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Thursday August 30, 2012

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AT THE CONVENTION

Walden arrives to rally Oregon delegation By Andrew Clevenger The Bulletin

TAMPA, Fla. — With the Republican National Convention in full swing Wednesday, Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, made the rounds, not to step into the spotlight but to rally the OrInside egon GOP. • Mitt Walden, the Romney deputy chair gets ready of National for his big Republican speech, A4 Congressional • Paul Ryan Committee, says Obama has risen into is ‘adrift,’ House leaderA5 ship since his friend John Boehner, ROhio, became speaker of the House in 2011. For Walden, Mitt Romney’s choice of House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan for the Republican vice president spot is high praise for the way Republican leadership in the House has conducted its business. And Ryan agrees. “(Ryan) said the other day on a conference call with my colleagues that this is really confirmational of how the House has led, that his selection really confirmed that the House was where dynamic new leadership was emerging,” Walden said Wednesday during an interview with The Bulletin. See Convention / A4

Judah, a 5-month-old puppy, sits in his kennel at the Humane Society of Central Oregon.

Troya, a 3-year-old labradoodle, and Judah are owned by Jeff and Lisa Penter of La Pine.

A canine

acquittal

Correction In a story headlined “Getting away from our roots,” which appeared Wednesday, Aug. 29, on Page A1, incorrect dates were listed for the recently canceled Bend Roots Revival. The event was scheduled Sept. 27-30. The Bulletin regrets the error.

TOP NEWS ISAAC: Rural areas get worst of the storm, A3 SYRIA: Assad says war could last long time, A3 TODAY’S WEATHER More sunshine High 79, Low 42 Page C6

INDEX Business E1-4 Calendar B3 Classified G1-4 Comics B4-5 Crosswords B5, G2 Dear Abby B3 Editorials C4 Health F1-6

Horoscope B3 Local News C1-6 Obituaries C5 Oregon News C3 Outing B1-6 Sports D1-6 Stocks E2-3 TV & Movies B2

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Revenue forecast brightens for Bend • Stability in housing market seen as key to Central Oregon’s recovery By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

SALEM — Central Oregon continues to be dragged down by the slow housing market, but state economists are forecasting significant improvements in the region by late 2013. “Bend and Central Oregon are really bouncing along the bottom,” state “Bend and Central economist Mark McMul- Oregon are really len said Wednesday after presenting the state’s bouncing along revenue forecast, a pro- the bottom. jection made quarterly to We’ve seen some state legislators. “We’ve seen some im- improvements, provements, along the along the lines lines of the housing mar- of the housing ket, but so far, nothing market, but so too drastic.” Because Bend was hit far, nothing too harder, it’s taken longer drastic.” to recover compared to other cities of similar — Mark McMullen, size across the U.S. since Oregon state economist the downturn. “Of course, (it’s all) tied to the housing market. It was just so extreme there,” McMullen said of Bend. But with the housing market showing signs of stabilizing, the state economist said the belief is young, working-age individuals will once again eye Bend as a viable place to live. “With improvements in the job market, the hope is we’ll see the flow (back to) Bend and it will help accelerate growth,” he said. “Most of our models are saying that will happen in late 2013 or early 2014.” See Revenue / A5

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Lisa and Jeff Penter listen as members of the Deschutes County Dog Control Board question the responding sheriff’s deputy during a hearing Wednesday evening at the Deschutes Service Center Building about photos the deputy had taken of the Penters’ dogs, which are believed to have killed a chicken.

• Two labradoodles from La Pine will be going home after the county dog board finds their owners not liable for the death of a chicken By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Two dogs implicated for recently killing a chicken in La Pine will be going home, a rarity for animals brought before the Deschutes County Dog Board. The three-member dog board ruled Wednesday that a 3-year-old Labradoodle and her 5-month-old puppy found standing over a dead chicken Sunday were most likely let out of their fenced yard by unidentified persons. As a result, owners Lisa and Jeff Penter could not be held responsible for the death of a chicken roughly 36 hours after they discovered their dogs were missing. State law sets strict penalties for dogs that kill livestock due to the negligence of their owners. First-time offenders must be adopted out, relocated or put down, and a second-time offender faces a mandatory death penalty. Lisa Penter said she was relieved, and is planning to get a lock for her gate as soon as she gets her dogs home.

John Larrity, an attorney with Deschutes County who helps oversee the dog board’s meetings, said the board does not drop all charges against a dog believed to have killed livestock very often. However, he said given the Penters’ credible explanation of how someone must have let their dogs out, a full acquittal seemed the only way to resolve the case. Exactly what happened to the dogs over the course of three days last weekend remains a mystery. The Penters told the board they arrived home in La Pine late Friday after going to the ZZ Top concert at the Les Schwab Amphitheater in Bend. Lisa Penter discovered two of their dogs were missing early the next morning, and began checking Craigslist for reports of found dogs and making fliers to post around her neighborhood. Because the dogs were incapable of jumping over their 4-foot fence and there were no holes in the fence, Lisa Penter suspected the dogs had been stolen. See Dogs / A5

Bin Laden posed no threat, a SEAL team leader writes By Joby Warrick The Washington Post

Osama bin Laden hid in his bedroom for at least 15 minutes as Navy SEALs battled their way through his Pakistani compound, making no attempt to arm himself before a U.S. commando shot him as he peeked from his doorway, according to the first published account by a participant in the now-famous raid on May 2, 2011. The account, in a book by one of the SEAL team leaders, sheds new light on the al-Qaeda chief’s final moments. In the account, bin Laden appears neither to surrender nor to directly challenge the special forces troops who killed his son and two associates as they worked their way to his third-floor apartment. A White House narrative of the raid had acknowledged that bin Laden was unarmed when he was killed but suggested that he posed a threat to the U.S. commandos. See Book / A2

Pre-Columbian ruins spark modern-day protest By Anne-Marie O’Connor Special to The Washington Post

MEXICO CITY— Mexicans are taught to revere their pre-Columbian roots. So some archaeologists are outraged by what they view as the government’s failure to safeguard the nation’s Mayan palaces and Aztec pyramids.

A recent decision by the government to erect a glass and steel facade on a portion of the historic Fort of Guadalupe in Puebla in time for the Sept. 15 Mexican independence celebrations was the last straw. The archaeologists have occupied Mexico’s prestigious National Museum of Anthropology, telling museum-goers that taking lib-

erties with federally protected buildings was becoming commonplace. The late-summer tourists who flock to the Chapultepec Park institution are greeted by banners, petitions and angry anthropologists with megaphones. A barefoot Mayan-speaking researcher in a white tunic blows into a conch shell to announce speeches in

the lobby. The occupying scientists have also declared: Admission is free. Archaeologists are tweeting about “aggressions against patrimony” and using Facebook to decry tacky tourist development and New Age spectacles that they say will ruin the ruins. See Protest / A5


THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

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Book Continued from A1 The depiction of an apparently passive bin Laden is among dozens of the revelations in the book, “No Easy Day,” which chronicles the raid in minute and often harrowing detail, from the nearly disastrous helicopter crash in the opening seconds to the shots fired into bin Laden’s twitching body as he lay apparently dead from a gunshot wound to the temple. The book also has provided fresh ammunition for partisans in the long-simmering controversy over the Obama administration’s handling of the raid’s aftermath. Author Matt Bissonnette’s account, written without Pentagon or White House approval, is being published at a time when the administration is cracking down on unauthorized leaks while also fending off accusations that it sought to exploit the success of the raid by offering unusual access to filmmakers. Republicans have sought to diminish Obama’s most significant counterterrorism achievement by accusing the White House of selectively leaking details about the raid to ensure a favorable portrayal of the president. Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney has decried such leaks as “contemptible” and called for an independent investigation. The White House has denied authorizing the release of classified information for political gain.

Obama credited Bissonnette, who retired last year, writes that the commandos knew instinctively that their successful mission would be exploited for political purposes. “We just got this guy reelected,” Bissonnette quotes one of his SEAL comrades as saying of Obama in the hours after the team returned to their base in Afghanistan. At the same time, Bissonnette credits Obama for having the courage to order the raid, and he describes being impressed by the president’s understated speech announcing the al-Qaeda leader’s death to the world. “None of us were huge fans of Obama,” Bissonnette writes in the book. “We respected him as the commander-inchief of the military and for giving us the green light on the mission.” In a “CBS Evening News” clip from a segment of “60 Minutes” scheduled to air Sunday, Bissonnette said the book was not intended to be political. “You know, if these crazies on either side of the aisle want to make it political, shame on them,” he said. “This a book is about September 11th and it needs to rest on September 11th, not be brought into the political arena.” The book, which Bissonnette wrote under the pseudonym Mark Owen, is scheduled for publication next week. The book presents what is by far the most intimate account of the high-stakes assault on bin Laden’s hideout, from the weeks of training by the SEALs at a secret base in North Carolina to the team’s race to return to Afghanistan ahead of Pakistani military jets that were scrambled to intercept the intruders. It also provides fresh and often colorful details of a mission that has been reconstructed repeatedly over the past 16 months, from bin Laden’s personal grooming and housekeeping to the frantic efforts to verify the alQaeda leader’s identity as he lay in pool of blood near wailing and shell-shocked family members.

Criticism from Pentagon Bissonnette asserts in an author’s note that he revealed no classified information in the book. He says he took “great pains to protect the tactics, techniques and procedures” of U.S. special forces teams and to conceal the identities of his active-duty comrades. Still, his decision to write an unauthorized account has drawn criticism from Pentagon officials who decried the break with a time-honored

TODAY It’s Thursday, Aug. 30, the 243rd day of 2012. There are 123 days left in the year.

HAPPENINGS • Mitt Romney delivers his speech accepting the Republican Party nomination as its candidate for president of the United States. A5

IN HISTORY Dutton via The Associated Press

The book-jacket image of “No Easy Day,” by Matt Bissonnette, using the pseudonym Mark Owen, with Kevin Maurer.

The Associated Press file photo

Al Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, the target of the Navy SEAL raid into Pakistan detailed in the new book “No Easy Day,” an eyewitness account of the raid. Some of the details in the book contradict official versions reported by the Obama Administration.

tradition of secrecy by the elite SEAL unit that carried out the raid. Officials were described as “livid” over the book when they learned of it, according to a military contractor who has worked for U.S. Special Operations Command and who spoke on the condition of anonymity. But on Wednesday, as news media published the first excerpts from the book, such criticisms were conspicuously absent. Defense officials, who received a copy of the manuscript Saturday, declined to take issue with Bissonnette’s account and gave no signals that they intend to take punitive action against him. Unlike the CIA’s strict censorship requirements for its officers, the Navy has no rule requiring former service members to submit a book to authorities for pre-publication review. Administration officials privately expressed surprise over details that they said contradicted official after-action reports about the raid. But a spokesman for the White House’s National Security Council declined to take issue with the author or his narrative. “As President Obama said on the night that justice was brought to Osama bin Laden, ‘We give thanks for the men who carried out this operation, for they exemplify the professionalism, patriotism, and unparalleled courage of those who serve our country,’ ” said the spokesman, Tommy Vietor.

Weeks of training In the book, Bissonnette says he was motivated to write in part to clear up inaccuracies in official and published accounts of the raid. His version of events is largely consistent with the amended accounts offered by White House officials in the days after bin Laden’s death. The author describes weeks of training, using elaborately produced, full-scale models of bin Laden’s compound. He describes seeing CIA surveillance video of a figure believed to be bin Laden — a man dubbed “the Pacer” because of his habitual strolls inside the compound’s high walls. A CIA operative assigned to the case assured the SEALs that the agency was “100 percent” certain that the mysterious stroller was bin Laden, though White House officials would later acknowledge doubts about whether the intelligence was reliable. The question of whether the terrorist leader would be killed or captured came up in briefings, Bissonnette writes. At one point, a government lawyer — perhaps a White House or Defense Department official — makes clear that “this wasn’t an assassination,” the author says. “If he is naked with his hands up, you’re not going to engage him,” Bissonnette

quotes the lawyer saying. “I am not going to tell you how to do your job. What we’re saying is, if he does not pose a threat, you will detain him.”

Taking no chances But according to the book, the SEALs decided to take no chances as they confronted the dark-bearded man who peered at them from his doorway on the villa’s third floor. By then, the raid was 15 minutes old and the occupants of the house had long been alerted to the presence of the team after multiple shootouts and the explosions from doorbreaching charges on the lower floors.

Crouching a few feet behind the point man in the assault team, Bissonnette knew that his team could be walking into an ambush because bin Laden “had plenty of time to strap on a suicide vest or simply get his gun.” The lead SEAL fired at the man, who disappeared into the dark room behind him. Cautiously entering the room with guns drawn, the SEALs saw bin Laden lying at the foot of a bed with two women standing over him. He had been shot in the head and blood was pooling beneath him. Bissonnette and other SEALs fired more rounds into bin Laden’s chest to make certain he was dead. Only later, during a search of the room, did he discover a pair of guns on a shelf near the door where bin Laden had been standing. Both were empty, Bissonnette wrote. “He hadn’t even prepared a defense,” the retired SEAL recalled. “He had no intention of fighting. He asked his followers for decades to wear suicide vests or fly planes into buildings, but he didn’t even pick up his weapon.”

Highlights: In 1905, Ty Cobb made his major-league debut as a player for the Detroit Tigers, hitting a double in his first at-bat in a game against the New York Highlanders. In 1997, Americans received word of the car crash in Paris that claimed the lives of Princess Diana, Dodi Fayed and their driver, Henri Paul. Ten years ago: With just hours to spare, baseball averted a strike; it was the first time since 1970 that players and owners had agreed to a new collective bargaining agreement without a work stoppage. Five years ago: In a serious breach of nuclear security, a B-52 bomber armed with six nuclear warheads flew crosscountry unnoticed; the Air Force later punished 70 people. One year ago: National Guard helicopters rushed food and water to a dozen cut-off Vermont towns after the rainy remnants of Hurricane Irene washed out roads and bridges.

BIRTHDAYS Actor Bill Daily is 85. Actress Elizabeth Ashley is 73. Actor Ben Jones is 71. Cartoonist R. Crumb is 69. Olympic gold medal skier Jean-Claude Killy is 69. Actress Peggy Lipton is 65. Comedian Lewis Black is 64. Actor Timothy Bottoms is 61. Actress Cameron Diaz is 40. — From wire reports


T S Attacks show power of Libyan extremists

N   B India court convicts 32 for 2002 rioting MADURAI, India — In a court case that has provided a grim reminder of the sectarian violence that has haunted India since its birth, 32 people were convicted Wednesday of participating in riots between Hindus and Muslims that followed the burning of a train in western Gujarat state in 2002. Sentencing is expected on Friday, with the prosecution demanding the death penalty. Legal experts expect most of those convicted to receive at least several years in prison given the high-profile nature of the case, stemming from riots that took the lives of more than 1,000 people, most of them Muslims. There were originally 62 defendants; 29 were acquitted, and one died during the lengthy trial. Separately, India’s Supreme Court affirmed the death sentence Wednesday for Ajmal Amir Kasab, 25, the lone surviving gunman in the 2008 Mumbai attack that killed 166 people.

Salmonella linked to tainted mangoes LOS ANGELES — Recent cases of salmonella infection in California are part of a cluster of cases in several states and Canada that appear to be linked to tainted mangoes, health officials say. At least 73 Californians have been sickened in recent weeks by salmonella Braenderup, according to the California Department of Public Health. The source of the problematic fruit and specific brands have not yet been identified. But the cases involve the same bacterial strain as in a recent outbreak in Canada, a state health department spokesman said. In those cases, Canadian authorities have warned people not to eat Daniella brand mangoes, which are grown in Mexico. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency said several people became ill after eating the fruit.

West Nile cases jump 40% in week West Nile virus cases are up 40 percent since last week and may rival the record years of 2002 and 2003, federal health officials said Wednesday. So far this year, 1,590 cases of the mosquito-borne disease have been reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and 66 deaths. About half of the cases are serious illnesses, and the CDC considers those the best indicator of West Nile activity because many mild cases do not get reported and their symptoms may not even be recognized. Typical symptoms are fever, headache and body aches, and most people get better on their own in a few days..

Defendant in rape case flees court LIBERTY, Texas — An arrest warrant has been issued after a man being tried on charges he took part in the repeated sexual assault of a young Texas girl didn’t come back to court after a break. Testimony continued Wednesday in the trial of Eric McGowen despite the 20-year-old’s absence. A court official says state District Judge Mark Morefield is drafting a bench warrant for McGowen’s arrest. McGowen didn’t come back after an afternoon break that followed the testimony of two co-defendants who pleaded guilty in the case. McGowen is one of 20 men and boys accused in attacks on the girl. — From wire reports

By Mel Frykberg McClatchy Newspapers

David Grunfeld / The Times-Picayune via The Associated Press

A vehicle lies crushed in New Orleans after a house collapsed on it Wednesday during the height of the Hurricane Isaac. Two other vehicles were also destroyed.

Isaac sends roaring wind, heavy rain to rural areas By Cain Burdeau and Michael Kunzelman The Associated Press

GULFPORT, Miss. — Hurricane Isaac sidestepped New Orleans on Wednesday, sending the worst of its howling wind and heavy rain into a cluster of rural fishing villages that had few defenses against the slow-moving storm that could bring days of unending rain. Isaac arrived exactly seven years after Hurricane Katrina and passed slightly to the west of New Orleans, where the city’s fortified levee system easily handled the assault. The city’s biggest problems seemed to be downed power lines, scattered tree limbs and minor flooding. Just one person was reported killed, compared with 1,800 deaths from Katrina in Louisiana and Mississippi. And police reported few problems with looting. Mayor Mitch Landrieu ordered a dusk-to-dawn curfew just to be sure. But in Plaquemines Parish, a sparsely populated area south of the city that is outside the federal levee system, dozens of people were stranded in flooded coastal areas and had to be rescued. The storm

pushed water over an 18-mile levee and put so much pressure on it that authorities planned to intentionally puncture the floodwall to relieve the strain. “I’m getting text messages from all over asking for help,” said Joshua Brockhaus, an electrician who was rescuing neighbors in his boat. “I’m dropping my dogs off, and I’m going back out there.” By midafternoon, Isaac had been downgraded to a tropical storm. The Louisiana National Guard wrapped up rescue operations in Plaquemines Parish, saying they felt confident they had gotten everyone out and there were no serious injuries but would stay in the area over the coming days to help, National Guard spokesman Capt. Lance Cagnolatti said. Isaac’s maximum sustained winds had decreased to 60 mph by Wednesday evening. Even at its strongest, Isaac was far weaker than Hurricane Katrina, which crippled New Orleans in 2005. Because Isaac’s coiled bands of rain and wind were moving at only 6 mph — about the pace of a brisk walk — the threat of storm surges and flooding was expected to last into a second

night as the immense commashaped system crawled across Louisiana. “We didn’t think it was going to be like that,” Brockhaus said. “The storm stayed over the top of us. For Katrina, we got 8 inches of water. Now we have 13 feet.” In Plaquemines Parish, about two dozen people who defied evacuation orders needed to be rescued. The stranded included two police officers whose car became stuck. “I think a lot of people were caught with their pants down,” said Jerry Larpenter, sheriff in nearby Terrebonne Parish. “This storm was never predicted right since it entered the Gulf. It was supposed to go to Florida, Panama City, Biloxi, New Orleans. We hope it loses its punch once it comes in all the way.” The storm knocked out power to as many as 700,000 people, stripped branches off trees and flattened fields of sugar cane so completely that they looked as if a tank had driven over them. Plaquemines Parish ordered a mandatory evacuation for the west bank of the Mississippi below Belle Chasse because of worries about a storm surge.

SYRIA

Assad: War may be drawn out By Hamza Hendawi and Bassem Mroue The Associated Press

BEIRUT — In a striking admission, President Bashar Assad said in an interview broadcast Wednesday that his armed forces will need time to defeat the rebels and addressed the string of defections from his authoritarian regime. The comments amounted to an acknowledgment that even though the opposition lacks the government’s tanks and airplanes, their tenacity and tactical creativity — combined with the military’s struggle to fight on multiple fronts — have yielded a stalemate that could prolong the civil war with many more dead. Over the past few months, Syria’s military has increasingly been stretched thin fighting on multiple fronts against rebels seeking to oust Assad. His forces have been unable to quell the rebellion as it spread to the capital, Damascus, with significant clashes that began in July and to Syria’s largest city, Aleppo, a few weeks later. At the same time, the military is fighting smaller scale battles in a string of other cities and towns around the country. “We are fighting a regional and global war, so time is needed to win it,” Assad said in an interview with the proregime private TV station Dunya. “We are moving forward. The situation is practically better but it has not been decided yet. That takes time,” he told the station, which is majority owned by Rami Makhlouf, a cousin of Assad and one of

Syria’s wealthiest men. “If the armed forces wanted to use the entire range of its firepower, it can wipe out many areas. But this will be unacceptable,” said Assad. Assad also appeared to make light of the significant number of defections, some of them senior military and political officials, including the prime minister.

“Defections are a positive process. Generally, it is selfcleansing of the state and the nation,” said Assad. “If there is a Syrian citizen who knows of someone who wishes to flee but is hesitant to do so he should encourage him,” he said with a smile. “Whoever flees is either weak or bad. A patriotic or a good person does not flee.”

TRIPOLI, Libya — An estimated 200 heavily armed Islamists destroyed 30 graves at a historic Turkish school in Tripoli’s old city early Wednesday and an unspecified number of other mosques also were attacked, further signs that Libya’s NATO-installed government is facing a major challenge from extremists less than a month after the first elections in this country in 50 years. Details of the destruction at the Othman Pasha Madrassa, a boarding school, were sparse, but school staff said the attackers also damaged as many as 1,000 books they found on the premises and destroyed a tree that the attackers said people had been worshiping in contravention of Islamic teachings. The attack at the school, which was founded in the 19th century by a Turkish official who is now buried there along with members of his family, was another in a string of assaults that have targeted mosques and other sites associated with Sufism, a mystical brand of Islam that some conservative Muslims consider heretical. Members of the police and the Supreme Security Committee, an amalgamation of militias that is the country’s military, stood guard and watched as armed Salafists, followers of a fundamentalist strain of Islam, razed Tripoli’s Sidi Shaab Mosque and the Abdel Salam al Asmar shrine in Zlitan, 100 miles east of Tripoli, over the weekend. Who exactly is behind the attacks is unclear. The IHS global information company, which specializes in geopolitical risk and security issues, tied the rise of armed Salafist groups in Libya to a broader trend of radical Islamism in the region.

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

Oregon’s delegation gets visits from VIPs By Andrew Clevenger The Bulletin

TAMPA — Before they returned to the convention floor for their official duties, Oregon’s delegates received visits Wednesday from powerful and influential political and business leaders. In the morning, House Speaker John Boehner, ROhio, spoke to the Oregon and Illinois delegations, which are staying in the same hotel in Clearwater. Boehner heaped praise on Paul Ryan, his House colleague whom Mitt Romney chose as his running mate. Boehner said he has known Ryan since the Wisconsin congressman was a 20-year-old student at Miami University in Ohio who helped place yard signs during the speaker’s first campaign. Ryan is well-versed on the economic problems facing the country, particularly its spiraling debt, he said. “But that’s only half the battle,” Boehner said. “The other half of the battle is we’ve got to grow our economy and put more Americans back to work. And I think Paul Ryan knows more about our pro-growth economic policy than almost anybody in the Congress.” But ultimately, Ryan’s selection as the vice presidential nominee says more about Mitt Romney than it does about Ryan. “It says to all of us that we’re going to be on offense throughout this campaign,” he said. Initially, Democrats celebrated Ryan’s selection because they wanted to tie Romney to House Republicans. But when they realized talking about Ryan’s plan to save Medicare was a political loser, they backed off, he said. “We have a plan that will actually save Medicare. They have no plan,” he said. “They can be critical of our plan, but where’s their plan?” Boehner called Romney and Ryan a “perfect team” to defeat Barack Obama. “We need some real leaders who will get the job done. The

Romney’s acceptance speech to be refined up to last minute

2 Oregon delegates run for Congress

By Philip Rucker

TAMPA, Fla. — The Oregon delegation includes two candidates who are running for the House of Representatives in November. Art Robinson is challenging Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Springfield, in the 4th Congressional District, while Fred Thompson is running against Rep. Kurt Schrader in the 5th District. • While visiting the Oregon delegates at their hotel in Clearwater, Rep. Greg Walden ran into Luis Fortuno, governor of Puerto Rico and former colleague in the House of Representatives. The two friends greeted each other warmly, and after chatting for a few minutes, Walden paused to record a campaign soundbite: “Vote Fortuno!” Fortuno was a featured speaker during Wednesday night’s program. • Speaking in front of the Oregon and Illinois delegations, Walden noted that the two states shared a storied history going back to Abraham Lincoln. Before he was elected president, Lincoln was offered the governorship but turned it down, not wanting to risk his fortunes in the wilderness, Walden said. But Lincoln’s friend, Edward Dickinson Baker (who won the nomination for a seat in Congress over Lincoln in 1844) did move West and was elected to represent Oregon in the U.S. Senate in 1860. Baker later became the only active member of Congress to be killed in combat while serving in the Union Army during the Civil War. “Leave it to an Oregonian to give us a lesson on Illinois history!” joked Illinois GOP chair Pat Brady. • Vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan will visit Oregon shortly after the convention with a trip to Portland on Sept. 10. Walden said he plans to join his friend and House colleague for lunch.

TAMPA, Fla. — When it comes to writing speeches, the Republican who would be president of the United States is a tinkerer. And not just a tinkerer. Mitt Romney is a deadlinepushing tinkerer whose mantra is that no speech is finished until after it’s delivered. Romney takes extensive notes in his journal, peppers his aides with questions about specifics, and transmits speech versions back and forth to his advisers late into the night. It’s become a joke among some of Romney’s senior aides that the worst job on the campaign is to be Romney’s speechwriter. In a campaign organization that has grown exponentially, it’s speechwriting in which Romney’s inner micromanager reveals itself. An English major in college, Romney is a voracious reader and is particular about the words he utters, advisers say. He obsesses and fine-tunes, for speeches consequential and trivial, on airplanes and in hotel suites. A business executive close to Romney said the candidate approaches speechwriting as he would constructing a persuasive essay. So it is that as Romney prepared to deliver the most important speech of his political career Thursday night at the Republican National Convention, he spent months reading past nominating and inaugural speeches (including President Barack Obama’s) and biographies. By the middle of last week, as the guts of the speech were coming together, he asserted, in a conversation with an associate, “I still have to write it.” On Friday, Romney told radio host Hugh Hewitt, “Mine is still a work in progress, kind of early stage.” Over the weekend, Romney took two days off the campaign trail to finish his drafts and rehearse with teleprompters at his New Hampshire getaway home. When reporters asked him after one rehearsal for a sneak peak of his speech, Romney previewed just five words: “Thank you, ladies and gentlemen.” He was laughing. All week, advisers were chiming in on this line or that line. One of them said that Romney will keep tinkering until just before he steps onto the Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired convention stage shortly after 10 EDT tonight — because, well, “he just likes to tinker.” Romney’s chief political strategist, Stuart Stevens, has been at his side all week. Stevens helped Romney’s wife, Ann, write her widely lauded convention speech on Tuesday night, and he is doing the same for Romney. Romney has an expanding speechwriting shop that helps him prepare his remarks, including Lindsay Hayes, a one-time speechwriter for Sarah Palin, and Matthew Scully, a former speechwriter for President George W. Bush, who also worked on Palin’s convention address in 2008. But the big speeches fall under Stevens’ purview, and he and Romney have developed a rapport trading versions between their iPads. Romney and Stevens

— Andrew Clevenger

president’s economic policies have failed. They’ve actually made things worse,” he said. “The American people want somebody who will fix our economy. There’s nobody who knows more about creating jobs, nobody who knows more about how the government can get in the way of private sector job creation, than Mitt Romney.” Over lunch, Intel President and CEO Paul Otellini told the delegates that while 75 percent of company sales are abroad, 75 percent of Intel’s manufacturing is done domestically. Intel is Oregon’s largest private employer, with 17,000 employees, including two members of the Oregon delegation, Lucas Willms and Douglas Harms, at the company’s Ronler Acres Campus in Hillsboro. When the contractors and temporary employees involved in building D1X, a new research and development facility, are added that number approaches 35,000.

Convention Continued from A1 “And he wasn’t speaking about himself — it was much bigger than just him.” Walden is effusive in his praise of Ryan, who was first elected to Congress in 1998, the same year as Walden. Walden rattled off words like smart, likeable, articulate, persuasive and real to describe his friend. “He can go as deep in the weeds as you need to go on just about any policy problem,” he said. “He can also discuss it in terms that the rest of us can understand.” More importantly, Ryan has energized Republicans in Oregon, who have been energized by the chemistry between Romney and Ryan that has emerged since Ryan joined the ticket. “What I’m finding and feeling in Oregon is Republicans are really fired up now that Paul Ryan’s on the ticket,” he said. Ryan’s selection wasn’t a calculated decision designed to shore up an area where Romney is weak, the way John F. Kennedy chose longtime Texas Sen. Lyndon B. Johnson to help with problems appealing to southern voters, he said. “This isn’t that. These are people who are feeding on each other because they want to solve problems. If that’s the message that gets through the clutter, Americans will like that message,” he said. Ryan’s selection has opened the door for Independents and wavering Democrats to reconsider voting for the Republican candidates, he said. Walden sat in House Speaker John Boehner’s box as Ryan’s speech at the convention drew roars from a raucous crowd late Wednesday. “It’s only gotten stronger, both personally and professionally,” he said of his relationship with Boehner. “When he asked me to chair the (his transition team) a couple of years ago, I didn’t really know what all that meant. And I’m not sure he

THE CANDIDATE PREPARES

Andrew Clevenger / The Bulletin

Rep. Greg Walden speaks to the Oregon and Illinois delegations Wednesday.

did. But he began to give me tasks and duties, and I began to put my shoulder into them and to work hard at it, and he liked the product.” In addition to running for reelection — Walden has held town halls this year in each county in his district — he remains focused on helping other Republican candidates win or hold seats in the House. “I’ve been in the majority and I’ve been in the minority. I can get a lot more done for Oregon and for Eastern and Central Oregon, in the majority than I was able to do in the minority,” he said. Walden conceded that remarks by Missouri Rep. Todd Akin, who is trying to unseat Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill, suggesting that women’s bodies can thwart pregnancies in cases of “legitimate rape,” have made his job harder. “His comments defy science. They defy common sense. They are reprehensible,” Walden said. “They are way beyond regrettable, and he should, in the best interest of the country and the party and the future of the Senate, give someone else the opportunity to be the nominee.” As the only Republican in Oregon’s congressional delegation, Walden is the de facto leader of the state’s GOP, and

The delegates peppered Otellini with questions on topics ranging from the impact of energy prices and geopolitical developments on Intel’s business prospects. Asked if there was enough skilled labor to meet the demands of Intel’s tech-heavy output, Otellini said there are enough engineers and computer scientists. But there aren’t enough skilled machinists to run the highly technical machines, he said. “You’re not running a lathe anymore,” he said. “You’re running a computer that runs a lathe.” In the future, technology will be more proactive, he said. Voice interaction will become more sophisticated, and devices will respond to increasingly small gestures from fingers and even eyes. “The stuff that really excites me is the way that people are going to interact with computers (and technology),” he said. — Reporter: 202-662-7456, aclevenger@bendbulletin.com

has high hopes for seeing more Republicans in Salem. With a tie in the House of Representatives and a 16-14 minority in the state Senate, Walden said there are major opportunities for Republicans to gain control of the Legislature, and even the governor’s office. Republican candidates like Knute Buehler of Bend for secretary of state and Bruce Starr for Bureau of Labor and Industries commissioner are also making strong cases for statewide office, he said. “I think Oregonians should never be taken for granted in their votes, and I think when you’ve had one-party rule for as long as we’ve had in Salem and in the governor’s office dating back to 1987, at some point, people say, ‘Is that the best we can do?’ ” he said. “Think about states that you would perceive to be more liberal than Oregon that have had multiple Republican governors since we have: New York, Vermont, Massachusetts, California,” he said. “Oregonians fundamentally want a government that works, and they want an economy that’s better. And I can’t imagine that they’re very happy with either of those at this point.” — Reporter: 202-662-7456, aclevenger@bendbulletin.com

The Washington Post

*

*Excludes Prior Sales

Evan Vucci / The Associated Press

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney watches the Republican National Convention with his grandchildren Wednesday from his hotel room in Tampa, Fla.

have been writing the convention speech together, aides said, although Stevens insisted this week that Romney wrote the speech himself. Stevens points to Romney’s June 2011 campaign announcement address in New Hampshire as a model for the message he will deliver through Election Day. That speech was a defense of free enterprise, individualism and American power in the world. “It’ll be a clear vision of a Romney presidency and very much from his heart about America and why he wants to be president and what a Romney presidency would be like,” Stevens told reporters. But Romney’s address in Tampa, which Stevens estimated will take about 40 minutes, will be twice as long as almost any speech he has delivered in this campaign, and

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the stakes are enormous. Mark McKinnon, a top strategist on the Bush and John McCain campaigns, said Thursday night’s speech will be Romney’s “most important moment of the campaign.” “It will be his best and perhaps last real-world opportunity to fill in the blanks and correct misperceptions about him in a way voters and the media find compelling, authentic and relevant,” McKinnon said. “The reality is that it’s pretty hard to give a bad convention speech. On the other hand, it’s not easy to deliver a truly great one, and that’s what Romney needs to do.”


THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Dogs Continued from A1 The Penters have sold Labradoodle puppies for as much as $800, she said, and it wouldn’t be difficult for anyone with a desire to steal a Labradoodle to find their home. On Sunday evening, several miles from the Penters’ home, Marc and Robin Mirrasoul let their chickens out of the coop to wander around the yard while they went out to dinner. When they got home, they found two strange dogs in their yard eating one of their chickens. The Mirrasouls herded the dogs into a kennel on their property and called the Sheriff’s Office. With no animal control officers available Sunday evening, the dogs stayed in the Mirrasouls’ kennel overnight, and on Monday were taken to the Humane Society of Central Oregon shelter. Addressing the board

Wednesday, Robin Mirrasoul requested leniency. Had the dogs she found among her chickens had collars, Mirrasoul said she would have taken it upon herself to locate the owners and not bothered with reporting the incident to the Sheriff’s Office. “Sometimes dogs do stupid things because they’re dogs,” she said. Lisa Penter said she couldn’t understand how the dogs could have made it from her home to the Mirrasouls’ without someone picking them up in a vehicle. Though their homes are only 4 to 5 miles apart as the crow flies, it’s roughly a 10-mile trip on foot, including a crossing of the Little Deschutes River. Jeff Penter said he would make arrangements to pay the Mirrasouls for the loss of their chicken. — Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com

JOB LOSS RATE BY CITY POPULATION SIZE

-12% -15%

Portland

U.S. median

600K OR MORE

-7% -7.9%

Eugene Salem

U.S. median

-7%

Bend Medford

100K-200K

-12.6% -10%

-9%

U.S. median

-6%

-7.7%

-3%

50K-100K

-16.7% -13%

50K OR FEWER

0%

-18%

Portland

4.1% 4.7%

600K OR MORE

U.S. median

3.3% 1.8% Eugene Salem 0.7% U.S. median

100K-200K

Bend Medford

50K OR FEWER

6% 4% 2% 0%

50K-100K

3.1% 2% 2.6%

JOB GAIN RATE, RECESSION THROUGH TO PRESENT, BY CITY POPULATION SIZE

U.S. median

TAMPA, Fla. — Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., accepted the Republican Party’s nomination for vice president on Wednesday with a declaration that President Barack Obama, elected only four years ago on a promise of hope and change, had failed and his opportunity had been squandered. Ryan said that Obama’s is “a presidency adrift, surviving on slogans that already seem tired, grasping at a moment that has already passed.” Ryan’s selection was a big gamble for presidential nominee Mitt Romney, given the House Budget Committee chairman’s authorship of a controversial budget that would overhaul the federal Medicare program — the preservation of which is an issue where Democrats have frequently bested Republicans in the past. “Our opponents can consider themselves on notice,” Ryan said. “In this election, on this issue, the usual posturing on the left isn’t going to work. Mitt Romney and I know the difference between protecting a program, and raiding it. Ladies and gentlemen, our nation needs this debate. We want this debate. We will win this debate.” Ryan’s nomination will put more pressure on the Republican ticket to articulate and defend its own economic vision, rather than simply stoking the electorate’s disappointment and dissatisfaction with Obama. Ryan, however, stuck to broad themes rather than gritty specifics in a speech that marked the first time that many Americans have seen and heard the vice presidential nominee. Again and again, delegates rose to their feet and cheered, as Ryan warmed to the tra-

ditional running mate’s role as aggressor. His home state governor and long-time friend, Scott Walker, wept. “I have never seen opponents so silent about their record, and so desperate to keep their power,” he said. “They’ve run out of ideas. Their moment came and went. Fear and division are all they’ve got left.” At 42, the congressman from Wisconsin is the first member of Generation X to run on a presidential ticket. He reflected his cohort’s anxiety that the Social Security and Medicare cannot be sustained long enough to take care of them in their retirement years. “I accept the calling of my generation to give our children the America that was given to us, with opportunity for the young and security for the old — and I know that we are ready,” he told the delegates. “I’m going to level with you,” he said. “We don’t have that much time. But if we are serious, and smart, and we lead, we can do this.” When he laid out his first major fiscal proposal three years ago, many in the upper ranks of the party were skittish of its particulars, especially the transformation of Medicare from a governmentfinanced system to a voucher program. Having passed the House twice since then, the Ryan budget now represents the epicenter of conservative Republican philosophy, calling for a dramatic shift in government’s priorities and sharp reduction in the scope of its mission. But many of its individual provisions remain unpopular with the electorate at large, and Democrats have made it clear that they intend to make the Ryan budget a major element in their case against Romney.

-9.1% U.S. median -5.9% Corvallis

The Washington Post

2.8% 3%

By Karen Tumulty

Continued from A1 Overall, the forecast included a mix of good and bad news. Oregon seems to have escaped the need for more budget cuts over the next year. But the future doesn’t look as promising. State economists were more optimistic about nearterm tax collections than they were three months ago, projecting that the general fund and lottery will take in about $80 million more than they predicted last quarter, according to the Associated Press. That’s enough money to pay for everything in the budget, plus a $55 million cushion. The long-term outlook is less rosy. Economists dialed back their projections for the two-year budget cycle that begins July 1, 2013, and the three that follow, raising the specter of more tough budget cuts as the costs and demand for government services rise. Experts now project the Oregon general fund and lottery will earn $16.6 billion during the 2013 cycle — down $590 million from their estimates one year ago. With elections looming in November, House lead-

The Oregon Office of Economic Analysis released its quarterly revenue forecast Wednesday, which includes information on the overall health of the state’s economy. Employment data show that Bend was stung harder than other cities in its population range.

Corvallis

Ryan assails Dems’ ‘fear and division’

Revenue

Bend hit harder during recession, seeing slower recovery

U.S. median

GOP CONVENTION: DAY 3

Source: Oregon Office of Economic Analysis

A5

ers from both parties used the mixed economic news to press their ideas for improving the economy. “This forecast shows we need to do more to plan for the long term,” said Rep. Tina Kotek of Portland, the No. 2 Democrat who’s in charge of the party’s campaign effort. “The more we can equip workers with the knowledge, skills and versatility needed for the jobs that will come as the economy grows, the better Oregon will be positioned to thrive in the coming years.” Republicans and Democrats are currently tied in the House, and both parties are jockeying to pick up at least one seat to get full control of the chamber. “We’ll continue our efforts to improve Oregon’s business environment to help attract and retain employers, while taking the same, fiscally conservative approach to the state budget that has prevented deeper cuts to programs that are important to all Oregonians,” said Rep. Andy Olson of Albany, the Republican leader in charge of GOP campaign operations. — Reporter: 541-554-1162, ldake@bendbulletin.com The Associated Press contributed to this report

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Protest Continued fromA1 Just when government officials were hoping to make money on the hype over Dec. 21 marking the end of the world, as some say the Mayan calendar predicts, archaeologists are threatening to shut down the party before it has begun. “Our national monuments are being violated,” said Felipe Echenique March, head of the union that represents the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH), the government agency charged with protecting historic sites. “Public archaeological sites are deteriorating. We are resisting this destruction.” Authorities were largely silent until last week, when the agency’s archaeological council said in a communique that it “categorically denied the claims of union groups pursuing political aims.” Echenique said authorities called him into the attorney general’s office Thursday and accused him of depriving the Anthropology Museum of more than $400,000 in revenue since the protest began in late July. Spokesmen for the attorney general’s office said they were unaware of the conversation. “We do have a political aim,” Echenique said. “We want enforcement of the federal laws that protect patrimony.” In recent days, protest banners have spread to the former palace home of Spanish conqueror Her-

nan Cortes in Cuernavaca, a historic fort in Puebla and a church in Nuevo Leon, aimed at what one bulletin called “the enemy in the house”— ineffectual leaders of the INAH. Archaeologists have come from Michoacan to protest the ongoing construction of a museum on a pre-Columbian base at the complex of circular pyramids at Tzintzuntzan, or “place of the hummingbirds,” the capital of the Tarascan people until the Spanish conquest. “They should not build this in an archeological zone. There might be important tombs below,” said Celia Gutierrez Ibarra, a 33-year state historian and author who stopped by to sign a petition calling for the protection of historic monuments. “This is a very healthy protest,” she said. “You can’t make changes to historic sites to make them more touristfriendly or let officials turn pyramids into Disneyland. This patrimony does not just belong to me, or to Mexicans, but to the whole world.” Chihuahua historians came to protest the removal of a row of colonial buildings in Hidalgo del Parral by local authorities who thought a less cluttered plaza was better for tourism in an act of “misunderstood overnight modernity,” a furious preservationist told Proceso magazine. INAH architect Carlos Huitz pointed to protest posters showing gothic-style ceil-

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ings that have been grafted onto traditional arched brick ceilings during the reconstruction of colonial convents in Oaxaca. “Local authorities saw these someplace else and just decided to copy them,” Huitz said. “These don’t belong on these convents. They didn’t care.” At a time when a debunked theory of ancient Mayan scripture announcing the end of the world in December is drawing droves of tourists to Mexico, Cancun is to host a “light, peace and world harmony” spectacle at the Mayan “Ruins of the King” palace complex during the fall equinox in September. “The people who approved this are totally corrupt, shameless bandits,” Echenique said. “The 2012 movement is exploiting the ignorance of the people to earn millions of dollars. This has about as much to do with the Mayans as Luciano Pavarotti had to do with Chichen Itza.” The protesters claim victories. Earlier this year, protest leaders sent letters to representatives of Paul McCartney, begging him not to hold a spring rock concert at the base of Chichen Itza - a famous pyramid in the Yucatan that has been the site of concerts

by Placido Domingo, Pavarotti and Elton John. The McCartney Chichen Itza concert never materialized, although McCartney played in May at the capital’s Estadio Azteca and to 200,000 people at a free concert in the Zocalo. “These are not profit centers,” scolds the movement’s website, under a photo of Chichen Itza and Teotihuacan, where workers drilled into the pyramid for a controversial but potentially lucrative light show that fizzled under pressure. But alongside the state commitment to preserving Mexico’s past, there is pressure to earn revenue and a history of uneven local application of laws to protect its archaeological treasures, analyst Jorge Chabat said.

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OUTING

TV & Movies, B2 Calendar, B3 Dear Abby, B3

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

A call for forest fire prevention

See Trails / B6

SPOTLIGHT Museum plans volunteer event The High Desert Museum plans its annual meeting and volunteer recognition event from 6 to 8 p.m. Sept. 7 at the museum south of Bend. Reservations are due by Sunday. The event will celebrate the achievements of the past year, honor volunteers and bid farewell to Bob Boyd, curator of Western History, who is retiring after nearly 30 years with the museum. It’s free for members, $5 for nonmembers and include hors d’oeuvres and a no-host bar. For more information or to make reservations, contact: 541-382-4754, ext. 241, or volunteer@ highdesertmusuem.org.

www.bendbulletin.com/outing

Hike, swim, hike, repeat

TRAIL UPDATE

High fire danger is prompting fire restrictions in the Deschutes National Forest going into Labor Day weekend. The U.S. Forest Service will today or Friday announce the details of restrictions on smoking and campfires in nonwilderness areas. They will take effect at the start of Saturday, said Chris Sabo, trails and recreation specialist for the Deschutes forest. While the weather is expected to be cooler into the weekend, with lows in the 30s at higher elevations, it will also remain dry. To limit forest fire concerns, campfires will likely be limited to certain campgrounds. Sabo emphasized that even at designated campsites and in wilderness areas, people are required to completely extinguish fires before departing, whether that be for a short hike or for home. “We’re regularly putting out abandoned fires,” he said. “Some of them do creep out of the contained fire ring.” Certain high-use spots in wilderness areas already have standing fire bans, including Green Lakes, Mirror Lakes and South Sister. High traffic is expected in those areas through the weekend. Sabo asked that people camp only in designated sites in the lake basins, follow dog-leash rules and use leave-no-trace practices, particularly when it comes to sanitation. Sabo also said recreationists should be prepared when they hit the trail, particularly since the weather is now transitioning from summer to fall.

• Enjoy an 8-mile loop hike and a late-season swim at Horse Lake By David Jasper The Bulletin

few weeks ago, my wife, our dog and I braved heat and horse droppings to make an approximately eight-mile loop hike out of several connecting trails west of Elk Lake. From Bend, we took Cascades Lakes Highway approximately 33 miles and parked at the Elk Lake Trailhead (look for it on the west side of the highway, directly across from the Elk Lake Resort entrance). As we readied our backpacks with food and water and clicked the dog into his leash, two guys walked out of the forest looking like they’d been on the trail a while, if facial hair and large backpacks were any sign. They were from New Mexico and were hiking the Pacific Crest Trail, and took an interest in our detailed map of the Sisters Wilderness Area, jawing aloud about a wrong turn they’d made earlier as they tried to find their way toward the resort. I was no help. For some reason, I told them they’d need to make a right when they got to the highway. But fortunately, all signs they’d have encountered as they reached the highway would have overruled my misdirection. Point being, these guys seemed to know what they were doing, and even they had made a wrong turn. So pay attention to the little map affixed to this article (Page B6). Better yet, get your hands on a wilderness map, GPS and compass, and know how to use them. See Outing / B6

A

If you go Getting there: From Bend, take Cascade Lakes Highway approximately 33 miles to the Elk Lake Trailhead, on the right, or west side, of the highway. Difficulty: Moderate Cost: Northwest Forest Pass or $5 day-use fee Contact: 541-3835300

Photos by David Jasper / The Bulletin

The trail to Horse Lake, west of Elk Lake, offers an array of scenery, from lakes to grassy meadows, complementing the shady forest.

— From staff reports

Correction In a box accompanying a story headlined “Feeding the hungry,” which appeared Saturday, Aug. 25, on Page B1, the address and time of a weekly perishable foods distribution at Newport Avenue Church of Christ was reported incorrectly. The church, located at 554 N.W. Newport Ave. in Bend, distributes the goods at 3:30 p.m. on Mondays. The Bulletin regrets the error.

B

Horoscope, B3 Comics, B4-5 Puzzles, B5

Horse Lake is as beautiful as any Cascades lake, and as secluded.


B2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

TV & M

T   B 

L M T 

FOR THURSDAY, AUG. 30

‘Mister Rogers’ inspired show coming to PBS Many of us grew up with “Mister Rogers� and Fred Rogers’ unique neighborhood. That spirit is rising again on PBS’ new show, “Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood,� premiering Sept. 3. A program for preschoolers, it’s buoyed by a passel of experts on the post-toddler and backed by Rogers’ widow, Joanne Byrd Rogers. Joanne Byrd Rogers says her husband never quite digested the immensity of his legacy. “I think he was always amazed by it,� she said.

Soap opera star to host ‘Deadly Affairs’ Susan Lucci will be back on television Sept. 8 when the former femme fatale of “All My Children� hosts a new “murder-most-foul� program for Investigation Discovery. The show, “Deadly Affairs,� outlines the true, twisted paths of infected alliances. “Every day on the news, I hear a story that’s more horrifying than the day before. And I will say to my husband, ‘The world’s gone mad. The world’s just gone mad.’ And you hear these stories of love triangles, sometimes quadrangles, as we portray on ‘Deadly Affairs’ gone terribly wrong,� said Lucci.

‘Anger Management’ gets 90 more episodes LOS ANGELES — Charlie Sheen’s “Anger Management� has managed a major renewal. The FX comedy starring the fired lead of “Two and A Half Men� has received a 90-episode order from the cable network. The order came as part of the original deal for the comedy to generate a designated viewership level over the airing of eight of its first 10 episodes. The series, which stars

Sheen as a former athlete who becomes a therapist for a group of eccentric patients, will begin production of new episodes in September and will return to the network in January.

MacFarlane to be season’s 1st ‘SNL’ host

BEND Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 6:30

NEW YORK — NBC says the big guy behind the cartoon comedy “Family Guy� will guest host the season’s first “Saturday Night Live.� The network announced Wednesday that Seth MacFarlane will be presiding when “SNL� begins its 38th season Sept. 15. Musical guest will be Frank Ocean. The multitalented MacFarlane created the Fox series “Family Guy� and serves as writer, producer and voice artist on the show. He recently directed his first feature film, “Ted,� and furnished the voice for its teddy-bear title character.

Paltrow, Roberts, Swift set for cancer telethon LOS ANGELES — An Alist cast of celebrities is joining a telethon to raise money and awareness to fight cancer. Stand Up to Cancer said Wednesday that Gwyneth Paltrow, Julia Roberts, Matt Damon, Emma Stone and Samuel L. Jackson are among the stars participating. Paltrow also is an executive producer for the fundraiser that will be carried commercial-free by the four major broadcast networks and more than a dozen cable channels. Musical performances by Taylor Swift, Coldplay, Alicia Keys and Tim McGraw are planned, and celebrities will be on hand to take phone pledges. The telethon comes a year after the founder of Stand Up to Cancer, “Spider-Man� movie producer Laura Ziskin, lost her life to the disease at age 61. The telethon airs Sept. 7.

THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) Noon, 2:45, 6 THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15

THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG) 12:20, 3:05, 6, 9 THE OOGIELOVES IN THE BIG BALLOON ADVENTURE (G) 12:40, 4, 7:45 PARANORMAN 3-D (PG) 1:15, 7:05 PARANORMAN (PG) 3:40, 9:35 PREMIUM RUSH (PG-13) 1:25, 4:35, 7:25, 10:05 SPARKLE (PG-13) 6:05, 9:30 TED (R) 1:35, 4:55, 7:35, 10:10 TOTAL RECALL (PG-13) 9:50

FAREWELL, MY QUEEN (R) 1, 3:30, 5:45

McMenamins Old St. Francis School

MOONRISE KINGDOM (PG-13) 1:15, 4, 7

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

RUBY SPARKS (R) 12:30, 3, 6:45

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

2016 OBAMA’S AMERICA (PG) 11:45 a.m., 2:05, 4:40, 7:15, 9:40

MAGIC MIKE (R) 9:10 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 6 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 3, 6:30, 9:45

Tin Pan Theater 869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

BRAVE (PG) 12:50, 3:35, 6:20, 9:05 THE CAMPAIGN (R) 1:50, 5, 8, 10:20 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES IMAX (PG-13) 12:30, 4:15, 7:55 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG13) Noon, 4, 7:45

THE WELL DIGGER’S DAUGHTER (no MPAA rating) 3 YOUR SISTER’S SISTER (R) 5:30

PREMIUM RUSH (PG-13) 5:15, 7:30

EDITOR’S NOTES: • Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15.50 for adults and $13 for children (ages 3 to 11) and seniors (ages 60 and older). • Movie times are subject to change after press time. • As of press time, complete movie times for Wednesday and Thursday at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX were unavailable. Check The Bulletin’s Community Life section that day for the complete movie listings.

MADRAS Madras Cinema 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 3:40, 6:30 THE CAMPAIGN (R) 2:35, 4:45, 7 THE EXPENDABLES 2 (R) 2:30, 4:55, 7:20 HIT AND RUN (R) 2:25, 4:40, 6:50 PARANORMAN 3-D (PG) 2:45, 5, 7:10

PRINEVILLE Pine Theater

THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 3:15, 6:15, 9:15 THE EXPENDABLES 2 (R) 2:15, 4:30, 6:45, 9 THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG) 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 PARANORMAN (PG) 2, 4:15, 6:30, 8:45

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

THE CAMPAIGN (R) 4, 7 TOTAL RECALL (UPSTAIRS — PG13) 3:40, 6:20 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

FULL MATTRESS

SISTERS Sisters Movie House 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

REDMOND Redmond Cinemas

THE EXPENDABLES 2 (R) 1:10, 4:25, 7, 10

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

HIT AND RUN (R) 1:40, 4:50, 7:40, 10:15

THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 7 THE CAMPAIGN (R) 7:30 MOONRISE KINGDOM (PG-13) 5:15 PARANORMAN (PG) 5, 7:15

HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13) 1, 3:55, 6:40, 9:20

Providing unparalled service across a variety of industries since 1983.

ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG) 12:05, 3:15 LAWLESS (R) 12:10, 3:25, 6:25, 9:15

541-389-1505

for appointments call 541-382-4900

Self Referrals Welcome

400 SW Bluff Dr Ste 200 Bend , OR 97702

STARTING AT

$

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ALL DAY, EVERY DAY! MADE IN THE U.S.A.

571 NE Azure Drive Bend, OR 97701 (541) 382-9091 • 1-800-344-3949

www.expresspros.com

541-706-6900

SETS

— From wire reports

L TV L  

THURSDAY PRIME TIME 8/30/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00

5:30

6:00

6:30

7:00

7:30

KATU News World News KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Ă… Republican National Convention News Nightly News NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Ă… Republican National Convention News Evening News Access H. Old Christine Republican National Convention KEZI 9 News World News KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Republican National Convention The Simpsons The Simpsons Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Big Bang Big Bang (4:00) Republican National Convention The 2012 Republican National Convention. (N) ’ (Live) Ă… NewsChannel 8 Nightly News NewsChannel 8 News Republican National Convention Meet, Browns Meet, Browns King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘G’ Chef John Besh Sara’s Time Goes By My Family Finding Your Roots

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Wipeout (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Rookie Blue Every Man (N) ‘14’ The Office ‘14’ Parks/Recreat Saving Hope (N) ’ ‘14’ Dateline NBC ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Big Bang Two/Half Men Big Brother (N) ’ Ă… How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Entertainment The Insider (N) Wipeout (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Rookie Blue Every Man (N) ‘14’ Raising Hope New Girl ’ ‘14’ Glee Nationals ’ ‘14’ Ă… News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Oregon Art Beat Outdoor Idaho Doc Martin Old Dogs ‘PG’ Ă… Casebook of Sherlock Holmes The Office ‘14’ Parks/Recreat Saving Hope (N) ’ ‘14’ Dateline NBC ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The Vampire Diaries ‘14’ Ă… The Next New York (N) ’ ‘PG’ CW Fall First ’Til Death ‘PG’ Republican National Convention The 2012 Republican National Convention. (N) ’ Ă…

11:00

11:30

KATU News (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Sandwiches That You Will Like NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno ’Til Death ‘PG’ That ’70s Show

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

The First 48 ‘PG’ Ă… The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… The First 48 Ă… The First 48 Shattered Ă… The First 48 (N) Ă… (11:01) The First 48 Ă… *A&E 130 28 18 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… CSI: Miami Bad Seed Stopping a CSI: Miami Bone Voyage A severed ››› “Pretty Womanâ€? (1990, Romance-Comedy) Richard Gere, Julia Roberts, Ralph Bellamy. A ››› “Pretty Womanâ€? (1990, Romance-Comedy) Richard CSI: Miami The CSIs search for a *AMC 102 40 39 deadly outbreak in Miami. ’ ‘14’ leg. ’ ‘14’ Ă… corporate raider hires a hooker to act as a business escort. Ă… Gere, Julia Roberts, Ralph Bellamy. Ă… missing groom. ’ ‘14’ Ă… Gator Boys Stormin’ Gators ‘PG’ Swamp Wars ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Gator Boys ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Gator Boys Warrior Gator ’ ‘PG’ Off the Hook Off the Hook Gator Boys ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Swamp Wars Killer Pythons ‘PG’ Million Dollar Listing New York Million Dollar Listing New York Million Dollar Listing New York Million Dollar Listing New York ›› “The Wedding Plannerâ€? (2001) Jennifer Lopez. ›› “The Wedding Plannerâ€? BRAVO 137 44 Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Reba ‘PG’ Ă… T. Swift Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Ron White’s Comedy Salute to the Troops 2012 ’ Ron White’s Comedy Salute to the Troops 2011 ’ CMT 190 32 42 53 Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Crime Inc. Hollywood Robbery (N) Your Money, Your Vote (N) (Live) Mad Money Crime Inc. Hollywood Robbery American Greed Get SHARK Supersmile ‘PG’ CNBC 54 36 40 52 Crime Inc. Piers Morgan Tonight (N) (Live) Republican National Convention ’ Ă… CNN 55 38 35 48 (4:00) Republican National Convention The 2012 Republican National Convention. (N) ’ (Live) Ă… (6:02) Tosh.0 Colbert Report Daily Show (7:44) Chappelle’s Show ‘14’ Chappelle Show (8:50) Tosh.0 (9:23) The Comedy Central Roast Roseanne ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report COM 135 53 135 47 (4:58) Futurama Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Talk of the Town Local issues. Desert Cooking Oregon Joy of Fishing Journal Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 Politico Convention Preview Politico Republican National Convention The 2012 Republican National Convention. ’ Ă… CSPAN 61 20 12 11 (4:00) Republican National Convention The 2012 Republican National Convention. (N) ’ (Live) Ă… Wizards-Place Phineas, Ferb Good-Charlie ›› “Underdogâ€? (2007) Voices of Jason Lee. ’ Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Austin & Ally ’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Phineas, Ferb *DIS 87 43 14 39 Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Saw Dogs ‘PG’ Saw Dogs ‘PG’ Auction Kings Auction Kings *DISC 156 21 16 37 Auction Kings Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians E! News (N) The Soup ‘14’ Jonas ›› “Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reasonâ€? (2004) RenĂŠe Zellweger. Chelsea Lately E! News *E! 136 25 (7:15) College Football Washington State at BYU (N) (Live) ‘G’ (10:15) SportsCenter (N) Ă… (11:15) SportsCenter (N) Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 (4:00) College Football South Carolina at Vanderbilt (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… NFL Live (N) (Live) Ă… Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… ESPN2 22 24 21 24 (4:00) 2012 U.S. Open Tennis Second Round From the USTA National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. (N) Friday Night Lights ‘14’ Ă… Friday Night Lights ‘14’ Ă… Car Auctions Car Auctions Summer Olympics (N) Summer Olym. Summer Olym. College Football ESPNC 23 25 123 25 White Shadow Cops Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNFC Press H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Melissa & Joey › “Wild Hogsâ€? (2007, Comedy) Tim Allen, John Travolta. › “Gone in Sixty Secondsâ€? (2000, Action) Nicolas Cage, Angelina Jolie. The 700 Club ’ ‘PG’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Hannity (N) America’s Election Headquarters (N) On the Record With Greta Van Susteren (N) Ă… America’s Election Headquarters Record FNC 57 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Paula’s Cooking Chopped My Way Chopped Go for It! Chopped Easy Peasy? Chopped Oui, Oui, Confit Extreme Chef Desert Survival (N) The Great Food Truck Race ‘G’ *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “Step Brothersâ€? (2008, Comedy) Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly. ›› “Date Nightâ€? (2010) Steve Carell, Tina Fey. Premiere. Wilfred (N) ‘MA’ (10:31) Louie (N) Totally Biased (11:31) Louie FX 131 Bang, Buck Bang, Buck Bang, Buck Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Brothers ‘G’ Ă… You Live in What? ‘G’ Ă… House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l HGTV 176 49 33 43 Bang, Buck Ancient Discoveries ‘PG’ Ă… Counting Cars Counting Cars Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Counting Cars Counting Cars (11:02) Great Lake Warriors ‘14’ *HIST 155 42 41 36 Ancient Discoveries ‘PG’ Ă… Project Runway ‘PG’ Ă… Project Runway ‘PG’ Ă… Project Runway ‘PG’ Ă… Project Runway Oh My Lord and Taylor (N) ‘PG’ Project Runway Oh My Lord and Taylor ‘PG’ Ă… LIFE 138 39 20 31 Project Runway ‘PG’ Ă… Republican National Convention ’ Ă… MSNBC 59 59 128 51 (4:00) Republican National Convention The 2012 Republican National Convention. (N) ’ Ă… Snooki Snooki Snooki (7:14) Awkward. ’ ‘14’ (7:59) Awkward. (8:24) Awkward. Awkward. ‘14’ Awkward. ‘14’ Snooki Awkward. ‘14’ One Direction Inbetweeners MTV 192 22 38 57 Snooki SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Ă… Victorious ‘G’ Figure It Out ‘G’ BrainSurge ‘G’ “Best Playerâ€? (2011) Jerry Trainor, Jennette McCurdy. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… George Lopez George Lopez Friends ’ ‘PG’ (11:33) Friends NICK 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ OWN 161 103 31 103 Married a Mob. Married a Mob. Married a Mob. Married a Mob. Married a Mob. Married a Mob. 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ Big Sky Seahawks Mariners High School Football (N) (Live) ‘G’ MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Minnesota Twins ROOT 20 45 28* 26 Bull Riding Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… iMPACT Wrestling (N) ’ (Live) ‘14’ Ă… ›› “The Marine 2â€? (2009, Action) Ted DiBiase, Robert Coleby. ’ SPIKE 132 31 34 46 Jail ‘14’ Ă… Paranormal Witness Paranormal Witness Paranormal Witness Paranormal Witness Paranormal Witness SYFY 133 35 133 45 › “Thirteen Ghostsâ€? (2001) Tony Shalhoub, Embeth Davidtz. Ă… Behind Scenes Joel Osteen Joseph Prince Hillsong TV Praise the Lord (Live). Ă… Live-Holy Land The Evidence Bible Prophecy Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord TBN Classics TBN 205 60 130 Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family Guy ’ ‘14’ Ă… Big Bang Big Bang Sullivan & Son Big Bang Conan (N) ‘14’ Ă… *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ ››› “Lady for a Dayâ€? (1933, Comedy-Drama) Warren (6:45) ››› “Cleopatraâ€? (1934) Claudette Colbert, Warren William. The Egyp- (8:45) ››› “Employees’ Entranceâ€? (1933, Comedy(10:15) ›› “The Case of the Howling Dogâ€? (1934, Mys- (11:45) “Lone Wolf TCM 101 44 101 29 William, May Robson, Guy Kibbee. tian queen has a tragic affair with Marc Antony. Drama) Warren William, Loretta Young. Ă… tery) Warren William, Mary Astor, Allen Jenkins. Spy Huntâ€? Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Here Comes Here Comes Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Four Weddings (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Four Weddings (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Four Weddings ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *TLC 178 34 32 34 Four Weddings ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The Mentalist Bloodshot ’ ‘14’ The Mentalist Carnelian Inc ‘14’ The Mentalist Redacted ’ ‘14’ The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist Blood Brothers ‘14’ CSI: NY Blink ’ ‘14’ Ă… *TNT 17 26 15 27 The Mentalist Red Alert ’ ‘14’ Johnny Test ’ Regular Show Regular Show Total Drama Total Drama Adventure Time Annoying Regular Show King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ *TOON 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Toy Hunter ‘PG’ Toy Hunter ‘PG’ Trip Flip (N) ‘G’ Trip Flip ‘PG’ Xtreme Waterparks: World’s Best Insane Coaster Wars: Top *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Bourdain: No Reservations M*A*S*H ‘PG’ (6:32) M*A*S*H (7:05) M*A*S*H (7:43) M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Ă… (8:21) M*A*S*H Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 Bonanza The Last Trophy ‘PG’ NCIS Capitol Offense ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS Heartland ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS Nine Lives ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS Murder 2.0 ’ ‘14’ NCIS Love & War ’ ‘14’ Ă… Covert Affairs ‘PG’ Ă… (DVS) USA 15 30 23 30 NCIS Agent Afloat ’ ‘14’ Ă… Hollywood Exes ’ ‘14’ Big Ang ’ ‘14’ Big Ang ’ ‘14’ ›› “Rock Starâ€? (2001, Drama) Mark Wahlberg, Jennifer Aniston. ’ Ă… 40 Greatest Pranks 3 ‘PG’ 40 Greatest Pranks 3 ‘PG’ VH1 191 48 37 54 Love, Hip Hop PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:10) ››› “The Other Guysâ€? 2010 Will Ferrell. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ››› “American History Xâ€? 1998 Edward Norton. ’ ‘R’ Ă… (10:05) ›› “Hard to Killâ€? 1990 Steven Seagal. ‘R’ (11:45) Takers ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:30) ›› “Hard to Killâ€? 1990 ›› “Hitmanâ€? 2007, Action Timothy Olyphant. ‘R’ Ă… ›› “Jackie Chan’s First Strikeâ€? 1996 ‘PG-13’ FXM Presents ›› “Twin Dragonsâ€? 1991, Comedy Jackie Chan. ‘PG-13’ Ă… FMC 104 204 104 120 (4:00) ›› “Hitmanâ€? 2007 ‘R’ UFC Reloaded UFC Rio: Aldo vs. Mendes Jose Aldo versus Chad Mendes. Best of PRIDE Fighting The Ultimate Fighter Brazil UFC Reloaded Jose Aldo versus Chad Mendes. FUEL 34 PGA Tour Golf On the Range Inside PGA Golf Central (N) ›› “Caddyshackâ€? (1980) Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield. PGA Tour Golf GOLF 28 301 27 301 On the Range (N) Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Medal ‘G’ Ă… (4:30) › “Marmadukeâ€? 2010 Voices of ›› “Green Lanternâ€? 2011, Action Ryan Reynolds, Blake Lively. A test pilot True Blood Save Yourself Eric tries to ›› “The Change-Upâ€? 2011, Comedy Ryan Reynolds. An overworked lawyer The Newsroom The Greater Fool HBO 425 501 425 501 Owen Wilson. ‘PG’ Ă… joins a band of intergalactic warriors. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… and his carefree buddy switch bodies. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Nina surprises Mac. ‘MA’ Ă… save Bill. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… ›››› “The Exorcistâ€? 1973 Ellen Burstyn. Jesuits try to rescue a possessed girl. ‘R’ (7:45) ›››› “The Exorcistâ€? 1973, Horror Ellen Burstyn. Jesuits try to rescue a possessed girl. ‘R’ ›› “The Eyeâ€? 2008, Horror Jessica Alba. ‘PG-13’ IFC 105 105 (4:10) ›› “Convictionâ€? 2010, Biogra- › “The Rage: Carrie 2â€? 1999 Emily Bergl. Teen discovers (7:45) ››› “Die Hard With a Vengeanceâ€? 1995, Action Bruce Willis, Jeremy Irons. A New York ›› “50 First Datesâ€? 2004 Adam Sandler. A man falls for a Life on Top FeaMAX 400 508 508 phy Hilary Swank. ’ ‘R’ Ă… telekinetic powers after a friend’s death. cop must stop a mad bomber’s game of revenge. ’ ‘R’ Ă… woman who has short-term memory loss. ture 7: Back American Colony: Hutterites American Colony: Hutterites Taboo Strange Passions ‘14’ Taboo Strange Passions ‘14’ American Colony: Hutterites American Colony: Hutterites American Gypsies ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Odd Parents Robot, Monster Planet Sheen Huntik: Secrets Odd Parents SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Huntik: Secrets Odd Parents In Pursuit With Realtree RealTree’s Bow Madness Ult. Adventures The Season Wild Outdoors Bushman Show Hunt Masters Wild Outdoors Steve’s Outdoor Sasquatch Fear No Evil OUTD 37 307 43 307 Hunt (3:45) “Charlie “Nobel Sonâ€? 2007, Suspense Alan Rickman, Bryan Greenberg, Shawn ››› “The Rockâ€? 1996, Action Sean Connery, Nicolas Cage, Ed Harris. Alcatraz Island terrorists The Real L Word Premonitions (N) The Real L Word Gigolos (N) ’ SHO 500 500 Bartlettâ€? 2007 Hatosy. A prize-winning scientist’s son is kidnapped. ’ ‘R’ threaten to gas San Francisco. ’ ‘R’ ‘MA’ Ă… ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Wrecked ‘14’ Wrecked ‘14’ Hard Parts Hard Parts Car Warriors Chevelle ‘14’ Wrecked ‘14’ Wrecked ‘14’ Hard Parts Hard Parts Unique Whips ‘14’ SPEED 35 303 125 303 Car Warriors Chevelle ‘14’ Starz Studios ›› “Honeyâ€? 2003 Jessica Alba. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… (8:10) ›› “Cars 2â€? 2011 Voices of Owen Wilson. ’ ‘G’ Ă… (10:02) ›› “Just Go With Itâ€? 2011 Adam Sandler. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:35) ››› “The Guardâ€? 2011 (4:05) ››› “The School of Rockâ€? ›› “The Dangerous Lives of Altar Boysâ€? 2002 Kieran Culkin. Students plot “No. 1 Cheer“Mr. Niceâ€? 2010, Drama Rhys Ifans, ChloĂŤ Sevigny. Based on the life of noto- › “Love, Wedding, Marriageâ€? 2011, Comedy Mandy TMC 525 525 leader Campâ€? 2003 Jack Black. ‘PG-13’ against a nun who seized their comic book. ’ ‘R’ Moore, Kellan Lutz. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… rious drug smuggler Howard Marks. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… Caught Looking (N) ‘G’ Caught Looking ‘G’ Costas Tonight Caught Looking ‘G’ Poker After Dark Darts Round Two NBCSN 27 58 30 209 Diving Braxton Family Values (N) L.A. Hair China Wages War Braxton Family Values Braxton Family Values Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Mary Mary Future Shock *WE 143 41 174 118 Braxton Family Values


THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Wife can’t stop man’s habitual skirt-chasing Dear Abby: I am 20 years younger than my husband. I am also attractive and sexually available to him. We have a great relationship except for one thing. I can’t trust him! I have caught him emailing women he met at work, inviting our neighbor to go with him on a motorcycle ride and heard many stories about him asking women on dates. But the worst was when I found out he was calling a woman every day and going to her house when I was at work. When I confronted him he said nothing sexual happened, but he moved out for a month. Why does he feel he has to have other women? I really believe some men are cheaters no matter what. Oh, yeah — I’m his fourth wife. He cheated on the others, too. How can I make him want only me? — Cheated On in the Midwest Dear Cheated On: You can’t. It may give you some comfort to know that the behavior you have described has nothing to do with you or your level of desirability. It is compulsive. You were naive to think if you married a serial cheater that he would be a faithful husband to you. The only person who can “make� him think differently is him, and before that can happen, he will have to realize he needs to change. Dear Abby: I have been a single mother for seven years raising a wonderful 16-yearold daughter. She is an honor student, works part-time and is very mature. I am dating an older man, “Gary,� who has grown children. Gary feels my daughter is old enough to spend a couple of nights a week alone in our house, while I spend the night with him. His house is 14 miles away. I live in a safe neighborhood, but the idea of leaving her alone makes me very uncomfortable. This is causing a rift between Gary and me. He

DEAR ABBY feels I am having a hard time “cutting the apron strings.� Is he right? — Single Mom in the Midwest Dear Single Mom: Inform Gary you are not ready to “cut the apron strings� because you don’t want your relationship with your daughter to turn to shreds. Although you say your daughter is mature, you are responsible for her safety and welfare until she turns 18. And that includes setting a good example for her. Dear Abby: I’m expecting my first child in three months and I am definitely showing. I work in a retirement community, and every day one or more of the residents makes it his or her business to tell me I’m “just getting SOOO BIG!� and then asks if I’m sure “there aren’t twins in there.� I find their comments rude. What’s the appropriate response to people who make unwelcome comments about my size? I want to tell them that stating the obvious is unnecessary. They wouldn’t comment about someone’s size who wasn’t pregnant, so why is it acceptable in my case? — Expecting in Maryland Dear Expecting: Although you find the comments unwelcome, I’m sure the residents are only trying to be friendly and join in the excitement of another life coming into the world. They are not meant to be insulting and you shouldn’t regard them in that light. All you should do is smile, pat your tummy and say, “Not according to the sonogram!� and move on. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar You alternate between being coldly rational and practical to being delightfully expressive and fun. Can you understand why some of your close friends could be confused by you at times? If you are single, you could attract someone who responds to one side of your personality and not the other. Go for broke. Look for places to mingle in summer 2013. If you are attached, your sweetie could be highly responsive to your ability to greet change with ease. As a result, your relationship will evolve to a new level. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Your friendship defines a relationship, especially as the other party initially is not as enthusiastic as you are. A tendency of yours to go overboard comes out. Perhaps you need to relax more. Make plans to start the weekend as early as possible. Tonight: Not to be found. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Understand your role, which could change rapidly during the day. An associate finally opens up because of your efforts, and you’ll take the lead in moving a situation forward. You easily could go to extremes if you are not careful. Accept a call from a friend. Tonight: Start the weekend early. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH You have an opportunity to break a pattern and head in a different direction once you understand the limitations of the course you are on. You might not want to share all the possibilities that come forward. Tonight: Be a statesman of sorts. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Deal with a key person or friend in your life directly. Your sensitivity comes out in the way you respond to someone’s offer. Take in the possibilities here, as well as what is being proposed in the discussion. You might be taken aback. Tonight: Let your imagination drift with music. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH You know when to defer to others. Such an occasion emerges today. A partner or loved one could be demanding. As a result, your perspective will change. You might want to rethink a particular situation. Lots of talking helps iron out a

problem. Tonight: With that favorite person. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH You might be more easygoing than in the past. Still, you need to adapt, not only to a changing financial situation, but also to a transformation involving a friend or loved one. Just relax — it will be easy. Let someone else take the lead. Tonight: Go with a different choice. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You are as frisky as can be. You might wonder why you are heading in a direction that has a dead end. Perhaps it is the process you enjoy more than the end results. Be open to a positive change and new opportunities. Tonight: Squeeze in a walk or some other form of exercise. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Pressure builds from the morning into the afternoon. You might feel as if you cannot handle what is on your plate until you get a wonderful idea for a solution. Relax, and weigh the pros and cons. Use your imagination. Tonight: Incorporate new information. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You might want to continue an irritating conversation to fully understand where someone is coming from. You could be overtired or dragged down by your own thoughts. Express your imagination and sense of determination. Tonight: Happy to go home. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Handle financial matters early on in the day. You could be subject to drifting thoughts in the afternoon, though there might be a great idea embedded in those daydreams. Follow your instincts with a much-needed conversation with a sibling or neighbor. Tonight: Take a relaxing walk. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Use the morning to the max, when you are at your prime. Communication among friends or associates reveals some nuggets of information you will want to hear. You might decide to check out those facts, or you could invest some time in a project. Tonight: Your treat. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH As the day goes on, you feel better and better. Use the morning for quieter activities, like doing research or reading the paper. Your perspective on a trip or possible heartfelt venture opens up. Tonight: Do absolutely what you want. Š 2012 by King Features Syndicate

B3

C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY TREEHOUSE PUPPETS IN THE PARK: With a performance of “Afraid of the Dark — Whose Eyes Are Out There Anyway?�; followed by a coordinated activity; free; 11 a.m.-noon; Columbia Park, 264 S.W. Columbia St., Bend; 541-389-7275 or www .bendparksandrec.org. TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-6 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, off of U.S. Highway 20 and Cook Avenue; 541-728-0088, earthsart@gmail.com or http:// tumalogardenmarket.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Kim Cooper-Findling reads from her book “Chance of Sun: An Oregon Memoir�; free; 6 p.m.; The Nature of Words, 224 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-6472233, info@thenatureofwords .org or www.thenatureofwords .org. MADELEINE PEYROUX: The jazz act performs; $25; 6:30 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-382-3940 or www .c3events.com. NEUTRALBOY: The Bremerton, Wash.-based punk band performs, with Murderland; free; 8 p.m.; Big T’s, 413 S.W. Glacier Ave., Redmond; 541-504-3864.

FRIDAY LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Friends of the Sunriver Area Public Library hosts a sale of books; free admission; 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. VOLUNTEER EXPO: Community organizations will be on hand to talk about volunteering options; free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-617-7080 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar. DIXIELAND PARTY BAND AND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and California perform; refreshments available; donations accepted; 1-10 p.m.; La Pine Moose Lodge, 52510 Drafter Road; 541-548-0679. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998, bendfarmers market@gmail.com or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street; www.sistersfarmersmarket.com. SUNRIVER FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 4-7 p.m.; Village at Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Drive; www.sunriverchamber.com. LITTLE WOODY BARREL AGED BREW FESTIVAL: Craft beer and rye whiskey tastings from Oregon breweries, with live music; ages 21 and older only; a portion of proceeds benefits the Deschutes County Historical Society; $6, $15 beer tasting package; 5-10 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; www.thelittlewoody.com. MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “Kung Fu Panda 2�; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Compass Park, 2500 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-389-0995 or www .northwestcrossing.com. CABIN PROJECT: The Portlandbased Indie-pop band performs, with Dream Symphony and Wilderness; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879. EVERYDAY PROPHETS: The Portland-based reggae-rock band performs, with All You All; $5; 8:30 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. DJ WICKED: The Portland-based DJ performs; free; 9 p.m.; The Blacksmith Restaurant, 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-318-0588. ESTOCAR: The Seattle-based pop-rock band performs, with The The The Thunder; $5; 9:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SATURDAY PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643 or prineville farmersmarket@gmail.com. VFW BREAKFAST: A breakfast of chicken-fried steak, biscuits with gravy and hashbrowns with eggs; $8, $7 senors and children ages 6 and younger; 8:30-10:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth

Submitted photo

Seattle-based pop-rock band Estocar will perform with The The The Thunder at 9:30 p.m. Friday at Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom in Bend. Entry is $5. St., Bend; 541-389-0775. “THE BISON — AMERICAN ICON� EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit explores the meaning and significance of the bison; exhibit runs through Jan. 6; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Free admission; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-489-3239 or madrassatmkt@ gmail.com. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www .centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Free; 10 a.m.2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; 541-382-1662, valerie@brooksresources.com or www.nwxfarmersmarket.com. GRAPE STOMP: Stomp grapes for wine; with live music and food; bring your own glass; a portion of proceeds from wine produced will benefit Terrebonne Community School; $8 in advance, $10 at the door, free for children; 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Maragas Winery, 15523 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Culver; 541-5465464 or www.maragaswinery.com. LABOR AND LUMBER: Featuring turn-of-the-century woodworking, cross-cut sawing and cabin building; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. DIXIELAND PARTY BAND AND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and California perform; refreshments available; donations accepted; noon-10 p.m.; La Pine Moose Lodge, 52510 Drafter Road; 541-548-0679. LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Friends of the Sunriver Area Public Library hosts a bag sale of books; free admission, $3 per bag; noon-5 p.m., 3-5 p.m. bag sale; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. LITTLE WOODY BARREL AGED BREW FESTIVAL: Craft beer and rye whiskey tastings from Oregon breweries, with live music; ages 21 and older only; a portion of proceeds benefits the Deschutes County Historical Society; $6, $15 beer tasting package; noon-10 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; www .thelittlewoody.com. SUNRIVER SUNFEST WINE FESTIVAL: Featuring wines from more than 50 wineries, art vendors, live music, food and more; free admission, signature glass required for tastings; noon-7 p.m.; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center, 57250 Overlook Road; 541-385-7988 or www.sunriver sunfest.com. BRANDI CARLILE: The rootsy singer-songwriter performs, with Blitzen Trapper and Ivan & Alyosha; $34 plus fees; 6 p.m., gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www.bend concerts.com. CASINO NIGHT: Featuring blackjack, craps, Texas hold ’em, an auction and more; proceeds benefit the Crooked River Ranch Lions Club Sight and Hearing Foundation, scouting organizations and children with diabetes; $15; 7-11 p.m.; Sandbagger Dinner House, 5165 Clubhouse Drive, Crooked River Ranch; 541-570-5565 or jay.nordin@hotmail.com. DJ WICKED: The Portland-based DJ performs; free; 9 p.m.; The Blacksmith Restaurant, 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-318-0588.

SUNDAY CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www .centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com.

HANDY ANDY MAGIC MAN: The magician performs magic for children and creates balloon animals; included in the price of admission donations, $2 for balloons; 10 a.m., 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Petersen Rock Gardens, 7930 S.W. 77th St., Redmond; 541-382-5574. DIXIELAND PARTY BAND AND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and California perform; refreshments available; donations accepted; 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; La Pine Moose Lodge, 52510 Drafter Road; 541-548-0679. LABOR AND LUMBER: Featuring turn-of-the-century woodworking, cross-cut sawing and cabin building; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. SUNRIVER SUNFEST WINE FESTIVAL: Featuring wines from more than 50 wineries, art vendors, live music, food and more; free admission, signature glass required for tastings; 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center, 57250 Overlook Road; 541-385-7988 or www.sunriver sunfest.com. NOTABLES SWING BAND: The big band plays swing, blues, Latin, rock ‘n’ roll and waltzes; $5; 2-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-639-7734 or www.notablesswingband.com. DOG SWIM: Play fetch with your dog, then give him/her a bath; $10; 4-6 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, 465 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. LIVE AT THE RANCH: Featuring a performance by Americana band nelo; $15, $10 ages 6-12; 4 p.m.; Lakeside Lawn at Black Butte Ranch, 12934 Hawks Beard, Sisters; 888-234-5956 or www .blackbutteranch.com/concerts.

MONDAY LABOR AND LUMBER: Featuring turn-of-the-century woodworking, cross-cut sawing and cabin building; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org.

TUESDAY REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or redmondfarmersmarket1@ hotmail.com. BROOKSWOOD PLAZA FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brookswood Meadow Plaza, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541323-3370 or farmersmarket@ brookswoodmeadowplaza.com. “THE LAST MOUNTAIN�: A screening of the documentary about environmental impacts of coal mining in West Virginia; free; 6:30 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Tom Martin talks about his book “Big Water Little Boats�; free; 7 p.m.; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend; 541-317-9407.

WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Featuring traditional Hawaiian dancing by the Hokulea Dancers; vendors available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or http:// visitredmondoregon.com.

THURSDAY Sept. 6 TONY SMILEY: The Portland-based

looping rocker performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com.

FRIDAY Sept. 7 RUN TO THE CASCADES MOTORCYCLE RALLY: The rally includes live music, jousting, charity poker, classic cars, a tattoo expo and more; a portion of proceeds benefit local charities; $15 day pass, $25 for weekend; 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711 or www .runtothecascades.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@ gmail.com or http://bendfarmers market.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street; www.sistersfarmersmarket.com. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill District; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL: Threeday folk music festival including performances by James McMurtry, Mary Gauthier, Gregory Alan Isakov and more; SOLD OUT; 5:30 p.m.1 a.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-5494979, info@sistersfolkfestival.org or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. YOGIS UNITE!: With yoga classes, social activities and dance performances; $25 for two days; 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, 800 N.E. Sixth St., Bend; information@yogisunitebend .com or www.yogisunitebend.com. MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “Hugo�; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Compass Park, 2500 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-389-0995 or www.northwest crossing.com. SYNRGY: The Ashland-based reggae band performs; free; 6-9 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery & Public House, 1044 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-9242. “GREGORIAN, GOSPEL AND GERSHWIN�: Mark Oglesby presents an organ concert; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-3631. RED ROCK SQUARE DANCE: Spectators and dancers welcome; $5, free for spectators; 7-10 p.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.; 541-923-8804. “RICHARD III�: Thoroughly Modern Productions and Stage Right Productions present Shakespeare’s play about the controversial English king; with a champagne reception; $18, $15 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com. SCREEN ON THE GREEN: Juggling performance followed by a screening of the PG-rated film “How to Train Your Dragon�; free; 7:30 p.m., 8 p.m. movie; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets, Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. BLACK BEAST REVIVAL: The rock band performs, with Strive Roots; $5; 8:30 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend.

SATURDAY Sept. 8 RUN TO THE CASCADES MOTORCYCLE RALLY: The rally includes live music, jousting, charity poker, classic cars, a tattoo expo and more; a portion of proceeds benefit local charities; $15 day pass, $25 for weekend; 8 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-5482711 or www.runtothecascades.com. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643 or prinevillefarmers market@gmail.com.


B4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

B5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


B6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

C D  

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY

BEND KNIT-UP: $2; 10 a.m.-noon; Rosie Bareis Community Campus, Bend; 541-728-0050.

BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688.

BINGO: 6 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-382-1371.

BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688.

COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30-7:45 p.m.; IHOP, Bend; 541-593-1656 or 541-480-0222.

THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-5 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

SATURDAY No events listed.

SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7311 or 541-848-7523.

TUESDAY BELLA ACAPPELLA HARMONY: 6 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-5038. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, Prineville; 541-447-7659.

MONDAY THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-5 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. SWEET ADELINES: 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-447-4756.

CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center; 541-317-9022. GAME DAY: 11:45 a.m.; Bend’s Community Center; 541-323-3344. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Canasta and cribbage; 9:45 a.m.-2 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

Outing Continued from B1 We opted to go in a counterclockwise direction on the loop, avoiding the strong sun we’d have faced going clockwise. The first leg of our trek took us on Trail 3514 out toward Horse Lake, located about halfway along the loop. For the most part, this is an easy stretch of uphill trail that levels out somewhat about halfway to the lake. If you want to head toward Horse Lake — a lovely spot for a dip while the season still permits — be sure to bear right and stay on Horse Creek Trail (a slight name change from “Horse Lake Trail,” but you’re on the right path) and watch for the blue on your left. The forest between the trail and Horse Lake is thick enough that you can’t see a lot of the southern portion of the lake, but it becomes easier to spy through the trees just as you’re about to pass it. We crossed a low-lying stretch of mud and grass and found a faint trace of trail to an old campsite, well-developed in that someone had built a fire pit next to a natural curve in a rock by stacking smaller stones around it and made a small bench out of a well-placed log next to it. I found an old wine bottle cork nearby and told my wife, with some degree of envy, “Some people really know how to live.” The jealous scold in me now thinks they should have packed out their trash, too, the self-indulgent ne’er-do-wells. We had neither camping gear nor wine, so our time there was going to be short — short like the remaining summer season. We made the best of it by immediately hitting the water. For a refreshing posthike cool-down, a cold lake beats air conditioning every time. Just as we had at Teddy Lake (near Cultus Lake) a few weeks prior, we had Horse Lake all to ourselves. Lately, I can’t get enough of swimming in these out-of-the-way spots. The cooling weather ahead will curtail that, but there may be some time left, if the weather holds, to get a little lake all to yourself — keep your tan and sun-damaged fingers crossed. My pattern of choice was rinse, dry, repeat. We swam and dripped dry on our blanket in the sunshine, then ate our sandwiches. After our cheap feast, my wife was through with cool water, but I went in for more, followed by

Trails Continued from B1 “We see poorly prepared people every year going up South Sister,” he said. “That just sets up a scenario in which search and rescue needs to be called.” Forest fires continue to ignite and burn throughout Or-

541-728-0050.

HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-382-5337. HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541390-5373 or 541-317-5052. LA PINE CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS: 8-9 a.m.; Gordy’s Truck Stop, La Pine; 541-536-9771.

BEND SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-286-5466. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon-1 p.m.; Juniper Golf and Country Club, Redmond; 541-5485935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org.

WEDNESDAY

PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:05-1 p.m.; Home Federal Bank, Prineville; 541-416-6549.

BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS: Noon-1 p.m.; The Environmental Center, Bend; 541-610-2308. BEND KNITUP: 5:30-8 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend;

REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTERS: Noon-1 p.m.; Ray’s Food Place, Redmond; 541-410-1758.

il

SUNDAY

Lower Horse Lake Middle Horse Lake

c Cre st Tra

FRIDAY

Horse Lake

Pacifi

O R GANIZATIONS

Colt Lake

To Bend Cascade Lakes 46 Highway

Sunset Lake

Trailhead Elk Lake Resort

Cascade Lakes Highway

Todd Lake Sparks Lake

46

Elk Lake

Bend 97

EElk Lake

Mt. Bachelor

46

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Photosby David Jasper / The Bulletin

A picnic blanket awaits its occupants near the shore of Horse Lake, about a 3.8-mile hike from Elk Lake Trailhead.

more lazing in the sun, then took a shoreline wade along the portion of the cove we called ours for a too-brief couple of hours. Soon enough, we loaded our stuff back in our packs and backtracked, finding our way back to Horse Lake Trail. At the trail crossing, we took a right and stuck to 3516, ignoring down the line a turn that would have taken us west on Trail 3530. About a half-mile down the trail, we reached trail 3515.1, where some helpful person had handwritten “Elk Lake” on the trail marker with an arrow, confirming we were heading the right way. Here we passed through forest peppered with flowery meadows and shallow ponds. We caught a glimpse of Sun-

set Lake to our right, but the nearest point was occupied by campers, so we left them alone and kept on moving to the intersection of Pacific Crest Trail, which traverses an open plain, a nice change of scenery from the forest. After 1.3 miles on this trail, we arrived at the Elk Lake turnoff, which passes through a burn area full of sentinel-like snags whose shadows stretched long in the afternoon sun. Before we knew it, we and our dusty selves were back at the car, where we’d stored more cold water for just this moment. During our hike, we met a trio of horses coming downhill with whom we had a quasi-prickly encounter. Seeing them approaching, I made sure to clip our dog, Kaloo,

onto his leash, and following trail etiquette, I stepped out of the way of approaching horseback riders. Kaloo has hair-trigger hackles, which contrast poorly with his otherwise friendly demeanor. As the riders neared, up went the hackles. When he started anxiously growling, I stepped farther back from the trail, unintentionally putting a lot more trees between us and the riders, essentially obscuring us from their view. Here I thought I was doing them a solid, but the front rider began yelling, though we couldn’t hear what in the commotion. “He’s on a leash,” I called to them reassuringly, to which the man shouted, “I don’t care if he’s on a leash! I need to be able to see you!”

egon. Learn about the latest fire activity and trail closures before heading out by checking www.inciweb.org. In other areas of the national forest, Road 370 to the Broken Top Trailhead opened last week. Beyond the trailhead, however, the road will remain closed for about more three weeks.

Trails are now reopened along the Metolius River. The Abbot Creek Road will be closed in the coming

days while a bridge is being replaced. — Heidi Hagemeier, The Bulletin

NEED SOMETHING FIXED? Call a Service Professional!

Check out our classifieds to find the service professional you need!

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It’s also important for hikers and riders to engage in a bit of friendly conversation to make the horse more comfortable. “When horses and hikers engage together, just make (it) known that you’re human, that you’re friendly, you’re not a predator for the horse. Some can get a little spooked, especially with, again, a backpack,” Sabo said. Accent on the word “friendly.” Occasionally, conflicts occur when runners and cyclists sneak up on horses from behind, he adds. “If it hears you coming and it’s a well-trained horse, not such a big issue, but for a biker to suddenly pop up … that really spooks horses pretty bad,” he said. — Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com

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Now my hackles started going up, until I saw his horse rear up a bit and spin halfway around. As they passed, he told us more calmly that he tells people to “hide in plain sight” when a horse approaches them on the trail. When a horse can hear but not see you — which is what happened when I put more distance between us — the horse can feel at risk. A woman at the rear of the party was calmer still, telling us something to the effect of, “What they can’t see, they think is a predator.” Chris Sabo, Deschutes National Forest trails specialist, is well aware of the various types of users on trails. Having dogs off-leash is permitted in that area, and we were right to clip ours in. Sabo recommends always having a leash at the ready for these kinds of encounters. “If you are with a dog, it’s best to clip in, because the interaction between the horse and the dog — who knows? — it could be a train wreck,” Sabo said. “Etiquette for hikers in the presence of horse traffic is to step down the hillside, if it’s safe, of course” and “make yourself a little bit smaller” if you’re wearing a large pack, Sabo says, noting that a predator would be more likely to leap downhill at a horse than uphill.

541.000.0000 Langstonclrkpaintcan.ore

Golf Shop & Restaurant Open to the Public

2 5 0 0 N W AW B R E Y G L E N D R I V E • B E N D w w w. a w b r e y g l e n . c o m • 5 4 1 - 3 8 8 - 8 5 2 6


LOCALNEWS

News of Record, C2 Editorials, C4

C

Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

LOCAL BRIEFING

www.bendbulletin.com/local

Adult season pass price* at Mt. Bachelor $1,000

Sentencing set for Bray Convicted on two counts each of firstdegree rape and firstdegree sodomy, and charges of fourth-degree assault and strangulation, Thomas Bray is set to be sentenced on Sept. 17. Bray, 38, was convicted for the rape of a woman he’d met on an online dating site and took out for a date in downtown Bend in February 2011. The two returned to his apartment in the Franklin Crossing building, where after a glass of wine Bray assaulted her for several hours. Bray has been held at the Deschutes County Jail since his conviction July 30. The Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office has recommended Bray serve 83 years and four months in prison.

800

$929 $829

$810

$829 $799 $799 $799 $829

MT. BACHELOR

Season pass rates stable

$699 $699 $699 $699

By Rachael Rees The Bulletin

600 400 200 0

’01 ’02 ’03 ’04 ’05 ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 ’10 ’11 ’12 -’02 -’03 -’04 -’05 -’06 -’07 -’08 -’09 -’10 -’11 -’12 -’13

Source: The Bulletin files

*All prices listed at preseason rate

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Despite the challenging conditions Mt. Bachelor faced last season, prices for season passes for 2012-13 will not increase, the ski area announced Wednesday, but daily lift ticket prices will go up. The preseason price for adult passes, $829, also falls $100 below the highest price — $929 in 2007-08 — the ski area has charged over the last dozen years or so.

“When you look at the 10-year average, prices have stayed relatively the same in the last decade,” said Andy Goggins, Mt. Bachelor director of marketing and communications. “Other costs have increased over the year for us such as insurance and fuel … but we’ve been able to keep the pass prices the same.” Passes go on sale today and can be purchased through Oct. 1 at the preseason rate, according to a news release.

After Oct. 1, the adult pass price increases to $1,029. Pass prices for other age groups vary. Season passes for nordic skiing will also remain the same as last year, $229 for an adult pass purchased before Oct. 1, and $299 after. For skiers and snowboarders interested in the season pass payment plan, a credit card down payment of $49 is required by Sept. 13. See Bachelor / C2

Deschutes to interview finalists for top exec

STEADY AS SHE GOES

More briefing and News of Record, C2

FIRE UPDATE

By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

Deschutes County hopes the second time’s the charm with county administrator prospects as it prepares for another round of interviews to fill the county’s top job. Interim County Administrator Erik Kropp told county commissioners Wednesday he will be inviting candidates for a full day of interviews on Sept. 17. The position has sat vacant for over a year. Former administrator Dave Kanner was fired in August 2011 and Kropp, the assistant county administrator, has served in the role in the interim. Kropp said Wednesday he did not apply for the job. This will be the county’s second attempt to fill the position. See Deschutes / C2

Reported for Central and Eastern Oregon. For the latest information, visit www.nwccweb .us/information/ firemap.aspx. Bend

1

2

Baker City Burns

Madras Bend 3

4

MILES

5 0

6

50

Lakeview

1. Waterfalls 2 Fire • Acres: 12,188 • Containment: 60% • Cause: Lightning 2. Hay Creek Fire • Acres: 1,000 • Containment: 10% • Cause: Under investigation 3. Finley Fire • Acres: 80 • Containment: 100% • Cause: Human 4. Parish Cabin Fire • Acres: 4,000 • Containment: 0% • Cause: Under investigation 5. Danner Loop 2 Fire • Acres: 19,000 • Containment: 10% • Cause: Under investigation 6. Barry Point Fire • Acres: 93,071 • Containment: 100% • Cause: Lightning

STATE NEWS

Baker City • • Crater Lake

Alex McDougall / The Bulletin

Dennis Snodgrass and his granddaughter Tilia Marie, 4, return to shore after testing out a paddleboard with the help of Tumalo Creek Kayak and Canoe employee Hayden Branch. The company offers free test runs of their boats during the Pickin’ and Paddlin’ Music Series and Demo Days. The next event in the series is scheduled for Sept. 19 and also features a free bluegrass concert.

Wildfire smoke predicted to ease By Dylan J. Darling The Bulletin

Wildfire smoke may find its way back to Bend over the Labor Day weekend, but it likely won’t be as thick as it was earlier this week. The weekend weather should be clear during the day and chilly at night, said Ann Adams of the National Weather Service in Pendleton. Highs should be around 80 degrees and lows should be around 40. “It looks like it is going to be pretty nice,” she said. A cold front passed through

Central Oregon late Tuesday and Wednesday, pushing out lingering wildfire smoke. Shifts in the wind may bring smoke back to Bend this weekend, but Adams said it should be lighter than it was just days ago. From Sunday to Tuesday smoke levels spiked in Bend between 9 and 11 a.m., at times to levels considered unhealthy by the state. Wednesday was a change of pace. “This is great air quality,” Mark Bailey, eastern region air quality manager for the

state Department of Environmental Quality, said late Wednesday afternoon. The smoke-free air allowed Bend blue skies and views of the surrounding mountains. “But I don’t think we are out of the woods yet,” Bailey said. “A lot of fires are going on, and we could get inundated with smoke again.” The largest fire still burning in Central Oregon is the Waterfalls 2 Fire on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation west of Madras. See Smoke / C2

Stories on C3

Correction In a schedule of open house events that appeared in the Wednesday, Aug. 29 edition of The Bulletin on Page C6, the date of the open house for Sisters Elementary School was incorrect. The correct day for the open house is from 3:30-4:30 p.m. today. The Bulletin regrets the error.

MICRONS PER CUBIC METER OF POLLUTANT PM2.5 250 Very unhealthy

Air pollutant levels in Bend reached into the unhealthy range at 9 a.m. Sunday

120 Unhealthy 94.2 Unhealthy for sensitive groups 40 Moderate 20 Good MIDNIGHT MIDNIGHT SATURDAY SUNDAY

MIDNIGHT MONDAY

MIDNIGHT TUESDAY

MIDNIGHT WEDNESDAY

Source: Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Bend City Council candidates finish filing process By Hillary Borrud

• Crater Lake: Diving halted to stop invasive species. • Baker City: Soldier from city killed in Afghanistan.

Smoky days Smoke from wildfires burning around Oregon has drifted into Bend in recent days, at times making the air unhealthy.

Bend City Council candidates

The Bulletin

Twelve people met the Tuesday deadline to complete the nomination process and declare themselves candidates in November for Bend City Council. Four of the seven seats on the City Council are in play in November. All councilors serve at large. Candidates Wade Fagen and Barb Campbell were working until the last minute Tuesday afternoon to gather signatures and have them verified by the Deschutes County Clerk’s Office, said City Recorder Robyn Christie. Both Fagen and Campbell met the deadline. Every candidate had to submit at least 150 verified signatures to the city recorder by 5 p.m Tuesday to qualify for the ballot. See Council / C2

COUNCIL SEAT 1

COUNCIL SEAT 3

Currently occupied by Tom Greene, who is running for a position on the Deschutes County Commission.

Incumbent Kathie Eckman faces challengers Ron “Rondo” Boozell and Sally Russell.

Barb Campbell

Ronald Boozell

Victor Chudowsky

Wade Fagen

Kathie Eckman

Sally Russell

COUNCIL SEAT 2

COUNCIL SEAT 4

Current council member and Mayor Jeff Eager plans to vacate his seat, and a host of candidates has filed to run for the spot.

Incumbent Jim Clinton is facing a challenge from candidate Mike Roberts, a former city of Bend building department official.

No photo available Charles Baer

ELECTION: NOV. 6 Ed Barbeau Doug Knight

Ed McCoy

Jim Clinton

Mike Roberts

For our complete coverage, visit www.bendbulletin.com/elections.


C2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

Deschutes LOCAL BRIEFING Continued from C1

Police seek robbery suspect Police say the suspect in the Tuesday robbery of a Bend gas station may be driving a dark-colored Jeep Grand Cherokee. The robbery took place at the AM/PM ARCO gas station on Northeast Bellevue Drive. The robber is described as a white man about 5 feet 7 inches tall. He was masked and armed when he entered the gas station demanding money. A gas station employee struggled with the robbery suspect for control of the firearm, and the suspect fled in a vehicle with an undisclosed amount of money. Police say the robber is driving a vehicle of model year 2000 or later. He is still on the loose. Anyone with information about the case is asked to call 541-6936911.

Sheriff’s office finds horse The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is seeking information about a horse that was found wandering in the La Pine area Aug. 22. The horse, a brown and white paint mare, had been wandering in the area since at least Aug. 19. The Sheriff’s Office describes her as somewhat “flighty,� but it appears she has had some training or handling in the past. She also appears to have been well-taken care of. Anyone with information about the possible owner is asked to call the nonemergency dispatch line at 541-6936911. Callers should reference case number 12-172116.

Well shot! READER PHOTOS Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@ bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication. Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

Council

BLOWING A BIG BUBBLE Mary Bliven captured this photo of her granddaughter, Anne Califf of Washougal, Wash., while she was visiting her grandparents in Redmond. Bliven used her Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX100V set to Intelligent Auto.

P  O    For The Bulletin’s full list, including federal, state, county and city levels, visit www.bendbulletin.com/officials. Web: www.ost.state.or.us

Gov. John Kitzhaber, Democrat 160 State Capitol, 900 Court St. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4582 Fax: 503-378-6872 Web: http://governor.oregon.gov

Superintendent of Public Instruction Susan Castillo 255 Capitol Street N.E. Salem, Oregon 97310 Phone: 503-947-5600 Fax: 503-378-5156 Email: superintendent.castillo @state.or.us Web: www.ode.state.or.us

Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum, Democrat 1162 Court St. N.E. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4400 Fax: 503-378-4017 Web: www.doj.state.or.us

Secretary of State Kate Brown, Democrat 136 State Capitol Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1616 Fax: 503-986-1616 Email: oregon.sos@state.or.us

Treasurer Ted Wheeler, Democrat 159 Oregon State Capitol 900 Court St. N.E. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4329 Email: oregon.treasurer @state.or.us

Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian 800 N.E. Oregon St., Suite 1045 Portland, OR 97232 Phone: 971-673-0761 Fax: 971-673-0762 Email: boli.mail@state.or.us Web: www.oregon.gov/boli

spring operating hours due to early-season weather challenges that affected its bottom line. The move sparked an effort on Facebook to buy the ski area. Many of the issues raised last season were touched on in a new Season Pass Holder Report released Wednesday. The report provides insight into the ski area’s management, operations, plans and relationship with Powdr Corp., Goggins said. “It’s a report that we can communicate with local pass holders,� he said. “It’s based on

feedback that we have received in the past (from) emails, feedback on Facebook and ongoing guest interactions.� Mt. Bachelor has spent nearly $3 million in off-season improvements, including constructing the new Bachelor Butte administration building and upgrading five lifts, according to the report. In this upcoming season, Goggins noted, tickets will be sold at the former Bachelor Ski & Sport building, now called the Mountain Gateway building. Mt. Bachelor will also de-

but a smartphone app this fall, he said, that notifies users of changes in lift status and provide access to Track Your Turns, a service that lets skiers and snowboarders track their total number of runs, vertical feet and days skied. The goal is to improve the guest experience on the mountain by communicating details more quickly, he said, as opposed to guests having to pull up the resort’s mobile site or going down and checking with staff at the base of the hill.

contained soon, Valerie Reed, assistant manager of the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center in Prineville, said Wednesday. Fire crews had a line dug completely around the 80acre Finley Fire about five miles from Newberry Crater, Reed said. The fire possibly spread from an abandoned campfire. Burning through sage and juniper about 10 miles northeast of Madras, the Hay Creek

fire had burned 1,000 acres as of Wednesday evening, Reed said. While it was considered only 10 percent contained, she said firefighters had stopped the forward spread of the blaze. Heading into the holiday weekend, the Deschutes National Forest imposed fresh restrictions aimed at preventing wildfires. The new restrictions take effect Saturday and limit campfires to rings in designated campgrounds; ban

smoking except in a vehicle, building or designated campground; and prohibit the use of fireworks or explosives. Similar regulations already apply in wilderness areas. “These restrictions are needed because a lack of recent significant moisture is causing forest vegetation to be increasingly dry and flammable,� John Allen, forest supervisor, said in a statement.

STATE OF OREGON

— From staff reports

Bachelor Continued from C1 Sign-ups for seasonal snow sports programs, such as Mighty Mites and All Mountain Skiers and Riders, also begin today, and openings are on a first-come first-served basis. Daily lift tickets will rise $3 from last season, to $76, and multiday tickets will increase slightly, Goggins said, although he could not provide details. During the 2011-12 season, Mt. Bachelor had to limit the

Smoke Continued from C1 As of Wednesday, the fire had charred more than 12,194 acres and was 60 percent contained, said Bernie Pineda, spokesman for the interagency team managing the fire. The fire, which was started by lightning on Aug. 4, is expected to be contained Sept. 15. Two smaller fires discovered Tuesday are likely to be

The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358.

reported entered at 3:52 p.m. Aug. 26, in the 61200 block of Bronze Meadow.

Theft — A theft was reported at 7:32 a.m. Aug. 13, in the 2600 block of Northeast Second Street.

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:51 p.m. Aug. 26, in the 21000 block of Wilderness Way.

Theft — A theft was reported at 1:32 p.m. Aug. 26, in the 2800 block of Northeast Woodridge Court.

Theft — A theft was reported at 8:59 p.m. Aug. 26, in the 200 block of Northwest Bond Street.

Theft — A theft was reported at 5:58 p.m. Aug. 8, in the 500 block of Southwest Mill View Way.

Theft — A theft was reported at 12:36 a.m. Aug. 27, in the 100 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue.

DUII — Brad James Jaster, 47, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:20 a.m. Aug. 28, in the area of Northeast Third Street and Northeast Webster Avenue.

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:10 a.m. Aug. 26, in the 100 block of Northwest Cascade Place.

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:15 a.m. Aug. 27, in the 100 block of Northwest Oregon Avenue.

Theft — A theft was reported at 12:13 p.m. Aug. 28, in the area of Grand Targhee Drive and Parrell Road.

Theft — A theft was reported at 10:43 a.m. Aug. 26, in the 200 block of Southeast Davis Avenue.

Theft — A theft was reported at 12:52 p.m. Aug. 21, in the 800 block of Southwest Industrial Way.

Theft — A theft was reported at 3 p.m. Aug. 26, in the 2700 block of Northeast Boyd Acres Road.

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:50 a.m. July 26, in the 1600 block of Northeast Purcell Boulevard.

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 5:37 a.m. Aug. 27, in the 2000 block of Northeast Holliday Avenue.

Bend Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was

Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at

Continued from C1 Campbell, owner of a store called Wabi Sabi on Northwest Wall Street that sells Japanese-themed merchandise, was the last to join the race. Campbell, 48, is running for the seat currently held by Tom Greene, who is not seeking re-election. Greene is running for a position on the Deschutes County Commission. Fagen and Victor Chudowsky are also running for the seat held by Greene. Campbell said she decided to file for this seat because in “most of the other races, there were people that I thought I might be more closely aligned� with. Meanwhile, candidate Mike Roberts is running against incumbent Jim Clinton. The only other incumbent seeking re-election is Kathie Eckman, who faces challengers Ronald “Rondo� Boozell and Sally Russell. Mayor Jeff Eager is not seeking re-election, and four candidates will vie for his seat: Doug Knight, Ed McCoy, Ed Barbeau and Charles Baer. Campbell said friends encouraged her to run for City Council. “I’ve had a few people thinking that I might be a good City Council member that honestly have been encouraging me and getting me to think about it,� Campbell said. “I think we could use more diversity, different voices on the council.� Campbell said the council “seems to me to be fairly heavily weighted toward development,� and tends to help west-side neighborhoods, newer neighborhoods around the city and new businesses. “Maybe we could spend a little more effort to supporting the businesses and jobs

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— Reporter: 541-617-7818, rrees@bendbulletin.com

— Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

N  R POLICE LOG

Continued from C1 A job listing last year drew 50 candidates, but the county decided in March that its future administrator wasn’t among the applicants. The county chose instead to hire consultant Greg Prothmann to assist in the search. This time around, the county received 56 applications. On Monday, the board whittled down the field to a more manageable number of interviews. “I don’t want to give out a

8:32 a.m. Aug. 28, in the area of Northeast Third Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:38 a.m. Aug. 28, in the area of Northeast Second Street. DUII — Darrell Lewis, 55, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 5:42 p.m. Aug. 28, in the area of North Main Street.

BEND FIRE RUNS Tuesday 12:21 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 2500 N.E. U.S. Highway 20. 3:58 p.m. — Natural vegetation fire, 1937 N.W. Monterey Pines Drive. 6:14 p.m. — Brush or brushand-grass mixture fire, 20258 Knightbridge Place. 16 — Medical aid calls.

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number on how many candidates we have now because it could still change,� Kropp said. “We are currently calling and offering the candidates interviews, and we will announce the candidates who confirm on Friday, or early next week.� The county hopes to hold a forum for the public to meet candidates on the evening of Sept. 16. Candidates will meet with the Board of Commissioners and panels of staff and community members on Sept. 17. — Reporter: 541-617-7837 ehidle@bendbulletin.com

we’ve got here,� Campbell said. For example, Campbell said she questions whether tax breaks for new businesses are the most effective strategy to add jobs to the local economy. Officials should also help established local businesses hire more employees. A top priority for Campbell, who lives on the east side of Bend near Pilot Butte, is to create a good quality of life throughout the city. “Bend is just a fantastic place to live, but you really do see differences when you drive from one part of town to another,� Campbell said. In some areas, the streets are easier to navigate and there are more parks, she said. Campbell’s other priority would be to cut costs, even when the dollar amount is relatively small. “We need to be pennypinching,� Campbell said. “I worry about that water project; is that really a necessary use of that much money?� The city is moving ahead with a $68.2 million project to replace a pipeline and other infrastructure that brings water from Bridge and Tumalo creeks to Bend. Campbell also questioned why the city plans to allow people to pay for more city services with credit cards, when the city must pay merchant fees to the credit card companies. Bend officials plan to begin accepting plastic to pay for building fees this fall, and the city already accepts credit card payments for municipal court fines and utility bills. In the 20112012 budget year, credit card companies charged the city $93,000 in merchant fees on court and utility payments. “To me, that’s a perfectly legitimate reason to make me bring my checkbook,� Campbell said. — Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com


THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

C3

O N Crater Lake closed to diving Baker City soldier dies in Afghanistan attack over invasive species threat By Devan Schwartz

WesCom News Service

It was 9:35 Monday morning in Laghman Province, Afghanistan, when Baker City’s Mabry J. Anders died. The Department of Defense on Tuesday confirmed Anders, 21, a U.S. Army specialist, died from enemy small arms fire. Sgt. Christopher J. Birdwell, 25, of Windsor, Colo., was killed in the same attack. Gail Lemberger, Baker High School counselor, remembered Anders as a smart young man with a great sense of humor. He was also eager to join the military, she said. Anders graduated in 2009 from the Baker Alternative School at Haines, although he left many friends at Baker High. “He already knew he wanted to be in the military, even as a sophomore,” Lemberger said. “He told me, ‘It will be good for me.’ ” Tineeka Kay Fletcher said she and Anders were both 14 and in high school when they met. “He’s been my best friend my whole life,” Fletcher said. “He could always make me laugh when I was down.” The two grew close, trading email, while he served in Afghanistan. They planned to marry in December when Anders would return from Afghanistan; they planned to live in Carson City, Nev. She last saw him in person two years ago, Fletcher said. “I will miss you so much,” Fletcher wrote in a letter to Anders that she gave the Baker City Herald. “You will always be my hero, friend, boyfriend and fiance. I will miss your sweet smile, your laugh and our long talks every night. “You will always be in my heart. I know you will be my guardian angel, with me forever.”

By Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

GRANTS PASS — National park officials on Wednesday temporarily closed Crater Lake to scuba diving over the threat that invasive species could muddy one of the clearest natural bodies of water in the world. The closure will remain in effect while rules are developed to be sure species including plants, water fleas, quagga mussels and viruses don’t hitchhike into the pristine lake waters on diving gear, said park Superintendent Craig Ackerman. Though only about 10 people a year dive in the lake, it is becoming more popular, park officials said. The September issue of Travel + Leisure magazine listed Crater Lake as the nation’s top lake scuba diving destination, despite the fact divers have to carry their gear down a long steep trail to reach the water. “The amount of use we are talking about is small,” said park aquatic ecologist Mark Buktenica. “The risk is pretty small because of that. But the consequences could be quite high.” Lying in the caldera created by the collapse of a huge volcano more than 7,000 years ago, Crater Lake is the nation’s deepest and clearest lake. It currently holds the world record for water clarity — 140 to 142 feet of visibility straight down, Ackerman said. Buktenica is already dealing with rainbow trout, kokanee salmon, and crawfish introduced into the lake by park staff more than a century ago in an attempt to increase

Crater Lake National Park / The Associated Press

A diver collects samples of moss from the bottom of Crater Lake. Park officials have temporarily closed the lake to scuba diving while they work out rules to prevent invasive species from hitchhiking into the lake on diving equipment.

the attraction to tourists. The trout eat a native newt, which already has a tough time making a living. The salmon eat zooplankton, which affects the balance of microscopic plant life in the lake. And the fish and crawfish defecate in the lake, providing nutrients to other organisms. All this affects the water clarity, Buktenica said. “Famous last words are, ‘That won’t survive here,’ ” Ackerman said. “They said that about the rainbow trout and (kokanee) salmon introduced in the lake. They need running water to reproduce. They haven’t stocked the lake since 1940. Unless those are

70-year-old trout in the lake, they found a way to survive.” Park officials are considering requiring divers to get a free permit before going in the lake, which would offer a chance to clean their gear of any invasive species and educate divers about the different demands of diving at high altitude. The lake surface is at 6,173 feet. Cleaning gear in saltwater or chlorinated water, and letting it fully dry, would be all that is required to kill hitchhiking organisms, Buktenica said. “We have the advantage of having a one-way access point into the lake,” Acker-

man said. “It’s much easier to prevent an infestation than it is to deal with it.” Bend dive shop owner Walt Bolton said he has dived the lake about 10 times, and he organizes dives with others. “There is very little aquatic life because there is not much nutrient in the water, but the blues, the colors are just gorgeous,” he said. “It’s the serenity. It’s a beautiful place.” His main concern about permits is if divers have to drive down to park headquarters to get them, because the drop in elevation defeats the high-altitude acclimation they go through to be safe, he said.

Revenue department offers info on tax fraud discipline The Associated Press SALEM — Oregon Revenue Department documents released Tuesday show three employees received written reprimands and a fourth was demoted after a Salem woman managed to claim a $2.1 million state tax refund she didn’t deserve. The Oregonian reports that the four employees failed to examine Krystle Reyes’ return. State Attorney General Ellen

Rosenblum denied the newspaper’s request for the names and personnel records of the Revenue workers involved. However, she did require the Revenue Department to release part of the disciplinary record. Two managers and one administrative clerk got written reprimands. A fourth worker was demoted and forced to take a transfer and a pay cut from about $45,400 a year to $41,200.

Reyes was sentenced to 5½ years in prison in July after pleading guilty to fraud and tax evasion. In addition to the four employees, the records show that a top manager in the personal income tax program was reprimanded and moved to another section of the agency after approving changes in the way returns were handled. The disciplinary report

finds that manager, paid $59,760 a year, exercised “poor judgment.” “That person was moved to another section with different job duties, where they no longer have the authority to approve cash refunds,” agency spokesman Dennis Thompson said Tuesday. None of the employees was identified by name. The Revenue Department claimed that is not in the public interest.

Anders entered the Army in January 2010 and reported to Fort Carson, Colo., in July 2011. Anders, a wheeled-vehicle mechanic in the 4th Special Troops Battalion, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, deployed Anders to Afghanistan March 10 as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Baker City Councilor Aletha Bonebrake devoted a prayer Tuesday to Anders and his family at the Baker City Council meeting. Bonebrake said she wanted to “take a moment of gratitude, to remember the son of Troy and Gen Woydziak, who gave his life for this great nation, in Afghanistan. “Let us never forget those brave young men that go in our stead to protect our freedoms that we cherish and enjoy.” According to a statement from Fort Carson, Colo., Anders was a decorated soldier whose awards included: • Army Achievement Medal • National Defense Service Medal • Afghanistan Campaign Medal with one campaign star • Global War on Terrorism Service Medal • Army Service Ribbon • Overseas Service Ribbon These honors were awarded posthumously: • Bronze Star Medal • Purple Heart • Army Good Conduct Medal • NATO Medal • Combat Action Badge

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Oregon Health Plan groups certified SALEM — The state has certified two more organizations to provide health care for people on the Oregon Health Plan. The Oregon Health Authority gave provisional approval to “coordinated care organizations” that want to operate in Hood River, Wasco and Yamhill counties. If formally approved later this month, they’ll begin operating on Nov. 1. Coordinated care organizations are the centerpiece of Gov. John Kitzhaber’s overhaul of the state Medicaid program, which was approved by the Legislature earlier this year. They’ll be responsible for finding ways to improve care and lower costs by preventing emergencies and improving coordination. Altogether, the state has given final or provisional certification to 16 care organizations covering more than 500,000 people in all 36 Oregon counties.

2 hunters escape Malheur wildfire PORTLAND — Authorities say two bow hunters safely escaped a wildfire burning in rugged terrain in Eastern Oregon. Grant County Sheriff Glenn Palmer says two law enforcement officers helped the pair

get out of harm’s way late Tuesday or early Wednesday. No helicopter was used to get them out, despite earlier reports. The Parish Cabin wildfire has scorched 5,000 acres in the Malheur National Forest. The blaze was sparked days after the start of bow-hunting season, and deputies evacuated 30 to 40 people from campsites. Palmer says the flames destroyed tents, a bicycle and some plastic furniture.

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

E State must take action on PERS or fail the future

“T

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

B  M C G B  J C  R  C

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

he riskiest thing Oregon can do right now is nothing. As Oregonians, we understand that not taking action is a choice ‌ a choice to reaf-

firm the status quo; it is a choice to abandon tens of thousands of Oregon children — in short, it is a choice to abandon the responsibility we owe to the next generation, a choice to fail the future.� Those are the words of Gov. John Kitzhaber. He was talking about education. We wish he’d take a similar stand on Oregon’s Public Employees Retirement System. This week there was yet another announcement that the cost of PERS is going up again. The system-wide average increase is approximately 5 percent of payroll, according to PERS documents. Worse still, it’s not expected to go down anytime soon. What does that mean at the local level? The Redmond School District, for instance, said it’s worried the cost of the latest bump in PERS costs could be the equivalent of 30 teachers or 13 school days. The reason is that investments underperformed what the PERS board hoped for in 2010 and 2011. It hoped for a rate of return of about 8 percent. It didn’t get it, again. So contributions from school districts and local governments have to go

up to fund the future liabilities of the system. “Barring future investment performance above assumption, rates are more likely than not to be at 2013-2015 levels (or higher) for the foreseeable future,� the actuaries for PERS told the board. No matter how strong Kitzhaber’s commitment is to delivering better results for students, more resources for teachers and more accountability for taxpayers, if PERS costs are continuing to pluck teachers or days from schools, his education reforms won’t matter. State Rep. Jason Conger, RBend, has tried to get the Legislature interested in reforming PERS. State Treasurer Ted Wheeler seems the only prominent Democrat who is interested. We applaud their efforts. But where is Kitzhaber? He has to make a choice to take action or fail Oregon’s future.

Park district should waive its records fee

N

othing can be more chilling on the public’s efforts to find public information than a hulking, forbidding price tag. The Bend Park & Recreation District recently told the Bend attorney representing United Seniors Citizens of Bend that the group’s public records request will cost more than $14,000 to process. That’s the estimate for staff time to search for emails, plus $200 an hour for an indeterminate time to review them all for confidential information. It would likely be cheaper for the USCB to sue the district to get the information, because then the district would not be able to bill for it, USCB’s attorney Bill Buchanan has pointed out. But there are really two things wrong here. The first is the scope of Buchanan’s request. The second is the district’s price for public records. Buchanan’s request can be narrowed to make it easier and much cheaper for the district to respond while still collecting the relevant emails. Because of the way his re-

quest was worded, it would require the district to do multiple individual searches of all the email accounts of the district’s 223 employees. The costs of complying with that portion of the request made up more than $13,000 of the total the district quoted. Buchanan did, though, file his request to answer a serious question for the entire community: Did the district systematically and deliberately drive the USCB from the senior center to convert it to pay-toplay facilities? Remember, USCB claims it paid nearly $1 million of the cost to build the center. Reviewing the requested emails is one way to determine if that worst-case scenario is true. We don’t dispute that the district can legally charge USCB for its time to unearth the emails and for an attorney’s time to review them. The question is if it should. The emails will help to resolve an important community matter. The district can choose to waive the charges in the interest of openness and resolving the question. It should.

My Nickel’s Worth Conger tackles tough issues Perhaps assuming that higher benefits and retirement pensions would attract the best teachers, resulting in the best education for Oregon’s children, past state Legislatures have raised state teachers’ retirements to unreasonable and unsustainable levels. These actions, whether naive or arrogant, have not resulted in better education, but seem rather to have gone in the opposite direction. A very serious consequence has been the accumulation of taxpayer debt for PERS retirement of $12.8 billion. They try to soften the impact of this by calling it UAL — Unfunded Actuarial Liability, but it’s nothing but plain old sky-high debt which we taxpayers get to somehow pay off, or suffer even harsher realities, like the unsustainability of the public employee retirement system. More and more voters are expecting their elected officials to actually tackle the tough questions, such as what to do about this collision course with disaster in the public employee retirement system. Jason Conger, in his first term in the Legislature, has attempted to do just that with the School Savings Act of 2012. Unfortunately this necessary and courageous piece of legislation was blocked during the last legislative session. Please join me in voting this November to return Jason Conger to Salem. He is a man with the integrity and fortitude to actually tackle the tough questions proactively.

J ohn Farnsworth Bend

Better to gargle the fluoride When people start talking about adding fluoride to public drinking water, it makes me grit my teeth. The idea of adding medicine to something we ingest every day seems like hunting butterflies with a shotgun. What if I drink much more water than the low-income child who is our target? I’ve heard that low doses of aspirin can help lower a person’s risk of heart attack; are we next going to consider adding it to our water supply? Fluoride application can be broken down into systemic, which is ingested like in your drinking water, and topical, which is rinsed off like in your toothpaste. Systemic treatment helps developing teeth before they have emerged, but what about after we grow up and have all of our teeth? It stands to reason that long-term ingestion of a systemic substance is going to build up over a lifetime. When I was in elementary school, we swished with fluoride at our desks weekly, only the kids with the “weird� parents didn’t get fluoride. Now maybe I’m the weird parent that doesn’t want medicine in my drinking water, but gargling fluoride in class sounds pretty reasonable. Gene Hubbard Bend

Great public works response I am a Eugene resident who was

recently house-sitting a lovely Bend home for two weeks. A rather strange incident occurred that led us to believe our water might have become contaminated by the septic system. I contacted the Public Works Department, and a service technician appeared within the hour. He ran field tests on the water and reassured us that it did not look like the water was adulterated, and he encouraged us to follow up on obvious problems with the septic system. Unsolicited, two other customer service technicians, including a supervisor, showed up within half an hour to do additional water sampling, which they then took to the lab for testing. The supervisor, Dave Lee, called the next day to reassure us that the water was just fine. I asked Lee why they had done additional testing when the field test appeared to be negative. The gist of his response was: We take water quality very seriously. I appreciated their professionalism, remarkably quick customer service, and their willingness to take our concerns very seriously. You are lucky to have them managing your water. And just in case inquiring minds want to know, something that you never want to see come out of a water faucet won’t, according to the septic serviceman and the utility technicians. However, it can come out of the overflow pipe in your tub and make it look like it is coming from the faucet. Very ugly mystery solved. Stella Dean Eugene

Letters policy

In My View policy

How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Choice of Ryan is a good one, despite partisan messages By Jim Huffman Before presidential candidate Mitt Romney could even confirm that Congressman Paul Ryan is his running mate selection, the political trash talking from the Obama campaign and the liberal “commentariat� was in full lather. An email message from Vice President Joe Biden advised me that “starting now, we can expect even more wealthy, rightwing ideologues lining up to support the Romney-Ryan ticket.� The Obama campaign immediately launched an advertisement listing “five facts� voters should know about Paul Ryan. Given the shallow depths of today’s political campaign messaging, and having just seen a performance of J.M. Barrie’s “The Admirable Crichton� in which the Countess of Brocklehurst advises her son George that when anyone leads off with the statement “the fact is� you know they are about to tell

I N M Y VIEW a lie, not to mention having heard Harry Reid assert that Romney paid no taxes for 10 years (how did the IRS miss that one?), I was fully prepared for five insulting distortions of the truth about Ryan. I was not disappointed, but “fact� number 4 jumped out at me as an Oregonian. “Paul Ryan’s extreme budget would end Medicare as we know it, turning it into a voucher program which would increase seniors’ health costs by $6,350 a year.� Isn’t Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden a co-sponsor with Ryan of a Medicare reform proposal? And isn’t Wyden the Senate’s leading champion of AARP-eligible Americans? Has Wyden been fooling us all these many years? If he is in bed with Ryan, Wyden, too, must be a rightwing ideologue.

No, Wyden is the same left-ofcenter policy wonk he has always been. And to his credit in this day of hyper-partisanship, he still thinks it is Congress’ responsibility to help meet the nation’s challenges. And so does Ryan. Wyden is also a party loyalist. It will be fascinating to see how he handles his close collaboration with Ryan now that the Democratic Party is on a mission to demonize the Wisconsin congressman turned vice presidential candidate. But the more interesting and significant question is whether Ryan will be able to turn a presidential contest devoid of any serious policy content into a national debate over how we begin to solve the immense challenges we face. You can disagree with Ryan’s economic and political philosophies, and most Democrats will. You can object to his budget and health care

Is Romney’s choice of Ryan a good one in terms of Republican prospects to reclaim the White House? I don’t know. But I do believe it is a superb choice for the future of American politics. proposals on their merits, and most liberals will do that as well. But no serious and honest person can claim that Ryan is an ill-informed, kneejerk, ideologue, or that his proposals for reform are not clear and full of intricate detail. Such claims are so implausible that we can hope against hope that a debate on the merits actually occurs before this presidential contest is settled in November. Is Romney’s choice of Ryan a good one in terms of Republican prospects to reclaim the White House? I don’t know. But I do believe it is a superb choice for the future of American politics.

Of course no one vice presidential candidate will alter the course of our politics any more than he will make the difference in the November election. But for the first time in this presidential election cycle, we have a candidate who has offered the nation serious and informed policy proposals that address the core challenges we face. I have no idea whether it will help or harm their chances for victory, but if the Romney campaign allows Ryan to go beyond scripted platitudes and be himself, they will have made an historic contribution to American political culture. — Jim Huffman lives in Portland.


THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

O D N  A'Lisa Joy Weston, of Ferran, Utah Mar. 6, 1990 - July 28, 2012 Services: No services are planned at this time. Contributions may be made to:

A Memorial Account that has been opened up for her in her name for contributions: At Wells Fargo Bank A'Lisa Joy Weston

Freda Madeline Cochran, of Sisters April 29, 1909 - Aug. 26, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn FuneralsRedmond (541-504-9485) www.autumnfunerals.net Services: A private service will be held at a later date.

James Vernon Pirrie "Jim", of Central Oregon July 1, 1936 - Aug. 23, 2012 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Graveside services were held on Wednesday, August 29, 2012 at 11:00 AM at Pilot Butte Cemetery in Bend, Oregon.

Judith Ann Clifford, of Bend Oct. 1, 1939 - Aug. 27, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend (541) 318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: A memorial mass will be held Saturday, September 1, 2012 at 11:00 A.M. at the Old Historic St. Francis Catholic Church, Lava and Franklin Ave.

Kay Edwin McGreer, of Bend Feb. 9, 1934 - Aug. 27, 2012 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: A family gathering will be held later. Contributions may be made to:

The Humane Society of Redmond, 1355 NE Hemlock, Redmond, OR 97756.

Edna J. Daniels Aug. 14, 1939 - Aug. 17, 2012 Born in Geraldton, Ontario, on August 14, 1939, died on August 17, 2012. She was predeceased by her parents, Julia and Joseph Sasnauskas. Edna is survived by her sister, Joyce Phillips and brother-in -law, Roy Phillips of Regina, Saskatche wan; her children, Cathie Edna J. Daniels Daniels Landeros of Sacramento, CA; Patrick Daniels (Suzi) of Mililani, HI; and Michael Daniels (Keelin) of Spokane, WA; and four grandchildren: Kali Landeros, Lexi Daniels, Parker and Kendal Daniels. She graduated from North Bay Teacher’s College in Ontario, and became a school teacher in Sault Ste Marie, Ontario, where she met her future husband and father of her children. After taking time off to raise her children, Edna worked in the BendLa Pine School District as a teacher’s aide and counseling secretary. In Jewell Elementary, Buckingham Elementary and Cascade Middle School, she proudly and lovingly served the children and families of Bend for 25 years. As a mother and grandmother, she was ever devoted to her family. An avid reader and gardener, Edna was known for her joyful attitude, fun sense of humor, and unwavering faith in Jesus. All who knew and cared for Edna are invited to join her family for a celebration of her life held at the Church of the Nazarene, in Bend, at 11:00 a.m., on December 28, 2012.

Pamela "Pam" A. Cooper, of La Pine Sept. 7, 1956 - Aug. 22, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private family gathering will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Humane Society of Central Oregon, 61170 Southeast 27th Street, Bend, OR 97702, (541) 382-3537; or St. Jude's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105, (901) 495-3300.

Theodore “Ted� Lister, of Redmond Aug. 27, 1931 - Aug. 27, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals Redmond, 541-504-9485 Services: Sat., Sept. 1, 2012, Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses, 851 NW Canal Blvd., Redmond, OR 97756.

Phylis Davida Iler April 29, 1953 - Aug. 26, 2012 Phylis Davida Iler, 59, of Bend, died Aug. 26 in her sleep at home after a decade long battle against cancer. A memorial service will be held Saturday, Sept. 1, at 2 p.m. at Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Rd., Bend. Iler was born on April 29, 1953, in Chicago, to Philip and Beatrice Tully. She grew up in the Phylis Iler city and graduated from Sullivan High School in 1970. During her youth, she volunteered at a camp for blind children and worked as a nanny. She worked as an underwriter for insurance companies in Chicago for many years. A co-worker one day introduced her to a friend visiting town. The friend was Don Iler, and a romance blossomed and they were married in Chicago on June 18, 1983. The couple moved to Massachusetts, where her first two children were born. In 1990, the family moved to Illinois and she selflessly stopped working to take care of her boys. The family moved to New Hampshire in 1993. One Sunday morning, she woke up and decided she needed to go to church, beginning her relationship with Jesus Christ, and she was baptized in 1994. In 1995, her youngest son, Matthew, was born. In 1997, the family moved west to Bend, Oregon, and she watched her three boys grow into men, devoting her life to taking care of them. She was an active member of her church, Eastmont, serving as the deaconess in charge of the church library. In 2002, she was diagnosed with cancer and for the next 10 years she fought courageously, always with a smile on her face, and defying the expectations of her doctors. She was a beacon of hope to her family and friends. Her kind and generous spirit continued even during the most difficult trials. Iler is survived by her husband of 29 years, Don P. Iler, and her sons, Patrick and Matthew, of Bend, and Don C., of Corvallis; her sister, Susan Tully, and brother, Joseph Tully, of Chicago; and her sister, Margaret and husband, Ed Fondel, of Hoffman Estates, Illinois. She was preceded in death by her parents.

OREGON NEWS

Portland thinks new toilet is flush Lederman was with opportunity engineer who helped develop artificial heart FEATURED OBITUARY

By Kim Murphy

Los Angeles Times

By Dennis Hevesi New York Times News Service

David Lederman, who led the team of scientists that developed the first fully implantable artificial heart — which, although it had limited success, prompted further advances in the treatment of late-stage heart disease — died on Aug. 15 at his home in Marblehead, Mass. He was 68. The cause was pancreatic cancer, his son, Jonathan, said. Lederman, an aerospace engineer, founded a small company called Abiomed in 1981, with the hopes of extending lives while providing a greater degree of independence for gravely debilitated heart patients awaiting a transplant. Working with Dr. Robert Kung, the company’s chief scientific officer, he brought together a research team (including other aerospace engineers) that designed the AbioCor. A grapefruit-size device that completely replaces a diseased heart, the AbioCor has no wires or tubes passing through the skin. When it is implanted, a coil transfers power across the skin and recharges the device from the outside. An internal battery and a controller that monitors and regulates the heart rate are implanted in the abdomen. The AbioCor differs greatly from the first total artificial heart, the Jarvik-7, designed by Dr. Robert Jarvik, which required tubes leading from the patient to a small refrigerator-size compressor when it was implanted in Dr. Barney Clark at the University of Utah in December 1982. That, too, is the distinction between the AbioCor and another artificial heart implant, the SynCardia, which is also air-driven by a compressor outside the body. Only 14 of the AbioCor devices were implanted, during clinical trials from 2001 to 2004, with the longest-living recipient surviving 512 days. By comparison, the SynCardia, with its outside-the-body tether, has been implanted in more than 1,000 patients, with the longest-living surviving 1,374 days. One problem with the AbioCor is that it is too large to fit into many patients. Abiomed is currently developing AbioCor II, which is one-third smaller than the original and projected to last up to five years. Still, the original device has had a significant impact on cardiology. “Despite the fact that the AbioCor was

not used in a multitude of patients, it paved the way for further development of completely self-contained artificial heart technology,� Dr. Kathy Magliato, a spokeswoman for the American Heart Association and the director of women’s cardiac services at the St. John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, Calif., said. Dr. Laman Gray, a professor of cardiac surgery at the University of Louisville, who with Dr. Robert Dowling performed the first AbioCor implant in 2002, concurred. “The significance is that it was totally implantable and offered people a better quality of life,� he said, adding that among the newer developments is a left-ventricular device “that is very commonly used today as a bridge to transplant.� According to the United Network for Organ Sharing, which manages the nation’s transplant system, 3,254 patients are waiting for a new heart, and so far this year 1,045 hearts have been donated. It could not be determined how many of those patients waiting for a transplant are supported by devices that evolved from the AbioCor. When it was invented, Gray said, “It was the most sophisticated device ever implanted in a human being.� David Mordechai Lederman was born in Bogota, Colombia, on May 26, 1944, to Rifka and Israel Joseph Lederman, who had immigrated there from Poland to escape the Nazis. After studying at the University of the Andes in Bogota, Lederman transferred to Cornell, from which he graduated in 1966 with a degree in engineering, physics and mathematics. He went on to earn master’s and doctoral degrees in aerospace engineering from Cornell. By then he was working on cardiac-assist technology for the Avco Corp., an aerospace technology company. He started Abiomed a year after his father died of a heart attack in his late 50s. Besides his son, he is survived by his wife of 45 years, the former Natalie Hirsch; a daughter, Jeanine Goodwin; a sister, Pearl Awenstern; two brothers, Max and Benjamin; and 10 grandchildren. Lederman had a grand vision for his enterprise. In a 2003 interview with CBS News, he said: “There is no reason a person should die when their heart stops. If the person’s brain and the rest of the body is in good shape, why should people die?�

D E 

 Deaths of note from around the world: Reginald Bartholomew, 76: U.S. diplomat who was entrusted with assignments in global danger zones and survived a bombing while serving as ambassador to Lebanon during that country’s long civil war. Died Aug. 26 at a hospital in New York City. Jan Sawka, 65: Artist whose work ranged from painting and sculpture to light shows and a movable 10-story stage

set for the Grateful Dead’s 25th-anniversary concert tour. Died Aug. 9 at his home in High Falls, N.Y. Robert Kotlowitz, 87: Novelist and editor who reluctantly became a public television executive in 1971 and went on to help shape a lineup of homegrown and imported shows including “The MacNeil/Lehrer Report,� and “Brideshead Revisited.� Died Saturday at his home in Manhattan. — From wire reports

PORTLAND — Pity the lowly public toilet, a redolent reminder of the failure of the best minds in urban planning to address the most fundamental of daily necessities. Millions have been invested in the facilities for collective relief. Often, they have become targets for graffiti, trash-can fires, furtive needle activity, commercial lovemaking, emergency baths, laundries for the homeless, and repositories of castoff diapers. Go to any city in America and ask whether it has fixed the public toilet problem, and most any city in America will hold its nose. Except Portland. Here, where just about everything is greener, hipper and more carbon-neutral, it was only a matter of time before someone came up with a sustainable urban toilet. It’s called the Portland Loo, and it may be the first toilet so popular it has its own Facebook page. The solar-powered, 6-by10-foot street-corner cabin, ingeniously stripped of much of its plumbing and privacy, has been installed at six locations around Portland, from the city’s dodgiest centers for the homeless to an upscale waterfront where stay-at-home moms take their children to play. So well has it eased into the urban landscape that Portland is looking to build and market Loos across the continent, hoping the profits will allow for the construction and maintenance of more at home. San Diego, Vancouver, Houston, Baltimore and Seattle all have expressed interest. The first official export was installed in Victoria, British Columbia, in November. “I’m convinced Portland is the only city in the U.S., and maybe the world, that celebrates the opening of bathrooms,� City Commissioner Randy Leonard said at the dedication ceremony for the city’s fifth Loo, as students from a nearby school, whose art adorns the exterior wall, sang “Skip to My Lou.� “We get calls all the time,� said project spokeswoman Anne Hill. “There’s a proven track record here: It’s in, and it’s working. And there is no other solution out there that’s been successful.� Portland officials say the Loos buck many of the conventions of public toilets: They are not installed in out-of-the-way spots where no one will see them. Rather, most are placed along sidewalks in full public view. They are not self-cleaning, but are made of prisongrade steel with plumbing so basic that they are almost impossible to damage, and a twice-a-day check by maintenance staff seems to keep them in good working order. The only water faucet is on the outside, making customers less likely to linger for hair-washing or laundry. Perhaps most important, they aren’t all that private. Louvered slats from foot level to knee level and again just above head level make activity inside somewhat visible,

and audible, to passers-by. “We can see your trunk, but not your junk,� the Portland Loo Facebook page posted recently, adding, “Bwahahaha.� “As you approach a Loo, you can see what’s happening inside,� Hill said. “If it’s 2 in the morning and there’s two sets of feet in the Loo, law enforcement has cause to knock on the door and say, ‘Why are there two sets of feet in the Loo? Two of those feet need to come out.’ � To enter the Portland Loo with a mission in mind is to understand the zen of utilitarian human biology. Function is all. There are no mirrors, no lavender sachets, no paper towel holders, no sink. Just four walls, a small dispenser of hand sanitizer and the reason you came: the steel, prison-grade toilet. The sounds of people chatting and laughing outside waft in disconcertingly between the slats. One feels the urge to act quickly and quietly, and move on. The project was the brainchild of Leonard, who watched several years ago as former Mayor Tom Potter championed the idea of spending $200,000 a year to keep a restroom in City Hall open overnight to service the city’s homeless. The problem, as Leonard saw it, was that most of the homeless hung out in Old Town, a mile away. Who, he wondered, was going to walk two miles round-trip to use the bathroom? Leonard sat down at a table with the city’s Central Precinct police captain and a community activist from what would become the citizens group PHLUSH, or Public Hygiene Lets Us Stay Human. They pored over designs from other cities, especially in Europe, and architectural designer Curtis Banger came up with a peekaboo toilet powered by two solar panels on the roof and with graffiti-washable panels. The cost: $60,000 to install plus $1,200 a month to maintain. The first installation, in December 2008, was near the Greyhound bus station in the Old Town-Chinatown area, or as Leonard puts it, “ground zero for homelessness in Portland.� The sixth, near the Portland Art Museum and Portland State University, opened this month. Portland’s Loo hasn’t been without controversy. Residents near Jamison Square Park fought bitterly against the toilet there until it went in, after which opposition seemed to melt away. A group of conservative taxpayers this year filed suit against the city, arguing that the toilets were costing more than the city claims and that city water funds aren’t meant to be spent on an international toilet marketing campaign. PHLUSH co-founder Carol McCreary, on the other hand, says the city hasn’t built enough new Loos. She says it’s also time for Portland to venture further: The group is encouraging city officials to look at comfort stations in La Jolla and Venice Beach that feature private cabins and unisex outdoor hand-washing facilities.

2012 Labor Day DEADLINES For Monday, September 3, 2012 and Tuesday, September 4, 2012

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254

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Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details.

PAID OBITUARIES .................................DEADLINE

Monday 9/3 ............................ Friday 8/31 1 p.m. Tuesday 9/4 ........................... Friday 8/31 1 p.m. DEATH NOTICES....................................DEADLINE

Monday 9/3 ........................... Saturday 9/1 noon Tuesday 9/4 .......................... Saturday 9/1 noon


THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

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W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, AUGUST 30

FRIDAY

Today: More sunshine, still a bit below average.

HIGH

Tonight: Comfortable conditions will continue through the night.

LOW

79

42 WEST Partly to mostly cloudy north and partly to mostly sunny south.

Astoria 65/53

62/50

Cannon Beach 61/48

Hillsboro Portland 76/54 76/47

Tillamook 68/46

Salem

63/47

79/52

83/53

Maupin

84/46

Corvallis Yachats

79/46

68/49

78/40

78/47

Coos Bay

77/38

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

Crescent

Chemult

78/50

83/45

82/47

Vale

Nyssa

76/38

91/48

79/39

86/44

Rome

Klamath Falls 84/43

Ashland

62/51

• 85°

91/47

Rome

83/48

81/42

88/53

Brookings

84/48

Frenchglen 91/51

Chiloquin

Medford

Yesterday’s state extremes

Jordan Valley

Paisley

64/52

88/53

Juntura

Burns Riley

82/37

85/50

EAST Mostly sunny and Ontario pleasant condi90/56 tions today.

91/56

80/40

Silver Lake

76/35

Grants Pass

Gold Beach

Unity

Christmas Valley

Port Orford 66/52

85/43

Hampton

Fort Rock 79/39

76/36

71/31

Roseburg

63/52

Baker City John Day

Brothers 78/37

La Pine 78/37

Crescent Lake

66/50

Bandon

Spray 85/43

79/42

80/44

72/42

Prineville 78/42 Sisters Redmond Paulina 74/38 79/40 81/41 Sunriver Bend

Eugene

Florence

CENTRAL Mostly sunny and pleasant conditions today.

78/41

Union

Granite

76/38

64/52

78/39

Joseph

Mitchell 80/43

82/44

Camp Sherman

79/50

Enterprise

Meacham 80/47

75/49

Madras

73/37

La Grande

Condon

Warm Springs

Wallowa

71/37

77/49

82/48

83/45

79/48

82/48

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

84/53

78/48

78/49

62/49

Hermiston 82/48

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 66/41

77/48

83/51

The Biggs Dalles 80/51

75/51

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

81/48

• 33° La

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

91/55

81/44

Pine

90/47

-30s

-20s

-10s

10s

Vancouver 65/53

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

0s

Calgary 70/42

• 32°

Cheyenne 88/58 San Francisco 63/54

Gulfport, Miss.

Las Vegas 101/82

Salt Lake City 91/70

Denver 94/60 Albuquerque 90/64

Los Angeles 78/67

Phoenix 105/86

Honolulu 87/73

40s Winnipeg 78/57

Tijuana 84/67

La Paz 94/79 Juneau 61/46

Mazatlan 90/75

60s

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 80/64

Thunder Bay 82/53

Halifax 78/62 Portland To ronto 83/60 82/68 Boston 85/66 Green Bay Detroit Buffalo 84/68 81/65 92/70 New York 86/69 Philadelphia Columbus Chicago 90/63 88/69 Omaha Des Moines 94/75 Washington, D. C. 98/67 100/66 87/69 Louisville Kansas City 94/73 98/68 St. Louis Charlotte 96/73 87/68 Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 95/69 89/72 88/74 Atlanta 85/71 Birmingham Dallas 83/72 94/74 Houston 89/76

Chihuahua 86/65

Anchorage 57/50

50s

Bismarck 84/60 St. Paul 92/68 Rapid City 88/62

Boise 87/50

Chamberlain, S.D.

• 7.72”

Saskatoon 78/50

Billings 85/54

Portland 76/54

More afternoon cloudiness, a touch cooler.

HIGH LOW

HIGH LOW

80 40

HIGH LOW

77 40

More sunshine, staying a little cool and below average.

76 38

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .5:35 a.m. . . . . . 7:29 p.m. Venus . . . . . .2:42 a.m. . . . . . 5:28 p.m. Mars. . . . . .11:27 a.m. . . . . . 9:43 p.m. Jupiter. . . . .11:41 p.m. . . . . . 2:51 p.m. Saturn. . . . .10:33 a.m. . . . . . 9:35 p.m. Uranus . . . . .8:39 p.m. . . . . . 9:06 a.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . . . . . “ High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ./ Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . “ Record high . . . . . . . . 95 in 1998 Average month to date. . . 0.45” Record low. . . . . . . . . 28 in 1969 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . “ Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Average year to date. . . . . 6.73” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.30.06 Record 24 hours . . .0.42 in 1953 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:27 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:44 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:28 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:42 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 7:00 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 5:34 a.m.

Moon phases Full

Last

New

First

Aug. 31 Sept. 8 Sept. 15 Sept. 22

OREGON CITIES

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97....High Bend, east of Hwy. 97.....High Redmond/Madras .......High

Astoria . . . . . . . 66/55/trace Baker City . . . . . .74/43/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .74/49/0.00 Burns. . . . . . . . . .77/39/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .79/51/0.00 Klamath Falls . . .77/37/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . MM/MM/NA La Pine . . . . . . . .74/33/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .84/49/0.00 Newport . . . . MM/MM/0.00 North Bend . . . . .68/54/0.00 Ontario . . . . . . . .82/59/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .76/52/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .75/58/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .70/39/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .73/37/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .80/50/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .76/51/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .75/38/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .80/55/0.00

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . . .65/53/c . . . . .66/54/pc . . . . .85/43/s . . . . . .84/43/s . . . .62/51/pc . . . . .59/52/pc . . . . .87/44/s . . . . . .87/45/s . . . . .79/46/s . . . . . .81/47/s . . . . .84/43/s . . . . . .80/38/s . . . . .81/44/s . . . . . .80/44/s . . . . .78/37/s . . . . . .79/34/s . . . . .88/53/s . . . . . .86/52/s . . . . .62/49/c . . . . .62/48/pc . . . . .63/50/s . . . . .63/48/pc . . . . .90/56/s . . . . . .91/57/s . . . . .82/48/s . . . . . .82/48/s . . . . .76/54/s . . . . . .78/55/s . . . . .78/42/s . . . . . .82/43/s . . . . .81/41/s . . . . . .80/38/s . . . .78/50/pc . . . . .80/52/pc . . . . .78/49/s . . . . . .79/49/s . . . . .79/40/s . . . . . .79/38/s . . . . .83/53/s . . . . . .82/50/s

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Sisters ..............................High La Pine..............................High Prineville...........................Ext.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,293 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118,470 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 70,921 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 23,114 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103,744 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 431 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . 1,400 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . 69 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85.2 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 1,996 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . NA Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 226 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 17.2 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 85.2 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 6

POLLEN COUNT

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL 30s

Seattle 69/54

• 112° Truckee, Calif.

20s

MONDAY

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

SUNDAY A few clouds in the afternoon hours.

Additional sunshine is expected as we wrap up the workweek.

81 39

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

HIGH LOW

SATURDAY

New Orleans 88/77

Monterrey 101/76

Orlando 93/75

National Hurricane Center's forecast position of Tropical Storm Isaac

Miami 89/78

FRONTS

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .93/66/0.00 . . . 95/71/s . 94/70/pc Akron . . . . . . . . . .77/57/0.00 . . . 86/61/s . 91/67/pc Albany. . . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . . . 83/59/s . . 90/66/s Albuquerque. . . . .90/66/0.00 . . . 90/64/s . . 90/67/s Anchorage . . . . . .63/42/0.00 . .57/50/sh . 58/49/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . . .80/73/0.98 . . . 85/71/t . . .86/73/t Atlantic City . . . . .79/61/0.00 . . . 86/69/s . . 91/72/s Austin . . . . . . . . . .95/77/0.00 . .96/75/pc . . .98/74/t Baltimore . . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . . . 86/68/s . . 90/69/s Billings . . . . . . . . .97/69/0.00 . . . 85/54/s . 88/56/pc Birmingham . . . . .85/74/0.00 . . . 83/72/t . . .87/72/t Bismarck. . . . . . .102/60/0.00 . . . 84/60/s . 87/66/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . . .83/57/0.00 . . . 87/50/s . . 87/51/s Boston. . . . . . . . . .75/62/0.00 . . . 85/66/s . . 92/69/s Bridgeport, CT. . . .78/65/0.00 . . . 83/65/s . . 88/70/s Buffalo . . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . . . 81/65/s . . 84/66/s Burlington, VT. . . .77/49/0.00 . . . 86/60/s . 86/62/pc Caribou, ME . . . . .70/48/0.00 . .77/61/pc . 80/58/pc Charleston, SC . . .88/73/0.37 . . . 85/73/t . 88/73/pc Charlotte. . . . . . . .85/73/0.00 . .87/68/pc . . 88/70/s Chattanooga. . . . .92/73/0.00 . . . 89/70/t . . .87/72/t Cheyenne . . . . . . .93/56/0.00 . .88/58/pc . 86/57/pc Chicago. . . . . . . . .84/65/0.00 . . . 94/75/s . . 97/74/s Cincinnati . . . . . . .86/59/0.00 . . . 92/64/s . 93/71/pc Cleveland . . . . . . .74/62/0.00 . . . 84/66/s . . 89/68/s Colorado Springs .91/57/0.00 . .87/53/pc . 84/54/pc Columbia, MO . . .96/68/0.00 . . . 98/67/s . 88/72/sh Columbia, SC . . . .88/75/0.07 . . . 87/70/t . 89/72/pc Columbus, GA. . . .93/74/0.04 . . . 86/73/t . . .88/74/t Columbus, OH. . . .84/60/0.00 . . . 90/63/s . 94/71/pc Concord, NH. . . . .77/49/0.00 . . . 86/55/s . 90/60/pc Corpus Christi. . .107/83/0.00 . .101/79/s . 98/79/pc Dallas Ft Worth. . .96/71/0.00 . . . 94/74/t . . .93/75/t Dayton . . . . . . . . .84/58/0.00 . . . 90/63/s . 93/70/pc Denver. . . . . . . . . .97/64/0.00 . .94/60/pc . 89/61/pc Des Moines. . . . . .96/68/0.00 . .100/66/s . . 90/68/s Detroit. . . . . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . . . 84/68/s . . 94/71/s Duluth. . . . . . . . . .83/56/0.00 . . . 90/61/s . 78/60/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . . .91/67/0.00 . . . 93/68/s . . 94/70/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . .60/40/0.00 . .70/47/pc . 64/46/sh Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .96/64/0.00 . . . 86/57/s . 86/64/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . . .80/50/0.00 . . . 79/53/t . . .77/55/t

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .81/55/0.00 . . . 88/69/s . 90/68/pc Green Bay. . . . . . .83/55/0.00 . . . 92/70/s . 88/65/pc Greensboro. . . . . .85/70/0.00 . . . 87/69/s . 88/68/pc Harrisburg. . . . . . .82/62/0.00 . . . 84/62/s . . 91/67/s Hartford, CT . . . . .77/62/0.00 . . . 85/60/s . . 91/66/s Helena. . . . . . . . . .82/60/0.00 . . . 86/52/s . 90/50/pc Honolulu. . . . . . . .85/74/0.00 . . . 87/73/s . . 88/74/s Houston . . . . . . . .98/80/0.00 . . . 89/76/t . . .94/78/t Huntsville . . . . . . .91/73/0.00 . . . 85/71/t . . .88/71/t Indianapolis . . . . .85/63/0.00 . . . 90/65/s . 91/72/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .83/75/0.41 . . . 85/74/t . . .89/75/t Jacksonville. . . . . .88/73/0.41 . . . 89/75/t . . .89/72/t Juneau. . . . . . . . . .66/44/0.00 . . . 61/46/s . . 56/44/c Kansas City. . . . . .97/66/0.00 . . . 98/68/s . 88/70/pc Lansing . . . . . . . . .80/50/0.00 . . . 88/67/s . 92/67/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .105/84/0.00 . . 101/82/t . 98/81/pc Lexington . . . . . . .87/63/0.00 . . . 90/69/s . 89/72/sh Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .98/63/0.00 . . . 98/64/s . 90/66/pc Little Rock. . . . . . .95/75/0.00 . . . 88/74/t . . .88/72/t Los Angeles. . . . . .85/72/0.00 . .78/67/pc . . 73/64/s Louisville. . . . . . . .92/67/0.00 . . . 94/73/s . 91/73/pc Madison, WI . . . . .87/62/0.00 . . . 96/68/s . . 93/66/s Memphis. . . . . . . .98/75/0.00 . . . 89/74/t . . .88/74/t Miami . . . . . . . . . .90/80/0.00 . .89/78/pc . 89/78/pc Milwaukee . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . . . 87/73/s . . 85/70/s Minneapolis . . . . .93/69/0.00 . .92/68/pc . 91/66/pc Nashville. . . . . . . .91/70/0.00 . . . 89/72/t . . .87/73/t New Orleans. . . . .79/77/6.57 . . . 88/77/t . . .89/77/t New York . . . . . . .79/67/0.00 . . . 86/69/s . . 92/74/s Newark, NJ . . . . . .83/65/0.00 . . . 86/67/s . . 94/70/s Norfolk, VA . . . . . .83/72/0.00 . . . 86/70/s . . 91/72/s Oklahoma City . . .94/66/0.00 . .95/69/pc . . .86/70/t Omaha . . . . . . . . .98/69/0.00 . . . 98/67/s . . 91/67/s Orlando. . . . . . . . .90/74/0.00 . . . 93/75/t . 91/75/pc Palm Springs. . . .106/82/0.00 . . 104/83/t 103/81/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . . .87/65/0.00 . . . 95/67/s . 92/70/sh Philadelphia . . . . .83/69/0.00 . . . 88/69/s . . 91/70/s Phoenix. . . . . . . .106/85/0.00 . . 105/86/t 103/84/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . . . 85/60/s . . 91/67/s Portland, ME. . . . .76/55/0.00 . . . 83/60/s . 87/62/pc Providence . . . . . .75/60/0.00 . . . 85/63/s . . 90/69/s Raleigh . . . . . . . . .86/72/0.00 . . . 88/69/s . . 90/70/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .107/62/0.00 . .88/62/pc . 91/64/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . . .93/51/0.00 . . . 91/58/s . . 89/54/s Richmond . . . . . . .87/69/0.00 . . . 89/68/s . . 93/70/s Rochester, NY . . . .72/57/0.00 . . . 85/64/s . . 92/67/s Sacramento. . . . . .95/54/0.00 . . . 93/58/s . . 88/57/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .91/67/0.00 . . . 96/73/s . 88/74/pc Salt Lake City . . . .95/75/0.00 . . . 91/70/t . . .91/67/t San Antonio . . . . .99/79/0.00 . . . 98/76/s 100/76/pc San Diego . . . . . . .78/67/0.00 . .81/71/pc . . 81/70/s San Francisco . . . .80/54/0.00 . . . 68/55/s . . 65/54/s San Jose . . . . . . . .89/56/0.00 . . . 78/56/s . . 72/55/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .89/55/0.00 . .82/56/pc . 83/58/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .89/73/0.64 . . . 87/73/t . 89/73/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . . .73/55/0.00 . .69/54/pc . . 68/55/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .100/59/0.00 . .101/65/s . 94/67/pc Spokane . . . . . . . .71/51/0.00 . . . 78/50/s . . 80/49/s Springfield, MO . .94/64/0.00 . . . 91/70/s . 80/70/sh Tampa. . . . . . . . . .87/75/0.15 . . . 92/78/t . 92/77/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .102/73/0.00 . . 101/74/t 101/75/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .97/65/0.00 . .95/72/pc . . .83/73/t Washington, DC . .87/69/0.00 . . . 87/69/s . . 91/71/s Wichita . . . . . . . . .94/65/0.00 . . . 94/68/s . 88/67/pc Yakima . . . . . . . . .78/44/0.00 . . . 81/50/s . . 81/47/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .105/86/0.00 . . 102/81/t 103/82/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .73/54/0.00 . .70/58/sh . 63/53/sh Athens. . . . . . . . . .84/64/0.00 . . . 91/70/s . . 87/71/s Auckland. . . . . . . .63/43/0.00 . .59/48/pc . . 61/48/s Baghdad . . . . . . .109/84/0.00 . .111/79/s . 109/77/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . . 87/75/t . . .86/77/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .95/72/0.00 . .89/63/pc . 83/63/pc Beirut . . . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . . 88/78/s . . 88/79/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .79/54/0.00 . .74/61/sh . 68/49/sh Bogota . . . . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . .69/51/sh . 68/49/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .84/52/0.00 . . . 85/57/s . 86/58/pc Buenos Aires. . . . .63/46/0.00 . . . 64/54/s . 70/58/pc Cabo San Lucas . .88/77/0.00 . . .92/79/c . . .90/77/t Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .93/77/0.00 . . . 93/76/s . . 93/73/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .70/52/0.00 . .70/42/pc . 68/45/pc Cancun . . . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . . . 89/77/t . . .89/79/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . .60/44/pc . . 65/54/c Edinburgh. . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . .58/39/sh . 55/52/sh Geneva . . . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . .73/57/sh . 64/51/sh Harare. . . . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . . . 76/48/s . . 78/52/s Hong Kong . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . . 92/82/t . . .91/82/t Istanbul. . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . .82/69/pc . 82/71/pc Jerusalem . . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . . . 86/68/s . . 87/68/s Johannesburg. . . .75/54/0.00 . . . 77/55/s . . 77/61/s Lima . . . . . . . . . . .66/61/0.00 . . . 68/60/s . 68/61/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . .80/66/pc . . 90/69/s London . . . . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . . . 69/52/t . 64/53/pc Madrid . . . . . . . . .90/64/0.00 . .87/56/pc . 82/50/pc Manila. . . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . . 82/76/t . . .84/76/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .106/84/0.00 . .107/87/s . 108/87/s Mexico City. . . . . .77/52/0.00 . . . 76/57/t . . .75/55/t Montreal. . . . . . . .77/52/0.00 . .87/71/pc . . .79/62/t Moscow . . . . . . . .59/54/0.00 . .63/42/pc . 58/43/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . . .75/59/0.00 . .76/57/pc . 78/58/pc Nassau . . . . . . . . .90/82/0.00 . . . 90/82/t . 89/80/pc New Delhi. . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . . . 96/82/t . . .98/84/t Osaka . . . . . . . . . .88/81/0.00 . . . 92/78/t . . .89/76/t Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . .63/51/sh . 58/44/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . . .77/43/0.00 . .89/67/pc . . .79/61/t Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . . . 69/55/t . 69/51/pc Rio de Janeiro. . . .75/64/0.00 . .77/63/pc . 75/59/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . . .86/63/0.00 . .86/68/pc . . .88/70/t Santiago . . . . . . . .72/48/0.00 . . .68/52/c . 71/56/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . .67/59/pc . 73/59/pc Sapporo . . . . . . . .81/79/0.00 . .82/67/pc . . 80/70/c Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . . . 83/74/r . 84/71/sh Shanghai. . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . .88/79/pc . 89/80/pc Singapore . . . . . . .84/79/0.00 . . . 85/79/t . 87/80/pc Stockholm. . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . .68/55/pc . 64/53/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . . .73/48/0.00 . .68/48/pc . 63/47/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .88/81/0.00 . . . 90/80/t . 89/80/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . . . 90/75/s . . 90/74/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . . . 93/78/t . . .89/76/t Toronto . . . . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . . . 82/68/s . 82/64/pc Vancouver. . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . .65/53/pc . . 68/53/s Vienna. . . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . . . 83/60/s . 69/55/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . . .75/48/0.00 . . . 76/53/s . . 76/59/c

Timeframeforpipeline University taking over radio stations commentsextended OREGON NEWS

The Associated Press MEDFORD — Southern Oregon University will take full control of Jefferson Public Radio’s broadcasting operations as part of a peace accord reached in the battle for its 22 stations. In the deal announced Monday, the university also will create a new fundraising arm for the entity that broadcasts in Southern Oregon and Northern California, The Mail Tribune reported. At the height of the battle in June, the university fired Ron Kramer as executive director of JPR, and he quit as head of the JPR Foundation, which did fundraising and controlled some of the radio stations. He led the operation since 1974 and had embarked on an ambitious fundraising cam-

paign to restore an old movie theater and build a new headquarters in Medford. An audit questioned his dual roles, and it warned that fundraising for the restoration of the Holly Theatre put the university at financial risk. The university, backed by the Oregon University System Chancellor’s Office, threatened to sue members of the foundation board over the issue. Gov. John Kitzhaber intervened and appointed a mediator. The agreement gives the university more oversight over the stations and creates Jefferson Live! LLC, a fundraising arm that will be a subsidiary of the JPR Foundation. Jefferson Live! could even-

tually take over ownership of the Holly Theatre, the Cascade Theatre in Redding, Calif., and Jefferson Square in Medford, the planned site of a new headquarters for the radio stations. The foundation will raise money solely for radio station operations. In addition, the university would sell the Cascade Theatre to the JPR Foundation for the remaining debt plus costs to transfer the property. University President Mary Cullinan said she saw no conflict in the fundraising activities of Jefferson Live! and the university. Sen. Alan Bates, D-Medford, and Rep. Peter Buckley, D-Ashland, said the agreement would foster a strong radio station and continue efforts to remodel the Holly

Theatre, part of an urban renewal project. Proceeds from the sale of any radio station licenses must go to support JPR, which broadcasts from Mendocino County in Northern California to Eugene. But the foundation would have to submit plans for selling off assets, borrowing money or buying property to the university for approval. The agreement also calls for the university and JPR Foundation to drop legal claims against Kramer if he agrees not to sue them. Steve Nelson, president of the JPR Foundation board, said there will be no further discussion about separating the radio stations from the university now that the agreement has been reached.

By Paul Fattig The (Medford) Mail Tribune

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has extended by nearly two months its public comment period regarding a proposed 230-mile natural gas pipeline between Coos Bay and Malin. FERC had set a Sept. 4 deadline for receiving public opinion as it prepares an environmental impact statement for the pipeline project, but U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., had asked that the comment period be extended to at least Oct. 4, citing the increased complexity of the proposal. Proponents of the Pacific Connector Pipeline earlier this year announced they

wanted to export natural gas rather than import it as previously requested. They had received FERC approval for importing natural gas, but that authorization was withdrawn after it was announced the gas would be exported. Vacating the authorization meant the firms had to obtain a new FERC certificate as LNG exporters before moving forward, according to a commission spokeswoman. The proposed pipeline would cross through northern Jackson County, including the upper Rogue River drainage. In Coos Bay, it would be connected to a proposed liquefied natural gas terminal to be built at Jordan Cove.


SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 Tennis, D2 NFL, D3

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

NFL Replacement refs set for Week 1 NEW YORK — The NFL will open the regular season next week with replacement officials and said it was prepared to use them “as much ... as necessary” afterward. Replacements will be on the field beginning Wednesday night when the Dallas Cowboys visit the New York Giants in the season opener, league executive Ray Anderson told the 32 teams in a memo. Negotiations are at a standstill between the NFL and the officials’ union. The NFL Referees Association was locked out in early June, and talks on a new collective bargaining agreement have gone nowhere. Replacements have been used throughout the preseason, with mixed results. In 2001, the NFL used replacements for the first week of the regular season before a contract was finalized. The speed of the game and the amount of time starters are on the field increase exponentially for real games, making the replacements’ task more challenging. The NFL Players Association, which went through a 4 ½- month lockout last year before settling on a new contract, expressed disappointment about the decision to use replacements. — The Associated Press

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

From wire reports CORVALLIS — Oregon State University’s originally scheduled home football opener Saturday against Nicholls State has been postponed because of Hurricane Isaac.

The two schools will not play on Sunday or Monday as was reported earlier Wednesday. “It became apparent as the day progressed that the safety of Nicholls State’s team and personnel was a pri-

mary concern,” Oregon State athletic director Bob De Carolis said. “Many of the Colonels’ student-athletes and staff are with family and there is a deepening concern about their safety in returning to campus. We will continue to discuss the possibility of rescheduling the game.” See OSU / D5

HUNTING & FISHING

to open season with test vs. Marist By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

Mark Morical / The Bulletin

John Garrison, of Sunriver, fishes East Lake in a smoky haze on Tuesday.

East Lake landings

Big stakes in some openers

— The Associated Press

PREP FOOTBALL: FRIDAY PREVIEW

Oregon State game postponed Bend High • Beavers will now start season against Wisconsin Sept. 8

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

CORAL GABLES, Fla. — A year ago, Georgia Tech started its season by dropping 63 points on Western Carolina, and Virginia Tech opened its slate with a 66-point outburst against Appalachian State. They were tune-up games, by design. This year, a handful of teams — the Yellow Jackets and Hokies included — won’t have that luxury. While plenty of teams will spend the first weekend of college football as huge favorites against overmatched opponents, six teams from the traditional power conferences will be starting up against one another, playing games that count in the league standings. South Carolina and Vanderbilt play the first Southeastern Conference game of the year tonight, Miami visits Boston College in an Atlantic Coast Conference opener on Saturday and Georgia Tech meets Virginia Tech in another ACC game on Monday night. No. 1 Southern California is a 40-point favorite to beat Hawaii this weekend, No. 3 LSU is a 43-point favorite over North Texas, and No. 4 Oklahoma, No. 5 Oregon, No. 6 Georgia are all big favorites to roll in their openers. That’s not to say everything outside of major-conference play is Cupcake City. No. 2 Alabama, the defending national champion, opens with a neutral-site game in Arlington, Texas, against No. 8 Michigan. And No. 13 Michigan State has an intriguing matchup against No. 24 Boise State.

D

MLB, D4 Hunting & Fishing, D6

NFL: NFC SEASON PREVIEW

• Going for the East Lake Slam with a fly rod is difficult, but not impossible

• Rainbows and Atlantic salmon are just half the menu for bait anglers

EAST LAKE — addy, that was awesome last night.” That was the first thing 7-year-old Ellie told her dad the next morning. After the wind that blew whitecaps all afternoon, after we missed dinner, after the girls both were ready to go home, after we shared pepGARY peroni and pretzels. LEWIS That was when we saw the first mayfly dry its wings and fly, saw the rise rings in still water along the bank. Scott Cook and I wanted to take our daughters on the water, to chase the East Lake Slam, to catch one of each — a rainbow, a brown trout, a kokanee and an Atlantic salmon. It is a feat I have never accomplished, although I have tried several times. Maybe today would be different. See Fly / D5

EAST LAKE — s soon as we pulled up to the boat ramp, John Garrison noted the coots that crowded the edge of the lake. The arrival of the dark, ducklike birds marks the coming of fall, according to Garrison, a longtime Central Oregon fishing guide. MARK “The change in MORICAL season is upon us,” he said. But one thing that has not changed is the consistent bait fishing on East Lake this summer. Garrison powered his 24-foot pontoon away from the Hot Springs boat ramp on Tuesday morning through thick smoke from regional wildfires. We were headed for an underground mound near the middle of the lake, where fish tend to congregate. See Bait / D5

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A

PACIFIC AMATEUR GOLF CLASSIC

Local golfers a rarity at Pac Am By Zack Hall The Bulletin

POWELL BUTTE — Kaye Williams and Carol Lee look like just about any other golfer at the Golf World Pacific Amateur Golf Classic. Milling about Wednesday on the outdoor patio of the clubhouse of Brasada Canyons, where they played their second round, Williams and Lee got caught up in banter with other golfers in the tournament field. Both women were decked out in fashionable golf attire and wearing loose smiles after playing well under bright, sunny skies. But Williams and Lee are a rarity in this tournament: They are both locals. Are the two Bend residents tour guides for the visiting golfers? See Pac Am / D5

Last fall, en route to an 8-3 record, Bend High opened the football season with a win against Lebanon and its deception-based veer-option offense and ended the year with a loss in the Class 5A state quarterfinals to West Albany and Inside its power-based • A look at I-formation runthe rest ning attack. of this And in the weekend’s nine games in games between, the featuring Lava Bears’ Central defense saw Oregon something differteams, D5 ent almost every single week. “That’s the biggest (challenge) we deal with is all the different looks you get today,” says first-year Bend head coach Matt Craven. “It’s not like the ’70s, when everyone ran a (five-man front) defense and the veer option, so when you prepared for one team, you prepared for all of them.” The Lava Bears, who open the 2012 campaign ranked seventh in Class 5A by The Oregonian newspaper, will match up against what is expected to be one of the top offenses in the state Friday night at 7 o’clock when they host third-ranked Marist of Eugene. See Bend / D5

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Carol Lee, center, with Nedra Partner-Miller, behind, looks over her approach shot on the 15th hole at Brasada Canyons during the Pacific Amateur Golf Classic Wednesday in Powell Butte. Lee is one of the few Bend golfers from that plays in the Pac Am.

Defending champion Giants get no respect By Rob Maaddi The Associated Press

From oddsmakers to experts, people aren’t giving the New York Giants the respect a Super Bowl champion deserves. Eli Manning and Co. sneaked into the playoffs last year Inside and then played • A teamtheir best football by-team in January and schedule, February. For the D3 second time in five years, they beat the favored On Friday New England Pa- • Look for triots to claim the an AFC Vince Lombardi preview Trophy. With nearly all their starters on defense returning and the core on offense back, the Giants have a legitimate chance to repeat. At least, they should be considered the team to beat in the NFC. Apparently, that’s not the case. In Las Vegas, 10 teams are listed ahead of the Giants in the Super Bowl odds. The Giants opened at 16-1 and have dropped to 22-1 at the Bovada Sportsbook. Then there’s the AP Pro32 NFL power rankings. The Giants were No. 3 behind the Green Bay Packers and the Patriots in the first-ever poll released July 31. See NFC / D3


D2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION Today

Friday

GOLF 5:30 a.m.: European Tour, European Masters, first round, Golf Channel. Noon: Web.com Tour, Mylan Classic, first round, Golf Channel. TENNIS 7:30 a.m.: U.S. Open, second round, Tennis Channel. 10 a.m.: U.S. Open, second round, ESPN2. 4 p.m.: U.S. Open, second round, ESPN2. BASEBALL 10 a.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Minnesota Twins, Root Sports. 4 p.m.: MLB, St. Louis Cardinals at Washington Nationals or Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto Blue Jays, MLB Network. FOOTBALL 4 p.m.: College, South Carolina at Vanderbilt, ESPN. 4 p.m.: College, Northern Colorado at Utah, Pac-12 Network. 4 p.m.: NFL, preseason, Kansas City Chiefs at Green Bay Packers, NFL Network. 4:30 p.m.: College, UCLA at Rice, CBS Sports Network. 7:15 p.m.: College, Washington State at BYU, ESPN. 7:30 p.m.: Northern Arizona at Arizona State, Pac-12 Network. 8 p.m.: College, Minnesota at UNLV, CBS Sports Network. 8 p.m.: NFL, preseason, Denver Broncos at Arizona Cardinals, NFL Network.

GOLF 5:30 a.m.: European Tour, European Masters, second round, Golf Channel. 11 a.m.: PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank Championship, first round, Golf Channel. 3:30: Web.com Tour, Mylan Classic, second round, Golf Channel. TENNIS 7:30 a.m.: U.S. Open, men’s second round and women’s third round, Tennis Channel. 10 a.m.: U.S. Open, men’s second round and women’s third round, ESPN2. 4 p.m.: U.S. Open, men’s second round and women’s third round, ESPN2. FIELD HOCKEY 2 p.m.: College, Northwestern at Cal, Pac-12 Network. BASEBALL 4 p.m.: MLB, Chicago White Sox at Detroit Tigers or Baltimore Orioles at New York Yankees 7 p.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Angels at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. VOLLEYBALL 4 p.m.: Women’s college, Stanford at Penn State, Big Ten Network. SOCCER 4 p.m.: Women’s college, Boston College at Stanford, Pac-12 Network. 7:30 p.m.: Major League Soccer, Colorado Rapids at Portland Timbers, NBC Sports Network. FOOTBALL 4:30 p.m.: Canadian Football League, BC Lions at Montreal Alouettes, NBC Sports Network. 5 p.m.: College, Boise State at Michigan State, ESPN. 7 p.m.: High school, Marist at Bend, COTV 11. 7 p.m.: College, San Jose State at Stanford, Pac-12 Network.

RADIO Friday FOOTBALL 7 p.m.: High school, Marist at Bend, KICE-AM 940, KBND-AM 1110. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Basketball • Walton joins Pac-12 Networks: Hall of Famer Bill Walton is joining the new Pac12 Networks as a color analyst who will work select college basketball games this season. Walton returns to broadcasting after a two-year hiatus to deal with back problems. He’ll also work as an ESPN analyst. The former UCLA star has spent 21 years doing commentary on the NBA, Final Four and Olympic basketball games for a variety of networks. The Pac-12 Networks said Wednesday that it will televise 150 live men’s basketball games this season, including eight conference tournament games. Every home conference game will be televised for the first time in league history. Last year, more than 90 league games weren’t on TV.

Hockey • No counteroffer from NHLPA: Talks between the NHL and its players’ association resumed at the league offices, a day after Commissioner Gary Bettman issued a second proposal with the hopes of securing a new collective bargaining agreement. The players will likely either reject Bettman’s latest offering, or issue a counterproposal sometime this week, yet neither happened on Wednesday as the two sides broke for the day in the late afternoon. Donald Fehr, the NHLPA’s executive director, said the counterproposal could come today. The current CBA expires Sept. 15, and the league has said it will lock the players out if a new agreement isn’t in place by then.

Baseball • Twins put Mauer on revocable trade waivers: The Minnesota Twins have placed All-Star catcher Joe Mauer on trade waivers, according to a report by Fox Sports. Wait, what? Joe Mauer, about to be dealt by his hometown team? The report on the network’s website late Tuesday, attributed to an unidentified “major league source,” was enough to raise

eyebrows around the sport. It said the waiver on Mauer expired Wednesday. Twins general manager Terry Ryan declined to comment, citing Major League Baseball’s policy prohibiting teams speaking publicly about the waiver wire. The process is supposed to be confidential.

Soccer • Timbers hire Akron coach: The Portland Timbers have hired University of Akron coach Caleb Porter as their head coach for the 2013 season. Porter has spent the past seven years at Akron and led the team to the national championship in 2010. He will stay with the Zips through this season. The Timbers, who are in last place in Major League Soccer’s Western Conference, fired coach John Spencer on July 9, and general manager Gavin Wilkinson took over for the rest of the season. Porter, 37, has been the Zips’ head coach since 2006, compiling a 106-17-14 record for the highest winning percentage (.825) among NCAA Division I coaches. That includes back-toback berths in the College Cup in 2009 and 2010.

ON DECK Friday Football: Marist at Bend, 7 p.m.; Mountain View at Lebanon, 7 p.m.; North Eugene at Summit, 7 p.m.; Sweet Home at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Medicine Hat (Alberta, Canada) at Ridgeview, 7 p.m.; Madras at Stayton, 7 p.m.; Henley at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Sisters at McLoughlin, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Chiloquin, 7 p.m. Cross-country: Crook County at the Night Meet in Wilsonville, 7 p.m. Volleyball: Central Christian at Trinity Lutheran, 2 p.m. Boys soccer: Sandy at Redmond, 3 p.m. Girls soccer: Sandy at Redmond, 4:30 p.m. Saturday Volleyball: Culver at Warrenton tournament, TBA Boys soccer: Sandy at Crook County, 4 p.m. Girls soccer: Sandy at Summit, noon

FOOTBALL

Local 2012 GOLF WORLD PACIFIC AMATEUR GOLF CLASSIC Aug. 29 At Courses Throughout Central Oregon Flight Leaders After Day Two (Scores are Net) Flight 1 — 1, Ross Bridges (Eugene), 136. 2, Robert Donnelly (Camas, Wash.), 139. 3, Joe Schulte (Gearhart), 141. 4 (tie), David Reid (Salem), 146; Timothy O’Reilly (Gold Canyon, Ariz.), 146; Greg Cheever (Redmond, Wash.), 146. Flight 2 — 1, Vernon Carlson (Pasco, Wash.), 138. 2, Jeff Vig (Tacoma, Wash.), 140. 3, Brian Sleight (Seatac, Wash.), 143. 4, Tom Carroll (Renton, Wash.), 144. Flight 3 — 1, Jared Ewen (Kennewick, Wash.), 138. 2, Gonzo Paigen (Santa Clarita, Calif.), 141. 3, Kyle Cronk (Renton, Wash.), 142. 4 (tie), Rick Barnett (Auburn, Wash.), 144; Stanley Anderson III (Aurora), 144; Sean Alderman (Salem), 144. Flight 4 — 1, Don Goethals (Lake Tapps, Wash.), 128. 2, Don Sherman (Portland), 140. 3, Edward Stroman (Mill Creek, Wash.), 141. 4, Darrin MacKay (Gresham), 146. Flight 5 — 1, Larry Hurley (Kingston, Wash.), 141. 2, Daniel Proulx (Keizer), 143. 3, Randy Wright (Broomfield, Colo.), 144. 4, Jim Madden (Dallas), 145. Flight 6 — 1, Clint Walker (Yuba City, Calif.), 140. 2, Anthony Gonzalez (Menlo Park, Calif.), 141. 3 (tie), Mike Parker (Portland), 142; Ron Franklin (Cashmere, Wash.), 142. Flight 7 — 1, Gary Erb (Seattle), 139. 2 (tie), Bruce Burson (Madras), 144; Joe Murray (Aloha), 144. 4, Jeffrey Nicholls (Olympia, Wash.), 148. Flight 8 — 1, Stan Richins (Yuba City, Calif.), 140. 2, Charles Korom (Phoenix), 142. 3 (tie), Scott Stovall (Bend), 143; Mark Novak (Seattle), 143. Flight 9 — 1, Thomas Ingram (Rohnert Park, Calif.), 140. 2, Wayne Neuburger (Keizer), 144. 3 (tie), Stephen Laue (Edmonds, Wash.), 146; Jim Coleman (Silverton), 146; Mike Premo (Seattle), 146 Flight 10 — 1, Timothy Swope (Redmond), 137. 2, Gary DeMattei (San Leandro, Calif.), 140. 3, William Hatch (Ojai, Calif.), 142. 4, Joe Stanley (Las Vegas), 143. Flight 11 — 1, Bob Wyrick (Arroyo Grande, Calif.), 137. 2, Mike Mirgeaux (Belmont, N.C.), 141. 3 (tie), Robert Reedal (Renton, Wash.), 142; Al Stautz (Ridgefield, Wash.), 142. Flight 12 — 1, Peach Waller (Pace, Fla.), 136. 2, Thomas Rehorst (Colorado Springs, Colo.), 140. 3 (tie), Jeff Cornwell (Lake Forest Park, Wash.), 143; Bill Abrams (Christchurch, New Zealand), 143. Flight 13 — 1, Don Morton (Garden Valley, Idaho), 138. 2, John O’Rullian (Rigby, Idaho), 139. 3 (tie), Kenneth Linden (Roseburg), 144; Bob Vidourek (Canyon City), 144. Flight 14 — 1, John Newnham (Randwick, Australia), 141. 2 (tie), Al Davis (Anchorage, Alaska), 148; Bill Bienapfl (Meridian, Idaho), 148. 4 (tie), Craig Savage (Big Lake, Alaska), 152; Mike Seashols (Belmont, Calif.), 152; David Bice (Lincoln City), 152. Flight 15 — 1 (tie), Jerry Gallardo (Grants Pass), 135; Ken Schwoerer (Villa Park, Calif.), 135. 3 (tie), Mike Laughlin (Springville, Calif.), 136; Jerry Taylor (Galt, Calif.), 136. Flight 16 — 1, Hans Behrens (Sisters), 132. 2, Jim Breymeyer (Yakima, Wash.), 135. 3, Bill Alberth (Seal Beach, Calif.), 137. 4, Ron Goodrich (Bend), 140. Flight 17 — 1 (tie), Devon Bratsman (Rexburg, Idaho), 130; Raymond Walker (Concord, Calif.), 130. 3, Taylor Story (Bend), 132. 4, Gilbert LeVander (Buckley, Wash.), 134. Flight 18 — 1, Valerie Robbins (San Diego), 145. 2, Mary Daby (Roseville, Calif.), 146. 3, Eleanor Devlin (Sammamish, Wash.), 147. 4 (tie), Kim Graham (Kirkland, Wash.), 148; Felicia King (Nampa, Idaho), 148. Flight 19 — 1, Kathy McDonald (unknown), 145. 2 (tie), Colleen Moulton (San Jose, Calif.), 147; Jennifer Fay (Milwaukie), 147. 4, Marcia Beck (Federal Way, Wash.), 149. Flight 20 — 1, Sun Baker (Belmont, Calif.), 143. 2, Nancy Rosa (Sacramento, Calif.), 144. 3, Linda Stead (Stockton, Calif.), 147. 4, Judy Knight (Hidden Valley Lake, Calif.), 148. Flight 21 — 1 (tie), Mary Ellen Knowles (Glendale, Calif.), 144; Peg Toft (Kremmling, Colo.), 144. 3 (tie), Laurilee Hatcher (Dallas, Ore.), 145; Mary Ann Low (San Jose, Calif.), 145. Flight 22 — 1, Paull Veroulis (Eureka, Mont.), 141. 2, Brett Johnson (Vancouver, Wash.), 148. 3 (tie), David LaRosa (Oakland), 152; Bret Mackay (Valencia, Calif.), 152; Gabriel Robles-Ellis (Beaverton), 152.

SOCCER MLS

GF 32 46 38 43 32 31 42 25 33 29

GA 23 39 30 37 30 29 44 30 38 46

GF GA

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE Preseason Glance All Times PDT ——— Wednesday’s Games Washington 30, Tampa Bay 3 N.Y. Giants 6, New England 3 Dallas 30, Miami 13 Today’s Games Atlanta at Jacksonville, 3:30 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Philadelphia, 3:35 p.m. Minnesota at Houston, 4 p.m. Baltimore at St. Louis, 4 p.m. Kansas City at Green Bay, 4 p.m. New Orleans at Tennessee, 4 p.m. Cincinnati at Indianapolis, 4 p.m. Buffalo at Detroit, 4 p.m. Chicago at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m. Carolina at Pittsburgh, 4:30 p.m. Oakland at Seattle, 7 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 7:05 p.m. Denver at Arizona, 8 p.m.

College PAC-12 CONFERENCE All Times PDT ——— Today’s Games Northern Colorado at Utah, 4:15 p.m. UCLA at Rice, 4:30 p.m. Washington State at BYU, 7:15 p.m. Northern Arizona at Arizona State, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Game San Jose State at Stanford, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games Nevada at California, noon Nicholls State at Oregon State, noon Colorado State vs. Colorado, 1 p.m. Hawaii at USC, 4:30 p.m. Toledo at Arizona, 7:30 p.m. San Diego State at Washington, 7:30 p.m. Arkansas State at Oregon, 7:30 p.m. Top 25 Schedule All Times PDT ——— Today’s Game No. 9 South Carolina at Vanderbilt, 4 p.m. Friday’s Games No. 13 Michigan State vs. No. 24 Boise State, 5 p.m. No. 21 Stanford vs. San Jose State, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 1 Southern Cal vs. Hawaii, 4:30 p.m. No. 2 Alabama vs. No. 8 Michigan at Arlington, Texas, 5 p.m. No. 3 LSU vs. North Texas, 4 p.m. No. 4 Oklahoma at UTEP, 7:30 p.m. No. 5 Oregon vs. Arkansas State, 7:30 p.m. No. 6 Georgia vs. Buffalo, 9:21 a.m. No. 7 Florida State vs. Murray State, 3 p.m. No. 10 Arkansas vs. Jacksonville State, 4 p.m. No. 11 West Virginia vs. Marshall, 9 a.m. No. 12 Wisconsin vs. Northern Iowa, 12:30 p.m. No. 14 Clemson vs. Auburn at Atlanta, 4 p.m. No. 15 Texas vs. Wyoming, 5 p.m. No. 17 Nebraska vs. Southern Miss., 12:30 p.m. No. 18 Ohio State vs. Miami (Ohio), 9 a.m. No. 19 Oklahoma State vs. Savannah State, 4 p.m. No. 22 Kansas State vs. Missouri State, 4 p.m. No. 23 Florida vs. Bowling Green, 12:30 p.m. Sunday’s Game No. 25 Louisville vs. Kentucky, 12:30 p.m. Monday’s Game No. 16 Virginia Tech vs. Georgia Tech, 5 p.m.

Betting line COLLEGE (Home teams in Caps) Thursday Favorite Opening Current Underdog S Carolina 6.5 7 VANDERBILT C Florida 23.5 24 AKRON BALL ST 3.5 3 E Michigan CONNECTICUT 25.5 24 Massachusetts Ucla 16 16.5 RICE BYU 13.5 12.5 Washington St Minnesota 8 8.5 UNLV Friday a-Tennessee 4 3 Nc State MICHIGAN ST 7 7 Boise St STANFORD 25.5 25.5 San Jose St Saturday i-Notre Dame 16.5 16.5 Navy W VIRGINIA 24 24.5 Marshall PENN ST 6.5 6.5 Ohio U Northwestern 1 1.5 SYRACUSE OHIO ST 22.5 24 Miami-Ohio ILLINOIS 9.5 10 W Michigan Tulsa 1 1.5 IOWA ST CALIFORNIA 11.5 11 Nevada NEBRASKA 17.5 20 So Miss Miami-Fla PK 2 BOSTON COLL c-Iowa 6.5 10 No Illinois d-Colorado 5.5 6 Colorado St GEORGIA 37.5 38 Buffalo FLORIDA 29 29 Bowling Green TEXAS 28.5 30 Wyoming HOUSTON 37.5 36.5 Texas St a-Clemson 3 3 Auburn USC 38.5 41 Hawaii ar-Alabama 12 14 Michigan Rutgers 17.5 20 TULANE Oklahoma 30.5 31 UTEP ARIZONA 10.5 10.5 Toledo WASHINGTON 14.5 14.5 San Diego St Troy 5.5 6 UAB DUKE 4 3.5 Florida Int’l

LSU OREGON

43.5 43.5 N Texas 35.5 36 Arkanas St Sunday LOUISVILLE 14.5 13.5 Kentucky BAYLOR 11 10 Smu Monday VA TECH 7.5 7.5 Ga Tech s-Shreveport, La.; a-Atlanta, Ga.; d-Dublin, Ireland.; c-Chicago, Ill.; de-Denver, Colo..; ar- Arlington, Texas.

TENNIS Professional U.S. Open Wednesday At The USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center New York Purse: $25.5 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Igor Sijsling, Netherlands, def. Daniel GimenoTraver, Spain, 7-5, 6-3, 6-4. David Ferrer (4), Spain, def. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, 6-4, 6-2, 7-6 (3). Grega Zemlja, Slovenia, def. Ricardo Mello, Brazil, 7-5, 7-6 (3), 7-5. Cedrik-Marcel Stebe, Germany, def. Viktor Troicki (29), Serbia, 6-4, 6-4, 3-6, 6-2. Brian Baker, United States, def. Jan Hajek, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-4, 6-2. Janko Tipsarevic (8), Serbia, def. Guillaume Rufin, France, 4-6, 3-6, 6-2, 6-3, 6-2. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, def. Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 6-0, 6-2, retired. Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, def. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, 6-4, 6-4, 7-5. Gilles Muller, Luxembourg, def. Mikhail Youzhny (28), Russia, 2-6, 3-6, 7-5, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (6). Benoit Paire, France, def. Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, 5-7, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 6-2. Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, def. Tobias Kamke, Germany, 4-6, 6-2, 6-1, 6-4. John Isner (9), United States, def. Xavier Malisse, Belgium, 6-3, 7-6 (5), 5-7, 7-6 (9). Richard Gasquet (13), France, def. Albert Montanes, Spain, 4-6, 6-2, 6-3, 6-3. Tommy Robredo, Spain , def. Andreas Seppi (26), Italy, 6-1, 7-5, 6-3. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, def. Tommy Haas (21), Germany, 3-6, 4-6, 6-4, 7-5, 6-3. Steve Johnson, United States, def. Rajeev Ram, United States, 6-3, 7-6 (5), 6-3. Juan Martin del Potro (7), Argentina, def. Florent Serra, France, 6-4, 7-6 (4), 6-4. Philipp Kohlschreiber (19), Germany, def. Michael Llodra, France, 7-6 (2), 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-1. Ryan Harrison, United States, def. Benjamin Becker, Germany, 7-5, 6-4, 6-2. Bradley Klahn, United States, def. Jurgen Melzer, Austria, 4-6, 6-3, 7-5, 5-7, 6-4. Second Round Andy Murray (3), Britain, def. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, 6-2, 6-1, 6-3. Women Second Round Nadia Petrova (19), Russia, def. Simona Halep, Romania, 6-1, 6-1. Victoria Azarenka (1), Belarus, def. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, 6-2, 6-2. Mallory Burdette, United States, def. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-4. Zheng Jie (28), China, def. Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, 6-3, 6-1. Lucie Safarova (15), Czech Republic, def. Aleksandra Wozniak, Canada, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2. Varvara Lepchenko (31), United States, def. Anastasia Rodionova, Australia, 6-2, 6-2. Mandy Minella, Luxembourg, def. Kristyna Pliskova, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-4. Petra Kvitova (5), Czech Republic, def. Alize Cornet, France, 6-4, 6-3. Pauline Parmentier, France, def. Yanina Wickmayer (25), Belgium, 7-6 (5), 6-3. Li Na (9), China, def. Casey Dellacqua, Australia, 6-4, 6-4. Kristina Mladenovic, France, def. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (17), Russia, 6-1, 6-2. Anna Tatishvili, Georgia, def. Sorana Cirstea, Romania, 6-7 (5), 6-1, 6-2. Laura Robson, Britain, def. Kim Clijsters (23), Belgium, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (5). Sam Stosur (7), Australia, def. Edina Gallovits-Hall, Romania, 6-3, 6-0. Marion Bartoli (11), France, def. Romina Oprandi, Switzerland, 6-2, 1-6, 7-5. Maria Sharapova (3), Russia, def. Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain, 6-0, 6-1. Show Court Schedules Today All Times PDT Play begins on all courts at 8 a.m. Arthur Ashe Stadium Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, vs. Ana Ivanovic (12), Serbia Not before 10 a.m.: Mardy Fish (23), United States, vs. Nikolay Davydenko, Russia Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez, Spain, vs. Serena Williams (4), United States Night Session (Play begins at 4 p.m.) Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, vs. Bjorn Phau, Germany Angelique Kerber (6), Germany, vs. Venus Williams, United States Louis Armstrong Stadium Maria Kirilenko (14), Russia, vs. Greta Arn, Hungary Martin Klizan, Slovakia, vs. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (5), France Sloane Stephens, United States, vs. Tatjana Malek, Germany Not before 2 p.m.: Marcel Granollers (24), Spain, vs. James Blake, United States

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Connecticut 18 6 .750 Indiana 15 8 .652 Atlanta 12 13 .480

GB — 2½ 6½

Chicago New York Washington

9 15 9 15 5 19 Western Conference W L x-Minnesota 20 4 x-Los Angeles 19 6 x-San Antonio 17 7 Seattle 11 13 Tulsa 5 19 Phoenix 4 19 x-clinched playoff spot ——— Wednesday’s Games No games scheduled Today’s Games Washington at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Indiana at New York, 4 p.m. Connecticut at San Antonio, 5 p.m. Los Angeles at Tulsa, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Seattle, 7 p.m.

.375 .375 .208

9 9 13

Pct GB .833 — .760 1½ .708 3 .458 9 .208 15 .174 15½

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX—Recalled RHP Zach Stewart from Pawtucket (IL). Optioned RHP Clayton Mortensen to Portland (EL). CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Optioned RHP Dylan Axelrod to Birmingham (SL). CLEVELAND INDIANS—Designated OF Shelley Duncan for assignment. Claimed LHP Scott Maine on waivers from the Chicago Cubs. Recalled RHP Jeanmar Gomez from Columbus (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Extended its player development contracts with Idaho Falls (Pioneer) and Burlington (Appalachian) through the 2014 season. MINNESOTA TWINS—Recalled INF-OF Chris Parmelee from Rochester (IL). Sent RHP Jeff Gray outright to Rochester. Announced LHP Scott Diamond has dropped his appeal of a six-game suspension for throwing behind Texas OF Josh Hamilton. TEXAS RANGERS—Extended its Player Development Agreement with the Hickory Crawdads of the South Atlantic League through the 2014 season. National League CHICAGO CUBS—Named Brandon Hyde director of player development. LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Placed LHP Scott Elbert on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Shawn Tolleson from Rancho Cucamonga (Calif.) ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Recalled RHP Trevor Rosenthal and C Bryan Anderson from Memphis (PCL). Optioned INF Ryan Jackson and RHP Brandon Dickson to Memphis. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Announced the completion of the sale of the franchise to the ownership group comprised of the Seidler/O’Malley families and Ron Fowler. Named Tom Garfinkel president and chief executive officer. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association HOUSTON ROCKETS—Waived F Sean Williams. PORTLAND TRAIL BLAZERS—Named Dale Osbourne assistant coach. WASHINGTON WIZARDS—Signed G-F Martell Webster. Women’s National Basketball Association ATLANTA DREAM—Suspended G Angel McCoughtry indefinitely for breaking team rules. FOOTBALL National Football League CHICAGO BEARS—Signed WR Terriun Crump. Waived/injured LB Dom DeCicco. CINCINNATI BENGALS—Signed C Jeff Faine. Waived WR Justin Hilton. NEW YORK JETS—Waived CB Ryan Steed. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Claimed DB Coye Francies off waivers from Seattle. Waived DB Conroy Black. Moved OL Zach Hurd, FB Rashawn Jackson , and OL Ed Wang from waived/injured to injured reserve. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Signed DT Matthew Masifilo to a two-year contract. Waived C Chase Beeler. WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Re-signed QB Jonathan Crompton. HOCKEY National Hockey League OTTAWA SENATORS—Signed C Kyle Turris to a five-year contract extension. SOCCER Major League Soccer MLS—Fined D.C. United coach Ben Olsen an undisclosed amount for criticizing officials after the team’s 1-1 draw against Philadelphia on Aug. 19 and FC Dallas for improper bench behavior after a 2-1 win over Real Salt Lake on Aug. 18. CHIVAS USA-Anounced Jorge Vergara and Angelica Fuentes have acquired the remaining 50 percent from their former partners to become absolute owners of MLS’ Chivas USA. HOUSTON DYNAMO—Signed MF Giles Barnes. NEW YORK RED BULLS—Loaned MF Victor Palsson to Dutch Eredivisie side NEC Nijmegen. for the entire 2012-13 Eredivisie season. PORTLAND TIMBERS—Named Caleb Porter coach for the 2013 season. COLLEGE NCAA—Declared New Mexico senior DL Ron Davis ineligible for the first two games and senior DL Fatu Ulale ineligible for the first four games of the 2012 season for impermissible benefit violations. PATRIOT LEAGUE—Announced Loyola of Maryland has accepted an invitation to join the League at the start of the 2013-14 academic year. EAST CAROLINA—Suspended senior WR Dayon Arrington, sophomore WR Danny Webster and redshirt freshman WR Antonio Cannon from the opening game for violating team policy. MARSHALL—Added G Austin Loop to the men’s basketball roster.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 7375 1494 2588 802 The Dalles 2196 645 1382 476 John Day 1644 462 634 273 McNary 1627 209 575 238 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 284,108 29,952 167,037 65,651 The Dalles 207,968 23,350 102,883 44,281 John Day 180,384 20,590 63,387 28,870 McNary 176,357 11,634 56,917 22,991

Clijsters says goodbye with 2nd-round loss

Cycling

By Howard Fendrich

• Contador charges at Vuelta: Joaquin Rodriguez held a slim overall lead on Alberto Contador after finishing seventh in the time trial Wednesday in the Spanish Vuelta. Fredrik Kessiakoff won the 24.5-mile, 11th stage individual sprint by 17 seconds over Contador. Rodriguez finished 1:16 behind Kessiakoff to retain a one-second overall lead on Contador, the 2008 champion. Christopher Froome finished 39 seconds behind the Astana cyclist’s winning time of 52 minutes, 36 seconds for third. The Tour de France runner-up is 15 seconds behind Rodriguez in third overall. Contador’s fresher state may help his push for a second Vuelta title after he arrived at the 67th edition of the classic with little racing because of a doping ban since February.

NEW YORK — Preparing for what she knew would be her last professional tennis tournament, Kim Clijsters — fourtime Grand Slam title winner; mother of 4-year-old Jada — devoted her effort and energy to the U.S. Open. Family time needed to wait a tad longer. “She was like, ‘Why don’t you come with us to go out, go for a walk?’ I’m like, ‘Mama’s almost done,’” Clijsters said Wednesday after her singles career ended where she wanted it to, just not the way she hoped. “So, yeah, I think she’s going to be excited to kind of have her mom around more, on a more regular kind of basis.” Little Jada’s gain is the tennis tour’s loss. Clijsters lost 7-6 (4), 7-6 (5) to 18-yearold Laura Robson of Britain in the second round of the U.S. Open, and will head into retirement after she finishes playing doubles at Flushing Meadows. She walked away from the sport once before, in May 2007, then returned after a hiatus of two-plus years. Now 29, the Belgian insisted this season that she means

The Associated Press

— From wire reports

33 32 26 40 35 37 35 40 43

NFL

GOLF

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts Sporting Kansas City 14 7 5 47 New York 13 7 7 46 Houston 11 6 9 42 D.C. 12 9 5 41 Chicago 12 8 5 41 Columbus 11 8 6 39 Montreal 12 13 3 39 Philadelphia 7 13 4 25 New England 6 14 6 24 Toronto FC 5 15 6 21 Western Conference W L T Pts

San Jose 15 6 5 50 52 Real Salt Lake 13 10 4 43 37 Seattle 12 6 7 43 40 Los Angeles 12 11 4 40 46 Vancouver 10 10 7 37 29 FC Dallas 8 12 8 32 33 Chivas USA 7 10 7 28 20 Colorado 8 16 2 26 33 Portland 6 13 6 24 26 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Wednesday’s Games New England 3, Chivas USA 3, tie Columbus 2, Philadelphia 1 D.C. United 2, New York 2, tie Friday’s Game Colorado at Portland, 7:30 p.m

TENNIS: U.S. OPEN it this time, and decided the U.S. Open — and its hard courts that she conquered on the way to three championships — would be her final tournament. The loss Wednesday ended Clijsters’ 22-match winning streak in New York, encompassing titles in 2005, 2009 and 2010, plus Monday’s first-round victory. Clijsters finished with a career singles record of 523-127 (a winning percentage of .805) and 41 titles, including her last major trophy at the 2011 Australian Open. She spent a total of 20 weeks ranked No. 1, as recently as February 2011. Ranked 89th, and with only one prior victory over a woman ranked in the top 25, Robson has been viewed — particularly back home in Britain — as an up-andcoming player whose smooth left-handed strokes would carry her far. But she had never produced the kind of grit and court-covering athleticism that carried her past the 23rd-seeded Clijsters. And until now, Robson never had won more than one match in a Grand Slam tournament; her claim to fame had been

teaming for a silver medal in mixed doubles at the London Olympics with Andy Murray, who reached the U.S. Open’s third round by beating 118th-ranked Ivan Dodig of Croatia 6-2, 6-1, 6-3 in the last match Wednesday night. Clijsters was the only woman of real significance who lost on Day 3, when the winners included No. 1 Victoria Azarenka, four-time major champion Maria Sharapova, defending champion Sam Stosur, 2011 Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova and 2011 French Open champion Li Na. Joining Robson with a surprise victory was American wild-card entry Mallory Burdette, the NCAA runner-up who reached the third round in her Grand Slam debut by eliminating 69th-ranked Lucie Hradecka 6-2, 6-4. She next faces Sharapova, a 6-0, 6-1 winner Wednesday night over 78th-ranked Lourdes Dominguez Lino of Spain. Earlier on Ashe, the highest-ranked American man, John Isner, let out a big exhale of relief while waving to the crowd after getting past an argumentative Xavier Malisse 6-3, 7-6 (5), 5-7, 7-6 (9) in the first round.


THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

2012 National Football League schedule Arizona Cardinals Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 4 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 29 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

Seattle at New England Philadelphia Miami at St. Louis Buffalo at Minnesota San Francisco at Green Bay BYE at Atlanta St. Louis at N.Y. Jets at Seattle Detroit Chicago at San Francisco

1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 1:25 p.m.

Dallas Cowboys Sept. 5 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Oct. 1 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 22 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30 .

at N.Y. Giants at Seattle Tampa Bay Chicago BYE at Baltimore at Carolina N.Y. Giants at Atlanta at Philadelphia Cleveland Washington Philadelphia-x at Cincinnati Pittsburgh New Orleans at Washington

5:30 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m.

Miami Dolphins Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 15 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

at Houston 10 a.m. Oakland 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets 10 a.m. at Arizona 1:05 p.m. at Cincinnati 10 a.m. St. Louis 10 a.m. BYE at N.Y. Jets 10 a.m. at Indianapolis 10 a.m. Tennessee 10 a.m. at Buffalo 5:20 p.m. Seattle 10 a.m. New England 10 a.m. at San Francisco 1:05 p.m. Jacksonville 10 a.m. Buffalo 10 a.m. at New England 10 a.m.

Pittsburgh Steelers Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 11 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 12 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

at Denver N.Y. Jets at Oakland BYE Philadelphia at Tennessee at Cincinnati Washington at N.Y. Giants Kansas City Baltimore-x at Cleveland at Baltimore San Diego at Dallas Cincinnati Cleveland

5:20 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m.

Atlanta Falcons Sept. 9 Sept. 17 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Nov. 29 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 22 Dec. 30

at Kansas City Denver at San Diego Carolina at Washington Oakland BYE at Philadelphia Dallas at New Orleans Arizona at Tampa Bay New Orleans at Carolina N.Y. Giants at Detroit Tampa Bay

10 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 10 a.m.

Baltimore Ravens Sept. 10 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 27 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

Denver Broncos Sept. 9 Sept. 17 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 15 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 6 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

Pittsburgh at Atlanta Houston Oakland at New England at San Diego BYE New Orleans at Cincinnati at Carolina San Diego at Kansas City Tampa Bay at Oakland at Baltimore Cleveland Kansas City

5:20 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 1:25 p.m.

Minnesota Vikings Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 25 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

Jacksonville at Indianapolis San Francisco at Detroit Tennessee at Washington Arizona Tampa Bay at Seattle Detroit BYE at Chicago at Green Bay Chicago at St. Louis at Houston Green Bay

10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m.

St. Louis Rams Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 4 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

at Detroit Washington at Chicago Seattle Arizona at Miami Green Bay New England** BYE at San Francisco N.Y. Jets at Arizona San Francisco at Buffalo Minnesota at Tampa Bay at Seattle

10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m.

Cincinnati at Philadelphia New England Cleveland at Kansas City Dallas at Houston BYE at Cleveland Oakland at Pittsburgh-x at San Diego Pittsburgh at Washington Denver N.Y. Giants at Cincinnati

4 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m.

Detroit Lions Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 22 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 22 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 22 Dec. 30

St. Louis at San Francisco at Tennessee Minnesota BYE at Philadelphia at Chicago Seattle at Jacksonville at Minnesota Green Bay Houston Indianapolis at Green Bay-x at Arizona Atlanta Chicago

10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 9:30 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 10 a.m.

New England Patriots Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 22 Dec. 2 Dec. 10 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

at Tennessee Arizona at Baltimore at Buffalo Denver at Seattle N.Y. Jets at St. Louis** BYE Buffalo Indianapolis at N.Y. Jets at Miami Houston San Francisco-x at Jacksonville Miami

10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m.

San Diego Chargers Sept. 10 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 15 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 1 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

at Oakland Tennessee Atlanta at Kansas City at New Orleans Denver BYE at Cleveland Kansas City at Tampa Bay at Denver Baltimore Cincinnati at Pittsburgh Carolina at N.Y. Jets-x Oakland

7:15 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 1:25 p.m.

Buffalo Bills Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 15 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

at N.Y. Jets Kansas City at Cleveland New England at San Francisco at Arizona Tennessee BYE at Houston at New England Miami at Indianapolis Jacksonville St. Louis Seattle* at Miami N.Y. Jets

10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m.

Green Bay Packers Sept. 9 Sept. 13 Sept. 24 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

San Francisco Chicago at Seattle New Orleans at Indianapolis at Houston at St. Louis Jacksonville Arizona BYE at Detroit at N.Y. Giants-x Minnesota Detroit-x at Chicago Tennessee at Minnesota

1:25 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m.

New Orleans Saints Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 5 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Nov. 29 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

Washington at Carolina Kansas City at Green Bay San Diego BYE at Tampa Bay at Denver Philadelphia Atlanta at Oakland San Francisco at Atlanta at N.Y. Giants Tampa Bay at Dallas Carolina

10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m.

San Francisco 49ers Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 18 Oct. 29 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 19 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

at Green Bay 1:25 p.m. Detroit 5:20 p.m. at Minnesota 10 a.m. at N.Y. Jets 10 a.m. Buffalo 1:25 p.m. N.Y. Giants 1:25 p.m. Seattle 5:20 p.m. at Arizona 5:30 p.m. BYE St. Louis 1:25 p.m. Chicago 5:30 p.m. at New Orleans 1:25 p.m. at St. Louis 10 a.m. Miami 1:05 p.m. at New England-x 5:20 p.m. at Seattle 1:25 p.m. Arizona 1:25 p.m.

Carolina Panthers Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 20 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 26 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

at Tampa Bay New Orleans N.Y. Giants at Atlanta Seattle BYE Dallas at Chicago at Washington Denver Tampa Bay at Philadelphia at Kansas City Atlanta at San Diego Oakland at New Orleans

1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m.

Houston Texans Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 8 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 22 Dec. 2 Dec. 10 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

Miami at Jacksonville at Denver Tennessee at N.Y. Jets Green Bay Baltimore BYE Buffalo at Chicago Jacksonville at Detroit at Tennessee at New England Indianapolis Minnesota at Indianapolis

10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 9:30 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m.

All times Pacific; times subject to change x-Sunday night games subject to change * inToronto ** in London

Chicago Bears Sept. 9 Sept. 13 Sept. 23 Oct. 1 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 22 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 19 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

Dallas Tampa Bay at Carolina at Philadelphia Cleveland at San Francisco Washington at Dallas Pittsburgh at Cincinnati BYE Green Bay-x at Washington New Orleans at Atlanta at Baltimore Philadelphia

5:30 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m.

Seattle Seahawks Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 24 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 18 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

at Arizona Dallas Green Bay at St. Louis at Carolina New England at San Francisco at Detroit Minnesota N.Y. Jets BYE at Miami at Chicago Arizona at Buffalo* San Francisco St. Louis

1:25 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 1:25 p.m.

Indianapolis at Green Bay St. Louis at Dallas at Jacksonville BYE Detroit Carolina at Tennessee Houston at San Francisco Minnesota Seattle at Minnesota Green Bay at Arizona at Detroit

Cincinnati Bengals

10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m.

Indianapolis Colts Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 8 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

at Chicago 10 a.m. Minnesota 10 a.m. Jacksonville 10 a.m. BYE Green Bay 10 a.m. at N.Y. Jets 10 a.m. Cleveland 10 a.m. at Tennessee 10 a.m. Miami 10 a.m. at Jacksonville 5:20 p.m. at New England 10 a.m. Buffalo 10 a.m. at Detroit 10 a.m. Tennessee 10 a.m. at Houston 10 a.m. at Kansas City 10 a.m. Houston 10 a.m.

New York Jets

New York Giants Sept. 5 Sept. 16 Sept. 20 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 3 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

D3

Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 8 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 22 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 17 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

Buffalo at Pittsburgh at Miami San Francisco Houston Indianapolis at New England Miami BYE at Seattle at St. Louis New England Arizona at Jacksonville at Tennessee San Diego-x at Buffalo

Carolina at N.Y. Giants at Dallas Washington BYE Kansas City New Orleans at Minnesota at Oakland San Diego at Carolina Atlanta at Denver Philadelphia at New Orleans St. Louis at Atlanta

at Baltimore Cleveland at Washington at Jacksonville Miami at Cleveland Pittsburgh BYE Denver N.Y. Giants at Kansas City Oakland at San Diego Dallas at Philadelphia at Pittsburgh Baltimore

4 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m.

Jacksonville Jaguars  Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 8 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

at Minnesota Houston at Indianapolis Cincinnati Chicago BYE at Oakland at Green Bay Detroit Indianapolis at Houston Tennessee at Buffalo N.Y. Jets at Miami New England at Tennessee

10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m.

Oakland Raiders

10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 25 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

Sept. 10 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 13 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m.

Sept. 10 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 6 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

San Diego at Miami Pittsburgh at Denver BYE at Atlanta Jacksonville at Kansas City Tampa Bay at Baltimore New Orleans at Cincinnati Cleveland Denver Kansas City at Carolina at San Diego

7:15 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m.

Tennessee Titans Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 11 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 17 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

New England at San Diego Detroit at Houston at Minnesota Pittsburgh at Buffalo Indianapolis Chicago at Miami BYE at Jacksonville Houston at Indianapolis N.Y. Jets at Green Bay Jacksonville

10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m.

Cleveland Browns Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 27 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

Philadelphia at Cincinnati Buffalo at Baltimore at N.Y. Giants Cincinnati at Indianapolis San Diego Baltimore BYE at Dallas Pittsburgh at Oakland Kansas City Washington at Denver at Pittsburgh

10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m.

Kansas City Chiefs Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 1 Nov. 12 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

Atlanta at Buffalo at New Orleans San Diego Baltimore at Tampa Bay BYE Oakland at San Diego at Pittsburgh Cincinnati Denver Carolina at Cleveland at Oakland Indianapolis at Denver

10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m.

Philadelphia Eagles Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 5 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 26 Dec. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 13 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

at Cleveland Baltimore at Arizona N.Y. Giants at Pittsburgh Detroit BYE Atlanta at New Orleans Dallas at Washington Carolina at Dallas-x at Tampa Bay Cincinnati Washington at N.Y. Giants

10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m.

Washington Redskins Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 Nov. 11 Nov. 18 Nov. 22 Dec. 3 Dec. 9 Dec. 16 Dec. 23 Dec. 30

at New Orleans at St. Louis Cincinnati at Tampa Bay Atlanta Minnesota at N.Y. Giants at Pittsburgh Carolina BYE Philadelphia at Dallas N.Y. Giants Baltimore at Cleveland at Philadelphia Dallas

10 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m.

SOURCE: National Football League

NFC Continued from D1 So, who do opponents think is the best team in the NFC? Even teammates disagree. “It was a coin flip whether the Giants even got into the playoffs,” Philadelphia Eagles guard Evan Mathis said. “They played very well, obviously, and they deserved it, but Green Bay, with their experience, should be the team to beat.” The Giants went 9-7 last year and split with the Eagles, losing at home with Vince Young starting in place of Michael Vick. Had one play gone differently in any of Philadelphia’s close defeats, the Eagles (8-8) would’ve won the division. Meanwhile, the Packers steamrolled to a 15-1 record and seemed on their way to winning their second straight Super Bowl before losing to the Giants in their first playoff game. “The Giants are the Super Bowl champs, so they’re the team to beat,” Eagles linebacker DeMeco Ryans said. “Each year, each team, it’s a new season. But the Giants hold the rein.” Maybe until Week 1. “We know we’ve got to improve,” Manning said. “We were 9-7 last year in the regular season. That’s not good enough. We were a better team than that. Obviously we showed that throughout the playoffs. We’ve got to have that urgency, that consistency, throughout the whole season, and play our best football for the 16 regular-season games. That’s what we’re going to work on and just keep grinding, staying hungry to get better and to make sure we can have another successful year this year.” The Packers might not place as much emphasis on the regular season after last year’s

AP

debacle. “We went through a great regular season, winning 15 games and doing a lot of things that hadn’t happened here in Green Bay before, and got knocked out in the first round,” NFL MVP Aaron Rodgers said. “It makes you realize the only thing that matters is winning championships, and you have to win some playoff games to get there.” Here is a look at the NFC’s divisions, in predicted order of finish:

NFC East The Giants have an elite quarterback, a strong defense led by All-Pro Jason PierrePaul, and a Hall-of-Fame caliber coach in Tom Coughlin. But they’ve never won a playoff game the season after winning a Super Bowl. And, they’ll have a hard time just getting out of a tough East. The Eagles are determined to prove last year was an aberration, and expect to build off a season-ending four-game winning streak. Players rallied around coach Andy Reid after his 29-year-old son, Garrett, died during training camp. They have an explosive offense with Vick, All-Pro running back LeSean McCoy and wide receivers DeSean Jackson and Jeremy Maclin, but need a revamped defense to do its part. In Dallas, the window could be closing on Tony Romo and the Cowboys. They lost four of five down the stretch last season to finish 8-8 and have won just one playoff game in 15 years. Dallas beefed up its defense in the offseason, giving second-year coordinator Rob Ryan more talent to work with. Romo and coach Jason Garrett have been together a long time, and the offense could be dangerous. There’s plenty of reason for optimism in Washington

because the Redskins finally have their franchise quarterback in Robert Griffin III. With RG3 leading the way and a defense that made huge strides last year, the Redskins have a chance to win more than six games for the first time under coach Mike Shanahan.

NFC North The Packers had little roster turnover and were nearly invincible last year until running into the Giants. Rodgers and the league’s No. 1 offense have a new weapon in running back Cedric Benson. But the worst-ranked defense needs to improve to make things easier. The Packers invested their first six draft picks on defense, so that should help a bit. Jay Cutler and Brandon Marshall are reunited in Chicago, bolstering an offense that was potent until injuries hit last season. Keeping Cutler healthy is a top priority. On defense, the Bears have some aging stars. Still, they could give Green Bay a run for the title. The Lions learned to win last year, going 10-6 and making the playoffs for the first time in more than a decade. They return almost all of their starters and have continuity on the coaching staff. QB Matthew Stafford, whose chief target is All-Pro WR Calvin Johnson, could be even better if the offense finds balance. All that means Detroit probably wasn’t a one-year flash. It’s clearly a rebuilding year in Minnesota. The Vikings won three games last year, and their best player, running back Adrian Peterson, is coming back from major knee surgery.

NFC South The Saints lost coach Sean Payton to a suspension, but they still have record-breaking QB Drew Brees. The bounty scandal made for a tumultu-

ous offseason, and the Saints are eager to just play football. Bringing in Steve Spagnuolo to run the defense could prove to be the biggest move of the offseason. It’s obvious Atlanta’s Matt Ryan and Mike Smith can win in the regular season. But the quarterback and the coach haven’t shown it in the playoffs. Two new coordinators could help Smith make the right moves. Cam Newton’s sensational rookie season has everyone eager to see more of Carolina. Newton is a special player who makes the offense a threat each time it has the ball. If the defense plays better, the Panthers could be a surprise team. Greg Schiano makes the transition from college to the pros in Tampa Bay. He’s got a tough task trying to turn around a 4-12 team. A difficult early schedule doesn’t help. Finishing .500 would be a remarkable step forward.

CB-KR Patrick Peterson can provide more of his magic. Rookie QB Russell Wilson beat out Matt Flynn for the starting job in Seattle. Neither will be throwing passes to Terrell Owens, but the new Seahawks QB can only upgrade an offense that ranked 28th despite featuring RB Marshawn Lynch. An already solid defense could be dominant with the addition of eight skilled rookies, and might get coach Pete Carroll a winning season. Jeff Fisher has his work cut

out for him in St. Louis. The Rams cleaned house after a 2-14 season. Fisher was one of the most successful coaches in the NFL with the Oilers/Titans. Count on the Rams to be a physical team that beats up some opponents, even if it doesn’t beat them on the scoreboard.

2012

NFC West Coach of the Year Jim Harbaugh led a San Francisco team with an often-maligned quarterback that hadn’t reached the playoffs in eight years to the doorstep of the Super Bowl. A stout defense returns all its starters, and Randy Moss is back in the league after a year off to upgrade an offense that once boasted some of the greatest players in history. Alex Smith finally has deep threats with the addition of Moss and Mario Manningham, but the 49ers still rely on Frank Gore and the run game. The Cardinals spent much of the preseason trying to figure out whether Kevin Kolb or John Skelton should be the starting QB. It doesn’t bode well that neither ran away with the job. Whoever is under center needs to get the ball to Larry Fitzgerald, and maybe

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D4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

M AJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

AL Boxscores Twins 10, Mariners 0 Seattle Ackley 2b T.Robinson lf Seager 3b Jaso dh Smoak 1b Thames rf Olivo c Figgins cf Kawasaki ss Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 3 0 2 1 2 1 0 0 10

Avg. .231 .247 .251 .279 .190 .246 .214 .185 .196

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Revere cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .306 J.Carroll 2b 5 2 2 0 0 0 .248 Mauer dh 5 1 3 2 0 0 .312 Willingham lf 3 1 2 2 0 0 .262 Mastroianni lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .272 Morneau 1b 4 1 2 2 0 2 .276 Doumit c 5 0 2 0 0 1 .284 Parmelee rf 5 2 1 0 0 1 .204 Plouffe 3b 4 2 2 4 1 1 .242 Florimon ss 2 1 1 0 2 1 .282 Totals 39 10 16 10 3 7 Seattle 000 000 000 — 0 2 1 Minnesota 003 210 31x — 10 16 0 E—Smoak (3). LOB—Seattle 2, Minnesota 10. 2B—Plouffe (13), Florimon (3). 3B—Mauer (2). HR—Plouffe (20), off Vargas; Willingham (32), off Vargas. SB—T.Robinson (6).

T—2:38. A—33,271 (41,009).

American League

National League

East Division Pct GB WCGB .577 — — .550 3½ — .546 4 ½ .473 13½ 10 .450 16½ 13 Central Division Pct GB WCGB .558 — — .535 3 2 .450 14 13 .423 17½ 16½ .408 19½ 18½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .592 — — .558 4½ — .523 9 3½ .481 14½ 9

East Division Pct GB WCGB .605 — — .565 5 — .469 17½ 10 .469 17½ 10 .450 20 12½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .606 — — .546 8 — .538 9 1 .481 16½ 8½ .380 29½ 21½ .308 39 31 West Division Pct GB WCGB .562 — — .534 3½ 1½ .489 9½ 7½ .462 13 11 .411 19½ 17½

New York Baltimore Tampa Bay Boston Toronto

W 75 71 71 62 58

L 55 58 59 69 71

Chicago Detroit Kansas City Cleveland Minnesota

W 72 69 58 55 53

L 57 60 71 75 77

Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 77 72 68 63

L 53 57 62 68

Wednesday’s Games Toronto 8, N.Y. Yankees 5 Chicago White Sox 8, Baltimore 1 Oakland 8, Cleveland 4 Tampa Bay 8, Texas 4 Kansas City 1, Detroit 0 Minnesota 10, Seattle 0 L.A. Angels 10, Boston 3

L10 4-6 7-3 5-5 3-7 2-8

Str Home Away L-1 40-26 35-29 L-1 36-30 35-28 W-1 35-30 36-29 L-2 32-38 30-31 W-1 31-30 27-41

L10 7-3 5-5 5-5 1-9 3-7

Str Home Away W-1 38-26 34-31 L-2 39-26 30-34 W-2 28-33 30-38 L-4 31-34 24-41 W-1 25-39 28-38

L10 7-3 8-2 6-4 6-4

Str Home Away L-1 43-25 34-28 W-5 39-27 33-30 W-2 35-29 33-33 L-1 33-30 30-38

Today’s Games Oakland (J.Parker 8-7) at Cleveland (Masterson 10-11), 9:05 a.m. Chicago White Sox (Quintana 5-2) at Baltimore (Britton 3-1), 9:35 a.m. Seattle (Beavan 8-8) at Minnesota (Duensing 3-9), 10:10 a.m. Tampa Bay (M.Moore 10-7) at Toronto (Villanueva 6-4), 4:07 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 9-9) at Kansas City (Guthrie 2-3), 5:10 p.m. Boston (Lester 8-10) at L.A. Angels (Greinke 2-2), 7:05 p.m.

Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Vargas L, 13-9 4 2-3 8 6 5 2 5 102 3.90 C.Capps 2 4 3 3 0 1 39 5.87 Luetge 1 1-3 4 1 1 1 1 35 2.55 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Deduno W, 5-2 7 2 0 0 0 9 98 3.72 T.Robertson 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 6.11 Swarzak 1 0 0 0 0 1 17 4.60 T—2:49. A—29,281 (39,500).

Washington Atlanta New York Philadelphia Miami

W 78 74 61 61 59

L 51 57 69 69 72

Cincinnati St. Louis Pittsburgh Milwaukee Chicago Houston

W 80 71 70 62 49 40

L 52 59 60 67 80 90

San Francisco Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado

W 73 70 64 61 53

L 57 61 67 71 76

Wednesday’s Games L.A. Dodgers 10, Colorado 8 Cincinnati 6, Arizona 2 San Diego 8, Atlanta 2 N.Y. Mets 3, Philadelphia 2 Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 0 Washington 8, Miami 4 Milwaukee 3, Chicago Cubs 1 San Francisco 6, Houston 4

Nationals 8, Marlins 4

L10 4-6 4-6 4-6 6-4 4-6

Str Home Away W-1 36-24 42-27 L-1 36-29 38-28 W-4 30-35 31-34 L-2 31-37 30-32 L-1 30-32 29-40

L10 6-4 6-4 4-6 8-2 2-8 1-9

Str Home Away W-3 42-24 38-28 L-2 40-26 31-33 W-2 40-26 30-34 W-4 38-28 24-39 L-3 32-32 17-48 L-4 27-37 13-53

L10 7-3 4-6 2-8 9-1 7-3

Str Home Away W-2 37-28 36-29 W-1 35-29 35-32 L-6 33-34 31-33 W-1 33-33 28-38 L-1 28-40 25-36

Today’s Games N.Y. Mets (Niese 10-7) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 7-9), 10:05 a.m. Milwaukee (Marcum 5-4) at Chicago Cubs (Raley 1-2), 11:20 a.m. St. Louis (J.Garcia 3-5) at Washington (E.Jackson 7-9), 4:05 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 11-7) at Houston (Lyles 3-10), 5:05 p.m. Arizona (I.Kennedy 11-11) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 12-7), 7:10 p.m.

Royals 1, Tigers 0 Detroit A.Jackson cf Dirks lf Mi.Cabrera 3b Fielder 1b D.Young dh Jh.Peralta ss Je.Baker rf Avila c R.Santiago 2b Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 4 3 2 3 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 6

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

SO 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 6

Avg. .309 .332 .325 .310 .271 .254 .206 .250 .211

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. J.Dyson cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .270 A.Escobar ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .304 A.Gordon lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .296 Butler dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .305 Moustakas 3b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .251 L.Cain rf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .251 Hosmer 1b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .240 B.Pena c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Giavotella 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .226 Totals 31 1 8 1 0 1 Detroit 000 000 000 — 0 6 0 Kansas City 000 100 00x — 1 8 0 LOB—Detroit 6, Kansas City 6. 2B—A.Jackson (23), Mi.Cabrera (33), Moustakas (27). SB— A.Escobar (27). DP—Detroit 1; Kansas City 2. Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA A.Sanchez L, 2-4 7 7 1 1 0 1 119 5.29 Dotel 1 1 0 0 0 0 20 2.98 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA B.Chen W, 10-10 8 4 0 0 1 4 100 5.13 G.Holland S, 9-11 1 2 0 0 0 2 18 2.83 T—2:25. A—13,024 (37,903).

Athletics 8, Indians 4 Oakland Crisp cf Drew ss Cespedes lf S.Smith dh Carter 1b Reddick rf Donaldson 3b D.Norris c Pennington 2b Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 43

R 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 8

H 2 1 3 1 2 3 2 1 0 15

BI 0 0 1 1 1 1 3 1 0 8

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 2 1 1 3 0 2 2 0 1 12

Avg. .256 .214 .298 .243 .274 .257 .226 .197 .194

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kipnis dh 5 0 0 1 0 3 .253 As.Cabrera ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .274 Hannahan 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Choo rf 3 1 0 0 2 1 .277 C.Santana c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .244 Marson c 1 1 1 0 0 0 .235 Brantley cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .287 Lillibridge 3b-ss 3 0 0 1 0 1 .185 LaPorta 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .130 a-Kotchman ph-1b 2 0 1 1 0 0 .235 Donald 2b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .215 Carrera lf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .308 Totals 34 4 7 4 3 8 Oakland 000 301 202 — 8 15 1 Cleveland 002 000 020 — 4 7 1 a-singled for LaPorta in the 7th. E—Donaldson (8), Donald (5). LOB—Oakland 8, Cleveland 8. 2B—Crisp (18), Drew (2), Cespedes (20), S.Smith (17), Carter (11), Reddick (24), D.Norris (7), Carrera (3). 3B—Carrera (3). HR—Donaldson (3), off Kluber; Donald (2), off Blackley. SB—Crisp (29). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP Blackley W, 5-3 5 2-3 3 2 2 2 5 92 Neshek H, 2 1-3 2 0 0 0 1 12 Doolittle H, 10 1 1-3 1 2 0 1 0 30 Blevins H, 10 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 R.Cook S, 13-20 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 2 22 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP Kluber L, 0-3 6 8 4 3 0 7 98 C.Allen 1 4 2 2 0 3 27 J.Gomez 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 Pestano 1 3 2 2 0 1 25 Neshek pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. T—3:26. A—14,412 (43,429).

ERA 3.50 1.08 3.23 2.55 2.40 ERA 5.16 2.04 5.11 2.08

Rays 8, Rangers 4 Tampa Bay De.Jennings lf B.Upton cf Zobrist ss Longoria dh Keppinger 1b R.Roberts 2b E.Johnson 3b J.Molina c Fuld rf Totals

AB 4 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 40

R 2 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 8

H 2 2 3 2 4 0 1 1 1 16

BI 0 3 1 3 0 0 1 0 0 8

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 2 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 7

Avg. .249 .247 .267 .293 .325 .212 .247 .207 .313

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler dh 5 0 0 0 0 3 .267 Andrus ss 4 1 2 0 0 1 .300 Hamilton cf 3 1 2 1 1 1 .292 Beltre 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .311 N.Cruz rf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .264 Mi.Young 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Dav.Murphy lf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .312 Moreland 1b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .296 L.Martinez c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .091 a-Soto ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Totals 36 4 9 4 1 8 Tampa Bay 330 001 001 — 8 16 1 Texas 021 010 000 — 4 9 1 a-lined out for L.Martinez in the 9th. E—Fuld (1), Mi.Young (5). LOB—Tampa Bay 6, Texas 6. 2B—Zobrist (33), Andrus (28). 3B—Fuld (2). HR—Longoria (8), off M.Harrison; B.Upton (16), off M.Harrison; E.Johnson (5), off M.Harrison; Longoria (9), off Ogando; Moreland (15), off Cobb; Hamilton (36), off Cobb. SB—B.Upton (25), Fuld (7). DP—Texas 4. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cobb 4 2-3 8 4 3 1 3 92 4.39 Badenhop 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 3.04 McGee W, 5-2 H 1 0 0 0 0 1 19 2.16 Farnsworth H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 2.84 Jo.Peralta H, 31 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 3.46 Rodney 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 0.75 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harrison L, 15-8 5 1-3 12 7 7 1 5 95 3.30 Uehara 1 2-3 2 0 0 0 2 17 1.88 R.Ross 1 0 0 0 0 0 17 1.78 Ogando 1 2 1 1 0 0 13 2.82 Inherited runners-scored—Badenhop 1-0, Uehara 1-0. WP—Cobb 2, M.Harrison. T—3:02. A—36,176 (48,194).

White Sox 8, Orioles 1 Chicago Wise cf

AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 1 1 0 1 1 .278

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Blue Jays 8, Yankees 5: NEW YORK — Yunel Escobar hit a two-run homer, three doubles and drove in five runs as Toronto beat New York, ending CC Sabathia’s five years of dominance over the Blue Jays. Sabathia (13-4) was undefeated over his past nine starts against Toronto — 8-0 with a 2.48 ERA — since the beginning of his Cy Young Award season of 2007 with Cleveland. • White Sox 8, Orioles 1: BALTIMORE — White Sox rookie Dylan Axelrod took a three-hitter into the eighth inning and Chicago spoiled the Baltimore debut of Joe Saunders, scoring seven runs off the left-hander. • Rays 8, Rangers 4: ARLINGTON, Texas — Evan Longoria homered twice, Tampa Bay roughed up Matt Harrison and the Rays beat the Rangers to snap a four-game losing streak. Josh Hamilton hit his 36th home run for Texas. • Athletics 8, Indians 4: CLEVELAND — Josh Donaldson hit a three-run homer and five Oakland pitchers combined to beat Cleveland. Oakland took over the AL wild-card lead by one game over Baltimore with its 11th win in 13 games. • Royals 1, Tigers 0: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Bruce Chen allowed four hits over a season-high eight innings, and Eric Hosmer’s infield single in the fourth drove in the only run in Kansas City’s win over Detroit. • Twins 10, Mariners 0: MINNEAPOLIS — Samuel Deduno dominated for seven innings, Trevor Plouffe homered and had four RBIs, and the Twins beat the Mariners. • Angels 10, Red Sox 3: ANAHEIM, Calif. — Kendrys Morales and Chris Iannetta hit early two-run homers, C.J. Wilson snapped his 11-start winless skid and Los Angeles beat Boston.

• Reds 6, Diamondbacks 2: PHOENIX — Chris Heisey hit two of Cincinnati’s four late homers, including a tying shot in the seventh inning, to rally the Reds to a victory over Arizona. Dioner Navarro’s solo shot two batters after Heisey’s two-run drive put Cincinnati ahead. • Dodgers 10, Rockies 8: DENVER — Joe Blanton pitched effectively into the eighth inning for his first win with Los Angeles and A.J. Ellis hit his first career grand slam in a victory over Colorado. • Pirates 5, Cardinals 0: PITTSBURGH — Pedro Alvarez kept up his recent tear, hitting his 26th homer and driving in three runs as Pittsburgh rolled to a victory over St. Louis. • Nationals 8, Marlins 4: MIAMI — Bryce Harper homered twice for the first time in his career and first-place Washington snapped a five-game losing streak by beating Miami. He had a chance for a threehomer night but grounded into a double play in the ninth, spiked his helmet in frustration after crossing the bag and was ejected by umpire C.B. Bucknor. • Padres 8, Braves 2: SAN DIEGO — With their new owners watching, Chase Headley and the Padres beat Atlanta for their ninth win in 10 games. • Mets 3, Phillies 2: PHILADELPHIA — Lucas Duda hit a two-run homer, Matt Harvey had another sharp outing and New York beat Philadelphia for its fourth straight win. • Brewers 3, Cubs 1: CHICAGO — Mike Fiers tossed 7 1⁄3 solid innings to lead Milwaukee to its eighth straight victory over Chicago. • Giants 6, Astros 4: HOUSTON — Hunter Pence hit a three-run homer and Joaquin Arias drove in two with a triple to help San Francisco beat Houston.

Youkilis 3b Olmedo 3b A.Dunn dh Konerko 1b Rios rf Viciedo lf Al.Ramirez ss Flowers c Beckham 2b Totals

4 1 3 4 4 4 4 3 4 35

0 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 0 0 0 3 8 12

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 8 5 7

.243 .278 .206 .315 .301 .255 .267 .231 .232

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Markakis rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .293 Hardy ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .231 Ford lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .205 McLouth lf-cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .263 Ad.Jones cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .286 Flaherty 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Wieters c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .238 C.Davis dh 3 0 1 0 0 0 .257 Mar.Reynolds 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .220 Quintanilla 2b-ss 2 0 0 1 0 1 .261 Machado 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .238 Totals 28 1 3 1 4 5 Chicago 400 102 100 — 8 12 0 Baltimore 000 100 000 — 1 3 1 E—Wieters (10). LOB—Chicago 6, Baltimore 6. 2B—Rios (31), Beckham (21), Wieters (21), C.Davis (15). SB—Wise (11). DP—Chicago 1; Baltimore 3. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Axelrod W, 2-2 7 1-3 3 1 1 4 5 112 4.93 Veal 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 15 1.42 N.Jones 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 3.20 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Saunders L, 0-1 5 1-3 10 7 6 2 4 99 10.13 Gregg 1 1-3 2 1 1 3 0 36 4.32 Ayala 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 23 2.71 S.Johnson 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.00 T—2:51. A—13,098 (45,971).

Angels 10, Red Sox 3 Boston Ciriaco 3b-2b Ellsbury cf Kalish cf Pedroia 2b Loney 1b C.Ross rf Lavarnway c M.Gomez 1b-3b Aviles dh Iglesias ss Podsednik lf Totals

AB 5 4 1 3 1 4 4 4 4 4 3 37

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 3

H 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 3 2 0 2 11

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 2 0 6

Avg. .345 .273 .202 .282 .308 .278 .196 .327 .257 .000 .370

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Trout cf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .339 Tor.Hunter rf 4 1 3 2 0 1 .294 Calhoun rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .188 Pujols dh 3 1 1 1 1 1 .285 a-Bo.Wilson ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .222 K.Morales 1b 4 2 2 2 1 2 .274 Trumbo lf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .277 H.Kendrick 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .292 Callaspo 3b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .246 Aybar ss 4 2 2 1 0 0 .276 Iannetta c 4 1 2 2 0 1 .248 Totals 37 10 14 9 4 8 Boston 010 020 000 — 3 11 1 Los Angeles 414 010 00x — 10 14 1 E—Pedroia (5), Iannetta (2). LOB—Boston 10, Los Angeles 7. 2B—Tor.Hunter 2 (18), K.Morales (18), Callaspo (14), Aybar 2 (24). HR—K.Morales (17), off Z.Stewart; Iannetta (7), off Z.Stewart. SB—Ellsbury (11), Aviles (12). DP—Boston 1 (Pedroia, Iglesias, M.Gomez). Boston Z.Stewart L, 1-3 Tazawa A.Miller Aceves Los Angeles C.Wilson W, 10-9 Walden Isringhausen Williams

IP 3 2 1 2 IP 6 1 1 1

H 10 1 2 1 H 8 0 2 1

R 9 1 0 0 R 3 0 0 0

ER BB SO NP ERA 9 0 2 72 7.91 1 1 2 24 1.80 0 1 2 22 3.67 0 2 2 33 4.61 ER BB SO NP ERA 3 2 4 108 3.86 0 0 0 13 3.98 0 0 1 20 4.01 0 0 1 12 4.68

T—3:06. A—37,841 (45,957).

Blue Jays 8, Yankees 5 Toronto R.Davis lf McCoy cf-rf Encarnacion dh Lind 1b Y.Escobar ss K.Johnson 2b Sierra rf b-Rasmus ph-cf Mathis c Hechavarria 3b Totals

AB 5 5 4 4 5 4 3 2 4 4 40

R 1 2 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 8

H 1 0 1 2 4 2 0 0 1 1 12

BI 0 0 1 1 5 0 0 0 1 0 8

BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 0 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 0 10

Avg. .249 .186 .287 .232 .252 .223 .282 .231 .217 .216

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jeter ss 4 1 1 0 1 1 .321 Swisher 1b 3 2 0 0 2 1 .274 Cano 2b 5 0 1 0 0 3 .307 An.Jones rf 4 1 1 1 1 1 .207 Granderson cf 4 0 1 3 0 0 .235 Pearce dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .237 c-Ibanez ph-dh 1 1 1 0 0 0 .238 J.Nix 3b 2 0 1 0 1 1 .259 R.Martin c 1 0 1 1 0 0 .197 I.Suzuki lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .267 C.Stewart c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .252 a-Er.Chavez ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .293 Totals 35 5 8 5 5 11 Toronto 003 002 012 — 8 12 0 New York 202 000 010 — 5 8 3 a-grounded out for C.Stewart in the 6th. b-struck out for Sierra in the 8th. E—Jeter (9), Er.Chavez (6), J.Nix (3). LOB—Toronto 9, New York 8. 2B—Y.Escobar 3 (18), Cano (37), Granderson (15), Ibanez (16), J.Nix (10), R.Martin (14), I.Suzuki (21). HR—Y.Escobar (8), off Sabathia. DP—New York 1. Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ W, 3-1 5 4 4 4 5 6 100 4.58 Delabar H, 6 1 2-3 2 0 0 0 3 26 3.83 Loup H, 4 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 2.14 Lyon H, 6 1 2 1 1 0 1 29 2.35 Janssen S, 17-20 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.31 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia L, 13-4 7 9 5 2 0 8 99 3.40 D.Lowe 0 2 1 1 0 0 4 5.34 Logan 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 3.89 Eppley 1 0 2 1 1 0 16 3.50 Rapada 0 0 0 0 1 0 7 2.94 Chamberlain 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 13 8.59 D.Lowe pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Rapada pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. T—3:37. A—46,010 (50,291).

NL Boxscores Giants 6, Astros 4 San Francisco Pagan cf Scutaro 2b Sandoval 3b S.Casilla p Ja.Lopez p Posey c Pence rf Arias ss-3b Belt 1b F.Peguero lf Affeldt p B.Crawford ss Zito p Kontos p Mota p Mijares p b-G.Blanco ph-lf Totals

AB 4 4 3 0 0 3 3 3 4 3 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 31

R 1 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

H 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 7

Avg. .291 .285 .285 .000 --.325 .260 .283 .261 .000 .000 .243 .075 .000 --.000 .237

Houston Altuve 2b Greene ss Storey p a-Bogusevic ph Ambriz p

AB 4 3 0 1 0

R 1 1 0 0 0

H 1 1 0 0 0

BI 0 0 0 0 0

BB 1 0 0 0 0

SO 0 1 0 1 0

Avg. .297 .226 --.208 ---

X.Cedeno p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 R.Cruz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-J.Castro ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Wallace 1b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .298 Paredes rf 3 0 0 1 0 0 .000 F.Martinez lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .186 C.Snyder c 3 2 1 0 1 1 .193 Ma.Gonzalez 3b-ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .235 B.Barnes cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .174 Keuchel p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .063 S.Moore 3b 2 0 2 1 0 0 .227 Totals 35 4 10 4 2 9 San Francisco 400 002 000 — 6 5 0 Houston 012 001 000 — 4 10 1 a-struck out for Storey in the 6th. b-sacrificed for Mijares in the 7th. c-grounded into a double play for R.Cruz in the 9th. E—S.Moore (6). LOB—San Francisco 5, Houston 7. 2B—Pagan (29), Scutaro (23), Wallace (7), C.Snyder (8). 3B—Arias (5). HR—Pence (19), off Keuchel. SB—Altuve (27). DP—San Francisco 1; Houston 1. San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP Zito 2 1-3 7 3 3 0 1 53 Kontos W, 1-0 2 2-3 0 0 0 0 4 34 Mota H, 3 2-3 1 1 1 1 1 16 Mijares H, 2 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 14 Affeldt H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 S.Casilla H, 5 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 14 Ja.Lopez S, 5-7 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP Keuchel L, 1-7 5 4 5 4 2 3 83 Storey 1 1 1 0 0 0 12 Ambriz 2 0 0 0 1 3 39 X.Cedeno 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 R.Cruz 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 7 Keuchel pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. T—3:20. A—13,207 (40,981).

ERA 4.42 2.08 5.56 5.63 2.86 2.92 2.43 ERA 5.54 3.00 4.15 4.57 6.85

Brewers 3, Cubs 1 Milwaukee AB R Aoki cf-rf 4 1 R.Weeks 2b 3 0 Braun lf 4 0 Ar.Ramirez 3b 4 0 Hart 1b 4 0 Lucroy c 4 0 Morgan rf 3 1 b-C.Gomez ph-cf 1 0 Segura ss 4 1 Fiers p 3 0 M.Parra p 0 0 Axford p 0 0 Totals 34 3

H 2 0 2 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 8

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 1 1 1 1 3 2 0 1 3 0 0 13

Avg. .284 .213 .308 .292 .272 .326 .240 .257 .206 .038 .000 .000

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. DeJesus rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Valbuena 3b 2 0 0 0 2 1 .222 S.Castro ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .276 A.Soriano lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .257 LaHair 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .256 W.Castillo c 3 0 1 0 0 2 .258 B.Jackson cf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .197 Barney 2b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .257 Samardzija p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .109 Corpas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Rizzo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Russell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 30 1 4 1 2 7 Milwaukee 100 000 200 — 3 8 1 Chicago 010 000 000 — 1 4 3 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Corpas in the 8th. b-flied out for Morgan in the 9th. E—Hart (5), Valbuena (7), Samardzija (2), W.Castillo (4). LOB—Milwaukee 5, Chicago 4. 2B—Aoki (24), Braun (26), S.Castro (19), W.Castillo (6).SB—Segura (2). DP—Milwaukee 1; Chicago 1. Milwaukee IP Fiers W, 8-6 7 1-3 M.Parra H, 9 2-3 Axford S, 22-30 1 Chicago IP Samardzija L, 8-12 7 Corpas 1 Russell 1

H 4 0 0 H 7 1 0

R 1 0 0 R 3 0 0

ER BB SO NP ERA 1 1 6 87 2.85 0 0 0 2 4.47 0 1 1 14 5.17 ER BB SO NP ERA 2 0 10 104 4.03 0 1 1 20 4.17 0 0 2 13 3.45

Washington AB Werth rf 5 Harper cf 5 Clippard p 0 Zimmerman 3b 5 LaRoche 1b 4 Morse lf 4 1-Bernadina pr-lf-cf 0 Desmond ss 3 Espinosa 2b 3 Mattheus p 0 c-Tracy ph 1 S.Burnett p 0 Storen p 0 T.Moore lf 0 K.Suzuki c 4 Detwiler p 2 Lombardozzi 2b 2 Totals 38

R 1 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 8

H 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 14

BI 1 3 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 8

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 2 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .301 .250 --.281 .260 .286 .308 .282 .248 .000 .277 ----.285 .217 .057 .281

Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. G.Hernandez cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .157 M.Dunn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Webb p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 H.Bell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --D.Solano 2b 4 1 3 0 0 1 .299 Reyes ss 4 0 2 1 0 0 .283 Ca.Lee 1b 4 0 0 1 0 0 .278 Stanton rf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .291 Ruggiano lf-cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .325 J.Buck c 3 0 1 1 0 0 .199 Do.Murphy 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .182 Ja.Turner p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 LeBlanc p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .111 a-Petersen ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .201 Gaudin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Dobbs ph-lf 1 0 0 1 0 0 .307 Totals 32 4 8 4 1 6 Washington 000 410 012 — 8 14 0 Miami 000 012 100 — 4 8 0 a-walked for LeBlanc in the 6th. b-hit a sacrifice fly for Gaudin in the 7th. c-grounded out for Mattheus in the 8th. 1-ran for Morse in the 8th. LOB—Washington 4, Miami 5. 2B—Zimmerman (29), D.Solano (7), Reyes (30), Stanton (27). 3B—Morse (1). HR—Harper 2 (14), off Ja.Turner 2; K.Suzuki (1), off H.Bell. SB—Lombardozzi (5). DP—Miami 2. Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP Detwiler W, 8-6 5 2-3 4 3 3 1 4 95 Mattheus H, 11 1 1-3 2 1 1 0 1 21 S.Burnett 0 2 0 0 0 0 8 Storen H, 7 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 Clippard 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP Ja.Turner L, 0-2 5 6 5 5 0 6 80 LeBlanc 1 1 0 0 1 1 14 Gaudin 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 M.Dunn 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 10 Webb 1-3 2 0 0 0 0 8 H.Bell 1 4 2 2 0 0 26 S.Burnett pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. T—3:03. A—24,909 (37,442).

ERA 3.32 2.44 2.01 3.60 2.73 ERA 6.55 2.54 4.19 3.89 4.35 5.92

Mets 3, Phillies 2 New York Tejada ss Dan.Murphy 2b D.Wright 3b I.Davis 1b Duda lf Bay lf Hairston cf An.Torres cf Baxter rf Shoppach c Harvey p Edgin p b-Ju.Turner ph R.Carson p Rauch p F.Francisco p Totals

AB 5 5 5 4 4 0 3 0 2 3 2 0 1 0 0 0 34

R 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 0 1 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

BI 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .296 .285 .315 .226 .245 .152 .271 .228 .283 .320 .462 --.277 -------

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rollins ss 4 0 1 1 0 2 .243 Pierre lf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .300 Utley 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .255 Howard 1b 3 0 0 1 0 1 .239 Mayberry cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .240 L.Nix rf 4 0 1 0 0 3 .260 Frandsen 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .333 Kratz c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .276 Cloyd p 0 0 0 0 2 0 --Horst p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Polanco ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .256 Bastardo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Aumont p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Lindblom p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 2 6 2 2 8 New York 012 000 000 — 3 8 1 Philadelphia 110 000 000 — 2 6 0 a-lined out for Horst in the 7th. b-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Edgin in the 8th. E—Shoppach (2). LOB—New York 9, Philadelphia 6. 2B—Hairston (23), Rollins (29), L.Nix (8). HR— Duda (13), off Cloyd. RBIs—Duda 2 (47), Harvey (3), Rollins (51), Howard (30). SB—Duda (1). S—Harvey. SF—Howard. DP—New York 1. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harvey W, 3-3 6 1-3 6 2 2 2 6 98 2.76 Edgin H, 4 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 4.19 R.Carson H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 4.50 Rauch H, 15 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 3.04 F.Francisco S, 22 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 5.94 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cloyd L, 0-1 6 7 3 3 2 5 102 4.50 Horst 1 0 0 0 0 1 6 0.92 Bastardo 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 5.13 Aumont 1 0 0 0 1 2 20 0.00 Lindblom 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 3.64 Bastardo pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—2:59. A—42,882 (43,651).

Pirates 5, Cardinals 0 St. Louis Jay cf Beltran rf Holliday lf Craig 1b Freese 3b Schumaker 2b Rosenthal p b-Descalso ph T.Cruz c Furcal ss J.Kelly p M.Carpenter 2b Totals

AB 1 4 4 4 4 3 0 1 4 4 2 1 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 5

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 8

Avg. .311 .269 .306 .313 .300 .307 --.220 .255 .265 .115 .307

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tabata lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .234 Snider rf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .301 A.McCutchen cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .344 G.Jones 1b 3 1 1 1 1 2 .281 Grilli p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hanrahan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --P.Alvarez 3b 4 2 2 3 0 1 .249 J.Harrison 2b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .245 Barajas c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .199 Barmes ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .223 W.Rodriguez p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .021 a-Clement ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 G.Sanchez 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .213 Totals 32 5 9 5 3 6 St. Louis 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 Pittsburgh 103 010 00x — 5 9 0 a-grounded out for W.Rodriguez in the 6th. bgrounded out for Rosenthal in the 9th. LOB—St. Louis 8, Pittsburgh 6. 2B—Snider (5), G.Jones (24), P.Alvarez (21). HR—P.Alvarez (26), off J.Kelly. SB—Snider (2). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP J.Kelly L, 4-6 5 8 5 5 3 3 90 Rosenthal 3 1 0 0 0 3 46 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP Rodriguez W, 9-13 6 3 0 0 3 3 96 Watson 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 Grilli 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 Hanrahan 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 T—2:42. A—19,398 (38,362).

ERA 3.61 2.35 ERA 3.86 3.83 2.20 2.31

Padres 8, Braves 2 Atlanta Bourn cf Re.Johnson lf Heyward rf C.Jones 3b Prado 1b D.Ross c

AB 3 4 4 4 4 3

R 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 0 1 0 2 1 2

BI 1 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 0 1 0 0 1

Avg. .283 .305 .274 .304 .296 .271

Uggla 2b Janish ss e-Hinske ph Hanson p Avilan p C.Martinez p b-Pastornicky ph Durbin p Venters p f-J.Francisco ph Totals

3 3 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 33

1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 7 2 2 7

.208 .197 .198 .025 .333 .000 .247 ----.250

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ev.Cabrera ss 4 1 0 0 0 1 .238 Venable rf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .261 d-Denorfia ph-rf 1 1 1 2 0 0 .291 Headley 3b 5 0 2 2 0 1 .277 Grandal c 4 1 1 1 1 1 .283 Alonso 1b 4 0 2 1 1 0 .276 Kotsay lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .263 Forsythe 2b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .270 Maybin cf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .229 Stults p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .389 a-Guzman ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .254 Layne p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Thayer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Amarista ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .253 Brach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 35 8 13 8 5 4 Atlanta 000 010 001 — 2 7 1 San Diego 000 220 04x — 8 13 1 a-walked for Stults in the 6th. b-grounded out for C.Martinez in the 7th. c-walked for Thayer in the 8th. d-singled for Venable in the 8th. e-flied out for Janish in the 9th. f-struck out for Venters in the 9th. E—C.Jones (9), Forsythe (8). LOB—Atlanta 7, San Diego 10. 2B—Venable (22), Forsythe 2 (9). HR—D.Ross (7), off Brach. SB—Venable (19). DP—Atlanta 1; San Diego 1. Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP Hanson L, 12-7 4 2-3 8 4 3 2 3 83 Avilan 1 1 0 0 1 0 22 C.Martinez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 Durbin 1 1 2 2 1 0 17 Venters 1 3 2 2 1 1 29 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP Stults W, 5-2 6 5 1 0 2 5 90 Layne H, 2 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 18 Thayer H, 10 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 Brach 1 1 1 1 0 1 12 Durbin pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. T—2:49. A—16,845 (42,691).

ERA 4.45 2.49 4.04 3.25 3.55 ERA 2.43 0.00 3.74 4.21

Reds 6, Diamondbacks 2 Cincinnati Cozart ss Stubbs cf B.Phillips 2b Bruce rf Frazier 3b Heisey lf Cairo 1b D.Navarro c Latos p Hoover p b-Paul ph Arredondo p Totals

AB 5 5 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 0 1 0 37

R 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

H 1 1 1 0 1 2 0 2 2 0 1 0 11

BI 0 0 2 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 10

Avg. .245 .221 .297 .256 .294 .282 .163 .222 .222 --.298 ---

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Young cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .223 A.Hill 2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .294 Kubel lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .264 Goldschmidt 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .286 J.Upton rf 3 1 1 0 1 2 .277 R.Wheeler 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .207 Elmore ss 4 0 2 1 0 0 .200 Nieves c 3 0 1 0 1 1 .299 Corbin p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .080 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 a-C.Johnson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Albers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Shaw p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 2 6 1 3 10 Cincinnati 000 000 330 — 6 11 0 Arizona 100 100 000 — 2 6 1 a-struck out for Ziegler in the 7th. b-singled for Hoover in the 9th. E—Nieves (2). LOB—Cincinnati 5, Arizona 6. 2B—Frazier (23), Elmore (2). HR—Heisey (5), off Corbin; D.Navarro (2), off Corbin; B.Phillips (15), off Albers; Heisey (6), off Albers. DP—Arizona 1. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Latos W, 11-4 7 5 2 2 3 7 118 3.79 Hoover 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 2.45 Arredondo 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 2.72 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Corbin L, 5-6 6 2-3 6 3 3 1 8 87 3.93 Ziegler 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 2.55 Albers 1 3 3 3 0 0 24 3.27 Shaw 1 2 0 0 0 1 14 4.21 T—2:49. A—18,451 (48,633).

Dodgers 10, Rockies 8 Los Angeles M.Ellis 2b Belisario p Victorino cf Ad.Gonzalez 1b H.Ramirez ss L.Cruz 3b Ethier rf J.Rivera lf A.Ellis c Blanton p Sh.Tolleson p Choate p Punto 2b Totals

AB 5 0 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 0 0 0 39

R 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 10

H 1 0 2 2 1 0 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 12

BI 1 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 10

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 8

Avg. .264 --.260 .250 .256 .291 .292 .243 .283 .085 ----.200

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Colvin cf-rf 4 0 2 2 0 0 .292 Rutledge ss 5 1 2 1 0 0 .350 C.Gonzalez lf 5 0 2 1 0 0 .309 Pacheco 1b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .306 Ra.Hernandez c 5 1 1 0 0 1 .212 Nelson 3b 5 1 3 1 0 0 .279 LeMahieu 2b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .297 Blackmon rf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .150 W.Harris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-A.Brown ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .239 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 D.Pomeranz p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .211 Ottavino p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .143 a-Fowler ph-cf 1 1 1 1 1 0 .306 Totals 40 8 15 7 2 5 Los Angeles 006 000 040 — 10 12 1 Colorado 000 000 170 — 8 15 2 a-walked for Ottavino in the 7th. b-walked for W.Harris in the 8th. E—Victorino (2), Fowler (5), Pacheco (10). LOB—Los Angeles 6, Colorado 8. 2B—J.Rivera (13). HR—H.Ramirez (22), off D.Pomeranz; A.Ellis (11), off W.Harris. DP—Los Angeles 2. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP Blanton W, 9-12 7 1-3 10 3 3 1 5 96 Sh.Tolleson 0 3 4 4 1 0 17 Choate 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 Belisario S, 1-4 1 2-3 2 0 0 0 0 21 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP D.Pomeranz L, 1-8 4 6 6 5 0 4 66 Ottavino 3 2 0 0 1 3 38 W.Harris 1 3 4 4 2 1 33 Belisle 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 Sh.Tolleson pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. Choate pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—2:58. A—25,155 (50,398).

ERA 4.95 4.94 2.76 2.75 ERA 5.13 3.55 8.31 3.21

Leaders Through Wednesday’s Games AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Trout, Los Angeles, .339; MiCabrera, Detroit, .325; Jeter, New York, .321; Konerko, Chicago, .315; Mauer, Minnesota, .312; Beltre, Texas, .311; Fielder, Detroit, .310. HOME RUNS—ADunn, Chicago, 38; Hamilton, Texas, 36; Encarnacion, Toronto, 34; Granderson, New York, 33; MiCabrera, Detroit, 32; Willingham, Minnesota, 32; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 30. STRIKEOUTS—Verlander, Detroit, 198; Scherzer, Detroit, 195; FHernandez, Seattle, 184; Darvish, Texas, 182; Shields, Tampa Bay, 176; Price, Tampa Bay, 170; Sabathia, New York, 157. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—MeCabrera, San Francisco, .346; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .344; YMolina, St. Louis, .325; Posey, San Francisco, .325; DWright, New York, .315; CGonzalez, Colorado, .309; Braun, Milwaukee, .308. HOME RUNS—Braun, Milwaukee, 35; Stanton, Miami, 29; Beltran, St. Louis, 28; Bruce, Cincinnati, 27; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 26; Kubel, Arizona, 26; Ludwick, Cincinnati, 25. STRIKEOUTS—Strasburg, Washington, 186; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 183; Dickey, New York, 183; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 172; Hamels, Philadelphia, 172.


THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Bait

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Kaye Williams, right, watches a putt by Sharon Wertz roll just to the side of the cup on the 17th hole at Brasada Canyons during the Pacific Amateur Golf Classic Wednesday in Powell Butte. Williams is one of the few players from Central Oregon that plays in the tournament staged on courses through the region.

Pac Am Continued from D1 “I’m a local and I don’t even get out to some of the places that these guys do,” said Williams, 65, who is playing in the annual Pac Am for the fourth time. “They’re a pretty seasoned group of folks.” The Pac Am attracted a field of not quite 500 golfers this year to play in the 54-hole net stroke play competition, staged at seven golf courses throughout the area. Only 27 of those golfers live in Central Oregon. That is probably not a shock for a tournament organized by the Central Oregon Visitors Association and marketed to bring golfers from out of town to bolster what is usually a soft week for this region’s tourism industry. So what attracts the smattering of local players? “It is so well organized and run,” said Lee, a 64-year-old playing in her fifth Pac Am. “It’s Central Oregon at its best.” Steve Priborsky, a 71-year-old retiree from Bend, was surprised last year when in his first Pac Am he did not meet more locals (38 Central Oregon residents played in the 2011 Pac Am). After all, who knows better than a Central Oregonian just how good the golf courses in this region are for such a tournament? “If people would go the first time, they would continue to come,” Priborsky said. “I just don’t know if they realize how good a deal it is.” For him, that good deal is about meeting people from all corners and in a competition among peers. Priborsky is an avid tournament golfer who plays annually in a four-day tournament in Arizona that is not unlike the Pac Am. And on Monday, he said, he found himself in a short-game competition with golfers from Nevada and Utah.

OSU Continued from D1 The bye weeks for both teams do not match, as OSU is off Sept. 15 and Nicholls State is idle Sept. 29. Officials at both schools will

Golf World Pacific Amateur Golf Classic At various Central Oregon courses:

TODAY 8:30 a.m.: Third round of competition, shotgun start 5:30-7 p.m.: Awards dinner at Sunriver Resort, Great Hall 7-8:30 p.m.: Awards ceremony, Sunriver Resort, Homestead Room

FRIDAY 9 a.m.: Flight Finalists Championship Round, Crosswater Club at Sunriver Resort For second-round leaders, see Scoreboard, D2. For more information and complete results, visit www. pacamgolf.com

“ It is so well organized and run. It’s Central Oregon at its best.” —Carol Lee, talking about the Pacific Amateur Golf Classic

“You get to meet so many really nice people from all over, they come from so many states,” Priborsky said. “It’s a social thing as well as a competitive thing, and they do so much to make it a good tournament,” he added. “All the clubs are really receptive that you play at. It’s just a really neat format.” Tim Swope, a 60-year-old Redmond resident, now knows what it’s like to play both as a visitor AND as a local. In his 10th year as a Pac Am participant, Swope spent his first nine years

consider scheduling options in the near future, with the possibility of playing the weekend of Dec. 1, providing the Beavers are not in the Pac-12 Championship Game or the Colonels are not in the Football Champi-

Bend Continued from D1 The Spartans, who went 111 in 2011 and advanced to the 5A state semifinal round, look to ride the arm of senior quarterback Kamerun Smith, who passed for 2,699 yards and 46 touchdowns last season. Senior receiver Austin Baird (635 yards, 12 TDs in 2011) is expected to be Smith’s main target this fall, while James Banks (195 yards, seven TDs) and Andrew Park (234 yards, one TD) are Marist’s top returning rushers. The Spartans, who passed more times than they ran the ball last year — 261 to 257 — love to press defenses vertically out of the shotgun formation, frequently lining up in a four-receiver set. Bend High should present a more balanced look Friday with both quarterback Jonah Koski (2,178 yards passing, 25 TDs) and Duke DeGaetano (686 yards rushing, nine TDs), the Lava Bear’s leading rusher last season, back for 2012. Bend, as it has commonly done in recent years, ran the ball 60 percent of the time in 2011. That percentage could climb this season with the emergence of DeGaetano. “I hope we see some big numbers from him,” Craven says. “If we do, we’ll be winning games.” — Reporter: 541-383-0305, beastes@bendbulletin.com

in the tournament traveling here from his home near Washington, D.C. Now he is semiretired and he and his wife moved last September to Central Oregon for many of the usual reasons. He said he discovered this area through the Pac Am. “We picked Eagle Crest (Resort) in Redmond because I knew the area from coming back here,” Swope said. “I love the weather out here. The people are friendly. No traffic. The weather is good. No humidity.” For him, the tournament has a different feel this year. But the reasons he always played at the Pac Am remain the same, including the camaraderie and, of course, the golf courses. The biggest difference? “Now I don’t have to fly in and out 3,000 miles to get back to Washington, D.C.,” Swope said. “Physically, it’s a lot easier on me.” Even though she is from Bend, Williams blends in seamlessly with the visitors in the Pac Am field. She occasionally helps a newbie to the tournament with directions to a golf course or a restaurant recommendation. For the most part, her experience is just that of any other golfer in the Pac Am who enjoys what the tournament provides, she said. Williams considers the tournament a good value even though the entry fee is more than $500. And she plans to play in the Pac Am again in the future. After all, she said, the tournament is fun, even on days when she does not play well. “Everybody is so friendly,” Williams said of tournament organizers. “I think they do a real good job, and it showcases Central Oregon. “I have been really impressed. There are little mishaps here and there. But they (organizers) are so receptive to feedback.”

onship Series playoffs. The Pac-12 Conference will also be involved in discussions about rescheduling the game. This is the first postponed Oregon State football game since Sept. 15, 2001, when

— Reporter: 541-617-7868, zhall@bendbulletin.com

the Beavers’ home game with Montana State was cancelled because of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The Beavers will now open their season Sept. 8 at home against the University of Wisconsin.

Prep football this weekend, at a glance Here’s a quick look at the rest of the area’s 2012 football openers on Friday (all games start at 7 p.m.), with last year’s records in parentheses: Mountain View (12-1) at Lebanon (8-4): The reigning 5A state champions will be tested early against Lebanon, a team the Cougars defeated in the 2011 state quarterfinals. Look for receiver John Carroll, Mountain View’s most experienced playmaker, to get touches early and often. While the Cougars bring back just four starters from last year, Lebanon expects to return 12 players with starting experience, including seven on defense. North Eugene (0-7) at Summit (5-5): Storm junior J.T. Evans rushed for 100 yards or more in four games last season. Evans could have another big night against a Highlander program that has posted just one win the past two years. (North Eugene’s lone victory was a 5A play-in win over Summit in 2010.) Sweet Home (8-3) at Redmond (3-7): The Panthers, reassigned to Class 5A this year from 6A, expect to be much more competitive this year with 13 starters back, including seven on defense. The Huskies advanced to the 4A state playoffs last season but fell to Baker in the first round. Medicine Hat (8-2) at Ridgeview: The Ravens have drawn what figures to be a tough international opponent for the first athletic contest in their school’s history. The Mohawks of Alberta, Canada, return their entire offensive backfield from last year’s team that advanced to the Alberta provincial quarterfinal round.

Madras (4-5) at Stayton (5-6): The White Buffaloes hope to hit the ground running as they return nine starters on offense, including all-Tri-Valley Conference receiver Devin Ceciliani and running back Joe Hisatake. Stayton placed third in the Oregon West Conference in 2011 but graduated a strong senior class. Henley (4-6) at Crook County (3-7): The Cowboys won a 21-20 road thriller over the Hornets in last year’s opener for both teams. Crook County senior running back Brandon Zemp looks to be the focal point of the Cowboy offense, at least early in the season. Sisters (2-8) at McLoughlin (1-8): Both programs look to rebuild with new coaches after disappointing seasons in 2011. Senior Cole Moore, an all-Sky-Em League firstteam selection last year, is expected to lead the Sisters offense. La Pine (1-8) at Chiloquin (0-8): Hawk running backs Jeremy Desrosiers and Kole Kimmel could cause Chiloquin matchup problems. Desrosiers, who placed at the Class 4A state track meet in the 200 and 400 this past spring is the speed back, while the 210-pound Kimmel is a force inside.

Continued from D1 East Lake — located at 6,381 feet in elevation in the Newberry National Volcanic Monument, 37 miles southeast of Bend — offers a variety of fish to the sport angler: rainbow trout, brown trout, Atlantic salmon and kokanee. As the cold wind whipped up waves on the lake, Garrison rigged one rod with PowerBait and another with a live dragonfly nymph and a bobber. (A piece of worm and a bobber is also an effective technique on East Lake.) East Lake has long been a reliable fishery for bait anglers, but it typically undergoes a midsummer slump when high water temperatures drive the trout and salmon down deep. “East Lake’s been good this year,” said Garrison, owner of Garrison’s Guide Service in Sunriver. “It’s not as good as it was, because of the heat. It’s cooling down, so the rest of the season should be thumbs up.” The first strike of the day was on the PowerBait. The rod twitched in the holder, and I grabbed it and set the hook. The fish — a plump 18-inch rainbow trout — came splashing out of the lake as I reeled it into the boat. Over the first hour of fishing, we landed five rainbows in the 16- to 20-inch range — colorful, healthy-looking fish that fought with tenacity. “The rainbows here are getting beautiful,” Garrison said. “Very, very nice rainbows.” Fishing boats began to crowd the popular lake as ospreys soared overhead and the wind gained even more intensity, clearing some of the smoke that had hovered above the lake. We hit a dry spell by midmorning. But Garrison glanced at his fish finder and we knew we were back in business — the

D5

finder showed a huge school of fish directly below the boat. They were most likely Atlantic salmon, as they tend to swim in schools. Slim, and silver-sided with spots, Atlantic salmon often fight hard beneath the surface, rather than flying out of the water like rainbows often do. “The Atlantics are nice fish — good fighters, too,” Garrison said. “They’re big, lean and crazy.” More than 40 feet away from the boat, one of the yellow bobbers stood on end. Garrison yelled and I clutched the rod, reeled the line tight, watched the bobber disappear, then set the hook. I cranked a 16-inch Atlantic salmon to the boat, and we admired its shiny silver coloring. We had found the Atlantics, and they seemed to want only the dragonfly nymphs. By late morning, the PowerBait was ineffective. Our bobbers were so active, I began to develop what Garrison calls “bobberitis,” an affliction of the easily excitable and anxious angler who thinks he sees movement on the bobber when in fact there is none. “You have bobberitis,” Garrison scolded me. “That’s when people start seeing things. I’ve seen it thousands of times. They see stuff that’s just not happening.” But I still managed to land my fair share of fish. We finished the day with eight rainbow trout and four Atlantic salmon, all released back into the lake. We had no luck on brown trout or kokanee, but a dozen fish in four hours made for a memorable day. East Lake will remain open through Oct. 31, and fall is one of the best times of year to land big brown trout. — Reporter: 541-383-0318, mmorical@bendbulletin.com

Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

Fishing at East Lake last week, Scott Cook nets a brown trout for his 7-year-old daughter Ellie.

Fly Continued from D1 I doubted it when I looked at the whitecaps. The first fish came hard, a 12-inch rainbow that glittered in the sun like a revelation. It fell for a Callibaetis nymph twitch-trolled on a slowsink line. After that, we missed bites and endured the pounding wind for a couple more hours. “East Lake has been consistent all season long,” Cook said. It seemed less so now as we wind-drifted fishless toward evening. Cook knows the lake as well as anybody. Owner of Fly and Field Outfitters, he personally fishes East Lake close to 40 days a year on business and pleasure. When the sun went behind the hill, things began to change. Mayflies lifted off the water or disappeared in swirls as trout took them at the surface. We rigged dry-fly rods and coated tiny temptations with floatant. In a slurp, my fly was sucked in, but I missed the grab. On the next cast, a fish took it in and we brought another rainbow in. Ellie scooped it up in the net. “We can expect the Callibaetis mayfly hatch into mid-September,” Cook said. “I think of them as a fall Callibaetis and we see them at Lava and Little Lava as well as at East Lake. A little lighter in color, like a tan Cahill dry fly, we match it with a size 16 or 18,” Cook said. My next fish to hand was a 13-inch Atlantic. East Lake is the only place in the state where an angler can keep an Atlantic salmon. “They will take anything,” Cook said. “Dries, Callibaetis nymphs on an intermediate line and chironomids. They seem to average 12 to 15 inches. I think Hosmer is the better place to catch a big one.” Bright-colored streamers can pay off for anglers as the Atlantic salmon get closer to the fall spawn.

“We can start throwing white woolly buggers and orange buggers,” Cook said. “They are salmon; they are not trout. As fly-fishermen, we have a tendency to match the hatch, but we don’t have to for salmon. They get kind of crazy around the spawning time. They will chase things and react more like a salmon than like a trout.” Use bright colored streamers and woolly buggers and strip them as fast as you can. That can trigger Atlantics as well as brown trout to strike. Over the past month, a few bigger browns have been brought to hand. Greg Hunt at East Lake Resort reported that guide Mike Clevinger boated four browns over 12 pounds in the last month while targeting kokanee. One big fish took the bait on a downrigger, two were tricked by Callibaetis nymphs and the fourth grabbed a kokanee jig. Scott Cook showed me a picture of a 28½-inch brown landed by one of his clients, a fish that would have tipped the scales at about 10 pounds. Our biggest trout for the evening were a rainbow and a brown that stretched the tape to 16 inches. Our biggest salmon was a fish Ellie caught, an Atlantic that measured 15 inches. My daughter Mikayla’s rainbow measured about 14 inches. The kokanee, the fish that are often the easiest to catch, eluded us and so did the coveted East Lake Slam. As nighttime temperatures plummet, match the hatch or throw big streamers. September and October can offer the best fishing of the year when fallspawning salmon move into the shallows and brown trout and big rainbows follow them up. — Gary Lewis is the host of “Adventure Journal” and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,” “Black Bear Hunting,” “Hunting Oregon” and other titles. Contact Lewis at www.GaryLewisOutdoors.com.


D6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

H U N T I NG & F ISH I NG

Archery season is underway

FLY-TYING CORNER

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Jeff’s Cascade Caddis, courtesy The Fly Fisher’s Place. When the big caddis and traveling sedge start to move, tie on a dry you can count on to stay afloat. It is an evening stillwater hatch. Look for bugs on the surface and the fish that chase them. Jeff Perin modified the Canadian favorite Tom Thumb to take advantage of the surface activity in July and August. Cast to rising trout, gather the line and make it skitter toward shore. Perin recommends using a dry shake

floatant. “Keep it handy. This fly, after a while, doesn’t want to float, but it will work better when it does.� Tie this pattern with black thread on a No. 10-12 long dry-fly hook. At the bend of the hook, tie in a small clump of elk hair. Next, wrap a body of caddis green Ice Dub. Tie down the elk hair behind the eye and trim to leave short fibers at the head as shown. — Gary Lewis

H & F  C   FISHING THE FLY FISHING FESTIVAL AT SUNRIVER: Saturday, Sept. 29, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in Sunriver Village; festival will include vendors, equipment, guides, outfitters, fly tiers, rod-casting area, boats; kids area with a bug pond, fly-tying and fishing pond; admission is free; visit hookfish.com/festival or call 541-593-2358. FREE FLY-FISHING LESSONS: Through the end of September, the Orvis Company retail store in Bend will offer free lessons every Tuesday, Thursday and most Saturdays from 10 a.m. to noon; RSVP’s are necessary; contact the Bend Orvis store at 541-3128200 to register; www.orvis.com/bend. CENTRAL OREGON BASS CLUB: Meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Abby’s Pizza in Redmond; 7 to 9 p.m.; new members welcome; www.cobc.us. DESCHUTES CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED: Meets on the first Monday of each month at the ONDA offices in Bend; meeting starts at 6:45 p.m. for members to meet and greet, and discuss what the chapter is up to; 541-306-4509; communications@deschutestu.org; www. deschutestu.org.

HUNTING THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the first

Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Prineville Fire Hall, 405 N. Belknap St.; contact: 447-5029.

SHOOTING BEND TRAP CLUB FUN SHOOT: Saturday, Sept. 8, 10 a.m.; $4 per shoot; 50/50 cash payout prizes; backers, annies and other games available; bring own shells or purchase at the shoot; all ages and abilities welcome; shotgun raffle offered; Bend Trap Club located near mile-marker 30 east of Bend off Highway 20; contact 541-408-5451 or 541-419-8401. COSSA KIDS: The Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association’s NRA Youth Marksmanship Program is every third Saturday of the month from 10 a.m. to noon at the COSSA Range; the range is east of Bend off U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; contact Don Thomas, 541-389-8284. BEND TRAP CLUB: Trap shooting, five-stand and skeet shooting are all open Thursdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m; located east of Bend off U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 30; contact Bill Grafton at 541-383-1428 or visit www.bendtrapclub.com. HUNTER SIGHT-IN DAYS AT REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Every weekend during September from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., except Sept. 22 during the morning, open during the afternoon; www.rrandgc.com or 541-504-1513.

Here is the weekly hunting report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by wildlife biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife: CENTRAL ZONE OPEN: Cougar, bear, archery deer/elk, forest grouse, dove (bird hunting opens Sept. 1) Fire restrictions and access: Be sure to check for any fire restrictions before you go afield. Oregon Department of Forestry has a list of fire restrictions and closures online and InciWeb has information about current fires, or check with USFS, BLM or the appropriate landowner. Wolves and coyotes can look alike: Most wolves in the state today are in northeast Oregon but a few have dispersed further west and south. Wolves are protected by state and/or federal law and it is unlawful to shoot them. Coyote hunters need to take extra care to identify their target as wolves can look like coyotes, especially wolf pups in the mid-summer and fall. ODFW appreciates hunters’ assistance to establish wolves’ presence in Oregon; please report any wolf sightings or wolf sign to ODFW using the online reporting system. Hunter orange required for youth: Hunters age 17 and under must wear a

HUNTING REPORT fluorescent orange upper garment OR hat when hunting upland game birds (except turkey) and game mammals (deer, elk, bear, cougar, pronghorn, goat, sheep, western gray squirrel) with a firearm. PRINEVILLE/OCHOCO WILDLIFE DISTRICT There are a number of fires burning in Eastern Oregon producing a lot of smoke. Fire danger remains a concern and recreational users should check with Ochoco and Prineville BLM offices for the latest access and camping information. BEAR: Successful hunters, remember you must check in unfrozen bear skulls at an ODFW office within 10 days of harvest. Please call ahead and make an appointment to ensure a biologist is present for the check in. It’s also a good idea to prop the bear’s mouths open with a stick for easier tissue sampling, teeth collection and tagging. See regulations for details. ARCHERY: Buck and elk seasons opened Aug. 25. Conditions are warm, dry, and noisy, which will make hunting challenging. The hot and dry conditions

have heightened fire concerns, and hunters should consult with the Prineville BLM and/or Ochoco National Forest for the latest fire restrictions. Hunters are reminded that the Maury is now a controlled entry unit for deer, and elk hunters must have the controlled entry deer tag in order to hunt in it. Conversely, the Ochoco remains a controlled entry unit for elk and archery deer hunters must have the controlled entry elk tag in order to hunt in it. ANTLERLESS ELK: Early hunts are ongoing in portions of the Maury, Ochoco and Grizzly units. These hunts are primarily on private agricultural and range lands where hunters need permission from the landowner. Typically elk move into these hunt areas in greater numbers during the late summer to take advantage of the irrigated pastures and hay fields. COUGAR: Are present throughout the Maury, Ochoco and Grizzly units but are more likely near deer and elk herds. The Maury and Ochoco units are recommended because of their greater amounts of accessible public land. Remember cougars must be checked in at an ODFW office within 10 days of harvest. Please consult the synopsis for all required parts, and be sure to call first to make an appointment.

Steelhead fishing picking up on Lower Deschutes Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife: CLEAR LAKE RESERVOIR: Water levels in the reservoir will be dropping as irrigation demand increases. Trout fishing should remain good, as long as the reservoir permits good access. CRANE PRAIRIE RESERVOIR: High temperatures will likely push trout into the old river channels. CRESCENT LAKE: Kokanee fishing has been good. CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: Fishing for trout has been good. DAVIS LAKE: Water is much higher than normal, and all boat ramps are accessible. Please note this is a fly-fishing only lake. Please check your synopsis for the regulations for this water body. DESCHUTES RIVER (Mouth to the Pelton Regulating Dam): Summer steelhead fishing in the lower 25 miles of the Deschutes is good and should only get better into September. Anglers are also reminded to that the river is open to the harvest of fall chinook.

FISHING REPORT EAST LAKE: Fishing is good and preliminary analysis of recent sampling suggests that fish size is increasing. ODFW is recently completed trapping operations to remove tui chubs. The chub removal program is designed to reduce competition with game species and increase the size of trout. HOSMER LAKE: Open to fishing and annual population sampling indicates that Atlantic salmon and brook trout populations are healthy. Fishing on Hosmer is restricted to fly-fishing with barbless hooks. LAKE BILLY CHINOOK: Fishing for smallmouth bass should be great right now. Fishing for kokanee has slowed a bit but anglers are still catching good numbers of fish. Kokanee are averaging about 10 to 11 inches long. METOLIUS RIVER: Trout fishing has been good. Insect hatches should offer lots of opportunities for good dry-fly fishing. ODELL LAKE: Kokanee fishing good on

the lake’s west end. PAULINA LAKE: Fishing is good. ODFW recently completed chub trapping operations. The chub trapping program is designed to reduce competition with game species and increase the size of trout. PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR: Fishing for bass, crappie and bullhead catfish should be good. Anglers are reporting more bass and larger smallmouth bass than in recent years. PRINEVILLE YOUTH FISHING POND: Anglers should target bass since the water is too warm for trout. It is unlikely that any trout exist in the pond now. SHEVLIN YOUTH FISHING POND: Shevlin has been stocked and is fishing well. SOUTH TWIN LAKE: Fishing is good. SUTTLE LAKE: Recent fish sampling showed excellent trophy brown trout opportunity. WALTON LAKE: Fishing has been good with the best fishing occurring during the cooler times of the day and near the springs. WICKIUP RESERVOIR: High water will spread out kokanee this fall, but there is opportunity for large kokanee.


BUSINESS

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Stock listings, E2-3 Calendar, E4 Permits, E4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

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NASDAQ

CLOSE 3,081.19 CHANGE +4.05 +.13%

s

DOW JONES

www.bendbulletin.com/business CLOSE 13,107.48 CHANGE +4.49 +.03%

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S&P 500

CLOSE 1,410.49 CHANGE +1.19 +.08%

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BONDS

10-year Treasury

CLOSE 1.65 CHANGE +.61%

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$1659.80 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$6.70

SILVER

CLOSE $30.831 CHANGE -$0.038

Citigroup to pay $590M in subprime lawsuit GDP

IN BRIEF John Day mill gets reprieve

By Jeffrey Cane

Private landowners will sell more timber to the Malheur Lumber Co. sawmill in John Day, postponing for six weeks the closing of the facility, according to Bruce Daucsavage, president of Prinevillebased Ochoco Lumber Co., which owns the John Day mill. On Aug. 17 the company announced the mill’s closure, attributing the move to insufficient timber supply from nearby national forests. Since then, Daucsavage said, owners of private timberlands from La Grande to Burns have called in with concerns about their ability to sell wood in the future. Altogether, the landowners will sell Ochoco 1 million board feet, Daucsavage said. The John Day mill employs about 90 people, he said.

New York Times News Service

Citigroup said Wednesday that it had agreed to pay $590 million to settle a class action lawsuit brought by shareholders who contended that they had been misled about the bank’s exposure to subprime mortgage debt before the financial crisis. The shareholder lawsuit,

originally filed in November 2007, alleged that former officers and directors of Citigroup had “concealed the company’s failure to write down impaired securities containing subprime debt” at a time when the collapse in the mortgage market made it apparent that banks including Citi would be adversely impacted. In late 2007, Citigroup wrote down billions

of dollars on collateralized debt obligations tied to subprime debt and reported a fourthquarter loss of $9.83 billion. In a statement Wednesday, Citigroup, which denied the allegations, said: “Citi will be pleased to put this matter behind us. This settlement is a significant step toward resolving our exposure to claims arising from the period of the

financial crisis.” It added, “Citi is fundamentally a different company today than at the beginning of the financial crisis.” The proposed settlement, which needs to be approved by Judge Sidney Stein of U.S. District Court in Manhattan, covers investors who bought Citi shares from Feb. 26, 2007, through April 18, 2008. See Citigroup / E4

The nation’s largest banks have provided nearly 140,000 homeowners with a total of $10.6 billion in relief under a $25 billion national settlement reached in February, the monitor for the agreement said Wednesday. The largest category of relief was in short sales, in which the banks forgave about $8.7 billion in first- or second-mortgage debt to allow the borrower to sell a home for less than what is owed. The report showed that Bank of America Corp. faltered in one key area of the settlement, completing no modifications of first mortgages from March 1 to June 30, the period covered in the first status report released by the Office of Mortgage Settlement Oversight.

United: Hardware caused outage United Airlines said a piece of computer hardware was behind the technology meltdown that delayed 580 flights and shut down its website for more than two hours. The outage on Tuesday prevented workers from boarding passengers on time. It also caused nine cancellations. The problem was a piece of hardware in a data center that failed to communicate properly with other computer equipment, said Megan McCarthy, a spokeswoman for United Continental Holdings Inc.

BEND REAL ESTATE

— Staff and wire reports

Confidence declines The Consumer Confidence Index fell to 60.6 in August, a nine-month low and well below 90, the level that indicates a healthy economy. 80 August 60.6

60

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Tabitha Dahl turned her house on Northwest Riverfront Street in Bend into a vacation rental earlier this year. Its proximity to the Deschutes River and downtown Bend make it appealing to visitors, Dahl said.

More vacation rentals are hitting the market • Owners are finding it’s a profitable use for their properties By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

If a house in Bend won’t sell, and renting just won’t deliver enough money, why not turn it into a vacation rental? People who own Bend homes are doing just that at a rate not seen since Bend city planners started approving properties for vacation-rental status in 2006. “The amount that you get from a vacation rental is a lot higher than just a month-tomonth rental,” said Tabitha Dahl, a Bend real estate broker who secured city approval last month to use her house, built in 1918 on Northwest Riverfront Street, as a vacation rental. She charges $150 per night. Four people Dahl knows on Riverfront Street have done the same thing, she said.

Chicago Tribune

40 30 A S O N D J F MA M J J A 2011 2012 Source: The Conference Board AP

Bend city planners this year have seen an increase in the number of applications to turn homes in the city into vacation rentals. Planners have been approving of the change since 2006. 28 30

16

10

5

4

11

6 5

0

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Note: Totals are for January-July. Source: City of Bend

The Old Bend Neighborhood, where Dahl’s house is located, is a short walk from breweries and other attractions in downtown Bend, and visitors can end river floating trips right behind the house, which is about three blocks

By Nelson D. Schwartz New York Times News Service

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

south of Northwest Galveston Avenue, Dahl said. Other property owners seem to be on the same wavelength. Of the 29 homes people proposed as vacation rentals in Bend between January and July of this year, more

than half were on, or within, three or so blocks of the Deschutes River. Twenty-seven of the 29 were on Bend’s west side, and 22 were in the northwest quadrant. The city counts 156 existing vacation rentals to date, Nita Williams, an employee in the city’s finance department, wrote in an email. A home must meet certain requirements for a planner to give it the OK, according to the Bend Development Code. Prior to approval, it must have one off-street parking space per bedroom and be registered to pay transient room taxes. Once approved, no more than two people per bedroom plus two other people may stay in a vacation rental at any given time. It must maintain a guest logbook. And customers may not use tents, travel trailers or recreational vehicles in association with a vacation rental. See Rentals / E3

California bests Texas as it adds more jobs By Darrell Preston Bloomberg News

California, which sent a delegation to Austin last year to find out how the Lone Star State had beat it in employment growth, surged ahead of Texas to lead the nation in job creation for the last two consecutive months. California added 365,100 nonfarm jobs in the year ending in July, a 2.6 percent increase and the state’s largest 12-month gain since 2000. Texas picked up 222,500, or 2.1 percent, according to U.S. Labor Department statistics. California also outpaced Texas the prior month. Texas led California in job creation in 18 of the last 24 months, since August 2010, the first month both states posted employment gains following the longest recession since the 1930s. The latest numbers show that California has defied comparisons with financially troubled Greece, including a joking reference by Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney earlier this month. See California / E3

Credit card lessons are crucial for the college-bound By Gail MarksJarvis

50

Bend vacation-home rental applications rising

20

growth revised upward

The U.S. economy grew at a slightly faster pace in the second quarter than initially estimated, according to Commerce Department data released Wednesday, increasing at an annual rate of 1.7 percent. The revision was driven by stronger export growth, along with fewer imports than originally estimated and a slight uptick in personal consumer spending. Inventory growth cooled, underscoring continued caution by businesses about the economic outlook. Meanwhile, in another sign of tepid economic conditions, a Federal Reserve report issued Wednesday afternoon found that the economy continued to expand gradually in July and early August, with slow growth in some parts of the East Coast. The Fed survey of 12 regional bank districts, known as the beige book, also found that employment held steady or grew only slightly nationwide, with weaker-than-expected results in the Boston, New York, Philadelphia and Richmond districts. See GDP / E3

Mortgage deal payouts at $10.6B

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The hunt for the extra-long sheets for the dormitory bed might be complete, and the car is probably packed to the roof for the trip to college, but before dropping your child off on campus, make sure you don’t forget to talk about money, and especially credit cards.

Students typically are naive about high interest rates, penalties from missing payments PERSONAL and the credit FINANCE lousy scores that will hound them for years if they don’t give their credit cards proper attention in college. Many adults, who are in trouble

with debt today, started burying themselves with credit cards while in college. In the past, banks spent college welcome weeks in booths peddling cards with killer interest rates to students with no income. Now, new federal rules keep them off campus and prevent them from giving credit cards to students without jobs or assets. But the

cards find their way to college students anyway, and interest rates and penalties can still be unmerciful. So some preparation is in order. Now banks find college students through their Facebook profiles and entice students through games and prizes, said Odysseas Papadimitriou, chief executive of CardHub. com, a site that compares

credit cards. About 35 percent of college students have credit cards, and three-quarters of those have them in their own name, according to a recent survey by lender Sallie Mae. Only a third pay their cards off each month; 42 percent carry balances of $500. Three percent carry $4,000. See Credit / E3


E2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

Consolidated stock listings N m

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A-B-C-D AAR 0.30 ABB Ltd 0.71 ABM 0.58 ACE Ltd 1.92 ACI Wwde AES Corp 0.16 AFLAC 1.32 AG MtgeIT 2.80 AGCO AGL Res 1.84 AK Steel AMC Net AOL 5.15 ARCA bi h ASML Hld 0.59 AT&T Inc 1.76 AU Optron AVG Tch n Aarons 0.06 Aastrom AbtLab 2.04 AberFitc 0.70 AbdAsPac 0.42 Abiomed Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh AcadiaRlt 0.72 Accenture 1.35 AccoBrds AccretivH Accuray Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActiveNet ActivsBliz 0.18 Actuant 0.04 Acuity 0.52 Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran 0.36 AdvAuto 0.24 AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi 0.11 AdvOil&Gs AdventSoft AdvActBear AdvisBd s AecomTch AegeanMP 0.04 Aegon 0.25 AerCap Aeropostl AEterna gh Aetna 0.70 AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agilent 0.40 Agnico g 0.80 Agrium g 1.00 AirProd 2.56 AirTrnsp Aircastle 0.60 Airgas 1.60 AkamaiT Akorn AlaskAir s AlaskCom 0.20 Albemarle 0.80 AlcatelLuc Alcoa 0.12 Alere AlexREE 2.04 AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza rs AlignTech Alkermes AllegTch 0.72 Allergan 0.20 Allete 1.84 AlliData AlliBInco 0.48 AlliBern 0.85 AlliantEgy 1.80 AlldNevG AlldWldA 1.50 AllisonT n 0.24 AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate 0.88 AlmadnM g AlnylamP AlonUSA 0.16 AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp 0.60 AlpTotDiv 0.66 AlpAlerMLP 1.00 AlteraCp lf 0.40 AlterraCap 0.64 Altria 1.76 Alumina 0.24 AmBev 1.15 Amarin Amazon Amdocs Ameren 1.60 Amerigrp AFTxE 0.50 AMovilL 0.28 AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus 1.35 ACapAgy 5.00 AmCapLtd ACapMtg 3.60 AEagleOut 0.44 AEP 1.88 AEqInvLf 0.12 AmExp 0.80 AFnclGrp 0.70 AGreet 0.60 AmIntlGrp AmPubEd ARltyCT n 0.72 AmTower 0.88 AmWtrWks 1.00 Amerigas 3.20 Ameriprise 1.40 AmeriBrgn 0.52 Ametek s 0.24 Amgen 1.44 AmicusTh AmkorTch Amphenol 0.42 AmpioPhm Amyris Anadarko 0.36 AnalogDev 1.20 Ancestry AngiesL n AnglogldA 0.61 ABInBev 1.57 Anixter 4.50 Ann Inc Annaly 2.27 Annies n Ansys AntaresP AntheraPh Anworth 0.83 Aon plc 0.63 A123 Sys h Apache 0.68 AptInv 0.80 ApolloCRE 1.60 ApolloGrp ApolloInv 0.80 ApolloRM 3.00 Apple Inc 10.60 ApldMatl 0.36 Approach AquaAm 0.70 ArQule ArcelorMit 0.75 ArchCap ArchCoal 0.12 ArchDan 0.70 ArcosDor 0.24 ArenaPhm AresCap h 1.52 AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest 0.12 ArmHld 0.18 ArmourRsd 1.20 ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRt s AscentSolr Ashland 0.90 AspenIns 0.68 AspenTech AssistLiv AsscdBanc 0.20 AsdEstat 0.72 Assurant 0.84 AssuredG 0.36 AstexPhm AstoriaF 0.16 AstraZen 2.85 AtlPwr g 1.15 Atmel ATMOS 1.38 AtwoodOcn AuRico g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv 2.00 AutoData 1.58 AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch 0.60 AvalnRare AvalonBay 3.88 AvanirPhm AVEO Ph AveryD 1.08 AvidTch AvisBudg Avista 1.16 Avnet Avon 0.92 Axcelis AXIS Cap 0.96 B&G Foods 1.08 BB&T Cp 0.80 BB&T pfE BBCN Bcp BCE g 2.27 B/E Aero

14.87 17.38 20.36 73.64 44.81 11.52 46.33 23.60 42.11 39.70 5.10 38.96 33.74 .37 56.99 36.82 3.06 10.16 29.83 1.67 65.61 35.94 7.92 22.53 2.00 25.59 1.78 24.77 61.02 6.74 10.80 6.24 6.75 19.73 23.14 11.07 11.79 28.44 64.32 17.06 31.96 21.06 71.44 12.91 3.77 3.66 3.53 23.85 21.44 44.40 19.34 7.05 5.17 12.58 14.00 .48 39.12 118.43 17.70 3.92 37.16 46.46 99.18 82.03 4.73 11.59 82.10 37.68 13.44 33.50 2.14 54.73 1.14 8.54 18.50 74.10 3.51 106.57 4.54 33.99 18.59 30.20 85.13 41.45 138.43 8.51 14.37 44.41 31.60 78.45 18.87 1.81 25.80 10.43 37.33 2.59 18.45 13.85 6.14 6.97 4.35 16.28 36.93 23.18 34.59 3.00 36.78 13.06 247.12 32.15 33.00 90.78 5.81 25.35 1.03 11.05 46.48 34.69 11.12 24.87 22.37 42.98 11.58 57.42 37.14 14.40 33.94 33.31 11.80 69.75 37.36 42.58 54.45 37.65 34.50 83.72 5.01 4.68 60.80 2.81 3.27 69.72 39.52 31.08 10.22 31.13 83.81 61.24 36.10 17.26 42.28 69.71 3.99 .94 6.85 52.02 .28 86.53 26.68 17.54 26.55 8.09 20.33 673.47 11.70 28.57 25.19 5.46 14.82 40.07 6.30 26.58 13.17 9.25 17.28 20.50 44.62 9.19 27.54 7.45 5.65 13.69 36.77 19.83 27.62 20.08 1.70 72.75 28.78 24.56 7.93 13.09 15.30 33.98 13.19 2.96 10.07 47.00 14.16 6.12 35.20 45.87 6.56 8.06 40.39 30.92 59.76 58.38 363.00 23.97 36.60 1.83 142.92 3.14 9.51 31.37 9.49 16.64 25.53 32.66 15.50 1.07 33.58 29.52 31.70 25.38 12.65 45.15 40.21

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D

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-.01 +.11 -.23

N m

D

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C

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D

C 61.30 38.81 40.22 23.24 55.10 12.27 41.40 3.09 .31 17.94 9.38 30.60 1.94 11.73 31.67 12.96 53.40 45.52 32.35 8.89 30.92 28.61 12.00 25.43 19.67 30.84 19.92 4.86 12.55 14.61 1.40 15.75 21.03 21.93 35.63 38.85 35.59 45.61 71.58 15.13 36.45 30.59 36.57 6.58 66.47 26.05 10.88 .52 3.99 49.17 55.05 23.56 41.23 24.99 25.39 12.25 10.94 9.77 8.30 1.61 92.42 34.33 20.97 7.26 42.59 19.81 33.14 10.24 24.17 69.24 6.14 53.58 44.37 38.25 6.31 8.46 23.24 15.92 31.45 3.30 47.09 46.51 5.98 4.83 14.31 6.78 10.45 .98 25.10 20.79 3.59 2.38 10.63 8.50 9.95 8.85 20.05 7.88 1.82 13.54 17.83 8.21 30.56 4.85 2.71 33.24 2.04 6.92 1.10 30.34 7.30 34.30 11.20 15.02 16.85 34.84 17.42 8.81 10.43 18.86 46.64 41.00 43.29 10.68 25.21 14.35 10.29 14.09 33.60 17.20 4.22 45.50 39.55 64.26 2.93 5.56 21.10 79.68 28.75 3.52 49.51 28.80 30.34 4.04 1.61 21.62 12.56 24.44 3.62 9.58 32.70 41.41 5.27 30.30 77.77 15.62 21.67 18.99 10.11 28.41 39.28 15.01 25.76 6.80 40.20 45.56 40.05 29.40 17.39 26.45 27.03 57.17 2.57 28.75 31.64 33.68 44.30 92.43 8.23 30.11 47.51 62.75 51.25 89.33 41.85 39.99 20.90 23.78 12.38 9.36 32.57 51.10 37.37 82.37 49.39 23.19 18.60 54.33 4.30 81.00 96.04 45.26 1.05 138.76 48.27 64.80 52.52 24.40 6.82 49.53 4.75 28.27 34.21 5.59 58.82 26.88 22.80

+1.31 +1.16 -.68 +.28 +.18 -.61 +.04 +.01 +.11 +.03 +.20 +.02 +.24 -.02 -.12 +.98 -.25 -.30 -.09 -.40 -.11 +.49 +.14 +.21 -.16 +.55 +.01 -.10 -.15 -.02 +.25 +.11 -1.18 +.08 +.13 -.08 +.22 -.48 +.03 -.01 +.06 -.06 +.08 +.24 +.01 +.22 +.02

N m

D

w

m W w

m m

W m M

m w m m

-.19 +.63 +.30 +.13 -.06 -.04 +.01 +.06 +.19 +.05 +1.12 -.04 +.03 -.42 +.25 +.26 +.47 -.11 -.38 +3.31 +.02 -.14 -.23 +.25 +.07 +.01 +.07 -.70 -.38 -.06 +.06 +1.84 +.11 -.02 +.02 +.05 +.02 +.36 -.53 -.19 -.02 +.08 +.22 +.14 +.03 -.54

M & W m

M

m m m

+.14 -.09 +.08 -.08 +.15 +.09 -.14 -.20 +.17 +.06 -.11 -1.10 -.24 +.20 +.08 +.18 -.18 -.15 +.07 +.07 -.11 +.85 +.12 +.66 +.02 -.07 +.04 -.06 -.04 +.18 +.50 -.14 +.01 -.05 +.45 +.01 +.13 +.17 +.61 +.28 +.33 -.08 -.63 +.02 -.32 -.16 +.25 +.04 +.05 +.55 +.41 +.03 -.25 +1.50 -.08 +1.31 -.32 +.16 -.28 -.16 -.11 +.05 -.18 +.04 +.16 -.36 +.16 +.19 -.04 -.16 +.89 -.01 -.34 +.16 +.88 +1.24 +.13 -.03 +.23 -1.10 +.25 +.77 +.01 +.58 -.08 -.26 +.84 -.10 -.18 +.16 +.12

w

+.26 -.07 +.14 +.02 +.08 +.11 -.66 -.03 -.02 +.78 -.72 -.04 +.12 +.80 -.09 +.39 -.17 -.07 -.05 -.04 -.58 -.02 +.

m M m

m Mw

M W& WM W W W W W W M W W W W W W W W W M W W W W W W W m W M W WW W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W m W W W W W W W W W Wm Wm Wm W W W m W W W W W m W m W W m W W WW W w W W W W M W m W M

m M m

m

m w w mm

w

m

UVWXYZ

m

C


THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Rentals

GDP

Continued from E1 Applying costs $429.48, excluding additional fees, according to a city price list. Vacation rentals are on the rise around Oregon. More have opened every year on average since 2006, with 825 in the third quarter of last year, according to a May report from the state Department of Revenue. Lodging providers must pay a 1 percent state lodging tax, in addition to any local transient lodging tax, according to the Revenue Department. With more vacation rentals becoming available in Bend, more people are staying in them. The percentage of tourists renting houses and condominiums went up from 17 percent of all lodging properties to 24 percent from 2009 to 2012, Visit Bend President and CEO Doug La Placa wrote in an email. Aaron Henson, a senior planner for the city, has an explanation for the bump he’s seen in vacation-rental applications. “In 2006, 2007, when the requirement was new, there probably weren’t a whole lot of people aware of the requirement,” Henson said. “In 2008, 2009, 2010, there were a lot of people losing homes (to) foreclosure, so there were some local and out-of-town investor types that were snapping up homes that are suitable for vacation rentals at good prices and cleaning them up and getting them ready for that type of use. And then now, we’re seeing kind of the fruits of that.” Greg Sweet didn’t purchase the home on Northwest Milwaukee Avenue that he turned into a vacation rental in June. He’d built it himself, and he wasn’t getting many good offers to buy. “We just decided it might be kind of neat to try it, so we did,” Sweet said. Since he started advertising it on a vacation-rental website, it’s been full about 75 percent of the time, attracting guests from Willamette Valley cities and even Canada. But, depending on how things go in the coming months, Sweet might do something else with the property. “If it’s just dead all winter, we’re not going to be doing it next year, because there’s a lot of overhead,” he said.

Continued from E1 One encouraging sign Wednesday was that pending home sales in July rose to their highest level in more than two years, according to data released by the National Association of Realtors. The Pending Home Sales Index, reflecting contracts but not closings, rose 2.4 percent from the prior month. The housing sector has been showing signs of life lately. On Tuesday, the latest figures from the S&P/CaseShiller Home Price Index showed that home prices rose 1.2 percent nationally in June from the same period a year ago. Home prices remain down almost a third from their peak in 2006, but a firming housing sector is one small bright spot in an otherwise cloudy economic

California Continued from E1 “What these new figures do is drive a stake through these weak Republican talking points,” said Gil Duran, a spokesman for California Gov. Jerry Brown. “California jobs are coming back at a higher rate here. We hope that happens everywhere.” To be sure, California is the only state where three cities have filed for bankruptcy in the past two months. The state’s unemployment rate of 10.7 percent in July was the third-highest in the United States, trailing only Nevada and Rhode Island. Texas ranked 30th with a jobless rate of 7.2 percent, beating the national average of 8.3 percent. Texas’s economic performance impressed California Assemblyman Dan Logue enough that he organized a delegation of California lawmakers and Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom to Austin in April 2011. California’s job picture reflects the depth of the recession in the state, where the economy relies more on housing and construction than energy-dependent Texas, said Christopher Thornberg, principal of Beacon Economics in Los Angeles. “California got hit a lot harder than Texas during the downturn,” Thornberg said. “We hit the ground pretty damn hard, so you’d expect

— Reporter: 541-633-2117, jnovet@bendbulletin.com

outlook. Indeed, while analysts had been expecting the small upward revision for economic growth in the second quarter, from the initial estimate of 1.5 percent, the latest figures still represent a deceleration in gross domestic product growth from the first quarter, when the economy grew at a 2 percent rate. The anemic pace of the recovery is a critical issue in the presidential race, and few economists expect the economy to speed up any time soon. In fact, despite the upward revision Wednesday, many economists see the economy actually slowing in the second half of the year. Julia Lynn Coronado, chief economist for North America at BNP Paribas, said she expected economic growth to slow to 1.3 percent in the third quarter, improv-

ing only slightly to 1.8 percent in the fourth quarter. “It’s not disastrous, but it is one reason the Federal Reserve is on high alert,” she said, referring to widespread speculation that the U.S. central bank could soon embark on a third round of monetary easing. Federal Reserve policymakers hold their next meeting Sept. 12 and 13, and the continued slow growth along with persistently high unemployment — 8.3 percent in July — could prompt the Fed to act then. At the current 1.7 percent rate, the economy is growing too slowly to make a dent in the unemployment rate. Later this week, the chairman of the Fed, Ben Bernanke, will speak at the central bank’s annual gathering in Jackson Hole, Wyo., and analysts will be closely

watching the address for any clues about the Fed’s future course. Two earlier rounds of so-called quantitative easing failed to produce a sustained increase in growth, and despite historically low interest rates, businesses remain cautious about new investment. Rising uncertainty about the presidential election in November and fiscal policy in the United States is crimping growth, Coronado said, along with continuing fears over Europe’s debt problems and a slowdown in China’s once-booming economy. Many companies are holding off on expansion plans ahead of the planned expiration of Bush-era tax cuts in January, along with automatic budget reductions that are set to go into effect unless Congress comes up with a deal to cut the deficit.

more of a bounce back.”

paid 0.33 percent to 0.43 percent on $10 billion in shortterm notes. The rivalry between the two most-populous U.S. states came into relief in April 2011 when 10 Republicans and a Democrat from California’s legislature, accompanied by Newsom, visited Texas to study its job-creation strategies. That month, Texas’s year-over-year job growth of 254,400 was more than 100,000 higher than California’s. Logue attributes much of the growth to early implementation of President Obama’s health care program. Educational and health-care employment grew 3 percent in the year ended in July, California’s Employment Development Department reported. The biggest increase was in professional and business services, at 5.4 percent.

California and Texas have different strengths. Texas has a lower cost of living and fewer regulations, while California has a more educated workforce and availability of venture capital, said Ray Perryman, a Waco, Texas-based economist. “Both states have fiscal challenges, though California’s is somewhat more severe,” Perryman said by email. “Texas has had the lead in that arena for some time, but long-term investments in education and infrastructure (primarily roads and water resource development) will be needed to sustain it.” Andrew Puzder, an executive who joined California’s delegation to Texas, said he’s no longer considering moving his company’s headquarters from Carpinteria to escape the state’s taxes and regulations. Puzder is chief executive officer of CKE Restaurants, which operates the Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s fastfood chains. Most economic recoveries are led by manufacturing and construction, with professional services gaining afterward, said Puzder, co-author of the book “Job Creation: How It Really Works and Why Government Doesn’t Understand It.” “Professional and business services are people who generally are not involved in creating wealth,” Puzder said. “They’re involved in managing and directing wealth.”

Tax rates The increase runs counter to the notion that growth favors states with lower taxes. California, the world’s ninthbiggest economy, has the highest statewide sales tax in the U.S., at 7.25 percent. That would rise to 7.5 percent if voters approve a November ballot initiative. The income tax rate for those making $1 million or more a year, now 10.3 percent, would rise to 13.3 percent, the most of any state. Texas, the 13th largest economy if it were a country, has no income tax. Most state revenue comes from a 6.25 percent sales levy. “Texas is still the model for job creation and economic growth in this country,” said Josh Havens, a spokesman for Gov. Rick Perry. It will maintain economic growth by following Perry’s policies of “low taxes, restrained spending, reasonable and predictable regulations, and a fair judicial system.” Texas has higher generalobligation credit ratings than California from both Moody’s Investors Service and Standard & Poor’s, meaning the state can borrow at more favorable rates. Both states received top ratings for shortterm notes they sold in August. Texas completed a $9.8 billion sale of one-year notes Aug. 21 at yields of 0.23 percent, a week after California

Northwest stocks Name

Div PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.16 .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40 .88 1.10 ... .28 .53 .24f .90f .20 .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

33.50 25.53 8.00 25.13 71.44 5.14 50.08 51.87 97.11 8.04 19.72 16.94 10.39 24.67 8.36 22.15 3.96 13.28 21.77 16.60 30.65

12 16 9 35 13 ... 10 18 27 54 14 6 ... 10 8 22 10 ... 19 14 15

-.08 +.07 +.04 +.35 -.08 ... +.49 +.35 +.54 -.04 +.20 +.04 +.38 -.33 +.05 -.05 ... -.16 -.03 +.09 +.02

-10.8 -.9 +43.9 +25.9 -2.6 +17.4 +6.2 +11.4 +16.6 +33.6 -21.3 -34.2 -.1 +1.7 +8.7 -8.5 -33.3 +64.6 +1.4 +22.4 +18.1

Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1657.00 $1659.80 $30.831

Newsom said lingering difficulties such as negative equity on 2 million homes in the state’s Central Valley threaten to hold back California’s recovery. “We may have another year or two of a recovery based on low-hanging fruit, but we still haven’t dealt with our structural problems,” Newsom said. “It’s good to be on the other side of bragging rights in terms of our competitive position with Texas, but we need to be cautious about reading too much into that.”

Market recap

Name

Div PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstBcp Weyerhsr

1.44 1.08 1.78 .08 .80 ... 1.68 .12 .70 .75 1.56 .89f .68 ... .36f .78 .32 .88 ... .60

Precious metals

Challenges ahead

YTD Last Chg %Chg

21 98.69 -.18 +2.4 18 58.03 +.59 +16.7 21 49.61 -.05 +3.5 12 5.67 +.03 +24.9 12 39.69 +.06 +5.9 ... 1.38 +.06 -27.7 37 40.85 +.13 +11.7 19 163.36 +.17 -.9 9 15.58 +.03 -26.0 12 27.47 -1.49 -35.0 29 144.53 +2.02 +61.9 10 30.99 +.01 -15.7 27 49.17 -.19 +6.9 ... 5.59 -.04 +14.8 16 12.75 +.15 +2.9 12 33.50 +.19 +23.8 13 16.32 -.03 +16.7 11 34.07 -.03 +23.6 12 19.86 -.23 +27.3 38 24.88 +.26 +33.3

Prime rate

Pvs Day

Time period

Percent

$1668.00 $1666.50 $30.869

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name NokiaCp BkofAm S&P500ETF iShEMkts Vale SA

Vol (00)

Last Chg

937270 2.90 -.13 885748 8.00 +.04 614720 141.51 +.11 309667 39.37 -.19 308706 16.10 -.46

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Yelp n CitiS&P5-14 Molycorp ChiNBorun SealAir

22.37 12.30 12.23 2.36 14.58

Chg %Chg +4.11 +1.55 +1.48 +.26 +1.58

+22.5 +14.4 +13.8 +12.4 +12.2

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Dycom BP Pru JinkoSolar Frontline TAL Educ

15.28 -3.60 -19.1 76.77 -16.69 -17.9 3.15 -.50 -13.7 3.19 -.50 -13.6 7.30 -1.10 -13.1

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Vringo CheniereEn NwGold g NovaGld g VirnetX

Gainers ($2 or more)

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Intel SiriusXM Cisco HudsCity Microsoft

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

IncOpR Arrhythm CCA Inds GoldRsv g Medgen wt

2.21 2.53 4.60 4.11 7.25

+.28 +14.5 +.28 +12.3 +.36 +8.5 +.22 +5.7 +.39 +5.7

JosABank UtdCmtyBc AngiesL n SecNtl lf MAKO Srg

47.44 +5.81 +14.0 7.24 +.85 +13.3 10.22 +1.19 +13.2 4.25 +.45 +11.8 17.27 +1.72 +11.1

Losers ($2 or more) Last

BiP Tin SynergyRs AlderonIr g Nevsun g DocuSec

43.82 -3.38 2.71 -.14 2.22 -.11 3.81 -.18 3.63 -.16

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

-7.2 -4.9 -4.7 -4.5 -4.2

ArQule AnchBcWA ChiCeram IntriCon AsiaEntRs

5.46 -1.24 -18.5 11.26 -1.44 -11.3 2.24 -.22 -8.9 4.63 -.37 -7.4 3.57 -.28 -7.3

220 192 32 444 5 4

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary 1,792 1,175 146 3,113 119 24

Last Chg

583479 24.67 -.33 410740 2.54 +.01 291939 19.20 -.02 246666 7.29 +.03 225563 30.65 +.02

Last

Name

Credit Continued from E1 Parents who want to keep tabs on their children in college may get a credit card for their offspring in both of their names. The interest rates on cards aimed at students average 16.3 percent, said Papadimitriou, providing this comparison: www.cardhub .com/best-credit-cards-for-college-students. Parents must guarantee payments so if a student fails to pay the balance each month, the parent must. If payments are missed, the parent’s credit score will take a hit. Yet, rather than parents overseeing student credit cards, Papadimitriou thinks parents should steer students to “secured cards” so the student learns to stay within a budget and be responsible, making timely monthly payments. With a secured card, the student can only charge as much as the sum of money that’s deposited in advance. So, for example, if a student deposits $200 it maintains security for the bank, and the student can charge up to $200. She then makes regular monthly payments to pay off any purchases she’s made up to $200. Think of the $200 like a security deposit for an apartment. If the student makes card payments in a timely manner, and eventually closes the secured card, that’s when the deposit will be returned. Papadimitriou likes secured cards such as the Capital One Secured card because students who pay reliably build a credit history — a necessity after college in order to get credit cards, rent apartments or borrow for purchases like cars. He urges parents to have their children make the security deposit so they have money to lose if they are sloppy with their payments. The drawback, however, is that there are fees for secured cards, and they can also be a hassle. If a student needs to buy a $300 airplane ticket home, but only has deposited $200 as security, she won’t be able to buy the ticket until she deposits another $100. I prefer the simplicity of a debit card instead. As long as there is no overdraft protection on it, the student won’t be able to spend any more than she has in her checking account. Ideally, before leaving your child at college, you will teach her to watch her balance in her checking account daily to make sure there is enough to cover debit card purchases. And you will have her create a budget for all her expenses.

Indexes

Name

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg

35082 3.27 +.07 27859 14.89 -.09 15682 10.71 -.32 13169 4.48 -.02 12487 26.88 +1.41

E3

Chg %Chg

Diary 1,463 958 134 2,555 67 22

52-Week High Low

Name

13,338.66 10,404.49 5,390.11 3,950.66 499.82 411.54 8,327.67 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,426.68 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 847.92 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

13,107.48 5,050.67 470.65 8,031.65 2,411.34 3,081.19 1,410.49 14,722.84 817.84

+4.49 -11.32 -2.21 -2.20 -14.37 +4.05 +1.19 +17.16 +3.56

+.03 -.22 -.47 -.03 -.59 +.13 +.08 +.12 +.44

+7.28 +.62 +1.28 +7.42 +5.84 +18.27 +12.16 +11.62 +10.38

+12.86 +8.22 +8.18 +6.68 +5.32 +19.45 +15.72 +14.52 +12.52

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

330.15 2,351.74 3,413.89 5,743.53 7,010.57 19,788.51 39,914.00 14,943.57 3,628.39 9,069.81 1,928.54 3,041.57 4,381.46 5,932.29

+.28 -.01 -.51 -.56 +.11 -.12 -.09 -.33 -.02 +.40 +.64 +.05 -.13 +.01

s t t t s t t t t s s s t s

1.0361 1.5836 1.0115 .002079 .1574 1.2528 .1289 .012706 .075118 .0311 .000881 .1501 1.0431 .0334

1.0378 1.5822 1.0120 .002078 .1574 1.2564 .1289 .012734 .075808 .0312 .000880 .1512 1.0461 .0334

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.88 +9.6 GrowthI 28.07 +0.02 +14.2 Ultra 26.20 +0.03 +14.3 American Funds A: AmcpA p 20.94 +11.7 AMutlA p 28.19 +0.01 +10.3 BalA p 19.96 +0.01 +10.7 BondA p 12.89 -0.01 +4.6 CapIBA p 52.71 -0.01 +9.1 CapWGA p 35.28 -0.02 +11.7 CapWA p 21.28 -0.05 +5.3 EupacA p 38.39 -0.05 +9.2 FdInvA p 39.33 +0.06 +11.9 GovtA p 14.58 -0.01 +1.9 GwthA p 32.87 +0.02 +14.4 HI TrA p 11.09 +0.01 +9.1 IncoA p 17.83 +0.01 +8.4 IntBdA p 13.76 +2.2 ICAA p 30.32 -0.02 +12.9 NEcoA p 27.58 +0.05 +16.0 N PerA p 29.64 +0.01 +13.3 NwWrldA 50.49 -0.06 +9.5 SmCpA p 37.83 +0.11 +14.0 TxExA p 13.08 +7.0 WshA p 31.01 +0.01 +10.4 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.92 -0.05 +15.6 IntlVal r 28.01 +0.04 +11.6 MidCap 38.46 +0.06 +16.8 MidCapVal 20.86 +0.01 +5.9 Baron Funds: Growth 56.80 +0.11 +11.4 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.16 -0.02 +4.0 DivMu 14.87 +2.3 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 19.66 +9.3 GlAlA r 19.20 +6.4 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.86 +5.8 BlackRock Instl:

EquityDv 19.71 +0.01 GlbAlloc r 19.29 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 69.33 -0.03 Columbia Class A: TxEA p 14.25 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.59 +0.07 AcornIntZ 38.22 +0.01 LgCapGr 13.43 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.36 +0.04 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.73 USCorEq1 12.03 +0.03 USCorEq2 11.82 +0.03 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.54 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 35.96 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.42 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 18.29 -0.05 EmMktV 27.23 -0.09 IntSmVa 14.41 LargeCo 11.16 +0.01 USLgVa 21.65 +0.08 US Small 22.85 +0.11 US SmVa 26.10 +0.09 IntlSmCo 14.62 Fixd 10.35 IntVa 15.14 -0.03 Glb5FxInc 11.29 2YGlFxd 10.13 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 75.29 +0.03 Income 13.83 IntlStk 31.52 -0.13 Stock 116.22 +0.07 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.37 -0.01 TRBd N p 11.37 Dreyfus:

+9.5 +6.6 +15.2 +7.2 +12.4 +12.0 +11.7 +2.2 +7.1 +12.5 +12.3 +9.4 +9.6 +5.4 +6.8 +5.5 +7.6 +13.7 +14.0 +11.8 +13.0 +7.2 +0.8 +4.9 +3.9 +0.8 +13.0 +6.0 +7.8 +15.5 NA NA

Aprec 44.61 -0.09 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.04 +0.01 GblMacAbR 9.82 -0.01 FMI Funds: LgCap p 17.10 FPA Funds: NewInco 10.65 FPACres 28.44 +0.06 Fairholme 30.25 +0.08 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.55 -0.01 StrValDvIS 5.13 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 22.56 +0.03 StrInA 12.60 -0.01 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 22.87 +0.03 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 14.12 FF2010K 12.93 FF2015 11.80 FF2015K 13.00 FF2020 14.28 +0.01 FF2020K 13.41 +0.01 FF2025 11.88 +0.01 FF2025K 13.54 +0.01 FF2030 14.14 +0.01 FF2030K 13.68 +0.01 FF2035 11.70 +0.01 FF2035K 13.75 +0.01 FF2040 8.16 FF2040K 13.79 +0.01 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.81 +0.02 AMgr50 16.16 AMgr20 r 13.29 Balanc 19.96 +0.01 BalancedK 19.96 +0.01 BlueChGr 49.57 +0.08 CapAp 29.20 CpInc r 9.27 Contra 77.45 +0.13 ContraK 77.46 +0.13

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Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r 39.40 +0.09 +12.4 500IdxAdv 50.15 +0.06 +13.8 TotMktAd r 40.89 +0.06 +13.6 USBond I 11.98 -0.01 +3.4 First Eagle: GlblA 48.59 -0.07 +7.7 OverseasA 21.78 -0.05 +7.0 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.26 +0.01 +1.9 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.72 +7.2 GrwthA p 49.37 +0.04 +10.6 HYTFA p 10.89 +9.1 IncomA p 2.20 +9.3 RisDvA p 36.94 +0.06 +6.1 StratInc p 10.58 +8.0 USGovA p 6.90 +1.8 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.06 -0.04 +9.1 IncmeAd 2.18 -0.01 +9.5 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.22 +8.9 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 22.08 +0.02 +11.5 Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 13.10 -0.04 +8.9 GrwthA p 18.02 -0.02 +10.6 WorldA p 15.06 -0.03 +9.6 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.13 -0.04 +8.7 GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 44.19 +0.02 +14.0 GMO Trust III: Quality 23.54 -0.01 +12.9 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 19.45 -0.06 +4.1 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 10.78 -0.07 +4.6 Quality 23.55 -0.01 +12.9 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.26 +10.4 MidCapV 37.84 +0.09 +12.7 Harbor Funds:

Bond 12.87 -0.01 CapApInst 42.21 +0.06 IntlInv t 56.80 -0.20 Intl r 57.43 -0.21 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 31.70 +0.08 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 41.19 +0.09 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.07 +0.02 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r15.87 -0.02 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.62 -0.01 CmstkA 16.97 +0.04 EqIncA 9.06 +0.02 GrIncA p 20.53 +0.05 HYMuA 10.04 -0.01 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.94 -0.02 AssetStA p 24.76 -0.02 AssetStrI r 25.01 -0.02 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 12.10 -0.01 JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond 12.10 -0.01 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 12.09 -0.01 HighYld 8.06 +0.01 ShtDurBd 11.01 USLCCrPls 22.67 +0.01 Janus T Shrs: PrkMCVal T21.63 +0.04 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.29 LSGrwth 13.15 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.65 -0.09 Longleaf Partners: Partners 29.67 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.73 -0.02 StrInc C 15.08 -0.01 LSBondR 14.67 -0.02

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StrIncA 14.99 -0.01 +7.7 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.55 -0.01 +7.9 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.62 +0.01 +11.1 BdDebA p 7.98 +0.01 +8.8 ShDurIncA p4.62 +4.6 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.65 +4.1 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.62 +4.6 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.98 +8.3 ValueA 24.95 +0.01 +12.4 MFS Funds I: ValueI 25.07 +0.01 +12.6 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 6.06 +0.01 +8.9 Managers Funds: Yacktman p18.84 +9.0 YacktFoc 20.29 +8.6 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.31 -0.02 +10.3 MergerFd 15.97 +0.01 +2.4 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.89 -0.01 +7.8 TotRtBdI 10.89 +8.0 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 34.41 +0.06 +4.5 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.63 -0.04 +9.2 GlbDiscZ 30.05 -0.04 +9.4 SharesZ 22.28 +0.02 +11.7 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 48.92 +0.07 +5.4 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.37 +0.01 +9.8 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.67 -0.01 +6.0 Intl I r 18.32 -0.04 +10.7 Oakmark 48.06 +0.04 +15.3 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.34 -0.01 +9.2 GlbSMdCap14.41 +8.9

Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 32.24 -0.17 GlobA p 59.28 +0.08 GblStrIncA 4.26 IntBdA p 6.45 MnStFdA 36.78 +0.07 RisingDivA 17.20 +0.01 S&MdCpVl30.25 +0.03 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 15.54 S&MdCpVl25.59 +0.02 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p15.48 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.50 -0.01 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 31.93 -0.17 IntlBdY 6.45 IntGrowY 28.30 -0.02 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.45 -0.02 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.97 -0.02 AllAsset 12.43 -0.02 ComodRR 6.96 +0.03 DivInc 12.08 EmgMkCur10.24 -0.04 EmMkBd 12.17 HiYld 9.44 InvGrCp 11.12 -0.01 LowDu 10.57 RealRtnI 12.43 -0.03 ShortT 9.86 TotRt 11.45 -0.02 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 12.43 -0.03 TotRtA 11.45 -0.02 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.45 -0.02 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.45 -0.02 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.45 -0.02 Perm Port Funds:

+10.0 +9.7 NA +6.6 +14.4 +10.4 +2.1 +9.7 +1.5 +9.8 +14.3 +10.2 +6.9 +10.9 +7.4 +11.0 +9.4 +8.1 +10.5 +4.2 +11.4 +9.5 +10.5 +4.5 +6.9 +2.6 +7.6 +6.7 +7.4 +6.8 +7.4 +7.6

Permannt 48.13 -0.10 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 41.52 +0.05 Price Funds: BlChip 45.15 +0.04 CapApp 22.86 +0.04 EmMktS 30.53 -0.10 EqInc 25.64 +0.02 EqIndex 38.12 +0.04 Growth 37.44 +0.06 HlthSci 41.99 +0.07 HiYield 6.81 +0.01 InstlCpG 18.66 +0.03 IntlBond 9.95 -0.03 Intl G&I 12.24 -0.02 IntlStk 13.40 -0.02 MidCap 58.12 +0.05 MCapVal 24.35 +0.04 N Asia 15.43 +0.04 New Era 42.18 -0.19 N Horiz 35.79 +0.12 N Inc 9.89 -0.01 OverS SF 7.98 -0.01 R2010 16.35 -0.01 R2015 12.70 R2020 17.58 R2025 12.86 R2030 18.46 R2035 13.05 +0.01 R2040 18.56 +0.01 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 35.65 +0.08 SmCapVal 38.03 +0.14 SpecIn 12.85 -0.01 Value 25.41 +0.06 Principal Inv: LgCGI In 10.22 +0.01 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.08 +0.03 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.55 +0.03 PremierI r 19.34 -0.02 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 40.08 +0.04

+4.4 +8.1 +16.8 +10.9 +7.1 +12.4 +13.6 +17.6 +28.8 +9.8 +15.8 +3.7 +6.3 +9.0 +10.2 +13.8 +10.9 +0.3 +15.3 +4.3 +9.0 +8.9 +9.7 +10.5 +11.1 +11.6 +11.9 +12.0 +2.2 +14.1 +10.3 +7.1 +12.7 +15.1 +11.7 +7.3 +4.4 +13.3

S&P Sel 22.26 +0.02 Scout Funds: Intl 30.60 +0.01 Sequoia 159.66 +0.35 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 10.13 -0.01 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.15 -0.03 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 25.60 -0.05 IncBuildC p18.63 -0.02 IntValue I 26.18 -0.05 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.46 +0.02 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 23.62 +0.02 CAITAdm 11.68 CpOpAdl 76.07 +0.21 EMAdmr r 33.57 -0.12 Energy 111.84 -0.73 EqInAdm n 50.27 +0.02 ExtdAdm 44.25 +0.11 500Adml 130.49 +0.14 GNMA Ad 11.07 -0.01 GrwAdm 36.75 +0.04 HlthCr 60.47 +0.16 HiYldCp 5.98 InfProAd 29.03 -0.08 ITBdAdml 12.10 -0.01 ITsryAdml 11.79 -0.01 IntGrAdm 56.57 -0.28 ITAdml 14.35 ITGrAdm 10.35 -0.01 LtdTrAd 11.18 LTGrAdml 10.91 -0.03 LT Adml 11.75 MCpAdml 98.82 +0.21 MuHYAdm 11.22 PrmCap r 71.12 +0.15 ReitAdm r 94.52 +0.03 STsyAdml 10.79 STBdAdml 10.66 ShtTrAd 15.93 STIGrAd 10.82

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SmCAdm 37.57 TtlBAdml 11.16 TStkAdm 35.21 WellslAdm 59.04 WelltnAdm 58.34 Windsor 48.29 WdsrIIAd 51.10 Vanguard Fds: CapOpp 32.93 DivdGro 16.67 Energy 59.56 EqInc 23.98 Explr 78.41 GNMA 11.07 HYCorp 5.98 HlthCre 143.30 InflaPro 14.78 IntlGr 17.77 IntlVal 28.64 ITIGrade 10.35 LifeCon 17.15 LifeGro 23.05 LifeMod 20.60 LTIGrade 10.91 Morg 19.97 MuInt 14.35 PrmcpCor 14.85 Prmcp r 68.51 SelValu r 20.38 STAR 20.30 STIGrade 10.82 StratEq 20.77 TgtRetInc 12.15 TgRe2010 24.10 TgtRe2015 13.31 TgRe2020 23.60 TgtRe2025 13.43 TgRe2030 23.02 TgtRe2035 13.83 TgtRe2040 22.72 TgtRe2045 14.27 USGro 20.85 Wellsly 24.37 Welltn 33.78

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Wndsr 14.31 +0.02 WndsII 28.79 +0.06 Vanguard Idx Fds: ExtMkt I 109.21 +0.26 MidCpIstPl107.68 +0.23 TotIntAdm r23.44 -0.03 TotIntlInst r93.74 -0.15 TotIntlIP r 93.77 -0.14 500 130.46 +0.13 MidCap 21.76 +0.05 TotBnd 11.16 -0.01 TotlIntl 14.01 -0.02 TotStk 35.20 +0.05 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 23.62 +0.02 DevMkInst 9.10 -0.01 ExtIn 44.24 +0.10 GrwthIst 36.75 +0.04 InfProInst 11.82 -0.04 InstIdx 129.65 +0.14 InsPl 129.66 +0.14 InsTStPlus 31.87 +0.04 MidCpIst 21.83 +0.05 STIGrInst 10.82 SCInst 37.56 +0.13 TBIst 11.16 -0.01 TSInst 35.22 +0.05 ValueIst 22.43 +0.02 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 107.79 +0.12 MidCpIdx 31.18 +0.06 STBdIdx 10.66 TotBdSgl 11.16 -0.01 TotStkSgl 33.98 +0.04 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.59

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E4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

B C 

TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765.

FRIDAY COFFEE CLATTER: Redmond Chamber of Commerce meeting; free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; U.S. Cellular, 355 N.W. Oak Tree Lane, Redmond; 541-526-5945. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Ponderosa Coffee House, 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

SATURDAY SMARTPHONE AND TABLET WORKSHOP: Learn more about the features, tips and tricks of a specific device; free; 8:30-10 a.m.; U.S. Cellular, 3197 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-385-0853.

TUESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 34:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3837290. REDMOND CHAMBER YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORK: 5:30 p.m.; Diego’s Spirited Kitchen, 447 S.W. Sixth St.; 541-923-9151. SMALL BUSINESS COUNSELING: No appointment necessary; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290.

WEDNESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789.

THURSDAY Sept. 6 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-3181794. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 23:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3837290. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765. BE A TAX PREPARER: Registration required. Sept. 6 through Nov. 15; $389; 6-10 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. SYSTEMS TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION PREP INFORMATIONAL WORKSHOP: Learn the needed skills and obtain the required certification for a position in the high-tech and server industry. The Systems Technician Certification Prep is a program that helps equip students for careers in the Information Technology industry. These classes are open to anyone 16 and older; free; 6 p.m.; COCC - Crook County Open Campus, 510 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-447-6228.

FRIDAY Sept. 7 COFFEE CLATTER: Redmond

Chamber of Commerce meeting; free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Free; 10:30 a.m.-noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541383-7290. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax. com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. KNOW COMPUTERS FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-383-7290.

SATURDAY Sept. 8 HOMEBUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-3187506, ext. 309.

noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 23:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3837290. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765.

FRIDAY Sept. 14 CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Free; 12:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3837290. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. KNOW WORD FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-383-7290.

Sept. 10 KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Free; 10:30 a.m.-noon; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-383-7290.

TUESDAY Sept. 11 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. KNOW DIGITAL DOWNLOADS: Free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 23:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-3837290. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 34:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3837290. SMALL BUSINESS COUNSELING: No appointment necessary; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290.

WEDNESDAY Sept. 12 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. OVERCOME THE FEAR OF PUBLIC SPEAKING: Reservations encouraged; free; 7:30 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.bendchamber.org. UPGRADE YOUR SALES TEAM IN 2012: Dennis Hungerford, President of Sandler Training Oregon, presents; registration required; free; 8:30-11 a.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541382-4316 or www.hcc.sandler.com. KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Free; 9:3011 a.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-383-7290. BUSINESS AFTER HOURS REDMOND’S BAZAAR: 4:30-5:30 p.m.; Redmond’s Bazaar, 2145 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-604-1367. ARE YOU READY TO BE IN BUSINESS?: Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Madras Campus, 1170 E. Ashwood Road, Madras; 541-383-7290.

THURSDAY Sept. 13 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS ANNUAL CELEBRATION: An evening of networking with associates from the Bend business community. Member of the Year and Facilitator of the Year for 2012 will be recognized. Free required annual meeting prior to the main event; $15 includes one drink; 5:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m.; The Point at Shevlin Corporate Park, 929 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend. EXPLORE THE BENEFITS OF WORKING WITH SCHWAB: Free;

France’s largest banks plan to exit the Greek market By Liz Alderman New York Times News Service

PARIS — France’s biggest banks are preparing to pull out of Greece in the coming weeks, the latest large international business to abandon the country as it grapples with a debilitating recession and nagging questions about its future in the eurozone. Societe Generale said Wednesday that it was in advanced discussions to sell its 99.1 percent stake in Geniki Bank, one of Greece’s biggest financial institutions, to Piraeus Bank of Greece. On Tuesday, Credit Agricole, another large French lender, said it expected to sign a deal to sell its troubled Greek arm, Emporiki Bank, to another Greek

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. FORECLOSURE CLASS: Call 541318-7506, ext. 309 to reserve a seat; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506. FORECLOSURE PREVENTION CLASS: Learn about NeighborImpact’s Housing Center tools and services which can assist individuals struggling to pay their mortgages; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 309, karenb@neighborimpact.org or www.homeownershipcenter.org.

TUESDAY Sept. 18 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. DO YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES TO RUN YOUR OWN BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541383-7290. KNOW COMPUTERS FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 34:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3837290. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NETWORKING SOCIAL: You do not have to be a Chamber member to attend. Call Hope Johnson at 541-9232679 or check out the website at www.crrchamber.com for more information; free; 5:30 p.m.; Juniper Realty, 14290 S.W. Chinook Road. SMALL BUSINESS COUNSELING: No appointment necessary; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290.

WEDNESDAY Sept. 19 CENTRAL OREGON OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH CONFERENCE: Oregon’s Occupational Safety and Health Division encourages workers and employers to attend the event to help improve safety and health performance. Keynote speaker is Jake French. Registration required; $125, with optional pre-conference workshops for $40; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 503-378-3272 or www.orosha.org/conferences. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. HR AND THE GREAT LEGAL ROUNDUP: Registration required at www.hrcentraloregon.org/ calendarevents.aspx#rsvpform; $30 for HRACO members, $40 for nonmembers; 7:30-11 a.m.; Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, 3105 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 541-389-9600.

bank in a matter of weeks. The French banks had embarked on a strategy of expanding in Greece and other Southern European countries when times were good, moving to take advantage of buoyant housing markets and rapid economic growth. When a deterioration in Greece’s finances helped ignite the European debt crisis three years ago, Societe Generale and Credit Agricole wound up being among the most exposed of any European banks to Greece. Their earnings were hit last year when a swath of Greek government bonds they had invested in turned toxic as the crisis deepened. At the same time, losses mounted at

their Greek operations as the country’s economy plunged, triggering a surge of defaults on loans to consumers and businesses. Prime Minister Antonis Samaras of Greece has been on a charm offensive in European capitals recently to reinforce the message that Greece wants to stay in the eurozone. To show that his government means business, Samaras is scrambling to get politicians in his coalition government to agree quickly to 11.5 billion euros, or $14.4 billion, worth of new austerity measures for 2013 and 2014 in order to secure a loan installment of 31.5 billion euros, which is needed to keep Greece’s economy afloat.

Samsung unveils new Galaxy smartphone By Peter Svensson The Associated Press

Sept. 17

MONDAY

EUROZONE CRISIS

NEW YORK — Fresh off a legal battle with Apple, Samsung is announcing a new version of the Galaxy Note, an offbeat, oversized smartphone that’s become a surprise hit. Samsung, the world’s largest maker of phones, is revealing the Galaxy Note II at a trade show in Berlin. The 5.5-inch screen is narrower but longer than on the

Citigroup Continued from E1 Shares of Citigroup traded as high as $55 in the summer of 2007. By Feb. 27, its stock price had tumbled by more than half. In a court filing Wednesday, the plaintiffs’ lawyers from the law firm Kirby McInerney wrote: “Although plaintiffs believe that the defendants knowingly or recklessly misrepresented Citigroup’s CDO exposure and valuation, defendants have raised a host of factual and legal challenges

first version. The processor is faster, and the software has been further adapted for the included stylus — the phone’s signature feature. While Apple has been releasing a new smartphone model each year, Samsung makes several to target different types of customers. That includes low-end phones for price-conscious customers. As a result, Samsung has been selling more smartphones than Apple this year.

The Note runs on Google’s Android operating system but isn’t among the phones that Apple is asking a judge to ban from the U.S., after a jury in California ruled last week that some of Samsung’s Android phones violated Apple patents. The Note is designed to work well with a stylus for jotting notes and drawing on a screen, while styluses for other devices tend to be an afterthought.

increasing the uncertainty of a favorable outcome absent settlement. Securities fraud litigations like this action are notoriously complex and difficult to prove: rarely is there concrete direct evidence of fraudulent intent.� For Citigroup, as well as other Wall Street firms, the business of slicing apart and packaging mortgages and other loans into complex securities had been a lucrative and fast-growing business before the financial crisis. The bank underwrote some $70 billion in CDOs from

2004 to 2008. In a separate case involving CDOs, the bank had agreed with the Securities and Exchange Commission to pay $285 million over allegations that Citi had misled investors in CDOs by not disclosing that it was helping select the mortgage securities that underpinned the investment and that the bank was betting against it. That settlement was initially rejected by a federal judge, but an appeals court found that the judge may have overstepped his authority.

N  R

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John Trachtenberg, 2991 N.W. Chardonnay, $246,191 Brookswood Bend LLC, 19711 S.W. Aspen Ridge, 205,198 Brookswood Bend LLC, 19694 Aspen Meadows, $214,447 Brookswood Bend LLC, 19702 S.W. Aspen Meadows, $182,232 David R. Madrigal, 21198 Sunburst, $213,846 Old Town Properties Inc., 63154 Riverstone, $269,582 Jim St. John Construction LLC, 2335 N.W. Frazer, $203,202 John Thomas Gerberding, 20270 S.E. Knightsbridge, $161,656 Brookswood Bend LLC, 19708 S.W. Aspen Meadows, $290,343 Bridges at Shadow Glen LLC,

61167 S.E. Ambassador, $266,812 Bridges at Shadow Glen LLC, 61168 S.E. Sydney Harbor, $245,671 Bridges at Shadow Glen LLC, 61172 S.E. Sydney Harbor, $266,812 Lambert Neighbour, 63372 N.E. Lamoine, $204,372 Bell Development Inc., 63148 Peale, $203,459

17760 Cascade Estates Drive, Bend, $142,974.72 Kate Lilienthal, 61539 Meeks Trail, Bend, $387,663.96 PWD Associates LLC, 18663 Coffee Court, Bend, $234,161.52 PWD Associates LLC, 18661 Coffee Court, Bend, $234,161.52 Russell A. Kirk, 68795 Log Bridge Lane, Sisters, $275,301.84

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HEALTH

Health Events, F2 People, F2 Medicine, F2-3

Money, F4 Fitness, F5 Nutrition, F6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

F www.bendbulletin.com/health

Improving

race care

• After Dirty Half death, nurses and others consider how to help By Anne Aurand • The Bulletin

T

he death of 40-year-old Bend runner est. He had been running with his fiancee, Billy Tufts during an off-road half Staci Carsten, 30, who, along with the help marathon in June prompted emer- of an emergency room doctor and cardiac gency medical professionals and nurse who happened to be in the race, perrace organizers to brainstorm ways formed CPR on Tufts. to prevent another fatality. Tufts had a blockage in a maAt least a dozen nurses and jor artery, Carsten said. In other MEDICINE emergency care providers have words, he had a heart attack durvolunteered to work these kinds ing the race. of remote races, and they’ll have Maybe nothing could have been new equipment — portable defibrillators and done to change the outcome of that sad day, she radios for communication — on the trails. said. The goal is to shorten the time it takes a “But it would have eased my pain to have distressed athlete to get help, especially in had help faster. It would have made it so much the case of life-threatening emergencies. better,” she said. It was “really frustrating” waiting more than a half-hour for paramedics and A sad, frustrating day search and rescue crews. Tufts was breathing Tufts collapsed midway through the 13.1- for at least 20 minutes after he went down, while mile Dirty Half race that winds through a they pumped on his chest, she said. See Race / F3 web of trails in the Deschutes National For-

Joe Kline / The Bulletin file photo

Does my child need a bedtime snack? By Anne Aurand

Changing America’s anthem on exercise

The Bulletin

Getting young kids to eat and to sleep can be challenging issues for many parents. And when those two things intersect, it can be a conflagration of frustration. To address the question of whether one’s child really needs to eat late at night, or if he or she is just stalling at bedtime, we asked for practical tips from Lori Brizee, a registered dietitian in Bend who wrote a book called “Healthy Choices, Healthy Children,” which aims to help parents raise fit, happy kids.

Q:

By Jane E. Brody New York Times News Service

What would it take to persuade you to exercise? A desire to FITNESS lose weight or improve your figure? To keep heart disease, cancer or diabetes at bay? To lower your blood pressure or cholesterol? To protect your bones? To live to a healthy old age? You’d think any of those reasons would be sufficient to get Americans exercising, but scores of studies have shown otherwise. It seems that public health experts,

NUTRITION

My family eats healthy, light dinners between 5:30 and 6 most evenings. Often, my child claims that she’s hungry after I put her to bed, sometime after 8 or 8:30 p.m. Is it real hunger or is it a stall tactic? If dinner is at 5:30 p.m. and bedtime is not until 8 or 8:30 p.m., I’d recommend a snack before bed. Offer the snack right before getting ready for bed and teeth-brushing time. If the child refuses the snack, then it is tough luck if she is suddenly hungry after you have said good night. In that case, I believe that is a ploy to stay up. If dinner is later, such as 7 p.m., then a snack is not necessary at bedtime. The child would probably need two small snacks or one large one between lunch and dinner. Even a dessert, such as a small dish of ice cream or cookies and milk, can be a good bedtime snack, rather than having dessert right after dinner. I know a lot of people would never admit giving their kids a dessert, or would think that I am not possibly a real nutritionist if I recom-

doctors and exercise devotees in the media — like me — have been using ineffective tactics to entice sedentary people to become, and remain, physically active. For decades, people have been bombarded with messages that regular exercise is necessary to lose weight, prevent serious disease and foster healthy aging. And yes, most people say they value these goals. Yet a vast majority of Americans — two-thirds of whom are overweight or obese — have thus far failed to swallow the “exercise pill.” See Exercise / F5

A:

For one doctor, the fee is $5 By Colleen Mastony Chicago Tribune

Illustration by Greg Cross / The Bulletin

mend sweets, but, really, a sweet once in a while is just normal and is not going to cause a child to be obese. I just recommend that any foods, sweets included, are eaten at the table, preferably with the rest of the family.

How do I overcome this late-night Q: Offer claim of hunger? a snack two to three hours afA: ter dinner, before bedtime. See Snack / F6

RUSHVILLE, Ill. — Stepping into the office of Dr. Russell DohMONEY ner feels like a trip back in time. At his one-man practice, the phones are rotary, the records are hand-written, and the charge — since the 1970s — has been just $5. It’s a fee that the 87-yearold family physician refuses

to change because, he says, “most everyone can afford $5.” And if they can’t, he says with a shrug, “we see them anyway.” And so, even before his clinic opens at 9 a.m., the line out front is already 12 people deep. Factory workers with callused hands. Farmers in muddy work boots. Senior citizens leaning on canes and slumping teenagers with spiky hair. See $5 / F4

HEALTH HIGHLIGHTS MEDICINE: An epidemic of overtreatment is taking its toll, F2

MONEY: Online health information becoming a valuable tool, F4

FITNESS: The safe way to work while kneeling, F5

NUTRITION: Folic acid may help prevent cancers in kids, F6


F2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

H

E 

M

Editor’s note: Ongoing support groups now appear online only. See www.bendbulletin. com/supportgroups. To submit an entry for either list, see instructions below.

Married men tend to drink less

CLAS S E S TREATMENT APPROACHES IN CROHN’S AND COLITIS: Learn about treatment options for inflammatory bowel disease; with a questionand-answer session; registration requested by Sunday; free; 6:30-8 p.m. Sept. 5; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; http://online. ccfa.org/bend12treatments or 425-451-8455.

By Jennifer LaRue Huget The Washington Post

Illustration by Stuart Bradford / New York Times News Service

How to submit Health Events: Email event information to healthevents@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing class listings must be updated monthly and will appear at www.bendbulletin.com/ healthclasses. Contact: 541-383-0358. People: Email info about local people involved in health issues to healthevents@ bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0358.

P  Dr. Angela Covington has joined the staff of Bend Memorial Clinic’s dermatology department. Covington is a graduate of the Keck School of Medicine at University of Southern California, and she completed Covington an internship at Huntington Memorial Hospital. She is a former employee of the Denver Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Children’s Hospital Colorado, Denver Health Medical Center and the University of Colorado Hospital. Kristin Campbell has joined KIDS Center as a medical assistant. Campbell is a graduate of Miami University in Ohio, where she received her Bachelor of Science in marketing. She is a former employee of the Village Baker in Bend, where she worked as the general manager. Eris Craven has joined the staff of MyMD Personal Medicine, where she will serve as a dietitian. Craven is a registered dietitian and exercise specialist.

If you’re fit at 50, chronic diseases are less likely later By Melissa Healy Los Angeles Times

WASHINGTON — Here’s a message that every one of those derisive “Turning 50?� birthday cards ought to carry: A new study finds that those who are most fit at midlife suffer the fewest chronic diseases after the age of 65 and boost the number of years they will live healthy lives. It does not, alas, make them live much longer. Those are the findings of research published Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine. It’s based on 18,670 men and women who, at around their 50th birthday in 1984, were completely healthy as they underwent a battery of measurements and fitness tests at the Cooper Clinic in Dallas, Texas. After these participants were enrolled at 65 in Medicare, the federal health plan for the seniors, the researchers tracked their health for a 10-year period up to 2010. They found that physical fitness at midlife made healthy aging — long considered a contradiction in terms — a distinct possibility.

Epidemic of overtreatment is taking a toll on patients of a questioning consumer.�

By Tara Parker-Pope New York Times News Service

When it comes to medical care, many patients and doctors believe more is better. But an epidemic of overtreatment — too many scans, too many blood tests, too many procedures — is costing the nation’s health care system at least $210 billion a year, according to the Institute of Medicine, and taking a human toll in pain, emotional suffering, severe complications and even death. “What people are not realizing is that sometimes the test poses harm,� said Shannon Brownlee, acting director of the health policy program at the New America Foundation and author of “Overtreated: Why Too Much Medicine Is Making Us Sicker and Poorer.� “Sometimes the test leads you down a path, a therapeutic cascade, where you start to tumble downstream to more and more testing, and more and more invasive testing, and possibly even treatment for things that should be left well enough alone.� Have you experienced too much medicine? As part of The New York Times’ online series The Agenda, I asked readers to share their stories. More than 1,000 responded, with examples big and small. Some complained that when they switch doctors they are required to undergo duplicate blood work, scans or other tests that their previous doctor had only recently ordered. Others told of being caught in an unending maze of testing and specialists who seem to forget the patient’s original complaint. I heard from doctors and nurses, too — health professionals frustrated by a system that encourages these excesses.

Trusting the pros Terrence Power of Breckenridge, Colo., said that after his wife, Diane, learned she had Wegener’s disease, an uncommon autoimmune disorder, the couple found it difficult to refuse testing recommended by a trusted doctor. The doctor insisted on office visits every three weeks, even when she was feeling well. He frequently ordered blood tests and X-rays, and repeatedly referred her to specialists for even minor complaints. Even when tests came back negative, more were ordered, and she was hospitalized as a precaution when she developed a cold. During one six-month

Bad medicine

four or five times a year.

Jim Donohue, a Brooklyn bank examiner, had to intervene on behalf of his father, now 79, who had a stroke in March 2007. Doctors in Florida put him on several medications, including two antidepressants, and soon after the man began hallucinating and showing signs of dementia. Donohue began researching the drugs and learned they were associated with cognitive problems. He persuaded his father’s doctors to change the medication, and his father quickly improved. He has since recovered and has been living on his own for four years. “All the medical professionals seeing him along the way, the hospital, two nursing homes and nobody thought of this,� said Donohue, who said his father never should have been given a diagnosis of depression in the first place. “I don’t know if we have too many specialists and every one is trying to practice their specialty, but it should not have happened.�

A black eye

Unsolved mysteries

Sometimes the toll of too much medicine is brief but emotional. Kara Riehman, 43, of Atlanta was vacationing in California when she lost a struggle with an ironing board in her hotel room and ended up with a black eye. As the bruising peaked around 10 days, she called her doctor to make sure everything looked normal. But instead of seeing her, the doctor, through a conversation with the nurse, ordered a CT scan. She had no symptoms other than a bruised eye, but the doctor never spoke with her or examined her. The scan came back with an ambiguous finding, and the nurse told her it could be a tumor. She was then given an MRI and for two weeks while she waited for the results, she worried she had brain cancer. The nurse called to tell her the MRI was fine. “It was really terrible,� she said. “It was only two weeks, but there is a lot of cancer in my family. I never actually talked to my doctor through this whole thing.� The total cost to her insurance company was about $7,000. “It did change how I think about interacting with the medical system,� Riehman said. “It made me much more

When Kathryn Gullo, a teacher in the Los Angeles area, gave birth to twins just 25 weeks into the pregnancy, she was thrust into the intense medical care of the neonatal ward that saved her children’s lives. But when her daughter, Grace, was 3 months old she was transferred to a different hospital, where doctors insisted on subjecting her to a battery of tests for symptoms that other doctors had dismissed as normal for her condition. “We felt like we were being bullied,� Gullo said. “I had enough faith in her previous doctors that it was then easy to say no.� The family switched hospitals. Their daughter, now 5 and living with mild cerebral palsy and some vision and feeding issues, continues to require specialized care. But recently, when doctors suggested an MRI that would require that their daughter be anesthetized, Gullo and her partner, Katie Ingram, said they asked two key questions: “What new information will this give us?� and “Will it change what we are doing?� After talking to the doctor, they declined the MRI. “Not every mystery has to be solved, and not every problem has to be addressed,� Gullo said. “That’s hard to get your brain around.�

Michal Czerwonka / New York Times News Service

Kathryn Gullo, of Glendale, Calif., plays with her daughter Grace, who has mild cerebral palsy. Gullo and her partner declined to get an MRI for Grace after much consideration.

“Sometimes the test leads you down a path, a therapeutic cascade, where you start to tumble downstream to more and more testing, and more and more invasive testing, and possibly even treatment for things that should be left well enough alone.� — Shannon Brownlee, acting director, health policy program at the New America Foundation

period, she had 25 doctor visits. The couple was spending about $30,000 a year out of pocket for her care. “He was convincing enough that we felt we needed to have it done,� said Diane Power, 60, who recalls being sedated before an endoscopy procedure, one of the last tests she allowed her doctor to perform. “When they were getting ready to knock me out I was thinking, ‘Why am I doing this?’ But we felt like the doctor knew what to do and we trusted him.� After several years of physical suffering and near financial ruin from the medical costs, the couple began questioning the treatment after consulting other patients in online support groups. Terrence Power spoke with his own primary care doctor, who advised him to find a new specialist to oversee Diane’s care. “It’s a really hard thing to determine when they’ve crossed the line,� Terrence said. “You think she’s getting the best care in the world, but after a while you start to wonder, what is the objective? He seemed caring, but he didn’t really consider my wife’s time and the suffering she was going through having all these tests done.� Under the new doctor’s care, the regular testing stopped and Diane Power was finally able to achieve remission. Now she sees the doctor only

The first thing to know about kids’ eye health By Dale Roe Cox Newspapers

AUSTIN, Texas — August is National Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month, so we asked Dell Children’s Eye Center pediatric ophthalmologist Annis Melinda Rainey to tell us the first thing we should know about children’s eye health. “The first thing you should know is what the child’s vision is in each eye, individually,� Rainey says. “Some children will have a large difference in the need for glasses between the two eyes. Since the brain

can’t focus both eyes at the same time, it will just use the eye with the lower prescription and turn off the other eye.� Since young children function perfectly fine with just one good eye (and have no reference point for how other people see) the difference can be hard to pick up. But the condition can stunt development of the part of the brain responsible for the “turnedoff� eye, causing amblyopia or “lazy eye.� A pediatrician will notice the problem during the 4year-old exam, Rainey says,

but parents can screen kids at home. Simply cover one of the child’s eyes and ask her to focus on a small object in the distance, and then repeat with the other eye. “If the child objects to having one eye covered more than the other or seems to have unequal vision, they should be seen by an eyecare professional,� Rainey says. “This type of amblyopia is reversible with glasses and sometimes patching, but must be treated before the age of 6 or 7.�

Care for loved ones. Comfort for all. 541-389-0006 www.evergreeninhome.com

How does marriage affect alcohol consumption? It depends on whether you are husband or wife, according to research released this month. The study, led by Corinne Reczek at the University of Cincinnati, showed that being married tended to temper men’s drinking. The opposite was true for women. Women married to drinkers were also negatively influenced by their husbands’ heavier drinking. Women who had been light drinkers prior to marriage typically adopted their husbands’ habits, according to the study. The researchers studied data for 5,305 Wisconsin residents who were surveyed four times between 1957 (when they were seniors in high school) and 2004. They also conducted in-depth interviews with 120 participants, half of them partners in longterm marriages — defined as lasting seven years or more — and the other half of varied marital statuses. The study also showed that married women drank more than women who had been divorced for a long time and those who had recently been widowed. Married men drank less than men who were never married, who were widowed or who were divorced. Women tended to cut back on their drinking after their marriages dissolved. Men tended to increase their alcohol consumption after divorce. The data suggest that for men, divorce may remove a barrier to drinking — the wife’s disapproval — and also “point to the use of alcohol, along with drugs, as important ways to cope with the stress and pain experienced during divorce,� the study says. But divorced women “did not experience the stress of marital loss as a pathway to alcohol use but rather one to depression,� the study found. “Moreover, the loss of their husbands’ alcohol influence prompted less alcohol use� among divorced women. “Future research should view alcohol use� as “part of a gendered trajectory that unfolds across the life course� as couples transition from “alcohol constraining and alcohol promoting gendered contexts,� the study concludes. Weekly Arts & Entertainment Inside

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

M ED ICIN E

F3

Tapping engineers, families for hospital safety Wrong • Foundation launches a 10-year, $500M project to design better safety systems By Lauran Neergaard The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Head of the hospital bed raised? Check. Patient’s teeth brushed? Check. Those simple but often overlooked steps can help protect some of the most critically ill patients — those on ventilators — from developing deadly pneumonia. And if they knew about them, family members could ensure the steps weren’t forgotten. Hospitals are rife with infections and opportunities for medical mistakes. Now, a nearly $9 million project at Johns Hopkins University aims to combine engineering with the power of patients and their families to prevent some of the most common threats. The idea: Design patient safety to be more like a car’s dashboard, which automatically signals drivers when the oil needs changing or if

a passenger forgot to buckle up, or like the countdown systems that make sure no step is missed when a satellite is launched. Today, safe, quality care largely depends on individual health workers remembering hundreds of steps without good ways to tell if they forget one, said Hopkins’ patient safety expert Dr. Peter Pronovost. Getting it right takes what he calls “almost heroic efforts.” And too often, the people best able to spot early warning signs — patients and their families — are treated as passive bystanders rather than encouraged to participate in their care, he said. “Who knows better than the family?” asked Dr. George BoLinn of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation’s new Patient Care Program. The foundation, created by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore, announced Tuesday

Race

that it is funding the Hopkins work as the first step in a planned 10-year, $500 million effort to improve patient safety and family engagement in hospitals around the country. Separately, the Institute of Medicine has signed on to help, partnering with the National Academy of Engineering, to bring together top experts on how to design safety systems.

‘Part of the team’ Sometimes the failure to merely discuss treatment with patients or their families causes the harm. Consider Nicole James, a commercial property manager in Elkridge, Md., who undergoes frequent overnight hospital stays to treat the intense pain of sickle cell anemia. One such visit turned into a miserable two-week stay when the ER doctor added a powerful antibiotic to James’ usual pain treatment without telling her first — a drug that worsened her sickle cell crisis. It turned out the doctor had spotted a shadow on James’ lung X-ray that he thought

Darin Durham, emergency services director at St. Charles Bend, demonstrates how the new portable defibrillator gives audible directions on how to operate the unit in his office recently. Money from the St. Charles Foundation bought three new portable defibrillators to use on remote trails during organized athletic events.

Continued from F1 Deschutes County Sheriff’s deputies ran more than four miles to reach him with a portable defibrillator. But that was unnecessary, Carsten said. Tufts was closer to a different parking area, but paramedics didn’t know exactly where he was or the most direct way to reach him, Carsten said. “I don’t want to take away from the idea that everyone tried very hard and did their best. It wasn’t because they had to run four miles. It’s because they didn’t know how to get there,” she said. “There needs to be better information and reaction time.” “If we had an AED sooner, he might have survived, but we don’t know that for sure,” said Dr. Michael Widmer, a cardiologist with Heart Center Cardiology. AEDs are automated external defibrillators, portable electronic devices that diagnose arrhythmias, or disturbances, in a person’s heartbeat. The defibrillators can send a dose of electric energy to resynchronize a rhythm. CPR can support blood circulation, but a defibrillator could have helped determine if it was an arrhythmia and whether an electric shock would have helped, Widmer said.

Photos by Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

Filling a gap Most races don’t have emergency medical technicians on standby. This is not unique to Bend. Outside Magazine published an article on this topic earlier this year; it reported that doctors and paramedics across the nation are hesitant to volunteer because they fear medical malpractice lawsuits. Ultimately, it’s the competitors who may pay the price. In Oregon, those who volunteer medical assistance are covered under the Good Samaritan Act, a law meant to protect medically trained people from legal liability if they offer free medical care within their level of training, according to Widmer and Darin Durham, director of emergency services for St. Charles Bend and chapter president of the Central Oregon Emergency Nurses Association. “Liability scares a lot of people,” Durham said. “Everyone is afraid they’ll get sued.” In many cases, including Tufts’, when someone goes down in an event, another race participant helps. The emergency room doctor and cardiac nurse who stopped to try to save Tufts were not obligated to provide that service, Durham said. However, once someone identifies themselves as a doctor or a nurse, they’re obligated to care for the person until another qualified professional takes over. In any case, Tufts’ death pushed into gear a lingering discussion about a lack of medical personnel at events, Durham said. Almost immediately, the Central Oregon Emergency Nurses Association, St. Charles Cardiovascular Services, the St. Charles Foundation and FootZone race orga-

Submitted photo

Billy Tufts, the 40-year-old who died of a heart attack in the Dirty Half trail race, and his fiancee, Staci Carsten, 30.

nizers, who were in charge of the Dirty Half, discussed how to prevent another fatality on the trail. The St. Charles Foundation provided money to buy three new portable AEDs, which cost about $2,000 each. Durham’s department is purchasing some radios because cellphones don’t always work in these forested, far-off locations. Almost a dozen nurses from the nurses association have signed up to volunteer at these types of events, namely, ones in places that emergency vehicles can’t quickly access. Medical personnel are coordinating with various event organizers to determine which upcoming events need what number of volunteers and where they should be stationed on various routes. “We want to be first responders in minutes,” said

Durham. Most frequently, Durham expects the volunteers will provide superficial first aid when runners scrape their skin or turn their ankles, or when mountain bikers crash and break a bone. But when it is more life-threatening than that, they will be especially glad to be within reach. “Cardiac is not the most probable (incident), but it is the most devastating,” said Karen Doolan, St. Charles’ manager of cardiovascular services. “If we do this for three years and save one person, it’s worth it.”

was pneumonia but that she could have told him, and her regular physician confirmed, really was old scar tissue. “I know what’s normal for me,” said James, 37, who now insists that relatives drive past closer hospitals for Hopkins, where her doctor practices, no matter how late at night or intense her pain. Because the doctors know her, “I am not just somebody lying on the table. I am part of the team.” Tens of thousands of preventable deaths occur in U.S. hospitals every year. Numerous programs are under way to improve patient safety. Among them is the government’s Partnership for Patients, funded by $1 billion from the new health care law, that is helping hospitals adopt proven safety strategies. Hopkins’ Pronovost led the creation of one of the most well-known — a simple checklist that ensures hospital workers follow steps that lower the risk of deadly bloodstream infections from common IV catheters. That checklist now

is being used in ICUs nationwide, and the government reported last year that those infections have plummeted by 60 percent as a result. But catheter infections are just one of a dozen serious hospital-caused harms that threaten ICU patients, Pronovost said. Rather than fighting them one at a time, his new project will target multiple ICU threats simultaneously — from ventilator-associated pneumonia to deadly blood clots — without relying on old-fashioned paper checklists and with more family involvement. Already, Hopkins has introduced a “family involvement menu” of care items. “We believe that you know the person that we are caring for far better than we do,” the menu reads. Ultimately, Pronovost envisions an iPad-like device that allows both health workers and family members to see at a glance which of dozens of required daily care steps have been performed and which still need to be.

said. “That’s a healthier population. That’s why it catches people off-guard. You can look healthy and still have heart disease.” Studies have shown that 81 percent of runners who died in an event had experienced prior symptoms. Widmer said even athletes in their 30s and 40s are at risk for developing atherosclerosis, the buildup of cholesterol plaque in heart arteries. There are two kinds of plaque: obstructive and nonobstructive, Widmer said. Obstructive plaque slowly closes off the coronary arteries, which supply blood to the heart. People with this condition often experience chest pain or shortness of breath during physical exertion, when their heart rate and blood pressure goes up but the obstruction limits how much blood can bring nutrients and oxygen to the heart. The other type of plaque is nonobstructive. It creates a thin crust over the gooey cholesterol and fat cells. Meanwhile, inflammation eats away at this crust so it gets weak and can rupture, allowing “all the junk on the inside of the plaque to seep out into the blood stream,” Widmer said. This can create a clot and a heart attack in a person with no previous symptoms. “People who are athletic and have good blood pressure and cholesterol are less likely to develop plaque and less likely to develop heart problems. But low risk doesn’t mean no risk,” he said. “Exercise is overall very good for the heart, and that’s why we encourage everyone to do it.”

Prevention Participants who register for events such as the Dirty Half must sign waivers that say they are aware of the risks, that they’re fit enough to participate and that they release race organizers of any responsibility for their health. As part of this new effort to prevent another death, Doolan

and Widmer want to add some advice on such waivers as well as on event websites, “and not in small print,” Widmer said, that “if you’re experiencing these symptoms, do not run this race.” Chest pain or discomfort during exertion is a sure sign to stop, Widmer said. Other red flags that everyone should watch for: an unusual shortness of breath, feeling dizzy, lightheadedness, fatigue, passing out. Doolan added that some symptoms are atypical. “I’ve had people say it was back pain, not chest pain. In women it’s even more atypical,” Doolan said. It could be pain in the jaw or shoulder, for example.

Tufts’ legacy “(Billy Tufts) was a fit 40year-old who had a heart condition…. He was active, an avid mountain biker,” said Carsten, who is now trying to reconfigure her future without the man she planned to marry. The company Tufts was working for donated some money to the Central Oregon Trail Alliance, a nonprofit, volunteer mountain biking group, Carsten said. She is brainstorming with COTA other programs that could help athletes off the beaten track who are in trouble, even if it’s just with dehydration. She envisions a volunteer bike patrol on certain foot or bike races. She said she knows that event planners do their best and that there’s a lot to do. But there’s always something else that could be done, she said. “We’re all kicking into gear. Nothing gets done until something horrible happens. If that’s what this does, makes it safer for everyone in the future, that’s more than I could ask for,” she said. “I’m thankful that people try to make things better.” — Reporter: 541-383-0304, aaurand@bendbulletin.com

bacteria in mouth can take heavy toll on health By Drs. Kay Judge and Maxine Barish-Wreden McClatchy Newspapers

Your mouth is the gateway to your body, and can affect the health of the rest of your body. Did you know that more than 6 billion bacteria are present inside the mouth? In essence, you have more bacteria in your mouth than the Earth’s human population! Most of the bacteria in the mouth are harmless, but the wrong bacteria in your mouth can led to tooth decay, gingivitis, heart disease and kidney disease. Specific bacteria, including Streptococcus mutans, are responsible for tooth decay. In addition, researchers from the Royal College of Surgeons published a study in March showing that there may be oral bacteria that are responsible for accelerating heart disease. Their research showed that Streptococcus gordonii can produce a molecule on its surface that enables it to mimic the human protein fibrinogen, which is a blood-clotting factor. This activates platelets — the blood cells that are involved in clotting — and causes them to clump inside blood vessels. Platelet clumping can result in growths on the heart valves (endocarditis) or blood vessel inflammation that can block blood supply to the heart or brain. Here are some key facts about oral bacteria you may want to know, to keep your mouth healthy: • Your oral bacteria shift with age and health. The microenvironment of the oral cavity changes with age, the eruption or loss of teeth, and the presence of periodontal disease. Systemic changes, such as pregnancy or drug intake, also alter the number and proportion of flora. These changes are due to changes in the flow, amount and composition of salivary fluid and in the levels and activity of defense components such as immunoglobulins and cytokines in the saliva. Taking probiotics may help keep the bacterial balance in your body. • Sugar promotes growth of bacteria and plaque. Bacteria consume sugar from food residue in the mouth and excrete lactic acid, which becomes part of the plaque layer. Foods to avoid include soda, fruit juice, caramels and candy. Drink plenty of water between meals instead of soda to rinse out food debris and remove bacteria, and eat crunchy vegetables that are nature’s natural flossers (e.g. celery). • Bad oral health is linked to an increased risk of heart disease. Here is a surprising statistic: The relative risk of cardiovascular disease is doubled in people with periodontal disease. • Smoking is a risk factor for periodontal disease. Yet one more reason to quit smoking.

Athletes and heart attacks It’s rare for runners or cyclists have heart attacks during athletic events, Widmer said. “But the thing about Central Oregon is, we have so many athletes and so many events and races and so forth, as opposed to other parts of the state or country, we have a higher concentration of potential risk,” he said. Across the country, the rate of deaths from myocardial infarction — heart attacks — in athletic events is probably between one out of 1,000 and one in 20,000, he estimated. But in Central Oregon, it’s probably higher than the norm because we have more events, more participants and probably more middle-age participants, he said. It’s especially shocking when an athlete dies of a heart attack. But athletes are more likely to ignore symptoms, Doolan said. “Denial is huge. ‘It can’t be me. It’s heartburn,’ ” Doolan

We would like to announce that Dr. Eric Shreve has joined our team.

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F4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

M Online health information starting to click for patients By Kristen Gerencher MarketWatch

Photos by Chris Walker / Chicago Tribune

Dr. Russell Dohner, 87, has been in the same practice since 1955, and charges only $5 per visit, or $8 for a sports eligibility physical exam.

$5 Continued from F1 All day long, they pack the gray vinyl seats in the waiting room. So many people come that, on a recent day, there wasn’t a seat for Larry Lenover, a 64-year-old heavy equipment operator, who was happy to stand because, he says, “Dr. Dohner cares about everyone. It doesn’t matter if you got money, or you don’t.” That open-door policy has made Dohner a beloved figure in Rushville, Ill., a city of 3,200 people — about 60 miles northwest of Springfield, Ill. — that has suffered from a drumbeat of factory closings and layoffs. But it’s not just the $5 fee that keeps the locals lining up. It is, they say, the kindness he has shown and the impact of his care. It is, in short, Dr. Dohner, a calm and gentle presence in a rumpled suit and fedora hat, who has, for nearly six decades, held the hand of the dying, tended to the sick and injured, and helped everyone else get on with the business of living. There was the baby girl who suffered from seizures. “He would come to the house and sit beside her crib all night,” recalled the girl’s sister, Lynn Stambaugh, now 49 and still touched by the memory. And the gasoline fire that left a 10year-old boy badly burned. That child survived in large part because there was a doctor in town — Dohner, of course — who was in the emergency room that day. “He loves the people in this community,” says Mayor Scott Thompson, 51, who, like most people over the age of 30, was delivered by Dohner. “And the thing is, people love him back.” He is a small man whose large eyeglasses, bald head, and tufts of thinning white hair, just above his ears, give him the look of a wise, old owl. Stooped and increasingly frail, he moves slowly, barely picking up his feet as he shuffles between exam rooms. But he continues to work because he knows, if not for his low fee, many couldn’t afford medical care. “I never went into medicine to make money,” he says. “I wanted to be a doctor, taking care of people.” He works seven days a week, opening his office for an hour before church on Sundays. He has never taken a vacation, and rarely left Schulyer County, except for the occasional medical conference. If someone gently suggests that he cut back, his answer is always the same. “What if someone needs me?”

A busy man The day begins at 8 a.m. at the one-story, 25-bed hospital in Rushville, where every morning he handles paperwork and visits patients. Next stop is the red-brick storefront on the town square where he has practiced for 57 years. Inside the wood-paneled waiting room, the furniture is from the 1950s. Behind the front desk, there’s no computer, no fax and no answering machine. None of that seems to bother his patients. When Dohner arrives at 10 a.m., the waiting room is packed. In exam room three is Cheryl Nimmons, 54, who is unemployed and uninsured. Dohner

Caden Simmert, 5, has his throat checked by Dohner in his Rushville, Ill., office.

asks how she’s doing. They talk about her medication and her battle to stop smoking, as he takes her blood pressure and listens to her heart. Then he scribbles out a new prescription. “I think you’re OK,” he says with a gentle smile. “We’ll see you in six months.” The simplicity of the interaction belies its significance. Without Dohner, Nimmons wouldn’t be able to see a doctor. “He’s called me at home as late as 8:30 (p.m.) to give me blood results,” she says. “Poor guy, sitting there at his desk at 8:30 at night. But he knew I was worried about that blood work. He said, ‘Everything is fine.’” All day long, patients cycle in and out the door. Dohner pats the knee of Ethan Deloche, a teary 4-year-old who came in with an itchy rash. “Let’s get him some Prednisone tablets,” says Dohner, handing a prescription to the boy’s harried mother. A moment later, he removes stitches and places a bandage on the arm of Harold Morrell, 86. “Just leave that on for a day or two, and I think you’ll be all right,” he says. He moves slowly and steadily, up and down the office hallway. Everyone is seen on a firstcome, first-served basis. Records — going back five decades — are kept on handwritten, 4-by-6-inch index cards, which are constantly getting misplaced. Dohner and his 85-yearold nurse, Rose Busby, spend much of the day bickering about lost cards. “I’ve worked here 12 years,” sighed Edith Moore, 84, the receptionist. “Sometimes it feels like 100.” But Moore’s eyes grow wide and her demeanor softens when she talks about the people who come for treatment. “We have an envelope here, for people who can’t pay,” she whispers. She opens her desk drawer to show an envelope, stuffed with dollar bills. Who puts the money in the envelope? “A lot of us,” she says.

Wedded to the town Raised during the Depression on a farm near Vermont, Ill., in the next county over, Dohner was the fifth of seven children. When he was 13 years old, he suffered from severe tonsillitis, which resulted in fevers and seizures. “When I came out of the seizures, Doctor Hamilton would be there,” he remembers. “That’s how I decided I wanted to be a doctor.” He graduated from Northwestern University medical school in 1953 with the intention of becoming a cardiologist. But Rushville needed a

doctor. He moved to the small town in 1955, intending to stay for five years. Those years came and went and, he says, “there wasn’t anyone else to take care of the people here.” Dohner decided to stay, but his wife at the time did not. After their divorce, he never remarried, and never had any children. He was close to his siblings and his 11 nieces and nephews. But in many ways, he was wedded to the town. “He’s given up everything to stay here and to take care of people,” says Dr. Linda Forestier, 64, the only other local physician, who has practiced in Rushville for four years. To mark Dohner’s 50 years in medicine, the town held a huge celebration a few years ago. At the parade, held in his honor, Dohner waved from a horse-drawn carriage. Today, the walls of his office are plastered with children’s crayon drawings. In his office refrigerator, boxes of temperature-sensitive medication sit next to boxes of chocolate, given to him by patients. A stick of homemade butter, wrapped in cellophane, bears a handwritten note: “4U because you are a good person.”

No reason to quit Charging $5 a patient, Dohner doesn’t make any money for himself or his practice. He says he supports his work with income from his family farm, and other investments. Part of the formula, he says, is keeping costs low. He doesn’t take health insurance, or do any billing. When patients arrive, there are no forms to fill out. Just tell the doctor what’s wrong, and he’ll do his best to help. If he can’t, he’ll send you to someone who can. For those too sick to make the trip to the office, Dohner still makes house calls. Though some in his waiting room are poor and have no other place to go, others simply prefer the elderly doctor who has treated some families for generations. “My kids love him. They won’t see anyone else,” says Lisa Hill, 39. When her young son came down with asthma, “Dohner had to bribe him with Snickers bars to get him to see a specialist.” Moore, the receptionist, locks the door at 5 p.m. But Dohner stays as late as it takes to see every patient. It is after 8 p.m., on a recent evening, when he finally ushers the last person to the door. “This is what I’ve done all my life,” he says as he grabs his hat and prepares to head to the hospital, where he typically eats dinner at his desk and checks on a few patients before going home for the evening. “This is what I’m supposed to be doing. I don’t have any reason to quit.”

SAN FRANCISCO — It’s not yet a perfect match, but the relationship between Internet users and online health information appears to be growing serious. And slowly but surely, more doctors and health care professionals are seeing the value when patients empower themselves with knowledge. Receiving a new diagnosis or helping a loved one through a health crisis can motivate even the most squeamish or technology-averse people to dive into the world of online health information. Websites also fill in when people can’t take time off work or afford the money to see a doctor. But knowing how to get what you’re looking for without being misled, coerced by commercial interests or scared silly can be harder than it looks. First, the good news. “The information that’s available online, particularly on the good sites, has improved dramatically,” says Jessie Gruman, president and founder of the Center for Advancing Health, a Washington-based nonprofit that aims to increase people’s engagement in their health care. “There is nothing like having a sense of what’s going on in your body and how this drug, procedure, surgery or diagnostic test is going to make a difference in how you feel and your ability to move around and work,” she says. “You can get information like that (online) that’s really important for your own selfconfidence and your ability to talk to your clinicians.” Most doctors are pleased when patients go online to get a general overview, Gruman says. But some still see an in-

“The information that’s available online, particularly on the good sites, has improved dramatically.” — Jessie Gruman, president and founder, Center for Advancing Health

formed patient as a threat to their authority, and patients need to realize there are limits to the usefulness of online health searches since many sites offer similar information aimed at the largest possible audience. “Information online is for the general public and the general case,” Gruman says “Most people fit into that. You can get solid information that’s incredibly helpful to manage those situations.” But if your case isn’t standard, finding credible online information becomes a lot harder, and you may have to go straight to your health care provider, she says. “If you have any quirks in your history, you might be out of luck.” Gruman knows this lesson firsthand. A few months ago, she was alarmed when a blood-sugar test showed she was prediabetic, a condition of higher-than-normal blood sugar levels that precedes Type 2 diabetes and gives many people a chance to prevent or delay its development. But upon researching prediabetes on sites such as MayoClinic.com and WebMd, she found the advice was targeted to people who were overweight. A survivor of four different cancers, being overweight

wasn’t a factor that applied to her. “I’m an avid exerciser and I’m really skinny,” she says. “The two things people are told to do to keep from developing diabetes are to lose weight and exercise.” Turning away from the Internet, Gruman saw her primary-care doctor, who then referred her to an endocrinologist. The endocrinologist put her mind at ease by telling her that many people who’d had her kind of radiation therapy showed the same sign of prediabetes but didn’t go on to develop diabetes. Because there were no other red flags, the specialist said she had one less thing to worry about. Meanwhile, a colleague of hers who didn’t hear back from his doctor for a week went online to see if other people had suffered from intense itching upon starting the same medication. Sure enough, she said, he found it was a common side effect and stopped taking the drug. Joanna Smith, president of Healthcare Liaison, a health care advocacy outfit in Berkeley, Calif., says the Internet is good for basics, such as learning what a urinary tract infection is. For complicated research, she uses UpToDate.com, an independent subscription service that synthesizes medical literature and is available to patients for $19.95 for seven days or $44.95 for 30 days. As online health information gets more sophisticated, patients shouldn’t be surprised if their doctor asks them to huddle around the office computer to do a targeted search or sends them a link to watch a video explaining their health condition in the comfort of their home.

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

F5

F Advanced sweat-wicking fabrics unsaturate the market Thomas Alva Edison never donned an Under Armour HeatGear fitted short-sleeve crew. But the inventor, who famously said, “Genius is 1 percent inspiration, 99 percent perspiration,” might as well have been talking about the Baltimore brand that started 16 years ago because founder Kevin Plank was sick of sweaty tees. Since then, the world has recognized that shirts don’t have to soak. If they’re made with the right fabrics, they can carry moisture away from the skin, keeping the wearer drier and more comfortable. The discovery of these textile advances has completely changed how people view what they wear to exercise — and garden, run errands and even just hang out. “When you go to dinner, you expect air conditioning. Now when you buy athletic clothes, you expect them to have wicking technology,” says Kevin Haley, senior vice president for innovation at Under Armour. Part of what’s pushing this trend is consumers’ embrace of physical activity. But the real driver seems to be the textile technology that’s allowing companies to do things never before imaginable. With each gradual advance, manufacturers are making products longer-lasting and capable of addressing what Haley calls “the laundry issue.” (Wicking clothes tend to get smellier than cotton ones.) Fibers have been

The Washington Post

Sheex, the “world’s first performance bed sheets,” were created by a pair of women’s basketball coaches in 2007. tweaked so they can pull moisture across a greater surface area. “If we can make evaporation happen faster, that makes you cooler. You work out longer, and you’ll be in better shape,” Haley says. Science has even figured out a way to give cotton — formerly the enemy of all exercisers — an edge. Under Armour launched wicking Charged Cotton gear last year, and Sheex Performance Sheets just rolled out a Performance Cotton line. “It might seem anathema to what we do,” says Brad Petit, a Sheex spokesman. “But this cotton can absorb excess body heat.” The latest technology from Under Armour is “coldblack,” which reflects infrared and

heat rays. “In the old days, if you were walking outside on a hot Washington day, you wouldn’t think about wearing a black shirt,” says Haley, who won’t reveal what’s coming next down the pipeline but hints at a fascinating future. Shoppers will get a sense of what lies ahead in 2013, when Under Armour’s E39 hits retail. The much-hyped shirt — which is wicking, of course — features an electronic sensor that tracks heart rate, breathing and G-force of acceleration. But the hottest thing in sweat technology coming next year is Columbia’s Omni-Freeze Zero. The development is the result of a process that started five years ago, says Woody Blackford, vice president of global innovation at Columbia, when the company decided to focus on making customers cool. Omni-Freeze Zero fabric is covered in tiny blue circles that do two things when they get wet. One, their temperature drops. And two, they suck up moisture. “It swells, like pumping up a tire,” Blackford says. That action alone keeps you drier, but it also allows air to come into the garment, which speeds up evaporation. “We’re taking advantage of sweat. Moisture wicking is moving it from one place to another, but it’s still there. In ours, we use it as an agent,” he says.

“Physical activity is an elixir of life, but we’re not teaching people that. We’re telling them it’s a pill to take or a punishment for bad numbers on the scale. Sustaining physical activity is a motivational and emotional issue, not a medical one.” — Michelle Segar, research investigator, Institute for Research on Women and Gender at the University of Michigan

Exercise Continued from F1 Now research by psychologists strongly suggests it’s time to stop thinking of future health, weight loss and body image as motivators. Instead, these experts recommend a strategy marketers use to sell products: portray physical activity as a way to enhance current well-being and happiness. “We need to make exercise relevant to people’s daily lives,” Michelle Segar, a research investigator at the Institute for Research on Women and Gender at the University of Michigan, said in an interview. “Everyone’s schedule is packed with nonstop to-do’s. We can only fit in what’s essential.”

Reframing the message Segar is among those who believe that people will not commit to exercise if they see its benefits as distant or theoretical. “It has to be portrayed as a compelling behavior that can benefit us today,” she said. “People who say they exercise for its benefits to quality of life exercise more over the course of a year than those who say they value exercise for its health benefits.” Her idea for a public service advertisement to promote exercise for working women with families: A woman is shown walking around the block after dinner with her children and says, “This is great. I can fit in fitness, spend quality time with my kids, and at the same time teach them how important exercise is.” Based on studies of what motivates people to adopt and sustain physical activity, Segar is urging that experts stop framing moderate exercise as a medical prescription that requires 150 minutes of aerobic effort each week. Instead, public health officials must begin to address “the emotional hooks that make it essential for people to fit it into their hectic lives.” “Immediate rewards are more motivating than distant

ones,” she added. “Feeling happy and less stressed is more motivating than not getting heart disease or cancer, maybe, someday in the future.” In a study of 252 office workers, David Ingledew and David Markland, psychologists at the University of Wales, found that while many began to exercise as a way to lose weight and improve their appearance, these motivations did not keep them exercising in the long term. “The well-being and enjoyment benefits of exercise should be emphasized,” the researchers concluded. Segar put it this way: “Physical activity is an elixir of life, but we’re not teaching people that. We’re telling them it’s a pill to take or a punishment for bad numbers on the scale. Sustaining physical activity is a motivational and emotional issue, not a medical one.” Other studies have shown that what gets people off their duffs and keeps them moving depends on age, gender, life circumstances and even ethnicity. For those of college age, for example, physical attractiveness typically heads the list of reasons to begin exercising, although what keeps them going seems to be the stress relief that a regular exercise program provides. The elderly, on the other hand, may get started because of health concerns. But often what keeps them exercising are the friendships, sense of community and camaraderie that may otherwise be missing from their lives — easily seen among the gray-haired women who faithfully attend water exercise classes at my local YMCA. In a recent study of 1,690 overweight or obese middleaged men and women, Segar found that enhancing daily well-being was the most influential factor for the women in the study. Men indicated they were motivated by more distant health benefits, although Segar suspects this may be because men feel less comfortable discussing their mental health needs. “What sustains us, we sus-

tain,” Segar said. “We need to promote what marketers call ‘customer loyalty.’ We need to help people stay engaged with movement by teaching them how it can help sustain them in their lives.”

In a weekly four-part series, physical therapist Lisa Ann McCall offers examples and tips about how to use our bodies safely in our daily lives. Part four of four: pulling weeds, working on the floor, cleaning the litter box Many jobs require us to be on our knees and work close to the floor. Done correctly, this work can stretch the groin, improve the range of motion in the hips and build strength in the back, buttocks and legs. With one foot forward (in this example, the left foot) and the spine straight, the weight is

evenly distributed between the right knee and left foot. Rotate the pelvis forward to avoid bending at the waist and rounding the spine. Relax. It is normal to feel some stretch or stress in the groin area and that is OK. Source: Lisa Ann McCall, physical therapist, former yoga teacher and author of The McCall Body Balance Method. McCall studied body movements in agrarian cultures, where people’s daily lives include a lot of manual labor but their joints and bodies don’t break down as much as people from Western cultures. — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin

Improper

— Vicky Hallett, The Washington Post

Proper

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

A great fitness teacher makes all the difference B y Nicole Tsong The Seattle Times

Illustration by Yvetta Fedorova / New York Times News Service

SAFE MOVEMENTS

SEATTLE — When a teacher is great, I spin faster, hold a pose longer or do one more set of core. Even when I don’t want to. Especially when I don’t want to. We know when we are in the presence of a great teacher. We can’t always put a finger on what makes the class better, but we keep going back and drag our friends along with us. We leave work early for them. We sweat for them. And on great days, we laugh — though maybe through gritted teeth. When it comes to staying fit, a great teacher can be the difference between being committed and giving up. But what are the qualities that make a teacher great? I consulted with people who think about this a lot more than most — people in the business of fitness and thus in the business of packing their rosters with great teachers who draw a crowd.

Everyone agreed that certification in his or her field and an understanding of technique were mandatory. Teachers must know the body and the rules around what works and what does not. In addition to training, the best teachers have a natural ability to organize information and intuitively get how to pace a class, Elliott says. They can read a room and shift their teaching style based on what they see. But just as important are the other intangible qualities: energy, inspiration and that funny bone. “A great teacher is a great performer,” Elliott says. Sami Sweeney, owner of Pure Barre in Seattle, looks for passion. Taking a class, she can see when a teacher is drained or treating it like a job. Her best teachers love the technique and love taking classes on their own. “They definitely shine when they’re teaching,” she says.

Elliott says critical thinking also helps, especially in the yoga world, which has exploded with all kinds of claims about how it will solve your life. Students know when a teacher is aware of both the good and bad about their industry and can even joke about it, Elliott says. For Eastside Seattle fitness teacher Marisa Mancke, it ultimately comes down to connection and loving people. Mancke, who owns Happy Hour by Marisa, loves the people who come to her class. She makes sure to use everybody’s names and to notice people when they return after some time off. Mancke, who has taught fitness for 18 years, was overweight herself. She knows what it’s like to come to a class where she didn’t know anyone, didn’t understand what was happening and was out of shape. When a teacher says your name, you feel like someone cares, she says.

Value beyond weight loss Many people, if not most, start exercising because they want to lose weight. But very often they abandon exercise when the pounds fail to fall off. Study after study has found that without major changes in eating habits, increasing physical activity is only somewhat effective for losing weight, though it helps people maintain weight loss, and shedding even a few pounds, especially around one’s middle, can improve health. For example, researchers in Brisbane, Australia, and in Leeds, England, studied 58 sedentary overweight or obese men and women who participated in a closely monitored 12-week aerobic exercise program. Weight loss was minimal, but nonetheless the participants’ waistlines shrunk, their blood pressure and resting heart rate dropped, and their aerobic capacity and mood improved. “Exercise should be encouraged and the emphasis on weight loss reduced,” the researchers concluded. “Disappointment and low self-esteem associated with poor weight loss could lead to low exercise adherence and a general perception that exercise is futile and not beneficial.” I walk three miles, or bike 10 miles and swim three-quarters of a mile daily. If you ask me why, weight control may be my first answer, followed by a desire to live long and well. But that’s not what gets me out of bed before dawn to join friends on a morning walk and then bike to the Y for my swim. It’s how these activities make me feel: more energized, less stressed, more productive, more engaged and, yes, happier — better able to smell the roses and cope with the inevitable frustrations of daily life.

M y p eace

of mind

I know when my body’s not working right, but I don’t always know why. That’s why my Family Medicine physician at Bend Memorial Clinic has me covered, whether I have a sore throat, migraines or something just hurts. If I need a specialist, my Family Medicine physician will help make the arrangements — and with 30 specialties within BMC’s TotalCare network, it will likely be just down the hall. They’re here to make getting good care easier. All in one place.

MY TOTAL CARE

BEND EASTSIDE CLINIC Kathleen Antolak, MD Audrey Davey, MD Charlotte Lin, MD Janey Purvis, MD Eric J. Schneider, MD Edward M. Tarbet, MD John D. Teller, MD Thomas A. Warlick, MD BEND WESTSIDE CLINIC Jeffrey P. Boggess, MD Dana M. Rhode, DO Hans G. Russell, MD Cindy Shuman, PA-C REDMOND CLINIC Sadie Arrington, MD Alan C. Hilles, MD SISTERS CLINIC May S. Fan, MD Alan C. Hilles, MD

Bend Eastside | Bend Westside | Redmond | Sisters bendmemorialclinic.com Call 541-382-4900 to make an appointment.


F6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

N Folic acid may help prevent kidney cancer and brain tumors in children A new study suggests that folic acid fortification of foods may have helped reduce the incidence of the most common type of kidney cancer (Wilms’ tumor) and a type of brain tumor (primitive neuroectodermal tumor) in children. In 1998, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration mandated fortification

of foods with folic acid in response to earlier studies that showed that prenatal consumption folic acid reduces RESEARCH of neural tube defects in babies. The new study, published in the journal Pediatrics, examined the incidence of childhood cancer before and after

folic acid fortification was mandated. Researchers used data from 1986 to 2008 involving 8,829 children from birth to age 4 from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, which has collected information on cancer cases from around the country since 1973. Researchers found that Wilms’ tumor

rates increased from 1986 to 1997 and decreased thereafter, coinciding with folic acid fortification. And, primitive neuroectodermal tumor rates increased from 1986 to 1993 and decreased thereafter, which does not exactly coincide with folic acid fortification, but does coincide with the 1992 recommendation for women of childbearing

age to consume 400 micrograms of folic acid daily, according to researchers. However, authors said that more research is needed to confirm these results and to rule out any other explanations. Source: Washington University in St. Louis — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin

U.S. cheese industry works to reduce sodium and fat have a large effect on Americans’ diets. There are some cheeses, like Swiss and mozzarella, that are naturally lower in salt than others, and cheese companies have had success marketing reduced-fat mozzarellas, particularly for school-lunch foods like pizza. But food shoppers have not flocked to most other lower-fat or lower-salt cheeses. Some cheeses are especially problematic. Most processed cheeses, in which natural cheeses are heated and mixed with other ingredients, use sodium-containing emulsifiers for blending and to control melting. A typical slice of American cheese can contain more than twice the sodium that the same amount of a natural cheddar has. “Cheese is just this big biochemistry experiment,” said Tonya Schoenfuss, a professor of food science and nutrition at the University of Minnesota.

By Henry Fountain New York Times News Service

MILWAUKEE — In the centuries that Americans have been making cheese, they have gotten very good at it, producing world-class cheddars and chevres, to name just two varieties. But more recently, cheese-making has been something of a struggle. Under pressure to reduce sodium and saturated fats in American diets — especially those of children — the cheese industry has tried to make products with less salt or fat that consumers will like. It has not had great success. “We’ve made some progress in that arena,” said Gregory Miller, president of the Dairy Research Institute. “But we have not been able to crack the code.” Miller, whose group is financed by the dairy industry, was referring to efforts to reduce salt, but he had a similar appraisal of the challenges of low-fat cheese. “When you take a lot of the fat out, essentially cheese will turn into an eraser,” he said. The trouble with cheese is that salt and fat are critical components, responsible for far more of its character than consumers might think. Salt helps control moisture content and bacterial activity — the starter culture that is added to the milk and naturally occurring strains. All of them can flavor the cheese, for better or worse, as it ages. “Salt serves as a preservative, as a director of flavor development,” said Mark Johnson, senior scientist with the Wisconsin Center for Dairy Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “If I remove it, my flavor goes in a different direction.” Fat affects moisture levels, too — less fat generally means more water, which can speed spoilage — and helps govern texture, balancing out proteins so a cheese slices properly and feels right when chewed. Because salt and fat both affect moisture, it is particularly

Snack Continued from F1 If she refuses it, she is obviously not hungry. Say something like, “You can have a snack after story time, but once that is finished you will brush your teeth and go to bed. You can have a glass of water by your bed, but no getting up.” A lot of kids will do Brizee anything to get parents’ attention after they are put to bed. My daughter once called to me saying, “You forgot to wash my face.” She was so afraid she was going to miss something once she was in bed.

A ‘real technical challenge’

Illustration by Lou Beach / New York Times News Service

difficult to make a product that is low in both. “If you really want to make bad cheese, make a low-fat, low-sodium one,” said Lloyd Metzger, a professor of dairy science at South Dakota State University.

The right type of cheese To be sure, few people are talking about tinkering with specialty cheeses — making a low-fat Camembert, say, or a low-salt Roquefort. “I’m buying those cheeses at a premium,” Johnson said, “and I want that premium flavor.” But what the cheese industry calls “American type” (natural Cheddar, Colby and similar varieties) and “Italian type” (mozzarella, provolone and others) together account for about four-fifths of the more than 10 billion pounds of cheese made in the United States each year. So producing good-tasting,

• 1 small tortilla or ½ large topped with 1 ounce of melted cheese, •½ to ¾ cup yogurt blended with ½ to ¾ cup fruit. Isn’t feeding my child Q: again after dinner a bad idea? The whole idea that eatA: ing after dinner is “bad” is not based in any real science. (There are people who eat more than 50 percent of their calories in the evening. That is not necessarily healthy, unless they work the night shift.) Kids typically need to eat four to six times per day to meet their nutritional needs — three meals and one to three snacks. If dinner is early, an evening snack will often be necessary. No one sleeps well if they are hungry in the night.

How much do I feed my Q : child for a late-night snack? Any other thoughts on This is going to depend Q: late-night snacking? A: on the child’s age and The thing to avoid is size. A 12-year-old is going to A: mindless munching eat much bigger servings than throughout the evening. A a 6-year-old. A 6- to 7-year-old could eat servings of recommended bedtime snacks such as: • 1 to 3 cups popcorn, • ½ cup of ice cream, plain or topped with some berries, peaches or banana, • ¾ to 1 cup cereal with ½ cup milk topped with ½ banana or peach, ½ cup berries, or other fruit, • ½ to one slice toast with peanut butter (and jam or honey, optional), • about 1 ounce of cheese and two to three crackers,

snack at the kitchen or dining room table is fine. Munching in front of the TV or while doing homework is not. Mindless eating is a big contributor to overeating and in turn excess weight gain. Parents and kids need to work on mindful eating. If you are hungry enough to eat something, you are hungry enough to sit at the table and savor it. If a child wants to keep playing or watching TV when it is snack time, then they forfeit the snack. — Reporter: 541-383-0304, aaurand@bendbulletin.com

good-textured versions with “reduced” fat or salt (defined by the government as at least 25 percent less than typical) or “low” fat or salt (containing a specific small amount) could

It’s an experiment in which salt plays a large role, and cheese-makers “really haven’t found a magic approach” to reducing sodium, said Miller of the Dairy Research Institute. “It’s a real technical challenge.” Most efforts focus on young, mild cheeses, because even though the reduction of salt

may make it more difficult to control bacterial activity, the cheeses are not aged long enough for this to affect flavor, Metzger said. But no cheesemaker is going to spend the time and money to age a Cheddar for several years, for example, and risk that it may develop off flavors. A common salt-reduction technique is to replace a portion of the sodium chloride with potassium chloride, which has a similar ability to control bacteria and provides a similar salty taste. But that chemical presents other problems. “Potassium salt by itself also gives a bitter note,” Johnson said. “If you get it too high, then you taste that as an off flavor.” So some cheese manufacturers add compounds that bind with the taste buds so the potassium salt does not. “They’re natural ingredients, not any weird chemical,” he continued. “It masks the unpleasantness.” David McCoy, vice president for product research at the Dairy Research Institute, said one avenue of study was to look for bacterial strains that are more sensitive to sodium — so less salt would have to be added to control them — but still produce the right flavors. “But that’s a long-term process,” he said. Several years ago, Miller and others analyzed the sodi-

um content of more than 1,650 samples of cheddar, mozzarella and processed cheeses from manufacturers around the country. “What we learned was that there’s a lot of variability within brands and across brands,” Miller said. By improving manufacturing processes, he added, companies should be able to make cheeses with consistent, and lower, sodium content and meet some of the targets established by efforts like the National Salt Reduction Initiative, a partnership led by the New York City health department. The initiative has a goal of a 5 percent sodium reduction in most cheeses by the end of this year and a 15 percent reduction by 2014. Targets for processed cheeses are stiffer. Johnson said the industry might meet some sodium-reduction goals by slowly lowering the salt content so consumers became accustomed to the change in taste. It is relatively easy to produce a cheese with 10 percent less sodium by just cutting the salt, Johnson said. “If I gave you that cheese, and gave you a full-sodium one, you’d know the difference,” he said. “But if I didn’t ever give you the higher one, and gave you the lower one, you’d go, ‘Mmmmm, that’s not bad.’ ”


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Want to Buy or Rent Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage costume jewelry. Top dollar paid for Gold/Silver.I buy by the Estate, Honest Artist Elizabeth,541-633-7006 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809 Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com Wanted! Pellet stove 541-382-4144 WANTED: RAZORS, Double or singleedged, straight razors, shaving brushes, mugs & scuttles, strops, shaving accessories & memorabilia. Fair prices paid. Call 541-390-7029 between 10 am-3 pm. 208

Pets & Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Australian Shepherd Mix Pups, 1 week old, reserve now, 4 left, $100, 541-815-9257

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for Guns, Knives & Ammo. 541-526-0617

LEARN TO SHOOT LIKE THE COPS plus UTAH Permit class. $99. Sisters, 1 p.m., Sun. Sept. 9. Call 817-789-5395 www.reacttrainingsystems.com

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THE BULLETIN re- Lift Recliner Chair, w/ attached remote conquires computer adtrol, taupe color, exc. vertisers with multiple cond., used 1 yr., ad schedules or those $1000 new, now selling multiple sys$400,541-848-7755 or tems/ software, to dis541-948-7518. or close the name of the business or the term dorene@quailbend.com "dealer" in their ads. Look at: Private party advertisBendhomes.com ers are defined as those who sell one for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale computer. 260

263

Misc. Items

Tools

22’ alum. semi-truck trlr, 10” Skil table saw Model 3400, extra blades, $75 best used for storage, obo, 541-647-1333 $500. 541-447-4405 BBQ propane grill $60; Extension Ladders: 24’ - $50; 16’ - $25. OBO. Peach colored dishes 541-548-7137 $40. 541-593-7307 Shopsmith Mk V-510 Buying Diamonds w/11” band saw, 12” /Gold for Cash sanding disk,drill chuck, Saxon’s Fine Jewelers more accessories, 541-389-6655 $800, 541-317-9040. BUYING Lionel/American Flyer Garage Sales trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. Garage Sales BUYING & SELLING All gold jewelry, silver Garage Sales and gold coins, bars, Find them rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silin ver, coin collect, vinThe Bulletin tage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, Classiieds 541-382-9419.

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We pay cash for boots, buckles, jewelry & more! 924 Brooks St. 541-678-5162

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Building Materials

www.getcowgirlcash.com 350’ rough cedar 2x6

Poulan Pro riding lawn mower 42” 18½ hp good shape. $600 OBO. 541-389-9268

used decking and 30’ 4x7x10 fir timbers $300, you haul. 541-593-7686

Professional Dart Board and flights, $35. 541-410-4596

REDMOND Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 1242 S. Hwy 97 541-548-1406 Open to the public.

Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 261

Medical Equipment Golden Power Wheelchair, like new, bright red, exc. cond., used only 3 mo, orig. $3500, sacrifice at $2000, 541-848-7755 or 541-948-7518. or dorene@quailbend.com

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Craftsman 21” Lawn Since September 29, Mower, good shape. 1991, advertising for $75. 541-410-4596 used woodstoves has been limited to modFor newspaper els which have been delivery, call the certified by the OrCirculation Dept. at egon Department of 541-385-5800 Environmental QualTo place an ad, call ity (DEQ) and the fed541-385-5809 eral Environmental or email Protection Agency classified@bendbulletin.com (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certifiSUPER TOP SOIL cation label, which is www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compermanently attached post mixed, no to the stove. The Bulrocks/clods. High huletin will not knowmus level, exc. for ingly accept advertisflower beds, lawns, ing for the sale of gardens, straight uncertified screened top soil. woodstoves. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. Wanted! 541-548-3949. Pellet stove 541-382-4144 270 267

Fuel & Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection. • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

Lost & Found Found: 2 bikes, near Skyview Middle School, 1 red, 1 aqua, around 8/1. Call to identify 541-389-5357 FOUND hearing aid on Brianne Place, Bend. Call to ID, 707-849-2901. Found Set of Keys, attached to pink slipper, 8/29, on Baker Rd, 541-317-9326 Found Siamese cat friendly female, corner of 21st. and Timber, Redmond. if unclaimed free to good home. 541-604-0063. Found: Sunglasses on lawn outside PacSun in lawn, during the ZZ Top Concert. Call to identify, 541-382-4530.

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2012

Yorkie AKC pup, male, teddy face, playful,health guarantee,house trained $550. 541-316-0005.

Boxer puppies, AKC reg, 1st shots, very social $700. 541-325-3376

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Beretta 686 white onyx, 30” 12 ga,O/U shotgun w/chokes, $1550. Call GENERATE SOME exRalph, 541-255-3242. citement in your neighborhood! Plan a Browning A-Bolt .270 Stainless Stalker, w/ Model 70 Pre 64, 300 garage sale and don't Leupold VarX-II 2-9x Winchester mag., origiforget to advertise in variable, silver scope nal, in great condition. classified! & rings, exc. cond., Savage model 99E car541-385-5809. bine, 243 cal., very good $600, 541-410-6242. Lamps, (2) sets, $5 ea. Call Classifieds at condition. 541-610-8535 Call for details, Browning BDA .380 Cal 541-385-5809 541-279-0591 www.bendbulletin.com semi auto. 13 round Remington 721, 300 H&H $750. Ruger 77 capacity. Excellent Table, solid oak pedHawkeye 25-06, new, condition. Wood estal, w/ 4 uphol$525. 541-548-4774 grips. $499 cash stered chairs on rollonly. 541-749-8449 US made 38 S.W., 5 ers. $350 OBO. shot, antique made 541-647-1333 CASH!! 1800s, ammo and For Guns, Ammo & W/D Set, older Frigidaire, holster, $210. Reloading Supplies. works well, $125, deEnglish Bulldog Pups. 209-985-7015 541-408-6900. livered, 541-548-0040 3 female, AKC, ready Wanted: Collector today! $2000. Call seeks high quality DO YOU HAVE 541-367-3370 or go to The Bulletin fishing items. SOMETHING TO www.ShippsMyTBullr ecommends extra Call 541-678-5753, or dogs.com SELL caution when pur503-351-2746 FOR $500 OR chasing products or Free 2 female rats to LESS? services from out of good home. If interested: Weatherby 7mm Mags Non-commercial the area. Sending leahw34@gmail.com (2), 1 left hand, 1 right advertisers may cash, checks, or hand,scope,slink, case, Kittens/cats avail. thru place an ad credit information exc. new cond., $1095 rescue group. Tame, with our may be subjected to each 541-593-8294. shots, altered, ID chip, "QUICK CASH FRAUD. For more more. Sat/Sun 1-5, Weatherby Orion 12 ga. SPECIAL" information about an other days by appt. O/U $875. Ithaca 20 1 week 3 lines $12 advertiser, you may 65480 78th Bend, ga. O/U $575. Contior call the Oregon 541-389-8420; visit nental Arms .410 2 weeks $20! State Attorney www.craftcats.org for $150 541-306-0346. Ad must General’s Office photos & more. include price of Consumer ProtecWinchester rifle, model single item of $500 tion hotline at Lab Pups AKC, black 1894, good cond. or less, or multiple 1-877-877-9392. & yellow, Master $750. King Arthur items whose total Hunter sired, perforSword, $60. Cross does not exceed mance pedigree, OFA Bow, $30. $500. cert hips & elbows, 541-388-1101 Call 541-771-2330 212 Call Classifieds at www.kinnamanretrievers.com Yugoslavian SKS Rifle, 541-385-5809 Antiques & Rare, $650 OBO, Labradoodles - Mini & www.bendbulletin.com John, 541-771-9902. med size, several colors Collectibles 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com 1925 Home Comfort EAA Elite Witness Match, USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! wood cookstove with .45, two-tone, adj. POODLE (TOY) PUPS warming oven, resights, 2 mags, case & Door-to-door selling with Well-socialized & lovstored & re-nickeled, ammo. Like-new! $500. fast results! It’s the easiest able. 541-475-3889 $2000. 541-447-4446 541-977-3173 way in the world to sell. TURN THE PAGE 1950 Okeefe Merritt gas GUN SHOW The Bulletin Classiied stove, restored. For More Ads Sept. 1 & 2 $4500. 541-382-3728 541-385-5809 Deschutes Fairgrounds The Bulletin Antiques wanted: tools, Buy! Sell! Trade! 253 furniture, fishing, SAT. 9-5 • SUN. 10-3 Queensland Heelers marbles, old signs, standard & mini,$150 & TV, Stereo & Video $8 Admission, toys, costume jewelry. up. 541-280-1537 http:// 12 & under free. Call 541-389-1578 rightwayranch.wordpress.com TV for sale $45; OREGON TRAIL GUN 541-593-7307 SHOWS 541-347-2120 Schnoodles,Great w/kids, The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all non-shed, shots, $350 ads from The Bulletin males, $450 females. newspaper onto The Pup kit 541-410-7701 Bulletin Internet webWhippet Puppies site. whimsical, family pets, $350, 541-280-1975.

Barn/shop cats FREE, some tame, some not. Yorkie AKC Male,Champ lines, potty trained, We deliver! Fixed, healthy,all shots, health shots, etc. 389-8420 guarantee $595, 541-233-3534

Bloodhound, female, almost 2 yrs, unaltered, AKC reg., $400, Brady, 541-848-9953.

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron, Bend 541-318-1501

AR15 carbine, SS barrel, flat top, rings, collapsible stock, & ammo. New! $900. 541-977-3173

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Coins & Stamps Private collector buying postage stamp albums & collections, world-wide and U.S. 573-286-4343 (local, cell #) 242

Exercise Equipment 45” Trampoline, $90, Sacrifice 541-410-4596

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Bowflex Xtreme like new, assembly required, you haul, Armoire, dark oak $99; $400. 541-383-3041. Rattan bookcase $45; rattan coffee table Tunturi C416 Stair $35; wine cart $35. Stepper, exlnt cond, 541-593-7307 $25. 541-504-6437 China Cabinet, contem245 porary glass shelves, Golf Equipment $250, 541-419-0799

Dog Kennel, cyclone fencing, 10.5’ long, 58” wide, 82” tall, China Hutch, maple, Easy Go Golf Carts 08 & 07, 36V, $2100/ea. $150, 541-382-2036 very good cond. $350 541-280-3848. or 503-706-6993 OBO. 541-279-0591 Doxie AKC mini pups, all Desk, Rolltop, dark oak, Taylor Made Rocket 43”x33”x20” Deep, 4 Balls Irons, 4-Pitching colors inc wheaton &dapl, drawer, brass pulls, wedge, $435, leave $375-425. 541-508-4558 $250, 541-382-0483 www.bendweenies.com msg at 541-480-1014

DEADLINES We will be closed Monday, Labor Day, Sept. 3, 2012 RETAIL & CLASSIFIED DISPLAY ADVERTISING DAY DEADLINE Monday 9/3....................................Wednesday, 8/29 4 p.m. At Home 9/4...................................Wednesday, 8/29 4 p.m. Tuesday 9/4.........................................Thursday, 8/30 Noon Wednesday 9/5.........................................Friday, 8/31 Noon

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Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise

OVER $500 in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days ................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days .................................................. $18.50 7 days .................................................. $24.00 14 days .................................................$33.50 28 days .................................................$61.50

4 lines for 4 days.................................. $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 270

270

Lost & Found

Lost & Found

Lost: 42nd Mason Ring, Lost Siamese cat near Jim Hignett engraved COCC. She’s a Seal inside band. Lost at Point with blue eyes Walmart in Bend. and white feet. $100 reward if found call. REWARD! 541-306-3078. 541-382-7473.

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Farm Market

Hay, Grain & Feed

Horses & Equipment

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

300

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Lost: Black purse, in Redmond on 8/27. Owner is almost blind, left behind while shopping. Please help find. 541-548-3590.

325 Need to get an Hay, Grain & Feed ad in ASAP? You can place it Exc. Orchard Grass Hay, no rain, barn online at: stored, small bales, www.bendbulletin.com $225 per ton, Lost Cat: Romaine Vil541-548-0731. lage Area, around 541-385-5809 7/14, white female, Premium 1st cutting Orw/1 black ear & black chard Grass hay, shed REMEMBER: If you tail, 1 blue eye, 1 stored, 70-lb bales, have lost an animal, green eye, $100 Re$225/ton. Call Ten Barr don't forget to check ward, 541-317-9299 The Humane Society Ranch, 541-389-1165 or 503-724-5858. in Bend 541-382-3537 Wheat Straw: Certified & Redmond, Lost: Maine Coon Cat, Bedding Straw & Garden 541-923-0882 dark brown tabby, Old Straw;Compost.546-6171 Prineville, Bend-Redmond Hwy/ 541-447-7178; Rogers Rd. area, Wheat straw, small 50-lb OR Craft Cats, possibly injured, bales, in stack, $1.25 541-389-8420. 541-788-8713. ea. 541-546-9821

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Estate Sales

Sales Southwest Bend

Sales Northeast Bend

Sales Redmond Area

Estate

Sale, Sat. & Estate Sale: Sat. 9 am.-

Sun. 8-5, 64745 Old Bend-Redmond Hwy. Household items, tools, equipment and much more. Proceeds go toward medical expenses.

?, 61018 Tuscany Dr, household misc, furniture, free piano, 2 elec. wheelchair misc. medical supplies, kitchen items, Toyota Camry.

Multi Family Yard Sale, Sat., 8-4, 19981 Sales Northwest Bend Covey Ln. (follow detour & look for signs. Asian art, pottery, fabric, knick-knacks; Kitchen, BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS dining, Pic frames; garSearch the area’s most den pots; electronic comprehensive listing of cables, tools, camping, classiied advertising... sports, much more. real estate to automotive, College Way to Sagi- merchandise to sporting naw to 2137 NW Cas- goods. Bulletin Classiieds cade View, Sat-Sun appear every day in the 9-2, Early Birds $$. print or on line. smalley.c.j@gmail.com Call 541-385-5809 BIG GARAGE SALE www.bendbulletin.com misc. items. Sat. 8-2. 2225 NW 5th NO EARLY BIRDS! Downsizing Yard Sale: 286 Fri. 8/31, Sat 9/1, 9-3, 64440 Quail Dr., off Sales Northeast Bend Tumalo Reservoir Rd., just past Re- “45 Years of Collecting” Moving Sale - House search Rd., Lots of Full!! Vintage, colstuff, blue & white palectibles, Bend history, tio set, doghouse, fishing, boating, campsmall size ladies ing, glassware, paintclothes, knick knacks, ings, photos, cameras, come & see us! huge tool collection, furFri. Only,8-2. Kids’ toys & niture, ‘50s sectional, clothes, books, housewomen’s clothes, ‘98 hold, kitchenware & lots Ford Taurus (low miles), more! 685 NW Powell car parts new/used, garButte Lp, off Awbrey Rd. den -- fabulous prices! Great Variety; Sat., 8-4 Sat-Sun, 9/1-2, 1104 NE Revere Ave, Bend 8-noon, 495 NW Sonora Dr., sports, pets, art, music, books, ESTATE/MOVING H SALE H cameras, baby, Xmas, Antiques including setclothing, storage. tee, piano, small furn. Muli-Family Garage pieces, enamelware, Sale in NW Crossing, kitchenware, china, children’s toys, clothes, depression and other electronics, furniture & glassware, sterling, household items, in alsilverplate sets, Pyrex, ley behind 1483 NW framed prints, stereoJohn Fremont, Sat. optic viewers, toys & dolls, lots of interestOnly 8 a.m. -Noon ing smalls PLUS Oak 284 china cabinet, bookSales Southwest Bend cases, ent. centers,, lamps, artwork, over 100 pcs. copper, holiDownsizing to full time day, books, jewelry, RVing, Bring cash, canoe, 3 old guns, take it away. Quality, lawn mower, vintage clean household Schwinn bikes, camitems. Queen size eras, loads misc! bdrm suite, includes: Hwy 20 E. to 62221 dresser, headboard Powell Butte Hwy /footboard, tall 2nd house left, 2 miles dresser, dresser with past Costco! mirror and two night Fri. & Sat. 9-4; stands (dark wood). control numbers Maple dining room crowdFri. at 8 a.m. table, chairs & hutch, www.atticestatesancontemporary sofa dappraisals.com and loveseat, leather Attic Estates & Aprecliner, many other praisals 541-350-6822 household items, & snowblower. Sat. & Just bought a new boat? Sun, 9/1 & 9/2, 8am - Sell your old one in the 2pm. 19951 Quail classiieds! Ask about our Pine Lp., off BrookSuper Seller rates! swood. 541-385-5809 282

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $2.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!”

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT at

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

288

Sales Southeast Bend

Need help ixing stuff? Call A Service Professional ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com 345

Livestock & Equipment

Moving Sale! Pickup, rototiller, ATV, brand new hot tub, tools, shotgun, antiques, lots of Ducks Unlimited prints & decoys. Sat-Sun, Sept 1-2, 9-4, 10100 Crooked River Dr, #10, (Smith Rock Mobile Estates)

Call a Pro Whether you need a fence ixed, hedges trimmed or a house built, you’ll ind professional help in The Bulletin’s “Call a Service Professional” Directory

About Products and Multi-family sale. Lots of items! 59865 Chey- Services Every Day through The Bulletin Classifieds enne Rd in DRW. Sat-Sun 9-4 only. No 292 early birds. Sales Other Areas Yard Sale - Sat 8-2, 61625 Vega St., Estate/Garage Sale Household items, fur- Contractor tools, camping gear, furniture, niture and more! scrapbooking, garden stuff, much, much more! 290 8/31 & 9/1, 8:30-5, NO Sales Redmond Area EARLY SALES. 17315 Bakersfield Rd., Sunriver 8/30, 31 & 9/1, 9-5, Items for hunting, LaPine Garage Sale: fishing, camping, RVs Sat. 9/1, 8-4, 52195 household & more. Elderberry Ln, col665 Angus Ln., Terrelectibles, furniture, bonne. household & more. 8342 S. Hwy 97, Fri. & Sisters Garage/Estate Sat. 9-4, Dick & Jane Sale: Sat. 9/1, 8-3, books, bunkbed, fur67996 Peterson Burn niture, household, Rd, lots of great items toys, holiday decor.

NOTICE

Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local utility companies.

Eagle Crest Sale, 9/1 Antiques, Glassware, tools, tires, furniture, pictures,799 Widgeon Rd,9-3 alturl.com/xi8ur, 541-316-0114 www.bendbulletin.com

Employment

400 421

Schools & Training

TRUCK SCHOOL

www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-387-9252 476

Employment Opportunities 1977 14' Blake Trailer, refurbished by Frenchglen Blacksmiths, a Classy Classic. Great design for multiple uses. Overhead tack box (bunkhouse) with side and easy pickup bed access; manger with left side access, windows and head divider. Toyo radial tires & spare; new floor with mats; center partition panel; bed liner coated in key areas, 6.5 K torsion axles with electric brakes, and new paint, $7500 OBO! Call John at 541-589-0777.

Automotive Service Advisor Must be customer focused with CSI a top priority. Fast pace dealership offering great benefits with a lasting career for a hard working individual. Send resume to: PO Box 6676, Bend, OR 97708 Banking

358

Fri., 8/31, 8 a.m.! 50” Farmers Column projection HD TV, 20” LCD TV, 2 tan chairs, 80 lineal ft. of welded glassware, jewelry, pipe horse corral, 4collectibles, garage rail, 2” pipe with 3” heater, quality stuff! posts & 2 feeders. 2251 NW 37th St. $300 541-410-3218

Moving Sale Fri & Sat 541-385-5809 8/31 & 9/1, Mini Fridge, coffee tables, 2 barstools, nice de- Multi-family moving sale Fri-Sat, 8-4. furn. appl. cor items, outdoor const. co. tools, swing, Marquis hottub, woodstove. 902 NE Yucca Way. 541-961-5830 60586 Ridge Hts at Knott Rd The Biggest Estate Sale in Central Oregon Fri. & Sat. 9-4, 5330 Moving Sale: Sat. Only, NW Coyner Ave, mov8-5, 21259 Hurita Pl, ing sale, everything patio set, lawn equip., must go! furniture, wash/dry, & much more! 410-4413 People Look for Information

Casta Vista Estates Multi-Family Yard Sale, 1 day only, Sat. 9/1, 8-4 3748 SW Xero Pl, No early birds.

Leather Western Saddle, 14.5” seat, $195. 541-923-7332 Mini ponies, mares and studs, $250 and up. 541-923-3530.

Free 2 acres irrigated pasture, sheep fenced (sheep only!) til end of Oct., in Redmond. 541-548-2357

We are excited to announce an available position in Bend, Oregon. Branch Supervisor Salary Range: $ 29,000 - $40,000 EOE. For more details, please apply online: www.sofcu.com

383

The Bulletin

Produce & Food

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THOMAS ORCHARDS Kimberly, OR U-Pick & Ready Picked: Freestone Canning peaches: Suncrest, Loring, Elberta, Angelus, Necarines, Plums, Bartlett Pears, Gala Apples BRING CONTAINERS Open 7 days a week 8am-6 pm only 541-934-2870. Visit us on Facebook for updates Also we are at Bend Farmer’s Mkt at Drake Park & St. Charles

Hospitality Front desk positions part time and full time. Apply in person at Sugarloaf Mountain Motel, 62980 No. Hwy 97, Bend, Oregon.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The TIRE SERVICE Bulletin' s web site America’s Tire Co. Finance will be able to click is looking for through automatically TIRE TECHNICIANS & Business to your site. • Great attitude a must! • Competitive Wages! SOCIAL SERVICES Join one of the largest • Advancement opps child education net- • Must be able to do works in Oregon pre- physical work paring children for • Able to pass drug/ 528 school. We are look- background check • Start $10/DOE Loans & Mortgages ing for an Health insurance ERSEA Supervisor • available WARNING at our Madras center • Will work around The Bulletin recomto recruit eligible fami- school schedule mends you use caulies into our Head tion when you proStart programs. FullVisit our website vide personal time year-round positires.com for an information to compation w/excellent ben- application and to learn nies offering loans or efits. $19.32 and up, more about credit, especially depending on exper. Discount Tire Co. those asking for adBilingual Spanish/ vance loan fees or English required. Please bring completed companies from out of Please visit our webapplication and state. If you have apply in person: site www.ocdc.net concerns or quesfor job description & 63553 N. Highway 97 tions, we suggest you Bend, OR 97701 requirements and to consult your attorney apply online. Or mail Where can you ind a or call CONSUMER resume to: Oregon HOTLINE, helping hand? Child Development 1-877-877-9392. Coalition Attn: HuFrom contractors to man Resources, 659 MONEY:We buy NE “A” St., Madras, yard care, it’s all here LOCAL secured trust deeds & in The Bulletin’s OR 97741 note,some hard money Equal Opportunity “Call A Service loans. Call Pat Kelley Employer 541-382-3099 ext.13. Professional” Directory

500

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DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

541-385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at:

www.bendbulletin.com

Manufacturing Plant Electrician

Warm Springs Composite Products is looking for an individual to help a growing innovative light manufacturing plant. Basic Duties: Assist in troubleshooting and repairs of plant equipment. Install, repair and maintain all electrical and electronic equipment. Able to read and revise electrical schematics, Must be able to perform both electrical and mechanical preventive maintenance requirements and report, PLC experience. Minimum Skills: A minimum of 5 years in the industrial maintenance field with a valid Oregon State Electricians License in Manufacturing. A strong mechanical aptitude with the ability to perform light welding and fabrication duties. Successful applicant shall supply the normal hand tools required for both electrical and mechanical maintenance. Benefits: Full Family Medical, Vision, Dental, Life, Disability, Salary Incentives, Company Bonuses, Pension and 401K w/Company Matching and Above Pay Rate Scale. Please remit resume to: Warm Springs Composite Products PO Box 906, Warm Springs, OR 97761 Phone: 541-553-1143, Fax: 541-553-1145 Attn: Mac Coombs, mcoombs@wscp.com

Sales

Heavy Truck Diesel Mechanic. 2 Yrs experience with own tools. Full time with benefits. Busy shop in Grants Pass. Submit resume to sales@pacifictruckandtrailer.com or call Bobby 541-471-4450.

Are you a highly competitive sales person who likes to win? If you are having a successful career selling IPBX business telephone systems and you are looking for a position that can provide you a long term competitive advantage WE HAVE IT FOR YOU. We are one of the fastest growing providers of hosted and on-site IPBX solutions in the Northwest and we are heavily committed to our success. If you are tired of competing with the same products and your only advantage is the lowest price, we have the solutions! We offer a competitive base salary, commissions and an excellent benefits package. To view position requirements and to apply, visit us online at www.uidchr.com.

Data Center Network Technicians Facebook is hiring! We’re seeking a highly motivated Data Center Network Technician to help us build a world-class facility at our Prineville, Oregon location. The ideal candidate will have 3+ years’ experience in data center network deployment, strong troubleshooting skills, a solid understanding of Layer 2 and Layer 3 network switching/routing, and experience in configuring and supporting Cisco, Juniper, and F5 devices. For more information please visit our careers page https://www.facebook.com/career or email ristine@fb.com.

Business Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

Operate Your Own Business

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Prineville, Sunriver/La Pine H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours.

Must have reliable, insured vehicle. Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

Rentals

600 605

Roommate Wanted

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860

875

880

881

882

Houses for Rent General

Homes for Sale

Redmond Homes

Motorcycles & Accessories

Watercraft

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Crooked River Ranch, 1350 sq.ft. ranch home, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, cement patio, mtn. views, no smoking, 1 small pet neg., $795, 541-548-4225. 650

Roommate wanted, for Houses for Rent info call Jennifer, NE Bend 541-876-5106 La Pine Share cozy mobile home 4 Bdrm 2.5 bath, 1700 sq in Terrebonne, $275+ ft, appls, fenced yd, on 1/2 utils 1-503-679-7496 culdesac. No smoking. Pets? 2400 NE Jeni Jo 630 Ct., near hospital. $1050. 503-680-9590 Rooms for Rent Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting $150/ week or $35/nt. Incl guest laundry, cable & WiFi. 541-382-6365 Studios & Kitchenettes Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro & fridge. Utils & linens. New owners.$145-$165/wk 541-382-1885 634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

CHECK OUT THIS HOT DEAL!

$299 1st month’s rent! * 2 bdrm, 1 bath $530 & 540 Carports & A/C incl! Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co *Upstairs only with lease*

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com, currently receiving over 1.5 million page views, every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 658

Houses for Rent Redmond

3 Bedroom, 2 Bath 636 home on 1.3 acres Apt./Multiplex NW Bend in Redmond, $895 mo. 541-548-2408 Fully furnished loft Apt on Wall Street in Bend, with parking. All utilities paid. Call 541-389-2389 for appt

Just too many collectibles?

Small studio downtown Sell them in area, all util. pd. $550, The Bulletin Classiieds $525 dep. No pets/ smoking. 541-3309769 or 541-480-7870 541-385-5809 642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

687

Commercial for Duplex 3 bdrm, 2 bath, Rent/Lease 1260 sq.ft., 1 story, garage w/opener, fenced Warehouse - Industrial yard, RV/Boat parking, unit for rent. 5600 fridge, dishwasher, misq.ft., $2250/month, cro, walk-in laundry, near Bend High. W/S/G paid, front gard541-389-8794. ner paid, $775+dep., 541-604-0338 693

648

Houses for Rent General

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 G3

648

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

Office space, high visibility on Highland Ave. PUBLISHER'S in Redmond. $425 NOTICE mo., incl. W/S/G, call All real estate adver541-419-1917. tising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal Real Estate to advertise "any For Sale preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any 726 such preference, limitation or discrimi- Timeshares for Sale nation." Familial status includes children Great location - Deschutes River views! under the age of 18 Nicely appointed, living with parents or turn-key fully-furlegal custodians, nished, 2 bdrm, 2 pregnant women, and bath, 1/10th Timepeople securing cusshare/fractional. Entody of children under joy the serenity of the 18. This newspaper flowing river below, will not knowingly acblue sky above & all cept any advertising the beauty Central for real estate which is Oregon and Eagle in violation of the law. Crest Resort have to Our readers are offer. $10,500 hereby informed that MLS#201203509, all dwellings adverJohn L. Scott Real tised in this newspaEstate 541-548-1712 per are available on an equal opportunity 738 basis. To complain of discrimination call Multiplexes for Sale HUD toll-free at 5665 1-800-877-0246. The FSBO: 4-Plex, sq.ft., Built 1996, 1471 toll free telephone NE Tuscon Way, all number for the hearrented, $399,000 ing impaired is 541-480-8080. 1-800-927-9275.

4 Bedroom, 2.5 bath, 1/4 Mi. Deschutes River Custom 1963 sq. ft. home lo- frontage. single level 3 bdrm, 3 cated in the heart of bath, 3962 sq.ft., Prineville. This lovely 12.72 acre gated traditional style home private has a low mainte- community, setting. $997,000. nance yard, solid MLS #201205961. wood cabinetry Pam Lester, Principal throughout, as well as a tile entry, and lami- Broker, Century 21 Gold Country Realty, nate wood floors. Inc. 541-504-1338 Master on the main floor and a bonus room over the garage. L o o k i n g f o r y o u r n e x t Wiring for AC unit is e m pl o y e e ? already there, short Place a Bulletin help distance to movies, wanted ad today and restaurants, and reach over 60,000 shopping. MLS readers each week. #201108663 Your classified ad $159,950. will also appear on Team Clark bendbulletin.com Century 21, which currently reGold Country Realty ceives over 541-548-2131 1.5 million page views every month 960 $190,000 at no extra cost. On-top-of-the hill. One Bulletin Classifieds of our best view locaGet Results! tions, quality CreekCall 385-5809 or side Townhome that place your ad on-line includes use of all at Eagle Crest Ridge bendbulletin.com amenities. A great buy, location and 762 priced to move. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1419 Homes with Acreage sq.ft. 1592 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2 Eagle Crest bath, site-built, 2 car Properties™ garage, 24x36 shop 866-722-3370 w/10’ ceilings & 220V 4270 sq ft, 6 bdrm, 6 ba, power, all on 1.22 treed 4-car, corner, .83 acre acre lot in CRR. $195,000. mtn view, by owner. $590,000 541-390-0886 http://bend.craigslist.org/ reo/3069581828.html See: bloomkey.com/8779 Call 541-633- 9613 BANK OWNED HOMES! 773 FREE List w/Pics! Acreages www.BendRepos.com bend and beyond real estate 20967 yeoman, bend or

BUNGALOW ON THE WESTSIDE! Cute with endless possibilities to re-design or plenty of room to add additional square footage on this large double lot. Sturdy construction of a bygone era with all the quirky charm you just don’t find in modern homes today. $219,900 MLS#201204713 Rhonda Garrison & Chris Sperry Principal Broker & Broker 541-279-1768 & 541-550-4922 John L. Scott Real Estate, Bend

*** CHECK YOUR AD

Honda Trail 110, great cond, 3000 mi., $1300 OBO, 541-447-5807

Softail Deluxe

2007 SeaDoo 2004 Waverunner, excellent condition, LOW hours. Double trailer, lots of extras.

Black Chameleon.

$10,000 541-719-8444

2010, 805 miles, $17,000

Call Don @

541-410-3823 865

ATVs

Honda TRX300 EX 2005 sport quad w/Rev, runs & rides great, new pipe & paddles incl. $1700 obo. 541-647-8931 Yamaha Grizzly 700 FI 2009, 543 mi, 2WD/ 4WD, black w/EPS, fuel injection, independent rear suspension winch w/handle controls & remote, ps, auto, large racks, exc. cond., $7850, 541-322-0215

Yamaha Kodiak 400, 2005 4x4, 2500 lb winch, gun rack & alum loading ramp, only 542 miles, show room cond, $4800. 541-280-9401 870

Boats & Accessories

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Immaculate!

Beaver Coach Marquis 40’ 1987. New cover, new paint (2004), new inverter (2007). Onan 6300 watt gen, 111K mi, parked covered $35,000 obo. 541-419-9859 or 541-280-2014

Coleman Canoe, Ram X-15, good condition, Monaco Dynasty 2004, loaded, 3 slides, die$300, 541-306-8160. sel, Reduced - now $119,000, 541-9238572 or 541-749-0037 Kayak, Eddyline Sandpiper, 12’, like new, $975, 541-420-3277.

Sea Kayaks - His & Hers, Eddyline Wind Dancers,17’, fiberglass boats, all equip incl., paddles, personal flotation devices,dry bags, spray skirts,roof rack w/ towers & cradles -- Just add water, $1250/boat Firm. 541-504-8557. 880

Motorhomes

Please check your ad on the first day it runs 17’ 1984 Chris Craft - Scorpion, 140 HP to make sure it is corinboard/outboard, 2 rect. Sometimes indepth finders, trollstructions over the ing motor, full cover, Allegro 2002, 2 slides, phone are misunderEZ - Load trailer, stood and an error 22K mi, workhorse $3500 OBO. can occur in your ad. chassis, 8.1 Chev en541-382-3728. If this happens to your gine, like new, $41,900 ad, please contact us obo. 541-420-9346 the first day your ad appears and we will 17’ Seaswirl 1988 be happy to fix it as open bow, rebuilt soon as we can. Chevy V6 engine, Deadlines are: Weeknew upholstery, days 11:00 noon for $4500 or best offer. next day, Sat. 11:00 707-688-4523 Country Coach Intrigue a.m. for Sunday and 2002, 40' Tag axle. Monday. 400hp Cummins Die541-385-5809 sel. two slide-outs. Thank you! 41,000 miles, new The Bulletin Classified www.JohnLScott.com/Bend tires & batteries. Most *** options. $95,000 OBO FIND IT! Powell Butte 6 acres, 541-678-5712 360 views, great horse 18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 BUY IT! Volvo Penta, 270HP, SELL IT! property, 10223 Houston Lake Rd. $99,900. low hrs., must see, The Bulletin Classiieds 541-350-4684 $17,500, 541-330-3939

National Sea Breeze 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, 2 power slides, upgraded queen mattress, hyd. leveling system, rear camera & monitor, only 6k mi. Reduced to $41,300! 541-480-0617 RV CONSIGNMENTS WANTED We Do The Work, You Keep The Cash, On-Site Credit Approval Team, Web Site Presence, We Take Trade-Ins. Free Advertising. BIG COUNTRY RV Bend 541-330-2495

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 882

Fifth Wheels

ALFA 30' RL 2007, front-view bedroom, granite, leather recliners, 4x20 slide, HDTV, micro/conv, central vac, $31,000 909-229-2921

SPRINTER 36’ 2005, $10,500 obo. Two slides, sleeps 5, queen air mattress, small sgl. bed, couch folds out. 1.5 baths, 541-382-0865, leave message!

Taurus 27.5’ 1988

Everything works, $1750/partial trade for car. 541-460-9127 885

Canopies & Campers

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, fireplace, 2 flat screen TVs. $60,000. 541-480-3923

Lance 945 1995, 11’3”, all appl., solar panel, new battery, exc. cond., $5995, 541-977-3181

Autos & Transportation

Redmond: 541-548-5254

Southwind 35.5’ Triton, 2008,V10, 2 slides, Dupont UV coat, 7500 mi. Bought new at $132,913; asking $94,900. Call 541-923-2774

Regal Prowler AX6 Extreme Edition 38’ ‘05, 4 slides,2 fireplaces, all maple cabs, king bed/ bdrm separated w/slide glass dr,loaded,always garaged,lived in only 3 mo,brand new $54,000, still like new, $28,500, will deliver,see rvt.com, ad#4957646 for pics. Cory, 541-580-7334

Fleetwood Wilderness 36’, 2005, 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, AC, W/D hkup beautiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380

900 908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

Komfort 25’ 2006, 1 slide, AC, TV, awning. 1/3 interest in ColumNEW: tires, converter, bia 400, located at batteries. Hardly used. Winnebago Class C 27’ Sunriver. $138,500. $19,500. 541-923-2595 1992, Ford 460 V8,64K Call 541-647-3718 mi., good cond., $7000 1/3 interest in wellOBO 541-678-5575 equipped IFR Beech Bonanza A36, loFind It in cated KBDN. $55,000. The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-419-9510 541-385-5809 Montana 3400RL 2008, 4 Executive Hangar slides, no smokers or at Bend Airport 881 pets, limited usage, (KBDN) 5500 watt Onan gen, 60’ wide x 50’ deep, Travel Trailers Econoline RV 1989, solar panel, fireplace, w/55’ wide x 17’ high fully loaded, exc. cond, dual A/C, central vac, bi-fold door. Natural 35K orig. mi., $22,750. elect. awning w/sungas heat, office, bathCall 541-546-6133. screen arctic pkg, rear room. Parking for 6 Fleetwood 28’ Pioneer receiver, alum wheels, 2 cars. Adjacent to 2003, 13’ slide, sleeps TVs, many extras. CAN’T BEAT THIS! Frontage Rd; great 6, walk-around bed with $35,500. 541-416-8087 Look before you visibility for aviation new mattress; power buy, below market bus. 1jetjock@q.com hitch, very clean value! Size & mile541-948-2126 $11,500. Please call age DOES matter! 541-548-4284. Class A 32’ Hurricane by Four Winds, 2007. 12,500 mi, all amenities, Ford V10, MONTANA 3585 2008, lthr, cherry, slides, exc. cond., 3 slides, like new! New low king bed, lrg LR, Arcprice, $54,900. ONLY 1 OWNERSHIP tic insulation, all op541-548-5216 Funfinder189 2008,slide, SHARE LEFT! tions $37,500. A/C, awning, furnace,self Economical flying in 541-420-3250 your own Cessna Gulfstream Scenic cont’d, queen, sleeps 5, $11000 obo 172/180 HP for only Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Open Road 37' 2004 541-610-5702 $10,000! Based at Cummins 330 hp die3 slides, W/D hookup, BDN. Call Gabe at sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 large LR w/rear winProfessional Air! in. kitchen slide out, dow. Desk area. 541-388-0019 new tires,under cover, Asking $19,750 OBO hwy. miles only,4 door Call (541) 280-7879 916 fridge/freezer icevisit rvt.com Trucks & maker, W/D combo, ad#104243920 Heavy Equipment Interbath tub & Springdale 29’ 2007, for pics shower, 50 amp proslide,Bunkhouse style, pane gen & more! sleeps 7-8, excellent Just bought a new boat? $55,000. condition, $16,900, Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our 541-948-2310 541-390-2504 Super Seller rates!

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Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

NOTICE: 18.5’ Bayliner 185 Tick, Tock All real estate adver2008. 3.0L, open bow, tised here in is subslim deck, custom Tick, Tock... ject to the Federal cover & trailer, exc. Fair Housing Act, cond., 30-35 total hrs., ...don’t let time get which makes it illegal incl. 4 life vests, away. Hire a to advertise any prefropes, anchor, stereo, professional out erence, limitation or depth finder, $12,000, discrimination based 541-729-9860. of The Bulletin’s on race, color, reli“Call A Service 19.5’ Bayliner Discovgion, sex, handicap, ery 2008,Merc cruiser familial status or naProfessional” 135 HP motor, open tional origin, or intenDirectory today! bow, full canopy, altion to make any such ways garage stored, preferences, limita775 used 5 times, $16,500 tions or discrimination. Manufactured/ 541-977-3120. We will not knowingly Mobile Homes accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of FACTORY SPECIAL this law. All persons New Home, 3 bdrm,1026 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner sq.ft., $46,900 finished are hereby informed 205 Run About, 220 that all dwellings ad- on your site,541.548.5511 HP, V8, open bow, vertised are available www.JandMHomes.com exc. cond., very fast on an equal opportuw/very low hours, nity basis. The Bullelots of extras incl. tin Classified tower, Bimini & Boats & RV’s custom trailer, SW Bend $19,500. Deschutes Landing 541-389-1413 Riverfront Townhomes Starting in the low $400,000s Pahlisch Homes The Hasson 860 Company Realtors. 20.5’ Seaswirl SpyMotorcycles & Accessories Edie Delay, Broker 541-385-5809 der 1989 H.O. 302, 541-420-2950, 285 hrs., exc. cond., Julie Burgoni, Broker Harley Davidson SoftDiamond Reo Dump stored indoors for Tail Deluxe 2007, 541-306-8927 Truck 1974, 12-14 life $11,900 OBO. Hunter’s Delight! Package deal! 1988 Winwhite/cobalt, w/pasyard box, runs good, 541-379-3530 nebago Super Chief, senger kit, Vance & $7900, 541-548-6812 38K miles, great Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 Hines muffler system Ads published in the shape; 1988 Bronco II & kit, 1045 mi., exc. 29’, weatherized, like "Boats" classification 4x4 to tow, 130K cond, $19,999, new, furnished & Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th wheel, 1 slide, AC, include: Speed, fishmostly towed miles, 541-389-9188. ready to go, incl WineTV,full awning, exceling, drift, canoe, nice rig! $15,000 both. gard Satellite dish, Harley Heritage lent shape, $23,900. house and sail boats. 541-382-3964, leave $26,995. 541-420-9964 $ Softail, 2003 Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at 140 (This special package is not available on our website) 541-350-8629 For all other types of msg. $5,000+ in extras, Econoline trailer watercraft, please see $2000 paint job, 16-Ton 29’ Bed, Itasca Sun Cruiser Class 875. 30K mi. 1 owner, w/fold up ramps, elec. 1997, 460 Ford, Class 541-385-5809 For more information brakes, Pintlehitch, Building/Contracting Home Improvement Landscaping/Yard Care A, 26K mi., 37’, living please call $4900, 541-548-6812 room slide, new aw541-385-8090 Weekend Warrior Toy NOTICE: Oregon state Kelly Kerfoot Const. Nelson Landscape nings, new fridge, 8 or 209-605-5537 Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, law requires any- 28 yrs exp in Central OR! new tires, 2 A/C, 6.5 Freightliner 2000, Maintenance GENERATE SOME exfuel station, exc cond. Pilgrim Open Road one who contracts Quality & honesty, from Onan Gen., new bat24’ van box, 8.3L Serving 2005, 36’, 3 slides, citement in your neigsleeps 8, black/gray HD FAT BOY for construction work carpentry & handyman teries, tow pkg., rear 210 HP eng. in w/d hookup, upCentral Oregon borhood. Plan a gainterior, used 3X, towing TV, 2 tv’s, new to be licensed with the jobs, to expert wall covgood cond. $9000, 1996 grades, $24,440. Residential rage sale and don't $24,999. hydraulic jack springs, Construction Con- ering install / removal. 541-749-0724. Completely rebuilt/ 541-312-4466 forget to advertise in & Commercial 541-389-9188 tandem axel, $15,000, tractors Board (CCB). Sr. discounts CCB#47120 customized, low classified! 385-5809. •Sprinkler Repair 541-385-1782 An active license Licensed/bonded/insured miles. Accepting of•Sprinkler means the contractor 541-389-1413 / 410-2422 fers. 541-548-4807 Installation is bonded and inregon YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 •Back Flow Testing Honda 90 Trail Bikes: sured. Verify the sified las Minn-Kota Trolling MoEXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! contractor’s CCB li•Fire Prevention, Jayco Greyhawk yellow, 1965, $1200; red tor, top of line, $100. cense through the Find exactly what Lot Clearing ing rtis 1974, $1400. Low miles, dve Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association. 2004, 31’ Class C, 541-548-7137 CCB Consumer you are looking for in the • Summer Clean up like new cond. Deal on 6800 mi., hyd. jacks, etwork Week of August 27, 2012 Website both! Call 702-578-5009 •Weekly Mowing new tires, slide out, CLASSIFIEDS www.hirealicensedcontractor. or 541-593-3984 •Bi-Monthly & Monthly exc. cond, $49,900, Used out-drive com 541-480-8648 Maintenance parts - Mercury or call 503-378-4621. Honda Elite 80 2001, •Flower Bed Clean Up OMC rebuilt maThe Bulletin recom1400 mi., absolutely •Bark, Rock, Etc. rine motors: 151 mends checking with like new., comes w/ Advertise your car! 541-385-5809 •Senior Discounts $1595; 3.0 $1895; the CCB prior to con- Landscaping/Yard Care carrying rack for 2” Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers! tracting with anyone. receiver, ideal for use 4.3 (1993), $1995. Bonded & Insured NOTICE: OREGON Call 541-385-5809 Some other trades w/motorhome, $995, 541-389-0435 541-815-4458 Landscape ContracThe Bulletin Classifieds also require addi541-546-6920 LCB#8759 tors Law (ORS 671) tional licenses and requires all busi- Call The Yard Doctor DIVORCE $135. Complete preparation. Includes children, certifications. nesses that advertise for yard maintenance, custody, support, property and bills division. No court to perform Landthatching, sod, sprinDebris Removal scape Construction kler blowouts, water appearances. Divorced in 1-5 weeks possible. 503-772-5295. which includes: features, more! JUNK BE GONE planting, decks, www.paralegalalternatives.com, divorce@usa.com. Allen 541-536-1294 I Haul Away FREE fences, arbors, LCB 5012 For Salvage. Also water-features, and Cleanups & Cleanouts Check out the installation, repair of Mel, 541-389-8107 irrigation systems to classiieds online be licensed with the www.bendbulletin.com 50% OFF oceanfront condos! 2BR/2BA was $700K, now Handyman Landscape ContracUpdated daily tors Board. This $399,000. Acquired from bank. 1 hr Vancouver, 2 hrs Seattle. ERIC REEVE HANDY 4-digit number is to be Aeration/Fall Clean-up SERVICES. Home & Berkshire Direct, 1-888-99-Marin x5418. included in all adverBOOK NOW! Commercial Repairs, tisements which indi- Weekly / one-time service Carpentry-Painting, cate the business has avail. Bonded, insured, Pressure-washing, free estimates! a bond, insurance and Honey Do's. On-time workers compensa- COLLINS Lawn Maint. promise. Senior C a ll 541-480-9714 tion for their employDRIVERS: ANNUAL salary $45K to $60K. $0.01 increase per Discount. Work guarees. For your protecanteed. 541-389-3361 mile after 6 months. Quarterly bonuses. CDL-A, 3 months tion call 503-378-5909 Maverick Landscaping or 541-771-4463 Mowing, weedeating, or use our website: current OTR experience. 800-414-9569, www.driveknight.com. Bonded & Insured yard detailing, chain www.lcb.state.or.us to saw work & more! CCB#181595 check license status LCB#8671 DRIVERS HANEY Truck Line pays all miles! Paid dock bumps, 541-923-4324 I DO THAT! before contracting Home/Rental repairs with the business. Holmes Landscape Maint 401k (with match), bonus programs, paid vacation. CDLSmall jobs to remodels Persons doing land• Clean-up • Aerate A, hazmat, doubles required. Call now, 1-888-414-4467, Honest, guaranteed scape maintenance • De-thatch • Free Est. work. CCB#151573 do not require a LCB • Weekly / Bi-wkly Svc. www.GoHaney.com. license. call Josh 541-610-6011 Dennis 541-317-9768

O C A N

Services

Real Estate

Help Wanted: Drivers


G4 THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

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Trucks & Heavy Equipment

Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Ford Ranchero 1979

Hyster H25E, runs

well, 2982 Hours, $3500, call 541-749-0724

Peterbilt 359 potable water truck, 1990, 3200 gal. tank, 5hp pump, 4-3" hoses, camlocks, $25,000. 541-820-3724 925

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

with 351 Cleveland modified engine. Body is in excellent condition, $2500 obo. 541-420-4677

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $ 500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for: $

10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Honda Accord 1981 parts car, $250. 541-447-4405 932

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Antique & Classic Autos

Chevy 1 ton 1968, dual tires, 11’ flatbed, 327 engine, 58k miles, $1000. 541-548-4774

‘69 Chevy C-20 Pickup, all orig.Tubro 44; auto 4-spd,396, model CST Find exactly what w/all options, orig. owner, $24,000, 541-923-6049 you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

FIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top. Just reduced to $3,750. 541-317-9319 or 541-647-8483

Chevy Suburban 2500 1995, 120K, auto, 4WD, pw/ps, CD, alloy wheels, extra set tires, roof cargo box, A/C, exc. cond., $3299, 541-325-2408

Chevy Trailblazer 2005, gold, LS 4X4, 6 cyl., auto, A/C, pdl, new tires, keyless entry, 66K mi., exc. cond. $8950. 541-598-5111

GMC Denali 2003

loaded with options. Exc. cond., snow tires and rims included. 130k hwy miles. $12,000. 541-419-4890.

Ford Ranger 1999, 4x4, 71K, X-cab, XLT, auto, 4.0L, $7900 OBO. 541-388-0232

Ford Ranger XLT 1998 X-cab

2.5L 4-cyl engine, 5-spd standard trans, long bed, newer motor & paint, new clutch & tires, excellent condition, clean, $4500. Call 541-447-6552

Jeep Wrangler 1999, TJ Sahara Ed., 4.0L, exc. tires, body & paint. 69,700+ mi, hardtop + new full buckskin soft & bikini tops, Warn winch, motorhome tow pkg, stinger, alum wheels, $12,300. 541-617-9176

THE BETTER WAY TO BUY A CAR! ’05 Nissan Xterra Auto, 4x4 #648291 ............. $10,995

’10 Chevy Cobalt #110478A .......... $12,495

’10 Nissan Sentra 4 DR Sedan, Great Fuel Saver #651104 ............. $14,695

’11 Hyundai Accent GLS Automatic #619037 ............. $13,995

’10 Ford Focus

#293446.............. $14,995

’11 Suzuki SX-4 33 MPG! #302264 ............. $14,995

’10 Toyota Corolla

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

AT, “Fuel Saver” #400886 ............. $13,995

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $3131 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

’10 Mazda 6 Automatic, Loaded #M05673A ......... $15,995

’11 VW Jetta Sedan #347612 ............. $15,795

’12 Nissan Versa Automatic, 5-Door HB, Fuel Saver #358909A .......... $16,556

’10 Honda Civic LX Sedan 4 Dr, Automatic

#527652 ............. $16,722

’10 Dodge Avenger R/T Sedan 37K Miles, Loaded! #177898 ............. $16,995

’12 Hyundai Sonata 4 Dr Sedan, AT, Loaded #320628 ............. $19,461

’11 Chrysler 200 Sedan Touring #553592 ............. $17,995

’11 Subaru Impreza AWD #511600A .......... $18,477

’09 Toyota Matrix AWD Only 28K Miles #009276A .......... $18,495

’09 Subaru Legacy Sedan H4 Special Edition #235780 ............. $19,995

’11 Toyota Tacoma D-Cab V6, 4x4, Only 16k miles #078811 ............. $32,715

’11 Chevy Silverado Crew Cab L o a d e d , AT, 4x4, Only 19k miles #212567 ............. $33,995 (KBB price $37,000)

’07 Toyota F-J Cruiser Auto, Loaded, Only 44K Miles! #085835 ............. $26,995 Through 9/6/12 All vehicles subject to prior sale, does not include tax, license or title and registration processing fee of $100. Vin#’s posted at dealership. See Hertz Car Sales of Bend for details. Dealer #4821

541-385-5809

Chevy Astro Cargo Van 2001,

pw, pdl, great cond., business car, well maint, regular oil changes, $4500, please call 541-633-5149

Buick LeSabre Limited 1997 111,000 miles, blue, new tires, brakes and air, $2900 firm. Others available, like a 1996 Regal with 86,000 miles, only $3500. Call Bob 541-318-9999. Cadillac Seville STS 2003 - just finished $4900 engine work by Certified GM mechanic. Has everything but navigation. Too many bells and whistles to list. I bought a new one. $6900 firm. 541-420-1283

541-647-2822 HertzBend.com DLR4821

NISSAN QUEST 1996, 3-seat mini van, extra nice in and out $3,400. Sold my Windstar, need another van! 541-318-9999, ask for Bob. Ask about free trip to D.C. for WWII vets.

Hyundai Accent 2008, 32MPG! $7900 obo Hatchback, 47,800 mi., A/C, one 0wner, Clean, 5 Spd Manual. 541-550-9935 Hyundai Sonata Limited 2009. #554768 $15, 988

VIN #110478A 541-598-3750

541-647-2822 HertzBend.com DLR4821

Chryser LeBaron 1990 convertible, 5 spd, new paint, top, tires and rims. $1400. 541-416-9566

541-647-2822 HertzBend.com DLR4821

Toyota Matrix 2009, AWD, 28K mi. VIN#09276A

$19,759

541-647-2822 HertzBend.com DLR4821

Chevy Cobalt 2010

$12,495

541-548-6592

$16,722

Mercedes E320 2004, 71K miles, silver/silver, exc. cond, below Blue Book, $12,900 Call 541-788-4229

Nissan Altima 3.5SR 2012, 13,200 mi., exc. Call The Bulletin At cond., 6-cyl., 270HP, 541-385-5809 8-way power driver seat, 60/40 rear seat, Place Your Ad Or E-Mail leather steering wheel At: www.bendbulletin.com with audio controls, AM/FM/CD/AUX with Volkswagen Passat 2005 Bose speakers, A/C, TDI wagon, 71,000 mi, Bluetooth, USB, back $12,000. 541-408-5350 up camera, heated Take care of front seats, power moonroof & more. In your investments Bend, below Blue with the help from Book at $24,000, (317) 966-2189 The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Pontiac Bonneville SE, 1992, runs great Professional” Directory $1350. 541-480-9808 PORSCHE 914 1974, Roller (no engine), lowered, full roll cage, 5-pt harnesses, racing seats, 911 dash & instruments, decent shape, very cool! $1699. 541-678-3249

VOLVO S40 2006 AWD, 66k miles,

$11,500

or best offer! 541-678-3913

Looking for your next employee?

Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads The Bulletin The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Say “goodbuy” to that unused item by placing it in The Bulletin Classiieds

541-385-5809

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac, dealer maint’d, loaded, now $17000. 503-459-1580

Ford Super Duty F-250 2001, 4X4, very good shape, V10 eng, $8500 OBO. 541-815-9939 Ford Galaxie 500 1963, 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & radio (orig),541-419-4989

Toyota 4-Runner 4x4 Ltd, 2006, Salsa Red pearl, 49,990 miles, exlnt cond, professionally detailed, $24,599. 541-390-7649

2004 Corvette Convertible. 6 speed. Spiral Gray Metallic with tan leather interior. Only 1,200 miles on new Michelin run flat tires, Corsa exhaust. Lots of extras. Only 25k miles. $28,950. (541) 410-2870.

aaaoregonautosource.com

Jeep Willys 1947,custom, small block Chevy, PS, OD,mags+ trailer.Swap Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, for backhoe.No am calls 1995, extended cab, please. 541-389-6990 long box, grill guard, running boards, bed rails & canopy, 178K miles, $4800 obo. 208-301-3321 (Bend)

Chrysler 300 Coupe Dodge 1500 2001, 4x4 sport, red, loaded, 1967, 440 engine, rollbar, AND 2011 auto. trans, ps, air, Moped Trike used 3 frame on rebuild, remonths, street legal. painted original blue, call 541-433-2384 original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. Ford F250 XLT ‘95, 4WD chrome, asking $9000 auto, long bed, 3/4 ton, or make offer. 8600 GVW, white,178K 541-385-9350. mi, AC, pw, pdl, Sirius, tow pkg., bedliner, bed People Look for Information rail caps, rear slide window, new tires, raAbout Products and diator, water pump, Services Every Day through hoses, brakes, more, The Bulletin Classifieds $5200, 541-322-0215

Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318

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Sport Utility Vehicles

Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc. cond., $19,900, call 541-923-0231.

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 Chev Corvair Monza coneng & wheels incl.) vertible,1964, new top & 541-593-2597 tranny, runs great, exlnt cruising car! $5500 obo. 933 541-420-5205 Pickups

Chevy Wagon 1957, 4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Toyota 4Runner 4WD 1986, auto, 2 dr., $1200, 541-923-7384

Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 4x4. 120K mi, Power seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd Toyota FJ Cruiser 2007 63K miles 2 sets tires, row seating, extra great shape. $20,350. tires, CD, privacy tint541-280-3068 ing, upgraded rims. GMC ½ ton 1971, Only Fantastic cond. $7995 940 $19,700! Original low Contact Timm at 541-408-2393 for info mile, exceptional, 3rd Vans or to view vehicle. owner. 951-699-7171

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Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

Ford Taurus 1998, low Mini Cooper Convert- Toyota Avalon, 1999, miles, very clean, with ible 2007 beautiful 250K miles, everyday additional snow tires, silver and black, 35+ driver. Moved to Mar$2990. 503-869-4444 mpg, very nice, low shall Islands; need to miles. $16,500 OBO sell. Best offer over Ford Thunderbird 1988, 541-510-2330. $2000. ALSO:, 1997 3.8 V-6, 35K actual mi., Camry coming soon, new hoses, belts, tires, Mitsubishi 3000 GT with 100K miles. battery, pb, ps, cruise, 1999, auto., pearl 541-318-9999 A/C, CD, exc. cond. in white, very low mi. & out, 2nd owner, $9500. 541-788-8218. maint. records, must Toyota Camry’s see & drive! 1984, $1200 Mitsubishi Galant Reduced! Now $3500, OBO, 1985 $1400 2011, 4 dr., 28K mi., obo. 541-330-0733 OBO, 1986 parts VIN#023061 car, $500; call for $14,310 Honda Civic LX 2010 details, 4 Dr. auto. #527652

541-647-2822 5 3 5 N E S a v a n n a h D r, B e n d HertzBend.com

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LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SEIZURE FOR CIVIL FORFEITURE TO ALL POTENTIAL CLAIMANTS AND TO ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS READ THIS CAREFULLY

laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter475); and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or facilitating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475). IN THE MATTER OF: One 2009 Dodge Challenger, OLN 583EBG, VIN 2B3LJ74WX9H63305 2, Case 12-04-1596 seized 04/18/2012 from Casey Roberti. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SEIZURE FOR CIVIL FORFEITURE TO ALL POTENTIAL CLAIMANTS AND TO ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS READ THIS CAREFULLY

Legal Notices g tating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475). IN THE MATTER OF: U.S. Currency in the amount of $4,960.00 Case 12-0692, seized 06/08/2012 from Clay Jamison and Amber Treat. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SEIZURE FOR CIVIL FORFEITURE TO ALL POTENTIAL CLAIMANTS AND TO ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS READ THIS CAREFULLY

If you have any interest in the seized property described below, you must claim that interest or you will automatically lose that interest. If you do not file a claim for the property, the property may be forfeited even if you are not convicted of any crime. To claim an interest, you must file a written claim with the forfeiture counsel named below, The written claim must be signed by you, sworn to under penalty of perjury before a notary public, and state: (a) Your true name; (b) The address at which you will accept future mailings from the court and forfeiture counsel; and (3) A statement that you have an interest in the seized property. Your deadline for filing the claim document with forfeiture counsel named below is 21 days from the last day of publication of this notice. Where to file a claim and for more information: Daina Vitolins, Crook County District Attorney Office, 300 NE Third Street, Prineville, OR 97754. Notice of reasons for Forfeiture: The property described below was seized for forfeiture because it: (1) Constitutes the proceeds of the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violates, the criminal

statement that you have an interest in the seized property. Your deadline for filing the claim document with forfeiture counsel named below is 21 days from the last day of publication of this notice. Where to file a claim and for more information: Daina Vitolins, Crook County District Attorneys Office, 300 N.E. Third Street, Prineville, OR 97754. Notice of reasons for Forfeiture: The property described below was seized for forfeiture because it: (1) Constitutes the proceeds of the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violates, the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475); and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or facilitating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475).

If you have any interest in the seized property described below, you must claim that interest or you will automatically lose that interest. If you do not file a claim for the property, the property may be forfeited even if you are not conIN THE MATTER OF: victed of any crime. $6,917.00 in US CurTo claim an interest, rency, Case #080677 you must file a written seized 04/18/2008 claim with the forfeifrom Jeffery Shetler; ture counsel named LEGAL NOTICE below, The written claim must be signed NOTICE OF SEIZURE FOR CIVIL by you, sworn to under penalty of perjury FORFEITURE TO ALL POTENTIAL before a notary public, and state: (a) Your CLAIMANTS AND TO ALL UNKNOWN true name; (b) The address at which you PERSONS READ THIS CAREFULLY will accept future mailings from the If you have any intercourt and forfeiture est in the seized counsel; and (3) A

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: MARY JEAN MCLAUGHLIN. Trustee:FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee:NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot 11, Block 2, TILLICUM VILLAGE, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3.RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: April 20, 2007. Recording No.: 2007-22704 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,353.73 each, due the first of each month, for the months of March 2012 through May 2012; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5.AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $262,229.12; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from February 1, 2012; plus late charges of $592.27; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF SALE. Date:October 18, 2012. Time:11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30960). DATED: May 29, 2012. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee. Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

property described below, you must claim that interest or you will automatically lose that interest. If you do not file a claim for the property, the property may be forfeited even if you are not convicted of any crime. To claim an interest, you must file a written claim with the forfeiture counsel named below, The written claim must be signed by you, sworn to under penalty of perjury before a notary public, and state: (a) Your true name; (b) The address at which you will accept future mailings from the court and forfeiture counsel; and (3) A statement that you have an interest in the seized property. Your deadline for filing the claim document with forfeiture counsel named below is 21 days from the last day of publication of this notice. Where to file a claim and for more information: Daina Vitolins, Crook County District Attorney Office, 300 NE Third Street, Prineville, OR 97754. Notice of reasons for Forfeiture: The property described below was seized for forfeiture because it: (1) Constitutes the proceeds of the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violates, the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter475); and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or facili-

If you have any interest in the seized property described below, you must claim that interest or you will automatically lose that interest. If you do not file a claim for the property, the property may be forfeited even if you are not convicted of any crime. To claim an interest, you must file a written claim with the forfeiture counsel named below, The written claim must be signed by you, sworn to under penalty of perjury before a notary public, and state: (a) Your true name; (b) The address at which you will accept future mailings from the court and forfeiture counsel; and (3) A statement that you have an interest in the seized property. Your deadline for filing the claim document with forfeiture counsel named below is 21

days from the last day of publication of this notice. Where to file a claim and for more information: Daina Vitolins, Crook County District Attorney Office, 300 NE Third Street, Prineville, OR 97754. Notice of reasons for Forfeiture: The property described below was seized for forfeiture because it: (1) Constitutes the proceeds of the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violates, the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter475); and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or facilitating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475). IN THE MATTER OF: U.S. Currency in the amount of $4,978.00, Case 12-115757 seized 6/13/2012 from Gavin Fraser. Good classiied ads tell the essential facts in an interesting Manner. Write from the readers view - not the seller’s. Convert the facts into beneits. Show the reader how the item will help them in some way.

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: ALAN M. MCFEE AND HEIDI K. MCFEE. Trustee:FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Parcel 1 of Partition Plat No. 1996-17, being located in the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (NW1/4NE1/4) of Section Twenty-three (23), Township Sixteen (16) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3.RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: May 24, 2006. Recording No. 2006-35829 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $2,813.63 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of May 2010 through May 2012; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5.AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $444,622.62; plus interest at An adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from April 15, 2010; plus late charges of $1,328.70; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF SALE. Date:October 18, 2012. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30898). DATED: May 24, 2012. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee. Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.


THE BULLETIN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012



Bulletin Daily Paper 08/30/12