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COLLEGE STUDY ABROAD THE LEADER IN CROSS-CULTURAL + EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION SINCE 1993


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Cover: Lauren Cain This page: Ryan Gasper


CONTENTS About Dragons OUR STORY

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HOW WE ARE DIFFERENT

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ALUMNI REFLECTIONS

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Programming Specifics ACADEMICS

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PROGRAM STRUCTURE

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Semester Programs CHINA: MOUNTAINS & MEGACITIES

14–15

INDIA: MOSAIC OF CULTURE & CONTRASTS

16–17

NEPAL: PASSAGES & PEAKS OF THE HIMALAYA

18–19

SOUTH AMERICA: THE SPIRIT OF THE ANDES

20–21

Summer Programs CHINA: LANGUAGE & CULTURAL EXPLORATION

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BOLIVIA: LANGUAGE & CULTURAL EXPLORATION

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Resources

MAPMAKERS ONCE DREW DRAGONS TO REPRESENT LANDS UNKNOWN. BOLD EXPLORERS WHO VENTURED BEYOND THE MAP’S EDGE WERE SAID TO GO

RISK MANAGEMENT

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FAQs

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COSTS & SCHOLARSHIPS

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ADMISSIONS

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PARTNERSHIPS

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“ where there be dragons ”…

Phone 303.413.0822 Fax 303.413.0857 Email STUDYABROAD@WHERETHEREBEDRAGONS.COM Mail

741 PEARL STREET, BOULDER, CO 80302

Web WHERETHEREBEDRAGONS.COM/COLLEGE 3


There is wisdom in turning as often as possible from the familiar to the unfamiliar; it keeps the mind nimble; it kills prejudice; and it fosters humor."

— S A N T AYA N A

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Left: Parker Pflaum Right: Annie Jiao


WHO WE ARE W H ERE THERE BE DRAGONS IS A COM M U N IT Y OF BOLD E D U C ATOR S. We are dedicated to facilitating international education experiences because we believe future leaders will be required to think beyond borders. We guide students to the map’s edge, provide them with essential skills and knowledge, and invite them to build relationships that foster understanding and empathy across cultures. Our programs are designed to help study abroad students develop the regional knowledge, self-awareness, and intercultural competencies needed to be active global citizens.

O U R S TO RY O UR STO RY BEGINS ON A STREET M E D IAN IN BE IJIN G IN T HE W IN T E R O F 1 9 8 8 ...

Coal smoke blanketed the city. Dragons founder, Chris Yager, remembers standing alone

Where There Be Dragons operates in 20

that day, mesmerized by tens of thousands of bicyclists. They didn’t smile and they didn’t

countries. Our programs have evolved, but

make a sound: a mass of humanity commuting to work in the smog of an industrial, closed

we still follow the same essential model as we

society. He remembers wondering what he wasn't seeing—what was beyond the faces of the

did in 1993: we empower instructors to bring their

people who pedaled by. What kinds of conversations were out there that could bridge gaps in

vision and expertise to a dynamic program design;

understanding? How does one create dialogue to discover shared hopes and aspirations?

and through small groups and meaningful engagement, we

How does one go about problem solving shared needs?

discover knowledge in places of exceptional beauty.

In that moment, the idea of Dragons was born. After five years of research and program

We are committed to working with inspired students. Participants join us from across the

development, Dragons launched its first programs in 1993. In the years since, more than a

US and beyond. We have a robust scholarship program to meet the needs of enthusiastic

thousand educators have come together to inform the learning experiences that represent

students who may not otherwise be able to study with us. At Dragons, we work with students

our current programming.

who are comfortable being uncomfortable.

W W W.W H E R E T H E R E B E D R A G O N S . C O M / C O L L E G E

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Thus travel spins us round in two ways at once: It shows us the sights and values and issues that we might ordinarily ignore; but it also, and more deeply, shows us all the parts of ourselves that might otherwise grow rusty."

— P I C O I Y E R , Why We Travel

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Photo: Aaron Slosberg


H OW W E A R E D I F F E R E N T W H AT SETS DR AGONS COLLEGE ST U DY ABR OAD PR OGR AM S APART… AN ALTERN ATI V E AP P R OACH TO LE AR N I NG

H OW W E TRAVE L

At Dragons, we believe in harnessing an experiential education approach to academics. This

At Dragons, we engage in low-impact travel which means minimizing both our environmental

means pushing the boundaries of the classroom, embracing challenge, listening to local

and cultural impact at every possible juncture. You carry only the essentials that fit into your

communities, and leaving room for spontaneity.

backpack, live with host families in both rural and urban areas, and explore the wilderness in intentional ways.

WHERE W E G O We go where other study abroad programs don’t. Whether trekking in the snow-capped peaks

DYNAMIC PRO G RAMMI NG

of the Andes or drinking chai on the train to Rajasthan, you go to places seldom visited by

The world is constantly changing and we believe our programs should too. Months before

foreigners. You explore communities with whom we have developed deep relationships, often

program departure, our staff builds a unique program itinerary based on field staff’s personal

in remote locations, and facilitate place-based learning every step of the way.

in-country connections and experience, the academic goals of the program, and the specific ambitions of your student group.

SM ALL G RO UP S We limit our programs to just 12 students. Because we keep our cohorts small, you can move more fluidly through communities with a lower impact. Our field staff travel with the group and support you to deepen regional knowledge, cultivate self-awareness, develop greater language competence, hone leadership skills, and make meaning out of experiences abroad.

GOING WHERE THERE BE DRAGONS TAKES CURIOSITY. WE GO THERE...

W W W.W H E R E T H E R E B E D R A G O N S . C O M / C O L L E G E

will you?

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E YA K

AR D•

•FRO

B

O

M

TH

In Nepal...

ALU M N I R E FLE C T ION S "AS OUR STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM COMES TO A CLOSE, THE GROUP WANTED TO ANONYMOUSLY SHARE SOME THOUGHTS ABOUT THAT WHICH WE EXPERIENCED, OBSERVED, AND LEARNED OVER THESE MANY MONTHS... “In Nepal...I experienced a supportive, inclusive, and compassionate group culture.

“In Nepal...I experienced what it is like to be a part of a true community.

I had the chance to step up as a leader, take on significant autonomy, independence, and

Everyone addresses each other as “brother” or “sister” even if they are complete strangers,

decision-making responsibility. I experienced life in a Buddhist Monastery, hiked in Gaurishankar

and they will not hesitate to go way out of their way to help each other out. The communal

Conservation Area, lived in Patan in the Kathmandu valley, solo traveled, and much more.”

mentality reminded me how important it is to be connected to others...”

“In Nepal...I learned how to braid momos, how to cut tiny tomatoes with a very dull knife,

"In Nepal...I stepped outside my comfort zone in various ways and consequently,

and how to walk along the edges of a terraced bean field, holding up the hem of a scarlet sari.”

experienced many different ways of thinking, viewing the world, and living. We met a diverse range of Nepalis: Tami farmers, permaculture practitioners, young

"In Nepal...I learned that culture exists in the grit and grime. In the dust created by

urbanites striving for change, Newari artisans, Kagyu Karmapa Tibetan Buddhist lamas,

civilizations. Its in the magenta and bright coral smeared across my hair playing Holi.

hiking guides, influential fixers and liaisons, and travelers. That access allowed

In the cracks between stones of a temple, in the carved hands of a goddess on a roof strut.

us to problematize and nuance our understandings of this country that is increasingly

It’s in the crimson, auburn, and ocher spices thrown over chopped potatoes frying in a

connected with the global community and navigating its way through complex questions.”

pan of sunflower oil. It’s even in the dust over Kathmandu, a specter so vast and omniscient and sentient that it has become its own character in the story."

“In Nepal...I experienced earth-shaking thunderstorms, bruised hips from terrible jeep rides, and countless red rhododendron bushes, growing smaller as the altitude increased.

“In Nepal...I experienced sadness as I learned how fast the aquamarine glaciers

I experienced sharp pain followed by instant relief as I washed my aching feet in frigid

overhead were receding, and when I sat with women, tears streaming down their faces

opalescent pools, and stifling silence when we awoke to a fresh blanket of snow

as they relayed their life’s unimaginable hardships."

covering the small Tibetan village”

The Yak Board is an online forum where students and instructors post reflections, photos and updates while in the field. Read the full yak: wtbdragons.com/yak/in-nepal

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YA K .W H E R E T H E R E B E D R A G O N S . C O M


Photo: Annika Kendall

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One’s destination is never a place, but a new way of seeing things."

—HENRY MILLER, WRITER

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Photo: Sylvia Snow


AC A D E M I C S MA KE THE MOST OF YOU R STU DY ABR OAD. Building on Dragons 25+ years of implementing experiential and cross-cultural educational programs, College Study Abroad Programs offer students the opportunity to earn academic credit while also developing essential language competence, regional knowledge, research experience, and intercultural understanding. Student typically enroll in four courses/16–credits (semester) or 4–credits (summer). Semester Program course offerings vary based on student interest and faculty availability. Included below is a overview of possible course options:

Regional Seminar

Language Study

Intercultural Development

Independent Study Project

Intercultural

ASIA/GLOS 310, ASIA/GLOS 320, ASIA/

CHIN/HIND/NPL/SPAN

and Global Citizenship

(ISP): Methods and Application

Communication

GLOS 330, LAS/GLOS 340; 4 credits

150, 250, or 350; 4 credits

GLOS 211; 4 credits

ANTH/ISP 325; 4 credits

COMM: 301; 4 credits

This course provides students

Student enroll in a Mandarin,

Drawing from culturally diverse

This course is focused on

This course provides an

with a background in regional

Hindi, Nepali, or Spanish language

models of leadership and

providing students with a basic

in-depth understanding of essential

history and politics that is specific

course. Language lessons focus

epistemology, this course examines

understanding of ethnographic

intercultural communication theories

to each host country. Course topics

on increasing verbal competency,

interpersonal and intercultural

research methods and skills,

as well as the integral skills to apply

may include modern history,

building vocabulary, improving

communication skills, leadership

while also giving students the

theories in interactions. Students

social issues, vulnerable populations,

grammar, and, in some cases,

styles, human development issues,

opportunity to develop specialized

focus on critical intercultural

religious traditions, and/or

learning how to read and write in a

ethnorelativism, and the roles of

knowledge in an individual

communication frameworks,

human rights.

new script or writing system.

global citizenship.

topic of study.

scholarship, and applications.

SC HO OL OF RE CO R D & T R A N S CR I P TS Dragons works in partnership with Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado. As Dragons School of Record, Naropa University provides oversight and guidance on academic aspects of the College Study Abroad Programs. After a student successfully completes a study abroad program, he/she receives a transcript from Naropa University.

W W W.W H E R E T H E R E B E D R A G O N S . C O M / C O L L E G E

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Meeting with local speakers, especially NGO workers...was particularly powerful because we saw first-hand how development issues and themes affected the local population and what was being done to address them."

—CLAIRE RIVKIN

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PROGRAM STRUCTURE H OW I T A L L WORKS We adventure, we explore, we learn...Students engage in both stationary and dynamic programming. Programs typically settle into a base community in a semi-urban environment to focus on immersion and cultural exploration and then move through the countryside to experience the diversity and breadth of the country as a whole. Courses are offered in intensive 60 hour blocks during the term, usually for 4–5 weeks at a time. Faculty deliver classes throughout the program, whether in a typical classroom in the program-base or in more creative environments during rural homestays and group travel experiences. A Dragons study abroad program is designed to be a fully immersive experience. In addition to the academic courses, the following program components are woven throughout the experience to ensure students are exposed to the stories and lessons of host communities:

R U G G E D T RAVEL

L E A R N I N G S E RV I C E

CO M PARAT I VE REL I GI O N & PHI LOSO PHY

We are travelers not tourists. We respect cultural norms by

We take pride in learning first and service second. Students use

In each place we visit, we consider how local spiritual

staying in family-owned accommodations and taking local

a framework to listen, assess, evaluate, and act when engag-

beliefs are used to interpret reality. Students explore the

transportation. The most profound learning moments often

ing in any service activity. We don’t measure success by the

belief systems of the host culture while living with homestay

arise in the spaces in between, and traveling alongside locals

number of ‘service hours’ logged, but rather by the number

families, visiting religious monuments, observing local rituals,

allows for unorchestrated moments of engagement.

of critical conversations such an engagement provokes.

and reading relevant texts.

HOMESTAYS

DE V E LO P ME N T STU D I E S

T REKKI NG

Dragons students are matched 1:1 with a local family,

Each program explores questions central to conversations

Some Dragons students hike over 16,000ft passes in the

allowing them to build meaningful connections both

about development. Students learn from local activists, use

Andes; others camp in the foothills of the Tibetan Plateau.

within the host community. Families are selected based

local examples to prompt discussion, and are encouraged to

Dragons Instructors guide students into the wilderness,

on their enthusiasm for cross-cultural engagement and a

challenge assumptions and expand their understanding of

exposing them to the pristine beauty of nature. Treks provide

comprehensive safety assessment.

what it means to be 'developed.'

a unique opportunity for students to assume leadership roles and build wilderness skills.

LANGUAGE ST UDY Mandarin, Nepali, Hindi, or Spanish: at a variety of proficiency

I N DE P E N D E N T STU DY P R OJE C TS (I S P ) All students conduct an ISP in which they explore an

levels. Courses focus on increasing verbal competency,

intellectual question or local tradition. ISPs allow students

building vocabulary, improving grammar, and, in some cases,

to tailor the program to meet their specific interests,

learning to read and write in a new script. Few skills do more

develop place-based expertise, and ethnographic

to empower students to be independent global citizens.

research skills.

W W W.W H E R E T H E R E B E D R A G O N S . C O M / C O L L E G E

Photos Top Row: Abrie Brutsche; Dragons archives; Dragons archives Middle: Erik Jenkins-Sahlin; Parker Pflaum Bottom: Erik Jenkins-Sahlin; Julianne Chandler; Lindsay Coe

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CHINA M OUN TAINS & MEG AC I T I ES January 24–May 9 | August 29–December 12

DURATION

OVERVIEW

107

PROGRAM COMPONENT EMPHASIS

Immerse yourself in Chinese culture and develop a broad understanding of the drivers and challenges confronting the world’s second largest economy.

Days

RUSSIA

HOMESTAY

DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

LANGUAGE STUDY

EXPLORE THIS DYNAMIC AND EVER-CHANGING LANDSCAPE. Dragons College Study Abroad semester in China does more than introduce the contemporary China that is seen in the country’s burgeoning cities. Our program takes us deep among China’s various demographics, allowing us to learn across disparate landscapes. Strong

MONGOLIA

language curriculum and a comprehensive, inter-disciplinary exploration of modern Chinese history and economic

XINING

BEIJING

development, society, and cultural traditions are combined with travel and trekking opportunities around the country.

QINGHAI

XIAHE

CHINA KUNMING

INDIA

JINGHONG

Located southeast of the Tibetan Plateau, Kunming serves as our home for a significant portion of the program. While in Kunming, students live with Chinese host families and gather daily at the Dragons Program House for intensive Chinese language study and to participate in lectures given by visiting scholars. In addition to our time in Kunming, the semester includes more dynamic segments, during which we explore pressing regional issues as we sink deep into Central Asian culture in China’s northwestern provinces, traverse the dramatic valleys of the Hengduan Mountains in Northwestern Yunnan, or connect with remote and historic Tibetan Buddhist monasteries. During the semester, we explore topics such as minority relations, economic reforms and development, environmental concerns, and China’s rich history. With a broad curriculum designed to explore both thriving urban centers and rural villages, this program offers an unparalleled comprehensive overview of today’s China.

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W W W. W H E R E T H E R E B E D R A G O N S . C O M / P R O G R A M / S T U D Y - A B R O A D - C H I N A


POSSIBLE COURSES INCLUDE:

Regional Seminar: China in Transition ASIA/GLOS 310; 4 credits

This course examines modern Chinese history, setting the stage for understanding social issues facing China. Topics include history, education, public health, environment, civil society, and economic development. Mandarin Chinese Language: Levels I, II & III CHIN 150/250/350; 4 credits

Students participate in standard Mandarin Chinese classes which focus on increasing vocabulary, improving grammar and pronunciation, and learning Chinese characters. Intercultural Communication COMM: 301; 4 credits Students gain an in-depth understanding of essential intercultural communication theories as well as the key skills needed to apply theories in interactions. Students focus on critical intercultural communication frameworks, scholarship, and applications. Independent Study Project (ISP): Methods and Application ANTH/ISP 325; 4 credits Students study ethnographic research methods and have the opportunity to develop knowledge in a specialized topic. Typical ISP projects include: in-depth study of calligraphy, martial arts, traditional Chinese medicine, or the role of women in modern China. Intercultural Development and Global

“Throughout the course, my understanding of culture shifted dramatically. Never had I been so exposed to authentic traditions... I had never really thought about culture in such a concrete and applicable way. I never saw it in such a pure form. I now see the beauty in these independently developed customs and traditions and the need to perpetuate this richness.” — N O A H S E LT Z E R

Citizenship GLOS 211; 4 credits Drawing from culturally diverse models of epistemology, this course examines topics such as intercultural communication, leadership, development, ethnorelativism, and the roles and responsibilities of global citizenship. 15


INDIA M OSAIC OF C ULT U R E & CONT R ASTS January 24–May 9 | August 29–December 12

DURATION

OVERVIEW

107

PROGRAM COMPONENT EMPHASIS

Build Hindi language proficiency, explore complex social dynamics around the country, learn from Buddhist monks and other scholars, and trek in the Himalaya.

Days

HOMESTAY

COMPARATIVE RELIGION

ISPs

ONE CANNOT UNDERSTAND INDIA FROM A CLASSROOM; it’s a land of color and contrasts, too vast and diverse to summarize without all five senses engaged. Typically

CHINA

our College Study Abroad India semester spends time in communities that represent the multiple visions of India: Jaipur, the

LEH

famed Pink City of Rajastan, Ladakh, a region high in the Himalaya,

MCLEOD GANJ

and McLeod Ganj, home to the Tibetan Government in Exile.

PA K I S TA N

NEW DELHI

TIBE T NEPAL

JAISALMER JAIPUR

While this program engages in academic exploration of and travels to the India Himalaya and the deserts of Rajasthan (among other places), it is our extended stay in Jaipur that frames the program. In Jaipur, study abroad students live in homestays and meet daily for classes and discussions. We learn Hindi from experienced

UDAIPUR

INDIA

local teachers and focus on intercultural communication in the classroom. Outside of the classroom, we explore the maze of markets in our community and visit nearby deserts, temples, and shrines to gain a deeper understanding of the culture and society of Rajasthan. Our approach to academics includes the chance to explore some of the subcontinent’s most venerated and least-known places. We engage with our regional studies and independent study coursework as we visit large and vibrant cities, and when we stay in local villages rarely visited by foreigners. We study modern India’s struggles and progress with gender, religion, caste, social justice, development, and environmental issues. Through all of this we see the scope of what it means to live in India in the 21st century.

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W W W. W H E R E T H E R E B E D R A G O N S . C O M / P R O G R A M / S T U D Y - A B R O A D - I N D I A


POSSIBLE COURSES INCLUDE:

Regional Seminar: Culture and Traditions in Modern India ASIA/GLOS 320; 4 credits This course provides an in-depth introduction to the cultures and traditions in contemporary India. Topics explored include the role of women, economic issues of the caste system, environment, public health, education, and spiritual traditions. Hindi Language: Levels I, II & III HIND 150/250/350; 4 credits

Students participate in Hindi classes which focus on increasing vocabulary, improving grammar and pronunciation, and learning to read and write Hindi (Devanagari script). Intercultural Communication COMM: 301; 4 credits Students gain an in-depth understanding of essential intercultural communication theories as well as the key skills needed to apply theories in interactions. Students focus on critical intercultural communication frameworks, scholarship, and applications. Independent Study Project (ISP): Methods and Application ANTH/ISP 325; 4 credits Students study ethnographic research methods and have the opportunity to develop knowledge in a specialized topic. Typical ISP projects include: environmental issues, yoga, Ayurvedic medicine, or the arts: jewelry, sitar, traditional dance, or tabla. Intercultural Development and Global Citizenship GLOS 211; 4 credits Drawing from culturally diverse models of epistemology, this

“The time I was given to discover a more mindful version of myself, whether through exploration or reflection, was priceless.” — FA I T H A N N E F E R G U S O N

course examines topics such as intercultural communication, leadership, development, ethnorelativism, and the roles and responsibilities of global citizenship. 17


N E PA L PASSAGE S & PE AKS OF T H E H I MALAYA January 24–May 9 | August 29–December 12

DURATION

107 Days

OVERVIEW

PROGRAM COMPONENT EMPHASIS

In the shadow of the Himalaya, explore the intersection of cultural heritage and religious traditions with themes of urbanization and nation-building.

TREKKING

COMPARATIVE RELIGION

HOMESTAY

OVER TIME, NEPAL HAS DRAWN THE MOST INTREPID OF TRAVELERS, MOUNTAINEERS, ANTHROPOLOGISTS, LINGUISTS, AND SPIRITUAL

CHINA

ASPIRANTS. The Kathmandu Valley was once only accessible by those brave enough to cross the jungles in the south or the snowy passes of the Himalaya. In

TIBE T

a land of deep traditions, this study abroad program explores the diversity of Nepal while also delving into themes of social justice, development, and leadership in an

NEPAL

intercultural context. Academic courses, as well as program travel experiences, provide depth and breadth to this program.

POKHARA CHIT WAN

PATA N

The backdrop for this program in Nepal is the medieval town of Patan, one of the three original kingdoms of the Kathmandu Valley. BHUTAN Our time in this community of cobblestone streets and brightly adorned shops is characterized by homestays, intensive Nepali language instruction, and

INDIA

exposure to local scholars. Our journey also takes us to the surrounding hills where we explore regional topics and the traditions of a rural community nestled in the shade of the Annapurna Mountains. While camped below snow-capped peaks, students explore the indigenous cultures that inhabit these extreme environs, guided by new academic frameworks and reflective tools received during a visit to a Buddhist meditation and education center. Students engage deeply with local families in Nepal, become proficient in Nepali language, and develop skills in leadership and cultural competency.

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W W W. W H E R E T H E R E B E D R A G O N S . C O M / P R O G R A M / S T U D Y - A B R O A D - N E P A L


POSSIBLE COURSES INCLUDE:

Regional Seminar: Diversity in the Himalayas ASIA/GLOS 330; 4 credits

This course explores the ethnicities and religious traditions that constitute Nepal. Topics explored include the environment, public health, education, human rights, caste, women's issues, and an extensive introduction to Hinduism and to Mahayana Buddhism. Nepali Language: Levels I, II & III NPL 150/250/350; 4 credits

Students participate in Nepali classes which focus on increasing vocabulary, improving grammar and pronunciation, and learning to read and write Nepali (Devanagari script). Intercultural Communication COMM: 301; 4 credits Students gain an in-depth understanding of essential intercultural communication theories as well as the key skills needed to apply theories in interactions. Students focus on critical intercultural communication frameworks, scholarship, and applications. Independent Study Project (ISP): Methods and Application ANTH/ISP 325; 4 credits Students study ethnographic research methods and have the opportunity to develop knowledge in a specialized topic. Typical ISP projects include: environmental issues, Tibetan medicine, the yogic tradition, or arts: mask carving, folk dance, thanka painting, or sitar. Intercultural Development and Global

“What is it that draws us, draws me, to this place—where dust hides the world’s greatest mountains and night falls early in narrow alleyways? My journal entries are rife with questions: What do those auburn marigolds, dried and strung over doorways, mean? Why do I keep hearing bells ringing? It’s a place I’ve equal parts dreamed of and never even known existed.” — C AT Y M AT T H E W S

Citizenship GLOS 211; 4 credits Drawing from culturally diverse models of epistemology, this course examines topics such as intercultural communication, leadership, development, ethnorelativism, and the roles and responsibilities of global citizenship. 19


SOUTH AMERICA TH E S PIR I T OF T H E ANDES January 24–May 9 | August 29–December 12

DURATION

OVERVIEW

107 Days

PROGRAM COMPONENT EMPHASIS

Examine social movements, indigenous identity, and conservation efforts in the mountains and jungles of Bolivia and Peru while deepening language skills and connecting with local communities.

LANGUAGE STUDY

RUGGED TRAVEL

TREKKING

HIKE TO THE EDGE OF RECEDING GLACIERS AT 17,000 FEET. Get your hands dirty with traditional agricultural practices on the sparkling shores of Lake Titicaca. These are just a couple of the many classrooms encountered on this study abroad program in Bolivia and Peru. Through academic courses, the program explores the diversity of the Central Andes and Upper Amazon while delving first-hand into themes of social justice, indigenous rights, environmental conservation, and political leadership. The backdrop for the semester is the town of Urubamba in the Sacred Valley of

BR A ZIL

Peru. Here, students live with local families, participate in intensive Spanish language instruction, and dive into studies of intercultural communication. The rest of our

PERU

time in Peru is highlighted by dramatic mountain landscapes, exposure to remote SACRED VALLE Y

indigenous communities, and a deeper understanding of development trends in southeastern Peru. We then travel overland to Bolivia. Here we spend time in the twin cities of La Paz and El Alto, where we partner with local organizations.

CUSCO O CO N G AT E

Heading into more rural parts of Bolivia, we witness the delicate transition between the high Andes and tropical forests below. In Bolivia, we

L A PA Z COCHABAMBA

BOLIVIA SUCRE

POTOSÍ

explore regional issues on a daily basis while we also engage in an additional homestay, wilderness exploration, and independent study. Our journey takes us to remote indigenous communities tucked within the folds of time, where community leaders grapple with the destabilizing effects of development and

CHILE

modernization. Along the way, our integrated academic curriculum guides students as they engage with pressing regional issues and develop essential language and communication skills.

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W W W.W H E R E T H E R E B E D R A G O N S . C O M / P R O G R A M / S T U D Y- A B R O A D - B O L I V I A - P E R U


POSSIBLE COURSES INCLUDE:

Regional Seminar: Tradition, Change & Cultural Resilience LAS/GLOS 340; 4 credits This course examines cultures of the Andes and Amazon and their relationship to the land. Topics explored include issues of racial and social conflicts, sustainable development, human rights, globalization, and the impact of colonialism on indigenous cultures. Spanish Language: Levels I, II & III SPAN 150/250/350; 4 credits

Students participate in Spanish classes which focus on increasing vocabulary, improving grammar and pronunciation, and learning to read and write in Spanish. Intercultural Communication COMM: 301; 4 credits Students gain an in-depth understanding of essential intercultural communication theories as well as the key skills needed to apply theories in interactions. Students focus on critical intercultural communication frameworks, scholarship, and applications. Independent Study Project (ISP): Methods and Application ANTH/ISP 325; 4 credits Students study ethnographic research methods and have the opportunity to develop knowledge in a specialized topic. Typical ISP projects include: sustainable agricultural techniques, Andean folk weaving, or learning to play the charango. Intercultural Development and Global Citizenship GLOS 211; 4 credits

“Absolutely incredible. The most wholesome, frustrating, nourishing, enriching study abroad program. This journey came full circle, and the experiences we had on our own, as a group and within Bolivia and Peru seemed to be exactly what we all needed.” — F A R I D A H N D I AY E S

Drawing from culturally diverse models of epistemology, this course examines topics such as intercultural communication, leadership, development, ethnorelativism, and the roles and responsibilities of global citizenship. 21


CHINA L ANGUAGE & C ULT U R AL EX P LOR AT I ON July 10–August 8

DURATION

OVERVIEW

30

PROGRAM COMPONENT EMPHASIS

Experience life in rural and urban China while you dramatically improve your Mandarin language skills, engage in multiple homestays, and examine complex cultural issues.

Days

RUSSIA

LANGUAGE STUDY

HOMESTAY

DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

LANGUAGE IN CHINA IS A DYNAMIC AND POWERFUL FORCE, AND ONE THAT IS KEY TO UNDERSTANDING THE DIVERSITY OF CHINA’S PEOPLE AND CULTURAL TRADITIONS. On this month-long summer program, College Study Abroad students explore the evolution of Mandarin within historical and cultural contexts, while also

MONGOLIA

experiencing both rural and urban Chinese homestays. These experiences provide unparalleled opportunities for linguistic BEIJING

and cultural immersion in multiple Chinese communities. Students spend two weeks living with families in Bangdong, an

CHINA

XI ’A N

ethnically Han village about three hours by road from the small city of Lincang. The program includes daily Mandarin classes (3–4 hours

TIGER LEAPING GORGE KUNMING

INDIA

of instruction per day), with classes often held outdoors or in courtyards of village homes. Students also engage in extended homestays with urban Chinese families in the dynamic city of Kunming. In Kunming, students take

BANGDONG

advantage of the myriad cultural and educational resources that this dynamic city has to offer. Students meet daily at the Program House for continued Mandarin instruction and classes with local experts. We use classroom and experiential activities to achieve this program’s ultimate goals of linguistic, cultural, and personal discovery. Mandarin Chinese Language: Levels I, II & III CHIN 150/250/350; 4 credits Students participate in standard Mandarin Chinese classes which focus on increasing vocabulary, improving grammar and pronunciation, and learning to read and write Chinese characters.

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W W W.W H E R E T H E R E B E D R A G O N S . C O M / P R O G R A M / S T U D Y- A B R O A D - C H I N A - S U M M E R


BOLIVIA LANGUAGE & C ULT U R AL EX PLOR AT I ON July 10–August 8

DURATION

30

OVERVIEW

PROGRAM COMPONENT EMPHASIS

Expand your Spanish language abilities through interactive instruction, investigate Bolivian culture in an extended rural homestay, and learn first-hand from local communities.

Days

LANGUAGE STUDY

HOMESTAY

DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

IN THE HEART OF SOUTH AMERICA, BOLIVIA PROVIDES A UNIQUE PERCH FROM WHICH TO EXPLORE THE LINKAGES BETWEEN LANGUAGE, CULTURE, AND DAILY LIFE. We dive into the heart of the land through language immersion, homestays, and workshops around local issues and global citizenship. Beginning in Cochabamba, between the high mountains and tropical lowlands,

BR A ZIL

we settle into an extended homestay in a Quechua farming neighborhood. Here we engage intimately with the community and dive into Spanish language instruction for 3–4 hours per day. During this month-long summer program, instructors craft relevant lessons to build upon each student’s individual explorations of the Spanish

L A PA Z

language, while placing the meaning of language in cultural context.

BOLIVIA

CORDILLERA REAL

In addition, students connect with scholars, activists, journalists, and

COCHABAMBA

local organizations in the city of Cochabamba in order to understand issues impacting local communities. Our journey then takes us high

SUCRE

into the Andes. In remote villages, we come to know the realities of rural communities that comprise the majority of Bolivia’s population. We continue regular Spanish language instruction and discuss issues of conservation and resource management in one of the most bio-diverse pockets of the planet. PAR AGUAY

CHILE

Spanish Language: Levels I, II & III SPAN 150/250/350; 4 credits

ARG ENTINA

Students participate in Spanish classes which focus on increasing vocabulary, improving grammar and pronunciation, and learning to read and write in Spanish.

W W W.W H E R E T H E R E B E D R A G O N S . C O M / P R O G R A M / S T U D Y- A B R O A D - B O L I V I A - S U M M E R

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I felt safe during the entire trip. I was able to understand perceived versus actual risk much better and felt that it pushed my old ideal of safety in order to reinvent my definition to be one that includes going out of my comfort zone."

—OLIVIA KLUGMAN

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Photo: Nina Redpath


R I S K M A N AG E M E N T W E BEL I EVE I N LEANING INTO RISK . At Dragons we challenge our students academically, physically, and emotionally. Our job is to help students embrace those challenges while navigating the associated risks—safely, professionally, and transparently. In our 25+ years of experience in the field, we’ve successfully trained over 1,000 Dragons Instructors and stewarded over 300,000 “in-field” days. Over time, we’ve built risk management systems and regional contacts that help us navigate a wide range of unexpected challenges. Over the years, we have developed a broad understanding of safety issues within a regional context and we have worked hard to incorporate our new findings into the pedagogy that currently supports our students' experiences. There are four foundational aspects of our risk management system:

1

WE HI RE E X P ER IE NCE D STAF F Typically, a Dragons instructor team collectively represents multiple languages, ten or more years of in-country experience, and years managing study abroad experiences. Instructors call

on their linguistic fluency, local contacts, and regional expertise to deftly navigate risk management issues. Instructors are also adept at working with students to manage medical issues, should they arise.

2

W E P L AC E A P R E MI U M O N P R O F E SS I O NAL DE VE LO PME NT Each year, we facilitate a 2-week staff training focused on curriculum development, innovative education practices, student group management, cross-cultural communication, and

wilderness risk management. This keeps our staff up-to-date with best practices in the field of international education.

3

W E HAV E A 24/7 S U P P O RT T E A M AT H E ADQ UARTE RS The Dragons Risk Management Team is dedicated to ensuring the highest-quality international programming, with acute attention to the safety and security of our students, instructors, and

in-country partners. This team is on-call 24/7 while students are in the field.

4

W E HAV E A R O B U ST N ET WO R K O F I N-CO U NTRY RE S O U RCE S Our organization is built on 25+ years of personal connections, and we often receive word of security issues before they are taken to press. We supplement word-of-mouth updates

with reports from the US State Department, the Overseas Security Advisory Council, the World Health Organization, the Center for Disease Control, and our insurance provider. As needed, we leverage these contacts to mobilize necessary resources. We have carefully researched in-country medical facilities and our instructors go into the field with comprehensive

emergency management tools.

?

IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT DRAGONS SAFETY AND SECURITY POLICIES PLEASE CONTACT US. WE WOULD BE MORE THAN HAPPY TO DISCUSS THE FINER POINTS OF OUR RISK MANAGEMENT SYSTEM WITH YOU.

W W W.W H E R E T H E R E B E D R A G O N S . C O M / C O L L E G E

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FA Q s EV E RYO N E WANTS TO KNOW... WHAT I S A TYP I CAL DAY LI K E ?

W H AT ARE TH E QUALI FI CAT I ONS OF I NST R UC TOR S AND FAC ULT Y ?

SEMESTER: Dragons College Study Abroad Programs are dynamic. During our time in

We strive to have a 4 to 1 student to field staff ratio. As a result, no other study abroad

a program base, you can expect to live in an extended homestay, have regular language

program approaches the level of personal attention and mentorship available on a Dragons

classes, and be engaging in one other course on an intensive basis such as the Intercultural

program. College Study Abroad Programs are staffed by both instructors and faculty. Outside

Development and Global Citizenship course. During the travel periods of the program, you can

of their work with Dragons, field staff have extensive experience. Whether working for

expect formal lectures or workshops for the Regional Seminar course, and time to formulate

local and transnational NGOs, conducting primary field research in remote communities, or

your plan for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Towards the end of the program, students

founding their own organization abroad, all share one similar quality: the desire to provide

engage in independent travel, designed to facilitate their ISP investigation. Throughout the

students with the most complete and exceptional educational experience possible.

program, students spend several hours a day with readings to help understand the context of the region and conducting independent inquiry and writing.

Instructors are hired for their in-depth knowledge of a country’s customs and traditions. Our instructors challenge students, draw them into an unsurpassed community of curious peers,

SUMMER: On summer programs, students study language intensively. Outside of the

and carefully guide participants through experiences that enliven and inform academic

classroom, students refine their language skills through while engaging in homestays in a

pursuits.

variety of communities and participating in experiential learning activities. Summer students also look at regional issues and cultural practices as we travel to both urban and rural parts of the host country. During broader explorations of the country, each day looks slightly different but includes continued language student and cultural learning.

H OW LO N G HAS D R AGO NS B E E N R U NNING STU DY AB ROAD PROG RA M S?

College Study Abroad Programs are also staffed with faculty. These faculty are either Dragons instructors who are present throughout the term or a visiting faculty member who teaches a course intensively. Dragons faculty possess a rich blend of academic training, instructional experience, and field-based skills. In addition to faculty, we also work with local experts such as experienced language teachers, Independent Study Project mentors, and local guest lecturers.

Dragons has been running programs since 1993. We have run study abroad programs which offer college level, credit-bearing courses since 2001.

W H AT STE PS DO I TAKE TO T R ANSFER C R EDI TS TO MY HOME

WHY D O E S D RAGO NS ST R U CT U R E P R O GRAMS W ITH DYNAMIC,

The first step is to meet with your home institution’s study abroad or academic advisor to

INSTITU TIO N? FLEXIBL E I T I N E R AR I E S?

understand your school’s process for transferring credit. Colleges and universities have varying

Dragons never runs a cookie-cutter program. Each experience is organic and new, with

processes and policies related to transferring credit from study abroad programs. We can

administrative members, field staff, and students working together to craft a unique focus

provide you with detailed course syllabi, an overview of our approach to academics, and/or

and direction for the program. Most importantly, a flexible itinerary can effectively respond

information about the academic oversight of our programs which you can share with your

to specific concerns as they pertain to political realities, group health, and other unforeseen

advisor.

circumstances. In addition, this dynamism allows our groups to move at their own pace to react to personal and group interests, and to take advantage of the learning opportunities that accompany the unexpected.

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Once you have been accepted into the program, you will register for your specific courses with Dragons. After successful completion of the program, you can request an official transcript from Dragons School of Record.

W W W.W H E R E T H E R E B E D R A G O N S . C O M / S T U D E N T S / C O L L E G E - S T U D Y- A B R O A D / FA Q


Everyone with any amount of curiosity should travel. As a Dragons course instructor I feel we are not only introducing a new place to students, but we are showing them it's our duty to travel, to understand other cultures, and to create an understanding of the world around us. We are showing them we can learn more by getting out in the world, than we learn in the four walls of our classrooms."

— M A N DY H A M M O N D

China Semester left: Parker Pflaum China Semester right: Dragons archives India Semester left: Michael Woodard India Semester right: Christy Sommers Nepal Semester left: Catherine Von Holt Nepal Semester right: Dragons archives South America Semester left: Dragons archives South America Semester right: Vanessa Luna China Summer: Eric Jenkins-Sahlin Bolivia Summer: Dragons archives This page: Keaton Smith

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I expected to meet amazing people and friends, be immersed in families and learn about culture first-hand, to enjoy the stunning mountain vistas and grapple with environmental and social justice issues alongside my fellow travelers (and locals!). These expectations were all met and exceeded."

—BENJAMIN SWIFT

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Photo: Maria Xu


COSTS & SCHOLARSHIPS TUITION & F EE S Tuition and fees vary from program to program. Visit our website for the most up-to-date information on program fees.

FINANCIAL AID IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO USE FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID FOR YOUR COLLEGE STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM, YOU SHOULD:

TUITION & F EE S INCLU DE :

1

• 12–16 credits (semester) or 4–credits (summer), and other educational costs

office and complete your FAFSA form for the appropriate

• All program-organized travel and excursions

academic year.

• Pre-departure preparation and in-country orientation

Contact your home institution’s federal financial aid

2 Reach out to your home institution's financial aid office

• All accommodations and meals (excluding personal travel)

and ask them if your federal, state, and/or institutional aid

• Supplementary lectures and special events

package is transferable to a Dragons program.

SC HO L A RSHI P S

3 Ask your study abroad advisor if your home institution

Dragons is committed to making College Study Abroad programs financially accessible through the offering of scholarships.

requires a contractual or consortium agreement with Dragons

Dragons offers need-based partial scholarships to a number of students each year. We continually strive to increase our ability

School of Record. If so, please contact Dragons about

to offer scholarships and make our programs available to any student who is appropriate, regardless of tuition costs. For more

applicable deadlines.

information, please visit our website: www.wheretherebedragons.com/students/college-study-abroad/scholarships

ADMISSIONS

NEXT STEPS

ELIG I BI L I TY

CHOOSE A PROGRAM

Students who participate in a Dragons Study Abroad Program come from different backgrounds, universities/colleges, and

Visit our website to review program options:

areas of interest. Eligible participants should have completed at least one semester of post-secondary study, be 18 years or

WWW.WHERETHEREBEDRAGONS.COM/COLLEGE

older, have a minimum GPA of 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale), and be interested in taking part in an dynamic experience abroad. CONSULT YOUR HOME CAMPUS

APPL I CATI ON P RO CE SS

Meet with a study abroad advisor on your home

In order to apply, you will fill out an online application and submit supporting documents to finalize your application.

campus to discuss the program and processes for

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis, with the following final application deadlines:

credit transfer.

• Spring terms: October 15 • Summer terms: March 15

READY TO ENROLL?

• Fall terms: April 15

1

Note that because our programs are small and we use rolling admissions, we advise applying in advance of the deadlines. We recommend submitting your application 3–5 months prior to the program start date. For information on remaining spaces or

Complete an online application.

2 Submit supporting documents. 3 Participate in an interview with Dragons staff.

the possibility of late applications, email studyabroad@wheretherebedragons.com. W W W.W H E R E T H E R E B E D R A G O N S . C O M / C O L L E G E

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Photo: Custom program in Morocco, Shino Yoshen


PA R T N E R S H I P S W E SUPP O RT FACU LTY-LED CU STOM IZ E D PR OGR AM M IN G. Our dynamic team of experienced international facilitators can deepen and enhance faculty-led programs. A Partnership with Dragons unlocks decades of experience designing and implementing challenging and immersive programming abroad, combining the best in classroom and experiential learning. Our program design process ensures a singularly unique program that specifically addresses your objectives while employing a core curriculum that nurtures student growth in global citizenship, self-awareness, and leadership skills. Why partner with Dragons?

A G R E ATER L E V E L O F E NGAGE ME N T

A SAFE R PRO G RAM

Our experienced field staff collaborate directly with professors and study abroad campus

Pre-program direction covers essential logistics and suggestions for preparing to work within

staff to develop original programs. With a pool of more than 1,000 field staff, a year-round

a new cultural context. Dragons instructors and administrators will often make visits to partner

presence in many of the countries in which we work, and regional Program Houses, Dragons

colleges and universities to build rapport, establish trust, and align expectations. Throughout

is able to connect students to uniquely-rich learning experiences. Our instructors complement

the program, instructors maintain regular check-ins with students and updates to our risk

the academic expertise of faculty members by providing expertly-crafted facilitation to help

management team. Should an event occur which requires immediate attention, our instructors

connect students to place and self.

are well trained and able to utilize local medical resources and our 24/7 on-call emergency response team.

BETT ER VA LUE Tourism—the act of journeying to a place for new experience and for pleasure—has its place.

LO NG -TE RM DE V ELOP MENT

At Dragons, however, we provide experiences for the traveler, developing and stewarding

Our goal is to be a long-time partner for your institution. A strong alliance includes your

meaningful encounters that evince global citizenship. The depth of learning that we provide

faculty providing the classroom education and Dragons providing the complementary

has been practiced over 100,000+ student days in the field. These support systems and

intercultural experiential programming. We pride ourselves on dynamism, professionalism, and

contacts provide deeper learning and more effective programming.

communication, and are positioned to grow and adapt to your institution’s needs. Dragons also offers faculty trainings, consulting, and professional development courses to further

L ESS HASSL E

support effective and safe international programming at your institution.

How would you coordinate a homestay in a remote part of the Andes, or arrange a meeting with the Dalai Lama, or source Arabic language instructors, or arrange to meet a dissident author in China? With administrators who speak over fifteen languages and with program histories that span 25+ years, we research, design, and implement programming so that home campus faculty and administrators can focus on the educational experience.

"We have worked with Dragons since 2006...The Dragons instructors and facilitators provide a complementary role by bringing experiential pedagogy to help students reflect and process their experiences, as well as solid training in risk management and a depth of experience on the ground." — H E L E N A K A U F M A N , D I R E C T O R O F O F F - C A M P U S S T U D Y, C A R L E T O N C O L L E G E

W W W.W H E R E T H E R E B E D R A G O N S . C O M / P A R T N E R S

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Bolivia | China | India | Nepal | Peru

MAPMAKERS ONCE DREW DRAGONS TO REPRESENT LANDS UNKNOWN. BOLD EXPLORERS WHO VENTURED BEYOND THE MAP’S EDGE WERE SAID TO GO

“ where there be dragons ”…

There are people who live their lives for adventure, exploration and knowledge… people who are willing to venture into the unknown for the sake of discovery. For those people, we offer incredible experiences. We hope you are one of them.

741 Pearl Street, Boulder, CO 80302

Phone: 303.413.0822

OR

800.982.9203 | Email: studyabroad@wheretherebedragons.com

WWW.WHERETHEREBEDRAGONS.COM/COLLEGE Certified B Corporations are businesses that meet the highest standards of verified accountability, transparency, and social and environmental performance.

Dragons 2020 Catalog: College Study Abroad  

Dragons study abroad opportunities are dynamic and adventuresome programs wherein academic studies come alive in unpredictable ways, allowin...

Dragons 2020 Catalog: College Study Abroad  

Dragons study abroad opportunities are dynamic and adventuresome programs wherein academic studies come alive in unpredictable ways, allowin...