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January 2011

incorporating The Number One magazine for the care sector

no.176 • £4.75 In association with

Real concern over delay in home opening By Dominic Musgrave AN MP has joined the criticism of the CQC’s registration process, which she claims is delaying the opening of a new state-of-the-art care home in her constituency. The Cedars, which has been developed by Ideal Care Homes, will provide a home for 42 people living with dementia. However, the development, which has been ready to receive new clients since September, cannot open its doors to those requiring care until it is officially registered. She said: “While I fully endorse the full and proper scrutiny of all registration applications, the oversight in the processing of this particular application is causing real concern. “I have approached the CQC and have received a standard reply but, following my visit to the home to take up relatives’ concerns, have now approached them a second time with a plea that they look at the individual circumstances and use their discretionary powers to comply with all sections of the registration - but within a timetable that is helpful to us here in Stoke on Trent.” Company chairman Lawrence Tomlinson said he has submitted all the relevant paperwork to the CQC,

but has still not had any acknowledgment as to the timescale for the registration. He added: “I would urge chief executive Cynthia Bower to address the many flaws within her organisation as a matter of urgency to prevent more innocent people from losing out. We have achieved registered provider status as a company, submitted a registration application for The Cedars, recruited and trained a staff team and built the home – but now find ourselves in the extremely frustrating position of not being able to operate it. “The current CQC system for registering homes is simply not working. Not only do we lose out as an operator, but local people waiting to be employed by us are unable to earn a living and vulnerable elderly people remain in below average facilities.” ECCA chief executive Martin Green has called on the inspectorate to act on these problems. He added: “CQC must ensure it not only has simple and efficient systems in place, but that there are enough skilled personnel to deal with any difficulties within the process. Over reliance on web-based systems will never deliver a solution to a very complex registration process.”

Healthcare market study to launch

A well-known Yorkshire chef has joined forces with a West Yorkshire care provider to put the spotlight on nutrition in later life at the official opening of their flagship Leeds development. Brian Turner CBE - who rose to fame through his association with some of Britain’s most celebrated restaurants, including Claridges and the Michelin-starred Capital Hotel in Kensington – worked with Westward Care’s Headingley Hall resident chef, Raj Govindan, to dish up a traditional Yorkshire luncheon tailored to meet the specific dietary requirements of older people.

THE Office of Fair Trading has announced plans to launch a market study into private healthcare. The study will examine the nature of competition in the market and whether the market is fully competitive. Now, ahead of the formal launch in Spring 2011, the OFT is calling on the industry to submit their views on what should be included in the study. So far, preliminary research has raised questions about whether the market is working well for private healthcare patients. Sonya Branch, OFT senior director of services and public markets said: “We are keen to establish whether patients and buyers of private healthcare services, including the NHS, are getting the full benefit of choice and competition. As this is a complex area, we want to engage with providers, patients and government first to ensure that we identify and focus on the correct issues prior to launching the market study in 2011.” Comments can be submitted by e-mail to: privatehealthcare@oft.gsi.go v.uk. Plans are to launch the study in Spring 2011 before publishing a final report by the end of 2011.


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MP to try to solve issue of bed-blockers By Dominic Musgrave A SHROPSHIRE MP has promised to do his best to free up hospital beds being taken up by elderly people after visiting a care home in his constituency. Philip Dunne visited Oldfield Care’s White Lodge residential home in Alveley to discuss the problem facing social services and the care industry with owner Simon Badland. He discovered there are beds available in care homes for the elderly in South Shropshire that are not being filled despite waiting lists, with some people unnecessarily ‘blocking’ beds in hospitals. Philip said: “I was surprised to learn of the number and frequency with which residential beds are left empty given the overall shortage of care home beds in the Ludlow constituency. “I am following this up with Shropshire council and the PCT to allow beds in our community hospitals to be freed up.” Oldfield Care owns six homes throughout the West Midlands,

Staffordshire, Shropshire and Worcestershire, and Simon said his staff constantly face problems of red tape when dealing with the various social services’ bodies and the PCTs. He added: “It’s not their fault at all. They do their very best. It’s the system itself and all the paper work that’s at fault. We have beds available to take elderly people in need of care out of hospital – the so-called “bed blockers” – so they can live in peace in a caring home-from-home environment. But for some reason the system keeps coming to a standstill, and we have empty beds waiting to be filled. “We reserve these beds for people who are totally funded by social services, and are made available at the rates social services set, so it isn’t a question of fees and costs. “I hope the new government really does address this growing problem soon. “We’ve found that as many as 60 per cent of our residents never or very rarely get visits, and that’s just one of the reasons why we promise to deliver home-from-home care.”

www.caring-uk.co.uk Advertising Sales and Marketing Director: Tony Barry National Sales Executives: Rebecca Hazell Tel: 01226 734685 Email: rh@whpl.net Mandy Edwards Tel: 01226 734333 Email: mandye@caring-uk.co.uk Fax: 01226 734477

Paddy Brice, managing director of Richmond Villages (centre) receives the What House award from James Sandbrook, managing director of House to Home and compère, comedian Jimmy Carr.

Village success AN Oxfordshire retirement village has received two national awards and a commendation. Richmond Letcombe Regis which was opened in June by The Earl of Wessex, has won both the prestigious What House? Gold award in the best retirement village category and best innovation in the UK Over 50s Housing Awards. It was also highly commended in the best retirement development category of the International Property Awards. Paddy Brice, managing director, said: “These awards recognise the quality of life our residents enjoy at Letcombe Regis, both through the buildings we have created and the lifestyle and care we provide.” The retirement village offers three forms of accommodation: assisted living apartments, independent living apartments and care bedrooms. The village also has its own registered domiciliary care team and care home, with activities including bridge, bowls, film nights, happy hours, supper clubs, shopping and theatre trips as well as visiting speakers and events.

Publishers Wharncliffe Publishing Ltd. 47 Church Street, Barnsley, South Yorkshire S70 2AS. Email: info@caring-uk.co.uk

Editorial Group Editor: Andrew Harrod Tel: 01226 734639 Fax: 01226 734478 Healthcare Editor: Dominic Musgrave Tel: 01226 734407 Reporter: Christina Eccles Tel: 01226 734463 Group Deputy Editor: Judith Halkerston Tel: 01226 734458 Database enquiries to: 01226 734695 E-mail: circulation@ wharncliffepublishing.co.uk Whilst every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of all content, the publishers do not accept liability for error, printed or otherwise, that may occur.

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Funding tops list of concerns FUNDING of care and support services remains at the top of the list of concerns for care home managers for the second successive year. That was the result of the National Care Forum’s ballot conducted at the annual managers conference, with CQC compliance and quality ratings and recruitment and retention tying for second. Changing management role and demands and partnership working were new entries at number four and six in the list respectively. The association’s executive director Des Kelly said he was not surprised by the results. He added: “The evidence of the challenge facing providers has become even more focused in the last year. “Coming at the time the Government has set out its vision for adult social care it serves as a reminder that aspirations for organisations and communities to develop new ways of caring for people are taking place in an especially difficult financial context. “Managers are crucial to the delivery of personalised services which achieve the best outcomes for people.”

MP opens greenhouse in memory of resident By Louise Cordell A GREENHOUSE bought in memory of a Bromsgrove care home resident has been officially opened by the local MP. Residents and staff at Regents Court welcomed Sajid Javid to open the addition to their garden, which has been bought in memory of resident Kath Wood, who passed away earlier this year at the age of 90. Kath, who lived at the home for two years before her death in February, enjoyed gardening throughout her life. Care home manager Karen Hancox said residents had already been enjoying the new facility. She added: “Kath lived here for a couple of years and, after she had passed away, her family wanted to do something in her memory. “She was a very popular figure at Regents Court. She was outgoing and absolutely lovely. She used to be on the stage when she was younger and she used to love singing and dancing while she was here. “She loved gardening and flowers and her bedroom used to look out onto the courtyard where the greenhouse has been put up, so it’s a very fitting tribute to her.”

Resident George Holloway with MP Sajid Javid and care home manager Karen Hancox Her family decided to donate £700 to allow Regents Court to buy the greenhouse as a lasting tribute to her. Karen added: “We would have never been able to afford such a high quality greenhouse without the donation from her family and we would like to say a big thanks to them. Kath had a plaque with her

name on her bedroom door and we’ve put it up in the greenhouse. She would have got a lot of pleasure from it. “Mr Javid had a tour of the home and met residents and staff before officially opening the greenhouse. We told him a little bit about our history and he was very impressed.”

Television personality Lisa Riley stopped by a Burnley nursing home for a chat and some afternoon tea. The special visit from the former Emmerdale soap opera star had been organised by staff at Dove Court.


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Bristol home must improve or face action By Dominic Musgrave THE owners of a Bristol nursing home have been told they must take immediate action to improve standards of care or face legal enforcement action. CQC inspectors found Mimosa Healthcare’s Sunnymead Manor nursing home in Southmead was failing to meet six of the essential standards of quality and safety. Their report identified concerns with cleanliness and infection control, management of medicines, care and welfare of people and a number of staffing issues. The inspectors visited the home in response to concerns which were first raised with the NHS by a member of staff at the home. Bristol city council suspended referrals to the home and the NHS Bristol has sent in a clinical team to assess residents. Ian Biggs, regional director of CQC in the south west, said his staff would monitor Sunnymead Manor closely, and would be prepared to take further action if it becomes necessary. He added: “The care at Sunnymead fell far short of the standards people have a right to expect. It is even more disturbing when you consider that many of the residents are frail, vulnerable people who are the least able to

complain about the poor and unhygienic environment, even though this is their permanent residence. “We found clear evidence that the home is not maintaining essential standards of cleanliness, with the risk that staff and residents are exposed to healthcare associated infection. We need to ensure people living at the home are not at any immediate risk of harm, which is why we have been working closely with the city council, NHS Bristol and others under the safeguarding procedures. If there was evidence that people were at risk, we would take further action.” Concerns included:  People with dementia being ignored despite repeated calls for help.  People who had food on their face and clothing, who were not supported to clean themselves.  All bedrooms seen had poor, offensive odours and stained carpets and flooring.  Chairs and furnishings stained and badly ingrained with dirt.  Morning medication still being given to residents in the lounge of the dementia unit at 11.15am.  No evidence of clinical training for staff in management of wound care and infection control.

John Suchet was the special guest at a dementia awareness event in Dorset. The television presenter talked about his experiences of looking after his wife Bonnie, who was diagnosed with the condition five years ago at the event at Colten Care’s Fernhill home. The event was open to mem-

bers of the public and saw a cross-section of audience members, ranging from people who have had relatives recently diagnosed with dementia to those with relatives living in care homes, as well as professionals attending from the local universities and colleges.


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Provider fined after woman dies in window fall By Dominic Musgrave

Residents at Stewton House Nursing Home in Louth were treated to a flying visit from Buzz, a red-tailed buzzard. The bird’s owner, Chris Cooper, is a staff nurse at the home and also a keen falconer. He demonstrated the techniques he uses to train Buzz to hunt, including radio tracking. Picture: Resident Conis Parker MBE with Chris Cooper and Buzz

Success on a plate for Dawn DAWN Scholefield was named Barchester Healthcare’s chef of the year at the annual event at Westminster College. The Stamford Bridge Beaumont care home in East Riding chef beat off competition from five of the company’s other chefs to be crowned by Paul Rankin. At the ‘cook off’ each chef created a menu including four dishes demonstrating how care home food

can be nutritious as well as tantalising and delicious. Barchester's founder and chief executive Mike Parsons and Westminster College's head of culinary arts Gary Hunter joined Paul as the judges. Second prize was jointly awarded to Laurel Bank in Lancaster’s Mike Watts and Szymon Skronski from Tixover House in Rutland.

A CARE home provider has been fined £16,000 and ordered to pay £25,000 costs after a 92-year-old woman died after falling from a first floor window. Thora Monk died after falling more than four metres from her bedroom window at The Lawns Nursing Home in Worcestershire on January 5, 2007. The home is operated by Heritage Manor Ltd, which manages retirement and nursing homes across the UK. During the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) prosecution of the company, Worcester Magistrates' Court heard the window in the frail woman's bedroom could be opened fully. Police attending the incident at the time found other windows could also be opened fully and were accessible to elderly residents. Published HSE guidance recommends windows, through which there is a risk of a person falling if opened, should be restricted so they open no more than 100mm. The court also heard Heritage Manor Ltd had failed to maintain its method

of restricting the opening of the windows adequately, putting residents at risk. HSE investigating inspector Claire Coleman said: “The risk of vulnerable people falling from windows is a well known issue in nursing homes. “Adequate controls are easy to implement and maintain, and advice is available from HSE. “For example, the fitting of chain restrictors that physically prevent windows from opening further than 100mm is a straightforward and inexpensive method of protecting people who are dependent upon others for their safety. “Care providers are urged to revisit their risk assessment to ensure they have adequate measures in place and that these are being suitably maintained.” Heritage Manor Ltd, of Coach House, The Lawns, Kempsey, pleaded guilty to breaching section three (one) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 and regulation three (one) of the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999.


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Profit-share reward for Scottish staff By Christina Eccles A SCOTTISH care home group has rewarded its staff by introducing a profit-sharing scheme. More than 250 staff at Fife-based Rosturk House Ltd who have worked at the company since March last year have received two-and-a-half per cent of last year’s gross annual wage in recognition of their loyalty to the company. Accounts and admin manager Ashleigh Deacon told Caring UK the new scheme has been set up to encourage all staff to consider their budgets. She added: “I report back to all the managers every month about how they are doing with regards to their budgets, but as I left a meeting last year I thought to myself what sort of incentive do they and their staff have to meet them. “We looked at doing something where they all meet as a team and are aware of how they are performing and, when I suggested the idea to the managing director he agreed. “It rewards staff staying with us, because although we pay above the minimum wage, everybody knows

that staff retention is a big issue in the sector as staff will go elsewhere if they are offered a few pounds more.” The group owns four care homes: Marchmont and Wilby House in Kirkcaldy, Rosturk House in Cupar and Peacehaven in Lundin Links, and Ashleigh said plans are in place to run the scheme again if the group has another successful year. She added: “The scheme has proved so successful and all of the feedback has been positive that we definitely plan to continue it again next year if we continue our performance figures. “It has been a way of passing on the responsibility for the day-to-day running of the homes back to the managers and their staff, because it affects them all. “Staff are now thinking about simple things that add up such as turning off a light that doesn’t need to be on or using an extra black bag or paper towel unless they need to as it may affect their budget.”  Do you have a reward scheme for your staff at your care home? Let Dominic Musgrave know by emailing dm@whpl.net or ring him on 01226 734407.

Residents at a care home near Kidderminster are getting active after scooping bags full of goodies from a local supermarket Westley Court in Cookley received a host of sporting goods and cooking equipment thanks to Kidderminster-based Sainbury's. The home won the prizes thanks to its activities coordinator, Charlie Cook, who saw the store’s Active Kids scheme – which is open to schools and community groups – and decided to enter on behalf of the residents. Picture: Resident Alfred Trahearn enjoys fooling around with a football.

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A group of students has taken part in a unique research study looking at the impact of volunteering on the well-being of nursing home residents. Dominic Musgrave found out more.

Bridging the generation gap WHEN a dozen students from Ashton Park College in Bristol embarked on a volunteering study at a city care home, little did they realise the impact they would make on the residents they would visit. The students, who took part in the project for their health and social care studies, volunteered their time to be trained and then visit six residents at the Brunelcare-owned Deerhurst care home in Soundwell. They agreed to take part in the ‘bridging the generation gap’ study which was exploring the effects of how support and social interaction from the younger generation would have on the well-being of the elderly residents. After attending three tutorials, the students were paired with a resident who did not always socially interact as well as others, and over the next six weeks the students encouraged them to reminisce, talk about their lives, look at photos together, talk about shared interests such as sport,

poetry or local history, walk in the gardens and play games. Some students even offered a bit of pampering with nail painting and foot spas, with a couple of parties also held so some dancing could be done. In return students also learned skills from their resident, such as how to crochet. Deerhurst’s manager Lesley Hobbs said: ”It was a wonderful sight to see some of our residents who wouldn’t usually interact with others, really come out of their shells and engage and want to be part of the social gathering. “The study has been a great success and I would love to get more volunteers on board, with among those people who might be attracted to work as volunteers for a few hours a week are college and senior school students, as well as intending students on a gap year. “Volunteering could provide some young people with opportunities to explore the possibility of a career in an area that they might not have otherwise considered.”

At the end of the six-week period those residents involved in the project showed improvement in their general well-being and along with other residents, enjoyed the social benefits of having volunteers around. Findings from all data collection sources showed that “trained” and

monitored volunteer support could bring about favourable improvements in residents’ social functioning such as improved wellbeing and reduced levels of illbeing. These findings were further supported by comments drawn from residents and students.


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Cooking meals from scratch pays off for award winner Mair By Louise Cordell A SOUTH Wales care home chef has cooked her way to a top award. Mair Jenkins efforts have been recognised in the 2010 Wales Care Awards, organised by Care Forum Wales. Dubbed the Oscars of social care, the awards event, which was held in Cardiff’s City Hall, sees the main representative body of the care sector in Wales celebrate the dedication of its unsung heroes and heroines. Mair has catered for more than 75 people at the Pentwyn House nursing home and Oak House care home in Cardiff for the past three years She cooks from scratch the healthy home-made meals and bakes cakes, pies and puddings every day. It’s these baking skills along with her dedication to the needs of all her residents that helped her win silver in the catering in care category of the Wales Care Awards. Mair, a trained chef who worked in lots of kitchens before starting at the Cardiff nursing homes, told Caring

UK it is a shame many modern cooks are no longer learning traditional baking skills. She added: “Making sure people are eating good, nutritious food is the favourite part of my job. “It’s a real shame more chefs don’t bake old-fashioned cakes and puddings, I think it really is becoming a dying art. “Our residents love what we prepare for them and I couldn’t imagine giving them anything bought or ready-made.” Mair, who is a trained chef and has worked in lots of kitchens before starting at the nursing homes three years ago, says she ensures fresh ingredients are used wherever possible in residents’ meals, and prides herself in ensuring every meal is not just delicious but healthy too. The awards were presented by the Welsh Assembly government’s deputy minister for health and social services, Gwenda Thomas, and they aim to raise the profile of care workers and educate the public about the vital work they do.

Mair Jenkins

Care system unveiled by television presenter

A social care pioneer received his MBE from the Queen at Buckingham Palace. Mario Kreft, chief executive of Care Forum Wales and proprietor of Pendine Park care organisation, was made an MBE as part of the Queen’s birthday honours in recognition of his services to social care. He was accompanied to Buckingham Palace by his wife, Gill, and other members of the family, including his

brother Carlos and his wife. Mario’s award coincided with the 25th anniversary of Pendine Park and the opening of a new centre of excellence, called Bodlondeb (place of contentment) to look after people with dementia at their main site in Wrexham. There are also plans in the pipeline for a similar centre in Caernarfon. Picture: Mario and Gill Kreft with the MBE

A SCIENTIST and television presenter unveiled his ground-breaking plans for a new community-based care system at a talk at Bromley central library. Professor Heinz Wolff’s Care4Care programme will see people over 50 earn credits – calculated both in time and money - for looking after their neighbours. These credits will then be carried forward and used for their own support when their time comes. He is currently talking with the government about his scheme, and says it is imperative it is adopted to adequately care and support the elderly. Heinz said: “If the UK is going to be able to cope simultaneously with the economic downturn, the

crisis in pension provision and intensified competition from ‘tiger’ economies, we will need a real cultural shift in the manner in which the community at large engages with “care”. “Under Care4Care, the community will assume this responsibility. Rather like a pension, by helping others, people will be working towards their own care provision, so that when they need it, they will have an absolute entitlement to care. “We must all use less and do more for others in the next two decades.” He was speaking at an event sponsored by the Abbeyfield Societies in Bromley, which also included the charity’s CEO Paul Allen.

Jilly is nurse of the year JILLY Maunge has been named nurse of the year by the care group that employs her. Jilly, who works at Stamford Court Care Centre in Stalybridge, won Meridian Healthcare’s inaugural award, which was launched

to recognise and reward excellence in nursing across the group. She was nominated for her ability to provide warmth and happiness to families and going that extra mile. Jilly received a certificate and £100 shopping vouchers.

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An era of balancing choice and rights By Brinda Bungaroo MANY of us will agree that managing and running a care home on a daily basis is not only a big responsibility, but we are faced with a multitude of challenges associated with moral and complexities. It comes with the challenges and responsibilities to look after both our staff and service users in their best interests. We are in the era of balancing choice and rights. Surely this is something that has always existed, but we are constantly being reminded that individual people must be given choice and entitled to their human rights. We are also being faced and asked by our staff and colleagues what is the answer to knowingly allowing the people we care for to take risks. On one hand, as care staff we have to protect the safety and work

in the best interests of our service users. But, on the other, we must empower our service users to take control of their lives – even if that means allowing them to take risks. Service users’ wishes to do certain things that can put themselves at great risk, such as walking up and down the stairs unaided, especially when the person is unsteady on their feet. Yet nothing can be done to stop or avoid the potential associated risks of the person using the stairs unsupervised. Because it is an individual’s choice, one needs to be careful of not taking their independence away from them. As the carer we know the service user is putting himself/herself at risk of injury. Every time the service users takes such action, your heart starts racing with the fear if he/she

misses a step and falls down the stairs the consequences will be your worst nightmare. Getting the right balance between safety and choice is not an easy one. It is part of our daily concerns. Nothing in life is without a risk, but removing them can lead to reducing someone’s quality of life. We all want to have and keep our human rights and be able to choose the way we want to lead our lives no matter our age. As care professionals, how are we rewarded, protected and acknowledged for the journey we pursue in order to provide good care. The one answer is to simply do our job to our best knowledge and in the best interest of the people we care for.  Brinda is the manager of Neva Manor in Weston-Super-Mare.

Brinda Bungaroo

Molly marks start of Christmas celebrations RESIDENTS at a Cheshire care home welcomed a donkey to mark the beginning of its Christmas celebrations. Molly’s visit to Ingersley Court was arranged through the Elizabeth Svendsen Trust as part of the home’s wider animal therapy programme for residents. Activity coordinator Cheryl Brooks said the residents loved the experience. She added: “We could immediately see the calming effect she had on them, particularly with one resident, who has unfortunately been unwell recently. “She beamed in surprise when she woke up to find Molly next to her bed and her spirits were instantly lifted.” Further events planned for the festive season at the home include carol services from local bands, choirs and church groups. Picture: Resident Arthur Perry with Molly the donkey


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Plan for fairer Welsh provision is welcomed

Comedy actor and presenter Michael Palin delighted residents and staff of Nightingale when he visited the south London care home. Best known for his performances on hit television show Monty Python, Michael spoke about his illustrious acting career including working on the film A Fish Called Wanda, as well as working with famous actors and actresses such as

Maggie Smith and John Cleese. The Bafta award winner also spoke to the residents about his travelling days including filming ‘Around the World in 80 days’ and travelling from the North to South Pole in five months while enduring temperatures of minus 50. Picture: Michael Palin with resident Rosalie Naydorf

PLANS to end the “postcode lottery” in social care have been welcomed by independent providers in Wales. A wide-ranging report, From Vision to Action, says that common eligibility criteria for social care should be introduced to ensure fairer provision of services across Wales. The development is one that Care Forum Wales, the main representative body, of independent care providers, had been campaigning for. They argued it was “unsustainable” to have 29 different contracts and sets of eligibility criteria for people who need care. Chief executive Mario Kreft said the current system is expensively bureaucratic and unfair because the availability and cost of care varies between counties. He added: “We’ve essentially got a postcode lottery of social care and I think what people want above all is to know where they stand, what they’re entitled to, how much they have to pay for it. “At a time like this when we’re facing such challenges on the public purse we really do need to cut any

bureaucracy that’s possible. “It is no longer appropriate that a country as small as Wales has 29 different contracts and 29 sets of eligibility criteria.” The Independent Commission on Social Services in Wales was established by the Welsh Assembly government to consider the provision of social services and social care over the next decade According to the commission, common criteria would be used to carry out assessments in all parts of Wales. If the new system is introduced, Wales would be the first country in the UK to provide such an assessment scheme. Mario added: “Strengthening the links with the independent providers will be vital as we can provide a network of professional expertise across Wales. “This is the time to do things differently and do things better for people who need care in Wales because providing the best possible public service is the reason we exist.


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Adult social care ‘vision’ is criticised By Dominic Musgrave THE Department of Health’s vision for adult social care in England has been criticised by the heading of one of the sector’s leading associations. The Registered Nursing Home Association says the government’s fine words about no top-down policy-making from Whitehall are at odds with its declared aim of persuading councils to spend less on nursing and residential care. Chief executive officer Frank Ursell described it as “a document full of contradictions that, if unresolved, could lead to worse, not better, services” He added: “Independent analysts – and indeed the government itself – acknowledge that demand for nursing and residential care will rise significantly over the next 30 years as the population ages. “Yet the secretary of state for health seems to think these vital services can and should be cut. If that happens, individuals’ health and welfare will be put at risk. “Mr Lansley talks about people being free to choose the services they want. He ignores the fact that, for very many people, coming into a nursing home is a positive choice because they know their long-term health needs will be addressed. “They will also feel safer than at home and benefit from the companionship of staff and other residents.

So who is Mr Lansley to proclaim freedom of choice and, almost in the same breath, to say he wants fewer people being looked after in this way?” The association is also challenging the Secretary of State’s assertion that the coalition’s Public Spending Review has provided ‘a stable financial base’ for social care over the next four years. Frank added: “From where we sit, it doesn’t look as straightforward as that. “In the small print of the Spending Review we know that the government’s social care grant is being mixed in with the general grants councils receive. “Can Mr Lansley give a cast-iron guarantee that every penny of the £1billion extra cash he likes to crow about will go on social care, and that it will not be diverted to prop up other services hit by the 26 per cent reduction in overall government funding for councils? “The reality is that nursing homes around the country are already receiving letters from their councils advising them that the fees paid for their services will be cut.” On a more positive note, the association has welcomed in principle the government’s suggestion that there should be ‘a level playing field for providers’, particularly for the smaller ones that struggle to engage with formal tendering processes.

Jabberwocky members send goodies to needy children A SOCIAL club set up by residents of three Felixstowe care homes has turned its attention to helping those less fortunate this Christmas. The ‘Jabberwocky Club’ – named after a poem by Lewis Carroll – was formed by residents from Mill Lane, Maynell House and Foxgrove, all run by Healthcare Homes. Members, who meet weekly for social activities like quizzes and talks from guest speakers, decided to use their time together to help ‘Operation Christmas Child’. The initiative, run by Samaritan’s Purse, urges members of the public to pack shoeboxes full of goodies for needy children in countries such as Bosnia and Zimbabwe. Mill Lane manager Lorraine Barker said: “The members collected items like toiletries, toys and sweets from visitors to the homes, while one of the group knitted hats and gloves to

send. In the end they made up 16 boxes of goodies – all the members were really proud to have helped such a worthy cause.” The club was formed in June after members completed an inter-generational project with students from Suffolk New College in Ipswich. Over a period of six months, residents came together with the young people to share their memories, such as wartime music and childhood tales. Once the project was over, the residents decided to keep meeting as part of the newly-formed Jabberwocky Club. Now, minibuses take the Foxgrove and Maynell House residents each Tuesday for the meetings at Mill Lane, which has recently benefited from refurbishment works to the bedrooms and communal facilities.

Actress Lynda Bellingham, a patron of the Care Professionals Benevolent Fund, visited Avery Healthcare’s Brampton View care village and home outside Northampton while she was starring in Calendar Girls in the town. She was shown around by managing director John Strowbridge and home manager Andrea Feeney. Avery homes recently raised nearly £4,000 in aid of the CPBF.

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Residents at a Northern Ireland care village can enjoy a trip back in time thanks to the opening of a reminiscence museum. Dominic Musgrave found out more.

Patricia takes her Belfast residents down Memory Lane NURSE manager Patricia McMullan has transformed an unused relaxation room at Nazareth House in Belfast into an area for them to evoke memories of bygone days. The new ‘Memory Lane’ facility at the village, which recently celebrated its 10th anniversary, boasts a wide variety of objects that include an old dresser, crockery and cutlery, newspapers and war and Irish memorabilia. Patricia came up with the idea to add the area after studying a project on mapping the lives of residents, believing it would a

perfect addition to the home’s holisitic approach. She added: “I firmly believe that we need to know as much about the residents as we can before we can start nursing for them, and that is why we we did the life maps. “More residents coming into the village have some form of dementia, meaning they can remember more about the past than the present, which is why they can relate to the museum and it has worked so well. “The best part about it is that it didn’t cost us anything as everything in there was either

donated by relatives or came from the staff’s own homes.” Patricia said the room, as well as being popular with the 48 nursing and 24 residential residents, has been particularly beneficial for certain individuals. She added: “One particular male resident who suffers from depression and never leaves his bedroom goes down there every evening to read some of the old newspapers, and we have noticed a real difference in him. “Another lady, who is very active, goes down there every day to sit and look at things, and she has told

me on numerous occasions how much she loves it, which makes all of the hard work worthwhile. “I’ve been to several conferences recently that have talked a lot about reminiscence and how hiring memorabilia from local museums can be great talking points, and I have to chuckle as I think how we now have our own.” Patricia regularly holds fundraising events for the comfort fund at the village, which has its own library and coffee shop, and last year published a book of poems which raised more than £1,000.

Care homes show spirit of Christmas

A spoof ‘Calendar Girls’ style calendar has been created by Barchester’s maintenance and property services teams to raise funds for the company’s healthcare foundation. The Toolbox 2011 calendar was the brainchild of Malcolm MacDonald, maintenance manager at White Lodge care home in Braydon, Swindon, to raise awareness of and funds for the charity, which is celebrating its 10th anniversary this year.

CHRISTMAS came early at a group of care homes on the south coast. At Care South’s Wickmeads in Southbourne, Dorset they hosted a Christmas bazaar, which has so far raised £550 for the amenity fund to provide outings, activities and entertainment for the residents. And, at St Martins in Gillingham, residents have knitted small hats and jumpers for premature babies at Yeovil and Salisbury hospitals, and slightly bigger hats for diabetic babies. Jumpers have also gone to Africa through the knitting project organised by the Feed the Children UK charity. In Weymouth a double celebration took place at Buxton House, with mayor Paul Kimber switching on the Christmas tree lights and joining the residents for tea and mince pies. The home’s fair also raised more than £400 for the residents’ amenity fund.


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Challenge to Commission latest report NURSING homes have challenged the adult social care regulator, the Care Quality Commission, to justify its claim that excellently performing councils are those which try to push people away from residential care. Responding to the CQC’s latest report on how well councils are doing in managing adult social care, the Registered Nursing Home Association says it is preposterous to imagine that the best solution for every person with multiple health and social care needs is to be looked after at home. For many thousands of people, the RNHA argues, coming into a nursing home for 24-hour care is the only safe and effective way of meeting their complex needs. Frank Ursell, RNHA chief executive officer, said: “It is disturbing that a fixed ideology about the primacy of non-residential care in virtually all circumstances appears to infect the Care Quality Commission. Of course many people would prefer to stay in their own homes as long as possible. “In fact, the majority do just that. But many people opt to come into nursing homes because their health needs are such that they could not cope at home. I do wish that the Care Quality Commission would reflect a little more carefully before making its sweeping statements about the relative benefits of residential or domiciliary care.”

Rhymes raise money for home activities By Louise Cordell RESIDENTS and staff at a Kent care home have published a book of poems to raise money for future activities. They have spent the last year coming up with their creations at Acacia House in Tenterden, with topics including everything from Wimbledon to bonfire night and Christmas to families. Manager Lisa Turner told Caring UK the residents came up with the idea of writing their own poetry following a discussion session with activities coordinator Lucie Hulf. She added: “I noticed a gap in the activities programme about a year ago and decided to fill it with poetry reading as I know a lot of the residents enjoy listening to them. “From there they decided to write their own, with everybody contributing at least a line or two somewhere along the way. “I then wrote a foreword once we had collected enough for a book to remember those that have been involved but have since passed away. “It has been lovely to watch the book grow, and is something all of the residents are extremely proud of.” The home printed and bound the

Residents Isabel Webb and Joan Daws work on their poems with activities co-ordinator Lucie Hulf. “I know the staff have also enjoyed book themselves, which they are it too, and have learned a lot about selling at £3 per copy, and the the residents that perhaps previously residents will decide how to spend they did not know. the profits at one of their monthly “There are already discussions meetings. going on at the meetings about what Lisa added: “As well as enjoying we are going to do next year – some putting the poems together, the people would like to start work on activity has also been really useful as a reminiscence tool for the residents, another book, while others have and has brought back a lot of thought about writing poems to go in memories. calendars.”

The Browns Field House team with Marsha Tuffin third from the right, receive their award from comedian and radio presenter Mike Osman

Top team award continues home’s run of success BROWNS Field House care home in Cambridge has added to its recent run of successes by winning the top team category at the National Dementia Care Awards. The home, part of The Abbeyfield Society, has 26 residents, many of whom suffer from some form of dementia. It is run by Marsha Tuffin. She said: “The win is great recognition for the drive and passion of the entire team in respect of delivering excellent quality care to all the residents.

“It is very gratifying that people with the experience and knowledge of dementia that judges, Yan Cartman from furniture manufacturer Renray and Jo Swinhoe from the Alzheimer’s Society, have identified this.” The home has also won the best team category at the international dementia awards, while Marsha also received the first Abbeyfield Royal Patrons award presented to a staff member.


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Quality care is key to securing funds By Dominic Musgrave QUALITY is the key when approaching banks to borrow money to fund an expansion, refurbishment or new build, it has been claimed. Dave Potter, director of healthcare business and commercial banking at RBS, said being able to prove that you deliver quality care, have quality management in place and have a quality asset are crucial for operators. He said: “With property we are told it is all about location, location, location, but with care the focus has to be on quality. “The sector is in a fight, the sort of which it hasn’t seen for a long time, and all care homes need to prove they are

capable of delivering a solid business in this sort of environment. “Different types of care being provided is the biggest challenge that faces the sector, in particular for care homes.” Ensuring your health and safety policies are properly monitored, your staff are properly trained and that you understand what is happening locally and have a clear vision of your business’ future are all key, Dave told the audience at the first in a series of conferences held in Manchester arranged by Network Care UK and law firm Beachcroft LLP. He added: “How you demonstrate that you provide good care is going to be a challenge with the move away from star

ratings. Inspection reports give external parties something to hang their hats on - how do I know you are good at what you do? “In terms of the CQC you need to tell them how you meet the quality outcomes. Being a local authority preferred provider is another tick in the box, and using customer service surveys is, for me, becoming an increasingly important document. Having those on the go may also make you a bit more money if you are looking to sell the business.” The demographic remains there, and the demand and pressure to provide social care is proven in the UK. Who pays for it and what form it takes remains the issue.”

Caring UK Commerce section brings you all the latest property, business and training news every month.

In this issue:  New system

more about ‘information gathering’ Page 21

 Avoiding the

common pitfalls of selling a home Page 22

 Sould your care

home business be incorporated? Page 23

Companies team up to improve standards BOVIS Lend Lease Consulting has been appointed Southern Cross Healthcare’s new strategic partner. The companies will work together to improve standards of service for home management teams and residents. Bovis will also be tasked with improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the planned and reactive maintenance of the group’s homes, and to reduce costs through smart procurement of the supply chain. Southern Cross Healthcare

currently spends approximately £70m annually on repairs, renewals and improvements. The company’s CEO, Jamie Buchan, said it is hoped the new partnership will lead to a more efficient use of the company’s cash resources. He added: “The well-being of our residents is our main priority, and any way that we can work with partners to ensure the care they receive is of the highest quality represents a great opportunity for us.”

Pete climbs to fifth in Top 50 Angela Rippon cuts the ribbon to officially open Greenfields care home watched by David Coull, chief executive of Coverage Care, and councillor Alan Chesters, mayor of Whitchurch

New £6.5m care home opens in Shropshire TELEVISION presenter and Alzheimer’s ambassador Angela Rippon OBE opened Coverage Care’s new £6.5m Greenfields care home in Whitchurch, Shropshire. The new care home, designed by DWA Architects and built by Castlemead Developments, has 75 individual en-suite

rooms with the latest facilities to support older residents, some needing nursing care and others who may have special needs arising from dementia. The two-storey building has four residential wings, each with a central communal area, dining areas, lounges, a hair salon and a private courtyard garden.

FOUR Seasons Health Care CEO Pete Calveley has leapt from 13th to fifth place in the 2010 Health Investor Power Fifty. Health Investor magazine has been counting down the ‘most influential’ people in the independent health sector, as voted by its readers, with the results announced at a gala dinner. Pete was appointed CEO in 2008, and recently completed the restructuring of Four Seasons £1.6 billion debt. He

is responsible for over 400 nursing and care homes and specialised care centres in England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Isle of Man. Pete has also pioneered a new specialist approach to dementia care with the launch of the PEARL specialist dementia programme, which has seen a reduction in drug use by up to 54 per cent across a number of homes.


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Homes should expand into village sector By Dominic Musgrave

BBC Radio Stoke’s Stuart George (front left) with Ian Cox (Thomas Vale), Christine Wheeler and Erica Bayliss (Staffordshire county council), Helen Morris (Newcastle Under Lyme borough council), David Bayliss, Sharon Swift (Newcastle Housing Advisory) and Matthew Beckley (Housing 21).

Ceremony marks completion BBC Radio Stoke presenter Stuart George joined representatives from the project partners at a ceremony to mark the completion of external work on a new community centre and extra care scheme. Work started on the £8.2m development to provide an ecofriendly community hub and village centre, along with a 63 apartment extra care scheme for older people. Lea Court, the extra care scheme, will offer independent living along with 24-hour on-site care, if needed. The purpose-built two-bedroom

apartments are available either to rent or to purchase on a shared ownership basis. In addition to a fully fitted kitchen and walk-in shower room each apartment will benefit from a secure entry system with intercom and emergency call facilities via a pull cord and pendant. Stuart joined people from Housing 21, the Madeley Community Development Project Group, Newcastleunder-Lyme borough council, Staffordshire county council and Thomas Vale Construction to celebrate the placing of the final tile on the roof.

CARE home operators should partner retirement and care villages to unlock their business potential, it has been claimed. Robin Hughes, chief executive of the recently formed Retirement and Care Village Partners consultancy firm, says large healthcare providers through to family-owned care homes should seize the opportunity now to increase their offer and expand into the retirement and care village sector. Robin, the former development director of Richmond Villages and Shelbourne Senior Living, said: “The UK care sector is fragmented and we currently have a situation where many of our existing care homes have outdated stock and larger healthcare companies can’t afford to upgrade. “Those operators who have already made a start in the retirement and care village business have had to contend with some major barriers to entry including expensive land purchases that are no longer viable and imperfect operating models. “Factors such as timing, gearing and a misplaced confidence on achieving planning means some of the most experienced operators have not yet realised their ambitions from the sector. “However, now is an ideal time to enter the business, without the complications that have hindered others.” The company is advising and will partner Shelbourne Senior Living on its second planned care village in Windsor, which is set to open in 2013. Robin added: “While the care village concept is still in its infancy here when compared with Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and the USA, there’s no doubting the demand for

Robin Hughes more choice when it comes to care and retirement living in the UK. “If you have a care home with land, for example, you should consider building some close care apartments for independent living within the grounds. “Moving your care home forward with a more sophisticated offering, with assistance available on an ‘as required’ basis from a choice of domestic and nursing care options, will address a wider section of the retired population across a broader age range.”

Tax reclaims for commercial property owners CAPITAL allowances are among the most valuable and least exploited methods of reducing property owners’ income tax or corporation tax liabilities. Capital allowances arise from capital expenditure on purchasing or constructing a new property along with extensions and refurbishments. We carry out retrospective, current year, and new build capital allowance claims, both for individuals and companies in relation to commercial properties right across the commercial sector. Most retrospective capital allowance claims that we handle lead to a significant tax refund for the client. We will quickly identify the validity of a claim without obligation. If a claim does not proceed, there will be no fee. We comprehensively survey the property which allows us to identify any qualifying items that, for numerous reasons, have previously not been claimed. Enquiries: Telephone 01246 293011 or visit www.salmon-business.com


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CARINGCOMMERCE

Speakers at the conference with organisers: Simon Wortley (partner Beachcrofts LLP), Dave Potter (RBS), Paul Spencer (counsel Three Sergeants Inn), Sue McMillan (regional director CQC), Sean Cassidy (director Network Care UK), Graham Drye (director Network Care UK) and Hazel Monaghan (associate, Beachcrofts).

New system more about ‘information gathering’ By Dominic Musgrave THE way care homes are inspected in future should not be proportionate and not an over burden to operators and be targeted, it has been claimed. And they should focus on particular areas of concern and not be a heavy load for those operators that are providing a good service, according to Sue McMillan, north west regional director for the CQC. She told the audience at the first in a series of seminars held in Manchester organised by Network Care UK and law firm Beachcroft LLP the new system is going to be more about information gathering. “The was homes are to be inspected in future should be different,” she added. “They should be shorter and focused, and geared up to find out what you need to know and not an all embracing look into all areas of care. “We will be talking to staff and other professionals, the families of residents, as well as the managers, commissioners and providers to gain an insight as to what is actually happening in the care home. “They may be infrequent, especially if we know a lot about the

care home and are happy about the service being provided, though we may come out to look at set things.” Sue did, however, confirm that the regulator still will have no powers to control how local authorities choose which homes to commission to. She added: “We cannot tell commissioners such as local authorities what to do. They will say they have a right to ensure that services they commission to are providing best practice. “If they decide to carry out something similar it could be seen as parallel, but we cannot stop them wanting to. “It would be childish to criticise and say we don’t want them to expect the best. “We need to have a rating system in place that is uniform so we don’t end up with 57 varieties nationwide. “That way if a care home is rated ‘good’ in Birmingham we can be confident that it would be the same in Barnsley. “The challenge is to make it work and valuable and, if in two years’ time it is not working. I think we are vulnerable.” Further seminars are planned for Bristol and Birmingham in 2011.

Barclays Corporate has appointed Neil Chandler as a relationship director within the healthcare team. He will be responsible for providing industry expertise within the healthcare sector and identifying new business opportunities in Gloucestershire. Neil has more than 18 years of banking experience and has specialised within the healthcare sector since 2005.

Village portfolio rises to 12 RETIREMENT Villages Ltd has increased its portfolio of operating villages to 12 with the addition of Avonpark near Bath in a deal worth £13m. The new site, bought from Care Estates Ltd, includes a broad range of retirement accommodation of one, two and three bedroom apartments and houses, extensive social and leisure facilities with related support and care services for residents. Set in 15 acres, the 10-year-old village is a continuing care retirement

community providing a range of options from supported independent living through to 24-hour nursing and dementia care. The business employs around 110 staff and has annual revenues of approximately £6m. Communal and leisure facilities include an on-site restaurant, bar and lounge; hairdressing salon; bridge room and library; conservatory, small shop; two guest suites; doctors’ surgery and therapy room; mini gym; meeting room; allotments; and landscaped gardens.


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Contract won THE Leadbitter Group has won a contract to design and build a £3m scheme for the elderly in Lee-onSolent, Gosport. Demolition of the existing 24 flats at Rogers House has commenced to make way for construction of a new three-storey building featuring 39 one and two bedroom apartments. The contract was awarded by Guinness Hermitage following a successful project the contractor carried out on its behalf in Southsea. The new development, which is due for completion next autumn, will provide modern facilities, including private balconies, a landscaped courtyard, communal laundry and lounge area.

Job confidence ADMINISTRATORS say they are confident of saving all 26 jobs at a Bridlington care home which has been placed in administration. Christopher White and Andrew Wood, partners at Sheffield-based The P&A Partnership, have been appointed joint administrators to Afton Court Ltd which trades as a residential care home. Chris said: “We are continuing to run the care home while in administration with a view to selling the business as a going concern. We hope to save all 26 jobs. “We are working closely with the local authorities, the regulators for specialist care homes, the CQC and a firm of specialist healthcare consultants to ensure that the services to residents are not disrupted.”

Family move ARTI Poddar has taken over the running of her brother’s two Glasgow care homes. Already the owner of Sterling Care Homes, which operates the 50-bed Nightingale House in Paisley, she will now also run Lotus Senior Living Limited’s 35-bed Nithsdale Lodge and the 65-bed Mohsen House.

Avoid the common pitfalls when selling a care home By Paul Burford

accountant about your tax position so you are clear where you stand before going to market. There is nothing worse than agreeing a deal and then withdrawing for tax reasons. Be warned, some agents will seek to charge you a fee for withdrawing once a deal has been agreed.

SELLING your care home is a complex, time consuming and often emotional event and particularly in the current climate, incredibly stressful. If you are considering selling your care home, there are a few pitfalls that you will want to avoid: Appoint the right agent You have to like your agent as a person. You will be speaking regularly to your agent for something in the region of six months so it is imperative that you get along well. Choose the person you feel most comfortable with and not necessarily the one who offers the cheapest fee or quotes the highest price for your home. Talk to the agent about their experience and for how many years they have been specifically selling care homes. Remember your agent may have to tell you things you don’t want to hear so make sure it is someone you trust. Appoint the right team It is essential to choose a team of professionals with experience in the healthcare industry. Don’t be tempted to use your family solicitor. There are commercial solicitors that have a specific healthcare department and this will speed up the process and avoid unnecessary complications. Your agent will regularly work with such

Paul Burford firms so let them recommend someone. Overpricing Listen to your agent and don’t insist that your home is marketed at an inflated figure. Your home will only sell for what it is worth. Some agents will deliberately give you a high figure to tempt you to sign up with them in the knowledge they will never achieve that figure. Don’t be afraid to get more than one opinion, as you would from an estate agent. Check your tax position Even before you pick up the phone to an agent, you will have a rough idea of what your home is worth. Speak with your

Preparation is key As with selling your house, ensure that your business is up to scratch. Décor, staff morale, occupancy and up to date accounts all play an important part in the value of your care home. Don’t wait until you have lost your enthusiasm for your business before selling. A tired owner will have an effect on the perceived quality of the home. Timescales Quite literally the old adage ‘as long as a piece of string’ is applicable here. Finding a buyer can take hours, days, weeks or even months. Once a deal has been agreed, there is an absolute minimum period of three months and more likely six months for the sale process. Don’t be tempted to book a holiday or make any other commitments until completion has actually taken place. You would be amazed at how many people do.  Paul is a director of Burford Care Homes business agency.

New home expected to create up to 250 jobs By Louise Cordell ACTIVITIES are to play a crucial role for the residents at a new care home that has recently opened on the outskirts of London. Ashton Lodge is Lukka Care Homes’ fourth in the capital, and once fully open will be able to house 83 residents. it is also expected to create between 200 and 250 new jobs. Experienced manager Victoria Forsythe, who has worked at several care homes and has also been a trouble shooter, said activities are key to the residents’ wellbeing. She added: “You still have to play a few of the mundane games because the residents enjoy them, but we are wanting to do much more than that to keep the residents focused and as independent as they can. “As well as doing the likes of drawing and painting, simple tasks

such as putting the shopping away, chopping vegetables or folding laundry can calm a resident with dementia who may be becoming agitated or help people remember when they were younger. “As well as taking part in the activities that will be organised with our full-time coordinator, the residents will take an active role in daily life around the home, so can get involved with laying tables at mealtimes or changing the menu cards.” Funding for the home, which also boasts its own temple and separate Asian house, was provided by the specialist healthcare team at RBS, and financial director Birju Lukka said plans are in place to develop the business further. He added: “We plan to employ our learnings and knowledge of the market to ensure Ashton Lodge is

Representatives from Lukka Care Homes toast the new Ashton Lodge with resident Cyril Badol and Graham Tallyn from RBS. another success. “We have a couple of plots of land that we are looking into doing something on and, providing the four care homes continue to run successfully, I’m confident that we will be able to secure the necessary

funding. “Demand is still very much there, and we have had a lot of interest in Ashton Lodge from local authorities, who are continuing to place people in good quality homes.”


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Should your care home business be incorporated? By Simon Garner IT’S a question that anyone who owns a business should have considered, but you need to know all of the pitfalls as well as the benefits before you make a choice. And don’t just assume you will pay less tax. Firstly, what is incorporation? It’s using a limited company to own your business, rather than trading as an individual or partnership. It puts a separate legal entity between you and your business which may limit your liability to people who interact with your business. However, it does not protect money or capital that you have put into the business. Many people incorporate their business solely because of tax savings, but there are other reasons. In an increasingly litigious society, having a limitation on liability to service users and others can be a big comfort. If you are planning to exit your business or bring in new management, then that too can be more easily achieved by structuring your business as a limited company. For residential care homes, the decision on whether to incorporate can be particularly complicated. This is because the business includes a property that is key to the business. Care homes that incorporate rarely want to transfer the property to a company because it would involve the payment of Stamp Duty at up to five per cent of the value. This then limits the value of goodwill transferred to the company and hence reduces the tax advantages of incorporation. There can also be problems if the property has a mortgage, as money needs to be extracted from the company to meet interest payments. Companies do currently pay lower rates of tax than individuals, and the

Simon Garner possibility of saving tax at higher rates is an attraction. There are also savings that can be made by avoiding National Insurance contributions that can really make a difference too. Therefore, if you are exempt from National Insurance, for example because you are over 65, then there is probably no saving from incorporation (assuming all profits are taken). If you need to take all of the profits of the business for personal use (rather than reinvesting in the business) then the tax savings are lost and you would only benefit by avoiding National Insurance and the ability to draw against capital invested in the company. Every situation is different, and just because incorporation is the answer for one business does not mean it will suit another. Always talk to your tax advisor before you make a change to your business structure and make sure you weigh up all the issues before going ahead.  Simon Garner is a director of Jamesons chartered accountants.

Company sells off freehold of seven homes in £33m deal THE LNT Group has unveiled deals from two of its group companies, Ideal Care Homes and LNT Construction. Ideal Care Homes has sold the freehold of seven of its homes for the total sum of £33.35m, which represents an average price of £80,000 per bed. Corporate development director Andrew Long added: “The movement of local authorities out of the care home business and the pressure on the housing market means that alternative models of care will not be able to keep pace with the demographic growth and growing needs of dementia sufferers. “The investment market has always been attracted to the sector but is now recognising the scale of opportunity that exists for replacement of

dated accommodation with welldesigned modern care homes. Even the majority of existing purpose built stock in the sector is nearly 20 years old.” Additionally, Ideal’s sister-company LNT Construction has sold one of its new-build turn-of-key care homes near Derby to MHA Care Group for £73,000 per registered bed space. “This is the seventh turn-of-key care home that we have sold out of the LNT Construction pipeline in the last 18 months,” added Andrew. “Working with our sales advisors, Christie and Co, we have received consistent demand from well informed operators seeking to improve their portfolio. Values have risen by 10 per cent in the last 12 months.”

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CARINGNEWS

Registration delay means lost income By Christina Eccles

Winning chef Julie Brown receiving her trophy

Julie cooks up a win CHEFS from care homes across the Orders of St John Care Trust recently took part in a skills development competition sponsored by food wholesaler Creed Foodservice. Twelve chefs from OSJCT homes took part in the competition to stage a themed day, covering criteria like nutritional value, resident and staff involvement, and activity innovation and a themed lunch was part of the criteria. The winning chef was Julie Brown from Marden Court, near Calne in Wiltshire, who served up

a musical treat based on a 50s and 60s theme. Her action packed theme day covered all sorts of relevant activities, from flower power to Beatles mania and residents enjoyed tie dying, making musical note and record table decorations, flower making and two music quizzes. Frances Chapman, catering and housekeeping manager for the OSJCT, said: “Our chefs really got involved with the competition which stretched their imaginations and developed all sorts of new skills.”

THE angry owner of a Leicester care home says he is losing out financially because of delays with the registration of his new dementia unit. Bassir Jugon, who runs The Manor in Aylestone says despite reregistering the home under the new system, he is finding it difficult to register an extra purpose-built 18 beds. He told Caring UK that he originally we made the application at the beginning of October 2010, but was told the process can take up to 16 weeks from the date of application. “Needless to say the home is losing considerable income, and we do not know whether the registration will be completed within the specified time scale,” Bassir said. “The reason for the delay, I am told, is that our application is awaiting to be

validated first before it goes to the next stage. “The hospital and local authority are as frustrated as we are that clients are unable to be placed with us, causing considerable anxiety for relatives for who are unable to place loved ones in their chosen home.” And Bassir says he has also had problems registering a new manager, despite him providing the CQC with all the necessary information together with the fees. He added: “We are told the process could take up to 12 weeks, trusting that during validation further information may be required. “CQC must be made aware that home owners, like ourselves, who invest thousands of pounds for the provision of good quality homes, are being placed in a situation that may lead to financial hardship or even bankruptcy.”

Caring Coral recognised with award A HERTFORDSHIRE care home’s member of staff was named nurse/care worker of the year at the county’s community awards organised by a local newspaper. Burleigh House’s Coral Clark won the award in recognition for the

outstanding care she provides and going the extra mile to make life even better for residents through all of the activities and events she organises within the home. 60-year-old Coral has worked at the home for 10 years.

Hard work marked with awards A KENT provider of residential and supported care has recognised the hard work of its workforce with an awards ceremony at The Historic Dockyard, Chatham. The Abbeyfield Kent Society charity, which provides care for more than 450 older people across 15 homes throughout the county, held the event to acknowledge staff who have served for five,10,15, 20 or 25 years, along with those who have gained an NVQ while working. A raffle, featuring prizes donated by Leeds Castle, Dickens World and Kent Life, was also held to raise funds for the Society’s Who Cares? campaign, which helps older people stay in their home when they can no longer afford to pay for their own care. Long service awards were presented to: Five years – Lesley Andrews, Roseline Baker, Sarah Bunyan, Carmel Belshin, Satwinder Pabail, Debbie Best, Sharon Gregory, Nataliya Tarnyagina, Josephine Welsh, Margaret Oyinlola, Tracy Cosier, Christine Carey, Emma Camburn, Jade Laker, Kevin Irwin and Diane Shand; 10 years – Jackie Miles, Colin Johnson, Nicky Pett, Hilary Vanns, Pauline Ryan, Linda Goodwin, Rose Lees, Christine Hutchinson, Christine Devlin and Mandy Smith; 15 years – Lorna Bailey and Sue Imms; 20 years – Jean Canning; 25 years – Gail Robinson.

St Martins care co-ordinator Lesley Andrews receives her five years’ certificate from Abbeyfield Kent Society chairman Robert Barnes and chief executive Leon Steer.


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CARINGDEMENTIA CARE

Home pioneers Department of Health initiative By Dominic Musgrave

Des Kelly presents Coverage Care staff with their awards with chief executive David Coull and NVQ coordinator Rachel Evans

Care company presents staff with awards MORE than 90 per cent of the 700 staff employed by a Shropshire care company are now qualified to at least NVQ level two in care. Eighty staff from Coverage Care’s 16 centres in the county have qualified this year, and they were presented with their awards and badges by Des Kelly OBE, executive director of the National Care Forum, at a special

celebration held at the company’s newest care home Greenfields, which opened in Whitchurch in September. The latest training initiative organised by Coverage Care is with the Royal College of Nursing to develop training for staff working with those with dementia, including dementia care mapping and similar practice based learning.

A LINCOLNSHIRE care home is pioneering a new Department of Health initiative which is key to changes proposed in the new NHS white paper. Barchester Healthcare’s Newton House in Grantham is one of the first community-based providers to involve people living in care homes, and their relatives, in using accounts to decide priorities for the quality of the health-related services delivered to them. The team has worked in collaboration with the local PCT for years, pushing the boundaries for managing people with continuing care needs and providing care to people with highly specialised needs who would otherwise face life confined to a hospital. It is one of two independent providers in the region to be asked to pilot the changed approach. The pilot involved drawing up a ‘quality account’ with people living in the home, their relatives and local health professionals like GPs and therapists.

Manager Lesley Marian Hart told Caring UK three more pilots are being set up in Barchester homes in other regions. She added: “Everyone concerned has worked hard and at our first meeting the enthusiasm we had from our review panel was extraordinary. “From a professional perspective the engagement of residents and relatives has been heartening. “We learned a lot from the process, too. “Our data gathering has become much more sophisticated, which has interested a lot of health providers – it helps demonstrate our successes with outcomes based care.” At Newton House’s first quality report panel meeting, pledges that received particular attention were action plans to use assistive technology to help reduce falls and to reduce the use of anti-psychotic drugs. Newton House is a purpose built home offering professional nursing care, a range of therapies and expert care for people living with dementia.

Labelling can clean up laundry problems RESIDENTS with dementia often experience distress if they cannot find the clothing they are familiar with, and it is important an individual’s garments are correctly returned to them after washing. With more than 1,200 garments going through the care home laundry this is not an easy task, especially if the garment is not named adequately. Attach-a-Tag is a simple, cost effective method of labelling clothing

and soft objects, and is an ideal way to quickly label short term and respite residents’ items as well as normal laundry. Replicating a button, it attaches in seconds to the garment seam or laundry label, making it discreet and comfortable to the wearer. The patented design is easy to attach but difficult to remove, and cannot be taken off by accident or come off during the laundry process.

Hairdressing service cuts out hassle JUST how can hairdressing impact upon your care home business? The majority of residential homes, nursing homes and care centres fully understand the benefits of preserving their residents’ pride in appearance and know the process should be an enjoyable one. However, according to The Alzheimer’s Society, personal care, including washing and bathing, is a common source of anxiety for those living with dementia. Lily Pins offers a fully managed, bespoke hairdressing service for care homes and provides industry specific

training to homes’ own hairdressers. Wouldn’t it be ideal if:  Your hairdresser was dementia trained and experienced in carework.  All residents could have their hair done irrespective of their frailties in or out of bed.  Staff didn’t have to escort residents to and from a salon. All hairdressing substances were COSHH assessed.  Hairdressers already had a valid transferrable CRB disclosure.  Administrators did not have to deal with hairdressing money.


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CARINGDEMENTIA CARE

Voluntary group’s film to be shown worldwide By Louise Cordell A FILM which gives a moving account of a family’s struggle to cope with a father’s dementia is to be shown worldwide to help doctors, carers and the public understand the condition. ‘Changed Days’ was produced by a Glasgow voluntary group and has been praised by medical experts for showing the “human” side of the condition. Based on a play performed at 18 community venues around north Glasgow, including the City Chambers, the 45-minute film was written by Alison Couston of the Baldy Bane theatre and media group, and commissioned by the North Glasgow Dementia Forum.

Chair John Kelly said: “There is much that each of us can do to help people with dementia and their carers whether we are family, neighbour, friend or passerby, through better understanding and support.” Themes were strongly influenced by families’ real experiences, and the film is interspersed with shots of a dementia sufferer recalling his time as a young father with his daughter. An estimated 14,400 people in the Glasgow area and 70,000 across Scotland have dementia. This figure is expected to double over the next 25 years, and one in three of us is expected to be affected in some way by the disease.

A South East and East Anglia based group of care home has opened a new specialist dementia facility in Cheltenham. Carebase’s 66-bed Amber Wood will cater particularly for those with the latter stages of the condition, and, as well as en-suite accommodation, will offer a concierge, private car collection, a hairdressing salon and a holistic therapy and

treatment room. There is also an al fresco dining area, a 16-seat in house cinema and sensory gardens. Manager Nicola Humphries said: “We hope this new care home will become the hub of the community and set the example of how residents can maintain their independence and dignity while enjoying a great quality of life.”

New dementia care unit underway A NOTTINGHAMSHIRE care group is developing a new 53-bed specialist dementia care unit in the Mapperley area of the city. All the bedrooms at the Eastgate Care owned Belle Vue Lodge facility will contain large, en-suite walk-in shower facilities, while five separate lounge areas will offer library/reading, specialist activity, quiet and sensory areas. A large open plan atrium will pro-

vide a light area for dining, looking out to an award winning garden designed to enhance the interaction with the outdoors and improve the quality of residents’ daily life. Building completion is due in May 2011, with opening scheduled for June. A recruitment drive is planned for mid-April, and the group expect to employ in excess of 70 staff.


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CARINGNEWS A pair of Leyton Orient footballers visited an Ilford care home as part of its Mitzvah Day celebrations. Staff and residents at Jewish Care’s Vi and John Rubens House were photographed with Ben Chorley and Alex Revell before they were given a tour of the facilities by registered manager Mary O’Rourke. The group’s director of community services Neil Taylor said: “You can’t imagine what a visit like this does for the residents’ spirits. Good humour and great rapport, the guys are so natural. The residents loved it and it will be the talk of the town for ages.”

Scheme seeks council go-ahead By Christina Eccles A NEW plan to encourage good quality care homes in Leicestershire will be launched in the new year if the county council gives it the green light. The ruling cabinet is set to adopt the new scheme, which would reward the best care home operators with higher fees and a quality kitemark, and charge those which fail to meet standards.

At the moment, the council has contracts with 194 private care homes, and 87 per cent of them are rated as ‘good’ or ‘excellent’ by the CQC.

better value for money for the council taxpayer.”

David Sprason, cabinet member for adults and communities, said: “This scheme should increase the number of ‘excellent’ and ‘good’ quality residential and nursing homes in Leicestershire, which has to be good news for older people who need their services and

 Involve the views and experiences of service users.

The proposed new payment arrangements, known as the quality assessment framework, would:

 Offer incentive payments to homes that meet the agreed criteria and encourage them to maintain those standards.  Introduce charges for homes

which do not comply with the council’s contract.  Stop further placements being made at the poorest homes. The kitemark will show that care homes put their residents’ needs first, under a national scheme known as Dignity in Care.  What do you think of the new plans for Leicestershire’s care homes? Let Dominic Musgrave know by emailing dm@whpl.net or telephone 01226 734407.


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Grace to look at domiciliary operation By Christina Eccles A SHROPSHIRE care provider has appointed its first graduate trainee who will review how the domiciliary side of the business is run. Grace Dyke from Oswestry has joined Coverage Care in Shrewsbury on a one-year graduate training placement in social care management. She is the first graduate selected to join the National Skills Academy for Social Care scheme in the county, having recently graduated from Liverpool University with a first class honours degree in business studies. During her placement, Grace will complete an ILM level four qualification in leadership and management skills. She is supported by a professional mentor from the National Skills Academy, and regularly meets with the 26 other participants in the training scheme to organise a number of combined learning opportunities for the group. Chief executive David Coull said: “The sector needs to invest in the future and we are delighted to do what we can to nurture talent. “The government is placing increasing emphasis of providing care for older people in their own homes. Having established a domiciliary care agency within the compa-

Grace Dyke ny, we have asked Grace to review how we operate today and explore how we might better serve the care needs of the older people who choose to remain in their own homes in the future.”

Acquisition sees service users top 1,000 mark A LIVERPOOL care group has boosted its number of service users to approximately 1,000 with the acquisition of a Doncaster company. Optimo, which supports people to live independently at home, has recruited an extra 140 members of staff to care for TLC Homecare’s additional 400 service users that it has gained in the deal, the value of which has not been disclosed. Optimo's expansion into South Yorkshire comes shortly after the

company strengthened in the north west with the acquisition of Warrencare in Liverpool. The firm, which was co-founded in 1998 by entrepreneur Mark Hale, now employs 400 people. Chief executive Richard Walker said: “This is the second acquisition within three months. “It complements the portfolio of services already provided by Warrencare, and opens up a new geographical market for us.”

Marjorie Dusgate tucks into a tasty meal at the launch of Taste for Life

Community meals scheme launched A WALSALL housing provider has joined forces with the local council and branch of Age UK to launch a community meals scheme. And, if successful, it is hoped that Caldmore Housing Association’s Taste for Life will be rolled out as a community model which could be adopted nationally. Mike Hew, chief executive of Caldmore Housing Association, which is part of the Accord Group, added: “For many years Walsall council has successfully provided meals for vulnerable people across the borough and we understand the importance of regular healthy eating. “We are committed to working

with the council to ensure people eat well but also benefit from an enhanced social network through lunch clubs, exercise sessions and other community activities in partnership with Church Links, other local agencies and the Help at Home service launched in July.” Lunch clubs will allow residents the opportunity to be transported to community venues from their homes by Walsall Community Transport, giving them the chance to meet people in similar situations to themselves and to make new friends. And, for those less able, the service will also facilitate other support for a range of practical issues and general help around the home.


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CARINGNEWS

Hopes that scullery will become a haven A SCULLERY has been created in a new dementia facility at a Lincolnshire retirement village. The new bird-patterned wallpaper decorated room in the 11-bed Aspen Suite at The Minstrels in Boston features traditional wing backed armchairs, a fire, ceramic sink and drop leaf tables. Paul Walsh, managing director of the care and operations division of

Retirement Villages Ltd, said it had been designed to resemble a familiar scene in homes across the country during wartime. He added: “People suffering from dementia often have clear childhood memories despite having poor short term memory. “This room will feel familiar. The idea is that it becomes a haven where residents can spend time

and reminisce.” The development has been carefully designed to meet the requirements of the most up to date research into the treatment of dementia patients. The doors on the individual bedrooms each have a memory box containing items personal to each resident. Paul added: “Those living with

Pupils bury time capsule at site of £8m home

Back row, from left, Chris Laybourn, head teacher; Martin Hillson, site manager and Len Merton, Sanctuary’s director of care; Front row, from left, pupils Matthew Pring, Tara Dolat and Osian Osmond

Signs

LOCAL school children have visited the site of a new £8m specialist dementia care home in Yarnton to bury a time capsule. Three pupils from William Fletcher Primary school took artwork, photographs and letters to the construction site next door to Yarnton Residential Nursing Home. To tie in with the new care home, the children had been asked to produce pieces of work on what they thought life would be like in 70 years. Sanctuary Group is building a specialist dementia care home which is due to be completed in autumn 2011 and the time capsule will be sealed and buried at the top of the driveway – ready to be opened in 2080. Len Merton, Sanctuary’s director of care, said: “I have no doubt that when our time capsule is opened in 70 years both young and old will have a lot of fun comparing what life is actually like to how the children imagined it would be.”

dementia don’t always recognise words – even their names – but they do remember wedding days, the face cream they’ve always used or favourite items of clothing. “Everything we have put in place is aimed at making life for our residents feel as secure and comfortable as possible.”

If you would like to advertise in Caring UK please contact: 01226 734479 or email rh@whpl.net Signs

Transport

No.1 in used Wheelchair Accessible Transport ACCESSIBLE TRANSPORT AT AFFORDABLE PRICES • We specialise in the sale and purchase of quality used wheelchair accessible and ambulance vehicles. • They can be bought as seen or refurbished and signwritten to your own requirements. • 12 months MOT Class 5, and 12 months warranty. • Independent engineers report supplied FOC. • Delivery service available. • All buses fitted with seatbelts and comply to seatbelt legislation.

Always wanted late wheelchair accessible vehicles Gardiners Lane North, Crays Hill, Billericay, Essex CM11 2XE Tel: 01268 521033 • Mobile: 07860 894331 • Fax: 01268 284951 • sales@hwpickrell.co.uk

Visit our website for photos of current stock www.hwpickrell.co.uk


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Simple solutions SINCE 1982, Colne (Lancs) based, Richards Residential Supplies have concentrated upon supplying simple solutions to common nursing home problems. The new WACMAT® adheres strongly to this tradition. With its ultra absorbent cotton pile and 100 per cent waterproof backing, the remarkable WACMAT® is an ideal accessory where spills may occur. Used as a commode mat, in bedrooms or bathrooms, the WACMAT® ensures full carpet protection. Then, after use, simply machine wash and tumble dry! It’s that simple... The WACMAT® will then be clean and odour-free, ready to perform time and time again. Alternatively the flat-laying WACMAT® can be used as an entrance mat, saving you hundreds of pounds in rental costs alone. Enquiries: Telephone 0800 074 3749

More Armstrong equipment for The Rowans Hospice THE laundry at The Rowans Hospice is a very busy one, and has just installed a new RS7 washer extractor from Armstrong Commercial Laundry Systems. As part of its service to the community the hospice cares for 19 patients in en-suite accommodation. The laundry handles everything, including bed linen, towels and patients’ personal clothing, and the housekeeping team operate the laundry seven days a week. “We work to extremely high standards and we could not be more satisfied with Armstrong’s support and service over many years,” said quality manager Jenny Redman. “So when we needed to replace a washerextractor they were an obvious choice, and the new machine is performing extremely well.” Enquiries: Telephone 01635 263410, fax 01635 32434, email enquiries@armstrong-laundry.co.uk or visit www.armstrong-laundry.co.uk

In the hands of the experts WHEN hygiene is critical, there is no room for compromise put yourself in the hands of the experts. Electrolux’s expertise in Barrier Washers will give you and your establishment peace of mind by providing the best defence against the spreading of mico-organisms and cross infections. Keeping linen clean requires excellent and consistent practice and discipline and using Electrolux Barrier Washers makes this simple. Dirty linen is loaded on one side and clean linen is unloaded from another door opening into a separate room, giving functional separation and assisting in RABC. Combined with the Electrolux CMIS software, the barrier laundry system provides the highest level of control and traceability. Ensuring your investment is future proofed against stringent new standards. By creating a functional separation between clean and soiled textures throughout the whole laundry process, the Barrier Concept represents the optimal way to ensure the highest standards of cleanliness and avoid the risk of recontamination. Electrolux Laundry Systems has extended its already wide range of Barrier Washers, adding two further ‘Pocket’ models - an enhanced version of the 13kg model with larger industrial inner doors and a new 18kg model. Both machines are designed and made to offer smaller healthcare customers the high quality and performance levels of Electrolux Laundry Systems’ Barrier know how and technology at an affordable price. For further information on Electrolux products and services please call Julie Fell, marketing manager, on: 08444 631 260, e-mail: julie.fell@electrolux.co.uk or visit: www.electrolux.co.uk/laundrysystems.

If you would like to advertise in Caring UK please contact:

01226 734479

Beaucare Medical announces European trademark registration for ‘Beaucare’ BEAUCARE Medical Ltd has officially announced its European trademark registration for the mark ‘Beaucare’. The company, owned by managing director Jonathan Brown, named the business Beaucare Medical when it first started trading 18 years ago. Since then the name has become synonymous with the purchase of good quality, low cost, medical, hygiene and janitorial supplies and equipment, and now carries a strong and trustworthy reputation within the care home industry and private individuals. With the registration mark ‘Beaucare’ covering its stock products (in classes 3, 5, 6, 7, 10, 12, 16, 20, 21, 24) the company can now protect and preserve it’s reputation, which will help further towards distinguishing its products and services from its competitors. For further information about the ‘Beaucare’ trademark registration contact marketing manager Nicole Mountain. Enquiries: Telephone 01423 878899, email sales@beaucare.com or visit www.beaucare.com

Tarkett refurbishment programme DORSET County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust has been undertaking a long-term refurbishment programme at Dorchester Hospital, including replacement of existing carpets throughout. Over the last five years, around 4000m2 of Tarkett’s Optima vinyl flooring have been installed within the wards, and the latest project has involved replacing around 1269m2 of carpet in the hospital streets with Tarkett’s Eminent vinyl flooring. The Trust undertook a trial with three different manufacturers’ products before selecting Tarkett’s Eminent Range. A hospital spokesperson said: “All tested products were multi directional and our criteria included aesthetics and durability, acoustics, safety, ease of cleaning and installation and maintenance costs. “We chose Tarkett’s Eminent range since not only did it meet all our performance criteria but the colour choice was far greater, allowing us to define different floor levels by colour.” As one of Tarkett’s highly successful iQ floorings, the Eminent range is ideal for hospital environments. Made of high quality raw materials, the homogeneous vinyl provides outstanding performance, even in heavy traffic areas. The third generation PUR surface treatment means iQ Eminent needs no wax or polish for life, reducing maintenance costs by up to 30 per cent compared to traditional cleaning methods. For more information call: 01622 854040, fax: 01622 854500, e-mail: uksales@tarkett.com or visit: www.tarkett-commercial.com.

Personalised linen for care homes TOWELSDIRECT has been supplying the care sector for the last 20 years, and are providing premium Turkish quality towels that last up to 150 washes. Most towels that you see in a retailer will only last 60 washes. We also provide minimum iron bedlinen that is constructed of easy care polycotton, again designed to last longer than your average bedsheet and save your staff time. Bespoke embroidery designs are available, along with matching bedlinen and curtains. Please call free for a no obligation discussion. Since Towelsdirect’s inception, we have always tried to focus on our uniqueness. Customers are reminded that we offer free delivery on orders over £150, operate a no minimum order policy and next day delivery from stock. We recognise that our customers’ needs are ever changing, and it is with this in mind that we are updating our website daily. Enquiries: Telephone 0800 018 6935 or visit www.towelsdirect.co.uk for our online catalogue.


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CARINGINDUSTRY NEWS

Serving up tasty meals for over 50 years AT Apetito, we have been providing home-cooked meals to the elderly and vulnerable for over 50 years – in fact, we are the market leaders. Our secret? Dedicated staff, over 200 delicious dishes and exceptional service. Delivering tasty meals that fulfil NACC nutritional standards and delight residents is a key part of

our recipe for success. However, we also understand that care homes need to save time and money too. That’s why we provide easy to prepare dishes in a flexible range of pack sizes, so you can minimise wastage and reduce labour costs. Steve Geach, owner of Oak View Care Home in Hampshire, said:

“We were not looking to review our food offering, but Apetito was too good to resist. “Appointing Apetito has not only led to an improvement in the quality of our food provision and satisfaction of our residents, but has also added around £30k annually to my bottom line and increased the value of my business by a factor of eight.”

Award-winning Keith ‘very honoured’ KEITH Cockell has been named as the Most Progressive Thinker in the UK retirement villages market.

presented to Keith at the London Awards Ceremony at the end of November.

He was presented with the award by the retirement housing industry to mark his contribution to changing market thinking about the housing needs of the next generation of older people.

He said: “I’m very honoured to have been singled out for this award and I’m delighted that as an industry, we are now beginning to realise that the way forward is to integrate retirement housing with family housing at the heart of the community.

The award is sponsored by UK Over 50s Housing Weekly News and was

“This is something that the volume

house builders have now recognised as a way of delivering a wider lifestyle choice for the elderly that doesn’t really exist in the UK today.” Keith created one of the UK’s first care villages in Coventry in the early 1990s and followed this with four further villages at Nantwich, Painswick, Northampton and Letcombe Regis through the English Care Villages company he founded.

Students make friends with residents YEAR ten school students have been forming friendships with elderly residents at Edmund House care home as part of the school’s social integration scheme. Frederick Gough School in Bottesford, Scunthorpe, started working with the care home, which is part of the Hadrian Healthcare Group, last year in the pilot of the BTEC work skills course ‘working as a volunteer’. The course aims to create social integration with elderly members in the local community with three groups of eight teenagers visiting fortnightly to interact with the residents. Zoe Gair, the school’s enrichment teacher and course leader, said: “Many elderly people in society have a misunderstanding of young people and this can be strongly down to negative media portrayal of the youth. “Our students are caring and articulate young adults who have made good friendships with the residents at Edmund House and many will be staying in touch with them after the

Our extensive new ‘Visions’ collection has been created with care and residential homes in mind and was successfully launched recently at the Care Show in Birmingham. The range comprises a choice of bedside cabinets, chests of draw-

ESTABLISHED care home agency DC Care is managing the sale of several specialist care businesses. The operational challenges and development potential of these businesses can vary widely, and in future there may be increased legislation and a more definite move towards more independent living. Director Anita Allen said: “Over the last few years many operators have diversified and, in addition to operating traditional residential care homes for the elderly, many have adapted their business model in keeping with government trends, personalisation and further new initiatives. “These businesses vary from supporting living units, domiciliary care provision, brain injury units, step down facilities and small residential homes for particularly challenging service users.” The DC Care team has taken the time and effort to explore how best to provide the same professional, personal agency service to vendors of these type of businesses. Anita added: “There is no ‘one size fits all’ scenario. We have to work closely with vendors to understand their business, and in doing so we hope to achieve an optimum price when operators decide to sell.”

File designed Student Kelsay Scutt visits resident Ivy Trenholm year. course ends. She said: “The residents have thor“The work skills course has even oughly enjoyed getting to know the opened their eyes to future career teenagers and spending quality time possibilities within the care sector with them. which they might not have thought “The students are all friendly and about before so it provides a very posaware young adults who have done itive advantage to both students and well to volunteer their time back into residents.” their community whilst also learning Edmund House manager Lisa Odlin valuable skills towards a qualificais now keen for the home to be part of tion.” the integration scheme again this

New bedroom range made especially for the care sector HUGHES Furniture Limited has been manufacturing bedroom furniture since 1982 and has now introduced a bedroom range specifically for the care sector.

Sales being managed by care home agency

ers and wardrobes in both double and triple-door formats. Some of the added features to ensure quality and durability include metal drawer sides, ‘solid’ mfc drawer bottoms and carcase backs and metal drawer runners. The tops and fascias are finished in 18mm vinyl-wrapped MDF with rounded corners and ‘soft-feel’ edges, which help to make the furniture more user-friendly in a caring environment.

VINE Technical Services has developed a safety management file designed to be used on a day-to-day basis and suitable for presentation at the time of a CQC/HSE inspection. Incorporating a comprehensive range of specific safety assessments, procedures and records, relating to both in house services staff and outsourced contractors, it offers a single point of reference for the management of services delivery and health and safety compliances within a care facility.

Why thousands of homes choose award-winning signs FOR award winning residents’ door signs be sure to look at the Badgemaster range – it is already the choice of thousands of residential and nursing homes. There are gold or silver door plates with replaceable, engraved inserts that are easy to read and are also available with Braille and Braille and tactile if required. Badgemaster provides a fast replacement service for inserts with no minimum order as and when changes occur.

There are two sizes available, now with end-stops that make for secure, tamper proof room identification. A full range of recognised international symbols and directional arrows are also available.


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Caring UK A-Z Directory Art Print and Framing Easy Art Unit 1-4 Tylers Business Park Lewis Road Blackboys Uckfield PN22 5LF Tel 0845 1662 732 customercare@easyart.com www.easyart.com

Bathrooms/ Hygiene Cistermiser Unit 1 Woodley Park Estate 59-69 Reading RG5 3AN pr@wardturner.co.uk www.cistermiser.co.uk 0118 9691611

Business Services Network Care 15-16 Queen Square Leeds LS2 8AJ Tel:0113 281 6772 info@networkcareuk.com www.networkcare.com

Care Monitoring Systems CM2000 4 Oakhouse 160 Lychfield road Sutton Coalfield B74 2TZ Tel: 0121 3083010 www.cm2000.co.uk

Catering Fowler UK Unit 9 Link 59 Business Park Deanfield Drive Clitheroe BB7 1QJ 0800 6199337 david@fowleruk.com www.fowleruk.com

Catering Equipment Alfamax ltd. Watchmoor Trade Centre Watchmoor Road Camberley Surrey GU15 3AJ Tel: 0844 357 4030 Fax 01276 62696 www.alfamax.info

Clothing Boyd Cooper 3 Long Acre Willow Farm business park Castle Donington DE74 2UG Tel: 01332856566 catalogue@boydcooper.com www.dimensions.co.uk/Boyd_Coo per

Construction Jab Enterprises 1 Bickenhall Mansions Bickenhall Street London W1U 6BP Tel: 0800 0141 366 jon@jabenterprises.com www.jabenterprises.co.uk

Furniture Specialists Care Chair Enterprise House Cranswick Industrial Estate Driffield YO25 9PF Tel 01377 271700 sales@carechair.uk.com www.carechair.uk.com

Health Care products Beaucare Medical Ltd Crimple Court, Hornbeam Square North, Hornbeam Park,Harrogate North Yorkshire HG2 8PB Tel: 01423 873666 Fax: 01423 873444 sales@beaucare.com www.beaucare.com

Holidays/ Excursions The Bond Hotel 120 Bond Street Blackpool 01253 341218 karen-dixon@bondhotel.co.uk www.bondhotel.co.uk

Home Care Providers Caremark Domiciliary Care Providers Unit 4 The Colonnades 17 London Road Pulborough West Sussex RH20 1AS Tel 01798 873770 info@caremarkuk.com www.caremarkuk.com

Infection Control Environmental Hygiene Solutions 65 Riverside 3 Medway city estate Rochester Kent ME2 4BH Tel: 08000 434270 www.enhys.com

Insurance Towergate Patrick Britannic House 230 Burlington Road New Malden Surrey KT3 4NW Tel 020 8336 0099 www.carehome-insurance.co.uk carehomes@towergate.co.uk

Laundry Electrolux Laundry Systems 99 Oakley Road Luton Bedfordshire LU4 9GE Tel: 08444 631 260 info.elsuk@electrolux.co.uk www.laundrysystems.electrolux.co.uk Miele Fairacres Marcham Rd Abingdon OX14 1TW 0845 3650555 slawrenson@themediashop.co.uk www.miele.co.uk

Nurse call/Patient Safety Systems Safety Systems Distribution Ltd Unit 11B Hobson Industrial Estate Newcastle, NE16 6EA neilrobson@safetysystemsdistribution.co.uk www.safetysystemsdistribution.co.uk

Tel: 0800 3282951

Follow us on twitter @CaringUK

Sensorcare Systems TP House Prince Of Wales Business Park Vulcan Street Oldham, OL1 4ER 0870 4214288 Paula.matsikidze@tpgroup.co.uk www.sensorcare.co.uk

Safety & Security Universal Hardware Direct UK Ltd Unit 202 Kingspark Business Centre 152 178 Kingston Rd New Malden Surrey, KT3 3ST Fireco 31-32 High Street Brighton, BN2 1RP 01273 696007 Alan.buckle@b3partnership.co.uk www.firecoltd.com

Solicitors/Legal Services Bates Wells & Braithwaite 2-6 Cannon St, London, EC4M 6YH 020 7551 7652 020 7551 7741 s.marchant@bwbllp.com d.tuck@bwbllp.com www.bwbllp.com

Training Healthcare Training College 7200 the Quorum Oxford Business Park North Oxford, 6X4 2JZ 0844 8006801 info@healthcaretrainingcollege.com


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Caring UK January 2011  

The number One magazine for the care sector.

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