Page 1

TUESDAY

October 2, 2012

Serving Central Oregon since 1903

Climbing Grand Teton — blind

75¢

New-look Blazers

COMMUNITY LIFE • B1

SPORTS • D1

bendbulletin.com

Brothers face charges in slayings of 3 sheepdogs

BRIDGE CREEK WATER PROJECT

ELECTION

Terrain has shifted in 2nd District rematch

By Joseph Ditzler

By Andrew Clevenger

The Bulletin

The Bulletin

Two brothers have been indicted by a Crook County grand jury on charges related to the killing in August of three Great Pyrenees sheepdogs in the Ochoco Mountains, according to the county Sheriff’s Office. Paul Johnson, 66, of Roseburg, and Craig Johnson, 59, of Bend, told a sheriff’s deputy they killed the animals “because they believed they were wild dogs,” according to a sheriff’s news release Monday. “I have never had another report of a wild dog in that area,” said Undersheriff John Gautney on Monday. “I’m not going to say there’s not any there. I’ve never seen any up there.” He said he knows of no other hunters’ reports of wild dogs in that area. The Johnson brothers were indicted Friday on three counts each of first-degree criminal mischief, a felony, and first-degree animal abuse, a misdemeanor. Hired hands working for sheep owner Gordon Clark, of Madras, discovered the dogs’ bodies Aug. 27 on an Ochoco grazing allotment near the Walton Lake Sno-Park off Forest Service Road 4210, according to the Sheriff’s Office. The animals were discovered close to one another with fatal gunshot wounds. Deputy Bryan Bottoms, who responded to the call, found spent .223-caliber shell casings in the road along with other evidence, according to sheriff’s Sgt. Jim Chapman. Bottoms also seized a Ruger Mark II .223caliber rifle from the Johnsons, a rifle believed to be the firearm used to kill the dogs, according to the Sheriff’s Office. Bottoms interviewed hunters in their camps before focusing on “two suspects camped very close to the crime scene,” according to the Sheriff’s Office. Bow hunters were out for deer, elk or both at the time. Gautney said he didn’t know what the Johnsons were hunting. Bottoms returned later in the day to speak with the Johnsons again and “at that time obtained a confession” from the brothers. See Dogs / A4

WASHINGTON — When voters in Oregon’s 2nd Congressional District look at their ballots this fall, they’ll see a pair of familiar names: Republican Greg Walden and Democrat Joyce Segers. The pair also faced off in 2010, with incumbent Walden handily defeating Segers to earn his seventh term in Congress. But circumstances — including Walden’s position in Washington — are different in 2012. Thanks to a nationwide surge in 2010, Republicans reclaimed control of the House of Representatives, putting the speaker’s gavel in the hands of longtime Walden friend and ally John Boehner, R-Ohio. Walden became deputy chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee, and Boehner hinted recently that Walden could become chair of the party’s campaign efforts in the House after the election. “I think it can be a real benefit to the people I represent,” Walden said of the possibility of becoming fifth in seniority in the House and continuing as the only member of Oregon’s congressional delegation in a leadership position in Congress. “It puts you at the leadership table,” which doesn’t mean you always get your way, but at least you get to have input into the discussion,” he said. See 2nd District / A4

OCHOCO N ATION A L FOREST

Prineville

Walton Lake Sno-park 22

Ochoco Reservoir

Mitchell

Walton 42 Lake

Despite legal challenge, Bend preps for pipeline Tumalo Falls Road closure

By Dylan J. Darling The Bulletin

Although it faces a challenge in federal court to the Bridge Creek water-pipeline project, the city of Bend continues to prepare for construction of the project in the Cascades foothills west of town. “As of now we are proceeding with staging equipment and look forward to starting construction,” said Justin Finestone, city spokesman. Construction is set to begin Oct. 10, but the court or the state Land Use Board of Appeals could stop it before then. The city is planning a $20.1 million overhaul of the capture system and delivery pipeline that provides drinking water from Bridge Creek. The pipeline would replace the two current pipelines, installed in the 1920s and 1950s, which Finestone said are crumbling. “They are in danger of failing and that would be catastrophic,” he said. Central Oregon LandWatch, a Bend-based nonprofit, filed a federal lawsuit Thursday against the U.S. Forest Service in District Court in Eugene. See Water / A4

The U.S. Forest Service Monday updated the map detailing the closure of Tumalo Falls Road, announced last week. The road and trailhead at Tumalo Falls will be closed until late May, which the road possibly reopening at times for winter recreation. While Bridge Creek, Fairwell and other trails leading into the Tumalo Falls trailhead will remain open, hikers will have to turn around there rather than connect to other trails. 370 4602

4601

rk Tr N. Fo

ail

Mrazek Trail

l wel Fareil Tra

26 To

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Large sections of pipe are unloaded from a truck Monday and stacked at the entrance to Tumalo Falls Road, west of Bend. The city is planning to break ground on its Bridge Creek water project on Oct. 10.

Bridge Closure area Creek Tumalo Creek Trailhead Watershed Creek Bridge

Bridge Creek Trail

Swampy Lakes Trail

4601 4603

il reek Tra Tumalo C il idge Tra Tumalo R

idge Swede R

. Rd ers n i l y Sk il ers Tra Sk ylin

2nd Congressional District

Trail

Source: U.S. Forest Service

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

“As of now we are proceeding with staging equipment and look forward to starting construction.”

26 Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Greg Walden

— Justin Finestone, spokesman, City of Bend

Joyce Segers

Senate works to avert Health care case damaged reputation automatic spending cuts SUPREME COURT

By Adam Liptak

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — In June, the Supreme Court pulled off a neat trick. By upholding President Barack Obama’s health care law, it simultaneously bolstered public support for the law and hurt its own reputation. That puts the health care case, a new study concluded, “in a public opinion class by itself among Supreme Court opinions.” The complicated reaction to the most important case of the last term may weigh on the justices, who started a new term on Monday. Andrea Campbell, a politi-

MON-SAT

We use recycled newsprint

U|xaIICGHy02329lz[

cal scientist at the Massachuhave an impact, it is typisetts Institute of Technology cally limited to setting the and an author of the study, agenda, to thrusting previsaid the aftermath of ously ignored isthe health care decito the forefront ANALYSIS sues sion surprised her. of public discus“It does seem unsion. In a new book precedented that the court called “From the Closet to would uphold a law and inthe Altar: Courts, Backcrease support for it,” lash, and the Struggle for she said, “and still experiSame-Sex Marriage,” Mience a hit to its own approval chael Klarman, a Harvard and standing at the same law professor, gave some time.” examples. It is unusual enough for the “Americans were not Supreme Court to influence preoccupied with flag burnpublic opinion in the first ing until the Supreme Court place, partly because people issued two controversial generally pay very little atrulings on the subject in tention to its work. 1989 and 1990,” he wrote. When the court does “Within six months of a 1990

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 109, No. 276, 38 pages, 7 sections

Supreme Court decision involving the right to die, half a million Americans drafted living wills.” Along these same lines, you will be hearing more about affirmative action in the coming months, thanks largely to a new case challenging race-conscious admissions at the University of Texas. But that does not mean the eventual ruling will change anyone’s mind about whether it is a good idea. When a court decision does have an effect, it is often negative, at least in the short term. See Court / A5

INDEX Business Calendar Classified

E1-4 B3 G1-4

Comics B4-5 Community B1-6 Crosswords B5, G2

Editorials C4 Local News C1-6 Obituaries C5

By Jonathan Weisman New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Senate leaders are closing in on a path for dealing with the “fiscal cliff” facing the country in January, opting to try to use a postelection session of Congress to reach agreement on a comprehensive deficit reduction deal rather than a short-term solution. Senate Democrats and Republicans remain far apart on the details, and House Republicans continue to resist any discussion of tax increases. But lawmakers and aides say that a bipartisan group of senators is coalescing around an ambitious three-step pro-

TODAY’S WEATHER Sports D1-6 Stocks E2-3 TV & Movies B2

Sunny, cooler High 75, Low 32 Page C6

cess to avert a series of automatic tax increases and deep spending cuts. First, senators would come to an agreement on a deficit reduction target — likely to be around $4 trillion over 10 years — to be reached through revenue raised by an overhaul of the tax code, savings from changes to social programs like Medicare and Social Security, and cuts to federal programs. Once the framework is approved, lawmakers would vote on expedited instructions to relevant congressional committees to draft the details over six months to a year. See Cuts / A4

TOP NEWS SYRIA: Official blames U.S., A3 DEBT: USPS misses payment, A3


THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

A2

The Bulletin

S S

How to reach us STOP, START OR MISS YOUR PAPER?

541-385-5800 Phone hours: 5:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 6:30 a.m.-noon Sat.-Sun.

GENERAL INFORMATION

541-382-1811 ONLINE

www.bendbulletin.com EMAIL

bulletin@bendbulletin.com NEWSROOM AFTER HOURS AND WEEKENDS

541-383-0348 NEWSROOM FAX

541-385-5804 NEWSROOM EMAIL Business ..... business@bendbulletin.com City Desk...........news@bendbulletin.com Community Life......................................... communitylife@bendbulletin.com Sports.............. sports@bendbulletin.com

OUR ADDRESS Street Mailing

1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702 P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

ADMINISTRATION Chairwoman Elizabeth C. McCool ...........541-383-0374 Publisher Gordon Black .....................541-383-0339 Editor-in-Chief John Costa .........................541-383-0337

DEPARTMENT HEADS Advertising Jay Brandt ..........................541-383-0370 Circulation and Operations Keith Foutz .........................541-385-5805 Finance Karen Anderson...541-383-0324 Human Resources Traci Donaca ......................541-383-0327

TALK TO AN EDITOR Business ............................541-383-0360 City Desk Joseph Ditzler.....541-383-0367 Community Life, Health Julie Johnson.....................541-383-0308 Editorials Richard Coe ......541-383-0353 Family, At Home Alandra Johnson................541-617-7860 GO! Magazine Ben Salmon........................541-383-0377 News Editor Jan Jordan ....541-383-0315 Photos Dean Guernsey......541-383-0366 Sports Bill Bigelow.............541-383-0359

REDMOND BUREAU Street address .......226 N.W. Sixth St. Redmond, OR 97756 Mailing address ....P.O. Box 788 Redmond, OR 97756 Phone.................................541-504-2336 Fax .....................................541-548-3203

CORRECTIONS The Bulletin’s primary concern is that all stories are accurate. If you know of an error in a story, call us at 541-383-0358.

TO SUBSCRIBE Home delivery and E-Edition: One month: $11 (Print only: $10.50) By mail in Deschutes County: One month: $14.50 By mail outside Deschutes County: One month: $18 E-Edition only: One month: $8 TO PLACE AN AD Classified...........................541-385-5809 Advertising fax ..................541-385-5802 Other information .............541-382-1811

OTHER SERVICES Photo reprints....................541-383-0358 Obituaries ..........................541-617-7825 Back issues .......................541-385-5800 All Bulletin payments are accepted at the drop box at City Hall. Check payments may be converted to an electronic funds transfer. The Bulletin, USPS #552-520, is published daily by Western Communications Inc., 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702. Periodicals postage paid at Bend, OR. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Bulletin circulation department, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. The Bulletin retains ownership and copyright protection of all staff-prepared news copy, advertising copy and news or ad illustrations. They may not be reproduced without explicit prior approval.

Oregon Lottery results As listed at www.oregonlottery.org

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn Monday night are:

8 16 24 34 35 47 The estimated jackpot is now $8 million.

Discoveries, breakthroughs, trends, names in the news — things you need to know to start your day. Until Election Day, this page will focus on politics.

CAMPAIGN 2012: THE SUPREME COURT

TODAY

Aging justices might provide next president with open seats

It’s Tuesday, Oct. 2, the 276th day of 2012. There are 90 days left in the year.

By Michael Doyle McClatchy Newspapers

WASHINGTON — Senior citizens dominate the Supreme Court. Some will leave in the next four years, and this year’s election for president will determine who’ll fill any vacancies on the court, President Barack Obama or President Mitt Romney. Whichever party is in charge, a vacancy in the next presidential term seems a foregone conclusion, perhaps more than one. Four Supreme Court justices are over the age of 70: Stephen Breyer is 74, Anthony Kennedy and Antonin Scalia are 76 and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a pancreatic cancer survivor, is 79. Ginsburg, for one, has hinted that she intends to match the court tenure of the late Justice Louis Brandeis, a goal that, if held to, would have her retiring in 2015. That’s within the next presidential term. The last 10 justices to depart the Supreme Court had an average age of nearly 80, though John Paul Stevens skewed this average upward when he stepped down in 2010 at age 90.

Court a low-priority issue If any or all leave the court, the ensuing confirmation struggles could shape law and politics for years to come. Yet despite the court’s significance to their own futures, neither Obama nor Romney has dwelled on the subject. Tellingly, neither man even mentioned the court in his nomination acceptance speech. Behind the scenes, though, analysts and insiders are sizing up the possible appointments. As a president, Obama already has a track record. He sent Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan to the high court. Romney’s background lies in Massachusetts, where he served as governor, and in his campaign for the Republican nomination. Conservatives complained that Romney bent to the left while making appointments in Democratic-dominated Massachusetts. A Boston Globe survey found that Romney had appointed nine registered Republicans, 14 registered Democrats

HAPPENINGS • A Pennsylvania judge faces a court-imposed deadline to decide whether the state’s tough new law requiring voters to show photo identification can remain intact, a ruling that could swing election momentum to Republican candidates now trailing in polls on the state’s top-of-the-ticket races.

IN HISTORY

The Associated Press file photo

The Supreme Court embarked on a new term Monday with four of the nine justices over 70, which leaves open the possibility that the next president could be appointing at least one justice during the next four years. Seated, from left, are justices Clarence Thomas and Antonin Scalia, Chief Justice John Roberts, and justices Anthony Kennedy and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Standing, from left, are justices Sonia Sotomayor, Stephen Breyer, Samuel Alito and Elena Kagan.

and 13 unaffiliated individuals, in a state politically dominated by Democrats. As a presidential candidate, though, Romney has emphasized his conservative bona fides by praising the likes of Roberts and Justice Samuel Alito. In a symbolic nod to the right, Romney named failed Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork to co-chair his judicial advisory committee.

Who is in line? Age matters, as presidents try to place judges who can rule for several decades. Based on past experience, the next Supreme Court nominee will be 55 or younger. This means the Supreme Court moment probably has passed for previous front-runner candidates such as Judge Diane Wood of the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Wood was a finalist in Obama’s thinking for the last two openings, in 2009 and 2010, but she’s now 62. Diversity could be an issue, though this also can take many forms. Currently, for instance, all nine justices earned their law degrees from one of three Ivy League schools. Only one has Western roots. All are either

Jewish or Roman Catholic, none has been elected to office and none has served in the active-duty military.

Congressional conflict Any nomination calculus also must account for Congress, particularly if different parties control the Senate and the White House after November. Senators of both parties have been escalating fights over top judicial nominees; another oftmentioned potential GOP highcourt nominee, Jeffrey Sutton, drew 41 Democratic “no” votes on an appellate court nomination. Retaliation is now the rule, as became apparent last year when Senate Republicans blocked Sacramento, Calif., native Goodwin Liu from an appellate court slot. “I think the ramifications of this filibuster are going to be long and difficult for those who caused this good man to be filibustered,” Democratic California Sen. Barbara Boxer warned at the time. Among potential Democratic nominees, Judge Merrick Garland of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, a former prosecutor, wins praise for his intellect and moderation, though his pros-

pects are hurt by his turning 60 a week after the election. Former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm, a 53-year-old Harvard Law School graduate, still appeals to those who want real-world political experience on the court, as does Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, a 54-year-old former Arizona governor. California Attorney General Kamala Harris, 47, has likewise seen her name floated. It isn’t a possibility she publicly entertains. “She is very focused on her job as attorney general,” Harris spokesman Shum Preston said. Among potential Republican nominees, former Bush administration Solicitor General Paul Clement is, at 46, often characterized as the nation’s best Supreme Court advocate and a nomination front-runner by any measure. Neck and neck as a potential GOP contender may be one of Garland’s highly regarded colleagues on the D.C.based appellate court, 47-yearold Judge Brett Kavanaugh. At least a dozen other Republican appointees on the nation’s appellate courts, the bench from which Supreme Court nominees often are picked, are likewise under the age of 53.

Highlights: In 1780, British spy John Andre was hanged in Tappan, N.Y., during the Revolutionary War. In 1919, President Woodrow Wilson suffered a serious stroke at the White House that left him paralyzed on his left side. In 1944, Nazi troops crushed the 2-month-old Warsaw Uprising, during which a quarter of a million people were killed. In 1950, the comic strip “Peanuts,” created by Charles M. Schulz, was syndicated to seven newspapers. In 1967, Thurgood Marshall was sworn as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court as the court opened its new term. In 1970, one of two chartered twin-engine planes flying the Wichita State University football team to Utah crashed into a mountain near Silver Plume, Colo., killing 31 of the 40 people on board. Ten years ago: The Washington, D.C.-area sniper attacks began as a resident of Silver Spring, Md., was shot and killed in a store parking lot in Wheaton; the next day, five people were shot dead, setting off a frantic manhunt lasting three weeks. (John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo were finally arrested for 10 killings and three woundings; Muhammad was executed in 2009; Malvo was sentenced to life in prison.) Five years ago: A federal jury in New York ordered the owners of the New York Knicks to pay $11.6 million to former team executive Anucha Browne Sanders, concluding she’d been sexually harassed and fired out of spite. One year ago: Syrian dissidents formally established a broad-based national council designed to overthrow President Bashar Assad’s regime, which they accused of pushing the country to the brink of civil war.

BIRTHDAYS ANALYSIS: THE DEBATES

Romney’s best chance for a turnaround? By Mark Z. Barabak Los Angeles Times

The presidential race enters its final, decisive phase with a distinct tilt toward President Barack Obama and three debates looming as Republican Mitt Romney’s best and possibly last chance to reverse the Democratic trend. After running neck and neck with Romney for months, Obama has opened up leads — some small, others more significant — in almost all of the eight states likely to decide the contest: Florida, Ohio, North Carolina, Virginia, Colorado, Iowa, Nevada and New Hampshire. Obama also leads in Wisconsin, the home state of Rep. Paul Ryan, the GOP vice presidential nominee, whose midAugust selection had erased the president’s advantage there for a time. In all, Obama has locked up or is comfortably ahead in contests for 237 of the 270 Electoral College votes needed to win re-election, compared with 191 for Romney. That leaves 110 electoral votes still up for grabs after several states, including Pennsylvania and Michigan, have seemingly fallen from contention and settled in Obama’s column. Whether the movement is the result of several difficult weeks for the former Massachusetts governor, as Republicans and Romney insiders suggest, or reflects a genuine

inflection point, as Democrats and Obama strategists believe, analysts say Romney must do something to shake up the race or he will almost certainly lose on Nov. 6. The debates — especially the first one Wednesday in Denver — present Romney with a vital opportunity to turn the direction of the contest. “Television ads aren’t going to change this race,” said Matthew Dowd, who managed President George W. Bush’s 2004 race, the last time an incumbent sought re-election to the White House. “Speeches aren’t going to change this race and staff’s not going to change this race.” There is always the prospect of an unforeseen event, such as a domestic or international crisis, undermining support for the president and upending his candidacy. But it is not at all clear that such an episode would be to Romney’s benefit with Election Day so near. Even the Iranian hostage crisis, which proved a foreign policy debacle for President Jimmy Carter, initially led Americans to rally around the incumbent. The effect of an “October surprise,” as political practitioners have come to call it, might also be mitigated by early voting. Already, ballots are being cast in more than half the states. By the completion of the third presidential debate on Oct. 22, two weeks from Election Day, a

majority of residents may have already voted in such battlegrounds as Florida, Colorado, Nevada and North Carolina. That is why Wednesday’s first debate will be so important: It will very likely shape the narrative of the race for days afterward and set expectations for the two sides heading into an Oct. 11 matchup of the vice presidential candidates and the two Romney-Obama sessions that follow. Obama arrived in southern Nevada on Sunday for several days of pre-debate cramming at Lake Las Vegas, a resort community in the suburb of Henderson. Romney, who has been practicing for months, was closeted with aides in Boston for another round of rehearsals. As the challenger trailing in polls, Romney could gain the most from the debates, depending, of course, on his performance. Just by stepping on stage at the University of Denver, Romney could enhance his stature. As Obama strategists — anticipating the post-debate analyses — are eager to point out, a challenger often gets a boost, at least in the first faceto-face meeting, just by standing alongside the incumbent and holding his own. Republicans, frustrated with Romney’s campaign, said he needed to do more than recite familiar talking points and parry Obama’s scripted zing-

ers. They urged him to seize the opportunity — with tens of millions watching — to make a clearer, more forceful case for himself to voters who don’t seem especially eager, despite high unemployment and slow economic growth, to oust the incumbent. “What I don’t think Romney has successfully done yet is make the case he would be better on the economy,” said Dick Wadhams, a veteran Republican strategist and former head of the Colorado GOP. “Part of the reason is that the Romney campaign for too long was trying to make this a referendum on Obama, when it was always going to be a choice election.”

Retired MLB All-Star Maury Wills is 80. Movie critic Rex Reed is 74. Singer-songwriter Don McLean is 67. Fashion designer Donna Karan is 64. Photographer Annie Leibovitz is 63. Rock musician Mike Rutherford is 62. Singer-actor Sting is 61. Actress Lorraine Bracco is 58. Rhythm-andblues singer Freddie Jackson is 54. Singer-producer Robbie Nevil is 54. Retro-soul singer James Hunter is 50. Folkcountry singer Gillian Welch is 45. Country singer Kelly Willis is 44. Rhythm-and-blues singer Dion Allen is 42. — From wire reports

Providing unparalled service across a variety of industries since 1983.

541-389-1505 400 SW Bluff Dr Ste 200 Bend , OR 97702

www.expresspros.com

Exp. 10/6/12


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A3

T S UNITED NATIONS

Syria blames foes for conflict By Neil MacFarquhar New York Times News Service

UNITED NATIONS — Syria’s foreign minister told the United Nations on Monday that the violence racking his country was entirely the fault of other nations supplying the armed opposition, that the refugee crisis was concocted by Syria’s enemies and that a dialogue on a political transition was still possible. The minister, Walid alMoallem, speaking on behalf of Syria at the annual opening debate of the General Assembly, did not introduce any new initiative in his recap of his country’s standard positions over the conflict that began in March 2011. Even as he was speaking, the United Nations was condemning his government for not doing enough to reduce the violence that has left more than 20,000 people dead and thousands more wounded.

Jason DeCrow / The Associated Press

Walid al-Moallem, Syrian foreign minister, addresses the 67th session of the United Nations General Assembly on Monday.

In an earlier meeting with the Syrian minister, Secretary General Ban Ki-moon “stressed that it was the Syrian people who were being killed, and appealed to the Government of Syria to show compassion to its own people,”

according to a statement issued by Ban’s spokesman just as Moallem had begun speaking. Moallem used his 30-minute speech to blame those supporting the opposition and imposing sanctions on Syria

as responsible for both the violence and the dire humanitarian situation. “We wonder to what extent the statements of Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, the United States and France, which clearly induce and support terrorism in Syria with money, weapons and foreign fighters, are in line with the international responsibilities of these countries in combating terrorism,” he said. The Syrian foreign minister placed blame for the high toll on terrorists, his government’s standard terminology for members of the armed insurgency. In one of his more striking assertions, Moallem said the refugees who had fled Syria had been manipulated into leaving by Syria’s neighbors, in order to create an artificial crisis so that these neighbors could receive foreign aid.

Georgian president, opponent both claim victory By Lynn Berry and Misha Dzhindzhikhashvili The Associated Press

TBILISI, Georgia — Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili and the opposition both claimed victory Monday in a parliamentary election that has been shaken up by a prison abuse video that activists say showed the cruel, authoritarian face of the government. The governing party was in a heated race with the opposition Georgian Dream coalition led by Bidzina Ivanishvili, a billionaire businessman who has posed the most serious challenge to the proWestern president since Saakashvili came to power almost nine years ago. No results have been released yet in Monday’s vote. Emotions were running high, with scores of opposition supporters thronging the streets of Tbilisi, the capital, early today. Both sides, however, have promised to respect the results if the election receives the approval of international observers. Two exit polls conducted by Edison Research and Gfk gave the edge to the opposition, but they were completed four hours before the voting stations closed and registered only the vote based on party lists, which is used to elect 77 of parliament’s 150 members. The remaining 73 members are directly elected by majority vote in their constituencies, where the president’s United National Movement is considered to have a strong advantage in this nation of 4.5 million people on the Black Sea. Saakashvili, speaking on television shortly after the polls closed, said the opposition had indeed won the party vote, largely on the strength of its support in Tbilisi. Still, he insisted his party was far ahead in the direct elections and would retain its majority in parliament. Georgian Dream, however, said its exit polls showed it would win the party vote by 63 percent and citing Ivanishvili as saying he was “prepared to ensure a parliamentary majority.” The Central Election Commission said the first preliminary results were expected at 3 a.m. today.

Nashanuddin Khan / The Associated Press

Afghan police secure the site of a suicide bombing Monday in Khost, south of Kabul. The suicide bomber was driving a motorcycle packed with explosives and rammed it into a patrol of Afghan and international forces, killing over a dozen people, including three Americans and their translator, officials said.

3 Americans among dead in Taliban suicide bombing By Heidi Vogt and Amir Shah The Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan — A Taliban suicide bomber rammed a motorcycle packed with explosives into a joint U.S.-Afghan patrol on Monday, killing 14 people including three Americans in the latest attack on an increasingly fraught program to help Afghan forces take over security so foreign troops can withdraw from the country over the next two years. The attack followed more American casualties over the weekend that pushed the U.S. military’s death toll for the 11year-war above 2,000 — a figure that has climbed steadily in recent months as attacks on the so-called “partnering” initiative have risen.

Joint patrols between NATO and Afghan forces, like the one targeted Monday, have been limited following a tide of attacks by Afghan soldiers and police on their international allies. Last month, the U.S. military issued new orders that require units to get approval from superiors before conducting operations with Afghans. Two weeks later, U.S. officials said most missions were being conducted with Afghans again, though the system of approvals remained in place. The close contact — coalition forces working side by side with Afghan troops as advisers, mentors and trainers — is a key part of the U.S. strategy for putting the Afghans in the lead as it and other nations

prepare to pull out their last combat troops by the end of 2014. But the rising death toll for international troops has raised troubling questions about whether they will achieve their aim, boosting calls inside the alliance for a pullout as soon as possible and jeopardizing the goal of training the Afghans to fully secure their country. In the latest attack, the bomber struck the mixed police and military patrol shortly after they got out of their vehicles to walk through a market area in the eastern city of Khost. It was a reminder that the insurgency is still fighting hard after 11 years of a U.S.-led war to defeat the militants.

Court delays band’s appeal The Associated Press MOSCOW — A Russian court postponed an appeal Monday by three members of the jailed rock band Pussy Riot after one of them fired her lawyers. Prosecutors criticized the move as a delaying tactic, while one defense lawyer said the women were under tremendous pressure, with the government threatening to take away their children. The two-year sentences given the three performers for hooliganism after they performed a “punk prayer” against President Vladimir Putin at Moscow’s main cathedral have provoked an international outcry that has embarrassed Putin’s government. As the hearing began Monday, band member Yekaterina Samutsevich announced that she has fired her three lawyers over an unspecified disagreement.

LIMIT ONE COUPON PER PERSON PER VISIT • COUPON EXPIRES NOV. 18, 2012

www.kamoyacasino.com

Billions deep in debt, Postal Service defaults on benefits payment By Ron Nixon New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The Postal Service sank deeper into debt Monday after the agency defaulted on a $5.6 billion payment due at the end of September, the second time the agency has missed a deadline this year to set aside money for its future retiree health benefits. The post office said it expected net operating losses to be $15 billion for the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30. That loss includes the two missed payments totaling $11.1 billion for the agency’s future retirement funds. This month, the post office also faces a $1.5 billion workers’ compensation insurance payment to the Labor Department. The post office said Monday that it would most likely make that payment, but that it would leave the agency with a cash shortage of about $100 million. Postal Service officials said they expected the shipping of holiday packages and election mailings to help offset some of the losses. Despite the losses, Patrick Donahoe, the postmaster general, said there would be no disruptions in post office operations. Mail will continue to be delivered on time, and employees and vendors will continue to be paid, he said. “Customers can be confident in the continued regular operations of the Postal Service,” Donahoe said. The post office had warned Congress for months that it would not be able to make the payments into the fund for its future retiree health benefits. The first $5.5 billion payment was due last September, but lawmakers allowed the service to push back the payment until August while they worked on postal legislation. The second payment was due on Sept. 30. The payments are required by a 2006 law and do not affect current retiree benefits. Lawmakers left Wash-

ington last month without passing legislation that would have helped the post office deal with its crippling debt and its operating losses. The agency is seeking to end Saturday delivery, enter new lines of business like shipping beer and wine, close nearly half of its mail processing centers and reduce hours at local post offices. It is also seeking to stretch out the payments for its future retiree benefits and to receive a refund of $11 billion that it has overpaid into one of its pension funds. The Senate passed a postal bill that would give the agency some of the changes it seeks, but the bill does not allow the agency to end Saturday delivery. The House has not passed its version of the legislation. Although Donahoe said he expected Congress to take up the measure when it returns after the elections, passage remains uncertain. Lawmakers will have to devote much of their time during the lame-duck session to dealing with the “fiscal cliff” — the end-of-the-year deadline for the expiration of hundreds of billions of dollars in tax cuts and for billions in across-the-board spending cuts. For now, the agency said it was doing what it could to lower costs, like reducing staffing levels and closing mail processing facilities. But post office officials, postal unions and large mailers said the agency could do only so much on its own. If the post office is to survive, Congress needs to pass postal reform legislation, they said. Postal Service revenue continues to decline as mail volume drops. Since 2006, the agency has seen first-class mail volume drop by 26 percent. The drop in mail volume and revenue comes as online bill payments, email and other forms of electronic communication become more widespread.

Warehouse Prices

Award-winning neighborhood on Bend’s westside.

MATTRESS

www.northwestcrossing.com

CASCADE 541•678•REST


A4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

2nd District Continued from A1 Should he win an eighth term, the Hood River resident’s top legislative priorities would include a long-term fix for federal payments to timber counties. Congress recently approved a one-year extension of the payments program, providing funding through the end of fiscal year 2013. But that tees up another fight over passage for the next session of Congress, and provides little long-term certainty for Oregon counties facing shrinking budgets. “We’ve got to get a permanent solution that really works. I think we’re on the cusp of that,” Walden said. Additionally, Walden looks to build on his work as chairman of the House Subcommittee on Communications and Technology to promote smart development and integration of technology into both Oregon’s and the nation’s economies. “Making sure our communities have the latest technology and access to broadband means jobs,” he said, noting that 50,000 jobs in Oregon are connected to the communications industry. Walden also hopes to repeal and replace “Obamacare,” as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has come to be known. Having been a small-business owner who supplied coverage for his employees and spent five years on the board of a community hospital, Walden said he has multiple perspectives on health care, and has doubts about the implications of the act. “There’s an enormous amount of uncertainty,” he said, adding that a recent study by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office concluded that 11 million Americans would be subject to the tax penalty under the law’s individual mandate. “It amounts to an enormous new tax on the middle class,” he said. “I still think it’s not built to survive fiscally and should be replaced.” Segers, an Ashland resident who sold her medical billing company in 2008, said she supports the Affordable Health Care Act and would fight efforts to repeal it. Health care costs could be reduced by changing the eligibility for Medicare by removing the age requirement, she said. “I think that Medicare will pay for itself if we can offer it in what some people call Medicare for all,” she said. “You would be infusing an enormous amount of money into the system, and because you have a healthier population (in the program), you’re going to have a reduction in (the cost of) claims.”

Divisive and edgy The candidates’ positions on health care — and that it remains a highly divisive issue — point to another key difference in this contest. Unlike 2010’s mid-year election, President Barack Obama is on the ballot this year, and more voters will turn out because of his and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney’s presence at the top of the ticket. For Walden, the failure of Obama and the Democratcontrolled Senate to act on measures coming out of the Republican-controlled House underscores the importance

Dogs Continued from A1 Clark estimated the sheepdogs were worth $7,500. They were placed to protect the flock, which at the time was grazing nearby, Guatney said. Two large herds were grazing on the allotment, according to Chapman’s news release. The Johnson brothers told Bottoms they were “unfamiliar with the large sheep herds in the area,” according to Chapman. Gautney said large signs at the entry to the area where the Johnsons were found caution hunters about sheep grazing nearby. “From where the dogs were shot and where the sheep were at, one would develop

of Republicans winning the Senate and White House this election. For example, in August the House passed a one-year extension of the Bush-era tax cuts, which are set to expire on Jan. 1. In 2010, Democrats agreed to a two-year extension of the cuts, saying it was a bad time to raise taxes, but, he asked, is the economy so much better off now as to justify a different conclusion? “I think we ought to do a one-year extension and then rewrite the tax code,” he said. Segers said Walden puts party loyalty ahead of the interests of his constituents. She cited his recent vote in support of the House version the Violence Against Women Act, which, unlike the Democratic version that passed the Senate, does not extend protections for women victims of domestic violence who are Native Americans, undocumented immigrants or lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgendered individuals. “Congressman Walden voted to exclude those minorities. That sent a big message out to the people of the 2nd District,” she said. “No matter who you are, you should be protected from violence.” But whoever occupies the White House and controls Congress in January, lawmakers will face the unenviable task of dealing with the looming “fiscal cliff.” That is shorthand for the expiration of the Bush and payroll tax cuts, the implementation of $1.2 trillion in mandatory spending cuts agreed to last year as part of sequestration and the need to raise the debt limit in early 2013. Walden likened the fiscal situation to a party thrown by teenagers when their parents aren’t home. No matter who wins in November, there’s going to be a mess to clean up come morning, he said. The House has already passed legislation that would avert the most harmful cuts to the defense budget, he said. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta recently said that if sequestration goes into effect as authorized, the Army would be forced to reduce troop levels to the lowest since 1940, the Navy would have the fewest ships since 1915 and the Air Force would be the smallest in its history. “I don’t think that’s acceptable when we have conflicts going on overseas,” Walden said. Defense spending represents 20 percent of the federal budget but is getting half of the mandatory cuts, he said. “The public expects the Congress to get its job done,” he said. “We’re trying to do our part about being more thoughtful about how the cuts occur.” For Segers, the expiration of the Bush tax cuts, and the subsequent increase in revenue, represents an opportunity for more spending programs in a smaller version of the stimulus plan from 2009. “(For) a turnaround, there has to be an investment in this country that comes from the government,” she said. “We’re in a place where creating jobs is the most important thing we can do, and it might take some government money to do that.” — Reporter: 202-662-7456, aclevenger@bendbulletin.com

the opinion that it would have been almost impossible not to see them,” Gautney said. Bottoms’ report does not indicate that the Johnsons alleged the dogs attacked or threatened them, or the sheep they were expected to protect, the undersheriff said. Livestock owners are allowed to shoot dogs threatening livestock, he said. He said he expected the District Attorney’s Office would issue a warrant for the two men’s arrest. District Attorney Daina Vitolins said she could not comment on the sheriff’s report of an indictment in the case. Clark could not be reached Monday for comment. — City Editor: 541-383-0367, jditzler@bendbulletin.com

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Water Continued from A1 It also filed an appeal of the city’s plans in May with the Land Use Board of Appeals. The group will ask the judge, and has already asked LUBA, to put the project on hold, said Paul Dewey of Central Oregon LandWatch. “What we are wanting is the city not to initiate construction,” he said. In approving the city’s project on national forest land earlier this year, the complaint contends, the Forest Service didn’t adequately evaluate the effects the Bridge Creek water project will have on wetlands and fish.

“They didn’t use the best available science,” Dewey said. Central Oregon LandWatch brought up the same concerns in an appeal to the Deschutes National Forest, which was denied, and then to the agency’s regional office. Late last month, Pacific Northwest Regional Forester Kent Connaughton upheld the rejection of the appeal. The agency established Oct. 10 as the day the city could start construction, following its procedure to give time for a possible lawsuit following an appeal decision. On Monday, the city of Bend asked to take part,

or intervene, in the federal lawsuit, according to court documents. If construction goes on as planned, Tumalo Falls Road and the Tumalo Falls Trailhead will be closed most of the time, the Forest Service and city announced last week. The 10-mile pipeline runs under Tumalo Falls and Skyliners roads. If work begins Oct. 10, it is scheduled to last until the end of May. The Forest Service closed the road and trailhead Wednesday to allow contractors to move in equipment and materials. Forest Service officials initially said trails connecting to the Tumalo Falls Trailhead

would be closed as well, but on Monday the agency released a map showing some trails will be open when accessed from other directions. Hikers will have to turn around at the Tumalo Falls Trailhead rather than link to other trails, said Jean NelsonDean, spokeswoman for the forest. Depending on how winter weather affects the pipeline work, Nelson-Dean said Tumalo Falls Road may be opened at times for winter recreation. “We will have no need for the closure if they are not doing construction,” she said. — Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

“A lot of what happens and when it happens depends on the outcome of the election.” — Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Republican leader

Cuts Continued from A1 If those efforts failed, another plan would take effect, probably a close derivative of the proposal by President Barack Obama’s fiscal commission led by Erskine Bowles, the Clinton White House chief of staff, and former Sen. Alan Simpson of Wyoming, a Republican. Those recommendations included changes to Social Security, broad cuts in federal programs and actions that would lower tax rates overall but eliminate or pare enough deductions and credits to yield as much as $2 trillion in additional revenue. Finally, they would vote to put off the automatic spending cuts, known as sequestration, and tax increases scheduled to hit all at once in January — but with some deficit reduction down payment to signal how serious Congress is. Obama has said he would not allow Congress to simply pass a new law to override the $1 trillion in automatic cuts agreed to in the Budget Control Act of 2011, but senators said they believed the White House would go along with a deal that locks in as much as four times those savings in exchange for canceling the automatic cuts. With both sides awaiting the outcome of the election, negotiators will not even try to determine how much money would come from the three components until after the voting, when, presumably, the victorious side would emerge with new leverage. “A lot of what happens and when it happens depends on the outcome of the election,” said Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Republican leader. House Republicans, favored to retain control regardless of the presidential and Senate results, have not been part of the Senate talks so far and could be difficult to sway to back a package with significant new revenue even if it wins bipartisan Senate support. Democratic leaders are already signaling a major stumbling block: They will accept no deal that extends Bush-era

“Fiscal cliff” tax increases A variety of tax cuts enacted during the tenures of presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama expire at the end of December. Expiring provisions include Bush-era cuts on wage and investment income and cuts for married couples and families with children. Also expiring is a 2 percentage point temporary payroll tax cut. A look the tax increases facing typical families: • A married couple with two children and an income of $100,000 would pay $7,935 in income taxes and $5,650 in payroll taxes this year, for a total federal tax burden of $13,585. Next year, they would face income taxes of $11,919 and payroll taxes of $7,650, for a total federal tax burden of $19,569, a total tax increase of $5,984. • A married couple with no children that makes $60,000 (each spouse earns $30,000) would pay $5,105 in federal income tax for 2011. Their income taxes would rise to $6,308 next year and their payroll taxes would rise from $3,390 in 2011 to $4,590 in 2012. • A single mother with three children and an income of $40,000 would benefit from the earned income and refundable child tax credits to receive a tax refund of $2,626 for 2011 and pay payroll taxes of $2,260 for a total federal tax burden of -$366. Under higher rates in 2013, she would owe $183 in income taxes and pay $366 more in payroll taxes. • A married couple earning $200,000 (one spouse earns $150,000, the other $50,000) would see their income tax bill jump almost $6,000 (from $34,587 to $40,545) and their payroll taxes rise $3,258 ($9,742 to $13,000). • A married couple earning $1 million faces income taxes of $311,344 for this year. That would jump to $354,224 next year at a maximum rate of 39.6 percent. They would pay almost $4,500 more in payroll taxes. Source: Tax Foundation

— The Associated Press

tax cuts for the rich, even for six months. “President Obama has clearly stated he will not extend the Bush tax cuts for millionaires and billionaires, and I fully support his position,” Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada, the majority leader, said in a statement. “Americans are sick and tired of simply kicking the can down the road and avoiding our nation’s financial issues.” Other senators, like Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., have counseled a more incremental approach to head off mandatory deep military cuts next year. Sen. Richard Durbin of Illinois, the second-ranking Democrat, had suggested finding enough savings for a six-month delay on taxes and cuts to give negotiators more time. But McConnell compared the government to a ship sinking under the weight of Medicare and Social Security and said that temporarily holding off the automatic budget cuts and tax increases would not

avert a disaster. “Even if we rearrange the chairs, fix the tax thing, fix the sequester, the ship’s still going down,” he said in an interview. “I want to deal with it altogether. The next best opportunity is the end of the year.” With their party leaders’ encouragement, Sens. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., and Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., have begun talks on legislative language to lock a deficit reduction framework into law. And pressure for a deal continues to grow. Monday, the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center released a study estimating that if nothing is done, the expiration of all the Bush-era tax cuts would raise taxes by more than $500 billion next year alone, an average increase of $3,500 per household. Middle-income families, it said, would see taxes rise by an average of almost $2,000. Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M.,

said figures like those and forecasts anticipating a recession if nothing is done have prompted some consideration for postponing any tax increases or spending cuts for a year. But he said lawmakers want to lock in action on the deficit now. “You have to have the framework of a plan,” he said. “We need to find something that’s going to make us come to the table and put our fiscal house in order.” The two parties will have only weeks to reach an agreement between Election Day and Dec. 31, and they remain far apart on some fundamental issues besides tax cuts for the wealthy. House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio says he will not accept any deal that raises tax rates or “decouples” the Bush-era tax rates by extending some but allowing others to expire. Senators have also failed to agree on a mechanism to enforce a deficit reduction plan. Durbin has suggested that if Congress cannot agree on changes to the tax code, entitlements and spending in six months, the automatic spending cuts and tax increases should go into effect. But the bipartisan group of senators says that medicine has already proved too tough to swallow. Instead, the backstop should be an acceptable deficit reduction program like Simpson-Bowles. “The idea is to put in place an end product upfront that is already fairly agreeable,” said a Senate official familiar with the plans. “You’d basically be giving Congress six months to improve upon it.” After so many false starts, even those involved in the talks are reluctant to express much optimism. McConnell and other Republicans said only the president could make a deal happen. “I encourage all these discussions,” he said. “They’re all good. But we need the president, whoever that is, to not be a bystander like this president, to step up to the plate, and do three things: make the deal, deliver the members of his party and sign the bill.”


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Court Continued from A1 That was, by many accounts, what happened after Brown v. Board of Education, the 1954 decision that called for desegregation of public schools, and Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that recognized a constitutional right to abortion. “Both produced dramatic political backlashes,” wrote Klarman, “even though opinion polls showed that half the country supported those rulings when they were decided.” The health care decision seems to tack in the other direction, said Barry Friedman, a law professor at New York University. “Earlier studies have tended to find that the Supreme Court does not bring people along with its decision by giving its imprimatur,” he said. “The more common reaction is backlash.” The Supreme Court’s approval ratings are not terrible, but they tested historic lows shortly after the health care decision. They had dropped along with those of the government generally, but they remained much higher than those of Congress, the news media, big business and labor. The military, the police and religious institutions enjoyed more respect. The Supreme Court is sometimes said to follow public opinion or at least not get too far out ahead of it. The decision in the health care case is not good evidence of this, as at least the central part of the law was quite unpopular. The new study, from Campbell and Nathaniel Persily, who teaches law and political science at Columbia, will be published next year as part of a book from Oxford University Press. It argues that the response to the health care decision may have had something to do with the nature of the court’s action. In the few cases that command the public’s attention, Campbell said, the court often strikes down the law under review. Here, the court stepped back and deferred to Congress

At the Supreme Court Cases on the court’s docket: • The Supreme Court seems torn on when the law should treat some floating homes as houseboats and when it should treat them as houses. The question came up Monday as the court was trying to figure out whether Riviera Beach, Fla., should have used maritime law to seize Fane Lozman’s floating home. Lozman said the gray, two-story floating structure was not a boat, so he should have had some of the same protection against seizure as a land-based house. But the city and the lower courts all said that since it had been towed several times to different marinas across hundreds of miles, it was a vessel like a houseboat. A ruling, which will be watched closely by floating casinos, hotels and restaurants, will come later this year. • The court declined to hear an appeal from a national anti-gay marriage group that tried to thwart Maine’s campaign disclosure law requiring it to release its donor list, but it’s unlikely the list will be made public soon. The court turned aside an appeal from the National Organization for Marriage, a Washington, D.C.-based group that donated $1.9 million to a political action committee that helped repeal Maine’s same-sex marriage law in 2009.

COMING UP The court has agreed to hear the following cases: Racialpreferences: In Fisher v. University of Texas, to be argued Oct. 10, the court will weigh Texas’ limited use of race to help fill out its incoming classes. The outcome could result in a major cutback in the use of racial preferences at the nation’s colleges. Accountability for human rights abuses: The justices will consider whether American courts may be used by foreign victims to sue over human rights violations abroad. The case of Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum, to be argued on Monday, concerns claims that the oil giant Shell was complicit in atrocities committed by the Nigerian government against its citizens in the oil-rich Niger delta. Drug-sniffing dogs: Two disputes involving drug-sniffing dogs will be heard by the court on Halloween. In one, the question is whether a dog brought to the front door of a home to sniff for marijuana amounts to a search. In the other, the court will consider a dog’s reliability and qualifications as a drug-sniffing animal in a case involving a traffic stop and a warrantless search that found the ingredients for making methamphetamines in a pickup truck. Fighting terrorism: The government is trying to shut down a constitutional challenge to a law that lets the United States eavesdrop on overseas communications. Lawyers, journalists and human rights advocates filed a lawsuit that objected to the latest version of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. The issue at the high court, to be argued Oct. 29, is whether the law’s challengers are entitled to make their case in federal court. — From wire reports

and the president. Perhaps inevitably, given the current political climate and how closely the health care law was associated with Obama, that decision gave rise to distinctly polarized reactions about the court. More than half of Republicans expressed disapproval of its work shortly after the decision, compared

with just over a third shortly before. Disapproval among independents rose to 43 percent from 32 percent. Only among Democrats did disapproval hold fairly steady, at about a third. “The case may exist,” the study concluded, “as the most polarizing instance of judicial restraint on record.”

A5

For businesspeople, not drinking can be a very expensive habit By Douglas Quenqua New York Times News Service

As an ad-sales executive with Forbes magazine, Terry Lavin worked hard to earn his reputation as a dependable drinking buddy. “I just basically rented space at P.J. Clarke’s,” he said, referring to the Midtown Manhattan watering hole. “I was always the last to leave, always had a cocktail in my hand.” In a business built on likability, the role helped him succeed. Until 2010, when he decided to give his body a break and quit drinking for six months. His health got better; his business did not. “I would call guys I was friendly with, guys who had their hands on big ad budgets, to see if they wanted to go to happy hour or get something to eat,” he recalled, “And they’d say: ‘Are you drinking? No? Don’t worry about it.’ ” So much for the benefits of the sober life. Even as three-martini lunches and whiskey-fueled staff meetings become harder to find outside of cable TV, plenty of American business rituals continue to revolve around alcohol. Whether it’s courting a client, sketching out a deal or simply proving you’re a team player, quaffing a round of beers is arguably more vital to many jobs than nailing a round of golf. For professionals who abstain from alcohol — for health, religion, recovery or simple preference — it can sometimes seem harder to get ahead if you’re not willing to throw one back. “You’re expected to drink, and drinking is part of what you do, and there’s a little bit of circumspection if you say you don’t do it,” said Link Christin, director of a special treatment program for legal professionals started last year by Hazelden, a network of al-

cohol- and drug-rehabilitation centers based in Minnesota. “If you say you don’t drink, you have to deal with the suspicion that you can’t play the game.” To find that attitude in action, look no further than this year’s presidential campaign. As a part of his pitch to voters that Mitt Romney, a teetotaler Mormon, is different from most Americans, President Barack Obama has made a conspicuous display of his own regular-guy fondness for beer. For less public figures, the notion that people who don’t drink can’t perform in business — or, worse, are somehow untrustworthy — can impede professional progress. “There is a perception almost that you’re impotent,” said one nondrinker, an editor at a liquor-focused lifestyle magazine who asked not to be identified because many of his co-workers don’t know he recently entered a 12-step program. Professional disadvantages to sobriety range from the literal — the editor had to decline a potential promotion because it would have involved wine tasting — to subtle. “I regularly turn down lunches and dinners with industry people that I would have jumped at in the past,” the editor said. “I just can’t go to dinner with a winemaker and tell him: ‘No, thank you. I’m not tasting those.’ ” One hardly has to work directly with alcohol to experience this. On Wall Street, where a “models and bottles” lifestyle prevails, those who don’t drink “complain that they can’t close a deal, can’t even get into early negotiations because they won’t engage in drinking behaviors,” said John Crepsac, a New York City therapist who counsels Wall Street workers in

recovery. Social scientists refer to it as “social capital,” the amount of economic potential to be harnessed from one’s capacity to fit in. “There were times I knew the guys were going out with customers that could help advance my career,” said one nondrinking Wall Street trader who asked to remain anonymous because his employer doesn’t allow staff members to talk to the media, “but it was just unspoken: ‘Yeah, we won’t invite him ’cause we’ll probably get up to some drinking and he won’t partake, so what’s the point?’” Of course, sobriety and success are not mutually exclusive. Warren Buffett, Donald Trump, Joe Biden and Larry Ellison are all lifetime abstainers. Whether or not he wins, Romney hasn’t lacked for success, either. And sober women might actually benefit from an old double standard. “Men are still expected to get together and go wild, but in some ways it’s frowned upon if the woman engages in it,” Crepsac said, noting that few of his female patients have complained that sobriety hurt their careers. “There are plenty of things for which women are discriminated against in the workplace, but this isn’t one of them.” Still, research supports the idea that nondrinkers have a harder time climbing the corporate ladder. Multiple studies have shown that moderate drinkers earn more money than those who don’t drink, though heavy drinkers earn less than moderate drinkers. That pressure to perform can sometimes cause professionals in recovery to backslide. This is one reason that Hazelden created a support group especially for lawyers who are trying to stay sober.


A6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

A man and his town: a love story By John M. Glionna Los Angeles Times

WOODSIDE, Utah — Roy Pogue has loved a lot of things in his 63 years — like his wife, Chris, and her little Daffy Duck tattoo, not to mention the couple’s six children. Yet few things have made his heart go flip-flop more than a dry-gulch piece of land out in the middle of Utah’s nowhere. Sometimes, love truly is blind. A lot of words describe Pogue’s backside-of-beyond parcel, where rust rules and the thermometers have all surrendered to the cold and the heat. One of those words is Godforsaken. More than 700 dusty, rocky acres in all, the spread sits along the trickling Price River, under the boxy shadow of the Book Cliffs. Like Pogue himself, a man in bib overalls, handlebar mustache and welloiled cowboy hat, the property exudes a bit of Wild West panache: At its core is a creaky old ghost town complete with an abandoned gold mine, coldwater geyser and a supposed one-time hide-out for the outlaw Butch Cassidy when he wasn’t riding with the Sundance Kid. But now, in a move that breaks Pogue’s heart, he’s put it all up for sale. Despite its scruffy “as is” condition, he’s asking a pretty price: $3.9 million. Potential buyers might see only isolation and neglect: a jumble of abandoned trailers, water tanks, squat-looking shacks and the shell of an old service station, all surrounded by a fence to keep out vandals. If most towns rise up out of the desert, this one just lies there. But for Pogue, the place has been a refuge. The little hamlet of Woodside, located along a lonely rural highway three hours southeast of Salt Lake City, was already long abandoned when Pogue settled here, but that suited him just fine. A disabled veteran from the nearby town of Moab who had a hard time finding steady carpentry work, Pogue says that in his 20 years here, he’s ruled his own fate: He’s been a one-man sheriff, judge, jury and good Samaritan. Over the years, he made ends meet by ranching, farming (yes, farming) and running his gas station. And for a long time he made it work. For 70 miles along isolated U.S. Route 6, between the towns of Price and Green River, it’s been just Pogue and a herd of free-range llamas. But maybe not for much longer. After decades of sweat, labor, battles with the federal government over cattle and water rights, fights with his wife, who prefers people to llamas — and, finally, declining health — Pogue performed the toughest chore of his life: pounding in the for-sale sign. “This place has meant so much to me,” he said, sweating under a relentless midday sun. “It’s the closest thing to real freedom I’ve ever known in my life. At this price, it might be a cold day in hell before someone buys it. And maybe that’s good.” When Pogue bought the land in the early 1990s, it no longer had water or electricity, not to mention other people. School buses wouldn’t come this far out, so his wife moved to a real town two hours away to raise the kids. Pogue visited his family when he could, but there was so much to do in town and only one man to do it. He won’t say how much he paid for Woodside. There are a few things, like why he walks with a limp and details of his early life, that Pogue just doesn’t want to discuss. “I was moving away from things — I didn’t want anybody to know anything about nobody’s business.” Slowly, he became an expert on Woodside, reading books and chatting up former residents. The town, he says, was founded in the late 1880s when the railroad provided local ranchers a way to get their livestock to East Coast markets. By 1910, Woodside’s population had swelled to 328. There was a large hotel, saloons and schoolhouses — all now long gone. For someone so solitary, Pogue likes to tell stories. Like the one about how, following the 1897 Castle Gate train robbery, Butch Cassidy hid out in an underground warren

of tunnels beneath one house outside town. Stubborn locals refused to give up the outlaw to the marshals, he says. As a boy, Pogue came here to see the famous cold-water geyser, which is akin to its hotwater counterpart except that carbon-dioxide bubbles — not steam — drive the eruptions. “The old-timers drank the water if they got sick,” he says. “It’s like sodium bicarbonate. If you’ve got a bout of gas, that’ll cure you. You’ll burp a couple of times and then you can go your own way.”

Pogue blames Lady Bird Johnson for ruining Woodside. Her 1960s highway beautification program tore down the unsightly billboards along U.S. Route 6, many advertising the town’s geyser attraction. Without signs to guide them, tourists buzzed on by. For years, Pogue battled the Bureau of Land Management, which he dismisses as the “Big Land Monster.” He says officials confiscated his cattle, denied him water rights and made his life miserable. In a statement, the agency said

that “it has been more than 10 years since the BLM has had any formal interaction with Mr. Pogue,” with whom officials worked with “on property boundary issues.” A few years ago, time and bad health caught up with Pogue, and he moved back in with his wife in a town a few hours north. He first considered selling in 2008, after suffering a third heart attack. “Really, I don’t know why I’m still here — maybe my name didn’t come up in that book yet,” he says.

Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Roy Pogue, 63, steps out of an old storage shed in Woodside, Utah. Pogue owns the entire town, 706 acres in all, on U.S. Highway 6, and has put it up for sale at $3.9 million.


COMMUNITYLIFE THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

SPOTLIGHT Share your fave restaurant for kids The Bulletin’s Family section is putting together a guide to the best kid-friendly restaurants in Central Oregon. Do you have a favorite spot? Please let us know your pick and why you love it. Email the information, including the name of the restaurant and why it’s great for kids, to family@bend bulletin.com. Tell us your favorites by 5 p.m. Friday. The information will appear in an upcoming edition of the Family section. Questions? Contact Family section editor Alandra Johnson at 541-617-7860.

www.bendbulletin.com/community

Grand accomplishment

PETS

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Lauren Stayer, a veterinarian at Bend Veterinary Clinic, listens to the heartbeat of 4-month-old Ginger, an Australian shepherd-Lab mix owned by Gina Vanderburg.

Pet health insurance can save you money

Tech class for seniors coming up The Central Oregon Council on Aging will host a Teen Elder Computer Help class with students from the Cascades Academy of Central Oregon from 2 to 3 p.m. Oct. 10. In TECH classes, teenagers help area seniors learn how to use Facebook, their digital cameras and cellphones. Registration is required. For more information, call COCOA’s office at 541-678-5483.

• Weigh coverage options before investing in a policy By Tom Olsen For The Bulletin

— From staff reports

YOUR PET

Submitted photos

Nancy Stevens, 51, of Bend, sits in the Lower Saddle, with the summit of Grand Teton looming above.

• Nancy Stevens becomes the first blind woman to scale the 13,770-foot Grand Teton By David Jasper • The Bulletin

Submitted photo

I

We love to play

“I loved cclimbing trees as a kid,”

Say hello to Catarina, left, and Rosco, two 3-year-old German shepherds who love to play, swim, chase squirrels and relax with their owners. They also enjoy camping and hiking with their owners Joe and Nicole Aldred, of La Pine. To submit a photo for publication, email a highresolution image along with your animal’s name, age and species or breed, your name, age, city of residence and contact information, and a few words about what makes your pet special. Send photos to pets@bendbulletin.com, drop them off at 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. in Bend, or mail them to The Bulletin Pets section, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. Contact: 541-383-0358.

says ays Nanc N Nancy Stevens, who was 6 when she he first fi clambered cl up a tree in her childhood hildh yard. “I was w climbing cl on a fence and

sort ort of o said said, ‘Oh, what’s this?’” she recalls. alls. Abo Above the fence, the young Stevens ens felt a nearby tree limb, grabbed hold and a began b pulling herself up — and d up.

“I said, ‘Oh, wow, this is cool!’ I just

kept going up, and all of a sudden I was like, ‘I don’t know how to get down,’” says Stevens, of Bend. None of that is unusual for a child. But Stevens has been blind since she

ADOPT ME

was born three months prematurely in Michigan, where hospital staff gave Stevens, top, practices rappelling just days before climbing Grand Teton. “I get up things fine. It’s climbing down that takes me longer. It’s scarier,” Stevens said.

her too much oxygen — succeeding in their efforts to save her, but damaging her retinas in the process.

Submitted photo

Stevens, 51, a retired claims repre-

Ray Ray flies solo Meet Ray Ray, a 2year-old black Labrador retriever and dachshund mix. He needs a home where he can be the only pet; he loves people and older children. Ray Ray has been at the shelter for almost six months. If you would like to meet Ray Ray, or any other animal available for adoption at the Jefferson County Kennels, visit 1694 S.E. McTaggart Road, Madras. Contact: 541-475-6889.

B

TV & Movies, B2 Calendar, B3 Horoscope, B3 Comics, B4-5 Puzzles, B5

sentative for the Social Security Administration who now does speaking engagements, is still reaching up and hoisting herself into unfamiliar places: In August, Stevens, already an accomplished skier and runner, became the first blind woman to scale the 13,770Ginny Deal, from left, Anne Dal Vera, Ryan Burke and Nancy Stevens celebrate reaching the summit of 13,770-foot Grand Teton.

foot Grand Teton. See Stevens / B6

The speeding car shattered the young hound’s hind leg, but at least the dog was still alive, said Bend veterinarian Lauren Stayer, and the owner was willing to bear any cost to restore the dog’s fourlegged mobility. A long and complex surgery to fix the bone followed, but the pet was too Inside active on the • Pet weak limb or insurance, the break was compared, too complex B6 to properly heal and, after a week, the repair failed. The hound’s owner then elected to save his beloved pet by having its leg amputated, but the trauma from the initial accident and first surgery led to additional complications. Over its recovery, the hound required two trips to the emergency room, several follow-up visits to the veterinarian’s office and a month of physical therapy. The good news is the dog recovered completely and is doing very well on three legs, Stayer said; the bad news is the owner paid about $4,000 in vet’s bills to save his pet, and most of that might have been avoided if the animal had been covered by pet health insurance. Still, pet insurance may not be for everyone, Stayer said, and owners should research the options before deciding to buy a policy. “Pet insurance is a newer product and many pet owners just don’t know about it,” Stayer said. She estimates that fewer than 10 percent of the owners of the pets cared for at her clinic carry pet health insurance, mostly for dogs. Most pet insurance policies cover diagnostic tests, treatment and medicines needed to address accidents, illnesses, wounds, poisonings, infections and even allergies, Stayer said, but owners also need to know the policies don’t cover everything. “Some owners are disappointed to discover their policies don’t cover some things like pre-existing conditions,” she said. Other common exclusions include breed-specific maladies such as hip dysplasia in German shepherds, and complications due to breeding. See Insurance / B6


B2

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

TV & M Half-shell heroes return to action

L M T FOR TUESDAY, OCT. 2

Joseph Gordon-Levitt, foreground, and Paul Dano star in the action thriller “Looper.�

BEND

just pet turtles until they were transformed by a weird green LOS ANGELES — Jim Far- ooze. Splinter retreated to the relly is a pop culture expert sewers, raising the four turtles at the University of Dayton, and training them as ninjas. where he teaches courses tiThe first TV series hit the tled “Fantasy and Magic� and air in 1987. Boys in particu“A p o c a l y p t ic lar responded Films.� As a perto this reptilTV SPOTLIGHT son who thinks ian rowdiness. seriously about The Turtles silly topics, he would seem wielded weird weapons like like an ideal candidate to field nunchuks, had a street style this question: What was it (they’re all dressed like break about “Teenage Mutant Ninja dancers in early episodes), Turtles� back in the 1980s that and used a colorful argot: made boys go gaga? “Cowabunga!� It didn’t hurt His answer: “There’s no ac- that the cartoon had a stickcounting for taste.� All right in-your-ears theme song. then! (Fun fact: Chuck Lorre, the Nickelodeon, however, not force behind “Two and a Half only thinks the answer is much Men,� co-composed the “hemore complex, it believes the roes in a half shell� tune.) question should be asked in Now comes Nickelodethe present tense. What young on’s back-to-basics remake. viewers first found charming The same DNA may still be in the ’80s worked again in the there, but the franchise has 1990s, and, most important, been reworked — “updated� Nickelodeon thinks the magic — in ways large and small. remains: “Teenage Mutant For starters, the Turtles spend Ninja Turtles,� a slick new com- a lot more time above ground. puter-animated series, which Cowabunga? No longer cool. arrived on the children’s cable The new catch phrase is network this weekend. “booyakasha,� described by Nickelodeon sees the Tur- the show’s creator, Ciro Nieli, tles — Leonardo, Raphael, as Jamaican patois meaning Donatello and Michelangelo “to give praise.� April is no — as potential heart paddles longer a busty 20-something for its schedule. Over the last in distress; now, she’s a feisty year, the channel’s audience teenager, an attempt to deepen has dropped more than 20 per- the show’s appeal to girls. cent, creating a code blue for Quirky humor remains a its executives and corporate hallmark of the franchise, but overlords. But for people who some of the silliness is gone. never understood the appeal For instance, the Turtles eat of these characters, it seems pizza, but at least in early epilike a long shot. sodes it is plain old pepperoni Ninja turtles? With Renais- — not pepperoni and ice sance names? Who live in cream or anchovy and peanut sewers? The franchise, just butter as in the old days. Nieli’s to jog your memory, centers lavishly animated, cinematic on four humanoid turtles and series is aggressive, actiontheir sensei, a rat named Mas- packed and dark. The Turtles ter Splinter. Splinter was once can look menacing and the human and the turtles were villains are creepier. By Brooks Barnes

New York Times News Service

Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15 CELESTE AND JESSE FOREVER (R) 1, 4, 7 FOR A GOOD TIME, CALL ... (R) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45 THE MASTER (R) Noon, 3, 6

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

2016: OBAMA’S AMERICA (PG) 1:40, 4:20, 7:20, 9:40 THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 12:05, 3:20, 6:40, 9:50 THE CAMPAIGN (R) 7:55, 10:10 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES IMAX (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 6 DREDD 3-D (R) 3:40, 10:15 DREDD (R) 12:55, 7:45 END OF WATCH (R) 12:40, 4:05, 7:25, 10:05

EDITOR’S NOTES:

Sony Pictures Entertainment via The Associated Press

THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG) 12:15, 2:50, 6:25, 9:15 PARANORMAN (PG) 1:30, 4:40 RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION (R) 3:50, 10:25 RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION IMAX (R) 3:05, 9:35 TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG13) 12:20, 3, 6:35, 9:20 WON’T BACK DOWN (PG) 1, 3:55, 7, 9:45

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 6 TOTAL RECALL (PG-13) 9:30 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

REDMOND Redmond Cinemas

MADRAS

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

Madras Cinema 5

HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13) 4, 6:15 HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG) 5:15, 7:15 HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (PG-13) 4:30, 6:45 TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG13) 4:15, 6:45

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

DREDD (R) 5:20, 7:30 END OF WATCH (R) 4:50, 7:10 FINDING NEMO 3-D (G) 4:30, 6:50 HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (PG-13) 5:10, 7:20 TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG13) 4:40, 7

SISTERS Sisters Movie House

PRINEVILLE Pine Theater

720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

END OF WATCH (R) 6:30

Tin Pan Theater

FINDING NEMO 3-D (G) 11:45 a.m., 2:30, 6:10, 9:05

HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13) 6:30

869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13) 1:20, 7:30

• Accessibility devices are available for some movies at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15.50 for adults and $13 for children (ages 3 to 11) and seniors (ages 60 and older). • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG) 6

AI WEIWEI: NEVER SORRY (R) 6

TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG13) 6:15

HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13) 4, 7 HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (UPSTAIRS — PG) 4:15, 6:30 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG) 12:45, 1:55, 4:30, 6:05, 6:50, 9:10 HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3-D (PG) 11:35 a.m., 3:15, 9 HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (PG-13) 1:10, 4:15, 7:40, 10:20

for appointments call 541-382-4900

LAWLESS (R) 11:55 a.m., 2:40 LOOPER (R) 12:30, 3:30, 7:10, 10 MALOOF MONEY CUP WORLD SKATEBOARDING CHAMPIONSHIP (no MPAA rating) 7:30

L TV L   TUESDAY PRIME TIME 10/2/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00

5:30

KATU News World News News Nightly News News Evening News KEZI 9 News World News America’s Funniest Home Videos Wild Kratts ‘Y’ Electric Comp. NewsChannel 8 Nightly News We There Yet? We There Yet? Mexico/Bayless Simply Ming ‘G’

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å Access H. Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men This Old House Business Rpt. NewsChannel 8 News King of Queens King of Queens New Tricks Moving Target Å

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Entertainment The Insider (N) Big Bang Big Bang PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition Engagement Engagement Beatles Rocked the Kremlin

8:00

8:30

Dancing With the Stars: All-Stars The Voice (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS Recovery (N) ’ ‘PG’ Dancing With the Stars: All-Stars Raising Hope Ben and Kate History Detectives (N) ‘PG’ Ă… The Voice (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Hart of Dixie I Fall to Pieces ‘PG’ The Cliburn: 50 Years of Gold ‘G’

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

Dancing With the Stars: All-Stars Private Practice (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… (9:01) Go On (N) New Normal (10:01) Parenthood The Talk ‘14’ NCIS: Los Angeles Recruit ‘14’ Vegas Money Plays (N) ‘14’ Ă… Dancing With the Stars: All-Stars Private Practice (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… New Girl (N) ‘14’ Mindy Project News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Half the Sky: Turning Oppression Into Opportunity for Women (9:01) Go On (N) New Normal (10:01) Parenthood The Talk ‘14’ The Next (N) ’ (Live) ‘PG’ Ă… Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ World News Tavis Smiley (N) Charlie Rose (N) ’ Ă…

11:00

11:30

KATU News (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline The Simpsons Family Guy ‘14’ NOVA Childbirth injuries. ’ ‘PG’ NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno ’Til Death ‘PG’ ’Til Death ‘14’ PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Shipping Wars Shipping Wars Shipping Wars Shipping Wars *A&E 130 28 18 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… (3:00) “Escape ›› “The Chronicles of Riddickâ€? (2004, Science Fiction) Vin Diesel, Colm Feore, Thandie Newton. ››› “The Fifth Elementâ€? (1997, Science Fiction) Bruce Willis, Gary Oldman, Ian Holm. Premiere. A New York cabby ››› “The Fifth Elementâ€? (1997) Bruce *AMC 102 40 39 From L.A.â€? Ă… A fugitive fights an invading ruler and his army. Ă… tries to save Earth in 2259. Willis, Gary Oldman. Fatal Attractions ’ ‘14’ Ă… ››› “Oceansâ€? (2009) Narrated by Pierce Brosnan. ’ ››› “The Crimson Wing: Mystery of the Flamingosâ€? (2008) “Crimson Wing: Flamingosâ€? *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Monsters Inside Me ‘PG’ Ă… Flipping Out Drawing the Line Flipping Out Bad Mojo ‘PG’ Ă… Inside the Actors Studio (N) Housewives/NJ Flipping Out Ă… Flipping Out House of Lies (N) What Happens Housewives/NJ BRAVO 137 44 Roseanne ‘G’ Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Redneck Rehab ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Redneck Rehab ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Bayou Billion Bayou Billion CMT 190 32 42 53 Roseanne ‘G’ 60 Minutes on CNBC Big Oil American Greed Mad Money 60 Minutes on CNBC Big Oil American Greed Paid Program Octaspring Ma. CNBC 54 36 40 52 The Facebook Obsession Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront CNN 55 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… South Park ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Colbert Report Daily Show Workaholics Tosh.0 ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Tosh.0 (N) ‘14’ Brickleberry (N) Daily Show Colbert Report COM 135 53 135 47 (4:58) Futurama Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Paid Program Morning Oregon Redmond City Council Morning Oregon City Edition COTV 11 Capitol Hill Hearings CSPAN 61 20 12 11 Capitol Hill Hearings Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Phineas, Ferb Good-Charlie Gravity Falls ’ Good-Charlie Austin & Ally ’ Gravity Falls ’ Good-Charlie A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Code 9 ’ ‘G’ Phineas, Ferb A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ My Babysitter *DIS 87 43 14 39 Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Alaska: The Last Frontier ’ ‘14’ Alaska: The Last Frontier ’ ‘14’ Alaska: The Last Frontier ’ ‘14’ Alaska: The Last Frontier (N) ‘14’ Yukon Men ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Alaska: The Last Frontier ’ ‘14’ *DISC 156 21 16 37 Yukon Men Tragic Spring ’ ‘PG’ Keeping Up With the Kardashians Kevin & Dani Jonas ‘14’ E! News (N) Jonas Jonas ›› “Must Love Dogsâ€? (2005) Diane Lane, John Cusack. Chelsea Lately E! News *E! 136 25 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 World Series of Poker SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 30 for 30 (Season Premiere) (N) Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter Best of the NFL Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… 30 for 30 (N) Football Live ESPN2 22 24 21 24 WNBA Basketball Conference Semifinal, Game 3: Teams TBA (N) Boxing Ă… Boxing From May 14, 2010. Ă… Boxing: 2009 Bailey vs. Urango Boxing Ă… Boxing Ă… Boxing Ă… Boxing: 2009 Bailey vs. Urango ESPNC 23 25 123 25 Boxing Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Melissa & Joey ››› “My Best Friend’s Weddingâ€? (1997) Julia Roberts. ››› “Pretty Womanâ€? (1990, Romance-Comedy) Richard Gere, Julia Roberts. The 700 Club ’ ‘PG’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five FNC 57 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Paula’s Cooking Chopped Ready, Set, Escargot! Cupcake Wars Renaissance Faire Cupcake Wars Cake Wars Chopped Chard & True ‘G’ Chopped No Kidding! (N) Chopped One in a Hundred ‘G’ *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Takenâ€? (2008, Action) Liam Neeson, Maggie Grace. Sons of Anarchy (N) ‘MA’ (11:04) Sons of Anarchy ‘MA’ FX 131 Million Dollar Million Dollar Rooms ‘G’ Ă… Hunters Int’l House Hunters Love It or List It ‘G’ Ă… Property Virgins Property Virgins House Hunters Hunters Int’l Million Dollar Rooms (N) ‘G’ Ă… HGTV 176 49 33 43 Million Dollar Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Ă… Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ How Playboy Changed the World (N) ‘14’ Ă… America’s Book of Secrets ‘PG’ *HIST 155 42 41 36 Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Ă… “Amish Graceâ€? (2010) Kimberly Williams-Paisley. ‘PG’ Ă… ››› “The Memory Keeper’s Daughterâ€? (2008, Drama) ‘PG’ Ă… ›› “The Brooke Ellison Storyâ€? (2004), John Slattery ‘PG’ Ă… LIFE 138 39 20 31 Wife Swap Mallick/Stewart ‘PG’ The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word The Ed Show The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews MSNBC 59 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Ă… Jersey Shore Girls Like That ‘14’ Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Ă… Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Ă… Teen Mom Farewell Special The cast reflects. (N) Teen Mom ’ MTV 192 22 38 57 Jersey Shore Dirty Pad ‘14’ Ă… SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Drake & Josh Drake & Josh Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ NICK 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Interrogations Interrogations Interrogations Iyanla, Fix My Life ‘PG’ Ă… Iyanla, Fix My Life ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Iyanla, Fix My Life ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Oprah: Where Are They Now? (N) Iyanla, Fix My Life ’ ‘PG’ Ă… OWN 161 103 31 103 Interrogations Mariners Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (N) (Live) Mariners Post. The Dan Patrick Show MLB Baseball ROOT 20 45 28* 26 MLB Baseball: Angels at Mariners ›› “Jurassic Park IIIâ€? (2001) Sam Neill, William H. Macy. ’ Ă… ›› “Jurassic Park IIIâ€? (2001) Sam Neill, William H. Macy. ’ Ă… SPIKE 132 31 34 46 ›››› “Star Wars IV: A New Hopeâ€? (1977, Science Fiction) Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford. ’ Face Off Alice in Zombieland ‘PG’ Face Off The artists use vehicles. Face Off Face Off Monster Twist (N) ‘14’ Hot Set Android Bordello (N) ‘PG’ Face Off Monster Twist ‘14’ SYFY 133 35 133 45 Face Off Year of the Dragon Behind Scenes Joyce Meyer Joseph Prince Rod Parsley Praise the Lord Ă… ACLJ Full Flame Kim Clement Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord Ă… TBN 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan (N) ‘14’ Ă… *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ ››› “An Affair to Rememberâ€? (1957) Cary Grant, Deborah Kerr. A sea cruise (7:15) ››› “A Patch of Blueâ€? (1965, Drama) Sidney Poitier. A black business- (9:15) ››› “Butterflies Are Freeâ€? (1972) Goldie Hawn, Edward Albert. A scat- (11:15) ››› “Gaby: A True Storyâ€? TCM 101 44 101 29 unites a playboy and an ex-nightclub singer. Ă… man befriends an 18-year-old blind woman. Ă… (DVS) terbrained actress and a blind neighbor find romance. (1987) Liv Ullmann. Breaking Amish ’ ‘14’ Ă… 19 Kids-Count 19 Kids-Count Abby & Brittany Abby & Brittany 19 Kids-Count 19 Kids-Count *TLC 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Island Medium Island Medium Secret Princes ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist Red Gold ’ ‘14’ The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist Red Badge ’ ‘14’ Rizzoli & Isles ‘14’ Ă… Leverage ‘PG’ Ă… *TNT 17 26 15 27 Bones A Halloween killer. ’ ‘14’ MAD ‘PG’ Annoying Regular Show Wrld, Gumball Regular Show Regular Show Looney Tunes Adventure Time King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ *TOON 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Travel Like a President (N) ‘G’ Airport 24/7: Mi Airport 24/7: Mi Mysteries at the Museum ‘PG’ Mysteries at the Museum ‘PG’ *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Bourdain: No Reservations M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Cosby Show Cosby Show Cosby Show Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 Bonanza The Law Maker ‘G’ Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU USA 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU Behind the Music ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Unplugged ‘PG’ ›› “Footlooseâ€? (1984, Drama) Kevin Bacon, Lori Singer, John Lithgow. ’ Ă… Rehab With Dr. Drew ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives LA ’ ‘14’ VH1 191 48 37 54 Rehab With Dr. Drew ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:05) ›››› “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrialâ€? 1982 Henry Thomas. ’ Jason and the Argonauts ‘PG’ Ă… (9:35) ››› “Batmanâ€? 1989 Jack Nicholson. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Conan-Barbarn ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:00) ›› “How Do You Knowâ€? FXM Presents ›› “Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonianâ€? 2009 ‘PG’ FXM Presents ›› “Simpaticoâ€? 1999, Comedy-Drama Nick Nolte. ‘R’ Ă… FMC 104 204 104 120 ›› “Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonianâ€? 2009 ‘PG’ The Ultimate Fighter ’ ‘PG’ UFC Unleashed UFC Tonight (N) UFC Insider UFC Fight Night UFC: Struve vs. Miocic UFC Tonight UFC Insider FUEL 34 Greenbrier Big Break Greenbrier (N) Chasing Chasing Big Break Golf Central Big Break Greenbrier Chasing Chasing Learning Center Inside PGA GOLF 28 301 27 301 Greenbrier Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Fulfillment ‘G’ The Fight Game ›› “Klitschkoâ€? 2011, Documentary The lives and careers of Vitali and Wladi- REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel › “The Sitterâ€? 2011 Jonah Hill. A ne’er-do-well watches a Treme Saints Antoine’s students show Boardwalk Empire Bone for Tuna HBO 425 501 425 501 With Jim mir Klitschko. ’ ‘NR’ brood of rambunctious children. ‘R’ Ă… interest. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Nucky receives a high honor. ‘MA’ ’ ‘PG’ Ă… ››› “Creepshowâ€? 1982, Horror Hal Holbrook, Adrienne Barbeau, E.G. Marshall. ‘R’ ›› “Saw IIâ€? 2005, Horror Donnie Wahlberg, Tobin Bell. ‘R’ ››› “Creepshowâ€? 1982, Horror Hal Holbrook, Adrienne Barbeau, E.G. Marshall. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:50) ›› “Love & Other Drugsâ€? 2010, Drama Jake Gyl- (6:45) ›› “The Running Manâ€? 1987 Arnold Schwarzenegger. Athletes hunt ›› “Final Destination 5â€? 2011, Horror Nicholas D’Agosto, ›› “Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundyâ€? 2004, (11:40) Strike MAX 400 508 508 lenhaal, Anne Hathaway. ’ ‘R’ Ă… convicted prisoners on a sadistic game show. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Emma Bell, Miles Fisher. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Comedy Will Ferrell, Paul Rudd. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… Back ’ ‘MA’ Lockdown ’ ‘14’ Hard Time Revolving Door (N) ‘14’ Taboo Weird Collections (N) ‘14’ Taboo Weird Collections ‘14’ Hard Time Revolving Door ‘14’ Lockdown ’ ‘14’ Wild Justice ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Planet Sheen Planet Sheen Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Odd Parents Odd Parents SpongeBob SpongeBob Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles ’ Dragon Ball Z Iron Man: Armor NTOON 89 115 189 115 Odd Parents Ted Nugent Hunt., Country Outdoors TV Wildlife Dream Season Hunting TV Michaels MRA Truth Hunting Wildlife The Hit List Bow Madness Legends of Fall SOLO Hunters OUTD 37 307 43 307 The Hit List (4:45) › “Bio-Domeâ€? 1996 Pauly Shore. Slack-brained Homeland The Smile A former asset Dexter Are You ...? Deb tries to cover Homeland The Smile A former asset Dexter Are You ...? Deb tries to cover ›› “Beastlyâ€? 2011 Alex Pettyfer. A teen must find true SHO 500 500 buddies crash a scientific experiment. Ă… love to break a curse. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… threatens Carrie’s peace. ‘MA’ up involvement. ‘MA’ Ă… threatens Carrie’s peace. ‘MA’ up involvement. ‘MA’ Ă… Dumbest Stuff Hard Parts Hard Parts My Ride Rules My Ride Rules Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff Hard Parts Hard Parts My Ride Rules My Ride Rules Unique Whips ‘14’ SPEED 35 303 125 303 Dumbest Stuff (5:50) ››› “The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towersâ€? 2002, Fantasy Elijah Wood. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ››› “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the Kingâ€? 2003, Fantasy Elijah Wood. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:20) ›› “Gnomeo and Julietâ€? (4:55) “Street Racerâ€? 2008 Clint Browning. A recently (6:25) ›› “Prey of the Jaguarâ€? 1996, Action Maxwell ›› “The Twilight Saga: Eclipseâ€? 2010, Romance Kristen Stewart. Bella must (10:05) ››› “The Cry of the Owlâ€? 2009, Suspense Paddy (11:45) › “GroupTMC 525 525 released convict goes back to street racing. Caulfield, Linda Blair, Stacy Keach. ’ ‘R’ Ă… choose between Edward and Jacob. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Considine, Julia Stiles. ’ ‘R’ Ă… ieâ€? 2010 Boxing Gabriel Rosado vs. Charles Whittaker Dream On: Journey Red Bull Signature Series ‘PG’ Caught Looking ‘PG’ Dream On: Journey NBCSN 27 58 30 209 Dream On: Journey CSI: Miami Bombshell ‘14’ Ă… CSI: Miami Wrecking Crew ‘14’ CSI: Miami Cheating Death ‘14’ CSI: Miami Gone Baby Gone ‘14’ Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘G’ *WE 143 41 174 118 CSI: Miami Raging Cannibal ‘14’


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Be sure to register to vote Dear Readers: If you like the way things are going, VOTE. If you don’t like the way things are going, VOTE. If you have never voted before, VOTE. (Don’t be embarrassed by your ignorance — when you get there, they’ll show you how.) If you’re not registered to vote and don’t know where to register, contact the League of Women Voters, your county registrar’s office or your secretary of state’s office for details. All are listed in your phone directory or online. The deadlines for registering vary from state to state. Don’t let anything — or anybody — keep you from voting on Tuesday, Nov. 6. It may be the most important thing you will do all year. Dear Abby: I have been dating a divorced woman for four years. She said in the beginning that she had very little sexual experience because her former husband “had problems,� but decided after the divorce to find out what she was missing. She hasn’t discussed this in detail, but once in a while she lets out little snippets of information that lead me to believe she was active. Do I have a right, now that we’re engaged, to know how many partners she had since the divorce? She’s being evasive about it. — Wondering Widower Dear Wondering: No, you do not have that “right,� because if she answers the question, your next questions will be what are their names, how many times did she sleep with them and were they better than you are in bed. Sometimes it is wiser to leave the past in the past and simply appreciate the special relationship you have with the person you love.

DEAR ABBY Dear Abby: “Webbed in Columbia, Md.� wondered what kind of spider went up the waterspout (July 8). Well, it depends on the location of that spout. Waterspouts in England, Australia (and I’m guessing Canada) attract spiders that are “incy wincy.� American waterspouts are climbed by “itsy bitsy� spiders. (And at this time of year we see really big ones.) Between English-speaking countries there are also slightly different lyrics for “The Wheels on the Bus� and “Ring Around the Rosie.� Because my hubby and I are from opposite sides of the Atlantic “pond,� our son is learning multiple versions of many things. — Sunkissed in Houston Dear Sunkissed: Readers young and old responded to that letter, and you are correct that it depends upon which side of the pond you hail from. In the United States, it’s also “teensy weensy� and “itty bitty.� In Switzerland, it’s “inky dinky.� And then there was the following submission: Dear Abby: The confusion may stem from “Webbed’s� family members having confused the “Itsy Bitsy Spider� poem (song) with the “Itsy Bitsy Teeny Weeny Yellow Polka Dot Bikini� song. The spider song I learned in school and the bikini song I heard when my dad belted it out. It made us all laugh. Thanks for the memories. — Karen in Reno, Nev. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar This year you express an unusual amount of serenity and caring. You will do whatever you need to do in order to keep the peace. You still could have a tendency to be overserious. That, too, will pass. You are willing to adapt and change, especially with family members and roommates. Look at real estate as a possible money source. If you are single, a friendship could play a strong role in your romantic life. If you are attached, your partnerships take a higher priority than in the past, particularly those involved with financial matters. TAURUS seems to connect with you on an unusually deep level. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Conversation revitalizes you and encourages a different perspective. A partner might be too intimidated to be as proactive as you are. A discussion with someone close results in support and nurturing. Curb a tendency to push your limits in a money matter ‌ you will get your share. Tonight: Roll with the moment. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH You gain new perspectives quickly and see a situation in a different vein, as a result. You demonstrate unusual flexibility. You have a way about you that appeals to associates, friends and family members — as long as you are just yourself. Be willing to manifest greater security and ease for yourself and others. Tonight: Go for what you want. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Be more visual in your thinking. A conversation with a respected friend helps you grasp more possibilities. Your creativity might not be so strong if you try to force yourself through a problem. Verbalize more of what you are thinking in order to get feedback. Tonight: Not to be found. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Listen to a partner’s or loved one’s suggestion. This person tends to put an interesting spin on situations, which helps you identify with others and better understand what is happening. His or her delightful words encourage your mind to wander. Tonight: Where the crowds are. LEO (July 23- Aug. 22) HHHH Others look to you to take the lead. You naturally enjoy yourself with even the most intense or negative people in your life. It appears that your mood is contagious. A conversation, though serious, has much compassion behind it. A partner or loved one has

a vision that affects you. Tonight: A must appearance. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Reach out for new information and different ways of seeing a situation. If you can come up with several different approaches, it could turn out far better than you’d originally thought possible. Use your unusual appeal later today. Tonight: Be willing to dream. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Deal with a change in a partner directly. This person has become unusually verbose or relaxed. This could be a good sign; however, it demands that you make an adjustment. Weigh the pros and cons, if you would like. Ultimately, you’ll know which way to go. Tonight: Dinner with a favorite person. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Others might be unusually difficult and touchy, but your persistence wins the day. Try not to challenge someone or get into a power play. Ultimately, it will not be worth it. Test out an idea on those who could be affected. Tonight: All smiles. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Stay level. Understand what has to be accomplished. You might find it difficult to home in on what is happening, as you are deep in thought. Be careful when using mechanical objects and driving cars. An authority figure admires the way you handle yourself. Tonight: Stop what you’re doing and take a break. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH Your creativity and determination prove to be unfamiliar benefits. Be willing to walk away from your comfort zone and look past restrictions. A more neutral environment with fewer judgments will enhance your relationships on all fronts. Tonight: Don’t forget to call a loved one at a distance. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH If you have a hankering to stay home, do. If you work, consider working from home if possible. In the long run, it might be a good idea to consider having a home-based business. Express your caring to a loved one — it always is nice to get a hug. Tonight: The homewardbound theme continues. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH You tend to find the right words at the right time; meanwhile, others seem to be grasping when it comes to their own self-expression. Touch base with a neighbor or relative. This tie easily can be neglected, but ultimately it is instrumental to your life. Tonight: Find a pal to hang with. Š 2012 by King Features Syndicate

B3

C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY

THURSDAY

“ETHOS�: A screening of the film about system flaws that work against democracy and the environment; free; 6:30 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Kaya Mclaren talks about her book “How I Came to Sparkle Again�; free; 6:30 p.m.; Between the Covers, 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766 or www .btcbooks.com. PUB QUIZ: Answer questions in rounds on different topics; donations benefit the Kurera Foundation; $40 per team of five; 6:30-9 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440.

PUMPKIN PATCH: Free admission; noon-6 p.m.; Central Oregon Pumpkin Company, 1250 N.E. Wilcox Ave., Terrebonne; 541-5041414 or www.pumpkinco.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Julia Kennedy Cochran presents her father’s memoir, “Ed Kennedy’s War: V-E Day, Censorship and the Associated Press�; free; 6:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-330-3760 or tinad@deschuteslibrary.org. “LAWRENCE OF ARABIA�: A screening of the 1962, PG film about a British military figure and his conflicted loyalties; $12.50; 7 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347 or www.fathomevents.com. “SPIRIT STORIES�: A performance of “Spirit Stories,� readings from the poetic drama of William Butler Yeats; featuring “Purgatory� and “At the Hawk’s Well�; $5 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721. JEFF CROSBY & THE REFUGEES: The Idaho-based Americana band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. SPEAKNOW: High-school students compete in a spoken word competition; $10, free to participate; 7 p.m., registration at 6:30 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; www.thenatureofwords.org. “WRONG WINDOW�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the comedy about a couple who think they have witnessed a murder through a window; $24, $18 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. BILLY DON BURNS: The country artist performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-7280879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. BOOM VARIETAL, THE RISE OF MALBEC: A screening of the wine documentary filmed in Argentina; $3; 8:30 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com.

WEDNESDAY PUMPKIN PATCH: Free admission; noon-6 p.m.; Central Oregon Pumpkin Company, 1250 N.E. Wilcox Ave., Terrebonne; 541-504-1414 or www.pumpkinco.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or www.bendfarmersmarket .com. BUDDY WAKEFIELD: Two-time Individual World Poetry Slam champion Buddy Wakefield performs; registration requested; $15, free for students; 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-647-2233 or www.thenatureofwords.org. ROB LARKIN AND THE WAYWARD ONES: The Los Angeles-based roots-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com. “WRONG WINDOW�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the comedy about a couple who think they have witnessed a murder through a window; $24, $18 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. MUSIC OF INDIA: Featuring a performance by the Mysore violin brothers; $15 in advance, $20 at the door; 7:30 p.m., doors open at 7 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-322-7273 or www.bend ticket.com.

FRIDAY PUMPKIN PATCH: Free admission; noon-6 p.m.; Central Oregon Pumpkin Company, 1250 N.E. Wilcox Ave., Terrebonne; 541-5041414 or www.pumpkinco.com. CORN MAIZE: $7.50, $5.50 ages 11-6, free ages 5 and younger; 3-7 p.m.; Central Oregon Pumpkin

Company, 1250 N.E. Wilcox Ave., Terrebonne; 541-504-1414 or www.pumpkinco.org. BEND FALL FESTIVAL: The annual event kicks off with a concert by Mosley Wotta, Sophistafunk and Radiation City; free; 5 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-389-0995 or www.c3events.com. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill District; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: April Streeter talks about her book “Women on Wheels�; free; 6 p.m.; Bend Electric Bikes, 223 N.W. Hill St.; 541-410-7408 or info@ bendelectricbikes.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Keith Scribner talks about his book “The Oregon Experiment�; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “SPIRIT STORIES�: A performance of “Spirit Stories,� readings from the poetic drama of William Butler Yeats; featuring “Purgatory� and “At the Hawk’s Well�; $5 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721. “THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL�: A screening of the PG13-rated 2011 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “WE, A COLLECTION OF INDIVIDUALS� AND “ACT NATURAL�: A screening of the Red Bull Media ski film, followed by a screening of the ski/snowboard film “Act Natural�; $13.50 plus fees; 7:30 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “WRONG WINDOW�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the comedy about a couple who think they have witnessed a murder through a window; $24, $18 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. JEFF CROSBY & THE REFUGEES: The Americana band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation.com/venue/ thehornedhand. HANK SHREVE BAND: The blues band performs, with Jaccuzi; $5; 8:30 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-389-6999. FLOATER: The Oregon rock band performs an acoustic set, with Jones Road; $15 plus fees in advance, $18 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.random presents.com.

THE HENHOUSE PROWLERS: The Chicago-based bluegrass act performs; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SATURDAY PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643 or prinevillefarmers market@gmail.com. VFW BREAKFAST: Community breakfast with pancakes and sausage or ham and eggs; $8, $7 seniors and children ages 6 and younger; 8:30-10:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. CRAFT AND BAKE SALE: “Cold Hands, Warm Hearts� sale, with a silent auction; proceeds benefit local nonprofits; free admission; 9 a.m.3 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-1672 or cver59@ bendbroadband.com. PUMPKIN PATCH: Free admission; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; DD Ranch, 3836 N.E. Smith Rock Way, Terrebonne; 541548-1432 or www.ddranch.net. CORN MAIZE: $7.50, $5.50 ages 116, free ages 5 and younger; 10 a.m.7 p.m.; Central Oregon Pumpkin Company, 1250 N.E. Wilcox Ave., Terrebonne; 541-504-1414 or www .pumpkinco.org. FARM FESTIVAL: Featuring a pumpkin patch, hay rides, petting zoo, a BBQ and more; $25 per vehicle; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; DD Ranch, 3836 N.E. Smith Rock Way, Terrebonne; 541-548-1432 or info@ofco.org. BEND FALL FESTIVAL: A celebration of all things fall featuring activities, a fashion show, contests, art and food; Sara Jackson Holman, The Horde and the Harem, Leaves Russel, Tango Alpha Tango, Sophistafunk, Larry and His Flask and the Steve Kimock Band perform; free; Family Harvest Area closes at 5 p.m; downtown Bend; 541-389-0995 or www.c3events .com/events/Bend-Fall-Festival. FALL BOOK SALE: The Friends of the Bend Public Library hosts a bag sale of books; free admission, $4 per bag; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Deschutes Library Administration Building, 507 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-312-1021. GENEALOGY 101: Learn the basics of genealogy and what resources the library offers; free; 1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Keith Scribner talks about his book “The Oregon Experiment�; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491.

P  C  GENERAL PET LOSS GROUP: Drop-in support group for anyone experiencing or anticipating the death of a pet; free; 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays; Partners in Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; Sharon Myers at 541-382-5882.

DOGS BEHAVIORAL TRAINING: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; Lin’s School for Dogs, 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-536-1418 or www.linsschoolfordogs.com. AKC RING-READY COACHING: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; Lin’s School for Dogs, 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-536-1418 or www.linsschoolfordogs.com. PUPPY 101: Puppies ages 8 to 13 weeks old may join any week; $85; 7-8 p.m. Tuesdays; Dancin’ Woofs, 63027 N.E. Lower Meadow Drive, Suite D, Bend; Mare Shey at 541-312-3766 or www.dancinwoofs.com. PUPPY KINDERGARTEN CLASSES: Ongoing training, behavior and socialization classes for puppies 10 to 16 weeks old; $80 for four weeks; 6:15-7:30 p.m. Thursdays; Pawsitive Experience, 65111 High Ridge Drive, Tumalo; Meredith Gage at 541-318-8459, trainingdogs123@ bendbroadband.com or www .pawsitiveexperience.com. OBEDIENCE CLASSES: Sixweek, drop-in classes; $99.95; 5 and 6 p.m. Mondays, 6 p.m. Fridays, and 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturdays; Petco, 3197 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; Loel Jensen at 541-382-0510. OBEDIENCE FOR AGILITY: Six weeks; $120; 4 p.m. Saturdays;

Desert Sage Agility, 24035 Dodds Road, Bend; Stephanie Morris at 541-633-6774 or www.desert sageagility.com. PUPPY MANNERS CLASS: Social skills for puppies up to 6 months; $110 for seven-week class, cost includes materials; 6-7 p.m. Mondays; preregister; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling at 541-350-2869 or www .friendsforlifedogtraining.com. PRIVATE TRAINING: For aggression and other serious behavior problems and one-on-one training; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling at 541-350-2869 or www.friendsforlifedogtraining.com. PRIVATE BEHAVIORAL COUNSELING: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Dancin’ Woofs, 63027 Lower Meadow Drive, Suite D, Bend; Mare Shey at 541-312-3766 or www.dancinwoofs.com. PRIVATE TRAINING: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Chris Waggoner at 541-633-0446 or www.DeschutesRiverDogs.com. MUTTS ABOUT YOU: Positive methods for basic training, all age groups; $115 for five weeks; class size limited; call for class hours; The Dog Patch Boutique, info@thedogpatchboutiqueinc.com or 541-678-5640. SOLVE CHALLENGING BEHAVIOR: S.A.N.E. Solutions for challenging dog behavior, private lessons; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Kathy Cascade at 541-516-8978 or kathy@sanedogtraining.com. TELLINGTON TTOUCH: Learn tools to reduce stress and reactivity, help your dog become more confident and improve social skills; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Kathy Cascade at 541-516-8978 or kathy@sanedogtraining.com. FIX LEASH AGGRESSION: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Dogs Ltd & Training, 59860

Cheyenne Road, Bend; Linda West at 541-318-6396 or www.dogsltd training.com. A BETTER-BEHAVED DOG: Individual marker training with positive reinforcement; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Anne Geser at 541-923-5665. BOARD AND TRAIN: Minimum of one week boarding; cost by quotation; times by appointment; La Pine Training Center, Diann Hecht at 541536-2458 or diannshappytails@msn .com or www.diannshappytails.com. PRIVATE TRAINING: For owners and their dogs with special behavior or scheduling needs; cost by quotation, times by appointment; La Pine Training Center, Diann Hecht at 541-536-2458, diannshappytails @msn.com or www.diannshappy tails.com. DAY SCHOOL FOR DOGS: Training basics for companion dogs, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. four days a week for three weeks; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Dogs Ltd & Training; 59860 Cheyenne Road, Bend; Linda West at 541-318-6396 or www.dogsltdtraining.com. K9 NOSE WORK: Drop-in class for advanced students; $15 per session; 6 p.m. Fridays; preregister; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling at 541-350-2869, Pam Bigoni at 541-306-9882 or www .friendsforlifedogtraining.com. BOARD AND TRAIN: Board your dog with a certified trainer; cost by quotation, times by appointment; La Pine Training Center, Diann Hecht, 541-536-2458 or diannshappytails@msn.com or www.diannshappytails.com. OFF-LEASH PLAY CLASS: Learn about off-leash recalls and manners, for nonaggressive dogs; $10 per session; 7-8 p.m. Thursdays; La Pine Training Center, Diann Hecht, 541-536-2458 or diannshappytails@msn.com or www.diannshappytails.com.

GREYHOUND ADOPTION: Meet retired racing greyhounds; free; 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 13 and Oct. 14; Eastside Bend Pet Express, 420 N.E. Windy Knolls Drive, Bend; 541-385-5298. CHIRO4CRITTERS: Animal chiropractic seminar; free; 11 a.m.2 p.m. Oct. 20; Eastside Bend Pet Express, 420 N.E. Windy Knolls Drive, Bend; 541-385-5298. ALL FOR DOGS ADOPTION: Meet dogs available for adoption; free; 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 20; Eastside Bend Pet Express, 420 N.E. Windy Knolls Drive, Bend; 541-385-5298. MICROCHIP ID AND RABIES CLINIC FOR COMPANION ANIMALS: $20 microchips and $12 rabies vaccinations; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 13; Humane Society of Central Oregon, 61170 SE 27th St., Bend; 541-382-3537.

HORSES ROLLING RANCH IN SISTERS: Open for trail-course practice and shows; $10 per horse; 69516 Hinkle Butte Drive, Sisters; Shari at 541-549-6962. ALL BREED AND APPALOOSA ULTIMATE TRAIL CHALLENGE: Test your riding skills on a trail course with prizes for top finishers in each class; registration required; $15 per class and $5 per horse facility day use fee; sign-ups begin at 8:30 a.m., first class at 10 a.m. Thursday; Rockin’ BG Ranch, 5701 West state Highway 126, Redmond; 541-6041517 or www.OTAHC.org. HEALTHY HORSE DAY: Learn about healthy and effective care and training of horses through demonstrations, presentations and vendors; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 7; Sky Hawk Ranch, 6287 N.E. 33rd St., Redmond; 541-548-1372 or www .ridinginstyle2.com/Healthy_Horse_ Day.php.


B4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

B5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


B6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

Gina Vanderburg, right, talks with Lauren Stayer, a veterinarian at Bend Veterinary Clinic, about her new puppy’s diet during a visit to the clinic.

Pet insurance compared Premium estimate based on a Labrador retreiver, neutered male, 1 year of age with no pre-existing conditions.

Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

Insurance company

Deductible

Coinsurance

Maximum benefit

Estimated monthly payment

Trupanion Pet Insurance

$200 per incident

90% reimbursement

No annual or lifetime limits

$45.42

Embrace Pet Insurance Co.

$200 per year

80% reimbursement

$25,000 lifetime

$47.01

Pet First Healthcare

$250 per incident

80% reimbursement

$20,000 with added exclusions

$30.53

Note: Coverages appeared equivalent and included accidents, illnesses, injuries, diagnostic imaging and testing, surgery and other procedures and medications; note that complete written policies were not available for review. Sources: Web sites www.petinsurancereview.com/dog, www.trupanion.com/, www.embracepetinsurance.com, www.petfirsthealthcare.com Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Insurance Continued from B1 Most policies don’t cover preventive care, either, Stayer said, including annual checkups, vaccinations,

Stevens Continued from B1 Back when she was 6 and stuck in a tree, her older brother offered to show her the way back down. Stevens began climbing trees whenever she could. When she was older, she tried rock climbing at a camp for the blind. And in college in 1979, she went on a trip to northern Canada, where she spent three weeks backpacking, rock climbing, sailing and canoeing. That time, she found climbing to be a little more difficult — and she’s never been fond of the frightful feeling she gets rappelling back down.

neutering or spaying, and routine teeth cleaning. Pet health insurance policy terms are much like those for peoples’ commercial health insurance, with choices of the amount of the deductible,

level of co-insurance — the percentage of approved vet bills the insurance company pays — and the maximum annual or lifetime benefits. (See chart.) Some pet health insurance policy

owners have also expressed frustration that veterinary bills must be paid up front, Stayer said, and those paid bills must then be submitted to the insurance company for reimbursement.

Nancy Stevens holds the rope during her ascent of Grand Teton. Stevens is the first blind woman to climb the mountain. Submitted photos

A long way down Whether or not you’re a climber, perhaps you can intuit how scary climbing down from a summit several thousand feet high might be. Now imagine not being able to see the ground far below, yet knowing — intimately, because you’ve already climbed up — that it’s a long, long way down. Several years would pass before she would do more climbing, but Stevens has always been active. She is a cyclist, runner and swimmer. As a competitive skier, she raced in the 1998 Winter Paralympics, which enabled her to take part in the Sept. 23 parade for Ashton Eaton and other area Olympians. “With downhill skiing, any sports like that, you have to have a guide to do it,” says Stevens, who says it can sometimes be frustrating when she wants to get up and ride her bike but has no one to guide her. In the mid-’80s, she took part in a new climbing class in Colorado. As her coach pointed out to her, with rock climbing, the lead climber — and, in Stevens’ case, guide — requires a second climber to perform belay duties, in which the second climber trails below, clenching the rope affixed to the climber above and preventing little falls from becoming big ones. She and two other students in the class learned knot tying and other climbing skills that had been glossed over during her Canada climbs in ’79. She also began pitch climbing, “where the lead climber goes up and waits for you on one ledge, and you climb up to them,” Stevens explains. A climb can be multipitch, with belay stops once each ledge is reached. “It was really neat to see: ‘Oh yeah, they really do need me to be there.’” She and friend Anne Dal Vera began making pitch climbs and scaling “14ers,” or peaks at least 14,000 feet high, in Colorado, where Stevens lived until moving to Bend in 2008. But the last time she and Dal Vera, who would later join her on the Grand Teton ascent, did any rock climbing together, Stevens was still in her early 30s. Over the years, she’d scaled a few indoor climbing walls, but “I didn’t really look into climbing with anybody else. Because of cross-country racing, whatever, I just had other things going on, so I didn’t really think about it much.”

Ever climbed rocks? During summer 2011, Stevens took a trip to Jackson Hole, Wyo., to visit her father, Ron. “I like to be really active when I go on vacation,” she says. Looking for a guide to

Stevens pauses at the top of the world after climbing Grand Teton in August.

run with her or a tandem bike to ride, she contacted an organization called Teton Adaptive Sports, a nonprofit that supports sports and recreation activities for people with disabilities. Ryan Burke, summer program manager of the organization, was her running guide. He’s also a rock climber who has climbed Grand Teton, the tallest of the area’s peaks, numerous times. “I don’t know why, (but) he just said, ‘Have you ever done any rock climbing?’” Stevens says. The two arranged to do a single-pitch climb at a place in Jackson Hole that “had a little bit of everything” climbers enjoy, Stevens says. “It had this crack to climb up, and there was a little overhang you had to reach up. I said, ‘Man, how did you find a rock that has everything?’” She asked him how “the Grand,” as many call Grand Teton, compared to 14ers in Colorado. “He said, ‘Why don’t you come and climb it and check it out?’” she says. “She was such a go-getter, excited about everything,” Burke told The Bulletin. “She did so good on that (first climb), I told her, ‘Well, why don’t you go up the Grand?’”

Making plans They considered the logistics during a run the next morning, knowing they’d need to bring along at least one other person to help guide Stevens. She thought immediately of Dal Vera. “I can’t even tell you the last time we had a cool adventure,” Stevens says. Dal Vera immediately said yes. “She said, ‘I’ve always wanted to do that.’” Dal Vera knew someone who worked for Exum Mountain Guides, a renowned climbing service in Jackson Hole. Stevens made a reservation with Exum, which agreed to have Burke come along on the climb, and over the winter, plans were solidified and the permit necessary for the popular climb acquired. Another old friend, Ginny Deal, also

arranged to join the group. Deal climbed Grand Teton with guides from Exum when she was 19, and wondered what it would be like to climb it again 43 years later, she told The Bulletin by email from Australia, where she’s living and working. She also knew the climb would be inherently different with Stevens. “I knew it would be a valuable, uplifting life experience,” Deal said. The steep climb would be challenging for anyone, and Exum’s clients usually do the trip in two days, hiking to the Lower Saddle, the space where Middle Teton meets the Grand, with an elevation over 11,000 feet. They camp overnight, departing for the climb to the summit in the early predawn hours and make it back to the parking lot — all in a day, explains Stevens. “I get up things fine. It’s climbing down that takes me longer. It’s scarier. I was saying, ‘Gosh, I don’t know if climbing to the summit and getting all the way back to the parking lot in a day is doable for me.’” Burke and Brenton Reagan of Exum convinced her she could. Stevens didn’t get around to doing any climbing locally in order to train for Grand Teton, but in July, aware that getting to the Lower Saddle would require a seven-mile hike — not to mention traversing a boulder field — she joined a women’s hiking group through the Bend Park & Recreation District. On twice-weekly hikes up to 12 miles in length and, depending on the hike, as much as a 2,500-foot elevation gain, Stevens carried a 25pound pack. She used hiking poles, focusing on the quickest, most efficient way to hike in preparation for the Grand, knowing time would be of the essence. Those guiding her on hikes used the same terms Stevens uses in running. “They don’t have to say there’s a crack, or a branch, or a curb; they just say, ‘Toes up,’ and I just know — it doesn’t matter what it is — I just know I have to be mindful and keep my feet up.”

When there were rocks to negotiate on the path, Stevens would sometimes lag behind on the hikes, but caught up by running once she could. “There were definitely some days this summer with my pack where I was just going, ‘Oh my God. This is really hard,’” she says.

Going to Wyoming She felt well-prepared by the time she left for Jackson Hole on Aug. 16, where she and her climbing partners began two days of training with Exum, including crossing a boulder field and progressively more difficult rock climbs. “They had everything you were going to encounter on the Grand,” she says. When an Exum guide wasn’t quite sure how to describe a boulder field to Stevens, Burke, more experienced working with disabilities, would step in, Stevens says. “‘Just put her hand on the rock and tell her which way to go!’” she says, laughing as she recalls the moment. Stevens says that approach is “so empowering” for her. But for the 120-foot rappel, also part of the training, it would be her, “hanging in the air, with (my) feet just out there,” as she describes it. Reagan rappelled down beside her. “They wanted to make sure everybody was comfortable with it,” Stevens says. After her rappel, Exum guide Jessica Baker told Stevens, “You looked terrified.” So Baker suggested they rappel from the ledge again. “I kept telling myself, ‘You better look more confident,’” Stevens says. Says Deal, “The two days of climbing instruction were fun and cemented us together as a team, which made us feel very prepared for the climb of the Grand itself.”

Climbing Grand Teton On the first day of climbing on Aug. 18, Stevens was told she was going faster than people usually hike in to the Lower Saddle. “She was going as fast as anyone that I’ve ever seen. I was very impressed,” says Burke.

While Stayer believes there can be good value in pet health insurance for puppy owners, in particular, her advice for those considering a policy is, “Do your research first.”

It was important to Stevens that friends Deal and Dal Vera got to enjoy the climb rather than have to guide her, so Burke and three guides led Stevens, switching off every hour in order to keep their eyes and minds fresh; Stevens says that the tactile way she climbs often left her unsure whether she’s more physically or mentally fatigued. At the Lower Saddle, she camped in a tent with Dal Vera and Deal. “I was so excited, I don’t think I slept hardly at all,” Stevens says. She didn’t have long to try. They were up at 3:30 a.m. and on their way by 4:30 a.m. The terrain became increasingly challenging as they hiked across scree and large rocks. It was a cold morning, and when it was time to begin the technical portion of the climb, Stevens, for whom the feel of the rock at hand is so important, had a dilemma: to wear the gloves she’d brought along or not? “If you think about it, I’m blind with gloves on,” she says. “Am I going to be able to feel the handholds as well?” she wondered, but once she felt the chilly face of rock, she opted to wear them. Once everyone was roped in, they began to climb. Stevens recalls plenty of “chimneys,” gaps between rocks large enough for someone to climb inside, rather than just reach into as with a smaller crack. Some of the climb is a blur for her. “I wish I could have sat down after each pitch and written a description or something, because I knew I wouldn’t be able to remember all of it,” she says. “It was just overall the neatest feeling,” as Baker showed her where to sit on the ledge to belay Deal, while others ahead were on their way to the next pitch. “It’s such a neat feeling of working together,” Stevens says. There were other groups and guides climbing the Grand that day, and all they encountered expressed support for Stevens.

Halfway there “We got about 15 feet from the top and Ryan says, ‘Just one more little pitch to go,’” says Stevens. When she peeked her head above the last rock, Stevens felt the sun on her face, and thought, “Wow, we really are up here!” In all, it took five hours to reach the top. Once safely at the summit, Stevens’ guides told her, “‘Now we can tell you, you’re the first

— Reporter: tom.olsen71@gmail.com

totally blind woman who’s climbed the Grand,’” she says. “I was like, ‘Wow.’ That wasn’t the reason I did it. I didn’t do any research to find that out; I just wanted to do it.” She didn’t have long to celebrate. After a half hour of pictures and a snack break, it was time to start back down. “You get to the summit, and they say, ‘You’re only halfway there,’” Stevens says laughing. “I said, ‘It doesn’t count if I don’t make it back.’ “All I could think, honestly, was, ‘Can I have some more M&Ms?’” Rather than be lowered by belay, Stevens preferred climbing back down through chimneys and made it safely through a 120-foot-long rappel. She was tired and aching, but thinking of the trip down in segments helped her, she says. Back at the campsite, she was able to sneak a short nap. She longed for more lunch, and soon the group began talking about pizza and all the foods they would eat that night. “We all stayed together.” To pass time, they began singing songs from the musical “Oliver!” including, of course, “Food, Glorious Food.” They got back to the parking lot at 10:30 p.m., earlier than some groups make it back. Her father was waiting for them. One of Stevens’ favorite things during the Teton trip was when guides would describe the terrain to her as they hiked and climbed. “It’s the journey,” she says. “People often say to me, ‘Why do you do this stuff? You don’t have the reward of getting to the top and being able to see it.’ But to me, the cool thing about it was just the teamwork and hearing everybody describe it. Everybody’s perspective is just a little bit different.” “I think she realizes the realities of (blindness), but doesn’t really think of them as an impediment,” Burke says. “She doesn’t see the obstacles. She just sees the potential.” Stevens says that she was amazed to learn she was the first blind woman to climb the Grand. “I’ve done a lot of firsts in my life, and it’s kind of fun to do that, but just to show people it can be done.” — Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com

Congratulations Dr. Tom Comerford Dr. Tom Comerford, Bend’s first Radiation Oncologist and founder of St Charles Cancer Center, is retiring after 30 years of dedicated service to our community! We would love to have you share your warm wishes and fond memories as he embarks on the next phase of his life. Please send your messages to: Linyee Chang, St. Charles Cancer Center 2500 NE Neff Road, Bend, OR 97701 lchang@stcharleshealthcare.org, fax: 541-706-6341


LOCALNEWS

Reader photo, C2 Editorials, C4

C

Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/local

State’s ESL progress ‘Immediate threat’: City sues called ‘unacceptable’ over rusting water tanks REDMOND

LOCAL BRIEFING 2 Bend men jailed in carjacking Two Bend men were arrested Sunday afternoon on suspicion of robbery and unlawful use of a vehicle after they attempted to collect on a debt, according to Bend police. At 2:40 p.m. Sunday, officers responded to a reported carjacking on Northeast 6th Street near Alden Avenue, according to a police news release. Adam Anderson, 25, and Christopher Hulgan, 39, both of Bend, allegedly attempted to collect a debt owed to them by Jacob Neubaum, 20, also of Bend. The men got into a fight and Neubaum suffered minor injuries that did not require medical attention, according to police. Neubaum escaped and called 911. While he was on the phone, he saw Hulgan driving away in Neubaum’s 1989 Chevrolet Blazer, police said. Police located the Blazer and arrested Hulgan on suspicion of second-degree assault and unlawful use of a motor vehicle. Anderson returned to the scene of the altercation, where he was arrested on suspicion of second-degree robbery, unlawful use of a motor vehicle and fourth-degree assault.

By Ben Botkin The Bulletin

Oregon’s public schools fell short of state goals set for educating students who are non-native English speakers, according to a state report released Monday. The Oregon Department of Education deputy superintendent called the results “unacceptable.� For example, the state goal called for at least 57 percent of English language learners to move up one skill level. Instead, just 50.2 percent of those students advanced during the 2011-12 school year, a figure

unchanged from the prior school year. “The results are clear; we need to change direction and change how we do business at every level to ensure our English language learners are receiving the instruction, support and opportunities they need and deserve,� said Deputy Superintendent Rob Saxton in a statement. “This year, we saw the results for our ELL students moving in the wrong direction and that is simply unacceptable.� See ESL / C5

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

The city of Redmond is suing local general contractor Jack Robinson & Sons Inc. for more than $1.5 million after paint began peeling off the inside of two reservoir tanks installed by the contractor to hold city drinking water. In a complaint filed Sept. 19 in Deschutes County Circuit Court, the city accused Jack Robinson & Sons of negligence and breaching the contract and warranty for the 2005 water project.

No one at Jack Robinson & Sons was available to comment Monday afternoon. The problems with the tank linings pose “an immediate threat to the City’s drinking water supply� and they must be repaired, according to the city complaint. Bill Duerden, Redmond Public Works Department director, said the threat is that the city will not have adequate space to store water if it cannot use the two reservoir tanks. The city has a total of five tanks.

The problems have not compromised water quality, said Duerden, who started working for the city in March. “There are portions that are delaminating, but it just sinks to the bottom of the tank and never gets into the water supply,� Duerden said. “It’s not a health risk by any means. It’s a threat that we would have to take these tanks out of service. We do need that storage capacity, particularly in the summer.� See Water tanks / C2

Following up on Central Oregon’s most interesting stories, even if they’ve been out of the headlines for a while. Email ideas to news@bendbulletin.com. To follow the series, visit www.bendbulletin.com/updates.

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO ...

THE WHYCHUS CREEK REROUTE

Conservation project a growing success

— Bulletin staff report

More briefing and News of Record, C2

FIRE UPDATE Reported for Central and Eastern Oregon. For the latest information, visit www.nwccweb .us/information/ firemap.aspx. Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

La Grande

2

At left, crews pour dirt over a pile of logs as part of the redirection of Whychus Creek through Camp Polk Meadow near Sisters in February. At right, the earthen dam is seen in September.

Madras Bend

1

• Groups await spawning salmon and steelhead now that the creek follows a more natural route

MILES 0

Bend

By Dylan J. Darling

50

Camp Polk Meadow Preserve

The Bulletin

1. Pole Creek Fire • Acres: 26,510 • Containment: 85% • Cause: Under investigation 2. Bald Mountain Fire • Acres: 1,009 • Containment: 0% • Cause: Lightning

STATE NEWS • Portland: Boy Scouts to begin reporting abuse suspects Story on C3

20 126

New route for Whychus Creek New run

Old run

Indian Ford Creek

Sisters

242

Whychus Creek

Camp Polk Meadow Preserve

126

20 MILES 0

Construction crews in February rerouted s u ch Whychus Creek at Why k Cree Camp Polk Meadow Preserve near Sisters, where the creek flows through 145 acres held as a preserve by the Deschutes Land Trust.

. Rd olk pP m Ca

SISTERS — Whychus Creek is growing into its new route through Camp Polk Meadow Preserve near Sisters — or should that be, the meadow is growing around the creek’s new route? After more than a decade of planning by conservation groups, construction crews plugged the old straight run of the creek through the meadow in February, forcing it into a meandering course. Since then, willow and other plants have grown tall along the stream and more birds are in the meadow, said Brad Chalfant, executive director of the Deschutes Land Trust. See Whychus / C2

2

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

September 2012 weather for Bend DAILY HIGHS AND LOWS Average temperature: 60.7° (4.6° above normal) DAY

1

HI 79

2

3

4

5

6

75

79

81

80

85

7

8

77 87

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

86

87

67

66

71

83 78

87

54

81

89 88

88

81

74 81

73

75

74

75

78

78

42

39

40

44

48

44

H

80 60 40 FREEZING

20 LO 40

42

44

40

45

45

42 42

55

42

32

L 31

L 31

36 46

54

42

45

44 44

45

48

47 41

PRECIPITATION TOTAL: TRACE Historical average precipitation for the month: .41�

T = Trace

INCH

T

OCTOBER 6TH & 7TH ~ 12:00 PM

ALMANAC Highest temperature Highest recorded temperature Highest for therecorded month:

maximum for the month 100° on Sept. 2, 1998

89°

Lowest temperature

31°

Average high

78.6°

Average low

Lowest recorded temperature for the month:

Monthly average high temperature through the years:

Monthly average low temperature through the years:

16°

73.8°

38.4°

on Sept. 24, 2002

* Monthly averages calculated from 1928 through 2005, Western Regional Climate Center Sources: NOAA, Western Regional Climate Center, Bend Public Works Department

42.7°

$20 for adults, free for juniors 17 and under. Participants have the option of booking a Get Golf Ready five lesson group series package at $99 following the event. Please contact the Pronghorn Golf Shop at 541.693.5365 to sign up.

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

101++Kmjibcjmi>gp]?mw0/,(14.(0.++wrrr)kmjibcjmi^gp])^jh


C2

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

Water tanks LOCAL BRIEFING Continued from C1

FBI investigating reservation death The FBI is investigating a death on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, but the agency would not release details on Monday. “It is undetermined at this time whether it was accidental or foul play was involved,” FBI spokeswoman Beth Anne Steele wrote in an email Monday evening. “We are not releasing any further information at this time.”

Well shot! READER PHOTOS Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email to readerphotos@bendbulletin.com your color or black-andwhite photos and we’ll pick the best for publication in the paper and online. Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

Police to patrol COCC bike lanes The Bend Police Department will begin issuing citations and possibly towing vehicles illegally parked in bike lanes near Central Oregon Community College’s Bend campus, according to a news release issued Monday. Police have had numerous complaints about vehicles parked in bike lanes on College Way. The parked cars cause bikes to enter travel lanes, causing hazards for bicyclists and drivers. Parking in the bike lane is a class D violation that can result in a fine of $110.

Damaged overpass prompts closure Southeast Brosterhous Road — north of Knott Road — was expected to be closed until early this morning after a backhoe being hauled on a flatbed trailer slammed into the railroad overpass Monday, causing structural damage. Seth Morgan, 37, of Bend, was driving a pickup south on Brosterhous at about 12:50 p.m. When he drove under the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad tracks, the upper part of the backhoe struck the overpass. Railroad employees determined that the accident had caused structural damage to the overpass, causing some trains to be rerouted. Brosterhous was restricted to one lane for two hours while the roadway was cleared. Repair work on the overpass was expected to keep a portion of the road closed until this morning, Bend police said. Drivers are advised to use other routes. Morgan, who was evaluated by paramedics but needed no additional treatment, was issued a citation for careless driving. Police say the overpass has been struck numerous times because of its low height compared to newer overpasses. — Bulletin staff reports

Have a story idea or submission? Contact us!

The Bulletin Call a reporter: Bend ................ 541-617-7829 Redmond ........ 541-977-7185 Sisters............. 541-977-7185 La Pine ........... 541-383-0348 Sunriver ......... 541-383-0348 Deschutes ...... 541-617-7837 Crook ..............541-633-2184 Jefferson ........541-633-2184 Salem ..............541-554-1162 D.C. .................202-662-7456 Business ........ 541-383-0360 Education ....... 541-977-7185 Public lands .....541-617-7812 Public safety.....541-383-0387 Projects .......... 541-617-7831

Submissions: • Civic Calendar notices: Email event information to news@bendbulletin.com, with “Civic Calendar” in the subject, and include a contact name and phone number. Contact: 541-383-0354

Continued from C1 In April 2005, Redmond signed a contract with Jack Robinson & Sons worth approximately $2.3 million to install a well-house and two welded steel reservoir tanks, each with a capacity of 2 million gallons. The tanks hold drinking water for the city. Jack Robinson & Sons subcontracted a “substantial portion of the work” with Morse Construction Group Inc. and other subcontractors, according to the city. “In early 2012, the City first observed what appeared to be deterioration and delamination (loss of adhesion) of the tank inside coating system on reservoir tanks 4 and 5,” according to the complaint filed by the city. City officials worried about keeping the drinking water safe, so they hired consultant Clear Wa-

ter Engineering Group LLC to evaluate the coating on the interiors and exteriors of the tanks. The consultant reported “defects and failures” in the tank coating: sections were cracking and falling off inside the tanks, and the steel tanks were rusted and corroded. The city provided the consultant’s report to Jack Robinson & Sons. The city continued to test the tanks, which were drained and inspected again in July. According to the city, the contractor failed to comply with city plans and specifications for the water project. Now, the city must repaint the interiors of the tanks with a new coating at a cost of $1.4 million and repaint the exteriors of the tanks at a cost of $60,000, according to the city complaint. At the time the city filed the lawsuit, it had already spent $47,000 on tank inspections and monitoring. — Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com

“It’s not a health risk by any means. It’s a threat that we would have to take these tanks out of service. We do need that storage capacity, particularly in the summer.” — Bill Duerden, director, Redmond Public Works Department

Whychus WIDE WEB Mariah Wilson, of Redmond, snapped this photo of a spider web near Cline Falls using a Canon PowerShot A1100 IS. “I’m glad that the spider who made this web wasn’t home,” Wilson wrote. “The web measured about four feet in diameter.”

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 2:35 p.m. Sept. 26, in the 2100 block of Northeast Shepard Road. DUII — Marvin Hernandez, 30, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:10 a.m. Sept. 27, in the area of Northwest Galveston Avenue and Northwest 13th Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:16 p.m. Sept. 27, in the 63100 block of Desert Sage Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 7:04 a.m. Sept. 28, in the 20700 block of St. George Court. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:23 a.m. Sept. 28, in the area of Yeoman Road and Northeast Purcell Boulevard. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 10:08 a.m. Sept. 28, in the 63100 block of Desert Sage Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 10:25 a.m. Sept. 28, in the 61400 block of Maid Marian Court. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:49 p.m. Sept. 28, in the 20700 block of St. George Court. Theft — A theft was reported at 6:24 p.m. Sept. 27, in the 200 block of Northwest Congress Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 7:24 p.m. Sept. 27, in the 20200 block of Kingsberry Court. DUII — Eric Mark Luther, 51, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:17 p.m. Sept. 27, in the 1200 block of Northeast Williamson Boulevard. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:57 p.m. Sept. 28, in the 400 block of Southeast Wye Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 3:57 p.m. Sept. 28, in the 61500 block of Friar Tuck Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 4 p.m. Sept. 28, in the 300 block of Southeast Fifth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:31 p.m. Sept. 28, in the area of Southeast Third Street and Southeast Reed Market Road. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 4:47 p.m. Sept. 28, in the 600 block of Northwest Wall Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:20 a.m. Sept. 29, in the 2700 block of Northeast 27th Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at

11:06 a.m. Sept. 11, in the 1100 block of Northwest Bond Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and an arrest made at 7:57 p.m. Sept. 28, in the 800 block of Northwest Brooks Street. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen and an arrest made at 1:45 a.m. Sept. 29, in the 700 block of Southwest 13th Place. DUII — Charles Russell Poarch, 29, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:44 a.m. Sept. 29, in the area of Southeast Breitenbush Lane and Southeast Minam Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:47 p.m. Sept. 29, in the 20900 block of King David Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:58 p.m. Sept. 30, in the 20900 block of King David Avenue. Prineville Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:25 p.m. Sept. 28, in the area of Northwest 10th Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:10 p.m. Sept. 28, in the area of Northeast Fairview Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:47 a.m. Sept. 29, in the area of Northwest Third Street. Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported Sept. 24, in the area of Northeast U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 86. Burglary — A burglary and theft were reported at 4:40 p.m. Sept. 28, in the 300 block of Adams Avenue in Metolius. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported Sept. 28, in the 1900 block of Northeast Avalon Drive in Madras.

Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported Sept. 29, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and Cooley Road in Bend. DUII — Steve David Marquess, 19, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:11 a.m. Sept. 30, in the area of Northeast Third Street and Northeast Seward Avenue. DUII — Evan Louis Elek, 25, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:38 p.m. Sept. 29, in the area of Northwest Idaho Avenue and Northwest Broadway Street in Bend. DUII — Robert Luke Lassell, 37, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:23 a.m. Sept. 30, in the area of Northeast Franklin Avenue and Northeast Fourth Street in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:50 p.m. Sept. 30, in the area of state Highway 58 near milepost 80.

BEND FIRE RUNS Friday 11:10 a.m. — Smoke odor reported, 22225 Bear Creek Road. 24 — Medical aid calls. Saturday 9:11 a.m. — Smoke odor reported, 212 N.E. McCartney Drive. 2:45 p.m. — Brush or brush-andgrass mixture fire, 21168 Reed Market Road. 7:08 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 19159 Pumice Butte Road. 8:49 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 1917 N.E. Purcell Blvd. 18 — Medical aid calls. Sunday 2:44 p.m. — Building fire, $5,000 loss, 880 S.E. Third St. 15 — Medical aid calls.

FLU SHOTS No appointments necessary Hours: 10 am - 6 pm BEND STORE: Friday, September 28 and Monday, October 1 thru Thursday, October 4

REDMOND STORE: Monday, October 1 thru Friday, October 5

Continued from C1 “It’s just a much more dynamic, diverse set of habitat out here,” he said during a visit to the meadow last month. The Land Trust owns the 145-acre meadow, but several groups and agencies — including the Upper Deschutes Watershed Council, the Deschutes River Conservancy and the U.S. Forest Service — helped with the project to reroute and restore Whychus Creek. Negotiations for purchase of the meadow started in 1997 and ended in 2000, Chalfant said. Portland General Electric, which owns and operates dams on the Deschutes River, funded the $1 million purchase as part of its salmon and steelhead reintroduction efforts. Whychus Creek flows into the Deschutes River near Lake Billy Chinook. The project is meant to remedy the results of a rechanneling of Whychus Creek nearly 50 years ago. Following a winter storm that caused flooding at Camp Polk Meadow in 1964, the Army Corps of Engineers moved the creek into a straight channel on the southern edge of the meadow. The design prevented the creek from flooding, which Chalfant said changed the balance of the meadow. Stopping the flooding left the meadow parched and the stream as a fast-moving straightaway unappealing to fish looking to spawn or Self Referrals Welcome

541-706-6900

raise their young. After examining aerial photographs of the meadow taken before the Army Corps’ changes and digging into the meadow to find the old stream bed, the groups involved in the project designed a new route for Whychus Creek. The reroute added a half-mile to the main channel of the creek and opened up three miles of side channels. During a spring storm, the channel spilled over its banks and into the side channels and over parts of Camp Polk Meadow, said Ryan Houston, executive director of the Upper Deschutes Watershed Council. “That is exactly what we want it to do,” he said. As the meadow shows signs of revival, the watch now is on the water and whether steelhead, reintroduced to the Upper Deschutes River system earlier this year, spawn there. The deep pools resulting from new curves in the creek as it passes through the meadow were designed to create prime steelhead spawning beds and refuge for young fish. “Certainly the habitat that has been created by the new channel is considerably better than the channelized section of Whychus Creek,” said Brett Hodgson, district fisheries biologist for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. — Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

C3

O N I B 

UO names its own police department EUGENE — The University of Oregon now has a police department — but still without guns. The university said Monday it is changing the name of the agency from the Department of Public Safety to the University of Oregon Police Department. It calls the renaming a small step in a transition that could take six years. Earlier this year, the Legislature approved a campus police department. University officers carry batons, pepper spray and restraints. Eugene police step in when firearms are called for — transporting prisoners, for example. The university says it won’t arm its officers until there’s “a broad campus discussion” this academic year. The department now has 27 uniformed officers — 11 sworn police officers and 16 public safety officers, whose authority is not so wide-ranging as the Eugene police.

Twice-stolen Corvette returned to owner ALBANY — Linn County authorities say a silver 1985 Corvette was reported stolen twice within 24 hours, but the owner has it back. The Albany Democrat-Herald reports the owner, who wasn’t identified, called sheriff’s deputies early Sunday to report it missing, and officers found it later in a ditch. The owner came to retrieve the sports car and the deputies left. But, say the deputies, the owner also left to retrieve something he’d forgotten. When he returned, the Corvette was gone again. Later Sunday, police arrested 45-year-old Terry Trachsel after a brief standoff at his trailer. He was accused of unauthorized use of the vehicle, which was returned. The paper said the investigation wasn’t complete and it was not known if Trachsel was suspected as well of the first theft.

Tualatin man dies after running into car TUALATIN — A man was fatally injured when he ran into the side of a car driven by his wife in the parking lot of a Tualatin apartment complex. Witnesses told police the man was trying to stop his wife from driving away Sunday evening when he ran into the side of her car. Arriving officers attempted to save the man’s life, but he died at the scene, at the Stones Throw Apartments. Clackamas County is helping Tualatin police with the investigation.

Biker hits deer, dies near Wallowa WALLOWA — A motorcycle rider was killed after colliding with a deer on state Highway 82 west of Wallowa, in northeast Oregon. Oregon State Police say the motorcycle was the lead motorcycle in a group of four around 7:20 Saturday evening when it hit the deer. The Oregonian reports the crash threw the rider and his passenger to the pavement. Police say 62-year-old Tony Sumpter, of Union, landed in the oncoming lane, where he was struck and killed by a vehicle. His passenger, Nichole Tinsley, of Spokane, declined medical treatment.

Californians killed in I-84 crash PORTLAND — A man and woman from Bakersfield, Calif., were killed in a rollover accident Sunday night on Interstate 84 east of Portland. The Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office says three people were ejected from a minivan as it rolled. The woman, 18-year-old Brittany A. Patty, died at the scene. The man, 19-year-old Luke J. Dial, was airlifted to a hospital with critical injuries and died. The third person, a 20-yearold man, remains in a hospital with serious injuries. — From wire reports

Mayoral BSA to begin reporting suspects hopeful confirms assault report SEX ABUSE IN THE BOY SCOUTS

By Terrence Petty and Nigel Duara

The Associated Press

PORTLAND — The Boy Scouts of America plan to do what critics argue they should have done decades ago — bring suspected abusers named in the organization’s so-called perversion files to the attention of police departments and sheriff’s offices across the country. The Scouts have, until now, argued they did all they could to prevent sex abuse within their ranks by spending a century tracking pedophiles and using those records to keep known sex offenders out of their organization. But a court-ordered release of the perversion files from 1965 to 1985, expected sometime in October, has prompted Scouts spokesman Deron Smith to say the organization will go back into the files and report any offenders who may have fallen through the cracks. Smith said Mike Johnson, the group’s youth protection director and a former police detective, will lead the review. That could prompt a new round of criminal prosecutions for offenders who have so far escaped justice, said Clatsop County District Attorney Josh Marquis. But investigations might require more than what most Scout files provide, including victims willing to cooperate. “Let’s even assume the suspect confessed,” he said. “An uncorroborated confession is not sufficient for a conviction.” Many states have no statutes of limitations for children victimized when they were younger than 16, so even decades-old crimes could be fair game. The Scouts began keep-

The Associated Press file photo

Kelly Clark, attorney for the Portland man who filed a sex abuse lawsuit against the Boy Scouts of America, uses a chart during his closing statements in the Multnomah County Courthouse in Portland in April 2010. The Boy Scouts of America plan to bring suspected abusers named in the organization’s so-called perversion files to the attention of police departments and sheriff ’s offices across the country.

ing the files shortly after their creation in 1910, when pedophilia was largely a crime dealt with privately — not publicly. The organization argues that the files helped them track offenders and protect children. But some of the files released in 1991, detailing cases from 1971 to 1991, showed repeated instances of Scouts leaders failing to disclose sex abuse to authorities, even when they had a confession. A lawsuit culminated in April 2010 with the jury ruling the BSA had failed to protect the plaintiff from a pedophile assistant Scoutmaster in the 1980s, even though that man had previously admitted to molesting Scouts. The jury awarded $20 million to the plaintiff. Files kept before 1971 remained secret, until a judge ruled — and the Oregon Supreme Court agreed — that they should be released. Attorneys are now redacting the ad-

dresses and other identifying material from the files, which stretch from 1965 to 1985. The release means that alleged abusers, and the names of Scout leaders who failed to report them, will be made public soon in tens of thousands of pages of confidential documents — one of the largest troves of the files the BSA has ever been forced to produce. A psychiatrist who reviewed the files, Dr. Jennifer Warren, found that police were involved in about two-thirds of the cases from 1965-85. Kelly Clark, a Portland attorney who won a landmark 2010 lawsuit against the Boy Scouts, says the documents show that even though the Scouts have been collecting the files nearly since the Boy Scouts’ founding in 1910, the organization failed to use them to protect boys from pedophiles. “What’s significant is that the Boy Scouts could have

these files for so long and not learn from them,” Clark said. Last week, the Scouts made public an internal report they compiled on the files by Warren, the psychiatrist who served as an expert witness for the Scouts in the 2010 Portland lawsuit. As part of the report, they emphasized the files’ success in preventing pedophiles from entering Scouting ranks, but acknowledged the organization’s failure to stop some abusers. “In some instances we failed to defend Scouts from those who would do them harm,” the Scouts said in a statement accompanying the report. “There have been instances where people misused their positions in Scouting to abuse children, and in certain cases, our response to these incidents and our efforts to protect youth were plainly insufficient, inappropriate, or wrong.” Warren’s report found that, of 930 files created between January 1965 and June 1984, there were 1,622 victims. Of the total victims, at least 1,302 were involved in Scouting. “My review of these files indicates that the reported rate of sexual abuse in Scouting has been very low,” Warren wrote in the report. Warren compared the rate of victimization in the Scouts — about 1.4 to 2.1 youth per 100,000 — to the nationallyreported incidence of child abuse by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which in 1980 found that 70 per 100,000 children experience sexual exploitation each year. Warren’s analysis didn’t account for the fact that files were destroyed for offenders who died or turned 75 years old, something she said didn’t affect her overall conclusions. Critics contend the organization’s legal battles reflect a long-standing effort to protect the Boy Scouts’ reputation, and to try to limit any lawsuits.

NORTHWEST RESOURCES

Hatchery salmon can help rebuild runs, study says By Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

GRANTS PASS — New research has found that a hatchery using wild salmon to spawn the next generation can help rebuild endangered salmon runs without passing on genetic problems that threaten future returns. The study, published Monday in the online edition of the scientific journal Molecular Ecology, contrasts earlier research suggesting that hatcheries themselves genetically select for fish that go on to fail once they are released into the wild. Researchers from the Columbia River Intertribal Fish Commission and the Nez Perce Tribe tracked an endangered run of chinook salmon in Johnson Creek in the Salmon River Basin in Idaho from 1998 through 2010 — more than two full generations. The commission and the Nez Perce Tribe have long been strong advocates for using hatcheries to rebuild endangered salmon runs, a practice questioned by some scientists. Genetic sampling from 7,726 adult fish returning to spawn showed that fish born and raised in the hatchery from parents taken from the wild produced adult fish that returned from the ocean at a higher rate — an average of 4.69 times higher — than fish spawned naturally in the river. When those returning fish spawned naturally in the river, they produced offspring that returned at an average rate of 1.32 times

higher over two brood years. They also found that male fish raised in hatcheries typically had a lower rate of success reproducing than wild males. “This helps us realize that supplementation programs can be effective at boosting populations that are endangered while having very limited genetic impact on wild populations,” said co-author Shawn Narum, lead geneticist for the commission. Hatcheries have long been used to make up for lost habitat, such as dams blocking access to spawning grounds, and the vast majority of salmon in the Columbia basin are born in hatcheries. But it eventually became clear that traditional hatchery practices were one of the problems that have led to 13 runs of salmon and steelhead being protected by the Endangered Species List. While scientists have urged that practices be changed, change has been slow, and hatcheries producing salmon only from wild brood stock are rare. It is more difficult and more expensive to go into the wild to collect fish for spawning than it is to wait for fish to swim into the hatchery. David Noakes, professor of fisheries at Oregon State University and senior scientist at the Oregon Hatchery Research Center, was not part of the study. He said the research was well done and published in a highly respected journal. He noted that earlier research suggesting hatcheries produce inferior fish was done with a different species, steelhead, which could account for the different findings. Steelhead do not all die after spawning, and in nature spend two years in rivers before

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

migrating to the ocean to mature. However, when raised in hatcheries, they are fed heavily to speed up their growth so they can be released after only one year. Unlike chinook salmon, many steelhead never go to the ocean, but remain in rivers as rainbow trout. Another factor could be that fish bred in hatcheries do not get to choose their mates, the way animals from fruit flies to humans do in real life, he added.

“It is important to understand, and they make this clear in the study, that hatcheries are a tool that can be used for a variety of purposes,” Noakes said. “They are not a solution, they are a tool.”

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend www.highdesertbank.com

EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

The Associated Press PORTLAND — Portland mayoral candidate Jefferson Smith was charged with assaulting a woman in a tussle at a party when he was a sophomore at the University of Oregon, but the misdemeanor charge was dropped when he paid the woman’s medical bills and did community service. Smith, 39, acknowledged the report Monday by Willamette Week. The paper’s website said witnesses recalled the woman was tipped off a couch at a party and charged at Smith, who was then 20 years old, in the mistaken belief he had done it. Smith told supporters in an email that the woman had been drinking and was awakened abruptly, and the accidental contact happened as he tried to push her away, the Oregonian reported. He told Willamette Week she was cut above her eyebrow. A witness told the paper he tapped her on the forehead. Smith, a two-term Democratic state representative, is running against former City Council member Charlie Hales. In May, Smith beat Eileen Brady for the second spot in the race, in what was considered an upset. His campaign has been dogged by revelations such as his ejection from two sports leagues after roughing up opponents and a record of seven driver’s license suspensions. The Lane County district attorney’s office said it had no record of the incident at the off-campus party, and the woman was not identified.

shelter • help • hope

www.bethleheminn.org 541.322.8768 ext. 21


C4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

B  M C G B  J C  R  C

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

State PERS crisis needs governor’s intervention

W

hat’s having one of the biggest financial impacts on schools, public safety and everything else Oregon wants to do? The state’s Public Employee

Retirement System. Here’s a rundown of Gov. John Kitzhaber’s recently announced plan to take leadership on PERS reform: That’s right, it’s a blank space. Kitzhaber is AWOL on PERS. The governor led the way for Oregon to restructure how it provides health care for the needy. He led the state into a zero-20 system for education. He’s put together a team to seek better options for the state’s tax structure. On PERS, he’s not leading. He’s not even following. The situation with PERS is just as urgent. Spending on PERS is costing the state teachers in the classroom and firefighters and police on the streets. The latest was the PERS board announcement last week of a systemwide 4.9 percent increase in employer rates for the 2013-15 biennium. That’s about $900 million in increased costs. Close to home, the Redmond School District says its $2.2 million PERS increase could cost it 28 teachers or 13 school days. BendLa Pine Schools will be paying about $4.3 million more per year. That’s the cost of more than 50 teachers or about 10 school days

for Bend. How is that not a crisis? PERS has about a $16 billion hole. If investments don’t perform, employers have to fill the hole. And investments haven’t been performing. State Treasurer Ted Wheeler, a Democrat who is one of the people in charge of investing the state’s money, doesn’t believe PERS investments are going to hit the 8 percent rate of return the PERS board projects. Kitzhaber could follow Wheeler’s leadership and urge the PERS board to lower its assumed earnings rate to something realistic. The second step Kitzhaber should take is to urge the Legislature to decouple the guaranteed rate of return on PERS investments from the assumed earnings rate of the PERS board. The guaranteed rate of return is currently at 8 percent for Tier 1 employees. If the guaranteed rate were decoupled from the assumed earnings rate, the guaranteed rate could be lowered without requiring local school boards and governments to increase contributions. Kitzhaber should show leadership on PERS, or at least start following.

Public employee benefits should be transparent

I

n calculating the compensation for some Oregon public employees for labor negotiations, officials don’t include overtime, sick leave and employer payments to the retirement system. That means the actual cost of hiring some employees is higher than their official compensation. What’s worse is that this illogic is mandated by state law. That needs to change. The Salem Statesman Journal reports these misleading requirements apply to employees, such as police, who are not permitted to strike. Looser rules apply to others who can strike. When compensation doesn’t equal cost to the employer, there’s a disconnect that masks the taxpayers’ full expenditure for that employee. And in contract negotiations, that means negotiations aren’t based on real costs. Benefit packages are a growing issue in Oregon and elsewhere as costs for retirement programs escalate, and voters need clarity. Having a law that makes compensation mean one thing for one employee but something different for

another just adds to the confusion. Even without those legally-imposed oddities, it’s already difficult for taxpayers to judge the cost of their public employees, as revealed in a Portland State University study released in September. That study revealed that public employees’ benefits can be more than 100 percent of their base salaries. According to a report in The Oregonian, the benefits include overtime, paid time off, medical and post-retirement benefits, among others. It cited the example of a Redmond police officer for whom the benefits are 136 percent of base pay. The results surprised even those closely involved, such as Sandy City Manager Scott Lazemby. He told The Oregonian that he and his colleagues expect benefits to add 30-40 percent to the base wage cost of an employee. That’s the critical issue: If those responsible for hiring don’t know the costs, how can good decisions be made? The definition of compensation needs to be the same for all public employees, and the total cost of their benefits easy to see.

My Nickel’s Worth Democrats changed Social Security for worse In his Sept. 20 letter, Bob Almquist credited Democrats for Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act. It’s true that Democrats passed these programs with minimal support from Republicans. But take a long, hard look at how the programs have evolved and the promises have been broken — thanks to Democrats. Franklin Roosevelt introduced the Social Security (FICA) Program promising: • The program would be completely voluntary — it no longer is; • Participants would only have to pay 1 percent of the first $1,400 of their annual incomes into the program — now it’s up to 7.65 percent of the first $90,000; • Money put into the program would be deductible from taxable income — no longer the case; • Money put into the independent “Trust Fundâ€? would only be used to fund the Social Security Retirement Program, not other government programs — under Lyndon Johnson, a Democrat, money was moved to the general fund and spent; • Payments to retirees would never be taxed — under Bill Clinton and Al Gore, up to 85 percent of your Social Security became taxable. Having paid into FICA for 50 years, I now receive a modest Social Security check. It’s troubling to get taxed on 85 percent of the money I gave the federal government to “put awayâ€? for me. Democrats were responsible for these deleterious changes. Now they have the unabashed nerve to claim Republicans want to take away Social Security and Medicare. Actions speak louder than talking points and bumper stickers.

Don’t let the Democrats fool you again. Robert Perry Redmond

Buehler a man of principle With all of Knute Buehler’s qualifications and experience, where do I begin? Who is this man, this doctor? Buehler is a native Oregonian and a family man, born and raised in Roseburg, where he learned the values of hard work, the importance of family life and community involvement from his parents. These values carried over into successful classroom experiences and on to the baseball diamond, both in high school and at Oregon State University, where he continued to excel. Buehler became OSU’s first Rhodes Scholar. He went on to Oxford University, where he earned his master’s in politics and economics. After Oxford, feeling called to serve people in a very personal way, Buehler attended Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, where he met his wife, Patty. They married in 1990 and returned to Oregon to complete their medical residences at Oregon Health & Science University. They live in Bend and have two children, Owen and Hannah. Buehler is a business owner. In Bend, he helped build and manage a medical clinic that employs 170 Oregonians, developed innovative computer-assisted surgery techniques, received patents for products distributed around the world, and serves on the boards of the Ford Family Foundation and St. Charles Health System. Most important of all, Buehler is a man of principle. That is what I want. That is how he will operate. No cronyism. I wish you could sit down and have a chat with him. Buehler for secretary of state! Verle Mitchell Bend

Romney’s wealth meant jobs for thousands In response to John Cushing’s Aug. 27 allegations regarding Mitt Romney, I’d like to rebut these allegations. Romney has indeed “made himself rich� by creating jobs for thousands of Americans. A prime example is GS Steel Industries, which was an affiliate of Amco. Amco announced the closure of GS if no buyer came forward. Bain invested $170 million in this struggling company and kept it afloat for eight years and saved jobs. Two years later, along with 31 other steel companies, they went bankrupt. Staples is another example of Bain’s success stories. They were a small struggling office supply company when Bain stepped in to help them become the employers of 90,000 workers. Other success stories are AMC Entertainment, Burger King, Burlington Coat Factory and Warner Music Group. Cushing states that Romney has no “core values.� Seriously? Here is a devout Mormon who performed his duty as a missionary for two years, mentored more than 400 people as a bishop for five years, oversaw the Olympics — refusing any salary for this as well as serving without salary as governor for four years. He has been a devoted, faithful husband to his wife of more than 40 years. As far as “flip-flopping� on government-run health care, one must surely realize the difference between managing health care for a small state with five million people and managing health care for 313 million people. Yes, Romney would repeal “Obamacare� and start over with a more realistic plan, and would not steal $500 trillion from Medicare to pay for it. Irene Rupprecht Redmond

Letters policy

In My View policy

How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Four-year university expansion a bad investment By Lynn Crisp he recent euphoria of building a four-year university in Bend has me wondering why we didn’t think of this sooner. If this is going to provide new employment opportunities for this region, we should all get on board and get this thing built. In an article by Matthew Kish of the Portland Business Journal, he writes, “a four-year university is seen as critical to the economic success of Bend.� In the same article, Oregon State University President Ed Ray said, “it’s unknown how much the expanded campus will cost.� When people in government ask for money, it is not uncommon that they don’t have accurate numbers on project costs. I decided to research the pros and cons of building a university here,

T

and came up with some troubling statistics. OSU wants to incur debt on many university projects. It is asking the Legislature to provide funding for these projects by issuing bonds. The list of construction projects is too long for this article. I decided to compare two other similar rural towns that have universities; Pullman, Wash., and Corvallis, to see how their economies are faring, since many believe that this expansion will provide economic growth. Corvallis has an unemployment rate of 6.3 percent but lags behind the state average in manufacturing, wholesale trade and several other key private sector employment categories. Pullman does not provide unemployment statistics, but does have personal income average of $16,944.00, 36 per-

IN MY VIEW cent below the income average in the state of Washington. It has a poverty rate 240 percent higher than average compared to the rest of Washington. These statistics prove to me that having a four-year university in a town is hardly enough to bring jobs to a region. Add to that, the Oregon Legislature is decreasing funding to our university system by 11 percent over the next two years, forcing increases in tuition and additional cuts in programs and staffing at OSU. Why OSU is asking for funding on numerous construction projects while overall university funding is being cut is perplexing to me. With all this bad news, you have to ask yourself, why all the eupho-

ria about building a university? The people supporting this move — school administrators and teachers — stand to gain increased opportunities of employment and promotion by having a large university system in place. I don’t know how many qualified teachers living in the Bend area would benefit by having a four-year university here, but I believe that the majority of the university positions will be filled by people moving to Bend and not by the local unemployed. The professors and administrators that will fill these positions are in the PERS system, which is bankrupting this state. The losers are the local taxpayers. Don’t be fooled. Local taxpayers will see increases in property taxes with a university expansion. Our unemployment rate will not see a dramatic drop by building this university.

The people promoting the university expansion say we have to move fast to get this done. They say this to prevent scrutiny by the public over the costs of such an undertaking. We already are being confronted with having to pay for infrastructure improvements, large water and sewer projects for Bend that will require tens of millions of dollars to build. We can’t figure out how we are going to pay for these projects that will have to be dealt with. With a population of 80,000 people to pay for all this, where is the money going to come from? The vast majority of Bend citizens work for low wages, and won’t have the capability for increases in property taxes. Don’t get fooled by the hype. The people promoting this expansion have a lot of explaining to do. — Lynn Crisp lives in Bend.


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

OREGON NEWS

O

A mission for Eric

June 7, 1921 - Aug. 25, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: Graveside Services will be held Friday, October 5, 2012 2:00 P.M. at Willamette National Cemetery, 11800 S.E. Mt. Scott Blvd., Portland, Oregon 97086.

Ingrid Esselstrom, of Salem June 8, 1939 - Sept. 27, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Celebration of Life for friends and family will take place on Saturday, October 13, 2012 at Ingrid's residence in Salem, Oregon. Please contact Birgit or Belinda for more information. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care 2075 NE Wyatt Court Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Sheila Rae Brantley, of Prineville Oct. 31, 1941 - Sept. 27, 2012 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: Visitation will be on Thursday, October 4, 2012 at Prineville Funeral Home, 199 NE 10th Street from 10am-5PM, and Friday, October 5 from 9am-1PM. A graveside service will be held at Juniper Haven Cemetery at 2PM on Friday, October 5.

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254 Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

D E 



— From wire reports

April 28, 1937 - Aug. 31, 2012 Edwina Margaret-Rose ‘Winnie’ Connell was born in Parkstone, Dorset, England, on April 28, 1937 and died on August 31, 2012. Winnie lived her life with spunk and vigor even during that final Winnie Connell year after she was diagnosed with cancer. At age 22, Winnie came to the United States to be a nanny for the Howard family that lived in Southern California. She remained close to the Howards and her young charges - Lisa, Melinda and Michael - throughout her life. She married Lon Davis in 1962 and the couple worked on a ranch in Nevada. Two children were born of that marriage, daughter, Denine and son, Brian. In 1999, Winnie married her second husband, Ross Connell, with whom she spent the last 14 years of her life. In Oregon, Winnie’s first job was at Stockman's Saddlery owned by Shirley Andre. The two women became best friends, a

friendship that was to last for 46 years. Winnie's next job took her to Prineville, where she worked on the cut line for Clear Pine Molding for 25 years. After that she loaded cargo into airliners at the Redmond Airport, modeled clothes for Gaylord's, and finally wrapped up her working career at Eagle Crest Resort where she was for 17 years before taking retirement. Winnie was preceded in death by her daughter, Denine Davis, her father and mother, Frank and Vera Reeks, and her brother, Reynold Reeks. She is survived by her husband, Ross Connell, her son, Brian Davis, her brothers, Teddy Reeks of Australia and Peter Reeks of Parkstone, England. A memorial event celebrating the life of Edwina Reeks-Davis-Connell will be held Sunday, October 7 at 1:00 p.m. at the Eagle Crest Resort Convention Center. The family requests your gifts or donations go to the American Cancer Society or charity of your choice. Please visit the online registry for the family at www.niswonger-reynolds. com

Willard Scott Fenderson Dec. 28, 1925 - Sept. 29, 2012 Willard Fenderson, a long-time Prineville minister, passed away at his home on Saturday, September 29, 2012. He was 86. Born on December 28, 1925, in Edgeley, North Dakota, Willard was the first-born of four sons born to Berma and Howard Fenderson. Willard spent most of his youth in the St. Paul area of Minnesota before enlisting in 1944 in the U.S. Navy at the height of WWII. As a signalman in the Navy, Saipan and Tinian were but two of the islands where Willard was stationed before he left the Navy as a SPC Y3C in 1946. After the service, Willard attended the University of Minnesota and St. Paul Bible College and he would later earn a theology degree from Bible Baptist College. Willard came to Oregon in the early 1950s where he worked for the U.S. Forest Service as a district clerk and manned the Acker Rock lookout tower in Tiller, OR. During this time he met and married Lois Lundell on June 25, 1954. This past summer they observed their 58th wedding anniversary. While at Tiller, Willard was the boys dean and a teacher at Canyonville Bible Academy and he pastored the Umpqua Community Church for two years before accepting the pastorate at the Brookings Bible Church where he served for nine years. In 1967, Willard became the pastor of the Prineville Community Church, a position he held for 27 years before retiring in 1994. While in Prineville, Wil-

lard became an avid fossil hunter. He loved hiking the hills of Central Oregon, enjoyed rockhounding, and spending time with his wife, Lois. For many years before and after retirement, Willard gave his time as a Visitation Director for Prineville Funeral Home, he was a chaplain for the hospice program, and for twenty years he served on the Crook County Selective Service Board. Willard is survived by his brothers, John of Murietta, CA; Douglas of New Brighton, MN; and David of LeMars, IA. His children are Wendy Knottingham (Dennis) of Yuba City, CA; Brian Fenderson (Ann) of Salem, OR; Laurie McAlister (Randy) of Tualitan, OR; Heidi Feely (Donald) of Canby, OR; Kathy March (Monte) of Prineville, OR; Rose Lopez (Greg) of Dundee, OR; and Kevan Fenderson (Wendolyn), of Dallas, TX; 19 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Willard was preceded in death by his parents and his wife, Lois. A private graveside service for the family will be held at Juniper Haven Cemetery and a Celebration of Willard's life will be held Wednesday, October 3, at 11:00 a.m., at Prineville Community Church with a reception to follow. In memory of Willard, the family asks that in lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Prineville Habitat for Humanity, 1427 NW Murphy Ct. Prineville, OR 97754 or Prineville Pioneer Memorial Hospice, 1201 NE Elm St., Prineville, OR 97754. Arrangements are in the care of Prineville Funeral Home. Please visit www.PrinevilleFuneralHome.com to share your memories or express your condolences by signing the on-line Guest Book.

• Medford family works to restore soldier’s beloved pickup before his deployment ends By Paul Fattig The Mail Tribune (Medford)

The front left fender of the forest-green 1973 Ford F-100 pickup is slightly munched. The old steering wheel is held together by two adjustable metal hose clamps. And the cloth cover on the bench seat appears to have been clawed by an angry wildcat. But Eric Lektorich is fond of the nearly 40-yearold truck with an engine he rebuilt as a senior project at North Medford High School, where he graduated in 2001. Now his parents and siblings in Medford want to make the old truck look like new as a surprise for Army Spc. 5 Lektorich, 29, who arrived Sept. 16 in Afghanistan to begin his second tour of duty. They figure they have nine months to complete their mission, which includes everything from body work to installing a new stereo. “It’s beat up a bit, but he loves that old pickup,� said his father, Jerry Lektorich. “He enjoys working on cars. When he is home on leave, it seems like he spends half his time working on vehicles for people.

ESL Continued from C1 Saxton added that improving services for English language learners is critical for the state’s education system. In Oregon, English language learner students number about 58,000 and represent nearly 10 percent of students. They are most likely to speak Spanish as their first language — other languages include Russian, Vietnamese and Chinese — according to the ODE. Overall, Oregon’s English language learners speak more than 150 languages, according to the state. Students are expected to become proficient in speaking, reading and writing English within five years, according to the Associated Press, progressing one level per year in order to exit the program.

Bend-La Pine’s performance Bend-La Pine Schools didn’t meet all the goals, but fared better than the state average. For example, 56.75 percent of Bend-La Pine English language learners moved up one level in proficiency, just onequarter of 1 percent short of the 57 percent state goal. The school district did meet goals on two other related measures. One is for the overall rate of students gaining the English skills needed to exit the ELL program. The

Commoner’s radiation study prompted change By Deepti Hajela The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Scientist and activist Barry Commoner, who raised early concerns about the effects of radioactive fallout and was one of the pioneers of the environmental movement, has died at age 95. Commoner died Sunday afternoon at a Manhattan hospital, where he had been since Friday, said his wife, Lisa Feiner. He lived in Brooklyn. Commoner was an outspoken advocate for environmental issues. He was one of the founders of a well-known survey of baby teeth in St. Louis that started in the late 1950s. The survey assessed the levels of strontium-90 in the teeth and showed how children

FEATUR ED OBITUARY were absorbing radioactive fallout from nuclear bombs that were being tested. The survey Commoner helped persuade government officials to partially ban some kinds of nuclear testing. Feiner said Commoner had “a very strong belief that scientists had a social responsibility, that the discoveries would be used for social good and that scientists also had an obligation to educate the public about scientific issues so that the public could make informed political decisions.�

Commoner took on that role of educating the public, writing books on environmental issues. Among his works were “Making Peace with the Planet� and “Science and Survival.� He made the cover of Time magazine in early 1970 and ran for president as a thirdparty candidate in 1980. He founded the Center for the Biology of Natural Systems at Washington University in St. Louis in 1966; he moved it to New York’s Queens College in 1981 and headed it until 2000. Commoner, who was born and raised in Brooklyn, went to Columbia University, majoring in zoology. He got his doctorate in cellular biology from Harvard University.

“So we want to upgrade his truck for him,� added the dental technician. “But it’s kind of a project that is bigger than us.� They are inviting anyone with expertise in body and fender work, car painting and other aspects of the project to step forward to help as a way to honor the soldier. Donations also are welcome. Their goal is to have the work done by mid-June of 2013, when his unit in the 101st Airborne Division out of Fort Campbell, Ky., is scheduled to return. “We’d like to have it as a complete surprise for him,� his father said. “We’re asking people to not put it on Facebook or anything,� stressed his mother, Sue Lektorich. Joining in on the surprise project is Eric’s older brother Scott and sisters Katie and Julie. A younger brother, Bryan, died in 2009. They describe the project as a labor of love that will demonstrate their feelings for a loved one now in harm’s way. “This guy is my hero and the greatest little brother ever,� Scott stressed of his soldier brother. “He loves his family and would do anything for us. This feels like the ultimate way to pay him back and show how much we love and respect him. “I almost consider Eric the family mechanic,� he said. “For our 16-year-old daughter at North, we bought a little Mazda. I told her, when her uncle comes back he will want to go through the car to make sure everything is OK.� When he isn’t tinkering on a

car to help folks out, Eric likes to ride a bicycle, hike the Table Rocks or play one of the bass guitars in his collection, they say. “Sometimes of an evening, you can catch him watching the sunset,� his father said. “He says that’s such a pretty view, watching the sun drop below the mountains.� “He told me he sometimes closes his eyes and remembers that skyline,� his mother said, noting that the thought nearly makes her cry. “Eric is a deep thinker,� she added with a smile. “I think he was born old.� The Medford native has an associate’s degree in machinetool technology from Mt. Hood Community College in Portland. He joined the Army in 2008 and served his first tour in Afghanistan in 2010-11. In addition to rebuilding the truck’s 360-cubic-inch V-8 engine, Eric has had the automatic transmission rebuilt in the truck and replaced a battered dashboard. The vehicle’s power steering and disc brakes are in good shape, the family said. The odometer reads 43,228, although it is likely that it has turned over once, Scott said. Now they want to have the dings pounded out, get a new paint job, have the seat reupholstered, install a stereo system, replace the exhaust system and fine-tune the engine. “The steering wheel is kind of cracked up,� Jerry observed. “It doesn’t have a radio, at least one that works,� he continued. “It does have an eighttrack stereo but no speakers.�

other is for the rate of students leaving the program after five years or longer. Overall, 20.34 percent of Bend-La Pine Schools’ English language learners exited the program. For students in the program for their fifth year or longer, the district’s rate was 35.7 percent. Dana Arntson, director of elementary programs for Bend-La Pine Schools, said changes the district’s ELL department has made in the last several years have helped students’ English learning.

the district. The district also monitors another 200 students who have successfully gained the English skills needed to leave the ELL program in the last two years and are still in school.

‘Honing’ practices The district takes steps to ensure that ELL teachers get a chance to interact with each other and gain training, Arntson said. For example, the teachers plan a lesson and observe one of their colleagues teaching it in the classroom and see how it works with students. Eventually, the rest of them put that lesson to practice in their own classrooms, later sharing with other teachers about the experience. “It’s a way of helping our teachers really hone their instruction practices,� Arntson said. The professional development is crucial because ELL teachers tend to be more isolated compared with other subjects, she said. For example, 19 ELL teachers work throughout the 27 district schools, with another teacher assigned as a coach at the district office. Those teachers educate about 600 ELL students in

Redmond’s performance The Redmond School District mirrored Bend-La Pine Schools. It also came within less than 1 percent of meeting the 57-percent goal. In Redmond, 56.3 percent of English language learners moved up one skill level. Redmond also met state goals for the level of students reaching proficiency and exiting the program. In Redmond, 19.89 percent of ELL students overall gained the skill level needed to leave the program, and 33.9 percent of students in the program for five years or more left the program. Martha Hinman, the district’s executive director of student services, said Redmond has a systemic approach that includes providing training to new teachers. The district’s teachers also meet to review data and see where the needs are. “I feel very strongly that Redmond has great programs and systems in place to support students with English language learning needs,� she said. ODE is leading a 13-state effort that received a $6.3 million grant for upgrading the assessment used for gauging student skill levels in English. — Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

Deschutes Memorial Chapel & Gardens ĆăĈćą/)JHIXBZĉćt#FOE

541.382.5592 Where Every Life is Celebrated

Deschutes Memorial now displays obituaries on our website. Please go to www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com to leave condolence messages for the family and to learn about funeral/ memorial services. ng Central O re rvi Se

ince nS go

Deaths of note from around the world: Carlos Moseley, 98: Took the New York Philharmonic into Lincoln Center a half-century ago, and then into the city’s parks and neighborhoods while presiding over enormous growth as the orchestra’s managing director, president and chairman. Died Monday in Spartanburg, S.C. James Burke, 87: Leader of Johnson & Johnson during the Tylenol poisonings in the 1980s whose manner at the time is regarded as a textbook example of how to handle a public relations crisis. Died Friday near New Brunswick, N.J. Eric Hobsbawm, 95: Author whose three-volume economic history of the rise of industrial capitalism established him as Britain’s pre-eminent Marxist historian. Died Monday in London of pneumonia.

Margaret-Rose Connell

Prou dl y

D N  Edwina 'Winnie' Russell John “Jack� Lunny, of Bend

C5

Funerals | Burials | Cremation

Locally Family Owned & Operated We honor all pre-arranged plans including Neptune Society.


THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

C6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, OCTOBER 2

WEDNESDAY

Today: Mostly sunny, starting to cool a little.

HIGH

Tonight: Getting breezy overnight, a chilly evening.

LOW

75

32

61 28

FORECAST: STATE Astoria

60/44

Seaside

59/51

Cannon Beach 58/46

77/41

68/41

59/42

Lincoln City

Salem

59/45

79/42

Corvallis Florence 63/47

73/38 73/36

72/41

Coos Bay

Crescent

Roseburg

62/49

Gold Beach

74/30

74/35

Paulina 69/34

Vale

Nyssa

Hampton 71/34

83/32

74/35

76/30 75/27

Frenchglen 81/35

Rome

Klamath Falls 78/34

Ashland

67/49

Medford

77/37

84/47

Brookings

• 93°

84/34

79/38

Chiloquin

Medford

64/49

Yesterday’s state extremes

JordanValley

Paisley

80/44

80/41

Juntura

Burns Riley

75/25

Grants Pass

EAST Mostly sunny skies Ontario with pleasant tem81/41 peratures today.

82/42

75/36

Silver Lake

71/31

Port Orford 66/47

Unity

Christmas Valley

Chemult

75/43

74/27

John Day

73/38

Fort Rock 74/35

71/32

66/27

Bandon

72/35

Brothers 73/33

La Pine 73/363

Crescent Lake

62/46

75/32

CENTRAL Mostly sunny skies with pleasant temperatures today.

68/28

Union

WEST Coastal clouds; otherwise mostly sunny and breezy today.

Baker City

77/40

72/34

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

69/28

66/29

Spray74/31

Prineville Sisters Redmond 74/36 76/37 Sunriver Bend

Eugene

Enterprise Joseph

Granite

Mitchell 75/39

71/34

59/48

71/35

65/36

Madras

Camp Sherman

70/40

67/29

Meacham

La Grande

Condon

Warm Springs

70/40

Yachats

67/37

78/41

Wallowa

60/25

74/37

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

70/35

Ruggs

Maupin

71/41

60/47

Pendleton

73/38

70/36

Government Camp 61/38

67/43

Hermiston73/35

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy 67/47

McMinnville

74/38

The Biggs Dalles 73/42

71/41

Hillsboro Portland 70/49

Tillamook

Umatilla

Hood River

78/49

• 28°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

83/42

77/38

Meacham

83/30

-30s

-20s

-10s

10s

Vancouver 57/43

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

0s

Calgary 42/31

30s

Saskatoon 56/40

Boise 75/37

Thermal, Calif.

Cheyenne 77/46 San Francisco 78/53

• 2.56” Chattanooga, Tenn.

Las Vegas 99/72

Salt Lak e City 81/57

Denver 83/48 Albuquerque 80/53

Los Angeles 89/65

Phoenix 103/75

Honolulu 85/72

Tijuana 89/69 Chihuahua 80/57

Anchorage 47/39

La Paz 91/75 Juneau 50/36

Mazatlan 89/78

50s

60s

70s

80s

90s

Thunder Bay 62/42 St. Paul 70/51

100s 110s

Quebec 63/48

Winnipeg 76/44

Rapid City 81/46

• 24° Stanley, Idaho

40s

Bismarck 80/46

Billings 82/41

Another cool and chilly day, calming winds.

A significant cooldown, breezy winds, below average.

CHEYENNE, Wyo. — Environmental groups hailed the U.S. Supreme Court’s rejection of an appeal challenging a federal rule that bars development on 50 million acres of roadless areas in national forests, ending one of the main legal battles that had left the rule in doubt for more than a decade. “The Supreme Court action validates arguably one of most important public land conservation polices in a generation,” said Jane Danowitz, a director of the Pew Environment Group, which has worked on the rulemaking since 1998. “Without the roadless rule and its national standard of protection, these millions of acres of pristine forest land could be opened to a variety of development, including logging, mining and drilling.” The justices said Monday they will leave in place a federal appeals court decision in a case brought by the state of Wyoming and the Colorado Mining Association that upheld the so-called roadless rule that took effect late in the presidency of Bill Clinton.

Warming a little, staying sunny.

HIGH LOW

63 29

HIGH LOW

63 31

68 32

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .8:36 a.m. . . . . . 7:13 p.m. Venus . . . . . .3:35 a.m. . . . . . 5:14 p.m. Mars. . . . . .11:15 a.m. . . . . . 8:33 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . .9:38 p.m. . . . . 12:50 p.m. Saturn. . . . . .8:41 a.m. . . . . . 7:33 p.m. Uranus . . . . .6:27 p.m. . . . . . 6:50 a.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82/43 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . 86 in 2010 Average month to date. . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . 17 in 1950 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.74” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Average year to date. . . . . 7.18” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.30.14 Record 24 hours . . .0.59 in 2005 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today. . . . . . 7:05 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 6:43 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:06 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 6:41 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 7:51 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 9:45 a.m.

Moon phases Last

Oct. 8

New

First

Full

Oct. 15 Oct. 21 Oct. 29

OREGON CITIES

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97......Ext. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.......Ext. Redmond/Madras .......High

Astoria . . . . . . . .73/42/0.02 Baker City . . . . . .81/33/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .87/59/0.00 Burns. . . . . . . . . .80/32/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .83/43/0.00 Klamath Falls . . .85/44/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .84/43/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .85/58/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .93/49/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 North Bend . . . . . .72/46/NA Ontario . . . . . . . .83/48/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .82/46/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .82/49/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .82/39/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .84/32/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .85/47/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .84/46/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .82/31/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .86/44/0.00

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . . .60/44/s . . . . . .66/45/s . . . . .74/27/s . . . . . .60/24/s . . . . .67/49/s . . . . . .66/45/s . . . . .77/27/s . . . . . .62/27/s . . . . .73/38/s . . . . . .72/39/s . . . . .78/34/s . . . . . .70/35/s . . . . .77/38/s . . . . . .65/36/s . . . .73/363/s . . . . . .63/12/s . . . . .84/47/s . . . . . .82/45/s . . . . .60/47/s . . . . . .65/47/s . . . . .62/45/s . . . . . .64/44/s . . . . .81/41/s . . . . . .66/35/s . . . . .70/35/s . . . . . .66/34/s . . . . .70/49/s . . . . . .70/45/s . . . . .73/38/s . . . . . .67/27/s . . . . .73/31/s . . . . . .63/23/s . . . .75/43/pc . . . . . .77/40/s . . . . .71/41/s . . . . . .72/41/s . . . . .74/36/s . . . . . .63/19/s . . . . .77/41/s . . . . . .70/36/s

To ronto 57/55

Green Bay 65/49

Bufal o

Halifax Portland 67/53 70/53 Boston 74/62

69/61

New York Detroit Philadelphia 73/66 65/59 Des Moines 76/65 Columbus 74/49 Chicago 74/58 Washington, D. C. 66/58 Omaha 78/67 75/46 Louisville 73/58 Kansas City 74/49 St. Louis Charlotte 66/56 78/63 Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 78/52 70/58 74/55 Atlanta Birmingham 76/56 Dallas 71/54 79/58 New Orleans 77/62 Orlando Houston 89/75 84/62 Miami 88/79

Monterrey 89/66

FRONTS

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .80/60/0.00 . . . 78/59/s . . 87/62/s Akron . . . . . . . . . .63/42/0.00 . . . 72/60/t . 72/54/sh Albany. . . . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . .69/59/sh . 76/60/sh Albuquerque. . . . .79/58/0.00 . . . 80/53/s . . 85/51/s Anchorage . . . . . .48/27/0.00 . . . 47/39/r . . .49/45/r Atlanta . . . . . . . . .72/66/0.78 . . . 76/56/t . 78/56/pc Atlantic City . . . . .72/47/0.00 . . . 75/67/t . 77/65/sh Austin . . . . . . . . . .84/56/0.00 . .83/59/pc . . 87/68/s Baltimore . . . . . . .72/48/0.00 . . . 77/66/t . 82/64/sh Billings . . . . . . . . .76/44/0.00 . .82/41/pc . .47/33/rs Birmingham . . . . .84/70/0.48 . . .71/54/c . . 79/57/s Bismarck. . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . .80/46/pc . 53/34/sh Boise . . . . . . . . . . .82/48/0.00 . . . 75/37/s . . 62/33/s Boston. . . . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . . .74/62/c . 73/62/sh Bridgeport, CT. . . .72/53/0.00 . .71/65/sh . 75/66/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . . . 69/61/t . 75/57/sh Burlington, VT. . . .60/52/0.34 . . .67/58/c . 74/63/sh Caribou, ME . . . . .58/51/0.09 . .68/43/pc . . 68/47/s Charleston, SC . . .88/69/0.00 . . . 86/71/t . . 83/66/c Charlotte. . . . . . . .65/60/0.37 . . . 78/63/t . 81/58/pc Chattanooga. . . . .76/60/2.56 . .74/56/sh . 77/56/pc Cheyenne . . . . . . .63/47/0.01 . . . 77/46/s . 59/31/pc Chicago. . . . . . . . .66/47/0.00 . . .66/58/c . 69/57/sh Cincinnati . . . . . . .66/47/0.30 . . . 73/58/t . 72/51/sh Cleveland . . . . . . .65/42/0.00 . . . 69/62/t . 70/58/sh Colorado Springs .68/52/0.00 . . . 76/47/s . 76/41/pc Columbia, MO . . .74/52/0.00 . . .72/52/c . . 79/56/s Columbia, SC . . . .76/67/0.24 . . . 82/63/t . 83/59/pc Columbus, GA. . . .76/68/0.62 . .77/57/pc . . 82/57/s Columbus, OH. . . .65/49/0.00 . . . 74/58/t . 72/52/sh Concord, NH. . . . .62/46/0.03 . . .74/52/c . . 75/54/c Corpus Christi. . . .88/65/0.00 . .87/67/pc . . 86/71/s Dallas Ft Worth. . .84/60/0.00 . .79/58/pc . . 86/65/s Dayton . . . . . . . . .65/46/0.03 . . . 72/58/t . 70/50/sh Denver. . . . . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . . . 83/48/s . 72/38/pc Des Moines. . . . . .79/54/0.00 . . . 74/49/s . . 84/52/s Detroit. . . . . . . . . .67/43/0.00 . .65/59/sh . 68/57/sh Duluth. . . . . . . . . .69/43/0.00 . . . 60/46/s . 67/45/sh El Paso. . . . . . . . . .86/59/0.00 . . . 87/64/s . . 91/65/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . .42/21/0.00 . . . 51/29/r . . .47/37/r Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .71/56/0.00 . . . 76/47/s . 60/39/sh Flagstaff . . . . . . . .76/42/0.00 . . . 78/33/s . . 79/34/s

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT Sisters ................................Ext. La Pine................................Ext. Prineville...........................Ext.

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 33,860 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107,033 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 30,803 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 18,361 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88,469 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 359 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . 989 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . 27 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 1,495 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . NA Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 196 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 14.4 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 4

POLLEN COUNT

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .67/40/0.00 . . .69/53/c . 67/53/sh Green Bay. . . . . . .66/37/0.00 . .65/49/pc . 69/50/pc Greensboro. . . . . .62/59/0.03 . . . 72/62/t . 79/57/pc Harrisburg. . . . . . .70/46/0.01 . . . 71/64/t . 79/58/sh Hartford, CT . . . . .69/49/0.00 . .73/59/sh . 76/63/sh Helena. . . . . . . . . .78/41/0.00 . .61/37/pc . 45/32/sh Honolulu. . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . . . 85/72/s . . 85/71/s Houston . . . . . . . .84/59/0.00 . .84/62/pc . . 87/68/s Huntsville . . . . . . .79/64/0.69 . .72/55/sh . 76/57/pc Indianapolis . . . . .64/50/0.12 . .67/56/sh . 68/54/sh Jackson, MS . . . . .65/60/0.12 . . .73/52/c . 83/59/pc Jacksonville. . . . . .90/69/0.01 . . . 88/71/t . . 85/70/c Juneau. . . . . . . . . .48/32/0.01 . . . 50/36/s . . .47/38/r Kansas City. . . . . .79/56/0.00 . . . 74/49/s . . 81/56/s Lansing . . . . . . . . .66/37/0.00 . . .68/54/c . 67/52/sh Las Vegas . . . . . . .98/71/0.00 . . . 99/72/s . . 98/72/s Lexington . . . . . . .62/56/0.27 . . . 74/57/t . 70/53/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .72/42/0.00 . . . 75/45/s . 84/49/pc Little Rock. . . . . . .77/61/0.06 . . .74/55/c . . 80/59/s Los Angeles. . . . . .83/65/0.00 . . . 89/65/s . . 80/65/s Louisville. . . . . . . .65/57/1.08 . . . 73/58/t . . 71/54/c Madison, WI . . . . .67/38/0.00 . .71/46/pc . 72/52/pc Memphis. . . . . . . .69/59/0.70 . .69/56/sh . 77/60/pc Miami . . . . . . . . . .83/77/1.68 . . . 88/79/t . . .91/79/t Milwaukee . . . . . .65/46/0.00 . . .64/55/c . . 66/55/c Minneapolis . . . . .72/53/0.00 . . . 70/51/s . . 79/49/s Nashville. . . . . . . .71/57/1.28 . .70/58/sh . 75/56/pc New Orleans. . . . .76/63/0.00 . .77/62/pc . . 84/66/s New York . . . . . . .70/52/0.00 . .73/66/sh . 77/67/sh Newark, NJ . . . . . .73/50/0.00 . . . 74/63/t . 78/63/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . . .71/61/0.00 . . . 83/71/t . 83/69/sh Oklahoma City . . .81/54/0.00 . . . 78/52/s . . 84/61/s Omaha . . . . . . . . .76/44/0.00 . . . 75/46/s . . 84/49/s Orlando. . . . . . . . .89/73/0.34 . . . 89/75/t . . .87/74/t Palm Springs. . . .111/79/0.00 . .108/75/s . 103/73/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .66/49/0.00 . . .70/52/c . 73/55/pc Philadelphia . . . . .72/52/0.00 . . . 76/65/t . 81/65/sh Phoenix. . . . . . . .103/74/0.00 . .103/74/s . 101/71/s Pittsburgh. . . . . . .65/39/0.00 . . . 74/61/t . 76/56/sh Portland, ME. . . . .68/50/0.02 . . .70/53/c . 72/58/pc Providence . . . . . .70/48/0.00 . . .74/60/c . 75/62/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . . .65/61/0.14 . . . 77/65/t . . 82/59/c

Court rejects roadless rule appeal The Associated Press

More sunshine, still below average.

HIGH LOW

NATIONAL NEWS, NORTHWEST IMPACT

By Bob Moen

SATURDAY

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

Seattle 61/42 Portland 70/49

• 112°

20s

FRIDAY

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

HIGH LOW

THURSDAY

Wyoming and the Colorado Mining Association said closing so much forest land to development IN D.C. has had serious consequences for residents of Western states and the logging, mining and drilling industries. Supporters of the rule said the nation’s forests need protection from development to preserve forested areas that provide wildlife and natural resource habitat for hunting, fishing and recreation as well as other benefits. They note the rule has exceptions to allow logging in order to protect the forest from severe wildfires and for public safety. “We’re glad the Supreme Court put the final nail in the coffin of Wyoming’s case,” Tim Preso, an attorney with the environmental law firm Earthjustice, said. The decision means there’s just one more legal challenge pending against the rule. The challenge filed by Alaska is pending in federal court in Washington, D.C. Danowitz expressed confidence that Monday’s Supreme

Court decision would mean the demise of the Alaska challenge as well. “When you get an action by the highest judicial body in the land that validates the roadless rule that bodes well for any future litigation,” she said. Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead said restrictions on 3 million acres of national forest in the state would have economic consequences for the state, which relies heavily on the mineral extraction industry. “While I am disappointed in the decision, I am ready to move on continuing to work with the (U.S.) Forest Service about these concerns,” Mead said in a short statement. Wyoming’s challenge centered on the contention that the U.S. Forest Service essentially declared forests to be wilderness areas, a power that rests with Congress under the 1964 Wilderness Act. The U.S. Forest Service currently manages more than 190 million acres of land used for multiple purposes that must comply with strict rules on land use changes spelled out in the federal Wilderness Act and National Environmental Policy Act.

The roadless rule enacted under Clinton in 2001 had been upheld earlier by both the Denver-based 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and the San Francisco-based 9th U.S. Circuit in separate cases. The 10th Circuit overturned Cheyenne-based U.S. District Judge Clarence Brimmer, who had decided the rule created a de facto wilderness area. The years of legal wrangling led to a variation of the national rule in Colorado, which developed its own regulations for the state’s 4.2 million acres of roadless areas. Its regulations, approved by U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack in July, are less stringent, allowing more flexibility to allow for the thinning of forests to help ski resort expansion and coal mining in the North Fork region. Colorado Mining Association President Stuart Sanderson said the Supreme Court action is disappointing but limited development of coal in some Colorado national forest areas will continue. “The mines in this region employ more than 1,000 workers, those jobs must be preserved,” Sanderson said.

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City. . . . . . .68/47/0.00 . . . 81/46/s . 56/38/sh Reno . . . . . . . . . . .90/50/0.00 . . . 89/48/s . . 83/46/s Richmond . . . . . . .70/55/0.01 . . . 80/69/t . 86/63/sh Rochester, NY . . . .67/52/0.00 . . . 68/60/t . 77/58/sh Sacramento. . . . . .98/57/0.00 . . . 99/60/s . . 94/57/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . .66/56/sh . 76/56/pc Salt Lake City . . . .80/51/0.00 . . . 81/57/s . . 66/43/s San Antonio . . . . .78/60/0.49 . .83/60/pc . . 87/67/s San Diego . . . . . . .80/66/0.00 . . . 84/68/s . . 81/67/s San Francisco . . . .91/57/0.00 . . . 79/54/s . . 69/53/s San Jose . . . . . . . .94/57/0.00 . . . 90/60/s . . 79/55/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .76/44/0.00 . . . 74/46/s . . 74/42/s

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .81/70/1.40 . . . 87/67/t . . 84/66/c Seattle. . . . . . . . . .74/48/0.00 . . . 61/42/s . . 64/41/s Sioux Falls. . . . . . .71/47/0.00 . . . 74/46/s . 76/42/sh Spokane . . . . . . . .76/48/0.00 . . . 66/35/s . . 61/33/s Springfield, MO . .71/54/0.00 . .72/49/pc . . 77/57/s Tampa. . . . . . . . . .89/77/0.00 . . . 88/73/t . . .88/73/t Tucson. . . . . . . . . .99/63/0.00 . . . 99/68/s . . 98/68/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .82/59/0.06 . . . 78/50/s . . 83/62/s Washington, DC . .72/54/0.00 . . . 78/67/t . 84/66/sh Wichita . . . . . . . . .78/52/0.02 . . . 75/48/s . . 83/57/s Yakima . . . . . . . . .83/43/0.00 . . . 70/37/s . . 65/35/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .109/76/0.00 . .106/71/s . 103/71/s

INTERNATIONAL Mecca . . . . . . . . .106/84/0.00 . .104/82/s . 105/82/s Mexico City. . . . . .73/54/0.00 . . . 65/48/t . . 66/47/c Montreal. . . . . . . .59/52/0.00 . . .64/54/c . 69/62/sh Moscow . . . . . . . .54/41/0.00 . . .56/47/c . 55/52/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . . . 81/55/s . . 80/58/s Nassau . . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . . 89/78/t . . .88/79/t New Delhi. . . . . . .93/72/0.00 . . . 97/75/s . . 97/73/s Osaka . . . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . .76/66/pc . 77/67/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .57/46/0.00 . . . 53/41/r . 50/44/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . . .66/52/0.00 . . .61/52/c . 64/56/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .68/41/0.00 . .68/52/sh . 59/55/sh Rio de Janeiro. . . .84/68/0.00 . .84/68/pc . . 86/67/s Rome. . . . . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . .74/55/pc . 74/63/pc Santiago . . . . . . . .54/45/0.00 . .61/44/pc . . 67/44/s Sao Paulo . . . . . . .90/57/0.00 . .83/63/sh . 86/67/sh Sapporo . . . . . . . .68/61/0.00 . .68/54/pc . 69/53/sh Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .73/52/0.00 . .74/55/pc . 73/52/pc Shanghai. . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . .74/63/pc . 73/62/pc Singapore . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . . . 89/80/t . . .87/78/t Stockholm. . . . . . .57/48/0.00 . .56/54/sh . . 56/51/c Sydney. . . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . . . 70/54/s . . 79/61/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .79/66/0.00 . .77/70/pc . 79/71/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . . 92/76/s . . 85/72/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . . .74/65/c . 71/64/sh Toronto . . . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . .57/55/sh . 66/59/sh Vancouver. . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . . . 57/43/s . 64/45/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . .63/46/sh . 68/56/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . . .61/39/0.00 . .64/50/pc . 55/43/sh

Amsterdam. . . . . .63/54/0.00 . .63/53/sh . 59/49/sh Athens. . . . . . . . . .86/60/0.00 . . . 86/71/s . 86/66/pc Auckland. . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . .60/54/sh . 60/55/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .104/68/0.00 107/76/pc . 107/74/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .93/77/0.00 . . . 78/76/t . . .86/79/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .79/46/0.00 . . .76/55/c . 72/58/pc Beirut . . . . . . . . . .99/82/0.00 . .93/78/pc . . 83/73/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .64/41/0.00 . .64/48/pc . . 69/51/c Bogota . . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . .67/51/sh . 65/50/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . .75/51/pc . 72/49/pc Buenos Aires. . . . .75/57/0.00 . .63/49/pc . . 69/49/s Cabo San Lucas . .90/73/0.00 . .90/73/pc . 92/74/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .88/72/0.00 . . . 92/68/s . . 89/69/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .73/43/0.00 . . .42/31/c . 38/22/pc Cancun . . . . . . . . .88/72/0.00 . . . 87/78/t . . .88/78/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .57/48/0.00 . .58/42/sh . 55/38/pc Edinburgh. . . . . . .59/46/0.00 . . . 60/44/r . 55/39/sh Geneva . . . . . . . . .64/50/0.00 . .64/47/pc . 63/49/sh Harare. . . . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . . . 84/52/s . . 84/52/s Hong Kong . . . . . .84/77/0.00 . .84/75/pc . . 79/77/s Istanbul. . . . . . . . .82/70/0.00 . . .75/66/c . 79/66/pc Jerusalem . . . . . . .95/73/0.00 . . . 90/70/s . . 82/63/s Johannesburg. . . .75/55/0.00 . . . 81/51/s . . 84/56/s Lima . . . . . . . . . . .66/61/0.00 . .68/60/pc . . 69/61/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . .74/59/pc . . 75/60/s London . . . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . .64/54/sh . 57/43/sh Madrid . . . . . . . . .73/46/0.00 . .71/53/pc . . 75/61/s Manila. . . . . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . .79/77/sh . . .86/77/t

Eugene man gets 10 years for trafficking The Associated Press PORTLAND — A Eugene man has been sentenced to 10 years in federal prison for trying to pimp a 15-year-old girl to an undercover sheriff’s deputy. U.S. District Judge Michael Simon sentenced Adam David Zimmer on Monday in Portland. Zimmer earlier pleaded guilty to sex trafficking a minor and employing a minor in drug operations. Federal prosecutors say Zimmer

offered the girl last December at the cost of $500 for one hour and described her as “super loaded” from eating psychedelic mushrooms. Prosecutors say Zimmer referred to several underage girls in his employ as “Prosti-Tots.” The girl was ultimately returned to her parents. Zimmer spoke briefly at his sentencing, apologizing to the girl and thanking his parents for being at the hearing. The girl declined a chance to address the court. For fun, for friends, for health, for life!

Bend Senior Center

celebrate fall with us

in October

Cuts jeopardize Medford youth subsidy program By Chris Conrad The Mail Tribune (Medford)

Ronique Snyder has worked herself onto the right track since dropping out of high school two years ago, but a tieup in federal funding meant to help low-income, working single mothers in Medford could leave her and her 14-monthold daughter without a home. Snyder, 18, says Community Works’ Transitional Living Program — which provides rent subsidies to former homeless youths, runaways and single parents — has helped her attend college and get a job to support her daughter, Dailynn. The program is in jeopardy and hangs in limbo until Community Works learns whether federal funding will come

“They don’t just take care of you by giving you rent money. You have to bust your butt and help yourself.” — Ronique Snyder, subsidy recipient, Community Works’ Transitional Living Program

through to keep the subsidies flowing to Jackson County residents who depend on them. “This program is not just a handout,” Snyder said. “They don’t just take care of you by giving you rent money. You have to bust your butt and help yourself.” To remain in the program, Snyder has to either be working or attending school. She then receives a $710 subsidy to pay the rent for her apartment.

“You have to spend 40 hours a week doing something productive, or they won’t let you in the program,” Snyder said. The father of her child is not providing support and rarely sees his daughter, Snyder said. The programs allows for 22 months of rent subsidies. Snyder has been in the program for six months. “I’ve been with it only a short time, but it’s done so much for me,” she said. “And I

know it’s helped other girls.” The program is funded by the Administration for Children and Families, a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The money ran out Monday, and Community Works gave those who rely on the subsidies a 30-day notice before they are cut off. “It’s been a scramble to work with other agencies to help them out,” said Coriann Matthews, a case manager with Community Works. “We don’t want them to get kicked out of their apartments with nowhere to go.” Community Works has enough money to continue providing rent help to five people for the foreseeable future.

Lunch & Learn Series: Fall Wellness Talks ฀฀ ฀฀

฀฀ ฀

฀ ฀฀

฀ ฀

฀ ฀

฀ ฀

Hood River Fruit Loop & Fall Colors Tour ฀ ฀

฀฀

฀ ฀

฀฀

฀฀

฀ ฀

฀ ฀

Under the Harvest Moon Dinner Dance ฀ ฀฀

฀ ฀ ฀

฀฀ ฀฀

฀ ฀ ฀฀

฀ ฀

฀ ฀฀

More than 25 weekly

Social Activities, Lunches & Dances More than 40 weekly

Fitness & Wellness Classes visit us at 1600 SE Reed Market Rd p. (541) 388-1133 or online at www.bendparksandrec.org


SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 NFL, D3 Motor sports, D3

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

CYCLING

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Beavers No. 1 in two BCS indexes Rolling Tide, meet Beaver Dam. Alabama, it turns out, does not have a mortal lock on the No. 1 spot in college football. Oregon State, which is off to a 3-0 start, is No. 1 in two of the six computer indexes used in the Bowl Championship Series standings formula. The Beavers are tops this week in the ColleyMatrix, which boasts “Bias Free Matrix Rankings.” If Colley had its way, Oregon State today would play No. 2 Notre Dame for the national title. This would not bring back fond memories for Notre Dame, which was handed a humiliating 41-9 loss by Oregon State in the 2001 Fiesta Bowl. Florida is No. 3 in Colley’s rankings, followed by Alabama (oh yeah, those guys), Florida State, South Carolina and Kansas State. UCLA fans will be thrilled to know the Bruins are No. 24, well ahead of No. 45 USC. Ken Massey’s BCS rankings also have Oregon State and Notre Dame in the first two spots, followed by Texas Tech (what?), Florida, Ohio State, South Carolina, Texas and ... Alabama. UCLA is No. 19 in Massey’s report. USC is 45. We’ll go out on a limb and say some of these numbers may fluxuate between now and December. Maybe between now and next Monday.

Bend’s Boswell signs with top team By Mark Morical The Bulletin

The top two finishers in this year’s Tour de France raced for Team Sky. Mark Cavendish, career winner of 23 stages in the Tour, also competed for the powerhouse British team. Marking a significant step in his young career, Bend’s Ian Boswell will join Team Sky as a WorldTour rookie for 2013, Boswell confirmed on Monday in Bend. Boswell, 21, enjoyed a successful 2012 season in both Europe and the United States, with a top-five finish in the Tour of Utah and a second place in the U23 Liège-Bas-

togne-Liège in Belgium. He rode for the Argos Shimano team at the end of this season, picking up another top-five placing at the Tour de l’Avenir in France. “It’s like signing for the Yankees in baseball,” Boswell said. “It’s the best team in the world. Team Sky has the best equipment, best riders, best staff and the best organization. To be a part of a team like this in my first professional season is an honor. I’m excited and motivated to take what I’ve learned and make it work at the next level.” Boswell, a 2009 graduate of Bend’s Summit High School, displayed his talent in Europe

as an under-23 rider on the Bontrager-Livestrong team the past two seasons. His Bontrager-Livestrong teammate Joe Dombrowski, 21 and of Marshall, Va., has also signed with Team Sky. Boswell said he was in negotiations with many different teams, but it was hard for him to turn down arguably the best team in cycling. “When you have a lot of options, you want to make sure you pick the right one,” Boswell said. “When the best team comes knocking at your door … and it’s not like I went there just because they’re the best. See Bos well / D5

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin file photo

Ian Boswell, second from left, rides on the final climb of the McKenzie Pass stage of the Cascade Cycling Classic on July 18.

COMMUNITY SPORTS

GOLF COMMENTARY

Losing the Ryder Cup? Unthinkable By Tim Dahlberg The Associated Press

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Ashleigh Mitchell, top center, demonstrates proper technique in using a foam roller to help the body perform better in athletics and recover from injuries, during a foam rolling clinic at FootZone in downtown Bend last month.

Huskies hunting for another upset

Know your roll

No. 23 Washington has set its sights on No. 2 Oregon after last week’s 17-13 win against No. 8 Stanford, D3.

MLB

• Foam rollers can be a powerful tool in preventing injury or speeding up recovery

AL

NL

Yankees 10 Red Sox 2

Phillies 2 Nationals 0

Rays Orioles

5 3

Cardinals 4 Reds 2

Tigers Royals

6 3

Brewers Padres

5 3

Blue Jays 6 Twins 5

Pirates Braves

2 1

White Sox 11 Indians 0

Marlins Mets

3 2

Athletics Rangers

Astros Cubs

3 0

Dodgers Giants

3 2

Rockies D’backs

7 5

Angels 8 Mariners 4

MEDINAH, Ill. — he Europeans had just begun to celebrate their improbable and delightfully sweet Ryder Cup win Sunday when Rory McIlroy and U.S. captain Davis Love III ran into each other amid the boisterous scene just off the 18th green. “Glad you could make it on time,” Love said, drawing a laugh from McIlroy. Getting there on time was not a problem for the Americans. They were there early, enjoying their final day as a team together, maybe even getting in a few last pingpong matches. They just didn’t show up to play. Maybe it was complacency. The U.S. almost always wins the singles matches, and with a 10-6 lead going into the final day it was time to start preparing victory speeches and choose the kind of champagne they wanted to spray on each other. Losing the Ryder Cup? Unthinkable. Well, almost. Love himself was up late the night before thinking about 1999, when he was a member of the U.S. team that staged a memorable comeback at Brookline to win a Ryder Cup everyone had already given to the Europeans. He thought about it again when he woke up at 6:15 a.m. on the one Ryder Cup morning everyone was supposed to sleep in a bit. “I know what we felt like going into it, and the stunning defeat that they had that day,” Love said. See Ryder / D5

T

— Los Angeles Times

4 3

D

College football, D3 MLB, D4 Community Sports, D5, 6

T

hat knot in your quadriceps muscle. That irritation on the outside of your thigh. We all have aches and pains. And while many of us exercise and pursue our sporting passions to, at least in part, stay healthy, sometimes all that running or cycling or even recreational softball can wear our bodies down, even to the point of injury. Enter the foam roller. Maybe you have seen one at the sporting goods store or watched someone roll over one on the floor at the gym, perhaps wincing in discomfort. Maybe your running buddy or chiropractor has even suggested that you

AMANDA MILES use one. They are cylinders made of dense foam, some are hollow and others are not. And they are hard: Rolling on one feels similar to what it might feel like to roll on a rolling pin. One of those tubes could be a powerful tool in helping you heal from an injury or preventing one in the first place. “If you have a restriction in your body, your body will adapt and com-

pensate for that restriction, and then you create a pattern of that ‘new normal’ and that ultimately can create nagging pains,” explains Ashleigh Mitchell, who teaches a monthly foamroller clinic at the running shoe store FootZone in downtown Bend. Mitchell is a certified Pilates teacher who primarily works out of the Athletic Club of Bend. Self myofascial release techniques, she says, are her specialty, and she has been teaching those techniques to others for about eight years. That sounds like a fancy term, but basically, fascia is a connective tissue that surrounds and supports muscle. See Roll / D5

NBA Yanks seize control New York Yankees open up one-game lead over Baltimore in the AL East with two games left to play, MLB roundup, D4.

Trail Blazers have a new look heading into the season By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

CORRECTION A story headlined “Beavers win road thriller, Ducks roll” that appeared in Sunday’s Bulletin on page B1 included incorrect Pac-12 Conference records for the Oregon State and Arizona football teams. Oregon State is now 2-0 in conference play. Arizona is now 0-2 in conference play. The Bulletin regrets the errors.

Portland’s LaMarcus Aldridge The Associated Press

PORTLAND — General manager Neil Olshey prefers the term “emerging” rather than “rebuilding” when it comes to the Portland Trail Blazers. The Blazers open training camp today with a new general manager, a new head coach and a group of promising if unproven young players as they seek to move forward from last season’s turbulence. “I think the process is further along than most people believe,” Olshey said Monday. The Blazers finished last season 28-38 and out of the playoffs for the first time in four years. They dismissed head coach Nate McMillan in mid-March and let go of some of their more veteran players,

choosing instead to build around AllStar forward LaMarcus Aldridge and swingman Nicolas Batum. Just seven players from last season were on the training camp roster for this season: Aldridge, Batum, guards Wesley Matthews, Nolan Smith and Elliott Williams, and forwards Luke Babbitt and J.J. Hickson. Williams is already likely out for the season after recent surgery to repair a torn left Achilles tendon. It was an obviously busy offseason for the Blazers, who got a nearly headto-toe makeover. Olshey was hired in June after nine years with the Los Angeles Clippers, who went to the second round of the playoffs last season with All-Stars Blake Griffin and Chris Paul. Portland’s new GM went to work

right away preparing for the NBA draft, and he went on to land guards Damian Lillard and Will Barton and center Meyers Leonard. In free agency, Portland made a play for 7-foot-2 restricted free-agent center Roy Hibbert, but the Indiana Pacers matched. The Blazers got into a poker match with the Minnesota Timberwolves over Batum, eventually matching Minnesota’s four-year offer sheet worth more than $45 million for the 23-year-old. While Portland insisted the whole time it would match any offers for Batum, the matter was complicated when his agent said he would rather be in Minnesota and the Timberwolves hoped perhaps they could force a sign-and-trade deal. See Blazers / D5


D2

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

O  A TELEVISION

SCOREBOARD

Today SOCCER 11:30 a.m.: UEFA Champions League, SL Benfica vs. Barcelona, Root Sports. BASKETBALL 6 p.m.: WNBA playoffs, Seattle Storm at Minnesota Lynx, ESPN2. BASEBALL 4 p.m.: MLB, Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees or Baltimore Orioles at Tampa Bay Rays, MLB Network. 7 p.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Angels at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports.

Wednesday SOCCER 3 a.m.: UEFA Champions League, CFR Cluj vs. Manchester United FC (sameday tape), Root Sports. 11:30 a.m.: UEFA Champions League, Arsenal FC vs. Olympiacos FC, Root Sports. BASEBALL 3 p.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Angels at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. 4 p.m.: MLB, Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees, ESPN. 4 p.m.: MLB, Baltimore Orioles at Tampa Bay Rays, ESPN2. VOLLEYBALL 7 p.m.: Women’s college, Oregon at California, Pac-12 Network. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

ON DECK Today Boys soccer: Crook County at Ridgeview, 3 p.m.; Umatilla at Culver, 4 p.m.; Mountain View at Summit, 6 p.m.; Bend at Redmond, 3 p.m.; Madras at La Salle, 6 p.m. Girls soccer: Crook County at Ridgeview, 4:30 p.m.; Sisters at La Pine, 4:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Summit, 7:30 p.m.; Bend at Redmond, 4:30 p.m.; La Salle at Madras, 4:30 p.m. Volleyball: Summit at Mountain View, 6:30 p.m.; Redmond at Bend, 6:30 p.m.; Ridgeview at Crook County, 6:30 p.m.; Sisters at Cottage Grove, 6:45 p.m.; Junction City at La Pine, 6:45 p.m.; Madras at La Salle, 6 p.m.; Gilchrist at Paisley, 4:30 p.m.; Sherman County at Central Christian, 5:30 p.m. Boys water polo: Summit at Redmond, TBA; Bend at Mountain View, TBA Thursday Volleyball: Crook County at Summit, 6:30 p.m.; Bend at Mountain View, 6:30 p.m.; Ridgeview at Redmond, 6:30 p.m.; Junction City at Sisters, 7 p.m.; Sweet Home at La Pine, 6:45 p.m.; Molalla at Madras, 6 p.m.; Western Mennonite at Culver, 6 p.m.; Dufur vs. Central Christian at Crook County Middle School (two matches), 5:30 p.m. Boys soccer: Redmond at Ridgeview, 3 p.m.; Sweet Home at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; Summit at Crook County, 3 p.m.; Mountain View at Bend, 3 p.m.; Molalla at Madras, 4:30 p.m. Girls soccer: Redmond at Ridgeview, 4:30 p.m.; Sisters at Sweet Home, 4:30 p.m.; Summit at Crook County, 4:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Cottage Grove, 7 p.m.; Madras at Molalla, 4:30 p.m. Boys water polo: Redmond at Madras, TBA; Summit at Mountain View, TBA Friday Football: Summit at Bend, 7 p.m.; Mountain View at Pendleton, 7 p.m.; Redmond at Crook County, 7 p.m.; The Dalles Wahtonka at Ridgeview, 7 p.m.; Madras at Molalla, 7 p.m.; Junction City at Sisters, 7 p.m.; Cottage Grove at La Pine, 7 p.m.; Regis at Culver, 7 p.m.; Triad at Gilchrist, 4 p.m. Cross-country: Bend, Mountain View, Summit, Redmond, Ridgeview, Crook County, La Pine at the Oxford Classic in Bend’s Drake Park, TBA Volleyball: Triad at Gilchrist, 5:30 p.m.; Paisley at Trinity Lutheran, 2 p.m. Boys water polo: Bend at Mountain View, TBA Saturday Cross-country: Summit, Sisters at Mizuno Harrier Classic in Albany, 12:40 p.m. Volleyball: La Pine, Madras at Junction City tournament, 9 a.m. Boys soccer: Sweet Home at Crook County, 1 p.m.; Irrigon at Central Christian, 1 p.m. Girls soccer: Sweet Home at Crook County, 11 a.m. Volleyball: Bend at Glencoe tournament, TBA; Central Christian at Gilchrist Tournament, 9 a.m.; Trinity Lutheran at Prospect, 1:15 p.m.

FOOTBALL NFL

S   B Prep sports • Culver volleyball gets two wins on the road: Road victories over Waldport (2522, 25-9, 25-15) and East Linn Christian (25-21, 28-26, 19-25, 27-25) in Lebanon on Monday night allowed the Culver volleyball team to take its record to 14-5 this season. “It’s tough to travel and play two teams, but the girls had a lot of fight tonight,” Culver coach Randi Viggiano said. “East Linn was a tough match and we had to fight.” Against East Linn, Gabrielle Alley led the Bulldogs with 16 kills, eight digs and two aces, while Shealene Little had 15 kills and nine digs. Culver returns home Thursday to take on Western Mennonite.

Football • Colts coach diagnosed with leukemia: Indianapolis Colts coach Chuck Pagano has been diagnosed with leukemia and could miss at least Sunday’s game against Green Bay. The Colts announced the news Monday at a news conference with owner Jim Irsay, general manager Ryan Grigson and a doctor. Offensive coordinator Bruce Arians will serve as interim head coach. The 51-year-old Pagano is in his first season with the Colts (1-2). He was hired in January after serving as the Baltimore Ravens’ defensive coordinator.

Baseball • Reds manager returns from mini-stroke: Dusty Baker missed the Cincinnati Reds’ division-clinching win. He watched Homer Bailey’s no-hitter on TV. Back for his first full day on the job Monday after recovering from a mini-stroke in Chicago, the veteran manager takes it as a sign there’ll be more good news ahead. “The way I look at it, the big one’s to come,” Baker said “I’m fine now. I’m not 100 percent, but I’m pretty close.”

Basketball • Bulls give Thibodeau a 4-year extension: The Chicago Bulls have given coach Tom Thibodeau a four-year contract extension through the 2016-17 season. General manager Gar Forman announced the move Monday. The Bulls had exercised the team’s option for next season this past spring. The new deal takes effect after this season. Thibodeau was the NBA’s Coach of the Year for the 2010-11 season and the runner-up last season. — From staff and wire reports

Carlos Berlocq, Argentina, def. Marinko Matosevic, Australia, 3-6, 6-2, 6-3. Alexandr Dolgopolov (6), Ukraine, def. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, 6-0, 6-4. Sam Querrey, United States, def. Fernando Verdasco (8), Spain, 5-7, 6-3, 6-4. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, def. Brian Baker, United States, 5-7, 6-3, 6-1. Women First Round Lara Arruabarrena-Vecino, Spain, def. Zheng Jie, China, 6-2, 6-4. Sabine Lisicki, Germany, def. Anabel Medina Garrigues, Spain, 6-3, 5-7, 6-2. Polona Hercog, Slovenia, def. Anastasia Pavlyuchnkova, Russia, 5-7, 6-4, 3-0, retired. Sorana Cirstea, Romania, def. Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, 6-2, 6-3. Victoria Azarenka (1), Belarus, def. Alize Cornet, France, 6-1, 6-0. Maria Sharapova (2), Russia, def. Simona Halep, Romania, 7-5, 7-5. Second Round Elena Vesnina, Russia, def. Tamira Paszek, Austria, 7-6 (5), 6-2. Carla Suarez Navarro, Spain, def. Petra Kvitova (4), Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-2. Ana Ivanovic (11), Serbia, def. Varvara Lepchenko, United States, 4-6, 7-5, 6-1. Caroline Wozniacki (10), Denmark, def. Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, 7-5, 6-7 (6), 6-2. Peng Shuai, China, def. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, 5-7, 7-5, 6-2.

IN THE BLEACHERS

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Jets 2 2 0 .500 81 New England 2 2 0 .500 134 Buffalo 2 2 0 .500 115 Miami 1 3 0 .250 86 South W L T Pct PF Houston 4 0 0 1.000 126 Indianapolis 1 2 0 .333 61 Jacksonville 1 3 0 .250 62 Tennessee 1 3 0 .250 81 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 3 1 0 .750 121 Cincinnati 3 1 0 .750 112 Pittsburgh 1 2 0 .333 77 Cleveland 0 4 0 .000 73 West W L T Pct PF San Diego 3 1 0 .750 100 Denver 2 2 0 .500 114 Kansas City 1 3 0 .250 88 Oakland 1 3 0 .250 67 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 3 1 0 .750 66 Dallas 2 2 0 .500 65 Washington 2 2 0 .500 123 N.Y. Giants 2 2 0 .500 111 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 4 0 0 1.000 124 Tampa Bay 1 3 0 .250 82 Carolina 1 3 0 .250 80 New Orleans 0 4 0 .000 110 North W L T Pct PF Minnesota 3 1 0 .750 90 Chicago 3 1 0 .750 108 Green Bay 2 2 0 .500 85 Detroit 1 3 0 .250 100 West W L T Pct PF Arizona 4 0 0 1.000 91 San Francisco 3 1 0 .750 104 St. Louis 2 2 0 .500 79 Seattle 2 2 0 .500 70 ——— Monday’s Game Chicago 34, Dallas 18 Thursday’s Game Arizona at St. Louis, 5:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Baltimore at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Atlanta at Washington, 10 a.m. Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. Green Bay at Indianapolis, 10 a.m. Cleveland at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. Miami at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Seattle at Carolina, 1:05 p.m. Chicago at Jacksonville, 1:05 p.m. Buffalo at San Francisco, 1:25 p.m. Tennessee at Minnesota, 1:25 p.m. Denver at New England, 1:25 p.m. San Diego at New Orleans, 5:20 p.m. Open: Dallas, Detroit, Oakland, Tampa Bay Monday, Oct. 8 Houston at N.Y. Jets, 5:30 p.m.

PA 109 92 131 90 PA 56 83 97 151 PA 83 112 75 98 PA 71 83 136 125 PA 83 88 123 84 PA 76 91 109 130 PA 72 68 81 114 PA 61 65 91 58

Monday’s Summary

Bears 34, Cowboys 18 Chicago Dallas

0 10 14 10 — 34 0 7 3 8 — 18 Second Quarter Chi—FG Gould 43, 4:15. Chi—Tillman 25 interception return (Gould kick), 2:38. Dal—Austin 10 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), :14. Third Quarter Chi—Hester 34 pass from Cutler (Gould kick), 11:54. Chi—Briggs 74 interception return (Gould kick), 6:11. Dal—FG Bailey 39, 2:11. Fourth Quarter Chi—FG Gould 21, 11:24. Chi—Marshall 31 pass from Cutler (Gould kick), 6:28. Dal—Witten 5 pass from Orton (Bryant pass from Orton), :34. A—90,080. ——— Chi Dal First downs 18 26 Total Net Yards 360 430 Rushes-yards 28-93 14-41 Passing 267 389 Punt Returns 1-8 0-0 Kickoff Returns 3-50 2-48 Interceptions Ret. 5-99 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 18-24-0 40-53-5 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-8 1-7 Punts 3-40.0 3-37.0 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 2-0 Penalties-Yards 4-25 2-10 Time of Possession 30:50 29:10 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Chicago: Forte 13-52, Bush 1029, Bell 2-12, Cutler 3-0. Dallas: Murray 11-24, F.Jones 1-13, Ogletree 1-4, Romo 1-0. PASSING—Chicago: Cutler 18-24-0-275. Dallas: Romo 31-43-5-307, Orton 9-10-0-89. RECEIVING—Chicago: Marshall 7-138, Davis 3-62, Hester 3-38, Jeffery 3-32, Bush 1-8, Forte

1-(minus 3). Dallas: Witten 13-112, Bryant 8-105, Murray 7-57, Austin 4-57, Ogletree 3-24, Tanner 220, Beasley 2-14, Holmes 1-7. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

College Schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) Thursday’s Games SOUTH Arkansas St. at FIU, 4:30 p.m. East Carolina at UCF, 5 p.m. FAR WEST Southern Cal at Utah, 6 p.m. ——— Friday’s Games EAST Pittsburgh at Syracuse, 4 p.m. FAR WEST Cal Poly at Weber St., 5 p.m. Utah St. at BYU, 7:15 p.m. ——— Saturday’s Games EAST Boston College at Army, 9 a.m. Northwestern at Penn St., 9 a.m. UConn at Rutgers, 9 a.m. Robert Morris at St. Francis (Pa.), 9 a.m. South Florida at Temple, 9 a.m. Dartmouth at Yale, 9 a.m. Columbia at Lehigh, 9:30 a.m. Albany (NY) at Bryant, 10 a.m. Georgetown at Fordham, 10 a.m. Cornell at Harvard, 10 a.m. Bucknell at Holy Cross, 10 a.m. Brown at Rhode Island, 10 a.m. Wagner at Sacred Heart, 10 a.m. Maine at Delaware, 12:30 p.m. William & Mary at Penn, 12:30 p.m. Princeton at Lafayette, 3 p.m. Charleston Southern at Stony Brook, 3 p.m. Richmond at Villanova, 3 p.m. SOUTH Arkansas at Auburn, 9 a.m. Boise St. at Southern Miss., 9 a.m. Mississippi St. at Kentucky, 9:21 a.m. Virginia Tech at North Carolina, 9:30 a.m. Dayton at Davidson, 10 a.m. Florida A&M at Howard, 10 a.m. Towson at James Madison, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Morehead St., 10 a.m. Presbyterian at VMI, 10:30 a.m. Furman at Wofford, 10:30 a.m. Texas Southern at Alabama St., 11 a.m. E. Kentucky at Tennessee St., 11 a.m. Southern U. at Alcorn St., noon Virginia at Duke, noon Alabama A&M at MVSU, noon The Citadel at Samford, noon SE Louisiana at UAB, noon E. Illinois at UT-Martin, noon Elon at Appalachian St., 12:30 p.m. Georgia Tech at Clemson, 12:30 p.m. LSU at Florida, 12:30 p.m. New Hampshire at Georgia St., 12:30 p.m. Gardner-Webb at Liberty, 12:30 p.m. Tulsa at Marshall, 12:30 p.m. Wake Forest at Maryland, 12:30 p.m. Louisiana-Monroe at Middle Tennessee, 12:30 p.m. Georgia Southern at W. Carolina, 12:30 p.m. NC A&T at Bethune-Cookman, 1 p.m. Delaware St. at Norfolk St., 1 p.m. Tulane at Louisiana-Lafayette, 2 p.m. Murray St. at Austin Peay, 4 p.m. UNLV at Louisiana Tech, 4 p.m. Rice at Memphis, 4 p.m. Texas A&M at Mississippi, 4 p.m. Lamar at Northwestern St., 4 p.m. Morgan St. at Savannah St., 4 p.m. Georgia at South Carolina, 4 p.m. Florida St. at NC State, 5 p.m. Jacksonville St. at Tennessee Tech, 5 p.m. MIDWEST Michigan St. at Indiana, 9 a.m. Kansas at Kansas St., 9 a.m. Buffalo at Ohio, 9 a.m. Kent St. at E. Michigan, 10 a.m. San Diego at Drake, 10:30 a.m. Bowling Green at Akron, 11 a.m. S. Illinois at Illinois St., 11 a.m. Youngstown St. at N. Dakota St., 11 a.m. Butler at Valparaiso, 11 a.m. UMass at W. Michigan, 11 a.m. SC State vs. NC Central at Indianapolis, 11:30 a.m. N. Illinois at Ball St., noon W. Illinois at South Dakota, noon Cent. Michigan at Toledo, noon Missouri St. at Indiana St., 12:05 p.m. Illinois at Wisconsin, 12:30 p.m. Michigan at Purdue, 1 p.m. Miami (Ohio) at Cincinnati, 4 p.m. Vanderbilt at Missouri, 4 p.m. Miami vs. Notre Dame at Chicago, 4:30 p.m. Nebraska at Ohio St., 5 p.m. SOUTHWEST Iowa St. at TCU, 12:30 p.m. Oklahoma at Texas Tech, 12:30 p.m. Stephen F. Austin vs. Sam Houston St. at Houston, 1 p.m. Jackson St. at Ark.-Pine Bluff, 4 p.m. Nicholls St. at Cent. Arkansas, 4 p.m. North Texas at Houston, 4 p.m. Grambling St. vs. Prairie View at Dallas, 4 p.m. West Virginia at Texas, 4 p.m. SMU at UTEP, 5 p.m. FAR WEST Navy at Air Force, 9:30 a.m. Sacramento St. at S. Utah, noon Arizona at Stanford, noon Montana at N. Colorado, 12:35 p.m. New Mexico St. at Idaho, 2 p.m. Texas St. at New Mexico, 3 p.m. Washington St. at Oregon St., 3 p.m. Fresno St. at Colorado St., 4 p.m. Montana St. at UC Davis, 4 p.m. Wyoming at Nevada, 4:05 p.m. Hawaii at San Diego St., 5 p.m. North Dakota at E. Washington, 5:05 p.m. Idaho St. at Portland St., 5:05 p.m. UCLA at California, 7 p.m. Washington at Oregon, 7:30 p.m. Top 25 Schedule All Times PDT Thursday No. 13 Southern Cal at Utah, 6 p.m. Saturday No. 2 Oregon vs. No. 23 Washington, 7:30 p.m. No. 3 Florida State at N.C. State, 5 p.m. No. 4 LSU at No. 10 Florida, 12:30 p.m. No. 5 Georgia at No. 6 South Carolina, 4 p.m. No. 7 Kansas State vs. Kansas, 9 a.m.

No. 8 West Virginia at No. 11 Texas, 4 p.m. No. 9 Notre Dame vs. Miami at Chicago, 4:30 p.m. No. 12 Ohio State vs. No. 21 Nebraska, 5 p.m. No. 14 Oregon State vs. Washington State, 3 p.m. No. 15 Clemson vs. Georgia Tech, 12:30 p.m. No. 15 TCU vs. Iowa State, 12:30 p.m. No. 17 Oklahoma at Texas Tech, 12:30 p.m. No. 18 Stanford vs. Arizona, noon No. 20 Mississippi State at Kentucky, 9:21 a.m. No. 22 Rutgers vs. UConn, 9 a.m. No. 24 Northwestern at Penn State, 9 a.m. No. 25 UCLA at California, 7 p.m. Pac-12 Standings All Times PDT ——— North Conf. Oregon 2-0 Oregon State 2-0 Washington 1-0 Stanford 1-1 Washington State 0-2 California 0-2 South Conf. Arizona State 2-0 UCLA 1-1 USC 1-1 Colorado 1-1 Utah 0-1 Arizona 0-2 Thursday’s Game USC at Utah, 6 p.m. Saturday’s Games Arizona at Stanford, noon Washington State at Oregon State, 3 p.m. UCLA at California, 7 p.m. Washington at Oregon, 7:30 p.m.

Overall 5-0 3-0 3-1 3-1 2-3 1-4 Overall 4-1 4-1 3-1 1-4 2-2 3-2

Betting line NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Thursday Cards 2 1.5 RAMS Sunday Falcons 3 3 REDSKINS STEELERS 3.5 3.5 Eagles Packers 7 7 COLTS GIANTS 10 10 Browns VIKINGS 6 5.5 Titans BENGALS 5 4.5 Dolphins Ravens 5 4.5 CHIEFS PANTHERS 3 3 Seahawks Bears NL NL JAGUARS PATRIOTS 7 7 Broncos 49ERS 9.5 9.5 Bills SAINTS 3 3.5 Chargers Monday Texans 7 7.5 JETS Bye week: Cowboys, Lions, Raiders, Bucs. Favorite

C FLORIDA Usc FLA INT’L Pittsburgh BYU AIR FORCE Michigan St No Illinois Boston Coll Bowl Green CINCINNATI CLEMSON DUKE S Florida PENN ST Kent St RUTGERS Florida St W MICHIGAN MISSOURI Texas A&M N CAROLINA OREGON S CAROLINA TEXAS TCU WISCONSIN KANSAS ST Ucla AUBURN Michigan NEVADA IDAHO STANFORD Oklahoma TOLEDO Boise St Rice MARYLAND KENTUCKY OREGON ST LA TECH Tulsa c-Notre Dame OHIO U OHIO ST SAN DIEGO ST Fresno St Lsu NEW MEXICO UTEP UL-LAFAYETTE UL-Monroe HOUSTON c-Chicago

College Football Thursday 14 14 13 14 1.5 1.5 Friday 3 2.5 7 7.5 Saturday 10 10 14.5 15.5 2 2.5 9.5 10 5 4.5 20.5 20.5 10 10 NL NL 5 5 3.5 3 3.5 3 9.5 9 13.5 14.5 15.5 16 7.5 7 9.5 11 3.5 4 24.5 24.5 3 2.5 7 6.5 12.5 11.5 14 14 24 24 2 2.5 10 10 3 3 15 16 9.5 10.5 12 10 4.5 5.5 13.5 10.5 11 11 NL NL 4 5.5 NL NL 14.5 14.5 25 25 4 3.5 13 13 16 15 4.5 3.5 19 22 15 15.5 3 3 3 3.5 2 2.5 NL NL 3.5 3 11 11

E Carolina UTAH Arkansas St SYRACUSE Utah St Navy INDIANA BALL ST ARMY AKRON Miami-Ohio Ga Tech Virginia TEMPLE Northwestern E MICHIGAN Connecticut NC STATE Massachusetts Vanderbilt MISSISSIPPI Va Tech Washington Georgia W Virginia Iowa St Illinois Kansas CALIFORNIA Arkansas PURDUE Wyoming New Mexico St Arizona TEXAS TECH C Michigan SO MISS MEMPHIS Wake Forest Miss St Washington St Unlv MARSHALL Miami-Florida Buffalo Nebraska Hawaii COLORADO ST FLORIDA Texas St Smu Tulane MID TENN ST N Texas

TENNIS Professional China Open Monday At The Beijing Tennis Centre Beijing Purse: Men, $2.205 million (WT500); Women, $4.8 million (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Marius Copil, Romania, def. Marin Cilic (4), Croatia, 3-6, 7-6 (0), 6-4. Florian Mayer, Germany, def. Fabio Fognini, Italy, 6-1, 6-2. Zhang Ze, China, def. Wu Di, China, 6-4, 6-1.

WTA Rankings Through Sept. 30 Singles 1. Victoria Azarenka, Belarus, 10095 2. Maria Sharapova, Russia, 8435 3. Agnieszka Radwanska, Poland, 8015 4. Serena Williams, United States, 7900 5. Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic, 6520 6. Angelique Kerber, Germany, 5350 7. Sara Errani, Italy, 4855 8. Li Na, China, 4650 9. Sam Stosur, Australia, 4475 10. Marion Bartoli, France, 3700 11. Caroline Wozniacki, Denmark, 3695 12. Ana Ivanovic, Serbia, 3145 13. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, 3060 14. Nadia Petrova, Russia, 2845 15. Maria Kirilenko, Russia, 2618 16. Roberta Vinci, Italy, 2480 17. Kaia Kanepi, Estonia, 2389 18. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, 2215 19. Varvara Lepchenko, United States, 1855 20. Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, 1766 21. Julia Goerges, Germany, 1760 22. Zheng Jie, China, 1705 23. Flavia Pennetta, Italy, 1690 24. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, 1675 25. Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium, 1675 26. Jelena Jankovic, Serbia, 1626 27. Tamira Paszek, Austria, 1612 28. Sabine Lisicki, Germany, 1588 29. Sorana Cirstea, Romania, 1571 30. Christina McHale, United States, 1556

GA 25 44 36 40 37 39 49 36 43 59 GA 39 34 43 31 40 41 46 52 49

WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-3) Eastern Conference Connecticut 2, New York 0 Thursday, Sept. 27: Connecticut 65, New York 60 Saturday, Sept. 29: Connecticut 75, New York 62 Atlanta 1, Indiana 1 Friday Sept. 28: Atlanta 75, Indiana 66 Sunday, Sept. 30: Indiana 103, Atlanta 88 Today, Oct. 2: Atlanta at Indiana, 4 p.m. Western Conference Minnesota 1, Seattle 1 Friday, Sept. 28: Minnesota 78, Seattle 70 Sunday, Sept. 30: Seattle 86, Minnesota 79 Today, Oct. 2: Seattle at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Los Angeles 2, San Antonio 0 Thursday, Sept. 27: Los Angeles 93, San Antonio 86 Saturday, Sept. 29: Los Angeles 101, San Antonio 94

BASEBALL MLB MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL ——— Monday’s Boxscores

Astros 3, Cubs 0 BI 0 1 0

BB 1 0 0

SO 0 0 0

ERA 3.76 2.53 5.45 3.31 ERA 4.82 3.97 3.25 3.40 3.48

AB 4 5 4 3 0 1 0 0 5 3 4 3 1 1 0 2 0 36

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

H 0 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 11

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 3

Avg. .289 .294 .308 .255 --.241 --.150 .225 .213 .165 .230 .000 .259 .000 .263 ---

Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Petersen lf 2 0 0 0 2 1 .192 G.Hernandez cf 3 0 3 0 1 0 .189 Reyes ss 2 0 0 1 1 0 .284 Stanton rf 4 1 1 1 0 3 .290 Ca.Lee 1b 2 1 1 0 2 0 .265 Brantly c 4 0 1 1 0 1 .295 D.Solano 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .296 Velazquez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .240 LeBlanc p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .083 b-Cousins ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .167 Koehler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Da.Jennings p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Webb p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 e-Kearns ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .245 H.Bell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Dobbs ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .287 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 26 3 8 3 9 6 New York 000 011 000 — 2 11 0 Miami 000 001 11x — 3 8 1 a-reached on error for Familia in the 5th. b-walked for LeBlanc in the 5th. c-doubled for El.Ramirez in the 6th. d-singled for Acosta in the 7th. e-walked for Webb in the 7th. f-singled for H.Bell in the 8th. E—Velazquez (2). LOB—New York 12, Miami 10. 2B—Shoppach (2), Baxter (14), Brantly (8). 3B—G.Hernandez (3). HR—Stanton (37), off Acosta. SB—D.Wright (15), An.Torres (13). DP—New York 2; Miami 1.

BASKETBALL

H 1 1 0

.000 .247 .243 .227 .253 .294 .257 .217 .153 --.203

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. DeJesus cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .264 Sappelt rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .281 Rizzo 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .288 A.Soriano lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .262 S.Castro ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .284 Valbuena 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .221 W.Castillo c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .271 Barney 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Berken p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 J.Chapman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-B.Jackson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .174 Russell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Camp p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-LaHair ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .257 d-Mather ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .209 Marmol p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 29 0 2 0 1 11 Houston 010 100 010 — 3 7 0 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 2 0 a-struck out for J.Chapman in the 5th. b-struck out for J.Valdez in the 8th. c-was announced for Camp in the 8th. d-struck out for LaHair in the 8th. LOB—Houston 4, Chicago 3. 2B—Maxwell (12), Rizzo (15). 3B—Dominguez (2). HR—F.Martinez (6), off Berken. DP—Chicago 1.

New York Tejada ss Dan.Murphy 2b D.Wright 3b Hairston rf Acosta p d-Duda ph Rauch p F.Lewis rf I.Davis 1b Shoppach c Bay lf An.Torres cf Familia p a-R.Cedeno ph El.Ramirez p c-Baxter ph-rf R.Ramirez p Totals

MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts GF x-Sporting Kansas City 17 7 7 58 39 New York 15 8 8 53 54 Chicago 16 9 5 53 42 D.C. 15 10 6 51 48 Houston 13 8 10 49 44 Columbus 14 11 6 48 39 Montreal 12 15 4 40 44 Philadelphia 8 15 6 30 31 New England 7 16 8 29 37 Toronto FC 5 19 7 22 35 Western Conference W L T Pts GF x-San Jose 18 6 7 61 65 x-Real Salt Lake 16 11 4 52 44 x-Los Angeles 15 11 5 50 55 x-Seattle 13 7 10 49 45 Vancouver 10 12 9 39 31 FC Dallas 9 12 10 37 38 Colorado 9 18 4 31 39 Portland 7 15 9 30 32 Chivas USA 7 16 7 28 21 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. x- clinched playoff berth ——— Wednesday’s Games Philadelphia at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Chivas USA at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games D.C. United at Toronto FC, 10 a.m. Chicago at New York, 12:30 p.m. New England at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Montreal at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Los Angeles, 6 p.m. San Jose at Colorado, 6 p.m. Sunday’s Games Sporting Kansas City at Columbus, 1 p.m. FC Dallas at Chivas USA, 4 p.m. Portland at Seattle FC, 6 p.m.

R 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 7 3 1 5

Marlins 3, Mets 2

SOCCER

AB 3 4 0

0 4 3 1 3 4 4 3 2 0 1 32

Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP Harrell W, 11-11 6 2 0 0 1 7 98 J.Valdez H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 Rodriguez H, 13 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 8 W.Wright S, 1-2 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 18 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP Berken L, 0-3 4 2-3 4 2 2 1 2 61 J.Chapman 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 Russell 2 0 0 0 0 0 24 Camp 1 2 1 1 0 1 20 Marmol 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 T—2:42. A—32,167 (41,009).

ATP World Tour Rankings Through Sept. 30 q-qualified for ATP World Tour Finals, London, Nov. 5-12 Singles 1. q-Roger Federer, Switzerland, 11805 2. q-Novak Djokovic, Serbia, 10470 3. q-Andy Murray, Britain, 8410 4. q-Rafael Nadal, Spain, 7385 5. David Ferrer, Spain, 5960 6. Tomas Berdych, Czech Republic, 4965 7. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, France, 4520 8. Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina, 3850 9. Janko Tipsarevic, Serbia, 3185 10. Juan Monaco, Argentina, 2775 11. John Isner, United States, 2610 12. Nicolas Almagro, Spain, 2515 13. Marin Cilic, Croatia, 2455 14. Richard Gasquet, France, 2370 15. Milos Raonic, Canada, 2090 16. Stanislas Wawrinka, Switzerland, 1865 17. Kei Nishikori, Japan, 1865 18. Gilles Simon, France, 1860 19. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, 1855 20. Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, 1745 21. Tommy Haas, Germany, 1553 22. Mardy Fish, United States, 1535 23. Fernando Verdasco, Spain, 1525 24. Marcel Granollers, Spain, 1510 25. Andreas Seppi, Italy, 1495 26. Sam Querrey, United States, 1440 27. Andy Roddick, United States, 1420 28. Mikhail Youzhny, Russia, 1335 29. Florian Mayer, Germany, 1295 30. Feliciano Lopez, Spain, 1220

Houston Altuve 2b S.Moore rf Fe.Rodriguez p

W.Wright p Lowrie ss F.Martinez lf Maxwell lf Wallace 1b Dominguez 3b J.Castro c B.Barnes cf Harrell p J.Valdez p b-Bogusevic ph-rf Totals

Avg. .291 .260 .000

New York IP H R ER BB SO NP Familia 4 1 0 0 6 3 75 El.Ramirez 1 1 0 0 1 0 18 Acosta H, 3 1 2 1 1 0 1 12 Rauch BS, 4-8 1 1 1 1 1 1 20 R.Ramirez L, 3-4 1 3 1 1 1 1 28 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP LeBlanc 5 7 1 0 2 2 95 Koehler 2-3 3 1 1 0 0 21 Da.Jennings 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 Webb 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 H.Bell W, 4-5 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 Cishek S, 15-19 1 0 0 0 0 0 19 T—3:16. A—24,543 (37,442).

ERA 5.84 5.66 6.65 3.61 4.24 ERA 3.67 5.40 1.93 4.10 4.95 2.73

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL National League MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Promoted Dan Larrea to senior director-team travel. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association ATLANTA HAWKS—Signed G-F Isma’il Muhammad. CHICAGO BULLS — Signed coach Tom Thibodeau to a four-year contract extension through the 2016-17 season. DETROIT PISTONS — Signed G Terrence Williams and G Johnny Flynn. OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER — Signed G Walker Russell. PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Picked up the contract option coach Doug Collins for the 2013-14 season. FOOTBALL National Football League DENVER BRONCOS — Placed C J.D. Watson on injured reserve. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Signed C A.Q. Shipley from the practice squad. Released LB Mario Addison. Released CB D.J. Johnson from the practice squad. Signed CB Marshay Green to the practice squad. NEW YORK JETS — Agreed to terms with CB Aaron Berry. ST. LOUIS RAMS — Released C Chase Beeler from the practice squad. Signed T Ty Nsekhe to the practice squad. COLLEGE SOUTHLAND CONFERENCE — Signed commissioner Tom Burnett to a contract extension through the 2015-16 academic year. CLEMSON — Named Lisa Chan athletic performance team’s sports nutritionist. RADFORD — Named Scott Bennett strength and conditioning coach. SHENANDOAH — Promoted Allen Corbin to men’s full-time assistant basketball coach. SOUTH FLORIDA — Suspended sophomore WR Chris Dunkley from the football team after he was arrested and charged with domestic battery. UTAH—Announced C David Foster will undergo foot surgery that will end his college career.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,363 1,124 889 259 The Dalles 2,212 1,956 1,481 413 John Day 2,510 2,282 2,020 647 McNary 2,888 1,247 1,866 533 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 571,059 130,598 223,226 81,718 The Dalles 393,466 110,453 180,724 64,015 John Day 319,999 95,689 134,190 50,704 McNary 317,143 50,502 121,182 41,310


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

NFL

D3

MOTOR SPORTS: NASCAR

Seattle not making QB switch just yet Bowyer By Tim Booth The Associated Press

RENTON, Wash. — Despite the continued struggles of the Seattle Seahawks offense and the worst passing production in the NFL, Pete Carroll is not ready to make a switch from rookie Russell Wilson at quarterback. Carroll said Monday that Wilson remains the Seahawks’ best option despite throwing three interceptions in Sunday’s 19-13 loss in St. Louis. Seattle’s passing offense is last in the league with just 523 net yards in four games. Wilson is completing 60 percent of his passes, but the big chunks of yardage are largely missing. “We’re going with Russell right now,” Carroll said. “He’s working his tail off to get it right, and where all of the focus that goes to the quarterback position, there’s a lot of guys that figure into what’s going on, and he’s one of them. So we’re just trying to get better.” Potentially this would be a chance for Seattle (2-2) to consider giving backup Matt Flynn an opportunity after both of Seattle’s losses have been somewhat due to problems with the passing game. In the opener at Arizona, the Seahawks offensive line failed to protect Wilson adequately, while his three interceptions in Sunday’s loss to the Rams were his first since the season opener. But any decision to give Flynn a chance is also complicated because the Seahawks are unsure whether a sore elbow that limited

Flynn at the end of the preseason would be fully able to handle the starter’s workload. Carroll said on his weekly radio show on 710 KIRO-AM, that Flynn is not fully healthy, even though he has not been listed on any injury reports since the first week of the regular season. Later in the afternoon, Carroll tried to clarify his comments, saying that Flynn is healthy enough to enter a game if needed, but unsure if his elbow could handle the full strain of all the throws a starter must make during the week of game preparations. “Matt’s ready to play. We just don’t know what’s going to happen when he gets a lot of work. He might be all right, we don’t know that, but we have not taken him there yet,” Carroll said. “But no, he’s ready to play in every game and he’s ready to go in the very next play if we need him.” Flynn signed a three-year deal with the Seahawks in the offseason, but lost out on the starting job to Wilson during training camp. His most extensive work since the end of the preseason came two weeks ago when he mimicked former Green Bay teammate Aaron Rodgers during practice in preparation for the Seahawks’ game against the Packers. Otherwise, Flynn’s been limited in his throws. Wilson was 17 of 25 for 160 yards against the Rams with three costly interceptions that weren’t entirely his fault. One pick

Tom Gannam / The Associated Press

Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson threw three interceptions during Sunday’s 19-13 loss to St. Louis.

deflected off the hands of Doug Baldwin, and Wilson was hit as he threw on another. The final interception came as Seattle was trying to put together

a winning drive in the final minute. Taking the snap at the St. Louis 35 with 1:08 remaining, Wilson had both Baldwin and tight end Anthony McCoy open. He opted for the longer throw toward the sideline, only to see McCoy tumble to the turf as he came out of his break. The throw fell into the arms of waiting defensive back Bradley Fletcher, and the Seahawks fell to 0-2 on the road this season. “I think we did all we could. We still need work. Not only Russell, but everybody. Our whole offense. Right now it’s not looking too good,” Seattle receiver Sidney Rice said after Sunday’s game. “We’re way better than what we’re showing on the field. The way we practice every week, we’ve got to make that stuff carry over to the field. It’s getting kind of depressing now.” Third down was one of the glaring areas where the passing game struggles were noticeable. Wilson missed all three pass attempts on third down and was sacked two other times. Seattle’s only two third-down conversions in the loss came when Wilson ran for 2 yards and Lynch rumbled for 8, both in third-and-1 situations. But the third-down problems weren’t limited to the offense. Defensively, the Seahawks gave up five third-down conversions to the Rams, but all five were of at least 10 yards or more. All five of the third-and-long conversions came on St. Louis drives that eventually led to points.

Cowboys can’t beat Bears’ D By Stephen Hawkins The Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas — Those 30-something defenders for the Chicago Bears showed Tony Romo how much they can still play. Lance Briggs and Charles Tillman, two of the five defensive starters for Chicago in their 30s, returned interceptions for touchdowns, and the Bears beat the Dallas Cowboys 34-18 on Monday night. Though Romo was only sacked once, on the Cowboys’ opening series, he was pressured relentlessly and threw five interceptions. That matched his career high, set five years ago in his first full season as a starter. “Just outstanding play by our defense,” Bears coach Lovie Smith said. “Seems like everybody had a say. Those were all good plays.” Briggs’ 74-yard interception return came in a wild two-play exchange of turnovers midway through the third quarter. “I got the ball, I just tried to score,” said Briggs, who had not returned a pick for a touchdown since 2005. “I needed to get in the end zone.” Bears quarterback Jay Cutler was nearly flawless after halftime, when he completed 11 of 12 passes for 219 yards

and two touchdowns. That included a 34-yard score to Devin Hester to start the half and a 31-yarder to Brandon Marshall with 6½ minutes left. Cutler was 18 of 24 overall for 275 yards. Marshall had seven catches for 138 yards. Major Wright, who returned an interception for a touchdown in Chicago’s last game, had two of the five interceptions. D.J. Moore has nine career interceptions, three of them against Romo after getting another one Monday night. Chicago’s first fumble of the season came when Cutler was sacked by DeMarcus Ware and Victor Butler recovered at the Bears 27. On the very next play, Romo was trying to escape pressure when he was hit from behind by Henry Melton. The ball popped forward into the air and Briggs grabbed it and rumbled for his first interception return for a score since 2005 to put the Bears (3-1) ahead 24-7. Once again, the Cowboys (2-2) are a .500 team. They are also one of the lowest-scoring team in the NFL with only 65 points. Since the start of the 1997 season, Dallas is 122-122 in regular-season games.

Sharon Ellman / The Associated Press

Chicago Bears’ Lance Briggs (55) celebrates a sack by Henry Melton (69) against Dallas Cowboys’ Tony Romo during Monday’s game in Arlington, Texas.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Huskies look for second straight top-10 win The Associated Press the past,” coach Steve Sarkisian said. SEATTLE — After knocking off “I think teams in the past we had guys Stanford for the first time in four seawho had lived through a whole bunch sons, the Washington Huskies are of adversity in the past and all that. looking toward getting another monWe’ve got the majority of this roster is key off their backs. here with the expectation that we are Next up The No. 2 Oregon Ducks. going to win a championship in their Washington moved into the AP Washington time here and that’s what their focus poll at No. 23 after a 17-13 win over at Oregon is.” the then-No. 8 Cardinal on Thursday The Huskies played Oregon tough • When: night. Washington’s defense showed a in the first half each of the past two Saturday, tenacity that has been missing for the years before the Ducks ran away in 7:30 p.m. better part of the past decade in the the second half. The tempo of Oregon’s win, holding Stanford’s power rushing • TV: ESPN offense wore down the Washington deattack to just 65 yards a week after the • Radio: KBND- fense and opened up big play opportuCardinal ran for 202 yards in a 21-14 AM 1110 nities for the Ducks. win over USC. “They run really good football plays. Next up is a trip to Autzen Stadium and an But the reality of it is those plays become even opponent that hasn’t been kind to the Huskies. better when you are wrong on defense and you Oregon has won the past eight meetings be- make mistakes, and you get out of your gap tween the two teams by an average of 25 points and maybe you are a little bit fatigued, and a game. maybe you don’t get the call and communicate Being ranked hasn’t been kind to Washing- as well with the guy next to you,” Sarkisian ton in recent years either. The last two times the said. Huskies were in the Top 25, they suffered blowSarkisian feels the Huskies are better out losses to Stanford, including a 65-21 loss equipped to handle the Ducks from a depth last season. standpoint this year. In his fourth year as head “This is a different team than we’ve had in coach, Sarkisian believes they have recruited

more speed on defense to counter the athleticism of Oregon’s skill players. The hope is the added depth allows them to be in the game with a chance to win in the fourth quarter. Improved tackling was a key to Washington’s victory over Stanford. The team has put an emphasis on better tackling this year, with practices being more physical and players having more contact. It’s a trend the Huskies will need to continue if they hope to knock off a top10 team for the second straight week. “We felt like that was something we needed to do from a team standpoint,” Sarkisian said. “If we were going to be able to defend the run. If we wanted to run the football the way we were capable of and ultimately tackle that way, you have to practice it. You can’t just expect to show up on Saturdays and expect to become a really good tackling team.” While both Oregon and Stanford rely on their running games, the styles couldn’t be more different. Stanford uses multiple tight ends and runs power schemes to take advantage of the Cardinal’s size. Oregon is all about speed. “They are different in how they do it but at the end of the day they both believe in running the football and utilizing play-action pass,” Sarkisian said.

believes he is ready to pounce at Talladega By Jenna Fryer The Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — It doesn’t take long to thin the field of championship contenders in the Chase for the Sprint Cup, and some believe it has already been reduced to a three-driver race. Clint Bowyer begs to differ. Bowyer has had a pretty nice start to the Chase, finishing inside the top 10 in all three races. But it’s not been enough in the points standings, where he is seemingly spinning his tires despite decent finishes. He is fourth in the standings, 25 points behind leader Brad Keselowski, but certain he’s still in the title race. Why? Because Round 4 of the Chase is at Talladega Superspeedway, where Bowyer is the two-time defending race winner. “This weekend is everything,” Bowyer said Monday. Bowyer “Talladega is the one that’s going to make the difference.” Everybody considers Talladega the wild card of the 10-race Chase because the smallest mistake in a restrictor plate race can have devastating consequences. Five-time NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson knows that all too well — he’s yet to finish a plate race this season through no fault of his own. Johnson was collected in an accident on the second lap of the Daytona 500, suffered an engine failure at Talladega in the spring and was in yet another accident at Daytona in July. Most title contenders are on pins and needles at Talladega, where they worry the championship can be lost because of another drivers’ error. Bowyer believes that’s going to work to his advantage, especially with everyone assuming only Keselowski, Johnson and Denny Hamlin are left as viable title contenders. “I’m going in there with the confidence of knowing I’ve won the last two, and I am a guy who needs a good run to get myself back in the championship,” he said. “The other three are looking over their shoulder, knowing they can’t get into trouble. But I’m going there to make a run at this thing. “And it’s not only me, but there’s three or four behind me who could pull all of us back in the running.” Only 17 points separate Bowyer from Michael Waltrip Racing teammate Martin Truex Jr., who is eighth in points. Wedged between the MWR drivers is three-time NASCAR champion Tony Stewart, Kasey Kahne and five-time Talladega winner Dale Earnhardt Jr. But it’s so hard to make up significant ground in the Chase, as Jeff Gordon has shown the past two weeks. He opened the Chase ranked 12th and a wreck in the opener at Chicago cost him. Gordon has bounced back with a third-place finish and a second-place finish the past two weeks, but he’s still 10th in the standings. That’s why Bowyer believes Talladega is so critical. He thinks any trouble for the top three drivers opens the door for everyone else. “If you win Talladega, it doesn’t matter what has already happened, you are going to put yourself right back in it,” he said. On paper, he’d be the pick for Sunday. Bowyer has two wins and is the only driver to finish inside the top 10 in his past five Talladega starts. He’s scored a seriesbest 465 points in that span, and his 3.4 average finish is also tops. Bowyer has led 82 laps, second only to Matt Kenseth’s 116. But the racing is different now that NASCAR has set rules designed to eliminate the two-car tandem drafting that Bowyer has mastered. And, he won his races with Chevrolet horsepower driving for Richard Childress Racing, and he’s still adapting in his first season with MWR and Toyota engines. He was debating Talladega strategy hours after Sunday’s ninth-place finish at Dover, and said how he races will depend on how he qualifies. A poor qualifying run, for example, would start Bowyer deep in the field and the best strategy would be to hang back to avoid an early accident. Problems on Sunday — and he expects more than a few Chase drivers to have some — could thin the field even more. “You know, Darrell Waltrip said it best, he said each week there’s another team that takes themselves out of the championship hunt until there’s just a couple left,” Bowyer said. “Nobody has gone out there yet and taken control, everybody stubs their toe and takes themselves out of it one at a time. Talladega is going to be a place where that happens, and it’s my chance to capitalize when it happens.”

Next up Good Sam Roadside Assistance 500 • When: Sunday, 11 a.m. • TV: ESPN


D4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

MA JOR L E AGUE BASEBA LL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

AL Boxscores Angels 8, Mariners 4 Los Angeles Trout cf-lf Tor.Hunter rf Bourjos cf Pujols 1b K.Morales dh Callaspo 3b Trumbo lf-rf 1-Calhoun pr-rf H.Kendrick 2b M.Izturis ss Iannetta c Totals

AB 5 4 0 5 5 4 5 0 4 5 3 40

R 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 2 0 8

H 4 2 0 2 0 0 2 0 4 2 0 16

BI 3 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 8

BB 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 4

American League SO 0 2 0 1 2 1 3 0 0 0 1 10

Avg. .325 .314 .226 .289 .270 .255 .267 .190 .286 .254 .242

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ackley 2b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .229 C.Wells rf 5 2 2 1 0 2 .227 Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .256 J.Montero dh 5 1 1 0 0 1 .256 Smoak 1b 3 1 1 1 2 1 .215 M.Saunders cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Olivo c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .222 T.Robinson lf 3 0 1 1 1 0 .219 Ryan ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .194 a-Thames ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .232 b-Triunfel ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Totals 37 4 9 3 5 9 Los Angeles 300 103 001 — 8 16 2 Seattle 100 000 300 — 4 9 2 a-was announced for Ryan in the 7th. b-lined out for Thames in the 7th. 1-ran for Trumbo in the 9th. E—H.Kendrick 2 (14), T.Robinson (2), Triunfel (1). LOB—Los Angeles 9, Seattle 11. 2B—Trout (26), Pujols (50), H.Kendrick (32), C.Wells (12), Smoak (13), Olivo (14). 3B—Trout (8). HR—C.Wells (9), off C.Wilson. DP—Los Angeles 1; Seattle 1. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Wilson W, 13-106 1-3 6 3 2 5 7 107 3.83 Richards 1-3 2 1 0 0 0 22 4.69 Maronde H, 3 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 3 1.59 Jepsen H, 18 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 3.02 Frieri 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 2.32 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hernandez L, 13-9 5 1-3 12 7 7 3 7 98 3.06 Kinney 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.94 Noesi 3 3 1 1 1 2 50 5.82 Maronde pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—3:19. A—13,963 (47,860).

White Sox 11, Indians 0 Chicago Wise cf Youkilis 3b Jo.Lopez 1b A.Dunn dh 1-Jor.Danks pr-rf Konerko 1b 2-Olmedo pr-3b Rios rf Septimo p Pierzynski c Viciedo lf Al.Ramirez ss Beckham 2b Totals

AB 6 5 0 4 0 4 0 5 0 4 4 5 5 42

R 2 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 11

H 2 1 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2 2 1 1 15

BI 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 5 1 0 11

BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 4

SO 3 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 11

Avg. .262 .235 .243 .206 .220 .299 .226 .304 --.278 .252 .265 .234

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .284 a-Neal ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Kipnis 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .256 b-C.Phelps ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .241 As.Cabrera ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .273 c-Lillibridge ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .197 C.Santana c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .253 Canzler dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .291 Brantley cf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .287 LaPorta 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .241 Chisenhall 3b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .271 Rottino lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .111 Totals 28 0 2 0 1 12 Chicago 000 004 016 — 11 15 0 Cleveland 000 000 000 — 0 2 1 a-was hit by a pitch for Choo in the 9th. b-singled for Kipnis in the 9th. c-struck out for As.Cabrera in the 9th. 1-ran for A.Dunn in the 9th. 2-ran for Konerko in the 9th. E—Chisenhall (5). LOB—Chicago 8, Cleveland 4. HR—Viciedo (23), off Maine. SB—Wise (18). DP—Chicago 1; Cleveland 1. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA H.Santiago W, 4-1 7 1 0 0 1 10 108 3.33 Crain 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.44 Septimo 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 5.54 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kluber L, 2-5 5 2-3 5 4 4 2 6 96 5.14 J.Smith 1 2 0 0 0 1 16 3.00 S.Barnes 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 4.50 C.Allen 2-3 2 1 1 1 1 28 3.77 E.Rogers 1-3 4 4 4 0 0 21 3.12 Maine 1 2 2 2 1 2 30 10.50 E.Rogers pitched to 4 batters in the 9th. T—3:02. A—14,756 (43,429).

Athletics 4, Rangers 3 Texas Kinsler 2b Andrus ss Hamilton cf Beltre dh N.Cruz rf Mi.Young 3b Dav.Murphy lf Napoli c Moreland 1b Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 33

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 3

H 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 1 1 6

BI 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 3

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

SO 2 0 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 11

Avg. .258 .289 .286 .319 .260 .275 .303 .232 .273

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Crisp cf 4 2 2 1 0 0 .262 J.Gomes dh 4 0 2 0 0 1 .260 Cespedes lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .290 Carter 1b 1 1 0 0 1 1 .239 a-Moss ph-1b 1 0 1 1 0 0 .287 Reddick rf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .244 Donaldson 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .237 Drew ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250 D.Norris c 3 0 1 0 1 1 .192 Rosales 2b 2 1 1 0 0 1 .227 b-Pennington ph-2b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .218 Totals 31 4 9 3 4 7 Texas 001 100 100 — 3 6 0 Oakland 200 020 00x — 4 9 0 a-hit a sacrifice fly for Carter in the 5th. b-singled for Rosales in the 6th. LOB—Texas 5, Oakland 8. 2B—Crisp (24), Rosales (5). HR—Mi.Young (8), off J.Parker; Napoli (24), off J.Parker. SB—Crisp (39). DP—Texas 1. Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP M.Perez L, 1-4 4 6 4 4 2 3 69 Feldman 1 2-3 1 0 0 2 3 37 Kirkman 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 Uehara 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 Oswalt 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP J.Parker W, 13-8 6 6 3 3 2 6 94 Doolittle H, 16 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 R.Cook H, 19 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 Balfour S, 23-25 1 0 0 0 0 3 12 J.Parker pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. M.Perez pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. T—3:03. A—21,162 (35,067).

ERA 5.45 5.09 3.89 1.82 5.83 ERA 3.47 3.18 2.14 2.60

Rays 5, Orioles 3 Baltimore McLouth lf Hardy ss C.Davis rf Ad.Jones cf Wieters c 2-Avery pr Thome dh Mar.Reynolds 1b Flaherty 2b a-Andino ph-2b b-En.Chavez ph Machado 3b Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 4 0 3 4 2 1 1 3 33

R 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 0 2 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BI 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 2 1 1 0 2 2 1 0 0 1 10

Avg. .274 .240 .272 .288 .250 .223 .277 .224 .224 .211 .203 .267

Tampa Bay De.Jennings lf B.Upton cf Zobrist ss Longoria 3b Keppinger 1b 1-Thompson pr C.Pena 1b B.Francisco dh Fuld rf R.Roberts 2b C.Gimenez c J.Molina c

AB 4 4 4 2 3 0 1 2 4 3 3 0

R 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0

H 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0

BB 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0

Avg. .248 .247 .273 .283 .328 .091 .199 .236 .266 .215 .253 .223

National League

East Division W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away z-New York 93 67 .581 — — 6-4 W-2 49-30 44-37 z-Baltimore 92 68 .575 1 — 6-4 L-1 47-34 45-34 Tampa Bay 89 71 .556 4 3 9-1 W-3 45-34 44-37 Toronto 71 89 .444 22 21 5-5 W-1 39-40 32-49 Boston 69 91 .431 24 23 1-9 L-6 34-47 35-44 Central Division W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away x-Detroit 87 73 .544 — — 7-3 W-3 50-31 37-42 Chicago 84 76 .525 3 8 3-7 W-1 45-36 39-40 Kansas City 71 89 .444 16 21 2-8 L-2 36-43 35-46 Cleveland 67 93 .419 20 25 5-5 L-1 36-43 31-50 Minnesota 66 94 .413 21 26 4-6 L-3 31-50 35-44 West Division W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away z-Texas 93 67 .581 — — 4-6 L-1 50-31 43-36 z-Oakland 92 68 .575 1 — 7-3 W-4 48-31 44-37 Los Angeles 89 71 .556 4 3 8-2 W-1 46-35 43-36 Seattle 73 87 .456 20 19 3-7 L-4 38-41 35-46 z-clinched playoff berth; x-clinched division; y-clinched wild card Monday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 10, Boston 2 Chicago White Sox 11, Cleveland 0 Toronto 6, Minnesota 5, 10 innings Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 3 Detroit 6, Kansas City 3 Oakland 4, Texas 3 L.A. Angels 8, Seattle 4

East Division Pct GB WCGB .600 — — .581 3 — .506 15 6 .456 23 14 .425 28 19 Central Division W L Pct GB WCGB x-Cincinnati 96 64 .600 — — St. Louis 87 73 .544 9 — Milwaukee 82 78 .513 14 5 Pittsburgh 78 82 .488 18 9 Chicago 60 100 .375 36 27 Houston 54 106 .338 42 33 West Division W L Pct GB WCGB x-San Francisco 93 67 .581 — — Los Angeles 85 75 .531 8 2 Arizona 80 80 .500 13 7 San Diego 75 85 .469 18 12 Colorado 63 97 .394 30 24

x-Washington y-Atlanta Philadelphia New York Miami

Today’s Games Boston (Lester 9-14) at N.Y. Yankees (D.Phelps 4-4), 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Peavy 11-12) at Cleveland (Masterson 11-15), 4:05 p.m. Minnesota (Swarzak 3-5) at Toronto (Jenkins 0-3), 4:07 p.m. Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 8-4) at Tampa Bay (Shields 15-9), 4:10 p.m. Detroit (Fister 10-9) at Kansas City (Guthrie 4-3), 5:10 p.m. Texas (M.Harrison 18-10) at Oakland (Blackley 5-4), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Haren 12-12) at Seattle (Iwakuma 8-5), 7:10 p.m.

W 96 93 81 73 68

L 64 67 79 87 92

Monday’s Games Pittsburgh 2, Atlanta 1 Philadelphia 2, Washington 0 Miami 3, N.Y. Mets 2 Houston 3, Chicago Cubs 0 Milwaukee 5, San Diego 3 St. Louis 4, Cincinnati 2 Colorado 7, Arizona 5, 13 innings L.A. Dodgers 3, San Francisco 2

L10 5-5 7-3 5-5 6-4 2-8

Str Home Away L-2 48-31 48-33 L-1 48-33 45-34 W-3 40-41 41-38 L-3 36-45 37-42 W-1 37-42 31-50

L10 5-5 7-3 4-6 4-6 2-8 6-4

Str Home Away L-1 50-31 46-33 W-2 49-30 38-43 W-1 48-31 34-47 W-1 44-35 34-47 L-1 37-42 23-58 W-2 35-46 19-60

L10 6-4 8-2 5-5 3-7 5-5

Str Home Away L-1 48-33 45-34 W-6 44-35 41-40 L-2 40-39 40-41 L-2 42-39 33-46 W-1 35-46 28-51

Today’s Games Atlanta (Hanson 13-9) at Pittsburgh (Correia 11-11), 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia (Rosenberg 1-2) at Washington (G.Gonzalez 21-8), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Dickey 20-6) at Miami (Ja. Turner 1-4), 4:10 p.m. Houston (B.Norris 6-13) at Chicago Cubs (Volstad 3-11), 5:05 p.m. San Diego (Bass 2-7) at Milwaukee (Thornburg 0-0), 5:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Latos 13-4) at St. Louis (C.Carpenter 0-1), 5:15 p.m. Colorado (Chacin 3-5) at Arizona (Corbin 6-8), 6:40 p.m. San Francisco (Zito 14-8) at L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 12-11), 7:10 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Tigers 6, Royals 3: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Miguel Cabrera had four hits, including a homer during a five-run sixth inning, and Detroit held off Kansas City to clinch the AL Central title. Gerald Laird added a bases-loaded double, Rick Porcello (10-12) pitched shutout ball into the sixth inning and Jhonny Peralta went deep off Bruce Chen (11-14) to help Detroit reach the postseason in consecutive years for the first time since 1934-35. • Yankees 10, Red Sox 2: NEW YORK — Robinson Cano, Curtis Granderson, Russell Martin and Mark Teixeira homered in a nine-run second inning, and New York routed Boston to open a one-game lead over Baltimore in the AL East with two games to play. Baltimore lost at Tampa Bay and dropped into second place. • Athletics 4, Rangers 3: OAKLAND, Calif. — Coco Crisp’s latest clutch hit helped put Oakland back in the playoffs for the first time in six years, and the Athletics beat first-place Texas to remain in contention for a division crown. Crisp had a go-ahead RBI double in the fifth as Oakland (92-68) pulled within one game of Texas (93-67) in the AL West race with two to go and moved into a tie with Baltimore for the American League’s top wild card. • Angels 8, Mariners 4: SEATTLE — Mike Trout had four hits and drove in three runs in Los Angeles’ victory over Seattle, but it was not enough to keep the Angels in the playoff chase. The Angels were eliminated from the wild-card race after Oakland’s victory over Texas. • Rays 5, Orioles 3: ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Alex Cobb allowed two hits over seven innings, however, Tampa Bay was eliminated from the postseason despite its victory over Baltimore. Ben Zobrist hit his 20th homer and Chris Giminez had a two-run double off Wei-Yin Chen (12-11) as the Rays pulled away from a 1-all tie in the seventh. • White Sox 11, Indians 0: CLEVELAND — White Sox rookie Hector Santiago allowed one hit in seven shutout innings to beat Cleveland, but Chicago was eliminated from postseason contention when Detroit defeated Kansas City. • Blue Jays 6, Twins 5: TORONTO — Anthony Gose singled home the winning run in the 10th inning and Toronto rallied to beat Minnesota.

• Phillies 2, Nationals 0: WASHINGTON — Thanks to strong pitching from Gio Gonzalez and Stephen Strasburg, Bryce Harper’s burst of energy and Adam LaRoche’s slugging, Washington won enough from April through September that even a loss on the first day of October could not stop them from clinching the NL East. Despite being beaten by Philadelphia, the Nationals earned their first division title since moving from Montreal in 2005, because second-place Atlanta lost at Pittsburgh. • Cardinals 4, Reds 2: ST. LOUIS — Jaime Garcia homered off Bronson Arroyo and pitched into the seventh inning, helping St. Louis clinch a tie for the second NL wild card and spoil Dusty Baker’s return from a mini-stroke. The defending World Series champions have won 11 of 14 and lead the Dodgers by two with two games to play. • Pirates 2, Braves 1: PITTSBURGH — Atlanta’s hopes of winning the National League East ended with a loss to Pittsburgh. The Braves, who needed to sweep the Pirates and have first-place Washington drop three games to Philadelphia to tie for the division lead, will instead be the top wild card team and host the wild card game Friday. • Dodgers 3, Giants 2: LOS ANGELES — Elian Herrera singled in the go-ahead run in the bottom of the ninth inning, lifting the Los Angeles Dodgers to a victory over San Francisco that kept their postseason hopes alive. The Dodgers’ sixth consecutive victory tied a season high and kept them two games behind St. Louis for the second NL wild card. • Marlins 3, Mets 2: MIAMI — Giancarlo Stanton hit his 37th homer, and Rob Brantly hit a tiebreaking RBI double in the eighth inning to help Miami beat the New York Mets. • Astros 3, Cubs 0: CHICAGO — The Chicago Cubs got their 100th loss of the season when Lucas Harrell threw six shutout innings to lead Houston to a win. • Brewers 5, Padres 3: MILWAUKEE — Carlos Gomez, Rickie Weeks and Jonathan Lucroy all hit home runs to lead Milwaukee to a win over San Diego. • Rockies 7, Diamondbacks 5: PHOENIX — Chris Nelson drove home Tyler Colvin to start a four-run rally in the 13th inning and Colorado hung on for a victory over Arizona.

Totals 30 5 7 5 3 4 Baltimore 000 000 102 — 3 6 1 Tampa Bay 000 100 31x — 5 7 1 a-flied out for Flaherty in the 8th. b-grounded out for Andino in the 9th. 1-ran for Keppinger in the 7th. 2-ran for Wieters in the 9th. E—Machado (5), Longoria (8). LOB—Baltimore 5, Tampa Bay 5. 2B—B.Upton (29), C.Gimenez (4). HR—Wieters (23), off Cobb; C.Davis (32), off Farnsworth; Zobrist (20), off W.Chen. SB—McLouth (12). DP—Baltimore 1. Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA W.Chen L, 12-11 6 2-3 6 4 1 1 4 101 4.02 Ayala 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 2.66 Strop 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 13 2.45 Patton 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 12 2.43 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cobb W, 11-9 7 2 1 1 2 7 88 4.03 McGee H, 19 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 1.99 Farnsworth 0 2 2 2 0 0 6 4.00 Rodney S, 47-49 1 2 0 0 0 2 18 0.61 Farnsworth pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. T—2:49. A—13,666 (34,078).

Yankees 10, Red Sox 2 Boston Ciriaco 2b Nava lf C.Ross rf M.Gomez 1b Lavarnway dh Saltalamacchia c Valencia 3b Lin cf Iglesias ss Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 4 2 3 3 3 30

R 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 4

BI 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 8

Avg. .286 .247 .267 .275 .166 .224 .190 .250 .117

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jeter ss 3 1 0 0 1 0 .316 a-E.Nunez ph-ss 1 1 1 0 0 0 .279 I.Suzuki lf-rf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .284 b-Gardner ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .310 Al.Rodriguez dh 3 0 0 1 0 2 .268 c-Mesa ph-dh 1 0 1 1 0 0 1.000 Cano 2b 5 2 3 3 0 0 .308 Teixeira 1b 3 1 1 2 1 1 .256 Dickerson lf-rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Swisher rf-1b 4 1 3 0 0 1 .268 McGehee 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .151 Granderson cf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .228 R.Martin c 4 1 1 1 0 2 .210 C.Stewart c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Er.Chavez 3b 2 1 0 0 2 1 .282 Totals 36 10 13 10 4 8 Boston 000 100 100 — 2 4 0 New York 090 000 01x — 10 13 0 a-singled for Jeter in the 8th. b-grounded out for I.Suzuki in the 8th. LOB—Boston 3, New York 7. 2B—M.Gomez (5), Cano 2 (48), Swisher (35). HR—Nava (6), off Sabathia; Cano (31), off Buchholz; Granderson (41), off Buchholz; R.Martin (21), off Buchholz; Teixeira (24), off Aceves. Boston Buchholz L, 11-8 Aceves Beato A.Miller A.Bailey

IP 1 2-3 2 1-3 2 1-3 2-3 1

H 6 3 1 1 2

R 8 1 0 0 1

ER BB SO NP 8 2 2 56 1 1 1 48 0 1 2 39 0 0 2 14 1 0 1 25

ERA 4.56 5.36 2.70 3.18 6.00

New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia W, 15-6 8 4 2 2 1 7 103 3.38 F.Garcia 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 5.25 T—2:58. A—45,478 (50,291).

Tigers 6, Royals 3 Detroit A.Jackson cf Infante 2b Mi.Cabrera 3b Fielder 1b D.Young dh Jh.Peralta ss Dirks lf A.Garcia rf G.Laird c Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 3 4 40

R 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 1 0 6

H 0 0 4 4 0 1 2 1 2 14

BI 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 3 5

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

SO 2 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 7

Avg. .298 .253 .329 .313 .269 .241 .323 .333 .282

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. J.Dyson dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .262 a-B.Pena ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .245 A.Escobar ss 5 0 1 0 0 0 .289 A.Gordon lf 4 2 2 1 0 1 .293 Butler 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .312 S.Perez c 3 0 2 0 1 0 .305 Moustakas 3b 2 0 0 0 2 1 .242 T.Abreu 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .265 Francoeur rf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .235 Lough cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .237 Falu 2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .354 Totals 33 3 9 2 5 6 Detroit 000 015 000 — 6 14 1 Kansas City 000 002 010 — 3 9 1 E—G.Laird (4), Lough (1). LOB—Detroit 8, Kansas City 8. 2B—Fielder (33), G.Laird (8), Butler (32). HR— Jh.Peralta (13), off B.Chen; Mi.Cabrera (44), off B.Chen; A.Gordon (14), off Porcello. SB—A.Escobar (33). DP—Detroit 2; Kansas City 1. Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP Porcello W, 10-12 5 4 1 1 3 3 88 Alburquerque 1 1 1 1 2 1 24 Dotel 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 Benoit 1 3 1 1 0 2 25 Valverde S, 35-40 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP B.Chen L, 11-14 5 2-3 10 6 2 1 3 90 L.Coleman 2 1-3 2 0 0 0 4 39 Mazzaro 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 6 Hottovy 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 Crow 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 Hottovy pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Porcello pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. T—2:55. A—15,312 (37,903).

ERA 4.59 0.68 3.57 3.68 3.78 ERA 5.07 3.75 5.73 2.89 3.53

Blue Jays 6, Twins 5 (10 innings) Minnesota Revere cf-rf J.Carroll 2b-3b Mauer dh Parmelee 1b Plouffe 3b A.Casilla 2b M.Carson rf-lf C.Herrmann lf Span cf Butera c Florimon ss Totals

AB 5 5 5 4 3 0 5 3 0 5 5 40

R 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

H 2 3 1 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 12

BI 0 1 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 3

SO 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 2 8

Avg. .286 .268 .322 .239 .236 .237 .224 .071 .283 .204 .224

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. R.Davis rf-lf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .257 Rasmus cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .223 a-Sierra ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .227 Lawrie 3b 4 1 2 0 1 1 .275 Lind 1b 4 1 4 2 0 0 .256 1-McCoy pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .173 Y.Gomes 1b 1 1 1 1 0 0 .211 Y.Escobar dh 3 0 0 0 1 2 .252 K.Johnson 2b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .224 b-Vizquel ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Hechavarria ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .252 Mathis c 4 0 1 2 0 2 .218 c-Arencibia ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .235 Gose lf-cf 4 0 1 1 1 1 .222 Totals 39 6 12 6 4 11 Minnesota 021 010 100 0 — 5 12 0 Toronto 100 002 101 1 — 6 12 1 Two outs when winning run scored. a-struck out for Rasmus in the 9th. b-grounded out for K.Johnson in the 10th. c-struck out for Mathis in the 10th. 1-ran for Lind in the 7th. E—Hechavarria (3). LOB—Minnesota 10, Toronto 10. 2B—J.Carroll (18), Parmelee (10), Plouffe (18), Butera (6), Lind (14), Mathis (13). HR—Plouffe (24), off Laffey; Y.Gomes (4), off Perkins. SB—Revere (40), K.Johnson (14). DP—Toronto 2. Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP Vasquez 5 2-3 6 3 3 3 1 94 Al.Burnett H, 10 1 1 1 1 0 3 19 T.Robertson 0 1 0 0 0 0 6 Fien H, 6 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 Burton H, 18 1 1 0 0 1 2 20 Perkins BS, 4-20 1 1 1 1 0 3 13 Duensing L, 4-12 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 15 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP Laffey 5 8 4 3 0 0 62 Beck 1 1 0 0 1 0 15 Cecil 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 16 Lincoln 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 4 24 Janssen 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 Lyon W, 4-0 1 1 0 0 1 1 15 T.Robertson pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—3:14. A—12,359 (49,260).

ERA 5.68 3.62 5.40 2.08 2.18 2.56 5.12 ERA 4.56 6.32 5.72 5.65 2.59 3.00

NL Boxscores Phillies 2, Nationals 0 Philadelphia Frandsen 3b Mayberry cf Utley 2b Ruiz c Wigginton 1b D.Brown rf-lf Ruf lf Schierholtz rf M.Martinez ss K.Kendrick p De Fratus p Horst p Aumont p Totals

AB 4 3 4 3 4 4 2 0 3 3 0 0 0 30

R 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 2 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 9

Avg. .333 .248 .262 .327 .234 .240 .333 .248 .168 .139 -------

Washington Werth rf Harper cf Zimmerman 3b

AB 4 3 4

R 0 0 0

H 1 1 0

BI 0 0 0

BB 0 1 0

SO 1 0 0

Avg. .297 .270 .282

LaRoche 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .269 Morse lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .286 Desmond ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .291 Espinosa 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .248 K.Suzuki c 2 0 1 0 1 1 .269 Lannan p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .111 a-Bernadina ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .289 Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Mattheus p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Lombardozzi ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .274 Storen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 0 5 0 2 6 Philadelphia 020 000 000 — 2 6 1 Washington 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 a-flied out for Lannan in the 5th. b-lined out for Mattheus in the 8th. E—K.Kendrick (1). LOB—Philadelphia 4, Washington 7. 2B—D.Brown (11), Harper (26). 3B—Ruf (1). DP—Washington 3. Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kendrick W, 11-12 7 4 0 0 1 4 100 3.90 De Fratus H, 5 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 15 3.72 Horst H, 6 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 1.19 Aumont S, 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 3.68 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lannan L, 4-1 5 6 2 2 3 2 80 4.13 Stammen 2 0 0 0 0 6 30 2.34 Mattheus 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.89 Storen 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 2.45 T—2:48. A—35,387 (41,487).

Pirates 2, Braves 1 Atlanta Bourn cf Prado 2b Heyward rf C.Jones 3b F.Freeman 1b 1-Constanza pr Re.Johnson lf c-Overbay ph McCann c Simmons ss Maholm p b-Je.Baker ph Moylan p Totals

AB 3 2 4 3 3 0 2 1 4 3 2 1 0 28

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 1 2 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

SO 2 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 8

Avg. .276 .302 .267 .285 .262 .243 .285 .257 .227 .296 .063 .255 ---

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. S.Marte lf 4 2 2 1 0 2 .253 d’Arnaud 2b 4 0 0 1 0 2 .000 Mercer 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .210 A.McCutchen cf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .329 G.Sanchez 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .217 McKenry c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .237 P.Alvarez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Tabata rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .244 Barmes ss 2 0 1 0 1 0 .227 Locke p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .091 Karstens p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .107 a-J.Harrison ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 J.Hughes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 28 2 5 2 3 9 Atlanta 001 000 000 — 1 2 0 Pittsburgh 001 010 00x — 2 5 1 a-grounded out for Karstens in the 7th. b-popped out for Maholm in the 8th. c-lined out for Re.Johnson in the 9th. 1-ran for F.Freeman in the 9th. E—P.Alvarez (27). LOB—Atlanta 6, Pittsburgh 5. 2B—A.McCutchen (29), Tabata (20). 3B—S.Marte (6). HR—S.Marte (5), off Maholm. DP—Atlanta 1; Pittsburgh 1. Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Maholm L, 13-11 7 5 2 2 3 8 105 3.67 Moylan 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 1.80 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Locke W, 1-3 6 2 1 1 5 6 104 5.50 Karstens H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 3.97 Watson H, 16 1 0 0 0 1 1 22 3.38 J.Hughes S, 2-4 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 2.85 T—2:38. A—15,009 (38,362).

Brewers 5, Padres 3 San Diego Ev.Cabrera ss d-Quentin ph 1-Parrino pr Forsythe 2b Headley 3b Grandal c Alonso 1b Venable rf Guzman lf Maybin cf b-Kotsay ph Amarista cf Richard p Vincent p c-Denorfia ph Totals

AB 3 0 0 5 3 3 4 4 4 3 1 0 3 0 1 34

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3

H 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 8

BI 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 3

BB 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 8

Avg. .242 .261 .207 .277 .283 .299 .273 .263 .246 .243 .264 .237 .087 .000 .294

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aoki rf 4 1 3 0 0 0 .289 R.Weeks 2b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .229 Braun lf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .321 Ar.Ramirez 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .299 Hart 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .270 Ishikawa 1b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .253 Lucroy c 4 1 1 1 0 0 .321 C.Gomez cf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .260 Segura ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .271 Marcum p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .105 a-Farris ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Henderson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Fr.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Axford p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 33 5 10 5 1 5 San Diego 001 001 100 — 3 8 1 Milwaukee 100 121 00x — 5 10 1 a-grounded out for Marcum in the 6th. b-lined out for Maybin in the 8th. c-struck out for Vincent in the 9th. d-walked for Ev.Cabrera in the 9th. 1-ran for Quentin in the 9th. E—Richard (6), Marcum (1). LOB—San Diego 9, Milwaukee 5. 2B—Venable 2 (25), Braun (36). HR— Richard (1), off Marcum; C.Gomez (19), off Richard; R.Weeks (21), off Richard; Lucroy (12), off Richard. SB—Ev.Cabrera 2 (43), Venable (24), Aoki (29). DP—Milwaukee 1. San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Richard L, 14-14 7 10 5 5 0 3 102 3.99 Vincent 1 0 0 0 1 2 23 1.75 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Marcum W, 7-4 6 6 2 2 4 2 104 3.70 Henderson H, 14 1 2 1 1 0 2 27 3.14 Fr.Rodriguez H, 31 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 4.50 Axford S, 34-43 1 0 0 0 1 3 20 4.81 WP—Henderson. Balk—Marcum. T—2:52. A—30,398 (41,900).

Cardinals 4, Reds 2 Cincinnati B.Phillips 2b W.Valdez 2b Cozart ss Votto 1b Ludwick lf Simon p a-Paul ph Hoover p Bruce rf Rolen 3b Hanigan c Stubbs cf Arroyo p Heisey lf Totals

AB 4 0 4 4 3 0 1 0 4 4 2 3 1 1 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2

H 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 6

BI 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 1 1 0 8

Avg. .283 .203 .249 .339 .277 .000 .310 --.251 .243 .275 .216 .143 .267

St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jay cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .303 Beltran rf 3 1 2 0 1 0 .271 Holliday lf 3 1 2 0 1 1 .294 Craig 1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .310 Y.Molina c 3 1 1 1 0 0 .317 Freese 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .294 Motte p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Descalso 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .228 Kozma ss 2 0 0 0 1 1 .328 J.Garcia p 3 1 1 1 0 0 .250 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Boggs p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --M.Carpenter 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .295 Totals 30 4 9 4 3 7 Cincinnati 001 000 100 — 2 6 0 St. Louis 003 001 00x — 4 9 1 a-flied out for Simon in the 8th. E—Freese (18). LOB—Cincinnati 5, St. Louis 6. 2B—Rolen (17), Craig (35). 3B—Descalso (7). HR—J.Garcia (1), off Arroyo. DP—Cincinnati 1; St. Louis 1. Cincinnati Arroyo L, 12-10 Simon Hoover

IP 5 2 1

H 6 3 0

R 3 1 0

ER BB SO NP 3 1 6 73 1 2 1 37 0 0 0 8

ERA 3.74 2.66 2.12

St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP J.Garcia W, 7-7 6 2-3 6 2 2 1 6 90 Mujica H, 30 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 Boggs H, 34 1 0 0 0 0 0 17 Motte S, 41-48 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 T—2:38. A—38,480 (43,975).

ERA 3.92 3.03 2.21 2.78

Dodgers 3, Giants 2 San Francisco Pagan cf Scutaro 2b Sandoval 3b Posey c Whiteside c Pence rf Belt 1b Nady lf Affeldt p c-A.Huff ph 1-Burriss pr S.Casilla p B.Crawford ss M.Cain p Mijares p Mota p G.Blanco lf Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 0 4 3 2 0 1 0 0 3 2 0 0 1 31

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

BI 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 8

Avg. .287 .305 .283 .336 .091 .255 .276 .193 .000 .192 .213 .333 .249 .176 .000 --.242

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. M.Ellis 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .260 Ethier rf 4 1 1 2 0 0 .281 League p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Kemp cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .307 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .297 H.Ramirez ss 3 1 1 0 1 0 .256 Victorino lf-rf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .256 L.Cruz 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .301 A.Ellis c 1 0 0 0 2 0 .269 Harang p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .071 Belisario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-B.Abreu ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .247 b-J.Rivera ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --E.Herrera lf 1 0 1 1 0 0 .249 Totals 30 3 9 3 3 3 San Francisco 100 000 010 — 2 6 0 Los Angeles 000 200 001 — 3 9 0 One out when winning run scored. a-was announced for Belisario in the 7th. b-flied out for B.Abreu in the 7th. c-singled for Affeldt in the 9th. 1-ran for A.Huff in the 9th. LOB—San Francisco 5, Los Angeles 8. 2B—Pagan (37), Posey (39), Ad.Gonzalez (10), Victorino (28). HR—Ethier (20), off M.Cain. SB—Belt (12). DP—San Francisco 1; Los Angeles 1. San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP M.Cain 5 4 2 2 1 2 68 Mijares 1 2 0 0 1 0 18 Mota 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 9 Affeldt 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 11 S.Casilla L, 7-6 1-3 3 1 1 1 0 12 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP Harang 6 2 1 1 2 3 91 Belisario H, 23 1 1 0 0 1 2 22 Jansen BS, 7-32 1 2 1 1 0 2 17 League W, 2-1 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 T—2:54. A—33,624 (56,000).

ERA 2.79 2.55 4.95 2.70 2.87 ERA 3.61 2.55 2.43 2.39

Rockies 7, Diamondbacks 5 (13 innings) Colorado Rutledge 2b Colvin cf-rf-cf Nelson 3b W.Rosario c A.Brown rf Fowler cf f-LeMahieu ph-1b McBride 1b-rf Blackmon lf J.Herrera ss D.Pomeranz p a-R.Ortega ph Ottavino p b-Pacheco ph Belisle p R.Betancourt p d-Chatwood ph Brothers p E.Escalona p Outman p Roenicke p Totals

AB 7 6 6 5 4 0 1 5 6 4 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 48

R 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

H 1 2 3 1 1 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13

BI 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 4 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 14

Avg. .281 .291 .301 .273 .240 .300 .290 .208 .295 .248 .231 .500 .111 .304 .000 --.267 .000 --.083 .083

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pollock cf 5 1 0 0 1 2 .244 A.Hill 2b 6 1 1 1 0 1 .302 J.Upton rf 5 1 0 0 1 2 .276 Goldschmidt 1b 6 1 2 1 0 3 .290 M.Montero c 3 0 1 0 1 1 .289 1-Graham pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Schmidt c 1 0 0 1 1 0 .000 C.Johnson 3b 5 0 0 1 0 1 .281 G.Parra lf 6 1 1 1 0 3 .272 Jo.McDonald ss 4 0 2 0 1 0 .242 Miley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .169 D.Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 c-R.Wheeler ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .231 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Putz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-C.Young ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .231 Shaw p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --g-Kubel ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Bergesen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Zagurski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 44 5 8 5 5 15 Colorado 000 000 120 000 4 — 7 13 0 Arizona 100 010 001 000 2 — 5 8 0 a-struck out for D.Pomeranz in the 6th. b-struck out for Ottavino in the 8th. c-struck out for D.Hernandez in the 8th. d-sacrificed for R.Betancourt in the 10th. esingled for Putz in the 10th. f-grounded into a double play for Fowler in the 11th. g-struck out for Shaw in the 12th. 1-ran for M.Montero in the 9th. LOB—Colorado 9, Arizona 8. 2B—Rutledge (20), Colvin 2 (25), Nelson (21), Blackmon (8). HR— W.Rosario (28), off Miley; A.Hill (25), off D.Pomeranz; G.Parra (7), off D.Pomeranz; Goldschmidt (20), off R.Betancourt. DP—Arizona 2. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA D.Pomeranz 5 3 2 2 2 7 80 4.93 Ottavino 2 0 0 0 0 3 19 4.58 Belisle H, 26 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.73 R.Betancourt 1 2 1 1 0 0 13 2.37 Brothers 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.99 E.Escalona 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 23 6.33 Outman W, 1-3 2-3 0 2 2 2 2 19 8.33 Roenicke S, 1-3 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 16 3.26 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miley 7 2-3 6 3 3 0 10 104 3.33 D.Hernandez 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 2.31 Ziegler 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 2.53 Putz 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 2.87 Shaw 2 2 0 0 2 1 33 3.49 Bergesen L, 2-1 1-3 2 4 4 2 0 17 3.64 Zagurski 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 18 5.54 T—4:14. A—24,123 (48,633). More Monday box scores in Scoreboard, D2.

Leaders Through Monday’s Games AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—MiCabrera, Detroit, .329; Trout, Los Angeles, .325; Mauer, Minnesota, .322; Beltre, Texas, .319; Jeter, New York, .316; TorHunter, Los Angeles, .314; Fielder, Detroit, .313. RUNS—Trout, Los Angeles, 129; MiCabrera, Detroit, 109; AJackson, Detroit, 103; AdJones, Baltimore, 103; Kinsler, Texas, 103; Cano, New York, 102; Hamilton, Texas, 102. RBI—MiCabrera, Detroit, 137; Hamilton, Texas, 127; Encarnacion, Toronto, 110; Willingham, Minnesota, 110; Fielder, Detroit, 108; Butler, Kansas City, 107; Pujols, Los Angeles, 105. HOME RUNS—MiCabrera, Detroit, 44; Hamilton, Texas, 43; Encarnacion, Toronto, 42; ADunn, Chicago, 41; Granderson, New York, 41; Beltre, Texas, 36; Willingham, Minnesota, 35. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—MeCabrera, San Francisco, .346; Posey, San Francisco, .336; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .329; Braun, Milwaukee, .321; YMolina, St. Louis, .317; Craig, St. Louis, .310; DWright, New York, .308. RUNS—AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 107; JUpton, Arizona, 107; Braun, Milwaukee, 106; Rollins, Philadelphia, 102; Harper, Washington, 97; Bourn, Atlanta, 95; Holliday, St. Louis, 95. RBI—Headley, San Diego, 113; Braun, Milwaukee, 112; ASoriano, Chicago, 108; Pence, San Francisco, 104; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 104; Holliday, St. Louis, 101; Posey, San Francisco, 101. HOME RUNS—Braun, Milwaukee, 41; Stanton, Miami, 37; Bruce, Cincinnati, 34; Beltran, St. Louis, 32; LaRoche, Washington, 32; ASoriano, Chicago, 32; IDavis, New York, 31; Headley, San Diego, 31; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 31.


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Boswell

C S    B  Basketball • League sign-up deadline approaching: The registration deadline for the Bend Park & Recreation District’s adult basketball league is Oct. 19. Five-on-five men’s and women’s leagues for players age 18 and older will be offered. Leagues will be for men 18 and older, men 35 and older, and women 18 and older. Games will be played on Sunday afternoons from Nov. 4 through March 16. Teams will play 12 games apiece and participate in a single-elimination tournament at season’s end. Registration is available at the park district office, 799 S.W. Columbia St. Walk-in registration only. Fee is $675 per team, and teams must register by 5 p.m. on Oct. 19. Space is limited. For more information, call Rich Ekman, park district sports coordinator, at 541-706-6126.

Rugby • Bobcats win first game: In the first match in program history, the Central Oregon Community College Rugby Football Club defeated Reed College of Portland 62-12 on

Saturday in Bend. Jeff Millan paced the Bobcats’ attack with 22 points, and COCC coach Woody Bennett praised the play of scrum half Taylor Ulbricht and full back Sergio Gairo. The Bobcats’ next game is scheduled for this Saturday in Tacoma, Wash., against the University of Puget Sound. The team’s next home match of the season is slated for 11 a.m. on Oct. 14 against Whitman College of Walla Walla, Wash.

Running • Fun run on tap: The seventh annual I Like Pie fun run and pie baking contest is once again scheduled for Thanksgiving Day, which this year is Nov. 22. Participants have the option of running 2-kilometer, 5K, 10K or 10-mile distances along the First Street Rapids trail in north Bend. Turnarounds will be marked. The run, which will not be timed, will begin at 9 a.m. at the Riverfront Plaza, behind the FootZone running shoe store in downtown Bend. Participants are free to bring pies to share. Entry in the pie baking contest is optional. A donation of $5 cash or check and five

cans of food is suggested. According to organizers, the 2011 I Like Pie event generated almost $6,000 and nearly 4,000 pounds of food for the nonprofit NeighborImpact, which is also the beneficiary this year. Registration is available in person at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., and online at footzonebend. com/events/i-like-pie. For information about NeighborImpact, an organization that assists economically disadvantaged Central Oregonians, go to neighborimpact.org. • No change in race route: Organizers of the Happy Dirty Girls trail-running event have announced that the Pole Creek Fire near Sisters has not affected the planned course routes for the trail half marathon and the 5K race. The inaugural women’s-only event is scheduled for Nov. 3. The half marathon route consists primarily of trails in the Peterson Ridge trail system, while the 5K route goes through downtown Sisters. The half marathon race is sold out, but entries are still being accepted for the 5K. Registration is $35 through Oct. 31 and $40 Nov. 1-3. For more information or to register, go to happygirlsrun.com. —Bulletin staff report

Roll Continued from D1 The foam roller, Mitchell says, is a tool to release the muscle and fascia, to help create space, allowing for joint mobility and muscle engagement. Essentially, using a foam roller is akin to giving yourself a deep tissue massage. Mitchell recommends using a foam roller before working out for alignment purposes and afterward for recovery purposes. Back, thighs, hips, calves — almost any body part can be foam-rolled. And remember balance. “Whatever you do to one side, do to the other,” Mitchell says. Colleen Moyer, a manager at FootZone, could be considered a poster child for foam rolling. Like other athletic types, Moyer, 42 and an avid ultramarathon runner, has owned a foam roller but never used it much until earlier this year, when she happened to be working during one of Mitchell’s clinics and decided to sit in. (I cannot judge. I attended Mitchell’s most recent clinic, but prior to that, my foam roller was serving as a stand for my TV antenna.) Not long after starting her own foam-rolling routine, Moyer discovered that some nerve issues she had been experiencing in her calves cleared up. She uses the foam roller for about 30 minutes per session and does so at least every other day. “I am very faithful to that foam roller,” says Moyer. “I’m maybe a little obsessive with it.” If starting your own foam-rolling routine sounds appealing, keep in mind that different rollers have different densities. They vary by brand, but generally, the darker the color of the roller, the more dense the material. Some come with various types of surfacing, such as nubs, to get into the tissue even more, and some are even reinforced with PVC pipe. So go a little easy on yourself at first. Using a foam roller is not like getting a relaxing massage at the spa. It should make you feel uncomfortable — but only to a point. “If you are new to the practice, starting with the least dense foam roller, it will likely be the best choice,” Mitchell advises. “Because if it’s too painful to be on the roller and stick with the practice, you won’t want to continue to do it, and you won’t get any results. “You have to be able to relax a little bit so that you can spend time,” she adds. “Time is a big element of the fascial release, so the longer you can stay on the tissue, on the trigger point, the likelihood of it releasing is greater.” Foam rollers can usually be found at running shoe shops and sporting goods

Ryder Continued from D1 “We knew that they remembered that, as well. Exact same score.” The urgency seemed to be lost on his players. After having their way with the Europeans the first two days, there was no indication they thought the singles matches would be any different. Especially not at home, where comebacks like the one at Brookline just don’t happen for the visiting team. Except these were not just any ordinary visitors. They proved it the late afternoon before, when Ian Poulter made them believe anything was possible when he birdied the final five holes — the last in near darkness — to pull out a point that the Americans were already putting up on their board. Yes, they were down. But they were pumped. “The whole atmosphere of the team changed last night,” Luke Donald said Sunday. To change the atmosphere on the course, though, Europe had to get something going early. Both sides knew it, and it was little secret that European captain Jose Maria Olazabal

Continued from D1 “It’s the best place for me to develop at the next level. I couldn’t pass up the offer.” Boswell — a strong climber with the potential to compete for overall victories in stage races — said he hopes to race his first Grand Tour (Tour de France, Giro d’Italia or Tour of Spain) sometime in the next two years. He signed a threeyear contract with Sky. “I’d like to see how I ride over a three-week race and how I progress,” Boswell said. “During my first year my aim is to learn as much as I can from everyone — from the staff, coaches and riders, and just become the most successful professional that I can be. It will be a development role. I can learn from the best in the world.” That includes 2012 Tour de France winner Bradley Wiggins and runner-up Chris Froome, both of whom will remain on Team Sky for 2013, Boswell said. Sky coach Bobby Julich called Boswell and Dombrowksi, both known as strong climbers, “two of the most talented under-23 riders in the world.” “Bontrager-Livestrong — and especially USA Cycling — have done a great job developing these guys into the riders they are today and we want to continue that hard work now to ensure they reach their full potential in the future,” Julich was quoted saying on the Sky

Blazers

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Ashleigh Mitchell, left, helps Shannon Strait with tips on how to do an exercise correctly at FootZone in downtown Bend.

stores, as well as online. Cost varies, but depending on your density needs, you should be able to find one for between $30 and $70. Worth noting is that some types of rollers do break down with use and may eventually need to be replaced. And as with any health aid, getting some information about how to use a foam roller is a good idea. Practitioners that Mitchell describes as “body workers” — think physical therapist or massage therapist, for example — use and recommend foam rollers, she says. And besides the clinics at FootZone, the studio Bend Pilates is another Central Oregon location that offers foam-roller instruction. Do keep in mind that a foam roller is not a miracle worker. It is one of a number of tools, however, that might be able to help overcome an injury. Mitchell recommends what she describes as cumulative practice. “Just doing it once doesn’t solve it,” she says. “Doing it more often will keep those patterns from re-establishing themselves, but it takes a while to peel

would front-load the lineup to put his stars out first in the hope they could turn things around. Love could have countered him with Phil Mickelson, or even Tiger Woods. Instead, he chose the jittery and emotional Bubba Watson to lead off against Donald, one of the coolest characters in golf. The results were predictable. The best part of Watson’s day came on the first tee when he got the crowd to cheer wildly during his swing. After that he went through the motions until he finally realized on the 15th hole that the next hole he didn’t win would be his last. Keegan Bradley followed two groups behind him, ready to tilt things the U.S. way after two days of winning — and celebrating — with partner Mickelson. But without his on-course BFF he didn’t seem to have the same spark as McIlroy — who had to commandeer a ride from a state trooper just to get to the first tee on time — and the best player in the world took him down without even warming up. “I thought it was a great plan,” Love said. “The first two teams that were supposed to win didn’t win. It didn’t work.” Not all great plans do work.

them back.” “It is not a panacea,” Mitchell says. “It will not immediately solve your problems, but you will release tension.” Michelle White, a manager at Fleet Feet shoe store in Bend, is another foamroller devotee. She says she uses hers after getting out of bed in the morning and after she goes running. White, 38, started competing in triathlons a couple of years ago. But she missed the 2012 racing season after hyperextending one of her knees earlier this year, which led to problems with her iliotibial band, a band of tissue that runs along the outside of the leg. After not being able to run at all, White is back to running a couple of miles up to several days a week, slow and steady progress aided by her foam roller. “I do definitely notice a difference,” White says. “If I haven’t done it in a while for some reason, then I get really tight again and things start going the other direction.”

As boxer Mike Tyson always liked to say, everyone has a plan until they get punched in the face, and the punch the Americans took came when the Europeans won the first five matches of the day. The rout was over. Now the Americans were nervously looking at scoreboards, never a good thing in the Ryder Cup. “When I went past the board at No. 10 tee, saw a lot of blue up on the board, started doing the math,” Steve Stricker said, when asked when he first noticed things were amiss. “Kind of figured that it was going to come down to Tiger or I in the last two groups.” Love had a contingency plan for that, too. He had handpicked Stricker and Jim Furyk to be on the U.S. squad, certain they would be the backbone of the team, the veteran players he could count on when things got tough. When that didn’t work — Stricker and Furyk both coughed it up on the final two holes — he had Woods to finish things up. The only thing was, things were all finished by then. Woods stood helplessly in the 18th fairway, iron in hand, watching as Martin Kaymer sank the winning putt and the celebration be-

Continued from D1 At the team’s annual media day on Monday, Batum said the contentious negotiations were part of the business. “If I could do it again, if I could change some things? Maybe,” said Batum, who has averaged 10.2 points and 3.9 rebounds over four seasons with the Blazers. Portland’s next move was to hire as its head coach Terry Stotts, who was 115-168 as coach of the Atlanta Hawks and Milwaukee Bucks but spent the past four seasons as an assistant with the Dallas Mavericks, where he won a championship. While Olshey went with the “emerging” Blazers, Stotts’ buzzword for the team was “possibilities.” He is looking to take the Blazers to the playoffs in his first season. “I don’t know why anyone would think otherwise,” Stotts said. Much of the hope for the Blazers’ future lies with Aldridge, in his sixth season with the team. He averaged 21.7 points and eight rebounds per game last season, his first as an All-Star. Asked for his characterization of this Blazer team, Aldridge chose the word “new.” “New pieces, new players, new locker room, new coach,” he said. “Everything’s new.” This season, Aldridge will be working closely with Lillard, whom Olshey has labeled the team’s franchise point guard. The sixth overall pick in the NBA draft, Lillard averaged

— Reporter: 541-383-0393, amiles@bendbulletin.com.

gan. Woods and Francesco Molinari had to play over the celebrants to finish out their match, with Woods whiffing a 3-footer to give Europe its final 14½-13½ margin. “You come here as a team and you win or lose as a team, and it’s pointless to even finish,” Woods said. The record books will show it as a collapse of epic proportions, though the U.S. players insisted they all played well. Furyk went as far as saying that even his opponent, Sergio Garcia, would agree he was outplayed, even if the scoreboard didn’t show it. If they were in denial, it is hard to blame them. A day that had started with such promise had gone bad so fast it was difficult to digest it all properly. The comparisons will all be to 1999 because the scores were all so similar. The only thing missing were the thousands of wildly cheering fans, though the European fans who were there on Sunday sang and cheered and drank well into the night. “That was fun,” Furyk said of Brookline. “This was pretty miserable.” Proof, perhaps, that turnaround is not always such fair play.

70 Years of Hearing Excellence

Call 541-389-9690

D5

website. In Central Oregon this past July, Dombrowski finished 10th overall and Boswell 13th in the annual Cascade Cycling Classic stage race. But cycling fans should not expect to see Boswell racing in Central Oregon next season, or anywhere in the U.S. for that matter. He will be racing full time in Europe, and he said he plans to move to Nice, France, in January, where several of the Team Sky cyclists live. While the team is based in Manchester, England, the weather in the south of France is better for training rides, Boswell explained. “It’s great, but at the same time it’s a big step,” Boswell said of his expected move to Europe. “I’ll be leaving my family. I’ll leave in January and might not be back until July, home for a week, and then back to Europe for the remainder of the year. I’m getting a place with an extra bed so friends and family can come visit.” For now, Boswell will remain home in Bend for most of October, riding his bike and spending time with friends and family before his big move to the highest levels of professional cycling. “It’s the offseason, but with weather like this I can’t help but ride,” Boswell said, “and catch up with all the people who have helped me out over the years.” — Reporter: 541-383-0318, mmorical@bendbulletin.com.

24.5 points, five rebounds and four assists as a junior last season at Weber State. He was impressive at the NBA Summer League, averaging 26.5 points, 5.3 assists and four rebounds in four games. “Hopefully I can be what they expect me to be,” Lillard said. While Lillard is expected to start, Leonard, a 7-1 center out of Illinois who was the 11th overall pick, will likely need more seasoning. Portland is thin at center and could use 6-9 J.J. Hickson in the starting lineup when the season opens. One interesting addition to the Blazers’ training camp roster was Adam Morrison, the former Gonzaga star who was the third overall pick in the 2006 draft. A 6-8 forward who built his reputation as a shooter, Morrison played for the Charlotte Bobcats and the Los Angeles Lakers but never really lived up to expectations in the NBA. He also played overseas in Serbia and Turkey. Morrison, 28, said he thought he’d give the league one more shot with the Blazers. “I’ve been through the gamut,” he said. “I’ve been to the top, I’ve been to the bottom. I’ve been to some championships, I’ve been overseas. I think I have something to offer these young kids.”


D6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

COM M U N I T Y SP ORTS

C S   C 

Please email Community Sports event information to sports@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a spaceavailability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

AUTOS AUTOCROSS CLUB OF CENTRAL OREGON MONTHLY MEETING: Wednesday; 6 p.m. social, 6:30 p.m. meeting; Pappy’s Pizza Parlor, Bend; all welcome; autoxclub.org.

BASKETBALL ADULT OPEN GYM: Age 18 and older; Mondays and Wednesdays through Dec. 19; 7 p.m.-9:30 p.m.; subject to school closures and activities; no drinks besides water in water bottles or food allowed; $3 per visit; 541-548-7275; raprd.org. CENTRAL OREGON BASKETBALL ORGANIZATION CLINICS: Sundays, Oct. 7-21; 6 p.m.-8 p.m.; Mountain View High School, Bend; $49 for all three sessions; register through the Bend Park & Recreation District; 541-389-7275. SUMMIT CENTRAL OREGON BASKETBALL ORGANIZATION YOUTH BASKETBALL CLINICS: Open to kids in grades five through eight; Sundays, Oct. 14-28; 6 p.m.8 p.m.; Summit High School, Bend; $50 for all three sessions; contact Jon Frazier at jdfrazier@gmail.com to register. RAVEN YOUTH BASKETBALL: For boys in grades five through eight living in the Ridgeview High School attendance boundaries; tryouts on Tuesday, Oct. 30, and Thursday, Nov. 1; 6 p.m.-8 p.m.; Ridgeview High School, Redmond; boys who make the teams will compete in Central Oregon Basketball Organization and regional tournaments; $100 (for season); Nathan Covill; 541-504-3600, ext. 6248; nathan.covill@redmond.k12. or.us. BITTY BALL: For boys and girls in kindergarten through grade two; Saturdays, Nov. 3-Dec. 15; Sky View Middle School, Bend; players shoot at 8-foot baskets and play five-on-five on shorter courts; registration deadline is Saturday, Oct. 14; $43 park district residents, $58 otherwise; 541-389-7275; bendparksandrec.org. BOYS YOUTH HOOPS: Grades three through eight; games (double headers) on Saturdays, Nov. 10Dec. 22, at Elton Gregory Middle School, Redmond; practices twice per week on weekdays as determined by volunteer coaches; reigstration deadline is Thursday, Oct. 5; $59; 541-548-7275; raprd. org. HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL LEAGUE: For players not participating in their high school basketball programs; one league for freshmen and sophomores, and one league for juniors and seniors; Sunday mornings, Dec. 2 through mid-March; Pilot Butte Middle School, Bend; recreational league with T-shirts, officials and scorekeepers provided; registration deadline is Tuesday, Nov. 27; $54 park district residents, $73 otherwise; 541-389-7275; bendparksandrec.org. MIDDLE SCHOOL BASKETBALL: For boys and girls in grades six through eight in Bend-La Pine Schools; boys league is Nov. 1-Dec. 21, and girls league is Jan. 14-March 12; emphasis on skill development, participation, sportsmanship and fun; practices and games will take place on weekdays; uniform tops provided; boys registration deadline is Monday, Oct. 15; girls registration deadline is Thursday, Dec. 27; walk-in registration only; $54, scholarships available; 541-3897275; bendparksandrec.org.

HIKING SILVER STRIDERS GUIDE SERVICE: One to two guided hikes per week in three national forests with a trained naturalist; geared toward those age 50 and older; all hikes through Oct. 13 begin at 9 a.m.; $20 for first hike, $25 otherwise; strideon@ silverstriders.com; 541-383-8077; www.silverstriders.com. LEARN THE ART OF TRACKING ANIMALS: Guided walks and workshops with a professional tracker; ongoing; 8 a.m.-noon; learn to identify and interpret tracks, signs and scat of animals

in the region; two or more walks per month; $35; 541-633-7045; dave@wildernesstracking.com; wildernesstracking.com.

HORSES DIANE’S HORSEBACK RIDING: For beginning riders ages 7-14; Saturdays, Oct. 6-27; 1 p.m.-2 p.m.; Diane’s Riding Place, Bend; learn proper horse care, how to cinch a saddle and ride; horses and tack provided; wear weatherappropriate clothing; $100; rarprd. org; 541-548-7275. THIRD ANNUAL ALL BREED AND APPALOOSA ULTIMATE TRAIL CHALLENGE: Saturday; Rockin’ BG Ranch, 5701 West Highway 126, Redmond; registration begins at 8:30 a.m., first class starts at 10 a.m.; test riding skills on trail course with more than 20 obstacles available; classes are in hand, youth rider (age 12 and younger), youth rider (ages 13-17), novice rider (no age restriction), novice horse, amateur rider (age 44 and younger), masters rider (age 45 and older) and timed event (all ages); overnight camping and stall accommodations available; $15 per class plus one-time $5 facility day-use fee per horse; futuritydirector@otahc.org; 541604-1517; registration forms available at otahc.org. ADAPTIVE HORSEBACK RIDING LESSONS: Age 9 and older; Saturday, Oct. 13; 2 p.m.-3:30 p.m.; taught by certified riding instructor Diane Schmidt; horse and tack available for each rider; learn about proper horse care and how to mount and ride a horse; dress for the weather, class is outside; $40; 541548-7275; raprd.org.

MISCELLANEOUS RESTORE PROPER MOVEMENT YOGA: Restorative yoga for busy athletes such as cyclists, runners and triathletes already training; no strength poses, just restorative yoga for active recovery; Mondays; 5 p.m.; Powered by Bowen, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 30 minutes; 5 points on Power Pass or $5 per class; 541-585-1500. ARCHERY: Ages 8-13; topics include safety and bow handling, archery etiquette and games; Thursdays, Oct. 4-24; 5:30-7 p.m.; at Cent Wise Sporting Goods, 533 S.W. Fifth St., Redmond; $25; raprd.org; 541-548-7275. ADAPTIVE ARCHERY: Age 8 and older; Wednesdays, Oct. 10-Dec. 12 (except Oct. 31 and Nov. 21); 5 p.m.-6 p.m.; Top Pin Archery, 1611 S.W. First St., Unit D, Redmond; all equipment provided; $8 per class; 541-548-7275; raprd.org. ACROVISION TAEKWONDO: Age 6 and older; Tuesdays and Thursdays, Oct. 16-Nov. 8; 7-8 p.m.; RAPRD Activity Center, Redmond; students will train in a complete martial arts system; uniforms are required and will be available for purchase; $69; 541548-7275 or raprd.org. MARTIAL ARTS SEMINAR: With Brazilian jiujitsu instructor Marcelo Alonso; Friday, Oct. 26, 7 p.m.-9 p.m.; Saturday, Oct. 27, 10 a.m.-noon; High Desert Martial Arts, 2535 N.E. Studio Road, Bend; all styles and levels welcome; $35 for one day, $60 for both days; 541-647-1220; bendhighdesertmartialarts.com. REDMOND COMMUNITY YOGA: 7 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays; $49 per six weeks, drop-in available, beginner to intermediate levels; Rebound Physical Therapy, 974 Veterans Way, Suite 4, Redmond; 541-504-2350. WINTER FENCING: High Desert Fencing in Bend welcomes youths age 10 and older and adults for competitive training and fitness; Mondays, 4 p.m.-7 p.m., and Tuesdays through Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.-7 p.m.; introductory coached fencing lesson on Mondays at 4:30 p.m. for new members; Randall, 541-389-4547; Jeff, 541-419-7087. BABY BOOTCAMP: Wednesdays at 10 a.m. at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave; bridget. cook@babybootcamp.com.

PADDLING KAYAKING: For all ages; weekly classes and open pool; equipment provided to those who preregister, first come, first served otherwise; Sundays, 4 p.m.-6 p.m., Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $3; 541548-7275; raprd.org.

PICKLEBALL BEND PICKLEBALL CLUB: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 9:30 a.m.-noon, Larkspur Park (Bend Senior Center) on Reed Market Road, Bend, rsss@ bendbroadband.com; Wednesdays, 8 a.m.-10 a.m., and Saturdays, 8 a.m.-11 a.m. Athletic Club of Bend (indoors), $15 drop-in fee (includes full club usage), 541385-3062; Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, 9 a.m.-11 a.m., Valley View tennis courts, 3660 S.W. Reservoir Drive, Redmond, jsmck@ hotmail.com; Mondays, 4 p.m.-6 p.m., indoor lodge courts at Sage Springs Club & Spa, Sunriver, $7.50 drop-in fee (includes full club usage), call 541-593-7890 in advance to sign up, palcic57@live. com; weekly play schedules also available at The Racquet Shoppe in Bend; oregonhighdesertpickleball. blogspot.com; bendpickleballclub@ hotmail.com.

RUNNING TIME TO RUN: Saturday; 9 a.m.; American Legion Park, Redmond; 10K and 5K runs, 1K fun run; benefits Pregnancy Resource Centers of Central Oregon; $25; prcco.org/news/time-to-run. IGNITE CHANGE 5K/10K RUN/WALK AND KIDS FUN RUN/CHALLENGE COURSE: Sunday; 11 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Bend; proceeds to Campfire USA Central Oregon; stroller-friendly 5K on sidewalks and paved trails; 10K includes dirt roads/trail surfaces; $10-$35; race360.com/15970. THE GREAT PUMPKIN RACE: Saturday, Oct. 13; 9 a.m.; Brookswood Meadow Plaza, Bend; 5K run and kids 1-mile fun run; costume-friendly; proceeds go toward Elk Meadows Elementary School; $5-$20; greatraceofbend. com. CORK CROSS-COUNTRY SERIES: Tuesdays, Oct. 16-30; Old Mill District, Bend; courses will be 5 to 6 kilometers in length; registration starts at 5 p.m.; $5; footzonebend. com/events. FALL GIRLS NIGHT OUT: Thursday, Oct. 18; 6:30 p.m.-9 p.m.; FootZone, downtown Bend; $5; footzonebend. com; 541-317-3568. SD’S DOWN & DIRTY HALF AND DIRTY 10K: Sunday, Oct. 21; 9 a.m.; Seventh Mountain Resort, Bend; half marathon and 10K trail runs; field size limited to 500; $20-$40; superfitproductions. com/?page_id=69. LEARN TO RUN : Next three-week session begins Saturday, Oct. 27; 9 a.m.; FootZone, downtown Bend; includes instruction in proper running gear and running/walking form, reference manual and training materials, and mentor support; $50$55; register online or in the store; connie@coachconnieaustin.com; footzonebend.com/events. MONSTER DASH 5K: Sunday, Oct. 28; 10 a.m.; Highland Elementary School, Bend; 5K run and kids 1-mile run; benefit for Angel Flight West; costume-friendly; $12-$30; fleetfeetbend.com/races/ monsterdash; registration available at time2race.com. LORD’S ACRE: Saturday, Nov. 3; Powell Butte Christian Church, Powell Butte; 9 a.m.10 run and 5K run/walk; $15-$20 (technical T-shirts available for $15); Dave Pickhardt; pickhardt5@yahoo.com; 541-977-3493. HAPPY DIRTY GIRLS: Saturday, Nov. 3; 8 a.m.; Sisters; half marathon and 5K trail runs; field limited to 250 participants; $35$75; happygirlsrun.com/dirtygirls. VETERANS DAY/MARINE CORPS BIRTHDAY RUN: Saturday, Nov. 10; 9 a.m.; City Hall, 710 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 5K run and 1-mile walk; fundraiser for Disabled American Veterans; $15-$21; chandler@ bendbroadband.com; 541-3508512; entry form available at vetsdayrun.homestead.com. I LIKE PIE: Thursday, Nov. 22; 9 a.m.; start is directly behind

League standings and high scores Lava Lanes, Bend Sept. 17-23 Casino Fun — All In the Family; Ray Camacho, 224/632; Tawina Norris, 143/393. His and Hers — No Boundaries; Allyn Hayes, 275/755; Carolyn Worth, 200/561. Guys and Gals — Spares-R-Us; Toby Cundell, 268/712; Janet Gettling, 192/544. Rejects — The Possibles; Jeff Norman, 236/638; Sue Snedden, 186/472. Lava Lanes Classic — Cause Mommy Said So; Jayme Dahlke, 248/719; Mary Stratton, 214/524. Wednesday Inc — High Desert Auto Supply; Will Piland, 259/728; Toby Cundell, 256/704. Tea Timers — Ball Breakers; Shari Hamel, 244/629. Latecomers — C.O. Trophies; Jane Supnet, 182/511. TNT — Old Guys Rule; Rommel Sundita, 234/662; Renee Gowdy, 193/498.

Progressive — Hills Horseshoeing; Matt Ayres, 251/680. Free Breathers — Pin Heads; Gary Davis, 276/667; Ellen Tucker, 205/548. T.G.I.F. — Beverage Consumption Control; Brian Best, 288/736; Joy Reeves, 220/597. Draft — Boomer Ducks; Mike Sima, 213/607; Susan Waltosz, 167/472. Rimrock Lanes, Prineville (Team scratch game, team scratch series; men’s scratch game; men’s scratch series; women’s scratch game; women’s scratch series) Week 3 Rimrock — Prineville Reservoir Resort, 1,006; Strykers Pro Shop, 2,737; DO Insulation, 1143; Gene McKenzie, 236; Jim Gregory 713; Ari Mayers, 198; Julie Mayers, 570. Week 4 50+ or - — Rusty Relics, 717; Fire Baller’s, 1,960; It’s R Turn, 832; Its A U Turn, 2,443; Buzz Stringer, 213;

fitness through organized and professionally coached dryland training sessions; open to ladies of all abilities and will focus on skill and fitness building in a fun, social atmosphere; ben@ bendenduranceacademy.org; 541-678-3864; enroll online at BendEnduranceAcademy.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC COMPETITION PROGRAM: Ages 14-23; Tuesdays through Sundays through May 1; times vary; instruction in varying activities to improve strength, technique, coordination, agility, aerobic and anaerobic capacities with the end goal to apply these skills to ski-racing environments; competition team members gain a solid understanding of physiology, technique and the ability to assist in the development of their own training plan; transportation provided; ben@ bendenduranceacademy.org or 541678-3864 with questions; enroll online at BendEnduranceAcademy. org.

SNOW SPORTS

SOCCER

MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION WINTER SPORTS SWAP: Saturday, Oct. 13; new location this year, 149 S.E. Ninth St., just south of Bend High School field; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION ALPINE, NORDIC, FREERIDE FALL DRYLAND TRAINING: Started in early September; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; mbsef.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC FALL CONDITIONING PROGRAM: Ages 11-14; Wednesdays, Oct. 10-Nov. 11; 1 p.m.-4:15 p.m.; five-week program aims to improve strength, coordination and flexibility for the upcoming nordic ski season; transportation provided from area middle schools; ben@ bendenduranceacademy.org; 541-678-3864; enroll online at BendEnduranceAcademy.org. BEND SKI CLUB MEETING: Monday, Oct. 15; 7 p.m.; Pappy’s Pizzeria, Bend; near the Bend Fred Meyer; two guest speakers; all are welcome; 541-382-1772. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC FALL LADIES (NFL): Women age 18 and older; Tuesdays through Nov. 6; 9:15 a.m.-11:45 a.m.; designed for women who wish to improve their overall ski

SOCCER STARS: Ages 6-8; Tuesdays, Oct. 9-23; 3:45 p.m.4:30 p.m.; RAPRD Activity Center, Redmond; skill-based classes working on dribbling, passing and scrimmaging; shin guards and gym shoes recommended, no cleats allowed; $20; 541-548-7275; raprd. org. PEEWEE SOCCER LEVEL I AND II: Ages 3-5; Level I is Wednesdays, Oct. 10-24; 11 a.m.-11:30 a.m. or 12:30 p.m.-1 p.m. and is for beginners; Level II is Thursdays, Oct. 11-25 and is for those with previous Peewee class experience; 3:45-4:15 p.m.; RAPRD Activity Center, Redmond; $17; 541-5487275; raprd.org. SOCCER OPEN PLAY (ADULT): Age 14 and older; no cleats, but shinguards required; $7; Friday nights; coed 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m., men 8:30 p.m.-10 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Soccer, Bend; 541-330-1183; callie@cascadeindoorsoccer.com; cascadeindoorsports.com.

SWIMMING ADAPTIVE SWIM LESSONS: All ages; for swimmers with disabilities; instructional staff is trained in adaptive aquatics and instruction techniques for patrons with developmental disabilities; Mondays, Wednesdays and

Fridays, Oct. 15-Nov. 2; 5:30 p.m.-6 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $32; 541-548-7275; raprd.org. WATERBABIES: Basic water skills for infants and toddlers; ages 6 months through 3 years; games and challenges; parent participation; next session is Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, Oct. 15Nov. 2; 6 p.m.-6:30 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $32; 541548-7275; raprd.org. AQUA KIDS SWIM LESSONS: Ages 3-5 and 6-11; next session is Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, Oct. 25-Nov. 2; 5:30 p.m.-6 p.m. and 6 p.m.-6:30 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $32; 541-548-7275; raprd.org. PRECOMP KIDS: Grades one through eight; advanced swimlesson program that serves as a feeder for Cascade Aquatic Club; must be able to swim one length of crawl stroke with side breathing and one length of backstroke in a level position; Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, Oct. 15-Nov. 2; 5:30 p.m.-6 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $32; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. CSC CLUB POLO: With the Cascade Swim Club; Thursdays; 7:15 p.m.8:25 p.m.; beginners through experienced players; drop-in fees apply; 541-548-7275. REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT FAMILY SWIM NIGHT: 7:25 p.m.-8:25 p.m., Tuesdays, Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; adult must accompany anyone under age 18; $10 per family; 541-548-7275, raprd.org.

VOLLEYBALL VOLLEYBALL CLINIC: For players in grades three through five; Sundays, Oct. 7-21; 4 p.m.-6 p.m.; Pilot Butte Middle School, Bend; sessions will be directed by local high school coaches, their staff and players; $49 park district residents, $66 otherwise; bendparksandrec.org; 541-389-7275. BEND HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL CAMP: For girls in grades three through eight; Friday, Oct. 12 (no-school day); 8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. for grades three through five; noon-3 p.m. for grades six through eight; Pilot Butte Middle School, Bend; $22 park district residents, $30 otherwise; players should take knee pads and a water bottle; space limited; register at bendparksandrec.org; 541-389-7275.

IDA’S CUPCAKE CAFE received over 230 coupons after running just one ad in The Bulletin.

THE LOCAL NEWSPAPER = LOCAL RESULTS!

COMMUNITY SPORTS SCOREBOARD Bowling

FootZone in downtown Bend, on Brooks Alley; untimed 2K, 5K and 10-mile runs; recommended $5 cash or check and five cans of food for Neighbor Impact; pie for participants; footzonebend.com; 541-317-3568. REDMOND OREGON RUNNING KLUB (RORK): Weekly run/walk; Saturdays at 8 a.m.; all levels welcome; free; for more information and to be added to a weekly email list, email Dan Edwards at rundanorun19@yahoo.com; follow Redmond Oregon Running Klub on Facebook. GOOD FORM RUNNING LEVEL 1 AND 2 CLINICS: Level 1 is a free 90-minute clinic that uses drills and video to work on proper mechanics; see schedule online for Level 1 dates; Level 2 is offered the first Tuesday of every month with Dave Cieslowski of Focus Physical Therapy to help runners find their best form; clinic sizes limited; 541317-3568; sign up at footzonebend. com/events/clinics; teague@ footzonebend.com.

Matt Hawes, 642; Darlee Stringer, 156; Laura Hawes, 468. Grizzly Mountain Men’s — Prineville Reservoir Resort, 990; Carson Oil, 2,965; Oregon Vision Center, 1,102; Killer Whale Audio, 3,265; Matt Hawes, 268; Grant Benton, 720; Marc Turner, 290; Levi Nichols, 768. Happy Bowlers — Golden Strikes, 632; Golden Strikes, 1,625; John Thurman, 177; Les Emerson, 381; Bobbi Asher, 176; Margaret Kemper, 456.

IDA’S CUPCAKE CAFE baked up a coupon idea to bring in more customers. They ran a one-day-only coupon that gave The Bulletin’s 70,000 readers a very tasty offer. The deal was so sweet that over 230 people couldn’t resist! IDA’S CUPCAKE CAFE got immediate results from one bite-sized coupon in The Bulletin. If you’d like to cook up some advertising results, call us today!

Flag football Bend Park & Recreation District Adult league standings and scores Week 3 Standings — 1, Naideens Boyz, 3-0. 2, Mavericks, 1-1. 3, Goodyear, 1-1. 4, Gamecocks, 1-2. 5, Daddy Wayne’s, 0-2. Scores — Goodyear, 13, Gamecocks 7; Naideens Boyz, 18, Mavericks, 0.

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 | To Advertise call 541-382-1811


BUSIN E SS

E

Stock listings, E2-3 Calendar, E4 Deeds, E4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

t

NASDAQ

CLOSE 3,113.53 CHANGE -2.70 -.09%

IN BRIEF American Express to pay penalty American Express Co., the biggest creditcard issuer by purchases, will pay $112.5 million to settle claims it violated consumer safeguards from marketing to collections in products sold to about 250,000 customers. “Several American Express companies violated consumer protection laws and those laws were violated at all stages of the game — from the moment a consumer shopped for a card to the moment the consumer got a phone call about long-overdue debt,” Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray said Monday in a statement announcing the settlement.

s

DOW JONES

www.bendbulletin.com/business CLOSE 13,515.11 CHANGE +77.98 +.58%

s

S&P 500

CLOSE 1,444.49 CHANGE +3.82 +.27%

n

BONDS

10-year Treasury

CLOSE 1.63 NO CHANGE

s

$1,780.50 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$9.40

• After-tax income would decline by about 6.2 percent next year, a new study says By Lori Montgomery The Washington Post

Nearly 90 percent of Americans would face higher taxes next year if Congress permits the nation to hurtle over the “fiscal cliff,” the year-end precipice of tax hikes and spending cuts that threatens to throw the nation back into recession. A study published Monday by the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center finds that taxes

would go up by a collective $536 billion next year, or about $3,500 per household, reducing after-tax income by about 6.2 percent. But the impact would vary significantly by income level, the study found, ranging from a $412 jump for the lowest earners (a reduction of 3.7 percent in after-tax income) to $120,000 for the top 1 percent (a bite of 10.5 percent). Middle-income households

— those earning between $40,000 and $65,000 a year — would see their taxes go up by an average of $2,000, the study found, leaving families with 4.4 percent less money to spend. For most taxpayers, the bulk of the increase would be triggered by the scheduled expiration of tax cuts enacted in 2001 and 2003 during the George W. Bush administration. The expiration of President Barack Obama’s payroll tax holiday, which shaves 2 percentage points off payments to Social Security,

comes in a close second. But the lowest earners would be hardest hit by the expiration of tax breaks enacted as part of Obama’s 2009 economic stimulus package, the study found. Those losses would include an expansion of the earned income tax credit and the child tax credit for working families, as well as a $2,500 credit for college tuition, which would shrink to $1,800 and be available for only two years instead of the current four. See Taxes / E3

EXECUTIVE FILE

U.S. builders spent more to construct homes in August, further evidence of a housing rebound. Still, the increase couldn’t offset cuts in public projects and commercial real estate. Overall construction spending dipped 0.7 percent in August from July, the Commerce Department reported Monday. It was the second straight monthly decline. The decline lowered construction spending to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $834.4 billion. That’s nearly 12 percent above a 12-year low hit in February 2011 and roughly half of what’s considered healthy.

Honda recalls 600,000 Accords

— From wire reports

Slower growth The Commerce Department said the U.S. economy grew at an annual rate of 1.3 percent in the second quarter, slower than the previous estimate of 1.7 percent.

P e t e Erickson / The Bulletin

Michele Cormalis, owner of Sisters-based Four Paws Mobile Pet Grooming, dries Bomber, a chocolate Labrador retriever owned by Gail Chehab, of Bend. Bomber is one of about 30 dogs Cormalis will groom this week.

Groomer on the go sees growing market By Rachael Rees The Bulletin

After lowering an electric hydraulic grooming table, Michele Cormalis lifted Bomber, a chocolate Labrador retriever, onto the table inside her pet-grooming trailer and placed him in the stainless steel tub for his monthly bath. As he sat, tail wagging, she rinsed him with warm water and soaped him up with aloe oatmeal shampoo. Bomber is one of about 30 dogs Cormalis plans to groom this week through her mobile dog-grooming service, Four Paws Mobile Pet Grooming. From sparkling colored toenails to fresh haircuts, pooches in Central Oregon can have salon service at their doors. “Some dogs do well in a salon environment, but others prefer the mobile grooming,” said Cormalis, the owner of the Sisters-based mobile dog-grooming company. “It’s more personal and private.”

Bloomberg News

4 3 2

1.3%

1 0

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 2011 2012

Source: Commerce Dept. AP

The basics What: Four Paws Mobile Pet Grooming Where: Based in Sisters Employees: 1 Phone: 541-382-6344 Website: www.fourpawspet.com/index .htm

Gail Chehab, Bomber’s owner, said she’s been using Cormalis’ grooming service since she moved to Bend about a year ago. But for more than a decade, she’s used similar services. “I like that it comes to my house,” Chehab said. “It’s very convenient. My dogs are comfortable … I can look right inside and see it’s clean for myself. Cormalis, 39, has been involved in the canine world since her parents bought her

an English setter, Jim, for her 13th birthday. At the age of 14, she started bathing and drying dogs alongside a professional groomer in a salon, and throughout the years learned how to groom all breeds from start to finish. But when Cormalis moved to Sisters, she left the salon behind and decided to go mobile. “I had always wanted to do mobile grooming because of the many benefits and the convenience it has to offer the customer and their pets,” she said. “Since Bend is such a dog-friendly community, I felt this was an excellent opportunity to start my mobile grooming business.” In 2009, she opened Waggin’ Tails, equipped with her own 16-foot mobilegrooming trailer constructed by her husband, Andre. Six months later, she bought Four Paws Mobile Pet Grooming, an 8year-old business based in Redmond. See Groomer / E3

Intel software snag delays Windows tablets By Dina Bass

5 percent

SILVER

CLOSE $34.881 CHANGE +$0.364

‘Fiscal cliff’ would bring big tax hike Venture

Construction spending dips

Honda is recalling 600,000 Accord midsize cars in the U.S. and Canada to fix a faulty power steering hose that can leak fluid and cause a fire. The recall affects Accords with V-6 engines from the 2003 through 2007 model years. Honda has a report of one fire but no injuries or crashes. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the government agency that monitors vehicle safety, said in a posting on its website during the weekend that the Accord’s power steering hose can deteriorate with prolonged exposure to engine heat. The hoses can crack and leak, possibly causing a fire or loss of powerassisted steering, the documents said. Honda will replace the hoses for free, but it won’t have the parts available until early next year.

s

SAN FRANCISCO — Intel Corp.’s delayed delivery of software that conserves computer battery life is holding up development of some tablets running the latest version of Microsoft’s Windows operating system, a person with knowledge of the matter said. Microsoft hasn’t yet approved any tablets featuring an Intel processor code-named Clover Trail

because the chipmaker hasn’t produced necessary powermanagement software, said the person, who asked not to be TECH since FOCUS named the process is private. The delay, following remarks by Intel Chief Executive Officer Paul Otellini, who told employees in Taiwan that Windows 8 needs improvement, underscores how the Wintel alliance that has domi-

nated the personal computer industry for three decades is struggling to respond to the threat of Apple’s iPad. At stake is the chance to make up for lackluster PC buying by capturing users who are flocking to mobile devices, snappy applications and elegant design. “The PC channel is in chaos right now,” said Alex Gauna, an analyst at JMP Securities in San Francisco. “They don’t know what to do. They don’t

know what to design for, they don’t know what the consumers are going to buy. Tablets have stolen their growth trajectory, plus the macro situation, plus Wintel has made a mess of their ecosystem.” PC makers, including Hewlett-Packard, Dell and Lenovo Group, are counting on the new version of Windows to help them compete in the $63.2 billion tablet market dominated by Apple. See Windows / E3

conference announces 5 finalists

Bulletin staff report Five finalists have been chosen to compete for a $10,000 grant in the Concept Stage at the Bend Venture Conference later this month, Economic Development for Central Oregon announced Monday. The BVC brings entrepreneurs and their business ideas face to face with investors and economic development officials. In the Concept Stage, companies with little more than an idea compete for $10,000, which helps the winner get his or her business off the ground. Startups — companies in the preliminary stages or even possibly generating positive revenue — compete in the Launch Stage category for a larger prize, such as last year’s $250,000. Audience members at Thursday’s EDCO Pub Talk picked the five Concept Stage finalists from 10 companies that participated, according to a news release from EDCO. This year’s Concept Stage finalists are: • Agrowpedia, an information technology service provider for gardeners and small farmers; • E-Z Leave, a website to help human resource workers navigate state and federal laws for employee leave; • K.A.D. Innovations, a company that hopes to develop products to simplify kebab making; • Play Habit, a videogame developer for mobile devices, and • ziPede, a maker of educational videos for families visiting pediatric offices The winner will be announced at the end of the two-day Bend Venture Conference, Oct. 18 and 19 at the Tower Theatre, along with the BVC Launch Stage winner, who can earn $250,000 or more from investors. Those selected to compete in the Launch Stage are expected to be announced Wednesday.

Kraft gets reheated in new company By David Welch Bloomberg News

NEW YORK — Kraft’s North American grocery business, which Monday listed on the Nasdaq Stock Market as an independent company, is starting life with a handicap: years of underinvestment in new products and marketing. The original Kraft Foods Inc., founded in 1909, is becoming two companies: an international snacks business called Mondelez International Inc. and Kraft Foods Group, the North American grocery enterprise. While the snacks business has grown almost 30 percent a year since 2009, its spun-off sibling is saddled with a portfolio of aging brands in need of freshening as it confronts potent rivals and rising commodity costs. See Kraft / E4


E2

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

Consolidated stock listings N m

D

C

A-B-C-D AAR 0.30 ABB Ltd 0.71 ABM 0.58 ACE Ltd 1.92 ACI Wwde ADT Cp n AES Corp 0.16 AFLAC 1.32 AFLAC 52 1.38 AGCO AGIC Cv 1.08 AGIC Cv2 1.02 AGL Res 1.84 AK Steel AMC Net AMN Hlth AOL 5.15 API Tech ASML Hld 0.59 AT&T Inc 1.76 AU Optron AVX Cp 0.30 AZZ Inc s 0.56 Aarons 0.06 AbtLab 2.04 AberFitc 0.70 AbdAsPac 0.42 Abiomed Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh AcadiaRlt 0.72 Accenture 1.49 AccessMid 1.68 AccoBrds AccretivH Accuray Accuride Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActiveNet ActivsBliz 0.18 Actuant 0.04 Acuity 0.52 Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran 0.36 AdvAuto 0.24 AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi 0.11 AdvOil&Gs AdventSoft Adventrx AdvActBear AecomTch Aegerion Aegon 0.25 AerCap Aeropostl AEterna gh Aetna 0.70 AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agilent 0.40 Agnico g 0.80 Agrium g 1.00 AirLease AirProd 2.56 AirTrnsp Aircastle 0.60 Airgas 1.60 AkamaiT Akorn AlaskAir s AlaskCom 0.20 Albemarle 0.80 AlcatelLuc Alcoa 0.12 Alere AlxB Inc n AlexREE 2.12 AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza rs AlignTech Alkermes AllegTch 0.72 Allergan 0.20 AlliData AlliBGlbHi 1.20 AlliBInco 0.48 AlliantEgy 1.80 AlliantTch 0.80 AlldNevG AlldWldA 1.50 AllisonT n 0.24 AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate 0.88 AlnylamP AlonUSA 0.16 AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp 0.60 AlpTotDiv 0.66 AlpAlerMLP 1.00 AlteraCp lf 0.40 Altria 1.76 Alvarion h AmBev 0.63 AmTrstFin 0.40 Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren 1.60 Amerigrp AMovilL 0.28 AmApparel AmAssets 0.84 AmAxle AmCampus 1.35 ACapAgy 5.00 AmCapLtd ACapMtg 3.60 AEagleOut 0.44 AEP 1.88 AEqInvLf 0.12 AmExp 0.80 AFnclGrp 0.78 AGreet 0.60 AmIntlGrp ARltyCT n 0.72 AmSupr AmTower 0.92 AVangrd 0.13 AmWtrWks 1.00 Ameriprise 1.40 AmeriBrgn 0.52 Ametek s 0.24 Amgen 1.44 AmkorTch Amphenol 0.42 AmpioPhm Amyris Anadarko 0.36 Anadigc AnalogDev 1.20 Ancestry AngiesL n AnglogldA 0.61 ABInBev 1.57 Anixter 4.50 Ann Inc Annaly 2.17 Ansys AntaresP AntheraPh Anworth 0.75 Aon plc 0.63 A123 Sys h Apache 0.68 AptInv 0.80 ApolloGM 1.65 ApolloGrp ApolloInv 0.80 ApolloRM 3.40 Apple Inc 10.60 ApldIndlT 0.84 ApldMatl 0.36 AMCC Approach ApricusBio Aptargrp 0.92 AquaAm 0.70 ArQule ArcelorMit 0.75 ArchCap ArchCoal 0.12 ArchDan 0.70 ArcosDor 0.24 ArenaPhm AresCap 1.52 AriadP ArkBest 0.12 ArmHld 0.18 ArmourRsd 1.08 ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRt s AscentSolr AshfordHT 0.44 Ashland 0.90 AspenIns 0.68 AspenTech AspnBio rs AsscdBanc 0.20 AsdEstat 0.72 Assurant 0.84 AssuredG 0.36 AstexPhm AstoriaF 0.16 AstraZen 2.85 athenahlth Athersys AtlPwr g 1.15 AtlasEngy 1.00 Atmel ATMOS 1.38 AtwoodOcn Audience n Augusta g AuRico g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv 2.00 AutoData 1.58 AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch 0.64 AvalnRare AvalonBay 3.88

16.74 18.94 18.91 76.94 40.93 37.27 10.80 47.60 24.98 46.80 9.44 8.69 40.63 4.88 43.32 10.20 35.38 2.72 53.39 37.75 3.53 9.68 37.25 27.49 69.08 33.45 7.84 21.04 2.36 26.39 2.47 24.49 69.95 33.64 6.23 11.49 7.12 4.79 10.68 17.01 25.55 12.06 11.11 28.75 63.10 18.16 32.62 16.99 67.99 12.33 3.28 3.83 3.93 24.36 .74 20.96 21.10 14.85 5.23 12.78 13.36 .67 39.81 122.49 20.97 4.32 38.86 52.72 105.53 20.59 82.85 4.49 11.62 83.09 38.21 13.00 35.17 2.32 52.70 1.05 8.91 19.71 28.69 72.75 4.24 116.00 4.57 38.00 20.64 32.13 92.63 141.51 16.07 8.70 43.20 51.96 39.22 77.42 20.67 25.00 12.84 39.95 18.85 14.04 6.58 1.65 7.37 4.46 16.70 33.86 33.64 .44 38.98 25.28 12.48 252.01 32.65 13.84 32.50 91.38 25.64 1.49 26.85 11.63 43.29 34.65 11.57 25.45 21.28 43.91 11.75 57.73 37.61 16.78 33.26 11.74 4.10 71.07 36.01 36.70 56.68 38.99 34.73 85.08 4.42 57.77 4.01 3.31 70.62 1.41 39.50 30.19 10.58 35.28 85.55 57.74 37.69 16.77 72.10 4.28 1.00 6.58 53.29 .30 86.41 25.48 14.52 28.88 7.74 22.21 659.39 41.75 11.13 4.85 30.38 3.29 51.74 24.42 4.99 14.52 42.38 6.28 27.77 15.35 8.31 17.20 23.88 7.74 27.92 7.64 5.73 12.76 34.10 22.38 28.10 20.92 1.09 8.35 71.87 30.91 24.87 2.59 12.92 15.04 37.31 13.52 3.04 9.97 47.47 89.75 1.29 14.95 35.35 5.20 35.31 45.00 5.98 2.84 6.97 5.08 43.50 33.38 63.51 58.51 369.07 24.83 34.69 1.98 135.42

+.32 +.24 -.02 +1.34 -1.33 +1.27 -.17 -.28 -.01 -.68 +.03 -.28 +.08 -.20 +.14 +.15 -.15 -.29 +.05 +.05 +.09 -.73 -.32 +.52 -.47 +.06 +.05 +.06 -1.02 -.06 -.33 -.08 +.51 -.26 +.33 +.04 +.13 +.28 -.09 -.06 -.47 -.17 +.13 -.19 -.11 +.19 -.29 -.45 +.00 -.09 +.10 +.18 -.21 +.02 -.04 -.06 +.03 +.02 +.28 -.17 -.03 +.21 -.51 -.09 -.02 +.41 +.84 +2.07 +.19 +.15 +.08 +.29 +.79 -.06 -.22 +.11 +.06 +.02 -.05 +.06 +.22 -.84 -.77 -.10 +1.60 +.17 +1.03 -.11 +.23 +1.05 -.44 +.19 +.06 -.19 +1.85 +.16 +.17 +.55 -1.52 +.42 +.34 +.06 +.34 +.01 +.05 +.03 +.13 -.14 +.25 -.05 +1.01 -.34 -.10 -2.31 -.34 +.02 -.17 -.05 +.21 -.05 +.06 +.36 -.59 +.05 +.22 +.32 +.20 -.03 +.12 +.87 -.29 -.02 +.47 -.05 -.32 +1.21 -.36 -.01 +.28 -.72 +.79 +.01 -1.11 +.11 -.13 +.70 +.02 +.33 +.11 +.23 -.36 +.28 -.04 -.07 -1.30 -.08 +.01 -.22 +1.00 +.05 -.06 -.51 -.14 -.17 -.14 +.17 -7.72 +.32 -.04 -.21 +.26 +.03 +.03 -.34 -.12 +.08 +.74 -.05 +.59 -.08 -.01 +.06 -.33 -.19 -.06 -.02 -.12 -.03 +.39 -.11 +.15 -.54 +.05 -.05 +.27 +.42 -.97 -.18 -.24 -.12 +.01 -.10 -.04 +.09 -.39 -2.02 -.10 -.01 +.81 -.07 -.48 -.45 -.22 +.14 -.02 -.18 -.17 +.03 +1.54 -.15 -.60 +.37 -.18 +.03 -.57

N m

D

AvanirPhm AVEO Ph AveryD 1.08 AvisBudg Avista 1.16 Avnet Avon 0.92 Axcelis AXIS Cap 0.96 B&G Foods 1.08 BB&T Cp 0.80 BBCN Bcp BCE g 2.27 B/E Aero BGC Ptrs 0.68 BHP BillLt 2.24 BHPBil plc 2.20 BJsRest BMC Sft BP PLC 1.92 BPZ Res BRE 1.54 BRFBrasil 0.27 BabckWil Baidu BakrHu 0.60 BallCorp 0.40 BallardPw BallyTech BcBilVArg 0.55 BcoBrad pf 0.58 BcoSantSA 0.82 BcoSBrasil 0.37 BncpBnk BcpSouth 0.04 BkofAm 0.04 BkAm wtA BkHawaii 1.80 BkIreld rs BkMont g 2.88 BkNYMel 0.52 BkNYM pfC 1.30 BkNova g 2.28 Bankrate BankUtd 0.68 BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPNG Barclay 0.39 Bar iPVix BarVixMdT Bard 0.80 BarnesNob BarrickG 0.80 BasicEnSv Baxter 1.80 Bazaarvc n BeacnRfg Beam Inc 0.82 BeazerHm BebeStrs 0.10 BectDck 1.80 BedBath Belo 0.32 Bemis 1.00 BenchElec Berkley 0.36 BerkH B BerryPet 0.32 BestBuy 0.68 Big 5Sprt 0.30 BigLots BBarrett BioRefLab BioDlvry lf Biocryst BioFuel rs BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR 0.86 BioSante rs BioScrip BlkHillsCp 1.48 BlkRKelso 1.04 Blckbaud 0.48 BlackRock 6.00 BlkCrAll4 0.94 BlkDebtStr 0.32 BlkEEqDv 0.68 BlkIntlG&I 0.67 Blackstone 0.40 BlockHR 0.80 BloominB n Blount Blucora Blyth s 0.20 BdwlkPpl 2.13 BodyCentrl Boeing 1.76 Boise Inc 0.48 BonTon 0.20 BoozAlln s 0.36 BorgWarn BostBeer BostProp 2.20 BostonSci BoxShips 1.04 BoydGm BradyCp 0.76 Brandyw 0.60 Braskem 0.65 BravoBrio BreitBurn 1.84 BrigStrat 0.48 Brightcv n Brightpnt BrigusG g Brinker 0.80 Brinks 0.40 BrMySq 1.36 BritATob 4.10 Broadcom 0.40 BroadrdgF 0.72 BroadSoft BroadVisn BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g 0.56 BrkfldOfPr 0.56 BrkfldRP BrklneB 0.34 BrooksAuto 0.32 BrwnBrn 0.34 BrownShoe 0.28 BrownFB s 0.93 BrukerCp Brunswick 0.05 Buckeye 4.15 BuckTch 0.32 Buckle 0.80 Buenavent 0.63 BuffaloWW BungeLt 1.08 BurgerK n C&J Engy CA Inc 1.00 CBL Asc 0.88 CBOE 0.60 CBRE GRE 0.54 CBRE Grp CBS B 0.48 CF Inds 1.60 CH Robins 1.32 CIT Grp CLECO 1.35 CME Grp s 1.80 CMS Eng 0.96 CNH Gbl CNO Fincl 0.08 CPFL Eng 1.54 CSG Sys CSX 0.56 CTC Media 0.52 CVB Fncl 0.34 CVR Engy 0.32 CVS Care 0.65 CYS Invest 1.80 Cabelas CblvsnNY 0.60 Cabot 0.80 CabotOG s 0.08 CACI CadencePh Cadence Caesars n CalDive Cal-Maine 1.25 CalaCvHi 1.02 CalaStrTR 0.84 CalAmp Calgon Calix CallGolf 0.04 Calpine CalumetSp 2.36 Cambrex CamdenPT 2.24 Cameco g 0.40 Cameron CampSp 1.16 CampusCC 0.64 CdnNRy g 1.50 CdnNRs gs 0.42 CP Rwy g 1.40 CdnSolar Canon CapOne 0.20 CapOne pfP 1.50 CapitlSrce 0.04 CapFedFn 0.30 CapsteadM 1.70 CpstnTrb h CarboCer 1.08 CardnlHlth 0.95 Cardiom gh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle 0.80 CarMax Carmike Carnival 1.00 CarpTech 0.72 Carrizo Carters CasellaW Caseys 0.66 CastleAM CatalystPh Catamaran Caterpillar 2.08 CathayGen 0.04 Cavium CazadorA h CedarF 1.90 CedarRlty 0.20 CelSci Celadon 0.08 Celanese 0.30 Celgene Celgene rt

3.27 10.22 31.89 15.46 25.79 28.52 16.15 1.05 35.32 30.76 32.96 12.72 44.20 41.96 4.92 69.02 63.20 45.29 42.85 42.22 2.80 46.91 17.62 25.39 112.77 45.05 42.47 .87 49.31 7.74 16.29 7.44 7.60 10.44 14.53 8.96 3.56 45.50 5.50 59.33 22.93 24.86 54.89 16.39 24.47 44.41 22.41 3.22 14.14 9.09 33.90 104.98 12.36 41.90 10.79 60.09 15.56 28.16 58.10 3.53 4.75 78.95 63.11 7.92 31.49 15.43 37.40 88.66 40.28 16.99 10.03 30.14 24.75 29.57 6.55 4.31 5.89 149.94 39.87 18.42 1.87 9.26 35.60 9.99 24.00 179.86 14.21 4.54 7.52 7.33 14.31 17.64 16.37 13.27 18.20 26.77 27.95 11.45 70.01 8.74 10.34 13.84 71.14 109.08 109.44 5.69 5.51 6.97 29.24 12.10 14.26 14.21 19.60 19.09 11.99 8.96 .99 34.40 25.68 33.91 103.40 34.11 23.05 39.19 9.79 5.99 23.31 34.36 16.40 14.86 8.72 7.80 26.08 16.10 65.49 13.29 22.50 48.75 31.72 46.04 38.84 86.20 67.74 14.35 20.00 25.45 21.10 29.56 8.88 18.65 35.52 224.51 59.10 39.21 41.82 57.10 23.43 38.91 9.80 22.11 22.70 20.81 9.09 11.88 40.18 48.67 14.15 54.98 15.79 36.20 45.70 52.38 3.92 12.68 6.61 1.47 45.74 12.63 10.23 8.33 14.45 6.44 6.40 17.36 33.07 11.89 64.10 19.64 55.90 35.04 10.61 88.86 31.51 84.18 2.84 32.66 58.06 24.97 7.58 12.00 13.43 1.00 63.80 39.50 .33 29.56 28.32 3.85 52.23 28.42 12.08 36.02 52.51 25.73 54.17 4.35 56.84 12.76 1.52 99.12 85.47 17.22 32.98 9.89 33.28 5.32 .35 15.35 37.72 76.78 2.99

C

N m

+.07 -.19 +.07 +.08 +.05 -.57 +.20

CellTher rs Cellcom 1.71 CelldexTh Celsion Cemex 0.32 Cemig pf s 1.18 Cencosud n 0.11 CenovusE 0.88 Centene CenterPnt 0.81 CnElBras pf 0.87 CenElBras 0.65 CentEuro lf CEurMed CFCda g 0.01 CentAl CntryLink 2.90 Cenveo Cepheid Ceradyne 0.60 Cereplast h Cerner ChRvLab ChartInds CharterCm ChkPoint Cheesecake 0.48 ChelseaTh Chemtura CheniereEn CheniereE 1.70 ChesEng 0.35 ChespkLdg 0.88 Chevron 3.60 ChicB&I 0.20 Chicos 0.21 ChildPlace Chimera 0.40 ChKanghui ChinaMble 2.18 ChinaUni 0.16 ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb 1.64 ChurchDwt 0.96 ChuysHld n CienaCorp Cigna 0.04 Cimarex 0.48 CinciBell CinnFin 1.63 Cinemark 0.84 Cintas 0.54 Cirrus Cisco 0.56 Citigroup 0.04 CitzRepBc CitrixSys CityNC 1.00 Clarcor 0.54 ClaudeR g CleanEngy CleanHarb ClearChn s 6.08 Clearwire CliffsNRs 2.50 Clorox 2.56 CloudPeak Coach 1.20 CobaltIEn CocaCola s 1.02 CocaCE 0.64 Coeur CogentC 0.40 CognizTech CohStInfra 1.44 CohStQIR 0.72 Coinstar ColdwCrk h Colfax ColgPal 2.48 CollctvBrd ColonPT 0.72 ColonyFncl 1.40 ColBnkg 0.36 ColumLab Comcast 0.65 Comc spcl 0.65 Comerica 0.60 CmcBMO 0.92 CmclMtls 0.48 CmclVehcl CmwREIT 2.00 CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao 0.22 CompssMn 1.89 CmplGnom CompSci 0.80 Compuwre ComstkMn ComstkRs Comverse Con-Way 0.40 ConAgra 1.00 ConchoRes ConcurTch Conns ConocPhil s 2.64 ConsolEngy 0.50 ConEd 2.42 ConstantC ConstellA ContlRes Cnvrgys 0.20 CooperCo 0.06 Cooper Ind 1.24 CooperTire 0.42 CopaHold 2.10 Copart s Copel 0.94 CoreLabs 1.12 CoreLogic CoreSite 0.72 CorinthC CorOnDem CornstProg 1.10 CornerstStr 1.33 Corning 0.30 CorpOffP 1.10 CorrectnCp 0.80 Cosan Ltd 0.29 Costco 1.10 Cott Cp CousPrp 0.18 Covance CovantaH 0.60 CoventryH 0.50 Covidien 1.04 CrackerB 2.00 Crane 1.12 CSVInvNG CSVLgNGs CS VS3xSlv CSVS2xVxS CSVelIVSt CSVSVixST CredSuiss 0.82 CrSuiHiY 0.32 Cree Inc CreXus 1.21 Crocs Crosshr g CrwnCstle CrownHold Ctrip.com CubeSmart 0.32 CubistPh CullenFr 1.92 Cummins 2.00 CumMed CurEuro 0.05 CurAstla 3.46 Cyberonics Cymer CypSemi 0.44 Cytec 0.50 Cytori DARA Bio DCT Indl 0.28 DDR Corp 0.48 DFC Glbl DNP Selct 0.78 DR Horton 0.15 DST Sys 0.80 DSW Inc 0.72 DTE 2.48 DanaHldg 0.20 Danaher 0.10 Darden 2.00 Darling DaVita DeVry 0.30 DealrTrk DeanFds DeckrsOut Deere 1.84 DejourE g Delcath Delek 0.15 Dell Inc 0.32 DelphiAu n DeltaAir Deluxe 1.00 DemndMda Demndw n DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dentsply 0.22 DeutschBk 0.92 DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevonE 0.80 Dex One DexCom Diageo 2.76 DiamndF hlf DiaOffs 0.50 DiamRk 0.32 DianaCont 0.85 DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg 0.50 Diebold 1.14 DigitalGen DigitalRlt 2.92 DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards 0.20 DirecTV DxEMBll rs 0.09 DxFnBull rs DirSCBear DirFnBear DirSPBear DirDGldBr 1.98 DirDGldBll 1.02 DrxTcBear

+.40 +.45 -.20 +.11 +.26 -.15 +.02 +.41 +.74 -.06 +1.36 -.14 -.06 +.02 +.32 -.08 -4.12 -.18 +.16 +.15 -.08 -.01 +.22 -.02 +.23 +.17 -.21 +.13 +.03 -.12 -.02 +.29 +.31 +.01 +.07 +.81 -.14 +.20 +.09 +.16 +.27 +.09 +.03 +.33 -.42 +.14 -.43 -.18 +.41 -.32 +.56 -.02 -.05 +.39 +.11 +.09 +.02 +.16 -.09 +.46 -.35 -.21 +.03 +.56 -.02 +.99 +.23 +.07 +.82 +.73 -.39 -.30 -.02 +.15 +.03 +.27 +.08 +1.56 +.03 +.03 -.04 +.04 +.03 +.31 -.08 +.11 +.39 +.78 +.05 +1.00 +.42 -.02 +.84 -.01 +2.03 -2.89 -1.17 -.05 -.44 -.09 -.04 -.09 +.15 -.34 +.17 +.42 +.31 -.01 -.90 -.01 +.16 +.76 -.47 -.28 -1.83 +.42 +.08 +.09 -.15 -.16 +.88 -.10 -.23 +.01 +.07 +.24 +.20 -.13 +.78 -.34 +.61 -.12 +.46 +.69 +.41 +.10 -.31 -.24 +.16 +.01 +.24 -.81 +2.27 +.52 -.18 -.16 -.19 -.12 +.14 +.15 +.20 +.21 +.06 +.04 +.03 +3.43 +.25 +.06 +.30 -.06 -.37 +.80 +.59 -.00 -.19 -.19 -.06 +.80 -.03 +.06 +.12 +.14 +.04 +.26 +.06 +1.07 +.16 -.39 +.19 -.17 +.22 -.19 +.63 +.72 +1.29 +.05 +.65 +1.05 -.05 +.04 -.06 +.88 +.53 -.00 -.20 -.07 +.09 +.31 +.12 +.80 -.41 +.19 +.72 +.33 +.08 -.30 +.27 +.01 +1.15 -.57 -.04 -.33 -.15 -.19 +.04 +.00 -.72 -.19 +.38 +.16

D

C 2.23 -.19 8.43 -.22 6.38 +.08 5.55 +.11 8.50 +.17 12.16 +.04 18.40 +.05 35.16 +.31 37.03 -.38 21.15 -.15 8.99 -.04 6.04 +.11 2.75 -.10 6.76 +.25 24.05 +.24 7.38 +.22 39.22 -1.18 2.41 +.12 34.48 -.02 34.97 +10.54 .26 77.41 +.02 39.92 +.32 74.11 +.26 75.01 -.05 46.72 -1.44 35.71 -.04 1.14 -.06 17.43 +.21 15.49 -.04 23.22 +.35 19.29 +.42 20.14 +.27 117.25 +.69 38.63 +.54 18.02 -.09 60.04 +.04 2.71 30.40 +.05 55.51 +.15 16.49 +.18 15.92 +.07 316.13 -1.41 7.60 -.04 3.55 +.04 77.29 +1.01 54.45 +.46 27.25 +2.73 13.15 -.45 48.09 +.92 58.39 -.16 5.75 +.05 37.84 -.03 22.55 +.12 41.69 +.26 37.60 -.79 19.04 -.06 32.75 +.03 19.59 +.24 75.89 -.64 51.55 +.04 44.57 -.06 .85 +.01 13.18 +.01 47.91 -.94 5.93 -.05 1.34 38.88 -.25 72.28 +.23 18.42 +.32 54.67 -1.35 22.22 -.05 38.38 +.45 31.61 +.34 29.15 +.32 22.39 -.60 71.25 +1.36 18.44 +.22 10.55 -.19 44.45 -.53 .98 +.14 36.18 -.49 107.99 +.77 21.73 +.02 21.00 -.05 19.67 +.19 18.70 +.16 .97 -.03 35.38 -.21 34.44 -.21 31.04 -.01 40.08 -.25 13.19 -.01 7.02 -.33 14.28 -.28 29.76 +.62 57.56 -1.10 45.64 +.53 74.57 -.02 3.10 -.01 31.74 -.47 9.70 -.19 3.23 -.04 19.27 +.89 6.17 +.01 27.34 -.03 27.77 +.18 97.48 +2.73 72.75 -.98 23.62 +1.57 57.41 +.23 30.45 +.40 59.48 -.41 18.05 +.65 32.67 +.32 76.80 -.10 15.56 -.11 94.04 -.42 74.94 -.12 19.50 +.32 83.22 +1.95 27.45 -.28 16.42 120.63 -.85 26.43 -.10 26.63 -.31 2.46 +.07 31.44 +.78 5.68 7.64 +.05 13.09 -.06 23.90 -.07 33.39 -.06 15.79 -.07 100.51 +.35 8.00 +.10 7.96 +.02 47.40 +.71 17.17 +.01 41.82 +.13 59.28 -.14 67.74 +.63 40.65 +.72 15.35 -2.41 38.70 +4.68 41.77 +.65 1.53 +.01 16.84 -.18 19.63 +.19 21.67 +.52 3.28 -.02 25.64 +.14 10.91 +.10 16.12 -.09 .14 -.01 63.78 -.32 36.95 +.20 16.75 -.13 12.69 -.18 48.03 +.34 57.06 -.37 92.31 +.10 2.76 +.02 128.04 +.35 103.70 -.06 51.50 -.92 51.22 +.16 10.61 -.10 65.32 -.20 4.13 -.28 1.00 -.05 6.46 15.23 -.13 17.20 +.05 9.75 -.11 20.70 +.08 57.06 +.50 65.75 -.97 59.51 -.43 12.37 +.07 56.25 +1.10 55.61 -.14 18.50 +.21 103.44 -.17 24.05 +1.29 28.01 +.16 16.26 -.09 36.26 -.39 82.60 +.13 .24 +.01 1.72 +.10 25.98 +.49 9.80 -.06 31.30 +.30 9.47 +.31 30.86 +.30 10.90 +.03 31.01 -.74 16.41 +.25 4.69 -.12 1.49 38.07 -.07 40.21 +.56 59.11 +.24 3.98 -.01 60.78 +.28 1.19 -.06 14.95 -.08 113.62 +.89 18.57 -.25 66.44 +.63 9.52 -.11 5.67 +.06 6.64 +.18 8.54 +.12 50.12 -1.73 33.26 -.45 11.50 +.14 69.01 -.84 16.70 +.04 20.78 +.39 72.41 +.09 52.04 -.41 91.24 +2.39 106.14 +1.20 14.74 -.14 18.02 -.20 17.05 -.13 23.40 -.31 17.92 +.20 8.21 +.05

N m

D

DrxEnBear DrxSOXBll DirEMBear DrxREBull DirxSCBull DirxSPBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCmA h DiscCmC h DiscovLab DishNetwk Disney DitechNt h DocuSec DolbyLab DoleFood DollarGen DollarTh DollarTr s DomRescs Dominos Domtar g Donldson s DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DresserR Drew Inds DryHYSt Dril-Quip DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEn rs DukeRlty DunBrad Dunkin DurectCp DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax DynexCap

2.00

0.40

2.00 0.60

2.11 3.00 1.80 0.36 1.04 0.60 1.40 1.28 1.36

0.42 1.72 0.60 3.06 0.68 1.52 0.60

1.16

C 7.51 -.14 26.73 -.23 11.37 -.37 71.44 -1.51 62.15 +.64 90.80 +.58 54.35 +.81 39.92 +.19 59.95 +.35 56.33 +.29 3.15 -.12 30.29 -.32 52.07 -.21 1.41 -.01 4.32 +.16 32.28 -.47 13.92 -.11 51.61 +.07 87.12 +.19 48.30 +.01 52.81 -.13 38.24 +.54 77.24 -1.05 34.55 -.16 10.61 +.01 1.00 +.06 23.07 59.55 +.06 29.32 +.37 44.63 +.10 2.10 -.14 19.14 -.10 54.56 -.55 30.46 +.25 4.40 +.05 71.37 -.51 2.30 -.04 50.36 +.09 24.82 -.43 64.38 -.41 14.60 -.10 80.60 +.98 28.99 -.20 1.44 2.66 +.06 14.15 -.23 4.76 10.82 +.07

E-F-G-H E-CDang E-House E-Trade eBay EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EPL O&G EQT Corp EagleMat EaglRkEn ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm s Eaton EatnVan EV LtdDur EVRiskMgd EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW EVTxBWOp Ebix Inc Ecolab Ecopetrol EdisonInt EducRlty EdwLfSci 8x8 Inc ElPasoEl ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts EFII ElizArden EllieMae Embraer EmeraldOil Emeritus EmersonEl EmpIca Emulex EnbrdgEPt Enbridge EnCana g EndvrIntl EndvSilv g EndoPhrm Endologix EndurSpec EnerNOC Energen Energizer EngyTEq EngyTsfr EngyXXI EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys Enphase n EnPro ENSCO Entegris Entergy EntPrPt EnterPT EntropCom Equifax Equinix EqLfPrp EqtyOne EqtyRsd Ericsson EssexPT EsteeLdr s Esterline EtfSilver Euronet EverestRe ExactSci h ExactTgt n ExcelM ExcoRes Exelis n Exelixis Exelon Expedia s ExpdIntl Express ExpScripts ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl EZchip F5 Netwks FEI Co FLIR Sys FMC Cp s FMC Tech FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FX Ener FXCM Facebook n FactsetR FairIsaac FairchldS FamilyDlr Fastenal FedExCp FedRlty FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo Fifth&Pac FifthStFin FifthThird FinclEngin Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstCashFn FstCwlth FFnclOH FstHorizon FstInRT FMajSilv g FstMarbhd FMidBc FstNiagara FstPotom FstRepBk FstSolar FT SCGr FT Fincl FT Matls FT Tech FT RNG FT SCCore FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FlagstBcp Fleetcor Flx3yrTips Flextrn Flotek FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA Fonar FootLockr FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil s FormFac Fortinet Fortress FortunaSlv FBHmSc n ForumEn n Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel Francesca FrancoN g FrankRes FrkStPrp FMCG

0.15

0.20 2.85 0.68 0.88 0.40 0.88 0.20 0.40 1.04 1.52 0.76 1.25 1.12 1.01 0.98 1.17 1.33 0.20 0.80 3.95 1.30 0.40 1.00 2.20 0.15

0.32 1.60 2.17 1.13 0.80

1.24 0.56 1.60 2.50 3.58 0.28 1.08 0.58

1.50 3.32 2.54 3.00 0.72 1.75 0.88 1.58 0.35 4.40 0.53

1.92

0.16 0.41 0.10 2.10 0.52 0.56

0.80 2.28 0.32 0.28 0.36 0.48

0.24 1.24 0.08 0.84 0.76 0.56 2.92 0.96

0.56 0.80 1.15 0.40 0.24 0.32 0.20 0.60 0.04

0.04 0.32 0.80 0.40 0.02 0.20 0.27 0.01 0.08 0.17 2.20 0.64

0.26 0.64 1.44 0.64 0.41 1.21 0.72 0.20

0.20

1.76 0.60 1.08 0.76 1.25

4.67 4.40 8.94 48.23 27.26 29.14 44.41 114.19 20.65 60.04 47.54 9.56 7.27 21.16 57.16 47.14 28.78 17.09 10.65 9.57 8.80 11.14 12.99 23.52 64.93 58.59 45.96 10.43 107.77 6.37 34.15 37.40 10.93 15.38 12.35 16.58 46.63 26.65 27.15 .84 20.99 47.93 8.16 7.39 29.72 39.33 22.77 9.81 10.06 32.24 13.60 39.53 13.02 51.64 73.91 45.70 42.20 35.60 2.78 16.90 16.84 35.52 3.89 36.62 54.77 8.35 69.23 53.98 44.81 5.61 47.10 203.23 68.37 20.76 57.21 9.04 146.22 63.16 58.33 34.40 19.16 108.30 11.17 24.10 .60 8.34 10.51 4.75 35.40 56.94 36.14 15.01 63.22 20.30 32.93 3.30 91.80 31.10 104.69 52.88 20.08 56.33 46.93 11.28 6.19 26.06 7.45 9.63 21.99 95.29 43.44 12.91 65.38 44.60 85.02 105.13 20.78 4.73 3.49 9.43 21.53 30.89 12.77 10.87 15.48 24.15 14.07 22.74 21.63 46.84 7.11 16.91 9.71 13.16 22.94 1.05 12.65 7.99 12.95 33.37 21.93 21.59 15.26 24.34 21.41 17.59 33.80 44.06 14.84 74.11 1.11 44.38 25.45 6.00 12.90 19.78 127.84 56.73 23.56 91.94 4.89 35.24 9.93 1.08 15.73 36.00 8.56 5.65 23.40 4.42 5.34 26.78 23.72 86.03 23.89 11.97 31.49 60.77 125.85 11.13 39.85

-.05 +.12 +.14 -.14 -.01 +.60 +.57 +2.14 +.36 +1.04 +1.28 +.14 +.04 +.15 -.13 -.18 +.11 +.12 +.06 -.01 +.04 -.02 -.09 +.12 -.34 +.27 -.47 +.40 -.19 -.10 +.18 +.21 +.14 -.34 -.04 -.61 -.58 +.53 +.01 +.05 -.34 +.42 +.18 +.28 +.30 +.85 +.14 +.08 +.53 -.22 +1.03 +.04 -.77 -.70 +.50 -.37 +.64 +.05 +.29 +.45 +.23 -.25 +.61 +.21 +.22 -.07 +.38 +.38 -.21 +.52 -2.82 +.25 -.30 -.32 -.08 -2.02 +1.59 +2.19 +.20 +.37 +1.34 +.17 -.12 -.09 +.33 +.17 -.08 -.18 -.91 -.21 +.19 +.59 +.02 -.32 -.05 +.35 +.51 +.05 -.62 +.11 +.95 +.63 +.07 +.01 -.62 +.08 +.33 -1.13 -.82 -.21 -.92 +1.61 +.40 -.17 +.09 -.01 +.06 +.09 +.14 -.33 -.01 -.11 -.02 +.34 -.25 +.01 -.04 +.83 +.06 +.08 +.02 -.23 +.09 -.09 +.07 -1.09 -.22 -.02 +.03 -.02 -.14 +.20 +.23 -.04 +.13 +.08 +.01 -.42 -.06 +.23 -.40 +.10 +.45 +.16 -.04 +1.14 -.26 +.07 +.05 -.12 +.39 +.11 +.06 -.72 +.02 -.23 -.60 +1.33 -.07 -.25 +.76 +1.84 +.78 +.06 +.27

N m

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e es s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed PE

So

Foo no N w w E Em m m T m w

m

C m mN w

P PE w W

w A d nd Foo no

C m

M w

m w

w N w

w w

W

U

m w

E

A m S m

m M m

w

C S

T

m S m

D w

w P

m

Am w

C w

S R w

m Am

m

D w H

w C m

m D

m

w

C

w

m D

w

w m m C

w

m

w m

P

m M Mu u

m

Fund Foo no F m S

w E

P R B

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe N m D Freescale FreshMkt FrontierCm 0.40 Frontline FuelCell FullerHB 0.34 FultonFncl 0.32 Fusion-io GATX 1.20 GMAC CpT 2.03 GMX Rs GNC 0.44 GT AdvTc Gafisa SA 0.24 GalenaBio Gallaghr 1.36 GamGldNR 1.44 GameStop 1.00 Gannett 0.80 Gap 0.50 GardDenv 0.20 Garmin 1.80 Gartner Gastar grs GencoShip GenCorp Generac 6.00 GnCable GenDynam 2.04 GenElec 0.68 GenGrPrp 0.44 GenMills 1.32 GenMotors GenesWyo GenesisEn 1.84 Genomic GenOn En Genpact 0.18 Gentex 0.52 Gentiva h GenuPrt 1.98 Genworth GeoGrp 0.80 GeoGloblR GaGulf 0.32 Gerdau 0.21 GeronCp Gevo GiantInter 0.30 Gildan 0.30 GileadSci GlaxoSKln 2.36 GlimchRt 0.40 GlobalCash GlobPay 0.08 GblXNorway 0.36 GlbXSilvM 0.04 GlbSpcMet 0.25 GlobusMd n GluMobile GolLinhas GolLNGLtd 1.60 GoldFLtd 0.49 GoldResrc 0.72 Goldcrp g 0.54 GoldenMin GoldStr g GoldmanS 1.84 GoodrPet Goodyear Google Gordmans GovPrpIT 1.68 vjGrace Graco 0.90 GrafTech Graingr 3.20 GramrcyC GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC 0.52 GraphPkg GrayTelev GrLkDrge 0.08 GtPanSilv g GtPlainEn 0.85 GreenDot GreenMtC GrnHCmdty GreenbCos GrnwyMd n Grifols rs Groupon n GpFSnMx n GpTelevisa 0.13 Guess 0.80 GuggChina 0.58 GugChinSC 0.62 GugGTimb 0.39 Guidewre n GulfportE H&E Eq s 7.00 HCA Hldg 2.00 HCC Ins 0.66 HCP Inc 2.00 HDFC Bk 0.24 HMS Hldgs HNI Corp 0.96 HSBC 2.05 HSBC Cap2 2.00 HSN Inc 0.50 Haemon HainCel HalconR rs Hallibrtn 0.36 Halozyme HamptnRB HancHld 0.96 Hanesbrds HanoverIns 1.20 HarleyD 0.62 Harman 0.60 Harmonic HarmonyG 0.13 HarrisCorp 1.48 HarrisTtr 0.56 HWinstn g Harsco 0.82 HartfdFn 0.40 Hasbro 1.44 HatterasF 3.50 HawaiiEl 1.24 HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT 2.96 HlthCSvc 0.66 HltMgmt HlthcrRlty 1.20 HlthcrTr n 0.57 HealthNet HlthSouth HrtlndEx 0.08 HrtldPay 0.24 Heckmann HeclaM 0.06 Heico s 0.12 Heinz 2.06 HelixEn HelmPayne 0.28 Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife 1.20 HercOffsh HercTGC 0.96 Hersha 0.24 Hershey 1.52 Hertz Hess 0.40 HewlettP 0.53 Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HigherOne HighwdPrp 1.70 Hill-Rom 0.50 HillenInc 0.77 Hillshire n 0.50 HimaxTch 0.06 Hittite HollyFront 0.60 Hologic HomeDp 1.16 Home Inns HmLnSvc n 1.32 HomeProp 2.64 HomeAway HomeownC 0.80 HomexDev Honda HonwllIntl 1.49 HorizPhm Hormel 0.60 Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT 1.80 HostHotls 0.32

9.47 58.71 4.82 3.96 .87 30.70 9.89 30.08 41.95 25.20 .78 39.20 5.35 4.38 1.78 35.71 14.55 21.24 17.97 36.10 60.38 41.78 45.80 1.73 3.43 9.81 25.03 30.03 67.42 22.81 19.17 39.97 23.09 67.75 34.56 35.89 2.58 16.74 17.34 11.44 60.81 5.13 27.92 .13 37.31 9.64 1.72 2.10 5.20 31.74 67.44 46.40 10.46 8.02 41.79 15.33 25.05 15.39 18.48 4.52 6.29 38.24 12.89 21.20 46.20 5.11 1.98 116.86 13.10 12.30 761.78 14.20 23.64 58.97 49.29 8.98 211.11 3.05 5.21 23.34 28.74 5.72 2.21 7.68 2.27 22.24 12.75 23.31 30.64 16.25 17.97 24.10 4.72 13.72 23.78 25.31 23.06 20.04 18.57 31.17 30.80 11.85 33.75 33.85 44.35 38.57 32.51 25.58 47.25 28.30 49.08 80.33 65.57 7.09 33.67 7.41 1.65 31.14 31.74 37.50 42.28 47.24 4.49 8.40 50.88 38.15 12.41 20.58 19.41 37.91 28.07 26.03 5.56 6.47 57.51 23.81 8.37 23.10 9.80 23.15 24.02 13.41 32.05 4.20 6.67 38.64 56.30 18.35 46.89 .78 79.21 50.21 4.88 11.05 4.89 71.38 13.86 53.95 17.21 24.11 6.74 59.43 13.40 32.38 29.20 18.22 26.77 2.04 56.07 41.47 20.40 60.57 26.03 16.80 60.33 23.73 23.71 14.24 30.59 60.80 3.39 29.54 36.98 9.47 32.83 23.63 15.76

C -.04 -1.22 -.10 +.12 -.01 +.02 +.04 -.19 -.49 +.09 -.03 +.23 -.10 +.01 -.11 +.15 +.24 +.22 +.32 -.03 +.04 -.29 +.07 -.25 +.32 +2.14 +.65 +1.30 +.10 -.31 +.12 +.34 +.89 +.93 +1.20 +.05 +.06 +.35 +.12 -.22 -.10 +.25 +1.09 +.13 +.01 -.04 +.01 +.06 +1.11 +.16 -.11 -.03 -.04 +.23 +.15 +.17 +.45 -.12 +.55 -.35 +.04 -.25 +.35 -.11 +.01 +3.18 +.46 +.11 +7.28 -4.25 +.24 -.11 -.99 -.01 +2.74 +.04 +.04 -.19 +.02 -.09 -.07 -.02 -.03 -.02 +.52 -.43 +.14 +.11 +.87 +1.27 -.05 +.02 +.27 -.11 +.24 +.28 +.18 +.12 -.46 -.27 +.50 -.04 -.13 +.99 -.88 +.07 +.79 +.05 +.03 +.13 +2.57 -.24 -.02 -.13 +.15 +.16 -.14 +.24 -.09 +1.08 -.05 -.01 -.34 -.69 +.57 +.05 -.03 -.26 -.12 -.28 -.03 -.11 -.23 +.95 -.02 +.05 +.02 +.64 -.04 +.05 +.37 +.12 -.05 +.35 +.08 -.72 -.02 -.01 +2.81 +.01 +.04 -.01 +.52 +.13 +.23 +.15 +.09 -.16 -.02 -.08 -.24 +.14 +.03 -.01 +.08 +.60 +.20 +.18 +.20 +1.23 +.52 -.94 +.30 +.21 +.60 -.31 +1.05 -.11 +.30 +.33 +.11 +.01 -.15 -.29

N m HotTopic HstnAEn HovnanE HubGroup HubbelB HudsCity Humana HuntJB HuntBncsh HuntgtnIng Huntsmn Hyatt Hyperdyn HystYale n

D 0.32

1.64 0.32 1.04 0.56 0.16 0.40

C 8.65 -.05 .63 -.27 3.39 -.07 29.73 +.05 79.08 -1.66 7.96 +.01 71.32 +1.17 52.03 -.01 6.93 +.04 42.03 -.02 14.91 -.02 39.65 -.50 .70 -.03 40.52 -2.21

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk IdexxLabs IHS Inc II-VI ING GlbDv ING INGPrRTr ION Geoph IPG Photon iRobot iShGold iShGSCI iSAstla iShBraz iSCan iShEMU iSFrnce iShGer iSh HK iShItaly iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iSSpain iSSwedn iSSwitz iSTaiwn iSh UK iSEMMnVol iShThai iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShACWX iShiBxB iSh ACWI iSEafeSC iSSPGTel iShEMBd iShIndones iSSPGth iSSPGlbEn iShNatRes iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShNMuBd iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShIntSelDv iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShMtg iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iShBFxBd iSR1KV iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarIntC iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShFltRNt iShR2K iShBar3-7 iShHiDivEq iShBShtT iShUSPfd iSRus3K iSUSAMinV iShRussia iShDJTel iShDJTch iSSPCStp iShREst iShDJHm iShHltcr iShFnSv iShUSEngy iShSPSm iShEur350 iSSCVal iStar ITC Hold ITT Cp s ITT Ed Icon PLC IconixBr Idacorp IdenixPh IDEX ITW Illumina Imax Corp ImmunoCll ImunoGn ImpaxLabs ImpOil gs inContact Incyte IndiaFd Inergy Infinera InfinityPh Informat Infosys IngerRd IngrmM Ingredion InlandRE InnerWkgs Innospec InovioPhm Insulet IntgDv IntegrysE Intel Inteliquent InterXion InteractB IntcntlEx IntCtlHtl InterDig Intrface Intermec InterMune IntlBcsh IBM IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntraLinks IntPotash Intuit IntSurg InvenSen n Invesco InvMtgCap InvVKCAV InvVKDyCr InVKSrInc InvRlEst IridiumCm IronMtn IronwdPh Isis ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeE h

0.96 52.59 0.25 16.35 0.62 40.37 97.66 97.40 19.23 1.12 9.11 8.11 0.43 6.17 6.91 57.51 22.99 17.29 33.88 1.11 24.02 1.48 54.54 0.57 28.70 1.10 30.39 0.70 21.34 0.58 22.73 0.55 18.34 0.42 12.27 0.20 9.14 0.37 59.65 0.54 14.76 0.92 66.12 0.48 13.47 1.85 45.00 2.80 27.75 0.91 28.40 0.65 24.93 0.47 13.48 0.62 17.51 1.32 57.43 1.87 76.42 33.65 1.28 66.64 2.01 57.71 2.30 122.00 0.90 56.80 0.93 34.94 1.03 87.06 2.83 144.92 2.99 112.20 0.82 41.74 1.19 39.80 4.65 121.71 1.06 46.94 1.16 38.82 2.89 60.65 5.42 120.98 0.46 29.99 1.51 78.03 0.95 39.56 0.53 39.72 1.31 42.96 1.45 65.95 3.27 111.67 3.36 124.42 2.38 108.52 1.62 31.85 0.34 84.48 1.72 53.43 0.92 48.68 0.52 62.15 1.64 110.75 1.23 98.32 6.74 91.66 1.71 15.05 0.57 143.63 2.24 77.27 2.57 109.02 1.52 72.31 0.82 66.87 1.39 79.63 1.46 74.26 3.66 111.07 2.08 105.29 0.76 95.87 0.50 50.37 1.23 83.72 1.25 123.68 1.96 61.01 0.01 110.21 2.22 39.76 1.40 85.13 0.25 29.77 0.49 22.88 0.64 25.41 0.51 75.58 1.65 74.00 2.18 63.92 0.09 19.28 1.33 84.99 0.70 56.18 0.62 42.38 0.94 77.29 1.27 36.86 1.22 79.37 8.17 1.51 75.40 0.36 19.98 31.80 24.40 18.48 1.52 42.76 4.59 0.80 41.70 1.52 59.57 49.03 20.51 2.80 14.87 26.43 0.48 46.38 6.63 17.90 1.20 23.40 1.50 19.22 5.48 23.50 33.63 0.92 49.46 0.64 44.49 15.23 1.04 54.90 0.57 8.38 13.56 34.01 .61 21.70 5.79 2.72 54.62 0.90 22.76 8.98 22.64 0.40 14.09 131.92 2.32 26.48 0.40 37.76 0.10 13.41 6.20 9.06 0.40 19.01 3.40 210.47 1.36 60.56 0.24 13.05 1.05 36.16 16.64 78.87 0.24 11.09 0.48 8.55 6.63 21.62 0.68 59.34 499.80 12.15 0.69 25.11 2.60 20.20 0.91 13.84 0.90 12.68 0.32 5.03 0.52 8.12 7.44 1.08 33.69 12.99 13.77 0.60 15.39 42.35 .54

+.53 +.54 +.23 -1.69 +.05 +.21 -.06 +.22 -.02 -.03 +.21 +.23 +.02 +.08 +.23 +.48 +.21 +.34 +.36 +.16 +.14 +.24 -.03 +.52 +.19 +.73 +.06 +.41 +.06 +.14 +.34 +.10 +.11 +.28 +.57 +.17 +.18 +.03 +.24 +.54 +.34 -.03 +.52 -.04 +.42 +.41 +.32 +.25 +.12 -.15 +.12 +.12 +.18 +.23 +.21 +.38 +.16 -.06 +.46 +.20 +.23 +.43 -.04 -.36 -.15 +.02 +1.04 -.58 -.01 +.13 +.17 +.15 +.32 -.08 -.34 +.26 -.05 +.28 +.02 +.08 +.10 +.28 +.04 +.31 -.12 -.29 +.08 -.46 -.07 +.40 +.51 +.20 +.22 +.34 +.37 -.11 -.18 -.17 -.43 +.03 +.24 -.51 +.03 -.07 +.10 +.84 +.60 -.01 +.28 +.47 +.35 +.13 -.15 +.16 +.19 -.01 -1.23 +.92 -.33 +.13 +.54 +.09 +.03 +.12 -.09 +2.42 +.10 -.41 -.08 +.07 -1.49 +.23 +.49 +.20 -.01 +.10 -.06 +3.02 +.98 -.04 -.16 -.05 +1.61 -.03 -.20 +.09 +.14 +.46 +4.17 +.20 +.12 +.07 -.21 +.02 -.16 +.12 -.42 +.21 -.30 +.12 -.78 +.02

N

m E

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

N m D Ixia j2Global 0.88 JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMCh pfD 1.38 JPMorgCh 1.20 JPMAlerian 2.04 Jabil 0.32 JackHenry 0.46 JackInBox JacobsEng Jaguar g JkksPac 0.40 Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap 0.24 Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies 0.30 JetBlue JiveSoft n JoesJeans JohnJn 2.44 JohnsnCtl 0.72 JonesGrp 0.20 JonesLL 0.40 JosABank JoyGlbl 0.70 JnprNtwk K12 KB Home 0.10 KBR Inc 0.20 KCAP Fin 0.96 KIT Digitl KKR 0.70 KKR Fn 0.84 KLA Tnc 1.60 KT Corp KC Southn 0.78 KapStone Kayak n KeeganR g Kellogg 1.76 Kemet Kemper 0.96 Kennamtl 0.64 KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp 0.20 KilroyR 1.40 KimbClk 2.96 Kimco 0.76 KindME 4.92 KindMorg 1.40 KindrM wt KindMM 4.92 KindredHlt Kinross g 0.16 KirbyCp KnghtCap KnightTr 0.24 KodiakO g Kohls 1.28 KoreaElc KornFer KrftFGp wi Kraft 1.16 KratonPP KratosDef KrispKrm Kroger 0.60 KronosWw 0.60 Kulicke L-3 Com 2.00 LAN Air 0.47 LDK Solar LG Display LKQ Cp s LML Pay LSB Inds LSI Corp LTX-Cred LaZBoy LabCp LadThalFn LamResrch LamarAdv Landec Landstar 0.24 LaredoP n LVSands 1.00 LaSalleH 0.80 Lattice Layne Lazard 0.80 LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp 0.56 LeggMason 0.44 LeggPlat 1.16 LenderPS 0.40 LennarA 0.16 Lennox 0.80 LeucNatl 0.25 Level3 rs LexiPhrm LexRltyTr 0.60 Lexmark 1.20 LbtyASE 0.32 LibGlobA LibGlobC LibCapA LibtyIntA LibVentA n LibtProp 1.90 LifePtrs 0.40 LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH Lifevantge LillyEli 1.96 Limited 1.00 LincElec 0.68 LincNat 0.32 LinearTch 1.00 LinkedIn LinnEngy 2.90 LionsGt g Liquidity LithiaMot 0.40 LiveNatn LivePrsn LloydBkg LockhdM 4.60 LodgeNet h Loews 0.25 Logitech 0.85 LogMeIn LonePine g LongweiPI Lorillard 6.20 LaPac Lowes 0.64 Lufkin 0.50 lululemn gs LumberLiq Luminex LyonBas A 1.60

16.16 32.79 .84 31.99 11.92 25.01 40.97 40.76 18.47 37.87 28.29 40.60 1.17 14.00 2.26 2.91 9.43 52.86 58.27 13.59 4.86 15.50 1.09 69.13 27.65 13.00 77.07 48.56 56.12 16.77 20.35 14.25 30.11 9.37 2.97 14.95 10.01 47.30 15.71 75.74 22.46 35.53 3.38 51.93 4.47 30.70 36.49 2.81 6.97 8.71 44.57 86.43 19.82 83.86 35.45 3.35 77.45 11.88 10.37 55.39 2.72 14.12 9.30 51.82 12.43 15.02 44.10 42.52 26.23 5.93 8.17 23.78 14.77 10.41 73.38 25.42 1.06 12.78 18.57 3.41 43.52 6.81 5.74 14.82 93.05 1.30 31.57 37.43 11.52 46.95 22.22 46.14 26.30 3.72 20.95 29.68 7.00 8.98 38.45 24.30 24.82 27.43 34.65 47.25 22.89 22.64 2.41 9.63 21.66 4.84 61.14 56.66 104.77 18.48 48.96 35.90 2.56 49.31 45.12 42.89 3.40 47.57 49.55 38.31 24.00 32.57 117.94 41.42 14.96 49.55 33.66 8.55 18.14 2.52 93.44 .62 41.55 9.24 22.70 1.51 1.75 115.39 12.68 30.31 54.24 73.57 51.20 19.25 52.20

C +.09 -.03 -.02 +.21 -.46 +.11 +.49 +.32 -.25 +.02 +.18 +.17 -.03 -.57 +.03 +.03 -.01 +.02 +1.27 -.10 +.07 -.21 +.01 +.22 +.25 +.13 +.72 +.08 +.06 -.34 +.15 -.10 +.29 +.11 -.03 -.16 -.04 -.41 +.07 -.04 +.07 +.20 -.33 +.27 +.07 -.01 -.59 -.01 -.03 -.03 -.21 +.65 -.26 +1.36 -.07 -.14 +1.05 +.50 +.16 +.11 +.05 -.18 -.06 +.60 +.01 -.31 -.54 +1.17 +.13 +.09 +.24 +.24 -.17 +.01 +1.67 +.14 -.03 +.21 +.09 +.01 -.35 -.10 -.01 +.19 +.58 -.02 -.21 +.38 +.07 -.33 +.24 -.23 -.39 -.12 +1.34 +.45 +.19 -.04 +.66 -.38 -.23 -.46 -.12 -1.11 +.14 -.33 +.09 -.03 -.59 +.01 +.39 +.15 +.69 -.02 -.68 -.34 -.14 +.45 -.62 +.11 -.03 +.16 +.29 -.74 -.19 +.75 -2.46 +.18 -.31 -.66 +.35 -.06 +.03 +.03 +.06 -.02 +.29 +.12 +.27 -.05 -.01 -1.06 +.18 +.07 +.42 -.37 +.52 -.19 +.54

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MEMC MFA Fncl MIN MGIC MGM Rsts MI Homes MIPS Tech MPG OffTr MRC Gbl n MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macquarie Macys MagelMPtr MagnaInt g MagHRes MaidenBrd Majesco MAKO Srg ManTech Manitowoc MannKd ManpwrGp Manulife g MarathnO MarathPet MarketLdr MktVGold

2.80 95.65 +.49 10.25 +.12 0.56 4.68 +.07 1.00 38.03 -.48 0.67 21.89 -.15 2.61 -.14 0.95 8.60 +.10 0.53 6.43 +.01 1.81 +.28 10.69 -.06 19.47 +.13 7.35 -.04 3.39 +.04 24.68 +.09 1.00 67.18 -.28 35.82 +.03 2.20 56.72 -.51 1.80 25.81 -.34 2.50 42.40 +.92 0.80 38.58 +.96 3.77 88.00 +.54 1.10 44.06 +.80 4.43 -.01 20.46 -.02 1.32 +.06 17.69 +.28 0.84 24.01 +.01 0.08 13.34 2.76 -.12 0.86 36.44 -.36 0.52 12.07 +.03 0.68 29.85 +.28 1.40 55.34 +.75 6.58 -.12 0.15 53.93 +.24

N m D MV OilSv s MV Semi n MktVRus 0.58 MkVEMBd 1.14 MktVJrGld 1.59 MktVIntM 0.71 MkVHiYMu 1.76 MktAxess 0.44 MarkWest 3.20 MarIntA 0.52 MarrVac n MarshM 0.92 MartMM 1.60 MarvellT 0.24 Masco 0.30 Masimo Mastec MasterCrd 1.20 Matson 0.60 Mattel 1.24 MaximIntg 0.96 McCorm 1.24 McDrmInt McDnlds 3.08 McGrwH 1.02 McKesson 0.80 McMoRn McEwenM MeadJohn 1.20 MdbkIns 0.20 MeadWvco 1.00 Mechel MedAssets MedProp 0.80 MediCo Medicis 0.40 Medivatn s MedleyCap 1.44 Mednax Medtrnic 1.04 MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW 0.72 MentorGr MercadoL 0.44 Merck 1.68 MrcCmp Meredith 1.53 MergeHlth MeridIntrst Meritage Meritor Merrimk n Methanx 0.74 MetLife 0.74 MetroPCS MetroHlth MettlerT MKors n Microchp 1.40 MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft 0.92 MidAApt 2.64 MdwGold g MillMda n MillerEnR MillerHer 0.36 MindrayM 0.40 Mindspeed MitekSys MitsuUFJ MobileTele Mohawk Molex 0.88 MolinaHlth MolsCoorB 1.28 Molycorp Momenta Mondelz wi MoneyG rs MonroMuf 0.40 Monsanto 1.50 MonstrBv s MonstrWw Montpelr 0.42 Moodys 0.64 MorgStan 0.20 MSEMDDbt 1.20 Mosaic 1.00 MotrlaSolu 1.04 Motricity rt Movado 0.20 Mueller 0.40 MuellerWat 0.07 MurphO 1.25 Mylan MyriadG NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt 1.80 NIC Inc 0.25 NICESys NII Hldg NPS Phm NQ Mobile NRG Egy 0.36 NTT DOCO 0.36 NV Energy 0.68 NXP Semi NYSE Eur 1.20 Nabors NACCO s 2.19 NamTai 0.28 Nanomtr Nanosphere NasdOMX 0.52 NBGrce rs NatFuGas 1.46 NatGrid 3.11 NatInstrm 0.56 NOilVarco 0.48 NatPenn 0.36 NatRetPrp 1.58 Nationstr n NavideaBio Navistar NektarTh NeoStem NetApp NetEase Netflix NetSpend NetSuite Neuralstem NeuStar Nevsun g 0.10 NwGold g NewOriEd 0.30 NY CmtyB 1.00 NYMtgTr 1.08 NY Times Newcastle 0.88 NewellRub 0.40 NewfldExp NewmtM 1.40 NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA 0.17 NewsCpB 0.17 Nexen g 0.20 NextEraEn 2.40 NexxusL h NiSource 0.96 NielsenH NikeB 1.44 NipponTT NobleCorp 0.56 NobleEn 0.88 NokiaCp 0.26 NorandaAl 0.16 NordicAm 1.20 Nordion g Nordson 0.60 Nordstrm 1.08 NorflkSo 2.00 NA Pall g NoestUt 1.37 NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst 1.20 NorthropG 2.20 NStarRlt 0.64 NwstBcsh 0.48 NovaBayP NovaCpp n NovaGld g Novartis 2.46 NovtlWrls Novavax NovoNord 2.50 NuSkin 0.80 NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor 1.46 NustarEn 4.38

40.34 31.63 29.31 26.51 24.80 23.67 32.85 31.36 54.78 38.97 36.31 34.27 82.08 9.19 15.34 24.00 20.07 456.89 20.16 35.29 27.20 62.54 12.16 91.99 54.73 85.91 11.39 4.75 72.96 7.66 30.89 6.90 17.77 10.47 25.67 43.26 56.32 14.26 74.39 43.27 13.68 101.09 34.39 15.30 84.95 45.22 9.99 34.52 3.80 16.71 37.76 4.33 8.92 28.58 34.33 11.52 9.58 171.62 52.90 32.90 5.77 47.61 19.46 29.49 64.14 1.58 14.43 4.82 19.34 34.55 3.55 2.93 4.61 17.70 78.64 25.98 25.03 42.82 10.98 14.67 27.85 17.01 33.64 90.39 55.03 7.63 22.64 44.27 16.79 16.54 58.01 50.62 .00 33.35 47.68 4.96 55.00 24.33 27.40 23.01 37.69 17.08 14.49 32.85 7.46 9.19 8.25 21.63 16.27 17.89 25.10 24.70 14.05 43.47 11.02 13.52 3.32 23.53 2.36 52.83 56.04 24.99 80.55 9.09 30.43 34.89 2.69 20.95 10.68 .69 32.94 55.78 56.05 9.93 62.68 1.18 40.34 4.68 12.25 16.60 14.09 7.11 9.72 7.80 18.87 31.38 55.70 7.43 11.20 24.55 24.84 25.30 70.15 .69 25.43 29.73 95.55 24.16 35.60 92.23 2.76 6.50 9.98 6.76 58.08 55.74 64.45 1.91 38.65 4.61 16.44 46.89 67.58 6.43 12.22 1.31 2.14 5.60 61.77 2.01 2.39 158.69 40.50 23.81 24.69 38.27 50.94

C +.11 -.01 +.52 +.08 +.08 +.01 -.12 -.25 +.36 -.13 +.29 +.34 -.79 +.03 +.29 -.18 +.37 +5.41 -.75 -.18 +.58 +.50 -.06 +.24 +.14 -.12 -.36 +.16 -.32 -.03 +.29 -.14 -.03 +.02 -.14 -.01 -.03 +.19 -.06 +.15 +.20 -.44 -.04 -.17 +2.40 +.12 -.63 -.48 -.02 +.21 -.27 +.09 -.46 +.04 -.13 -.19 +.24 +.88 -.28 +.16 -.21 -1.55 -.61 -.27 -1.17 -.06 +.08 -.21 -.10 +.94 +.09 -.30 -.04 +.18 -1.38 -.31 -.12 -2.23 -.52 +.10 +1.34 +2.07 -1.55 -.63 +.97 +.30 +.51 +.10 +.05 +.07 +.40 +.07 -.00 -.37 +2.21 +.06 +1.31 -.04 +.45 -.30 -.45 +.26 -.31 -.37 -.37 -.06 +.25 +.24 +.11 -.12 +.09 +.05 +.02 +3.52 +.30 -.29 +.24 -.04 -1.21 +.68 -.14 +.44 -.02 -.07 +1.71 -.06 -.14 +.01 +.06 -.36 +1.61 +.10 -1.12 -.07 +.31 -.02 +.03 -.07 -.07 +.06 -.04 +.27 -.22 +.06 -.32 +.02 +.14 +.05 +.05 -.04 -.18 -.08 -.05 -.25 +.64 +.45 -.18 -.48 +.19 -.19 -.10 +.01 -.47 +.56 +.82 +.01 +.42 +.03 -.55 +.47 +1.15 +.07 -.01 +.10 -.01 +.51 +.03 +.23 +.88 +1.67 +.90 -.20 +.01 +.06

D

NvCredStr 0.80 NvEPOp 1.12 NuMulCGv 1.25 NuvMuVal 0.44 NvPfdInco 0.76 Nvidia NxStageMd OCZ Tech OGE Engy 1.57 OReillyAu OasisPet OcciPet 2.16 Oceaneerg 0.72 Och-Ziff 0.47 Oclaro OcwenFn OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax 0.08 Oi SA s 2.01 OilStates OldDomF s OldNBcp 0.36 OldRepub 0.71 Olin 0.80 OmegaHlt 1.68 Omncre 0.56 Omnicom 1.20 OmniVisn Omnova OnAssign OnSmcnd Oncothyr ONEOK s 1.32 OneokPtrs 2.64 OnyxPh OpenTble h OpkoHlth OptimerPh Oracle 0.24 OraSure Orbitz Orexigen OrientEH OshkoshCp Osiris OvShip OwensMin 0.88 OwensCorn OwensIll PDC Engy PDL Bio 0.60 PG&E Cp 1.82 PHH Corp Pimc1-5Tip 0.65 PimcoTR 1.29 PimShMat 1.55 PLX Tch PMC Sra PNC 1.60 PNM Res 0.58 PPG 2.36 PPL Corp 1.44 PSS Wrld PVH Corp 0.15 PVR Ptrs 2.12 Paccar 0.80 PacDrill n PacEthan h PacSunwr PaciraPhm PackAmer 1.00 PallCorp 1.00 PaloANet n PanASlv 0.20 Pandora PaneraBrd ParametSd ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkStrlg ParkDrl ParkerHan 1.64 ParkerVsn PartnerRe 2.48 PatrkInd Patterson 0.56 PattUTI 0.20 Paychex 1.28 PeabdyE 0.34 Pebblebrk 0.48 Pengrth g 0.48 PnnNGm PennVa 0.23 PennWst g 1.08 PennantPk 1.12 Penney PennaRE 0.64 PennyMac 2.20 Penske 0.48 PensonW h Pentair 0.88 PeopUtdF 0.64 PepBoy PepcoHold 1.08 PepsiCo 2.15 PeregrinP PerfectWld 2.00 Perfrmnt n PerkElm 0.28 Perrigo 0.32 PetSmart 0.66 PetrbrsA 1.03 Petrobras 1.03 Petrolog n 1.80 PtroqstE Pfizer 0.88 Pharmacyc Pharmerica PhilipMor 3.40 PhilipsEl 1.00 Phillips66 n 0.80 PiedmOfc 0.80 Pier 1 0.16 PilgrimsP PimDyInco 2.12 PimcoHiI 1.46 PinnclEnt PinWst 2.10 PionEnSvc PioNtrl 0.08 PitnyBw 1.50 PlainsAA 4.26 PlainsEx Plantron 0.40 PlumCrk 1.68 PluristemT Polaris 1.48 Polycom PolyOne 0.20 Polypore Popular rs PortGE 1.08 PortglTel 0.85 PostHldg n PostPrp 1.00 Potash 0.84 Potlatch 1.24 PwrInteg 0.20 Power-One PwshDB PS PrcMet PS Agri PS Oil PS BasMet PS USDBull PSFinPf 1.23 PSBldABd 1.50 PS SrLoan 1.30 PS SP LwV 0.81 PShNatMu 1.08 PSh1-30Tr 0.72 PSHYCpBd 1.08 PwShPfd 0.93 PShEMSov 1.49 PSIndia 0.13 PwShs QQQ 0.61 Pwrwv rsh Praxair 2.20 PrecMxNik 0.20 PrecCastpt 0.12 PrecDrill PriceTR 1.36 priceline Primerica 0.28 Primero g PrinFncl 0.84 PrivateB 0.04 ProLogis 1.12 ProShtDow ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow 0.22 ProUltMC PrUltQQQ s PrUShQQQ ProUltSP 0.32 PrUShtFin ProUShL20 ProShtEM ProUltSOG ProUltSBM ProUltFin 0.34 ProUPShD30 ProUBasM 0.08 PrUPR2K 0.01 ProShtR2K PrUPQQQ s ProUltR2K 0.01 ProSht20Tr PrUltSP500 0.03 PrUSSilv rs PrSUltNG rs PrUVxST rs PrShtVixST PrUltCrude PrUShCrde ProVixSTF ProUltSGld ProUltSlv s ProUShEuro ProctGam 2.25 ProgrsSoft ProgsvCp 0.41 ProgWaste 0.56 PUShDow rs ProUSR2K PUSSP500 rs PUPSR2K rs PUPSM400 rs PUShQQQ rs PrUltSRE rs ProspctCap 1.22 ProspBcsh 0.78 ProtLife 0.72 Prudentl 1.45 PSEG 1.42 PubStrg 4.40 PulseElec 0.10

C 9.78 12.80 13.41 10.46 9.90 13.12 13.23 3.20 55.47 83.84 29.72 86.38 54.84 9.67 2.78 28.64 3.14 2.47 7.85 4.10 78.88 30.13 13.75 9.27 21.51 22.65 33.78 51.68 13.76 7.85 19.94 6.13 5.14 48.08 59.62 85.27 42.70 4.16 13.67 31.67 11.20 2.61 5.78 8.89 27.34 11.18 6.49 29.96 33.39 19.15 31.90 7.86 42.24 20.93 54.00 108.88 101.47 5.67 5.60 62.76 20.84 115.55 28.80 22.71 92.95 25.07 40.60 9.94 .41 2.61 17.95 35.68 64.34 60.60 21.67 10.46 171.41 6.60 21.52 2.61 31.06 5.13 4.29 83.43 2.38 75.32 18.49 34.27 15.74 32.71 22.63 23.38 6.79 43.52 6.15 14.12 10.64 24.58 15.95 23.45 29.98 .05 42.48 12.04 9.93 18.94 70.65 .86 10.62 10.95 29.41 117.28 67.56 22.28 23.08 13.19 6.78 25.04 65.56 12.94 90.71 23.52 46.56 17.25 18.53 5.26 28.50 14.10 12.39 52.49 7.77 103.90 13.78 89.76 37.08 35.57 42.99 3.84 81.28 9.90 16.51 36.14 17.42 27.07 4.90 30.10 47.48 43.69 37.27 31.01 5.56 28.72 61.89 29.43 26.23 19.92 21.87 18.50 30.13 24.96 28.21 25.73 33.19 19.06 14.80 30.82 19.04 68.47 .58 104.01 13.60 164.96 7.83 63.19 624.86 28.75 5.27 26.90 16.08 34.58 33.84 24.65 34.01 13.57 74.43 68.87 60.55 27.66 61.56 37.46 15.46 28.76 20.16 14.54 62.58 16.39 35.36 69.24 24.90 60.38 44.53 28.95 90.98 39.62 55.76 31.55 133.46 31.43 40.45 19.37 14.05 59.03 20.01 69.45 21.48 20.89 20.63 46.35 26.73 38.18 36.81 42.92 36.91 25.81 11.52 42.79 26.17 54.48 31.71 138.96 .73

+.06 +.18 +.21 +.04 +.04 -.23 +.02 -.27 +.01 +.22 +.25 +.32 -.41 +.01 +.09 +1.23 -.01 -.09 +.04 +.08 -.58 -.01 +.14 -.03 -.22 -.08 -.19 +.12 -.20 +.28 +.02 -.05 +.01 -.23 +.12 +.77 +1.10 -.02 -.45 +.21 +.09 +.06 +.07 -.01 -.09 +.13 -.11 +.08 -.07 +.39 +.27 +.16 -.43 +.58 +.08 +.11 -.02 -.08 -.01 -.34 -.19 +.71 -.25 -.07 -.77 -.31 +.58 -.03 +.01 +.11 +.55 -.62 +.85 -.97 +.23 -.49 +.52 +.11 -.25 -.05 +.30 +.19 +.06 -.15 +.03 +1.04 +3.02 +.03 -.08 -.58 +.34 -.01 +.05 +.40 -.05 -.12 +.03 +.29 +.09 +.08 -.11 -.00 -1.77 -.10 -.25 +.04 -.12 -.17 -.24 +.22 -.06 +1.11 -1.42 +.21 +.14 +.22 +.07 +.19 +1.06 +.28 +.77 +.07 +.19 -.09 -.21 +.15 +.27 +.10 +.15 -.31 -.02 -.50 -.04 +1.56 -.39 +.24 -.85 -.10 +.41 +.05 -.06 +.79 -.03 +.03 -.06 +.04 -.48 +.27 -.11 +.56 -.03 +.04 +.23 +.02 +.12 +.12 -.05 +.04 +.07 +.01 +.04 -.02 +.07 +.02 +.13 +.27 -.10 -.03 +.13 -.03 +1.62 -.01 -.11 +5.79 +.11 +.05 -.04 +.09 -.45 -.17 +.03 -.07 -.06 +.72 -.70 -.28 +.06 +.34 -.31 -.13 -.26 -.19 -.14 +.40 -.26 +.22 +.66 -.08 -.26 +.44 -.14 +.60 -.52 +4.67 +.63 -1.28 +.22 -.27 +.15 -.07 +.68 -.11 +.09 +.09 +.15 +.06 -.45 -.14 -.20 -.37 +.60 +.13 +.30 +.17 -.04 -.03 -.47 -.21 -.10

N m

D

PulteGrp 15.31 PureBio rs 1.06 PPrIT 0.36 5.77

C

N m

-.19 +.01 +.04

Skullcandy SkyWest 0.16 SkywksSol SmartBal Smith&N 1.04 SmithWes SmithAO 0.80 SmithfF Smucker 2.08 SnapOn 1.36 SocQ&M 1.04 SodaStrm Sohu.cm SolarWinds Solera 0.50 SonicAut 0.10 SonicCorp SonocoP 1.20 Sonus SonyCp 0.32 Sothebys 0.32 SouFun 2.00 Sourcefire SouthnCo 1.96 SthnCopper 1.66 SwstAirl 0.04 SwstnEngy Spansion SpectraEn 1.12 Spectranet SpectPh SpiritAero SpiritAir SpiritRC n Splunk n Spreadtrm 0.40 SprintNex SprottSilv SprottGold StageStrs 0.40 StancrpFn 0.89 SP Matls 0.75 SP HlthC 0.76 SP CnSt 0.94 SP Consum 0.68 SP Engy 1.22 SPDR Fncl 0.25 SP Inds 0.80 SP Tech 0.44 SP Util 1.45 StdPac StanBlkDk 1.96 Staples 0.44 StarScient Starbucks 0.68 StarwdHtl 0.50 StarwdPT 1.76 StateStr 0.96 Statoil ASA 1.12 StlDynam 0.40 Steelcse 0.36 StemCells Stericycle Steris 0.76 Sterlite 0.15 SMadden StewEnt 0.16 StifelFin StillwtrM StoneEngy Stonerdg Stratasys StratHotels Stryker 0.85 SturmRug 1.05 SumitMitsu SummitHtl 0.45 SmmtMP n SunLfFn g 1.44 SunCokeE Suncor gs 0.52 SunesisPh Sunoco 0.80 SunocoL s 1.88 SunPwr h SunriseSen SunshHrt n SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst 0.20 SupEnrgy Supvalu 0.35 SusqBnc 0.24 SusserPet n SwRCmATR SwERCmTR SwftEng SwiftTrans SwisherH lf SycamrNt 10.00 SykesEnt Symantec SymetraF 0.28 Synacor n Synaptics SynrgyP rs SynergyRs Synopsys Synovus 0.04 SyntaPhm Sysco 1.08 TAL Intl 2.40 TCF Fncl 0.20 TD Ameritr 0.24 TE Connect 0.84 TECO 0.88 TFS Fncl THL Credit 1.28 TICC Cap 1.16 TIM Part TJX s 0.46 TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi 0.50 TakeTwo TalismE g 0.27 TangerFac 0.84 Tangoe TanzRy g TargaRes 1.58 Target 1.44 Taseko TASER TataMotors 0.36 Taubmn 1.85 TeamHlth TearLab TechData TeckRes g 0.80 Teekay 1.27 TeekLNG 2.70 TeekOffsh 2.05 TeekayTnk 0.53 TlCmSys TelItalia 0.57 Teleflex 1.36 TelefBrasil 1.86 TelefEsp TelData 0.49 Tellabs 0.08 TempurP Tenaris 0.76 TenetHlth Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium 0.75 TeslaMot Tesoro 0.48 TetraTc TetraTech TevaPhrm 0.99 TxCapBsh Texas Inds TexInst 0.84 TexRdhse 0.36 Textainer 1.68 Textron 0.08 Theragen Theravnce ThermoFis 0.52 Thermon ThomCrk g ThomsonR 1.28 Thor Inds 0.72 Thoratec 3D Sys 3M Co 2.36 ThrshdPhm TibcoSft Tidwtr 1.00 Tiffany 1.28 TW Cable 2.24 TimeWarn 1.04 Timken 0.92 Titan Intl 0.02 TitanMach TitanMet 0.30 TiVo Inc TollBros Torchmark 0.60 ToroCo s 0.44 TorDBk g 3.08 Total SA 2.90 TotalSys 0.40 TowersWat 0.46 Toyota 0.52 TractSupp 0.80 TrCda g 1.76 TransDigm Transocn 3.16

Q-R-S-T QEP Res 0.08 QIAGEN QR Energy 1.95 Qihoo360 QlikTech Qlogic Qualcom 1.00 QualityS s 0.70 Qualys n QuantaSvc QntmDSS Quaterra g QstDiag 0.68 Questar 0.65 Questcor 0.80 QksilvRes Quiksilvr RAIT Fin 0.36 RBS pfG RF MicD RLJ LodgT 0.66 RPC s 0.32 RPM 0.86 RPX Corp RTI IntlM Rackspace RadiSys RadianGrp 0.01 RadioShk RailAmer Ralcorp RLauren 1.60 Rambus RamcoG 0.65 Ramtrn Randgold 0.40 RangeRs 0.16 RareEle g RJamesFn 0.52 Rayonier 1.76 Raytheon 2.00 RealD RealPage RltyInco 1.82 RedHat RedwdTr 1.00 RegalBel 0.76 RegalEnt 0.84 RgcyCtrs 1.85 RegncyEn 1.84 Regenrn RegionsFn 0.04 Regis Cp 0.24 ReinsGrp 0.96 RelStlAl 1.00 Renren RentACt 0.64 Rentech 1.06 RentechN n 4.68 ReprosTh RepubSvc 0.94 RschMotn ResMed 0.68 ResoluteEn ResoluteF ResrceCap 0.80 RetailOpp 0.56 RetailPrp n 0.66 RexEnergy Rexnord n ReynAmer 2.36 Richmnt g RioTinto 1.64 RitchieBr 0.49 RiteAid RiverbedT RobbMyer 0.20 RobtHalf 0.60 RockTen 0.80 RockwlAut 1.88 RockColl 1.20 RockwdH 1.40 Rollins 0.32 Roper 0.55 RosttaG rs RosettaR RossStrs s 0.56 Roundys n 0.92 Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g 2.40 RBScotlnd RylCarb 0.48 RoyDShllB 3.44 RoyDShllA 3.44 RoyGld 0.60 RoyaleEn Rubicon g Rudolph Ryanair 2.20 Ryder 1.24 Ryland 0.12 RymanHP SAIC 0.48 SAP AG 1.48 SBA Com SCANA 1.98 SEI Inv 0.30 SK Tlcm SLGreen 1.00 SLM Cp 0.50 SM Energy 0.10 SpdrDJIA 3.67 SpdrGold SpdrEuro50 1.28 SpdrEMDv 2.60 SpdrEMSmC2.30 SpdrIntDiv 3.19 S&PBRIC40 0.58 SpdrIntRE 1.55 SpdrWldxUS0.59 SP Mid 1.83 S&P500ETF 2.85 SpdrBiot Spdr Div 1.83 SpdrHome 0.22 SpdrS&PBk 0.42 SpdrBarcCv 1.89 SpdrLTBd 2.10 SpdrLehHY 3.59 SpdrNuBST 0.27 SpdrNuBMu 0.82 SP IntTip 1.68 SPLeIntTB 1.77 SpdrLehAgB 2.01 SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrS&P RB0.48 SpdrRetl 0.68 SpdrOGEx 0.49 SpdrOGEq 0.17 SpdrMetM 0.60 SPX Cp 1.00 SS&C Tech STEC STMicro 0.40 SVB FnGp SABESP 2.96 SafeBulk 0.60 Safeway 0.70 StJoe StJude 0.92 Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty SamsO&G SJuanB 1.12 SanchezE n SanDisk SandRdge SandRM2 n 0.77 Sandst g rs Sanmina Sanofi 1.76 Sanofi rt Santarus Sapient Sarepta rs SavientPh Schlmbrg 1.10 Schnitzer 0.75 SchwUSMkt 0.63 Schwab 0.24 SciClone SciGames Scotts 1.30 ScrippsNet 0.48 SeabGld g SeadrillLtd 3.36 SeagateT 1.28 SealAir 0.52 Sealy SearsHldgs 0.33 SearsHm rt SeattGen SelCmfrt SelMedHld SelectvIns 0.52 SemGroup SempraEn 2.40 Semtech SenHous 1.52 SensataT Sensient 0.88 Sequenom ServiceCp 0.24 ServNow n SvcSource 7DaysGrp ShandaG s 1.02 ShawGrp Sherwin 1.56 ShipFin 1.56 Shire 0.46 ShufflMstr Shutterfly SiderurNac 0.43 Siemens 4.04 SigmaAld 0.80 SignatBk SignetJwlrs 0.48 SilganHld 0.48 SilicGrIn SilicnImg SilcnLab Slcnware 0.24 SilvStd g SilvWhtn g 0.37 SilvrcpM g 0.10 SimonProp 4.20 Sina Sinclair 0.60 SiriusXM SironaDent SixFlags 2.40 Skechers

32.08 18.87 20.12 21.81 21.90 11.33 61.91 17.89 13.95 24.69 1.64 .38 63.39 20.03 19.01 4.19 3.32 5.26 18.00 3.85 19.03 11.93 27.99 10.96 23.78 66.06 3.43 4.28 2.33 27.50 72.90 151.76 5.32 12.35 3.08 126.88 70.40 4.67 36.73 48.67 55.58 9.03 22.33 40.76 55.22 14.59 69.29 14.08 48.44 23.55 154.42 7.13 18.33 57.52 51.54 3.93 34.19 2.53 39.27 15.42 27.29 7.86 40.38 8.90 12.95 5.90 12.96 11.43 13.27 18.24 43.45 4.61 47.09 19.38 1.16 22.88 59.77 26.32 72.05 69.38 54.25 46.57 22.93 109.23 6.68 46.81 66.15 6.33 14.24 33.51 57.81 8.51 30.41 71.40 69.42 98.40 3.89 3.69 10.65 32.80 39.29 29.62 40.13 11.97 70.63 63.17 47.88 21.11 14.61 78.86 15.98 54.30 134.78 172.30 31.38 43.79 44.96 45.47 23.16 39.28 24.03 178.97 144.35 93.72 58.04 24.70 23.51 39.49 41.87 39.98 24.43 24.58 62.17 61.44 59.19 45.81 28.59 62.56 56.18 33.91 43.63 64.83 24.89 6.67 5.57 60.70 81.99 5.67 16.10 19.66 42.24 10.24 151.14 42.42 24.89 1.04 14.69 19.85 43.01 7.03 20.13 13.40 8.21 43.97 1.68 8.95 10.61 16.53 2.53 72.58 28.14 34.62 12.88 5.73 8.22 43.60 62.54 19.26 39.82 30.09 15.68 2.19 55.30 2.91 26.69 30.95 11.50 19.26 36.82 64.64 24.89 21.67 30.18 36.85 3.49 13.43 36.48 10.34 11.75 3.66 43.85 148.20 16.00 88.73 15.95 29.94 5.62 100.86 72.65 66.59 48.50 42.91 8.74 4.60 36.59 5.61 15.90 39.22 6.46 151.19 63.75 11.66 2.57 57.06 59.49 20.37

+.42 +.36 +.60 -.24 -.49 -.09 -.56 -.64 -.21 -.01 +.03 +.02 -.04 -.30 +.54 +.10 +.01 +.09 -.10 +.12 +.04 -.55 -.24 -.16 -.03 -.17 -.06 -.05 +.03 -.10 +.53 -.22 -.18 +3.89 +.53 -.25 +.08 -.34 -1.08 +.09 -.27 -.13 -1.72 +.13 -1.19 +.01 -.29 +.23 +1.76 -.07 -.05 -.35 -.81 -.10 -.85 +.07 +.51 +.19 -.22 +.36 -.09 +.03 -.05 +.02 +.09 +.11 -.08 +.02 +.11 -.15 +.33 +.15 -.01 -.40 +.17 -.31 -.13 -.17 +.61 -.03 -.46 -.66 -.51 -1.08 +1.56 +.28 -.27 -.26 +.40 +.19 +.20 +.10 +.01 -1.43 -.15 -.05 +.15 +.55 +.23 -.38 +.60 -.07 -.70 +.27 -.39 -.34 +.07 -1.21 +.26 +.19 +.73 +.41 +.35 +.21 +.51 +.26 +.26 +.03 +.13 -.95 +.38 +.31 -.06 -.13 +.03 +.03 +.08 -.01 -.05 +.06 +.35 -.05 +.09 -.05 -.19 +.49 -.07 +.12 -.58 -.32 -.08 +.17 +.24 +.78 -.13 +.01 +.16 +.11 -.07 -1.55 +.08 -.20 +.01 +.52 -.58 -.42 +.06 -.21 +.54 -.30 +.91 +.07 -.05 +1.00 +.03 +.25 -.01 +.08 +.10 +.18 -.06 +.13 +1.31 -.14 +.60 -.88 +.22 +.01 -.19 +.19 -.25 -.58 +.27 +.26 -.03 +.15 -.25 -.11 +.41 +.09 -.04 -.03 -2.20 +.07 +.13 -.11 +.23 -.71 +.28 +.03 +.14 -1.18 -.01 +.71 +.68 -.49 -.26 -.60 -.36 +.03 -.17 +.10 -.13 -.49 -.02 -.62 -.93 +.45 -.03 +.10 +.69 -.03

D

C 14.01 10.61 22.99 12.19 55.73 11.05 57.25 20.15 87.13 71.50 62.05 37.01 41.33 54.52 43.57 18.94 10.43 30.98 1.84 11.84 31.29 17.89 48.55 45.67 34.56 8.86 35.35 12.00 29.56 14.87 11.75 22.38 17.20 15.66 35.93 20.34 5.18 14.19 15.23 21.26 31.46 36.92 40.36 36.06 46.76 73.80 15.66 36.70 30.76 36.22 6.53 76.08 11.61 3.18 50.15 57.49 23.66 42.07 25.77 11.29 10.05 2.03 90.64 35.85 7.69 42.39 8.49 34.30 12.12 24.73 5.11 54.66 5.90 54.90 49.15 6.11 8.27 21.30 23.47 16.68 33.21 5.68 46.54 49.24 4.36 14.30 8.54 10.86 .87 28.48 20.26 2.35 10.44 23.90 9.58 8.94 21.07 8.41 1.39 15.18 13.81 17.78 12.30 7.74 22.87 4.91 4.26 32.37 2.34 9.41 31.56 34.19 11.97 15.57 34.03 17.50 9.02 14.03 10.33 19.40 45.41 47.08 9.40 27.41 15.90 10.20 13.54 31.80 12.92 5.19 51.09 62.99 3.37 6.15 26.16 75.99 27.27 3.90 45.00 29.54 32.21 38.30 27.88 3.73 2.35 10.12 68.93 22.00 13.29 25.39 3.49 30.90 41.54 6.48 29.27 74.47 14.14 22.17 19.55 29.16 43.00 26.06 6.18 41.10 50.24 40.54 27.61 17.50 30.58 26.46 1.63 25.72 59.23 25.54 2.76 28.84 36.32 34.46 33.86 93.29 6.35 29.64 48.01 61.50 95.71 45.50 37.14 17.84 20.37 12.82 10.45 33.18 51.31 39.80 83.22 50.39 23.61 52.68 77.07 97.99 45.46 141.69

+.26 +.28 -.57 +.11 +.61 +.04 -.29 +.50 +.80 -.37 +.41 -2.16 -.76 -1.22 -.30 -.04 +.16 -.01 -.05 +.14 -.21 +2.06 -.48 -.42 +.20 +.09 +.57 +.08 +.20 +.12 +.05 +.17 +.12 +.16 -.79 -.17 -.34 +.06 +.03 +.20 +.22 +.12 +.24 +.24 -.03 +.37 +.07 +.17 -.07 -.17 -.23 -.17 +.09 -.28 -.57 -.47 +.39 +.11 -.02 +.05 +.20 -.03 +.15 +.38 +.10 -1.33 +.10 +.70 +.33 -.39 +.14 +.26 -.11 -.76 -.34 -.07 -.27 +.19 +.24 +.56 +.36 +.05 -.29 +2.59 -.15 +.03 +.20 -.14 +.01 +.21 -.26 -.06 -.01 -.10 -.04 +.03 +.19 -.21 -.22 +.37 -.20 +.16 -1.15 +.13 +.09 -.63 -.03 +1.79 +.29 +.21 +.03 +.20 +.02 -.24 -.05 -.07 +.18 +.62 +3.37 -.02 +1.32 +.08 -.24 +.22 -.53 -.21 +.08 +.75 -.48 +.03 +.12 +.48 -.74 +.14 +.05 -.25 +.09 +1.01 +.68 +.37 -.01 +.18 +.08 +.09 +.26 +.01 -.22 -.04 +1.01 +.77 +.21 +1.27 -.94 -.08 -.41 -.07 -.12 +1.10 -.20 +.13 -.31 +.53 -.11 +.06 +.40 +.03 +.29 -.07 -.19 +.40 +.55 -.09 -.02 -.14 +1.01 +.87 -.89 -.59 -.52 -.38 +.65 +.17 -.02 +.18 +.09 -.01 +.02 -.05 -.04 +.02 +.66 +.29 -.09 -.37 -1.44 -.91 -.04 -.18

N m

D w

m W w

m m

W M

m w m m

M & W W m

M

m m m

m M m

m Mw

M W& W WM W W W W W W W M W W W W W W W W W W M W W W W W W W W m W M W W WW W W W W W W W W W W m W W W M W W W W W W W W W W W Wm Wm Wm W W W m W W W W m W W WW W w W W W W M W W m W M

m M m m

m m

m

m w w mm

w

m

UVWXYZ m

C


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Groomer Continued from E1 Although her business model and services stayed the same, she said she decided to switch the name to Four Paws because of the following that company already had. By taking over Four Paws, she said, she picked up additional regular clientele from Redmond and Bend. Now, Cormalis said, she has about 150 customers, with the majority having their dogs groomed every four to six weeks. While she grooms cats, too, most of her clientele are canine. When Cormalis arrives at her customer’s house, she sets up her trailer for a doggie dayspa session. Equipped with hot water, forced-air drying, nonslip flooring, a grooming table and a washtub, she said, her trailer is self-contained. “I think it’s the modern way

Windows Continued from E1 Any software development delay gives manufacturers less time to get their tablets ready for the year-end holiday shopping season, undermining attempts to erode Apple’s 70 percent share of tablets. Tablets featuring Clover Trail are the ones designed by Intel to most closely compete with the iPad. The industry can ill afford a slowdown in getting them into stores with the next iPad due to be released in March or April, said Wes Miller, an analyst at Directions on Microsoft, based in Kirkland, Wash. “It’s bad news for Microsoft and Intel because it’s not going to present the best light on either one and it will hurt the perception of Windows 8,” Miller said. While Windows is fundamentally sound, the operating system lacks a wide range of robust applications and PC makers haven’t had enough time to work out kinks with so-called drivers, which connect software to such hardware as printers, according to Directions on Microsoft. Microsoft has certified some 800 machines with the new software, said Mark Martin, a spokesman for Redmond, Wash.-based Microsoft. That includes tablets running lowpower chips with technology from ARM Holdings on a ver-

to groom your dog,” she said. “I have the power (and) the water. I just need the pet.” Once inside, Cormalis performs a variety of services ranging from nail clipping, ear cleaning and teeth brushing to shampooing, coat brushing and haircuts. She even puts colored plastic nail covers on her customers’ dogs if requested. Cormalis said she charges a $10 to $20 travel fee, based on the location. Depending on the breeds, the grooming services, the number of dogs customers have and how often they’re groomed, she said, the price varies. For example, nail clipping costs $15 and a full-grooming service on a large-breed dog can cost up to $85, she said. Cormalis said she’s not the only mobile pet-grooming service in town. In fact, she thinks it is a growing industry. But with the popularity of dogs in Bend, she said there’s more than enough business to

sion of the software called RT. The recent entrant to the Windows family compounds threats to Intel. “Microsoft has worked closely with Intel and our hardware partners,” Martin said in a statement. “We look forward to the new Atom-based offerings from Intel to complement the already strong Windows 8 and Windows RT ecosystem.” Tablets and laptops convertible into tablets built on Clover Trail will be available Oct. 26, said Jon Carvill, a spokesman for Santa Clara, Calif.-based Intel. “We’re excited about the opportunity for Windows 8 tablets with a broad range of” Intel chips, Carvill said. “We’ve collaborated very closely with Microsoft in extensive testing and validation” for chips, he said. Intel held an event last week showcasing Clover Trailbased tablets from Acer, Asustek Computer, Dell, Fujitsu, Hewlett-Packard, Lenovo and Samsung Electronics. The new devices, many of which featured detachable keyboards, have weeks of standby time and are capable of playing high-definition video for 10 hours. Still, any delays caused by unfinished software or untested hardware in tablets, laptops and desktops would be harmful to an industry already seeing demand faltering in China and Brazil, countries that until

Q: A:

How much has your business grown? Business has grown between 10 and 15 percent per year since 2009. More people keep trying out the mobile grooming. (But) many people don’t even know it exists.

Div PE

AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.16 .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40 .88 1.10 ... .28 .53 .24f .90 .20 .60f ... ... .67 ... .92f

YTD Last Chg %Chg

12 35.17 +.11 -6.3 17 25.79 +.05 +.2 10 8.96 +.13 +61.2 40 28.61 +1.51 +43.3 12 70.01 +.42 -4.6 ... 5.41 +.13 +23.5 11 53.98 -.76 +14.4 18 53.90 +.01 +15.8 28 100.51 +.35 +20.6 53 7.90 +.05 +31.2 14 20.08 +.11 -19.9 6 17.21 +.15 -33.2 ... 11.28 -.04 +8.5 10 22.76 +.10 -6.2 9 8.71 -.03 +13.3 22 23.78 +.24 -1.8 9 3.72 -.12 -37.4 ... 12.68 +.18 +57.1 19 21.89 -.15 +2.0 13 15.30 -.17 +12.8 15 29.49 -.27 +13.6

environment is quiet. When you go to a salon, there are several dogs being groomed at one time, and the other ones are crated. It takes an hour and a half for a pet to be in and out with me, instead of three to four hours.

person, my husband will start converting another trailer. That would allow me to provide same-day and next-day service. Right now, clients have to book two weeks in advance. Sometimes in the summer, customers will have to book a month ahead.

is your favorite part Q: What about grooming dogs?

— Reporter: 541-617-7818, rrees@bendbulletin.com

recently could be counted on to compensate for weakness in the United States and Europe. The refresh of the software that runs more than 90 percent of all personal computers typically leads PC makers to stock up on parts in anticipation of a surge in orders. Microprocessor shipments have risen an average 6.7 percent in the quarter before new Windows PCs go on sale, according to Mercury Research, while PC sales gained by more than 15 percent in each of the past two release quarters, researcher IDC said. This time around, Intel is on pace for a sequential decline in third-quarter sales for the first time in two decades. Western Digital Corp. trimmed its forecast for disk drives, and analysts at IDC said the PC market will expand less than 1 percent this year — the worst performance since it shrank in 2001. “It’s a tough environment right now,” said Dean McCarron, an analyst at Cave Creek, Ariz.-based Mercury Research, who has been tracking PC-industry data for two decades. According to McCarron, computer-processor industry sales have posted as steep a decline only twice before in 20 years: in 2000, amid the bursting of the dot-com bubble, and in the fourth quarter of 2008, after the financial meltdown. He estimates that 8 million

fewer PC processors will ship last quarter than the previous period, which means fewer PCs built. Chip orders are an important indicator of how confident manufacturers are of what will happen when the new PC models go on sale. While consumers no longer stand in line outside stores to get the latest version of Microsoft’s operating system, as they did when Windows 95 went on sale in August of that year, even versions like Vista — which was panned by reviewers — can help the industry. PC sales jumped 15.3 percent from a year earlier in the quarter Windows Vista debuted. Its replacement, Windows 7, prompted a 15.2 percent increase, according to IDC. In answer to the surging popularity of handheld devices led by the iPad, Microsoft has given Windows 8 a touchscreen interface. It has also opened up Windows to chip technology other than Intel’s, and is plotting a move into the hardware market itself with a line of tablets, dubbed Surface. All that may be cold comfort for Intel and other traditional PC component makers, because in many cases tablets rely on parts better made by competing suppliers. Meanwhile, tablet shipments have more than tripled in 2011 and will jump 67 percent this year, according to an estimate by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1777.00 $1780.50 $34.881

Zuckerberg visits Russia, meets with Medvedev By Amdrew E. Kramer New York Times News Service

MOSCOW — The hoodie stayed back at the hotel when Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook, met Russia’s prime minister and former president, Dmitry Medvedev, on Monday. “Good conversation with Prime Minister Medvedev,” Zuckerman wrote on his Facebook wall beside a picture of the two, in suits and grinning, at the Russian leader’s residence outside Moscow. Zuckerberg also visited Red Square — in his hoodie — ate at McDonald’s and helped judge a competition for Russian programmers under way in Moscow in his first visit to Russia, a country that is in important ways pivotal for Facebook. One of Google’s founders, Sergey Brin, is Russian. For Facebook, the tie is more oblique: The country is an important test case for the balancing act Facebook is undertaking as a new media company in countries that are important commercially but have traditionally heavily regulated their old media, if not censored it. And two of Facebook’s largest investors

Taxes Continued from E1 The fiscal cliff is the name given to a collection of changes in current law that are all set to strike in January. The bulk involves the scheduled expiration of tax policies — or, in the case of new taxes in Obama’s health-care initiative, levies that are set to take effect for the first time, such as a new 3.8 percent tax on capital gains for high-income households. The cliff also includes $110 billion in automatic spending cuts at the Pentagon and other federal agencies. The Tax Policy Center report only examines the effect of tax changes. One striking conclusion of the study: Although the political debate has focused on the Bush tax cuts and whether they should be expired for high earners, the

Market recap

Name

Div PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstBcp Weyerhsr

1.44 1.08 1.78 .08 .80 ... 1.68 .12 .70 .75 1.56 .89f .68 ... .36 .78 .32 .88 .20 .60

Precious metals

the dogs prance around after they’re done is very rewarding. If a dog isn’t groomed properly and on a regular basis, it can lead to health issues. I’m helping to contribute to the pet staying healthy through grooming them.

Besides convenience Q: to the customer, what What does the future are the other benefits of us- Q: hold for Four Paws? ing a mobile dog-grooming I’m the only employee, business? A: but I’m looking to exIt’s definitely less stress pand. I want to add another A: to the pet, due to the en- trailer and person to the busivironment the pet is in. The ness. Once I find the right

Northwest stocks Name

I feel I have the best job A: ever. I love making dogs look and feel better. Seeing

go around.

YTD Last Chg %Chg

21 95.55 +.64 -.9 18 55.74 +.56 +12.1 21 49.25 +.01 +2.8 17 7.85 +.04 +72.9 12 40.60 +.58 +8.4 ... 1.35 ... -29.3 39 42.99 -.85 +17.6 19 164.96 +1.62 +.1 9 16.10 +.01 -23.5 12 28.14 -.01 -33.4 30 148.20 -.71 +66.0 10 31.46 +.22 -14.4 28 50.15 -.57 +9.0 ... 5.02 -.02 +3.1 15 12.70 -.20 +2.5 13 34.09 -.21 +26.0 13 16.30 -.36 +16.5 11 34.70 +.17 +25.9 14 22.65 +.13 +45.2 40 26.10 -.04 +39.8

Prime rate

Pvs Day

Time period

Percent

$1769.00 $1771.10 $34.517

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

BkofAm S&P500ETF NokiaCp SprintNex AT&T Inc

1291511 8.96 +.13 1217613 144.35 +.38 723362 2.76 +.19 649891 5.18 -.34 533073 37.75 +.05

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

MoneyG rs CSVLgNGs SouFun GolLinhas CVR Engy

17.01 38.70 17.89 6.29 40.18

+2.07 +13.9 +4.68 +13.8 +2.06 +13.0 +.55 +9.6 +3.43 +9.3

Losers ($2 or more)

Amex

Name

Name

Last Chg

37631 15.49 -.04 27490 12.25 +.03 22401 2.53 +.07 19378 1.98 +.01 18196 2.97 +.07

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Versar AvalonHld IncOpR WalterInv TriangPet

3.86 +.50 +14.9 4.31 +.46 +11.9 3.75 +.30 +8.7 40.03 +3.02 +8.2 7.63 +.47 +6.6

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

CSVInvNG GNIron PrUShNG s BoxShips CSVS2xInPlt

15.35 72.15 20.13 5.51 36.80

-2.41 -13.6 -8.25 -10.3 -2.01 -9.1 -.44 -7.4 -2.76 -7.0

KeeganR g Sifco RareEle g ECB Bnc AmDGEn

3.38 -.33 17.20 -1.00 4.67 -.25 14.80 -.70 2.48 -.11

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more)

Vol (00)

Vol (00)

SiriusXM Intel Microsoft RschMotn Facebook n

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Ceradyne SyntaPhm PatrkInd PrimaBio n UnvStainls

34.97 +10.54 9.41 +1.79 18.49 +3.02 6.50 +.75 41.37 +4.22

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Chg %Chg +43.1 +23.5 +19.5 +13.0 +11.4

Name

Last

-8.9 -5.5 -5.1 -4.5 -4.2

Gordmans HMN Fn StarScient K Swiss Cytori wt

14.20 -4.25 -23.0 2.87 -.28 -8.9 3.18 -.28 -8.1 3.16 -.27 -7.9 2.16 -.18 -7.7

251 175 38 464 26 4

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary 1,883 1,172 88 3,143 251 13

Last Chg

596056 2.57 -.03 532335 22.76 +.10 529457 29.49 -.27 515432 7.86 +.36 500908 21.99 +.33

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

are Russian. Zuckerberg and Medvedev talked about Facebook’s role in politics, though only jokingly in reference to its importance in the U.S. presidential campaign, according to Medvedev’s press office. They also discussed copyright rules and high-tech business. Zuckerberg gave the Russian leader a T-shirt; the meeting lasted about 20 minutes. Facebook, in Russia as elsewhere, plays a double role as a tool for posting silly party pictures and a tool for political organizing. Facebook played an integral role in political dissent in Russia last winter, allowing street protests to coalesce when handing out fliers or posting notices on corkboards would not have worked. Russia is also home to two large and early Facebook investors, Alisher Usmanov, a steel tycoon, and Yuri Milner, an expert on monetizing social network traffic in emerging markets. The two partly cashed out in the initial public offering of Facebook stock earlier this year but still own billions of dollars’ worth of shares.

tax portion of the fiscal cliff is not monolithic. Instead, the Tax Policy Center identified nine categories of taxes, each with its own set of political considerations. Researchers then ranked the changes according to the likelihood that they will take effect. Their conclusion: The payroll tax holiday will almost certainly be allowed to expire, decreasing the average worker’s paycheck by about $80 a month. However, analysts concluded, Congress is highly unlikely to let the alternative minimum tax expand to strike an additional 20 million families in April. Households making from $65,000 to $500,000 would take the hardest hit. “That’s something that’s unlikely for Congress to want to embrace,” Tax Policy Center director Donald Marron said at a morning briefing for reporters.

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) CheniereEn NwGold g Rentech GoldStr g Vringo

E3

Chg %Chg

Diary 1,389 1,064 132 2,585 134 29

52-Week High Low

Name

13,653.24 10,404.49 5,390.11 3,950.66 499.82 411.54 8,515.60 6,414.89 2,502.21 1,941.99 3,196.93 2,298.89 1,474.51 1,074.77 15,432.54 11,208.42 868.50 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

13,515.11 4,899.73 474.11 8,284.36 2,452.70 3,113.53 1,444.49 15,078.94 840.31

+77.98 +7.11 -1.64 +33.36 +15.18 -2.70 +3.82 +34.72 +2.86

+.58 +.15 -.34 +.40 +.62 -.09 +.27 +.23 +.34

+10.62 -2.39 +2.03 +10.80 +7.65 +19.51 +14.86 +14.32 +13.41

+26.84 +21.32 +11.93 +26.07 +22.60 +33.29 +31.41 +31.59 +37.87

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

327.52 2,402.41 3,434.98 5,820.45 7,326.73 20,840.38 41,124.56 15,523.10 3,830.03 8,796.51 1,996.21 3,057.86 4,408.27 6,111.71

+1.34 +1.23 +2.39 +1.37 +1.53 +.38 +.63 +2.83 -.11 -.83 +.38 -.08 +.04 +1.68

s s s s s s s s t t s t s s

1.0377 1.6133 1.0182 .002112 .1591 1.2886 .1290 .012817 .078055 .0320 .000897 .1518 1.0657 .0341

1.0374 1.6140 1.0169 .002111 .1590 1.2855 .1290 .012823 .077740 .0321 .000899 .1524 1.0634 .0341

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.99 +0.02 +11.9 GrowthI 28.57 +0.05 +16.3 Ultra 26.78 +0.04 +16.8 American Funds A: AmcpA p 21.43 +0.07 +14.3 AMutlA p 28.43 +0.08 +11.8 BalA p 20.30 +0.07 +13.1 BondA p 12.98 +0.01 +5.5 CapIBA p 53.09 +0.22 +10.9 CapWGA p 36.27 +0.25 +15.3 CapWA p 21.65 +0.02 +7.1 EupacA p 40.00 +0.30 +13.8 FdInvA p 40.30 +0.18 +15.0 GovtA p 14.64 +0.01 +2.4 GwthA p 33.97 +0.11 +18.2 HI TrA p 11.19 +0.01 +10.8 IncoA p 18.03 +0.05 +10.6 IntBdA p 13.81 +0.01 +2.7 ICAA p 30.77 +0.12 +15.1 NEcoA p 28.57 +0.04 +20.1 N PerA p 30.56 +0.22 +16.8 NwWrldA 52.52 +0.22 +13.9 SmCpA p 39.44 +0.17 +18.9 TxExA p 13.14 +7.8 WshA p 31.43 +0.12 +12.5 Artisan Funds: Intl 23.64 +0.10 NA IntlVal r 28.94 +0.22 NA MidCap 38.74 -0.07 NA MidCapVal 21.16 +0.04 NA Baron Funds: Growth 58.19 +14.1 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.25 +0.01 +5.0 DivMu 14.92 +2.9 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 20.16 +0.07 +12.1 GlAlA r 19.62 +0.05 +8.8 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.24 +0.04 +8.1 BlackRock Instl:

EquityDv 20.22 +0.08 GlbAlloc r 19.72 +0.05 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 67.36 -0.57 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 31.15 -0.02 AcornIntZ 39.93 +0.12 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.59 +0.03 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.05 +0.06 USCorEq1 12.30 +0.02 USCorEq2 12.13 +0.03 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 36.43 +0.24 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 36.88 +0.25 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.47 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 19.21 +0.08 EmMktV 28.72 +0.13 IntSmVa 15.07 +0.05 LargeCo 11.39 +0.03 USLgVa 22.36 +0.08 US Small 23.49 +0.09 US SmVa 26.98 +0.19 IntlSmCo 15.22 +0.04 Fixd 10.35 IntVa 15.62 +0.10 Glb5FxInc 11.27 2YGlFxd 10.13 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 76.79 +0.22 Income 13.85 +0.02 IntlStk 32.79 +0.34 Stock 119.36 +0.42 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.41 +0.01 TRBd N p 11.40 +0.01 Dreyfus: Aprec 45.37 +0.20 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.09

+12.3 +9.0 +12.5 +14.4 +17.0 +5.0 +11.1 +15.6 +15.7 +12.1 +12.4 +6.3 +12.9 +12.0 +12.8 +16.6 +18.3 +15.2 +17.0 +11.9 +0.8 +8.8 +4.4 +0.9 +15.4 +7.1 +12.1 +19.1 NA NA +13.3 +6.7

GblMacAbR 9.97 +0.01 FMI Funds: LgCap p 17.44 +0.06 FPA Funds: NewInco 10.63 -0.07 FPACres 28.83 +0.09 Fairholme 30.25 +0.22 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.64 +0.01 StrValDvIS 5.14 +0.01 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 23.27 +0.06 StrInA 12.74 +0.02 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 23.59 +0.05 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 14.37 +0.03 FF2010K 13.17 +0.03 FF2015 12.02 +0.03 FF2015K 13.24 +0.03 FF2020 14.56 +0.04 FF2020K 13.68 +0.04 FF2025 12.14 +0.03 FF2025K 13.85 +0.04 FF2030 14.47 +0.04 FF2030K 14.00 +0.04 FF2035 12.00 +0.04 FF2035K 14.10 +0.04 FF2040 8.37 +0.02 FF2040K 14.14 +0.04 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 13.10 +0.02 AMgr50 16.45 +0.04 AMgr20 r 13.40 +0.01 Balanc 20.35 +0.03 BalancedK 20.35 +0.03 BlueChGr 50.54 +0.05 CapAp 29.80 +0.08 CpInc r 9.36 +0.01 Contra 79.86 +0.18 ContraK 79.87 +0.18 DisEq 24.92 +0.06 DivIntl 29.16 +0.15 DivrsIntK r 29.15 +0.15

+4.5 +14.4 +2.1 +8.6 +30.7 +6.0 +9.0 +18.0 +8.5 +18.2 +10.0 +10.2 +10.3 +10.4 +11.3 +11.4 +12.6 +12.7 +13.0 +13.2 +14.0 +14.0 +13.9 +14.1 +16.7 +10.5 +6.4 +12.8 +12.9 +19.2 +21.0 +12.7 +18.4 +18.5 +15.9 +14.3 +14.4

DivGth 30.22 +0.08 Eq Inc 47.48 +0.11 EQII 19.83 +0.06 Fidel 36.34 +0.09 FltRateHi r 9.94 GNMA 11.90 +0.03 GovtInc 10.96 +0.01 GroCo 98.28 +0.04 GroInc 21.36 +0.05 GrowCoF 98.31 +0.05 GrowthCoK98.29 +0.05 HighInc r 9.28 +0.01 IntBd 11.16 +0.01 IntmMu 10.68 IntlDisc 31.96 +0.19 InvGrBd 12.08 +0.02 InvGB 8.02 +0.01 LgCapVal 11.47 +0.03 LowP r 39.25 +0.06 LowPriK r 39.22 +0.06 Magelln 74.98 +0.16 MidCap 30.15 -0.02 MuniInc 13.56 NwMkt r 17.67 +0.06 OTC 61.58 -0.15 100Index 10.45 +0.04 Puritn 19.96 +0.04 PuritanK 19.96 +0.04 SAllSecEqF13.12 +0.02 SCmdtyStrt 9.45 +0.04 SCmdtyStrF 9.48 +0.04 SrsIntGrw 11.64 +0.07 SrsIntVal 9.11 +0.06 SrInvGrdF 12.09 +0.02 STBF 8.60 StratInc 11.41 +0.02 TotalBd 11.33 +0.02 USBI 12.05 +0.02 Value 74.14 +0.07 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 51.44 +0.14 500Idx I 51.45 +0.14 Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r 40.26 +0.01

+17.6 +16.5 +15.3 +17.4 +5.6 +3.6 +2.9 +21.5 +18.2 +21.7 +21.6 +12.1 +4.5 +4.4 +15.8 +5.4 +6.0 +13.9 +15.0 +15.1 +19.3 +15.4 +6.9 +15.9 +12.6 +18.5 +13.8 +14.0 +16.8 +5.5 +5.7 +15.1 +12.7 +5.4 +2.1 +8.8 +6.1 +4.2 +16.8 +16.7 +16.7 +14.8

500IdxAdv 51.44 +0.14 +16.7 TotMktAd r 41.92 +0.10 +16.4 USBond I 12.05 +0.02 +4.3 First Eagle: GlblA 49.66 +0.12 +10.1 OverseasA 22.41 +0.05 +10.1 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.24 -0.01 +1.7 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA px 12.73 -0.04 +7.9 GrwthA p 50.26 +0.13 +12.6 HYTFA p 10.91 +9.7 IncomA px 2.22 -0.01 +11.5 RisDvA p 37.90 +0.04 +8.9 StratInc p 10.65 +0.01 +9.7 USGovA px 6.89 -0.02 +2.2 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.34 -0.01 +11.8 IncmeAd x 2.21 -0.01 +12.2 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC tx 2.25 +11.4 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 22.35 +0.10 +13.6 Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 13.38 -0.01 +11.5 GrwthA p 18.77 +0.18 +15.2 WorldA p 15.67 +0.11 +14.0 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.41 +11.3 GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 45.38 +0.11 +17.1 GMO Trust III: Quality 24.03 +0.10 +15.2 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 20.17 +0.14 +7.9 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.37 +0.04 +10.3 Quality 24.04 +0.10 +15.3 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.33 +0.01 +12.2 MidCapV 38.30 -0.04 +14.1 Harbor Funds: Bond 13.01 +0.01 NA CapApInst 43.29 +0.07 +17.3

IntlInv t 58.67 +0.53 Intl r 59.35 +0.54 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.65 +0.13 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 42.30 +0.15 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r16.26 +0.05 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.96 +0.04 CmstkA 17.48 +0.06 EqIncA 9.24 +0.03 GrIncA p 21.09 +0.08 HYMuA 10.08 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 24.55 +0.04 AssetStA p 25.40 +0.04 AssetStrI r 25.66 +0.04 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 12.14 +0.01 JP Morgan Instl: MdCpVal 27.83 JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond 12.14 +0.01 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 12.13 +0.01 HighYld 8.09 +0.01 ShtDurBd 11.02 USLCCrPls 23.23 +0.07 Janus T Shrs: PrkMCVal T22.05 +0.03 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.53 +0.03 LSGrwth 13.49 +0.03 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.47 -0.01 Longleaf Partners: Partners 30.30 +0.18 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 15.02 +0.03 StrInc C 15.41 +0.02 LSBondR 14.96 +0.03 StrIncA 15.33 +0.03 Loomis Sayles Inv:

+12.8 +13.2 +13.3 +13.8 +5.9 +11.9 +16.2 +12.6 +14.7 +11.9 +13.5 +14.1 +14.3 +4.6 +17.2 +5.0 +4.8 +11.4 +1.6 +17.7 +9.2 +12.1 +13.3 +15.9 +13.7 +11.9 +9.8 +11.7 +10.5

InvGrBdY x12.74 -0.03 +10.4 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.96 +0.04 +14.8 BdDebA p 8.07 +10.6 ShDurIncA p4.64 +5.4 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.67 +4.8 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.64 +5.5 MFS Funds A: TotRA 15.25 +0.06 +10.7 ValueA 25.66 +0.15 +16.0 MFS Funds I: ValueI 25.77 +0.15 +16.3 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 6.07 +10.3 Managers Funds: Yacktman p19.30 +0.03 +11.6 YacktFoc 20.74 +0.03 +11.0 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.50 +0.06 +13.2 MergerFd 15.95 +0.01 +2.3 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 11.06 +0.01 +9.9 TotRtBdI 11.06 +0.01 +10.0 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 35.16 -0.17 +6.8 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.78 +0.20 +11.4 GlbDiscZ 30.21 +0.20 +11.6 SharesZ 22.57 +0.11 +13.9 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 49.98 +0.01 +7.6 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.45 NA Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 29.24 +0.15 +8.1 Intl I r 19.05 +0.26 +15.1 Oakmark 49.17 +0.20 +17.9 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.50 +0.01 +11.6 GlbSMdCap14.79 +0.06 +11.8 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 34.11 +0.20 +16.3

GlobA p 61.17 +0.35 GblStrIncA 4.31 +0.01 IntBdA p 6.54 MnStFdA 37.78 +0.12 RisingDivA 17.46 +0.05 S&MdCpVl30.89 -0.04 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 15.80 +0.05 S&MdCpVl26.11 -0.04 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p15.73 +0.05 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.53 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 33.79 +0.20 IntlBdY 6.54 +0.01 IntGrowY 29.50 +0.26 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.59 +0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 11.20 +0.02 AllAsset 12.70 +0.03 ComodRR 7.18 +0.04 DivInc 12.20 +0.02 EmgMkCur10.50 +0.01 EmMkBd 12.32 +0.03 HiYld 9.53 +0.01 InvGrCp 11.29 +0.02 LowDu 10.67 +0.01 RealRtnI 12.58 +0.02 ShortT 9.89 TotRt 11.59 +0.01 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 12.58 +0.02 TotRtA 11.59 +0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.59 +0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.59 +0.01 PIMCO Funds P: AstAllAuthP11.19 +0.02 TotRtnP 11.59 +0.01 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 49.61 +0.08

+13.2 +10.6 +8.4 +17.5 +12.4 +4.3 +11.7 +3.6 +11.8 +15.5 +16.6 +8.8 +15.6 +9.0 +14.3 +12.5 +12.4 +12.0 +7.0 +13.2 +11.2 +12.7 +5.7 +8.3 +3.0 +9.2 +8.0 +8.9 +8.3 +9.0 +14.2 +9.1 +7.6

Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 42.22 +0.15 Price Funds: BlChip 46.20 +0.05 CapApp 23.31 +0.08 EmMktS 32.38 +0.15 EqInc 26.18 +0.07 EqIndex 38.92 +0.11 Growth 38.27 +0.02 HlthSci 44.34 +0.25 HiYield 6.89 +0.01 InstlCpG 19.05 IntlBond 10.18 +0.02 Intl G&I 12.58 +0.08 IntlStk 13.91 +0.08 MidCap 59.11 +0.02 MCapVal 25.07 +0.07 N Asia 16.32 -0.02 New Era 44.05 +0.31 N Horiz 36.35 +0.01 N Inc 9.97 +0.01 OverS SF 8.23 +0.05 R2010 16.69 +0.03 R2015 13.00 +0.03 R2020 18.02 +0.04 R2025 13.21 +0.04 R2030 18.99 +0.06 R2035 13.43 +0.04 R2040 19.11 +0.06 ShtBd 4.86 SmCpStk 36.25 +0.01 SmCapVal 39.01 +0.12 SpecIn 13.00 +0.02 Value 26.33 +0.12 Principal Inv: LgCGI In 10.44 +0.01 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.52 +0.05 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.81 +0.03 PremierI r 19.64 +0.03 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 41.04 +0.09 S&P Sel 22.84 +0.07

+10.2 +19.5 +13.0 +13.6 +15.3 +16.5 +20.2 +36.0 +11.9 +18.2 +6.3 +9.2 +13.2 +12.1 +17.2 +17.3 +4.8 +17.1 +5.4 +12.4 +11.1 +12.3 +13.3 +14.1 +14.8 +15.2 +15.3 +2.6 +16.0 +13.1 +8.8 +16.8 +17.6 +15.5 +9.8 +6.0 +16.0 +16.7

Scout Funds: Intl 31.65 +0.21 Sequoia 164.38 +1.29 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI x10.25 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.94 +0.24 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 26.27 +0.19 IncBuildC p18.96 +0.07 IntValue I 26.86 +0.20 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.89 +0.25 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 23.91 +0.04 CAITAdm 11.75 CpOpAdl 76.92 +0.18 EMAdmr r 34.94 +0.15 Energy 115.79 +0.80 EqInAdm n 51.16 +0.22 ExtdAdm 45.19 +0.01 500Adml 133.18 +0.35 GNMA Ad 11.11 GrwAdm 37.33 +0.06 HlthCr 62.88 +0.36 HiYldCp 6.03 +0.01 InfProAd 29.20 +0.04 ITBdAdml 12.21 +0.01 ITsryAdml 11.84 +0.01 IntGrAdm 58.85 +0.36 ITAdml 14.42 ITGrAdm 10.47 +0.01 LtdTrAd 11.20 LTGrAdml 11.04 +0.05 LT Adml 11.80 MCpAdml100.55 MuHYAdm 11.26 PrmCap r 72.33 +0.30 ReitAdm r 91.41 -0.67 STsyAdml 10.80 STBdAdml 10.68 ShtTrAd 15.94 STIGrAd 10.87 SmCAdm 38.45 +0.05

+14.0 +13.0 NA +11.3 +10.4 +9.7 +10.8 +13.9 +11.5 +6.0 +12.9 +11.7 +4.6 +13.9 +14.9 +16.7 +2.8 +18.5 +15.9 +11.2 +6.4 +6.6 +3.0 +13.2 +5.3 +8.3 +1.8 +11.6 +7.2 +12.8 +8.1 +12.9 +14.0 +0.7 +1.9 +1.0 +4.0 +15.2

TtlBAdml 11.21 TStkAdm 35.93 WellslAdm 59.47 WelltnAdm 59.30 Windsor 49.75 WdsrIIAd 52.37 Vanguard Fds: CapOpp 33.29 DivdGro 16.97 Energy 61.65 EqInc 24.41 Explr 79.92 GNMA 11.11 HYCorp 6.03 HlthCre 148.98 InflaPro 14.87 IntlGr 18.49 IntlVal 29.75 ITIGrade 10.47 LifeCon 17.31 LifeGro 23.62 LifeMod 21.02 LTIGrade 11.04 Morg 20.33 MuInt 14.42 PrmcpCor 15.04 Prmcp r 69.68 SelValu r 20.89 STAR 20.73 STIGrade 10.87 StratEq 21.04 TgtRetInc 12.25 TgRe2010 24.50 TgtRe2015 13.57 TgRe2020 24.10 TgtRe2025 13.73 TgRe2030 23.58 TgtRe2035 14.20 TgtRe2040 23.33 TgtRe2045 14.65 USGro 21.30 Wellsly 24.55 Welltn 34.34 Wndsr 14.75

+0.01 +0.08 +0.19 +0.19 +0.23 +0.18

+4.1 +16.4 +9.7 +11.9 +16.7 +15.8

+0.08 +0.07 +0.42 +0.10 +0.03

+12.8 +11.3 +4.6 +13.9 +11.9 +2.7 +11.2 +15.9 +6.3 +13.1 +11.7 +8.3 +8.4 +12.8 +10.6 +11.5 +16.4 +5.2 +11.5 +12.9 +12.4 +11.6 +4.0 +14.7 +7.6 +9.2 +10.3 +11.1 +11.9 +12.7 +13.5 +13.8 +13.8 +18.0 +9.6 +11.9 +16.6

+0.01 +0.85 +0.02 +0.12 +0.20 +0.01 +0.04 +0.07 +0.06 +0.05 +0.02 +0.06 +0.29 +0.01 +0.07 +0.02 +0.02 +0.05 +0.03 +0.06 +0.03 +0.07 +0.05 +0.07 +0.05 +0.04 +0.08 +0.11 +0.07

WndsII 29.50 +0.10 Vanguard Idx Fds: ExtMkt I 111.54 +0.02 MidCpIstPl109.56 -0.01 TotIntAdm r23.95 +0.15 TotIntlInst r95.79 +0.59 TotIntlIP r 95.80 +0.58 500 133.18 +0.35 TotBnd 11.21 +0.01 TotlIntl 14.32 +0.09 TotStk 35.92 +0.08 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 23.91 +0.04 DevMkInst 9.39 +0.07 ExtIn 45.19 +0.01 GrwthIst 37.33 +0.07 InfProInst 11.89 +0.01 InstIdx 132.30 +0.35 InsPl 132.31 +0.36 InsTStPlus 32.52 +0.08 MidCpIst 22.21 STIGrInst 10.87 SCInst 38.45 +0.05 TBIst 11.21 +0.01 TSInst 35.93 +0.08 ValueIst 22.99 +0.07 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 110.01 +0.29 MidCpIdx 31.73 STBdIdx 10.68 TotBdSgl 11.21 +0.01 TotStkSgl 34.67 +0.07 Virtus Funds I: EmMktI 9.89 +0.02 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.68 +0.01

+15.7 +14.9 +12.8 +11.5 +11.5 +11.6 +16.6 +4.0 +11.5 +16.3 +11.5 +11.5 +14.9 +18.5 +6.4 +16.7 +16.8 +16.5 +12.8 +4.1 +15.2 +4.1 +16.4 +14.5 +16.7 +12.8 +1.9 +4.1 +16.4 +14.5 +7.7


E4 THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

M  

If y ou hav e Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

Small-business lending up

B C 

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. WORKPLACE INVESTIGATIONS AND TERMINATIONS: Presentation by Katherine Tank, an attorney with Schwabe, Williamson, and Wyatt; $50 includes breakfast; 7:15 a.m.12:15 p.m.; The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center, 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-388-6296 or brenda.r.pierce@state.or.us. GO SOLAR! CENTRAL OREGON FREE WORKSHOP: Free; 5:30-6:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-323-9722 or www.gosolarcentraloregon.org. YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORK: 5:30 p.m.; Coyote Ranch, 1368 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-548-7700. IS THERE A CUSTOMER BASE TO SUPPORT YOUR BUSINESS?: Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; COCC-Crook County Open Campus, 510 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541383-7290. FIVE KEY STRATEGIES TO GUARANTEE YOUR SUCCESS IN THE REAL ESTATE BUSINESS: Live Internet show; free; 7 p.m.; Exit Realty Bend, 354 N.E. Greenwood Ave., No. 100; 541-480-8835 or http://goo.gl/RtnJe.

successful letters of interest; RSVP to a.kaffen@oregonhumanities .org; free; 11 a.m.-noon; Jefferson County Library, 241 S.E. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351. GO SOLAR! CENTRAL OREGON FREE WORKSHOP: Free; 5:30-6:30 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-323-9722 or www.gosolarcentraloregon.org. LAUNCH YOUR BUSINESS: Designed to help business owners get off to a good beginning and develop a working plan; preregistration is required; the course combines four one-hour daytime coaching sessions that start Sept. 26, with three Wednesday evening classes on Oct. 3, Oct. 17 and Nov. 7; $79; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Madras Campus, 1170 E. Ashwood Road, Madras; 541-383-7290. MTA SECURITY FUNDAMENTALS: Discover whether a future in computers is for you with this Microsoft Technology Associate class on security; this class prepares one to pass the MTA exam in security; class meets Wednesdays, Oct. 3-24; registration required; $99-$249; 6-9 p.m.; COCC-Crook County Open Campus, 510 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-383-7273 or www.cocc.edu/ continuinged/systech/. WHAT ARE YOUR OPTIONS FOR FUNDING YOUR BUSINESS?: Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7290.

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-749-0789. PUBLIC MEETING OF THE CENTRAL OREGON WORKFORCE COORDINATING COUNCIL: Review of the Central Oregon proposal for phase one implementation of the Certified Work Ready Communities program and review of the Local Area Workforce Development Plan; 9:30-11 a.m.; Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council Conference Room, 334 N.E. Hawthorne Ave., Bend; 541-5043306. GRANT WORKSHOP: Oregon Humanities Director of Programs Jennifer Allen and Program Officer Annie Kaffen will review guidelines for 2013 Public Program Grants and share best practices in preparing

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. LEADERSHIP SERIES: Nine seminars designed to give managers and team leaders the skills they need to succeed in their organizations; registration required; course continues every first Thursday of the month; $725 for entire series, $95 per seminar; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290. GRANT WORKSHOP: Oregon Humanities Director of Programs Jennifer Allen and Program Officer Annie Kaffen will review guidelines for 2013 Public Program Grants and share best practices in preparing successful letters of interest; RSVP

TODAY

to a.kaffen@oregonhumanities.org; free; 11 a.m.-noon; Crook County Library, 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765. GO SOLAR! CENTRAL OREGON FREE WORKSHOP: Free; 5:30-6:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, 241 S.E. Seventh St., Madras; 541-323-9722 or www.gosolarcentraloregon.org.

FRIDAY TECHVISION, BOOSTING ECONOMIC GROWTH THROUGH TECHNOLOGY: Karnopp Petersen’s business 20/20 executive seminar with national broadband expert and analyst Craig Settles and round-table discussion with panelists from BendBroadband, St. Charles Health System, Manzama, Formative Ventures and Warm Springs Telecom; registration required; $25 includes breakfast; 7:30-9:30 a.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or kpbusiness2020.com. COFFEE CLATTER: 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Opportunity Foundation of Central Oregon, 835 state Highway 126, Redmond; 541-548-2611. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. GRANT WORKSHOP: Oregon Humanities Director of Programs Jennifer Allen and Program Officer Annie Kaffen will review guidelines for 2013 Public Program Grants and share best practices in preparing successful letters of interest; RSVP to a.kaffen@oregonhumanities.org; free; 11 a.m.-noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

SATURDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain an alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.;

Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www .happyhourtraining.com.

MONDAY CYBERSECURITY WORKSHOP: Hosted by Rep. Greg Walden; free; 2-3:30 p.m.; OSU-Cascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-389-4408. GO SOLAR! CENTRAL OREGON FREE WORKSHOP: Free; 5:306:30 p.m.; Crook County Library, 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-323-9722 or www .gosolarcentraloregon.org. MEDICAL CODING PROCEDURES COURSE: A six-week blended delivery course (classroom and online) for those wishing to enter the health care field in an administrative role or expand their knowledge of medical coding; classes continue Thursdays through Nov. 15; registration required; $495; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or www.cocc .edu/ContinuingEd/Medoffice/.

TUESDAY Oct. 9 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. HOMEBUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 309.

WEDNESDAY Oct. 10 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-749-0789. IMPACTING YOUR PROFIT: This class is designed to help established business owners or principals identify what drives profit and how to increase profitability; the course combines three one-on-one advising sessions with three twohour classes on Oct. 10, Oct. 24 and Nov. 7; registration required; $199; 8-10 a.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290.

N  R DEEDS Deschutes County

Kerwin L. and Maureen S. Davis, Jeffrey J. and Donna M. Kestek and Timothy M. and Janice L. Rippey to Matthew T. Halferty, River Village 3, Lot 8, Block 16, $311,000 James T. and Cheryl M. Fischer to Stephen E. Lewis, Golf Course Condominium Section, Phase 2, Unit 87, $483,000 Richard S. and Merrily K. Graber to Robert R. and Diana M. Robertson, Broken Top, Phase 3D, Lot 370, $600,000 Pablo Pena-Gomez and Beatriz A. Pena to Betty L. Morris, Sterling Pointe, Phase 2, Lot 65, $216,000 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington to JP Morgan Chase Bank N.A., Canyon Point Estates, Phase 2, Lot 29, $184,640.31 Donald I. Fisher, trustee for Ivan C. Romanoff Trust, to Carol M. Hunt, Township 15, Range 12, Section 27, $295,000 James and Kimberly A. Kinney to Winnie Properties LLC, Shevlin Crest, Lot 34, $235,000 Clark G. and Sharron M. Pickar to Robert G. and Carolyn B. Norman, Canal Row, Lot 17, $197,500 Jack E. and Sandra S. Hoxie, trustees for Jack and Sandra Hoxie Living Trust, to Chad and Kristin Prosser, North C Acres, Lot 4, Block 1, $155,000 William L. Bryan, trustee for William Lester Bryan Living Trust, to Richard A. and Tammera S. Johnson, Champion Ridge, Phase 2, Lot 38, $599,000 Structure Development N.W. LLC to Patricia M. Gilbert, trustee for Gilbert Family Revocable Trust, NorthWest Crossing, Phase 16, Lot 728, $488,000 Renee L. Hammond to Gary E. and Barbara L. Elms, Summit Crest, Phase 1, Lot 69, $160,000 OSM Construction LLC to Douglas J. and Gayle H. DeHaan, Deschutes Pointe, Lot 3, $250,000 William K. and Elizabeth R. Seitz, trustees for Seitz Living Trust, to Timothy M. and Julia C. Baumgarte, J-D Ranch Estates, Lot 2, Block 3, $280,000 Carol R. Schunk to Allison L.

Avery, East Knoll Section of Sunrise Village, Lot 3, Block 25, $415,000 Timothy L. and Pamela A. Williams to Chanda N. and Robert R. Villano, Valhalla Heights, Phase 1, Lot 8, Block 1, $315,000 Rick and Dawn L. Ellis to Robert D. Ashley, Skyliner Summit at Broken Top, Phase 10, Lot 205, $375,000 Hayden Homes LLC to Dustin R. and Shawnacy M. Woodworth, Aspen Rim, Lot 50, $189,560 Melvin L. McDougal to Gerald D. and Frances L. Faulkenberry, Stonegate P.U.D., Phase 1, Lot 42, $299,900 Earl J. Westrick to Gregory D. Jacobs, Fairway Point Village 3, Lot 6, Block 15, $420,000 Tennbrook Financing LLC to Stonebridge Homes NW LLC, Renaissance at Shevlin Park, Lots 11 and 53, $201,650 Susan H. and Donald E. Butts to Cody R. and Julie E. McCabe, Pinebrook, Phase 2, Lot 1, Block 5, $220,000 Perry M. and Sabine E. Atkinson, trustees for Atkinson Living Trust, to Edith A. Zukauskas, Brookside First Addition, Lot 15, Block 2, $192,000 Quality Loan Services Corporation of Washington to Federal National Mortgage Association, Selken, Lot 12, Block 1, $237,784.35 Quality Loan Services Corporation of Washington to Federal National Mortgage Association, Sunpointe, Phase 3, Lot 35, $176,221.39 Jeffery P. and Lucy L. Stack, trustees for Stack Family Trust, to Leon C. Handley Jr. and Susanne C. Handley, trustees for Leon C. Handley Jr. and Susanne C. Handley 1994 Trusts, Broken Top, Phase 2C, Lot 132, $850,000 Federal National Mortgage Association to Michael P. Gibson, Township 15, Range 12, Section 36, $287,500 Pamela Alley aka Pamela Gaszynski to Wayne D. Lannen II and Kristina K. Lannen, Wyndemere, Phase 4, Lot 4, Block 6, $462,500 Robert C. Hollipeter, administrator of Freedom Foundation of Oregon, to Frank M. and Gwen H. Werner, trustees for the Werner Family Trust, Frank Werner, trustee for the

Ingrid Werner Revocable Intervivos Trust, Stephen Laner, trustee for the Margaret Laner and Stephen Laner Revocable Trust, Courtenay Footman, Jennifer R. Bennett and Katrina B. Petrescu, Township 17, Range 12, Section 21, $2,200,000 Federal National Mortgage Association to Christopher F. and Christine L. Kuka, Township 16, Range 11, Section 25, $320,000 Kele Howell to Robert P. and Joyce M. Knowles, Township 14, Range 13, Section 32, $155,000 Steven W. and Dennel M. Beadnell to Mark S. and Mary J. Appel, Fairway Point Village 4, Lot 3, Block 17, $524,000 Keith W. Bell to Robert J. and Doris E. Hodge, Golf Course Estates at Aspen Lakes, Phase 1, Lot 15, $695,000 Fannie Mae aka Federal National Mortgage Association to Robert N. and Garnet K. Wilson, Tetherow Crossing, Phase 7, Lot 17, Block 4, $209,900 Vergent LLC to Jessica Anderson, Second Addition to Bend Park, Lot 11, Block 156, $160,000 Bart S. Gernhart to James W. and Stephanie J. Holmes, Deschutes River Recreation Homesites Inc. Block 5, Lot 33, Block 23, $220,000 Hayden Homes LLC to Reid and Maria Simonton, Aspen Rim, Lot 53, $186,900 Kenneth R. and Laveta L. Day to B. Craig and Sally Matthis, First Addition River Forest Acres, Lot 3, Block 2, $475,000 Dan C. and Suzann M. Peterson to Jon W. Schulfer, Lake Park Estates, Lot 7, Block 16, $163,000 Robert E. and Margaret A. Brookover, trustee for Robert E. and Margaret A. Brookover Revocable Trust, to Randy A. Huber and Shirley Y. Shaw, Forest Hills, Phase 2, Lot 25, $329,000 Aaron and Rebecca Borror to Jack F. Vollstedt, Township 14, Range 12, Sections 20 and 21, $2,000,000 Jerry Burger to John C. and Leslie A. Scheppegrell, Riverside, Lot 7, Block 18, $275,000 Recontrust Company N.A. to Bank of America N.A. successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing LP fka Countrywide

Home Loans Servicing LP, Greens at Redmond, Phases 4 and 5, Lot 38, $379,103.87 Eugene S. and Margaret V. Lapin to Patrick W. Bellini, Bluffs at River Bend, Phases 3 and 4, Lot 10, $510,000 Morris C. Stiffler to Kenneth L. Hanna and Tracy A. Drouin, Township 17, Range 13, Section 33, $239,500 Mary A. Dawson. trustee for Mary Ann Dawson 2004 Family Trust, to Brandon E. and Erin M. Weis, Revised Plat of Meadow Village, Lot 6, Block 3, $195,500 Deschutes Property Investment LLC, which acquired title as Deschutes Landing Property Investment LLS, to Steven K. Lewis, Deschutes Landing, Lot 34, Township 18, Range 12, Section 5, $394,000 Ronald O. and Christine M. Nelson to Richard A. Holmes Jr. and Meghan M. Holmes, Township 15, Range 13, Section 19, $265,000 Ralph C. Tolli Jr. and Carol Tolli to Glynn A. Mills, Dobbin Acres, First Addition, Lot 4, Block 6, $300,000 Terrance M. and Brenda K. Shine to Gwen and Brian Janes, Township 14, Range 13, Section 14, $240,000 Stanton S. Sherwood aka Stanton S. Sherwood Jr. and Sandra J. Sherwood to Judith A. Frisco, Township 17, Range 12, Section 5, $299,900 R & R Ranches LLC to Mariah A. and Paul H. Beck, Deschutes River Woods, Lot 20, $245,000 William B. and Robin A. Baber to Tina L. and Lance P. Lyons, Awbrey Ridge, Phase 1, Lot 8, $289,000 Robert L. Teeters and Carolyn T. Colombo to William A. Battey III and Diane M. Battey, Buck Run, Third Addition, Lot 64, $389,000 Eric K. and Donna L. Birky to William R. and Candace C. Brower, Pinebrook Phase 2, Lot 5, Block 7, $224,000 Richard J. Nichols to Scott and Anne Thomas, Awbrey Meadows, Lot 2, $335,000 Sandra L. McKinley, trustee for Sandra L. McKinley Revocable Living Trust, to Arthur R. Leger, Township 18, Range 12, Section 12, $565,000

The Associated Press NEW YORK — Business is looking a little brighter at smaller companies. A survey released Monday shows that they borrowed more money during August — a sign that business owners are becoming more confident about the economy. The survey by PayNet, a research firm that tracks loans to small businesses,

shows that lending rose 3 percent, the second straight monthly increase. Prior to July, lending had fallen in five out of six months. The Thomson Reuters PayNet Small Business index rose to 109.9 in August from 106 in July. The index was just shy of its high point following the recession, 110, reached last December.

Kraft

company spent plenty on developing and marketing new products. New entries generated 9 percent of revenue last year, and Kraft Foods is well positioned to go off on its own, she said. “They have a jewel portfolio of brands,� Rosenfeld said. “They will continue to grow.� While Vernon declined to say how much more Kraft will spend on advertising, much of the budget will be lavished on the company’s power brands, including Velveeta, Kraft Macaroni and Cheese, Miracle Whip, Jell-O and Planters.

Continued from E1 To goose growth, Kraft Foods will spend more on marketing and research and has unleashed edgy new TV commercials that are already generating buzz on YouTube. “Parts of Kraft have been undermanaged for a very long time,� said Edward Aaron, an analyst with RBC Capital Markets in Denver. “Part of the merit of the split is to improve resource allocation and make cultural changes that should have been made a long time ago.� For years, Kraft’s North American grocery business was used to help finance growth in international markets, while the snacks business received a larger share of advertising and research and development money. That’s no real surprise, Kraft Foods Group Chief Executive Officer Tony Vernon said. “The choice between focusing on growth in China versus Oscar Mayer, anyone would make that call,� he said. Yet the decision to prioritize overseas growth means Northfield, Ill.-based Kraft Foods has plenty of work to do in the U.S. to spur sales of such brands as Oscar Mayer, Velveeta, Planters and Kraft, Vernon acknowledges. Kraft’s grocery business has lost ground to French competitor Groupe Lactalis, Saputo Inc. of Canada and private-label producers. While sales have increased an average of 4 percent in the past three years — partly helped by rising food prices and an improving economy — Kraft Foods has lost market share in key segments. Its share of the North American dairy business fell from 12.6 percent in 2008 to 11.3 percent in 2011, according to data compiled by Bloomberg, sauces and dressings from 11.5 percent to 10.4 percent. Oscar Mayer has retained stable market share in the meat business.

Brand revival Jell-O is an example of a brand that needs a turnaround, said Michael Osanloo, president of Kraft Foods grocery unit. While yogurt companies pushed their products as a healthy alternative to kids and sold them as single cups or in two-packs, Kraft kept advertising the same snacks and sold them in six-packs. This month, JellO rolled out Mix-Ins, which have toppings and pudding in one cup and contain real milk and no artificial sweeteners or high-fructose corn syrup. It hasn’t helped that Kraft Foods has spent less on marketing than rivals. From 2009 through 2011, the company spent about 3 percent of sales on advertising, according to filings. By comparison, in 2011, Battle Creek, Mich.based Kellogg Co. spent 8.6 percent and Minneapolisbased General Mills Inc. spent 5.7 percent, according to data compiled by Alix Partners, a New York-based consulting firm. The underfunding of the North American grocery business is the “handiwork� of Irene Rosenfeld, the Kraft CEO who will now run Mondelez, said Ken Harris, an independent consumer products consultant. “She made her bet on emerging markets,� he said. “When they start to invest in the Foods Group, they will be pleased with the response because they haven’t had the investment they deserve.� Rosenfeld said in a phone interview that the combined

Taking risks in advertising The company also has abandoned a play-it-safe approach to advertising in favor of edgier commercials that veer into darker and even creepier territory, much as Burger King Worldwide Inc. did when it introduced The King — since retired. Kraft hired the advertising agency Wieden & Kennedy to handle Velveeta. The firm created Chrysler’s “Imported from Detroit� ads featuring rapper Eminem. Consider a TV commercial for Cheesy Skillets, a dinner kit that includes cheese sauce and shells that can be turned into a quick meal by adding ground beef or other ingredients. The ad features a medieval blacksmith suggestively wrapping his arms around a homemaker while whipping up a cheese dinner. “Stir in the noodles, seasoning,� he says. “Then smite them with the liquid gold until there can be no more smiting.� The blacksmith wasn’t supposed to be suggestive, said Ken Smith, Velveeta account director at Portland-based Wieden & Kennedy. The character was meant to be weird and awkward, he said. That accomplished Kraft’s mission to get more aggressive. The old campaign used country music and targeted buyers in the Midwest and South, Smith said. “They were looking to shake things up against an entrenched competitor in Hamburger Helper,� Smith said. The commercial garnered such comments as “frightening� and “creepy� on YouTube. A Miracle Whip ad, part of a campaign produced by New York-based Dentsu Mcgarrybowen, pays homage to the Scarlet Letter. The red MW letters are as much a pariah as the letter “A� of adultery in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s novel. The point is to get people to try a brand that trails Unilever NV’s top-selling Hellmann’s mayo.

A focus on innovation Vernon also plans to improve the innovation process and push more new products. Jell-O and Cool Whip will both get attention. Cool Whip has amped up marketing with an ad campaign that uses characters from “Family Guy,� a sometimes raunchy adult cartoon TV series. This month, Kraft is also adding Cool Whip frosting to the frozen foods aisle. Kraft will seek new revenue by extending its bestknown brands. Planters peanut butter, which debuted last year, is growing sales. Osanloo said he expects Velveeta Cheesy Skillets to more than double sales to about $100 million in the next 18 months. “I get nervous about a new brand and a new category,� Osanloo said. “I get excited about extending a powerful brand into a new category. We will grow the business.�


ATHOME

Food, F2-3 Home, F4 Garden, F5

F

Ask Martha, F6 Recipe Finder, F6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/athome

HOME

Artistic touch to a straw-bale home Editor’s note: The At Home section features a profile of a local home each month. To suggest a home, email athome@bendbulletin .com.

GARDEN

From left: “Cupig,” “Heron,” and “Small Quail” are displayed outside the Clearwater Gallery in Sisters. The metal sculptures are the work of Judy and Doug Marcoe, owners of The Rustic Garden. They also make 10-inch potted plant holders, end tables and sprinklers.

By Penny Nakamura For The Bulletin

Watercolor artist Winnie Givot knows all about color and blending colors to make a powerful impact on paper. Give this artist some power tools and years to build a family straw-bale home in Sisters, and the same strong visual impact transpires. Givot says the journey to build the two-bedroom, two-bath straw-bale home started in 1992 when her husband, Irv Givot, made weekly visits to Central Oregon from the Willamette Valley to find the perfect piece of property. With grand views of Broken Top, the Three Sisters, Jefferson and Black Butte, this 15-acre parcel was the couple’s destiny from the moment they saw it. The property didn’t have an existing permanent home on the land, but there was a double-wide trailer, and from here the Givots plotted their perfect home for nearly a dozen years. “Because we lived in the trailer for 12 years, we knew exactly where the sun came in, and what direction to place the house, when it came time to build it,” said Givot, sitting in the covered outdoor dining area, which was originally framed as the third bedroom. See Straw / F4

Liven up your

landscape • From the whimsical to the functional, art to dress up your yard as blooms fade

By Marielle Gallagher The Bulletin

A

s flowers go to seed and leaves fall, a garden begins to lose its summer vibrancy. One way to add color and

texture year-round is to place some garden art into the landscape. Adding a sculpture or a dramatic piece of pottery instantly creates a focal point and splash of color to dress up an outdoor patio or garden bed. A few Central Oregon

AT THE MARKET

artists and retailers who specialize in adding art to green spaces around a home shared their products and techniques for placing art into a garden. See Art / F5

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

At the Marketis aweeklylook atproduce available atlocal farmers markets. What: Red Russian kale Season: Available year-round but best in colder months About: Kale comes in many varieties, and it can be fun to try different types. Red Russian kale has a lovely reddish-purple tint and pointy leaves. It also has a fairly sweet flavor profile, compared with some of the other varieties, which can edge toward bitter. No matter what kale you choose, you are choosing well, as the stuff is packed with vitamins A and C, folic acid, iron and calcium, according to “The New Food Lover’s Companion.” Preparation: Kale requires a bit more in the way of prep than spinach or chard. Remove the center stalk, either by cutting it away, or by grabbing the stalk and ripping it out. From there, chop the leaves into strips. Kale is great sauteed and can even be eaten raw in salads. One of my favorite ways to enjoy kale is in soups, as it holds up beautifully and absorbs flavors well.

TODAY’S RECIPES

Photos by Joe Kline / The Bulletin

ABOVE: A decorative windmill sits at Earth’s Art/Tumalo Garden Market, which also sells a windmill that can turn a pump system for a nearby pond. “Most of everything I have (at the store) is artful but is functional,” says Michael Ludeman, the store’s owner. RIGHT: Dianne Landberg, owner of Vintage Glass Sculpture in Bend, uses antique glass globes, lamp bases, plates, vases and other items to create glass sculptures for the garden.

Straight from the farmers market, fresh sandwich fodder By Jan Roberts-Dominguez For The Bulletin

My entire philosophy of sandwich construction can be stated in one simple thought: No matter what edibles you’ve got lurking in the kitchen,

• Just a Tomato Sandwich, F2 • Sesame & Poppy Seed Mayonnaise, F2

they’re only moments away from becoming a sandwich of some sort. And with the autumn bounty available from the nearest farmers market, the options become even more grand and enticing.

• Grilled Eggplant and Arugula Sandwich, F2 • Garden Tomato & Cheese Broil, F2

FOOD Starting out with a base of carbohydrate — loosely defined as bread, but more realistically incorporating

• Chopped Salad Sandwich Filling, F2 • Mashed Sweet Potatoes With Honey and Caramelized Apples, F2

anything from cracker to croissant to tortilla — the garden yields dozens of possibilities each season. From vine-ripened tomatoes, cucumbers and golden bell peppers to tender sheets of

• Hillbilly Blueberry Pie, F3 • Low-and-Slow Smoked Meatloaf, F3 • BBQ Joint Chicken Wings, F3

lettuce, fragrant herbs and exotic eggplant, sandwiches from your garden are a healthy and inspirational answer to the question, “What’s for dinner?” See Sandw iches / F2

• Apple Crisp, F6 • Brown-Sugar Layer Cake with Caramel Buttercream Frosting, F6


F2

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

F    Check out sweet potatoes’ sweet side By Step h an ie Witt Sedgwick Special to The Washington Post

Sweet potato dishes can be sweet, savory or a mix of both. Here I aim for sweet, adding honey, cinnamon and apples. The key is to balance the tartness of the apple with the honey. A little butter doesn’t hurt, rounding out and softening the flavors. It’s an ideal accompaniment to braised beef, spicy grilled chicken or roast pork. It’s also a beautiful dish, and if I’m serving it on a holiday table I add some apple chips to dress it up. You can buy apple chips, but they’re easy to make. Thinly slice a whole apple, removing any seeds. Lay the slices out on a parchment-lined baking sheet and sprinkle with cinnamon sugar. Bake in a 300degree oven for 30 minutes, then turn the slices over and sprinkle with a little more cinnamon sugar. Bake until the slices are dry and starting to brown, 20 to 40 minutes.

Mashed Sweet Potatoes With Honey and Caramelized Apples Makes 6 servings. 2 lbs sweet potatoes (3 to 4 med potatoes) 2 TBS unsalted butter 2 tsp vegetable oil 1 lg Granny Smith apple (9 oz), peeled, cored and cut into approximately 1 ⁄4 -inch cubes 1 ⁄2 tsp ground cinnamon 1 ⁄4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg Salt Freshly ground black pepper 3 TBS honey, or more to taste Place a large piece of aluminum foil directly on the middle rack of the oven, and preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Use a fork or skewer to prick the sweet potatoes on several sides. Transfer them to the aluminum foil and bake for 60 to 90 minutes, until juice is bubbling out of the sweet potatoes and they are soft to the touch. Let them cool for 15 minutes. Heat the butter and oil in a medium nonstick saute pan or skillet over medium-high heat. Add the apple cubes and stir; cook for 6 to 7 minutes, until it starts to soften, tossing every couple of minutes. Add the cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt and pepper to taste. Cook until the apple begins to brown. Remove from the heat. Cut each sweet potato in half and scoop the insides into the bowl of a stand mixer or handheld electric mixer; beat at medium speed until smooth. Add the honey and the caramelized apples, beating at low speed to combine. Taste, and adjust the seasoning as needed. Serve warm. Nutrition information per serving: 230 calories, 3 g protein, 45 g carbohydrates, 6 g fat, 3 g saturated fat, 10 mg cholesterol, 135 mg sodium, 5 g dietary fiber, 19 g sugar

Next week: Grocery store secrets

Sandwiches Continued from F1 The creations first take hold on my imaginary palate, where the flavors, textures and colors of the harvest unite. Then, it’s merely a matter of fine-tuning the process back in the kitchen, adding appropriate condiments, cheeses or whatever it takes to round out the offering. This is what makes the sandwich the perfect summer meal: its adaptability, spontaneity and, in many cases, portability. And I’ve never under-

estimated the respectability factor of the sandwich either. That is, the freedom to legally eat with your fingers and not get sent to your room! Of course, there are some basic guidelines that encourage successful pairings: • Great sandwiches begin with excellent bread, such as nutty whole grain, rich challah or brioche, flaky croissants, crusty French or dark, dense rye. And there are so many talented bread makers these days that finding these great breads shouldn’t be a challenge.

• Appropriate pairings are essential. Bold-flavored and juicy fillings stand up to bold, coarse-grained and crusty breads and condiments. Alternatively, delicate ingredients are more appreciated on the softer, more refined breads. • Keep it manageable. If opting for focaccia bread, brioche, or any type of specialty bun, it should never be so thick, or the crust so hard as to render the sandwich unconquerable. • A light toasting of the bread can often add a per-

fect-yet-subtle depth of flavor, transforming a good sandwich into a truly memorable one. Toasting also seems to forestall sogginess, so when working with particularly moist fillings, it’s a good idea to brown at least the inner side of each slice. • If preparing sandwiches for a picnic, “wet” fillings should be spooned into a thermos and assembled just before serving. • Great breads aren’t cheap. So after building your sandwiches, freeze the leftovers, or turn them into crou-

Makes 1 sandwich. This is the time of year when tomatoes become a meal all unto themselves. If you make the Sesame & Poppy Seed Mayonnaise, you will swear you’ve tucked a little bit of smoked bacon into the affair. Or you can opt for the purity of plain, good quality mayonnaise. In either approach, bon appetit! 2 slices of bread, lightly toasted Mayonnaise or Sesame & Poppy Seed Mayonnaise (see recipe) 1 really vine-ripened backyard tomato, thickly sliced Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Makes enough filling for 8 sandwiches. Whether you roll it up in pita bread or a flour tortilla, or pile it into a pocket bread half, this is a great make-ahead sandwich filling to have lurking in your refrigerator for nights when the meal has to be quick, or when people are eating in shifts. No wilting, no tossing at the last minute, and it can be dished out to order, one diner at a time. Make it vegetarian by eliminating the salami and other meats.

Makes about ¾ cup. As you’ll see, there is no bacon in this mayonnaise — but the combination of toasted sesame and poppy seeds makes it seem as though there is. Because of its bacon-like flavor, this spread is particularly wonderful on tomato based sandwiches.

3 really ripe local tomatoes, seeded, chopped and drained 1 cucumber, peeled, halved lengthwise, seeded and chopped 1 each red and green sweet bell pepper, seeded and chopped 1 C chopped celery 1 C chopped carrots 1 C chopped dry salami (start with deli-cut slices, then cut into strips and then chop) 1 C chopped ham, smoked turkey or grilled chicken breast 1 C sliced black olives, well drained ½ C chopped sweet onion ½ C chopped green onion (all of the white and pale green portion and a bit of the dark green) 1½ C coarsely shredded Jack, Gouda or Swiss cheese Vinaigrette (recipe follows) Raita Sauce (recipe follows)

4 TBS red or white wine vinegar 1 TBS sugar 2 TBS lightly toasted sesame seeds (see note) 1 TBS poppy seeds 1 TBS coarsely chopped yellow onion ½ tsp Worcestershire sauce ¼ tsp paprika ½ C good quality mayonnaise Salt to taste

725 NE Greenwood, Bend

Saturday, Oct. 6 & 13 • 12 pm - 4 pm

Prineville Erickson’s Thriftway 315 W. Third, Prineville

Friday, Oct. 5 • 12 pm - 5 pm Flu Shots $30 Medicare part-B, PacificSource*, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Oregon, LifeWise accepted *Excluding Community Health Solutions Minimum 12 years of age • All immunizations by licensed nurse Service by GetAFluShot.com

Makes 1 sandwich. Peppery greens and thinly sliced onion cut the unctuousness of eggplant without masking its flavor. A simple favorite for the eggplant obsessed.

Chopped Salad Sandwich Filling

Sesame & Poppy Seed Mayonnaise

Bend Erickson’s Thriftway

Grilled Eggplant and Arugula Sandwich

Preheat the broiler. Whisk together olive oil, garlic, herbs, salt and pepper. Brush all over the eggplant slices and bread and arrange on a baking sheet. Grill eggplant and bread until beautifully browned on both sides. As soon as the bread is removed from the oven, place the cheese on one side of one piece. To compose the sandwich, layer the eggplant slices on top of the cheese. Top with a few onion slices, some of the arugula leaves, and the second slice of bread (spread with a bit of mayonnaise, if desired). Slice and serve.

Slather both pieces of bread with enough mayonnaise (or Sesame & Poppy Seed Mayonnaise) to make an extremely goopy sandwich. Layer on three or more slices of the tomato. Season the tomato with salt and pepper. Put the sandwich together and enjoy! Naturally, variations abound — which is where bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwiches come from, of course. Or you could layer on some thin slices of a yellow onion, and/or good quality smoked ham or turkey.

FLU SHOTS!

— Jan Roberts-Dominguez is a Corvallis food writer, cookbook author and artist. Contact: janrd@proaxis.com.

½ C olive oil 2 tsp minced garlic 1 tsp herbes de Provence Salt and freshly ground pepper 1 lg Japanese eggplant, trimmed and thinly sliced lengthwise 2 thick slices rustic country bread 2 deli-cut slices of provolone cheese Thinly sliced onion Handful of young arugula leaves Mayonnaise (optional)

Just a Tomato Sandwich

Place the vinegar, sugar, sesame seeds, poppy seeds, onion, Worcestershire and paprika in a blender jar. Blend until most of the sesame seeds are ground (stop the motor several times and scrape down the sides of the container). With a rubber spatula, scrape the contents into a small bowl; whisk in the mayonnaise, then adjust flavor, adding salt if necessary. Note on toasted sesame seeds: To toast sesame seeds, heat a small nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add the seeds and cook them, shaking the pan occasionally to keep the seeds browning evenly, until they are beginning to turn a light golden brown and become very fragrant. Scrape them out onto a dish to cool. Cool completely before using in the mayonnaise.

tons, crostini or bruschetta to serve with soup, salads and appetizers.

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Open-faced tomato and cheese sandwiches come together in just a few steps. Start with a mixture of mayonnaise, Parmesan and fresh herbs spread on slices of bread. Add thickly sliced tomatoes and thinly sliced cheese. Cook under the broiler just until the cheese melts.

Garden Tomato & Cheese Broil Makes 4 sandwiches. The trick is to serve this sandwich while the cheese is still hot and bubbly but the tomatoes underneath are still cool and juicy and slightly firm. It’s a wonderful contrast in textures and flavors. There are a couple of directions you could take this simple open-faced sandwich, including serving it with a second slice of bread (but you’ll have to make an additional amount of the mayonnaise mixture to spread on the second slice before topping the sandwich). Just make sure you start with absolutely local vine-ripened tomatoes. 4 TBS mayonnaise (or the Sesame & Poppy Seed Mayonnaise; see recipe) 1 TBS shredded Parmesan cheese 1 tsp finely minced fresh basil

½ tsp of finely chopped fresh oregano 4 slices bread, lightly toasted 4 local, vine-ripened tomatoes, thickly sliced Olive oil (optional)

Balsamic vinegar (optional) Salt and freshly ground black pepper 4 thinly sliced medium-soft cheese (such as havarti or provolone)

Whisk together the mayonnaise with the Parmesan cheese, fresh basil and fresh oregano; set aside (refrigerate if made more than 30 minutes in advance). When ready to serve, preheat oven to broil. While the oven is heating up, spread a portion of the mayonnaise on one side of each slice of bread. Arrange tomato slices on top of the mayonnaise mixture, being generous with each sandwich. If desired, drizzle a few drops of the olive oil and the balsamic vinegar on top of each layering of tomatoes. Sprinkle each layering with a bit of salt and pepper, then place one thin layer of the cheese on top. Place the sandwiches in the preheated broiler and broil JUST until the cheese has begun to melt and become bubbly. Remove from oven and serve immediately while the cheese is very hot and the tomato slices are still firm and cool.

Two to 24 hours ahead, combine the tomatoes, cucumber, sweet bell peppers, celery, carrots, salami, ham (or other meats), olives, sweet onion, green onion and shredded cheese in a large bowl. Toss with enough of the vinaigrette to evenly coat the salad. Cover and refrigerate. Makes 6 to 8 generous servings. Vinaigrette: Whisk together 1¼ C extra-virgin olive oil, ¼ C red wine vinegar, 3 TBS balsamic vinegar, 2 TBS fresh lemon juice, 1 tsp Dijon mustard, 3 cloves finely minced garlic, ½ tsp dried thyme leaves, ¼ tsp dried oregano, 1 tsp sugar or honey, ¾ tsp salt, ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper. Makes about 2 cups vinaigrette. Raita Sauce: In a small bowl, combine 1 peeled, seeded and chopped cucumber; ½ C finely chopped yellow onion; 1 C plain yogurt; 1 C sour cream; 2 tsp cumin powder; salt and pepper to taste. Chill for at least 1 hour before serving to allow flavors to blend. May be made up to 5 days ahead and refrigerated. Yields a scant 2¾ cups.


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

FOOD

F3

A high-flying chef’s down-home turn By Jim Shahin

Low-and-Slow Smoked Meatloaf

Special to The Washington Post

Andrew Evans is chopping smoked brisket on a midsummer Saturday afternoon. He’s in the open kitchen of the BBQ Joint, his airy yet cozy restaurant in Easton, Md. At 47, he looks a bit like Russell Crowe, dressed in a red T-shirt, jeans, apron and black baseball cap. It is a far cry from his highflying days as the chef-owner of one of the most highly touted restaurants in the Mid-Atlantic, the Inn at Easton. Food enEvans thusiasts made their way to his place on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, about 11⁄2 hours’ drive from Washington, D.C., to experience Evans’ adventurous cuisine. In 2007, The Washington Post’s Tom Sietsema awarded the restaurant three stars. In his last food piece before he died in 2006, the legendary New York Times writer and gourmand R.W. “Johnny” Apple Jr. wrote that the chef “works magic” with the inn’s Australia-meetsAsia-meets-Maryland menu. Roasted kangaroo tenderloin, fried Chesapeake oysters and green Thai bouillabaisse existed, somehow harmoniously, on the roster of dishes — probably due to Evans’ training at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y., followed by an eight-year stint at an Asian restaurant in Australia. Evans’ acclaim attracted the likes of top toques such as Eric Ziebold, Roberto Donna, Robert Wiedmaier and Cathal Armstrong to cook a dinner as part of his 2006 Guest Chef series. But two years later, personal matters led Evans to close the inn; he sold it the next year. He moved to his current location and opened a Thai restaurant. “It was completely open, like a night-market stall,” he says, referring to stands in Southeast Asia. “That was my baby. It didn’t work, though.” His woes were compounded by the recession. “I was on the ropes, financially,” he says. “I went to my biggest investor, my mom. You toe the line when you go to your mom. And I said, ‘I could try barbecue,’ and she said, ‘All right, give it a try.’” Born in New York City and raised in Ohio and New Hampshire, Evans did not grow up around barbecue. He graduated from the University of Virginia in 1989 with a degree in religious studies (specializing in Zen Buddhism). He worked as a line cook at a Baltimore restaurant before attending the CIA. After graduation, he was sponsored to cook in Australia. He thought he would be there a year. He ended up staying for eight. But Evans’ interest in barbecue had grown steadily since 2004, when he served as a judge at the prestigious Jack Daniels World Championship Invitational Barbecue in Lynchburg, Tenn. “I don’t know why they asked me,” he says. “But it changed my perspective completely. Chefs think barbecue is redneck food and it’s beneath them. That’s how I used to think.” When he returned from what is simply known as the Jack, Evans began experimenting with smoking meats and held backyard competitions. In 2008, he formed Walk the Swine, a competition team. Evans had caught the barbecue bug. When the Thai restaurant didn’t work out, he saw barbecue not only as a viable business option but also as something to fulfill his relatively newfound love affair with the cuisine. “I think barbecue plucks a primal chord in your brain and when it is plucked just right, something you don’t even realize happens, “ he says. “The crusty bark on the meat, the fire. It just goes … ping.” He tore up the carpet in the Thai restaurant, installed two 250-pound Cookshack indoor electric smokers, and reopened the place in January 2010 as the BBQ Joint. Rather than work all hours, as he did at the inn, Evans smokes the meats overnight and keeps them in a warmer until service. The method allows him to leave in the afternoon on most days to be at

Makes 6 to 8 servings. 21⁄4 lbs 80-20 ground beef 1 ⁄4 C tomato-based barbecue sauce, plus 1⁄4 C for glazing 2 lg eggs 1 C plain dried bread crumbs, such as panko

8 oz canned diced tomatoes, drained 11⁄2 tsp kosher salt 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper

Prepare the grill for indirect heat. For a charcoal grill, light the charcoal or wood briquettes; when the briquettes are ready, dump them into a mound on one side of the grill. For a medium-hot fire, you should be able to hold your hand about 6 inches above the coals for 4 to 5 seconds. For a gas grill, place the wood chunk or chips in a smoker box or a foil packet with fork holes puncturing the top to let smoke escape. Prepare the grill for indirect heat (fire up only one side). Preheat the grill to high. When smoke appears, reduce the heat to as low as it will go, about 200 degrees. Combine the ground beef, sauce, eggs, bread crumbs, tomatoes, salt and pepper in a large bowl and mix well. Pack the mixture into a 5-by-9inch loaf pan or 6-by-10-inch baking dish. When the grill is ready, place the meatloaf pan on the cool, or indirect, side of the grill. Fill a 9-by-9-inch aluminum pan with an inch of water and place it on the other side of the grill. (If there’s not enough space for the pan, that’s okay; you can omit it.) If using a charcoal grill, add the hickory chunk or chips to the coals now. Cover the grill, and smoke the meatloaf over indirect heat as close to 200 degrees as possible until the interior temperature of the meatloaf registers 140 degrees on an instantread thermometer. At that point, brush the remaining 1⁄4 cup of barbecue sauce on top of the meatloaf and cover the grill. The glaze will set while the meatloaf reaches its final temperature of 150 to 160 degrees. The total cooking time will depend on the heat of your fire and the size of your baking pan or dish, but 3 hours is a good estimate. Transfer the meatloaf pan to a heatproof surface, cover it with aluminum foil and allow it to rest for 20 minutes before slicing and serving. Nutrition information per serving (based on 8): 400 calories, 25 g protein, 11 g carbohydrates, 28 g fat, 11 g saturated fat, 145 mg cholesterol, 740 mg sodium, 0 g dietary fiber, 5 g sugar

Smoking a meatloaf is not much more complicated than throwing it into the oven, but the resulting flavor is outstanding.

BBQ Joint Chicken Wings Photos by Deb Lindsey / For The Washington Post

The Hillbilly Blueberry Pie is baked in a cast-iron pan, a method born out of necessity when chef Andrew Evans couldn’t find a pie plate in his restaurant kitchen.

Hillbilly Blueberry Pie Makes 6 to 8 servings. At his restaurant, the BBQ Joint, chef-owner Andrew Evans wanted to make a pie as a special dessert, but there wasn’t a pie dish to be found. He recruited a cast-iron skillet that was usually used for frying bacon, and Hillbilly Pie was born. The restaurant now offers deep-dish pies made in cast-iron pans every day. Evans says this one is a favorite. Serve it with vanilla bean ice cream. You’ll need a cast-iron skillet about 10 inches in diameter and 2 inches deep. 1

⁄8 tsp ground allspice ⁄8 tsp ground cinnamon 1 ⁄3 C cornstarch 2 ⁄3 C turbinado sugar, plus 1 TBS for sprinkling 1

1 tsp finely grated lemon zest, plus 1⁄2 tsp fresh lemon juice (from 1 med lemon) 1 ⁄8 tsp kosher salt 6 C blueberries, stemmed (3 pints)

2 homemade or store-bought deep-dish pie shells 2 TBS unsalted butter, cut into pea-size dice, plus 1 TBS melted unsalted butter

Position an oven rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 325 degrees. Sift the allspice, cinnamon and cornstarch together into a large bowl, then add the 2/3 cup of sugar, the lemon zest and juice, and the salt; stir to combine. Add the blueberries and toss to coat. Roll out the dough into two large rounds about 13 inches in diameter. Line the skillet with one of the dough rounds, bringing it all the way up the sides. Toss the blueberries one last time and pour them into the skillet. Distribute the diced butter over the berries and top with the remaining round of dough, either whole or cut into strips to make a lattice. Brush the dough with the melted butter and sprinkle with the remaining tablespoon of sugar. Use a small knife to cut a few slits near the center for venting. Bake for 1 hour or until the crust is golden brown. Serve warm. Nutrition information per serving (based 8): 490 calories, 3 g protein, 66 g carbohydrates, 25 g fat, 7 g saturated fat, 10 mg cholesterol, 230 mg sodium, 4 g dietary fiber, 33 g sugar

Makes 6 or more appetizer servings. Make ahead: The wings can be cooked up to 3 days in advance and refrigerated in an airtight container. To reheat, lay them out on a baking sheet and bake at 350 degrees for 10 to 15 minutes or until warmed through. 36 jointed chicken wings 1 C homemade or storebought barbecue rub 4 TBS (1⁄2 stick) unsalted butter, melted

1 C ranch or blue cheese dressing, for dipping 3 ribs celery, cut crosswise into 3-inch lengths (optional)

Prepare the grill for indirect heat. For a charcoal grill, light the charcoal or wood briquettes; when the briquettes are ready, dump them into a mound on one side of the grill. For a medium-hot fire, you should be able to hold your hand about 6 inches above the coals for 4 to 5 seconds. For a gas grill, place the wood chunk or chips in a smoker box or a foil packet with fork holes puncturing the top to let smoke escape. Prepare the grill for indirect heat (fire up only one side). Preheat the grill to high. When smoke appears, reduce the heat to low, 275 to 300 degrees. Toss the wings with 1⁄2 cup of the rub in a large bowl. Transfer the wings to the cool, or indirect, side of the grill. Fill a 9-by-9-inch aluminum pan with an inch of water and place it on the other side of the grill. (If there’s not enough space for the pan, that’s okay; you can omit it.) Smoke the wings over indirect heat at 275 to 300 degrees until an instant-read thermometer registers an internal temperature of 180 degrees. Transfer the wings to a large, clean bowl. Add the melted butter and toss to evenly coat the wings, then use a shaker or strainer to sprinkle on the remaining 1⁄2 cup of rub, tossing to coat. Heap the wings onto a serving platter; serve with the dressing and with celery sticks, if desired. Nutrition information per serving (not including dressing): 720 calories, 54 g protein, 0 g carbohydrates, 55 g fat, 18 g saturated fat, 245 mg cholesterol, 3900 mg sodium, 0 g dietary fiber, 0 g sugar

Find Moving and Storing a stressful experience? Not if you choose any of our three facilities located on Bends west side. Chef Andrew Evans uses his special competition chicken rub on wings and serves them with ranch dressing.

home with his daughters, ages 14 and 10, just three blocks away. He volunteers at their schools, and he makes dinner for them, something he didn’t have time to do when he and his wife were running the inn. (The couple divorced in 2009.) “Back then, my whole life was babysitter, babysitter, babysitter,” he says. The girls’ favorite family meals reflect their chef-dad’s pedigree: gnoc-

chi; steamed artichokes with garlic and butter; and salmon glazed with a ginger chutney, served over sauteed bok choy with a side of jasmine rice. His formal training has benefited his barbecue, he says. “I have the advantage of being a chef, which helps me accelerate my knowledge,” nodding toward the beans on a visitor’s plate. “We use four different beans and about 18 ingredients in those — measured to the gram.”

Our managers will advise you on unit size, recommend movers, provide you with packing supplies, anything to ease the moving stress! Multiple sizes available at Summer Rates!

Inquire at any of our 3 sites, all conveniently located on the west side.

S ONLINE PAEYRMVAETNIOTNS ONLINE RES WAY ONLY A CLICK ORAAGE.COM EGONST WWW.CENTRALOR

541-382-8808

541-317-5700

541-330-0023

visit us at www.centraloregonstorage.com


F4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

H

Next week: Going plastic-free

A cutout in the wall of Winnie and Irv Givot’s home in Sisters shows the straw underneath. The walls are nearly two feet thick with straw, and the plaster is an inch thick on either side.

Winnie Givot sits at a table on a covered porch at her home in Sisters. The dining area gets morning sun and provides shade during the hotter part of the day.

Straw Continued from F1 “This dining area has the sun streaming in during the morning hours, which is perfect because it’s cool then, and the rest of the day it’s in the shade, which is perfect in the summer,” she said. They finally broke ground in 2004. “We take most of our meals out here in the summer and, because it’s covered, we can also eat outdoors when it’s raining.” The outdoor dining area gives the home a distinct hacienda feel, and because this is a straw-bale home, the thick curved walls provide an adobestyling, which appealed to the Givots, who once lived in an authentic adobe home in New Mexico. “We actually thought of building an adobe home, because we loved it so much, but there’s not a lot of adobe out here, but what there is a lot of is straw,” said Givot with a chuckle. “My husband did a lot of research on straw-bale homes before we started building.” Straw-bale homes aren’t new. They were first built in the late 1800s by homesteaders in Nebraska because of the lack of timber there. Their popularity has gained traction, as people like the Givots try to build more sustainably. The couple sees it as an earth-friendly choice, one that is thermally efficient. “The walls are nearly two feet thick because the straw bales are the insulation for this home. Then the plaster is an inch thick on either side,” explained Givot, sitting in her cozy living room looking out of the French doors toward the magnificent views of the Cascade Mountains. “We have no air conditioning in here because we don’t need it; the thick walls keep the house very comfortable. In the winter, when it’s in the single digits and there’s hoar frost outside, we’re still very comfortable. We basically only use that tiny woodburning stove combined with the passive solar heating from the southwest-facing windows, and that’s our primary heat source.” Givot rises from the sofa and walks to one of the thick walls in the living room and opens up the “truth window,” which is a small foot-long double wooden door built into the wall. When the little doors are opened, visitors can see that the inside of the wall is indeed all straw insulation. Givot says people are often surprised to find out straw-

Call Stark’s for all your Central Vacuum needs!

Photos by Joe Kline / The Bulletin

The Givots’ straw-bale home is seen from the exterior. The 1,800-square-foot home takes advantage of passive solar heating, otherwise using just a “tiny woodburning stove” for warmth.

bale homes are also highly fire resistant. “The straw bales are packed so tightly not a lot of oxygen is in the bales, and then there’s an inch of plaster all around the walls, so it’s harder for this type of home to catch on fire than a stick home,” said Givot. Because she’s an artist, color and the way the colors play in the sun was important to Givot. She’s thrilled with the interior plaster she was able to find. “What’s wonderful about this plaster is that you never have to paint it. It doesn’t fade. It’s an earth plaster made from clay, mica and marble dust,” said Givot, pointing to the thick walls. “When the sun shines in here, the mica sparkles and adds more light in here, I love this plaster. It’s from a thousand-year quarry in the south of France, where they mine this.” The open plan of this 1,800square-foot home takes full advantage of the mountain views. The kitchen opens up to the living room, and throughout the house the Givots tiled their floors with 18-inch porcelain tiles reminiscent of Mexican tiles. What may be the most impressive artistic coup in the house for Givot is not the interior plastering, nor the tiling, but the mill work throughout the home. If it’s wood, she has built it. That would include

The seven-sided master bedroom’s windows maximize the view of the mountains.

The kitchen features cabinets made by Winnie Givot.

all the kitchen cabinetry, and built-in cabinets in their walkin closets. “I did take a sabbatical from painting and teaching while I was working on the house,” confessed Givot. “Learning all the different techniques was a steep learning curve, but I always started with a practice room.” Within the kitchen, she put in a built-in wooden table against a window that looks out to the front porch.

7:30 AM - 5:30 PM MON-FRI 8 AM - 3 PM SAT. HWY 20E & Dean Swift Rd. (1 block West of Costco)

A hallway in the Givot home shows off the thick, curved styling of the walls and the 18-inch porcelain floor tiles. The interior plaster contains clay, mica and marble dust, and the mica sparkles when the sun shines on the walls.

See additional photos on The Bulletin’s website: bendbulletin.com/athometour

541-382-4171 541-548-7707

541-323 - 3011 • starks.com

2121 NE Division Bend

641 NW Fir Redmond

Sewing Machine Repair & Service

www.denfeldpaints.com

856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com

Irv Givot’s small study contains vaulted ceilings with big mountain views from his large desk. Farther down the hallway is the seven-sided master bedroom, which maximizes views to the mountains. Givot credits her husband for doing the mathematical calculations to get this room just right. The room is simple and clean and doesn’t need a lot of decoration because of the mountain views that almost fully surround it. In the master bathroom, Givot’s natural artistry can be seen, as she repurposed leftover bamboo poles, which were used to cinch the straw bales. She grouted the bamboo poles into the wall, using them like tiles to great visual effect and

on the walls and backsplash. Using as much natural light as possible, Givot shows the oblong window in the master closet that she strategically placed there, so during the day the light switch would not need to be used. She points to an apple tree outside this closet window, and explains that while she could’ve had a larger closet, she decided against it, in favor of saving that tree. “I’m so glad we saved the tree, because from this window it feels like we’re actually in that tree. And I noticed after we moved in, there are golden finches nesting in that tree, and they’re so much fun to watch from here,” said Givot. “It’s also a beautiful tree in the spring when it’s blossoming.” Givot’s artistic hand is evident in the guest bathroom. Though the room is small, she has added touches with decorative Mexican hand-painted tiles, which she’s had stored from her days in New Mexico. Though the bathroom has no windows, Givot thought to put a solar tube in the ceiling, which makes the bathroom naturally glow without using a light switch. She also built the

cabinets and towel racks. Next to this bathroom is the second bedroom with a futoncouch. Givot says it also serves as a television room when they don’t have guests. Because this room faces the front of the house, she put curtains in here; she proudly claims it’s the only room that needs window treatments for privacy. Givot walks around the property, and with a satisfied grin says she’s done working on the house, though the abundant vegetable gardens that surround it are an annual job. Nevertheless, Givot is back in her artist studio, which is located in the barn. She’s busy painting and teaching again. As she picks up one of her watercolor paintings, she stands back at arms length and exclaims, “You see so much more when you’re drawing or painting something, like this tree.” It’s in the details. Details the Givots got right with their straw-bale home. Winnie Givot says she has a greater appreciation for her home because she had a hand in building it. Creation and art come in many forms. — Reporter: pnakamura@ bendbulletin.com


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

G

F5

Next week: Geraniums

Local artists and merchants EARTH’S ART/TUMALO GARDEN MARKET Where: 19879 Eighth St., Tumalo Prices: Windmills, $1500-$2,400; wood fired ovens, starting at $1,200; greenhouses, $2,200-$7,500 installed; pottery, $20-$200; bird accessories, $40-$65; 11- by 17-foot sun sails, $100 Contact: www. tumalogardenmarket.com, 541-728-0088

VINTAGE GLASS SCULPTURES Sold at: Vive le Decor, 1350 S.E. Reed Market Road, Bend Prices: $35-$75 Contact: Owner Dianne Landberg, 541-383-217

THE RUSTIC GARDEN Sold at: • Pomegranate Home & Garden, 120 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive, Bend • Clearwater Gallery, 303 West Hood Ave., Sisters • Madras Garden Depot, 60 N.W. Depot Road, Madras Prices: Most designs are $7-$125 Contact: www. therusticgarden.com

Photos by Joe Kline / The Bulletin

“Tiki” ($145), a metal sculpture by Doug and Judy Marcoe, is on display outside the Clearwater Gallery in Sisters.

Sculptures by artist Dianne Landberg are displayed outside her home south of Bend. “It started as a hobby and then it got out of hand,” says Landberg. “I love to go junking … I surrounded myself with old glassware and old dishes and thought how good they’d look together. Then I thought one of them looked good in the garden.”

Art Continued from F1

Whimsical art For Dianne Landberg, owner of Vintage Glass Sculpture in Bend, garden art is about adding a bit of whimsy to the landscape. Landberg uses antique glass globes, lamp bases, plates, vases and other items to create glass sculptures that look straight out of Alice in Wonderland’s tea party. Landberg’s philosophy is to use the things that she says would add to our already full landfills and repurpose them into sculptures to dress up a garden. “It started as a hobby and then it got out of hand,” explains Landberg. “I love to go junking … I surrounded myself with old glassware and old dishes and thought how good they’d look together. Then I thought one of them looked good in the garden.” At Landberg’s home she uses the sculptures as side tables, bird baths and gazing balls. “I think they look really pretty against greenery or I like to sit them next to a pond where they just catch the sunlight.”

Functional art Michael Ludeman, owner of Earth’s Art/Tumalo Garden Market, focuses on garden art that combines function and

A pizza oven for sale at Earth’s Art/Tumalo Garden Market provides heat up to 900 degrees to cook a pizza in four minutes.

garden corner or seating area.

Metal art

Michael Ludeman, of Earth’s Art/Tumalo Garden Market, also sells greenhouses. “They withstand weather, efficiently heat your plants and it’s a place where you can put a couple chairs and enjoy a glass of wine in inclement weather,” he says.

decoration. “Most of everything I have (at the store) is artful but is functional.” A 20-foot windmill borders a pond outside the store. “The windmill’s function is to turn a pump system that pushes air to the bottom of the pond,” said Ludeman. Also on display at Ludeman’s store are custom-built

greenhouses and wood-fired ovens. “I’ve got one (greenhouse) that’s built out of cedar and glass and it’s adorable … they withstand weather, efficiently heat your plants and it’s a place where you can put a couple chairs and enjoy a glass of wine in inclement weather,” said Ludeman. The adobe and brick wood-

fired ovens heat up to 900 degrees and cook a pizza in about four minutes. Other decorative garden items include bold, colorful pottery from Asia, Malaysia and Vietnam, handmade bird feeders, houses and baths, and sun sails, available in pastel colors, to provide shade and a pop of color and geometric shape to a

Judy and Doug Marcoe own The Rustic Garden and produce metal garden art from their shop in Madras. Although they begin the process with brand new steel, the finished product has a rusted look that melds well in natural landscapes. The Marcoes spent the first 10 years of the business hand-cutting the designs, but have since invested in a computerized cutter to expedite the process. To create the rusted look, they keep the metal sheets flat, water them morning and night and apply apple cider vinegar and bleach. In addition to the decorative

designs of animals, flowers, trees and the sun and moon, the Marcoes make 10-inch potted plant holders, end tables and sprinklers. “When the economy took a dive and people were staying home, they started buying pieces to decorate those great big open spaces (around the home).” One of the Marcoes’ most popular designs is the quail. “Our quail continue to be our biggest seller every year. We sell them as a family: dad, mom and three babies and sell them individually.” Placed along a path or in between foliage, the quail can be arranged in a row to look like they’re on the move. — Reporter: 541-383-0361 or mgallagher@bendbulletin.com

By any name, scarlet rosemallow a treasured, cold-tolerant perennial By Norman Winter McClatchy-Tribune News Service

No matter the type of garden you have, the scarlet rosemallow has the ability to steal the attention of your visitors. To be honest I hate that name from a marketing standpoint and I actually learned of the plant as a Texas Star hibiscus. As luck would have it some taxonomic board has concluded it is not native to Texas. I hear there is now even an argument that it is not really native to the Southeast. Don’t let native status or an ugly name like swamp mallow or scarlet mallow deter you from growing one of the most picturesque perennial hibiscuses available at the garden center. To clarify my first sentence, the tightly formal need not try to use this plant. But those with a grandma’s cottage feel, a passion for the Caribbean or the backyard wildlife enthusiast, this is definitely a plant for you. Here at the Columbus Botanical Garden our complex is designed around a late 1800’s farmhouse with many of the original outbuild-

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

The scarlet rosemallow produces an abundance of scarlet star-shaped blooms that will delight both hummingbirds and butterflies.

ings. The scarlet rosemallow fits this garden perfectly as nearby we have planted rudbeckias, Joe Pye weed, and other perennials known to be favorites of butterflies and hummingbirds. It is a cold-tolerant perennial hardy from zones 5 through 10 and produces some of the tallest plants for the flower border. Ours has been producing scores of scarlet, star-shaped

flowers in abundance and to the delight of the ruby-throated hummingbirds. The foliage is a striking glossy-green and has a maple-like shape. If you are into the tropical look, you can create your corner of paradise by combining it with large banana trees like the cold-hardy Japanese fiber banana or with elephant ears. Try using in combination with the yellow bush-form allaman-

da or yellow blooming canna lilies. Place the hibiscus to the back of the border to hide their giraffe leg-like stalks. Though considered a plant for all soils, requirements for the scarlet rosemallow hibiscus are much like those of other perennials. Plant in welldrained, well-prepared beds and use a good layer of mulch to keep the soil evenly moist through the season. This hibiscus is found growing naturally in sandy, moist, acidic soils but I have seen many fine plants in central Texas. Expect them to easily reach 6 feet in height and width, so space on 3-foot centers. Choose a site with plenty of sunlight. Morning sun and filtered afternoon light are just about perfect in our state. Hibiscus blooms on new growth, so it is important to keep it growing vigorously throughout the season. Keep them well fed and watered during periods of drought. After your hibiscus has frozen in the fall, cut them back to ground level and add a little extra mulch. I always go for nursery-grown plants,

but many gardeners ask if these can be grown from seed, and indeed they can. It does help to lightly scrape with sandpaper for easier germination. You may be in love with the tropical Chinese hibiscus, but I predict once you can look past the name you will fall in love with the scarlet rosemallow, or if you will, swamp mallow,

too, and welcome it to your perennial garden. — Norman Winter is executive director of the Columbus Botanical Garden, Columbus Ga.

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY

541-389-9663

NEED SOMETHING FIXED? Call a Service Professional!

Check out our classifieds to find the service professional you need!

Langston Clarke

CCB #012S4Y6

FREE ESTIMATES Interior Exterior Painting or Staining Mention This Ad for Extra Savings! 2 Year Warranty on all our work!

www.bendbulletin.com

Call 541-385-5809

541.000.0000 Langstonclrkpaintcan.ore


F6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

Tasty apple crisp assembles in a snap truly a snap to make. Now that I know it tastes so good, I might try making one with cherry pie filling next.

By Julie Rothman The Baltimore Sun

Debbie Housden from Baltimore was looking for a recipe for an apple crisp that she said was published Recipe requests in the Sunpapers at least 10 Agnes Todd from South years ago. She said the crisp Bend, Ind., is looking for a was made with apple pie recipe for a Pineapple Cream filling instead of apples and Pie like the one her sister used corn flakes in the top- used to make. Her sister no longer has the recipe ping. Diane Crupi from but they know that Bend sent in a photothe pie had a graham copy of a recipe for an cracker crust and that apple crisp that almost the filling included certainly is the one that Housden was in search canned pineapple, of. Unfortunately, the RECIPE cream cheese, instant clipping is not dated, FINDER lemon pudding and nor does it say where it some other ingredients was clipped from, but that they cannot recall. I can tell by the way it is forSally Koons from Shenanmatted that it is an old Recipe doah, Pa., would like to have Finder column. the recipe for the Spinach Pie The original recipe tester, that is sold at Grauls market Laura Reiley, commented, in Cape St. Claire, Md. It is “this really is a no-fuss des- made with tubular pasta, sert.” She goes on the say garlic, spinach, and topped that “the whole thing took me with tomato. She thinks about 10 minutes to put to- there is probably mozzarelgether, and the results were a la cheese in it as well and a classic apple crisp. Very hom- cream sauce of some kind. — Looking for a hard-to-find ey and cinnamony.” I’ll admit recipe or can answer a request? I was a little reluctant to make Write to Julie Rothman, an apple crisp with apple pie Recipe Finder, The Baltimore filling instead of fresh apples, Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., but once I tasted this one, I Baltimore, MD 21278, or email had no problem with it. It was baltsunrecipefinder@gmail.com. absolutely delicious thanks Names must accompany recipes to the buttery and slightly for them to be published. crunchy crust, and it was

Apple Crisp Makes 9 servings. ¾ C Kellogg’s Corn Flake Crumbs (see note) ½ C all-purpose flour ½ tsp salt ½ C firmly packed brown sugar 1 ⁄3 C chopped nuts

½ C butter or margarine, softened 1 can (1 lb, 4 oz) apple pie filling 1 TBS lemon juice 1 tsp ground cinnamon

For the topping, mix together the first six ingredients. Set aside. In an ungreased 8-by-8-by-2-inch glass baking dish, stir together remaining ingredients. Spread evenly in dish. Crumble topping evenly over apples. Bake in oven at 400 degrees about 30 minutes or until topping is crisp and lightly browned. Serve warm or cooled with ice cream or whipped topping. Note: The Kellogg Co. makes Corn Flake Crumbs, but regular Corn Flakes may be crumbled for this recipe.

Birthday party for a granddaughter MARTHA STEWART

H

aving finally been gifted with a grandchild (actually, now two), it was my great pleasure recently to host baby Jude’s first birthday. Because she is growing up in New York City, and because her mother was very busy preparing for a second baby, Truman (who was born two days before Jude’s birthday), we planned Jude’s party close to home at the very pretty and modern eatery Perry St., owned by my friend, chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten. The guest list comprised all the adults who had had something to do with baby Jude in her first year. For example, Hosanna Houser, who helped me create the extraordinary Arctic wall hanging for Jude’s bedroom; “Uncle” Kevin Sharkey, who is perhaps Jude’s best friend; and Jayne Hinds Bidaut, Jude’s first photographer, were all in attendance. The only other child was Olivier, Jean-Georges’ grandchild and son of Cedric Vongerichten, the talented chef de cuisine of Perry St. The restaurant’s simple, elegant architecture and decor made it so easy to decorate for a child’s party planned primarily for adults. We picked a theme — animals — and most everything was created around the idea with Steiff stuffed toys, wooden cutouts, printed images and sculpted marzipan. Because the event was a lunch for grown-ups, we kept the celebratory aspects minimal but whimsical. Clear and white helium balloons added a very festive but unobtrusive touch to the dining table and the dessert table. The back of the long banquette provided us with a ledge for wooden cutout animals of all sorts, which we painted white for uniformity. Dozens of stuffed Steiff animals were arranged down the center of the table, some perched on blocks. The place mats were heavy white paper printed with

photos of the stuffed toys, and we crafted a menu card with an image of Jude on the cover. Everything you need to re-create these table decorations is available at marthastewart. com/judes-birthday. Off to the side, we set up the dessert buffet: three special birthday cakes displayed under glass domes, boxed animal sugar cookies by Sweet Dani B (sweetdanib.com), and more Steiff animals peering here and there. It was a workday for all of us, and we had to be sensitive to the babies’ schedules,

so lunch was not a drawn-out affair. But it was so sweet and delicious and delightful that we will all remember it most assuredly. And because we photographed it, Jude will always have a visual memento of what occurred on that first birthday. And now the big question: What will next year’s party be? Keep in mind, Truman will be 1, two days before Jude will be 2! — Questions of general interest can be emailed to mslletters@ marthastewart.com. For more information on this column, visit www.marthastewart.com.

New York Times News Service

Cakes are decorated with marzipan animals. For instructions on making the animals, visit www.marthastewart.com.

Brown-Sugar Layer Cake with Caramel Buttercream Frosting Makes 10 to 12 servings. 2 sticks unsalted butter, softened, plus more for pans 3 C cake flour, plus more for pans

2 C packed dark-brown sugar 1 C sugar 6 lg eggs 1 TBS pure vanilla extract 1 ⁄4 tsp salt

8 oz sour cream ⁄2 tsp baking soda Caramel Buttercream Frosting (recipe follows)

1

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Butter two 8-inch round cake pans. Line with parchment. Butter paper, and flour pans. Beat together butter and sugars with a mixer until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Beat in eggs, 1 at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in vanilla. Whisk together flour and salt. In another bowl, combine sour cream and baking soda. Gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture in 3 additions, alternating with sour cream mixture and starting and ending with flour mixture. Divide batter between pans. Bake until golden and a toothpick inserted into centers comes out clean, about 50 minutes. Let cakes cool in pans, about 30 minutes. Invert cakes, remove pans and parchment, and let cool completely on a wire rack. Trim tops of cakes with a serrated knife to make level, then cut each cake in half horizontally. Reserve 1 bottom layer for another use. Place remaining bottom layer on a cake stand, and spread evenly with 11⁄4 C frosting. Repeat with a second layer and another 11⁄4 C frosting. Place third layer on top. Spread entire cake top and sides with 11⁄4 C frosting. Refrigerate cake until firm, about 30 minutes. Spread with 11⁄2 C frosting, smoothing top and sides. Serve immediately with marzipan animals, or refrigerate up to 2 days; if refrigerated, let cake come to room temperature before serving.

Caramel Buttercream Frosting Makes 7 cups. After frosting the cake, you will have about 13⁄4 cups of buttercream left over. It can be frozen for up to a month. 21⁄4 C sugar, divided ⁄2 C water 1 ⁄2 C heavy cream 1

9 lg egg whites, room temperature 6 sticks unsalted butter, softened, divided

11⁄2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

Combine 11⁄4 C sugar and the water in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve sugar. Brush down sides of pan with a damp pastry brush, and cook, without stirring, until dark amber. Remove from heat, and gradually stir in cream until completely smooth. Whisk together remaining sugar and the egg whites in the bowl of a mixer set over a pot of simmering water. Whisk until sugar dissolves and mixture is warm. Transfer bowl to a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, and whisk on medium-high speed until fluffy and cool and stiff peaks form, about 10 minutes. Add butter, 2 TBS at a time, whisking well after each addition. Whisk in vanilla. Slowly pour in caramel with mixer on medium speed, and whisk until completely incorporated. Continue to whisk until smooth, about 3 minutes. Use immediately, or transfer to an airtight container and refrigerate up to 3 days. Before using, bring to room temperature and beat until smooth.


THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012 G1

CLASSIFIEDS

To place your ad visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

The Bulletin

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

EMPLOYMENT

GENERAL MERCHANDISE

LEGAL NOTICES

Find Classifieds at

www.bendbulletin.com

RENTALS/REAL ESTATE

contact us:

TRANSPORTATION

hours:

Place an ad: 541-385-5809

FAX an ad: 541-322-7253

Business Hours:

Place an ad with the help of a Bulletin Classified representative between the business hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Include your name, phone number and address

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Subscriber Services: 541-385-5800

Classified Telephone Hours:

Subscribe or manage your subscription

24 Hour Message Line: 541-383-2371

On the web at: www.bendbulletin.com

Place, cancel, or extend an ad

T h e

B u l l e t i n :

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns, Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. 263 - Tools

General Merchandise

200

1 7 7 7

264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found GARAGE SALES 275 - Auction Sales 280 - Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets & Supplies

Pets & Supplies

Chihuahua, teacups (2), shots & dewormed, $250 ea 541-977-0035

Kittens/cats avail. thru rescue group. Tame, shots, altered, ID chip, more. Sat/Sun 1-5, call re: other days. 65480 78th St., Bend, 541-389-8420, 5985488; photos, etc. at www.craftcats.org

Dachshund AKC mini pup $375/$425.541-508-4558 www.bendweenies.com

202

Dog Kennel, 10x10x6 Behlen complete club Want to Buy or Rent kennel, like new, Labradoodles - Mini & $450. 541-647-1236 WANTED: RAZORS, med size, several colors Double or single541-504-2662 edged, straight DO YOU HAVE www.alpen-ridge.com razors, shaving SOMETHING TO brushes, mugs & Labrador AKC puppies, SELL scuttles, strops, black & choc, dewclaws, FOR $500 OR shaving accessories athletic parents, ready LESS? & memorabilia. 9/25. 541-410-9000 Non-commercial Fair prices paid. advertisers may Labrador AKC pups, Call 541-390-7029 place an ad with choc / blk / yellow, males between 10 am-3 pm. our & females, exlnt hunters/ "QUICK CASH 205 family dogs. $600 each. SPECIAL" 1st shots & dewormed. Items for Free 1 week 3 lines, $12 In Hillsboro, OR, or 2 weeks, $20! 1-707-775-5809 or FREE Llama Manure Ad must include www.facebook.com/ Shovel ready, you haul! price of single item amandito.casteen Call 541-389-7329 of $500 or less, or multiple items POODLE (TOY) Pups, 208 AKC. Pomapoos also! whose total does Pets & Supplies So cute! 541-475-3889 not exceed $500. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Aussie Shepherd reg. pups, standard, blue & red merles anrd tris, 541-420-1580 www.highdesertaussies.com

AUSSIES, MINI/TOY AKC, all colors, must see, parents on site. 541-598-5314/788-7799 Barn/shop cats FREE, some tame, some not. We deliver! Fixed, shots. 541-389-8420

Chihuahua Tea cup puppy, $250. Call Kathy @ 541.815.8364

Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

www.bendbulletin.com

English Bulldog Puppies AKC registered, 1st shots & microchipped. Ready to go! $2000. 541 416-0375 English Bulldogs, DOB 8/6/12, 4 females, 3 males, 1st shots, $2200. 541-280-6268

Queensland Heelers standard & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://

rightwayranch.wordpress.com

SIBERIAN HUSKY PUP - $150 to great home only. Gorgeous 8 mos old male red & white. Super healthy, smart, loving. Very special boy! 805-832-3434.

Free Lionhead Female Yorkie male puppies (2), Rabbit, to good ap- 8 weeks, vet checked & proved home only, shots, can deliver, 541-548-0747 $600. 541-792-0375

S . W .

C h a n d l e r

A v e . ,

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

B e n d

O r e g o n

210

243

257

265

269

Furniture & Appliances

Ski Equipment

Musical Instruments

Building Materials

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

GENERATE SOME ex- 2 pair of 175mm ParaBend Habitat bolic skis: 1 pair citement in your RESTORE Atomic 2 yrs old with neighborhood! Plan a Building Supply Resale binding & poles $120; garage sale and don't Quality at LOW 1 pair Dynastar with forget to advertise in PRICES bindings & poles 4 classified! 740 NE 1st yrs old, $100. Used Piano, Steinway Model 541-385-5809. 541-312-6709 by elderly couple Open to the public. O Baby Grand 1911, Kitchen table light col541-383-4142. gorgeous, artist qual- Sisters Habitat ReStore ored wood with 4 ity instrument w/great Building Supply Resale chairs. Good condiaction & Steinway’s Need to get an Quality items. tion $100. call warm, rich sound. Will LOW PRICES! 541-388-0153 ad in ASAP? adorn any living room, 150 N. Fir. You can place it OASIS Large capacity church or music stu541-549-1621 Kenmore (Elite) HE dio perfectly. New reonline at: Open to the public. Washer & Electric tail $69,000. Sacriwww.bendbulletin.com Dryer - $600. fice at $34,000 OBO, Get your 2.0 GE Profile Microcall 541-383-3150. 541-385-5809 wave - counter top business 260 $150. Misc. Items Call (541) 639-4047 246 GROW Washer & dryer, stackGuns, Hunting Buying Diamonds able, like new, $400 & Fishing /Gold for Cash with an ad in set. 541-593-1101 Saxon’s Fine Jewelers The Bulletin’s Bend local pays CASH!! 541-389-6655 The Bulletin for Guns, Knives & “Call A Service BUYING r ecommends extra Ammo. 541-526-0617 Professional” Lionel/American Flyer caution when purtrains, accessories. chasing products or Browning Bar II .338 Directory 541-408-2191. $1150. Ruger .357 SS services from out of SOLD .Mossberg 308 BUYING & SELLING 266 the area. Sending SOLD. 541-408-4844 All gold jewelry, silver cash, checks, or Heating & Stoves and gold coins, bars, credit information CASH!! rounds, wedding sets, may be subjected to NOTICE TO For Guns, Ammo & class rings, sterling silFRAUD. For more ADVERTISER Reloading Supplies. ver, coin collect, vininformation about an Since September 29, 541-408-6900. tage watches, dental advertiser, you may 1991, advertising for gold. Bill Fleming, call the Oregon used woodstoves has 541-382-9419. State Attorney been limited to modGeneral’s Office Car tent 10x20 els which have been Consumer Protecnew $120 obo. certified by the Ortion hotline at DO YOU HAVE 541-389-9268 egon Department of 1-877-877-9392. SOMETHING TO Environmental QualPeople Look for Information SELL ity (DEQ) and the fedAbout Products and FOR $500 OR eral Environmental Services Every Day through LESS? Protection Agency The Bulletin Classifieds Non-commercial (EPA) as having met 212 advertisers may smoke emission stanCOWGIRL CASH place an ad Antiques & dards. A certified We buy Jewelry, Boots, with our woodstove may be Collectibles Vintage Dresses & "QUICK CASH identified by its certifiMore. 924 Brooks St. SPECIAL" cation label, which is Antiques wanted: tools, 541-678-5162 1 week 3 lines $12 permanently attached furniture, fishing, www.getcowgirlcash.com or to the stove. The Bulmarbles, old signs, Custom made female 2 weeks $20! letin will not knowtoys, costume jewelry. black-powder wool Ad must ingly accept advertisCall 541-389-1578 squaw dress & leggings, include price of ing for the sale of Bottom half of sewing unadorned, with accessingle item of $500 uncertified machine. Makes great sories. $150 obo. or less, or multiple woodstoves. side table. $25. 541-280-0112 or items whose total Quadifire 3100 wood 541-536-2412 541-389-8672. does not exceed stove, good condition. $500. Large mirror, $99. 4 auto Breyer collectible horses $700. 541-382-4144. rims, $15 each. OHSA vintage from Call Classifieds at safety harness, $99. 267 1975-1980 Prices vary 541-385-5809 Hampton Bay stand up at $20 or less. Also Fuel & Wood 3-spd fan, $99. Router, tack & stables for www.bendbulletin.com $125. 541-948-4413 sale. 541-504-9078 WHEN BUYING Security camera monitor, Cabbage Patch doll recorder, cameras & wall FIREWOOD... vintage 1986 w/box Large Capacity stand; you come uninChampion Gun red hair, blue eyes. To avoid fraud, stall from my home, now Safe. $750. Manual $50. 541-504-9078 The Bulletin $250. 541-948-4413 Lock. Good Condirecommends paytion. Buyer moves. Wanted- paying cash ment for Firewood (541)891-4619 for Hi-fi audio & stuonly upon delivery dio equip. McIntosh, and inspection. JBL, Marantz, Dy- • A cord is 128 cu. ft. Rem. 742 30-06, Visit our HUGE naco, Heathkit, Sansemi-auto w/ 2x7 Red4’ x 4’ x 8’ home decor sui, Carver, NAD, etc. • Receipts should field. Deluxe, $375. consignment store. Call 541-261-1808 541-815-4901 include name, New items phone, price and arrive daily! WHEN YOU SEE THIS Wanted: Collector kind of wood pur930 SE Textron, seeks high quality chased. Bend 541-318-1501 fishing items. • Firewood ads www.redeuxbend.com Call 541-678-5753, or MUST include spe503-351-2746 On a classified ad cies and cost per Just bought a new boat? go to cord to better serve Sell your old one in the Winchester Model 94 www.bendbulletin.com our customers. classiieds! Ask about our 30-30,orig. box,“Golden to view additional Super Seller rates! Spike”Commemorative, photos of the item. 541-385-5809 #105 of limited US run, $850 firm,541-350-5373 263 The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all Tools Dry seasoned Juniper, 255 ads from The Bulletin $200/cord split; newspaper onto The Computers SW Portable Boss air$175/cord rounds. Bulletin Internet webless paint sprayer, Call 541-977-4500 or site. THE BULLETIN re$500. 541-949-4413 530-524-3299 quires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple sys215 tems/ software, to dis“Arctic Fox Silver Edition 1140, 2005. 5 hrs on Coins & Stamps close the name of the gen; air, slideout, dry bath, like new, loaded! . business or the term Also 2004 Dodge Ram 3500 quad cab dually Private collector buying "dealer" in their ads. 4x4, 11,800 mi, SuperHitch...” postage stamp alPrivate party advertisRichard, Bend, OR bums & collections, ers are defined as world-wide and U.S. those who sell one 573-286-4343 (local, Get Results from Qualified computer. cell #) Central Oregon Buyers!

Yorkies, 2 purebred males, hand raised, 12 weeks around 7 lbs, 1/2 years old around 3lbs. $300 each. 541-280-4200 Golden Retriever pups, AKC, written guarantee, 210 shots, parents on site, 20+ yr. breeder, nice Furniture & Appliances range of color from red to light golden. Beauty & A1 Washers&Dryers brains, calm tempera$150 ea. Full warment, good hunters. Turanty. Free Del. Also malo area. Ready now. wanted, used W/D’s $500. 541-420-5253 541-280-7355 241 Golden Retriever pups, ready Oct. 13, Male & Bicycles & China Hutch, exc. cond., Female left. Call Accessories dark wood, $500 541-848-2277. OBO, 541-504-7994. Trex (2) multi-track 700s, Husky Malamute Pups, 8 weeks old, beautiful Computer Desk & chair, 26”, with 15” & 19” $25, call frames, like new, $240 markings, 1st shots, $350. 541-306-9218 541-504-1624. each. 541-322-6280

ING

SOLD IN 19 DAYS!

257

Musical Instruments

Call us at 541-385-5809 and ask about our Wheel Deal Special!

For newspaper delivery, call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email

classified@bendbulletin.com

www .bendbulletin

Farm Market

300 308

Farm Equipment & Machinery

IH1566, 180 hp, duals, 3 pt., 540/1000 pto, cab, heat, a/c, tilt, www.hersheysoilandbark.com stereo, low hours Screened, soil & com- $16,800. 541-419-2713 post mixed, no rocks/clods. High hu- Wanted Used Farm Equipment & Machinmus level, exc. for ery. Looking to buy, or flower beds, lawns, consign of good used gardens, straight quality equipment. screened top soil. Deschutes Valley Bark. Clean fill. DeEquipment liver/you haul. 541-548-8385 541-548-3949. SUPER TOP SOIL

325 Yard Bug riding lawnmower from Home DeHay, Grain & Feed pot, just tuned up, $250. 541-389-9503 after 5pm 3A Livestock Supplies •Panels •Gates •Feeders 270 Now galvanized! Lost & Found •6-Rail 12’ panels, $101 •6-Rail 16’ panels, $117 Found 9/25, Weedeater Custom sizes available & bucket of tools, on 541-475-1255 South bound parkway near Powers Rd. Call Wheat Straw: Certified & to identify Bedding Straw & Garden Straw;Compost.546-6171 541-420-7232.

Found CD Holder w/ CD’s, White Peaks Dr, 9/24, 541-419-5677. Found Sunglasses, in Redmond, 9/24, call to ID, 541-388-1533. Ladies black leather cross-stitch foldover hand wallet with silver heart, lost on 9/22 at Albertson’s Redmond. Reward for return with contents. Leave msg. 541-504-1908 Lost in area of NE Vogt/Cool and Boyd Acres: Llasa-Apso male, B&W, underbite, no collar. $150 reward. 541-419-5120 Lost totally gray cat (Russian Blue) name Lucy last seen Mon. 9/24 Wilson & Upper Terrace, Bend. Call Jon, 602-290-9009 or Bill 541-548-0844 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420. 286

Sales Northeast Bend

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $2.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!”

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT at

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

292

Sales Other Areas Piano/Organ /Guitar Lessons - all ages and pro-piano tuning special! 541-647-1366

9 7 7 0 2

Estate Sale in Sisters: Thurs. Oct. 4- Sun. Oct. 7th 9-5, 16036 Cattle Drive Rd.

Where can you ind a helping hand? From contractors to yard care, it’s all here in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 358

Farmers Column Long term lease on 40+ irrigated acres in Alfalfa. Available now for fall or spring planting. 541-548-0040 FIND YOUR FUTURE HOME IN THE BULLETIN Your future is just a page away. Whether you’re looking for a hat or a place to hang it, The Bulletin Classiied is your best source. Every day thousands of buyers and sellers of goods and services do business in these pages. They know you can’t beat The Bulletin Classiied Section for selection and convenience - every item is just a phone call away. The Classiied Section is easy to use. Every item is categorized and every cartegory is indexed on the section’s front page. Whether you are looking for a home or need a service, your future is in the pages of The Bulletin Classiied.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

G2 TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Edited by Will Shortz

PLACE AN AD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . .11:00 am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Starting at 3 lines

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise

OVER $500 in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days ................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days .................................................. $18.50 7 days .................................................. $24.00 14 days .................................................$33.50 28 days .................................................$61.50

4 lines for 4 days.................................. $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

470

476

Domestic & In-Home Positions

Employment Opportunities

Weekend help needed: CNA/caregiver for female with MS. Sat-Sun, 9am-1pm in private home close to COCC. 2 references required. Call 541-318-1335

421

Schools & Training

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

476

Employment Opportunities

TRUCK SCHOOL

www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-387-9252

Admin Asst BBR PD Part-time, Yr. Round Job descript & app at www.blackbutteranch police.com

Just too many collectibles?

541-385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at:

www.bendbulletin.com

Take care of your investments with the help from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Beauty/Barber Sell them in Supercuts now hiring The Bulletin Classiieds stylists for Bend, Redmond & Prineville. Apply at all 5 loca541-385-5809 tions or fax resume to LoggingImmediate 541-923-7640. 454 openings for Log Looking for Employment Loader, Chipper, and Garage Sales Cat Skidder operators, Log Truck drivCollege graduate ers, and Fire Patrol. reliable,motivated 11 month work year, looking for not shut down due to entry-level full time fire danger, work in N job in any field. CA. 530-258-3025. 717-380-0477 (Jared) Find them in Remember.... Add your web adThe Bulletin FIND YOUR FUTURE dress to your ad and Classiieds! readers on The HOME IN THE BULLETIN Bulletin' s web site Your future is just a page will be able to click away. Whether you’re looking through automatically for a hat or a place to hang it, to your site. The Bulletin Classiied is your best source. Medical Every day thousands of Clinical Informatics Coordinator - FT buyers and sellers of goods Whitefish, MT and services do business in these pages. They know North Valley Hospital (NVH) in beautiful NW you can’t beat The Bulletin Montana is transitioning to a new electronic Classiied Section for health record (EHR) system. We seek an indiselection and convenience vidual with a clinical, healthcare background and - every item is just a phone experience using MCKESSON PARAGON call away. CLINICAL MODULES & HORIZON PATIENT FOLDER or similar EHR system. Coordinator The Classiied Section is will design, build & train advanced clinical comeasy to use. Every item ponents of NVH’s new EHR system; coordinate is categorized and every design, build & training for Physician Workflows cartegory is indexed on the within the products; be first line of technical section’s front page. support for nursing staff; and provide training to Whether you are looking for nursing and other areas on clinical components. a home or need a service, Visit www.nvhosp.org and click on Careers & Volyour future is in the pages of unteers, and then click Employment OpportuniThe Bulletin Classiied. ties to view full job description & learn more about NVH. Excellent benefits: group health/dental, earned leave/retirement plans. EOE

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

541-385-5809

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

Operate Your Own Business

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Prineville H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours.

Must have reliable, insured vehicle. Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Sales Telephone prospecting position for important professional services. Income potential $50,000. (average income 30k-35k) opportunity for advancement. Base & Commission, Health and Dental Benefits. Will train the right person. Fax resume to: 541-848-6408. Good classiied ads tell the essential facts in an interesting Manner. Write from the readers view - not the seller’s. Convert the facts into beneits. Show the reader how the item will help them in some way.

Check out the Find exactly what classiieds online you are looking for in the www.bendbulletin.com CLASSIFIEDS Updated daily

Finance & Business

500 528

Loans & Mortgages

528

573

Loans & Mortgages

Business Opportunities

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200. LOCAL MONEY:We buy secured trust deeds & note,some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 ext.13.

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you proSay “goodbuy” vide personal to that unused information to companies offering loans or item by placing it in credit, especially The Bulletin Classiieds those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of 541-385-5809 state. If you have concerns or quesReverse Mortgages tions, we suggest you by local expert Mike consult your attorney LeRoux NMLS57716 or call CONSUMER Call to learn more. HOTLINE, 541-350-7839 1-877-877-9392. Security1 Lending NMLS98161

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Door-to-door selling with fast results! It’s the easiest way in the world to sell. The Bulletin Classiied

541-385-5809


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012 G3 648

Houses for Rent General

Rentals

600 630

Rooms for Rent Furnished rm, $425 +sec dep; refs. TV, Wifi, micro, frig. 541-389-9268 Studios & Kitchenettes Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro & fridge. Utils & linens. New owners.$145-$165/wk 541-382-1885

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 730 - New Listings 732 - Commercial Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condos & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 634

642

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Call for Specials! Limited numbers avail. 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks. MOUNTAIN GLEN, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Duplex 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1260 sq.ft., 1 story, garage w/opener, fenced yard, RV/Boat parking, fridge, dishwasher, micro, walk-in laundry, W/S/G paid, front gardner paid, $775+dep., 541-604-0338

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend Fully furnished loft Apt

on Wall Street in Bend, with parking. All utilities paid. Call 541-389-2389 for appt

Want to impress the relatives? Remodel your home with the help of a professional from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $299 1st mo. rent!! * GET THEM BEFORE THEY ARE GONE! 2 bdrm, 1 bath $530 & $540 Carports & A/C included! Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co *Upstairs only with lease

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $ 500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for: $

10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

personals To the bicyclist who I invertantly cut off at the Mill Mall roundabout last Saturday, my apologies.

AVAILABLE BEND AREA RENTALS •2 Bdrm/1 Bath Upstairs Apt. - Next to Kiwanis Park. Spacious. On-site laundry close to this unit. Balcony off large kitchen. $550 WST •2 Bdrm, 1 Bath SE Duplex - Single garage. Small fenced, natural back yard. Fireplace. W/D Hookups. New carpet & paint. No Pets. $650 WST •Lovely Condo on the River - 2 Bdrm/2 Bath. Gated community. Extra storage room. Gas FP. Vaulted ceilings. W/D hookups. Great floor plan. $1150 WS •3 Bdrm/2 Bath NW Home - Shevlin Park Fenced back yard. Dbl. garage. Tile counters. Hardwood floors. Pine trim & decor. W/D included. Dogs only considered. GFA. 1638 sq. ft. $1250 AVAILABLE REDMOND AREA RENTALS 3 Bdrm/2 Bath SW Home - Fenced back yard with large patio. Dbl. garage. New paint, carpet, appl., 1120 sq. ft. $850.00 2 Bdrm/1 Bath NW Apt. - Spacious, bright upstairs unit with A/C. Nice balcony. Extra large kitchen. On-site laundry. $525.00 WST *** FOR ADDITIONAL PROPERTIES *** CALL 541-382-0053 &/or Stop By the Office at 587 NE Greenwood, Bend

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Building/Contracting

Landscaping/Yard Care

Landscaping/Yard Care

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). More Than Service An active license Peace Of Mind means the contractor is bonded and inFall Clean Up sured. Verify the contractor’s CCB li- Don’t track it in all Winter •Leaves cense through the •Cones CCB Consumer •Needles Website •Pruning

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Debris Removal

JUNK BE GONE

I Haul Away FREE

For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel, 541-389-8107 Handyman

•Debris Hauling

Gutter Cleaning Compost Applications Use Less Water

$$$ SAVE $$$ Improve Soil

2012 Maintenance Package Available weekly, monthly and one time service EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES. Home & Free Estimates Commercial Repairs, Senior Discounts Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, 541-390-1466 Honey Do's. On-time Same Day Response promise. Senior NOTICE: OREGON Discount. Work guarLandscape Contracanteed. 541-389-3361 tors Law (ORS 671) or 541-771-4463 requires all busiBonded & Insured nesses that advertise CCB#181595 to perform Landscape Construction I DO THAT! which includes: Home/Rental repairs planting, decks, Small jobs to remodels fences, arbors, Honest, guaranteed water-features, and work. CCB#151573 installation, repair of Dennis 541-317-9768 irrigation systems to be licensed with the USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Landscape Contractors Board. This Door-to-door selling with 4-digit number is to be fast results! It’s the easiest included in all adverway in the world to sell. tisements which indicate the business has The Bulletin Classiied a bond, insurance and 541-385-5809 workers compensation for their employees. For your protecHome Improvement tion call 503-378-5909 or use our website: Kelly Kerfoot Const. www.lcb.state.or.us to 28 yrs exp in Central OR! check license status Quality & honesty, from before contracting carpentry & handyman with the business. jobs, to expert wall covPersons doing landering install / removal. scape maintenance Sr. discounts CCB#47120 do not require a LCB Licensed/bonded/insured license. 541-389-1413 / 410-2422

Boats & RV’s

700 800

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

745

850

Homes for Sale

Snowmobiles

880

882

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Immaculate!

Fleetwood Wilderness 36’, 2005, 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, AC, W/D hkup beautiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380

Used out-drive parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

Beaver Coach Marquis 40’ 1987. New cover, new paint (2004), new inverter (2007). Onan 6300 watt gen, 111K mi, parked covered $35,000 obo. 541-419-9859 or 541-280-2014

What are you 4270Sq.ft., 6/6, 4-car, corner, .83 acre mtn looking for? view, by owner. $590,000 541-390-0886 You’ll ind it in See: bloomkey.com/8779 The Bulletin Classiieds BANK OWNED HOMES! PACKAGE DEAL! FREE List w/Pics! www.BendRepos.com 2003 800 Skidoo Sum541-385-5809 mit; 1997 Yamaha bend and beyond real estate 20967 yeoman, bend or Phaser. Ultra-lite 875 2-place trailer. Only NOTICE: Watercraft $4500. 541-815-4811. Monaco Dynasty 2004, All real estate adverloaded, 3 slides, dietised here in is subsel, Reduced - now 2007 SeaDoo ject to the Federal 860 $119,000, 541-9232004 Waverunner, Fair Housing Act, 8572 or 541-749-0037 excellent condition, which makes it illegal Motorcycles & Accessories LOW hours. Double to advertise any preftrailer, lots of extras. erence, limitation or Harley Davidson SoftTail Deluxe 2007, $10,000 discrimination based white/cobalt, w/pas541-719-8444 on race, color, relisenger kit, Vance & gion, sex, handicap, Hines muffler system familial status or na& kit, 1045 mi., exc. Ads published in "Wa- Southwind 35.5’ Triton, tional origin, or intentercraft" include: Kay- 2008,V10, 2 slides, Ducond, $19,999, tion to make any such aks, rafts and motor- pont UV coat, 7500 mi. 541-389-9188. preferences, limitaized personal Bought new at tions or discrimination. watercrafts. For $132,913; Harley Heritage We will not knowingly "boats" please see asking $93,500. Softail, 2003 accept any advertisClass 870. Call 541-419-4212 $5,000+ in extras, ing for real estate $2000 paint job, 541-385-5809 which is in violation of 30K mi. 1 owner, this law. All persons For more information are hereby informed please call that all dwellings ad541-385-8090 vertised are available or 209-605-5537 on an equal opportuWinnebago Class C 27’ nity basis. The Bulle- Harley Street Glide 2006, 1992, Ford 460 V8,64K 21K miles, $11,500. tin Classified Ranch Cottage,LonePine mi., good cond., $7000 541-728-0445 Valley,Terrebonne,1bdrm OBO 541-678-5575 750 1 bath, 800 sq.ft., $600, Sea Kayaks - His & Redmond Homes 881 1st, last, dep., no pets/ HD FAT BOY Hers, Eddyline Wind smoking,541-548-0731 Travel Trailers Dancers,17’, fiberglass 1996 Redmond Worry Free boats, all equip incl., Completely rebuilt/ Certified Home $149,000 650 paddles, personal flocustomized, low Huge Landscaped Lot Houses for Rent tation devices,dry bags, miles. Accepting ofMove in Ready! spray skirts,roof rack w/ fers. 541-548-4807 NE Bend 800-451-5808 ext 819 towers & cradles -- Just add water, $1250/boat Looking for your next HD Screaming Eagle Firm. 541-504-8557. Looking for your next employee? Electra Glide 2005, Komfort 20’ Trailblazer, employee? Place a Bulletin help 880 103” motor, two tone 2004, with all the extras, Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and candy teal, new tires, from new tires & chrome wanted ad today and Motorhomes reach over 60,000 23K miles, CD player, wheels to A/C! $8495. reach over 60,000 readers each week. hydraulic clutch, ex541-447-3342, Prineville readers each week. Your classified ad cellent condition. Your classified ad will also appear on Highest offer takes it. will also appear on bendbulletin.com 541-480-8080. bendbulletin.com, which currently recurrently receiving Honda Elite 80 2001, ceives over over 1.5 million page 1400 mi., absolutely Country Coach Intrigue 1.5 million page views, every month like new., comes w/ views every month 2002, 40' Tag axle. Springdale 2005 27’, 4’ at no extra cost. carrying rack for 2” at no extra cost. 400hp Cummins Die- slide in dining/living area, Bulletin Classifieds receiver, ideal for use Bulletin Classifieds sel. two slide-outs. sleeps 6, low mi,$15,000 Get Results! w/motorhome, $995, Get Results! 41,000 miles, new obo. 541-408-3811 Call 541-385-5809 or 541-546-6920 Call 385-5809 or tires & batteries. Most place your ad on-line place your ad on-line options. $95,000 OBO at at 541-678-5712 bendbulletin.com Softail Deluxe bendbulletin.com

2010, 805 miles,

...don’t let time get away. Hire a professional out of The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory today! 652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Kayak special Classic 2 bdrm, quiet near river, econ. heat. $775+ last +dep.lease. No pets. Local refs.1977 NW 2nd

Garage Sales Garage Sales Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classiieds

Serving 541-385-5809 Central Oregon Residential 656 & Commercial •Sprinkler Repair Houses for Rent •Sprinkler SW Bend Installation •Back Flow Testing Clean 3 (could be 4) •Fire Prevention, bedroom, on nearly 1 acre, $1200 mo., 1 Lot Clearing year lease required, •Fall Clean up 541-390-4213 •Weekly Mowing •Bark, Rock, Etc. Call The Bulletin At •Senior Discounts 541-385-5809 Reserving spots Place Your Ad Or E-Mail for sprinkler winterization & snow At: www.bendbulletin.com removal 658 Bonded & Insured Houses for Rent 541-815-4458

Komfort 25’ 2006, 1 slide, AC, TV, awning. NEW: tires, converter, batteries. Hardly used. $15,500. 541-923-2595

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads The Bulletin

Montana 3400RL 2008, 4 slides, no smokers or pets, limited usage, 5500 watt Onan gen, solar panel, fireplace, dual A/C, central vac, elect. awning w/sunscreen arctic pkg, rear receiver, alum wheels, 2 TVs, many extras. $35,500. 541-416-8087

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $37,500. 541-420-3250 NuWa 297LK HitchHiker 2007, *Snowbird Special* 32’, touring coach, left kitchen, rear lounge, many extras, beautiful cond. inside & out, $35,900 OBO, Prineville. 541-447-5502 days & 541-447-1641 eves.

Open Road 2004 37' w/ 3 slides W/D hook-up, lrg LR w/rear window & desk area. $19,750 obo. 541-280-7879

Black Chameleon.

773

Tick, Tock Tick, Tock...

$17,000

Acreages

Call Don @

***

541-410-3823

CHECK YOUR AD

Please check your ad 870 on the first day it runs Boats & Accessories to make sure it is correct. Sometimes inSmokercraft structions over the 13’ 1985, good cond., phone are misunderstood and an error 15HP gas Evinrude can occur in your ad. + Minakota 44 elec. If this happens to your motor, fish finder, 2 ad, please contact us extra seats, trailer, the first day your ad extra equip. $3500 appears and we will obo. 541-388-9270 be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Week- 17’ 1984 Chris Craft days 11:00 noon for - Scorpion, 140 HP next day, Sat. 11:00 inboard/outboard, 2 a.m. for Sunday and depth finders, trollMonday. ing motor, full cover, 541-385-5809 EZ - Load trailer, Thank you! $3500 OBO. The Bulletin Classified 541-382-3728. *** 775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

FACTORY SPECIAL

New Home, 3 bdrm, $47,500 finished on your site,541.548.5511 www.JandMHomes.com

17’ Seaswirl 1988 open bow, rebuilt Chevy V6 engine, new upholstery, $4500 or best offer. 707-688-4523

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide,Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent Econoline RV 1989, condition, $16,900, Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th fully loaded, exc. cond, 541-390-2504 wheel, 1 slide, AC, 35K orig. mi., $19,750. TV,full awning, excelCall 541-546-6133. lent shape, $23,900. 541-350-8629 CAN’T BEAT THIS! Look before you buy, below market value! Size & mile- Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 age DOES matter! 29’, weatherized, like Class A 32’ Hurrinew, furnished & cane by Four Winds, ready to go, incl Wine- Pilgrim International 2007. 12,500 mi, all gard Satellite dish, 2005, 36’ 5th Wheel, amenities, Ford V10, $26,995. 541-420-9964 Model#M-349 RLDS-5 lthr, cherry, slides, like new! New low Fall price $21,865. price, $54,900. 541-312-4466 541-548-5216 Viking Tent trailer 2008, clean, self Gulfstream Scenic contained, sleeps 5, Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, easy to tow, great Cummins 330 hp diecond. $5200, obo. sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 541-383-7150. in. kitchen slide out, Regal Prowler AX6 Exnew tires,under cover, treme Edition 38’ ‘05, hwy. miles only,4 door 4 slides,2 fireplaces, all maple cabs, king bed/ fridge/freezer icebdrm separated w/slide maker, W/D combo, glass dr,loaded,always Interbath tub & garaged,lived in only 3 shower, 50 amp pro- Weekend Warrior Toy mo,brand new $54,000, pane gen & more! Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, still like new, $28,500, $55,000. fuel station, exc cond. will deliver,see rvt.com, 541-948-2310 sleeps 8, black/gray ad#4957646 for pics. interior, used 3X, Cory, 541-580-7334 $24,999. 541-389-9188 Roadranger 27’ 1993, A/C, awning, sleeps 6, Hunter’s Delight! Pack882 exc. cond., used little, age deal! 1988 WinFifth Wheels $4,495 OBO. nebago Super Chief, 541-389-8963 38K miles, great shape; 1988 Bronco II Bighorn 2008 3400RL 37' fireplace, 3 slides, 4x4 to tow, 130K SPRINTER 36’ 2005, king bed, upgrades mostly towed miles, $10,500 obo. Two $30,000 nice rig! $15,000 both. slides, sleeps 5, 541-815-7220 541-382-3964, leave queen air mattress, msg. small sgl. bed, couch folds out. 1.5 baths, 541-382-0865, Itasca Spirit Class C leave message! 2007, 20K miles, front entertainment center, all bells & whistles, Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 extremely good conby Carriage, 4 slidedition, 2 slides, 2 outs, inverter, satelHDTV’s, $48,500 lite sys, fireplace, 2 OBO. 541-447-5484 flat screen TVs. Taurus 27.5’ 1988 $60,000. Everything works, 541-480-3923 $1750/partial trade for car. 541-460-9127

Fleetwood 1997, 14x60, 2 bdrm, 1 bath., well maint., $17,000 OBO, must be moved from Tumalo location, 18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 503-523-7908. Volvo Penta, 270HP, low hrs., must see, Move in Ready $15,000, 541-330-3939 $19,900 2 bdrm, 2 bath $23,900 2 bdrm, 1 bath $38,900 3 bdrm, 2 bath $39,999 3 bdrm, 2 bath 541-548-5511 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner www.JandMHomes.com 205 Run About, 220 Movers! $7,999 2 bdrm, HP, V8, open bow, 1 bath, $19,999 Office/ exc. cond., very fast Studio, $32,900 3 bdrm, w/very low hours, 2 bath, 541-548-5511 lots of extras incl. www.JandMHomes.com tower, Bimini & LCB#8759 custom trailer, Redmond Have an item to $19,500. Call The Yard Doctor 541-389-1413 for yard maintenance, 1600 sq ft 3 bdrm + den, sell quick? 1.75 bath, gas fireplace, thatching, sod, sprinIf it’s under 2-car garage, fenced kler blowouts, water backyard, great neigh- $500 you can place it in features, more! borhood, close to shopAllen 541-536-1294 Need to get an ad The Bulletin ping & schools. $895/mo 885 LCB 5012 20.5’ Seaswirl Spy+ dep. Pets nego, avail in ASAP? Classii eds for: Canopies & Campers 10/1/12. 541-504-4624, der 1989 H.O. 302, BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS or 541-419-0137 285 hrs., exc. cond., Jayco Seneca 2007, $ Search the area’s most 17K mi., 35ft., Chevy Fax it to 541-322-7253 Raider canopy, fits 6-ft 10 - 3 lines, 7 days stored indoors for comprehensive listing of bed, fiberglass, perfect 5500 diesel, toy $ 660 life $11,900 OBO. 16 - 3 lines, 14 days classiied advertising... $600. Call hauler $130,000. The Bulletin Classiieds shape, 541-379-3530 Houses for Rent (Private Party ads only) real estate to automotive, 541-388-4662; 604-0116 541-389-2636. La Pine merchandise to sporting goods. Bulletin Classiieds appear every day in the La Pine - Nice 3 Bd, 2.5 Ba, in Crescent Creek print or on line. subdivision. Gas appliCall 541-385-5809 ances & fireplace, dbl www.bendbulletin.com garage, fitness center, park. $800 mo; $900 deposit. 541-815-5494

S h o w Yo u r S t u ff .

Aeration/Fall Clean-up BOOK NOW! Weekly / one-time service avail. Bonded, insured, free estimates!

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease

COLLINS Lawn Maint. Spectrum professional Call 541-480-9714 building, 250’-500’, $1.00 per ft. total. No Maverick Landscaping NNN. Call Andy, Mowing, weedeating, 541-385-6732. yard detailing, chain saw work & more! LCB#8671 541-923-4324 Get your Pet Services

Gentle Giant Animal Care

Central Oregon Best in-home animal care service. Going on vacation? We provide compassionate and loving in-home animal care. Make it a vacation for your pet too! Call today!

Tamron Stone 541-215-5372

Now you can add a full-color photo to your Bulletin classified ad starting at only $15.00 per week, when you order your ad online. To place your Bulletin ad with a photo, visit www.bendbulletin.com, click on “Place an ad” and follow these easy steps:

business

GRO W

ING

With an ad in

"Call A Service Professional" Directory

1.

Pick a category (for example - pets or transportation) and choose your ad package.

2.

Write your ad and upload your digital photo.

3.

Create your account with any major credit card. All ads appear in both print and online. Please allow 24 hours for photo processing before your ad appears in print and online.

The Bulletin's

S0305 5X4 kk

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condos & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Real Estate For Sale

870

To place your photo ad, visit us online at www.bendbulletin.com or call with questions, 541-385-5809

www.bendbulletin.com


G4 TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Autos & Transportation

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles 932

932

Antique & Classic Autos

Antique & Classic Autos

900 908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718 1/3 interest in wellequipped IFR Beech Bonanza A36, located KBDN. $55,000. 541-419-9510

Executive Hangar

at Bend Airport (KBDN) 60’ wide x 50’ deep, w/55’ wide x 17’ high bi-fold door. Natural gas heat, office, bathroom. Parking for 6 cars. Adjacent to Frontage Rd; great visibility for aviation bus. 1jetjock@q.com 541-948-2126

Chev Corvair Monza con- FIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, vertible,1964, new top & door panels w/flowers tranny, runs great, exlnt & hummingbirds, cruising car! $5500 obo. white soft top & hard 541-420-5205 top. Just reduced to $3,750. 541-317-9319 or 541-647-8483

932

933

935

975

975

975

Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

1980 Chevy C30, 16K original miles, 400 cu in, auto, 4WD, winch. $7000 obo. 541-389-2600

Chevy Wagon 1957, 4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

ONLY 1 OWNERSHIP SHARE LEFT! Economical flying in Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, your own Cessna auto. trans, ps, air, 172/180 HP for only frame on rebuild, re$10,000! Based at painted original blue, BDN. Call Gabe at original blue interior, Professional Air! original hub caps, exc. 541-388-0019 chrome, asking $9000 916 or make offer. 541-385-9350. Trucks & Heavy Equipment

with 351 Cleveland modified engine. Body is in excellent condition, $2500 obo. 541-420-4677 Ford T-Bird 1966 390 engine, power everything, new paint, 54K original miles, runs great, excellent cond. in & out. Asking $8,500. 541-480-3179

VW Karman Ghia 1970, good cond., new upholstery and convertible top. $10,000. 541-389-2636

Pickups

Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, 1995, extended cab, long box, grill guard, running boards, bed rails & canopy, 178K miles, $4800 obo. 208-301-3321 (Bend)

auto, X-cab, heated leather seats, tow pkg, chrome brush guard, exc. cond., runs great, 130K mi., $9500, 541-389-5579.

business

Diamond Reo Dump Truck 1974, 12-14 yard box, runs good, $6900, 541-548-6812

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

GRO W

ING

The Bulletin's "Call A Service Professional" Directory

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac, dealer maint’d, loaded, now $17000. 503-459-1580

Toyota 4Runner 4WD 1986, auto, 2 dr., needs work $995, 541-923-7384

Chrysler Sebring 2006 exc. cond, very low miles (38k), always garaged, transferable warranty incl. $8600 541-330-4087

Toyota 4-Runner 4x4 Ltd, 2006, Salsa Red pearl, 49,990 miles, exlnt cond, professionally detailed, $22,900. 541-390-7649 RAM 2500 2003, 5.7L hemi V8, hd, auto, cruise, am / fm / cd. $8400 obro. 541-420-3634 / 390-1285 935

With an ad in Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318

GMC Denali 2003

loaded with options. Exc. cond., snow tires and rims included. 130k hwy miles. $12,000. 541-419-4890.

Chevy Silverado 1500 2000, 4WD, Sport Utility Vehicles

Get your GMC ½ ton 1971, Only $19,700! Original low mile, exceptional, 3rd owner. 951-699-7171

Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc. cond., $18,900, call 541-923-0231.

PROJECT CARS: Chevy 2-dr FB 1949 & Chevy Coupe 1950 - rolling Ford Ranger 1999, 4x4, 71K, X-cab, XLT, chassis’s $1750 ea., auto, 4.0L, $7900 Chevy 4-dr 1949, comOBO. 541-388-0232 plete car, $1949; Cadillac Series 61 1950, 2 dr. hard top, complete w/spare front clip., $3950, 541-382-7391 Jeep Willys 1947,custom, small block Chevy, PS, VW Bugs 1968 & 970, OD,mags+ trailer.Swap VW Baja Bug 1968, Ford Super Duty F-250 for backhoe.No am calls all good cond., Make 2001, 4X4, very good please. 541-389-6990 offers. 541-389-2636 shape, V10 eng, $7900 OBO. 541-815-9939

Chevy C-20 Pickup 1969, all orig. Turbo 44; auto 4-spd, 396, model Ford Galaxie 500 1963, CST /all options, orig. 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, owner, $24,000, 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & VW Thing 1974, good radio (orig),541-419-4989 541-923-6049 cond. Extremely Rare! Ford Mustang Coupe Only built in 1973 & 1966, original owner, 1974. $8,000. V8, automatic, great 541-389-2636 shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199 933

Ford Ranchero 1979

Ford F250 XLT 4x4 Lariat, 1990, red, 80K original miles, 4” lift with 39’s, well maintained, $4000 obo. 541-419-5495

Audi S4 Cabriolet 2005 49K mi, red w/charcoal interior, 2 sets tires, exc. cond., $19,950 firm. 541-350-5373. Buicks! 1996 Regal, 87k; 1997 LeSabre, Nissan Altima 3.5SR 2012, 13,200 mi., exc. 112k; and others! cond., 6-cyl., 270HP, You’ll not find nicer 8-way power driver Buicks $3500 & up. seat, 60/40 rear seat, One look’s worth a leather steering wheel thousand words. Call with audio controls, Bob, 541-318-9999. AM/FM/CD/AUX with for an appt. and take a Bose speakers, A/C, drive in a 30 mpg. car Bluetooth, USB, back Cadillac CTS Sedan up camera, heated 2007, 29K, auto, exc. front seats, power cond, loaded, $17,900 moonroof & more. In Bend, below Blue OBO, 541-549-8828 Book at $21,955, Cadillac El Dorado (317) 966-2189 1994, Total cream puff, body, paint, trunk as showroom, blue leather, $1700 wheels w/snow tires although car has not been wet in 8 years. On trip to Boise avg. 28.5 mpg., Porsche 911 1974, low $5400, 541-593-4016. mi., complete motor/ trans. rebuild, tuned Cadillac Seville STS suspension, int. & ext. refurb., oil cooling, 2003 - just finished shows new in & out, $4900 engine work perf. mech. cond. by Certified GM meMuch more! chanic. Has every$28,000 541-420-2715 thing but navigation. Too many bells and PORSCHE 914 1974, whistles to list. I Roller (no engine), bought a new one. lowered, full roll cage, $6900 firm. 5-pt harnesses, rac541-420-1283 ing seats, 911 dash & instruments, decent The Bulletin shape, very cool! To Subscribe call $1699. 541-678-3249 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com Subaru Forester

940

Vans

Chevy Astro Cargo Van 2001,

pw, pdl, great cond., business car, well maint, regular oil changes, $4500, please call 541-633-5149

Toyota Prius 2008 Touring w/leather, 6 CD/ MP3, GPS, bluetooth, snow tires on rims, new headlamps & windshield 47,700 miles, clean, $18,200 541-408-5618 Toyotas: 1999 Avalon 254k; 1996 Camry, 98k, 4 cyl. Lots of miles left in these cars. Price? You tell me! I’d guess $2000-$4000. Your servant, Bob at 541-318-9999, no charge for looking. Volvo S40 2010, 47,310 miles. #682041 $18,995

541-598-3750

aaaoregonautosource.com

WHEN YOU SEE THIS

On a classified ad go to www.bendbulletin.com to view additional photos of the item. FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

2004 Turbo, 5-spd manual, studded tires & wheels, chains, Thule ski box, 67K miles, perfect! $13,950. 541-504-8316

Looking for your next employee?

Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Subaru Outback 2002, 1 owner, garaged, all options except leather, $7500, 541-318-8668.

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 2005, fully loaded, sunroof, heated leather seats, new tires, GPS, always garaged, 127K 1 owner miles, maint. records, $9900, 541-593-9908.

Toyota Camry’s 1984, $1200 OBO, 1985 $1400 OBO, 1986 parts car, $500; call for details, 541-548-6592

Mitsubishi 3000 GT Toyota Camry XLE 1999, auto., pearl 1994 V6, 4 dr, leather white, very low mi. interior, AM/FM radio Buick Enclave 2008 CXL Ford Arrowstar 1989 $9500. 541-788-8218. CD/Tape player, sunAWD, V-6, black, clean, roof, auto., ps/pb, $400 or best offer. mechanically sound, 82k cruise, A/C, very 541-977-4391 miles. $23,900. clean, great condition, Call 541-815-1216 975 $3150. 541-593-2134 Automobiles Need help ixing stuff? Call A Service Professional Call a Pro ind the help you need. Whether you need a www.bendbulletin.com fence ixed, hedges Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 trimmed or a house Find them in 4x4. 120K mi, Power built, you’ll ind seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd The Bulletin row seating, extra Audi Q5 2011, 3.2L, professional help in SLine Blk, 270 hp V6, tires, CD, privacy tintClassiieds! The Bulletin’s “Call a auto/man 6spd trans; ing, upgraded rims. Service Professional” AWD NAV, 20" whls, Fantastic cond. $7995 21k mi, exceptional Contact Timm at Directory $43,500. Call/text 541-408-2393 for info 541-385-5809 541-480-9931 or to view vehicle.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

541-385-5809

Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications) 1. Publication Title

Econoline trailer 16-Ton 29’ Bed, w/fold up ramps, elec. brakes, Pintlehitch, $4700, 541-548-6812

well, 2982 Hours, $3500, call 541-749-0724

Peterbilt 359 potable water truck, 1990, 3200 gal. tank, 5hp pump, 4-3" hoses, camlocks, $25,000. 541-820-3724 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale 925

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024. Continental Express 17’ cargo trailer w/ramp, 2007, good shape. $3500. 541-536-4299 931

Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories Snow tires,16” studded, on 2007 Volvo wheels, $650, 541-382-4029 or 541-408-2331, FIND YOUR FUTURE HOME IN THE BULLETIN Your future is just a page away. Whether you’re looking for a hat or a place to hang it, The Bulletin Classiied is your best source. Every day thousands of buyers and sellers of goods and services do business in these pages. They know you can’t beat The Bulletin Classiied Section for selection and convenience - every item is just a phone call away. The Classiied Section is easy to use. Every item is categorized and every cartegory is indexed on the section’s front page. Whether you are looking for a home or need a service, your future is in the pages of The Bulletin Classiied.

5 5 2 5

4. Issue Frequency

_

3. Filing Date

2 0

09-28-12

5. Number of Issues Published Annually

Daily

1000

LEGAL NOTICE Estate of ROBERT L. SCHWAN. NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS. Case No: 12PB0088. Notice: The Circuit Court of the State of Oregon, for the County of Deschutes, has appointed Susanne M. Schwan as Personal Representative of the Estate of Robert L. Schwan, deceased. All persons having claims against said estate are required to present the same, with proper vouchers to Susanne M. Schwan, c/o ANDREA SHARTEL, ATTY AT LAW, PO Box 688, Bend, OR 97709 within four months from the date of first publication of this notice as stated below, or they may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by this proceeding may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative, or the Attorney for Personal Representative. Dated and first published September 25, 2012. Personal representative: Susanne M. Schwan, 2600 NE Forum Drive, #35, Bend, OR 97701. Attorney for Personal Representative: Andrea Shartel, OSB#96178, PO Box 688, Bend, OR 97709, Telephone: (541) 330-1704, Fax: (541) 330-1844, Email: andrea@shartellaw.com LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES. LAW OFFICE OF MIKEL R. MILLER, P.C., Plaintiff, vs. ANDREW THOMAS POWELL, Defendant. Case No. CV 120060. SUMMONS. To: ANDREW THOMAS POWELL, Defendant. YOU ARE hereby required to appear and answer the complaint filed against you in the above-entitled action within thirty (30) days from the date of the first publication of this summons upon you, with the required Court filing fee; in

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices g g ture because it: (1) case of your failure to representative at 747 Constitutes the prodo so, for want SW Mill View Way, ceeds of the violation thereof, petitioner will Bend, Oregon 97702, of, solicitation to vioapply to the Court for within four months late, attempt to viothe relief demanded in after the date of first late, or conspiracy to the complaint. The publication of this noviolates, the criminal complaint alleges tice, or the claims may laws of the State of breach of contract for be barred. All perOregon regarding the damages in the sons whose rights manufacture, distribuamount of $3,331.86 may be affected by tion, or possession of plus interest of 1.5% the proceedings may controlled substances each month since Deobtain additional in(ORS Chapter 475); cember 31, 2011, and formation from the and/or (2) Was used attorney fees pursurecords of the court, or intended for use in ant to ORS 20.082. the personal reprecommitting or faciliNOTICE TO THE sentative, or the lawtating the violation of, DEFENDANT: READ yers for the personal solicitation to violate, THESE PAPERS representative, RYAN attempt to violate, or CAREFULLY! You P. CORREA. Dated conspiracy to violate must “appear” in this and first published on the criminal laws of case or the other side September 18, 2012. the State of Oregon will win automatically. DONNA J. ROBISON, regarding the manuTo “appear” you must Personal Representafacture, distribution or file with the court a letive. possession of congal paper called a LEGAL NOTICE trolled substances “motion” or “answer”. NOTICE OF SEIZURE (ORS Chapter 475). The “motion” or “anFOR CIVIL IN THE MATTER OF: swer” must be given FORFEITURE TO ALL (1)U.S. Currency in to the court clerk or POTENTIAL the amount of administrator within CLAIMANTS AND TO $4,751.00, Case No. 30 days of the date of ALL UNKNOWN 2012-00168697 first publication speci- PERSONS READ THIS seized 8/17/12 from fied herein along with CAREFULLY James Babcock. the required filing fee. It must be in proper (2)U.S. Currency in If you have any interform and have proof the amount of est in the seized of service on the $5,067.00, Case No. property described plaintiff’s attorney or, 2012-00168697 below, you must claim if the plaintiff does not seized 8/16/12 and that interest or you will have an attorney, 8/17/12 from Jessica automatically lose that proof of service upon Smith. interest. If you do not the plaintiff. If you LEGAL NOTICE file a claim for the have any questions property, the property The Tillicum Village you should see an Homeowners Assomay be forfeited even attorney immediately! ciation is required by if you are not conIf you need help in agreement with the victed of any crime. finding an attorney, City of Bend to conTo claim an interest, you may call the Orvert its non-potable iryou must file a written egon State Bar Lawrigation system to the claim with the forfeiyer Referral Service at potable City water ture counsel named (503) 684-3763 or toll system by April 2015. below, The written free in Oregon at The Tillicum Village claim must be signed (800) 452-7636. Board of Directors is by you, sworn to unFIRST DATE OF seeking bids from der penalty of perjury PUBLICATION: Octoqualified irrigation debefore a notary public, ber 2, 2012. /s/Mikel sign and construction and state: (a) Your R. Miller. Mikel R. contractors to detrue name; (b) The Miller, OSB# 914754, velop plans for this address at which you Attorney for Plaintiff. conversion complete will accept future with specifications mailings from the LEGAL NOTICE and cost estimates. court and forfeiture IN THE CIRCUIT The successful bider counsel; and (3) A COURT OF THE will also be required to statement that you STATE OF OREGON provide installation of have an interest in the FOR THE COUNTY the approved plan. seized property. Your OF DESCHUTES. In deadline for filing the A pre-bid meeting will the Matter of the Esbe held for all interclaim document with tate of SHIRLEY E.V. ested bidders at the forfeiture counsel CRAWFORD, DeDeschutes Downtown named below is 21 ceased. Case No. Bend Library on days from the last day 12PB0091. NOTICE Wednesday, October of publication of this TO INTERESTED 10, 2012. from 6:00 notice. Where to file PERSONS. NOTICE p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Site a claim and for more IS HEREBY GIVEN visits are encouraged information: Daina that the undersigned both prior and after Vitolins, Crook County has been appointed the pre-bid meeting. District Attorney Ofpersonal representafice, 300 NE Third Questions may be ditive. All persons havrected to the ChairStreet, Prineville, OR ing claims against the man of the Tillicum 97754. trust estate are reVillage Water ConverNotice of reasons for quired to present sion Committee, Deak Forfeiture: The propthem, with vouchers Preble at (541) erty described below attached, to the un388-3366. was seized for forfeidersigned personal

6. Annual Subscription Price

365

$132

7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication (Not printer) (Street, city, county, state, and ZIP+4 ®)

Legal Notices

Hyster H25E, runs

2. Publication Number

The Bulletin

Contact Person

Karen Douglas Telephone (Include area code) 541-383-0332

1777 SW Chandler Ave., P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher (Not printer)

1777 SW Chandler Ave., P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor (Do not leave blank) Publisher (Name and complete mailing address)

Gordon Black, 61909 Broken Top Dr., Bend, OR 97702-1085 Editor (Name and complete mailing address)

John Costa, 1611 NW Promontory Dr., Bend, OR 97701-5622 Managing Editor (Name and complete mailing address)

N/A 10. Owner (Do not leave blank. If the publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followed by the names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of each individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address.) Complete Mailing Address Full Name

Janet C. Stevens

2130 NE Eighth St., Bend, OR 97701

Margaret C. Cushman

61307 Tam McArthur Loop, Bend, OR 97702

Mary Jean Chandler

759 SW Otter Way, Bend, OR 97702

Patricia C. Moss

538 NW State St., Bend, OR 97701

Elizabeth C. McCool

60359 Arnold Market Rd., Bend, OR 97702

Robert W. Chandler, Jr.

69205 Hawksflight Dr., Sisters, OR 97759

Laura Renne Moss

2620 SW Hume St., Portland, OR 97219

Annie Louise Moss

306 E 96 St. #9B, New York, NY 10128

Jeffrey Cushman

20574 Scarlet Sage Way, Bend, OR 97702

Mary Frances Cushman

6509 SW 19th Ave., Portland, OR 97239

Joseph C. Jordan

759 SW Otter Way, Bend, OR 97702

Michael C. Jordan

759 SW Otter Way, Bend, OR 97702

Andrew D.C. Jordan

759 SW Otter Way, Bend, OR 97702

11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities. If none, check box None Complete Mailing Address

x

Full Name

12. Tax Status (For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates) (Check one) The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes: Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months Has Changed During Preceding 12 Months (Publisher must submit explanation of change with this statement) PS Form 3526, August 2012 (Page 1 of 3 (Instructions Page 3)) PSN: 7530-01-000-9931 13.

PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com.

Publication Title

14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below

The Bulletin

09-08-2012

15. Extent and Nature of Circulation

a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run)

b. Paid Circulation (By Mail and Outside the Mail)

(1)

Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies)

(2)

Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies)

(3)

Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS®

(4)

Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS (e.g., FirstClass Mail®)

c. Total Paid Distribution (Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), and (4)) d. Free or (1) Nominal Rate Distribution (2) (By Mail and (3) Outside the Mail) (4)

e.

Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County Copies included on PS Form 3541 Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included on PS Form 3541 Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Classes Through the USPS (e.g., First-Class Mail) Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means)

Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4))

f.

Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e)

g.

Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4 (page #3))

h.

Total (Sum of 15f and g)

i.

Percent Paid (15c divided by 15f times 100)

Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months

No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date

33700

34418

154

145

8

6

30999

31582

0

0

31161 12 1 0 1311

31733 12 1 0 1267

1324

1280

32485

33013

1215

1405

33700

34418

95%

97%

Total circulation includes electronic copies. Report circulation on PS Form 3526-X worksheet.

16.

17. Publication of Statement of Ownership

x

If the publication is a general publication, publication of this statement is required. Will be printed

10-02-12

Publication not required.

in the ________________________ issue of this publication. 18. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner

Date

09-28-12 I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties). PS Form

3526, August 2012 (Page 2 of 3)


CENTRAL OREGON MARKETPLACE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

LOCAL COUPON

LOCAL COUPON

CLIP & SAVE!

CLIP & SAVE!

It’s time to save more money!

It’s time to save more money!

Clean & Healthy Carpets for your Pumpkin Chem-Dry of Central Oregon Green & Clean Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

20% OFF Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning 541-388-7374 Bend Offer valid with coupon only. Excluding RVs & stairs. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: Oct. 31, 2012

Pet & Baby Safe Non-toxic & Odorless Allergen Arrestor

J.L. Scott 541-382-3883 Lawn & Landscape Maintenance

20% OFF FALL IS THE BEST TIME TO RESEED

OFF

LUNCH

FALL ENDLESS

PROMOTIONAL PRICES START AT

SHRIMP

$

1500

Coupon required, cannot combine with other offers, not valid with Lounge menu. Expires 11/30/12

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

1999 mo for 12 Months with 24-month agreement

$

Fish House

when you make the purchase on the Goodyear Credit Card.1

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE • 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

FEST

Any two Lunch Entrees and two Beverages

160

on purchases of $500 or more made from October 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 12 months or if you make a late payment. Minimum payment required. See this ad for details.

Expires 10/31/12

on 3rd Street 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

$

NO INTEREST IF PAID IN FULL WITHIN 12 MONTHS*

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

5

80

OR

1. Mail-In Rebate paid in the form of a Goodyear Visa® Prepaid Card. To double your Mail-In Rebate, qualifying purchase must be made on the Goodyear Credit Card. Subject to credit approval. Offers valid on purchases between 10/01/12 -12/31/12. Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery. See Store Associate for complete details and Rebate Form. Additional terms and conditions apply.2

Reseeding is a fast & inexpensive way to bring your grass back to looking green and healthy.

$ 00 541-382-3173 Behind Bank of America

DOUBLE YOUR MAIL-IN REBATE UP TO

by Mail-In Rebate when you purchase a set of four select Goodyear® or Dunlop® tires.1

LAWN RESEEDING Serving Central Oregon for Over 20 Years

$

GET UP TO

Choice of two sides After 4:00 pm, Monday - Saturday

PAC12 Network Now Available!

Locally Owned - Giving Excellent Service!

NO COUPON REQUIRED.

INTERNET & SATELLITE

Expires 11/30/12 OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 11/30/12

541.923.3234 1715 SW Highland Ave., Redmond www.linkpointnw.com

3 Rooms Cleaned

Fall ! l Specia

$

99

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 11/30/2012

BW1012

2 Rooms Cleaned

$

74

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 11/30/2012

BW1012

Whole House Cleaning

$

149

OXI Fresh of Central Oregon 541-593-1799

$

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 11/30/2012 BW1012

Special Oil Change Price!

32

23 OIL CHANGES! CUSTOMER LOYALTY KEY TAGS ARE HERE!

murrayandholt.com

541-382-2222

d Street and Franklin in Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

3 Oil Changes (Gas)

Bend.

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:45am to

Covers most vehicles. Diesels extra. Coupon expires 10/31/12.

Special Oil Change Price!

The key tag includes 3 lube, oil & filters. The cost is only $ 6995 per tag.

Includes 5 quarts of oil, (blend of synthetic oil) replace oil filter, 21-point inspection, discounts up to 10%, roadside assistance, 12/12 warranty.

$

2332 each

Special Oil Change Price!

Special Oil Change Price!

Special Oil Change Price!

Up to 5 Rooms Cleaned

Special Oil Change Price!

Beyond Carpet Cleaning CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | FURNITURE

Serving Central Oregon 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, staircases, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. With coupon only. Some restrictions may apply. Expires 9/30/12 ®

®

OFFERS END 10/30/12


L A C O L P O H S & SAVE!

L A C O L P O H S & SAVE!

Using coupons makes a LOT of cents!

Using coupons makes a LOT of cents!

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

Our Hot Carbonating Truck Mount Extraction cleans deep! We use one-fifth the amount of water compared to steam cleaners so carpet dries in 1 to 2 hours. Our cleaner, The Natural®, is green certified, non-toxic, so it’s safe for your family and pets who are allergy sensitive! Leaves no sticky residue! Using Chem-Dry resists re-soiling so your carpet fibers stay cleaner, longer! Don’t forget your area rugs & upholstery too!

Chem-Dry of Central Oregon 541-388-7374 • Residential & Commercial Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

MONEY-SAVING COUPONS! BRAKE

MAINTENANCE Install new disc pads/shoes, resurface drums/rotors. Most cars per axle. Ceramic or carbon metallic pads extra if required. Starting at

$

99

119

Bearing Repack Extra Most cars & light trucks. Expires 10/31/12

Lube, Oil, Filter & Tire Rotation

$

99

29

We Use Synthetic Blend Motor Oil

• Chassis Lube • Wash Exterior Front • New Oil Filter Window • Up to 5 Qts of 5W30 • Vacuum Front Kendall Synthetic Blend Floorboards • Tire Rotation • Top off most Fluids under the hood Most cars & light trucks. 3/4 & 1 Ton may require extra fee. Expires 10/31/12

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE | 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

WE WILL PAY YOU $

00 *

150 CASH

• We Bundle Dish Network & CenturyLink Hi-Speed Internet • RV Setup & Installation • FREE Installation up to 6 rooms • FREE HD/DVR Upgrade for existing customers *$100 Cash for Dish Network *$50 Visa Cash Card for Century Link

Locally Owned - Giving Excellent Service!

INTERNET & SATELLITE

541.923.3234 1715 SW Highland Ave., Redmond www.linkpointnw.com

J.L. Scott 541-382-3883

Lawn & Landscape Maintenance

Complete Landscape Maintenance Commercial & Residential * Mowing Services * Lawn Reseeding * De-thatching *Aeration *Fertilization

* Spring & Fall Clean Up * Trimming *Bark Installation * Top Dressing

Serving Central Oregon for Over 20 Years

October Aeration $49 * • Allows more efficient watering and fertilizing • Enhances root growth & enriches surface soil • Decreases water run-off *Up to 2500 sq. ft., some restrictions may apply. Call for more details. Coupons expire 10/31/12

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

$ 00

5

OFF

541-382-3173

FALL ENDLESS

Behind Bank of America on 3rd Street 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

FEST

SHRIMP $

LUNCH Any two Lunch Entrees and two Beverages

Fish House

Coupon required, cannot combine with other offers, not valid with Lounge menu. Expires 11/30/12

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

00

15

Choice of two sides After 4:00 pm, Monday - Saturday NO COUPON REQUIRED.

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 11/30/12

Expires 11/30/12

The power of oxygen is undeniable; Mother Nature has used oxygen to naturally purify the Earth for thousands of years. Now let the power of oxygen clean your carpets!

of Central Oregon

541-593-1799

✓ Convenient Appointments ✓ FREE Estimate Over the Phone ✓ IICRC Certified Technician

Oxi Fresh uses a combination of its one of a kind Oxi Sponge Encapsulator, and Oxi Powder. This three part cleaning solution creates a powerful oxygenated cleaning system that breaks down the stains while encapsulating them, so that they can be efficiently removed from the carpet pile. It is safe for children and pets, leaves no sticky residue, reduces returning stains and has an one hour average dry time.

www.oxifresh.com murrayandholt.com

541-382-2222

WAX PLUS Expires 10/31/12

$49.95 (CARS/SMALL SUVS) $59.95 (FULL SIZE TRUCK/SUV) INCLUDES: Hand Wash & Dry Wash System Applied Wax Tires & Wheels Cleaned Door Jams Wiped Out Tire Protect & Shine Right on the Corner of Third Street and Franklin in Bend. Right on the Price.

Beyond Carpet Cleaning CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | FURNITURE

Serving Central Oregon 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com **Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, staircases, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Some restrictions may apply. Expires 9/30/12 *Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Minimum charges apply and cannot be combined with any other discounts. Must present coupon at time of service. Residential only; Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq. ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, staircases, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Protector not included. Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over seven (7) feet and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer not applicable to leather furniture. Offer does not include protector. ®

®

OFFERS END 10/30/12

Vacuum Interior Wipe Dash, Doors & Center Console Clean Glass Treat Dash-Vinyl & Leather SERVICE HOURS M–F 7:45am to 5:30pm

541-382-2222


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

THE BULLETIN

LOCAL COUPON

LOCAL COUPON

CLIP & SAVE!

CLIP & SAVE!

It’s time to save more money!

It’s time to save more money!

J.L. Scott 541-382-3883 Lawn & Landscape Maintenance

20% OFF LAWN RESEEDING FALL IS THE BEST TIME TO RESEED

Serving Central Oregon for Over 20 Years

Reseeding is a fast & inexpensive way to bring your grass back to looking green and healthy. Expires 10/31/12

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!” Special Oil Change Price!

$

2332 OIL CHANGES! CUSTOMER LOYALTY KEY TAGS ARE HERE!

murrayandholt.com

541-382-2222

d Street and Fran Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

3 Oil Changes (Gas) Includes 5 quarts of oil, (blend of synthetic oil) replace oil filter, 21-point inspection, discounts up to 10%, roadside assistance, 12/12 warranty.

klin in Bend.

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:45am to

Covers most vehicles. Diesels extra. Coupon expires 10/31/12.

The key tag includes 3 lube, oil & filters. The cost is only $ 6995 per tag.

Special Oil Change Price!

$

2332 each

Special Oil Change Price!

Special Oil Change Price!

Special Oil Change Price!

Special Oil Change Price!

3 Rooms Cleaned

Fall ! l Specia

$

99

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 11/30/2012

BW1012

2 Rooms Cleaned

$

74

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 11/30/2012

BW1012

Whole House Cleaning

$

149

OXI Fresh of Central Oregon 541-593-1799

1999 mo for 12 Months with 24-month agreement

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

20% OFF Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning 541-388-7374 Bend Offer valid with coupon only. Excluding RVs & stairs. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: Oct. 31, 2012

Now Available!

Locally Owned - Giving Excellent Service!

541.923.3234 1715 SW Highland Ave., Redmond www.linkpointnw.com

Pet & Baby Safe Non-toxic & Odorless Allergen Arrestor

$ 00 541-382-3173 Behind Bank of America

5

on 3rd Street 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

OFF

FALL ENDLESS

SHRIMP FEST

$

LUNCH Any two Lunch Entrees and two Beverages

Fish House

Coupon required, cannot combine with other offers, not valid with Lounge menu. Expires 11/30/12

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

00

15

Choice of two sides After 4:00 pm, Monday - Saturday NO COUPON REQUIRED. Expires 11/30/12

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 11/30/12

Expires 11/30/2012 BW1012

GET UP TO

80

DOUBLE YOUR MAIL-IN REBATE UP TO

OR

$

160

when you make the purchase on the Goodyear Credit Card.1

by Mail-In Rebate when you purchase a set of four select Goodyear® or Dunlop® tires.1

PAC12 Network

INTERNET & SATELLITE

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply.

Chem-Dry of Central Oregon Green &Clean

$

PROMOTIONAL PRICES START AT

$

Up to 5 Rooms Cleaned

Clean & Healthy Carpets for your Pumpkin

1. Mail-In Rebate paid in the form of a Goodyear Visa® Prepaid Card. To double your Mail-In Rebate, qualifying purchase must be made on the Goodyear Credit Card. Subject to credit approval. Offers valid on purchases between 10/01/12 -12/31/12. Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery. See Store Associate for complete details and Rebate Form. Additional terms and conditions apply.2

NO INTEREST IF PAID IN FULL WITHIN 12 MONTHS* on purchases of $500 or more made from October 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 12 months or if you make a late payment. Minimum payment required. See this ad for details.

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE • 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

Beyond Carpet Cleaning CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | FURNITURE

Serving Central Oregon 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, staircases, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. With coupon only. Some restrictions may apply. Expires 9/30/12 ®

®

OFFERS END 10/30/12


L A C O L P O H S & SAVE!

L A C O L P O H S & SAVE!

Using coupons makes a LOT of cents!

Using coupons makes a LOT of cents!

J.L. Scott 541-382-3883

Lawn & Landscape Maintenance

October Aeration $49 *

Complete Landscape Maintenance Commercial & Residential * Mowing Services * Lawn Reseeding * De-thatching *Aeration *Fertilization

* Spring & Fall Clean Up * Trimming *Bark Installation * Top Dressing

• Allows more efficient watering and fertilizing • Enhances root growth & enriches surface soil • Decreases water run-off

Serving Central Oregon for Over 20 Years

*Up to 2500 sq. ft., some restrictions may apply. Call for more details. Coupons expire 10/31/12

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!” murrayandholt.com

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

WAX PLUS

541-382-2222

Expires 10/31/12

Our Hot Carbonating Truck Mount Extraction cleans deep! We use one-fifth the amount of water compared to steam cleaners so carpet dries in 1 to 2 hours.

$49.95 (CARS/SMALL SUVS) $59.95 (FULL SIZE TRUCK/SUV) INCLUDES: Hand Wash & Dry Wash System Applied Wax Tires & Wheels Cleaned Door Jams Wiped Out Tire Protect & Shine

Our cleaner, The Natural®, is green certified, non-toxic, so it’s safe for your family and pets who are allergy sensitive! Leaves no sticky residue! Using Chem-Dry resists re-soiling so your carpet fibers stay cleaner, longer! Don’t forget your area rugs & upholstery too!

Chem-Dry of Central Oregon

Vacuum Interior Wipe Dash, Doors & Center Console Clean Glass Treat Dash-Vinyl & Leather

Right on the Corner of Third Street and Franklin in Bend. Right on the Price.

541-388-7374 • Residential & Commercial Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

$ 00

5

OFF

541-382-3173

FALL ENDLESS

Behind Bank of America on 3rd Street 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

FEST

Any two Lunch Entrees and two Beverages

Fish House

Coupon required, cannot combine with other offers, not valid with Lounge menu. Expires 11/30/12

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 11/30/12

00

15

BRAKE

Install new disc pads/shoes, resurface drums/rotors. Most cars per axle. Ceramic or carbon metallic pads extra if required. Starting at

$

99

119

Bearing Repack Extra Most cars & light trucks. Expires 10/31/12

541-593-1799

Choice of two sides After 4:00 pm, Monday - Saturday

Oxi Fresh uses a combination of its one of a kind Oxi Sponge Encapsulator, and Oxi Powder. This three part cleaning solution creates a powerful oxygenated cleaning system that breaks down the stains while encapsulating them, so that they can be efficiently removed from the carpet pile.

NO COUPON REQUIRED.

It is safe for children and pets, leaves no sticky residue, reduces returning stains and has an one hour average dry time.

Expires 11/30/12

Lube, Oil, Filter & Tire Rotation

$

99

29

We Use Synthetic Blend Motor Oil

• Chassis Lube • Wash Exterior Front • New Oil Filter Window • Up to 5 Qts of 5W30 • Vacuum Front Kendall Synthetic Blend Floorboards • Tire Rotation • Top off most Fluids under the hood Most cars & light trucks. 3/4 & 1 Ton may require extra fee. Expires 10/31/12

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE | 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

Beyond Carpet Cleaning CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | FURNITURE

Serving Central Oregon 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com **Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, staircases, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Some restrictions may apply. Expires 9/30/12 *Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Minimum charges apply and cannot be combined with any other discounts. Must present coupon at time of service. Residential only; Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq. ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, staircases, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Protector not included. Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over seven (7) feet and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer not applicable to leather furniture. Offer does not include protector. ®

®

✓ Convenient Appointments ✓ FREE Estimate Over the Phone ✓ IICRC Certified Technician

of Central Oregon

www.oxifresh.com

MONEY-SAVING COUPONS! MAINTENANCE

541-382-2222

The power of oxygen is undeniable; Mother Nature has used oxygen to naturally purify the Earth for thousands of years. Now let the power of oxygen clean your carpets!

SHRIMP $

LUNCH

SERVICE HOURS M–F 7:45am to 5:30pm

OFFERS END 10/30/12

WE WILL PAY YOU $

00 *

150 CASH

• We Bundle Dish Network & CenturyLink Hi-Speed Internet • RV Setup & Installation • FREE Installation up to 6 rooms • FREE HD/DVR Upgrade for existing customers *$100 Cash for Dish Network *$50 Visa Cash Card for Century Link

Locally Owned - Giving Excellent Service!

INTERNET & SATELLITE

541.923.3234 1715 SW Highland Ave., Redmond www.linkpointnw.com


Bulletin Daily Paper 10/02/12  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Tuesday October 2, 2012

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you