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IOWA CITY WEST HIGH SCHOOL

2901 MELROSE AVE.

IOWA CITY, IA 52246

YOU ARE BEING WATCHED

WSSPAPER.COM

PG. 38-40

AS THE BOSTON BOMBINGS FOCUS THE NATION ON VIDEO SURVEILLANCE, THE WSS TAKES AN INVESTIGATORY LOOK AT BOTH THE NECESSITY AND DANGER OF LEANING ON TECHNOLOGY TO EXPOSE THE TRUTH. flip over for the senior issue

VOLUME 44 ISSUE 7

MAY 22, 2013


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[46-47]FEATURE

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THE IOWA CITY BUBBLE

The pervasively accepting nature and relatively low crime rate in Iowa City raises the question: does this town prepare students for the outside world?

[44-45]PROFILES

LEAVING LEGACIES

The WSS salutes those teachers who will be leaving the school next year.

[38-40]IN-DEPTH

MONITORING MATTERS

An in-depth discussion of video surveillance and its uses and dangers in an ever-modernizing society.

PHOTO BY//MEGUMI KITAMOTO

The bass choir dances to “Sound Off� during their concert on May 1.

EQUITY STATEMENT

It is the policy of the Iowa City Community School not to discriminate on the basis of race, creed, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, martial status, sexual orientation, gender identity, veteran status, disability or socioeconomic programs, activities, or employment practices. If you believe you have (or your child has) been discriminated against or treated unjustly at your school, please contact the Equity Director, Ross Wilburn, at 509 Dubuque Street, 319-688-1000.

EDITORIAL POLICY

The West Side Story reflects the views of the staff and does not represent the school administration, faculty or student body. Guest articles may be accepted to represent an additional point of view or as a part of a collection of reader contributions. The staff will carefully scrutinize all reader submissions. All ads are subject to approval by the business staff. Those that are libelous, obscene or plainly offensive may be rejected. The West Side Story attempts to publish all letters, which must be signed, to the Editors, but may reject submissions due to space limitations, inaccuracy or poor quality. It is the responsibility of the opinion editor to verify authorship. Editors can make minor edits for the sake of clarity, length and grammatical correctness.

SPORTS

INTO INTRAMURALS

Apart from the classic high school sports, West High participates in many athletics. The WSS explores student activity in rugby, ultimate frisbee and gymnastics.

Juliann Skarda Editor-in-Chief Shirley Wang Design Editor, Front/back Ed. Ashton Duncan Managing Editor Amelia Moser Copy Editor Frannie Rizzo Business Editor Hannah Merrill News Editor Pombie Silverman A &E Editor Olive Carrollhach In depth Editor, Artist Katie Mons Feature Editor Velarchana Santhana Feature Editor Blake Oetting Profiles Editor, Sports Ed. Abbie Skemp Photographer, Sports Ed. Jordan Rossen Columns Editor Brenna Deerberg Editorial Editor, News Ed. Frank Weirich Photo Editor Leela Sathyaputri Comics Editor, Artist Hannah Muellerleile Photographer, Designer Erin Weathers Photographer, Designer Amiela Canin Writer Megumi Kitamoto Writer Brittani Langland Writer Lushia Anson Writer, Designer Kaitlyn McCurdy Writer, Designer Aileen Norris Ad Designer Alyssa Mckeone Designer Tyler Voss Designer Sara Jane Whittaker Adviser Fiona Armstrong-Pavlik Web copy Editor Audrey Hopewell Web copy Editor Zora Hurst Web Editor Paul Curry Video Editor

WSS STAFF

[36]

COVER PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY//JAEHO LEE


TOP OF IOWA

80s workout icon Richard Simmons released a new video this month; however, the topic differed from exercise instruction. Instead, Simmons, clad in a black spandex outfit emblazoned with the word “sweat,” addressed students in teacher Matt Harding’s physics class. Seniors Amalia Introna and Ivy Lenane contacted the star for their jazzercisethemed trebuchet project. In the video, Simmons offered support and encouragement to physics students. “I hope you find a passion in your life because you are the next generation that’s going to help make this world a better place … Study hard, give each other a hug for me and know I’m right there rooting for you,” he said. COMPILED BY//JULIANN SKARDA

SCAN THIS WITH YOUR SMARTPHONE TO WATCH THE VIDEO

Side

stories @wsspaper asked West High students

What was your favorite memory from the 2012-2013 school year? @m_gast14:

WEST SIDE WORD

COMPILED BY//VELARCHANA SANTHANA

West High has been named the number one high school in Iowa by Newsweek’s annual America’s Best High School list. The list was based on several criteria including graduation rates, the percentage of students accepted to two or fouryear college programs, the average number of AP tests taken per student and the percent of students who partake in at least one AP class. Newsweek rated West High 327 out of over 2,000 schools across the country. West also tied for sixth place in AP scores with the overall number one school on the national list, Carol Martin Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science located in Kentucky, with an average AP test score of 4.5. “I think that [Newsweek’s rating of West] is a direct reflection of the quality of the teachers [at West]. It is a great compliment to our high school community,” Dr. Arganbright said.

“I LOVE PHYSICS”

{DESIGN BY SHIRLEY WANG}

skidoosh (skuh-doosh) A way to answer a question which nobody seems to know the answer to. “Man, what was Calvinism’s view on predestination?” “Skidoosh!” COMPILED BY//BLAKE OETTING

6 11 NEWS BY THE NUMBERS

Fruit trees EATS bought for the West High garden. The club planted them on April 27.

Years in a row that girls track team has won the Mississippi Valley Conference title.

COMPILED BY//FIONA ARMSTRONG-PAVLIK

Our football boys finally getting the boot back to the right side of town! Zach Richmond ’14 Maddie Gast ’13

@minsuu1220:

Show choir competitions with @TiffanieDuong and @alexandra_dobre :)

Minsu Song ’15

@elliotcyoung:

Can I get back to you in three days?

Elliot Young ’14

COMPILED BY//MEGUMI KITAMOTO

ON MAY 22, THE WRIGHT BROTHERS PATENTED THEIR “FLYING MACHINE.” HERE ARE OTHER PATENTED DEVICES. } MAY 2013 NEWS 50


49 ADS MAY 2013


{DESIGN BY HANNAH MERRILL}

PHOTO BY//AMIELA CANIN

ABOVE: Some of the proposed plans may affect Lincoln Elementary School, pictured here.

ICCSD considering building plans through One Vision Parents, teachers and administrators are getting involved in the discussion as the Iowa City Community School District plans the future of its facilities. BY AMIELA CANIN

acanin@wsspaper.com

After resolving two contentious issues in recent years - elementary school redistricting and the district-wide diversity policy - the Iowa City Community School District is once again wondering what Iowa City schools will look like in the next decades. The projected increase in student population will put strain on existing school buildings, many of which are already considered inefficient. To combat these issues, the school board has created a master planning process called “One Vision” to take charge of the future of the Iowa City Community School District’s facilities. The district hired the Illinois-based archi-

tecture firm BLDD Architects to analyze current facilities and project what kinds of school buildings will be needed in the future. BLDD has proposed several options involving remodeling facilities and adding new ones. So far, six public meetings have been held on the subject. “There is a large range of possibilities [for changes in school facilities], from doing nothing to doing a lot,” said Sam Johnson, one of the principals of BLDD Architects, at a meeting on Tuesday, May 14. “A lot,” according to One Vision, means any of various proposals involving new buildings and additions and upgrades to existing buildings. Existing facilities may also be repurposed or retired. These scenarios can

be combined in 127 different ways. Another possible scenario is grade realignment. Several of the ideas involve changing the grade levels encompassed in the schools. There are a number of ways this might be achieved. One possibility is to make high school only grades 10 to 12. There is also the possibility of building separate ninth grade centers. At the meetings, there appeared to be widespread support for protecting older neighborhood elementary schools and building a third high school. According to BLDD, however, the most cost-efficient plan involves closing elementary schools, while also still building a new high school.

Government teacher and Coralville City Council Member Mitch Gross was selected to represent the city of Coralville in the school planning process. “I thought great conversations were going on [at the meetings],” he said. “There has been consensus on several scenarios. There was consensus on [building] a third high school and not to close neighborhood elementary schools.” In the coming months, the school board and community will continue to work toward their vision for the future of the Iowa City Community School District.

A GLASS THAT SHOCKS YOU WHEN YOU DRINK FROM IT TO CURE HICCUPS WAS PATENTED IN 2006. } MAY 2013 NEWS 48


{DESIGN BY TYLER VOSS

In the

bubble The WSS explores Iowa City’s environment and whether it prepares its citizens for the world outside Iowa. BY MEGUMI KITAMOTO & BLAKE OETTING

T

ART BY//LEELA SATHYAPUTRI

he AP bubble here certainly has its benefits, seen has been a con- in our high-achieving high schools troversial issue and rich arts scene. However, these for students same factors also have negative at West High consequences. The omnipresent befor a long nevolence has the time. The potential to leave concern students incapable is that students taking higher to deal with the level classes could be losing vital “real world” and connections with students who its undeniable choose not to. It has been argued differences from that AP students are given an their Iowan oasis. unrealistic view of a classroom Justin Hamlin because they are surrounded by Justin Hamlin ’13 ’13, who grew up people similar to them. This isin Texas, believes sue, with slightly different concerns, Iowa City renders students naïve to can be extended to Iowa City as a issues in the world. whole. The well-educated, relatively “I think people here don’t really safe and accepting environment have a sense of what causes crime …

I think it’s hard for them to relate to Hamlin said. big controversies. Take gun control, Rachel Ruback ’12 also experifor example; there aren’t that many enced a different scene after she gun crimes in Iowa City, so people went to Quimperlé in France for don’t have first-hand exabout six months to perience with it,” Hamlin study abroad. Living in said. Iowa City helped her adDespite that, Hamlin also just to these cultural difbelieves that he has benferences. efited from Iowa City’s so“[I learned] that there cially accepting nature. were everyday things “When I lived [in Texas], that I don’t usually think the area I lived in was about ... I’ve never conall white people – it was Rachel Ruback ’12 sidered myself a closepretty segregated. I didn’t minded person, but the know that being gay was little habits, like standing even possible until I moved up here and shaking hands were very differ… when I moved up here, I got way ent. [Iowa City] is a very liberal and more used to diversity. I realize now happy place, but since it is so diverse diversity should be everywhere,” [in Iowa City], I would not have had

47 FEATURE MAY 2013 { A PILLOW WITH A RETRACTABLE UMBRELLA TO PROTECT A BEACH-GOER FROM THE SUN WAS PATENTED IN 2004.


as big of a culture shock as I would have if I lived in a smaller town,” Ruback said. David Huang ’11, a current sophomore at the Un i v e r s i t y of Chicago, thinks the issue is less black and white. While he agrees Iowa City’s David Huang ’11 culture left him a tad naive, he doesn’t believe it is a fault of the city, but instead a natural disparity between small town Iowa and an urban hub. “There are realities ... for which

Iowa City could not have possibly Huang, however, thinks challenges prepared me ... it’s [odd] having like this are a normal part of being to travel for an hour to get places in an urban location. within the same city when you’re “There are certain things that just used to traveling for an happen, and if you’re hour to get across your unlucky, they happen to entire life. However, I’m you. But one should keep less inclined to think in mind that there are that this is a difference people who go through between ‘Iowa City’ and four years of study in ‘the real world’ and more Chicago and never ena difference between … counter any crime, and two different places and there are people in Iowa two different contexts,” City who get their cars Karen Meyer, Huang said. broken into by projectile math teacher That’s not to say that the rock twice over the span stark differences in setting don’t of- of three years and don’t qualify for fer some difficulties for Huang. Last enough damages to be covered by year, Huang was mugged at gun- insurance,” Huang said. point while returning to college. However, Karen Meyer, a math

teacher at West who has taught in multiple foreign countries, believes the benefits from the “Iowa City bubble” are unavoidable. “Being in Iowa City is like an oasis. Kids get enough international exposure from foreign exchange students, and West High is filled with so many opportunities, including AP classes and extracurricular activities,” Meyer said. Current and past residents of Iowa City rave about the socially accepting nature of this town. On the other hand, they recognize the naivety students can be left with. The “Iowa City bubble” has a clear effect on West High students and their lives after high school.

TUBES THE (HUMAN) USER CAN WEAR WHILE A HAMSTER CRAWLS THROUGH THEM WAS PATENTED IN 1999. } MAY 2013 FEATURE 46


Gone but not forgotten

Some of our most beloved staff members talk to the WSS about their futures and what they’ll miss after leaving West High.

COMPILED BY//MEGUMI KITAMOTO, BRITTANI LANGLAND, HANNAH MERRILL, SHIRLEY WANG AND AMIELA CANIN PHOTOS BY//ABBIE SKEMP

After West, I’m going to continue

to tutor students in Spanish and possibly assist in Success Center next year. I would also like to exercise, read and travel more.

-Rachel Temple, Spanish teacher

I have another house in Montana

and I’ll do a lot of outdoor stuff. I’ll take a scooter trip up there and spend the summer at my house up in the

mountains hiking, sitting in the hot springs

and riding my dirt bike. Hopefully, I’ll get a job with [the] U.S. Forest

Service working outdoors. -Jim Walden, librarian

I am staying home to raise my and children and [will be] volunteering

[at] Montessori School of Iowa City, where

they attend preschool. I plan to travel abroad and continue pursuing

professional development opportunities.

-Sejal Patel-Ashby, biology teacher

45 PROFILES MAY 2013 { A FORK WITH A TIMER TO TELL THE USER WHEN THEY MAY TAKE ANOTHER BITE OF FOOD WAS PATENTED IN 1995.


{DESIGN BY KAITLYN MCCURDY AND VELARCHANA SANTHANA}

[I’m going to miss] ... all the people, the students and the teachers. I’m going to travel, spend time with my grandkids and really just do what I want to do.

” “

-Val Donohoe, treasury secretary

[I will miss] the students, their parents and my colleagues. But it’s not that sad because I am going to be on the other side of town [as an assistant principal at City High].

-Scott Jespersen, social studies teacher

I will definitely remember the satisfaction of watching students grow and mature over their high school years, seeing their successes and watching them pull together during times of adversity... After I retire I hope to do some traveling.

-Peg Schollmeier, guidance counselor

A DEVICE THAT RELEASES AIR TO BLOW OUT BIRTHDAY CANDLES TO AVOID SPIT-ON CAKE WAS PATENTED IN 1965. } MAY 2013 PROFILES 44


the

Arts

Joe Brooks “Marching Band” “I like the lyrics because it promotes optimism and makes you feel good about your life.” Jason Walker “Echo” “I listen to this song when I am sad because it is a slow and powerful ballad about saying things but not being heard.” Johnny Stimson “New Shoes” “This is a really cute song that talks about always being there for someone that you care about.” Jay May “Gray or Blue” “I like the happy-go-lucky feel of this song and the ukulele.” Blink-182 “First Date” “Blink-182 is my guilty pleasure because I usually don’t listen to punk pop. The song is really corny, but it is fun to rock out to.”

While most people jam out to their music, Alexandra Dobre ’16 creates her own as a way to relieve stress with her voice, piano and guitar. “[I am inspired by] life and people in general. I mostly take the hardships in life and make it into music, so most of my songs turn out sad or melancholy,” Dobre said. Dobre also enjoys the simplicity of the instruments she uses. “Voice, piano and guitar don’t require a lot of mechanics, so you can personalize it,” she said.

Imogen Heap “Hide and Seek” “This song is a capella and has a lot of harmonies. The lyrics are different, and they make you think.” Lights “Pretend” “I like the message of this song, because it promotes the innocence of being a child.” The Black Keys “Everlasting Light” “I can relate to the song, because I want to help people and be their everlasting light.”

mixtape: alexandra dobre ’16 COMPILED BY//MEGUMI KITAMOTO PHOTO BY//ABBIE SKEMP

43 A&E MAY 2013 { A SYSTEM TO REPEL SNAKES USING THE SMELL OF GARLIC OR ONION WAS PATENTED IN 2011.

{DESIGN BY MEGUMI KITAMOTO}


ON ARTS

{DESIGN BY KATIE MONS}

PHOTO BY//AUDREY HOPEWELL

THE

PAYTON PROUD ’16

BY AUDREY HOPEWELL ahopewell@wsspaper.com

The goal of performing with renowned tap dancer Jason Samuels Smith is an ambitious one, but that won’t stop Payton Proud ’16. “I saw a show of his ... and it inspired me [because of] how good he is, and I just want to be like him,” Proud said. Proud, a tap dancer herself, says that performing with Smith would be a major accomplishment in her dance career. In addition to tap dance, she does

ballet, pointe, jazz, modern and contemporary dance. “Being in dance, I have a lot of experience with injuries,” Proud said. Because of this, she wants to be a physical therapist in the future. Proud has a condition called retrocalcaneal bursitis, which is inflammation of the bursa, a part of the heel under the Achilles tendon. This injury has presented a challenge for Proud, as it makes it painful for her to walk. Despite this, Proud continues because she likes the versatility of

dance and its accessibility to so many people. Proud says this is her favorite part of the activity. “It doesn’t matter how young or old you are, [and] you can still do it whether you’re good or bad,” Proud said. Her passion for the performing arts doesn’t stop at dance, however. She plays bass clarinet in concert band as well as clarinet in the marching band at West. She went to All-State this year, and felt that she learned a lot. Proud hopes to be a four-year All-Stater in band.

“[It was] overwhelming. There were so many good people there,” Proud said of the experience. As for why she really enjoys participating in music, Proud says it’s because music is universal. “Anyone can pick up an instrument and play,” she said. What really inspires Proud is her belief that performing arts like her music and dance have no absolute requirements and can be very personal. “It’s not anybody else,” Proud said. “It’s just me.”

A HAT WITH POLES ATTACHED THAT HAVE BIRD FEEDERS HANGING OFF THEM FOR BIRDING WAS PATENTED IN 1999. } MAY 2013 A&E 42


41 ADS MAY 2013


12:57:55

12:57:40

09:41:28

11:23:44

YOU’RE BEING WATCHED.

BY LUSHIA ANSON AND AMELIA MOSER

15:32:53

When you left your house today, it’s likely that at least one camera recorded you in your journey. Chances are it was more than one.

07:15:09 10:08:43


wwwww

PHOTOS BY//FRANK WEIRICH PHOTOS BY//FRANK WEIRICH

T

13:00:11

raffic cameras, store cameras, street cameras, school cameras – for better or for worse, “going out in public” no longer just means being visible to the people you walk past. It also means being recorded and documented, or even watched live, as you go about your daily business. Surveillance from incidents like the explosions at the Boston Marathon remind people of the benefits of these types of technologies - and make it easy to think that’s the only time the cameras are on. But it isn’t just unmistakingly scary situations and tragedies that are recorded. No one necessarily thought the Tsarnaev brothers looked suspicious and focused on taking photos of them. That’s just how many photos there are. These new technologies raise new questions about the balance between individual privacy and public safety.

15:30:21

15:30:17

LOSING PRIVACY IN THE PUBLIC SPACE

ies are not very well-defined.” Maya Bassuk ’14 agreed privacy is Instagram and Snapchat are indicative of the trend toward increasing on the decline. “It’s weird, because certain comthe numbers of photos taken, but panies have to get waivers and perthey aren’t alone. “Modern public video surveillance mission to videotape people ... they systems … can be equipped with ... have to have our parents sign a form high resolution and magnification, and whatever, but there’s all this othmotion detection, ... and biometric er surveillance that happens without identification … [and] these types any permission from us,” she said. West High English teacher Darci of systems are beginning to cover Witthoft believes that inthe American urban landnovations within surveilscape,” according to the lance affect the ways we Constitution Project, a choose to use the technolself-proclaimed bipartisan ogy. think tank that focuses on “It’s so convenient [to constitutional and legal isrecord people], and now sues. they have devices that are Some view such new, Darci Witthoft so small, so they’re easy advanced surveillance to hide, so I think that technologies with appremakes people less ethical… I just hension. “These technologies are decreasing think they can get by with it more… the amount of privacy everyone has businesses, government [and] whatsignificantly,” said Valerie Hsieh ’16. not,” she said. Part of being able to “get by with “I think that we’ve kind of gone to the extreme with it, and ... boundar- it” is whether people notice being 39 DPS MAY 2013

recorded in the first place. Several defined boundaries. I want to know students, including Claire Hird ’13, if I’m being watched.” said they didn’t normally notice street or store cameras. CAMERAS AND CRIME “I think I’m just kind of used to it The most obvious use of surveilby now,” Hird said. “There’s so many lance is related to preventing and sources of recording … that at this solving crime. point it’s almost “I think cama constant thing, “AS LONG AS THE CAMERAS ARE eras are useful whether you both a deterIN A PUBLIC PLACE, THE IMAGES as know about it or rent and as a not.” THEY CAPTURE ARE FAIR GAME tool to aid in the Witthoft AND THE USE OF VIDEO WOULD identification agrees. and apprehen“I think we’re NOT BE AN INFRINGEMENT ON sion of those somewhat comommitting THE RIGHTS OF ANY INDIVIDUAL.” ccrimes, placent about ” said it. You know, -SGT. VICKI LALLA, IOWA CITY POLICE Sgt. Vicki Lalla we just assume of the Iowa City it’s happening. And we don’t think Police Department. of [privacy] as a right anymore, … Lalla pointed out that an increasunless it’s in our home,” she said. ing number of store cameras make “If you act like your privacy’s being it easier officers to review footage if infringed upon, then it’s like, ‘well, an incident occurs. what do you have to hide?’, and it’s “There are very few businesses that not even that. I have nothing to I can think of that do not have some hide, it’s just that there have to be sort of video cameras in place,” she


wwwww

{DESIGN BY SHIRLEY WANG}

12:58:21

NUMBER OF SURVEILLANCE CAMERAS AT* West High City High Tate

12:57:36 12:59:02

*one box indicates two cameras

OUR SCHOOLS AND CAMERAS

COMPILED BY//AMELIA MOSER

A report by the National Center for Education Statistics states that the percentage of public schools using security cameras for monitoring more than tripled between the 1999-2000 and 2009-2010 school years, from

19% to 61%.

The numbers for specifically high schools monitoring students are even higher -

said. “If you didn’t have a camera, you’d Legally, Lalla isn’t concerned about pretty much be like, ‘oh let’s go find using that footage. some witnesses and ask them’ … “As long as the cameras are in a it’s easier to just look at the camera public place, the images they cap- footage, and you don’t have to worry ture are fair game and the use of about someone hiding the truth video would not be an infringement from you or different perspectives of on the rights of any indiwhat happened,” she said. vidual,” she said. Even if using them did SEEING RED slightly infringe on rights, Red light traffic cameras Hird said it would still be have been controversial in worth it. Iowa City for years. Just a “I think the downside week ago, the Iowa City of [potentially] infringCouncil decided to put a ing on someone’s rights Valerie Hsieh ’16 hold on installing cameras [by recording them] in a after receiving a petition public place does not outbalance the containing 2,543 signatures to ban benefit of catching somebody who the recording devices. But not evmight harm those people in later eryone is so strongly against them. times” she said. Dr. Shauna Hallmark, Interim DiSophie Shoultz ’14 agrees that rector of the Institute for Transporfootage makes a big difference. tation at Iowa State University, led a

84 out of 100 use cameras.

study to find the effect traffic cam“You really don’t have a right to eras have on accidents and running privacy [driving in the road]. … red lights in You don’t have Davenport and the right to run “WE DON’T THINK OF [PRIVACY] a red light and Cedar Rapids. “In all cases, AS A RIGHT ANYMORE … UNLESS kill somebody,” we found a she said. huge reduction IT’S IN OUR HOME.” Kazimier in crashes,” she -DARCI WITTHOFT, ENGLISH TEACHER Smith ’15 said. “When doesn’t think you give people privacy argua ticket, things are going to change.” ments apply to red light cameras Witthoft said the presence of the either. cameras deters light-runners. “People [are] used to being able “I’d say I support [traffic cameras] to get away with [running lights], because the police force can’t be and now they can’t, so they’re using large enough to monitor everything their privacy as an excuse when, in ... just having [cameras] there can reality, it seems more likely that they reduce the breaking of the laws,” just want to be able to make minor Witthoft said. infringements on laws without getPrivacy rights aren’t part of the ting in trouble,” he said. equation when it comes to traffic cameras for Hallmark. MAY 2013 DPS 38


37 ADS MAY 2013


AND

ABOVE: Working on his offense, Jackson Peplow ’13 runs downfield. TOP RIGHT: Unique to rugby, the boys scrummage to restart a play. RIGHT: Looking for a teammate, Aydan Wynos ’14 gets ready to pass the ball.

LEFT:Yelling for his teammates’ attention, Shane Nicholson ’13 looks to make a pass. BOTTOM LEFT: Preparing a pass to Joey Abreu ’13, Sean Dempsey ’13 waits for his opportunity. BOTTOM RIGHT: Blocking his opponent, Kegan Wakefield ’13 trys to keep the other team from scoring.

COMPILED BY//BRITTANI LANGLAND

PHOTOS BY//BRITTANI LANGLAND

Alongside the core West High athletic teams two intramural sports have emerged: rugby and ultimate frisbee. After making it to state last year, the rugby team is ready to get back on the field. Likewise, the ultimate frisbee team, called the “Metallic Wings,” has qualified for state on June 15.

RUGBY

NEW NOTEWORTHY

{DESIGN BY TYLER VOSS}

FRISBEE

ULTIMATE

A SOCK WITH VELCRO TO STICK TO THE INSIDE OF A SHOE WAS PATENTED IN 1976. } MAY 2013 SPORTS 36


Pushing past a defender, Eleni Katz ’14 moves the ball forward to a teammate, resulting in the game winning goal on May 7.

Anna Hausler ’14 kicks the ball to a fellow teammate during the City-West game. The Trojans won 2-1 against the Little Hawks.

West pitcher Nick Gallagher ’14 throws a strike against the City hitter. Despite their successful performance in their first game of the season against Kennedy, West lost to the Little Hawks.

Sliding into home, a Trojan base man steals a run while the Xavier catcher reaches for the ball.

Nick Gallagher ’14 bats during the game against City High on April 14.

35 SPORTS MAY 2013 { A DEVICE TO PLAY CAT’S CRADLE ALONE WITH A BASE WITH ARMS TO LOOP THE STRING ON WAS PATENTED IN 2006.


{DESIGN BY KATIE MONS

Using fancy footwork, Aaron Miller ’13 passes a City defender as Alex Bode ’14 backs him up.

Throwing a warm-up pitch, Sam Scott ’13 prepares to pitch against Xavier late in the game.

Holding off a City defender, Omar El Ramady ’13 works to get the ball to a teammate for a chance to score. West beat City 3-1.

Out of your

league

As school comes to an end, summer sports are just heating up. Soccer and baseball are in full swing now that April showers have given way to May flowers. PHOTOS BY//FRANK WEIRICH

Batting against City, a Trojan player makes it to first after this base hit.

CLOTHING WITH 2D OPTICAL ILLUSIONS TO DISGUISE THE USER’S BODY SHAPE WAS PATENTED IN 2006. } MAY 2013 SPORTS 34


{DESIGN BY BLAKE OETTING}

QUALITY of life

A smart choice?

INDEX

In light of the Iowa City Community School District’s ongoing implementation of its goal to equip every classroom with MAY a SMART Board, projector and document camera, the West Graduation Side Story questions whether the new technology is neces- Although the seniors will feel elation walking across the sary in the first place. Carver Hawkeye stage, it is It’s only been two years since West students and teachers rose up against the suggested ICCSD budget cuts with multiple rallies, a video that garnered 4.5k views and a Facebook group with 705 members, but already things have changed dramatically. We went from talking about taking money from multiple teaching positions and programs to an initiative to have a new thousand-dollar piece of equipment in every single classroom in the district: the SMART Board. Aside from the functioning of the technology itself, the idea that a one-size-fits-all approach to technology across the district could be either cost-effective or useful seems silly. Students in math class at Weber Elementary obviously have very different needs than students in AP Chemistry at West. Saying “we’re going to have a SMART Board in every classroom” is a great talking point, but the implementation is less impressive. Not every classroom needs or even wants a SMART Board, and every single board that isn’t used extensively on a daily basis is a waste of over a thousand dollars. With the financial problems our district has struggled with in the past, we can’t have short memories and throw that kind of money away. Once the money is spent, it’s a question of how they’re used. Several teachers are either insufficiently trained in the use of SMART Boards or just choose to not use them. It’s fine if they don’t want to use a SMART Board, but then why bother spending the money to give them one? Because they’re being installed 33 OPINION MAY 2013

one-by-one throughout the school year, teachers get the SMART Boards as they’re teaching their classes, forcing them to choose between learning how to use it on-thefly or ignoring it. To be fair, there are multiple teachers who have become quite adept at using their SMART Boards, which is great, but they don’t appear to be the majority thus far. And even those teachers who use them perfectly run into certain roadblocks, just by the nature of the technology itself. For one, SMART Board screens are significantly smaller than the chalkboards we originally had. Previously, chalkboards extended across entire walls, allowing students to see a lot of writing all at once instead of small sections one-by-one on the SMART Board. They’re also arguably harder to write with - an algebra problem written in small writing with chalk can be easily legible, but try writing small with a SMART Board marker and you’ll just get an unreadable smooshed blob of pixels. Erasing is just as imprecise - you’re not going to erase a word, let alone a letter. You’re going to erase the better part of a sentence, if you’re lucky. Entire swathes of the board suddenly disappear at the smallest swipe of the erasing tool. The ICCSD’s EveryClassroom brochure estimates “$2 million for equipment, installation and professional development to ensure successful implementation.” That money could have gone toward a lot of things. Teacher salaries and benefits, for one. Art programs, music pro-

grams and clubs for another. It could have been used to increase funding for specialized supplies to be used in individual school departments and classrooms or more hands-on activities and newer textbooks. It also could have gone toward renovations to the physical buildings students go to school in. At some point overcrowding impacts a student’s education more than using a traditional chalkboard. Change is usually great, including modernizing technology in the classroom - computers have become indispensable - but throwing these kinds of expensive devices at every single teacher, seemingly regardless of the class or that teacher’s specific wishes, isn’t good for anyone.

a right of the underclassmen to feel sad and envious. We’ll miss you, seniors.

minus 5

Hello, spring I think it is now safe to say that the uncharacteristically gray start to spring is over, and sunshine and frivolity have struck the students of West High.

plus 4

No air conditioning

The lack of cool air may be fine for the tank-clad bros of the world, but for us sleevelovers, some air conditioning would be nice.

minus 3

Senior year Are SMART Boards a necessary investment for every classroom’s education?

0-16

The WSS editorial board voted against the EveryClassroom SMART Board policy.

Hello, juniors.You know those college applications our senior compatriots were stressing over a couple of months ago? Yeah, we’re next. But hey, only one more year.

plus 5

Grad party hopping

Yes. The season is finally here. Pancheros catering and final goodbyes are upon us. The awkward encounters with seniors you have never met are also sure to please.

Total:

plus 3 plus 4

COMPILED BY//BLAKE OETTING

May 22, 2013 West Side Story  

West High's May 2013 West Side Story - The Regular Issue

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