Page 1

free!

The Local Guide for Active Urban Families

camp guide part 1

sleepaway camps mom Tovah Paglaro westcoast

april 2013

get green | eco-resources


n ew

*For a limited time only. At participating McDonald’s® restaurants in British Columbia and Whitehorse, YT. ©2013 McDonald’s.


April 2013

3


families westcoast

april2013

• camp guide part 1 • get green

10 camp guide top story

on our cover... WCFmag Facebook cover contest winners, 10-year-old Mackenzie and 11-year-old Bracken play up their inner campers for our April cover. Photographed by Revival Arts Studio www.revivalartsstudio.com

Travel Scottsdale, AZ The Wild West

Get Green Modern Home Ec Easy Meals in a Jar

10

12

Camp Guide Marshmallows & Meltdowns Preparing Kids for Camp

14

Camp Guide 2013 Camp Guide Sleepaway Camp Listings

20

Get Green Fire Your Dryer Better Ways to Dry Clothes

26

24 mom westcoast

24 WCM Profile Tovah Paglaro 27 WCM Events

from the editor 6 7 8 22 28 30

Editor’s Note Contests WestCoast Finds WCF News Community Calendar Last Look Seed Bombs

next issue may • Preschool & Daycare • Camp Guide, Part 2: Day Camps

4

WestCoastFamilies.com

www.twitter.com/wcfmag www.facebook.com/westcoastfamilies www.pinterest.com/wcfmag


April 2013

5


editor’s note

a

s we West Coasters continue to be blessed with an abundance of life-giving water falling from the heavens (hey, we have an unassailably positive attitude at WestCoast Families), it may be a challenge to envision the balmy days of summer we have ahead of us. Nevertheless, it’s time to make summer plans, and for that reason, our April issue features part deux of our Summer Camp Guide, this time devoted to sleepaway camps. Sleepaway camp, also known as “peace and quiet week” for moms and dads, can be the best week of summer for your kids, and if you need help with logistics, we have expert advice on everything from choosing the right camp, to packing, to planning for any anxiety you or your kids may face. April is also our Green Issue, and we’re thrilled to profile the current David Suzuki Foundation “Queen of Green,” Tovah Paglaro, as well as delve into the positive dietary, social, and physical benefits of community gardening with your family. Whether you live in the city or the suburbs, in an apartment or a house, there are growing opportunities to get together with others in your community and learn about raising healthy, sustainable food for your table. Let’s all appreciate these April showers, they are what keeps our beautiful coast green, and remember, if we all keep making small positive steps toward a more sustainable lifestyle, our home will stay green for our children and generations to come.

Stephanie MacDonald Editor

more online! this month at

www.westcoastfamilies.com

greenology safe food handling

Relevant and local websites and apps to make your green living fun and easy.

a series on preventing foodborne illnesses and food handling for your family.

Coming in the May issue of WCF Preschools & Daycare local resources and information – everything you need to know to prepare and register for childcare/preschool

CampGuide part II - Day Camps. Listings and fun ideas for your kids this summer.

6

families westcoast

WestCoastFamilies.com

westcoastfamilies.com

Managing Editor Andrea Vance editor@westcoastfamilies.com Editor Stephanie MacDonald stephanie@westcoastfamilies.com Contributing Editor Jodi Iverson jodi@westcoastfamilies.com Art Director & Layout Krysta Furioso studio@westcoastfamilies.com Administration Jennifer Bruyns admin@westcoastfamilies.com Accounts Receivable & Payable Jennifer Brule finance@westcoastfamilies.com Advertising sales@westcoastfamilies.com 604.249.2866 Published by National Families Network Publisher: Andrea Vance publisher@westcoastfamilies.com For distribution inquiries, please email publisher@westcoastfamilies.com For submissions to our community calendars, please email admin@westcoastfamilies.com To share your feedback, please email editor@westcoastfamilies.com Contributors Stephanie MacDonald, Jennifer Bruyns, Nicole Iverson, Jodi Iverson, Julie Languille, Michele Kambolis All contents copyrighted ©. Written permission from the publisher is required to reproduce, quote, reprint or copy any material from WestCoast Families Mailing address: 1215-C56 St. Box 18057 Delta, BC V4L 2M4 T 604 249 2866 | F 604 676 2802


contests!

Visit us online for new contests every issue!

www.westcoastfamilies.com

WIN a week of fun and adventure at Evans Lake Summer Camp Evans Lake Summer Camp is located just North of Squamish. The core of the Evans Lake Youth Camp is our Eco-Fun outdoor education program. You’ll learn about the wonders of the forest, outdoor survival skills and learn how to paddle a canoe (to name a few). Six days at Evans Lake also means cabin vs. cabin competitions, giant camp classic games like Stones on the Field; and Capture the Flag & Survival in the forest. We also do day hikes, swimming in our very own fresh water lake, canoeing, paddle-boarding, rock-climbing, archery, theme days, skits and songs. To win: potential campers between the ages of 8 and 16-years-old may go to our contest page and submit their entry up to 300 words telling us why they would like to explore Evans Lake Summer Camp this year! We’ll select the most creative, compelling, and unique entry to win.

WIN this Earth Day gift basket from Lavish and Lime Includes an ORE owl cotton insulated lunch bag, Owl thermal food container, Two Keep Leaf cotton/velcro reusable snack bags (large and small), A Keep Leaf cotton food wrap, a Reusable sandwich wrapper, Pure recyclable glass water bottle with a Safe-Shell coating, A pack of 3 Ecojot recycled paper notebooks, a bag of soy crayon rocks, four packs of 10 Cleanwell all natural, alcohol-free sanitizing wipes, and a signed copy of Wendy Rosenoff’s book Grow your own Treehugger, 101 activities to teach your child how to live green. Value: $120 www.lavishandlime.com

www.evanslake.com

Enter at www.westcoastfamilies.com

Enter at www.westcoastfamilies.com

Deadline to enter: April 30, 2013

Deadline to enter: April 30, 2012

April 2013

7


westcoast finds green finds

editor’s pick

SodaStream Source Unit Get more fizz in your life! There’s something about bubbles in your water that perks you up, tingles your nose and gives your spirit (and spirits!) a lift. But bottled club soda is a downer because of the sodium and all the carbon emissions it creates being shipped around all over the place. SodaStream Source to the rescue: this elegant little appliance infuses your regular tap water with effervescence, conveniently and efficiently. And why stop at water? Fizz up your juice, ice tea and any drink you think could use a little pizzazz.

$149 at Sears and many other retailers.

White-O-Coccoli Children’s tablewear When it comes to what you feed your kids on, parents seem to be stuck between ceramic (which smashes appealingly for children, and expensively for parents) or plastic (indestructible, but not biodegradable and full of scary chemicals that could slowly poison your children to death). But now there’s another solution: White-O-Coccoli bamboo fibre tablewear. These cute and colourful dish sets, dyed with soy-based eco-friendly dyes, come in four different charming theme from robots to princesses. They are good for three years after the first wash, then when you throw them away you can rest assured they will break down in the soil leaving no trace. And they are dishwasher safe!

SpeeZees Tees Did you know that species around the world are disappearing at a rate up to 1500 times what is considered ‘normal’ today? SpeeZees is all about bringing attention to species we love on our beautiful planet, one t-shirt at a time. This beautiful and engaging new collection of printed 100% GOTS certified organic cotton kids t-shirts donates $1 a tee to a dedicated organization working to restore and preserve each t-shirt’s species, and plays an important role in recognizing and honouring the fact that the children of today are the future stewards of this planet. Even the hang tags are plantable, made from wildflower seeded recycled paper. Yes, kids can grow a little wildflower garden with SpeeZees hang tags! www.speezees.com

$28 each, available at Beansprouts at 4305 Main St

LunaPads

$23 per set at whiteococcoli.com

Created by a fashion designer whose conscience was t weak ed by all the wastefulness of regular sanitary products, LunaPads reusable products help women who care about the environment achieve “eco-positive periods.” Purchasing LunaPads means that you’re not only keeping waste out of the landfill, you are also supporting a company that has helped thousands of girls in developing nations attend school free from the stigma that would keep them at home during their cycle.

3 for $4, at Walmart and other smaller retailers

Pads start at $15 on lunapads.com

8

WestCoastFamilies.com


camp finds

PickmeUp Napkin You send your little treasures out into the world everyday to face their little joys and challenges on their own. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t take every opportunity to let them know that you’ve got their back. When your child opens his or her lunch, imagine their delight when the first thing they see is a positive message of love and encouragement. With PICKmeUP cloth napkins you can give your kids a different boost every day, and since they are reusable, they can live to cheer another day.

$30 set of 5 napkins at www.pickmeupnapkins.ca

Camping Dish Drying Mat When you’re camping space is at a premium, but that doesn’t mean that you can just dry your dirty dishes on the ground because you don’t have room for a drying rack and pan. This handy Camping Dish Drying Mat from HerAtSmallGoods on Etsy dries quickly, folds efficiently, and even has other practical uses beyond the dishes… as a tea cozy, or a potholder, or a table protector… the list goes on.

$14 on www.etsy.com/shop/HereAtSmallGoods

Summer Maple Wooden Block Puzzle Make your kids happy campers with this adorable and durable Summer Wooden Maple Block Puzzel set from Etsy. This set is so beautifully crafted, with classic scenes of the outdoors life, that after your kids are grown up you just might want to use it as décor for your cabin or summer cottage.

$28 at www.etsy.com/shop/fidoodle

April 2013

9


travel

Scottsdale, AZ The Wild West By Jodi Iverson

w

hen you think of the Wild West your first thoughts are probably Saguaro cacti, cowboys, and stagecoaches but these days it’s more about nature, luxury accommodations, Southwestern culture & world class spas! We had the chance to visit Scottsdale, Arizona recently and are pleased to report it is a great choice for YVR families looking for some sun & adventure. Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport is a short 3 hour direct flight from YVR, making it an easy jaunt for local families with young kids. That’s only one movie! But don’t forget to look out the window, because on a clear day you might be lucky enough to spy the majestic Grand Canyon upon descent. Choosing a hotel in Scottsdale is like shopping a half-price sale at Holts... Luxury and amenities galore at amazing prices. We chose the breathtaking Fairmont Scottsdale Princess. Overlooking the spectacular McDowell Mountains, the Princess is a 65-acre, world class resort. The Princess features a variety of rooms to meet family needs, including the Casita Suite, perfect for families, with a separate bedroom and dining area. Rooms are spacious and have a private patio perfect for morning coffee while watching the kids play. There is a ton of beautifully landscaped green space for the kids to enjoy and even a charming fishing pond! With an average of 314 sunny days a year, Scottsdale offers ample opportunity to check out the 5 gorgeous pool areas the Princess has to offer, including the Sonoran Splash. This 6000-square-foot water park features two twisting waterslides, a zero entry deck and a huge sandbox. Luxury cabanas and poolside butlers are available, making this the perfect way to spend a warm desert day with the family. Not to be missed is Well & Being at Willow Stream Spa. Well & Being features an innovative experience at its spa, integrating health & wellness, fitness and spa services. Whether you are looking for a fully customised program or simply a la carte treatment you will find it here. We took full advantage of the spa’s massages, beautiful waterfall and rooftop pool. If you prefer to spend time at the spa or pool sans kids, check out Bobcat Billy’s Clubhouse—a day camp style kids club that focuses on the culture and wildlife of the great Sonoran Desert. There are full- and half-day programs and on weekends, a “dinner and a movie” night, freeing you up to check out one of the resorts fantastic restaurants or explore Scottsdale’s cosmopolitan nightlife.

10 WestCoastFamilies.com

If you are looking for adventure you have come to the right place. Scottsdale has countless historical, cultural, and nature-filled choices. We selected a guided hike in the McDowell Mountains and were so glad we did. Kids and adults alike will love learning about the distinctive Sonoran desert. Bring your cameras, this desert is the real deal and there are some amazing photo ops to be had. We also took a breathtaking hot air balloon ride, floating peacefully 4,000 feet above the desert. From take-off we all had ear-to-ear grins. Our pilot was very knowledgeable and kept us entertained and informed. Upon landing you will enjoy a beautiful brunch in the desert and a traditional secret ceremony celebrated by balloonists worldwide, making this a truly a once in a lifetime experience! Being a bit of an architecture nerd I was really excited to visit Taliesin West, architect Frank Lloyd Wright’s winter home and school that is still in operation. Whether or not you are an architecture buff this is a must see. Take a guided tour from one of the knowledgeable guides and be sure to check out the gift shop—one of the first times I have bought souvenirs that didn’t end up collecting dust! Whatever your vacation preference, Scottsdale delivers – from upscale shopping, and dining, to desert exploration to simply relaxing at one the areas 70 resorts and hotels. So round up your posse and get ready for family fun in the new wild west! www.scottsdaleprincess.com | www.experiencescottsdale.com


April 2013

11


modern home-ec easy meals in a jar

Julie Languille

Every family needs quick and easy go-to meals. Nothing is quite as heavenly as that moment, at the end of a hectic day and a hurried dash through the pantry and no dinner in sight, when suddenly your eyes land upon it, an instant, delicious, just-add-water meal in a jar. Let’s face it, convenience foods are really convenient sometimes, but they don’t always deliver in terms of taste, economy and healthful qualities. What if you could make your own, and they are delicious and nutritious at much less cost? Meals in a Jar: Quick and Easy, Just-Add-Water, Homemade Recipes is filled with recipes for that very concept in mind. Here are a couple of samples to get you started:

Beefy Brown Rice and Vegetable Soup The brown rice adds a nutty and filling flavor to this lovely beefy soup. Makes 8 jars of 8 servings each Ingredients • • • • • • • • • • • •

12 cups dehydrated broccoli 6 cups dehydrated carrots 6 cups dehydrated onion 6 cups dehydrated celery 8 cups uncooked brown rice 1 cup beef soup base or bouillon granules ½ cup salt ¼ cup pepper 5 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon dried garlic 4 teaspoons dried thyme 8 bay leaves 8 (15 ounce) cans diced tomatoes

Instructions For soup mix, in each of 8 vacuum bags or jars, add and then vacuum seal: • 1 ½ cups dehydrated broccoli • ¾ cup dehydrated carrots • ¾ cup dehydrated onion • ¾ cup dehydrated celery • 1 cup uncooked brown rice • 2 tablespoons beef soup base/bouillon granules • 1 tablespoon of salt • ½ tablespoon of pepper • 2 teaspoons dried garlic • ½ teaspoon dried thyme • 1 bay leaf Ready Made Meal Assembly In each of 8 mylar bags, tote bags, or vacuum bags, store one bag or jar of soup mix and one can tomatoes. Label each bag. In a large pot, combine all ingredients and 8 cups of water. Simmer over medium high heat for 50 minutes or until rice is cooked through.

Pancakes Four Ways The big flavor hit with these pancakes is the vanilla powder. Add it to each bag individually so each bag gets its share. Be sure to get the actual ground vanilla beans. If your vanilla powder is the vanilla-infused-sugar variety used in hot drinks, use about 1 teaspoon more per bag. By including nuts, chocolate chips, or dried fruit in each readymade meal, you can make one bag of plain pancakes and one bag of each variation. Makes 16 (4 to 6-serving) bags (about sixteen 4-inch pancakes per bag) Ingredients • 2 cups walnuts or pecans (optional) • 3 cups chocolate chips (optional) • 2 cups dried blueberries, apples, or sweetened cranberries (optional) • 20 cups flour (5 pounds) • 7½ cups dry milk • 3¾ cups sugar • 3½ tablespoon salt • ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons baking powder • 1 cup shortening • 8 cups syrup or 16 Syrup Sidekits (page TK), for serving (optional) • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons vanilla powder (optional) Instructions For pancake mix: In a very large bowl, whisk together the flour, dry milk, sugar, salt, and baking powder until very well combined. For shortening: Wrap 16 (1-tablespoon) portions shortening each in a 4-inch square of plastic wrap. For syrup, if using: In each of 16 (1/2-cup) mini round disposable containers (such as those made by Glad), package ½ cup syrup Ready Made Meal Assembly Into each of 16 (1-quart) jars or vacuum bags, use a canning funnel to fill with: • 2 cups pancake mix • 2 teaspoons vanilla powder Add: • 1 packet shortening • 1 container syrup (if using) • 1 package optional additions Label each bag: To prepare, add 1 cup of water to dry ingredients and stir well until blended. Stir in the nuts, dried fruit, or chocolate chips, if included. Heat a skillet over medium-high heat and add some shortening. When melted and hot, add batter ¼-cup at a time and cook until fully bubbled and golden. Flip and cook until browned on the other side. Cook the remaining batter in batches, add more shortening as needed. Serve with syrup. Makes about 16 (4-inch) pancakes.

Julie Languille owns www.dinnersinaflash.com, a dinner planning website with thousands of recipes compiled to make dinner planning, shopping and cooking easy for families.

12 WestCoastFamilies.com


April 2013 13


camp feature

Marshmallows & Meltdowns How to Survive Summer Camp Season by Michele Kambolis

t

here’s nothing like the wide-eyed camper, ready to forge into the uncharted candy- and iPad-free territory of the wilderness (OK, they do get a flashlight). Every spring countless parents begin the hunt for the perfect child-camp fit, knowing the decision may as easily be a hit as a flop (with the latter resulting in months, if not years, of complaints about that terrible experience). So why do we bother? While the prep is considerable, the benefits are three-fold: camp is a natural way for our children to safely take important steps towards independence; it’s good old-fashion fun; and it gives parents some much needed breathing room in school-free months. But choosing, registering, and surviving camp can be as hairy as a three-legged race – here’s a few tips to guide you through the process.

Pitch Your Tent Like a good scout, parents are always prepared. Here’s 4 ways to ease the anxiety of summer separation. Don’t be left scrambling. Whether you are arranging day or over night camps, last minute decisions can be a set-up for regret. Plan early (and confirm early registration dates) as good camps and spots fill up fast, leaving parents scrambling for solutions. Get the kids involved. After you’ve done a little investigating and have a general lay of the land, bring the kids into the conversation. Giving them some input will not only allow them the opportunity to make independent decisions, it may make them more invested in the experience: Involved kids are empowered kids. Let familiarity work its magic. Taking the time to introduce your campgoer to at least one camp instructor well in advance will go a long ways towards calming pre-camp anxiety. Attachment is king when it comes to camp success and the biggest impressions are the relationships built, so taking the time to make connections early will help set the stage for a confident start.

by-step list of practical tools to help them cope (mindful breathing, talking with the camp counselor or writing Mum or Dad). Avoid over-focusing on how much you’ll miss them and instead discuss what you’re looking forward to once they return. When children or youth see how confident you are in their ability to manage this new step, they’re more likely to move passed any separation jitters – believing in themselves gets them half way there. Campers should stay in their comfort zone. Parents often choose camps that specialize in their child’s comfort zone – hockey players can be found at hockey camps and art lovers are first to sign up at Arts Umbrella. While staying with the familiar can build confidence, consider balancing your campers experience by encouraging uncharted territory. Camps that introduce new experiences and skills can be exhilarating and build a confidence that just can’t be found with the familiar.

Catching worry bugs. Find out what worries your child about camp and troubleshoot early. Whether it’s bugs, new foods, or sleeping without Mum close by, preparing to combat anticipated worries with a well thought out plan of attack can help calm nerves. Ask your child “What’s the worse thing you believe will happen?” and “What is the probability that will actually come true”? When even young children use their wise mind to calm their emotional mind they realize how illogical worries can be.

Isn’t it just glorified daycare? Deadlines, packing, stress, worry – is it really worth the fuss? While it’s not a fit for every child, researchers tell us most camp goers benefit greatly. In fact, the Canadian Summer Camp Research Project from the University of Waterloo found that kids who participated in provincially accredited camps improved in several key areas: social integration and citizenship, environmental awareness, attitudes towards physical activity, emotional intelligence, and self- confidence and personal development.

Pack Away the Camp Myths

Once you’ve survived early registration and fitting two weeks of clothes in one tiny napsack—the great outdoors will be a cinch! After slicing and dicing the summer camp schedule your kids will be thrilled and you’ll get some much deserved personal time – in theory.

Homesick equals unhappiness. Most parents assume and dread the homesickness that their child will inevitably face upon separation – but homesickness does not equal unhappiness. While it’s a natural sign of attachment for a child to long for their parent at some point during camp, most also report they’re enjoying themselves. Letting your child know that they “may” become homesick and planning ways to cope will help assure them that they have the ability to manage difficult emotions. Making a step-

14 WestCoastFamilies.com

Michele Kambolis is a registered Child and Family Therapist and Parent Educator dedicated to mental health awareness. Her weekly column, Parent Traps, appears in the Monday edition of The Vancouver Sun. Twitter: @Kambolis www.michelekambolis.com


April 2013 15


camp 2013

••••••••••••••••••••••••

camp name location basic description website Advertisers listed in bold Camp BowIsle

Bowen Island

Outdoor, recreational, cultural & spiritual

www.bowisle.com

Camp Deka

Cariboo

Outdoor adventure

www.vanymca.org/camps

Camp Douglas

Roberts Creek, Sunshine Coast

Christian outdoor Camp

www.campdouglas.ca

Camp Elphinstone

Gibsons

Outdoor adventure

www.vanymca.org/camps

Camp Fircom

Vancouver

Nature education, esp. for Van. eastside residents

www.fircom.ca

Camp Firwood (Bellingham)

Bellingham WA

Outdoor Adventure, multisport

www.campfirwood.org

Camp Goodtimes

Vancouver & Maple Ridge

For children with history of cancer

www.campgoodtimes.org

Camp Grafton

Shuswap Lake

Outdoor Adventure

www.campgrafton.ca

Camp Hatikvah

Okanagan

Active camp for Jewish

www.camphatikvah.com

Camp Homewood

Quadra Island

Outdoor Adventure, horsemanship, sailing

www.homewood.bc.ca

Camp Imadene

Mesachie Lake, Vancouver Island

Outdoor Camp

www.imadene.com

Camp Jubilee

Indian Arm, Mt Seymour

Land & water Challenge skills

www.campjubilee.ca

Camp Luther

Mission

Fun adventure

www.campluther.ca

Camp Mackenzie

Enderby

Outdoor, Arts & Leadership

www.mackenziecamp.ca

Camp Narnia

Nanoose Bay

Adventure & imagination

www.campnarnia.blogspot.ca

Camp Potlatch

Howe Sound

Adventure camping

www.bgc-gv.bc.ca

Camp Pringle

Shawnigan Lake

Outdoor adventure, leadership, family camps

www.camppringle.com

Camp Qwanoes

Crofton

Outdoor Adventure

www.qwanoes.ca

Camp Squeah

Fraser canyon

Outdoor education

www.campsqueah.hopebc.ca

Camp Summit

Squamish

Outdoor adventure

www.campsummit.ca

Camp Thunderbird

Sooke

Outdoor Adventure & leadership

www.victoriay.com/campthunderbird

Comox Valley Youth Music Centre

Courtenay

Music camp

www.cymc.ca

Cultus Lake United Church Camp

Cultus Lake

Adventure

www.cultuslakecamp.ca

Dave Murray Summer Ski & Snowboard Camp

Whistler

Ski & Snowboard

www.skiandsnowboard.com

Digital Media Academy

UBC Campus

Computer & digital media camp

www.digitalmediaacademy.org

Eaglehearts Academy

Shawnigan Lake

Dance, fine arts

www.eaglearts.ca

Easter Seal Camp Shawnigan

Various Locations

For kids with disabilities

www.eastersealscamps.ca

Eureka Camp Society

Gibsons, Deka Lake

Children with invisible disabilities

www.eurekacamp.ca

Evans Lake Summer Camp

Evans Lake, Squamish

Outdoor Adventure

www.evanslake.com

Film & Television School

Galiano Island

Performing arts, tv & video

www.giftsfilms.com

Fireside Adventures

Various locations throughout BC

Outdoor adventure camp

www.creativetoolbox.ca

Gardom Lake

Enderby

Outdoor Adventure

www.gardomlake.ca

Green Bay Bible Camp

West Kelowna

Water camp

www.greenbay.bc.ca

Guitar Workshop Plus

Vancouver

Guitar, bass, drum, keyboard and vocal

www.guitarworkshopplus.com

Imadene

Mesachie Lake

Outdoor Adventure

www.imadene.com

Island Escapades

Salt Spring Island

Eco Education programs

www.islandescapades.com

Kawkawa

Hope

Outdoor Adventure & leadership

www.kawkawa.com

Keats Camps

Keats Island/ Gibsons

Outdoor water aventure Camp

www.keatscamps.com

Latona

Gambier Island

Outdoor Adventure & Education

www.camplatona.com

Miriam

Gabriola Island

Jewish adventure camp

www.campmiriam.org

Owaissi (Kelowna)

Kelowna

Outdoor Adventure

www.campoac.com

Salvation Army Camp Sunrise

Gibsons

For children who have experienced tragedy

www.campsunrise.ca

Sasamat

Sasamat Lake, Port Moody

Outdoor adventure camp

www.sasamat.org

Silver Lake Camp

Peachland

Outdoor Adventure

www.ymcaokanagan.ca

SLS Summer Rugby Academy

Shawnigan Lake

Rugby

www.slssummerrugbyacademy.com

Stillwood Camp

Lindell Beach

Outdoor Adventure

www.stillwood.ca

Strathcona WYLD Camp

Strathcona Provincial Park

Outdoor Adventure & leadership

www.strathcona.bc.ca

Sunnybrae Bible Camp

Shuswap Lake

Adventure

www.sunnybrae.ca

The YES

Cowichan Lake

Leadership camp

www.theyes.ca

Timberline Ranch

Maple Ridge

Outdoor adventure & sports

www.timberlineranch.com

Tulahead

Princeton

Outdoor Adventure

www.camptulahead.com

Webbs Holiday Acres

Aldergrove

Horse Camp

www.webbsholidayacres.ca

Whistler Teen Adventure Camp

Whistler

Outdoor adventure camp & ESL

www.tamwood.com

Zajac Ranch

Mission

For children with life threatening or chronic illnesses

www.zajacranch.com

16 WestCoastFamilies.com

More online! Go to www.westcoastfamilies.com to see even more camps!


guide listings

• part 1: residential & family camps

length cost (range) age range phone # Religious swimming biking music arts

for kids for kids with mental with physical health challenges challenges

7 days

$575 - $675

8-17 yrs

877.923.2442

y

y

n

y

y

n

n

1, 2 or 4 week

$398-$1967

8-17 yrs

604-939-9622

n

y

n

y

y

y

y

5 days

$360 +

5-16 yrs(+fam pgm) 866.885.3355

y

y

n

y

y

n

n

1 or 2 weeks

$629 -$1997

7-17 yrs(+fam pgm) 604.939.9622

n

y

n

y

y

y

y

3-14 days

$160+

7-18 yrs (+fam pgm) 604-662-7746

y

n

n

n

n

n

n

6 & 7 days

$329 -$449

8-18 yrs

y

y

n

y

y

n

n

7 days

Free

7-18 yrs(+fam pgm) 604.675.7141

n

y

n

y

y

y

y

6 & 7 days

$275 -$300

8-17 yrs

y

y

n

y

y

n

n

6 nights-6wks

$810 +

7-15 yrs(+fam pgm) 604.263.1200

y

y

n

y

y

n

n

4 & 6 days

$200 - $490

6-19 yrs

y

y

n

y

y

n

n

5-7days

$345 -415

7-17 yrs(+fam pgm) 800.445.7575

y

y

n

y

y

n

n

4-7 days

$329 -$569

7-16 yrs

n

y

n

y

n

n

n

360.733.6840 250.320.4192 250.285.3483 604.937.7388

5 days

$275 -$370

7-17 yrs

604.826.7062

y

y

n

y

y

n

n

4 & 6 days

$195 - $378

7-16 yrs

250.838.6293

y

y

n

y

y

n

n

250.298.9238

y

n

7 days

$450

6-15 yrs

n

y

n

y

n

5 days

$400 +

7-17 yrs(+fam pgm) 604.324.2267

n

y

n

y

y

n

4, 5 & 6 days

$375 - $1500

6-15 yrs

y

y

y

y

y

n

n

7 days

$399 +

8-18 yrs(+fam pgm) 250.246.3014

y

y

y

n

n

n

n

3 days+

$185 +

6-17 yrs(+fam pgm) 604.869.5353

y

y

n

y

y

n

n

3-14 days

$225.75+

4-16 yrs(+fam pgm) 604.898.3700

n

y

y

y

y

n

n

5-26 days

$485 -$3000

7-17 yrs

n

y

n

y

y

n

n

250.743.2189

250.386.7511

1-2 weeks

$400 -$800

13+ yrs

250.338.7463

n

n

n

y

y

n

n

5 days

$250 -$385

7-18 yrs

604.858.6033

y

y

n

y

y

n

n

5 & 8 days

$1,025 -$2,195

7-12 yrs

604.902.9227

n

y

n

n

n

n

n

5 days

$695 -$1195

6-18 yrs

866.656.3342

n

n

n

y

y

y

y

14 days

$1795 -$1895

8-17 yrs

250.896.4664

n

n

n

y

y

n

n

3-7 days

n/a

6-18 yrs

604.873.1865

n

y

n

y

y

y

y

5-13 days

$816 -$1846

8-14 yrs

604.520.1155

n

y

n

n

y

y

y

6,7,8 days

$480 -$685

8-16 yrs

604.294.2267

n

y

y

n

n

n

n

5days,2weeks

$565 -$995

10+ yrs

250.539.5729

n

n

n

n

y

y

y

4-21 days

$465 -$3349

8-19 yrs

604.241.9169

n

y

n

n

y

n

y

250.838.6645

n

6 days

$270 - $350

10-16 yrs

y

y

n

y

y

n

7 days

$249 -$299

8-13 yrs(+fam pgm) 250.768.5884

y

y

n

n

y

n

n

7 days

$1320 +

12+ yrs

n

n

n

y

n

n

n

905.567.8000

5 & 7 days

$275 - $415

7-18 yrs

800.445.7575

y

y

n

y

y

n

n

6,12 &14 days

$490 - $1795

8-19 yrs

888.529.2567

n

y

n

n

n

n

n

4, 5 & 12 days

$265 -$399

7-18 yrs

604.869.9637

y

y

n

y

y

n

n

4,7,11,14 days

$349 -$928

7-18 yrs

604.925.6799

y

y

y

y

n

n

n

4 & 6 days

$375 -$400

7-18 yrs

604.340.5634

y

y

n

y

y

n

n

7, 14, 21,46,51 days

$775 -$2100

8-17 yrs yrs

604.266.2825

y

y

n

y

y

n

n

3, 4 & 5 days

$120 -$295

7-17 yrs

250.769.3676

y

y

n

y

y

n

n

6 days

$244 -$300

7-18 yrs

604.886.7232

y

y

n

y

n

n

n

5 days

$445 -$840

8-17 yrs(+fam pgm) 604.939.2268

n

y

n

y

y

n

n

2, 4 & 5 days

$125 -$350

6-14 yrs

n

y

n

y

y

n

n

5 days

$799

14-17 yrs

6 days

$346.50-$404.25 8-16 yrs

250.491.9622 250.732.3818

n

n

n

n

n

n

n

604.858.6845

y

y

n

n

n

n

n

8 - 12 days

$795 -$1440

12-17 yrs

250.286.3122

n

y

n

n

n

n

n

5 days

$235 -$360

8-18 yrs

250.835.4596

y

y

n

y

y

y

n

7 days

$650

14-18 yrs

604.662.3906

n

y

n

y

y

n

n

3-5 days

$279-$439

9-16 yrs

604.463.9278

n

y

n

n

n

n

n

7 days

$270 - $508

8-17 yrs

250.295.6233

y

y

n

y

y

n

n

5 & 7 days

$380 -$495

6-14 yrs

604.857.1712

n

y

n

n

y

n

n

1-6 weeks

$1634 -$2048

13-17 yrs

604.899.4480

n

y

y

n

n

n

n

3-7 days`

varies

7-17 yrs

604.739.0444

n

y

n

n

y

y

y

We’ve done our best to ensure the information shown here is accurate, but it is always a good idea to check with each camp to confirm

April 2013 17


packing for

sleepaway camps Every camp is different when it comes to what to bring. But you can insure that your little camper has more good memories (“made friends”, “learned how to canoe”), than bad memories (“one thousand bug bites”, “got lost on the way to the outhouse at night”) if you pack thoughtfully. Space is clearly at a premium, but these extras will go a long way to ensuring that even if Junior is pinched by a crab or falls in the mud during tug-of-war, he’ll remember how comfy and prepared he was for the rest of the trip. Clothing that can be layered. Instead of bringing a bulky sweater or heavy jacket, consider packing three or four long t-shirts and a couple light sweaters that can go over them. You save space and your camper can add or shed layers as needed. Two disposable cameras. Waiting to get film developed is an exciting and under-rated activity, and if your kid loses one, or is snap-happy, there’s an extra. The right variety of shoes for the activities presented. New shoes can cause blisters, so bring well-worn sneakers and hiking boots. Don’t forget flip flops for the shower! First-Aid kit. Be sure to include antiseptic cream, lots of bandaids, moleskins for blisters, and after-bite spray. Of course pack any medication your child takes. Toiletries in a separate bag along with an extra shower towel. It’s nice to have a separate bag for the shower, and a towel that can dry during the day, while the other one is getting sandy at the beach. A Journal. For personal observations and memories. A flashlight and extra batteries. For reading after lights-out and bathroom-finding, among other things. An extra tote bag. Perfect for bringing home arts and crafts and any presents or souvenirs they might accumulate. Sunscreen and bug spray. This is BC after all! Self-addressed and stamped postcards or envelopes (or your contact numbers if they are allowed phone calls). For all those long letters home you’re sure not to get, but just in case!

18 WestCoastFamilies.com


April 2013 19


get green

Learning “Organically” Cultural, Practical Knowledge from Your Local Community Garden By Stephanie MacDonald

o

h, the mortifying moment that you learn that your children believe all carrots are created baby-sized. Or, when you notice your child is visibly repelled by the “weird lunch” of the student sitting next to her. You think to yourself, “I’m a conscientious parent, how did this happen?”We have come a long way from the frozen and canned diets of the past, but in an urban environment, our kids are usually removed from the production of their foods. We feed our kids organic foods, whole foods, we teach them to eat their veggies from the beginning, but there are so many benefits to working with your kids to grow even a part of what goes on your table. When you join a community garden, even if you have a back yard of your own, all the benefits of growing your own food and involving your kids multiply exponentially. Becoming part of a community garden is a great way for people who don’t have access to their own land to grow their own food, but the positive effects of community gardening go so far beyond that. Kids, especially, can learn and grow from the experience in many different ways. Kids love learning from doing. What may be a dry lecture on farming in school can become a fascinating learning exercise when you can get your hands dirty and watch something grow. Patience and the science of plant biology both come to your child naturally when they are involved in the process of growing things. Success and failure are all part of gardening, and figuring out why the kale went gangbusters but the tomatoes never ripened teaches both kids and adults to learn from experience, and to study and experiment to produce optimal results. One key benefit to gardening within a community is the exchange of information between gardeners from different cultures, generations, and levels of experience. Most gardeners love talking, teaching what they know, and commiserating on the tough aspects of trial and error in a garden; and kids love asking questions. Different cultures can mingle in a garden and kids can see the types of things that other people are growing. It opens up their eyes to the world of food beyond what they are used to, and may even expand their palate.

being developed are joining up to garden with other people in order to socialize, learn and take advantage of group tools, materials and labour. Surrey is a good example of a city that was very agricultural but is now becoming increasingly urbanized, and forward-thinking city planners are including lots of space for community-minded gardeners of the future in their designs. “We are seeing a slow but steady increase in demand for community gardens,” says Owen Croy, Surrey’s Manager of Parks. “We already have four gardens on city parkland and outside the Surrey city core, we have plans for more. We are also very open to people getting together and proposing additional garden space.” So even if you live outside the city, or even if you have a back yard of your own, becoming active in a community garden can enhance the happiness and wellbeing of your whole family, while making your community stronger and a more friendly, healthy place to live. And if there isn’t a community garden near you, be a hero and start one! Your kids and future generations will thank you.

Even if growing vegetables isn’t your thing, there are many other foodproducing cooperative projects all over the Lower Mainland, including a community orchard and berry patch near Trout Lake, a garden of indigenous edible plants near Joyce SkyTrain, and a permaculture food forest growing in North Vancouver.

Find the community garden nearest to you

In a community garden, particularly on “work party” days, families can work with other families and individuals for the common upkeep of the garden, and this shows young people how fun and rewarding it is to work together as a team. This is a great way to meet, connect, and engage with your neighbours, and the resulting communication strengthens the community as a whole.

www.richmondfoodsecurity.org

Community gardens turn negative spaces into positive spaces, reducing crime, improving the urban ecosystem by filtering rainwater, increasing oxygen and green space, and this positive effect is not limited to urban community gardens. More and more, people in traditionally agricultural areas that are

20 WestCoastFamilies.com

Vancouver

www.vancouver.ca/people-programs/start-a-new-community-garden

Richmond Burnaby

www.baraga.ca

North Vancouver

www.ediblegardenproject.com

General resources

www.communitygarden.org www.cityfarmer.info


April 2013 21


wcf news >> Scouting Youth Inspire Change – One Good Turn at a Time If one good turn deserves another, then 100,000 good turns deserve the same. Designed to spread friendliness and compassion throughout the country, Good Turn Week returns on April 13-21 and Scouts Canada invites all Canadians to participate.

>> The Wildlife Conservation Society Expands the WCS Run for the Wild For Worldwide Participation The Wildlife Conservation Society is celebrating the fifth anniversary of the WCS Run for the Wild – this year dedicated to elephants – by expanding the annual 5k run/walk at the Bronx Zoo to encourage participation from around the world.

Good Turn Week was established by Scouting youth to encourage Canadians of all ages to reach out and make a difference in the lives of other people and contribute to the development of stronger, friendlier communities. “Every Scout lives by the principle to always help others. With Good Turn Week, we simply ask Canadians to perform one act of kindness to help create a happier society,” says Kaylee Galipeau, National Youth Commissioner and Chair of the National Youth Network, Scouts Canada. “The best part is that it works both ways – doing a Good Turn not only makes someone else’s day, but the individual also reaps the reward through the gratifying feelings it brings.”

The new WCS Run for the Wild: World engages wildlife enthusiasts from around the globe and allows them to make tracks for elephants from wherever they are. “Virtual” participants can run on their own, start their own team, or create their own fundraiser to contribute to WCS’s work to save this iconic species. They can also support teams or runners at the WCS Run for the Wild event in the Bronx Zoo.

During the week, potentially more than 100,000 Scouts will pass along a Good Turn bracelet for each act of kindness they perform and encourage the recipient to pay it forward, creating a chain of goodwill spreading across the country. Of course, those who don’t receive a bracelet can still do a Good Turn and share it with Scouts Canada by texting “Good Turn” with a description of their good deed to 51051 or submitting it via www.scouts.ca/goodturn.

Each year, WCS dedicates the WCS Run for the Wild to a different animal species in need of conservation. The decision to dedicate this year’s event to elephants was made out of necessity. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says that the illegal wildlife trade is now a multi-billion dollar industry that threatens thousands of species around the world. Elephants have been particularly hard hit with 2011 considered the worst year since 1989 for the illegal poaching of elephants for their ivory.

1. Donate blood, clothes, furniture, toys, books or food – or give money to a charity.

The fifth annual 5k-run/walk takes place on Saturday, April 27, 2013 at the Bronx Zoo and is dedicated to saving elephants, their habitat, and other wildlife. Since its inception in 2009, more than 23,000 people have participated and $2.6M has been raised through donations, registration, and sponsorship. Those who cannot be in New York for the event at the zoo can participate in the WCS Run for the Wild: World between now and the end of April.

7. Visit a nursing home just to chat with one of the residents.

Visit www.crowdrise.com/WCSRunfortheWild

22 WestCoastFamilies.com

These 10 Good Turns are easy to do: 2. Volunteer for a community program, or at a local food bank or shelter. 3. Help an elderly neighbour with grocery shopping or a household chore. 4. Write a letter to the Canadian forces thanking them for their service. 5. Feed or adopt an abandoned animal. 6. When shoveling snow or raking leaves, do the same for your neighbour. 8. Bring a special snack or lunch for your colleagues/classmates. 9. Buy a homeless person a meal. 10. Help someone who is short of change at the store checkout. To follow the Good Turn Week momentum and see what Good Turns other Canadians are doing visit the interactive website at scouts.ca/goodturn, follow @scoutscanada on Twitter and like Scouts Canada on Facebook www,facebook.com/scoutscanada.


>> Earth Day Canada Issues Challenge to Canadians Earth Day Canada is issuing an action-based challenge during April urging all Canadians (kids, classrooms, groups, businesses, individuals and families) to make positive changes to their daily habits. Called Act for the Planet, the challenge runs from April 1 to April 30, 2013 and encourages people to take up activities that will demonstrate just how easy it is to make daily routines greener (and healthier). “We know that beyond air, food and water quality, the types of products we use on a daily basis, as well as the amount of activity we get, can have substantial effects on our health and the environment,” says Jed Goldberg, President of Earth Day Canada. Called Act for the Planet, Earth Day Canada’s challenge runs from April 1 to April 30, 2013 and encourages people to take up activities that will demonstrate just how easy it is to make daily routines greener (and healthier). Fun and easy actions with step-by-step guides include: • Build a Bug House


>> Race to the End of the Earth at the Royal BC Museum Organized by the American Museum of Natural History in New York, in collaboration with the Royal BC Museum and the Musée des Confluences in Lyon, France, Race to the End of the Earth recounts one of the most stirring tales of Antarctic exploration: the quest to be the first to reach the South Pole in 1911-1912. The exhibition explores the epic adventures of Norwegian Roald Amundsen and Captain Robert Falcon Scott of the British Royal Navy on their respective 3,000-kilometre journeys from the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf to the Pole and back. Race to the End of the Earth features photographs, paintings, and original artifacts from Amundsen’s and Scott’s expeditions, placing visitors in the midst of Antarctic exploration and research at the dawn of the last century. A highlight of the exhibition is the life-sized re-creations of Scott’s hut at Cape Evans, , and Amundsen’s underground workrooms, where his crew was able to work on their gear protected from the extreme wind and cold outside. A video projection, digital map and other interactive exhibits reveal what scientists are learning today about Antarctica’s surprising sub-ice landscape, ocean currents and weather, and how people live year-round in this forbidding yet fascinating place.

• Grow and Eat Sprouts
 • Reconnect with Nature 
 • Swap Stuff 
 • Start an Anti-idling Campaign. On April 1, 2013, join the conversation on Facebook for daily reminders, more ideas and “super challenges!” Or visit www.earthday.ca and download the checklist to work through the actions at your own pace. Join other Canadians this spring to make change a habit!

April 2013 23


mom westcoast

Tovah Paglaro David Suzuki’s “Queen of Green” By Stephanie MacDonald | Photo by Dylan Doubt

“I know people always say this, but it is true that having children shifts your priorities... 24 WestCoastFamilies.com


i

f she had a throne, it would be made of recycled bamboo; her crown of homegrown produce – but she doesn’t have much time to sit around munching on her headdress. You’re much more likely to find Tovah Paglaro blogging about her passion for eco-friendly living, engaging families around the country to live more sustainably, chasing after her three children, or digging in the garden. As the current Queen of Green at the David Suzuki Foundation, this former awardwinning filmmaker and busy mom of Asher (seven-and-a-half ), Bergandy (four-and-ahalf ), and Weston (two), writes an e-newsletter about living green, and answers green living questions from around the world on Twitter, her blog, and a syndicated Metro column. When she ascended to the throne five months ago, Tovah was not new to writing about sustainable living, with many years behind her of writing her own column for the online magazine Green and Thrifty as well as her own weekly column “Growing Up Green”. When the former, and original, Queen of Green, left The David Suzuki Foundation to have a baby last year, Tovah was a natural successor. “I was involved as a green living coach for the former Queen of Green, Lindsay Coulter. As a coach, I got to recruit five families from the community and coach them along the path to living more sustainably. I put out an email to my son’s grade one class, and there was a lot of interest.” The first year of the Green Coaches, Lindsay signed up four volunteer coaches, each with five families. This year, Tovah and the foundation have almost 20 coaches and a hundred families participating. “To be a coach, you don’t have to be an expert,” explains Tovah, “the coaches learn the four modules, centred on waste management, food, household toxins, and community involvement, and then use this information to coach their families from being ‘light green’ to ‘darker green’. Everybody learns something.” The families incorporated many simple, yet meaningful changes into their everyday lives, including installing rain barrels, practicing meatless Mondays, joining organic food co-ops, arranging weekly play dates in nature, and they managed to assimilate these changes as a permanent part of their lifestyles. Despite her passion for the environment and community engagement, Tovah did not grow up on a hippie commune in the forest. Born in Northern Alberta, film and television were her first loves, and straight out of high school Tovah was knocking on doors asking for production and directing experience. She worked her way up to assistant directing and worked on many prominent series and films. While working on her degree in business and filmmaking at SFU, Tovah decided she wanted to work on her own projects, and went on to create many awardwinning films and short films. Her debut project, “When Jesse Was Born”, took the Grand Prize in the ActionCut Short Film Competition in Los Angeles, and her accolades include being shortlisted for the Best Emerging Filmmaker at the Vancouver International Film Festival for her project “Locked Out”. She was then hired as a producer at CTV where she stayed for a couple of years before heading off to do her own thing. For some people that’s devoting time to yoga, or setting up a shop; for Tovah this meant shifting her formidable energy to the thing that had become most important to her: the world that her children were going to grow up in. “I know people always say this, but it is true that having children shifts your priorities. There’s something about having a kid that makes you want to work to create the world your children will inherit.” Today Tovah keeps her thousands of readers up-to-date on the latest trends, new advances, and smart advice on how to live as lightly on the Earth as possible, effecting a sea change in thinking that will ensure that all our children get to grow up on a healthy planet.

There’s something about having a kid that makes you want to work to create the world your children will inherit.” April 2013 25


get green

A Better Way to Dry Clothes Make This The Year To “Fire Your Clothes Dryer” by Carla Knipe

w

alk down any suburban street, even on the warmest summer days, and you’re likely to hear the hum of a tumble dryer and smell the sicklysweetness of laundry products wafting from at least one house. Despite the fact that many families want to live a greener lifestyle, laundry remains a bastion of convenience versus environmental sustainability. After all, who wants to lug around heavy baskets of wet washing to a clothesline when it’s so much easier just to press a button to deal with the chore? It’s easy to forget that laundry habits were, even in the not-sodistant past, completely different. Clothes were hung outside on clotheslines on nice days, or inside on drying racks in poor weather. Tumble dryers were not common until after World War Two, and even then, many families just couldn’t afford one. This all changed during the 1960s and 70s, where advertising campaigns by appliance manufacturers promoted dryers as modern, timesaving devices and also perpetuated the myth that hanging up clothes was passé and associated with impoverished tenements, not modern progress. Owning a dryer is now the norm. Clotheslines have disappeared from most backyards. However, if you ask people about a vivid childhood memory, the smell of fresh, sundried laundry is often at the top of their list. In the last few decades, the cost of electricity has substantially increased and power consumption by households is at an all-time high. Other than the fridge, the washing machine and tumble dryer are the most energyguzzling appliances in the house. The simple fact is, changing your laundry habits can reduce your power bills by an average of $25/month, eliminate a substantial amount of C02 emissions from entering Earth’s atmosphere, and reduce wear and tear on your clothing (which also saves you money by helping them to last longer). Even if you don’t hang out every single wash load, you will still make noticeable changes to your household budget as well as protect our planet’s natural resources. So why is there still such resistance to air dying clothes? The first reason is that people think they aren’t allowed to. Thanks to media stories highlighting municipal clothesline bans which have often led to citizens going to court to defend their “right to dry”, many people

Other easy ways to green your laundry Do less laundry. Not everything needs to be washed after just one wearing. Evaluate whether clothes and towels can be used a couple of times before they are thrown into the laundry pile. This greatly cuts down on the number of wash loads per week—not to mention the amount of time spent doing laundry. Use Less Products. Often, using half of the recommended dose of laundry soap still results in clean clothes, even in hard water areas. Using fabric softener every time isn’t necessary and can leave an oily residue that weakens clothing fibres. Also, chlorine bleach might seem like a great idea but it contaminates waterways, and traditional chemical dry-cleaning is definitely not a “green” way to care for your clothes.

26 WestCoastFamilies.com

believe that it is illegal to hang clothes outside. Clothesline bans still exist in many American communities, especially in condominium and apartment complexes. However, there is no government law here either in Canada or BC banning outside clotheslines. Some power companies in Canada have ongoing programs to distribute free clotheslines to encourage air-drying laundry. Though it may seem ironic that utility companies are promoting power conservation, there is a reason behind it. Several provinces, including BC and Ontario, have implemented government-legislated energy efficiency targets that must be met. They also realize that it is more cost effective to encourage people to use less electricity rather than build new electrical infrastructure. There is a growing movement of support—from bloggers to frugal families to national environmental groups—that want to make line drying acceptable again. Project Laundry List www.laundrylist.org, founded in 1996, has partnered with North American governments, environmental organizations and local community associations to promote the “Slow Laundry” movement. Since 1998, they have named April 19th as National Hanging Out Day, to encourage people to take the first steps in breaking the tumble-drying habit. So, will you challenge yourself to give your dryer the pink slip? April, which is Earth Month, is a good time to make the break. You can be an environmental leader right in your own backyard, just by changing the way you do laundry…one load at a time.

Use eco-friendly products. Most name-brand laundry products are petroleumbased and aren’t good for sensitive skin--or the environment. You may pay a little more initially for natural laundry products but they are a much better choice for skin, clothes and municipal water supplies. However, just because a product says it’s “environmentally friendly” on the label, it may not be. Do your research and find out whether the product is truly made from natural ingredients. Make the Switch to Front-Loaders. In many parts of the world, front-loading washers and dryers are the norm. Here in North America, they are relatively new. Front loaders are called “High Efficiency” appliances for a reason, as they tend to be more space-saving and use less water and electricity because gravity helps to move the clothes around instead of a central agitator (in the case of top-loading washers). Don’t Iron Everything Irons use a lot of energy. Often, hanging clothes immediately after washing will avoid wrinkles. You can fluff clothes briefly in a dryer just before folding.


momevents westcoast

Adult Events for the Hip Mom Around Town! The Bakers Market Moberly Arts & Cultural Centre Ongoing until May 4, 11am-3pm This is a gathering of professional, amateur; student & Mommy bakers who get together to buy and sell their baked goods to the community. Inspired by farmers markets (no veggies please), just lots of sweet & savoury baked goodies. www.bakersmarket.com Leisure Fair 2013 Trout Lake Community Centre April 3, 6-8:30pm Hosted by Developmental Disabilities Association, Vancouver Parks & Recreation, Sunny Hill, and Trout Lake Community Centre, explore recreation resources and demonstrations available for children and youth with disabilities. Admission is free 604.301.2831 Mis Hermanas: Thicker than Water, My Sisters and I Vancouver Playhouse April 6, This is a personal story, but a story that in Canada – a land of immigrants – could be anybody’s story. Through narrative, dance, sound effects, stills and video projections, the audience will be taken on a journey from Mexico to Spain and from Spain to Canada. 604.737.1273 | www.flamencorosario.org Walnut Grove Community Kidswap North Langley Community Church April 6, 10am-1pm Need gently used kids’ toys or clothing? It’s only $1 admission and all proceeds go to women’s programs such as the spring Single Mom’s Saturday. www.nlcc.ca/Swap Motown Meltdown Tri-Cities Red Robinson Show Theatre April 6, 8pm Dance to the sweet sounds of soul music with some of the most seasoned session musicians in the country. Advanced Tickets: $30 www.ticketmaster.ca

Girl’s Night Out River Springs Recreation Centre, Coquitlam April 20, 7pm For the 5th time, the Gaby Davis Foundation and My Girlfriend’s Closet are partnering together for another fun night of shopping, wine, appies, live entertainment and a fabulous fashion show.Tickets are $20 and must be purchased in advance. Ladies must be 19+. Proceeds and 20% of sales benefitting the Gaby Davis Foundation which helps families affected by childhood cancer. 604.464.GABY(4229) | www.gabydavisfoundation.com North Shore Parents of Multiples Kids Swap Sale St. David’s United Church, 1525 Taylor Way April 20, 9:30am-12noon Find your way to the spring kids’ swap sale hosted by the North Shore Parents of Multiples. Tables piled high with great deals on gently used toys, clothes and gear for babies and kids of all ages. $2 for adults, kids are free. www.northshoremoms.ca Busy Bump Baby Shower The Sutton Place Hotel Vancouver April 21, 2-5pm This is a fun, interactive and informative afternoon featuring The Top 10 Items to Purchase for Baby as well as expert speakers on a variety of pregnancy and parenting related topics, plus lots of amazing prizes to be won! www.busybump.com Historical Performance Ensemble in Go 4 Baroque! Scotiabank Dance Centre April 25,12noon The company will perform a program of authentic social and theatrical Baroque dances recreated from 18th century written notations featuring beautifully and accurately constructed garments, and music played live on reconstructions of period instruments. Tickets $12 604.606.6400 | www.thedancecentre.ca

8th Annual Wine Tasting Redwoods Golf Course April 26, 7-9pm Enjoy a silent auction, entertainment and door prizes while tasting wine! Tickets are $65 in advance 604.534.1155 | www.langleycdc.com Got Craft? Maritime Labour Centre April 27-28, 10am-5pm Vancouver’s largest indie craft fair is back with top-notch vendors, new DIY workshops, and delicious food carts, all at a brand new home. The first 50 guests through the door receive one of the coveted swag bags! Admission is $3 (cash at the door) www.gotcraft.com Nutrition and the Special Needs Child University Women’s Club at Hycroft April 28, 8:45am Discuss such topics as Nutrition and the Special Needs Child, Bringing Out the Best in Children and Teens with Special Needs, and a panel discussion Advocating for Your Special Needs Child. Cost: $55. Please pre register. www.edutalksseminars.com Once Upon a Belly Roundhouse Community Centre April 28, 10am-2:30pm An informative and exciting festival for new and expectant parents, providing an amazing environment that brings together everything your growing family will need. Admission is by donation. www.onceuponabelly.com

If you’d like WestCoast Families magazine delivered to your event free of charge, please email your request to publisher@westcoastfamilies.com.

The Original Bridal Swap ~ Her Something Old is Your Something New! The Roundhouse Community Centre April 7, This is an exciting and popular eco-friendly event in a fun and chic setting where past brides sell their gently used wedding decor and personal DIY decor items to future brides! Think fancy flea market with music and hors d’oeuvres! 604.537.3575 | www.bridalswap.ca Children’s Toy & Clothes Market Douglas Park Community Centre April 7, 10am to 1pm Buy or sell used children’s toys and clothes. Only used materials can be sold. No merchants or businesses. 604.257.8130 Nifty for Fifty Heritage Hall April 14, 11am–8pm This sale features approximately 31 Vancouver designers selling everything from clothing to shoes and accessories for $50 or less! Cash only. $1 admission at the door. www.ferrmelissa.wix.com/niftyforfiftysale

The Children’s Party Specialists Face painting, balloon animals, arts and crafts, and more.

604-318-1261 • www.partyarts.ca April 2013 27


community The Secret World of Sharks and Rays Vancouver Aquarium Ongoing until April 29 Ever wonder what makes a shark a fierce hunter or how they achieve incredible stealth and speed through the water? Then join us this spring for The Secret World of Sharks and Rays to explore the mysterious lives of these fascinating creatures and their cousins, the skates, rays and ratfishes. 604.659.3474 | www.vanaqua.org Discovery Days Drop-In Fraser River Discovery Centre First and third Sundays until April 20 Inspired by the Fraser River and their interactive exhibits, you will discover interesting facts about the Mighty Fraser River during our fun, hands-on, interactive Discovery Days Drop-In programs. 604.521.8401 www.fraserriverdiscovery.org Burnaby Railway’s Season Grand Opening 120 North Willingdon Opening Easter day, Fridays-Mondays until December, 11am-5pm See 4 big days of 1/8 scale live steam trains in action! Book your birthday parties & private functions now & over 2 kilometers of track & 70 switches. www.burnabyrailway.org www.wcra.org www/fvhrs.org Annual Easter Egg Hunt Kilby Historic Site April 1 Join in for the annual Easter egg hunt on the grounds of the historic site and as always splendid crafts for the children throughout the day. www.kilby.ca

28 WestCoastFamilies.com

Critter Caper-Case of the Lost Bunny Burnaby Lake Regional Park April 1, 12noon-4pm Examine teeth marks, hair, and other clues to retrace the bunny’s steps and help it find the way home. Allow one hour. Meet at the Burnaby Lake Nature House, 4519 Piper Avenue off Winston Street. www.burnaby.ca

Easter in Dundarave Dundarave Village April 6-8, Kick off the weekend with the Annual Southern Straits Classic Yacht Race. Enjoy music, a pancake breakfast and a visit from the Easter Bunny. Then join in the Easter Egg Hunt and the ever-popular plush bunny give-a-way! www.southernstraits.ca

Cherry Blossom Festival 5251 Oak St April 4-30 Through a wide array of diverse programs from Cherry Jam Downtown, Haiku Invitational, Bike the Blossoms, Japan Fair, BC Blossom Watch Photo Contest, Cherry Scouts Program, Tree Talks & Walks & the Cherry Blossom Viewing Map, the festival captures the exuberance of the blossoming with cultural programming for the whole community to enjoy. www.vcbf.ca

Heroes Hockey Challenge Abbotsford Entertainment & Sports Centre April 7, 3pm The game will be played in two 20 minute halves, with a minor hockey match at the intermission between the NHL legends and local minor hockey players. There will also be an NHL legends autograph session at the end of the game. All tickets are $28.25 866.977.2372

Robotics Club at Science World Saturdays from April 6–May 11, 10am–2pm For kids aged 9-13 years old who have always wanted to build a robot, you will be introduced to the world of VEX Robotics and LEGO Mindstorms in a fun, hands-on and interactive way. $125 + tax (Members) for six 4-hour sessions. 604.443.7440 | www.scienceworld.ca

Spring Carnival West End Community Centre April 13, 10am-2pm Enjoy games, bouncy castle, arts & crafts, make a flower fascinator, decorate a cookie and enjoy some music! This will be interactive for the whole family to enjoy a morning together and celebrate spring. Please pre-register to ensure your spot, space limited. $5/child, $6/Day-of. 604.257.8333

Try Hockey Richmond Ice Centre, Forum Rink April 6, 1-3pm This is a free event and is suitable for children of all ages. Ice skates and hockey equipment will be provided. www.richmondminorhockey.com

Grouse Mountain Park Jams 2013 Grouse Mountain April 13, 11am-1pm Whether you are a skier or snowboarder, guy or girl, young or old, come on out to win loads of prizing and have a good time! Grousepark. com bloggers will be onsite to cover the events! There is no entry fee. www.grousemountain.com

Cloverdale Spring Fair Shannon Hall at the Cloverdale Fairgrounds April 6, 10am-6pm Vendors will be selling a wide variety of products and food. Entertainment for the kids will include magic and balloon animals as well as face painting and other activities for the whole family! Admission is free and canned food will be accepted for the food bank. www.cloverspringfair.com

Celebrate Spring: Festival of Colour Nikkei National Museum & Cultural Centre April 13, 11:30am-4pm This annual family friendly event features tons of Japanese activities and traditions showcasing Japanese kimono dressings, tea ceremonies and kids crafts. 604.777.7000 | www.nikkeiplace.org


calendar Early Bird Catches the Concert Get Loud Sing a Long Roundhouse Community Arts & Recreation Centre April 13, 9:30am This sing a long concert featuring local children’s entertainer Will Stroet will surely provide full entertainment for your kids! Prices start at $10 for kids 17 and under, $12 for adults 18 and over or $40 for a family of four with two kids under 17. 604.713.1800 www.roundhouse.ca www.childrenshearing.ca Owl’s Annual Open House OWL, 3800 72nd Street April 13-14, 10am-3pm Tour the facility; meet the volunteers and education birds. Learn what is involved in rescue and rehabilitation of magnificent raptors. A rehabilitated raptor will be released each day at 1pm! 604.946.3171 | www.owlcanada.ca Mommies N Munchkins Fair Fort Langley Community Hall April 14, 10am-3pm This event is targeted towards families in the lower mainland and features a variety of vendors, entertainment and excellent cuisine! Admission is $2 and children under 12 are free. www.mommiesnmunchkins.com The Little Mermaid 13055 Huntley Ave. Surrey April 15-18, 7pm Betty Huff Theatre Company is presenting the Disney musical, The Little Mermaid. Tickets are $6 and available at the door. 604.585.3104 Celebrate Earth Day Art Festival April 20 This free, family-oriented event features exhibitors from the community, local institutions and commerce showcasing their environmental activities. 604.463.5545

Earth Day at Britannia Mine Museum Britannia Mine Museum April 20, 10am-3pm Make a recycled planter pot, plant a seed, bring it home and watch it grow. Done every hour. 604.896.2233 | britanniaminemuseum.ca Early Years Festival April 20, 10am-3pm Chuck Bailey Recreation Centre, Surrey Join us for a fun family day designed for families with little ones and babies age six and under, and expecting parents too. Free! www.surrey.ca/events Goodbye Chums Kanaka Creek Regional Park April 21, 11am-3pm Release salmon fry into the creek, and celebrate the new fish hatchery opening. Meet at Bell–Irving Hatchery on 256th Street, south of Dewdney Trunk Road. 604.530.4983 | www.pacifi cparklands.com/ Projects/kanakacentre.html European Folk Dance at the Balkan Spring Festival Roundhouse Community Arts & Recreation Centre April 21, 2-3pm The performance features the rich and colourful costumes, music and dances from Bulgaria, Romania and Serbia, ranging from simple traditional village dances, to very complex dances with fast, intricate steps. www.newworks.ca EarthFest Burnaby Lake Rowing Pavilion April 21, 11am-3pm This free event, organized by the Wildlife Rescue Association of BC, offers many activities for nature lovers including canoe rides and the opportunity to make & take home your own bird or bee box, and guided walks around the park. www.wildliferescue.ca

Watershed Creek Fish Release Watershed Park April 21, 12noon-2pm Children and families are provided with buckets of tiny fish (chum and coho fry) to release into Watershed creek to help boost local fish stock and kick off Earth Week. 604.946.3293 Behind the Scenes Maplewood Farms April 23 & 27, 11am-2pm How interesting would it be if you could be a farmer for a day? Children get a ‘Behind the Scenes’ look into the operation of the farm including egg collection and washing, animal grooming, setting up feed and exploring “Staff Only” areas. Sessions go for about one hour. 604.929.5610 | www.maplewoodfarm.bc.ca Party for the Planet Central City Plaza, Surrey April 27, 10am-9pm Celebrate BC’s largest Earth Day celebration at this free event boasting a diverse line-up of topnotch performers including a unique variety of highly talented children’s performers will get kids on their feet. www.surrey.ca/partyfortheplanet

Vancouver Lego Games; Ready, Set, Build! Burnaby Firefighters’ Club April 28 Vancouver Lego Games will be providing bricks for each person in which a theme will be announced and they will have 15 minutes to create a unique creation to go along with that theme. Judges will then choose the winner from each age category and prizes will be awarded. $10. www.vancouverlegogames.eventbrite.com Visit www.westcoastfamilies.com/events_calendar for more family friendly events in June! To have your event included in the WestCoast Families community calendar, please email your details to admin@westcoastfamilies.com.

If you’d like WestCoast Families magazine delivered to your event free of charge, please email your request to publisher@westcoastfamilies.com. April 2013 29


last look Bombs Away! Seed Bomb DIY

By Jodi Iverson

Seed bombing is a fun way to nourish & beautify barren land by dropping clay bombs containing seeds. Be mindful when tossing your little bombs, choose areas that give them the best chance of reaching maturity, always choosing non-invasive, native seeds and always avoid farmland! Try launching your bombs at home in your garden or a planter or get creative in your neighborhood by looking for potential targets in vacant lots, alleyways and anywhere that needs some joy in flower form!

materials • 1 ½ parts seeds – have fun researching what plants are native & helpful to your area! Try herbs, wildflowers, bee friendly flower mixes and more! • 2 parts potting soil • 5 parts pottery clay (available at craft or art supply stores) • 1 ½ parts water • Bucket to mix ingredients • Cardboard Box to dry and store seed balls

make it! Step 1 Mix soil & clay Step 2 Slowly add water and knead until the mixture is smooth Step 3 Knead seeds into mixture adding a small amount of water if necessary Step 4 Roll mixture into 1-2” balls Step 5 Dry seed balls for 2 days in a cardboard box (do not store in plastic!)

30 WestCoastFamilies.com


April 2013 31


WestCoast Families magazine April 2013  

The April 2013 issue of WestCoast Families magazine, from Vancouver, BC. Features on Living Green, and Summer Camp Guide for kids.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you