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WEXNER CENTER FOR THE ARTS | THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY | 1871 NORTH HIGH STREET | COLUMBUS, OHIO 43210-1393

01+02 2013

NON-PROFIT ORG U S POSTAGE P A I D COLUMBUS OHIO PERMIT NO 711

J A N U A RY + F E B R U A RY 2 0 1 3 E V E N T S

wexner center for the arts

S20 HIROAKI UMEDA


onView JANUARY 27–APRIL 7

Josiah McElheny TOWARDS A LIGHT CLUB

Former residency artist Josiah McElheny explores modernist ideas of utopia through projected visual images and magnificently crafted glass sculptures in this new exhibition. McElheny uses glass and filmmaking to investigate a variety of artistic and intellectual concerns, often producing dazzling fabricated objects whose seductive beauty is matched by their intellectual rigor. The artist and master craftsman is fascinated by such subjects as the nature of visual perception, the narratives of modernism, the origins of the universe, and the enduring appeal of utopian fantasies. A highlight of this exhibition is McElheny’s most recent film, The Light Club of Vizcaya: A Women’s Picture (2012), an evocative and stylized adaptation of a 1912 novella, The Light Club of Batavia by German expressionist writer Paul Scheerbart. McElheny is designing a dramatic viewing environment for the film, an enclosed cathedral-like cinema space consisting in part of colored glass-block windows. Filmed in 2012 at the legendary Vizcaya mansion in Miami, with voiceover narration by photographer Zoe Leonard, The Light Club of Vizcaya was post-produced in the Wexner Center’s Film/Video Studio. Made possible with support from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Additional support provided by the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass.

JOSIAH MCELHENY TOP: Crystalline Landscape After Hablik and Luckhardt III, 2011, Hand-blown molded glass objects, colored sheet glass laminated to low-iron mirror, two-way mirror, glass diffuser, electric lighting, birch plywood and steel display structure, 56 x 57 x 30 inches, Courtesy Donald Young Gallery, Chicago

BOTTOM: From an Alternative Modernity (Mirror for Bruno Taut), 2009, Colored glass, laminated between low-iron glass, low-iron chrome mirror, 181/2 x 143/4 inches, Edition of 35, James Keith Brown and Eric Diefenbach, Photo courtesy Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York

J O S I A H M C EL H EN Y: TOWA R DS A L I G H T C LU B M A D E P O S S I B L E BY

A D D I T I O N A L S U P P O RT F O R J O S I A H M C EL H EN Y: TOWA R DS A L I G H T C LU B

THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS

ART ALLIANCE FOR CONTEMPOR ARY GL ASS


LAMBERT FAMILY LECTURE

A Conversation with Christian Marclay and Josiah McElheny SAT, JAN 26 | 5 pm FILM/VIDEO THEATER FREE

Join genre-bending artists Christan Marclay and Josiah McElheny as they discuss each other’s celebrated works, including those currently on view in the galleries. Curator at Large Bill Horrigan moderates the conversation. Everyone attending the conversation is welcome to stay for the preview party.

Christian Marclay: The Clock Christian Marclay’s The Clock is an international sensation that we’re pleased to bring here for its Midwest debut. A 24-hour video work that literally tells the time, The Clock features thousands of movie scenes depicting clocks, watches, and other timepieces, spliced together seamlessly. And you’ll watch the clips unfold precisely synced to our local time, with opportunities to view The Clock in its complete 24-hour duration on several occasions. Ranging from iconic movie scenes to more obscure film excerpts, The Clock includes “cameo appearances” by such stars as Marilyn Monroe, Gregory Peck, Jimmy Stewart, Charlie Chaplin,

Nicole Kidman, Robert Redford, and scores of other actors, as they watch or talk about the time. Dazzling in its artistic and technical virtuosity, The Clock is a remarkable feat. The New York Times calls it a “beguiling dream of eternal cinema and also a startling wake-up call,” and the New Yorker writes, “It’s one of those things you have to see.” Like Annie Leibovitz, this is an exhibition you’ll want to visit time and again. Visitors to The Clock are admitted on a first-come, first-served basis. Demand is expected to be high, and space in the gallery is limited, so you may experience significant wait times.

Made possible by generous support from the Lambert Family Lecture Series Endowment, which promotes dialogue about global issues in art and contemporary culture.

WINTER EXHIBITIONS

Member Preview

SAT, JAN 26 | 6–8 pm GALLERIES OPEN | 4 pm Help us welcome these three new shows at this festive gathering for our members, Ohio State students, faculty, and staff, and special guests. RSVP for the preview and lecture described above at wexarts.org/rsvp.

EXTENDED HOURS

Christian Marclay: The Clock SAT, JAN 26 members only SAT, FEB 9 SAT, MAR 2 SAT, APR 6 So that you can experience The Clock at every hour of the day and night, we will keep the gallery open all night on selected evenings. See the website for details, updates, and additions.

WALK-IN TOURS

Take a tour of the exhibition with a Wexner Center docent most Thursdays (5 pm) and Saturdays (1 pm). Tours are free with gallery admission (and free on Thursdays). Check the schedule on wexarts.org.

More American Photographs See renowned Farm Security Administration (FSA) photographs, taken between 1934 and 1944, juxtaposed with newly commissioned photographs of 21st-century America by 12 contemporary photographers. During the 1930s, the FSA employed photographers to travel throughout the country, documenting the “third of a nation” that President Franklin Delano Roosevelt defined as “ill-housed, ill-clad, ill-nourished.” More than 80 years later, this project sent renowned contemporary photographers, including William E. Jones, Catherine Opie, Sharon Lockhart, and Walead Beshty, across America to document the nation as we know it today. The result is a visually engaging, emotionally provocative exhibition that offers us new insights into America past and present: the changing face of the nation, our floundering and flourishing communities, and our people’s unceasing determination to persevere. The exhibition features more than 120 works: nearly 50 FSA photographs and over 70 images produced in 2011. Select FSA archival materials, cameras, and two documentaries are also on view. Organized by the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, San Francisco. CHRISTIAN MARCLAY The Clock, 2010, single-channel video, duration: 24 hours, © Christian Marclay, courtesy White Cube, London and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

MORE AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHS TOP: CATHERINE OPIE Bravo (Plumbing), 2011, Cibachrome print, 15 x 20 inches.

BOTTOM: GORDON PARKS Washington, D.C. Government charwoman, 1942, Inkjet Print, Courtesy the Library of Congress, Washington DC

JOIN NOW

Wexner Center members can visit the exhibitions as many times as they like, with free admission every time. Join when you come to the show, and we’ll credit your admission toward your membership. Join online 24/7 at wexarts.org/join. TICKET INFO

FREE members, college students (with valid ID), under 18 $6

senior citizens (65 and older) Ohio State faculty and staff (with BUCK ID)

$8

general public

FREE ADMISSION

Every Thursday from 4 to 8 pm and on the first Sunday of each month. IN THE STORE

Pick up the Wexner Center’s own catalogue of Josiah McElheny’s Towards a Light Club, along with the publication accompanying More American Photographs, in the Wexner Center Store. Additional books on McElheny and Marclay, as well as titles relating to the artists in More American Photographs, are also available.


CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON, Image courtesy Universal Pictures

onScreen

CLASSICS 3D DIGITAL RESTORATION

Creature from the Black Lagoon (Jack Arnold, 1954) THU, JAN 3 | 7 pm SAT, JAN 5 | 4 pm It’s our first plunge into digital 3D! Join us for this special presentation of one of Universal’s most iconic monster films. A group of scientists get more than they bargained for when they try to capture and study the fabled Amazonian creature. (79 mins., 2K DCP)

NEW DIGITAL RESTORATION

Heaven’s Gate (Michael Cimino, 1980) FRI–SAT, JAN 4–5 | 7 pm

(Raoul Walsh, 1924)

NEW DIGITAL RESTORATION OF DIRECTOR’S CUT

FRI, JAN 25 | 7 pm

Pulled from theaters one week after opening and rereleased with over an hour of footage cut, this so-called endpoint of the 1970s golden age of new American cinema (and notorious box-office disaster) recounts the 1892 land war between wealthy cattle barons and immigrant homesteaders. The triumphant new restoration brings a long-overdue reappraisal to the classic. (216 mins. plus intermission, 2K DCP)

The ever-iconic The Thief of Bagdad shows us a dapper Douglas Fairbanks leaping, swinging, and riding his magic carpet through a maze of wondrous (and pre-digital) sets by William Cameron Menzies. One of the most thrilling epics of the silent era, featuring a recorded score by Carl Davis (Napoleon). (149 mins., 2K DCP)

NEW DIGITAL RESTORATION

NEW DIGITAL RESTORATION INTRODUCED BY TIM LANZA OF THE COHEN FILM COLLECTION

Lawrence of Arabia

FILM HISTORY 101

NEW DIGITAL RESTORATION

The Thief of Bagdad

Tristana (Luis Buñuel, 1970)

FRI–SAT, JAN 11–12 | 7 pm

FRI–SAT, FEB 8–9 | 7 pm

Widely acclaimed as one of the greatest films of all time, this seven-time Oscar winner is now available in its most extensive restoration yet. Designed to show the film’s magnificence, these first local 4K screenings display T. E. Lawrence’s poetic interpretation of life during World War I’s Arabic campaign in all its epic glory. (217 mins. plus intermission, 4K DCP)

See the film that marked Buñuel’s return to production in Spain after his exile following the Spanish Civil War. Catherine Deneuve stars as the young orphan left in the care of a liberally minded (and much older) atheist aristocrat who quickly imposes himself on her as both father and lover. Tristana leaves with a young artist, only to seek revenge on her aging abuser years later. (95 mins., 2K DCP)

TUE, JAN 22 | 7 pm Featuring 20 minutes of unseen footage! In this visionary adaptation of Günter Grass’s acclaimed novel, a highly intelligent three-year-old decides to stop aging to protest the hypocrisy of adulthood and society. Caught in a state of perpetual childhood, he lashes out on 1920s Danzig with frantic poundings on his tin drum while the rest of the world marches toward the folly of World War II. An unforgettable fantasia of surreal imagery, striking eroticism, and unflinching satire. (163 mins., 2K DCP) Image courtesy Sony Pictures

(David Lean, 1962)

The Tin Drum (Volker Schlöndorff, 1979)

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA, Image courtesy Sony Pictures

TICKET INFO

$6 members, students, senior citizens $8 general public $3 children under 12 All events are in the Film/Video Theater, unless otherwise indicated.

Film/Video tickets are on sale at tickets.wexarts.org and the Patron Services Desk on the entrance level of the building. In-person ticket sales continue until a half-hour after show times or until the start of the second film of double features.

NEW DIGITAL RESTORATION

Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion (Elio Petri, 1970) TUE, FEB 19 | 7 pm In this dark satire, a top cop (Gian Maria Volonté) suddenly slashes the throat of his mistress and is then asked to head up the murder investigation. Things get even darker when the psychopathic officer begins intentionally dropping clues, all but daring his colleagues to catch him. Featuring a memorable score by Ennio Morricone. (112 mins., 4K DCP)

Non–English language films have English subtitles, unless otherwise indicated. All programs are subject to change.


JAMES ACHESON, Photo courtesy Columbia Pictures

AVANT-GARDE MASTERS: A DECADE OF PRESERVATION We’re proud to present three special screenings paying tribute to the milestone films of American experimental cinema. Thanks to an annual grant program funded by Martin Scorsese’s The Film Foundation and the National Film Preservation Foundation, 20 organizations (including The Ohio State University) have saved 105 films by 49 filmmakers—and made new copies of these classics available for exhibition and study. Join us for this rare, not-to-bemissed opportunity. INTRODUCED BY JEFF LAMBERT

Assistant Director of the National Film Preservation Foundation

Preserving the Underground

THU, JAN 10 | 7 pm This captivating program offers a wide-ranging introduction to some of the most significant American experimental films and filmmakers. Trust us: you’ve never seen these films look so beautiful. Highlights of the program include two early computer animations by Lillian Schwartz (recently preserved by The Ohio State University), Kenneth Anger’s Rabbit’s Moon (1950), Abigail Child’s Prefaces (1981), Bruce Conner’s Cosmic Ray (1961), and Andy Warhol’s concert film The Velvet Underground in Boston (1967). (app. 100 mins., 16mm & 35mm)

VISITING FILMMAKERS Mitchell Rose

William E. Jones

THU, JAN 17 | 7 pm

THU, JAN 31 | 7 pm

Short Films (1999–2012)

“A rare and wonderful talent.” —NEW YORK TIMES

Mitchell Rose mines everyday life for the humorous and absurd in this award-winning series of films inspired by his choreography and performance art background. The program highlights Rose’s celebrated comedic work, including Elevator World (1999), a computer-animated essay on the politics of elevator riding; Modern Daydreams (2001), an exploration of the human connection with inanimate objects; and Contact (2012), a love letter about human interaction. Visit wexarts.org/fv for a complete program lineup. (app. 75 mins., digital video) Cosponsored with Ohio State’s Department of Dance.

James Acheson

Costume Design for Film

SAT, JAN 19 | 7 pm $8 members, $10 general public Join costume designer James Acheson as he discusses his illustrious career in film and television. The three-time Oscar winner (for The Last Emperor, Dangerous Liasons, and Restoration) has produced an astonishing body of work on film and television ranging from Dr. Who to Brazil to the Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man trilogy to this summer’s Superman spectacular Man of Steel. Clips and illustrations highlighting his vast and diverse body of work accompany the conversation. (app. 100 mins.)

Selected Short Films

William E. Jones captures new life in old images. Whether it’s unused photos from Depression-era Farm Security Administration projects, educational films, or interstitial scenes from gay porn, Jones‘ films reclaim discarded materials from the world’s image banks, creating a remarkable hybrid of the forgotten past. Join us as he presents a program of his short films from the past decade, many of which we’re proud to have helped support through his nearly annual visits to the Film/Video Studio Program. (app. 90 mins., video)

Lucian Georgescu

A Tribute to the Kuchar Brothers WED, JAN 16 | 7 pm

The Phantom Father (2011) WED, FEB 20 | 2 pm  FREE ADMISSION

In The Phantom Father, an American professor embarks on an adventurous and amusing journey through Bucovina to learn more about his Romanian Jewish heritage. There he finds not only romance but also a love for old cinema in the person of an elderly projectionist. Stick around after the screening for a talk and Q&A with the film’s director Lucian Georgescu. Georgescu is Senior Lecturer in Screenwriting at the Romanian Theatre and Film University in Bucharest. As a screenwriter, director, and critic he has been an active participant in and commentator on the celebrated Romanian New Wave cinema movement. (90 mins, 35mm) Cosponsored by Ohio State’s Center for Slavic and East European Studies, Film Studies, and the Department of Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures. 

NEW DOCUMENTARY

American independent cinema lost a towering figure when filmmaker George Kuchar passed away in 2011. Including rarely seen Super 8 films from the Kuchar brothers’ teenage years, this program of newly preserved work pays tribute to George Kuchar and illustrates why the brothers‘ wickedly perverse pop-culture parodies and iconic humor were such major influences on filmmakers ranging from John Waters to Guy Maddin. (95 mins., 16mm)

Urban & Rural Landscapes THU, JAN 24 | 7 pm Landscapes have long been a source of inspiration for artists, and this program spotlights the gorgeous restoration of two films that took that inspiration to unbelievably unique places. Described by critic J. Hoberman as one of the best films of the 1990s, Ernie Gehr’s Side/Walk/Shuttle (1991) is among the most stunning cinematic portraits of San Francisco. Hoberman called it “pure sensation: a slow-motion roller coaster.” In a more pastoral exploration, Larry Gottheim’s Barn Rushes (1971) provides a multifaceted portrait of a single barn and its ever-changing landscape. (77 mins., 35mm & 16mm)

Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters (Ben Shapiro, 2012) TUE, JAN 29 | 7 pm

SIGNIFIC ANT CONTRIBUTIONS FOR FILM/VIDEO

ROHAUER COLLECTION FOUNDATION

GENEROUS SUPPORT FOR VISITING FILMMAKER SCREENINGS

Image courtesy Zeitgeist Films

Acclaimed photographer Gregory Crewdson has created some of the most gorgeously haunting pictures in the history of the medium. Inspired by a range of influences including David Lynch, Alfred Hitchcock, Diane Arbus, and Edward Hopper, Crewdson creates meticulously composed images that offer eerily imagined narratives of smalltown American life. Produced over a decade with unprecedented access to the artist, Brief Encounters is a compelling look at both Crewdson’s process and his riveting images. (77 mins., HDCAM)

VIA BR ASIL MADE POSSIBLE BY

THE ANDREW W. MELLON FOUNDATION

PREFERRED AIRLINE

PRESERVING THE UNDERGROUND TOP Motel Capri (George Kuchar, 1986), image courtesy National Film Preservation Foundation

BOTTOM Rabbit’s Moon (Kenneth Anger, 1950), image courtesy National Film Preservation Foundation


onScreen

FIELD & SCREEN

Returning for its fourth year, the Field & Screen series features films about food and environmental issues.

Bestiaire (Denis Côté, 2012)

FILM AND PANEL DISCUSSION

Covenant (Michael Mercil, 2012)

INTRODUCED BY MATT MEINDL

PRECEDED BY

THU, FEB 7 | 7 pm

(Matt Meindl, 2012)

Covenant is the filmic extension of Michael Mercil’s 2008–2011 installation The Virtual Pasture. The film reflects on the economy of keeping livestock and examines the rewards, challenges, and anxieties of the bond between humans and farm animals. Following this premiere screening, we’ll feature a panel discussion organized by the Department of Art’s Living Culture Initiative and cosponsored by the Humanities Institute. (43 mins., HD Video)

Don’t Break Down

FRI, FEB 1 | 7 pm In this stunning visual essay, a tourist-jammed Quebec safari park is the setting for an almost surrealist meditation on the relationship between nature and humanity. Through a series of stark tableaux, Bestiare explores the deep human desire to observe our fellow creatures—and how that desire is often at odds with the best interests of the creatures we’re observing. (72 mins., 2K DCP) Don’t Break Down screens in the Box video space throughout February. Its filmmaker, Matt Meindl, introduces this presentation. See the Box blurbs for the description.

Sushi: The Global Catch (Mark Hall, 2012)

SAT, FEB 2 | 7 pm SUN, FEB 3 | 2 pm What happens when a once-simple Japanese street food becomes a worldwide phenomenon? This award-winning documentary, shot in five countries, examines the global history, traditions, and growth of the beautiful and iconic sushi dish...and whether the oceans can continue to support our ever-increasing hunger for it. (75 mins., HDCAM)

A Fierce Green Fire: The Battle for a Living Planet (Mark Kitchell, 2012) SAT, FEB 16 | 7 pm SUN, FEB 17 | 2 pm Environmentalism may be our largest global movement, and A Fierce Green Fire examines how that movement came to be. Oscarnominated documentarian Mark Kitchell (Berkeley in the Sixties) traces environmentalism’s compelling history from the Sierra Club and Greenpeace to new organizations currently leading the struggle to keep the planet clean, safe, and sustainable. Narrated by Robert Redford, Meryl Streep, and Ashley Judd. (110 mins., HD video)

Nuclear Nation (Atsushi Funahashi, 2012)

VALENTINE’S DAY SPECIAL

Step Up to the Plate

TUE, FEB 5 | 7 pm

Now, Forager (Jason Cortlund & Julia Halperin, 2012)

SAT, FEB 2 4:30 pm & 8:30 pm Described by the LA Times as “an appealing off-menu slice for hungry indie admirers,” Now, Forager follows a young, fringe-dwelling couple as they attempt to eke out a living by foraging wild fungi and selling it to New York City restaurants. When one seeks out the stability of a restaurant job, however, the relationship goes from delicious to distant faster than you can say chanterelle. (93 mins., 2K DCP)

THIS PAGE FROM LEFT: NOW FORAGER Image courtesy Argot Pictures SUSHI: THE GLOBAL CATCH Image courtesy Kino Lorber STEP UP TO THE PLATE Image courtesy Cinema Guild

ITS’S THE EARTH NOT THE MOON Image courtesy the artist WILD BILL’S RUN Image courtesy the artist BELOW: BESTIAIRE Image courtesy Zeitgeist Films

Filmed in the wake of Japan’s catastrophic tsunami and subsequent Fukushima reactor disaster, Nuclear Nation follows exiled residents of the small Tokyo suburb Futaba as they attempt to resettle. But what starts as resiliency and determination quickly turns to frustration and rage as governmental and corporate indifference, as well as a troubled nuclear policy, contributes to the displaced citizens’ plight. (145 mins., HDCAM)

OPPOSITE PAGE FROM TOP:

THE BOX MIDCENTURY Image courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery

DONA FLOR AND HER TWO HUSBANDS Image courtesy New Yorker Films

THU, FEB 14 | 7:30 pm SAT, FEB 16 | 4:30 pm Can’t make the pilgrimage to the famed Bras eatery this Valentine’s Day? We’ve got the next best thing: Step Up to the Plate, Paul Lacoste’s behind-the-scenes look at this 3-star Michelin restaurant in the southern French countryside. Meet Michel and Sebastian Bras, the father and son team who laboriously maintain the quality of their culinary creations while simultaneously preparing for the inevitable passing of the whisk from one generation to the next. (87 mins., 2K DCP) Heirloom features specials on Valentine’s Day to delight your palate before the film.

TABU Image courtesy Adopt Films SISTER Image courtesy Adopt Films

(Paul Lacoste, 2012)

DON’T BREAK DOWN Image courtesy the artist

Wex at Gateway

Check wexarts.org or gatewayfilmcenter.com for details about the films we program at South Campus Gateway. Members save with discounts on all films at Gateway.

It’s the Earth Not the Moon (Gonçalo Tocha, 2012) THU, FEB 21 | 7 pm Director Gonçalo Tocha begins this film with a self-directed challenge: to document every square inch of Corvo, the barely accessible Azorean island at the western-most edge of Europe. Using a handheld technique to absorbing effect, Tocha balances Corvo’s otherworldly landscapes with the everyday activity of its inhabitants, creating a part-anthropological, part-aesthetic conversation about the collision of traditional life with the growing presence of modernity. (183 mins., 2K DCP)


CONTEMPORARY SCREEN True Wolf (Rob Whitehair, 2011) SAT, FEB 23 | 4 pm How exactly do you walk a wolf? This is just one of many questions Montana wildlife experts Pat Tucker and Bruce Weide contemplate when they find themselves responsible for Koani, a wolf pup born in captivity. True Wolf follows the couple’s 16year journey with Koani as they raise her, fall in love with her, and eventually introduce her to the world as an ambassador for the oft-misunderstood creature. (76 mins., 2K DCP)

TABU (Miguel Gomes, 2012) FRI, JAN 18 | 7 pm “A gracious love letter to cinema.” –SIGHT AND SOUND Described by the New York Times as having “prompted something approaching a collective swoon” at the Berlin International Film Festival, the dryly absurd and deeply romantic Tabu tells the story of a mildly batty elderly woman in contemporary Lisbon, tracing her life back 50 years to an illicit love affair. An inventive homage to early cinema and movie love from rising Portuguese star Miguel Gomes. (118 mins., 2K DCP)

Wild Bill’s Run (Mike Scholtz, 2012)

PRECEDED BY

Inside the Whale

(Mike Scholtz & Greg Carlson, 2012)

THU, FEB 28 | 7 pm

The evening begins with a screening of Inside the Whale, a portrait of Columbus artist Matt Kish and the creation of Moby Dick in Pictures, the lush book in which he illustrates each page of the fabled novel. (10 mins., HD Video)

William E. Jones Midcentury (2012) Created in the Wexner Center’s Film/Video Studio, Midcentury is a compilation of short works mimicking a network’s broadcast day if it were condensed to a half-hour. Though Midcentury contains no first-person narration, it’s an autobiography of sorts: the work of a hyperactive child who grew up on a diet of television in the industrial wasteland of Massillon, Ohio, during the Cold War. (30 mins., video)

INTRODUCED BY MIKE SCHOLTZ

Equal parts documentary, crime caper, and tall tale, Wild Bill’s Run tells the story of Wild Bill Cooper, the adventuresome outlaw who in 1972 led a ragtag team of mechanics, ranchers, and photographers on a quest to snowmobile the 5,000 miles from Minnesota to Moscow. The mission may have met with icy failure (and Bill, eventually, with most-wanted fugitive status), but it produced one of the greatest adventure stories in modern history. (60 mins., Digibeta)

JANUARY

SISTER (Ursula Meier, 2012) FRI–SAT, FEB 22–23 | 7 pm This touching look at the line between the haves and have-nots follows a young brother and sister who live alone on the margins of society, stealing from a nearby luxury ski resort to make ends meet. When an English tourist (Gillian Anderson) notices the usually unnoticed duo, their stories intertwine in a heartbreaking meditation on loneliness, kindness, and our dependence on one another. (97 mins., 2K DCP)

FEBRUARY Matt Meindl Don’t Break Down (2012)

HOUR OF THE STAR

(Suzana Amaral, 1986)

WED, JAN 23 | 7 pm Based on the ruthless novella by Brazilian writer Clarice Lispector, the wildly acclaimed Hour of the Star introduces us to Macabéa, a poor peasant girl from rural Brazil who heads to São Paulo for work after her aunt’s death. Saddled with a troubled job and even more troubled relationship, Macabéa eventually discovers that even the most outlandish dreams can come true. (96 mins., 35mm)

OHIO SHORTS CALL FOR ENTRIES

DONA FLOR AND HER TWO HUSBANDS

(Bruno Barreto, 1976)

FRI, FEB 15 | 7 pm In the bawdy satire that made Sonia Braga an international sex symbol, a sensual widow tries to reconcile memories of her passionate late husband with the realities of her respectable but dull new mate. Nominated for a Golden Globe, Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands is one of the finest adaptations of beloved Brazilian writer Jorge Amado. (110 mins., 35mm)

Heads up, filmmakers and video artists of all ages. Starting January 7, we’ll be accepting entries for Ohio Shorts, the Wex’s annual showcase of short films from throughout Ohio. The deadline for submissions is Friday, March 22.

Tying into our annual Field & Screen film series, this latest work from Columbus filmmaker Matt Meindl playfully imagines an afterlife for the ever-present garbage in our urban environments. Meindl shot the film entirely on Super 8 with stop-motion animated sequences and produced it with support from a 2011–12 Wexner Center Artist Residency Award in film/video and the Greater Columbus Arts Council’s 2011 Media Arts Fellowship Award. (7 mins., video) Meindl introduces Don’t Break Down before the screening of Bestiaire on February 1.

Artists 18 and under can enter the Ohio Shorts Youth Division. See the Insight section for details. No fee is charged for entries. Find complete submission details and entry forms at wexarts.org/ ohioshorts.


Sun

EX exhibitions PP

public programs

FV film/video ME membership PA

performing arts

ST store

GREGORY CREWDSON: BRIEF ENCOUNTERS, photo: “Untitled (Ophelia)” from the Twilight Series by Gregory Crewdson © Gregory Crewdson

Find out more at wexarts.org Read complete event descriptions and updates, buy tickets, and view trailers.

onView IN THE GALLERIES JANUARY 26–APRIL 7

Christian Marclay: The Clock

Mon

Tue

jan

More American Photographs

20

Josiah McElheny: Towards a Light Club

STORE CLOSED FOR INVENTORY

1

WEXNER CENTER CLOSED FOR NEW YEAR’S DAY

HEIRLOOM CLOSED THROUGH JANUARY 6

14

PA NEXT@WEX

Jeff Mangum

Southern Theater | 8 pm

15

PP SCREENING AND PANEL

21

WEXNER CENTER CLOSED FOR MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. DAY

James Castle: Portrait of an Artist Film/Video Theater | 4:30 pm

22 FV FILM HISTORY 101

The Tin Drum

Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

The Box 29

JANUARY

William E. Jones Midcentury (2012)

FV NEW DOCUMENTARY

DECEMBER

Matt Meindl Don’t Break Down (2012)

Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters

Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

Store Stop by the Wexner Center Store starting January 2 for great clearance savings before we close for inventory on January 20. Look for our exclusive DVD edition of William E. Jones’s breakthrough film Massillon, featuring neverbefore-seen photographs by Jones and a conversation between the artist and Bill Horrigan, the Wexner Center’s curator at large. Your purchases help support all the Wexner Center’s programs. Too busy to come in? Shop online at store.wexarts.org.

3 FV FIELD & SCREEN

Sushi: The Global Catch Film/Video Theater | 2 pm

5 FV FIELD & SCREEN

Nuclear Nation

Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

PP ESPECIALLY FOR EDUCATORS

10 PP WEX LAB FOR TEENS

Experimental Video Shorts with Rashana Smith Performance Space | 11 am–4 pm

17 FV FIELD & SCREEN

Heirloom After our short winter break, we reopen on January 7 with our extended hours on Thursday and Friday evenings continuing through January and February. Our weekend hours resume on January 27, after our winter exhibitions open to the public. Come in and warm up with a delicious meal or snack. We’ll be open and serving up a special menu on Valentine’s Day; keep us in mind for your celebration.

Winter Teacher Tour Night Register in Advance | 4:30 pm

A Fierce Green Fire: The Battle for a Living Planet Film/Video Theater | 2 pm

PA THEATER

Tim Crouch I, Malvolio

Performance Space | 2 pm

19 FV FILM HISTORY 101

Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

PA DANCE

S20/Hiroaki Umeda

Capitol Theatre at Riffe Center | 8 pm


Wed

Thu

Fri

3

FV CLASSICS

Creature from the Black Lagoon Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

Sat

4

FV CLASSICS

5

FV CLASSICS

Heaven’s Gate

Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

Creature from the Black Lagoon Film/Video Theater | 4 pm

FV CLASSICS

10 FV AVANT-GARDE MASTERS

16 FV AVANT-GARDE MASTERS

Preserving the Underground INTRODUCED BY Jeff Lambert Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

FV VISITING FILMMAKERS

Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

Mitchell Rose Short Films (1999–2012) Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

Heaven’s Gate

Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

11 FV CLASSICS

17

A Tribute to the Kuchar Brothers

Lawrence of Arabia Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

12 FV CLASSICS

18 FV CONTEMPORARY SCREEN

Tabu

Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

Lawrence of Arabia Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

19 FV VISITING FILMMAKERS

James Acheson: Costume Design

Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

PA JAZZ

23 FV VIA BRASIL

24 FV AVANT-GARDE MASTERS

Hour of the Star

Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

Urban & Rural Landscapes Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

Gilad Hekselman 4tet Performance Space | 8 pm

25 FV CLASSICS

The Thief of Bagdad Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

26 PP LAMBERT FAMILY LECTURE

A Conversation with Christian Marclay and Josiah McElheny Film/Video Theater | 5 pm

EX ESPECIALLY FOR MEMBERS

31 FV VISITING FILMMAKERS

1 FV FIELD & SCREEN

2 FV FIELD & SCREEN

William E. Jones Selected Shorts

Bestiaire

Now, Forager

Film/Video Theater | 4:30 & 8:30 pm

Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

PA THEATER

Seinendan Theater Company + Osaka University Robot Theater Project Performance Space | 8 pm

PRECEDED BY Don’t Break Down INTRODUCED BY Matt Meindl

Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

FV FIELD & SCREEN

feb PA THEATER

Seinendan Theater Company + Osaka University Robot Theater Project Performance Space | 8 pm

7 FV FIELD & SCREEN

Covenant Film and Panel Discussion Film/Video Theater | 7 pm PA JAZZ

Rudresh Mahanthappa’s Gamak Performance Space | 8 pm

14 FV FIELD & SCREEN

Step Up to the Plate Film/Video Theater | 7:30 pm

PA THEATER

Tim Crouch I, Malvolio

Performance Space | 8 pm

8

FV CLASSICS

20 FV VISITING FILMMAKERS

Lucian Georgescu The Phantom Father Film/Video Theater | 2 pm

It’s the Earth Not the Moon Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

FV CLASSICS

INTRODUCED BY Tim Lanza

Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

15

FV VIA BRASIL

Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

PA THEATER

INTRODUCED BY Tim Lanza

Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

16

FV FIELD & SCREEN

Step Up to the Plate Film/Video Theater | 4:30 pm

FV FIELD & SCREEN

Tim Crouch I, Malvolio

Performance Space | 8 pm

A Fierce Green Fire: The Battle for a Living Planet Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

PA THEATER

Jukebox the Ghost Mershon Stage | 8 pm

FV FIELD & SCREEN

9

Tristana

21

Seinendan Theater Company + Osaka University Robot Theater Project Performance Space | 8 pm

Tristana

PA NEXT@WEX

Sushi: The Global Catch Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

PA THEATER

Exhibitions Preview | 6 pm

Tim Crouch I, Malvolio

Performance Space | 7 pm

22 FV CONTEMPORARY SCREEN

Sister

Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

23 FV FIELD & SCREEN

True Wolf

Film/Video Theater | 4 pm

FV CONTEMPORARY SCREEN

Sister

27 PP DOUBLE TAKE

28 FV FIELD & SCREEN

Jessica Mallios and Trevon D. Logan

Wexner Center galleries | 12:30 pm

PRECEDED BY Inside the Whale INTRODUCED BY Mike Scholtz

Film/Video Theater | 7 pm

Wild Bill’s Run

Film/Video Theater | 7 pm


ANDROID-HUMAN THEATER: SAYONARA ROBOT-HUMAN THEATER: I, WORKER THU–SAT, JAN 31–FEB 2 | 8 pm PERFORMANCE SPACE $16 members, $18 public, $10 students

“Enthralling…not only with the stateof-the-art technology but also with its compelling humanist message.”

Japan has long led the world in the development of sophisticated robots and their integration into daily life. Those efforts have imprinted us with archetypal images— from gigantic robots threatening civilization in old sci-fi films to benign robots embodying today’s “cute” culture in Japan. So it should come as no surprise that the Japanese fascination with robots, androids, and artificial intelligence would find its way into the world of theater. Tokyo-based Seinendan Theater Company’s founder/playwright/director Oriza Hirata enlisted Dr. Hiroshi Ishiguro, a leading researcher on robotics and the director of the Intelligent Robotics Laboratory at Osaka University, as an expert collaborator and technical advisor for this compelling pair of productions. Sayonara highlights the interactions of a human actress and a startlingly lifelike android who is retooled for fixing a critically damaged nuclear power plant. I, Robot features a married couple at home with their domestic robots and their contrasting attitudes towards work. Both works summon strong emotions and a high degree of empathy for the sensitive and responsive robot and android characters. See for yourself when Seinendan Theater Company makes their Columbus debut with their visions of things to come. PERFORMED IN JAPANESE WITH ENGLISH SURTITLES. Six-city tour coproduced by Japan Society, New York, and the Japan Foundation, and organized by Japan Society, New York. Additional support provided by Ohio State’s East Asian Studies Center.

—THE NATION [THAILAND]

ANDROID–HUMAN THEATER: SAYONARA, Photo © Tatsuo Nambu, Aichi Triennale 2010

onStage

SEINENDAN THEATER COMPANY + OSAKA UNIVERSITY ROBOT THEATER PROJECT

TIM CROUCH

I, Malvolio

THU–FRI, FEB 14–15 | 8 pm SAT, FEB 16 | 7 pm SUN, FEB 17 | 2 pm PERFORMANCE SPACE $16 members, $18 public, $10 students

“Look at you. Sitting there with your bellies full of pop and pickled herring. Laughing at me. Go on. Laugh at the funny man. Laugh. Make the funny man cry.” —MALVOLIO IN SHAKESPEARE’S TWELFTH NIGHT

Photo © Matthew Andrews 2010

Superlative British theater artist Tim Crouch returns with the latest in his series of solo shows inspired by Shakespearean characters. These comic performances are intended for young audiences (recommended for ages 11 and up), and they’re the perfect, slightly subversive introduction to the Bard for fidgety, bored adolescents. But they are equally appealing to adult audiences. Crouch’s smartly wrought turn as Malvolio, the pompous, pent-up steward who is grossly aggrieved, mocked, and subjected to humiliation in Twelfth Night, offers a hilarious and often unsettling rant from a man “notoriously wronged.” A story of lost dignity, prudery, practical jokes, and bullying, this one-man act of storytelling alchemy draws us deep into the madness of Shakespeare’s classic comedy. As Postcards from the Gods’ blogging reviewer said, “I, Malvolio is incredibly funny, utterly heart-breaking, deeply sophisticated, beguilingly simple, hugely compassionate, completely uncompromising and incredibly intricate…all at the same time.” Tim Crouch’s I, Malvolio is one of a series of contemporary theater events that utilize Shakespeare as a point of departure programmed by the Wexner Center to complement Ohio State’s partnership initiatives with the Royal Shakespeare Company.

TICKETS.WEXARTS.ORG

ACCESSIBILITY

The Wex’s online ticketing platform is easy and convenient to use, and you can even print your tickets at home whenever you like. Member and student tickets are available, too, for most events.

Please contact houseweb@wexarts.org with questions about accessibility and ADA-related accommodations for any event.


S20 HIROAKI UMEDA —GUARDIAN (UK)

TUE, FEB 19 | 8 pm

CAPITOL THEATRE AT RIFFE CENTER 77 South High Street (downtown) $17 members, $20 public, $10 students plus $1 capa facility fee on all tickets

Japanese artist Hiroaki Umeda is at the cutting edge of integrating advanced digital technology into his dynamic works for the stage. Umeda, whose company is called S20, is now recognized more as a visual artist than as a choreographer, a mover rather than a dancer. Creating tightly composed action that is minimal and radical, subtle and violent, Umeda also incorporates crackling digital soundscapes and awe-inspiring vistas of projected images and lighting. Drawing from butoh and street dance, he builds accumulations of electrifying physical activity that seem simultaneously constrained and explosive, mirroring the accelerated pace of life in hyperurban Japan. In Holistic Strata you will see him totally immersed in shifting skeins of intense digital light patterns that respond directly to his charged movement. And in Haptic he steps away from digital imagery to explore a chromatic universe created with lighting to, as he

M A J O R S E A S O N S U P P O RT F O R P E R F O R M I N G A RT S

EVENT S U P P O RT

ACCO M M O DAT I O N S

PERFORMING ARTS JAPAN

expresses it, “focus on the physical aspect of the perception of color, not simply to show it, but to give substance to the relationship it has with dance.”

This presentation made possible, in part, by the Japan Foundation and its Performing Arts Japan touring program. Additional support provided by Ohio State’s East Asian Studies Center.

Public tickets for this event are available on ticketmaster.com, at Ticketmaster outlets, and at the CAPA ticket office. Student tickets are available at the CAPA ticket office. All ticket levels are available at the Capitol Theatre box office on the evening of the show.

TICKET OFFER FOR MEMBERS If you are currently a member at the Sponsor ($250) or Fellow ($500) level or of the Donor Circles ($1000+), you are eligible for two complimentary tickets to this performance. See details in Member News and Events.

Image courtesy Yamaguchi Center for Arts and Media

“With Holistic Strata Umeda has turned into a human screen, a dancing landscape, seemingly on the verge of being overwhelmed by pixels and dissolving into the electron flux.”


FRI, JAN 18 | 8 pm

THU, FEB 7 | 8 pm

F E AT U R I N G

PERFORMANCE SPACE $16 members, $18 public, $13 students

PERFORMANCE SPACE $16 members, $18 public, $13 students Photo courtesy Gilad Hekselman

onStage

Mark Turner, Marcus Gilmore, and Joe Martin

Rudresh Mahanthappa’s Gamak

Gilad Hekselman 4tet

Mostly Other People Do the Killing SAT, MAR 2 | 8 pm PERFORMANCE SPACE $16 members, $18 public, $13 students Photo courtesy Hot Cup Records

Young Israeli jazz guitar sensation Gilad Hekselman has quickly established himself in the New York scene as a key musician to follow. At this concert you’ll hear him playing with drummer Marcus Gilmore, bassist Joe Martin, and spirited, warmtoned saxophonist Mark Turner, the same talents Hekselman enlists on his most recent release, Hearts Wide Open. Together, they evoke expansive imagery and provide a simmering backdrop for intimate solos that slyly draw in listeners instead of demanding attention with flash and flare. The New York Times noted that “the feeling in a small club quickly grows intense when Gilad Hekselman steps up to improvise.”

Welcome back jazz sax sensation Rudresh Mahanthappa, whose Coltrane-inspired sound is well matched to the ever-questing thrust of Gamak, his new quartet. Gamak features the stellar, intricate guitar work of Dave “Fuze” Fiuczynski (who also teams up with Mahanthappa in Jack DeJohnette’s current group), as well as Mahanthappa’s longtime rhythm section of Francois Moutin on bass and Dan Weiss on drums. This stunning ensemble furthers Mahanthappa’s ongoing interest in drawing on non-Western sources of musical inspiration to fuel his new jazz concepts. Gamak will issue a new recording early in 2013, and you’ll be able to hear the musicians tear into this fresh material up close in the intimate cabaret-style setting of our Performance Space.

RUDRESH MAHANTHAPPA, Photo courtesy Mark Duggan, White Noise Visuals

“Mostly Other People Do the Killing should rightly be famous, or possibly infamous, for their live shows.… But just go with the flow and you’re guaranteed a payoff in genre-busting exhilaration.”—JAZZ MANN Yes, you read that right, Mostly Other People Do the Killing is actually the name of a jazz band… and a killer jazz band at that. One of the highlights of the most recent Winter Jazz Fest in New York City, the freewheeling high-energy Downtown quartet slayed the crowd with an immediately infectious sense of fun (a spirit too often missing in the jazz scene). Spearheaded by bassist/ composer Moppa Elliott, the band features A-list talents including Jon Irabagon on sax (he recently played here with the Mary Halvorson Quintet), interlocking with Peter Evans on trumpet, backed by thoroughly unbridled drummer Kevin Shea. All find a special thrill in upending expectations with a grin, mixing in rapid-fire affectionate swipes at classic jazz styles while keeping the forwardthinking momentum in overdrive.

“Mahanthappa’s biting attack pairs a Coltrane influence with an incisive, exacting articulation, which absolutely soars.”—JAZZTIMES

JEFF MANGUM

with Tall Firs and Briars of North America

Stop at our bar on the way in, sit back, relax, and prepare to let yourself go for the bloody-minded exuberance of Mostly Other People Do the Killing.

no tickets are currently available for this concert. Some may be released on the

Tickets for this event are available only on ticketmaster.com, at Ticketmaster outlets, or at the CAPA ticket office.

MON, JAN 14 | 8 pm

Please note: Jeff Mangum requests absolutely no photography or recording at this concert. This includes cell phones. Please respect his wishes.

day of the show. Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for updates.

SOUTHERN THEATER, 21 E. Main Street Indie rock icon Jeff Mangum, of Neutral Milk Hotel renown, has recently emerged from a decade-plus retreat from the public eye to thrill devoted fans with a series of live concerts. He has invited Tall Firs and Briars of North America to open this rare show.

Jeff Mangum is donating $1 per ticket to benefit Children of the Blue Sky.

Jukebox the Ghost

with Matt Pond and The Lighthouse and the Whaler

THU, FEB 14 | 8 pm BLACK BOX ON MERSHON STAGE $12 all audiences


inSight

Cosponsored Event

For Teens

SCREENING AND PANEL

James Castle: Portrait of an Artist

Wex Lab: Experimental Video Shorts with Rashana Smith SUN, FEB 10 | 11 am–4 pm PERFORMANCE SPACE $30 members $40 general public

TUE, JAN 15 | 4:30 pm FILM/VIDEO THEATER FREE This acclaimed documentary by Ohio State alumni Jeffrey Wolf uncovers the life and creative process of James Castle: a self-trained, deaf artist who portrayed his surroundings (and otherworldly imaginings) with found media like matchbooks, notebooks, calendars, twine—even soot mixed with his own saliva. Castle recycled the ephemera of his family’s homestead and general store to produce an astonishing body of work that has rightfully garnered worldwide recognition.

Call for Entries

DEADLINE: FRI, MAR 22 BY 5 pm

Thank you to Ohio State’s Office of Disability Services for providing American Sign Language interpretation of the panel discussion.

Especially for Educators Screening Party MON, APR 15 6 pm | Wexner Center cafe SCREENINGS TO FOLLOW

7 pm | Film/Video theater

Heads-up, young Ohio filmmakers: Starting January 7, we’ll be accepting submissions for the Ohio Shorts Youth Division. If you’re an artist 18 or under, send your best music videos, infomercial spoofs, documentaries, dramas, animations, mashups—anything you want, under 5 minutes. We’ll screen your vid at our best-ever annual showcase, complete with free treats, a DJ, and a photobooth, then award 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and audience choice prizes.

FILM AND PANEL DISCUSSION

COVENANT

Advance registration is required. Register at tickets.wexarts.org. Scholarships are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Please contact Jean Pitman at (614) 292-4614 or jpitman@wexarts.org for more information.

The screening and following panel discussion occur in conjunction with an exhibition at the Urban Arts Space in January and February. The show features over 100 pieces by the enigmatic artist and offers the full story of a true outsider artist—and a remarkable example of the triumph of the spirit and imagination. Cosponsored by Greater Columbus Arts Council and Ohio State’s College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Arts Administration, Education, and Policy, Department of English, American Sign Language Program, Literacy Studies, Disability Studies Program, Diversity and Identity Studies Collective, with support from an Arts and Humanities Research and Creative Activity Grant.

Spend a day with video teacher (and Ohio Roller Girl!) Rashana Smith as you gear up for Ohio Shorts Youth Division by working on a five-minute or less experimental video (with super-simple equipment) from start to finish. You can take your project in any direction you want, but please come with an idea in mind—or, better yet, a short storyboard sketch! We’ll also go over the Ohio Shorts guidelines and answer any questions you might have about submitting your work to the festival. Free lunch included.

Winter Teacher Tour Night TUE, FEB 5 | 4:30 pm FREE Calling all teachers: Let our galleries be your inspiration as you explore our winter exhibitions and brainstorm new ways to connect your gallery visit with your classroom’s curriculum. RSVP is appreciated. Head to wexarts.org/learn to register.

Head to wexarts.org/ohioshorts for the submission form and instructions. Got a question or need to brainstorm? Contact Jean Pitman at (614) 292-4614 or jpitman@wexarts.org.

(Michael Mercil, 2012)

THU, FEB 7 | 7 pm FILM/VIDEO THEATER Join us for the premiere of this captivating extension of Michael Mercil’s installation The Virtual Pasture, which was on view outside the Wexner Center from 2008 to 2011. Covenant reflects on the economy of keeping livestock, while exploring the rewards, challenges, and anxieties of the human to farm animal bond. Following the premiere, we’ll feature a panel discussion organized by the Department of Art Living Culture Initiative and cosponsored by the Humanities Institute. (43 mins., HD Video)

S U P P O RT F O R P RO G R A M S F O R S C H O O L S A N D T E AC H E R S

INGRAM–WHITE CASTLE FOUNDATION

MARTHA HOLDEN JENNINGS FOUNDATION

MILTON & SALLY AVERY ARTS FOUNDATION

JAMES CASTLE: PORTRAIT OF AN ARTIST Image courtesy The Ohio State University, Urban Arts Space

COVENANT Image courtesy Matt Keida OHIO SHORTS IaMU (Alfred C. Taylor), second prize Ohio Shorts Youth Division 2012

WEX LAB Photo courtesy Jean Pitman


inSight Member News & Events Exhibitions Related Events

SAT, MAR 9 | 9:30 pm–2 am

L A M B E R T F A M I LY L E C T U R E

Step into the light! The party of the year returns as the Wexner Center transforms into an all-night moveable feast for the eyes, taste buds, and, of course, booty. We’ll dance all night to deep grooves (from soon-to-be-named DJs), enjoy scrumptious delights from over a dozen Dine Originals restaurants, and take in three dazzling exhibitions in our galleries, including Josiah McElheny’s Towards a Light Club. Tickets go on sale in early January. VIP tickets get you started at 8 pm. Watch wexarts. org and follow us on Facebook and Twitter for announcements leading up to the party.

A Conversation with Christian Marclay and Josiah McElheny SAT, JAN 26 | 5 pm FILM/VIDEO THEATER FREE Join genre-bending artists Christan Marclay and Josiah McElheny as they discuss each other’s celebrated works, including those currently on view in the galleries. Curator at Large Bill Horrigan moderates the conversation. Everyone attending the conversation is welcome to stay for the preview party. Described by critic Thom Jurek as the “unwitting inventor of turntablism,” Christian Marclay collapses the visual and aural realms into pieces that explore connections between sound, performance, video, and photography. McElheny, on the other hand, uses the unique characteristics of sculpted glass to visualize concepts ranging from philosophy to physics. Both artists have previously appeared at the Wexner Center, but this not-to-be-missed event is the first time they’ll discuss their shared influences together. Made possible by generous support from the Lambert Family Lecture Series Endowment, which promotes dialogue about global issues in art and contemporary culture.

WINTER EXHIBITIONS

Member Preview SAT, JAN 26 | 6–8 pm GALLERIES OPEN | 4 pm Help us welcome three new shows at a festive gathering for our members, Ohio State students, faculty, and staff, and special guests. RSVP for the preview and lecture described above at wexarts.org/rsvp.

Super Sunday: It’s About Time SUN, MAR 3 | 12–5 pm FREE

F E AT U R I N G J E S S I C A M A L L I O S AND TREVON D. LOGAN

Double Take: Aesthetics and the Economy WED, FEB 27 | 12:30 pm WEXNER CENTER GALLERIES FREE with gallery admission

In our Double Take series, Ohio State faculty from two different fields offer their perspectives on Wexner Center exhibitions. Join us as Jessica Mallios from the Department of Art’s photography program and Trevon D. Logan, an economics professor specializing in history and demography, discuss the Great Depression and modern economic crises as depicted in More American Photographs.

A Conversation with Kate Bauer Kate Bauer is all about e ­ ngaging Columbus’ art fans. As this year’s chair of the GenWex Advisory Committee (GWAC), she helps reach out to the local creative and young professional communities through GenWex’s part-social, part-educational events. In advance of Off the Grid, the group’s signature event held this year on March 9, Bauer chatted with Wexner Center educator and GenWex staff chair Amanda Potter about the importance of GenWex and its role in Columbus’ thriving young community. Amanda Potter: How would you describe Off the Grid to someone who’s never attended? Kate Bauer: The best time you’ll ever have in the coolest venue imaginable. As always with the Wexner Center, there’s something for everyone: Good food and conversation in the café and live music and dancing in the performance space for those looking for a little more excitement. A great deal of planning goes into the annual party. Lots of local partners donate everything from food to decorations. It’s a great example of how the Columbus community and the Wexner Center support one another. And the best part is that the proceeds go toward the Wexner Center’s educational programs, so you’re partying for a cause.

AP: What’s your favorite Off the Grid memory? KB: I’m smiling just thinking about it. I met my husband, Ted, at the very first Off the Grid in 2010. What an amazing night. The Hood Internet came in from Chicago and we danced the night away. We got separated at one point during the evening and kept missing one another, so our mutual friend ran interference, texting us both when we came by looking for one another. So Off the Grid, for me, is something truly special. Ted and I have the posters from each year framed and hanging in our dining room. I’ve been involved with GenWex and GWAC for about the same amount of time I’ve been with Ted. I see both relationships lasting a lifetime.

Head to the Wexblog to read more from this conversation (and find out how Kate got involved with the center).

AP: What does having the Wexner Center in Columbus mean for the city’s young professionals? KB: The Wexner Center attracts incredible exhibitions. Young professionals in Columbus are fortunate to have access to such high-caliber national and international performing arts, music, photography, theater, and more. And let’s not forget the cool parties! It provides the opportunity to be social, to learn, to be engaged. Most importantly, it gives us the opportunity to experience the world’s greatest creativity right at home.

GenWex

Designed to engage all ages, Super Sundays take place once during each set of exhibitions at the Wex. This edition’s open house takes us on a jaunt through time and history. See the impact of economic distress in More American Photographs. Consider how past generations thought about the future with Josiah McElheny’s films and glass sculptures. Then lose yourself in Christian Marclay’s The Clock, a working timepiece comprised of thousands of film clips. The day also features free gallery admission and fun, hands-on activities for visitors of all ages.

THIS EVENT IS 21 AND OVER.

THIS PAGE FROM TOP:

OPPOSITE PAGE FROM TOP:

OFF THE GRID Photo: Rachel Barbash

A WEEKEND TO REMEMBER Photos: Kevin Fitzsimons and Kris Misevski (middle row, right)

CONVERSATION WITH KATE BAUER Photo: Blair Perry

SPECIAL TICKET OFFER S20/Hiroaki Umeda, image courtesy Yamaguchi Center for Arts and Media Shantala Shivalingappa, photo: Laurent Philippe (inset)


A WEEKEND TO REMEMBER

Photographer Annie Leibovitz and Rolling Stone founder Jann Wenner thrilled nearly 2000 listeners with the memories they shared during the Wexner Prize Conversation on November 9. The next evening, guests including Donor Circles and Corporate Council members watched Leibovitz accept the 14th Wexner Prize from Wex Director Sherri Geldin, Wexner Center Foundation Chair Leslie H. Wexner, and Ohio State University President E. Gordon Gee. After the ceremony, guests enjoyed delicious food and cocktails, then danced into the wee hours at the Anniversary Party and GenWex’s Last Shot. Leibovitz also led Ohio State students on a tour of the Annie Leibovitz exhibition. See more pictures on our blog at wexarts.org.

A Special Ticket Offer, Just for Members If you are currently a member at the Sponsor ($250) or Fellow ($500) level or of the Donor Circles ($1000+), you are eligible for two complimentary tickets to S20/Hiroaki Umeda on February 19 or to the dance concert with Shantala Shivalingappa on April 9 at Thurber Theatre. To reserve your tickets, call our ticket desk at (614) 292-3535 or stop by on your next visit to the Wex. Complimentary tickets are available only until one week before the shows (February 12 or April 2). Have your member number or member card available.

NOT A MEMBER? HERE’S HOW TO JOIN

Online: wexarts.org/join On site: Visit the Patron Services Desk or Wexner Center Store By phone: Call (614) 292-1777

Receive benefits like free gallery admission, membersonly films, special events and discounts, plus so much more.

For more information click the Join tab at wexarts.org, call (614) 292-1777, or email membership@wexarts.org.


Don’t forget your valentine FEB 14

Hours

Starting January 27, Heirloom is open on Saturdays & Sundays 11 am–5 pm. The Store is closed January 20 for inventory.

Galleries

Store

(614) 292-1807

Tickets + Info

(614) 292-3535

Mon–Wed Thu–Fri Sat Sun

10 am–6 pm 10 am–8 pm 11 am–8 pm 11 am–6 pm

Mon–Wed Thu–Fri Sat Sun

9 am–6 pm 9 am–8 pm 10 am–8 pm 11 am–6 pm

Heirloom

(614) 292-2233

Administrative Offices

(614) 292-0330

Mon–Fri

9 am–6 pm

Mon Tue–Wed, Sun Thu–Sat

closed 11 am–6 pm 11 am–8 pm

Calendar of Events Published 6 times a year Volume 25, Number 1 January+February 2013

ON THE COVER: S20/HIROAKI UMEDA Image courtesy of Yamaguchi Center for Arts and Media

The Box Same as Tickets + Info

Mon–Wed 8 am–4 pm Thurs–Fri 8 am–8 pm

Printed using soy-based inks on Cascades Rolland Enviro100 Print, a process-chlorine-free (PCF) paper manufactured using biogas energy and containing Forest Stewardship Council™–certified 100% postconsumer fiber.

Information Visiting the Wexner Center L o c at i o n The Wexner Center for the Arts is located on the campus of Ohio State University at the corner of High Street and 15th Avenue. Off-site locations for other Wexner Center events are noted throughout this calendar/newsletter. Parking Parking is available in the Ohio Union Garages on campus and at the South Campus Gateway Garage, located one block east of North High Street between 9th and 11th Avenues. Limited, shortterm parking is available at the parking meters in front of Mershon Auditorium. c h e c k f o r u p d at e s Check wexarts.org or call (614) 292-3535 for updates. All programs are subject to change. Galleries Please note that the Wexner Center galleries are closed Mondays and between exhibitions. See the exhibitions pages for a current schedule.

General Support Tickets Purchase tickets at tickets.wexarts.org or from the Patron Services Desk (614 292-3535) on the entrance level of the Wexner Center. Ticketing services for sales and pickup of prepaid tickets are available at event locations one hour prior to showtimes. Film/Video tickets are available until a half-hour after showtimes or until the start of the second film of double features. (Sorry, no refunds or exchanges for Wexner Center tickets, unless an event is canceled.) osu students All Ohio State University students receive benefits including discounts in the Wexner Center Store and on films and performing arts events. Check out the schedules in the calendar and on the website! r e n ta l s Mershon Auditorium and selected Wexner Center spaces are available for corporate meetings or gatherings. See wexarts.org for details.

Tours group tours Prearranged group tours are available to school, youth, and college/university audiences, as well as adult community groups. These hour-long tours can be tailored to many different interests. Please make reservations for all group tours at least three weeks in advance. Call the education department at (614) 292-6493.

walk-in tours Walk-in Tours require no advance reservations. These tours feature highlights of the current exhibitions. See the current schedule inside this calendar.

The Wexner Center for the Arts is part of The Ohio State University and receives major public institutional support from the university. Major support is also provided through the Corporate Annual Fund of the Wexner Center Foundation and by Wexner Center members. The foundation is a private, nonprofit partner of the university’s Board of Trustees, established to provide trustee guidance and financial support for the Wexner Center.

Wexner Center Foundation Leslie H. Wexner Chair E. Gordon Gee Vice Chair James Lyski President Trustees Nicholas K. Akins David M. Aronowitz Jeni Britton Bauer Shelley Bird Michael J. Canter Adam R. Flatto Sherri Geldin Ann Gilbert Getty Michael P. Glimcher Elizabeth Kessler C. Robert Kidder Nancy Kramer James E. Kunk Bill Lambert Ronald A. Pizzuti Janet B. Reid Joyce Shenk Alex Shumate A. Alfred Taubman Barbara Trueman Abigail S. Wexner John F. Wolfe Ex Officio Joseph A. Alutto Mark Shanda Bruce A. Soll Mark E. Vannatta

Senior Programming Staff Sherri Geldin Director Jack Jackson Deputy Director Shelly Casto Director of Education Jill Davis Director of Exhibitions Management David Filipi Director of Film/Video Charles R. Helm Director of Performing Arts Bill Horrigan Curator at Large Jennifer Lange Curator of Film/Video Studio Program Calendar of Events Staff Ann Bremner Editor Erica Anderson Senior Graphic Designer Michael Greenler Graphic Designer


January/February 2013 Calendar