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Prairie Life VOL. 2 - ISSUE 2

MARCH 2019

Belief in Farm Values

Toys with a message

Created by Naomi Johnson

Music Album released

Henderson works on new project

Peniuk Farms

Dedication, hard work and passion

national archery

Hunter Chipley gaining recognition

Bridging two cultures

Bed and breakfast near Canora

What’s Inside: Quin and Billiejoe Townsend believe in strong family values Page 2 • A Brandon-area entrepreneur is making her penchant for knitting a business Page 3 • A public art piece installation will celebrate Manitou Beach’s centennial; A poet shares the secret to writing success Page 5 • Joel Henderson to release new music album Page 6 • Young grain producer makes a name for himself Page 8 • Archer’s ability puts him in the national spotlight; Scott Day promotes curling in the States Page 8 • La Campagna offers an authentic prairie experience Page 9 • STARS brings hope and life to people in need Page 10 • Young Farmers award recipients share their experiences Page 11


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Prairie Life

MARCH 2019

Young couple are strong believers in farm values Quin and Billiejoe Townsend believe in strong family values and are teaching their four sons that by expanding and growing the couple’s farm, as they gain sustainability and a home based income together. The couple has four boys, Liam, 7; Sawyer, 5; Ross, 4 and Emerson, 6 months old. “In the big scheme of things, if our boys want a life in agriculture when they are older we will be able to leave them with a piece of this place along with the knowledge to survive starting up in agriculture. “Leave them with something more, and leave them with a way of life,” said Billiejoe. The young couple grew up only a few miles away from one another in the Rockford area and were married in 2010. They built their farm house almost eight years ago and started a family farm. “We both grew up on farms and came from a long line of farmers and homesteaders. It was important for us to live near our family and friends to have a good group of people to surround our children,” stated Townsend. The couple were both raised on family farms and were taught that hard work, dedication and a passion for farming has rewarding benefits. “We absolutely love it on the farm and wouldn’t want to live any other way,” she said. “It’s not always easy and the weather has been tough the past few years but grain farming and cattle farming is what we truly want to do. Right now Quin works between the farm and in the oil field, but eventually hopes to be full-time on the farm. Expanding our farm is a slow and steady process it seems, but it’s coming together,” she said. The young couple owns two quarters and farms 1,000 acres of hay and a variety of cereal crops and raises just over 30 head of commercial cattle. “We ran a Speckle Park bull the past two years for easy calving with our commercial herd. Next year we are trying out Red Angus. Lively, thriving calves with easy births are ideal for when Quin’s at work. It makes it easier for the boys and I to oversee the calving process with as little trouble as possible. “We are currently building our herd and hope in the future to

Prairie Life March 2019

VOL. 2 - ISSUE 2

With a belief in the core values of the people, their stories and the beautiful vast land we call home, Prairie Life recognizes the importance of keeping our history relevant and our future promising – one story at a time. Andrea Corrigan, Publisher (306) 842-7487 Nancy Johnson, Consulting Publisher (204) 726-4362 Sales Team Sean Choo-Foo, Regional Manitoba Sales (306) 575-8577 Shawna Andrews, Virden Area (204) 748-3931 Andrea Corrigan, Weyburn Area (306) 842-7487

By Ken Lewchuk

The Townsend family children all enjoy doing chores on the family farm. From left: Sawyer, Liam, Emerson and Ross. have a good cross of Red Angus and Speckled Parks calves,” stated Townsend. The couple also has a variety of other animals on its family farm, including 12 Nubian goats that they milk to make goat cheese and yogurt. Billiejoe was involved in 4-H clubs while growing up and they have passed the passion down to their children. The boys were involved in the local club with goat projects but due to the lack of interest the club has been temporary suspended. “We are hopeful that in the future it can start up again,” she said. The farm sustains 60 laying chickens and 100 meat chickens in the spring. Billiejoe incubates her own chicken eggs in the spring. Townsend hatches nearly 80 chicks at one incubation period. The couple inherited two pot belly pigs from an individual who realized that they were too big for the house. “We acquired these two pigs who are living the rest of their lives out here as family pets,” stated Townsend. To add the family’s pets, there are six Flemish Giant rabbits, turkeys, ducks, three horses and one pony. “We bought Joey, our pony, so the boys could feel more comfortable and gain confidence in riding a smaller animal. The pony is broke to be driven and the boys love to take him out for a ride. He is very special to the boys and they take very good care of him,” stated Townsend. The family also has a small greenhouse for its own use. “Living by the river we have a very short growing season with early frost,” she explained. “The greenhouse allows us to get a head start on the growing season. It also teaches the boys how to grow our own vegetables and be more sustainable on the farm. “We try to be self-sustainable and teach our kids that the re-

ward for hard work is so incredible. Knowing how to hunt, grow your own vegetables and raise your own meat is very important! Having the kids learning alongside us never makes for a dull moment and we have as much fun as we can along the way. “Our kids take in a lot of activities like swimming, baseball, skating, 4-H, fishing, hunting, building on their mud truck with dad, and all the other occupations and hobbies that come along with operating a farm,” concluded Townsend. Prior to farming and starting their own family, Billiejoe and Quin both worked off the farm but the pull of farming called them back to their original passion. The couple is hopeful that it won’t be long until Quin will be able to quit working away and be able to stay home, and grow their family farm. The young couple’s son Liam echoed their passion for farming with his 4-H speech. “My name is Liam Townsend. I am 7 years old, I have three brothers and live on a farm. I love living on a farm. We have cows, horses, goats, chickens, ducks, turkeys, cats, dogs and bunnies. We hatch our own chicks, milk goats and cows when they have babies, and grow all sorts of food in our greenhouse. “I enjoy helping on the farm. I help my mom with my baby brother; even with diapers. I help farm, build, weld, and do chores. We play a lot outside and I can’t wait for summer. “My 4-H pony is Joey. He loves attention and treats. Right now he’s very fuzzy and fat. I’m learning a lot about how to ride him and soon hope to ride my mom’s big horses. “When I’m inside I like learning how to draw, read, do Legos, play games and dream about when I’m old enough to hunt. When I grow up I want to be a farmer or be a police officer,” he concluded in his speech.

Leslie Dempsey, Production Supervisor (ads@weyburnreview.com) Sabrina Kraft, Production Coordinator CONTRIBUTIONS BY: Ken, Lewchuck, Canora Courier Rocky Neufeld, Canora Courier Judy Wells, Deloraine Times & Star David Willberg, Estevan Mercury Ana Bykhovskais, Estevan Mercury Devan Tesa, Humboldt Journal Christopher Istace, Westman Journal Greg Nikkel, Weyburn Review Calvin Daniels, Yorkton This Week Next Issue – APRIL 19, 2019 • Deadline – MONDAY, april 8, 2018

We connect the borders of Southeastern Saskatchewan and Southwestern Manitoba with 32,000+ copies 10 times a year.

this week

The Citizen Kipling

Final Dates Monuments Niche doors Urns Urns Niche doors Monuments Final Dates

Above left: Sawyer Townsend was photographed with his favourite pet chicken, Carmel. Middle: Liam Townsend helped out with picking vegetables from his family’s greenhouse. Right: Emerson Townsend is the youngest Townsend boy and loves hanging out doing chores on the family farm. #NewspapersMatter #NowMoreThanEver

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matter.ca


Prairie Life

MARCH 2019

Brandon-crafted dolls are toys with a message After adopting four children with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), a Brandon-area entrepreneur is making her penchant for knitting a business with an important message for expectant mothers. Naomi Johnson’s Neenee Kaboo Baby and Youth Products is marketing a line of unique dolls for babies, toddlers and older children while highlighting the fact that drinking any amount of alcohol during pregnancy can negatively affect the fetus. The idea came to her when she combined her goal of starting a business with creating a line of toys for her youngest daughter. “We adopted a little girl and all her siblings, which are also adopted and quite a bit older than her,” Johnson told The Westman Journal. “I had this crazy idea that what she could really use was a ragdoll type thing that looks like her siblings because they’re all at school now. I went looking for custom dolls and couldn’t believe how much they cost and what it took to make them. I decided that I had enough knitting skills from somewhere way back beyond to start doing that myself.” A year later, she has established a line of toys that are sized according to the age of the child playing with them. The dolls have different tones of skin and various personalities outlined on documents that come with their purchase. Johnson also makes custom dolls for families wishing to make miniature versions of themselves. “It was something I saw a need for with our daughter,” she said. “There are a lot of toys out there, but there’s something different about a toy they can hold. We found, as I was knitting, I would give the dolls to her to play with as I was getting the design right and when they’re babies, the baby (dolls) themselves are the perfect size. It fits their hand. It doesn’t have any legs and doesn’t have a whole bunch of pieces, but they can hold it. She recognizes the main features, like the eyes and the nose, and she knew which way around the head was.” Each doll also has a card with educational information highlighting the dangers of drinking while pregnant and the affects of FAS. Johnson knows that most children may not understand the information, but the message about drinking during pregnancy is clear to the parents and older children.

Brandon-area entrepreneur Naomi Johnson has created a line of dolls for young children, each one highlighting the fact that no amount of alcohol is permissible while pregnant. “If there is one message that they take from it, it would be not to drink if and when that times comes, or to encourage others not to. That would be great,” Johnson said. The Neenee Kaboo line of dolls are currently being retailed through the business’s website, neeneekaboo.com, and the Baby Bump Pregnancy Care Centre on 18th Street in Brandon. Originally from England, Johnson has also made connections there, taking her burgeoning business international. Since beginning to sell the dolls in November, customers in England and New Zealand have been in contact with her. “There seems to be quite a big movement for preventing FAS disorders in Australia and New Zealand,” she said, adding that she also hopes to work with organizations like the

By Christopher L. Istace

Brandon School Division (BSD) to create fundraising initiatives with her line of products. “We haven’t heard word back from (BSD), but we have some other ties in other areas of Canada. We have family in Flin Flon and some friends in Yellowknife that would like to pass it on to their school division, so we’re hoping that would be the route it takes.” Neenee Kaboo’s proposed fundraising program would see 20 per cent of proceeds from the sale of the dolls benefiting schools, parent councils or other organizations wishing to raise money for their own needs. “I’m hoping as the business grows and we’re making more dolls that we can donate the profits or make dolls to gift to places like the Elspeth Reid Centre and Pregnancy Crisis Centre Westman to pass on,” she said. “I was (at the crisis centre) this morning, actually. It would be a really nice to give a doll to hand on to a mother; just something for them to hold on to so they remember during that time that there is a baby involved in their life right from the very beginning.” The business’s website continues to develop with the same emphasis on the dangers of FAS. Johnson is working with an acquaintance in England on developing an animation on fetal alcohol syndrome with the dolls as characters. Besides being available to watch at neeneekaboo.com, Johnson hopes the video will be made available to schools and health facilities for educational purposes. Bobs and Lolo, a children’s music duo based in Vancouver, B.C., has offered their music for a soundtrack on both the video and the website. All of this was born from the adoption of four children, each of whom require care across a spectrum of disorders associated with FAS. “FASD affects some of the children more emotionally, and some socially and one of our children, academically, and it’s something you can’t see,” said Johnson. “Our kids are all very well behaved, but it’s something very real to them. It’s an uphill struggle and they do amazing. Kids can definitely be successful. It’s just very hard to see that it is something that is 100 per cent preventable… “There’s no permissible amount of alcohol to have while you’re expecting.”

Blairs.ag Cattle Co.

The Pursuit of Excellence

3

2019 Bull sale

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 1:00 PM Jackson Cattle Co. Sale Facility, Sedley, Saskatchewan


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Prairie Life

MARCH 2019

WRAZ 61F

GBR 29F

Feb 14 Act BW 64 lb • Oct 2 Act WW 774 lb • Dam 91W has a proven track record of good ones regardless of sire choice. Keep all the daughters! Steers will have excellent eye appeal, muscle definition, top and a hair coat to top the market.

WRAZ 88F

SOS Game of Thrones 98D x Bar J Trojan 68X 3rd Gen Pld, BW 90, 205 DW 800 CE 6.9 BW -.5 WW 34 YW 70 M 23 TM 40 Calving ease from a 1st calver

GBR 117F McTavish Excel 20B x Pleasant Dawn Infusion 413A 3rd Gen Pld, BW 91, 205 DW 872 CE 3.2 BW 1.7 WW 43 YW 77 M 25 TM 47 Tremendous hair that is consistent in Excel sons

Feb 18 Act BW 74 lb • Oct 2 Act WW 814 lb • Dam 30X is a mix of New Trend and Indeed known to produce outstanding females. 30X is one of the top females in the herd. 88F is a big barrelled masculine son of Assassin that will add hair and muscle. Keep all the females!

WRAZ 147F

GBR 212F XAL Custom Made 1C x G.Bros Standout 8S 3rd Gen Pld, BW 93, 205 DW 821 CE 5.9 BW .6 WW 38 YW 71 M 22 TM 41 Good length and shape in these Custom Made sons

Mar 4 Act BW 61 lb • Nov 9 Act WW 718 lb • Dam 607D has done a fabulous job on her first one! Big time calving ease in this pedigree along with the actual BW. Monopoly has proven calving ease along with excellent muscle shape. A heifer bull that will leave you calves you are proud to market!

OPEN HOUSE at WRAZ, Saturday, April 6 • 1:30 PM Presale viewing of the bulls, their sires, dams & siblings with calves at foot.

“The program you can count on”

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Sale Manager

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Kelly, Tracy, William & Wyatt Brimner Box 93, Manor, SK S0C 1R0 T 306-448-2028 • C 306-577-7698

View the catalogue online at www.bylivestock.com


Prairie Life

Art piece to highlight lake’s beauty

A public art installation that will celebrate Manitou Beach’s centennial will use the reflective power of stainless steel to beautify and interact with the lakeshore environment. Manitou Reflections is a joint effort between three local artists: mural painter Michael Gaudet, welder/blacksmith Robert Thibault, and painter/landscaper Darrell Basckak. “We’re collaborating to create a stainless steel cut-out wall that will overlook the lake at Manitou Beach here. The idea is that it’s going to have cut out shapes of the north side of the lake reflected in the water,” said Gaudet. “It’s going to tie into the north side of the lake visually. That’s the the idea. It’s going to all tie together with the actual landscape.” In the past few years, the lakeshore has been ravaged by rising water levels. The installation aims to help re-beautify the area again. The installation will be made up of 42 panels that are 32 inches by 32 inches. They will be riveted together into a 12 foot by 16-foot-high curved wall, installed along the shore of Little Manitou Lake, and will be suspended eight feet off the ground using steel posts. The resort village has committed to terracing the slopes around the installation, creating an amphitheatre-like environ-

By Devan C. Tasa

Michael Gaudet holds up concept art of a new public art installation he’s working on with Robert Thibault and Darrell Basckak to mark the Resort Village of Manitou Beach’s centennial. ment. It will also fork the nearby boardwalk to make it wheelchair accessible. Heritage Canada has given a 50 per cent matching grant for

the $51,000 project. “We have a couple of fundraising concepts in place to raise the balance to get us over the top to do this thing in spring and summer,” Gaudet said. People can help by sponsoring panels, each available for a $250 sponsorship. People can also buy one of 100 steel geese or simply donate to the project. All donors will be listed on a nearby plaque. Gaudet said they’ve raised 75 per cent of the funds they need. Patti Lindgren is working as the project manager of the installation after finding the idea behind it inspiring “Everything about this actually almost makes me want to cry. It’s so moving,” she said. “I’ve never seen a stainless steel art installation like this before. I think the design is beautiful and that the idea for an amphitheater in a reflection zone is absolutely brilliant.” Lindgren said she’s encouraging locals to honour their ancestors by purchasing a panel. She herself encouraged the descendants of her grandparents, who homesteaded in the area, to chip in for a panel. Gaudet said the hope is to have the installation ready by August, with fabrication work beginning at the end of April.

Persistence key to becoming professional writer

Robert Currie, Poet Laureate

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MARCH 2019

A poet recognized by the lieutenant governor for his lifelong contribution to the arts said the secret to writing success is just to continue writing. “I’ve known lots of writers along the way who haven’t kept doing it, and that’s what you have to do, because it’s very competitive,” said Robert Currie. “You have to have a thick skin because you’re going to get rejected over and over again. Every writer does.” Currie, who’s from Moose Jaw, came to Humboldt Feb. 19 to read some of his poems, most of them from his newest collection One-Way Ticket. The poems touch on subjects ranging from childhood memories to finding a cancer survivor’s fake breast, the game of hockey, the thoughts of a school shooter’s mother and a man who’s come home af-

ter many years seeking money from his parents. Currie won the 2009 Lieutenant Governor’s Lifetime Achievement Arts Award, became a Saskatchewan’s Poet Laureate in 2007 and was one of the first chairs of the Saskatchewan Writers Guild. “If I don’t write, eventually, I just feel like I’m missing something in life,” he said. “Once I get going writing something, I feel very much alive and time just flies. The hours go by very quickly when I’m writing, and I enjoy that.” Currie began writing as a kid, beginning his career when he made a submission to Canadian Boy. “They had writing contests and every month, and that was where I published my first story, so it was really neat to be a published writer when you’re just a kid.” The poet said he gains inspiration by looking

By Devan C. Tasa

at the past, being observant about what’s going on and being interested in general. He had some advice for aspiring poets. “Read a lot to find writers whose work you admire and notice what’s good about it, why do you admire them, and then just keep doing that.” Currie said the most important part of writing professionally is to keep doing it, adding he’s heard there’s almost like a decade-long apprenticeship to become a professional. “If you can write every day, that really helps,” he said. “I’m lucky because I have a little corner in the Moose Jaw library where I go to write, and they let me keep some books there – dictionary, thesaurus, that kind of thing. It’s just like having an office to go to and so I go there five days a week to write.”

Producing the Right Kind Year after Year! Wilson Lees

HE SELLS!

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Friday, April 5, 2019 Right Cross Ranch Sales Facility Kisbey, Saskatchewan, Canada 2 PM sale start time

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Glenlees Farm George & Annette Lees 306-455-2612 Corey & Tasha Lees 306-577-9971 www.glenlees.com

Haroldson’s Polled Herefords Chad Wilson 306-577-1256 www.haroldsons.com

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WW: 60.0

yW: 91.9

MILk: 24.4

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HOMO POLLED GLENLEES BNC 27C CONTACT 113F

NJW 73S 38W Rimrock 27C ET x GF 4L CONTENDER 220P BW: 3.4

WW: 51.8

yW: 83.8

MILk: 31.7

TM: 57.6


Poor 6

Nameless Boy releases a new album

Prairie Life

MARCH 2019

Former Estevan resident Joel Henderson, in the world of music better known as Poor Nameless Boy, has his new album put together. The Wake Up Call EP’s release will be on March 29, and the next day, Henderson will come back to Estevan’s Art Concepts, his second stop on a Western Canada tour. A lot has changed since his last album Bravery was released in 2016. More than two years later the new project turned out to be another unique experience. “The last project was made by a lot of friends; it was made by a lot of people really putting in contributions. Songs were written over a shorter period of time, it was a big shot in the dark. And this one, the biggest difference to me is the evolution of songwriting. People will be able to tell from these tracks that the style is just a little different. And I love it,” Henderson said. He explained that there will be a little bit less roots and country in the new album, and a little bit more Americana. His producer took on the project along with Henderson and there were a number of musicians joining Poor Nameless Boy for some of the songs, so it still was a collaborative project. All songwriting was done by Henderson. Some concerts on the tour will have the entire band performing together, while others, including Estevan, were a solo acoustic program by Henderson. So far, just one song from the new album was released. Henderson said that the response to Catch Up and Slow Down song was really good. “Radio picked it up. We went with the new radio tracker for that from the last one. And results are very good, I was really happy,” Henderson noted. Henderson believes that “this song is a slow-burner and over time people will come

Joel Henderson will release his latest album later this month. File photo down to understand the message of Catch Up and Slow Down and realize that it’s just a call to realize what’s important in life and spend time with that.” The rest of the album is about communication in general. The social realm made Henderson look this way and address the topic in his art. “There was a bit of a time where everyone can kind of hear a bit of a political shift in Canada and the United States. And the one thing that I noticed above everything else was just not necessarily the rise and the rhetoric,

Virden,MB

Phone: 204-748-2809 Toll free 1-888-784-9882 Fax 204-748-3478 hls.virden@hls.ca

FEB/MAR SCHEDULE MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

18 CLOSED LOUIS RIEL DAY

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20 REGULAR FEEDER SALE • 9 AM

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22 BRED COW SALE 11:30 AM

25 BUTCHER SALE 9 AM

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27 PRESORT FEEDER SALE • 10 AM

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4 BUTCHER SALE 9 AM

10 REBELS OF THE WEST SIMMENTAL BULL SALE

11 BUTCHER SALE 9 AM

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25 BUTCHER SALE 9 AM

WED

THURS

FRI

SAT

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8 BRED COW SALE 11:30 AM

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13 14 PRESORT SHEEP/ FEEDER GOAT SALE SALE • 10 AM 12:00 NOON

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16 PLEASANT DAWN CHAROLAIS BULL SALE

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but how people were talking to one another,” said Henderson. “It was wanting to be right, instead of wanting to hear the other side of the argument, consider that you were wrong, or to just gain more perspective, or the conversation became shouting matches, or it became blame pointing. And it was constant as well. “I think over the last few years people have tuned out some people in society, or they’ve muted them in a sense.” His album was created to become a call to wake up and come back to impor-

By Ana Bykhovskaia

tant people, to give each other grace and a chance to be heard. The inspiration for this album was gained over the past couple years, while Poor Nameless Boy had many successful tours and performances all over the world. “I’ve been showcasing and touring in multiple different international places. I’ve been to Australia, Germany twice, Denmark, Switzerland, UK, including Scotland, to Belgium, France and down to the United States as well,” Henderson said. The reception in many countries was good. “It’s been really cool. I’m really hoping to get back to Australia at some point. I know that I will be back to the UK pretty soon. But Germany was, I think, probably where I was well received the most. I got into some different playlists there, and some wonderful showcases, and some great reviews while I was in their country,” Henderson said. The contemporary tour will cover many places in western Canada, but Henderson is the most excited about performing in Regina and Saskatoon, since those venues will have the entire band playing together and will also be bigger venues, which will provide some understanding of how many fans he has by now. “It’s really where the fullness of the sound is going to come out,” he said. However, having a heart of the songwriter Henderson still loves smaller intimate concerts. “I’m loving to take the songs on the road, because I still have the heart of a songwriter where there is nothing like just sitting with the acoustic guitar and playing the songs.” Besides, coming back to Estevan also always makes his heart beat harder. “It’s just always great to play in Estevan, it was my home for 18 years and it’s always interesting to come back.”

ging the Arts in r B f o s r a 50 Ye

to You!

The Celtic Tenor The Celtic Tenors WEYBURN CONCERT SERIES

Ghostboy 2019-2020 Season Ticket pkgs. will be available at this concert Adult - Advance $30.00 www.celtic-tenors.com www.celtic-tenors.com Child/Student - Advance $15.00

ADVANCE TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: Music Craft, 215 Railway Ave., Weyburn Old Fashion Foods, 122 - 3rd Street N.E., Weyburn Weyburn Review, 904 East Ave., Weyburn or at www.weyburnconcertseries.ca

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2015 7:30 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2015 at 7:30atP.M.

For any marketing information or questions regarding our feeder finance program or online auction contact: Adult - Door $35.00 Robin Hill, Manager (204-851-5465), Rick Gabrielle (204-851-0613), Ken Day (204-748-7713), Child/Student - Door $20.00 Orillon Beaton (204-851-7495), Kolton Mcintosh (204-280-0359) Butcher Cattle Sales start Monday SEPT. 24 selling cows, bulls and fat cattle. DLMS Sales evety Thursday at 11 am at www.dlms.ca - call us to list your cattle Pre-sort sales - Delivery accepted until 5 pm the day before the sale. CUGNET CENTRE - WEYBURN COMPREHENSIVE SCHOOL 2015-2016 SINGLE TICKET TICKET PRICES: ABBAmania/Night Fever TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: 2015-2016 SINGLE PRICES: ABBAmania/Night Fever TICKETS TICKET PRICES: ABBAmania/Night Fever TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: AVAILABLE AT: Bred Cow Sales - Delivery accepted until 2pm the day before the sale. Regular sale delivery accepted2015-2016 SINGLE Superior Office Products 122 Third Adult Advance $28.00 Child/Student Advance $12.00 Superior Products -- 122 Third Adult AdvanceChild/Student $28.00 Child/Student Advance $12.00Superior Office Products Office - 122 Third Street, Weyburn $28.00 Advance $12.00 Tuesday 8 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Sunday delivery between noon and 8 pm for Monday Butcher Sales. Adult Advance or Adult at $30.00 Child/Student at or at at www.weyburnconcertseries.ca www.weyburnconcertseries.ca k e Adult at Door Door Child/Student $30.00 Child/Student at Door Door $15.00 $15.00or atis www.weyburnconcertseries.ca e Adult at Door $30.00 at Door $15.00 w th Presort Influence Sales - all breeds and classes of feeder cattle accepted for these sales. ALL CATTLE MUST HAVE THE CCIA RFID CATTLE IDENTIFICATION TAGS.

CUGNET - WEYBURN COMPREHENSIVE CUGNET CENTRECENTRE - MARCH WEYBURN COMPREHENSIVE WEDNESDAY, 27, 2019 - 7:30SCHOOL P.M. SCH

SK DEALERS LICENSE 171306 MB DEALERS LICENSE 1317

PRAIRIE SKY CO-OP

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Prairie Life

MARCH 2019

Young grain producer making a name for himself

Tyler Peniuk of Sturgis learned at an early age that something worth doing took dedication, hard work and passion. Along with his dad, Gaye, he has built up his farm, Peniuk Farms from 2,700 acres to 6,500 seeded acres. Tyler said he grew-up and graduated in the Sturgis area, helping his dad on the family farm. At 16 years of age, he had the opportunity to rent 300 acres of government land with the financial backing of his dad. That kicked off his passion for grain farming. He continued with renting some land and went into partnership with his dad. After Peniuk graduated from Sturgis Composite School he attended the University of Saskatchewan enrolled in agriculture. He only attended school for a brief period but returned to the farm and his true passion. “There were times I wondered what I was doing coming back to farm. Many individuals told me not to but my dad always supported me and encouraged me to follow my dreams,” said Peniuk. When he returned to the family farm, he was faced with many challenges including using old equipment. Peniuk had a vision. Through hard work and determination, he has built up his equipment and expanded his grain farming business. Currently, Peniuk seeds 6,500 acres of wheat and canola and has two full-time and four seasonal employees. He has grown other crops but has found that wheat and canola seem to be a firm staple with a faster and simpler growing season. “Seeding time will see us going 24 hours a day until completed,” said Peniuk. “Harvest is equally busy with combines and one tractor and grain cart. Weather does play a role but we usually managed to wrap up harvest

by the end of September.” After harvest Peniuk stores his grain in bins that hold up to 42,000 bushels and in temporary grain bags over five different yard sites. “The 2018 harvest was the best year we had in a while, with 2004 as probably the worst year with early frost, but with hard work and dedication we continued. To help diversify the farm I have hauled oil for four years and contaminated soil last year as well hauling gravel, including for the new Viterra project in Wadena. We also do custom seeding and combining after we are done our own,” he explained. “It has been a learning curve for me but with great help from my mom, Karen Peniuk who runs for parts and meals and my friends who have seen me through all the tough times. Kyle Bileski and Lee Kozak were a key factor in supporting me and being right beside me for the past 10 years. Kozak and Cody Link are my two main guys who are tremendous hard workers. I could not ask for a better crew to work with. They have all shared experiences and helped us build up the farm. “It is very fortunate that there is a big farm equipment dealership close by as the guys there have been great with answering my questions especially with the bigger newer equipment and its technology. Tim Olson and Conrad Peterson are very knowledgeable as the guys in the dealership shop. “I am happy where I am at this time with the farm and strive to maintain what I have. I believe in keeping it simple and manage what I have with the best possible profit. I feel very fortunate and lucky to be able to take over the family farm, as not everyone gets this opportunity,” he concluded.

By Ken Lewchuk

Harvesting the wheat grain crop is a busy time with three combines in operational all season.

A drone captured the action of combining season at the Peniuk Farms in September 2018. Drone photographs courtesy Matt Cave

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8

Prairie Life

MARCH 2019

Archer’s ability puts him in national spotlight

People in Estevan, and in Canada’s archery community, know how talented Hunter Chipley is with a bow and arrow. At age 17, he has already competed on the national stage and has won championships. But now he is gaining recognition for his abilities beyond the archery community. Chipley, 17, was a star at the recent Canada Winter Games in Red Deer, Alta. He won a gold medal in the men’s individual recurve event and a silver medal in the team recurve mixed event, alongside teammate Jay Gegner of Regina. Then, just hours before the Games ended, Chipley found out he would be Team Saskatchewan’s flag bearer for the closing ceremonies. He led a team of 215 athletes and 96 coaches, managers and support staff into the venue for the ceremonies, which were held at the Enmax Centrium on March 2. The event aired on TSN/RDS. “I didn’t think they would pick me, because there was 200-something athletes, and a variety of athletes there,” Chipley said in an interview. Once they had walked into the venue, Chipley was presented with a Saskatchewan flag that he held onto for the rest of the ceremonies. Not only was he singled out for his success in the sport, but he was also chosen for having a positive attitude. He recognizes there were a lot of talented athletes to choose from. Chipley was among the contenders in men’s individual recurve from the outset. After the first round, he was in second place with a score of 573, just seven points behind first place finisher Aaron Cox of Alberta. He also had a score of 573 in the second round, which was nine points behind Cox. It’s a pretty good score, he said, as it is out of 600 possible points. Archers are awarded points based on their proximity to the bull’s-eye with their arrows. Chipley finished the qualification round in second spot with a score of 1,146, which earned him a bye to the quarter-finals. He defeated New Brunswick’s Luc Arseneau Chiasson 6-0 in the quarters, and Ontario’s Reece Wilson-Poyton 7-3 in the semifinal round, setting up the showdown with Cox in the final, which Chipley won 6-4. “You shoot a round, and if you win it, you get two points, and if you tie, you get one each,” he said. Archers get to shoot three arrows in each round in the playoffs. Ten points are awarded

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for a bull’s-eye, and Chipley said a score of 29 is really good. The first archer to win three rounds wins. It means he could have as few as nine arrows to shoot in a matchup, which was the case against Arseneau Chiasson, or closer to 20, which happened against Cox. The final against Cox was a tough match between the toptwo ranked competitors, but it was a lot of fun. “In one of the 600 ends (in the preliminary round), I was shooting beside him, and it was a good time. We’d talk and have fun. But we respected each other. If he shot a good round, or I shot a good round, we’d say it was a good round to each other.” Cox is 19, so it was his last year as a junior, while it was Chipley’s first year as a junior. The following day, he added the silver medal to his tally. The Saskatchewan entry of Chipley and Gegner was among the best throughout the competition. They were second after the initial qualifying round with a score of 1,083 points, and finished third in Round 2 with 1,073 points. Their two-round total of 2,156 points left them in third spot overall. “There were lots of strong shots, and holding everything together,” said Chipley. “But it’s really hard. Before you know where you’re placed for medals and things like that, there are lots of nerves because you want to get into the medal matches, but as soon as Jay and I got into the gold and silver match, we relaxed.” They knew they were going to leave with a medal they had earned together. In the quarterfinals, they defeated sixth-seeded Manitoba 6-4, and then knocked off Ontario, the No. 2 team, 6-4 in the semifinal round, putting them in the final against Quebec, which they lost 6-2. This was the first time he had competed with her. “We get along pretty well,” he said. “We both know how to calm each other down, and stuff like that, and make each other feel good about ourselves,” said Chipley.

Deloraine’s new curling rink was emulated in Utah in midJanuary. Scott Day was home to Deloraine early in the New Year and while here he visited the new curling a few days before the official opening. His goal was to get some photos of the curling rink, the hacks, the rings, etc. to take back to the States to explain the game. After 24 years with Manitoba Agriculture as an extension agronomist and research farm manager, Day helped start the San Francisco-based private equity company “Fall Line Capital” in 2012 and is now their Director of Agronomy. While working for Fall Line full time he and his wife Ann spend 6 months each winter at their head office in Silicon Valley and then the 6 months of summer working out of their home in Deloraine and farming with Scott’s parents near Dand, Man. Every other year Fall Line brings all its farmers and ag tech investment people from across the USA together for a two day farming summit in Park City, Utah. Park City was a major venue for the 2002 Olympics (like Whistler was to Vancouver’s Olympics). Two years ago they did the biathlonthlon as their outside activity but this year everyone wanted to try curling. Approximately 100 farmers, scientists and investors took up this opportunity to curl for the very first time. Day was asked to explain and introduce the game because he was the only person in the entire group that had even seen a curling rock. It had been 30 years since he had curled, and he joked “even back then I was terrible, despite Phil Edwards being my

By Judy Wells

High School skip – so we were a sad bunch on the ice in Utah but the local curling club there in Park City assigned us six club members to help coach and explain the game further. We played twoend games and by all accounts everyone had a fantastic time.” “When I said we would do Skip’s Rocks if we were tied after the two ends – even the local club members didn’t know that I was talking about – they thought that was a great idea and will now incorporate that into their league games going forward!” Day adds that curling is gaining popularity at a quick pace in the U.S. This is due to the U.S. Men’s gold medal at the 2018 Olympics. “I’m sure if anyone wants to do a working holiday in the U.S. there would be plenty of coaching and mentoring opportunities even in the deep south – just make sure you have the right paperwork – or do it for free.” “They are building the first dedicated curling rink in the San Francisco area across the bay from our office right now – and there are 8 million people in the Bay area! – I see it being a very popular sport here in the near future.” “Ann and I will soon be in Deloraine for the summer. We are grateful for and proud of the Deloraine Winchester Community Centre back home. My pictures of Deloraine’s new facility were integral to explain the game and its importance to our Prairie culture and community at our Utah event. I also stressed that the USA will definitely not win the gold in the next Olympics,” Day concluded.

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Chipley said he worked really hard to be a contender at the Games, and he was happy with how he shot in Red Deer. There were some very talented young archers at the Games, and he was happy to come home with two medals. “We’re all shooting really high scores, and really consistent scores, so the competition was pretty hard,” said Chipley. He believes his previous experience at national events was a big boost. “It’s a multi-sport event,” he said. “So there’s a whole bunch of different sports here. We all stay in one village and stuff like that. But it helped with calming myself , and knowing my steps, and what I have to do.” Archery is truly a family affair for the Chipley clan: Hunter has been training in the sport since the age of two, his older sister Jade is a two-time archery team alumni of the Canada Games, his father Ken has twice coached the archery team at a Canada Games, and his mother Monai Wanner was team manager for archery. He credits his parents and the Estevan Archery Club for his development in the sport. He and his father have gone to Toronto for competitions and other events, allowing him to learn from the best in the country. Wanner was pleased with not only the amount of work that her son put in, but with all of the archers on Team Sask. “They’ve all been in the program for the last three years, and have met at least once every two months to practice together, to go through training through Sask. Sport,” she said. “They did mental training with Sask. Sport, as well as physical training.” That commitment and dedication paid off. This is their sport, and they’re not usually involved in other sports. The archery athletes at the Winter Games were the best in the country, too. “All of the kids, in order to get on the team for each province, had to go through some type of elimination round or competition to pick the best kids in that province,” she said.

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Prairie Life

MARCH 2019

Offering an authentic prairie experience Alfredo Converso and Linda Osachoff are the proprietors of La Campagna, a bed and breakfast located near Canora which first opened to the public in 2011. He is from the Puglia countryside in Italy, while she is of Ukrainian/Russian heritage and was born and raised in Canora. Converso first came to Canada as a teenager in 1968 under sponsorship from his aunt, and lived in Ontario. He worked in sales for approximately 30 years in investments, insurance and later in new home sales. But in 2001 he returned to Italy to care for his father until he passed away in 2005. He returned to Canada, but this time came to Canora. Osachoff has lived in the Canora area for most of her life, and worked in senior leadership positions for a number of organizations, including the Crossroads Credit Union and health care human resources. La Campagna is on a quarter section of land where the environment and the accommodations have wide ranging appeal for visitors. “La Campagna is a word that bridged our two cultures,” said Converso. “In Italian it means ‘countryside,’ and in Russian it’s very similar to a word that means ‘company.’” The bed and breakfast includes two suites. One looks out on the nearby Whitesand River, while the second is just a few steps away from the gardens. When visitors open the front door, they are greeted by a flower garden featuring many vibrant colours. The trees play a significant role in the landscape, and they have been working to make sure that continues. “We started oak trees from acorns for our shelter belt,” said Converso. “We started 255 and over 72 per cent of them sprouted, so we’re quite pleased with that.”

They occasionally hire part time help during the busiest times, but Converso and Osachoff do the majority of the work themselves. The market garden is a busy place throughout the growing season, and produces many of the foods featured in La Campagna meals, including: tomatoes, potatoes, corn, lettuce, onions, currants, grapes, and garlic. The operation is not certified organic, but no pesticides are used. Converso said they have noticed that this is becoming important to an increasing number of visitors. Produce not used at La Campagna is often sold at area farmers markets. Converso has become well known around the region for his flavourful garlic. “We charge $12 per pound for it, and customers don’t mind once they taste it. You get what you pay for.” Converso plants three different types of garlic, which he said have to be at least 50 yards apart to prevent cross pollination. Weeding is easily the most time consuming job. “The area between rows can be done with a mulcher, but around the plants we do the weeding on hands and knees,” said Converso. He said he harvests the scapes from the healthiest garlic plants, which are stems growing directly from the bulbs, and allows them to go to seed. He dries and plants them, and leaves them in the ground for two years before they are harvested, which “produces strong garlic with excellent disease resistance.” Even though the Italian and Ukrainian cultures are very different, one thing both agree on is the importance of garlic. They presently have about half an acre, but Converso said they have enough demand to grow and sell 10 acres. Another thing Converso and Osachoff have in common is their love of cooking, and their eagerness to share it with visitors.

9

By Rocky Neufeld

Alfredo and Linda are strong believers in al fresco dining with visitors, which literally means, “In the fresh outside.” “When people come to our place, our goal is a brand new experience for them,” Converso said. “For preparing meals we have an open space and encourage guests to watch and smell the food preparation.” “We offer six courses,” Osachoff explained, “including appetizers, soup, salad, pasta, main course and dessert.” As much as possible, they cater to the needs of guests, including special requests such as gluten free meals. Of course, Italian dishes are a staple here, including seared scallops in brown butter and Italian bruschetta. Osachoff bakes Italian bread and makes homemade pasta and pasta sauce. “A lot of people have never experienced Italian eating,” said Converso. “Some call it the slow food movement. It’s not unusual for a meal to start at 1 p.m. and continue until around 5 p.m.” “While we grow our own produce, all our meats are sourced locally from area livestock producers,” said Osachoff. After meals, visitors are encouraged to enjoy the yard. Some enjoy walking and taking in the stillness of the countryside. “Some like to help with picking produce in the garden, which we

really appreciate,” chuckled Osachoff, “while others like to bring books and board games to read or play while they’re here.” La Campagna has entertained visitors from across Canada and the northern United States. The business has consistently won awards for placing in the top 10 bed and breakfasts in Saskatchewan, which is sponsored by the Saskatchewan Bed and Breakfast Association. Converso and Osachoff believe the fees they pay to the association for membership are worthwhile to provide added assurance of a quality experience for visitors. A variety of happy occasions have been celebrated at La Campagna, including marriage proposals and honeymoons. “We feel lucky to be living in this part of the world,” said Osachoff, “where we have clean air, clean water, and good neighbours. There’s more than enough space for people to be alone if they want, or they can be around other people.” Osachoff and Converso each do volunteer work for the National Doukhobor Heritage Village in nearby Veregin, while he also is involved with the Canora Co-op, the provincial Bed and Breakfast Association and the local and provincial Arts Councils.

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TARS brings hope and life to people in need

Prairie Life

MARCH 2019

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An Evening with STARS is set to take stage on Tuesday, April 9 at McKenna Hall in Weyburn, starting at 5:30 pm. The affair will host special guests from the STARS Trauma Team, headed by CEO and President Andrea Robertson. The goal for this fundraising event is to raise funds to build a helicopter emergency landing pad for the future new hospital to serve Weyburn and area. All proceeds will go to the Weyburn and District Hospital Foundation as efforts continue to build and equip a new hospital for Weyburn and area. STARS has benefitted and helped many local families, including Jean Fahlman of Weyburn. She shared how her daughter and son-in-law were directly impacted by the services of the STARS Air Ambulance as they helped save a life. Michael and Holly Gammon worked as a doctor and nurse in the hospital in Brooks, Alta., but their lives were abruptly changed by a serious accident involving Michael on June 5, 2010, which happened to be his 65th birthday. He was driving from Brooks to Bassano when his car rolled over and he was seriously injured. “We didn’t know why he had that accident,” said Jean, noting Michael has no memory of the accident. Some time after the accident, Jean and her family met a woman who happened to be a witness of the rollover, and this shed some light on how the accident occurred. The woman said Michael had passed her on the highway, and while travelling ahead of her, he seemed to turn his head to something in the car. He swerved and hit a soft spot on the shoulder, tried to correct himself and ended up rolling over in the ditch. Michael was taken to hospital in Brooks, and the doctor on call treated him but had no idea how to deal with the extensive injuries Michael had, so the STARS Air Ambulance was called. Michael’s wife Holly was also there as she had been called in. “STARS responded with a team with a woman and two men, and they worked on him for two hours before they him stable enough to fly him to Calgary. They were wonderful, and they included Holly in their efforts to save his life,” said Jean. “She thought they were so professional and so compassionate. The care they gave him in Brooks saved his life.” The woman from the STARS trauma team came to the hospital in Calgary where he was in ICU, and watched as medical staff there continued to treat him. For her to follow up at the hospital “was above and beyond, with the interest she showed” in his care, and this impressed the family very much, and Jean noted that there is no doubt in Holly’s mind that her husband’s life was saved by their efforts in Brooks before transporting him. Holly left her job as a nurse, and took up residence in Calgary to be near Michael as he embarked on a long, slow journey to recovery from his severe injuries. Doctors felt he would never walk again, but he is able to walk now with assistance. “They have had two grandchildren since that time, and he is enjoying them a lot. They are very understanding of his condition,” said Jean. “We certainly know that STARS saved his life, without any doubt, and for that we are very grateful. He’ll never be the same, but he’s better than we thought he would ever be.” Another Weyburn resident who received help from STARS

was Darwin Stainbrook, whose wife, Carmen Vilness-Stainbrook, related the story of how STARS provided the necessary assistance to save his life. In October of 2017, Darwin was at the Wholesale Club buying some groceries, and when he was at the till to pay for them, the cashier could see he was in some distress and called 911. “The cashier could tell something was wrong, and he kept wanting to leave,” said Carmen, who expressed thankfulness that she was able to keep Darwin there until an ambulance arrived. When the ambulance came, the EMTs were able to determine he had signs of a severe stroke, and he was taken to Estevan where doctors were able to give him a CT scan. Due to the location of the clot and Darwin’s condition, doctors recommended that he be taken to Saskatoon where the proper equipment was available to treat him. “He was alone at the store when this happened, but people who helped him knew who he was, and they contacted me and his son Derek. We drove to Estevan where he had been taken,” said Carmen, noting that as Saskatoon was highly recommended for treatment, STARS had to be called to transport him. Due to the distance from Estevan, STARS brought a plane in rather than a helicopter, and with a nurse and paramedic, she was able to fly along with Darwin up to Saskatoon, while Derek drove up as soon as he was able to come. Carmen was told that the STARS flight had to be made without the need for refueling, so the plane was needed rather than the helicopter. “I wasn’t aware the air ambulance and STARS are both under the same umbrella,” said Carmen, noting that due to the funding provided to STARS, the cost was the same as for a helicopter, and it’s kept low compared to the cost of a ground ambulance. She was impressed with the quickness of the service too, noting that his stroke occurred around 2:30 or 3 p.m. at the Wholesale Club, and before midnight he was being treated for his clot at the Saskatoon hospital. As the stroke happened on the left side of his body, the right side was affected by the stroke, including his mobility at first. If Darwin hadn’t been treated in such a timely fashion, he would have had a lot more complications, said Carmen, noting that Darwin has had a long, slow recovery, but he has made definite progress. One of the signs of his progress was just this week, he took an assessment for his driver’s licence, and he will be receiving his licence back soon, said Carmen. Darwin was treated in Saskatoon for about five days, then he was taken to Regina, where he was treated at the General Hospital for a couple of weeks, and was at the Wascana Rehabilitation Centre for about a month. Carmen said she was very impressed with the service provided by STARS. “They were very professional,” she said, noting the plane had a pilot and co-pilot, a nurse and a paramedic, and there was enough room for her to go with them, which would not have been the case with a helicopter. “The paramedic always let me know what was happening, and I was very comfortable with how everything was going,” said Carmen. “I just think it’s an excellent service, and buying tickets for the fundraiser will help everyone.”

The TFSA: A Flexible Savings Choice The Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA) is frequently called “a Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) for everything else beyond retirement.” Unlike with an RRSP, you can access the money in your TFSA with no tax consequences for any need, and the amounts withdrawn are added back to your contribution limit amount in the following year. As of January 1, 2019, any Canadian resident who has reached the age of majority can contribute up to $6,000 annually to a TFSA. But when should you consider this type of savings plan? A TFSA may be useful if: • You are a younger investor. If you are currently in a low tax bracket and expect to be in a higher bracket in the future, contributing to a TFSA may be best for you. RRSPs offer tax savings if your income is in a higher tax bracket when you contribute to the plan and in a lower bracket when you withdraw. By contributing to a TFSA while in a low tax bracket, your investments grow tax free. When your tax rate is higher, you can withdraw funds from your TFSA to contribute to an RRSP and reduce more of your future taxes. Also, you are able to reclaim the amount you withdraw toward your TFSA annual contribution limit in the following year. • You are an established saver. If you have limited contribution room or have maximized your annual RRSP contributions

and are looking for ways to save more for retirement, a TFSA can help complement your retirement plan. In addition, you can give your spouse money that he or she can then use to contribute to a TFSA without affecting your TFSA contribution room or attracting income attribution. • You are transitioning to retirement. The TFSA can offer you tax-free income during retirement, which may help diversify your income stream. You can hold accounts with differing tax treatments in order to help smooth out your tax liabilities. • You are retired. Unlike with an RRSP, there is no requirement to close your TFSA at age 71. In addition, you can continue to contribute to a TFSA even though you may no longer be eligible to make RRSP contributions. • You are interested in preserving your financial legacy. The TFSA allows you to directly name a beneficiary. Upon your death, your TFSA assets can pass directly to your beneficiary tax free and also avoid probate. As always, please consult your tax advisor or estate-planning lawyer and your financial advisor. If you’re looking for a flexible savings vehicle, take another look at the TFSA. You might like what you see. Edward Jones, its employees and Edward Jones advisors cannot offer tax or legal advice. You should consult a qualified tax specialist or lawyer for professional advice regarding your situation.


Prairie Life

MARCH 2019

A trip ‘down under’ to talk farming It was a trip ‘down under’ to talk farming for the 2018 recipients of the Saskatchewan Outstanding Young Farmers Award. Jordan and Jennifer Lindgren of Norquay, who were presented the provincial award at the Farm Progress Show held in Regina last June, gave three presentations in Australia earlier this year, the speaking tour coming as a direct result of their award. Following the award presentation in Regina, something Jennifer Lindgren termed at the time as “pretty darned exciting” noting as well, “the other nominees were pretty incredible,” the couple advanced to the national competition. “It was pretty intense,” said Jordan in a recent interview. “You’re being judged as soon as you walk into the hotel.” In the end the national awards went to producers in Alberta and Quebec, but the Lindgrens were not overly disappointed because of the connections they’ve made. “It was an interesting experience,” said Jordan. “It’s like we’re part of a big family (now).” Jennifer said ultimately being part of the process both provincially and nationally built connections between the finalists and extending to participants from previous years as well. “We’re all super close now,” she said, adding they even group chat via social media to stay connected. The connections turned out to go beyond the circle of participants. “The night of the presentations at nationals, we got an email from a gentleman in Australia,” said Jordan. It turned out the contact from the Grains Research and Development Corporation was looking for a speaker for a meeting in Australia. Initially, the Australian group had apparently thought about seeking a producer in Great Britain, but they thought the farming would be too different, said Jordan. “The UK didn’t really translate to Australia,” he said.

So they Google searched outstanding young farmers in the United States, but came up empty, which had him turn the search to Canada, where Google brought him to the Lindgrens. The Lindgrens eagerly accepted the invitation and headed to Australia, doing a series of three presentations, the largest speaking to 700 producers in Perth. Jennifer said it was interesting to see the commonalities of farming here and in Australia, where wheat and canola are main crops for both countries. Jordan said in terms of their presentation they had been asked to talk about their operation, and to have lots of photographs, adding it helped that they had gathered a lot of information for the Outstanding Young Farmer Awards. The photos which garnered the most interest were those of a Saskatchewan winter. Jordan noted the Australian producers were amazed, if not shocked, that he would be out hauling grain when temperatures dipped as low as they do in Saskatchewan. The Lindgrens have always seen themselves as having a role in helping share information with other farmers. They do that by partnering with local agriculture distributors to host the ‘Field of Dreams’ tour that is held annually on their farm, which is an opportunity to share trial results from previous years and showcase the current trials that are focused on new genetics, applications and variable fertilizer rates. And, for the first time in 2018, they became a part of educating the next generation as they incorporate a ‘Food Farm’ into their operation which is an interactive tour geared at educating Grade 3 and 4 students on agriculture. Both undertakings played a prominent role in their Australian presentation. The Lindgrens said there was a great deal of interest in the ‘Food Farm’ concept as pro-

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ducers in Australia are working to get more agriculture into the education system. Of course there were lots of questions for the Canadian couple. “As soon as we got off the stage people were just swamping us,” said Jennifer. There was also a look at the Saskatchewan farm. The couple started out farming with Jordan’s father and uncle, buying some land of their own, and working in what evolved into a three-way partnership. Over time Jordan had assumed the management role, and then about eight years ago the couple bought out Jordan’s father and uncle. “We had to buy everything,” said Jordan in an earlier YTW interview, noting his father and uncle deserved to be paid for what they had built up through their partnership of near four decades. “It’s what they had worked their whole entire lives for. They deserved getting the most they could out of all their hard work.” There was never any hesitation to buy out the farm, but it took planning. There were kitchen table discussions regarding succession, and Jordan and Jennifer were helped out by having some of their own land and equipment to soften the impact of taking over. “We were preparing for it … We had built up to where we were able to do it,” said Jennifer on a farm visit last year. The move increased the couple’s debt load, but Jordan said debt is part of farming these days. If someone is going to farm “debt is going to be part of it.” “If there’s no risk, there’s no reward,” added Jennifer. Jordan said having Jennifer on the farm where she can bring meals to the field is a huge asset. He said having a hot, homecooked meal is something his employees look forward too during the busy seeding and harvesting seasons, the time of sharing a meal

11

By Calvin Daniels

Jennifer Lindgren being interviewed. being a key element of building camaraderie. Keeping workers happy is important on an operation where they employ two full and four seasonal people get all the work done. Jordan said he tries to create a working atmosphere where he’d want to work himself, if he were not farming. The workers are looked at almost as extended family. Jordan said he needs good workers because his focus is on dealing with breakdowns, planning crop sales, doing the management that increasingly has his attention on a computer screen rather than the steering wheel of a tractor. The farm staff may soon include an Australian. As a result of their speaking tour Jordan said they have received a resume from a young man, who wants to come to Canada to work on their farm after he completes his four-year agriculture course. “It’s opening some of these doors,” said Jordan, reflecting back on the Outstanding Young Farmer Award. “We’re starting to see the opportunity to make the connections,” echoed Jennifer. “… Really it’s such a small world today. You can learn stuff from everybody.”


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Prairie Life

MARCH 2019

WE’RE BLOWING OUT THE 2018s

2018 F150 CC 4X4 LARIAT

2018 F150 CC 4X4 XLT XTR

2018 FUSION AWD SPORT

2018 EDGE AWD SPORT

2018 ESCAPE SE FWD

MSRP

MSRP

MSRP

MSRP

MSRP

18LT179

18LT16

18FUS38

18EDG90

18ESC219

$68,118 $

51,811

$58,868 ($359 - BWKLY)

2018 ESCAPE SE AWD

MSRP

$32,789

SOLD

18ESC221

$

26,696

$

45,223

($187 BWKLY)

MSRP

$77,448 $

62,194

18LT61

18LT142

$56,868 ($296 - BWKLY)

2018 F150 CC 4X4 XLT SPORT

MSRP

$55,103

SOLD

18LT193

$

41,832

SOLD

$

43,421

($430 - BWKLY)

SOLD ($299 - BWKLY)

2018 F150 4X4 XLT SPORT SPECIAL EDITION

MSRP

$62,818

SOLD

18LT183

($290 - BWKLY)

$

48,776

$56,389 $

2018 ECOSPORT FWD SE

2018 EXPEDITION LIMITED MAX 4X4

$81,445

24,598 ($172 - BWKLY)

2018 F150 CC 4X4 PLATINUM

MSRP

MSRP

18LT95

18LT136

$74,584

$72,299

SOLD

18LT306

$

57,980

($399 B-WKLY)

2018 F150 CC LARIAT CHROME PKG DIESEL

$

51,749

($358 - BWKLY)

MSRP

$74,784

SOLD

18LT320

$

61,768

2018 F350 CC 4X4 KING RANCH DIESEL

MSRP

$93,333

SOLD

$

81,596

($563 -BWKLY)

44,917

($311 - BWKLY)

MSRP

$74,398

SOLD

$

61,453

$93,258 $

80,989

$69,168

SOLD

18LT328

($425 - BWKLY)

2018 F350 CC 4X4 KING RANCH DIESEL

MSRP

MSRP

SOLD

$

52,747

$83,593

SOLD

18SD156

(559 - BWKLY)

$

70,956

18LT192

$

54,652

($378 BWKLY)

2018 ECOSPORT 4WD SE

SOLD

$

26,688 ($187 - BWKLY)

2018 F350 CC 4X4 PLATINUM DIESEL

SOLD

MSRP

$94,023 $

40,707

($283 - BWKLY)

2018 F150 CC 4X4 XLT XTR

MSRP

$54,233 $

40,988 ($285 - BWKLY)

2018 F150 CC PLATINUM 4X4

MSRP

$85,778 18LT333

81,623

($563 - BWKLY)

2018 ECOSPORT 4WD SE

SOLD

MSRP

$31,589 $

$

SOLD

18LT195

18EC238

($490 BWKLY)

($290 - BWKLY)

18LT296

2018 F-350 CC 4X4 LARIAT DIESEL

MSRP

41,832

$53,853

18SD102

($365 - BWKLY)

$

MSRP

$69,618

18EC70

2018 F150 CC 4X4 LARIAT SPORT

($286 - BWKLY)

MSRP

$31,489 ($299 - BWKLY)

($421 BWKLY)

2018 F150 CC 4X4 XLT XTR

18LT307

43,157

60,979

2018 F150 CC 4X4 LARIAT SPORT

18LT322

$

$

$55,103

41,175

MSRP

18SD197

18SD266

$

$56,583

18LT321

($427 - BWKLY)

SOLD

$

MSRP

2018 F150 CC LARIAT CHROME PKG DIESEL

$76,098

18LT194

$54,383

MSRP

($291 - BWKLY)

MSRP

18LT270

$68,048

2018 F150 CC 4X4 XLT XTR

41,854

2018 F150 CC 4X4 LARIAT SPECIAL EDITION

18LT81

64,289 ($443 - BWKLY)

2018 F150 SC 4X4 XLT SPORT

$

26,464 ($185 - BWKLY)

MSRP

SOLD

18LT290

$55,098

$

MSRP

MSRP

18LT295

MSRP

$31,239

2018 F150 CC 4X4 XLT SPORT

18LT274

2018 F150 CC 4X4 LARIAT

MSRP

2018 F150 CC 4X4 XLT XTR

$58,538 ($286 - BWKLY)

2018 ECOSPORT 4WD SE

2018 F150 CC 4X4 LARIAT

MSRP

41,150

(168 - BWKLY)

$

MSRP

$

23,989

59,584 ($412 - BWKLY)

$

MSRP

43,989 ($305 - BWKLY)

SOLD

$80,078

2018 F150 CC 4X4 XLT SPORT

$

71,880 ($496 - BWKLY)

2018 F150 CC 4X4 LARIAT SPECIAL EDITION

2018 F150 CC 4X4 XLT XTR

$54,353

$

$

SOLD

18EC175

18EX45

2018 F150 CC 4X4 XLT XTR

$57,598

SOLD

MSRP

$28,639

18LT241

($339 - BWKLY)

48,696 ($337 - BWKLY)

Dealer demo with approx 7000km

MSRP

$

$30,339

38,988 ($271 - BWKLY)

18EC75

2018 F150 CC 4X4 XLT XTR

MSRP

$56,033

$

2018 F150 CC 4X4 LARIAT SPECIAL EDITION

MSRP

42,671

($314 - BWKLY)

18LT80

2018 F150 CC 4X4 XLT

$

$45,588

$

71,409

($493 - BWKLY)

2018 F150 CC 4X4 XLT XTR

MSRP

$56,583 18LT308

26,779

($187 BWKLY)

$

42,989 ($298 - BWKLY)

Payments include all applicable taxes and documentation fees. Selling price does not include applicable taxes and documentation fees. Payments are based on 6.49% OAC up to a maximum of 96 months.

206 Sims Ave. W. Weyburn

306-842-2645 www.greatplainsford.com

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Prairie Life, March, 2019  

Prairie Life, March, 2019  

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