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Vol. 11, No. 1 , 2021

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contents Vol. 10, No. 4 2020

DEPARTMENTS 12 EDUCATION

USJ hosts Virtual Learning Series

34

WEDDINGS Begley/Glasgow s

39

WINE To cork or cap?

42

CHAMBER NOTES All Networking is Global

20 GARDENING

Planning for spring

22

MEN’S FASHION Organize your closet

24

WOMEN’S FASHION Virtual Styling

30 FINANCE

How our biases affect financial decisions

Pictured on the cover, windows at the old greenhouse at Elizabeth Park by art photographer Lanny Nagler. See page 47

FEATURES 15

TRAVEL TULIP TIME IN THE NETHERLANDS

27 SPORTS

UNDERSTANDING THE SCIENCE OF GOLF

32

8

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PEOPLE RUTHIE FIERBERG’S WHY WE THEATER PODCAST

Vol. 11, No.1, 2021 west hartford magazine


FROM THE PUBLISHER

Digital issues? Dear Readers,

W

e hope this issue finds you, your family, friends and colleagues safe and well. Many have asked why our beloved magazine is no longer printed and mailed to homes via snail mail. Initially, we went digital because the pandemic sidelined our printer and it was the only way of ensuring that WeHa Magazine reached all of our readers. Soon, however, we found that publishing a digital magazine enabled readers to share, share, share and share some more, all the feature stories and columns they found interesting or informative. As for our advertisers, going digital extended their reach into the marketplace by leaps and bounds almost instantaneously. And by leaps and bounds, what we mean is our reach grew almost overnight from 7,000 to nearly one million. That’s right – nearly one million! And so, we came to an obvious conclusion: Digital simply works better! It works better for our readers; it works better for our advertisers; and it’s here to stay.

We look forward to continually enhancing our reach. One way we’re doing that is through programs like the UNIVERSITY OF SAINT JOSEPH VIRTUAL LEARNING SERIES, which is featured on page 12 of this issue. Another example is WeHaCal.com, which was launched in June of 2020. This comprehensive calendar of communitywide events serving West Hartford and its surrounding areas is the he first of its kind in West Hartford. Today, the site averages 20,000 monthly visitors. We welcome you (if you haven’t already) to join us! Facebook  West Hartford Magazine We-Ha.com Twitter @westhartfordmag @wehartford Instagram @westhartfordite Hashtags #wehaevents #bestofweha #weha #westhartford #wehahacomedy LinkedIn #wehaevents #2020Media

The 20/20 Media team thanks you all for your support over the course of the last year. By working together, we have and will get through this together. My favorite motto continues to be … as a TEAM –Together Everyone Achieves More! We do hope you’ll join us in doing one random act of kindness each and every day and make this a better place – both in West Hartford and around the world – for all of us to enjoy and live in!

Thomas P. Hickey, Publisher tomh@westhartfordmagazine.com

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Dedicated to Service for over 50 years

WeHa Publisher Tom Hickey Associate Publisher Leslie Iarusso Editor in Chief Judie Jacobson Sales and Marketing Director Donna Edelstein Creative Director Elisa S. Wagner Digital Media Manager Hillary Sarrasin Graphic Designer Chris Bonito Accounts Manager Judy Yung Proofreader Tim Knecht Office Manager Howard Meyerowitz

Providing our community with the BEST possible service in their time of need. 1084 New Britain Ave. West Hartford 860.561.3800 | www.sheehanhilbornbreen.com

Contributing Writers & Columnists: Matt Banever, Chris Conway, Karla Dalley, Stacey Dresner, Karen Herbert, Garrett Hickey , Barbara Karsky, Robert Laraia, Lisa Martin, Ertan Seyyar Sener Photography Todd Fairchild/Shutterbug CT Publishing Partner Ledger Publications Websites: We-Ha.com, WestHartfordMagazine.com, Wehawheels.com, JewishLedger.com, 20Media20.com, wehacal.com Mike Roy/Roy Web Design Principals Thomas P. Hickey II James H. Gould III

40 Woodland St., Hartford, CT 06105 westhartfordmagazine.com office: 860.508.4032 West Hartford Magazine is published by 20/20 Media. To subscribe, renew or change address write: West Hartford Magazine, PO Box 271835, West Hartford, CT 06127; www.we-ha.com/subscribe. ADVERTISING: 860-508-4032. ©20/20 WHMedia, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without express permission of the publisher. West Hartford Magazine is a registered trademark owned by WHMedia, Inc. The opinions expressed by writers published by West Hartford Magazine are not necessarily those of the magazine.

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Follow us on Social Media: Facebook  West Hartford Magazine We-Ha.com Twitter @westhartfordmag @wehartford Instagram @westhartfordite Hashtags #wehaevents #bestofweha #weha #westhartford #wehahacomedy

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Kathy Binder & Kathy Fishman, Co-Chairs


EDUCATION PROFESSIONALLY SPEAKING THE UNIVERSITY OF SAINT JOSEPH AND 20/20MEDIA TEAM UP TO TALK ABOUT TRENDS IN TOMORROW’S JOB MARKET

Not too long ago, the creative team at the new cutting-edge marketing company, 20/20Media, and the marketing team at the University of Saint Joseph (USJ) put their heads together to brainstorm ways in which to sidestep the constraints created by the pandemic, in order to get the word out about the professional opportunities that have arisen from some of today’s pressing issues. Their solution: “The USJ Virtual Learning Series,” an innovative quarterly program that casts a spotlight on pressing issues confronting our nation and our neighborhoods today. Hosted by USJ and 20/20Media, Virtual Learning Series programs are free of charge and hosted by the University of Saint Joseph, co-sponsored by USJ and 20/20Media.

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“The goal of the series is to offer the public an accessible pathway to in-demand career opportunities, and discuss the innovative educational programs that are sustaining our future workforce,” remarked USJ President Rhona Free. Launched in December, the first program in the USJ Virtual Learning Series focused on — what else? — COVID-19 and Getting Into The Healthcare Workforce. Specifically, a panel of experts addressed the burgeoning need for a broad range of health-related professionals. Nationally recognized as a leader in educating students in a broad range of health care careers, USJ experts discussed how the West Hartford university continues to meet that need.

justice learn more about the myriad of professional opportunities the field has to offer. The free program will held on Tuesday, March 23, 7 - 8 p.m. on Zoom. Hosted by Brian Foley, Department of Emergency Services & Public Protection, State of Connecticut, panelists will include: Dr. Rhona C. Free, President, University of Saint Joseph; Brian Enns, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice, USJ; Kendra Herrick, Parole Supervisor, Department of Corrections, Division of Parole and Community Services and, Emory Hightower, Supervisory Inspector, Office of the Hartford State's Attorney, State of Connecticut. A question-and-answer period will follow the presentation. ________________________________

The panel of professionals was rounded out by Elizabeth (Betsy) Francis-Connolly, Ph.D., dean of USJ’s School of Interdisciplinary Health and Science. Next up in the series is “Careers in Criminal Justice,” a discussion featuring several criminal justice experts that is intended to help young people interested in pursuing a career in criminal

All program in the USJ Virtual Learning Series are open to the public free of charge. For more information or to register contact Hillary Sarrasin at Hillary@20media20.com.


VIRTUAL LEARNING FOR EVERYONE. Tuesday, March 23, 7-8pm CAREERS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

The University of Saint Joseph invites you to learn more about the exciting and expanding field of Criminal Justice. Find out what it means to be a member of this in demand and growing field along with the broad range of professional opportunities it offers.

GUESTS INCLUDE: Welcome by Dr. Rhona C. Free, President, University of Saint Joseph Brian Enns, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice, University of Saint Joseph Kendra Herrick, Parole Supervisor, Department of Corrections, Division of Parole and Community Services Emory Hightower, Supervisory Inspector, Office of the Hartford State’s Attorney, State of Connecticut. Hosted by Brian Foley, Department of Emergency Services & Public Protection, State of Connecticut

FREE TO THE PUBLIC Spring topic will focus on TEACHING! Watch for details online.

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Registration is free, but space is limited. Contact hillary@20media20.com


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Tulip Time & Floriade

T

ulip Time is mid-April until the end of May, when the Netherlands’ famous tulip fields bloom. Floriade is a celebrated International horticultural event that happens only once every ten years, focusing on innovations in sustainability, gardens, and art. The next Floriade will be in 2022, with the Expo grounds just outside of Amsterdam in Almere.

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Tulip Time at Keukenhof

T

his is a wonderful time to take a riverboat cruise to Amsterdam, to visit the Keukenhof Garden, known as the Garden of Europe, one of the world's largest flower gardens, situated in the municipality of Lisse, in the Netherlands. The Keukenhof garden was begun in 1950 to promote local bulb and flower exporters. The garden stretches across 79 acres and has approximately 7 million flower bulbs – and not just tulips! The Keukenhof is visited by 1.5 million people each year. This past year of course it was closed, but since the garden was still blooming, staff took 23 videos and shared them with the world. Right now, the planting for 2021 is complete and there are over 800 varieties of tulips enjoying the cold weather, cold weather that is necessary for the tulips to bloom properly. The staff use a method called “lasagne,” in which they layer the bulbs with different blooming times on top of each other so there will be continuous blooms over the 8-week period when the garden is open to the public. Besides soaking in the beauty of all of those blooms, activities include a Whisper boat ride and renting a bicycle to cycle around the gardens. Children have a garden of their own, next to the Pancake House where they can enjoy the smell and colors of the flowers. There are also a petting zoo and a maze for the little ones. 2022 will be planned by the master gardeners once the 2021 season is completed and this year’s flowers are removed.

Floriade

F

loriade began 60 years ago to promote local bulb exporters, similar to the Keukenhof. The focus is on green, food, energy, and health and is being developed to be a new green living area after the Expo. Over 30 countries are expected to join in for this International Expo. Visitors’ experiences are planned to “explore, touch and change”. There will be gardens, innovative gardening exhibits, live entertainment, talk shows, and food. Floriade will look to all the countries of the world to create this model of a future urban town tied to nature, adapted to an everyday lifestyle. For this coming year they have a new 5-minute aerial ride for

those who want to get a bird’s eye view of the park. Also new is The Bobbing Forest, a sustainable life artwork of 20 recycled sea buoys filled with 20 Dutch Elm trees. There will be an arboretum that will be an alphabetically organized tree, flower, and plant encyclopedia that you can walk through. The Garden of Peace will be participating, building a green, sustainable livable city where

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Watch footage of the "Bobbing Forest" by clicking on the image above. Visitors of Floriade will enjoy a spectacular 5-minute ride experience from an 850 meter-long ropeway on the Floriade cable car above the park. Immerse yourself in the arboretum’s greenery: a living catalogue of trees and plants.

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people with diverse backgrounds and cultures live together, addressing education, architecture and the economy of nature in their pavilion. A Growing Airplanes project has begun with the local University and aircraft manufacturers to develop aircraft parts based on horticultural waste – the results will be seen at the Expo in 2022!

Travel

R

iver cruises offered by Ama Waterways are a perfect match for visiting the Keukenhof garden and the Floriade Expo, as their European River Cruise ships have been recognized in 2020 with Green awards for their sustainability using fuel-efficient engines, microfiltration and onboard recycling and energy-saving LED lighting. Experience both once-in-a-lifetime events while sailing on the Rhine and other Dutch and Belgian waterways. There are nine different itineraries to choose from. Ama Waterways is a favorite river cruise company of mine and my colleagues because of their service, ships, excursions, and dining. I am going on the Tulip Time Cruise, round trip Amsterdam and besides these two important events, we will be visiting the Delta area of the Rhine. The two medieval cities of Ghent and Bruges, Belgium will be highlighted including the art of Belgian chocolate making with a master chocolatier before we head to Antwerp and Rotterdam. Two UNESCO sites, the World Heritage Site of Kinderdijk, the village with the country’s largest concentration of windmills, and the Cathedral of Our Lady in Antwerp are available for exploration during this trip. An excursion to Delft or a bicycle ride past the windmills can be done as options. While in Antwerp flower lovers and gardeners can roam through Floralia, an annual spring flower show featuring approximately one million

bulbs that are hand-planted each year by the castle staff. Other excursions are offered at your choice of a gentle, moderate, and active pace. If you prefer, a custom land-based vacation can be built! 2022 is next year, so even though many have put off travel in 2020 and 2021, 2021 is the year to book The Netherlands for 2022. n

Lisa Martin, Travel Advisor, Luxury Cruise Specialist, ACC, Cruise Planners; Land and Cruise 860.929.0708 lisa.martin@ cruiseplanners.com TotalTravelToday.com

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GARDENING

Nature Knows No Limits BY KARLA A. DALLEY

W

hen I looked back to last year’s spring gardening article – drafted in mid-February of 2020 – I re-read it a couple of times in disbelief before I understood how much our lives had changed in the past year. That’s how I decided on this year’s title. Yet despite what we have all been through – and will continue to endure – spring will come again. It will bring the beauty that it is known for: lovely early bulbs, hellebores, then larger bulbs like tulips and daffodils, and finally it will break into a riot of flowering shrubs and trees as if it can no longer keep its beauty to itself. During this past year, “nature” of various kinds has provided solace to our weary state. More people than ever used our beaches and parks – to the point where they had to close during times of peak use. I saw more people out walking – and people with “pandemic puppies” in my neighborhood. Nothing like a dog to get someone out walking every day. But what is even more amazing is that everyone, it seems, became a gardener of some sort. People who had never gardened before became gardeners and lots of them gardened on a huge scale. Many planted the so-called “quarantine gardens,” which were a type of twenty-first century Victory Gardens. People planted all sorts of edibles, herbs and even fruit trees. Even better, surveys show that not only do these gardeners intend to continue gardening in 2021,

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but they intend to garden even more than in 2020. A whole new generation of gardeners has been born, it seems. But edible gardening wasn’t the only thing that got people excited last year, apparently. Because so many people were outside and spending time in their yards, 73% of them planted flowers, according to Axiom Marketing*, a marketing firm who did a survey of gardeners of all age groups. That’s an incredible number of people who wanted to plant just to beautify their yards. What got me thinking about this was that I did not garden all that much in 2020. I made a few trips to a local garden center and one or two purchases from a specialty bulb retailer but for the most part, I simply contented myself by bringing my house plants outdoors for the summer and tending to those (lest you think that I was restrained, I have somewhere between 100-200 house plants at any one time, so that’s still quite a bit of tending!). My initial plan in early January was to do more of the same. And then suddenly, something happened. I am not sure if it was the couple of snows at the end of January and early February, or if I was suffering from “pent up” gardening demand, but it was as if the “gardening” switch in my brain suddenly got turned on to hyper drive. I can’t wait to plant! I am poring over catalogs to see what I might want to add to the garden. I am trying to decide how I might incorporate edibles with the copious critter problem that I have. I am planning different con-

tainer designs (always a favorite thing to do). I am attending Zoom lectures about different gardening techniques, growing mushrooms from a kit in my kitchen (that is a story for another day!), and going to webinars about what the plant breeders are doing – one of my favorite topics anyway. When I am out walking my dog, as she sniffs around my garden beds, I am eyeing them critically to see what can be added, what can be pruned and what can be changed. I’ve already done a little tree pruning and plan to do a little more if the weather permits. Those of you who remember my “sustainable” articles from earlier years know that I am not one to clean-up my garden beds too early because I want to ensure that the beneficial insects have plenty of time to survive – so about all I can do outside is prune on warmish days. And while I do love to prune, there’s a limit to how creative that can be. So, let’s hope for an early spring – and no late snows – this year. All of us will be happy to be outside again! *https://axiomcom.com/2021-axiom-gardening-survey/

Karla Dalley is a garden writer and speaker from West Hartford. kdalley@comcast.net. gardendaze.wordpress.com Photo courtesy of the Olive Gypsy Boutique, by ADRIANA LAJOIE PHOTOGRAPHY


Spring into Hope VIR TU AL F U N D R AI S E R Out of respect for your health and safety, we are asking for your remote support of the children and families in our community.

For more information, call 860.521.8035 or visit bridgefamilycenter.org

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MEN'S FASHION

Reinventing Your Style Post-Covid BY MATTHEW BANEVER

W

e made it through 2020! The continuation of the healing process is determined by what we do right now. For most, working remotely has become our reality. One area of our homes has become akin to a museum, the closet: “And here, children, we have daddy’s ties (audible ooh-ing and ah-ing). They were important for meetings, but between us most of those meetings could have been emails.” We have spent years amassing a wardrobe that fit the job we had and now we still have the job but have ditched the ‘fit (short for outfit). We are seeing the last vestiges of the ‘Business Professional’ dress code. Our lives have become informal and sedentary. The most human interaction we have come to know is our spot on the Brady Bunch opening-credit-zoom-meetings. While time has slowed, personal clarity has become paramount. Right now, we can reinvent ourselves. Traditionally, if an office transitioned from Business Professional to Business Casual, we traded in the skirts for leggings, and the pleats for pants that zipped off at the knee. I am here to tell you to resist the propensity to achieve the MOST casual look possible, there is greatness available. I know it may not feel like it right now, but what we are experiencing will come to an end. We will return to meeting our friends in West Hartford Center for cocktails, traveling to remote locations for weddings, re-entering the dating scene, and for some, going back into the office. Our jobs have vied for control

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of our closets up until this point in our lives, but we now have the opportunity to ask ourselves; “What actually is MY style?” Your first reaction may be to scream out “Comfort! Comfort is my style!”. Humor me, join me in an exercise. This does not need to be travail; in fact, I guarantee you will find some catharsis. Stand in front of your wardrobe, closet, drawers, plastic bins under your bed, all of it. You are going to make 3 piles: r Keep r Tailor r Donate Be brutally honest when you do this. We all have that leather jacket that we have never worn but can’t get rid of because, well, it’s a leather jacket. Now is the time. Take every single article out of your closet and put it into these 3

piles. If you have a pair of pants you wear all the time, put it in the keep pile and ask yourself, “What do I like about these pants? What do they say about me?” And buy more of that. Focus on what you’re keeping: Do you see any commonalities? Style, color, length, comfort, durability. Are there areas for opportunity? This should become a regular routine. If you need help, don’t have time to drop off the donations, or need alterations, call me. All clothing will be donated to GHREC (Greater Hartford Reentry Council), Best Chance Program, and various programs assisting vetted individuals looking for employment. Matthew Banever Bards Clothing, Founder, Owner (860) 978-6234 Matthew@BardsClothing.com


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ONLINE STYLE BETTER THAN BEING THERE Step up your game with Virtual Styling! Barbara & Karen have been styling fabulous women on Facebook Live every Wednesday at 7pm for nearly one year. Grab your favorite BFF, glass of wine and settle in... it’s fun! THE BK & CO. DIFFERENCE From clothing and accessory consultation to perfect selection, BK & Co. helps define your own extraordinary style. Developing intimate, personal relationships with their “client-friends” is what motivates them to understand and cater to your needs thoroughly and meticulously. Their stylists are dedicated to helping women (and men shopping for women) find beautiful clothing that fits and flatters. They ensure that you look as fabulous as you feel, so you are always your very best!

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Dave adjusting the loft on the driver to get the perfect trajectory on drive.

Black marker drawn in a line on the ball helps determine the proper lie angle for the golfer.

Tape designed to show the location of contact with the ball.

Measurement of Garrett's hands and reach to the ground for proper grip size and club length.

If a player hits consistently to one side of the club, adjustments can be made to center the contact.

Dave selecting the right clubhead 26 Vol. 11, No. 1, 2021 west hartford magazine to match Garrett's ability level.

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Dave selecting the right shaft flex and weight to optimize Garrett's distance.


Understanding The Science of Golf BY GARRETT HICKEY

M

y goal for my golf game has always been TaylorMade to continue to improve enough so that every time I step on the course I am consistent and 135 3845 17.00 confident in what I do. I have been playing/practicing my golf game Taylormade consistently for the last 6 years and have improved tremendously. As I continued to play I realized I needed a new set of clubs. My 136 2569 18.67 parents had given me the set I currently use some 15 years ago when I was still in high school. It was time for an upgrade. As I sat with a friend one day talking about new clubs, he told me that I should look into getting a club fitting. I was not sure that was what I needed or how to go about getting one, but he had recently done this and continued to boast about it. Eventually, I went home and looked up GOLFTEC, as I remembered it being close to my parents’ home in West Hartford. I scheduled an appointment to have a full bag fitting and, boy, was I happy! My fitting coach David Souza explained to me the science behind taking a person's swing and matching it with a club that will get the most out of that person’s potential. David was able to communicate the numbers, graphs, and pictures in such a way that was easy for me to understand (I could even recognize and identify it on my own almost immediately). The first thing we looked at was my driver, which is the weakest and most inconsistent club in my bag. David started by having me hit some balls with my current driver and explaining to me the numbers that were showing up on the screen. These numbers all correlated to why my club/ball was doing certain things. My numbers were supposed to be showing up in the center of the gauge but I wasn’t even close. Next, he measured my hand to figure out the size grip that is best for me, looked at shaft weight and a bunch of other things. Then we spent time hitting different clubs and making adjustments STUDENT

Fri Feb 12th 2021

YOUR CURRENT CLUB

Swing Average

Burner

BACK SPIN

RECOMMENDED CLUB

as needed. Although I did not hit my driver as consistently as I would have liked, by the end we found a club that I was hitting 23 yards farther than my current driver (when I hit it properly). I was very happy and surprised as I had no idea about all the different things he 32.0 46.50 220.8 changed to find a club that was best for me. I am excited to get back for a lesson with my driver to start improving upon some of the things David showed me during my session. Next came the iron fitting. I did not 29.7 43.00 243.7 need to hit every single iron in my bag because David explained that the 7 iron is a median for the rest of the cubs in my bag. I began hitting my shots at a much more consistent rate. Then we started doing the same thing as I did with $529.99 the driver, changing the grip size and texture, shaft weight, angle of the face of my club, etc. David even gave me a little pointer on how to set up my iron shots every time to keep my ball striking more consistently. After all was said and done, I had about 11 more yards on my 7 iron shots with this new club. Again, I was extremely happy with those results. When I walked outside I said to myself,“I can’t believe all the science and numbers behind this stuff.” More importantly, I was so happy and pleased with working with David for those two hours. It is not the easiest thing to continually hit in front of someone knowing they are watching and recording you. But he made it very comfortable and even after a few bad shots I didn’t feel discouraged. The entire time I was locked into his knowledge and all the different aspects to look at in a swing. When I now go to simulators and hit, I actually can look at the feedback and make adjustments and understand what I am doing right and wrong. This is just after one session with David. For me that is the mark of an outstanding coach: take something a bit complex and turn it into something that can be easily understood. I am very excited to get my new clubs and to go back and work with David on my game and I highly recommend you reach out to GOLFTEC before you hit your course. n CLUB FITTER

Garrett Hickey (860) 466-0831 ghickey1120@gmail.com

DRIVER FITTING

LAUNCH ANGLE

Ball Speed

Back Spin

Launch

MPH

RPM

DEG

Swing Average

SIM 2

BACK SPIN

Launch

MPH

RPM

DEGREES

+1 MPH

-1276 RPM

+1.7 DEG

GRIP SELECTION

Brand: Golf Pride Model: MCC Plus 4 Black-Grey Size: Midsize

ORDER SUMMARY

Head: Taylormade-SIM-2-8-RH-Driver Shaft: Taylormade-True-Temper-HZRDUS-Black-65-S-0.335 Flex: S

Length: 45.5" Loft: 8° CPM / SW: 238 / D2

DESCENT ANGLE

O ine

Descent

Distance

YDS

DEG

YDS

LAUNCH ANGLE

Back Spin

Ball Speed

Website GOLFTEC West Hartford 1146 New Britain Ave. West Hartford CT 6110 (860) 222-2299

DESCENT ANGLE

O ine

Descent

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In our continued commitment to engage the community with classical music, we bring you an amazing evening with two favorite local world-class performers - live from Beth El’s Main Sanctuary. No charge. Click here to register tinyurl.com/BEMA4Ever

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FINANCE DO OUR BIASES AFFECT OUR FINANCIAL CHOICES? Even the most seasoned investors are prone to their influence. PROVIDED BY ROBERT A. LARAIA, RFC, FOUNDING PARTNER NORTHSTAR WEALTH PARTNERS

Investors are routinely warned about allowing their emotions to influence their decisions. However, they are less routinely cautioned about their preconceptions and biases that may color their financial choices. In a battle between the facts and biases, our biases may win. If we acknowledge this tendency, we may be able to avoid some unexamined choices when it comes to personal finance. It may actually "pay" to recognize blind spots and biases with investing. Here are some common examples of bias creeping into our financial lives. Letting emotions run the show. An investor thinks, "I got a great return from that decision," instead of thinking, "that was a good decision because ______."1 How many investment decisions do we make that have a predictable outcome? Hardly any. In retrospect, it is all too easy to prize the gain from a decision

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over the wisdom of the decision, and to, therefore, believe that the findings with the best outcomes were the best decisions (not necessarily true). Putting some distance between your impulse to make a change and the action you want to take to help get some distance from your emotions.1

logical reasons. The herd mentality is what leads many investors to buy high (and sell low). It can also promote panic selling. The advent of social media hasn't helped with this idea. Above all, it encourages market timing, and when investors try to time the market, they frequently realize subpar returns.4

Valuing facts, we "know" & "see" more than "abstract" facts. Information that seems abstract may seem less valid or valuable than information that relates to personal experience. This is true when we consider different types of investments, the state of the markets, and the economy's health.2

Sometimes, asking ourselves what our certainty is based on and reflecting about ourselves can be a helpful and informative step. Examining our preconceptions may help us as we invest. n

Valuing the latest information most. In the investment world, the latest news is often more valuable than old news. But when the latest news is consistently good (or consistently bad), memories of previous market climate(s) may become too distant. If we are not careful, our minds may subconsciously dismiss the eventual emergence of the next bear (or bull) market.2 Being overconfident. The more experienced we are at investing, the more confidence we have about our investment choices. When the market is going up, and a clear majority of our investment choices work out well, this reinforces our confidence, sometimes to a point where we may start to feel we can do little wrong, thanks to the state of the market, our investing acumen, or both. This can be dangerous.3 The herd mentality. You know how this goes: if everyone is doing something, they must be doing it for sound and

Northstar Wealth Partners nstarwp.com rlaraia@nstarwp.com Robert A. Laraia, RFC, Founding Parnter Northstar Wealth Partners 433 South Main Street Suite 120 West Hartford, CT 06110 888.886.7737 860.561.1906 fax rlaraia@nstarwp.com www.nstarwp.com

Securities offered through LPL Financial, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advice offered through Northstar Wealth Partners, a Registered Investment Advisor and a separate entity from LPL Financial This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note - investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. «RepresentativeDisclosure» Citations 1. CNBC.com, September 28, 2020 2. Forbes.com, March 26, 2020 3. Forbes.com, March 19, 2020 4. CNBC.com, June 26, 2020


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Ruthie Fierberg’s new podcast links theater to social justice BY STACEY DRESNER

W

est Hartford native Ruthie Fierberg has always loved the theater. “I remember going to the city once or twice a year to see shows,” she says. “My first Broadway show was Grease and then Les Miz the next day. I also grew up going to The Bushnell. I wanted to soak up shows whenever I could.” Fierberg has now launched Why We Theater, a podcast on the Broadway Podcast Network that looks at theater not just as entertainment but as a vehicle for supporting social justice. In each podcast, Fierberg talks with a playwright or director about their work, then engages with a panel of experts to discuss the social issues presented in the production. Her goal is to help theatergoers take action to remedy some of the intense emotional issues reflected on stage. The podcast’s

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first 10-episode season, launched in July, highlights plays with themes that include “colorism” and beauty, LGBTQIA rights, education inequity, Internet addiction and antisemitism and the Holocaust. Fierberg says she got the idea for the podcast five years ago after seeing “Disgraced,” the Pulitzer Prize-winning drama by Ayad Aktar about post-9/11 Islamophobia, which she found shocking. “More and more I’m inspired by shows that talk about social and civic issues,” says Fierberg. “I realized…that when we see a curtain come down and think it’s the end, it’s not – it’s actually the beginning. An artist is ‘putting the basketball down in the middle of the court’ and we’re not picking it up.” One of the plays featured in Fierberg’s podcast is “If I Forget” by Steven Levenson – the story of three adult Jewish children coming home to visit their father on his 75th birthday.

“The eldest is the ‘two-times-a-year Jew;’ the middle is a Jewish studies professor, completely secular, who looks at Judaism from an intellectual perspective; and the youngest is very religious and very involved,” Fierberg says. “The professor writes a book called Forgetting the Holocaust about how Judaism has become a religion haunted by death and ghosts.” Family drama ensues. On the podcast, Fierberg talks with Levenson about the play’s message. Rabbi Shuli Passow of B’nai Jeshrun in Manhattan and Judah Isseroff, a Jewish scholar at Princeton University, join in as the discussion turns to American Jewish identity, Israel and Zionism and antisemitism. Fierberg says that Judaism is a part of her work “every step of the way.” The daughter of Randi and Elliot Fierberg, her family are longtime members of The Emanuel Synagogue in West Hartford.


“I was the co-president of [Emanuel Synagogue’s] USY chapter and it was always very ingrained in us that we had to have Tikun Olam projects interwoven throughout our programming,” says Fierberg, who now belongs to Manhattan’s Congregation B’nai Jeshrun. While she loves the theater, Fierberg said her first love is writing. She previously worked for the Meredith Corp., writing for magazines such as Good Housekeeping and Parents. While at Backstage, she wrote feature stories and produced digital videos for events like the Tony Awards, and interviewed the likes of Hugh Jackman, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Ben Platt and Annette Benning. Most recently she served as senior features editor at Playbill, creating written, multimedia and video content. She left that position in November and has been focusing on the podcast and several video projects. Fortuitously, in early 2020 as Fierberg was beginning to work on Why We Theater, when Broadway producer Dori Bernstein decided to launch a podcast network called the Broadway Podcast Network and offered studio space, equipment and editing staff to potential podcasters. She said, ‘Pitch me the idea; I’ll do all that work for you,’ Fierberg recalls. “I was planning to do my first recording on March 16, and my second on March 18 – I had studio space reserved.” Then COVID-19 changed those plans. “We immediately had to switch to remote recording,” she says. “So, I record on one platform and then we Zoom.” Recorded in her New York City apartment, the podcast can be heard on Apple podcasts, Google Play and Spotify. Fierberg is already planning the second season. “Part of my goal with every episode is to give tangible, actionable ideas to people; whether that is a question to ask yourself to check your own bias, who to write a letter to, an organization to donate to or volunteer with,” she says. “I want people to realize there is theater out there for everyone that will appeal to whatever their interests are and allow them to ask bigger questions.” n

We bring clarity to your communication. Words are the catalyst for action. Advocacy Writing | Content Development | Public Relations

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WEDDINGS

LOVE IN THE AGE OF COVID

Shealagh Begley Glasgow & Trevor Glasgow Photos byJustin Schwalbs; schwalbsphotography.com

W

hen Trevor Glasgow got down on one knee to propose to Shealagh Begley on August 3, 2019 on Block Island, everyone on Main Street stopped to watch the beautiful moment unfurl. Her sister Bridget was on hand to take a picture of the proposal – as per Trevor’s instructions. The proposal that day was an amazing surprise for Shealagh, and her parents - while Trevor had asked for permission

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from Shealagh's father John in advance, her family didn't know it was going to happen on that day. Just over a year later, on September 26, 2020, the couple was married at St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church in West Hartford. Even though their wedding date fell during the COVID-19 pandemic, the couple still wanted to get married that day. The wedding was not as big as they had originally planned and some loved ones

couldn't come due to travel restrictions. But they still made it work. “It was the best day ever!” Shealagh exclaimed. The wedding was officiated by Father Joseph Crowley, a dear friend of the Begley family, and Shealagh's priest from her days as a student at Northwest Catholic High School. The reception was held outside at Wampanoag Country Club in West Hartford, which holds many special


memories for Shealagh and her family, members of the club for the past 16 years. The downsized reception took place outside on the patio. Everyone stood around the putting green – socially distanced – to watch Trevor and Shealagh’s first dance as a married couple. Entertainment was provided by two bands – “The Zoo” and “Two for the Road” – a local Irish band that closed down the festivities as MaryBeth Begley,

mother of the bride – performed a rousing Irish stepdance for the crowd. MaryBeth and John Begley live in West Hartford, where they are the owners and operators of Begley Landscaping / L&M Paving. The groom’s parents are Cheryl and Sean Glasgow of Simsbury. Sean works at Travelers Insurance and Cheryl at AIG. Shealagh, a graduate of the University of Hartford, now works in Talent Acquisition at Hartford HealthCare.

Trevor, a graduate of Simsbury High School and UConn, is a financial advisor at Merrilll Lynch. They now reside in West Hartford and due to COVID, plan to take a romantic honeymoon to Italy next year. n

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find us online all the time at find us online all the time at westhartfordmagazine.com

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WINE

To cork or cap... Is that the question? BY ERTAN SENER

O

ne day, as I began to think about possible topics for this article, I was opening a bottle of my favorite Prosecco. While the thoughts whirled through my head I began to open the bottle in hand. I didn’t have to remove any foil or any cage; there was no twisting and turning of the knob of a cork stopper. I actually reached for a bottle cap opener and carefully pried the crown cap (yes, like a beer cap) off the top of the bottle to the sound of the bottle’s sigh of relief. The thought came to me that I would have to now convince certain customers that this IS quality Prosecco, which I never needed to do back when it had a different closer…a CORK. Well, my topic was found and I would like to take the time to compare and contrast the closures of wine bottles, as we know them. Taking a closer look at the ever so debated (thunder clap!)…THE SCREWCAP! First, let us examine the age-old friend to wine closures, the cork. Cork comes from a relatively young species of Oak Tree. It needs very specific climate as well as other growing conditions to survive. That is why we find the majority

of cork trees on the coast of the western Mediterranean, such as Spain, North Africa and much of Portugal where growing conditions are ideal. Cork production and exportation is a very important to that of the Portuguese economy. A third of the world’s cork oak concentration is in Portugal, covering over 1.6 million acres! The cork tree is very unique, where you can remove or strip its bark from the trunk and branches without hurting the tree. This is where the cork stoppers are plugged from, the thick strips of bark. The cork tree needs to be in its 25th year in order for it to be producing commercially viable cork. That seems a long time, but the life of a cork tree is about 170 years, without the stripping process taking away from this number. Record had been kept that some trees have lived over 200 years. Well, from these trees come a curious material used in many industries, but have passed in the hands of many of us as the cork closure. Cork, like today, was used to close wine bottles as far back as thousands of years ago by the Egyptians, in the fifth century BCE by the Greeks, and definitely early on by the Romans.

Why is cork a sound closer for wine? Well, the structure of cork is very unique. It consists of closely packed, 14-sided cells, thus rendering its light, elastic quality. It is very impermeable to gases and most liquids, not so effective to those with strong acids. Corks are, and should be, an airtight closure. A very interesting article in Appellation America.com, entitled “Please Stop Telling People Corks ‘Breathe’, by Richard Grant Peterson, Ph.D., February 10, 2008, says, “Show me a cork that breathes and I’ll show you a bottle of vinegar.” Well then, why are there so many closures being developed to replace the use of cork? Ooo…very good question! Even though cork is a great way to close a bottle of wine, it being a natural product, there could be inconsistencies and/or possible faults or imperfections. Let us look at a few of the more important ones to understand. If a wine bottle is not stored correctly, it could dry out the cork and let oxygen in, which is bad. If the cork was not put in correctly, there might be some seepage, which could let some air in, and we know that would be bad. But the worst of all, a CORKED bottle of wine. Let me

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define what corked wine actually means, and this is not the fault of the cork! It happens in the sterilization process of

the corks, and it is a chemical reaction. A nasty little resultant, 2,4,6-Trichloranisole, or as it is more commonly referred to as, TCA. Ever open a favorite bottle of wine, pour a glass, take a big sniff and…POW, you get slapped in the face with the smell of wet newspaper, moldy cardboard or basement floor! Well, this is no good! This is TCA, and has nothing to the quality of the wine, it is a reaction process to the cleaning of the cork and that damaged the wine. This is important to know the next time this happens to you in a restaurant. Just ask

for a new bottle. This is the main reason the search for the closure started in our modern age. The most popular of these the Stelvin Closure, a.k.a. the Screwcap! Well, the Stelvin Closure was created to save the wine from the taint of TCA, and it was designed to resemble the traditional cork closure, with its long skirt, resembling the foil of a traditional cork closer. But where is the romance with the twist and turn of the screwcap? Oh please. Let’s grow up. It’s about the wine. It’s about getting the wine from the bottle to the glass and to you lips with the pleasing of possibilities. What is romantic about stinky wine? Nothing! That Stelvin Closure comes with a promise, that wine is what it is and has not been affected by TCA! Sounds good to me! It is great to see so many wonderful producers of wine accepting this method of closure. To uphold what the bottle holds and protects, the wine! Well, I hope the next time you are in your favorite restaurant or wine shop and someone suggest a wine that has a

screwcap, you don’t wrinkle your nose until you try the wine! Let’s not judge a wine by its closure, but for the quality of the juice that is contained within. There will always be wines that will have the cork to please that particular person, but if it is the delicious ancient recipe of liquid that is the goal, we need look past the package and look out for the well-being of the wine. n Ertan Seyyar Sener Senior Operation Manager Maximum Beverage 333 North Main Street MOVING soon to 340 North Main Street behind Whole Foods, next to Anytime Fitness West Hartford 06107 860.761.2541 Ertan Sener is also an accomplished musician working as a Conductor/Music Educator at the Hartt School, University of Hartford, Music Director of the Simsbury Community Band and former conductor with the New Britain Symphony Orchestra.

LOOK FOR UPCOMING ISSUES OF WEHA MAGAZINE June 25 September 3 November 19 Advertising deadline is one month prior. Contact Donna Edelstein at 860.833.0839 or Donna@20media20.com

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W. H. CHAMBER NOTES

The West Hartford Chamber of Commerce:

All Networking is Global BY CHRIS CONWAY

“You’re on mute!” “We can’t see you. Click the red X on the camera in the lower left!” “Oooooo, what’s your kitten’s name?” For anyone who has spent any amount of time on ZOOM, Google Meets, Webex or any other virtual meeting platform, no further explanation is required. The prophecy foretold by The Jetsons over a half-century ago has finally become a reality - “video-telephone” has arrived. COVID-19 has forced us to connect with people in new ways. These virtual meetings extend well beyond the business world. Holiday celebrations, grandparent visits and even weddings and wakes have all gone virtual. The West Hartford Chamber of Commerce was an early adopter of virtual programming. On Tuesday, March 17, 2020, Governor Lamont announced that the state would, for all intents and purposes, be shut down by Thursday. The Chamber moved swiftly by holding its monthly meeting of the Board of Directors on ZOOM the day of the announcement. The Chamber’s twice-per-month AM Connections was to meet that Friday at The Noah Webster Library. This meeting normally would attract 75 or more people from the area to network, share leads and learn about each other’s businesses. The Chamber staff elected to hold the meeting as scheduled on ZOOM. Over 40 of the regular attendees logged in to do what they normally do...network. In spring 2020 during what is now colloquially referred to as “the early days of COVID,” some of the conversation surrounded topics such as how long this was going to last, how people were changing their business and how they

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were dealing with their family all being at home. Networking was still happening, leads were still being passed and people were sharing successes with working with one another. Seeing the quick embrace of the virtual format by Chamber members, the Chamber staff elected to hold the meetings weekly rather than twice-amonth. Quickly, attendance grew to 60 people every week. Along with growing attendance, the geographical reach of the meeting also expanded. While the Chamber largely serves businesses in West Hartford and the adjoining towns, we do have members in southwestern Massachusetts. People from California, New Jersey and even Canada started logging in and networking with our local businesses. “COVID has brought so many challenges to the way we do our work now, but it has also brought some unexpected and beneficial changes,” says Jennifer Van Beckum. “For instance, before COVID I never would have thought to network in other parts of the country and, indeed, even other parts of the world.” Jennifer works with Melaleuca. com, a company that specializes in wellness products. She is an active member of the West Hartford Chamber, even though she is based in MA. “I run the type of business where I can work anywhere in the country and in 19 other countries, as well,” Jennifer added. “When COVID hit, new networking groups began to crop up seemingly overnight. Someone invited me to one and then I got invited to another and now I am opening accounts in CA, GA, and even Canada! In this way, COVID has expanded our minds and broadened our horizons.”

Even local businesses have found that the virtual format has allowed them to expand the time they spend networking. With driving from meeting to meeting being replaced by logging in from your home/office/anywhere, more networking is now a reality. “When the West Hartford Chamber’s AM Connections event went virtual, it opened up opportunities not just for members, but for businesses all over West Hartford,” says Eric Lopkin, Founder of The Modern Observer Group, a coaching and business consulting company. “It made it much easier for West Hartford businesses to connect with partners and customers all over Connecticut and beyond. The Modern Observer Group is based in New Haven and I live in Middletown. While I have always been a supporter of the Connections meeting and the Chamber, switching to a virtual format made it possible for me to attend much more frequently and to build deeper relationships within the West Hartford community.” While we all look forward to a time when the world resembles the “old ways,” The West Hartford Chamber has already set the framework for the “new normal” and the opportunities it will bring. n Christopher Conway Executive Director West Hartford Chamber of Commerce 860.521.2300 - office 860.810.5663 - cell cconway@whchamber.com www.whchamber.com


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Fine Art Portfolio | Paris, France

Fine Art Portfolio | West Hartford, USA

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COVER ART FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY Lanny Nagler Fine Art Portfolio | West Hartford, CT, USA Award-winning professional photographer Lanny Nagler has more than 40 years of experience capturing with his creative eye the aesthetic beauty to be discovered in locations both near and far, exotic and ordinary — everywhere from Hartford to New York City to Madrid to Brazil to Vietnam, and all points in between.

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Fine Art Portfolio | Madrid, Spain

A resident of West Hartford, Nagler’s reach is international, boasting a diverse cadre of loyal clientele worldwide. His extensive portfolio of fine art — including landscapes and ‘wallscapes’, and images in both black-andwhite and color — can be viewed online, where prints are available for purchase. All artwork in the collection is suitable for framing. In addition to fine art, Lanny Nagler’s portfolio includes a collection of stock photography. He also photographs people, annual reports, industrial, product, architectural and has an impressive array of travel photography.

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Vol. 11, No. 1, 2021 west hartford magazine 49


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