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westsidestory IOWA CITY WEST HIGH SCHOOL

The

2901 MELROSE AVE.

New

Normal

A look at the 2013 family

pg.17-19

IOWA CITY, IA 52246

WSSPAPER.COM

VOLUME 44 ISSUE 4

FEBRUARY 1, 2013


FEBRUARY

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Goodtime Company’s show choir members perform Janet Jackson’s

“Rhythm Nation.”

PHOTO BY//FRANNIE RIZZO

BODY TALK

Your actions have the power to say more than your mouth. Read on to find out how a tilted head can betray a lie and what it really means when you bite your lips.

[28-29]HEALTH

THE FAST TRACK

Slow down and take a look at student perspectives on fasting. Be it for religion, cleansing or fad diets, these restricted regimens have both benefits and drawbacks.

EQUITY STATEMENT

It is the policy of the Iowa City Community School not to discriminate on the basis of race, creed, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, martial status, sexual orientation, gender identity, veteran status, disability, or socioeconomic programs, activities, or employment practices. If you believe you have (or your child has) been discriminated against or treated unjustly at your school, please contact the Equity Director, Ross Wilburn, at 509 Dubuque Street, 319-688-1000.

EDITORIAL POLICY

The West Side Story reflects the views of the staff and does not represent the school administration, faculty or student body. Guest articles may be accepted to represent an additional point of view or as a part of a collection of reader contributions. The staff will carefully scrutinize all reader submissions. All ads are subject to approval by the business staff. Those that are libelous, obscene or plainly offensive may be rejected. The West Side Story attempts to publish all letters, which must be signed, to the Editors, but may reject submissions due to space limitations, inaccuracy or poor quality. It is the responsibility of the opinion editor to verify authorship. Editors can make minor edits for the sake of clarity, length and grammatical correctness.

[17-19] IN-DEPTH

THE NEW NORMAL

The 1950s-style family model is long outdated. From blended families to same-sex parents, the typical American family is ... well, atypical.

[22-23]SPORTS

AN ATHLETIC PURSUIT

The WSS investigates what factors play into prompting students to change schools—or even school districts—for high school athletics.

Juliann Skarda Editor-in-Chief Shirley Wang Design Editor, Front/back Ed. Ashton Duncan Managing Editor Amelia Moser Copy Editor Frannie Rizzo Business Editor Hannah Merrill News Editor Pombie Silverman A &E Editor Olive Carrollhach In depth Editor, Artist Katie Mons Feature Editor Velarchana Santhana Feature Editor Blake Oetting Profiles Editor, Sports Ed. Abbie Skemp Photographer, Sports Ed. Jordan Rossen Columns Editor Brenna Deerberg Editorial Editor, News Ed. Frank Weirich Photo Editor Leela Sathyaputri Comics Editor, Artist Hannah Muellerleile Photographer, Designer Erin Weathers Photographer, Designer Amiela Canin Writer Megumi Kitamoto Writer Brittani Langland Writer Lushia Anson Writer, Designer Kaitlyn McCurdy Writer, Designer Aileen Norris Ad Designer Alyssa Mckeone Designer Tyler Voss Designer Sara Jane Whittaker Adviser Fiona Armstrong-Pavlik Web copy Editor Audrey Hopewell Web copy Editor Zora Hurst Web Editor Paul Curry Video Editor

WSS STAFF

[9-11] FEATURE

COVER PHOTO ILLUSTRATION AND ART BY//LEELA SATHYAPUTRI AND ABBIE SKEMP


$21,292 42

{DESIGN BY SHIRLEY WANG}

NEWS BY THE NUMBERS

For the kids. With this battle cry, West High’s Mini Dance Marathon raised $21,292 at the event on Jan. 20. Six West faculty members: Christian Aanestead, Kathy Bresnahan, Paul Breitbach, Mitch Gross, Scott Jespersen and Jenifer Secrist shaved heads in solidarity with the fundraising campaign as promised, since the students raised over $20,000. “Sometimes people need multiple reasons to come

Consecutive basketball games the West High boys team has won. [as of deadline]

together,” said Secrist. “I wanted to help my students to come together and work together for one community, ... shaving my head was simply a motivational factor .” The University of Iowa’s Dance Marathon takes place tonight. Last year, dancers and donors alike raised over $1 million for the project, boosting the Dance Marathon total to well over $11 million. COMPILED BY//ASHTON DUNCAN

Side

stories

PHOTO BY//FRANK WEIRICH

salty (sawl-tee)

What would be your perfect Valentine’s day date?

Angry, agitated, upset

Finishing with an 89 in pre-calulus made me pretty salty.

@nicknbpearce:

COMPILED BY//FRANNIE RIZZO

Shakira and I go to Niagara Falls, split some cheese fries and kiss in the Zach moonlight. Richmond ’14

@arcanine_4_lyfe:

Nick Pearce ’13

ABSOLUTE ZERO EMP

sitting in my basement and watching Community by myself with a bucket of Cheetos. Erin Cook ’14

A CLUCKING the movement to legalize 2009

/A B B O BY /

COMPILED BY//ERIN WEATHERS

P H OT

I want to go on a long walk in the park with Karl Wenzel (’14) while he sings my favorite One DirecCeci White-Baer ’15 tion songs to me.

IE SK

@cecipolarbaer:

CLAUSE:

WESTSIDE WORD

@wsspaper asked West High students

COMPILED BY//JULIANN SKARDA

urban chickens

NOV. 2012

A narrow vote allowed Iowa City to join Cedar CLUC (Citizens for Rapids, Mount Vernon the Legalization of FEB. 2013 and Ames in Iowa cities Urban Chickens) was Iowa City residents may that allow citizens to raise founded. 2010 purchase a $25 permit backyard hens. valid for one year to Iowa City Friends of Urban Chickens keep up to six hens on a was founded. tract of land.

Recently a group of German scientists cooled atoms to the point that they fell into the realm of negative temperature. The group of atoms was below absolute zero [-273.15 C] and hotter than infinity degrees. As a group of negative temperature atoms gain energy their order increases, violating the laws of entropy. While this concept is extremely complex, its uses are practical. Energy is harvested from the movement of temperature from high-energy objects to low, but energy will still flow from negative temperatures to positive temperatures. Imagine a cold object heating up another.Theoretical engines could be created with more than 100 percent efficiency. Unfortunately, only about 100,000 atoms were cooled to this state [about the size of a fat molecule]. But this discovery could change our concept of temperature to a very large degree. COMPILED BY//PAUL CURRY

ENJOY THIS PROVERBIAL WISDOM FROM AROUND THE WORLD. } FEBRUARY 2013 NEWS 3


Distributing diversity

PHOTO BY//AUDREY HOPEWELL

The Iowa City Community School District School Board will vote in Feb. for the third and final time on the proposed Diversity Policy. If passed, the policy will regulate the levels of students receiving free or reduced lunch among schools in the district. BY JULIANN SKARDA jskarda@wsspaper.com

T

he proposed Diversity Policy in the Iowa City Community School District awaits its third and final vote tentatively scheduled for the Feb. 5 school board meeting. According to Superintendent Steve Murley, the purpose of the policy is to evenly distribute students receiving free or reduced lunch throughout schools in the district. The goal is that, in five years’ time, no two schools will have more than a 30 percent difference in levels of FRL students.

Currently, the range of the distribution exceeds the proposed boundary. Schools such as Wickham and Lincoln Elementary have student populations comprised of about 6 percent FRL students, while 63 percent of students at Hills Elementary receive subsidized school meals. Proponents of the policy, such as school board member Sally Hoelscher, cite observational studies which show lower levels of students performing at or above proficiency on standardized reading tests in elementary schools with higher FRL student levels. “The educational experience of

the children in those schools— they’re great schools—but the educational experience is not all that it could be,” she said. Hoelscher addressed another counterargument to the policy about the redistricting of school boundaries. She said she believes the timing of redistricting for the policy is ideal since the board hopes to add three new elementary schools as well as a third high school, and the addition of these new facilities would already require the redrawing of boundaries. However, the narrow 4-3 passing of the second vote on Jan. 15 reflects the disagreement

4 NEWS FEBRUARY 2013 { A BOOK IS LIKE A GARDEN CARRIED IN THE POCKET. - ARAB PROVERB

amongst board members as well as community members. At a listening post on Jan. 12 held by board members to discuss the proposed policy, 35 people spoke about their opinions of the plan. Among them was West student Akash Borde ’15, who believes that slowing the process of the vote would ease unrest and confusion among community members. “Like I saw at the listening post, read in subsequent articles about the policy and observed during discussions in class, a large portion of the community is invested in what this policy means for them, and they all have ideas that de-


FAST FACTS

{DESIGN BY KAITLYN MCCURDY}

The disparity between the levels of students receiving free or reduced lunch among schools is changing as the district grows. According to the diversity policy, the difference between FRL rates at the junior high level should be 15% and 10% at the high school level.

JUNIOR HIGH FRL Levels

PROJECTED

District Growth

HIGH SCHOOL FRL Levels

COMPILED BY// KAITLYN MCCURDY & LUSHIA ANSON

*Due to rounding, percentages may not equal 100.

serve to be heard. Specifically, the families on the Free and Reduced Lunch Price Policy must have their inputs considered because they will be the most directly affected. Simply put, delaying the decision will bring only improvements in the draft and poses no possible harms to the community,” he said. Borde said that he is not necessarily arguing against the implementation of the policy, but instead against the timeframe which he believes will allow for “less thought and input [to go] into the decision.” Andre Echols, a math teacher at West, also voiced his concerns about the policy at the listening post. “One of the things I questioned is how the policy is based on socioeconomic status, but our [school district’s] equity statement says we’re not supposed to discriminate on things such as race, sex or socioeconomic status … I understand the heart of what they’re trying to do, but I feel like [it should not] be based upon class or how much money you make,” he said. Borde, like most current high school students in the district, will not experience firsthand many of the effects of the policy if passed. This is, as Hoelscher explained, because the board believes the need for redistribution of FRL

students is more urgent among the district’s elementary schools. “At the secondary level … the disparity is not as great as at the elementary level … If you look at the schools that are going to feed into City High and West High if it’s unchecked, eventually there will also be a large disparity at the high schools,” she said. City High Student Senate School Board Representative Mohamed Rouabhi ’13 believes the policy is crucial in improving learning environments within ICCSD elementary schools. “I think the main thing the policy will help is the situation [in] the elementary schools. We have some schools on the east side … that are around the 80 percent mark [in terms of FRL students]. It’s hard to learn in a situation where it’s hard to eat at home, and it’s difficult to manage a classroom where 20 out of 25 students are hungry,” Rouabhi said. Hoelscher added that she hopes that the district might incentivize movement between the schools. She cited the example of instating an International Baccalaureate program at only one high school in order to prompt some students to choose one school over the other. Currently, all board members are backing the same opin-

ions that they held at the second vote, meaning the policy will be passed during the third and final vote if no members change sides. FOR MORE OF THIS ARTICLE GO TO WSSPAPER.COM

I understand the

heart of what

they’re trying to do, but I feel like [it should not] be based

class or how much money upon

you make.”

-Andre Echols, West math teacher

A CLEAR CONSCIENCE IS A SOFT PILLOW. - GERMAN PROVERB } FEBRUARY 2013 NEWS 5


UNREST IN THE BY BRENNA DEERBERG

F

bdeerberg@wsspaper.com

or many West High students, the word “terror” means facing down Academic Dean Brian Sauser or taking a particularly tricky test they may or may not have studied for. But for others, terror means not knowing if your family and friends will survive the day, or hearing missiles fly over your childhood home. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict, while thousands of miles away, is not isolated to the Holy Land. Several students at West High feel a personal connection with the conflict, and each have differing views surrounding its cause. “The first step to understanding this conflict is recognizing its complexity,” said Hilah Kohen ’14. “It is very hard to deal in absolutes.” Kohen’s parents came to the United States from Israel for her father’s postdoctoral training and most of her family still resides in Israel. However, Kohen doesn’t entirely align herself with Israel in this conflict. “Being ‘pro-Israel’ and being ‘pro-Palestinian’ are not mutually exclusive in any shape or form,” Kohen said. “It doesn’t make sense to me to imply that I’m ‘anti-’ an

entire country or territory because of the actions of a few of its residents … This is not so much a conflict between Israelis and Palestinians as it is a conflict between extremist groups and ordinary citizens.” Senior Taha Taha believes that the conflict was born when Britain bequeathed Palestine’s land to Israel in the early 20th century. “[England giving Palestine to Israel is] like me telling someone else they could have your car … but they’re stronger so you can’t do anything about it,” said Taha. “It just doesn’t make sense that Israel is taking over because Britain said they could.”

The first step to understanding this conflict is recognizing its

complexity.” -Hilah Kohen ’14 While Taha agrees that this land transfer is the cause of the conflict, he isn’t angry about the land

dispute—rather—he is angry about the many innocent lives that have been lost in the fight. Taha’s stance was impacted when his cousin’s friend was shot and killed while visiting his family in Palestine. Senior Sara Elhattab is concerned that the conflict will lead to the loss of many innocent lives. She and Azzah Nasraddin ’13 are opposed to the conditions many children in Palestine face every day. According to these two students, children in Palestine often join gangs to escape their environment. This decision is due in part to the low quality education available to many children. “All [the children] learn is to throw rocks at Israeli Soldiers,” Nasraddin said. Senior Amy

6 NEWS FEBRUARY 2013 { A COURTYARD COMMON TO ALL WILL BE SWEPT BY NONE. - CHINESE PROVERB

Schey has respect for the struggles children face from both countries. “Israeli and Palestinian children have grown up equally,” Schey said. The ongoing struggle is the ownership of the Holy Land provides yet another source of


{DESIGN BY AMIELA CANIN}

HOLY LAND conflict between Israelis and Palestinians. According to Elhattab, Palestinians are currently denied access to their holy land. “I can’t imagine not being able to practice my religion,” El-hattab said, adding that the land under

ART BY/LEELA SATHYAPUTRI

dispute is a large part of her religion. “It is not an issue of the history … what is happening right now is something that is very unjust … and nobody is doing anything about it. [Nasraddin] and I understand where the Israelis are coming from and we know how they are justifying this … All the Palestinians want to know is ‘why?’” Schey, who hails from Israel, says she often feels attacked when she tries to talk about the conflict with other people. “When people say that Israel is always the one to attack … I can’t handle that,” Schey said. Schey believes it is especially unjust when United Statesborn people with no personal connection to the

conflict take sides. “[People who have always lived in the United States are] not the ones who grew up with rockets being

[People who have always lived in the United States are] not the ones who grew up with rockets being fired and the

fear of war

starting every day.” -Amy Schey ’13 fired and the fear of war starting every day,” Schey said. While Schey often feels “ignored” when she tries to share her viewpoint, she was able to discuss the conflict with her Palestinian-supporting friend Alaa Mohamedali ’12 during her open

hour last year. “[Mohamedali is the] only person I can talk to with common sense,” Schey said. “We respected each other’s side.” While the views of students on either side of the conflict differ, they all agree that a peaceful, twostate resolution would be ideal for everyone involved. “[There should be two Democratic governments] talking about issues, not shooting about issues,” Schey said. Taha agrees, adding that the land should be split between the two countries based on their populations. El-hattab and Nasraddin also believe that a two-state solution would be ideal, but the media coverage of the conflict has generated too much hatred for a peaceful division to be plausible. Kohen, on the other hand, believes that a two-state solution is the only realistic conclusion. “A two-state solution is the only doable idea,” Kohen said. “A lot of concessions would have to happen. … [It could be] a little tense, but diplomatic.”

THERE IS NO STRENGTH WITHOUT UNITY. - IRISH PROVERB } FEBRUARY 2013 NEWS 7


8 FEBRUARY 2012


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TALK

BODY BY BRITTANI LANGLAND blangland@wsspaper.com

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WANT TO BE A HUMAN LIE DETECTOR? AN INTERVIEW PRO? A MATCH- MAKER?

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LOOK NO FURTHER

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(UN)SPOKEN WORDS

RED HOT LOVIN’

THE UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE

THEY MIGHT BE FLIRTING IF...

Spanning centuries, cultures and even species, there is one dialect everyone uses: body language. Because it’s so prevalent, understanding body language can go a long way. Body language is a way people communicate non-verbally, and it accounts for a large portion of interaction. Body language can be shown through facial expressions, gestures and body movements. Having an understanding of this unspoken communication can help interpret someone’s feelings more accurately. According to psychology teacher Gary Neuzil, nonverbal communication is important partly because it sets the stage for verbal communication. “Understanding body language can establish legitimacy, and it allows for professionalism in the classroom,” Neuzil said. A person’s body language is unique to the individual and can be subject to change with age or shifting scenarios. Although there is no ‘dictionary’ defining each specific gesture or expression, there are a few general movements that are used by most people.

[If they share]

Understanding body language

pudding

can establish

legitimacy.”

-Gary Neuzil, psychology teacher

at lunch.”

-Aileen Weeks ’15

They do the

cool head nod.”

-Erin Kallsen ’13

They blush, smile maniacally,

laugh loudly and tease you.”

-Sharon Xiang ’16

Their face gets really

red.”

-James Kang ’13

ART BY//OLIVE CARROLLHACH

DO ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN PHOTOS BY//ERIN WEATHERS

UNDER PRESSURE When students are “sent to Sauser’s” (cue collective gasp), many panic. However, panic can lead to a loss of self-control. “If you come in and you’re really nice and calm, I’m not going to be mad at you,” said Brian Sauser. Sauser is aware of his reputa-

tion among students, and says “I don’t expect you to come in with a huge smile on your face.” If students sit down, maintain eye contact and stay calm, they can avoid more severe consequences.

10 FEATURE FEBRUARY 2013 { A FRIEND’S EYE IS A GOOD MIRROR. -IRISH PROVERB

NO ARMS FOLDED FACING AWAY


INTERVIEW A-GAME

LIAR LIAR

HOW TO ACE ANY INTERVIEW

CLUES THEY’RE CONCEALING SOMETHING

Job interviews can be stressful and frightening, but it is important to stay calm. According to career center coordinator Russ Johnson, this is because body language during a job interview is examined just as much as what is said. “Poor non-verbal communication can sabotage an interview and the chance at being hired,” Johnson said. “Making eye contact and sitting up straight is necessary and may seem easy, but are often forgotten about. Staying natural is also important by smiling or laughing, but only at the appropriate time.” Johnson said that different people have their own nervous habits, from foot tapping to lip-biting to teeth grinding. By maintaining awareness of these habits, most people can prevent them. Placing hands in the lap or under the table can be a way to avoid these nervous habits. Johnson recommends to start and end the interview strongly by using an appropriate handshake. “A limp handshake can show lack of confidence but an over-aggressive handshake is just plain weird,” Johnson said. “Staying aware of body language will improve the likelihood of getting the job,” he said.

{DESIGN BY OLIVE CARROLLHACH}

Too much

An overly-

aggressive handshake is just plain weird.”

-Russ Johnson,

career center coordinator

eye contact or not enough.”

-Brian Melendez ’13

They put a lot of detail into the

conversation.”

-Kathryn Quelle ’15

Their mouth

twitches.”

-Bailey Banks ’15

Their eyes are

all over the place.”

-Uma Balakrishnan ’13

WORDS? NO

YES

AVERTED EYES

ATTENTIVE AVERTED EYES

SLOUCHING

SMILING

A RUMOR GOES IN ONE EAR AND OUT MANY MOUTHS. -CHINESE PROVERB } FEBRUARY 2013 FEATURE 11


Acting out

with

SPIT

Passionate West students work to perfect their roles in rehearsal for SPIT’s upcoming comedy and drama shows. PHOTO BY//FIONA ARMSTRONG-PAVLIK

ABOVE: Nicolas Barker ’13 and Thomas Sparks ’14 chat before rehearsal starts. RIGHT: Keon Hunt ’13, Joey Abreu ’13, Jonah Pouleson ’13, and Kasra Zarei ’13 discuss ideas for the shows.

[The best part about SPIT] is

meeting new

people who enjoy the same

hobbies as I do.” -Joey Abreu ’13

PHOTO BY//FIONA ARMSTRONG-PAVLIK PHOTOS BY//SHIRLEY WANG

LEFT & BELOW: Nathaniel Lovin ’13, Jena Brooks ’16, Megan Clements ’14 and Olaf Sunleaf ’14 rehearse for SPIT’s comedy piece. PHOTO BY//FIONA ARMSTRONG-PAVLIK

12 A&E FEBRUARY 2013 { A THRONE IS ONLY A BENCH COVERED WITH VELVET. -FRENCH PROVERB.


Meet the

Directors COMPILED BY//MEGUMI KITAMOTO

{DESIGN BY HANNAH MUELLERLEILE}

Four directors, two shows, one amazing experience. The WSS talked to the directors of Students Producing Innovative Theater, or SPIT, about the comedy and drama productions they are directing. The comedy and the drama productions will be shown at the Little Theater on Friday, February 1st and Saturday, February 2nd, both at 7:30 PM.

PHOTOS BY//FIONA ARMSTRONG-PAVLIK

Aidan Manaligod ’13 Erin Kallsen ’13

Vicky Zhu ’13

Jonah Pouleson ’13

WSS: What were the auditions like? Aidan Manaligod: At the initial auditions, [the auditionees] did group scenes and monologues. From that we [took] notes on who we liked and who we wanted to see more of and then recalled people. A lot of recalls were based on fitting roles with people. We made our cast from that, which was pretty hard. WSS: Describe a typical day of rehearsal. AM: We do run-throughs where I usually tell the actors what I want to see more of and we play games. There are also a lot of jokes and goofing around, which is a large portion of SPIT practice. WSS: How is directing different from acting? AM: Directing was a little difficult for me because I have to do all of the behind the scenes stuff, which can get hectic, but both are fun. WSS: What qualities were you looking for in the people that auditioned for SPIT? AM: [We were looking for] people who are able to project and convey emotions to people. If you weren’t invested in what you were saying, then you [were] not going to impress us.

WSS: What do you like about the comedy? Vicky Zhu: It’s fun because the people in it are so funny and it’s a great time. We get a lot done, but have fun at the same time. When I do speech, I do drama, so it’s a good change. WSS: Is there anything that SPIT has taught you? VZ: Since I am a get-things-done kind of girl, I learned how to be flexible with other people; and even if we are stressing out now, it will all pay off. WSS: Why did you select “Crushed” by Don Zolidis as the comedy? VZ: It’s a cute play and it had a lot of room for making it our ‘own thing.’ There were a lot of characters, so a lot of people can have the opportunity to be in SPIT. The comedy part is the awkward, real-life aspects of the play like the encounters that the characters have. WSS: Did you cut anything out of the play? VZ: We only cut out a couple of sentences that were kind of awkward because it is important to know what is the best for the audience and to not make them feel uncomfortable.

WSS: How did you become a director for SPIT? Jonah Pouleson: If you were involved in acting, the directors from the previous year interviewed you at the end of the year and they pick who they want to carry on the tradition of SPIT. WSS: Have you received any advice from previous SPIT directors? JP: Not really, but they told me that they would be there for me if I needed help. We haven’t talked much yet, but we probably will talk more later on about preparing for the show. WSS: Do you plan to continue theater in college? JP: I hope so, and I plan to double major in business and theater. WSS: What do you like about SPIT? JP: It’s a really great opportunity for students to be able to direct and it was an eye-opening experience for me because it made me really appreciative of what Ms. Nahra and the other theater people do for us in the Theatre West productions. WSS: How do you plan to improve the SPIT program? JP: I think we tried to include everyone in the cast in everything we do, and we also tried to improve the relations of the cast members.

WSS: What do you like about theater? Erin Kallsen: The people involved in it. They’re all super nice, funny, upbeat and creative and energetic. Everyone in Theatre West is also super accepting, so everyone can always be himself or herself. WSS: Why did you select “The Glory in the Flower” by William Inge as the drama? EK: I liked [that the play] had a clear message without being too sad or tragic and it had the ideal number of characters and a larger cast size. WSS: What was most difficult about the audition process? EK: So many people auditioned for SPIT this year and everyone was really good. That made casting really difficult. WSS: Do you have any tips for aspiring actors and directors? EK: I think confidence is key. Even if you don’t know what you are doing, speaking loudly and clearly was a quality we were looking for during auditions. Being a good person and becoming familiar with theater is very important for acting. To become a director, it’s important to be organized, have good leadership skills and to be familiar with theater.

A MAN IS NOT HONEST SIMPLY BECAUSE HE NEVER HAD A CHANCE TO STEAL. -YIDDISH PROVER } FEBRUARY 2013 A&E 13


Arts

{DESIGN BY TYLER VOSS}

the

PHOTO OF THE MONTH

THE READER

Michael Scudiero ’13

Anthony Horowitz “[The ‘Alex Rider’] series is an action-based series about a person thrust into a world that he doesn’t understand, similar to “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.” You can sympathize a lot with the characters; it’s easier to relate to the characters as they remind [you] about going on a long journey only to discover a secret.”

“I was walking back into a barn [and] a horse made a face at me. I was so disappointed that I hadn’t been ready to take a picture of her, but as soon as I got closer she did it again and I was quick to snap it that time.” COMPILED BY//POMBIE SILVERMAN “Sword of Truth” Series

Terry Goodkind “I think Terry Goodkind is one of the best fantasy authors I’ve read. I like that the series expands a lot on characters more intensely than I’m used to … there are entire chapters devoted to an entire conversation where characters react to revelations.”

“The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy”

Douglas Adams “I’ve been hooked on this five-book trilogy. Adams wanted it to be a trilogy, but wrote a fourth [and] fifth book and still called it a trilogy. Each book flatly contradicts points made in the previous book, which adds a sense of humor and makes the plot line interesting. Anyone who has an appreciation for things that don’t make sense should read COMPILED BY//POMBIE SILVERMAN this book.” 14 A&E FEBRUARY 2013 { A TREE FALLS THE WAY IT LEANS. -BULGARIAN PROVERB

“Gravity” by Sophia Aley ’01

ART USED WITH PERMISSION FROM//SOPHIA ALEY

PHOTO BY//ERIN WEATHERS

“Alex Rider” Series

“Noël” by Lizzie Pruneau ’14


PHOTO BY//ERIN WEATHERS

STUDENT MIXTAPE

Harry Manaligod ’15

CO M P

IL E D B

Y//P O M

B IE S IL V E R MA

N

“Best Party Ever [Remix]” JORDAN LIGHTYEAR “It’s got a really energetic feel to it. I can’t help but bob my head whenever I listen to it.”

“Luckier” SHAZAM “[This is just] a really relaxing song.”

“Rifle Burs” GMCFOSHO “It’s got the hardest beat. The beat’s made out of gunshots.”

“Chameleon” HERBIE HANCOCK “This is the funkiest song to ever grace the Earth.”

“Mister Chicken” DELUXE “Yes, it’s about fried chicken. It also happens to be really smooth.”

“Disco Sirens” MIDFIELD GENERAL, VILLA, DAMIAN HARRIS “This is one of those songs that one would vigorously dance to.”

“Ladybug” BUMBLEBEE UNLIMITED “This song is really simple, but it’s also really happy.”

“Butter” A TRIBE CALLED QUEST “A Tribe Called Quest has really nice flow and really nice beats.”

An alumni’s easel BY POMBIE SILVERMAN

psilverman@wsspaper.com

As a West High student, Sophia Aley ’01 was heavily involved in the arts: she was a member of Wind Ensemble, Orchestra and was a three-year Drum Major of the Marching Band. Despite her love for music, Aley replaced her instrument with a paintbrush, becoming a professional artist at her studio, Grey Street Studio. In May 2011, Aley painted live at the Blue Note Jazz Club in Manhattan, New York, as a fellow improviser in free jazz sessions. In addition, she has received commissions in cities such as Chicago and Atlanta.

Aley began painting her senior year at Augustana College in Rock Island, Illinois, as a “conscientious attempt to balance the rigors of four jobs, a major in music performance on Horn, a minor in English Literature, [her] four-year post as Principal Horn of the Augustana Symphony Orchestra, intensive orchestral conducting study, along with performing in and conducting various other ensembles and being a board member of Augustana’s literary magazine, SAGA.” According to Aley, painting was “an exercise in relinquishing conscious control into the far greater reaches of spontaneous creative expression, similar to a jazz musician

improvising: free of planned structure, free from oppressive, negative thought-prejudice-utterly free to simply move and react with strokes and throws of paint.” Painting is not only a stress-reliever, but is a nice change of pace from Aley’s usual studies. “[Painting] is an ideal state of happy abandon to move into when I want to work,” Aley said. Aley is particular about her painting, only painting with the same seven shades of enamel bought from hardware stores and “mixed per the moment’s color needswhich I usually do not know until the moment I approach a blank canvas to work.”

In addition to materials, Aley is meticulous about the manner in which she paints. “I’ll then walk around the canvas [on the floor], throwing or spattering paint in fast, hard flings from plastic cups full of mixed paint or from brushes of various sizes,” she said. However, Aley is reluctant to add specific meaning to her pieces. “I’m happiest when [viewers] choose a painting’s orientation or entitle it themselves. That excites me and signals the true completion of a piece. My ego is wholly satiated by the very act of painting,” Aley said.

AGE IS HONORABLE, AND YOUTH IS NORBLE.- IRISH PROVERB } FEBRUARY 2013 A&E 15


ON ARTS {DESIGN BY POMBIE SILVERMAN}

PHOTO BY//FIONA ARMSTRONG-PAVLIK

THE

DANIAL SYED ’14

BY MEGUMI KITAMOTO

mkitamoto@wsspaper.com

Whether it was an essay, narrative or symposium, we’ve all had to write a formal paper at some point in our high school careers. Most students stick to solely assigned writing, it is rare to find a student that goes beyond writing for educational purposes, and even rarer for him to publish a work. That is, unless you are Danial Syed ’14. Syed’s 78-page science fiction novel, Time Forder, was published on Amazon.com. “I came up with the idea during ninth-grade Biology when we learned about cryptobiosis, which is where animals can go to sleep for long periods of time. I based this story off of a fairy tale [Rip Van Winkle], where there was a man who was sleeping under a tree for 20 years, except for it is in a science fiction setting,” Syed said.

This story is not Syed’s first writing experience. He began writing outside of school when he was in eighth grade. “My teacher [former Northwest Junior High language arts teacher Andrea Keech] encouraged me to publish my works very early on. She was a really big inspiration to me to write,” he said. According to Syed, finding a publisher was a difficult task. “The [publishing] industry is shrinking nowadays because of eBooks. My family used to tell me that is was pointless to write and [to] not do anything with it,” Syed said. Syed used Kindle Direct Publishing on Amazon, a program that allows writers to publish and sell a work via eBook stores, to publish his book. “[Kindle Direct Publishing] is a pretty simple process. I took the picture for the title page myself.

One of the great things about having an eBook is that it isn’t fixed and you are able to make changes to it,” Syed said. In his free time, Syed revises Time Forder with help from readers’ online reviews. To promote his book, Syed made his eBook for free for a limited period of time and posted summaries of his story on websites. According to Syed, lack of time because of involvement in extracurricular activities and too many ideas prevented him from writing as much as he wanted. However, he believes there are still many benefits to writing an eBook. “Even though education is becoming more multiple-choice based, I think that writing is an important skill to have, especially when you have to write essays for college,” Syed said. “For me, writing helps focus my thoughts and

16 A&E FEBRUARY 2013 { AN ENEMY WILL AGREE, BUT A FRIEND WILL ARGUE. -RUSSIAN PROVERB

it’s also really nice to see that I’m improving over time.” Syed believes his writing improved once he became a member of West High’s speech team. “When I first started [writing], all of my ideas came out, but they were very cluttered and preachy. Speech has definitely helped me write more concisely,” he said. Although Syed enjoys writing essays for school, he prefers writing specifically about his favorite genre. “I usually write science fiction and it is generally my go-to genre because it allows authors present their beliefs on how the universe works,” he said. As for future works, he is still at the planning stage. “ [I have] nothing specific yet, but I’ll just keep on writing,” Syed said.


A

Relative

Normal

It’s no question that diverse family structures have become common in the U.S. Whether it be parental divorce or having gay parents, it is inevitable that students at West are experiencing this societal trend firsthand. BY BLAKE OETTING boetting@wsspaper.com


PHOTOS BY//ABBIE SKEMP

F

lipping through old advertisements or perusing classic movies, there’s a clear pattern. Sitting around the dinner table, families have always graced media attention. The common stereotype shows dad, the symbol of stability and strength. Next to him is his beautiful wife, who concocts delicious meals while soothing the children and staring adoringly at her husband. Lastly, there are  two smiling, charmingly mischievous children playing together. The scene is joyous. This family has no troubles. The parents never bicker, the children stay in line and the table is always set when dad gets home from work. This scene is the idea of “family” that has been portrayed for generations. In 2013, however, the family portrait is painted much differently. With nine states legalizing gay marriage, divorce rates rising and the number of single-parent households increasing, it’s safe to say there is a new “normal” family. Many students at West have seen this this societal shift firsthand. The most noticeable change with the modern family is the   increasing divorce rate.   According to Marriages, Families & Intimate Relationships by Brian K. Williams, Stacey C. Sawyer and Carl M. Wahlstrom, “married adults now divorce two-and-a-half times as

often as adults did 20 years ago and four times as often as they did 50 years ago … between 40 percent and 60 percent of new marriages will eventually end in divorce. Perhaps 25 percent of children ages 16 and under live with a stepparent.” Jordan Wright ’13 has experienced this phenomenon and the effects it carries. “[My parents’ divorce] made me a lot more mature. When I was little I had to decide who to stay with; I had to set my priorities straight,” Wright said. Wright explained that she has not always had the luxury of choosing where she would like to stay.             “I was kicked out of my mom’s house. I live in my dad’s house in Cedar Rapids so each day I have to drive back and forth,” she said. However, her situation has shed some light on the importance of family, especially with her younger siblings. “I don’t act like [I’m my siblings’] mom, but I make sure that they’re getting along. I want them to know siblings are important,” Wright said. Despite her parents’ divorce and the separation it causes, Wright still feels a family unit is important. “It has made me realize that I have to care about my family because they don’t have to be there … I have


{DESIGN BY KATIE MONS} ALL ART BY//LEELA SATHYAPUTRI

to appreciate my family,” Wright family is from ... or even who they said. are,” Johnson said. According to Marriages, Families & A common challenge to single Intimate Relationships, the number parent families is the monetary of single-parent households have burden it can place on the family. also increased. Shabrina Johnson However, Johnson credits her ’14 has experienced this firsthand. mom for making this not an issue. Johnson lives with her mother “My mom is a daycare provider, and five sisters. Johnson’s family so we don’t have any financial composition is made more unique problems. She is one of those by the diverse background of the people who will prove you wrong. children: out of her five sisters, She went the extra mile to better three of them are adopted. The herself,” Johnson said. relatively large number of siblings, Despite her acceptance of her according to own family, Johnson, makes Johnson for a hectic, but does think fun, atmosphere When I look at my there are at home. some definite “There’s a lot family, I don’ t look advantages more people to having a . I to blame things at it as “traditional” on. But if you have a ... family that f a m i l y , need to talk sp e c i f i c a l ly to someone, so in having there’s always both male someone there. if [people] think it’s and female Also it makes abnormal that’s their role models. Thanksgiving But at the and Christmas problem.” same time, and all holidays -Shabrina Johnson ’14 she flouts the way more fun,” notion that Johnson said. her family is inferior to the familial Despite the atmosphere of a lively archetype. home, Johnson feels there are some “When I look at my family, I downsides to being adopted. don’t look at  it as abnormal. I have “When you have to figure out a mom that loves me and a family where you got certain traits, it’s that sticks together, so if [people] hard if you don’t know where your think it’s abnormal that’s their

abnormal

sticks together,

problem,” Johnson said. The number of gay parents has also risen over the past few decades. Nick Pearce ’13 has seen this societal trend develop. Pearce has lesbian parents. As a child, his parents split up and remarried. Pearce’s family now consists of he and his three siblings, and four mothers. “There’s the usual discrimination. And some people think even weirder things about it. Some think I automatically have a favorite. Some think breastfeeding from lesbians make you homosexual and some think one has to be the mom and one the dad. It’s like walking into a Chinese restaurant, looking at the two chopsticks and asking which one is the fork,” Pearce said. Despite the occasional critiques of his family, Pearce doesn’t see tremendous differences between his and others’ families, and believes his situation has helped his perspective on life. “It’s not that different from a normal family and it’s not like gay people are trying to ruin your way of life. You should just let them do their own thing. I was brought up to not judge people based on what they think or what they look like. I was brought up to be more sensitive to other people’s beliefs,” Pearce said.


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Student athletes share their stories on enrolling at a new school and their athletic experiences with a new team.


{DESIGN BY AILEEN NORRIS}

My view is the

priority of a

high school education should be centered on the quality

of the classroom teachers and

what students receive in those settings more than after school

programs.”

-Dr. Jerry Arganbright, Principal

A new team BY ALYSSA MCKEONE

amckeone@wsspaper.com

Making new friends. Beginning new classes. Joining a new team. Transferring schools is not a new concept. There are two different types of transferring. There is transferring between schools in the same district, where students must wait one calendar year before playing a varsity sport at their new school. The second option is open enrollment, where students transfer between districts for reasons such as academics, sports or moving to a new house. For open enrollment, students must wait 90 schools days to play a varsity sport. West High Principal Jerry Arganbright is not in favor of open enrollment for sports related reasons. “My view is the priority of a high

school education should be centered on the quality of the classroom teachers and what students receive in those settings more than after school programs. Our afterschool programs, including athletics are very important and essential to our school, but they are not the primary mission of our school, in my opinion. We have had students move to and from our school due to perceptions of the quality or opportunity within a certain sport. That is obviously their families’ call, but not one I would endorse or do for my own children,” said Arganbright. The number of students who leave the Iowa City Community School District (ICCSD) and those who enroll in the district fluctuates. According to an ICCSD report, during 2012 419 students left the ICCSD to attend another school in Iowa-while only 134 students

PHOTOS BY//FRANK WEIRICH

transferred to the ICCSD. The top three school that students open enroll to are Clear Creek Amana High School, Mid-Prairie High School and Solon High School. The report also showed survey results for the reasons why students left ICCSD. Of the 37 people surveyed, 16 students left because they believed another school was better. Other reasons included a change in family status and having friends or family in another district. Dalton Grell ’13 transferred from West High to West Branch High School during his junior year in order to get more playing time during football games. According to Grell, joining a new team is difficult. There are new coaches with different coaching styles and new plays to learn. “The naming system for the plays is really old. It’s the same one they’ve been using for 30 years,”

22 SPORTS FEBRUARY 2013 { ANGER IS AS A STONE CAST INTO A WASP’S NEST. -MALABAR PROVERB

Grell said. Academics is another change that transfer students notice. Students face new teachers with different expectations and new classes. According to Grell, there are “still AP classes offered, but [not as many] as West.They offer more Kirkwood classes so i take a combination of AP and Kirkwood classes.” Wrestler Kegan Wakefield ’13 noticed his athletic performance improve after he moved from the east side of Iowa City to a new home within West High boundaries. According to Wakefield, the social aspect of switching schools was difficult. “My friendship with city high friends started to fade though once I started getting friends on the west side. I still talk to them but not as much as I used to,” said Wakefield. Eventually Wakefield met new people.


“It was a little weird at first. It was building friends again,” Wakefield said. “I went to Fry Fest and met Sean Dempsey ’13. Then in the summer I met Shane Nicholson ’13 and Devin Deneve ’13. We hung out quite a bit in the summer. West wouldn’t be as fun for me without them and I’ve met -Dalton more and more friends through them.” Since the West High athletics policy has not been revised recently, Scott Kibby, West High Athletic Director plans to look over the athletic policy for open enrollment students. “If I were king, I’d be in favor of

changing that [90 days] to 180 days,” Kibby said. According to Kibby, changing the policy from 90 to 180 days would ensure that students do not open enrolling solely for sports. Although there are downfalls to beginning a new school, there are also many positive aspects. Students can get more time competing and and make new Grell ’13 friends. Grell likes his new friends and has discovered a new definition of a team. “We are more than a team. We are more of a family,” Grell said.

We are more than a team; we are more of a family.

FAR LEFT: Checking his form in the mirror, Dalton Grell ’13 resigns himself to another day in the lifting room. “I try to get in every day that I can,” Grell said. TOP: Defeating the opposing wrestler, Kegan Wakefield ’13 helped contribute to a large Trojan victory over City High. ABOVE LEFT: Showing off a full lift, Grell raises a two hundred pound bar over his head, proving that form is as important as strength. ABOVE RIGHT: Ready to get on the mat, Wakefield prepares for his match against his City opponent.

DO NOT LOOK WHERE YOU FELL, BUT WHERE YOU SLIPPED. -AFRICAN PROVERB } FEBRUARY 2013 SPORTS 23


24 FEBRAURY 2013


FEBRUARY 2013 25


NO SUBSTITUTE FOR VICTORY As is the West way, numerous athletes are nearing the end of successful seasons. The boys basketball team stands first in the state, with an undefeated record of 15-0, as of Jan. 28. The girls also have a nearly pristine history, at 13-4 overall. See if they can snag another win tonight at

home against Waterloo West. Trojan wrestlers have represented us exceptionally in meets, overtaking City at home Jan. 14. The State wrestling tournament begins Feb. 14 at the Wells Fargo Arena, so keep an eye out for headlines announcing victories. PHOTO BY//FRANK WEIRICH

JAN. 4

PHOTO BY//FRANK WEIRICH

TOP LEFT: Gliding through the air past Dubuque Senior players, Dondre Alexander ’13 eyes the basket as he sets up for a twopoint shot. ABOVE: West’s Jeremy Morgan runs though defenders on his way to the basket. LEFT: Fighting the crowd of defenders, Myzaeh Batie-Gaddie ’13 jumps for the basket.

PHOTO BY//FRANK WEIRICH

26 SPORTS FEBRUARY 2013 { EVERYONE IS KNEADED OUT OF THE SAME DOUGH BUT NOT BAKED IN THE SAME OVEN. - YIDDISH PROVERB


{DESIGN BY ERIN WEATHERS}

RIGHT: Pushing for a layup at the end of the first of two overtimes, Danielle Craig ’15 dominates her Cedar Rapids Prairie opponent. Craig contributed 17 points, the secondmost on the team, to the final score of 70-61. BELOW: Taking hold, Kegan Wakefield ’13 holds a City wrestler at bay.

PHOTO BY//ERIN WEATHERS PHOTO BY//FRANK WEIRICH

JAN. 14

JAN. 25

PHOTO BY//FRANK WEIRICH

ABOVE: A brief look at the overpowering Trojan wrestling skill that dominated City High on Jan. 10. RIGHT: During the second quarter, Mikaela Morgan ’15 fends off her guard. Morgan played a tough defensive game and scored 10 points for the Women of Troy Friday night.

PHOTO BY//ERIN WEATHERS

IF YOU BELIEVE EVERYTHING YOU READ, YOU HAD BETTER NOT READ. - JAPANESE PROVERB } FEBRUARY 2013 SPORTS 27


In the fast lane From avoiding food and water to drinking specific smoothies, “fasters� around the world choose to give up daily routines for very different reasons.The WSS followed up with some of them to examine the health implications of and reasons behind this form of cleansing. BY AMELIA MOSER

amoser@wsspaper.com


{DESIGN BY VELARCHANA SANTHANA}

F

ood, water and oxygen. The three most basic necessities for human survival. Giving up one, let alone two for any period of time is uncomfortable at best--and yet, many find it to be more than worth their while. For some people, fasting is a part of life. A variety of motivations exist to keep it so, ranging from religion to a desire to be healthier. Madeline Quint ’14 tried out a Dr. Oz diet that “consists of drinking smoothies made up of all of kinds of fruits and vegetables and flax seed … for three days, you don’t eat anything else.” Quint wanted to try the diet to “cleanse [her] body and get rid of all the bad toxins.” She explained that each smoothie from the diet has different ingredients, including ingredients such as flax seed, almond butter, spinach, banana, raspberries, lemon and water. Quint says she plans to use this method of cleansing once every three weeks. “I had so much more energy, my skin was clearer and I felt lighter on my feet. It also helps you lose weight,” she said. Despite giving up her diet, Quint says she was not hungry. “During the duration of the three-day diet I was never hungry for the ‘normal’ food,” she said. “The last day was the hardest because I knew I was going to eat ‘normal’ food again … but if I had just kept going on the diet longer … I would have been fine. The smoothies keep you full.” In addition to cleansing of physical toxins, many major religions participate for spiritual reasons as well.

“I choose to fast because it’s one of Siddig largely hasn’t noticed fastthe basic pillars of Islam. It helps me ing negatively affecting how she take time to reflect on myself and be feels. closer to God, especially during the “Obviously, you’re getting less month of Ramadan,” said Layla Sid- calories, but other than occasionally dig ’15. feeling thirsty, I feel fine,” she said. “Each day [of fasting] is different, “[Not drinking] is the most painful but this Ramadan, I tried to really part.” reflect on myself and become closer Having to avoid liquids becomes to God, since I’m not exactly the especially difficult when exercising, most religious person in the world Siddig explained. ... I would wake up, take a few mo“[Exercising on fasting days] defiments to think about a Panchero’s nitely makes you really thirsty, and burrito, then actually start my day. sometimes tired. On those days, I That consists of praying, … watch- just went home and slept until it was ing TV, thinking time to eat. I some more about know some good food and people who somewhere in just don’t fast there I read some because they of the Quran. do sports,” she Also, I sleep said. through the day Siddig said ... a lot ... which she feels betis something I ter physically shouldn’t do, and spiritubut it helps get ally after fastthrough the day,” ing. -Madeline Quint ’14 she said. “Right beIslam isn’t the fore sunrise, only religion that we wake up fasts--David Bernat ’14 gives up and eat a meal … so there is somefood and sometimes water for Yom thing that keeps you going for a Kippur. while. On the days where that meal “I feel … a cultural [and] tradi- is healthy, and then the meal I eat tional obligation to respect fasting,” at sunset is healthy, I feel better behe said. “[It puts] things in perspec- cause I’m not snacking on junk food tive.” throughout the day like I normally Bernat said he doesn’t exercise the do. Also, [fasting] is spiritually day of fasting, but he does play his cleansing. Specifically during Rainstruments. madan, fasting isn’t just not eating “At a certain point I start getting [or] drinking. A lot of that time is very tired … it’s interesting to expe- also spent doing things like reflecrience being hungry and continuing tion, more knowledge about my renot eating for a long time,” he said. ligion, and feeling closer [and] purer “My dinner is particularly good- to God. It’s sort of like a month to tasting after … I appreciate the food restart with certain things, and es[more].” tablish some new habits.”

I had so much more energy, my skin was clearer and I felt lighter on my feet.

NEVER CUT WHAT CAN BE UNTIED. -PORTUGUESE PROVERB } FEBRUARY 2013 HEALTH 29


PHOTOS BY//FRANNIE RIZZO

HYPED UP BY JORDAN ROSSEN jrossen@wsspaper.com

W

est students try everything from flash cards to lucky socks to get the grades and test scores they want. However, one method--the use of medications intended for the treatment of ADHD--is becoming increasingly popular, even among students that do not have the disorder. One study done by the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical IT FEELS LIKE I Center found that calls to poiNEED TO CHEAT son control TO DO AS WELL centers regardAS MY FRIENDS.” ing teen ADHD med use increased by 86 percent from 1998-2005. Medications such as Adderall, Ritalin and Focalin are stimulants used to calm nerves and prolong

“ BETTER WAYS TO FOCUS

It can be easier to focus with the right environment and mentality. If you are having trouble concentrating, pick a nice area to study that is both comfortable and quiet. Try studying in 50-10 minute increments; use 50 minutes to do your schoolwork, then use 10 minutes to think about whatever you want, check your phone or fuel up on some food.

attention spans. When ADHD drugs are taken by those who do not have the disorder, the effects are nearly the same. This creates enormous potential for abuse. Many drugs like Adderall are class II federally controlled substances, because they can lead to dependence. Some West students use ADHD drugs before big tests or to help them study for prolonged periods of time. “It is absolutely the only way I don’t fail half of my classes,” said Will*. “I didn’t realize what I was getting myself into when I signed up for classes, but Adderall really makes dealing with it a lot easier.” The side effects of ADHD medications depend on the specific drug, but some of the most common include loss of sleep and appetite, and increased body temperature and heart rate. According to the FDA, with excessive doses, the possibility of more serious consequences like hallucinations or stroke can occur. According to Harold Koplewicz, president of the Child Mind Institute, ADHD medications are not addictive when taken in correct doses. However, when taken

COMPILED BY//SHIRLEY WANG

30 HEALTH FEBRUARY 2013 { ONE GENERATION PLANTS THE TREES; ANOTHER GETS THE SHADE. -CHINESE PROVERB


{DESIGN BY SHIRLEY WANG}

ABUSE OF ADHD MEDICINE LOSS OF SLEEP LOSS OF APPETITE INCREASED BODY TEMPERATURE INCREASED HEART RATE POSSIBILITY OF STROKE AND HALLUCINATIONS

86% 10%

INCREASE IN CALLS TO THE POISON CONTROL CENTER REGARDING TEEN ADHD MEDICINE USE.

with higher frequency or in larger doses, users can build up a tolerance to the drug and rect, require more of it to experience the t h e same effects. frequency of Drugs such as Ritalin are not just prescriptions makes used for studying, however. Ritalin it extremely easy for some can be used as a “party drug” to de- students to find ADHD drugs. liver a high and help the user stay “It’s way easier to get than booze,” awake for longer periods of time. said Jessie. “None of my friends According to the Notre Dame Of- have a prescription for vodka or fice of Alcohol and Drug Educa- even the ability to legally get it, but tion, Ritalin can enable the user I have at least three friends who continue to drink past when they could easily get me Focalin.” normally would have passed out The unprescribed use does not and allow the consumption of un- stop outside West High. Accordsafe amounts of alcohol. ing to a study done by the National One factor that contributes to the Survey on Drug Use and Health, spread of ADHD drug abuse is the 15 percent of college ease with which the medications students have illegally can be obtained. According used Ritalin, Focalin or to a study done by the another stimulant in the U.S. Centers for I’M IN THE past year. Disease “It’s way more comMINORITY IF Control, mon than I thought it I DON’T USE nearly one would be,” said Julie*, THEM.” in ten Ameria West alumnus. “I had can children have a few friends in high been diagnosed school who used drugs with ADHD. Extensive controto study without a preversy surrounds the legitimacy of scription, but it feels these diagnoses, but whether or not like I’m in the minority if I don’t these diagnoses are medically cor- use them.”

PERCENT OF AMERICAN CHILDREN DIAGNOSED WITH ADHD.

One factor limiting the spread of these medications is the shame that surrounds them. “Telling people that you need [ADHD medications] to perform can be kind of embarrassing … It feels like I need to cheat to do as well as my friends,” Will said. To some, the idea of telling their friends is worse than telling their parents. “My parents don’t care at all. They just see it as me really being dedicated to my studies,” said another West student. One barrier to effective treatment of the problem is the question of responsibility. Many school districts shrug the problem off to who they see as the primary motivator, testing agencies like ACT and SAT, or to

those who are traditionally in charge of law enforcement. Ultimately, if action is to be taken to prevent this dangerous standoff then one of the players has to take responsibility. *names have been changed

PATIENCE IS BITTER BUT ITS FRUIT IS SWEET. -FRENCH PROVERB } FEBRUARY 2013 HEALTH 31


EDITORIAL: RpS DISTRESS

The ICCSD’s proposed new Revenue Purpose Statement will give the board the ability to make more plans for the future so that the District can continue to support the needs of the growing schools. However, the West Side Story editorial board decided that they do not support it, because it does not assure or promise the public that the proposed plans will actually happen. The WSS Editorial Board asked: in spite of its ambiguity, are you in support of the proposed RPS? The WSS voted against the proposal 10-6.

“ there’s BEEN SOME DIVISIVENESS. NORTH, SOUTH EAST and WEST AND IT’S BECAUSE THERE HAS BEEN

TOO MANY

NEEDS AND NOT ENOUGH

RESOURCES. STEVE MURLEY, SUPERINTENDENT

32 OPINION FEBURARY 2013

ith the vote for the new Revenue Purpose Statement (RPS) this Tuesday, many people seem conflicted, as well as confused about what exactly the RPS is and what it intends on doing. Others have pointed out that it seems almost too easy—as if it is too good to be true. In fact the RPS does have many positives, one example being its ability to allow the Iowa City Community School District (ICCSD) to make long-term plans, without increasing taxes. But nothing is perfect, and it is important to understand what it is before forming an opinion. Perhaps frustrating to some, the RPS does not say specifically what will be done with the money. The ICCSD has named possibilities for work to be done on the schools and the RPS gives the ICCSD the power to choose where to spend the money from taxes, instead of letting the state choose. It has its own limitations though. In 2007, Johnson county approved Iowa’s School Infrastructure Local Option (SILO) tax. Soon after, Secure an Advanced Vision for Education (SAVE) was passed, allowing for a one cent tax to be distributed to Iowa school districts. But the SILO funds can only be used for renovations, etc. As Superintendent Murley pointed when he spoke with the West Side Story staff, we are a growing district, which does come with many benefits, but also creates problems. The school district has been struggling to keep up with the growth in

w

student numbers, and thus, because so much money has been spent on buildings, spending on classroom resources has not been the focus. Murley explained that the District has gained 1000 students in five years, and will continue to gain at least 200 students per year for five more years. One of the benefits of having a growing district is that the ICCSD obtains more money from the state—each student is worth about $6,000—therefore the more students, the more dollars. However, because there are so many students and not enough classroom space and teachers, the school district has been building new facilities and has neglected to update older buildings in the area—for example, Longfellow is inaccessible for handicapped students and therefore needs an elevator. But putting an elevator into a building as old as Longfellow is about $800,000, and the District doesn’t have that kind of money at their fingertips at the moment. And so here is where the RPS would be able to help: The ICCSD has projected that they will collect $10 million per year from states sales tax for the next 17 years—do the math and that is $170 million. Were the RPS to pass, the school district would borrow $100 million in the form of a bond—this money could be put towards the various projects district-wide. Of course, there would be interest, but rates are low right now. Unfortunately, until spring, it will be difficult to prioritize the projects, because the district will not yet have

an analysis on the state of the buildings district-wide. But some of the main projects that proponents of the RPS say it will hopefully accomplish would be to put a new addition on Penn, add new seats on the Eastside by building new facilities, add an addition to North Central, and update the schools with air conditioning and new safety and security features. The last step would be building a new high school. While voting for the RPS does not guarantee that everything the district wants or needs will be completed, it allows the ICCSD greater flexibility in placing funds where they view them as being most needed. Finally, the vote on Feb. 5 will decide the fate of the RPS. Whether or not it passes will be up to the voters and will require the community to work together in the future no matter what. But without the RPS, it will be difficult to keep up with all of the projects needed in Iowa City because of the inability to make longterm plans.

2012-2013 Editorial Board Fiona Armstrong-Pavlik Olive Carrollhach Brenna Deerberg Ashton Duncan Zora Hurst Alyssa Mckeone Katie Mons Amelia Moser

Blake Oetting Jordan Rossen Pombie Silverman Juliann Skarda Abbie Skemp Shirley Wang Erin Weathers Frank Weirich


{DESIGN BY ASHTON DUNCAN}

REVENUE PURPOSE STATEMENT VISUAL REPRESENTATION COMPILED BY//ASHTON DUNCAN

THE PROJECTS REPRESENTED BELOW ARE THOSE PROPOSED BY THE “ONE DISTRICT FACILITY PLAN��� for TAX REVENUES Each circle represents $500,000

CURRENT BUILDING RENOVATIONS AND UPGRADEs $32,500,000

Multiple site acquisition costs $5,000,000

PENN ELEMENTARY ADDITION 7,500,000

NEW EAST IC ELEMENTARY 13,500,000 NEW NORTH LIBERTY ELEMENTARY 14,500,000

NEW EAST IC ELEMENTARY 13,500,000

END OF ESTIMATED BOND PROCEEDS [LOAN ON ANTICIPATED SALES TAX REVENUE] NORTH CENTRAL JUNIOR HIGH ADDITION 7,500,000

NEW HIGH SCHOOL/PROPERTY/DEMO AND FISCAL ANALYSIS $50,000,000

All estimates from Iowa City Community School District Calculation of Net Revenues Avaliable from SILO/SAVE

FEBRUARY 2013 OPINION 33


{DESIGN BY JORDAN ROSSEN}

A visit from Reagan BY PAUL CURRY

pcurry@wsspaper.com

O

n Jan. 16 President Barack Obama signed 23 executive orders aimed at stopping gun violence in the United States. Instantly, there was a large backlash to this proposed “fun-control” and Rand Paul (Ron Paul and Ayn Rand combined into the ultimate conservative lawmaker), proposed legislation shooting down the executive orders and protecting the right of Americans to defend themselves from 30 intruders a second. If you actually look at the

executive orders, none of them in any way “ban guns.” In fact, they just enforce rules that already exist (kind of the executive branch’s job). Originally, I was humored by the backlash, specifically the “Gun Appreciation Day,” which drew crowds of thousands and injured five. How dare the President nominate a director for the Bureau of Alcohol Firearms and Tobacco! No research is the best research! But today I had an epiphany. I was sitting on my couch playing video games after getting my wisdom teeth pulled out. I was wondering why so many people were adamant about guns, especially for hunting. “What’s the fun in shooting innocent creatures?” I said as I got a triple headshot kill in Call of Duty. But as I tossed my head pretentiously, a man caught my eye

in the mirror by the TV. I gasped. Ronald Reagan stared back at me through the looking glass. Before I could croak out a “Ronald!?” He reached through the glass and put a finger on my lips. “Paul, don’t fret, I’m not here to hurt you.” I had severely underestimated the sheer magnetism of Reagan. A shiver trickled down my spine and my bladder became deregulated. He explained to me through his soothing cowboy voice and frequent references to “a bear in the woods” that my trivialization of gun culture was the prime reason there was such a harsh reaction to Obama’s executive orders. “If gun-control advocates weren’t so patronizing about guns,” Reagan explained, “then perhaps there would not be such resistance

to very common-sense legislation”. Before I could say another word he vanished in a cloud of red, white, blue and magenta. So, me and other gun-control advocates sincerely apologize for our ignorance—we don’t want to do away with the second amendment, we want to stop gun violence. That’s why I’m founding the 501c3 NRA ANational Reasonable Arguments Association. Preconceived notions should be thrown out the window on both sides of the table. Rand Paul and Me-Paul need to stop being so paranoid of each other’s positions. Only then can we protect ourselves from an enemy that can’t be shot in the face: political division. Oh, and the doctor gives you pretty strong drugs when you get your wisdom teeth out.

In elementary school, I was a bookish thing that liked singing and coloring and playing freeze tag. The only thing I worried about was getting my shoes on the right feet, and even that could be shrugged off because unoccupied swings didn’t wait for untied laces. Unoccupied swings didn’t wait for anyone. Do you remember? Stress used to be a few seconds of regret at impatience because coloring in the lines was boring. Anger was throwing a kickball at a kid’s face for stepping on my glasses. Terror was the nanosecond before face-planting when realization struck: trying to run in ice skates was probably not the best idea. Hope was interpreting grass stains as small miracles, and seeing puppies in cloud formations.

Maybe I’m still that kid, beneath the pizza crusts and clementine peels and coffee grounds. Maybe we’re all still those kids, playing kickball, tying the arms of our windbreakers around our waists so we can scream-dash down yellow lines painted on fairly-fresh blacktop or poking at the exposed bodies of worms in order to make cute girls shriek. Maybe we’re all still fascinated with the dogwood trees at the end of the playground, wondering how their blossoms can be so beautiful and so malodorous. Maybe we never came back from the book fair and are still hoping our parents will get us spy kits, or that we’ll win raffles for bikes that we’ll outgrow in a few summers. Maybe life should never get more difficult than this choice: chocolate or strawberry milk. And maybe it never does.

Disenchantment BY ZORA HURST

zhurst@wsspaper.com

L

ately, I’ve been feeling sort of strange—like if I were to lie in the heart of a parking lot where cracks from once-frozen asphalt split like chapped skin, my brain would seep into the earth beneath. Formerly forest, this paved area is presently the abandoned storefront of a pathetic strip mall. This imbalance has come from plenty of things, all of them mundane. Lunches microwaved not-quite long enough become metaphors for half-assed projects 34 OPINION FEBRUARY 2013

and broken promises to hang out. It’s hard to enjoy made-fromscratch soup when it’s tainted by your own apathy when it comes to French grammar homework. I am too busy trying to draw meaning out of every moment of my life to even live it. These hypersensitive strings of time are when my anxiety reaches its zenith and my cup runneth over with discontent because: I haven’t learned to manage my time properly, I don’t drink enough water and I still don’t floss. Remembering a time before this one is an almost-impossible feat. Haven’t my dreams always centered around financial aid and oligopoly graphs? I used to be fun, posterity! I used to be cool. No, I didn’t have those all-white K-Swiss sneakers, but I had serenity. I had confidence.


HUMANS OF IOWA CITY

{DESIGN BY HANNAH MUELLERLEILE}

PHOTOS BY//FRANK WEIRICH

I

nspired by Brandon Stanton’s webproject “Humans of New York”, which seeks to give a brief glimpse into the lives of the strangers that make up New York City, the West Side Story braved the chilly streets of Iowa City to photograph the unique people that make Iowa City, well, Iowa City. BELOW: Bringing color to a dreary afternoon, Tom heads into the Iowa City Public Library.

ABOVE: Cold weather doesn’t keep Hello Kitty-clad Emily from heading out with her book. LEFT: Tuba player Wyatt goes to practice after being invited up to a music studio. FAR LEFT: Iowa City resident Scott takes the bus downtown for some afternoon shopping.


{DESIGN BY SHIRLEY WANG}

You sit in my Spanish class looking wonderfully cute. I don’t think you know I exist, but seeing you walk in makes my day a little better. I’d love to say something, except I can’t speak words to a girl as pretty as you. I saw you in the hallway and made eye contact. I thought it was true love, but then you blinked and my dreams were crushed. I’ll never love again, my heart has an irreparable scar that cannot be mended. Thanks a lot, “lover”.

Want to teach me some of your tennis/show choir skills? There’s nothing better than a cute blonde ... HMU. You woo me every afternoon with your green eyes, nun-chuck skills and endearing awkwardness. Hit me up and let’s watch Netflix documentaries sometime.

missed connections

submitted by west high students

I was looking at this girl in the hallway and I was like damn, girl got a donk. I always hope to see you in the halls, but when I do see you, I hide behind people, so you can’t see me. I don’t know if I don’t want to confront you, or if I just don’t want to confront myself. But I like your smile, and I think you are super cute. If only I actually had the guts to walk up to you and say ‘hi’ ... I fell for you the moment I saw you twerking in the hall outside my bio class. You screamed, “LOOK FOR THE GIRL WITH THE BROKEN SMILE!” and left. Let’s be friends?

We locked eyes from across the library. You were in the computer science lab and I was pretending to check out a book (but I was really checking you out ;) ) oovoo me if you want to light the flame of our love. I graduate in four months and will move across the country to different skies and different secret smiles, but the fact of the matter still remains: your mismatched socks are posh, and no one else can pull off that haircut. You’re the best-looking person I follow on Twitter. And that’s saying something, because I follow Kate Upton.


Feb. 1, 2013 issue