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 2018 GOLF GUIDE

 SPOTLIGHT ON AURORA

 RACING AWAY TO INDY

MAY 2018 WEST SUBURBAN LIVING • MAKING OF A SUMMER FEST

THE MAKING OF A VOL. 23 • NUMBER 5

SUMMER FESTIVAL

Q&A with

Divergent author Veronica Roth MAY APRIL2018 2018 $3.95 $3.95

www.westsuburbanliving.net

05

A behind-the-scenes look at the planning, organization and management involved in hosting a successful fest 0

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Editor & Publisher | Chuck Cozette Managing Editor | Anne Knudsen Art Director | Rachel Switall Contributing Writers Laurie Barton, Emily Belden, Joni Hirsch Blackman, Buzz Brandt, Sara Pearsaul Vice, Lynn Petrak, Megan Pellegrini, Lisa Sloan and Michele Weldon Contributing Photographer Ed Ahern Advertising Sales Pam Loebel, Susan Reetz Accounting Jennifer Cozette Circulation Coordinator Ken Cozette Editorial Intern Gabrielle Cone Reader Advisory Board Laurie Barton (Glen Ellyn) Linda Cassidy (Campton Hills) Mary Ellen Coombs (Wheaton), Joan Hoff (Elmhurst) M Grace Grzanek (Batavia), Liz Hunka (Wheaton) Nancy Jensen (Batavia), Holly Jordan (Wheaton) Mary Ellen Kastenholz (Western Springs) Kate Kirkpatrick (Naperville) Molly Livermore (St. Charles) Pamela Peterson (Burr Ridge) Diana Santos (Woodridge), Darla Scheidt (Darien) Jean Stawarz (Oak Brook) Marilyn Straub Garazin (Winfield) West Suburban Living is a publication of C2 Publishing, Inc. Suite 412, High Point Plaza, 4415 Harrison St, Hillside, IL 60162 630 834-4995 / 630 834-4996 (fax) wsl@westsuburbanliving.net subscriptions@westsuburbanliving.net www.westsuburbanliving.net No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission of C2 Publishing, Inc. Any views expressed in any advertisement, signed letter, article or photograph are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the position of West Suburban Living or its parent company. West Suburban Living (Vol. 23, No. 5 MAY 2018; ISSN No. 1532-6705) is published monthly, except for July/August and November/December issues (10 times a year), by C2 Publishing, Inc., Suite 412, High Point Plaza, 4415 Harrison St., Hillside, IL 60162, 630 834-4995, fax 630 834-4996. Periodicals postage paid at Elmhurst, Illinois and additional mailing offices. Subscriptions: 1 year $15; 2 years $24; 3 years $32. Single copy $3.95; back issues, as available, $7. West Suburban Living assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials. POSTMASTER: Send changes of address to West Suburban Living Magazine, P.O. Box 111, Elmhurst, IL 60126. Printed in USA. 2 MAY 2018 | WWW.WESTSUBURBANLIVING.NET | WEST SUBURBAN LIVING

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Contents |

May

|

2018

Photo courtesy of St. Charles Park District

West Suburban Living

Getaways

36

Racing Off to Indy

Indianapolis is an accessible big city, with Hoosier hospitality as a way of life.

Home&Garden

48

Porches, Decks and Patios

52

Perennial Favorites

Creative ways to make the most of your outdoor living spaces.

Flower power, all summer long

Health

56

40

Photo by Slav Polinski courtesy of GroveFest

 Features 32

The Making of a Summer Festival A behind-the-scenes look at the planning, organization and management involved in hosting a successful fest

Rotary GroveFest

40

Exploring senior living options close to home in the western suburbs

58

Pottawatomie Golf Course

32

PLANNING AHEAD

Dementia Care

West suburban experts and care centers provide hope and help for those suffering from Alzheimer’s and other memory loss conditions.

Town Focus

62

AURORA

This city of lights is a mecca for shopping, dining, entertainment and family fun

Cover photo of Rotary GroveFest by Slav Polinski

2018 Golf Guide The western suburbs are home to some of the best public golf courses in the country.

4 MAY 2018 | WWW.WESTSUBURBANLIVING.NET | WEST SUBURBAN LIVING

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Departments May

|

2018

SALT CREEK BALLET

Photo by Joanna Volpe

|

Photo by Keith Gerling

West Suburban Living

VERONICA ROTH

STEAK + VINE

72

Photo courtesy Steak + Vine

14

21 Around the Towns

Perspectives

8

18

80

FOREWORD

Hats off to the behind-the-scenes folks who bring us so many great summer festivals

12

BY THE NUMBERS

14

Q&A

20

LOCAL AUTHORS

78

SCENE & SEEN

LOOK TO THE WESTERN SKY

A tragic tornado sparks a career seeking to increase future preparedness LAST WORD

The most valuable type of IQ may actually be social-emotional, not intellectual

16

Intriguing numerical tidbits

With Veronica Roth, best selling sci-fi novelist from Barrington

New book releases from west suburban writers

A photo gallery of recent notable charitable events

Dining

70

REVIEW: Two Brothers Roundhouse in Aurora

72

REVIEW: Steak + Vine in Glen Ellyn

69

NEW RESTAURANTS

75

CHEERS

Style&Fashion

Santo Cielo in Naperville, Le Pain Quotidien in Naperville and Coom’s Corner in Lockport

STOPS & SHOPS

New stores and hidden gems

Out&About

21

westsuburbanliving.net The go-to site for the Best of the Western Suburbs at your fingertips!

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Tannins: Experienced as an aspect of a wine’s texture, causing a drying sensation.

The best in music, theatre and other area events

6 MAY 2018 | WWW.WESTSUBURBANLIVING.NET | WEST SUBURBAN LIVING

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editor’s Note Finding Delight in the Details

“Let us be grateful

O

to people who make us happy, they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.” - Marcel Proust

“The world is my country, all mankind are my brethren, and to do good is my religion.” - Thomas Paine

“Let us sacrifice our today, so that our children can have a better tomorrow.”

- A. P. J. Abdul Kalam

“Lord, make me an instrument of thy peace. Where there is hatred, let me sow love.”

- Francis of Assisi

“Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for by this some have entertained angels without knowing it.”

ne of the challenges of putting out this magazine is managing the myriad details involved throughout the production process. There are so many components from a variety of sources that need to be kept track of, information that needs to checked and double-checked, and then everything has to be translated onto the printed page in a ways that is fun, interesting and visually appealing. On a micro level, each printed word is a potential mistake — or at least a typo or misspelling — waiting to happen. Thank goodness for spell check! On the macro level, we might inadvertently print incorrect information or make other types of errors that could call the credibility of the magazine into question. For that reason — and because professionalism demands it — we very much “sweat the details.” The problem is that by nature, I am not a very detail-oriented person. It’s not that I am especially a big-picture type, but rather that I try to prioritize what is important. That can be a challenge when all of the details are important. I know, I know, there are many jobs where attention to detail is far more critical — the medical professions immediately come to mind. And event planning. OK, granted, the stakes are obviously not life and death in the latter. But having helped organize a few small special events over the years, I gained a true appreciation for the many details and variables involved when organizing an event of any magnitude. That came to mind when editing our cover article this issue, “The Making of a Summer Festival.” After talking with organizers of several of the area’s largest

and longest running summer fests, I came away truly amazed. Held over multiple days, involving a wide range of activities, and attracting thousands of people, what could possibly go wrong? Seemingly almost anything and everything. Yet year after year, these festivals are carried off without a hitch — much to the delight and appreciation of local fest-goers. More impressive yet is the fact that most of the festivals are run almost entirely by volunteers. The reason it works is the passion that these volunteer fest organizers have for what they are doing. They love that they are giving back to their communities, while also often helping raise monies for local charities. No question, it is a lot of work, they say, and making sure everything goes smoothly is a challenge. But it is also fun and rewarding, which is why many keep signing on to help year after year. As always, we have lots of other great articles in this issue, including a Q&A with Veronica Roth, author of the blockbuster Divergent series of science fiction books turned movies. To think the Barrington native started writing the books when she was a graduate student at Northwestern. Enjoy the warm weather and, as always, thanks for being a reader!

- Hebrews 13:2

Chuck Cozette, Editor & Publisher chuck@westsuburbanliving.net 8

MAY 2018 | WWW.WESTSUBURBANLIVING.NET | WEST SUBURBAN LIVING

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THE

AROUND TOWNS |

STOPS & SHOPS

|

LOOK TO THE WESTERN SKY

|

LOCAL AUTHORS Photo courtesy of Forest Preserve District of DuPage County

Q&A

Equestrian Dreams

N

estled amid hundreds of acres of woodlands at

saddle up gentle ponies Sundance or Quazar while

Danada Forest Preserve in Wheaton is a well-loved

adults may choose Joe, an off-the-track horse, or the

pasture that is home to a small herd of 19 horses. On the site of what was once a working farm, there now stands a 20-stall Kentucky-style barn and, next to it, a riding arena. Here, anyone who has ever dreamed of riding on horseback through wooded trails can make that wish come true. A full-scale riding school, Danada offers lessons

larger half-draft horses, Captain and Grace. Those who are not quite ready to ride can get to know and groom the horses in a class aptly named No Rush Brush. Through family days and special events, Danada invites everyone to get up close with the horses. The Hansen Center in Burr Ridge offers an altogether different equine experience. Here, children and adults

for teens, adults and seniors, both one-on-one and in

with disabilities participate in therapeutic sessions

small groups of no more than four. Lessons begin with

in which they learn to ride or otherwise engage with

groom-and-tack instructions and an opportunity to learn

the horses as a path to cognitive, physical, emotional

how to communicate with the horse. Younger riders might

and social well-being.

— Anne Knudsen

WEST SUBURBAN LIVING | WWW.WESTSUBURBANLIVING.NET | MAY 2018 11

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the

By Numbers Photo courtesy of ??????

1 of 135

If you are in Naperville on Memorial Day, take a moment to view “The Spirit of the American Doughboy,” a life-size, pressed-copper sculpture that honors the sacrifice of seven Naperville men who lost their lives during World War I. November will see the 100th anniversary of the 1918 armistice. Machine die-stamped in 75 separate pieces that were then welded together, the hollow statue weighs in at 200 lbs. Naperville’s Doughboy — a moniker for the war’s infantrymen — was installed in May 1926, then restored and rededicated in May 2003. Designed by sculptor E.M. Viquesney, a total of 150 statues are thought to have been cast, though only 135 have been verified, six of those in Illinois (one in Soldier Field and another in Lincoln Park). Don’t confuse this Doughboy with look-alike statues named “Over the Top” in nearby Wheaton and Elgin, two of an estimated 55 created by rival sculptor John Paulding. Accusing Viquesney of stealing his design, Paulding kept up a feud of dueling Doughboys until his death in 1935.

1,157,490

golf balls sold at the pro shop, and shot across the 22-station driving

range at Downers Grove Golf Club during 2017. This year, the building of a new all-weather shelter over 10 of those stations will give the club’s 20,000 yearly golfers a longer season to swing a club — and

4.6

even more balls to hit. Infrared heaters, ceiling fans and lights will mean it’s never too cold, too hot, or too dark to work on your drive. The club anticipates that the shelters will bring in 5,000 more golfers

seconds is how long sending or receiving a text takes a driver’s eyes off the road, the equivalent of driving blind at 55 mph for the length of an entire football field, according to the Illinois Drop It and Drive program.

6,300

who will buy even more buckets of balls. The average golfer spends 30 minutes on the driving

3 4

Three full-grown reindeer

graze the outdoor habitat

range and hits 60 balls

at Brookfield Zoo’s Hamill

onto target greens at 75,

Family Wild Encounters

115, 185 and 240 yards. The

— and now, baby makes

maximum distance is 300

four! Born in early April at

yards. And the cost? Just

just over 12 pounds and

$5 for a bucket of 30 balls.

18 inches tall, the fawn will

comfortable, full-view seats are ready for Chicago-area baseball fans

grow to about 220 pounds,

who have a new team to cheer on — inside a $60 million, state-of-the-art

the average for females.

stadium. A newcomer to the American Association of Independent

And one day soon, this

Professional Baseball’s minor league, the Chicago Dogs has made its home in west suburban Rosemont.

little girl will sport two

The new Impact Field — with 12-year

spiked antlers, just like male

naming rights going to tech giant Impact

reindeer who can grow

Networking ­— will host the first home game

as many as 18 to 20 spikes!

on May 25, with a 50 home-game season continuing until September. With bleacher tickets as low as $9, it’s a bargain day out for the whole family. A massive two-sided digital scoreboard, which can be seen from I-294, tracks each game and is visible to more than 70 million cars Photo by Matt Rigby; photo inset by Daniel Boczarski

that drive by each year. Photos courtesy of Brookfield Zoo

12 MAY 2018 | WWW.WESTSUBURBANLIVING.NET | WEST SUBURBAN LIVING

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Q&A

Veronica Roth/ Photo by Reinaldo Coddou

The author of the mega-hit Divergent series talks books, life and growing up in Barrington VR: We did a lot of driving around. Going to 7-Eleven for slushies or to the grocery store to get Funfetti cake mix, stuff like that. The people I hung out with in high school weren’t really into partying, so we had to find ways to entertain ourselves — spending time in each other’s basements watching “What Not to Wear.” My boyfriend was in a metal band, so I went to a lot of metal shows to see him play. n What kind of student were you?

VERonica ROTH’s DEBUT Novel Divergent, which she began writing when she was in college, was a breakaway bestseller that transformed her almost overnight into a fan favorite among readers of sci-fi and fantasy fiction. The young novelist Immediately caught the attention of Hollywood and a series of top-grossing movies followed. A graduate of Barrington High School and the creative writing program at Northwestern University, Roth has recently released The Fates Divide, the second book in her Carve the Mark series. n What were you interested in when you

were the age of your young heroes? VR: Writing! I was fixated on it, to the point where I think my mom was a little worried. She just wanted to make sure I didn’t become anti-social, I think. She’s always been a good balancing influence. n How did you spend your time as a teen?

Q&A

VR: I was very dedicated, determined to get good grades and get into a good college, but I tried to challenge myself, so I was never the smartest in any class. (Not even close!) I sang in choir and I was on the congressional debate team. I played volleyball for a little while, too, but gave it up to focus on school, because our volleyball program at the time was very competitive (and successful). n Do you still have favorite haunts in

and around Barrington and the suburbs? VR: I was so excited to introduce my husband to Boloney’s Sandwich Shop, which has been part of my life since I was a kid. (I’m sad to hear it has changed, but at least it didn’t close!) I haven’t gotten to take him to the Bread Basket yet, but we went to Canteen Restaurant and Egg Harbor when it was still in that little Hough Street location. Apparently most of my Barrington favorites are breakfast places!

were never allowed to complain about being bored — and one of them was a “bookmaking” kit. You filled in the pages and then sent them off to be bound. It made me realize I could write all my imaginings down.

n n How did your time at Northwestern

help you develop as a writer? VR: The first time I ever let other people read my work — except for assignments in high school — was in a short story workshop at Northwestern. You have to sit silently as other people critique your work — you can’t defend yourself. The theory is that if you have to explain your story for people to understand it, you aren’t writing well enough. The only thing that matters is the story itself. I’ve carried that lesson with me, as well as a high tolerance for criticism, directly from Northwestern. I would absolutely not be the writer I am today without that program. I started Divergent while I was in college, but not for a class, just on the side!

started to take off? VR: I was waiting for the other shoe to drop! I’m very pessimistic that way. I don’t trust good things to last. I didn’t expect it to be as big as it was! I didn’t expect it to get published, period. That was my real dream, so everything after that was just extremely good icing on an already good cake. n How was the experience of watching

writing fiction? VR: Ten or 11, I think. My mother bought a lot of “kits” to keep us occupied — we

the movies for the first time? VR: It was unreal. To see the finished product after all that work and to know

and Alice Munro come to mind

Favorite thing to do in the west

— their characters, their subtlety,

suburbs? This is true, I swear, not just

their command of language.

a crowd pleaser — I like hanging

Favorite childhood or teen book

Is writing easy for you or difficult?

Something to aim for, certainly.

out with my mom. We see movies.

or movie? “Wayne’s World” is our

Both! Always both.

What do you do for pleasure?

We do art projects. We talk about life.

family movie. And my favorite books?

Which writers inspire you?

Lately, I’ve been learning about

She’s the best.

Harry Potter, A Wrinkle in Time, The

Writers doing something completely

photography from my husband.

Best lesson from your success?

Giver and anything by Judy Blume

different from me. Marilynne Robinson

Also, boxing, when I can.

Your worth is not in your work.

n

d a s r V f ( t f c i I r y s y a t e a

n

c —

14 MAY 2018 | WWW.WESTSUBURBANLIVING.NET | WEST SUBURBAN LIVING

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o V n p b e s c e A t t o — a t m i

n How did you feel when Divergent

n How old were you when you started

RAPID FIRE

h t d e s e t o t i t

4/24/18 1:33 AM


how many people worked on it — not just the director and actors, but the costume designers and production designers and editors and the craftsmen who built the sets, everyone! — was an unforgettable experience. I knew that no matter how the movies performed at the box office, or how similar they were to the books, just that feeling, that people had taken my ideas and put that much work into making them come alive, was truly remarkable. n Can you give our readers a quick

overview of the Carve the Mark series? VR: Carve the Mark is about a young man named Akos, who lives on a frozen, divided planet. He and his brother are kidnapped by the “enemy” nation’s leader, and he enlists the help of Cyra, a young woman suffering from a kind of supernatural chronic pain, to rescue his brother. Then everything gets a little more complicated. Along the way, he discovers there’s more to the people he’s been taught to hate than he ever imagined. The Fates Divide is about the aftermath of Carve the Mark, which I’ll try not to spoil — but essentially, the two nations that Cyra and Akos are from are now at war, and they are desperate to end it before too many people get hurt. As you might imagine, that’s bordering on impossible.

but also vulnerable. Did you set out to create a role model for young girls? VR: No, I try to avoid prescriptive writing as much as possible. No role models, no lessons. My responsibility to young people, I believe, is to be honest with them — which doesn’t mean making everything realistic, because we’re talking about books with prophecies and supernatural powers in them! But it means, to the extent possible, making characters feel real, which means imperfect, and responding to situations imperfectly, sometimes quite poorly. My hope is that when people read my books, the stories become one strand in an incredibly complex web of ideas that they consider as they develop. n Your young heroes are fighters, out

to change the world. Considering recent events in Parkland, Florida, do you have thoughts on the “hero” survivors who are up-ending attitudes toward gun laws? VR: Honestly, what those amazing young people make me feel most is the weight of my own responsibility. They are taking action because we forced them to by not doing enough, by not fighting for their safety hard enough. And while I support them wholeheartedly, I can’t escape that weight. They have endured a trauma they should never have endured.

n You’re writing about people from

n What do you enjoy about writing

different galaxies, yet they come across as entirely human. What do you think science fiction can teach your young readers about the world they live in? VR: Well, nothing in science fiction comes from nowhere. I am from this planet (obviously) and from this time; the ideas that I come up with in my writing emerge from the particular context of my life, culture and knowledge. The Fates Divide is about a war on fantastical planets, but I know what war is because of what I’ve read and learned. Science fiction gives you an escape from reality, yes, but at the same time, it very much doesn’t. It shows you, through exaggeration, parts of yourself and your world. Maybe it even shows you them for the first time, because it offers you enough distance to encounter ideas in a way that feels fresh, or safe or new.

for young adults? VR: I love how they read. When you’re an adult, it’s so easy to be cynical about stories that you no longer immerse yourself in reading. But for the average teen reader, books still completely absorb them, feel real to them, matter to them in a special way. I love being a voice that speaks, not about them, not over them, but to them. And I love listening to them, too.

n With Cyra, in particular, you’ve

created a multi-dimensional character — she’s strong, curious and resourceful,

n Do you ever get writer’s block?

VR: Often! I go back to the point at which the story stopped working and delete everything that followed, then figure out what went wrong, and write it again. n Does the story come out exactly

as you imagine, or do you go through multiple drafts? VR: So many drafts! The real work of writing, to me, is in revision. It’s like a rough draft is just clay, and the actual sculpture happens when you make something with it. n WEST SUBURBAN LIVING | WWW.WESTSUBURBANLIVING.NET | MAY 2018 15

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Stops&Shops

Make a purchase with a purpose

at 25 Silver Boutique at 204 Yorktown Center in Lombard (630 495-3238). This beautifully designed, familyowned shop features jewelry, handbags, accessories and gifts, most with a heart-warming mission. Alex & Ani bracelets, made from recycled gold and silver, feature little charms carrying ancient symbols that convey messages of positive energy. The Giving Keys, a company that employs those transitioning out of homelessness, makes necklaces from vintage keys and other repurposed metals. Mona B purses and wallets are crafted from truck tarps and military tents saved from landfills. A tag tells of the journey the fabric has made. No two items are alike. Chavez for Charity offers beaded bracelets in colors aligned with specific causes, with a share of profits going to groups that provide treatment for mental illness or care for animals. If you’re looking for a gift, spoiling yourself or just like putting your dollars behind good causes, this shop checks all the boxes. — Laurie Barton

A Gem in Downtown geneva, Jori & June boutique, located at 25 S. Third St. (630 457-5505), is where eye-catching items happily combine fashion and comfort. Everyday wear ranges in price from the affordable to the special occasion splurge. There are distinctive dresses, tops and jackets from brands like Amuse Society and Gentle Fawn as well as popular denims from Articles of Society. Clever jewelry designs by Gorjana draw attention, while Gemelli Jewelry offers boho style in bracelets, necklaces and earrings that feature stones and metals. Nature-inspired graphic pocket t-shirts are designed by co-owner Juliet Polonus under the brand Behova and are available in sizes from newborn to mens. The store encourages local artists and entrepreneurs by showcasing their items. The welcoming staff assists shoppers in finding the perfect gift among the various, plentiful and tempting items on display. — Laurie Barton

Photo by Jeff Knudsen

Photo courtesy of Jori & June

Photo by Laurie Barton

Hidden Gems & Longtime Favorites

Ready to Re-imagine and Re-cycle,

ReUse Depot rescues rare and random items from demolition sites then cleans them up for resale. Its mission, along with affiliated not-forprofit Deconstruction Solutions, is to divert building materials from landfills. The vast 25,000-sq-ft warehouse on the site of the historic Maywood Armory (50 Madison St., Maywood, 708 223-0502) houses an intriguing array of vintage pieces. There are rows upon rows of doors and windows, wooden beams and crown moldings. Stacks of planks in barnwood, maple and heavy cedar await customers ready to reinvent them into cool modern furnishings. Giant casement windows, mantels and a period staircase were pulled from regal estates, while decorative posts, arches and pew ends once belonged in churches. Hundreds of smaller items — English tiles, chandeliers and glass door knobs — sit beside claw foot tubs and art-deco vanities. Also awaiting a chance at a new life is a stunning piece of wall art — the soundboard of a grand piano. — Anne Knudsen

New Store Openings Following is a sampling of new shops that have opened in the last few months in the western suburbs. For an extensive list of other interesting shops and boutiques, go to westsuburbanliving.net. The Shade Store Upscale, showroom of window treatments. 89 Oakbrook Center, Oak Brook. 630 413-4441 Patel Brothers Authentic Indian grocery

store with ethnic foods, produce and spices. 1568 W. Ogden Ave., Naperville. 630 857-3440

house-made cheesecakes, and cheesecake push pops. 1019 Station Dr., Oswego. 630 636-7209

Steve Buresh’s Cheesecake Store Shop and café starring

Syrah Home Furniture and lighting inspired by India and Morocco. 233 S. Main

St., Naperville. (331 888-2580) Aurora Botanicals, Gourmet & Sweets Aurora-based virtual store offering all-natural plants, foods and candy. www.aurora-botanicals.com

Board & Brush Creative Studio DIY classes in woodworking, painting and sign-making — plus wine and creative outings with friends or for parties. 83 E. Templeton Dr., Oswego. 630 383-7219

16 MAY 2018 | WWW.WESTSUBURBANLIVING.NET | WEST SUBURBAN LIVING

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4/25/18 3:10 AM


TO THE

LOOK WESTERN SKY

By Joni Hirsch Blackman

In Pursuit of the Eye of the Storm A tragic tornado sparks a career seeking to increase future preparedness

F

ormer Warrenville resident Victor Gensini loves the views around his new home in Sugar Grove. “Further west in Kane County we can see a lot more sky — the sunsets are gorgeous.” The assistant professor of Geographic and Atmospheric Sciences at Northern Illinois University has kept an eye on the horizon since he was a kid, who, whenever a storm was brewing, ran outside to watch rather than to the basement to take cover. A native of tiny McNabb, located in Putnam County, Illinois’ smallest county, Gensini left his home town to chase storms from south Texas to central Canada. In 2015, while teaching at College of DuPage, he and his team found a way to predict tornado activity — weeks in advance. Whether a storm will produce a tornado is one of the toughest events to forecast, so the team’s research findings were remarkable. Gensini remembers being a bit overwhelmed seeing his name on national television news crawls. “Life’s just like a tornado in some ways,” he says. “It’s unpredictable regarding where you’re going to end up.” Where, and how quickly? Because, oh yeah, Dr. Victor Gensini is all of 31 years old, the youngest professor at NIU. He was a teenager on April 20, 2004 when a tornado blew through Putnam and LaSalle counties. “It was a day you never forget, that terrible Tuesday in the Illinois Valley,” recalls Gensini. “It hit my high school and killed eight people in Utica.” During the community’s post-storm clean-up, Gensini became fascinated with the physical damage he witnessed, as well as the mental scar it left on residents’ psyches. “The tornado was a defining moment in their lives — they talk of ‘before’ and ‘after’ the tornado,” says Gensini.

The questions sparked by that day — How did the storm occur? Will there be another one? — inspired the then teenaged Gensini to find answers. First stop was Illinois Valley Community College’s math and science courses. “I wasn’t necessarily good at those topics, but I had good teachers,” he says.

researching historical events. Like crime scenes, weather events leave fingerprints of conditions present in the atmosphere. When they tested the model they’d created, “my jaw hit the floor — we got some really strong relationships,” recalls Gensini. The research was published in a scientific

I wake up every day and say, ‘I don’t really work, I just research tornados.’ It doesn’t seem like work at all.” Gensini went on to earn bachelor’s and master’s degrees from NIU then headed to a well-regarded PhD program in atmospheric science at University of Georgia. He then taught at COD for four years before returning in a quick full-circle to NIU, having already changed the field that fascinated him as a teen. “Back in 2004, there was a tornado watch, then a warning. But there was no outlook in the days before the event that would have let someone know it was coming,” says Gensini. “That was a major driving force for me. It’s extremely difficult to forecast a small phenomenon — your house could be hit and the neighborhood could be fine.” It didn’t stop Gensini from trying. Every May and June he spent time in the tornado belt to learn the mechanics and dynamics of storms and how they behave. At COD, Gensini led groups of residents through 10-day, three-credit, on-the-road storm chases — “a great opportunity for people interested in storms” — that continue each spring at in-district tuition costs for west suburban residents. The 2015 breakthrough came while

journal and picked up by the Associated Press. The story ran in newspapers across the country, including on the front page of the Chicago Tribune on March 4, 2016. So far, their tornado forecasting methodology (available at atlas.niu.edu) is holding up. Gensini believes eventually conditions ripe for tornadoes will be forecast two to six weeks ahead of time. “Our forecasts say whether there is an above or below average chance for increased tornado activity in the United States. We are testing regionally this year to see what we can say with any sort of certainty regarding the Midwest or Illinois.” But even states with an increased probability shouldn’t panic. “For the dayto-day weather consumer, the longer-range forecasts don’t mean anything. If you’re in FEMA or an insurance company or a storm chaser, you’re interested.” And it’s relevant for anyone planning anything outdoors. Gensini’s team is always looking for donors to help fund research for tornado forecasting. But to him, it’s not a job. “I wake up every day and say, ‘I don’t really work, I just research tornados.’ It doesn’t seem like work at all.” n

18 MAY 2018 | WWW.WESTSUBURBANLIVING.NET | WEST SUBURBAN LIVING

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Local Authors

By Anne Knudsen

A Well-Respected Man Clarendon Hills novelist wraps complex issues into a story of love, loss and redemption

situations and characters of satisfying emotional depth, Berner writes with the fluid confidence of a gifted story teller. He also demonstrates the rare ability to weave philosophical meditations on the choices we make in life into a compelling story line.

The Harrow Legacy

David W. Berner, a resident of Clarendon Hills, has received the Chicago Writers Association Award and the Royal Dragonfly Book Award. He has been short listed for the Eric Hoffer Grand Prize. Berner is a news anchor at Chicago’s WBBM radio and an associate professor at Columbia College. Photo by Casey Berner

M

id-life crises can strike even the seemingly most stable and respected among us. Celebrated writer and beloved professor Martin Gregory finds his life in shambles when news gets out of his misguided love affair with a student. Leaving the shattered pieces behind, Martin retreats from Chicago to a quiet English village where he hopes to get his life back into balance. When a mystery woman brings an unexpected message and an implausible request, Martin’s life is turned on end once again. A cross-country train ride, a visit to his father’s grave, and the need to confront personal heartbreak combine to throw the

life Martin chose and the one thrust upon him into sharp relief. Creating unexpected yet believable

Anthony Rizzo Is a Good Italian Boy

The ABCs to a Mindful ME

by Diane Kowal Kirtley

Dick Rousts The Russkie

of Western Springs

by George Larson (writing as

by Amanda ReCupido &

Set against the backdrop of

Richard Avery) of Sugar Grove

Matt Lynch of Downers Grove

the Blue Ridge Mountains in

In a plot twisted by conspiracy,

Just in time for baseball season,

is filled with games, puzzles

Asheville, North Carolina, this

spies and money from Big Oil,

this jauntily illustrated children’s

and exercises intended to help

contemporary novel follows the

special agent Dick Avery is

book reminds suburban readers

children learn self control, make

fortunes and reveals the closely

on a mission to hunt down an

why we all love the Cubbies.

better decisions, master study

held secrets of an American

ex-KGB officer — a madman

Find out what makes the

skills, and develop empathy.

family. Told through the

menacingly known as Vlad the

legendary Cubs hitter a good

Zientek, a lifelong educator

individual voices of the parents

Impaler. In hot pursuit across

Italian boy — from hitting home

and therapist, gives parents

and three daughters — the

East Africa and the Middle East,

runs to sharing his last cannoli.

and teachers a set of tools to

shy eldest, the beauty queen

Avery tangles with terrorists —

Full of heart, fabled hits and

help children overcome anxieties

and the studious youngest girl

and with his beautiful Russian

good home cooking, this is a

and respond well to change

— the story leads its characters

counterpart, Ludmilla Petrova

book destined to make young

by becoming more mindful.

to familiar scenes around

— in his most daring and

Cub fans root, root, root for their

An accompanying CD includes

Chicago and the suburbs.

dangerous operation yet.

home-team heroes.

worksheets and lesson plans.

by Joan A. Zientek of Elmhurst This fun, educational workbook

20 MAY 2018 | WWW.WESTSUBURBANLIVING.NET | WEST SUBURBAN LIVING

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OUT&ABOUT |

THEATRE

|

COMEDY

|

ART

|

FAMILY ACTIVITIES

|

HOME & GARDEN

|

AND MUCH MORE Photo courtesy of Harpeth Rising

MUSIC

Harpeth Rising May 12 The trio plays “chamberfolk” on cello, violin and banjo — a fusion of folk, “newgrass,” rock and classical music wrapped in three-part vocal harmonies and reminiscent of both Appalachia and Medieval Europe — at Maple Street Chapel in Lombard. Call 630 627-0171

WEST SUBURBAN LIVING | WWW.WESTSUBURBANLIVING.NET | MAY 2018 21

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Out&about

Calendar of Events

THEATRE

COMEDY

| Best of Friends | Through May 6, Fri − Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. A romantic comedy in which a lifelong philanderer, thought killed in a plane crash, turns up to complicate the lives of his family and his new love. Cost: $18/15. Grove Players, Lincoln Center, 935 Maple Ave., Downers Grove. 630 415-3682

| Steve Byrne | May 3 – 5, Thur, 7:30 p.m., Fri, 8 & 10:15 p.m. and Sat, 7 & 9:15 p.m. An evening of stand-up from American comedian who created and stared in ”Sullivan & Son.” Cost: $22 + 2 item min. Chicago Improv, 5 Woodfield Mall K120B, Schaumburg. 847 240-2001 | First Fridays Improv | Fri, May 4, 8 p.m. GreenRoom Productions presents an evening of comic antics, live music and a cash bar. Hemmens Cultural Center, 45 Symphony Way, Elgin Cost: $15/12 847 931-5900

| The Wolf at the End of the Block | Through May 19, Thur – Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sat, 4 & 8 p.m. A pointed and political thriller by Ike Holter. Cost: $22. 16th Street Theater, Berwyn Cultural Center, 6420 16th St., Berwyn. 708 795-6704

| Capitol Steps | Sat, May 12, 4 p.m. & 8 p.m. Back by popular demand, the comedy troupe founded by former U.S. Senate staffers satirizes the political world through song parodies and original sketches. Cost: $49/42. Belushi Performance Hall at McAninch Art Center, 426 Fawell Blvd., Glen Ellyn. 630 942-2220

| Once: The Musical | Through Jun 3, Wed, 1:30 & 7 p.m., Thur, 7 p.m., Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 3 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 1 & 5 p.m. Tony Award-winning musical based on the Oscarwinning movie set in Dublin, where a lonely guitar player struggling to connect with the world meets a fellow musician. Cost: $64/36. Paramount Theatre, 23 E Galena Blvd., Aurora. 630 896-6666

| The Best of Second City | Sat, May 12, 7 p.m. Awardwinning sketch comedy and improv group brings popular and newly created comic routines. Cost: $33/28. Blizzard Theatre at Elgin Community College, 1700 Spartan Dr., Elgin. 847 622-0300.

| Outside Mullingar | Through Jun 3, Thur – Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, 3 p.m. Buffalo Theatre Ensemble presents John Patrick Shanley’s romantic comedy of introverted middle-aged misfits looking for love in rural Ireland. Cost: $20/14. Playhouse Theatre at McAninch Art Center, 426 Fawell Blvd., Glen Ellyn. 630 942-2220 | South Pacific | Through Jun 17, Wed,1:30 p.m., Thur, 1:30 & 8 p.m., Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 5 & 8:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 & 6 p.m. No matinée on Thur, Apr 5. More timely than ever, this Rodgers & Hammerstein, Pulitzer Prize- and Tony Award-winning musical proves that even the backdrop of a tropical paradise cannot shelter its residents from the prejudices of World War II. Cost:$62/47. Drury Lane Theatre, 100 Drury Ln., Oakbrook Terrace. 630 530-0111 | Churchill | May 2 – 6, Wed, Fri & Sat, 8 p.m., Thur & Sun, 3 p.m. In this dramatic play, the wartime British Prime Minister shares his life and stories through a series of flashbacks. Cost: $35/29. Mayslake Peabody Estate, 1717 31st St, Oak Brook. www.firstfolio.org or 630 986-8067 | Marjorie Prime | May 11 – Jun 16, Fri – Sat, 8 p.m. In this 2015 Pulitzer Prize Finalist, it’s the age of artificial intelligence, and 85-year-old Marjorie — a jumble of disparate, fading memories — has a handsome new companion, a robot programmed to feed the story of her life back to her. Cost: $17/15. The Riverfront Playhouse, 13 S Water St., Aurora. 630 897-9496 | Unrehearsed Shakespeare | May 12 – 13,Sat,8 p.m.and Sun 2 p.m. In this fast-paced, interactive performance, actors draw on clues embedded in the text of the First Folio to stage Shakespeare as you’ve never seen it before — unrehearsed. The Mill Theatre, Elmhurst College, 190 Prospect Ave., Elmhurst. 630 617-3005 | Gilbert & Sullivan's Trial by Jury | Wed, May 16, 7:30 p.m. Performed by Sinfonietta Bel Canto, this fully staged production of the comedic operetta is a courtroom tale of a breach of promise over a broken engagement, with a judge, plaintiff and defendant all equally flawed and fickle. Cost: $24/7. Mayslake Peabody Estate, 1717 31st St, Oak Brook. www.sinfoniettabelcanto.org | 4,000 Miles | May 18 – Jun 10, Fri - Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, 3 p.m. In this Pulitzer Prize finalist play, two outsiders find their way to each other in a complicated world. Cost: $28/22. Steel Beam Theatre, 111 W. Main St., St. Charles. 630 587 8521

May 19 Salt Creek Ballet In a dual program, the ballet presents Camille Saint-Saëns' “Carnival of the Animals,” a witty salute to the animal kingdom, followed by divertissements from “Paquita” by Parisian ballet master Joseph Mazilier at McAninch Art Center in Glen Ellyn. Call 630 942-2220

| Vinegar Tom | May 24 − 27, Thur − Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sat, 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. This 1976 play by British playwright Caryl Churchill examines gender and power relationships through the lens of 17th century witchcraft trials. Cost: $8. Theatre at Meiley-Swallow Hall, 31 S Ellsworth St., Naperville. 630 637-7469 | She Loves Me | May 25 – Jun 16, Fri – Sat 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. In this 1936 classic musical comedy by Bock and Harnick, romantically involved pen pals meet in real life — without knowing it. Cost: $20. Village Players Theatre Guild, 2S720 S Park Blvd., Glen Ellyn. 630 469-8230 | Company | May 25 – Jun 17, Thur – Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Stephen Sondheim's game-changing musical is a sophisticated and honest look at modern relationships, featuring a brisk, energetic score. Cost: $23/20. Playhouse 111, 111 N Hale St., Wheaton. 630 260-1820 | Dead Man's Cell Phone | Jun 1 − 17, Fri − Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. In this dark comedy, a misplaced cell phone entangles a woman in a dead man's life, leading to questions of mortality, morality and redemption. Cost: $18/15. Elgin Art Showcase, 164 Division St., 8th Floor, Elgin. 847 741-0532 | Hairspray | Jun 8 – 24, Fri – Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, 3 p.m. A Tony Award-winning musical set in teeny-bop Baltimore, when an unlikely dancer joins a popular TV show, upending social norms. Cost: $30/25. BrightSide Theatre, Meiley Swallow Hall, 31 S Ellsworth St., Naperville. 630 447-8497

| Butch Bradley | May 17 – 19, Thur – Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 7:30 & 9:45. A Comedy Central favorite and regular guest of Craig Ferguson brings an easy-going comedy routine. Cost: $25 + 2 item min. Zanies Comedy Club, Pheasant Run Resort, 4051 E Main St., St. Charles. 630 584-6300 | Aries Spears | May 17 – 20, Thur, 7:30 p.m., Fri, 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun, 7 p.m. A night of comedy from New York actor and long-time cast member on Fox's “MADtv.” Cost: $27 + 2 item min. Chicago Improv, 5 Woodfield Mall K120B, Schaumburg. 847 240-2001 | Larry Reeb | May 23 – 26, Wed - Thur, 8 p.m, Fri, 8 p.m. & 10:30 p.m. and Sat, 7 & 9:30 p.m. Voted Chicago Comedian of the Year and known as "Uncle Lar." Reeb brings an evening of wise-cracking, politically incorrect comedy. Cost: $22 + 2 item min. Zanies Comedy Club, Parkway Bank Park, 5437 Park Pl., Rosemont. 847 813-0484 | The Three Stooges! The Live Vegas Show | Sat, May 26, 8 p.m. Laugh out loud at this stage-show revival of the slapstick greats. Cost: $89/39. Arcada Theatre, 105 E Main St., St. Charles. 630 962-7000

MUSIC | Home Free: The Timeless Tour | Thur, May 3, 7:30 p.m. Nashville's popular five-man band brings a mix of allvocal music and quick humor that has earned the group 185 million YouTube views. Cost: $45/30. Rialto Square Theatre, 15 E Van Buren St., Joliet. 815 726-6600 | Gene Simmons Band | Thur, May 4, 4 p.m. Provocative showman from KISS performs rock hits. Cost: $175/100. Arcada Theatre, 105 E Main St., St. Charles. 630 962-7000 | Elmhurst Symphony Orchestra: European Romance with Weber & Saint-Saëns | Sat, May 5, 7 p.m. Directed by Stephen Alltop, ESO performs 19th century selections from Carl Maria von Weber, William Walton and Camille Saint-Saëns. Cost: $35/12. Elmhurst Christian Reformed Church, 149 W Brush Hill Rd., Elmhurst. 630 941-0202

22 MAY 2018 | WWW.WESTSUBURBANLIVING.NET | WEST SUBURBAN LIVING

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Photo by Thomas J. King

| Fareed Haque | Sat, May 5, 8 p.m. International guitar virtuoso, steeped in classical and jazz traditions, performs with a jazz quartet. Cost: $18. Norris Cultural Arts Center, 1040 Durham Rd., St. Charles. 630 584-7200 | The World's Finest Tribute To Kiss | Sat, May 5, 8 p.m. Be as close as you can get to a real Kiss concert, as this 18year tribute band led captures the band dangerous and outrageous rock sounds and styles. Cost: $35. Pheasant Run Resort, 4051 E Main St., St. Charles. 630 584-6300 | Elgin Symphony Orchestra: Bernstein and Mahler 5 | May 5 – 6, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2:30 p.m. ESO plays Bernstein's Candide Suite, pairing it with Mahler's symphonic masterpiece. Hemmens Cultural Center, 45 Symphony Way, Elgin. 847 931-5900 | DuPage Symphony Orchestra: Body, Earth & Spirit | Sat, May 5, 8 p.m. The symphony presents a new work by acclaimed composer Augusta Read Thomas as well as pieces by Leonard Bernstein. Cost: $38/15. Wentz Concert Hall, 171 E Chicago Ave, Naperville. 630 637-7469 | DuPage Chorale & DuPage Chorale Orchestra | Sun, May 6, 7:30 p.m. Lee R. Kesselman conducts “Annelies” by British composer James Whitbourn and librettist Melanie Challenger, based on Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl. Cost: $16/14. McAninch Art Center, 426 Fawell Blvd., Glen Ellyn. 630 942-4000 | Josh Turner | Fri, May 11, 8 p.m. Multi-platinum recording artist, Grammy Award winner and one of the youngest members of the Grand Ole Opry brings the best of traditional country music. Cost: $125/69. Arcada Theatre, 105 E Main St., St. Charles. 630 962-7000

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Through Jun 3 Once: The Musical Tony Award-winning musical based on the Oscar-winning movie set in Dublin, where a lonely guitar player struggling to connect with the world meets a fellow musician, at Paramount Theatre in Aurora. Call 630 896-6666

| Harpeth Rising | Sat, May 12, 7:30 p.m. The female trio plays “chamberfolk” on cello, violin, banjo, with three-part vocal harmony, reminiscent of Appalachia and Medieval Europe. Cost: $18. Maple Street Concerts, Maple Street Chapel, 200 S Main St., Lombard. 630 627-0171 | Chicago Sinfonietta: Praise + Punk | Sat, May 12, 8 p.m. A concert mash-up that puts combines gospel, classical and a marching band music in one program. Cost: $62/10. Wentz Concert Hall, 171 E. Chicago Ave, Naperville. 630 637-7469 | Herman's Hermits with Peter Noone | Sun, May 13,

5 p.m. Lead singer, songwriter and guitarist with hit pop group of the 1960s revives the hits. Cost: $89/49. Arcada Theatre, 105 E Main St., St. Charles. 630 962-7000 | Orion Ensemble: Quintessential Quintets | Sun, May 13, 7 p.m. The all-female chamber music ensemble, joined by guest violinist Mathias Tacke and viola Stephen Boe, plays George Gershwin, Antonín Dvorák and Carl Maria von Weber. Cost: $26/10. First Baptist Church of Geneva, 2300 South St., Geneva. www.orionensemble.org | Southern Accents: Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers Tribute | Thur, May 17, 8 p.m. Assembled from Nashville

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Calendar of Events

studio musicians and the touring circuit, this tribute group recreates the style and sound of the iconic band. Cost: $15/12. Joe’s Live, 5441 Park Pl., Rosemont. 847 261-0392

May 6 DuPage Chorale & DuPage Chorale Orchestra Lee R. Kesselman conducts “Annelies” by British composer James Whitbourn and librettist Melanie Challenger, based on Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl at McAninch Art Center in Glen Ellyn. Call 630 942-4000

| Glenn Miller Orchestra | Sat, May 19, 7:30 p.m. The world-acclaimed orchestra plays the big-band swing sounds of a bygone age. Cost: $40 for non-subscribers; $35 for TWS subscribers. Theatre of Western Springs, 4384 Hampton Ave. Western Springs. 708-246-3380

Photo courtesy of the McAninch Arts Center

Out&about

| Ray Orbison: The Tribute | Sat, May 19, 8 p.m. Singer and guitarist Brian McCullough emulates the legendary performer. Cost: $35. Pheasant Run Resort, 4051 E Main St., St. Charles. 630 584-6300 | Tough Love Benefit Concert | Sun, May 20, 4 p.m. With proceeds going to Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, the all-girl rock group from the 1980s is supported by Dream Police and Kevin Lee & The Kings. Cost: $10. Joe’s Live, 5441 Park Pl., Rosemont. 847 261-0392 | Music at Mayslake: Picosa | Sun, May 20, 7 p.m. Listen to contemporary and traditional chamber music by Spanish and Latin American composers. Cost: $25. Mayslake Peabody Estate, 1717 31st St, Oak Brook. www. picosamusic.com | Luis Miguel: México Por Siempre | Wed, May 23, 8:30 p.m. Iconic Latin vocalist and recording artist, known for bolero, mariachi and big band sounds, celebrates the music of Mexico. Cost: $895/50 Rosemont Theatre, 5400 N River Rd., Rosemont. 847 671-5100 | Chicago Latin Groove | Fri, May 25, 8 p.m. Chicagobased band plays tropical music, from classic boleros to fast-paced salsas. Cost: $20/10. Pheasant Run Resort, 4051 E Main St., St. Charles. 630 584-6300 | Outdoor Concert Series: The Boy Band Night | Sun, May 27, 3 – 5 p.m. A live band pays tribute to anything that is boy bands, playing hits from NSYNC, Backstreet Boys, New Kids on the Block, One Direction and others. The Bandshell at Cantigny Park, 1S151 Winfield Rd., Wheaton. 630 260-5161 | Outdoor Concert Series: Illinois Brass Band | Mon, May 28, 3 – 4:30 p.m. Celebrate Memorial Day with a tribute to the armed services with the 30-musician band directed by Stephen Squires. The Bandshell at Cantigny Park, 1S151 Winfield Rd., Wheaton. 630 260-5161 | Downers Grove Summer Concert Series | Tues, May 29, 7 p.m. The first of a series of outdoor concerts, with poprock group, The Hat Guys. Veterans Memorial Pavilion, Fishel Park. Grove St. Downers Grove. 630 960-7500 | Live on the Lawn | Wed, May 30, 6:30 p.m. Live music outdoors, with drink specials and an American-casual menu. St. Andrews Golf and Country Club, 2241 Route 59, West Chicago. 630 231-3100

DANCE | Russian National Ballet: Romeo and Juliet and Carmen | Sat, May 5, 8 p.m. Under the direction of Elena Radchenko, more than 50 dancers in resplendent costumes perform stories of ill-fated romance. Cost: $38/15. Pfeiffer Hall at North Central College, 171 E Chicago Ave, Naperville. 630 637-7469

| Salt Creek Ballet | Sat, May 19, 3 p.m. and Sun, May 20, 1 p.m. In a dual program, the ballet presents Camille Saint-Saëns' "Carnival of the Animals" and divertissements from "Paquita" by Parisian ballet master Joseph Mazilier. Cost: $30/20. Belushi Performance Hall at McAninch Art Center, 426 Fawell Blvd., Glen Ellyn. 630 942-2220

ART | Donna Castellanos: Rescuer of Once Loved Things | Through May 6, Thur & Sat − Sun 11 a.m. − 5 p.m. and Fri 11 a.m. − 7 p.m. Elmhurst artist presents a hands-on exhibit where cast-off items are incorporated into a variety of mixed media. Elmhurst Art Museum, 150 S Cottage Hill Ave., Elmhurst. 630 834-0202 | Rhonda Wheatley: At Your Soul's Discretion | Through May 19, Wed − Sat, noon − 4 p.m., Mon & Sat, 10 a.m. − 6 p.m., and Sun noon − 5 p.m. Works grounded in the speculative, metaphysical and spiritual combine such diverse materials as moss, crystals and vintage electronics. Aurora Public Art Commission, City of Aurora, 20 E Downer Pl., Aurora. 630 256-3340 | ROUSE: Music + Fashion Art | Through May 27, Tue − Fri, 10 a.m. − 9 p.m., Mon & Sat, 10 a.m. − 6 p.m., and Sun noon − 5 p.m. Through photography and styled looks, Jen Dodson shows the impact of fashion on the music industry. Schoenherr Gallery at North Central College, 171 E Chicago Ave, Naperville. 630 637-7469 | 1917: Catalyst for the Modern Era | Through July 30, Mon – Fri, 9:30 a.m. − 4 p.m. and Sat − Sun, noon − 4 p.m. An exhibit shedding light on the catastrophe of WWI and its century-long aftermath, with military artifacts. DuPage County Historical Museum, 102 E Wesley St., Wheaton. 630 520-4941 | Cameos & Chakras | Through Sept 16, Tue – Sat, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. and Sun 1 – 5 p.m. A combined exhibit of Italian shell cameos with Christian themes and ancient Indian Chakra stones related to positive awareness. Lizzadro Museum of Lapidary Art, 220 Cottage Hill Ave., Elmhurst. 630 833-1616

| Troll Hunt | May 7 – Jun 21, a.m. Watch Danish artistin-residence Thomas Dambo at work as he constructs six colossal trolls from reclaimed wood. The Morton Arboretum, 4100 Illinois Route 53, Lisle. 630 719-2468 | Art for Social Change: Sanctuary | May 11 – Jun 1, Mon − Fri, 1 - 5 p.m., Sat, 1 − 4 p.m. A national exhibit of postcard art, reflecting issues of diversity, inclusion and human rights. Oak Park Art League, 720 Chicago Ave., Oak Park. 708 386-9853 | Prairie Plein Air Show | May 16 – June 30, Mon – Fri, 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. A community art show, featuring pieces depicting scenes, locations and experiences within Schaumburg city limits. Herb Aigner Gallery, Al Larson Prairie Center, 201 Schaumburg Ct., Schaumburg. 847 895-3600 | ClaySpace Pottery Show | Sat, May 19, 10 a.m. − 4 p.m. Sponsored by the non-profit arts studio, this show features demonstrations and pottery for sale. Visitors Center at Cantigny Park, 1S151 Winfield Rd., Wheaton. 630 668-5161 | Women Painting Men | May 20 – Jun 23, Tue – Sat, 1 – 5 p.m. The works of six female painters showing portrayals of men that run from sexual to sympathetic to sentimental. Riverside Arts Center, 32 E Quincy St., Riverside. 708 442-6400

Festivals & Fairs | 22nd Annual Art in Wilder Park | Sat – Sun, May 5 – 6, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. A weekend of fine art, crafts and design, with more than 125 artist booths, food, drink, entertainment and children's activities. Wilder Park, 175 S Prospect Ave., Elmhurst. 630 712-6541 | Spring Fun Fest | Sat, May 12, 1 – 6 p.m. An afternoon of family fun with balloon art, face painting, bounce houses, a petting zoo, a corn hole and live entertainment from Sushi Roll and Istavan & His Imaginary Band. Parkway Bank Park, 5501 Park Pl., Rosemont. 847 349-5008

24 MAY 2018 | WWW.WESTSUBURBANLIVING.NET | WEST SUBURBAN LIVING

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Photo courtesy of the McAninch Arts Center

| 41st Annual Taste of Glen Ellyn | May 17 − 20, Thur, 5:30 − 7:30 p.m.; Fri, 5:30 − 10:30 p.m.; Sat, noon − 10:30 p.m.; and Sun, noon − 7 p.m. A festival with food vendors, a carnival, a crafts market and live music. Main St., Glen Ellyn. www.glenellynchamber.com. 630 469-0907 | Blooming Fest and Artéculture | Sat, May 19, 9 a.m. − 3 p.m. A garden festival and art display with a plant sale, live music from local performers, children's activities and more. Downtown West Chicago. www.westchicago.org | Aurora Kite Festival | Sat, May 19. 10 a.m. - noon. Come fly a kite, with 100 free kites to the first 100 children. RiverEdge Park along Broadway, Aurora. www.auroradowntown.org | 31st Annual Prairie Arts Festival | Sat, May 26, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. An outdoor fine arts and crafts exhibition and sale. Robert O. Atcher Municipal Center, 101 Schaumburg Ct., Schaumburg. 847 895-3600 | St. Charles Fine Art Show | May 26 – 27, Sat, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. , Sun, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. An outdoor festival and art sale with works from 100 juried artists in watercolor, oil, sculpture, jewelry, wood, fiber and glass. Arcada Theatre, 105 E Main St., St. Charles. 630 962-7000 | Taste of Wheaton | May 31 − Jun 1, Thur, 3 − 9:30 p.m., Fri, 3 − 10 p.m., Sat, 9 a.m. − 10 p.m. and Sun, noon − 6 p.m. Come for food for local vendors, stay for arts, crafts and live music. Memorial Park, 208 W Union Ave., Wheaton. www.wheatonparkdistrict.com | La Grange Carnival | Jun 1 − 3, Fri, 5 − 10 p.m., Sat, noon − 10 p.m. and Sun, noon − 5 p.m. A three-day festival with carnival rides, live music, games of skill, food vendors and a food tent. Harris Ave. between La Grange Rd. and Ashland Ave., La Grange. www.lgba.com | 5th Annual Glen Ellyn Vintage Auto Fest | Sat, Jun 2, 10 a.m. − 3 p.m. View a show of vintage automobiles, with talks on auto history, a bake sale and mini-tours to Stacy's Tavern Museum. Glen Ellyn History Center, 800 N Main St., Glen Ellyn. 630 469-1867 | Fine Line Arts Festival | Sat, Jun 2, 10 a.m. − 3 p.m. Watch art demonstrations, shop for art, then listen to live music. Fine Line Creative Arts Center, 37W570 Bolcum Rd., St. Charles. 630 584-8443

FAMILY & GENERAL | La Grange Outdoor Farmers Market | Through Oct 25, Thursdays, 7 a.m. − 1 p.m. A selection of produce, berries, fresh eggs and more from local farmers, plus artisinal items, children’s games and live music. In front of Village Hall, 53 S La Grange Rd., La Grange. www.lgba.com | Geneva French Market | Through Nov 11, Sundays 9 a.m. − 2 p.m. Enjoy farm-fresh produce, fresh flowers, baked goods, jewelry and more. Parking lot of the Metra Train Station at 4th St. & South St., Geneva. 312 575-0286 | Jym Elders Mentalist Show | Fri, May 4 11. 7:30 p.m. A pyschic magic performance, including mind reading, thought transference, predictions and mind over matter. Cost: $7. St. Andrews Golf & Country Club, 2241 Route 59, West Chicago. 630 231-3100 WEST SUBURBAN LIVING | WWW.WESTSUBURBANLIVING.NET | MAY 2018 25

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Calendar of Events

May 20 RARE BREEDS SHOW Breeders from around the Midwest display rare and historic livestock at Garfield Farm Museum in Campton Hills. Call 630 584-8485

Photo courtesy of Garfield Farm Museum

OUT&ABOUT

KIDS | Seussical the Musical | Through Jun 9, Sat, 11:30 a.m. Theatre for Young Audiences brings the colorful world of Dr. Seuss, as a lovesick bird and a compassionate elephant pair up to save a planet. Cost:$17/13. Drury Lane Theatre, 100 Drury Ln., Oakbrook Terrace. 630 530-0111 | Motion Explosion | Fri, May 4, 11 am − 2 p.m. A fun event that combines Touch-A-Truck, safety education and kite flying. Cypress Cove Family Aquatic Park, 8301 Janes Ave, Woodridge. 630 353-3300 | Tiny Great Performance™| Saturdays, May 5 & 19, 10 a.m. & 11 a.m. An acoustic experience by Super Stolie’s Soundscapes, where children create sound with their voices, instruments and art. DuPage Children’s Museum, 301 N Washington St., Naperville. 630 637-8000 | Disney Junior Dance Party on Tour | Sat, May 5, 4 p.m. An interactive concert, with sing-alongs to hits by favorite characters Mickey and the Roadster Racers, Sofia The First and Puppy Dog Pals. Cost: $63/30. Rosemont Theatre, 5400 N River Rd., Rosemont. 847 671-5100

| Downers Grove Founders’ Day | Sat, May 5, 9 a.m. This annual celebration features a 10K, a 5K, a family bike ride, a petting zoo and pioneer games. Various downtown locations, Downers Grove. www.downtowndg.org | All Animal Expo | Saturdays, May 5 & 20, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Vendors bring reptiles, birds, exotic mammals, hedgehogs, rabbits and non-puppy mill dogs, plus cages, tanks and pet supplies. Cost: $5. DuPage County Fairgrounds, 2015 Manchester Rd., Wheaton. 630 917-0366 | Great Midwest Train Show | Sunday, May 6 & Jun 3, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. A monthly model train show to buy, sell and trade, with operating model train displays and LEGO layouts. Cost: $7/2. DuPage County Fairgrounds, 2015 Manchester Rd., Wheaton. 630 290-1962 | Hollywood Confidential with Lainie Kazan, Renee Taylor and Connie Stevens | Sun, May 6, 3 p.m. Peek behind the scenes as long-time Hollywood friends share film clips, photos and a whole lot of dish. Cost: $99/59. Arcada Theatre, 105 E Main St., St. Charles. 630 962-7000 | Art @ York Presents Django | Wed, May 9. 12:30 p.m. Organist Dave Rhodes plays before a screening of the movie about famed composer and guitarist Django Reinhardt and his flight from German-occupied Paris in 1943. York Theatre, 150 N York Rd., Elmhurst. 630 834-0675 | ECO Car Show | Sun, May 11, 6 – 8 p.m. Co-sponsored by Elmhurst Public Library and Elmhurst Cool cities, reps from Tesla, Fox Valley Electric Auto Association and others show green vehicle options and give test drives. Corner of Prospect and Park Ave., Elmhurst. 630 279-8696 | Illusionist Jeanette Andrews | Sat, May 12, 3 p.m. The acclaimed magician and artist leads an hour of mysteries and magic in a performance intended for

ages 18 and over. Cost: $15/12. Registration required. McCormick House, Cantigny Park,1S151 Winfield Road, Wheaton. www.wheatonlwvil.org or 630 260-8162 | The Story Collider | Sat, May 12, 8 p.m. Five true stories — some hilarious, some heartbreaking — about people who have changed and grown through their experiences with science. Cost: $15. Fermilab’s Ramsey Auditorium, Kirk Rd. & Pine St., Batavia. 630 840-2787 | Downtown Wheaton Vintage Rides | Fridays, May 18 − Aug 31, 6 − 9 p.m. Vintage cars, motorcycles and trucks, plus a DJ spinning tunes and featuring a piano night on May 25. Hale St. between Liberty and Willow, Wheaton. www.downtownwheaton.com | 4th Annual Primrose Farm Barn Dance | Sat, May 19, 6 – 10 p.m. Swing into summer with Chicagoland's 10-piece swing band, Shout Section, dance lessons courtesy of Geneva’s Vargo’s Dance and a vintage costume contest. Cost: $15/10. Primrose Farm, 5N726 Crane Rd., St. Charles. 630 513-4370 | Rare Breeds Show | Sun, May 20, 11 am – 4 p.m. Breeders display rare and historic livestock, with poultry and by-products for sale. Cost: $6/3. Garfield Farm Museum, 3N016 Garfield Rd., Campton Hills. 630 584-8485

| ArtsPower: Are You My Mother? | May 5 – 6, Sat, noon, Sun, 3 p.m. Early education theatre group presents a musical that tells of a persistent baby bird in search of a home. Cost: $12/6. Pfeiffer Hall at North Central College, 171 E Chicago Ave, Naperville. 630 637-7469 | Spring Festival | Sun, May 6, 11 am − 3 p.m. Celebrate spring with a day of activities for all ages, including animal encounters, a tree climb, guided wildflower walks, netting in the pond, seed planting and building a bird house. Trailside Museum of Natural History, 738 Thatcher Ave., River Forest. 708 366-6530 | Wonderful World of Wheels | Mon, May 7, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. Children can see and touch community vehicles, including police cars, buses and maintenance trucks. 2607 West 75th St. Naperville. 630 995-8924 | Alphabet Soup Presents Peter Pan | Thur – Fri, May 10 – 11, 10 a.m. A professional theatre for young

May 11 TOUCH A TRUCK Children of all ages are invited to put their imagination in gear as they explore trucks, police cars, emergency vehicles, a crane, a dump truck and more in Batavia. Call 630 879-5235

Photo courtesy of Batavia Park District

| Carden Super Spectacular Circus | May 4 − 6, Fri, 7:30 p.m.; Sat, 10:30 a.m., 3 p.m. & 7:30 p.m.; and Sun, 1:30 p.m. & 5 p.m. Experience feats of athleticism and showmanship, plus performances with animals from around the world. Cost: $45/12. Sears Centre Arena, 5333 Prairie Stone Pkwy., Hoffman Estates. 847 649-2270

|Downers Grove Summer Nights Classic Car Show| Fridays, May 25 − Aug 31, 6 − 9 p.m. View different models of cars each night plus live entertainment. Main Street from Maple to Franklin, with featured cars on Curtiss St. in downtown Downers Grove. 630 725-0991 | Movie Premiere: City of Lights | Fri, May 25, 7 p.m. A short film about a struggling musician by Aurora native Martrell Webb, showcasing the landmarks of the city. Aurora Public Art, 20 E Downer Pl. , Aurora. www.auroradowntown.org. | Amazing Arachnids | May 26 – Sept 3, Mon – Fri, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. and Sat – Sun, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Temporary exhibit with interactive components, showing the connections between humans and spiders. Cost: $5/3. Brookfield Zoo, 8400 31st St., Brookfield. 708 688-8000

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Photo courtesy of Batavia Park District

audiences performs a stage show of the classic story. Cost: $9/8. Tivoli Theatre, 5021 Highland Ave, Downers Grove 630 932-1555 | PJ Masks Live | Thur, May 10, 6 p.m. A live show based on a top-rated animated Disney TV series, with fun, music and immersive interactivity from Catboy, Owlette, Gekko and the Baddies. Cost: $100/40. Rialto Square Theatre, 15 E Van Buren St., Joliet. 815 726-6600 | Touch a Truck | Fri, May 11, 10 am − noon. Children of all ages are invited to put their imagination in gear as they explore trucks, police cars, emergency vehicles, a crane, a dump truck and more. The Lodge at Laurelwood, 800 N. River St., Batavia. 630 879-5235 | Zoo-Topia — Kid Rock Event | Tues, May 15, 10 a.m. Children ages 1– 5, with an adult, sing, dance, and play instruments on the theme of zoo animals. Registration required. Cost: $12/10. Education Center, Cantigny Park, 1S151 Winfield Rd., Wheaton. 630 260-8162

HISTORY

| Death in DuPage | Through Jun 24, Mon − Fri, 9:30 a.m. − 4 p.m. and Sat − Sun,noon − 4 p.m. Explore mourning traditions and how dying was understood from the settlement period to the Civil War. DuPage County Historical Museum, 102 E Wesley St., Wheaton. 630 510-4941 | In Other Words | Through Nov 4, Tue − Sat, 11 a.m. − 4 p.m. Engage with history by exploring communications that are written, spoken, printed, recorded or captured in a picture, then try out typewriters, dial-phones and other antiquated equipment. Cost: $3/2. Geneva History Museum, 113 S Third St., Geneva. 630 232-4951 | Happy Illinois Bicentennial Birthday Bash | Sun, May 6, 4 p.m. To honor its statehood, Terry Lynch leads the audience in a game-like journey through the history of Illinois. Cost: $10/7. Century Memorial Chapel at Naper Settlement, 523 S Webster St., Naperville. 630 420-6010 | Civil War Days | Sat – Sun, May 19 – 20, 2:30 p.m. Experience history as Naper Settlement transforms into an 1863 Civil War encampment, where visitors meet famous figures and watch reenactments complete with blasting cannons and marching infantry. Cost: $15. Naper Settlement, 523 S Webster St., Naperville. 630 420-6010 | Mayslake Hall Franciscan Era Tour | Sat, May 26, 1 p.m. Learn about the Franciscan Province of the Sacred Heart, which operated Mayslake Hall as a retreat from 1924 to 1991, and the “mad monks” who chased away curious visitors. Registration required. Cost: $15. Mayslake Peabody Estate, 1717 31st St., Oak Brook. 630 206-9566 | Walking Tour of Historic Riverside | Sun, May 27, 2 p.m. Join a docent-led walking tour organized by the Olmsted Society and find out more about the history and heritage of the town. Cost: $20/15. Riverside Train Station, 90 Bloomingbank Rd., Riverside. 708 442-7675

Photos by Graham Webb

| Snoopy and the Red Baron | Through Jun 17. Tue − Sun 1 − 5 p.m. and Sat 10 a.m. − 5 p.m. In an exhibit from the Charles M. Schulz Museum, the cartoon aviator is showcased in Peanuts comic strips, alongside ephemera that elucidate the air battles of World War I. Elmhurst History Museum, 120 E Park Ave., Elmhurst. 630 833-1457

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French Country Market 123 W. Illinois Ave., Morris, IL

Calendar of Events

Photo courtesy of Forest Preserve District of Will County

Out&about

May 5 – Aug 11 Bird Viewings at Lake RenwicK Heron Rookery View cormorants, egrets, blue heron and other wild birds from the viewing platform, with staff at hand to answer questions, at Lake Renwick Preserve in Plainfield. Call 815 886-1467

Antiques. Hand Crafted Items. Artisans. Fresh Produce. Baked Goods. Flowers.

May 12th 8am - 2pm June 9th 8am - 2pm July 14th 8am - 2pm Aug. 11th 8am - 2pm Sept. 8th 8am - 2pm Oct. 13th 8am - 2pm for more information:

3FrenchHensMarket.blogspot.com Vendor Inquiries Welcome

815.513.5600

~ Holiday Market ~ Nov. 9th &10th Grundy County Fairgrounds Friday, 4-10pm Saturday, 9am-4pm for more information - 815.513.5600

3 French Hens Country Market

2018

| Centennial Commemoration: The Battle of Cantigny | Mon, May 28, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. A day in honor of the first major offensive battle American forces fought in World War I, with a memorial ceremony, a poppy display and family activities. The First Division Museum at Cantigny Park, 1S151 Winfield Rd., Wheaton. 630 260-5161 | Memorial Day Remembered | Mon, May 28, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. Enjoy a ceremony rooted in the Decoration Day traditions of the late 1800s. Kline Creek Farm, 1N600 County Farm Rd., West Chicago. 630 876-5900

HOME & GARDEN | Bloomingdale Garden Club Plant Sale | May 4 – 5, Fri, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. and Sat, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Shop for annuals in flats, hanging baskets, tropicals, grasses, vegetables and herbs, with advice from master gardeners Bloomingdale Park District Maintenance Building, 259 Springfield Dr., Bloomingdale. www.bloomingdalegardenclub.org | Bringing Back the Monarchs | Sat, May 5, 9 – 11:30 a.m. Learn to garden with native plants to benefit butterflies and other pollinators. Sugar Creek Administration Center, 17540 W. Laraway Rd., Joliet. 815 722-5370 | Greenhouse Open House | Sun, May 6, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Take a tram ride to the greenhouse tour summer plantings Visitors Center, Cantigny Park, 1S151 Winfield Road, Wheaton. 630 260-8162 | Tales Our Houses Tell Housewalk | Sun, May 6, 1 − 5 p.m. Explore six homes built during the 1920s, when the area was transformed from fields into brick homes. Cost: $30/25. Various locations in Oak Park. 708 848-6755 | Lombard Garden Club Lilac Sale | May 10 – 12, Thur, 3 – 7 p.m., Fri, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. and Sat 8 a.m. until sold out. Ten trees and 450 lilac bushes across 17 cultivars for sale. Lilacia Park, 150 S Park Ave., Lombard. 630 495-0022. | Glen Ellyn Infant Welfare Housewalk| Fri, May 11, 10 a.m. − 9 p.m. The housewalk showcases modern and

historic architecture and design. Cost: $45/40. Various homes in Glen Ellyn. www.glenellyninfantwelfare.org | Hinsdale Cooks! Kitchen Walk | Fri, May 11, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Benefit local historic preservation while touring the town's top kitchens in homes that showcase the latest in décor, products and design ideas. Cost: $50. Various locations in Hinsdale. 630 789-2600 | Native Plant Sale | May 11 – 12, Fri 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. and Sat, 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Choose from grasses, flowers, trees and shrubs and get advice from plant experts. Mayslake Peabody Estate, 1717 31st St, Oak Brook. 630 933-7200 | Wright Plus Housewalk | Sat, May 19, 9 a.m. − 5 p.m. This annual event offers visitors a look at private residences designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Cost: $110/85. Various locations in Oak Park. www.flwright.org | Native Plant Ideas | Sun, May 20, 1 – 3:30 p.m. Learn how to incorporate natives into a landscape, followed by a trail walk to see plants suited to local conditions. Glen Ellyn Park District, Frank Johnson Center, 490 Kenilworth Rd., Glen Ellyn. www.gepark.org | Spring Bulb Day | Thur, May 24, 7 – 9 a.m. Bargain prices on a huge variety of bulbs, but bring your own bags or boxes to carry home. Parking lot at Visitors Center, Cantigny Park, 1S151 Winfield Rd., Wheaton. 630 260-8162 | Wild Edibles | Sat, Jun 2, 10 a.m − noon. Take a walk with a naturalist and nibble on wild edible plants, then watch a cooking demonstration. Registration required. Cost: $34/29. Thornhill Education Center at The Morton Arboretum, 4100 Illinois Route 53, Lisle. 630 719-2468

FASHION & BRIDAL | Nancy Neill Jewelry Trunk Show | Sun, May 6, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Shop from a local designer, with jewelry crafted from found objects. Visitors Center, Cantigny Park, 1S151 Winfield Road, Wheaton. 630 260-8162

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| Luxury Bridal Expo and Fashion Show | Sun, May 20, 11:30 – 4 p.m. See all the trends from wedding professionals and find vendors for décor, cakes, gowns, DJs, and more. Cost: $25/10. Chicago Marriott Hotel, 1801 N Naper Blvd., Naperville. 847-428-3320, ext. 225

OUTDOORS | Midwest Morel Fest | Sat, May 5, 7 a.m. – 5 p.m. Learn about, hunt and buy mushrooms at an outdoor festival with a huge market, plus vendors, food and drink. Reservation required. Cost: $50/15. Jordan Block Park at Main & Route 23/71N, Ottawa. 815 434-2737 | Horsin' Around at Danada: Kentucky Derby Day| Sat, May 5, noon – 4 p.m. Join a fun-filled day about horses, including visits with members of the Danada herd and self-guided barn tours. Danada Equestrian Center, 3S507 Naperville Rd., Wheaton 630 668-6012 | Bird Viewings at Lake Renwick Heron Rookery | May 5 – Aug 11, 8 a.m. – noon. View wild birds from the viewing platform, with staff at hand to answer questions. 230 W Renwick Rd., Plainfield. 815 886-1467 | National Public Gardens Day | Fri, May 11, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Join a tour led by horticulture staff, then see a demo on container gardening. Visitors Center, Cantigny Park, 1S151 Winfield Rd., Wheaton. 630 260-8162 | 10th Annual Birdwatching Open | Sat, May 12, 7:30 a.m. Celebrate Migratory Bird Day by walking the nonplay areas of the golf course, as a guide helps you spot 80 or so species. Registration required. Cantigny Golf, 27W270 Mack Rd., Wheaton. 630 260-8162

| Endangered Species Day | Sat, May 19, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Learn about endangered species in Illinois and worldwide while supporting the zoo’s efforts to protect the Illinois Endangered Blanding’s Turtle. Cosley Zoo, 1356 N. Gary Ave., Wheaton. 630 665-5534 | Adult Hike with a Naturalist | Wed, May 23, 7 a.m. Join a naturalist on an early morning hike to view wildflowers and wildlife. Knoch Knolls Nature Center, 320 Knoch Knolls Rd., Naperville. 630 848-5000 | Breed All About It | Sat, Jun 2, noon – 4 p.m. Learn all about horses and visit with mares and geldings in the barn and in the riding arena. Danada Equestrian Center, 3S507 Naperville Rd., Wheaton 630 668-6012

FOOD & DRINK | Mash Up Home Brew Tasting | Sat, May 5, noon – 4 p.m. Celebrate National Homebrewers Day with a family friendly festival and competition. Ottawa Visitors Center, 1028 La Salle St., Ottawa, 815 434-2737 | 3 French Hens Country Market | Sat, May 12, 8 a.m. − 2 p.m. Browse a French-style market filled with antiques, hand-crafted items, baked goods, flowers and many more home décor ideas. 123 W. Illinois Ave., Morris. www.3frenchhensmarket.blogspot.com | Patsy Kline Tribute Lunch Concert | Wed, May 16, 11:30 a.m. Enjoy a chef-created feast while vocalist May Pfeiffer performs the hits of the country music legend. St. Andrews Golf & Country Club, 2241 Route 59, West Chicago. 630 231-3100 | Taste of the Town: Food for Life | Thur, May 17, 6 − 10 p.m. Sample food, wine and beers from local Photo by Marissa Amoni, courtesy of Aurora Downtown

| International Migratory Bird Day | Sat, May 12, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Celebrate and learn about bird migration, with bird hikes, special exhibits and information on supporting bird conservation. Sagawau Environmental Learning Center, 12545 W 111th St., Lemont. 630 257-2045

| Architectural Walking Tour | Sat, May 19, 10 a.m. – noon. Take a 1.5 mile history tour of the city, with a scavenger hunt. Cost: $6/4. DuPage County Historical Museum, 102 E Wesley St., Wheaton. 630 510-4941

May 19 Aurora Kite Festival Come fly a kite, with 100 free kites to the first 100 children, in RiverEdge Park in Aurora. www.auroradowntown.org

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Calendar of Events

The Doppelgänger

Photo by Matthew Murphy

Out&about

restaurants, view cooking demos, and enjoy live music. Cost: $70/60. Wilder Mansion, 211 S Prospect Ave., Elmhurst. www.ucca-elmhurst.org | Luncheon Concert with Karen Berk | Tues, May 22, 11 a.m. In this one-woman show, the pianist/vocalist performs Broadway favorites. Oak Brook Women's Club, Ruth Lake Country House, 6200 S. Madison St., Hinsdale. www.oakbrookwomensclub.org | Wine Tasting at the Arboretum | Thur, May 24, 6 p.m. Savor the flavors of wine as you stroll through the grounds and listen to music from AD3 Acoustic Trio. Cost: $40/35. The Morton Arboretum, 4100 Illinois Route 53. 630 719-2424

Wor th Going Downtown For 9 to 5 The Musical Through May 20. A country-pop show based on the Dolly Parton movie. Cost: $45. Den Theatre, 1331 N Milwaukee. 773 697-3830 Jesus Christ Superstar Through May 20. A re-magined production of Rice & Lloyd Webber's rock musical. Cost: $219/33. Lyric Opera of Chicago, 20 N. Wacker Dr. 312 332-2244 The Doppelgänger Through Jun 2. Rainn Wilson, best known as Dwight in "The Office" stars in a slapstick political satire. Cost: $114/30. Steppenwolf Theatre, 1650 N. Halsted St. 312 335-1650 On Your Feet! Through Jun 3. A new musical based on Emilio and Gloria Estefan from their Cuban roots to their global stardom. Cost: $172/52. Cadillac Palace Theatre, 151 W Randolph St. 312 384-1502 Macbeth Through Jun 24. Directed by Teller (Penn & Teller) and Aaron Posner, Shakespeare’s thriller of ghosts, witches and madness. Cost: $44/24. Chicago Shakespeare Theatre, 800 E Grand Ave. 312 595-5600 Chicago Beer Classic Sat, May 5, 11:30 a.m. One of the city's largest beer festivals with hundreds of brews. Cost: $85/55. Soldier Field, 1410 S Museum Campus Dr. 312 235-7000 Suzanne Vega Sat – Sun, May 5 – 6, 8 p.m. Neo-folk artist and distinctive vocalist brings an evening of acoustic music. Cost: $58/45. City Winery, 1200 W Randolph St. 312 733-9463 R&B Super Jam Fri, May 11, 8 p.m. Urban Vibe plays Chicago rhythm & blues with KEM, Eric Benet and Anthony Hamilton.

Cost: $125/59. Wintrust Arena, 200 E Cermak Rd., 312 791-6900 Zoo-ologie Sat, May 12. Walk on the wild side, with live music, wine and more. Cost: $160/110. Lincoln Park Zoo, 2001 N Clark St., Chicago.www.zoo-ologie.org Anthony Jeselnik Sun, May 13, 8 & 10 p.m. Former writer for Late Night with Jimmy Fallon brings a night of sharp satire and dark comedy. Cost: $30. The Vic, 3145 N Sheffield. 773 472-0449 Beyond the Aria Thur, May 17. Opera greats Nicole Cabell, Mario Rojas and Patrick Guetti perform. together. Cost: $598/328. Jay Pritzker Pavilion, Millennium Park, 201 E Randolph St. www.jaypritzkerpavilion.com Adler After Dark: Planetary Prom Thur, May 17, 6:30 p.m. Hands-on programs and theater shows, talks, along with dancing and refreshments. Cost:$20/15. Adler Planetarium,1300 S Lake Shore Dr., Chicago. 312 922-7827 Daryl Hall & John Oates + Train Fri, May 18. Classic pop duo is joined by a new band. Cost: $949/63. United Center, 1901 W Madison St. 312 455-4500 Don Quixote Fri – Sun, May 18 – 20. Ballet Nacional de Cuba joins Chicago Philharmonic. Cost: $140/21. Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University, 50 E Congress Pkwy. 312 341-2300 Rob Lowe Sat, May 19., 8 p.m. A one-man show by TV and movie star. Cost: $62/25. Cadillac Palace Theatre, 151 W Randolph St. 312 384-1502 Todd Rundgren Tue, May 22, 8 p.m. The rock 'n' roll guitarist, singer/songwriter and producer

comes to back to town. Cost: $560/101. Chicago Theatre, 175 N State St. 312 462-6300 U2 Tue – Wed, May 22 – 23, 8 p.m. Irish rock band led by Bono performs new and classic hits. Cost: $1,995/27. United Center, 1901 W Madison St. 312 455-4500 Waiting for Godot May 23 – Jun 3. Beckett's classic play as performed by Ireland's Druid Theatre. Cost: $78/68. Chicago Shakespeare Theatre, 800 E Grand Ave. 312 595-5600 Salonen & Uchida Thur – Sat, May 24 – 26, 8 p.m. Esa-Pekka Salonen leads a program of Brahms an Bartók featuring pianist Mitsuko Uchida. Cost: $220/34. Symphony Hall, 220 S Michigan Ave. 312 294-3000 All Black Affair Fri, May 25, 7:30 p.m. Dress up for the R&B sounds of Kindred Family Soul, Jon B, Carl Thomas, Ginuwine and Dru Hill. Cost: $125/32. Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University, 50 E Congress Pkwy. 312 341-2300 Dirty Dancing May 29 – Jun 3. A short run of the dance-heavy Broadway show. Cost: $77/15. Cadillac Palace Theatre, 151 W Randolph St. 312 384-1502 Taylor Swift Fri – Sat, Jun 1 - 2, 7 p.m. A national tour event from America's leading country vocalist and singer-songwriter. Cost: $200. Soldier Field, 1410 S Museum Campus Dr. 312 235-7000 David Byrne Fri – Sun, Jun 1 – 3. Backed by a 12-piece band, legendary songwriter performs his solo and Talking Heads hits. Cost: $250/30. Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University, 50 E Congress Pkwy. 312 341-2300

| Starved Rock Country Brew Fest | Sat, May 26, noon − 5 p.m. Sample more than 60 unique American craft beers, along with food and live entertainment. Cost: $40/30. 201 Albin Stevens Dr., Ottawa. 815 434-2737 | 8th Annual Ottawa Two Rivers Wine & Jazz Fest | Jun 1 − 3, Fri, 5 − 10 p.m., Sat, noon − 10 p.m. and Sun, noon − 5 p.m. Celebrate Chicago jazz while sampling from wineries and breweries from across the state, plus an outdoor market. 101 W Main St., Ottawa. 815 434-2737 | Downtown Naperville Wine Walk | Sun, Jun 3, noon – 5 p.m. Sample wines and foods at shops and restaurants in historic Naperville, with proceeds to benefit Arranmore Arts. Various locations in downtown Naperville. www.arranmorearts.org

SPORTS | Kane County Cougars | Mon, May 7, 6:30 p.m.; Tue, May 8, noon; Wed, May 9, 11 a.m.; Thur May 10, 6:30 p.m.; Sat, May 12, 1 p.m.; Mon, May 21, 6:30 p.m.; Tue, May 22, noon; Wed, May 23, 11 a.m.; Thur – Sun, May 24 – 27, 6:30 p.m.; and Mon, May 28, I p.m. Minor league baseball, with preand post-game entertainment. Northwestern Medicine Field, 34W002 Cherry Ln., Geneva. 630 232-8811 | Chicago Wildfire | Sat,May 12 & 19,6 p.m.The Chicago area's pro team in Ultimate Disc (frisbee) plays as part of a nationwide 23-team league. Cost: $10. BenedettiWehrli Stadium at North Central College 455 S Brainard St., Naperville. www.chicago-wildfire.com | Vintage Base Ball | Sun, May 20, 1 – 4 p.m. Enjoy an afternoon of America’s pastime as it was played more than 100 years ago. Parade Field at Cantigny Park, 1S151 Winfield Rd., Wheaton. 630 260-5161 | Chicago Sky | Sun, May 20, 6 p.m.; Wed, May 23, 11 a.m.; Fri, Jun 1, 8 p.m.; and Sun, Jun 3, 5 p.m. Professional women’s basketball in the WNBA league. Cost: $125/ 26. Allstate Arena,6920 N Mannheim Rd., Rosemont. 847 635-6601 | Chicago Dogs | May 25 - 27, Fri - Sat, 7 p.m., Sun, 1 p.m. Be part of the inaugural season of Chicago's new league baseball team. Cost: $25/9. Impact Field, Balmoral Ave. & Pearl St., Rosemont.www.chicagodogs.com | NHRA Route 66 Nationals | Thur – Sun, May 31 – Jun3, Chicago Speedway's season begins. Cost: $56/11. For schedule, visit www.route66raceway.com. Chicagoland Speedway,500 Speedway Blvd., Joliet. 815 722- 5500

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Photo by Heidi Ross

LITERATURE | Raymond Benson | Sun, May 6, 2 p.m. American novelist known as the official James Bond author from 1997 to 2003, presents In the Hush of the Night, a thriller set in Chicago and the suburbs. Centuries & Sleuths Bookstore, 7419 Madison St., Forest Park. 708 771-7243 | Julia Fine | Wed, May 9, 7 p.m. Chicago-based author introduces her first novel, What Should Be Wild, a modern myth with a coming of age theme. Anderson’s Bookshop, 123 W Jefferson Ave., Naperville 630 355-2665

May 27 Jon Meacham Presidential historian and Pulitizer Prize-winner introduces The Soul of America, about stormy periods in the nation's history, at Anderson’s Bookshop in Naperville. Call 630 355-2665

Fitness | Walk for Wellness 5K & 3K | Sun, May 6, 7 a.m. WGN's Ben Bradley kicks off the 3,000 participant day of events to benefit cancer survivors. Registration required. Cost: $25. Wellness House, 131 N Country Line Rd., Hinsdale. 630 654-5103 | Starved Rock Country Marathon & Half Marathon | Sat, May 12, 7 a.m. A challenging run in the rolling landscapes around IStarved Rock State Park. Cost: $120/110. Shuttles leave form 5:30 a.m. onwards from 901 LaSalle St., Ottawa. 815 434-2737 | 29th Annual Groovin' in the Grove 5K | Sat, May 12, 9 a.m. − noon. A Mother’s Day 5K race, a warrior challenge and a Little Groovers Race. Registration required. Cost: $47/8. Midwestern University Recreation & Wellness Center, 555 31st St., Downers Grove. 630 971-6401

| Amanda Quick & Christina Todd | Thur, May 10, 7 p.m. Moderated by Susan Elizabeth Phillips, the romance writers discuss their books. Anderson’s Bookshop, 123 W Jefferson Ave., Naperville. 630 355-2665 | Jason Mott | Wed, May 16, 7 p.m. New York Times bestselling author of The Returned launches his new fantasy novel, The Crossing. Anderson’s Bookshop, 26 S La Grange Rd., La Grange. 708 582 6353 | Richard Munson | Tue, May 22, 7 p.m. The Chicagobased author and clean energy advocate presents Tesla: Inventor of the Modern. Anderson’s Bookshop, 26 S La Grange Rd., La Grange. 708 582-6353 | Jon Meacham | Sun, May 27, 2:30 p.m. Presidential historian and Pulitizer Prize-winning author introduces The Soul of America. Anderson’s Bookshop, 123 W Jefferson Ave., Naperville 630 355-2665 | Jennifer Zeynab Joukhadar | Wed, May 30, 7 p.m. Syrian-American novelist presents her debut, The Map of Salt and Stars. Anderson’s Bookshop, 5112 Main St., Downers Grove. 630 963-2665

LECTURES

| 9th Annual Race to the Flag 5K | Sun, May 27, 8 a.m. A chip-timed walk/run to benefit Westmont's Peoples Resource Center, plus a pancake breakfast. Cost: $28/10. Registration required. Ty Warner Park, 700 Blackhawk Dr., Westmont. 630-384-1355

| Danielle Feinberg: The Art & Science Behind Pixar Films | May 4, 8 p.m. Cinematographer who has worked on “Toy Story 2,” “Finding Nemo” and other animated movies shows how art and science come together to create cinematic magic. Cost: $7. Fermilab’s Ramsey Auditorium, Kirk Rd. & Pine St., Batavia. 630 840-2787

| 37th Annual Cosley Zoo Run for the Animals | Sat, Jun 2, 7:30 a.m. Join 2,500 runners in a 5K, 10K or half-mile run for children. Registration required. Cost: $40/15. Memorial Park, 208 W Union, Wheaton. 630 665-5534

| A Self-Made Man | Sun, May 6, 2 p.m. Hosted by Equality for All in Downers Grove, filmmaker Tony Ferriaolo presents his documentary, with a Q&A on transgender issues. First Methodist Church of Downers Grove, 1032 Maple Ave., Downers Grove. 630 241-9075

| Girls Run the World 5K & Party in the Park | Sat, Jun 2, 8 a.m. Come together to run or walk in support of the empowerment, leadership development, overall well-being of our female youth. Phillips Park Aquatic Center, 828 Montgomery Rd., Aurora. 630 256-5288

| Civic Awareness Series: U.S. Supreme Court | Thur, May 10, 7 p.m. Co-hosted by the League of Women Voters, Constitutional Law Professor at John Marshall Law School discusses issues facing the court in a politically charged environment. Registration required. McCormick House Freedom Hall, Cantigny Park,1S151 Winfield Road, Wheaton. www.wheatonlwvil.org

| Pet Walk & 5K Run | Sun, June 3, 8 a.m. Hinsdale Humane Society's run and pet walk, with a festival hosted by celebrity emcee Judy Hsu. Registration required. Cost: $40/10. Katherine Legge Memorial Park, between E 57th & 60th Streets, Hinsdale. 630 323-5630

Information is as accurate as possible, but times and dates change and events are canceled. Please call to verify. To include an event in this guide, send details two

Check us out online

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months in advance to: West Suburban Living, P.O. Box 111, Elmhurst, IL 60126, or wsl@westsuburbanliving.net.

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Photos by Slav Polinski courtesy of Rotary GroveFest

Photo by Slav Polinski courtesy of Rotary GroveFest

The Making of a

Summer Festival A behind-the-scenes look at the planning, organization and management of the many thousands of details involved in hosting a successful fest

by Anne Knudsen

A

majestic Ferris wheel surrounded by carnival rides. Cotton candy and corn dogs — and these days, beer gardens! Stuffed animal prizes for midway games that look easy but aren’t. A cacophony of sounds with classic rock tunes playing in the background, courtesy of the live band playing on a nearby stage. And people, lots and lots of people — friends, neighbors and thousands of folks from throughout the area and beyond wanting to revel in the simple charm and fun of a good old-time summer festival. While the outward charm of a summer fest may harken back to simpler times, the behind-the-scenes planning, organization, preparation and roll-up-your sleeves, do-what-you’ve got-to-do work that goes into making a festival run smoothly is anything but simple. More impressive yet is that the majority of area festivals are run almost entirely by local charitable groups and volunteers. To get a better sense of the time and effort that goes into managing the many challenges and thousands of details that go into producing a successful festival, we went to organizers of some of the top fests in the western suburbs and asked them to give a behind-the-scenes look at how they make such complex events come off without a hitch ­— at least most of the time.

Ribfest in Naperville — Planning for Happy With the Independence Day opening of this year’s Ribfest just two months off, intensive planning for the 2019 fest is already underway. The four-day festival, anticipating crowds upwards of a quarter of a million people from the western suburbs and beyond, will be held at Naperville’s Knoch Park from July 4 – 7. Now in its 31st year, the festival still counts on help from its original “idea” man, Bruce Erickson, who is a charter member of the Exchange Club of Naperville, the not-for-profit behind this formidable community event. This year Erickson, who has been instrumental in the growth and stewardship of RibFest since its inception, will man the food area in the Sponsor Tent. The Exchange Club has about 150 members and this year hired its first executive director, Rick Grimes, after 30 years of strictly volunteer leadership. In addition to the countless hours put in by club members, an estimated 3,000 people — many involved in local charitable groups — will volunteer at Ribfest. There is a detailed time line and about an 18-month cycle for each Ribfest, explains Mary Howenstine, the club’s director of marketing for the event, adding that, “Right now, Marketing/PR, Logistics and Entertainment are working simultaneously on 2018 and 2019. “For a service club to run an event the size of Ribfest, the buy-in

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o H y s — c w f b t h h t a d i “ s a t b i d S b w P t o r H w l b s t


Does all the planning ensure the festival goes off without a hitch? Well, most of the time. Howenstine recalls the year that a semi-truck storing ice slowly sank into two feet of mud: “It was a head-tilt moment — ‘Does that truck look shorter than it did an hour ago?’” Then there was the night that the shuttle ended its last run — without looping back to pick up the high-school crew that had been cleaning the park. Volunteers and their parents were “not happy,” admits Howenstine. Organizers made up for the glitch the next day by inviting the group on stage to a standing ovation. Result? Everybody happy, which is the ultimate goal of Ribfest. Rotary GroveFest in Downers Grove — All Hands on Deck Loss can sometimes lead to reinvention. In 2010, the city of Downers Grove made the difficult decision to discontinue its popular 30-year Heritage Festival due to budget cuts. Seeing an opportunity, the Rotary Club of Downers Grove stepped in. Having managed the beer garden at Heritage Fest for 15 years, club members had hands-on experience and knowledge on how the fest operated. But without the city’s funding, they knew they would have to do things differently — they downsized the event a bit and turned to a key resource, the community, which wholeheartedly supported their efforts. Now in its ninth year, Rotary GroveFest is held over the weekend of June 20 – 24, and is made possible by the helping hands of 300-plus dedicated volunteers, many

Photo by Slav Polinski courtesy of GroveFest

Photo courtesy of Jim Hoch/Ron Hume/Exchange Club of Naperville

of the club members is critical,” adds Howenstine. “Club members work year-round on Ribfest. Then, they work sun up to after sun down during Ribfest — 12- and 14- hour days. Without the club members’ passion for service, Ribfest would lack an essential element: heart.” The tasks are many and varied — serving food, managing finance, working on the bus schedule, emceeing the event, refilling the bbq sauce dispensers, ordering signs, hanging banners, signing in volunteers, hauling ice, working the gates, cleaning the sponsorship tables, picking up garbage, and showing up at 5 a.m. to accept food deliveries. “Every club member is important to the event,” says Howenstine, “They come early, stay late. They make sure they eat lunch together to connect and check in with each other. They wave to their friends and families as they fly by on some errand. They wouldn’t have it any other way.” Ribfest prides itself on being mission driven — its hashtag is #partywithapurpose. Since 1987, more than $16 million has been directed back into the community, with last year’s total at just over $1 million. Proceeds fund charitable agencies from throughout the area, with an emphasis on organizations that strengthen families and reduce child abuse and domestic violence. “The biggest challenge,” says Howenstine “is that we can’t control the weather.” To partially offset the risks, a literal rainy-day fund is set aside, managed by the DuPage Community Foundation, so that agencies can still be funded in the event Ribfest is ever canceled.

of whom come from local charitable organizations. In a nice win-win arrangement, volunteers earn a stipend from GroveFest for their respective charities for each shift that they work. Other proceeds from the fest are used to help fund the Rotary’s “service scholarships” to help deserving local students pay for college. “Critical organizing time is February through July,” says Kent Ebersold, club member in charge of sponsorships and marketing for GroveFest, “with many other things like music and key vendors being decided much sooner, almost right after the last fest. “Over 30 people on the main committee are involved and time lines

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Making of a Summer Festival Swedish Days and Festival of the Vine in Geneva — Sweating the Details The Geneva Chamber of Commerce hosts not one, but two summer festivals and, according to Chamber President Jean Gaines, “It’s all about the details.” Swedish Days, timed for the summer solstice, runs from June 19 – 24 and celebrates Geneva’s Swedish heritage, while Festival of the Vine comes at summer’s end, running from Sept. 7 – 9. Swedish Days is among the oldest, longest and best-attended area festivals,

— the weather — is planned for. A detailed budget anticipates that there may be a year when summer showers lower attendance. Funds are set aside for future fests, just in case. “In the end, GroveFest is all about community,” says Lisa Rasin, Rotary Chair for the festival, noting that high school reunions are now often planned around the event. “When all is said and done, we’re physically exhausted,” says Rasin. “But four days of fun, laughter and enjoyment by so many people make the time and effort worth it. And then we look back and realize, ‘Wow, look what we’ve accomplished for the good of the community.’ ”

says Gaines. It was founded “by a group of businessmen in the 1940s and the formula they put together is still followed today.” Celebrating its 69th year, the six-day event anticipates 200,000 attendees. “The Festival of the Vine is all about food,” says Gaines, adding that it was patterned after Taste of Chicago, and started a year later. “We wanted a fall event but not an Octoberfest so popular in many communities. The Vine was selected because it could be anything grown on a vine including grapes, pumpkins and gourds. Grapes and wine with great food was the most popular theme and it has grown today to be one of the most popular of our festivals.”

Photo courtesy of Lockport Canal Days

Photo by Slav Polinski courtesy of Rotary GroveFest

are set for each area of responsibility,” adds Ebersold. “Lots of different pieces go into the Rotary GroveFest ‘puzzle’ to get all that needs to be done accomplished. We all have some strengths and we work hard to get the right people in the right positions. Amazing that it all comes together so darn well! The Rotary Club works hand-in-hand with the Village of Downers Grove, the police department and public works to make sure the event goes off smoothly. Even the most unpredictable element

Traditional or not, Gaines, who has been involved in planning for 40 years, states how important it is to constantly monitor each event, keeping activities that are popular but adding new ones to keep the festivals fresh and competitive. “Planning never stops,” she says, as staff work year round, shopping for ideas, setting agreements and printing marketing materials. “Often, we think our year goes faster because we are always working six to nine months ahead!” As with other area festivals, the weather always poses a risk. But Gaines explains it this way, “Once one has invited thousands of people to town, there is no way to say, ‘Sorry, it’s raining.’” That’s one reason why the town has opted for longer-running events — with luck, not every day will be a rainout. Occasionally, there are unexpected events that the best of planning can not anticipate. Take, for instance, the time that two port-a-potties were set on fire, most likely by kids. In Gaines’ experience, “One has to be prepared for a surprise or two, but careful planning, checking the details again and again and reminder calls to vendors make it more secure.” Most important, says Gaines, are the partnerships between the city and the volunteers, and a staff dedicated to creating a quality event. Patience, too, is needed. In the words of this long-time expert, “All events need time to grow.” Old Canal Days in Lockport — Each Year Better Than the Last Little did John Lamb know when he set out on a mission to elevate the Illinois and Michigan Canal from “a dirty creek running through town” into a respected part of Lockport’s history, that he was creating an event that would celebrate the town for years to come. Back in the 1970s, the historian and Professor at Lewis University in Romeoville wanted to promote the significance of the canal. The result was Old Canal Days — this year slated for June 14 - 17 ­— the success of which has helped finance local improvements such as the Canal Path,

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Scarecrow Fest in St. Charles — Expertise and Enthusiasm Professionalism and coordination are the name of the game at Scarecrow Fest, a Columbus Day Weekend celebration in downtown St. Charles (October 5 – 7). Now in its 33rd year, the festival is run by the Greater St. Charles Convention and Visitors Bureau, which, until 2010, handled all aspects of the event. Since 2011, the Bureau has enlisted the expertise of Ravenswood Event Services and JMF Events to make sure every detail is covered. An added bonus of bringing in help from outside is that experts come armed with good ideas, contacts with potential sponsors and the ability to elevate the event

Photo courtesy of Geneva Chamber of Commerce Photos at left and far left by Slav Polinski courtesy of GroveFest

new walking bridges and the development of Lock 1 near Division Street. This community bash — which includes live entertainment, an arts and crafts fair, beer and wine tents, and a carnival atmosphere — takes a full year in the planning, with the carnival booked for the following year as soon as the festival closes and bands and key vendors signed up immediately thereafter. With State Street under construction this summer, Ron Lif, president of the Lockport Chamber of Commerce, expects this year’s fest will prove more challenging than usual. Construction work is expected to affect sidewalks, water mains, traffic lights and street lights. Planners worked with the police and public works department to figure out an alternate route for the opening parade on Friday evening, diverting it away from State Street to avoid the risk of injury to attendees. “The parade is the official start to the weekend,” says Lif, “and without that excitement, momentum for the rest of the festival is lost.” Lif, who has been involved in Old Canal Days for a number of years, has learned one good trick to help anticipate setbacks. “As soon as the festival is over, I write down everything that went well along with what didn’t go well,” he says. “I then come up with suggestions on what could have been done better.”

in ways the Visitors Bureau may not have imagined, says DeAnn Wagner, interim executive director for the Visitors Bureau. Over the years, the festival has grown in attendance from 60,000 to more than 100,000, according to Wagner. While that’s good news, costs have risen, too. “Insurance costs have gone up, remote parking shuttles and more toilets were added, and the number of people needed to set up and tear down the event increased,” she explains. “To make up the difference, additional sponsors are sought, many of whom provide an activity that enhances the event.” That’s just one area where outside resources help. Ravenswood also contracts with entertainers and makes sure they have everything they need during the event. The Visitors Bureau works closely with Ravenswood’s event staff to address any problems and work jointly in marketing the event and organizing its signature scarecrow contest. External expertise is also helpful in the early stages. Festival planning typically begins in January and in recent years has been managed by three representatives from the Visitors Bureau working closely with four staffers from Ravenswood, plus Julie Farris from JMF Events. The team creates a time line, specifying items due

every month — everything from submitting an event application to the city to ordering pantyhose for the Make Your Own Scarecrow activity. The downtown location presents an immediate challenge, as the Fox River runs directly through the center of town. This means that Scarecrow Fest has multiple entry points, making crowd flow a constant challenge. Organizers learned the hard way that it’s best to keep its crowd-pleaser, the scarecrow contest, in one place. One year, with the intention of improving crowd flow, different contest categories were set up in three separate areas on the east and west sides of the river. Confusion ensued and coordinators have since kept all entries on the west side, in or near Lincoln Park. Beyond professional assistance, the Visitors Bureau enlists special help for its key event, Make Your Own Scarecrow. “Boy Scout Troop 60 has done a wonderful job managing the event for over 10 years,” says Wagner. Collecting clothing from sponsor Salvation Army, the scouts sort through to make sure there are 1,500 sets of long-sleeve shirts and pants. And during the event, they assist families with making the scarecrows. Says Wagner, it’s a team effort, all round. n

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Racing Off to Indy Indianapolis is an accessible big city, with good old-fashioned Hoosier hospitality as a way of life.

I

By Megan Pellegrini

s Indy the land of the movie Hoosiers or, more modern, The Fault in Our Stars? How about both. While Indianapolis certainly loves its sports — and its real-life and fictional underdogs like Notre Dame’s Rudy Ruettiger and the Breaking Away crew — the Crossroads of America is also home to the largest Children’s Museum, Robert Indiana’s LOVE sculpture, trendy restaurants and a cultural trail that connects art, parks and historical museums. It’s well worth a second look — and a weekend getaway. And there’s no better time to make the three-and-a-half-hour drive from Chicago than in the Spring, as the month of May is consumed with one of the most famous races in the world — the Indianapolis 500. Race fever grips the largest city in Indiana as qualification races, daily practices, concerts, balls and the largest half marathon in the United States, which ends with a lap around the track, build up anticipation before “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing” itself. Plus, for being the Midwest’s second largest city, Indianapolis still feels pretty accessible, with good old-fashioned

Hoosier hospitality a way of life, not just in the movies. The Indy 500: More Than a Weekend Andretti. Unser. Foyt. These legends of Gasoline Alley aren’t just names memorized by Indiana schoolchildren, but are worldrenowned for their feats at the Indianapolis 500, held every Memorial Day Weekend since 1916. The largest single day sporting event in the world brings more than 300,000 people to Indy. The race is much more than 33 fast cars flying around a track 200 times to complete the fabled 500 miles. It’s the unmistakable sound of burning rubber, pit crews that change tires in the blink of an eye, people and celebrity watching, the final sprint to the finish when one false move can ruin a driver’s dreams to win the world’s biggest sporting event, and finally, the best tasting-bottle of cold milk for the winner. Plus, attending is a pretty attainable wish, as the race offers tickets starting at $40. It’s worth the extra money to buy passes to access the pits and garages MONUMENT CIRCLE pre-race, as this is where you’ll see drivers,

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Photos courtesy of Visit Indy

crews, cars and celebrities up close. Race weekend’s marquee events are Carb Day on Friday; the downtown 500 parade, Snakepit Ball and Legends Day at the track on Saturday; and the big race itself on Sunday, complete with Air Force fighter jet fly-overs and celebrities leading the Pace Car laps. If the best seats are sold out, hearty souls can try General Admission infield seating, which is available even on race day. Year round, visitors can tour the Brickyard and stroll through the Hall of Fame Museum or Brickyard Crossing Golf Resort. Better yet, they can experience the thrill of racing around the track themselves as a passenger in the Indy Racing Experience Driving Program. How much speed do you need? Find out as you sit shotgun with an Indy 500 race car driver in a Two-Seat Ride, trying to catch a lead Verizon Indy Series race car around the track, as fast as you can handle (or, 130 mph tops).

Behind-the-Scenes Sports Tours Indy is the amateur sports capital of the world, playing host to numerous NCAA Final Fours, the Pan Am Games and Big Ten Football Championships. Visitors can still sign up for behindthe-scenes tours of Lucas Oil Stadium, home to the NFL’s Indianapolis Colts. The multipurpose facility seats more than 67,000 fans. Public tours last 90 minutes and include visits to the playing field, an NFL locker room, the press box and numerous other non-public areas. Bankers Life Fieldhouse, the home of the Indiana Pacers and Indiana Fever, also offers a behind-the-scenes tour. All 750,000 square feet of the stadium pay tribute to Indiana’s rich basketball history through its retro-style field house design. The Children’s Museum: Lots to See for Adults, Too Indianapolis is home to the world’s largest museum for kids, The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. The 472,900-sq-ft facility located on 29 acres is a must-see destination, whether one has kids or not. Plan plenty of time, if not most of the

Motor Speedway Pedal Car Racetrack to a mini golf course designed by Pete Dye. At the main campus, children can slide down a river of chocolate, come face to face with full-size dinosaur skeletons in the Dinosphere; learn the day-to-day duties of an astronaut in the International Space Station; fly over the great wall of China; examine the 5-story-high Fireworks of Glass; and learn how even children can change the world — by stepping into a replica of Ryan White’s bedroom, Ruby Bridges’ classroom, or Anne Frank’s annex and watching live re-enactments of their struggles and achievements.

CENTRAL CANAL

LUCAS OIL STADIUM

INDIANAPOLIS ZOO

day, to spend at this 93-year-old, awardwinning museum that continually reinvents itself while creating family learning experiences. This spring, the museum unveiled its largest expansion in 40 years. The Riley Children’s Health Sports Legends Experience is a $38 million, 7.5 acre addition devoted to fitness, exercise and activity. This immersive exhibit allows children to experience sports from their sports stars’ perspective — and get moving while they have fun. Visitors can walk through the Avenue of Champions, which features some of Indiana’s most beloved sports icons — Indy champ A.J. Foyt, basketball greats Larry Bird and Oscar Robertson and Olympic gold medalist Wilma “Skeeter” Rudolph. Then, there’s a walk or ride up the Tree of Sports, a 25-ft-high tree sculpture carved with sports symbols, before whizzing down one of three slides. The outdoor campus features 12 zones, ranging from a recreated Indianapolis

A City Where the Past Comes Alive Another interactive history museum is Conner Prairie, where the past comes alive in north suburban Fishers, as costumed interpreters show how pioneers lived in the 1836 town. Visitors can experience a 1859 Balloon Voyage by rising 350 feet high above the prairie. Downtown’s White River State Park is home to 250 acres of green space in the center of Indianapolis. Families can stroll urban pathways, rent a bike or surrey and take pedal-boat rides on the Central Canal. The park connects the city’s major attractions, including the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, the Indiana State Museum, the NCAA Hall of Champions, the Congressional Medal of Honor Memorial and Victory Field Baseball Park. The park also swings by the Indianapolis Zoo, a world-class attraction hosting a million visitors a year. Make sure to see the Dolphin Presentation and Butterfly Kaleidoscope, then chat with animal keepers and visit the 3-plus acre White River Gardens. This past April commemorated 50 years since Robert F. Kennedy’s iconic speech in Indianapolis, following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Visitors can view the Landmark for Peace Memorial located in MLK Park, a sculpture representing RFK and MLK reaching out to each other. Just down the street is the home

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of Indiana’s only president, Benjamin Harrison, providing another historic arm to the Old Northside neighborhood. Visitors soon find that Indianapolis is second to only Washington, D.C., in monuments and memorials, and devotes more acreage to our nation’s fallen than any other city, including the Indiana War Memorial Museum, Indiana War Memorial Plaza and Veterans’ Memorial Plaza. The city grid itself was inspired by Washington, D.C., with all roads leading out from the center of the city. There, tourists can view Monument Circle, which includes the iconic 1902 Soldiers and Sailors Monument. Try climbing the steps or, better yet, take an elevator to the top for a 360-degree view. Connecting Art and Exercise Indianapolis loves to make it easy for people to combine exercise with culture. Five years ago, city leaders took out one lane of traffic all across the city to make way for an 8-mile walking and biking

Photos courtesy of Visit Indy

Indianapolis

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM LANDMARK FOR PEACE

trail that connects the city’s six cultural districts. Make sure to walk part or all of the Indianapolis Cultural Trail, as millions of dollars of public art and green space will flank your path. Plus, who can resist posing for a picture in front of the iconic 1970s LOVE sculpture at the Indianapolis Museum of Art at the Newfields campus? The grounds are home to the Oldfields-Lilly House Tour (the

former home of Eli Lilly and Company president, J.K. Lilly, Jr.), a garden tour, a beer garden, Yoga at Newfields, and many traveling art exhibits and classes. This has been proclaimed the Year of the Arts in Indy. Fountain Square is one of Indy’s funky arts districts, while Massachusetts Avenue also provides cultural offerings. The Cabaret and Phoenix Theatre have new spaces that provide sleek additions to an already impressive arts scene. Summer highlights at The Cabaret include concerts from Broadway stars Jennifer Holliday in June and Laura Benanti in July. A longtime favorite, the Indiana Repertory Theatre hosts the backstage comedy Noises Off in May and kicks off its 2018 – 19 season in September with Holmes and Watson. Broadway in Indianapolis plays at Clowes Memorial Hall and Murat Theatre, with the summer line-up of shows including Wicked, Rent and The Lion King. Murat Theatre, along with Ruoff Home Mortgage Music Center,

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Iraqi war vet (Travis) and his wife (Hillary) — thus the name Hotel Tango after the letters H and T in the phonetic alphabet.

Photo courtesy of Visit Indy

Indianapolis Motor Speedway and White River State Park, are among the city’s top-tier live music venues. Look for tour stops from Taylor Swift, Kenny Chesney, David Byrne, Jimmy Buffett and Miranda Lambert, among others this summer. Dining: From Haute to Hip After a full day of sightseeing, you deserve a St. Elmo’s Shrimp Cocktail, the “world’s spiciest dish,” along with a great steak. St. Elmo Steak House on Illinois Street is Indy’s premier, fine-dining restaurant and is a visitor favorite. Slippery Noodle Inn is another legendary downtown spot and the oldest bar in the state. Considered Indiana’s home of the blues, live music is customary every night in the historic building that — at different times in its colorful history — was a luxurious inn, a former stop on the Underground Railroad and a brothel. Look for Gangster John Dillinger’s bullet holes as well, which are still in the walls.

KURT VONNEGUT MURAL

Some of the new hip spots to note include Bluebeard in Fletcher Place, themed after a novel by Indy native Kurt Vonnegut; Bar One Fourteen in SoBro, a New York-style bar with 16 seats, blacked out windows and a unique listening space; Tinker Street Restaurant & Wine Bar in the Old Northside Neighborhood; and Livery, just off Mass Avenue in a former, well, livery. Another great place to grab a cocktail is Hotel Tango, a distillery founded by an

Day Tripping from Indy If there’s time for a day trip, try heading south to Indiana University in Bloomington to check out a Big Ten college scene, Columbus for outstanding architecture and public art, Hamilton County for an afternoon of golf, or Brown County for phenomenal hiking and exploring. While many will initially visit Indy to see the larger-than-life Indianapolis 500, they are bound to return for the city’s welcoming culture, family activities and, yes, healthy lifestyle. n Megan Pellegrini is a proud former Hoosier, who grew up wanting to be a race car driver but settled for the fast-paced world of freelance writing. She is a former contributor to Indianapolis Woman magazine and many Chicago-based business journals.

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GOLF GUIDE 2018

The western suburbs are home to some of the best public courses in the country ARLINGTON LAKES GOLF CLUB 1211 S. New Wilke Rd., Arlington Heights 847 577-3030, www.ahpd.org. Pro: Tim Govern. Fees — Wkdays (non-residents): $35 for 18, $21 for 9. Wknds (non-residents): $38 for 18 before 11 a.m., $30 after 11 a.m., $26 after 5 p.m., $26 from 5 – 7 a.m. Wkdays (residents): $30 for 18, $19 for 9. Wknds (residents): $34 for 18 before 11 a.m., $25 after 11 a.m., $21 after 5 p.m., $20 from 5 – 7 a.m. Senior rates available. Features strategically placed, fescue-edged bunkers, nine water holes and 100-plus sand traps. ARROWHEAD GOLF CLUB 26W151 Butterfield Rd., Wheaton, 630 653-5800, www.arrowheadgolfclub.org. Pro: Andrew Ogata. Fees — Wkdays (non-residents): $74 for 18, $37 for 9. Wknds (non-residents): $84 for 18, $42 for 9. Wkdays (residents): $61 for 18, $30.50 for 9. Wknds (residents): $66 for 18, $33 for 9. Prices include cart fees. Surrounded by forest preserves, this 27-hole course features ponds, tree-lined fairways and white sand bunkers. BIG RUN GOLF CLUB 17211 W. 135th St., Lockport, 815 838-1057, www.bigrungolf.com. Pro: William Roper. Fees — Wkdays: $49 before 10 a.m., $59 from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., $45 after 2 p.m. Wknds: $69 before noon, $59 from noon

“What other people may find in poetry or art museums, I find in the flight of a good drive.” — Arnold Palmer

to 2 p.m., $49 from 2 – 4 p.m. Senior and seasonal rates available. BLACKBERRY OAKS GOLF COURSE 2245 Kennedy Rd., Bristol, 630 553-7170, www.blackberryoaks.com. Pro: Chad Johansen. Fees — Wkdays: $41 for 18, $26 for 9. Wknds: $49 for 18, $39 for 18 after 2 p.m., $32 after 4 p.m. ; $33 for 9, Senior and junior rates available. Features wetland and prairie grasses BLISS CREEK GOLF COURSE 1 Golfview Ln., Sugar Grove, 630 466-4177, www.blisscreekgolf.com Pro: Dave O’Neal. Fees — Wkdays: $35 for 18, $25 for 9. Wknds: $45 for 18, $31 for 9. Senior and junior rates available. Features tree-lined fairways and well-placed water hazards. BLOOMINGDALE GOLF CLUB 181 Glen Ellyn Rd., Bloomingdale, 630 5296232, www.bloomingdalegc.com. Pro: David Shallcross. Fees — Wkdays (non-residents):

$53 for 18, $28.50 for 9, $38 after 2 p.m. Wknds (non-residents): $58 for 18 before 11 a.m., $49 from 11 a.m.– 2 p.m., $41 after 2 p.m., $20 after 5 p.m. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available. Community card available for residents. BOLINGBROOK GOLF CLUB 2001 Rodéo Dr., Bolingbrook, 630 771-9400, www.bolingbrookgolfclub.com. Pro: David Thompson. Fees — M – Th (non-residents): $89 for 18, $79 from 11 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.,$69 from 1 – 2:50 p.m., $55 after 3 p.m., $45 after 5 p.m.; F (non-residents): $89 for 18, $94 from 11 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.,$89 from 1 – 2:50 p.m., $69 after 3 p.m., $45 after 5 p.m.; Sat – Sun (non residents): $99 for 18, $89 from 11 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.,$75 from 1 – 2:50 p.m., $55 after 3 p.m., $45 after 5 p.m. M – Th (residents): $79 for 18, $55 after 3 p.m. $35 after 5 p.m.; F – Sun (residents): $90 for 18, $69 from 11 a.m. – 12:50 p.m., $59 from 1 – 2:50 p.m., $45 after 3 p.m., $35 after 5 p.m. Prices include cart fees.

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Photo courtesy of Mistwood Golf Club

E

“Golf is a game of coordination, rhythm, and grace; women have these to a high degree.” — Babe Didrikson Zaharias

CANTIGNY GOLF 27W270 Mack Rd., Wheaton, 630 668-8463, www.cantignygolf.com. Pro: Patrick Lynch. Fees — Wkdays (M – Th): $81 for 18, $42 for 9. Wknds (F – Sun): $97 for 18, $42 for 9. Cart fee: $20 for 18, $12 for 9 (per person). Senior and junior rates available. Three unique golf experiences over 27 holes. Also features 9-hole Youth Links exclusively for juniors and Cantigny Golf Academy. CARRIAGE GREENS COUNTRY CLUB 8700 Carriage Greens Dr., Darien, 630 985-3400, www.carriagegreens.com. Pro: Dan Kochevar. Fees — Wkdays: $32 for 18. Wknds: $39 for 18. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available. CINDER RIDGE GOLF LINKS 24801 Lakepoint Dr., Wilmington, 815 476-4000, www.cinderridge.com. Pro: Scott Hogan Fees — Wkdays: $40 for 18, $35 after 12 p.m., $24 for 9. Wknds: $50 for 18, $45 after 12 p.m., $29 for 9. Twilight rates available. Prices include cart fees. Built on the site of disused coal mining operations, 350 acres wind through ravines and flat areas.

MISTWOOD GOLF CLUB

Senior and junior rates available. BONNIE DUNDEE GOLF CLUB 270 Kennedy Dr., Carpentersville, 847 426-5511, www.bonniedundeegc.com. Pro: Bob Mertel. Fees — Daily (non-residents): $47 for 18, $30 for 9. Daily (residents): $43 for 18, $28 for 9. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available. BOWES CREEK COUNTRY CLUB 1250 Bowes Creek Blvd., Elgin, IL 60124, 847 214-5880. www.bowescreekcc.com. Pro: Mike Lehman. Fees — Wkdays (nonmembers): $63 for 18, $59 for 18 from noon – 2 p.m., $49 after 2 p.m.; $33 for 9. Wknds (nonmembers): $95 for 18, $75 from 10 a.m. – noon, $65 from noon – 2 p.m., $55 after 2 p.m. 9 for $45 after 2 p.m. Prices include cart fees. Resident, senior and junior rates available. BROKEN ARROW GOLF CLUB 16325 W Broken Arrow Dr., Lockport, 815 836-8858, www.golfbrokenarrow.com. Pro: Matt Reed. Fees — Wkdays: $59 for 18, $35 from 2 – 5 p.m., $26 after 5 p.m.;$32 for 9, $30 after 2 p.m. Wknds: $69 for 18, $35 from 2 – 5 p.m., $26 after 5 p.m.; $33 for 9, $30 after 2 p.m. Manic Monday: $33. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available. North Course has the only double-greens in Illinois

COG HILL GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB 12294 Archer Ave., Lemont, 866 264-4455, www.coghillgolf.com. Pro: Kevin Weeks. Fees — Wkdays (courses 1 & 3): $54 for 18, $31 after 3 p.m. Wknds (courses 1 & 3): $62 for 18, $36 after 3 p.m. Daily (course 2): $74 for 18, $42 after 3 p.m. Daily (course 4): $155 for 18, $100 after 4 p.m. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available. EAGLEWOOD RESORT & SPA 1401 Nordic Rd., Itasca, 630 773-1410. www.eaglewoodresort.com. Pro: David A. Fazio. Fees — Wkdays: $56 for 18 before noon, $46 from noon–3 p.m., $36 for 9. Wknds: $66 for 18 before noon, $56 from noon – 3 p.m., $46 for 9. Prices include cart fees. Senior rates available. Features rolling greens with trees and lakes.

“Keep close count of your nickels and dimes, stay away from whiskey and never concede a putt.” — Sam Snead

FOX BEND GOLF COURSE 3516 Rt. 34, Oswego, 630 554-3939, www.foxbendgolfcourse.com. Pro: Keith Pike. Fees — Wkdays: $39 for 18, $26 for 9. Wknds: $44 for 18, $30 for 9. Cart fee: $17 for 18, $11 for 9. $25 for Sunset Special after 5 p.m., including cart. Resident and senior rates available. Features plush fairways, mature trees and challenging greens. Host of three Illinois Opens.

FOX RUN GOLF LINKS 333 Plum Grove Rd., Elk Grove Village, 847 228-3544, www.foxrungolflinks.com. Pro: John O’Brien. Fees — Wkdays (nonresidents): $54 for 18, $38 after 3 p.m. ; $31 for 9. Wknds (non-residents): $67 for 18, $41 after 3 p.m. ;$35 for 9. Wkdays (residents): $44 for 18, $32 after 3 p.m. ; $26 for 9. Wknds (residents): $56 for 18, $34 after 3 p.m.; $29 for 9, Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available. FRESH MEADOW Golf Club 2144 S Wolf Rd., Hillside, 708 449-3434, www.freshmeadowgc.com. Pro: Jake Thurm. Fees — Wkdays: $25 for 18 until 7 a.m., $32 from 7 a.m. – 2 p.m., $29 after 2 p.m., $25 after 5 p.m.; $20 for 9. Wknds: $45 for 18 before 8 a.m., $49 from 8 – 11 a.m., $39 from 11 – 1 p.m., $35 from 1 – 2 p.m., $27 from 2 – 5 p.m. $25 after 5 p.m.; $25 for 9. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available. Check website to verify prices. GLENDALE LAKES GOLF CLUB 1550 President St., Glendale Heights, 630 260-0018, www.glendalelakes.com. Pros: Jennifer Ferrell and Steve Solesky. Fees — Spring Rates: Wkdays (non-residents): $30 for 18.; SR, $25; $20 for 9 or twilight. Wknds (non-residents): $40 for 18 before noon, $25 after noon; $25 for 9 or twilight. Prices include cart fees. Residents of Glendale Heights and Carol Stream pay $3 off any price with proof of residency. Water in play on 11 holes. GLENEAGLES COUNTRY CLUB 13070 McCarthy Rd., Lemont, 630 257-5466, www.golfgleneagles.com. Pro: Joe DeMino and Paul Crespo. Fees — Wkdays: $53, $36 from 3 – 5 p.m., $20 after 5 p.m. Wknds: $59, $33 from 3 – 5 p.m.,$25 after 5 p.m. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available. Two historic courses and former host to Chicago Open. HERITAGE BLUFFS PUBLIC GOLF CLUB 24355 W Bluff Rd., Channahon, 815 467-7888, www.heritagebluffs.com. Pro: Brian Smith. Fees — Wkdays (non-residents): $27 until 7:30 a.m., $54 for 18, $36 for 9 after 2 p.m., $32 twilight. Wknds (non-residents): $70 for 18, $40 for 9. Wkdays (residents): $18 until 7:30 a.m., $40 for 18, $27 for 9 after 2 p.m., $21 twilight. Wknds (residents): $52 for 18, $31 for 9, $29 twilight. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available. Situated on 166 rolling, wooded acres. THE HIGHLANDS OF ELGIN 875 Sports Way, Elgin, 847 931-5950, www.highlandsofelgin.com. Pro: Jim Vogt. Fees — Wkdays (non-residents): $46 for 18, $36 after 4 p.m. ; $24 for 9. Wknds (non-residents): $53 for 18, $37 after 4 p.m. Wkdays (residents): $37 for 18, $27 after 4 p.m.; $21 for 9. Wknds (residents): $44 for 18, $28 after 4 p.m. Senior and junior rates available.

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GOLF GUIDE 2018

CANTIGNY GOLF

MAKRAY MEMORIAL GOLF CLUB 1010 S Northwest Hwy., Barrington,847 381-6500, www.makraygolf.com. Pro: Don Habjan. Fees — Wkdays: $49 for 18, $27 for 9. Wknds: $74 for 18, $40 for 9. Senior and junior rates available.

HUGHES CREEK GOLF CLUB 1749 Spring Valley Dr., Elburn, 630 365-9200, www.hughescreek.com. Pro: Sam Bradberry. Fees — M – Th (non-residents): $36 for 18, $28 for 9; Fri: $38 for 18, $29 for 9. Wknds (non-residents): $52 for 18 before noon, $42 for 18 after noon, $29 for 9 after noon; M – Th (residents): $34 for 18, $26 for 9; Fri: $36 for 18, $28 for 9. Wknds (residents): $50 for 18 before noon, $40 for 18 after noon, $28 for 9 after noon. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available.

MAPLE MEADOWS GOLF CLUB 272 S. Addison Rd., Wood Dale, 630 616-8424, www.dupagegolf.com. Pro: Chris Malek. Fees (west course) — Wkdays: $50 for 18, $29 for 9. Wknds: $64 for 18; $39 for 9; Twilight (daily):

OAK BROOK GOLF CLUB 2606 York Rd., Oak Brook, 630 368-6400, www.golfoakbrook.org. Pro: Jeff Kawucha. Fees — Wkdays (non-residents): $53 for 18, $38.50 after twilight; $32.50 for 9. Wknds (non-residents): $58 for 18, $38.50 after twilight; $35.50 for 9. Wkdays (residents): $34.50 for 18,

“The next time I cry about golf it will only be with joy. It’s not worth crying over golf for any other reason. After all, it’s only a game.”

KLEIN CREEK GOLF CLUB 1N333 Pleasant Hill Rd., Winfield, 630 690-0101, www.kleincreek.com. Director: Matte Allman. Fees — M&Th (non-residents): $67 for 18, $35 after 3 p.m.; F – Sun: $79 for 18, $40 after 3 p.m.; $35 for 9. M&Th (residents): $57 for 18, $30 after 3 p.m.; F – Sun: $67 for 18, $34 after 3 p.m.; $30 for 9. Prices include cart fees. Senior and military rates available.

— Rory McIlroy $36 for 18. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available. MILL CREEK GOLF CLUB 39W525 Herrington, Geneva, 630 208-7272, www.millcreekgolfcourse.com. Currently undergoing change of ownership, with plans to reopen in summer 2018. Check website for updates.

Photo courtesy of St. Charles Park District

LINKS AT CARILLON 21200 S Carillon Dr., Plainfield, 815 886-2132, www.carillongolf.com. Pro: Chris Dimmitt. Fees — Wkdays: $40 for 18, $25 for 9. Wknds: $57 for 18, $35 after 2 p.m. ;$30 for 9. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available.

Pottawatomie Golf Course

(members): $57 for 18 before noon, $52 after noon, $33 for 9 and super twilight. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available.

MISTWOOD GOLF CLUB 1700 W Renwick Rd., Romeoville, 815 254-3333, www.mistwoodgc.com. Pro: John Platt. Fees — Wkdays: $85 for 18, $65 after 2 p.m. Wknds: $110 for 18, $90 after 2 p.m. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available. Home of the Illinois Women’s Open. NAPERBROOK GOLF COURSE 22204 W 111th St./Hassert Blvd., Plainfield, 630 378-4215, www.golfnaperville.org. Pros: Tim Dunn and Mike Lyzun. Fees — Wkdays (non-members): $52 for 18 before noon, $47 after noon, $34 for 9 and super twilight. Wknds (non-members): $62 for 18 before noon, $57 after noon, $38 for 9 and super twilight. Wkdays (members): $47 for 18 before noon, $42 after noon, $29 for 9 and super twilight. Wknds

$26.50 after twilight; $25 for 9. Wknds (residents): $36.50 for 18, $29 after twilight; $25 for 9. Senior and junior rates available. OLD OAK COUNTRY CLUB 14200 S Parker Rd., Homer Glen, 708 301-3344, www.oldoakcc.com. Pro: Dan Shields. Fees — M – Th: $56 for 18, $37 after noon, $26 after 5 p.m.; $35 for 9. F: $60 for 18, $37 after noon, $26 after 5 p.m. , S – Sun: $69 for 18, $57 from 11 a.m.–3 p.m., $37 after 3 p.m., $26 after 5 p.m. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available. ORCHARD VALLEY GOLF COURSE 2411 W Illinois Ave., Aurora, 630 907-0500, www.orchardvalleygolf.com. Pro: Jim Tourloukis. Fees — Wkdays (non-residents): $48 for 18, $29 after 3 p.m. Wknds (non-residents): $72 for 18, $40 after 3 p.m. Wkdays (residents): $41 for 18, $23 after 3 p.m. Wknds (residents): $62 for 18, $30 after 3 p.m. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available. PHEASANT RUN RESORT 4051 E Main St., St. Charles, 630 584-4914, www.pheasantrungolfresort.com. Pro: Jamie Nieto. Fees — Wkdays: $49 for 18, $39 after

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GOLF

“Golf is a game that’s played on a five-inch course — the distance between your ears.” — Bobby Jones PHILLIPS PARK 1001 Hill Ave., Aurora, 630 256-3760, www.phillipsparkaurora.com. Pro: Jeff Schmidt. Fees — Wkdays: $47 for 18, $38 after 1 p.m., $34 after 4 p.m.; $31 for 9. Wknds: $54 for 18, $42 after 1 p.m., $37 after 4 p.m. Prices include cart fees. Senior, junior and military rates available. PINECREST GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB 11220 Algonquin Rd., Huntley, 847 669-3111, www.pinecresthuntley.com. Pro: Tom Larsen. Fees — Wkdays (non-residents): $42 for 18, $32 after 2 p.m., $28 after 5 p.m. Wknds (nonresidents): $57 for 18, $48 after 2 p.m., $38 after 5 p.m. Wkdays (residents): $35 for 18, $28 after 2 p.m., $24 after 5 p.m. Wknds (non-residents): $50 for 18, $44 after 2 p.m., $34 after 5 p.m. Prices include cart fees. Senior rates available. PRAIRIE BLUFF PUBLIC GOLF CLUB 19433 Renwick Rd., Crest Hill, 815 836-4653, www.prairiebluffgc.com, Pro: Scott Lunde.

Fees — Wkdays (non-residents): $52 for 18, $34 for 9, $42 after 11 a.m. Wknds (non-residents): $65 for 18, $51 after noon. Prices include cart fees. Resident, junior and senior rates available.

Photo courtesy of Cantigny Golf

2 p.m., $29 after 5:30 p.m. ; $30 for 9. Wknds: $61 for 18, $49 after 2 p.m., $39 after 5 p.m.; $35 for 9. Prices include cart fees. Hotel guest, senior and junior rates available.

PRAIRIE LANDING GOLF CLUB 2325 Longest Dr., West Chicago, 630 208-7600, www.prairielanding.com. Pro: Brian King. Fees — Wkdays: $72 for 18 from 7 – 11 a.m., $60 from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m., $50 from 1 – 5 p.m., $35 after 5 p.m. Wknds: $92 for 18 from 5:30 – 11 a.m., $77 from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m., $60 from 2 – 5 p.m., $48 after 5 p.m. Prices include cart fees. Golf Digest 4-1/2-star rated links-style public course, designed by Robert Trent Jones. Preserve at Oak Meadows 900 N Wood Dale Rd., Addison, 630 595 0071, www.dupagegolf.com. Pro: Austin Copp. Fees — Wkdays (non-residents): $75 for 18, $49 after twilight; $42 for 9; Wknds: $89 for 18, $49 after twilight; $42 for 9, Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available; discount card for residents. Recently renovated course, designed to meander alongside Salt Creek, the course beautifully blends conservation and recreation. RUFFLED FEATHERS GOLF CLUB 1 Pete Dye Dr., Lemont, 630 257-1000, www.ruffledfeathersgc.com. Pro: Zach Wrobel. Fees — Seasonal rates apply, call course. Only course in the Chicago area designed by Pete and P. B. Dye. ST. ANDREWS GOLF CLUB 2241 Rt. 59, West Chicago, 630 231-3100,

www.standrewsgc.com. Pro: Dave Erickson. Fees — Wkdays: $24 before 8:30 a.m., $41 from 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m., $25 after 1 p.m., $23 after 3 p.m., $13 after 6 p.m.; $27.50 for 9 with cart until 2:52 p.m. Wknds: $49 before 11 a.m., $39 after 11 a.m., $28 after 2 p.m., $17 after 6 p.m.; $33 for 9 with cart from 10 a.m. – 1:52 p.m. Senior and junior rates available. Built in 1926, this championship course features vast rolling terrain, mature trees, and a historic setting. SANCTUARY GOLF COURSE 485 N. Marley Rd., New Lenox, 815 462-4653, www.golfsanctuary.com. Pro: Bob Schulz. Fees (non-residents) — Wkdays (non-residents): $50 for 18, $35 for 9. Wknds (non-residents): $60 for 18, $48 after 2 p.m.; $40 for 9. Wkdays (residents): $40 for 18, $30 for 9. Wknds (residents): $48 for 18, $41 after 2 p.m.; $34 for 9. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available.

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Photo courtesy of Downers Grove Park District

GOLF GUIDE 2018

DOWNERS GROVE GOLF CLUB

“I get to play golf for a living. What more can you ask for – getting paid for doing what you love.” — Tiger Woods

SCHAUMBURG GOLF CLUB 401 N. Roselle Rd., Schaumburg, 847 885-9000, www.schaumburggolf.com. Pro: Jonathan Parsons. Fees (non-residents) — Wkdays: $44 for 18, $33 after 3 p.m. ; $22 for 9, Wknds: $55 for 18, $39 after 3 p.m. ; $25 for 9. Resident, senior and junior rates available. SETTLER’S HILL GOLF COURSE 919 E. Fabyan Pkwy., Batavia, 630 232-1636 www.settlershill.com Manager: John O’Connor. Fees — Wkdays (non-card holders): $38 for 18, $23 for 9. Wknds (non-card holders): $465 for 18, $27 twilight. Wkdays (residents): $26 for 18, $16 for 9. Wknds (residents): $50 for 18, $22 after twilight. Senior and junior rates available. Course is built around a forest preserve. SEVEN BRIDGES GOLF CLUB 1 Mulligan Dr., Woodridge, 630 964-7777, www.sevenbridgesgolfclub.com. Director: Ben Nachtwey. Fees — M – Th: $89 for 18 before 10 a.m., $96 from 10 a.m. – 2:20 p.m. F: $96 for 18 before 10 a.m., $106 from 10 a.m. – 2:20 p.m.; S – Sun: $116 before 10 a.m., $96 from 10 a.m. – 2:20 p.m.; Daily: $86 from 2:30 – 3:20 p.m.; $59 after 3:30 p.m. Prices include cart fees. Senior and foursome rates available. Front nine meanders through 100-year-old oaks. SPRINGBROOK GOLF COURSE 2220 W 83rd St., Naperville, 630 848-5060, www.golfnaperville.org. Pro: Mike Lyzun.

Fees (non-members) — Wkdays: $56 for 18 before noon, $51 for 18 after noon, $35 after twilight, $35 for 9, Wknds: $66 for 18 before noon, $61 for 18 after noon, $39 for twilight, $39 for 9, Prices include cart fees. Member, junior and senior rates available. TAMARACK GOLF CLUB 24032 Royal Worlington Dr., Naperville 630 904-4000, www.tamarackgc.com. General Manager: Miles Tucker. Fees — Wkdays: $34 for 18 before 2 p.m., $25 after 2 p.m. Wknds: $42 for 18 before 2 p.m., $28 after 2 p.m. (Rates are from Spring 2018; Summer rates not yet posted.) Prices include cart fees. Senior rates available. TANNA FARMS GOLF CLUB 39W808 Hughes Rd., Geneva, 630 232-4300, www.tannafarms.com. Manager: Chad Zipse. Fees — Wkdays: $49 for 18, $35 for 9, $35 after 2:30 p.m., $35 for replay. Wknds: $65 for 18 before 11 a.m., $55 after 11 a.m., $40 for 9, $35 after 2:30 p.m., $35 for replay. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available. VALLEY GREEN GOLF COURSE 314 Kingswood Dr., North Aurora, 630 897-3000, www.valleygreengc.com. Fees — Wkdays: $23 for 18, $15 for 9. Wknds: $24 for 18, $16 for 9. VILLA OLIVIA COUNTRY CLUB 1401 W Lake St., Bartlett, 630 289-1000, www.villaolivia.com. Fees — Wkdays : $32 for 18, $23 after 4 p.m.; $18 for 9. Wknds: $38 for 18, $28 after 4 p.m.; $22 for 9. VILLAGE GREENS OF WOODRIDGE 1575 W 75th St., Woodridge, 630 985-3610. www.villagegreensgolf.com. Manager/Pro: Brandon Evans. Fees — Wkday (non-residents): $34.99 for 18, $24.99 after 3 p.m.; $24.99 for 9. Wknd: $35.75 for 18, $22 after 3 p.m.;$29.99 for 9. Wkday (residents): $29.99 for 18, $24.99 after

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Photo courtesy of Downers Grove Park District

3 p.m. ; $24.99 for 9. Wknd: $30.75 for 18, $21 after 3 p.m.; $24.99 for 9. (Rates are from Spring 2018; Summer rates not yet posted.) Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available.

“The worse you’re performing, the more you must work mentally and emotionally. The greatest and toughest art in golf is “playing badly well.” All the true greats have been masters at it. — Jack Nicklaus VILLAGE LINKS OF GLEN ELLYN 485 Winchell Way, Glen Ellyn, 630 469-8180, www.villagelinksgolf.com. Pro: Michael Campbell. Fees — Wkdays: $57 for 18, $26 after 3:30 p.m.; $20 for 9. Wknds: $62 for 18, $36.75 after 2 p.m., $26 after 3:30 p.m. $25 for 9. Daily: $8 for 9 after 6:30 p.m. Resident rates available. WEDGEWOOD GOLF COURSE 5001 Caton Farm Rd., Joliet, 815 741-7270, www.golfjoilet.com. Pro: Jason Shook. Fees — $50 for 18, $40 after twilight; $32 for 9, Wknds: $56 for 18, $45 after twilight. Prices include cart fees. Senior, junior and season rates available. WHISPER CREEK 12840 Del Webb Blvd., Huntley, 847 515-7682, www.whispercreekgolf.com. Pro: Tony Malatesta. Fees — Wkdays (non-residents): $57 for 18, $36 after 3 p.m. Wknds (non-residents): $69 until noon, $59 from noon – 3 p.m., $39 after 3 p.m. Wkdays (residents): $43 for 18, $27 after 3 p.m. Wknds (residents): $52 for 18 until noon, $44 from noon – 3 p.m., $29 after 3 p.m. WHITE PINES GOLF CLUB 500 W Jefferson St., Bensenville, 630 766-0304, www.whitepinesgolf.com. Pro: Chuck Lynch and Marty Joyce. Fees — Wkdays: $19 for 18 before 7 a.m. $39 from 7 a.m. – 2 p.m., $25 after 2 p.m.;$22 for 9, $12 after 5 p.m. Wknds: $59 for 18 before 1 p.m. $30 from 1 – 4 p.m.; $32 for 9, $12 after 5:30 p.m. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates also available. A 240acre course built in 1928. WILLOW CREST GOLF CLUB (AT OAK BROOK HILLS RESOrT) 3500 Midwest Rd., Oak Brook, 630 850-5530. www.oakbrookhillsresortchicago.com/golf. Pro: Randy Bolstad. Fees — Wkdays: $75 for 18, $60 before 8 a.m. , $30 after 2.30 p.m., $35 after 5 p.m. $40 for 9. Wknds: $79 for 18, $65 after 2:30 p.m., $45 after 4.30 p.m. Prices include cart fees. Senior, junior and military rates available. WOODRUFF GOLF COURSE 621 N Gougar Rd., Joliet, 815 741-7272, www.golfjoliet.com. Fees — Wkdays (non-residents): $50 for 18, $40 after twilight; $32 for 9. Wknds (non-residents): $56 for 18, $45 after twilight. Wkdays (residents): $39 for 18, $34 after twilight; $26 for 9, Wknds (residents): $44 for 18, $39 after twilight. (Rates are from 2017; Summer 2018 rates not yet posted.) Prices include cart fees. Senior, junior and season rates available. WEST SUBURBAN LIVING | WWW.WESTSUBURBANLIVING.NET | MAY 2018 45

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Photo courtesy of River Bend Golf Club

GOLF GUIDE 2018

RIVER BEND GOLF CLUB

9-HOLE COURSES APPLE ORCHARD GOLF COURSE 692 W Stearns Rd., Bartlett, 630 540-4807, www.bartlettparks.org. Manager: Rich Glover. Fees — Wkdays (non-residents): $13.50. Wknds (non-residents): $14.50. Wkdays (residents): $11.50. Wknds (residents): $12.50. Solo rider cart rental: $5.50. Senior and junior rates available. BOUGHTON RIDGE GOLF COURSE 335 E Boughton Rd., Bolingbrook, 630 739-4100, www.boughtoneridgegolf.com. Manager: Marc LeRoux. Fees — Daily: $16. Cart fees: $10 per person. DOWNERS GROVE GOLF CLUB 2420 Haddow, Downers Grove, 630 963-1306, www.dgparks.org. Pro: Jim Festle. Fees — M – Th (non-residents): $23; F – Sun (non-residents): $25; twilight: $13.; M – Th (residents): $19; F – Sun (residents): $21; twilight: $13. Senior and junior rates available. Course designed in 1892, 24-station range.

Don’t Miss a Single Issue Return the enclosed reply card or call 630 834-4995.

FLAGG CREEK golf Course 6939 S Wolf Rd., Countryside, 708 246-3336, www.flaggcreekgolfcourse.org. Pro: Wayne Solomon. Fees — Wkdays (non-residents): $19. Wknds (non-residents): $21. Wkdays (residents): $15. Wknds (residents): $17. Senior and junior rates available. Premier 9-hole course, 25-station lighted driving range. GREEN MEADOWS GOLF CLUB 18W201 W 63rd, Westmont, 630 810-5330, www.dupagegolf.com. Fees — Wkdays: $23 for 18, $14 for 9. Wknds: $24 for 18, $14 for 9. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available. Discount card for residents. Traditional park-like setting with two large putting/chipping practice greens. LINKS & TEES GOLF FACILITY 900 W Lake St., Addison, 630 233-7275 ext. 4 www.addisonparks.org. Manager: Charles Sims.

Fees — Daily (non-residents): $11 for 9, $5 after 6 p.m. Daily (residents): $8 for 9; $5 after 6 p.m. Lighted practice range rated a Top 50 Standalone Range by the Golf Range Association of America. Features 1,100 yards of bent grass tees, fairways and greens. Outdoor golf range and indoor golf dome. MEADOWLARK GOLF COURSE 11599 W 31st St., Hinsdale, 708 562-2977, www.forestpreservegolf.com Manager: Brian Dober. Fees — Wkdays (non-cardholders): $28. Wknds (non-cardholders): $30. Twilight (non-cardholders): $25. Wkdays (cardholders): $25. Wknds (cardholders): $27 Twilight (cardholders): $22. Prices include cart fees. Senior and junior rates available on weekdays. Cook County Forest Preserve course.

“The only thing a golfer needs is more daylight.” — Ben Hogan POTTAWATOMIE GOLF CLUB 845 N 2nd Ave., St. Charles, 630 584-8356, www.pottawatomiegc.com. Pro: Ron Skubisz. Fees — Wkdays: $15 before 8 a.m., $19 from 8 a.m. – 3 p.m., $15 after 3 p.m. Wknds: $20. Located along the banks of the Fox River, the course was designed in 1939 by Robert Trent Jones, Sr. Ranked 15th among the best nine-hole courses in America by Golf World magazine. RIVER BEND golf club 5900 S Rt. 53, Lisle, 630 968-1920, www.riverbendgolfclub.org. Manager: Todd Shamberg. Fees—Wkdays (non-residents): $20. Wknds (non-residents): $22. Wkdays (residents): $15. Wknds (residents): $17. Senior and junior rates available. Nine-hole public course with scenic wetlands coming into play on eight holes. Golf bikes available to rent.

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Photo courtesy of River Bend Golf Club

SALT CREEK GOLF CLUB 1051 N. Prospect Ave., Wood Dale, 630 773-0184, www.saltcreekgolfclub.com. Manager: Frank Bonanno. Fees — Wkdays: $17. Wknds: $18. Replay: $6. Senior and junior rates available.

“The older I get, the better I used to be.” — Lee Trevino STREAMWOOD OAKS 565 Madison Dr., Streamwood, 630 483-1881, www.streamwoodoaksgolf.com. Manager: Randy Shepherd. Fees — Wkdays (non-residents): $16. Wknds (non-residents): $18. Wkdays (residents): $15. Wknds (residents): $16. Senior and junior rates available. Option to play two rounds of 9.

Kids Love to Golf!

SUGAR CREEK 500 E Van Buren St., Villa Park, 630 834-3325, www.sugarcreekgolfcourse.org. Head Golf Pro: Cory Ferrell. Fees — Wkdays (non-residents): $20. Wknds (non-residents): $22. Wkdays (residents): $17. Wknds (residents): $19. Senior and junior rates available. Lighted driving range, 25 practice stations. TWIN LAKES golf Club 400 W 59th St., Westmont, 630 852-7167, www.westmontparks.org. Clubhouse Manager: Craig Grember. Fees — Wkdays (non-residents): $15. Wknds (non-residents): $16. Wkdays (residents): $12. Wknds (residents): $12. Senior rates available. Twilight and child specials available F – Sun. A facility of Westmont Park District with challenging golf for beginners as well as advanced golfers. Located on 25 acres with woods, lakes and rolling hills. WALNUT GREENS GOLF COURSE 1150 N Walnut Ln, Schaumburg, 847 490-7878, www.walnutgreensgolf.com. Pro: Peggy Ellsworth. Fees — Wkdays: $11.50. Wknds: $13.50. Senior and junior rates available. WESTERN ACRES 2400 W Butterfield Rd., Lombard, 630 469-6768, www.westernacres.com. Clubhouse Manager: Don Voth. Fees — Wkdays (non-residents) $19. Wknds (non-residents): $21. Wkdays (residents): $16. Wknds: (residents): $18. Senior and junior rates also available. Family friendly park district course.

Our renowned Par 3 Course and Large Grass Practice Range are the perfect setting for our outstanding Junior Golf Program and our Summer Junior Golf League. 75th & Dunham, Woodridge (630) 985-GOLF

Check us out on the web at: www.zigfieldtroygolf.com

WING PARK 1010 Wing St., Elgin, 847 931-5952, www.wingparkgolf.com. Fees — Wkdays (non-residents): $18. Wknds (non-residents): $20. Wkdays (residents): $14. Wknds (residents): $16. Senior and junior rates available. Oldest municipal course in Illinois dating back to 1908. ZIGFIELD TROY GOLF CLUB 1535 W. 75th St., Woodridge, 630 985-4653, www.zigfieldtroygolf.com. Pros: Tim & Mike Troy, Barry Butterfield, Mark Arentsen and Patricia Brindle. Fees — Wkdays: $10. Wk nds: $12. Replays: $5; Senior and junior rates available. Sporty with challenging greens, large year-round practice range and Lost Mountain Adventure miniature golf.

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Photo courtesy of Hursthouse Landscape Architects

Backyard Inspiration By Lisa Sloan

Creative ways to make the most of your outdoor living spaces.

S

pring was a long time coming this year, but now that we’ve finally said goodbye to snow, it’s time to head outside and soak up the sun. If you want your outdoor living area to be an inviting and attractive escape to enjoy this summer and beyond, it may be time to consider installing or updating a porch, patio, deck or other structure. Here’s the lowdown on the latest trends in backyard beautification. Inside Out The shift toward outdoor living that first gained traction on the West Coast is now fully embraced by Midwesterners, despite the shorter season here. “We’re finding people are using more outdoor furniture, sofas,

outdoor sitting areas, loveseats — almost creating a mirror image of their interior outdoors,” says landscape architect Gene R. Grant Jr., CEO of Grant & Power Landscaping in West Chicago. “It’s amazing to see how the focus on the outdoor living concept has grown in the last five to 10 years,” acknowledges Matt Haber, design director for Naperville-based Western DuPage Landscaping, who has observed soft seating areas becoming as popular as outdoor dining areas. Haber attributes some of the popularity to the shift in home sizes. “As people gravitate toward smaller homes, the concept of outside/inside has become more important. People are looking at it as an extension of the back of the house and the family room and kitchen area.”

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Personalized Presence When designing an outdoor space, it’s best to take the same approach that you would for an interior room — that is, beginning not with particular materials or items, but with careful consideration of your lifestyle and how you want to use the area. For example, if you love to entertain and cook for guests, you may want to create a built-in grill, a pizza oven or even a full outdoor kitchen. If you have a large family or typically host big gatherings, you’ll need to include plenty of seating options. Or you might want to replicate the comfort of your family room in an outdoor setting, with space for a sectional, an outdoor fireplace and entertainment options such as a television or audio system. “When we start a project, our primary

Photo courtesy of Grant & Power Landscaping Inc.

goal is to get a good sense of the client, their family and their goals,” says Haber. “Materials are secondary.” Grant agrees. “Understanding your lifestyle is most important,” he says.

Photo courtesy of TimberBuilt Rooms

Material Issues When it comes to materials to use for a patio, the choices have greatly expanded in recent years. “There are many more options than there used to be,” says Haber. “Bluestone, limestone and flagstone are always popular, but there are other, newer stones, and a wide array of concrete products that mimic stone materials.” “We’ve been doing a lot more natural stone, and we can get product from all around the world,” says Mark King, president of King’s Landscaping in Hinsdale, whose customers have been gravitating to materials like flagstone and Colorado granite. Though the modern, clean look that is popular in many interiors is extending to the patio and often favors materials such as concrete or larger stone pieces, interlocking clay pavers are still favored by some homeowners, especially in more traditional communities. As far as patio shapes, Grant has observed that designs combining clean lines and curvilinear arcs are taking the place of more rounded or free-form configurations. He’s also noted that clients enjoy more than one type of space, for example, a kitchen area, a seating area and a dining area. “People are less apt to have one big patio, and are instead going with more segmented areas separated by plantings,” he says. “It’s a softer effect than one big hardscape area.” Though patios are preferred by many, decks are sometimes needed to bridge Photo courtesy of Hursthouse Landscape Architects

Photo courtesy of Hursthouse Landscape Architects

Rooms to Enjoy Screen porches or screen rooms help facilitate the blurring of lines between indoors and out, as do structures such as pergolas and pavilions. Mike Kinane of TimberBuilt Rooms in St. Charles says screen rooms, which are one of the company’s specialties, are a great way to get the appeal of being outdoors but without the annoyance of summertime pests. The rooms, which are situated on a reinforced deck and attached to the house, feature post and beam construction built with western red cedar. Grant says homeowners are also enamored with pergolas, because they lend an area a bit of shade but also provide an outdoor room effect. “People like pergolas with TVs, fans, fire features or even a full outdoor kitchen,” he says. “It really brings the entertaining area outdoors.” TimberBuilt builds pavilions and pergolas, as well as a hybrid structure that they have dubbed a “pavola.” These are popular to provide coverage for outdoor kitchens and grill areas. “They are like miniature pavilions,” says Kinane. “They can have a solid roof or a glass roof, and they offer some protection from sun and rain.”

the drop between the house and yard or to extend outside a screen room. In some cases, particularly for homes with sloping lots or walkout basements, a deck with a patio underneath is a popular choice. Cedar is still a sought-after decking material, though many homeowners now favor composite products for their low maintenance.

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Backyard Inspiration Elemental Appeal In addition to the sights, scents and sounds of Mother Natures, adding unique elements to make the outdoor space enjoyable is essential to any project. Task and ambient lighting should be part of your plan from the beginning. And don’t forget the flora. “Plants can make a nice patio great,” says Haber. “People get so focused on the hardscape — the paving and walls — that they forget about plants. You need that seasonal interest and variation of color and texture, or the space may feel cold.” Fire features are hot, from built-in fire pits to outdoor fireplaces. For an appearance that mimics what you would see indoors, fireplaces made of whole stones or faced with stone veneers have become favored over brick paver blocks. Those features provide a warm glow, but natural gas heaters are another option that can make spaces usable even when there’s a chill in the air. “We can even mount them in the ceiling of a pergola

Five Tips for Designing Outdoor Spaces 1. Pay attention to base preparation. Work with a professional to ensure that the base material is sufficient to support features such as a fireplace or pergola or, in the case of a patio at grade level, prevent stone from shifting over time. 2. Account for proper pitch and drainage. Pooling water can damage materials and dampen your enjoyment of your patio. 3. Plan ahead. If you think you may want to add a feature later, make sure you work with your landscaper to include it in the plans from the beginning. For example, create space to run a gas line or wiring for outdoor speakers or lighting.“You don’t want to do something today that you have to rip out tomorrow,” says Gene Grant of Grant & Power Landscaping in West Chicago. 4. Don’t supersize. Mike Kinane of TimberBuilt Rooms in St. Charles advises keeping the size of your screen room in check to allow for other outdoor amenities.“What ends up happening is that people want big rooms, but they forget they also want a deck, outdoor space for a grill, and room for a kiddie pool,” he says. 5. Do your research. If you want an outdoor kitchen, for example, you might want to check out the types of products available, such as refrigerators, smokers, grills, etc. and allow space in your budget for the items that top your wish list.“Start looking into appliances ahead of time — there is a wide range of product and the cost really varies,” says Mark King of King’s Landscaping in Hinsdale.

and supply heat to the area so you can extend your season,” says King. Water features are also in vogue. “We are seeing a lot of outdoor fountains,”

says Grant. “People like vases and things that recirculate water because they provide the relaxing sound without the upkeep of a pond.” n

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TimberBuilt Rooms ™

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Photos courtesy of Perennial Plant Association

Photos courtesy of Chicago Botanic Gardens

HELENIUM AUTUMNALE

ASCLEPIAS TUBEROSA

Photos courtesy of Ball Horticultural Company

Aconitum CarmichaELIi

Echinacea Sombrero

Dianthus Mountain Frost

Perennial Favorites Flower Power, All Season Long By Sara Pearsaul Vice

P

erennial plants may be a little less showy than their annual counterparts, but they have staying power. So while they cost a bit more than annuals, think of perennials as an investment in the future. Plants known as herbaceous perennials, which die back to the ground after the growing season but grow again the next, will give your garden fancy foliage and flower power for years to come. Even better, as they grow over the years, you can divide your perennial plants to fill in bare spots or to share with friends and neighbors.

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How to Pick a Perennial Perennials are expected to last at least three years and many last much longer, so they usually cost more than annual flowers. A good number of local

Photo courtesy of Walter’s Gardens, Perennial Plant Association

Photo courtesy of Blumen Gardens

SCLEPIAS UBEROSA

Consider the Seasons Most flowering perennials have a specific bloom time, whether in spring, summer or fall. When laying out your garden, select perennials that will bloom at different times throughout the season. “The jewels of the garden are your perennials,” says Joel Barczak, owner of Blumen Gardens in Sycamore. “Perennial season starts in April and keeps going through October and November.” Even if the perennials you choose have shorter bloom times, the foliage can be a show stopper as well. Barczak suggests that you look for perennials that offer lasting value, which he measures in terms of the foliage, color, long bloom time, persistent elements of the plant, and most of all, “reliability.” A select group of perennials are known as repeat bloomers, but you can’t always count on how often they will re-bloom. Daylilies can be particularly finicky, even those that claim to keep blooming non-stop. “What people want is something that looks good all the time and requires no maintenance,” says Barczak. While the hope that nature will tame itself is likely false, certain plants do require less care than others. He prefers to select perennials based on plant evaluations done by Richard Hawke at the Chicago Botanic Garden. “We try to get as many of the four- and five-star plants as we can,” says Barczak. Among the many perennials he recommends for sunny spots are catmint (nepeta) for long blooms and pollinators, yarrows for cut flowers, winecups for their magenta flowers, and perennial salvia. For shade, Barczak suggests dwarf astilbe, native ginger, lily turf (liriope), hosta, and pachysandra. He suggests that you keep the flower shape in mind when designing beds. “Be aware of flat, spike and ball-like flowers and intermix them,” he explains. Barczak also sees growing interest in using perennials in containers.

And the Winner Is . . . The Perennial Plant of the Year for 2018 is a dolled up member of the onion family — none other than ‘Millenium’ allium, and yes, they spell that name with one n. Unlike springblooming alliums, this one puts on its show in mid-summer. According to the Perennial Plant Association, headquartered in Oakbrook Terrace, whose members vote on the annual winner, “This cultivar is the result of a multigenerational breeding program … selected for late flowering with masses of rose-purple blooms, uniform habit with neat shiny green foliage that remains attractive season long, and for its drought-resistant constitution.” It’s also a butterfly magnet, as is last year’s winner, a bright orange milkweed that goes by the name of asclepias tuberosa, or butterfly weed. With so many homeowners interested in feeding bees, butterflies and other pollinators, it’s no wonder that the prizes went to perennials that pollinators and gardeners alike find irresistible.

independent garden centers grow their own perennials, rather than bring them in from afar, which means the plants are acclimated to our environment. When visiting a local garden center, ask if the perennials are grown locally. At The Growing Place in Aurora, perennial manager Joannie Rocchi, who has been working at the garden center for 27 years, describes her perennials almost as if they were family members. After sharing a long list of varieties from coreopsis to peonies, she recalls fondly, “We must not

forget coral bells.” Otherwise known as heuchera, some 45 varieties of coral bells are available this year, with flashy foliage colors that range from lime green to bright red, such as the Fire Alarm version. Rocchi points out that the hardiest perennials receive the designation Growing Place Choice “because they are very strong performers year after year and stay attractive with a lot less maintenance.” If the options seem overwhelming, she suggests strolling through the 26 learning gardens to see how the perennials look in the ground.

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Photos courtesy of Ball Horticultural Company

Perennial Favorites

Bloom Times Karl Batschke of Darwin Perennials

Echinacea Sombrero

RhythmiX COMBOS Boogie BluEs

kindly provided a list of bloom times for perennial plants so that you can plant to ensure a succession of color from early spring to late fall. April/May Allysum Golden Spring Iberis Snowsation Phlox Drummons Pink Dianthus Mountain Frost series Salvia: Lyrical series, Marvel series, May Night June Achillea New Vintage series Coreopsis: UpTick series and Little Bird Echinacea Sombrero series Heliopsis Sunstruck Monarda Balmy series Nepeta Junior Walker Veronica Moody Blues series July Perovskia Crazy Blue Helenium Salud series Phlox: Ka-Pow series and Laura Agastache: Rosie Posy Rudbeckia: Goldsturm August Anemone Pretty Lady Sedum Autumn Joy Caryopteris Grand Bleu September Helianthus Autumn Gold Source: Darwin Perennials

How to Plant a Perennial One rule of a green thumb: plan first and then plant. “It’s challenging for folks to take the extra time to plan their garden,” says Heather Prince, nursery manager for Wannemaker’s Home and Garden in Downers Grove. She suggests looking through books and magazines and determining what flower colors you like and don’t like before making your plant selections. Then make sure you are choosing a perennial to plant that you are certain will do well in your yard’s conditions. “It’s right plant, right place,” she says. “Perennials may get a bad rap because folks put them in the wrong spot.” Each plant has different needs for sun or shade, wet or dry soil, so it’s important to read the plant labels. She advises that you take a shovel to the spot you have in mind to check out the soil conditions before planting. “Don’t be afraid to ask for help,” she says. “Folks who work at independent garden centers are crazy about gardening.” At the Planter’s Palette in Winfield, Maria Dvorak, retail manager, agrees. “Knowing what your site has to offer is important for choosing perennials for success.” For example, she says that a shady area under a tree is going to be

a tough spot for most perennials to thrive. She recommends checking out the soil and amending your flower beds accordingly, with such soil helpers as mushroom compost and Purple Cow Organics fertilizer. “May to June is a great time to plant,” Dvorak says. The Planter’s Palette and other garden centers offer free guides for planting. One mistake she often sees is planting too deep. The crown of the plant should be above ground to “give it a chance to grow.” Among her preferred perennials are bleeding heart for spring, ornamental grasses like miscanthus for structure, perennial hibiscus for its dinner-platesized flowers for summer, and sedums for fall. She also sees old-fashioned favorites like bellflowers making a comeback, as gardeners recall their grandmothers’ gardens. Although we tend to think of a singular growing season, the growing conditions of spring, summer and fall are wildly different. Thankfully, perennial plants offer a range of visual interest throughout the growing season, as flowers and foliage change with the climate. “For me, I find that I plant things for seasonality,” Prince shares. “I’m excited by seeing something new every day.”

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Planting for Bloom Times At Darwin Perennials, Karl Batschke, global product development manager, is behind the breeding of perennials designed to meet market demands. “The consumers are saying, ‘We love this idea that you plant something in the ground that stays for several years, but we want a perennial that gives us the color and show of an annual plant,’” he says. As a result, Darwin Perennials is breeding to “extend the flowering window while still preserving the quality of the plant in the landscape,” Batschke explains. Most of Darwin Perennials’ new product development is grown in Elburn and West Chicago, where the parent

X COMBOS oogie BluEs

organization Ball Horticultural Company is headquartered. For long bloom times and strong foliage, Batschke recommends their new UpTick coreopsis with multi-colored petals, which bloom from June through October, and coleus and coral bells. Other long-blooming perennials include Mountain Frost dianthus in pinks and white, the Sombrero series of echinacea in hot hues, and Sunstruck heliopsis with its bright yellow, daisy-like flowers. For an autumn star of the garden, he favors the willowleaf sunflower. He notes that many perennial varieties can take the frost, while most annual plants will wilt as soon as cold weather hits. n

Help Is At Hand Visit our area garden centers for

University of Illinois Extension

knowledgeable plant advice or ask

extension.illinois.edu

our public garden and university pros

Online information includes “Gardening

for help. You may want to stroll through

with Perennials” and “Stepping Stones

a few gardens to see how the many

to Perennial Garden Design.”

different perennials on show grow in the great outdoors before deciding what will work best for your yard. Chicago Botanic Garden, Glencoe Get Growing Weekend: May 18 – 20, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Learn from the experts at talks and demonstrations and shop the gardener’s marketplace and specialty plant sale with hundreds of plants from nurseries and botanical institutions across the country. The featured speaker at 1 p.m. on Friday is Jeff Ross, farmstead educator

Ask a Master Gardener Kane County 630 584-6166 DuPage County 630 955-1123 Kendall County 630 553-5823 Morton Arboretum, Lisle Daylily Society Show: July 15, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. This is an opportunity to marvel at the different colors of more than 150 varieties of daylilies and get advice from Chicago Daylily Society members. Daylily varieties also available for purchase. www.mortonarb.org

and artisan chef at the luxury resort

Check out the Tree and Plant Advice

Blackberry Farm in Tennessee.

and Horticulture Care sections for tips.

www.chicagobotanic.org

Plant Clinic

The garden staff conducts plant

plantclinic@mortonarb.org

breeding and plant evaluations and

630 719-2424

introduces their favorites to the public

Wannemaker’s Home and Garden,

through the Chicagoland Grows program.

Downers Grove

You can find extensive plant research

Perennial Gardening Seminar:

and plant profiles online.

June 2, 10 a.m.

Plant Information Service

Learn how to have bloom from spring

plantinfo@chicagobotanic.org 847 835-0972

until fall, how to choose the best plants for your garden and how to care for them.

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Photos courtesy of Garlands of Barrington

Planning Ahead Exploring senior living options close to home in the western suburbs By Sara Pearsaul Vice

W

hether you are contemplating your own retirement or assisting an older loved one, exploring the options for senior living can be complicated. The good news is that the western suburbs offer everything under the sun when it comes to retirement communities and elder care facilities. We’ll take you on a quick tour. Understand Your Choices The continuum for senior living ranges from active senior residences for those age 55 or older to skilled nursing facilities for those requiring round-the-clock access to medical care. In between are services designed to keep seniors living at home as long as possible and as independently as their situation allows. For seniors who require some help with activities of daily living, having a home health aide come by several days a week may be all that is needed. For adult children caring for aging parents, services such as respite care and adult day care can offer relief from the daily stress of caregiving. Respite care refers to a short-term stay in an elder care facility, while adult day care offers structured activities and meals in a community setting. Following

a hospitalization, some seniors need a few weeks in rehabilitation, which means short-term skilled nursing care. Assisted living is often the first step after independent living arrangements, providing meals and personal care. People with serious health issues, however, may require skilled nursing or specialized memory care facilities, depending on their medical conditions. At The Garlands of Barrington and other continuing care retirement communities, all of the options are available to residents. “The first thing we like to do, whether the person is a prospect or a family member, is to really get to know that person and their reason to make a move,” explains Dawn Kempf, vice president of sales, marketing and health care. She helps the family determine “where that person is going to best fit and succeed.” Know When It’s Time to Move Perhaps one of the hardest decisions to make is leaving the place you have called home for many years. At Villa St. Benedict in Lisle, Director of Nursing Lori D’Auben sees families wrestling with the decision of whether to help move parents out of their homes. “It’s a very emotional

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thing — the sense of loss of independence,” she says. “We partner with families to determine what level of care is needed.” Often, a crisis precipitates the move. “We see those who are coming in more needy, later in life, with more frailty.” She relates that the nursing staff observes some level of physical and cognitive issues with residents in all levels of the facility, from independent living to assisted living to memory care and nursing care. On an occasional visit, family members may not see the problems, such as the resident wandering at night or losing keys repeatedly. Staff regularly assess each resident and help families decide when it is time to move up to the next level of care. “We have the core values of hospitality, stewardship, respect and justice,” says D’Auben of the Catholic institution, all of which guide its approach to care. The Area Agency on Aging offers free care coordination and an in-home assessment to determine an individual’s need for assistance and/or ability to remain at home. State and federal governments fund services for seniors through 13 Area Agencies on Aging in Illinois, including one for suburban Cook County and another for Northeastern Illinois, which covers DuPage, Kane, Kankakee, Kendall, Grundy, Lake, McHenry and Will counties. According to Marla Fronczak, executive director of the Northeastern Illinois Area Agency on Aging, “AAAs develop and coordinate comprehensive systems of home and community-based services to enable older adults with chronic illnesses and disabilities to live in the least restrictive settings and avoid unnecessary hospital readmissions and placements in long-term care facilities.” The in-home assessment is free to Illinois residents age 60 and up and evaluates the ability to accomplish activities of daily living, such as bathing and meal preparation,

the accessibility of the home for a disabled person, income constraints, chronic health conditions and cognitive abilities. “Our goal is to keep people in the community safely,” Fronczak shares. To do so, the agency offers a variety of supportive services for seniors living independently, such as transportation and meal delivery. Some services, such as in-home care, are available only to those who would otherwise need a nursing home and who have total assets of $17,500 or less, not counting a home and car. Fronczak observes that many people mistakenly believe that Medicare will pay

for long-term care. Medicaid is the only government funding available for skilled nursing care and is only for those who have virtually no financial resources. For information on services from a local Area Agency on Aging, call 800 528-2000 or visit www.ageguide.org for northeastern Illinois. For suburban Cook County, call 800 699-9043 or visit www.ageoptions.org. Prepare Financially When looking at senior living options, be prepared for sticker shock. The monthly costs go up with the level of care provided. For example, 2017 Cost of Care estimates for the Chicago area, provided by Genworth Financial, place a private, one-bedroom assisted living facility at $4,695 per month, while a private room in a skilled nursing home runs $8,517. In comparison, adult

day care costs $1,562 per month. You can compare costs of elder care facilities in Illinois online at www.livingpath.com and www.mylifesite.net. Kempf explains that contracts for living arrangements and services differ among retirement communities, so you’ll want to look carefully at the details before signing up. If you’re moving into a continuing care retirement community, there is likely to be a significant entrance fee and monthly fees that vary with the type of residence needed. A “life care” or Type A retirement community will require a higher upfront investment and higher monthly fees but will guarantee care for life, including skilled nursing, at basically the same monthly fee. The Garlands offers a Type B contract, which is more flexible. Type B facilities tend to require a lower entrance fee and lower monthly fees but charge more when assisted living or skilled nursing care are required. The Garlands allows residents 90 days of skilled nursing care at no extra charge. Kempf notes that new residents can enter into independent or assisted living or memory care, but not directly into skilled nursing. She describes Type C as rental communities, which operate under fee-for-service contracts with costs that fluctuate with the level of care and services. Take a Tour When considering retirement living options, it’s a good idea to do your homework and then select a few facilities to visit. Retirement community representatives are happy to give educational tours to family members, caregivers and potential residents alike. Look for the amenities that suit personal preferences and lifestyle, such as golf or art classes. The goal of retirement living, after all, is to live the best life you can for as long as you can. n

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Photos courtesy of AMITA Health

Dementia Care West suburban experts and care centers provide hope and help for those suffering from Alzheimer’s and related memory loss conditions By Sara Pearsaul Vice

A

diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia may be one of the most devastating to receive. Learning that you will lose your ability to think, remember and function normally is almost beyond comprehension for all involved. Often, people dismiss early signs of dementia as simple forgetfulness or aging. But waiting to get a diagnosis and begin treatment can have adverse consequences in the long run. What experts in dementia want us to know is that all of us can help in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

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Photos courtesy of AMITA Health

Hope for Early Diagnosis According to the Alzheimer’s Association, headquartered in Chicago, Alzheimer’s disease is the leading type of dementia, accounting for some 60 to 80 percent of all cases, but it isn’t the only kind. Other forms of dementia that the association identifies include vascular dementia following a stroke, dementia with Lewy bodies, Parkinson’s disease and mixed dementia. Alzheimer’s typically progresses slowly, damaging brain cells. Although early signs may be difficult to distinguish, a general decline in memory, thinking and reasoning skills, along with changes in behavior, may indicate dementia. If you’re at all concerned about yourself or a loved one, the first step is to get a diagnosis. For most people, a visit to a primary care physician is the place to start. If dementia is a concern, the physician may provide a referral to a memory care specialist for a complete neuro-psychological evaluation. The worst place to start is the emergency room. According to Jennifer Beckman, clinical therapist in the Gero/Generations Unit at Linden Oaks Hospital in Naperville, many dementia patients come to the behavioral health hospital for treatment via ambulance from Edward Hospital, after they were first taken there in a crisis situation. She explains that emergency room patients with agitation and other signs of dementia often are given a CT or MRI scan to rule out other possible medical causes, such as a urinary tract infection, before transfer to Linden Oaks for a complete evaluation. “We really take a holistic approach,” Beckman says. For extreme behavioral issues, the patient may be prescribed medication to manage agitation. Beckman explains that it may take a week or two to get the medication to the optimal level to help the person regain control. She notes that the environment itself helps. “We provide a quieter, low-stimulating room,” and “person-centered care,” she says, which

focuses on what the patient wants. When the patient is ready to be discharged, Beckman helps with referrals to appropriate resources, such as memory care facilities, nursing homes or home health services. Although no treatments are available as yet to cure Alzheimer’s, early diagnosis can make a big difference in the progression of the disease, according to Dr. Concetta Forchetti, medical director of the AMITA Health Memory Disorder Clinic and Clinical Research at Alexian Brothers Medical Center in Elk Grove

brain, has resulted in greater compliance among patients in making lifestyle changes, as well as improvements in disease management by physicians. Hope for Prevention The more we learn about disease progression of any kind, whether it be heart disease, diabetes, cancer or dementia, the more we understand that a healthy lifestyle is the best form of prevention. Starting this year, the Alzheimer’s

An epilepsy consultation at an AMITA Health Memory Disorder Clinic

Village. She points to the ability to use PET scans to identify biological markers in the brain to accurately diagnose Alzheimer’s in its early stages, which also can help identify people at risk for developing dementia. “We counsel patients who are at risk, but may delay progression time by taking better care of themselves,” says Forchetti, which includes getting more exercise, following a plant-based diet, socializing and stimulating the brain. Drugs to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s can also be given, although the results may be difficult to discern. She notes that their clinical research using PET scans to identify biomarkers, including amyloid plaque and tau protein tangles in the

Association will conduct a national research study called the U.S. Study to Protect Brain Health Through Lifestyle Intervention to Reduce Risk, known as U.S. POINTER. As Heidi Johnson, senior manager of research engagement for the Illinois chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association, explains, “The two-year clinical trial will test whether lifestyle intervention, focused on combining physical activity, healthy nutrition, social and intellectual challenge, and improved self-management of medical conditions can protect cognitive function in older adults who are at increased risk for cognitive decline.” In short, taking better care of your overall health may turn out to be the best way to avoid dementia.

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Dementia Care

Photo courtesy Alzheimer’s Association Illinois Chapter

Photo courtesy of Artis Senior Living

There’s a kind of heroic component Hope for Treatment Clinical trials of all kinds are perhaps to participating, to saying, ‘I’m doing the brightest hope for finding a treatment this for my grandchildren.’ To me, those and a cure for Alzheimer’s and other are all heroes.” forms of dementia. “What I would like the public to know is that research is Hope for Life never stopping,” Dr. Forchetti says. Today, some 5.7 million Americans “There is a relentless dedication to of all ages are living with Alzheimer’s expand our knowledge about Alzheimer’s disease, and that number is expected to find a treatment.” Through AMITA, to rise quickly as the population ages. she is conducting research to evaluate While there is no cure, there are ways different ways to remove tau and to help Alzheimer’s patients and their caregivers achieve a better quality of life. amyloid from the brain as potential prevention or treatment methods. She notes that the clinical trials are open to anyone who applies and qualifies for the study, and the PET scans and genetic tests are given at no charge to participants. At the Alzheimer’s Association, which sponsors many clinical trials, Johnson says that the biggest need, after fund raising, is finding enough clinical trial volunteers. Both healthy people and those diagnosed with Friendships are formed in a neighborhood setting at Artis cognitive impairment are needed Senior Living in Bartlett and Elmhurst. to participate in research studies. The Chicago area is fortunate to have two of the 29 centers for Alzheimer’s research in the United States, which are designated and funded by the National Institute on Aging — Northwestern Medicine’s Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease Center and the Rush University Alzheimer’s Disease Center. Clinical trials being conducted locally and nationally can be found To help the search for a cure, families join together at the online through the Alzheimer’s St. Charles Walk to End Alzheimer’s, organized by the Illinois Association TrialMatch database chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association. at www.alz.org/trialmatch. A patient or a caregiver can create a confidential For caregivers of Alzheimer’s patients, profile online to be matched with suitable finding help when needed is crucial. The clinical trials for new drugs or other Alzheimer’s Association offers a national therapies, if they choose to participate. hotline at 800 272-3900, which is Dr. Forchetti encourages anyone directed to the region of the caller’s area code and answered 24/7 by a master’swith an interest in preventing Alzheimer’s trained social worker or counselor. to look into clinical trials, pointing to the past development of drugs designed The hotline experts can provide answers to slow disease progression. “If we to urgent questions, referrals and access didn’t have people who accepted the to the association’s resources. challenge, we wouldn’t have those drugs. “The progression can last eight to 12

years. With some people, the progression goes more quickly. The physical burden of care becomes very high. At some point, people become dependent for all their physical care,” says Melissa Tucker, director of the Helpline and Supportive Services for the Illinois chapter. “It’s very common for caregivers to work themselves to death.” She observes that caregivers often feel guilty about moving the loved one into an assisted living or skilled nursing facility. One critical service that the association offers is care navigation, an online assessment program to help people reach the right decision for patient care. The association also offers a medical alert safe return ID bracelet that directs calls to the helpline to identify a person who is wandering and lost. In addition, a variety of support groups for caregivers and early-stage patients meet throughout the suburbs. More information about the Illinois chapter’s resources can be found at www.alzheimers-illinois.org. For people who have younger-onset Alzheimer’s, which is diagnosed before age 65, a special support group, run by the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, meets monthly in Elmhurst. Here, people who thought they were too young to develop dementia are finding help and encouragement, together with their care partners. Support groups also are open to adult children and younger children of younger-onset Alzheimer’s patients. Their experience has been captured on camera in a documentary, “Too Soon to Forget,” which will be aired on public television. For more information on the medical and support services available at Rush, call Susan Frick, social worker, at 312 942-5359. To better accommodate people living with dementia, new facilities designed specifically for memory care are springing up throughout the area, including Artis Senior Living of Bartlett, which opens in June, and its sister community in Elmhurst. The Bartlett community’s 64 rooms are divided into four

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The Alzheimer’s Association’s 10 Warning Signs 1. Memory loss that disrupts daily life 2. Challenges in planning or solving problems 3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, at work or at leisure 4. Confusion with time or place 5. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships 6. New problems with words in speaking or writing 7. Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps 8. Decreased or poor judgment 9. Withdrawal from work or social activities 10. Changes in mood and personality

“neighborhoods” of 16 rooms each. “What makes our community unique are the neighborhoods, which are distinctly different from the outside, with different front porches, that look like home,” says Jennifer Navarro, social worker and director of partnership development at Artis in Bartlett. Each neighborhood has its own walking paths, dining room and family room. The entire development offers indoor and outdoor spaces open to all residents, including a large community room, beauty salon, art studio and patio in the center. Because Alzheimer’s patients tend to wander, the outdoor areas are all lighted, fenced and secured. “We take a life-enrichment approach,” explains Navarro. “We don’t want to just keep people busy, we want to keep them engaged in activities they enjoy.” Families complete a detailed questionnaire on the patient about their likes and dislikes and background so that the staff can provide activities that fit each person’s preferences. Artis’ services are based on its overall philosophy of care, says Navarro, “putting residents first so they can have the best quality of life.” 

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By Lynn Petrak

Aurora

i w l o s a “ c t t c A D “ L n c s R A t

This city of lights is a mecca for shopping, dining, entertainment and family fun

F

or a community that shares a name with the natural phenomena of the northern nights, Aurora always has something interesting on the horizon. Depending on your location, vantage point, time of day, season and purpose, there is something to do or see in virtually every part of town. Like an aurora display on a summer’s night, the shape, hue and duration of things to do in this city is unique, variable and often vibrant. Such a broad and distinct scope isn’t that surprising when you consider that this far western suburb is an Illinois metropolis and home to approximately 200,000 residents of parts of Kane, Will, Kendall and DuPage counties, not to mention thousands more who work in Aurora or visit on a daily basis. “Being the second largest city in the state next to Chicago, we have a number of business parks, retail corridors and dining and entertainment establishments,” says Maureen Gasek, director of events and marketing for the Aurora Regional Chamber of Commerce. In addition to its central downtown district, which has its own high rise in the form of the 22-story Leland Tower and a new residential development going up, Aurora boasts other thriving areas. “Route 59 is the second busiest retail corridor in the state, after the Magnificent Mile in Chicago,” says Gasek of the wide, north-south byway lined with all kinds of businesses and services. That’s not even counting other commercial hubs in Aurora, including the Chicago Premium Outlets shopping center and the Fox Valley Mall.

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There is another natural occurrence in this city of lights that makes Aurora what it is — a community of residents, civic leaders, volunteers, business leaders and others. This network, often inter-linking, springs out of various neighborhoods and common purposes and interests. “You see that in any big city, and it keeps communities tight,” says Gasek, adding that while neighborhoods and groups are tight-knit, Aurora is a diverse 21st century community in many ways. That viewpoint is shared by Marissa Amoni, events coordinator for the Downtown Aurora business organization “People do indeed light up the City of Lights,” she says of Aurora, which got its name in part because it was one of the first cities in the country to have an electric street lighting system in the 1880s. Amoni cites the example of Mayor Richard Irvin’s state of the city address in April, which attracted an audience of more than 800 and echoed the sentiment that

Aurora’s robust community spirit is driven by dedicated people. “To see grassroots events like First Fridays being heralded by the mayor is encouraging,” says Amoni. “Over the years, business owners and citizens have stepped up to create their own vision for the city they love. It’s everyone working together and cheering each other on that is palpable and makes Aurora shine brightly.” For a city of this size, there are a lot of instances of people working together. Accordingly, the list of things to do, see and experience in Aurora is a long one, with some highlights that exemplify the character of the area.

Historic Stolp Island: Downtown Aurora

Just as Chicago has its Loop, Aurora has its historic downtown. Similar to the larger city to its east, Aurora’s downtown also was built along a river, in this case, the Fox River.

Aurora is unique in the sense that part of its downtown is located on a piece of geography called Stolp Island, which divides the east and west sides of town and which was home to various manufacturing sites and government buildings for the good part of a century. Today, Stolp Island — connected by bridges to other parts of the city — is still a hub for business and entertainment, while also offering urban living within the suburbs. Visitors might want to stop on Stolp Island to pick up information from the Aurora Area Convention and Visitors Bureau or to pop into the Aurora Public Library. The city’s civic offices are in this part of town, too. The Leland Tower — at one point the tallest building in the state outside of Chicago, when it was built in 1928 as a hotel — is now a residential structure. At the base is Leland Legends, a restaurant that offers a throwback to the era in which the hotel boomed and welcomed the likes

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TOWN FOCUS

Aurora

RIVEREDGE PARK

Photo courtesy of City of Aurora

Resources

elements of the downtown area. “One unique aspect is that not only do we have dining and nightlife, we have outfitters where people can rent kayaks. People go kayaking or canoeing on the river and biking along the river trail,” he says.

Concert Time: RiverEdge Park

Aurora Public Library n

Total holdings: 545,936

n

Items checked out per year: 1.2 million

n

Visitors per year: more than 1 million

Higher Education n Aurora University – 347 S. Gladstone. A liberal arts college with undergraduate majors in education, business, nursing and social work, seven adult degree completion programs, 16 Masters degrees and multiple certification programs. 630 844-5533 n Waubonsee

Community College –18 S. River St. Offers associates degrees and transfer-track credits in 100plus courses, plus non-credit community education programs. 630 585-7900

Museums n Aurora Regional Fire Museum – 53 N Broadway St. A variety of interactive exhibits featuring firefighter gear and history. 630 256-4140 n David L.. Pierce Art & History Center – 20 E. Downer Pl. Art exhibits and collections of historical artifacts, plus a civil war veterans memorial, the Grand Army of the Republic Memorial Hall. 630 256-3340 n Schingoethe Center for Native American Cultures 1315 Prairie St. Exhibits to

promote native American art. 630 844-7844

indoor playground for young children. 630 585-1505

n SciTech

Hands on Museum 18 W. Benton St. Interactive science and technology center for all ages, with 200plus exhibits. 630 859-3434

n

n William Tanner House 305 Cedar St. Furnished Italianate home from the 1830s, housing Aurora Historical Society’s collections of photos, maps and artifacts. 630 906-0650

n Phillips

Activities n Hollywood Casino 1 W. New York St. A 53,000sq-ft casino with slots and table games plus stage shows and dining. 630 801-1234 n Paramount Theatre 23 E. Galena Blvd. A historic theatre with professional Broadway style shows, celebrity concerts, music and dance. 630 896-6666 n RiverEdge Park – 360 N. Broadway. A summer concert venue and park on 30 acres. 630 896-6666

Recreation n Blackberry

Farm –100 S. Barnes Rd. Outdoor pioneer history museum with demonstrations and hands-on activities. 630 892-1550

n Kidz

Fun Land – 2109 Fox Valley Center Dr. A soft-play

Phillips Park Aquatic Center – 828 Montgomery Rd. Outdoor water park with slides, volleyball courts and a lap pool. 630 851-8686 Park Zoo –1000 Ray Moses Dr. An educational zoo with a gallery of Mastodon bones. 630 256-3861

Splash Country Water Park 195 S. Barnes Rd. An outdoor park with slides, a lazy river and sand volleyball courts. 630 906-7981 n

n Vaughan Athletic & Aquatic Center – 2121 W. Indian Trail. A multi-use fieldhouse with a fitness center, tennis courts and an indoor water park and lap pool. 630 907-1931

Events

Food Truck Festival An annual celebration on Benton Street on May 4. n

n Aurora

Kite Festival – A day to bring or make kite, meeting at 220 N. Broadway on May 19. 630 906-0332

n Summer Concert Series – Live bands at weekends from June to August, performing outdoors at RiverEdge Park. 630 896-6666 n Winter Lights – A November celebration to kick off the holiday season. 630 256-3370

RiverEdge Park is a downtown spot that is as conveniently located as it is scenic. “It’s a great location, right on the river, across from the Metra station and the Two Brothers Roundhouse,” says Carlson. “Even those who live in Chicago or the other near-west suburbs can take the train here, see a show or go to eat, and get on a train to go back home.” To be sure, this is a busy time of year at RiverEdge Park, which offers a full slate of events and concerts. The season kicks off on June 15 and 16 with Blues on the Fox, an event featuring several blues performers, including Aaron Neville and Elle King. George Thorogood and the Destroyers come into town on Aug. 4, and Gladys Knight and the O’Jays are stopping by on Aug. 18 for a show. The park has its own concession area, and guests can also nosh on goodies from food trucks that often pull up nearby.

That’s Entertainment: Paramount Arts Center

Indeed, the arts and entertainment are alive and well in downtown Aurora. One venue that reflects the history of the city and its status as a regional attraction is Paramount Theatre, run by the Aurora Civic Center Authority, the organization that manages RiverEdge Park. Built in 1931 as one of the country’s grandest movie palaces, the 1,888-seat Paramount Theatre (it’s actually larger than many Broadway theaters) has long attracted high-wattage performers, from Claudette Colbert who attended the grand opening in 1931 to comedian Jay Leno, who came to town in mid-April for a comedy show. For the past several years — following an extensive restoration — the theatre has become known for its strong theater productions that have

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TOWN FOCUS

Aurora

RIVEREDGE PARK

Photo courtesy of City of Aurora

Resources

elements of the downtown area. “One unique aspect is that not only do we have dining and nightlife, we have outfitters where people can rent kayaks. People go kayaking or canoeing on the river and biking along the river trail,” he says.

Concert Time: RiverEdge Park

Aurora Public Library n

Total holdings: 545,936

n

Items checked out per year: 1.2 million

n

Visitors per year: Approx. Over 1 million

Higher Education n Aurora University – 347 S. Gladstone. A liberal arts college with undergraduate majors in education, business, nursing and social work, seven adult degree completion programs, 16 Masters degrees and multiple certification programs. 630 844-5533 n Waubonsee

Community College –18 S. River St. Offers associates degrees and transfer-track credits in 100plus courses, plus non-credit community education programs. 630 585-7900

Museums n Aurora Regional Fire Museum – 53 N Broadway St. A variety of interactive exhibits featuring firefighter gear and history. 630 256-4140 n David L.. Pierce Art & History Center – 20 E. Downer Pl. Art exhibits and collections of historical artifacts, plus a civil war veterans memorial, the Grand Army of the Republic Memorial Hall. 630 256-3340 n Schingoethe Center for Native American Cultures 1315 Prairie St. Exhibits to

promote native American art. 630 844-7844

indoor playground for young children. 630 585-1505

n SciTech

Hands on Museum 18 W. Benton St. Interactive science and technology center for all ages, with 200plus exhibits. 630 859-3434

n

n William Tanner House 305 Cedar St. Furnished Italianate home from the 1830s, housing Aurora Historical Society’s collections of photos, maps and artifacts. 630 906-0650

n Phillips

Activities n Hollywood Casino 1 W. New York St. A 53,000sq-ft casino with slots and table games plus stage shows and dining. 630 801-1234 n Paramount Theatre 23 E. Galena Blvd. A historic theatre with professional Broadway style shows, celebrity concerts, music and dance. 630 896-6666 n RiverEdge Park – 360 N. Broadway. A summer concert venue and park on 30 acres. 630 896-6666

Recreation n Blackberry

Farm –100 S. Barnes Rd. Outdoor pioneer history museum with demonstrations and hands-on activities. 630 892-1550

n Kidz

Fun Land – 2109 Fox Valley Center Dr. A soft-play

Phillips Park Aquatic Center – 828 Montgomery Rd. Outdoor water park with slides, volleyball courts and a lap pool. 630 851-8686 Park Zoo –1000 Ray Moses Dr. An educational zoo with a gallery of Mastodon bones. 630 256-3861

Splash Country Water Park 195 S. Barnes Rd. An outdoor park with slides, a lazy river and sand volleyball courts. 630 906-7981 n

n Vaughan Athletic & Aquatic Center – 2121 W. Indian Trail. A multi-use fieldhouse with a fitness center, tennis courts and an indoor water park and lap pool. 630 907-1931

Events

Food Truck Festival An annual celebration on Benton Street on May 4. n

n Aurora

Kite Festival – A day to bring or make kite, meeting at 220 N. Broadway on May 19. 630 906-0332

n Summer Concert Series – Live bands at weekends from June to August, performing outdoors at RiverEdge Park. 630 896-6666 n Winter Lights – A November celebration to kick off the holiday season. 630 256-3370

RiverEdge Park is a downtown spot that is as conveniently located as it is scenic. “It’s a great location, right on the river, across from the Metra station and the Two Brothers Roundhouse,” says Carlson. “Even those who live in Chicago or the other near-west suburbs can take the train here, see a show or go to eat, and get on a train to go back home.” To be sure, this is a busy time of year at RiverEdge Park, which offers a full slate of events and concerts. The season kicks off on June 15 and 16 with Blues on the Fox, an event featuring several blues performers, including Aaron Neville and Elle King. George Thorogood and the Destroyers come into town on Aug. 4, and Gladys Knight and the O’Jays are stopping by on Aug. 18 for a show. The park has its own concession area, and guests can also nosh on goodies from food trucks that often pull up nearby.

That’s Entertainment: Paramount Arts Center

Indeed, the arts and entertainment are alive and well in downtown Aurora. One venue that reflects the history of the city and its status as a regional attraction is Paramount Theatre, run by the Aurora Civic Center Authority, the organization that manages RiverEdge Park. Built in 1931 as one of the country’s grandest movie palaces, the 1,888-seat Paramount Theatre (it’s actually larger than many Broadway theaters) has long attracted high-wattage performers, from Claudette Colbert who attended the grand opening in 1931 to comedian Jay Leno, who came to town in mid-April for a comedy show. For the past several years — following an extensive restoration — the theatre has become known for its strong theater productions that have

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drawn large and diverse crowds. “Seven or eight years ago, the all-time attendance was 56,000 in an entire year. This past year, when we did Elf, we had 82,000 attend in seven weeks. Paramount brings in 350,000 guests a year,” says Jim Jarvis, vice president of programming and sales, who points out that the venue boasts the country’s second largest subscription base, with more than 36,000 subscribers hailing from 13 states. While award-winning shows and talented performers have elevated Paramount’s reputation as a serious theater venue, the increasing popularity is also due to its operators’ emphasis on the sheer enjoyment of the arts. “One of the greatest things about it is that we are bringing the arts to everyone. We want to make it affordable, a great experience and a family place to bring the kids,” says Jarvis. There’s also the bonus of enjoying art in a grand setting. Even visiting performers get a thrill from being at Paramount. “When you get to watch someone walk into our theater for the first time, and see how it’s restored to the 1930s character, it’s amazing to see their face,” says Jarvis of the reaction that extends from celebrity performers to first-time patrons. Upcoming shows at Paramount include a staging of the Tony-award-winning show Once: The Musical, through June 3, and Legally Blonde, from Sept. 5 through Oct. 21. Back to Jarvis’s point about accessible entertainment, Paramount Theatre screens classic movies on Mondays for just $1 admission. “Return to Oz” will be shown on May 14, “Hacksaw Ridge” on May 21 and “Interstellar” on May 28. The Aurora Civic Center Authority also manages Paramount’s “sister” theater, the Copley Theater, across the street on Galena Boulevard. The organization is currently working hard on the January 2019 opening of a new Paramount School of the Arts in a building next door to the theatre, which will offer classes for all ages in singing, dancing, music and improv, among other areas of interest.

Free Admission

Open Year-Round! Hours: 9 AM to 5 PM Close to home! Surrounded by a beautiful park, a new playground, abundant picnic areas, and a splash pad! Spend an hour or Spend the day!

1000 Ray Moses Drive And www.Aurora-il.org/150/Phillips-Park-Zoo

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Photo courtesy of City of Aurora

TOWN FOCUS

Aurora

In the Cards: Hollywood Casino It’s a large city well outside Chicago. It’s located along a river. It has a network of hotels and restaurants and accessibility to roadways and public transportation. All of those factors make Aurora an ideal site for a riverboat casino. Accordingly, Hollywood Casino draws sizable crowds to this 53,000-sq-ft venue. Visitors play the slots (there are more than 1,000 machines) and try their hand at table games. Befitting a casino, there are on-site restaurants, including Fairbanks Steakhouse, Take Two Deli and, of course, a buffet that’s dubbed Epic Buffet.

Animal Adventures: Phillips Park Zoo

One of the best kept secrets in Aurora is that the city has its own zoo. Well, it might not be a secret, but it’s not as widely known as Brookfield Zoo or Lincoln Park Zoo in the Chicagoland area. “We’re trying to become more visible, and are working on buildings and on getting in new and more animals,” says zoo manager Dan Powell, citing recent and pending additions like goats, snakes, and reptiles. Currently, the zoo has an extensive population of birds ranging from bald eagles to peregrine falcons, as well as mammals such as North American river otters and gray wolves to reptiles like the American alligator and African spurred tortoise. The Phillips Park Zoo is charming because of the animal life and its setting. “With a lot of zoos, you have to drive a ways to get there and once you do, you have to park, and then spend almost the whole day there to make it worth the drive and money,” Powell points out. “With this zoo, it’s free, you can see it within two hours and there is still time to have a picnic or walk around. We’re surrounded by a park, so you can make it a leisurely day.”

outdoor activities and events. Organizers in the city of Aurora are more than accommodating in that regard. Underscoring the tight-knit nature of Aurora residents, many special events are the result of collaborations on ways to make visiting and living in this city better. “Aurora has an active group of citizens that have dreamed up things like the Aurora ArtWalk, Alley Art Festival and The ArtBar. The community is constantly evolving, but one constant is the passion and energy of Aurorans to nurture a vibrant downtown,” says Amoni. An ongoing “First Fridays” series has proven especially popular. “On the first Friday of the month from February to December with the exception of July, downtown venues are open with art, music, and more. There’s everything from dancing to massage at more than 20 participating locations. A trolley takes patrons on free rides on every First Friday, too,” says Amoni. Other upcoming and well-attended events include a Food Truck Festival with live music at Millennium Plaza on Stolp Avenue on May 4, and a Downtown Aurora Magic event on June 9, focusing on magic and wizardry. “An event that’s been growing in recent years is Roots Aurora, a one-of-a-kind celebration of diversity and culture in Aurora,” adds Amoni. Roots Aurora is held on the first Friday in September on Water Street Mall, a pedestrian area near City Hall. Traditional seasonal events include a Fourth of July parade on Independence Day, trick or treating in the downtown area in October and a Winter Lights festival around the holidays.

Best of the Fests: Special Events Now that the warmer weather is arriving, more people are headed outside to dine al fresco, take a bike ride or enjoy

Get Smart: SciTech Museum You might say that one attraction is gathering steam in Aurora — in this case,

STEAM. The SciTech Hands-On Museum offers more than 200 interactive exhibits based on the STEAM principles of science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics. A popular destination for families, field trips, birthday parties as well as individual visitors, SciTech offers a variety of programs based on certain themes, such as May 17 activities on bees, spiders and butterflies. Housed in a former U.S. Post Office building, the museum also offers summer camp programs for children in pre-kindergarten through 8th grade.

Other Aurora Highlights • Get back to nature — and maybe back a century or so — at Blackberry Farm. The living history museum recreates pioneer life and offers all kinds of fun to go along with the education, including hay rides, paddle boats, pony rides and more. Family Fun Free Days are offered on select dates in the summer • The Riverfront Playhouse in downtown Aurora is run by a small local group that stages plays throughout the year, including performances in May of Marjorie Prime. • Golfers can hit the links at the 18-hole Phillips Park Golf, owned and operated by the city of Aurora. A new lighted practice facility recently opened. • Higher education is part of the fabric of the city at institutions like Waubonsee Community College’s downtown Aurora campus, and at Aurora University, located in a charming neighborhood on the west side of town. A recently unveiled athletic venue is among the school’s new facilities. • All of those cars you see parked in huge lots just off the Reagan Tollway? They’re from visitors to the Chicago Premium Outlet mall, which shows that despite online commerce, brick and mortar stores are hardly out of fashion. Chicago Premium Outlet also hosts concerts in the summer, like an upcoming performance by Beatles tribute band American English on June 15. • Speaking of malls, Fox Valley Mall on the east side of Aurora is home to dozens of stores, from American Eagle to Zales, along with numerous on-site dining spots. n

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DINING |

REVIEWS

|

LISTINGS

|

CHEERS WINE COLUMN

|

AND MUCH MORE Photo courtesy of Santo Cielo

RESTAURANT OPENINGS

NOW OPEN

Santo Cielo

E

xpanding on a west suburban

river, the sleekly designed, monochromatic

scallop chowder, featuring glazed carrots,

trifecta of authentic-modern

interior features all-glass panel windows that

roasted leeks and crispy fingerling potatoes

Mexican restaurants — Bien

give the restaurant an open-air ambiance,

(pictured). Other highlights include charred

Trucha in Geneva, A Toda

as guests imagine they are dining beneath

Spanish octopus, saffron tagliatelle, aji-miso

Madre in Glen Ellyn and Quiubo

the stars.

glazed sea bass and sweet cucumber

in Naperville — newly opened Santo Cielo seeks to prove the sky’s the limit.

Created in a lively open-view kitchen, Santo Cielo’s bold, colorful plates are meant

brisket sliders. Designed to accommodate both

to be shared. The culinary team, led by

intimate and large parties, Santo Cielo is

Indigo at 123 Water St. (630 323-0700) and

Abel Cortes, spins fresh, seasonal ingredients

open Tuesday through Sunday and will soon

with expansive views over the city and the

into such dishes as the bright, flavorful

offer Sunday brunch.

Situated high atop Naperville’s Hotel

— Anne Knudsen

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GoOd food

By Emily Belden

Two Brothers Roundhouse Aurora landmark turned eatery and brew house

T

wo Brothers Roundhouse combines the comfort of a neighborhood bar with the square footage of a big-time brewery. Nestled in downtown Aurora, this craft beer and restaurant hot spot is worth the drive — or Metra ride — whether just for a round of drinks or for a complete meal. The full-service brewpub concept is rooted in a love of artisan beer, but this sprawling location — the largest of five Two Brothers’ establishments — offers more, such as house-brewed coffee, homemade sodas, distilled-on-site liquors like gin, whiskey and vodka, and a comprehensive food menu. Deciding on a beer is a tough choice, but servers are knowledgeable and eager to help. Coming in on a cold and rainy night? The coffee and chocolate notes of the dark Northwind Imperial Stout make this a nice, high ABV draft that’s not too strong or heavy. For spring, the seasonal In the Flesh pomegranate sour is a refreshing, tart option. This one will rotate to pear and then guava throughout the warmer months. The line-up of appetizers includes the usual suspects — wings, spinach dip and a soft pretzel with a signature beer cheese. But Two Brothers is surprisingly known for its brussels sprouts. “These aren’t the healthy

kind,” a friendly server advised. “We fry them, bake them and serve them with chili sauce.” For larger appetites, go with the chimichurri nachos. Enough for four, they are baked directly on the plate on which they are served, ensuring every chip is hot, crunchy and covered in melted cheese. Fish tacos with roasted vegetables Entrées include comfort food favorites such as tender filet medallions In warmer weather, the giant outdoor beer and a hearty pot roast, but there are also garden and gazebo are open. soups and signature salads for lighter fare. Don’t leave before rounding out the meal The handheld sandwiches stand out, namely with a cup of joe brewed at Two Brothers the Brewer’s Reuben, which is stuffed with Café, as well as a decadent dessert. A slice brisket, as well as the melt-in-your-mouth of crème brûlée cheesecake will do the trick. short rib sandwich, served piping hot on Chocoholics, don’t fret. A flourless torte or a soft bun with sriracha mayo. Sandwiches slice of Swiss chalet cake has your name on it. come with chips, but they can be subbed Richness isn’t just found in the desserts, for fries for a small upcharge. there is also quite a bit of history to the Food comes out hot and quick in this location. It was erected in 1856 as a railroad lodge-like brewpub, complete with soaring roundhouse — a service building that once ceilings and extra-large bay windows. Once housed a huge turntable to reverse the direction finished with the meal, patrons can enjoy of train engines. It was built with locally other elements of the 70,000-sq-ft facility quarried stone from nearby Batavia and — depending on the day of the week — is the oldest limestone roundhouse in the including live music, comedy and a walkUnited States, with a listing on the National through of the on-site merchandise store. Register of Historic Places. n

QUICK FACTS

Two Brothers Roundhouse

205 N. Broadway, Aurora 630 264-2739 www.twobrothersbrewing.com

Recommended Dishes

Cost

Hours

Extras

Roundhouse Burger;

Appetizers: $7 – $12

M - Thur: 11 a.m. – midnight

Comedy on Thurs;

fish tacos; and

Small plates: $6 – $13

F – Sat: 11 a.m., – 1 a.m.

live music on F & Sat;

brussels sprouts

Entrées: $14 – $25

Sun: 11 a.m. – 11 p.m.

outdoor beer garden

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DIning NW DUPAGE & UPPER FOX VALLEY

South Barrington NE DUPAGE & NW COOK

Schaumburg Bartlett

Itasca

Bloomingdale

South Elgin

Glen St. Charles Ellyn West Chicago

Geneva

90 294

Elmhurst

Oak Park 290

CENTRAL DUPAGE

Batavia North Aurora

Lisle

Willowbrook

Bolingbrook

SW DUPAGE & LOWER FOX VALLEY Plainfield

La Grange

Oak Brook Hinsdale

355

Naperville Oswego

190

290

Wheaton

88

Aurora

Photo courtesy of Le Pain Quotidien

West Dundee

n n n n Recently Opened

Burr Ridge Lemont

55

Romeoville

294

SE DUPAGE & SW COOK

Listings Following is a sampling of some of the best dining destinations in the western suburbs, including reader favorites, advertisers and a cross-section of just plain good places to grab a bite. Bon appétit! n Central DuPage n Nw DuPage & Upper Fox Valley n Sw DuPage & lower fox valley n Se Dupage & SW Cook

Le Pain Quotidien Belgian bakery and restaurant brings simple, nutritious fare to Naperville

W

arm plaster walls

— fresh and from scratch.

quinoa and farro with roasted

and a communal

Here, “the daily bread”

beets, kale, arugula, spiced

table made from reclaimed

is handmade and organic,

pecans and fresh goat cheese.

wood create an atmosphere

ranging from crispy baguettes

Soups, quiches, frittatas

of rusticity and simplicity that

to dark ryes. The café’s

and egg specialties round

is matched on the plate

signature open-faced

out the menu. For dessert

at Le Pain Quotidien.

sandwiches — or tartines

there are hard-to-resist tarts,

The European bakery

— include a whole wheat

pastries, éclaires, donuts

and café at 204 S. Washington

sourdough toast topped

and cakes — all artisinal

St. in the heart of Naperville

with avocado and smoked

and preservative free.

(331 215-5789) is open from

salmon. Salads center around

The café seats 86, with 16

7 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily to serve

organic ingredients, like the

more on an outdoor patio.

breakfast, lunch and dinner

warm grain bowl that pairs

– Anne Knudsen

n Ne DuPage & nw cook n ADELLE’S: 535 W Liberty Dr, Wheaton. 630 784-8015.

New twists on old American favorites served by seasoned professionals in a stylish ambiance. Capacity: 160 plus 50 on outdoor patio. Yrs in bus: 14. Chef’s Choice: White fish. Entrée prices: $18-$34. Extras: Bar, outdoor dining, banquets, wine room, carry-out, live jazz Th at 7 pm, live music on select other nights, lounge, fireplaces. T-Th 5-10, F-Sat 4:30-9:30, Sun 4-8. Reservations: Recommended n Allgauer’s: 3003 Corporate West Dr, Lisle; in Hilton Lisle/Naperville. 630 245-7650. American fare with a modern twist, featuring locally sourced, dry-aged steaks, chops and seafood. Capacity: 196 at 44 tables. Yrs in bus: 35. Chef’s Choice: Potatocrusted halibut. Entrée prices: $25- $44; lunch menu $9-$18. Extras: Bar, banquets, breakfast, lunch and seafood buffets. M–F 6:30 am–10 pm. Sat–Sun 7 am–10 pm. Reservations: Recommended. n Amerika’s: 734 Lake St, Oak Park. 708 613-4254.

Nuevo Latino cuisine with a contemporary American flair in an intimate, romantic setting. Capacity: 44. Mths in bus: 4. Chef’s Choice: Chili-Braised Duck. Extras: Sharable plates; full bar. M 4:30-9:30, T-Th 11:30-9:30, F-Sat 5-11:30, Sun 4-9:30. Reservations: Yes. n ANYWAYS CHICAGO RESTAURANT & PUB:

5 E Roosevelt Rd, Oakbrook Terrace. 630 932-9323. Classic neighborhood pub with American cuisine. Capacity: 200 at 45 tables. Yrs in bus: 22. Chef’s Choice: Izzy’s jambalaya pasta and Certified Angus burgers. Entrée prices: $7-$15. Extras: Bar, carry-out, banquets, outdoor dining, kids’ menu.

M-Th 11:30 am-1 am, F-Sat 11:30 am-2 am, Sun noon-1 am. Reservations: Yes. Additional location at 304 W Army Trail Rd, Bloomingdale, 630 351-8870. n ARROWHEAD RESTAURANT & BAR: 26W151

Butterfield Rd, Wheaton. 630 510-5070. American fare and premium spirits with panoramic golf course views. Capacity: 120 inside, 60 on patio. Yrs in bus: 11. Chef’s Choice: Barrel Cut Ribeye. Entrée prices: $16-$40. Extras: Bar, outdoor dining, wine list, beer list, private rooms, carry-out, weekly and daily specials, 15 HDTVs. M-Th 11-11, F-Sat 11 am-midnight, Sun 10-9. n ATWATER’S: 15 S River Ln, Geneva; in Herrington

Inn & Spa. 630 208-8920. Eclectic American cuisine with a seasonal menu in a European-style atrium overlooking the Fox River. Capacity: 40. Yrs in bus: 23. Entrée prices: $24-$45. Extras: Bar, outdoor dining, banquets, catering, private dining in gazebo, event space. Breakfast M-F 7 am-11 am, Sat-Sun 8 am-11 am; Lunch M-Sun 11-2; Dinner Sun-Th 5-9, F-Sat 5-10; Brunch Sun 11-2. Reservations: Recommended. n BARREL + RYE: 477 S Third St, Suite 184, Geneva.

630 402-0647. American bistro featuring a wide range of whiskey and craft cocktails, salads, burgers and shareable plates. Capacity: 50, 20 at bar. Yrs in bus: 2. Chef’s Choice: Southern fried chicken sandwich. Entrée prices: $10-$17. Extras: TVs, full bar, carry-out, selection of scotch and bourbon, patio. Sun-M 11-11, Tu-Th 11am-12 pm, F-Sat 11 am-1 am. n BIAGGI’S RISTORANTE ITALIANO: 2752

Showplace Dr, Naperville. 630 428-8500. Classic

and contemporary Italian dining in a casual setting. Capacity: 240. Yrs in bus: 10. Chef’s Choice: Black fettuccine with lobster & wild mushrooms. Entrée prices: $10-$30. Extras: Exhibition kitchen, bar, private parties. M-Th 11:30-9:30, F-Sat11:30-10:30, Sun 11-9. Reservations: Yes. Additional location at 20560 N Rand Rd, Deer Park, 847 438-1850. n CAPRI RISTORANTE: 324 Burr Ridge Pkwy.,

Burr Ridge. 630 455-4003. Authentic Italian fare served in a warm and elegant setting. Capacity: 150. Yrs in bus: 12. Chef’s Choice: Homemade rigatoni with vodka sauce, with soup or salad. Entrée prices: $15-$40. Extras: Full bar, carry-out, catering, outdoor dining, private parties. M 11:30-2 & 4-11, T-F 11:30-11, Sat 4-midnight, Sun 2-9. Reservations: recommended. n CARLUCCI: 1801 Butterfield Rd, Downers Grove.

630 512-0990. Rustic Italian restaurant serving Tuscan cuisine. Capacity: 300. Yrs in bus: 14. Chef’s Choice: Linguini bobonato. Entrée prices: $12-$33. Extras: Carry-out, private dining, outdoor dining, bar open later, live music. Lunch M-F 11:30-3; Dinner M-Th 3:30-9:30, F 3:30-10:30, Sat 4:30-10:30, Sun 4:30-9. Reservations: Recommended. n CATCH 35: 35 S Washington St, Naperville. 630 717-3500. A deep and interesting variety of seafood and premium steaks in an uptown atmosphere. Capacity: 192 (including bar seating: 247. Yrs in bus: 13. Chef’s Choice: Chilean sea bass. Entrée prices: $16-$50. Extras: Bar, private parties, outdoor dining, valet parking T-Sat. Lunch M-Sat 11:30-4; Dinner M-Sat 4-10, Sun 4-9. Reservations: Yes.

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GoOd food

By Lynn Petrak

Steak + Vine Fine steaks and other prime indulgences in La Grange

S

ure, there’s a lot of red meat and wine varietals here. But Steak + Vine goes well beyond the ranch and vineyard with its wide-ranging menu. Take, for example, the French onion soup. Like, really take it and try it, because it’s a worthy signature item at this La Grange restaurant. Bubbling, perfectly browned provolone and smoked gouda cheeses top the crock of rich onion-laced broth in a recipe that originated in owner Nick Gangas’ previous restaurant in town, In Kahoots. Gangas and business partner Mike Wilson opened Steak + Vine in 2016 in a prime storefront location on La Grange Road, an area increasingly known for its vibrant dining scene. The namesake steaks are well-marbled and accordingly sumptuous, including the Certified Angus New York strip, prime ribeye, prime New York strip, wagyu hangar steak and filet. For a boost of flavor, diners can add a “crust” of blue cheese, horseradish or Parmesan, or a sauce of peppercorn, mushroom or red wine demi-glace. If you’re in the mood for some decadence on top of indulgence, you can go for the S+V topping of shrimp and bacon with lobster butter. Other beef selections include braised short ribs, burgers and an appetizer “shot”

of roasted bone marrow. Those who prefer poultry, pork, seafood or vegetable-based dishes can choose from other entrées, sandwiches and salads. In a restaurant that prides itself on the sourcing of proteins, the Duroc pork chop is a hearty dish, as is the Slagel Farm Greek Chicken. Seafood items, including shrimp and grits and cedar Jumbo stuffed shrimp appetizer plank salmon, round out the menu along with bright meatless dishes like the “La Grange IL,” a stone sour made like penne pesto and a salad layered with with bourbon and a hint of habanero, and beets, butternut squash, frisée, arugula, the “Secret Agent Man,” a blood orange toasted almonds and peppered ricotta, margarita that evokes a summer sunset. all under a drizzle of almond butter. Stick around for dessert. The flourless Side dishes here aren’t just a side show. chocolate cake and carrot cake are made by The chef serves up generous portions of Sugar Sisters, a bakery business started by Lyonnaise potatoes, bacon-studded roasted two high-school-aged siblings from nearby brussels sprouts and sautéed spinach and Riverside. The vanilla, salted caramel and mushrooms, along with comfort food Buffalo Trace bourbon ice cream is made classics like mashed potatoes, French fries, at Tate’s, an independent ice cream shop baked potatoes and cheesy grits, which a couple of blocks away. are just the right amount of creamy. If several menu items have a local flavor, The wine list, sourced from vines all so too does the ambiance. Photos and over the world, ranges in price from $26 to artwork from area artists adorn the walls, the triple digits. The drinks menu is eclectic and entertainment is provided by local artists and broad, including house-made cocktails and musicians. n

QUICK FACTS

Steak + Vine

37 S. La Grange Rd., La Grange 708 579-0520 www.steakandvine.com

Recommended Dishes

Cost

Hours

Extras

Prime steaks with flavorful

Appetizers: $7 – $13

M - Thur: 5 – 9 p.m.; F – Sat:

Sunday brunch;

toppings; Duroc pork chop;

Entrées: $20 – $48

4 – 10 p.m.; Sun: 10 a.m. –

supper club dinners;

French onion soup

Desserts: $5 – $14

2 p.m. and 4 – 9 p.m.

and delivery

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DIning n CINE MODERN TAQUERIA: 29 E First St, Hinsdale. 630 590-5655. Contemporary Mexican restaurant serving quality Latin fare. Capacity: 150. Yrs in bus: 3. Chef’s Choice: Chicken Alambre. Entrée prices: $16-$30. Extras: Outdoor dining, carry-out, delivery, daily specials, full bar, live entertainment on Th, free kids’ tacos on Sun. Lunch T-Sat 11:30-2:30; Dinner Sun 5-9, T-Th 4-9, F-Sat 4-10. Reservations: Yes. n CHE FIGATA: 2155 City Gate Ln., Naperville

630 579-3210. Expected to open in early May. Authentic Italian restaurant and marketplace characterized by fresh, homemade dishes in an open space with views into the working kitchen. Capacity: 200 (inside); 50 (outside). Mths in bus: 1. Chef’s Choice: Carciofi fritti alla Romona (fried artichokes) and homemade taglierini pasta. Extras: Chef’s counter dining, patio, handcrafted cocktails, private dining, valet parking. Reservations: Yes. n CITYGATE GRILLE: 2020 Calamos Ct, Naperville. 630 718-1010. Fine dining, contemporary American fare in a steakhouse atmosphere. Capacity: 220. Yrs in bus: 8. Chef’s Choice: 20-oz bone-in rib eye in Bordelaise sauce. Entrée prices: $18-$50, Avg: $25. Extras: Live entertainment, F-Sat, private parties, catering, kids’ menu. M-Th 11:30-9, F 11:30-10, Sat 5-10 (bar open later F-Sat). Reservations: Yes. n DELL RHEA’S CHICKEN BASKET: 645 Joliet Rd, Willowbrook. 630 325-0780. World-famous fried chicken in a 1940s-style Route 66 roadhouse featuring video gaming. Capacity: 225 at 40 tables. Yrs in bus: 72. Chef’s Choice: 50/50 burger and breakfast burger. Entrée prices: $10-$20, Avg: $13. Extras: Carry-out, bar, catering, over 50 craft style beers. Sun-Th 11-9, F-Sat 11-10 n D.O.C. WINE BAR: 326 Yorktown Center,

Lombard. 630 627-6666. Light, contemporary fare plus 300 wines. Capacity: 150. Yrs in bus: 9. Chef’s Choice: Butcher’s block. Entrée prices: $9-$35. Extras: Full bar, carry-out, lounge, wine flights, retail shop, private dining, daily specials. M-Th 11:30-10, F-Sat noon-midnight, Sun noon-9:30. n EDDIE MERLOT’S: 28254 Diehl Rd, Warrenville.

630 393-1900. Upscale contemporary steakhouse with a lighter ambiance and known for its wine. Capacity: 260. Yrs in bus: 5. Chef’s Choice: Prime aged steaks and wagyu. Entree prices: $23-$51. Extras: Extensive wine list, outdoor dining, lounge with drink specials. M-Th 4-10, F-Sat 4-11, Sun 4-9. Reservations: Recommended. Additional location at 201 Bridewell Dr, Burr Ridge. 630 468-2098 n Eden on the River: 1 Illinois St, St. Charles. 630 945-3332. Upscale dining in a riverside location with authentic Mediterranean and Middle Eastern fare. Capacity: 104 (inside); 100 (outside). Mths in bus: 4. Chef’s Choice: Baked Mediterranean Fish. Entrée prices: $17-$25. Extras: Outdoor dining, live music, kids and gluten-free menus. T-Th 4-11, F-Sat 4-11:45.; Sun 4-9. Reservations: Recommended. n EMILIO’S TAPAS BAR: 4100 Roosevelt Rd, Hillside. 708 547-7177. Spanish tapas in an authentic countryside atmosphere. Capacity: 150. Yrs in bus: 29. Chef’s Choice: Paella and datiles con bacon. Entrée prices: $6-$23. Extras: Bar, patio, carry-out, Tapeo bites menu 4:30-6:30 M-Fri, live entertainment Fridays, catering. M 4:30-9:30, T-Th 11:30-9:30, F-Sat 11:30-10, Sun 4-9. Reservations: Yes. n FIRE + WINE: 433 N Main St, Glen Ellyn.

630 793-9955. Rustic and inviting restaurant with modern Italian flair, serving small-plate fare, authentic Neapolitan artisan pizzas and classic pastas in a family-friendly atmosphere. Capacity: 135. Yrs in bus: 5. Chef’s Choice: Hanger Steak and Grilled Romaine Salad. Entrée prices: $9-$19. Extras: Bar, carry-out, wine list, craft beer, kids’ menu, private event hosting, specials. T-Th 4-10, F 4-11, Sat 3-11 and Sun 3-9 (bar closes 1 hour later). WEST SUBURBAN LIVING | WWW.WESTSUBURBANLIVING.NET | MAY 2018 73

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DIning n n n n Recently Opened Photo courtesy of Cooms Corner Sports Grill

Sun 7 am-10 pm. Reservations: Recommended.

Coom’s Corner Sports Grill Burgers, brews and a ballgame at Cub broadcaster’s bar and grill in Lockport

F

ormer 9-year major

higher schooler — a variety

Pizzas are house-made, as

league ballplayer and

of prime burgers are among

are the signature sandwiches

current Chicago Cubs radio

the featured menu offerings.

and wraps. Entrées — all $18

color analyst Ron Coomer has

There’s a Hopped Stout

or less — include short ribs with

opened a neighborhood grill

Burger with crispy bacon and

whipped potatoes and baby

where sports fans can chow

Tillamook cheddar, doused

carrots; spaghetti & meatballs;

down on American favorites

in stout-braised onions. The

and a BBQ salmon dish.

while watching the game

Hot Head features salsa and

on big screen TVs.

jalapeños, while the quinoa-

ales, ciders and porters as well

A beer menu offers pale

At Coom’s Corner Sports

based Garden Burger pleases

as seven craft brews on tap.

Grill, 1225 E. 9th St. in

the vegetarian palette. All are

Coom’s Corner stays open

Lockport (815 838-4420) —

under $12 and come with

until 1 a.m. on weekdays and

the same community where

the option of truffle fries.

2 a.m. on weekends.

Coomer played ball as a

Square-cut Crispy Tavern

– Anne Knudsen

n FOGO DE CHÃO: 1824 Abriter Ct, Naperville.

n Gia Mia: 106 N Hale St, Wheaton. 630 480-2480.

630 955-0022. Brazilian steakhouse known for churrasco style of cooking meats over an open fire in a warm, contemporary atmosphere. Capacity: 200. Mths in bus: 9. Chef’s Choice: Cordeiro and Picanha. Entrée prices: Avg: $32/$49. Extras: Full bar, valet, seasonal patio, Sat and Sun brunch. Lunch: Sun-F 11-2; Dinner: M-Th 5-10, F 5-10:30, Sat 2-10:30, Sun 4-9. Reservations: Yes. Additional location at 5460 Park Pl, Rosemont, 847 678-7200

Old-world Neapolitan pizza in a rustic restaurant. Capacity: 120. Yrs in bus: 2. Chef’s Choice: Handcrafted meatballs. Entrée prices: $10-$20. Extras: Bar, TVs, carry-out, large wine menu, local sourcing, brick oven. M-T 11-9, W-Sat 11-10. Reservations: No, but call-ahead seating available. Additional location at 13 N Third St. Geneva, 630 405-5544.

n FOXFIRE: 17 W State St, Geneva. 630 232-1369.

Casual steakhouse with downtown atmosphere. Capacity: 175. Yrs in bus: 14. Chef’s Choice: Bordone New York Strip. Entrée prices: $18-$46, lunch $9+. Extras: Bar (open later), outdoor dining, daily specials, carry-out, bar menu, wine list. M-Th 11-9, F-Sat 11-10. Reservations: Yes, recommended. n Fuller House: 35 E First St, Hinsdale. 630 537-1653.

Craft beer and bar food in an industrial, rustic setting. Capacity: 140. Yrs in bus: 2. Chef’s Choice: Buffalo shrimp. Entrée prices: $11-$20. Extras: TVs, sidewalk seating, full bar, carry-out, beer garden. M-Th 11-11, F-Sat 11-midnight, Sun 11-10. n Gaetano’s: 7636 W Madison St, Forest Park.

708 366-4010. Rustic Italian dining in an intimate, contemporary atmosphere. Capacity: 90. Yrs in bus: 9. Chef’s Choice: Chef’s four-course tasting menu. Entrée prices: $16-$36. Extras: Cooking classes, private parties, wine dinners. M-Th 5-9:30, F-Sat 4:30-10:30. Reservations: Recommended. Additional location at 15 E Main St, Batavia, 630 406-3009.

n Gatto’s Restaurant & Bar: 5123 Main St, Downers Grove. 630 515-6400. Italian comfort food served in a rustic setting. Capacity: 145. Yrs in bus: 8. Chef’s Choice: Chicken carmine.Entrée prices: $8-$24. Extras: Private parties, banquets, bar, catering, carry-out. M-F 4-10, Sat 4-11, Sun 4-9. n Gibsons Steakhouse: 5464 N River Rd, Rosemont.

847 928-9900. Classic American steakhouse in 1920s art-deco style. Capacity: 260. Yrs in bus: 17. Chef’s Choice: WR’s Chicago Cut. Entrée prices: $12-$52. Extras: Piano bar (open until 2 am), live music. M-Sun 11-2. Reservations: Yes. Additional location at 2105 S Spring Rd, Oak Brook, 630 954-0000. n Glen Prairie: 1250 Roosevelt Rd, Glen Ellyn;

in Crowne-Plaza Glen Ellyn-Lombard. 630 613-1250. Contemporary American cuisine with a strong emphasis on local Midwest flavors and products, as well as natural and organic ingredients. Capacity: 120. Yrs in bus: 9. Chef’s Choice: Skuna Bay Salmon & Short Ribs. Entrée prices: $11-$32. Extras: Lounge, private dining, “green”-farmed wine list, bar (open later), Wi-Fi, gluten-free and vegetarian options. M-Th 6 am-10 pm, F 6 am-11 pm, Sat 7 am-11 pm,

n Hampton Social: 705 Village Center Dr, Burr Ridge. 630 219-0009. East coast ambiance, with fresh seafood menu, plus burgers. Mths in bus: 5 Chef’s Choice: Alaskan Sea Trout. Entrée prices: $16-$30. Extras: Cocktail menu, weekend brunch, live music. M-T 11-10, w-Th 11-11, Fri 11 am-midnight, Sun 10-10. Reservations: Yes. n Hardware: 2000 W Orchard Rd, North Aurora. 630 299-3977. A sustainable gastro pub & brewery complete with a greenhouse and organic hop farm. Capacity: 220 Yrs in bus: 1 Chef’s Choice: Charcuterie. Entree prices: 14-40. Extras: Private parties, carry-out, 400 whiskeys, local craft beers, extensive wine list. T-Th 11-10, F-Sat 11-midnight, Sun noon-9. Reservations: Recommended. n Harry Caray’s Italian Steakhouse: 70 Yorktown Center, Lombard; inside the Westin Hotel. 630 953-3400. Classic Italian steakhouse in a sports-themed atmosphere. Capacity: 550. Yrs in bus: 10. Chef’s Choice: Prime steaks, chops and Italian Specialties. Entrée prices: $12-$52. Extras: Outdoor dining, bar, sports memorabilia, carry-out, private events. Lunch M-Sun 11-5 (bar only); Dinner M-Sat 5-10, Sun 4-9. Reservations: Yes. Additional location at 10233 W Higgins Rd, Rosemont, 847 699-1200. n Hemmingway’s Bistro: 211 N Oak Park Ave,

Oak Park. 708 524-0806. Upscale French dishes in a Parisian bistro atmosphere. Capacity: 80. Yrs in bus: 14. Chef’s Choice: Herb-crusted whitefish. Entrée prices: $21-$35. Extras: Banquets, bar, valet parking on weekends, W & Sun jazz and martini night, Sun champagne brunch 11-3 with live jazz. M-Th 7 am-10 pm, F-Sat 7 am-11 pm, Sun 7 am-9:30 pm. Reservations: Recommended. n Holy Mackerel!: 70 Yorktown Center, Lombard; in the Westin Hotel. 630 953-3444. Fresh spin on fish house classics in a vintage décor. Capacity: 150. Yrs in bus: 10. Chef’s Choice: Kasu marinated sea bass. Entrée prices: $9-$46. Extras: Private parties, bar, carry-out. Breakfast M-Sat 6-11, Sun 6 am-noon; Lunch M-Sat 11-4; Dinner M-Sat 4-9. Reservations: Yes. n Indian Harvest: 796 Royal St. George Dr, Naperville. 630 579-9500. Casual and upscale dining featuring vibrant Indian cuisine. Capacity: 160. Yrs in bus: 19. Chef’s Choice: Tandoori lamb chops. Entrée prices: $10-$23. Extras: Carry-out, catering, bar, buffet, private parties, outdoor dining, delivery. Lunch M-F 11:30-2:15, Sat-Sun noon-2:45; Dinner Sun-Th 5-9:45, F-Sat 5-10:15. Reservations: Yes. n Ivy Restaurant: 120 N Hale St, Wheaton. 630 665-2489. Casually elegant dining featuring steaks, chops and seafood. Capacity: 170, plus 90 on the patio. Yrs in bus: 9. Chef’s Choice: Black pepper shrimp. Entrée prices: Avg: $19. Extras: Banquets, outdoor dining, carry-out. M-Th 11-9, F-Sat 11-10, Sun 11-9. Reservations: Yes. n J. Alexander’s: 1410 16th St, Oak Brook.

630 573-8180. American cuisine in a sophisticated setting. Capacity: 250 at 47 tables. Yrs in bus: 22. Chef’s Choice: Prime rib. Entrée prices: $10-$35. Extras: Bar, outdoor dining, kids’ menu. Sun-Th 11-10, F-Sat 11-11. Reservations: Yes. n LIVIA: 207 S Third St, Geneva. 630 402-6444. Organically driven Italian cuisine with an emphasis on locally sourced ingredients. Yrs in bus: 1. Entrée prices: $11-$27. Extras: Bar, children’s menu, outdoor dining, carry-out M-Th Noon-11- 10, F 11-11, Sat 10-11, Sun 10-9. Second location at 116 E Schiller St, Elmhurst, 630 402-6195. Reservations: OpenTable. Additional location at 116 Schiller St., Elmhurst. 630 402-6195.

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 LIVIA ITALIAN EATERY 116 Schiller St, Elmhurst.

630 402-6195. Southern Italian cuisine in a lively, modern atmosphere. Capacity: 145. Mths: 4. Chef’s Choice: East Coast Oysters. Entrée prices: $16-$36. Extras: Full bar, seasonal outdoor tables, private dining. M-T 11-9, W-Th 11-10, F-Sat 11-11, Sun 11-9. Reservations: Recommended. Additional location at 207 3rd St, Geneva. 630 402-6444.  MACARENA TAPAS: 618 S Rt 59, Naperville. 630 420-8995. Hot and cold tapas served in a romantic, Spanish ambiance. Capacity: 60. Yrs in bus: 10. Chef’s Choice: Solomillo en Tostada and Croquetas de Queso de Cabra. Entrée prices: $5-$12. Extras: Bar, private parties, carry-out, TVs, free Wi-Fi. Lunch T-F 11:30-2; Dinner T-Th 5-9, F 5-10, Sat 4-10, Sun 4-9. Reservations: Yes. Additional location at 1890 W Main St, St. Charles 630 945-3458.  MICHAEL JORDAN’S RESTAURANT: 1225

W 22nd St, Oak Brook. 312 455-8626. Refined American restaurant and bar featuring premium quality, seasonal ingredients prepared in an active, open-view kitchen. Mths in bus: 10. Chef’s Choice: Chilean Sea Bass in Maque Choux sauce. Entrée prices: $11-$30. Extras: Full bar, TVs, Wi-Fi, catering, carry-out, valet, outdoor seating. M-Th 11-10, F-Sat 11-midnight, Sun 4-9. Reservations: Yes.

Experience the Finest Selection of Italian Cuisine One-of-a-Kind Gourmet Specialties, Custom Created by Experienced Chefs

 MORTON’S: 1751 Freedom Dr, Naperville.

630 577-1372. An upscale American steakhouse featuring an à la carte menu. Capacity: 175. Yrs in bus: 9. Chef’s Choice: Porterhouse steak and veal chop. Entrée prices: $40-$60. Extras: Bar, free valet parking T-Sat, lounge, private dining, patio. M-Th 5:30-10, F 5:30-11, Sat 5-11, Sun 5-10. Reservations: Recommended. Additional locations at 9525 W Bryn Mawr Ave, Rosemont, 847 678-5155; and 1470 McConnor Pkwy, Schaumburg, 847 413-8771.

483 Spring Road www.robertosristorante.com

Elmhurst

630.279.8486

Mon - Thurs 11 am - 11 pm • Fri 11 am - midnight • Sat 4 pm - midnight • Sun 2 - 10 pm

 NABUKI: 18 E First St, Hinsdale. 630 654-8880. Contemporary Japanese cuisine and sushi restaurant serving traditional and innovative dishes. Capacity: 100. Yrs in bus: 6.5. Chef’s Choice: Red devil roll and Stanley Cup. Entrée prices: $14-$32. Extras: Kid’s menu, carry-out, bar. Lunch M-F 11:30-2:30; Dinner M-Th 5-9, F-Sat 5-10, Sun 5-8. Reservations: Recommended.  NOBEL HOUSE: 305 W State St, Geneva.

630 402-0452. American comfort food, handcrafted cocktails and in-house smoked meats served up at this gastro pub. Capacity: 70. Yrs in bus: 3. Chef’s Choice: Smoked brisket sandwich. Entrée prices: $10-$15. Extras: Carry-out, full bar, Wi-Fi, TVs, catering, brunch Sat & Sun, kids’ menu, 30 taps. M-T 11-10, W-Th 11-11, F 11-2 am, Sat-Sun 10-2 am. Reservations: No.  PARKER’S RESTAURANT & BAR: 1000 31st St,

Downers Grove. 630 960-5700. Casually elegant restaurant serving contemporary American cuisine. Capacity: 250. Yrs in bus: 16. Chef’s Choice: Cedar-planked halibut and charcoalgrilled center cut pork chop. Entrée prices: $14-$65, Avg: $32. Extras: Bar, outdoor dining, private dining, live jazz music in lounge Tu-Sat. M-Th 11:30-10, F 11:30-10:30, Sat 4-10:30, Sun 4-8:30. Reservations: Recommended.  PATIO RESTAURANT: 7440 S Kingery Hwy

(Rt 83), Darien. 630 920-0211. Casual American fare, specializing in BBQ ribs. Capacity: 300. Yrs in bus: 25. Chef’s Choice: BBQ ribs. Entrée prices: $7-$22. Extras: Carry-out, outdoor dining, catering, drive-up window. M-Th 10:30-10, F-Sat 10:30-11 pm, Sun 10:30-9:30. Reservations: No. Additional locations at 4400 Fox Valley Center Dr, Aurora. 630 820-8800; 151 S Weber Rd, Bolingbrook, 630 226-9696; and 2780 S Highland Ave, Lombard, 630 627-2600.  PERRY’S STEAKHOUSE & GRILLE: 5 Oakbrook

Center, Oak Brook. 630 571-1808. Classic steakhouse with premium steaks and fare prepared tableside. Capacity: 300. Yrs in bus: 4. Chef’s Choice: 14–oz WEST SUBURBAN LIVING | WWW.WESTSUBURBANLIVING.NET | MAY 2018 75

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cheers

DIning

By Buzz Brandt

New York Strip steak and Perry’s Famous Pork Chops. Entrée prices: $26-$59. Extras: island bar, patio, live music M-Sat, carry-out. M-Th 4-10, F 11-10, Sat 4-11 Sun 4-9 (bar open later). Reservations: Yes.

p c S

n n Plank Bar & Kitchen: 120 Water St, Naperville.

Tannins

630 778-9676. Upscale bar serving tastes of local food in a rustic modern atmosphere. Capacity: 75 plus 12 at bar. Yrs in bus:1. Chef’s Choice: Fish tacos and flatbread. Entrée prices: $12-$25. Extras: Room service, covered parking, valet parking. Breakfast M-F 6:30-10:30, Sat-Sun 7:30-11:30; Dinner M-Sun 4:30-11. Reservations: Yes.

Experienced as an aspect of a wine’s texture, causing a drying sensation

A

long with alcohol, acid and fruitiness, tannins are an essential component of the wine tasting experience. Chemically classified as polyphenols, they play a part in plant physiology. Their bitterness is a deterrent to foraging predators and their natural antioxidant and antibiotic properties are an aid in healing damaged tissue. Tannins work by binding with proteins, rendering them inactive. In the mouth they deactivate the lubricating qualities of protein-rich saliva — hence the moisturewicking, tooth-coating, lip-puckering sensation so familiar to wine lovers. Tannins are derived from the skins, leaves, seeds and stems of red, purple and “black” grapes. To achieve their color, reds undergo extended contact with the crushed grape pulp during maceration and fermentation. White wines, derived from green grapes, are not usually fermented with skins and seeds and so are quite low in tannins. Rosés achieve their pink color from minimal skin contact, and so also display low tannin levels. To minimize harshness, vintners often de-stem high-tannin red

grapes like Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah/ Shiraz before crushing, while low-tannin fruit like Pinot Noir is readily fermented whole cluster, stems and all. Additional tannic content results from aging in oak barrels, adding structure, complexity and depth. Tannins — which are tasteless and odorless — are experienced as texture, an astringent, bitter or coarse sensation that grips the sides of the tongue and the front of the oral cavity. Descriptors such as “green,” “harsh “or “chewy” abound, especially with young red varietals. A drying sensation is the

hallmark of a tannic wine (but is not a measure of the dryness of the wine, a term used to describe levels of sweetness). As the wine matures in barrels or bottles, tannin molecules “polymerize” or clump up into long chains, softening their harshness and rendering the mouth-feel supple, round, velvety, lush and integrated. Examples of low or moderately tannic reds are Zinfandel, Pinot Noir, Grenache, Merlot, Gamay, Malbec and Barbera. High tannic wines include Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Syrah/ Shiraz, Petit Sirah, Nebiolo and Tempranillo. n

Expert wine recommendations •Nancy sabatini Mainstreet 5425 S. La Grange Rd. Countryside. (708 354-0355) 2017 Miro Cellars Chevalier Vineyard Grenache Rosé (Calif.) $20. A classic ruby rosé produced with cold fermentation and no oak contact to assure aromas and flavors of ripe berries, orange and hibiscus. Dry with a juicy acidity. 2014 Balletto Russian River Valley Estate Pinot Noir (Calif.) $23. A lush

Sonoma Pinot with a smooth body of red and black fruit, pomegranates and plums, and scents of currants, black cherries, earth, mocha and spice. This layered wine balances fresh acidity and tannins. •Alixe Lischette Cabernet & Company 434 N. Main St., Glen Ellyn. (630 469-2644) 2016 Omen Cabernet Sauvignon (Calif.) $20. This big, bold

red boasts black cherry, blackberry and cassis with hints of smoke, graphite and chocolate, all balanced by well-integrated tannins. 2014 Cambria Tepusquet Vineyard Syrah (Calif.) $20. A nose of dark fruits, spice and mocha leads to a dynamic palate with layers of berries. The harmonious tannins and acidity induce a nicely rounded mouth-feel.

n Preservation Bread & Wine CafÉ: 513 S Third

St, Geneva. 630 208-1588. Sandwiches, cheeses, meats, savory bites and desserts paired with a selection of wine, beer and spirits. Capacity: 30. Yrs in bus: 6. Chef’s choice: Short Rib Pie. Entrée prices: $9-$13. Extras: Full bar, wine bottles for purchase, monthly wine dinner, catering, private parties. T-Th 11-9, F-Sat 11-10. Reservations: Yes. n Primo: 29 S Third St, Geneva. 630 232-2280. Fine

wine bar serving Chef Plates from Chef Roby, owner of All-Chocolate Kitchen. Capacity: 30. Yrs in bus: 9. Chef’s Choice: Short ribs. Entrée prices: $12-$22. Extras: Beer & wine, chocolate martinis. W-Th 5-9, F-Sat 5-10. Reservations: Recommended. n Priscilla’s Ultimate Soul Food: 1840 E Army

Trail Rd, Hanover Park. 630 540-2040. Fresh, homemade Southern-style soul food. Capacity: 80. Yrs in bus: 5. Chef’s Choice: Catfish filet and fried chicken. Entrée prices: $9-$13. Extras: Catering, carry-out, private parties. W-Sun 11-8. Reservations: No. Additional location: 4330 W Roosevelt Road, Hillside; 708 544-6230.

n

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n

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n

6 o i C p m 1 l 8

n n PRONTO’S: 2260 Bloomingdale Rd, Glendale

Heights. 630 980-7383. Pizza and Italian fare. Yrs in bus: 12. Entrée prices: $5-$18. Extras: Pastry chef, bar, carry-out, delivery, TVs, live music. M-Th 11-9, F-Sat 11-11, Sun 2-9. Reservations: Accepted. n Punch Bowl Social: 1100 American Ln,

Schaumburg. 224 836-9080. Specialty burgers and sandwiches served in an industrial/Victorian style space. Capacity: 108 main diner, 100 bar, 75 patio. Yrs in bus: 10. Chef’s Choice: The American Burger. Entrée prices: $8-$21. Extras: Carry-out, brunch, karaoke, bar, happy hour, outdoor seating, TVs, ping pong, bowling, shuffleboard, darts, vintage arcade games, live DJ. M-Th 11-11, F 11 am-2 am, Sat 9 am-2 am, Sun 9 am-11pm. Reservations: Accepted.

6 p a C $ s F

n

7 p i A c M

n n QUIUBO: 120 Water St, Naperville. 331 702-2711.

Mexican-inspired restaurant featuring shareable plates, seasonal menus and locally-sourced ingredients. Chef’s Choice: Bientrucha Tacos. Entrée prices: $7-$24. Extras: Full bar, happy hour. Mon-Thur 11-10, F-Sat 11-11. Reservations: Accepted. Affiliated with Bien Trucha in Geneva.

N a Y $ c p

n n Reel Club: 272 Oakbrook Center, Oak Brook.

630 368-9400. Fresh fish and sushi in contemporary ambiance. Capacity: 350. Yrs in bus: 8. Chef’s Choice: Sea bass & sushi. Entrée prices: $20-$35. Extras: Lounge, private dining, outdoor dining, carry-out. M-Th 11:15-10, F-Sat 11:15-10:30, Sun 10-9, Sun brunch 10-2. Reservations: Yes.

6 s S l 3

n

331 472-4767. Intimate, upscale dining with contemporary American fare. Capacity: 44. Mths in bus: 3. Chef’s Choice: Grilled Maple Leaf Farms Duckling Breast. Extras: Private events, 16 wines by the glass daily, outdoor seating, expert sommeliers. T-S 5-10. Reservations: Recommended.

6 C r d S a 1 L

n Roberto’s Ristorante & Pizzeria: 483 Spring

n

Rd, Elmhurst. 630 279-8486. Italian cuisine served in a romantic, neighborhood atmosphere. Capacity: 250. Yrs in bus: 55. Chef’s Choice: Fish entrées. Entrée

7 J C

n RESERVE ROOM: 123 Water St, Naperville.

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prices: $14-$44. Extras: Carry-out, bar, outdoor dining, catering, family friendly. M-Th 11-11, F 11am-midnight, Sat 4-midnight, Sun 2-10. Reservations: Yes. n RoKA AKOR: 166 Oakbrook Center, Oak Brook,

630 634-7652. Diners sit around a robata grill in a convivial form of “fireside cooking” featuring prime steak as well as sushi and nigiri. Mths in bus: 4. Chef’s Choice: Omakase personal tasting menu. Extras: Bar, outdoor dining, three private dining rooms. n Saffron Restaurant: 6200 S Cass Ave,

Westmont. 630 769-9662. Northern Indian food and ambiance. Capacity: 65. Yrs in bus: 20. Chef’s Choice: Reshmi kabob. Entree prices: $9-$30. Extras: Carry-out, delivery, online ordering, bar, banquet facilities, catering. Lunch T-Sun 11:30-2:30; Dinner T-Sun 5-9:45. Reservations: Yes. n SEARED FINE DINING: 400 Park Blvd, Itasca;

inside the Western Hotel Chicago Northwest. 630 773-4000. Elegant and elevated fine dining centered around fresh seafood and steaks in a recently renovated space. Capacity: 67. Yrs in bus: 1. Entrée prices: $35-$49. Extras: Private room, full bar. M-Sat 5-11 n Seasons 52: 3 Oakbrook Center, Oak Brook.

630 571-4752. Fresh grill and wine bar focusing on low-calorie entrées and farmers’ marketinfluenced fare. Capacity: 350. Yrs in bus: 5. Chef’s Choice: Caramelized sea scallops. Entrée prices: $16-$25. Extras: Extensive wine list, live music, private dining. M-Th 11-10, F-Sat 11-11, Sun 10-9. Reservations: Yes, recommended. Additional location at 1770 E Higgins Rd, Schaumburg. 847 517-5252. n SIXTYFOUR: A WINE BAR: 123 Water St, Naperville. 630 780-6464. Wine bar serving hand-crafted small plates and featuring 64 wines by the glass as well as 64 local and regional craft beers. Capacity: 130. Chef’s Choice: Grilled Hanger Steak. Entrée prices: $12-$15. Extras: Private events, beer & wine, outdoor seating, expert sommeliers, TVs, Wi-Fi. Sun-Th 11-10, F-Sat 11-11. n Steak + Vine: 37 S La Grange Rd, La Grange.

708 579-0520. Neighborhood steakhouse with USDA prime meat in an urban space. Capacity: 109. Yrs in bus: 1. Chef’s Choice: Prime rib-eye. Entrée prices: Avg: $25. Extras: Bar, over 80 wines, 46 beers and ciders, craft cocktails, 102 whiskeys and bourbons. M-Th 5-9, F-Sat 4-11, Sun 4-9. Reservations: Yes. n Sugartoad: Hotel Arista, 2139 CityGate Ln,

Naperville. 630 778-8623. American cuisine with a French touch in a modern décor. Capacity: 80. Yrs in bus: 8. Chef’s Choice: Scallops. Entrée prices: $18-$35 (dinner). Extras: Bar, catering, on-site garden, carry-out, weekend brunch 7-2. M-Sat 6:30 am-10 pm, Sun 6:30 am-9 pm. Reservations: Yes. n Sullivan’s Steakhouse: 244 S Main St, Naperville.

630 305-0230. Steak, chops and seafood in a Chicagostyle décor. Capacity: 300. Yrs in bus: 18. Chef’s Choice: Seafood and steak. Entrée prices: $30-$60. Extras: Bar, live entertainment, valet parking. M-Sat 4:30-11, Sun 3-9. Reservations: Recommended. n Sushi House: 830 E Ogden Ave, Westmont.

630 920-8948. Sushi, sashimi and Japanese fare. Capacity: 100. Yrs in bus: 22. Chef’s Choice: Cracker roll. Entrée prices: $10-$20. Extras: Carry-out, catering, delivery, private parties. M-F 11:30-10, Sat noon-10, Sun noon-9:30. Reservations: Yes. Additional locations at 950 Warren Ave, Downers Grove, 630 968-0088; 1107 Lake St,Oak Park, 708 660-8899; and 281 Rice Lake Square, Wheaton, 630 221-8986. n Sushi UKAI: 120 W Calendar Ct, La Grange.

708 354-8899. Modern interpretation of classic Japanese dishes and sushi. Yrs in bus: 3. Chef’s Choice: Fresh sushi rolls. Entrée prices: $14-$27.

M-Sat 11-10, Sun, Noon-9:30. Reservations: No. n Suzette’s: 211 W Front St, Wheaton. 630 462-0898. Crêperie, pâtisserie, boulangerie, French country bistro and wine bar in a casual setting. Capacity: 88. Yrs in bus: 17. Chef’s Choice: Beef bourguignon crêpe and Suzette’s benedict. Entrée prices: $13-$40. Extras: Wine bar, bakery, carry-out, full bar, outdoor dining, private parties, boutique weddings, occasional live music. Pâtisserie open at 7 am, M-Sat, Sun brunch 11-2, afternoon tea T-Sat 2 pm, Sun 1 pm. T-Th 7 am - 9 pm, F-Sat 7 am - 10 pm, Sun 8 am - 2 pm. Reservations: Recommended. n Tallgrass: 1006 S State, Lockport. 815 838-5566. Modern French cuisine in an intimate Victorian building. Capacity: 32. Yrs in bus: 37. Chef’s Choice: Lobster lasagna. Entrée prices: $59, $69 & $79 for 3, 4 & 5 course dinners. Extras: Bar, private parties. W-Sun 6 pm-10. Reservations: Required. n TaNGO2: 5 Jackson Ave., Naperville, 331 888 2646. Argentinian steaks and tapas in a lively, music-filled atmosphere. Yrs in bus: 1. Chef’s Choice: Paradilla Argentina and grilled skirt steak. Entrée prices: $14-$38. Carry out, speciality cocktails. M-Thur 11:30-9:30, Sat 11:30-10, Sun 11:30-9. Reservations: No. n Two Brothers Social Tap: 100 S Marion St, Oak Park. 630 665-4380. Newly opened brew pub with scratch kitchen and artisanal manu. Mnths in bus: 1. Chef’s Choice: Burgers. Entrée prices: $8-$15. Extras: Bar, specialty cocktails, coffee roaster. M-Th 11-11, F-Sat 11-midnight, Sun 11-10. n Uncle Julio’s Hacienda: 2360 Fountain Square Dr, Lombard. 630 705-9260. Tex-Mex food in a family friendly and festive atmosphere. Capacity: 350. Yrs in bus: 12. Chef’s Choice: Fajitas. Entrée prices: $10-$27. Extras: Carry-out, outdoor dining, catering. Sun-Th 11-10, F-Sat 11-11. n Victory Meat and Seafood: 116 N York Rd, Elmhurst, 630 359-5599. Light, airy space with a wide-ranging menu of Mediterranean-inspired cuisine and cocktails. Capacity: 32. Mths in bus: 4. Chef’s Choice: Crispy Herb Brick Chicken; oysters. Entrée prices: $19-$35. Extras: Oyster bar, full bar, wine list. Reservations: Recommended. n Vie: 4471 Lawn Ave, Western Springs. 708 246-2082.

Seasonal, contemporary American à la carte menu with European influences in an elegant , upscale atmosphere. Capacity: 120. Yrs in bus: 13. Chef’s Choice: Gnocchi. Entrée prices: $26-$46. Extras: Bar, gluten-free and vegetarian options, private parties. M-Th 5-9, F-Sat 5-10. Reservations: Yes. n Villa Verone: 416 Hamilton St, Geneva.

630 232-2201. Casual, upscale dining serving Italian favorites. Capacity: 200. Yrs in bus: 19. Entrée prices: $13-$25. Chef’s Choice: Pasta. Extras: Carry-out, live entertainment, outdoor dining, bar and club (open later). M-Th 11:30-9, F 11:30-10, Sat 4-10, Sun 4-9. n VINTAGE 53: 162 S First St, St. Charles.

630 549-0423. Small plates, flatbreads and charcuterie plus 100 wines served in a rustic-industrial ambiance. Capacity: 65, 10 on patio. Mths in bus: 8. Chef’s Choice: BBQ pork belly. Entrée prices: $15-$20. Extras: Live music, private events, outdoor seating, free Wi-Fi, happy hour. T-Th 4-10, F-Sat 4-midnight. n YORK TAVERN: 3702 York Rd, Oak Brook. 630 323-5090. The oldest, continuously operating restaurant in DuPage County, serving burgers and American fare in a casual pub atmosphere. Capacity: 60. Yrs in bus: 172. Chef’s Choice: Burgers. Entrée prices: $6-$20. Extras: Carry-out, bar. M-F 11-1 am, Sat 11-2 am, Sun noon-10. Reservations: No.

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Emcee Judy Hsu, ABC7 prime-time anchor, of Hinsdale; Martin P. Slark, CEO of Molex, LLC of Lisle; Robert A. Livingston, president and CEO of Dover Corporation, of Hinsdale; Sarah Orleans, president and CEO of DuPage Children’s Museum, of Wheaton; and Mark Trembacki, DuPage Children’s Museum board chairman, of Naperville

Photos by Erica Johnson

Charitable Events of Note

Photos by Ron Hume

SCENE&SEEN

Julie Chirico with Naperville Mayor Steve Chirico

DuPage Children’s Museum (DCM) hosted its annual Benefit Ball on April 7. This year’s event, “AWE Inspiring Moments,” emphasized the child-adult learning partnership that is at the core of the museum’s mission to “ignite the potential of all children to learn through hands-on exploration by integrating art, math and

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to support the organization which, over the last 30-plus

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years, has established an important footprint in the

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support of early childhood education throughout

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the west suburban area. The event raised over $500,000.

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Guests check out more than 50 silent auction packages donated by generous local businesses.

Amber Sweda, Rebecca Given and Kristie Saad, all of Naperville, enjoy the evening’s festivities.

Abby and Chad Warden, both of Naperville, sample wine tastings from Terlato Wines.

Ronald McDonald Family Room in Edward Hospital recently held its annual fundraiser, “Uncork Your Support,” at Cress Creek Country Club in Naperville. This year’s sold-out event, with about 350 attendees, was the most successful to date, raising more than $90,000. The funds are equivalent to 1,058 nights of care, comfort and compassion for families of hospitalized children using the Ronald McDonald Family Room in Edward Hospital. Allowing families to stay close to their child in the hospital supports the health and well-being of the child, and saves

Julie Rouches, Lori Brady, Holly Geritty, Gina Cuttaia and Karen George, all of Naperville, toast to six years of “Uncork Your Support.”

families more than $10 million in hotel and food costs each year.

Naperville’s Holly Krug and her husband Peter Krug show off her new diamond earrings won in an exclusive raffle from Costello Jewelers.

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Photos courtesy of Alzheimer’s Association Illinois Chapter

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gathered at the Embassy Suites by Hilton in Naperville

Photos courtesy of Litrina Valera Photography

Performers Dave Orleans of Wheaton and Daphne Heeley of Naperville

2018 Benefit Ball Committee (left to right): Carole Gebbia of Plainfield; and Jody Morris, Denise Mikula and Tami Weir, all of Naperville

science.” Nearly 400 Chicagoland donors and guests


Photos by Erica Johnson

Photos by Ron Hume

Hundreds gathered for the Kane County 4-H Foundation’s 10th annual pork chop dinner and auction fundraiser on April 14 in St. Charles, bringing in more than $20,000. Proceeds benefit University of Illinois Extension programs in Kane County, including 4-H youth development, Master Gardeners, nutrition and wellness, and more. The event is planned and executed each year by 4-H and Extension volunteers with strong support from the community and local businesses

4-H member Emily Thompson of St. Charles serves a meal.

and organizations.

In all, 120 volunteers from Kane County 4-H Foundation and University of Illinois Extension served more than 800 meals. The silent and live auction included 80 items donated by 15 4-H clubs, 50 business and several individuals.

Nearly 200 people joined together to raise close to $100,000 for Alzheimer’s care, support and research at the Alzheimer’s Association’s annual “Reason to Hope” luncheon on April 12. Guests joined together for a one hour program on the disease, which affects more than 220,000 Illinois residents. WGN’s Dean Richards emceed the event, which was held in the Grand Oaks Pavilion at the Hyatt Lodge. The luncheon benefits the Alzheimer’s Association Illinois Chapter, the mission of which is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research, to provide and enhance

Photos courtesy of Alzheimer’s Association Illinois Chapter

Photos courtesy of Litrina Valera Photography

care and support for all affected, and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.

Sarah Justice and Sarah Cigrang, both of Westchester Cathy Parks of Oak Brook, Lynne Wallace of Hinsdale and JoAnn Kunkel of La Grange

Kay and Ray Schriks, and Rick Shanley, all of Western Springs

Sarah Justice, Marcus Payne and Martin Howell, all of Westchester

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Last Word

By Michele Weldon

A Different Kind of Smart Cookie The most valuable type of IQ may actually be social-emotional, not intellectual

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am not quite certain whether I have social-emotional intelligence or not. But I am fairly certain I can spot when it is missing in someone else. Self-awareness seems to be the key here, and not the kind concerned with how you look in your favorite color or whether or not your eyeglasses complement the shape of your face. The deeper kind. I’m referring to that intuitive selfregulation about how you are received — if you speak to people in the way they want to be spoken to and whether or not you are invading space when you ask personal questions. In short, if you have a clue. The term was born in 1990 by Peter Salvey from Yale University and John Mayer (no, not the singer, who clearly is lacking in emotional IQ, at least if we are to believe former girlfriends Katy Perry and Taylor Swift) of the University of New Hampshire. The two professors decided emotional IQ was of better use to humans than cognitive IQ. Self-awareness, self-management, social awareness and social skills are the ultimate keys to a wonderful life. The bottom line, they asserted, is the more social-emotional intelligence you have, the better your life probably is — and better too are the lives of people you deal with, like the children who live upstairs or the colleague you commute with to the office. I like that it is called “intelligence” because that assigns it a loftier attribute than just the “people smart” vs. “book smart” vs. “street smart” delineations my mother was so fond of proclaiming. She much preferred I be friends with book smart girls, because the street smart girls were not who she wanted me palling

“I’m referring to that intuitive self-regulation about how you are received. In short, if you have a clue.” around with on weekends. Similarly, the book smart boys, the nerds, were preferred by both my parents as high school dates over the boys who arrived on motorcycles, for whom my parents wouldn’t let me leave the house. The ideal is to have a little — or a lot — of all three kinds of smart. Not so good if you are completely missing a side of the triangle. And we all know some of those. I have been lucky enough in my work to meet gobs of super intelligent people who do great work in fields from law to medicine to engineering to philanthropy and, yes, to journalism. I look to these people for brain stimulus on what to read, watch, absorb, discover, attempt or avoid. Not all of them are equipped on the social-emotional intelligence front. They might not be able to read a room and know when they are going on too long or that someone is sobbing uncontrollably in the corner and it is perhaps time to shush up. They usually act surprised when you whisper that maybe this is not the right time for that, or suggest a more humane response to someone who is offended to the core by an offhand remark. “Bless her heart,” as my Dallas friends would say. Which anyone from Texas or any part of the South will tell you is not really what they mean. It’s a judgment call that the person just might be clueless and doesn’t know any better. And that blessings are all that will save her. I do value traditional or cognitive

intelligence, the yearning to learn and discover new ideas or a reverence for culture, art, history and the brilliance of science as a way to unleash solutions. I like the process of finding answers to questions and reading up on the answers that others have already unearthed. I also appreciate the social-emotional brilliance of people who are quick to sum up a situation — like the Kenny Rogers song says, “You’ve got to know when to hold ‘em. Know when to fold ‘em. Know when to walk away. And know when to run.” Some people just don’t. Yet there are those who do. And these folks are masterfully blessed with social-emotional intelligence. These are my friends and, if I am lucky, new acquaintances, who treat everyone the way they want to be treated, have kindness and empathy tacked onto every sentence, and can read a person as easily as if she was a billboard three stories high. As the weather warms and spring turns to summer, I seem to get more welcome invitations to gatherings, dinners, lunches and events indoors and out, all blooming with chances to connect with others and learn more about them — and more about myself in the process. I hope to spend more time with people who bear the qualities of self-awareness that I so wish to convey. Maybe, just maybe, some of their emotional brilliance will rub off on me. n

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West Suburban Living May 2018  
West Suburban Living May 2018  
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