor

Marshalla Eves, ‘11 Chatterbox Co-Editor-in-Chief I must say that I have much ammunition for this month’s address. It’s February. Need I say more? Not only is it recognized as the month of love and a major transition period for many students, it is the month that celebrates the history of Black Americans as inventors, artists, and many more things that we, as people, know too little of. Did you know that Black History Month started as Negro History Week in 1926 by Carter G. Woodson? It was created in efforts to educate the American people about the cultural backgrounds of AfricanAmericans and their highly regarded achievements. So, I hope that you learned something new this month. In addition to Black History, we celebrate the spirit of the love. All those hearts shot, and shot

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Sarah Davidoff, Junior Managing Co-Editor

Clayton Castle, Fine Arts Editor Emily Friedman, Style & Culture Editor Jonah Roth, News & Features Editor Riley Theurer, Visual Editor Advisors: Samantha Gerwe-Perkins & Dawn Wolfe

down, by our friend Cupid. The candy. The flowers. The stuffed animals. All of these make Valentine’s Day fun for the few hours that it actually lasts. So, if you did not get the girl or guy of your dreams, don’t worry about it. Create your own holiday and try again. He or she will definitely appreciate your spontaneity more than the common gifts exchanged that day. Don’t dwell. Better things are definitely ahead. As we settle into the New Year, moving past, or forgetting, our resolutions and into spring, we often reflect on our lives. We begin to think about all we have accomplished and what we have to show for it thus far. Think about it. How many times have we tried to do something and failed to achieve it? What have we learned in that particular attempt? If our achievements do not tally up, our spring tends to hold the chill of the winter but if we learn from our mistakes, whether it is a matter of the heart or a wrong-doing to a friend, our success and self-gain is assured. As we transition into March, let us set new goals for the new season, or maybe even go back and pick up some of the jobs that were left unfinished. It is never too late to start improving.

Walnut Hills High School

The Chatterbox Policy Statement The Chatterbox has been guaranteed the right of freedom of the press through the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. The administration of Walnut Hills High School is thus bound to support and protect The Chatterbox’s inalienable rights as a free press. As an integral part of the Walnut Hills High School community, The Chatterbox has the responsibility to report in the most comprehensive and objective manner possible. Students, parents, faculty, and administrators are encouraged to use this publication as a forum to express any ideas or concerns, whether they be personal or of local, national, or international scope. Journalists are required to work under established guidelines. Invasion of privacy as a means of news gathering is prohibited. Articles found to be discriminatory, libelous, or unnecessarily obscene (as determined by the editors or the advisor) will not be published. Finally, journalists are granted the right to keep private the name of a source from whom they received information with the understanding that the source was to remain anonymous. The role of the newspaper advisor will be to provide counsel and criticism pertaining to the newspaper’s content and production. Although both the advisor and the administration hold certain powers regarding The Chatterbox, both must respect the paper’s autonomy. No student shall be prevented from joining the staff on the basis of sex, race, creed, or national origin. Vol. CV, No. 4


View Points

What You Should Have Done When You Optioned Serena Dugan, ‘11 Viewpoints Editor As January recedes into the distance, the floors of Walnut Hills are rife with misplaced and hastily discarded optioning forms. The course curriculum is cursorily perused by inquisitive students and a flutter of uncertainty passes through the collective body of underclassman. Surely the dread and anticipation of optioning is upon us. The mysterious absence of an optioning form in my own hand, while slightly disconcerting, is somewhat relieving. Watching the flurry of the under classes as they siphon through the extensive list of Walnut’s AP courses, it feels odd to take a back seat in the proceedings. Alas, this should not strike me as odd, but there is within me a residing nostalgia, and a frustrating resistance to my title as SENIOR. But despite my own woes on the subject, I can still offer some insight on the optioning process. Your regard is, of course, your own domain. I would advise you to take only those classes that interest you personally: namely, it would be imprudent to copy your boyfriend’s schedule onto your own optioning sheet. The old maxim holds true: if your friend decides to jump off a cliff, it would likely not behoove you to follow him to his perilous demise. Second, it is usually better to get general requirements out of the way, such as PE, Health, Time to Speak, and the new Econ requirement. If you wait until you are a SENIOR, you will invariably find yourself in a pit of despair as your scheduling liberties will be significantly impaired. You don’t want to have to say ‘sayonara’ to your most anticipated AP classes! Man up and take your requirements. If you Vol. CV, No. 4

The Chatterbox

February 25, 2011

don’t, the guidance office will get you eventually. This leads to my second maxim of the day: don’t shoot your own self in the foot. Ignorance is not bliss; it is merely the delayed acknowledgement of stupidity. Lastly, I would advise you to find a good balance in your coursework. It is typical at Walnut that students either overestimate their intelligence or insouciantly disregard any incitement towards realizing their scholastic potential. Again: you do not want to be either of these people. Find a safe place in the middle of the road, where you will not be attacked by the metaphorical bicyclist or falling tree, and stay there. In academia, moderation is key (maxim number three if you’re keeping track). If Calculus isn’t your forte, don’t take physics C. If you believe yourself a prime candidate of SENIORitis, don’t load your plate with demanding coursework. And if you are a hopeless overachiever, take a deep breath, cross one AP off your list, and get yourself a social life

assume that velociraptors are highly threatening. If resurrected, it is possible that such creatures could return at four times their original size, a staggering 6’ 5”. Such a creature would set even a zombie running for its life (or lack thereof). To keep yourself safe from so gargantuan a threat, here are some guidelines to add to your list of zombie apocalypse survival methods. Do not run from the velociraptor. If confronted with the predator, arm yourself with heavy artillery or something very, very sharp. Chances are, if you attempt to escape, you will be outrun and subsequently devoured. Therefore, it is imperative that you kill the velociraptor before it kills you. This method is slightly different from that employed during a zombie confrontation, in which case it would be perfectly safe to run away. Keep in mind that, while they cannot open doors, velociraptors would have no problem running through them. While real velociraptors may not be as intelligent as the ones depicted in Jurassic Park, this may, in fact, work toward A Field Guide to Mythical their advantage. A dumb velociraptor Creatures: Never Run From The possesses approximately 132 times the Raptors destructive power of a dumb human, Rachel Chung, ‘11 and therefore must be carefully avoided. Chatterbox Staff Writer For example, a velociraptor possessing the intellectual capacity equal Now that we are prepared for the to that of a human might not consider onslaught of the zombie apocalypse, it is that running through the door or wall time to address another pressing issue: is faster than trying to turn the knob, velociraptors. Velociraptors are a genus and thus will quickly become frustrated of dinosaur that roamed the earth in the and deterred (I have seen this happen Late Cretaceous period. While actual to many humans). However, were that velociraptors measured only 1.6 feet tall velociraptor less intelligent, it wouldn’t by 6.8 feet long, their menace has been consider the door at all—just the prey sincerely underestimated. As we have on the other side. seen in Hollywood, Velociraptors are a If, in our lifetimes, we see such a very real threat to mankind. terrible episode of destruction, these Velociraptors are known to possess guidelines should ensure your survival, two large, sickle-shaped claws, measur- at least for a little while. And if we are ing about 2.6 inches in length, with one confronted with both zombies and veloon each manus, or “hand.” These claws ciraptors simultaneously, or—do I even were likely used to slice into unfortudare suggest it—zombie velociraptors, I nate prey. would hope not for luck, but mercy. That being said, I think it is safe to

Walnut Hills High School

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Sports

The Chatterbox

Fun on the Hill

February 25, 2011

The friendships cultivated through Ski Club are truly great: as your skills progress over the years, you will be able to conquer “Center Stage” together with your friends. Maybe you’ll even convince one of them to try to land a back-flip in the terrain park! (Just make sure this friend wears his or her helmet for safety.) Such accomplishments are reminisced about for years to come. By joining Ski Club you have a reason to look forward to the usually dreary Cincinnati winters and are assured lasting friendships. With such a promise, how could you not join? Get out there and join Ski Club!

where the varsity team usually places very highly. During the University Jake Findley, ‘11 of Louisville Academic Challenge, Chatterbox Contributer the A Team, the highest of Walnut’s sub-teams, placed third out of thirty Have you ever seen kids walkteams. ing through the halls after school In addition, the quiz team has on a Thursday, fully bundled in a brought home victories against Wilmcoat, mittens, a scarf, and a hat ington, Anderson, Glen Este, Milford, while hauling a pair of skis? They and Turpin during its weekly matches. are heading off to hit the Perfect The team has a record of 33-11, not North ski slopes. As one of the including SENIOR Joe Nutter’s solo largest clubs at our school, Ski matches, and was ranked 74th in the Club brings together all grades to nation. This ranking is not necessaribond over hot chocolate, chicken ly reflective of the team’s performance, tenders and man-made snow in however, as it has beaten teams such the serene setting of Lawrenceas Northmont, the team ranked 12th burg, Indiana. “It’s not really nationally. about the skiing. It’s really about This year’s Ski Club is drawing to a Mr. Grunder, largely recognized for coming out with friends and avoidclose. See Mr. Miles next year to get in his quizzical brilliance, coaches the ing homework,” says one anonyon the fun! team. Its captains are SENIOR Joe mous member. That being said, Nutter and sophomore Ashwin Kuanyone who has the desire to ski mar. The roster consists of SENIORS can and should join. Perfect North The Wiz Kids James Avant IV, Sarah Berman, and even offers a ski school for those Alex Reblando, ‘14 Matt Verbryke; Juniors Ben Brandiwho need a little help figuring out Chatterbox Staff Writer court, Josh Mansfield, Anna Mendlein, why people enjoy strapping pieces and Kaelyn Willingham; Sophomores of wood to their feet in the freezing The Academic Quiz Team has Sarah Adams, Stuart Johnson, Olivia cold and falling downhill. continued its success this year, achievKappers, Jack McCann, John McCor“I love the snow!” exclaims ing a feat that it has previously never mick, Cosmo Philpott, Matthew Roth, red-nosed SENIOR Emily Butaccomplished: getting featured on a Will Schweller; and Freshman Alex terbaugh. This love of the snow game show. The Walnut Hills quiz Reblando. Hopefully the team will concan be attributed to her participateam participated in “The Brain tinue its victorious season and do well tion in Ski Club since 7th grade. Game” earlier this year, a quiz team in its upcoming tournaments. Unlike most other clubs, Ski Club reality/game show that airs on the is open to 7th through 12th gradDiscovery Channel. This honor just ers. This is also a great activity for those that have not yet passed tops off the other rewards gained by the quiz team this year. The team the most important test known to 2 3 24 qualified for the state championship at man - the driving test - since free Ohio State University in April and the busing is offered for those who two national tournaments in Atlanta purchase a season pass through 2 in May and in Chicago in June. The Walnut. team’s goal is to get itself recognized throughout the nation. 24 3 The academic quiz team competes against other schools and answers trivia questions to gain the highest 3 score. The team also participates in larger competitions and tournaments with multiple schools from across the region. The quiz team has been Ski Club Ken Ken directions can be found on page 8 busy playing in over five tournaments Mac Calvert, ‘11

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Walnut Hills High School

Vol. CV, No. 4


Fine Arts

The Chatterbox

High School Students Making a Difference in the Arts World

soon as the council members were chosen, they began to plan the regional arts competition, Emerging Artists 2011. The competition is for 7th-12th Mia Manavalan, ‘12 graders, and the council will judge and Senior Co-Managing Editor choose one winner from each grade. Students entered their pieces of 2-D Twenty-one students from the art (painting, photograph, sketch, Greater Cincinnati area were etc.). chosen in December of 2010 to The winners will be announced at be the spokespeople of the comSTUDIO 2011 on Saturday, February munity’s art culture. ArtsWave’s 26th. Each winner’s artwork will be Teen Arts Council is a program for displayed in one of several Graeter’s energetic high school students to locations throughout the region. The reach out to the community and council members have been responhelp it rediscover its vibrant art. sible for all the details of the event: These high school students plan planning logistics, developing a events, organize concerts, and put marketing plan, communicating with together exhibits - all created and Graeter’s stores, facilitating the judggeared towards other Cincinnati ing, and more. This is just the first of teenagers. a couple more events that the council This exclusive council is will plan from now through the sumcomposed of students from many mer. There may be a possibility to colhigh schools, including St. Xavier laborate with other arts organizations High School, Cincinnati Country in the area to put on exciting events Day, Wyoming High School, Saint that will connect teens and the arts. If Ursula Academy, Withrow High you want to sign up to receive inforSchool, and many more. From mation from the Teen Arts Council Walnut Hills, three students were about upcoming events, email teenchosen: Junior Jessica Fan, Junior artscouncil@theartswave.org. As Teen Michelle Baverman, and FreshArts Council member Jessica Fan man Katie Brown. says, “Make art because it connects us Michelle Baverman says, “We all together in one circle of life!” became part of this unique council that plans events that bring people together through the arts.” To be selected, the students had to complete an application detailing their involvement in the arts and why they would be good candidates. “ArtsWave received many applications from many talented and ambitious students, but ultimately we could only choose 21 people to be a part of the council. The council members have arts interests spanning all art forms – dance, musical theatre, drama, music, visual art, and more. They are a dynamic group of teens who Juniors Michelle Baverman and Jessica Fan have an energetic passion for the from Teen Arts Council. arts,” says Siobhan Lau, the Arts Photo by: Mia Manavalan, ‘12 Learning Program Associate. As Vol. CV, No. 4

Walnut Hills High School

February 25, 2011

Backstage with Clayton Clayton Castle, ‘11 Fine Arts Page Editor

Many students transfer to Walnut Hills from schools that specialize in more than just academics. One school that many students, including myself, have transferred from is the School for Creative and Performing Arts. I recently talked to another former SCPA student and talented pianist, Sophomore Lucy Hattemer. In 2007 and 2008, Lucy won the bronze medal in the World Piano Competition. She has performed for President Obama and has been featured at Carnegie Hall. Recently, she won the piano division in the Blue Ash Montgomery Symphony Orchestra Competition. Q: When did you begin playing the piano? A: I began playing the piano when I turned six, but it was more of a “practice-right-before-the-lesson” sort of playing. In second and third grade, I began to practice more, but it wasn’t until I went to SCPA that I became serious about it. Q: Did your experience as a student at SCPA help you grow and mature as a musician? If so, how? A: SCPA at first simply helped to structure piano for me. I had a 45-minute class in which to practice every day, and I had a lesson once a week. In sixth grade, I switched over to my current teacher, Simon Goykhman. Sixth grade is when I realized that I wanted to keep playing piano and that I liked it. If I hadn’t gone to SCPA, I probably wouldn’t have kept playing. The quarterly recitals also gave me a chance to get used to performing. Q: Any last words to the aspiring musicians? A: The only piece of advice I’m even remotely qualified to give would be to find something you like doing, and do it. If you like it, you’ll enjoy doing it even when it gets hard.

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Style & Culture

The Ides of March Jenna Weber, ‘12 Chatterbox Staff Writer

Rain Man, Milk Money, Traffic, and Little Man Tate. What do all these movies have in common? They were filmed in Cincinnati. And the next film to be added to this list is The Ides of March, the story of a young presidential candidate who gets caught up in dirty politics while campaigning. The cast of this movie includes actors Ryan Gosling, Evan Rachel Wood, Marisa Tomei, and Paul Giamatti. But why is a movie starring these four big Hollywood names being produced in Cincinnati instead of Los Angeles? It is common knowledge that George Clooney grew up in the Tri-State Region of Augusta and Mason. In fact, some of your parents may have gone to high school with him. George’s father was a local radio and television personality, and his aunt, Rosemary Clooney, was a famous singer and movie star, getting her start on WLW radio. Because Clooney is head director of the movie The Ides of March, it is not surprising that he has chosen to set his next movie in the area where he spent his childhood. Clooney wrote the screenplay with Grant Heslov and based it on the Beau Willimon play “Farragut North.” The playwright Willimon was an aide for John Dean during his run for president in 2004. Clooney has been scouting out locations all over the city since November. Locations confirmed for filming include Memorial Hall, a historic 102-year-old auditorium on Elm Street, and Lunken Airport. Both sites are commonly used by national candidates on the campaign trail.However, up to twenty-six other locations 5

The Chatterbox throughout the region will also be used. After filming in Cincinnati during the month of February, Clooney and his crew will move on to Grand Rapids, Michigan. As many are already aware, a casting call for the movie was publicized in newspapers in mid-December. The announcement received a huge response, with 15,000 online applications from residents hoping to be extras in the film. Who knows? Maybe your friend, neighbor, or even one of your teachers could land on the big screen in the not too distant future.

Café Français

Michael Manning, ‘12 Chatterbox Staff Writer Fancy divine Brie and Boursin? What about decadent French delicacies such as crème brûlée, petits fours, or éclairs au chocolat? Or would you rather have a brief parler with amis? Well, the good news is you don’t have to travel to Paris to indulge in la vie Français (the French life), because every year the French language department organizes the Café Français right here at Walnut. This year on January 6 the Forum was transformed into a cozy guinguette (music hall) on the banks of the Seine River. As I strolled from table to table mesmerized by the gourmet hors d’oeuvres, I heard the sweet low sound of a baseline. It was coming from members of the Cincinnati-based musical group, the Faux Frenchmen, who played smooth “gypsy” jazz over the low murmur of conversation. Students Jessica Fan and Lucy Rahner also contributed to the euro-chic atmosphere with Francophone music. As the night progressed, parents and students alike soaked in the French culture and atmosphere. According to Madame LaJeunesse, one of the French teachers here at Walnut, a complete study of French includes not only conjugations and vocabulary

Walnut Hills High School

February 25, 2011

but also a general appreciation of the culture. Walnut students have many reasons for taking the language. Freshman Jo Ellen Pellman chose French to help her ballet technique, not to mention the fact it’s a beautiful language. “If you know a language, it will open many doors for you,” said two-year French student and junior, Emma Currens. She couldn’t be more correct. The French language is spoken by an estimated five-hundred million people throughout the world, and its impact on other tongues (including English) is immense: approximately 30% of words are borrowed from French. It is also an important diplomatic language at international organizations such as the European Union, the United Nations, and the Red Cross. French is not only a language, but a portal to a blissful way of life with good food, good culture, and good company. The music at Café Français could no doubt have continued far into the night, but when the clock struck nine the festivities concluded. All were relieved that no Trans-Atlantic flight was required to return home. Everyone who attended can agree that Café Français was a truly delightful soirée.

Vol. CV, No. 4


News

The Renovation: Maintaining our Heritage Garret Oester, ‘14

Chatterbox Staff Writer The rapidly approaching renovation is tasked with “simplifying, unifying, lightening, and brightening, all with respect to our classical architecture.” Walnut Hills High School is a classical, collegeprep school. Students are required to take Latin, and Greco-Roman history is factored into many courses. One goal of the renovation is to modernize and enhance the classical feel of the school. This will be carried out with colors, textures, materials, art, and the restoration of classical design elements already in the structure. The most apparent classical feature will be in the paint colors throughout the building. In the 1932 building, these will comprise of creams, whites, and blacks. In the new academic wing, these will be blues and terra cottas. The Arts and Sciences wing will continue to contain greens and terra cottas with the addition of a medium blue hue. In the music wing, the colors will be light blue, white, cream, black, and the terra cotta. These colors are in a classical palate that provide interest and tie the spaces together. Another main focus of the project is on the materials placed into the space. These include woods, flooring materials, stone, carpets, and fabrics. The woods are in cherry tones, and the tiles in restrooms and other areas all resemble natural stone. The flooring in hallways and classrooms ties in with the paint colors. The carpets all show natural designs. The classical details in the buildings are also important in Vol. CV, No. 4

The Chatterbox creating the classical feel. One area that has the most classical elements is the auditorium. The main theater lobby has two Rookwood pottery water fountains donated by former classes. Rookwood was one of the premier potters in the country, and before it closed, it was located in a building overlooking downtown Cincinnati. Inside the actual theater, there are friezes, raised carvings, and images that depict the muses of tragedy and comedy. The library also contains many classical, historical pieces, the most apparent of which are the sixteen blue-green Rookwood reliefs that depict the ancient history of fighting, hunting, and worship. Mrs. Wolfe’s classroom, room 217, contains a series of panels painted by Paul Ashbrook, a painter who was born in 1867. His wife was a French teacher at Walnut Hills High School from 1922 until 1949. They were photographed, and the room was recreated at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington D.C. The murals will be removed, restored, and reinstalled after Phase One of the renovation is complete. There are many other classical parts of the building that are also being retained. There are copper-coated dormer windows located above the Black-Box Theater and rooms 300 and 301. There is also a copper cupola atop the auditorium. The most iconic exterior architectural feature that will remain, however, is the dome over the library. All of the art, statues, paintings, and busts will be kept. Some of them will be restored as well. This includes the two athletes in Museum Hall, and the paintings in the main lobby. However, the fate of the paintings that are returning to the new building has not been decided. The next article will be a reflection on the building: what is changing, and what is disappearing forever. Questions and comments can be emailed to whhsrenovation@gmail.com.

Walnut Hills High School

February 25, 2011

Requirements Have Changed Mia Manavalan, ‘12 Senior Managing Co- Editor

On February 10, Mr. Brokamp announced information that drew excitement from many of Walnut’s younger students, but upset many of Walnut’s upperclassmen. After a long debate, the administration decided, for the class of 2013 and beyond, Time to Speak is no longer a graduation requirement. However, this does not exempt the sixty- three current juniors who did not take Time to Speak this year, who may option to take the course during the summer. A possible reason for this is because this select number of students would have an unfair advantage to gain a higher class rank. Because Time to Speak has a 1.0 grade point, the students who did not take it this year could option for an AP class which has a higher weighting of 1.5----thus, improving their class rank. While many current juniors moan and groan at this, it is a fairly legitimate reason. However, beginning with the class of 2013, Walnut students do not have to take this class. “I’m glad because I already have presentations in English class and I heard Time to Speak involves a lot of writing too. That class doesn’t sound very appealing to me,” says freshman Rachel Wilz. While this class is still offered as an elective, it is difficult to say how many are optioning for it. Instead, current sophomores are eager about the idea of fitting yet another AP class into their schedules. This article is continued on page 8. Cover Photo Credits: Mac Calver, ‘11 and Harry Kran Annexstein, ‘11

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Features

The Power of Facebook Michelle Glazer, ‘11 Chatterbox Contributer

Have you ever wondered how a magnificent tool such as Facebook was ever created? In one instant, a person from Israel can be viewing the inside details of a person’s life in America. Some people worry about their privacy while others are ecstatic about this new invention. Facebook is a popular, worldwide communication tool created by brilliant young men that offers a variety of features which allow people to publicly communicate with others. It began as a social network for college students, which then developed into allowing high school students to connect. Soon later people would join by a regional network, but this finally changed permanently and now anyone from everywhere can join this massive site. In September 2006, Facebook created a new feature, the News Feed, which agitated various people. Launching this new feature was a risk the company had to take in order to make a large step in social networking. The News Feed feature allows people to view their friends’ updates on their homepage rather than stored away on their profiles. This is a more convenient way to view peoples’ updates and newly uploaded pictures. Some members of Facebook knocked this new characteristic as creepy and stalker-ish, which brings upon the issue of privacy. “I feel the Newsfeed feature is kind of creepy because not only do people waste time looking through people’s profiles that they don’t know, but you are forced to deal with an influx of unnecessary info that no one really cares about,” says Junior Stephanie Gerard. In order to please people, Facebook 7

The Chatterbox added some privacy controls so that members would have the option to not share certain details of their Facebook routines on their friends’ home pages. As written in the article Facebook’s Zuckerberg: “We really messed this one up.” People also continue to worry about their privacy because of new additions to Facebook such as the “See Friendship” feature, where a person can view a meticulous relationship between two people. Facebook has recently added this new feature that some people think is stalker-ish, but others enjoy. The “See Friendship” feature includes wall posts, events, and pictures between two people. A number of people may appreciate the convenience in viewing their Facebook relationship with a friend, but most users find this to be eerie. “The See Friendship feature is odd. I almost feel like Facebook is forcing us to be creepy by showing us every singly interaction between two people,” says Junior Anthony Foster. The fact that a person can click this function and view an entire history of these peoples’ relationships seems to scare quite a few Facebook members.

February 25, 2011

Are Your Priorities Always In Line? Phillip McDonald, ‘11 Chatterbox Contributer

Have you ever had a girlfriend, boyfriend, or been in any sort of serious relationship? It is my personal opinion that students should not be involved in serious high school relationships. “Serious” dating in high school is detrimental to a student’s academic well-being, not to mention the potential physical, emotional, and mental trauma. Don’t get me wrong, there are those students who are able to balance a relationship with the rest of their priorities, but for most students, these priorities change. There are also factors of a relationship that are completely self-destructive, and for the most part, hard to avoid: change, insufficient communication, sex, double standards, jealousy, abuse, and reality. One of the most important priorities that a student should uphold is his or her academic success. While in a relationship, the sight of a successful future is often supplanted by the notion of starting a family with “You are forced to deal with an inone’s high school lover. As our futures flux of unnecessary info that no one change, we may also notice similar really cares about” changes in our grades. Whether a couple is arguing or having a good Zuckerberg and the Facebook team time, their focus is elsewhere. If this continually try their best to improve occurs, grades will drop and trouble the social networking website. Memwill ensue. bers may become frustrated and The emotional symptoms of a disagree with certain additions, yet relationship tie in closely with the the Facebook team’s main goal is to physical. The long and lust for somecreate an enjoyable method for conthing that more than likely will lead to necting with old friends. Facebook is nowhere is a detriment to our youth, a great invention, allowing people to though studies show that “60% of high communicate with one another from school sweethearts get married”. This across the world. Life would be astrois a refreshing statistic, but it still nomically different without Facebook does not take away from the harsh and friendships would not be as potent realities of high school relationships. as they are today. Continued on the following page...

Walnut Hills High School

Vol. CV, No. 4


Features

I must say, not all relationships are bad, and frankly, the opposite of everything I have discussed may occur. A healthy relationship or supporting partner may actually cause one’s grades, attendance, and self-esteem to go up. It may, in fact, play one of the most critical and influential roles in one’s life. But here lies the question: is it worth the risk? What I am suggesting is not that relationships are always bad, but that they usually lead to unnecessary stress, distraction, and heartbreak. Of course, everybody needs somebody; but if you can’t fully commit to the relationship, what’s the point? If you fail to heed this advice, I can only say that you got what was coming. For those with a fairy tale ending, I applaud you. But for those with a broken heart, let’s just say I told you so.

Quotables On High School Romance . . . George Ross, ‘12

“I think high school relationships are a good experience, that most people should go through, but only if you’re mature enough to handle them. I have definitely seen that they are a positive factor in many people’s high school experience.” Maddy Kissling, ‘12 “High school relationships are taken way too seriously. Aren’t they supposed to be fun and lighthearted? Most of these relationships are really dramatic and full Vol. CV, No. 4

The Chatterbox ing two AP exams in May); take the semester Economics class; or take the online economics class offered during this summer. Junior Josh Mansfield who is currently in the AP Economics class expresses his views on the matter. “Many people dislike classes because they don’t apply to their lives. Economics is practically one’s life. I worry about the person who doesn’t know how money works these days. While Economics AP is a theoretical class, Mr. Martin is great at relating it to Sophia Melnyk, ‘12 things happening in real life. It re“High school relaally is a good class to apply in your tionships are a case daily life.” Although this may be by case basis, each true, many juniors are angry that one is different. this rule applies to them. Junior Some can be healthy Paul Neidhard says, “It threw off and others can go to my whole senior year and I think extremes and become it’s completely unfair that we have a distraction. It deto take this class. What happened pends on how mature to taking classes you’re actually the people involved interested in?” are.” A word of advice to current freshmen and younger: don’t have your heart set on what courses Log on to www.walnuthillseagles.com you’ll be taking the rest of your and click on the Chatterbox link to vote high school career. The requirefor your favorite quote. The winner will ments may change, yet again. be announced in the next issue. of unnecessary anxiety Personally, I feel like the capacity to love is a mature thing and expecting to be together forever is a little crazy and stupid. Maybe that’s just because I’ve never had a high school relationship...”

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Requirements Have Changed

Continuing from page 6.... This isn’t the only requirement that the administration has changed. However, students do not have the Walnut Hills faculty to blame for this alteration. According to the Ohio Revised Code 3313.603 (Requirements for high school graduation), “each school shall integrate the study of economics and financial literacy, as expressed in the social studies academic content standards adopted by the state board of education.” The state board of education has revised the graduation requirements. Walnut students now have three choices: take AP Micro/ Macro Economics (which includes tak-

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RULES FOR KENKEN® Fill the grid with digits so as not to repeat a digit in any row or column, and so the digits within each heavily outlined box will produce the target number shown in that box by using the operation (addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division) shown by the symbol after the numeral. So, for example, the notation 6+ means that the numerals in the box should add up to 6, and the notation 48x means that by multiplying the numbers in the box you will get 48.  A 4x4 grid will use the digits 1-4.  A 5x5 grid will use 1-5. A 6x6 grid will use 1-6, and so on.  

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Sports

February 25, 2011

The Chatterbox

The Afterschool Dilemma

students feel as if they are constantly being watched over as though the administration thinks they will riot if left unattended for a few minutes. Junior swimmer Michelle Baverman expresses her anger about the situation, similar to many other athletes. “It feels like the administration doesn’t realize that we can control ourselves and don’t need a babysitter. It is ridiculous that they take away our phones when they see them out, as if we are being disruptive.” In addition to the athletes, many younger kids study together and are tutored after A student swimmer sadly looks at school in the lunchroom. Ms. Savagefreedom from behind bars. Photo by: Gentry, the Junior High principal, Mac Calvert, ‘11 explains the purpose of the cell-less policy: “The mission of the After At Walnut Hills, education is School program is to allow students known to come before all other to continue to pursue their goals after activities. Many students do like to mix some enjoyment with study, hours. The use of cell phones can be disruptive to the atmosphere we are however, and find a sports team trying to create.” The rules in place to be the perfect way to do so. At what point, though, does the focus are for the students’ best interest, on education start to bring pain to though they are having a bit of difstudents and athletes? Every day ficulty recognizing this. Perhaps it is due to the somber atmosphere created, after school, the cafeteria plays host to a variety of students, many as stated by Junior Grace Counts: “Its like a prison. They keep the gates of which are athletes waiting for down and yell at us.” The issue here practice to start—currently memmay not lie in the rules, but how they bers of the basketball and swim teams. Others are merely waiting are handled. Besides, Ms. Gentry reveals a bit of misinformation that has for a ride home. These students spread among the athletes: “The board do not willingly hang out in the allows the athletes to quietly use their cafeteria; rather, they are herded phones. It is the athletic programs’ into there after getting reprirule that they not use their phones. manded by the security guards if caught in the halls. However, this It is the discretion of the individual coaches.” So while the administration cafeteria time does not have to be says the blame is on the coaches, the a painful experience, as long as coaches are all under the impression relative peace is maintained. Many students believe that the it’s the administration’s orders. While rules are a bit too strict. In partic- this miscommunication is just a minor ular, no cell phones are to be used nuisance to the administration and coaches, it’s the student-athletes who while in the cafeteria. If a cell phone is seen, it is instantly taken end up with the bad deal. away and kept by the administration for the required three days. This alone, however, does not seem like too big of a deal. After all, it’s a regular school rule. The Adam Wolf, ‘11 Sports Editor

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Walnut Hills High School

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Vol. CV, No. 4


Gleam

February 25, 2011

The Chatterbox

The River

from beneath the indigo sea The ramblings of decaying men suffering great insanity.

The Wind-Ward Trail

Come, let us Meet by the river. We will shove our feet in the mud and the muck and the dirt a thousand years old. We will lay down our memories, yours over mine, over yours, over mine, build up the foundation with the past present, future the things we cannot know, the things we do not want to remember. We will hold our legs, keep them steady and still so they can transform into pillars. We will reach with our hands, open palms touching, looking up, and our arms will become bridges to cross. We will feel the weight of the water as it greets our waists, and we will turn our faces to the sun with a smile because it is all so familiar.

A hallowed soul, the original ghoul, the face of genuine fear The one that cremated the exaggerated mask of fright The horseman that lost his brain but not his head on the path We love and hate the shivering emoitions it inspires. Poetry like the screeching of a rotting violin, playing for burning witches on doomed and dismal pyres.

Follow the winding wind-ward trail Up to the gate in the sky To the lofty lake that boasts of a sail While still learning to fly

Madison Koenig, ‘11 Gleam Editor

From the Fall 2010 Edition

A Tribute to the Halloween Poet Emma Wilson, ‘12

And now captain, we remove our wandering eyes, and give thanks for all you wrenched from Poe.

The understated haunted house, with closets that open only once, and close twice Red maple floorboards, red as blood of new, hide the stench of the literary corpse he tore apart, then stitched back together. Horrors of the inner earth, flow inside his veins beneath the coldest skin, the move the deepest incisions And let death out again. This holy horrible holiday, not at all way what we make it to be. For without the brackish waters of his mind spilled upon the pages, the crushed threads of all we held in joyful contempt. The candy we consume, turns to ash inside our mouths a taste we attempt to curtail As we remember the man, the hallowed man who made our nightmares real.

by AJ Schwartz, ‘14 Gleam contributor

Follow the trail where the milk is sweet And the ice is silver and cold Where every castle has a king on its seat Each with a heart of gold Follow the trail to where the pegasi live Laughing at the horses pinned to the ground To where the grain grows without any chaff And no treasure goes unfound The land is hidden, but still can be found To those who seek to prevail: Get your head in the clouds and your feet off the ground And follow the wind-ward trail From the Fall 2010 Edition All editions of Gleam are available in Dr. Bard’s room for $5. Gleam meets every Thursday in Dr. Bard’s room. All newcomers and submissions are welcome.

Winner of this year’s Halloween contest

The darkest creatures that crawl the straightest lines The sweetest of organs that tell the sickest lies The call of the long dead siren Vol. CV, No. 4

Walnut Hills High School

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The Wally Hill

February 25, 2011

The Chatterbox

The Wally Hill on Valentine’s Day

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Walnut Hills High School

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Cryptogram http://www.puzzlemesilly.com

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Solutions 1. Money frees you from doing things you dislike. Since I dislike doing nearly everything, money is handy. -Groucho Marx 2. Most modern calendars mar the sweet simplicity of our lives by reminding us that each day that passes is the anniversary of some perfectly uninteresting event. -Oscar Wilde 3. Don’t you wish there were a knob on the TV to turn up the intelligence? There’s one marked ‘Brightness,’ but it doesn’t work. - Gallagher

rants everywhere open their doors to amorous couples, offering romantic dinners and desserts. However, the Wally Hill, ‘11 day itself offers myriad opportunities, some of which I have observed from Why is it that average calorie the two-star romantic comedy Valenconsumption spikes in February? tine’s Day, which premiered around Valentine’s Day, of course. Young women everywhere consume mass this time last year. Here are a few basic rules, which, if followed exactly amounts of candy for myriad reaand unerringly, should make any Valsons. Young women coping with heart break find it difficult to focus entine’s Day exceptional (mostly next year’s since this year’s has already on all five Advanced Placement classes, as do young women in the happened): throws of young love. Valentine’s 1) Never, ever, ever, EVER, propose on Day is possibly one of the most Valentine’s Day. Not only will you look controversial holidays of all time. The world is transformed into pink like a dork and a terrible sap, but... you will look like a dork and a terrible and red for approximately three sap..... weeks, and sales at Hallmark skyrocket. Walgreens lines its shelves with heart shaped boxes of 2) Don’t be a florist or teacher on Valentine’s Day. candy and boxes of heart shaped candy. Shoppers everywhere are confronted with little stuffed polar 3) Avoid planes at all costs. bears holding hearts. 4) Don’t eat the Twilight-themed To put it frankly, Valentine’s candy. Day is almost as offensive as Christmas, though not quite as Ah, Valentine’s Day. Love it or hate expensive. The only difference it, it is one more day of giving (mostly between Valentine’s Day and to women). The giving of mysterious Christmas is that Christmas bears chocolate (I say mysterious because an actual purpose to many people, these boxes rarely come with the who celebrate it not only for comhandy guides that tell you what’s in mercial but also for religious reaeach candy), of stuffed polar bears sons. Though Valentine’s Day is that say “Be My Valentine” when based on the life of a saint, there they should say “Save Me from Global is nothing religious about buying Warming,” and of millions upon milyour significant other chocolate lions of bouquets of overpriced flowers and saying awkward, affectionate that will die within the week and join things to him or her (in fact, both the ranks of the discarded boxes of are generally considered sinful). mysterious chocolate, which someone So, we wonder: what should tried to eat but eventually gave up a couple do to make Valentine’s Day meaningful? A cheeseball like after biting into three in a row filled myself would say that if your rela- with cherry cordial. I sincerely hope that your Valentine’s Day was filled tionship is truly healthy, then evwith all of these wonderful things, and ery day should be it’s own ValenI wish you an even better one next tine’s Day. However, we all know year, now that you are well-equipped that this is not the case for many with all the know-how of Valentine’s couples. For starters, Valentine’s Day is a great excuse to do nothing Day success. but frolic for a whole day. Restau-

Vol. CV, No. 4


Cartoons

February 25, 2011

The Chatterbox

Last Issue’s Winning Caption: “This is why we shouldn’t pollute” - Anonymous

This Issue’s Caption Contest:

Place caption suggestions in The Chatterbox mail in the main office, or email to cboxwalnut@gmail.com

“We know it tastes bad, but we’ll change the recipe later...” By: JP Schmitz Vol. CV, No. 4

Walnut Hills High School

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Just Nuts

February 25, 2011

The Chatterbox

Katie Peters Relationship with Parents (Mr. &Mrs. Peters) Tanner Walters, ‘12 Chatterbox Staff Writer

Every day after school, many students are faced with the obligatory question from their parents: “How was school today, honey?” If you’re like most of us, the answer is probably something along the lines of “It was okay.” But for sophomore Katie Peters, this question is unnecessary - both of her parents are teachers here at Walnut Hills. Katie’s mother and father, Lisa and Tom Peters, are the directors of Walnut’s choir and drama departments, respectively. In fact, Katie is the third (and last) of the Peters’ children to attend Walnut Hills; her brother Michael graduated last year, preceded by Andy, who graduated in 2007. For the Peters clan, it is truly all in the family. Let’s be honest - for most of us, having our parents as teachers would be a nightmare. But for Katie, it isn’t a problem. “The best part is that I really enjoy being in

their classes,” she said. “It would be frustrating if they taught classes that I didn’t like.” Fortunately for Katie, she has inherited her parents passion for music and theatre. An aspiring actress, Katie has been involved in a number of plays and musicals at Walnut. One of her favorite roles was Marian in last year’s production of “The Music Man”, her first lead role. “I remember being so nervous opening night, I was actually shaking! But it was such a great learning experience and I had a lot of fun,” said Katie. This year, she performed as a nun in “The Sound of Music”. Both shows were directed by her parents. “A positive example of having parents as directors is that I’m not nervous around them so I can really focus on doing my best, whether it’s in an audition or rehearsal,” she said. “It’s helpful taking direction from them because they both are so good at what they do, and I’ve learned so much from them. At first, it was kind of awkward, but I realized that I can’t let that get in the way or I won’t be doing the best I can do,” said Katie. But there are negatives, according to Katie. “People think I get cast a certain way just because I’m the director’s daughter, but that’s not true at

all; I have not gotten the part my parents knew I was interested in plenty of times. It all comes down to a person’s ability, not his or her last name. The biggest negative is that I can’t say to my parents: ‘the show is so fun! I can’t wait for you to see it,’ like a normal student could.” But, for Katie, the positives far outweigh the negatives. “I have to give my parents credit because they introduced me to most of my favorite musicals,” she said. While she does not know if she will pursue theater in college, she plans on staying involved for a long time and you can be certain that her parents will be there to support her all along the way.

Heroes 2000

Kayla Boggess, ‘12 Chatterbox Contributer In a hurry to get to your next class, you probably barely get the chance to stop and look at the paintings that hang along the walls of the arcade. But, if you knew their story, you might want to take one more second and get a good look. To view Kayla Boggess’ full article, visit the Chatterbox site at www.walnuthillseagles.com.

In Character: Lea Phillips Photos by Mia Manavalan, ‘12

Left: You thought the your secret admirer was the cute boy in the band. Turns out... he’s your English teacher! Above: You just found out that delicious hamburger you ate was made out of human meat!

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Walnut Hills High School

Above: Mr. Brokamp decides to stop doing the morning announcements.

Vol. CV, No. 4


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The Chatterbox

Vol. CV, No. 4

Walnut Hills High School

Febrary 25, 2011

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Photo by: Harry Kran-Annexstein, ‘11

We are offering a FREE 2 hour course on the 26th of February from 12 PM to 2 PM in the forum to become American Red Cross CPR and AED certified. There are no prerequisites for enrollment in the course. The technical content within in the CPR/ AED program reflects the most current consensus on scientific recommendations. The program content includes the knowledge and skills necessary for participants to identify and prevent potentially hazardous conditions and give appropriate care regardless of the type of emergency. Please join us! To reserve your spot, please contact Ashley Welker at welkera@cpsboe.k12.us.

Fine Arts Calendar

Athletics Calendar

UC - College Conservatory of Music presents RENT February 24 - March 6

Walnut Fest February 26

Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park presents The Piano Teacher February 12 - March 13

Boys Varsity Baseball vs. Purcell Marian High School (scrimmage) March 21

Cincinnati Shakespeare Company presents Pride and Prejudice February 16 - March 13

Girls Varsity Softball @ Winton Woods High School March 23

Covedale Center for Performing Arts presents Shout! The Mod Musical February 24 - March 13 Walnut Hills High School presents Once on this Island, Jr. March 3 - 5 For a complete list of Fine Arts events at Walnut, visit www.walnuthillseagles.com .

Boys Varsity Track & Field @ Centerville Elk Relays March 26 Boys Varsity Baseball vs. Milford High School March 28 Boys Varsity Tennis @ Cincinnati Country Day School March 30 For a complete list of sporting events at Walnut, visit www.walnuthillseagles.com.


CV.4 - February 2011