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Area growers sell year-round online • SHOPPING, E1

Golfer Brandon Kearney returns to Bend after tour • SPORTS, D1

WEATHER TODAY

WEDNESDAY

• September 29, 2010 50¢

Mostly sunny, unseasonably warm High 84, Low 42 Page C6

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

The incumbent’s claims

ELECTION 2010: DISTRICT 54 As the race for House District 54 marches on, The Bulletin weighs the records and claims of the candidates, then profiles each of them on Sunday.

Where does Judy Stiegler stand on local issues? By Cindy Powers The Bulletin

When Judy Stiegler, Jason Conger and Mike Kozak hit the campaign trail, they say a lot of things. Incumbent Stiegler touts her record while her challengers fire shots at her. Conger and Kozak advocate for change in Salem and have different ideas about how to make it happen. The three are running for the

FOCUS ON 54 seat representing House District 54, which includes Bend and Deschutes River Woods. First-term Democrat Stiegler, of Bend, is facing off against Bend lawyer and Republican Conger and unaffiliated real estate investment firm owner Kozak. All are stumping for votes

Today: Judy Stiegler

by putting out campaign ads, knocking on doors and appearing at debates and forums. After reviewing the candidate’s official statements, ads, websites and claims they’re making on the campaign trail, The Bulletin conducted in-depth interviews with all three. Each was asked to provide specific answers about claims or promises they’ve made. See Stiegler / A4

Thursday: Jason Conger Friday: Mike Kozak Sunday: Candidate profiles If you missed a story, visit www.bendbulletin.com/dist54

Are there wolves in Central Oregon? By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

MacArthur Foundation reveals 2010 ‘genius grants’

Prescription for burns

By Carla K. Johnson The Associated Press

CHICAGO — David Simon, creator of the HBO television series “The Wire,” is among 23 recipients of this year’s MacArthur Foundation “genius grants” — news that left him with what he described as “a Inside vague sense • OSU of guilt.” scientists T h e awarded $500,000 grants, grants were Page A4 announced T u e s d a y • Full list of by the Chi‘genius grant’ cago-based recipients, John D. and Page A4 Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. The money, paid quarterly over five years, comes with no strings, allowing winners unfettered freedom to pursue their creativity. Simon’s guilt stemmed from already being amply funded in an industry that’s “a little bit recession-proof,” he said. Still, the award’s prestige will go far with network executives. While critically acclaimed, Simon’s dissection of urban problems in “The Wire” and more recently “Treme” hasn’t yet scored Emmys or high Nielsen ratings. “It makes it easier to go into the room with the network and argue against doing the usual thing in television,” Simon said. See Grants / A4

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

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fireMike

Dake, 27, of Prineville,

Prescribed burns scheduled for this week

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In a story headlined “Employers must pay much more into PERS,” which appeared Tuesday, Sept. 28, on Page A1, a quote from Deschutes County Administrator Dave Kanner was reported incorrectly. Kanner said public employers’ pension fund contribution rates have been at historic lows for several years, and Deschutes County used that period to save up to pay for future anticipated rate increases. The Bulletin regrets the error.

MON-SAT

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Brothers

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Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Vol. 107, No. 272, 6 pages, 40 sections

FORT BRAGG, N.C. — Their parachutes were rigged. Their weapons were secured. Three days of food and supplies were strapped to their bodies. In full combat gear, hundreds of paratroopers from the 82nd Airborne Division dropped from the North Carolina sky at 23 feet per second. They hit the ground hard and scrambled to their feet, rifles ready. It was only an exercise, but for paratroopers just back from Afghanistan and Iraq it was a back-tothe-future moment, part of a new training focus that looks beyond America’s current counterinsurgency wars. For the first time in years, Army troops are training for “full-spectrum operations” — mounting large strikes against all types of enemies, not just insurgents. The paratroopers among the scrub oaks at Fort Bragg didn’t role-play at cajoling village elders, helping with bridge or road projects, or training local police and soldiers — their main duties in Afghanistan and Iraq before returning to North Carolina. Instead, their mission was to seize a simulated overseas airfield and kill or drive off imaginary enemy forces. See Training / A5

— Maj. Jason Brown, 3rd Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division

INDEX

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

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of town.

Los Angeles Times

“We’re not going backwards, but we are looking to the past to help us go back to what we do best — close with and destroy the enemy.”

MILES

Gilchrist Crescent

elevation winds, keeping the smoky conditions out

DESCHUTES COUNTY

La Pine

a controlled burn, with a

Army refocuses on training for full range of ops By David Zucchino

Multiple prescribed burns around Central Oregon have created a blanket of smoke across the region, with more to come as foresters take advantage of cooler weather to remove excess vegetation. The Deschutes National Forest and Bureau of Land Management expect to burn approximately 1,000 acres this week.

above, uses a drip torch on

Hayley Elshire was running near the Phil’s Trail complex on a cold and rainy Saturday a couple weeks ago, when she and her friend spotted two large animals about 150 feet away. “I first thought they If you go were small to mid-sized What: The Oregon deer,” said Elshire, of Fish and Wildlife Bend, but “the more we Commission meeting looked, we realized it When: 10 a.m., wasn’t deer.” Thursday Instead, Elshire and Where: The Deschutes her friend identified the County Services pair as wolves. Building, Board of “They were just Commissioners Room, huge,” she said. “That 1300 N.W. Wall St. was just the one thing that made me know for The commissioners sure it wasn’t a coyote could decide to or a fox or something ... continue the meeting The way they walk, and at 8 a.m. Friday, in the the profile of their ears same location, if the and their nose, to me is meeting goes long. what a wolf looks like.” And as sightings of wolves continue to add up and packs form in Northeast Oregon, wildlife officials say that it’s likely wolves have at least passed through the Central Oregon area. See Wolves / A5

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TOP NEWS INSIDE NORTH KOREA: Fear of instability grows for entire region, Page A3


A2 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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F / Environment

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY

NOAA: Extreme weather not over The Washington Post

A tornado watch was issued Tuesday evening for New York City and the U.S. Northeast, letting residents know conditions were right for the fourth tornado to hit New York City this summer. Two touched down Sept. 16 and one hit the Bronx in July. It’s been a year of extreme weather, from Snowmageddon in Washington, D.C., to triple-digit heat in Los Angeles and from hurricanes in the Gulf to floods in Wisconsin. And the extreme weather won’t

stop anytime soon, scientists say. David Easterling, chief of the Scientific Services Division at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climatic Data Center, said there will be more incidents of extreme weather because the planet is heating up. What we consider heat waves will become more the norm, Easterling said, and along with heat waves, heavy rainfall and flooding will increase. Plus, Easterling said, while “hurricanes have always been a problem ... the ones that do occur

will be more powerful.” The heavy rains and snows can also be attributed to the increased heat because the warmer the air, the more moisture it holds. “Expect more snow,” Easterling said, but also expect that the length of the snow season will be reduced. Former president Bill Clinton voiced his concern about climate change at the recent Clinton Global Initiative in New York. “There is every reason to believe the incidence of economically devastating natural disasters will accelerate around the

world with the changing of the climate,” he said. Despite these signs of climate change, The Washington Post’s Juliet Eilperin reports that “weakened political support for curbing emissions means the United States is unlikely to impose national limits on greenhouse gases before 2013, at the earliest. Several leading GOP candidates this fall are questioning whether these emissions even cause warming, while some key Democratic Senate candidates are disavowing the cap-and-trade bill the House passed in 2009.”

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGA MILLIONS The numbers drawn are:

2 10 13 36 38 18 x3 Nobody won the jackpot Tuesday night in the Mega Millions game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $32 million for the next drawing.

Dave Yoder / New York Times News Service

Wind turbines are seen outside Tocca da Casauria, Italy. The town produces 30 percent more energy than it uses. Thanks to power revenue, residents pay no local income taxes or fees for services like trash removal.

The wind at their backs Ancient Italian town’s turbines produce 30% surplus power By Elisabeth Rosenthal

New York Times News Service

TOCCO DA CASAURIA, Italy — The towering white wind turbines that rise ramrod straight from gnarled ancient olive groves here speak to something extraordinary happening across Italy. Faced with sky-high electricity rates, small communities across a country known more for garbage than environmental citizenship are finding economic salvation in making renewable energy. More than 800 Italian communities now make more energy than they use because of the recent addition of renewable energy plants, according to a survey this year by the Italian environmental group Legambiente. Renewable energy has been such a boon for Tocco that it makes money from electricity production and has no local taxes or fees for services like garbage removal. A quintessential Italian town of 2,700 people in Italy’s poor mountainous center, with its well-maintained church and ruined castle, Tocco is in most ways stuck in yesteryear. Old men talking politics fill gritty bars, and old women wander through the market. The olive harvest is the most important event on the calendar. Yet, from an energy perspective, Tocco is very much tomorrow. In addition to the town’s wind turbines, solar panels generate electricity at its ancient cemetery and sports complex, as well as at a growing number of private residences. “Normally when you think about energy you think about big plants, but here what’s inter-

“Normally when you think about energy you think about big plants, but here what’s interesting is that local municipalities have been very active. That this can happen in a place like Italy is really impressive.” — Edoardo Zanchini, Legambiente energy division

esting is that local municipalities have been very active,” said Edoardo Zanchini, in charge of Legambiente’s energy division. “That this can happen in a place like Italy is really impressive.” Italy is an unlikely backdrop for a renewable revolution. It has been repeatedly criticized by the European Union for failing to follow the bloc’s environmental directives. It is not on track to meet either its European Unionmandated emissions-reduction target or its commitment to get 17 percent of its total power from renewable sources by 2020, experts say. Currently, only 7 percent of Italy’s power comes from renewable sources.

Other countries But the growth of small renewable projects in towns like Tocco — not only in Italy but also in other countries — highlights the way that shifting energy economics are often more important than national planning in promoting alternative energy. Tocco was motivated to take action early because Italy had among the highest electricity rates in Europe, and nearly three times the U.S. average, and it could not cope with the wild fluctuations in fossil fuel prices and supply that prevailed during the past decade. At the same time, the costs of renewable energy have been falling rapidly. And as in much of Europe, the lure of alternative power here was sweetened by feed-in tariffs — government guarantees to buy renewable electricity at an attractive set price from any company, city or household that

produced it. In the United States, where electricity is cheap and government policy has favored setting minimum standards for the percentage of energy produced from renewable sources rather than direct economic incentives like Europe’s feed-in tariffs, stimulating alternative energy has been only mildly successful. But in countries where energy from fossil fuels is naturally expensive — or rendered so because of a carbon tax — and there is money to be made, renewable energy quickly starts to flow, even in unlikely places like Tocco. With its four wind turbines (two completed in 2007 and two last year), Tocco is now essentially energy-independent from a financial standpoint, generating 30 percent more electricity than it uses. Production of green electricity earned the town 170,000 euros, or more than $200,000, last year. The town is renovating the school for earthquake protection and has tripled the budget for street cleaners.

cording to the International Energy Agency: Italy has almost no fossil fuels of its own, and until last year, it banned nuclear power plants; new plants will take a decade to build even if strong public opposition can be overcome.

No functioning energy market Although Italy has officially opened the former state electricity monopoly, Enel, to private competition, the country does not yet have a functioning market, the energy agency has found. Large renewable projects are still rare in Italy compared with other European countries because Italian planning and permitting procedures are so complicated. The type of renewable energy coming from small towns like Tocco depends on local resources. In the northern Alpine counties there is a heavy reliance on hydropower and the burning of agricultural waste. Italy’s scorching south tilts a bit more toward solar, although wind, too, is important there because it is by far the most cost-effective renewable technology, the energy agency said.

Find It All Online

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Report: Wind can power much of East Coast By Renee Schoof

McClatchy-Tibune News Service

WASHINGTON — The strong winds off the Atlantic Ocean could become a cost-effective way to power much of the East Coast — especially the Carolinas, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Virginia, a study released Tuesday says. The report by the conservation advocacy group Oceana argues that offshore wind could generate 30 percent more electricity on the East Coast than could be generated by the region’s untapped oil and gas. It predicts that wind from the ocean could be cost-competitive with nuclear power and natural gas to produce electricity. The study appears just as new developments are starting to push U.S. efforts to catch up with Europe and China on tapping the energy in offshore wind. Great Britain last week opened the world’s largest wind farm, and China built its first pilot offshore wind farm in 2008, using turbines from the nation’s largest wind turbine producer, Sinovel. The Department of Energy earlier this month issued a draft plan for creating a U.S. offshore wind energy program. “Offshore wind energy can help the nation reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, diversify its energy supply, provide cost-competitive electricity to key coastal regions, and stimulate economic revitalization of key sectors of the economy,” the study says.

Embattled plant The nation’s first offshore wind farm, Cape Wind in Massachusetts, has received all its permits, but is embroiled in lawsuits. Opponents say the wind project could alter the habitat, risking migratory birds, sea mammals and other wildlife. In addition, they say that government subsidies tilt the economics of wind farms to give the appearance that they’re economically feasible. Oceana opposes offshore drilling and presented its study as a better alternative. The authors based their costs for offshore wind — 10 to 13 cents per kilowatt hour — on a 2007 study, but it’s also the target price that the Department of Energy has set for the next two decades. The study concludes that offshore wind could generate 127 gigawatts of power, or 48 percent of the electricity in the top 11 states with the best wind — which it ranks in order as Delaware, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, Virginia, South Carolina, Rhode Island, Maryland, Florida, New York and Georgia.

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‘Positive contribution’ Kieran McNamara, Italy desk officer for the International Energy Agency, said that although small renewable energy projects were not enough to sustain an entire industrial economy like Italy’s, they were important. “These small projects have their own intrinsic value and make a very, very positive contribution in countries where electricity prices are high,” McNamara said. High electricity prices in Italy are a result of various forces, ac-

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 29, 2010 A3

T S RUSSIA

North Koreans Mayor’s fall doesn’t settle leadership debate bolster power of ruler’s kin By Clifford J. Levy

New York Times News Service

MOSCOW — President Dmitry Medvedev has long endured questions about whether he truly rules Russia or is merely a figurehead manipulated by Vladimir Putin, the former — and possibly future — president. On Tuesday, Medvedev moved to quiet those doubts by ousting a heavyweight political rival, Moscow’s longtime mayor, who had tried in recent weeks to cast Medvedev as a weakling unfit to

run the Kremlin. Medvedev’s decision, perhaps the most consequential of his tenure, seemed intended to make clear to Russia’s political class that he was an assertive leader and a viable candidate for president in 2012. His authority has been undermined because Putin has refused to exclude seeking a return to the presidency himself. But as is often the case in Russia, where top politicians’ intentions are difficult to divine, there is an another view of the fallout

from the removal of the mayor, Yuri Luzhkov. Medvedev is instead described as having been damaged because it took him too long to dismiss Luzhkov, who dominated the Moscow government for nearly two decades. Some politicians have said they suspected that Medvedev did not act more resolutely because he had to lobby for Putin’s approval, and Putin has a better rapport with Luzhkov. In other words, in the end, Putin, the current prime minis-

ter, is still the boss. Putin, who was barred from running for a third consecutive term as president, has not said whether he will be a candidate in 2012. Both he and Medvedev have said they will consult about who will run, while indicating that they will not compete against each other. Luzhkov did not immediately issue a statement, but he did send a letter to Medvedev on Monday night that surfaced in the Russian media Tuesday.

GUNMAN KILLS SELF IN UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS LIBRARY

Jimmy Carter hospitalized after taking ill on flight By James Barron

New York Times News Service

Former President Jimmy Carter, flying to Cleveland to promote his new book, complained that he felt sick Tuesday morning and was taken to a hospital by ambulance after the plane landed, a spokeswoman for Cleveland Hopkins International Airport said. Carter “developed an upset stomach” on the flight from Atlanta and was “resting comfortably” at the hospital, according to a statement issued by the Carter Center in Atlanta. The center said later in the day that on his doctor’s advice, he would spend Tuesday night in the hospital “to rest.” The hospital, MetroHealth Medical Center, said the overnight stay was “purely precautionary.” Carter was “fully alert and participating in all decision-making related to his care,” the hospital said in a statement. The center said he would resume the tour for “White House Diary,” the annotated journals of his four years in the White House, in Washington on Wednesday. The airport spokeswoman, Jacqueline Mayo, said the Delta Airlines jet carrying the 85year-old former president had radioed the control tower to say that a passenger had fallen ill. She said the pilot did not identify the sick passenger as Carter, who was on his way to an appearance at a Joseph-Beth bookstore in a mall in Lyndhurst, Ohio. Another airport spokesman, Todd Payne, said that an airport medical team was waiting when the plane landed at 11:18 a.m. They took Carter to MetroHealth. A spokesman for the White House told Bloomberg News that President Barack Obama spoke to Carter by telephone in the afternoon and that the former president “sounded great” on the call.

Eric Gay / The Associated Press

Crime scene barrier tape is seen on the University of Texas campus near the scene where a gunman opened fire then killed himself inside a library Tuesday in Austin. The UT clock tower is seen in the background. A ski-masked student armed with an AK-47 spread terror at the University of Texas in Austin on Tuesday as he fired randomly into the air before running into a library, where he killed himself, investigators said. No one else was injured in the hours-long drama, and UT officials praised the swift response from a combined force of UT and Austin police. The Travis County medical examiner identified the gunman as 19-year-old Colton Tooley, a sophomore mathematics major from Austin. Late Tuesday, authorities still had not determined a motive. Colton Tooley Tooley lived with his parents in a tranquil middle-class neighborhood in Austin and was described by neighbors and former teachers as an amicable teenager with a standout scholastic record in high school. The drama immediately brought back memories of August 1966, when Charles Whitman climbed to the observation deck of the UT Tower and began shooting. Fourteen people died, and 31 were wounded. Whitman had also killed his wife and mother the night before. On Tuesday, the first shots were fired about 7:50 a.m. as the black-clad gunman walked through part of the campus, alternately shooting into the air and at the ground as horrified students and faculty members ran for safety. Some witnesses said the gunman waved and smiled. UT Police Chief Robert Dahlstrom said that when the gunman saw police officers approaching, he rushed into the Perry-Castaneda Library and made his way to the sixth floor, where he killed himself. About 100 students were reportedly in the library and immediately responded to shouts from library

By Martin Fackler and Mark McDonald

New York Times News Service

TOKYO — Kim Jong Il, North Korea’s supreme leader, took new steps Tuesday to ensure that his family remained in charge after his death, but the biggest leadership shuffling in a generation has so far produced more political intrigue than signs of real change in North Korea, one of the world’s most isolated nations. Kim elevated his sister and a close friend to a high military ranking and had his youngest son and heir apparent, Kim Jong Un, made a member of the Central Committee of the ruling Workers’ Party. The promotions came a day after the younger Kim was also made a four-star general and seemed aimed at ensuring a dynastic succession that would give Kim Jong Un, thought to be in his late 20s, time to solidify his power. The elevation of the completely unknown Kim, and hints that other members of the extended Kim clan will exercise power behind the scenes in a kind of Communist regency, add to the uncertainty about North Korea.

Afghan leader names council for peace talks with Taliban By Carlotta Gall

New York Times News Service

Tamir Kalifa / The Daily Texan

Police prepare to enter Calhoun Hall at the University of Texas campus in Austin, Texas, on Tuesday. officials to evacuate the building. Authorities locked down the sprawling university — nicknamed “the Forty Acres” — until early afternoon as investigators and SWAT officers swarmed the campus searching for a possible second gunman and for explosives. Helicopters and armored vehicles were also dispatched. Emergency sirens blared throughout the morning. — McClatchy-Tribune News Service

KABUL, Afghanistan — Repeating his determination to find a peaceful solution to the war, President Hamid Karzai named a 70-member peace council Tuesday, a long-awaited announcement that was the government’s first concrete step to open formal contacts with the Taliban. The American commander in Afghanistan, Gen. David Petraeus, indicated support for the reconciliation process and said high-level members of the Taliban had already reached out to the government. Some dismissed Karzai’s council as unworkable, though, given that its membership was dominated largely by anti-Taliban figures. While a handful of influential people from the former Taliban government have been included, the council is heavily weighted with many of the same factional leaders who have dominated the wars and politics of the past 30 years, and who have been fighting the Taliban for half that time. Karzai also named at least eight women, a move that signaled the government’s intention to preserve the women’s

BendSpineandPain.com

U.S. SUPREME COURT

Justices to examine rights of corporations By Adam Liptak

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Continuing to explore the limits of corporations’ constitutional rights, the Supreme Court on Tuesday added cases to its docket that will test the scope of companies’ rights to due process and privacy. The new cases follow the court’s decision in January in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, which ruled that corporations and unions have a First Amendment right to spend money in candidate elections. In two of the cases, the justices will consider how the state secrets privilege, which can allow the government to shut down litigation by invoking national security, applies in a contract dispute between the Navy and military contractors hired to create a stealth aircraft. In the third case, the justices agreed to decide whether corpo-

rations have privacy rights for the purposes of the Freedom of Information Act. The court’s newest member, Justice Elena Kagan, disqualified herself from four of the new cases, including the one concerning corporate privacy, because she participated in them as U.S. solicitor general before joining the court in August.

Context for secrets debate The state secrets case arises in a surprising context. The court has turned back appeals from people who say they were sent abroad to be tortured but whose lawsuits were dismissed after the government invoked the privilege. This month, a sharply divided 11-member panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, in San Francisco, dismissed a lawsuit against Jeppe-

sen Dataplan, a Boeing subsidiary accused of arranging flights for the Central Intelligence Agency to transfer prisoners to other countries for imprisonment and interrogation, on state secrets grounds.

Heard from Boeing Boeing, as successor to the McDonnell Douglas Corp., is one of the parties to the state secrets cases the court agreed to hear on Tuesday, Boeing Co. v. United States, No. 09-1302, but now it objects to the government’s invocation of the privilege. Its case has been consolidated with the second one, General Dynamics Corp. v. United States, No. 09-1298. The privacy case, Federal Communications Commission v. AT&T Inc., No. 09-1279, will consider whether a provision of the Freedom of Information Act concerning “personal privacy”

applies to corporations. AT&T seeks to block the release of documents it provided to the FCC, which conducted an investigation into claims of overcharges by the company in a program to provide equipment and services to schools. The documents were sought under the freedom of information law by a trade association representing some of AT&T’s competitors. AT&T relied on an exemption to the law for law enforcement records that could “constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy.” The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, in Philadelphia, ruled for the company, relying in part on a definition of “person” in the law that included corporations.

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The country appears to have mostly abandoned its incipient economic reforms and has declined to enter new international talks about its nuclear weapons program, leaving its neighbors and the United States alarmed about its intentions. Few analysts claim to fully understand the inner workings of the North Korean military or the Kim dynasty. But many who watch the country closely say they see few signs that succession will produce a stable, credible leadership that is, at least initially, confident enough to engage with the outside world or to steer resources to economic development rather than the military. Some analysts predict that new leaders may feel compelled to prove their nationalist credentials by engaging in provocative actions that could worsen tensions with South Korea and Japan and their main ally, the United States. In the most destabilizing situation, an internal power struggle could also lead to the collapse of the government. But many observers discount that possibility, largely because of the support of another neighbor, China.

(541) 647-1646

rights guaranteed in the Constitution. They are unlikely, though, to have any influence with the Taliban. The peace council will have the authority to develop existing contacts and open direct negotiations with the Taliban and other armed opponents, said the presidential spokesman, Waheed Omer. Government officials say there has been an increase in contacts with members of the Taliban and signals from them since the government held a large peace gathering in Kabul in June. A Western diplomat confirmed that some people had approached the government claiming to represent Taliban leaders, but said that it was not yet clear if they were genuine. Former members of the Taliban government, including Maulavi Arsala Rahmani, who was minister of higher education in the Taliban government and is now a senator, say that Taliban leaders know that they cannot win the war and that the time is ripe for negotiation.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Grants

Online community giving immigrant laborers a voice By Esmeralda Bermudez Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — She approaches men and women unassumingly — on the crosstown bus, outside garment factories, along street corners when the light flashes red. How’s your day going? She asks in Spanish. How is work? Do you have children? If they don’t mind, she whips out her Flip Video camera and begins to record. Two years ago, Maria de Lourdes Gonzalez didn’t own a cellphone. Now the 62-year-old housekeeper carries a tape recorder and a video camera and regularly snaps photos and sends text messages. Her interviews end up on her blog on vozmob, a new site launched by the University of Southern California and the Institute of Popular Education of Southern California, which works to organize and educate immigrant communities. The idea is to give immigrants, mainly day laborers, an online space to speak their minds and share their stories. They are also encouraged to document their work as a form of self-protection.

Mix of grants Organizers rolled out the program last month with a mix of grants from various foundations, including $40,000 worth of cellphones to train laborers. They fanned out to local job centers to teach workers how to upload text, photos and videos. So far about half a dozen laborers have launched their own blogs. Others are experimenting, transferring bits of broken audio and blurry images onto the Web. The contributions to vozmob.net are varied. In one post, a worker named Adolfo features a video clip of day laborers at a Hollywood center singing with an accordion player and guitarist as they

Stiegler Continued from A1 Their responses will be the subject of three articles, starting today with Stiegler. The topics include questions pulled from her voting record and positions taken during her time in the Legislature.

Beer tax In a candidate statement filed with the Oregon secretary of state, Stiegler says she “stopped the proposed beer tax because it would have hurt local breweries,” something she also references in her stump speeches. The proposal, backed by state Rep. Ben Cannon, D-Portland, would have raised the beer tax from $2.60 per barrel to $52.21 per barrel. When debate over the bill was at its height in the spring of 2009, Stiegler told The Bulletin she was waiting to see how the final draft of the bill came out before making her decision. Mark Nelson, a lobbyist for Anheuser-Busch, who led the charge against the increase, said at the time that he believed Stiegler was open to a toneddown version of the bill. “She was never a committed ‘no’ vote, ever,” Nelson said. “She thought some of the proposals were too high but, if it was a lower proposal, she might support it. But she didn’t know what that level was.” Stiegler said she never met with Nelson, so she’s not sure how he came to that conclusion. She said her focus was on how the bill would impact local businesses, not national companies. Local brewers confirm she met with a group of them to talk about the beer tax bill. Stiegler said the meeting pushed her firmly into the “no” camp, though the bill died before going to a full vote. “I came out of that with the understanding it could potentially impact 400 jobs and a growing, thriving industry here in Central Oregon,” Stiegler said. “I was a consistent, persistent ‘Ben, you ain’t going to get my vote.’ ” Both House Speaker Dave Hunt and Cannon agreed with Stiegler’s characterization of her role. “She was a consistent and forceful opponent of increasing the tax,” Cannon said. “She made her views known early and often to me and was a real thorn in my side during that debate.”

wait for work. In another, a Long Beach laborer named Ranferi displays a photo of a cream-colored snake he found on the sidewalk and warns others to be cautious. A man named Marcos likes to upload samples of his handiwork: light fixtures he has installed, bathtubs he has tiled and water-thrifty gardens he has planted.

Politics take center stage Politics often takes center stage, with posts featuring photos of immigrants rights marches and short, heated paragraphs blasting Arizona’s new immigration law. A grandmother of seven, Gonzalez prefers to be called a housekeeper, never a domestic worker “because domestic is for domesticated animals.” She says she likes to hit the streets and record personal stories. When her subjects shy away from the camera — and many do — she records their hands, “the hands that do the work,” she says. She talks to pupusa vendors, men driving tractors, gardeners and seamstresses, and she films hands dry and calloused, covered with dirt or paint, bruised black beneath the nails. On one morning bus ride, she spoke to Jacqueline Rivera, an undocumented worker who was about to lose her job. Rivera told Gonzalez she slept in a closet to save money for her children. The housekeeper’s face in a grainy photo shows her lips turned up in a shy smile. “The idea is to let those voices be heard,” Gonzalez said, “to bring out of us what’s already inside.” Amanda Garces, who is coordinating the project for the institute, said no one expects most participants to be so active. The hope is that some day laborers at least will become more comfortable with technology.

Measures 66 & 67 Stiegler’s opponents have attacked her support of two legislatively referred ballot measures, which raised taxes on Oregon corporations and higher-income earners. Oregon voters approved the measures, which were projected to bring in an additional $700 million in revenue in the current biennium. Voters in Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties came out against the measure, prompting criticism that Stiegler had lost touch with her district. Kozak has said Stiegler’s support of the measures is the reason he is running for her seat. Stiegler has said she would be willing to reconsider her position on the measures but stands by her vote. “I’ll say what I said at the time, which was that it isn’t perfect legislation,” she said. “I understood what I was doing. I was making a difficult decision between making deeper cuts in education and public safety and programs that I care about — care for seniors, employment-related day care — things that keep people working and keep money coming into our economy.” She said that, because the state has no sales tax — a tax consistently rejected by Oregon voters — legislators had to look for other ways to bring in revenue. “We don’t have a lot of flexibility in how we deal with revenue shortfalls because our state is almost solely reliant on property tax and income tax, so we didn’t have a lot of options,” she said. Stiegler said she and other lawmakers also encouraged negotiations between Gov. Ted Kulongoski and the union that covers most state employees that resulted in unpaid furlough days for state workers. Stiegler said she was unhappy with a section of Measure 67 that disproportionately impacted lower-profit margin businesses by taxing them on gross receipts. She also would have liked to see a smaller jump in the minimum corporate tax, which went from $10 to $150. “But we all knew it was going to be referred to the voters,” she said. “We had the anti-tax people out there banging the drums that they would make sure this was referred to the voters. I figured my job was to be a voice to try to make it as reasonable and rational as possible.” Stiegler said she was pleased the legislation exempted many

Continued from A1 His next pitch? The history of the CIA since World War II and a housing desegregation fight in Yonkers are two subjects inspiring him now. “Not all these things have the best possible commercial outlook,” he said. MacArthur winners don’t need to tell anyone how they’ll spend the grant money. There are no reporting requirements. “We could spend it all on cake,” joked theater director David Cromer, one of this year’s recipients. Cromer, known for staging American classics like “Our Town,” said he wasn’t ready to discuss what he may attempt with the grant’s support. But he has some non-cake ideas. “It purchases you freedom,” Cromer said. “I can do things now that aren’t necessarily going to generate an income.” That’s exactly what the foundation has in mind. Bob Gallucci, the foundation’s president, called the grants “an investment in people who have already done extraordinary things.” There have been 828 MacArthur Fellows, including this year’s winners. “We’re hoping not only that they’ll do extraordinary things in the future, but that this fellowship will make that somewhat more likely,” Gallucci said. Jason Moran, a jazz pianist and composer, said he was elated and that the grant would fuel many of the projects that have lain dormant in his mind. “I have already begun making minor plans on band expeditions to Senegal to study Senegalese drumming, or bringing our music down to perform in rural parts of America, or to simply create new collaborations with artists in other fields, or begin a series of recordings made on the old format of Edison wax cylinders,” he said. “It’s all in play now.” None of the winners is from New Orleans, but the Big Easy exerts a strong pull on the 2010 grantees. Simon’s newest HBO series “Treme” is about residents of post-Katrina New Orleans. Cromer recently revived

small businesses from the minimum corporate tax increase.

OSU-Cascades/COCC In both her candidate statement and on the campaign trail, Stiegler takes credit for keeping the Oregon State University-Cascades Campus open. The school was on a “cut list” issued last year listing branch campuses around the state targeted for closure. “When I got wind of that, I sounded the alarm,” Stiegler said at a recent town hall meeting in Bend. “I knew that I could do things in the Legislature, and I knew I needed to get that done.” In a meeting with The Bulletin’s editorial board, Conger questioned the extent of Stiegler’s role in saving OSUCascades. But lawmakers in Salem and university officials have universally credited her with getting the branch campus off the cut list. They say she doggedly lobbied members of the Legislature’s Joint Ways and Means Committee, including Rep. Peter Buckley, D-Ashland, the top budget-writer in the House. Stiegler also credits the hundreds of people who showed up to an April 2009 meeting of the committee in Bend, many of whom appealed to lawmakers to keep the campus open. In addition to saving OSU-Cascades, Stiegler says she secured about $2.8 million in additional funding for Central Oregon Community College. As a member of a ways and means subcommittee on education, Stiegler was one of a group of lawmakers who recommended the minimum level of funding for community colleges. “The dollar allotment that came in was woefully short of what community colleges need to be able to support the increased student numbers,” she said. The group advocated for a $30 million dollar increase, bringing the total funding level up to about $450 million. The additional money for COCC came out of that increase, Stiegler said.

$2 billion in cuts Stiegler includes in her talking points that she voted to “cut government spending by $2 billion.” The cuts were all over the board, Stiegler said, including votes in 2009 and 2010 that cut the general fund budget by 9 percent each time. Stiegler acknowledges that

2010 MacArthur Fellows

OSU scientist awarded ‘genius grant’ PORTLAND — An Oregon State University scientist has received a prestigious grant in recognition of her career contributions. A $500,000 MacArthur Foundation fellowship was awarded to Kelly Benoit-Bird, a 34-year-old marine biologist who uses sophisticated acous-

“(A MacArthur Foundation grant) purchases you freedom. I can do things now that aren’t necessarily going to generate an income.” — David Cromer, theater director Tennessee Williams’ “A Streetcar Named Desire,” set in New Orleans, to great praise. And Shannon Lee Dawdy, an anthropologist and archaeologist from the University of Chicago, has studied New Orleans since 1994. After Hurricane Katrina, she worked with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the state of Louisiana to make sure recovery efforts respected the city’s archaeological heritage. She regrets she hasn’t been able to save Holt Cemetery, a potter’s field where homemade plot markers were washed away by the post-Katrina flooding. “I would like to work with the local community to preserve living traditions and the site itself,” Dawdy said, and the MacArthur grant may help. “It might mean that I’m able take things I’ve long wished to do, things in the ‘wouldn’t it be nice?’ category, and make that actually happen magically.” Receiving word of the MacArthur was “like receiving a phone call from the Greek gods,” Dawdy said, because “someone you can’t see is pulling the strings of your fate.” Winners have no idea they’ve

hers was just one vote among lawmakers from both sides of the aisle who supported the cuts. The cuts were made from a projected budget that had been adjusted upward for inflation to maintain current service levels. Stiegler also voted last year, along with the majority of her party, to tax and fee hikes totaling more than $1 billion to help close a projected hole in the general fund of about $4 billion. When asked for specific cuts she voted for, Stiegler cited a “disappropriation bill” that reduced the legislative assembly’s budget by $4.3 million. “We understood and recognized right out of the chute that we were going to feel some pain too, so we cut the legislative portion of the budget.” Stiegler said legislators also cut back the total education budget to 2007 levels. Though the general fund budget came down, the state’s budget overall increased because of an influx in federal stimulus funding, Stiegler said. Getting those dollars meant shifting some money around in order to qualify for matching federal funds. “We had to be cautious about not taking something out of the budget that could have gotten us dollars,” she said. “It wasn’t like we had to budget additional dollars but there were places to budget dollars that were more strategic so that we could leverage that federal money.”

‘Portland Liberals’ In her stump speeches and campaign commercials, Stiegler says she’s fought “Salem politicians” and “Portland liberals” to protect Bend’s interests. Though her voting record shows she sides with her fellow Democrats 97 percent of the time, Stiegler says she fought them on some key issues affecting Central Oregon. She points to keeping OSUCascades open and her opposition of the beer tax as examples. Stiegler also opposed her peers on a bill proposed in the regular session to limit where in Oregon destination resorts could be built. “The way it was constructed, it was apparent to me that (the bill) was very focused on Central Oregon and Deschutes County, sort of a sock in the eye,” she said. “I saw it, in some respects, as Portland legislators saying ‘You haven’t handled it well and so we’re going to take care of it.’ ” Stiegler did vote for a bill blocking destination resorts in

tic engineering to study everything from swarms of zooplankton to spinner dolphins. Benoit-Bird said the “genius grant” — the nickname for the MacArthur fellowships — came “out of the blue” with a phone call from a foundation representative. — The Oregonian

been nominated. Nominators are pledged to secrecy. There’s “nothing more fun” than informing the winners, Gallucci said. He broke the news to four grantees this year, he said, first making sure they weren’t driving or holding a baby. Subterfuge can be involved in the notification. MacArthur winner Amir AboShaeer, a public high school physics teacher in California, said he was expecting a call from a college student named Liz Brooks who was interested in his work when the foundation called to tell him about the grant. There was no Liz Brooks. She was a creation of the foundation to get the busy teacher on the phone. “I am prepared to lie like a rug,” admitted Gallucci, who notified Abo-Shaeer of the grant. Abo-Shaeer, who left a job in industry to become a teacher, wants to train other educators about his innovative curriculum and the importance of recruiting and inspiring female students. “Right now I teach full time. I can relieve my schedule to be a teacher trainer. If I have an idea that’s exciting or interesting, I can try it,” he said. The MacArthurs have been nicknamed “genius grants,” which can be problematic for winners. Simon, the HBO producer, said his wife would like to thank the foundation for “five years of fresh material.” The morning after she heard the news, Simon’s wife, best-selling novelist Laura Lippman, told him, “Hey Genius, you forgot to take the trash out last night.”

the Metolius River Basin Area. In another pushback against her Portland colleagues, Stiegler said she voted against funding for a new soccer stadium in the Rose City. “I vote for what I think is good for Oregon and what is good for Bend and Central Oregon,” she said.

Tax and fee hikes In nearly all of his campaign speeches, Conger talks about Stiegler’s votes on tax and fee hikes. Based on information from the Oregon Legislative Fiscal Office, Conger says the incumbent voted for 38 of 39 tax and fee hikes during her term. Stiegler says she actually voted for 38 of 40. “Close to half of those bills were generated by a governor’s request on behalf of a government agency,” she said. In other words, a state agency approached the governor asking for a fee increase and he, in turn, asked the Legislature, Stiegler said. Stiegler was not able to provide specifics on each vote by the time of publication. But she said some taxes and fees were necessary to preserve programs she didn’t want to cut. She cited a $10 excise tax on video lottery games to benefit the Oregon Youth Conservation Corps as one example. Stiegler also supported a hospital tax to fund health insurance for poor children and a gas tax hike for new roads, according to her voting record.

Amir Abo-Shaeer, 38, physics teacher, Goleta, Calif. Jesse Little Doe Baird, 46, indigenous language preservationist, Mashpee, Mass. Kelly Benoit-Bird, 34, marine biologist, Corvallis, Ore. Nicholas Benson, 46, stone carver, Newport, R.I. Drew Berry, 40, biomedical animator, Melbourne, Australia. Carlos D. Bustamante, 35, population geneticist, Stanford, Calif. Matthew Carter, 72, type designer, Cambridge, Mass. David Cromer, 45, theater director, New York. John Dabiri, 30, biophysicist, Pasadena, Calif. Shannon Lee Dawdy, 43, anthropologist, Chicago. Annette Gordon-Reed, 51, American historian, Cambridge, Mass. Yiyun Li, 37, fiction writer, Davis, Calif. Michal Lipson, 40, optical physicist, Ithaca, N.Y. Nergis Mavalvala, 42, quantum astrophysicist, Cambridge, Mass. Jason Moran, 35, jazz pianist and composer, New York. Carol Padden, 55, sign language linguist, La Jolla, Calif. Jorge Pardo, 47, installation artist, Los Angeles. Sebastian Ruth, 35, violist, violinist and music educator, Providence, R.I. Emmanuel Saez, 37, economist, Berkeley, Calif. David Simon, 50, author, producer and screenwriter, Baltimore. Dawn Song, 35, computer security specialist, Berkeley, Calif. Marla Spivak, 55, entomologist, St. Paul, Minn. Elizabeth Turk, 48, sculptor, Atlanta.

cized her opponent, Chuck Burley, for missing votes while serving in the Legislature. Burley’s voting record showed he missed 21 percent of more than 1,300 votes taken in the 2007 legislative session. Stiegler promised voters she would show up to vote and a review of her record shows she missed 1.85 percent of the roughly 1,200 votes in the 2009 session. Stiegler said she missed 24 votes total. Of those, 12 were excused because she was engaged in state business and another 12 were excused in advance of a personal trip.

Looking forward With a projected $3 billion budget hole in the next biennium, Stiegler said she understands legislators will be making additional cuts in the future. But when asked what will be on the chopping block, Stiegler said she isn’t sure exactly what those cuts will be. “I think it’s not very judicious of me to get down in the weeds at this stage of the game,” she said. “But I will say there are certain principals I hold sacrosanct. We need to preserve education, public safety and our vulnerable citizens, and we are not going to do it on the backs of hardworking Oregon families.” Cindy Powers can be reached at 541-617-7812 or cpowers@bendbulletin.com

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 29, 2010 A5

Backyard the new political venue for White House Persian Gulf states win U.S. arms without full record of effect

ALBUQUERQUE — President Obama was raised in a condominium apartment, and later he lived as an urban apartment dweller. Perhaps that helps explain his new favorite hangout: other people’s backyards. On a whirlwind trip across this country this week, Obama is venturing into the yards of “real people” to push out several messages on the economy. His backyard visits over the course of Tuesday and Wednesday were each to feature a specific topic: education in Albuquerque; fighting for the middle class in Des Moines; tax cuts and deficits in Richmond. The common theme at all the stops will be Republicans — specifically, how dangerous their return to power would be for the economic health of the nation, administration officials said. Obama will tee off on the recently unveiled GOP “Pledge to America” and discuss “why he thinks the direction the Republicans are pushing to go would be irresponsible, would

“This has proven an effective way to continue the conversation he’s been having with the American people since he began running for president, And where better to do it than right in America’s backyards.” — Bill Burton, deputy press secretary

be a mistake,” White House communications director Dan Pfeiffer said Another big difference between the parties, White House officials hope, will be the increasingly populist message of the president — in contrast with a Republican message that they say should remind people of the previous decade, when big businesses flourished. This is where the backyard backdrop comes in. It is the rare venue that allows Obama to take off his suit jacket and sit face-to-face with regular voters — without looking explicitly like he is at a campaign event (as similar town hall meetings often do). On his four-state

tour this week, only one stop — a campus rally in Madison — is officially political. The rest are designed as presidential stops and are not expected to include overt stumping for candidates. The backyard setting also puts a name and face on the policies at hand — a time-honored presidential ritual, reminiscent of the individuals President Ronald Reagan first installed in the presidential box during the State of the Union address, or the “tax families” President George W. Bush invoked a decade ago as he sold the tax cuts now about to expire. For Obama, though, there is an additional selling point to the backyard events: he simply likes

them. He “likes getting out of the White House,” one adviser said wryly, noting that “likes” was an understatement. And the gatherings are reminiscent of events Obama did in kitchens and, occasionally, in backyards during the 2008 campaign, a vibe he is trying to recapture with just five weeks until the midterm elections. “This has proven an effective way to continue the conversation he’s been having with the American people since he began running for president,” said deputy press secretary Bill Burton as he traveled with Obama to New Mexico on Monday. “And where better to do it than right in America’s backyards.” The backyard parties have been overwhelmingly friendly toward Obama, even if the settings have not always looked as relaxed as intended, with large clusters of guests in suits (not to mention camera crews in tow). Still, White House officials said, they consider it as authentic a setting as any. “It’s not a screened crowd. It’s not a handpicked crowd,” Pfeiffer said.

Training Continued from A1 Drained by grueling heartsand-minds efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan, the military is refocusing on fighting and killing the enemy, not nation-building. Writing recently in Foreign Affairs magazine, Defense Secretary Robert Gates said, “The United States is unlikely to repeat a mission on the scale of those in Afghanistan or Iraq anytime soon — that is, forced regime change followed by nation building under fire.” Instead, U.S. forces will probably be called on to help other countries’ armies defend themselves, particularly against terrorist attacks but also against conventional armies. Lawrence Korb, a former assistant secretary of Defense who closely follows military planning, said flatly: “We aren’t going to be doing counterinsurgency again. ... We’re not that good at it.” Many units’ major combat skills are rusty because of the counterinsurgency focus, Korb said. Many of the paratroopers who leaped out of C-130 cargo planes at Fort Bragg have served a number of tours in Afghanistan and Iraq. Now, “we’re focusing on the basics again — full-spectrum operations,” said Lt. Col. Christopher LaNeve, the division’s operations officer, as paratroopers lugged their gear and parachutes to board aircraft. LaNeve said the “operational tempo” — military speak for the relentless demand for counterinsurgency troops in Afghanistan and Iraq — has not allowed time for more traditional training. But for the first time since 2001, the entire 82nd Airborne, 22,000 soldiers strong, is back at Fort Bragg for an extended period. “We’re not going backwards, but we are looking to the past to help us go back to what we do

Wolves

best — close with and destroy the enemy,” said Maj. Jason Brown of the division’s 3rd Brigade, which took part in the exercise. The Army’s “full-spectrum operations” doctrine was published in 2008, but most troops are only now beginning to train for it as U.S. troop levels diminish in Iraq. Even if a unit is scheduled to deploy to Afghanistan or Iraq, “they will be trained to fight and win in a full-spectrum operations environment,” said Col. Peter Utley, director of training for the Army’s operations staff. Counterinsurgency, which used to be the focus, is now just one of many training scenarios. “You have to be able to deal with any challenge presented to you,” Utley said. When the brigade heads to the Joint Readiness Training Center at Ft. Polk, La., next month, the make-believe enemy force will not be Afghan or Iraqi insurgents but soldiers from a fictitious country called Cortina.

Scenarios will involve largescale combat. If a world crisis erupts affecting national security, the first U.S. unit ordered into action would almost certainly be the 82nd Airborne. The division is the nation’s designated “global response force” — what paratroopers call “the president’s 911 call.” One brigade is designated to be first on call — at the moment, the 3rd Brigade. The paratroopers could be ordered to support special operations forces attempting to rescue civilians held by terrorists, or to assist an ally’s troops in a military crisis. They also could be sent to assist civilians in a natural disaster or humanitarian crisis. They could face a showdown with a conventional army as well, Korb said. For instance, the Obama administration has said that military action against Iran is an option if that country continues to develop nuclear

weapons. North Korea, another country at odds with the United States over nuclear weapons, could use its huge standing army to invade South Korea, where about 28,000 U.S. troops would need immediate help. And the always-volatile Middle East could erupt into crisis at any time. If called upon, the 82nd Airborne paratroopers could be required to ship out within as little as 18 hours. The nine-day exercise on Fort Bragg’s Sicily Drop Zone this month involved more than 2,000 paratroopers and airmen. Huge Air Force cargo planes dropped not only paratroopers, but also heavy vehicles and artillery pieces. It was the type of largescale mission rarely attempted in Afghanistan or Iraq. “This is about as hard as it gets,” LaNeve said as his paratroopers boarded their planes. “If you can get this right, you can do anything.”

“There’s pretty strong evidence that we’ve had wolves moving through the area periodically. I think there’s some chance that there’s individuals staying in the area. We don’t have any evidence to suggest there’s a pack.”

life Services to determine that — a change that was suggested after some controversy over the issue this year, Morgan said.

— John Stephenson, Oregon wolf coordinator, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

At Thursday’s meeting, the commission will also discuss sage grouse habitat, and what kind of development buffers the agency should recommend to protect the birds. Staffers have been gathering information from different groups about the balance between preserving habitat and allowing construction of facilities such as wind farms, and will present what they have heard, said Rick Hargrave, spokesman with the agency. The commissioners will also decide whether hunters should be required to wear orange hats or clothing for safety, Hargrave said. Oregon is one of 10 states that doesn’t have “hunter orange” requirements, he said. The commission will decide whether to keep it that way, require hunters younger than 18 to wear two orange items, or require all hunters to wear either an orange vest or hat. The agency has already received a lot of comments about the issue, he said, and will take additional public comments on that issue and the other agenda items at the Thursday meeting.

Services followed tracks near Hampton Butte for 20 miles. “You don’t see many domestic dogs covering 20 miles overnight,” Stephenson said. “So we feel like that was a pretty strong sighting.” People have been reporting wolf sightings in Central Oregon for decades, said Corey Heath, wildlife biologist with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife — even before wild wolves returned to the state. Those sightings were probably of pet wolves or wolf hybrids, which either escaped or were let go, he said. Now, however, wolves introduced into Idaho have migrated to Oregon, with two packs confirmed in the northeastern part of the state. And that makes it more likely that gray wolves would keep heading west toward Central Oregon, Heath said. “There may be a few individuals pioneering around now,” he said. But biologists need to do DNA tests to confirm that wild wolves are in the area, he said — and they haven’t found any carcasses,

or trapped animals to do that yet. In Northeastern Oregon, where wolves have been radio-collared and tracked, the question for wildlife officials is now how to help prevent wolves from killing livestock. At the Fish and Wildlife Commission meeting, commissioners will consider adopting changes to the state’s wolf management plan — taking into consideration the handful of calves killed by wolves this spring, said Russ Morgan, wolf coordinator with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. “We’ve learned quite a lot in the last six months from the depredations in Oregon, and so really it’s about applying what we’ve learned,” he said. The proposed changes to the plan are pretty small, he said, and include things like issuing permits to harass wolves to the person who is operating the ranch, rather than the landowner. Other possible changes include requiring state Fish and Wildlife biologists to confirm that a wolf killed livestock, instead of allowing people with the federal Wild-

Sage grouse and hunter orange

Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

Bloomberg News

WASHINGTON — The United States authorized as much as $37 billion of arms sales to Saudi Arabia and other Persian Gulf nations over five years without always documenting the potential effect on foreign policy and national security, government investigators found. The departments of Defense and State cleared the transfers of fighter planes, helicopters and missiles from fiscal 2005 through 2009 even as the six receiving countries rejected U.S. appeals to coordinate more as a group, according to a report by the Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress. “As arms transfer authorizations increase to this part of the world, the U.S. government needs to ensure that it reviews requests” for their impact on foreign policy and national security, the GAO concluded in a report obtained by Bloomberg News. “The partial absence of documentation of agencies’ reviews, however, raises concerns that U.S. priorities are not consistently considered before such sales are authorized.” The report exposes gaps in the way the U.S. tracks and evaluates sales to the region as the Obama administration prepares to notify Congress of another planned package for Saudi Arabia that may total as much as $60 billion. The U.S. is seeking to improve regional security against Iran and terror groups such as al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula with sales including missile-defense systems. Among the considerations required by federal law for arms transfers to the region are the capacity of the U.S. defense industry, the U.S. pledge to maintain Israel’s military edge in the region, protection of human rights and safeguarding of sensitive technologies.

‘Concerns remain’ The GAO conducted the analysis at the request of three Republicans on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, led by ranking member Ileana Ros-Lehtinen of Florida. They asked for the review in October 2008 during the waning days of President George W. Bush’s administration, and the report was delivered to lawmakers this month. “Concerns remain regarding the integration of these programs with broad U.S. policy objectives in the region,” the lawmakers said in their 2008 request for the report. They also expressed concern over “implementation in some recipient countries,” without giving details. Investigators sought to calculate total arms sales to Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Qatar, Oman and Kuwait. The GAO also examined a sample of 28 cases

“As arms transfer authorizations increase to this part of (the Middle East), the U.S. government needs to ensure that it reviews requests (for their impact on foreign policy and national security).” — Government Accountability Office report of arms transfers handled by the State Department or the Pentagon for how the prospective sales were evaluated. The Defense Department authorized about $22 billion of transfers under the Foreign Military Sales program to the six Gulf countries, the GAO found. Saudi Arabia and the UAE accounted for more than 88 percent of the total value.

Value undetermined The GAO couldn’t accurately determine the value of transfers under the State Department’s Direct Commercial Sales program because some figures were duplicated and at least $6 billion of $21 billion in authorized transfers were for U.S. military units. The countries mainly used their own money to buy the weapons, according to the GAO. That included the UAE’s purchase of a Patriot missile defense system and Oman’s acquisition of antitank missiles. Officials didn’t always evaluate the potential foreign policy or national security implications, or failed to document the assessments, the GAO determined. The State Department didn’t have a record of its evaluations of arms transfer requests against a set of criteria such as protecting human rights and safeguarding sensitive technologies, the GAO reported. The State Department, in a written response accompanying the GAO report, agreed its process could be improved, while disagreeing that the gaps posed any risk, saying appropriate evaluations are conducted. The Defense Department agreed to do a better job of documenting reviews. The investigators said State Department and defense officials cited evidence of cooperation by the Gulf countries with steps such as bases for U.S. troops and support for operations in Afghanistan or for neighbors such as Iraq and Yemen. Bahrain provides basing for the U.S. Navy’s Fifth Fleet, and Qatar plays host to the Tampa-based U.S. Central Command’s field headquarters.

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Continued from A1 “There’s pretty strong evidence that we’ve had wolves moving through the area periodically,” said John Stephenson, Oregon’s wolf coordinator with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “I think there’s some chance that there’s individuals staying in the area. We don’t have any evidence to suggest there’s a pack.” Wolf management in Oregon will be one of the topics at the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission meeting Thursday in Bend. Stephenson said he gets a couple of reports of wolf sightings a month, and some are more likely to be actual wolves than others. Wild wolves would not typically live in an area like Phil’s Trail, close to a highly populated area, Stephenson said. But a little over a month ago he received a report from people who spotted what they thought was a wolf along the Cascade Lakes Highway, near Widgi Creek Golf Club. “Maybe something’s running around,” he said. “I’d be surprised if there are wild wolves hanging around close to town, but it seems like something.” Last winter brought a couple good clues pointing to wolf presence in the area, he said. In midDecember, biologists tracked what looked like wolf prints south of Wickiup Reservoir. And then someone with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife

David Zucchino / Los Angeles Times

An airfield security team monitors the landing of a U.S. Air Force cargo plane that had dropped paratroopers from the 82nd Airborne Division during a training exercise at Fort Bragg, N.C.

By Viola Gienger

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At Work Special-needs kids keep working parents extra busy, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2010

MARKET REPORT

s

2,379.59 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +9.82 +.41%

10,858.14 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE +46.10 +.43%

s

s

1,147.70 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +5.54 +.48%

t

BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 2.45 treasury CHANGE -2.78%

s

$1,306.60 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$9.90

s

$21.688 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.233

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Bend lands meeting of Trout Unlimited Trout Unlimited, a national conservation organization dedicated to conserving, protecting and restoring North America’s cold-water fisheries and watersheds, announced Tuesday that it has awarded its 2011 annual meeting to Bend. The meeting will be held Sept. 14-17. “Visit Bend and our entire conservation community is honored and thrilled to be hosting Trout Unlimited and their members for a week of meetings, fishing and conservation work,” said Kevney Dugan, sports development manager for Visit Bend, the city’s tourism-promotion agency. “This is a great opportunity to introduce Bend to new visitors from across the country and share with them the exciting conservation work and natural beauty that make Central Oregon so special.” The meeting is expected to attract 350 to 650 attendees from across the country, according to Doug La Placa, Visit Bend’s president and CEO. That’s not as large as some sporting events, “but from a conference or convention standpoint, this would be one of the larger (ones) that we’ve landed,” he said. With two national bicycle races also scheduled next September, it “should be a lucrative month for Bend tourism.” Visit Bend will work with Trout Unlimited over the coming months to identify meeting spaces, host hotels and locations for other meeting activities.

It’s not unusual to see a new eatery opening in downtown Bend. What sets Common Table apart is its goal: to feed everyone, especially those in need

Uncommon restaurant

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Don’t take the latest snapshot of U.S. home prices too seriously. The Standard & Poor’s/CaseShiller 20-city index released Tuesday ticked up in July from June. But the gain is merely temporary, analysts say. They see home values taking a dive in many major markets well into next year. That’s because the peak homebuying season is now ending after a dismal summer. The hardest-hit markets, already battered by foreclosures, are bracing for a bigger wave of homes sold at foreclosure or through short sales. A short sale is when a lender lets a homeowner sell for less than the mortgage is worth. Add high unemployment and reluctant buyers, and the outlook in many areas is bleak. Nationally, home values are projected to fall 2.2 percent in the second half of the year, according to analysts

100 80

Inc., which tracks the housing market

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Zach Hancock, left, and Bob Pearson, two of the many co-founders of the Common Table restaurant, sit at the large wooden table inside the restaurant in downtown Bend on Tuesday afternoon.

By David Holley • The Bulletin

A

nonprofit restaurant that intends to provide free meals to low-income and homeless individuals is opening Thurs-

day in downtown Bend. People who can afford to pay, will. Known as Common Table, the restaurant is fashioned to be more like a mellow pub rather than the white-tablecloth, fine-dining establishment Cork that formerly occupied the space on Oregon Avenue. Its mantra is to be an eatery for everyone — a goal it aims to achieve, in part, by providing $10 vouchers to underprivileged diners.

“It’s a place where we hope people will gather,” said Zach Hancock, who acts as general manager and said his title is “director of community” for Common Table. “Everyone comes to the table regardless of pedigree.” A large, 20-foot-long black walnut table is the centerpiece of the space. Open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., Common Table will

By Chris Spillane and Ryan Flinn Bloomberg News

Sept. 48.5

60 40 20 2005 ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 2010 Source: National Association of Realtors AP

surveyed by MacroMarkets LLC. And Moody’s Analytics predicts the Case-Shiller index will drop 8 percent within a year. Among the areas likely to endure big price drops, according to Veros, a real estate analysis company: • Port St. Lucie, Fla., and Reno, Nev., where prices could fall 7 percent over the next year. • Orlando and Daytona Beach, Fla., which face price drops of at least 6 percent. • Las Vegas, which led all declines in the latest report, is also expected to post a 6 percent drop. Home values there have already tumbled 57 percent from their peak four years ago. Las Vegas has been hit by foreclosures and the loss of tourism and construction jobs. More than 70 percent of homeowners there owe more on their mortgages than their homes are worth, according to real estate data firm CoreLogic. See Housing / B2

“The market, at best, is weak, and starting to decline.” — Michael Feder, chief executive of Radar Logic

serve breakfast, lunch, dinner and drinks. Matthew Mulder, who ran Bluefish Bistro before it was sold to another restaurant operator and closed, is the head chef. He’ll focus on local and organic foods. Common Table’s menu may include quiches, soups, sandwiches and drinks like sangria and local beers. The restaurant’s founders said it will not be a soup kitchen, but instead will serve regular meals like any other. Additionally, the $10 vouchers — paid for with the restaurant’s profits or by patrons who want to buy them for those in need — will provide meals for people who otherwise couldn’t afford them. See Restaurant / B5

Company owner’s death adds to Segway’s safety, image challenges

1985=100 120

Home prices likely to take a hit next year By Alan Zibel and Janna Herron

Confidence lags Americans’ view of the economy turned grimmer in September amid escalating job worries. This raises more fears about the tenuous U.S. economic recovery.

Reed Saxon / The Associated Press

Analysts cite factors including the end of peak buying season, high jobless rates

Barnes & Noble wins battle over board The bookseller Barnes & Noble, after fending off a challenge to its chairman, can now focus on a turnaround and a sale. The company still has a large number of shareholders who question its strategy, but it won some breathing space Tuesday after shareholders backed its three candidates for the board, including its chairman, Leonard Riggio, over a slate led by the investor Ronald Burkle. A preliminary tally showed that about 44 percent of the shares voted for the Barnes & Noble slate, while 38 percent voted for the candidates named by Burkle’s investment firm, the Yucaipa Cos. Shareholders also rejected a proposal by Yucaipa to remove a poison-pill plan aimed at limiting Burkle’s holdings to under 20 percent. The results came after months of bitter public fighting between the two sides, punctuated by sharply worded accusations of greed and incompetence. — Staff and wire reports

A “new price” flag has been added to a Realtor’s sign at a home in Glendale, Calif. Many cities are bracing for declines in home sales in the year ahead.

Segway Inc. may face fresh challenges trying to broaden the appeal of its transporter after the company’s owner died driving the vehicle off a cliff. Jimi Heselden, the British millionaire who owned the company, accidentally drove a Segway off a precipice and into a river, according to police in West Yorkshire, England, where he had his estate. He was pronounced dead at the

scene, and the two-wheeled vehicle was recovered from the water. The Segway, hailed as a revolutionary invention when it debuted nine years ago, has struggled to expand beyond its status as a niche product. Though some law enforcement and sightseeing groups have embraced the vehicle, a $6,000-plus price tag has prevented it from catching on with consumers. See Segway / B2

Jimi Heselden rode a Segway off a cliff and died.

Hard times POVERTY RISES Oregonians’ for Harry median income & David drops; more use Recession, debt leave Medford-based gift food stamps company struggling By Nathaniel Popper Los Angeles Times

The holiday catalogs are already being mailed out by Harry & David, offering the century-old merchant’s trademark luxury gifts including gourmet fruit from Oregon’s Rogue River Valley, with a promise of “happiness delivered.” The pic- Inside ture is much • Charting less cheerful Harry & at the comDavid’s pany’s headchanging quarters in fortunes, Medford, where costPage B2 cutting and absentee management belie the firm’s public face as a folksy outfit with roots as solid as those of the pear trees in its orchards. Since New York-based private equity investors bought Harry & David six years ago, the company has sliced its work force by a third and cut back on raises and benefits. The turmoil worsened this year when the company’s longtime chief executive was fired and replaced by a hotel executive who had left his previous highprofile job under a cloud. See Harry / B2

By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

Rising poverty rates and food stamp use in Oregon and nationwide reflect the recession’s toll, according to the 2009 American Community Survey released Tuesday by the U.S. Census Bureau. The survey compared data from 2008 to 2009 covering 40 topics, including changes in median household incomes, poverty rates, use of food stamps, number of children living in poverty, hours worked per week and other areas to chronicle the nation’s socioeconomic, housing and demographic characteristics, according to the Census Bureau. Findings include a 2.9 percent drop in median household income nationwide from $51,726 to $50,221 from 2008 to 2009. In Oregon — one of 34 states where median household incomes dropped — the survey showed a decline of 2.5 percent, from $49,714 to $48,457. By comparison, Washington state’s median household income fell 1.7 percent, from $57,536 to $56,548. Idaho’s toppled 4.9 percent, from $47,248 to $44,926 during the same period. Oregon is one of 12 states where the poverty rate topped 16 percent in 2009, compared with 14.3 percent living below the poverty line nationwide. See Poverty / B5


B2 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

DISPUTE WITH CHINA

Michael Keane rides a Segway in Washington, D.C. Segway Inc. is facing renewed image and safety challenges following the death of owner Jimi Heselden, who accidentally drove one of the vehicles off a cliff into a river on his estate in England on Sunday. See Page C5 for Heselden’s obituary.

Mineral shipment ban called a threat to Japan By Hiroko Tabuchi

New York Times News Service

TOKYO — A halt of Chinese shipments of crucial industrial minerals to Japan poses a threat to the Japanese economy, a top Tokyo government official said Tuesday, amid a dispute over territorial sovereignty that has damaged relations between the regional rivals. The Chinese commerce ministry has denied that it is blocking exports of the minerals, known as rare earths, that are used in products like hybrid cars and wind turbines. An official at a trading house in Japan said early today, however, that there were signs that Chinese authorities were issuing new export licenses for rare earth shipments to Japan, which he said had been terminated since early last week.

Andrew Harrer Bloomberg News

Segway Continued from B1 Product recalls and restrictions by cities such as New York also have hampered the Segway’s sales. While the accident may have had nothing to do with the Segway’s design, the company could use it to highlight safety precautions, said Glenn Bunting, managing director of public- relations firm Sitrick and Co. “They have to use it as teachable moment for their customers,” said Bunting, whose firm specializes in crisis management. “What we would recommend is: Thoroughly investigate how this tragedy occurred, and from it, not only do you learn, but use it for an opportunity to enhance safety measures.” The San Francisco-based Electric Tour Co., which has a fleet of 48 Segways, requires all riders to wear bright-green vests and helmets, said owner Brian Huber. The nearly 6-year- old business also spends as much as 45 minutes on safety training. Since the city doesn’t allow Segways on sidewalks, the company takes extra precautions, Huber said. “We don’t let anyone leave our

Harry Continued from B1 The new chief executive — who is running Harry & David from an office near his home in Atlanta, more than 2,000 miles away — cleaned out the rest of the executive suite soon after taking over in February. Within a few months, new faces occupied nearly all of the company’s 20 top positions. More lowerlevel workers were let go in April, and management has been farming out to contractors some work that had been done in-house. Among the remaining staff, the mood is described as one of gloom and apprehension. “You walk around and you see that people have taken down their family pictures in their cubicles,” said a headquarters employee, who, like other staffers, did not want to be identified for fear of being fired. “Tomorrow, if security comes to get them, they don’t want to have to pack up.”

’Financing became an issue’ The company’s circumstances can be explained in part by the country’s economic downturn, which has sharply depressed demand for most upscale goods. Harry & David’s sales have plunged 25 percent from their peak before the recession. But that pain has been compounded by debt that has made it harder for the company to make a profit. The investors who acquired Harry & David in 2004 first loaded it up with debt to finance the deal. Then they piled on more debt a few months later to pay themselves back all the cash they put up to buy the company. “This is a classic case of a leveraged buyout,” said Raj Parikh, dean of the business school at Southern Oregon University in nearby Ashland. “They hoped to increase the earnings through a combo of slashing expenses and then paying off the debt.” Ellis Jones, chief executive of New York private equity firm Wasserstein & Co., which led the buyout, acknowledged that the interest payments that Harry & David now must make are a drag on the company. But he said the borrowing appeared prudent at the time. “Based on the company’s performance, the leverage we put on

facility unless we think they’re a competent rider,” he said in an interview. “Something like this we will use as another reminder to stay away from treacherous objects.”

’A tragic accident’ Heselden crashed into the River Wharfe in West Yorkshire while riding around his estate on Sunday, said Neil Wardley, a police spokesman. The accident isn’t believed to be suspicious, Wardley said Monday. The 62-year-old, who made his fortune from the Leeds, Englandbased Hesco Bastion Ltd., bought the Segway business this year. He had an estimated personal fortune of $263.2 million, according to the latest Sunday Times Rich List. “Our family has been left devastated by the sudden and tragic loss of a much loved father and husband,” Heselden’s family said in an e-mail. “There is absolutely nothing to suggest it was anything other than a tragic accident.” Segway, based in Bedford, N.H., didn’t immediately return requests for comment after business hours. Dean Kamen, who invented the Segway, is traveling internationally and couldn’t be

reached, said Dennis Garrigan, a spokesman for Kamen’s nonprofit organization. He no longer works at Segway. The death marks a low point for a product that was greeted with hype initially, followed by tepid demand and later marred by recalls. The Segway, a twowheeled, self-balancing transportation device, allows riders to remain upright and steer with body movements. The invention gained attention even before it was unveiled in December 2001, spurred by leaked quotes from a book proposal that ran on the Inside.com news site. It quoted Apple Chief Executive Officer Steve Jobs saying people would design cities around the invention and venture capitalist John Doerr comparing its significance to the World Wide Web.

Setbacks and successes Prices of between $5,000 and $10,000 limited the appeal, and cities such as New York restricted where people could drive their Segways. In 2003, President George W. Bush was photographed leaping from one of the vehicles after losing control of it in Maine. In the same year, the company recalled all 6,000 of its

the company looked extremely conservative,” Jones said. “It was only after the great recession — the 100-year flood — that financing became an issue.”

a group of prominent corporate leaders. “It’s something that we took a great amount of pride in — we had this economic engine that paid well and that played well with the community. It’s not that anymore.” Rank-and-file employees who still have their jobs have felt pain in the form of benefit cutbacks that began even before sales tumbled. The company froze its traditional pension plan, then suspended contributions to its 401(k) plan. Most yearly raises also have come to an end, according to employees. The hiring this year of executives from the outside prompted a surge in workplace gossip after the staff searched the Internet for information on their new bosses. The new CEO, Steve Heyer, lost his most recent high-profile job as chief executive at Starwood Hotels after facing allegations that he had sent inappropriate sexual e-mails to underlings. Ross Klein, whom Heyer brought in to run Harry & David’s new branding effort, left a job at Hilton Hotels in 2008 after he was accused of corporate espionage, an allegation that is a subject of a federal criminal investigation. Klein is working out of an office near his home in Beverly Hills, Calif. Heyer and Klein have denied any wrongdoing. Jones of Wasserstein praised both men. “The only thing I will say in connection with either of them is that these are first-rate executives, and they are both extraordinarily talented, and we’re very proud and happy to have them working for us,” he said.

Bad news for Medford

A source of tension

The combination of plunging sales and heavy debt has not only ravaged Harry & David’s work force, but it also has caused business leaders in the Medford area, where the company is the largest private employer, to worry about the local economy. “For the average person that landed in Medford 20 years ago, they saw Camelot,” a promised land of good jobs and beautiful scenery in the mountainous southwest corner of the state, said Bill Thorndike, owner of a local manufacturing firm who is on the boards of the charitable Oregon Community Foundation and the Oregon Business Council,

The new executives, he added, are positioning the company for the future by creating partnerships with other retailers and by revamping its website and tweaking some recipes. “Our objective is to have this be a leading consumer product specialty food company and a real pride of the Northwest,” Jones said. Another new top executive, Drew Reifenberger, is responsible for customer relations. Like Heyer, he is working out of an office in Atlanta. The hirings have an added sting for employees because of the compensation the newcomers

Not so sweet Harry & David, the Oregonbased gourmet food and gift company, has seen its interest expense eat into its net income, leading it to cut employees and expenses to offset the loss.

Sales, in millions $600

$427

400 200 0

’05 ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 ’10

By year, in millions Net income

Interest expense

$40

$18.9

20 0 -20 -40

-$39.2 ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 ’10

Employees 1,600 800 0

1,538 1,026

’05 ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 ’10

Source: Harry & David company filings

© 2010 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

transporters after a safety report found operators risk falling as batteries ran out. In September 2006, the company voluntarily recalled 23,500 of its scooters because they could suddenly reverse, causing the rider to fall. The wheels could unexpectedly switch direction when the rider leaned the transporter back to slow down, get off and get on again in a short period of time. More than 500 organizations worldwide now use the transporters for policing and security, according to the company. Consumers make up 60 percent of sales, with 350 retail outlets in 80 countries. Forty-four states allow Segways to operate in the same spaces as walkers and bikers, according to the company. Huber, at Electric Tour Co. in San Francisco, said Segway crashes are rarer than bicycle accidents. When they do happen, they typically result in the same kind of scrapes and bumps that bike riders get, he said. Still, the transporters can instill an inflated sense of confidence, Huber said. “People think Segways are like hovercrafts, that if you bang them into a curb you’re not going to fall,” he said. “They’re not magic.”

are getting. Heyer is making $9.7 million this year; his predecessor earned $1.4 million last year. Employees also are miffed that Heyer decided not to move to Oregon from Atlanta. Instead, the company is paying for an office for him in Georgia and firstclass flights for his visits to Medford, a town of 77,000 between the Cascades and the Siskiyou Mountains.

Housing Continued from B1 And the city’s unemployment rate is nearly 15 percent, one of the highest for major U.S. markets. The outlook in Orlando is also grim. More than half of borrowers owe more on their mortgages than their properties are worth. The unemployment rate there is nearly 12 percent. This year, about 2 million, or 41 percent, of the 5 million homes sold this year will be distressed sales, predict analysts at John Burns Real Estate Consulting in Irvine, Calif. Distressed sales include foreclosures and short sales. For next year, that figure is on pace to hit 2.4 million homes, or 45 percent of all sales. Distressed sales are projected to make up at least a quarter of the market for the next four years. In healthy housing markets, distressed sales typically make up only 6 to 7 percent of annual sales. A much brighter outlook is forecast for some areas of the country, especially major cities that never experienced an outsized housing boom — and bust. Major cities in Texas, for example, have relatively healthy economies and low levels of foreclosures. Dallas home prices fell only 11 percent from their peak in 2007 and bottomed out last year. They have since rebounded about 8 percent. Houston and Dallas are projected to rise about 3 to 4 percent over the next year.

An official at the headquarters of China’s customs agency and an official at the Beijing municipal customs office each declined to comment. Executives and traders in both countries have said that Chinese customs agents have blocked rare earth exports since early last week, after a diplomatic dispute over Japan’s detention of a Chinese fishing trawler captain in waters claimed by both countries. Japan released the captain on Friday. A Japanese minerals trader said Tuesday that customs agents were still not allowing shipments of rare earths to Japan. Traders here say that it would be extremely difficult to find other sources of the minerals if shipments continue to be held up. China mines 93 percent of the world’s rare earth minerals.

Those markets “don’t have the huge supply of homes that a lot of the coastal markets have,” said Eric Fox, vice president of economic and statistical modeling at Veros. Houston and Dallas both have jobless rates of under 9 percent, below the national average of 9.6 percent. And in both cities, fewer than 15 percent of borrowers owe more on their homes than their properties are worth. Nationally, prices have risen nearly 7 percent from their April 2009 bottom. Yet they remain nearly 28 percent below their July 2006 peak. Most experts predict about 5 million homes will be sold this year. That would be in line with last year and just above 2008, the worst sales performance since 1997. The latest changes in the CaseShiller national index represent a three-month moving average — for May, June and July. Sales in May and June were inflated by government tax credits that have since expired. July was the worst month for home sales in 15 years. August wasn’t much better. The record number of foreclosures, job concerns and weak demand from buyers have combined to weigh down prices. “The market, at best, is weak, and starting to decline,” said Michael Feder, chief executive of Radar Logic Inc., which tracks the housing market.

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 29, 2010 B3

A W Special-needs children keep The unemployed working parents extra busy join forces to press “I tried hard to make sure they knew I was going to take care of my workload ... even if I had to work at night or over the weekends. It was incredible pressure, but I did it.”

Job flexibility and employers’ support are essential, so more parents are opening up about their kids’ needs By Cindy Krischer Goodman

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

ESPN commentator and former tennis star Mary Joe Fernandez remembers the day she learned her son had asthma. “It was like a wake-up call that threw me into action,” Fernandez said. She realized she would need to become ultra-organized to keep up travel for her broadcasting job, find the best asthma treatments and manage her son’s medical needs. “I came up with an action plan that I leave behind with his school, or baby sitter, or my parents so when I travel they know what to do.” Fernandez just recently started to talk openly about her son’s illness, even during a recent tennis clinic for children at the U.S. Open in New York to raise awareness and empower other parents. Despite their fears about job security, more parents of children with chronic illnesses and disabilities are opening up — even at work. What they have going for them is strength in numbers: One in seven children under age 18, or approximately 10.2 million children in the United States, have special health care needs, according to Department of Health and Human Services. Most parents say they have no choice but to open up; they need their jobs to support their families, and more importantly, they need the health insurance. They also need flexibility and resources for what becomes a lifetime commitment.

— Kathy Crisci, on juggling her work schedule and her son Erik’s medical needs

C.W. Griffi n / Miami Herald

Kathy Crisci with her sons Charley Crisci, reclining, and Erik Aguirre, holding the family’s dog, Peppito. Erik suffered from cancer and the aftereffects of chemo, but his mom has been there for him, balancing work and family. “If you don’t have employer support, it can become overwhelming,” said Isabel Garcia, executive director of Parent to Parent of Miami, a community resource center. Judith Marte balances a highpressure job — she is chief budget officer for Miami-Dade County Public Schools — and her family, which includes a 19-year-old son with a severe form of autism. Raising a child with special needs magnifies your stress level at least three times, she said. Over the years, Marte has put in place a support system that includes her boss, who understands about emergencies. “Having a supportive workplace is hugely important. I could not work at a place that was not family-oriented,” she said. Most working parents juggle a variety of time demands. But

having a child with a disability or chronic illness requires additional time and effort. Parents of these children must find and manage treatment, attend doctor appointments, handle conflicts at day care or school, and seek the right education choices. It easily can create financial problems, marital discord, sibling issues and problems at work. Even understanding employers may be flexible only up to a certain point. During her 23 years with the City of Sunrise, Fla., community development department, Gladys “Kathy” Crisci has juggled work with surgeries and treatments for her son Erik. At age 4, Erik was diagnosed with cancer. He is now 21. Chemotherapy and radiation keeps his cancer at bay but has created a lifetime of serious health complications.

Crisci said that at the time of the diagnosis, her boss gave her time off, and her co-workers donated vacation time. But over the years, more treatments were necessary. Crisci worked for a few different supervisors, some more understanding than others. To keep her job, she put in extra effort to make up for her absences. “I tried hard to make sure they knew I was going to take care of my workload, that I could handle both, even if I had to work at night or over the weekends. It was incredible pressure, but I did it,” she said. On the other hand, some parents of children with special needs may refrain from talking about their children at work — or asking for help. Steve Rossman, chairmandesignate for Easter Seals’ international board of directors, is a single father raising his daughter with special needs and a granddaughter. Rossman also is a Miami law partner who tries to create a family-friendly workplace and concedes that some bosses are less than understanding of the lifetime challenges facing these parents. “The key is to sit down and try to work out a solution that works,” he said.

Professional jealousy hurts workplace relationships McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Would you like a promotion at work? If so, look around to see if someone is blocking your progress. Backstabbers live in almost every work setting. To overcome sabotage, which is likely to happen if you’re good at your job, you’ve got to be clever, and speak up early on. These tips can help:

• Talk privately with an HR manager. Sit down with someone who can document the jealousy issues. State your concerns clearly. • Act out benevolent behaviors. Let co-workers know you are a team player. They’ll get the true picture of what’s going on. • Treat the jealous person with kindness. Even if everyone knows you’re unhappy about the jealousy, try to act civil toward this per-

son. Outclass him or her. An HR manager we’ll call Peggy says people with low self-esteem often try to backstab others. But, anything you do to raise their self-esteem will likely backfire, says Peggy. She offers these tips to supervisors of such people: • Ask the jealous person for his opinion. Talk to him often to gain insight into what bothers him. This diffuses anger he might act

out on co-workers. • Give this person specific tasks. Keep her busy doing online research that is important for a big project. Steer him away from serving on committees or group activities. • Find this person’s strong points. Make sure the whole department understands what this person does well. It can’t hurt to brag, if the statements are true.

Congress for aid

‘99ers’ want their benefits extended By Alana Semuels Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — After his wife pulls out of the driveway every morning to head to college, Scott Mathewson sits down at the computer in his apartment and talks to his unemployment group. Mathewson, a San Jose, Calif., electrician who has been out of work for more than two years, spends most days in an online chat room he created to lobby for another round of unemployment benefits. In this election year, he and other jobless workers are trying to turn the nation’s 14.9 million unemployed into a political force. “This has made me 110 percent more politically active,” said Mathewson, 45, who in March exhausted his 99 weeks of jobless benefits, the maximum available. Mathewson is part of a growing army of so-called 99ers, the estimated 3.5 million unemployed workers who will have fallen off the jobless benefit rolls by year’s end. Their prospects for finding new work are dim. The U.S. economy continues to shed jobs, and the national unemployment rate is 9.6 percent. With their finances in tatters and little hope of finding work anytime soon, Mathewson and other 99ers are pressing policymakers for additional aid.

Banding together Last week, a group of grassroots, Internet-based organizations blitzed members of the U.S. Senate with faxes and emails. Calling themselves the American 99ers Union, they’re urging lawmakers to approve a stalled bill granting an additional 20 weeks of benefits to long-term jobless workers in hard-hit states. “You’ve had a lot of groups out there with the same end goal, an extension,” said Gregg Rosen, an unemployed marketer from Pennsylvania who founded the umbrella group. “We thought, ‘Let’s start putting these groups together into one laser-focused group.’ ” Rosen estimates that the 16 groups in the coalition are

composed of 100,000 members from across the country. Whether they can mobilize the nation’s jobless or sway public policy remains to be seen. Few legislators or candidates this political season are championing efforts to extend unemployment benefits because of concerns over the size of the federal budget deficit. There’s no powerful entity in Washington representing the jobless or the millions of Americans getting by on part-time jobs. Many unemployed people are so strapped for cash that they’ve lost their Internet and phone service. Others spend so much time job hunting that they have little energy for political action. “The jobless are not a lobbying group. There’s no national association of the unemployed,” said former Labor Secretary Robert Reich, a professor of public policy at University of California-Berkeley. “Most people who have lost a job think of themselves as very much alone.”

Getting political Michael White, 58, said this is the time to band together. White, of Los Angeles, didn’t follow politics until he lost his job as a video editor in June 2008. He’s since founded the Unemployed Workers Action Group, which is affiliated with the American 99ers Union. White helped organize an August rally on Wall Street that drew dozens of unemployed, some holding signs reading “The American Dream Has No Expiration Date” and “Where Are the Jobs?” The group encouraged 99ers to call their members of Congress about introducing legislation to grant an extension of unemployment benefits, called Tier 5, to those whose benefits have run out. “They say you shouldn’t vote on one issue, but my next vote is going to be based on this issue,” White said. “When people are losing their homes, it’s a very important issue by which to judge politicians.” Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

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DianaShip DicksSptg Diebold DigAngel h DigitalRlt DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards DimeCBc DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DrSCBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBr DrxSOXBll DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DivX DrReddy DolbyLab DoleFood n DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DoverMot DowChm DrPepSnap DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR Drew Inds DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuoyGWat Duoyuan n DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy rs

1.08 2.12 0.16 0.56 6.26 5.68 0.20 0.01

7.35 3.41 4.77 8.06 5.06 0.08

2.00 0.35 0.24

1.83 1.00 1.04 0.40 1.10 0.60 1.00

0.52

1.64 0.48 0.98 0.68 1.40

Nm 12.93 +.12 28.21 +.18 30.57 +.10 .47 -.00 61.85 +.63 33.28 +1.69 30.76 -.34 23.88 +.14 13.90 +.69 41.98 +.11 34.24 +.11 33.58 +.75 33.59 -.09 26.06 -.80 23.33 -.30 44.24 -.93 28.57 -1.48 31.17 +1.39 27.70 -.55 13.13 -.11 21.74 +.15 33.36 -.66 48.25 +.69 47.00 +1.27 12.24 -.18 53.46 +.66 32.18 +.63 16.51 +.02 43.69 -.05 38.20 -.04 .21 -.01 19.14 +.03 33.22 -.07 8.80 +.34 32.75 -.05 60.32 -1.60 9.10 -.20 29.76 +.51 50.29 -.50 49.15 +.35 44.19 -.07 13.25 +.06 64.61 +.28 17.32 +.20 1.68 -.05 17.47 -.03 51.46 +.48 1.82 +.07 27.86 +.09 35.72 +.90 32.03 +.03 24.27 +.37 37.05 -.01 20.20 -.25 4.48 +.02 62.42 +1.56 1.95 +.03 4.85 +.38 45.67 +.37 25.25 +.35 17.94 +.04 11.71 +.05 74.54 +1.03 12.85 +.96 2.83 +.16 2.42 +.01 9.64 +.13 1.84 +.08 4.88 +.08

E-F-G-H E-House ETrade rs eBay EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp eResrch EagleBulk EagleMat ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton EatnVan EV LtdDur EVRiskMgd EV TxAG EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW Ebix Inc s Ecolab Ecopetrol EdisonInt EducMgt n EducRlty EdwLfSci s 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoEl ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts EBrasAero Emcore lf EMS EmersonEl EmpDist EmpireRst EmployH Emulex EnbrEPtrs Enbridge EnCana g s EndvrInt EndvSilv g EndoPhrm EndurSpec Ener1 EnerNOC Energen Energizer EngyConv EnrgyRec EngyTEq EngyTsfr EgyXXI rs EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys ENSCO Entegris Entergy EntPrPt EnterPT EntreeGold EntropCom EnzonPhar EpicorSft Equifax Equinix EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EssexPT EsteeLdr EtfSilver EthanAl EverestRe EvrgrSlr h ExactSci h Exar ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl ExpScrip s ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl Ezcorp F5 Netwks FEI Co FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FactsetR FairIsaac FairchldS FamilyDlr Fastenal FedExCp FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird FinEngin n Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstBcpPR FstCwlth FFnclOH FstHorizon FstInRT FMidBc FstNiagara FstSolar FTDJInet FT ConDis FT Fincl FT HiLgSh FTMstrDv FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FlagstB rs Flextrn Flotek h FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil

0.25 19.50 -.10 14.79 -.53 24.87 +.10 21.18 -.32 24.98 +.19 2.51 43.13 +.64 0.62 91.78 +.53 0.88 34.39 +.59 7.64 +.10 5.24 +.14 0.40 23.93 +.87 0.64 9.07 +.01 0.04 16.23 +.04 1.76 73.47 +1.01 4.26 +.13 2.32 82.48 +.57 0.64 29.00 +.12 1.39 16.43 +.09 1.80 13.79 +.03 1.23 13.87 +.12 1.62 11.69 +.03 1.53 10.96 +.03 1.56 12.74 +.06 24.00 +.77 0.62 50.62 -.06 1.34 40.99 +.97 1.26 34.77 +.50 11.86 -.17 0.20 7.16 +.05 67.96 -.16 2.09 -.11 0.04 12.33 +.05 23.63 +.05 1.60 31.95 +.54 5.37 +.18 0.05 19.00 +.84 16.55 -.02 0.38 28.58 +.55 .77 -.11 52.11 +.07 1.34 52.90 -.05 1.28 20.04 +.09 1.13 -.02 0.24 15.22 -.10 10.53 -.01 4.11 55.56 +.19 1.70 51.25 +.50 0.80 28.42 -.19 1.26 +.01 4.02 +.03 33.10 +2.49 1.00 38.77 -.43 3.89 +.06 31.60 -.58 0.52 45.24 +.24 70.38 -.88 4.75 -.02 3.59 -.05 2.16 37.26 +.37 3.58 48.00 +.10 22.01 +.07 0.10 5.04 -.12 2.16 24.34 +.08 0.68 23.61 +.09 24.92 +.14 1.40 44.51 -.21 4.79 +.07 3.32 77.56 +.31 2.30 39.01 +.23 2.60 43.75 +.57 2.76 +.08 9.61 -.19 11.28 +.13 8.62 -.06 0.16 31.03 +.32 103.16 +.64 0.88 16.91 +.14 1.35 48.06 -.06 0.28 10.86 +.15 4.13 108.23 +.67 0.55 62.80 +1.50 21.70 +.30 0.20 17.30 +.08 1.92 86.13 +.97 .61 -.00 7.19 +.18 5.88 +.09 5.64 +.11 0.16 14.61 +.04 4.00 -.09 2.10 43.04 -.05 6.52 -.03 4.92 +.15 0.28 29.01 -.28 0.40 46.28 +.72 49.04 +.15 21.85 +.20 0.33 16.30 -.01 3.10 -.01 1.76 62.06 +.35 19.92 +.28 104.06 +.83 20.48 +.99 25.99 -1.01 0.50 68.26 +.71 66.99 +.49 0.48 8.60 +.14 2.79 +.01 33.98 +.07 0.92 81.81 +1.35 0.08 24.91 +.42 9.23 +.06 0.62 43.34 +.37 0.84 53.80 +.94 0.48 84.71 +.64 2.68 81.91 +.89 0.24 5.54 +.15 0.96 22.96 +.06 4.59 +.11 13.66 +.78 17.72 +.44 0.72 15.77 +.47 0.20 27.52 +.12 1.26 10.93 -.06 0.04 12.02 +.12 13.48 -.26 18.35 +.67 0.16 14.20 +.09 0.24 15.08 +.38 .30 +.01 0.04 5.29 +.01 0.40 16.73 +.09 0.72 11.17 +.20 5.17 +.21 0.04 11.19 +.06 0.56 11.53 +.23 148.52 +.61 30.31 +.07 0.06 17.16 +.14 0.11 13.49 +.10 20.00 0.62 15.27 +.07 2.20 38.34 -.06 0.64 18.19 +.51 53.99 -.19 1.83 +.01 5.96 -.03 1.38 -.08 0.80 24.57 +.03 1.16 107.15 +.43 0.50 50.06 +1.19 23.55 +.85 0.32 51.19 -.16 0.60 14.94 +.20 4.96 +.12 12.52 +.04 4.50 12.63 +.01 31.07 29.47 +.35

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

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D 8.66 +.02 24.36 -.31 3.65 -.03 0.76 49.78 +.43 54.59 +1.46 25.19 +1.43 1.77 21.84 +.10 0.88 107.99 +.79 0.76 12.61 +.23 1.20 87.03 +.47 .04 +.00 7.23 +.20 0.75 8.17 -.07 13.10 +.12 1.90 29.46 +.33 39.85 +1.16 1.22 +.05 0.28 20.00 +.03 0.12 8.84 +.18 5.96 -.04 5.41 +.09 8.54 1.12 29.06 +.13 0.20 4.78 -.05 4.49 4.32 +.13 25.31 +.27 7.96 -.28 0.48 5.07 +.05 1.68 17.26 -.02 0.14 15.99 +.37 1.28 26.13 +.03 19.88 +.06 7.29 +.19 0.16 12.50 +.15 0.40 18.91 +.30 0.20 52.80 +.35 1.50 30.68 28.89 +.19 3.92 -.04 30.86 +.50 47.96 +.51 16.12 +.30 4.74 +.03 26.43 +.16 1.68 63.27 +.14 0.48 16.44 +.01 15.56 +.05 0.32 4.62 +.14 1.12 36.96 +.22 3.56 +.11 .51 +.02 44.05 +1.19 13.59 -.17 0.44 19.27 +.03 22.16 -.37 1.64 45.21 +.60 .64 -.01 12.41 +.08 71.50 +.30 23.69 +.86 0.21 13.85 +.35 5.43 +.12 0.18 6.52 +.01 28.28 +.54 36.14 +.28 0.52 14.38 +.19 1.98 40.08 -.23 1.72 +.08 0.40 6.27 +.10 2.03 23.95 -.05 4.10 +.01 5.22 +.13 0.08 41.99 +.07 18.83 +.14 1.72 +.05 0.15 14.18 +.04 1.34 +.02 0.40 15.92 +.26 0.16 15.12 +.26 0.06 19.49 +1.53 0.18 44.12 +.51 5.09 +.17 1.40 145.01 -.99 1.08 73.95 +1.71 14.22 +.06 10.83 -.02 527.17 -3.24 1.64 26.55 +.05 28.09 +.03 0.80 30.90 +.35 15.64 +.11 2.16 120.62 +1.27 6.94 +.03 0.92 22.69 +.53 3.39 +.15 4.16 +.02 2.36 +.02 0.07 5.47 +.03 0.83 18.81 -.11 37.01 -.54 11.70 +.82 15.70 +.47 12.18 +.26 28.71 +.08 10.15 +.45 0.52 18.82 +.34 0.64 40.25 +.56 0.38 22.89 +.44 0.03 29.91 +.01 8.25 +.02 7.30 -.01 12.60 +.43 .62 -.16 42.88 +.17 0.58 25.98 -.01 1.86 36.22 +.09 0.81 180.99 +.46 1.70 52.03 -.17 26.71 -.09 29.97 +.31 24.10 +.28 0.36 32.77 +.36 7.69 +.18 1.35 17.76 +.06 24.64 +.14 14.33 +.01 1.28 1.00 46.11 +.08 1.48 +.02 47.26 +.07 0.40 28.63 +.41 33.59 +.42 6.59 -.01 0.07 11.55 +.24 1.00 45.13 +.60 12.10 -.03 0.82 24.42 +.43 0.30 11.60 +.35 0.20 23.44 +.94 14.93 +.71 1.81 23.97 +.36 10.40 +1.30 1.00 45.21 +.18 4.60 28.95 +.17 1.24 22.67 -.15 5.90 +.02 3.35 +.03 2.76 47.31 +.46 7.50 +.06 1.20 23.19 +.23 27.10 -.12 19.41 +.66 26.15 +.27 12.37 +.27 0.08 14.83 +.20 3.90 -.04 6.37 +.20 1.80 47.94 -.06 10.57 +.37 0.24 39.68 +.19 .57 -.01 57.59 +.53 1.00 59.77 +.95 2.59 +.07 0.20 5.16 +.05 1.28 47.64 +.23 11.44 +.16 0.40 58.19 +.52 50.72 -.05 0.32 41.62 +.36 18.37 +.13 24.71 +.22 25.22 +.01 1.70 32.28 +.48 0.41 35.23 -.11 0.60 28.01 +.08 10.82 +.13 16.26 -.19 0.95 31.81 +.21 50.79 +2.03 2.32 52.43 +.52 35.57 +.26 1.21 44.19 +.35 0.32 17.92 +.69 0.84 44.74 +.14

Nm Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HovnanE HubGroup HudsCity HugotnR HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HutchT Hyperdyn

D

1.80 0.04 0.28 0.60 1.35 0.48 0.04 0.40

19.12 9.90 57.82 22.58 14.64 5.96 3.90 29.48 12.25 19.61 28.59 50.59 35.39 5.72 11.55 3.49 2.49

+.67 +.33 +.72 +.59 +.37 +.10 +.08 -.46 +.18 +.16 -.40 +.56 +.27 -.02 -.11 +.03 +.51

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk IESI-BFC g iGateCorp II-VI ING GRE ING GlbDv ING ING 6.375 ING 8.5cap INGPrRTr ION Geoph iShGold s iSAstla iSAstria iShBraz iSCan iShEMU iSFrnce iShGer iSh HK iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSSpain iSSwedn iSTaiwn iSh UK iShThai iShChile iShTurkey iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSh ACWI iSEafeSC iShIndones iSSPGth iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShDevRE iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShSft iShSemi iShNetw iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSR1KV iSR1KG iShBCred iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShBar3-7 iShBShtT iShUSPfd iSRus3K iShDJTel iShREst iShDJHm iShFnSc iShSPSm iShBasM iShEur350 iStar ITC Hold ITT Corp ITT Ed Icon PLC IconixBr Idacorp IDEX Ikanos ITW Illumina Imax Corp Immucor ImunoGn ImpaxLabs Incyte IndiaGC IndoTel Inergy Infinera InfoSpace Informat InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM InlandRE InovioPhm InsitTc Insmed h InspPhar IntgDv ISSI IntegrysE Intel IntcntlEx InterDig Intrface Intermec InterMune IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif IntTower g InternetB InterntCap InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntraLks n IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invesco InvMtgCap InVKSrInc InvTech InvRlEst IridiumCm IronMtn IsilonSys Isis IsleCapri ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g Ixia JCrew JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMCh wt JPMAlerian JPMCh pfB JPMCh pfZ JPMCh pfC

27.02 +.32 17.66 +.27 49.57 +.71 22.22 -.21 18.96 +.10 37.45 +.95 0.54 7.46 +.01 1.20 11.50 +.07 10.60 +.13 1.59 22.87 +.31 2.13 26.14 +.03 0.33 5.68 +.01 4.86 +.12 12.81 +.12 0.81 24.38 +.40 0.76 19.67 +.32 2.58 75.40 +1.01 0.42 27.81 +.15 0.96 34.86 +.36 0.60 24.26 +.30 0.30 22.09 +.18 0.48 17.92 -.11 0.16 9.96 +.04 0.39 52.89 +.21 0.25 13.71 +.02 0.75 53.31 +.41 0.38 13.21 +.01 1.37 44.94 +.37 1.36 66.91 +1.24 2.26 41.03 +.47 0.61 29.03 +.57 0.21 13.40 +.07 0.44 16.57 +.02 1.20 60.89 +.30 0.68 74.15 +.32 1.22 69.85 +1.86 21.29 +.30 1.08 51.83 +.12 1.69 46.98 +.28 2.56 109.79 +.76 0.87 59.90 +.10 0.68 42.49 -.14 1.01 81.74 +.27 2.34 115.12 +.51 3.83 108.77 +.26 0.59 44.36 +.32 5.39 112.88 +.20 0.64 43.26 +.09 0.89 38.65 +.30 0.08 29.01 +.09 1.13 59.67 +.20 1.22 49.71 +.46 1.24 54.57 +.29 3.74 106.02 +.72 3.79 99.37 +.33 1.13 84.38 +.02 1.38 55.42 +.32 0.83 40.42 +.28 0.52 49.95 +.42 2.29 30.57 +.30 1.42 90.49 +.72 0.99 79.95 +.57 8.10 89.03 +.13 52.52 +.18 0.44 47.47 +.82 0.07 29.73 +.06 86.84 +.52 1.85 62.30 +.23 1.28 59.30 +.28 0.72 51.61 +.23 4.52 108.30 +.53 1.11 63.39 +.24 1.06 61.91 +.59 3.36 104.94 -.09 0.47 74.73 +.68 0.79 67.48 +.66 2.97 118.36 +.23 0.09 110.24 2.89 39.75 -.05 1.19 67.76 +.34 0.67 21.88 +.05 1.88 53.15 +.14 0.08 12.10 +.14 0.59 52.37 +.16 0.58 59.17 +.43 0.91 65.13 +.39 1.02 38.24 +.34 3.11 -.05 1.34 62.48 -.12 1.00 46.90 +.12 64.19 +1.27 21.88 -.26 17.75 +.39 1.20 35.49 +.45 0.60 35.52 +.53 1.19 +.18 1.36 47.08 +.48 49.95 +.43 16.20 -.24 19.50 -.14 5.99 +.29 19.59 -.02 15.92 +.49 1.17 +.05 1.25 41.15 +.60 2.82 39.01 +.33 11.79 +.01 8.73 +.20 37.91 -.05 0.54 67.24 +1.11 0.28 35.56 +.68 16.35 +.17 0.57 8.15 +.13 1.24 -.02 23.73 -.02 .69 +.00 5.71 +.21 5.79 +.14 8.70 -.16 2.72 52.27 +.46 0.63 19.50 +.27 105.84 +.77 28.71 +.17 0.04 14.13 +.11 12.35 +.16 13.29 +.73 2.60 134.89 +.24 5.39 1.08 49.46 +.64 0.24 14.40 +.17 0.50 21.41 -.31 21.13 +.29 6.58 +.20 13.18 -.01 11.44 +.28 69.77 +2.47 10.13 -.04 0.48 11.81 +.45 16.89 +1.53 27.03 +.48 44.81 -.15 290.03 -.23 0.44 21.67 +.04 3.57 21.79 -.02 0.31 4.65 14.71 +.03 0.69 8.38 +.14 8.96 +.16 0.25 22.32 +.46 22.71 +.61 8.32 -.04 7.24 +.06 0.59 23.29 +.49 60.04 +1.67 1.94 +.03 24.45 +1.23 12.71 -.04 33.84 +.15 8.42 +.13 25.46 +.35 12.27 +.11 0.20 38.95 -.13 11.95 -.05 1.80 33.42 +.10 1.80 26.75 +.13 2.00 27.07 -.04 1.68 25.32 +.06 0.06 0.53 0.50 0.11

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Nm Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHew JacobsEng Jaguar g Jamba JanusCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JinkoSol n JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesApp JonesLL JosABnk s JoyGlbl JnprNtwk K12 KB FnclGp KB Home KBR Inc KKR n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA KC Southn KapStone KA MLP Kellogg Kemet Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp Kforce KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KindMM KindredHlt KineticC KingPhrm Kinross g Kirklands KnghtCap KnightTr KnightT KodiakO g Kohls KopinCp KoreaElc KornFer Kraft KratonPP n KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LG Display LKQ Corp LSI Corp LTX-Cred LaZBoy LabCp LaBrnch LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LearCorp n LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LibertyAcq LibAcq wt LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibStrzA n LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH Lihua Intl LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincNat LincNtl wt Lindsay LinearTch LinnEngy LithiaMot LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg Local.com LockhdM LodgeNet Loews Logitech LogMeIn LongtopFn LongweiPI Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol Lufkin s lululemn g

D 0.28 13.76 -.13 0.38 25.49 +.16 21.64 +.30 .96 +.05 37.75 +.03 6.58 +.11 2.26 +.01 0.04 11.08 +.27 0.33 30.81 +.45 10.81 +.56 0.30 22.61 +.15 6.53 +.17 29.45 -.75 45.81 +1.41 1.97 -.03 2.16 62.43 +.40 0.52 30.63 +.66 0.20 19.67 +.18 0.20 87.36 +.48 43.73 +1.00 0.70 70.71 -.10 31.26 +.23 28.97 +.14 43.39 -.07 0.25 11.73 -.22 0.20 24.26 +.02 0.08 10.49 -.19 0.48 8.56 -.15 1.00 34.90 +1.09 20.31 +.29 2.40 +.34 38.40 -.22 12.30 +.27 1.92 25.89 -.10 1.62 50.66 +.05 3.20 0.48 31.75 +.63 4.83 -.03 9.25 +.15 0.04 7.91 +.07 13.49 +.00 1.40 32.88 +.09 2.64 64.72 -.60 0.64 16.19 -.01 4.36 68.19 -.30 4.36 60.06 +.32 12.72 +.21 36.61 +.98 9.93 +.03 0.10 19.00 +.29 13.99 +.22 12.45 +.09 0.24 19.29 +.17 1.20 19.75 -2.14 3.32 +.02 52.98 +.84 3.45 +.08 13.03 +.04 16.47 +.62 1.16 31.48 -.03 26.55 -.05 4.68 +.27 0.42 21.88 -.04 6.16 +.20 7.73 +.01 11.71 -.04 1.60 72.15 +.90 0.46 29.51 +.22 9.88 -.57 16.56 +.15 20.17 -.57 4.43 -.01 1.99 +.03 8.34 +.11 78.13 +1.83 4.00 +.10 42.52 +1.23 31.53 -.11 0.20 38.12 -.06 35.59 +.49 0.44 23.75 +.29 4.82 +.20 8.25 +.07 0.50 35.47 +.40 11.76 +.13 75.25 +.10 0.16 30.31 -.07 1.08 23.05 +.37 0.40 32.71 +.41 0.16 15.61 +.21 0.60 41.61 -.10 23.79 +.11 .96 -.02 1.51 +.03 0.40 7.36 +.06 43.55 +.51 10.40 1.66 -.02 0.29 4.41 +.04 31.05 +.13 30.94 +.19 13.79 +.54 52.21 +.44 64.00 +.23 1.90 32.27 +.29 47.91 +.29 39.74 +.49 34.01 +.03 8.28 +.28 1.96 36.39 +.45 5.11 +.10 0.60 27.26 +.28 0.80 24.94 +.41 0.04 23.99 +.31 16.04 +.09 0.34 43.53 -.26 0.92 30.99 +.50 2.52 31.50 +.38 0.20 9.90 +.42 9.85 +.01 8.33 +.22 5.99 +.25 1.45 4.73 -.01 4.42 -.07 3.00 72.47 +.09 3.23 -.09 0.25 37.73 +.41 16.40 +.47 38.39 +1.02 39.02 -.48 2.15 +.10 4.50 80.79 -.40 7.82 +.07 0.44 22.41 +.14 1.44 106.84 +.66 0.50 43.13 +.72 45.83 +2.59

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDS g MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MagelnHl MagelMPtr Magma MagnaI g MagHRes MaidenBrd MMTrip n Manitowoc MannKd Manntch ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinerEn MktVGold MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktVCoal MarIntA MarshM MarshIls Martek MartMM MarvellT

2.80 82.50 -1.74 10.78 -.06 0.24 6.06 +.07 1.00 29.61 +.55 10.35 +.12 0.63 19.84 +.11 6.67 -.28 11.87 +.06 7.26 -.09 0.76 7.65 +.03 0.58 6.86 +.02 9.08 +.15 11.44 +.19 9.87 +.03 18.22 +.25 2.57 0.88 53.74 +.54 34.39 +.79 2.00 42.95 +.04 1.80 32.67 +.15 0.20 22.97 +.24 46.67 +.35 2.93 50.93 +.18 3.67 +.10 1.20 80.27 +.50 4.16 -.02 29.89 +.69 39.62 -.63 0.08 10.39 +.34 6.08 +.03 2.22 -.15 0.74 49.70 +.81 0.52 12.58 -.10 1.00 32.49 +.30 24.01 -.08 0.11 56.66 +1.32 0.08 32.11 +.17 34.14 +.64 0.42 47.09 -.35 0.45 55.87 +.16 0.31 37.29 +.11 0.16 36.31 +.39 0.84 24.33 +.17 0.04 7.09 +.14 22.60 +.17 1.60 76.12 +.19 17.50 +.07

Nm Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MdbkIns MeadWvco Mechel Mechel pf MedAssets MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn MensW MentorGr MercadoL Merck Meredith MergeHlth MeridBio Meritage Mesab Metalico Metalline MetLife MetroPCS Micrel Microchp MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Microtune Micrvisn MidAApt MillerHer Millicom MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine Mohawk Molex MolexA MolinaH MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MSEMDDbt Mosaic Motorola Motricity n MuellerWat MultiFnElc MurphO Mylan MyriadG NBTY NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NaraBncp NasdOMX NBkGreece NatCineM NatCoal rs NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatResPtrs Nautilus NavigCons Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh Net1UEPS NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NtScout NetSolTch NetSuite NetwkEng NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NGenBiof h NwGold g NewOriEd NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NightwkR NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus NovoNord NSTAR NuSkin NuHoriz lf NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor

D 0.30 11.00 +.07 2.00 27.36 +.41 0.24 30.72 -.73 9.94 +.02 0.60 223.00 +.63 0.75 23.66 +.36 2.77 +.05 0.84 18.26 +.45 3.95 +.01 1.04 41.10 -.36 14.45 +.11 2.44 74.63 -.13 0.94 33.01 +.17 0.72 62.47 +1.02 16.51 +.36 47.25 +.04 0.90 56.66 +.16 0.12 8.57 -.03 0.92 24.67 +.18 24.35 +.01 8.13 +.17 20.37 +.17 51.89 +1.02 6.69 0.80 10.27 +.11 14.49 -.07 0.24 30.24 +.33 27.04 +.37 12.68 +.20 53.35 +.39 0.90 33.47 +.07 5.22 -.02 0.36 24.18 +.52 10.84 +.29 74.90 -.08 1.52 37.25 +.12 0.92 33.14 +.25 2.80 +.05 0.76 21.60 +.29 19.77 +.02 1.70 37.01 +1.62 4.02 +.04 .69 +.02 0.74 39.30 +.52 10.35 -.05 0.14 9.87 -.10 1.37 31.33 +.53 7.15 +.12 42.25 +.35 17.51 +.37 0.64 24.68 -.06 2.89 -.02 2.16 +.01 2.46 58.38 +.09 0.09 19.16 +.47 7.24 98.10 -.60 0.20 29.59 +.01 8.31 -.09 10.68 +.14 10.10 +.15 4.80 +.03 2.98 +.07 20.83 +.13 12.56 -.07 52.79 +1.00 0.61 20.80 +.29 0.61 17.40 +.09 27.00 +.01 1.12 47.22 +.54 26.00 -3.08 14.80 +.04 2.45 -.02 16.80 +.54 1.12 48.75 -4.32 12.76 +.29 0.36 17.13 +.09 0.42 25.43 +.33 0.20 24.50 -.37 1.20 16.90 +.21 0.20 61.77 -1.62 8.58 13.00 +1.88 0.07 3.07 +.08 21.99 -.56 1.10 61.54 +1.23 18.80 +.15 16.04 -.30 54.96 +.10 13.55 -.14 27.23 -.43 0.60 15.80 -.01 41.71 -.06 2.14 -.02 7.23 +.42 20.89 +.19 0.44 13.02 -.16 1.20 28.72 +.07 18.23 -.14 0.14 25.51 -.06 14.01 -.04 7.13 -.03 19.89 +.15 2.30 -.05 0.72 17.97 -.03 .97 +.32 12.60 +.09 1.38 51.31 -.16 7.17 43.65 +.24 0.40 44.31 +.66 0.04 6.36 +.03 1.52 25.23 +.13 0.40 12.87 +.25 1.84 38.93 -.12 2.16 26.41 -.36 1.29 -.11 11.21 +.17 0.24 5.66 +.07 1.68 18.03 +.09 46.05 +1.32 14.73 +.56 11.73 +.74 12.83 +.31 27.61 +.32 51.00 +1.61 39.74 -.21 27.05 +.02 161.86 -3.13 2.92 -.07 20.36 -.12 1.65 +.08 23.73 +.25 1.44 -.05 12.45 -.35 4.96 +.10 .05 -.01 .17 -.02 6.56 +.23 95.21 +1.54 1.00 16.14 +.06 7.82 +.06 0.28 12.44 +.19 3.16 +.04 0.20 18.07 +.30 56.26 +.56 0.60 64.23 +1.58 8.09 -.61 11.19 -.02 0.15 13.61 +.02 0.15 15.62 -.04 0.20 20.04 -.02 2.00 55.01 +.34 0.92 17.49 +.06 1.86 45.38 +.33 6.39 +.01 1.08 80.64 +1.53 18.77 +.37 22.25 -.05 0.20 33.67 +.36 0.72 75.21 +.24 0.56 9.86 +.05 4.86 -.07 1.55 26.68 +.10 0.80 38.31 +1.40 1.44 59.64 +.07 3.98 +.06 1.03 29.81 +.11 8.50 +.04 16.34 -.02 1.12 48.10 +.13 3.41 +.07 1.88 60.52 +.25 0.40 3.76 +.13 0.40 11.21 +.12 9.00 +.38 1.99 58.09 +.37 7.66 -.01 2.21 +.05 6.12 +.05 26.78 +.38 1.41 98.10 +2.26 1.60 39.59 +.33 0.50 27.70 +.21 6.96 34.67 +1.13 15.84 +.23 1.44 38.02 +.47

NutriSyst NvDCmdty NvMulSI&G NvMSI&G2 Nvidia NxStageMd O2Micro OGE Engy OM Group OReillyA h OasisPet n OccamNet OcciPet Oceaneer OceanFr rs Oclaro rs OcwenFn OfficeDpt OfficeMax OilSvHT OilStates Oilsands g OldDomF s OldNBcp OldRepub Olin OmegaHlt Omncre Omnicell Omnicom OmniVisn Omnova OnSmcnd Oncolyt g Oncothyr ONEOK OnyxPh OpenTxt OpenTable OpnwvSy OpexaTher optXprs Oracle OrbitalSci Orexigen OrientEH OriginAg Orthovta OshkoshCp OvShip OwensM s OwensCorn OwensIll Oxigene h PC Mall PDL Bio PF Chng PG&E Cp PHH Corp PMC Sra PMI Grp PNC PNM Res PPG PPL Corp PSS Wrld Paccar PacerIntl PacCapB PacEth h PacSunwr PackAmer Pactiv PaetecHld PallCorp PanASlv Panasonic PaneraBrd ParPharm ParagShip ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan PartnerRe PatriotCoal Patterson PattUTI Paychex PeabdyE Pebblebk n PeetsCfeT Pegasys lf Pengrth g PnnNGm PennVa PennVaGP PennWst g PennantPk Penney PenRE Penske Pentair PeopUtdF PepBoy PepcoHold PepsiCo Peregrne rs PerfectWld Perficient Pericom PerkElm Perrigo Petrohawk PetrbrsA Petrobras PtroqstE PetsMart Pfizer PhmHTr PharmPdt Pharmacyc Pharmerica PhilipMor PhilipsEl PhlVH PhnxCos PhotrIn PiedNG PiedmOfc n Pier 1 PilgrmsP n PimcoHiI PimcoStrat PinnclEnt PinnaclFn PinWst PioNtrl PitnyBw PlainsEx Plantron PlatGpMet PlugPwr h PlumCrk PluristemT Polaris Polo RL Polycom PolyMet g PolyOne Polypore Pool Corp Popular PortGE PostPrp Potash Potlatch PwrInteg Power-One PSCrudeDS PwshDB PS Agri PS BasMet PS USDBull PS USDBear PwSClnEn PwSWtr PSTechLdr PSFinPf PSETecLd PwShPfd PShEMSov PwShs QQQ Powrwav Praxair PrecCastpt PrecDrill PremGlbSv Prestige PriceTR priceline PrideIntl Primerica n PrinFncl PrivateB ProShtDow ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow PrUlShDow PrUShMC ProUltQQQ PrUShQQQ ProUltSP ProUShL20 PrUShtSem PrUSCh25 rs ProUSEM rs PrUShtTch ProUSRE rs ProUSOG rs ProUSBM rs ProUltRE rs ProUShtFn ProUFin rs PrUPShQQQ ProUltSemi ProUltO&G ProUBasM ProShtR2K ProUltPQQQ ProUSR2K ProUltR2K ProUSSP500 ProUltSP500 ProUltCrude ProSUltGold ProUSGld rs ProUSSlv rs ProUShCrude ProSUltSilv ProUShEuro ProctGam ProgrssEn ProgsvCp ProLogis ProspctCap ProspBcsh ProtLife

D 0.70 19.47 +.54 25.00 0.75 8.30 -.01 0.75 8.79 +.04 11.97 -.02 19.08 +.57 5.95 +.21 1.45 40.11 -.31 30.55 +.48 53.90 +.91 17.93 -.01 7.62 +.26 1.52 75.51 +.70 53.45 +.50 .97 +.04 14.81 +.08 10.20 +.11 4.67 +.13 13.11 -.19 2.60 111.72 +1.44 45.14 +.27 .51 +.00 25.88 +.05 0.28 10.52 -.03 0.69 13.78 +.12 0.80 20.31 +.36 1.44 22.26 +.23 0.13 23.45 +.94 12.68 +.28 0.80 39.71 +.15 22.73 +.62 7.61 +.17 7.22 +.21 4.75 +.51 3.36 -.07 1.84 44.59 +.09 26.71 +.01 47.50 +.48 68.57 +.41 1.67 +.01 1.63 +.04 15.20 -.11 0.20 27.19 +.24 14.62 +.33 5.69 +.02 11.40 +.31 8.27 -.01 2.23 +.18 27.28 +.65 1.75 34.67 -.30 0.71 28.26 +.34 25.40 +.03 27.90 +.46 .27 +.00 6.44 -.46 1.00 5.34 +.07 0.42 47.04 +.23 1.82 45.55 +.10 21.21 -.25 7.43 +.14 3.64 +.08 0.40 52.50 +1.03 0.50 11.49 +.08 2.20 73.14 +.36 1.40 27.58 -.08 21.27 +.20 0.48 47.47 +.55 5.89 -.19 .83 -.04 .99 -.09 5.49 +.36 0.60 23.35 +.14 32.95 +.07 4.27 +.04 0.64 41.80 +.30 0.05 29.54 +.22 0.11 13.72 +.15 88.69 -.56 28.65 +.60 0.20 3.99 +.03 19.05 +.06 1.58 +.02 22.92 +.06 4.26 1.08 70.11 +.69 2.00 79.55 +.53 11.40 +.13 0.40 28.34 +.31 0.20 16.89 +.05 1.24 27.17 +.24 0.28 48.99 +.21 18.26 +.25 35.47 +1.42 0.12 29.86 +.19 0.84 11.02 +.12 29.74 +.11 0.23 16.07 -.15 1.56 22.87 +.14 1.80 19.53 +.37 1.04 10.59 +.11 0.80 26.11 +.43 0.60 12.12 -.33 12.98 +.14 0.76 33.04 +.01 0.62 13.05 +.15 0.12 10.69 +.34 1.08 18.75 +.21 1.92 66.78 +.41 1.49 +.04 24.94 -1.06 9.10 -.08 8.29 -.25 0.28 23.18 +.09 0.25 65.46 -.39 15.25 -.01 1.18 31.66 -.34 1.18 35.58 -.28 6.06 +.01 0.50 35.41 +.96 0.72 17.43 +.26 7.59 65.51 +.46 0.60 24.11 -.35 8.00 -.05 9.67 +.17 2.56 56.08 +.62 0.95 31.42 +.70 0.15 59.05 +.32 2.17 5.22 -.16 1.12 28.90 +.10 1.26 18.93 +.43 8.29 +.31 5.66 -.04 1.46 13.06 +.09 0.90 10.62 -.05 10.84 -.08 9.23 +.22 2.10 41.69 +.20 0.08 64.26 -.06 1.46 21.30 +.15 25.59 -.15 0.20 34.28 +.90 2.17 +.03 .40 -.01 1.68 35.56 +.49 1.50 +.08 1.60 65.34 +.13 0.40 91.09 +2.09 28.13 1.90 -.04 12.53 +.33 29.53 +.51 0.52 20.32 +.18 2.80 +.01 1.04 20.31 +.13 0.80 28.07 +.14 0.40 145.81 -.49 2.04 34.23 +.61 0.20 33.42 +.94 8.69 -.21 77.21 +.20 23.66 27.87 -.13 21.86 +.33 22.88 -.12 27.01 +.13 9.64 +.10 0.11 16.55 +.13 0.02 21.13 +.10 1.30 18.22 +.01 0.11 17.38 +.09 1.02 14.43 -.01 1.64 27.73 +.08 0.33 49.37 -.02 1.85 +.01 1.80 90.43 +.62 0.12 130.15 +.82 6.24 +.03 7.01 +.26 9.65 +.13 1.08 50.10 +.13 349.93 +4.77 29.60 -.06 0.04 20.61 +.36 0.50 26.26 +.34 0.04 11.46 -.07 47.87 -.20 38.58 -.04 48.59 -.24 29.26 -.27 0.40 47.57 +.35 24.18 -.20 15.64 -.24 67.27 +.11 14.48 0.43 39.77 +.29 31.01 -.42 15.76 -.48 32.87 +.20 38.54 -.56 19.40 -.06 21.19 -.16 57.52 -.73 28.42 -.38 0.41 45.07 +.33 19.65 -.13 0.09 55.03 +.31 43.41 -.17 0.14 29.33 +.94 0.23 30.96 +.47 0.10 36.11 +.52 37.92 -.37 111.70 +.28 17.54 -.36 0.01 31.75 +.58 26.68 -.29 0.48 155.12 +1.62 9.19 -.02 61.07 +1.14 33.69 -.66 22.59 -.75 14.79 +.03 83.22 +2.23 19.97 -.33 1.93 60.62 -.42 2.48 44.72 +.29 0.16 21.35 +.27 0.60 11.77 +.41 1.21 9.77 -.03 0.62 32.44 +.48 0.56 21.53 +.42

Nm

D

ProvET g ProvidFS Prudentl PsychSol PSEG PubStrg PubSt pfI PulteGrp PureBio PPrIT

0.72 6.80 -.06 0.44 12.21 +.22 0.70 55.80 +.07 33.54 +.09 1.37 33.14 +.08 3.20 98.36 -.66 1.81 25.27 +.01 8.85 +.13 2.32 -.16 0.71 6.79 +.09

Q-R-S-T QEP Res n QIAGEN QlikTech n Qlogic Qualcom QualitySys QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h QstDiag QuestSft Questar s Questcor QuickLog QksilvRes Quidel Quiksilvr QwestCm RAIT Fin RBS pfE RBS pfG RF MicD RPC RPM RRI Engy RSC Hldgs RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp RadntSys RadientPh RadioShk Radware RaeSyst Ralcorp Rambus RamcoG Randgold RangeRs RareEle g RaserT h RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealD n RealNwk RltyInco RedHat Rdiff.cm RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegncyEn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp RehabCG ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola RentACt Rentech Repsol RepubAir RepubSvc ResCare RschMotn ResMed s ResrceCap ResConn RetailHT RexEnergy ReynldAm RigelPh RINO Intl RioTinto s RitchieBr RiteAid Riverbed RoadrnTr n RobbMyer RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RogCm gs Roper RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Royce Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues Ruddick RuthsHosp Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW Ryland SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SM Energy SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SpdrIntlSC SP Mid S&P500ETF Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrWilRE SpdrLehHY SpdrNuBST SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrMetM SPX Cp SRA Intl STEC STMicro STR Hld n SVB FnGp SXC Hlth s SABESP Safeway StJoe StJude Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SamsO&G SanderFm SanDisk SandRdge Sanmina Sanofi Santarus Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satcon h Satyam lf SavientPh Savvis Schlmbrg Schnitzer Scholastc Schwab SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet ScrippsEW SeabGld g SeacoastBk SeadrillLtd SeagateT SealAir Sealy SearsHldgs SeattGen SelCmfrt SemiHTr SemiMfg SempraEn Semtech Senesco SenHous Sensient Sequenom ServiceCp ShandaGm ShawGrp ShengdaTc Sherwin ShipFin Shire ShufflMstr SiderNac s Siemens Sify SigaTech h SigmaDsg SigmaAld SignatBk SignetJwlrs SilicnImg SilcnLab Slcnware SilvStd g SilvWhtn g SilvrcpM g SimonProp SimpsnM Sina Sinclair Sinovac SiriusXM

0.02 29.84 +.67 18.23 +.31 24.97 -.33 17.70 +.57 0.76 44.07 -.52 1.20 66.69 +1.59 19.31 -.07 1.92 +.05 .59 +.08 0.40 49.81 +1.18 24.92 +.30 0.56 17.26 -.20 10.24 +.27 5.15 -.07 12.64 +.15 10.84 -.41 4.08 +.12 0.32 6.34 +.09 1.68 -.02 1.47 14.17 -.43 1.52 14.30 -.40 6.15 +.35 0.24 20.73 +.49 0.82 20.02 +.21 3.59 +.02 7.60 +.37 31.25 +.05 26.11 +1.77 0.01 7.87 +.40 16.98 -.32 .74 +.04 0.25 21.38 +.21 32.18 -1.32 1.59 +.03 57.44 -.10 20.76 +.21 0.65 10.95 0.17 103.73 +2.57 0.16 36.94 +1.56 8.60 -.25 .26 -.05 0.44 25.39 +.43 2.00 50.19 +.13 1.50 45.77 +.40 18.69 +.71 3.24 +.14 1.73 33.82 +.32 41.27 +.45 5.94 +.64 1.00 14.30 +.16 0.68 58.74 -.76 0.72 13.31 +.08 1.85 39.20 +.82 1.78 24.18 +.07 0.58 73.70 -.08 0.04 7.10 +.13 0.16 19.02 +.14 19.64 +.15 0.48 48.66 +.79 0.40 41.15 +.14 1.00 58.50 -.36 11.47 -.11 0.24 22.46 +.06 .95 +.01 1.15 25.98 +.23 8.40 +.18 0.80 30.16 +.27 13.30 +.04 46.91 -1.45 32.93 +.07 1.00 6.42 +.07 0.16 13.38 +.40 1.66 99.42 +1.28 12.42 +.39 3.60 59.71 +.73 8.40 -.08 13.88 -.48 0.90 59.60 +1.12 0.42 20.17 +.48 .94 46.03 +1.82 10.76 -.04 0.17 27.35 +.64 0.52 25.34 +.45 0.60 51.27 +.68 1.40 62.22 +1.03 0.96 57.98 +.60 32.21 -.05 1.28 37.70 -.02 0.38 65.59 +1.02 22.91 -.17 0.64 56.15 +.72 52.10 +1.38 29.76 +.30 2.00 51.75 +.15 15.22 -.16 31.58 +.08 3.36 58.80 +.23 3.36 60.54 +.23 0.36 50.76 +1.43 12.05 +.21 4.16 +.04 21.52 +.23 11.91 +.12 0.48 34.65 +.24 3.96 +.02 2.13 30.24 +.10 1.08 43.14 +.32 0.62 42.50 +.30 0.12 18.02 +.42 15.92 +.16 0.67 49.84 +.26 39.94 +.54 1.90 40.46 +.06 0.20 19.99 +.11 6.28 +.27 17.15 +.08 0.40 62.73 -.69 11.91 +.07 0.10 37.53 +.42 2.55 108.56 +.37 127.85 +1.13 0.42 28.12 +.21 1.54 145.35 +.93 2.31 114.67 +.40 1.68 50.25 +.33 0.12 15.91 +.18 0.11 22.99 +.08 0.43 39.92 +.38 1.75 57.65 +.28 4.40 39.78 +.08 0.46 24.34 -.01 45.85 -.01 0.30 22.80 +.28 0.57 42.20 +.55 0.20 41.30 +.26 0.35 53.55 +.34 1.00 62.29 +.24 19.18 +.20 12.79 -.13 0.28 7.70 +.10 21.07 +.29 40.85 +.69 36.32 -.01 1.30 43.23 +.13 0.48 20.86 -.12 24.56 -.35 38.10 +.31 8.65 +.16 114.77 -2.27 41.76 -.63 11.70 +.27 1.32 -.06 0.60 41.61 +.20 35.98 +.09 5.26 +.19 11.94 +.03 1.63 33.73 +.31 2.85 +.20 0.35 11.90 +.05 0.44 13.60 -.08 1.46 44.81 +.75 3.51 +.08 4.54 +.08 22.71 +.48 21.40 -.25 0.84 60.29 +.43 0.07 46.97 -.25 0.30 27.63 +.36 0.24 14.19 +.26 9.88 +.08 1.00 51.55 -.08 0.30 47.04 +.14 7.88 -.03 29.49 +.95 1.25 +.04 2.31 27.83 -.17 11.69 +.14 0.52 22.70 +.19 2.78 +.10 73.02 +.52 14.11 -.19 7.03 +.10 0.52 27.86 +.53 3.55 +.17 1.56 53.93 +.30 19.96 +.61 .28 -.05 1.44 23.82 -.06 0.80 30.61 +.31 6.78 +.01 0.16 8.47 +.03 5.53 -.07 33.90 +.38 4.77 +.11 1.44 76.59 +1.25 1.40 19.20 +.15 0.34 69.87 +.86 8.46 +.46 0.58 17.61 +.54 2.41 105.86 +1.09 2.79 +.35 8.35 -.39 11.27 +.31 0.64 61.00 +.68 38.59 +.66 31.60 +.54 4.93 +.13 37.55 +.44 0.41 4.93 +.04 20.45 +.54 26.75 +.21 0.08 8.39 -.01 2.40 93.87 +.03 0.40 25.93 +.20 51.90 -.51 7.05 3.88 -.03 1.18 +.02

Nm SironaDent Skechers SkilldHcre SkyWest SkywksSol SmartBal SmartM SmartT gn SmartHeat SmithWes SmithMicro SmithfF Smucker SmurfStn n SnapOn SocQ&M Sohu.cm Solarfun SolarWinds Solera Solutia Somaxon SonicAut SonicCorp SonicSolu SonocoP Sonus SonyCp Sothebys Sourcefire SouthFn h SouthnCo SthnCopper SoUnCo SwstAirl SwtGas SwstnEngy SovranSS Spartch SpectraEn SpiritAero Spreadtrm SprintNex SprottGld n StageStrs StancrpFn SP Matls SP HlthC SP CnSt SP Consum SP Engy SPDR Fncl SP Inds SP Tech SP Util StdMic StdPac StanBlkDk Staples StarScient Starbucks StarwdHtl StarwdPT StateStr Statoil ASA StlDynam Steelcse StemCell h Stericycle Steris SterlBcsh StrlF WA h Sterlite SMadden s StewEnt StifelFn StillwtrM StoneEngy StratHotels Stryker SuccessF SulphCo SunHlthGp SunLfFn g Suncor gs SunesisP h Sunoco SunOpta SunPowerA SunPwr B SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst SuperMicro SupEnrgy Supvalu support.cm SusqBnc SwRCmATR SwftEng SykesEnt Symantec Synaptics Syngenta Syniverse Synopsys Synovus Synovus pf Sysco TAM SA TCF Fncl TD Ameritr TECO TFS Fncl THQ TICC Cap TIM Partic TJX TPC Grp TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi TakeTwo Talbots TalecrisB n TalismE g Tanger TanzRy g TargaRes Target Taseko TASER TataMotors Taubmn TechData TeckRes g Teekay TeekayTnk Tegal h Tekelec TlCmSys TelNorL TlcmArg TelcmNZ TelItalia TelefEsp TelMexL TelData Tellabs TempleInld TmpEMI TmpGlb TempurP Tenaris TenetHlth Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium TerNRoy n Terremk TerreStar TeslaMot n Tesoro TesseraT TetraTc TetraTech TevaPhrm TxCapBsh Texas Inds TexInst TexRdhse Textron Theravnce ThermoFis ThmBet ThomCrk g ThomsonR Thor Inds Thoratec 3M Co TibcoSft Tidwtr Tiffany Timberlnd TimberlnR TW Cable TimeWarn Timken Titan Intl TitanMet TiVo Inc Tix Corp TollBros Trchmrk Toreador TorDBk g Total SA TotalSys TowerGrp TowerSemi TowersWat Toyota TractSup s TradeStatn TrCda g TransAtlH TrnsatlPt n TransDigm TransGlb Transocn Travelers Travelzoo TreeHse n TridentM h TrimbleN TrinaSol s Trinity TriQuint Triumph TrueRelig TrstNY Trustmk TuesMrn Tuppwre Turkcell TutorPerini TwoHrbInv

D

0.16

1.60 1.20 0.62

0.30

1.12 0.28 0.20 1.82 1.43 0.60 0.02 1.00 1.80 1.00

0.30 0.80 1.05 0.58 0.77 0.43 1.00 0.16 0.60 0.31 1.27 1.36 0.36 0.52 0.20 1.32 0.04 1.02 0.30 0.16 0.60 0.06 0.15 0.12

0.60

1.44 0.40 0.60

0.04 0.35 0.04

1.13 0.04 2.06 1.00 0.92 0.20 0.82 0.88 0.71 0.60

0.47

0.25 1.55 2.11 1.00 0.32 1.66 0.40 1.27 1.12

1.65 0.90 0.85 0.68 4.78 1.35 0.45 0.08 0.44 1.00 0.54 0.68

0.50

0.72 0.30 0.52 0.08

1.16 0.28 2.10 1.00 1.00 1.60 0.85 0.52 0.02

0.64 2.44 3.23 0.28 0.50 0.30 0.28 1.60 0.84 7.65 1.44

0.32 0.16 0.26 0.92 1.00 0.66 1.34

Nm 36.24 +.37 22.90 +.19 4.00 -.14 14.02 +.32 21.09 +.21 3.90 -.02 6.26 +.12 13.88 +.15 6.06 -.09 3.66 -.03 9.78 +.25 16.83 +.35 61.27 +.22 18.80 -.16 46.53 +.34 49.95 +.73 59.51 -.57 12.44 +.09 17.95 +.04 43.45 +.15 15.99 +.13 3.94 -.11 9.78 +.07 7.68 +.10 10.11 +.55 33.99 +.36 3.52 +.01 30.77 -.09 36.28 +.12 29.15 -.26 .29 -.00 37.52 35.17 +.14 24.23 -.17 13.24 -.11 33.80 +.37 32.75 +.27 38.18 +.38 8.26 +.07 22.51 +.44 19.61 +.12 12.90 -.67 4.60 +.01 11.44 +.05 13.26 +.43 38.13 +.37 33.17 30.68 +.25 28.06 +.18 33.74 +.26 55.45 +.39 14.48 +.04 31.41 +.17 23.16 +.03 31.54 +.02 22.48 +.79 3.91 +.05 61.23 +1.26 20.82 +.26 1.98 -.08 26.14 -.01 53.57 +.63 20.03 +.46 37.97 -.21 20.65 +.01 14.15 -.12 7.86 +.03 .77 -.01 68.95 +.38 33.28 +.17 5.40 +.16 .68 +.08 14.84 -.65 40.91 +1.43 5.33 +.03 48.27 +.27 17.11 +.10 14.17 +.04 4.26 +.13 50.11 +1.11 25.48 -.47 .38 +.00 8.16 +.16 25.88 +.07 31.50 +.23 .44 +.01 35.08 +.89 5.81 +.02 13.68 +.16 13.39 +.27 3.49 -.09 9.26 -.02 9.09 -.02 25.96 +.13 10.49 +.66 27.13 +.66 11.45 +.16 4.63 -.07 8.47 +.14 8.90 -.09 28.36 -.15 13.71 15.55 +.13 27.98 +.30 51.99 +.26 24.04 +.14 24.86 +.21 2.49 +.02 23.65 +.02 29.55 23.04 +.26 15.92 +.27 16.40 +.10 17.40 -.06 9.18 +.12 4.13 +.12 10.35 +.17 32.84 +.39 45.22 +.39 24.00 40.63 +.30 9.84 +.35 18.75 +.01 10.09 +.20 10.10 +.20 12.63 +.12 22.80 +.14 16.68 +.16 47.16 -.11 7.33 +.18 27.65 +.13 54.53 +.14 5.30 -.02 3.82 -.09 24.74 +.09 45.10 +.15 39.39 +.24 40.06 +.01 27.47 +.17 13.24 +.07 .46 +.03 12.82 +.24 3.89 +.01 14.37 +.24 22.09 +1.42 7.66 +.07 14.08 +.18 74.72 +.90 14.84 +.14 33.17 +.21 7.73 +.18 19.19 +.28 16.89 +.10 10.91 +.00 31.12 +1.36 38.26 +.34 4.42 +.06 29.00 +.03 38.83 +.98 11.40 +.25 22.56 +.03 33.06 -.29 7.35 +.19 10.37 +.03 .48 -.01 21.40 +.87 12.92 +.10 18.73 +.41 20.75 +.34 10.35 +.07 53.61 -.02 16.87 +.21 31.57 +.54 27.06 +.38 14.30 -.21 20.88 +.12 19.39 +.45 48.18 +.46 41.12 -.33 11.01 37.50 -.24 28.98 +.49 39.90 -.19 87.04 +.85 18.30 +.29 44.08 +.39 47.11 +1.25 19.78 +.38 1.07 -.01 54.73 +1.56 30.97 +.05 38.49 +.44 13.65 +.04 20.09 -.30 9.17 -.05 .54 -.17 19.09 +.31 54.03 +.51 9.82 +.04 71.74 -.11 51.66 +.56 15.27 +.06 23.39 +.61 1.38 +.01 47.53 +2.38 73.15 +.75 39.60 +1.25 6.53 -.12 37.33 +.34 50.87 +.76 2.81 -.16 61.81 +.13 9.60 +.05 63.20 +.84 52.69 +.53 26.66 +1.37 45.99 +.32 1.70 -.02 35.00 +.47 27.50 +.51 21.95 +1.13 9.43 +.31 74.40 +2.60 21.58 +.47 5.56 +.03 21.72 +.28 4.78 46.05 +2.40 16.84 +.10 19.85 +.03 8.99 +.04

D

TycoElec TycoIntl TylerTech Tyson

0.64 29.09 +.12 0.85 37.49 -.21 19.73 -.09 0.16 15.27 +.05

U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It UAL UBS AG UDR UGI Corp UIL Hold UQM Tech URS US Airwy USEcology US Geoth US Gold USA Tech h USEC USG UTiWrldwd UTStrcm UltaSalon UltraPt g Uluru Umpqua UndrArmr UniSrcEn UnilevNV Unilever UnionPac Unisys rs UtdCBksGa UtdMicro UtdNtrlF UtdOnln UPS B UtdRentals US Bancrp US NGsFd US OilFd USSteel UStatn UtdTech UtdTherap UtdhlthGp Unitrin UnvAmr UnivDisp UnvHlth s UnivTravel UnumGrp Uranerz UraniumEn UranmR h UrbanOut VCA Ant VF Cp VailRsrt Valassis Vale SA Vale SA pf ValeantPh ValenceT h ValeroE Validus VlyNBcp Valspar ValueClick VanceInfo VangSTBd VangTotBd VangGrth VangMidC VangSmCp VangSCG VangTSM VangValu V R D W m D M m G

m m m M m

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M W& O WG H WM W W O W W R W M W W W W W R W WR W W M W W W W W W W W m W MD W W WW W R W W W W w W W W W W W W m W W W H W D O WD W R W U W m W W W W W W H W W W Wm Wm Wm W G Wm W mm D W m W D W W R W W W W W WW W Ww G W W W W W W W m W U G OM

R Ww m G m

mm

m w w mG

0.10 0.74 1.00 1.73

0.72

0.06

0.20 1.56 1.22 1.22 1.32 0.08 0.40 1.88 0.20 0.20 0.10 1.70 0.50 0.88 2.00 0.20 0.37

2.40 0.52 0.52 0.38 0.20 0.88 0.72 0.64 1.94 3.00 0.67 0.71 0.65 0.23 1.25 1.32

8.55 +.12 23.02 +.18 17.90 +.25 21.13 +.27 28.74 -.05 28.17 +.22 2.71 -.03 38.28 +.09 9.24 -.05 15.45 +.49 .89 +.09 5.10 +.16 1.30 +.17 5.20 +.03 13.44 -.23 15.82 -.02 2.21 -.05 29.35 +.71 39.48 +.57 .11 11.33 +.18 45.47 +.25 33.48 +.17 30.15 +.44 29.20 +.34 82.30 +.65 28.06 +.18 2.15 -.01 2.70 +.03 33.86 -1.44 5.74 -.09 67.18 +.10 14.80 +.17 21.83 +.02 6.34 +.10 33.19 -.05 43.66 +.87 53.27 +.04 71.60 +.69 56.05 +.40 35.04 -.31 24.49 -.10 14.62 +.16 24.25 +1.04 38.82 +.08 4.45 +.01 22.35 +.20 1.65 +.19 3.15 +.15 1.38 +.13 34.87 +.50 20.45 -.02 80.72 +1.05 37.82 +.53 34.49 +.02 30.86 +.39 27.13 +.62 26.00 -.35 1.04 -.03 17.07 +.19 26.78 +.24 12.82 +.03 32.12 +.22 13.33 +.26 32.83 +.45 81.79 +.09 82.79 +.18 55.22 +.22 66.38 +.51 63.41 +.58 66.72 +.69 58.60 +.33 48.96 +.25


C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 29, 2010 B5

IN CONGRESS

Poverty

Johnson & Johnson chief to testify on drug recalls By Natasha Singer and Reed Abelson New York Times News Service

In recent weeks, the chief executive of Johnson & Johnson has gone on the offensive in a very public way, trying to assure customers and company employees that the recalls of popular over-thecounter drugs like children’s liquid Tylenol did not reflect systemic problems across the corporation. And on Thursday, the executive, William Weldon, is expected to appear at a congressional hearing, for the first time to provide his own account to lawmakers of the manufacturing problems that led to the recalls. Weldon has asserted that missteps at the company’s McNeil Consumer Healthcare unit, which was responsible for the withdrawal of certain products from the marketplace, have been contained. “From Johnson & Johnson’s perspective, our response to this issue was the most responsible it could possibly be,” Weldon said in a recent interview. His testimony before Congress comes as the company confronts other highly publicized problems that have swirled around Weldon’s stewardship and the integrity of one of the world’s most respected companies. In recent months, the company has recalled tens of thousands of artificial hips as well as several million contact lenses, made by distinct units. It is also the subject of numerous government inquiries and consumer lawsuits. In McNeil’s case, the unit recalled about 136 million bottles of liquid infants’ and children’s medicines in April and millions of bottles of Tylenol and other pills for adults earlier in the year. Rep. Darrell Issa of California, the ranking Republican on the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, which is holding the hearing, said the company had failed to adequately oversee the McNeil unit and did not correct the manufacturing problems there quickly.

Andy Tullis/The Bulletin

Common Table bartender Mikal Lilly, of Bend, unpacks glasses while preparing the bar for the restaurant’s grand opening, in downtown Bend on Tuesday afternoon.

Restaurant Continued from B1 A free meal may come in a carry-out box if a diner needs a shower, for example, and doesn’t meet requirements for dining inside.

Problem or solution? The concept of Common Table has generally been well-received. Bob Pearson, a volunteer and co-founder of the restaurant, said some downtown business owners expressed concern that Common Table could cause more panhandling from homeless people, thus potentially discouraging shoppers from visiting local businesses. “Our perspective is that they’re already downtown,” said Pearson, who said he still understands businesses’ concerns. “Give them a place they can go.” AJ Cohen, who owns the Local Joe clothing store on Wall Street, said downtown has become a premier shopping area. He said if Common Table did attract more homeless people downtown — which he wasn’t sure would occur because he had only heard secondhand accounts of the restaurant’s purpose — it could lead to more panhandling and fewer customers. Cohen said female customers, in particular, have complained to him about being harassed by people who appear to be homeless. While he emphasized that it’s important to have compassion for

people, and that not all homeless people cause problems, Cohen said he can’t figure out why the restaurant has been established downtown. But “I reserve judgment, ’cause I don’t know what it’s going to do,” he said. Others also are waiting to see how the business operates before making judgments. As long as the operation is organized, the restaurant seems like a great idea, said Carlos Chan, owner of Showcase Hats & Apparel, which moved from Minnesota Avenue to Oregon Avenue earlier this year. Hancock thinks the restaurant’s intent has been misunderstood at times. “We’re a part of the solution of having people find their feet,” he said. “It actually alleviates the problem, rather than ignores it.”

Funding The purchase of the Cork space and renovation was funded by grants from the Presbyterian Church at the local and national levels, donations and Deschutes County’s Economic Development Fund, which contributed $3,000. Pearson, who retired to Bend from Silicon Valley nine years ago, said the project has cost six figures, but he declined to be specific. He has previously said the group would use $280,000 in pledged or donated funding for the restaurant over the next three years. Common Table will employ

about 20 workers. Volunteers will complement paid staff. Hancock said he’s had more than 200 people contact him about volunteering, something that can be a résumé-booster for the unemployed. Though much of the funding for Common Table comes from the church and some employees are rooted in it — Hancock was previously a youth pastor in Colorado — the staff is diverse, Hancock said, like they want the patrons to be.

More than just food The group plans to host events like book readings and lectures in the evenings. Hancock said the events will be on a variety of subjects, not necessarily issues related to spirituality. The restaurant will donate some of its proceeds in the form of the $10 vouchers to organizations like NeighborImpact and Family Access Network, which will then give them to people in need, founders said. Hancock said another idea is to create a low-cost meal every Monday, like soup and salad, that will be free to anyone. “It’s a public space,” Hancock said. “We believe people gather around food and drink. We set the table and are the host and welcome people into that space.” David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@bendbulletin.com.

cluded in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. At least one improvement Continued from B1 was reported in the survey: Oregon also is one of 16 states an increase in the percentage with the highest reported use of children covered by health of food stamps. Oregon’s rate insurance. jumped from 11.7 percent of the “Between 2008 and 2009, the statewide population in 2008 to percentage of insured children 14.5 percent in 2009, according in the United States increased to the survey. from 90.3 percent to 91 percent, Neighboring states reported with 1.12 million more insured significantly lower food stamp children in 2009,” according to usage, with 8.8 percent of Idaho the survey. residents and 11.1 percent of However, the percentage of Washington residents reporting the total population uninsured food stamp usage in 2009, up nationwide increased from 14.6 from 7.9 percent percent to 15.1 and 8.7 percent, percent, with respectively, in “The survey 2.2 million more 2008. uninsured peoconfirms the “The surple nationwide vey confirms damage wrought by in 2009 than in the damage the recession and 2008, according wrought by the to the survey. recession and underscores the The recession underscores the need for Oregon also took a toll need for Oregon on the number and the nation and the nation to of hours people to maintain a maintain a strong worked per strong safety week, which net that protects safety net that fell nationwide people when protects people by 36 minutes, the economy when the economy from 39 hours fails them,” said in 2008 to 38.4 Steve Robinson, fails them.” hours in 2009, policy analyst according to with the Oregon — Steve Robinson, policy the survey. Center for Pub- analyst with the Oregon Workers Center for Public Policy lic Policy. hardest hit by Despite the the recession decline in inincluded the comes and rise in poverty rate construction, mining and other and use of food stamps, the Or- extraction industries, mainteegon Center for Public Policy nance and repair industries, criticized Congress for failing where work hours declined to approve an extension of fund- nationwide by 63 minutes per ing set to expire Thursday for week. the Temporary Assistance for In Oregon, work hours reNeedy Families program. ported for the Portland-Vancou“The news that the poverty ver-Beaverton metro area fell rate rose comes as develop- an average of 48 minutes per ments in Washington, D.C., and week, 12 more than the national Oregon threaten the joint fed- decline, according to the survey. eral-state program that protects Other information about Orvery poor families with depen- egon contained in the survey dent children,” the group said in showed the number of Oregoa Tuesday press statement about nians covered by employer-prothe survey. vided health insurance at nearly Tom Towsley, spokesman for 2.1 million; the number of occuSen. Ron Wyden, said Wyden pied housing units statewide at was among a number of sena- nearly 1.46 million; the median tors who signed a letter Tues- age of Oregon’s population at day urging immediate passage 38; and that 29 percent of the of $500 million in temporary population older than 25 have funding to keep the TANF pro- a bachelor’s degree or higher gram funded for another three education, according to Gail months while Congress wran- Krumenauer, an economist gles over budget issues. with the Oregon Department of “The bill would extend the Employment. TANF emergency contingency The survey also showed that fund for three months until Dec. nearly two in five renters na31,” Towsley said. “That $500 tionwide reported that housing million is fully offset.” costs consume 35 percent or Towsley said the funding that more of their incomes. expires on Sept. 30, however, Ed Merriman can be is not the base funding for the TANF program, but was a sup- reached at 541-617-7820 or plemental level of funding in- emerriman@bendbulletin.com.

Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .32 1.68 ... .40f .72 .82 ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .42f ... ... .63 ... .64f

10 14 88 28 50 ... ... 29 23 65 18 11 33 12 ... ... 19 ... 15 ... 7

YTD Last Chg %Chg 49.64 20.98 13.27 15.44 64.52 .56 31.31 58.86 65.00 7.75 25.99 41.62 12.32 19.50 7.91 21.88 4.82 7.82 19.84 10.84 24.68

-.33 +.12 +.03 +.34 +.63 ... +1.03 +1.35 +1.27 +.08 -1.01 +.36 +.23 +.27 +.07 -.04 +.20 +.07 +.11 +.29 -.06

+43.6 -2.8 -11.9 +25.6 +19.2 -17.6 +13.9 +50.8 +9.9 +222.9 -20.6 -19.2 -7.4 -4.4 +42.5 +6.6 +78.5 +12.0 -15.9 +22.8 -19.0

Market recap

Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

1.08 .80 1.66 ... .48f ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .80f .52f ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20a

20 16 17 23 75 ... 35 20 ... 22 19 9 24 21 ... 16 84 10 ... ...

80.64 +1.53 +22.1 38.31 +1.40 +1.9 47.02 -.09 +4.4 13.11 -.19 +3.3 47.47 +.55 +30.9 2.21 -.03 -21.4 35.56 +.49 -5.8 130.15 +.82 +17.9 20.86 -.12 -2.0 46.97 -.25 -1.5 76.59 +1.25 +24.2 38.13 +.37 -4.7 26.14 -.01 +13.4 9.43 +.31 +57.2 11.33 +.18 -15.5 21.83 +.02 -3.0 15.07 +.18 -22.1 25.35 -.18 -6.1 2.40 +.04 +14.3 16.38 ... +3.4

Precious metals Metal

Price (troy oz.)

NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

$1308.00 $1306.60 $21.688

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more)

Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp S&P500ETF BkofAm SPDR Fncl iShR2K

2771765 1919255 1178535 795708 597931

Last Chg

3.88 114.67 13.27 14.48 67.48

+.01 +.40 +.03 +.04 +.66

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

KV PhmA KV PhmB HarvNRes ChinaMM Walgrn

Last

Chg %Chg

2.40 +.34 +16.5 2.63 +.35 +15.4 10.40 +1.30 +14.3 2.45 +.26 +11.9 33.81 +3.46 +11.4

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Molycorp n Monsanto NewpkRes DeutsBk rt BkIrelnd

Last

Chg %Chg

26.00 -3.08 -10.6 48.75 -4.32 -8.1 8.09 -.61 -7.0 4.86 -.36 -6.9 2.98 -.21 -6.6

$1297.00 $1296.70 $21.455

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Vol (00)

RareEle g GrtBasG g GoldStr g CapGold n LibertyAcq

Last Chg

49067 8.60 47320 2.36 44918 5.09 37530 4.73 29390 10.40

-.25 +.02 +.17 +.39 ...

Gainers ($2 or more)

Most Active ($1 or more)

Name

Vol (00)

PwShs QQQ Cisco Intel Microsoft DryShips

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Hyperdyn Versar ChinNEPet AoxingP rs AmShrd

2.49 3.10 5.28 3.03 2.98

+.51 +.42 +.58 +.29 +.28

ArcticCat Subaye Motricity n Jingwei Cognex

+25.8 +15.7 +12.3 +10.6 +10.4

Losers ($2 or more)

Last

Last Chg

49.37 21.86 19.50 24.68 4.85

-.02 -.25 +.27 -.06 +.38

10.57 12.53 13.00 4.74 26.50

Chg %Chg

+1.62 +1.91 +1.88 +.65 +3.61

+18.1 +18.0 +16.9 +15.9 +15.8

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

ChinaNutri MexcoEn SuprmInd Tofutti TrnsatlPt n

2.70 5.68 2.30 2.38 2.81

-.20 -.37 -.14 -.15 -.16

-6.9 -6.1 -5.9 -5.9 -5.4

DJSP un Amedisys IBC Cap pf FstBkshs KnightT

301 165 49 515 27 7

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

974221 630626 597129 543870 474130

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Diary 2,126 900 113 3,139 169 15

52-Week High Low Name

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more)

Name

Diary Pvs Day

Indexes

3.99 24.02 11.34 7.00 19.75

Chg %Chg

-1.01 -4.41 -1.66 -1.00 -2.14

-20.2 -15.5 -12.8 -12.5 -9.8

Diary 1,766 855 138 2,759 128 18

11,258.01 9,430.08 Dow Jones Industrials 4,812.87 3,546.48 Dow Jones Transportation 408.57 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 7,743.74 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,031.93 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,535.28 2,024.27 Nasdaq Composite 1,219.80 1,010.91 S&P 500 12,847.91 10,543.89 Wilshire 5000 745.95 553.30 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,858.14 4,531.19 400.95 7,310.32 2,025.18 2,379.59 1,147.70 12,069.14 675.43

+46.10 +22.48 +.37 +46.95 +7.08 +9.82 +5.54 +64.47 +7.14

YTD %Chg %Chg +.43 +.50 +.09 +.65 +.35 +.41 +.48 +.54 +1.07

52-wk %Chg

+4.12 +10.53 +.74 +1.74 +10.97 +4.87 +2.92 +4.51 +8.00

+11.45 +18.41 +5.44 +5.54 +14.41 +12.03 +8.21 +9.85 +10.64

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Tuesday.

Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Monday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

338.17 2,603.50 3,762.35 5,578.44 6,276.09 22,109.95 33,258.53 20,541.59 3,230.23 9,495.76 1,855.97 3,097.35 4,717.00 5,612.99

+.30 s +.22 s -.10 t +.09 s -.04 t -1.03 t +.41 s -.25 t -.28 t -1.12 t -.26 t -.52 t -.11 t -.14 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9666 1.5793 .9698 .002060 .1493 1.3567 .1288 .011914 .080035 .0328 .000872 .1476 1.0239 .0318

.9637 1.5855 .9748 .002059 .1494 1.3475 .1288 .011872 .079879 .0327 .000868 .1464 1.0157 .0319

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.12 +0.09 +4.3 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.80 +0.03 +5.9 GrowthI 23.18 +0.12 +5.2 Ultra 20.36 +0.05 +4.6 American Funds A: AmcpA p 16.97 +0.12 +2.7 AMutlA p 23.79 +0.11 +4.7 BalA p 16.99 +0.06 +6.6 BondA p 12.48 +0.02 +8.8 CapWA p 20.99 +0.07 +7.5 CapIBA p 49.04 +0.25 +5.3 CapWGA p 34.28 +0.21 +2.8 EupacA p 39.67 +0.21 +3.5 FdInvA p 33.65 +0.18 +4.0 GovtA p 14.75 +0.03 +7.5 GwthA p 27.92 +0.15 +2.2 HI TrA p 11.11 +0.01 +10.6 IncoA p 16.07 +0.08 +7.1 IntBdA p 13.67 +0.02 +6.0 ICAA p 26.16 +0.18 +2.4 NEcoA p 23.56 +0.10 +4.8 N PerA p 26.67 +0.19 +4.0 NwWrldA 52.49 +0.24 +11.2 STBA p 10.16 +2.5 SmCpA p 35.72 +0.23 +13.3 TxExA p 12.50 +6.8 WshA p 25.40 +0.11 +4.9 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 28.83 +0.17 +2.1 IntlEqA 28.09 +0.17 +1.9 IntEqII I r 11.94 +0.07 +1.4 Artisan Funds: Intl 20.62 +0.08 -0.2 MidCap 29.71 +0.30 +16.2 MidCapVal 18.81 +0.15 +4.6 Baron Funds: Growth 44.16 +0.15 +6.9 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.15 +0.02 +10.1 DivMu 14.77 +4.9 TxMgdIntl 15.27 +0.10 -0.1

BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.33 +0.08 +4.1 GlAlA r 18.54 +0.07 +4.0 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.30 +0.06 +3.3 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 16.37 +0.09 +4.3 GlbAlloc r 18.62 +0.06 +4.1 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 47.62 +0.27 +7.1 Columbia Class A: DivEqInc 9.06 +0.04 +3.9 DivrBd 5.09 +0.01 +8.7 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 27.06 +0.26 +9.8 AcornIntZ 37.91 +0.22 +12.7 ValRestr 43.75 +0.28 +3.3 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.43 +0.06 +4.8 USCorEq2 9.71 +0.07 +7.2 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 31.45 +0.20 +1.5 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 31.83 +0.20 +1.7 NYVen C 30.27 +0.19 +1.0 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.72 +0.02 +8.2 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 20.52 +0.09 +13.9 EmMktV 34.85 +0.16 +11.9 IntSmVa 15.67 +0.11 +4.9 LargeCo 9.05 +0.04 +4.4 USLgVa 18.00 +0.13 +6.9 US SmVa 21.55 +0.25 +10.0 IntlSmCo 15.54 +0.09 +10.6 Fixd 10.37 +1.1 IntVa 17.28 +0.09 +3.4 Glb5FxInc 11.63 +0.02 +7.2 2YGlFxd 10.23 +1.7 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 65.33 +0.37 +3.9 Income 13.38 +0.02 +7.0 IntlStk 33.55 +0.18 +5.3 Stock 97.59 +0.73 +2.5 Eaton Vance A:

LgCpVal 16.69 NatlMunInc 10.02 Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 16.73 FPA Funds: NwInc 11.05 FPACres 25.74 Fairholme 32.62 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 5.05 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 18.37 StrInA 12.78 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 18.56 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.11 FF2015 10.93 FF2020 13.14 FF2020K 12.55 FF2025 10.87 FF2030 12.94 FF2035 10.68 FF2040 7.45 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.94 AMgr50 14.70 Balanc 17.28 BlueChGr 40.05 Canada 51.96 CapAp 22.85 CpInc r 9.04 Contra 62.45 ContraK 62.48 DisEq 20.87 DivIntl 28.45 DivrsIntK r 28.47 DivGth 24.85 EmrMk 24.47 Eq Inc 40.24 EQII 16.62 Fidel 28.78 FltRateHi r 9.62 GNMA 11.64 GovtInc 10.81

+0.09 +0.5 -0.01 +9.4 +0.09 +0.7 +2.9 +0.15 +5.3 +0.04 +8.4 +0.02 +8.4 +0.08 +6.8 +0.03 +8.7 +0.08 +6.9 +0.04 +0.04 +0.05 +0.05 +0.04 +0.06 +0.05 +0.03 +0.07 +0.05 +0.08 +0.13 +0.34 +0.14 +0.03 +0.27 +0.27 +0.12 +0.12 +0.12 +0.19 +0.06 +0.24 +0.11 +0.13

+5.5 +5.6 +5.4 +5.6 +5.3 +5.1 +4.7 +4.7

+4.4 +7.1 +6.6 +5.5 +7.2 +6.6 +9.5 +7.3 +7.4 -0.7 +1.6 +1.8 +5.6 +8.2 +3.7 +2.5 +1.9 +4.6 +0.01 +6.9 +0.02 +7.3

GroCo 74.91 GroInc 16.37 GrowthCoK 74.96 HighInc r 8.80 Indepn 21.34 IntBd 10.78 IntmMu 10.44 IntlDisc 31.06 InvGrBd 11.96 InvGB 7.49 LgCapVal 11.39 LatAm 55.47 LevCoStk 23.91 LowP r 34.66 LowPriK r 34.65 Magelln 64.63 MidCap 25.22 MuniInc 12.95 NwMkt r 16.18 OTC 48.57 100Index 8.12 Ovrsea 30.28 Puritn 16.87 SCmdtyStrt 10.89 StIntMu 10.79 STBF 8.50 SmllCpS r 16.89 StratInc 11.40 StrReRt r 9.14 TotalBd 11.09 USBI 11.66 Value 61.56 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 53.16 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 40.82 IntlInxInv 34.02 TotMktInv 33.22 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 40.82 TotMktAd r 33.22 First Eagle: GlblA 43.15 OverseasA 21.36

+0.34 +0.09 +0.34 +0.01 +0.13 +0.01

+8.6 +2.2 +8.7 +9.3 +7.1 +9.0 +5.4 +0.10 +2.3 +0.02 +8.5 +0.01 +9.1 +0.07 +1.3 +0.62 +7.0 +0.21 +4.5 +0.21 +8.7 +0.21 +8.9 +0.54 +0.6 +0.23 +8.0 +0.01 +7.1 +0.03 +12.1 +0.18 +6.2 +0.03 +2.4 +0.10 -2.1 +0.06 +6.2 -0.01 -0.1 +3.1 +3.8 +0.15 +6.0 +0.02 +9.0 +0.03 +7.4 +0.02 +8.9 +0.02 +7.9 +0.57 +8.1 +0.99 +25.2 +0.21 +4.4 +0.13 +1.8 +0.19 +5.6 +0.21 +4.4 +0.19 +5.6 +0.23 +7.9 +0.11 +9.8

Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.15 +0.01 +6.6 FoundAl p 10.01 NA HYTFA p 10.39 +0.01 +9.3 IncomA p 2.11 +7.4 USGovA p 6.82 +0.01 +5.8 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +11.3 IncmeAd 2.10 +7.6 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.13 +0.01 +7.0 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 19.60 +0.06 +3.8 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.59 NA GlBd A p 13.68 +11.1 GrwthA p 16.87 +0.05 +0.4 WorldA p 13.98 +0.03 +0.1 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.71 +0.01 +10.8 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 37.00 +0.08 +0.4 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.17 +0.09 -0.3 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 13.52 +0.07 +10.3 Quality 19.18 +0.09 -0.2 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.17 +9.4 HYMuni 8.82 +0.01 +12.0 Harbor Funds: Bond 13.14 +0.03 +9.3 CapApInst 33.21 +0.15 +0.7 Intl r 56.72 +0.40 +3.4 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 31.10 +0.17 +1.4 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 31.08 +0.17 +1.5 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 37.90 +0.20 +3.7 Div&Gr 18.16 +0.10 +3.6 Advisers 18.23 +0.06 +4.5 TotRetBd 11.41 +0.02 +8.3 HussmnStrGr 13.35 +0.05 +4.5 Invesco Funds A:

Chart p 14.98 +0.08 -0.3 CmstkA 14.30 +0.09 +4.7 EqIncA 7.98 +0.05 +3.9 GrIncA p 17.38 +0.12 +1.6 HYMuA 9.66 +10.5 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.15 +0.07 +1.7 AssetStA p 22.79 +0.08 +2.3 AssetStrI r 22.98 +0.07 +2.5 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.73 +0.02 +8.2 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.72 +0.02 +8.3 HighYld 8.06 +0.01 +10.0 IntmTFBd 11.16 +4.7 ShtDurBd 11.05 +3.1 USLCCrPls 18.68 +0.06 +2.8 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 47.89 +0.12 +12.7 PrkMCVal T 20.66 +0.15 +4.3 Twenty T 60.97 +0.18 -1.0 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.40 NA LSGrwth 12.08 NA Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 21.17 +0.25 +6.8 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 20.71 +0.17 +15.4 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.04 +0.17 +15.1 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 16.08 -0.01 +5.3 Longleaf Partners: Partners 25.70 +0.14 +6.7 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.20 +0.04 +11.3 StrInc C 14.76 +0.03 +10.4 LSBondR 14.14 +0.03 +11.0 StrIncA 14.69 +0.04 +11.0 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdA p 12.57 +0.03 +11.0 InvGrBdY 12.58 +0.04 +11.3 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.32 +0.05 +1.4 BdDebA p 7.66 +0.02 +9.0

ShDurIncA p 4.66 +6.0 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.54 +0.05 +4.8 ValueA x 21.05 +0.05 +2.4 MFS Funds I: ValueI x 21.14 +0.04 +2.5 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.86 +0.01 +9.0 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.29 +0.06 +2.7 Matthews Asian: AsianG&I 17.71 -0.01 +13.6 PacTiger 22.89 -0.04 +19.0 MergerFd 15.96 +2.7 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.69 +0.02 +11.8 TotRtBdI 10.69 +0.02 +11.9 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.33 +0.02 +6.1 GlbDiscZ 28.71 +0.02 +6.2 QuestZ 17.76 NA SharesZ 19.79 +0.07 +4.1 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 40.03 +0.29 +6.0 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 41.52 +0.31 +5.8 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.18 +0.01 +9.5 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.04 +0.15 +2.0 Intl I r 18.22 +0.03 +8.2 Oakmark r 38.47 +0.28 +3.9 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.80 +0.01 +10.3 GlbSMdCap 14.19 +0.10 +11.1 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 39.59 +0.21 -0.9 DvMktA p 33.26 +0.03 +15.6 GlobA p 56.61 +0.44 +6.8 GblStrIncA 4.31 +0.02 +14.7 IntBdA p 6.77 +0.03 +9.1 MnStFdA 29.43 +0.09 +4.6 RisingDivA 14.19 +0.09 +3.0 S&MdCpVl 28.23 +0.28 +6.2 Oppenheimer B:

RisingDivB 12.89 +0.08 +2.4 S&MdCpVl 24.27 +0.24 +5.6 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 12.84 +0.08 +2.4 Oppenheimer Roch: LtdNYA p 3.33 +5.9 RcNtMuA 7.33 +0.01 +9.8 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 32.96 +0.03 +15.9 IntlBdY 6.77 +0.03 +9.3 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.60 +0.02 +9.6 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 12.47 +0.04 +12.3 ComodRR 8.20 +0.03 +7.3 HiYld 9.23 +0.01 +11.2 InvGrCp 11.85 +0.03 +13.0 LowDu 10.63 +0.01 +4.7 RealRtnI 11.62 +0.07 +9.5 ShortT 9.92 +1.8 TotRt 11.60 +0.02 +9.8 TR II 11.20 +0.02 +9.1 TRIII 10.30 +0.01 +10.1 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.63 +0.01 +4.4 RealRtA p 11.62 +0.07 +9.2 TotRtA 11.60 +0.02 +9.5 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.60 +0.02 +8.9 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.60 +0.02 +9.6 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.60 +0.02 +9.8 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 42.93 +0.25 +11.0 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 36.75 +0.28 +3.6 Price Funds: BlChip 34.37 +0.14 +4.9 CapApp 19.08 +0.06 +5.1 EmMktS 33.19 +0.07 +10.3 EqInc x 21.55 -0.04 +4.3 EqIndex x 30.91 +0.01 +4.2 Growth 29.04 +0.11 +5.6 HlthSci 27.76 +0.25 +6.1

HiYield 6.69 IntlBond 10.29 IntlStk 13.43 MidCap 53.46 MCapVal 21.90 N Asia 19.01 New Era 43.86 N Horiz 29.18 N Inc 9.76 R2010 14.88 R2015 11.38 R2020 15.56 R2025 11.30 R2030 16.08 R2040 16.08 ShtBd 4.89 SmCpStk 30.33 SmCapVal 31.80 SpecIn 12.34 Value 21.35 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.28 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.13 PremierI r 17.68 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 34.63 S&P Sel 18.11 Scout Funds: Intl 30.50 Selected Funds: AmShD 38.05 AmShS p 37.99 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 10.40 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 19.47 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 48.48 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 26.19 IntValue I 26.76 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 22.59 USAA Group:

+0.01 +10.2 +0.05 +6.2 +0.04 +6.6 +0.46 +12.6 +0.17 +5.7 -0.07 +17.8 +0.31 +0.5 +0.28 +14.1 +0.01 +8.3 +0.05 +6.7 +0.05 +6.7 +0.07 +6.6 +0.06 +6.5 +0.08 +6.3 +0.08 +6.1 +3.3 +0.26 +12.6 +0.29 +7.9 +0.01 +7.8 +0.11 +4.2 +0.09 +3.1 +0.10 +7.2 +0.21 +8.4 +0.18 +5.0 +0.09 +4.4 +0.27 +5.6 +0.27 +2.1 +0.27 +1.9 +0.01 +10.3 +0.03 +1.2 -0.12 +4.7 +0.05 +6.2 +0.05 +6.5 +6.6

TxEIt 13.24 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 11.28 CpOpAdl 68.45 EMAdmr r 37.33 Energy 106.57 500Adml 105.65 GNMA Ad 11.03 HlthCr 51.35 HiYldCp 5.68 InfProAd 26.25 ITBdAdml 11.74 ITsryAdml 11.97 IntGrAdm 58.40 ITAdml 13.91 ITGrAdm 10.40 LtdTrAd 11.17 LTGrAdml 9.90 LT Adml 11.33 MuHYAdm 10.74 PrmCap r 62.82 STsyAdml 10.91 ShtTrAd 15.96 STFdAd 10.97 STIGrAd 10.88 TtlBAdml 10.89 TStkAdm 28.54 WellslAdm 52.52 WelltnAdm 51.40 Windsor 40.84 WdsrIIAd 42.09 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 23.25 CapOpp 29.63 DivdGro 13.50 Energy 56.74 EqInc 18.95 Explr 63.46 GNMA 11.03 GlobEq 16.74 HYCorp 5.68 HlthCre 121.65 InflaPro 13.36 IntlGr 18.34

+6.7 +7.1 +0.35 -1.4 +0.20 +9.6 +0.64 -4.9 +0.53 +4.5 +0.01 +6.7 +0.39 +2.3 +10.0 +0.17 +7.8 +0.03 +12.9 +0.03 +10.7 +0.40 +8.1 +6.1 +0.02 +12.5 +3.0 +0.04 +15.8 +6.6 +7.9 +0.21 +1.9 +0.01 +3.3 +1.3 +0.01 +4.0 +0.01 +5.5 +0.01 +8.0 +0.17 +5.4 +0.20 +9.5 +0.21 +5.5 +0.24 +2.3 +0.29 +1.3 +0.12 +9.0 +0.16 -1.4 +0.08 +3.6 +0.34 -4.9 +0.12 +6.0 +0.58 +10.8 +0.01 +6.6 +0.09 +6.8 +9.9 +0.93 +2.2 +0.08 +7.7 +0.12 +7.9

IntlVal 30.91 ITIGrade 10.40 LifeCon 15.96 LifeGro 20.71 LifeMod 18.82 LTIGrade 9.90 Morg 16.13 MuInt 13.91 MuLtd 11.17 MuShrt 15.96 PrecMtls r 23.62 PrmcpCor 12.53 Prmcp r 60.52 SelValu r 17.14 STAR 18.36 STIGrade 10.88 StratEq 16.30 TgtRetInc 11.16 TgRe2010 21.93 TgtRe2015 12.06 TgRe2020 21.23 TgtRe2025 12.01 TgRe2030 20.43 TgtRe2035 12.27 TgtRe2040 20.10 TgtRe2045 12.69 USGro 16.34 Wellsly 21.68 Welltn 29.76 Wndsr 12.10 WndsII 23.72 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 105.64 Balanced 20.27 EMkt 28.36 Europe 26.09 Extend 36.03 Growth 28.42 ITBnd 11.74 MidCap 18.09 Pacific 10.27 REIT r 17.40 SmCap 30.33 SmlCpVl 14.28

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STBnd

10.72 +0.01 +4.6

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14.99 +0.08 +4.0

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28.53 +0.16 +5.3

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19.09 +0.10 +4.3

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

9.69 +0.06

NS

ExtIn

36.08 +0.32 +10.4

FTAllWldI r

89.51 +0.51 +4.4

GrwthIst

28.43 +0.15 +5.1

InfProInst

10.69 +0.07 +7.8

InstIdx

104.96 +0.53 +4.5

InsPl

104.96 +0.53 +4.5

InsTStPlus

25.79 +0.15 +5.4

MidCpIst

18.16 +0.15 +10.8

SCInst

30.39 +0.32 +10.5

TBIst

10.89 +0.01 +8.1

TSInst

28.54 +0.16 +5.4

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

87.27 +0.44 +4.5

STBdIdx

10.72 +0.01 +4.7

TotBdSgl

10.89 +0.01 +8.0

TotStkSgl

27.54 +0.16 +5.4

Wells Fargo Adv C: AstAllC t

11.36 +0.05 +2.9

Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p

4.82

+1.1

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.96 +0.02 +12.2


B USI N ESS

B6 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY BEGINNING EXCEL 2007: Registration required. Class continues Sept 29; $59; 8-11 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit. cocc .edu. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Learn the basic steps needed to open a business. Cost includes handouts. Registration is required. $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY WEBCAM CONFERENCE: Learn about the latest trends in marketing, including Web marketing, search marketing, social media and search engine optimization, brand management, design and copy writing. Highlights include keynote presentations by Jason Bagley with Wieden & Kennedy in Portland, who will discuss the revolutionary Old Spice “Smell Like a Man, Man” campaign and Mike Geiger, chief digital officer at Goodby, Silverstein & Partners in San Francisco. Selected speakers and breakout sessions will be scheduled at the Tower Theatre; see www.bendwebcam.com for rates; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-639-5002. WHAT WORKS, A TIME-TESTED APPROACH TO INVESTING: Learn to create an investment plan, put it into action, and how to review and adjust the plan to stay on track. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior. Registration requested by Sept. 28; free; noon1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541318-1794 or www.schwab.com.

FRIDAY WEBCAM CONFERENCE: Learn about the latest trends in marketing, including Web marketing, search marketing, social media and search engine optimization, brand management, design and copy writing. Highlights include keynote presentations by Jason Bagley with Wieden & Kennedy in Portland, who will discuss the revolutionary Old Spice “Smell Like a Man, Man” campaign and Mike Geiger, chief

digital officer at Goodby, Silverstein & Partners in San Francisco. Selected speakers and breakout sessions will be scheduled at the Tower Theatre; see www.bendwebcam.com for rates; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-639-5002. GRAPHIC DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS SERIES: Central Oregon Community College’s Community Learning Department is offering a graphic design series made up of four separate courses: Composition, Beginning Illustrator, Make It Visual and Beginning InDesign. Participants may take the whole series or individual classes. Registration required. Classes continue through Nov. 30; series $299, individual class prices vary; 8:30 a.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: 8:309:30 a.m.; Opportunity Foundation of Central Oregon, 835 state Highway 126. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVICE PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain an alcohol service permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

SATURDAY BEGINNING FLASH ANIMATION: Learn to create basic animation in Flash that can be incorporated into webpages. Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. QUICKBOOKS PRO: Central Oregon Community College’s Community Learning Department is offering several Quick Books Pro classes in Central Oregon this fall. Registration is required. Please see website for additional dates and location information; $59; 9 a.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. SIMON MAX HILL ON-CAMERA AUDITION WORKSHOP: Learn about the process of auditioning and what casting directors look for from actors in on-camera auditions. To register, go to www.filmoregon.org; $79;

10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541977-5677. WOOD STOVE LEGALITIES: Learn about wood stove laws, tax incentives and environmental information about heating with wood biomass. Presenters will include personnel certified by the National Fireplace Institute and Oregon Department of Environmental Quality. Light breakfast will be provided; free; 10 a.m.-noon; Fireside, 424 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-382-2597.

MONDAY REALIZING THE AMERICAN DREAM: Learn about the process of shopping for and buying a home, including the basics on budgeting, credit and getting a mortgage. Registration required; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506 ext. 109. Class continues Oct. 6, 5:30 -9:30 p.m. MS OFFICE FOR MAC: Offered by Central Oregon Community College’s Community Learning Department, this three-evening class will teach participants to operate Microsoft Office on the Macintosh operating system. Registration required; $69; 6-9 p.m.; Sky View Middle School, 63555 N.E. 18th St., Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

TUESDAY INTRODUCTION TO ALTERNATIVE INVESTMENTS, FIRST OF SERIES: This class will cover in detail the five types of alternative investments and how they differ from traditional investments. Risks and potential rewards are analyzed. Space is limited. Please RSVP by Oct. 4; free; 4 p.m.; Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, 705 S.W. Bonnett Way, Suite 1200, Bend; 541-617-6038 or http:// fa.smithbarney.com/payne_wettig. BUILD A PROFESSIONAL WEBSITE FOR YOUR BUSINESS: Learn to use the industry standard, Wordpress, to create a customized website without having to use a professional designer. Registration required; $149; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc .edu. WEB DESIGN WITH DREAMWEAVER: Registration required; $69; 6-9 p.m.;

NEWS OF RECORD Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc .edu. WRITING FINANCIAL POLICIES : Learn about financial policies that nonprofit organizations should have in place in a workshop led by nonprofit attorney David Atkin and CPA Katherine DeYoung; $40 until Sept. 24, $50 thereafter; 6-8:30 p.m.; North Redmond Station Conference Center, 1857 N.W. Sixth St.; 541-9299320 or www.financialsteward.org. EXIT REALTY’S LIVE REAL ESTATE SHOW: Guest Larry Wallace, mortgage banker, broker and real estate expert will discuss the current real estate market, shadow inventories, foreclosures, short sales and a forecast of what to expect for the remainder of 2010 and beyond. Visit the website and click on the show icons; free; 7 p.m.; www .ExitRealtyBend.com.

WEDNESDAY Oct. 6 HOME ENERGY ANALYST CORE TRAINING: Central Oregon Community College’s Continuing Education Department is offering this five-day training for building professionals who would like to become home energy analysts and/or become certified by the Building Performance Institute. Cost includes books and materials. Registration required by Sept. 28; $795; 8 a.m.5 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu/energy. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION LOAN BRIEFING: Presented by SBA loan specialist Russ Hooker, the briefing will cover financing options to start or grow a small business. Topics will include the SBA loan guarantee program, credit requirements, use of proceeds, how to approach a lender and loan proposal assistance. Registration required; free; noon1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

BANKRUPTCIES Chapter 7 Filed Sept. 21

Thelma E. Dunkelberger, 1507 S.E. Skylark Drive, Bend George W. and Beverly G. Potts, 12512 S.W. Juniper Pine Lane, Powell Butte Patrick J. and Theresa C. Jones, P.O. Box 2310, Redmond and 8602 Sixth St., Terrebonne, respectively Jason T. and Nicole B. Seguin, P.O. Box 3530, La Pine Filed Sept. 22

Ryan J. and Stephanie K. Westendorf, 6295 N.W. 59th St., Redmond John E. Carroll, 13671 S.W. Meadowlark Lane, Powell Butte Marty J. and Jill A. Erickson, 626 S.W. 11th St., Redmond David J. T. and Michelle L. Bolam, 2060 N.W. Shiraz Court, Bend Jason T. and Kelly L. Adams, 55330 Big River Drive, Bend Charlene A. McMann, 11799 S.E. Juniper Canyon Road, Prineville Sean M. and Terri L. Walior, 61175 Ferguson Road, Bend Filed Sept. 23

Roy L. and Debbie J. Bright, 61000 Brosterhous Road Unit 613, Bend Martin Montes-Sanchez and Arisbeth Montes-Bautista, 643 Mountain Ridge Drive, Culver Jess T. Meddock, 2112 N.E. Full Moon Drive, Bend Connie S. Cruise, 668 S. Main St. No. 19, Prineville Arian E. Robles, 19837 Mahogany St., Bend Philip A. and Heather I. Cortado, 20713 Snow Peaks Drive, Bend Anthony R. and Betty L. Steele, 60674 Rocking Horse Court, Bend Michael R. and Carol L. McMurray, 61282 Chikamin Drive, Bend Jefferson P. and Cheryl A. Dawn, 1201 E. Fairhaven Ave. Apt 20-J, Santa Ana, Calif., and 62283 Wallace Road, Bend, respectively Filed Sept. 24

Patricia L. Busch, 716 N.W. Hemlock, Redmond Bradley D. and Carla M. Mandal, 2030 S.W. 28th Court, Redmond Raymond J. Jr. and Charla L. Theiss,

61259 Kwinnum Drive, Bend Robert V. Guillot, 139 S.E. Roosevelt Ave., Bend Rocio Hernandez, 665 N.W. Creek’s Edge Court, Prineville Kelley R. Robertson, 70 S.W. Century Drive #100-104, Bend Sept. 26

William A. Irvin, 8414 N.W. 18th St., Terrebonne Sept. 27

Senorino Hernandez-Perez and Maria L. Milian Calvillo, P.O. Box 1058, Madras Christopher R. and Karen L. Grant, 19517 SW Fishhawk Loop, Bend Patti I. Miller, 21121 Ann Margaret Drive, Bend Marci L. McCleery, 3235 N.E. Eddie Court, Bend Jedidiah J. Tuller, P.O. Box 7879, Bend David A. Newby and Roberta A. Pinckney-Newby, 52953 Riverview Drive, La Pine Marc A. and Heather D. Faast, 608 S.E. Woodland, Bend Filed Sept. 28

Keri J. Bur, 6225 N.W. Euston Court, Redmond Vernon L. and Juanita M. Grigg, 300 S.W. 89th St., Redmond Marc A. and Brenda M. Weinschenk, 11174 N.W. Morrow Ave., Prineville Chapter 13 Filed Sept. 21

Robert A. Rose, 9001 S.W. Sand Ridge Road, Terrebonne Filed Sept. 22

Ralph F. and Robin C. Welty, 2160 S.E. Lauren, Prineville William R. and Linda R. Hayes, 2628 N.E. Rosemary Drive, Bend Aaron R. and Tracie M. Luff, 644 N.E. Seward Ave., Bend Philip A. and Heather I. Cortado, 20713 Snow Peaks Drive, Bend Collin T. and Regina L. Olmsted, P.O. Box 641, Terrebonne Filed Sept. 27

Christian K. H. Schuster, 61100 Rustic Lane, Bend Mitchell K. and Kathy A. Howard, 64555 Sylvan Loop, Bend


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OREGON Xxx xxx xxx, see Page CX. CALIFORNIA Xxx xxx xxx, see Page CX. WASHINGTON Xxx xxx xxx, see Page CX.

Inside

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2010

BEND-LA PINE SCHOOL DISTRICT

Traffic Board OKs contract with workers law blitz Classified staff agree to give up cost of living raise; issue to be revisited in spring comes to U.S. 97 “It is just a one-year agreement that we reached, and we’ll be chatting again this spring. But we met the interests of all the parties to the extent we could.”

Multi-agency team aims to make area roads safer during 4-hour crackdowns By Erin Golden The Bulletin

Cruising down U.S. Highway 97 on the north end of Bend, it doesn’t take long for Deschutes County Sheriff’s Deputy Ron Brown to spot the drivers not following the rules. In the next lane, a man behind the wheel is talking on his cell phone. Oncoming cars zoom past at well over the speed limit, making the numbers on Brown’s dashboard radar screen flash up and down. Many don’t seem to notice that they’ve picked the wrong day for violating traffic rules — a day when extra officers are on the road looking for problem drivers. On the other side of the highway, another deputy has pulled over a car for a traffic stop. Brown swings around and parks behind the deputy, waiting to see if passing drivers obey the “Move Over” law, which requires them to switch lanes and slow down when emergency vehicles or tow trucks are on the side of the road. Less than a minute goes by before a Honda Accord races past in the right lane and Brown takes off after it. After he pulls over the car, he gets out to talk to the driver. The woman tells him she knew about the law, but thought she only had to move over within her own lane. He straightens her out on the rules and hands her a written warning.

Threat of $300 ticket The driver could have received a nearly $300 ticket, but Brown figured it wasn’t necessary to get the point across. “I think we took care of the problem right there,” he said, getting back into his car. It was one of 49 warnings — and 26 citations — issued over a four-hour period last Friday afternoon by a Multi-Agency Traffic Team of Deschutes County deputies, Oregon State Police troopers and officers from the Bend and Redmond police departments. The eight-member team patrolled the stretch of Highway 97 between Lava Butte and Redmond, searching for speeders, aggressive drivers and people ignoring cell phone, seat belt and Move Over laws. Sgt. Chris Carney of the Bend Police Department said the team tries to arrange a special enforcement operation once a month. Each time, a different agency selects a problem area to target with the help of additional resources from the other local departments. In Bend, for example, officers have focused on problem drivers on the Bend Parkway and on busy intersections like Reed Market Road and Third Street. See Traffic / C5

Corrections An editorial headlined “How not to fix property taxes,” which appeared Sunday, Sept. 26, on page F2, contained an error. Under Oregon’s property tax limits, property that is sold does not jump in assessed value. In a story about volunteers being ticketed for stashing water in a wildlife refuge near the U.S.Mexico border, which appeared Monday, Sept. 27, on Page B2, the incorrect agency was named in the story’s second headline. Federal Fish and Wildlife agents are ticketing volunteers. The Bulletin regrets the errors.

By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

The Bend-La Pine Schools board approved a one-year contract with the district’s classified staff Tuesday that provides no cost-of-living increase for more than 700 employees. Classified staff are school district em-

— John Rexford, Bend-La Pine School District deputy superintendent

ployees like bus drivers, education assistants and cooks. The district and Oregon School Employees Association actually conducted contract negotiations in June, but the union bylaws require 15 days notice before a vote. “Our new members dissipated into

the woodwork when school let out,” said union representative Linda Bradetich. “September seventh was the first day they were all back and that’s when I put it out, and on the 22nd they ratified it.” Employees will not see any increase in the amount they’re expected to provide for insurance during the 2010-11 school year. The agreement runs from July 1 to June 30, 2011. It provides employees with no cost-of-living adjustments. In the 2009-10 school year, classified employees deferred their 2.5 percent cost-of-living increase. See Contract / C5

READING, WRITING AND ARITMÉTICA

DESCHUTES COUNTY

Farmland wedding dispute continues Redmond woman asks commissioners to waive land use fee By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

S

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

tudents in Cathy Fall’s Ochoco Elementary School bilingual kindergarten class ask to be called on to answer a question Monday at the Prineville school. Parents across Crook County are sending their students to the dual-language immersion program, which has 21 kindergartners

enrolled. Though it’s only the second week of class, the kindergartners have already started down the road to becoming bilingual. With more immersion programs in the works, the school’s long-term goal is to have students more or less bilingual by the end of third grade. See story on Page C3

JEFFERSON COUNTY

Metolius move angers 3 parties Environmental group, tribes, landowners are all appealing terms of commission’s decision to allow construction of cabins By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

A move earlier this month by Jefferson County commissioners to allow a group of landowners to build more than a dozen 850square-foot fishing accommodations on their property, which sits near the Metolius River on Lake Billy Chinook, has everyone involved — including the landowners — appealing the commission’s decision.

The landowners disagree with the county’s proposal that all the cabins should be clustered on the property. Environmentalists are worried that allowing the development could set a dangerous legal precedent and threaten Oregon’s rivers in the future. And the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs believe the county’s decision exceeds state law. All three parties plan to appeal the commission’s vote to the Oregon Land Use Board of Appeals.

Existing structures unlawful Photos show development on the property in question as far back as 1988. Since 1996, the county has flagged buildings on

the property for being out of compliance. There are now eight camp trailers, 11 buildings, three covered patio areas, five decks and 11 docks on the property. They were all built illegally, without county building permits. County officials were working with the landowners to find a solution to help them avoid code violations and bring the property into compliance. For property zoned as forest management, the county’s code and state law allows for 15 guest rooms or fishing accommodations. So, the county proposed the landowners comply by building the fishing accommodations. See Metloius / C5

A Redmond woman who has rented out her farmland for weddings wants to restart the process to legalize the practice in Deschutes County, and she is asking the county to waive a $10,000 land use fee. Kelly Brown’s request, which has yet to be scheduled for discussion by the Deschutes County Commission, is the latest development in an ongoing dispute between property owners who believe they have the right to rent out their farmland for events, and neighbors and others who believe the practice is illegal. The decision on whether to waive the land use fee is up to the Deschutes County Commission, a county attorney has said. On Tuesday, Brown referred questions to her attorney, Dave Hunnicutt, with the property rights advocacy nonprofit Oregonians In Action. Brown is not currently renting her property out for events, Hunnicutt said.

‘Devastating financial impact’ “A large part of her ability to continue use of that property in agriculture was based on these events and since the county has decided that she can no longer conduct these events, it’s had a devastating financial impact on her,” Hunnicutt said of his client. Brown and other property owners who hold events on farmland went through the same process last year, but Brown withdrew the group’s application to change county code two days before a scheduled hearing before the County Commission. In that case, Brown and the other property owners paid a land use application fee of $4,510, according to the county. That fee was not refunded when they withdrew it, said Community Development Director Tom Anderson. See Farmland / C5

Man held after four-hour standoff was unarmed, authorities say By Erin Golden The Bulletin

A Bend man who made threats about using guns and bombs during a four-hour standoff with SWAT team officers Monday was unarmed, police said Tuesday. Officials were called to the Greenwood Manor apartment complex on Fourth Street about

2 p.m. Monday. They tried for several hours to negotiate with Mark Thomas Hipple, 52, who had barricaded himself in his first-floor apartment and was believed to be armed with a rifle. Residents from the apartment complex were evacuated to an area across the street and later to Marshall High School, and

a local school was put in lockdown as police closed off streets in a four-block area. Nearly 40 officers from several local law enforcement agencies were called to help. About three hours into the standoff, Hipple tossed some of his belongings through his windows. At about 6 p.m., SWAT officers approached the apart-

ment and used a Taser through a broken window to get Hipple under control.

Held on $12,500 bail Hipple was handcuffed and taken to the hospital for a psychiatric evaluation. Lt. Paul Kansky of the Bend Police Department said it ap-

peared Hipple had been drinking before Monday’s standoff. On Tuesday morning, Hipple was booked in the Deschutes County jail. Sheriff’s Office records show he is being held on $12,500 bail on suspicion of first-degree disorderly conduct, first-degree criminal mischief and menacing. See Standoff / B5


L

Inside

THE WEST A positive side to bark beetles? see Page C2. OBITUARIES Former Heisman contender Stan Heath dies, see Page C5. OREGON Father, son go on trial in officer killings, see Page C6.

C

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2010

BEND-LA PINE SCHOOL DISTRICT

Traffic Board OKs contract with workers law blitz Classified staff give up cost-of-living raise; issue to be revisited in talks on 2011-2012 comes to U.S. 97 “It is just a one-year agreement that we reached, and we’ll be chatting again this spring. But we met the interests of all the parties to the extent we could.”

Multi-agency team aims to make area roads safer during 4-hour crackdowns By Erin Golden The Bulletin

Cruising down U.S. Highway 97 on the north end of Bend, it doesn’t take long for Deschutes County Sheriff’s Deputy Ron Brown to spot the drivers not following the rules. In the next lane, a man behind the wheel is talking on his cell phone. Oncoming cars zoom past at well over the speed limit, making the numbers on Brown’s dashboard radar screen flash up and down. Many don’t seem to notice that they’ve picked the wrong day for violating traffic rules — a day when extra officers are on the road looking for problem drivers. On the other side of the highway, another deputy has pulled over a motorist. Brown swings around and parks behind the deputy, waiting to see if passing drivers obey the “Move Over” law, which requires them to switch lanes and slow down when emergency vehicles or tow trucks are on the side of the road. Less than a minute goes by before a Honda Accord races past in the right lane and Brown takes off after it. After he pulls over the car, he gets out to talk to the driver. The woman tells him she knew about the law, but thought she only had to move over within her own lane. He straightens her out on the rules and hands her a written warning.

Threat of $300 ticket The driver could have received a nearly $300 ticket, but Brown figured that wasn’t necessary to get the point across. “I think we took care of the problem right there,” he said, getting back into his car. It was one of 49 warnings — and 26 citations — issued over a four-hour period last Friday afternoon by a Multi-Agency Traffic Team of Deschutes County deputies, Oregon State Police troopers and officers from the Bend and Redmond police departments. The eight-member team patrolled the stretch of Highway 97 between Lava Butte and Redmond, searching for speeders, aggressive drivers and people ignoring cell phone, seat belt and Move Over laws. Sgt. Chris Carney of the Bend Police Department said the team tries to arrange a special enforcement operation once a month. Each time, a different agency selects a problem area to target with the help of additional resources from the other local departments. In Bend, for example, officers have focused on problem drivers on the Bend Parkway and on busy intersections like Reed Market Road and Third Street. See Traffic / C5

Corrections An editorial headlined “How not to fix property taxes,” which appeared Sunday, Sept. 26, on page F2, contained an error. Under Oregon’s property tax limits, property that is sold does not jump in assessed value. In a story about volunteers being ticketed for stashing water in a wildlife refuge near the U.S.Mexico border, which appeared Monday, Sept. 27, on Page B2, the incorrect agency was named in the story’s second headline. Federal Fish and Wildlife agents are ticketing volunteers. The Bulletin regrets the errors.

By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

The Bend-La Pine Schools board approved a one-year contract with the district’s classified staff Tuesday that provides no cost-of-living increase for more than 700 employees. Classified staff are school district em-

— John Rexford, Bend-La Pine School District deputy superintendent

ployees like bus drivers, education assistants and cooks. The district and Oregon School Employees Association actually conducted contract negotiations in June, but the union bylaws require 15 days’ notice before a vote. “Our new members dissipated into

the woodwork when school let out,” said union representative Linda Bradetich. “September seventh was the first day they were all back, and that’s when I put it out, and on the 22nd they ratified it.” Employees will not see any increase in the amount they’re expected to provide for insurance during the 2010-11 school year. The agreement runs from July 1 to June 30, 2011. It provides employees with no cost-of-living adjustments. In the 2009-10 school year, classified employees deferred their 2.5 percent cost-of-living increase. See Contract / C5

READING, WRITING AND ARITMÉTICA

DESCHUTES COUNTY

Farmland wedding dispute continues Redmond woman asks commissioners to waive land use fee By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

S

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

tudents in Cathy Fall’s Ochoco Elementary School bilingual kindergarten class ask to be called on to answer a question Monday at the Prineville school. Parents across Crook County are sending their students to the dual-language immersion program, which has 21 kindergartners

enrolled. Though it’s only the second week of class, the kindergartners have already started down the road to becoming bilingual. With more immersion programs in the works, the school’s long-term goal is to have students more or less bilingual by the end of third grade. See story on Page C3

JEFFERSON COUNTY

Metolius move angers 3 parties Environmental group, tribes, landowners are all appealing terms of commission’s decision to allow construction of cabins By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

A move earlier this month by Jefferson County commissioners to allow a group of landowners to build more than a dozen 850square-foot fishing accommodations on their property, which sits near the Metolius River on Lake Billy Chinook, has everyone involved — including the landowners — appealing the commission’s decision.

The landowners disagree with the county’s proposal that all the cabins should be clustered on the property. Environmentalists are worried that allowing the development could set a dangerous legal precedent and threaten Oregon’s rivers in the future. And the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs believe the county’s decision exceeds state law. All three parties plan to appeal the commission’s vote to the Oregon Land Use Board of Appeals.

Existing structures unlawful Photos show development on the property in question as far back as 1988. Since 1996, the county has flagged buildings on

the property for being out of compliance. There are now eight camp trailers, 11 buildings, three covered patio areas, five decks and 11 docks on the property. They were all built illegally, without county building permits. County officials were working with the landowners to find a solution to help them avoid code violations and bring the property into compliance. For property zoned as forest management, the county’s code and state law allows for 15 guest rooms or fishing accommodations. So, the county proposed the landowners comply by building the fishing accommodations. See Metolius / C5

A Redmond woman who has rented out her farmland for weddings wants to restart the process to legalize the practice in Deschutes County, and she is asking the county to waive a $10,000 land use fee. Kelly Brown’s request, which has yet to be scheduled for discussion by the Deschutes County Commission, is the latest development in an ongoing dispute between property owners who believe they have the right to rent out their farmland for events, and neighbors and others who believe the practice is illegal. The decision on whether to waive the land use fee is up to the Deschutes County Commission, a county attorney has said. On Tuesday, Brown referred questions to her attorney, Dave Hunnicutt, with the property rights advocacy nonprofit Oregonians In Action. Brown is not currently renting her property out for events, Hunnicutt said.

‘Devastating financial impact’ “A large part of her ability to continue use of that property in agriculture was based on these events, and since the county has decided that she can no longer conduct these events, it’s had a devastating financial impact on her,” Hunnicutt said of his client. Brown and other property owners who hold events on farmland went through the same process last year, but Brown withdrew the group’s application to change county code two days before a scheduled hearing before the County Commission. In that case, Brown and the other property owners paid a land use application fee of $4,510, according to the county. That fee was not refunded when they withdrew it, said Community Development Director Tom Anderson. See Farmland / C5

Man held after four-hour standoff was unarmed, authorities say By Erin Golden The Bulletin

A Bend man who made threats about using guns and bombs during a four-hour standoff with SWAT team officers Monday was unarmed, police said Tuesday. Officials were called to the Greenwood Manor apartment complex on Fourth Street about

2 p.m. Monday. They tried for several hours to negotiate with Mark Thomas Hipple, 52, who had barricaded himself in his first-floor apartment and was believed to be armed with a rifle. Residents from the apartment complex were evacuated to an area across the street and later to Marshall High School, and

a local school was put in lockdown as police closed off streets in a four-block area. Nearly 40 officers from several local law enforcement agencies were called to help. About three hours into the standoff, Hipple tossed some of his belongings through his windows. At about 6 p.m., SWAT officers approached the apart-

ment and used a Taser through a broken window to get Hipple under control.

Held on $12,500 bail Hipple was handcuffed and taken to the hospital for a psychiatric evaluation. Lt. Paul Kansky of the Bend Police Department said it ap-

peared Hipple had been drinking before Monday’s standoff. On Tuesday morning, Hipple was booked in the Deschutes County jail. Sheriff’s Office records show he is being held on $12,500 bail on suspicion of first-degree disorderly conduct, first-degree criminal mischief and menacing. See Standoff / C5


C2 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Study: Bark beetles reduce wildfire risk By Bettina Boxall Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Dire warnings have accompanied the armies of bark beetles that bored their way across the Mountain West in the past decade: Millions of acres had turned into a tinderbox of scraggly, dead trees ready to explode in flames. But scientists are pouring water on that conventional wisdom. A new study in the lodgepole pine forests of the greater Yellowstone region concludes that rather than increasing the wildfire risk, beetle attacks reduce it by thinning tree crowns. “It’s really counterintuitive,� said University of Wisconsin ecology professor Monica Turner, co-author of a paper that has been accepted for publication in Ecological Monographs. “The beetles are good foresters, thinning the forests for us in a way.� Beetle infestations have spread across more than 100 million acres in the Western U.S. and British Columbia since the 1990s, staining the rich green of conifer forests with the grays and rusts of dead and dying pine, spruce and fir trees. Experts say drought and a century of fire suppression have left forests more vulnerable to the insects’ cyclical outbreaks, while rising temperatures mean there are fewer fall and spring cold snaps to keep the bugs in check. The beetle destruction has prompted calls for stepped-up efforts to remove the dead trees and reduce the wildfire hazard. A Senate bill introduced last year would give the U.S. Agriculture Department authority to designate “insect and disease emergency� areas on national forest land, giving priority to thinning projects. But Turner and co-authors Martin Simard, William Romme and Jacob Griffin concluded that overall, mountain pine beetle damage “generally results in a dampening rather than an am-

Beetle reversal New evidence suggests bark beetle attacks in pine forests reduce the threat of wildfire rather than increase it. Dead trees drop their needles and thinner tree crowns slow a spreading fire.

Attacking a tree 1 Beetles bore through the outer bark and attract mates

2 Females carve galleries to lay eggs, spreading fungus as they burrow

Today is Wednesday, Sept. 29, the 272nd day of 2010. There are 93 days left in the year.

4 Fungus spreads, cutting the veins that carry water to branches; tree dies

Outer bark Inner bark Moves sugars down to the root system

Heartwood 1 2 4

Beetle

3

Fungus Cambium Outer cells provide new bark; inner cells provide new wood

Sapwood Conducts water from the roots to the needles

Pitch tubes appear when a healthy tree can produce enough resin to drown or force out a beetle that has bored its way into the trunk

Source: Oregon Department of Forestry; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Canadian Forest Service; Alabama Urban Forestry Assn.; U.S. Forest Service Š 2010 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

plification of fire behavior and intensity.� When the dead pines drop their needles, they are shedding fuel that can drive fast-moving fires in the tree crowns. “It’s the decline in the canopy fuels that is responsible for the reduction in the fire hazard,� Turner explained. “The perception people have about the increase in fire risk really did not have much of a basis.� The study also found that the increase in dead needles on the forest floor had little effect on the intensity and spread of surface fire, which is fed by fallen limbs and branches.

Cyanide-laced Tylenol claims first victim in ’82 The Associated Press

3 Eggs hatch, and larvae burrow into the inner bark and cambium layers

T O D AY IN HISTORY

TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Sept. 29, 1910, the National Urban League had its beginnings as The Committee on Urban Conditions Among Negroes was established in New York.

TEN YEARS AGO Israeli riot police stormed a major Jerusalem shrine and opened fire on stone-throwing Muslim worshippers, killing four Palestinians and wounding 175.

ON THIS DATE In 1789, the U.S. War Department established a regular army with a strength of several hundred men. In 1829, London’s reorganized police force, which became known as Scotland Yard, went on duty. In 1907, the foundation stone was laid for the Washington National Cathedral, which wasn’t fully completed until this date in 1990. In 1918, Allied forces began their decisive breakthrough of the Hindenburg Line during World War I. In 1938, British, French, German and Italian leaders concluded the Munich Agreement, which was aimed at appeasing Adolf Hitler by allowing Nazi annexation of Czechoslovakia’s Sudetenland. In 1960, the situation comedy “My Three Sons,� starring Fred MacMurray, premiered on ABC. The musical “Irma La Douce� opened on Broadway. In 1978, Pope John Paul I was found dead in his Vatican apartment just over a month after becoming head of the Roman Catholic Church. In 1980, The Washington Post published “Jimmy’s World,� a feature article about an 8-year-old heroin addict that went on to win a Pulitzer Prize; however, the story turned out to have been totally fabricated by the reporter, Janet Cooke. In 1982, Extra-Strength Tylenol capsules laced with cyanide claimed the first of seven victims in the Chicago area. (To date, the case remains unsolved.) In 1990, the Washington National Cathedral, begun in 1907, was formally completed with President George H.W. Bush overseeing the laying of the final stone atop the southwest pinnacle of the cathedral’s St. Paul Tower.

FIVE YEARS AGO John G. Roberts Jr. was sworn in as the nation’s 17th chief justice after winning Senate confirmation. New York Times reporter Judith Miller was released from 85 days of federal detention after agreeing to testify in a criminal probe into the leak of a covert CIA officer’s identity. Three suicide car bombs exploded nearly simultaneously in Balad, a mostly Shiite town north of Baghdad, killing some 60 people. ONE YEAR AGO New York City terrorism suspect Najibullah Zazi pleaded not guilty to conspiring to use weapons of mass destruction in what authorities said was a planned attack on commuter trains. (Zazi later pleaded guilty to charges including conspiracy to use weapons of mass destruction and supporting al-Qaida.) Former Democratic fundraiser Norman Hsu was sentenced in New York to more than 24 years in prison for his guilty plea to fraud charges and another four years and four months in prison for his conviction at trial for breaking campaign finance laws. A tsunami killed nearly 200 people in Samoa, American Samoa and Tonga. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Singer Jerry Lee Lewis is 75. Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi is 74. Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) is 68. Actor Ian McShane is 68. Actress Patricia Hodge is 64. TV personality Bryant Gumbel is 62. Broadcast journalist Gwen Ifill is 55. Singer-musician Les Claypool is 47. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Justice cannot be for one side alone, but must be for both.� — Eleanor Roosevelt, American first lady (1884-1962)

Researchers used satellite imagery to map lodgepole stands attacked by mountain pine beetles, hiked into the areas to confirm the beetle damage and measured fuel loads. Then they ran computer models to predict fire behavior. “The overall message that bark beetles do not increase the risk of wildfire is something that has been coming out of the scientific literature for a number of years,� said Dominik Kulakowski, an assistant geography professor at Clark University in Massachusetts who was not involved in the study. “What has been missing is the mechanism explaining that.�

He has testified before Congress that climate is what’s driving the growth in Western wildfires not the beetle epidemic. “The risk of wildfire is real and present, but that risk is associated with drought conditions,� he said. “If we chase after the bark beetle outbreaks ... we’re going to waste very precious resources.� Michael Jenkins, an associate ecology professor at Utah State University, said his own research findings largely agree with the Yellowstone work, but there are two exceptions. His studies in lodgepole forests in Utah and Idaho found that there is a relatively shortlived increase in the potential for surface fires when dying needles that have not yet lost all their resins pile up on the ground. He also said the potential for a crown fire briefly increases in the early stages of a beetle epidemic, when the forest is a mixture of dying, dead and living trees. But by the time the beetles have finished their work, leaving behind a sea of ghostly gray pine corpses, Jenkins said the wildfire “hazard is gone.� At that stage, he added, there is no point in cutting down the dead trees. “We’re in a post-outbreak phase. That’s the phase we’re in now in the Colorado Rockies,� a hot spot of lodgepole infestation. The research on beetles and wildfire has focused on lodgepole and spruce-fir stands, so scientists can’t say if the results apply to other forest types that have also experienced beetle damage. While the intermountain West has been the hardest hit, bark beetles carved a swath of destruction through Southern California’s San Bernardino National Forest in 2003 and 2004. Citing fire risk, forest managers there have spent millions removing dead trees on about 29,000 acres near communities, roads and recreation areas.

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

County establishes septic loan program Deschutes County announced Tuesday the launch of a new $60,000 loan program to help low-income people required to upgrade their septic systems to nitrate-reducing systems. The program, which will be administered by NeighborImpact, is specifically for south Deschutes County residents who have been disqualified from NeigborImpact’s existing cost-deferred loan program due to mortgage delinquency, inadequate equity and other factors, according to a county news release. The income limit for a four-person household is $50,800, according to the county. The county will contribute $60,000 to the program in the current fiscal year, from an approximately $500,0000 fund dedicated to preventing nitrate pollution in southern Deschutes County’s shallow aquifer. Money in the fund comes from a combination of an Environmental Protection Agency grant, sales of federal land transferred to Deschutes County to create the Newberry Neighborhood and sales of development credits through a market-driven system to reduce development in certain sensitive areas.

Museum+Events/default.aspx to obtain a registration form. A social gathering for veterans also will be held on Oct. 8 at the senior center, and will start at 4 p.m. and go until 6 p.m.

Grazing permit near Badlands retired A 2,971-acre parcel of Bureau of Land Management land next to the Oregon Badlands Wilderness will no longer be used for livestock grazing, according to a news release from the Oregon Natural Desert Association. The Bend-based nonprofit worked with a local rancher on the voluntary retirement of the Lynch Allotment, which features old-growth junipers and wildlife habitat. The Bureau of Land Management, which manages the area, has approved the retirement, said Brent Fenty, executive director of the organization, and the plan was also supported by the Deschutes County commission and the property’s neighbors. The Oregon Natural Desert Association paid about $10,000 to compensate the rancher who previously grazed the parcel for the value of the permit, Fenty said.

Bend man fined World War II event for open burning at Bend Senior Center The Department of

A symposium about World War II and the home front will be held Oct. 9 at the Bend Senior Center, according to a news release. The Deschutes County Historical Society is coordinating the event, which will start at 8 a.m. and go until 4:30 p.m. The title of the symposium is “World War II in Central Oregon: The Home Front,� and those interested in attending can register at 8 a.m. on the day of the event, or can go to www.deschuteshistory.org/

Environmental Quality has fined Ralph Adam Sutterfield $2,000 for burning debris on his Bend property, according to a news release from the state agency. He has not appealed the penalty. Sutterfield, who lives at 61600 Gribbling Road, illegally burned material including tar paper, plastic packaging and horse manure in November 2009, according to the release, which can emit dense smoke and a bad smell, as well as expose people to toxic chemicals.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Burglary — A bicycle and snowboard were reported stolen at 9:05 a.m. Sept. 27, in the 63800 block of Hunters Circle. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 8:08 p.m. Sept. 27, in the 61400 block of South U.S. Highway 97. DUII — Robert Russell Flanagan, 42, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:57 p.m. Sept. 27, in the 30000 block of Brookswood Boulevard. Redmond Police Department

DUII — Travis Scott Dishman, 32, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:59 p.m. Sept. 27, in the area of Northwest 17th Street and Northwest Ivy Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 4:56 p.m. Sept. 27, in the 2900 block of Northwest Canyon Drive. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 2:59 p.m. Sept. 27, in the 1300 Southwest Obsidian Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 2:43 p.m. Sept. 27, in the 1300 block of Northwest Spruce Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:17 p.m. Sept. 27, in the 700 block of Northeast Quince Place. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:13 p.m. Sept. 27, in the 300 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 10:46 a.m. Sept. 27, in the 2400 block of Northwest 13th Street. Theft — Medication was reported stolen at 9:09 a.m. Sept. 27, in the 2000 block of Southwest 36th Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:58 a.m. Sept. 27, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and Southwest Highland Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:47 a.m. Sept. 27, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and Northwest Quince Avenue. Prineville Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:38 p.m. Sept. 27, in the area of Northeast Third Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:30 p.m. Sept. 27, in the area of Northwest Gardner Road. Black Butte Police Department

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:30 a.m. Sept. 27, in the 70400 block of Bowdenii. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

DUII — David Kelly Costa, 46, was arrested on suspicion of driving under

the influence of intoxicants at 10:25 p.m. Sept. 27, in the area of 11th Street and F Avenue in Terrebonne. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:01 p.m. Sept. 27, in the 51500 block of U.S. Highway 97 in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 6:25 p.m. Sept. 27, in the 500 block of F Avenue in Terrebonne. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 5:18 p.m. Sept. 27, in the 9500 block of 16th Street in Terrebonne. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 5:02 p.m. Sept. 27, in the 500 block of East Cascade Avenue in Sisters. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 10:44 a.m. Sept. 27, in the 9200 block of 16th Street in Terrebonne. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 9:41 a.m. Sept. 27, in the 9300 block of 16th Street in Terrebonne. Oregon State Police

Burglary — A burglary was reported

at 12:45 a.m. Sept. 27, in the area of China Hat Road near milepost four.

PETS

BEND FIRE RUNS

The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541923-0882 — or refer to the website at www.redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org.

Friday 1:22 p.m. — Confined cooking fire, 725 N.E. Greenwood Ave. 5:12 p.m. — Smoke odor reported, 20200 China Hat Road. 11:24 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 474 N.E. Franklin Ave. 16 — Medical aid calls. Saturday 16 — Medical aid calls. Sunday 4:09 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 60085 Crater Road. 9:27 p.m. — Smoke odor reported, 2004 N.E. Purser Ave. 19 — Medical aid calls. Monday 12:53 p.m. — Building fire, 2470 N.E. Second St. 10 — Medical aid calls.

Redmond

Domestic short-haired cat — Young female, black; found near Northwest Homestead Way.

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 29, 2010 C3

L S Double the dialogue

A special section featuring news from schools in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties

IN BRIEF Inventerprise contest under way The Inventerprise science contest is challenging students to develop ways to improve human abilities or create devices for people with physical or medical limitations. The contest, sponsored by Bend Research with help from Bend-La Pine Schools and Central Oregon Community College, is open to all students in kindergarten through high school. Entries are due Nov. 12. Prizes are awarded at all grade levels; the top two high school entries will earn cash prizes of $1,000 and $500. Entries can be delivered to the Bend Research facility in Tumalo between Nov. 10 and Nov. 12. For more information go to www.cocc.edu/inventerprise or call Bend Research at 541-382-4100.

Kids in Ochoco Elementary’s dual-language program learn in Spanish, English By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

PRINEVILLE — Standing up in front of the class, her cheeks a bright shade of red, Ana Laura Jacuinde Caballero, 5, took a deep breath and showed her class how to count to five in her native language Monday morning at Ochoco Elementary School. “Uno, dos, tres, cuatro, cinco,” she said, a smile of relief flooding her face once she reached five. A row of hands shot up as the teacher asked who else would like to try pronouncing numbers in Spanish. Most of the hands belonged to native English-speaking students, inspired to try a new way of counting. “I’ve been shocked that the kids are so willing to try a new language out,” said Cathy Fall, teacher of the class and driving force behind the dual-language immersion program at the Prineville school. “Things are going better than I even dreamed they would.” In its first year at the school, the dual-language immersion program has 21 kindergartners enrolled, with parents across the county sending their students to learn a second language. Though it’s only the second week of class for the kindergartners, the children have already started down the road to becoming bilingual. “I’ve learned agua, baño, and lápiz,” said Torrin Keller, 6, a native English speaker in the program who has picked up the Spanish words for “water,” “bathroom” and “pencil.” The class consists of half native English speakers and half native Spanish speakers. English and Spanish are taught on alternating days, with students learning all the basics of kindergarten, along with another language. “The kids are already making progress,” said Merry Duggan, an ESL teacher at several schools in the district. “We’re really excited to see it all happen.” Duggan said many of the students have already started to speak freely to one another in both languages. Duggan recounted one incident in which a native English speaker began asking questions in Spanish to a native Spanish speaker, without any instruction. In addition to helping children become bilingual, the class provides some pupils a greater sense of belonging than a normal kindergarten experience could, Fall said. “It really bolsters the selfesteem of the native Spanish speakers,” she said, adding that rather than forcing them to learn English, the program emphasizes the value of both languages. “It teaches them the importance of keeping their own language.” During Monday’s session, the language of the day was Spanish, with students absorbing it through several activities. After recess, students sat in a circle on the alfombra, or carpet, to practice pronouncing words together. Students asked and responded to the question, “¿Cómo te llamas?” or “What’s your name?” After that, the class reviewed letters of the alphabet. Fall held up flash cards of letters with drawings

C O N TAC T U S SCHOOL BRIEFS: Items and announcements of general interest. Please include details and contact information. Phone: 541-617-7831 E-mail: smiller@bendbulletin.com Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Teacher Cathy Fall answers a question from a student in her bilingual kindergarten class Monday at Ochoco Elementary School in Prineville.

“The younger they learn a second language, the more apt they are to be more successful. Learning a language is like learning any other skill — you need practical application to really get it.” — Stan Johns, principal of Ochoco Elementary in Prineville

Leslie Velasco, 5, listens to a story read by her teacher, Cathy Fall, during the dual-language kindergarten class Monday in Prineville. corresponding to the letter underneath, and then had students act out the drawings. “Be, Ba, Bate,” Students repeated together, acting out the swing of baseball bat. Though it was a day of Spanish instruction, the class also reviewed the English alphabet so all students could get a solid handle on the pronunciation of letters in both languages. “Aa-Ah-Apple” students repeated for the letter ‘a,’ pretending to bite into an imaginary piece of fruit. After a review of letters and numbers, students returned to their tables for a session of selfportrait drawing. Kindergartners sketched their own faces and filled out the word “contenta” or “contento,” meaning “happy” or “pleased,” beneath their portraits. “He has hair like mine,” said Torrin, pointing to the spikyhaired boy in his portrait. “Conten-to,” he said, pronouncing the word slowly. Though the class is taught in both languages, some characteristics of the program are the same as in any other kindergarten. “Coloring is my favorite part of the day,” said Leslie Velasco, 5, adding wavy hair to the girl in her self-portrait. “And I like making new friends.” So far, Leslie said, she likes kindergarten a lot. Haley Nelson, 6, said she has made a lot of friends, too, and has already learned a lot of words. “My favorite new word is ‘yo.’ And I like ‘sí,’ too,” said

Haley, referencing the words for ‘I’ and ‘yes.’ Principal Stan Johns said the school plans to add another kin-

dergarten immersion class next year. The program’s goal is to have students more or less bilingual by the end of third grade. “The younger they learn a second language, the more apt they are to be more successful,” said Johns. “Learning a language is like learning any other skill — you need practical application to really get it.” The class finished up Monday with a reading of the popular children’s book “La Oruga Muy Hambrienta,” or “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” by Eric Carle. Though it was clear that many of

the English speakers in the class didn’t understand every word of the book, they understood the basics — counting along with Fall as the caterpillar ate more and more throughout the book. “I wish everyone could see how this is working,” Fall said after class let out. “We’ve had some opposition about the program, but I think if people could see how well it’s going, they’d be sold on it.”

The Associated Press ASHLAND — Southern Oregon University has established a joint degree program with a Chinese university to allow Chinese students to complete bachelor’s degrees in business, computer science or digital design in Oregon. Chinese students are expected to arrive in Ashland beginning in fall 2011 under the agreement

with Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, in China’s Henan Province. Gary Miller, director of international programs at Southern Oregon, told the Ashland Daily Tidings the first year should bring about six students from China. “Our goal is to build slowly,” he said. “Quality is what we want to do from the beginning.”

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Inside

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Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@ bendbulletin.com

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TEEN FEATS: The Bulletin wants to recognize high school students’ achievements off the playing fields. Do you know of teens who have been recognized recently for their academic achievements or who have won an award or certificate for their participation in clubs, choirs or volunteer groups? If so, please submit the information and a photo. Phone: 541-383-0358 Mail: P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 E-mail: youth@bendbulletin.com

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C4 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

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BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Three choices for Redmond council

R

edmond voters must choose from four candidates to fill three vacancies on the City Council. In doing so, they should select Ed Onimus, one of the two incumbents, and

both newcomers, Margie Dawson and Tory Allman. Dawson was reared in Redmond but moved away for a time before returning in the 1990s. She’s a businesswoman, has developed commercial property and is active in the city’s downtown urban renewal district, the Chamber of Commerce and the city’s development commission. She serves on the city planning commission, as well. She believes the city’s urban renewal district has helped improve downtown and would consider extending its life another 20 years if the city can come up with a solid plan for spending the money it would generate. Tory Allman manages Centwise Sporting Goods downtown. Like Dawson, he has been involved in the urban renewal district, and he serves as president of his Kiwanis Club. He believes the city should focus on providing basic services, including transportation, while keeping taxes low. By doing so, he argues, the city might be able to attract more businesses, which would generate both revenue and job opportunities. All three candidates say economic development will be one of the critical issues facing Redmond in the years

ahead. Both Allman and Dawson know something about the subject, having either run or owned small businesses in the city. Meanwhile, Onimus, an accountant, is determined to minimize the costs imposed by government. To this end, he has sometimes found himself in the minority on City Council votes. Recently, he points out, he sought unsuccessfully to delay a hike in system development charges for a year, arguing that raising fees in the current economic environment is imprudent. He lost the vote, much as he did when it came to buying the old Evergreen School for possible use as a city hall. Not only is the city’s current facility adequate for the time being, he argues, it also isn’t the government’s role to underwrite historic preservation. Even if Onimus is in the minority, as he was in this case, his willingness to challenge city spending at least forces those on the other side to justify their proposals. That’s a good thing. Redmond residents should return Onimus and elect Dawson and Allman to the council. The combination of old and new blood will serve the city well.

Pick Rodd Clark for Crook County Sheriff T

wo imperfect candidates would like to serve for the next four years as Crook County’s sheriff. One is the 24-year incumbent, Rodd Clark. The other, Jim Hensley, was Clark’s undersheriff until Clark demoted him a couple of years ago.

Although we have reservations about Clark, we don’t believe Hensley is the right man for the job. He focuses more on Clark’s shortcomings than on what he would do in the office. He simply hasn’t made the case that he’s better qualified for the position than Clark, which is ultimately what matters. Clark has some shortcomings of his own, however. While his actions in one instance may have been legal, they certainly look bad. And that matters. In addition to obeying the letter of the law, public officials — and law enforcement officials in particular — should scrupulously avoid behavior that even appears ethically dubious. Clark, it seems, doesn’t give much thought to such subtleties. The episode in question involves Clark’s daughter, who was hired recently to work in his department. Clark believes his office followed the law, but the Oregon Government Ethics Commission will have the final say on whether that is so. Clark also says he was not involved in the hiring, which is more than a little difficult to believe. While Clark may not have picked up the phone

himself and said, “Hey, want a job?” it beggars belief that the leader of a department as small as his had absolutely nothing to do with the hiring of his daughter. He clearly knew about it, and if nothing else, that gave him an opportunity to say “no” in order to preserve the reputation of his office. Generally speaking, a hire that requires action by the state ethics commission is a hire that shouldn’t happen. That’s especially true when it involves a member of your family. Despite this problem, Clark has done a good job as sheriff for more than two decades. In recent years, he’s stretched relatively thin resources as far as possible. About one-third of his deputies are financed by grants and through special programs, and without them county residents almost surely would feel the pinch. More importantly, voters lack a better alternative. Even Hensley acknowledges that his performance had slipped before Clark demoted him, though he attributes that to the effect of a painful divorce. Crook County residents should give Clark their votes. But Clark should return the favor by having his ethics glasses checked. Crook County’s unemployment rate is well into the double digits. Surely, his daughter wasn’t the only person qualified for and interested in the job his office gave her.

My Nickel’s Worth Have sympathy Your Sept. 20 editorial, poorly titled “Tax-and-spend trend is bad for the deficit,” seemed pretty familiar. Then I remembered your editorial from April 9 titled “Too little skin in the tax game.” So we have basically the same editorial repeated within six months. In both editorials, The Bulletin recommends increasing the income tax rate for Central Oregon’s lowest wage earners, working families that have been desperately scrambling to keep a roof over their children’s heads and food on the table during the hardest time since the ’30s. These are families that have paid income taxes year after year when times were better. These folks took any work they could find, but earned so little even that the Bush administration said they don’t make enough money to pay. One would expect a trace of sympathy for these folks, but instead they get a scolding about “recognizing the consequences of our own behavior.” Now these families have turned to food stamps for the first time in their lives. But the Bulletin wants them to pay more taxes, which would take that food back off their tables. Dennis O’Shea Bend

Property taxes I feel the reporter for The Bulletin missed the point in his article about the property taxes for two properties in Bend. Both properties were purchased or valued at the similar price in 1995 and now are worth very different values. Harold Slater does not make any more

Letters policy We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

money from his house than Bill Shaw. It is only when it is sold that a difference in value is received. When sold, Slater will have to pay at least $300,000 for taxes and the new owner will have his house now taxed at the $1.6 million figure. A house does not gain in true value until sold. Does it seem fair to make a person’s taxes more than a similarpriced home purchased in 1995, just because he was lucky or smart and now his house has gone up more in value? He probably has more expenses than the less expensive house just because of the value of maintaining the home in a more expensive area. If two people buy stocks on the same day and one goes up and one goes down, yet neither one sells the stock, should the guy that bought the increasing stock pay more even though he is not selling the stock? Vern Bauch Bend

Impressed by Stiegler As an independent-minded Republican, I look at a candidate’s record more than at his/her party affiliation. I have been consistently impressed with Rep. Judy Stiegler. She is willing to bring diverse interests together to benefit our community, in order to keep it a great place to start a business and raise a family. She has also shown that she will take risks in order to do the right thing. A perfect example: When Stiegler was asked to consider a tax on the growing craft brewing industry, she brought local brewers together to find out how such a tax would affect their businesses. With nearly 400 local jobs at stake, Stiegler stood firm — even

in opposition to her own party — and stopped the beer tax. Stiegler looks out for the interests of Central Oregon by getting people to come together to solve our problems. Whether it’s booting the beer tax, working together to balance conservation and development needs, or sticking up for small business, seniors and children, Stiegler is a strong voice for our community. Katie Wendel Bend

Silly ramp rules The Sept. 19 front-page article “Is that ramp on the level” unintentionally illustrates the consequences of bureaucracy run amok: “A grade that is 0.1 percent off can make a ramp noncompliant. Landing slope cannot have more than a 2 percent grade in any direction.” First, consider the time and effort some federal employee devoted to drafting these ridiculously close tolerances and, I’m sure, many other petty regulations. No doubt they had to be discussed in numerous committee meetings and then approved by several layers of management. And then consider that these silly regulations require the city of Bend to employ one or more curb ramp inspectors. Bend’s street division manager likens curb ramp construction to brain surgery. Unbelievable! People, whatever happened to common sense? Just wait until you see the reams of new, exacting regulations arising from Obamacare. You ain’t seen nothing yet. Robert Bolin Sunriver

In My View policy

Submissions

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Federal Fair Tax would simplify collection, save money By Patrick Burkett

Bulletin guest columnist

Regarding the Sept. 9, editorial, “A tax battle for all to like,” I applaud the editor’s insight that “the cost and hassle of compliance (of the tax code) have become so high that many beneficiaries of the code’s wrinkles might be willing to trade preferential treatment for greater simplicity.” This statement at once recognizes the difficulties of complying with the code’s many facets, the favoritism for some lucky groups, and holds out the possibility of relief. I would like to put in a plug for the Fair Tax Legislation (FTL) currently awaiting consideration by the U.S. House of Representatives as H.R. 25. This is not just a simplification of the tax code, it is a complete replacement, and it eliminates completely the insane yearly April 15 fiasco of tax filing. It is a national retail consumption tax (on new items only) that replaces not only income taxes, Social Security and Medicare payroll taxes, and capital gains tax, but also federal business taxes, the inheritance

tax, and the Alternative Minimum Tax. The average American worker gives up 30 percent of his income in these taxes. This fact must be kept in mind when one considers that the Fair Tax replaces this lost revenue with a 23 percent tax on new purchases, which, although it sounds excessive, is actually less than the 30 percent of lost income. In my opinion, this gain in take-home pay, when considered with several other advantages of the Fair Tax system, makes putting such a law into effect a “no-brainer” decision. Consider a few of the advantages (there are many more): 1. You get 100 percent of your wage as take-home pay (no withholding or estimated tax payments). 2. You never file a tax return. The federal government receives its income every time you purchase anything in new condition. Collection of the tax is done the same way and at the same time as any other retail sales tax, but the merchant and/or the state will receive a small percent of the tax as reimbursement for collecting the tax. Forty-four

IN MY VIEW states have a network of sales-tax authorities already in existence. The other six will be required to establish a collection system and will then be reimbursed for collections as stated above. 3. You never deal with the IRS over disputed income reports or deductions. And no need to keep a record of donations and other tax-deductible payments. 4. The estimated $2 trillion-a-year “underground” economy, including some illegal immigrants’ activities, those who have found ways to avoid taxes, dealers of illegal drugs, and others who deal only with cash transactions, end up paying the federal government whenever they spend money for everyday living expenses. 5. The 40 million yearly foreign tourists will broaden the tax base with their purchases. 6. Those in upper-income categories usually spend more on luxury items

than the average person, and the more expensive the luxury item, the more federal income the 23 percent tax will generate. And upper-income persons are often the ones who take advantage of tax loopholes to avoid as much income tax as possible. 7. It is estimated that as much as $300 billion is spent each year by persons who pay to have their tax returns professionally prepared and to develop sophisticated tax strategies to avoid paying what they owe. That expense and avoidance is eliminated by the FTL. The current tax law is a tome of 67,500 pages. Even the IRS has trouble keeping track of all of the detailed regulations in the current law. 8. Business taxes such as corporate taxes (ours are the second-highest in the world) and the employer’s share of Social Security and Medicare taxes are eliminated. This will lower the cost of goods, as well as make our nation’s companies more competitive with foreign producers and, hopefully, bring back to our country businesses that have found

it more profitable to move abroad. 9. The IRS will be significantly downsized once all back taxes are collected, resulting in a huge savings for government expenses. A computer-generated model of what effect the FTL would have on our economy compared with continuing the present tax system showed the following: 1. GDP would rise 8 to 10 percent, starting within the first year. 2. Domestic investment would be 65 to 75 percent higher. 3. Capital stock would be 9.3 to 17 percent higher. 4. Real wages would be 9 to 10 percent higher. 5. Consumption would drop initially, but then rebound over five years to a 6 percent higher amount. If the Fair Tax Legislation makes sense to you, please lend your support in every way possible. For some ideas on how to do so, please see the website www.fairtax.org. Patrick Burkett lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 29, 2010 C5

O D

N   Colette J. Jakabosky, of Prineville Oct. 12, 1962 - Sept. 26, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Cremation & Burial, in Tigard, OR. 503-443-4900 Services: No services will be held.

Ronald Allan Slinkard, of Bend July 6, 1928 - Sept. 24, 2010 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, 541- 382-5592, www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: 12 p.m., October 2, 2010, Niswonger-Reynolds Chapel, 105 NW Irving St., Bend.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Robbie Jean McCorkle June 26, 1932 - Sept. 23, 2010 Robbie Jean McCorkle passed away at her home in Falkville, Alabama. She was born in Cullman County, Alabama, to parents, Mose Suite and Maude Mae Shedd Suite. She is survived by sons, Alan Mickelson, TX, Gary Mickelson, CA, Kurtis Mickelson, AL, and Michael Mickelson, CA and Raymond McCorkle, Sr., AL; daughter, Renee Isola of Bend, OR; brother, Edward Suite, AL, and sister, Mary McElwey, AL; nine grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents, and her husband, Raymond E. McCorkle, MD. Services were held at Bell Springs Cemetery, Falkville, AL, September 24, 2010. Peck Funeral Home, Hartselle, AL, handled the arrangements, (256) 773-2541

Traffic Continued from C1 In Redmond, the focus is often on Highway 97 on the south end of the city, where there have been several serious accidents. Some operations are targeted toward one particular offense, like drivers stopping for pedestrians in downtown Bend. Others, like Friday’s event, provide a chance to look for any traffic violations. Carney said the special traffic operations aren’t meant to be a surprise — organizers always spread the word that they’re planning an event by contacting local media outlets. The goal, said Oregon State Police Lt. Carl Rhodes, is to get drivers’ attention, whether they just see several officers on the road and check their speed or get a ticket for talking on a cell phone or following other cars too closely.

James Heselden, 62, owner of Segway, dies New York Times News Service

LONDON — James W. Heselden, a British businessman who invented and sold fortification containers for flood control and military protection and who owned the company that makes Segway electric scooters, died Sunday after plunging from a cliff in West Yorkshire, the police said, apparently while touring his property on a Segway. He was 62. His body was found late Sunday morning after a passer-by

reported seeing a man plummet 30 feet into the River Wharfe, the police said, adding that a “Segway-style vehicle” had also been found. They did not say what had caused the accident.

Worked as coal miner Heselden was born in Leeds, in modest circumstances, and left school at 15. He worked as a coal miner, lost his job after the 1984 miners’ strike, and used

his severance pay to start Hesco Bastion, which manufactures the Hesco barriers he invented in 1990. The barriers — galvanizedsteel mesh baskets rising to chest height that can be filled with dirt — were originally developed as flood control devices, and have been used in places like New Orleans and Iowa. Light, portable and easy to assemble, they have also replaced sandbags as a feature of virtually every defensive barrier deployed by coalition

forces in Iraq and Afghanistan, and are standard equipment for NATO. In recent years, Heselden has appeared on the Sunday Times of London’s list of 1,000 richest people in Britain. A passionate philanthropist, he donated almost $16 million to the Leeds Community Foundation earlier this month, bringing his total lifetime donations to charity to more than $36 million. The two-wheeled Segway personal transporter, which oper-

ates on electricity and changes direction according to the way its driver tilts, was invented by Dean Kamen in 2001. Matt Dailida, vice president for government affairs at Segway, said that Heselden was “a Segway p.t. owner long before he bought the company,” in December 2009. Dailida said that Segway was still trying to find out more about what caused Heselden to go off the cliff. Heselden is survived by his wife, Julie; five children, and eight grandchildren.

Ex-Lions DB, coach Ex-Nevada quarterback, Heisman Trophy contender Stan Heath, 83, dies Don Doll dies at 84 The Associated Press

sharing the honor with Chris Vargas. “When I played here, he was my idol,” said Nevada coach Chris Ault, who was the Wolf Pack’s quarterback in the early 1970s. “He played on that 1948 team, was the first all-American this university ever had,” Ault said Tuesday. “He loved this university. He followed us and was an avid fan of our football program. He was a very, very special Wolf Pack guy who now gets to look down on us from above.” Heath led the nation in passing, total offense and touchdown passes in 1948. The Green Bay Packers made him the fifth pick in the NFL draft that year at a salary of $15,000 per year. He

Standoff

day, they said he seemed particularly frustrated. Kansky said he wasn’t sure what charges would be filed against Hipple, if any. But he said the man might be a candidate for the county’s mental health court, which helps provide treatment for offenders. He said getting the right kind of help can be crucial for keeping people with mental health problems from becoming repeat offenders. “What we don’t want to happen is to have it fall through the cracks,” he said.

RENO, Nev. — Stan Heath, an all-America quarterback at Nevada who finished fifth in the voting for the Heisman Trophy in 1948, has died. He was 83. Heath died at his home in Jesup, Ga., on Sunday. That’s the same day Nevada cracked The Associated Press poll for the first time since that 1948 team. Heath had been battling cancer. The family plans a private memorial service but the date has not been set, Ray Howard of Howard-Jones-Nobles Funeral Home in Jesup said Tuesday. Heath was an inaugural member of the University of Nevada Athletic Hall of Fame and one of the quarterbacks on Nevada’s Team of the Century,

Continued from C1 Kansky said officers had nearly wrapped up their work on the case and were preparing to turn it over to the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office. Chief Deputy District Attorney Darryl Nakahira said Tuesday afternoon that prosecutors had not yet received any reports on the case. Hipple’s actions were apparently related to “tenant issues,” Kansky said. Neighbors said Hipple had been upset about an upcoming move from the apartment complex. On Monday, his 52nd birth-

Contract Continued from C1 Employees who are due for a step increase in salary during the 2010-11 school year will still receive that pay increase. “It is a pretty austere settlement, and we talked about that a lot,” Deputy Superintendent John Rexford said. “It is just a one-year agreement that we reached, and we’ll be chatting again this spring. But we met the interests of all the parties to the extent we could.”

Furlough days Superintendent Ron Wilkinson noted that all classified employees will take between five

“I hope it’s a positive impact of reminding (drivers) that they need to pay attention,” he said. “You should, every day of the week, 24/7, pay attention, but it brings to light drivers that may be getting a little lax on moving over for law enforcement or cell phone usage. … It puts a hard focus on reducing or eliminating some of these hazardous traffic violations, the crash-causing violations.” Officials from the Bend and Redmond police departments and the Oregon State Police said they schedule officers and troopers on their regular shifts to work the traffic operations. The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office pulls in deputies on overtime for the traffic operations. Capt. Tim Edwards of the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office says he has about $6,000 in the budget each year for overtime traffic shifts. Until a few years ago, the Sheriff’s Office had its

Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

and 10 furlough days this year. “That’s definitely impacted their income this year,” he said. Bradetich said the district and union agreed there was little to be gained in long negotiations, since the district has taken several cuts in state funding over the past two years. “We could see there weren’t many options,” Bradetich said. Rexford said the bargaining could have been much more challenging. “We had a tough situation,” he said. “But our relationships really matter as we work through these tough times.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

played one year in Green Bay before moving to Canada, where he played for the Hamilton TigerCats and Calgary Stampeders. Heath starred on Nevada’s 1947 and 1948 teams that went a combined 18-4 and played in bowl games both years under coach Joe Sheetketski. In a 1948 game against Oklahoma City, Heath threw five touchdown passes, a school record that stood unmatched for 30 years and unbroken until Vargas threw seven against UNLV in 1993. Heath spent 20 years as a cattle rancher in Nebraska and became close friends with longtime Nebraska coach Bob Devaney, starting a “Beef Club” for the Cornhuskers.

Metolius Continued from C1 First, though, the county said they would need to demolish all the existing structures on the property and rebuild all the guest rooms on one portion of the property. Lisa Klemp, a Redmondbased attorney who represents the landowners, said the condition that all the cabins be clustered doesn’t make sense. “It requires them to cluster at the top of the hill, which is where the wildlife foraging is,” Klemp said. Central Oregon LandWatch lawyer Paul Dewey said his

Farmland Continued from C1 Brown and Hunnicutt have not yet submitted a land use application. Hunnicutt said he could draft proposed language to authorize commercial events as a conditional use on farmland, but it would also be OK with him if county planners draft the changes to county land use code. Any proposal would likely limit the types of events and their length, noise, traffic and other issues, Hunnicutt said. Opponents of commercial events on farmland could not be reached for comment Tuesday, but in the past some have said their concerns include noise

“To me, it’s not a success if we’re writing more citations. The whole concept with the (traffic) details is to be high-visibility and gain compliance.” — Sgt. Chris Carney, Bend Police Department

own traffic team, but decided to reorganize so all of the deputies on the road would be open for any type of call. The monthly traffic blitzes, Edwards said, help put more focus on problems that deputies spot on a daily basis. “We feel like traffic issues are not central to any one location, so we can better use our resources by assisting each other to hit some of these trouble spots,” he said. The local agencies often get additional grant money to target more specific problems, like seat

belt use and drunken driving. The extra money provided for those efforts allows officers to be pulled in for overtime shifts; the departments have to submit reports about how they used grant money. On the general traffic operations and the targeted, grantfunded efforts, officials said there’s no quota they aim to reach in terms of tickets or warnings. Money collected from traffic tickets doesn’t go directly back to the agencies that write them — and in many cases, those agencies never see the money at all.

The Associated Press

ALLEN PARK, Mich. — Don Doll, a standout defensive back who was part of Detroit’s 1952 NFL championship team before coaching the Lions, has died. He was 84. The Lions said Tuesday that Doll died last Wednesday in San Juan Capistrano, Calif. The team didn’t announce a cause of death. The team said Doll had at least 10 interceptions in three seasons, the only NFL player to accomplish that feat. Doll played safety for the Lions from 1949-52, and he intercepted four passes in one game against the Chicago Cardinals as a rookie in 1949. He also played one season each with the Washington Redskins and Los Angeles

Rams. He was a four-time Pro Bowl selection, and was named the MVP of the game in 1953. Doll returned to the Lions as a coach from 1963-64 and again from 1978-88. He was a four-year letterman playing halfback at Southern California, where he played in the 1945 Rose Bowl when the Trojans beat Tennessee and again in 1949 when they lost to Michigan. Doll led the Trojans in rushing in 1944, ‘47 and ‘48. He ran for 1,067 career yards and led the team in receptions and scoring in ‘48. Doll missed the 1948 season while serving in the Marines. The school said he was aboard the USS Missouri when the Japanese signed surrender papers on the ship to end World War II.

said, is not the intent of the law. “The state law is flexible … but my understanding is the (landowners) don’t want fishing accommodations or sleeping rooms, they want 15 separate second homes, and that’s just not allowable,” Dewey said. “If it were, every river in Oregon, the — Paul Dewey, Central Oregon Metolius, the Deschutes would LandWatch lawyer be lined with 15-unit subdivisions. It’s so contrary to state law, it’s amazing the county apchallenge will focus on the size proved it.” of the fishing accommodations. All parties plan to file ap“The basic challenge is the peals, and LUBA will set a date county’s interpretation of 15 for a hearing. sleeping rooms for fishing acLauren Dake can be commodations,” Dewey said. He said the county is allowing essen- reached at 541-419-8074 or at tially 15 second homes, which, he ldake@bendbulletin.com.

“If it were, every river in Oregon, the Metolius, the Deschutes would be lined with 15-unit subdivisions.”

and traffic. Anderson said the county Planning Division’s to-do list for this budget year already includes addressing whether commercial events should be allowed on farmland, but planners are already extremely busy this year with projects such as overhauling the county’s land use blueprint, called the comprehensive plan. “We’ve gone through significant staffing reductions, and we’re on a reduced workweek, so our capacity is limited,” Anderson said. In August, a Circuit Court judge found Brown guilty and sentenced her to a $500 fine for violating county land use laws by renting out her property for a wedding. Brown charged a

Oregon State Police traffic cases end up in circuit court, and any fees collected go into the state’s general fund. Fees from traffic issues sorted out in municipal court or Deschutes County Justice Court, meanwhile, go to the county or are split between the county and a city, if a Redmond or Bend officer writes the ticket. “To me, it’s not a success if we’re writing more citations,” Carney said. “The whole concept with the (traffic) details is to be high-visibility and gain compliance.” In some cases, officers are able to stop people suspected of other serious offenses. About a half-hour into his traffic shift on Friday, Brown heard a call on the radio about a suspected drunken driver. He spotted the vehicle headed north on Highway 97 and after talking to the driver and performing a field sobriety test, he took the man to jail.

fee of $2,500 for the June 2009 wedding, according a court document. At the August sentencing, Hunnicutt also entered guilty pleas on Brown’s behalf for three more cases in which the county alleged Brown held weddings on her property in violation of county code. Circuit Court Judge Barbara Haslinger decided not to impose fees for those cases, but said if Brown violates county code by renting her property for weddings again, she should have to pay the full fine. The maximum penalty under state law for the Class A infractions is a fine of $720. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Because the traffic operations happen in different locations, on different days and at different times, officials said it’s hard to use numbers to tell if things are getting better on the road. But Lt. Nathan Garibay of the Redmond Police Department said he sees the traffic operations as an important opportunity for local agencies to check in with each other on a common concern — and show people traveling through Central Oregon that following traffic rules is a priority. “Drivers cross jurisdictional boundaries all the time, going from Redmond to Bend to La Pine,” he said. “It’s really about helping people, reminding people about safe driving habits throughout the entire region, and we get positive bleed-over in every community.” Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.


W E AT H ER

C6 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, SEPTEMBER 29

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

76/51

72/52

80/51

67/46

Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

Mitchell

Madras

82/44

85/47

Camp Sherman 81/39 Redmond Prineville 84/42 Cascadia 80/43 83/43 Sisters 84/41 Bend Post 84/42

Oakridge Elk Lake 81/41

72/30

Early clouds, then mostly sunny today. Clear to partly cloudy tonight. Central

86/48

89/49

80/39

84/39

81/38

86/40

84/38 79/39

Fort Rock

BEND ALMANAC

Vancouver 68/51

Chemult 81/36

Calgary 66/41

Seattle Missoula 76/44

Helena

Eugene 83/50

Bend

86/47

90/46

Idaho Falls Redding

Elko

102/59

Christmas Valley 87/41

Silver Lake

76/45

Boise

84/42

85/36

90/40

Reno

85/43

95/53

Mostly sunny skies today. San Francisco 67/54 Mostly clear skies tonight.

Crater Lake 75/52

Salt Lake City 87/56

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

Last

New

Sept. 30 Oct. 7

Wednesday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

First

Full

Oct. 14

Oct. 22

Astoria . . . . . . . . 70/60/0.02 . . . . . . 67/53/s. . . . . . 68/53/pc Baker City . . . . . . 85/38/0.00 . . . . . . 83/42/s. . . . . . . 85/46/s Brookings . . . . . . 73/55/0.00 . . . . . 67/51/pc. . . . . . 63/51/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 89/36/0.00 . . . . . . 86/49/s. . . . . . . 87/47/s Eugene . . . . . . . . 83/56/0.00 . . . . . . 83/50/s. . . . . . . 81/51/s Klamath Falls . . . 87/39/0.00 . . . . . . 87/40/s. . . . . . . 86/40/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 88/34/0.00 . . . . . . 91/44/s. . . . . . . 89/40/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 85/38/0.00 . . . . . . 84/38/s. . . . . . 85/37/pc Medford . . . . . . . 90/56/0.00 . . . . . . 93/53/s. . . . . . . 91/52/s Newport . . . . . . .66/59/trace . . . . . . 65/56/s. . . . . . 65/54/pc North Bend . . . . . 72/57/0.00 . . . . . . 66/53/s. . . . . . . 67/53/s Ontario . . . . . . . . 87/42/0.00 . . . . . . 87/50/s. . . . . . . 87/49/s Pendleton . . . . . . 85/56/0.00 . . . . . . 80/55/s. . . . . . . 86/51/s Portland . . . . . . . 77/63/0.00 . . . . . . 80/57/s. . . . . . . 81/56/s Prineville . . . . . . . 80/47/0.00 . . . . . . 80/43/s. . . . . . 87/49/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 85/44/0.00 . . . . . . 80/46/s. . . . . . . 86/45/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 84/60/0.00 . . . . . 86/55/pc. . . . . . . 82/55/s Salem . . . . . . . . . 83/60/0.00 . . . . . . 82/52/s. . . . . . . 82/53/s Sisters . . . . . . . . . 84/45/0.00 . . . . . . 84/41/s. . . . . . 88/39/pc The Dalles . . . . . .88/60/trace . . . . . . 81/57/s. . . . . . . 84/55/s

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

4

0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82/54 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 in 1967 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.46” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 in 1950 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.47” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.95” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 7.85” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.06 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.38 in 1977 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97....Mod. Sisters...............................Mod. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.....Mod. La Pine..............................Mod. Redmond/Madras...........Low Prineville .........................Mod.

LOW

LOW

72 39

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Thursday Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy and significantly cooler. HIGH

81 40 PLANET WATCH

Moon phases

SUNDAY Mainly sunny skies and unseasonably warm.

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .5:53 a.m. . . . . . .6:30 p.m. Venus . . . . . . .10:25 a.m. . . . . . .7:30 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .9:58 a.m. . . . . . .8:02 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .6:25 p.m. . . . . . .6:14 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .7:01 a.m. . . . . . .6:57 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .6:24 p.m. . . . . . .6:21 a.m.

OREGON CITIES City

72/54

Grants Pass

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:01 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 6:50 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:02 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 6:48 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 10:26 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 1:34 p.m.

LOW

84 40

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

83/40

75/32

HIGH

NORTHWEST

Eastern

Hampton

LOW

85 43

80/57

Burns

La Pine

HIGH

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 93° Rome • 34° Lakeview

SATURDAY Mainly sunny skies and unseasonably warm.

High pressure will provide mostly sunny skies and above normal temperatures today.

76/39

Brothers

Sunriver

83/37

LOW

Portland

Mostly sunny skies today. Mostly clear skies tonight.

FRIDAY Mainly sunny skies and unseasonably warm.

Tonight: Mainly clear and cool.

42

Paulina

80/40

Crescent

Crescent Lake

Today: Mainly sunny skies and unseasonably warm.

84

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

THURSDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33,567 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,413 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 58,068 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 24,772 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97,333 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 238 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 859 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58.1 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,292 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.5 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 68/51

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

Calgary 66/41

Seattle 72/54

S

S

Saskatoon 62/40 Winnipeg 65/43

S

S

Thunder Bay 62/46

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 64/51

Halifax 71/59 Portland Billings To ronto P ortland (in the 48 74/58 76/45 66/51 80/57 St. Paul Green Bay contiguous states): Boston 69/52 67/50 Boise 76/64 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 86/47 67/53 New York 71/46 • 110° 67/55 74/65 Des Moines San Luis Obispo, Calif. Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 75/52 Chicago 76/46 72/52 74/66 Omaha San Francisco 70/56 • 24° 81/51 67/54 Salt Lake Washington, D. C. Fraser, Colo. City 75/64 Las Denver Kansas City Louisville 87/56 Vegas • 3.64” 77/58 85/52 78/55 St. Louis 101/75 NASA, Fla. Charlotte 75/57 75/60 Los Angeles Nashville Little Rock 76/62 79/51 79/57 Phoenix Albuquerque Oklahoma City Atlanta 84/57 105/79 Honolulu 79/61 90/60 Birmingham 87/71 Dallas Tijuana 83/55 86/61 81/62 New Orleans Orlando 84/63 88/73 Houston Chihuahua 87/64 84/56 Bismarck 73/39

La Paz 95/75 Anchorage 48/40

Juneau 51/45

Mazatlan 91/81

Monterrey 88/65

Miami 86/78

FRONTS

Yesterday WednesdayThursday Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .67/52/0.01 . 67/51/pc . . 66/46/pc Rapid City . . . . . .89/45/0.00 . . .71/46/s . . . 71/49/s Green Bay. . . . . .63/46/0.00 . .67/50/sh . . 65/42/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .95/49/0.00 . . .95/53/s . . . 94/52/s Greensboro. . . . .78/60/0.16 . . .72/65/t . . 77/59/sh Richmond . . . . . .83/68/0.02 . . .73/66/t . . . .77/59/r Harrisburg. . . . . .80/68/0.49 . . .73/60/c . . . .74/55/r Rochester, NY . . .77/62/0.24 . 68/54/pc . . . .65/50/r Hartford, CT . . . .78/64/0.11 . 78/63/pc . . . .75/59/r Sacramento. . . .102/63/0.00 . . .98/55/s . . . 94/58/s Helena. . . . . . . . .87/48/0.00 . . .76/45/s . . . 75/44/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .77/52/0.00 . . .75/57/s . . . 74/54/s Honolulu . . . . . . .86/71/0.00 . . .87/71/s . . . 86/71/s Salt Lake City . . .90/59/0.00 . . .87/56/s . . . 88/60/s Houston . . . . . . .85/57/0.00 . . .87/64/s . . . 89/66/s San Antonio . . . .87/52/0.00 . . .88/62/s . . . 88/63/s Huntsville . . . . . .73/51/0.00 . . .79/51/s . . . 81/57/s San Diego . . . . . .82/75/0.00 . 77/65/pc . . 73/64/pc Indianapolis . . . .72/50/0.00 . . .76/53/s . . . 75/51/s San Francisco . . .95/67/0.00 . . .67/54/s . . . 66/55/s Jackson, MS . . . .82/52/0.00 . . .83/56/s . . . 85/59/s San Jose . . . . . . .99/65/0.00 . . .84/56/s . . . 78/57/s Madison, WI . . . .71/43/0.00 . 71/52/pc . . 66/44/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .88/49/0.00 . . .87/53/s . . . 82/52/s Jacksonville. . . . .83/69/0.00 . . .85/67/t . . 85/64/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .50/45/0.32 . . .51/45/r . . . .54/46/r Kansas City. . . . .76/55/0.00 . . .77/58/s . . . 73/51/s Amsterdam. . . . .59/50/0.01 . . .58/45/s . . 58/47/sh Lansing . . . . . . . .63/50/0.07 . 68/51/pc . . 66/44/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .82/62/0.02 . .80/69/sh . . . 77/63/s Las Vegas . . . . .103/75/0.00 . .101/75/s . . 98/74/pc Auckland. . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . .67/55/sh . . . .62/56/r Lexington . . . . . .67/49/0.00 . . .75/53/s . . . 75/50/s Baghdad . . . . . .100/82/0.00 . .102/74/s . . 103/74/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .78/56/0.00 . . .82/51/s . . . 74/46/s Bangkok . . . . . . .91/75/3.73 . . .90/76/t . . . .91/76/t Little Rock. . . . . .85/52/0.00 . . .79/57/s . . . 83/57/s Beijing. . . . . . . . .66/46/0.00 . . .71/48/s . . . 77/52/s Los Angeles. . . . .94/73/0.00 . 76/62/pc . . 73/64/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . .88/78/s . . . 90/79/s Louisville . . . . . . .75/53/0.00 . . .78/55/s . . . 78/51/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .55/48/0.00 . .52/41/sh . . 53/41/pc Memphis. . . . . . .80/54/0.00 . . .80/58/s . . . 82/59/s Bogota . . . . . . . .66/50/1.56 . . .69/48/t . . . .66/50/t Miami . . . . . . . . .87/76/0.76 . . .86/78/t . . 89/76/pc Budapest. . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . 57/43/pc . . 58/41/pc Milwaukee . . . . .68/48/0.00 . 66/55/pc . . 66/48/pc Buenos Aires. . . .66/57/0.00 . .58/48/sh . . . 60/45/s Minneapolis . . . .66/54/0.00 . 69/52/pc . . 66/47/pc Cabo San Lucas .90/75/0.00 . 93/76/pc . . 94/77/pc Nashville . . . . . . .74/50/0.00 . . .79/51/s . . . 79/56/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .97/77/0.00 . . .96/73/s . . . 98/74/s New Orleans. . . .82/68/0.00 . . .84/63/s . . . 87/67/s Calgary . . . . . . . .61/52/0.00 . . .66/41/s . . . 65/41/s New York . . . . . .73/70/0.37 . 74/65/pc . . . .74/60/r Cancun . . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . . .87/74/t . . 86/71/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .78/73/0.06 . 73/63/pc . . 75/58/sh Dublin . . . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . .58/48/sh . . 60/50/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .82/71/0.56 . . .77/71/t . . . .79/65/r Edinburgh . . . . . .61/52/0.00 . . .58/52/r . . 58/48/pc Oklahoma City . .84/53/0.00 . . .84/57/s . . . 83/57/s Geneva . . . . . . . .59/37/0.00 . 63/46/pc . . . 64/49/c Omaha . . . . . . . .76/54/0.00 . . .81/51/s . . . 71/47/s Harare . . . . . . . . .77/57/0.00 . . .83/50/s . . . 84/50/s Orlando. . . . . . . .87/72/2.66 . . .88/73/t . . 89/72/pc Hong Kong . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .86/79/t . . . .87/79/t Palm Springs. . . .96/80/0.00 105/75/pc . 107/77/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .81/68/0.00 . .79/68/sh . . 69/55/sh Peoria . . . . . . . . .75/47/0.00 . . .74/55/s . . . 74/49/s Jerusalem . . . . . .92/70/0.00 . . .90/70/s . . . 96/72/s Philadelphia . . . .80/72/0.06 . . .74/66/c . . . .75/61/r Johannesburg . . .61/46/0.00 . . .79/51/s . . . 81/54/s Phoenix. . . . . . .101/81/0.00 . .105/79/s . . 107/79/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .66/59/0.00 . 64/58/pc . . 64/57/sh Pittsburgh . . . . . .63/55/1.20 . . .69/52/s . . 70/51/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . . .78/62/s . . . 79/62/s Portland, ME. . . .69/57/0.27 . 74/58/pc . . . .65/58/r London . . . . . . . .63/55/0.02 . . .61/55/r . . 62/51/pc Providence . . . . .77/64/0.43 . 77/65/pc . . . .75/64/r Madrid . . . . . . . .77/46/0.00 . . .77/50/s . . 79/51/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .81/66/0.05 . . .74/68/t . . . .77/60/r Manila. . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .89/79/t . . . .90/78/t

SIT, STAY ... STEER?

Group denied bid to halt roundups of wild horses

A dog sits in a truck in downtown Eugene on Tuesday while waiting for its driver to return.

The Associated Press

RENO, Nev. — A federal judge has denied a request by animal rights advocates to halt roundups of wild horses after the federal government quietly gathered nearly 400 mustangs at a national wildlife refuge on the Nevada-Oregon line. Grass Roots Horse, a mustang advocacy group, had sought a restraining order against ongoing roundups. U.S. District Judge Larry Hicks on Monday denied its request for a temporary restraining order, but has not yet set a date to hear arguments in the case. The group had amended its complaint Friday to include details of the latest roundup at the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge last week. It alleged that their observer was harassed by the helicopter contractor and federal employees, and that the observer discovered a gravesite strewn with the bones of horses killed during roundups. “The Fish and Wildlife Service has created an avenue for horses to be gathered without public notice and without any accountability,” said Laura Leigh, a spokeswoman for Grass Roots Horse. “If they are doing nothing wrong, then why all the secrecy?” Paul Steblein, the agency’s project leader in Sheldon, confirmed 396 horses were removed from the refuge last week. He said the roundup was kept “low and quiet” for the safety of the workers and the horses because spectators at the site increase the chance of injury for humans and animals. “We didn’t send out any advance warning, but we’ve had gathers every year in September,” Steblein said. “We didn’t deny it. When asked, we admitted it.” Steblein said the roundup was part of a management plan approved in 2008 that calls for reducing the horse population through 2011.

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .88/55/0.00 . . .86/58/s . . . 86/59/s Akron . . . . . . . . .60/54/1.18 . . .70/46/s . . 70/46/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .78/61/0.09 . 73/60/pc . . . .71/55/r Albuquerque. . . .87/61/0.00 . . .90/60/s . . . 86/57/s Anchorage . . . . .42/26/0.00 . . .48/40/r . . . .49/41/r Atlanta . . . . . . . .76/54/0.00 . . .79/61/s . . . 81/59/s Atlantic City . . . .76/71/0.03 . . .76/67/r . . . .79/65/r Austin . . . . . . . . .86/48/0.00 . . .88/58/s . . . 88/60/s Baltimore . . . . . .81/70/0.03 . . .73/63/r . . . .74/60/r Billings. . . . . . . . .92/57/0.00 . . .76/45/s . . . 78/48/s Birmingham . . . .78/53/0.00 . . .83/55/s . . . 83/56/s Bismarck . . . . . . .84/40/0.00 . . .73/39/s . . . 69/41/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .89/56/0.00 . . .86/47/s . . . 90/50/s Boston. . . . . . . . .79/60/0.57 . 76/64/pc . . . .73/64/r Bridgeport, CT. . .76/73/0.00 . 76/65/pc . . . .71/61/r Buffalo . . . . . . . .72/59/0.36 . 67/53/pc . . . .66/51/r Burlington, VT. . .81/60/0.12 . 71/57/pc . . . .66/53/r Caribou, ME . . . .74/54/0.39 . 73/52/pc . . . .64/57/r Charleston, SC . .82/67/0.00 . . .79/68/t . . 82/71/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .78/59/0.55 . . .75/60/t . . . .80/58/r Chattanooga. . . .75/54/0.00 . . .80/55/s . . . 82/57/s Cheyenne . . . . . .89/46/0.00 . . .76/46/s . . . 73/47/s Chicago. . . . . . . .71/46/0.00 . 70/56/pc . . . 70/52/s Cincinnati . . . . . .66/54/0.00 . . .74/49/s . . . 75/50/s Cleveland . . . . . .61/55/1.09 . . .68/52/s . . 69/51/pc Colorado Springs 88/48/0.00 . . .84/48/s . . . 75/50/s Columbia, MO . .74/51/0.00 . . .75/55/s . . . 73/49/s Columbia, SC . . .78/58/0.00 . . .77/65/t . . 83/61/pc Columbus, GA. . .81/58/0.00 . . .83/61/s . . . 83/60/s Columbus, OH. . .59/54/0.49 . . .72/52/s . . 73/51/pc Concord, NH . . . .74/55/0.25 . 77/57/pc . . . .73/57/r Corpus Christi. . . 83/-1/0.00 . . .87/63/s . . . 88/64/s Dallas Ft Worth. .86/56/0.00 . . .86/61/s . . . 85/62/s Dayton . . . . . . . .63/51/0.06 . . .72/50/s . . 73/48/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .92/51/0.00 . . .85/52/s . . . 81/51/s Des Moines. . . . .74/55/0.00 . 75/52/pc . . . 72/49/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .57/53/0.96 . . .67/55/s . . 69/48/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .57/48/0.00 . .63/44/sh . . . 60/40/s El Paso. . . . . . . . .90/59/0.00 . . .92/62/s . . . 88/59/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .39/14/0.00 . . .40/25/c . . . .48/30/r Fargo. . . . . . . . . .71/45/0.00 . 71/44/pc . . . 65/42/s Flagstaff . . . . . . .83/42/0.00 . . .82/39/s . . . 81/41/s

Kevin Clark The RegisterGuard

Father, son go on trial for ’08 officer killings By JEFF BARNARD

Associated Press Writer

SALEM — After the threatening phone call to a Wells Fargo bank employee, Oregon State Police bomb technician Bill Hakim examined the supposed explosive device: a cell phone atop a package containing trash Bruce bags, all in a Turnidge garbage bin. Not a bomb, he concluded. A few hours later, he was back to X-ray a green metal box found in the bushes outside the Joshua adjacent West Turnidge Coast Bank office in the Willamette Valley town of Woodburn. Not a bomb, he concluded. Hakim and Woodburn police Lt. Tom Tennant took the box into the building and tried to take it apart. A bomb inside the box exploded, killing them and severely injuring Woodburn Po-

lice Chief Scott Russell, who lost his right leg. Nearly two years later, a father and son go on trial Wednesday, accused of aggravated murder and other charges. They could face the death penalty. Prosecutors have alleged the bomb that went off Dec. 12, 2008, was part of a robbery attempt, and they’ve indicated they plan to introduce evidence showing the suspects harbored anti-government feelings. The defense strategy will be outlined in opening statements scheduled to begin today. Bruce A. Turnidge, 59, had a string of failed businesses in Oregon and Nevada, and his son, Joshua A. Turnidge, 34, a Navy veteran, ran a biodiesel facility with his uncle. The family has deep roots in the Willamette Valley. Bruce Turnidge’s father once owned a major mint farm in the valley but lost it when Bruce was just 18, forcing him and his brothers to go out on their own. Records show Bruce Turnidge lived on a farm in Nevada and had a struggling excavating business from the late 1990s until 2006. He also had a dispute with a rancher over ownership of a mobile home. He moved

back to Oregon in 2006 and ran up a string of debts. A search warrant affidavit obtained by The Oregonian quoted a friend of Bruce and Joshua Turnidge as saying they talked regularly about robbing banks and shared anti-government feelings. Police quoted Ronald Laughlin as saying that at a Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant in 1994, Joshua Turnidge told him about making a bomb threat to a Woodburn bank and demanding money. On the morning of Dec. 12, 2008, court documents say, a man called the Wells Fargo branch in Woodburn and warned everyone to leave the building or die. The caller added that a cell phone would be in a garbage bin outside, which he would call with further instructions. Local police found the phone in the garbage bin on top of a package. Hakim, a 51-year-old trooper, and an FBI bomb technician examined the package and determined it wasn’t a bomb. Later that day, as police continued a search that began with the morning call, the metal utility box, painted green, was found in the bushes at the West Coast Bank branch.

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . .81/65/0.00 . . .80/68/t . . 83/69/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .66/60/0.00 . . .72/54/s . . . 74/55/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .74/50/0.00 . 77/47/pc . . . 70/42/s Spokane . . . . . . .81/56/0.00 . . .77/49/s . . . 81/51/s Springfield, MO. .73/51/0.00 . . .74/54/s . . . 73/51/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .88/75/0.01 . . .89/74/t . . 89/73/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .99/69/0.00 . .100/69/s . . 102/68/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .81/52/0.00 . . .81/57/s . . . 80/55/s Washington, DC .84/72/0.00 . . .75/64/r . . . .75/61/r Wichita . . . . . . . .79/56/0.00 . . .84/56/s . . . 78/53/s Yakima . . . . . . . .88/53/0.00 . . .76/52/s . . . 82/53/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .96/83/0.00 103/76/pc . 104/78/pc

INTERNATIONAL Mecca . . . . . . . .108/84/0.00 . .104/81/s . . 103/80/s Mexico City. . . . .73/59/0.00 . . .74/51/s . . . 73/51/s Montreal. . . . . . .75/61/0.66 . 66/51/pc . . 67/54/sh Moscow . . . . . . .55/46/0.01 . .52/42/sh . . 45/32/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/59/0.07 . . .82/58/s . . 80/57/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . . .85/77/t . . . .86/77/t New Delhi. . . . . .94/69/0.00 . . .94/73/s . . . 95/74/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .81/68/1.37 . . .75/62/s . . 76/63/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .52/32/0.00 . . .55/36/s . . 55/37/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .75/57/1.26 . 66/51/pc . . 67/53/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . .64/52/sh . . 64/51/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .77/70/0.00 . . .83/73/t . . . .84/73/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . .68/54/sh . . 70/55/pc Santiago . . . . . . .68/36/0.00 . .66/45/sh . . 62/44/sh Sao Paulo . . . . . .72/63/0.00 . . .79/64/t . . . .80/66/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .72/64/1.97 . 62/51/pc . . . 64/51/s Seoul . . . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . . .70/49/s . . . 72/52/s Shanghai. . . . . . .75/70/0.00 . .74/65/sh . . . 80/69/s Singapore . . . . . .88/77/0.23 . . .88/76/t . . . .88/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .52/39/0.00 . 55/42/pc . . 58/43/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . .62/50/sh . . . 64/48/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .93/77/0.00 . . .90/77/t . . . .90/76/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .91/73/0.00 . . .90/76/s . . . 94/78/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .73/61/0.00 . 77/64/pc . . . .71/63/r Toronto . . . . . . . .63/55/0.33 . . .66/51/s . . 67/51/sh Vancouver. . . . . .66/61/0.20 . . .68/51/s . . . 70/53/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .57/50/0.00 . .56/45/sh . . 57/40/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .54/50/0.06 . .54/46/sh . . 51/36/pc

O  B Ex-editor’s wife pleads Eugene cuts response guilty, avoids jail time to barking dogs MEDFORD — The wife of a former Oregon newspaper editor has pleaded guilty to theft and forgery charges to avoid jail time. The Mail Tribune reported that 43-year-old Lori Bolsinger, wife of former Ashland Daily Tidings editor Andrew Scot Bolsinger, was sentenced Monday to 18 months’ probation. Lori Bolsinger also turned over $7,000 that her attorney said was her personal responsibility in a larger debt. A statement by a woman who said she lost $123,000 she invested with the Bolsingers was read in court. Scot Bolsinger was fired in February 2008 from the Daily Tidings. He was sentenced to three years in prison after pleading guilty to theft and forgery charges, but was already serving nearly two years on a sex abuse conviction involving a teenage girl.

Eugene launches free downtown parking EUGENE — Workers are removing 288 parking meters from a 12-square block area of downtown Eugene. Businesses hope two hours of free parking will bring in more shoppers. Parking enforcement officers will mark tires with chalk and ticket cars that exceed the limit. The Register-Guard reports a 75-cents-an-hour parking charge remains for curbside parking elsewhere in Eugene and in city parking lots.

Portland high school redesign vote looms PORTLAND — Portland Superintendent Carole Smith has proposed closing or shrinking four high schools to make the remaining seven large high schools stronger. The Oregonian reports the school board is scheduled to vote on her plan in two weeks. The goal is to improve the courses offered to most minority and lowincome students and reduce the dropout rate. The school board has been discussing a high school redesign for two years.

EUGENE — The racket of barking dogs in Eugene is the sound of budget cuts. Lane County Animal Services no longer responds to barking dog complaints. The agency cut an animal control officer position earlier this year because of a $100,000 funding reduction. The county official who oversees animal control, Karen Gaffney, told The Register-Guard that officers are busy responding to loose dog or animal abuse cases. Residents who complain about barking dogs are told to talk to their neighbors.

Oregon State Hospital, fired doctor settle SALEM — A doctor who said he was forced to resign from Oregon State Hospital after the death of a patient is back on the job. The Statesman Journal reports Dr. Michael Robins resumed patient care duties Monday under a negotiated settlement to avoid a legal battle. Part of the deal requires him to resign by Jan. 15. The hospital will give him a “neutral reference.” Robinson said he was unfairly pressured to resign in July during the investigation into the death of a neglected patient with heart disease.

Boy accused of taking gun, ammo to school BANKS — The Washington County district attorney has filed six charges against a 15-year-old boy accused of bringing a gun and ammunition to school. The North Plains boy was arrested last Thursday at Banks High School after a 14-year-old girl told a counselor the boy had threatened to shoot her and another 15-year-old boy. The Oregonian says school officials called police, who found an unloaded semiautomatic handgun and ammunition in the boy’s backpack. The district attorney has filed charges that include unlawful possession of a firearm, unauthorized use of a weapon and menacing. The boy is expected to remain in a juvenile detention facility until a hearing set for Oct. 13. — From wire reports


S

S R T, W A L E • NEWPO O C T. 1 - 3 ATCHES • ER CUP M 38TH RYD 1

Twenty Ten Course at Celtic Manor

Europeans try to

Par 4 Yards 465

Golf Inside A preview of the Ryder Cup, with a guide to the course, see Page D5.

shot is The opening tee while a dogleg left, and the players can make a hole shorter with drive down the left, there are three deep bunkers on that side where the hole turns. The green is guarded a by two bunkers, with

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runoff areas to the the right and behind green.

UNITED STATES

Par 5 Yards 610 not only The drive should as this be long but straight, with is a narrow fairway deep bunkers dotting both sides. As many birdies can be made laying up as going for the green and because of the contours the steep run-offs, right of the especially to the send a green, which can away and ball some 50 feet well below the green.

Par 3 Yards 189 Water is short and left of the green, the with a bunker on be right that also should of the avoided. The back green features another steep runoff.

EUROPE Corey Pavin-Captain Captain Cink-c Colin MontgomerieEngland 1. Stewart Luke Donald-c, 2. Rickie Fowler-c Ross Fisher, England 3. Jim Furyk Sweden Peter Hanson, Johnson Ireland 4. Dustin Padraig Harrington-c, Spain 5. Zach Johnson-c Kuchar Miguel Angel Jimenez, Germany 6. Matt Mahan Martin Kaymer, N. Ireland 7. Hunter Graeme McDowell, Ireland 8. Phil Mickelson Rory McIlroy, N. Italy 9. Jeff Overton Stricker Edoardo Molinari-c, Italy 10. Steve Francesco Molinari, 11. Bubba Watson Ian Poulter, England 12. Tiger Woods-c England Lee Westwood,

NL

Yankees .........6 Blue Jays .......1

Reds...............3 Astros ............2

Rays ...............5 Orioles ...........0

Nationals .......2 Phillies...........1

Mariners ........3 Rangers .........1

Braves............3 Marlins ..........2

White Sox ......5 Red Sox .........4

Cubs ..............5 Padres ...........2

Royals .......... 10 Twins .............1

Dodgers .........9 Rockies ..........7

Angels ...........4 A’s ..................2

Giants ............4 D’backs ..........2

Tigers .............. Indians ......ppd.

Mets...............4 Brewers..........3 Pirates ...........7 Cardinals .......2

Three teams lock up their spots in the postseason

By Beau Eastes

12 9

This could be the most exciting hole at Celtic Manor, with a green that can be tee, reached from the can provided players trees left of the go over a ridge of surface. Anything leaves a to an elevated putting a creek, while right green could go into guarded by putt. The green is difficult chip and that it's on the left so deep two bunkers, one pin. tough to see the

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(all times PDT)

p.m. Friday • 11:30 a.m. (Thursday) to 10 (Friday) • ESPN 10 a.m. (Replay starts at on ESPN2) to Saturday • 5 a.m. 3 p.m. • NBC Sports to Sunday • 4 a.m. 10 a.m. • NBC Sports

11

Par 4 Yards 499

16 15 10

Par 5 Yards 580

The longest par 4 on the course and likely into a prevailing wind. The fairway is narrow, with a bunker on the left side that only the big hitters can carry. A tee shot to the right is likely to catch another bunker. The a hill green is tucked into bunkers. and guarded by three

Par 4 Yards 422

Par 4 Yards 458

The hole can measure although some 665 yards, from it is expected to play a forward tee to make the green shots. accessible in two Tee shot must avoid two bunkers on the right for players the wanting to reach shot green. The second bunker must avoid a big deep to the right and a left. pot bunker on the

Another hole that bends to the right with the lake down the entire right side of this mediumlenghth hole. Bunkers could catch a tee shot that runs through the fairway. Two left bunkers guard the and front of the green, to the with a deep bunker hole back. The toughest right, where location is to the send the a slight miss could ball into the water.

the This starts perhaps stretch at most compelling the Celtic Manor. It goes of No. opposite direction down 11, again with water more the left side, with on the water to the right approach second shot. The and the is slightly uphill, travel as ball is unlikely to far in cooler temperatures.

Par 3 Yards 211

Par 3 Yards 189

Par 3 Yards 210

The longest green on the course, with a severe slope from right to left. The green has one bunker on the left, and five bunkers short and right.

The tee shot must clear water, to although two bunkers b gain

their goals before the break. “We wanted to be really aggresScoring three goals in the first 21 • Prep sive in the first 10 minutes of the minutes against two-time defendgame,” said Cougar forward Tash roundup, ing state champion Bend High, Anderson, who gave Mountain Page D4 Mountain View rolled to a 4-0 InView a 1-0 lead with a goal off a termountain Conference victory McKayla Madison assist in the Tuesday, cementing its status as a contend- fifth minute of the match. “The plan was er for the 2010 Class 5A girls state soccer to get as many shots as possible in the first title. five to 10 minutes.” The Cougars (3-0 IMC, 7-0 overall) domiMaddy Booster made it 2-0 for the Counated the middle of the field at Mountain gars with an unassisted goal in the 13th View High School and controlled the ball minute. See Soccer / D4 for most of the first half, scoring all four of

Inside

The Bulletin

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Mountain View’s McKayla Madison (15) dribbles the ball past Bend goalkeeper Kenzie Bell to score during the first half Tuesday at Mountain View.

TEE TO GREEN

LOCAL GOLF

Tetherow set to host 2011 Northwest Amateur

What a year! Bend golfer Brandon Kearney returns home after a stellar season on the links Brandon Kearney puts his golf glove away after another competitive round of golf. He stows his tees and golf balls in his golf bag. It’s a routine with which any golfer is familiar. But with hundreds of golfers around at Bend’s Awbrey Glen Golf Club, one of four sites hostInside ing this week’s Fall Tour, 31-year• An update old Kearney is getting a bit more from the attention than a casual observer Fall Tour would expect. in Central On a warm and cloudless day, Oregon, several well-wishers walk up to Page D4 Kearney, a Bend golf professional, to congratulate him for his solid play all season. “Great playing this summer,” one golfer says to Kearney. Kearney, who grew up in the San Diego area but has lived in Bend since 2006, politely replies: “Thanks.” Traveling by car from point to point throughout the Pacific Northwest, playing mostly in events held by the PGA’s Pacific Northwest Section, Kearney has quietly become one of the top players in the region. This week Kearney is enjoying what has been a rarity for the Bend Golf and Country Club assistant pro this year: A tournament staged close to home. See Kearney / D4

By Zack Hall The Bulletin

One of the largest and oldest amateur golf tournaments in the Pacific Northwest next summer will be played in Central Oregon for the first time in the event’s 100-plus-year history. The 110th annual Pacific Northwest Golf Association’s Men’s Amateur Championship is scheduled to be hosted by Tetherow Golf Club in Bend on July 11-16, 2011. The Men’s Amateur is the highest in profile of two PNGA tournaments slated for this region in 2011. Black Butte Ranch’s Big Meadow course is scheduled to host the PNGA Senior and Super Senior Men’s Amateur, next June 7-9. The Pacific Northwest Golf Association tournament typically attracts the top amateur golfers from Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, British Columbia and beyond. “We’re excited to have it,” says Martin Chuck, Tetherow’s director of golf. “It was just a matter of reaching out, and (the PNGA) thought it would be a great idea. And now we are hosting it.” The Men’s Amateur, which was first played in 1899 (the tournament took a three-year hiatus during World War II), will bring a rich history to Central Oregon. The list of past champions includes Tiger Woods, who won the tournament in 1994, and current PGA Tour golfers Jeff Quinney (1998, 2000) and Ben Crane (1997), both of whom are from Oregon. See Tetherow / D4

Brandon Kearney, a pro golfer from Bend, watches his ball after teeing of at the 11th hole at Broken Top Golf Course Tuesday while competing in the Fall Tour at Broken Top Golf Club. Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

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COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Rodgers expected to be TIRE SALE back as Beavers regroup 32EE6C:6D Next up

By Anne M. Peterson

• Arizona State at Oregon State • When: Saturday, 3:30 p.m. • TV: FSNW

Oregon State has been here before, with discouraging losses to open a season. Yet the team has reason to be optimistic. First, the Beavers have a history of overcoming slow starts, and second, James Rodgers should be fine for Saturday’s game against Arizona State. Rodgers suffered a concussion in Oregon State’s 37-24 loss last Saturday at Boise State. Coach Mike Riley said Rodgers will be held out of practice this week, following the NCAA protocol for dealing with concussions, but he should be able to play against the Sun Devils. Rodgers, who is averaging 184.3 all-purpose yards a game, is one of Oregon State’s top playmakers as the team embarks on the Pac-10 season. The Beavers emerged from the preseason at 1-2, with losses to No. 5 TCU and No. 3 Boise State. They beat Louisville 35-28 at home in between. See Beavers / D4

New York Yankees, Tampa Bay Rays and Cincinnati Reds all earn playoff berths on Tuesday, see Page D3

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 MLB ...........................................D3 Prep Sports .............................. D4 Tee to Green....................... D5-D6

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Mountain View rolls past Bend High, 4-0

The Bulletin

AL

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PREP GIRLS SOCCER

By Zack Hall

Cincinnati Reds fans celebrate after the Reds defeated the Houston Astros to clinch the NL Central, Tuesday in Cincinnati.

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www.bendbulletin.com/sports

UO football coach Kelly agrees to 6-year extension

MLB

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c-captain’s pick

Par 3 Y ds 213

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

INSIDE

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TV schedule

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2010

EUGENE — Chip Kelly, second-year head football coach at the University of Oregon, has agreed to a six-year contract extension, the university reported Tuesday. According to a UO Chip Kelly release, Kelly, who last season guided the Ducks to the Pac10 Conference championship and a berth in the Rose Bowl, agreed to a deal designed to keep him as Oregon’s head coach through at least the 2015 season. The total value of the sixyear agreement was reported to be $20.5 million. The 2010 Ducks are currently ranked No. 4 nationally in both the Associated Press and USA Today coaches polls. Their 4-0 record makes Kelly, 46, the first coach in the UO football program’s 115 seasons to post 14 wins in his first 17 games at the Oregon helm. According to Tuesday’s release, all money used to compensate Kelly — and all of the university’s coaches and staff — comes from athletics department funds and not from UO general funds or state taxpayer dollars. —From wire service reports

Par 4 Yards 377

Length: 7,378 yards Par: 36-35 – 71

regain Cup

States and the best of United he Ryder Cup – featuring team competigolfers – is a biennial European professional team is playing better of this year’s American Europetion. Although most the matches, the team heading into Europe, golf than the European the cup in Wales. favored to regain to take the ans are still heavily 2010, are hungry championships in winners of two major soil in Wales. U.S. on their home cup back from the

Don Ryan / The Associated Press

Oregon State wide receiver James Rodgers sustained a concussion during Saturday’s loss to Boise State.

The Associated Press

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D2 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

SCOREBOARD

O  A TELEVISION TODAY BASEBALL 11 a.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers, FSNW. 1:30 p.m. — MLB, Florida Marlins at Atlanta Braves, ESPN. 7 p.m. — MLB, Arizona Diamondbacks at San Francisco Giants, ESPN.

THURSDAY

State, ESPN.

BASEBALL 3:30 p.m. — MLB, Chicago Cubs at San Diego Padres, MLB Network. 7 p.m. — MLB, Oakland Athletics at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

MIXED MARTIAL ARTS 6 p.m. — World Extreme Cagefighting, Jose Also vs. Manny Gamburyan, VS. network.

SOCCER 7 p.m. — High school boys, Bend at Summit, COTV.

GOLF 1 p.m. — Nationwide Tour, Soboba Golf Classic, first round, Golf Channel.

RADIO THURSDAY

5 p.m. — PGA Tour, Viking Classic, first round, Golf Channel. 11:30 p.m. — Ryder Cup, day one, ESPN.

FOOTBALL 3 p.m. — United Football League, Las Vegas Locomotives at Florida Tuskers, VS. network. 4:30 p.m. — College, Texas A&M at Oklahoma

BASEBALL 3:30 p.m. — MLB, Chicago Cubs at San Diego Padres, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations

S   B Football • NFL, union discuss 18-game season, rookie wages: The NFL and its players’ union discussed a proposal to change to an 18-game regular season during a bargaining session Tuesday. The league and the NFL Players Association issued a joint statement about the meeting, saying that negotiations “focused on several matters,” including the longer regular season, a rookie wage scale and improvements for retired players. Tuesday’s talks took place in Washington, where the NFLPA has its headquarters. The current collective bargaining agreement expires in March, and NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith has said he believes owners are preparing for a lockout. League owners and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell want to expand the regular season from 16 games to 18, and cut the preseason from four games to two. Indianapolis Colts President Bill Polian said Monday he thinks such a switch is a “fait accompli;” the union has not said it wants to make a change. Goodell has pointed out that the league does not need approval from the players in order to extend the regular season. • Michigan State coach to return Saturday: Michigan State’s Mark Dantonio plans to coach his team Saturday when the No. 24 Spartans host No. 11 Wisconsin, two weeks after he was hospitalized following a mild heart attack. Looking upbeat and even wisecracking about eating more vegetables, Dantonio announced his intentions Tuesday after showing up at the team’s weekly news conference. “I’m going to ease back into this much like anybody would after any injury,” Dantonio said. “I’m going to listen to our doctors, but I am going to ease back into this and do something daily with our football team.” Dantonio said he expects to be in a coaching box during the game, although later in the day he indicated the staff would work out logistics as the week goes on. • Seattle signs WR Stokley: The Seattle Seahawks have signed former Denver wide receiver Brandon Stokley, reuniting him with offensive coordinator Jeremy Bates. Seattle made the move on Tuesday, along with signing offensive linemen Allen Barbre and Breno Giacomini. The Seahawks released running back/fullback Quinton Ganther and offensive linemen Mike Gibson and Mansfield Wrotto to make room. Stokley played in all 16 games last season for Denver but had just 19 catches.

Horse racing • 1998 Derby, Preakness winner Real Quiet dies: Real Quiet, the 1998 Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner who missed a Triple Crown by a nose, has died at 15. The former champion 3-year-old died Monday following a fall in his paddock, Penn Ridge Farms owner Mike Jester said. The horse broke his neck when his left shoulder hit the ground. Trained by Hall of Famer Bob Baffert, owned by Mike Pegram and ridden by Kent Desormeaux, Real Quiet narrowly missed the Triple Crown a dozen years ago. He beat Victory Gallop in both the Derby and the Preakness before Victory Gallop edged him at the wire in the Belmont. • ’09 Horse of Year Rachel Alexandra retired: Rachel Alexandra’s undefeated season in 2009 won her Horse of the Year honors and electrified a down-on-its-luck industry. Though the sensational filly is leaving racing’s stage, a future breeding date with another superstar could make things interesting. Having won only two of five races this year, Rachel Alexandra was retired Tuesday, with co-owner Jess Jackson saying it was time to “reward her with a less stressful life.” He said she would be bred to Curlin, the 2007 and 2008 Horse of the Year, at Jackson’s Stonestreet Farm in Lexington, Ky. The popular 4-year-old Rachel caused quite a stir last year when she won all eight of her races. Ridden by Calvin Borel, she beat fillies by 20 lengths in the Kentucky Oaks and 19 lengths in the Mother Goose Stakes before taking on the boys and winning the Preakness, Haskell Invitational and Woodward Stakes. Rachel had 13 wins in 19 starts and earned more than $3.4 million.

Equestrian • Netherlands takes team dressage gold: The Netherlands won the gold medal

in team Grand Prix dressage at the World Equestrian Games on Tuesday in Lexington, Ky., despite having a horse disqualified. Britain was second and Germany beat out the United States for bronze.

Basketball • U.S. women win: Sylvia Fowles scored 15 points and Diana Taurasi added 14 to help the unbeaten United States rout Belarus at the women’s basketball world championship in the Czech Republic. Candice Dupree had 12, and Swin Cash scored 11 in another balanced offensive effort by the U.S., which shot 68 percent. The Americans (5-0) will play rival Australia tonight in the final game of the second round. • Deal sending Anthony to Nets is ‘dead’: A four-way deal that would have sent the Denver Nuggets’ Carmelo Anthony to New Jersey is “dead,” a person with knowledge of the discussions said Tuesday. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because he wasn’t authorized to speak publicly about the trade. Anthony took the court with his Nuggets teammates on the first day of training camp Tuesday. But his days in Denver could very well be numbered even after the four-team deal that also would have included Charlotte and Utah collapsed. The Nuggets could still listen to offers. Anthony has yet to sign off on a three-year, $65 million extension that’s been on the table since June, leading the Nuggets to explore trade options.

Baseball • Hamilton anticipates playing for Texas this weekend: Texas Rangers slugger Josh Hamilton is swinging and catching. Hamilton took 20 swings with his own bat off a tee and then 20 swings off tossed pitches in the batting cage Tuesday, a day after hitting off a tee with a fungo bat. He then shagged balls in the outfield during batting practice. Hamilton, the majors’ leading hitter who hasn’t played since Sept. 4 because of two broken ribs, anticipates playing a game this weekend before the playoffs begin next week for the AL West champion Rangers. The Rangers outfielder is hitting .361 with 31 home runs and 97 RBIs. • Rays giving away tickets for home finale: Spurred by fan reaction to All-Star Evan Longoria’s criticism of Tampa Bay’s home attendance, the AL East-leading Rays are making 20,000 free tickets available for Wednesday night’s game against the Baltimore Orioles. Longoria called Monday’s turnout of just 12,446 for a game in which the Rays had a chance to clinch the second playoff berth in franchise history “disheartening.” All-Star pitcher David Price weighed in on the subject on Twitter, calling the small crowd “embarrassing.” Team president Matt Silverman said the club had been discussing the possibility of giving away tickets for the Rays’ home finale, but probably wouldn’t have actually done it if the players hadn’t spoken out. Silverman said the Rays had received mixed reaction from fans in phone calls and e-mail. Attendance has long been an issue for the cost-conscious Rays. Their average of 22,913 through 79 dates, ranked 22nd in the major leagues. • DuPuy quits as baseball’s chief operating officer: Bob DuPuy has resigned as Major League Baseball’s chief operating officer following 8½ years as commissioner Bud Selig’s top aide. The move is effective Oct. 31, and Selig doesn’t currently intend to replace him. DuPuy was Selig’s outside lawyer when he became executive vice president for administration in 1998. He was promoted to president in March 2002 and replaced Paul Beeston. Relations between Selig and DuPuy have become strained in recent years. • Baseball is among sports cut by Cal: Citing the economic downturn and decreased state funding, the University of California announced Tuesday that it will eliminate four varsity sports programs — including baseball — at the end of the 2011 academic year. Men’s and women’s gymnastics and women’s lacrosse also will be cut, and the men’s rugby team will be reduced to a club sport. Cal’s baseball team, founded in 1892, earned an NCAA regional berth last season. It has won two national titles and made five trips to the College World Series. — From wire reports

IN THE BLEACHERS

ON DECK Today Volleyball: La Pine at Sisters, 6:45 p.m.

Bengals PACKERS SAINTS FALCONS Seahawks Jets Colts Texans CHARGERS EAGLES GIANTS

Thursday Cross country: Sisters, La Pine at Harrier’s Challenge in Cottage Grove, 4 p.m. Boys soccer: Bend at Summit, 7 p.m.; Estacada at Madras, 4 p.m.; Roosevelt at Crook County, 4 p.m.; Sisters at Sweet Home, 4:30 p.m. Girls soccer: Summit at Bend, 4 p.m.; Madras at Estacada, 4 p.m.; Sweet Home at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; Cottage Grove at La Pine, 4:30 p.m.; Roosevelt at Crook County, 4 p.m. Volleyball: Summit at Mountain View, 6:30 p.m.; Roosevelt at Crook County, 4 p.m.; Estacada at Madras, 6:30 p.m.; Central Linn at Culver, 6 p.m.; Central Christian at Trinity Lutheran, 6 p.m.

Patriots

TENNIS WTA Tour

ATP Tour ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— THAILAND OPEN Tuesday Bangkok, Thailand Singles First Round Dudi Sela, Israel, def. Konstantin Kravchuk, Russia, 6-3, 6-4. Mikhail Kukuskin, Kazakhstan, def. Ryler Deheart, United States, 6-3, 6-7 (4), 6-4. Rainer Schuettler, Germany, def. Ricardo Mello, Brazil, 6-4, 6-2. Ruben Bemelmans, Belgium, def. Frederik Nielsen, Denmark, 6-2, 6-3. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, def. Danai Udomchoke, Thailand, 6-3, 6-2. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def. Michael Berrer (8), Germany, 6-4, 7-6 (4). Olivier Rochus, Belgium, def. Juan Martin del Potro (5), Argentina, 7-6 (7), 6-4. MALAYSIAN OPEN Tuesday Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Singles First Round Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, def. Laurent Recouderc, France, 6-3, 6-1. Igor Andreev, Russia, def. Go Soeda, Japan, 6-1, 6-4. Milos Raonic, Canada, def. Igor Kunitsyn, Russia, 7-6 (6), 6-3. Marcos Baghdatis (6), Cyprus, def. Kei Nishikori, Japan, 6-1, 6-1.

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Jets 2 1 0 .667 68 Miami 2 1 0 .667 52 New England 2 1 0 .667 90 Buffalo 0 3 0 .000 47 South W L T Pct PF Houston 2 1 0 .667 77 Indianapolis 2 1 0 .667 89 Tennessee 2 1 0 .667 78 Jacksonville 1 2 0 .333 40 North W L T Pct PF Pittsburgh 3 0 0 1.000 72 Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 59 Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 44 Cleveland 0 3 0 .000 45 West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 3 0 0 1.000 68 San Diego 1 2 0 .333 72 Denver 1 2 0 .333 61 Oakland 1 2 0 .333 52 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 2 1 0 .667 83 Washington 1 2 0 .333 56 Dallas 1 2 0 .333 54 N.Y. Giants 1 2 0 .333 55 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 2 1 0 .667 77 New Orleans 2 1 0 .667 63 Tampa Bay 2 1 0 .667 50 Carolina 0 3 0 .000 32 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 3 0 0 1.000 66 Green Bay 2 1 0 .667 78 Minnesota 1 2 0 .333 43 Detroit 0 3 0 .000 56 West W L T Pct PF Seattle 2 1 0 .667 72 Arizona 2 1 0 .667 48 St. Louis 1 2 0 .333 57 San Francisco 0 3 0 .000 38 ——— Sunday’s Games Denver at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Detroit at Green Bay, 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Seattle at St. Louis, 10 a.m. San Francisco at Atlanta, 10 a.m. Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. Carolina at New Orleans, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Houston at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 1:05 p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 1:15 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 1:15 p.m. Chicago at N.Y. Giants, 5:20 p.m. Open: Kansas City, Dallas, Minnesota, Tampa Bay Monday, Oct. 4 New England at Miami, 5:30 p.m. NFC Individual Leaders Week 3 Quarterbacks Att Com Yds Vick, PHL 89 54 750 Cutler, CHI 91 60 870 Brees, NOR 112 85 856 M. Ryan, ATL 106 67 705 Romo, DAL 128 88 940 Rodgers, GBY 105 72 759

PA 47 51 82 87 PA 78 61 42 83 PA 33 55 41 57 PA 38 61 65 76 PA 62 67 53 85 PA 46 58 59 71 PA 51 47 38 78 PA 57 77 49 87

TD Int 6 0 6 2 6 2 5 1 4 2 5 3

McNabb, WAS Freeman, TAM E. Manning, NYG Hasselbeck, SEA

102 62 83 49 102 67 90 57 Rushers Att Yds A. Peterson, MIN 70 392 Bradshaw, NYG 52 253 M. Turner, ATL 58 231 S. Jackson, STL 51 214 Hightower, ARI 35 209 L. McCoy, PHL 34 209 Snelling, ATL 40 195 Gore, SNF 52 193 DeA. Williams, CAR 43 180 Vick, PHL 23 170 Receivers No Yds R. White, ATL 25 258 Austin, DAL 22 308 Sa. Moss, WAS 22 290 Gore, SNF 22 203 St. Smith, NYG 18 181 Driver, GBY 18 129 Finley, GBY 17 265 M. Clayton, STL 17 228 P. Thomas, NOR 17 133 Best, DET 16 183 Punt Returners No Yds G. Tate, SEA 5 126 D. Bryant, DAL 5 89 D. Hester, CHI 9 105 Munnerlyn, CAR 5 46 Tra. Williams, GBY 5 42 R. Bush, NOR 6 50 Amendola, STL 6 49 Spurlock, TAM 6 45 P. Adams, SNF 4 29 Komar, ARI 5 31 Kickoff Returners No Yds L. Washington, SEA 7 324 Dev. Thomas, WAS 11 312 Stephens-Howling, ARI 13 352 D. Manning, CHI 6 157 J. Nelson, GBY 12 314 Roby, NOR 9 232 Weems, ATL 5 125 Hobbs, PHL 8 197 Logan, DET 13 319 J. Norwood, ATL 4 97

833 544 810 623

2 4 5 4

1 2 6 5

Avg 5.60 4.87 3.98 4.20 5.97 6.15 4.88 3.71 4.19 7.39

LG TD 80t 3 39 2 32 1 42t 1 80t 2 46t 4 30 2 20 1 29 0 31 1

Avg 10.3 14.0 13.2 9.2 10.1 7.2 15.6 13.4 7.8 11.4

LG TD 24 2 30 1 56 1 41 1 29 0 13 2 34 0 39 2 23 0 75t 1

Avg 25.2 17.8 11.7 9.2 8.4 8.3 8.2 7.5 7.3 6.2

LG TD 63 0 62t 1 62t 1 28 0 10 0 43 0 21 0 23 0 16 0 9 0

Avg LG TD 46.3 101t 2 28.4 42 0 27.1 102t 1 26.2 44 0 26.2 51 0 25.8 39 0 25.0 35 0 24.6 46 0 24.5 35 0 24.3 34 0

AFC Individual Leaders Week 3 Quarterbacks Att Com Yds P. Manning, IND 126 87 1013 Brady, NWE 98 66 758 Sanchez, NYJ 79 46 550 Orton, DEN 125 83 1078 V. Young, TEN 43 30 338 P. Rivers, SND 121 73 1087 Schaub, HOU 101 70 845 Henne, MIA 93 56 659 S. Wallace, CLE 55 34 370 Cassel, KAN 77 42 494 Rushers Att Yds Avg A. Foster, HOU 69 406 5.88 D. McFadden, OAK 73 345 4.73 Mendenhall, PIT 64 332 5.19 Chr. Johnson, TEN 75 301 4.01 Charles, KAN 34 238 7.00 Hillis, CLE 39 220 5.64 Jones-Drew, JAC 57 217 3.81 T. Jones, KAN 52 217 4.17 Rice, BAL 52 210 4.04 Tomlinson, NYJ 37 208 5.62 Receivers No Yds Avg Collie, IND 27 359 13.3 B. Marshall, MIA 22 290 13.2 Dal. Clark, IND 21 207 9.9 Boldin, BAL 20 287 14.4 Ochocinco, CIN 20 237 11.9 And. Johnson, HOU 19 255 13.4 Wayne, IND 18 260 14.4 Welker, NWE 18 147 8.2 Gates, SND 17 242 14.2 Gaffney, DEN 17 189 11.1 Punt Returners No Yds Avg McCluster, KAN 6 142 23.7 Leonhard, NYJ 4 65 16.3 Jac. Jones, HOU 7 79 11.3 E. Royal, DEN 5 56 11.2 Mi. Thomas, JAC 8 88 11.0 Mariani, TEN 6 64 10.7 Higgins, OAK 7 74 10.6 Arenas, KAN 9 89 9.9 Powers, IND 5 41 8.2 Cosby, CIN 7 48 6.9 Kickoff Returners No Yds Avg Ant. Brown, PIT 5 174 34.8 Spiller, BUF 12 374 31.2 Bra. Smith, NYJ 7 214 30.6 Br. Tate, NWE 15 448 29.9 T. Underwood, JAC 12 294 24.5 Mariani, TEN 10 241 24.1 J. Ford, OAK 6 144 24.0 Parmele, BAL 10 234 23.4 Cobbs, MIA 7 153 21.9 De. Moore, IND 10 211 21.1

TD Int 9 0 8 2 6 0 4 2 3 2 7 4 5 4 3 1 2 1 4 3 LG TD 42 3 33 1 50t 2 76t 4 56t 1 48 3 18 0 27 1 30 0 31 1 LG TD 73t 4 46 1 50t 2 38 3 28t 1 34t 1 34 2 27 3 34 4 26 1 LG TD 94t 1 32 0 39 0 28 0 41 0 38 0 53 0 36 0 13 0 10 0 LG TD 89t 1 95t 1 54 0 97t 1 53 0 45 0 39 0 39 0 30 0 26 0

College THE AP TOP 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 25, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Alabama (57) 4-0 1,496 1 2. Ohio St. (2) 4-0 1,431 2 3. Boise St. (1) 3-0 1,356 3 4. Oregon 4-0 1,276 5 5. TCU 4-0 1,269 4 6. Nebraska 4-0 1,158 6 7. Florida 4-0 1,132 9 8. Oklahoma 4-0 1,095 8 9. Stanford 4-0 895 16 10. Auburn 4-0 863 17 11. Wisconsin 4-0 854 11 12. LSU 4-0 805 15 13. Utah 4-0 792 13 14. Arizona 4-0 724 14 15. Arkansas 3-1 716 10 16. Miami 2-1 598 19 17. Iowa 3-1 505 18 18. Southern Cal 4-0 467 20 19. Michigan 4-0 398 21 20. South Carolina 3-1 397 12 21. Texas 3-1 364 7 22. Penn St. 3-1 197 23 23. N.C. State 4-0 166 — 24. Michigan St. 4-0 149 25 25. Nevada 4-0 123 —

Schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) Thursday’s Games SOUTH Hampton (2-1) at Delaware St. (0-3), 4:30 p.m. Tenn.-Martin (1-3) at Tennessee Tech (1-3), 5 p.m. SOUTHWEST Texas A&M (3-0) at Oklahoma St. (3-0), 4:30 p.m. Friday’s Game FAR WEST BYU (1-3) at Utah St. (1-3), 5 p.m. Saturday’s Games EAST Temple (3-1) at Army (3-1), 9 a.m. Vanderbilt (1-2) at Connecticut (2-2), 9 a.m. Harvard (1-1) at Lafayette (0-3), 9 a.m. Albany, N.Y. (1-2) at Yale (2-0), 9 a.m. Princeton (1-1) at Columbia (1-1), 9:30 a.m. Georgetown, D.C. (3-1) at Colgate (1-2), 10 a.m. Monmouth, N.J. (0-3) at Duquesne (3-1), 10 a.m. Fordham (2-2) at Holy Cross (1-3), 10 a.m. Brown (2-0) at Rhode Island (1-2), 10 a.m. Cent. Connecticut St. (2-2) at Sacred Heart (1-3), 10 a.m. Robert Morris (3-1) at St. Francis, Pa. (1-2), 10 a.m. Bryant (3-1) at Wagner (1-2), 10 a.m. Tulane (1-2) at Rutgers (2-1), 11 a.m. Cornell (0-2) at Bucknell (0-3), 12:30 p.m. Dartmouth (2-0) at Penn (1-1), 12:30 p.m. Fla. International (0-3) at Pittsburgh (1-2), 12:30 p.m. New Hampshire (2-2) at Maine (1-3), 3 p.m. Massachusetts (3-1) at Towson (1-3), 4 p.m. Notre Dame (1-3) at Boston College (2-1), 5 p.m. SOUTH Miami (2-1) at Clemson (2-1), 9 a.m. Florida St. (3-1) at Virginia (2-1), 9 a.m. Louisiana-Monroe (1-1) at Auburn (4-0), 9 a.m. San Diego (1-3) at Jacksonville (3-1), 9 a.m. Alcorn St. (1-0) at Mississippi St. (2-2), 9 a.m. Delaware (4-0) at James Madison (3-0), 9:05 a.m. Kentucky (3-1) at Mississippi (2-2), 9:20 a.m. Morehead St. (2-2) at Georgia St. (2-2), 10 a.m. Lincoln, Pa. (1-2) at Howard (0-3), 10 a.m. Coastal Carolina (1-3) at Richmond (1-2), 10 a.m. W. Carolina (1-3) at The Citadel (2-2), 10 a.m. Samford (2-2) at Elon (1-3), 10:30 a.m. Presbyterian (0-4) at VMI (1-2), 10:30 a.m. Furman (2-1) at Wofford (2-1), 10:30 a.m. Prairie View (1-3) at MVSU (0-4), noon McNeese St. (1-2) at Northwestern St. (1-3), noon Tennessee (2-2) at LSU (4-0), 12:30 p.m. East Carolina (2-1) at North Carolina (1-2), 12:30 p.m. Virginia Tech (2-2) at N.C. State (4-0), 12:30 p.m. Villanova (3-1) at William & Mary (3-1), 12:30 p.m. Grambling St. (2-1) at Alabama A&M (2-2), 1 p.m. Bethune-Cookman (3-0) at Morgan St. (1-2), 1 p.m. S. Carolina St. (2-1) at Florida A&M (2-2), 3 p.m. Duke (1-3) at Maryland (3-1), 3 p.m. Gardner-Webb (1-2) at Old Dominion (2-2), 3 p.m. Kentucky St. (0-0) at E. Kentucky (0-3), 4 p.m. Murray St. (1-3) at Jacksonville St. (4-0), 4 p.m. Savannah St. (0-4) at Liberty (2-2), 4 p.m. Tulsa (2-2) at Memphis (1-3), 4 p.m. Ark.-Pine Bluff (1-2) at Southern U. (1-2), 4 p.m. Georgia Tech (2-2) at Wake Forest (2-2), 4 p.m. Florida Atlantic (1-2) at South Florida (2-1), 4:05 p.m. Florida (4-0) at Alabama (4-0), 5 p.m. Texas Southern (1-3) at Alabama St. (3-0), 5 p.m. Marshall (1-3) at Southern Miss. (3-1), 5 p.m. MIDWEST Campbell (1-3) at Butler (2-2), 9 a.m. Ohio (1-3) at E. Michigan (0-4), 9 a.m. Ohio St. (4-0) at Illinois (2-1), 9 a.m. Northwestern (4-0) at Minnesota (1-3), 9 a.m. Valparaiso (0-4) at Dayton (3-1), 10 a.m. Kent St. (1-2) at Miami (Ohio) (2-2), 10 a.m. Marist (1-2) at Drake (2-2), 11 a.m. S. Illinois (1-3) at Illinois St. (3-1), 11 a.m. Youngstown St. (3-1) at Missouri St. (1-2), 11 a.m. W. Illinois (3-1) at N. Dakota St. (3-1), 11 a.m. Idaho (2-2) at W. Michigan (1-2), 11 a.m. SE Missouri (3-1) at E. Illinois (0-4), 11:30 a.m. North Dakota (2-2) at South Dakota (2-2), noon Buffalo (1-3) at Bowling Green (1-3), 12:30 p.m. Ball St. (1-3) at Cent. Michigan (2-2), 12:30 p.m. Michigan (4-0) at Indiana (3-0), 12:30 p.m. Wisconsin (4-0) at Michigan St. (4-0), 12:30 p.m. N. Carolina A&T (0-4) vs. Tennessee St. (2-2), 1 p.m. Quincy (0-4) at Indiana St. (1-2), 2:05 p.m. S. Dakota St. (0-3) at N. Iowa (1-2), 2:05 p.m. N. Illinois (2-2) at Akron (0-4), 3 p.m. Texas Tech (2-1) at Iowa St. (2-2), 4 p.m. Wyoming (1-3) at Toledo (3-1), 4 p.m. Penn St. (3-1) at Iowa (3-1), 5:05 p.m. SOUTHWEST Kansas (2-2) at Baylor (3-1), 9 a.m. Texas (3-1) vs. Oklahoma (4-0) at Dallas, 12:30 p.m. Louisville (1-2) at Arkansas St. (1-3), 4 p.m. Sam Houston St. (1-2) at Lamar (2-2), 4 p.m. SMU (2-2) at Rice (1-3), 4 p.m. Louisiana-Lafayette (1-2) at North Texas (1-3), 4:30 p.m. FAR WEST TCU (4-0) at Colorado St. (1-3), 11 a.m. Navy (2-1) at Air Force (3-1), 11:30 a.m. N. Arizona (2-1) at S. Utah (1-3), noon Washington St. (1-3) at UCLA (2-2), 12:30 p.m. E. Washington (2-2) at Weber St. (2-2), 12:30 p.m. Montana (2-2) at N. Colorado (2-2), 12:35 p.m. Montana St. (3-1) at Sacramento St. (2-2), 1:05 p.m. UTEP (3-1) at New Mexico (0-4), 3 p.m. Arizona St. (2-2) at Oregon St. (1-2), 3:30 p.m. Georgia (1-3) at Colorado (2-1), 4 p.m. Boise St. (3-0) at New Mexico St. (0-3), 5 p.m. Stanford (4-0) at Oregon (4-0), 5 p.m. UC Davis (1-3) at San Jose St. (1-3), 5 p.m. Washington (1-2) at Southern Cal (4-0), 5 p.m. Idaho St. (1-3) at Portland St. (1-2), 5:05 p.m. Cal Poly (3-1) at Fresno St. (2-1), 7 p.m. Nevada (4-0) at UNLV (1-3), 7 p.m. Louisiana Tech (1-3) at Hawaii (2-2), 8:30 p.m. PAC-10 CONFERENCE Standings All Times PDT ——— Conf. W L Arizona 1 0 Oregon 1 0 Stanford 1 0 USC 1 0 Oregon State 0 0 Washington 0 0 Arizona State 0 1 California 0 1 UCLA 0 1 Washington State 0 1 Saturday’s Games Washington State at UCLA, 12:30 p.m. Arizona State at Oregon State, 3:30 p.m. Washington at USC, 5 p.m. Stanford at Oregon, 5 p.m.

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Preseason All Times PDT ——— Tuesday’s Games Columbus 3, Minnesota 2, SO Washington 3, Boston 2 Pittsburgh 4, Chicago 1 New Jersey 3, Philadelphia 2 Buffalo 2, Ottawa 1 Colorado 2, Dallas 1 Calgary 3, Phoenix 1 Vancouver 3, San Jose 1 Los Angeles 8, Anaheim 3 Today’s Games Detroit at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Nashville at Atlanta, 4 p.m. N.Y. Islanders (ss) at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Washington at Boston, 4 p.m. Carolina at Florida, ppd., weather threat Toronto at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. Phoenix at Edmonton, 6 p.m. Calgary vs. N.Y. Islanders (ss) at Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, 6 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Today’s Games Philadelphia at Colorado, 6 p.m. Chicago at San Jose, 8 p.m.

DEALS Transactions

L 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 2 3

Betting Line Favorite TITANS STEELERS

DOLPHINS

HOCKEY NHL

Ov’ll W 4 4 4 4 1 1 2 2 2 1

BROWNS Lions Panthers 49ers RAMS BILLS JAGUARS RAIDERS Cards Redskins Bears

COLLEGE Thursday OKLAHOMA ST 3.5 3 Texas A&M Friday Byu 6 5 UTAH ST Saturday d-Oklahoma 4 3.5 Texas CONNECTICUT 7 7.5 Vanderbilt Ohio U 8 10 E MICHIGAN C MICHIGAN 15.5 17 Ball St Wisconsin 1.5 2 MICHIGAN ST Michigan 13.5 10 INDIANA Northwestern 4.5 5.5 MINNESOTA Virginia Tech 3.5 4 NC STATE N CAROLINA 10.5 13 E Carolina MARYLAND 7.5 7.5 Duke RUTGERS 14.5 15.5 Tulane Temple 4 5 ARMY Georgia Tech 10 9.5 WAKE FOREST Texas Tech 8 7 IOWA ST MISSISSIPPI 2.5 2.5 Kentucky Tulsa 10 10.5 MEMPHIS BAYLOR 9 9 Kansas Kent St 1(M) 3 MIAMI-OHIO Idaho 2 3 W MICHIGAN Tcu 33.5 33 COLORADO ST AIR FORCE 9 10 Navy BOWLING GREEN 6.5 3.5 Buffalo Notre Dame 2.5 2.5 BOSTON COLL LSU 14.5 16 Tennessee UCLA 25.5 27 Washington St Ohio St 18.5 17.5 ILLINOIS Georgia 4 5 COLORADO No Illinois 13.5 13.5 AKRON Utep 14.5 15 NEW MEXICO OREGON ST 5.5 3.5 Arizona St TOLEDO 3 3 Wyoming Smu 12 12.5 RICE Florida St 7.5 7 VIRGINIA ALABAMA 9 9 Florida SOUTHERN MISS 10.5 10 Marshall IOWA 7 7 Penn St USC 10.5 10 Washington Miami-Florida 3 3 CLEMSON Boise St 40 42.5 NEW MEXICO ST Nevada 19.5 21 UNLV OREGON 7 7 Stanford HAWAII 10 8 Louisiana Tech PITTSBURGH 18.5 19.5 Florida Int’l Louisville 5 5 ARKANSAS ST NORTH TEXAS 3.5 4 UL-Lafayette AUBURN 34 35 UL-Monroe S FLORIDA 21 22 Fla Atlantic d- Dallas, TX. (M) — Miami-Ohio opened as a favorite

Friday Football: Redmond at Bend, 7 p.m.; Mountain View at The Dalles-Wahtonka, 7 p.m.; Hood River Valley at Summit, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Cascade Christian, 7 p.m.; La Salle at Madras, 7 p.m.; Junction City at Sisters, 7 p.m.; Cottage Grove at La Pine, 7 p.m.; Gilchrist at Camas Valley, 4 p.m. Boys soccer: Redmond at Grant, 4 p.m. Girls soccer: Redmond at Grant, 4 p.m. Volleyball: Redmond at Grant, 4 p.m.; Crook County vs. Roosevelt at Marshall High in Portland, 5 p.m.; Crook County at Marshall, 7 p.m.: Hosanna at Gilchrist, 4 p.m.; Triad at Trinity Lutheran, 4:30 p.m.

WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— TORAY PAN PACIFIC OPEN Tuesday Tokyo Singles Second Round Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (16), Russia def. Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine, 6-2, 6-1. Victoria Azarenka (8), Belarus def. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, 6-1, 6-3. Andrea Petkovic, Germany, def. Svetlana Kuznetsova (10), Russia, 6-3, 7-5. Roberta Vinci, Italy, def. Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria, 6-4, 6-2. Flavia Penneta, Italy, def. Maria Kirilenko, Russia, 6-3, 4-6, 6-3. Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia, def. Sara Errani, Italy, 63, 6-3. Marion Bartoli (11), France def. Ana Ivanovic, Serbia, 6-2, 6-1. Kaia Kanepi, Estonia, def. Shahar Peer (13), Israel, 6-3, 7-6 (5). Francesca Schiavone (5), Italy def. Alexandra Dulgheru, Romania, 7-5, 6-3. Elena Dementieva (7), Russia def. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, 6-0, 6-1. CoCo Vandeweghe, United States, def. Aravane Rezai, France, 6-4, 6-4. Julia Goerges, Germany, def. Sam Stosur (4), Australia, 7-5, 6-3. Kimiko Date Krumm, Japan, def. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, 6-2, 0-6, 4-0, retired. Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Greta Arn, Hungary, 6-1, 6-3.

3 3 14.5 14.5 14 13.5 7 6.5 1.5 1 4.5 4.5 7 7.5 3.5 3.5 9 8 6.5 6 4 4 Monday 1 1

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Sunday 6.5 6.5 Broncos 1 1.5 Ravens

BASEBALL Major League Baseball Players Association MLB—Announced the resignation of chief operating officer Bob DuPuy, effective Oct. 31. MLBPA—Announced the retirement of chief operating officer Gene Orza, effective March 31, 2011. National League MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Named Dick Groch special assistant to the general manager in charge of pro scouting and player personnel, Zack Minasian director of professional scouting and Karl Mueller director of video scouting and baseball research. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHARLOTTE BOBCATS—Signed C Matt Rogers. DETROIT PISTONS—Added G Vernon Hamilton to their training camp roster. LOS ANGELES CLIPPERS—Exercised their fourthyear contract option on G Eric Gordon and their third-year option on F Blake Griffin. SAN ANTONIO SPURS—Signed G Kirk Penney. NBA Development League AUSTIN TOROS—Named Brad Jones coach. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS—Re-signed CB A.J. Jefferson to the practice squad. BUFFALO BILLS—Re-signed QB Levi Brown. CAROLINA PANTHERS—Released DT Louis Leonard. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Claimed QB Trent Edwards off waivers from Buffalo. Waived LB Alvin Bowen. NEW YORK GIANTS—Placed S Michael Johnson on injured reserve. Promoted DB Brian Jackson from the practice squad. ST. LOUIS RAMS—Signed RB Chauncey Washington from the New York Jets practice squad. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Signed WR Brandon Stokley, OL Allen Barbre and OL Breno Giacomini. Released RBFB Quinton Ganther, OL Mike Gibson and OL Mansfield Wrotto.HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Assigned F Hugh Jessiman to Rockford (AHL). Returned F Ludvig Rensfeldt to Brynas IF (Sweden). COLORADO AVALANCHE—Signed RW Luke Walker. NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Assigned F Matt Halischuk, F Linus Klasen, F Nick Spaling, F Andreas Thuresson, F Kelsey Wilson, D Teemu Laakso, D Grant Lewis, D Brett Palin and G Chet Pickard to Milwaukee (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS—Assigned D Tyler Eckford, D Olivier Magnan-Grenier, F Patrick Davis, F Stephen Gionta, F David McIntyre, F Brad Mills, F Tim Sestito, F Michael Swift, F Alexander Vasyunov, F Chad Wiseman and F Vladimir Zharkov to Albany (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS—Agreed to terms with D Mike Mottau on a two-year contract. ST. LOUIS BLUES—Assigned F T.J. Hensick to Peoria (AHL). COLLEGE MINNESOTA—Reinstated junior WR-KR Troy Stoudermire after a one-game suspension. MISSOURI—Suspended senior S Jasper Simmons indefinitely.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 5,710 1,597 1,594 365 The Dalles 4,908 1,601 2,712 78 John Day 8,066 1,517 2,403 84 McNary 6,955 808 1,832 538 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 770,044 83,939 401,888 151,997 The Dalles 504,432 64,686 295,827 110,123 John Day 425,639 59,857 234,499 85,949 McNary 363,078 36,463 212,381 72,456


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 29, 2010 D3

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL NL ROUNDUP Reds 3, Astros 2 CINCINNATI — Jay Bruce homered on the first pitch of the bottom of the ninth to give Cincinnati a victory over Houston, sending the Reds to the postseason for the first time in 15 years. The Reds, who won in their last at-bat for the 22nd time this season, won the NL Central title. Houston AB Bourgeois cf 4 Keppinger 2b 3 Pence rf 4 Ca.Lee lf-1b 4 C.Johnson 3b 4 Wallace 1b 3 c-Michaels ph-lf 1 Ang.Sanchez ss 4 Ja.Castro c 3 W.Rodriguez p 1 a-A.Hernandez ph 1 W.Lopez p 0 Abad p 0 Lindstrom p 0 Byrdak p 0 Totals 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 2 1 12

Avg. .225 .291 .286 .244 .316 .226 .250 .279 .207 .190 .190 --.000 --.000

Cincinnati Stubbs cf O.Cabrera ss Votto 1b Rolen 3b Gomes lf B.Phillips 2b Bruce rf R.Hernandez c Volquez p Rhodes p b-Alonso ph Masset p Chapman p Totals

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 3 4

Avg. .251 .262 .325 .290 .264 .271 .275 .297 .118 --.200 -----

AB 3 3 4 3 4 2 4 3 2 0 1 0 0 29

SO 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 9

Houston 020 000 000 — 2 7 2 Cincinnati 100 001 001 — 3 7 0 No outs when winning run scored. a-struck out for W.Rodriguez in the 7th. b-grounded out for Rhodes in the 7th. c-struck out for Wallace in the 9th. E—C.Johnson 2 (17). LOB—Houston 5, Cincinnati 7. 2B—Stubbs (19). HR—Bruce (22), off Byrdak. RBIs— Ja.Castro (8), W.Rodriguez (4), Rolen (84), B.Phillips (55), Bruce (66). SB—Stubbs (27). CS—Ang.Sanchez (1), B.Phillips (12). S—W.Rodriguez. Runners left in scoring position—Houston 2 (Bourgeois, Ang.Sanchez); Cincinnati 4 (Gomes, Bruce 2, O.Cabrera). GIDP—Votto, Bruce. DP—Houston 3 (Keppinger, Ang.Sanchez, Wallace), (Ja.Castro, Ja.Castro, Ang.Sanchez), (Keppinger, Ang. Sanchez, Wallace). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA W.Rodriguez 6 4 2 2 4 8 108 3.65 W.Lopez 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 3.08 Abad 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 3.24 Lindstrom 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 7 4.47 Byrdak L, 2-2 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 3.49 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Volquez 6 7 2 2 1 8 104 4.31 Rhodes 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.33 Masset 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 3.48 Chapmn W, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.38 Byrdak pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. HBP—by W.Rodriguez (B.Phillips). WP—Volquez. T—2:51. A—30,151 (42,319).

Giants 4, Diamondbacks 2 SAN FRANCISCO — Juan Uribe matched a career best with his 23rd home run and first-place San Francisco increased its NL West lead over San Diego to two games. Arizona S.Drew ss R.Roberts lf K.Johnson 2b C.Young cf Ad.LaRoche 1b T.Abreu 3b Montero c Gillespie rf d-G.Parra ph R.Lopez p Hampton p b-Allen ph Norberto p Boyer p Vasquez p Totals

AB 3 4 3 4 4 4 3 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 30

San Francisco AB A.Torres cf 5 Fontenot 2b 3 A.Huff 1b 3 C.Ross lf 0 Posey c 4 Burrell lf 4 1-Velez pr 0 Romo p 0 Ja.Lopez p 0 Br.Wilson p 0 J.Guillen rf 3 R.Ramirez p 0 c-Ishikawa ph-1b 1 Uribe ss 4 Sandoval 3b 3 J.Sanchez p 1 a-Schierholtz ph-rf 2 Totals 33

R 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB SO 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 2 4 11

R H 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 1 4 10

BI 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 4

BB 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3

SO 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 6

Avg. .277 .206 .284 .258 .261 .238 .274 .232 .259 .079 --.273 --.000 .000 Avg. .268 .286 .289 .264 .313 .265 .173 .000 .000 .000 .282 --.269 .248 .266 .125 .247

Arizona 011 000 000 — 2 5 0 San Francisco 001 101 10x — 4 10 0 a-singled for J.Sanchez in the 6th. b-struck out for Hampton in the 7th. c-singled for R.Ramirez in the 7th. d-struck out for Gillespie in the 9th. 1-ran for Burrell in the 7th. LOB—Arizona 6, San Francisco 9. 2B—R.Roberts (4), Uribe (23), Sandoval (34). 3B—A.Torres (8). HR— K.Johnson (26), off J.Sanchez; Uribe (23), off R.Lopez. RBIs—K.Johnson (70), R.Lopez (1), Fontenot (25), Burrell (48), Uribe (84), Schierholtz (17). CS—S.Drew (5). S—J.Sanchez. SF—R.Lopez. Runners left in scoring position—Arizona 2 (S.Drew, Ad.LaRoche); San Francisco 4 (J.Sanchez, J.Guillen, Fontenot, Uribe). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA R.Lopez L, 7-15 5 2-3 8 3 3 2 2 93 5.03 Hampton 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 0.00 Norberto 1-3 0 1 1 1 1 11 6.16 Boyer 2-3 2 0 0 0 0 13 4.34 Vasquez 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 4.70 San Fran. IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchz W, 12-9 6 3 2 2 4 6 91 3.15 R.Ramirez H, 3 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 0.70 Romo H, 19 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 6 2.28 Ja.Lopez 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.40 Wilson S, 46 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 26 1.86 Ja.Lopez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Hampton 1-0, Boyer 1-1, Ja.Lopez 1-0, Br.Wilson 2-0. IBB—off R.Lopez (Sandoval), off J.Sanchez (Gillespie). WP—R.Lopez, Norberto, J.Sanchez. T—2:45. A—37,449 (41,915).

Cubs 5, Padres 2 SAN DIEGO — Alfonso Soriano homered twice, including a two-run shot off struggling San Diego ace Mat Latos, and Chicago Cubs won to drop the wilting Padres 1½ games behind Atlanta in the NL wild-card race. Chicago Fukudome rf S.Castro ss Byrd cf Ar.Ramirez 3b Nady 1b A.Soriano lf DeWitt 2b

AB 5 5 3 5 4 4 4

R 1 0 0 0 1 2 0

H BI BB 1 1 0 2 0 0 2 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 0

SO 1 3 0 2 2 0 0

Avg. .265 .301 .297 .242 .253 .257 .263

K.Hill c Dempster p b-B.Snyder ph Cashner p Marmol p Totals

4 1 1 0 0 36

1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 10

RAYS CELEBRATE

Overbay 1b A.Hill 2b J.Buck c Encarnacion 3b Arencibia dh Totals

4 3 3 3 3 30

0 0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 3

0 0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 2

3 1 0 0 1 8

.245 .205 .272 .230 .152

0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 11

.213 .140 .286 .000 ---

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 3 1 1 2 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 3 11

Avg. .267 .276 .299 .257 .227 .259 .249 .265 .115 --.000 .278 -----

New York 101 010 021 — 6 9 0 Toronto 001 000 000 — 1 3 1 1-ran for Swisher in the 8th. 2-ran for Thames in the 9th. E—J.Buck (5). LOB—New York 7, Toronto 4. 3B— Gardner (7). HR—Snider (12), off Sabathia. RBIs—Jeter (66), Golson (1), Teixeira (107), A.Rodriguez 2 (121), Cano (106), Snider (28). S—Swisher. SF—Teixeira, A.Rodriguez, Cano. Runners left in scoring position—New York 4 (Gardner, Posada, A.Rodriguez 2); Toronto 1 (Overbay). Runners moved up—Golson. GIDP—Swisher, Cano, Berkman. DP—Toronto 3 (Overbay, Drabek), (Overbay, Y.Escobar, Overbay), (Overbay, Y.Escobar, Overbay).

Minnesota Span cf Revere cf O.Hudson dh a-Plouffe ph Delm.Young lf Repko lf Kubel rf Cuddyer 1b A.Casilla 2b Valencia 3b J.Morales c Tolbert 2b-1b Punto ss Totals

AB 2 1 2 1 4 0 3 4 0 4 4 4 3 32

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 5 1 6

SO 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 1 1 8

Avg. .270 .192 .267 .111 .299 .230 .249 .272 .278 .317 .188 .238 .243

Chicago 000 022 010 — 5 10 0 San Diego 000 020 000 — 2 4 3 a-struck out for Frieri in the 7th. b-struck out for Dempster in the 8th. E—M.Tejada (3), Ad.Gonzalez (8), Latos (1). LOB—Chicago 8, San Diego 5. 2B—Fukudome (20), Stairs (6). HR—A.Soriano (23), off Latos; A.Soriano (24), off Adams; Hundley (8), off Dempster. RBIs—Fukudome (44), A.Soriano 3 (78), Hundley 2 (43). CS—S.Castro (8). S—Dempster 2. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 4 (A.Soriano, Ar.Ramirez 2, Fukudome); San Diego 1 (Torrealba).

New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabthia W, 21-7 8 1-3 3 1 1 2 8 110 3.18 Ma.Rivera 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 1.83 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Drabek L, 0-3 6 5 3 3 1 4 88 4.76 Mills 1 1-3 2 2 2 1 1 20 5.64 Roenicke 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 5.68 Purcey 2-3 2 1 1 1 1 22 3.82 Janssen 1 0 0 0 1 2 21 3.74 Roenicke pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Purcey pitched to 3 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Ma.Rivera 2-0, Roenicke 3-1, Purcey 3-1, Janssen 3-1. WP—Drabek 2. T—2:55. A—18,193 (49,539).

Kansas City Dyson cf Aviles 2b B.Butler dh Ka’aihue 1b Fields 3b Gordon lf Y.Betancourt ss May c Ja.Miller rf Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 4 3 4 4 4 34

R 2 2 0 4 1 0 1 0 0 10

H 0 3 0 3 2 0 1 1 0 10

SO 2 0 1 0 0 1 1 2 3 10

Avg. .220 .311 .319 .220 .317 .219 .257 .182 .250

San Diego AB R Eckstein 2b 4 0 M.Tejada ss 4 0 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 0 Ludwick rf 4 0 Stairs lf 4 0 Headley 3b 1 1 Hundley c 4 1 Denorfia cf 3 0 Latos p 2 0 Thatcher p 0 0 Frieri p 0 0 a-Torrealba ph 1 0 Adams p 0 0 Mujica p 0 0 Totals 31 2

0 0 0 0 0 4

Chicago IP H R ER BB SO Dmpstr W, 15-11 7 4 2 2 2 9 Cashner H, 15 1 0 0 0 0 1 Marmol S, 36 1 0 0 0 1 1 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO Latos L, 14-9 5 2-3 7 4 2 2 6 Thatcher 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 Frieri 1 0 0 0 0 2 Adams 1 1 1 1 0 2 Mujica 1 2 0 0 0 1 Inherited runners-scored—Thatcher 1-0. T—2:54. A—27,619 (42,691).

NP 108 12 25 NP 94 5 19 14 19

ERA 3.83 5.02 2.62 ERA 2.92 1.29 1.76 1.86 3.62

Rays 5, Orioles 0 Steve Nesius / The Associated Press

Tampa Bay Rays’ James Shields, Kelly Shoppach, Willy Aybar, Matt Garza, Andy Sonnanstine and David Price, from left, rush the field after the Rays beat the Baltimore Orioles 5-0 to clinch a playoff berth on Tuesday night in St. Petersburg, Fla.

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

Braves 3, Marlins 2 ATLANTA — Eric Hinske hit a pinch-hit, two-run homer in the seventh inning and Atlanta improved its wild card chances. Florida AB Bonifacio ss-3b 3 Maybin cf 4 Cousins cf 0 d-Luna ph 1 Morrison lf 4 Uggla 2b 3 G.Sanchez 1b 4 Tracy 3b 2 b-O.Martinez ph-ss 1 Stanton rf 4 B.Davis c 4 Ani.Sanchez p 3 Sanches p 0 Badenhop p 0 c-Helms ph 1 Totals 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

Atlanta AB R O.Infante 2b 4 0 Heyward rf 3 0 McCann c 4 0 D.Lee 1b 3 0 Me.Cabrera lf 4 1 Ale.Gonzalez ss 2 0 Conrad 3b 3 1 Ankiel cf 3 0 T.Hudson p 2 0 Kimbrel p 0 0 a-Hinske ph 1 1 Moylan p 0 0 Venters p 0 0 Wagner p 0 0 Totals 29 3

H BI BB SO 1 0 2 1 2 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 9 2 5 10

Avg. .280 .234 .300 .148 .281 .286 .276 .237 .280 .254 .229 .105 --.000 .220

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 3 2

Avg. .326 .279 .271 .255 .257 .250 .241 .211 .187 --.259 --.000 ---

SO 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

Florida 001 000 010 — 2 9 1 Atlanta 000 000 30x — 3 8 0 a-homered for Kimbrel in the 7th. b-grounded out for Tracy in the 8th. c-struck out for Badenhop in the 9th. dstruck out for Cousins in the 9th. E—Ani.Sanchez (5). LOB—Florida 10, Atlanta 5. 2B—B.Davis (7), D.Lee (31). 3B—Conrad (1). HR—Uggla (32), off Moylan; Hinske (11), off Ani.Sanchez. RBIs—Maybin (28), Uggla (100), Conrad (28), Hinske 2 (50). SB—Bonifacio (11), O.Infante (7). S—Ale. Gonzalez. Runners left in scoring position—Florida 3 (G.Sanchez 3); Atlanta 2 (D.Lee, Heyward). Runners moved up—Morrison. GIDP—G.Sanchez. DP—Florida 1 (Bonifacio); Atlanta 1 (Ale.Gonzalez, O.Infante, D.Lee). Florida IP H R ER BB SO Snchz L, 12-12 6 2-3 7 3 3 2 6 Sanches 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 Badenhop 1 0 0 0 0 0 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO T.Hudson 6 7 1 1 4 4 Kimbrel W, 4-0 1 0 0 0 0 3 Moylan H, 20 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 Venters H, 24 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 Wagner S, 36 1 0 0 0 1 3 IBB—off T.Hudson (Uggla). WP—Sanches. T—2:44. A—36,155 (49,743).

NP 105 7 16 NP 100 18 6 6 21

ERA 3.62 2.23 4.22 ERA 2.76 0.47 3.00 1.78 1.34

Nationals 2, Phillies 1 WASHINGTON — Adam Dunn led off the bottom of the ninth with his 38th homer, this one off Jose Contreras (6-4), to give Washington the win. The Phillies clinched home-field advantage throughout the postseason a night earlier. Philadelphia Rollins ss Bocock ss Ibanez lf Utley 2b Howard 1b B.Francisco cf Do.Brown rf Dobbs 3b Schneider c 1-Mayberry pr Hoover c Oswalt p Baez p a-Gload ph Herndon p J.Romero p Bastardo p b-Victorino ph Contreras p Totals

AB 3 2 4 4 4 4 3 4 3 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 35

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Washington AB R Morgan cf 2 1 Bernadina lf 4 0 Storen p 0 0 Desmond ss 3 0 A.Dunn 1b 4 1 Morse rf 2 0 Clippard p 0 0 Maxwell rf 0 0 Espinosa 2b 3 0 I.Rodriguez c 3 0 Alb.Gonzalez 3b 3 0 Marquis p 2 0 W.Harris rf-lf 1 0 Totals 27 2

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 9 1 2 11 H BI BB 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 3

SO 2 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 9

Avg. .245 .000 .274 .278 .278 .259 .217 .185 .235 .200 .278 .140 --.280 .000 ----.260 --Avg. .256 .249 .500 .274 .264 .290 .500 .146 .233 .271 .259 .136 .184

Philadelphia 000 100 000 — 1 9 1 Washington 100 000 001 — 2 3 0 No outs when winning run scored. a-singled for Baez in the 7th. b-struck out for Bastardo in the 9th. 1-ran for Schneider in the 9th. E—Dobbs (6). LOB—Philadelphia 9, Washington 5. HR—Ibanez (16), off Marquis; A.Dunn (38), off Contreras. RBIs—Ibanez (80), A.Dunn 2 (103). SB— B.Francisco (7), Do.Brown (2), Morgan (34), Desmond (17). CS—Mayberry (1). Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 5 (Schneider 3, Howard, Dobbs); Washington 3 (Morse, I.Rodriguez, Espinosa). Runners moved up—Dobbs, A.Dunn. GIDP— I.Rodriguez. DP—Philadelphia 1 (Rollins, Utley, Howard). Philadelphia IP

H R ER BB SO NP ERA

AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L z-Tampa Bay 94 63 z-New York 94 64 Boston 87 70 Toronto 81 76 Baltimore 62 95 Central Division W L x-Minnesota 92 65 Chicago 84 73 Detroit 80 76 Cleveland 66 91 Kansas City 65 92 West Division W L x-Texas 87 70 Los Angeles 77 80 Oakland 77 80 Seattle 61 96 z-clinched playoff berth x-clinched division

Pct .599 .595 .554 .516 .395 Pct .586 .535 .513 .420 .414 Pct .554 .490 .490 .389

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB — ½ 7 13 32 GB — 8 11½ 26 27 GB — 10 10 26

Tuesday’s Games Detroit at Cleveland, ppd., rain N.Y. Yankees 6, Toronto 1 Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 0 Seattle 3, Texas 1 Chicago White Sox 5, Boston 4 Kansas City 10, Minnesota 1 L.A. Angels 4, Oakland 2

Oswalt 5 2 1 0 2 Baez 1 0 0 0 1 Herndon 2-3 0 0 0 0 J.Romero 1-3 0 0 0 0 Bastardo 1 0 0 0 0 Contrers L, 6-4 0 1 1 1 0 Washington IP H R ER BB Marquis 6 7 1 1 1 Clippard 2 2 0 0 0 Storen W, 4-4 1 0 0 0 1 Contreras pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. HBP—by Oswalt (Morse). T—2:40. A—19,117 (41,546).

WCGB — — 6½ 12½ 31½ WCGB — 9½ 13 27½ 28½ WCGB — 16½ 16½ 32½

Str W-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-1 Str L-5 W-1 L-1 W-4 W-2 Str L-2 W-2 L-5 W-3

Home 49-31 52-29 44-34 45-35 34-43 Home 52-25 41-35 52-29 36-43 36-40 Home 48-28 42-38 47-34 35-42

Away 45-32 42-35 43-36 36-41 28-52 Away 40-40 43-38 28-47 30-48 29-52 Away 39-42 35-42 30-46 26-54

East Division x-Philadelphia Atlanta New York Florida Washington Central Division x-Cincinnati St. Louis Houston Milwaukee Chicago Pittsburgh West Division San Francisco San Diego Colorado Los Angeles Arizona

Today’s Games Seattle (J.Vargas 9-12) at Texas (Harden 5-5), 11:05 a.m. Oakland (Cramer 2-1) at L.A. Angels (Pineiro 10-7), 12:35 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 12-10) at Cleveland (Talbot 9-13), 1:05 p.m., 1st game N.Y. Yankees (Vazquez 10-9) at Toronto (Cecil 14-7), 4:07 p.m. Baltimore (Millwood 3-16) at Tampa Bay (Niemann 11-7), 4:10 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 18-8) at Cleveland (Tomlin 5-4), 4:35 p.m., 2nd game Boston (Beckett 6-5) at Chicago White Sox (F.Garcia 11-6), 5:10 p.m. Minnesota (S.Baker 12-9) at Kansas City (Hochevar 6-6), 5:10 p.m.

3 1 1 1 3 0 SO 7 2 2

67 18 9 5 15 3 NP 100 29 13

2.73 4.89 4.33 3.60 4.86 3.46 ERA 6.60 2.71 3.74

Pirates 7, Cardinals 2 ST. LOUIS — Garrett Jones homered on a threehit night and drove in three runs and Brian Burres pitched effectively into the sixth inning for Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh A.McCutchen cf Tabata lf N.Walker 2b G.Jones 1b Alvarez 3b Doumit c Cedeno ss Moss rf 1-Presley pr-rf Burres p Resop p a-Delw.Young ph Gallagher p d-Bowker ph Meek p Leroux p Totals

L10 5-5 4-6 5-5 7-3 4-6 L10 4-6 5-5 8-2 5-5 5-5 L10 4-6 5-5 4-6 5-5

AB 3 4 5 5 5 3 3 2 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 35

R 2 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

H BI BB 1 0 2 1 0 1 1 1 0 3 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 7 6

SO 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .285 .303 .300 .251 .248 .254 .251 .056 .316 .130 --.233 .000 .210 1.000 ---

St. Louis AB Greene 2b 2 c-M.Hamilton ph 1 MacDougal p 0 Winn lf 0 Descalso 3b-ss 4 Pujols 1b 3 Mather 1b 0 Holliday lf 3 P.Feliz 3b 0 Craig rf 3 Salas p 0 Miles ss-p 0 Rasmus cf 4 Pagnozzi c 3 e-Bry.Anderson ph 1 B.Ryan ss 2 b-Schumaker ph-2b2 Suppan p 2 T.Miller p 0 Jay rf 2 Totals 32

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5 1 3

SO 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .214 .000 --.257 .318 .313 .204 .311 .219 .232 --.292 .278 .333 .250 .221 .263 .208 --.301

Pittsburgh 300 001 030 — 7 9 1 St. Louis 011 000 000 — 2 5 1 a-struck out for Resop in the 7th. b-grounded out for B.Ryan in the 7th. c-popped out for Greene in the 7th. ddoubled for Gallagher in the 8th. e-reached on a strikeout and wild pitch for Pagnozzi in the 9th. 1-ran for Moss in the 7th. E—Cedeno (16), Suppan (2). LOB—Pittsburgh 7, St. Louis 7. 2B—N.Walker (28), G.Jones (33), Cedeno (28), Bowker (8). HR—G.Jones (21), off Suppan; Pagnozzi (1), off Burres. RBIs—N.Walker (64), G.Jones 3 (86), Bowker 3 (20), Pagnozzi (5). SB—Presley (1). Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 5 (Doumit, N.Walker 2, A.McCutchen, Alvarez); St. Louis 3 (Craig, Rasmus 2). Runners moved up—Tabata, N.Walker, Craig. GIDP—Doumit, Pujols, Schumaker. DP—Pittsburgh 2 (Alvarez, N.Walker, G.Jones), (N.Walker, G.Jones); St. Louis 2 (Pujols, B.Ryan), (Greene, Pujols). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Burres W, 4-4 5 2-3 4 2 1 3 0 85 5.01 Resop H, 5 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 4.05 Gallagher H, 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 5.72 Meek 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 2.16 Leroux 1 0 0 0 0 1 5 6.85 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Suppan L, 2-8 5 1-3 5 4 3 1 3 74 5.38 T.Miller 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 11 4.08 Salas 1 0 0 0 3 1 32 3.45 MacDougal 1 2 3 3 2 1 20 7.23 Miles 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Resop 1-0, T.Miller 2-1. IBB—off MacDougal (Doumit). HBP—by Meek (Miles). WP—Leroux. PB—Pagnozzi.

W 94 89 77 77 68 W 88 81 74 73 72 56 W 89 87 83 77 64

Dodgers 9, Rockies 7 DENVER — Casey Blake homered twice, Rafael Furcal had two triples and Los Angeles put Colorado a step closer to playoff elimination. AB 5 4 0 3 5 5 5 4 0 0 0 1 3 0 1 2 2 40

R H 2 2 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 9 14

BI 2 0 0 1 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

BB 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 0 1 2 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 10

Avg. .301 .271 1.000 .285 .248 .249 .268 .263 ------.293 .287 .167 .236 .036 .250

Colorado AB R H Fowler cf 5 2 3 C.Nelson 2b 5 1 1 C.Gonzalez lf 5 0 2 Tulowitzki ss 5 0 0 Mora 3b 4 2 2 Helton 1b 4 1 2 S.Smith rf 3 0 0 Iannetta c 2 1 0 Francis p 0 0 0 a-McKenry ph 1 0 0 E.Rogers p 1 0 0 b-Payton ph 1 0 0 Dotel p 0 0 0 Mat.Reynolds p 0 0 0 c-Spilborghs ph 1 0 0 Street p 0 0 0 Totals 37 7 10

BI 2 0 2 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 9

Avg. .254 .353 .341 .314 .290 .260 .249 .206 .091 .000 .176 .370 .000 --.280 .000

Los Angeles 005 000 121 — 9 14 0 Colorado 101 000 410 — 7 10 1 a-grounded out for Francis in the 3rd. b-grounded out for E.Rogers in the 7th. c-struck out for Mat.Reynolds in the 8th. 1-ran for A.Ellis in the 8th. E—Mora (9). LOB—Los Angeles 9, Colorado 6. 2B—A.Ellis (5), C.Nelson (1). 3B—Furcal 2 (7), Fowler (13). HR—Kemp (24), off Francis; Blake (16), off Francis; Loney (10), off E.Rogers; Blake (17), off Street; Helton (8), off Kuroda; Fowler (5), off Belisario. RBIs—Furcal 2 (43), Ethier (80), Kemp 2 (79), Blake 2 (64), Loney (85), Fowler 2 (35), C.Gonzalez 2 (117), Helton 2 (36), Iannetta (27). SB—J.Carroll (12), Hu (1). S—Kuroda. SF—Ethier. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 5 (Blake, Kemp 2, Ethier, Oeltjen); Colorado 3 (Spilborghs 2, Tulowitzki). Runners moved up—Payton. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kuroda 6 1-3 6 5 5 1 6 104 3.39 Belisario W, 3-1 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 6 5.06 Sherrill H, 6 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 7.01 Broxton H, 3 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 8 4.04 Jansen S, 3-3 1 1-3 1 0 0 2 2 36 0.72 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Francis 3 6 5 4 0 1 61 4.93 E.Rogers 4 3 1 1 2 6 68 6.22 Dotel L, 3-4 1-3 3 2 2 0 0 18 4.21 Mat.Reynolds 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 2.04 Street 1 2 1 1 0 2 14 3.61 Inherited runners-scored—Belisario 1-1, Jansen 2-1, Mat.Reynolds 2-1. HBP—by E.Rogers (A.Ellis). WP—Belisario. T—3:18. A—34,430 (50,449).

Mets 4, Brewers 3 NEW YORK — Light-hitting New York rookie Ruben Tejada laced a two-run double in the bottom of the ninth off Milwaukee closer John Axford. Milwaukee Weeks 2b Inglett lf

AB R 3 0 4 1

Pct .595 .563 .494 .490 .430 Pct .561 .516 .471 .468 .459 .357 Pct .567 .554 .529 .487 .408

GB — 5 16 16½ 26 GB — 7 14 14½ 16 32 GB — 2 6 12½ 25

WCGB — — 11 11½ 21 WCGB — 7½ 14½ 15 16½ 32½ WCGB — 1½ 5½ 12 24½

Tuesday’s Games Washington 2, Philadelphia 1 Atlanta 3, Florida 2 Cincinnati 3, Houston 2 N.Y. Mets 4, Milwaukee 3 Pittsburgh 7, St. Louis 2 L.A. Dodgers 9, Colorado 7 Chicago Cubs 5, San Diego 2 San Francisco 4, Arizona 2

T—3:00. A—38,315 (43,975).

Los Angeles Furcal ss Theriot 2b Jansen p Ethier rf Kemp cf Blake 3b Loney 1b Re.Johnson lf Belisario p Sherrill p Broxton p J.Carroll 2b A.Ellis c 1-Hu pr Barajas c Kuroda p Oeltjen lf Totals

L 64 69 79 80 90 L 69 76 83 83 85 101 L 68 70 74 81 93

H BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 1 0 .269 2 0 0 0 .257

L10 7-3 5-5 4-6 4-6 6-4 L10 5-5 5-5 3-7 5-5 6-4 7-3 L10 6-4 5-5 2-8 5-5 5-5

Str L-1 W-2 W-3 L-3 W-1 Str W-2 L-1 L-3 L-1 W-2 W-1 Str W-2 L-3 L-3 W-2 L-1

Home 52-29 54-23 45-30 38-39 41-39 Home 46-30 47-29 41-37 40-41 35-46 40-41 Home 46-30 44-35 52-28 43-35 40-41

Away 42-35 35-46 32-49 39-41 27-51 Away 42-39 34-47 33-46 33-42 37-39 16-60 Away 43-38 43-35 31-46 34-46 24-52

Today’s Games Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 4-5) at St. Louis (Walters 1-0), 10:40 a.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 13-10) at Colorado (J.Chacin 9-10), 12:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Gallardo 14-7) at N.Y. Mets (Dickey 11-8), 1:10 p.m., 1st game Florida (A.Miller 1-4) at Atlanta (D.Lowe 15-12), 1:35 p.m. Philadelphia (Blanton 8-6) at Washington (Detwiler 1-2), 4:05 p.m. Houston (Figueroa 5-4) at Cincinnati (Cueto 12-6), 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Bush 7-13) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 9-10), 4:40 p.m., 2nd game Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 8-13) at San Diego (C.Young 1-0), 7:05 p.m.

C.Gomez lf Hart rf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b Axford p L.Cain cf A.Escobar ss Kottaras c Ra.Wolf p McClendon p Braddock p Counsell 3b Totals

0 4 4 2 0 4 4 3 2 0 0 0 30

0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

New York AB R Jos.Reyes ss 3 0 J.Feliciano rf-cf 3 0 c-J.Arias ph 0 0 Dessens p 0 0 Beltran cf 2 0 Duda lf 2 1 D.Wright 3b 4 1 I.Davis 1b 4 1 N.Evans lf-rf-cf 4 0 Thole c 4 0 1-L.Castillo pr 0 1 R.Tejada 2b 4 0 Pelfrey p 2 0 P.Feliciano p 0 0 a-Hessman ph 0 0 b-Carter ph-rf 1 0 Totals 33 4

0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 5

0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

.239 .281 .265 .286 --.276 .234 .205 .243 .500 --.251

H BI BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 8 4 2

SO 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .282 .250 .263 --.255 .193 .286 .268 .333 .276 .234 .210 .115 --.149 .256

Milwaukee 000 101 010 — 3 5 1 New York 000 002 002 — 4 8 0 One out when winning run scored. a-was announced for P.Feliciano in the 8th. b-doubled for Hessman in the 8th. c-walked for J.Feliciano in the 8th. 1-ran for Thole in the 9th. E—McGehee (17). LOB—Milwaukee 5, New York 6. 2B—Inglett (8), L.Cain (8), I.Davis (33), R.Tejada 2 (11), Carter (9). HR—Hart (31), off Pelfrey; D.Wright (27), off Ra.Wolf. RBIs—Hart (97), Fielder (81), L.Cain (8), D.Wright 2 (98), R.Tejada 2 (15). S—Ra.Wolf. Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 2 (A.Escobar, Inglett); New York 2 (Pelfrey, D.Wright). Runners moved up—Weeks, Hart, Fielder. GIDP— Jos.Reyes. DP—Milwaukee 1 (Ra.Wolf, A.Escobar, Fielder). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ra.Wolf 7 4 2 2 1 4 108 4.18 McClndon H, 2 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 7 3.06 Braddock H, 13 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 8 3.03 Axford L, 8-2 2-3 3 2 2 0 2 19 2.57 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pelfrey 7 1-3 5 3 3 4 2 108 3.75 P.Feliciano 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 2.79 Dessens W, 4-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 2.35 Inherited runners-scored—Braddock 1-0, Axford 2-0, P.Feliciano 1-1. T—2:34. A—24,666 (41,800).\

AL ROUNDUP

).

Yankees 6, Blue Jays 1 TORONTO — The New York Yankees clinched their 15th postseason berth in the last 16 years and CC Sabathia got his 21st win of the season .Derek Jeter scored three runs and drove in another for the Yankees. New York Jeter ss Swisher rf 1-Golson pr-rf Teixeira 1b A.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b Posada c Berkman dh a-Thames ph 2-E.Nunez pr-dh Granderson cf Gardner lf Totals

AB 4 3 1 2 3 3 4 3 1 0 3 4 31

R 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 6

H BI BB 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 2 1 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 9 6 5

SO 1 1 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 8

Avg. .267 .288 .263 .259 .272 .316 .253 .257 .291 .298 .249 .278

Toronto Snider lf Y.Escobar ss J.Bautista rf V.Wells cf

AB 4 3 3 4

R 1 0 0 0

H BI BB 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0

SO 1 0 2 0

Avg. .252 .282 .261 .273

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. Tampa Bay clinched its second playoff berth in three years, beating Baltimore behind another strong pitching performance by 19-game winner David Price. Price (19-6) scattered six hits over eight innings and allowed only one runner past second base. Baltimore Lugo 2b Bran.Snyder 1b Andino ss Markakis rf Wigginton 1b-2b J.Fox dh a-C.Patterson ph Ad.Jones cf Wieters c Reimold lf J.Bell 3b Totals

AB 3 1 4 4 4 3 1 4 3 3 3 33

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 0 0 10

Avg. .249 .235 .244 .293 .254 .219 .270 .280 .252 .214 .211

Tampa Bay Jaso c Zobrist 2b Crawford lf D.Johnson dh Joyce rf C.Pena 1b B.Upton cf Brignac ss S.Rodriguez 3b Totals

AB 4 3 3 4 3 2 3 3 3 28

R 1 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 5

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 5 3

Avg. .266 .243 .309 .212 .234 .199 .240 .263 .253

SO 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 4

Baltimore 000 000 000 — 0 6 0 Tampa Bay 011 120 00x — 5 6 0 LOB—Baltimore 6, Tampa Bay 3. 2B—Markakis (45), Wieters (22), D.Johnson (3). 3B—Jaso (3). HR—C.Pena (28), off Bergesen; Crawford (17), off Bergesen. RBIs— Zobrist (75), Crawford (88), D.Johnson (23), C.Pena (82), B.Upton (61). SF—Zobrist. Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 3 (Wieters, J.Fox, J.Bell); Tampa Bay 1 (Joyce). Runners moved up—Reimold. DP—Baltimore 1 (Ad.Jones, Ad.Jones, J.Bell). Baltimore IP H R Bergsen L, 8-11 5 6 5 Hendrickson 2 0 0 Viola 1 0 0 Tampa Bay IP H R Price W, 19-6 8 6 0 R.Soriano 1 0 0 T—2:08. A—17,891 (36,973).

ER 5 0 0 ER 0 0

BB 3 0 0 BB 0 0

SO 2 0 2 SO 8 2

NP ERA 89 5.02 14 4.80 9 13.50 NP ERA 113 2.73 14 1.76

White Sox 5, Red Sox 4 CHICAGO — Paul Konerko tied the game in the eighth inning with a run-scoring double and Dayan Viciedo won it with a pinch-hit RBI single in the ninth and Chicago rallied to beat Boston. Boston’s slim playoff hopes were dashed were about an hour before the game ended when the Yankees and Rays won. Boston AB E.Patterson cf 3 c-Nava ph-lf 1 J.Drew rf 4 V.Martinez 1b 4 D.Ortiz dh 4 A.Beltre 3b 3 Lowrie ss 4 Reddick lf 3 b-McDonld ph-lf-cf 1 Varitek c 4 F.Lopez 2b 4 Totals 35

R 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 3 1 0 2 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 4 1

SO 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 2 9

Avg. .220 .243 .258 .303 .268 .325 .282 .214 .273 .231 .000

Chicago AB Pierre lf 5 Vizquel 2b 5 Man.Ramirez dh 2 1-Lillibridge pr-dh 0 d-Teahen ph 0 Konerko 1b 4 2-Beckham pr 0 Kotsay 1b 0 e-Viciedo ph 1 Pierzynski c 4 Quentin rf 4 Al.Ramirez ss 3 De Aza cf 2 a-An.Jones ph-cf 2 Morel 3b 3 Totals 35

R 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 5

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 9 5 5

SO 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 6

Avg. .271 .283 .265 .244 .261 .310 .252 .238 .289 .269 .244 .281 .083 .226 .191

Boston 012 001 000 — 4 9 0 Chicago 000 200 111 — 5 9 1 Two outs when winning run scored. a-popped out for De Aza in the 7th. b-struck out for Reddick in the 8th. c-struck out for E.Patterson in the 9th. e-singled for Kotsay in the 9th. 1-ran for Man.Ramirez in the 8th. 2-ran for Konerko in the 8th. E—Konerko (7). LOB—Boston 6, Chicago 9. 2B—A.Beltre (49), Lowrie (14), Konerko (30), De Aza (1). HR—J.Drew (21), off E.Jackson; D.Ortiz (32), off E.Jackson; Quentin (26), off Lackey. RBIs—J.Drew (66), D.Ortiz (101), A.Beltre (102), Lowrie (21), Konerko (107), Viciedo (9), Quentin 2 (87), Morel (6). SB—Pierre 2 (63), Lillibridge (5), Morel (2). SF—A.Beltre. Runners left in scoring position—Boston 3 (F.Lopez, Lowrie, D.McDonald); Chicago 4 (Vizquel 3, An.Jones). Runners moved up—Varitek, Pierzynski. GIDP— J.Drew. DP—Chicago 1 (Vizquel, Al.Ramirez, Konerko). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lackey 6 3 2 2 2 5 108 4.47 Atchison 0 2 1 1 0 0 4 4.32 R.Hill H, 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 D.Bard BS, 7 1 1 1 1 2 1 29 1.96 Bowden L, 0-1 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 7 5.68 Richardson 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 4.15 M.Fox 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 4.91 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA E.Jackson 7 7 4 3 1 6 105 3.25 Sale W, 2-1 2 2 0 0 0 3 33 1.27 Atchison pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Richardson pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. M.Fox pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—R.Hill 2-1, Richardson 10, M.Fox 2-1. WP—Atchison, E.Jackson. T—3:10. A—16,982 (40,615).

Royals 10, Twins 1 KANSAS CITY, Mo. —

Kila Ka’aihue hit two home runs and drove in a careerhigh four runs to lead Kansas City over Minnesota.

BI 1 1 0 4 2 0 1 0 0 9

BB 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3

Minnesota 000 010 000 — 1 5 1 Kansas City 321 020 20x — 10 10 1 E—Blackburn (2), Fields (5). LOB—Minnesota 10, Kansas City 3. 2B—Delm.Young (45), Aviles (15). 3B—Aviles (3), Ka’aihue (1). HR—Ka’aihue 2 (7), off Blackburn 2; Fields (3), off Perkins. RBIs—Cuddyer (80), Dyson (4), Aviles (32), Ka’aihue 4 (22), Fields 2 (6), Y.Betancourt (78). SB—Span (26), Dyson 2 (8), Aviles (12). Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 7 (Kubel 3, Tolbert, Punto, Valencia, Cuddyer); Kansas City 2 (B.Butler, May). Runners moved up—J.Morales, Ja.Miller. GIDP— Delm.Young. DP—Kansas City 1 (O’Sullivan, Aviles, Ka’aihue). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blckbrn L, 10-11 4 1-3 8 8 8 2 4 82 5.55 Perkins 2 2-3 2 2 2 1 3 43 6.41 Capps 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 2.16 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA O’Sullivn W, 4-66 5 1 1 6 1 114 5.91 Bl.Wood 2 0 0 0 0 4 23 5.18 G.Holland 1 0 0 0 0 3 13 7.13 O’Sullivan pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Perkins 2-1, Bl.Wood 2-0. Balk—Blackburn. T—2:43. A—18,487 (37,840).

Mariners 3, Rangers 1 ARLINGTON, Texas — Felix Hernandez allowed only one run over eight innings and Justin Smoak hit the tiebreaking homer to lead last-place Seattle past AL West champion Texas.

Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 2b Jo.Lopez 3b Tuiasosopo 3b F.Gutierrez cf Smoak 1b Mangini dh A.Moore c M.Saunders lf Jo.Wilson ss Totals

AB 4 3 2 1 3 3 3 4 4 4 31

R 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 8 3 3

SO 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 1 1 0 7

Avg. .315 .259 .240 .173 .250 .208 .211 .196 .207 .228

Texas German 2b-ss A.Blanco ss C.Davis 3b Dav.Murphy lf N.Cruz dh Francoeur rf Moreland 1b Cantu 3b-2b B.Molina c 1-Teagarden pr-c Borbon cf Totals

AB 3 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 3 0 3 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

H BI BB 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 2

SO 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 6

Avg. .222 .284 .192 .292 .313 .349 .246 .236 .224 .157 .279

Seattle 100 200 000 — 3 8 1 Texas 001 000 000 — 1 5 0 1-ran for B.Molina in the 7th. E—Jo.Wilson (21). LOB—Seattle 6, Texas 6. 2B—Jo.Lopez (29), Dav.Murphy (26), B.Molina (6). HR—Smoak (12), off Feldman. RBIs—F.Gutierrez (62), Smoak 2 (44), Dav.Murphy (65). SB—Borbon (14). S—Figgins, A.Blanco. SF—F.Gutierrez. Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 4 (Smoak, Jo.Lopez, Jo.Wilson 2); Texas 4 (N.Cruz 2, Francoeur, Borbon). Runners moved up—Figgins, Dav.Murphy. GIDP— Francoeur. DP—Seattle 1 (Figgins, Jo.Wilson, Smoak); Texas 1 (A.Blanco, German). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hrndz W, 13-12 8 5 1 1 2 5 111 2.27 League S, 6-12 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 3.46 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fldmn L, 7-11 4 1-3 5 3 3 2 2 86 5.48 Tom.Hunter 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 9 3.80 Rapada 2 2 0 0 0 1 19 4.00 O’Day 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 1.95 Strop 1 1 0 0 1 2 17 10.13 Inherited runners-scored—Tom.Hunter 1-0. WP—Strop. T—2:39. A—26,043 (49,170).

Angels 4, Athletics 2 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Torii Hunter opened the scoring with a home run and his center field replacement, rookie Peter Bourjos, robbed Landon Powell of a homer to lead Los Angeles over Oakland. Oakland R.Davis cf Barton 1b M.Ellis 2b Cust dh Kouzmanoff 3b Hermida rf Carter lf Gross lf a-K.Suzuki ph Powell c Pennington ss Totals

AB 3 5 4 3 4 4 3 0 1 4 4 35

R 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 1 0 2 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 9 2 3

Los Angeles Bourjos cf H.Kendrick 2b B.Abreu lf Willits lf Tor.Hunter rf Napoli 1b H.Matsui dh Callaspo 3b J.Mathis c Br.Wood ss Totals

AB 4 3 4 0 4 4 4 3 3 2 31

R H 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 2 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 4 10

BI 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 8

Avg. .274 .272 .287 .274 .251 .219 .127 .241 .248 .214 .252

SO 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 4

Avg. .194 .278 .256 .261 .285 .244 .272 .266 .191 .147

Oakland 000 110 000 — 2 9 1 Los Angeles 010 002 10x — 4 10 0 a-grounded out for Gross in the 9th. E—Powell (6). LOB—Oakland 9, Los Angeles 5. 2B—R.Davis (26), M.Ellis (23). HR—Kouzmanoff (15), off Haren; Tor.Hunter (22), off Braden. RBIs—M.Ellis (44), Kouzmanoff (70), H.Kendrick (73), Tor.Hunter (87), Napoli (68), H.Matsui (82). S—Br.Wood. SF—H.Kendrick. Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 4 (Kouzmanoff, Barton 2, Hermida); Los Angeles 3 (Br.Wood, Callaspo, B.Abreu). Runners moved up—Barton, M.Ellis, H.Matsui. GIDP—B.Abreu. DP—Oakland 1 (M.Ellis, Pennington, Barton). Oakland IP H R Braden L, 10-14 7 10 4 Bonser 1 0 0 Los Angeles IP H R Haren W, 4-4 6 6 2 Jepsen H, 25 1 1 0 Walden H, 6 1 1 0 Rodney S, 14 1 1 0 WP—Jepsen. T—2:30. A—43,163 (45,285).

ER 3 0 ER 2 0 0 0

BB 0 0 BB 1 1 0 1

SO 3 1 SO 5 0 2 1

NP 94 11 NP 96 22 19 18

ERA 3.50 6.75 ERA 2.86 4.18 2.03 4.03


D4 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Soccer

Kearney

Continued from D1 She blasted a shot to the upper-left corner of the net from approximately 25 yards out. Madison added a score of her own in the 21st minute, streaking toward the goal from midfield before taking a Molly McCool pass and beating Bend’s goalkeeper one-on-one to give Mountain View a 3-0 advantage. The Cougars tacked on one more score before the half when Allie Cummins tapped in a goal after a Mountain View corner kick. While the Cougars did not score after halftime, Mountain View’s offense never let up against the Lava Bears. Mountain View posted 12 shots on goal Tuesday, while Bend recorded just four shots on goal. “Our midfield is very, very strong,” said first-year Cougars coach Grant Mattox, who previously was an assistant at Bend High. “We talk a lot about keeping the (shutout). You’re not going to lose the game if they don’t score.” The Lava Bears (1-1 IMC, 2-22), who are in rebuilding mode

Continued from D1 The Fall Tour is an annual proam tournament held by the PGA of America’s Oregon Section. The 2010 edition is being played this week at four Central Oregon golf courses: Awbrey Glen, Broken Top Club in Bend, Eagle Crest Resort’s Ridge Course in Redmond, and Black Butte Ranch’s Big Meadow course. “Sleeping in your own bed does not get overrated when you are on the road all the time,” says Kearney, who hs been married for two years to his wife, Jodi. But he has played his best golf this year away from Central Oregon. In May, he finished in a tie for ninth place in May at the Washington Open in Bellevue. In July, he was second at the Rosauers Open in Spokane. And in August, he tied for second at the Northwest Open in Walla Walla, Wash. All three tournaments are considered major championships in the Pacific Northwest PGA. Ironically, Kearney’s worst finish in a Northwest major came at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond, where in June he finished in a tie for 21st place in Oregon Open. But Kearney also won the Wildhorse Pro-Am in Pendleton in July, and the Callaway Golf Pacific Northwest Assistants in Medina, Wash., in August. And he added a fourth-place finish two weeks ago at the Montana Open in Missoula. He tried to qualify for two tournaments on the Nationwide Tour — the PGA Tour’s main developmental circuit — held last month in Salt Lake City and Boise, Idaho, and shot 66 each time. But neither score was low enough to qualify. Kearney’s consistency this year is something his fellow club pros have noticed. “Other than (Jeff) Coston (a Washington club pro and former PGA Tour player), who has had a really good year this year, I have to say he has been the best,” says Brian Nosler, a Vancouver, Wash., pro who is among the top players in the region and is playing this week in the Fall Tour. “Rob Gibbons (a Molalla club pro) has had a really good year, and Kearney. “He (Kearney) is in the top three every week, it seems like.” And the money has piled up for Kearney, at least by club pro standards. He won more than $7,000 at the Rosauers, and $6,000 at the Wildhorse Pro-Am. He has earned thousands of dollars at other tournaments, too. How much has he won? “People keep asking me,” Kearney says with a smile. “I should give a W-2 (income tax form) to all the people who ask me. But I don’t know. It’s been fairly decent though.” Those earnings do not include tax deductions, nor do they account for travel expenses. But the winnings have been enough for Kearney to pay the entry fee for the PGA Tour’s National Qualifying School ($4,500 for Q-School’s first round), in which he plans to compete next month. And he is hoping to have enough left to head to Southern California, “where it’s warmer to play golf for the winter,” he says. Kearney’s success this year has been just what he needed to bounce back from 2008, when he made the developmental Canadian Tour but struggled with injury and the grind of all the travel to make just one cut in 11 tries. His hot play this year has given him confidence, a commodity in golf. And Kearney has a calmness about him these days. “Golf will beat you up if you let it,” he says. “No matter how good you are and how solid, there is always something.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Bend’s Trinity Combs, left, tries to block a pass by Mountain View’s Edna Ibarra during the first half of Tuesday’s match at Mountain View. this season after replacing 10 senior starters from a year ago, held Mountain View scoreless in the second half, but struggled to finish scoring opportunities

of their own. “They have to see the positives in a game like this,” Bend coach Bob Welch said about his young team. “It’s a growing

process.” Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

PREP ROUNDUP

Sisters volleyball rebounds with victory Bulletin Staff Report

SISTERS — Stung by a loss to Burns on Saturday, Sisters High quickly returned to its winning ways Tuesday night in a SkyEm League match against Elmira. The Outlaws defeated the Falcons 25-13, 25-8, 25-18 to improve to 2-0 in league play. Senior setter Kaity Douglass made five digs and posted 21 assists for Sisters, while teammate Megan Minke adding seven kills. Jenna Loheed recorded nine kills for the visiting Falcons. “We’re focusing on our mental toughness,” said Sisters coach Diane Bremer. “I’m definitely getting the leadership I need from our three seniors.” Those seniors, Douglass, Mary Jane Schulte and Marisa Calavan, have a chance to win three Class 4A state titles in four years. The Outlaws host La Pine tonight before traveling to Cottage Grove next Monday. In other prep events Tuesday: BOYS SOCCER Mountain View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 After a scoreless first half at Bend High, Austin Kihs put Mountain View ahead 1-0 in the 55th minute, capitalizing on a Lava Bear defensive miscue. Cougar goalkeeper Brandon Navarro cleared the ball and Bend High, unable to handle the long pass, left the door open for Kihs. Ten minutes later, Kihs’ offensive pressure resulted in another Mountain View goal, this time from Cam Riemhofer on a Kihs assist. The Lava Bears (1-1 IMC, 2-4-0 overall) had a few looks in the second half, according to Bend coach Nils Eriksson, but failed to convert. Bend travels to meet crosstown rival Summit on Thursday, while the Cougars (1-1-1 IMC, 2-2-3 overall) are at Crook County next Tuesday. Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Lincoln . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 REDMOND — Trailing 2-0 at halftime, the Panthers rallied back to tie the Cardinals in both teams’ Class 6A Special District 1 opener. Travis Simpson scored in the 54th minute to put Redmond down 2-1 before Alex Mendez nailed a penalty kick in the 80th minute to make the score 2-2. The Panthers (0-0-1 SD1, 3-0-2 overall) play Grant in Portland on Friday. Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Gladstone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 PORTLAND — Despite falling behind 1-0 in the 28th minute, Madras evened the score in the Tri-Valley Conference matchup four minutes later when Jose Medina found the back of the net on a Bernabe Felix pass. The White Buffaloes (2-0 Tri-Valley, 5-0 overall) took the lead in the 48th minute with a goal from Eduardo Lopez, who also scored the go-ahead goal with five minutes remaining. Madras looks to keep its unbeaten streak alive Thursday, hosting Estacada. Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Marshall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 PORTLAND — Facing a 2-0 deficit at

Beavers Continued from D1 Oregon State hasn’t had a winning record in September for seven straight seasons. However, they are 37-14 from October to December since 2004 — and in five of six of those years the team earned a bowl berth. The Beavers were 2-2 last year when they visited Arizona State on Oct. 3 and came away with a 28-17 victory. They won six of the next seven games to set up the Civil War against Oregon for the Pac-10 championship and a Rose Bowl berth, which the Ducks claimed. “They seem to get better as the year goes along,” said Arizona State coach Dennis Erickson, who coached at Oregon State from 1999-02. “They seem to get to this point and then go on a roll.” While Riley said Tuesday that he hopes Oregon State has been strengthened by the level of competition in a brutal nonconfer-

the half, Crook County came alive in the second half, scoring in the 41st and 60th minutes. Luis Toledo blasted a shot from outside the penalty box only a minute into the second half to help change the tide of the Class 4A Special District 1 matchup. Toledo added a second goal nearly 20 minutes later on a penalty kick. The Cowboys (0-0-1 SD 1, 0-4-2 overall) continue district action Thursday, hosting Roosevelt High of Portland. Central Christian. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Burns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 REDMOND — In-Taek Hong notched two goals en route to Central Christian’s third Class 3A/2A/1A/ Special District 5 win of the season. Weston Shepherd, Isaac Staples and Isaac Reynolds also tallied goals for the White Tigers (3-3 SD 5, 3-3 overall) in the home victory. Central Christian hosts Irrigon on Friday. Grant Union . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 JOHN DAY — The Bulldogs fell to 32 in Class 3A/2A/1A Special District 5 play, getting shut out for the second time in three games. The Prospectors are also 3-2 in league games. Culver is back home Saturday against Central Christian of Redmond. GIRLS SOCCER Lincoln . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 REDMOND — Auschere Caufield posted Redmond’s only goal, scoring in the 60th minute on a pass from Cassidy Fisher. Lincoln held a 2-0 lead at the half and added two more in the second half to stay well clear of their Panther hosts. Redmond (01 Special District 1, 1-4 overall) continues district play at Grant on Friday. Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 SISTERS — Jodie Reoch recorded three goals in the Sky-Em League home win, posting her first in the 22nd minute after both Zoe McAllister and Natalie Ambrose had posted goals of their own. Harley Bowler scored five minutes later and Reoch followed with goals in the 29th and 31st minutes. Marin Allen, who dished out two assists on the day, netted a goal in the 34th minute to give the undefeated Outlaws (3-0 Sky-Em League, 6-0 overall) a 7-0 advantage at the half. In the second half, Riley Barrett added a goal in the 44th minute and sister Peggy Barrett contributed a goal eight minutes later. The Hawks (0-2-1 SkyEm League, 0-4-1 overall) host Cottage Grove Thursday, while Sisters entertains Sweet Home, also on Thursday. Marshall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 PORTLAND — The Cowgirls encountered a stingy Marshall defense in its first Class 4A Special District 1 match of the season. The Minutemen posted their second consecutive shutout, handing Crook County its fifth loss of the year. The Cowgirls (0-1 district, 1-5 overall) allowed all three goals in the first half. Crook County

hosts Roosevelt of Portland on Thursday. Gladstone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 MADRAS — The host White Buffaloes surrendered five first-half goals and dropped the Tri-Valley Conference match to Gladstone, the reigning Class 4A/3A/ 2A/1A state champion. Madras (0-2 TVC, 0-3-1 overall) plays at TVC foe Estacada on Thursday. VOLLEYBALL Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-25-25 Lincoln . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-17-20 REDMOND — The Panthers won their Class 6A Special District 1 opener, sweeping visiting Lincoln High of Portland. Aubrey Nitschelm recorded 11 kills and Jessica Nurge added 28 digs in the Redmond victory. Chloe Payne contributed nine kills, while Jesslyn Albrecht directed the Panther offense with 36 assists. Redmond continues district play on Friday with a road match at Grant High of Portland. Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-24-25-25 Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-26-19-11 The Storm moved to 2-0 in Intermountain Conference play, besting the host Lava Bears in four games. Gabby Crowell recorded 18 kills and eight aces while Andie Kenneally ended the night 21 of 21 from the service line with five aces. Paulina Zavala led the Bend offense with seven kills, while Kenzi Boehme added five kills and three aces. The Storm (2-0 IMC) are at Mountain View on Thursday, while the Lava Bears (04 IMC) host Mountain View next Tuesday. Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-25-25 Gladstone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18-14-12 GLADSTONE — The White Buffaloes won their first road match in the new Class 4A Tri-Valley Conference, sweeping Gladstone in three games. Senior Hannah Mikkelson and junior Laura Sullivan combined to produce 15 kills for the White Buffaloes, and senior setter Rachel Simmons produced 24 assists. Madras is now 1-1 in TriValley play and will host another league foe, Estacada, on Thursday. Cottage Grove . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-25-25 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-6-17 LA PINE — The Hawks played tough in two of their three Sky-Em League games against the Lions but were not consistent enough for the win. Carly Roderick recorded four kills, three blocks and an ace for La Pine, while Sarah Alford added two kills and a block. Hawk coach Aaron Mallory also praised the play of Wendy Price, who came off the bench and contributed three kills for La Pine. The Hawks are at Sisters today. Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-26-25 Kennedy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-24-14 MT. ANGEL — Culver dispatched Kennedy in a three-game sweep and improved to 5-2 in Tri-River League play. Gabrielle Alley led the Bulldogs with 13 digs and five aces in the road win. Culver’s Kelsie Stafford posted eight kills and Cheyenne Dobkins offered up 12 assists. Central Linn will make the trip to Culver on Thursday for another league matchup.

ence schedule, the team cannot rely on history to tilt the balance to the win column. “You know from experience and your knowledge from the past that it can be done. But it is certainly not given to you by right of passage. You have to earn it,” Riley said. “Those teams persevered. They recognized where they need to go, what they needed to do to get better, and they did, so the team got better. “But we’ve got a ton of things we’ve got to get better on ... and nobody can make the assumption that just because those teams did that, that this team’s automatically going to be given the passage to do it. We’ve got to prove it.” Oregon State, ranked No. 24 last week, fell out of the top 25 after last weekend’s loss to the Broncos. Rodgers, a senior flanker and the older brother of running back Jacquizz Rodgers, has been consistent for the Beavers despite the tough nonconference foes. But he was injured early in the third quarter against

Boise State. Rodgers was blocking on a scramble by quarterback Ryan Katz when he collided helmet-to-helmet with Boise State safety Winston Venable. Rodgers immediately fell to the turf as trainers from both teams rushed the field. He was prone on the 45 yard line for a few minutes before being helped up by Jacquizz. It was said that he paced the sidelines afterward in search of his helmet, which the trainers took away. Rodgers returned a punt 54 yards for a touchdown in the first quarter. Despite the injury, Rodgers is ranked fifth in the nation for all-purpose yard average so far this season. He surpassed leader Ken Simonton on Oregon State’s career allpurpose yards list with 5,630. The Western Athletic Conference was reviewing Venable’s hit on Rodgers. Boise State coach Chris Petersen said simply that Venable was “running hard,” and the hit occurred.

Tetherow Continued from D1 The tournament is structured in much the same way as the U.S. Amateur, starting with two rounds of stroke play to cut the field to 64 golfers, followed by six rounds of single-elimination match play. Chuck says that Tetherow — a twisting links golf course loaded with obstacles — particularly lends itself to match play, in which a high score on a particular hole is less punitive than in stroke play. “It will be perfect at this place,” Chuck said. “There are so many risk/reward opportunities out here in match play, it’s perfect.” The Senior Amateur, first played in 1965, is a 54-hole stroke-play tournament for golfers age 55 and older. While not as well known as the PNGA Men’s Amateur, the Senior Amateur is also considered a major tournament on the PNGA schedule. It has been in Central Oregon before: in 2000 at Sunriver Resort’s Crosswater Club, and before that in 1993 at Black Butte Ranch. And Black Butte Ranch is happy to have it back. “Big Meadow, from a senior standpoint, is a great golf course,”

Black Butte Ranch pro leading way at Fall Tour Black Butte Ranch’s director of instruction continues to pile up cash at the Fall Tour. George Mack Jr. shot a 3-underpar 69 Tuesday at Bend’s Broken Top Club, to tie with Sean Arey, of Trysting Tree Golf Club in Corvallis, for the top two-day total of 7 under par. Mack and Arey have each won $1,225 for winning the two-day portion of the tournament, tying for first place during Monday’s first round and tying for sixth place Tuesday. The Fall Tour is hosted by four different Central Oregon golf courses. The tournament is split into a pair of two-round events and includes club professionals and amateurs. Cash prizes are awarded for the lowest rounds each day, lowest two-day totals, team competitions and other contests. Mark Keating, a pro from Astoria Golf & Country Club, carded the lowest second-round score with a 6-under-par 66. Brandon Kearney, an assistant pro at Bend Golf and Country Club, and Brian Nosler of Vanco Driving Range in Vancouver, Wash., tied for second place at 5-under 67. Scott Cravens, of Crave Golf Learning Center in Redmond, tied Jim Wilkinson of Langdon Farms Golf Club in Aurora, for first place in the senior division after each shot 3-under 69. Jesse Erlich of Trysting Tree, Matt Notdurft of Corvallis Country Club, and J.P. Praisler of Broadmoor Golf Course in Portland each shot 2-under 70 tie for the second-round win in the amateur gross division. The tournament continues today at Eagle Crest Resort’s Ridge Course in Redmond. Spectators are welcome and admission is free. — Bulletin staff report “I don’t know if it’s just maturity or just learning how to accept things better, but you can’t control everything. Unfortunately with golf, you like to try and do that, but golf wins more often than you do.” Kearney has already earned more than $800 through two days of the Fall Tour, and he has two more days to play. Then he will concentrate on October’s Q-School, a pressure-soaked grinder played in three stages for an opportunity to make it on the PGA or Nationwide tours. Kearney played in Q-School last year, but he did not advance to the second stage. “It’s just a constant process,” Kearney says of playing golf professionally. “If I continue to get better each year, then that’s a goal achieved. It sounds simple, but that’s basically it.” At least one of his fellow pros will be rooting for him at Q-School. “Hopefully he goes out full time (on a pro golf tour) and leaves us alone,” Nosler jokes. Kearney’s strong showing this year will not matter at Q-School. But he is hoping his strongest finish is yet to come. “It’s just a matter of playing well at the right time,” Kearney says. “Unfortunately, your job interview for being a PGA Tour or Nationwide Tour professional is three weeks out of the year and how you play (during that time). They don’t really care how you’ve done the rest of the year.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541617-7868 or at zhall@bendbulletin. com.

Tetherow raises $3,000 for charity Tetherow Golf Club raised about $3,000 during its charity golf day, the Bend golf course said Tuesday. The course donated all but $40 (the combined cost of a forecaddie and a golf cart) of each greens fee collected last Sunday to the charity of choice for each golfer. The cost to play an 18-hole round ranged from $89 to $110.

says Charles Kingsbaker, director of sales and marketing at Black Butte Ranch. “It’s a very walkable golf course and a traditional Northwest design. “We’re excited. It fits a good niche for us.” The PNGA Amateur is open to golfers with a 4.4 handicap or lower. Golfers must have a handicap of 22.4 or lower to play in the PNGA Senior Amateur. The Super Senior is open to players age 65 and older with a 26.4 handicap or lower. Zack Hall can be reached at 541617-7868 or at zhall@bendbulletin. com.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 29, 2010 D5 3 8 T H R Y D E R C U P M AT C H E S • O C T. 1 - 3 • N E W P O R T, W A L E S

Europeans

Par 4 Yards 465

try to

The opening tee shot is a dogleg left, and while players can make the hole shorter with a drive down the left, there are three deep bunkers on that side where the hole turns. The green is guarded by two bunkers, with a runoff areas to the right and behind the green.

T

1

Twenty Ten Course at Celtic Manor

regain Cup

Length: 7,378 yards Par: 36-35 – 71

2

Par 4 Yards 377

5

he Ryder Cup – featuring the best of United States and European professional golfers – is a biennial team competi-

tion. Although most of this year’s American team is playing better 4

golf than the European team heading into the matches, the Europe-

3

ans are still heavily favored to regain the cup in Wales. Europe,

8

18

winners of two major championships in 2010, are hungry to take the 6

cup back from the U.S. on their home soil in Wales. EUROPE

Par 5 Yards 610 The drive should not only be long but straight, as this is a narrow fairway with deep bunkers dotting both sides. As many birdies can be made laying up as going for the green because of the contours and the steep run-offs, especially to the right of the green, which can send a ball some 50 feet away and well below the green.

Colin Montgomerie-Captain Corey Pavin-Captain Luke Donald-c, England 1. Stewart Cink-c Ross Fisher, England 2. Rickie Fowler-c Peter Hanson, Sweden 3. Jim Furyk Padraig Harrington-c, Ireland 4. Dustin Johnson Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 5. Zach Johnson-c Martin Kaymer, Germany 6. Matt Kuchar Graeme McDowell, N. Ireland 7. Hunter Mahan Rory McIlroy, N. Ireland 8. Phil Mickelson Edoardo Molinari-c, Italy 9. Jeff Overton Francesco Molinari, Italy 10. Steve Stricker Ian Poulter, England 11. Bubba Watson Lee Westwood, England 12. Tiger Woods-c

Water is short and left of the green, with a bunker on the right that also should be avoided. The back of the green features another steep runoff.

12 9

TV schedule (all times PDT)

Friday • 11:30 p.m. (Thursday) to 10 a.m. (Friday) • ESPN (Replay starts at 10 a.m. on ESPN2) Saturday • 5 a.m. to 3 p.m. • NBC Sports Sunday • 4 a.m. to 10 a.m. • NBC Sports

11 16 15 10

Par 4 Yards 499

c-captain’s pick

Par 4 Yards 458

The hole can measure some 665 yards, although it is expected to play from a forward tee to make the green accessible in two shots. Tee shot must avoid two bunkers on the right for players wanting to reach the green. The second shot must avoid a big bunker to the right and a deep pot bunker on the left.

This starts perhaps the most compelling stretch at Celtic Manor. It goes the opposite direction of No. 11, again with water down the left side, with more water to the right on the second shot. The approach is slightly uphill, and the ball is unlikely to travel as far in cooler temperatures.

Par 3 Yards 211 The longest green on the course, with a severe slope from right to left. The green has one bunker on the left, and five bunkers short and right.

Par 3 Yards 189 Par 3 Yards 213

Par 4 Yards 461

A fairly straightforward par 3 with a bunker guarding the left side of the green and a smaller bunker to the right that has been deepened and moved closer to the green.

This turns back toward the clubhouse into the prevailing wind. The choice is to drive short of the bunkers, although it becomes harder to hold the green. With the contours of this green, it doesn't take much for the slightest miss to roll off the edges of the putting surface.

Par 4 Yards 439

Par 4 Yards 433 A dogleg right with a stream running down the right side and then in front of the green. Missing the fairway makes it extremely difficult to hold the green, which has several run-off areas.

The longest par 4 on the course and likely into a prevailing wind. The fairway is narrow, with a bunker on the left side that only the big hitters can carry. A tee shot to the right is likely to catch another bunker. The green is tucked into a hill and guarded by three bunkers.

Par 5 Yards 580

Par 4 Yards 422 Another hole that bends to the right with the lake down the entire right side of this mediumlenghth hole. Bunkers could catch a tee shot that runs through the fairway. Two bunkers guard the left and front of the green, with a deep bunker to the back. The toughest hole location is to the right, where a slight miss could send the ball into the water.

Par 3 Yards 189

7

14

17

UNITED STATES

13

This could be the most exciting hole at Celtic Manor, with a green that can be reached from the tee, provided players can go over a ridge of trees to an elevated putting surface. Anything left of the green could go into a creek, while right leaves a difficult chip and putt. The green is guarded by two bunkers, one on the left so deep that it's tough to see the pin.

Fairway bunkers to the left and right, including one at about 300 yards and sticks out into the fairway. Two bunkers to the right of the green, which is heavily contoured. A steep slope has been added to the right of the green, which will send the ball well below the green and leave a difficult chip back up the slope.

Par 3 Yards 210

The tee shot must clear water, although two bunkers to the back are no bargain. Playing from the back bunker brings the water short of the green into play for the second time, as the green slopes toward the lake.

One of the smallest greens on the course, it slopes from back to front and from right to left, and it is surrounded by bunkers. It is tough to gauge the wind on this hole.

Par 5 Yards 575

Par 5 Yards 562 The shortest par 5 at Celtic Manor, and similar to the ninth with water down the entire left side of the hole. Tee shot must avoid a bunker to the right for any shot at reaching the green in two. Bunkers at staggered distances protect the front and right of the green, with a slope behind the bunker on the right that leads toward the water.

Par 4 Yards 485 A new tee makes it tough to go over the water, meaning the tee shot must be aimed to the left and creates a tougher angle at the green, which is guarded by water down the left side.

The forward tee is being used to make the green reachable in two. The elevated green is just beyond the water, with large bunkers on either side. The bunker on the left side makes for a tough up-and-own when the hole location is front right. Should provide plenty of birdies, while a par most likely will not be good enough.

Text by AP golf writer Doug Ferguson

SOURCE: The Celtic Manor Resort

Ed DeGasero • AP

Nerves are tested as nowhere else at Ryder Cup By Larry Dorman

New York Times News Service

NEWPORT, Wales — For a sport with no collisions, no punches or kicks thrown, no speeding projectiles, parachutes or oxygen tanks, golf can surely be hair-raising, especially every two years when it goes visceral at the Ryder Cup. Playing for country, team and pride produces a pressure unlike any that golfers experience in tournament play, even the four majors, and it is exacerbated by partisan crowds. No one assembled here this week at Celtic Manor for the 38th Ryder Cup is immune. Like a cold mist rolling off a moor, pressure seeps through cracks in confidence, and it can start before the first tee shot. “There are veterans that I’ve talked to and they say it’s tenfold of however nervous you’ve ever been,” said Bubba Watson, one of five rookies on the United States team, which will face a European

team that includes six rookies. There have been instances when players walked to the first tee and suddenly realized they would not be able to draw back the club. In 2004, Chris DiMarco, known as a fiery competitor, was supposed to open the afternoon foursomes match but was so nervous that he asked his partner, Jay Haas, to hit the first tee shot. Tom Lehman, a vice captain for this year’s United States team, said he could barely put his ball on a tee for the first shot in the 1995 matches at Oak Hill in Rochester. Lehman said that he was not one to get sick to his stomach when he got nervous but that he “was so shaky and so nervous” that morning he could have. Shaking and being nervous do not necessarily lead to failure. DiMarco and Haas won their match that day in 2004, 3 and 2, over Miguel Angel Jimenez and Thomas Levet. Lehman estimated that he smashed a draw around the corner of the first hole

more than 300 yards with a 3-wood that day in 1995. He and his partner, this year’s American captain, Corey Pavin, went on to defeat Europe’s power pairing of Nick Faldo and Colin Montgomerie, the captain of this year’s European team. “You keep telling yourself, swing slow, swing slow, swing slow, and I’m sure it was a blur,” Lehman said. “That first shot was harrowing.” Tiger Woods might face the most pressure in this year’s event. Each time Pavin has been asked about Woods, including Monday, he has taken pains to put him under the protective team umbrella. Woods, he said, is “one of the 12 guys on the team” and his responsibilities will be “the same as everyone else’s.” It is almost a given that Woods, the No. 1-ranked player in the world, will face some heckling from the huge partisan crowds about his well-publicized divorce and the events that precipitated it. Pavin has chosen not to further expose

Woods by placing additional expectations or responsibilities on him. Woods is not alone in facing pressure. Consider Padraig Harrington, whom Montgomerie chose despite his winless season and form that was less than scintillating until his closing 65 on Sunday at the Vivendi Cup. Harrington has shown himself to be as tough under pressure as any other player in recent history, winning three major championships in a 13-month span in 2007 and 2008. One reason Harrington was picked was for his ability to provide perspective when the caldron of Ryder Cup pressure begins to boil. Harrington played in his first Ryder Cup in 1999 at the Country Club at Brookline, Mass. “You get so nervous that it just all goes into a blur,” he added. “And you just kind of have to go with — I’ve got to go. It’s not like you’re going to stand there all day, so you might as well hit it. So, yeah, the height of nervousness, as

I said.” It will probably be the height of nervousness for Rickie Fowler, the 21-yearold rookie from Southern California, and Rory McIlroy, the 21-year-old rookie from Northern Ireland. More than 50,000 fans a day are expected at Celtic Manor, roars exploding during the four morning and four afternoon matches. “Deafening,” Pavin said. “Especially if the European team gets off to a fast start. What I’ll be stressing to my guys is that our goal is for it to be quiet. The quieter it is, the better it will be for us.” Even then, there will be hair-raising moments, exposed nerve endings, constant pressure. Because every match will be like being in the last group at a major, with, perhaps, a twist. “When you’re in the last group at a major, you know you’re playing well,” Padraig Harrington said. “What makes the Ryder Cup so tough is that it’s asking for players to play good on that given week, which is a tough test.”


T EE

D6 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

TO

G R EEN

GOLF SCOREBOARD LOCAL

Rupp, No. 17.

The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-385-0831, e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

Club Results AWBREY GLEN Central Oregon Senior Women’s Golf Association Sept. 21 Stroke Play Flight A — Gross: 1 (tie), Debbie Hehn, 86; Sue Rogers, 86. 3, Jan Sandburg, 89. 4, Debbie Kerr, 90. Net: 1, Linda Hill, 67. 2, Jean Gregerson, 68. 3, Pauline Rhoads, 71. 4 (tie), Veron Rygh, 73; Karen Wintermyre, 73. Flight B — Gross: 1, Carmen West, 92. 2, Marcia Wood, 95. 3, Karen Jamison, 97. 4, Jean Sowles, 98. Net: 1, Mary Clark, 72. 2, Linda Corson, 73. 3 (tie), Carol Hallock, 74; Phyllis Pengally, 74. Flight C — Gross: 1, Mary Johnson, 99. 2, Lael Cooksley, 102. 3 (tie), Marilyn Baer, 104; Ruth Smallwood, 104. Net: 1, Chris Fitzgibbons, 71. 2, Jean Fincham, 72. 3 (tie), Ruby Kraus, 74; Sharene Wanichek, 74. Flight D — Gross: 1, Judi Price, 106. 2, Jan Bull, 109. 3, Deborah Cox, 111. 4 (tie), Connie Torres, 112; Deanna Cooper, 112. Net: 1, Lynne Henze, 72. 2, Chris Larson, 74. 3 (tie), Shenny Braemer, 77; Joyce Heater, 77; Marge Newell, 77; Pat Porter, 77. KPs — Flight A: Pam Looney. Flight B: Claudia Loveland. Flight C: Ellie Rutledge. Flight D: Deborah Cox. Accurate Drive — Flight A: Kristina Evans. Flight B: Bonnie Gaston. Flight C: Lola Solomon. Flight D: Judi Price. Men’s Sweeps, Sept. 22 Two Net Best Ball 1, Richard Smith/Tom LaBissoniere/Bob Johanson/Marshall Thomas, 125. 2, Tom Carrico/Ron Foerster/Bob Jakse/Blind draw, 128. 3, John Maniscalco/Joe Oberto/Jim Weir/Doug Moore, 129. Women’s Sweeps, Sept. 23 Two Net Better Balls 1, Sue Everett/Louann Thomas/Chris Larson/Bonnie Tomsheck, 121. Chip-ins — Chris Larson, No. 11; Robetra Dyer, No. 13; Theresa Kavanagh, No. 16. BEND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Ladies’ Golf Association, Sept. 22 Stroke Play Championship Flight (0-16 handicap) — Gross: 1, Gretchen Byrd, 80. 2, Kandy Lamson, 81. Net: 1, Judie Bell-Putas, 70. 2, Terri Holmquist, 72. A Flight (17-23) — Gross: 1, Lyn Chase, 87. 2, Kristina Evans, 90. Net: 1, Linda Boydston, 64. 2, Elaine Dehart, 71. B Flight (24-28) — Gross: 1, Linda Bjorvik, 99. Net: 1, Joy Strickland, 73. C Flight (29-33) — Gross: 1, Ann Moore, 104. 2, Robin Schueler, 107. Net: 1, Sandy Mills, 72. 2, Linda Kammerich, 75. D Flight (34 and higher) — Gross: 1, Doris Sutton, 107. Net: 1, Martha Weaver, 72. Nine-Hole Flight — Gross: 1, Dugan Lumpkin, 58. Net: 1, Linda Beccio, 35.5. BLACK BUTTE RANCH Does & Bucks, Sept. 23 Scramble Meadow Flight — 1, Ellie Rutledge/Tom Rutledge. 2, Nancy Elliott/Rich Elliott. 3, Alicia Knox/Tom Fish. Mountain Flight — 1, Jackie Kvanvig/Jerry Kvanvig. 2, Judy Osborne/Owen Osborne. 3, Mae Willianson/Jim Kindorf. BROKEN TOP Men’s Gathering, Sept. 22 Flag Day Green Flight — 1, John James, 21. 2 (tie), Tom Sifferman, 19; Ken McCumber, 19. 4, Gene Moore, 18. 5 (tie), Greg Cushman, 18; Alan Wade, 18. Green/Silver Flight — 1, Larry Dougharty, 20. 2, Kip Gladder, 20. 3, David Light, 19. 4, Lynn Smith, 19. Women’s Golf Association, Sept. 23 Nine-Hole Stroke Play Gross: 1, L. Stack, 39. 2, T. Burnside, 41. 3, M. Erbe, 41. Net: 1, P. Felton, 31. 2, P. Williams, 34. DESERT PEAKS Wednesday Ladies Club, Sept. 15 Best Ball 1, Shirley Cowden/Sara Gephart, 60. 2, Betty Cook/Patty Pliska, 66. KP — Shirley Cowden Thursday Men’s Club, Sept. 16 Net Stroke Play 1, Sam Brown, 65. 2, Jordan Say, 66. 3, Val Paterson, 68. KP — Bob Victorin. LD — Jordan Say. Friday Night Couples, Sept. 17 Chapman 1, Francisco Morales/Kris Conner, 31.4. 2, Scott Ditmore/Vicki Moore, 31.8. Sunday Group Play, Sept. 19 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Ed McDaniel, 71. 2, Francisco Morales, 72. 3, Fred Blackman, 76. Net: 1, Tina Gruner, 62. 2, Trimble Cannon, 64. 3 (tie), Craig Weigand, 67; Kris Conner, 67. KP — Mike Gardner. LD — Ed McDaniel. Thursday Men’s Club, Sept. 23 Net Blind Draw 1, Jordan Say/Skip Ditmore, 141. 2, Dean Ditmore/Ken Southwick, 142. 3, Dean Hunt/Mel Minor, 144. KP — Bob Victorin. Long Drive — Ken Southwick. Friday Night Couples, Sept. 24 Net Chapman 1, Francisco Morales/Kris Conner, 32.4. 2, Dean Ditmore/Terry Crawford, 33.1. 3, Scott Ditmore/Vicki Moore, 33.8. Sunday Group Play, Sept. 26 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Ed McDaniel, 70. 2, Jim Wyzard, 79. 3 (tie), Mike Gardner, 81; Fred Blackman, 81. Net: 1, Val Paterson, 69. 2 (tie), Scott Ditmore, 70; Dean Hunt, 70. KP — Jim Wyzard. Long Drive — Jim Wyzard. EAGLE CREST Women’s Club, Sept. 21 O-N-E-S at Challenge Course Flight A — 1, Bette Chappron, 25.5. 2, Winnie Miller, 27. 3, Dawn Duby, 29.5. 4 (tie), Sue Marx, 30; Teddie Crippen, 30. Flight B — 1, Diane Concannon, 26. 2, Janice Jackson, 27. 3, Elaine Blyler, 29.5. 4, Judith Moore, 31. Flight C — 1, Joan Mathews, 28.5. 2 (tie), Bette Wald, 29.5; Raydene Heitzhausen, 29.5. 4 (tie), Cathy Brown, 31; Sharon Loberg, 31. Men’s Club, Sept. 22 Two Net Best Balls at Resort Course 1, Phil McCage/Jim Kelly/Jim Meyers/Brad Hallock, 123. 2 (tie), Steve Austin/Ron Cady/Gary Jackson/Jim Madison, 124; 2 (tie), Angelo Radatti/Mike Bessonette/Cliff Schrock/Melvin Nunn, 124. 4 (tie), Ken Murrill/Allan Falco/John Boynton/Billy Balding, 127; Ray Schadt/Peter O’Reilly/Phil Chappron/Matt Conner, 127. 6, Jim Hawkes/Ted Moore/Bill Greeley/Bob Reed, 128. GREENS AT REDMOND Club Championship for Ladies of the Greens, Sept. 21 Stroke Play First Round A Flight — 1, Hazel Blackmore, 35. 2, Diane Miyauchi, 39. 3, Sharron Rosengarth, 42. B Flight — 1, Helen Hinman, 43. 2, Ruth Backup, 43. 3, Claudia Brandow, 44. C Flight — 1, Dagmar Haussler, 49. 2, Lois Houlberg, 50. 3, Judi Vanderpool, 51. D Flight — 1, Carol Suderno, 51. 2, Marilyn Marold, 56. 3, Anita Ertle, 57. Golfer of the Week — Hazel Blackmore, 35/25. Low Putts — Hazel Blackmore, 14. LDs — C Flight: Dagmar Haussler. D Flight: Carol Suderno. KPs — Dagmar Haussler. Men’s Club, Sept. 23 Net Stroke Play A Flight — Nine Holes: 1, John Glover, 29.5. 2 (tie), Jerry Kuchta, 30; Tony Rosengarth, 30. 4, Don O’Malley, 30.5. 18 Holes: 1 (tie), John Glover, 57; Jerry Kuchta, 57. 3 (tie), Joe Carpenter, 60; Don O’Malley, 60. B Flight — Nine Holes: 1, Phil Backup, 23.5. 2 (tie), Bob Haak, 30.5; Louis Rogerson, 30.5. 4 (tie), Bob Sarasin, 32.5; Art Tassie, 32.5. 18 Holes: 1, Bob Sarasin, 60. 2, Dave Kurowski, 63. 3, P. Blackmore, 64. 4 (tie), Roy Brown, 65; Bob Haak, 65. KPs — Miles Hutchins, Nos. 1, 7; Don O’Malley, No. 10; Steve

JUNIPER Ladies Club, Sept. 22 Odd Holes 1 (tie), Carol Mitchell, 34.5; JoAnne Hare, 34.5. 3 (tie), Janet King, 35; Darlene Ross, 35; Sally Martin, 35. 6, Jackie Yake, 36. Chip-Ins — Becky Carl, No. 10; Pat Majchrowski, No. 13. KPs — 0-20 handicaps: Kareen Queen. 21-28: Linda Wakefield. 29-35: Shar Wanichek. 36 or higher: none. LDs — 0-20 handicaps: Kareen Queen. 21-28: Jackie Cooper. 29-35: Shar Wanichek. 36 or higher: Cherie Kurth. QUAIL RUN Quail Run VS. Crooked River Home & Home, Sept. 22 Team Match Play Quail Run def. Crooker River, 22-17 Net Best Ball Flight A — 1, Jim Ulrey/Jerry Page, 61. 2, Brian Meade/George Johnson, 63. 3, Todd Sickles/Grant Martin, 65. Flight B — 1, Richard Johnson/Bill Quinn, 66. 2, Butch Yant/ Stephen Massey, 67. 3, Al Wakefield/Terry Carpenter, 67. KPs — David Davalos, No. 10; Tim Jenning, No. 8. Women’s Club, Sept. 23 Net Putts Flight A — Nine Holes: 1, Barb Heilman, 15. 2, Linda Bauman, 18. 18 Holes: 1, Linda Morrow, 76. Flight B — Nine Holes: 1, Betty Quinn, 18. 2, Pat Buettgenbach, 19. 18 Holes: 1, Vivian Taylor, 77. 2, Gwen Duran, 80. MEADOW LAKES Maverix Golf Tour, Sept. 23 Stroke Play Gross: 1 (tie), Scott Cravens, 76; Tim Eide, 76. Net: 1 (tie), Gary Heeter, 72; John Hess, 72; Ed Carson, 72. Skins — Gross: Tim Eide, Nos. 2, 11; John Hess, Nos. 4, 14; Mike Morris, No. 5; Ed Carson, No. 6; Gary Heeter, No. 16. Net: John Hess, Nos. 4, 8, 14; Tim Eide, No. 2; Bill Beckley, No. 7. RIVER’S EDGE Men’s Club, Sept. 23 Two-Man Best Ball Gross: 1, Hi Becker/Ben Becker, 76. 2, Dieter Haussler/Don Braunton, 79. 3, Jerry Egge/Wayne Johnson, 80. 4, Roger Bean/ Dave Bryson, 82. 5, Jim Wilcox/Terry Loose, 83. 6, Keith Wood/ Chuck Mackdanz, 85. 7, Steve Langenberg/Mike Reuter, 91. 8, Dick Carroll/Richard Schieferstein, 96. Net: 1, Jim Wilcox/Terry Loose, 59. 2, Jerry Egge/Wayne Johnson, 64. 3, Roger Bean/Dave Bryson, 66. 4, Keith Wood/Chuck Mackdanz, 67. 5, Dieter Haussler/Don Braunton, 68. 6, Dick Carroll/Richard Schieferstein, 70. 7 (tie), Hi Becker/Ben Becker, 74; Steve Langenberg/Mike Reuter, 74. SUNRIVER RESORT Women’s Golf Association 36-Hole Stroke Play at Woodlands, Sept. 19 at Meadows, Sept. 22 Club Champions — Gross: 1, Julie Sagalewicz, 176. Net: Barbara Weybright, 140. Flight 1 — Gross: 1, Denice Gardemeyer, 177. Net: 1, Helen Brown, 147. 2, Sharon Kelly, 150. Flight 2 — Gross: 1, Sallie Hennessy, 205. Net: 1, Diana Norem, 148. 2, Lynn Gamble, 152. River’s Edge-Sunriver Home & Home, Sept. 22 at Woodlands One Net Ball 1, Don Martin/Roy Bowen (Sunriver), 57. 2, Virgil Martin/Gary Johansen (Sunriver), 59. 3, Clair Spaulding/Paul Grieco (Sunriver), 60. 4, Robert Hill/Dixon Freeman (Sunriver), 60. 5, Peter Knaupp/ Don Larson (Sunriver), 60. 6, Eric Seberg/Brent Hite (Sunriver), 60. 7, Don Olson/Tom Ellis (Sunriver), 60. 8, D. Hughes/R. Fullerton (River’s Edge), 60. Individual Stroke Play — Gross: 1, Ron Bures. Net: 1, Richard Imper. KPs — Peter Knaupp, No. 5; Ron Bures, No. 7; Brent Hite, No. 12; Nick Fancher, No. 17. WIDGI CREEK Women’s Golf Association Championship Sept. 8, 15 36-Hole Stroke Play Overall Champion —1, Jan Sandburg, 166. Championship Flight — Gross: 1, Melinda Bailey, 163. 2, Kathy Madrigal, 194. Net: 1, Elly Cashel, 138. 2, Denise Waddell, 150. 1st Flight — Gross: 1, Hilary Kenyon, 193. 2, Donna Baker, 194. Net: 1, Janet Campbell, 143. 2nd Flight — Gross: 1, Diane Struve, 200. 2, Sue Gordon, 203. Net: 1, Demy Schleicher, 143. 2, Susan Saunders, 158. Men’s Club, Sept. 22 Stroke Play Blue Tees — Gross: 1, John Deetz, 78. 2, Mitch Cloninger, 79. 3, Fran Ostlund, 80. 4, Gary Wendland, 82. Net: 1, John Masterton, 67. 2, Daryl Hjeresen, 69. 3 (tie), Tom Haigh, 71; Randy Edwards, 71. White Tees — Net: 1, Ray Ehly, 61. 2, Ron Stassens, 63. 3 (tie), Jim Bradbury, 68; Dave Madrigal, 68. 5, Bob Drake, 69. KPs — Daryl Hjeresen, No. 2; Chas Nelson, No. 11. Women’s Club, Sept. 22 Net Tee to Green Flight 1 — 1, Sherry Deetz, 43. 2 (tie), Jan Sandburg, 44.5; Kathy Madrigal, 44.5. Flight 2 — 1, Virginia Knowles, 43. 2 (tie), Mindy Cicinelli, 45.5; Chris Fitzgibbons, 45.5. Flight 3 — 1, Jan Guettler, 46.5. 2, Maxine Fletcher, 47. 3, Demy Schleicher, 48.5. KPs — Jan Sandburg, No. 2; Ann Kieffer, No. 5; Hilary Kenyon, No. 11; Eva Dryselt, No. 15.

Hole-In-One Report Sept. 23 EAGLE CREST RIDGE Randy Myers, Redmond No. 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 yards. . . . . . . . . . pitching wedge Sept. 23 EAGLE CREST RIDGE Donna Hawkes, Sisters No. 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 yards . . . . . . . . . . pitching wedge Sept. 26 EAGLE CREST CHALLENGE George Steelhammer, Salem No. 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . gap wedge Sept. 26 CROOKED RIVER RANCH Judy Parker, Crooked River Ranch No. 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-hybrid Sept. 28 DESERT PEAKS Juanice Schram, Madras No. 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . sand wedge

Calendar The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf events calendar. Items should be mailed to P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708; faxed to the sports department at 541-385-0831; or e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com. ——— TOURNAMENTS Sept. 30 — Maverix Golf Tour event at Quail Run Golf Course in La Pine. The Maverix Golf Tour is a weekly competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses with prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-3897676 or www.maverixgolftour.com. Oct. 2 — Fall All-In Scramble at Prineville Golf Club. For more information or to register, call 541-447-3008. Oct. 2-3 — Deer Widows Invitational at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond is a women’s-only tournament. For more information or to register, call Juniper at 541-548-3121, or visit www. junipergolfcourse.com. Oct. 2-3 — The Crooked River Ranch Couples Caper is a 36-hole, two-person Chapman. Tournament is open to any golfer with an official USGA handicap and begins with a 9 a.m. shotgun. Cost is $150 per couple, and includes three rounds of golf each, Saturday lunch, morning coffee and doughnuts and tee prizes. Carts are $30 per couple for each day. For more information or to register, call Crooked River Ranch at 541-923-6343, or visit www. crookedriveranch.com. Oct. 7 — Maverix Golf Tour event at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. The Maverix Golf Tour is a weekly competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses with prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-3897676 or www.maverixgolftour.com. Oct. 9 — Summit Football Golf Tournament at Broken Top Club to benefit the Summit High School football program. The 18-hole scramble will begin with a noon shotgun start. The cost to play is

TUESDAY

OCTOBER 5,

$125 per player or $500 per team and includes greens fees, driving range balls, cart, dinner and awards. Presenting sponsorships and hole sponsorships are also available. For more information or to register, call Jerry Hackenbruck at 541-647-4802. Oct. 11 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $110 for the season plus a $5 per-event fee. For more information, call Ron Meisner at 541-548-3307. Oct. 14 — Maverix Golf Tour event at the Club at Brasada Ranch in Powell Butte. The Maverix Golf Tour is a weekly competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses with prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676 or www. maverixgolftour.com. Oct. 15-17 — The Tetherow Two-Ball Invitational is a two-person, select-drive best ball at Tetherow Golf Club in Bend. Tee times Saturday will be between 10:30 a.m. and noon. Play will begin Sunday at 11 a.m. Cost is $600 per team, with no more than one professional on each team, and includes Friday practice round, breakfast and on-course snacks, Saturday dinner, caddy, gifts, trophies and prizes. The field will be limited to the first 30 teams to register. For more information, call Tetherow at 541-388-2582, Oct. 21 — Maverix Golf Tour event at Crooked River Ranch. The Maverix Golf Tour is a weekly competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses with prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676 or www.maverixgolftour.com. Oct. 28 — Maverix Golf Tour event at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. The Maverix Golf Tour is a weekly competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses with prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676, or www. maverixgolftour.com. Nov. 7 — The Turkey Open at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville is a two-person best ball tournament. Event tees off with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes pro shop at 541-447-7113.

PROFESSIONAL PGA Tour Money Leaders Through Sept. 26 Rank. Name Trn 1. Matt Kuchar 25 2. Jim Furyk 21 3. Ernie Els 20 4. Dustin Johnson 23 5. Steve Stricker 19 6. Phil Mickelson 20 7. Luke Donald 20 8. Paul Casey 17 9. Justin Rose 22 10. Hunter Mahan 24 11. Jeff Overton 26 12. Tim Clark 23 13. Retief Goosen 19 14. Bubba Watson 22 15. Camilo Villegas 20 16. Jason Day 24 17. Ben Crane 24 18. Zach Johnson 24 19. Ryan Palmer 25 20. Robert Allenby 21 21. Bo Van Pelt 26 22. Anthony Kim 14 23. Charley Hoffman 23 24. Rory McIlroy 16 25. Adam Scott 20 26. Geoff Ogilvy 19 27. Nick Watney 23 28. Ryan Moore 24 29. J.B. Holmes 23 30. Rickie Fowler 25 31. K.J. Choi 22 32. Ian Poulter 15 33. Kevin Na 25 34. Stuart Appleby 29 35. Carl Pettersson 27 36. Brendon de Jonge 29 37. Jason Bohn 22 38. Vaughn Taylor 23 39. Sean O’Hair 23 40. Bill Haas 23 41. Ricky Barnes 26 42. Martin Laird 25 43. Scott Verplank 22 44. Heath Slocum 22 45. Brandt Snedeker 26 46. Brian Davis 27 47. Graeme McDowell 10 48. Fredrik Jacobson 21 49. Stewart Cink 22 50. Charlie Wi 23 51. Lucas Glover 22 52. Marc Leishman 24 53. Rory Sabbatini 23 54. Bryce Molder 24 55. D.J. Trahan 24 56. Kevin Streelman 27 57. Brian Gay 26 58. Padraig Harrington 18 59. Michael Sim 20 60. David Toms 23 61. Y.E. Yang 21 62. Steve Marino 22 63. Tiger Woods 12 64. Arjun Atwal 10 65. Angel Cabrera 19 66. Vijay Singh 23 67. Matt Jones 25 68. Charles Howell III 24 69. Tom Gillis 24 70. Jason Dufner 25 71. Davis Love III 21 72. John Rollins 23 73. Kris Blanks 26 74. Paul Goydos 23 75. Bill Lunde 25 76. J.J. Henry 27 77. Cameron Beckman 21 78. Shaun Micheel 17 79. Greg Chalmers 25 80. Justin Leonard 24 81. Kenny Perry 20 82. D.A. Points 25 83. Derek Lamely 25 84. Tim Petrovic 27 85. Blake Adams 24 86. Steve Elkington 21 87. Jimmy Walker 25 88. Andres Romero 19 89. Sergio Garcia 15 90. Chris Riley 20 91. Josh Teater 27 92. Stephen Ames 21 93. Alex Cejka 24 94. John Senden 26 95. Jerry Kelly 24 96. Chris Couch 22 97. Boo Weekley 25 98. Garrett Willis 21 99. Corey Pavin 8 100. Matt Bettencourt 28

Money $4,881,227 $4,809,622 $4,558,861 $4,473,122 $4,190,235 $3,821,733 $3,665,234 $3,613,194 $3,603,331 $3,564,391 $3,456,356 $3,383,931 $3,218,089 $3,198,998 $3,035,523 $2,904,327 $2,841,500 $2,832,993 $2,801,611 $2,766,997 $2,762,258 $2,574,921 $2,559,646 $2,554,280 $2,489,402 $2,393,045 $2,387,289 $2,374,823 $2,337,716 $2,332,790 $2,199,962 $2,079,664 $2,009,224 $1,954,825 $1,921,145 $1,878,519 $1,860,891 $1,829,401 $1,825,913 $1,825,136 $1,793,942 $1,759,528 $1,653,190 $1,644,865 $1,602,690 $1,602,367 $1,589,337 $1,583,752 $1,514,651 $1,513,355 $1,511,275 $1,488,837 $1,454,688 $1,428,438 $1,398,162 $1,389,849 $1,388,579 $1,381,453 $1,338,926 $1,309,198 $1,301,726 $1,297,859 $1,294,765 $1,268,490 $1,266,440 $1,242,142 $1,206,623 $1,132,121 $1,130,767 $1,121,695 $1,110,117 $1,098,736 $1,096,588 $1,074,092 $1,044,734 $1,035,688 $1,000,749 $988,410 $973,075 $971,610 $968,811 $955,653 $949,229 $947,314 $945,048 $938,494 $937,987 $937,917 $936,845 $929,122 $920,273 $916,527 $904,253 $901,238 $891,493 $888,146 $856,139 $856,073 $839,193 $836,176

G W RYDER CUP Site: Newport, Wales. Schedule: Friday and Saturday, four morning fourball (better-ball) matches and four afternoon foursomes (alternateshot) matches; Sunday, 12 singles matches. Course: Celtic Manor Resort, The Twenty Ten Course (7,378 yards, par 71). Television: ESPN (Thursday, 11:30 p.m.Friday, 10 a.m.), ESPN2 (Friday, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.) and NBC (Saturday, 5 a.m.-3 p.m.; Sunday, 4-10 a.m.). United States (c-captain’s pick): c-Stewart Cink, c-Rickie Fowler, Jim Furyk, Dustin Johnson, Zach Johnson, Matt Kuchar, Hunter Mahan, Phil Mickelson, Jeff Overton, Steve Stricker, Bubba Watson, c-Tiger Woods. Captain: Corey Pavin. Europe: c-Luke Donald, England; Ross Fisher, England; Peter Hanson, Sweden; c-Padraig Harrington, Ireland; Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain; Martin Kaymer, Germany; Graeme McDowell, Northern Ireland; Rory McIlroy, Northern Ireland; c-Edoardo Molinari, Italy; Francesco Molinari, Italy; Ian Poulter, England; Lee Westwood, England. Captain: Colin Montgomerie, Scotland. Series: United States leads 25-10-2. Last matches: In 2008 at Valhalla in Kentucky, the United States won 16½-11½ for its first victory since 1999. Jim Furyk’s 2-and-1 victory over Jimenez gave the U.S. team — playing without the injured Woods — the decisive point. Last week: Furyk won the Tour Championship, earning $1.35 million for the tournament victory and $10 million for the FedEx Cup title. He closed with an even-par 70 for a one-shot victory over Donald in a steady rain at East Lake in Atlanta. Furyk has three victories this year. ... England’s John Parry won the Vivendi Cup in France for his first PGA European Tour title, beating Sweden’s Johan Edfors by two strokes.

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Last year: Jay Haas won the event for the second time in five seasons, closing with a 7-under 65 for a tournamentrecord 18-under 198 total. Andy Bean and Russ Cochran tied for second, two strokes back.

Last week: Nate Smith won the WNB Golf Classic in Midland, Texas, for his first tour title, shooting a 6-under 66 for a two-stroke victory over Alistair Presnell, Fabian Gomez and Brandt Jobe. Smith earned $94,500 to jump from 78th to 25th on the money list with $153,054.

Last week: Cochran won his second straight Champions Tour title, shooting a 1-under 71 for a two-stroke victory over Tom Pernice Jr. in the SAS Championship in Cary, N.C. The 51-year-old Cochran won the Songdo Championship on Sept. 12 in South Korea for his first victory on the 50and-over tour.

Notes: Jamie Lovemark leads the money list with $416,669, followed by Chris Kirk ($407,673), Tommy Gainey ($371,960), Hunter Haas ($333,604) and Martin Piller ($324,427). The final top 25 will earn 2011 PGA Tour cards. Kirk, Gainey, Haas and Piller each have two victories this year, putting them a win away from an immediate PGA Tour promotion. ... The Chattanooga Classic is next week.

Notes: Bernhard Langer, the tour leader with five victories and $2,180,175, tops the field along with 50-year-old Fred Couples, a three-time winner this year. Langer also leads the Charles Schwab Cup, 672 points ahead of second-place Couples. ... Tom Byrum is making his Champions Tour debut. The 1989 Kemper Open winner turned 50 on Tuesday. ... The Constellation Energy Senior Players Championship, the last of the tour’s five major championships, is next week in Potomac, Md.

All Times PDT

NATIONWIDE TOUR SOBOBA GOLF CLASSIC Site: San Jacinto, Calif. Course: The Country Club at Soboda Springs (7,102 yards, par 71). Purse: $1 million. Winner’s share: $180,000. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-Sunday, 1-3 p.m.). Last year: Jerod Turner won his first Na-

PGA TOUR VIKING CLASSIC Site: Madison, Miss. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Annandale Golf Club (7,199 yards, par 72). Purse: $3.6 million. Winner’s share: $648,000. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-Sunday, 5-7 p.m.). Last year: The tournament was canceled because of unplayable conditions at rain-soaked Annandale. In 2008, Will MacKenzie won the Fall Series event for his second tour title, beating Marc Turnesa with a birdie on the second hole of a playoff. Brian Gay was eliminated on the first extra hole. Notes: The tournament opens the fiveevent Fall Series. ... John Daly is in the field. He has one top-25 finish — a tie for 24th in the Puerto Rico Open — in 17 tour starts this year. ... The McGladrey Classic is next week in Sea Island, Ga., followed by the Frys.com Open in San Martin, Calif.

CHAMPIONS ENSURE CLASSIC Site: Conover, N.C. Schedule: Friday-Sunday. Course: Rock Barn Golf and Spa, Jones Course (7,090 yards, par 72). Purse: $1.75 million. Winner’s share: $262,500.

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tionwide Tour title, birdieing the final hole for a 2-under 69 and a two-stroke victory over Derek Lamely. Turner was making only his seventh start of the year after earning a spot in the field with a seventh-place tie in the previous event.

Notes: Woods has played on only one winning Ryder Cup team in his career. ... The United State hasn’t won in Europe since 1993 at The Belfry. ... The team from Britain and Ireland was expanded in 1979 to include all of Europe. ... The course is the first specifically for the Ryder Cup. It combines nine new holes created by European Golf Design and nine renovated holes from the Wentwood Hills course designed by Robert Trent Jones Jr. ... The 2012 event will be played at Medinah near Chicago.

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a full dinner hosted by BRAND 33 Restaurant, Buckboard Murder MINI-MYSTERY, and a lively raffle & auction

Sign up at redmondhumane.org or call 541-815-2639

N Hwy 97 • Next to ShopKo 541-593-GOLF (4653) Mon–Fri 10–6 Sat 9–5, Sun 10–4

18707 SW Century Dr., Bend w w w.widgi.com | (541) 382-4449

Proud to be Central Oregon’s only golf specialty store! Locally owned. *Not to be combined with any other offer. Sale prices on in-stock items only. Certain manufacturer’s restrictions apply. See store for details.


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HELPING YOU MAKE GOOD BUYING DECISIONS

SAVVY SHOPPER

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Inside

‘The Whole Truth’ After cancer fight, Maura Tierney finds a better fit in ABC series, Page E2

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/savvyshopper

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2010

SHOPPING IN BRIEF

Old Mill trunk show features fall shoes Representatives from Born and Sofft shoe companies will present their fall styles at Acadia Footwear’s trunk show from 5 to 9 p.m. Oct. 7. Store owner Hillary Richards said the predominant styles from the two lines are ballet flats, clogs and leather boots. As for the styling, expect lots of detailing, including metallic studs and buckles, detailed stitching and perforations similar to saddle shoes, as well as distressed textured leather, snake prints and animal prints such as cheetah. The Born line also includes Submitted photo men’s shoes, Examples from which include Born’s fall line leather slipinclude the on driving Nathaniel shoe moccasins, for men, $110, casual laceand women’s ups and a Polyana shoe, dressier ox$100. ford style, as well as distressed leather boots. “(Sofft and Born) are my two best-selling shoes. People love their comfort,” Richards said. Cocktails and refreshments will be provided. Acadia Footwear is located at 330 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, #110 in Bend’s Old Mill District. Contact: 541-389-8900 or www.acadiacomfortfootwear .com.

Military sale planned at the fairgrounds Smokey Point Commissary will host an on-site commissary sale at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. Valid military identification cards from any branch, active or retired, are required for entrance to the sale. Sale products, which will include groceries, paper products and cleaning supplies, will be sold at a discount. Parking and admission are free. Accepted forms of payment are cash, checks and debit and credit cards. Contact: Devona Johnson at 425-304-3414 or Leva Fairley at 425-304-3412. — Marielle Gallagher, The Bulletin

Top sellers For the week of Sept. 23

Los Angeles Times fiction best-seller “Freedom,” by Jonathan Franzen

Los Angeles Times nonfiction best-seller “The Grand Design,” by Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow

Top Billboard album “A Thousand Suns,” Linkin Park

Top R&B album

Community-supported agriculture program Agricultural Connections offers a variety of local and organic products every week, including carrots, strawberries and roma tomatoes.

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Elizabeth Weigand, 30, manager of Agricultural Connections, helps Bretagne Dow-Hygelund, 33, right, with her son Byron, 1, gather her food last week at Environmental Center of Bend, the CSA’s pickup site.

Eat local

year-round Feasting on Oregon’s bounty doesn’t have to end when farmers markets close

By Marielle Gallagher n the summertime, it’s easy to find food produced in Oregon via farmers markets, local produce stands or community-supported agriculture programs, also known as CSAs. But by mid-October, farmers markets and most CSA programs will close until spring. At most CSAs, members pay a lump sum upfront and collect boxes of produce from local farms throughout the growing season. An option for consumers looking for local food in the winter is Agricultural Connections, a year-round, Bend-based CSA. Founded by former Bend resident Andrew Adams in January, AC partners with several farms in Oregon to buy vegetables, fruit, dairy products and more on a 52-weeks-a-year basis. The manager and sole employee of AC, Elizabeth Weigand, 30, says one of the differ-

I

By Melissa Magsaysay

Anyone who knows me knows I love animals. My pets are like family, so I am always mindful of the products that I buy to care for them. Fortunately, it’s easier than ever to find eco-friendly alternatives that are equally effective and will reduce your exposure to potentially dangerous chemicals. Flea and tick treatments: Collars, sprays, and topical applications are often made

Top Amazon.com DVD seller Iron Man 2 Sources: Wire reports

Los Angeles Times

for your 4-legged friends

Top country album

“Luis Miguel,” Luis Miguel

ences between AC and other CSA programs is that instead of paying upfront for the season, customers order on a weekly basis. Customers order via the website www. bendcsa.com, where they can click on “Visit The Shop” to see grocery items listed by farm of origin. There are two sizes for the “boxes” of produce, individual ($20) and family ($28), and there are side items that can be added, such as eggs, mushrooms, milk, half ’n half, yogurt, 15 types of cheese, butter, meat, jam and pet food. See Winter / E6

Faux fur: Chic or just cheap? Eco-friendly alternatives By Terri Bennett

Top Latin album

•Comparing the cost of “eating local” between a community agriculture program, Whole Foods Market and Safeway, Page E6

DO YOUR PART

“Passion, Pain & Pleasure,” Trey Songz “The Guitar Song,” Jamey Johnson

Inside

The Bulletin

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

with dangerous pesticides that can rub off on humans. Oral flea treatments for dogs and cats are the safer alternative. If you notice fleas, wash bedding in hot, soapy water and vacuum the home weekly to remove eggs and larvae. Dog shampoo: Some shampoos are made from petroleum-based ingredients and are known to actually irritate skin, create rashes and cause cancer. See Pets / E6

New York Times News Service

Fall fashion look features a faux fur jacket from La Garconne.

Deliberating the fur/faux fur trend? Some say it looks cheap; others, that it’s simply trendy. I agree with both points of view. The fur — and much more politically correct faux fur — trend is in full force this fall, coming in everything from swing coats to duffel bags. But I also think that faux fur can easily go very wrong if made of some cheap acrylic mess that looks more like an old Chewbacca costume than a stylish piece of clothing. If you’re going to buy a jacket or cardigan trimmed with or made entirely of faux fur this season, first make sure it doesn’t feel like

a can of Aqua Net was let loose all over it. That tacky-to-the-touch feeling equals tacky to the sight as well. The texture should be as soft and plush as possible. The pieces I particularly love when it comes to faux fur are jackets that have removable faux fur collars. An army green bomber jacket from Rebecca Taylor ($495), for instance, has an optional faux fur collar that looks real and lays flat so the wearer doesn’t look like she’s giving a piggyback ride to a Muppet. Plus the jacket provides options — collar-on makes a statement, collaroff is a little more understated — and ultimately you’ll be getting a little more bang for your buck. See Fur / E6


S

HELPING YOU MAKE GOOD BUYING DECISIONS

SAVVY SHOPPER

E

Inside

‘The Whole Truth’ After cancer fight, Maura Tierney finds a good fit in ABC series, Page E2

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/savvyshopper

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2010

SHOPPING IN BRIEF

Old Mill trunk show features fall shoes Representatives from Born and Sofft shoe companies will present their fall styles at Acadia Footwear’s trunk show from 5 to 9 p.m. Oct. 7. Store owner Hillary Richards said the predominant styles from the two lines are ballet flats, clogs and leather boots. As for the styling, expect lots of detailing, including metallic studs and buckles, detailed stitching and perforations similar to saddle shoes, as well as distressed textured leather, snake prints and animal prints such as cheetah. The Born line also includes Submitted photo men’s shoes, Examples from which include Born’s fall line leather slipinclude the on driving Nathaniel shoe moccasins, for men, $110, casual laceand women’s ups and a Polyana shoe, dressier ox$100. ford style, as well as distressed leather boots. “(Sofft and Born) are my two best-selling shoes. People love their comfort,” Richards said. Cocktails and refreshments will be provided. Acadia Footwear is located at 330 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, #110 in Bend’s Old Mill District. Contact: 541-389-8900 or www.acadiacomfortfootwear .com.

Military sale planned at the fairgrounds Smokey Point Commissary will host an on-site commissary sale at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. Valid military identification cards from any branch, active or retired, are required for entrance to the sale. Sale products, which will include groceries, paper products and cleaning supplies, will be sold at a discount. Parking and admission are free. Accepted forms of payment are cash, checks and debit and credit cards. Contact: Devona Johnson at 425-304-3414 or Leva Fairley at 425-304-3412. — Marielle Gallagher, The Bulletin

Top sellers For the week of Sept. 23

Los Angeles Times fiction best-seller “Freedom,” by Jonathan Franzen

Los Angeles Times nonfiction best-seller “The Grand Design,” by Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow

Top Billboard album “A Thousand Suns,” Linkin Park

Top R&B album

Community-supported agriculture program Agricultural Connections offers a variety of local and organic products every week, including carrots, strawberries and roma tomatoes.

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Elizabeth Weigand, manager of Agricultural Connections, helps Bretagne Dow-Hygelund, right, with her son Byron, 1, gather her food last week at Environmental Center of Bend, the CSA’s pickup site.

Eat local

year-round Feasting on Oregon’s bounty doesn’t have to end when farmers markets close

By Marielle Gallagher n the summertime, it’s easy to find food produced in Oregon via farmers markets, local produce stands or community-supported agriculture programs, also known as CSAs. But by mid-October, farmers markets and most CSA programs will close until spring. At most CSAs, members pay a lump sum upfront and collect boxes of produce from local farms throughout the growing season. An option for consumers looking for local food in the winter is Agricultural Connections, a year-round, Bend-based CSA. Founded by former Bend resident Andrew Adams in January, AC partners with several farms in Oregon to buy vegetables, fruit, dairy products and more on a 52-weeks-a-year basis. The manager and sole employee of AC, Elizabeth Weigand, 30, says one of the differ-

I

By Melissa Magsaysay

Anyone who knows me knows I love animals. My pets are like family, so I am always mindful of the products that I buy to care for them. Fortunately, it’s easier than ever to find eco-friendly alternatives that are equally effective and will reduce your exposure to potentially dangerous chemicals. Flea and tick treatments: Collars, sprays, and topical applications are often made

Top Amazon.com DVD seller Iron Man 2 Sources: Wire reports

Los Angeles Times

for your 4-legged friends

Top country album

“Luis Miguel,” Luis Miguel

ences between AC and other CSA programs is that instead of paying upfront for the season, customers order on a weekly basis. Customers order via the website www. bendcsa.com, where they can click on “Visit The Shop” to see grocery items listed by farm of origin. There are two sizes for the “boxes” of produce, individual ($20) and family ($28), and there are side items that can be added, such as eggs, mushrooms, milk, half ’n half, yogurt, 15 types of cheese, butter, meat, jam and pet food. See Winter / E6

Faux fur: Chic or just cheap? Eco-friendly alternatives By Terri Bennett

Top Latin album

•Comparing the costs between a community agriculture program, Whole Foods Market and Safeway, Page E6

DO YOUR PART

“Passion, Pain & Pleasure,” Trey Songz “The Guitar Song,” Jamey Johnson

Inside

The Bulletin

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

with dangerous pesticides that can rub off on humans. Oral flea treatments for dogs and cats are the safer alternative. If you notice fleas, wash bedding in hot, soapy water and vacuum the home weekly to remove eggs and larvae. Dog shampoo: Some shampoos are made from petroleum-based ingredients and are known to actually irritate skin, create rashes and cause cancer. See Pets / E6

New York Times News Service

Fall fashion look features a faux fur jacket from La Garconne.

Deliberating the fur/faux fur trend? Some say it looks cheap; others, that it’s simply trendy. I agree with both points of view. The fur — and much more politically correct faux fur — trend is in full force this fall, coming in everything from swing coats to duffel bags. But I also think that faux fur can easily go very wrong if made of some cheap acrylic mess that looks more like an old Chewbacca costume than a stylish piece of clothing. If you’re going to buy a jacket or cardigan trimmed with or made entirely of faux fur this season, first make sure it doesn’t feel like

a can of Aqua Net was let loose all over it. That tacky-to-the-touch feeling equals tacky to the sight as well. The texture should be as soft and plush as possible. The pieces I particularly love when it comes to faux fur are jackets that have removable faux fur collars. An army green bomber jacket from Rebecca Taylor ($495), for instance, has an optional faux fur collar that looks real and lays flat so the wearer doesn’t look like she’s giving a piggyback ride to a Muppet. Plus the jacket provides options — collar-on makes a statement, collaroff is a little more understated — and ultimately you’ll be getting a little more bang for your buck. See Fur / E6


T EL EV ISION

E2 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Man must sort out attractions before he’s ready to marry Dear Abby: After many months of dating a wonderful woman, “Amy,” we have set a date for our wedding. However, there’s a problem. As the date draws closer, Amy is concerned about my lack of physical intimacy with her. While I am very attracted to her, I am having some doubts. I recently noticed a young man at my health club and experienced some unfamiliar feelings. I don’t think I am gay, but I am no longer sure that Amy is what I have been looking for. Should I push these feelings aside or should I tell Amy the truth about these feelings? — Searching For Answers in Pennsylvania Dear Searching: You should absolutely tell your fiancée the truth about the feelings you’re having — all of them. To marry a woman knowing you might be more attracted to a someone else would bring everyone involved great pain. It is very important that you find out who you are and what you’re looking for before coupling up with anyone. While Amy may not be thrilled to hear what you have to say, you owe it to her and to yourself to be frank before this goes any further. Dear Abby: My husband and I dated for eight years before we were married two years ago. He has a son from a previous relationship, and we have a 9-monthold son together. My problem is my mother-inlaw. More often than not, she calls me by my stepson’s mother’s name. Abby, that woman and my husband haven’t been together for more than 12 years! My husband thinks I’m making a big deal out of nothing. My relationship with his mother has suffered because of it. She lives near us and helps out with watching our baby, so I see her quite often.

DEAR ABBY What are your thoughts on this? — Also Known As ... Dear A.K.A.: If your mother-inlaw’s slip of the tongue happened occasionally, I would agree with your husband that it’s no big deal. Because it happens often, it appears the woman is doing it deliberately. Have you confronted her about it and told her how hurtful it is? And if it doesn’t stop, then you’re within your rights to limit your time with her and/or arrange for other supervision for your baby. It would be confusing for him to grow up around a grandmother who calls his mother by a stranger’s name. Dear Abby: When I am out with my friends, they can’t keep their hands and eyes off their cell phones. They sit there and text whatever guy they’re involved with, and I feel like they would rather be with anyone else but me. I have talked to them about it, but they say I “don’t understand” because I have never been in a relationship. Abby, I’m not jealous, I am hurt that my friends think cyber communication is more important than spending time with friends. What do you think? — Texted Out in Texas Dear Texted Out: I’m glad you asked. It is rude for people to behave the way you have described. Good manners dictate that people give their undivided attention to those they are with. To do otherwise sends the signal that their present company is less important. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Tierney bounces back after cancer fight By Gail Pennington

When a man in a wheelchair is found dead in New York Harbor, Assistant District Attorney Kathryn Peale (Maura Tierney) brings a murder charge against the man’s daughter in “The Whole Truth,” airing tonight on ABC.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

LOS ANGELES — Maura Tierney likes her new, pixie haircut. “It dries faster,” she said, tugging at a curl behind her ear. Mainly, though, she’s happy to have hair. After being diagnosed with breast cancer last year, Tierney, 45, had surgery and chemotherapy, dropping out of NBC’s “Parenthood” to do everything necessary to get well. But as of this week, Tierney is back on television in ABC’s “The Whole Truth.” Lauren Graham replaced her in “Parenthood,” leaving Tierney free to take a role that was actually written for her. Tom Donaghy created the character of Kathryn Peale, the no-nonsense lead prosecutor who matches wits with friend and adversary Jimmy Brogan (Rob Morrow), with Tierney in mind. Donaghy and Tierney have known each other since college, but she was committed to “Parenthood,” so he cast Joely Richardson. Then real life intervened. While Tierney was finishing treatment and acting in a play in New York, Richardson asked to be released from “The Whole Truth.” “Joely’s life was fairly complicated,” executive producer Jonathan Littman told TV critics when ABC introduced “The Whole Truth” in August. Richardson’s mother is actress Vanessa Redgrave, and three members of that family — Joely’s sister, Natasha Richardson; her uncle, Corin Redgrave; and her aunt, Lynn Redgrave — had died within 14 months of one another. “It was the right thing to do, to let her go and deal with that,” Littman said. “The timing worked out great, because then Maura was available and

ABC via McClatchyTribune News Service

able to do it.” Tierney spent nine years on “ER,” leaving in 2008. Tough nurse Abby Cunningham, always determined not to look vulnerable, showed up a bit when Tierney was asked about her cancer. “I’m good,” she said, adding, when pressed, “I’m healthy. ... I read the script, and I liked it. So that was that.” Tierney had chosen to return to theater, rather than television, because she said she appreciated the precision and structure that a play required. “I wasn’t really thinking about doing another (TV) show,” she said. “But I really responded to the character that Tom wrote, I guess because (he) wrote it for me.” Donaghy created the role in response to “a lot of female char-

acters on television that weren’t strong in the way that I understand how women can be strong and also feminine,” he said. “I knew Maura had the elegance, and we keep saying this word ‘wit,’ so I wrote it with her talents in mind, never thinking she would be available. So it’s quite a gift that she is.” Added Tierney, “My ego’s not involved there at all. But I thought she was a really, really appealing character ... and funny. And it was interesting to find a character that had such sort of a great sense of humor, yet was so driven.” Tierney has been quoted as saying she was uncomfortable having to ask for help during her treatment, and she clearly would rather get past questions about how she was changed by the experience.

Weekly Arts & Entertainment

When: 10 tonight Where: ABC

“I probably have a new perspective on everything, in general,” she said. Still, “My perspective probably should change more than it has, quite honestly. But as far as work goes ... it’s a priority for me now to be able to work with people who I really like and trust.” Of Donaghy, she said, “Tom and I are friends, like actual real friends, not Hollywood friends. We went to college together. We’ve known each other for over 20 years. So that will be a factor because I feel like, yeah, it’s too much time involved of your life to not enjoy it.”

MORROW’S SEWING & VACUUM CENTER

Every Friday In

Self Referrals Welcome

‘The Whole Truth’

304 NE 3rd Street Bend 541-382-3882

Lose A Pound A Day! (541) 317 - 4894

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KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! Ruff News Nightly News House of Payne House of Payne Everyday Food Scandinavian Tracks Ahead ‘G’ Steves Europe

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ Passport-Adv. Nightly Business News News Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Steves Europe Travelscope ‘G’ Passport-Adv. Nightly Business

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Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider (N) The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

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The Middle ‘PG’ Better With You Modern Family Cougar Town (N) The Whole Truth (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Undercovers Instructions (N) ’ ‘14’ Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Los Angeles (N) ‘14’ Survivor: Nicaragua (N) ’ Å Criminal Minds JJ (N) ’ ‘14’ Å The Defenders (N) ’ ‘14’ Å The Middle ‘PG’ Better With You Modern Family Cougar Town (N) The Whole Truth (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Hell’s Kitchen A contestant infuriates chef Ramsay. (N) ’ (PA) ‘14’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ News The Unit ’ (Part 1 of 2) ‘14’ Å The Unit ’ (Part 2 of 2) ‘14’ Å American Experience ’ ‘PG’ The Tenth Inning Bottom of the Tenth Boston Red Sox win the World Series. (N) ‘PG’ Undercovers Instructions (N) ’ ‘14’ Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Los Angeles (N) ‘14’ America’s Next Top Model (N) ‘PG’ Hellcats (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Married... With Married... With For Your Home Katie Brown Knit & Crochet Watercolor Quest Test Kitchen Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ American Experience ’ ‘PG’ The Tenth Inning Bottom of the Tenth Boston Red Sox win the World Series. (N) ‘PG’

11:00 KATU News at 11 News News News (N) Family Guy ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ News King of Queens Everyday Food

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A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å Dog the Bounty Hunter ‘PG’ Å Dog the Bounty Hunter ‘PG’ Å Steven Seagal Steven Seagal Biography Steven Seagal ‘PG’ Å 130 28 8 32 CSI: Miami The DeLuca Motel ‘14’ (3:15) ››› “Dirty ›› “Magnum Force” (1973, Crime Drama) Clint Eastwood, Hal Holbrook, David Soul. “Dirty” Harry investi- ›› “The Enforcer” (1976, Crime Drama) Clint Eastwood, Tyne Daly, Harry Guardino. ›› “Sudden Impact” (1983, Crime Drama) Clint Eastwood, Sondra Locke, Pat Hingle. 102 40 39 Harry” gates gangland-style murders. Å Dirty Harry and partner hunt rocket-armed radicals. Å Detective Harry Callahan searches for a serial killer. Å Most Extreme Most Extreme Most Extreme Maneaters ’ ‘PG’ Å I’m Alive Saved ’ ‘PG’ Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 12 38 Most Extreme Top Chef The Last Supper ‘14’ Top Chef Final challenges. ‘14’ Å Top Chef Season Finale: Part II ‘14’ Top Chef: Just Desserts ‘14’ Top Chef: Just Desserts ‘14’ Top Chef: Just Desserts (N) ‘14’ (11:15) Top Chef: Just Desserts ‘14’ 137 44 (6:15) CMT Music Are You Smarter? The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ ›› “Police Academy” (1984, Comedy) Steve Guttenberg, Kim Cattrall. ’ Mabe in America CMT Music ’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ 190 32 42 53 (4:00) ›› “Police Academy” ’ Trash Inc: The Secret Life of Trash Inc: The Secret Life of Mad Money Trash Inc: The Secret Life of Trash Inc: The Secret Life of Paid Program Profit-Town 51 36 40 52 Marijuana: America’s Pot Industry Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Rick’s List Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Chappelle Show Chappelle’s Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Tosh.0 Å Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Naked Gun Ride Guide ‘14’ Untracked PM Edition Bend on the Run Bend City Council Outside Presents Outside Presents Outside Film Festival PM Edition 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington Hannah Montana Good-Charlie Suite/Deck Fish Hooks ‘G’ Phineas and Ferb ››› “Lilo & Stitch” (2002) Voices of Daveigh Chase. Suite/Deck Hannah Montana Hannah Montana Jonas L.A. ‘G’ Jonas L.A. ‘G’ 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å MythBusters Duct Tape Hour 2 ‘PG’ MythBusters Red Rag to a Bull ‘PG’ MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab: Dark Baseball Tonight (Live) Å MLB Baseball Arizona Diamondbacks at San Francisco Giants From AT&T Park in San Francisco. (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 SportsCenter 2010 Poker 2010 World Series of Poker SportsCenter (Live) Å NFL Live (N) SportsNation Baseball Tonight SportsNation Skateboard Street League 22 24 21 24 Skateboard Street League From Las Vegas. (N) Boxing: 2001 Chavez vs. Johnson Boxing: 1999 Camacho vs. Goossen Cheap Seats Cheap Seats AWA Wrestling Å MLB Baseball From Oct. 17, 1979. Å 23 25 123 25 Boxing SportsNation SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Friday Night Lights ’ ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Challenge Food Network Unwrapped 2 (N) Bobby Flay Bobby Flay 24 Hour Restaurant Battle Diners, Drive Diners, Drive 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Beavers Cougars Access Huskies MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers From Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas. Beavers Football Football Preview Seahawks The Final Score 20 45 28* 26 Seahawks (4:00) ››› “Live Free or Die Hard” (2007) Bruce Willis, Justin Long. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men › “Meet the Spartans” (2008) Sean Maguire, Carmen Electra. Premiere. Terriers Fustercluck (N) ‘MA’ (11:01) Terriers Fustercluck ‘MA’ 131 Get It Sold ‘G’ Holmes/Homes Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins My First Place Income Property House Crashers House Hunters Hunters Int’l All American Handyman ‘G’ Å 176 49 33 43 Get It Sold ‘G’ How the Earth Was Made ‘PG’ How the Earth Was Made ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ How the States Got Their Shapes ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels Fry It ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 How the Earth Was Made ‘PG’ Reba ‘PG’ Å Old Christine Old Christine Old Christine Old Christine How I Met How I Met ›› “Never Been Kissed” (1999) Drew Barrymore, David Arquette. Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Reba ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann When I Was 17 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show True Life I Have OCD ’ Å World of Jenks World of Jenks Teen Mom ’ ‘14’ Å The Real World (N) ’ ‘14’ Å The Real World ’ ‘14’ Å 192 22 38 57 The Seven ’ Jimmy Neutron iCarly iFence ‘G’ Big Time Rush iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ Å UFC Unleashed (N) ’ ‘14’ Å The Ultimate Fighter (N) ’ ‘14’ Best of PRIDE Fighting 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ Stargate SG-1 ’ ‘PG’ Å Ghost Hunters Shadow People ‘PG’ Ghost Hunters U.S.S. Hornet ‘PG’ Ghost Hunters Lemp Mansion ‘PG’ Destination Truth ’ Å Ghost Hunters Lemp Mansion ‘PG’ 133 35 133 45 Stargate Atlantis Epiphany ’ ‘14’ Behind Scenes Grant Jeffrey Secrets of Bible Van Impe Pres Praise the Lord Å Easter Exper. Jesse Duplantis Thru History Changing-World The Emissary 205 60 130 King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ American Dad House of Payne House of Payne Meet the Browns Meet the Browns Meet the Browns Meet the Browns Lopez Tonight (N) ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond ››› “Days of Heaven” (1978, Drama) Richard Gere, Brooke Adams. Teenage farm ››› “The Sundowners” (1960, Drama) Deborah Kerr, Robert Mitchum, Peter Ustinov. Australian sheep ›››› “The Southerner” (1945) Zachary Scott. A poor share(11:15) ›››› “Of Mice and Men” (1939) 101 44 101 29 workers cross paths with a wheat farmer. Å drovers face a challenging daily life. cropper and his family try to eke out a living. Burgess Meredith. Å Say Yes, Dress Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Sister Wives ’ ‘14’ Å Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ Å LA Ink Kat is bitten by a spider. ‘PG’ LA Ink Oh Brother (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å LA Ink Kat is bitten by a spider. ‘PG’ 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Law & Order ’ ‘14’ Å (DVS) Bones Yanks in the U.K. ‘14’ Å Bones Yanks in the U.K. ‘14’ Å Bones ’ ‘14’ Å CSI: NY Criminal Justice ‘14’ Å CSI: NY Stealing Home ’ ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Fools for Love ’ ‘14’ Unnatural History ‘PG’ MAD ‘PG’ Garfield Show Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Would Happen Destroy Build Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Man v. Food ‘G’ Man-Carnivore Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Food Wars ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Bert-Conqueror Man v. Food ‘G’ 179 51 45 42 Food Wars ‘G’ Andy Griffith All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond She’s Got the Look (N) ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Andy Griffith NCIS Bloodbath ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Grace Period ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Love & War ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Truth or Consequences ’ ‘14’ NCIS The death of a Marine. ’ ‘14’ “National Treasure: Book” 15 30 23 30 NCIS A missing staff sergeant. ‘PG’ Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Greatest Songs of the ’90s Greatest Songs of the ’90s Greatest Songs of the ’90s Greatest Songs of the ’90s 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:00) ›› “K-PAX” 2001 ‘PG-13’ (6:05) ››› “The Fabulous Baker Boys” 1989 Jeff Bridges. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› “The Big Lebowski” 1998, Comedy Jeff Bridges. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› “Against All Odds” 1984, Crime Drama Rachel Ward. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› “Willie and Phil” 1980, Comedy-Drama Michael Ontkean. ‘R’ Å ››› “The Paper Chase” 1973 Timothy Bottoms. ‘PG’ Å ››› “Nell” 1994, Drama Jodie Foster, Liam Neeson. ‘PG-13’ ›› “Luna” 1979 Jill Clayburgh. ‘R’ Red Bull X-Fighters 2010 Moscow Firsthand ‘PG’ The Daily Habit Big Air Bash Nuclear Cowboyz King of Wake Firsthand Built to Shred The Daily Habit Big Air Bash Nuclear Cowboyz Pull ‘14’ Pull ‘PG’ (4:00) Live From the Ryder Cup Big Break Dominican Republic (N) Live From the Ryder Cup Big Break Dominican Republic 19th Hole Live From the Ryder Cup The Martha Stewart Show ‘G’ Å Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ “Class” (2010, Drama) Jodi Lyn O’Keefe, Justin Bruening. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (4:00) › “Couples Retreat” 2009 Vince Wall Street: Money Boardwalk Empire Agent Nelson Van Real Time With Bill Maher Andrew Breit›› “The Women” 2008, Comedy-Drama Meg Ryan, Annette Bening. Betrayal strains Atlantic City: The Boardwalk Empire Boardwalk Empire HBO 425 501 425 10 Vaughn. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å the bond between two high-powered women. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Original Sin City Jimmy makes an alliance. ‘MA’ Never Alden visits Nucky. ’ ‘MA’ Å bart; Seth MacFarlane. ’ ‘MA’ (4:45) ››› “Sling Blade” 1996, Drama Billy Bob Thornton. ‘R’ Arrested Dev. ››› “Leaving Las Vegas” 1995, Drama Nicolas Cage, Julian Sands. ‘R’ ››› “Sling Blade” 1996, Drama Billy Bob Thornton, Dwight Yoakam. ‘R’ (11:45) D.E.B.S. IFC 105 105 ›› “Ninja Assassin” 2009, Action Rain. A rogue assassin saves (11:45) › “Resident (4:30) ›› “Nights in Rodanthe” 2008 (6:10) › “New Best Friend” 2002 Mia Kirshner. A college stu- (7:45) ›› “He’s Just Not That Into You” 2009, Romance-Comedy Ben Affleck, Jennifer Aniston. Men and MAX 400 508 7 Richard Gere. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å dent leads a classmate down the road to ruin. women navigate through complex relationships. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å the life of a Europol agent. ’ ‘R’ Å Evil” 2002 Lockdown ’ ‘14’ Border Wars Dirty Money (N) ‘PG’ Border Wars No End in Sight ‘PG’ Lockdown ’ ‘14’ Border Wars Dirty Money ‘PG’ Border Wars No End in Sight ‘PG’ Icy Killers: Alaska’s Salmon Shark NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Jimmy Neutron Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Action League NTOON 89 115 189 S.W.A.T. Maga Shooting USA Sighting Gun Nuts Amer. Rifleman Impossible Shots Shooting Gallery Cowboys Shooting USA Sighting Best Defense Cowboys Gun Nuts Amer. Rifleman OUTD 37 307 43 (3:45) ›› “Twilight” 2008 Kristen Stewart, (5:50) ››› “The Hurt Locker” 2008, War Jeremy Renner, Brian Geraghty. iTV. Mem- Dexter My Bad Dexter must make a Inside the NFL (iTV) NFL news and high- Inside NASCAR (iTV) News, highlights Inside the NFL (iTV) NFL news and highSHO 500 500 Billy Burke. iTV. ’ ‘PG-13’ bers of an elite bomb squad pull hazardous duty in Iraq. ‘R’ choice. ’ ‘MA’ Å lights. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å and commentary. (N) ‘PG’ lights. ’ ‘PG’ Å Stealth Rider (N) Stealth Rider Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Intersections (N) Intersections Stealth Rider Stealth Rider Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Intersections Intersections NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 The Open Road (5:35) ›› “Bedtime Stories” 2008, Comedy Adam Sandler. ’ ‘PG’ Å (7:20) › “Did You Hear About the Morgans?” 2009 ’ (9:07) ››› “Michael Jackson’s This Is It” 2009 ’ ‘PG’ Å Martin Lawrence Martin Lawrence STARZ 300 408 300 ›› “Explicit Ills” 2008 Rosario Dawson. South Philadelphia ››› “King of California” 2007 Michael Douglas. An unstable (9:35) ›› “Soul Men” 2008 Samuel L. Jackson. Estranged sing- (11:15) › “The Spirit” 2008, Action Gabriel › “Black Ops” 2008, Horror Gary Stretch. A ghost terrorizes TMC 525 525 residents live their day-to-day lives. ’ ‘R’ Å soldiers aboard a secret prison ship. ’ ‘R’ musician and his daughter look for treasure. ’ ers reunite for a tribute concert. ’ ‘R’ Macht. ’ ‘PG-13’ NASCAR Racing World Extreme Cagefighting Jose Aldo vs. Mike Brown. From Las Vegas. The Daily Line World Extreme Cagefighting Jose Aldo vs. Mike Brown. From Las Vegas. The Daily Line VS. 27 58 30 Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å 20/20 Vanished: Missing Co-eds ‘14’ 20/20 on WE (N) ‘14’ Å 20/20 on WE ‘PG’ Å 20/20 on WE Danger Next Door ‘14’ Ghost Whisperer On Thin Ice ‘PG’ John Edward Cross Country ‘PG’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 29, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY HOW TO BENDFILM: Orit Schwartz talks about her top picks for BendFilm 2010; free; noon; Cowgirl Cash, 924 Brooks St., Bend; 541-815-8996. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Ellen Waterston talks about her book “Where the Crooked River Rises”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134. TALK OF THE TOWN: COTV hosts “Deschutes County Commissioner Candidates Debate”; reservations required; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, Community Room, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541388-5814, talk@bendbroadband.com or www.talkofthetownco.com. BLIND PILOT: The Portland-based indie rock band performs, with Sara Jackson-Holman; $15 plus fees; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

THURSDAY AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Sarahlee Lawrence reads from her book “River House”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jack Nisbet talks about David Douglas and the natural history of the Northwest; free; 7 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351. IGNITE BEND: A series of five-minute presentations on a range of topics, each chosen by the presenter; registration requested; $5 suggested donation; 710 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St.; 541-948-9088 or www.ignitebend.com.

FRIDAY “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: A screening of the 1962 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: Opening night of 2nd Street Theater’s presentation of the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. OBSERVATORY OPEN HOUSE NIGHT: Get to know the night sky with a variety of telescopes; free; 8-10 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend, the Old Mill District and NorthWest Crossing; free; 5-9 p.m., and until 8 p.m. in NorthWest Crossing; throughout Bend. TOMORROWS BAD SEEDS: The Los Angeles-based reggae-rock band performs, with Passafire; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoon brewing.com. RENEGADE ROLLER DERBY FUNDRAISER: Featuring a besttattoo contest; proceeds benefit the roller derby team and breast cancer research; $5; 10 p.m.; Seven Nightclub, 1033 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-760-9412.

SATURDAY VFW BREAKFAST: Community breakfast with pancakes, sausage, ham, eggs, coffee and more; $7, $6 seniors and children; 8-10:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. GREEN AND SOLAR HOME TOUR: Tour sustainable homes in Central Oregon; with a kickoff and presentation by keynote speaker Matt Briggs at Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, in Bend; free; 9 a.m. speaker, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. homes open; 541-647-8802, highdesert@ cascadiagbc.org or www.green andsolarhometour.com. FALL BOOK SALE: The Friends of the Bend Public Library hosts a sale of fiction, nonfiction, travel, children’s books and more; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Deschutes Library Administration Building, 507 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-536-1622. BUDDY WALK: Walk to promote awareness of Down syndrome; event includes live entertainment, face painting, a clown, a bounce house and more; $5 per person, $20 per family in advance; $10 per person, $25 family at the event; 10 a.m. registration, 11 a.m. walk; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-548-8559 or www.codsn.org. GARDEN CENTER FARMERS MARKET: Local producers sell fruits, vegetables and farm-fresh products; free; 11 a.m.; CHS Garden Center, 60 N.W. Depot Road, Madras; 541-475-2222. HARVEST FESTIVAL: Press apples, grind corn, build a log cabin, meet homesteaders and more; $2, $10

per family, free ages 2 and younger; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jack Nisbet reads from his book “The Collector: David Douglas and the Natural History of the Northwest”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. JAZZ AT JOE’S VOLUME 25: The Jazz at Joe’s series presents Warren Rand and Quartet Northwest; tickets should be purchased in advance; $25; 7-9 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541977-5637, joe@justjoesmusic.com or www.justjoesmusic.com/jazzatjoes/ events.htm. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreet theater.com. “LOVE LETTERS”: Gregory Harrison and Linda Purl star in a performance of A.R. Gurney’s play about friendship and ill-fated romance across decades; proceeds benefit the Sisters Schools Foundation; $25-$75; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. THE REDWOOD PLAN: The Seattlebased dance-punk band performs; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

SUNDAY FALL BOOK SALE: The Friends of the Bend Public Library hosts a bag sale of fiction, nonfiction, travel, children’s books and more; free admission, $4 per bag of books; 1-4 p.m.; Deschutes Library Administration Building, 507 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-536-1622. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 5 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jack Nisbet reads from his book “The Collector: David Douglas and the Natural History of the Northwest”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866.

MONDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and create art; themed “Scales and Tales”; $15, $10 museum members; 9 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-3824754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Jurassic Park” by Michael Crichton; free; noon; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7085 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. WORLD SERIES HOLD ’EM FOR HABITAT: Poker tournament, followed by a closed winners’ tournament Oct. 5; proceeds benefit Habitat for Humanity; $5; 6:30 p.m., 5 p.m. sign-ups; Jake’s Diner, 2210 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-419-6021.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TUESDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and create art; themed “Scales and Tales”; $15, $10 museum members; 9 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-3824754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. RED DOG GOLF TOURNAMENT: A day of golf, with dinner, a murder-mystery show and more; a portion of proceeds benefits the Humane Society of Redmond; $100; noon; Aspen Lakes Golf & Country Club, 16900 Aspen Lakes Drive, Sisters; 541-815-2639. GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “Sprawling From Grace,” a documentary about car addiction and sustainable energy solutions; free; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. COWBOY JUNKIES: The country and blues band performs; $31-$43 in advance, $34-$46 day of show; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “FINDING FREMONT IN OREGON, 1843”: A screening of the documentary about John C. Fremont’s 1843 trek through Oregon; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Des Chutes Historical Museum; $10; 8 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174. THE DEVIL MAKES THREE: The Santa Cruz, Calif.-based acoustic band performs, with Larry and His Flask and The Dela Project; $17 plus fees in advance, $20 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com.

WEDNESDAY Oct. 6 BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. GREG BROWN: The folk singer and songwriter performs, with Bo Ramsey; $30 plus fees in advance, $35 day of show; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700.

THURSDAY Oct. 7 BENDFILM: The seventh annual independent film festival features films showing at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, the Tower Theatre, Sisters Movie House and the Oxford Hotel; $150 full festival pass, $95 full film pass, individual tickets $10; 10 a.m.-11 p.m.; 541-388-3378, info@bendfilm.org or www.bendfilm.org. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Maus: A Survivor’s Tale” by Art Spiegelman; bring a lunch; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541312-1085 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. CLOTHES DOWN CHILD ABUSE: A fall fashion show, with appetizers and a silent auction; proceeds benefit KIDS Center; $10; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Elks Lodge, 151 N. Main St., Prineville; 541-408-3616.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

“EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com.

FRIDAY Oct. 8 A DAY OF CULTURE: Learn about cultures that have influenced the museum and visit various stations; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. BENDFILM: The seventh annual independent film festival features films showing at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, the Tower Theatre, Sisters Movie House and the Oxford Hotel; $150 full festival pass, $95 full film pass, individual tickets $10; 10 a.m.-11 p.m.; 541388-3378, info@bendfilm.org or www.bendfilm.org. SOCIAL GATHERING: Central Oregon veterans talk about their experiences, preceding the symposium on World War II; free; 4-6 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-389-1813 or www .deschuteshistory.org. “DARWIN’S LEGACY — 200 YEARS OF INSIGHTS AND CHALLENGES”: Featuring “Evolution of Human and Primate Behavior” with Frances White; $10, $3 students, $8 members of the Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-5934442. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Garth Stein reads from and discusses his book “The Art of Racing in the Rain”; free; 7-9:30 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-4477978, mashcraft@crooklib.org or www.crooklib.org. STARS OVER SISTERS: Learn about and observe the night sky; telescopes provided; bring binoculars and dress warmly; free; 7 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541549-8846 or drjhammond@ oldshoepress .com. “CRAZY HEART”: A screening of the 2009 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com.

M T For Wednesday, Sept. 29

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

FLIPPED (PG) Noon, 2:20, 4:25, 7:30 GET LOW (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:10, 4:35, 7:05 THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE (R) 11:35 a.m., 2:30, 7:15 MAO’S LAST DANCER (PG) 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7:10 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:40, 7 THE WILDEST DREAM: CONQUEST OF EVEREST (PG) 11:55 a.m., 2:25, 4:45, 7:20

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

ALPHA AND OMEGA 3-D (PG) 12:10, 2:15, 5:05 THE AMERICAN (R) 12:50, 3:40, 6:25, 9:20 DESPICABLE ME (PG) 2:10, 4:40 DEVIL (PG-13) 1:45, 4:30, 7:30, 9:25 EASY A (PG-13) 12:35, 2:05, 4:10, 5, 6:55, 7:40, 9:15, 10:05 EAT PRAY LOVE (PG-13) 12:20, 3:25, 6:40, 9:45 THE EXPENDABLES (R) 7:45, 10:15 INCEPTION (PG-13) 12:10, 3:20, 6:45, 9:55 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) 1:40, 4:45, 7:25, 9:40 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE 3-D (PG) 12:30, 3:50, 6:15, 9 THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) 2, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50 RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE (R) 12:55, 3:45, 6:20, 9:05 RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE 3-D (R) 7:50, 10:10 THE TOWN (R) 12:45, 4:20, 7:15, 10:05 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER

SLEEPS (PG-13) 12:15, 1, 3:30, 4, 6:30, 7, 9:30, 10 YOU AGAIN (PG) 1:50, 4:35, 7:05, 9:35 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT (R) 8:45 SCOTT PILGRIM VS. THE WORLD (PG-13) 6 TOY STORY 3 (G) 3:30

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

ALPHA AND OMEGA (PG) 4:30, 6:30, 8:30 DEVIL (PG-13) 5:15, 7:15, 9:15 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) 4:45, 7, 9:15 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 4, 6:45, 9:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

GET LOW (PG-13) 7 LEGENDS OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) 6:30 THE TOWN (R) 6:45 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 6:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

GOING THE DISTANCE (R) 7 NANNY MCPHEE RETURNS (PG) 4


E4 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 29, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, Sept. 29, 2010: This year, your imagination and intellect go into fifth gear. As a result, you often see solutions way before anyone else. Travel, new experiences and an opportunity to live life in a new way continue to reinforce the process of growth toward less rigidity. If you are single, you could meet someone quite exotic, spiritual or even a foreigner. This person is likely to be part of the many openings of your year. If you are attached, decide as a couple to do a workshop together or plan that special trip. Share more and love more. GEMINI presents many different views. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Your efforts to make inroads with a loved one or another key person in your life finally seem to reap results. Still, be careful with this person. He or she could be more flaky than you anticipate. Tonight: Meet up with friends. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Your fiscal wisdom might be more in demand than you realize. Although you could feel taken aback or astounded by another person’s reaction, you need to maintain a steady course. Tonight: Check in with a loved one or child who could be hurting. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Trust in your ability to mend bridges. Others appeal to you for your ability to network.

They like your originality and style. Confirm an important meeting. Don’t make assumptions. Tonight: Beam in exactly what you want. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HH Pull back. You also might want to come in late to work or call in. Worry a little less. The quality of a project can only be enhanced by some downtime. You might take another person’s comment too personally. Tonight: Talking up a storm. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH You might want to zero in on the essentials while others want to talk fluff. You might wonder how you can reconcile the difference. Recognize that the chasm might not be as deep as it looks. You might discover people’s moods are what is causing the separation, not the ideas. Tonight: Where the party is. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You could be overly tense. Though you don’t mean to cause a problem, you could. Calm down and have a longoverdue talk this morning. If you are uncomfortable, you don’t want to put off this conversation any longer than need be, for your sake. Tonight: A must approach. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Stretch by walking in another person’s shoes. Through empathizing, you’ll gain both understanding and detachment. Be careful with a crack or sarcastic comment. Don’t take it personally. Tonight: Feed your mind. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Deal directly with others.

Sometimes you prefer to let someone else be your messenger. Express compassion and give up being a judge. You’ll come out on top of your game. Tonight: Listen to a loved one’s suggestion. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Others provide a lot of insight into their behavior without realizing it. You might be smiling within, but don’t share those thoughts at the moment. Timing means everything. A boss could flip from one point of view to another. Tonight: Where people are. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Just as you think you have a complete perspective, you realize some details have been left out. Though this experience could be frustrating, don’t miss a beat as you seek out information and perhaps another’s expertise. Tonight: Burning the midnight oil. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH You could be more in control of a situation than you realize. Even though someone clearly disagrees with you, that doesn’t mean you aren’t righton. Question what is happening within your immediate circle. Tonight: You need some fun! PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Keep your best interests in mind, which might look like taking the day off again or simply not sharing a lot. It is best not to say anything until you clear your head. A close friend or loved one also could be somewhat unpredictable. Tonight: Do only what you want. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Winter Continued from E1 Online shopping is completed by making payment via PayPal, credit card or electronic check. For customers wanting to pay by cash or check, or who don’t have Internet access, Weigand says she can take orders via phone and take payment at the AC food pickup site a week in advance. When The Bulletin compared the cost of produce items from AC against prices at Whole Foods Market and Safeway (on Century Drive), both in Bend, we found that AC and Whole Foods were nearly identical in cost, while Safeway — where only one of the items on our list was “Locally Grown” but most were organic — was significantly less expensive.

Direct connection AC’s slogan is “Bridging the gap between farmers and consumers.” Weigand said AC offers a more direct connection with the farmers than grocery stores, where “the farms sell it to the distributor, the distributor marks it up and sells it to the grocery store, and the grocery store marks it up and sells it to the customer, as far as I understand.” At AC, she said, “we buy it from the farmer and sell it to the customer.” Every Tuesday, Weigand departs at 5 a.m. from Bend in a small truck pulling a trailer. Her route takes her through Eugene for mushrooms, Junction City for produce, Crabtree for dairy products, Lebanon for eggs, blueberries and jam, and finally back to Bend, where customers get their food less than 38 hours after it was harvested. AC’s wintertime offerings from its main produce provider, Cinco Estrellas Farm, an organic farm in Junction City, will include kale, spinach, potatoes, cabbage, beets, parsnips, leeks, carrots, and a salad mix including red- and green-leaf lettuce, arugula and tatsoi, a mustard green. Fruit in the winter will include fresh apples, pears and peaches from Kimberly Orchards in Eastern Oregon. Cinco Estrellas Farm owner Roberto Cruz’s daughter-in-law, Jacey Cruz, who helps on the farm, said business from AC carried the farm through the past winter. “If we would not have had them, a lot would’ve gone to waste. … They carried us through the hardest time.” Weigand says that since America’s food systems became industrialized in the 1950s, people have become more disconnected from the source of food. AC customers can easily contact the farm where they get their tomatoes or milk if they have questions. Dani Harp, office manager at Noris Dairy, which supplies all dairy products to AC, says customers call the dairy on a regular basis. “I think it’s very important for consumers to be able to contact our farm, know our practices and our milk,” Harp said.

‘Local’ on the label Unlike organic, which is a USDA-regulated term, “local” has no commonly accepted definition. “For AC, local means within 100 miles from Bend as the crow flies,” Weigand said, although the route to Cinco Estrellas in Junction City is 143 miles by road. Because the food is traveling a relatively short distance, Weigand says growers can choose to grow a variety of products based on flavor rather than

The cost of local, organic food Because the content offerings from Agricultural Connections vary by week, while price remains the same ($20-$28), it ’s impossible to figure the price per item. To make the price comparison, we weighed each item from the AC box and then collected the price per pound or bunch of the same products at Safeway (on Century Drive) and Whole Foods Market, both in Bend. Since AC’s product is local and organic, we tried to find the same qualities in the products from Safeway and Whole Foods. We were able to find all of the same local and organic vegetables and fruit from Whole Foods. At Safeway, most of the products were organic but only the lettuce was advertised as “Locally Grown.”

WHAT WAS IN OUR BOX? • One medium yellow squash • Two small zucchinis • Six carrots with tops • One large cucumber • One medium broccoli • One bunch of kale • Four nectarines • One pint of cherry tomatoes • One head of lettuce • Green beans

COST COMPARISON The listed contents in equal quantities from these vendors would total: • Agricultural Connections: $28 • Safeway: $18.56 • Whole Foods Market: $28.15 A DOZEN ORGANIC, CAGE-FREE EGGS: • Agriculture Connections: $4.50 • Safeway: $3.99 • Whole Foods Market: $3.99 1 QUART 2 PERCENT ORGANIC MILK: • Agricultural Connections (nonhomogenized): $4.75 (includes a $2 bottle deposit fee, which is reimbursable upon return of the bottle) • Safeway: $1.53 • Whole Foods Market (nonhomogenized): $1.98 8 OUNCES GOUDA CHEESE: • Agricultural Connections (organic and local from Noris Dairy): $4.50 • Safeway (Italian Gouda, not organic or local): $9 Whole Foods (Smoked Gouda from Willamette Valley): $10

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

to inquire to get more specific regional and farm information. “Unless the product is still in the box, there’s no way to retrieve that information,” said Burgess. He explained that he places produce orders seven days a week to a warehouse in Clackamas. The warehouse then does the ordering for 118 Safeway stores in Oregon and Washington. At Whole Foods in Bend earlier last week, three produce workers restocking figs and apples were able to talk at length about the farms the store buys from. Store team leader Steve Nelson gestured to different produce while

Continued from E1 There are some faux fur items on QVC that look surprisingly good. Rachel Zoe, who is a lover of fur (though more often the real deal than faux) is doing some faux pieces for her line on QVC. Her V-neck vest with faux fur front ($62) could be worn with some cutoffs and Wellies for that early-fall music festival vibe. Also on QVC, Dennis Basso is doing faux fur bags and blankets ($81.12 for a bag and travel throw), which felt to me like chenille though they look just like fur. A faux fur tote bag looks chic when traveling — just watch out for the paparazzi because, really, who travels in fur besides Victoria Beckham and Andre Leon Talley? Personally, my favorite way to wear this faux fur trend is with a “Mad Men”-esque twist. A simple sable-colored swing coat from Wink ($288) has short sleeves and a 1960s appeal that works with skinny black pants and flats or a highwaist pencil skirt and heels. Don’t go overboard with the faux fur trend (or with any trend, for that matter), because it’s one that can definitely leave you looking like a fur-swathed fashion victim when it’s overdone.

Pets

Scarlett Dow-Hygelund puts a package of blueberries in a reusable grocery bag as she helps her mother, Bretagne Dow-Hygelund, get their week’s worth of food from Agricultural Connections last week at the Environmental Center of Bend. durability. “To ship the food 1,500 miles and have it stay firm, a lot of the food has to be picked before it’s ripe,” said Weigand. There are some fruits and vegetables that will ripen off the plant, but for those that don’t, “they never reach their full flavor capacity.” Phil Burgess, produce manager at the Bend Safeway on Century Drive, said the only way he could really tell where a certain product originated was to get the name from the box in which it arrived. Although some products in Safeway are labeled as local, customers would need

Fur

identifying the farm of origin. A placard next to the “Washington Organic” nectarines showed a picture of Valicoff Fruit Co. in Wapato, Wash., and included information about the farm where the nectarines grew. AC customer Bretagne DowHygelund, 33, says she started getting food from AC in March or April and hasn’t missed a week since. At the AC pickup site last week, her children helped bag their fruits and vegetables. She talked while placing the food in a cooler in the back of her truck. “A big part of why we do it is to support the local farmers and

to know where our food comes from. And there’s no packaging.” Before using AC, Dow-Hygelund shopped at Whole Foods Market and Nature’s General Store, also in Bend, but she says her budget of $100 a week hasn’t changed since switching to AC. The fruits and vegetables provided through AC vary week to week so members don’t know exactly the contents until they pick them up, which in DowHygelund’s case has forced her to learn to cook foods she wouldn’t normally buy. “We switched our menu and gears to be revolving around what they (the AC) offer,” she said. “It’s taught my children that when we run out of milk, we go a couple days without. It’s a different set of values than just running to the store when you are out of something.” She says it has also taught them to eat what Oregon is capable of producing. “What I like is that we have to adjust our diet expectations to the tangible products of our community and the reality of what Oregon has to offer, instead of going to the store and getting things that aren’t producible, like watermelon.” Weigand says AC’s yearlong availability is part of the expanding options for consumers who want healthier, organic-food products. “This is an option for people who are aware of the fact that organic food is better for your body, better for your kids that you’re feeding and better for economically stimulating local farmers who otherwise are in a conventional system.” Marielle Gallagher can be reached at 541-383-0361 or mgallagher@bendbulletin.com.

Continued from E1 Over years, those toxins can be absorbed into your pet’s skin and into the skin of the person doing the dog washing. Then the toxins go right down the drain, polluting the water supply. A much better choice is biodegradable shampoos free from coloring, preservatives, or fragrances. Who wants their dog smelling like vanilla anyway? For the felines, it’s all about the kitty litter. Avoid using clay-based clumping cat litter that contains sodium betonite. Tiny silica dust particles can cause lung disease or worse in humans and respiratory or digestive problems in cats. Plus, there are many other options that are better for you, your cat and the planet. Litters made from used newspapers, reclaimed wood chips, or even whole kernel corn are easy to find. If you need help battling odor, you can also add a layer of baking soda to the bottom of the litter pan before filling. It’s inexpensive and nontoxic. Baking soda is also great for removing pet odors around the home. You can freshen up carpets or pet bedding by sprinkling a little on and letting it set for 15 minutes before vacuuming. And when the inevitable accident happens, reach for nontoxic vinegar to clean up the mess. It’s a natural disinfectant that’s pennies on the dollar compared to other cleaners. Do your part and make smarter choices when buying products for your four-legged friends. You’ll be keeping potentially toxic materials away from your pets, your family and our environment. Terri Bennett is a veteran TV meteorologist, syndicated columnist, and host of DoYourPart.com.


Bulletin Daily Sept. 29, 2010