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THURSDAY

September 13, 2012

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Bend’s parade to honor Eaton set for Sunday By Joel Aschbrenner The Bulletin

Eaton

Young residents of Central Oregon will have a chance Sunday to do what no Olympic decathletes in London could: keep up with Ashton Eaton.

Following a parade for Eaton, there will be a fun run for children 10 and under to jog with the Bend resident and Olympic gold medalist. The run is free and no registration is required.

The parade will begin at 1 p.m. in downtown Bend, on Bond Street at Franklin Avenue, and will turn left on Oregon Avenue and left again on Wall Street, ending at the Tower Theatre. See Parade / A4

NEW ROUNDABOUT

Project is running late

BEND SENIOR CENTER

Group gives park district bill for $1M • Seniors’ attorney demands his clients be repaid by Christmas as dispute heats up By Mac McLean

By Ben Botkin

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Broken T op Dr.

The completion date for the roundabout project at Mt. Washington Drive and Simpson Avenue in Bend has been pushed back from the end of September to Oct. 19, a city official said. Motorists and school buses will have three more weeks of making a detour around the blocked-off intersection. The intersection has been closed to traffic since June 26. The project completion date was pushed back due to a combination of factors, said David Abbas, a project engineer for the city.

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The Bulletin

The Bulletin

e. Troon Av Knoll Ave. Simpson Ave.

Now expected to be finished by Oct. 19 Mt. Washington Dr. Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

There was a delay in the legal process of acquiring the necessary right-of-way because of the time needed to track down some property owners and serve them paperwork, he said. See Roundabout / A4

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Work continues this week on the new roundabout at Mt. Washington Drive and Simpson Avenue in Bend. Right-ofway issues and other factors have delayed the construction, according to city project engineer David Abbas.

PICKING THE ART

A dispute between the groups that built the Bend Senior Center heated up when an attorney representing the United Senior Citizens of Bend demanded the Bend Park & Recreation District pay his clients close to $1 million by Christmas. The USCB, upset that it raised money for the center only to see its mission changed, wants its money back. Attorney Bill Buchanan said Wednesday he is drafting a letter seeking to dissolve what he claims is a legally binding partnership the park district and USCB entered into when they raised $1.9 million together to build the senior center and another $400,000 to expand it. The USCB terminated its lease with the park district last summer and moved to Bend’s Community Center because it were upset with the type of programs the

For some, anti-obesity campaign is backfiring

district was providing. Buchanan said the senior center strayed from its original mission — which he says was “to provide critical services to low-income seniors” — and became more of a recreational facility that catered to wealthier seniors. This apparent change in mission has upset USCB members, Buchanan said, who now want to dissolve their partnership agreement and use the money they make to continue their original mission. Buchanan’s announcement comes two days after Neil Bryant, an attorney hired to represent the park district, sent Buchanan a letter dismissing his partnership claim and questioning the amount USCB would be entitled to if this claim were proven to be valid. “We see no good-faith basis in law or fact for the demands you have chosen to make,” Bryant wrote in his letter. See Seniors / A5

Egypt, not Libya, may be biggest problem for the U.S.

By Melissa Healy Los Angeles Times

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

S

helly Ricci, of Bend, casts her vote for a sculpture for the new roundabout. Models of the three contenders are on display at the Downtown Bend Public Library, and folks have until Sunday to vote for their favorites. At right, from left: “Klastos” by Riis Burwell, “High Desert Spiral” by John Fleming and “Elemental Spirit” by Erik Nelson.

MON-SAT

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The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 109, No. 257, 38 pages, 7 sections

INDEX Business Classified Comics

E1-4 G1-4 B4-5

Crosswords B5, G2 Dear Abby B3 Health F1-6

Local News C1-6 Obituaries C5 Outing B1-6

LOS ANGELES — As American health authorities wage an all-out war against obesity, researchers are warning that the nation’s 78 million obese adults and 12.5 million obese children are suffering collateral damage. The message that they will become victims of selfinflicted disease, poor role models for their families and a drag on the economy unless they lose weight has left many feeling depressed, defeated and ashamed, these experts warn. Ironically, some of the campaigns aimed at obese Americans could sink efforts to help them improve their health, the experts wrote this week in the International Journal of Obesity. Anti-obesity campaigns viewed as stigmatizing “instill less motivation to improve health,” while the messages that appeared most effective at encouraging behavior change didn’t mention obesity at all, said to the research team from Yale University’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity. See Obesity / A5

TODAY’S WEATHER Sports D1-6 Stocks E2-3 TV & Movies B2

Sunny, pleasant High 83, Low 39 Page C6

By Helene Cooper and Mark Landler New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — For all the harrowing images of the deadly attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, the Obama administration is grappling with the possibility that its far bigger longterm problem lies in Egypt. Inside Hours • More before the atdetails in tacks in Libya embassy on Tuesday, attack, A4 the U.S. Embassy in • Slain Cairo came diplomat under siege remembered, A4 from protesters. While the violence there did not result in any American deaths, the tepid response from the Egyptian government gave officials in Washington — already troubled by the direction of President Mohammed Morsi’s new government — further cause for concern. President Barack Obama pointedly noted that Libyan authorities had tried to help protect diplomats in Benghazi. See Mideast / A4

TOP NEWS U.S.: Income gap grows wider, A3 BRITAIN: Apology in deaths, A6


THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

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Discoveries, breakthroughs, trends, names in the news — things you need to know to start your day.

TODAY

FOCUS: AGING

Testosterone marketing frenzy has its fans, but also its skeptics By Matthew Perrone The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — “Are you falling asleep after dinner?” “Do you have a decrease in libido?” “Have you noticed a recent deterioration in your ability to play sports?” “It could be Low-T.” Welcome to the latest big marketing push by the nation’s drug companies. In this case, it’s a Web page for Abbott Laboratories’ Androgel, a billion-dollar selling testosterone gel used by millions of American men struggling with the symptoms of growing older that are associated with low testosterone, such as poor sex drive, weight gain and fatigue. Androgel is one of a growing number of prescription gels, patches and injections aimed at boosting the male hormone that begins to decline after about age 40. Drugmakers and some doctors claim testosterone therapy can reverse some of the signs of aging — even though the safety and effectiveness of such treatments is unclear. “The problem is that we don’t have any evidence that prescribing testosterone to older by drugmakers is for easy-tomen with relatively low testos- use gels and patches that are terone levels does any good,” aimed at a much broader popsays Dr. Sergei Romashkan, ulation of otherwise healthy who oversees clinical trials for older men with low testosterthe National Institute on Aging, one, or androgen deficiency. a part of the National Institutes The condition is associated of Health conglomerate of re- with a broad range of unpleassearch centers. ant symptoms ranging from inLow testosterone is the latest somnia to depression to erectile example of a once-natural part dysfunction. Drug companies of getting old that has become peg this group at about 15 mila target for medical treatment. lion American men, though Bladder problems, brittle bones federal scientists do not use and hot flashes have followed a such estimates. similar path: from inconvenient Watson Pharmaceuticals facts of life, to ailments that can now markets its Androderm be treated with drugs. The rise patch, which slowly releases tesof such therapies is being fu- tosterone into the bloodstream. eled by both demographics and Abbott has its gel that can be industry marketing. applied to the shoulders and arms. And Eli Lilly’s Axiron is Longer lifespans an underarm gel that rolls on Baby boomers are living like deodorant. Androderm, longer and looking for ways launched last year, had $87 milto deal with the infirmities of lion in sales, and Axiron, which old age: Life expectancy in the was launched in 2010, had sales U.S. today is 78 years, up from of $48 million last year. 69 years a half-century ago. “All of a sudden you’ve got And companies have stepped these big players with a lot of up their marketing to the older money using consumer dicrowd: Spending on print and rected marketing to change television ads promoting testos- the landscape,” said Dr. Natan terone by firms like Abbott and Bar-Chama, a male reproducEli Lilly has risen more than tive specialist at Mount Sinai 170 percent in the last three Hospital in New York. “They years to more than $14 million see the potential, they see the in 2011, according to advertis- market growth annually and ing tracker Kantar Media. it’s very impressive.” Doctors say that’s led to an But government researchincrease in men seeking treat- ers worry that medical treatment for low testosterone. ments have gotten ahead of the Prescriptions for the hormone science. have increased nearly 90 perMale testosterone is mainly cent over the last five years, produced in the testes and afaccording to IMS Health. Last fects muscle mass, sperm proyear, global sales reached $1.9 duction and various sexual billion. characteristics. The hormone “People are living longer and can easily be checked with a want to be more active,” says blood test, but doctors can’t Dr. Spyros Mezitis, a hormone agree on what constitutes specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital a low reading in older men. in New York. “They no longer Typical testosterone levels for consider that because they’re younger men range between older they shouldn’t have sexu- 300 and 1,000 nanograms per al intercourse.” deciliter, but once levels begin Former marathon runner dropping there is little consenDamon Lease, 50, had been sus on what makes a “normal complaining of low energy and number.” depression, for which his docSome doctors believe testostor prescribed a combination terone levels below 300 lead of four psychiatric drugs. But to sexual dysfunction in older since he started taking twice- men, but the rule does not cover a-week testosterone injections all cases. A 2010 study by rein May, he says he’s been able searchers at the University of to stop taking two of the medi- Manchester and other Eurocations and hopes to eliminate pean institutions found that 25 them completely. He says he percent of men with testosterhas more energy, improved one levels above that threshold mood and concentration. had the same sexual problems “I spent 27 years running used to diagnose low testosterlong distances, I like biking, I one. Adding to the ambiguity is like hiking, and I guess every that testosterone levels change guy wants to have an active by the hour, so a man who takes sex life ... I want to keep doing a blood test for testosterone in those things as long as I can,” the morning may get a comsays Lease, who works as a pletely different reading when software company executive. “I tested in the afternoon. feel 20 years younger.”

Mass-market hormone Despite its rising popularity, testosterone therapy is not completely new. Testosterone injections were long used for men with hypogonadism, a disorder defined by low testosterone caused by injury or infection to the reproductive or hormonal organs. But the latest marketing push

Axiron, an underarm gel that rolls on like deodorant, is among a growing array of prescription products aimed at boosting testosterone levels, which begin to decline after men hit age 40 or so. Eli Lilly & Co. via The Associated Press

involving 230 patients in the Netherlands, found no improvement in muscle strength, cognitive thinking, bone density or overall quality of life among men taking testosterone. Muscle mass increased 1.2 percent, but not enough to improve physical mobility. The National Institute on Aging is currently conducting an 800-man trial to definitively answer whether testosterone therapy improves walking ability, sexual function, energy, memory and blood cell count in men 65 years and older. But

those results aren’t expected until 2014. In addition to concerns about testosterone’s effectiveness, the long-term side effects of the hormone are not entirely understood because most trials to date have only followed patients for a few months. But the most serious risks include heart problems and prostate cancer. In 2010, researchers at Boston University’s School of Medicine halted a large study of testosterone in senior men because patients taking the hormone were five times more likely to suffer a serious heart event, including congestive heart failure, than those taking placebo. A review of 19 testosterone trials in 2006 found that prostate cancer was significantly higher among men taking testosterone. All testosterone drugs carry a warning that the hormone should not be given to men who have a personal or family history of prostate cancer. Also in 2006, the Endocrine Society published the first physician guidelines for prescribing testosterone for men with androgen deficiency. All six of the co-authors had received consulting fees or research funding from drugmakers that market testosterone. Despite those ties, the authors took a cautious tone, stressing the difficulty of accurately diagnosing low testosterone and acknowledging that they were unable to reach an agreement about when doctors should begin therapy. They also recommend doctors have an “explicit discussion of the uncertainty about the risks and benefits of testosterone therapy.”

It’s Thursday, Sept. 13, the 257th day of 2012. There are 109 days left in the year.

HAPPENINGS • A public memorial service is planned for astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon, at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. Armstrong died Aug. 25.

IN HISTORY Highlights: In 1759, during the final French and Indian War, the British defeated the French on the Plains of Abraham overlooking Quebec City. In 1788, the Congress of the Confederation authorized the first national election, and declared New York City the temporary national capital. In 1997, funeral services were held in Calcutta, India, for Nobel peace laureate Mother Teresa. Ten years ago: President George W. Bush said it was “highly doubtful” that Saddam Hussein would comply with demands that he disarm. Five years ago: The NFL fined New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick $500,000 and the team $250,000 for spying on the New York Jets. One year ago: Insurgents firing rocket-propelled grenades and automatic weapons struck at the U.S. Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan.

BIRTHDAYS Actress Barbara Bain is 81. TV producer Fred Silverman is 75. Actress Jacqueline Bisset is 68. Singer Peter Cetera is 68. Actress Jean Smart is 61. Record producer Don Was is 60. Radio-TV personality Tavis Smiley is 48. — From wire reports

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T S Income gap widens among Soft-drink industry U.S. households, Census finds

NYC SODA BAN

braces for long fight By Michael M. Grynbaum New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — Fearful that stricter limits on soda sales in New York City could incite a national trend — and a long-term erosion of the industry’s profits — the nation’s sweetenedbeverage companies plan to continue campaigning against Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s restrictions on large sodas, even after the plan’s expected approval today by the Board of Health. Officials in the softdrink industry, while conceding they cannot win the vote by the mayor-appointed board, say they will do whatever is necessary to stop the plan before it can be put in effect in March, including a possible legal challenge and continuing discussions with lawmakers. “Mayor Bloomberg will not be mayor forever,” said Eliot Hoff, a spokesman for New Yorkers for Beverage Choices, the industry-sponsored group that has spent more than $1 million on a public-relations campaign against the mayor’s plan. The plan would limit the size of sugary drinks to 16 ounces in the city’s restaurants, movie theaters and other venues. “It’s important for us to have our voices heard for the next administration.” To the soda industry’s chagrin, Bloomberg’s plan has generated widespread interest in the debate about soft drinks and obesity, an issue that had lurked mostly in academic journals and Washington policy circles. A defeat of the mayor’s measure could be a deterrent for other cities considering similar steps.

Group calls for quick action on Gulf Coast By Greg Gordon McClatchy Newspapers

WASHINGTON — A five-state coalition, warning that decades of damage inflicted by man and nature could take a $350 billion toll, called Wednesday on the White House and Congress to make an urgent commitment of massive, long-term aid to protect the battered Gulf Coast, its fragile ecosystem and its oil, seafood, shipping and tourism industries. “The Gulf Coast is coming to the end of its borrowed time, I’m afraid,” R. King Milling, the chairman of America’s Wetland Foundation, said in unveiling a report containing 30 recommendations for coastal restoration from Florida to Texas, steps estimated to cost tens of billions of dollars at a time of fiscal frugality in Washington. The report summarizes the results of forums held over 14 months in 11 communities from Florida to Texas in which more than 1,100 local leaders were asked to set aside partisan or parochial differences and join in a common cause. It estimates that the Gulf Coast could face $350 billion in cumulative economic losses over the next 20 years from storm surges, rising seas because of global warming and sinking land masses because of mistaken management of the Mississippi River.

By Sabrina Tavernise New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The income gap between the wealthiest 20 percent of U.S. households and the rest of the country grew sharply in 2011, the Census Bureau reported, as the overwhelming majority of Americans saw no gains from a weak economic recovery in its second full year. Income for the top fifth of U.S. households rose by 1.6 percent in 2011, driven by even larger increases for the top 5 percent of households, said

David Johnson, the Census Bureau official who presented the findings. All households in the middle of the scale saw declines, while those at the very bottom stagnated. “You’re really struck by the unevenness of the recovery,” said Lawrence Katz, an economics professor at Harvard. “The top end took a whack in the recession, but they’ve gotten back on their feet. Everyone else is still down for the count.” The numbers helped drive an overall decline in income for the typical American fam-

ily. Median household income after inflation fell to $50,054, a level that was 8 percent lower than in 2007, the year before the recession took hold. The Census Bureau reported that a standard measure of income inequality, the Gini index, registered the first yearon-year increase since 1993, a surprise for economists who say the measure usually changes so slowly that a statistically significant rise over the course of one calendar year is rare. Two other of the report’s findings were promoted by

the Obama administration as achievements. The share of Americans without health insurance declined, driven by a 2.2 percent drop in the portion of uninsured 19-25 year olds, strong evidence that a provision in President Barack Obama’s health care measure that allowed children to stay on their parents’ insurance policies until age 26 is having an impact. And the percentage of Americans in poverty remained unchanged for the first time in four years.

Sitthixay Ditthavong / The Associated Press

A large group of public school teachers marches past John Marshall Metropolitan High School on Wednesday in West Chicago. Teachers walked off the job Monday for the first time in 25 years over issues that include pay raises, classroom conditions, job security and teacher evaluations.

Negotiators return to table on 3rd day of Chicago teachers strike By Sophia Tareen and Don Babwin The Associated Press

The public exchanges between striking Chicago teachers and the school district grew more personal Wednesday as negotiators returned to the bargaining table on the walkout’s third day. A top district negotiator, Barbara Byrd-Bennett, criticized teachers union President Karen Lewis for using the word “silly” when describing the negotiations to a crowd of adoring teachers a day earlier. “It is not silly that we spent over 10 hours yesterday attempting to bridge the gap,” Byrd-Bennett said just before the talks resumed. “We take these negotiations incredibly serious.” The strike has canceled classes for more than 350,000 students. Union officials continued to play down the chances of a quick resolution to the dispute, which centers on the district’s proposed new teacher evaluation process and a policy on re-

Evaluations are a flashpoint Striking teachers in Chicago are fighting a contentious education reform that could overhaul how they are paid and evaluated, highlighting the difficulty of judging them by the performance of their students. While the debate plays out dramatically in Illinois, new teacher evaluation systems have created conflict in other states, including Florida and Tennessee, which now use students’ standardized test scores

hiring teachers that have been laid off. The district said it had presented the union with a new comprehensive proposal Tuesday and was demanding either a response in writing or a comprehensive counter-proposal. “It’s going to take time to work things out,” Lewis said. “It’s also going to take the will to make compromises. We have made quite a few. We would like to see more on their

in their evaluations of teachers. And the stakes of such evaluations are increasing in many places, with personnel decisions often hinging on the results. A 2010 law passed in Illinois requires that all schools in the state adopt a new evaluation system by the 2016-17 school year. In Chicago, student “growth” — or improvement — on standardized tests will count for at least 25 percent of a teacher’s evaluation. — McClatchy-Tribune News Service

side.” Mayor Rahm Emanuel, commenting on the strike after a City Council meeting, pushed again for a quick conclusion to the talks, saying the final issues could be resolved with the children back in school. Nevertheless, he said, district officials were arranging for children to receive more computer access at drop-off schools so they can spend time learning

as the strike goes on. On Tuesday, officials in the country’s third-largest school district announced that, beginning Thursday, the 147 dropoff centers where students can get free breakfast and a morning of supervision will be open six hours a day rather than four. As the teachers walk the picket lines, they have been joined by parents who are scrambling to find a place for children to pass the time or for baby sitters. Mothers and fathers — some with their kids in tow — are marching with the teachers. Other parents are honking their encouragement from cars or planting yard signs that announce their support in English and Spanish. Unions are still hallowed organizations in much of Chicago, and the teachers union holds a special place of honor in many households where children often grow up to join the same police, firefighter or trade unions as their parents and grandparents.

Alaska fisherman rescued after 24 hours adrift By Kim Murphy Los Angeles Times

SEATTLE — A 19-year-old fisherman whose boat capsized in the chilly waters of southern Alaska floated for more than 24 hours in a 4-foot plastic fish tub, singing “Row, Row, Row Your Boat” to keep his spirits up. Ryan Harris was finally rescued from his battle with 8-foot waves by a Coast Guard helicopter, which had joined a massive search of the waters around Sitka, Alaska, for Harris and his crewmate, Stonie

Huffman, the Sitka Daily Sentinel reported. Huffman survived, too, though he didn’t have a bin in which to float. Instead, he was able to don a buoyant survival suit, grab on to the lid of one of the fishing bins, and battle the crashing waves to head toward shore. The two men had set out for a routine day of fishing for coho salmon when they were hit with twin problems: a failed hydraulics system and high waves crashing around their

aluminum boat. Just as they managed to make repairs to the hydraulic system, the boat went down a steep wave that dumped a deluge of water in the bow of the boat. Almost immediately, a second large wave hit the stern, and the two men found themselves in the water, with the boat going down. Huffman helped Harris climb into a bin, but he couldn’t get in one himself, instead grabbing onto a lid of one of the bins and struggling into a survival

suit that was drifting nearby. With waves reaching 8 feet, it took him two hours to get into the suit, and by that time, the two men were no longer in view of each other. Having to stay awake and alert to keep the tiny tub from tipping in the high waves, Harris sang “Row Your Boat” and “Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” as well as other songs, to pass the long hours of darkness. “I never thought I was going to die, but I was worried about Mac,” he said.

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

Attackers of U.S. consulate in Libya well-armed, organized

Stevens recalled as a man who cared deeply for Libya SACRAMENTO, Calif — After a recent break from work, U.S. Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens e-mailed his family in Northern California that he’d arrived back in Libya. “He just got back to Libya a few days ago,” said his brother, Tom Stevens, 46. “He sent an email saying he had a lot of work waiting for him, so he’d have to email more later.” And then came the tragic news. On the 11th Stevens anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, the 52-year-old Stevens and three other embassy staff members were killed in an attack on the consulate in Benghazi. His stepfather, Robert Commanday, told CNN that Stevens loved the Libyan people and was passionate about helping the country recover from its revolution. A day after Stevens died, his family and friends remembered him as a dedicated career foreign service officer and a smart, amiable, unflappable man with a gift for caring about the world around him. He loved playing tennis, and he played it around the globe, using the tennis court as a way to get to know other diplomats, his brother said. He loved running, and he ran everywhere. “He even ran on the dangerous streets of Tripoli,” said Tom Stevens. Locally, some remembered Chris Stevens as the boy who attended Pioneer Elementary and Emerson Junior High in the city of Davis, where he joined the ski club and played saxophone in the band.

By David D. Kirkpatrick and Steven Lee Myers New York Times News Service

CAIRO — Islamist militants armed with antiaircraft weapons and rocket-propelled grenades stormed a lightly defended U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, late Tuesday, killing the U.S. ambassador and three members of his staff and raising fresh questions about the radicalization of countries swept up in the Arab Spring. The ambassador, J. Christopher Stevens, was missing almost immediately after the start of an intense, four-hour firefight for control of the mission, and his body was not located until Wednesday morning at dawn, when he was found dead at a Benghazi hospital, U.S. and Libyan officials said. It was the first time since 1979 that a U.S. ambassador had died in a violent assault. U.S. and European officials said that while many details about the attack remained unclear, the assailants seemed organized, well-trained and heavily armed and appeared to have at least some level of advanced planning. But the officials cautioned that it was too soon to tell whether the attack was related to the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. Fighters involved in the assault, which was spearheaded by a Islamist brigade formed during last year’s uprising against Moammar Gadhafi, said in interviews during the battle that they were moved to attack the mission by anger over a 14-minute, Americanmade video that depicted the Prophet Muhammad, Islam’s founder, as a villainous, homosexual and child-molesting buffoon.

Mideast Continued from A1 “This attack will not break the bonds between the United States and Libya,” Obama said Wednesday. The Libyans, he added, “helped some of our diplomats find safety, and they carried Ambassador Stevens’ body to the hospital, where we tragically learned he had died,” he added, referring to the envoy J. Christopher Stevens. The president found less reason to be pleased with Egypt, the second-largest recipient of U.S. foreign aid after Israel, at $2 billion a year. Morsi issued only a mild rebuke of the rioters — and on Facebook — while his movement, the Muslim Brotherhood, has called for a second day of protests against the lurid anti-Muslim video that set off the riots. And though the Egyptian police coordinated with U.S. officials, Morsi waited 24 hours before issuing his statement against the militants who stormed the embassy; Libyan authorities, issued immediate, unequivocal statements of regret for the bloodshed in Benghazi. Obama seemed to indicate

Parade Continued from A1 The city is inviting about 25 other Olympians who have lived or trained in Bend to participate in the parade. Robyn Christie, the city recorder, said she could not confirm which athletes would be present as organizers are still trying to contact most of them. A brief program is scheduled to follow the parade. Eaton and Mayor Jeff Eager will speak. Then Eaton will lead the fun run, jogging up the block from

Roundabout Continued from A1 A pipe was uncovered at the site Wednesday, an unanticipated discovery as it’s no longer in use. “We found an old 36-inch culvert pipe from clear back in the day when it was a dirt road,” Abbas said. Curb work will start next week, he said. “It’s going all right,” Abbas

Ibrahim Alaguri / The Associated Press

Libyans walk on the grounds of the gutted U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on Wednesday, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens.

Their attack followed by just a few hours the storming of the compound surrounding the U.S. Embassy in Cairo by an unarmed mob protesting the same video. On Wednesday, new crowds of protesters gathered outside the U.S. Embassies in Tunis and in Cairo. The wave of unrest set off by the video, posted online in the United States two months ago and dubbed into Arabic for the first time eight days ago, has further underscored the instability of the countries that cast off their longtime dictators in the Arab Spring revolts. It also cast doubt on the adequacy of security prep-

that the U.S. relationship with Egypt is evolving. “I don’t think that we would consider them an ally, but we don’t consider them an enemy,” he said in an interview with Telemundo that was broadcast Wednesday night on The Rachel Maddow Show on MSNBC. “I think it’s still a work in progress, but certainly in this situation, what we’re going to expect is that they are responsive to our insistence that our embassy is protected.” For the U.S., “politically the bigger issue is Egypt,” said Martin Indyk, a former U.S. ambassador to Israel. “On the one hand, you didn’t have Americans getting killed, but this was the fourth time an embassy was assaulted in Cairo with the Egyptian police doing precious little,” Indyk said. “And where was President Morsi’s condemnation of this?” Several foreign policy experts said they worried that Morsi was putting appeasement of his country’s Islamist population ahead of national security. That comes on top of other moves by his government, including restrictions on press freedom and squabbling

arations at U.S. diplomatic outposts in the volatile region. President Barack Obama condemned the killings, promised to bring the assailants to justice, and ordered tighter security at all U.S. diplomatic installations. The administration also dispatched 50 Marines to the Libyan capital, Tripoli, to help with security at the U.S. Embassy there, and ordered all nonemergency personnel to leave Libya and warned Americans not to travel there. A senior defense official said Wednesday night that the Pentagon was moving two warships toward the Libyan coast as a precaution.

In Tripoli, Libyan leaders also vowed to track down the attackers and stressed their unity with Washington. Obama administration officials and regional officials scrambled to sort out conflicting reports about the nature of the attack and the motivation of the attackers on Wednesday. A senior administration official told reporters during a conference call that “it was clearly a complex attack,” but offered no details. A translated version of the video that set off the uprising arrived first in Egypt before reaching the rest of the Islamic world. Its author, whose

Evan Vucci / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton walk to the Rose Garden of the White House on Wednesday, where Obama spoke about the death of J. Christopher Stevens, the U.S. ambassador to Libya.

with Israel over how to crack down on terrorists taking root in the Sinai Peninsula. While the killing of Stevens is a “tragedy,” said Robert Malley, head of the Middle East and North Africa with the International Crisis Group, “in the longer term, Libya mainly is a problem for Libyans.” What happens in Egypt,

the theater and back. Afterward, he will be available at the Tower Theater to sign autographs. The Mountain View High School marching band and the Summit Express Jazz band will play at the parade. Eaton’s decorated track career began in Central Oregon. He moved to La Pine at age 2 and to Bend before the sixth grade. At Mountain View, he was a track and field standout, winning state titles in the 400 meters and long jump. At the University of Oregon, Eaton won three national titles in

the decathlon from 2008 to 2010. He won an indoor heptathlon title in 2009 and again in 2010, breaking a world record set by fellow Oregonian Dan O’Brien. In June, Eaton set the world record in the decathlon with 9,039 points, winning the U.S Olympic trials in Eugene and qualifying for London. In London, he ran away from the field, taking gold with 8,869 points, nearly 200 more than silver medal winner and teammate Trey Hardee.

said. “We had a couple things come up. It happens in construction when you start getting into underground work. We’re working on getting it done.” Because of the roundabout project, school buses have to take alternate routes to transport students to Summit High School, Cascade Middle School and Miller Elementary School, said Sue McAdam, the

operations manager for routing at Bend-La Pine Schools. That adds about five to seven minutes onto bus rides for youngsters, she said. The roundabout project has an estimated cost of $3 million and is being paid for by a $30 million bond measure that Bend voters approved in 2011 for road improvements.

— Reporter: 541-633-2184, jaschbrenner@bendbulletin.com

— Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

by contrast, from “popular attitudes toward the U.S., to its domestic economy, to relations between the Muslim Brotherhood and the army, to relations between Cairo and Jerusalem, to the situation in Sinai, will profoundly affect the region, and so will profoundly affect America’s posture in the region,” Malley said.

identity is now a mystery, devoted the video’s prologue to caricatured depictions of Egyptian Muslims abusing Egyptian Coptic Christians while Egyptian police officers stood by. It was publicized last week by an American Coptic Christian activist, Morris Sadek, well known here for his scathing attacks on Islam. Sadek promoted the video in tandem with a declaration by Terry Jones — a Florida pastor best known for burning the Quran and promoting what he called “International Judge Muhammad Day” on Sept. 11.

What makes Egypt’s uncertain course so vexing for the White House is that Obama, more than any other foreign leader, has sided again and again with the Arab street in Cairo, even when it meant going expressly against the wishes of traditional allies, including the Egyptian military, the Persian Gulf states, and Israel. As recently as June, Obama was calling on the Egyptian military to quickly hand over power to the democratically elected civilian government — a move that helped Morsi, whose movement has called for greater use of Islamic law, assume power. At the same time, the administration was chastising the military, which has for 30 years served as the bulwark of a key U.S. strategic interest in the Middle East: the 1979 Camp David peace treaty between Egypt and Israel. For anti-American unrest to erupt in Egypt after all that could reflect a deeper divergence of a once-staunch ally from the U.S. Morsi’s belated reaction came after other actions that have troubled U.S. officials, from his decision to attend a meeting of non-

— The Sacramento Bee

aligned countries in Tehran to his choice of China for his first overseas trip. Obama has pledged to forgive $1 billion in Egyptian debt. “How does the president go to the Hill and say, ‘we need to forgive $1 billion in Egyptian debt?’” said Steven Cook, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. “The complication is that this is happening six weeks before the election. The things that the administration wants to do in Egypt have become a heavier lift.” David Makovsky, a senior fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, said, “There are some real serious questions about the direction of the Egyptian government. Some of this will be submerged because of the election, but it is likely to come back later.” The violence in Libya and Egypt reinforces what has been true from the start of the Arab uprising last year: these are homegrown movements over which the U.S. has at limited influence. The administration, experts say, can do little more than reaffirm its democratic aspirations and commitment to basic principles.

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Member of WE HONOR VETERANS Program

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Wednesday, October 17 Redmond Senior Center 325 Northwest Dogwood Avenue 11:00 am - 3:00 pm

Monday, October 22 La Pine Senior Center 16450 Victory Way 9:00 am - 12:00 pm

Who needs a flu shot? Adults 50 and over. Residents of nursing and foster care homes. Health care personnel. We bill for Medicare qualified and Pacific Source ($30 charge for others).

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Hospice | Home Health | Hospice House | Transitions


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Obesity

Seniors

Continued from A1 The study comes as state and federal public health officials grapple with an obesity crisis that threatens to swamp efforts to contain health care costs and prolong Americans’ lifespans. In a bid to reverse surging rates of obesity in the United States and the industrialized world, public health officials have spawned a slew of campaigns that take a variety of approaches. Many encourage behavior change with helpful tips such as “eat a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables every day,” as a program backed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises. But other campaigns have been less upbeat. In Georgia, a controversial series of video and billboard advertisements remind parents that “fat kids become fat adults,” and that “being fat takes the fun out of being a kid.” An Australian anti-obesity campaign pointedly warns viewers, “the more you gain, the more you have to lose.” Such messages are broadcast amid widespread stigma against the obese: heavy workers earn less, are more likely to be passed over for jobs and promotions, and are more likely than their thinner peers to be viewed as lazy and undisciplined, researchers have found. A poll released last month by Harris Interactive/HealthDay found that 61 percent of Americans do not consider negative remarks about a person’s weight to be offensive. Even among physicians, obese patients elicit feelings of prejudice and blame. A 2003 survey, published in the journal Obesity Research, found that half considered their obese patients awkward, ugly, unattractive and unlikely to follow their advice. In addition, one-third of doctors also viewed obese patients as weak-willed, sloppy and lazy. Against this backdrop, it’s little wonder that some public health campaigns would employ guilt and shame to motivate people to lose weight, said Rebecca Puhl, the Rudd Center’s research director and

Continued from A1

The claim

The Associated Press file photo

Two overweight women converse in New York City earlier this year. Two-thirds of American adults are either overweight or obese and some 17 percent of children and teens are obese.

leader of the new study. “There tends to be a sense that maybe a little bit of stigma isn’t such a bad thing, that maybe it’ll give overweight or obese viewers a little motivation,” she said. But such views do not account for shame’s boomerang effect. “When children or adults are made to feel stigmatized, shamed or teased about their weight, they’re likely to engage in binge eating and unhealthy weight-control practices, and to avoid physical activity,” Puhl said. “We find that people actually cope with stigma by eating more food.” To Nina Savelle-Rocklin, a San Fernando Valley psychotherapist who specializes in treating those with eating disorders, the link between shame and overeating is clear. “Shame is about feeling bad about who you are,” SavelleRocklin said. That message “is unbearable and intolerable” to most, and those who quell negative emotions by eating “are going to turn to food. ... It’s just a recipe for disaster.” University of California, Los Angeles psychologist Matthew D. Lieberman, who studies the neuroscience of persuasion, said the latest study is in line with research showing that public health campaigns can only be successful if they “fit with our sense of ourselves.” When he’s in the lab watching the persuasive process unfold on brain scans, the messages that spur people to action are the ones that ac-

tivate a region of the brain involved in thinking and reflecting about one’s self. Negative thoughts aren’t likely to recruit the neural systems that convert a message into action, Lieberman said. Puhl and her colleagues asked 1,014 volunteers to evaluate 30 public service announcements from several countries aimed at curbing obesity. The team found that obese subjects who viewed the anti-obesity campaign messages were likely to perceive shame and stigma more strongly and more often than their slimmer counterparts. Past research suggests that their long exposure to others’ negative attitudes toward them may prime obese viewers to experience stress when the subject of weight is raised. They commonly respond to such stress by consuming more calories, said Puhl. “It’s not a helpful public health tool,” she said. “It reinforces the problem and makes the situation worse.” Far more effective were messages that suggested specific steps that would improve health, conveyed a sense of empowerment and left references to obesity unspoken. In the study, the slogan that got the highest marks for motivation was “Eat well. Move more. Live longer.” Part of a British campaign called Change4Life, it was rated stigmatizing by less than 30 percent of participants, and 85 percent said it would move them to make changes.

In 1999, USCB and the city of Bend filled out an application seeking a $600,000 community development block grant that would help the city construct a 10,500-squarefoot building that would serve the city’s senior population. The Bend Park & Recreation District would own the building and manage it in exchange for contributing two acres of land it had to house the project in at the corner of 15th Street and Reed Market Avenue. The senior center opened in November 2001 soon after the city secured the grant and the rest of the money to complete its construction. It was expanded to include a 3,500-square-foot activity room three years later. Even though the park district and USCB never had an official partnership agreement, Buchanan maintains one existed between the parties as they worked to raise this money. He based this on news reports stating the parties worked together as partners, passages in the state of Oregon’s partnership code, and a divorce case in which a woman was given half of a business she and her husband helped build even though they had a prenuptial agreement separating their assets. “When you dissolve a partnership, the issue is whether one of the parties wants out,” said Buchanan, who first met with Bryant to discuss the

legal basis for his partnership claim in June. “We don’t need to accuse them of any wrongdoing (or prove it), we just need to say, ‘I break with thee.’ ” But breaking up is hard to do when one of the parties involved in the supposed partnership denies such a relationship existed in the first place, and that’s exactly what Bryant, the park district’s attorney, did in the letter he sent to Buchanan on Monday. In the document, Bryant quotes a passage of the Oregon state code that defines a partnership as being the “association of two or more persons to carry on as co-owners of a business for profit.” The city, the park district and the USCB had hoped that whatever money the senior center generated would be able to pay its expenses when they set out to build it, Bryant claims, adding the three parties involved in its construction never intended to run the facility as a business for profit.

The money In the letter, Bryant also, “for the sake of argument,” questioned whether USCB would get the money it wants if a judge ruled a partnership did exist between USCB and the park district when they raised the money to build the senior center. Buchanan claims USCB is due $925,000, which is 49 percent of the building’s current value, because it contributed $890,000, or 49 percent of the money it, the park district and the city raised to build

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the senior center and pay for its 2004 expansion. Part of this contribution includes the $325,000 the city made after it sold a building USCB occupied from 1979 to when the senior center was built to Bend’s Community Center, he said. “(USCB’s building) was given to them by the city,” park district executive director Don Horton said as he challenged this claim in a Wednesday interview. Because the building that is now Bend’s Community Center was the city’s to begin with, Horton said, the money made from its sale could not count toward its contribution. This understanding was spelled out in a fundraising agreement he said the city, the park district and USCB entered into when they built the senior center. That agreement called on USCB to contribute $700,000 in cash toward the project, an amount Horton said it missed by $670,000. Horton said USCB did contribute $250,000 toward the senior center’s expansion, which brings its total contribution to $280,000, an amount far short of the $890,000 Buchanan claims the group contributed and is using as the basis of his claim for a 49 percent stake in its ownership. “At best,” Bryant wrote in his letter. “USCB would own a minority interest in the building and would be responsible for its share of the expenses.” — Reporter: 541-617-7816, mmclean@bendbulletin.com

Study: Social networks boost voter turnout New York Times News Service A study of millions of Facebook users on Election Day 2010 has found that online social networks can have a measurable, though limited, effect on voter turnout. The study, published online Wednesday by the journal Nature, suggests that a special “get out the vote” message, showing each user

pictures of friends who said they had already voted, generated 340,000 additional votes nationwide — whether for Democrats or Republicans, the researchers could not determine. The scientists, from Facebook and the University of California, San Diego, said they believed the study was the first to demonstrate that

social networks could have an impact on elections. Significantly if not surprisingly, the voting study showed that patterns of influence were much more likely to be demonstrated between close friends. And the researchers found an indirect impact from the messages: Friends of friends were influenced as well.


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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

HILLSBOROUGH DISASTER

W  B

Britain apologizes for blaming victims

Colombians pin hopes on peace talks

• Cameron: Portraying soccer fans as hooligans added to tragedy By John F. Burns New York Times News Service

LONDON — Nearly a quarter of a century after 96 Liverpool soccer fans were crushed to death in one of the worst stadium disasters in history, Prime Minister David Cameron formally apologized Wednesday to the victims’ families, saying their “appalling deaths” were compounded by an attempt by the police, investigators and the media to depict the victims as

Suicide bombing targets Somalia’s president By Abdi Guled The Associated Press

MOGADISHU, Somalia — Somalia’s new president survived an assassination attempt on his second day in office when two suicide bombers blew themselves up Wednesday while trying to gain access into a heavily guarded hotel that is his Mohamud tempora r y residence, officials and witnesses said. The attack highlights the challenge that insecurity caused by an Islamist insurgency poses to Somalia’s fledgling government. The African Union Mission for Somalia said one of its soldiers was killed when the two suicide attackers attempted to penetrate the Jazeera Hotel where the President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud and Kenya’s foreign minister were giving a news conference. Three soldiers were wounded in the blast. The two suicide bombers set off explosions after they were shot by soldiers guarding the Jazeera Hotel, while another was intercepted and shot dead as he attempted to scale the walls of the hotel’s compound, the African Union Mission for Somalia, known as Amisom, said in a statement. Witnesses say at least one more person was killed, bringing the total death toll to a minimum of five, including the three attackers.

hooligans and to blame them for the disaster. Before a hushed House of Commons, Cameron said the families had suffered “a double injustice” in the failures of the police, fire and other authorities to anticipate the disaster or to contain its scale once it occurred, and in the efforts that followed to cover up the police failings by altering dozens of witness statements, and to pin responsibility on the victims for their

own deaths. The prime minister’s apology, and the findings of a new inquiry panel on which it was based, marked a stunning reversal in a saga that had been an open wound in Britain since April 15, 1989, when 3,000 Liverpool supporters sought to crowd into standing-room terraces approved for barely half that many at Hillsborough Stadium in Sheffield, 150 miles north of London. All but one of the vic-

tims perished that day, many of them within minutes. It has become known simply as the Hillsborough disaster, a horrifying reference point for sports officials throughout the world, and it has come to symbolize an era of rambunctious British soccer fans and the measures that clubs and the police took to contain them. In effect, Cameron’s apology amounted to an acknowledgment that the official version of what happened in the Hillsborough disaster was a stereotyped overlay, eagerly

crafted by the police, on a far more complex event that had its roots in bungling and cover-up by the authorities. “This appalling death toll of so many loved ones was compounded by an attempt to blame the victims,” Cameron said as the new report was published, effectively rejecting earlier findings by a judicial inquiry and an inquest whose narrow conclusions, blaming police failings but also pointing to unruliness among the victims, had been battled by the families for more than 20 years.

Deadly Pakistan factory fires blamed on safety violations By Adil Jawad and Sebastian Abbot The Associated Press

KARACHI, Pakistan — Fires at two clothing factories in Pakistan left 283 people dead — many trapped behind locked doors and barred windows — tragedies that highlight workplace perils in a country where many buildings lack basic safety equipment and owners often bribe officials to ignore the violations. The blazes broke out Tuesday night at a garment factory in of Karachi and a shoe manufacturer in Lahore. At least 258 people died in the fire in Karachi, where rescue workers were still searching Wednesday for bodies in the charred building. Another 25 perished in Lahore. Panicked workers in Karachi had only one way out since the factory’s owner had locked all the other exit doors in response to a recent theft, officials said. Many victims suffocated in the smoke-filled basement. “The owner of the factory should also be burned to death the way our dear ones have died in a miserable condition,” said Nizam-ud-Din, whose nephew was killed in the fire, one of the deadliest industrial accidents in Paki-

Fareed Khan / The Associated Press

Outside a mortuary in Karachi, Pakistan, on Wednesday, a woman mourns the death of a family member who was killed in a fire at a clothing factory.

stani history. Police were searching for the factory’s managers and placed the owner on a list of people who are not allowed to leave the country, said Roshan Ali Sheikh, a top government official in Karachi. “It is a criminal act to lock the emergency exit doors, and we are trying to know who did it, and why,” Sheikh said.

The fire started when a boiler exploded and the flames ignited chemicals that were stored in the factory, which manufactured jeans and other clothes for export. Between 300 and 400 workers were inside when the blaze erupted. The fire that swept through the four-story shoe factory in Lahore left 25 people dead,

some from burns and others from suffocation, said senior police officer Multan Khan. The fire broke out as workers were trying to start a generator after electricity went out in the building. Sparks from the generator made contact with chemicals used to make shoes, igniting the blaze, which blocked the only exit.

German court backs euro rescue fund New York Times News Service KARLSRUHE, Germany — Germany’s Federal Constitutional Court on Wednesday gave Chancellor Angela Merkel a significant victory in her bid to master the debt crisis that has affected the Continent for years and endangered its common cur-

rency, granting approval to one of the key pillars of her strategy. With the ruling, the 17 countries of the eurozone will be able to move ahead with the establishment of the European Stability Mechanism, something like a continental version of the International

Monetary Fund. The mechanism will handle bailouts and work in tandem with the European Central Bank to buy the bonds of countries like Italy and Spain that are straining under high interest rates. The court ruled that Germany could proceed with its contribution to the mecha-

nism but set certain conditions, including a requirement for parliamentary approval of any increase in the agreedupon German contribution of 190 billion euros, or about $240 billion. While unlikely to still the crisis entirely, a rejection could have unleashed new waves of instability.

MARQUETALIA,Colombia — It was here, on steep green hillsides reachable by mule train, that peasants armed with old bolt-action rifles became the FARC, a rebel group that would use the bounties of the drug trade to wage decades of war against the U.S.supported government. But today, the FARC’s commanders and old guard say they are ready to begin official peace talks with Colombia’s government, the fourth time since the 1980s that the two sides will negotiate. That has given the people of this region, who have lived since 1964 in the midst of one of the world’s oldest conflicts, a faint hope that the violence they have known all their lives could at last come to an end. As President Juan Manuel Santos’ government prepares for negotiations to begin next month, polls show most people in this country of nearly 47 million have embraced the possibility that talks could finally lead the FARC to lay down its weapons.

Activists can’t return to disputed islands HONG KONG — A group of Chinese activists revealed Wednesday that their vessel was not seaworthy enough for a return to a group of islands claimed by both China and Japan. The group, the Action Committee for Defending the Diaoyu Islands, had sailed to the islands last month to support China’s claim to the islands. Even without another trip by the activists, tensions between China and Japan remain high. On Tuesday, China sent two patrol ships toward the islands and accused Japan of stealing them after the Japanese government said it had agreed to buy three of them from their private owner. The pro-China activist group, the Action Committee for Defending the Diaoyu Islands, held a small protest at lunchtime Wednesday near the base of Exchange Square.

Musicians should be freed, Medvedev says MOSCOW — Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev said Wednesday that he believed that three female punk rockers jailed for a profane stunt in Moscow’s main Russian Orthodox cathedral should be released rather than serve out their two-year sentences. Weighing in on a case that has drawn widespread condemnation in the West, Medvedev was careful to assure his audience that he did not approve of the women’s performance of an anti-Kremlin song at the cathedral. But he went on to say that further incarceration would be “unproductive” — the most explicit commentary to come from a high-ranking official since the Aug. 17 sentencing. — From wire reports


O U T IN G

TV & Movies, B2 Calendar, B3 Dear Abby, B3

Horoscope, B3 Comics, B4-5 Puzzles, B5

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

B www.bendbulletin.com/outing

TRAIL UPDATE Trails are dry, less busy These last weeks of summer are great for enjoying the trails, said Chris Sabo, U.S. Forest Service trails specialist. “The mosquitoes are finished, use is down.... (It is) a nice quiet time of year.” All of the routine summer trail clearing and maintenance is done for the year, Sabo said. Some trails are dusty, but not too bad, he said. The dry weather does cause concern for fires, he said, and in many campgrounds and trail areas, campfires are not permitted. Public use restrictions for fire, smoking and chain saw use have been posted on the Forest Service website (http://tinyurl.com/ d29jsll). Trail users in wilderness areas should be on the defensive with fire danger, Sabo said — and “even though campfires are currently permitted within the wilderness areas, we are asking folks to be extremely careful with them if they do need one.” Fires should be kept small and completely extinguished if you have to leave the fire for any length of time, Sabo said. Some areas, including Green, Moraine, and Mirror lakes, have fire closures in effect year-round. The Pole Creek Fire “has closed down quite a large area on the east side of the Three Sisters (North, Middle and South) … at least from the McKenzie Pass south to the Park Meadow Trail, all the way over to the 16 Road west to the (Pacific Crest Trail),” Sabo said.

Courtesy Kevin Smith Courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Turkey vulture

A sharp-shinned hawk soars over the East Cascade Audubon Society’s hawk watch site on Green Ridge.

Courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

American kestrel

Watch and learn

See Trails / B6

SPOTLIGHT

Gre e n Ri d g e

Camp Sherman

By Mac McLean The Bulletin

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Black Butte

Black Butte Ranch Indian Ford Campground 242

d. dR or

— From staff reports

• East Cascade Audubon Society volunteers help count raptors during their migration

F ian Ind

The Humane Society of Central Oregon’s Mutt Strut & More, a benefit for homeless pets in the region, will be at 10 a.m. Saturday at Riverbend Park, 799 S.E. Columbia St., Bend. The mutt strut is a 1.3mile walk along the Deschutes River for people and their canine companions. Shorter routes are optional for seniors, people with disabilities and anyone who wants to walk less. There are contests, activities and prizes (including an iPad 2). Participants can enter as individuals or part of a team for registration fees ranging from $20 to $200. The event is free for 12 and younger. The event raises money to help care for the 4,000 animals that arrive at the shelter every year. Registration forms are available at the Humane Society of Central Oregon shelter (61170 S.E. 27th St.), the thrift store (500 N.E. Greenwood Ave.), at Paws & Shop (550 S.W. Industrial Way in the Old Mill Marketplace) and on the website at www .hsco.org. Day-of-race registration begins at 9 a.m. Contact: 541-3307096.

Mac McLean / The Bulletin

Hidden by the shadows, East Cascade Audubon Society volunteer Peter Low scans the horizon for migrating birds of prey.

Metolius River

‘Mutt Strut’ aids homeless pets

20 126 Sisters

126 20

eering through the eyepiece of his tripod-mounted spotting scope, Peter Low scanned a string of ridges and peaks that stretched between Mount Jefferson and Mount Hood from a vantage point he set up due east atop Green Ridge in the Deschutes National Forest. “I’ve got three accipiters to the right of the skinny snag,” he shouted. When he made this announcement, we — as in myself, my wife, Meryl Ibis, and some volunteers from the East Cas-

cade Audubon Society and the High Desert Museum — trained our binoculars on a dead fir tree that stuck out on the horizon, and waited for a set of birds to soar through the air. Almost immediately, the trio of sharp-shinned hawks thrust above the horizon and rode a series of air currents flowing up Green Ridge’s western slope. On outstretched wings, they headed south over the 4,400-foot-high ridgeline to their winter homes. “We’ve got a counter,” Kevin Smith said as he watched one of the three hawks fly past.

For the next two weeks, teams of volunteers from the High Desert Museum and the East Cascades Audubon Society will meet up at the Indian Ford Campground northwest of Sisters and head out to their viewpoint to count the raptors that fly overhead (see “If you go,” Page B6). The data collected about the migrating raptors will be shared with a number of groups, including the Utah-based HawkWatch International, in order to learn more about the birds and protect them so that others may watch their flights in the future. See Outing / B6

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Watch our night sky change with the seasons By Bill Logan For The Bulletin

SKY WATCH

The summer constellations Virgo, Libra and Scorpius are now low in the west. Sagittarius “A,” the center of our Milky Way galaxy, is due south at 8 p.m., but by 10:30 p.m. falls below the southwestern horizon. The autumn constellations, Capricorn, Aquarius and Pisces are now becoming prominent along the

zodiac in the south and southeast. We can get a sneak preview of the winter constellations Taurus and Orion just after midnight as they rise in the east. Autumn begins when the sun crosses the equator at precisely 7:33 a.m. Sept. 22 on its southward journey for the winter. Daylight will become shorter yet and the nights will become longer until the sun

reaches its southernmost travels, arriving at the Tropic of Capricorn for the winter solstice Dec. 21. The beautiful open star cluster M45, the Pleiades, will rise in the east at 10 p.m. and is best viewed with a good pair of binoculars. Jupiter is still in the constellation Taurus and will rise tonight at 10:27 p.m. in the east just below the Pleiades. Venus will rise at 3:11 a.m.

Friday morning in the constellation Cancer. The moon is a 6-dayold waxing crescent and will set at 10:56 p.m., making the night sky ideal for deep-space viewing with a good telescope. Bill Logan is an expert solar observer and a volunteer amateur astronomer with University of Oregon’s Pine Mountain Observatory. He lives in Bend. Contact: blogan0821@gmail.com.


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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

TV & M

Glenn Beck’s show heads to satellite 2011, the conventional take on Beck has been that although Glenn Beck is bringing his he was making more money brand of conservative com- online than at the cable netmentary back to the TV set. work, he was reaching far One year after embracing fewer viewers than he was on an Internet-only distribution Fox. There, he peaked at over model, Beck is repositioning 3 million viewers a night. his streaming Beck, hownetwork, Theever, asserted TV SPOTLIGHT Blaze TV, as in an interview an offering for that his compacable and satellite operators ny overall “now reaches more — in other words, TV the old- people across more platforms fashioned way. than ever before.� On Wednesday, he anHe hosts what continues nounced an agreement with to be a hugely popular syndithe Dish Network, the first of cated radio show, free over the what his company hopes will airwaves, as well as the nightbe many such deals. ly subscription-only show on TheBlaze TV, an Internet TheBlaze TV. television network, will reCutting deals with cable and main available via the Web for satellite companies was in the its 300,000 paying subscribers, back of Beck’s mind when he including those not subscrib- adapted the streaming-movie ing to Dish. But the distribu- business model of Netflix for tion deal with Dish gives Beck, his online network, originally formerly a host on Fox News, a called GBTV. He acknowlnew way to reach viewers that edged that he was asking a lot may be adopted by other Inter- of his fans to seek him out onnet entrepreneurs seeking a line at the outset. way into traditional television. Looking back a year later, he “Our success over the past said his priority was control: year has given us the ability to both the “freedom to try new go on traditional television while things� from a business standmaintaining complete creative point and the flexibility to “do control and freedom and re- whatever show I wanted when maining at the center of the In- I wanted� and program other ternet revolution,� Beck said. shows from a creative standDespite all the hoopla about point. Online, he has done that. online viewing and devices TheBlaze TV, which reto connect the Internet to tele- vealed several months ago that vision sets — TheBlaze TV it had more than 300,000 subpromised online subscribers it scribers paying $99.95 a year was easy to do — a lot of people or $9.95 a month, said that still just want to see what is on number was still accurate. TV the easy traditional way. The network will be avail“We’d like to make that as able to customers who have simple for them as possible,� Dish’s 250-channel package; said Chris Balfe, the president customers with lesser packagof Beck’s media company, es will be able to buy TheBlaze Mercury Radio Arts. The TV as a $5 monthly add-on, channel launched at 5 p.m. a step toward a la carte proWednesday. gramming for people wanting Since Beck, 48, and Fox more control over which chanparted ways in the summer of nels they pay for.

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FOR THURSDAY, SEPT. 13

BEND

By Brian Stelter

Regal Pilot Butte 6

New York Times News Service

2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (PG-13) 1:15, 3:45, 6:45

Rachel Weisz, as Dr. Marta Shearing, and Jeremy Renner, as Aaron Cross, in a scene from “The Bourne Legacy.�

EDITOR’S NOTES: • Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15.50 for adults and $13 for children (ages 3 to 11) and seniors (ages 60 and older). • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

Universal Pictures via The Associated Press

THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15 THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) Noon, 5:45 BRANDED (R) 12:30, 3, 6 CELESTE AND JESSE FOREVER (R) 1, 4, 7 KILLER JOE (NC-17) 12:45, 3:30, 6:30 ROBOT AND FRANK (PG-13) 2:50

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

2016: OBAMA’S AMERICA (PG) Noon, 3, 6, 9

RUBY SPARKS (R) 6:45 THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG) 12:45, 3:30, 6:10, 9:10 PARANORMAN 3-D (PG) 1, 6:45 PARANORMAN (PG) 3:40, 9:15 THE POSSESSION (PG-13) 1:55, 4:55, 7:30, 9:55 PREMIUM RUSH (PG-13) 1:45, 4:45, 7:20, 9:40 RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK IMAX (PG) 12:30, 3:45, 7, 9:45 THE WORDS (PG-13) 1:25, 3:50, 7:10, 9:50

McMenamins Old St. Francis School

THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 12:05, 3:25, 6:30, 9:35 THE CAMPAIGN (R) 2, 5, 8, 10:15

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

THE COLD LIGHT OF DAY (PG13) 12:55, 3:15, 7:40, 10:10 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG13) 12:20, 4:05, 7:45 THE EXPENDABLES 2 (R) 1:15, 4:25, 6:55, 9:30 HIT AND RUN (R) 1:35, 4:35, 7:25, 10

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG13) 6 TED (R) 9:10 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13) 1:10, 3:55, 6:35, 9:05

MPAA rating) 3:30

MADRAS

REDMOND

Madras Cinema 5

Redmond Cinemas

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

THE CAMPAIGN (R) 5:15, 7:15, 9:15 THE EXPENDABLES 2 (R) 4:30, 6:45, 9

THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 6:30 THE EXPENDABLES 2 (R) 4:55, 7:20 HIT AND RUN (R) 4:40, 6:50

LAWLESS (R) 4:30, 7, 9:30

LAWLESS (R) 4:35, 7

THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG) 4:15, 6:45, 9:15

PARANORMAN 3-D (PG) 5, 7:10

PRINEVILLE SISTERS

Pine Theater

Sisters Movie House

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

LAWLESS (R) 6

BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (PG-13) 7

THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG) 4, 7

LAWLESS (R) 6:30

Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

PREMIUM RUSH (PG-13) 6:45

Tin Pan Theater 869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

LAWLESS (R) 12:15, 3:05, 6:20, 9:20 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG13) 12:40, 4:15, 7:55

FIRST POSITION (no MPAA rating) 6 GERHARD RICHTER PAINTING (no

for appointments call 541-382-4900

CASCADE Warehouse Prices

MATTRESS 541•678•REST

856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com

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THURSDAY PRIME TIME 9/13/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00

5:30

KATU News World News News Nightly News News Evening News KEZI 9 News World News America’s Funniest Home Videos Wild Kratts ‘Y’ Electric Comp. NewsChannel 8 Nightly News Meet, Browns Meet, Browns Chef John Besh Sara’s

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å Access H. Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Travelscope Business Rpt. NewsChannel 8 News King of Queens King of Queens Time Goes By My Family

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Entertainment The Insider (N) Big Bang Big Bang PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition Engagement Engagement Finding Your Roots

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

11:00

11:30

Wipeout (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Grey’s Anatomy Migration ’ ‘14’ (10:02) Scandal The Trail ’ ‘14’ KATU News (11:35) Nightline America’s Got Talent Nick reveals the winner; Justin Bieber. (N) ‘PG’ Rock Center With Brian Williams News Jay Leno Big Bang Two/Half Men Big Brother (N) ’ Ă… Person of Interest ’ ‘14’ Ă… News Letterman Wipeout (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Grey’s Anatomy Migration ’ ‘14’ (10:02) Scandal The Trail ’ ‘14’ KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline The X Factor Auditions No. 2 ‘14’ Glee The New Rachel (N) ’ ‘14’ News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ The Simpsons Family Guy ‘14’ Leonard Cohen Live in London ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Use Your Brain to Change Your Age With Dr. Daniel Amen ‘G’ Ă… Steves America’s Got Talent Nick reveals the winner; Justin Bieber. (N) ‘PG’ Rock Center With Brian Williams NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno The Vampire Diaries ‘14’ Ă… The Next Dallas (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ ’Til Death ‘14’ ’Til Death ‘PG’ POV The Light in Her Eyes ’ ‘G’ World News Tavis Smiley ’ Charlie Rose (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… The First 48 (N) Ă… (11:01) The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… *A&E 130 28 18 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… CSI: Miami See No Evil A blind man CSI: Miami Manhunt Horatio’s wife’s ››› “The Green Mileâ€? (1999, Drama) Tom Hanks, David Morse, Michael Clarke Duncan. A guard thinks an inmate has a supernatural power to heal. Ă… ››› “The Green Mileâ€? (1999) Tom *AMC 102 40 39 hears a girl’s abduction. ‘14’ killer escapes. ‘14’ Ă… Hanks, David Morse. Ă… Gator Boys ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Swamp Wars ’ ‘PG’ Ă… River Monsters: Unhooked ‘PG’ Great Barrier Reef ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters: Unhooked ‘PG’ *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Swamp Wars ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ The Real Housewives of Miami (10:15) The Real Housewives of Miami What Happens BRAVO 137 44 Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders: Making the Team ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Cheer ’ ‘PG’ Ă… CMT 190 32 42 53 Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Crime Inc. American Greed Mad Money Crime Inc. American Greed P90X! Ninja CNBC 54 36 40 52 Crime Inc. Hollywood Robbery Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront CNN 55 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… (6:02) Tosh.0 Colbert Report Daily Show (7:44) Chappelle’s Show ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ (8:50) Futurama (9:23) Futurama (9:56) Futurama Futurama ‘14’ Daily Show Colbert Report COM 135 53 135 47 (4:58) Futurama Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Talk of the Town Local issues. Desert Cooking Oregon Joy of Fishing Journal Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 Capitol Hill Hearings CSPAN 61 20 12 11 Capitol Hill Hearings Good-Charlie Jessie ’ Ă… Austin & Ally ’ A.N.T. Farm ’ Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Austin & Ally ’ Good-Charlie Phineas, Ferb Phineas, Ferb My Babysitter Austin & Ally ’ *DIS 87 43 14 39 Gravity Falls ’ Gravity Falls ’ Phineas, Ferb Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Texas Car Wars Flip or Flop (N) Auction Kings Auction Kings *DISC 156 21 16 37 Auction Kings Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians E! News (N) The Soup ‘14’ Khloe & Lamar Jonas Jonas Jonas Jonas Chelsea Lately E! News *E! 136 25 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 (4:30) College Football Rutgers vs. South Florida (N) (Live) 24/7 Chavez Boxing Aaron Martinez vs. Jessie Vargas (N) (Live) Ă… NFL Live (N) (Live) Ă… Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… MMA Live (N) SportsNation ESPN2 22 24 21 24 CrossFit Games CrossFit Games 24/7 Chavez Friday Night Lights ’ ‘14’ Ă… Friday Night Lights ’ ‘14’ Ă… Car Auctions Car Auctions AWA Wrestling Ă… College Football From Oct. 29, 2011. Ă… ESPNC 23 25 123 25 White Shadow Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… ›› “Alice in Wonderlandâ€? (2010, Fantasy) Johnny Depp, Mia Wasikowska. ›› “Prince of Persia: The Sands of Timeâ€? (2010) Jake Gyllenhaal, Gemma Arterton. The 700 Club ’ ‘PG’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five FNC 57 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Paula’s Cooking Chopped Chefs on a Mission Chopped Judge Knows Best Chopped Own It! ‘G’ Chopped Stacking Up Extreme Chef The $50,000 Bite The Great Food Truck Race ‘G’ *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes (3:30) ››› “Wantedâ€? (2008) Two/Half Men Two/Half Men How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Wilfred (N) ‘MA’ Louie (N) ‘MA’ Totally Biased (11:31) Louie FX 131 My First Place My First Place My First Place Hunters Int’l House Hunters Buying and Selling ‘G’ Ă… You Live in What? ‘G’ Ă… House Hunters Hunters Int’l Living Abroad Hunters Int’l HGTV 176 49 33 43 My First Place How the Earth Was Made ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Counting Cars Counting Cars (11:02) Top Gear One Tank ‘PG’ *HIST 155 42 41 36 How the Earth Was Made ‘PG’ Project Runway ‘PG’ Ă… Project Runway ‘PG’ Ă… Project Runway ‘PG’ Ă… Project Runway It’s All About Me (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Dance Moms Abby’s dancers battle for a title. ‘PG’ LIFE 138 39 20 31 Project Runway ‘PG’ Ă… The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word The Ed Show The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews MSNBC 59 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) Snooki Snooki Snooki Snooki Snooki Snooki Snooki Snooki Snooki Snooki Awkward. ‘14’ Inbetweeners Snooki MTV 192 22 38 57 Snooki SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob iCarly iStart a Fan War ‘G’ Ă… Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ (11:33) Friends NICK 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob The Will: Secrets Revealed The Will: Secrets Revealed 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ OWN 161 103 31 103 The Will: Secrets Revealed Mariners Post. High School Football Kings at Arch Bishop (N) (Live) Seahawks The Dan Patrick Show (N) ROOT 20 45 28* 26 (4:00) MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Toronto Blue Jays (N) (Live) Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… iMPACT Wrestling Austin Aries faces off against Jeff Hardy. (N) Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… DEA Deadly Chase ‘14’ SPIKE 132 31 34 46 Jail ‘14’ Ă… Merlin The Sword in the Stone Face Off Face Off Pirate Treasure ‘PG’ Face Off Year of the Dragon Face Off Alice in Zombieland ‘PG’ › “Stigmataâ€? (1999) Ă… SYFY 133 35 133 45 Merlin The Sword in the Stone Behind Scenes Joel Osteen Joseph Prince Hillsong TV Praise the Lord Ă… Live-Holy Land The Evidence Grant Jeffrey Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord Ă… TBN 205 60 130 Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Big Bang Big Bang Sullivan & Son Big Bang Conan (N) Ă… *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ A Bird’s a Bird (5:22) Gussle’s (6:06) Court Dirty Work in a A Lover’s Lost A Submarine Dizzy Heights (8:22) Fatty and (9:06) Wife and His Bitter Pill (9:52) The Wait- (10:36) Madcap Teddy at the (11:22) Her TorTCM 101 44 101 29 Day of Rest House Crooks Laundry Control Pirate and Daring Mabel Adrift Auto Trouble ers’ Ball Ambrose Throttle pedoed Love Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Here Comes Here Comes Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Four Weddings (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Say Yes:The Big Day Four Weddings ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *TLC 178 34 32 34 Four Weddings ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist Bleeding Heart ‘14’ The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist At First Blush ‘14’ CSI: NY On the Job ’ ‘14’ Ă… *TNT 17 26 15 27 The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… MAD ‘PG’ Regular Show Regular Show Wrld, Gumball Adventure Time Annoying MAD ‘PG’ Regular Show King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ *TOON 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Toy Hunter ‘PG’ Toy Hunter ‘PG’ Trip Flip ‘PG’ Trip Flip ‘G’ Mysteries at the Museum ‘PG’ Mysteries at the Museum ‘PG’ *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Bourdain: No Reservations M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Home Improve. Home Improve. Cosby Show Cosby Show Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 (4:30) Bonanza M*A*S*H ‘PG’ NCIS Double Identity ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS Obsession ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS Faking It ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS Dead and Unburied ’ ‘PG’ NCIS Smoked ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Covert Affairs ‘PG’ Ă… (DVS) USA 15 30 23 30 NCIS Mother’s Day ’ ‘14’ Ă… Behind the Music 50 Cent ’ ‘14’ Behind the Music Nas Nas. ‘14’ Behind the Music Notorious B.I.G. ’ ‘14’ Ă… ››› “Something From Nothing: The Art of Rapâ€? (2012) T.I. and Tiny Bask. Wives LA VH1 191 48 37 54 T.I. and Tiny PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:20) ›› “National Lampoon’s Vacationâ€? 1983 ›› “Colombianaâ€? 2011, Action Zoe Saldana. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… (9:50) ››› “True Liesâ€? 1994 Arnold Schwarzenegger. ‘R’ Ă… ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:15) ››› “Holesâ€? 2003 Sigourney Weaver. ‘PG’ › “Max Payneâ€? 2008, Action Mark Wahlberg. ‘PG-13’ Ă… › “The Oneâ€? 2001, Action Jet Li, Carla Gugino. ‘PG-13’ Ă… ›› “Darkness Fallsâ€? 2003, Horror Chaney Kley. ‘PG-13’ Ă… FMC 104 204 104 120 (4:00) › “Max Payneâ€? 2008 Ă… UFC Tonight UFC Insider Best of PRIDE Fighting UFC Reloaded UFC 147: Silva vs. Franklin II Highlights of UFC 147 in Brazil. UFC Tonight UFC Insider Best of PRIDE Fighting FUEL 34 Ryder Cup Highlights Ryder Cup Highlights Ryder Cup Highlights Golf Central (N) 19th Hole (N) American Triumvirate American American American GOLF 28 301 27 301 Ryder Cup Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Typewriter ‘G’ ›› “Water for Elephantsâ€? 2011, Drama Reese Witherspoon. An orphaned ›› “Hopâ€? 2011, Comedy Voices of James Marsden, Rus- (8:45) ›› “Wall Street: Money Never Sleepsâ€? 2010 Michael Douglas. Master manipulator Gordon Taxicab Confessions: New York, HBO 425 501 425 501 veterinary student joins a traveling circus. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… sell Brand, Kaley Cuoco. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Gekko emerges from prison with a new agenda. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… New York ’ ‘MA’ Ă… ››› “Training Dayâ€? 2001, Crime Drama Denzel Washington, Ethan Hawke. ‘R’ ››› “Training Dayâ€? 2001, Crime Drama Denzel Washington, Ethan Hawke. ‘R’ ››› “Sexy Beastâ€? 2000, Comedy-Drama Ray Winstone. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:40) ›› “Knight and Dayâ€? 2010, Action Tom Cruise, ›› “The Hangover Part IIâ€? 2011, Comedy Bradley Coo- (8:15) ›› “Caddyshackâ€? 1980, Comedy Chevy Chase, Bill Murray. A vulgar ›› “Cowboys & Aliensâ€? 2011, Science Fiction Daniel Craig. Extraterrestrials MAX 400 508 508 Cameron Diaz. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… per, Ed Helms. ’ ‘R’ Ă… newcomer clashes with the country club set. ‘R’ Ă… attack a 19th-century Arizona town. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… American Colony: Hutterites American Colony: Hutterites Taboo Teen Sex ‘14’ Taboo Teen Sex ‘14’ American Colony: Hutterites American Colony: Hutterites American Gypsies ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Planet Sheen Planet Sheen Robot, Monster Avatar: Air. Odd Parents Odd Parents SpongeBob SpongeBob Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Dragon Ball Z Iron Man: Armor NTOON 89 115 189 115 Odd Parents In Pursuit With Realtree RealTree’s Bow Madness Ult. Adventures The Season Wild Outdoors Bushman Show Hunt Masters Wild Outdoors Steve’s Outdoor Sasquatch Fear No Evil OUTD 37 307 43 307 Hunt (4:45) “The Lieâ€? 2011 Joshua Leon- (6:15) ›› “Angels Crestâ€? 2011, Drama Thomas Dekker, Lynn Collins, Jeremy ›› “Shakespeare Highâ€? 2011, Documentary Premiere. (9:25) ›› “Tanner Hallâ€? 2009, Drama Rooney Mara, Geor- Gigolos (N) ’ Polyamory: MarSHO 500 500 ard. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Piven. A child’s death throws a town into turmoil. ‘R’ gia King. Premiere. ’ ‘R’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… ried & Dating ’ ‘NR’ Ă… Car Warriors Cutlass ‘14’ Wrecked ‘PG’ Wrecked ‘14’ Hard Parts Hard Parts Unique Whips ‘14’ SPEED 35 303 125 303 NASCAR Sprint Cup Replay (7:40) ››› “The Thomas Crown Affairâ€? 1999 Pierce Brosnan. ‘R’ (9:42) ›› “Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tidesâ€? 2011 Johnny Depp. ‘PG-13’ STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:30) Boss ‘MA’ ›› “How Do You Knowâ€? 2010 Reese Witherspoon. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… (4:35) ›› “The Night We Never Metâ€? (6:15) “Meskadaâ€? 2010, Drama Nick Stahl, Rachel Nichols. A detective traces ››› “The Helpâ€? 2011, Drama Viola Davis, Emma Stone, Bryce Dallas Howard. An aspiring writer › “Uninvited Guestâ€? 2000 Mekhi Phifer. A stranger wreaks TMC 525 525 1993 Matthew Broderick. ‘R’ a boy’s murder back to his hometown. ’ ‘R’ Ă… captures the experiences of black women. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… havoc on an Ohio couple. ‘R’ Ă… Caught Looking (N) Caught Looking Sports Illustrated ‘PG’ Caught Looking NFL Turning Point Sports Illustrated ‘PG’ NBCSN 27 58 30 209 Sports Illustrated ‘PG’ Braxton Family Values (N) L.A. Hair The Big Blow Out Braxton Family Values Braxton Family Values Ghost Whisperer Threshold ‘PG’ Braxton Family Values I Love L.A. *WE 143 41 174 118 Braxton Family Values


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Siblings blinded by father’s money turn away from mom Dear Abby: My father left my mother after 32 years of marriage. To say Mom was devastated would be putting it mildly. She tried to keep things cordial for the sake of her four kids, but Dad spurned her efforts. My three brothers and I are now married with children of our own. Only recently have I been able to express how ashamed I am of myself and my siblings for the despicable way we have treated our mother for the past 17 years. Dad was always arrogant, but he became even worse when he came into money. In our lives, Dad became No. 1. The reason? You guessed it — the money. We put our mother down every chance we got, and our spouses chimed right in. We visited her only once or twice a year and never repaid the money she lent us. She knew she wasn’t wanted or respected. Dad is clueless to the fact that we hang around only because of what we can get (and have gotten) from him. This is still true of my brothers, but I no longer want any part of this charade. Mom is gone now. No, she hasn’t passed away. She quietly moved out of our lives and I don’t know where she is. I don’t blame her for leaving. The abuse she took from us shouldn’t happen to a dog. When I look back, I remember a mother who held a full-time job, kept a marvelous home, was a great cook and had a wonderful laugh and sensitivity. She didn’t smoke, drink or cheat on Dad. Was she perfect? Of course not; none of us is. All she wanted after the divorce was to be loved by her kids and spend time with her grandkids. Now the grandkids are growing up without knowing this wonderful woman. Mom, if you see this letter, I love you dearly.I hope you can someday forgive me for all the years of hateful remarks and unkind deeds. The pain you must have suffered is some-

DEAR A B B Y thing I’ll have to live with the rest of my life. You are a class act, and I’m going to live the rest of my life trying to emulate your values and quiet dignity. — Missing My Mom in Scottsdale, Ariz. Dear Missing: If you’re truly sorry, it’s time to tell your mother personally and ask her forgiveness. Do whatever it takes to locate her, including hiring a private detective if necessary. It may be expensive, but use some of the money you got from Dear Old Dad. Dear Abby: I am an 81-yearold grandmother who blindly trusted that my annual Pap smear exam would provide early detection for any type of uterine cancer. It took a diagnosis of uterine cancer that resulted in a subsequent hysterectomy for me to discover that this test is not enough. Although the Pap test should be part of a regular checkup, it only checks for cervical cancer. Except when hormone therapy is being taken, any bleeding, spotting or abnormal discharge following menopause is NOT normal and should be reported at once to your doctor. — Georgia Grandmother Dear Grandmother: I’m pleased that your cancer was caught in time. However, whether a woman is pre- or post-menopausal — and whether or not she is on hormone therapy — she should immediately alert her doctor to any abnormal bleeding, spotting or discharge. These symptoms are not just warning signs of cancer. They could also indicate a polyp that needs removal, or a sexually transmitted disease. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar This year the unexpected has become a theme in your life, especially as a partner or loved one tends to express an unpredictable energy. You often feel like you have to start over at square one and crawl your way back up to the top. This struggle is more symbolic than realistic. Bosses and higher-ups let you know how much they value your work. If you are single, you could meet someone very special through your work. Let it happen. If you are attached, the two of you enjoy making public appearances together. Socializing is right up your alley. A fellow LEO understands you even better than you do. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH Your very playful style attracts quite a few people. Your creativity comes out when you relax and are yourself. Opportunity soars because of your ingenuity. Others respond to your ideas; you simply need to communicate them. Tonight: Love the moment. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Your principles work. You are able to sustain a great amount of change, even when it is unexpected. You prove this time and time again. Try not to place too much value on money, as it comes and goes. Tonight: Home really is your castle. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Keep talking and sharing your feelings. Others might surprise you by their actions and/or responses. The good news is that you have the ability to respond appropriately and with flexibility. You attract people through your openness. Tonight: Say what you mean, and mean what you say. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Unexpected developments force your hand. You’ll see life through new eyes as a result, and humor helps you flow through what could be difficult moments. Use your intuition with your finances. Tonight: Go buy yourself that item you love. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH You greet life with a smile and a willingness to jump through hoops. How you see a personal situation could change drastically as associates come in with noteworthy ideas. Anything is possible; make it

so. Tonight: Allow your Leo charm to do its magic. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Know when to pull back and say little. The less said, the greater the flexibility you’ll have. Someone who makes an impact takes an unusual stance while you work overtime to catch up and understand what went through his or her mind. Tonight: The only answer is “yes.� LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Look at what is going on around you. People seek you out. If you’re trying to concentrate or be studious, you can forget it. The ethers are declaring that it is time for you to socialize more. Opportunities head your way. Tonight: Follow the music. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH You cannot get around a certain responsibility that looks like it will have certain aspects that you will need time to figure out. You are not a free spirit. Honor your life’s demands, and you will be well-rewarded. Tonight: Burn the candle at both ends. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH You must detach or else everything that’s happening around you could get jumbled. You will feel as if your mind is a maze. The more mental distance you gain, the better your choices will be. Someone close seems to share too much. Tonight: Why work when you can play? CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Someone comes to you with an unexpected proposition. Listen well, though know that you might block out some details, as you are a bit taken aback. See how you can work this idea into your life. You could be thrilled by the results. Tonight: One-on-one relating. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Defer to others with the full knowledge as to what you need. You see key people around you being extremely domineering. Let them be — you cannot change them. Let them see the results of their actions. Use the freedom well. Tonight: Say “yes.� PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH An even pace works, despite your tendency to change topics or actions and head in different directions. You might have to discipline yourself in order to achieve your day’s goals. Postpone spontaneity. Tonight: The time is now. Š 2012 by King Features Syndicate

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C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY FALL RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2013 models; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711. BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB LUNCHEON: A luncheon benefiting the Boys and Girls Clubs of Central Oregon as part of the “It Just Takes One� campaign; registration requested; donations accepted; noon-1 p.m.; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-2877, llmaxwell@bg cco.org or www.bgcco.org. THE LIBRARY BOOK CLUB: Read and discuss “Tuesdays with Morrie� by Mitch Albom; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www.deschutes library.org/calendar. THE LIBRARY BOOK CLUB: Read and discuss “Have a Little Faith� by Mitch Albom; free; noon; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7080 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar. TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-6 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, off of U.S. Highway 20 and Cook Avenue; 541-728-0088, earthsart@gmail.com or http:// tumalogardenmarket.com. MAPS OF EARLY MEXICO: A slide show presentation and discussion of maps of early Mexico; free; 6:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-312-1032. “RICHARD III�: Thoroughly Modern Productions and Stage Right Productions present Shakespeare’s play about the controversial English king; $18, $15 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com. ANIMAL EYES: The Portlandbased indie rockers perform; free; 9 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www .reverbnation.com/venue/the hornedhand. ERIN & THE PROJECT: The California-based indie-soul band performs; $5; 9:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com.

FRIDAY FALL RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2013 models; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711. WESTERN AND ANTIQUE AUCTION: Event includes a sale of Western collectibles and live and Internet auctions; free; Auction at 4:30 p.m. on Sept. 14, 9 a.m. Sept. 15; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541815-6115 or www.auctioneer4u.net. BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB LUNCHEON: A luncheon benefiting the Boys and Girls Clubs of Central Oregon as part of the “It Just Takes One� campaign; registration requested; donations accepted; noon-1 p.m.; Highland Baptist Church, 3100 S.W. Highland Ave., Redmond; 541-548-4161, llmaxwell@bgcco.org or www .bgcco.org. MYTHS AND REALITIES OF THE SPANISH CONQUEST OF MEXICO: Robert Haskett explores myths and realities of what happened after Cortes arrived in Mexico; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 451-3121032 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998, bendfarmers market@gmail.com or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street; www.sistersfarmersmarket.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jarold Ramsey reads from his newest book “Thinking Like a Canyon�; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. “HUGO�: A screening of the PG13-rated 2011 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org.

Deschutes Public Library system is hosting several events in honor of popular author Mitch Albom at Central Oregon libraries. Albom fans are welcome to read and discuss “Tuesdays with Morrie� at the Redmond Public Library at noon today and “Have a Little Faith� at noon today at the Downtown Bend Public Library. On 6 p.m. Saturday, Albom will speak at Bend High School. Tickets are $20-$75. The public is welcome to read and discuss “For One More Day� at noon Tuesday at East Bend Public Library and “Tuesdays with Morrie� at noon Thursday, Sept. 20, at La Pine Public Library. Submitted photo

“RICHARD III�: Thoroughly Modern Productions and Stage Right Productions present Shakespeare’s play about the controversial English king; $18, $15 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com. “THE PRODUCERS�: Cat Call Productions presents the musical satire about two people who set out to produce the worst show in Broadway history; $30 or $35; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. SHADOWS ON STARS: The musical duo performs, with Cadence; $5; 8:30 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-389-6999.

SATURDAY WESTERN AND ANTIQUE AUCTION: Event includes a sale of Western collectibles and live and internet auctions; free; Auction at 4:30 p.m. on Sept. 14, 9 a.m. Sept. 15; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-815-6115 or www .auctioneer-4u.net. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643 or prinevillefarmers market@gmail.com. FALL RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2013 models; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711. ROAD TO RECOVERY: A 5K run/walk, followed by live music; registration required; proceeds benefit National Alliance on Mental Illness; $20 or $30; 9 a.m.; OSUCascades Campus, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-322-3100, apendygraft@telecarecorp.com or http://namicentraloregon.org. YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit church activities; free admission; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Zion Lutheran Church, 1113 S.W. Black Butte Blvd., Redmond; 541-306-8665. BIG RIG CELEBRATION: Children can watch and climb on big rigs and play in the sand with their own toy rigs; proceeds benefit Together for Children; $5 per child, first 100 free; parents free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Knife River Co., 64500 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 541-280-9686 or www.together-for-children.org. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FAIR: Featuring demonstrations for emergency preparations, displays of emergency kits and more; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sisters Elementary School, 611 E. Cascade Ave.; www .sisterscountrypreparedandready.org. END OF SUMMER BASH: Watch race trucks, off-road buggies, mini trophy karts and other vehicles battle each other on the track; $10 adults, free ages 10 and younger; Gates open at 8 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-410-8119 or www .centraloregonracepark.com. FESTIVAL OF CULTURES: With cultural booths, dance troupes, live music, food and more; free; 10 a.m.6 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-382-4366 or www.festivalofcultures.info. LA PINE FALL FESTIVAL: A celebration of fall featuring local bands, a chili cook-off and salsa contest; free; 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-536-2223. MODEL RAILROAD OPEN HOUSE: Ride trains and view a scale railroad layout at the open house hosted by the Eastern Cascades Model Railroad Club and the Central

Oregon Area Live Steamers; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Eastern Cascades Model Railroad Clubhouse, 21520 Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545 or www.ecmrr.org. MUTT STRUT & MORE: Featuring a 1.3-mile dog walk, games, contests and more; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Central Oregon. Online registration; free, $20 for walk; 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-382-3537 or www.hsco.org. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Free; 10 a.m.2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; 541-382-1662, valerie@brooksresources.com or www.nwxfarmersmarket.com. SENSATIONAL SATURDAY: Learn how bison altered the High Desert landscape and became cultural icons throughout the West; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. SISTERS FALL STREET FESTIVAL: Arts and crafts fair with silent auction benefiting the Sisters High School art department; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-420-0279 or centraloregonshows@gmail.com. UNDER PRESSURE: Watch artists use road equipment to make art prints; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759 or www.atelier6000.org. VFW DINNER AND DANCE: Open to everyone. Music will be provided by the “Bob and Edi�. Dinner includes spaghetti with homemade meat sauce, salad, garlic bread and dessert. Proceeds benefit the Ladies Auxiliary to the VFW Cancer Aid & Research fund. Reservations recommended; $10, $4-$6 dance; Service begins at 5:30 p.m., music at 7.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-548-4108. AUTHOR! AUTHOR!: Mitch Albom, author of “Tuesdays with Morrie� and “Five People You’ll Meet in Heaven� speaks; $20-$75; 6 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-3121027 or www.dplfoundation.org. “RICHARD III�: Thoroughly Modern Productions and Stage Right Productions present Shakespeare’s play about the controversial English king; $18, $15 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com. “THE PRODUCERS�: Cat Call Productions presents the musical satire about two people who set out to produce the worst show in Broadway history; $30 or $35; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

SUNDAY FALL RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2013 models; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711. ICE CREAM SOCIAL AND GOSPEL MUSIC JUBILEE: An outdoor concert featuring the Mud Springs Gospel Band and Susie McEntire, with free ice cream; free; 10 a.m.6 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-536-2223. MODEL RAILROAD OPEN HOUSE: Ride trains and view a scale railroad layout at the open house hosted by the Eastern Cascades Model Railroad Club and the Central Oregon Area Live Steamers; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Eastern Cascades Model Railroad Clubhouse, 21520 Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545 or www.ecmrr.org.

SISTERS FALL STREET FESTIVAL: Arts and crafts fair with silent auction benefiting the Sisters High School art department; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-420-0279 or central oregonshows@gmail.com. UNDER PRESSURE: Watch artists use road equipment to make art prints; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759 or www.atelier6000.org. ANNIVERSARY STREET PARTY: The radio station KSJJ 102.9 celebrates its 30th anniversary featuring vendor booths, a BBQ and a concert by Rachele Lynae and Countryfield; $5, free for children 12 and younger; Tickets available at 11 a.m.; concert from 2 -7 p.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-617-3215 or www.ksjj1029.com. “RICHARD III�: Thoroughly Modern Productions and Stage Right Productions present Shakespeare’s play about the controversial English king; $18, $15 students and seniors; 3 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com. “THE PRODUCERS�: Cat Call Productions presents the musical satire about two people who set out to produce the worst show in Broadway history; $30 or $35; 4 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

MONDAY “YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN�: A screening of the PG-rated comedy about a young scientist and experiments with reanimation; $9, free with ticket to “The Producers�; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

TUESDAY “THE HISTORY OF MADRAS�: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Steve Lent; free; 10 a.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-317-9553 or www.orgenweb.org/deschutes/ bend-gs. THE LIBRARY BOOK CLUB: Read and discuss “For One More Day� by Mitch Albom; free; noon; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-330-3764 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. BROOKSWOOD PLAZA FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brookswood Meadow Plaza, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541323-3370 or farmersmarket@ brookswoodmeadowplaza.com. “BLAZING SADDLES�: A screening of the R-rated Western film spoof; $9, free with ticket to “The Producers�; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org.

WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. PICKIN’ AND PADDLIN’ MUSIC SERIES: Includes boat demonstrations in the Deschutes River and music by Americana act Polecat; proceeds benefit Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; free; 4-7 p.m. demonstrations, 7-10 p.m. music; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend; 541-317-9407.


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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

B5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


B6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

C D  

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

ORGANIZATIONS

TODAY AMERICAN LEGION MEMBERSHIP MEETING: 7 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-382-1371. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30-7:45 p.m.; IHOP, Bend; 541-593-1656 or 541-480-0222. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

FRIDAY

SUNDAY

BEND KNIT-UP: $2; 10 a.m.-noon; Rosie Bareis Community Campus, Bend; 541-728-0050.

BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688.

BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688.

THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-5 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

MONDAY SATURDAY INTERCAMBIO SPANISH/ENGLISH CONVERSATION GROUP: 9:3011:30 a.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, Redmond; 541-279-7298.

CASCADE CAMERA CLUB: 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; www.cascadecameraclub.org or 541-312-4364. ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR: 7:30 p.m.; Masonic Lodge, Redmond; 541-504-0444.

SWEET ADELINES: 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-447-4756. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7311 or 541-848-7523. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-5 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-382-5337. HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541390-5373 or 541-317-5052. LA PINE CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS: 8-9 a.m.; Gordy’s Truck Stop, La Pine; 541-536-9771.

TUESDAY BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, Prineville; 541-447-7659. CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center; 541-317-9022. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Canasta and cribbage; 9:45 a.m.-2 p.m.; 40

WEDNESDAY BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS: Noon-1 p.m.; The Environmental Center, Bend; 541-610-2308. BEND KNIT-UP: 5:30-8 p.m.;

Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; 541-728-0050. BEND SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-286-5466. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon-1 p.m.; Juniper Golf and Country Club, Redmond; 541-5485935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:05-1 p.m.; Home Federal Bank, Prineville; 541-416-6549. REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTERS: Noon-1 p.m.; Ray’s Food Place, Redmond; 541-410-1758.

Outing

If you go

Continued from B1

Volunteers from the East Cascade Audubon Society and the High Desert Museum will be heading up Green Ridge to watch and count migrating raptors for several days in September. Members of the public are welcome to join them. When: The raptor group will be heading up Green Ridge on Sept. 13, 15, 16, 19, 20, 21 and 27. Volunteers will meet at the Indian Ford Campground, which is located 5.5 miles northwest of Sisters on U.S. Highway 20, at 9 a.m. each day and carpool to the migratory bird viewing site. What to bring: Binoculars, field guides, warm clothing, snacks and a lunch. Volunteers usually stay on the mountain until 5 p.m. each day. For more information, call the High Desert Museum at 541-382-4754.

The viewpoint With a wingspan of 23 to 27 inches, sharp-shinned hawks are some of the smallest birds of prey that fly over Central Oregon during the months of September and October as they migrate south for the winter. Other raptors that have been spotted flying over Green Ridge include bald and golden eagles, kestrels, merlins, peregrine falcons, turkey vultures, Cooper’s hawks and red-tailed hawks. Low said it’s impossible to tell where the birds are coming from and where they’ll end up when they’ve finished their migration. Most of the raptors head south from areas in the Pacific Northwest and Canada to Central or South America, he said. But there are a few birds, like a roughlegged hawk he spotted in October, which spend their summers in the Arctic tundra and spend their winters in the relatively warmer climate of the northern United States. “We only count the birds that pass this position,” Low said. He explained that this way we could tell the migrating raptors — the ones that flew over Green Ridge on their way south — from the locals, or resident raptors that lived in the area and were just out for a quick flight. Low and the other volunteers planned to stay at their viewpoint until 5 p.m. — the Pole Creek Fire started that morning may be affecting the viewpoint because of its smoke — as they gazed through their binoculars and swapped stories about previous hawk-watching trips. But Meryl and I, who between us only had one set of binoculars and a camera lens that wasn’t powerful enough to catch the birds, decided we’d been on top of the ridge long enough after a couple of hours and headed home. We probably would have stuck around much longer had we brought a comfortable chair and some better equipment — and come on a day closer to the migration season’s peak when the raptor counts were much higher. My conversation with Joseph Dane, the development director for HawkWatch International, might also have encouraged us to stay a bit longer.

The count Amanda Wilhelm, of the High Desert Museum, said she counted nine raptors

Trails Continued from B1 Affected trails and recreation areas include Three Creek Lake and nearby campgrounds, Camp Lake, Chambers Lake and the Three Sisters Loop trail, which “has been burned over in some areas,” Sabo said. The PCT was still open as of Monday. For up-to-date fire clo-

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Mac McLean / The Bulletin

Mount Hood sticks out on the horizon in this view from the East Cascade Audubon Society’s hawk watch site on Green Ridge.

— six sharp-shinned hawks, a turkey vulture, a Cooper’s hawk, and an American kestrel — during the time Meryl and I were up on the ridge. She promised we’d see 10 times as many birds later in the month. But she didn’t tell us what happens with the counts once we came down the mountain. Luckily, my conversation with Dane, whose group manages nine official hawk watch sites in the Western United States and collects data from dozens more, filled in the missing pieces. “We’re looking to see if there are any major shifts in raptor populations,” Dane said. HawkWatch International can do this because bird watchers at its official sites — like the one atop Bonney Butte in the Mount Hood National Forest — have been monitoring their raptor populations for at least 10 years and have enough data to tell when something is different. The Green Ridge site has been in operation for about seven years. While it shares information with HawkWatch International, it is not considered an official part of the program. Once they have a steady picture of an area’s rap-

tor population that’s been gleaned by counting birds at HawkWatch’s migration sites and by tracking the ones it has banded with special tags, he said it’s possible to tell when something’s not right and is causing the country’s birds of prey some problems. Significant drops in the bald eagle and peregrine falcon counts HawkWatch International monitored in the late 1970s and the early 1980s helped the organization track the effect of pesticides on bird populations. The counts are currently being used to discover how cheatgrass, an invasive species, is affecting raptor populations in the West and to determine where wind farms should not be located. “There’s a lot of work to be done,” he said. “American kestrel populations are dropping and we still haven’t figured out why.” Knowing that I was part of this work and, in some limited fashion, helping to solve the mystery surrounding the American kestrel, a species of falcon with a wingspan of only 20 to 24 inches, probably would have convinced me to stay on top of that ridge a little bit longer.

sures and conditions, check InciWeb: http://inciweb.org/ incident/3244/. In the Mount Jefferson Wilderness area, trail conditions have been consistent over the past few months. The Jefferson Lake, Sugarpine Ridge, Brush Creek and Mento Lake trails are still blocked by overgrown brush and a high number of fallen trees due to fire impacts, and should be considered im-

passable and inadvisable for any level of recreationist. Trail users should be aware that there are some bow hunting seasons in effect and they may see some hunter activity. Youth crews will be working along the Metolius River late in the September, finishing the last of seven new bridges in that area. The trails will remain open.

— Reporter: 541-617-7816, mmclean@bendbulletin.com

— Lydia Hoffman, The Bulletin

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LOCALNEWS

News of Record, C2 Editorials, C4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/local

LOCAL BRIEFING

Sisters air quality hits hazard level again Get emergency notifications Deschutes County residents can sign up to receive emergency notifications through their cellphones. Last year, the Deschutes County Citizen Emergency Notification System acquired the ability to use cellphones to alert the public during a natural disaster or other emergency. Residents who sign up for the service receive an automated call, email or text message should Deschutes County 911 decide a threat to public safety warrants widespread notification. Until last year, the county’s system could only make automated calls to land line phones. For more information or to sign up for the service, visit www.des chutes.org/citizenalerts or call the Deschutes County 911 business line at 541-388-0185.

Smoke from the Pole Creek Fire burning near Sisters caused air quality in the town the past two mornings to reach conditions deemed hazardous by the state.

MICRONS PER CUBIC METER OF POLLUTANT PM2.5

Sisters residents face continued air hazard By Dylan J. Darling

250

Hazardous

Very unhealthy 120 94.2 Unhealthy 40 Unhealthy for sensitive groups 20 MIDNIGHT MIDNIGHT MIDNIGHT SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY

MIDNIGHT WEDNESDAY

Source: Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

The Bulletin

Inside

Smoke poured into Sisters early Wednesday morning, again dropping air quality to levels the state considers hazardous. A similar increase in smoke pollution sullied the morning air Tuesday and is likely to continue as long as the weather stays the same and the Pole Creek Fire continues to burn. Early Tuesday and

• Fire at popular Phil’s trailhead quickly extinguished, C6

early Wednesday the amount of smoke in Sisters was more than twice what the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality deems unhealthy. “This is extremely higher than we normally see from wildfire impacts,� said Mark

FALLEN TREE CLEANUP BEGINS

— Bulletin staff reports

STATE NEWS

Jobless benefit rules are uncertain By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

V

olunteers worked over the weekend to help remove branches from a large willow tree, located behind homes on

the 500 block of Northwest Riverfront Street,

• Portland

that fell into the Deschutes River last month. At right, the tree is pictured last month, shortly af-

• Eugene

ter it had fallen into the river.

• Talent

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

• Portland: City Council votes to begin water fluoridation. • Eugene: Lane County considers broad smoking bans. • Talent: Bath salts implicated in man’s death. Stories on C3

FIRE UPDATE Reported for Central and Eastern Oregon. For the latest information, visit www.nwccweb .us/information/ firemap.aspx. Bend

Bailey, eastern region air quality manager for the DEQ. “This is very high and very concerning for us.� The readings are likely so high because of the proximity of the fire, six miles southwest of Sisters, and the weather. Cold mornings have caused inversions, which push smoke down rather than up. The town is downhill of the fire so smoke collects there. See Air / C5

SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS

Paper-shredding service offered The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office will shred unwanted documents in Terrebonne on Saturday. There is no cost to the public for up to four medium-sized boxes of personal documents. The shredding will be done from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the sheriff’s substation, 8154 11th St., Suite 3. The service is not for business disposal. A deputy will also be available to collect outdated or unwanted prescription medication. Participants are asked to bring a donation of nonperishable food to benefit Terrebonne food banks.

C

Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

Deschutes County settles discrimination suit for $70K By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Deschutes County has paid $70,000 to a former jail employee who alleged she was discriminated against during her two-year tenure as a corrections nurse.

Dora Rivera Murillo filed a federal complaint against the county and the county Sheriff’s Office in June 2011. She alleged she was demeaned and humiliated in front of co-workers, held to a different standard of conduct than

her co-workers and denied overtime pay for hours she worked. Murillo, who is Hispanic, also alleged she was referred to as the “brown� or “Indian nurse� and was at least once physically assaulted by a

co-worker, who hit her with a chair. She said when she complained about the mistreatment she was retaliated against. In November 2010 Murillo resigned. See Settlement / C5

SALEM — If you’re a substitute teacher in Central Oregon, you may be eligible for unemployment benefits. Or you may not be. Of the 500 substitutes employed by the High Desert Education Service District, about 120 have at one time received unemployment benefits, Superintendent John Rexford said. The tab for those benefits totaled $30,000 last year and more than $100,000 the year before. The problem is that no one seems to know which substitutes qualify for unemployment benefits and when. Rexford, who supplies substitutes to Central Oregon school districts, has enlisted the help of Rep. John Huffman, R-The Dalles, with the hope of clearing up the uncertainty with legislation in 2013. “We just want to get it clarified,� Rexford said. Craig Spivey, spokesman for the state Employment Department, said most of the laws dictating who receives unemployment benefits are federal, meaning they can’t be changed at the state level. Spivey understands, however, that certainty could be helpful. “It does make a lot of sense that the ESDs would want to put in some clarification,� Spivey said. See Subs / C5 PAID ADVERTISEMENT

FEMA pays some money Deschutes claims it’s owed

1 2

Baker City Burns

Madras Bend

3

MILES 0

50

Lakeview 1. Waterfalls 2 Fire • Acres: 12,265 • Containment: 90% • Cause: Lightning 2. Pole Creek Fire • Acres: 4,336 • Containment: 5% • Cause: Under investigation 3. Parish Cabin Fire • Acres: 6,481 • Containment: 97% • Cause: Human

By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

The first of two fire suppression grant payments disputed by Deschutes County and the Federal Emergency Management Agency is nearly settled. But the second grant, where a more substantial sum is up for debate, requires further discussion. The county says it will receive an outstanding $4,705 payment from FEMA for a grant issued in 2008. The grant paid for fire suppression across the county, but payouts were disputed in 2010 when FEMA claimed some work to clear brush was completed outside of preapproved zones. The county succeeded in

FEMA grants Federal Emergency Management Agency wildfire prevention grants awarded in Central Oregon: 2007: $1.3 million to Deschutes and Crook counties. 2008: $1.1 million to Deschutes and Crook counties. 2010: $3.9 million to Crook, Deschutes and Klamath counties.

proving those zones would have been approved regardless, and now expects to be paid the disputed $4,705. The Oregon Office of

Emergency Management, which helps administer the federal funds, agrees the county met the guidelines for work but says FEMA must still approve the final payment. “FEMA has to review what we said in the letter we sent them to officially close out the grant,� said Dennis Sigrist, state hazard mitigation officer for Oregon Emergency Management. “But the notion is that Deschutes County has validated all their information ... and all that was validated and certified by FEMA.� Sigrist said he doesn’t have a time frame for when FEMA will finalize the payment. See FEMA / C5

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

Well shot! READER PHOTOS We asked for your cutest back-toschool shots. Here is a sampling:

To see the entire gallery of your back-to-school photos, go to www.bendbulletin.com/back2schoolpics

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 11:06 p.m. Sept. 1, in the 21200 block of Starlight Drive. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 10:31 a.m. Aug. 31, in the 100 block of Northwest Oregon Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:30 p.m. Sept. 6, in the 2700 block of Northeast 27th Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:53 p.m. Sept. 6, in the 3600 block of North U.S. Highway 97.

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:28 p.m. Sept. 7, in the 20700 block of High Desert Lane. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:39 p.m. Sept. 9, in the 800 block of Northeast Sixth Street. DUII — Kay Leigha Brown, 44, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:28 p.m. Sept. 9, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 and Southeast 15th Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:52 a.m. Sept. 10, in the 2300 block of Northwest Todds Crest Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:10 a.m. Sept. 10, in the 1100 block of Northwest Kingston Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:40 a.m. Sept. 10, in the 61300 block of Southeast Mount Vista Drive.

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:03 p.m. Sept. 10, in the 600 block of Northwest Harriman Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 1:45 p.m. Sept. 10, in the 2300 block of Northwest Todds Crest Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:11 p.m. Sept. 9, in the 700 block of Northwest Columbia Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:17 p.m. Sept. 4, in the 3100 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 3:17 p.m. Sept. 4, in the 300 block of Northeast Second Street.

Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 6:55 p.m. Sept. 5, in the 61500 block of South U.S. Highway 97.

8:43 p.m. Sept. 10, in the 900 block of Northeast Butler Market Road.

Theft — A theft was reported at 7:11 a.m. Sept. 7, in the 400 block of Northeast Emerson Avenue.

Burglary — A burglary was reported and an arrest made at 2:29 a.m. Sept. 11, in the area of Southwest Meadowlakes Drive. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:13 a.m. Sept. 11, in the area of Northeast Third Street.

Theft — A theft was reported at 9:28 p.m. Sept. 10, in the 1300 block of Northwest Wall Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9 a.m. Sept. 11, in the 20500 block of Jacklight Lane. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:17 a.m. Sept. 11, in the 800 block of Southeast Woodland Boulevard. Theft — A theft was reported at

Prineville Police Department

BEND FIRE RUNS Tuesday 5:28 a.m. — Natural vegetation fire, 1180 S.E. Third St. 7:24 a.m. — Smoke odor reported, Butler Market Road.

11:23 a.m. — Natural vegetation fire, 1551 N.W. Newport Ave. 13 — Medical aid calls.

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

C3

O N Portland approves fluoridation; Lane County opponents vow to keep up fight considers broad By Steven DuBois The Associated Press

PORTLAND — The City Council approved a plan Wednesday to add fluoride to Portland’s water, meaning Oregon’s biggest city is no longer the largest holdout in the U.S. The ordinance calls for city water to be fluoridated by March 2014. Dental experts say fluoride is effective in fighting cavities. Opponents of public fluoridation say it’s unsafe and violates an individual’s right to consent to medication. “Reasonable people can disagree, but the science is on the side of fluoridation,” Mayor Sam Adams said after the unanimous vote. Opponents also say council members rushed into action without a public vote. They plan to collect almost 20,000 signatures in the next 30 days to force a referendum early next year — before the mineral is added to a water supply that serves about 900,000 people in Portland and a few suburbs. “There is no question that we are going to need a lot of financial and volunteer support to make this happen, but we are seeing a major backlash to how the City Council has handled this,” said Kim Kaminski, executive director of Oregon Citizens for Safe Drinking Water. Public fluoridation remains an emotional topic in many parts of the country. The issue arose in Phoenix this week when a public stir prompted re-examination of a policy in place since 1989. After a contentious hearing Tuesday, council members voted to continue adding fluoride to the water in the nation’s sixthlargest city. Wichita, Kan., residents will vote in November whether to add fluoride to the city’s water supply. Portland’s drinking water already contains naturally occurring fluoride, though not at levels considered to be effective at fighting cavities. Voters in Portland twice rejected fluoridation before ap-

Don Ryan / The Associated Press

Angel Lambart holds her daughter, Gwendolyn, 18 months, as she gives a thumbs down Wednesday during a City Council vote on whether to add fluoride to city water in Portland. The City Council approved a plan Wednesday to add fluoride to Portland’s water, meaning Oregon’s biggest city is no longer the largest holdout in the U.S.

proving it in 1978. That plan was overturned before any fluoride was ever added to the water. Before announcing his vote, Commissioner Randy Leonard said the passion from both sides showed why previous councils sidestepped the matter: “This issue is not for the faint of heart.” Dozens of opponents turned out for the vote that went as expected. They booed, hissed and held signs that said “Public water, public vote.” When it became apparent that commissioners would indeed approve the ordinance, they stood with their backs turned. Regina LaRocca, who had her back turned, said the

“money and power” on the side of fluoridation was difficult to overcome, but commissioners might have altered their votes had more people flooded City Hall. “I’m disappointed in the people of Portland, and their apathy,” she said. Last week, 227 people — most of them opponents — signed up to testify at a public hearing that lasted 6 1⁄2 hours. Commissioners said now is the time to act because Portland children have more dental problems than kids from neighboring states that fluoridate, and adding the mineral to the water is the most safe, effective and affordable way

to address it. Seventy-three percent of the U.S. population drinks water treated with fluoride — more than three times the rate in Oregon. Fluoride opponents contend the dental benefits of fluoride are small and don’t outweigh the cons. Several pointed to a recent study by researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health, which appeared in Environmental Health Perspectives. It showed that Chinese children who had high levels of naturally occurring fluoride in their drinking water had lower IQs than those who lived in villages with less fluoride in their water. “These people are putting their children’s teeth above their children’s brains, and that’s ridiculous,” said Paul Connett, author of the book “The Case Against Fluoride,” who traveled to the meeting from New York. Residents with thyroid issues, kidney disease and multiple chemical sensitivity worry fluoridation will make their lives worse. Others are concerned it can cause cancer, autism and other problems. Commissioners counter that more than 200 million Americans drink water with added fluoride, and it doesn’t appear to have caused great harm. Moreover, it is endorsed by most health organizations, including the American Medical Association and Centers for Disease Control. Fluoride supporters and opponents agreed that fluoridation alone won’t solve Portland’s dental problems. They say parents must stress proper hygiene and stop giving their children drinks loaded with sugar. But the commissioners say fluoridation will at least give children, particularly those from families without money or education, some protection against tooth decay. “A 3-year-old child can’t be expected to take responsibility for their dental care,” Commissioner Dan Saltzman said, to which a frustrated member of the audience shouted: “Their parents can.”

Bath salts implicated in Talent man’s death By Chris Conrad Mail Tribune, Medford

TALENT — The Talent man who died after a violent struggle with police last week might have used the dangerous drug “bath salts” hours before his death, according to family members. The father of Christoph LaDue Jr., 23, said a baggie that contained bath salts was found in his home, suggesting LaDue had smoked the drug before his deadly encounter with police. “If he hadn’t have used that stuff, he would be alive today,” said an emotional Christoph LaDue Sr. “This bath salts stuff killed my boy.” Jackson County sheriff’s detectives did not return calls seeking comment. Police normally won’t divulge details of a case until after an investigation is completed. However, LaDue is convinced his son had used bath salts because his behavior that day was very much out of character. Police were called to LaDue’s home on Wagner Creek Road after a neighbor said he ran to the home and tried to enter. LaDue Sr. said his son did not mean any harm to the neighbor but was trying to seek help after experiencing the effects of the bath salts. “He kept screaming, ‘Dad, I’m on fire, Dad, I’m on fire,’ ” LaDue Sr. said. “He wasn’t trying to break into someone’s house to cause harm. He was a gentle soul.” The family struggled with LaDue before he broke free and ran to the neighbor’s house.

“... This is the classic description of what happens when someone does bath salts. You have the elevated temperature ... the violence. This is what we are seeing across the country.” — Dr. James Hammel, psychiatrist

Police arrived and battled with LaDue, using Tasers that seemed to have no effect. Finally, the officers fought LaDue to the ground and were able to handcuff him. Ladue’s heart stopped shortly afterward. Nearby medical personnel, who had come to the initial call for help and had been standing by, immediately attempted to resuscitate Ladue before transporting him to Rogue Regional Medical Center. He died an hour later. LaDue suffered from schizophrenia but had no history of violence, his father said. “He was a good kid and was doing so well,” LaDue Sr. said. “He was going to (Rogue Community College) and playing drums in a band.” LaDue did not understand his son’s bizarre behavior that day, at least not until the empty bath salts package was discovered. Bath salts are a type of designer drug created by backalley chemists and marketed to young people. The drug is a stimulant in the manner of methamphetamine, but also has the euphoric, hallucinogenic effects of Ecstasy. The drug can be smoked, snorted or injected. It has been known to cause severe agitation, paranoia, chest pains, suicidal thoughts and actions, and violence, and could lead to permanent brain damage.

The Oregon Pharmacy Board declared bath salts an illegal drug last April. The bath salts label is a marketing ploy to make the drug seem harmless. Hammel said the drug is easy to obtain on the Internet and that parents who find a package of it in their kids’ bedroom might be duped into thinking it’s harmless. Dr. James Hammel, a psychiatrist who graduated from Harvard Medical School, has seen the devastating effects of bath salts in a number of patients in recent years. Hammel said he has treated a steady flow of bath salts users since he arrived in the Rogue Valley last year. He said LaDue’s condition was common among bath salts patients. “I didn’t treat (LaDue), but this is the classic description of what happens when someone does bath salts,” Hammel said. “You have the elevated tem-

perature ... the violence. This is what we are seeing across the country.” A man admitted to Rogue Regional Medical Center who was believed to be under the influence of bath salts barricaded himself in a third-floor room and injured a police officer during an epic struggle earlier this year. Local police have said that bath salts users have abnormally high pain tolerance, making Tasers ineffective. They also have shown higherthan-average strength and overall bizarre behavior. Hammel said he has seen the drug raise someone’s body temperature to 107.5 degrees Fahrenheit, which is deadly. “This drug is going to be a problem in our community for years to come,” Hammel said. “It’s something we are going to struggle with.” LaDue Sr. is hoping an autopsy and a toxicology report scheduled on his son will provide some answers. Until then, the family has to face a new life without the young man. “We need to make sure no one else get a hold of this stuff,” LaDue said.

smoking bans The Associated Press EUGENE — Public health officials in Lane County are talking about broadening smoking bans on county property, including its 4,600 acres of parks, campgrounds and other recreation facilities. County officials acknowledged it would be hard to bar smoking in parks but said it’s in tune with other efforts to reduce tobacco use. “It is something that we are committed to,” said Jason Davis, a spokesman for the county health agency. It would be up to the county commission to approve any restrictions. The county has 73 parks and other recreation facilities. Among the heavily used open spaces is Wayne Morse Free Speech Plaza at its administration building in downtown Eugene. State law already bans smoking in enclosed workplaces statewide and within 10 feet of entrances, exits or windows of workplaces. Recent proposals have sought to broaden that area. The University of Oregon has banned smoking on its campus and other properties, including sports venues, starting Sept. 1. Lane Community College bans smok-

ing on campus except in two small designated areas in parking lots. Last month, Gov. John Kitzhaber issued an executive order banning tobacco use on all property surrounding state buildings. That ban currently doesn’t apply to college campuses or to places meant for the public, such as state parks. However, Kitzhaber is asking governing boards to ban or restrict tobacco in those places, too. In Lane County, nearly 17 percent of adults smoke; as do 15 percent of 11th-graders and 8 percent of eighth-graders. Health agency director Alicia Hays said the county already is moving toward smoke-free facilities and the intention is to expand that to all county properties. The agency is meeting with the public and the county staff to figure out how a tobacco ban should be implemented rather than whether it should happen, she said. “There’s a lot going on around tobacco-free. This is a chance for our community to come together and hear why and have discussions and voice their opinion,” she said. “We’re just one of many entities moving forward with this.”

O  B 

ijuana will be confiscated. Suspect sought in The Dalles killing Judge rules couple THE DALLES — Au- built pool in wetland thorities have identified a suspect in the slaying of a man in The Dalles. Police Chief Jay Waterbury said Wednesday an arrest warrant has been issued for 20-year-old Carlos Medina — the lone suspect in the death of Mark Labonte. The men reportedly got into a fight late Sunday in a Fred Meyer parking lot. Labonte was flown to a Portland hospital after the altercation and died early Monday.

Officers conduct medical pot raid VALE — Police in Eastern Oregon and Idaho say they’ve conducted 11 raids in an investigation of the misuse of Oregon’s medical marijuana law. The Ontario Argus-Observer reported that no arrests were made, and Malheur County Sheriff Brian Wolfe said none are expected this week. He said a substantial amount of mar-

WEST LINN — A threeyear battle over a swimming pool in the backyard of a West Linn home has ended with a municipal court judge ruling that the homeowners built the pool in a wetland without a permit. The next step is for the city and Troy and Gina Bundy to decide whether they have to remove the 1,100-square-foot pool and whether they will have to pay a fine of as much as $360,000. A judge may decide the matter at a Sept. 20 hearing. — From wire reports

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

E Test scores are hard to evaluate

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The Bulletin

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hanging standards make it difficult to make sense of the latest Oregon student achievement scores, which were released this week.

For 2011-12, the state raised benchmarks for elementary and middle school reading and science. The previous year, it had raised the benchmarks for math. Students who score above the benchmarks have met the standards, and those who score below have not. The state had good reason to set more rigorous standards, having determined that the benchmarks were set too low to align with national and international expectations. Those changes, as well as additional graduation requirements, move Oregon in the right direction. An unfortunate result, however, is that parents and other taxpayers, as well as educators themselves, struggle to make sense of applesto-oranges comparisons. For example, a simple comparison of the statewide percentage of third-graders who met reading standards appears to show a drop to 70 percent last year from 83 percent in the previous year. In fact, there was a 10 percent gain if both sets of scores are rated against the same benchmark. In eighth-grade science, there’s really a 1 percent drop, although it appears to be a 5 percent drop. To see progress over time, the results have to be recalculated so

they can be compared. Those recalculations show plenty of progress, especially in reading, but also areas of weakness, particularly in science. The new standards, sadly, reveal that Oregon students have a long way to go: Only 63 percent of all students are meeting math standards, 66 percent in science and 72 percent in reading. Some local results are stronger. For instance, Bend-La Pine’s overall pass rates are higher than the state’s by 9 percent in math, 9.6 percent in reading, 8.1 percent in science and 7.1 percent in writing. But that still leaves nearly 30 percent not meeting benchmarks in math, nearly 20 percent in reading, and roughly 25 percent in science and writing. In addition to raising its testing benchmarks, Oregon is one of 45 states to adopt Common Core State Standards. Districts are in the process of implementing that curriculum, based on national expectations aligned with international standards. New tests, called the Smarter Balanced Assessment, are expected to replace the current state tests by spring 2015. They offer the hope of tests that can be compared across time and across the nation, allowing a better evaluation of student progress.

Gill-net compromise makes ‘no’ an easy vote

O

ne item Oregonians will see on their general election ballots next month is Ballot Measure 81, which would ban commercial gill-net fishing on the Oregon side of the Columbia River. Supporters of the measure said this week they will quit fighting for its passage, opting instead for a compromise proposal put forward by Gov. John Kitzhaber. The compromise helps make a “no� vote on 81 an easy choice. Gill netting as practiced in Oregon waters is not the barbaric practice opponents say it is. The state regulates every aspect of it, from net size to the amount of time nets may stay in the water to requiring training for commercial gill netters. Commercial seasons can run hours, not days, when runs are low. In fact, Indian tribes that have fishing rights along the Columbia oppose the ban, noting, correctly, that it would simply mean recreational, not commercial, fishermen would catch the same fish. About 200 commercial fishermen work gill nets on the Columbia. Kitzhaber’s proposal, meanwhile, would limit gill-net fishing

to side channels of the Columbia. It would have to be approved by the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission and would not prohibit gill-net fishing on the Washington side of the river. Kitzhaber has said he hopes to persuade Washingtonians to adopt a matching policy for that state’s side of the river. We don’t believe that managing natural resources by ballot box is the best way to go about such things, for it puts emotion, not reason or science, in control of the decision-making. Kitzhaber’s proposed compromise may not be perfect, but it does allow ODFW to exercise its best informed judgment on the matter. Meanwhile, Kitzhaber’s proposal includes a bone to commercial fishermen in the form of increased hatchery production of salmon to replace those unavailable because of the ban. Commercial fishermen remain leery of the state’s ability to supply enough fish to accomplish that, but it surely is worth a try. It’s a better approach by far than the outright ban on commercial gill netting Measure 81 would require.

My Nickel’s Worth How are we spending our money? For some time now I have been interested in how and where we (USA) are spending our money. So I write to suggest that on a regular basis, once a month, you report to readers how much we are giving to other countries and, if known, what the money is being paid for. I recall hearing a snatch of story now and then reporting that our president or our secretary of state has visited such and such a country and has promised several millions or some huge amount to that country. I should like to see a list of all countries we are giving dollars to. I want it to appear regularly so we can count on finding it and also to impress on the minds of Americans what we are doing in the world. When a disaster occurs, such as a tsunami, I am aware that our Navy is on the scene far ahead of all others to help. This is just one of many places we step in, and I would like to see the cost estimate for these things. Perhaps a spot in world news, on the 15th of the month. It would also be appropriate to list the names of any and all countries where we have servicemen and women and a reminder of how long they have been there. I want to know what part of our government approves of these expenditures and the amounts. Is it all approved by the House of Representatives? Bonnie Brownfield Bend

Religious beliefs don’t belong in closet I feel compelled to respond to recent

letters found in My Nickel’s Worth. I find it to be a disconcerting thought that, according to David Smullin’s letter on July 26, religion is something to be hidden in order for “all to get along well.� Or, as stated by Sherry Cupp on Aug. 28, that because a person chooses to exercise and exhibit his or her belief, that it is perceived as being “forced on others,� and most recently Ethan Singer’s Aug. 29 letter to “save God and prayer for church teams.� There seems to be a misconception that Christianity is something to be pulled out of one’s closet and donned only for a couple of hours on Sunday. Speaking for myself, it is who I am in all areas of life: wife, mother, worker, citizen. I could no more separate myself from being a Christian than I could from being a woman. Of course there are societies that believe that is something to be hidden as well. Thankfully, in this country, I still have the freedom to outwardly be both. Crystal Byrnes Bend

Businesses, taxpayers provide infrastructure In commenting on Keith Feilzer’s Sept. 2 exception to what he says is a noncontextual presentation of Obama’s “you didn’t build that� quote: Oh, yes, conservatives got it perfectly right. Obama’s beliefs obviously demonstrate that he assumes that government made the infrastructure possible for business people to succeed. No, it was the business people and all state and federal taxpayers who made it possible for infrastructure to be built. In many instances businesses demanded that infrastructure come to them. Our government survives because

business and taxpayers support it, not the other way around. Thama Koury Bend

False attack by Brown about voting On Aug. 30, Secretary of State Kate Brown posted a false attack online and to her supporters, stating, “Knute Buehler supports the movement to restrict ballot access that is gaining momentum in states across the country. If Buehler wins, he will support efforts that make it harder for citizens to exercise their right to vote.� Seems Kate Brown has once again lowered herself to make false and baseless claims to fire up her base, and distract voters from the real issues Oregonians care about. If there is one candidate in this race who has worked hard to include more voters in the election process, it’s Buehler. He has worked on ballot measures to grant greater access to Independents, unaffiliated voters and minor parties in Oregon’s primary elections. Furthermore, this past spring, Buehler helped persuade the Republican Party to allow nonaffiliates to vote in the primary. Brown responded by refusing to send them Republican ballots, and forcing qualified voters to jump through more hoops to actually get a ballot. Disenfranchised voters anyone? As we all know, actions speak louder than words. Buehler is the Republican and Independent Party nominee for Oregon secretary of state, and this is his first run for public office. Please support him this November to help get Oregon working again. Kaye Williams Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Are men failing to adapt to succeed in new economy?

Y

ou’re probably aware of the basic trends. The financial rewards to education have increased over the past few decades, but men failed to get the memo. In elementary and high school, male academic performance is lagging. Boys earn three-quarters of the D’s and F’s. By college, men are clearly behind. Only 40 percent of bachelor’s degrees go to men, along with 40 percent of master’s degrees. Thanks to their lower skills, men are dropping out of the labor force. In 1954, 96 percent of the American men between the ages of 25 and 54 worked. Today, that number is down to 80 percent. Male labor force participation has reached an all-time low. Millions of men are collecting disability. Even many of those who do have a job are doing poorly. According to Michael Greenstone of the Hamilton Project, annual earnings for median prime-age males have dropped by 28 percent over the past 40 years. Men still dominate the tippy-top of

the corporate ladder because many women take time off to raise children, but women lead or are gaining nearly everywhere else. Women in their 20s outearn men in their 20s. Twelve out of the 15 fastest-growing professions are dominated by women. Over the years, many of us have embraced a certain theory to explain men’s economic decline. It is that the information-age economy rewards traits that, for neurological and cultural reasons, women are more likely to possess. To succeed today, you have to be able to sit still and focus attention in school at an early age. You have to be emotionally sensitive and aware of context. You have to communicate smoothly. For genetic and cultural reasons, many men stink at these tasks. But, in her fascinating new book, “The End of Men,� Hanna Rosin posits a different theory. It has to do with adaptability. Women, Rosin argues, are like immigrants who have moved to a new country. They see a new social context, and they flexibly adapt to

DAVID BROOKS new circumstances. Men are like immigrants who have physically moved to a new country but who have kept their minds in the old one. They speak the old language. They follow the old mores. Men are more likely to be rigid; women are more fluid. This theory has less to do with innate traits and more to do with social position. When there’s big social change, the people who were on the top of the old order are bound to cling to the old ways. The people who were on the bottom are bound to experience a burst of energy. They’re going to explore their new surroundings more enthusiastically. Rosin reports from working-class Alabama. The women she meets are flooding into new jobs and new opportunities. The men are waiting around

for the jobs that left and are never coming back. They are strangely immune to new options. In the AuburnOpelika region, the median female income is 140 percent of the median male income. Rosin also reports from college campuses where women are pioneering new social arrangements. The usual story is that men are exploiting the new campus hookup culture in order to get plenty of sex without romantic commitments. Rosin argues that, in fact, women support the hookup culture. It allows them to have sex and fun without any time-consuming distractions from their careers. Rosin is not saying that women are winners in a global gender war or that they are doing super simply because men are doing worse. She’s just saying women are adapting to today’s economy more flexibly and resiliently than men. A study by the National Federation of Independent Business found that small businesses owned by women

outperformed male-owned small business during the last recession. In finance, women who switch firms are more likely to see their performance improve, whereas men are more likely to see theirs decline. There’s even evidence that women are better able to adjust to divorce. Today, more women than men see their incomes rise by 25 percent after a marital breakup. Forty years ago, men and women adhered to certain ideologies, what it meant to be a man or a woman. Young women today, Rosin argues, are more like clean slates, having abandoned both feminist and prefeminist preconceptions. Men still adhere to the masculinity rules, which limits their vision and their movement. If she’s right, then men will have to be less like Achilles, imposing their will on the world, and more like Odysseus, the crafty, many-sided sojourner. They’ll have to acknowledge that they are strangers in a strange land. — David Brooks is a columnist for The New York Times.


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

O D N  D. Clare Hyde Feb. 14, 1921 - Aug. 22, 2012

Alice Louraine Banta, of Bend Nov. 2, 1933 - Sept. 9, 2012 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: A memorial service will be held Sunday, Sept. 16, 2012 at 3:00 PM in the Nativity Lutheran Church at 27th (Knott) and Brosterhaus Rd., Bend.

Allen Dewayne Zufelt, of Bend Jan. 8, 1929 - Sept. 9, 2012 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541)382-5592;

www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: 10:00 AM, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012 Graveside with Military Honors at Deschutes Memorial Gardens, 63875 N. Hwy 97, Bend. Visitation: Thursday, 2-5 PM & 8 to 9:30 AM. Contributions may be made to:

Partners-In-Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

Donald Brent Smith, of Chemult Sept. 15, 1959 - Sept. 4, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Memorial Service in Utah will take place at a later date.

Estelene Stigall Gray, of Bend Jan. 20, 1931 - Sept. 8, 2012 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: A private graveside service will be held at Pilot Butte Cemetery in Bend, Oregon. Contributions may be made to:

Humane Society of Central Oregon, 61170 SE 27th Street, Bend, Oregon 97702, www.hsco.org or Salvation Army, 755 NE 2nd Street, Bend, Oregon 97701, www.salvationarmybendorego n.org

Lydia Stella MacFarlane, of Bend Jan. 5, 1920 - Sept. 10, 2012 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: No services will be held per the family's request.

Peter A. Ross, of Mitchell Sept. 24, 1937 - Sept. 7, 2012 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: A Memorial service will be held on Saturday, October 6, 2012 at 11:00 a.m., at the Assembly of God Church in Mitchell, Oregon. Contributions may be made to:

American Heart Association at PO Box 742030 Los Angeles CA 90074-2030. (800) 242-8721 or www.heart.org/donate or the American Diabetes Association at 4380 Southwest Macadam Avenue, Portland, OR 97239 or (888) 342-2383 / www.diabetes.org

Verda Dianne BlakeChrysler, of Bend Nov. 8, 1944 - Aug. 24, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: A Memorial Service will be held at a later date.

Clare passed away in Mesa, AZ. He was born in Scio, OR, to J. Blanche Wilson and Carl C. Hyde. Clare was a proud veteran of the Army Air Corps in WWII in which he flew many missions. Following his service years, he attended college to become a veterinarian. He practiced many years in Oregon City, before retiring to Arizona. Survivors are a sister, Emmalene Quigley of Shoreline, WA; step-sisters, Leona Osmundson of Yuma, AZ, Marjorie Rouse and Doris Hassler of Redmond, OR; and several nieces and nephews. His son, Kevin; and wife, Sybil Marion, preceded him in death. An error appeared in the

original obituary published for Mr. Hyde, on Wed., September 12. The corrected version appears today. The Bulletin regrets the error.

Gwendolyn J. Stillwell Feb. 8, 1931 - Sept. 9, 2012 Gwen Stillwell of Whidbey Island, Washington, died September 9, 2012. She was 81. She lived in Prineville, Oregon, from August 1956 until August 2011, When failing health forced her to relocate to be closer to Gwen Stillwell her son. Born February 8, 1931, in Englewood, Tennessee, she was the daughter of Starling Avery and Bessie Lee (Conner) Raper. She graduated from Englewood High School in 1949, and enrolled at Berea College in Berea, Kentucky. After graduating from Berea in 1953, she became a fellow in an innovative teaching program at George Peabody College for Teachers and Vanderbilt University. The program was one of 39 funded by the Ford Foundation Fund for Advancement of Education in the years between the end of World War II and the beginning of the space race. She completed her student teaching in Nashville public schools and earned a joint master's degree in 1954. In 1954-1955, she taught at Waterford Township High School in Pontiac, Michigan. She came to Oregon in August 1955, to teach seventh-grade social studies at Prineville Junior High School. She soon met Ben Stillwell, who taught industrial arts at Crook County High School in Prineville. They married on August 11, 1956, and began building their own home. She taught at PJHS until the birth of her first child in 1960. She was a stay-at-home mom until 1975, when she began work as a library assistant at Crook County Library. A voracious reader, she particularly enjoyed matching books to other eager readers. She worked at the library until 1982. After Ben died in 1990, she became a doting granny to four grandchildren. Survivors include her son, Bret Stillwell of Whidbey Island, Washington; daughter, Martha Anderson of Oregon; sister, Martha Lowe of Florida; grandchildren, Sam, Savannah, Avery and Alice; three nephews and three nieces. Memorial contributions may be made to The Berea Fund, Berea College, CPO 2216, Berea, KY 40404 or to Friends of the Crook County Library, PO Box 861, Prineville, OR 97754. Arrangements by Burley Funeral Chapel, Oak Harbor, Washington.

D E 

 Deaths of note from around the world: Dr. Thomas Szasz, 92: Leader of anti-psychiatry movement who was himself a psychiatrist and the author of “The Myth of Mental Ill-

ness� in 1962. Died Saturday in Manlius, N.Y. Gaeton Fonzi, 76: Relentless investigator of the Kennedy assassination. Died Aug. 30 in Florida. — From wire reports

WEST NEWS

Air

Fewer trees dying from pine beetles

Continued from C1 Looking at weather predictions stretching into next week, National Weather Service forecaster Alan Polan said the cycle of morning inversions will keep repeating. “I don’t see much in the way of relief,� he said. The Pole Creek Fire will likely keep putting off smoke for awhile, said Katie Lighthall, spokeswoman for the interagency team managing the fire. The fire grew by about 200 acres in the past couple of days, having burned 4,583 acres as of Wednesday night. It is still considered 5 percent contained. Firefighters today will be keeping a watch on how the fire responds to a slight change in weather. “It is supposed to get a little hotter and a little drier,� Lighthall said. The Pole Creek Fire started Sunday morning, causing the evacuation of about 30 hikers and campers from the northeast corner of the Three Sisters Wilderness and destroying four cars parked at the Pole Creek Trailhead.

The Associated Press BILLINGS, Mont. — A pine beetle outbreak that has left many Western states with vast stands of dead and dying trees has eased for the second consecutive year, the U.S. Forest Service said Monday. With fewer trees left for the beetles to eat, officials said a 2011 aerial survey recorded beetle-killed trees on 3.8 million acres of public and private land. That’s down by more than half from 2009, when about 9 million acres with dead trees were tallied. But the good news is tempered by more trees dying at higher elevations as beetles take advantage of warm winters to gain a new foothold, said Robert Mangold, the Forest Service’s acting associate deputy chief for research and development. And with trees on roughly 42 million acres killed by various beetles since 2000, it could take decades for some forests to fully recover.

Subs Continued from C1 “Because, let’s be honest, they don’t want to pay unemployment if they don’t have to and if they can understand that (one) position might get it. ‌ It affects the way they do business.â€? Right now, Spivey said, it’s difficult to make blanket statements about who is eligible for benefits. Generally, a substitute teacher working directly with the school district doesn’t qualify. For a teacher working through the education service district, however, the law is more ambiguous. “You could have a situation

FEMA Continued from C1 Still in question is what the county is due from a 2008 FEMA grant. The unpaid balance comes to $96,199.17. FEMA is also questioning the scope of work on the 2008 grant. The county has submitted similar proof that work would be approved for the grant. Still, it must discuss the matter with both Oregon Emergency Management and

Settlement Continued from C1 In the lawsuit, Murillo asked for $750,000 in damages arising from economic loss and emotional distress. Deschutes County Sheriff Larry Blanton and interim

Beetle outbreaks can lead to more intense wildfires and hurt timber companies by making some trees unsuitable to harvest. Montana recorded the most beetle kill acreage in 2011, with dead trees across almost one million acres. Idaho, Colorado, Wyoming and Oregon also had significant losses. Mountain pine beetle are native to the region and their outbreaks are cyclical, but the current one has been the worst in at least three decades. Mangold said it was too soon to say if the decreasing mortality seen over the last two years is a trend that will continue. The beetle’s 2011 retreat helped drive a nationwide decline in trees killed by insects and disease. Dead trees were seen on 6.4 million acres of public and private land in 2011, compared to 9.2 million acres in 2010.

— Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

tricts as well. “This is where it can get really confusing,� Spivey said. “People ask, ‘Why do they get unemployment and I don’t?’� Federal law says ESD employees who spend 50 percent or more of their time physically working at a school fall under the same category as a school district employee and would not qualify for benefits. If they spend less time in a school setting, they are put into the “ESD category,� Spivey said, and could qualify for benefits. And there are instances where substitute teachers can draw benefits during the summer. Superintendent George

Murdock of the Douglas Education Service District in Roseburg said he shares Rexford’s concern. Some of the 400 substitute teachers his district employs receive unemployment checks during the summer months. “When you work in a school it’s seasonal work,â€? he said. “I question why ‌ they get unemployment while school is not in session. Because we’re strapped, PERS (public employees retirement system) have gone up. Our budgets have been cut. And we’re having a hard time making ends meet.â€?

FEMA to see if the work sites can be approved after the fact. County Forester Ed Keith said he’s optimistic all sides can come to an accord. He also said it appears the county is making way on a third, stalled grant issued in 2010. The 2010 grant, shared by Deschutes, Crook and Klamath counties, was paused while the parties involved hashed out the scope of work issue over the previous grants. “The significance of this

is that this has broken loose some work on the (2010) grant,� Keith said. “FEMA has sent us some preliminary steps to take in order to get the ball rolling on (the 2010 grant).� Former Deschutes County Forester Joe Stutler has stayed with the county to assist in negotiating the grant problem. He was unavailable for comment Wednesday, but Stutler has long said he wants to see work begin on the 2010 grant before the federal fiscal year

ends Sept. 30. His fear is that funds will be reappropriated to help balance a struggling federal budget. Sigrist said it is unlikely funds from the 2010 grant will be available by the end of the month. Oregon Emergency Management has taken the position that the funds won’t dissolve at the end of the federal fiscal year, but roll over into the next budget.

County Administrator Erik Kropp signed the settlement agreement Sept. 5. According to the settlement, the county and sheriff’s office agree to pay Murillo $70,000. Of that, $7,000 is “allocated toward (Murillo’s) claim for wage loss,� and the

rest is divided equally among each of Murillo’s seven claims for noneconomic damages. The settlement doesn’t admit any liability and includes both a nondisclosure agreement and a nondisparagement clause. Neither Murillo’s attorney,

Scott Hunt, nor county counsel Mark Pilliod could be reached for comment. In June, the county had already spent about $94,000 in legal bills related to the Murillo lawsuit.

FEATURED OBITUARY

New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — Albert Marre, the Tony Award-winning director of the original Broadway production of “Man of La Mancha� — and three of its four Broadway revivals — died in Manhattan on Sept. 4. He was 87. His wife, Mimi Turque Marre, confirmed his death. Marre directed or staged more than two-dozen Broadway shows during his more than 50 years in theater, among them the musicals “Kismet� and “Milk and Honey.� But it was “Man of La Mancha,� the musical adaptation of “Don Quixote� (written by Dale Wasserman, with lyrics by Joe Darion and music by Mitch Leigh), that brought him his greatest acclaim. The famous story of a deluded would-be knight, presented as a play within a play performed by the novel’s author, Miguel de Cervantes, and his fellow prisoners as he awaits trial during the Spanish Inquisition, “Man of La Mancha� began off-Broadway but soon moved uptown and went on to become one of the biggest hits

What started the fire near the trailhead remains under investigation. In and around Sisters, residents are becoming used to the morning smoke from the Pole Creek Fire. While it is smoky outside, Leland Bliss, facilities manager for the Sisters School District, said he’s been recirculating air in the district’s three schools inside to keep the air clean. He brings fresh air into the buildings when the outside air clears up by 10 or 11 a.m. When the smoke is thick, Sisters City Manager Eileen Stein said people should avoid being out in it. “Our best advice to people who are sensitive to the smoke is to stay inside until things clear up,� she said. Even indoors, the smoke can become a problem, said Rebecca Ferrell, 42, who lives in the Crossroads subdivision near Sisters. Around 1 a.m. Thursday she said the smoke became strong enough to smell indoors. “It gives you a headache, it makes your ears scratchy,� she said. “It is not good for you.�

where some ESD substitutes would get unemployment and some wouldn’t,� Spivey said. “It depends on the type of work and it does get confusing. They have the same employer, but their work is categorized differently.� Whether substitutes qualify for unemployment compensation or not depends on the type of job they held, the type of job they are going back to and if they have a reasonable assurance of going back to work. The amount of time they spent physically in a classroom also matters. There are different rules governing school districts and education service dis-

Marre directed Broadway play ‘Man of La Mancha’ By Dennis Hevesi

C5

in Broadway history. It ran on Broadway for 2,328 performances, from November 1965 through June 1971. The original cast starred Richard Kiley as Don Quixote; Irving Jacobson as his squire, Sancho Panza; and Joan Diener (Marre’s second wife) as the servant who becomes his true love, Dulcinea. But the show was probably best known for one song: “The Impossible Dream.� “One does not expect complete fidelity to Cervantes outside his pages — who reads him these days? — but there are charm, gallantry and a delicacy of spirit in this reincarnation of Quixote,� Howard Taubman wrote in The New York Times. Marre won the Tony for best director of a musical. He remained closely identified with the show for many years, directing its Broadway revivals in 1972, 1977 and 1992, as well as numerous productions around the country and internationally. Marre made his Broadway debut as an actor and associate director of the 1950 revival of

John Vanbrugh’s comedy “The Relapse.� He directed “Kismet,� for which he received the 1954 Donaldson Award, a precursor to the Tonys. In 1956, Marre was nominated for a Tony for his direction of “The Chalk Garden,� Enid Bagnold’s play about a disturbed child under the care of her grandmother and a governess. In 1961 he directed “Milk and Honey,� a story about the birth of Israel. Featuring songs by Jerry Herman, it was nominated for five Tonys, including best musical (although Marre did not receive a nomination). Marre, who was known as Albie, graduated from Oberlin College and then served in the Navy during World War II. After the war he attended Harvard Law School, but stopped going to classes after he and several fellow students created what became the Brattle Theater in Cambridge, Mass., one of the country’s first classical repertory companies. There he met the actress Jan Farrand, whom he married and later divorced. His second wife, Diener, died in 2006. Three years later he married Mimi Turque.

— Reporter: 541-554-1162, ldake@bendbulletin.com

— Reporter: 541-617-7837 ehidle@bendbulletin.com

— Reporter: 541-617-7831, smiller@bendbulletin.com

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254 Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708


THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

C6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, SEPTEMBER 13

FRIDAY

Today: More sunshine, a very nice day, near average.

HIGH

Tonight: Clear skies throughout the night, light winds.

LOW

83

HIGH LOW

39

85 43

FORECAST: STATE Astoria 79/50

Seaside

70/51

Cannon Beach 71/51

Hillsboro Portland 89/54 89/47

Tillamook 79/49

Salem

73/47

90/49

89/46

Maupin

87/40

Corvallis Yachats

79/32

Prineville 81/36 Sisters Redmond Paulina 77/32 82/34 84/35 Sunriver Bend

70/52

Eugene

Florence

90/48

61/50

81/34

89/47

Coos Bay

80/24

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

Crescent

Roseburg

57/49

Silver Lake

79/29

Port Orford 57/50

Gold Beach 55/51

Vale 86/50

Riley

84/49

Juntura

Burns

79/32

88/46

82/33

85/44

Jordan Valley 81/43

Frenchglen 88/50

Yesterday’s state extremes

Rome

• 96°

87/44

Medford

86/52

86/47

Klamath Falls 85/45

Ashland

57/50

Hampton

83/34

Chiloquin

Medford

CENTRAL Sunny skies and warm temperatures can be expected.

EAST Ontario Skies will be sunny 85/50 and temperatures will be warm.

82/43

84/45

Paisley 99/58

Brookings

84/41

Unity

87/40

Grants Pass 97/56

Baker City John Day

Christmas Valley

Chemult

94/54

75/42

WEST Coastal clouds south; otherwise, mostly sunny today.

Nyssa

Fort Rock 82/33

79/30

74/25

Bandon

83/41

Brothers 81/31

La Pine 81/30

Crescent Lake

59/48

83/39

80/41

Union

Mitchell 83/37

85/38

Camp Sherman

90/48

81/38

Joseph

Granite Spray 91/42

Enterprise

Meacham 84/38

79/49

Madras

77/36

La Grande

Condon

Warm Springs

Wallowa

80/33

81/47

87/48

86/39

89/48

87/41

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

86/50

81/47

90/50

74/47

Hermiston 82/44

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 78/52

86/50

83/49

The Biggs Dalles 84/51

89/51

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

92/57

• 22°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

87/54

84/49

Meacham

88/42

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

• 102° Cotulla, Texas

• 16° Stanley, Idaho

• 2.44” New Iberia, La.

Honolulu 86/73

-10s

0s

Vancouver 73/59

10s Calgary 72/48

20s

HIGH LOW

A few highlevel clouds in the afternoon, mostly sunny skies.

MONDAY Cooling a touch, still very comfortable, plenty of sunshine.

HIGH LOW

80 41

HIGH LOW

77 41

Another sunny day ahead, still dry and comfortable.

80 42

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .7:01 a.m. . . . . . 7:30 p.m. Venus . . . . . .3:00 a.m. . . . . . 5:26 p.m. Mars. . . . . .11:21 a.m. . . . . . 9:11 p.m. Jupiter. . . . .10:50 p.m. . . . . . 2:02 p.m. Saturn. . . . . .9:45 a.m. . . . . . 8:43 p.m. Uranus . . . . .7:43 p.m. . . . . . 8:08 a.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72/34 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . 91 in 1981 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . 24 in 1949 Average month to date. . . 0.17” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.61” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Average year to date. . . . . 6.93” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.30.27 Record 24 hours . . .0.19 in 1994 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:43 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:18 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:44 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:16 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 4:05 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 5:46 p.m.

Moon phases New

First

Full

Last

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OREGON CITIES

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97......Ext. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.......Ext. Redmond/Madras......Mod.

Astoria . . . . . . . .78/43/0.00 Baker City . . . . . .74/25/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .65/51/0.00 Burns. . . . . . . . . .78/25/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .85/40/0.00 Klamath Falls . . .84/40/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .82/37/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .73/25/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .96/47/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .70/43/0.00 North Bend . . . . .70/46/0.00 Ontario . . . . . . . .83/46/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .75/37/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .83/50/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .72/28/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .75/24/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .86/44/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .87/47/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .73/32/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .81/39/0.00

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . . .79/50/s . . . . .67/52/pc . . . . .84/41/s . . . . . .87/43/s . . . . . 57/50/f . . . . . . 56/49/f . . . . .84/44/s . . . . . .89/44/s . . . . .90/48/s . . . . . .87/49/s . . . . .85/45/s . . . . . .84/42/s . . . . .84/49/s . . . . . .84/45/s . . . . .81/30/s . . . . . .83/33/s . . . . .99/58/s . . . . . .95/53/s . . . . .74/47/s . . . . . . 62/48/f . . . . .59/50/c . . . . .61/51/pc . . . . .85/50/s . . . . . .88/54/s . . . . .87/41/s . . . . . .90/51/s . . . . .89/54/s . . . . . .86/56/s . . . . .81/36/s . . . . . .86/45/s . . . . .85/41/s . . . . . .86/43/s . . . . .94/54/s . . . . . .89/49/s . . . . .90/50/s . . . . . .86/51/s . . . . .82/34/s . . . . . .84/42/s . . . . .89/46/s . . . . . .90/52/s

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT Sisters ................................Ext. La Pine................................Ext. Prineville...........................Ext.

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 34,458 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110,183 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 70,215 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 20,834 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97,024 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 416 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . 1,400 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . 44 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81.1 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 1,829 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . 1 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 222 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 15.1 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 81.1 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 6

POLLEN COUNT

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL 30s

Saskatoon 73/52

Seattle 82/55

A little above average, more sunshine and pleasant conditions.

SUNDAY

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

SATURDAY

40s

Winnipeg 63/42

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 69/43

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 81/59

Halifax 74/55 Portland Billings Portland 80/57 75/43 To ronto 89/54 St. Paul Green Bay 80/60 Boston 70/44 63/46 Boise 81/62 Buffalo Rapid City 82/48 Detroit 80/60 New York 70/44 82/63 82/62 Chicago Cheyenne 73/59 Philadelphia 69/38 Columbus 83/61 Omaha Des Moines San Francisco 84/61 Salt Lake W ashington, D. C. 69/44 65/47 67/54 City 85/64 St. Louis Las Denver Louisville 82/58 87/61 Kansas City Vegas 67/44 85/65 66/50 95/75 Charlotte 81/61 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville 79/66 66/49 77/56 Little Rock 85/62 Phoenix 88/67 Atlanta 99/79 82/64 Birmingham Dallas Tijuana 84/65 88/66 85/66 New Orleans 88/72 Orlando Houston 90/73 Chihuahua 90/74 87/62 Miami 89/78 Monterrey La Paz 93/72 94/77 Mazatlan Anchorage 86/74 54/40 Juneau 54/45 Bismarck 69/41

FRONTS

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .95/69/0.00 . . . 80/60/t . 73/55/sh Akron . . . . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . . . 81/58/s . 75/56/pc Albany. . . . . . . . . .79/46/0.00 . . . 82/56/s . . 80/55/s Albuquerque. . . . .75/60/0.16 . .66/49/sh . . 72/51/s Anchorage . . . . . .51/43/0.59 . . .54/40/c . . .53/43/r Atlanta . . . . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . .82/64/pc . 83/67/pc Atlantic City . . . . .77/49/0.00 . . . 78/63/s . . 79/67/s Austin . . . . . . . . . .97/71/0.00 . . . 92/69/t . 88/65/sh Baltimore . . . . . . .79/53/0.00 . . . 83/60/s . . 83/65/s Billings . . . . . . . . .67/39/0.00 . . . 75/43/s . . 84/50/s Birmingham . . . . .83/67/0.00 . .84/65/pc . 88/65/pc Bismarck. . . . . . . .72/37/0.00 . . . 69/41/s . . 77/49/s Boise . . . . . . . . . . .78/44/0.00 . . . 82/48/s . . 86/51/s Boston. . . . . . . . . .73/53/0.00 . . . 81/62/s . . 80/60/s Bridgeport, CT. . . .79/54/0.00 . . . 80/61/s . . 78/62/s Buffalo . . . . . . . . .79/53/0.00 . . . 80/60/s . 80/58/pc Burlington, VT. . . .80/48/0.00 . . . 82/57/s . 82/59/sh Caribou, ME . . . . .78/43/0.00 . . . 81/55/s . . 77/54/s Charleston, SC . . .83/62/0.00 . . . 84/69/s . 85/71/pc Charlotte. . . . . . . .81/58/0.00 . . . 81/61/s . 82/62/pc Chattanooga. . . . .83/61/0.00 . .85/60/pc . 85/65/pc Cheyenne . . . . . . .56/47/0.29 . . . 69/38/s . . 73/46/s Chicago. . . . . . . . .86/63/0.00 . .73/59/sh . . 70/57/s Cincinnati . . . . . . .84/53/0.00 . . . 84/58/s . 78/53/sh Cleveland . . . . . . .81/52/0.00 . . . 81/60/s . . 75/59/s Colorado Springs .63/49/0.97 . .63/44/pc . . 75/46/s Columbia, MO . . .87/62/0.00 . .83/56/sh . 72/50/sh Columbia, SC . . . .83/58/0.00 . . . 83/63/s . 85/66/pc Columbus, GA. . . .84/67/0.00 . .84/64/pc . 85/67/pc Columbus, OH. . . .85/54/0.00 . . . 84/61/s . 76/52/pc Concord, NH. . . . .78/40/0.00 . . . 85/52/s . . 82/56/s Corpus Christi. . . .99/76/0.00 . . . 88/77/t . . .88/78/t Dallas Ft Worth. . .94/68/0.00 . . . 88/66/t . 80/61/sh Dayton . . . . . . . . .82/55/0.00 . . . 83/60/s . 75/52/sh Denver. . . . . . . . . .60/48/0.95 . .64/44/pc . . 76/49/s Des Moines. . . . . .86/65/0.00 . .65/47/sh . . 73/48/s Detroit. . . . . . . . . .84/56/0.00 . .82/63/pc . . 74/60/s Duluth. . . . . . . . . .67/55/0.00 . .69/42/pc . . 71/47/s El Paso. . . . . . . . . .89/67/0.00 . . . 78/60/t . . 73/57/c Fairbanks. . . . . . . .54/29/0.00 . .54/33/pc . 54/31/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .74/50/0.00 . . . 69/40/s . . 75/48/s Flagstaff . . . . . . . .69/50/0.00 . . . 71/46/s . . 68/43/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .84/58/0.00 . .74/52/sh . 70/54/sh Green Bay. . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . .63/46/sh . 69/51/sh Greensboro. . . . . .79/56/0.00 . . . 80/58/s . 82/61/pc Harrisburg. . . . . . .79/50/0.00 . . . 81/56/s . 81/59/pc Hartford, CT . . . . .80/50/0.00 . . . 82/57/s . . 83/57/s Helena. . . . . . . . . .69/41/0.00 . . . 82/44/s . . 87/46/s Honolulu. . . . . . . .86/74/0.00 . . . 86/73/s . . 87/72/s Houston . . . . . . . .88/71/0.31 . . . 90/74/t . . .88/72/t Huntsville . . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . .83/59/pc . 84/63/pc Indianapolis . . . . .83/57/0.00 . .82/59/pc . . 74/54/s Jackson, MS . . . . .88/64/0.00 . .86/66/pc . 89/65/pc Jacksonville. . . . . .85/70/0.46 . . . 85/70/t . . .87/71/t Juneau. . . . . . . . . .54/47/0.70 . . . 54/45/r . 53/44/sh Kansas City. . . . . .88/67/0.00 . .66/50/sh . . 73/49/s Lansing . . . . . . . . .83/57/0.00 . .79/53/sh . 63/54/sh Las Vegas . . . . . . .92/68/0.00 . . . 95/75/s . . 94/76/s Lexington . . . . . . .82/58/0.00 . . . 82/62/s . 81/58/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .78/55/0.00 . .71/42/pc . . 74/48/s Little Rock. . . . . . .85/62/0.00 . .88/67/pc . 81/62/sh Los Angeles. . . . . .76/67/0.00 . . . 79/66/s . . 85/68/s Louisville. . . . . . . .84/62/0.00 . .85/65/pc . 82/58/pc Madison, WI . . . . .86/65/0.00 . .61/43/sh . . 72/44/s Memphis. . . . . . . .85/68/0.00 . .87/68/pc . . 84/62/c Miami . . . . . . . . . .89/80/0.01 . . . 89/78/t . . .89/79/t Milwaukee . . . . . .86/65/0.00 . .64/55/sh . . 68/56/s Minneapolis . . . . .78/57/0.09 . . . 70/44/t . . 71/48/s Nashville. . . . . . . .84/65/0.00 . .85/62/pc . 84/62/pc New Orleans. . . . .89/75/0.00 . . . 88/72/t . 88/72/pc New York . . . . . . .80/59/0.00 . . . 82/62/s . . 80/64/s Newark, NJ . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . . . 82/60/s . . 82/62/s Norfolk, VA . . . . . .76/55/0.00 . . . 81/64/s . . 82/66/s Oklahoma City . . .93/66/0.00 . . . 77/56/t . 72/54/sh Omaha . . . . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . .69/44/pc . . 72/49/s Orlando. . . . . . . . .88/72/0.01 . . . 90/73/t . . .90/72/t Palm Springs. . . .101/77/0.00 . .106/81/s . 106/82/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .84/58/0.00 . .78/57/sh . 71/51/sh Philadelphia . . . . .79/58/0.00 . . . 83/61/s . . 82/65/s Phoenix. . . . . . . . .94/75/0.00 . . . 99/79/s . . 99/79/s Pittsburgh . . . . . . .80/50/0.00 . . . 83/58/s . 77/53/pc Portland, ME. . . . .73/48/0.00 . . . 80/57/s . . 78/58/s Providence . . . . . .75/50/0.00 . . . 79/60/s . . 79/61/s Raleigh . . . . . . . . .79/53/0.00 . . . 81/60/s . 82/63/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .72/48/0.00 . . . 70/44/s . . 80/57/s Reno . . . . . . . . . . .88/53/0.00 . . . 89/50/s . . 90/53/s Richmond . . . . . . .80/53/0.00 . . . 81/62/s . . 85/62/s Rochester, NY . . . .80/52/0.00 . . . 81/60/s . 80/59/pc Sacramento. . . . . .92/59/0.00 . . . 95/62/s . . 95/61/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . .87/61/pc . . 72/52/s Salt Lake City . . . .77/52/0.00 . . . 82/58/s . . 86/61/s San Antonio . . . . .98/73/0.00 . . . 94/71/t . . .88/67/t San Diego . . . . . . .79/71/0.00 . . . 80/70/s . . 83/72/s San Francisco . . . .67/54/0.00 . . . 72/54/s . . 68/54/s San Jose . . . . . . . .76/53/0.00 . . . 82/58/s . . 79/58/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .65/56/0.13 . . . 59/43/t . . 64/46/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .84/63/0.00 . .85/69/pc . 85/68/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . . . 82/55/s . . 76/54/s Sioux Falls. . . . . . .67/54/0.29 . .71/39/pc . . 73/47/s Spokane . . . . . . . .70/38/0.00 . . . 82/50/s . . 78/49/s Springfield, MO . .83/62/0.00 . .82/59/pc . 70/51/sh Tampa. . . . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . . . 91/74/t . . .90/74/t Tucson. . . . . . . . . .87/68/0.01 . . . 90/72/s . . 92/72/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .91/70/0.00 . . . 79/59/t . 74/57/sh Washington, DC . .81/60/0.00 . . . 85/64/s . . 82/64/s Wichita . . . . . . . . .95/70/0.00 . .66/52/sh . 74/52/pc Yakima . . . . . . . . .76/39/0.00 . . . 82/49/s . . 89/54/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . . .98/78/0.00 . . . 99/81/s . 100/82/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .61/48/0.00 . .61/53/pc . 63/55/pc Athens. . . . . . . . . .77/68/0.00 . . . 83/75/s . . .82/74/t Auckland. . . . . . . .54/41/0.00 . . . 58/45/s . . 61/47/s Baghdad . . . . . . .104/75/0.00 . .106/77/s . 105/74/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .93/79/0.00 . . . 93/77/t . . .89/77/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .77/57/0.00 . . . 77/60/s . . 79/61/s Beirut . . . . . . . . . .86/79/0.00 . . . 86/77/s . . 86/76/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . .64/46/pc . 67/52/pc Bogota . . . . . . . . .64/45/0.00 . .63/52/sh . 66/47/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .84/54/0.00 . .66/51/sh . . 69/50/c Buenos Aires. . . . .75/54/0.00 . . . 72/56/s . 73/56/pc Cabo San Lucas . .93/77/0.00 . . . 90/77/t . . .86/76/t Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .88/72/0.00 . . . 89/71/s . . 90/71/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .66/36/0.00 . . . 72/48/s . . 78/52/s Cancun . . . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . . . 88/76/t . 89/75/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . . .61/43/0.00 . .68/54/pc . 63/45/pc Edinburgh. . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . . .64/52/c . . 57/49/c Geneva . . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . .60/42/pc . . 65/46/s Harare. . . . . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . . . 81/51/s . . 81/51/s Hong Kong . . . . . .91/82/0.00 . . . 89/79/t . 90/77/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . .74/65/pc . . 82/72/s Jerusalem . . . . . . .83/64/0.02 . . . 84/62/s . . 86/62/s Johannesburg. . . .72/50/0.00 . . . 70/53/s . 67/46/sh Lima . . . . . . . . . . .66/61/0.00 . .68/63/pc . 69/63/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .88/66/0.00 . . . 93/66/s . . 92/71/s London . . . . . . . . .64/45/0.00 . .67/55/pc . 67/45/pc Madrid . . . . . . . . .91/59/0.00 . .79/51/pc . . 86/55/s Manila. . . . . . . . . .86/79/0.00 . . . 90/77/t . . .89/77/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .106/84/0.00 . .106/83/s . 108/83/s Mexico City. . . . . .73/59/0.45 . . . 74/54/t . . .71/52/t Montreal. . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . . . 82/59/s . 82/50/sh Moscow . . . . . . . .73/48/0.00 . . . 70/50/s . 71/52/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . .75/60/pc . . .75/59/t Nassau . . . . . . . . .84/77/0.00 . . . 88/77/t . . .88/78/t New Delhi. . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . . . 95/83/t . . .95/82/t Osaka . . . . . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . .88/75/pc . . .88/76/t Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .55/37/0.00 . .58/44/pc . 59/45/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . . .79/52/0.00 . . . 82/62/s . 80/50/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . .69/49/pc . 71/52/pc Rio de Janeiro. . . .77/73/0.00 . .76/64/sh . 77/64/sh Rome. . . . . . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . .74/60/sh . 70/59/sh Santiago . . . . . . . .77/43/0.00 . . . 68/52/s . 66/48/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . . .71/61/c . 76/62/pc Sapporo . . . . . . . .77/70/0.00 . . .80/69/c . 82/69/pc Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . . . 73/63/r . . 73/61/c Shanghai. . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . .79/70/sh . 79/67/pc Singapore . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . . 87/80/t . 87/78/pc Stockholm. . . . . . .61/46/0.00 . . . 60/45/s . 60/49/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . .69/49/sh . . 69/48/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . .90/78/pc . . .84/72/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . . . 85/74/s . . 87/76/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . .88/75/pc . . .88/77/t Toronto . . . . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . .80/60/pc . 78/51/sh Vancouver. . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . . . 73/59/s . . 69/55/s Vienna. . . . . . . . . .77/52/0.00 . .58/51/sh . 66/52/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . .61/51/sh . 63/49/pc

PHIL’S TRAILHEAD FIRE

Karen Kenlan / The Bulletin

Firefighters quickly stopped a wildfire Wednesday afternoon close to the popular Phil’s Trailhead west of Bend. Firefighters kept it to a quarter of an acre. Jean Nelson-Dean, spokeswoman for the Deschutes National Forest, said there is no apparent connection between the Pole Creek Fire, which started Sunday at a trailhead southwest of Sisters, and the fire at Phil’s Trailhead. The Phil’s Trailhead fire was started by a person; the cause is under investigation.

IC

S MU E LIV d ore s n Spo

Skydiving company sues Creswell over ban The Associated Press EUGENE — A skydiving company has sued the city of Creswell, Ore., contending the city’s no-parachuting rules at the municipal airport have cost the company more than $700,000 over the past six years. The Register-Guard reports that Eugene Skydivers filed suit Friday in Lane County Circuit Court. The company accuses the city of violating a lease agree-

ment when city officials outlawed parachute landing at Hobby Field in 2006. The ban went into effect after private pilots complained about nearly being hit by skydiving planes while flying near the airport, and after reports of skydivers jumping through clouds. Eugene Skydivers has asked the Federal Aviation Administration to restore landing rights for skydivers at Hobby Field. A decision in that case is expected in November.

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SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 MLB, D3, D4 College football, D4

Prep sports, D4 Hunting & Fishing, D5, D6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

HUNTING & FISHING

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

PREP FOOTBALL: FRIDAY PREVIEW

UConn coach Calhoun retiring

BRISTOL, Conn. — Former ESPN anchor George Grande says that when he signed on to host the first SportsCenter in 1979, he had a feeling there might be a market for more than just the three minutes of sports people were used to seeing on the local news. He was right. Today, ESPN will air its 50,000th SportsCenter, the network’s flagship show of highlights, news and analysis that has had a major impact on the nation’s sports culture. “It’s changed the expectation of every sports fan in the United States,” said Dennis Deninger, a former ESPN executive who now runs the sports communications graduate program at Syracuse University. “We now expect to see highlights from every game, wherever it is played. If there is something odd or strange anywhere — a triple play — we expect to be able to see it, and see it immediately. That’s what this show has done.” It also has given the job of sportscaster national celebrity status and blurred some of the lines between entertainment and news. When SportsCenter first aired, about 1.4 million homes had access to ESPN, according to the network. That figure is about 98.3 million today. —The Associated Press

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

A fly angler works a section of the Deschutes River at Sawyer Park in Bend on Tuesday.

Close to home Fishing in town The map below shows some of the best spots to fish in Bend:

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n the fishing paradise of Central Oregon, we are surrounded by so many world-class angling opportunities just an hour’s drive away that sometimes we forget that fine fishing can be found right in Bend. Joined by Bulletin photographer Ryan Brennecke, I left the office at noon on Tuesday with the goal of flyfishing three select spots along the DesMARK chutes River MORICAL — all within the Bend city limits. Our first stop was along the river south of Bill Healy Memorial Bridge, basically across the street (Century Drive) from The Bulletin. This area is not as popular with anglers as it is with runners and hikers, but we would do our best not to hook a jogger with a wayward back cast. The late-summer sun gave the riffled water a serene sparkle as we cast out copper john nymphs, hoping to catch some rainbow or brown trout. See Home / D5

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The Bulletin

14th St.

TELEVISION

By Beau Eastes

d. ey R

— The Associated Press

Unbeaten La Pine set to face Ridgeview

. Ril O.B

NEW YORK — Jim Calhoun has spent more than half his life as a head basketball coach, never venturing far from the New England area where he was born. Calhoun Between high schools and colleges in Massachusetts and Connecticut, he racked up 873 wins — most of them coming at his beloved UConn, where he ran the men’s program for 26 years and won three national titles. Recently, though, the 70-year-old Hall of Famer has struggled with health problems, including a fractured hip last month that put him on crutches. On Thursday, he plans to announce his retirement, a person familiar with the decision told The Associated Press. The person spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because Calhoun’s move had not yet been made public. WVIT-TV in Hartford first reported the expected announcement. Assistant coach Kevin Ollie was expected to replace Calhoun, the person who spoke to the AP said. The school scheduled a 2 p.m. Eastern news conference “to address the future of the men’s basketball program.” Ollie will take over a Huskies team that is ineligible for the 2013 NCAA tournament because of its failure to meet national academic standards, one of several off-court problems that hit UConn late in Calhoun’s tenure.

D

Murphy Rd.

Mark Morical / The Bulletin

Bulletin photographer Ryan Brennecke battles a rainbow trout near the Colorado Avenue Bridge on the Deschutes River Tuesday.

Just two weeks into the 2012 football season, La Pine has won more games than it did in the past two years combined. No, these are not the same old Hawks. “Our No. 1 goal heading into the season was to just have fun,” says La Pine coach Bob Metcalf, whose program snapped a 22-game losing streak in its 2011 season finale, a 32-22 victory over Junction City. “Our seniors did a good job last year (strengthening the program) and the juniors from that season just took the ball and ran with it.” Inside The Hawks • Capsules look to improve on other to 3-0 on Friday Central night when they Oregon host Redmond’s games, Ridgeview High D4 in a Class 4A nonconference contest. La Pine opened the season with a 47-0 road blowout over 2A Chiloquin, a game in which the Hawks scored six first-half touchdowns. La Pine won away from home again last Friday, rallying in the final minute to top Oakridge, another 2A school, 13-12. Kole Kimmel scored the game-winning touchdown and Jeremy Desrosiers rushed for 140 yards and a score on 24 carries to give the Hawks their first two-game winning streak since September 2009. According to Metcalf, a big reason for his team’s success this fall can be traced back to the previous winter and spring. Metcalf and La Pine math teacher Heidi Merwin gave up their prep periods the final two semesters of the 2011-12 school year to teach a nutrition and health class for all students. A good chunk of Hawk football players bought into the program, which also included speed and weight training. “We’ve got talented, hardworking kids down here,” Metcalf says. “They worked all through the winter and spring and just kept it going through the summer.” In Ridgeview, La Pine will face its strongest opposition in the young season. The Ravens (1-1), who lost to Klamath Union 42-35 last week, have scored 95 points in two games so far in their first season, and as a team Ridgeview has rushed for 616 yards and nine touchdowns. See Football / D4

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

COMMENTARY

Beavers’ defense back on track

Notre Dame’s move, minus football, to ACC will benefit everyone

The Associated Press CORVALLIS — After struggling all of last season, Oregon State’s defense appears to have righted itself. The Beavers made a seasonopening statement last weekend with a 10-7 victory over then-No. 13 Wisconsin — holding last year’s Big Ten champions scoreless until the final minutes. “We played a helluva game, and from the D-line to the linebackers to the secondary everybody was making plays,” cornerback Jordan Poyer said. “That’s the type of defense we want to be this season.” Oregon State shut down the Badgers’ fearsome running back, Montee Ball, a Heisman Trophy finalist last season, holding him to 61 uneventful yards. Overall, the Beavers held Wisconsin to 35 yards rushing and 207 yards of total offense.

By Chris Dufresne Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — nyone over at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory could tell you this wasn’t rocket science. Notre Dame’s announced move from the Big East to the Atlantic Coast Conference might have been the biggest news, with the biggest caveat, in press release history. The Irish are switching conferences in all sports ... with the exception of football. That’s like announcing the Crickets are leaving for another band ... except for Buddy Holly. The news Wednesday was sort of presented inside out. It was certainly a big deal for the ACC, which only months ago teetered on the edge of ineptness as it related to conference realignment. See Notre Dame / D5

A

Greg Wahl-Stephens / The Associated Press

Oregon State’s D.J. Welch (4) and Jordan Poyer (14) defend against Wisconsin’s James White during the second half of Saturday’s 10-7 victory in Corvallis. The OSU defense allowed just 35 yards rushing in the game.

“That defense worked their tails off this fall camp,” Oregon State wide receiver Brandin Cooks said. “I knew they were going to come in

and do something special. … That defense is running around with fire.” See Beavers / D5


D2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

O  A TELEVISION

SCOREBOARD

Today GOLF 5:30 a.m.: European Tour, Italian Open, first round, Golf Channel. 6 a.m.: LPGA Tour, Women’s British Open, first round, ESPN2. 2 p.m.: Web.com Tour, Boise Open, first round, Golf Channel. BASEBALL 4 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Toronto Blue Jays, Root Sports. 4 or 5 p.m.: MLB, New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox (4) or Detroit Tigers at Chicago White Sox (5), MLB Network. FOOTBALL 4:30 p.m.: College, Rutgers vs. South Florida, ESPN. 5 p.m.: College, Texas A&M Commerce at Midwestern State, CBS Sports Network. 5 p.m.: NFL, Chicago Bears at Green Bay Packers, NFL Network. 7:30 p.m.: High school, Washington state, Kings at Archbishop Murphy, Root Sports. BOXING 7 p.m.: Aaron Martinez vs. Jessie Vargas, ESPN2.

Friday GOLF 5:30 a.m.: European Tour, Italian Open, second round, Golf Channel. 6 a.m.: LPGA Tour, Women’s British Open, second round, ESPN2. 2 p.m.: Web.com Tour, Boise Open, second round, Golf Channel. 4:30 p.m.: Champions Tour, Hawaii Championship, first round, Golf Channel. MOTOR SPORTS 10 a.m.: NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Geico 400 practice, ESPN2. 11:30 a.m.: NASCAR, Nationwide, Dollar General 300 practice, ESPN2. 1 p.m.: NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Geico 400 final practice, ESPN2. 4:30 p.m.: IndyCar, Mav TV 500 qualifying, NBC Sports Network. SOCCER 4 p.m.: Women’s college, Gonzaga at Oregon State, Pac12 Network. 5:30 p.m.: MLS, Houston Dynamo at Sporting Kansas City, NBC Sports Network. 6 p.m.: Women’s college, Seattle at Oregon, Pac-12 Network. 8 p.m.: Women’s college, Hawaii at Washington State (same-day tape), Pac-12 Network. 10 p.m.: Women’s college, Pennsylvania at California (same-day tape), Pac-12 Network. BASEBALL 4 or 4:30 p.m.: MLB, Washington Nationals at Atlanta Braves (4:30) or Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees (4), MLB Network. 5 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers, Root Sports. FOOTBALL 5 p.m.: High school, Don Bosco Prep (N.J.) vs. St. Thomas Aquinas (Fla.), ESPN2. 6 p.m.: College, Washington State at UNLV, ESPN. 6:50 p.m.: High school, Klamath Union at Summit, COTV.

RADIO Friday FOOTBALL 7 p.m.: High school, West Salem at Bend, KBND-AM 1110. 7 p.m.: High school, Klamath Union at Summit, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

ON DECK Today Volleyball: Sisters at Summit, 6:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Bend (nonleague), 6:30 p.m.; Crook County at Burns, 6 p.m.; Ridgeview at Madras, 6:30 p.m.; Cascade at La Pine, 7 p.m.; Culver vs. Heppner, at Dufur, 5:30 p.m. Boys soccer: Ridgeview JV at La Pine, 4:30 p.m.; Sisters at Redmond, 4 p.m.; Cascade at Madras, 4:30 p.m. Girls soccer: La Pine at Ridgeview, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at Stayton, 3:30 p.m. Boys water polo: Bend at Madras, TBA

Japan, 6-4, 6-4. Donna Vekic, Croatia, def. Lara ArruabarrenaVecino, Spain, 6-2, 6-2. Bojana Jovanovski (6), Serbia, def. Eleni Daniilidou, Greece, 6-3, 6-7 (8), 6-3.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Bell Challenge Wednesday At Club Avantage Multi-Sports de Quebec Quebec City Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles First Round Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, def. Dominika Cibulkova (1), Slovakia, 2-6, 6-3, 7-5. Second Round Mona Barthel (3), Germany, def. Petra Rampre, Slovenia, 6-2, 6-1. Lauren Davis, United States, def. Yanina Wickmayer (2), Belgium, 6-1, 6-1. Kristina Mladenovic, France, def. Annika Beck, Germany, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3. Barbora Zahlavova Strycova (6), Czech Republic, def. Tatjana Malek, Germany, 6-3, 6-3.

Friday Football: West Salem at Bend, 7 p.m.; Sprague at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; Klamath Union at Summit, 7 p.m.; Redmond at Hood River Valley, 7 p.m.; Ridgeview at La Pine, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Madras, 7 p.m.; The Dalles Wahtonka at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Culver at Stanfield, 7 p.m.; Prospect at Gilchrist, 4 p.m. Boys soccer: Culver at Central Christian, 4 p.m.; Crescent Valley at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Corvallis at Bend, 4 p.m. Girls soccer: Mountain View at Crescent Valley, 4 p.m.; Bend at Corvallis, 4 p.m. Volleyball: Santiam at Culver, 6 p.m.; Prospect at Gilchrist, 5 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran at North Lake, 4 p.m.

SOCCER MLS

Saturday Cross-country: Mountain View at Saxon XC Invitational in Salem, 10 a.m.; Summit at New Balance Festival of Champions in Oregon City, 11:55 a.m.; Sisters at Molalla Invitational, noon Boys soccer: Culver at Riverside, 1 p.m.; Sisters at Henley, noon; Woodburn at Summit, 2 p.m.; Corvallis at Mountain View, 11 a.m.; Crescent Valley at Bend, 11 a.m. Girls soccer: Henley at Sisters, 2 p.m.; Mountain View at Corvallis, 11 a.m.; Bend at Crescent Valley, 11 a.m.; Stayton at La Pine, 1:30 p.m.; Tillamook at Madras, 2 p.m. Volleyball: Redmond at North Marion tournament, TBA; La Pine at Lakeview tournament, 9 a.m.; Prospect at Trinity Lutheran, 2:15 p.m.; Central Christian at C.S. Lewis tourney in Newberg, 10:30 a.m. Denver at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m.

FOOTBALL NFL National Football League All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct N.Y. Jets 1 0 0 1.000 New England 1 0 0 1.000 Miami 0 1 0 .000 Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 South W L T Pct Houston 1 0 0 1.000 Jacksonville 0 1 0 .000 Indianapolis 0 1 0 .000 Tennessee 0 1 0 .000 North W L T Pct Baltimore 1 0 0 1.000 Cleveland 0 1 0 .000 Pittsburgh 0 1 0 .000 Cincinnati 0 1 0 .000 West W L T Pct Denver 1 0 0 1.000 San Diego 1 0 0 1.000 Oakland 0 1 0 .000 Kansas City 0 1 0 .000 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 Washington 1 0 0 1.000 Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 South W L T Pct Tampa Bay 1 0 0 1.000 Atlanta 1 0 0 1.000 New Orleans 0 1 0 .000 Carolina 0 1 0 .000 North W L T Pct Detroit 1 0 0 1.000 Chicago 1 0 0 1.000 Minnesota 1 0 0 1.000 Green Bay 0 1 0 .000 West W L T Pct Arizona 1 0 0 1.000 San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 St. Louis 0 1 0 .000 Seattle 0 1 0 .000 ——— Today’s Game Chicago at Green Bay, 5:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Tampa Bay at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Carolina, 10 a.m. Arizona at New England, 10 a.m. Minnesota at Indianapolis, 10 a.m. Baltimore at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. Kansas City at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Cleveland at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Houston at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Oakland at Miami, 10 a.m. Dallas at Seattle, 1:05 p.m. Washington at St. Louis, 1:05 p.m. Tennessee at San Diego, 1:25 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Pittsburgh, 1:25 p.m. Detroit at San Francisco, 5:20 p.m. Monday, Sep. 17

College Today

College

PF 48 34 10 28

PA 28 13 30 48

PF 30 23 21 13

PA 10 26 41 34

PF 44 16 19 13

PA 13 17 31 44

PF 31 22 14 24

PA 19 14 22 40

PF 24 40 17 17

PA 17 32 16 24

PF 16 40 32 10

PA 10 24 40 16

PF 27 41 26 22

PA 23 21 23 30

PF 20 30 23 16

PA 16 22 27 20

S. FLORIDA

Pac-12 Standings All Times PDT ——— North Conf. Overall Oregon 0-0 2-0 Stanford 0-0 2-0 Oregon State 0-0 1-0 California 0-0 1-1 Washington 0-0 1-1 Washington State 0-0 1-1 South Conf. Overall Arizona 0-0 2-0 Arizona State 0-0 2-0 UCLA 0-0 2-0 USC 0-0 2-0 Utah 0-0 1-1 Colorado 0-0 0-2 Friday’s Game x-Washington State at UNLV, 6 p.m. Saturday’s Games x-California at Ohio State, 9 a.m. x-Tennessee Tech at Oregon, noon x-Portland State at Washington, 1 p.m. x-Arizona State at Missouri, 4 p.m. USC at Stanford, 4:30 p.m. x-Colorado at Fresno State, 5 p.m. x-BYU at Utah, 7 p.m. x-South Carolina State at Arizona, 7:30 p.m. x-Houston at UCLA, 7:30 p.m. x=nonleague Schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) Today’s Games SOUTH Glenville St. at Chattanooga, 4 p.m. SE Louisiana at UT-Martin, 4 p.m. Rutgers at South Florida, 4:30 p.m. MVSU at Southern U., 4:30 p.m. ——— Friday’s Game FAR WEST Washington St. at UNLV, 6 p.m.

Betting line NFL (Home teams in Caps) Favorite Opening Current Today PACKERS 5 6 Sunday GIANTS 8 7.5 PATRIOTS 13.5 13.5 Vikings 1.5 1 Saints 2.5 2.5 BILLS 3.5 3 EAGLES 2.5 2.5 Raiders 2.5 2.5 BENGALS 7 7 Texans 7.5 7 Cowboys 3 3 Redskins 3 3 STEELERS 6 6 CHARGERS 6 6 49ERS 6.5 6.5 Monday FALCONS 3 3

9.5

8

Rutgers

Friday Washington St

11 9 Saturday PENN ST 6 6 MICHIGAN 45.5 47 NORTHWESTERN 4.5 3.5 PURDUE 22.5 24 N. Illinois 2.5 3 FLORIDA ST 24 28 Connecticut 1.5 3 Texas A&M 13.5 13 Virginia Tech 11.5 10 Usc 9 8.5 S. MISSISSIPPI 8.5 8 OHIO ST 17.5 17 Texas 10.5 10.5 MISSOURI 7 6.5 Byu 3.5 4 LOUISVILLE 4 3 GEORGIA TECH 10 10.5 Alabama 14 21 BOISE ST 20.5 21 Tcu 21 21 LOUISIANA TECH 20 20.5 MINNESOTA 3 2.5 TOLEDO 6 3.5 S. CAROLINA 34 33.5 Ohio 6.5 6.5 TEXAS TECH 34 33.5 TENNESSEE 2 3 SAN JOSE ST 10.5 11 WISCONSIN 14 14 LSU 43 42.5 MICHIGAN ST 3.5 6 INDIANA 3 2.5 FRESNO ST 14 15 UTEP 12.5 12.5 UCLA 17.5 17 GEORGIA 43.5 42.5 NEBRASKA 24 24.5 NC STATE 32 31.5 C. FLORIDA 15.5 17 OKLAHOMA ST 22.5 22.5 KANSAS ST 28 28.5 Mid Tenn St 3.5 3.5 KENTUCKY 7 7 Mississippi St 15.5 16 AUBURN 16.5 16.5

UNLV Navy UMass Boston College E. Michigan ARMY Wake Forest MARYLAND SMU PITTSBURGH STANFORD E. Carolina California MISSISSIPPI Arizona St UTAH N. Carolina Virginia ARKANSAS Miami-Ohio KANSAS Rice W. Michigan Bowling Green Uab MARSHALL New Mexico Florida Colorado St Utah St Idaho Notre Dame Ball St Colorado New Mexico St Houston Florida Atlantic Arkansas St S. Alabama Florida Int’l UL-Lafayette N. Texas MEMPHIS W. Kentucky TROY UL-Monroe

TENNIS Underdog Bears Buccaneers Cardinals COLTS PANTHERS Chiefs Ravens DOLPHINS Browns JAGUARS SEAHAWKS RAMS Jets Titans Lions Broncos

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts GF Sporting Kansas City 15 7 5 50 34 Chicago 14 8 5 47 37 New York 13 7 7 46 46 Houston 12 7 9 45 40 Columbus 12 9 6 42 33 D.C. 12 10 5 41 43 Montreal 12 14 3 39 43 New England 7 14 7 28 35 Philadelphia 7 13 5 26 25 Toronto FC 5 17 6 21 31 Western Conference W L T Pts GF x-San Jose 16 6 5 53 56 Seattle 13 6 8 47 43 Real Salt Lake 14 11 4 46 38 Los Angeles 13 11 4 43 48 Vancouver 10 11 7 37 29 FC Dallas 8 12 9 33 34 Colorado 9 17 2 29 36 Chivas USA 7 12 7 28 21 Portland 7 14 6 27 27 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. x- clinched playoff berth Wednesday’s Games Chicago 2, Toronto FC 1 Friday’s Games Houston at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Colorado at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. Saturday’s Games Philadelphia at Toronto FC, 10 a.m. Seattle FC at Portland, 12:30 p.m. Columbus at New York, 4 p.m. New England at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. Vancouver at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Montreal at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. San Jose at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m.

GA 33 28 33 40 37 38 41 41 46

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct x-Connecticut 22 8 .733 x-Indiana 20 9 .690 Atlanta 17 14 .548 New York 13 17 .433 Chicago 12 17 .414 Washington 5 25 .167 Western Conference W L Pct z-Minnesota 24 5 .828 x-Los Angeles 20 10 .667 x-San Antonio 18 11 .621 x-Seattle 13 16 .448 Phoenix 7 22 .241 Tulsa 6 23 .207 x-clinched playoff spot; z-clinched conference Wednesday’s Games Indiana 72, Seattle 48 New York 75, Washington 62 San Antonio 78, Tulsa 67 Connecticut 100, Phoenix 78 Today’s Game Chicago at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.

Professional Tashkent Open Wednesday At The Olympic Tennis School Tashkent, Uzbekistan Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Second Round Alexandra Cadantu (5), Romania, def. Sabina Sharipova, Uzbekistan, 1-6, 6-3, 6-3. Urszula Radwanska (2), Poland, def. Vitalia Diatchenko, Russia, 6-2, 6-2. Eva Birnerova, Czech Republic, def. Karin Knapp, Italy, 6-2, 6-2. Galina Voskoboeva (8), Kazakhstan, def. Anna Chakvetadze, Russia, 6-1, 6-3. Irina-Camelia Begu, Romania, def. Alize Cornet (3), France, 6-4, 6-1. Alexandra Panova (7), Russia, def. Misaki Doi,

GA 24 32 39 33 32 38 46 38 30 50

GB — 1½ 5½ 9 9½ 17 GB — 4½ 6 11 17 18

DEALS

velopment contract with Savannah (SAL) through the 2014 season. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Extended their player development contract with Eugene (NWL) through the 2014 season. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Assigned RHP Steve Edlefsen to Fresno (PCL). Reinstated RHP Clay Hensley from the 15-day DL. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association BROOKLYN NETS—Signed F Andray Blatche. OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER — Signed G DeAndre Liggins and G Andy Rautins. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL — Fined Dallas OT Tyron Smith $15,000 for a horse-collar tackle that prevented a touchdown on an interception return during the Sept. 5 game against the N.Y. Giants. ARIZONA CARDINALS — Signed CB Greg McCoy to the practice squad. Released CB Larry Parker from the practice squad. ATLANTA FALCONS — Signed CB Terrence Johnson. Signed WR James Rodgers and G Phillip Manley to the practice squad. BALTIMORE RAVENS — Signed RB Bobby Rainey to the practice squad. DALLAS COWBOYS — Signed CB LeQuan Lewis. DENVER BRONCOS — Signed DE Jamie Blatnick to the practice squad. Released G Wayne Tribue from the practice squad. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Signed CB Brandian Ross to the practice squad. Released RB Marc Tyler from the practice squad. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Claimed T Troy Kropog off waivers from Tennessee. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Reinstated LB Tamba Hali from the practice squad. Released LB Cameron Sheffield. Released WR Junior Hemingway from the practice squad. MIAMI DOLPHINS — Signed D Ryan Baker. Released LB Sammy Brown. Signed DT Chas Alecxih and WR Brian Tyms to the practice squad. Released WR Chris Hogan from the practice squad. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Signed S Cyhl Quarles to the practice squad. Released TE Alex Silvestro from the practice squad. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS — Placed WR Adrian Arrington on injured reserve. Signed WR Greg Camarillo. NEW YORK GIANTS — Signed WR Brandon Collins and T Matt McCants to the practice squad. Released CB Terrence Frederick and C Scott Wedige from the practice squad. NEW YORK JETS — Released WR Patrick Turner. Signed WR Stanley Arukwe and LB Ricky Sapp to the practice squad. Released WR Royce Pollard and CB LeQuan Lewis from the practice squad. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Signed DE Brandon Bair and TE Nick Guess to the practice squad. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Signed WR Mardy Gilyard. Released S Jaiquawn Jarrett. Signed WR Derek Carrier to the practice squad. Released TE Chase Ford from the practice squad. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS — Signed G Reggie Wells. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Removed RB Vai Taua on injured reserve and released him. Signed NT Hebron Fangupo and WR Jermaine Kearse to the practice squad. Released C Tommie Draheim and TE Gabe Miller from the practice squad. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Signed T Mike Remmers to the practice squad. TENNESSEE TITANS — Signed G Deuce Lutui. Reinstated WR Kenny Britt from the suspended list. Released DE Pannel Egboh and T Troy Kropog. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Signed NT Delvin Johnson to the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League FLORIDA PANTHERS — Assigned D Jason DeSantis, G Brian Foster, F Jonathan Hazen, G Michael Houser, F Quinton Howden, G Jacob Markstrom, F Mattias Lindstrom, F Anthony Luciani, D Josh McFadden, F John McFarland, D Alex Petrovic, F Jon Rheault, D Colby Robak, F Eric Selleck, F Drew Shore, F Scott Timmins and F Garrett Wilson to San Antonio (AHL). Loaned F Jonathan Huberdeau and F Vincent Trocheck to their junior clubs. LOS ANGELES KINGS — Signed D Kurtis MacDermid to a three-year, entry-level contract. SAN JOSE SHARKS — Named David Cunniff associate coach of Worcester (AHL). TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS — Signed G Ben Scrivens to a two-year contract. WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Re-signed F Troy Brouwer to a three-year contract. COLLEGE ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE — Announced Notre Dame is joining for all sports but football. ARKANSAS STATE — Announced WR Allen Muse has left the football team. BUTLER — Dismissed G Chrishawn Hopkins from the men’s basketball team. MONTANA — Promoted associate athletic director Kent Haslam to athletic director. NEBRASKA—Announced DT Chase Rome has left the football team.

Transactions

FISH COUNT

BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Reinstated RHP Scott Atchison from the 60-day DL. Transferred LHP Franklin Morales to the 60-day DL. CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Reinstated RHP Gavin Floyd from the 15-day DL. NEW YORK YANKEES — Recalled OF Melky Mesa from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). TEXAS RANGERS — Extended its player development contract with Round Rock (PCL) through the 2018 season. National League HOUSTON ASTROS — Reinstated SS Jed Lowrie from the 15-day DL. NEW YORK METS — Renewed their player de-

Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 8,165 2,741 1,358 398 The Dalles 8,661 3,042 2,356 649 John Day 6,240 2,752 2,828 845 McNary 6,515 1,008 2,427 745 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 444,355 69,597 195,211 73,741 The Dalles 295,642 51,932 137,299 52,921 John Day 241,669 44,613 90,392 37,661 McNary 228,626 21,519 77,703 29,469

26 passes for 320 yards with two touchdowns and no interceptions in Sunday’s victory — making him the first player in league history to amass 300-plus yards passing, two or more passing touchdowns and no interceptions in an NFL debut.

in Davis Cup, are back in doubles, with John Isner and Sam Querrey playing singles.

S   B Hockey • NHL, NHLPA exchange offers: The NHL and the players’ association swapped proposals Wednesday in an effort to head off a lockout scheduled to start this weekend. The NHLPA, led by executive director Donald Fehr, made its presentation in the morning, but that was quickly dismissed by Commissioner Gary Bettman, who said it wasn’t much different than earlier offers. Bettman then met with Boston Bruins owner Jeremy Jacobs, and Murray Edwards of the Calgary Flames, and a new NHL offer was handed back to the players’ association with a shelf life on it. After not meeting face to face since last Friday, the sides gathered Wednesday at the league office before the NHLPA was to hold player meetings later Wednesday at a New York hotel. The NHL board of governors will convene today with Bettman, while the union holds a second day of discussions with more than 250 players.

Baseball • Reds to host Angels in first interleague opener: One of baseball’s traditional home openers will have an innovative twist next season. The Cincinnati Reds will host the Los Angeles Angels on April 1, becoming the first teams to start their seasons with an interleague matchup. Major League

Baseball’s 2013 preliminary schedule, announced Wednesday, includes several format changes caused by the shift of the Houston Astros to the American League. A National League franchise for its first 51 seasons, the Astros start AL play on April 2 when they host cross-state rival Texas. Because there will be 15 teams in each major league for the first time, interleague play is necessary nearly every day.

Football • Portland State dismisses defensive coordinator: Portland State coach Nigel Burton has dismissed defensive coordinator Eric Jackson effective immediately. The Vikings opened with a victory over lower-division Carroll College but fell 45-37 at North Dakota last weekend. Jackson joined Burton’s staff when he was named head coach in 2010. Before coming to the Vikings, he was secondary-special teams coordinator at Princeton for nine years. Burton says he will begin the search for a replacement immediately. Portland State travels to Washington to face the Huskies on Saturday. • WR Chad Johnson charged with domestic battery: Six-time Pro Bowl receiver Chad Johnson has been formally charged with one count of misdemeanor domestic battery. The Broward State Attorney’s Office filed the charge Wednesday. Johnson faces up to

a year in county jail. Johnson was arrested last month after his wife accused him of head-butting her during an argument in front of their home. He was later freed on $2,500 bond. • Goodell wants bounty meeting with players soon: NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell wants to meet with the players whose bounty suspensions were temporarily lifted “as soon as possible.” Appearing at a hearing on Capitol Hill, Goodell noted Wednesday that the league “offered several times to have them come in as part of the hearing process, the CBA process, and I hope that they’ll do that soon.” An appeals panel last week overturned the suspensions of Saints linebacker Jonathan Vilma (2012 season) and defensive end Will Smith (four games) for their roles in the team’s bounty program from 2009-11. Browns linebacker Scott Fujita got three games and DE Anthony Hargrove, now a free agent, got eight. • RG3 first rookie QB to win Week 1 player of week: Robert Griffin III is the first rookie quarterback to win an offensive player of the week award after his debut game. The NFL announced Wednesday that Griffin is the NFC offensive player of the week for his performance in the Washington Redskins’ 40-32 win over the New Orleans Saints. The No. 2 overall draft pick completed 19 of

Tennis • Spain hopes to oust U.S. in Davis Cup: Spain has history on its side in its Davis Cup semifinal against the United States. The United States has won in Spain only once and that was 40 years ago, while Spain’s comfortable wins this year over Kazakhstan and Austria extended its 12-year unbeaten streak at home to 23, all on clay. Spain is the defending champion and also won in 2008 and 2009. Spain will face the United States this weekend on clay in Gijon, the port city on the Atlantic north coast. In the other semifinal, the Czech Republic will play Argentina in Buenos Aires, also on clay. With Rafael Nadal still rehabbing the injured left knee that kept him out of the Olympics and U.S. Open, Spain will be led again by David Ferrer, who is undefeated in Davis Cup at home and on clay. Nicolas Almagro is 4-0 in singles cup play this year, and Marcel Granollers and Marc Lopez will be the likely doubles team. The U.S. has surprised this year, with wins in Switzerland and France, both on clay. The Bryan twins, formidable

Boxing • Pacquiao fight with Marquez almost set: Manny Pacquiao will return to the ring Dec. 8, almost surely in a fourth fight against Mexican rival Juan Manuel Marquez. Promoter Bob Arum said final negotiations were scheduled Wednesday with Pacquiao adviser Michael Koncz for the fight, which would be the first for Pacquiao since he lost a hotly disputed decision to Timothy Bradley on June 9.

Cycling • Feds investigate theft of Olympic medalist’s bikes: Federal authorities are investigating the theft of two bicycles belonging to Olympic gold medalist Kristin Armstrong. The bikes were stolen at some point while being shipped to Boise from Germany, where they had been on display at an event. Armstrong’s gold medal time trial bike is worth nearly $30,000 and her road bike is valued at almost that much. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said Wednesday agents in the United States and Germany were investigating the theft. Armstrong says the time trial bike symbolizes of all her hard work and she’s sad that somebody took that away from her family. —From wire reports


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

D3

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

AL Boxscores Mariners 3, Blue Jays 2 Seattle Ackley 2b Gutierrez cf Seager 3b J.Montero dh M.Saunders rf Olivo c Carp 1b Smoak 1b T.Robinson lf C.Wells lf Ryan ss Totals

AB 4 4 5 4 3 5 3 0 4 0 3 35

R 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 3

H 1 1 3 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 9

BI 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 1 1 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 7

American League SO 0 3 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 3 10

Avg. .231 .280 .256 .264 .251 .215 .218 .189 .232 .222 .195

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lawrie 3b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .278 Rasmus cf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .228 Encarnacion 1b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .279 Y.Escobar ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .253 Lind dh 2 0 1 0 0 0 .232 a-R.Davis ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Arencibia c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .234 Sierra rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .247 Gose lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Hechavarria 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .228 Totals 28 2 2 2 3 9 Seattle 010 200 000 — 3 9 0 Toronto 000 200 000 — 2 2 0 LOB—Seattle 12, Toronto 2. 2B—Ackley (20), Seager (28). HR—Olivo (10), off R.Romero; Encarnacion (39), off Millwood. SB—M.Saunders (19). DP—Seattle 1; Toronto 1. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP Millwood W, 6-12 5 2 2 2 1 3 66 Kelley H, 5 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 12 O.Perez H, 5 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 Kinney H, 7 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 3 21 Wilhelmsen S, 26 1 0 0 0 1 2 19 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP R.Romero L, 8-14 4 8 3 3 4 3 87 Delabar 2 0 0 0 1 4 32 Lyon 1 0 0 0 1 0 10 Oliver 1 0 0 0 1 2 18 Janssen 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 R.Romero pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. T—2:55. A—13,519 (49,260).

ERA 4.25 3.05 1.54 3.60 2.50 ERA 5.87 3.51 2.75 1.62 2.43

Tigers 8, White Sox 6 Detroit A.Jackson cf Dirks lf Mi.Cabrera 3b Fielder 1b D.Young dh Boesch rf A.Garcia rf Jh.Peralta ss Avila c Infante 2b Totals

AB 5 4 5 5 5 3 1 3 3 4 38

R 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 2 1 0 8

H 3 2 3 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 14

BI 2 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 1 1 8

BB 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 3

SO 0 2 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 8

Avg. .309 .319 .328 .305 .271 .244 .313 .252 .244 .261

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. De Aza lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .278 Youkilis 3b 4 2 2 4 0 0 .236 Wise cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .276 Konerko 1b 4 0 2 0 0 2 .310 Rios rf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .293 Pierzynski c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .280 Al.Ramirez ss 4 0 0 1 0 0 .272 D.Johnson dh 3 1 2 0 1 1 .500 1-Olmedo pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .207 O.Hudson 2b 3 1 0 0 1 3 .182 Totals 34 6 9 6 2 11 Detroit 000 030 320 — 8 14 0 Chicago 000 100 041 — 6 9 0 1-ran for D.Johnson in the 9th. LOB—Detroit 7, Chicago 3. 2B—A.Jackson (24), Avila (19). HR—Fielder (26), off Septimo; Youkilis (17), off Scherzer; Youkilis (18), off Benoit. SB—Rios (21). DP—Detroit 1; Chicago 2. Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer W, 16-6 6 4 1 1 0 7 115 3.77 B.Villarreal 1 1-3 1 2 2 2 1 19 2.37 Benoit 2-3 2 2 2 0 2 19 3.36 Valverde S, 30-34 1 2 1 1 0 1 15 3.62 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Floyd L, 9-10 4 2-3 4 3 3 1 7 69 4.59 H.Santiago 2 3 1 1 2 1 51 3.49 Omogrosso 0 1 1 1 0 0 2 3.75 Septimo 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 11 5.73 Axelrod 1 4 2 2 0 0 20 5.29 Veal 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.93 Myers 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 3.97 Omogrosso pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—3:25. A—30,667 (40,615).

Royals 10, Twins 5 Kansas City Lough rf A.Escobar ss A.Gordon lf Butler dh S.Perez c Moustakas 3b L.Cain cf Hosmer 1b Giavotella 2b Totals

AB 6 4 5 5 5 4 5 3 5 42

R 1 2 2 0 1 0 0 2 2 10

H 2 2 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 14

BI 0 1 2 3 2 0 1 0 0 9

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2

SO 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 6

Avg. .304 .298 .292 .310 .319 .250 .265 .244 .248

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Span cf 5 2 3 0 0 1 .290 Revere rf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .301 Willingham dh 4 1 1 1 1 1 .260 Morneau 1b 3 1 0 0 2 2 .278 Doumit lf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .282 J.Carroll 3b 3 0 1 3 0 0 .259 A.Casilla 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .219 Butera c 3 0 1 0 1 2 .219 Florimon ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Totals 33 5 8 5 5 7 Kansas City 000 150 040 — 10 14 0 Minnesota 102 020 000 — 5 8 3 E—Doumit 3 (5). LOB—Kansas City 9, Minnesota 8. 2B—Doumit (30). 3B—Span (4). HR—S.Perez (10), off Walters. SB—A.Casilla (18). DP—Minnesota 1. Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hochevar W, 8-13 5 6 5 5 4 4 110 5.46 Collins H, 9 2 0 0 0 1 1 28 3.09 K.Herrera 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 2.37 Bueno 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 1.50 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Walters L, 2-4 4 7 6 6 2 3 72 6.70 Swarzak 2 2-3 2 0 0 0 1 30 4.93 Duensing 2-3 2 2 1 0 0 12 5.09 Fien 0 1 1 1 0 0 12 1.65 T.Robertson 0 0 1 1 0 0 4 6.00 Waldrop 2-3 2 0 0 0 0 17 2.51 Perdomo 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 4.66 Walters pitched to 6 batters in the 5th. Fien pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T.Robertson pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—3:25. A—28,139 (39,500).

Yankees 5, Red Sox 4 New York AB R H Jeter ss 5 1 2 McGehee 3b 0 0 0 Granderson cf 5 2 2 Al.Rodriguez dh 5 1 1 Cano 2b 5 1 1 Swisher 1b 5 0 3 Ibanez lf 2 0 0 a-J.Nix ph-3b-ss 3 0 0 Er.Chavez 3b 2 0 2 b-An.Jones ph-lf 1 0 0 1-Dickerson pr-lf 0 0 0 I.Suzuki rf 3 0 0 C.Stewart c 3 0 0 Totals 39 5 11

BI 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2

SO 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .323 .174 .235 .274 .300 .261 .225 .245 .288 .204 .250 .269 .248

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ellsbury cf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .267 Ciriaco 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .300 Pedroia 2b 3 1 2 0 0 0 .295 De Jesus 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Loney 1b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .269 C.Ross rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .277 Kalish rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .229 Saltalamacchia c 3 2 3 1 1 0 .232 Nava lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .248 Podsednik dh 2 0 0 0 0 1 .313 c-M.Gomez ph-dh 2 0 0 1 0 0 .290 Iglesias ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .083 d-Aviles ph-ss 2 0 1 1 0 0 .252 Totals 36 4 10 4 1 8 New York 000 300 200 — 5 11 1 Boston 000 100 201 — 4 10 3 a-struck out for Ibanez in the 6th. b-was intentionally walked for Er.Chavez in the 6th. d-doubled for Iglesias in the 7th. 1-ran for An.Jones in the 8th.

Baltimore New York Tampa Bay Toronto Boston

W 80 80 77 64 64

L 62 62 65 77 79

Chicago Detroit Kansas City Cleveland Minnesota

W 76 75 65 59 59

L 66 67 77 84 84

Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 85 82 77 69

L 57 60 66 74

East Division Pct GB WCGB .563 — — .563 — — .542 3 3 .454 15½ 15½ .448 16½ 16½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .535 — — .528 1 5 .458 11 15 .413 17½ 21½ .413 17½ 21½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .599 — — .577 3 — .538 8½ 3½ .483 16½ 11½

Wednesday’s Games Baltimore 3, Tampa Bay 2 Seattle 3, Toronto 2 N.Y. Yankees 5, Boston 4 Texas 5, Cleveland 2 Detroit 8, Chicago White Sox 6 Kansas City 10, Minnesota 5 Oakland 4, L.A. Angels 1

DP—Milwaukee 1 (Bianchi, R.Weeks, Ishikawa).

National League

L10 7-3 4-6 6-4 4-6 2-8

Str Home Away W-2 41-32 39-30 W-1 41-28 39-34 L-2 39-32 38-33 L-2 34-36 30-41 L-1 33-42 31-37

L10 4-6 4-6 6-4 3-7 4-6

Str Home Away L-2 42-31 34-35 W-2 43-28 32-39 W-3 31-38 34-39 L-5 32-37 27-47 L-2 28-43 31-41

L10 7-3 7-3 6-4 5-5

Str Home Away W-2 45-25 40-32 W-6 42-30 40-30 L-3 39-32 38-34 W-2 36-36 33-38

Today’s Games Tampa Bay (Hellickson 8-10) at Baltimore (W.Chen 12-9), 9:35 a.m. Oakland (Bre.Anderson 4-0) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 16-4), 12:35 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 13-7) at Toronto (H.Alvarez 8-12), 4:07 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 14-12) at Boston (Doubront 10-8), 4:10 p.m. Cleveland (McAllister 5-7) at Texas (D.Holland 10-6), 5:05 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 13-8) at Chicago White Sox (Sale 16-6), 5:10 p.m. Kansas City (Mendoza 7-9) at Minnesota (Hendriks 0-7), 5:10 p.m.

Washington Atlanta Philadelphia New York Miami

W 89 81 72 65 63

L 54 63 71 78 81

Cincinnati St. Louis Pittsburgh Milwaukee Chicago Houston

W 87 75 72 72 56 45

L 57 68 70 71 87 98

San Francisco Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado

W 81 74 71 69 57

L 62 69 72 75 85

East Division Pct GB WCGB .622 — — .563 8½ — .503 17 3 .455 24 10 .438 26½ 12½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .604 — — .524 11½ — .507 14 2½ .503 14½ 3 .392 30½ 19 .315 41½ 30 West Division Pct GB WCGB .566 — — .517 7 1 .497 10 4 .479 12½ 6½ .401 23½ 17½

Wednesday’s Games Philadelphia 3, Miami 1 San Diego 3, St. Louis 2 Cincinnati 2, Pittsburgh 1 Washington 2, N.Y. Mets 0 Chicago Cubs 5, Houston 1 Milwaukee 8, Atlanta 2 San Francisco 8, Colorado 3 Arizona 3, L.A. Dodgers 2

L10 8-2 6-4 8-2 2-8 4-6

Str Home Away W-3 44-27 45-27 L-3 40-32 41-31 W-7 38-37 34-34 L-6 30-41 35-37 L-3 32-37 31-44

L10 6-4 3-7 2-8 7-3 5-5 4-6

Str Home Away W-3 47-28 40-29 L-3 43-29 32-39 L-6 42-30 30-40 W-3 44-28 28-43 W-1 34-34 22-53 L-1 29-42 16-56

L10 6-4 4-6 5-5 7-3 2-8

Str Home Away W-2 40-31 41-31 L-3 38-33 36-36 W-2 35-34 36-38 W-4 38-34 31-41 L-2 31-43 26-42

Today’s Games Philadelphia (Cloyd 1-1) at Houston (Harrell 10-9), 5:05 p.m. St. Louis (Lynn 14-7) at L.A. Dodgers (Beckett 1-2), 7:10 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Orioles 3, Rays 2: BALTIMORE — Manny Machado led off the ninth inning with a single and scored the winning run on a single by Nate McLouth, and Baltimore beat Tampa Bay to retain a share of first place in the AL East. • Yankees 5, Red Sox 4: BOSTON — Curtis Granderson hit two home runs, Robinson Cano also homered and New York defeated Boston to remain tied for first place in the AL East. • Tigers 8, White Sox 6: CHICAGO — Max Scherzer pitched six effective innings to earn his career-high 16th win, Prince Fielder hit a three-run homer and Detroit beat Chicago to move within a game of the first-place White Sox in the AL Central. • Rangers 5, Indians 2: ARLINGTON, Texas — Josh Hamilton and Adrian Beltre homered before each left the game with injuries, and Texas beat Cleveland. • Athletics 4, Angels 1: ANAHEIM, Calif. — A.J. Griffin threw eight scoreless innings, becoming the second Athletics pitcher in 85 years to start his major league career with six straight wins. • Royals 10, Twins 5: MINNEAPOLIS — Billy Butler had three hits and three RBIs, and Kansas City’s bullpen picked up struggling starter Luke Hochevar with four scoreless innings in a victory over Minnesota. • Mariners 3, Blue Jays 2: TORONTO — Miguel Olivo hit a solo home run and Kevin Millwood won consecutive starts for the first time since May as Seattle beat Toronto.

• Phillies 3, Marlins 1: PHILADELPHIA — Jimmy Rollins hit a two-run homer and Cliff Lee pitched seven strong innings to lead streaking Philadelphia to its seventh straight win, beating Miami. • Nationals 2, Mets 0: NEW YORK — John Lannan pitched 5 2⁄3 shutout innings and Washington lowered its magic number for clinching a playoff berth to six with a win over punchless New York. • Reds 2, Pirates 1: CINCINNATI — Homer Bailey pitched seven solid innings and Cincinnati finished a three-game sweep of Pittsburgh. • Giants 8, Rockies 3: DENVER — Tim Lincecum pitched effectively for six innings, Brandon Crawford doubled twice and drove in two runs, and San Francisco beat Colorado. • Padres 3, Cardinals 2: SAN DIEGO — Clayton Richard pitched seven strong innings and rookie Yasmani Grandal singled home the go-ahead run as San Diego handed St. Louis its 11th loss in 15 games. • Diamondbacks 3, Dodgers 2: PHOENIX — Justin Upton and Gerardo Parra hit consecutive RBI singles to support Trevor Cahill’s seven strong innings as Arizona topped Los Angeles. • Brewers 8, Braves 2: MILWAUKEE — Rickie Weeks blasted a three-run home run, and Travis Ishikawa hit a three-run double in an eight-run fifth inning for Milwaukee in a win over Atlanta. • Cubs 5, Astros 1: HOUSTON — Alfonso Soriano finished a triple shy of the cycle and drove in two runs to lead Chicago over Houston.

E—R.Soriano (1), Aviles (14), Ciriaco (6), A.Miller (1). LOB—New York 10, Boston 6. 2B—Swisher 2 (33), Er.Chavez 2 (12), Pedroia (34), Loney (2), Saltalamacchia (15), Nava (18), Aviles (28). 3B—Saltalamacchia (1). HR—Granderson (36), off A.Cook; Cano (30), off A.Cook; Granderson (37), off Aceves; Saltalamacchia (24), off R.Soriano. SB—Dickerson (2). DP—New York 2; Boston 1. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP D.Phelps W, 4-4 5 2-3 5 1 1 1 5 93 Rapada H, 6 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 Eppley 1-3 1 1 1 0 1 11 Logan 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 Chamberlain H, 2 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 12 D.Robertson H, 25 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 12 R.Soriano S, 37 1 1-3 1 1 1 0 1 22 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP A.Cook L, 3-10 5 7 3 3 0 2 81 R.Hill 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 14 Aceves 1 3 2 2 0 1 27 C.Carpenter 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 20 A.Miller 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 18 Padilla 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 A.Cook pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Logan pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—3:43. A—37,230 (37,495).

ERA 3.42 2.83 3.46 3.88 6.75 2.81 2.17 ERA 5.18 2.16 4.66 0.00 3.32 4.44

Rangers 5, Indians 2 Cleveland Choo rf Kipnis 2b C.Santana c Brantley cf Canzler dh Chisenhall 3b Kotchman 1b Lillibridge ss Carrera lf Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 3 4 4 3 3 32

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

H 2 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 7

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 2 1 0 2 3 0 2 0 11

Avg. .281 .255 .246 .284 .270 .278 .227 .190 .255

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b-3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .264 Andrus ss 3 0 2 0 1 0 .297 Hamilton cf 4 2 1 2 0 2 .285 Gentry cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .307 Beltre 3b 1 1 1 2 1 0 .318 Olt 3b 2 0 1 0 0 1 .156 1-Profar pr-2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 N.Cruz rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .254 Mi.Young dh 4 1 1 0 0 0 .265 Dav.Murphy lf 4 0 3 0 0 0 .317 Soto c 3 0 0 1 0 1 .213 Moreland 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .279 Totals 32 5 11 5 2 6 Cleveland 000 110 000 — 2 7 0 Texas 301 100 00x — 5 11 0 1-ran for Olt in the 7th. LOB—Cleveland 5, Texas 6. 2B—Kinsler (40), Mi.Young (22). 3B—Dav.Murphy (3). HR—Beltre (32), off J.Gomez; Hamilton (41), off J.Gomez. . SB—Carrera (6). DP—Cleveland 1 (Chisenhall, Kipnis, Kotchman). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Gomez L, 5-8 4 6 5 5 1 1 64 5.61 D.Huff 2 2-3 3 0 0 1 4 44 0.00 E.Rogers 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 6 2.66 C.Perez 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 3.55 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Dempster W, 6-1 7 7 2 2 1 8 103 4.11 Uehara H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.33 Nathan S, 33-34 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.35 T—2:41. A—36,001 (48,194).

Orioles 3, Rays 2 Tampa Bay B.Upton cf Keppinger dh 1-Thompson pr-dh Zobrist ss Longoria 3b B.Francisco lf Fuld lf C.Pena 1b R.Roberts 2b Joyce rf J.Molina c a-Scott ph Lobaton c Totals

AB 4 5 0 4 3 4 0 3 4 2 3 1 0 33

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 9

BI 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 7

SO 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 5

Avg. .254 .328 .105 .260 .290 .244 .293 .190 .221 .253 .201 .217 .229

Baltimore McLouth lf Hardy ss

AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 1 2 1 0 1 .279 4 1 1 0 0 2 .238

Ad.Jones cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .288 Wieters c 3 0 2 1 1 1 .247 Betemit dh 4 0 1 1 0 2 .263 Mar.Reynolds 1b 3 0 0 0 1 3 .228 C.Davis rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .257 Machado 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .272 Andino 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .217 Totals 33 3 10 3 3 12 Tampa Bay 101 000 000 — 2 9 1 Baltimore 200 000 001 — 3 10 0 One out when winning run scored. a-grounded out for J.Molina in the 8th. 1-ran for Keppinger in the 9th. E—C.Pena (7). LOB—Tampa Bay 11, Baltimore 9. 2B—B.Francisco (8), Wieters (23). HR—B.Upton (22), off Mig.Gonzalez. RBIs—B.Upton (67), B.Francisco (5), McLouth (13), Wieters (74), Betemit (40). SB—B.Upton (30), Thompson (4), Ad.Jones (14). S—Andino. DP—Tampa Bay 1; Baltimore 2. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cobb 4 2-3 7 2 2 2 6 87 4.26 McGee 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 4 20 1.96 W.Davis 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 2.18 Jo.Peralta 1 1 0 0 1 0 22 3.51 Farnsworth L, 1-5 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 4 3.52 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mig.Gonzalez 6 6 2 2 5 4 104 3.57 O’Day 1 0 0 0 2 1 26 2.30 Strop 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 2.19 Ji.Johnson W, 2-1 1 2 0 0 0 0 22 2.88 T—3:35. A—26,076 (45,971).

Athletics 4, Angels 1 Oakland Crisp cf S.Smith lf a-J.Gomes ph-lf Reddick rf Cespedes dh Moss 1b Donaldson 3b Drew ss D.Norris c Pennington 2b Totals

AB 5 2 2 5 4 4 4 3 4 4 37

R 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 4

H 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 9

BI 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 3

BB 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 4

SO 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 6

Avg. .254 .249 .260 .248 .287 .262 .242 .219 .198 .215

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Trout cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .331 Tor.Hunter rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .305 Pujols dh 4 1 2 1 0 0 .287 K.Morales 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .277 H.Kendrick 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .284 Aybar ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .285 V.Wells lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .223 Callaspo 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .247 Iannetta c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .247 Totals 34 1 8 1 0 6 Oakland 100 001 020 — 4 9 0 Los Angeles 000 000 001 — 1 8 1 a-singled for S.Smith in the 7th. E—Aybar (13). LOB—Oakland 10, Los Angeles 6. 2B—Reddick (26), Donaldson (14), D.Norris (8), Aybar (27). HR—Cespedes (18), off E.Santana; Pujols (30), off Doolittle. SB—Reddick (11), Cespedes (16). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Griffin W, 6-0 8 6 0 0 0 6 107 1.94 Doolittle 2-3 2 1 1 0 0 16 3.44 R.Cook S, 14-21 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 2.48 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA E.Santana L, 8-12 6 4 2 1 3 6 103 5.08 S.Downs 2-3 2 0 0 0 0 8 2.81 Hawkins 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 8 3.57 Isringhausen 1-3 2 2 2 0 0 13 4.23 Enright 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 21 0.00 T—2:51. A—38,097 (45,957).

NL Boxscores Cubs 5, Astros 1 Chicago Mather cf b-DeJesus ph-cf-rf Barney 2b S.Castro ss A.Soriano lf 1-Campana pr-cf W.Castillo c Vitters 3b c-Valbuena ph-3b Sappelt rf-lf Recker 1b T.Wood p

AB 3 1 5 4 4 0 5 3 2 3 4 4

R 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0

H 0 1 1 0 3 0 1 1 0 3 1 0

BI 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0

BB 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

SO 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 3

Avg. .210 .265 .257 .280 .260 .262 .281 .103 .215 .350 .222 .178

Camp p Marmol p Totals

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 38 5 11 4 4 8

-----

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .289 Lowrie ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .250 J.D.Martinez lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .238 R.Cruz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Maxwell cf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .239 Dominguez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .280 f-S.Moore ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .233 B.Laird 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .222 g-Bogusevic ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .206 C.Snyder c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .190 h-J.Castro ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .259 B.Barnes rf 3 1 2 0 0 1 .197 Abad p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Fick p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Del Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-M.Downs ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .205 Fe.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Storey p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --J.Valdez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Greene ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .227 e-F.Martinez ph-lf 1 0 1 1 0 0 .247 Totals 31 1 6 1 3 10 Chicago 100 010 111 — 5 11 0 Houston 000 000 010 — 1 6 2 a-struck out for Del Rosario in the 6th. b-singled for Mather in the 7th. c-flied out for Vitters in the 8th. d-was announced for J.Valdez in the 8th. e-singled for Greene in the 8th. f-struck out for Dominguez in the 9th. g-struck out for B.Laird in the 9th. h-struck out for C.Snyder in the 9th. 1-ran for A.Soriano in the 9th. E—C.Snyder (4), Fe.Rodriguez (2). LOB—Chicago 10, Houston 6. 2B—A.Soriano (29), Sappelt (4), Recker (1), B.Barnes (2). HR—A.Soriano (29), off Fick. SB—Campana (28). DP—Chicago 2. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T.Wood W, 6-11 7 2-3 4 1 1 1 6 108 4.23 Camp 1-3 2 0 0 1 1 20 3.60 Marmol 1 0 0 0 1 3 20 3.80 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Abad L, 0-4 3 1-3 4 1 1 3 2 68 5.08 Fick 1 2-3 1 1 1 0 3 28 4.42 Del Rosario 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 7.31 Fe.Rodriguez 1 2 1 1 0 0 14 5.80 Storey 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 5 3.00 J.Valdez 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 16 0.00 R.Cruz 1 1 1 0 0 1 20 6.52 T—3:24. A—13,101 (40,981).

Brewers 8, Braves 2 Atlanta Bourn cf Prado lf Heyward rf C.Jones 3b F.Freeman 1b Uggla 2b McCann c Janish ss c-Hinske ph Maholm p C.Martinez p Avilan p a-Overbay ph Venters p Durbin p Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 4 3 3 2 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 31

R 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .277 .297 .274 .297 .264 .214 .230 .186 .200 .071 .000 .333 .276 -----

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aoki rf 4 1 2 0 1 1 .287 R.Weeks 2b 5 1 2 3 0 0 .230 Braun lf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .310 Ar.Ramirez 3b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .296 Lucroy c 3 1 1 1 2 1 .322 C.Gomez cf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .249 L.Schafer cf 2 1 0 0 1 0 .167 Ishikawa 1b 4 1 2 3 0 1 .270 Bianchi ss 4 1 0 0 0 0 .185 Gallardo p 2 0 1 1 0 0 .164 b-Farris ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Veras p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Loe p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 36 8 12 8 4 6 Atlanta 100 100 000 — 2 5 1 Milwaukee 000 080 00x — 8 12 0 a-flied out for Avilan in the 7th. b-struck out for Gallardo in the 7th. c-flied out for Janish in the 9th. E—C.Jones (11). LOB—Atlanta 6, Milwaukee 9. 2B—Ishikawa (9), Gallardo (3). HR—Heyward (26), off Gallardo; R.Weeks (19), off Maholm.

Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Maholm L, 12-10 4 1-3 9 8 6 2 2 86 3.90 C.Martinez 1 1-3 1 0 0 2 1 28 4.04 Avilan 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 2.28 Venters 1 1 0 0 0 2 14 3.71 Durbin 1 1 0 0 0 1 21 3.34 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo W, 15-8 7 4 2 2 3 6 104 3.72 Veras 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 4.03 Loe 1 1 0 0 1 1 23 3.88 T—2:53. A—37,847 (41,900).

Reds 2, Pirates 1 Pittsburgh Holt 2b J.Harrison 3b d-Snider ph Watson p Grilli p A.McCutchen cf G.Jones rf G.Sanchez 1b Presley lf Barmes ss e-Clement ph 1-d’Arnaud pr Barajas c a-S.Marte ph J.Hughes p Mercer 3b f-Tabata ph A.J.Burnett p b-McKenry ph-c Totals

AB 4 3 1 0 0 4 4 4 3 3 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 1 33

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 5

Avg. .364 .232 .263 .000 --.340 .283 .222 .238 .221 .154 .000 .196 .231 .000 .196 .239 .056 .252

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. B.Phillips 2b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .295 W.Valdez ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .201 Votto 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .339 Ludwick lf 3 1 1 0 1 2 .275 Hoover p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .261 Rolen 3b 3 0 0 1 0 2 .240 Heisey cf-lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .284 Hanigan c 3 1 1 0 0 0 .290 H.Bailey p 1 0 0 0 1 1 .115 c-H.Rodriguez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 LeCure p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Stubbs cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Totals 29 2 6 2 3 11 Pittsburgh 000 100 000 — 1 7 1 Cincinnati 001 001 00x — 2 6 0 a-struck out for Barajas in the 7th. b-flied out for A.J.Burnett in the 7th. c-grounded out for H.Bailey in the 7th. d-grounded out for J.Harrison in the 8th. esingled for Barmes in the 9th. f-struck out for Mercer in the 9th. 1-ran for Clement in the 9th. E—G.Jones (8). LOB—Pittsburgh 7, Cincinnati 7. 2B—Ludwick (25). 3B—Presley (6). SB—B.Phillips (14). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Burnett L, 15-7 6 5 2 2 2 8 101 3.66 J.Hughes 1 1 0 0 0 1 19 2.54 Watson 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 14 3.52 Grilli 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 2.91 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA H.Bailey W, 11-9 7 6 1 1 2 4 116 3.93 LeCure H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 2.96 Hoover S, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 2.08 T—3:18. A—21,203 (42,319).

Nationals 2, Mets 0 Washington Werth rf Harper cf Zimmerman 3b LaRoche 1b Desmond ss Bernadina lf a-T.Moore ph-lf K.Suzuki c Lombardozzi 2b Lannan p C.Garcia p c-DeRosa ph 1-E.Perez pr Stammen p Mattheus p e-Tracy ph S.Burnett p Storen p Totals

AB 3 4 2 4 3 2 2 4 4 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 32

R 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BI 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 2 2 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11

Avg. .306 .262 .287 .269 .295 .300 .279 .253 .280 .167 --.157 .000 .000 .000 .286 -----

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tejada ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .292 R.Cedeno 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Valdespin 2b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .244 D.Wright 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .314 Hairston rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .264 Duda 1b-lf 3 0 2 0 1 0 .243 Shoppach c 3 0 1 0 0 2 .255 Bay lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .156 b-I.Davis ph-1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .223 An.Torres cf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .225 Harvey p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .375 R.Carson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Parnell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hampson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-F.Lewis ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Rauch p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --F.Francisco p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Ju.Turner ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .280 g-Dan.Murphy ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .291 Totals 33 0 8 0 1 3 Washington 000 100 010 — 2 7 1 New York 000 000 000 — 0 8 0 a-fouled out for Bernadina in the 6th. b-flied out for Bay in the 6th. c-singled for C.Garcia in the 7th. dgrounded out for Hampson in the 7th. e-popped out for Mattheus in the 9th. f-was announced for F.Francisco in the 9th. g-flied out for Ju.Turner in the 9th. 1-ran for DeRosa in the 7th. E—Zimmerman (16). LOB—Washington 9, New York 9. HR—Zimmerman (22), off Harvey; Desmond (23), off Rauch. B—D.Wright 2 (14). DP—Washington 1; New York 1. Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lannan W, 3-0 5 2-3 5 0 0 1 2 81 2.41 C.Garcia H, 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 1.69 Stammen H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.42 Mattheus H, 13 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 2.44 S.Burnett H, 28 2-3 2 0 0 0 1 14 2.45 Storen S, 2-2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 3.00 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harvey L, 3-5 5 5 1 1 3 10 106 2.92 R.Carson 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 5.23 Parnell 1-3 1 0 0 2 0 15 2.97 Hampson 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 2.70 Rauch 1 1 1 1 0 1 13 2.94 F.Francisco 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 5.66 Harvey pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. T—3:12. A—21,205 (41,922).

Phillies 3, Marlins 1 Miami G.Hernandez cf D.Solano 2b Reyes ss Stanton rf Ca.Lee 1b Ruggiano lf Kearns lf J.Buck c Do.Murphy 3b Dobbs 3b Jo.Johnson p Webb p b-Petersen ph Totals

AB 5 4 3 4 4 1 2 3 3 1 3 0 0 33

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 3

SO 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 2 1 1 0 0 10

Avg. .158 .287 .277 .283 .275 .318 .242 .199 .205 .304 .100 .000 .223

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rollins ss 4 2 2 2 0 0 .249 Pierre lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .306 Schierholtz rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Utley 2b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .254 Howard 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .227 Mayberry cf 2 0 1 1 2 1 .255 D.Brown rf-lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .248 Kratz c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .256 M.Martinez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .156 Cl.Lee p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .179 a-Orr ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .298 Aumont p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Papelbon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 27 3 4 3 4 7 Miami 000 001 000 — 1 4 0 Philadelphia 000 001 20x — 3 4 2 a-singled for Cl.Lee in the 7th. b-walked for Webb in the 9th. E—Rollins (12), Cl.Lee (2). LOB—Miami 9, Philadelphia 6. HR—Rollins (19), off Jo.Johnson. SB—Orr (2). Miami IP Johnson L, 8-12 7 Webb 1

H R ER BB SO NP ERA 4 3 3 3 6 115 3.81 0 0 0 1 1 18 4.07

Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cl.Lee W, 5-7 7 4 1 0 1 6 107 3.36 Aumont H, 3 1 0 0 0 1 1 14 1.08 Papelbon S, 34-38 1 0 0 0 1 3 19 2.44 T—2:45. A—42,178 (43,651).

Padres 3, Cardinals 2 St. Louis Jay cf M.Carpenter rf Holliday lf Craig 1b 1-Chambers pr Y.Molina c Freese 3b Descalso 2b c-Beltran ph 2-S.Robinson pr Kozma ss d-Schumaker ph Lohse p a-S.Hill ph Rosenthal p Rzepczynski p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 0 3 4 2 0 0 2 1 2 1 0 0 31

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BI 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 6

Avg. .316 .305 .301 .305 .256 .315 .297 .224 .260 .253 .353 .289 .086 .222 -----

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ev.Cabrera ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .240 Venable rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .257 Headley 3b 3 1 1 0 0 2 .282 Grandal c 3 0 1 1 0 0 .273 Alonso 1b 3 1 1 0 0 1 .270 Forsythe 2b 3 1 1 1 0 2 .289 Maybin cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .246 Amarista lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .254 Richard p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .078 Layne p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Thayer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Guzman ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .252 Gregerson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 29 3 5 2 0 9 St. Louis 000 002 000 — 2 4 1 San Diego 010 011 00x — 3 5 1 a-struck out for Lohse in the 7th. b-grounded out for Thayer in the 8th. c-walked for Descalso in the 9th. d-grounded out for Kozma in the 9th. 1-ran for Craig in the 9th. 2-ran for Beltran in the 9th. E—M.Carpenter (8), Forsythe (9). LOB—St. Louis 6, San Diego 2. 2B—Craig (30), Headley (26), Maybin (18). HR—M.Carpenter (5), off Richard; Forsythe (5), off Lohse. St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lohse L, 14-3 6 5 3 2 0 8 93 2.81 Rosenthal 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 3.07 Rzepczynski 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 4.43 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Richard W, 13-12 7 3 2 2 1 5 103 3.74 Layne H, 6 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 1.54 Thayer H, 16 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 3.99 Gregerson S, 7-11 1 1 0 0 1 0 18 2.28 HBP—by Richard (Descalso). PB—Grandal. T—2:16. A—16,442 (42,691).

Giants 8, Rockies 3 San Francisco G.Blanco cf-lf Scutaro 2b Posey 1b Pence rf Arias 3b Belt lf S.Casilla p Affeldt p e-A.Huff ph Mota p Ja.Lopez p Romo p H.Sanchez c B.Crawford ss Lincecum p Kontos p Mijares p Christian lf b-Pagan ph-cf Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 4 4 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 4 2 0 0 0 1 40

R 1 2 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

H 2 3 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 15

BI 0 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 8

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 1 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 12

Avg. .242 .293 .333 .258 .279 .273 .000 .000 .179 ------.267 .246 .095 .000 .000 .125 .289

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 4 0 1 0 1 2 .311 Rutledge 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .304 C.Gonzalez lf 3 1 1 0 2 0 .305 W.Rosario c 4 1 2 2 1 1 .255 Pacheco 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .307 Colvin rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .295 Nelson 3b 3 1 1 0 1 2 .278 J.Herrera ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .241 c-McBride ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .176 LeMahieu ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .264 Francis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .038 Ottavino p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .111 a-Blackmon ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .241 W.Harris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Outman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .111 E.Escalona p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-A.Brown ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .220 Roenicke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .083 Totals 34 3 8 3 5 11 San Francisco 500 001 002 — 8 15 0 Colorado 101 001 000 — 3 8 0 a-doubled for Ottavino in the 6th. b-struck out for Christian in the 8th. c-flied out for J.Herrera in the 8th. d-grounded out for E.Escalona in the 8th. e-flied out for Affeldt in the 9th. LOB—San Francisco 7, Colorado 10. 2B—Posey (35), B.Crawford 2 (25), Blackmon (5). 3B—G.Blanco (5), Pence (4). HR—W.Rosario (24), off Lincecum. SB—G.Blanco (22), Scutaro (9), Belt (11), C.Gonzalez 2 (18). San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lincecum W, 9-14 6 6 3 3 4 8 108 5.09 Kontos H, 3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 2.35 Mijares 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 3.55 S.Casilla H, 8 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 2.63 Affeldt H, 12 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 2.91 Mota 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 8 5.40 Ja.Lopez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.36 Romo 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 2.08 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Francis L, 5-5 3 7 5 5 0 5 78 5.68 Ottavino 3 5 1 1 0 4 48 3.56 W.Harris 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 10 5.79 Outman 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 14 8.54 E.Escalona 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 9.26 Roenicke 1 2 2 2 0 1 17 3.01 Mijares pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—3:28. A—24,182 (50,398).

Diamondbacks 3, Dodgers 2 Los Angeles M.Ellis 2b Victorino lf Kemp cf Ad.Gonzalez 1b H.Ramirez ss Ethier rf L.Cruz 3b A.Ellis c Harang p Choate p Sh.Tolleson p J.Wright p b-B.Abreu ph Belisario p Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 4 3 3 3 1 0 0 0 1 0 30

R 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BI 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 0 3 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .268 .257 .312 .229 .251 .287 .303 .278 .060 ----.000 .245 ---

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .323 A.Hill 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .294 R.Wheeler 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .228 Goldschmidt 1b 3 2 1 0 1 1 .287 M.Montero c 2 1 1 0 2 0 .286 J.Upton rf 2 0 1 2 0 0 .271 G.Parra lf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .271 Jo.McDonald ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .232 Cahill p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .115 a-Elmore ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .192 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 D.Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 Totals 27 3 5 3 4 5 Los Angeles 200 000 000 — 2 4 0 Arizona 010 002 00x — 3 5 0 a-grounded out for Cahill in the 7th. b-grounded out for J.Wright in the 8th. LOB—Los Angeles 3, Arizona 5. 2B—Ad.Gonzalez (4). SB—Goldschmidt (16). DP—Los Angeles 1. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP Harang L, 9-9 5 2-3 4 3 3 4 3 83 Choate 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 Sh.Tolleson 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 J.Wright 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 Belisario 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP Cahill W, 11-11 7 4 2 2 0 7 93 Ziegler H, 15 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 Hernandez S, 4-9 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 Choate pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. T—2:26. A—25,048 (48,633).

ERA 3.79 2.80 4.60 3.58 2.45 ERA 3.92 2.41 2.43


D4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

PREP ROUNDUP

Extra berth is putting the ‘wild’ in the wild-card races By Benjamin Hoffman New York Times News Service

If a team wants to be in playoff contention in mid-September, a viable strategy may be to give up in July. That is what the Philadelphia Phillies did on July 31 when they traded away Hunter Pence and Shane Victorino in separate deadline deals. Despite that, the Phillies were three games back in the National League wild-card standings after winning Wedensday night. The Milwaukee Brewers gave up even earlier, letting Prince Fielder leave as a free agent before the season started and trading away the team’s best pitcher, Zack Greinke, on July 27. They were also three games out after winning on Wednesday. The thought of the Phillies making the postseason may seem comical, but with a sevengame winning streak the team is clearly entertaining the idea. “You hear it’s a cliche that this is what you play for, for September, but it’s true,” shortstop Jimmy Rollins told reporters after Tuesday’s win over the Miami Marlins. “We have a lot of flags but we don’t have a wild-card flag, so this would be a good time.” Forty-five years ago, just two teams qualified for postseason play each year, but through Tuesday, 18 of the 30 teams were within five games of the 10 available postseason positions. If Major League Baseball was hoping to create parity through chaos in the playoff races, adding a second wild-card team in each league this year accomplished that goal. It is not that the Phillies or the Brewers should start printing playoff tickets; overcoming a three-game deficit in the remaining weeks, especially with so many other teams having to fail, will be difficult. But the fact that two teams that sent up a white flag are hanging around a pennant race is a sign that meaningful baseball will continue to be played late in the regular season under the new playoff format, in which a third of the teams advance. The list of contenders even includes two teams, the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Baltimore Orioles, that are trying to attain their first winning seasons since the Internet became mainstream. The Orioles are nearly a lock, needing to go just 2-18 in the remaining games for their first winning season since 1997. The slumping Pirates have a tougher road, needing to go 10-10 to end their streak of losing seasons, which dates to 1992. The only team officially eliminated through Tuesday was the Houston Astros. With the worst record in the major leagues, 45-97, the Astros were 40 1⁄2 games out of first place. In soccer they would be facing relegation to a

Matt Slocum / The Associated Press

Philadelphia Phillies’ Jonathan Papelbon, right, and Carlos Ruiz celebrate after winning a baseball game against the Miami Marlins on Tuesday in Philadelphia. The Phillies are one of several teams still in the postseason hunt because of two added playoff spots.

lower division, but instead they will be sent to the American League West to balance the leagues at 15 teams each. Taking a look around the playoff races shows one thing: chaos reigns. Major League Baseball will have to hope that where there is chaos, there is interest.

Division races The three division races in the National League are the only places of tranquillity this season. Barring a collapse that only New York Mets fans would find reasonable, the Washington Nationals, the Cincinnati Reds and the San Francisco Giants will each win their division. Despite that, each team has had some drama. The Nationals shut down Stephen Strasburg, though the move was not as dire as many presumed, considering he has been the team’s third best starting pitcher behind Jordan Zimmermann and Gio Gonzalez. The Reds also shut down a young phenomenon, closer Aroldis Chapman, hoping it helps him regain some lost velocity. Having traded for Jonathan Broxton and already having Logan Ondrusek, Jose Arredondo and Sean Marshall, the team should be fine without him. The Giants lost outfielder Melky Cabrera to a 50-game drug suspension, which will keep him out through the first week of the playoffs, but they have rode the hot bat of Buster Posey to a commanding lead over the Los Angeles Dodgers despite the blockbuster deal Los Angeles completed last month to acquire three of the Boston Red Sox’s most expensive players. The American League is nowhere near as

clear-cut. The Orioles and the New York Yankees remained tied for the lead in the East on Wednesday, three games ahead of the Tampa Bay Rays; the Chicago White Sox were one game ahead of the Detroit Tigers in the Central; and the Texas Rangers were three games ahead of the Oakland Athletics in the West. Seven teams are vying for three spots, with each team believing it can fall back on winning one of the two wild-card berths.

New York Times News Service

ARCATA, Calif. — The Marching Lumberjacks, surely one of the country’s more irreverent college bands, had launched into “Misirlou.” One member banged on a trash can lid while another knocked together sticks that could have been plucked from the nearby old-growth forest. All were clad in suspenders and hard hats. The band leader danced maniacally, an oversize ax hoisted above her head. With each Humboldt State touchdown, six men and women dressed as lumberjacks fired up chain saws near the end zone, bringing cheers from the crowd as the power tools roared to life. California’s only full-fledged NCAA Division II football team was on its way to an easy seasonopening win against Colorado Mesa on Aug. 30, and the eclectic mix of fans in attendance knew it. Wins are expected often this season in this isolated corner of California, one reason Humboldt has held on to its pricey football team while other colleges in the state have folded theirs. Humboldt has been California’s only Division II program since the University of California-Davis, moved to Division I in 2003. The last Cal State campus to drop Division II football was Chico, in 1997. In a region known more for marijuana culture and environmental activism than athletics, football has captured the locals’ attention. “This keeps me sane,” Cedric Aaron, a Humboldt State alumnus and season-ticket holder who works with the mentally ill, said as he watched the game against Colorado Mesa. Two other Cal State campuses, San Francisco and Sonoma, also dropped football in the mid-1990s after the 23-campus university’s agreement with the National Organization for Women to abide by gender-equity laws. With more than 100 men per football roster, it became too difficult for some universities dependent on state financing to offer enough women’s

COLLEGE FOOTBALL sports to meet the requirements.

Bucking trends Humboldt, however, chose a different path, keeping football and adding women’s soccer and rowing. The rowing team was honored at halftime against Colorado Mesa after winning its first national championship this year. With the nearest metropolitan area, the San Francisco Bay region, more than five hours away, Humboldt’s leaders have stuck with football, in part, to give residents behind the Redwood Curtain something to cheer. Arcata’s population barely tops 17,000 when school is in session. “There’s a sense of pride in your team and your small town,” said Pete Ciotti, a season-ticket holder and pizzeria owner who moved to Arcata from Ithaca, N.Y., 15 years ago. An entire row of Humboldt seats includes Big Pete’s Pizzeria plaques. “Everyone’s just really excited about it,” Ciotti added. “We all sat through terrible seasons, getting rained on. We knew things would get turned around.” Rain still falls on Redwood Bowl, one reason an old-growth forest abuts the 7,000-capacity stadium, but the Lumberjacks bear little resemblance to the 2008 team, which went 2-9 in Rob Smith’s first season as coach. The squad has improved significantly since then, culminating in last year’s 9-1 record and two home sellouts, which was new ground for Humboldt, whose following over the years has been loyal but small. Not including scholarships, Humboldt spends slightly more than $650,000 a year on football, about $213,000 more than the university spends on men’s basketball, the second most expensive sport. Football also costs about $380,000 more than Humboldt’s most expensive women’s sport, basketball.

A different model Amid a financial crunch that has devastated the state universi-

Bulletin staff report HOOD RIVER — Ridgeview junior Dakota Steen earned the highest finish for the Ravens at the Hood River Invitational on Wednesday, taking 25th in the girls race after running the 5,000meter course in 22 minutes, 47.98 seconds. Junior Natalie Ulum’s time of 24:53.43 was good enough for 47th, while sophomore Taylor Bernard’s 24:55.04 gave her the 48th spot. For the boys, it was junior James Seeley leading the way for Ridgeview, recording a mark of 18:50 to finish 39th. Landon Prescott, also a junior, claimed 46th after finishing in 19:28. The Ravens get back to work on Sept. 22, when they compete in the Northwest Classic at Lane Community College in Eugene. In other prep action Wednesday: T h ree Buffs finish under 26 minutes SILVER FALLS — In the Silver Falls Invitational, the White Buffaloes were led by junior J’Von Smith, who finished the 5,200-meter course at Silver Falls State Park in 24:36. Juniors Isaac Fisher and Brandon Hawes came in below the 26-minute mark as well, logging times of 25:33.8 and 25:43, respectively. The White Buffaloes did not have a varsity runner in the girls event. Madras is at the Three Course Challenge in Seaside on Sept. 22.

Wild cards The addition of the second wild card is where things get crazy. In the National League, the Atlanta Braves were safely in front for the first wild card, 51⁄2 games ahead of their nearest competitor, the St. Louis Cardinals. But the Cardinals had a one-game lead over the newly rich Dodgers, and a 2 1⁄2-game lead over the Pirates. Slumps by those three teams could put the Phillies or the Brewers in the playoffs despite their intentions to play for the future. The American League, meanwhile, is a free-for-all. The Rangers appear safely on the way to the playoffs, either as a division winner or a wild card, but nothing else is guaranteed. The pool of teams to fill out the other five spots includes the Yankees, the Orioles, the Rays, the White Sox, the Tigers, the Athletics and the Los Angeles Angels. The Orioles and the Athletics may seem strange fits among that list of high-profile and deep-pocketed teams, but both clubs have shown a flair for late-game wins that at some point has to get in the heads of their opponents.

At Humboldt State, football is worth the price By Matt Krupnick

Ridgeview runner posts top-25 finish at Hood River Invitational

ty system’s academic and studentsupport programs, Humboldt administrators emphasize that the university spends no state money on athletics. The program, rather, is financed through a student fee and private money. Humboldt’s president, Rollin Richmond, concerned about athletics’ future, raised the fee in 2010 over students’ objections and faculty concerns. In an advisory vote that year, students overwhelmed by quickly rising tuition opposed Richmond’s increase by a 2-1 margin. “People here were somewhat divided on it,” said Richmond, a biologist who came to Humboldt a decade ago. “That was a challenge. Students, rightly so, feel like the state has abandoned them.” The university system has staggered under a series of budget cuts that have more than tripled tuition in the past decade, forcing its 430,000 or so students to shoulder the country’s fastest-rising prices. But animosity over Humboldt’s higher athletic fees appears to have decreased while the football team’s success has grown. Few Humboldt students seem to know or care that they each pay hundreds of dollars a year to keep the athletic department running. “I don’t really mind,” DeAndre Crenshaw, 20, said as he sat on a bench on Humboldt’s central quad. Other students pay for his extracurricular activities, he noted.

Creative accounting University leaders say the student fees are crucial to football’s survival. Even with that money, the team can afford the equivalent of only 14 full scholarships, they say, far fewer than the 36 the NCAA allows for Division II universities. The team is inventive when it comes to making its money go as far as it can. Athletes from other sports clean up Redwood Bowl after games to save money, which is why the university’s cross-country and track coach was carrying a leaf blower around the stadium after the opening game.

Humboldt has sponsored football since the mid-1920s, when it avoided travel costs by playing local high schools. The team still tries to limit travel expenses, sometimes taking 15-hour bus trips to road games rather than flying. Travel costs are one major reason why Azusa Pacific, a private university of 5,200 students near Los Angeles, has decided to join Humboldt in Division II and the Great Northwest Athletic Conference. In 2007, the university’s football team traveled 18,000 miles, more than any other team in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, said Gary Pine, Azusa Pacific’s athletic director.

Building a program Humboldt’s football team came into the 2012 season ranked as high as No. 17 in national polls, and it has moved up to No. 11 after starting 2-0. The Lumberjacks’ resurgence has led to recent, albeit short, NFL stints for former players like Taylor Boggs (New York Jets) and Lyndon Rowells (Carolina Panthers). The inviting confines of the Redwood Bowl have come as something of a relief to Smith, who in 2005 left a job as Western Washington’s head coach, frustrated by what he saw as a lack of respect for football on campus. Citing the shortage of Division II teams on the West Coast, Western Washington dropped football in 2009. “It’s been very difficult for someone like me, who has given his life to this sport,” said Smith, who played in a Rose Bowl with the University of Washington. “But football is always a target.” During eight straight losing seasons from 1996 to 2003, the Humboldt football team sometimes had trouble attracting fans. But at the 2012 season opener, with a victory assured, Stephanie Lane, an assistant athletic director who grew up nearby as a Humboldt fan, proudly looked over bleachers filled with students. “This is our NFL,” she said. “I don’t miss football games. It’s just in my blood.”

PREP SCOREBOARD Cross-country CLASS 4A ———

HOOD RIVER INVITATIONAL

Hood River Valley High School Boys Individual winner — Alejandro Cisneros, Hermiston, 16:19.01 Top 10 — 1, Cisneros, Hermiston, 16.19.01; 2, Jackson Packham, Franklin, 16:22.67; 3, Jose Macias, Hermiston, 16:25.45; 4, Christopher Black, Franklin, 16:38.20; 5, Eduardo Juarez, 16:42.18; 6, Ethan Livermore, Cleveland, 16:50.95; 7, Efrain Jaime, Hermiston, 16:54.48; 8, Noah Leonard, Franklin, 16:55.67; 9, Ricardo Castillo, Hood River Valley, 16:57.08; 10, Roba Sultessa, Cleveland, 17:09.79. RIDGEVIEW— 39, James Seeley, 18:50.00; 46, Landon Prescott, 19:28.00; 60, Mitchell Felty, 20:57.04; 63, Jayden Goeman, 21:39.02; 65, Nick Griffin, 21:46.98; 66, Jacob Kinzer, 22:18.58; 67, Trystin Graham, 23:10.81. Girls Individual winner — Maggie Coleman, Hermiston, 19:08.59. Top 10 —1, Coleman, Hermiston, 19:08.59; 2, Grace Grim, Hood River Valley, 19:47.46; 3, Katie Markwick, Hermiston, 19:54.54; 4, Sascha Bockius, Hood River Valley, 20:10.28; 5, Delaney Clem, Pendleton, 20:29.09; 6, Zoey Garcia, Hermiston, 21:07.35; 7, Isabel Leonard, Franklin, 21:11.51; 8, Margarita Lauer, Franklin, 21:23.79; 9, Emma Wren, Cleveland, 21:35.35; 10, Evelyn Perez, Pendleton, 21:43.92.

RIDGEVIEW— 25, Dakota Steen, 22:47.98; 47, Natalie Ulum, 24:53.43; 48, Taylor Bernard, 24:55.04; 52, Georgia MacCrone, 25:36.89; 56, Katlin Wilbur, 27:18.16; 58, Katie Hakala, 28:36.33.

SILVER FALLS INVITATIONAL

Silver Falls State Park Boys Individual winner — Clay Stuhr, Dallas, 20:33.1 Top 10 — 1, Stuhr, Dallas, 20:33.1; 2, Brian Blythe, Philomath, 20:48.2; 3, Jonathan Sisley, Silverton, 20:50.6; 4, Kody Osborne, East Linn Christian, 21:07.2; 5, Jamin Hooley, East Linn Christian, 21:13.3; 6, Morgan Coxen, Silverton, 21:38.5; 7, John Roth, Cascade, 21:43.0; 8, Parr Christian, North Marion, 21:43.8; 9, Dalton Susee, Kennedy, 21:52.5; 10, Caelin Alba, Philomath, 22:02.4. MADRAS — J’Von Smith, 24:36.0; Isaac Fisher, 25:37.7; Brandon Hawes, 25:43.0; Miguel Vasquez, 27:33.8; Raymond Hill, 31:52.9. Girls Individual winner — Anne Christensen, West Albany, 24:41.9 Top 10 — 1, Christensen, West Albany, 24:41.9; 2, Maddie Fuhrman, Silverton, 25:35.0; 3, Mckenzie Spooner, Catlin Gabel, 25:45.4; 4, Kelly Faulhaber, Silverton, 26:55.2; 5, Anna Burkey, East Linn Christian, 26:57.4; 6, Sabrina Boyd, Pleasant Hill, 27:02.5; 7, Eliza Smith, Blanchet Catholic, 27:03.2; 8, Kenzie Collins, East Linn Christian, 27:08.9; 9, Freya Christensen, Cascade, 27:13.0; 10, Alena Voss, Dallas, 27:40.6.

Football Continued from D1 Junior running back Boomer Fleming has been the key back in the Ravens’ run-based offense, totaling 213 yards and three touchdowns on just 26 carries. In other games Friday involving Central Oregon teams: • Klamath Union (2-0) at Summit (1-1): The Storm face another tough test after last week’s 34-7 loss at Eagle Point. Summit will have to stop the run better after giving up 316 yards on the ground against the Eagles. The Pelicans, who held off Ridgeview 42-35 last week, are looking for their second win against a Class 5A program in three weeks after upsetting Ashland in their season opener. • West Salem (1-1) at Bend High (0-2): The Titans knocked off Thurston 44-35 last week behind sophomore quarterback Cade Smith, who completed nine of 12 passes for 133 yards and rushed for 133 yards and three touchdowns on 16 carries. Duke DeGaetano ran for 123 yards last week for the Lava Bears. • Sprague (2-0) at Mountain View (1-1): Senior quarterback Jon Schaub passed for 179 yards and three touchdowns last week as the Olympians rolled past Roseburg 40-20 in Salem. The Cougars look to bounce back from their first defeat since Sept. 16 of last year. Mountain View quarterback Toby Webb has passed for 465 yards and five touchdowns in the Cougars’ first two games. • Redmond (2-0) at Hood River Valley (2-0): The Panthers, who have given up just 14 points in two games, will try to contain Eagles running back Forrest Broddie, who piled up 134 yards and three touchdowns last week in Hood River Valley’s 3421 win over Forest Grove. Redmond running back Trevor Hindman had a career game of his own last Friday, rushing for 180 yards and four scores in the Panthers’ 41-14 victory at Madras. • The Dalles Wahtonka (1-1) at Crook County (1-1): The Cowboys gave up 19 first-half points last week in their 31-12 defeat at Cascade. Meanwhile, the Eagle Indians blew out Portland’s Benson High 316 for their first win of the year. • Sisters (1-1) at Madras (1-1): Both Central Oregon teams are looking to bounce back from losses in Week 2, when Burns rallied past Sisters 36-18 and Redmond rolled over Madras 41-14. Devin Ceciliani posted two touchdowns for the White Buffaloes last week, one on a kickoff return. • Culver (0-1) at Stanfield (1-0): The Bulldogs struggled mightily in their opener, falling to Grant Union 61-0. The Tigers easily handled Washington foe Dayton, 47-6. • Prospect (2-0) at Gilchrist (0-1): The Grizzlies face a Prospect squad that has outscored its first two opponents 122-20. Gilchrist lost to Elkton 4212 in its opener. — Reporter: 541-383-0305, beastes@bendbulletin.com.


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Home Continued from D1 The stretch upstream from Bend tends not to hold as many fish as downstream from town, and the river is generally wider there, allowing the fish to disperse more. “The fishing above town in places can actually be pretty good,” says Dave Merrick, shop manager at Fly & Field Outfitters in Bend. “It’s sometimes overlooked, because we have so many other choices. The reality is, it doesn’t see a whole lot of fishing pressure — lots of runners and hikers, and occasionally you’ll see someone out there fishing.” We saw one other fisherman across the river, and about 50 joggers and walkers passed behind us along the trail as we fished. Merrick says that large brown trout linger in that stretch of the Deschutes above town, but we had little luck and decided to head to our next stop: the bridge at Colorado Avenue. There, the fishing is good yearround — not so much because the fish collect below the spillway that runs under the bridge, but more because of the rocky nature of the river and the whitewater it produces, according to Merrick. That sort of water is a haven for bug life — the kind of bugs that fish like to eat. “That whole river there has a rocky bottom,” Merrick says. “(The fish) are very close to the dinner table. They can move in and feed. You can wade out from both sides of the river. In winter, the water level comes down and the wading gets easier.” Rainbow trout and whitefish are the catch at the bridge, and Ryan had fished for about five minutes before he brought a 10-inch rainbow to hand. Ryan was using a pheasant tail nymph (size 16) to catch his quarry. Fly patterns tend to work uniformly well on any stretch of the Deschutes through Bend. If dry-fly fishing, caddis and mayflies can work this time of year. If nymphing (fishing below the surface), the best patterns include pheasant tails and scuds, as well as mayfly and caddis nymphs. I was using a copper john at the Colorado bridge, with little

Beavers Continued from D1 Beavers head coach Mike Riley agreed. “It was just a great performance,” Riley said. “Guys were very sound. I think one of the key elements was that everyone worked hard and was winning off the block. Those are big guys (on the Wisconsin offensive line), but our defensive coaches had a great plan. When we got into situations where we threw in a nickel and dime defense we made some big plays, and that combination is awesome.” The effort was in marked contrast to those turned in by last year’s overmatched — and often star-crossed — defensive squad. The 2011 defense was too often slow, tentative and technically sloppy. It ranked 84th in the country overall and yielded nearly 200 yards a game on the

Notre Dame Continued from D1 Only weeks ago, there were rumblings the Big 12 might wrench Florida State and Clemson from the ACC. Why Notre Dame is joining the ACC in all sports except for football is simple: The ACC in a few years will look more like the Big East than the Big East. The addition of Notre Dame will make six former Big East schools in the ACC. A few years ago, the ACC raided the Big East of Miami, Virginia Tech and Boston College. Pittsburgh and Syracuse are joining the ACC next year. Notre Dame’s move made perfect, non-football sense. The school needed refuge for all its other sports. The “old” Big East is reconfiguring and is about to look like the Western Athletic Conference, circa 1996. The Big East is adding schools such as San Diego State, Boise State, Southern Methodist and Houston. That’s not a conference, it’s a geography test. Notre Dame joining the ACC is a sweetheart deal for both business partners. The Irish stay independent in football but get the security of five ACC games per year. That leaves seven dates to maintain Notre Dame’s national identity with games against the likes of USC, Stanford and Navy. Notre Dame gets to keep its television money, but also buys

D5

FISHING REPORT

Brown trout opportunity on Suttle Lake

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Bulletin reporter Mark Morical makes a cast on the Deschutes River just upstream from Bill Healy Memorial Bridge on Tuesday.

As we fished near the bridge, walkers through McKay Park watched us and drivers passing over the bridge glanced down to see us casting to the middle of the river. We might have looked odd, fishing in such a busy section of town, but drive over the bridge anytime during the summer and chances are good that you will see an angler or two down there. It is not exactly a secret spot. success. As we fished near the bridge, walkers through McKay Park watched us and drivers passing over the bridge glanced down to see us casting to the middle of the river. We might have looked odd, fishing in such a busy section of town, but drive over the bridge anytime during the summer and chances are good that you will see an angler or two down there. It is not exactly a secret spot. And, according to Merrick, that stretch fishes well even in the dead of winter. The same cannot be said of the

Beating the best Three Pac-12 schools — UCLA, Oregon State and Arizona — recorded wins last weekend over Associated Press top 25 opponents. The last time that happened was Jan. 1, 1985, when UCLA, USC and Washington all defeated ranked opponents in bowl games.

ground. The Beavers were especially bad when the chips were down, ranking 10th in the conference on third-down plays and eighth in red-zone defense. There was also a lot of bad luck. Injuries haunted the defensive unit the entire season. In one game, five key defensive players were lost, and half of Oregon State’s projected starters going into the season missed time

stretch of the river just north of Bend, which fishermen should hit in the next month or so, before irrigation season ends and the fishing is made difficult by rising water levels. Currently, though, that area is the place to be, as Ryan and I noticed when we arrived at Sawyer Park and encountered more than half a dozen anglers lining the banks in the middle of a weekday afternoon. The river through the park flows in a narrow stream, rocky and picturesque, meandering slowly through and over smooth gray boulders.

at some point. Freshmen Scott Crichton, Dylan Wynn and Ryan Murphy emerged as playmakers, but their inexperience led to mistakes. Last Saturday against Wisconsin, the Beavers seemed to have total control. Holes closed up as soon as they appeared. The linebackers were active and effective. Linebackers Feti Unga and D.J. Welch combined for 13 tackles, and Welch earned Pac12 defensive player of the week honors. Oregon State also unveiled some new pressures and different looks. Unga was lined up deeper than last year. Poyer made a huge play by blindsiding Badgers quarterback Danny O’Brien on a corner blitz that caused a fumble. The Beavers sacked O’Brien three times. Maybe the best sign of all was that the Beavers displayed an outward confidence — jawing,

ACC+Notre Dame = ? Below are some of the highlights of the deal under which Notre Dame will join the Atlantic Coast Conference; the agreement was announced on Wednesday: • Notre Dame will remain independent in football, meaning it can keep all the money from its contract with NBC. The school has not disclosed how much that is. • Notre Dame, which has no bowl affiliation the next two seasons if it does not qualify for the BCS, will have access to the ACC’s non-BCS bowls. The bowls cannot select Notre Dame over an ACC team unless the Irish are ranked higher in the BCS standings or are within one victory of that ACC team. • Notre Dame will play five football games annually against ACC teams, playing each team every three years. It will mean an end to Notre Dame’s annual games with Pittsburgh and Boston College. • ACC Commissioner John Swofford says the league has no intention of adding a 16th member. • The ACC increased its exit fees for league schools to three times the annual operation budget, more than $50 million. • Notre Dame athletic director Jack Swarbrick described the deal as “financially neutral” for the school. Swofford said the deal likely would mean higher revenues for the ACC. • Beside football, Notre Dame hockey will be the only other Irish athletic team not in the ACC. It is joining the Hockey East in two seasons. — The Associated Press

some insurance by tying into the ACC’s bowl affiliations. And the ACC adds the name brand of Notre Dame. This is not dramatic news on the football side. Notre Dame played five ACC opponents in football last year if you count future member Pittsburgh. As for tying into the conference’s postseason structure, bowls affiliated with the ACC will also be able to choose Notre Dame. And the Fighting Irish will

share bowl revenues just like any other conference member — unless it plays in a BCS bowl other than the Orange; in that case, Notre Dame would keep all the money. “Speaking strictly from a football standpoint, we have further solidified our future as an independent in college football, maintained our unique ability to schedule nationally and greatly improved our postseason bowl game options,” Notre

“That stretch fishes very well,” Merrick says. “Once you get down to Tumalo State Park, it’s not as good. It’s actually better closer to Sawyer Park. It’s a great park. You’re right in town, but you don’t see any houses. You kind of forget you’re right in town. “The only difference there is, at Sawyer, the water will come up starting in mid-October. It can fish well at times after that, you just have to pay attention to the water level.” We found a spot downstream of the other anglers, and Ryan had soon landed another rainbow trout on his pheasant tail pattern. I changed my fly from a copper john to a pheasant tail, hoping to find the same luck. We continued to fish along the Deschutes, focused on nothing but the quiet current of the river and our orange strike indicators drifting atop the gently flowing water — all right in the middle of town. — Reporter: 541-383-0318, mmorical@bendbulletin.com

chest bumping, high-fiving and hugging — that they rarely had a reason to show last year. It’s been a slow decline since defensive coordinator Mark Banker’s crew led the nation in run defense in 2007. One game does not indicate a complete turnaround, but coaches have said the signs of real improvement have been unmistakable throughout preseason camp, and Poyer, one of four team captains, believes a corner has been turned. “How good we can be is unlimited,” he said. “It’s just going to be determined on the work that we put in week in and week out and how bad we want it. We’ve just got a taste of it right here with this ‘W.’ We’re going to keep working, keep grinding to be the best defense we could be.” Oregon State has this weekend off before visiting UCLA in the Beavers’ Pac-12 Conference opener on Sept. 22.

Dame coach Brian Kelly said in a statement. Notre Dame doesn’t have to worry now about losing Big Ten opponents should that conference decide to go to a nine-game league schedule. The Irish, if it chooses, can still play Michigan, Michigan State or Purdue. What about Notre Dame to the Big Ten? It could have happened ... in 1999. However, the Irish declined that offer, and these days the Big Ten is not interested in Notre Dame as a partial member. The decision Wednesday quells rumors the Big 12 would inevitably make a football run after Notre Dame. It should cap, for now, some of this expansion madness. If Notre Dame ever decides to join a conference in football, you can safely say it will be the ACC. Remember, though, in 1995 Notre Dame joined the Big East in all sports except football — and never joined in football. Notre Dame will remain football independent as long as it can fill its schedule with quality opponents and NBC (or another network) offers exclusive broadcast rights. To recap: this is not a precursor. The move protects all other Irish sports from the ravages of Big East reconfiguration. Also, it would be shocking if Notre Dame has to fulfill the Big East’s 27-month exit timetable. Syracuse and Pittsburgh negotiated earlier departures.

Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife: CENTRAL ZONE ANTELOPE FLAT RESERVOIR: Fishing has been slow but anglers are still reporting 18- to 20-inch trout. Fishing should begin to pick up with the cooling weather. BIG LAVA LAKE: No recent reports but fishing should be good. ODFW has completed trapping operations to remove invasive tui chubs from Lava Lake. The chub removal program is designed to reduce competition with game species and increase the size of trout. CLEAR LAKE RESERVOIR: Water levels in the reservoir will be dropping as irrigation demand increases. Trout fishing should remain good, as long as the reservoir permits good access. CRESCENT LAKE: Kokanee fishing has been good. CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: Fishing for trout has been good. DESCHUTES RIVER (Mouth to the Pelton Regulating Dam): Summer steelhead fishing on the Lower Deschutes is at its best in September. Good numbers of fish are being found by anglers from the mouth upstream to Sherars Falls. Fall chinook and summer steelhead fishing at Sherars Falls is getting good and should only get better as September progresses. Limits of bright fall chinook have been reported already. EAST LAKE: Fishing is good, and preliminary analysis of recent sampling suggests that fish size is increasing. FALL RIVER: Fishing is good. HOSMER LAKE: Open to fishing and annual population sampling indicates that Atlantic salmon and brook trout populations are healthy. Fishing on Hosmer is restricted to fly fishing with barbless hooks. LAKE BILLY CHINOOK: Fishing for smallmouth bass has been good. Fishing for kokanee has picked up as the fish are staging in the Metolius arm prior to entering the Metolius River to spawn. METOLIUS RIVER: Trout fishing has been good. Insect hatches should offer lots of opportunities for good dry-fly fishing. ODELL LAKE: Kokanee fishing good on the lake’s west end. PAULINA LAKE: Fishing is good. PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR: Fishing for bass, crappie and bullhead catfish should be good. Anglers are reporting more bass and larger smallmouth bass than in recent years. SUTTLE LAKE: Recent fish sampling showed excellent trophy brown trout opportunity. WICKIUP RESERVOIR: High water will spread out kokanee this fall, but there is opportunity for large kokanee.

HUNTING REPORT

Elk more vocal at night in Ochoco district Here is the weekly hunting report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by wildlife biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife: CENTRAL ZONE OPEN: cougar, bear, archery deer/elk, forest grouse, dove, Sept. Canada goose, band-tailed pigeon (open Sept. 15-23) PRINEVILLE/OCHOCO WILDLIFE DISTRICT Fire danger remains a concern and recreational users should check with Ochoco and Prineville BLM offices for the latest access and camping information. Bear: Successful hunters must check in unfrozen bear skulls at an ODFW office within 10 days of harvest. Please call ahead and make an appointment to ensure a biologist is present for the check in. It’s also a good idea to prop the bear’s mouth open with a stick for easier tissue sampling, teeth collection and tagging. Remember that cubs and sows with cubs are illegal to take, so if in doubt use caution. See regulations for details. Archery: Buck and elk seasons are open. The hot and dry conditions have heightened fire concerns, and hunters should consult with the Prineville BLM and/or Ochoco National Forest for the latest fire restrictions. Although days are warm and dry, the nights are beginning to cool off and we have received some reports of bulls becoming more vocal. Hunters are reminded that the Maury is now a controlled entry unit for deer and elk hunters, who must have the controlled entry deer tag in order to hunt in it. Conversely, the Ochoco remains a controlled entry unit for elk, and archery deer hunters must have the controlled entry elk tag in order to hunt in it. Antlerless elk: Hunts are ongoing in portions of the Maury, Ochoco and Grizzly units. These hunts are primarily on private agricultural and range lands where hunters need permission from the landowner. Typically elk move into these hunt areas in greater numbers during the late summer to take advantage of the irrigated pastures and hay fields. Cougar: Cougars are present throughout the Maury, Ochoco and Grizzly units but are more likely near deer and elk herds. The Maury and Ochoco units are recommended because of their greater amounts of accessible public land. Remember cougars must be checked in at an ODFW office within 10 days of harvest. Please consult the synopsis for all required parts and be sure to call first to make an appointment.


D6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

H U N T I NG & F ISH I NG

COMMENTARY

Employing searching patterns on western waters G A RY LEWIS

I

n the Valley of the Moon, green farm fields stretched a quirky patchwork beside a little stream that meandered back and forth to its confluence with a more determined river. We were in Patagonia, but it could have been any western stream in any hemisphere. Alejandro, our guide, led the way and spoke to us over his shoulder. “The wind, on a scale of one to seven, is, I think, a four.� We leaned into it, our faces tight against the raindrops that stung our cheeks. “You will need a 4-weight with maybe a 5-weight line to cast into the wind. But the trout can be big, so use a 3X tippet. On some streams we might use a dropper, but not here, these fish for some reason like to take a dry. “We will walk for forty minutes then get in the water and play leapfrog or baseball, back upstream.� Meaning we would be careful not to work the water already fished by the angler ahead of us. If there were two anglers in the same water, they would alternate runs or trade off after two strikes. “You will start always downstream and cast first to the middle then to the side and the other side. Then take two steps up and cast again. It is a searching pattern.� To run the searching pattern to its utmost efficiency,

we would place a water bottle on a gravel bar at our starting point. When the angler behind caught up to the water bottle, he would pick it up and walk upstream, allowing the other angler several good runs to fish before he would pick up the bottle and leapfrog ahead. It is a strategy that works when there is one party on the river and the anglers cooperate to work one section of river. Whenever an angler finds himself on a new stretch of water with no visible hatch in progress, a searching pattern should be employed. I thought of Alejandro’s instruction when I strung my rod last week on the Los Pinos River near Durango, Colo. There are three types of searching patterns: the kind you tie on the end of your line, the kind you use to cover water and the kind the guide employs to make sure everyone casts over undisturbed fish. I poked through my boxes. I could have used a Soft Hackle Hare’s Ear or a Muddler Minnow, but I opted for a black beadhead Woolly Bugger. My friend John Dustin would employ a black Panther Martin, the spinning rod equivalent. JD pointed me upstream to a rapid that broke over a line of rocks with a few boulders that broke the seam. I started at the top and cast a short line then lengthened it by 18 inches on each cast until I threw as much line as I could with a simple lift-and-lie-down. After that, each cast was two steps downstream. It is called

Whenever an angler finds himself on a new stretch of water with no visible hatch in progress, a searching pattern should be employed.... There are three types of searching patterns: the kind you tie on the end of your line, the kind you use to cover water and the kind the guide employs to make sure everyone casts over undisturbed fish.

Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

Sam Pyke, of Sisters, battles a rainbow on a lake in Colorado.

the Wet Fly Swing. Throw quartering down, mend once, let it swing, take two steps down and do it again. When I had covered the run, I started again at the top. On the second pass, I touched three fish but hooked none of them. Another way to come at the same problem is to fish two beadhead nymphs below an indicator. In intimate water, a Prince or Girdle Bug paired with a Scud or a Spitfire is a good combination. In this case, the angler should start downstream and cast up.

After an hour, we worked our way to a shallow springfed lake. No bugs flitted over the surface, no rises broke the glassy stillness. This called for a searching fly. In deeper water, I might have employed one of Bob Gaviglio’s Rufus patterns, but in this case, I thought an unweighted nymph might be a good choice. Perhaps a simple Brown Hackle was in order, maybe a grizzly-hackled Woolly Worm. Instead, when I opened my box, I spied a No. 14 Peacock Pheasant Tail. Meanwhile, Sam Pyke tied

on a Prince and worked his way to the other side of the lake. I fan-cast in an arc starting on my left and before long had a hook-up, a rainbow that charged the fly from behind. For the next hour, I moved up and down the bank and covered the water with long casts and slow retrieves. Best fish of the morning was a 15-inch rainbow that straightened my line and went airborne when the bug stuck like lipstick. Across the water, Sam used his Prince to turn a couple of fish, including a nice rainbow

H & F  C   Please email Hunting & Fishing event information to sports@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a spaceavailability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

FISHING THE FLY FISHING FESTIVAL AT SUNRIVER: Saturday, Sept. 29, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in Sunriver Village; festival will include vendors, equipment, guides, outfitters, fly tiers, rod-casting area, boats; kids area with a bug pond, fly-tying and fishing pond; admission is free; visit hookfish.com/festival or call 541-593-2358. FREE FLY-FISHING LESSONS: Through the end of September, the Orvis Company retail store in Bend will offer free lessons every Tuesday, Thursday and MOST Saturdays from 10 a.m. to noon; RSVP’s are necessary; contact the Bend Orvis store at 541-312-8200 to register; www.orvis.com/bend. CENTRAL OREGON BASS CLUB: Meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Abby’s Pizza in Redmond; 7 to 9 p.m.; new members welcome; www.cobc.us. DESCHUTES CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED: Meets on the first Monday of each month at the ONDA offices in Bend; meeting starts at 6:45 p.m. for members to meet and greet and discuss what the chapter is up to; 541-306-4509; communications@deschutestu.org; www.deschutestu.org. BEND CASTING CLUB: The Bend Casting Club is a group of local fly anglers from around Central Oregon who are trying to improve their casting technique; club meets on the fourth Wednesday of each month, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Orvis Casting Course in Bend’s Old Mill District; 541-306-4509 or bendcastingclub@ gmail.com. THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB: Meets on the third Thursday of each month (except July and

August) at 7 p.m. at the Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center (SHARC); contact www. sunriveranglers.org. THE CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS CLUB: Meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bend Senior Center, 1600 SE Reed Market Road; contact: www.coflyfishers.org.

HUNTING LEARN THE ART OF TRACKING ANIMALS: Guided walks and workshops with a certified professional tracker; learn to identify and interpret tracks, sign and scat of the animals in Central Oregon; two or more walks per month all year; $35; ongoing, 8 a.m. to noon; 541-633-7045; dave@wildernesstracking.com; wildernesstracking.com. THE BEND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the King Buffet at the north end of the Wagner Mall, across from Robberson Ford in Bend; contact: ohabend.webs.com. THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Prineville Fire Hall, 405 N. Belknap St.; contact: 447-5029. THE REDMOND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Redmond VFW Hall.

SHOOTING OREGON STATE BLACKPOWDER SHOOTOUT: Sept. 22-23, 9 a.m.

to 4 p.m. each day; Oregon State Blackpowder Championship at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association (COSSA) range hosted by Pine Mountain Posse; free; registration is required by Sept. 21; 541-815-9087; outlawandannie@yahoo.com; www. pinemountainposse.com. COSSA KIDS: The Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association’s NRA Youth Marksmanship Program is every third Saturday of the month from 10 a.m. to noon at the COSSA Range; the range is east of Bend off U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; contact Don Thomas, 541-389-8284. BEND TRAP CLUB: Trap shooting, five-stand and skeet shooting are all open Thursdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m; located east of Bend off U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 30; contact Bill Grafton at 541-383-1428 or visit www. bendtrapclub.com. CENTRAL OREGON SPORTING CLAYS AND HUNTING PRESERVE: 13-station, 100-target course and 5-stand open Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to dusk, and Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 11 a.m. to dusk (closed Wednesday); located at 9020 South Highway 97, Redmond; www.birdandclay.com or 541-383-0001. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Archery, pistol and rifle are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; skeet is Tuesdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. to about 2 p.m.; sporting clays is the first and third Saturdays of each month from 10 a.m. to about 2 p.m.; trap is Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to about 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to closing, and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; non-members are welcome; check www.rrandgc.com for events and closures. HUNTER SIGHT-IN DAYS AT REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Every weekend during September from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., except Sept. 22

FLY-TYING CORNER Now, with fall coming on, summer is on the run and summer-runs are in the river. The sun no longer glares down from overhead, but diffuses the water from an angle. Tie on a fly that dances in the light, that shimmers in purple. The Summer Run is a good pattern for September and early October when a steelhead will move to take a fly. Cast down and across then throw an upstream mend. Let the fly swing. Then take two steps down and cast again. At the grab, let the fish turn with it. Now lift the rod. To tie this pattern, start with purple thread on a No. 5 Alec Jackson or similar hook. For the tag, start with a base of wire overlaid with flat silver tinsel. Tie the tail with purple holographic tinsel then build the body with lavender dubbing at the rear and purple dubbing at the fore. Rib with silver tinsel. For the wing, use hanked

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Summer Run, courtesy Fly & Field Outfitters. Lite Brite and purple tinsel. Finish with a purple dyed guinea collar. — Gary Lewis

during the morning, open during the afternoon; www.rrandgc.com or 541-504-1513. PINE MOUNTAIN POSSE: Cowboy action shooting club that shoots at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; second Sunday of each month; 541-318-8199 or

www.pinemountainposse.com. HORSE RIDGE PISTOLEROS: Cowboy action shooting with pistols, rifles and shotguns at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.; 541-4087027 or www.hrp-sass.com.

he battled to the bank. On our way to the afternoon plane, we pulled off the road and looked back into the Los Pinos valley and out across a network of roads that wound between two-acre homesteads and timber-framed hobby ranches. Beside a ribbon that shimmered blue, the willows and cottonwoods were tinted by September. Shifting shafts of shining searched the patterns of the landscape. Through it a river ran, woven in the fabric of my dreams. — Gary Lewis is the host of “Adventure Journal� and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,� “Black Bear Hunting,� “Hunting Oregon� and other titles. Contact Lewis at www. GaryLewisOutdoors.com.


BUSINESS

Stock listings, E2-3 News of Record, E4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

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IN BRIEF McDonald’s will post calories LOS ANGELES — Soon to be listed among the Big Macs and McFlurrys on every McDonald’s menu board and drive-thrus across the country: calorie counts. As diners increasingly demand more healthful dietary options and nutritional disclosures, the world’s largest hamburger chain says it’s embracing both transparency and better ingredients. Starting Monday, calorie counts will be posted at its more than 14,000 U.S. locations. That means customers will know off the bat that four pieces of Chicken McNuggets have 190 calories and that a McCafe Iced Mocha has 260. On Wednesday, McDonald’s also said it was testing out more betterfor-you options, including seasonal produce such as blueberries and cucumbers, grilled chicken, McWraps starting at 350 calories and a version of the Egg McMuffin made with egg whites and a whole grain muffin. “We’ve made a lot of good progress toward our nutrition commitments and we recognize there’s still more to do,” said Dr. Cindy Goody, McDonald’s senior director of nutrition, in a statement.

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DOW JONES

www.bendbulletin.com/business

CLOSE 13,333.35 CHANGE +9.99 +.07%

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CLOSE 1,436.56 CHANGE +3.00 +.21%

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10-year Treasury

CLOSE 1.76 CHANGE +3.53%

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$1730.60 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$1.20

Lancair building up for sale By Elon Glucklich The Bulletin

Lancair’s facility in Redmond has been put up for sale. But the kit-airplane company isn’t going anywhere, company officials said. Lancair plans to stay in the building at 250 S.E. Timber Ave. near the Redmond Airport as a tenant, said Chief Operating Officer Tom Bowen. The company might

even make a push to buy the building, though no proposal has yet been put forward. Compass Commercial Real Estate Services listed the 38,375-square-foot building for sale last week, at a price of $1.72 million. It joins the former Cessna airplane factory in Bend, which has been on the market for about three years. Lancair had been leasing its building from Lake Oswego

developer Harold Cox, according to Deschutes County property records. Cox bought the building in 2006, paying $2.6 million, county records show. But he lost it in foreclosure in June, and Southern California financial services firm Sabal Financial now holds the title. Two out of town groups have shown interest in the building, said Gardner Williams, a principal broker with Compass Commercial.

But Bowen said that, while Lancair hasn’t formally put a bid on the building, an ownership push isn’t out of the question. “We’ve talked to (Sabal) ourselves, and are interested in the building,” Bowen said. “We lease the building from whoever the owner is. We’re a good tenant, and that’s part of what makes this an attractive listing.” See Lancair / E3

APPLE UNVEILS ITS NEWEST GADGETS

EADS, BAE talking merger LONDON — U.K. defense contractor BAE Systems PLC and European aerospace giant EADS NV announced Wednesday that they are in talks about combining their businesses. The merged companies would have combined sales of more than $90.3 billion and more than 220,000 employees. The deal would create a global company that would be better be able to cope with a sector facing challenges and uncertainties amid cuts to government defense budgets in Europe and the United States. EADS is already one of Europe’s biggest companies, parent to planemaker Airbus, helicopter maker Eurocopter, satellite builder Astrium and defense electronics contractor Cassidian. Airbus and EADS have long been rivals to U.S.based Boeing in civil and defense aviation. — From wire reports

Building too many homes Residential real estate construction may have peaked as a share of China’s economy, and has fallen steeply in other countries that recently had real estate booms.

RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE CONSTRUCTION As a percentage of G.D.P.

12% 10

Spain

China

8 6 4 2

United States

0 ’02 ’04 ’06 ’08 ’10 ’12 2012 data for China and the United States is for the first and second quarter. Sources: CEIC; Thomson Datastream; Capital Economics New York Times News Service

Jeff Chiu / The Associated Press

Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks about iPods during the company’s introduction of new products Wednesday in San Francisco. Apple demonstrated its new iPhone 5 at the event.

New iPhone bigger, lighter By Peter Delevett, Troy Wolverton and Jeremy C. Owens San Jose Mercury News

Apple showed off the newest iterations of its wildly popular smartphone Wednesday morning in San Francisco, confirming that the iPhone 5 will be larger, lighter and faster while connecting to newer cellular networks. Apple CEO Tim Cook got acolytes and analysts fired up at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, kicking off the unveiling of the first allnew Apple phone since the company’s co-founder and longtime CEO, Steve Jobs, died last year by telling the large crowd, “We’ve got some amazing things to show you.” Apple marketing guru Phil Schiller followed Cook on stage for the official introduction, calling the iPhone 5 the “most beautiful device we’ve ever made.” He immediately showed that the new iPhone will be taller than previous iterations, allowing Apple to

Eric Risberg / The Associated Press

Apple executives have described the new iPhone 5 as the “most beautiful device we’ve ever made.”

add a fifth row of icons to the home screen. The phone will be the thinnest and lightest iPhone yet, despite the size change, with Schiller saying the iPhone 5 is 20 percent lighter than the iPhone 4S at 112 grams. Schiller then expounded on the technical abilities of the iPhone, which will con-

nect with 4G, or LTE, cellular networks as well as HSPA+ and dual-band Wi-Fi. The phone has an A6 chip that will double the speed of the CPU and graphics, which Apple demonstrated by having Rob Murray of gaming company Electronic Arts come out on stage to show off a racing game on the device.

Cook — in his Jobs-like attire of black shirt, jeans and tennis shoes — began his address by noting Apple’s success in the “post-PC era,” telling attendees that Apple has sold more iPads, the company’s tablet offering, than any tech company has sold PCs. The CEO told the excited crowd at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts that Apple had sold 400 million devices running the company’s mobile operating system, iOS, which Cook called “amazing.” Before the event, 9to5Mac and other blogs were able to find links prepared for news releases on Apple’s website Wednesday morning that announced the phone would be called the iPhone 5 and have LTE connectivity; other links pointed to a new version of iTunes and new iPod Touch and Nano devices. Apple took down its online store Wednesday morning, which the company commonly does ahead of announcements of new products. See Apple / E3

Old, trusting and prime prey for scams erally raised to be polite and trusting. Con artists exploit these traits.” Grace, an 81-year-old widow in ColoIdentity theft has been the leading conrado, lost her life savings recently to sumer crime complaint in recent years. identity thieves who had stolen her per- The Federal Trade Commission reported sonal and financial information. more than 279,000 complaints She has hard-earned advice for in 2011, a jump from 250,000 anyone who gets a call from a PERSONAL in 2010. The FTC tally includes FINANCE data from the FBI, state law enstranger. “Anytime they say you’ve won forcement agencies and private a prize and they ask you to send groups like the Better Business money,” she said, “hang up on them. Bureau. They lie to you and tell you you’re a winThose numbers are “probably only ner. You are not.” the tip of the iceberg,” said Susan Grant, The FBI warns that “senior citizens director of consumer protection at the especially should be aware of fraud Consumer Federation of America, an schemes.” It says: “People who grew up umbrella group of about 300 nonprofit in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s were gen- organizations. There is no requirement By Milt Freudenheim

New York Times News Service

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for centralized reporting, and many victims are too embarrassed to tell their sad tales. By last spring, Grace had lost close to $66,000. She asked that her last name be withheld, hoping to limit her exposure on the “sucker lists” that swindlers trade and sell to each other. Over the last year, thieves were able to transfer a bank account of hers to their control without her permission, attaching their own telephone number to maintain their access to it. They claimed that she had won $4 million and a Mercedes in a Publishers Clearing House sweepstakes. Then they doubled the phantom prize to $8 million and two Mercedes. See Scams / E3

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SILVER

CLOSE $33.233 CHANGE -$0.276

FDIC: 18.7% of Oregon households underbanked Bulletin staff report More than 28 percent of U.S. households either had no checking or savings accounts last year or relied on money orders, checkcashing or similar services, according to a report released Wednesday. In Oregon, 18.7 percent of households surveyed fell into those categories, conducting some or all of their financial transactions outside the mainstream banking system, according to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., the government agency that promotes banking and insures deposits. The report, the “2011 National Survey of Unbanked and Underbanked Households,” estimates how many in the country can be classified as unbanked — those that have no account of any type at a bank or depository institution — and underbanked, those with checking or savings accounts but who still use money orders, check-cashing services, remittances, payday loans or similar services. The survey showed the percentage of unbanked and underbanked combined in the U.S. increased slightly from the first survey conducted in 2009. Oregon, however, saw a slight decrease in unbanked households, meaning more residents had checking or savings accounts in 2011. The drop, 1.6 percentage points, was not statistically significant, the report said. See Banking / E3

Major action expected at Fed meeting By Martin Crutsinger The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — If the world’s investors are right, the Federal Reserve is about to take a bold new step to try to invigorate the U.S. economy. And many expect the Fed to unleash its most potent weapon: a third round of bond purchases meant to ease long-term interest rates and spur borrowing and spending. It’s called “quantitative easing,” or QE. Others foresee a more measured response when the Fed ends a two-day policy meeting Thursday. They think it will extend its timetable for any rise in record-low short-term rates beyond the current target of late 2014 at the earliest. Fed officials began their discussions Wednesday and will end with an announcement of any decision around 12:30 p.m. Eastern time. Later, Chairman Ben Bernanke will hold his quarterly news conference. The stock market edged higher Wednesday, partly in anticipation of Fed action and after the highest court in Germany cleared the way for that country to contribute to Europe’s rescue fund to help indebted governments. The Fed is facing pressure to act now because the U.S. economy is still growing too slowly to reduce high unemployment. The unemployment rate has topped 8 percent every month since the Great Recession officially ended more than three years ago. See Fed / E4


E2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

Consolidated stock listings N m

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A-B-C-D AAR 0.30 ABB Ltd 0.71 ABM 0.58 ACE Ltd 1.92 ACI Wwde AES Corp 0.16 AFLAC 1.32 AG MtgeIT 3.08 AGCO AGIC Cv 1.08 AGIC Cv2 1.02 AGL Res 1.84 AK Steel AMC Net AOL 5.15 ASML Hld 0.59 AT&T Inc 1.76 AU Optron AVG Tch n Aarons 0.06 AbtLab 2.04 AberFitc 0.70 AbdAsPac 0.42 Abiomed Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaHl n AcadiaPh Accenture 1.35 AccessMid 1.68 AccoBrds AccretivH Accuray Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActiveNet ActivsBliz 0.18 Actuant 0.04 Acuity 0.52 Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran 0.36 AdvAuto 0.24 AMD AdvSemi 0.11 AdvOil&Gs AdventSoft AdvActBear AecomTch AegeanMP 0.04 Aegerion Aegion Aegon 0.25 AerCap Aeropostl AeroViron AEterna gh Aetna 0.70 AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agilent 0.40 Agnico g 0.80 Agrium g 1.00 AirLease AirProd 2.56 AirTrnsp Aircastle 0.60 Airgas 1.60 AkamaiT Akorn AlaskAir s AlaskCom 0.20 Albemarle 0.80 AlcatelLuc Alcoa 0.12 Alere AlexREE 2.12 AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza rs AlignTech Alkermes AllegTch 0.72 Allergan 0.20 AlliData AlliBInco 0.48 AlliBern 0.85 AlliantEgy 1.80 AlldNevG AllisonT n 0.24 AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate 0.88 AllyFn pfB 2.13 AlmadnM g AlnylamP AlonUSA 0.16 AlphaOmg AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp 0.60 AlpTotDiv 0.66 AlpAlerMLP 1.00 AlteraCp lf 0.40 AlterraCap 0.64 Altria 1.76 Alumina 0.24 Alvarion h AmBev 1.15 Amarin Amazon Amdocs Ameren 1.60 Amerigrp AMovilL 0.28 AmApparel AmAssets 0.84 AmAxle AmCampus 1.35 ACapAgy 5.00 AmCapLtd ACapMtg 3.60 AEagleOut 0.44 AEP 1.88 AEqInvLf 0.12 AmExp 0.80 AFnclGrp 0.70 AGreet 0.60 AIG wt AmIntlGrp ARltyCT n 0.72 AmTower 0.88 AVangrd 0.10 AmWtrWks 1.00 Ameriprise 1.40 AmeriBrgn 0.52 Ametek s 0.24 Amgen 1.44 AmkorTch Amphenol 0.42 AmpioPhm Amyris Anadarko 0.36 Anadigc AnalogDev 1.20 Ancestry AngiesL n AnglogldA 0.61 ABInBev 1.57 Ann Inc Annaly 2.27 Ansys AntaresP AntheraPh Anworth 0.83 Aon plc 0.63 A123 Sys h Apache 0.68 AptInv 0.80 ApolloGrp ApolloInv 0.80 ApolloRM 3.00 Apple Inc 10.60 ApldIndlT 0.84 ApldMatl 0.36 AMCC Approach AquaAm 0.70 ArQule ArcelorMit 0.75 ArchCap ArchCoal 0.12 ArchDan 0.70 ArcosDor 0.24 ArcticCat ArenaPhm AresCap h 1.52 AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest 0.12 ArmHld 0.18 ArmourRsd 1.20 ArmstrWld 8.55 ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRt s AscentSolr AshfordHT 0.44 Ashland 0.90 AspenIns 0.68 AspenTech AspnBio rs AssistLiv AsscdBanc 0.20 AsdEstat 0.72 Assurant 0.84 AssuredG 0.36 AstexPhm AstoriaF 0.16 AstraZen 2.85 AtlPwr g 1.15 AtlasAir AtlasEngy 1.00 AtlasPpln 2.24 AtlatsaR g Atmel ATMOS 1.38 AtwoodOcn Audience n Augusta g AuRico g Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv 2.00 AutoData 1.58 AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch 0.64 AvalnRare AvalonBay 3.88 AvanirPhm AVEO Ph AveryD 1.08

16.78 19.06 18.71 75.55 44.87 11.26 48.54 24.07 44.80 9.33 8.64 40.83 6.08 41.51 34.14 55.62 37.72 3.68 10.83 28.26 67.84 37.92 7.74 20.59 2.23 27.39 22.41 2.10 65.17 30.50 6.95 12.94 5.67 8.01 18.84 25.67 12.36 11.91 29.47 68.10 18.24 32.42 20.09 70.59 3.89 3.87 3.67 24.06 20.29 20.91 6.90 15.14 20.89 5.62 13.00 14.21 22.20 .55 37.35 121.87 19.44 3.91 37.49 48.34 103.33 22.39 83.39 4.74 11.93 83.01 37.89 14.63 34.72 2.17 54.68 1.20 9.35 19.59 74.62 3.96 109.06 4.90 38.51 18.73 33.88 89.64 140.45 8.50 14.75 44.26 36.02 19.42 27.58 11.24 38.82 24.84 2.77 19.75 13.47 9.32 7.34 7.29 4.47 16.37 37.25 23.45 33.30 3.63 .34 37.34 13.32 255.63 33.17 32.31 90.98 25.24 1.41 27.39 12.23 45.58 35.94 11.69 25.80 23.46 43.50 12.14 57.27 38.40 15.78 14.16 33.80 12.08 71.95 31.97 37.28 56.66 37.90 35.45 83.15 4.68 61.27 2.95 3.23 72.43 1.23 40.26 30.59 10.73 34.09 83.98 37.99 17.75 72.37 3.95 .95 6.92 51.90 .36 90.51 26.60 28.84 8.09 21.10 669.79 43.13 11.60 5.26 31.78 25.01 5.60 16.09 40.58 6.71 27.19 13.76 44.94 8.36 17.26 22.95 44.72 8.35 26.68 7.48 44.14 5.34 13.93 36.82 20.87 28.90 20.85 1.76 8.84 75.73 29.82 24.92 1.87 7.55 13.24 15.33 37.44 15.20 3.26 10.46 46.88 14.47 56.98 36.09 34.48 .14 6.31 35.26 48.28 6.75 2.75 5.86 4.66 8.02 41.09 32.58 62.99 57.39 373.16 23.61 35.23 1.89 140.41 3.32 10.22 30.64

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D 5.82 3.13 22.99 11.57 7.63 42.60 2.27 38.73 .19 71.40 3.36 25.22 38.24 71.86 80.20 48.01 8.27 34.81 1.26 69.53 17.79 16.48 19.89 114.48 40.08 19.10 58.72 2.71 1.94 53.04 .43 16.58 14.42 337.89 6.40 3.47 75.80 30.50 54.08 13.93 46.13 60.25 5.33 39.22 23.29 41.86 43.12 19.08 27.67 33.05 19.87 80.28 49.05 .84 13.71 52.48 1.63 40.62 71.69 18.90 20.12 60.90 23.11 37.55 30.70 25.06 8.70 20.73 68.20 32.60 18.52 11.12 51.23 .72 33.80 102.62 21.67 21.68 19.44 .97 34.59 33.80 32.17 41.10 14.30 15.32 27.44 54.37 44.65 2.80 6.14 33.06 10.05 15.01 19.23 6.27 30.87 25.56 19.90 93.22 75.00 24.04 56.54 31.30 60.18 19.82 32.49 78.49 16.08 93.98 75.43 22.27 82.78 27.95 15.93 125.85 25.88 2.36 6.47 12.70 24.47 34.28 14.90 15.74 100.89 8.38 8.18 47.38 17.55 41.10 56.85 39.94 11.83 125.00 20.85 30.66 22.94 36.91 1.77 16.39 24.57 22.55 3.26 27.79 10.63 17.88 12.96 14.13 63.74 37.04 17.13 13.16 47.59 58.30 98.50 4.22 128.11 31.43 49.89 12.36 66.30 .83 3.64 6.58 15.53 10.03 .03 20.57 64.10 59.24 13.91 54.79 54.58 17.35 98.47 21.69 16.07 44.95 78.79 .19 1.72 25.94 10.64 30.98 9.50 13.10 31.00 10.68 31.19 16.54 4.94 1.42 37.46 42.43 26.39 27.24 11.44 56.30 4.21 61.43 13.73 107.37 19.23 69.01 10.24 5.61 6.90 8.27 51.68 34.26 12.19 72.36 16.66 20.38 78.21 19.05 53.26 .15 56.63 85.79 107.56 14.60 18.02 17.39 30.44 14.51 8.18 7.56 30.63 12.36 63.36

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OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax 0.08 Oi SA s 2.01 OilStates OldDomF s OldNBcp 0.36 OldRepub 0.71 Olin 0.80 OmegaHlt 1.68 Omncre 0.28 Omnicom 1.20 OmniVisn Omnova OnSmcnd Oncolyt g Oncothyr ONEOK s 1.32 OneokPtrs 2.64 OnyxPh OpenTble h OpexaTh h OpkoHlth Oracle 0.24 OraSure OrbitalSci Orbitz Orexigen OrientEH OriginAg OshkoshCp Otelco un OvShip OwensMin 0.88 OwensCorn OwensIll PAA NGsS 1.43 PDC Engy PDL Bio 0.60 PG&E Cp 1.82 PHH Corp PIMCO1-3Tr 0.27 PimcoTR 1.09 PLX Tch PMC Sra PMFG PNC 1.60 PNC pfP PNM Res 0.58 POSCO 2.09 PPG 2.36 PPL Corp 1.44 PSS Wrld PVH Corp 0.15 PVR Ptrs 2.12 Paccar 0.80 PacerIntl PacBiosci PacDrill n PacEthan h PacSunwr PaciraPhm PackAmer 1.00 PallCorp 0.84 PaloANet n PanASlv 0.20 Panasonic 0.06 Pandora PaneraBrd ParPharm ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan 1.64 ParkerVsn PrtnrCm 0.50 PartnerRe 2.48 Patterson 0.56 PattUTI 0.20 Paychex 1.28 PeabdyE 0.34 Pearson 0.68 Pebblebrk 0.48 Pendrell Pengrth g 0.48 PnnNGm PennVa 0.23 PennWst g 1.08 PennantPk 1.12 Penney PennaRE 0.64 PennyMac 2.20 Penske 0.48 PensonW h Pentair 0.88 PeopUtdF 0.64 PepBoy PepcoHold 1.08 PepsiCo 2.15 PeregrinP PerfectWld 2.00 PerkElm 0.28 Prmian 1.26 Perrigo 0.32 PetSmart 0.66 PetrbrsA 1.03 Petrobras 1.03 PtroqstE Pfizer 0.88 PhrmAth Pharmacyc PhilipMor 3.40 PhilipsEl 1.00 Phillips66 n 0.80 PhxNMda PhotoMdx PhotrIn PiedNG 1.20 PiedmOfc 0.80 Pier 1 0.16 PilgrimsP PimCpOp 1.56 PimDyInco 2.12 PimcoHiI 1.46 PinnclEnt PinWst 2.10 PionEnSvc PionHiIn 1.65 PioNtrl 0.08 PitnyBw 1.50 PlainsAA 4.26 PlainsEx PlatGpMet PlumCrk 1.68 PluristemT Polaris 1.48 Polycom PolyOne 0.20 Polypore Pool Corp 0.64 Popular rs PortGE 1.08 PortglTel 0.85 PostPrp 1.00 Potash 0.56 Power-One PSCrudeDS PwshDB PS PrcMet PS Agri PS USDBull PwShHiYD 0.32 PSTechLdr 0.08 PSPrivEq 0.05 PSFinPf 1.24 PS KBWBk 0.86 PS SrLoan 1.29 PS SP LwV 0.82 PShNatMu 1.09 PSHYCpBd 1.09 PwShPfd 0.93 PShEMSov 1.49 PwShs QQQ 0.51 PSS&PBW 2.24 Pwrwv rsh PranaBio Praxair 2.20 PrecMxNik 0.20 PrecCastpt 0.12 PrecDrill PresLf 0.25 Prestige PriceTR 1.36 priceline Primerica 0.28 Primero g PrinFncl 0.84 PrivateB 0.04 ProLogis 1.12 ProShtDow ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltMC PrUltQQQ s PrUShQQQ ProUltSP 0.29 PrUShtFin ProUShL20 ProUltSOG ProUltSBM ProUltFin 0.34 ProUPShD30 ProUltO&G 0.07 ProUBasM 0.08 PrUPR2K 0.01 ProShtR2K PrUPQQQ s ProUltR2K 0.01 ProSht20Tr PrUltSP500 0.06 PrUSSilv rs PrSUltNG rs PrUVxST rs ProSUltGold PrShtVixST PrUltCrude PrUShCrde ProVixSTF ProUltSGld ProUltSlv s ProUShEuro ProctGam 2.25 ProgsvCp 0.41 PUShDow rs ProUSR2K PrUShEur PUSSP500 rs PUPSR2K rs PUShQQQ rs ProspctCap 1.22 Protalix ProtLife 0.72 Prudentl 1.45 PSEG 1.42 PubStrg 4.40 PulseElec 0.10 PulteGrp PureBio rs PMIIT 0.31

3.67 2.29 6.72 4.03 83.21 31.80 13.56 9.35 22.80 24.59 34.07 53.54 16.37 8.60 6.62 2.48 5.34 46.31 57.68 75.96 46.04 .75 4.37 32.26 10.20 14.50 2.78 5.33 9.13 1.44 27.01 2.00 6.72 28.54 33.97 19.33 18.95 31.97 7.44 43.09 18.92 51.02 107.59 6.03 6.21 6.86 64.15 27.88 20.42 82.09 115.77 28.81 21.96 92.76 24.59 41.44 3.94 1.93 10.02 .38 2.23 17.13 32.31 58.17 64.86 18.58 7.00 9.97 166.53 49.83 23.29 2.62 30.14 4.57 84.17 2.73 4.67 75.04 34.46 16.35 33.72 24.05 18.90 24.76 1.21 7.13 40.86 6.44 15.50 11.00 29.05 16.48 22.48 29.31 .07 43.89 12.14 9.98 18.81 70.06 4.17 10.91 28.73 15.60 109.93 70.20 21.74 22.47 6.71 24.07 1.26 65.04 86.67 24.09 46.28 3.52 14.42 5.98 31.78 17.45 19.55 5.40 19.64 27.20 14.05 11.88 52.27 8.20 18.75 106.57 14.66 87.90 37.82 1.13 41.77 4.54 82.80 11.01 16.15 35.84 40.01 17.55 27.07 5.20 50.78 41.94 6.02 39.49 29.22 60.06 30.43 21.89 9.66 27.76 9.54 18.55 25.44 24.99 27.92 25.55 19.31 14.83 30.75 68.63 21.05 .73 2.12 105.99 13.74 158.72 8.68 13.95 16.20 63.37 619.95 29.90 5.51 28.08 16.73 36.07 34.30 24.72 34.22 13.74 72.13 60.65 27.81 61.07 37.26 16.20 20.32 14.56 63.47 17.11 49.29 35.76 70.50 24.83 60.43 45.12 29.64 89.87 44.02 47.35 35.90 92.70 130.00 34.94 36.88 20.41 14.90 54.49 20.03 68.10 20.24 47.60 26.52 30.68 38.90 36.42 37.19 11.99 4.85 28.59 56.91 31.25 145.63 1.05 15.55 1.14 5.19

C

N m

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PMOT PPrIT

0.80 13.23 0.36 5.72

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C +.03

Q-R-S-T QEP Res 0.08 QIAGEN QR Energy 1.95 Qihoo360 QlikTech Qlogic QuadGrph 1.00 Qualcom 1.00 QualityS s 0.70 QuanexBld 0.16 QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h QstDiag 0.68 QuestSft Questar 0.65 Questcor QuickLog QksilvRes Quiksilvr RAIT Fin 0.32 RBS pfG RF MicD RLJ LodgT 0.66 RPC s 0.32 RPM 0.86 RTI Biolog Rackspace RadianGrp 0.01 RadioShk Ralcorp RLauren 1.60 Rambus RamcoG 0.65 Randgold 0.40 RangeRs 0.16 RaptorPhm RareEle g RJamesFn 0.52 Rayonier 1.76 Raytheon 2.00 RealD RealPage RltyInco 1.81 RedHat RedLionH Rdiff.cm RedwdTr 1.00 RegalBel 0.76 RegalEnt 0.84 RgcyCtrs 1.85 RegncyEn 1.84 Regenrn RegionsFn 0.04 Regis Cp 0.24 ReinsGrp 0.96 RelStlAl 1.00 RenaisRe 1.08 ReneSola Renren RentACt 0.64 Rentech 1.06 RentechN n 4.68 RepubSvc 0.94 RschMotn ResMed 0.68 ResoluteEn ResoluteF ResrceCap 0.80 Responsys RetailPrp n 0.66 RexEnergy ReynAmer 2.36 Richmnt g RigelPh RioTinto 1.64 RitchieBr 0.49 RiteAid RiverbedT RobbMyer 0.20 RobtHalf 0.60 RockTen 0.80 RockwlAut 1.88 RockColl 1.20 RockwdH 1.40 RogCm gs 1.58 Roper 0.55 RosttaG rs RosettaR RossStrs s 0.56 Roundys n 0.92 Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g 2.40 RBScotlnd RBSct prH 1.81 RBSct prM 1.60 RBSct prS 1.65 RBSct prT 1.81 RylCarb 0.48 RoyDShllB 3.44 RoyDShllA 3.44 RoyGld 0.60 Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues rue21 Ryanair Ryder 1.24 Ryland 0.12 SAIC 0.48 SAP AG 1.48 SBA Com SCANA 1.98 SEI Inv 0.30 SK Tlcm SLGreen 1.00 SLM Cp 0.50 SM Energy 0.10 SpdrDJIA 3.60 SpdrGold SpdrEuro50 1.31 S&PChina 1.47 SpdrDJ RE 1.20 SpdrIntDiv 3.56 SpdrIntRE 1.51 SpdrIntlSC 0.96 SP Mid 1.69 S&P500ETF 2.70 Spdr Div 1.79 SpdrHome 0.23 SpdrS&PBk 0.41 SpdrShTHiY 0.80 SpdrLehHY 3.60 SpdrNuBST 0.28 SpdrSTCpBd0.49 SP IntTip 1.57 SPLeIntTB 1.93 SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrS&P RB0.48 SpdrRetl 0.58 SpdrOGEx 0.45 SpdrOGEq 0.14 SpdrMetM 0.56 SPX Cp 1.00 SS&C Tech STEC STMicro 0.40 SVB FnGp SABESP 2.96 SabraHltc 1.32 SafeBulk 0.60 Safeway 0.70 StJoe StJude 0.92 Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty SamsO&G SJuanB 1.24 SanchezE n SanDisk SandRdge SangBio Sanmina Sanofi 1.76 Sanofi rt Santarus Sapient Sarepta rs Sasol 2.11 SavientPh Schlmbrg 1.10 Schnitzer 0.75 SchwLCGr 0.34 Schwab 0.24 SciClone SciGames Scotts 1.30 ScrippsNet 0.48 SeabGld g SeadrillLtd 3.36 SeagateT 1.28 SealAir 0.52 Sealy SearsHldgs 0.33 SearsHm rt SeattGen SelCmfrt SelMedHld SemGroup SempraEn 2.40 Semtech SenHous 1.52 SensataT Sequenom ServiceCp 0.24 ServNow n SvcSource ShandaG s 1.02 ShawGrp Sherwin 1.56 ShipFin 1.56 Shire 0.46 ShufflMstr Shutterfly SiderurNac 0.43 Siemens 4.04 SifyTech SigmaDsg SigmaAld 0.80 SignatBk SignetJwlrs 0.48 SilganHld 0.48 SilicGrIn SilicnImg SilicnMotn Slcnware 0.24 SilvStd g SilvWhtn g 0.37 SilvrcpM g 0.10 SimonProp 4.20 Sina Sinclair 0.60 Sinovac h SiriusXM

31.75 18.42 18.85 24.25 23.59 12.49 19.89 62.44 18.12 18.07 24.87 1.60 .85 61.35 27.97 19.92 50.59 3.00 4.07 3.58 5.10 18.17 4.15 18.58 13.20 28.49 4.01 64.52 4.80 2.77 72.26 158.59 4.75 13.14 110.59 70.75 5.38 4.43 37.40 50.54 57.88 9.73 26.26 42.01 57.32 6.78 4.06 14.62 71.27 13.85 49.91 22.76 145.63 7.29 18.74 59.52 55.95 77.05 1.57 3.81 36.44 2.38 35.50 28.24 7.42 39.50 9.63 13.66 5.94 9.66 11.45 13.68 43.20 4.45 10.58 49.73 19.41 1.29 21.52 59.72 26.87 67.69 70.26 52.75 48.09 41.74 104.07 5.47 46.51 66.69 7.72 16.35 36.97 56.77 8.83 24.75 21.15 21.20 23.22 29.61 73.81 71.73 86.96 3.58 9.37 7.09 32.37 32.01 42.67 29.24 12.60 70.35 59.44 48.25 22.04 14.75 82.27 16.28 55.09 133.37 167.92 32.50 63.32 41.75 47.38 39.69 27.23 183.49 144.39 58.34 24.87 23.71 30.43 40.54 24.47 30.74 61.75 61.41 45.81 29.01 63.79 56.64 35.56 44.61 67.32 23.69 7.11 6.19 60.44 76.65 19.51 6.10 16.45 21.33 40.15 11.18 152.71 42.22 27.12 1.21 13.75 19.03 44.97 7.24 6.11 9.15 43.26 1.72 8.17 10.65 12.96 45.36 1.60 74.32 30.34 34.83 14.01 4.75 8.10 43.45 61.52 17.76 40.63 30.00 15.80 1.80 60.90 2.12 27.52 32.35 10.58 35.95 66.29 25.47 22.40 31.17 3.91 13.67 35.05 9.54 3.80 43.06 144.05 17.06 91.71 14.60 31.27 5.78 100.76 2.65 6.31 72.33 66.16 48.30 42.25 9.34 5.00 14.31 5.73 15.07 36.22 6.11 158.59 64.38 12.02 2.22 2.43

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N m

D

SironaDent SixFlags 2.40 Skechers Skullcandy SkyWest 0.16 SkywksSol SmartBal SmartTc g SmithWes SmithAO 0.80 SmithfF Smucker 2.08 SnapOn 1.36 SocQ&M 1.04 SodaStrm Sohu.cm SolarWinds SoltaMed Somaxon h SonicAut 0.10 SonicCorp SonocoP 1.20 Sonus SonyCp 0.32 Sothebys 0.32 Sourcefire SouthnCo 1.96 SthnCopper 1.66 SwstAirl 0.04 SwstBc SwstnEngy Spansion SpectraEn 1.12 SpectPh SpiritAero SpiritAir Splunk n Spreadtrm 0.40 SprintNex SprottSilv SprottGold SprottRL g 0.06 STAG Indl 1.08 StageStrs 0.40 SP Matls 0.74 SP HlthC 0.74 SP CnSt 0.91 SP Consum 0.64 SP Engy 1.15 SPDR Fncl 0.23 SP Inds 0.74 SP Tech 0.40 SP Util 1.41 StMotr 0.36 StdPac StanBlkDk 1.96 StanB&D 52 1.44 Staples 0.44 StarBulk h 0.06 StarScient Starbucks 0.68 StarwdHtl 0.50 StarwdPT 1.76 StateStr 0.96 StateSt pfC Statoil ASA 1.12 StlDynam 0.40 Steelcse 0.36 StemCells Stericycle Sterlite 0.15 SMadden StewEnt 0.16 StifelFin StillwtrM StoneEngy Stratasys StratHotels StreamHlt Stryker 0.85 SturmRug 1.05 SubPpne 3.41 SumitMitsu SunCmts 2.52 SunCokeE Suncor gs 0.52 SunesisPh Sunoco 0.80 SunocoL s 1.88 SunPower SunriseSen SunshHrt n SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst 0.20 SupEnrgy SuperiorInd 0.64 Supvalu 0.35 SusqBnc 0.24 SwftEng SwiftTrans SwisherH lf Symantec SymetraF 0.28 Synacor n Synaptics Synchron SynrgyP rs SynergyRs Synopsys Synovus 0.04 SyntaPhm Syntrolm h Sysco 1.08 TCF Fncl 0.20 TCW Strat 0.35 TD Ameritr 0.24 TE Connect 0.84 TECO 0.88 TFS Fncl THL Credit 1.28 TICC Cap 1.16 TIM Part TJX s 0.46 TPC Grp TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi 0.50 TakeTwo TalismE g 0.27 TangerFac 0.84 Tangoe TanzRy g TargaRes 1.58 Target 1.44 Taseko TASER TataMotors 0.36 Taubmn 1.85 TeamHlth TearLab TeckRes g 0.80 Teekay 1.27 TeekLNG 2.70 TeekOffsh 2.05 TeekayTnk 0.53 TlCmSys TlcmArg 0.93 TelItalia 0.57 Teledyne Teleflex 1.36 TelefBrasil 1.86 TelefEsp TeleNav TelData 0.49 Tellabs 0.08 TmpGlb 0.42 TempurP Tenaris 0.76 TenetHlth Tengsco Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium 0.75 TescoCp TeslaMot Tesoro 0.48 TetraTc TetraTech TeucrCorn TevaPhrm 0.99 TxCapBsh Texas Inds TexInst 0.68 TexRdhse 0.36 Textron 0.08 Theravnce ThermoFis 0.52 ThomCrk g ThomsonR 1.28 Thor Inds 0.72 Thoratec 3D Sys 3M Co 2.36 3SBio ThrshdPhm TibcoSft Tidwtr 1.00 Tiffany 1.28 THorton g 0.84 TW Cable 2.24 TimeWarn 1.04 Timken 0.92 Titan Intl 0.02 TitanMach TitanMet 0.30 TiVo Inc TollBros Torchmark 0.60 Tornier ToroCo s 0.44 TorDBk g 3.08 Total SA 2.90 TotalSys 0.40 TowerGrp 0.75 TowersWat 0.46 Towerstm Toyota 0.52 TractSupp 0.80 TrCda g 1.76 Transocn 3.16 TranSwt

C 54.64 57.15 20.89 14.25 9.85 29.06 11.22 1.65 10.65 56.23 20.62 86.13 72.42 62.19 40.69 42.50 58.52 3.11 .31 19.09 10.20 30.23 2.06 12.04 34.50 55.56 45.32 34.51 9.18 11.14 35.39 12.76 28.49 12.07 25.00 19.77 36.88 20.75 5.10 13.59 14.81 1.44 16.37 22.01 36.97 39.43 35.42 46.92 74.36 15.74 37.11 31.01 36.28 18.95 7.01 72.89 26.06 11.54 .53 3.68 51.17 58.15 23.99 43.18 25.23 25.82 11.80 9.86 2.09 93.28 7.05 43.80 8.17 35.06 12.11 26.31 64.73 6.37 4.20 54.42 47.94 37.99 6.36 44.11 16.96 33.38 3.80 47.34 49.00 4.80 14.30 8.27 11.30 .85 28.09 22.34 17.82 2.35 10.78 21.13 8.90 1.66 19.06 13.21 7.62 26.28 24.42 4.50 2.91 34.06 2.37 7.71 .73 30.19 11.77 5.50 17.54 36.30 17.40 9.04 14.08 10.74 20.45 45.59 41.92 46.25 10.58 25.69 14.97 10.57 14.14 33.55 14.93 4.65 47.67 64.38 3.28 5.45 23.70 80.29 27.56 3.75 31.36 32.36 38.00 27.20 4.12 2.11 10.00 10.95 64.50 69.51 23.07 14.58 6.08 25.42 3.72 9.33 33.35 42.40 5.46 .70 30.87 75.02 15.85 24.28 19.80 10.25 28.28 40.34 27.34 6.75 49.65 40.32 46.78 43.76 28.59 17.69 27.67 25.61 59.33 3.42 28.87 33.71 33.84 38.27 90.81 13.42 8.54 30.95 48.90 62.55 51.58 91.78 43.07 40.37 19.95 19.37 12.84 9.69 34.94 52.19 19.49 38.99 83.26 52.79 23.34 18.74 54.24 3.84 82.07 98.50 46.29 46.19

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+.12 +.39 +.38 +.10 -.11 -.04 +.37 +.24 -.05 +.02 -.19 +.23 +.45 +.06 +.15 +.17 -.21 +.94 +.10 +.71 -.01 +.17 +.01 -.08 +.44 -.11 +.30 +.08 -.04 -.15 -.48 +.04 +.19 +.09 +.01 -.61 -.08 +.21 +.77 +.37 +2.43 -.02 -.20 +.42 +.37 -.08 +.07 +.06 -.07 -.10 +.31 +.09 +.51 +.04 +.01 -.90 +.02 +.05 +.51 +.27 +.06 -.07 +.04 +.09 +.09 -.04 +.06 +.21 +.02 -2.12 +.45 -.14 +.09 +.40 +.04 -.02 -.01 -.27 +.23 +.01 +.10 -.03 -.10 +.08 +.24 +.01 +.11 +.04 +.81 +.04 +.05 +.29 +.05 -.25 -.19 -.08 +.71 -.08 +.25 -.10 -.15 -.02 +1.06 +.39 -1.80 +.16 -.19 +.40 -.15 -1.56 +.04 +.04 +.17 +.17 -.05 +.97 +.33 +.24 +.07 +.29 +.09 +.03 +.73 +.29 +.04 -.03 -1.13 -.12 -.04 +1.31 +.15 -.14 +.48 +.03 +.13 -.03 -.36 -.29 -.20 +2.14 +.01 -.04 +.60 +.86 +.25 +.11 +.44 -.04 +.31 -.89 -.36 +1.83 -.35 -.67 +.29 +.27 +.43 +.03 -.17 -.70 -.29 +.09 -.01 +1.41 -.15 +.35 +.11 -.60 +.14 +.12 -.15 -.10 +.77 -.77 -.24 -.42

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Lancair

Apple

The same can’t be said of the former occupant of another Central Oregon airplane factory, Cessna. Bend city and economic development officials have been trying to find a buyer for the 204,000-square-foot factory on Nelson Road at Bend Municipal Airport since Cessna left in 2009. Two years earlier, Cessna had paid $26 million to buy the former Columbia Aircraft company out of bankruptcy. Officials have led potential buyers on tours of the facility several times since it went on the market, said Roger Lee, CEO of Economic Development for Central Oregon. No one has bitten so far. Collier’s International, the real estate company listing the Cessna plant, dropped its asking price to $3.9 million earlier this year, broker Jerry Matson said. The building, still owned by Cessna but on land owned by the city of Bend, was first put on the market for $7 million. The asking price was reduced to $5.97 million in June 2010, Matson said, before being lowered again this year. The lower price could generate new buzz for the building, though talks on the building haven’t gone farther than preliminary discussions, he said. “We continue to get inquiries from a number of different sources,” Matson said. “People continue to tour it, both locally based and from afar.”

Continued from E1 Like much of Central Oregon’s aviation industry, Lancair’s bottom line has taken a hit since the market crash in 2008. A huge slowdown in demand for big-ticket items like planes has completely reversed the early 2000s growth in the market. Deschutes County had a monthly average of nearly 1,200 transportation manufacturing jobs in 2006, according to Oregon Employment Department data. That figure has dropped 80 percent, to an average of 240 jobs, this year. Lancair has lowered its workforce from about 70 in 2010 to about 50 today, with across-the-board cuts reducing overhead costs at the company, amid a dropoff in demand for their kit planes. “We’ve been steadily retrenching since late 2010,” Bowen said. “We’re a market-driven business.... Private aviation is a business that’s primarily driven by high net-worth individuals. The market for multimillion-dollar airplanes isn’t robust right now because of the economy.” But the company is still focused on finding buyers for its Evolution Turbine model kit planes, and it’s still one of the biggest players left in Central Oregon’s airplane industry, along with Epic Aircraft, which earlier this year purchased the building it had been leasing at Bend Municipal Airport.

Continued from E1 Since Cook unveiled the third-generation iPad, his first major product release, at the same spot in March, Apple’s star has only continued to expand to supernova status. A jury last month ruled that Samsung had violated Apple’s patents for the iPhone and iPad, a potentially industrychanging verdict that analysts say could help the Cupertino, Calif., tech giant regain dominance in the smartphone market from Google’s Android operating system. The iPhone 4S was Cook’s first product launch as Apple’s full-time CEO. The device was greeted with disappointment

Scams Continued from E1 The thieves urged her to send money for “federal taxes” and “customs duties” on the cars. The FBI says it’s an old story. “From way back, people have been using the Clearing House name, trying to scam people,” said Charles Pavelites, an FBI supervising agent at the Internet Crime Complaint Center. He added: “It’s hard to prosecute the scammers, and even harder if they are overseas and set up accounts to represent that they are in New York.” Christopher L. Irving, a Clearing House executive, said people should be wary of requests for money using the Clearing House name. “If they are asked to send money, it’s not the real Publishers Clearing House,” he said. He added that the company reported all instances of possible fraud to the FTC’s law enforcement database with the accusers’ permission. Grace’s caller ID is still showing calls from Jamaica, which is often used by the swindlers; she now refuses to answer the calls. Police officials in Colorado told her she was unlikely to ever reclaim the money. She was advised to place a freeze on requests for her personal and financial information at the three main

— Reporter: 541-617-7820 eglucklich@bendbulletin.com

Banking

with an insured financial institution,” he said in the release. The survey did not include the Bend Metropolitan Statistical Area, but it showed about 17 percent of households in the PortlandVancouver, Wash.-Beaverton metro area were either unbanked or underbanked last year. It represented a decrease of about 1 percentage point from the 2009 survey.

Continued from E1 Accounts at federally insured banks allow residents to handle basic financial transactions more easily, build wealth, save for emergencies or long-term security and get access to credit on fair terms, Martin J. Gruenberg, FDIC acting chairman, said in a news release. “There are many positives to establishing a relationship

by many who expected a fifthgeneration iPhone rather than simply an improved version of the existing product. Critics at the time also noted Cook’s subdued manner at the launch — a mood that perhaps became more understandable the following day, when Jobs died of pancreatic cancer just six weeks after handing the company’s reins to Cook, formerly his chief operating officer. Despite the criticism, the iPhone 4S generated blockbuster sales and record preorders, perhaps fueled in part by a worldwide outpouring of emotion in the wake of Jobs’ death. The iPhone 5, by contrast, will rise or fall solely on its

merits, and ISI analyst Brian Marshall has projected Apple could sell as many as 50 million of them in the December quarter alone if its supply chain can keep up. Stephen Baker, a telecom industry analyst with NPD Group in New York, offered a minority dissent, warning that a blowout debut isn’t necessarily guaranteed for the iPhone 5. He noted that the U.S. smartphone market “appears to be an increasingly mature one” and that Apple and Android dominate it so completely there are few weaker competitors from whom Apple might steal market share. Too, Baker pointed out, it’s been less than a year since the

iPhone 4S was launched. Apple has unveiled a new iPhone once a year, selling a reported 244 million in all — 40 percent of those during this fiscal year alone. Android, which Google released as an open-source platform 10 months after Jobs announced the iPhone, operates some 480 million devices worldwide, according to the Mountain View, Calif., titan’s own estimates. Entrenched players such as Dell and Hewlett-Packard have been thrown off-balance as consumers, then corporate clients began ditching their desktop and laptop computers for the increased mobility and convenience of smartphones and tablets.

credit rating companies, Experian, TransUnion and Equifax, which she did. She says she believes the thieves originally obtained her profile from one of the companies by pretending they needed it for a business purpose. Her bank branch recommended that she buy fraud protection services from LifeLock, one of more than 20 competing firms, which typically charge a monthly fee to monitor a customer’s credit ratings, bank accounts and credit cards and to inform the customer of suspicious activity. There is disagreement among experts about the usefulness of such services. “I wouldn’t sign up,” said Avivah Litan, who specializes in security and fraud at the Gartner business and technology consulting firm. “I would worry about what they can’t protect against,” she said, for example, thefts from stock brokerage accounts. Personal credit cards typically protect their customers by absorbing all but $50 of a cardholder’s loss. But if you end up owing bill collectors $20,000 on fraudulent credit card purchases, the monitors usually do not cover your loss, according to Litan. Often, they pay only legal fees, she said. She added: “But if you are really paranoid, it doesn’t

hurt to purchase an anti-fraud service.” Michelle Jun, a senior lawyer at Consumers Union in San Francisco, said, “Our advice to consumers is to use the tools that are already accessible and free,” like freezing access without a password to your information at the credit rating companies. “Credit monitoring services usually get to problems when it is too late,” Jun said. The Consumer Federation of America recently rated 20 identity theft services, using thumbs-up and thumbsdown icons, and also noting instances when it felt a protection service needed improvement. Dr. Virginia Templeton, a family physician who is executive director of Memory Care, a nonprofit clinic in Asheville, N.C., said retirees were often “independent, high-functioning people” who fell victim before cognitive issues that develop as the brain processes slow down in normal aging became obvious. Sylvia Easterling said her mother, 82, a retired schoolteacher and “a smart woman,” who has her own

apartment in her daughter’s house, lost several thousand dollars in a fraud scheme and was on the verge of losing much more. It was the second time around for their family. The daughter had attended workshops on fraud at the Memory Care clinic when her father was victimized shortly before he died. She became suspicious when she noticed that her mother was getting a high volume of phone calls. She overheard some of the conversations. In one, a woman was “pretending over the phone,” she said, “saying things I find totally infuriating. I overheard prayers.” There was also talk of a $25 million prize and sending money for income taxes. The thieves had her mother’s Social Security number. Once alerted, Easterling was able to intercept a FedEx envelope containing $12,000 in cash her mother was sending to an Illinois address. She said her mother did not want to be named. “She doesn’t understand how this happened to her,” she said. “She is baffled and

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Northwest stocks Name

Div PE

AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.16 .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40 .88 1.10 ... .28 .53 .24f .90f .20 .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

YTD Last Chg %Chg

12 34.72 +.26 -7.5 16 25.25 -.19 -1.9 10 8.97 -.06 +61.3 36 26.09 -.01 +30.7 13 70.96 -.31 -3.3 ... 5.24 -.14 +19.6 11 53.73 +.89 +13.9 18 52.37 +.55 +12.5 28 100.89 +1.37 +21.1 54 8.13 -.04 +35.0 14 20.65 +.18 -17.6 6 17.99 +.04 -30.2 ... 10.92 +.12 +5.0 10 23.19 -.15 -4.4 9 8.69 +.04 +13.0 22 23.92 +.52 -1.2 11 4.43 +.22 -25.4 ... 14.23 +.06 +76.3 20 22.44 -.01 +4.6 15 17.02 +.02 +25.5 15 30.78 -.01 +18.6

NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1729.50 $1730.60 $33.233

www.expresspros.com EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

Market recap

Name

Div PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstBcp Weyerhsr

1.44 1.08 1.78 .08 .80 ... 1.68 .12 .70 .75 1.56 .89f .68 ... .36 .78 .32 .88 ... .60

Precious metals Metal

E3

YTD Last Chg %Chg

21 100.84 +1.16 +4.6 18 57.95 +.18 +16.6 21 48.16 -.56 +.5 15 6.72 +.22 +48.0 12 41.44 -.27 +10.6 ... 1.32 -.01 -30.9 38 41.77 +.76 +14.3 18 158.72 -.67 -3.7 9 16.45 +.05 -21.8 13 30.34 -.75 -28.2 29 144.05 +2.20 +61.4 10 31.62 -.07 -14.0 28 51.17 +.44 +11.2 ... 5.92 +.04 +21.6 16 13.10 +.02 +5.7 12 33.94 -.10 +25.5 13 16.51 ... +18.0 11 34.33 +.18 +24.6 12 20.36 +.17 +30.5 40 26.31 +.47 +40.9

Prime rate

Pvs Day

Time period

Percent

$1732.00 $1731.80 $33.509

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

BkofAm NokiaCp AmIntlGrp S&P500ETF SprintNex

1958091 8.97 -.06 1425221 2.75 -.04 771709 33.80 +.35 692695 144.39 +.48 504075 5.10 +.10

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name LincN pf OfficeDpt NBGrce rs Amrep MillMda n

Last

Chg %Chg

389.08+109.83 2.29 +.40 2.61 +.37 9.24 +.99 13.68 +1.44

+39.3 +21.2 +16.5 +12.0 +11.8

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Cemig pf s Cemig s TRC Cos RedLionH HalconR rs

12.47 -3.30 -20.9 11.35 -2.01 -15.0 6.72 -.98 -12.7 6.78 -.95 -12.3 7.58 -.97 -11.3

Amex

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more)

Most Active ($1 or more)

Name

Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

Facebook n SiriusXM Intel PwShs QQQ Microsoft

1131142 928419 436461 405035 304698

20.93 +1.50 2.43 -.08 23.19 -.15 68.63 +.20 30.78 -.01

Vol (00)

CheniereEn GoldStr g Neuralstem NovaGld g NA Pall g

Last Chg

62397 16.48 +.19 33726 1.63 +.03 27997 1.00 +.21 24226 5.18 +.08 24132 2.11 +.05

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

MastechH NovaCpp n SL Ind Glowpoint WalterInv

5.39 +.38 2.27 +.13 14.63 +.63 2.19 +.09 35.64 +1.33

Chg %Chg +7.6 +6.1 +4.5 +4.1 +3.9

Losers ($2 or more)

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Mindspeed GTx Inc 3SBio HorizPhm Iridium un

3.28 +.72 +28.1 4.52 +.73 +19.3 13.42 +1.83 +15.8 4.69 +.62 +15.2 9.80 +1.25 +14.6

Losers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Medgen wt UraniumEn Banro g Taseko WizrdSft rs

4.40 2.65 4.50 3.28 4.35

-.35 -.14 -.21 -.15 -.19

-7.4 -5.0 -4.5 -4.4 -4.2

Globeco PMFG Lawsn Xyratex MonstrBv s

11.09 6.86 6.51 9.65 50.78

-2.21 -1.21 -.74 -1.09 -5.58

233 191 39 463 11 7

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary 1,930 1,081 113 3,124 261 14

Chg %Chg

Name

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Indexes

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

-16.6 -15.0 -10.2 -10.1 -9.9

Diary 1,455 981 144 2,580 92 16

52-Week High Low

Name

13,354.34 10,404.49 5,390.11 3,950.66 499.82 411.54 8,327.67 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,139.61 2,298.89 1,438.74 1,074.77 15,047.44 11,208.42 847.92 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

13,333.35 5,174.18 467.89 8,267.31 2,420.49 3,114.31 1,436.56 15,038.58 845.12

+9.99 +40.68 -2.02 +21.16 -16.47 +9.78 +3.00 +40.81 +3.21

+.07 +.79 -.43 +.26 -.68 +.32 +.21 +.27 +.38

+9.13 +3.08 +.69 +10.57 +6.24 +19.54 +14.23 +14.02 +14.06

+18.55 +12.44 +8.94 +14.84 +9.07 +21.06 +20.85 +19.89 +20.02

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

336.10 2,439.49 3,543.79 5,781.39 7,343.53 20,075.39 40,254.17 16,419.79 3,789.72 8,959.96 1,950.03 3,029.66 4,383.11 6,017.16

... +.90 +.18 -.19 +.46 +1.10 +.64 +1.19 +1.20 +1.73 +1.56 +.44 +.80 -.08

s s t s s s s s s s s s t

1.0457 1.6102 1.0242 .002111 .1580 1.2894 .1290 .012842 .076702 .0319 .000888 .1519 1.0665 .0338

1.0438 1.6070 1.0274 .002107 .1578 1.2860 .1290 .012857 .076918 .0316 .000886 .1513 1.0651 .0337

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Century Inv: EqInc 8.01 +0.01 +11.4 GrowthI 28.46 +0.06 +15.8 Ultra 26.55 +0.07 +15.8 American Funds A: AmcpA p 21.40 +0.07 +14.1 AMutlA p 28.47 +0.04 +11.3 BalA p 20.14 +0.02 +12.2 BondA p 12.90 -0.01 +4.7 CapIBA p 53.18 -0.04 +10.1 CapWGA p 36.17 +0.09 +14.5 CapWA p 21.51 -0.02 +6.4 EupacA p 39.54 +0.15 +12.5 FdInvA px 40.08 -0.04 +14.4 GovtA p 14.56 -0.02 +1.8 GwthA p 33.66 +0.12 +17.2 HI TrA p 11.21 +0.03 +10.6 IncoA p 18.10 +0.03 +10.1 IntBdA p 13.76 -0.01 +2.2 ICAA p 30.81 +0.06 +14.8 NEcoA p 28.11 +0.13 +18.2 N PerA p 30.25 +0.03 +15.6 NwWrldA 51.72 +0.14 +12.1 SmCpA p 38.94 +0.13 +17.4 TxExA p 13.04 -0.02 +6.8 WshA p 31.46 +0.06 +12.0 Artisan Funds: Intl 23.37 +0.12 +17.9 IntlVal r 28.96 +0.09 +15.4 MidCap 39.39 +0.08 +19.6 MidCapVal 21.52 +0.11 +9.2 Baron Funds: Growth 58.48 +0.33 +14.6 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.14 -0.03 +4.0 DivMu 14.85 -0.01 +2.3 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 19.95 +0.01 +11.0 GlAlA r 19.52 +0.04 +8.2 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.16 +0.04 +7.6 BlackRock Instl:

EquityDv 20.00 +0.01 GlbAlloc r 19.62 +0.04 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 70.20 +0.14 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 31.57 +0.11 AcornIntZ 39.49 +0.24 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.60 +0.05 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.09 +0.08 USCorEq1 12.30 +0.04 USCorEq2 12.13 +0.04 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 36.25 +0.11 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 36.69 +0.12 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.40 -0.02 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 18.68 +0.09 EmMktV 27.85 +0.16 IntSmVa 15.05 +0.13 LargeCo 11.32 +0.02 USLgVa 22.32 +0.09 US Small 23.58 +0.09 US SmVa 27.11 +0.12 IntlSmCo 15.19 +0.13 Fixd 10.35 IntVa 15.83 +0.13 Glb5FxInc 11.22 -0.02 2YGlFxd 10.12 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 77.16 +0.29 Income 13.85 -0.01 IntlStk 32.98 +0.26 Stock 120.01 +0.65 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.35 TRBd N p 11.34 Dreyfus: Aprec 45.08 -0.04 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.08 +0.01

+11.1 +8.4 +16.7 +16.0 +15.7 +5.1 +11.5 +15.6 +15.7 +11.5 +11.8 +5.3 +9.8 +8.6 +12.7 +15.9 +18.1 +15.7 +17.6 +11.7 +0.8 +10.2 +3.9 +0.8 +15.9 +6.1 +12.8 +19.3 NA NA +12.1 +6.3

FMI Funds: LgCap p 17.38 +0.04 FPA Funds: NewInco 10.68 FPACres 28.79 +0.02 Fairholme 31.26 +0.61 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.55 -0.02 StrValDvIS 5.13 -0.01 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 23.00 +0.09 StrInA 12.72 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 23.32 +0.09 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 14.31 +0.02 FF2010K 13.11 +0.02 FF2015 11.97 +0.02 FF2015K 13.18 +0.02 FF2020 14.50 +0.03 FF2020K 13.61 +0.02 FF2025 12.10 +0.03 FF2025K 13.79 +0.04 FF2030 14.41 +0.04 FF2030K 13.94 +0.04 FF2035 11.96 +0.04 FF2035K 14.05 +0.04 FF2040 8.34 +0.02 FF2040K 14.09 +0.04 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 13.07 +0.05 AMgr50 16.36 +0.02 AMgr20 r 13.33 Balanc 20.24 +0.04 BalancedK 20.24 +0.04 BlueChGr 50.39 +0.17 CapAp 29.94 +0.16 CpInc r 9.39 +0.03 Contra 78.95 +0.31 ContraK 78.96 +0.31 DisEq 24.81 +0.08 DivIntl 28.88 +0.09 DivrsIntK r 28.86 +0.08 DivGth 30.22 +0.11

+14.0 +1.8 +8.4 +35.0 +5.0 +8.4 +16.6 +8.2 +16.8 +9.5 +9.7 +9.8 +9.9 +10.8 +10.8 +12.2 +12.2 +12.5 +12.7 +13.6 +13.6 +13.5 +13.7 +16.4 +9.9 +5.8 +12.2 +12.3 +18.8 +21.6 +12.7 +17.0 +17.1 +15.3 +13.2 +13.3 +17.6

Eq Inc 47.12 +0.08 EQII 19.64 +0.01 Fidel 36.04 +0.14 FltRateHi r 9.93 +0.01 GNMA 11.83 -0.01 GovtInc 10.89 -0.02 GroCo 98.47 +0.28 GroInc 21.19 +0.05 GrowCoF 98.49 +0.28 GrowthCoK98.47 +0.28 HighInc r 9.30 +0.03 IntBd 11.10 -0.01 IntmMu 10.62 -0.01 IntlDisc 31.67 +0.13 InvGrBd 11.98 -0.02 InvGB 7.94 -0.02 LgCapVal 11.41 +0.05 LowP r 39.34 +0.08 LowPriK r 39.32 +0.09 Magelln 74.21 +0.22 MidCap 30.29 +0.09 MuniInc 13.47 -0.02 NwMkt r 17.61 -0.04 OTC 63.09 +0.29 100Index 10.34 +0.02 Puritn 19.76 +0.03 PuritanK 19.76 +0.04 SAllSecEqF13.08 +0.05 SCmdtyStrt 9.48 +0.05 SCmdtyStrF 9.51 +0.05 SrsIntGrw 11.55 -0.01 SrsIntVal 9.14 +0.07 SrInvGrdF 11.98 -0.03 STBF 8.59 StratInc 11.39 TotalBd 11.24 -0.02 USBI 11.96 -0.02 Value 74.65 +0.29 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 51.12 +0.13 500Idx I 51.12 +0.12 Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r 40.71 +0.17 500IdxAdv 51.12 +0.12

+15.6 +14.2 +16.4 +5.4 +2.8 +2.2 +21.7 +17.3 +21.9 +21.9 +12.0 +3.8 +3.7 +14.7 +4.4 +4.8 +13.3 +15.2 +15.4 +18.1 +16.0 +6.0 +15.3 +15.3 +17.2 +12.7 +12.8 +16.5 +5.8 +6.0 +14.2 +13.1 +4.4 +2.0 +8.4 +5.1 +3.3 +17.6 +16.0 +16.0 +16.1 +16.0

TotMktAd r 41.78 +0.11 +16.0 USBond I 11.96 -0.02 +3.4 First Eagle: GlblA 49.42 +0.21 +9.5 OverseasA 22.24 +0.11 +9.2 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.19 -0.02 +1.3 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.65 -0.03 +6.9 GrwthA p 50.27 +0.13 +12.6 HYTFA p 10.85 -0.02 +8.8 IncomA p 2.23 +11.4 RisDvA p 37.58 -0.01 +8.0 StratInc p 10.64 +0.02 +9.1 USGovA p 6.88 -0.01 +1.8 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.27 +0.03 NA IncmeAd 2.21 +11.6 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.25 +10.9 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 22.29 +0.04 NA Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 13.31 +0.03 NA GrwthA p 19.01 +0.15 NA WorldA p 15.81 +0.13 NA Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.34 +0.04 NA GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 45.04 +0.12 +16.2 GMO Trust III: Quality 23.68 -0.04 +13.5 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 20.42 +0.17 +9.3 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.22 +0.06 +8.8 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.35 +0.02 +12.0 MidCapV 38.80 +0.14 +15.6 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.92 -0.01 +7.3 CapApInst 43.16 +0.11 +17.0 IntlInv t 58.60 +0.18 +12.7 Intl r 59.27 +0.18 +13.0

Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.79 +0.21 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 42.53 +0.23 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 10.89 -0.03 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r16.25 +0.08 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.93 +0.03 CmstkA 17.39 +0.05 EqIncA 9.19 +0.02 GrIncA p 20.91 +0.05 HYMuA 10.03 -0.01 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 24.28 +0.06 AssetStA p 25.12 +0.07 AssetStrI r 25.37 +0.07 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 12.07 -0.02 JP Morgan Instl: MdCpVal 27.93 +0.08 JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond 12.07 -0.02 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 12.06 -0.02 HighYld 8.13 +0.03 ShtDurBd 11.01 -0.01 USLCCrPls 23.23 +0.09 Janus T Shrs: PrkMCVal T22.23 +0.07 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.52 +0.03 LSGrwth 13.43 +0.04 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.18 +0.04 Longleaf Partners: Partners 30.57 +0.26 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.96 +0.02 StrInc C 15.40 +0.03 LSBondR 14.90 +0.02 StrIncA 15.32 +0.03 Loomis Sayles Inv:

+13.8 +14.4 -12.4 +5.8 +11.7 +15.2 +11.4 +13.3 +11.0 +12.3 +12.8 +13.0 +3.8 +17.6 +4.1 +4.0 +11.4 +1.4 +17.7 +10.1 +11.6 +12.8 +14.2 +14.7 +11.1 +9.5 +10.8 +10.1

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+0.04

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E4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

B C 

TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. FALL RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2013 models; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711. EXPLORE THE BENEFITS OF WORKING WITH SCHWAB: Free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 23:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-6177080. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors welcome; first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765. OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS ANNUAL CELEBRATION: $15; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; The Point at Shevlin Corporate Park, 929 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend; 541728-0820 or president@sibend.org.

FRIDAY FALL RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2013 models; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. CENTRAL OREGON BUSINESS EDUCATION & NETWORKING MEETUP GROUP: Launch meeting, COCC learning center, lunch provided, registration requested; $5; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-848-3600, kmuinch@hotmail.com or http:// www.meetup.com/COBEN12/. KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Free; 1-2:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax. com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. KNOW WORD FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050.

SATURDAY FALL RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2013 models; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.

SUNDAY FALL RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2013 models; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www. happyhourtraining.com. FORECLOSURE CLASS: 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; call 541-318-7506 ext. 309 to reserve a seat. FORECLOSURE PREVENTION CLASS: Learn about NeighborImpact’s Housing Center tools and services which can assist individuals struggling to pay their mortgages; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 309, karenb@neighborimpact.org or www.homeownershipcenter.org.

TUESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors welcome; first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541420-7377. DO YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES TO RUN YOUR OWN BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7290.

KNOW COMPUTERS FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7080. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 34:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3121050. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NETWORKING SOCIAL: You need not be a Chamber member to attend. Free; 5:30 p.m.; Juniper Realty, 14290 S.W. Chinook Road. For more information, call Hope Johnson at 541-923-2679 or go to www.crrchamber.com. SMALL BUSINESS COUNSELING: No appointment necessary; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7080.

WEDNESDAY CENTRAL OREGON OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH CONFERENCE: Oregon’s Occupational Safety and Health Division encourages workers and employers to attend the event to help improve safety and health performance. Keynote speaker Jake French. Registration required; $125, with optional pre-conference workshops for $40; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 503-378-3272 or www. orosha.org/conferences. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-749-0789. HR AND THE GREAT LEGAL ROUNDUP: Registration required at www.hrcentraloregon.org/ calendarevents.aspx#rsvpform; $30 for HRACO members, $40 for nonmembers; 7:30-11 a.m.; Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, 3105 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 541-389-9600. FOR WHAT AM I PAYING?: Learn about the costs of various, investment-related products from Miller Ferrari Wealth Management. Coffee will be provided; free; 8:3010 a.m.; Starbucks, 61470 U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-639-8055. KNOW EXCEL FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 1:30-3 p.m.; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-5360515. NETWORK OF ENTREPRENEURIAL WOMEN MONTHLY MEETING: Elevating the art of networking. $22 for members; $30 for nonmembers; 5-8 p.m.; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; Register online at http://networkwomen.org before Sept. 13. For more information, call 541-848-8598.

THURSDAY Sept. 20 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors welcome; first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. CENTRAL OREGON OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH CONFERENCE: Oregon’s Occupational Safety and Health Division encourages workers and employers to attend the event to help improve safety and health performance. Keynote speaker Jake French. Registration required; $125, with optional pre-conference workshops for $40; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 503-378-3272 or www.orosha.org/conferences. DESERT CONFERENCE: A forum for land managers, conservationists, academics and advocates to educate and collaborate on critical desert issues. Includes Wild and Scenic Film Fest, live music and guest speakers; $50; 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Oregon Natural Desert Association, 50 S.W. Bond St., Suite 4, Bend; 541-330-2638. ADVICE AT SCHWAB: Free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. KNOW WORD FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 2-3:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-330-3760. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 23:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-6177080. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765. HOW TO SELECT THE RIGHT FRANCHISE: Participants will learn about how to choose a franchise, how to arrange financing, and other critical details. Registration required; free; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290.

FRIDAY Sept. 21 TOWN HALL FORUM: Four-year university: What it means for education in Bend; free; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-7437 or www.bendchamber.org. DESERT CONFERENCE: A forum for land managers, conservationists, academics and advocates to educate and collaborate on critical desert issues. Includes Wild and Scenic Film Fest, live music and guest speakers; $50; 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Oregon Natural Desert Association, 50 S.W. Bond St., Suite 4, Bend; 541-330-2638. ENTRELEADERSHIP ONE DAY SIMULCAST: Nationally syndicated radio talk show host and New York Times best-selling author, Dave Ramsey, will teach companies how to take their businesses to the next level in a live simulcast from Nashville to locations around the country. Contact Jet Cowan at 541-788-3868 for more information or to register; 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St.; 541-382-5496. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. KNOW CRAIGSLIST: Free; 1-2:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax. com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. KNOW WORD II: Free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050. REDMOND CHAMBER DINNER DANCE AND AUCTION: Theme, “The Great Outdoors.�; 6-11 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way; 541-548-2711.

SATURDAY

Gas prices go sky high as stations lodge protest By Katie Zezima The Associated Press

SOUTH PLAINFIELD, N.J. — More than 50 Lukoil gas stations in New Jersey and Pennsylvania jacked up prices to more than $8 a gallon Wednesday to protest what they say are unfair pricing practices by Lukoil North America that leave them at a competitive disadvantage. Dozens of Lukoil franchise owners also gathered to protest at a station in this central New Jersey town where the posted prices were an eyepopping $8.99 a gallon. The owners and the New Jersey Gasoline, Convenience, Automotive Association said the protest was aimed at raising consumer awareness about the challenges facing Lukoil dealers and getting the company to respond to dealer grievances. Station owners said Lukoil charges them more for gasoline than other companies charge their franchisees, forcing them to pass that increase onto consumers. It is not uncommon, they said, to see a competitor selling gas to the public for considerably less than what they’re paying Lukoil per gallon. “My price on invoices is what my competitors are selling on this street,� said Khalid Zackria, owner of the South Plainfield station where the dealers assembled. “That’s why it’s hard for me to survive.� Sal Risalvato, executive director of the gas station association, said Lukoil charg-

Mel Evans / The Associated Press

A sign says regular gas is $9.99 a gallon at a Lukoil service station Wednesday in Princeton, N.J., as Lukoil dealers and workers protest what they say are unfair pricing practices by Lukoil North America.

es 7 cents more per gallon than other companies and that owners might pay more on top of that depending on where their station is located. Lukoil North America issued a statement defending its pricing practices, which it said comply with state law, and accused the gas station association of encouraging “public misstatements and illconceived actions.� Lukoil is Russia’s secondlargest oil producer. The first Lukoil-branded service stations in the U.S. opened in 2003 and today the company has more than 500 in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic. Many of the franchisees entered into agreements with other companies that were bought by Lukoil. The gas station associa-

tion said the high prices were meant to get the attention of customers so they know the price pressures they are facing. Gas stations taking part in the protest handed out fliers to customers explaining why they are struggling to keep their prices down and put up banners asking customers to contact Lukoil. One car pulled into the Lukoil station around the time of the protest; its driver circled the pumps and left. Roger Verma, who coowns four Lukoil stations and three Exxon stations, said he pays 18 to 20 cents more per gallon to buy gas from Lukoil than from Exxon. “Me, as a consumer myself, won’t go to Lukoil,� Verma said. “How can I expect my customers to?�

“a grave concern� that inflicts “enormous suffering.� His remarks sent a clear signal that the Fed will do more. “He had a sense of urgency in that Jackson Hole speech,� said David Jones, chief economist at DMJ Advisors. “I think he is convinced that there is a need to do something.� Some critics, inside and outside the Fed, remain opposed to further bond buying. They fear that by pumping so much cash into the financial system, the Fed is raising the risk of high inflation in the future. And many don’t think more bond purchases would help anyway because interest rates are already near record lows. Some economists who doubt the Fed is about to begin more bond buying say the European Central Bank has eased some pressure on the Fed. Last week, the ECB announced a plan to buy unlimited amounts of government bonds to help lower borrowing costs for countries strug-

gling with debts. If the ECB’s plan succeeds in bolstering Europe, the U.S. economy could benefit, too. Europe’s financial crisis and recession have slowed the U.S. economy, in part by reducing European purchases of U.S. goods. Some also think the Fed might be reluctant to launch a bond-buying program in the final two months of the presidential campaign. Many Republicans have been critical of the Fed’s unconventional methods to boost the economy. After the financial crisis struck in 2008, the Fed bought more than $2 trillion in Treasury and mortgage-backed securities. The Fed “is already a campaign issue, and enlarging its balance sheet will make it even more of one,� argues Vincent Reinhart, chief economist at Morgan Stanley and a former top economist at the Fed. Reinhart thinks the Fed will prefer to wait until at least December before announcing more bond buying.

Sept. 22 DESERT CONFERENCE: A forum for land-managers, conservationists, academics and advocates to educate and collaborate on critical desert issues. Includes Wild and Scenic Film fest, live music and guest speakers; $50; 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Oregon Natural Desert Association, 50 S.W. Bond St., Suite 4, , Bend; 541-330-2638.

TUESDAY Sept. 25 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; ; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. THE SIMPLE MECHANICS OF QUICKLY PERFECTING YOUR BUSINESS (AND LIFE): Sam Carpenter, founder and CEO of Centratel will get to the nuts and bolts of his bestselling book, Work the System: The Simple Mechanics of Making More and Working Less. Registration required; $25 for Chamber members and $45 for non-members; 11 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-7437 or www. bendchamber.org. KNOW INTERNET FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7080. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 23:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-3303760. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 34:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3121050. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 5:307 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3121050. SMALL BUSINESS COUNSELING: No appointment necessary; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7080. SUSTAINABLE WASTEWATER SOLUTIONS, BETTER CHOICES FOR CITIES, DEVELOPMENTS & INDIVIDUAL HOMES: Morgan Brown, Whole Water Systems, will present; free; 7 p.m.; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, Community Room, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541-389-7275.

WEDNESDAY Sept. 26 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789.

Fed Continued from E1 In August, job growth slowed sharply. The unemployment rate did fall to 8.1 percent from 8.3 percent. But that was because many Americans stopped looking for work, so they were no longer counted as unemployed. Chronic high unemployment was a theme Bernanke spotlighted in a speech to an economic conference in Jackson Hole, Wyo., late last month. Bernanke argued that QE and other unorthodox Fed actions had helped ease borrowing costs and boosted stock prices. Higher stock prices increase Americans’ wealth and confidence and typically lead individuals and businesses to spend more. In his speech, Bernanke cited research showing that the two previous rounds of QE had created 2 million jobs and accelerated economic growth. Still, he said persistently weak hiring remains

N  R

PERMITS City of Bend

John Trachtenberg, 2991 N.W. Chardonnay, $246,191 Brookswood Bend LLC, 19711 S.W. Aspen Ridge, $205,198 Brookswood Bend LLC, 19694 S.W. Aspen Ridge, $214,447 Brookswood Bend LLC, 19702 S.W. Aspen Ridge, $182,232 David R. Madrigal, 21198 Sunburst, $213,846 Old Town Properties Inc., 63154 Riverstone, $269,582 Jim St. John Construction LLC, 1335 N.W. Frazer, $203,202 John Thomas Gerberding, 20270 S.E. Knightsbridge, $161,656 Brookswood Bend LLC, 19708 S.W. Aspen Ridge, $290,343 Bridges at Shadow Glen LLC, 61167 S.E. Ambassador, $266,812 Bridges at Shadow Glen LLC, 61168 S.E. Sydney Harbor, $245,671 Bridges at Shadow Glen LLC, 61172 S.E. Sydney Harbor, $266,812 Lambert Neighbour, 63372 N.E. Lamoine, $204,372 Bell Development Inc., 63148 Peale, $203,459 Maryanne L. Freedman Trust, 19693 Sunshine, $369,784

William Paul Welch, 1258 N.W. Saginaw, $240,186 Richard Kotyluk, 3164 N.W. Shevlin Meadow, $292,618 Rose River LLC, 20638 Silas, $200,641 Duane D. Scott, 1647 N.E. Daphine, $214,509 Steven C. Olson Trust, 1653 N.W. Wild Rye, $376,834 Litte Fish Investments LLC, 20405 Penhollow, $193,564 Allan A. Harris, 21063 Don, $128,029 Brookswood Bend LLC, 61165 Snowbrush, $182,855 Brookswood Bend LLC, 61201 Snowbrush, $182,855 Hendrickson Homes of Oregon LLC, 60825 Whitney, $235,822 1002 N.W. Wall Street LLC, 1000 N.W. Wall, $700,500 Long Term Bend Investors LLC, 667 N.E. Mason, $153,387 Long Term Bend Investors LLC, 673 N.E. Mason, $153,387 Gary L. Patterson, 61334 South U.S. Highway 97, $250,000 Yelas Developments Inc., 61587 Summer Shade, $194,906 West Bend Property Company, 2470 N.W. Drouillard, $275,928 Brookswood Bend LLC, 19732 S.W. Aspen Meadows, $205,198

McDonalds Corporation, 1151 South U.S. Highway 97, $265,000 Robert Myron Lorenzen II, 2181 N.W. Lolo, $305,916 Chet Antonsen, 21267 S.E. Daylily, $206,202 Paterson Communcations Inc., 3191 N.E. Yellow Ribbon, $231,746 Creative Real Estate Solutions, 1252 N.W. Elgin, $179,425 Mclarty Investments LP, 2616 N.W. Crossing, $231,315 Patrick John Campbell, 3202 N.W. Starview, $483,451 Brooks Resources Corporation, 2475 N.W. Drouillard, $195,251 Wood Hill Enterprises LLC, 61185 S.W. Hobart, $274,691 Salvesen Homes LLC, 2328 N.W. Frazer, $181,173 City of Redmond

Oregon Joy LLC, 3360 S.W. Antler Ridge Lane, $193,644 Michael A. and Patricia A. Shantie, 3395 N.W. Elm Ave., $186,593 Deschutes County

Larry D. Gelbrich, 1385 Grosbeak Court, Redmond, $160,000 Lawrence J. Wood, 655 Foss Drive, Terrebonne, $216,456.26 Cascades Academy of Central Oregon, 19860 Tumalo Reservoir Road, Bend, $834,461


HEALTH

Health Events, F2 People, F2 Money, F2

F

Nutrition, F3 Medicine, F4-5 Fitness, F6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/health

Shake things up to stay fit • Get progressively in better shape with trainer’s week-by-week plan

SODIUM NITRATE

MSG

FOOD DYES

ANTIBIOTICS

By Anne Aurand The Bulletin

Just as philosophers believe there’s a natural order to the universe, fitness trainers believe there’s a natural order to conditioning the body. The body learns something new and adapts to it, or improves. To continue to see progress, exercisers must ratchet up their effort, or change their exercise. This can apply to getting stron- FITNESS ger, faster or fitter. Lane Young, director of strength and conditioning at ModalityX, a gym in Bend, outlined a general, four-week progression that can apply to anyone, no matter their starting point or their goal. (See week-by-week plan, Page F6.) This plan refers to intervalstrength training workouts, but it could translate into other types of conditioning, such as running or swimming. “When you’re looking to get in shape for a season, (such as ski season,) you need about 90 days to get in shape,” he said. Those 90 days can be broken down into three, four-week progressive training periods. “When you’re starting a new program, you need to give muscles time to adapt and learn new movements and demands you’re placing on them,” he said. See Progression / F6

4 weeks of fitness Lane Young, director of strength and conditioning at ModalityX in Bend, shares his progression fitness program, Page F6 Progression fitness

ned this four-week a gym in Bend, desig itioning at ModalityX, sort of training. In this case, it of strength and cond e doing just about any Lane Young, director anyon to apply can that progression concept sity interval describes high-inten WEEK 4 includes resistance training, which se • Demand the of inten sets een betw g restin most of your . action le musc WEEK 3 body. • Increase • Use heavier weight loads. weights, even if WEEK 2 • Boost intensity you can’t WEEK 5 • Increase nge challe and complete entire • Start a new volume to two to yourself. series of reps. WEEK 1 program. three sets. • Bump up the • Start a new the • One or two sets • Bump up t on at weigh program. only, lighter weight on two to to two least sets • One to two weights. three exercises. ises. exerc three only, lighter • Learn new weights. exercises. • Learn new exercises.

: WOMEN, TAKE NOTE Start Week 1 during the PMS eek menstrual

Week 2 should fall within the period week,

Additives: Friends or foes?

ation of women can The hormonal fluctu hormones are affect training. When third and fourth the g durin ized, optim n, strength, ek of the progressio

Too young for a stroke? Think again

OLESTRA

• You can avoid additives by limiting the amount of processed food you eat By Anne Aurand • The Bulletin

By Jane E. Brody New York Times News Service

Six years ago, Todd McGee was a lean, athletic 34-year-old working in construction and living with his wife and toddler daughter on Martha’s Vineyard, where he spent summer weekends surf- MEDICINE ing. A stroke changed his life forever. Today, with one arm useless and difficulty speaking, McGee, now 40, cannot work. He devotes most of his time to keeping as healthy as possible. Although he is able to drive and care for his daughter, now 7, everything takes longer, and he has trouble concentrating even on routine activities that others take in stride, like grocery shopping. “I definitely wish I had my old life back, building houses and boats and surfing in my spare time,” he said. His experience, complicated by a serious delay in diagnosis, is a powerful reminder that strokes can and do happen to young people. The sooner the correct diagnosis is made, the less likely the result will be lifelong impairment. Although a vast majority of strokes occur in people over age 65 (the risk is 30 to 50 per 1,000 in this age group), 10 percent to 15 percent affect people age 45 and younger (a risk of 1 in 1,000). A study by doctors at the Wayne State University-Detroit Medical Center Stroke Program found that among 57 young stroke victims, 1 in 7 were given a misdiagnosis of vertigo, migraine, alcohol intoxication, seizure, inner ear disorder or other problems — and sent home without proper treatment. “Although young stroke victims benefit the most from early treatment, it must be administered within 4½ hours,” said Dr. Seemant Chaturvedi, a neurologist at Wayne State who directs the program and led the study. “After 48 to 72 hours, there are no major interventions available to improve stroke outcome.” See Stroke / F4

ASPARTAME

“... In fact, the additives themselves are likely not harmful, but a diet with a lot of additives points to a diet high in processed foods. That is a problem.” — Julie Hood Gonsalves

T

he vivid orange of macaroni and cheese. So, here’s an overview of additives, especially the The buttery taste and texture of Pringles ones to be aware of. light chips. The sweetness of sugar-free What are additives? gum. The jiggle of Jell-O. Food additives are generally defined as any subThese comestible characteristics all have stance that will either directly or indirectly become a food additives to thank for their existence. component of or affect the characteristics Additives, from preservatives NUTRITION of a food. Direct additives have a specific to food dyes, are used to enhance the taste, purpose in a food, such as taste or color. texture and appearance of many foods. They are listed on the food label. “In general, people tend to believe adIndirect additives become a part of a food in trace ditives are harmful and undesirable,” said Julie Hood Gonsalves, a registered dietitian and associate profes- amounts without being deliberately added. This can sor of health at Central Oregon Community College. include chemicals such as Bisphenol A (BPA), which “In fact, the additives themselves are likely not harm- gets into food from some kinds of packaging, or the ful, but a diet with a lot of additives points to a diet antibiotics that farmers feed the cattle that becomes hamburgers. high in processed foods. That is a problem.” Some additives improve safety and freshness. PreFood additives would be less prevalent in our diets if we grew, harvested and cooked all of our servatives slow spoilage from mold and bacteria, for food, if we ate what was local and fresh. But that’s example. See Additives / F3 not how most Americans eat most of the time.

States have power to shape implementation of health care law By Laura Green Cox Newspapers

WASHINGTON — Though Florida lost its Supreme Court challenge to President Obama’s health care law, state politicians could still have a say in setting minimum health benefits for plans in the state under the federal Affordable Care Act. And that’s what has some health care

advocacy groups worried. “We have just seen the governor try to thwart the Affordable Care Act at every MONEY step he can,” said Laura Goodhue, executive director at Florida CHAIN, a statewide consumer health care advocacy organization. “We just don’t want the governor to submit

something that is completely opposite of the spirit and intention of the law.” Florida was the lead state challenging the Affordable Care Act and Gov. Rick Scott, since the ruling, refuses to comply with any part of the law that isn’t required. With the federal government promising to offer states flexibil-

ity, advocates worry that leaders in Florida will allow their repugnance for the federal law to cheapen the benefits available to its residents. The Affordable Care Act aims to offer Americans not just affordable coverage, but quality coverage, proponents of the law say. See States / F2

HEALTH HIGHLIGHTS MONEY: China set to outpace the U.S. in health spending, F2

NUTRITION: Obesity may lead to diminished cognitive skills, F3

MEDICINE: Gadgets help autistic workers get the job done, F4

FITNESS: Why your feet may go numb while exercising, F6


F2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

H E  Editor’s note: Ongoing support groups now appear online only. See www.bendbulletin. com/supportgroups. To submit an entry for either list, see instructions below.

FLU SHOTS FLU SHOT CLINIC: Administered by HealthWise to benefit Healthy Beginnings, for ages 9 and older; $25, with health insurance billing options; noon-6 p.m. Friday; Newport Avenue Market, 1121 NW Newport Ave., Bend; www.myhb.org. FLU SHOT CLINIC: Administered by HealthWise to benefit Healthy Beginnings, for ages 9 and older; $25, with health insurance billing options; noon-6 p.m. Wednesday; Newport Avenue Market, 1121 NW Newport Ave., Bend; www.myhb.org.

CLASSES HEALTHY BEGINNINGS SCREENINGS: Free health screenings for ages 0-5; Friday; Bend; call for location, 541-383-6357. MEDICATION MANAGEMENT CLASS: Learn about the importance of managing a senior’s medical history, doctor visits and medication; 6:30 p.m.-8p.m. Monday; Whispering Winds, 2920 Conners Ave., Bend; www .agewideopen.com. CONCUSSION BASELINE TESTING: A computerized “snapshot” of brain functioning for children ages 11-17 conducted by The Center Foundation; $10; registration required; 9 a.m.-11 a.m. Tuesday; The Center, 2200 N.E. Neff Road, Bend; 541-322-2321. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC: The Nordic Fall Ladies program, designed for female skiers

of all levels who wish to improve their overall ski fitness; registration required; $120; Tuesdays from 9:15 a.m.-11:45 a.m. Sept. 18-Nov. 6.; Bend Endurance Academy, 500 SW Bond St., Suite 142; 541-678-3864 or www.bendenduranceacademy. org. NAMI EDUCATIONAL MEETING: Dr. Lisa Rosen will speak on the Mental Health Court Program at the National Alliance on Mental Illness Central Oregon meeting; 7 p.m. Tuesday; St. Charles Bend, conference room C, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; www.namicentraloregon.org. IMPROVING CARE OUTCOMES FOR RETURNING VETERANS: A workshop exploring mental and behavioral health issues of returning veterans; $30, registration required; 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20; St. Charles Bend Conference Center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-706-2617 or http://classes. stcharleshealthcare.org. LIVING WELL WITH CHRONIC CONDITIONS: Learn how to achieve a healthier way of living and overcome symptoms of chronic conditions; registration required; $10 for six classes; Thursdays from 1 p.m.-3:30 p.m. Sept. 20-Oct. 25; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.E. 19th St., Redmond; 541322-7430 or www.livingwellco.org. WELLNESS AND FITNESS FAIR: “For the Health of It” fair includes educational presentations, diabetes testing and visual check-ups; noon-4 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. THE VANCE STANCE: Learn perfect posture and flexibility to eliminate pain, in a 10-week series; $100 for 10 classes; 6-8 p.m. Mondays or Wednesdays, noon-2 p.m. Mondays or Thursdays (mix and match class times), beginning Monday, Sept. 24; register for east Bend location; 541-330-9070.

How to submit Health Events: Email event information to healthevents@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” at www.bend bulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing class listings must be updated monthly and will appear at www.bendbulletin.com/healthclasses. Contact: 541-383-0358. People: Email information about local people involved in health issues to healthevents@bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0358.

P 

Weed

Dr. Matthew Weed has joined Bend Memorial Clinic’s east-side clinic gastroenterology department. Weed is a graduate of St. George’s University School of Medicine, and he completed a fellowship at West Virginia University and a residency at East Carolina University. Weed is board certified in internal medicine.

Teens lose sleep over texting The Dallas Morning News DALLAS — Fifty-six percent of teens, ages 13-18, bring their cellphones into their bedrooms and use them, with texting especially popular in the hour before trying to go to sleep, according to the 2011 Sleep in America Poll from the National Sleep Foundation. The mission of the nonprofit, based in Washington, D.C., is to alert the public, health care providers and policymakers to the importance of adequate sleep. The study noted a correla-

tion between those who text in the hour before trying to go to sleep at least a few nights a week, with 51 percent less likely to report getting a good night’s sleep, 65 percent more likely to wake up feeling unrefreshed, 17 percent more likely to be categorized as sleepy during the day and 63 percent more likely to drive drowsy.

M China health spending forecast to triple by 2020 Bloomberg News BEIJING — Health care spending in China will almost triple to $1 trillion annually by 2020 driven by an aging population and government efforts to broaden insurance coverage, according to a McKinsey & Co. report released Wednesday. China will spend more on drugs, medical devices and hospital treatments as it lifts spending to 7 percent of gross domestic product, from 5.5 percent, or $350 billion, in 2010, McKinsey said. This will make it the biggest

States Continued from F2 To ensure that plans don’t leave out necessary coverage in the name of saving a buck, the Department of Health and Human Services came up with some parameters to set the low bar for plans offered to small employers and individuals buying insurance on their own. This part of the law does not apply to plans offered by large employers because the vast majority offer comprehensive coverage already. For the smaller markets, HHS has established certain categories that must be covered, such as maternity and pediatric care. But the law leaves the decision of setting the minimum bar in the hands of state officials. States have until Oct. 1 to name their Essential Health Benefits or surrender the decision to the federal government. If that happens in Florida, a plan offered by Florida Blue (formerly Blue Cross Blue Shield) would be the minimum benchmark, per the federal rules. A group of 15 medical and health advocacy organizations wrote to Scott, the state insurance commissioner and other leaders, asking them to hold public hearings and seek input on what benefits will best serve Floridians. “This is such an important decision that affects literally millions in Florida,” said Goodhue, whose group was one of the letter’s signers. The state Office of Insurance Regulation said the decision rests with Scott and the Florida Legislature. “Gov. Scott has issued statements to the effect that he does not want the state to implement any parts of the Affordable Care Act,” noted Jack McDermott, the insurance regulation office’s director of communications. The legislature isn’t likely to bite because it won’t begin committee meetings

market globally by 2020 after the United States, which in 2009 spent $2.5 trillion, or 17.6 percent of its GDP, on health care, said the consulting company. “This will be a key priority for China in the coming years. The government is trying to promote social harmony, and closing the gap on health care is a big part of this,” Franck Le Deu, a Shanghai-based McKinsey partner, said. “This is a market that is still extremely early in the stage of development.”

China’s government raised its own spending on health care to 737.9 billion yuan ($116 billion) in 2011, up from 359.4 billion yuan in 2008, the Ministry of Health said in an Aug. 17 statement. It raised medical insurance coverage to more than 95 percent of the population and added diseases including lung and gastric cancer to an insured list, the ministry said. Global drugmakers including Pfizer, Novartis and GlaxoSmithKline have hired more sales representatives and expanded product lines

“There’s no trick to making health insurance affordable. I can sell a policy to everybody in the country that only costs $1 a year. It would only include a toothbrush.” — Karen Pollitz, senior fellow, Kaiser Family Foundation

until December and the session doesn’t start until March — long after the deadline, said Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, the incoming state Senate president. So far, Scott has made no move on his own to set the benefits. His spokesman, Lane Wright, noted that the governor is committed to complying with any part of the law that is required. In this case, the governor can choose not to act. If state leaders do claim a role, they can choose among 10 plans. They include the three most popular sold in their state to small employers. Other options are popular plans sold to federal employees or state employees and the largest nonMedicaid HMO.

Flexibility in the law With just 10 options, it would not seem governors who opposed the law would have much room to let politics color their decision. But in a set of guidelines, HHS indicated that states may have the flexibility to allow for less coverage for one area of care as long as that value is spread to another. Some worry that flexibility could allow an insurer to cover very little treatment for cancer or transplants in exchange for a lot more of a less expensive service, like breast cancer screenings or colonoscopies, said Karen Pollitz, a senior fellow at the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan source for health policy analysis. “Right now, insurance companies compete and make money, to a large extent, by cherry picking, by how good a

job they do of keeping people who don’t make a lot of claims and getting rid of people who make a lot of claims,” she said. The law is supposed to stop that, but the promised flexibility has created concerns that, once again, necessary benefits could be lost. “There’s no trick to making health insurance affordable,” Pollitz said. “I can sell a policy to everybody in the country that only costs $1 a year. It would only include a toothbrush.” Pollitz notes Florida previously tried to reform health care with a plan that offered minimal coverage. Cover Florida, signed into law in 2008, collapsed in less than two years. Insurers could place limits on coverage and refuse to insure preexisting conditions. The plan’s offerings were also shabby. Under the Affordable Care Act, insurers can’t refuse people with preexisting conditions. “It took the term ‘bare bones’ to a whole new level,” Pollitz said. Even under the Affordable Care Act, Florida has sought to shape coverage in a way that concerns some health advocates. For example, the state twice sought a waiver from a rule designed to prevent health insurance profits from going to bonuses and other costs that don’t improve care. The state insurance commissioner asked to avoid a rule that says 80 cents of every dollar consumers spend for their premiums must be spent on health care or improving quality. The federal govern-

HIGH LAKES WELCOMES

in China, in search of growth to offset losses of patent protection on best-selling drugs elsewhere. Those ambitions are being curbed by Chinese government policies aimed at reducing medical costs. “Back in the early 2000s, it was pretty easy for multinationals to grow 25 to 35 percent a year in China,” said Le Deu, who heads McKinsey’s Greater China Healthcare practice. “To some extent those easy days are over. The going is getting tougher in terms of complexity and requirements for success.”

ment denied the request.

Essential Health Benefits Still, the law leaves a lot of power in the hands of state leaders who choose to pick up the reins. “There is a significant opportunity for states to say this is what Essential Health Benefits will mean here,” Pollitz said. “I don’t think anyone envisioned the election of 2010 and so many states taking this very firm stance that (the Affordable Care Act) is political poison and we don’t want anything to do with it.” What are Essential Health Benefits? It is the minimum coverage insurers must offer in health plans for small employers and for individuals buying insurance on their own. Large employer plans are not included because they typically offer comprehensive benefits already. The Essential Health Benefits will also govern plans on the state exchange. The exchange is meant to be a onestop shop where people who need insurance can find all of their options and through which low-income residents can get government subsidies to buy insurance. Currently Gov. Rick Scott has not moved to open an exchange in Florida. If he does not, residents will be able to buy from a federal exchange. The federal government has laid out a number of guidelines governing services that must be covered in Essential Health Benefits, such as maternity and pediatric care. But states will have some say in choosing the number of visits that will be covered and determining what services, precisely, are covered in each category. If state leaders choose not to set their own minimum benefits, the federal government chose a default plan offered in their state.

Dr. Jane Birschbach

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Bend Upper Mill 541.389.7741 Bend Eastside. 541.318.4249 Sisters 541.549.9609 Visit our new website and get connected to your health.

H I G H L A K E S H E A LT H CA R E . C O M


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

F3

N Obesity could lead to diminished cognitive skills, study suggests To protect your mind, you might think about taking care of your body. A new study published in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, suggested that obese people who have other metabolic abnormalities may lose their cognitive skills faster than their healthier counterparts. Metabolic abnormalities are defined as two or more of the following risk factors: having high blood pressure, having low HDL or “good” cholesterol, taking diabetes medication, taking

Additives Continued from F1 Others, such as emulsifiers, stabilizers and thickeners, create texture and consistency that consumers expect, according to the Food and Drug Administration, the agency responsible for determining the safe use of additives. Gonsalves said some additives sound worse than they actually are. The old adage in nutrition is: If you can’t pronounce it, you probably shouldn’t eat it. But, she said, “words like tocopherol, cholecalciferol, pyridoxine, ascorbic acid are difficult to pronounce and might seem to be toxic.” In reality, those words identify: vitamin E, vitamin D, B6 and vitamin C, and can be added to foods to enhance nutritional value. Such foods are described as fortified. The FDA has a list of more than 3,000 ingredients in its database describing everything that gets added to foods, including everyday staples such as baking soda, yeast or spices. Since 1958, manufacturers have done their own testing of food additives, which Gonsalves acknowledged “sounds like the fox guarding the hen house.” But the testing is regulated by the FDA and must be approved by the FDA. The FDA maintains a list of additives used prior to 1958, which is referred to as the GRAS “generally recognized as safe” list. The FDA continually updates the list as it tests those additives, removing those that are unsafe. For example, a previously listed GRAS item was a specific red dye, known as red dye No. 3, Gonsalves said. That’s the one that made maraschino cherries so red. But the dye was eventually associated in some studies with cancer. (M&Ms had a different red dye in them, but for a few years they weren’t produced because people were afraid of red dye, Gonsalves said.) “Because scientific research isn’t perfect, the FDA can never be absolutely certain that there is no health risk with any additive, but testing is rigorous and ongoing,” Gonsalves said.

Additives to avoid • Antibiotics, indirectly consumed Antibiotics are used by farmers to help cattle gain weight. Research isn’t completely clear about whether human consumption of antibiotics as an indirect additive to meat contributes to producing antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria, Gonsalves said. Research has shown that antibiotic-fed animals gain weight faster than those not fed antibiotics. The mechanism isn’t clear, but a change in gut flora is likely involved, which Gonsalves said is particularly interesting since the use of antibiotics in feed correlates with a change in human weight over time. A recent study published in Nature, a scientific journal, observed that mice receiving antibiotics developed more fat mass, had increased bone density and altered hormones related to metabolism. Researchers said the antibiotics affected the function of bacteria in the gut and that altered how certain nutrients were metabolized. The FDA recommends eliminating the use of antibiotics to promote growth in animals. In the meantime, this is an additive Gonsalves said she would put on the top of the list of additives to avoid.

cholesterol-lowering medication and having high triglycerides, a type of fat found in the blood. The study RESEARCH involved 6,401 people with an average age of 50 at the start of the study. Body mass index (BMI) and metabolic risk factors were determined at the beginning of the study. Over 10 years, participants took memory and cognitive skills tests three times. Researchers found: 31 percent of the participants had two or more metabolic

“Every food we eat, whether a just-picked strawberry or a homemade cookie, is made up of chemical compounds that determine flavor, color, texture and nutrient value. All food additives are carefully regulated by federal authorities and various international organizations to ensure that foods are safe to eat and are accurately labeled.” — The FDA’s website

Additives to limit • Sodium nitrite This is put into meats including ham, hot dogs and bacon to cure and preserve the meat and give it certain characteristics, such as a pink color, or a specific flavor, Gonsalves said. Originally, it was added to meats to protect against botulism. Nitrite and nitrate are found naturally in many vegetables, including spinach, cauliflower, and some fresh meat. During the curing process, nitrites may combine with amino acids found in the meat, leading to the formation of nitrosamines, Gonsalves said. Nitrites themselves do not cause cancer, or else they couldn’t be added to foods, but nitrosamines are carcinogenic. Adding vitamin C prior to the curing process inhibits the formation of nitrosamines. So read labels and look for ascorbic acid in cured meats, she said. • Food dyes In the 1970s, Dr. Benjamin Feingold speculated that food dyes caused hyperactivity in children. For decades, his research was not supported by other scientists. But in the past decade, some research has shown a slight increase in hyperactivity in a small proportion of sensitive children who consume food dyes. Gonsalves said reducing the amount of processed foods eaten is a good idea for everyone. “Whether or not this goround of research on food dyes proves to be true, eating more whole foods without food dyes is worth doing,” she said. Many foods have dyes listed on their ingredients labels, including Kraft macaroni and cheese, some yogurts or candies such as sprinkles or Starburst. Some people have allergic reactions after consuming certain food colorings, namely yellow No. 5 or No. 6, red No. 40, carmine, and cochineal extract. • MSG, or monosodium glutamate Some individuals are sensitive to MSG, experiencing allergylike symptoms including headaches, nausea, shortness of breath and more. The additive is considered safe, and is not considered an allergen. Glutamate is an amino acid, found in virtually all protein foods. Monosodium glutamate is glutamate, plus sodium and water. It adds a flavor known as “umami,” or savoriness. It’s found in soups, such as some canned soups, and stews and cold cuts. MSG is not particularly high in sodium, and in fact, may add flavor to a food, allowing for a smaller amount of salt, Gonsalves said. The average American consumes about 11 grams of glutamate per day from natural

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abnormalities; 9 percent were obese and 38 percent were overweight. Of the 582 obese people, 60 percent met the

protein sources and less than 1 gram of glutamate per day from MSG. When MSG enters the body, it is treated the same as glutamate from other sources, such as proteins, Gonsalves said. In well-controlled studies, it was found that very few people could distinguish between a placebo and MSG supplements in terms of bad reactions. But some people are sensitive to it and should avoid it if they experience the above listed reactions, she said.

Other additives of note • Saccharin, aspartame and acesulfame-K The Center for Science in the Public Interest, a Washington, D.C.-based consumer interest advocacy group that focuses on nutrition, includes artificial sweeteners saccharin, aspartame and acesulfame-K on its list of additives to avoid. These additives would be found in diet foods and drinks, gelatin desserts, lowcalorie desserts and more. The center’s website cites studies conducted on rodents that suggested that the sweeteners may increase the risk of various cancers. (See: www .cspinet.org/reports/chem cuisine.htm.) However, the FDA states that there is “no convincing evidence of a cause-and-effect relationship between these sweeteners and negative health effects in humans. The FDA has monitored consumer complaints of possible adverse reactions for more than 15 years.” • Olestra The Center for Science in the Public Interest, along with an April article from Consumer Reports, also included olestra on their “additives to avoid” lists. Olestra is a synthetic fat that is not absorbed in the digestive system so therefore has no calories. It can be found in Lay’s light chips and Pringles light chips, according to the center. It reduces the body’s ability to absorb fat-soluble carotenoids such as alpha and beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein and canthaxanthin from fruits and vegetables. An occasional serving wouldn’t be a problem, according to the center. But it’s important that those nutrients be absorbed, since they are believed to reduce the risk of cancer and heart disease. The FDA’s website about food ingredients aims to reconcile the concerns of consumers about food additives. The FDA website says: “Every food we eat, whether a just-picked strawberry or a homemade cookie, is made up of chemical compounds that determine flavor, color, texture and nutrient value. All food additives are carefully regulated by federal authorities and various international organizations to ensure that foods are safe to eat and are accurately labeled.” With indirect food additives, such as those that leach into foods from packaging, the packaging manufacturers must prove to the FDA that the materials are safe before the FDA approves their use, according to the FDA. “Food and color additives are strictly studied, regulated and monitored. Federal regulations require evidence that each substance is safe at its intended level of use before it may be added to foods. Furthermore, all additives are subject to ongoing safety review as scientific understanding and methods of testing continue to improve,” according to the FDA. “Consumers should feel safe about the foods they eat.” — Reporter: 541-383-0304, aaurand@bendbulletin.com

criteria for metabolic abnormality. Over 10 years, people who were both obese and metabolically abnormal experienced a 22.5 percent faster decline on their cognitive test scores than those who were of normal weight without metabolic abnormalities. Metabolically normal but obese individuals experienced similar amounts of rapid cognitive decline. In the metabolically abnormal group, the decline on scores were faster among obese than among normal weight people. Study author Archana Singh-Ma-

noux said in a written statement that the study provided evidence against the concept of “metabolically healthy obesity.” The study suggests that obese people without metabolic risk factors still have negative cardiac and cognitive results. More research is needed to look at potential impacts from genetic factors, to account for differing durations of time that people have been obese or had metabolic risk factors, authors said. — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin

Organic junk food? Say it isn’t so By Barbara Quinn The Monterey County Herald

Organic jelly beans. Organic potato chips. Organic vodka. “Organic” is a term perceived as healthier than conventional products … no matter what they are, according to a recent article by registered dietitian Sharon Palmer in the “Environmental Nutrition” newsletter. So what does the term “organic” mean anyway? According to the United States Department of Agriculture — which regulates organic standards — “organic food is produced without using most conventional pesticides, fertilizers with synthetic ingredients, bioengineering, or ionizing radiation.” In other words, “organic” refers to how a food is farmed. Organic does not necessarily mean a food can’t be highly processed, however. (“Processed” means it has been changed in some way from its natural form.) Take a chocolate chip cookie, for example. OK, take two. “Organic” chocolate chip cookies are made with organically cultivated wheat, sugar, butter and chocolate. The “organic” flour and sugar can still be refined and white, however. And the nutritional value of these cookies may be no different from regular cookies. Sorry to blow a fantasy, but excess fat and calories from organic treats are no less damaging than those from other foods. So while organic farming methods help ensure healthy soil and ecosystems, organic standards do not regulate a food product’s nutritional attributes, says Palmer. Take a product made with organic brown rice syrup or

evaporated cane juice. It’s still sugar. And organic sweetened beverages, candy bars, and chips? If they are stripped of healthful nutrients, they’re just “organic junk food.” What about organic milk? It comes from cows that were fed organic feed and were not given hormones or certain types of medications for illness. Both organic and regular milk contain the same profile of essential nutrients, say nutrition experts. And both types of milk are enriched with vitamin D — a hormone-like vitamin that helps the body absorb calcium. One interesting note: Some organic milk may last longer than regular milk because of how it is processed, according

to Craig Baumrucker, professor of animal nutrition and physiology at Pennsylvania State University. Because organic milk is not produced in all parts of the country, it may have to travel farther to reach stores. To help it stay fresh longer, it may be treated with UHT (Ultra High Temperature) which destroys all its bacteria content. It may be this UHT process that gives organic milk its slightly sweeter taste, says Baumrucker. Bottom line? Organic or not, health experts still call us to choose from whole grains, fresh fruit, vegetables, beans and legumes, low-fat dairy foods and lean meats, poultry and fish. And an occasional cookie.


F4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

M Mixing medications? Communication is key Autistic workers By Nancy Churnin

Bengt Bostrom, 71, organizes his medications at his home in Coppell, Texas. Bostrom ended up with a bleeding ulcer after he started taking naproxen for his prostate cancer.

The Dallas Morning News

DALLAS — A failure of communication proved to be life-threatening for Bengt Bostrom. Bostrom, 71, of Coppell, Texas, went to his internist, Dr. Bradley Jones, to figure out why he was so exhausted. Bostrom was already being treated for prostate cancer, and a specialist had prescribed naproxen to help reduce swelling. If Jones had known that, he’d have added a medicine to protect Bostrom’s stomach. Instead, Jones didn’t find out until he noted how unnaturally pale Bostrom was, ran tests and sent him to the hospital, where he required four units of blood to stabilize a bleeding ulcer. “I didn’t suspect the medication,” Bostrom says, noting that the naproxen, which Jones identified as the culprit, was an over-the-counter pill he’d only taken for four or five days. Jones, an internist on staff at Baylor Medical Center at Irving, Texas, says the incident points out the importance of having one doctor monitor all of a patient’s medications — prescription, over-the-counter and herbal. “The internist is the quarterback of a patient’s care,” Jones says. “The internist needs to make the referrals, and if you self-refer, the specialist should send a report back so the internist can say this medicine is fine or there’s a reason why we can’t do this medicine.” Armon Neel Jr., a fifth-generation pharmacist and author of “Are Your Prescriptions Killing You?” (Atria Books, $25), might add that a boardcertified pharmacist, working with that doctor, can play a key role as well.

A common problem About 46 million people in the United States have multiple chronic health conditions that require multiple medications and rely on multiple health care providers for their care, according to the Alliance for Integrated Medication Management, an organization created in June with the goal of integrating pharmacists into primary care services with the

Stroke Continued from F1 “Symptoms that appear suddenly, even if they seem trivial, warrant a meticulous workup,” he added. Follow-up analyses of the Detroit study showed that patients seen by a neurologist in the emergency room, as well as those who were given an MRI as part of the initial workup, were less likely to receive a misdiagnosis. “Patients, too, should be aware of the risk of stroke regardless of their age,” Chaturvedi said in an interview. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have reported a steep increase in strokes among people in their 30s and 40s. A rise in risk factors — obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and sleep apnea — and improved diagnosis account for this upturn. But younger patients are no better today at recognizing the symptoms of stroke. “Only 20 to 30 percent of patients get to the emergency room within three hours of symptom onset,” Chaturvedi said. “They tend to wait to see if the symptoms will go away spontaneously, and they show up in the ER 12 to 24 hours later.”

A cautionary tale After an intense workout in the surf the day before, McGee awoke one morning with a headache and feeling out of sorts. He went to work but came home nauseated and chilled. He assumed he’d come down with the flu his family had just had. Then in the middle of the night, a headache he described as “the worst pain of my life” prompted a trip to the emergency room. The attending doctor thought McGee had

Louis DeLuca Dallas Morning News

Tips for monitoring prescriptions • Compile a personal medication dossier, keep it up to date, and show it to all doctors and health care professionals you see on every visit. • If you don’t know why you’re taking medications on the list or are not sure how to take them, ask. • If you’re taking more than one medication for the same condition, ask why. • If you are taking medications prescribed by doctors you don’t see on a regular basis, ask your primary care physician whether you still need to take them. Source: Are Your Prescriptions Killing You? by Armon B. Neel Jr. and Bill Hogan

help of the Health Resources and Services Administration of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Medication-related problems are common, costly and hurt people, according to a 2012 report from the American Geriatrics Society. Problems can occur when medications are taken incorrectly or conflict with one another or with certain foods and alcohol. Fatal prescription interactions can occur at any age, as witnessed by the case of actor Heath Ledger, who died

a muscle tension headache, treated him with intravenous pain medication, handed him some pain pills and sent him home. Embarrassed that he’d gone to the hospital “for just a headache,” McGee took the pills when the pain returned the next afternoon. Soon after, he suffered what he thought were side effects from the medicine. Now he knows what it really was: a transient ischemic attack, a mini-stroke, that left him briefly unable to speak and numb on one side. That night, he fell out of bed trying to get to the bathroom and lost bladder control en route. One arm, he found, had begun flapping uncontrollably. He returned to the ER, where two doctors ordered a CT scan that suggested either a severe migraine or a stroke. At the time the hospital had no MRI equipment, which could have revealed the real problem: a stroke resulting from a tear in the carotid artery, which feeds the brain. By the time an ambulance and ferry got McGee to Boston, where the diagnosis of stroke was confirmed, it was much too late for the clot-busting drug tPA to ameliorate the stroke’s effects; the drug must be given intravenously within three or four hours. (Although some doctors are concerned that tPA can cause fatal bleeding in a person with a torn carotid, Chaturvedi said the drug is “safe and effective” in such patients.) Repeated blows from surfing, possibly combined with an inherent arterial weakness, are believed to be responsible for McGee’s stroke. Other activities that can cause a carotid tear are those that involve sudden neck jerks, including scuba diving, golf and tennis, as well as chiropractic manip-

in 2008 from an accidental overdose of six prescription drugs, including painkillers, sleeping pills and anti-anxiety medication. However, Dr. Paul Carns, an anesthesiologist and assistant professor of anesthesiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., says that the most vulnerable are the elderly, who use an average of 16 medications apiece, often prescribed by different specialists and acquired at different pharmacies as patients shop for the best prices. “As we get older, we have more chronic conditions that require multiple medications that are more powerful than ever before,” he says. “Many work specifically on certain places in our body, and many times there’s an interaction.”

A long list of dangers The problem extends to over-the-counter medications taken in excess, from fever reducers such as Tylenol, which can damage the liver, and antiinflammatory medications such as Advil, which can affect the kidneys, he says. Additional interactions to watch for: certain beta blockers can have an adverse effect on blood sugar; anti-inflammatory medicines can raise blood pressure; some antibiotics and high doses of grapefruit can inhibit the metabolism or breakdown of statins in cholesterol medications; coumadin, a blood thinner, can be blocked by too much vitamin K, which comes from eating green vegetables.

ulation and bending the head sharply back (the so-called beauty parlor stroke). But most strokes that affect young adults result from clots precipitated by the usual cardiac risk factors: obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and smoking. Abuse of alcohol and drugs are also contributing factors; among women, use of birth control pills can raise the risk of stroke. People prone to migraines also have a somewhat higher risk of stroke.

When to act fast The distinguishing characteristic of stroke symptoms is their sudden onset. Thus, Chaturvedi said, no matter what a person’s age, the sudden appearance of any of the following symptoms should prompt a trip to the hospital as quickly as possible. • Numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body. • Confusion, trouble speaking or understanding speech. • Trouble seeing in one or both eyes. • Difficulty walking, dizziness or loss of balance or coordination. • Sudden, severe headache with no known cause. Unlike a heart attack, most strokes are painless. Even if the initial symptoms dissipate, they must be taken seriously. “A CT scan doesn’t show strokes very well in the first 24 hours,” Chaturvedi said. He recommended that if the diagnosis is uncertain, an MRI should be done and a neurologist consulted in the emergency room. “Patients may have to be proactive and insist on a thorough workup and ask to be seen by a neurologist, and ER doctors should consider the possibility of stroke regardless of a patient’s age,” he said.

Neel offers a long list of potentially adverse reactions in his book, pointing out how patients taking blood pressure drugs should be monitored for muscle pain, migraines, blackouts, diabetes and kidney failure. So how should patients manage? Carns advises patients and caregivers to keep a medication list on them at all times, know what their medications are used for, and be sure to include over-the-counter medicines, herbal supplements and vitamins on the list for a doctor to see. While he goes over all medications with his patients, he will also order a pharmacy consultation for patients who need additional help. As for Bostrom, he keeps a list of all his medications in his wallet, takes only the ones that have been cleared by Jones, and reports back when he feels they need to tinker with the balance. Communication, they agree, is key to getting it right. “I had one medication that gave me a cough and he switched me to something that doesn’t. We’re doing good together.”

get helping hand from iPod Touches By Monte Morin Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — “Jeffrey” was barely two weeks into his first job, and already he was about to lose it. The autistic 21-year-old was good at wiping down tables and cleaning bathrooms at a Virginia fastfood restaurant, but his boss grew alarmed whenever Jeffrey would spin around in the dining room, humming to himself and staring at the ceiling. But the shy, $8-an-hour custodian managed to keep his job after he was equipped with a specially programmed iPod that used videos, clock alarms and written messages to remind him of work tasks. With his workday clearly delineated, Jeffrey no longer felt so nervous that he had to calm himself down by spinning and humming. In a case study published this week in the Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, researchers said the use of an Apple iPod Touch greatly improved the workplace performance of employees diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorder, or ASD, and greatly reduce episodes of disruptive behavior. The program uses a suite of applications that includes lists, scheduled reminders, video prompts, navigation instructions and calming movies or music. Whereas the program reminded Jeffrey to move on to other cleanup tasks instead of wiping down the same table endlessly, it helped 60year-old “Grace” cope with the stress of catching the

bus to and from work. It also helped 20-year-old “Lily” negotiate her job as a hospital custodian even though she could not read or write. (The names of the study participants are pseudonyms. Their true identities were withheld by the study authors to protect their privacy.) Today, only 15 percent of U.S. adults diagnosed with autism hold paying jobs, according to study author Tony Gentry, an occupational therapy professor at Virginia Commonwealth University. Difficulties involving cognition, behavior and poor communication make it hard for people with autism to be employed. However, occupational therapists say the autistic have valuable workplace skills, and efforts to keep them in jobs help businesses as well as the workers. Some autistic adults excel at math and computer skills, while others have photographic memory. Others exhibit high levels of honesty, reliability and perseverance, and their limited interest in personal relationships makes them less likely to engage in workplace socializing, according to study authors. The case study was part of a four-year trial that involved dozens of subjects and was funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research. The iPod Touch was chosen because at the time the study was designed, it was the only pocket-sized personal digital assistant, or PDA, available.

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M EDICI N E

DEFIBRILLATOR EXTRACTIONS

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

F5

Iron overload can bring a host of ills • Deficiency, once a common worry, is now less likely than excess levels By Jane E. Brody New York Times News Service

Jerry Holt / Minneapolis Star Tribune

Dr. Pierce Vatterott, left, watches a monitor during the removal of four defibrillator leads from a patient at United Hospital in St. Paul, Minn. GlideLight, a tool recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, helps make the lead extractions easier.

New device makes a difficult surgery more manageable By James Walsh Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

MINNEAPOLIS — Dr. Pierce Vatterott and his team of nurses and technicians worked smoothly and efficiently in the chilly catheter lab at St. Paul’s United Hospital. It was complex and potentially risky work, removing four leads — wires that connect a defibrillator to the heart — from an 84-year-old man. But Vatterott and his team are experienced hands and they had a new tool, to boot, a laser sheath that more quickly and easily cuts through scar tissue to free the wires. Millions of people need defibrillators and pacemakers to keep them alive. The wires that lead to those devices sometimes need to be replaced because of age or defect. But one wrong move when extracting a lead can leave a piece of the wire behind or, worse, perforate the heart or blood vessel. So anything that makes lead extraction safer is a good thing, Vatterott said. “It has helped,” he said of the GlideLight, made by Colorado Springs, Colo.-based Spectranetics and recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. “It has definitely helped.” Potentially dangerous problems in the past five years with leads made by Medtronic Inc. and, most recently, St. Jude Medical Inc., have left tens of thousands of people facing difficult choices. Do they thread new leads through the same vein to the heart, but leave the old ones — disconnected — in place? Or do they pull them out entirely? Sometimes, the congestion of too many wires in the vein can block blood flow. One lead rubbing against another also can cause inappropriate shocking. If a lead becomes infected, it has to come out. “The extraction of leads that have been implanted in patients for years is one of the most complex procedures cardiologists perform,” said Dr. Robert Hauser, a senior consulting cardiologist at the Minneapolis Heart Institute at Abbott Northwestern Hospital. “It should be done only by highly experienced physicians and their teams in hospitals equipped for emergency surgery.”

Vatterott and his team at United Heart and Vascular Clinic at United Hospital fit the bill. They have done about 2,000 lead extractions over the years and were the first to use the new GlideLight device in Minnesota. The doctor said they are doing one to two lead extractions each week. GlideLight is also being used at Abbott Northwestern. Kurt Riebe, 84, and his wife, Lorraine, will celebrate 63 years of marriage in August. Lorraine calls it “a nice start.” The North St. Paul, Minn., couple has every intention of celebrating many anniversaries to come. So when they learned that Riebe had an infection around his defibrillatorpacemaker, the decision was made to take out the device and the four leads that had been implanted and replace them. It would not be easy, Vatterott said. Riebe is frail. But the GlideLight made it easier. Not that a five-hour procedure, with Vatterott and his nurses monitoring blood pressure, watching multiple monitors, cutting out infected tissue, cauterizing blood vessels and snaking wires and something that looks like a laser-tipped black soda straw into the heart can be called easy. It took two hours just to do the prep work to get the leads ready for removal. As he worked, Vatterott praised his team time and again, pointing out that each has 15 to 20 years of experience. First, they worked to clear the “pocket” where the defibrillator was located. Then they disconnected the wires from the device, temporarily hooking up Riebe to an external pacemaker. Then, the doctor slid the GlideLight over the first lead, snaking it down the vein into Riebe’s heart. Along the way, the device made a clicking sound as the laser cut through the scar tissue that blocked its path. Once clear, the doctor slowly pulled out the lead before removing the sheath. Then, it was on to the second lead. Then the third. Then the fourth. During the entire procedure, a surgical team was standing by to assist if a complication arose. One never did. By the end of the week, Riebe was home and doing well.

Iron, an essential nutrient, has long been the nation’s most common nutritional deficiency. In decades past, many parents worried that children who were picky eaters would develop iron-deficiency anemia. My mother boiled meat I refused to eat and fed me the concentrated broth in hopes I’d get some of its iron. Now baby foods, infant formula and many other child-friendly foods, like breakfast cereals, breads, rice and pasta, are fortified with iron. Today iron deficiency is more likely in infants who are exclusively breast-fed, young children who consume too much milk, menstruating and pregnant women, vegans and strict vegetarians and people who take medications that cause internal bleeding or interfere with iron absorption. These days, more attention is being paid to the opposite problem: iron overload, which studies indicate can damage organs and may increase the risk of diabetes, heart attack and cancer, particularly in older people. In examining more than 1,000 white Americans ages 67 to 96 participating in the Framingham Heart Study, researchers found that only about 3 percent had deficient levels of iron in their blood or stored in their bodies, but 13 percent had levels considered too high. The authors concluded that “the likely liability in iron nutriture in free-living, elderly white Americans eating a Western diet is high iron stores, not iron deficiency.” Iron is an essential part of the proteins that transport oxygen in the body. Hemoglobin, the oxygencarrying protein in red blood cells, accounts for about two-thirds of the body’s iron supply. Smaller amounts are found in myoglobin, the protein that supplies oxygen to muscles, and in enzymes needed for various biochemical reactions. In addition, a varying amount of iron is stored in proteins that release it to the blood when needed. The more iron that is absorbed from the diet, the higher the level of stored iron. About one person in 250 inherits a genetic disorder called hemochromatosis that increases iron absorption and results in a gradual, organ-damaging buildup of stored iron, although symptoms of the problem usually don’t become apparent until midlife or later.

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Yvetta Fedorova / New York Times News Service

Iron has long been the nation’s most common nutritional deficiency, but now more attention is being paid to the opposite problem: iron overload.

Factors affecting iron absorption Iron deficiency can result in a confusing array of symptoms, including fatigue and weakness, poor work performance, increased risk of infections, difficulty keeping warm, lightheadedness, rapid heartbeat and shortness of breath with exercise. Studies have suggested that people who engage regularly in strenuous exercise, especially adolescents and vegetarians, are at increased risk of developing iron-deficiency anemia. Iron deficiency is rare in men and postmenopausal women, and most should avoid supplements containing iron to reduce the risk of organ damage from too much iron. Also, if a routine blood test indicates low iron, experts warn against simply taking a supplement. Rather, a doctor should first check for hidden blood loss or impediments to iron absorption resulting from diet habits, medications or chronic health conditions, like colitis or the aftermath of weight-loss surgery. There are two kinds of dietary iron, heme and nonheme. Heme iron, found only in meat, fish and poultry, is much better absorbed that the nonheme iron found in vegetables, fortified foods, supplements and acidic foods cooked in cast-iron pots. Whereas 15 to 30 percent of heme iron consumed is absorbed, only 5 percent of nonheme iron gets into the blood. To assure adequate iron absorption, some vegans and vegetarians may need to take a supplement. Various factors can affect iron absorption. Some vegetables, like spinach (Popeye not-

withstanding), contain oxalic acid, which interferes with iron absorption. High-fiber foods like whole grains that contain phytates and foods high in calcium also diminish the amount of iron that enters blood. But the vitamin C and other acids naturally present in fruits, fruit juices and some vegetables increase iron absorption. In a subsequent study by the Framingham researchers, men and women ages 68 to 93 had the highest levels of stored iron if they consumed red meat four or more times a week, took more than 30 milligrams of an iron supplement daily or ate more than 21 servings of fruit each week. However, levels were much lower among those who consumed more than seven servings of whole grains each week.

Hazards of iron overload Earlier this year, Nutrition Action Healthletter, published by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, summarized the latest evidence for the effects of excess iron stores. The problem with too much stored iron is that, short of bleeding, the body can’t easily get rid of it. Menstruating women are unlikely to have a problem, but for others with high stores the recommended treatments include phlebotomy and frequent blood donation. Without these measures, excess iron is deposited in the liver, heart and pancreas, where it can cause cirrhosis, liver cancer, cardiac arrhythmias and diabetes. These health consequences can develop even in people without hemochromatosis, the genetic disorder, who ac-

cumulate very high levels of stored iron. For example, among 32,000 women followed for 10 years in the Nurses’ Health Study, those with the highest levels of stored iron were nearly three times as likely to have diabetes as those with the lowest levels. Likewise, among 38,000 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, those who consumed the most heme iron had a 63 percent greater risk of developing diabetes. While the risk of cancer from too much iron is uncertain except in people with hemochromatosis, the known links between high levels of red meat consumption and cancers of the colon and prostate are highly suggestive of an increased risk associated with excessive consumption of heme iron. As for heart disease, the link found in some studies to high levels of heme iron consumption may reflect the effect of saturated fats from red meat, the richest source of heme iron, more than that of iron itself. High levels of iron have been found in the brains of people with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease). But sick brain cells accumulate abnormal levels of minerals like aluminum, so iron in these cases may be an effect of brain disease rather than its cause. Nonetheless, there are ample health and environmental reasons to limit consumption of red meat to no more than two or three times a week and to focus more on poultry, seafood and plant sources of protein.


F6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

F Why feet go numb when exercising

The plank strengthens abs and lower back

Have you ever been exercising and realized your feet were numb? “There are a couple of reasons it can happen depending on the person and sport,” said trainer Shannon Segerstrom, owner of inMotion Training Studio in Bend. In kick boxing or on an elliptical machine, a person may be continually on the ball of the foot, and that pressure can affect a nerve that makes the foot go

The plank is a top pick for improving total body strength, and particularly targets the abdominals and lower back. An isometric pose, this exercise works many muscle groups at the same time, and requires no equipment. Execution: Start by lying face down, arms bent and resting on the forearms. The elbows should be directly under the shoulders. Slowly lift your hips from the floor, making sure not to bend at

I NM O T I O N numb, she said. Different shoes may help, but some people need to see a specialist if they have nerve problems. Shoes that are too tight or too loose can also be a culprit. “You can try different shoes or try orthotics to take pressure off of the ball of the foot. With

biking, shoes tend to be smaller and then when we exercise the foot swells or expands and may trigger the nerve,” she said. Barefoot sports such as stand-up paddleboarding or sand volleyball may create foot numbness at first too, until the foot muscles get used to that sort of exercise. It might have to do with the muscles in the foot working over time to keep the body balanced, she said. — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin

This marathon is extreme — even in running circles By Lenny Bernstein The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — If misery could be measured in meters, surely the place to do it, with agonizing precision, was the outdoor track at Falls Church (Va.) High School on Saturday afternoon. That’s where 10 hardy masochists decided to run a marathon, covering 26.2 miles 400 meters at a time, 105½ laps in all, around and around like human stock cars at Daytona. What drew me to the inaugural “Last Track to Boston” event was the idea that anyone would choose to do this when he or she could sign up for one of the hundreds of marathons held throughout the United States and the rest of the world. Those runs would take you up mountains and down river valleys, past famous monuments, through urban neighborhoods, along trails in the woods — pretty much anywhere except the baked black rubber surface of a high school track. It is 89 degrees when I arrive shortly before 4:30 p.m., less than an hour into the race, with 54 percent humidity that makes it feel like 95 degrees. Ideally, marathons should start near dawn and be run in 40- or 50-degree weather. The runners already are drenched in their own sweat, which drips from their hats and runs down their legs into their squishy shoes. A couple of older guys are already plodding. If there is a circle in hell for marathoners, it undoubtedly resembles this oval. At least, that’s how I feel about it. The runners mostly disagree. In July, several of them ran an indoor marathon, which is held on a 200-meter track and takes 211 laps to complete. “It’s to do something different and see how your body responds to this,” says Tammy Bagdasarian, 44, of Herndon, Va., one of two women to finish the race (Bagdasarian was second in 5:25:43). The course doesn’t bother Bagdasarian much, though she prefers ultramarathons, which tax a variety of muscles because the terrain varies. “It’s not bad, except the heat,” she says. Eugene Fritzel, 62, of Lu-

Dayna Smith / The Washington Post

Race organizer Jay Jacob Wind, 62, of Arlington, Va., ran a full marathon (105½ laps) Saturday on the Falls Church (Va.) High School track.

therville, Md., is running his 203rd marathon over the past 23 years, a race history that includes at least one run in each of the 50 states and the indoor marathon in Arlington, Va., in July that attracted 37 runners. “It’s hot. It’s miserable. It’s just not as easy as a regular marathon,” he tells me as we walk a few laps together. Fritzel would finish in 5:47:38, long after the sun set, yet he is having a good time. “It’s a small bunch of people. You see the same people. It’s different,” he says. “… It’s actually kind of great.” Saturday’s event was set up by Jay Jacob Wind, of Arlington, who told me he has been staging races in the Washington area since 1981. With the qualifying period for the 2013 Boston Marathon nearly over, he wanted to give runners one last chance to gain entry to the historic race. He figured a flat course with easy access to water, food and bathrooms would give them their best shot. Wind, a scrawny 62-yearold who has been running most of his life, finished third in 3:56:35. I’ve been to distance events crammed into tiny spaces, notably a triple Ironman triathlon in Virginia’s Lake Anna State Park whose bike leg was 67 laps of the same five-mile stretch of blacktop and whose run leg covered just a two-mile stretch 39 times. The Savage Seven in Ocala, Fla. — whose participants try to complete seven marathons in seven days — was held on a track its

first two years. Saturday’s run wasn’t quite that crazy, though the heat and humidity all but precluded a Boston qualifying time or personal best before the race even began. Yet onward they forged, with only a few starters dropping out. In fact, the winner, Miguel Angel Sanchez-Ruano, 45, of Woodbridge, Va. (3:50:11), and second-place finisher, Nicklaus Randall Combs, 29, of Fairfax, Va. (3:55:20), were running their first organized marathons. Perhaps my favorite runner was Edward Keller, a lieutenant colonel in the Kansas National Guard stationed in Washington, who ultimately finished last in 6:14:26. Keller, 50, doesn’t look like a marathoner and he was already suffering when I arrived. But there was no chance he would quit. I mean, no chance. He was running his 16th marathon since January, including the brutal Pikes Peak Marathon in Colorado in August, and plans to do more, including the JFK 50 Mile race in Boonsboro, Md., in November. “Runners, we don’t like to rest on our laurels,” he said. “We like to compete and challenge our bodies.” He also likened the race to his deployments to Iraq, where he was in charge of defending a U.S. base. No matter what happens, he said, “You’ve got to put your boots on and get to your job. People are counting on you to do your job.”

the waist or allow excess arching/sagging of the lower back. Your body should be held in a rigid pose, and when viewed from the side, should be in a straight line from head to heels. Hold this position for as long as possible. Time yourself to get an idea of current strength, and try to improve upon this over time. A good goal is to work up to 60 seconds or longer. Before and after, take time to gently stretch by lying on your back and slowly pulling both

Lane Young, director of strength and conditioning at ModalityX, a gym in Bend, designed this four-week progression concept that can apply to anyone doing just about any sort of training. In this case, it describes high-intensity interval resistance training, which includes WEEK 4 resting between sets of intense • Demand the muscle action. most of your WEEK 3 body. • Increase • Use heavier weight loads. WEEK 2 weights, even if • Boost intensity • Increase you can’t and challenge volume to two to WEEK 1 WEEK 5 complete entire yourself. three sets. • Start a new • Start a new series of reps. • Bump up the • Bump up the program. program. weight on at • One to two sets weight on two to • One or two sets least two to three exercises. only, lighter only, lighter three exercises. weights. weights. • Learn new • Learn new exercises. exercises.

WOMEN, TAKE NOTE: Start Week 1 during the PMS week, menstrual cycle days 21-28. During this week, women should change jumps and hops to stationary exercises.

The hormonal fluctuation of women can affect training. When hormones are optimized, during the third and fourth week of the progression, strength, power and the nervous system are optimized.

Week 2 should fall within the period week, menstrual cycle days 1-5.

Source: Lane Young, director of strength and conditioning at ModalityX, a gym in Bend

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Progression Continued from F1 After a few boosts in effort and corresponding adaptations in the body, a person’s progress will plateau, typically in four to six weeks. So it’s time to do something different. For example: increase weight lifting repetitions from two sets to three sets; or reduce the repetitions from 12 to eight while adding more weight to increase the intensity; or try a new and different type of exercise altogether. “The additional strain on the nervous system will tell it, ‘I need to find a new gear.’ It needs time to learn how to shift into first gear, then into second gear,” he said. If a person’s goal was to run a 10K race in a certain,

faster time, it would not help to go run 10K every day for 90 days leading up to a race. That doesn’t teach the body to run faster. Instead, Young said, the first four-week plan would be to try to progressively run 2K faster. The next four-week block would focus on running 4K faster. The final four-week block would focus on running 6K faster. Each time the runner’s body adapts to running a shorter distance faster, the runner would increase the distance a little. It’s important to include rest and recovery in any ambitious exercise plan. During any “time off” a person can still do gentle exercise such as yoga or pilates, walking or stretching. In other words, he said,

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Workshop series offered: In Redmond and Bend (please call for times and locations)

Beginning Sept. 20th in Redmond and Sept. 27th in Bend Bend Upper Mill 541.389.7741 Bend Eastside. 541.318.4249 Sisters 541.549.9609

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“light activity, just not hammering it.” Everyone needs at least one day off a week, Young said. A person who has been sedentary for at least three months can generally keep going for up to 16 weeks without any big breaks — that is, anything more significant than a day off — and continue to see progress. Intermediate exercisers need at least two to three days off every four to eight weeks. More advanced exercisers should take a full week off every three to four weeks. “People often ask, ‘Why take a week off? I feel great,’ ” Young said. “Well, then you didn’t … push yourself hard enough.” — Reporter: 541-383-0304, aaurand@bendbulletin.com

Dr. Alison Lynch-Miller

Living Well with Ongoing Health Issues Workshops begin Sept 20th.

www.livingwellco.org

— Marjie Gilliam, Cox Newspapers

Progression fitness

Put Life Back in Your Life

If you have conditions such as diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, heart disease, chronic pain and anxiety, the Living Well with ongoing health issues program can help you take charge of your life. The six-week workshop and the book “Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Conditions” costs only $10.

knees toward the chest. A good starting point for beginners would be to perform one or two repetitions if able to hold for 30 seconds or longer. If less than 30 seconds, lower your body when fully fatigued, rest for 10 to 15 seconds, then try again, until total repetitions reach a total of 60 seconds. If you find you are unable to do a regular plank, you can bend the knees instead of keeping the legs straight.

Visit our new website and get connected to your health.

H I G H L A K E S H E A LT H CA R E . C O M


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Boxer puppies, AKC reg, 1st shots, very social $700. 541-325-3376

Boxer pups AKC, 8 wks ready to go! 1F, 5M, Wanted: $Cash paid for $550-$700 vintage costume jew541-280-6677 elry. Top dollar paid for Gold/Silver.I buy by the Cavachon, Pomachon, & Estate, Honest Artist Shichon beautiful pupElizabeth,541-633-7006 pies, home raised, vet checked, will be small lap Wanted! dogs. Reasonable; can Pellet stove deliver. 1-503-598-6769 541-382-4144 Chihuahuas, 2 males, WANTED: RAZORS, light brown, 8 wks, Double or single$160/ea. 541-385-6167 edged, straight Chihuahua, teacups (2), razors, shaving shots & dewormed, brushes, mugs & scuttles, strops, $250 ea,541-977-0035 shaving accessories & memorabilia. Fair prices paid. Call 541-390-7029 between 10 am-3 pm. 208

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Aussies,Mini/Toy's AKC all colors parents on site 1st shots,wormed 541-598-5314/788-7799 Barn/shop cats FREE, some tame, some not. We deliver! Fixed, shots, etc. 389-8420 Border Collie mix, male, born 6/15, very loving, playful. $50 to good home. 541-589-2278 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through The Bulletin Classifieds

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Dachshund purebred mini puppy born 7/25, will be 6-10 lbs. $500; parents on site. 541-536-3809 in La Pine Doxie AKC mini pups, all colors inc wheaton &dapl, $375-425. 541-508-4558 www.bendweenies.com Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS Doxie,choc AKC mini pup, 4 wks, female,Sunriver, $425, 541-593-7606 DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines, $12 or 2 weeks, $20! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

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Rescue group has young shy/skittish kittens needing 1-on-1 attention. Altered, shots, more. Free to suitable homes; not good w/small kids at this time. Will take back if it does not work out. 389-8420 or www.craftcats.org. Shiba Inu/Pom/Rat Terrier Puppies for sale. Asking $200 each. Call 541-977-7935. Special pet adoption event at PetSmart, 212 featuring adoptable Call Classifieds at Antiques & kittens, cats, dogs & 541-385-5809 Collectibles puppies from rescue www.bendbulletin.com groups & shelters. Sept. 14 thru 16, 11 FNAR, semi-auto .308, AM-4 PM. Your next $1200, please call best friend will be 541-571-9833. waiting! Low adoption fees, some free prodHowa 30-06, $300; Italucts from PetSmart. ian coach gun 20 ga., Cascade Village Mall Antique 1929 Canadian $300 + 7 boxes ammo; McClary’s wood or near Target/Penney's. five game winches, coal stove, restored, www.craftcats.org never lift an animal in renickeled, like new your pickup again! At Whippet Puppies, 1st with pipes & chimney my cost $220 each; shots. Ready now! blocks, $2000, 8’ Leer canopy, miss$300. 541-280-1975. 208 541-389-4079. ing rear door, $250 Pets & Supplies Yorkie Pups, 3 hand541-480-1536 The Bulletin reserves some purebred males, the right to publish all ready now, 1st shots Need to get an ads from The Bulletin & deworming, mom & newspaper onto The ad in ASAP? dad on site, $500 ea. Bulletin Internet webcontact Kristina You can place it site. 541-408-3211. online at: 210 www.bendbulletin.com Fenton is a big, gorgeous Russian Blue, Furniture & Appliances declawed/inside only, 241 541-385-5809 wants to be the only Bicycles & A1 Washers&Dryers cat. Affectionate, likes LIKE NEW Ruger SP $150 ea. Full warAccessories people. 389-8420 or 101 .38/.357 w/ammo, ranty. Free Del. Also see www.craftcats.org box & manual. $440 wanted, used W/D’s Roadmaster 26” city OBO. 541-977-3173 French Bulldogs, AKC 541-280-7355 bike, white wall tires. 1 male, 1 female, $45. 541-420-5855 Premier Goose Gun, 720.277.8517 Mon- Beautiful solid cherry Benelli Super Black mouth Ore. 242 dining table & 6 chairs, Eagle, camo, custom German Shepherd custom padded, French Exercise Equipment ported 28” barrel, relike new, purebred, spayed fe- country, coil system,trigger work and swing weight, exc. male, 3 yrs, black & 68”x48” with leaf. $800 Sit-down abdomen 540-241-5794 (in Sisters) cond., $1350 firm, tan, current shots, chair, $25. 541-385-3355. very sweet, great with 541-948-4413 people. $200 Get your Remington 243 788 carWavemaster punch & 541-383-3349. business bine, scope, sling, nice! kick bag, adult size, Husky Malamute Pups, $500. 541-788-8137 $99. 541-948-4413 almost 6 weeks, Remington 721, 300 beautiful colors, $400, GROW 246 H&H $695. 541-306-9218 Guns, Hunting 541-548-4774 with an ad in Japanese Chin females, & Fishing Ruger M77 .338 Mag, 2 avail., 2 yrs, black & The Bulletin’s white. $175-$275. 2-7 Leupold, loading 1953 Marlin 336, exc “Call A Service 541-788-0326 dies, 4 boxes bullets, cond, .35 Rem, w/box Professional” $495. 541-382-4382 factory loads, $425. Kittens/cats avail. thru Directory 541-318-8080 rescue group. Tame, SHOTGUNS FOR SALE shots, altered, ID chip, Fridge, Maytag stainless, AMT back up ss 380 3 Verona LX680 Gold Trap more. Sat/Sun 1-5, 12ga, 30”, new gun, 32”, bottom freeze, clips 350$. KBI $1025. Other quality call re: other days. $750; Range, 30” slidemakarov 380 holster shotguns: H.K., Win65480 78th St., Bend, in,Stainless Fridgidaire and one clip 300$ chester, Remington, 389-8420; photos, etc. gas convection, $1100; 541-419-8883 Mossburg, Beretta, at www.craftcats.org Micro, Fridgidaire Franchi, Verona. stainless, 30”, $350, all AR-15 new frontier arLab Pups AKC, black Call 541-447-4101 professional series, like mory w/mags 800$ & yellow, Master new, 541-330-6037. 541-279-0014, James Wanted: Collector Hunter sired, perforseeks high quality mance pedigree, OFA Browning Gold Finger fishing items. cert hips & elbows, pump 12 ga., HI-RIB, Call 541-678-5753, or Call 541-771-2330 field model 28, use 2 www.kinnamanretrievers.com 503-351-2746 times, exc. cond. Visit our HUGE $500 firm, Wanted: Quality 28 Ga. Labradoodles - Mini & home decor med size, several colors 541-815-5174. Shotgun, call consignment store. 541-504-2662 541-408-0014. New items www.alpen-ridge.com Good classiied ads tell arrive daily! the essential facts in an Maltese Toy AKC, champ Weatherby 7mm 930 SE Textron, interesting Manner. Write lines, extra small, w/ Burris 4X16 Bend 541-318-1501 from the readers view not 541-420-1577 $1150. www.redeuxbend.com the seller’s. Convert the 541-420-8117 facts into beneits. Show Check out the GENERATE SOME ex- the reader how the item will classiieds online citement in your 255 help them in some way. www.bendbulletin.com neighborhood! Plan a Computers Updated daily garage sale and don't forget to advertise in THE BULLETIN rePit bull terrier puppy, classified! quires computer adbeautiful purebred, 7mo, 541-385-5809. neutered, all shots, great vertisers with multiple with small kids & cats! Large mirror, decoraad schedules or those $150 obo. 541-306-8640 tive frame, 42”x67”, selling multiple sysCASH!! $149. 541-948-4413 tems/ software, to disFor Guns, Ammo & POODLE (TOY) PUPS close the name of the Reloading Supplies. Well-socialized & lov- Oak veneer 2-pc china business or the term 541-408-6900. hutch, 81”Hx66”W able. 541-475-3889 "dealer" in their ads. $89. 541-948-4413 Private party advertisCollector WIN model Queensland Heelers ers are defined as 63, nice! $1200. standard & mini,$150 & Washer, Kenmore heavy those who sell one BRWN 348, new. duty, 7 yrs, exlnt cond, up. 541-280-1537 http:// computer. $1000. 541-447-0202 rightwayranch.wordpress.com $200. 541-447-4078

ING

Office schedule dry erase board, 25”L x 30.5”H $50. 541-948-4413 263

Piano, Steinway Model O Baby Grand 1911, gorgeous, artist quality instrument w/great action & Steinway’s warm, rich sound. Will adorn any living room, church or music studio perfectly. New retail $69,000. Sacrifice at $34,000 OBO, call 541-383-3150. Saxophone Panamerican Alto, good cond., $395 Firm, 541-388-9270 Upright studio piano, ‘30s vintage, great cond, just tuned $575 541-815-5029 Wanted: Stand for keyboard, that has place for music book, also any Gospel music books for Chord Organ, 541-382-2194. 260

Tools 2 Payload 8’ toolside truck boxes, $499 both. 541-948-4413 Bandsaw Delta 14” wood -cutting, Model 28-275, $350. 541-848-7819 Delta 10” tablesaw, $350. Grizzly ½” drill press, $100. Lathe tools, $45. 541-815-0665

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2 Rubbermaid storage sheds, 71”Hx34.5”x20”D $99 ea. 541-948-4413

Greeley construction steel job box, $199. 541-948-4413

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash Saxon’s Fine Jewelers 541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. BUYING & SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

COWGIRL CASH

OHSA safety harness set, $99. 541-948-4413 Sears Craftsman router & line laser, never used, $150. 541-948-4413 264

Snow Removal Equipment Sears Gold Series snow blower, 8.5hp, 26”, $350. 541-948-4413 Snow Blower, Ariens 5.5hp 24”, easy start, $350. 541-848-7819

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection. • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

Dry Juniper Firewood $200 per cord, split. 1/2 cords available. Immediate delivery! 541-408-6193 Dry Lodgepole: $175 cord rounds; $210 cord split.1½ Cord Minimum 37 yrs service to Cent. Ore. 541-350-2859 Dry seasoned Juniper, $200/cord split; $175/cord rounds. Call 541-977-4500 or 530-524-3299 269

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We pay cash for boots, Snowblower,Tecumseh, 5 hp, 5 spd forward, buckles, jewelry & $200, 541-617-1476. more! 924 Brooks St. McPheeters Turf Fall 541-678-5162 Nursery Sale: Trees 265 www.getcowgirlcash.com & Shrubs Only, Sept. Building Materials Hampton Bay free7th-15th, closed Sun. standing 3-speed fan, Cash & Check Only. REDMOND Habitat $99. 541-948-4413 All Sales Final. RESTORE 541-546-9081 Jewelers/Watchmaking Building Supply Resale equip., 50 yrs. worth, Quality at SUPER TOP SOIL furnishings & parts, LOW PRICES www.hersheysoilandbark.com call 541-389-4079. 1242 S. Hwy 97 Screened, soil & com541-548-1406 post mixed, no Moving Boxes, 4 sizes, Open to the public. rocks/clods. High hu200 total, cost $300, mus level, exc. for Asking $100 OBO. 266 flower beds, lawns, 541-306-4181 gardens, straight Heating & Stoves Security camera monitor, screened top soil. recorder, cameras & wall Bionaire indoor low proBark. Clean fill. Destand; you come unin- file heaters (2), $45 ea, liver/you haul. stall from my home, $80 both. 541-948-4413 541-548-3949. $350. 541-948-4413 270 Two Burial plots at Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809 Redmond Cemetery, Lost & Found $1200. 541-771-9841 Place Your Ad Or E-Mail Wanted- paying cash At: www.bendbulletin.com Found: 2 Kid’s Winter Coats & backpack, for Hi-fi audio & stuShad Rd in CRR, 9/6, dio equip. McIntosh, Diesel portable forced air heater, 170T model, 541-504-1791. JBL, Marantz, Dy$275. 541-948-4413 naco, Heathkit, SanFound Car key to Volvo, sui, Carver, NAD, etc. NOTICE TO SE Bend, Call to Call 541-261-1808 ADVERTISER identify. 541-410-1078 Since September 29, WHEN YOU SEE THIS 1991, advertising for Found mens wedding used woodstoves has ring on golf course. been limited to modCall to describe. els which have been 541-359-9197 On a classified ad certified by the Orgo to egon Department of Found Women’s Clothwww.bendbulletin.com Environmental Qualing & Running shoes, to view additional ity (DEQ) and the fed9/9, near COCC, call photos of the item. eral Environmental to ID, 541-728-0672. Protection Agency 261 Lost in Bend, (EPA) as having met Medical Equipment blue stone, white smoke emission standards. A certified diamonds, yellow gold Golden brand power womans ring. Reward! woodstove may be wheelchair, red, like 541-388-4888 identified by its certifinew, used only 6 mos, cation label, which is $3400 new; sacrifice REMEMBER: If you permanently attached $2000. 541-848-7755 have lost an animal, to the stove. The Bulor 541-948-7518 don't forget to check letin will not knowThe Humane Society ingly accept advertis262 in Bend 541-382-3537 ing for the sale of Commercial/Ofice Redmond, uncertified 541-923-0882 Equipment & Fixtures woodstoves. Prineville, 541-447-7178; Wanted! File cabinets, letter size Pellet stove OR Craft Cats, 4-drawer, 3@$60 ea/ 541-382-4144 $150 all. 541-948-4413 541-389-8420.


G2 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 476

Farm Market

Employment

300 400 280

Estate Sales

HESTATE SALE H Quality items include lighted china cabinet & curio, oak roll top desk & glass door bookcase, dressers, electric bed & lift chair, recliner, 2 oak glider rockers, small tables, many small furn. pieces, lamps, lots of floral & décor, kitchen, TVs, Dyson vac, treadmill, electric mower, antiques, collectibles, glassware, holiday décor, new White XL1760 sewing machine, 2 nice patio sets, snow blower, W/D set, men & ladies clothing & more!

2411 Buckwheat Ct. Mt. View Park off NE 27th, Bend.

Fri. & Sat. 9-4;

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $2.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!”

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT at

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

Yard Sale -Sat. Only 8-2, The house sold so this will be the last sale here. Huge Sale, antiques, outdoor stuff, tons & tons of designer clothes & shoes, makeup, books, movies, linens & knick knacks, Everything HAS to go! Don’t miss this one, 61445 Skene Trl. off Century, right on Skyliner Ranch Rd, right on Skene, gates open 8-2. 284

Sales Southwest Bend Garage Sale Sat 9-4, 61390 Duncan Ln. Lots of power / hand tools, saws & saw blades, etc. Multi family Sale, Fri & Sat. 8:30-4, 19915 Porcupine Dr, off Brookswood 286

Sales Northeast Bend Books, toys, clothes, juicer, karaoke, table, videos, misc. 3055 NE Fairmont Ct Fri-Sat, 9-3 Estate Sale: Everything from 50 cents to $100s! 21378 Puffin Dr. 9/14 & 9/15, Fri & Sat, 8-2

Garage Sale, Sat. 9-3. Holiday, vintage jewelry & accordion, teachers materials, tools, camping & golf, lawn furniture, limited edition prints, household items & more. 60370 Woodside Lp. Garage Sale: Sat. 9-4, misc.jewelry,BBQ,desk, file cabinet & much more, 1383 SE Lostine. Multi-family Garage Sale, Fri-Sat, 8-5. No early sales! 21091 Pettigrew Court. Lots of good stuff!

Tools & more! Saturday only 9/15, 9am-4pm. 60624 Ridge Heights off Fri. & Sat 9-3. Pet car- Knott Rd near China Hat. rier & feeders, furni541-593-0206 ture & collectables. 1237 NE Burnside. 290

Crowd control numbers Garage Sale, Sat. & Fri. at 8 a.m. Sun. 8-3, 734 NE Majesty Ln. Lots of www.atticestatesangreat stuff. Don’t miss! dappraisals.com Attic Estates & ApJust downsized. Lots to praisals 541-350-6822 sell! Fri. & Sat., 7-3. 63317 Stonewood Dr. 282 Ebay business closeout Sales Northwest Bend Living Estate Sale! FurAwbrey Butte Estate niture, household, crafts, Sale: Fri. & Sat., 8 am., tools, fishing equipment, audio & sports equip, boat. Fri-Sat, 9-3, 2200 Hwy 20, Space 16 Craftsman tools, TV’s, NE (behind Jake’s) collectibles, furniture, candles, games & toys, Moving Sale 1848 NE 2603 NW Loggan Ct. Providence Dr. Everything must go, great Drafting table, rattan prices - kitchen, dining chairs, entertainment room, living room, office, center, women's M/L, 2 bedrooms & garage men's XL, baskets, inside & outside sale. Fri wagon, books, dishes, & Sat 9/14-15, 8am-3pm so many treasures! MOVING SALE 3970 NW Northcliff. 1 Day Only! Sat/Sun 9-4. Friday 9/14, 8am- 2pm 787 NE Savannah Dr. Garage - Downsizing Free Drawing Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-4. Cordless Vac Tools, crafts, antiques, 20973 89th St. Moving Sale! Sat. 9/15, 8a-4p. Furniture & colHigh Quality Sale! lectibles, plus! 1396 NE Antiques, porcelain dolls, Drost Ave., off Shepard. collectibles, tools, furniture, new books, cloth- Sat. Only, 9-3, 1010 NE ing, crafts, Sat. 9am-3pm Wiest Way, name 720 NW Silver Buckle. brand clothing size 10-12, Jade jewelry, Just bought a new boat? household, vintage. Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our 288 Super Seller rates! Sales Southeast Bend 541-385-5809 Multi-Family Sale-Fund raiser for Summit High Cheer Team, Sat. 9-1, in NW Crossing at 2439 NW High Lakes Lp in back alley.

288

Sales Southeast Bend

Sales Redmond Area Church Lawn Sale, 9-2 Sat. 9/15. Quilting materials featured + kitchen, garden, misc. Children welcome to pet a Llama between 10-12! St. Paul’s, corner of SW 12th St. & Forest Ave. (1 block north off Glacier). Community Yard Sale, 9/14-15, 9-4. From Hwy 97, go west on Pershall to Yucca, follow signs. Fri.-Sat., 8-1. 710 NW 21st Ct. Stereo equip., toy tractors, Bose Wave Radio, 1950 Ford parts, Datsun pickup parts, tools, household & more.

325

421

Hay, Grain & Feed

Schools & Training

Premium 1st cutting Orchard Grass hay, shed stored, 70-lb bales, $225/ton. Call Ten Barr Ranch, 541-389-1165

TRUCK SCHOOL

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden 454 Straw;Compost.546-6171 Looking for Employment Wheat straw, small 50-lb couple bales, in stack, $1.00 Experienced avail. for housesitting ea. 541-546-9821 Oct. 1. 541-410-4794

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com TURN THE PAGE For More Ads The Bulletin 345

Livestock & Equipment

Yard Sale - Collectibles, household & shop items. Border Collie Puppies, Cream separator, Red & White, friendly, snowmobile, ‘58 Ford Herding Workaholics. Classic. Gate open Sat $200, King Creek only, 9-4. 4178 SW 58th Ranch, Fossil. 541-763-4052 or Yard Sale: Fri.-Sun., 541-806-0695 cell. 8-4, 6756 NW 17th St, Terrebonne, some358 thing for everyone! Farmers Column 292

Sales Other Areas

NOTICE

Quonset Hut, 12’x24’, you take down & haul, $350. 541-923-6049

383 Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs Produce & Food (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event THOMAS ORCHARDS Garage Sale: Fri.-Sat. is over! THANKS! Kimberly, OR 9-4, 60665 Crocket From The Bulletin U-Pick & Ready Picked: Way, off Groff & RickFreestone Canning and your local utility ard Rd, antique peaches: Monroe & companies. Grahmaphone, disO’Henry, Bartlett Pears, play case, furniture, Gala Apples, Jonagold household items & Apples some unique items, BRING CONTAINERS www.bendbulletin.com no early birds. Open 7 days a week 8 am - 6 pm only 541-934-2870. Malcolm Silver Visit us on Facebook for updates Sandy Silver Also we are at Bend 20787 Canterbury Ct., Farmer’s Mkt at Drake Park & St. Charles Nottingham Square Bend Fri. & Sat.. • Sept. 14 & 15 • 9 to 5 ONLY! FIND YOUR FUTURE Crowd control admittance numbers at 8:00 a.m. Friday HOME IN THE BULLETIN (Take 15th Street south from Reed Market Rd. Your future is just a page and go to north entrance of Nottingham away. Whether you’re looking Square--follow signs) for a hat or a place to hang it, The Bulletin Classiied is King size bed with Cherrywood headboard; Two your best source. smaller oak dining sets--each with four chairs; Klick Klack 1950s pink frieze sofa; Large sofa; Every day thousands of Kenmore washer and electric dryer; Gas dryer; buyers and sellers of goods Painted cabinet--cute; Carved wood bear; Two and services do business in large copper "Genie” Pots; Microwave; Glass these pages. They know topped coffee and end tables; Large painted you can’t beat The Bulletin desk; Wood entry bench and small butlers table; Classiied Section for Pantry cabinet; White dresser; Triple dresser and nightstands; Wicker front dresser and night- selection and convenience stand; Patio chairs; Large bakers rack; plants; - every item is just a phone call away. Pictures; Some food products; Pots and Pans; bakeware; Electrical appliances; Vacuum; LeThe Classiied Section is nox Stainless flatware; Clothing and ladies size easy to use. Every item 8 shoes; 2006 TV; Cookbooks Handicapped is categorized and every items include Wheelchair; potty chair; shower cartegory is indexed on the stool; etc.; King size brass headboard; Christsection’s front page. mas items; linens and dishes; 1927 Hindenburg Whether you are looking for newspaper. Lots of other items. a home or need a service, your future is in the pages of See you at the sale!!! The Bulletin Classiied. Handled by...

ESTATE SALE MOVING SALE

Deedy's Estate Sales Co.

541-419-4742 days • 541-382-5950 eves www.deedysestatesales.com

www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-387-9252

Employment Opportunities

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

541-385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at:

www.bendbulletin.com

Food Service - Bruno’s Grocery & U-bake is hiring for Cashier & Pizza Maker. Apply in person: 1709 NE 6th, Bend. No phone calls.

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION READERS:

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

476

528

Finance & Business

Employment Opportunities The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

500 528

Loans & Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Loans & Mortgages BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200. LOCAL MONEY:We buy secured trust deeds & note,some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 ext.13. Reverse Mortgages by local expert Mike LeRoux NMLS57716

Ads published in "EmCall to learn more. ployment Opportuni541-350-7839 ties" include emSecurity1 Lending ployee and NMLS98161 independent posiDetails at: tions. Ads for posiHave an item to tions that require a fee heartcentercardiology.com sell quick? or upfront investment Need help ixing stuff? must be stated. With If it’s under Call A Service Professional any independent job Remember.... $ ind the help you need. 500 you can place it in opportunity, please Add your web ad- www.bendbulletin.com investigate thordress to your ad and The Bulletin oughly. readers on The TRUCK DRIVER Classiieds for: wanted must have Bulletin' s web site The Bulletin Use extra caution when doubles endorsement, will be able to click $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days applying for jobs onTo Subscribe call local run, call through automatically $ line and never pro541-385-5800 or go to 16 - 3 lines, 14 days 541-475-4221 to your site. vide personal inforwww.bendbulletin.com (Private Party ads only) mation to any source Looking for your next Sales you may not have reemployee? Representative searched and deemed Community Sports Reporter Place a Bulletin help to be reputable. Use Lincare, a leading The Redmond Spokesman, a 102-year-old wanted ad today and national respiratory extreme caution when weekly published in the high desert paradise reach over 60,000 company, seeks reresponding to ANY of Central Oregon, is looking for a reporter readers each week. sults-driven sales online employment with a passion for high school and community Your classified ad representative. Cread from out-of-state. sports, with the ability to be adept at both will also appear on ate working relationfeature writing and game coverage. The ideal bendbulletin.com ships with MDs, We suggest you call candidate will be accurate, stay on deadline which currently nurses, social workthe State of Oregon and go beyond the scoreboard to find the receives over 1.5 ers, and articulate Consumer Hotline at story. million page views our excellent patient 1-503-378-4320 every month at care with attentive Applicants should be creative, energetic and no extra cost. listening skills. For Equal Opportunity innovative, both in print and online. The job inBulletin Classifieds Competitive base + Laws: Oregon Bucludes both feature and game stories, sports Get Results! uncapped commisreau of Labor & Inagate, and the ability to manage coverage of Call 385-5809 sion. Drug-free dustry, Civil Rights multiple sport and recreational subjects and a or place workplace. EOE. Division, network of sources. The position will also reyour ad on-line at Please fax resume 971-673-0764 quire occasional editing tasks and the crebendbulletin.com to 541-382-8358. ation of regular news and business features. If you have any quesCandidates with photography and social meLook at: tions, concerns or dia skills will rise to the top of the list. Prior exTick, Tock comments, contact: Bendhomes.com perience or recent journalism students only. Classified Department for Complete Listings of Tick, Tock... The Bulletin The Redmond Spokesman is an equal opArea Real Estate for Sale 541-385-5809 portunity employer. All hiring is contingent on ...don’t let time get Skidder Operator & Log passing a drug test. away. Hire a Processor Operator for work in Central & Southprofessional out To apply, send a cover letter, resume and ern OR. 6 mos min exclips by mail to: of The Bulletin’s perience required. ExLesle Pugmire-Hole, Editor Automotive tensive travel; full-time “Call A Service The Redmond Spokesman Service Advisor work. Call 541-330-1930 PO Box 788, Redmond, OR 97756 Professional” Must be customer or email: lpugmire@redmondspokesman.com focused with CSI a Staffing Coordinator Directory today! top priority. Fast At Home Care Group pace dealership is searching for a offering great benStaffing Coordinator Independent Contractor efits with a lasting to join our team. This career for a hard is a full-time position. working individual. Qualified applicants Send resume to: must have a miniPO Box 6676, mum of 2 years health Bend, OR 97708 care experience. Staffing experience preferred, but not reAutomotive quired. Applicant must Technician have experience with Good diagnostician? MS Word & MS Excel, Good automotive and Outlook. Must be FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF background? Stickenergetic, outgoing, ler for done right the have a positive atti1st time? We have a tude and be ready for spot for you on our a challenge. Approaward-winning team! priate candidates will Send resume with come prepared to verifiable work hismulti-task in a very tory to PO Box 6676, fast paced environBend, OR 97708 ment and understand We are looking for independent contractors to the importance of service home delivery routes in: communication. ComBanking pensation: $12-$13/hour DOE. Staffing Coordinator will be eligible for medical and dental Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. benefits after 90 days We are excited to of employment. This Must have reliable, insured vehicle. announce an availposition requires that able position in you be on-call as well. Bend, Oregon. Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 Please email resume Branch Supervisor during business hours to: anne@athomecarSalary Range: egroup.com or apply apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com $ 29,000 - $40,000 in person at: EOE. At Home Care Group For more details, 205 SE Wilson Avenue, please apply online: Suite 1, www.sofcu.com Bend, OR 97702

MA / LPN / RN

H Supplement Your Income H

Operate Your Own Business

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

& Call Today &

H Prineville, Sunriver/La Pine H


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condos & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 730 - New Listings 732 - Commercial Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condos & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 631

642

Condo/Townhomes for Rent

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

600

Next to Pilot Butte Park 1962 NE Sams Lp. #2 2 master bdrms each w/ 2 full baths, + ½ bath downstairs. Fully appl’d kitchen, gas fireplace, deck, garage w/opener. 605 $725/mo. + $725 dep; Roommate Wanted incl. w/s/yard care, no pets. Call Jim or DoRoommate needed, avail. lores, 541-389-3761 or 9/15. Own bath, quiet 541-408-0260 (Jim is liduplex, $350 mo., $200 censed real estate brkr.) dep.+½ util., internet incl. 541-728-5731. 634 630

Rooms for Rent

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

CHECK OUT THIS HOT DEAL!

Studios & Kitchenettes $299 1st month’s rent! * Furnished room, TV w/ 2 bdrm, 1 bath cable, micro & fridge. $530 & 540 Utils & linens. New Carports & A/C incl! owners.$145-$165/wk Fox Hollow Apts. 541-382-1885 (541) 383-3152 631

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co *Upstairs only with lease*

Condo/Townhomes for Rent

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

638

Furnished1 bdrm condo Duplex,Clean ,spacious 3 at Inn of 7th Mtn. utils bdrm, 2 bath, dbl ga+cable & wifi paid, deck, rage,fridge,dishwasher, pools, $700, no smoking/ W/D hook, $850,132B pets, 541-979-8940 Roosevelt, 382-9462

CALL A SERVICE PROFESSIONAL Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service

Building/Contracting

Landscaping/Yard Care

NOTICE: Oregon state NOTICE: OREGON law requires anyLandscape Contracone who contracts tors Law (ORS 671) for construction work requires all busito be licensed with the nesses that advertise Construction Conto perform Landtractors Board (CCB). scape Construction An active license which includes: means the contractor planting, decks, is bonded and infences, arbors, sured. Verify the water-features, and contractor’s CCB liinstallation, repair of cense through the irrigation systems to CCB Consumer be licensed with the Website Landscape Contracwww.hirealicensedcontractor. tors Board. This com 4-digit number is to be or call 503-378-4621. included in all adverThe Bulletin recomtisements which indimends checking with cate the business has the CCB prior to cona bond, insurance and tracting with anyone. workers compensaSome other trades tion for their employalso require addiees. For your protectional licenses and tion call 503-378-5909 certifications. or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status Debris Removal before contracting with the business. JUNK BE GONE Persons doing landI Haul Away FREE scape maintenance For Salvage. Also do not require a LCB Cleanups & Cleanouts license. Mel, 541-389-8107 Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES. Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. On-time promise. Senior Discount. Work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS Search the area’s most comprehensive listing of classiied advertising... real estate to automotive, merchandise to sporting goods. Bulletin Classiieds appear every day in the print or on line. Call 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

I DO THAT! Home/Rental repairs Small jobs to remodels Honest, guaranteed work. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768 USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Door-to-door selling with fast results! It’s the easiest way in the world to sell. The Bulletin Classiied

541-385-5809 Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Const.

28 yrs exp in Central OR!

Quality & honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to expert wall covering install / removal. Sr. discounts CCB#47120 Licensed/bonded/insured 541-389-1413 / 410-2422

LCB#8759

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maintenance, thatching, sod, sprinkler blowouts, water features, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012 Aeration/Fall Clean-up BOOK NOW! Weekly / one-time service avail. Bonded, insured, free estimates!

COLLINS Lawn Maint. Call 541-480-9714 Maverick Landscaping Mowing, weedeating, yard detailing, chain saw work & more! LCB#8671 541-923-4324 Pet Services

870

880

880

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent

ATVs

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

2 bdrm, 1 bath, wood stove, fridge, w/d. SW Bend, $675 month, $725 deposit. 541-382-8244 675

RV Parking Don’t rent when you can own! 48’x14’ GarajMahal, pvt upgraded RV storage suite w/professionally installed expoxy floor, 30 & 50-amp pwr, 12’x14’ door, elect. opener w/outside keypad, RV dump, gas heat, security gate access, owners’ clubhouse, $59,500. 541-480-7837

Real Estate For Sale

700 732

Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale Existing & operating sports bar in Burns, OR. My loss, your gain! P & L in the plus. Call Krysta, 619-866-1415, for info.

745 Duplex 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1260 sq.ft., 1 story, gaHomes for Sale rage w/opener, fenced yard, RV/Boat parking, 4270 sq ft, 6 bdrm, 6 ba, fridge, dishwasher, mi- 4-car, corner, .83 acre cro, walk-in laundry, mtn view, by owner. W/S/G paid, front gard- $590,000 541-390-0886 ner paid, $775+dep., See: bloomkey.com/8779 541-604-0338 BANK OWNED HOMES! 648 FREE List w/Pics! www.BendRepos.com Houses for bend and beyond real estate Rent General 20967 yeoman, bend or

Boats & RV’s

800

RV CONSIGNMENTS WANTED We Do The Work, You Keep The Cash, On-Site Credit Approval Team, Web Site Presence, We Take Trade-Ins. Free Advertising. BIG COUNTRY RV Bend 541-330-2495

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Yamaha Kodiak 400, Country Coach Intrigue 2005 4x4, 2500 lb winch, 2002, 40' Tag axle. gun rack & alum loading 400hp Cummins DieMotorcycles & Accessories ramp, only 542 miles, sel. two slide-outs. show room cond, $4800. 41,000 miles, new Harley Davidson Helmet, 541-280-9401 Ads published in the tires & batteries. Most Redmond: 541-548-5254 Chaps & heavy leather "Boats" classification options. $95,000 OBO coat, all like new, exc. 870 include: Speed, fish541-678-5712 cond., Maker Offer, Boats & Accessories ing, drift, canoe, 541-420-2408. house and sail boats. For all other types of Harley Davidson Soft13’ Smokercraft watercraft, please see Tail Deluxe 2007, Class 875. 1985, good cond., white/cobalt, w/pas541-385-5809 senger kit, Vance & 15HP gas engine Southwind 35.5’ Triton, Hines muffler system 2008,V10, 2 slides, Du+ elec. motor & Econoline RV 1989, pont UV coat, 7500 mi. & kit, 1045 mi., exc. lots of extra equip, fully loaded, exc. cond, Bought new at cond, $19,999, reduced to $4000. GENERATE SOME ex- 35K orig. mi., $19,750. $132,913; 541-389-9188. Call 541-546-6133. 541-388-9270. citement in your neigasking $94,900. Harley Heritage borhood. Plan a gaCall 541-923-2774 Softail, 2003 15’ Smokercraft Alas- rage sale and don't CAN’T BEAT THIS! $5,000+ in extras, Look before you forget to advertise in kan 1998, 15HP 4 $2000 paint job, buy, below market Stroke Johnson, classified! 385-5809. 30K mi. 1 owner, value! Size & mileelectric start, trailer, For more information age DOES matter! Bimini top, fish finder, please call Class A 32’ Hurricenter console, and 541-385-8090 cane by Four Winds, or 209-605-5537 extras. $3995. 2007. 12,500 mi, all Winnebago Class C 27’ Used out-drive 541-316-1388. amenities, Ford V10, 1992, Ford 460 V8,64K parts - Mercury lthr, cherry, slides, HD FAT BOY mi., good cond., $7000 Just bought a new boat? OMC rebuilt malike new! New low OBO 541-678-5575 Sell your old one in the 1996 rine motors: 151 price, $54,900. classii eds! Ask about our Completely rebuilt/ $1595; 3.0 $1895; 541-548-5216 Super Seller rates! 881 customized, low 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-385-5809 miles. Accepting ofTravel Trailers 541-389-0435 Gulfstream Scenic fers. 541-548-4807 Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, 17’ 1984 Chris Craft Cummins 330 hp die875 - Scorpion, 140 HP HD Screaming Eagle sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 inboard/outboard, 2 Watercraft Electra Glide 2005, in. kitchen slide out, depth finders, troll103” motor, two tone new tires,under cover, ing motor, full cover, candy teal, new tires, hwy. miles only,4 door 2007 SeaDoo EZ - Load trailer, 23K miles, CD player, fridge/freezer ice- Komfort 20’ Trailblazer, 2004 Waverunner, $3500 OBO. hydraulic clutch, exmaker, W/D combo, 2004, with all the extras, excellent condition, 541-382-3728. cellent condition. Interbath tub & from new tires & chrome LOW hours. Double Highest offer takes it. shower, 50 amp pro- wheels to A/C! $8495. trailer, lots of extras. 17’ Boston Whaler, 541-480-8080. pane gen & more! $10,000 541-447-3342, Prineville with trailer, $6500, $55,000. Honda Elite 80 2001, 541-719-8444 619-733-8472. 541-948-2310 1400 mi., absolutely Ragen SS2400 2006 like new., comes w/ Toy hauler. 5.5Kw 17’ Seaswirl 1988 Ads published in "Wacarrying rack for 2” Onan gen. Sleeps 5+. tercraft" include: Kayopen bow, rebuilt receiver, ideal for use Fuel station. Excelaks, rafts and motorChevy V6 engine, w/motorhome, $995, lent condition. many ized personal Hunter’s Delight! Packnew upholstery, 541-546-6920 extras. $16500, age deal! 1988 Winwatercrafts. For $4500 or best offer. 541-447-6584. nebago Super Chief, "boats" please see Honda Goldwing As707-688-4523 38K miles, great Class 870. pencade 1983, exc. shape; 1988 Bronco II ROUA Digorgio 1971 cond., $2750 OBO, 541-385-5809 fridge, heater, propane 4x4 to tow, 130K 541-390-7888. & elec. lights, awning, mostly towed miles, 2 spares, extra insunice rig! $15,000 both. lation for late season Softail Deluxe 541-382-3964, leave hunting/cold weather 2010, 805 miles, msg. camping, well maint, Black Chameleon. very roomy, sleeps 5, 18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 $17,000 great for hunting, Volvo Penta, 270HP, Call Don @ $3200, 541-410-6561 low hrs., must see, Jayco Greyhawk 541-410-3823 $15,000, 541-330-3939 2004, 31’ Class C, Sea Kayaks - His & 6800 mi., hyd. jacks, Hers, Eddyline Wind 18.5’ Bayliner 185 Advertise your car! new tires, slide out, Dancers,17’, fiberglass 2008. 3.0L, open bow, Add A Picture! exc. cond, $49,900, boats, all equip incl., slim deck, custom Reach thousands of readers! paddles, personal flo541-480-8648 cover & trailer, exc. Call 541-385-5809 tation devices,dry bags, cond., 30-35 total hrs., The Bulletin Classifieds spray skirts,roof rack w/ Lazy Daze 26’ 2004, Springdale 29’ 2007, incl. 4 life vests, towers & cradles -- Just Suzuki Blvd, 2006, less 14K mi., $42,000. ropes, anchor, stereo, slide,Bunkhouse style, add water, $1250/boat than 6K miles, exc cond, 619-733-8472. depth finder, $12,000, sleeps 7-8, excellent Firm. 541-504-8557. $3695 obo 541-410-7075 541-729-9860. condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504 880 865 860

NEW ON MARKET! PUBLISHER'S Enjoy peace & tranNOTICE quility in this 3 All real estate adverbdrm/2.5 bath, 2080 tising in this newspasq. ft. on just under .5 per is subject to the acre on corner lot in Fair Housing Act cul-de-sac. Move-in which makes it illegal ready, so don’t wait! to advertise "any Close to recreation preference, limitation and just minutes from or discrimination Bend! MLS# based on race, color, 201206813. Kathy religion, sex, handiDenning, Broker cap, familial status, 541-480-4429 marital status or national origin, or an in- John L. Scott Real tention to make any Estate, Bend such preference, www.johnlscott.com/57 361 limitation or discrimination." Familial staNOTICE: tus includes children All real estate adverunder the age of 18 tised here in is subliving with parents or ject to the Federal legal custodians, Fair Housing Act, pregnant women, and which makes it illegal people securing cusATVs to advertise any preftody of children under erence, limitation or 18. This newspaper discrimination based will not knowingly acon race, color, relicept any advertising gion, sex, handicap, for real estate which is familial status or nain violation of the law. tional origin, or intenOur readers are tion to make any such Honda TRX300 EX 2005 hereby informed that preferences, limita- sport quad w/Rev, runs all dwellings advertions or discrimination. & rides great, new pipe & tised in this newspaWe will not knowingly paddles incl. $1700 obo. per are available on accept any advertis- 541-647-8931 an equal opportunity ing for real estate basis. To complain of which is in violation of discrimination call this law. All persons HUD toll-free at are hereby informed 1-800-877-0246. The that all dwellings adtoll free telephone vertised are available number for the hearon an equal opportuing impaired is nity basis. The Bulle1-800-927-9275. tin Classified CRR- Nice and clean 2 750 bdrm, 2 bath, custom ranch home with mtn Redmond Homes views, dbl. garage., No smoking. One Looking for your next small pet neg. $750. employee? 541-548-4225. Place a Bulletin help 650 wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 Houses for Rent readers each week. NE Bend Your classified ad will also appear on 4 Bdrm 2.5 bath, 1700 sq bendbulletin.com ft, appls, fenced yd, on which currently reculdesac. No smoking. ceives over Pets? 2400 NE Jeni Jo 1.5 million page Ct., near hospital. views every month $1050. 503-680-9590 at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds All ready to move into Get Results! a 3 bdrm, 2 bath, gas Call 385-5809 or heat, fenced yard, dbl. place your ad on-line garage Near hospital, at no smoking/ no pets. bendbulletin.com Call 541-388-2250, or 541-815-7099.

Motorhomes 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Immaculate!

Allegro 2002, 2 slides, 22K mi, workhorse chassis, 8.1 Chev engine, like new, $41,900 obo. 541-420-9346

Beaver Coach Marquis 40’ 1987. New cover, Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 new paint (2004), new 29’, weatherized, like inverter (2007). Onan new, furnished & 6300 watt gen, 111K mi, ready to go, incl Wineparked covered $35,000 gard Satellite dish, obo. 541-419-9859 or $26,995. 541-420-9964 541-280-2014

Show Your Stuff.

Nelson Landscape Beautiful 3 bdrm 2½ bath Maintenance home with nicely land-

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial •Sprinkler Repair •Sprinkler Installation •Back Flow Testing •Fire Prevention, Lot Clearing •Fall Clean up •Weekly Mowing •Bark, Rock, Etc. •Senior Discounts Reserving spots for sprinkler winterization & snow removal Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458

865

762

Now you can add a full-color photo to your Bulletin classified ad starting at only $15.00 per week, when you order your ad online.

Homes with Acreage

scaped yard. Bonus rm above garage. $1450. Deschutes River front541-977-6610 /420-8810 age. Custom single level 3 bdrm, 3 bath, Quiet 2-1/2 bath, 2 bed3962 sq.ft., 12.72 acre room Duplex.Firegated community, priplace, single car gavate setting with 1/4 rage, water & mile river frontage. landscaping paid. $997,000. MLS $725/mo. with $1000 #201205961. Pam security. No smoking/ Lester, Principal Bropets. 541 460-3010 ker, Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. FIND IT! 541-504-1338 BUY IT! SELL IT! 773 The Bulletin Classiieds Acreages Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com, currently receiving over 1.5 million page views, every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 652

Houses for Rent NW Bend

To place your Bulletin ad with a photo, visit www.bendbulletin.com, click on “Place an ad” and follow these easy steps:

139716 Dorothy Lane, Crescent Lake, Ore. Charming cottage with 150 feet of Crescent Creek frontage. Perfect vacation home with covered deck for entertaining, wood stove, 2 bed/ 1 bath. An RV garage and lots of upgrades on this one acre. Close to the Ski Pass, trails and lakes. $275,000 MLS# 201207074. Call Kerry at 541-815-6363 Cascade Realty

1.

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Powell Butte 6 acres, 360 views, great horse property, 10223 Houston Lake Rd. $99,900. 541-350-4684

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775

Clean, quiet 2 bdrm, nice Manufactured/ yard, “R-60” insulation! Mobile Homes $800+ last+ dep. lease. No pets. Local refs. 1977 NW 2nd. FACTORY SPECIAL Central Oregon Best New Home, 3 bdrm,1026 in-home animal care sq.ft., $46,900 finished 656 service. Going on on your site,541.548.5511 Houses for Rent vacation? We provide www.JandMHomes.com compassionate and SW Bend loving in-home aniFleetwood 1997, 960 mal care. Make it a Clean 3 (could be 4) sq.ft., 2 bdrm, 1 bath., vacation for your pet bedroom, on nearly 1 well maint., $17,000 too! Call today! acre, $1200 mo., 1 OBO, must be moved Tamron Stone year lease required, from Tumalo location, 541-215-5372 541-390-4213 503-523-7908.

Gentle Giant Animal Care

S0305 5X10 kk

Rentals

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 G3 671

To place your photo ad, visit us online at www.bendbulletin.com or call with questions, 541-385-5809

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G4 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

881

885

932

Travel Trailers

Canopies & Campers

Antique & Classic Autos

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, Lance 945 1995, 11’3”, all appl., solar panel, ‘69 Chevy C-20 Pickup, fuel station, exc cond. new battery, exc. cond., sleeps 8, black/gray all orig.Turbo 44; auto $5995, 541-977-3181 interior, used 3X, 4-spd,396, model CST $24,999. /all options, orig. owner, 541-389-9188 $24,000, 541-923-6049 882

Fifth Wheels

Autos & Transportation

900 908

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, fireplace, 2 flat screen TVs. $60,000. 541-480-3923

Fleetwood Wilderness 36’, 2005, 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, AC, W/D hkup beautiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380

Komfort 25’ 2006, 1 slide, AC, TV, awning. NEW: tires, converter, batteries. Hardly used. $16,500. 541-923-2595 Komfort 26’ 1996, sleeps 6, FSC, super slide, new tires, clean, $6500 OBO, 541-974-2660.

Aircraft, Parts & Service

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718 1/3 interest in wellequipped IFR Beech Bonanza A36, located KBDN. $55,000. 541-419-9510

Executive Hangar

at Bend Airport (KBDN) 60’ wide x 50’ deep, w/55’ wide x 17’ high bi-fold door. Natural gas heat, office, bathroom. Parking for 6 cars. Adjacent to Frontage Rd; great visibility for aviation bus. 1jetjock@q.com 541-948-2126 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through The Bulletin Classifieds

Montana 3400RL 2008, 4 slides, no smokers or pets, limited usage, 5500 watt Onan gen, ½ Interest in RV-9A solar panel, fireplace, 300 hr, RDM, glass $40K dual A/C, central vac, OBO. 541-923-2318 elect. awning w/sunscreen arctic pkg, rear receiver, alum wheels, 2 TVs, many extras. $35,500. 541-416-8087

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $37,500. 541-420-3250

Hit the road in this nice Open Road 37' ‘04 with 3 slides! W/D hook-up, large LR with rear window & desk area. $19,750 OBO (541) 280-7879

ONLY 1 OWNERSHIP SHARE LEFT! Economical flying in your own Cessna 172/180 HP for only $10,000! Based at BDN. Call Gabe at Professional Air! 541-388-0019 916

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

935

975

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Nissan Armada SE 2007, 4WD, auto, leather, DVD, CD. Vin#700432. $14,788.

Mazda 6 2010,

Ford Ranger 1999, 4x4, 2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend 71K, X-cab, XLT, 877-266-3821 auto, 4.0L, $7900 Dlr #0354 OBO. 541-388-0232

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $3131 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

Toyota 4Runner 4WD 1986, auto, 2 dr., $1200, 541-923-7384

Toyota 4-Runner 4x4 Ltd, 2006, Salsa Red pearl, 49,990 miles, exlnt cond, professionally detailed, $22,900. 541-390-7649

940 Chevy Wagon 1957, 4-dr., complete, Vans $15,000 OBO, trades, please call Nissan Titan Crewcab LE 2007, auto, Chevy 541-420-5453. Astro leather, nav., loaded. Cargo Van 2001, Chrysler 300 Coupe Vin #210963. pw, pdl, great cond., 1967, 440 engine, $18,999. business car, well auto. trans, ps, air, maint, regular oil frame on rebuild, rechanges, $4500, painted original blue, please call original blue interior, 2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend 541-633-5149 877-266-3821 original hub caps, exc. Dlr #0354 chrome, asking $9000 975 or make offer. Subaru Baja Turbo Automobiles 541-385-9350. Pickup 2006, manual, AWD, leather, preBuicks! 1996 Regal, mium wheels, moon87k; 1997 LeSabre, roof, tonneau cover. 112k; and others! Vin #103218. Chrysler SD 4-Door You’ll not find nicer $16,988. 1930, CDS Royal Buicks $4000 & up. Standard, 8-cylinder, One look’s worth a body is good, needs thousand words. Call some restoration, 2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend Bob, 541-318-9999. 877-266-3821 runs, taking bids, for an appt. and take a Dlr #0354 541-383-3888, drive in a 30 mpg. car 541-815-3318 Toyota Tundra 2010, Cadillac CTS Sedan double cab, 5.7 L, auto. 2007, 29K, auto, exc. VIN #157408 cond, loaded, $17,900 OBO, 541-549-8828 $29,495 Cadillac El Dorado 1994, Total cream puff, body, paint, trunk 541-647-2822 FIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, as showroom, blue HertzBend.com door panels w/flowers leather, $1700 wheels DLR4821 & hummingbirds, w/snow tires although white soft top & hard 935 car has not been wet top. Just reduced to in 8 years. On trip to Sport Utility Vehicles $3,750. 541-317-9319 Boise avg. 28.5 mpg., or 541-647-8483 $5400, 541-593-4016. Chevy Tahoe 1500 LS 2004, auto, 4X4, Cadillac Seville STS Vin #216330. $9,999. 2003 - just finished $4900 engine work by Certified GM me2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend chanic. Has every877-266-3821 thing but navigation. Ford Galaxie 500 1963, Dlr #0354 Too many bells and 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, whistles to list. I 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 bought a new one. 4x4. 120K mi, Power radio (orig),541-419-4989 seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd $6900 firm. Ford Mustang Coupe row seating, extra 541-420-1283 1966, original owner, tires, CD, privacy tintV8, automatic, great ing, upgraded rims. Where can you ind a shape, $9000 OBO. Fantastic cond. $7995 helping hand? 530-515-8199 Contact Timm at 541-408-2393 for info From contractors to or to view vehicle. Ford Ranchero yard care, it’s all here 1979 in The Bulletin’s Ford Escape 2006, with 351 Cleveland Limited edition, 57K “Call A Service modified engine. mi, $10,950 OBO, call Professional” Directory Body is in Rod at 541-647-1650. excellent condition, Chevy Aveo 2010 $2500 obo. Auto, fuel saver. 541-420-4677 VIN #118671

Diamond Reo Dump Truck 1974, 12-14 Find exactly what yard box, runs good, $6900, 541-548-6812 you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc. cond., $18,900, call 541-923-0231.

GMC Denali 2003

loaded with options. Exc. cond., snow tires and rims included. 130k hwy miles. $12,000. 541-419-4890.

Hummer H2 2003, auto, Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th 4X4, premium wheels, wheel, 1 slide, AC, 3rd seat, leather, grill TV,full awning, excelguard, lots of extras. lent shape, $23,900. Vin #113566. Econoline trailer 541-350-8629 $17,988. 16-Ton 29’ Bed, w/fold up ramps, elec. GMC ½ ton 1971, Only brakes, Pintlehitch, $19,700! Original low $4700, 541-548-6812 mile, exceptional, 3rd 2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend 877-266-3821 owner. 951-699-7171 Dlr #0354

541-647-2822 HertzBend.com DLR4821

Chrysler 300 C SRT8 2006, exc. cond., 43,800 mi.,, loaded, no DVD, $25,000, 541-977-4921.

Canopies & Campers

Chev Corvair Monza convertible,1964, new top & Camper Shell 1985, 8’x tranny, runs great, exlnt 73” wide, good cond, cruising car! $5500 obo. $50 obo. 541-678-5575. 541-420-5205

DLR4821

PORSCHE 914 1974, Roller (no engine), lowered, full roll cage, 5-pt harnesses, racing seats, 911 dash & instruments, decent shape, very cool! $1699. 541-678-3249

Porsche Carrera 1999 black metallic, 46k careful mi, beautiful, upgrades, Tiptronic. $20,000. 541-593-2394

Subaru Outback Wagon 2007, 2.5 manual, alloy wheels, AWD. Vin #335770. $16,999. 2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend 877-266-3821 Dlr #0354 Toyota Avalon 2001, $5500 941-735-1332 or 407-341-9824

Toyota Camry’s 1984, $1200 OBO, 1985 $1400 OBO, 1986 parts car, $500; call for details, 541-548-6592 Toyotas: 1999 Avalon 254k; 1996 Camry, 98k, 4 cyl. Lots of miles left in these cars. Price? You tell me! I’d guess $2000-$4000. Your servant, Bob at 541-318-9999, no charge for looking.

Volvo V70XC 2000,

3rd row seat, mounted studs, tow pkg, extras, $5000, 541.693.4764

Volvo XC70 Wagon 2007, 2.5T, Auto, AWD, leather, moonroof, alloy wheels. Vin #287220. $14,799 2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend 877-266-3821 Dlr #0354 WHEN YOU SEE THIS

On a classified ad go to www.bendbulletin.com to view additional photos of the item.

THE BETTER WAY TO BUY A CAR! ’10 Chevy Cobalt #110478A .......... $12,495

’11 Hyundai Accent GLS Automatic #619037 ............. $13,995

’10 Chevy Aveo AT, “Fuel Saver” #118671 ............. $13,995

’10 Nissan Sentra 4 DR Sedan, Great Fuel Saver #651104 ............. $14,695

Chrysler Sebring 2006 exc. cond, very low miles (38k), always garaged, transferable warranty incl. $9,100 541-330-4087

SOLD IN 30 DAYS!!

1500 2000, 4WD, auto, X-cab, heated leather seats, tow pkg, chrome brush guard, exc. cond., runs great, 130K mi., $9500, 541-389-5579.

541-647-2822 HertzBend.com

$13,995

Fiat 500 2012, Jeep Liberty 2002 4x4 Pilgrim International 2 dr., 2700 miles. low mi. #07401 2005, 36’ 5th Wheel, VIN #214043 $7,995 Mercury Monterrey Model#M-349 RLDS-5 $18,595 1965, Exc. All original, Fall price $21,865. Peterbilt 359 potable 4-dr. sedan, in storwater truck, 1990, 541-312-4466 age last 15 yrs., 390 3200 gal. tank, 5hp pump, 4-3" hoses, High Compression 541-647-2822 camlocks, $25,000. engine, new tires & li541-598-3750 HertzBend.com 541-820-3724 cense, reduced to aaaoregonautosource.com DLR4821 $2850, 541-410-3425. 925 Jeep Liberty Limited Ford Mustang GT 2007, 4X4, leather, Utility Trailers coupe 1995, manual, Regal Prowler AX6 Exnav., Vin #646827. 5.0L, premium treme Edition 38’ ‘05, $12,999. wheels. Vin #237331. 4 slides,2 fireplaces, all $2,999. maple cabs, king bed/ bdrm separated w/slide Big Tex Landscap2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend glass dr,loaded,always Plymouth Barracuda ing/ ATV Trailer, 877-266-3821 2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend garaged,lived in only 3 1966, original car! 300 dual axle flatbed, Dlr #0354 877-266-3821 mo,brand new $54,000, hp, 360 V8, center7’x16’, 7000 lb. Dlr #0354 still like new, $28,500, lines, (Original 273 GVW, all steel, will deliver,see rvt.com, eng & wheels incl.) Honda Accord EX 1997, $1400. ad#4957646 for pics. 541-593-2597 auto, moonroof, alloy 541-382-4115, or Cory, 541-580-7334 wheels, Vin #063075. 541-280-7024. PROJECT CARS: Chevy $3,999. Roadranger 27’ 1993, 2-dr FB 1949 & Chevy A/C, awning, sleeps 6, 931 Coupe 1950 - rolling Jeep Willys 1947,custom, exc. cond., used little, small block Chevy, PS, chassis’s $1750 ea., Automotive Parts, $4,495 OBO. OD,mags+ trailer.Swap 2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend Chevy 4-dr 1949, comService & Accessories 541-389-8963 plete car, $1949; Cafor backhoe.No am calls 877-266-3821 dillac Series 61 1950, 2 please. 541-389-6990 Dlr #0354 4 Michelin LT 245/75R16 dr. hard top, complete SPRINTER 36’ 2005, on Chev 8-hole whls, 1/3 w/spare front clip., $10,500 obo. Two tread $150 541-382-4537 $3950, 541-382-7391 slides, sleeps 5, queen air mattress, Wheels (4), new, 20x7.5, 933 “Please discontinue this small sgl. bed, couch GM,chrome, aluminum, ad as the vehicle has folds out. 1.5 baths, Pickups 6x132 $125, 390-8386 been sold. I am pleased 541-382-0865, Wheels, fit 215/65R16 leave message! to tell you that I had tires, 4 @ $15 ea. posted it on Craig’s List 541-948-4413 on 6 different locations Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, Murano but it was the Bulletin ad Nissan 932 SL-AWD 2004, 75k, 1995, extended cab, that sold it!” all-weather tires, tow long box, grill guard, Antique & pkg, gold metallic, running boards, bed Lee, G. Classic Autos beige leather int., rails & canopy, 178K Taurus 27.5’ 1988 moonroof, ......... miles, $4800 obo. Everything works, 208-301-3321 (Bend) $1750/partial trade for Want Results from qualified car. 541-460-9127 local buyers? Chevy Silverado 885

$15,995

Mercedes-Benz E320, 2001. Loaded. 196K miles. Runs great! $4700 OBO. Text 541-948-5552. I can Porsche Cayenne 2004, send pics Ford Super Duty F-250 86k, immac, dealer 2001, 4X4, very good Mitsubishi 3000 GT maint’d, loaded, now shape, V10 eng, $8500 1999, auto., pearl $17000. 503-459-1580 OBO. 541-815-9939 white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

Ford T-Bird 1966 390 engine, power everything, new paint, 54K original miles, runs great, excellent cond. in & out. Asking $8,500. 541-480-3179

auto, loaded. VIN #05673A

Call us at 541-385-5809 and ask about our Wheel Deal special!

www .bendbulletin

’10 Chevy Malibu 4 Dr, LT Sedan #246671 ............. $14,980

’10 Ford Focus

#293446.............. $14,995

’11 Suzuki SX-4 33 MPG! #302264 ............. $14,995

’10 Dodge Avenger R/T Sedan 37K Miles, Loaded! #177898 ............. $15,495

’10 Mazda 6 Automatic, Loaded #M05673A ......... $15,995

’12 Nissan Versa Automatic, 5-Door HB, Fuel Saver #358909A .......... $16,556

’11 Chrysler 200 Sedan Touring #553592 ............. $17,995

’11 Subaru Impreza AWD #511600A .......... $17,995

’09 Toyota Matrix AWD Only 28K Miles #009276A .......... $18,495

’12 Fiat 500 2 Dr, 2700 miles ........................... $18,595

’11 KIA Sedona 4 Dr, Blue #371299 ............. $18,650

’12 Hyundai Sonata 4 Dr Sedan, AT, Loaded #320628 ............. $19,461

’09 Subaru Legacy Sedan H4 Special Edition #235780 ............. $19,995

’07 Toyota F-J Cruiser Auto, Loaded, Only 44K Miles! #085835 ............. $26,295

’10 Toyota Tundra Double-cab, 5.71T, AT, Tow pack #157408 ............. $29,495

’11 Toyota Tacoma D-Cab V6, 4x4, Only 16k miles #078811 ............. $32,715

Through 9/19/12 All vehicles subject to prior sale, does not include tax, license or title and registration processing fee of $100. Vin#’s posted at dealership. See Hertz Car Sales of Bend for details. Dealer #4821

541-647-2822 535 NE Savannah Dr, Bend HertzBend.com

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

notice. Where to file LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE a claim and for more NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE OF SEIZURE information: Daina OF PERSONAL FOR CIVIL Vitolins, Crook County PROPERTY FORFEITURE TO ALL District Attorney OfBy virtue of a POTENTIAL fice, 300 NE Third landlord’s lien and lien CLAIMANTS AND TO Street, Prineville, OR for storage in the ALL UNKNOWN 97754. amount of PERSONS READ THIS Notice of reasons for $10,990.00, against CAREFULLY Forfeiture: The propMichael Bailey, Lois erty described below Bailey, and Cascade If you have any interwas seized for forfeiSwiss Products, Inc. est in the seized ture because it: (1) (”Tenant”), Howard property described Constitutes the proWhitson has levied on below, you must claim ceeds of the violation the property of Tenthat interest or you will of, solicitation to vioant described as folautomatically lose that late, attempt to violows: All machinery, interest. If you do not late, or conspiracy to equipment, tools and file a claim for the violates, the criminal assorted supporting property, the property laws of the State of instruments, trade may be forfeited even Oregon regarding the fixtures, and furniture if you are not conmanufacture, distribuof Cascade Swiss victed of any crime. tion, or possession of Products, Inc. Notice To claim an interest, controlled substances is hereby given that you must file a written (ORS Chapter475); on Friday, September claim with the forfeiand/or (2) Was used 28, 2012 at 1:00 p.m. ture counsel named or intended for use in at 61550 American below, The written committing or faciliLane, Unit #2, Bend, claim must be signed tating the violation of, OR 97701, Howard by you, sworn to unsolicitation to violate, Whitson will sell the der penalty of perjury attempt to violate, or described personal before a notary public, conspiracy to violate property to the highand state: (a) Your the criminal laws of est bidder for cash or true name; (b) The the State of Oregon certified check. Dated address at which you regarding the manuthis 24th day of Auwill accept future facture, distribution or gust 2012. Sarah E. mailings from the possession of conHarlos, OSB #08591, court and forfeiture trolled substances Of Attorneys for counsel; and (3) A (ORS Chapter 475). Howard Whitson. statement that you IN THE MATTER OF: have an interest in the LEGAL NOTICE U.S. Currency in the seized property. Your NOTICE OF SEIZURE amount of $4,978.00, deadline for filing the FOR CIVIL Case 12-115757 claim document with FORFEITURE TO ALL seized 6/13/2012 from forfeiture counsel POTENTIAL Gavin Fraser. named below is 21 CLAIMANTS AND TO days from the last day LEGAL NOTICE ALL UNKNOWN of publication of this NOTICE OF SEIZURE PERSONS READ THIS notice. Where to file FOR CIVIL CAREFULLY a claim and for more FORFEITURE TO ALL information: Daina POTENTIAL If you have any interVitolins, Crook County CLAIMANTS AND TO est in the seized District Attorney OfALL UNKNOWN property described fice, 300 NE Third PERSONS READ THIS below, you must claim Street, Prineville, OR CAREFULLY that interest or you will 97754. Notice of reaautomatically lose that sons for Forfeiture: If you have any interinterest. If you do not The property deest in the seized file a claim for the scribed below was property described property, the property seized for forfeiture below, you must claim may be forfeited even because it: (1) Conthat interest or you will if you are not constitutes the proceeds automatically lose that victed of any crime. of the violation of, sointerest. If you do not To claim an interest, licitation to violate, file a claim for the you must file a written attempt to violate, or property, the property claim with the forfeiconspiracy to violates, may be forfeited even ture counsel named the criminal laws of if you are not conbelow, The written the State of Oregon victed of any crime. claim must be signed regarding the manuTo claim an interest, by you, sworn to unfacture, distribution, or you must file a written der penalty of perjury possession of conclaim with the forfeibefore a notary public, trolled substances ture counsel named and state: (a) Your (ORS Chapter 475); below, The written true name; (b) The and/or (2) Was used claim must be signed address at which you or intended for use in by you, sworn to unwill accept future committing or facilider penalty of perjury mailings from the tating the violation of, before a notary public, court and forfeiture solicitation to violate, and state: (a) Your counsel; and (3) A attempt to violate, or true name; (b) The statement that you conspiracy to violate address at which you have an interest in the the criminal laws of will accept future seized property. Your the State of Oregon mailings from the deadline for filing the regarding the manucourt and forfeiture claim document with facture, distribution or counsel; and (3) A forfeiture counsel possession of constatement that you named below is 21 trolled substances have an interest in the days from the last day (ORS Chapter 475). seized property. Your of publication of this IN THE MATTER OF: deadline for filing the notice. Where to file U.S. Currency in the claim document with a claim and for more amount of forfeiture counsel information: Daina $14,522.00, and a named below is 21 Vitolins, Crook County 2003 Chrysler PT days from the last day District Attorney OfCruiser, Blue, CA of publication of this fice, 300 NE Third plates 6TNK468, VIN notice. Where to file Street, Prineville, OR 3C4FY48B13T593732, a claim and for more 97754. Notice of reaCase No. information: Daina sons for Forfeiture: 2012-145376 seized Vitolins, Crook County The property de7/19/12 from Juan District Attorney Ofscribed below was Pablo Jacobo Lopez fice, 300 NE Third seized for forfeiture and Daniel Silva-Ortiz. Street, Prineville, OR because it: (1) Con97754. LEGAL NOTICE stitutes the proceeds Notice of reasons for of the violation of, so- NOTICE OF SEIZURE Forfeiture: The propFOR CIVIL licitation to violate, erty described below attempt to violate, or FORFEITURE TO ALL was seized for forfeiPOTENTIAL conspiracy to violates, ture because it: (1) the criminal laws of CLAIMANTS AND TO Constitutes the proALL UNKNOWN the State of Oregon ceeds of the violation regarding the manu- PERSONS READ THIS of, solicitation to vioCAREFULLY facture, distribution, or late, attempt to viopossession of conlate, or conspiracy to If you have any intertrolled substances violates, the criminal est in the seized (ORS Chapter 475); laws of the State of property described and/or (2) Was used Oregon regarding the below, you must claim or intended for use in manufacture, distributhat interest or you will committing or facilition, or possession of automatically lose that tating the violation of, controlled substances interest. If you do not solicitation to violate, (ORS Chapter475); file a claim for the attempt to violate, or and/or (2) Was used property, the property conspiracy to violate or intended for use in may be forfeited even the criminal laws of committing or faciliif you are not conthe State of Oregon tating the violation of, victed of any crime. regarding the manusolicitation to violate, To claim an interest, facture, distribution or attempt to violate, or you must file a written possession of conconspiracy to violate claim with the forfeitrolled substances the criminal laws of ture counsel named (ORS Chapter 475). the State of Oregon below, The written IN THE MATTER OF: regarding the manuclaim must be signed U.S. Currency in the facture, distribution or by you, sworn to unamount of $1,011.00, possession of conder penalty of perjury Case No. 12-85340 trolled substances before a notary public, seized 5/2/12 from (ORS Chapter 475). and state: (a) Your Jeremy Taylor. IN THE MATTER OF: true name; (b) The U.S. Currency in the address at which you Call a Pro amount of $4,960.00 will accept future Case 12-0692, seized mailings from the Whether you need a 06/08/2012 from Clay court and forfeiture fence ixed, hedges Jamison and Amber counsel; and (3) A trimmed or a house Treat. statement that you have an interest in the built, you’ll ind seized property. Your professional help in deadline for filing the The Bulletin’s “Call a claim document with Find It in forfeiture counsel The Bulletin Classifieds! Service Professional” named below is 21 Directory 541-385-5809 days from the last day 541-385-5809 of publication of this

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Bulletin Daily Paper 09/13/12