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dragons w h e r e

g l o b a l

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S U M M E R A N D G A P Y E A R P R O G R A M S ’ 14 / 15

p r o g r a m s

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program comparison chart a few words from our director p1 who we are, what we do p2 where we go p3 course design and planning c o n t e n t s p4 leadership p5 our participants p6 the importance of small groups p7 four summer prog rams in china core program components p14 p8 health & safety four summer prog rams in southeast asia p12 p2 0 two summer programs in the himalayas p2 6

four summer prog rams in africa p3 0

four summer prog rams in latin america p3 6

eight semester prog rams, each in fall and spring

central america, andes and amazon, indonesia, mekong, west africa, china, india, himalayas p4 2


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P r o g r a m

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china: a comprehensive survey 4 wk

p 16

★★

★★

★★

★★

★★ ★

★★ ★

★★ ★

★★ ★

china: a comprehensive survey 6 wk

p 16

★★

★★ ★

★★

★★

★★ ★

★★ ★

★★ ★

china: language intensive 4 wk

p 17

★★

★★ ★★

★★

★★

★★ ★

★★ ★

china: language intensive 6 wk

p 17

★★

★★ ★★

★★

★★

★★ ★

the silk road

p 18

★★ ★★

★★

★★ ★

china: internship program

p 19

★★

★★ ★★

★★

thailand: the spirit of greng jai

p22

★★ ★

★★ ★★

cambodia: development & peace

p23

★★ ★★

myanmar: service & development

p24

★★ ★★

indonesia: islands & lost cultures

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Dragons Summer Programs

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C o m p a r i s o n

Summer p22

china southeast asia himalayas

Summer p26 Summer p30

africa & middle east

Summer p 14

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C h a r t

Dates

Ages

★★ ★★

June 28 – July 28

15 - 17

★★ ★

★★★ ★ ★

June 28 – August 8

16 - 18

★★★ ★ ★

★★

★★ ★

4 wk: June 28 – July 28

15 - 18

★★ ★

★★★ ★ ★

★★

★★ ★

6 wk: June 28 – August 8

15 - 18

★★ ★★

★★

★★ ★★

★★ ★★

June 28 – August 8

16 - 18

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★★ ★ ★

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★ ★

June 28 – July 28

17 - 2 2

★★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★

★★ ★★

★★ ★★

★★ ★★

June 29 – July 29

15 - 17

★★ ★★

★★

★★

★★★ ★ ★

★★

★★ ★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

June 29 – August 8

16 - 19

★★

★★

★★ ★★

★★★ ★ ★

★★ ★

★★

★★ ★

★★★ ★ ★

June 29 – July 29

17 - 2 0

p25

★★★ ★★ ★ ★ ★

★★

★★★ ★ ★

★★

★★

★★★ ★★★ ★ ★ ★ ★

June 29 – August 8

16 - 19

north india: roof of the world

p28

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★

★★ ★

★★★ ★★★ ★ ★ ★ ★

June 28 – August 8

16 - 19

nepal: traditions of the himalayas

p29

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★

★★ ★

★★★ ★★★ ★ ★ ★ ★

June 28 – July 28

16 - 19

senegal: africa’s warm embrace

p32

★★ ★★

★★★ ★ ★

★★

★★

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★

June 28 – July 28

16 - 18

morocco: crossroads of mountains & faith

p33

★★ ★★

★★ ★★

★★ ★★

★★

★★ ★

★★

★★ ★

★★★ ★★ ★ ★

June 28 – July 28

16 - 18

rwanda: transforming conflict

p34

★★ ★★

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

June 28 – August 8

17- 2 0

jordan: arabic language & culture

p35

★★

★★ ★★

★★

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★★ ★★ ★ ★ ★★

June 28 – July 28

17- 2 0

p40

★★ ★★


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tr ed ru

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Summer p36

latin america

or call 8 0 0 . 9 8 2 . 9 2 0 3

guatemala: el mundo maya

4 wk

p38

★★ ★

★★★ ★ ★

★★

★★ ★★

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★★ ★★ ★ ★ ★

★★ ★★

4 week: June 28 – July 28

15 - 17

guatemala: el mundo maya

6 wk

p38

★★ ★

★★★ ★ ★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★ ★★

★★ ★★

★★★ ★★ ★ ★ ★

★★ ★★

6 week: June 28 – Aug. 8

16 - 18

D r a g o n s S u m m e r P r o g r a m s ( c o n t.)

Page

Dates

Ages

bolivia: diversity & development

4 wk

p39

★★ ★★

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

4 week: June 28 – July 28

16 - 18

bolivia: diversity & development

6 wk

p39

★★★ ★★ ★ ★ ★★

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★ ★

★★ ★

★★ ★

6 week: June 28 – August 8

17 - 19

peru: sacred mountains

4 wk

p40

★★★ ★★ ★ ★ ★

★★ ★★

★★

★★ ★

★★

★★

★★ ★

★★ ★

4 week: June 28 – July 28

15 - 17

peru: sacred mountains

6 wk

p40

★★★ ★★ ★ ★ ★★

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★

★★

★★ ★

★★ ★

6 week: June 28 – Aug. 8

16 - 18

p41

★★ ★

★★

★★★ ★★ ★ ★ ★★

★★ ★

★★★ ★★ ★ ★

★★ ★★

June 28 – July 28

16 - 18

nicaragua: cultivating change

Dragons Semester Programs p42

wheretherebedragons.com

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8 -11

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core program components on pages

for complete program information, visit us at

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learn all about Dragons’

★★★ ★ ★

Dragons Semester Programs

Dates

Ages

Sept. 6 – Dec. 8; Feb. 9 – May 12

17 - 2 2

★★ ★

Sept. 6 – Dec. 8; Feb. 9 – May 12

17 - 2 2

Sept. 6 – Dec. 6; Feb. 9 – May 10

Page

★★

★★★ ★★★ ★ ★ ★ ★

★★ ★

★★★ ★★ ★ ★ ★

★★ ★★

central america: seeds of change

p44

★★★ ★★ ★ ★ ★★

★★★ ★ ★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★★ ★★ ★ ★ ★

★★ ★★

andes & amazon

p45

17 - 2 2

★★★ ★★★ ★ ★ ★ ★

★★

★★

★★★ ★ ★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★ ★★

★★ ★★

indonesia: community, conservation

p46

Sept. 6 – Dec. 8; Feb. 9 – May 12

17 - 2 2

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★

★★ ★

★★★ ★ ★

★★ ★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★★ ★ ★

life along the mekong

p47

Sept. 6 – Dec. 8; Feb. 9 – May 12

17 - 2 2

★★ ★★

★★★ ★ ★

★★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★ ★★

★★★ ★ ★

the rhythm of west africa

p48

Sept. 6 – Dec. 6; Feb. 9 – May 10

17 - 2 2

★★ ★

★★★ ★ ★

★★

★★

★★★ ★ ★

★★ ★★

★★★ ★★ ★ ★ ★

★★★ ★ ★

china: south of the clouds

p49

Sept. 6 – Dec. 8; Feb. 9 – May 12

17 - 2 2

★★ ★

★★★ ★ ★

★★

★★ ★

★★ ★

★★★ ★ ★

★★ ★★

★★★ ★ ★

★★★ ★ ★

visions of india

p50

Sept. 6 – Dec. 6; Feb. 9 – May 10

17 - 2 2

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★ ★★

★★ ★

★★ ★★

★★ ★★

★★ ★★

★★ ★★

★★ ★★

himalayan studies

p 51

★★★ ★ ★


from the director

C h r i s Ya g e r

dragons

is a community of dedicated and innovative educators who believe firmly that authentic, well-intentioned and carefully crafted cross-cultural experiences promote self-assured leadership and global citizenship. By engaging with foreign cultures on basic human levels, we strive to mitigate racism, foster compassion, and nurture lives that are built on knowledge and wisdom. The relationships, curriculum and resources that we’ve built over the years ensure our participants a learning experience that will deeply broaden their understanding of the world and inspire confidence in their own abilities. When considering the level of care and intention that we put into every learning adventure, you’ll see that Dragons programs are the finest, best-staffed, and best executed overseas programs available. Since founding Dragons twenty-two years ago, the road we’ve traveled has been an extraordinary journey, filled with learning, challenge and achievement. To all those who have been a part of the Dragons story, a heartfelt thank you. And to those who are soon to join us, you have so much to look forward to!

C h r i s a n d A l i Ya g e r


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Something hidden. Go and find it. Go and look behind the Ranges –

Something lost behind the Ranges. I n t h e d ay s b e f o r e t h e w o r l d h a d b e e n f u l ly ch a r t e d ,

map-makers would draw in

Lost and waiting for you.

dragons

to represent the lands that were still unknown. Bold explorers who ventured beyond the map’s edge were said to go “

go. – Rudyard Kipling

where there be dragons . ”

Since 1993, Where There Be Dragons (Dragons for short) has guided thousands of students on rugged, honest, small-group journeys in the developing world. While courses vary in their focus – with some trekking and wilderness intensive, others strong on service and development studies, and still others language oriented – all Dragons courses are designed to be inspiring journeys that put a premium on

authentic and meaningful encounters with distinctly unique cultures and dramatic physical landscapes. Working with mature and experienced guides, Dragons courses follow a core curriculum that fosters leadership, cultivates personal responsibility, and engages the whole student. On each course we challenge, educate, and provide a forum for deep reflection of our own culture and values, while becoming familiar with the complicated relationships that cross cultures and continents.

“This trip was ‘epic’ in Sebastian’s words. We expected it to be life changing – but did not expect the results to be so immediate. We thought he would be learning from this trip for decades to come, so we were thrilled that so much had an immediate and visible impact on him from the moment he returned. For our family, this was a tremendous success in our efforts to grow a well-adjusted human.” Parents of Sebastian Scholl, Tibet Cultural


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Dragons courses combine the best in experiential education, travel, service learning, and physically and intellectually challenging experiences. When our students step out of the familiar world and settle into a richly different one, they gain a unique point of reference from which they can look back on their own lives with greater clarity and perspective. In a world being fractured by cultural misunderstanding, we believe that tomorrow’s leaders will be most effective when they have been informed by close encounters with the other.

along the map’s edge, in the valleys and mountains of developing countries, there are cultures and landscapes of extraordinary beauty. So join us on an extraordinary journey to some place that’s beyond your understanding. If you want to have your senses blown, your worldview challenged, and your life hugely enhanced by the dramatic difference of life along the Map’s Edge, then give us a call or go on line for further details. This is your passport to global citizenship, skill building and leadership. Tell us where YOU want to go!

“I look at myself today and see someone whose eyes have been opened to the world.” Student, Cambodia

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“We wanted a program outside of “convention.” There are many programs, international or domestic, that are glorified teen-tours. We sought a program that would challenge our son and introduce him to the “education” involved not only in sojourning within foreign landscapes, but in building relationships within a community.” Parent of Jacob Krushel, Silk Road

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And we shall not cease from exploration, and at the end of our

exploring, With an average group size of twelve participants, we keep our groups small, and with an average of three instructors per group, we maintain a student-to-instructor ratio of 4 to 1.

we shall return to the place where we started and know the place for the first time. – T. S . E l i o t

Each of our courses is, from start to finish, a unique travel adventure that is built on a carefully considered set of principles and is managed with exceptional care. global citizenship

humility inter-connectedness compassion gratitude

awareness curiosity authenticity self exploration

responsibility ownership courage self-reliance leadership and skill building

Our programs are not tours or conventional trips; rather, they are expertly led, low-impact travel adventures that draw the most from on-site learning opportunities. All Dragons courses follow a core curriculum that empowers students and cultivates our core values: global citizenship, self-knowledge, and leadership and skill building.

From the care that we put into our admissions process, to the selection of our instructors and the training we provide, to the work we do pre-course to create visionary and singularly unique travel experiences, to the support we provide while groups are in the field, Dragons’ attention to detail and ability to run extraordinary overseas learning adventures is unrivaled in the field of experiential education.

“Dragons offered a profound experience for my daughter. Although she had traveled extensively and lived with host families, Dragons took the cultural, political, and religious understandings to a much different level. Zoe has returned with a zeal to expand her educational horizons with a view toward working in a multicultural and diverse world. Thank you for a wonderful experience.” Parent of Zoe Egelman, Tibet Cultural


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As a professional guiding company, with more than 200,000 participant-days in the field, we have found that students’ journeys are richest and most rewarding when our instructors actively participate in the vision, planning and execution of their courses. Each course is run by a leader team – most often three instructors who work together to create and execute the goals of the course. Instructor teams are typically comprised of a male and female Western guide with in-country work experience and language proficiency, and a third local instructor who has been trained to work with Western students.

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“Mackenzie was enchanted and inspired by the instructors. She was left wanting to re-think what she wants to do with her life as she got to know people who have packed so much into so few years. It was my greatest hope for an experience like this: to have her write that ‘This changes everything.’ ” Parent of Mackenzie Roberts, Indonesia

Through a fastidious selection process and intensive leadership training, Dragons builds leader teams that are safe, responsible and intellectually sharp, but also easy-going, caring and fun. When not guiding with Dragons, our instructors are graduate students, returned Peace Corps Volunteers, U.N. development professionals, veteran guides, and career teachers. They share a passion for exploration, adventure, and hands-on learning through authentic, low-impact travel experiences.

“The instructors now join the ranks of the most influential people in my child’s life.” Parent of Sebastian Scholl, Tibet Cultural


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A mind that is

Who joins a Dragons program? It’s an unusual person who sees the value of developing a deep understanding of the lives of people so far away, living so differently. Students join us from all 50 states and abroad. No two come from the same background yet they have one thing in common: they want to travel and they want to learn. Participants on Dragons courses are looking for a truthful, enlightening experience to give them a better understanding of the world, and to provide them with the tools to help make a difference. Each year, Dragons provides scholarships to 20% of its students, and while we cannot accommodate everyone’s financial needs we are intent on making our programs accessible to as many people as possible.

stretched

by new

experiences can never go back to its old

dimensions. – Oliver Wendell Holmes

Absolutely no language training is necessary. What is necessary is an enthusiasm for adventure, a willingness to leave one’s culture behind, and a desire to learn and travel with attention to one’s surroundings. “Thank you. Thank you so much. I can feel my life from here on out to be taking a new shape. You gave me such an opportunity this summer, not just to travel to this magical place, but something to hold on to that has sparked a new light, purpose, and ambition in my life. I am so grateful.” Brigette Barnato, Sikkim


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“The strengths of Dragons programs are tremendous attention to safety, great opportunity for travel into ‘the beyond,’ impressive student/leader ratio, varied experiences, and unique opportunity to grow and learn about yourself and a group of amazing peers.”

Small groups enable us to provide authentic, low-to-the-ground, high quality learning adventures. We can best address the personal needs, interests and goals of each traveler. Because of our small group size and high instructor-student ratio, we are able to efficiently utilize the same modes of transportation used by locals, and we can provide intimate experiences without creating a wake of cultural impact. The flexibility of small groups enables us to take advantage of a myriad of unique opportunities. We can easily fit into a nomad’s tent, or pile into the back of a tractor. Additionally, by keeping groups small we can more easily respond to changes in the group’s health. A small group size opens the trip up to safer, more interesting, personal and fun experiences.

P a r e n t o f K a i t l i n D o n n e l l y, P e r u

“This trip has absolutely been the most amazing experience of my life. I came here expecting to learn about a developing nation and came away with a much deeper understanding of myself.” K a y l a M u r p h y, C a m b o d i a

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To e n s u r e t h a t e a c h c o u r s e i s

rewarding, consistent themes are threaded through all of our programs, our core program components

rugged travel

home-stays

trekking & wilderness exploration

service learning

“The manner in which you run your programs – student focus of inquiry driven, flexible itineraries, tremendous freedom for the student, small groups, unbelievable student: instructor ratio made this a valuable learning opportunity for Scott, but also facilitated his personal growth in a manner I’m not sure any other summer program could have done.” Parent of Scott Newman, China Comprehensive

survey of development issues

independent study projects (ISP)

language study

introduction to philosophy/comparative religion

“You are what you say you are. It’s a true immersion program. It’s not for everyone, but it is truly life altering. Elie came back with incredible stories – so enthusiastic about telling them to us – and wonderful observations about the culture, her friends and the instructors.” Parent of Elie Sokoloff, Laos


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rugged travel

home-stays

trekking & wilderness exploration

Dragons participants travel in a style that enables them to genuinely know the people of the countries we visit. Most often we travel on local buses and trains. We may pile onto a tractor or horse-drawn cart. And at an occasional river crossing, we may hop on the back of a yak. We typically stay in familyrun guest-houses (small lodges), though we may stay with families, in village common huts, or at temples and monasteries. This often isn’t the fastest or most comfortable way to travel, but for adaptable participants it offers the most authentic experience.

Often the most challenging and fulfilling component of our programs, our home-stays take students to the core of their experience. Home-stay families are respected members of their local communities, and share Dragons’ commitment to expanding participants’ understanding of their culture. All have been selected because of the safety of their home environments and the enthusiasm the families have shown in working with course participants.

Whether backpacking through pristine wilderness, rafting down jungle rivers or hiking to breath-taking mountain views, we discover remote and infrequently traveled places. Intensive foot travel enables us to venture to towns isolated from modern technological influences. In a world where development increasingly encroaches upon remaining wilderness, Dragons trips are a once in a lifetime opportunity to see incredible foreign, natural beauty that is rapidly disappearing.

★★★★★ =

★★★★★ =

extremely rugged, few showers, undeveloped roads

15 + days of home-stay

★★★★ =

★★★★ =

limited time in urban/developed areas, mostly remote

10 + days of home-stay

★★★ =

★★★ =

half time in urban areas

5 + days of home-stay

★★ =

★★ =

some remote, more than half the time in urban locales

3 + days of home-stay

★=

★=

limited remote travel

possible 1 or 2 day home-stay

★ ★★★★★ trekking = 20 + days of wilderness hiking and camping ★★★★ trekking = 12 + days ★★★ trekking = 7 + days ★★ trekking = 4 + days ★ trekking = day hikes

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service learning

survey of development issues

independent study projects

To learn the most from our time serving others and to affect the greatest degree of positive change, Dragons works with individuals and organizations that have a long-standing commitment to the community’s needs. Participants may work as a whole group, in smaller sub-groups, or individually, participating in projects that range from classroom teaching to health-care outreach, assistance in micro-economic development, or hands-on building projects.

Each course explores a range of development issues, from issues in health care, resource management and environmental impact, to children and women’s issues, to peace and conflict studies. Through meetings with development professionals, participants learn first-hand how the efforts of community leaders and aid organizations both positively and negatively impact the region’s people, culture and environment.

The Independent Study Project is an opportunity for each student to choose a topic of particular interest and study it throughout the length of the course. ISP choices are limited only by a student’s imagination and self-direction, and may include mentored relationships with artists, musicians, yogis, monks, dancers, cultivators, development workers, and healers.

★★★★★ =

★★★★★ =

★★★★★ =

40 + hours

focus of program

major component of program

★★★★ =

★★★★ =

★★★★ =

20 + hours

concentrated inspection

strongly emphasized

★★★ =

★★★ =

★★★ =

10 + hours

fairly strong survey

fairly integral to course design

★★ =

★★ =

★★ =

5 + hours

limited consideration

part of program, not emphasized

★=

★=

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limited

not relevant to program

limited opportunities for self-directed projects

(ISP)


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language study

introduction to philosophy/ comparative religion

focus of inquiry

All Dragons courses incorporate language training. We absolutely do not expect participants to come with language skills, nor to master them. We do expect our travelers will want to interact with locals as closely as they can. Few things do more to empower participants, and facilitate an ease of cultural understanding, than frequent language lessons with supportive instructors.

Regardless of the program, participants are introduced to the commonly shared religious and political thinking that has helped shape the country’s culture. Depending on the country, travelers explore the tenets of Theravada, Mahayana or Zen Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, Shamanism, Confucianism and Neo-Confucianism, or Hinduism. In Latin America, our programs examine how Catholicism and traditional Maya, Inca and Aztec religions have collided and intersected. We survey religious traditions through temple visits, monastery stays, and meetings with accomplished teachers and practitioners.

Each course lends itself differently to the introduction of particular academic themes. Programs may be more heavily weighted towards an introduction to minority issues, land-use issues, expedition planning, or traditional art, music and performance. Course instructors present lessons and lead discussions to introduce these topics, and additional friends and contacts such as US ambassadors, high lamas, factory managers, laborers, health-care workers, farmers, career mountaineers or newspaper reporters may augment the instructors’ lesson plans.

★★★★★ =

★★★★★ =

★★★★★ =

40 + hours

major component of program

major component of program

★★★★ =

★★★★ =

★★★★ =

30 + hours

strongly emphasized

strongly emphasized

★★★ =

★★★ =

★★★ =

15 + hours

fairly integral to course design

fairly integral to course design

★★ =

★★ =

★★ =

10 + hours

part of program, not emphasized

part of program, not emphasized

★=

★=

★=

limited

limited opportunities for study and exploration

influences program, only slight emphasis

11


12

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s

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f

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y

I went out for a walk and concluded to stay ’til sundown,

Dragons’ attention to

health and safety. In determining course areas, designing itineraries, hiring

for going out, I found, was really

going

in. – John Muir

staff, and working with contractors, safety is our paramount concern. We are acutely aware that political concerns and other risk issues weigh heavily on the minds of participants and their families. Dragons instructors are experienced and mature adults, motivated to exercise good judgment. We have developed relationships with medical clinics and emergency evacuation resources in all the countries in which we travel. Our emergency response team and outside contractors rehearse scenarios and manage evacuations with exceptional care. Our itineraries are designed to calculate distance to emergency medical care, evacuation procedures, access to quality food and water, rates of acclimatization, and quality of transportation. We maintain a student-to-leader ratio that averages 4:1, and we keep groups small to promote social relationships and to create an environment that can nurture students’ physical health and mental well-being. Dragons’ risk management team assesses risk issues before each course goes into the field. If we determine that travel to a planned program area will present unacceptable risk to our students, we will alter our travel plans without hesitation – something easily done due to the strengths of our instructor teams, the limited size of our groups, our low student to leader ratio, and the support provided by our administrative staff.

“I was concerned about her safety. The leader-to-student ratio helped, as well as their in-country and medical expertise. The responsiveness of the emergency US staff, when Luisa was sick, was excellent. And I want to reinforce the wisdom in working with both the returning travelers and parents in adjusting back to life in the US.” P a r e n t o f L u i s a S p e r r y, C a m b o d i a

“Safety was our biggest concern. Talking to the parents of children who had gone on a Dragons trip before was what convinced my husband and me to send our son. You demonstrated professional attitudes and complete competence.” Parent of Jason Cohen, Sikkim


h

e

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l

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n

d

s

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f

e

There are inherent and other risks in adventure and recreational activities and travel which we cannot control. Traveling in foreign countries, at high altitudes, in wilderness areas or mountainous terrain, presents real risks. Unpredictable changes in weather conditions, political instability, or recreational or travel activities such as trekking, backpacking, bike riding, or taking local transportation involve hazards that can lead to injury or possibly even death. Evacuations can be difficult, and can be complicated by severe weather, poor roads or other unforeseen circumstances that are beyond our control. On some of our programs we may be several days from competent emergency medical care.

Students interested in our programs should understand the risks and hazards, and be willing to take personal responsibility for their well-being. This process begins when students are medically screened for our programs. In consideration of the primacy we place on risk management, we require a candid review of each student’s medical history, and students found to have withheld medical or psychological issues will be asked to return home early, without refund. Though courses vary in physical rigor, all students should be in reasonably good physical condition prior to attending any Dragons program. As some programs are much more strenuous than others, students should carefully read individual program descriptions for details.

t

13

y

“We were greatly impressed with the nimble nature of the team, both in the field and in Boulder – and how they work seamlessly together. We felt that in a crisis, we got real-time information, and were pleased with the ability of the instructors to quickly re-direct the group out of harm’s way, without so much as a ripple to the kids.” P a r e n t o f M a d d i e C o n s i d i n e , S i l k R o a d , r e - r o u t e d 2 0 10

We have an excellent safety record and we take pride in the attention we give to students’ health and safety. Please read all our program materials thoroughly, and call us if you have any questions.


14

When you get off the plane in

china

you can immediately sense the dramatic difference of this tremendous country. A country on the path towards reinventing itself, ancient temples now

stand next to modern high rises, the countryside seems centuries away from China’s global urban centers, and

4 summer programs in china

busy entrepreneurs on cell phones lean against walls painted with Communist slogans. In China, Dragons offers the most thorough and comprehensive travel and learning experiences available, with intimate and meaningful explorations that provide a window on China’s past while informing students on the expanding potential of China’s future. We travel from mega-cities to small rural villages, sleep on the Great Wall and camp on the Tibetan Plateau, dine in simple night markets and in grand Qing Dynasty courtyard homes, and hike breathtaking mountains while also exploring areas straining under the weight of development.


15

Every Dragons China program is broad in scope, with exploration of extreme rural and urban realities, as well as the complicated and prevalent co-existence of minority and majority cultures. We meet with artists, musicians, authors, traditional doctors, farmers, journalists and philosophers, and are introduced to China’s philosophical, social and political movements.

On all China programs, students are introduced to Chinese language study. Throughout our China journeys we examine the diversity of culture and human experience in China and learn about the issues China confronts as it continues down its extraordinary path of modernization.

“Well planned. Well balanced between rural/urban. Excellent instructors. You successfully introduced my daughter to a completely foreign environment and she came home exuberant and inspired.” Parent of Adrian Walsh, China Language

“This was not a vacation; it was an experience. I was truly immersed in Chinese culture.” Umar Amin, Silk Road


16

china survey 4 wk: June 28 – July 28 6 wk: June 28 – Aug. 8 a g e s 16 - 18

Traveling the length of the country, from China’s arid north to the lush terraced fields of the south, we explore rural and urban realities while delving

“This trip was exactly what I wanted. I learned so much more on this program than I ever could in a classroom. Most importantly, this trip made me realize that there is so much to see in the world.”

into the cultures and histories of both minority and majority ethnic groups. As our ports of entry and exit, Beijing and Hong Kong offer incredible glimpses into the region’s everdeveloping global and age-old cultural significances. Journeying into the provinces of Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan, Guangxi, and Guizhou, we connect regions of stunning geographical and cultural diversity. In ethnic Tibetan, Hui (Muslim), Naxi, Mosuo, Bai, Yi, and Miao communities,

Nu Xiong, China Comp

china: comprehensive survey exploring

the

cultural

history

and

diversity

we indulge in an ethnographic exploration of the rich Chinese tapestry. In seldom-visited towns and villages we are presented with a clear window into China’s past. Invitations to participate in traditional festivals, teachings, home-stays, and service projects allow us a singular and vital perspective on development concerns of the present. In meetings with artists, environmentalists, musicians, authors, traditional doctors, farmers, journalists and business executives, we are introduced to China’s foundational philosophical, social and political movements – including Buddhism, Daoism, Islam, Confucianism, Marxism, and now, Capitalism. Regular Chinese lessons introduce students to the challenging and beautiful communicative system of Mandarin. We round out this broad learning adventure with meaningful service work and a mountain trek through the foothills of the Tibetan Plateau. Offering a comprehensive exploration of historical trends and modern issues, our journey provides deep insight into the character and present-day reality of China. for itineraries, prices, application and enrollment info, visit us at

of

modern

China

Russia Kazakstan Mongolia Beijing

China Kham

Tibet Ne

Xian

Yellow Sea

Chengdu

pa l

Guizhou Kunming

India Burma

wheretherebedragons.com

Guangxi Hong Kong

Vietnam

South China Sea

or call 800.982.9203


Our Intensive Mandarin programs are based in China’s southwestern Yunnan Province, a region renowned for its natural beauty and ethnic diversity. Russia

Dragons’ Mandarin intensive programs are unique in that they offer students

Kazakstan Mongolia Beijing

Yellow Sea

China Tibet Ne pal

Tiger Leaping Gorge Guizhou Lashihai Guangxi Kunming

India Burma

Vietnam

understanding

Hong Kong

South China Sea

modern

opportunities for both an urban home-stay and an extended rural home-stay, providing unparalleled opportunities for language and cultural immersion while allowing students to experience the joys and daily realities of both cosmopolitan and pastoral Chinese life. During our rural home-stay in Lashihai, a village nestled at the base of the Tibetan Plateau, students paddle around the lake in traditional dugout canoes, organize “U.S. vs. China” pick-up soccer and basketball games, forage for medicinal plants with local medicine men, bike and trek through remote ethnic minority villages, visit Buddhist temples, shop at local markets, participate in workshops at a nearby artist colony, teach English to village children, volunteer at an orphanage, and collaborate with local NGOs on service projects. The urban home-stay, in Yunnan’s capital Kunming, provides a

China

through

intensive

language

study

china: language intensive see program component comparisons in cover foldout

stunning contrast to the more traditional lifestyle of the village-stay. While in Kunming, students meet daily at the Dragons Program House for intensive Mandarin instruction (4-5 hours per day, with options for additional one-on-one tutoring sessions). Students meet with local university professors, NGO workers, business professionals, artists, musicians and practitioners of traditional arts to learn about Chinese cooking, calligraphy, Traditional Chinese Medicine, political history, martial arts and environmental issues.

meet our instructors and find complete program details at

wheretherebedragons.com

a g e s 15 - 18 4 wk: June 28 – July 28 6 wk: June 28 – Aug. 8

china language

17


the silk road

18

June 28 – August 8 a g e s 16 - 18

Worlds away from Beijing, the far-western province of Xinjiang is a land where vast desert basins meet 20,000-foot peaks;

“Amy returned from the Silk Road program inspired. She has changed her studies in her college program to China. She wants to return there for her third semester course next spring. I am so thrilled that she has returned from China with a new curiosity and devotion to learning more about the culture and the people of the far East.”

where Central Asian cultures blend and exist in stark contrast to the China of the East. Amidst Asia’s most striking landscapes, we survey a huge diversity of ethnic customs and religious traditions: those of Uyghur, Kyrgyz, Kazakh, Tajik, Mongour, Tibetan, and Han communities. In the oasis city of Kashgar, not far from China’s shared borders with several Central Asian Islamic states, we explore bazaars,

the silk road a

rugged

journey

along

the

vibrant,

ancient

trade

mosques, and the world’s largest outdoor market. We ascend high into the Pamir Mountain range, enjoying the phenomenal beauty of this seldom visited section of the Himalayas. We explore the Tarim Basin, the ancient ruins of Turpan, and the painted caves of Dunhuang, which archive centuries of sculpted Buddha images and unparalleled Buddhist art. At Kanas Lake we trek from Mongolian encampments deep into the Altai region, and as we traverse the Tibetan Plateau we camp beside Tibetan nomads and their yaks. Concluding in Beijing, we venture to the Great Wall, visit the city’s various cultural and historic monuments, become more acquainted with contemporary Han Chinese society, and consider the great influences carried by the caravans of the Silk Road.

for itineraries, prices, application and enrollment info, visit us at

Parent of Amy Stafford, Silk Road

routes

of

We s t e r n

Kazakstan

Mongolia Urumqi Turpan

Kashgar

V V Karakorum VRange

Beijing

Xining

China

Tibet Ne

China

Xian

Yellow Sea

p al

India Burma

wheretherebedragons.com

or call 800.982.9203


19

American journalist Charles Kuralt once said: “If you really want to learn about a country, work there.” Where There Be Dragons’ China Internship program Russia

gives students a rare opportunity to gain valuable work experience in China while

Kazakstan Mongolia Beijing

Yellow Sea

China Tibet Ne pal

Tiger Leaping Gorge Kunming

India Burma

Guizhou Guangxi Hong Kong

Vietnam

rewarding

South China Sea

work

attending intensive Mandarin classes, living with Chinese host families and participating in a variety of cultural activities and excursions. Our China Internship program is based in the vibrant city of Kunming, the political, economic, cultural and communications capital of China’s Yunnan Province. Students choose between a variety of volunteer and internship opportunities, such as interning with a local journalist, photographer or at a radio or television station, teaching English, working alongside development professionals on projects, assisting with the production of a local magazine, working in a Chinese law firm or learning the ins and outs of doing business in China while interning at a local business. In addition to internships this program also offers 3-4 hours of Mandarin instruction per day, plus opportunities for additional one-on-one tutoring sessions. Four weeks of home-stays with Chinese families give students additional opportunities to immerse

experience

in

the

world’s

fastest

growing

economy

china: internship see program component comparisons in cover foldout

themselves in the language and culture of China while forming close relationships with our Chinese hosts. Additionally, classes and activities at the Dragons Program House in martial arts, Traditional Chinese Medicine, cooking, ink painting, calligraphy, history, politics and economics help give students a balanced introduction to the ancient traditions and modern realities of China. Students who perform exceptionally well at their internships can sometimes extend their placements, while a small number of outstanding older students may be offered continued work as paid interns. a g e s 17- 2 2 June 28 – July 28

meet our instructors and find complete program details at

wheretherebedragons.com

china internship


20

With biologically diverse jungles, rich river basins, thickly-forested mountains, and stunning coastline,

southeast asia is a land of exceptional natural beauty.

On a journey through Southeast Asia, be prepared to be as easily swept off of your feet by your surroundings as you are by the immense culture of hospitality that you encounter in every interaction.

4 summer programs in thailand cambodia burma indonesia

Our Southeast Asia courses are for students who want to be intrigued by diverse historical, environmental, and religious experiences amid cultural backdrops known throughout the world for their artistic aesthetic and cultures of balance, calm and compassion.


21

In Southeast Asia, students discover their potential for participating in constructive change through service and global citizenship. A summer in Southeast Asia is an opportunity to be

involved in community building and to get beneath the skin and delve into cultures of tremendous kindness, generosity, and spirit.

“Today we made it to the most beautiful place I have ever been. I felt like I was standing in a picture. The jungle came right up to the sand and the water was so calm and clear that you could see all the way to the bottom. I can truly say that I have been to paradise.” Thailand group journal

“This course surpassed my expectations. It’s indescribable what I’ve experienced. It’s been so vast and comprehensive. Deep, intellectual and powerful. Raw and full of emotion” Megan Anderson, Cambodia


22

thailand June 29 – July 29 a g e s 15 - 17

From forested mountain tops to small rural villages nestled amid rice paddies to the buzzing metropolis of Bangkok, our Thailand

“I felt so proud of myself when I learned the Wai Kro, which is a ceremonial dance that precedes a Thai fight. I was able to learn the dance as my ISP, thanks to one of my instructors: her resourcefulness and dancing experience helped me out greatly.”

program is a broad and unforgettable journey in “The Land of Smiles.” In one of the world’s most popular travel destinations, our Thailand course provides off-the-beaten-path experiences that incorporate village home-stays, community service work, jungle trekking, extensive discourse on Theravada Buddhism, and a thorough discussion of regional politics and issues in human rights. Our program

thailand: the spirit of greng jai the

beauty

of

community

and

spirituality

begins in Chiang Mai, in Thailand’s north, and then travels to border areas in the east. Outside of Mae Hong Son we hike through bamboo forest and stay with ethnic Karen villagers. In Mae Sot near the Burmese border, we survey border issues and integrate service work with inspiring visits to medical clinics, orphanages, and various NGO’s. In Sukhothai we explore fantastic ancient ruins in one of Asia’s most splendid World Heritage Sites, and we settle into a Buddhist monastery for a five-day meditation retreat. From the hill-regions of the north, we travel to the coastal communities of the south for a week-long exploration of sea-fairing communities in regions bordering Malaysia. Our Thailand adventure culminates with a few day’s exploration of the country’s colorful and bustling capitol, Bangkok. Broad in scope, our Thailand program immerses students in a culture famed throughout the world for its generous spirit. It is an ideal journey for anyone looking to fall in love with all the best that travel has to offer. for itineraries, prices, application and enrollment info, visit us at

Thailand Summer Participant

in

rural

Thailand

Burma

Laos Mae Hong Son

Sukhothai

Thailand Ubon Ratchatani

Bangkok

Cambodia

Krabi

South China Sea

wheretherebedragons.com


Known throughout the world for the incomparable ruins of Angkor Wat, Cambodia is a country that evokes images of overgrown jungle temples, elaborate stone carvings, robed monks, and complete religious splendor. Our Cambodia Thailand

Laos

Siem Reap Battambang

Mondulkiri Province

Vietnam

Cambodia Phnom Penh Sihanoukville

Gulf of Thailand

the

diverse

course peels back the layers of an underexposed country to explore topics related to religious and political persecution, the pressures of modernization and the impacts of development. From our starting point in Phnom Penh we travel deep into the majestic forests of far eastern Cambodia, along the Vietnamese border where we spend our days trekking through the jungle and enjoy quiet nights sleeping under thatch-roofed village homes. Our travels to Siem Reap expose us to the extraordinary splendor of ancient Angkor Wat. In Pursat, we meet with representatives from international aid and development agencies and work on much needed community service projects. In an idyllic village not far from Phnom Penh – along a meandering tributary of the Mekong River – we live in simple homes, cook over wood fires, and experience daily chores such as harvesting

influences

shaping

contemporary

Khmer

society

cambodia: development,peace see program component comparisons in cover foldout

sugarcane and washing cows in the Mekong. During the last week of our journey, we travel to remote areas of Cambodia’s coast, including the undeveloped islands of Koh Rong and Koh Rong Sanleum where we explore fishing towns, play on deserted beaches and critique the benefits and drawbacks of newly planned development projects. Our Cambodia course takes on complicated, thorny issues, the intensity of which requires intellectual and emotional maturity and a willingness to explore the unknown with tolerance, openness, curiosity, and compassion. a g e s 16 - 18 June 29 – August 9

meet our instructors and find complete program details at

wheretherebedragons.com

cambodia

23


24

myanmar June 29 – July 29 a g e s 17 - 2 0

Magnetic. Inspiring. Devout. Myanmar is a nation of warmth, beauty and complexity. Through service-learning and multifarious windows into the world of development,

we uncover significant pieces of the puzzle of Myanmar: how has a country so rich in culture and religion struggled politically and economically for more than fifty years? Our course begins in one of the old capitals, Bego, where we dive into an intensive meditation retreat at a forest monastery, surrounded by monsoon rains and lush greenery. From Bego, our next destination is in the furthest reaches of northern Myanmar: the foothills of the Himalayas. By volunteering with a

myanmar: service & development a

grassroots

journey

through

Southeast

Asia’s

conservation organization and exploring the uses of alternative energy, students gain firsthand perspective of Myanmar’s development on the grassroots level. We follow our work with a trek to remote villages that have rarely seen foreigners, staying with, and learning from, families who live in this mountainous and isolated region. Boat, train, bus, and ox-cart: our adventure down to Mandalay is as creative as it is scenically enchanting. Once settled in Myanmar’s second largest city, students volunteer at either a local monastic school or at a public health organization. In Bagan we bike among architectural wonders. We also learn about one of the poorest and most famine-stricken areas of Myanmar, the dry-zone. In Yangon, the largest city and economic capital, we continue our focus on service-learning by volunteering in small groups according to interest and paired with Burmese students as cultural ambassadors. Balancing long days of service, we meet with experts from a variety of fields to deepen our understanding of development, contemporary Southeast Asian issues, and the presence and impact of international actors.

for itineraries, prices, application and enrollment info, visit us at

least

known

country

“The most impactful moment, other than the whole trip itself, was the work I did at my service site. I loved the fact that we were given the opportunity to choose a site to work at independently. I think that is an opportunity few students have in foreign countries.” Alexander Weisman, Myanmar

wheretherebedragons.com

or call 800.982.9203


Celebes Sea

Manado

Borneo

A collection of 17,000 islands, boasting pristine rainforest, brilliant coral reefs, hillsides of verdant green rice paddies and dramatic volcanic mountains, Indonesia is home to extraordinary cultural and

Luwuk

Morowali Tana Toraja

Sulawesi Makassar

Indonesia Banda Sea Ubud, Bali

an

eco-adventure,

biological diversity. Beginning in Yogyakarta, we delve into rich artistic traditions, plant and harvest rice with farmers, hike a volcano to greet the sunrise, and learn to cook tasty local dishes. From Yogyakarta, we fly to Makassar on the island of Sulawesi, where we begin the second chapter of our adventure in the Tana Toraja region of the southern highlands. A trek through cascading rice terraces and mist covered mountains brings us to remote villages where we stay in the tongkonan (ancestral houses) with their other worldly winged bamboo roofs that resemble spaceships. Here we explore the deep connections between Torajan religion and nearly every facet of daily life. The last leg of our journey takes us to the Wakatobi islands to stay with the Bajau people (commonly known as “sea nomads�) who live most of their lives on the water. In fact, our host village of stilted bamboo huts is entirely disconnected from land! While in home-stays with the Bajau, we learn about the impacts of

exploring

island

culture,

conservation

&

development

indonesia: culture & conservation see program component comparisons in cover foldout

fishing practices on coral reefs, deforestation of mangrove forests, and the effects of development on the unique Bajau sea culture. We also have the chance to dive beneath the surface to snorkel the world-class reefs of the Wakatobi Marine Reserve. Indonesia students come away with a first-hand perspective of how indigenous cultures and environments are adapting for survival in the modernizing world.

June 29 – August 9 a g e s 17 - 2 0 meet our instructors and find complete program details at

wheretherebedragons.com

indonesia

25


26

Life in the

himalayas – influenced on so many levels by the tenets and aesthetic of

Buddhist tradition – teaches us to explore and embrace the unknown with tolerance, openness, curiosity, and compassion. Featuring a unique balance of program components, Dragons’ Himalaya programs match the intensity of the physical experience

with the intensity of the spiritual experience, providing students with an opportunity unlike any other, to explore intimacy and 2 summer programs in north india nepal

openness within a small group setting. Dragons adventurers in this mystical and remote region relish in culturally-intimate interactions, profound self-exploration and cultivation, and some of the greatest trekking on Earth.


27

High on the “Roof of the World” the sun shines brighter than anywhere else, and the harsh realities of the climate shape the character of the people and the ways in which they pass their days. It is not uncommon during a Dragons’ Himalaya program to join our hosts in the fields: harvesting barley or mustard seed; grazing sheep and goats; or milking dri, female yaks, a staple life source in an environment that

produces limited basic commodities. In these lands, Buddhist religion pulses through all aspects of daily life and through all levels of society. No matter our location, in cities, rural villages, or atop high mountain passes, we are never far from extraordinary places of worship.

“Nate scored his Dragons trip an ‘11’ on a scale of 1-10. He arrived home dirty and smelly, but more mature, thoughtful and with a greater understanding of that part of the world. He also learned about himself and had a great sense of accomplishment from finishing the trek; he had never done anything as physically challenging before. The course exceeded our expectations in every way.” K a r e n Z u c h e r, p a r e n t , H i m a l a y a n A d v e n t u r e

“Matt has grown so much: in his ability to connect to his higher and inner self, ability to be present, and in his intelligence and heart. I wish I could be 17 and be a part of Dragons. Thank you with all our heart.” Parent of Matthew Friedman, India Himalaya


28

north india June 28 – August 8 a g e s 16 - 18

Our journey to the roof of the world begins in Ladakh, North India. Known as “Little Tibet” Ladakh is an area of striking physical similarity to

Tibet’s westerly Ngari Province; the only boundary separating Ladakh from Ngari is the India-China border. In and around Leh, we engage in service projects and sit before Buddhist philosophers, teachers, and environmentalists who present on their traditions and the threats to the area’s cultural, ecological, and economic livelihood. Our journey then takes us to the Tibet border and the remote Changthang Plateau, a land of herders and nomads; it is also an area that

“This trip was simply AMAZING! I always thought of how by just being here, it would be a life changing experience, but it was meeting new people and listening to their perspectives that really made the experience more significant. I wouldn’t change a single aspect of the trip.” Judith Garcia, North India

north india: roof of the world cultural

survival,

Buddhist

tradition

and

rugged

marks the safe end to many Tibetans’ pilgrimage from the east. At the high alpine reserve of Lake Tso Moriri, situated at over 15,000 feet, we visit herding encampments, participate in a self-directed ecological preservation project, and prepare for a challenging 9-day trek crossing out of Ladakh and into Himachal Pradesh. In Spiti, we explore rarely-visited monasteries, learn about meditative practice, and discover the timeless beauty of traditional Buddhist architecture, arts and iconography. We settle in for an extended home-stay in the high mountain villages of Komik and Langza, where we work in the fields, sip endless cups of chai tea, and witness yet another variation of life in the Indian Himalaya. We conclude our program in Dharamsala, working at the Tibetan Children’s Village, volunteering with Gu Chu Sum’s ex-political prisoner’s organization, attending dance and music classes at the Tibetan Institute of Performing Arts, practicing traditional thangka painting at the Norbulingka Institute, and visiting with prominent regional scholars, high lamas, and well respected community leaders. for itineraries, prices, application and enrollment info, visit us at

exploration

Pakistan

▲ ▲ ▲ Zanskar Range

of

Ladakh

Tibet

Leh Manali

Nepal

Delhi

India Arabian Sea

wheretherebedragons.com

Bay of Bengal

or call 800.982.9203


Home to over 100 castes and ethnic groups, Nepal’s stunning landscape is strewn with myriad Buddhist and Hindu temples waiting to be explored. While engaging

China

Leh

in the daily realities of Newaris, Sherpas, Gurungs, Tamangs, Magars, Thar, Limbus,

Tibet

Delhi

Nepal Kathmandu

India

Bhutan Sikkim

cultural

diversity,

the

and ethnic Tibetans, we learn about the many social and spiritual constructs that frame identity, community, and personal well-being. Our Nepal journey takes us into steep, terraced valleys – set against the earth’s tallest mountains – where we examine development pressures on both the cultural and natural environments. We begin our Nepal program in the medieval town of Bhaktapur, where we spend a few days orienting ourselves to our new physical and cultural surroundings. We then move into Kathmandu and are welcomed by our generous home-stay families. We also begin our work with our ISP mentors. Local scholars and activists join us at our Program House to share their insights on Nepal’s history, politics and culture. From Kathmandu we trek into the foothills of the Himalaya to explore rural Nepali village life and enjoy a home-stay amongst the high-mountain farming community of Chaukati. As we

arts,

and

the

prominence

of

spiritual

tradition

nepal: traditions of the himalayas see program component comparisons in cover foldout

settle into the slower pace of agrarian life we learn about subsistence living, and we offer our time and energy to a service project that works within the unique cultural and religious weave of the village. Depending on the weather, we hike 3 to 5 days into hills that rest below soaring Himalayan peaks. Before heading back to Kathmandu, we participate in a two-day Buddhist meditation retreat in the village of Pharping. Our Nepal program concludes in Bhaktapur where students have an opportunity to build on their learning by organizing many of the final daily activities, projects and excursions. a g e s 17 - 2 0 June 28 – July 28

meet our instructors and find complete program details at

wheretherebedragons.com

nepal

29


30

The drum sounds, the sun beats relentlessly,

neighbors gather under the mango tree to share tea

in

africa

There are those of us who are inexplicably called to the African continent. We come with a longing

to unveil our many preconceived conceptions of an often misunderstood land. Dragons’ Africa participants often aspire to return to a quintessential way of being – of interacting with neighbors and of revisiting an existence that sways

4 summer programs in senegal morocco rwanda jordan

with the cycles of the seasons. It is not uncommon on a Dragons’ Africa program to join our home-stay families toiling in the fields or milking cows; to dance unreservedly amidst encouraging on-lookers; to ceremoniously share a cup of tea for hours with neighbors; to meander through bustling markets.


31

When traveling in the deserts, villages and cities of the

middle east

students are struck by the contrast between profoundly ancient and progressively modern systems of thought, behavior and culture. The proverbial cradle of civilization, the lands incorporated within the modern day Levant are home to an ever-changing multitude of kingdoms, peoples, religions and cultures. So it was in ancient times, and so it is today.

Dragons’ Africa and Middle East programs are distinguished by a focus on human to human relationships with meaningful service work and generous home-stays. Also common to these programs is an inquisition into development, a submergence into authentic cultural experiences, and a comparison of traditional values juxtaposed with modernization.

“I am most proud of learning to let go of all inhibitions and dance. Dance for myself, for the group, for the world – to sing and laugh and be myself, and not to regret it. This was made possible with the support of the group and leaders. I also feel like I have developed a new level of acceptance and tolerance.” Julia Chanin, Senegal

“When people at home have asked me how this trip was, each time I have told them that it was ‘life-changing.’ ” Kennedy Edmonds, Jordan


32

senegal June 28 – July 28 a g e s 16 - 18

In Senegal, traditional rhythms, dance, art and terranga (the culture of giving) intersect with striking development issues; this is a program that

celebrates the beauty of daily life in a culturally rich and proud nation, while also probing the often harsh realities of an increasingly connected global economy. In Senegal we experience an authentic encounter with a country that embodies modern day Africa’s struggle between traditional values and globalization. We start our Senegalese journey in the city of Thies, where we spend a week learning the language, exploring colorful markets, visiting

“I loved our music and dance lessons. Not only does music say so much about a culture and a people, but it unites us. And no matter who we were with, how uncomfortable we were, or how strange it was, when the music began we were connected, we were unified.” Julia Chanin, Senegal

senegal: africa’s warm embrace authentic

exposure

to

the

welcoming

and

vibrant

nearby villages, and doing small scale community service art projects. From there we travel to the east and watch the flat desert landscape, scattered with ancient baobab trees, turn into lush, green forests. We settle in the Kedougou region, where we spend 10 days trekking in the foothills of the Guinean mountains. We leave the hills for the southern region of Kolda and spend a week doing home-stays in rural Pulaar villages, with each student living in a small, thatched hut family compound. Along the way we practice the local dialects; engage in lessons focused on international development, and the economic, political, and historical contours of the country; we eat in communal bowls with our hands; and we make lasting connections with the individuals who are kind enough to open their homes to us. As a group, we see that amidst the daily hardships and poverty, it is the character of the Senegalese people that make one so quickly and so completely fall in love with this country.

for itineraries, prices, application and enrollment info, visit us at

culture

of

Senegal

Mauritania Saint Louis

Thies DAKAR

Senegal Tambacounda

The Gambia

Mali Kolda

Guinea Bissau

wheretherebedragons.com

Kedougou

Guinea

or call 800.982.9203


33

Wandering through ancient Moroccan markets that lie within historic walls of city medinas, you are sure to think that you’ve entered another time.

Spain Portugal

Carefully balanced mounds of spices – red, green, brown and deep ochre – flank narrow paths that wind through a labyrinthine souq (or market place). Hiking along trade routes and nomadic enclaves that have been traversed for hundreds of years, we experience a Morocco that few travelers encounter. While living in remote villages, we are immersed in Morocco’s unrivaled hospitality; families welcome us as kin and our cups of sweet mint tea are never empty. In the imperial cities of Fes and Marrakech, we stumble upon the melodic sounds of people bargaining in Arabic and the fragrance of exotic spices. Surrounded by such an onslaught to the senses, it is difficult to remember that just a few hours hike will bring us to mud huts in the mountains. Though Morocco shows us a land of great differences, we come to see how devotion to Islam unites the indigenous Amazigh and the Arab. Our time in Morocco

Rabat Casablanca Marrakech

Morocco

Algeria Western Sahara Mauritania

hospitality,

faith

and

spirituality...from

mountain

ranges

to

ancient

cities

and

villages

morocco: crossroads of mountains & faith see program component comparisons in cover foldout

provides us profound opportunities to learn about the history and tradition of Islam and Muslim culture. Whether outside an intricately decorated mosque in Casablanca or walking an unpaved road in a tranquil mountain town, we are always sure to encounter the Call to Prayer, and are reminded five times a day that among the vastly disparate lives of Morocco’s people, Islamic culture, faith and devotion continues to bring families and communities together as it has for the last 1300 years. a g e s 16 - 18 June 28 – July 28

meet our instructors and find complete program details at

wheretherebedragons.com

morocco


34

rwanda June 28 – August 8 a g e s 17 - 2 0

“I loved the range of experiences I got to participate in – there was time for everything. To exercise my body and mind, to play, to learn by doing, to sit and reflect. The most exciting part is being able to take it all home – my trip really doesn’t end here.”

Marked by a tragic past, this land of innate beauty is one of stark ironies. On our journey through “The Land of a Thousand Hills,” we

discover that despite the genocide that made this country known to the world in the early ’90s, Rwanda is comprised of an easy-going people who are working towards making their motherland into a model of development leading the way for nations throughout the continent. We begin our journey in Rwanda with an inquisition into modern culture and how it intersects with the multilayered complexities of history; learning the basics of Kinyarwanda

Julia Reichelstein, Rwanda

rwanda: transforming conflict peace

and

conflict

resolution

in

the

land

and French, visiting the well-crafted Kigali genocide memorial site, exploring the market, and hearing Rwandans of various backgrounds speak of their experiences and perspectives. Heading north, we acquire our first taste of rural life as we set out on foot traversing lovely green hills and meandering from village to village, staying with local families and participating in daily life. Continuing on to the sleepy intellectual center of Butare, we settle into 7-10 days of one-on-one home-stays. We then return to the countryside and enjoy a rural home-stay, living with local farmers whose terraced parcels of patch-worked land blanket the hilly landscape. Participating in a “live-in” service project, we stay in an orphanage that is home to children whose lives have been affected by the 1994 genocide. Investigating the complexities of recent history, sleeping side-by-side with Rwandan families, and diving into multifarious issues around peace and conflict resolution, we begin to bridge lives separated by seemingly different life circumstances and diverse cultures. for itineraries, prices, application and enrollment info, visit us at

of

a

thousand

hills

Uganda

DR Congo

Ruhengeri

Lake Kivu

Rwanda KIGALI Kibuye

Butare

wheretherebedragons.com

Tanzania Burundi

or call 800.982.9203


Turkey

struck by the contrast between profoundly ancient and progressively modern systems

Syria Lebanon Damascus

Israel Jerusalem

Amman Madaba

Iraq

Jordan Egypt

Wadi Rum Aqaba

Saudi Arabia

35

A bedouin in traditional red shamagh sends text messages from his iPhone. When traveling in the deserts, villages and cities of the Levant, students are of thought, behavior and culture. The proverbial cradle of civilization, the lands incorporated within modern day Jordan are home to an ever-changing multitude of kingdoms, peoples, religions and cultures. Our adventure begins in the Jordanian port city of Aqaba, where we settle into local lodgings and begin our studies in language and culture. After acclimatizing to south Jordan, we head north to Wadi Rum, the heart of Bedouin territory, where we trek along Lawrence of Arabia’s famed path to the beginning of the Arab Revolt. From Wadi Rum, we travel to the ancient Nabatean city of Petra, where we explore the ancient city by day and spend our nights with families in a local Bedouin village. From Petra, we travel down into the Jordan Valley for an exploration of the ecological challenges facing this desert nation. Highlights include visits to the Dead Sea and a community-run nature reserve. Our visit to the

crossroads

of

tradition

and

modernity

jordan: arabic language & culture see program component comparisons in cover foldout

Jordan Valley also takes us to Lot’s Cave and Jesus’ Baptism site, allowing us to consider the confluence of faiths found in the Levant. From the Jordan Valley, we travel north to Madaba where we are welcomed once again by local families. In Madaba we spend a week soaking up the rhythms of small town life while working with local NGOs. Our program concludes with a student-led expedition to further reaches of Jordan or, depending on the political climate, a week-long trip to neighboring Israel.

meet our instructors and find complete program details at

a g e s 16 - 18 4 wk: June 28 – July 28 6 wk: June 28 – Aug. 8

wheretherebedragons.com

jordan


36

Find yourself beyond the ranges

latin america in

You will stand in the silent mist-shrouded ancient temples; you will navigate the colorful bustle of modern cities; and you

will learn from indigenous elders and experts in development to weave together a new and challenging vision of the Americas. Our Latin America journeys lead us through the cobbled streets of colonial cities where the contagious rhythm of

4 summer programs in guatemala bolivia peru nicaragua

salsa music drifts past the gilded facades of impressive cathedrals. Trekking to isolated villages tucked deep in the folds of the sacred Andes Mountains, we wake to the sound of llamas being herded to pasture as host families prepare a simple breakfast over an open fire. On a river barge we travel deep into the heart of the Amazon rainforest where we tackle the challenges faced by indigenous tribes and world-class scientists as they struggle to negotiate


37

critical conservation and development strategies. On a Dragons’ Latin America program, expect to hone your Spanish language skills; dive into current issues such as immigration and trade; explore topics related to indigenous movements, conquest, revolution, and social justice; get your

hands dirty in an environmental service project; and participate in the uncommon beauty, diversity and warmth of life within the jungles and mountains that form the map’s edge.

“When Robbie first got home, we talked all night. He was somewhat reluctant to tell me his favorite part of his trip. Finally, he did. No, it wasn’t the fun of traveling with 11 other likeable and intelligent kids, the delight of swimming in a jungle lake or the joy of seeing Tikal. Best of all, was Robbie’s stay with the indigenous women in San Juan Cotzal because he got to work with them and get to know them personally.” S u e R o s s i t e r, G u a t e m a l a

“I feel like I truly understand who I am now. This trip has given me confidence, comfort, and awareness within myself. Most importantly, I feel inspired to pursue true happiness, no matter what.” Grady Lenkin, Peru


guatemala

38

4 wk: June 28 – July 28 6 wk: June 28 – Aug. 8 a g e s 15 - 17

Guatemala is the “land of eternal spring” where surreal landscapes dominated by towering active volcanoes cradle the rich cultural heritage of the

resiliently colorful Maya peoples. Through this lush and textured land Dragons’ Guatemala course travels to remote communities to study with professional Spanish instructors in personalized one-on-one lessons while engaging in authentic home-stays and meaningful service learning projects. Passing through quaint colonial cities such as Chichicastenango, we explore the dazzling colors of indigenous markets and bear witness to smoky fires of local

“Listening to Armando and Alfredo taught me the most about what kind of person I want to be – self-aware, intelligent, selfless, thoughtful and humble. If every day I get a little closer to being like them, then this trip was a priceless experience.”

guatemala: el mundo maya a

language

intensive

journey

through

Maya

culture...ancient

cities,

ceremonies while learning about struggles for indigenous rights and political representation. On the shores of Lake Atitlan, the birthplace of the Q’iche people, we dance and play with local children at La Cambalacha, an arts center for local youth, and learn about the ambiguous effects of tourism and development. Turning north we stroll amidst thousands year old temples jutting up through rainforest canopy where only macaws and monkeys provide the music. Throughout our journey we focus on improving our Spanish language skills while exploring the riveting story of the Maya culture, from pre-Columbian glory through cycles of conquest and revolution, to contemporary plights for national ethnic recognition and basic human rights.

for itineraries, prices, application and enrollment info, visit us at

vibrant

B e n j a m i n M e r c e r- G o l d e n , Guatemala 4 week

communities

Mexico Tikal

Belize

Guatemala Cobán Todos Santos Guatemala City

Santiago Atitlan

Honduras

Antigua

wheretherebedragons.com

El Salvador

or call 800.982.9203


39

The Andes and Amazon region of Bolivia is defined by breathtaking contrasts and unimaginable cultural and natural beauty. Diving from the snowcapped peaks of the Andes, over twenty thousand feet down to the steamy lush canopy of the Amazon rainforest, the region challenges and inspires travelers to expose themselves to the wisdom and strength of their surroundings. In isolated valleys of the Andean highlands, we partake in the profound joy and simple grace that characterizes communal life amongst the Quechua and Aymara cultures while introducing cultural and ecological relationships and studying Spanish Language. Moving to the colonial city of La Paz we meet with political and NGO leaders, turning our attention to critical challenges and valiant strategies for community development and political representation. Heading out of the mountains we trek Incan pathways to the Amazon, learning about the majesty of this unique

Brazil Peru Amazon Basin Cordillera Apolobamba Lake Titicaca

Sorata Cordillera Real LA PAZ

Bolivia

Pacific Ocean

Chile

rugged

Paraguay Argentina

exploration

of

ancient

cultures,

Andean

peaks

and

the

depths

bolivia: diversity & development see program component comparisons in cover foldout

ecosystem and the compelling need for sustainable cultural and environmental conservation strategies before settling back into La Paz to conclude our epic adventure. Our journey takes us to the mountains and forests that make up the maps edge, highlighting unparalleled trekking and wilderness exploration, rural home-stays, examination of indigenous rights, and the opportunity to hone Spanish language skills.

meet our instructors and find complete program details at

wheretherebedragons.com

a g e s 17 - 19 4 wk: June 28 – July 28 6 wk: June 28 – Aug. 8

bolivia

of

the

Amazon

Basin


40

peru 4 wk: June 28 – July 28 6 wk: June 28 – Aug. 8 a g e s 16 - 18

Imagine yourself on a high mountain pass, with the snow-capped Andes behind you, and the site of parrots gliding through a verdant orchid-filled

rainforest canopy below. These moments in nature, coupled with the cultural traditions of the Quechua people of Peru teach us that the mountains really are alive; they are mystical beings, or apus, working alongside the pachamama or mother earth to sustain life. Through community home-stays and rugged exploration of remote wilderness, our Peru course celebrates in the warmth of communal and cultural life while delving into complex development issues, such as

peru: sacred mountains development

and

culture

through

service

and

“The strengths of this program are the off-thebeaten-path aspect, the strong philosophy espoused and that you treat the kids like responsible adults to help make them become responsible adults.” Parent of Zander Abranowicz Peru 4-week

wilderness

education, health, tourism, and globalization. By immersing ourselves into the daily lives of Peruvian people, we have the opportunity to engage in challenging service-learning projects while celebrating the beauty and resilience of Andean culture. Farming potatoes and wheat we learn from local artisans, spiritual healers, and community leaders about the Andean culture, past and present. We also briefly visit the stunning Amazon basin, floating down rivers winding through some of the most biologically diverse terrain on the planet. The Peru program is rugged and challenging and is ideal for students who are looking to develop their leadership skills and for those who seek to engage themselves with a hands-on understanding of critical development issues in Latin America. Expect to hone your Spanish, live closely with remote indigenous communities, and trek through awe-inspiring terrain as you discover profound new relationships between yourself and the world around you.

exploration

Ecuador

Peru

Brazil

Satipo Chiquian Lima Cusco Puno

Bolivia

Lago Titicaca

Chile

for itineraries, prices, application and enrollment info, visit us at

wheretherebedragons.com

or call 800.982.9203


Central America: a narrow strip of steaming jungles and fiery volcanoes, is the earth’s most recent major land formation, and a melting pot of cultural and biological diversity. At its heart lays Nicaragua, the “land of lakes Guatemala Honduras Nicaragua

El Salvador Estelí

Matagalpa

León

H

MANAGUA

Granada

Pacific Ocean

Costa Rica

service,

spanish

and volcanoes,” and a hotbed of innovative community response to the rapid changes of globalization. With an emphasis on community based service-learning, intimate home-stays, and exceptional language instruction, our Nicaragua program allows students to learn directly from community activists, famers, and NGOs working for social justice and sustainability. In the picturesque colonial city of Esteli, we deepen our understanding of Spanish language and the burning social issues of Latin America while immersing ourselves in the warm hospitality of Latin Culture through intimate home-stays. Hiking through mystical cloud forests in the Miraflor Nature Reserve we arrive in small farming villages to roll up our sleeves and get dirty, working on permaculture projects, building solar ovens, and making life-giving

language,

social

justice

and

sustainable

farming

nicaragua: cultivating change see program component comparisons in cover foldout

compost with local experts. On the island of Ometepe, we summit the Concepcion volcano and visit lush coffee and banana plantations that skirt its base. The Nicaragua program provides rich cultural immersion that allows students to gain a deep understanding of important social issues facing Latin America while greatly improving their Spanish language and exploring new skills in farming and sustainable development. a g e s 16 - 18 June 28 – July 28

meet our instructors and find complete program details at

wheretherebedragons.com

nicaragua

41


42

our gap year and college-accredited

semester For young adults,

programs

eager to expand their world, views and experience, we have developed

college accredited 13-week semester programs With unique and carefully selected home-stays, abundant opportunities to delve deeply into an internship or Independent Study Project, and

8 semester programs, each in fall and spring

opportunities for extensive community service work, Dragons semester courses provide forward thinking students deep encounters with people and cultures of developing nations. On a Dragons semester course, you may apprentice in a new art form; you may choose to learn a new musical instrument; you may explore a new discipline in body control; and you may significantly


43

impact the lives of the people you meet through constructive service work. On all of our semester programs we provide excellent language instruction. Our Program Houses provide students classroom and meeting space, use of our stocked libraries, and gathering areas for performances and celebrations. After thirteen weeks in a developing nation, exploring the country through carefully designed program components, our semester students return home better informed, vital, and inspired to pursue more focused interests in college and the adult world.

Through Naropa University, students may opt to take up to four accredited courses per semester. For further details, please visit www.wheretherebedragons.com or call the Dragons office at 800.982.9203.

“A profound experience of heart, mind and body. You have opened a door for my daughter, one that has expanded her as a person as no book/movie/or conversation could ever do. Thank you, thank you.” Parent of Frankee Grove, India Semester

“The greatest compliment that Marjorie paid Dragons was that she wished she had done it BEFORE she did her other (shorter) gap programs. Her experience with Dragons showed her HOW TO LOOK at the world around her, not simply put one foot in front of the other.” Parent of Marjorie Isaacs, Indonesia Semester


44

central america sem. F e b r u a r y 9 – M a y 12 Sept. 6 – Dec. 8

Central America...this narrow strip of steaming jungles and fiery volcanoes unites two massive continents and splits the world’s largest oceans. Rising out ot the sea at a confluence of five tectonic plates, this causeway of cultures

and ecological diversity is an explosion of rapid biological and cultural change. Today the countries of Central America continue their historic legacy of adaptation, responding to environmental and social challenges with innovative communal strategies. The Central America Semester takes a hands-in-the-dirt approach to understanding indigenous culture and collective life in Guatemala, Nicaragua and El Salvador through extended rural home-stays, one-on-one language study, work on communal farms, and a participatory examination of land-use and grass roots activism. In the western highlands of Guatemala, over eighty percent of the population is indigenous Maya who maintain a legacy of rich cultural survival and community strength in the face of diverse external pressures. Living with indigenous families, working the fields, and learning Spanish, we begin our semester with an land use and social justice along the intercontinental land bridge experiential understanding of Mesoamerican culture and the legacy of conquest and resistance that has played out here for five hundred years. Herbal healers, weavers, and community leaders share their arts and experience while conversations with local NGOs working in human rights, community health, and development provide opportunities to get involved in contemporary struggles for continuity and change in Guatemalan society. Embarking on a two-week adventure we pass through the seldomtravelled Ixil Triangle before heading south to El Salvador where we learn about its civil war history. While considering the United States’ history of involvement in the region, we meet up with local non-profits to learn about the solidarity work they undertake with supportive US organizations. Our final destination is Nicaragua, where communities have long relied on local solutions to social and environmental challenges. In the face of political strife, devastating war, and rapid globalization, these communities have joined together and come up with creative and revolutionary responses in the form of radical people’s movements, progressive organizations, and innovative appropriate technologies. While living in homes with local farmers and continuing with their one-on-one Spanish instruction, students Mexico learn about the revolution, participate in local agricultural co-ops, intern with NGOs, partake in the annual coffee harvest and meet some of the friendliest folk in this part of the world. Belize Through a rugged and authentic exploration of some of the most remote regions of Central Guatemala Quetzaltenango Honduras H America, the “Roots of Rebellion” semester seeks to unearth the complex myriad issues facing Guatemala City indigenous and peasant communities working towards development and conservation today. With Nicaragua El Salvador Spanish lessons, rural home-stays on organic farms and service learning at the forefront, this H Managua semester program provides an experiential and fresh perspective on relationships with land and Costa community organization. Rica

central america: seeds of change

Pacific Ocean

Panama

for itineraries, prices, application and enrollment info, visit us at

wheretherebedragons.com

or call 800.982.9203


Accredited Courses, college credit optional

Spanish Language 101, 201, 301 Ancient Andes, Modern Andes: Cultural Change and Social Movement in the Andean Highlands, Anthropology and Sociology Cultural and Agricultural Ecology: Environmental Studies and Anthropology Independent Study Project

Brazil

Peru Cusco Cordillera Apolobama Puno Lake Titicaca

Sorata LA PAZ Cordillera Real

Bolivia Pacific Ocean

45

This land of the Incas contains a fascinating mix of ancient civilizations and dramatic landscapes placed in a modern context of political change and cultural identity issues. Through intensive

Chile

cultural,

Spanish language courses, numerous service learning opportunities, rugged travel and independent study, Dragons’ Andes & Amazon semester explores the links between dramatic landscapes and rich cultures, past and present. All roads lead to La Paz and our time in Bolivia as well as Southern Peru will revolve around this bustling center, beginning in and returning to this nook in the Andes with its colorful and stimulating markets; its palpable sense of important political, economic and social change; and its proud cultural heritage and warm hospitality. Our first rural home-stay is deep in the Apolobamba Mountains along the Peruvian border to the north, one of the most remote corners of the Andes. Here we live with Kallawaya families, a culture renowned for its lineage of healers, fortune-tellers and shaman. Following a 6-day trek in the Apolobamba, we move to our base in Sorata for the next month. Sitting at a temperate 6,000 feet, Sorata is stunningly beautiful, perched on a ridge below two 21,000 foot peaks, some of the highest in the Andes. In Sorata we develop ISPs with themes as varied as traditional weaving and current politics, Andean music and agriculture. A traditional hacienda style farm perched on the banks of a rushing mountain stream will act as our classroom and program house. Here we begin studies in cultural ecology by exploring the intricate links between the rich cultural heritage and natural landscape of the Andes region. We meet daily with language instructors who guide us through intensive Spanish-language courses. At night, we bed down in traditional Aymara households. Our time in Sorata is also defined by the collaborative work we do with the Sorata environmental

and

political

diversity

in

Bolivia

and

Southern

Pe r u

andes & amazon

Youth Association, affording opportunities to learn about leadership, grassroots development and youth-empowerment through sustainable development and service projects. The contrast between barren high-alpine landscapes and lush tropical jungle is nowhere more stark than where the Andes meet the Amazon. To see this transition intimately, we next trek along pre-Incan trails known as “the path of gold” that dive down into the unimaginably lush Amazon rainforest. Rising back up from the Amazon to the higher climes of Peru, we arrive at Cuzco, the heart of Incan culture and a historic colonial Spanish city. From here we take excursions into the Sacred Valley and we visit Machu Picchu, studying pre-Hispanic civilization and eco-tourism. We finish our time in Peru by visiting the surreal Lake Titicaca, with additional studies of pre-Columbian Tiahuanaco and Incan cultures amid this famous mythological birthplace of Andean civilization.

February 9 – May 12 Sept. 6 – Dec. 8

andes/amazon sem.

visit us at

wheretherebedragons.com

see program component comparisons on cover foldout

for itineraries, prices, application and enrollment info, or call 800.982.9203


indonesia semester

46

Spanning from Malaysia to Australia, with over 17,000 equatorial islands, Indonesia hosts the world’s highest level of biodiversity and one of the richest cultural tapestries on earth. Dragons’ Indonesia semester

F e b r u a r y 9 – M a y 10 Sept. 6 – Dec. 6

is an ethnographic adventure that explores remote communities and ecosystems that are rarely seen by outsiders. Our program begins in Yogyakarta, on the island of Java. In this center for arts and culture, ritual crafts of gamelan, Javanese dance and shadow puppetry are dutifully studied and expertly performed as they have been for centuries. During our four-week home-stay and while apprenticing with local masters, we begin to understand how the region’s lush volcanic landscape informs myriad aspects of the Javanese worldview. From Java, we head east to the island of Sulawesi and into the Tana Toraja region of the southern highlands, home of extraordinary

indonesia: community, culture, conservation Tongkonan architecture. Starting in the city of Rantepeo, we visit the famous buffalo market and wander the labyrinth of coffee and spice stalls. We then trek through terraced rice paddies and along mountain ridges. Living in home-stays, students are honored guests at a week-long funeral ceremony – a celebrated event that has brought international attention to Torajan culture. We then travel by boat to the southeastern archipelago of Wakatobi, an extraordinary National Marine Park and home to the Bajau people (otherwise known as “sea nomads”). Staying in the stilted bamboo huts of Sampela, students learn about Bajau culture, practices, and religion. We snorkel world-class coral reefs, learn from host fathers how to fish with spears and nets, attend indigenous ceremonies, visit endangered mangrove ecosystems, and look at various paradigms of environmental conservation. Heading east we travel to the mysterious Bandas, a small group of 10 volcanic islands famous as a source of nutmeg and cloves. Featuring dramatic volcanic formations draped in luxuriant vegetation and uninhabited islands wrapped in white sand beaches, the Celebes Sea Bandas boasts the world’s most biodiverse marine Map environment and much of our stay is spent Kalimantan studying coral reef ecology and learning about the area’s rich marine life. We then Luwuk (Borneo) visit Seram, where we find ourselves in a jungle based home-stay with the people of Lore Lindu Morowali National Park Reserve The Moluccas Masihulan. We learn to weave waterproof baskets from harvested rattan, cook Tana Toraja traditional Moluccan dishes, volunteer in the local school, harvest and prepare sago, Kendari Ambon and take part in forest ecology lessons. Through meetings with local villagers, we learn firsthand about the many ways in which deforestation and land management Makassar Banda Sea affects local communities. Traveling by boat up the Salawai River, students spend a Wakatobi few nights in the stunning rainforest of Manusela National Park. We seek out rainbow lorikeets, salmon-crested cockatoos and giant fruit bats. From the forest, we head Flores Island back to the small village of Sawai, set serenely on a peaceful bay, where students Ubud, Bali prepare for the final leg of their journey and their student-led expedition. Sumba Island Timor Leste

semester

in

indonesia

Raja Ampat Islands

Wahai

Seram Island

Mak

assa

r St rait

a

AUSTRALIA

for itineraries, prices, application and enrollment info, visit us at

wheretherebedragons.com

or call 800.982.9203


47

From high on the northeast corner of the Tibetan Plateau flows Southeast Asia’s most important life source: the Mekong River. Running its 4,800km-course from the sacred headwaters in the

Tibet

Mt.Kawa Karpo

Sichuan

< M eko

India

China

ng Riv er

Yunnan Kunming

Burma Sipsongpanna Luang Prabang Vientiane

South China Sea

Laos Thailand 4000 Islands Bangkok

Cambodia Tonlé Sap

Gulf of Thailand

Kratie

Vietnam Phnom Penh

Ho Chi Minh City

Mekong Delta

barren Tibetan high country, the river rumbles through the mountains of southwest China and into the heart of Southeast Asia, finally reaching the South China Sea in southern Vietnam. To the Tibetans, the Zaqu (Upper Mekong) is the powerful, mystical entity that shapes the dramatic valleys in which they practice their spiritual traditions. In China, the river is known as the Lancang Jiang, and is home to some of the country’s richest ecological and cultural biodiversity. Yet China’s interest in the Mekong is more about feeding the country’s teeming population and rampant economic development than ecological management. We begin our program along the southeast rim of the Tibetan Plateau, in a remote corner of China’s Yunnan Province. We trek through unimaginably beautiful mountains; learn about Tibetan culture; visit the sites of China’s controversial mega-dam projects; and take a hard look at issues related to development on the local scale, such as modernization, forced relocation, and disregard for minority cultures. Crossing into Laos, we explore the provinces of Luang Nam Tha, Bokeo, and Udomxai, all of which are considered some of the most remote regions in Southeast Asia. Based in rural home-stays, we study basic Lao language, engage in mentored studies, learn about sustainable tourism, contribute to local service efforts, explore the area by foot and by bicycle, and spend our afternoons on day hikes, exploring local markets, playing soccer, or cooling off with local children in the slow currents of the river. From Luang Prabang, we dive deeper into the heart of Southeast Asia,

socio-cultural

and

environmental

impacts

of

development

in

Southeast

Asia

life along the mekong

following the river into southern Laos where we explore famous Buddhist temples and Hindu ruins in Champasak, learn about coffee and banana cultivation on the Bolaven Plateau, and navigate the beautiful 4,000 islands of the Mekong, home of the rare Irawaddy river dolphin. Crossing into Cambodia, we learn about ancient empires, ethnic disputes and border politics, the tumultuous history of a region ravaged by war and genocide, and contemporary life along tributaries of the mighty Mekong. We conclude our voyage in Phnom Penh, where the mighty Mekong reverses the flow of tributary rivers each rainy season, filling up the Tonle Sap lake. At this critical point in the river’s ecology, we reflect on the long-term health of the area’s natural environment and we enjoy a powerful, reflective space to bring our great journey to a close. Dragons’ spring Mekong Semester begins in Cambodia and concludes at the February 9 – May 12 river’s source in the Tibetan Plateau. Sept. 6 – Dec. 8

mekong semester

visit us at

wheretherebedragons.com

see program component comparisons on cover foldout for itineraries, prices, application and enrollment info, or call 800.982.9203


48

west africa semester F e b r u a r y 9 – M a y 12 Sept. 6 – Dec. 9

A voyage to the African continent is often marked by an inexplicable calling: a longing to return to a simple way of being, where daily life deeply reflects a profound connection to the cycles

of the rainy season, where authentic interactions with neighbors abound, and where the enigmatic rhythms of political, spiritual, and cultural life reflect the circular pulse of ancient drum beats. Marked by an unyielding hospitality, West African culture embraces us from the onset as we begin our semester journey residing with families in the urban center of Thies, Senegal. Students dive into complex issues surrounding gender, human rights, traditional medicine, modernization, and the brotherhoods of Sufi Islam through NGO visits, guest lectures, music and dance lessons, collaborations with local schools, and ISP internships. We then leave the Baobabdotted desert of the north and head southeast into the rolling

the rhythm of west africa traditional

arts,

modern

development,

and

ritual

in

Senegal

and

Guinea

green hills of Kedougou. With packs on our backs, we embark on our inquisition into rural life much like the locals do: on foot. Sauntering down the dusty red road that leads past traditional earthen dwellings, we hike into neighboring Guinea, where we begin to investigate the stark disparity between urban and rural African communities. Continuing our investigation of the Fulani culture and agricultural society, we return to Senegal and settle into 2-3 weeks of rural home-stays in small villages located outside of the town of Kolda. Confronted by a vast hospitality in these bucolic farming communities, students engage in a small-scale development project addressing local health issues, observe grass roots decision-making processes, practice their language skills in weekly markets, continue with their drum and dance lessons, and authentically delve into the rhythms of African life while Mauritania milking cows, sleeping in mud huts and creating bonds with home-stay siblings. Our course progresses with a move into the urban centers of the north, where we are St. Louis welcomed by the animated cadence of Dakar and the easygoing tempo of the historic and quaint Senegal Thies settlement of St. Louis. We conclude our African journey in an alcove perched on cliffs above the DAKAR Tambacounda The Gambia sea, where we reflect upon our sojourn and the ease in which complete strangers who, at first Kolda Kedougou glance, appeared radically and unfathomably different, have transformed into people whom we Guinea Fouta Djallon Bissau Highlands leave calling “brother, sister, mother, father, grandma...” Labe Guinea

for itineraries, prices, application and enrollment info, visit us at

wheretherebedragons.com

or call 800.982.9203

Mali


China. Few countries evoke the same curiosity, myriad images, and intense fascination. With 5,000 years of history and an expansive tapestry of cultures, this country generously presents our Semester adventurers with a fascinating semester experience. With a full thirteen weeks, we seize the opportunity to understand the reality of China’s transition. Dragons’ semester in China does more than introduce the contemporary China that is seen in the country’s burgeoning cities; our course takes us deep among this country’s various faces and across disparate urban and rural landscapes. Exploring little-seen sides of this vast land, we challenge many preconceived Western notions about this country. We venture into remote areas where China is still dramatically underdeveloped. We explore regions of extraordinary natural beauty and rich cultural heritage. Inventive travel experiences are balanced with a strong language curriculum and a Accredited Courses, comprehensive, inter-disciplinary exploration of Modern Chinese history and economic development, society, college credit optional and cultural tradition. Kunming – southeast of the Tibetan Plateau, within a few days’ reach of either Burma or Laos – is our Chinese Language home for six weeks of the program. This 101, 201, 301 “city of eternal spring” is the capital of Modern Chinese History, China’s southwest Yunnan Province, and From 1911 to Present: it is an ideal location from which we Interdisciplinary Course explore Han Chinese/minority relations, in History and economic reforms and development, Political Science environmental concerns, and China’s rich history. Through classes, lectures, Social Issues in Modern discussions and mentorships we explore China: Interdisciplinary traditional Chinese approaches to healing, Course in the Humanities cooking, body discipline, art and music. Independent Study Project In Kunming, students live independently with Chinese host families, many of whom represent the “new a semester in southwest china Kazakstan class” within contemMongolia porary society. At the Beijing Dragons Program House, Shanhaiguan we gather for Chinese China language study, work on Yellow Xian Xiahe Sea Tibet Independent Study Projects, hear lectures from visiting scholars, and cook traditional meals with fresh foods Chengdu Ne pal purchased at the local market. Two travel segments bookend our Kunming experience, with options to sink deep into Central Asian Kunming India culture in China’s Northwestern Provinces, or traverse the dramatic valleys of the Hengduan Mountains in Northwestern Yunnan, or connect lost and forgotten Tibetan Buddhist Monasteries, or cross ancient stone bridges to link Southeastern villages. With a broad curriculum and an itinerary designed to explore both thriving urban centers and undeveloped villages, our China semester offers an unparalleled February 9 – May 10 comprehensive overview of today’s China. Sept. 6 – Dec. 6

49

china: south of the clouds

china semester

visit us at

wheretherebedragons.com

see program component comparisons on cover foldout for itineraries, prices, application and enrollment info, or call 800.982.9203


50

india semester Based in Varanasi, the City of Light, our India semester program immerses students in an intensely thriving community built along the banks of the Ganges River. Among the most

F e b r u a r y 9 – M a y 12 Sept. 6 – Dec. 8

sacred cities in India, Varanasi is a melting pot of ancient tradition, modern commerce and spiritual exploration. Depending on the season, we either begin or end our course with a mountain trek deep into the Indian Himalayas. To communicate the breadth and depth of Indian culture and the complexities of the modern Indian State, we embark on trips to Delhi, Calcutta, Agra and the Taj Mahal, and Bodghaya. However, it is our extended stay in Varanasi that frames this course, providing students an incredibly deep cultural encounter that encompasses extended home-stays, yoga instruction, artist internships, ISP studies, and service work. In Varanasi students see Hindus walk through dawn light for a ritual dip in their cherished Ganges, and they

visions of india Va r a n a s i ,

the

Ganges

and

other

sacred

places

learn as well from the communities of Buddhists, Accredited Courses, Jains, Muslims, Sikhs and college credit optional other devoted people who live and practice in Varanasi. Introductory Hindi Language It is in this inspirational celebration of life and Cultural Anthropology: transformation that we Life Along the Ganges River immerse ourselves. Students Examining Inequalities: live with welcoming families Disparate Social Conditions whose members might and Initiatives for Change include world-renowned sitar Independent Study Project and tabla players, traditional doctors, university professors, or local artisans. Daily language classes in Hindi not only help students communicate with Indian hosts, but with leaders of community service projects sponsored by schools, clinics, and environmental organizations. Independent Study Projects are a core component of Dragons India semester, giving students the chance to master new and fascinating skills, develop a fresh perspective on historical and social Tibet Afghanistan (China) issues, and practice traditional Indian art forms. While engaging in these studies, students also have the chance to Pakistan Gangotri Rishikesh explore some of the subcontinent’s most venerated and least-known places. From a trip to the Bodhi Tree and Nepal Temple at Bodhgaya, where the Buddha attained enlightenment, to traditional local villages rarely visited by Delhi Westerners, students witness what it means to live in India in the 21st century. In addition, they also have the Varanasi Calcutta opportunity to explore the life and culture that has flourished along this most sacred Indian river – from Gangotri India Glacier, the source of the Ganges in the Himalayas, to Calcutta, where the river empties into the Bay of Bengal. And throughout the journey, students and instructors collaborate to create spaces in which students discover new aspects Arabian Bay of of compassion and leadership and grow to better know themselves. Sea Bengal for itineraries, prices, application and enrollment info, visit us at

wheretherebedragons.com

or call 800.982.9203


51

The Himalayas. Since time immemorial, these colossal peaks with their vast web of rugged, isolated valleys and distinct ethnic groups have drawn only the most intrepid travelers from distant lands. Through rural and urban home-stays, ten days in a Buddhist monastery, trekking, service learning and independent study, Dragons’ Himalaya Semester students have the opportunity to explore this remarkable region and its people, encountering the ancient spiritual traditions which have deep roots in this mystical land. Our Himalaya Semester is based in the Kathmandu Valley, an ancient crossroads and melting pot of Himalayan peoples, where students encounter the convergence of deep traditions with modern life. While living with host families and studying Nepali language, students meet with local scholars and activists and learn about Nepal’s history, politics and culture while pursuing a wide range of independent study and service learning projects. From Kathmandu we hike into the foothills of the Himalaya to explore rural Nepali village life. We settle into a calmer pace of agrarian life, living without electricity and learning about subsistence living. We also venture high into the Himalayas of Nepal where we live within high altitude Buddhist farming communities and trek for a week at elevations reaching over 15,000 ft, a singularly unique journey through one of the most ruggedly beautiful and dramatic areas on earth. The study of religious traditions is a central component of our Himalaya semester, introducing students to a range of concepts in Buddhism, Hinduism and Shamanism. From academic discourse to hands on study, students find areas of personal interest to explore in depth during our time in Kathmandu. Bronze casting, jewelry making, stone carving, thangka (Buddhist iconography) painting, and music are just a few

Accredited Courses, college credit optional

Introduction to Nepali Language Comparative Religions of the Himalaya Cultural Anthropology of the Himalaya Independent Study Project China

Ladakh

Tibet

India

(China)

Nepal

Namtso

Dolpo Langtang Kathmandu

Sikkim

Terdom Lhasa

Mt. Everest

Bhutan

exploration

of

himalayan

culture,

religion

and

development

himalayan studies

of the apprenticeship opportunities available. Students interested in traditional medicine can work with a Tibetan doctor, or with Ayurvedic practitioners or shamanic healers. With a wide range of NGOs, Kathmandu also offers unparalleled opportunities to learn about the challenges and potential that Nepal’s traditional society faces as it intersects with rapid modernization. For those interested in community service projects, teaching English, volunteering in local orphanages, and participating in environmental awareness and HIV/AIDS education programs are just a few of the volunteer opportunities available. On our Himalaya Studies semester, students encounter the earth’s highest peaks and most extreme mountain terrain; however, it is the deep and meaningful interaction that we have with our host families, ISP mentors, and teachers that inspires a lifelong connection with this extraordinary land.

February 9 – May 10 Sept. 6 – Dec. 6

himalayan semester

visit us at

wheretherebedragons.com

see program component comparisons on cover foldout

for itineraries, prices, application and enrollment info, or call 800.982.9203


52

m e e t

a

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D r a g o n s

i n s t r u c t o r s

China

China Language

Silk Road

Burma

Thailand

Cambodia

North India Himalaya Semester

Stewart Motta

Sophie Mu

McKay Barrow

Michael Paller

Rachel Bonaiuto

Daniela Papi

Ziva Licul

B.A. East Asian Studies, Colorado College. Age 29.

M.A. in progress, School for Oriental and Asian Studies, England; B.A. in Chinese Literature, Yunnan University. Age 30.

M.A. Sociocultural Anthropology, University of California, Santa Barbara; B.A. Cultural Anthropology, Minor Chinese, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Age 36.

M.A. International Development Studies, Chulalongkorn University; B.A. Political Science and Sociology, Brandeis University. Age 32.

M.A. Somatic Counseling Psychology and Dance Movement Therapy, Naropa University; BA Psychology and Philosophy, Indiana University. Age 35.

M.A. in progress, Development Studies, Oxford University; B.A. Economics, University of Notre Dame. Age 34.

B.A. Sinology and Sociology of Culture, University of Ljubljana. Age 34.

Stew began his life in the ‘Middle Kingdom’ studying Mandarin at Beijing Educational Institute, and his life path has been bending toward China ever since. Through a series of grants Stew returned to Yunnan Province to conduct thesis research on the Mekong River. He settled down in Kunming to pursue a deeper understanding of the complex issues that coalesce when balancing development, conservation, international water rights, and the political theater of China’s energy and resource needs. Stew has been working for the Kunming based NGO Green Watershed, conducting water management and community development projects. Stew has threetimes led Dragons’ China Comprehensive summer program, the inaugural Mekong Semester, China Summer Internship program, and the China South of the Clouds Semester. Stew is a certified Wilderness First Responder.

Sophie is an ethnic Jingpo (one of China’s 56 minorities), who, at age 18, left her home in a small prefecture near the YunnanBurmese border for the bright lights of Kunming. Sophie speaks three Jingpo languages, Mandarin and English and has extensive experience teaching Mandarin to non-native speakers. Sophie works for Dragons as a Mandarin instructor and also uses her local knowledge to set up home-stays, service projects, lessons and activities for all of Dragons China programs. Sophie is much admired for her prowess in the kitchen and especially enjoys teaching traditional Chinese and Jingpo cooking to lucky Dragons students. Sophie has worked with Dragons since 2006.

While studying in China in 2001, McKay first discovered Xinjiang. Three times the size of France and characterized by vast sandy deserts, ancient oasis towns, and lush alpine mountains, Xinjiang’s scenery alone makes it worth a visit. However what struck McKay most was the rich history and diverse cultures that exist there. Understanding how these different people worked together in one place became the focus of McKay’s graduate studies. As part of his schooling McKay attended intensive language training in the Uyghur language at Indiana University. In 2008 he finished graduate school and took a job as an English language instructor at Xinjiang Normal University in Urumqi where he worked for two years with Uyghur and Han Chinese students. McKay is now working on a second masters degree at Indiana University’s department of Second Language Acquisition.

After serving as Regional Field Director for the 21st Century Democrats’ Young Voter Project, Michael moved to Chiang Mai, Thailand where he received a grant to work with the Human Rights Education Institute of Burma (HREIB). At HREIB he was exposed to pressing issues in international development through research on refugees, migrant workers, child soldiers and human trafficking. After completing his M.A., he returned to Chiang Mai and HREIB to manage a research project on children affected by armed conflict. Michael is currently the Deputy Director of HREIB.

While studying psychology and philosophy as an undergraduate Rachael spent a semester in Nepal. In Nepal, her love for Eastern studies blossomed from a theoretical understanding to a lived experience. In 2001, Rachael joined the Peace Corps in Thailand where she spent 3.5 years working as a teacher trainer, a community development specialist, an addiction therapist, and life skills educator. Rachael returned from Thailand to receive her Masters degree from Naropa University, a Buddhist inspired school with a contemplative and experiential approach to education. Rachael enjoys any opportunity to play, reflect and connect through dancing, yoga, meditation, hiking, and music.

Daniela has spent the past six years designing curriculum and running educational developmentstudies programs in Cambodia. Through the non-profit educational and service-learning organization that she founded in 2005, PEPY (www.pepyride.org), and in her work as an international lecturer and writer (www.lessonsilearned.org), Daniela has emerged as a well-respected voice in the conversation over sustainable and effective development strategies.

Growing up in the mountains of Slovenia, Ziva developed a love of outdoor sports, and is an avid skier, trekker and swimmer. She completed her studies in comparative religion and Chinese studies, focusing on Buddhism and sacred geography. A highlight of her travels was in-field research on popular beliefs concerning Mt. Kailas, Tibet’s most sacred mountain. A student of Chinese martial arts and Chinese medicine, she is fluent in Chinese, and well versed in both Chinese and Tibetan culture and philosophy. She has also been a practitioner of Tibetan Buddhism for several years and has studied extensively with Tibetan Lamas in India and Nepal. As a Dragons instructors, Ziva has led Tibet Cultural, China Semester and Himalayan Studies semester courses. Ziva has been working with Dragons since 2006.


53 Guatemala

Nicaragua

Bolivia, Andes and Amazon

Peru

Senegal

J o rd a n

M o ro c c o

Adelaide Nalley

Dhyana Kuhl

Julianne Chandler

Annelies Hamerlinck

Nikolas Sweet

Alena Bartoli

Darren Grosch

M.A. Sociology, UCLA; B.A. Sociology with high honors, UC Berkeley and UC Santa Cruz. Age 34.

M.A. International Education Development, Columbia University; B.A. Language, Literature and Culture, Antioch College. Age 35.

M.A. Poverty and Development, Institute of Development Studies, England; B.A. Anthropology and Latin American Studies with honors, New York University. Age 29.

M.A. Development Cooperation, University of Ghent, Belgium; M.A. Strategic Business Administration, Centrum, Lima, Babson College; B.A. Sports and Movement Sciences, University of Ghent, Belgium. Age 34.

Ph.D. in progress, Linguistic Anthropology, University of Michigan; B.A. French and Economics, Virginia Tech. Age 30.

M.A. International Studies, Uppsala University; B.A. Geology & Geophysics/International Studies, Yale University. Age 35.

M.A. Intercultural Education, Antioch University; B.A. Environmental Education, San Jose State. Age 35.

Julianne has lived, worked and studied in several parts of Latin America, including Chile, Mexico and Bolivia. In Chile, she carried out intensive research on the exploitation of water resources by the copper mining industry in the Atacama Desert, an experience that incited her passion for helping to preserve the environmental and cultural patrimony of indigenous populations in the Americas. After completing her degree at NYU, Julianne moved to Bolivia to work with a local NGO on mitigating the impact of natural disasters among Tsimane indigenous populations in the Amazon basin. She currently lives in Bolivia where she works as the Program Coordinator for the Foundation for Sustainable Development (FSD), facilitating partnerships with over 30 local non-profit organizations and conducting workshops on sustainable development, grant writing, and relevant social and political issues in Bolivia.

Raised in Belgium on an organic vegetable farm, Annelies was born with an appetite for adventure and entrepreneurship. At a young age her father taught her to take care of the environment by imparting a deep appreciation for the natural world. Annelies loves to explore the wilderness and started to employ her skills as an outdoor education instructor in Belgium, Italy and the Spanish Pyrenees where she instructed kayaking, rock climbing, canyoneering, rafting, hiking, speleology, mountain biking, and ski courses for the visually impaired. Annelies started up Vamos Expeditions, a “fair travel” adventure tour operator based in Peru that works hand in hand with Andean, coastal, and Amazonian communities to help preserve their environmental and cultural heritages. Annelies speaks seven languages and is convinced that continuous learning through challenges and travel is the best food for the heart and soul.

A Phi Beta Kappa scholar, Nikolas double majored at Virginia Tech in French literature and Economics. After college, Nikolas joined the Peace Corps in Senegal and served as a small business consultant for three years in a fragile border community at the crossroads of international mining companies, transnational highways and border trafficking. As a volunteer, Nikolas consulted with women’s groups, helped organize environmental youth camps as well as HIV/AIDS campaigns and malaria eradication campaigns. Nikolas has earned a National Science Foundation fellowship to study emigration from West Africa to Europe.

Exploration has always been a significant part of Alena’s life, whether following the neighborhood stream to its source as a child in California, studying the politics of identity as a graduate student in Sweden, or living with a Bedouin tribe in southern Jordan. Alena first came to Jordan to direct the college advising program at King’s Academy, a boarding school based on Deerfield Academy, her high-school alma mater. After leaving King’s Academy, Alena spent a year managing AMIDEAST’s programs in southern Jordan. She currently runs her own consulting business out of a small house in Diseh village, Jordan. 2012 will be Alena’s fourth year with Dragons.

A four-year Peace Corps volunteer (Chad and Morocco), Darren is passionate about service, international development, and Arab culture. As a Peace Corps Volunteer, Darren was selected to train incoming volunteers. Following Peace Corps, Darren spent an additional two years in Morocco working as the Project Manager for Morocco Exchange, an international travel company. Currently, Darren is the Director of International Student Services at Los Angeles Southwest College. When not working, Darren enjoys playing piano and drums, boxing, and language study. Darren is fluent in Moroccan Arabic, and French. Darren returns in 2012 for his fourth season with Dragons.

For the past eight years Adelaide has been exploring culinary delights, wandering through enchanted landscapes, conversing with extraordinary individuals, learning about political and personal struggles, and dancing wildly to superb (or not-so-superb) live music in nearly forty countries. In Argentina Adelaide studied circus arts; in Colombia she monitored US foreign policy; and in the SF Bay Area she directed school service learning. Recently, Adelaide has developed a passion for permaculture and natural building, which she has since studied throughout the Americas. 2012 is Adelaide’s seventh year leading with Dragons.

Dhyana’s career as a teacher has zigzagged through northern California, central Mexico, Ciudad Juarez on the U.S.-Mexico border, New York City’s public schools, Nicaragua, and the Ancash region of Peru. For 7 years Dhyana coordinated development projects in Nicaragua that brought together youth from different parts of the world. Since 2008, Dhyana has been supported and inspired by the work of The Poverty Initiative in NYC which brings together low-income community organizers committed to building a movement to end poverty, led by the poor. Dhyana eventually returned to Nicaragua to take a job as the Development Coordinator of “Cooperativa INNOVA” where she currently works with engineers who confront climate change and unemployment in their country by training a young workforce to use sustainable technologies.


rugged travel • service • language immersion • trekking and wilderness exploration • culture and development studies

On ancient maps, dragons were drawn to symbolize the unknown and to travel beyond the familiar world was to go “where there be dragons.” There are people who live their lives for adventure, exploration and knowledge – people who are willing to venture into the unknown for the sake of discovery. For those people, we offer incredible experiences. We hope you’re one of them. Won’t you join us?

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t h e l e a d e r i n c r o s s - c u l t u r a l e d u c a t i o n , f o s t e r i n g l e a d e r s h i p , s e l f e x p l o r a t i o n a n d g l o b a l c i t i z e n s h i p s i n c e 19 93 for further information, please visit us at www.wheretherebedragons.com, or call toll-free 800.982.9203 p h 3 0 3 . 413 . 0 8 2 2 • f x 3 0 3 . 413 . 0 8 5 7 • 3 2 0 0 C a r b o n P l a c e , #10 2 , B o u l d e r, C O 8 0 3 01 • e - m a i l : i n f o @ w h e r e t h e r e b e d r a g o n s . c o m

Dragons 2014 Student Catalog  

For twenty years, Where There Be Dragons ("Dragons" for short,) has pioneered unparalleled small-group global citizenship & leadership progr...

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