Page 1

June 2012 Demand weak and prices falling or under pressure, but production continues above last year’s levels

The Eurozone crisis continues, with piece‐meal solutions in Greece and Ireland being followed by a bail‐ out  for  Spanish  banks  in  early  June.  These  actions  do  not  appear  likely  to  solve  the  problem  permanently, while politicians and commentators around the world are citing weak economic growth in  Europe as a concern for their own regions. Thus business confidence throughout Europe is still poor and  is  likely  to  remain  so  for  some  months,  but  China  and  US  are  increasingly  affected.  The  euro  has  weakened sharply against the dollar after remaining at higher levels since the new year. This has recently  cut  the  level  of  imports  into  Europe  and  is  enabling  exports  from  European  producers  to  increase  in  some cases.    However, the economic situation in some other regions is better. In North America, economic data and  leading indicators have been more positive, with unemployment falling, and there are still hopes that  this election year will bring its usual good news for the US economy. This would fit with a boost in the  second half of the year, but some sectors such as automotive and energy are already doing better than  other steel‐using segments.     Economic growth in Asia is steady although the power‐houses of China and India are showing slower  growth than predicted for steel demand. Demand has held up for Q2, but sentiment is still cautious and  the third quarter is usually weaker. The Chinese economy has grown at a more modest rate in the first  half, but an interest rate cut in early June and anticipation that government spending has been held back  for the second half is giving some cause for optimism. Steel demand is less strong than a year ago, but  output  is  slightly  higher  year‐on‐year.  Some  sectors,  especially  construction,  still  have  some  improvement to make. Drawdown of Chinese inventories has been slower than at this time last year, so  stock levels are higher than preferred.      In US, flat products prices appear likely to continue slipping downwards as an attempt at increases by  some  producers  was  short‐lived.  In  Europe,  spot  flats  prices  could  keep  Con nued on Page 2     

Global Overview Pg 4

Coil Regional Review Pg 6

Long Product Review Pg 7

Plate Review Pg 8

Scrap Review Pg 8

Global Overview of Production Pg 9

The key question is will producers be driven to cut production levels if they are loss‐making between now and Au‐ gust or September, when the drop in actual demand over the summer may begin to be reversed.   

WEAK DEMAND FOR FLATS IN US WILL LEAD TO STEADILY FALLING PRICES IN JUNE AND EARLY IN Q3, WHILE EUROPEAN PRIC‐ ES COULD ALSO SLIP UNLESS SUPPLY‐DEMAND BALANCE IMPROVES. COIL PRICES IN ASIA ARE LIKELY TO WEAKEN SLOWLY.  LONG PRODUCTS’ PRICES ARE LIKELY TO DROP IN Q3 IN EUROPE AND US, IF SCRAP PRICING FALLS AND AFFECTS SENTIMENT.  ASIAN LONGS LEVELS COULD ALSO SLIP. SCRAP PRICES ARE LIKELY TO CONTINUE TO FALL BEFORE FINDING A NEW, STABLE  PRICE LEVEL FOR Q3.     

GMO Video 

Market Sen ment Survey 

Watch GMO Editor Mark  Wiggett expand on this  month’s forecast.     Visit  sbb.com/media/ to view  all the video reports 

Steel Price Outlook Expectations in May (For Next 3 Months) 66% Decrease

55% 47%

JSW Group’s  

26% No Change

33% 17%

Seshagiri Rao 

North America

Available soon!

Europe

8% Increase

Asia & Middle East

12%

view!

36% 0%

10%

Source: The Steel Index 

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

For more details visit www.sbb.com or call +44 20 7176 3800 

% of Respondents

www.thesteelindex.com

www.platts.com/SBB

© Copyright The Steel Index 2012

Copyright © 2012 by Platts, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Page 1


June 2012

slipping  during  the  rest  of  Q2  and  into  Q3,  though  mills  may  cut  back  output  to  ensure  it 

matches real  demand  until  after  the  summer  shutdowns.  Long  products  pricing  in  mature  markets  could  continue  to  be  stable  provided  production  levels  match  the  lukewarm  demand, but weakening scrap levels may drag prices down.      Asian prices may follow the weaker levels in other regions in what is a traditionally‐slower  quarter, but Chinese pricing may remain more stable, if second‐half demand increases and  stock‐levels are drawn down as production slows.      The Middle East markets for long products will be quiet for the next few months in the height  of summer and with Ramadan approaching. This will affect exporters from Turkey, putting  pressure on price levels, and may have an impact on scrap demand and pricing. Export prices  for  CIS  products,  both  flat  and  long,  have  slipped  after  recent  firmness,  but  demand  has  improved strongly in their domestic markets.      Scrap prices began falling during May except in USA where they remained surprisingly stable.  Prices  usually  drop  during  Q2  and  Q3  as  better  weather  leads  to  higher  collection,  but  international demand in Turkey, India and Asia which had been keeping export levels firm,  may now fall leaving US and Europe over‐supplied. Iron ore prices fell steadily during most of  May as Chinese buyers have been slow to return to the market to restock. Ore price levels are  likely to remain stable in the next few months if Chinese steel production remains at current  rates, though buyers may compare pricing with movements in the scrap market.      Looking ahead to the fourth quarter of 2012, producers in US and Europe will be trying to  push prices upwards if there is the anticipated rise in demand after the summer slowdowns.  In Asia, producers should be able to secure price rises from a firmer base level during Q3, as  offtake should improve and production levels are likely to have been brought back into line  with demand.        The likely scenarios for the next three months are:    •  US flats spot prices are likely to continue to weaken slightly but may find a bottom‐ level during Q3 and producers could attempt price increases by the end of the quarter. Real  demand is likely to be fair if the general economy improves but, unless production is cut, the  market could be weaker.      •  Northern European coil spot prices are likely to slip during June, as destocking ahead  of  the  summer  shutdowns  continues  but  import  levels  will  now  fall.  Several  mills  have  announced small increases in early June, which may be difficult to achieve until later in Q3. 

www.platts.com/SBB

    “The Middle East markets  for long products will be  quiet for the next few  months in the height of  summer and with  Ramadan approaching.  This will affect exporters  from Turkey, pu ng  pressure on price levels”          “In Asia, producers  should be able to secure  price rises from a firmer  base level during Q3, as  o ake should improve  and produc on levels are  likely to have been  brought back into line  with demand”           

Copyright © 2012 by Platts, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Page 2


June 2012

Output levels have decreased slightly in April and there will be some slowdowns in July and  August. If there are further production cuts in May and June, prices could remain more stable  as output matches actual demand.     •  Southern  European  flat  products  prices  could  continue  slipping  during  June  after  falling in May, but lower production levels could be more in line with the poor demand.  Spanish mills will cut output in July and Italian producers in August, so over‐supply may be  reduced. Prices are often stable during early Q3 as there are limited new transactions.   •  Prices  of  coils  into  Asia  have  fallen  steadily  during  May.  Sentiment  has  been  weakening in line with other regions, and demand normally eases during Q3. Prices are  likely  to  decrease  slightly  in  the  third  quarter,  especially  if  raw  materials  prices  are  weaker.   •  Domestic Chinese flats pricing has been steady during Q2, and demand is expected to  remain  fair  after  improving  from  end‐2011’s  poor  levels.  However,  output  has  been  very  strong so far this year, and stock levels are higher than in 2011. If there is an H2 stimulus,  prices could increase later in the year.   •  Long products’ pricing could fall in Europe and US during June, after recent weakness,  even if construction season demand is fair. Falling scrap prices could have a downwards effect  on sentiment and pricing. Prices in Asia have fallen slightly, in line with billet and scrap levels,  and are likely to weaken going into Q3.     •  The spot market for 63% iron ore fell further in early June after stabilising in late May,  with prices finishing the month at US$ 135‐136/dmt. Prices should become firmer again when  Chinese  buyers  need  to  restock.  Indian  problems  of  availability  and  shipping  during  the  monsoon will be less significant this year.   Iron ore quarterly contract costs for Q2‐to‐date, April to June, have fallen slightly from  •  Q1 levels but are still well above spot market levels. Two new exchanges or market places  began operation in May, which could also closely reflect the spot market.   •  Scrap prices began falling during May in most markets outside US as collection rates  rose while demand fell. This export demand had been strong but could now fall further, and  all prices fell sharply in early June. European domestic levels also weakened during May and  prices could be more stable in Euro terms even while falling in US dollars. Asian and Turkish  mills’  scrap  demand  may  ease  over  the  next  few  months,  if  steel  demand  slackens,  which  should  keep  prices  weak  and  mean  any  excess  material  remains  in  Europe  and  North  America.      •  Spot coking coal prices stabilised and rose briefly during May, as strikes and shipping  problems in Australia continued. Any increase in demand in the fourth quarter, after a quiet  Q3, could push prices upwards again.           WSA figures show that global output fell by 3.7 million tonnes (m t) in April compared with  March’s figure of 132.2m t. Daily production rose 0.5% as April is a shorter month. Chinese  monthly production was down slightly to 60.6m t, but this was a 1.6% increase in daily rate  from March’s output and the four‐month total shows a rise of 1.9% from last year’s output.  South Korean production for April was also higher on a daily basis. 

www.platts.com/SBB

“Spanish mills will cut  output in July and Italian  producers in August, so  over‐supply may be  reduced. Prices are o en  stable during early Q3 as  there are limited new  transac ons”          “Two new exchanges or  market places began  opera on in May, which  could also closely reflect  the spot market”          “WSA figures show that  global output fell by 3.7  million tonnes (m t) in  April compared with  March’s figure of 132.2m  t. Daily produc on rose  0.5% as April is a shorter  month”             

Copyright © 2012 by Platts, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Page 3


June 2012

Most regions showed a small increase in daily output, though actual EU‐27 production fell by  5.4%.  Daily  production  fell  in  Turkey  and  Russia,  but  increased  in  South  America.  North  America  and  other  Asian  countries  maintained  their  output  levels.  The  growth  in  global  production so far in 2012 is 0.7% above 2011, and the year‐to‐date total is 504 million tonnes.    GLOBAL OVERVIEW    US  flats spot prices moved steadily downwards  during May  a er  another  US$  30/st  announced increase failed to halt the slide in prices. Transac on levels will con nue  to  move  downwards  during  June.  Stockholder  demand  con nues  to  be  for  replacement  or  real  demand  as  destocking is likely to con nue un l  HR Coil US$/t  a er  the  summer  slowdowns.  End‐ user  o ake  may  then  improve  at  the  end  of  the  third  quarter,  if  the  general  economic  situa on  con nues to grow. In Europe, prices  have  fallen during  May,  but several  producers  have  announced  a  small  price  increase  to  try  to  push  levels  back  upwards  for  June.  O ake  is  s ll  fair  in  Asia,  but  flats  and  longs  prices  have  both  moved  steadily  downwards  during  May.  Sen ment  is s ll cau ous, and Q3 is typically a  slower  quarter  for  most  buyers.  Domes c  China  demand  for  flats  has  been  steady  during  May,  and  strong output has kept prices stable  but  under  pressure.  Inventories  have  not  been  drawn  down  as  Graph 1  quickly  as  at  the  start  of  Q2  last  year. Long products consump on is also not as strong as would be expected for Q2,  but prices rose sharply at the start of May before falling back again. Chinese export  prices have fallen  to match regional market levels.     In US, prices for coil products fell during May and prices were under further pressure at  the  start  of  June.  Produc on  levels  remained  high  in  April,  and  seem  likely  to  have  con nued during May, though the closure of RG Steel may show up later. Plate prices  weakened again, though less sharply than coils so far, while rebar producers kept prices  steady for most of the month before  European Coil Euro/t Ex-works reducing  levels  at  the  end  of  May  as  the  scrap  pricing  mechanism  dropped.     Prices  for  flat  steel  products  in  European  markets  fell  slightly  during  May.  Some  European  producers  have  announced a small price increase due to  higher  costs,  but  poor  apparent  demand may mean this will be difficult  to  achieve.  Stockholders  are  likely  to  continue  to  de‐stock  until  late  in  Q3.  Production levels have been cut slightly  in  April,  and  the  weakening  currency  and lower price levels are likely to mean  that  import  material  arrivals  will  decrease for the near future.     

    “Stockholder demand  con nues to be for  replacement or real  demand as destocking is  likely to con nue un l  a er the summer  slowdowns”          “Long products  consump on is also not  as strong as would be  expected for Q2, but  prices rose sharply at the  start of May before  falling back again”          “Some European  producers have  announced a small price  increase due to higher  costs, but poor apparent  demand may mean this  will be difficult to  achieve” 

Graph 2 

www.platts.com/SBB

Copyright © 2012 by Platts, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Page 4


June 2012

Prices for HR coil in Asia decreased, and CR and HDGalvanised coil prices also slipped by  similar  amounts  during  May.  They  are  all  expected  to  drop  further  as  offtake  is  likely  to  ease  during  Q3,  after  a  disappointing  Q2.  Flat  products  prices  in  China  decreased  at  the  start  of  the  month  but  then  rose  slightly  due  to  steady  demand.  Some  mills  have  announced  unchanged  list  prices  for  June,  which  may  help  to  support  the  spot  market.  Export  prices  for  flat  products  from  China  decreased  slightly  during  May  and  remain  competitive in regional markets.      Long products demand has remained fair so far in Q2 after the firmer first quarter in  the  mature  economies  of  Europe  and  US,  due  to  the  mild  weather.  Production  appears  to  have  matched  demand  so  prices  have  been  under  less  pressure,  but  lower  scrap  prices  may  change  that.  Prices  in  Europe  have  eased  during  May,  and  could  be  stable  at  best  in  June  as  falling  scrap  prices  affect  sentiment.  Rebar  producers  in  US  reduced  prices  at  the  end  of  May  based  on  the  scrap‐pricing  mechanism, and may have to  reduce prices again during  June. However, producers  will raise base prices so the fall will be less than the scrap mechanism would suggest.  Merchant bar and wire rod prices also fell in Europe during May, and could be under  further  pressure  in  the  next  few  months  unless  end‐user  demand  holds  up  despite  the holiday period.     Prices for H Beams, medium and heavy sections have been slightly weaker in Europe and  Asia, though US producers held US WF Beams transaction prices steady. However, all beam  prices are likely to weaken slightly in June.     In  US,  wire  rod  producers  saw  their  prices  slip  during  May,  as  lower  scrap  prices  and rising imports took effect, and are likely to see further falls in June. Merchant  bar  prices  in  US  were  slightly  Rebar $/t  lower  during  May,  and  could  slip  further in June.       Billet  prices  in  South  East  Asia  fell  sharply  lower  during  May  and  could  move  further  downwards  in  June  as  prices of export material from Turkey  and  CIS  weaken  as  demand  falls  in  other  export  markets,  especially  in  the  Middle  East  due  to  summer  and  Ramadan.       Imported prices of most finished long  products  into  SE  Asia  were  slightly  weaker  during  May,  and  may  slip  further  in  June  as  demand  falls  as  usual during the third quarter. Rebar,  wire rods and merchant bar prices all  decreased  slightly  during  May.  Graph 3  Domestic  prices  for  all  long  products  in  China  rose  initially  during  May  despite  stable  demand  as  activity  outside  the  social  housing programme remained lacklustre.      Scrap prices remained steady in US during May, despite falling markets elsewhere, as good  collection  rates  were  offset  by  strong  domestic  and  export  demand.  However,  import  prices into Turkey and Asia began to fall in mid‐May and this has continued into early June.  Prices  have  fallen  even  more  sharply  in  US  in  early  June,  so  the  decreases  are  now  equivalent.  Prices  in  Europe  could  drop  further  in  June  if  export  demand  remains  weak  while collection rates increase, though the effect may be smaller in Euro terms. Prices for  imported scrap into Asia could fall further even if demand is steady, while offtake drops in  other regions.    

www.platts.com/SBB

“Produc on appears to  have matched demand so  prices have been under  less pressure, but lower  scrap prices may change  that” 

“In US, wire rod  producers saw their  prices slip during May, as  lower scrap prices and  rising imports took effect,  and are likely to see  further falls in June” 

“import prices into Turkey  and Asia began to fall in  mid‐May and this has  con nued into early June.  Prices have fallen even  more sharply in US in  early June, so the  decreases are now  equivalent” 

Copyright © 2012 by Platts, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Page 5


June 2012

COIL REGIONAL REVIEW    Flat products spot prices in US dropped sharply during May, as a brief attempt to stabilise  levels  by  announcing  a  US$  30/short  ton  increase  failed.  Buyers  are  only  making  necessary purchases as they anticipate lower prices ahead, especially while future supply  levels  appear  likely  to  be  plentiful.  Flats  prices  moved  lower  in  northern  Europe,  especially for HR coil, as buyers waited for Q3 announcements while noting that demand  was showing weakness from early May onwards. Levels in southern Europe finished the  month  slightly  lower  as  prices  had  fallen  earlier,  even  though  market  sentiment  remained poor. Prices in Asia also fell during May, as buyers took a cautious view on a  quarter that has not been as strong as usual.    HR Coil prices in US fell on a weekly basis totalling US$ 35/st to US$ 635‐645/st (US$ 700‐ 711/t) at the end of May. Prices are likely to continue to fall in June unless the producers  can convince the market that the bottom has been reached. CR coil prices also dropped by  US$ 40/st, ending May at US$ 735‐755/st (US$ 810‐832/t). HD Galvanised coil was also US$  35/st  lower  at  US$  795‐805/st  (US$  877‐888/t),  though  the  steady  automotive  sector  should  soon  give  these  prices  some  support.  Import  volumes  for  most  products  have  increased sharply, as bookings were made when earlier price levels were more attractive,  but these could begin to slow soon. Mill production rates continued at high levels during  April, and there are no signs  of any slowdown in output in May, though June may show  some decreases.     Flat  products  producers  in  northern  Europe  have  seen  spot  levels  move  steadily  downwards during May, and may slip further. The weakness continued into early June, but  several producers announced small increases and it remains to be seen whether buyers will  accept these new levels. It is likely that prices will hold steadier with few transactions as  actual demand is likely to be poor until September. If destocking has been successful ahead  of the summer shutdowns, apparent demand may improve. Daily production fell in April  and this may be continued in the rest of Q2.    In  northern  Europe,  HR  Coils  prices  fell  to  Eur  500‐525/t  (US$  625‐656/t),  while  CR  Coils  also decreased more slowly to Eur 590‐615/t (US$ 737‐768/t). HD Galvanised base prices  dropped  to  Eur  580‐610/t  (US$  724‐762/t),  but  there  may  be  more  strength  in  CR  and  HDGalvanised coil prices in Q3.    Southern European coil prices slipped slightly during May, having been more stable since  February  and  not  achieved  the  higher  levels  as  in  the  north.  Demand  remains  at  low  levels,  especially  for  a  second  quarter,  and  destocking  is  already  taking  place.  Some  production is being cut, and Spain will  have  the  earliest  holidays  in  July.  HRC $/t  There  is  also  no  sign  of  any  end‐user  offtake  improvement  before  the  summer  slowdowns.  HR  Coil  prices  are  now  at  Eur  510‐520/t  (US$  637‐ 649/t)  and  these  prices  are  likely  to  slip  further  in  June,  though  falling  import  volumes  could  help  price  levels.  Prices  for  CR  Coil  were  slightly  lower at Eur 580‐610/t (US$ 724‐762/ t)  while  HDGalvanised  coil  base  price  was also down to Eur 560‐600/t (US$  699‐749/t).     South East Asian HR coil prices moved  lower  during  May  to  US$  635‐660/t  cfr,  and  they  may  drop  slightly  during  June  if  demand  eases  and  supply  continues at high levels. Latest Chinese  Graph 4 

www.platts.com/SBB

Coil Price Outlook  Products (HRC) 

May

Jun*

Brazil dom. Del. BRL/t 

1970-2030 2049-2110 

China dom. Shanghai RMB/t

4090-4270 4150-4160 

China export FOB $/t

620-625

605-615

E. Asia import CFR $/t

635-665

620-650

Eur import CIF S.Eur pt €/t

500-550

500-530

60-60

60-60

Middle East imp CFR $/t

660-720

600-650

N.America dom FOB $/s.ton

635-680

625-645

N.Euro dom Ex-Works €/t

500-545

500-535

Rus Blk Sea export FOB $/t

580-620

565-585

S.Euro dom Ex-Works €/t

510-525

495-525

Ukr Blk Sea export FOB $/t

560-605

560-565

May

Jun*

Jap dom FOT ¥/kg

Products (CRC)  Brazil dom. Del. BRL/t 

2560-2570 2682-2700 

China dom. Shanghai RMB/t

4730-4930 4700-4800 

China export FOB $/t

675-680

675-680

E. Asia import CFR $/t

700-750

690-740

Eur import CIF S.Eur pt €/t

575-595

570-590

N.America dom FOB $/s.ton

735-795

725-755

N.Euro dom Ex-Works €/t

590-630

580-615

Rus Blk Sea export FOB $/t

680-740

650-690

S.Euro dom Ex-Works €/t

580-610

570-600

Ukr Blk Sea export FOB $/t

670-680

670-680

May

Jun*

Products (HDG)  China dom. Shanghai RMB/t 

4920-5000 4920-5000 

China export FOB $/t

700-710

700-710

E. Asia import CFR $/t

760-810

750-800

Eur import CIF S.Eur pt €/t

580-600

570-590

Mid E. import CFR $/t

800-900

790-840

N.America dom FOB $/s.ton

795-840

785-805

N.Europe dom Ex-Works €/t

580-630

570-600

S.Europe dom Ex-Works €/t

560-620

550-590

*Prices listed are SBB forecasts 

Copyright © 2012 by Platts, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Page 6


June 2012

export prices for HR coil have also fallen to US$ 620‐625/t fob, which followed the SE Asian  market levels downwards, but sales have been more difficult to achieve recently. CR coil  and HD Galvanised prices in SE Asia both fell US$ 10/t during May to US$ 700‐750/t and  US$ 760‐810/t cfr, and they are likely to decrease slightly in June.       LONG PRODUCTS REGIONAL REVIEW     Rebar  prices  moved  lower  during  May  in  all  the  key  regions.  Prices  in  Asia  moved  downwards  by  US$  30/tonne  and  were  steady  for  most  of  the  month  in  US  before  dropping sharply at the end of May driven by lower scrap pricing. Rebar prices in Europe  also fell by Eur 10/t during May. Construction industry activity should remain steady, at  what should be the height of the season, and prices will be nearly stable if production  continues to be well‐matched to real demand in the mature markets. European prices for  merchant bar were sharply lower in May, and are likely to be weaker during June. In Asia,  H Beam, merchant bar and wire rods price levels were slightly lower in May, and are also  likely to weaken.    Medium and heavy sections prices in Europe declined during May, with prices down to Eur  590‐620/t (US$ 737‐774/t), and levels are expected to weaken further in June. SE Asian H‐ Beam price levels rose early in May but then slipped back to US$ 810‐820/t cfr. Prices of  WF  Beams  in  US  were  unchanged  at  US$  790‐820/st  (US$  871‐904/t)  Wire Rod $/t  during  May,  but  prices  will  be  under  pressure  from  falling  scrap  levels  during June.      Wire rod pricing in US slipped in May  to US$ 740‐760/st (US$ 816‐838/t) as  scrap  prices  fell  and  rising  imports  helped  to  push  pricing  lower.  Rebar  prices in US were steady for most of  the month before falling to US$ 695‐ 715/st (US$ 756‐789/t) at the end of  May.  Mills  will  be  aiming  to  offset  some  of  the  imminent  scrap  price  decreases  by  increasing  base  prices,  as  demand  should  con nue  to  be  fair.     Rebar prices in Europe fell back slightly  Graph 5  during  May  and  finished  at  Eur  520‐ 540/t  (US$  649‐674/t),  and  could  slip  in  June  if  scrap  levels  fall  further.  Wire  rod  prices  slipped slightly during May to Eur 520‐540/t (US$ 649‐674/t), and may struggle to remain  stable as end‐user demand eases during the summer.      Rebar prices in SE Asia ended the month US$ 30/t lower at US$ 610‐650/t cfr. Import price  levels for merchant bars decreased by US$ 10/t to US$ 770‐790/t cfr. Imported wire rod  prices into SE Asia were also slightly lower at US$ 650‐660/t cfr, and are likely to slip further  in June.      Billet prices continued their decline from the end of March and fell US$ 30/t during May in  SE  Asia,  and  finished  the  month  at  US$  630‐650/t  cfr.  Export  prices  for  CIS  and  Turkish  material  have  also  fallen  steadily  during  May  once  the  US$  600/t  fob  level  had  been  breached on the downside, finishing at US$ 565‐585/t fob. CIS billet producers will try to  return prices upwards if Asian demand is fair, but there are fewer buyers in other regions  competing for this material, especially as Ramadan approaches and reduces demand in the  Middle East.      

www.platts.com/SBB

Longs Price Outlook  Products (Debar/Rebar) 

May

Jun*

Turkey export FOB $/t 

640-670

620-650

Blk sea export FOB $/t 

620-660

615-630

E. Asia import CFR $/t 

610-680

610-640

3940-4140

3910-3930

Eur dom del €/t 

520-545

515-540

Eur import CIF S.Eur pt €/t 

510-520

490-510

China dom. Shanghai RMB/t 

55-55

55-55

Mid E. import CFR $/t 

670-680

670-675

N.America dom FOB $/s.ton 

695-725

695-715

Products (Beams /Sections) 

May

Jun*

E Asia import CFR $/t 

820-830

810-820

Eur dom del €/t 

590-640

580-620

Jap dom FOT ¥/kg 

Jap dom FOT ¥/kg  N.America dom FOB $/s.ton  Products (Merchant Bar) 

73-73

73-73

790-820

790-820

May

Jun*

4300-4300

4190-4200

E Asia import CFR $/t 

770-790

770-790

Eur dom del €/t 

550-620

540-580

N.America dom FOB $/s.ton 

890-920

890-920

China dom. Shanghai RMB/t 

Products (Wire Rod)  Blk sea export FOB $/t 

May

Jun*

630-670

630-650

4220-4230

4000-4010

E Asia import CFR $/t 

650-660

640-660

Eur dom del €/t 

520-540

515-540

Eur import CIF S.Eur pt €/t 

530-540

520-530

N.America dom FOB $/s.ton 

740-780

740-760

China dom. Shanghai RMB/t 

*Prices listed are SBB forecasts 

Copyright © 2012 by Platts, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Page 7


June 2012

COMMODITY PLATE REVIEW    Plate prices fell in all regions during May. Prices dropped slightly in northern and southern  Europe in Euro terms during May, and decreased steadily in Asia. Prices fell more heavily in  US but may hold steady at this lower level. Chinese export prices have also eased slightly in  line  with  lower  Asian  market  levels,  and  prices  are  expected  to  drop  Plate $/t  further in June.     Plate  prices  decreased  continually  in  northern  Europe  by  Eur  30/t  and  transaction prices are in the range Eur  580‐600/t  (US$  724‐749/t),  and  they  could  slip  further  in  June.  Stockists’  inventories are reported to be back to  normal  levels,  which  is  higher  than  intended  ahead  of  the  summer  shutdowns,  but  end‐user  demand  could  be  fair  during  the  third  quarter.  Hence prices are likely to be weak even  if output matches actual demand.     Southern  European  commodity  plate  producers  also  saw  spot  price  levels  drop  by  Eur  30/t  during  May,  due  to  Graph 6  weak  demand  in  the  key  markets  of  Italy  and  Spain.  Current  levels  are  at  Eur  550‐570/t  (US$  687‐712/t),  and  these  may  slip  further in the next few months although exports could increase.      In USA, commodity plate prices have been under pressure since the start of May, as demand  appeared  to  drop.  This  was  due  to  concerns  about  high  production  rates  and  the  level  of  imports, which have been rising. Inventory levels appear to be slightly higher than normal, but  firm end‐user demand has not absorbed current production levels. Prices fell back by US$ 40/ st  and  were  at  US$  880‐900/st  (US$  970‐992/t)  at  the  end  of  May,  and  may  now  have  reached a plateau for Q3.     In  SE  Asia,  prices  for  commodity  plate  dropped  to  US$  640‐660/t  cfr,  and  are  expected  to  decrease further in June as demand is unlikely to improve. Export prices of Chinese material  have also fallen sharply by US$ 35/t to US$ 610‐620/t fob, so as to remain competitive in the  Asian region.      SCRAP AND RAW MATERIALS REVIEW    Scrap prices have been falling in most regions during the second half of May except North  America, where prices remained fairly stable. However, prices are falling sharply in US at  the start of June, and continuing to drop elsewhere. The normal improved availability, due  to  the  better  weather  in  both  Europe  and  North  America,  had  been  absorbed  by  steady  export demand and prices. Later in May, export demand began to slow and prices began  falling steadily. Lower US export prices due to the reduced import demand from Turkey and  Asia  will  continue  to  drag  domestic  prices  downwards.  Ramadan  and  slower  summer  activity will restrict Turkish demand for the next few months.      Northern  European  scrap  price  levels  in  euros  slipped  during  May,  which  meant  an  even  sharper decrease in dollar terms. Scrap prices in southern Europe increased slightly early in  May, taking them above levels in the north, but then dropped more sharply at the start of  June.  Price  levels  in  SE  Asia  dropped  steadily  during  May,  and  are  likely  to  continue  to  be  weak in June as demand from importers falls.   

www.platts.com/SBB

Plate Price Outlook  May 

Jun*

4150-4200

4040-4070

CIS export FOB  $/t 

620-680

n/a

N.Europe dom Ex‐Works €/t 

580-630

570-600

S.Europe dom Ex‐Works €/t 

550-600

545-570

Eur import CIF S.Eur pt €/t 

535-560

535-555

E. Asia import CFR $/t 

640-660

640-660

N.America dom FOB $/s.ton 

880-900

880-900

China export FOB $/t 

610-620

610-620

Products China dom. Shanghai RMB/t 

*Prices listed are SBB forecasts  

          “The normal improved  availability, due to the  be er weather in both  Europe and North  America, had been  absorbed by steady  export demand and  prices”               “Price levels in SE Asia  dropped steadily during  May, and are likely to  con nue to be weak in  June as demand from  importers falls”          

Copyright © 2012 by Platts, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Page 8


June 2012

Domestic scrap  prices  in  US  for  No  1  Bundles  and  Bushelling  were  slightly  weaker during May at US$ 440‐445/lt, after  falling  US$  5/lt  from  April’s  levels.  Shredded scrap was also lower during May  at  US$  420‐425/lt,  after  losing  US$  15/lt  since  March.  Both  prices  fell  US$  45‐65/lt  in early June.     In northern Europe, shredded scrap prices  fell  Eur  5‐10/t  from  April’s  levels  and  finished  May  at  Eur  305‐320/t  (US$  381‐ 400/t).  Prices  in  southern  Europe  rose  slightly before easing to Eur 320‐340/t (US$  400‐425/t). Export prices of shredded scrap  from  Europe  increased  by  US$  5/t  to  US$  410‐415/t  fob  before  dropping  in  the  Graph 7  second  half  of  the  month,  and  may  continue  to  drop  further  later  in  June  after  falling  sharply  at  the  start  of  the  month  as  overseas pricing continues to weaken.     Scrap prices in Asia also fell steadily during  Raw Materials US$/mt  May to US$ 440‐445/t cfr for HMS 1/2, and  prices have continued to drop in early June.    Spot  iron  ore  prices  fell  steadily  during  most of May, losing US$ 12/dmt as Chinese  buyers  still  remained  out  of  the  market  despite  appearing  to  need  to  restock.  Prices  have  dropped  back  again  in  early  June  but  may  then  move  higher  if  more  Chinese  mills  come  back  to  restock  while  their  steel  output  continues  to  run  faster  than  last year. Indian  supply offers  will  be  fewer as the monsoon takes effect, though  demand  for  these  products  has  declined.  More  miners  and  customers  in  China  are  agreeing current‐quarter, current‐month or  Graph 8  weekly pricing periods which should closely  follow  the  spot  market.  For  May,  spot  prices  finished  below  the  current‐quarter‐to‐date’s  level  and  the  monthly  average,  and  this  situation  may  put  pressure  on  the  system  unless  prices keep firming.       The spot market for Indian origin material 63% Fe iron ore fell during May, starting at US$ 147 ‐153/dmt and dropping to US$ 135‐136/dmt cfr.     Coking  coal  contract  prices  for  the  next  quarter  have  firmed  slightly,  as  spot  prices  have  rebounded  upwards  to  US$  215‐225/t  fob  Australia  at  the  end  of  May.  A  strike  and  bad  weather have recently affected East coast Australian operations, and spot prices are likely to  continue to be firmer in the short‐term. However, any decline in demand in Q3 could mean  that this price rise is reversed for the next quarter.        GLOBAL OVERVIEW OF PRODUCTION    The  monthly  production  figures  from  WSA  show  that  April’s  global  production  was  3.6  million tonnes less than in March. April is a shorter month, so its actual tonnage calculates  to a 0.5% increase in daily output rate compared with March. The monthly output was 1.2%  higher than April 2011. World monthly production in April was 128.4 million tonnes, which 

Scrap US$/t 

www.platts.com/SBB

“Export prices of  shredded scrap from  Europe increased by US$  5/t to US$ 410‐415/t fob  before dropping in the  second half of the month,  and may con nue to  drop further”        “Prices have dropped  back again in early June  but may then move  higher if more Chinese  mills come back to  restock while their steel  output con nues to run  faster than last year”            “World monthly  produc on in April was  128.4 million tonnes,  which means that the  four‐month global output  total is 504 million  tonnes, 0.7% above  2011’s level” 

Copyright © 2012 by Platts, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Page 9


June 2012

means that  the  four‐month  global  output  total  is  504  million  tonnes,  0.7%  above  2011’s  level.     European  actual  production  fell  sharply  month‐on‐month  by  5.4%  ‐  2.2%  lower  on  a  daily  basis ‐ while total Asian output decreased by 1.6 million tonnes. Most other regions showed  steady  daily  output,  but  Crude Steel Output (thousand tonnes)  production  was  slower  in  Turkey and Russia.   Feb 2012  Mar 2012  Apr 2012         EU27  output  of  14.9  million  26,110  28,445  26,995  Europe  tonnes  in  April  was  850,000  14,142  15,736  14,884  - EU 27  tonnes  lower  than  in March.  There were sharp declines in  2,904  3,344  3,111  - Other Europe  output  in  France,  Germany,  Italy and Spain.     9,064  9,365  9,000  - CIS    10,191  10,781  10,425  N America  In  Other  Europe,  Turkey’s  monthly  output  fell  sharply  7,544  7,961  7,705  - USA  to 2.9 million tonnes, a fall of  nearly  8%  from  March.  The  3,856  4,250  4,129  S America  total  CIS  output  was  3.9%  lower  than  in  March,  with  1,202*  1,299*  1,260*  Africa  Russian  production  falling  1,661*  1,625*  1,559*  Middle East  4.4%  and  Ukraine  maintaining  unchanged  daily  77,353  85,059  83,459  Asia  production levels.     55,883  61,581  60,575  - China  US  output  was  7.7  million  548  575  550  Oceania  tonnes  in  April,  which  was  3.2%  lower  than  March’s  120,922*  132,033*  128,376*  World Total  revised  figure.  South  Source: WSA                                                      * 3 countries’ data re‐instated  American  output  was  0.12  million tonnes below March’s  level at 4.1 million tonnes, a 0.4% increase in the daily rate. Brazilian production was 2.7%  lower at 3 million tonnes.    China’s  monthly  output  of  60.6  million  tonnes  was  1.6%  lower  than  March’s  figure.  April’s  production  is  an  increase  of  2.6%  on  April  2011’s  output.  India’s  monthly  production  was  estimated as 3.2% lower at 6 million tonnes. Japan’s output was 2.7% below March’s level,  and South Korea’s production was 1.4% lower compared to the previous month at 6 million  tonnes. Taiwan’s estimated production fell by 3% to 1.8 million tonnes. Their combined total  output  is  around  16.9  million  tonnes,  which  is  a  4.3%  increase  from  the  joint  monthly  production level achieved in April 2011.     The Asian countries’ total production of 83.5 million tonnes was an increase of 3% from April  2011. This region accounted for 65% of global production in April, consistent with figures for  recent months.     World output excluding China was 67.8 million tonnes in April. World output excluding China  for the four months to date is 270 million tonnes, compared to 270.6 million tonnes in 2011, a  decrease of 0.2%. 

                 

Enquiries Call:   UK: +44 (0)20 7176 3800   USA: +1 (412) 431 4370   Brazil: +55 (0)11 3371 5755  Dubai: +971 4 454 8700   Singapore: +65 6227 7811 

www.platts.com/SBB

Email: General:  info.metals@platts.com  Marketing:  marketing@sbb.com  Editorial: editorial@sbb.com 

Copyright © 2012 by Platts, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Page 10

Platts  

platts market

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you