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AT THE CONVENTION

Romney wins easily but Paul’s supporters aren’t happy

PERS hike hits schools hard By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

TIGARD — School districts and government agencies will pay more to fund the state pension plan with the Oregon Public Employees Retirement System rates on the rise again. The average public employer will be hit with an approximate 45 percent rate increase for the 2013-15 biennium, according to numbers unveiled Tues-

TAMPA — Convention or coronation? The question lingered on the minds of delegates who remained steadfastly loyal to Ron Paul on Tuesday, even Inside as the Re• Paul Ryan publican gets ready for National an important Convenspeech, A4 tion of• Bus trouble ficially for Oregon’s nominated delegation, A4 Mitt Rom• Wrap-up of ney as Tuesday’s its candiactivities, A5 date for president. Romney sewed up the nomination in the primary elections long before the convention even began. But Paul, the one primary candidate who had not conceded and released his delegates to the former Massachusetts governor, represented the only threat — however remote and improbable — to Romney’s nomination. As it turned out, Romney cruised to an easy victory on the first ballot, going over the top as New Jersey cast its 50 votes for Romney. The 177 votes cast for Paul, a congressman from Texas, ended up being largely symbolic. See Convention / A4

Hard-hit cities show rebound in home prices

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Rise Up director Jesse Roberts stands in an outdoor entertainment area Tuesday at Good Life Brewery at Century Center. Rise Up is a nonprofit community arts group that puts on the Bend Roots Revival music festival.

• An annual music festival has been canceled by a dispute over redeveloping the event’s venue By Hillary Borrud

New York Times News Service

The Bulletin

Even some of the cities that suffered the most in the housing bust are showing signs of improvement, with prices beginning to recover in places like Miami, Atlanta and Detroit, according to the latest housing data. In fact, there is improvement across the board, with home prices nationally inching up over their levels a year ago for the first time since 2010, when sales were fueled by a temporary tax credit for home buyers. The data is contained in the S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Index, which tracks prices nationally and in 20 major cities. Both showed gains over the past year, from June to June — 1.2 percent nationally, and 0.5 percent in the 20 cities. See Housing / A6

A music festival that was canceled Monday appears to be a casualty of the conflict over redevelopment of an old industrial building on Southwest Century Drive. The Century Center, the site of the Bend Roots Revival for the past two years, will not host the event as planned on Sept. 21-23, owner Dave Hill said Tuesday. Hill said he recently decided not to hold this or any other outdoor event until he receives final approval of several land-use applications. Nosler, a bullet and firearms manufacturer behind the Century Center, filed notices on Aug. 13 of its intent to appeal two of Hill’s development applications to the Oregon Land Use Board of Appeals.

MON-SAT

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ployers must make up the difference to keep the fund stable. This will be the second spike in rates due to the 2008 downturn in the economy. Rates will likely remain high or even increase in the foreseeable future. They will vary from district to district and likely be higher for school districts compared to general government. See PERS / A5

Getting away from our Roots

By Shaila Dewan

We use recycled newsprint

until September. But Bend-La Pine Schools Superintendent Ron Wilkinson said he estimates that the percent increase would translate into an approximately $4.7 million increase the district pays into PERS for the 2013-14 school year. The district’s total budget is about $120 million. Much of PERS’ revenue comes from its investment fund. When that fund doesn’t do well and earnings fall, em-

BEND ROOTS REVIVAL

By Andrew Clevenger The Bulletin

day at a PERS board meeting. For the Redmond School District, that could mean a $2.3 million budget shortfall for the 2013-14 school year. That’s the equivalent of 30 teachers or 13 school days. “That is a big hole to for us to fill,� said Kathy Steinert, director of fiscal services with the Redmond School District. Exact numbers won’t be available

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin file photo

Tim Coffey & Friends perform in front of Back Porch Coffee House during the 2011 Bend Roots Revival music festival.

“The appeals just happened,� Hill said. “I didn’t anticipate those.� Steven Hultberg, a lawyer for Nosler, said the company appealed two landuse decisions by the city of Bend be-

cause of concerns about increased traffic from the Century Center. An exit road from the center runs through Nosler’s employee parking lot. See Festival / A5

“I don’t feel like we have adequate notice for them to cancel on us with less than a month to go. . .I’m still hopeful Century will change their mind.� — Jesse Roberts, director of Rise Up, organizer of the revival

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 109, No. 242, 34 pages, 6 sections

INDEX Business Calendar Classified

E1-4 B3 F1-6

Comics B4-5 Crosswords B5, F2 Editorials

C4

Local News C1-6 Obituaries C5 Shopping B1-6

TODAY’S WEATHER Sports D1-6 Stocks E2-3 TV & Movies B2

Mostly sunny High 74, Low 37 Page C6

States hope Isaac brings a little relief from drought By Josh Funk The Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. — The remnants of Hurricane Isaac could bring welcome rain to some states in the Mississippi River valley this week, but experts say it’s unlikely Inside to break the • Isaac hits drought Louisiana as gripping the a hurricane, Midwest. A3 Along with the deluge of rain expected along the Gulf Coast when Isaac makes landfall, the National Weather Service predicts 2 to 6 inches of rain will fall by Sunday morning in eastern Arkansas and southeast Missouri, much of Illinois and Indiana and parts of Ohio. Those areas are among those hard hit by the drought that stretches from the West Coast east into Kentucky and Ohio, with pockets in Georgia and Alabama. The rain that falls inland likely will ease, but not eliminate, drought because those areas are so dry, said Mark Svoboda, a climatologist with the National Drought Mitigation Center. Arkansas rancher Don Rodgers said his area is short 17 inches of rain this year. He said even a couple of inches from Isaac would make a significant difference because he would have water for his cattle and might be able to grow some forage for this winter. “I’m very sorry for the people in the path of this hurricane. I’m just praying we can get some of the benefit from it up here,â€? said Rodgers, who lives in Crawford County, a rural area near the Oklahoma border. Heavy rain, especially if the storm pushes into the Ohio River Valley, would improve traffic on the Mississippi River, where low water levels have been a problem for weeks, National Weather Service hydrologist Marty Pope said. Pope said any rise in the river would help clear clogged shipping channels, which have caused temporary closures. “If that happens, it would help us out quite a bit,â€? Pope said. The low water levels also have prompted companies to reduce loads on barges carrying goods ranging from grain to gasoline, which can mean big losses for shippers. See Drought / A6

TOP NEWS ISRAEL: Court rejects Corrie suit, A3 YOSEMITE: Hantavirus death, A6


THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012

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TODAY

Real-life masked crusaders fight crime in their own way

It’s Wednesday, Aug. 29, the 242nd day of 2012. There are 124 days left in the year.

By John M. Glionna Los Angeles Times

SALT LAKE CITY — By his own admission, Dave Montgomery was a functioning drunk who hated himself. Not that many years ago, he might guzzle 30 Rolling Rocks to mask the memory of a hitand-run life that included two divorces and a precious daughter who died in childbirth. After he quit boozing, his very existence bored him. Then one night in 2006 the suburban tattoo artist typed into a computer search the words he now says have made all the difference: “real-life superheroes.” Since then, he’s joined a world of masked crusaders, morphing from flawed human to a fantastic creation straight out of his imagination. At least one night a month, he dons a black leather outfit that suggests pure urban menace, inserts blue contact lenses that give his eyes an eerie glow, and steps into industrial-goth boots that rise nearly to his knees. And then comes the piece de resistance: a blood-red wraparound mask in the shape of a cross with no nose or mouth. “It’s like reapplying a very old skin you forgot you had, finding out all over again what you really look like,” he says of his costume. “It just feels natural.” He calls himself Nihilist, a thing without rules, and he’s the founder of the so-called Black Monday Society — a collection of two dozen characters with such names as Asylum, Fool King, Red Voltage and Iron Head who walk Salt Lake City streets looking for trouble — not making it, but trying to prevent it.

Growing phenomenon At 41, Montgomery is among the growing ranks of self-styled superheroes prowling the pavement in places like San Jose, Boston, Minneapolis, New York, Cleveland and Kansas City. They’re teachers, artists, students and blue-collar Joes who transform themselves into crime-fighters similar to the comic-book characters they cheered on as children. On their irregular forays, the Black Monday Society forms up in groups of four or more to patrol troubled downtown neighborhoods like Drug Alley and Area 51. They stride with the assurance of rock stars. For the most part, they have only themselves for company. They have yet to encounter a crime in progress, although they have broken up fights and helped drunks passed out on the sidewalk. All the while, passers-by gawk. Cars slow and people shout praise or hurl insults, most of which involve a similar theme: “I thought Halloween was in October.” Montgomery waves it off with a gloved hand.

HAPPENINGS • Oregon’s state government is scheduled to release its quarterly revenue forecast. • Republican vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan will address the party’s national convention in Tampa, Fla. • President Barack Obama will make a campaign stop at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville.

IN HISTORY

Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Members of the Black Monday Society — from left, Roman Daniels, 24, known as Red Voltage; Wally Gutierrez, 31, known as Fool King; Dave Montgomery, 41, known as Nihilist; and Professor Midnight, who wouldn’t reveal his real name — pose in Salt Lake City, Utah, before going out on patrol for criminals and wrongdoers.

“There just aren’t any role models out there anymore, so we created our own superheroes,” he says. “Our message: Believe in yourself. Become your own hero.”

Not vigilantes The Black Monday Society, a name coined to express the hopelessness many feel on the first working day of the week, doesn’t carry weapons. Members insist they’re not vigilantes. When one potential recruit emailed that he was “an experienced swordsman” who “makes his own weapons,” the group didn’t respond. But superheroes in other cities have armed themselves with mace, pepper spray and clubs, causing many to fear that the idealistic crusaders are soon going to hurt themselves — or someone else. In May, a member of the Rain City Superhero Movement in Seattle allegedly pepper-sprayed protesters in the city’s downtown, saying he was trying to stop an anarchist from throwing a bomb at the courthouse. Such violence has led many police departments to distance themselves from the masked crime fighters. “We don’t approve or condemn these characters,” said Detective Joshua Ashdown, a spokesman for the Salt Lake City Police Department. He noted that unlike police department volunteers, Montgomery and his group have no formal training. On a recent night, Black Monday members parked their cars on a side street near the downtown library. They walked for two hours, always staying on the sidewalk, the leader pausing on street cor-

ners to randomly change direction. Most passers-by were curious, but some nights bring tension. After coming upon a bar fight, members walked bar patrons to their cars in an effort to instill calm. “Whether these guy wore costumes or not, they were out there helping,” said Jeff Hacker, a local bar manager. “What do most people do at night? Go home and watch TV.” Stan Lee, the former president and chairman of Marvel Comics who collaborated on such characters as Spider-Man, the Hulk and the Fantastic Four, has another explanation for the movement’s popularity. “There’s not much glamor in the average guy’s life, but if you can put on a costume and give yourself a name and walk down the street, you’re something special,” he said. “Everybody wants to be a superhero.”

The dark side Like Montgomery, the ranks of the Black Monday Society include people with troubled pasts — ex-gangbangers and street toughs. Like the comic-book superheroes of old, they’ve each got a dark side, a secret weakness. Montgomery’s tattoo parlor reflects a jumbled life of joy, attitude and heartbreak: Comic book covers and horror masks hang next to a snapshot of Johnnie, who died at birth, and a set of photo-booth shots with his 6-year-old daughter, Frankie. Montgomery looks past the family photos to talk about his motivation for taking to the streets: “I want to tell people I meet, ‘Hey, I’m not doing this to save you; I’m doing this to save myself.’ ”

Mike Gailey, a 32-year-old tattoo artist, says his alter ego Asylum is his sanity. Gailey once provided muscle for drug dealers and worked as a strip club bouncer. “As Asylum, I tap into that gray area between who I used to be and who I am today,” he said. “I’m a dude who used to own the streets but who now walks them in a different way.” Now he asks his wife for permission to go out at night with his Black Monday pals. A plaque at his tattoo station spells out his superhero mantra: “We grew up with giant monsters, comic books, punk, science fiction, skateboarding, robots and rebellion. No one made what we wanted. So we made it ourselves.” But the veterans are also finding that, like a comic book read over and over, the superhero story line can get old. Montgomery has handed over the reins of Black Monday to a younger crusader and now prefers to spend more time with Frankie and less on patrol. “Do you know how hard it is to actually find a crime?” he said. “On the street, there are no real supervillains. Life is

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BIRTHDAYS Actor-director Lord Richard Attenborough is 89. Movie director William Friedkin is 77. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., is 76. Actor Elliott Gould is 74. TV personality Robin Leach is 71. Actor Ray Wise is 65. Actress Deborah Van Valkenburgh is 60. Actress Rebecca DeMornay is 53. Actress Carla Gugino is 41. Rock musician Kyle Cook (Matchbox Twenty) is 37. Actor John Hensley is 35. Rock musician David Desrosiers (Simple Plan) is 32. Rapper A+ is 30. — From wire reports

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Bigfoot hoax ends badly: Jokester hit, killed by 2 cars By Rene Lynch Los Angeles Times

A Montana man who was apparently trying to trigger a Bigfoot sighting by dressing up in a costume and darting out onto a dark stretch of highway was struck and killed by two passing cars, officials said. Randy Lee Tenley, 44, of Kalispell, Mont., was apparently wearing a Ghillie suit at the time. That’s a camouflage outfit — sometimes used by military snipers or hunters — designed to resemble dense, thick foliage. “What we know so far is that we had a couple of guys out, allegedly trying to prompt a sighting of Bigfoot,” Montana Highway Patrol Lt. Col.

Butch Huseby told the Los Angeles Times. The officer added: “This is one of the dumbest things I’ve ever seen. Really.” But it was no doubt a frightening sight for the teenage girl who was driving down a twolane highway at about 10:30 p.m. Sunday near Flathead Lake in northeastern Montana. That’s when Tenley, dressed in the camo, stepped out onto the roadway, officials say. The girl’s car struck Tenley, who was then struck by a second car — also driven by a teenage girl, Huseby said. The victim was pronounced dead at the scene. The incident remains under investigation, including whether the men involved were drinking at the time and wheth-

er the drivers were in any way culpable, Huseby said. He added that the teenage drivers — assuming they’re unfamiliar with military camouflage — probably had no idea what they were seeing. And they might indeed have thought they were seeing Bigfoot, or Sasquatch. “For somebody who has never seen (a Ghillie suit), they look absolutely odd. You would not understand what you were looking at,” especially in the dark, he said. “It goes from head to toe. You would look at it and think, ‘What in the world is that?’ ” Tenley was with a buddy at the time, and the friend told authorities what the pair was up to, Huseby said.

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A3

T S Israeli court rejects suit brought by activist’s kin By Joel Greenberg The Washington Post

John McCusker / The Times-Picayune via The Associated Press

A group of thrill-seekers face the waves Tuesday as they crash over the seawall of Lake Pontchartrain at Canal Boulevard in New Orleans. Hurricane Isaac was arriving at the seventh anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which devastated Louisiana and Mississippi in 2005.

Isaac slams into Louisiana By Michael Kunzelman and Stacey Plaisance The Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — Hurricane Isaac spun into the southern Louisiana coast late Tuesday, sending floodwaters surging and unleashing fierce winds as residents hunkered down behind boarded-up windows. New Orleans calmly waited out another storm on the eve of Hurricane Katrina’s seventh anniversary, hoping the city’s strengthened levees will hold. Isaac, a massive storm spanning nearly 200 miles from its center, made landfall at about 6:45 p.m. near the mouth of the Mississippi River. But it was zeroing in on New Orleans, about 75 miles to the northwest, turning streets famous for all-hours celebrations into ghost boulevards. The storm drew intense scrutiny because of its timing — just before the anniversary of the hurricane that devastated that city, while the first major speeches of the Republican National Convention went on in Tampa, Fla., already delayed and tempered by the storm While many residents stayed put, evacuations were

N   B Pirates kidnap 24 off W. Africa coast LAGOS, Nigeria — Pirates attacked an oil tanker Tuesday off the coast of Togo, taking control of its bridge and kidnapping 24 Russian sailors before escaping amid an exchange of gunfire with a naval patrol boat, officials said. It wasn’t immediately clear if anyone was injured in the attack on the Greek-owned oil tanker, which had been anchored about 19 miles off Lome, Togo’s capital. The pirates took control of the vessel quickly, though an alarm from the ship alerted the Togolese navy, said Noel Choong, an official with the International Maritime Bureau. The navy boat trailed the tanker and sailors exchanged gunfire with the pirates before the tanker escaped, Choong said. Togolese Security Minister Col. Damehame Yark and Togo’s Chief of Defense Staff, Gen. Mohammed Titikpina, confirmed the attack took place, but offered few other details. The attack comes as Togo is hosting U.S. officials in Lome for an anti-piracy conference.

Typhoon wreaks havoc on S. Korea SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A powerful typhoon pounded South Korea with strong winds and heavy rain Tuesday, killing nine and churning up rough seas that smashed two Chinese fishing ships into rocks and forced the coast guard to perform a daring rescue of survivors. Rescuers saved 12 fishermen and searched for 10 still missing from the ships that hit rocks off South Korea’s southern Jeju island. Five fishermen were killed, officials said. Separately, at least four other people died as Typhoon Bolaven knocked out power to hundreds of thousands of South Koreans, canceled flights and temporarily halted joint war games by U.S. and South Korean military forces. — From wire reports

NOAA via The Associated Press

A satellite image from Tuesday afternoon shows Hurricane Isaac over the Gulf of Mexico as it approaches New Orleans.

ordered in low-lying areas of Louisiana and Mississippi, where officials closed 12 shorefront casinos. By late Tuesday, more than 100,000 homes and businesses had lost power. Ed Rappaport, deputy director of the National Hurricane Center, said Isaac’s core would pass west of New Orleans with winds close to 80 mph and head for Baton Rouge. “On this course, the hurricane will gradually weaken,” Rappaport said Tuesday night

from the Miami-based center. He said gusts could reach about 100 mph at times, especially at higher levels which could damage high-rise buildings in New Orleans. As Isaac neared the city, there was little fear or panic. With New Orleans’ airport closed, tourists retreated to hotels and most denizens of a coastline that has witnessed countless hurricanes decided to ride out the storm. Officials, chastened by

Goal of united Syrian opposition still elusive By Ben Hubbard and Robert H. Reid The Associated Press

AZAZ, Syria — In the foreign halls of power, the strategy is clear: Syria’s opposition should unite to present an alternative to Bashar Assad’s rule — a step France’s president says would lead to diplomatic recognition. As a move toward unity, Syrian exiles from the main opposition Syrian National Council and other groups unveiled a blueprint Tuesday in the German capital of Berlin for transition to a democratic, transparent society free of religious and ethnic favoritism. But rebels and civilians in the bomb-shattered Syrian town of Azaz near the Turkish border view such talk as hollow. They are deeply skeptical of all exiled leaders and believe what really matters is their fight on the ground to overthrow the regime. “They have never come up with a united position that will save the people,” said Fadi Hajji, 25, who had been camped out along the Syrian border with Turkey with his wife and two infant daughters for five days. “All they are good at is arguing. They don’t represent anyone here and they don’t help.” There was more bloodshed Tuesday as a car bomb ripped through a Damascus suburb, killing 12 people, according to the state news agency. Activists also said an airstrike in the town of Kfar Nabl killed at least 13 people as fighting raged nationwide. With no end to the carnage in sight, French President Francois Hollande called on the Syrian opposition Monday to form a provisional government, saying France would recognize and support it. Hollande’s statement, believed to be the first of its kind, was quickly shot down by U.S. officials who said talk of a provisional government was premature given the deep divisions within the opposition movement.

Muhammed Muheisen / The Associated Press

Haya Khalil, 8, who fled her home in Homs with her family due to fighting between the Syrian government forces and the rebels, takes refuge Tuesday at a border crossing into Turkey, where the family hopes to enter a refugee camp.

The head of the main Syrian opposition group, the Syrian National Council, criticized the U.S. stand, saying that efforts were under way to forge a united front but that the process takes time — especially in the midst of a raging civil war. “It seems to me as if the international community is not prepared to take decisive decisions and blames the Syrian opposition for its own shortcomings,” Abdelbaset Sieda told The Associated Press by telephone Tuesday from Switzerland. “Yes, there are differences within the Syrian opposition, and this is normal in any country. But as long as we are agreed on a common vision, these differences can be overcome,” he added. “The international community must make a move before it’s too late.” Those comments were echoed in Berlin by opposition exiles who drafted the 122-page transition blueprint during six months of consultations funded by governments of the United States, Germany, Switzerland and private groups in Norway and the Netherlands.

memories and experience, advised caution. “We don’t expect a Katrinalike event, but remember there are things about a Category 1 storm that can kill you,” New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu said, urging people to use common sense and to stay off any streets that may flood. Tens of thousands of people were told to leave low-lying areas, including 700 patients of Louisiana nursing homes, but officials decided not to call for mass evacuations like those that preceded Katrina, which packed 135 mph winds in 2005. Isaac also promised to test a New Orleans levee system bolstered after the catastrophic failures during Hurricane Katrina. But in a city that has already weathered Hurricane Gustav in 2008, calm prevailed. “I feel safe,” said Pamela Young, who settled in to her home in the Lower 9th Ward — a neighborhood devastated by Katrina — with dog Princess and her television. “Everybody’s talking ‘going, going,’ but the thing is, when you go, there’s no telling what will happen. The storm isn’t going to just hit here.”

HAIFA, Israel — An Israeli court on Tuesday rejected a civil lawsuit brought by the family of an American activist crushed to death in 2003 by an Israeli army bulldozer as she tried to block its path in the Gaza Strip, ruling that the killing was accidental. In his verdict at the Haifa District Court, Judge Oded Gershon accepted the military’s version of events, finding that 23-year-old Rachel Corrie was not visible to the bulldozer driver at the time of the incident and was hidden by the blade and a mound of earth. The judge said that Corrie had “put herself in a dangerous situation” when she stood between the bulldozer and a Palestinian house she feared would be destroyed, and that she had died in an “accident the deceased brought upon herself.” Corrie, from Olympia, Wash., was in the southern border town of Rafah with other activists from the International Solidarity Movement, a group that aids Palestinians and works to document and non-violently disrupt Israeli military actions in the Palestinian areas. The activists were acting as human shields, trying to block the razing of Palestinian homes by Israeli forces along the frontier between the Gaza Strip and Egypt. The Corrie family argued in the lawsuit, filed in 2005, that Rachel, who was wearing a bright red jacket, was clearly visible at the time of the incident on March 16, 2003, and that she had been

intentionally run over by the bulldozer driver. The driver testified in court that he could not see Corrie. Corrie’s mother, Cindy, told reporters after the ruling that the family was “deeply saddened and deeply troubled” by the court’s decision. “I believe that this was a bad day, not only for our family, but a bad day for human rights, for humanity, for the rule of law and also for the country of Israel,” she said. The court ruling, following military investigations that found no wrongdoing, pointed to “a well-heeled system to protect the Israeli military and the soldiers who conduct actions in that military, to provide them with impunity at the cost of all the civilians who are impacted by what they do,” Cindy Corrie added. In rejecting the family’s claim for compensation, Gershon said that the army had been operating in a war zone, not demolishing homes that day, but leveling land to deny cover to gunmen who regularly attacked troops in the area. He said that the army’s actions were a “combat operation” and thus protected from damage claims. The Israeli army demolished 1,700 homes in Rafah between 2000 and 2004, leaving 17,000 people homeless, according to data presented in court. The military action was meant to clear swaths near its border positions, affording a clear view to army lookouts and removing possible cover for gunmen among buildings and vegetation.


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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012

ROMNEY’S RUNNING MATE TO SPEAK

Oregon delegates delayed by late buses

Ryan’s aides are familiar faces

TAMPA — The Republican National Convention officially kicked off Tuesday afternoon, but Oregon’s delegation had to wait longer than expected to take its spot on the convention floor. The buses used to transport the delegates the 40-minute drive from the hotel in Clearwater to downtown Tampa were more than an hour late. Part of the problem, organizers explained, is that there aren’t enough local drivers qualified to operate the buses. Many have been brought in from other areas, which makes it more likely they might get lost navigating all the closures caused by the convention. • Some delegates who braved the weather to go to the Tampa Bay Times Forum on Monday to see GOP Chairman Reince Priebus gavel the session and postpone events until Tuesday ran into John Oliver and Al Madrigal from Comedy Central’s news parody program “The Daily Show.” While a few may have posed for pictures with the faux correspondents, none were interviewed, wary of the show’s skill at poking fun of its subjects. • Shawn Corrigan, an alternate delegate from Rogue River and a former Bend resident, asked local officials if his Oregon concealed weapons permit covered him in Florida. According to the website USACarry.com, Oregon and Florida do not have a reciprocity agreement, so he was out of luck. • After the official convention events wound down on Tuesday, some Oregon delegates planned on going to an after-party for Western states at Liberty Plaza. Well, mostly Western, since the host states included Colorado, South Dakota, Wyoming and Florida. Country singer Trace Adkins provided the entertainment.

By Felicia Sonmez The Washington Post

— Andrew Clevenger

Convention Continued from A1 In the Oregon delegation, Paul enjoyed more support than his delegate count reflected. Although a proportional allocation based on the results of Oregon’s May primary translated to 18 delegates for Romney, three for Paul, three for Rick Santorum and one for Newt Gingrich, the actual votes cast were slightly different. Ultimately, Oregon cast 23 votes for Romney, four for Paul and one for Santorum. Gingrich and Santorum had conceded, released their delegates and thrown their support to Romney. Paul never conceded, and his supporters were adamant that he be given his due during the convention. Thaddeus Gala, a delegate from Eagle Point, said Paul had earned the right to be on the ballot and to speak at the convention. The Romney camp extended Paul an invitation, but required that he endorse Romney and that he submit his speech beforehand for approval, Gala said. “They didn’t invite him as he is; they gave him restrictions,” so Paul turned them down, he said. To Gala and other Paul supporters, the slights toward Paul by the GOP leadership may have consequences in November. Some, like Gala, might vote for Paul, even if he is not on the ballot, preferring to cast their vote for the person they actually want to see in the White House. Others, like Devin Watkins, an alternate delegate from Beaverton, said he will vote for Romney because he represents the best chance at ousting President Obama from the White House. “Unfortunately, I think Obama has destroyed the country,” Watkins said. “I like Mitt Romney a hell of a lot more than I liked (2008 GOP nominee John) McCain.” John Philo, an alternate delegate from Bend, agrees that Paul’s positions have some merit, and deserve consideration for inclusion in the GOP

Paul backers boo new party rules The Associated Press TAMPA, Fla. — Feeling slighted, supporters of Texas Rep. Ron Paul’s presidential run made their voices heard Tuesday at a Republican convention intended to promote party harmony. The Paul delegates booed and chanted against new rules adopted by the party, which they saw as a power play by the Republican old guard. The rules are designed to limit the ability of insurgent presidential candidates to amass delegates to future Republican conventions. They will bind delegates to the outcome of presidential primaries and caucuses, preventing a candidate like Paul from pushing up their delegate counts at state conventions. Supporters of the new rules say voters expect the delegate count to reflect the outcome of state primaries and caucuses.

platform. But Philo, the director of the Deschutes County Tea Party, continues to support Romney. “This time around, through the primaries, other ideas (than Paul’s) are more prevalent,” he said. “This time around is not his day. The states have spoken.” Gala sees the passion that Paul inspires in his supporters, particularly young people who have been a challenging demographic for the GOP, and wonders why the party hasn’t made more of an effort to reach out to them. “If they don’t make amends with the Ron Paul group, I don’t think (Romney) is going to win the election,” he said. “If the Republican party can embrace this group of people, it would be huge.” — Reporter: 202-662-7456, aclevenger@bendbulletin.com

TAMPA, Fla. — Paul Ryan, flying on his campaign plane from his hometown of Janesville, Wis., to the GOP convention on Tuesday afternoon, put the final touches on a speech that will mark his debut on the national stage tonight. Seated to his left at the table strewn with mugs of coffee and sheets of paper was an aide from Ryan’s Washington office. In front of him was an adviser, tapped by Mitt Romney’s top leadership in Boston, whom Ryan has known since they served as congressional aides together in the 1990s. The scene underscored a dynamic that has marked Ryan’s 19 days on the trail as the Republican vice presidential nominee: The seven-term Wisconsin congressman has run a tightly scripted campaign, surrounded by operatives from Romney’s Boston headquarters who also happen to have a close relationship with Ryan. When Ryan steps onto the stage in Tampa, Fla., the speech he delivers will be the most tangible product yet of that dynamic. It’s an address that Ryan — a former speechwriter for Rep. Jack Kemp , R-N.Y. and later for Kemp’s Empower America think tank — played a leading role in writing, with the aid of advisers from Boston as well as his own inner circle. “Well, it’s me,” Ryan told reporters aboard his campaign plane last Wednesday when asked about the developing address. “It’s what I believe and what I do. It’s going to be — I used to write speeches, I’ve done a lot of speechwriting in the past. Words matter a lot, and I’m putting a lot of effort into it.”

Mary Altaffer / The Associated Press

Rep. Paul Ryan, center, R-Wis., works on the speech he will deliver at the Republican National Convention tonight with senior adviser Dan Senor, left, and senior aide Conor Sweeney. Ryan flew Tuesday from Wisconsin to Tampa.

Throughout his 21⁄2 weeks on the trail, Ryan has kept in close contact with Boston through video conferences, and advisers at campaign headquarters have reviewed versions of his speech. In addition, two top Republican speechwriters — Matthew Scully and John McConnell, both former writers for George W. Bush — were enlisted by the Romney campaign to work with Ryan in crafting his address. Scully is renowned for writing thenAlaska Gov. Sarah Palin’s widely hailed 2008 convention speech, although few traces of her in-your-face brand are expected when Ryan takes the stage. McConnell also served as chief speechwriter to Vice President Dick Cheney. The speechwriting duo traveled the trail with Ryan from the day he was announced as Romney’s running mate until the following Saturday, when they parted ways with the GOP nominee at a Florida campaign event and continued their collaboration from afar. When it comes to the other

traveling aides who have been working with Ryan on the speech, the group is a blend of longtime Ryan aides and a campaign-staff-in-waiting put into place by Boston well before Ryan was chosen for the vice presidential slot. Even so, Ryan has known many of the Romney loyalists for years, in part from joint work on Capitol Hill. Among the Ryan staffers are Joyce Meyer and Andy Speth, the candidate’s Washington- and Wisconsinbased chiefs of staff, respectively; Speth is a longtime friend of Ryan’s. Conor Sweeney, spokesman for Ryan’s House Budget Committee, is another member of the inner circle who Ryan brought to the campaign. All three have been involved in helping Ryan make tweaks to his speech and were among the aides present Monday at the Holiday Inn Express in Janesville, where Ryan — who typically delivers his stump speech from notes and uses a hand-held microphone — rehearsed his address and practiced using a

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

CONVENTION: DAY 2

PERS

GOP formally nominates Romney; Christie calls Democrats dishonest

Continued from A1 “Hopefully, employers have done some planning for (the rate spikes) because they are not a surprise, unfortunately,” Matt Larrabee, an actuarial consultant with the firm Milliam, told the Oregon PERS board Tuesday afternoon. The increased diversion of money to PERS means less money will be available to fund schools or pay teachers’ salaries. “We’ve seen this coming,” said Patrick West, a member of the PERS board, “but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t hurt.” The breakdown of how much individual school districts, local governments and other public employers will be on the hook for will be released late next month. Most public employers now pay about 10.8 percent-

By David A. Fahrenthold The Washington Post

TAMPA, Fla. — The Republican Party on Tuesday formally bestowed its presidential nomination on former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney, launching its convention here with two goals: to make the GOP contender more appealing and sharpen the case against giving President Barack Obama a second term. Ann Romney, the nominee’s wife, represented the velvet glove in that endeavor. In a speech Tuesday evening, she told a love story about her high school sweetheart, her partner though the ups and downs of raising five sons, and her rock through her struggles with multiple sclerosis and breast cancer. She said he would bring the same qualities to running the country. “No one will work harder. No one will care more,” Romney said, speaking against a backdrop of black-and-white family photographs. “No one will move heaven and Earth like Mitt Romney to make this country a better place to live.” “This man will not fail,” she said, bringing the convention audience to its feet. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a former federal prosecutor known for his forthright style, followed her with an indictment of the current White House occupant and his party, saying they are unwilling to be candid with Americans about the challenges ahead. Romney aimed much of her address at women, a constituency with which her husband and the GOP have struggled to connect, particularly amid recent controversies over birth control and abortion. She said that for women, economic issues trump all others. “I’m not sure if men really understand this, but I don’t think there’s a woman in America who really expects her life to be easy,” she said.

Lynne Sladky / The Associated Press

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and his wife, Ann, wave to delegates Tuesday after her speech at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla.

“But these last few years have been harder than they needed to be. . . . The good jobs, the chance at college, that home you want to buy, just get harder.” At the end of her address, her husband made his first appearance at the convention, joining her onstage to the strains of the song “My Girl.” In the keynote address, Christie said of Obama and the Democrats: “They believe that the American people don’t want to hear the truth about the extent of our fiscal difficulties and need to be coddled by big government. They believe the American people are content to live the lie with them.” Though he did not mention the president by name, he said, “Our leaders today have decided it is more important to be popular, to do what is easy and say yes, rather than to say no when no is what’s required.” The New Jersey governor is a rising GOP star whose blunt, confrontational style has made him a sensation on YouTube. Many in the party hope that he will be a presidential candidate in coming years. On Tuesday, however, Christie had to compete with another force of nature: Hurricane Isaac, which was making land-

fall southeast of New Orleans. Isaac had forced convention organizers to delay the start of major events by a day, and they were watching the storm carefully, sensitive to the appearance of a partisan celebration against a potential backdrop of devastation. Romney began the convention less popular than any major candidate in recent political history, as measured by polls back to 1984. A new Washington Post-ABC News poll finds his unfavorability at its highest point, with 51 percent of Americans expressing negative views of the nominee. Just 35 percent have positive impressions of Romney, well under the 50 percent who view Obama favorably. But in an environment of economic struggle and disappointment with the performance of the incumbent, Republicans suggest that the popularity threshold that Romney must clear is relatively low. “It’s almost an acceptability standard rather than having to do what I think a lot of people did in 2008, which is sort of swoon over this person that made a lot of promises and was able to articulate a vision that seemed very compelling,” said Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio,.

Festival Continued from A1 City planners approved the two land-use applications administratively, without a public process for Nosler and other neighbors to raise concerns, Hultberg said. “There is no connection between our appeals and the music festival,” Hultberg said. Nosler spokesman Zach Waterman said the company supports the Bend Roots Revival. “Nosler’s been in Bend since 1958,” Waterman said. “We’re big supporters of this ... city and we like to see events like the Roots festival.” Hill’s long-term plans for the former Brightwood mill, which manufactured wood products, include a new parking lot, additional retail space and a 60-seat theater for movies and plays, according to city development documents. Earlier this year, Hill applied to change the use of existing mill buildings to pursue those plans. In July, Bend planners administratively approved the two applications and determined the development would not create enough new traffic for the city to require the Century

age points of their payroll to PERS. Based on the net rate, that will now increase to about 15.7 percent, Larrabee said. The rates can vary dramatically depending on the employer. School districts will see more of an increase, closer to 7 percentage points or a 50 percent rate increase than other public employers, such as state government. The system’s unfunded liability is $16 billion. “It’s not acceptable for us to pay the percentages into PERS we are paying,” Wilkinson said. “We have to continue to work with the Legislature to find a solution that makes sense.” Rep. Jason Conger, R-Bend, was an advocate for PERS reform in the last legislative session but was unable to make much headway. He’s now teamed up with Knute Buehler, a local surgeon and can-

Center to make street improvements. These are the decisions that Nosler plans to appeal. Bend planning manager Colin Stephens said the Century Center also has an application with the city to modify an earlier site plan to reflect how Hill developed the existing parking lot and indoor event center. The city could have initiated code enforcement against the Century Center because this redevelopment and construction did not reflect what the city previously approved, Stephens said. However, the city is working with the Century Center to fix the problem. Tuesday morning, Jesse Roberts, one of the revival organizers, said he planned to appeal to Hill to change his mind and allow the revival at the Century Center this year. Roberts is the director of Rise Up, a nonprofit community arts group that organizes the revival. The event has taken place for seven years, and organizers said on their website that more than 4,000 people attended annually in recent years. The free festival features roughly 100 local acts and educational workshops, and organizers call it “the largest ‘locals’ festival in Cen-

A5

didate for secretary of state, to continue pushing for reforms. The two have proposed ending the so-called double-dipping practice, which allows retirees to retire and then go back to work under a contract while still receiving their benefits; capping the cost-of-living adjustments and reducing the guaranteed rate of return to 6 percent; and putting contributions from the Individual Account Program into the PERS general fund. Wilkinson has also been vocal about reforms. “I’m convinced there are things we can do that don’t destroy the system … but certainly put the system back in balance,” Wilkinson said. “This next legislative session, lawmakers have to step up and assume responsibility so we don’t destroy public schools as we know them.” — Reporter: 541-554-1162, ldake@bendbulletin.com

tral Oregon.” “Essentially we’ve been planning this festival since February, and we were kind of notified by the Century Center last Thursday or Friday that they were going to have to cancel with us based on some disputes they had with Nosler,” Roberts said. “I kind of feel like we were put in the middle of this,” Roberts said. “I don’t feel like we have adequate notice for them to cancel on us with less than a month to go.... I’m still hopeful Century will change their mind.” In its early years, Bend Roots Revival was at the Parrilla Grill and The Victorian Cafe on the west side of Bend. Since 2010, Hill allowed organizers of the Bend Roots Revival to hold the event at the center free of charge. Hill said he only canceled outdoor events and still planned to hold indoor events, such as concerts, fundraisers and weddings. “If things get resolved, the (Bend Roots Revival) can resume next year,” Hill said. “If things don’t get resolved, it may not happen there again. I just don’t know at this point.” — Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com

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A6

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012

Drought

Housing

Continued from A1 Port of Greenville, Miss., Director Tommy Hart said he has been praying for rain for weeks but it’s not clear yet how much Isaac will help. “I may have prayed too hard, I don’t need a hurricane,” he said Tuesday. Isaac has been gaining strength and it officially became a Category 1 hurricane on Tuesday before making landfall. The storm’s path may change, but the drought is so widespread that the rain is certain to be welcomed in most areas that get it. More than half of all U.S. counties have been identified as natural disaster areas this summer, mostly because of drought. Conditions are especially bad in the Corn Belt. Nearly all of Nebraska, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri and more than two-thirds of Iowa are in the worst two stages of drought. But Svoboda said a high pressure system over the Great Plains this week will keep Isaac’s moisture from reaching much of that area. And Iowa may be too far north to see significant rainfall since the storm will have dropped much of the moisture it picked up in the Gulf by the time it hits there. Farmers have been hoping for rain all summer, as drought damaged corn, soybeans and other crops. But Missouri farmer Will Spargo said Isaac is arriving too late in the season to help much. The rain could even slow the corn harvest if fields become too muddy to support combines and grain trucks. “We’ve gone months and months without rain, and now here it is at harvest that we’re getting rain,” said Spargo, who grows corn, soybeans and rice near Neelyville, Mo. But farmers and ranchers in the path of the storm still were looking forward to the rain because anything that improves soil moisture will help them next year. Flooding can be a concern anytime too much rain falls quickly in an area, but officials in Arkansas and Missouri said they weren’t too concerned because the ground is so dry that it should be able to absorb the rain. And streams and lakes in the area should be able to handle runoff because they’re so low. With as dry as this year has been, many people would probably welcome the moisture even if it is accompanied by some flooding, Arkansas climatologist Michael Borengasser said. “We’ll take all of it we can get,” Borengasser said.

Continued from A1 Although prices were still depressed in a few of the cities compared to a year ago, every one of them showed price gains between May and June. The report is highly respected because it tracks actual price differences as a home is sold and resold over time. Home prices are still down almost a third from their peak in 2006, but the bulk of the recent data reports are pointing to a slow recovery and increased optimism that could encourage potential buyers to take the plunge. In Atlanta, the city with the biggest one-year decline in home prices, the market perked up by about 4 percent in May and again in June, according to non-seasonally adjusted numbers. Detroit prices increased 6 percent from May to June, while in Miami, prices rose by 1.4 percent in May and 1.6 percent in June. A spike in prices is to be expected in June, a time when the market ordinarily heats up, but analysts called these increases particularly strong. Housing went from being a huge engine of growth to a drag on the economy as inventories swelled, foreclosures mounted and prices crashed. More recently, economists have pointed to a slow turnaround, saying it is once again contributing to the nation’s economic output. Several factors have helped: Investors have bought cheap properties; reduced inventory has prompted competitive bidding; and lower interest rates have emboldened buyers. The number of foreclosures has declined as banks responded to tightened oversight in some jurisdictions. After the national settlement over foreclosure abuse, housing counselors report that banks are taking more aggressive measures,

Ben Margot / The Associated Press file photo

This file photo shows the “tent cabins’ of Curry Village in California’s Yosemite National Park. Park officials announced a second person had died of a rare, rodent-borne disease after staying in Curry Village, one of Yosemite’s most popular lodging areas. The death prompted federal officials to step up efforts to locate and warn recent visitors.

2nd Yosemite hantavirus death prompts closures of campsites By K ate Mather Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — A second hantavirus death has prompted partial closures of a popular Yosemite National Park campsite and warnings to 1,700 recent visitors as officials try to understand what is being characterized as an “unprecedented” outbreak of the disease. After learning that a Pennsylvania visitor’s death was caused by hantavirus, Yosemite officials sent emails Monday evening to those who stayed in the “signature tent cabins” in Curry Village between mid-June and late August, said park spokesman Scott Gediman. Letters were sent to visitors whose email addresses were not on record. The fatality marked the third confirmed case of the rare rodent-borne disease linked to the park — last week, park officials said a 37-yearold San Francisco Bay Area man had died and an Inland Empire woman in her 40s was recovering after being exposed to the virus. Park officials believe there may be a fourth case but had yet to receive confirmation Tuesday. All four stayed separately at the signature tent cabins in June, Gediman said. Officials have traced the outbreak to deer mouse droppings in the area. Repeated cases of hantavirus at the same location within a year is “very rare,” said Dr. Barbara Knust, an epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There have been 587 cases of human infection from hantavirus recorded between 1993, when the virus was first identified in the Four Corners area, and 2011, according to the CDC. About one-third have been fatal. Jana McCabe, a Yosemite park ranger, called the outbreak “unprecedented.” “We take this extremely seriously,” she said. “We want to

know what’s going on.” Transmitted through urine, droppings or saliva of infected rodents, hantavirus pulmonary syndrome takes between one and six weeks to show in humans, officials said. The symptoms — fatigue, fever, muscle aches, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain — are often confused with the flu, Knust said, but can quickly worsen as one’s lungs begin to fill with fluid. In general, Knust said, the virus is transmitted when people come in contact with an enclosed area that has been infested. The disease is not spread from human to human, officials said. Hantavirus exposures have been traced to Yosemite twice before, in 2000 and 2010, McCabe said. Neither case, linked to lodging in Tuolumne Meadows, was fatal. After the 2010 case, park officials worked with public health authorities to re-evaluate existing hantavirus prevention protocol, McCabe said. The updates, including changes to cleaning policies, were finalized in April. For instance, McCabe said, although the cabins were always cleaned after guests checked out, visitors used to be able to sweep out their cabins daily, potentially stirring up dust carrying the virus. Park officials trained in how to handle mouse droppings now do that task. And although officials are still trapping and testing deer mice across the park to determine what caused this outbreak, McCabe said, they are “pretty confident that it’s not a cleanliness issue.” “We’ve reviewed the cases; we’ve reviewed the cleaning methods,” she said. “It makes you start wondering, what has changed? What is going on in the environment? That’s really the question.” After confirming the first two infections earlier this month, Yosemite officials be-

gan catching deer mice and disinfecting the Curry Village cabins. They also contacted health authorities. Park officials learned of the second fatality Friday, McCabe said. The Pennsylvania man’s doctor didn’t initially suspect hantavirus, but after hearing of the Yosemite cases, confirmed that the deceased patient had recently traveled to the park. The park has since stepped up its response, implementing “rolling closures” of the cabins for deep cleaning, McCabe said. Crews are tearing down interior walls to look inside and repairing holes where mice could get into the structures. The California Department of Public Health said Tuesday afternoon that it had recommended a closure of affected cabins “due to the level of mouse activity and presence of the hantavirus.” Gediman said the closure was part of the cleaning and repair process already under way.

a number of housing counselors report, to keep homeowners in their homes. But economists cautioned of potential dangers that could still hold homebuyers back. Consumer confidence unexpectedly dropped in August, the Conference Board reported Tuesday, largely because of diminished expectations for the future. The November election and the “fiscal cliff” of expiring tax breaks and looming spending cuts at the end of the year may also be keeping a damper on things. “All those kinds of things will weigh on housing because it’s still a big decision and a big purchase for people,” said David M. Blitzer, the chairman of the index committee for S&P Dow Jones Indices, which produces the home price index. “But all the underpinnings look better.” Some of the strongest showings could be seen in many cities in the South and West that were among those hit hardest by the crash. When home prices were rising, places like Phoenix and Las Vegas were growing rapidly and real estate was a major component of the local economy. Afterward, homes there lost more than half their value, according to Case-Shiller data. But while Las Vegas has shown little movement, recovering only 4.5 percent from its trough, Phoenix has rebounded by 14 percent, San Francisco by 18 percent and Atlanta by 11 percent. Mark Zandi, chief economist for Moody’s Analytics, said the Phoenix economy is more diverse than Las Vegas’, the job market started to recover sooner and investors have been more eager to buy. “That said,” he added, “I don’t think the Vegas economy and housing market are too far behind.”

856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com

SEPTEMBER 14-16 | LES SCHWAB AMPHITHEATER BEND, OREGON

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC ON SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15TH

FEATURING:

British Sports Cars After a 17-year run in Sunriver, the Oregon Festival of Cars has moved to the Les Schwab Amphitheater. The Festival has always been very popular with both participants and spectators, and there has been tremendous buzz about this year’s event. We expect over 150 sports and enthusiast cars on the field and several thousand spectators.

G REAT EX POSUR E: The guide will publish in The Bulletin Wednesday, September 12th reaching more than 70,000 readers in Central Oregon, and will also be available at the event.

PUBLISHES ON SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

Call 541-382-1811 to reserve your ad space.


SAVVYSHOPPER

B

TV & Movies, B2 Dear Abby, B3 Comics, B4 Puzzles, B5

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/savvyshopper

IN BRIEF Eat local with 1-day deal event Area participating retailers and restaurants will be offering discounts Sept. 6 in a oneday effort called Dine Fresh Dine Local. The push is part of the Buy Fresh Buy Local campaign to support producers and purveyors of locally produced food. To get the discounts, customers are asked to present a Dine Fresh Dine Local coupon card. The cards will be available at participating retailers and can be printed from the Facebook address below. Discounts are unique to each business. For instance, Devore’s Good Food Store in Bend will take 20 percent off. Drinks will be $1 off at Lone Pine Coffee Roasters. Rockin’ Daves Bagel Bistro in Bend will serve its breakfast sandwiches with locally produced ham or bacon at no extra charge. The event is intended to help introduce consumers to local businesses, farmers and ranchers. Buy Fresh Buy Local is a program of the Central Oregon Food Policy Council. For coupons: www .facebook.com/COFood PolicyCouncil. Contact: www.central oregonfoodpolicy.org or 541-504-3307.

Brandon Showers New York Times News Service

Legs take their turn By Bee-Shyuan Chang New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — Marcy Stein, 46, a former competitive power lifter who lives on Manhattan’s Upper East Side and manages large construction projects for a consulting company, keeps an eye on the shape of her legs. “When you’re power lifting, your legs are amazing, but they’re big and muscular,” she said. Now, like many women in New York City, Stein has a workout regimen that includes a thigh-busting ballet barre routine, specifically, the Figure 4 class at Pure Yoga in her neighborhood. “The workout has elongated the muscles,” she said on a recent July evening, pointing to her upper quadriceps. “I look more proportioned and feminine in my skirts.” See Legs / B6

Patagonia moves to larger space Downtown Bend mainstay Patagonia @ Bend is getting ready to move to more spacious digs. The new location, the former home of Sportsvisionbend at the intersection of Wall Street and Oregon Avenue, is expected to be ready for the move by the end of September. It will double the space for the store, making room available for Patagonia’s kids line, shoes and more merchandise. Patagonia @ Bend is currently located at 920 N.W. Bond St. Its present hours will remain the same: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sundays. Contact: http:// patagoniabend.com or 541-382-6694.

Careful with mobile banking The regional office of the Better Business Bureau is warning consumers to proceed with caution when using mobile devices for banking. Various financial institutions now offer avenues for smartphones and other devices for mobile banking. The BBB says in a news release that one-third of cellphone users will use mobile banking within the next year. The consumer protection agency says users should be more cognizant than ever of safeguarding personal account information. To keep safe, the organization offers advice. • Don’t follow links in unsolicited emails or unfamiliar websites. It could be an attempt to get personal information. • Avoid public networks when banking. • Always lock mobile devices and change passcodes frequently. The regional BBB serves Oregon, Western Washington and Alaska. Contact: bbb.org.

Julie Glassberg New York Times News Service

LIFE INSURANCE

The wine list at Roman’s in New York offers unusual choices.

In case of a

rainy day • Experts lay out who needs coverage and how to choose the right plan By Heidi Hagemeier The Bulletin

A

mong fun shopping pursuits, life insurance doesn’t usually make the top of the list. It involves difficult conversations, poses one more household expense and appears exceedingly complicated. Yet experts say life insurance is one of the most important safety nets for families to consider. “Let’s face it, nobody likes to buy insurance,” said Jason Epple, a principal at Century Insurance Group in Bend. “But when something happens you’re really glad it’s there.” Assessing whether you need life insurance — and if so, how much — takes a bit of research. But it can ultimately make for better peace of mind. Here is how to get started.

When do you need life insurance? The main idea behind life insurance, put bluntly, is to replace an economic loss caused by a death. Bob Mullins is a Bend-based certified money management volunteer for the nonprofit organization Money Management International and also used to be a licensed insurance agent. He said the answer is simple. “In truth, you only need life insurance if somebody depends on your income,” he said. Life insurance, he said, should ensure that the spouse and children left behind after a death maintain the same financial security as if you were alive. It’s there to help cover the bills, pay off the house, help send the children to college and provide for some retirement. Single individuals who have no loan co-signers, children or other dependents don’t need life insurance, Mullins said, unless they want to cover their funeral expenses. At the time of death, previously accrued debt becomes irrelevant. See Insurance / B6

— Heidi Hagemeier, The Bulletin Illustration by Jennifer Montgomery / The Bulletin

Should a wine list educate or merely be flattering? By Eric Asimov New York Times News Service

Picture yourself on a first visit to a new restaurant. It could be French, Greek, Spanish, even American, specializing in the cuisine of any country with a wide-ranging wine industry. You place your order, maybe asking a waiter to describe some dishes to help decide. Then you look at the wine list, dozens of choices all consistent with the restaurant’s ethnicity. Not one bottle seems familiar. What do you do? A) Close your eyes, point randomly to a bottle and order it. B) Throw up your hands and order a beer (assuming you recognize any of those choices). C) Ask for advice from the sommelier or a server familiar with the list. D) Rant about pretentious sommeliers who create lists of esoteric wines under the deluded notion that their mission is to educate customers. Dummies! If you are Steve Cuozzo, the restaurant critic at the New York Post, you chose option D. See List / B3


B2

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012

TV & M

Fall brings a gab-fest TV SPOTLIGHT By Chuck Barney Contra Costa Times

Soap operas might be falling by the wayside, but that doesn’t mean daytime television is lacking drama. This fall, no fewer than five chatty contenders will wage an all-out battle for your attention as they launch afternoon talk shows. The crowded field includes a pair of big-name celebrities (Katie Couric and Steve Harvey), a daytime comeback candidate (Ricki Lake), a reality TV fixture (Jeff Probst) and a foreign import (Trisha Goddard). Here’s the roster: “Katie� Premieres: Sept. 10 The backstory: She thrived in the morning, took her lumps in the evening (news), and now tries her luck in the afternoons. The promo pitch: “Finding the right answers is all about asking the right questions.� “I’m excited,� Couric told reporters at TV’s summer press tour. “It’s much more fun to talk to actual people and to have somebody reacting to the things you’re saying and doing.� “Steve Harvey� Premieres: Sept. 4 The backstory: Successful comedian, radio and game show host, author and film producer looks to conquer another corner of the media landscape. The promo pitch: “Life can get pretty confusing. ... I’m here to help. You and I will get through this together.� “There’s not a lot funny in daytime television outside of Ellen DeGeneres. I’m going to be extremely funny,� Harvey said. “I firmly believe that laughter does the absolute most for people.�

“The Jeff Probst Show� Premieres: Sept. 10 The backstory: “Survivor� host emerges from the jungle to embrace a very different kind of tribal council. The promo pitch: “Bringing a whole new energy to daytime talk.� “If you’re looking for Jerry (Springer) or Maury (Povich), this show isn’t for you,� Probst said during his press tour visit. “I’m not interested in people fighting on stage and I’m not interested in paternity tests.� “The Ricki Lake Show� Premieres: Sept. 10 The backstory: Daytime veteran (1993-2004), now older and wiser, returns to the chatfest fray. The promo pitch: “Whatever you want to talk about, the conversation begins here.� “I’m sort of reinventing myself in this genre,� Lake said at the press tour. “I’m more evolved. ... I think we’re doing a show now that’s a little less fluff, a little more substance.� “Trisha Goddard� Premieres: Sept. 17 The backstory: Mental health activist and breast-cancer survivor hosted talk shows in Australia and England before doing guest stints on “Maury� as a “conflict-resolution� expert. The promo pitch: “Straight talk with a no-excuse mentality.� Leading the way: A native of the UK, Goddard broke ground in the late 1980s as Australia’s first black TV news anchorwoman. “I love what I do. I love connecting with people ... But I’m far more relaxed about it all now; I’m not some career-driven beast,� Gold told the British newspaper the Mail.

L M T 

FOR WEDNESDAY, AUG. 29

BEND Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 6:30 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) Noon, 2:45, 6 THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15

THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG) 12:20, 3:05, 6, 9 THE OOGIELOVES IN THE BIG BALLOON ADVENTURE (G) 12:40, 4, 7:45 PARANORMAN 3-D (PG) 1:15, 7:05 PARANORMAN (PG) 3:40, 9:35 PREMIUM RUSH (PG-13) 1:25, 4:35, 7:25, 10:05 SPARKLE (PG-13) 6:05, 9:30 TED (R) 1:35, 4:55, 7:35, 10:10 TOTAL RECALL (PG-13) 9:50

FAREWELL, MY QUEEN (R) 1, 3:30, 5:45

McMenamins Old St. Francis School

MOONRISE KINGDOM (PG-13) 1:15, 4, 7

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

RUBY SPARKS (R) 12:30, 3, 6:45

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

2016 OBAMA’S AMERICA (PG) 11:45 a.m., 2:05, 4:40, 7:15, 9:40

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) 3 MAGIC MIKE (R) 9:10 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 6 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 3, 6:30, 9:45

THE CAMPAIGN (R) 1:50, 5, 8, 10:20 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES IMAX (PG-13) 12:30, 4:15, 7:55 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG13) Noon, 4, 7:45

Redmond Cinemas 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13) 1, 3:55, 6:40, 9:20 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG) 12:05, 3:15 LAWLESS (R) 12:10, 3:25, 6:25, 9:15

SISTERS Sisters Movie House 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 7

PREMIUM RUSH (PG-13) 5:15, 7:30

THE CAMPAIGN (R) 2:35, 4:45, 7 THE EXPENDABLES 2 (R) 2:30, 4:55, 7:20 HIT AND RUN (R) 2:25, 4:40, 6:50 PARANORMAN 3-D (PG) 2:45, 5, 7:10

PRINEVILLE Pine Theater

MADRAS

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

Madras Cinema 5

REDMOND

HIT AND RUN (R) 1:40, 4:50, 7:40, 10:15

PARANORMAN (PG) 2, 4:15, 6:30, 8:45

PARANORMAN (PG) 5, 7:15

THE WELL DIGGER’S DAUGHTER (no MPAA rating) 3 YOUR SISTER’S SISTER (R) 5:30, 8

THE EXPENDABLES 2 (R) 1:10, 4:25, 7, 10

Courtesy Universal Pictures

MOONRISE KINGDOM (PG-13) 5:15

869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

• Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15.50 for adults and $13 for children (ages 3 to 11) and seniors (ages 60 and older). • Movie times are subject to change after press time. • As of press time, complete movie times for Wednesday and Thursday at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX were unavailable. Check The Bulletin’s Community Life section that day for the complete movie listings.

The Huntsman (Chris Hemsworth) joins forces with Snow White (Kristen Stewart) in the epic action-adventure “Snow White and the Huntsman.�

THE CAMPAIGN (R) 7:30

Tin Pan Theater

BRAVE (PG) 12:50, 3:35, 6:20, 9:05

EDITOR’S NOTES:

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 3:40, 6:30

THE CAMPAIGN (R) 4, 7 TOTAL RECALL (UPSTAIRS — PG13) 3:40, 6:20 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 3:15, 6:15, 9:15 THE EXPENDABLES 2 (R) 2:15, 4:30, 6:45, 9 THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG) 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15

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WEDNESDAY PRIME TIME 8/29/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

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BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

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KATU News World News KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Ă… Republican National Convention News Nightly News NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Ă… Republican National Convention News Evening News Access H. Old Christine Republican National Convention KEZI 9 News World News KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Republican National Convention The Simpsons The Simpsons Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Big Bang Big Bang (4:00) Republican National Convention The 2012 Republican National Convention. (N) ’ (Live) Ă… NewsChannel 8 Nightly News NewsChannel 8 News Republican National Convention Meet, Browns Meet, Browns King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Primal Grill Kimchi Chron Outnumbered Last of Wine Midsomer Murders ‘PG’ Ă…

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(N) ’ (Live) Ă… (6:06) Tosh.0 Colbert Report The Daily Show With Jon Stewart South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ (8:54) Futurama (9:27) Futurama Futurama (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Daily Show Colbert Report COM 135 53 135 47 (5:02) Futurama Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Bend City Council Work Session Bend City Council Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 Politico Convention Preview Politico Republican National Convention The 2012 Republican National Convention. ’ Ă… CSPAN 61 20 12 11 (4:00) Republican National Convention The 2012 Republican National Convention. (N) ’ (Live) Ă… Wizards-Place Phineas, Ferb Good-Charlie My Babysitter A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ Phineas, Ferb Phineas, Ferb Austin & Ally ’ Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Good-Charlie Phineas, Ferb *DIS 87 43 14 39 Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Dirty Jobs Fossil Hunter ’ ‘PG’ American Guns ’ ‘14’ Ă… American Guns ’ ‘14’ Ă… American Guns (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Dirty Jobs: Down Under (N) ‘PG’ American Guns ’ ‘14’ Ă… *DISC 156 21 16 37 Dirty Jobs Tower Top Hand ‘PG’ Keeping Up With the Kardashians Jonas Jonas E! News (N) Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians The Soup ‘14’ Jonas Chelsea Lately E! News *E! 136 25 Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 (4:00) MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at Pittsburgh Pirates (N) 2012 World Series of Poker NFL Live (N) (Live) Ă… Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… NASCAR Now NFL Yearbook ESPN2 22 24 21 24 (4:00) 2012 U.S. Open Tennis Men’s First Round and Women’s Second Round (N) (Live) Stories of... Stories of... Long Way Down Ă… White Shadow Cops Ă… Stories of... Stories of... College Football From Pasadena, Calif. Ă… ESPNC 23 25 123 25 (4:00) Summer Olympics SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNFC Press H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… The 700 Club ‘G’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey Baby Daddy (N) ›› “The Sandlotâ€? (1993, Comedy-Drama) Tom Guiry, Mike Vitar. Hannity (N) America’s Election Headquarters (N) On the Record With Greta Van Susteren (N) Ă… America’s Election Headquarters Record FNC 57 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Paula’s Cooking Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Restaurant: Impossible ‘G’ Restaurant: Impossible Restaurant: Impossible (N) Restaurant Stakeout (N) Restaurant: Impossible ‘G’ *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes (4:00) ›› “There’s Something About Maryâ€? Anger Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “Step Brothersâ€? (2008, Comedy) Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly. ›› “Dear Johnâ€? (2010) Channing Tatum, Amanda Seyfried. FX 131 Property Brothers Amber ‘G’ Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Brothers Olivia ‘G’ Ă… Buying and Selling (N) ‘G’ Ă… House Hunters Hunters Int’l Property Brothers ‘G’ Ă… HGTV 176 49 33 43 Property Brothers ‘G’ Ă… Restoration Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration *HIST 155 42 41 36 Restoration Trading Spouses: Mommy Trading Spouses: Mommy ››› “Something’s Gotta Giveâ€? (2003, Romance-Comedy) Jack Nicholson, Diane Keaton. Ă… Drop Dead Diva ‘PG’ Ă… LIFE 138 39 20 31 Wife Swap Lowe/Hamilton ‘PG’ Republican National Convention ’ Ă… MSNBC 59 59 128 51 (4:00) Republican National Convention The 2012 Republican National Convention. (N) ’ Ă… (8:24) Teen Mom Amber reconsiders custody. Ă… The Real World (N) ’ Ă… (11:01) True Life (N) ’ MTV 192 22 38 57 Parental Control Parental Control Parental Control Parental Control (7:14) Teen Mom Maci and Ryan fight. ‘PG’ Ă… SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Ă… Victorious ‘G’ Figure It Out ‘Y’ BrainSurge ‘G’ “Fred 3: Camp Fredâ€? (2012, Comedy) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… My Wife & Kids George Lopez George Lopez Friends ’ ‘PG’ (11:33) Friends NICK 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Breaking Down the Bars ’ ‘14’ Breaking Down the Bars ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ OWN 161 103 31 103 Breaking Down the Bars ’ ‘14’ Mariners Post. MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Minnesota Twins From Target Field in Minneapolis. Dan Patrick ROOT 20 45 28* 26 MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Minnesota Twins From Target Field in Minneapolis. (N) (Live) SPIKE 132 31 34 46 Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Haunted Collector Paranormal Witness Haunted Collector Haunted Collector (N) Paranormal Witness (N) (11:01) Haunted Collector SYFY 133 35 133 45 Haunted Collector Behind Scenes Turning Point Joseph Prince End of the Age Praise the Lord (Live). Ă… Always Good Jesse Duplantis Easter Exper. Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord TBN Classics TBN 205 60 130 King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ’ ‘14’ Ă… Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan (N) ‘14’ Ă… *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘14’ ››› “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hydeâ€? (1941) Spencer Tracy, Ingrid Bergman. A ›››› “Casablancaâ€? (1942, Drama) Humphrey Bogart. Nazis, intrigue and ››› “Joan of Arcâ€? (1948, Biography) Ingrid Bergman, Jose Ferrer, Francis L. Sullivan. A devout ›› “Elena and TCM 101 44 101 29 scientist’s personality experiments backfire. Ă… (DVS) romance clash at a Moroccan nightclub. Ă… (DVS) French peasant girl fights the English for Charles VII. Ă… Her Menâ€? Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Here Comes Here Comes Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Here Comes Here Comes Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *TLC 178 34 32 34 Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist Scarlett Fever ‘14’ The Mentalist Bloodstream ‘14’ The Mentalist The Red Mile ‘14’ The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… CSI: NY Life Sentence ‘14’ Ă… *TNT 17 26 15 27 The Mentalist Red Hot ‘14’ Ă… Johnny Test ’ Regular Show Regular Show Wrld, Gumball Adventure Time Johnny Test ’ NinjaGo: Mstrs NinjaGo: Mstrs King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ *TOON 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Toy Hunter ‘PG’ Toy Hunter ‘PG’ Deep Fried Paradise ‘G’ Ă… Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Bourdain: No Reservations M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Love-Raymond Love-Raymond The Soul Man The Exes ‘14’ Retired at 35 King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 Bonanza The Stranger ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS Patriot Down ’ ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Rule Fifty-One ’ ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Broken Arrow ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Royal Pains (N) ‘PG’ (10:01) Necessary Roughness (N) (11:02) Suits High Noon ‘PG’ USA 15 30 23 30 NCIS Judgment Day ‘14’ Ă… Hollywood Exes ’ ‘14’ Hollywood Exes ’ ‘14’ Hollywood Exes ’ ‘14’ Hollywood Exes (N) ’ ‘14’ Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta ‘14’ Mama Drama My New Mom ‘14’ VH1 191 48 37 54 Hollywood Exes ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:20) ››› “Babe: Pig in the Cityâ€? 1998 ‘G’ Ă… ›› “Gnomeo and Julietâ€? 2011 ’ ‘G’ Ă… ›› “Godzillaâ€? 1998, Science Fiction Matthew Broderick, Jean Reno. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:35) ››› “It Could Happen to Youâ€? 1994 ‘PG’ › “The Happeningâ€? 2008, Science Fiction Mark Wahlberg. ‘R’ Ă… ›› “The Strangersâ€? 2008 Liv Tyler. ‘R’ Ă… FXM Presents › “Shutterâ€? 2008, Horror Joshua Jackson. ‘PG-13’ Ă… FMC 104 204 104 120 (4:00) › “The Happeningâ€? 2008 UFC Reloaded UFC 134: Silva vs. Okami Silva vs Okami and Rua vs Griffin. UFC Unleashed UFC Tonight UFC Insider UFC Reloaded Silva vs Okami and Rua vs Griffin. FUEL 34 ›› “Caddyshackâ€? (1980) Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield. Golf Central Golf Now Golf Now Golf Now Golf Now School of Golf Golf Academy GOLF 28 301 27 301 (4:30) ›› “Caddyshackâ€? (1980) Chevy Chase. Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Last Straw ‘G’ (4:00) “The Medal- ››› “Puss in Bootsâ€? 2011, Adventure Voices of Antonio Hard Knocks: Training Camp With ›› “The Hangover Part IIâ€? 2011, Comedy Bradley Coo- Boardwalk Em- True Blood Save Yourself Eric tries to Hard Knocks: Training Camp With HBO 425 501 425 501 lionâ€? 2003 Banderas, Salma Hayek. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… the Miami Dolphins ’ ‘MA’ per, Ed Helms. ’ ‘R’ Ă… pire: Distilling save Bill. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… the Miami Dolphins ’ ‘MA’ ››› “The Last King of Scotlandâ€? 2006, Biography Forest Whitaker. ‘R’ ››› “Marie Antoinetteâ€? 2006, Historical Drama Kirsten Dunst, Judy Davis. ‘PG-13’ ››› “The Magdalene Sistersâ€? 2002 Geraldine McEwan. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voy- (6:10) ››› “Set It Offâ€? 1996, Action Jada Pinkett, Queen Latifah. Desperation (8:15) ››› “Unstoppableâ€? 2010, Action Denzel Washington. Two men try to ›› “Cowboys & Aliensâ€? 2011, Science Fiction Daniel Craig. Extraterrestrials MAX 400 508 508 age of the Dawn Treaderâ€? ’ drives four women to bank-robbery. ’ ‘R’ Ă… stop a runaway train carrying toxic cargo. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… attack a 19th-century Arizona town. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… Abandoned ‘PG’ Abandoned ‘PG’ Abandoned ‘PG’ Abandoned ‘PG’ America’s Lost Treasures (N) ‘G’ Abandoned ‘PG’ Abandoned ‘PG’ America’s Lost Treasures ‘G’ Abandoned ‘PG’ Abandoned ‘PG’ Alaska State Troopers ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Odd Parents Planet Sheen Planet Sheen Huntik: Secrets Odd Parents SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Huntik: Secrets Odd Parents Shooting USA Best Defense Amer. Rifleman Impossible Gun Stories Gun Nuts Shooting USA Ă… Best Defense Gun Stories Impossible Amer. Rifleman OUTD 37 307 43 307 Midway USA’s Gun Stories (4:15) ››› Weeds Saplings ’ Episodes ’ (5:45) ›› “Phenomenonâ€? 1996, Drama John Travolta, Kyra Sedgwick, Forest Whitaker. A small- ›› “Scream 4â€? 2011, Horror Neve Campbell, Courteney Cox. The Ghostface Larry Wilmore’s Race, Religion SHO 500 500 town mechanic is gifted with amazing mental powers. ’ ‘PG’ Killer returns to claim new victims. ’ ‘R’ Ă… & Sex ‘MA’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… “Panicâ€? 2000 101 Cars 101 Cars Barrett-Jackson Special Edition Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ 101 Cars 101 Cars Barrett-Jackson Special Edition Unique Whips ‘14’ SPEED 35 303 125 303 Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ (5:20) ›› “Promâ€? 2011 Aimee Teegarden. ’ ‘PG’ (7:15) ›› “The Fogâ€? 2005, Horror Tom Welling. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… › “Zookeeperâ€? 2011 Kevin James. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (10:45) ›› “How Do You Knowâ€? 2010 ’ ‘PG-13’ STARZ 300 408 300 408 Winnie Pooh (4:30) ››› “Source Codeâ€? 2011 Jake (6:05) ››› “Chasing Amyâ€? 1997, Romance-Comedy Ben Affleck. A male art- ››› “The Helpâ€? 2011, Drama Viola Davis, Emma Stone, Bryce Dallas Howard. An aspiring writer › “The Heart Specialistâ€? 2006, Romance-Comedy Wood TMC 525 525 Gyllenhaal. ’ ‘PG-13’ ist pursues romance with a confirmed lesbian. ’ ‘R’ Ă… captures the experiences of black women. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Harris, Zoe Saldana. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Costas Tonight (N) ››› “Rudyâ€? (1993, Drama) Sean Astin, Ned Beatty, Charles S. Dutton. Costas Tonight Poker After Dark IndyCar 36 ‘PG’ NBCSN 27 58 30 209 Diving Bridezillas Michelle & Tasha ‘14’ Bridezillas Tasha & Tracy ‘14’ Bridezillas Tasha & Remy ‘14’ Bridezillas Remy & Blanca ‘14’ Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ *WE 143 41 174 118 Bridezillas Brittany & Michelle ‘14’


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A & A 

Transgender woman struggles with orientation, commitment

C   C 

Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY Dear Abby: I am a confused transwoman. I have been in a committed relationship for years with a woman who knew me before “the change.� I have lied to myself for a long time about what gender I have been attracted to, and now it’s coming back to haunt me. As I have gone through several years changing, my confidence and emotional depth have grown. I successfully transitioned two years ago, and live and work as a woman. This means when I go to clubs and bars with other girlfriends, I attract male attention in a positive way. (I’m attractive and pass well.) The problem is, my attraction to women is fading and men are now much more appealing. My pulse races at the idea of spending time in the company of men, but no longer with women, who are now more like sisters than anything else. My relationship with my current female spouse has become that of a housemate or female family member. She was there for me during my changes, and now I feel I am evolving away from her. This upsets me, and I know it upsets her because we have talked about the possibility that this might occur. Now I’m worried about breaking her heart, but feel if I don’t move on, I will have cheated myself out of living. What should I do? Should I swallow my feelings and stay with her, or admit that in order to feel like a heterosexual woman I must leave and be in a relationship with a man? Help! — Lost Angel Dear Lost: I discussed your letter with Denise Leclair, the executive director of the International Foundation for Gender Education (IFGE), who tells me that what you’re experiencing is not unusual. Transgender people can be so consumed with gender issues that they are sometimes unfocused on whom they are really

DEAR ABBY attracted to. While I can’t make this decision for you, you can get some helpful input from IFGE. Founded in 1987, it offers support and educational services for and about gender-variant persons — including referrals to medical and psychological professionals. You can email IFGE at info@ifge.org. Dear Abby: Thanks for the wonderful letters and sage advice over the years. I can’t tell you how many columns I have clipped and shared. Some years ago when I was teaching in Massachusetts, a dear friend, Pat, told me about something she did that impressed me. Every year on her birthday, she sent flowers to her parents with a note thanking them for their love and support. I adopted her idea. We have a Mother’s Day and a Father’s Day, but isn’t Pat’s idea wonderful? Many parents would be thrilled to receive flowers from their child on his or her birthday, especially when a note accompanies the bouquet. After all, the parents gave the children life and nurturing. It seems only right that children should show their appreciation at that special time. Please share this idea with your readers. — Former Teacher in Athens, Ga. Dear Teacher: Thank you for sharing your friend’s tradition. It’s not the first time I’ve heard this, but I’m pleased to share her terrific idea with those who are receptive. P.S. If flowers aren’t in the budget, a handwritten note of appreciation costs nothing and would be treasured for a lifetime. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar This year you acquire a new ability to visualize and create. Tap into your dynamic imagination more often, and you’ll achieve long-desired results. In the same vein, take risks only if they are grounded. Trust yourself the way others trust you. Pace yourself, as much is on your plate. Question what you must eliminate. If you are single, you could meet The One. Keep your distance from anyone who seems to be controlling. If you are attached, your significant other at times could be jealous or insecure. Do what you need to eliminate discomfort here. AQUARIUS seems contrary to your ideas. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Communication excels. You might not be able to meet everyone’s requests or needs. You also might not be able to respond to all the activity going on around you. Look at your priorities, and decide whether you should put order to the chaos or just go with the flow. Tonight: Don’t be too serious. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Stay on top of a situation, and know full well that you might be making a decision for someone else. Don’t worry — others trust your judgment. Expect the unexpected. Excitement marks a financial matter. Drive a steady course. Tonight: Up late. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH You tend to see all sides of an issue. You are unusually serious and dedicated when looking at a creative venture. Be open to more innovative thinking; be willing to break a barrier. Listen to an associate’s feedback. Tonight: Togetherness is the theme. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH You sense that what a partner needs is way beyond what you originally thought. You might want to go beyond the obvious and deal with the basics. Make a decision as to how committed you need or want to be; let decisions stem from there. Tonight: Be a duo. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Defer to others. Unexpected news comes forward that might force you to regroup. Knowing what you want could make a big difference in your decisionmaking process. Let go, and try not to worry about a serious situation.

Tonight: Go with a suggestion. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Your even pace helps you follow through when others let go and do the unexpected. You might find everything that is going on to be a bit humorous on some level. Be smart and keep this perspective to yourself. Be direct. Tonight: Time for you. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Allow more playfulness into your day. Detach, and look at the big picture. You’ll gain much more understanding, which will allow your creativity to mount. You know what works; do not settle for anything less than that. Tonight: Finally, time to party away. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Make sure to stay on top of your obligations. Listen to news with enthusiasm, and make this information work for you in your day-to-day life. You make a unique impression on others without having to reveal all of your thoughts. Tonight: Head home. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH You might want to debate the pros and cons of a situation. Others could be slightly more impulsive than you might have imagined. Try to hold back some, as you could be concerned about a potential error. Tonight: You know what works; follow that path. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Order might be nice in the face of the unpredictable. Your grounded nature allows you to accept a lot, but there is a point at which you can take no more. Efforts to stabilize your finances and a domestic issue will not happen with ease. Tonight: Your treat. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH You can’t help but smile at the excitement that occurs when you open up to others. You’ll see choices being made far more easily than in the past. You’re always spontaneous, and you often blaze a new trail. Tonight: Whatever suits you. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You might want to revamp your plans more than once. You could be overwhelmed by a personal matter, as positive as it might be. A partner supports you and gives you a lot of feedback. Listening to this person’s ideas does not mean you have to use them. Tonight: Vanish early! Š 2012 by King Features Syndicate

B3

BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. PICKIN’ AND PADDLIN’ MUSIC SERIES: Includes boat demonstrations in the Deschutes River and music by bluegrass act Eight Dollar Mountain; proceeds benefit Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; free; 4-7 p.m. demonstrations, 7-10 p.m. music; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend; 541-317-9407. MUSIC IN THE CANYON: Jazz Under the Stars performs jazz music; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; American Legion Community Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; www.musicin thecanyon.com. END OF SUMMER CRUZ: Event features classic cars, live music by the Taelour Project and a barbecue; proceeds benefit the High Desert A’s COCC automotive scholarship fund; free admission; 6-8 p.m., barbecue begins at 5:30 p.m.; Jake’s Diner, 2210 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-419-6021. PICNIC IN THE PARK: Featuring an Americana performance by The Sugar Beets; free; 6-8 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-447-6909. COMEDY BENEFIT: Featuring a performance by Jim Mortenson; proceeds benefit nursing students traveling to the Dharamsala Medical Mission; $6 in advance, $8 at the door; 7:30 p.m.; Timbers North, 3315 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-678-2115 or nursingstudentmission@ gmail.com. TARTUFI: The San Franciscobased rock band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541728-0879 or www.reverbnation .com/venue/thehornedhand.

THURSDAY TREEHOUSE PUPPETS IN THE PARK: With a performance of “Afraid of the Dark — Whose Eyes Are Out There Anyway?�; followed by a coordinated activity; free; 11 a.m.-noon; Columbia Park, 264 S.W. Columbia St., Bend; 541-389-7275 or www .bendparksandrec.org. TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-6 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, off of U.S. Highway 20 and Cook Avenue; 541-728-0088, earthsart@gmail.com or http:// tumalogardenmarket.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Kim Cooper-Findling reads from her book “Chance of Sun: An Oregon Memoir�; free; 6 p.m.; The Nature of Words, 224 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-647-2233, info@ thenatureofwords.org or www .thenatureofwords.org. MADELEINE PEYROUX: The jazz act performs; $25; 6:30 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-382-3940 or www.c3events.com. NEUTRALBOY: The Bremerton, Wash.-based punk band performs, with Murderland; free; 8 p.m.; Big T’s, 413 S.W. Glacier Ave., Redmond; 541504-3864.

L ist Continued from B1 In a recent column headlined “Sour Grapes,� Cuozzo railed against restaurants with wine lists that he described as “100 percent inscrutable.� He mentioned a couple of Greek restaurants with lists that were almost all Greek. (Surprise: He doesn’t care for Greek wines.) He reserved particular scorn for the entirely French list at Reynard in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, where, he wrote, he didn’t recognize a single bottle among almost 200 choices. By contrast, he cited the wine list at Cafe Boulud as admirable for offering, among hundreds of very expensive bottles, a section of 60 or so wines from a dozen countries, all $60 and under. Cuozzo’s tirade landed like a fat bug in a glass of fine Irouleguy blanc. Bloggers and readers from coast to coast debated his stand, many denouncing him for know-nothingism and ignorance. One blogger, possibly sincerely, praised Cuozzo for expressing the view of those who are “not well employed or well educated.�

Submitted photo

Charles Webster Baer samples one of the many choices of beers at last year’s Little Woody Barrel Aged Brew Festival. This year’s festival is 5-10 p.m. Friday and noon-10 p.m. Saturday at the Des Chutes Historical Museum in Bend.

FRIDAY LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Friends of the Sunriver Area Public Library hosts a sale of books; free admission; 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. VOLUNTEER EXPO: Community organizations will be on hand to talk about volunteering options; free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-617-7080 or www.deschutes library.org/calendar. DIXIELAND PARTY BAND AND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and California perform; refreshments available; donations accepted; 1-10 p.m.; La Pine Moose Lodge, 52510 Drafter Road; 541-548-0679. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@ gmail.com or http://bendfarmers market.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street; www.sistersfarmersmarket.com. SUNRIVER FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 4-7 p.m.; Village at Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Drive; www.sunriverchamber.com. LITTLE WOODY BARREL AGED BREW FESTIVAL: Craft beer and rye whiskey tastings from Oregon breweries, with live music; ages 21 and older only; a portion of proceeds benefits the Deschutes County Historical Society; $6, $15 beer tasting package; 5-10 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; www .thelittlewoody.com. MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “Kung Fu Panda 2�; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Compass Park, 2500 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-389-0995 or www.northwestcrossing.com. CABIN PROJECT: The Portlandbased Indie-pop band performs, with Dream Symphony and Wilderness; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879. EVERYDAY PROPHETS: The Portland-based reggae-rock band performs, with All You All; $5; 8:30 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. DJ WICKED: The Portland-based DJ performs; free; 9 p.m.; The Blacksmith Restaurant, 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-318-0588.

Regardless, Cuozzo’s diatribe raised crucial questions that go to the core of a restaurant’s identity. Are restaurants obliged to offer something for everybody? Or do they have the right to stay uncompromisingly true to a vision that may strike some as arcane? Ordinarily this question is addressed to the food. Most restaurants, no matter how it might affront a chef’s creative bent, offer a few safe landing places for less adventurous customers, like steak or salmon. But most have their limits. Must a restaurant offer bottles that even the most timid diner will recognize? Or can a wine list reflect a restaurant’s best conception of itself, no matter how unconventional? The world is dominated by the ordinary and the massmarket. Most restaurants, even in New York City, conform to a mainstream vision of food and wine. For that reason alone we should celebrate the departures, not feel threatened by them. If a restaurant is so unorthodox that you feel discomfited, plenty of more conventional choices beckon. Even restaurants with wine lists that appear to be esoteric are, on closer examination, tethered to the familiar. Roman’s, an Italianesque sib-

ESTOCAR: The Seattle-based poprock band performs, with The The The Thunder; $5; 9:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SATURDAY PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643 or prinevillefarmersmarket@gmail.com. VFW BREAKFAST: A breakfast of chicken-fried steak, biscuits with gravy and hashbrowns with eggs; $8, $7 senors and children ages 6 and younger; 8:30-10:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. “THE BISON — AMERICAN ICON� EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit explores the meaning and significance of the bison; exhibit runs through Jan. 6; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Free admission; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-489-3239 or madrassatmkt@ gmail.com. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www .centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Free; 10 a.m.2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; 541-382-1662, valerie@brooksresources.com or www.nwxfarmersmarket.com. GRAPE STOMP: Stomp grapes for wine; with live music and food; bring your own glass; a portion of proceeds from wine produced will benefit Terrebonne Community School; $8 in advance, $10 at the door, free for children; 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Maragas Winery, 15523 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Culver; 541-546-5464 or www.maragaswinery.com. LABOR AND LUMBER: Featuring turn-of-the-century woodworking, cross-cut sawing and cabin building; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org.

ling of Reynard in Fort Greene, Brooklyn, offers a list with many unusual Italian choices. You can order a rose from Frank Cornelissen, who makes wine on Mount Etna in Sicily, that may shock you. It may also delight you. It’s polarizing. If it seems risky, a nebbiolo rose from Burlotto in the Piedmont might be just the thing. It’s by no means an ordinary wine but not unrecognizable. The entire list is like that. You most likely won’t find any of the wines in a supermarket, but it has far better versions of those supermarket wines, even if from little-known producers. The list was put together by Lee Campbell, who also did the French list at Reynard. She has worked all over the wine business, in retail and for importers, pouring wine in East Hampton and in Harlem. She’s the last person who would ever seek to belittle customers and certainly isn’t “off junketing, doing TV or otherwise MIA� as Cuozzo put it, discussing absentee sommeliers in his comments on one blog. “I’m always going to try to introduce people to obscure wines that are good values,� she said. “To be fair, we have an adventurous demographic.�

DIXIELAND PARTY BAND AND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and California perform; refreshments available; donations accepted; noon-10 p.m.; La Pine Moose Lodge, 52510 Drafter Road; 541-548-0679. LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Friends of the Sunriver Area Public Library hosts a bag sale of books; free admission, $3 per bag; noon-5 p.m., 3-5 p.m. bag sale; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. LITTLE WOODY BARREL AGED BREW FESTIVAL: Craft beer and rye whiskey tastings from Oregon breweries, with live music; ages 21 and older only; a portion of proceeds benefits the Deschutes County Historical Society; $6, $15 beer tasting package; noon-10 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; www.thelittlewoody.com. SUNRIVER SUNFEST WINE FESTIVAL: Featuring wines from more than 50 wineries, art vendors, live music, food and more; free admission, signature glass required for tastings; noon-7 p.m.; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center, 57250 Overlook Road; 541-385-7988 or www.sunriversunfest.com. BRANDI CARLILE: The rootsy singer-songwriter performs, with Blitzen Trapper and Ivan & Alyosha; $34 plus fees; 6 p.m., gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www .bendconcerts.com. CASINO NIGHT: Featuring blackjack, craps, Texas hold ’em, an auction and more; proceeds benefit the Crooked River Ranch Lions Club Sight and Hearing Foundation, scouting organizations and children with diabetes; $15; 7-11 p.m.; Sandbagger Dinner House, 5165 Clubhouse Drive, Crooked River Ranch; 541-570-5565 or jay.nordin@hotmail.com. DJ WICKED: The Portland-based DJ performs; free; 9 p.m.; The Blacksmith Restaurant, 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-318-0588.

SUNDAY CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www .centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. HANDY ANDY MAGIC MAN: The magician performs magic for children and creates balloon animals; included in the price of admission donations, $2 for balloons; 10 a.m., 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Petersen Rock Gardens, 7930 S.W. 77th St., Redmond; 541-382-5574. DIXIELAND PARTY BAND AND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and California perform; refreshments available; donations accepted; 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; La Pine Moose Lodge, 52510 Drafter Road; 541-548-0679. LABOR AND LUMBER: Featuring turn-of-the-century woodworking, cross-cut sawing and cabin building; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. NOTABLES SWING BAND: The big band plays swing, blues, Latin, rock ‘n’ roll and waltzes; $5; 2-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-639-7734 or www.notablesswingband.com.

Demanding mainstream wines at a restaurant with a new wave Brooklyn ambience is like expressing shock that the waitress is tattooed. Should a Greek restaurant in Yorkville offer Bordeaux and Napa sauvignon blanc? On one condition, in my opinion: if the wine director believed that these wines expressed the ethos of the restaurant, not because they were recognizable to the mainstream customer. I have no problem with an entirely Greek list at a Greek restaurant, as long as somebody can answer questions intelligently. Restaurants with a list of unfamiliar wines must be able to discuss and explain the list in simple terms. Cuozzo thinks those restaurants are rare, but in my experience wine service has improved exponentially in the last 20 years. Most restaurants that offer unconventional lists do so because they love the wines and love to talk about them, sometimes too much. The crucial point for consumers is to feel free to ask questions and to insist on simple answers if the reply seems to verge on becoming a technical lecture. The enemy isn’t obscure wines or challenging lists. It’s fear of wine.


B4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

B5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


B6

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012

Insurance Continued from B1 Epple said a good time to consider life insurance is upon marriage. The purchase of that first home is also another time to assess. And all agree that anyone with children should buy life insurance. On the flip side, life insurance needs wane later in life, Epple said. Older couples who no longer have dependents and are secure in their retirement might have little need for such coverage.

What kind do you need? Life insurance largely falls into two categories. Term life insurance comes with a fixed time period. You buy an amount of coverage deemed right for your needs for a certain length of time — often ranging from five to 30 years — and pay regular premiums along the way. At the end of the term, coverage and payments end. Besides term, there is an array of policy types referred to as whole or permanent life insurance. There are many variants — universal life, variable life and equity indexed life, just to name a few. Permanent life insurance is what it sounds like: It lasts for a lifetime as long as the premiums are paid. But it includes a savings component in which part of your premium goes toward the policy and the rest goes into an investment. Later, you can borrow or take money from the policy. Mullins has a strong opinion about which to choose. “My recommendation is and will always be term life insurance,” he said. It’s cheaper, he said, and the tax-free investment strategies offered by permanent life insurance policies are now available in other products like Roth IRAs and, for college savings, 529 savings accounts. “Invest with an investment professional,” Mullins said. “Get life insurance from an insurance professional.” Epple said term life insurance will make sense for most people. But those with a considerable amount of wealth will want to consider permanent life insurance as part of estate planning, particularly to cover taxes.

How much do you need? Life insurance isn’t a onesize-fits-all proposition, said John Egan, managing editor for Web-based insurance shopping site Bankrate Insurance.com. So pinpointing how much coverage to buy will take some homework. “Buying an insurance product should not be taken lightly,” he said. “This isn’t something to do on your lunch break.” One common assumption, Egan said, is that a life insurance policy provided by your employer is sufficient. “The rule of thumb is that the basic group coverage at work is one times your salary, and experts say you need a lot more than that,” he said. The amount of coverage purchased — $500,000, $1 million or $2 million — might seem intimidating, but consider the amount of money it would take to pay off the mortgage, put children through college and provide for retirement. There are also other considerations. The need to pay for child care if a stay-at-home parent dies is one such instance. Mullins said he advises that people think what kind of interest earnings they can make by investing the policy. Coverage of $1 million, for instance, earning 4 percent will provide $40,000 in interest a year. While 4 percent might seem high right now, he said, historically it’s been a reasonable expectation. The amount of coverage needed will change over time, such as when children are no longer dependents or the house is paid off.

Legs

Resources • www.cbs.state.or.us/ins/ consumer/life-insurance/life. html and www.cbs.state. or.us/ins/consumer/lifeinsurance/lifeannuitycompany-reports.html — Oregon Insurance Division websites with various life insurance links, including to complaints made against companies, reports on the financial condition of companies and an employee who answers questions • BankrateInsurance.com, Insure.com and Accuquote. com — These three sites all provide ways to get quotes online and other information.

One approach, Epple said, is to buy a term policy after buying the first home, and then buy a second policy upon having children. People can buy more than one policy at a time, with the expirations occurring just as the needs decrease.

What factors matter? Just like other forms of insurance, life insurance rates are determined by actuarial tables. Companies offer the best rates when purchasers are young and healthy. If you buy right when you first need coverage, Epple said, you lock in that lower rate for the duration of the insurance, even on a 30-year term policy. Insurance companies will ask a lot of questions when assessing how much to charge for coverage, Egan said. A health exam is often required. And fibbing a bit isn’t an option, since you don’t want to give the company a reason not to extend the coverage when needed. Other factors might play into what rates you will pay. Egan said dangerous activities could drive up rates. “I think if one of your big hobbies is skydiving, then it will have an impact on your life insurance,” he said. It might therefore be even more important for people with special conditions or hobbies to shop around. “One insurance company may look at it differently than another one,” Egan said.

Where should I shop? The local insurance agency often offers life coverage. So do sources online, also staffed by licensed insurance brokers. Financial advisers might also be licensed to sell life insurance products. Egan recommended that if life insurance is part of estate planning, consulting a financial adviser might be the best route. Other than that, he said, where to buy depends on your circumstances and comfort level. “Some people are very comfortable doing business on the Internet,” he said. “Others still prefer a one-on-one interaction.” Internet sites aren’t able to offer better prices than an insurance agent — there is no analogy to book-buying on Amazon. What websites do provide, Egan said, is a great research tool to assess what is available out there. They also provide a way to investigate the insurance companies themselves. It’s prudent to look for a company that isn’t awash in consumer complaints or financially unstable (see “Resources”). “You should know who you’re doing business with,” Egan said. Given that prices aren’t going to be that different online, Epple said it’s worth working with an agent. An agent can answer questions, understand your needs and be there in case something does happen. “You really need to have somebody who wants to sit down and talk to you,” he said.

Continued from B1 Ever since Angelina Jolie bared her right leg on the Oscars’ red carpet in February (generating countless parodies), exposed legs, smooth and coltish, seem to have protruded at every turn. They rippled impressively at the Olympics and peeked from beneath the split long skirts that have been trendy this summer, and are a focal point for fall. “People want their legs and butts to look their best,” said Kate Albarelli, the creator of Figure 4. “It’s the complaint I’ve been hearing the most lately. You can always cover things up top with flouncy shirts, but the legs aren’t as easy.” She said her clients and students often point to toned celebrities, like Cameron Diaz and Fergie, as having the legs they want. And Jolie? “I never get Angelina,” Albarelli said. “She doesn’t have muscle tone. We’re not in the time of the waif look anymore.” A former ballerina, Albarelli recommends mixing up both range and tempo when exercising thighs and calves. “A lot of the traditional knee-bending exercises, like squats, don’t do much,” she said. “You have to vary the movement so you’re hitting 360 degrees of your leg muscle.” Not everyone is so eager to hit the gym. With fall merchandise already on store racks, some women are seeking quicker fixes. Dr. Adam Kolker is a Park Avenue plastic surgeon who performs microliposuction to contour legs. “Women tend to store fat in the upper outer thigh region, or what’s unfortunately called the saddlebag area,” he said. “There is never a substitute for hard work, but even if a woman is thin, it’s an area that is most diet- and exercise-resistant.” Kolker charges from $3,500 to $10,000 for the procedure; recovery can be as long as 12 weeks. “The results from microliposuction are fairly permanent,” said Robert Ano-

Makeup artist Troy Jensen will use Benefit Bathina and Natura Bisse leg care products on his celebrity clients. Brandon Showers New York Times News Service

Josh Haner / New York Times News Service

Angelina Jolie’s pose at the 84th Academy Awards spurred a trend for exercises and makeup for legs.

lik, a Manhattan dermatologist and clinical assistant professor at Weill-Cornell Medical College. “And there is a bit less downtime for the patient than liposuction because the rods that are used are smaller. But you’re still cutting the skin and running all the risks associated with surgery.” He prefers Cryolipolysis, or CoolSculpting, a noninvasive fat-freezing procedure. To those wary, perhaps, of both knives and machines, Reserveage Organics has found success marketing an over-the-counter supplement, Beautiful Legs. The capsules ($24.99 for 30) contain diosmin, a derivative of citrus rinds that originated in Europe and that the company claims promotes circulation and helps maintain smooth skin tone. They sell particularly well in the Northeast, said Naomi Whittel, the chief executive of Reserveage, adding, “Our primary customer base is the working woman who is sitting all day.”

A leg pedi? And then there is the temporary balm of self-tanner. At Salon AKS on Fifth Avenue, the “perfect leg pedicure” ($95), introduced in July, has been so popular that the own-

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

The COCC Community Learning Fall Schedule will hit your mailbox this week.

YOU’LL FIND INSPIRATION ON EVERY PAGE.

— Reporter: 541-617-7828, hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com

*

A dynamic mix of classes to inspire you year-round.

*Excludes Prior Sales

COMMUNITY LEARNING Registration opens Monday, Aug. 27 www.cocc.edu\continuinged 541.383.7270

ers are extending the service into the winter. Along with toenail polish, the 75-minute treatment features exfoliation, a hot stone calf massage and a full-leg application of St. Tropez’s bronzing mousse. “We’re getting a range of ages that come in for it,” said Susanna Romano, a partner in the salon. “Younger women like their legs darker than the rest of their body. They think it makes them look thinner. And older women, who are getting rid of their nude hosiery because it looks dated, find the mousse camouflages spider veins.” St. Tropez also created a targeted spray, called Perfect Legs ($18), which comes in an aerosol can and began selling in Sephora in May. On celebrity clients, Sophie Evans, St. Tropez’s skin-finishing expert, will spray a dark stream along the inner thigh for a leaner, lengthened illusion. “It’s also good for slimming down cankles,” she said. Hollywood professionals have other tricks up their sleeves. “First step is to moisturize,” said Ricky Wilson, a celebrity makeup artist for Dior. For his clients, who have included Jane Lynch and Sharon Stone, he will sometimes blend in cellulite cream or serum with body lotion before a red carpet event. “It’s only temporary,” Wilson said. “But it can help with bloat.”

Care for loved ones. Comfort for all. 541-389-0006 www.evergreeninhome.com

To cover imperfections, Wilson uses Dior Airflash foundation ($62), dispersed through a fine-spray nozzle. Like car paint, the makeup, which was created for the face, is misted on in light coats. Wilson prefers to go a shade darker on the legs, “because the face is normally lighter.” The foundation can “cover up sun damage, too,” he said. Troy Jensen, a makeup artist in Los Angeles who has worked on Elle Macpherson, Cameron Diaz and Kim Kardashian, prefers to sponge on makeup (he likes Revlon’s ColorStay face foundation) up to five shades darker than a woman’s natural skin tone. To finish, he’ll run a shimmer product, like Benefit’s Bathina rose-gold balm ($28), down the shins. “It’s like adding seams to the leg,” Jensen said. “It gives a beautiful line and there’s a pearly sheen to it that almost buffs out flaws.” Jensen finds “body makeup and highlighting skin from head to toe” is now part of his everyday job. “Not everyone, not even movie stars, are born with perfectly shaped legs,” he said. “That’s why we find a way to cheat the system.”

for appointments call 541-382-4900


LOCALNEWS

News of Record, C2 Editorials, C4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012

LOCAL BRIEFING Crews battle new wildfires Two fires at opposite ends of Central Oregon broke out on Tuesday, and crews were continuing to fight both blazes into the night. The Finley Fire, located about 5 miles southwest of Newberry Crater, was reported around 2:30 p.m. and had grown to an estimated 40 acres by nightfall. Heather Fisher of the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Team said local firefighters fought the Finley Fire with assistance from two helicopters and an aerial tanker Tuesday afternoon, and have completed a bulldozer line and burnouts around the less active side of the fire. Starla Green from the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office said a fire about 10 miles northeast of Madras was reported on the west side of the highway around 4 p.m., and jumped the highway heading east within 20 minutes. Fire crews from multiple agencies and the Bureau of Land Management responded and closed the highway, halting all traffic for approximately three hours. Green said five residents of a home on the east side of the highway were evacuated, but their home was no longer threatened as of 10 p.m. The fire was estimated to have burned 200 acres of grass, sagebrush and juniper as of Tuesday night. Crews will be on the fire through the night, Green said Tuesday.

C

Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

www.bendbulletin.com/local

ELECTION: DESCHUTES COMMISSIONER

Candidates tout goals at Rotary Club debate

Region doing more to charge up e-cars By Joel Aschbrenner The Bulletin

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Deschutes County Commissioner Alan Unger argued that his nearly four years on the commission gives him an edge over challenger and Bend City Councilor Tom Greene at a debate Tuesday before members of the Rotary Club of Greater Bend. Greene acknowledged his résumé in government is not as long as his opponent’s, but touted his service on 11 boards as a representative of Bend, and said he’ll ask the right questions to make Deschutes County more business-friendly and create jobs. See Debate / C5

Greene

Unger

For the growing number of electric car drivers around the state, Bend is somewhat of an island. There are a few charging stations around town, but the region’s arterial highways lack the infrastructure for electric cars to reach Portland and other destinations without running out of juice. But that’s changing.

Private developers and the state plan to build new high-speed charging stations that will connect Central Oregon with the state’s network of charging stations that span the Willamette Valley, the Portland area and the coast.

Built by 2013 Portland-based developer EV4 Oregon plans to build a solar-powered charging station in Madras that company

Just add students

owner Hans van der Meer said should be working by the end of year. The Madras City Council voted Tuesday to move ahead with a lease with EV4. The charging station will be a critical link providing electric car drivers the power needed to cross the Cascades on U.S. Highway 26 and reach a charging station the state is building at Government Camp. See Car-charger / C5

BACK TO SCHOOL www.bendbulletin.com/back2school

Bend police seeking robber A man who robbed a northeast Bend gas station Tuesday morning is still on the loose, police said. At 6 a.m., a masked man armed with a gun entered the AM/PM Arco station on Northeast Bellevue Drive and demanded money. An employee struggled with the man for possession of the gun, and at least one shot was fired. The suspect then fled in a car with an undisclosed amount of money. The employee was not shot, but sustained injuries in the struggle. The employee was treated at St. Charles Bend and released. The suspect is described as a white man about 5 feet 7 inches tall. He was wearing a white jacket and shorts. — Bulletin staff reports

More briefing, C5 News of Record, C2

FIRE UPDATE Reported for Central and Eastern Oregon. For the latest information, visit www.nwccweb .us/information/ firemap.aspx.

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

F

rom left, Elk Meadow Elementary School life skills teacher Rachael Astrella chats with Linda Bradetich and Angela Porterfield — both record clerks with Bend-La Pine Schools — and Elk Meadow first-grade teacher Allison Harris during the breakfast portion of a back-to-

school event at Bend High School on Tuesday morning.

Inside • More information on clinics for required immunizations, C2 • Open house events for schools across Central Oregon, C6

Bend-La Pine teachers, administrators ready for Day 1 By Ben Botkin The Bulletin

Erin Carroll is getting ready for her first year of full-time teaching. A new teacher on her first day feels a lot like a new student on the first day, she said. “I feel the same emotions and the same nervousness and the stress

and anxiety, but in a calmer manner because I know I’m prepared,” said Carroll, 25. Carroll was among some 800 staff members at Bend-La Pine Schools who gathered Tuesday at Bend High School for the annual back-to-school welcome for district employees. Next week, the district will open

its school doors for an estimated 16,410 students. Classes start Sept. 5 for students in first through ninth grade students and Sept. 6 for 10th through 12th grades. Superintendent Ron Wilkinson in a pep talk at the event highlighted successes of the past year. He also encouraged educators to aim for higher goals.

Bend-La Pine high school students last year earned more than 8,000 quarter credits in college-level courses, 913 of them took at least one Advanced Placement course and another 358 opted for at least one International Baccalaureate class. Both programs offer upper level classes. See Back-to-school / C6

Bend

1

Madras Bend

Baker City Burns

New students of an ancient trade

MILES 0

By Megan Kehoe

50

The Bulletin

Lakeview

2

1. Waterfalls 2 Fire • Acres: 11,786 • Containment: 50% • Cause: Lightning 2. Barry Point Fire • Acres: 93,071 • Containment: 100% • Cause: Lightning

OUR SCHOOLS, OUR STUDENTS Educational news and activities, and local kids and their achievements. • School Notes and submission info, C2

A

t first, students used the hammers timidly, swinging as if afraid each strike might destroy their work. After an hour of being blacksmiths, it was clear the students had overcome their fears as the sound of iron hitting iron made the air ring. “Hammering is the best,” Cody Dolf, 14, said from behind a pair of safety glasses. “It takes more strength than you think, but it’s really fun.” Last Wednesday, a group of seven

students spent the morning learning the trade in the heated warehouse of Orion Forge in southeast Bend. The class was offered through the Bend Park & Recreation District, and taught students the basics. Students got a chance to create artistic iron coat hooks that they could bring home. “There’s heat, smoke, color, ringing iron and blisters,” said Eric Denzler, the park district’s outdoor programs coordinator. “There’s all these things that make it so satisfying for the kids.” See Smithing / C2

Jeremy Lewis of Bend, left, owner of Raven Forge, teaches the basics of blacksmithing during a youth workshop at Orion Forge in Bend on Aug. 22. The workshop was organized by the Bend Park & Recreation District. Andy Tullis The Bulletin


C2

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012

STUDENTS STICKING IT TO ILLNESS

“They’re learning about how to make something with their own hands. They’re learning how to follow through on a project. That’s something that you seldom see these days.” — Hunter Dahlberg, owner, Orion Forge

Smithing Continued from C1 Maia Denzler, Eric Denzler’s daughter, suggested the idea for the workshop to her dad last winter after wanting to take her crafting abilities to the next level. “I’ve done a lot of Celtic jewelry,” Maia, 13, said. “But I wanted to turn it up a notch and do bigger things.” The workshop lasted into the early afternoon. Students worked in two stations: one inside the warehouse using the gas-fueled furnaces, and one outside the warehouse using a carefully controlled coal fire. Jeremy Lewis, a volunteer teacher and owner of Raven Forge, said that by using the coal fire, students got a lesson on the rich legacy of blacksmithing. “Nobody knows what coal is anymore unless they paid attention in science class,”

Lewis said. “It’s important for these kids to realize that the old ways still work.” After sufficiently heating the end of an iron rod in the furnace, students worked on hammering it into the shape of a leaf. Maia said that even though it may not look like it, blacksmithing takes a delicate hand. “You wouldn’t think it would make a difference, but an extra half-turn can change a piece completely,” Maia said. Hunter Dahlberg, the owner of Orion Forge, says that learning the trade of blacksmithing gave students a sense of empowerment. “They’re learning about how to make something with their own hands,” Dahlberg said. “They’re learning how to follow through on a project. That’s something that you seldom see these days.” — Reporter: 541-383-0354, mkehoe@bendbulletin.com

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Obsidian Middle School seventhgrader McKenna Hamilton, 12, gets an immunization shot from Donna Gilmore, a registered nurse with the Deschutes County Health Department, at M.A. Lynch Elementary School in Redmond

on Tuesday. Deschutes County Health Services will hold clinics for required immunizations today at the Ensworth School Based Health Center at 2150 N.E. Daggett Lane in Bend and Thursday at

the Sisters School Based Health Center at 1707 McKinney Butte Road in Sisters, according to a press release. For more information on immunization clinics and costs, visit www .deschutes.org/immunization.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Hunter Dahlberg, center, owner of Orion Forge in Bend, checks on Maia Denzler, 13, of Bend, during a blacksmithing youth workshop at Orion Forge in Bend on Aug. 22. Students made iron coat hangers.

S  N  REUNIONS USS Columbus CA-74/CG-12/SSN762 reunion; Sept. 12-16; Holiday Inn Portland Airport; for registration information, contact Allen R. Hope, president, 3828 Hobson Road, Fort Wayne, Ind., 46815-4505, 260486-2221 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. EST) or hope4391@frontier.com. Madras High School Class of 1972 will hold a reunion Sept. 15; free; 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Juniper Hills Park, East Ashwood Road and Northeast Bean Drive, Madras; contact 541-4104602, williams_lore@yahoo.com or mlhagman@madras.net.

TEEN FEATS Anthony Johnson, of Bend, recently attained the rank of Eagle Scout from the Boys Scouts of America. Johnson is a member of Varsity Team 120 in Bend and a senior at Summit High School. For his service project, he built a play area at Bethlehem Inn and installed a play structure that had been donated by the Ronald McDonald House. This project was completed in 2010. He plans to attend Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, for a year before serving a mission for his church.

Johnson is the son of Mark and Cindy Johnson, of Bend.

MILITARY NOTES Air National Guard Airman Stephen Johnson recently completed basic training at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio. Johnson is a 2010 graduate of Redmond High School and the son of Dena Johnson, of Terrebonne. Marine Corps Lance Corporal Christian Cullen recently completed the Marine Corps Basic Combat Engineer Course at Camp Lejeune, N.C. Cullen is a 2010 graduate of Clackamas High School and is the son of Patrick Cullen, of Portland, and Martha Cullen, of Bend.

COLLEGE NOTES The following local students received a degree from Western Oregon University: Bryan Danaher, Cassie Hickey, Chelsey Grigsby, Christian Voeller, Geoffrey Brummett, Heidi Maricle, Kristen Robbel and Tyson Vandehey, all of Bend; Matthew Bruck, of Madras; Carlie Severson, Elysia Kiyija and Haley Christensen, all of Prineville; and Lisa Holley, Sara Davis, Sean Maloney and Timothy Kirkman, all of Redmond.

How to submit

Story ideas

Teen feats: Kids recognized recently for academic achievements or for participation in clubs, choirs or volunteer groups. (Please submit a photo.) Contact: 541-383-0358, youth@bendbulletin.com Mail: P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

School briefs: Items and announcements of general interest. Contact: 541-633-2161, news@bendbulletin.com

Theft — A theft was reported at 10:41 p.m. Aug. 23, in the 61500 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 9:01 a.m. Aug. 24, in the 200 block of Northwest Florida Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 10:50 a.m. Aug. 24, in the 1500 block of Northwest Hartford Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 11:11 a.m. Aug. 24, in the 61000 block of Borden Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:23 p.m. Aug. 24, in the 100 block of Northwest Oregon Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and two arrests made at 3:35 p.m. Aug. 17, in the 20100 block of Pinebrook Boulevard. DUII — Sara Margaret Wiley, 31, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:42 a.m. Aug. 22, in the area of Northwest Greenwood Avenue and Northwest Hill Street. DUII — Tina Marie Knapp, 25, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:34 a.m. Aug. 24, in the area of Northeast Purcell Boulevard and Northeast Paula Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 9:11 a.m. Aug. 24, in the 61200 block of Gooseberry Place. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 11:20 a.m. Aug. 24, in the area of Princeton Loop and Aspen Ridge Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 3:32 p.m. Aug. 24, in the 19500 block of

Campbell Road. DUII — Timothy Edward Reeser, 54, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:25 p.m. Aug. 24, in the area of Northeast U.S. Highway 20 and Northeast 15th Street. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 1:20 a.m. Aug. 25, in the 600 block of Southeast Glengarry Place. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:38 a.m. Aug. 25, in the 100 block of Scalehouse Loop. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:18 p.m. Aug. 21, in the 3000 block of Northeast Quiet Canyon Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 4:43 a.m. Aug. 22, in the 400 block of Northeast Penn Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered, items stolen and an arrest made at 9:34 a.m. Aug. 22, in the 500 block of Southwest Forest Grove Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:15 p.m. Aug. 23, in the 2500 block of Northeast Neff Road. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:49 p.m. Aug. 23, in the 61100 block of U.S. Highway 97. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:24 p.m. Aug. 23, in the 1500 block of Northeast Providence Drive. DUII — Marina Mealani Brassfield, 18, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:29 a.m. Aug. 24, in the area of Northwest Harmon Boulevard and Northwest Jacksonville Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:06 a.m. Aug. 24, in the 1800 block of Northeast Yellowstone Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 10:37 a.m. Aug. 24, in the 61000 block of Honkers Lane.

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 11:50 a.m. Aug. 24, in the 1900 block of Northeast Red Rock Lane. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 12:26 p.m. Aug. 24, in the 800 block of Southeast Sixth Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:40 p.m. Aug. 24, in the 61100 block of Snowbrush Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 2:33 p.m. Aug. 24, in the 1900 block of Northeast Cobble Creek Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 2:55 p.m. Aug. 24, in the 600 block of Northeast Savannah Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:10 a.m. Aug. 25, in the 500 block of Northeast Bellevue Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 7:34 a.m. Aug. 25, in the 400 block of Northeast Franklin Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:01 a.m. Aug. 25, in the 400 block of Northeast Franklin Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:43 p.m. Aug. 25, in the 500 block of Northwest 13th Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 4:52 p.m. Aug. 25, in the area of Reed Market Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 9:27 a.m. Aug. 26, in the 61100 block of Lodgepole Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:21 a.m. Aug. 23, in the 62700 block of Promise Place. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:51 p.m. Aug. 22, in the 63300 block of Nels Anderson Road.

9:27 p.m. Aug. 27, in the area of Northwest Madras Highway. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Notice of Dismissal — The DUII charges against Jerald Lewis Cooper reported in The Bulletin on Feb. 28, 2012 were dismissed by the Deschutes County Circuit Court on June 26, 2012. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1 p.m. Aug. 26, in the area of East U.S. Highway 20 near milepost 32.

BEND FIRE RUNS Friday 12:38 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 19742 Manzanita Lane. 18 — Medical aid calls. Saturday 7:52 a.m. — Smoke odor reported, 21050 Clairaway Avenue. 11:26 a.m. — Natural vegetation fire, 1070 N.E. Purcell Boulevard. 4:27 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 61280 Parrell Road. 23 — Medical aid calls. Sunday 10:07 a.m. — Smoke odor reported, in the area of Starwood Drive. 11:46 a.m. — Unauthorized burning, 59999 Cheyenne Road. 21 — Medical aid calls. Monday 12:43 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 63030 Butler Market Road. 11:21 p.m. — Natural vegetation fire, area of Bear Creek Road. 21 — Medical aid calls.

Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at

Rebecca Nonweiler, MD, Board Certified

(541) 318-7311

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Student profiles: Know of a kid with a compelling story? Contact: 541-383-0354, mkehoe@bendbulletin.com

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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O N PORTLAND

I B 

Surgeon indicted in patient’s death

West Nile cases confirmed PORTLAND — Health officials say two cases of West Nile virus have been confirmed among humans in Oregon, in Coos and Malheur counties. Both people are recovering. Mosquitoes carry the virus. Most infections are mild, but Oregon health officials say the virus can cause severe symptoms such as encephalitis. It is rarely fatal. Nationally, health officials said last week that this year’s outbreak is one of the largest. Oregon authorities say the cases typically peak by the Labor Day weekend. They recommend steps to ward off mosquitoes such as eliminating standing water, wearing long sleeves and pants in infested areas, and using repellents at dawn and dusk.

Missing man’s body found in lake KLAMATH FALLS — Klamath County sheriff’s divers recovered the body of a missing Coos Bay man Monday from Four Mile Lake near Mount McLoughlin where he had been camping. The sheriff’s office says 61-year-old Andrew S. Kaufman apparently drowned. A raft he had been using has not been found. Kaufman was last seen Aug. 17. More than 50 searchers from several agencies and volunteer groups looked for him. The body was located by sonar in 85 feet of water. — From wire reports

By Steven DuBois The Associated Press

Michelle Cole / The Oregonian

Tom Barrows, landscape manager for the Oregon Department of Human Services, shows off one of more than a dozen traps set Monday for rats in the infested Barbara Roberts Human Services Building in Salem.

State human services building infested with rats By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Despite Oregon’s budget challenges, dozens of new residents have settled comfortably into a state office building in Salem. But these new residents aren’t dedicated public servants . A breeding colony of rats has infested the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, which houses workers for health and social services agencies. So far, the critters are winning this battle. “To date, 36 rats have been caught, all of which are second and third generation,” the email

Corvallis couple makes long work of sustainability By James Day Corvallis Gazette-Times

CORVALLIS — From the outside, Walt and Marielu Eager’s house resembles others that dot the hills of northwest Corvallis. But a closer inspection reveals some fascinating differences: The garage contains an electric Leaf and a Toyota pickup that Walt, 81, is converting to electric power. The family also owns a Toyota van that has used just seven gallons of gasoline in the past eight months. The house has galvanized steel siding that was painted at the factory and has not needed repainting since the house was built in 1979-80. It cost 20 percent more than conventional siding, but Walt Eager estimates that it already has paid for itself three times over. It’s an example of what he calls “low life cycle costs.” “We’ve got to develop an ethic where we go to contractors and ask them to build with low life cycle costs,” he said. “We can’t sustain this throwaway economy.”

Solar-charged cars The solar panels produce enough electricity to charge the vehicles and take care of other household uses. There is enough power left over in the late spring, summer and fall to enable the Eagers to forward a surplus to Consumer Power Inc. The utility returns the favor in late fall, winter and early spring, when the solar panels produce less energy. The house has 15-inchthick concrete walls that absorb solar energy and release it selectively into the interior at night. Most of the family’s food is grown in an organic garden Marielu Eager tends. The conifer trees they planted at the rear of the property further help to reduce the carbon footprint of the property and provide firewood for the winter.

PORTLAND — A Portland doctor whose patient died following a botched, late-night cosmetic surgery has been indicted on a manslaughter charge. Dr. Soraya Abbassian, 44, pleaded not guilty at Tuesday’s arraignment. She was released from the Multnomah County jail after posting $50,000 bail. Kathleen Haley, executive director of the state Medical Board, which suspended Abbassian’s license in December 2010, said it’s the first time in her 18 years with the agency that a doctor has been criminally charged in a case involving the death of an Oregon patient. Abbassian also faces a misdemeanor charge of recklessly endangering a second patient. Her attorney, Stephen Houze, declined to comment on the specifics of either case. Judith Desmarets, 59, died Dec. 19, 2010, four days after the attempted procedure at Abbassian’s clinic. An autopsy found she was given a fatal overdose of local anesthesia. Desmarets, a friend and

“There is so much waste. We hope that each person who tours here takes away something that they can use.”

said. “We have been unable to capture rodents of breeding age.” The note says the rodents tend to come out overnight, but a few have been seen during the day. Workers are being asked to help eradicate the rodents by removing all plants, taking food out of the building overnight and emptying open water containers at the end of each day. About 1,300 people work in the 20-year-old building. By cutting off easy access to food and water, officials hope they can drive the rodents to seek out food inside traps. “Together, we need to step

up our efforts so rats no longer find a welcoming home” in the building, two officials wrote in an email Aug. 16 to employees at the Department of Human Services and the Oregon Health Authority. “We’re doing our best to get rid of them,” said Randy Gangler, operations manager for the Department of Administrative Services. “We have our professional contractor engaged in that, and we feel that right now getting rid of all the food and water is our best bet. We’re trying to avoid using poison. That’s our absolute last resort if this doesn’t work.”

employee of Abbassian, sought to have hanging fat and skin removed from her abdomen in a surgery that began at 10 p.m., according to medical board documents and the prosecutor. There was no support staff present and the clinic was not equipped to handle a medical emergency. Desmarets complained of chest pain and shortness of breath after the doctor administered a local anesthetic in the abdomen area. She suffered a seizure and lost consciousness. Abbassian performed about 15 chest compressions and then called 911. Emergency personnel took Desmarets to a hospital, where she remained on life support until her death. The board suspended Abbassian the following day, saying “the decision to perform a surgical procedure on a personal friend late at night at her clinic without staff support displayed poor medical judgment and places her current patients at immediate risk of harm.”

7:30 AM - 5:30 PM MON-FRI 8 AM - 3 PM SAT. 541-382-4171 541-548-7707 2121 NE Division Bend

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2012

DEADLINES We will be closed Monday, Labor Day, Sept. 3, 2012 RETAIL & CLASSIFIED DISPLAY ADVERTISING DAY DEADLINE Monday 9/3...................................Wednesday, 8/29 4 p.m. At Home 9/4..................................Wednesday, 8/29 4 p.m. Tuesday 9/4........................................Thursday, 8/30 Noon Wednesday 9/5........................................Friday, 8/31 Noon

CLASSIFIED LINER DEADLINES

— Walt Eager, sustainable homeowner

Tuesday 9/4..............................Noon Saturday 9/1

Classifieds • 541-385-5809 The Eagers practice a sophisticated approach to sustainability, one that had its genesis in the oil embargo of 1973-74, when oil prices quadrupled. Walt Eager, an engineer, looked into the future. “I saw what was coming,” he said. “It was pretty clear that this wasn’t going to stop.” So they built their house on a hill and kept adding pieces — more solar panels, the electric vehicles, used recycled lumber to repair the deck — that increased their home’s sustainability. Their motto is reuse, modify and reuse or recycle. The household generates little trash, and much of what they do generate is used for composting. The family also takes an annual delivery of leaves from Allied Waste used for mulch.

‘Old is valuable’ “We need a new aesthetic,” Eager said. “Things don’t have to be replaced just because they are old. At 81, I am particularly anxious that society develops a new aesthetic that old is valuable. We need to become sustainable because ultimately it is beneficial to posterity and humanity in general.” The Eagers also are enthusiastic about sharing their knowledge by giving tours of the property (see info box). “There is so much waste,” Walt Eager said. “We hope that each person who tours here takes away something that they can use.”

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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012

E Voters should have final say on water project

T

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

B  M C G B  J C  R  C

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

here was an air of inevitability around the news that Central Oregon LandWatch has appealed a U.S. Forest Service decision to issue a permit for the city of

Bend’s water improvement project at Bridge Creek. Tying the other side into legal knots is, after all, an accepted tactic when trying to stop public agencies from acting in a manner with which you disagree. LandWatch and some others oppose the city’s plan to improve the existing Bridge Creek water system. Instead, some have argued, the city should focus its water supply efforts on digging new wells to tap into groundwater. They’ve complained about the process, questioned the results of reviews of that process and generally made clear they’ll be satisfied with nothing less than complete capitulation on the city’s part. We’ll agree that the city could have handled parts of its planning for the Bridge Creek improvements better than it did. At the same time, officials make a plausible case about why their chosen plan is the best way to go. Meanwhile, LandWatch is using old, familiar tactics. First it asked the state’s Land Use Board of Appeals to overturn a city resolution expressing its continued commitment to the Bridge Creek project. That request was denied on Aug. 16, as was another motion before LUBA. A third remains unresolved. Now comes the move to have the U.S. Forest Service rescind its per-

mit for the project. In its appeal, the land-use group throws up a fistful of charges, apparently hoping at least one will stick. They range from objections to the Forest Service’s failure to consider global warming in its decision-making to arguing that a city review of the project was inherently biased because the reviewer has a stake in the outcome. These are the sort of delaying tactics with which both LUBA and the Forest Service are all too familiar, unfortunately, and we believe they miss the point. In the end, it is the citizens of Bend who will pay for whatever water system finally is developed. In addition, they will pay for LUBA appeals, Forest Service appeals, and goodness knows what else. A far better resolution, it seems to us, is to ask those citizens to decide now what they want to do and then abide by that decision. A majority of Bend City Council seats must be filled in the November election, and voters should find out now where the various candidates stand on the Bridge Creek project, then vote for those whose views they share.

Politics shortchanged men’s health coverage

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he federal health care overhaul lists 22 preventive services that must be provided with no co-pay or deductible for women, 27 for children and 16 for adults. But exclusively for men? Zero. There’s no separate list. Many items on the women’s list are specifically related to female-only issues, and the adult list includes some services men would receive. But it’s hardly equal coverage. For example, sexually active women can get free HIV screening, but men are out of luck unless they are considered high risk. The women’s list includes well-visits to doctors and screenings for gonorrhea and HPV, but those are lacking from the adult list. Women get free contraceptives, including tubal ligations, while there’s no listing for vasectomies. And for male issues such as prostate cancer screening? Nothing. Why the difference? Kaiser Health News says it’s because women’s health groups focused on the coverage and men’s did not. “Groups that were really focused on the health of women were identifying specific gaps that they wanted to make sure were covered,� said Adam Sonfield, an

associate of the Guttmacher Institute, a research and advocacy organization. Sounds like a political decision, not a medical one. Ironically, the lack of free vasectomies could hurt women by discouraging men from getting one. The surgery for men is generally simpler and less expensive than women’s tubal ligations, experts told Kaiser, but the cost can get in the way. The coverage decisions also won’t help correct the existing disparity between men and women in getting regular check-ups. Kaiser reports that 66 percent of women ages 18-44 see a primary care practitioner while only 52 percent of men do so. The law requires insurance plans to provide listed services free of charge when the plan starts its new year, unless the plan was grandfathered because it made no other substantial changes. We’re not convinced the government should be requiring so many services to be offered without copays and deductibles, but we do think men’s health issues should get equal treatment with women’s.

My Nickel’s Worth Fluoridation makes sense I certainly agree with the Aug. 20, editorial supporting the fluoridation of water supplies in Oregon. Long overdue. This support generally mentions the positive effects water fluoridation would have for healthier teeth in children and fewer cavities. Usually not mentioned is the positive effect fluoride has on bone health in older aged people. For these reasons, I favor the fluoridation of our water supplies. It makes good health sense for our population and good financial sense. Conrad Weiler Camp Sherman

PERS problem will grow Public Employees Retirement System-wide contribution rates are about to increase by about one third, or $1 billion statewide — almost $700 per household — to feed the pension system rather than be used for much-needed public services. The base cost of PERS will reach a new historical high and will eat 25 to 30 percent of government employers’ payroll budgets. The PERS $16 billion unfunded pension liability is not merely the net sum of future payouts and incomes, it is the discounted present value based on some very hopeful actuarial assumptions. PERS rates are based on an optimistic view of the investment world. PERS assumes that its investments will earn an average of 8 percent every year. That didn’t pan out last year, when the fund earned 2.2 percent. And it wasn’t the case over five- or 10-year periods either, during which pension investment returns averaged 1.9 percent and 7 percent, respectively.

Given the state of the global economy, investors could be in for a long period of lower returns. If that’s so, Oregon PERS and other large public pension systems are understating the future out-ofpocket costs for each member, chronically shortchanging the system and then raising the local government contribution rates. I suspect Oregon’s reported unfunded pension liability will increase dramatically in the future, as the Governmental Accounting Standards Board recently adopted new rules to provide for a more accurate view of the assets and liabilities for pension funds across the nation. Bruce Dechert Bend

Don’t push your religion on me I am tired of writers like Kent Wieber, who defend coaches or anyone else praying to Jesus and invoking God during practice and games during public school activities. Save God and prayer for church teams where one can be surer that all present are believers of the same denomination. I grew up playing soccer for my school’s team and I, along with the other non-Christians on the team, felt like a second-class citizen when our coach invoked Jesus before games. Why? Because we held beliefs different from the coaches’ beliefs. I don’t think any particular religion has a place in public schools or in public school sports. I’d have more respect for Wieber if he were defending a Muslim’s, Jew’s, Sikh’s or atheist’s right to invoke their deities and beliefs during public

school activities. Would Wieber defend these people’s right to belief? I don’t know. You see, I am comfortable with my own religious beliefs, and what I want is not freedom from religion, I want freedom from Wieber, and people like him, trying to push their religion on me or my children in public school. Ethan Singer Bend

Computer glitch is not an excuse The State of Oregon Employment Department audit just released indicates that they overpaid the jobless in Oregon by $41 million. They have indicated that it was because of a computer software problem and fixes have been made to cut down on errors in future payments to the jobless. Why were no controls in place to catch double payments to the same person? I would think that they could run a weekly report and it could have identified double payments, using a person’s Social Security number. A computer glitch is not an excuse as they are only as good as the person programming them. Will anyone be held accountable for this fiasco, and will anyone lose their jobs? If they were working in the private sector, they would no longer have jobs. Can I use the “computer glitch� excuse when Turbo Tax tells me that I do not owe any federal or state income taxes? It is no wonder that citizens have lost faith in their government and their ability to manage our money. How sad for all of us. Chris Selby Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Central Oregon provides so many opportunities for fun By Ronald Wou d a hree years ago, my wife and I moved from Eagle River, Alaska, to Redmond. We wanted to have a better and more active life for ourselves in our “golden years.� We wanted warmer weather — be careful for what you wish for — more things to see and do and be able to stretch our limited income to simply enjoy life. Well today, we proudly proclaim, “we have done it.� Today, we proudly exclaim, “Thank you, Central Oregon.� In the last two months, we have been to two air shows, two quilt shows, two county fairs, two car show, on several scenic drives and ate

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at several excellent restaurants. The list of activities is quite longer, but we would like to expand our thoughts on three events that reaffirmed our decision to live in Central Oregon was the right one. These three events showed us some of the best of what Central Oregon has to offer — kindness, greatness and just plain fun. • The 18th Annual Sunriver Wings & Wheels Airport Fly-In. This event was free, with no admission or parking fees — something very uncommon nowadays. The numerous airplanes and automobiles to see were fantastic and would please any antique enthusiast or airplane aficionado. The aircraft and automobile owners were very friendly and informa-

I N M Y VIEW tive. There was a pancake breakfast that was so affordable that I am sorry that we had breakfast before we left home. • The 27th Annual Flashback Cruz 2012. This event was also free and had no admission or parking fees. At this event, we saw so many classic cars that we are glad we have a digital camera to record it. Drake Park is an excellent place for this event, as it offers space, shade and a place for badly needed rest. The owners and vendors were fun to talk to and made us feel like family. There was free music that completed this event.

• Prineville Airport’s Spirit of Aviation. We cannot believe this was another car/air show with no admission or parking fees. Once again, there were more cars and airplanes to see that we had never seen before. Once again, we met people that were extremely friendly and courteous. There were several food vendors at the event and one had the best snow cone we have had in a while. Once again there was a very reasonable breakfast that we missed out on. We must stop cooking before we go to these events so we might enjoy the local cuisine at a reasonable price. To sum it up for these three events and many more we have been to, we say thank you. You have shown us

more kindness and goodness than one thought possible. These three events are only the tip of the iceberg that Central Oregon has to offer. One only has to look at the local newspaper to find many more free or low-cost events. It seems to us that these events have made it a public policy that people come first and the financial rewards come later. Central Oregon and the state as a whole have so much to offer in both man-made and natural beauty. It is our sincere wish that one day we might see it all. If we sound like two kids in a candy shop, we are — and boy, is the candy sweet. — Ronald Wouda lives in Redmond.


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

O D N  Jack D. Dodson

OREGON NEWS

Slump in business closes medical marijuana eatery

August 31,1934 - August 24, 2012

A'Lisa Joy Weston, of Ferran, Utah Passed away July 28, 2012 Services: No services are planned at this time. Contributions may be made to:

A Memorial Account that has been opened up for her in her name for contributions: At Wells Fargo Bank A'Lisa Joy Weston

Bonnie Louise Peters, of La Pine June 2, 1937 - Aug. 25, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Celebration of Life gathering will take place on Saturday, September 1, 2012, at 1:30 p.m., at the Wagon Trail Homeowners Association Clubhouse.

Jeanne V. Owens, of Bend June 17, 1915 - Aug. 26, 2012 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541)382-5592; www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: 11:00 AM, Thursday, August 30, 2012 Mass of Christian Burial at St. Edward the Martyr Catholic Church, 123 Trinity Way, Sisters, OR. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

Tracie M. Alter, of Klamath Falls Dec. 30, 1981 - Aug. 26, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Celebration of Life potluck will take place at her parents’ home on Saturday, September 1, 2012, at 1:00 p.m., at 5208 Blue Mountain Drive, Klamath Falls. Contributions may be made to:

Spokes Unlimited, 415 Main Street, Klamath Falls, OR 97601, (541) 883-7547, in Tracie’s memory.

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254 Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

Jack Duane Dodson passed away at home in Albany, OR, on August 24, 2012. Born in Burns, OR, to Merle B. and Marie (Mitchell) Dodson on August 31, 1934, he graduated Burns Union High School in 1952. He moved to Salem in 1966, and then transferred to Newport, OR, where he resided for 36 years before returning to Burns upon retiring in 1994. In his retirement, he volunteered for the U.S. Forest Service maintaining hiking trails. Jack returned to Albany in 2004 to be closer to his children. Jack retired from the Burns unit of the Oregon National Guard and was a 24-year volunteer fireman, a 50-year member of Burns Masonic Lodge #97, and Burns Elks, American Legion Post # 63 and a member of Oregon Hunters Association. He enjoyed hunting, fishing, biking, hiking and beach-combing. Preceding him in death were his daughter, Pamela, his parents, Merle B. and Marie Dodson, and his brother, Richard Gene. Survivors include Arden, his wife of 55 years; daughter, Kym and husband, Billy of Broomfield, CO; sons, Michael of Albany, OR, Patrick and wife, Nancy of Dallas, OR, Christopher and wife, Stacey of Bend, OR; and grandchildren, Samantha, Stephanie, Austin, Alison, Krystal, Emily, Tiffany; and several nieces and nephews. A celebration of life will be held Sept. 15, 2012, at the Yaquina Bay Yacht Club, 750 SW Bay Blvd., Newport, Oregon 97365. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Evergreen Hospice, 1046 SW 6th Ave., Albany, OR 97321 or Newport Fire Department, 245 NW 10th St. Newport, OR 97365.

Jeanne Owens June 17, 1915 - Aug. 26, 2012 Jeanne was born in St. Norbert, Manitoba, Canada, on June 17, 1915, the tenth child of Bruno and Emilienne Verrier. Her mother died when she was eleven days old. When she was a small child an aunt and uncle, Oliva and Louis Roy, took her to Riverside, CaliforJeanne Owens nia. She married James Eston Owens on November 28, 1936. Jeanne was active in the community and in the Queen of Angels Catholic Church in LaSierra/Riverside. Jeanne moved to Bend in 1993, to be near her daughter, Donna. She became active at St. Edward the Martyr Catholic Church in Sisters and made many baby outfits for the abused girls at Grandma's House. She was preceded in death by her husband, Eston Owens; her daughter-in-law, Eilene Owens; her parents; seven brothers; and two sisters. She is survived by her son, Gene Owens of Watsonville, CA; and her daughter and son-in-law, Donna and Charlie Young of Bend. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701. Mass of Christian Burial will be at 11:00 a.m., on Thursday, August 30, at St. Edward, the Martyr Catholic Church, in Sisters, OR. Please visit www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com to leave online condolences.

D E 

 Deaths of note from around the world: Art Heyman, 71: Captain of the Duke University Blue Devils’ first Final Four basketball team in 1963. Died Monday in Florida. Reginald Bartholomew, 76: Unflappable U.S. diplomat who was entrusted with assignments in global danger zones and survived a bombing while serving as ambas-

sador to Lebanon during that country’s long civil war. Died Aug. 26 in New York City of cancer. Tomas Sedlacek, 94: Czech general who fought with the Allies in France, Britain and the Soviet Union during World War II and who later resisted the communist regimes in his own country. Died Monday in Prague. — From wire reports

C5

The Associated Press ASHLAND — An Ashland cafe that tried to cater to medical marijuana patients has closed its doors. When the Earth Dragon Edibles Restaurant & Lounge opened in April, it had a novel business model: It would serve only patients holding cards under Oregon’s medical marijuana laws. On the menu was Mongolian barbecue cooked with marijuana-infused grapeseed oil. While waiting for the cooks to make their meals, customers could belly up and take a toke from the free hash bar. Also available: cannabis-laced lollipops, cookies and ice cream. Ashland police Chief

Car-charger Continued from C1 And the state, after installing high-speed charging stations throughout the length of Interstate 5, is looking to expand the network east of the Cascades. There are plans for charging stations in Redmond and The Dalles, using a federal grant that funds the installation of charging stations outside of urban areas, said Art James, senior project director with the Oregon Department of Transportation’s Innovative Partnership Program. And to provide the link needed for electric car drivers to travel between Bend and Eugene, the state recently opened a charging station in Sisters, James said. Most electric cars can travel about 100 miles on a full battery, but for practical purposes, charging stations are needed about every 50 miles, Van der Meer said. Van der Meer’s charging station in Madras is set to go up at the new city hall and police station scheduled to open next year. EV4 proposed the charging station in the spring. City Councilor Jon Young said he thinks the charging station serves little purpose in Madras,

Debate Continued from C1 Unger, a Democrat elected to the commission in 2008 after serving eight years as mayor of Redmond, said he believed he knew county issues when he first joined the commission, but quickly realized how much he had to learn. Greene, a Republican whose experience in elected office began with his election to the council in 2008, would face a steep learning curve if elected to the commission, Unger said. Both candidates said they would like to see the timber industry return to prominence in Central Oregon, and expressed the belief that expanded logging is possible without clearcutting. Unger praised the “gappy-patchy-clumpy� ap-

“ Being open to the general public really hurt us. I don’t think the medical cardholders felt comfortable anymore.� — Kevin Wallace, co-owner, Earth Dragon Edibles Restaurant & Lounge

Terry Holderness and the city attorney at the time, Dave Lohman, said they thought the business model was illegal. A city ordinance barred business licenses to anyone violating federal law, which holds that marijuana is illegal, state law legalizing medical marijuana or not. So a week after the restau-

where there are few if any electric cars, but voted in favor of the lease because it will allow the city to meet a state requirement for renewable energy developments. The 2008 law requires that 1.5 percent of the cost of any public building worth more than $1 million be dedicated to solar energy developments. The charging station will be paid for by EV4 and will save the city from having to spend about $60,000 on solar developments, said City Manager Gus Burril. “I think it’s a winwin on most fronts for us.�

Other EV4 stations EV4 also plans to build charging stations in Bend at Northwest Crossing and in the Cascade Village Shopping Center. The company also is negotiating to build one at Indian Head Casino in Warm Springs, Van der Meer said. Bend officials declined Van der Meer’s proposal earlier this year to build charging stations on city property downtown. “They seemed to be lukewarm on the idea, while the reaction in Madras has been more than welcome,� he said. Bend city spokesman Justin Finestone said city officials were leery of sacrificing already scarce parking spots downtown to build a charging station. The city was also concerned that agreeing to a lease with EV4 without accepting

proach to forest management, a system that leaves some stands of trees in place to provide wildlife habitat while creating firebreaks through the selective harvest of other trees. Forests in the area surrounding Black Butte Ranch illustrate the approach he’d like to see taken in other forests. Greene said he would lobby the state and federal government for changes that could boost the local timber harvest and diversify the economy. The $1 million spent annually by the U.S. Forest Service on thinning and forest cleanup in the region does adequately remedy fire risks, he said, and local residents would be better served by an expanded timber industry with a payroll in the tens of millions. Unger and Greene endorsed the push to boost the supply of property suitable for industrial development in Central Oregon cities, and spoke admiringly of efforts to expand the

Browne snapped famous photo of burning monk New York Times News Service When a Buddhist monk set Malcolm Browne, a Pulitzer himself on fire in 1963 in proPrize-winning reporter whose test of the government of South four-decade career Vietnam, Browne included covering the FEATURED was the only reporter Vietnam War — and and he captured OBITUARY there, taking one of the most the stunning moment memorable photos of in a photograph. the conflict — and a second act In 1964, while working for as a science writer, died Monday The Associated Press, Browne in Hanover, N.H. He was 81. shared the Pulitzer for interThe cause was complica- national reporting with David tions of Parkinson’s disease, Halberstam, who was coversaid his wife. ing the war for The Times.

rant opened, the city rejected its application for a business permit. The cafe owners came up with an alternative business model. The restaurant would be open to the public at large, and the only pot to be cooked would be supplied by the medical marijuana cardholders themselves. The city issued a permit, and the restaurant reopened May 7. But business slumped, co-owner Kevin Wallace said. “Being open to the general public really hurt us,� Wallace told The Ashland Daily Tidings. “I don’t think the medical cardholders felt comfortable anymore.� The restaurant closed July 31. Wallace said he’s working to pay off about $10,000 in debts the restaurant accumulated.

offers from other developers would violate public project bidding rules, he said. In Oregon there are only about 1,400 electric cars on the road, but they are becoming more prevalent as carmakers release more electric models, James said. What electric cars lack in range, they make up for in costs, James said. At $4 a gallon, an average car burns about 20 cents of gas per mile, while an electric car uses about 2 cents per mile, he said. Charging speed is critical for long-distance travel, James said. Older charging stations, like those currently in Bend, can take up to six hours to fully charge a battery, while newer charging stations that utilize direct current technology take only 15 to 20 minutes, he said. “The fast-charge technology is kind of a game-changer,� James said. Van der Meer estimated that 80 percent of the power at his company’s charging stations comes from renewable resources. The station’s solar panels will provide enough electricity to charge about two cars a day. For additional charges, or charging at night, the station pulls power from the grid, which could be derived from coal, wind or hydro power, he said. — Reporter: 541-633-2184, jaschbrenner@bendbulletin.com

use of biomass for electricity generation. Similarly, both Unger and Greene said they welcome discussions of eliminating duplication of services provided by both Deschutes County and cities. Unger said the county is already providing services for cities in the area. Chipsealing and line striping on all city roads outside Bend is performed by county crews, he said, and the county’s building division handles plan review and inspections for Redmond and La Pine. Greene said he’d like to see Bend and Deschutes County explore the possibility of consolidating their road departments and vehicle maintenance shops. Perhaps, Greene said, the county shop could focus on servicing heavy equipment while the city would maintain light vehicles. — Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com

LOCAL BRIEFING Continued from C1

COCC appoints board member The Central Oregon Community College board Tuesday appointed Laura Craska Cooper of Prineville to fill a vacancy. Cooper will represent Zone 2 of the college’s district, which primarily encompasses Crook County. Cooper will take the oath of office Sept. 12 at the board’s next meeting. She replaces Dr. Joyce Lynn Garrett, who resigned last month. Cooper will serve through June 30, when the term expires. The position is one of four COCC board openings up for election on the May 2013 ballot. “I live in a community where the economy is top of mind for everyone,� Cooper said in a statement. “A strong community college is vital to rebuilding and diversifying our economy ... and I’m thrilled to be joining the team that is making that happen.� COCC board positions open on the May 2013 ballot are: Zone 1, which is in primarily Jefferson County; Zone 2, primarily Crook County; Zone 3, the city of Redmond and surrounding precincts; and Zone 4, one of three positions that represents the city of Bend and surrounding precincts.

Flags to lower for Armstrong Gov. John Kitzhaber has ordered all flags at public institutions in Oregon be flown at halfstaff Friday in honor of Neil Armstrong, who died last weekend. As requested by President Barack Obama, flags will be flown half-staff across the nation that day.

Traffic sting set for Prineville Police will conduct a pedestrian safety sting Thursday in downtown Prineville. The sting will be conducted between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Officers will be looking for distracted motorists using their cellphones while driving. The minimum fine for driving while using a cellphone is $142. Warning signs will be posted to caution drivers of the pedestrian safety operation. Once a pedestrian is in a crosswalk, drivers must remain stopped until the pedestrian clears the street. Failure to do so will result in a fine of $260. — Bulletin staff reports

Well shot! reader photos

• Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@ bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication. Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

2012 Labor Day DEADLINES For Monday, September 3, 2012 and Tuesday, September 4, 2012 PAID OBITUARIES .................................DEADLINE

Monday 9/3 ............................ Friday 8/31 1 p.m. Tuesday 9/4 ........................... Friday 8/31 1 p.m. DEATH NOTICES....................................DEADLINE

Monday 9/3 ........................... Saturday 9/1 noon Tuesday 9/4 .......................... Saturday 9/1 noon


THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012

C6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, AUGUST 29

THURSDAY Tonight: Mostly clear.

Today: Mostly sunny, chance showers.

HIGH

LOW

74 63/53

60/53

Cannon Beach 60/52

Hillsboro Portland 72/55 71/49

Tillamook 64/50

Salem

61/49

75/53

77/51

Maupin

77/44

Corvallis 74/51

Yachats 61/53

Eugene

Florence

74/49

68/49

71/46

74/50

Coos Bay

71/34

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

Crescent

Roseburg

63/52

Silver Lake

70/31

Port Orford 66/55

Gold Beach 62/54

82/51

Juntura 83/45

72/35

75/41

Jordan Valley

73/36

76/42

Frenchglen 81/47

Yesterday’s state extremes

Rome

• 94°

83/43

Ontario

77/43

Chiloquin

Medford

73/40

Klamath Falls 75/37

Ashland

61/51

83/53

Vale 85/53

Paisley 81/50

Brookings

72/42

74/44

77/35

Grants Pass 81/47

Unity

Christmas Valley

Chemult

75/51

John Day

Burns Riley

Fort Rock 73/35

70/32

65/27

Bandon

EAST Mostly sunny and pleasant condiOntario tions.

75/40

Nyssa

Hampton 69/34

CENTRAL Mostly sunny and pleasant conditions.

Baker City

Brothers 71/33

La Pine 72/33

Crescent Lake

66/51

74/37

73/42

66/41

Spray 78/45

Prineville 76/38 Sisters Redmond Paulina 72/34 72/36 74/37 Sunriver Bend

71/39

Union

Granite

69/34

71/38

Joseph

Mitchell 77/39

75/42

Camp Sherman

Enterprise

Meacham 74/44

70/46

Madras

68/37

La Grande

Condon

Warm Springs

Wallowa

65/35

72/46

76/48

76/43

74/50

79/49

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

80/53

72/48

73/52

61/50

Hermiston 78/50

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 61/47

72/50

79/52

The Biggs Dalles 75/50

72/54

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

75/47

• 32°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

83/51

74/44

Burns

85/39

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

• 113° Needles, Calif.

• 30° Truckee, Calif.

• 2.75” Rock Hill, S.C.

Honolulu 88/73

-10s

0s

Vancouver 65/55

10s Calgary 68/45

20s

30s

40s Winnipeg 91/68

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 83/62

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 72/54

Halifax 68/55 P ortland Bismarck To ronto Portland 76/54 99/69 76/58 72/55 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 91/73 Billings 84/67 Boise 75/60 Buffalo Rapid City 100/56 Detroit 80/46 76/56 New York 100/69 77/62 82/65 Des Moines Cheyenne Philadelphia 97/70 Chicago Salt Lake 94/59 Columbus 83/60 84/70 City Omaha San Francisco 82/58 Washington, D. C. 96/65 94/67 65/54 84/64 Denver Louisville Kansas City 94/62 88/64 96/66 St. Louis Las Charlotte 93/66 Nashville 85/69 Vegas Albuquerque 90/69 Los Angeles 105/83 Oklahoma City Little Rock 90/63 77/67 94/66 92/73 Phoenix Atlanta 107/84 83/72 Birmingham Dallas Tijuana 84/73 94/71 84/68 New Orleans Orlando 84/79 Houston 93/75 Chihuahua 95/75 84/64 Miami 91/79 Monterrey La Paz 102/75 96/78 Mazatlan Anchorage 92/78 60/49 Juneau 62/40

FRONTS

Back-to-school Continued from C1 Wilkinson also pointed to improved scores in the ACT College Placement Exam. The district scored a 20.3 composite score, 0.3 points over 2009, when the district started paying for all its juniors to take the exam. The district uses the exam results as a measure of student academic progress. Bend-La Pine’s averages are lower than the 2012 state composite score of 21.4. The district’s composite accounts for all 11th-grade students, as opposed to the state composite, which only accounts for

Mostly sunny.

HIGH LOW

HIGH LOW

82 40

Mostly sunny.

HIGH LOW

78 40

81 40

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .5:28 a.m. . . . . . 7:28 p.m. Venus . . . . . .2:41 a.m. . . . . . 5:28 p.m. Mars. . . . . .11:27 a.m. . . . . . 9:45 p.m. Jupiter. . . . .11:44 p.m. . . . . . 2:55 p.m. Saturn. . . . .10:36 a.m. . . . . . 9:39 p.m. Uranus . . . . .8:43 p.m. . . . . . 9:10 a.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77/46 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.04” Record high . . . . . . . . 95 in 1929 Average month to date. . . 0.43” Record low. . . . . . . . . 30 in 1960 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.61” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Average year to date. . . . . 6.71” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.29.96 Record 24 hours . . .0.19 in 1975 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:26 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:45 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:27 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:44 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 6:30 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 4:25 a.m.

Moon phases Full

Last

New

First

Aug. 31 Sept. 8 Sept. 15 Sept. 22

OREGON CITIES

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Wednesday Thursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97......Ext. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.....High Redmond/Madras .......High

Astoria . . . . . . . .66/51/0.00 Baker City . . . . . .90/38/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .66/47/0.00 Burns. . . . . . . . . .87/32/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .78/49/0.00 Klamath Falls . . .80/38/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . MM/MM/NA La Pine . . . . . . . .78/38/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .61/52/0.00 North Bend . . . . .70/48/0.00 Ontario . . . . . . . .94/50/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .83/52/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .77/62/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .78/45/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .80/43/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .79/52/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .77/52/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .80/45/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .82/61/0.00

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . .63/53/sh . . . . . .65/55/c . . . . .75/40/s . . . . . .80/42/s . . . .61/51/pc . . . . .64/53/pc . . . . .79/41/s . . . . . .84/44/s . . . .74/49/pc . . . . .77/48/pc . . . . .75/37/s . . . . . .81/41/s . . . . .74/44/s . . . . . .81/45/s . . . .72/33/pc . . . . . .76/30/s . . . . .81/50/s . . . . . .86/54/s . . . . .61/50/c . . . . . .61/50/c . . . .63/51/pc . . . . . .64/51/c . . . . .83/53/s . . . . . .85/55/s . . . .79/49/pc . . . . . .81/48/s . . . .72/55/pc . . . . .73/56/pc . . . .76/38/pc . . . . . .79/43/s . . . . .75/35/s . . . . . .79/41/s . . . .75/51/pc . . . . . .78/50/s . . . .73/52/pc . . . . .76/50/pc . . . .72/36/pc . . . . . .77/34/s . . . .77/51/pc . . . . . .82/52/s

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT Sisters ..............................High La Pine................................Ext. Prineville...........................Ext.

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,460 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119,302 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 70,961 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 23,312 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104,233 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 431 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . 1,470 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . 99 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 2,053 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . NA Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 224 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 15.8 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 5

POLLEN COUNT

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

Saskatoon 82/55

Seattle 67/54

SUNDAY

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

Mostly sunny.

81 40

WEST Partly to mostly cloudy skies can be expected today.

Astoria

SATURDAY

Mostly sunny.

HIGH LOW

37

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

FRIDAY

college-bound seniors. Wilkinson said the testing of younger students doesn’t hinder the push for further improvement. He said his dream is that the district will reach the point where the average scores of all students tested equals the state and national averages.

‘Batteries charged’ For teachers, the start of the school year is a chance to start fresh, Wilkinson said. “It’s a chance to have batteries charged and come out in full force because teachers work awfully hard,” Wilkinson said. Of course, educators’ efforts

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .93/69/0.00 . . . 91/65/s . . 92/70/s Akron . . . . . . . . . .80/67/0.00 . . . 80/51/s . . 86/58/s Albany. . . . . . . . . .82/68/0.72 . . . 76/51/s . . 82/58/s Albuquerque. . . . .91/66/0.00 . . . 90/63/s . . 90/65/s Anchorage . . . . . .65/43/0.00 . . . 60/49/s . . .57/50/r Atlanta . . . . . . . . 90/74/trace . . . 83/72/t . . .82/71/t Atlantic City . . . . .87/75/0.00 . . . 82/60/s . . 80/72/s Austin . . . . . . . . . .95/74/0.00 . .96/74/pc . 97/73/pc Baltimore . . . . . . .89/73/0.03 . . . 83/58/s . . 87/67/s Billings . . . . . . . . .99/61/0.00 . .100/56/s . . 81/54/s Birmingham . . . . .83/73/0.27 . . . 84/73/t . . .83/74/t Bismarck. . . . . . . .91/65/0.12 . .99/69/pc . . 86/60/s Boise . . . . . . . . . . .95/62/0.00 . . . 80/46/s . . 81/48/s Boston. . . . . . . . . .86/68/0.15 . . . 75/60/s . . 82/66/s Bridgeport, CT. . . .88/75/0.05 . . . 77/59/s . . 79/65/s Buffalo . . . . . . . . .80/64/0.00 . . . 76/56/s . . 83/66/s Burlington, VT. . . .80/68/0.02 . .72/54/pc . . 80/61/s Caribou, ME . . . . .74/57/0.29 . .68/50/pc . 76/57/pc Charleston, SC . . .78/74/2.30 . . . 86/73/t . . .86/73/t Charlotte. . . . . . . .87/72/0.00 . . . 85/69/t . . .84/68/t Chattanooga. . . . .85/69/0.00 . . . 87/69/t . . .88/71/t Cheyenne . . . . . . .90/57/0.02 . .94/59/pc . . 91/58/s Chicago. . . . . . . . .86/63/0.00 . . . 84/70/s . . 92/69/s Cincinnati . . . . . . .90/63/0.00 . . . 85/57/s . . 88/65/s Cleveland . . . . . . .78/66/0.00 . . . 75/59/s . . 84/64/s Colorado Springs .92/58/0.00 . . . 91/59/s . . 89/57/s Columbia, MO . . .97/65/0.00 . . . 95/65/s . . 96/65/s Columbia, SC . . . .84/75/0.32 . . . 84/73/t . . .87/71/t Columbus, GA. . . .91/75/0.02 . . . 87/73/t . . .87/73/t Columbus, OH. . . .86/65/0.00 . . . 82/58/s . . 87/66/s Concord, NH. . . . .86/66/0.21 . . . 78/47/s . . 85/53/s Corpus Christi. . .101/80/0.00 . . .92/75/c . 95/80/pc Dallas Ft Worth. . .95/76/0.00 . . . 94/71/s . . .95/73/t Dayton . . . . . . . . .85/61/0.00 . . . 83/58/s . . 88/65/s Denver. . . . . . . . . .96/65/0.00 . . . 94/62/s . . 91/59/s Des Moines. . . . . .94/68/0.00 . . . 97/70/s . . 99/64/s Detroit. . . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . . . 77/62/s . . 84/66/s Duluth. . . . . . . . . .77/53/0.00 . . . 83/68/s . 90/63/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . . .92/70/0.00 . . . 93/70/s . . 93/70/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . .58/42/0.00 . . .61/44/c . . 67/47/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .91/59/0.00 . . . 95/71/s . 90/63/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . . .81/50/0.07 . . . 79/53/t . . .77/54/t

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .81/60/0.00 . . . 82/59/s . . 90/64/s Green Bay. . . . . . .80/57/0.00 . . . 84/67/s . . 92/66/s Greensboro. . . . . .89/71/0.00 . .85/66/pc . 84/67/pc Harrisburg. . . . . . .86/72/0.11 . . . 80/55/s . . 84/63/s Hartford, CT . . . . .86/72/0.19 . . . 79/51/s . . 83/61/s Helena. . . . . . . . . .97/53/0.00 . . . 86/48/s . . 82/50/s Honolulu. . . . . . . .87/74/0.00 . . . 88/73/s . . 88/73/s Houston . . . . . . . .97/78/0.00 . .95/75/pc . . .96/76/t Huntsville . . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . . . 85/72/t . . .85/71/t Indianapolis . . . . .84/61/0.00 . . . 86/61/s . . 88/66/s Jackson, MS . . . . .88/75/0.01 . . . 83/75/t . . .86/75/t Jacksonville. . . . . .91/75/0.08 . . . 89/76/t . . .89/74/t Juneau. . . . . . . . . .54/52/0.83 . .62/40/pc . 60/44/pc Kansas City. . . . . .95/64/0.00 . . . 96/66/s . . 96/66/s Lansing . . . . . . . . .80/55/0.00 . . . 82/59/s . . 90/63/s Las Vegas . . . . . .105/79/0.00 105/83/pc 102/80/pc Lexington . . . . . . .89/71/0.00 . . . 84/61/s . . 89/70/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .97/60/0.00 . . . 95/65/s . . 94/63/s Little Rock. . . . . . .94/78/0.00 . .92/73/pc . . .88/74/t Los Angeles. . . . . .79/67/0.00 . .77/67/pc . 75/66/pc Louisville. . . . . . . .92/70/0.00 . . . 88/64/s . . 90/70/s Madison, WI . . . . .86/56/0.00 . .90/66/pc . . 93/66/s Memphis. . . . . . . .95/79/0.00 . . . 91/73/t . . .87/75/t Miami . . . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . .91/79/pc . . .91/79/t Milwaukee . . . . . .76/65/0.00 . .82/68/pc . . 88/67/s Minneapolis . . . . .84/66/0.00 . . . 91/73/s . 100/70/s Nashville. . . . . . . .90/72/0.00 . .90/69/pc . . .88/72/t New Orleans. . . . .86/78/0.30 . . . 84/79/t . . .88/78/t New York . . . . . . .87/73/0.14 . . . 82/65/s . . 85/68/s Newark, NJ . . . . . .89/75/0.06 . . . 81/63/s . . 86/68/s Norfolk, VA . . . . . .91/72/1.63 . .84/65/pc . . 84/66/s Oklahoma City . . .93/72/0.00 . . . 94/66/s . . 94/69/s Omaha . . . . . . . . .95/68/0.00 . . . 96/65/s . . 95/63/s Orlando. . . . . . . . .89/75/0.38 . . . 93/75/t . . .92/75/t Palm Springs. . . 108/83/trace 106/85/pc . 104/83/t Peoria . . . . . . . . . .89/63/0.00 . . . 90/64/s . . 91/64/s Philadelphia . . . . .89/75/0.17 . . . 83/60/s . . 87/68/s Phoenix. . . . . . . .109/86/0.00 107/84/pc 106/85/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . . .83/66/0.00 . . . 79/52/s . . 84/59/s Portland, ME. . . . .84/69/0.08 . . . 76/54/s . 82/58/pc Providence . . . . . .85/70/0.15 . . . 78/56/s . . 82/63/s Raleigh . . . . . . . . .87/73/0.00 . . . 84/67/t . 85/68/pc

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .100/63/0.00 100/69/pc . 87/62/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . . .91/51/0.00 . . . 88/54/s . . 91/54/s Richmond . . . . . . .91/73/0.00 . . . 85/63/s . . 86/65/s Rochester, NY . . . .79/65/0.00 . . . 75/54/s . . 85/65/s Sacramento. . . . . .93/56/0.00 . . . 94/60/s . . 95/58/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .93/66/0.00 . . . 93/66/s . . 94/69/s Salt Lake City . . . .98/74/0.00 . .94/67/pc . 91/69/pc San Antonio . . . .100/77/0.00 . .97/74/pc . 99/75/pc San Diego . . . . . . .80/68/0.00 . .81/71/pc . 79/70/pc San Francisco . . . .76/57/0.00 . . . 68/54/s . . 67/54/s San Jose . . . . . . . .84/59/0.00 . . . 76/56/s . . 77/56/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .88/56/0.00 . . . 82/55/s . 83/58/pc

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .83/77/0.92 . . . 87/73/t . . .87/73/t Seattle. . . . . . . . . .73/55/0.00 . .67/54/sh . 69/52/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . . .99/68/0.02 . . . 99/69/s . 101/66/s Spokane . . . . . . . .82/53/0.00 . .71/46/pc . . 74/49/s Springfield, MO . .92/60/0.00 . . . 92/64/s . . 91/67/s Tampa. . . . . . . . . .89/80/0.01 . . . 88/78/t . . .91/78/t Tucson. . . . . . . . .102/76/0.00 102/75/pc 101/75/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .94/65/0.00 . . . 94/69/s . 94/70/pc Washington, DC . .91/75/0.03 . . . 84/64/s . . 88/68/s Wichita . . . . . . . . .94/63/0.00 . . . 94/65/s . . 94/66/s Yakima . . . . . . . . .84/52/0.00 . .79/51/pc . . 79/50/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .109/87/0.00 105/82/pc . 104/82/t

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .72/57/0.00 . .70/60/sh . 67/56/sh Athens. . . . . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . . . 90/69/s . . 86/72/s Auckland. . . . . . . .59/46/0.00 . .59/49/pc . 59/46/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .113/79/0.00 . .113/83/s . 111/80/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .95/77/0.00 . . . 86/77/t . . .87/79/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .93/70/0.00 . . . 92/68/s . . 91/66/s Beirut . . . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . . 87/77/s . . 87/78/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .75/48/0.00 . .79/60/pc . . .76/57/t Bogota . . . . . . . . .64/50/0.00 . .65/54/sh . 69/51/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .79/45/0.00 . .84/59/pc . . 88/59/s Buenos Aires. . . . .59/34/0.00 . .61/50/pc . . 66/54/s Cabo San Lucas . .91/77/0.00 . .91/78/pc . . 92/79/c Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .93/75/0.00 . . . 93/75/s . . 92/75/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .86/59/0.00 . .68/45/sh . 69/40/pc Cancun . . . . . . . . .86/75/0.65 . . . 88/77/t . . .89/77/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . .67/49/pc . 59/45/pc Edinburgh. . . . . . .66/54/0.00 . .65/48/sh . 57/42/pc Geneva . . . . . . . . .79/54/0.00 . . . 85/60/t . . .74/57/t Harare. . . . . . . . . .73/50/0.00 . . . 76/47/s . . 77/48/s Hong Kong . . . . . .95/84/0.00 . . . 91/81/t . . .91/81/t Istanbul. . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . . . 76/67/s . . 83/71/s Jerusalem . . . . . . .85/68/0.00 . . . 86/67/s . . 85/66/s Johannesburg. . . .72/55/0.00 . . . 77/51/s . . 80/52/s Lima . . . . . . . . . . .64/59/0.00 . .68/61/pc . . 68/61/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . .76/62/pc . . 79/63/s London . . . . . . . . .73/57/0.00 . .67/56/sh . 67/48/sh Madrid . . . . . . . . .91/59/0.00 . .89/73/pc . 88/53/pc Manila. . . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . . 81/75/t . . 82/76/c

Mecca . . . . . . . . .104/86/0.00 . .107/87/s . 108/87/s Mexico City. . . . . .75/59/0.00 . . . 74/55/t . . .74/54/t Montreal. . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . . . 78/61/s . 81/64/pc Moscow . . . . . . . .61/59/0.00 . .59/52/sh . 62/49/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . . .79/54/0.00 . .74/55/sh . 77/54/pc Nassau . . . . . . . . .88/82/0.00 . . . 90/81/t . . .91/81/t New Delhi. . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . . 97/83/t . . .98/84/t Osaka . . . . . . . . . .93/79/0.00 . . . 90/80/t . . .92/78/t Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .57/45/0.00 . .66/52/pc . 59/52/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . . .73/64/0.00 . . . 79/57/s . 83/64/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . .75/61/pc . 72/53/sh Rio de Janeiro. . . .72/68/0.00 . .79/62/sh . 77/63/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . . . 85/68/s . . 87/71/s Santiago . . . . . . . .72/43/0.00 . . .68/51/c . . 67/52/c Sao Paulo . . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . .68/61/sh . 67/56/pc Sapporo . . . . . . not available . .82/71/pc . 82/68/pc Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .84/73/0.00 . . . 84/73/t . 84/73/sh Shanghai. . . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . . . 89/77/t . 91/79/pc Singapore . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . . . 86/80/t . . .85/80/t Stockholm. . . . . . .61/36/0.00 . .68/55/pc . 70/60/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . . .75/48/c . 68/50/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .84/79/0.00 . . . 90/78/t . . .91/81/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . . . 88/73/s . . 89/75/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . .91/77/pc . . .93/78/t Toronto . . . . . . . . .77/64/0.00 . . . 76/58/s . . 85/65/s Vancouver. . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . .65/55/sh . 67/53/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . . .79/48/0.00 . .80/60/pc . 82/58/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . . .70/46/0.00 . . . 75/55/s . . 78/55/s

didn’t cease entirely during the summer. At La Pine High School, a new summer program — High School 101 — offered incoming freshmen a chance to take classes and get familiar with their new school. About 25-30 students took advantage of the program, which included exercises and field trips. High School 101 was a fun opportunity to work with small groups of students and get them ready for the transition, said Kendra Munro, a language arts teacher at La Pine High School. — Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

Open houses for Central Oregon schools BEND-LA PINE SCHOOLS • Amity Creek Magnet School: None • Bear Creek Elementary School: Thursday, 4-6 p.m. • Buckingham Elementary School: Sept. 20, 6-7:30 p.m. • Elk Meadow Elementary School: Thursday, 4:30-6 p.m. • Ensworth Elementary School: Thursday, 4:30-6 p.m. • High Lakes Elementary School: Thursday, 3 p.m. • Highland Magnet School: Today, 3-5 p.m. • Juniper Elementary School: Today, 5 p.m. • La Pine Elementary School: Sept. 13, 6-7:30 p.m. • Lava Ridge Elementary School: Sept. 13, 6-7:30 p.m. • Pine Ridge Elementary School: Thursday, 4:30-6 p.m. • Ponderosa Elementary School: Thursday, 2:30-4 p.m. • R.E. Jewell Elementary School: Today, 4:30-6 p.m. • Rosland Elementary School: Sept. 13, 5:30-7:30 p.m. • Three Rivers Elementary School: Sept. 27, 5-7 p.m. • Westside Village Magnet School: Thursday, 4 p.m. • William E. Miller Elementary School: Thursday, 2:30-4 p.m. • Cascade Middle School: Sept. 18, 6-8 p.m. • High Desert Middle School: Sept. 20, 6 p.m. • Rimrock Expeditionary Alternative Learning Middle School: Contact the school • La Pine Middle School: Sept. 13, 6-7:30 p.m.

• Pilot Butte Middle School: Today, 6-7 p.m. • Sky View Middle School: Sept. 13, 6-7:30 p.m. • Bend High School: Sept. 17, 7-8:30 p.m. • La Pine High School: Sept. 13, 6-7:30 p.m. • Marshall High School: Sept. 19, 5:30-7:30 p.m. • Mountain View High School: Sept. 17, 7-9 p.m. • Summit High School: Sept. 19, 6 p.m.

CROOK COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT • Crook County High School: None • Pioneer Alternative High School: Sept. 18, 4:30-6 p.m. • Crook County Middle School: Sept. 18, 7-8:30 p.m. • Crooked River Elementary School: Today, 3-6 p.m. • Cecil Sly Elementary School: Sept. 6, 5-7 p.m. • Ochoco Elementary School: Sept. 13, 6-7 p.m. • Paulina Elementary School: Sept. 12, 7 p.m. • Powell Butte Community Charter School: Sept. 18, 6:30 p.m.

Sept. 27, 6-7:30 p.m. • Warm Springs Elementary School: Sept. 13, 5:30-7 p.m. • Metolius Elementary School: Sept. 25, 6-7:30 p.m. • Jefferson County Middle School: Sept. 18, 6-7:30 p.m. • Madras High School: Sept. 10, 5:30-7 p.m.

/ PER MO. 36 MO. Lease. MSRP $36,265. Sale Price $33,995. $3,403 Due at signing. On Approved Credit. No Security Deposit. 10,000 Miles/year. Residual Amount $20,246.40. Excludes tax, title, & MV fees. VIN: 117007

REDMOND SCHOOL DISTRICT • John Tuck Elementary School: TBA • Tom McCall Elementary School: TBA • M.A. Lynch Elementary School: Sept. 25, 5:30-7:30 p.m. • Sage Elementary School: Sept. 27, 5:30-8 p.m. • Vern Patrick Elementary School: Sept. 27, 5:30-7 p.m. • Terrebonne Community School: Sept. 10, 8-8:45 a.m.; Sept. 18, 6-7:30 p.m. • Obsidian Middle School: Sept. 20, 6-8 p.m. • Elton Gregory Middle School: Sept. 20, 6-8 p.m. • Redmond High School: None • Ridgeview High School: None • Redmond Proficiency Academy: Thursday, 4:30-6 p.m.

/ PER MO. 84 MO. Purchase. MSRP $42,410. $2,500 Due at signing. 2.49% On Approved Credit. Excludes tax, title, & MV fees. VIN: 2366435

SISTERS SCHOOL DISTRICT CULVER SCHOOL DISTRICT • All grades: Sept. 19, 6:30-8 p.m., in the main gym

JEFFERSON COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT • Buff Intermediate School: Sept. 20, 6-7:30 p.m. • Madras Primary School:

• Sisters Elementary School: Sept. 30, 3:30-4:30 p.m. • Sisters Middle School: Thursday, fifth- and sixthgraders, 4:45-6 p.m.; seventhand eighth-graders 6-7 p.m. • Sisters High School: None

SMOLICH VOLVO 1865 North East Highway 20 | Bend, OR | (541) 389-1177 www.smolichvolvo.com

Expires 8/31/12


SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 MLB, D3 College football, D4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012

GOLF Father, son win Oregon pro event ALOHA — Father’s Day is in June, but Tuesday felt like it for Jay Haas at Peter Jacobsen’s Umpqua Bank Challenge. Haas teamed with his son, Bill, to shoot a best-ball score of 17-under 55 to win the 36-hole tournament by eight strokes over Scott McCarron and Steve Elkington at The Reserve Vineyards and Golf Club. The Haas duo shot a two-round score of 26under 118, the lowest score during the 18-year history of tje Umpqua Bank and Fred Meyer challenges. Jay Haas had a front row seat to a spectacular performance put on by Bill, who shot 60 with his own ball. They were 15 under through the first 14 holes and didn’t make a par until the par4 15th hole. “He was obviously on today. As any parent can relate, having any son or daughter do well, come into the family business and show out like that, that’s a treat for me,� Haas said. Bill Haas was 12 under through 14 holes, then made four pars to finish out the round. “Certainly would have liked to get one more for the old 59 number. It would have been unofficial, but it certainly was fun,� the younger Haas said. Eight two-player teams, with players from the PGA, LPGA and Champions tours, competed in the twoday event. Kyle Stanley and University of Oregon coach Casey Martin finished third, nine strokes back. Jacobsen and Lee Trevino placed seventh at 9 under.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

PREP VOLLEYBALL: SEASON PREVIEW

From left, Summit’s Emma Dahl, Dani Taylor and Laney Hayes anchor the front line of the defending Class 5A state volleyball champs.

Summit, Crook County set to defend state titles By Beau Eastes

Inside

The Bulletin

Summit High has its work cut out this season if the Storm hope to repeat as Class 5A state volleyball champions. Six of the eight Summit players who made an appearance in last year’s championship final against West Albany have graduated, including all-state first-team selections Gabby Crowell — 5A’s player of the year — and Hannah Harrer.

Alex McDougall / The Bulletin

Small, but still strong • The field for the Pacific Amateur Golf Classic continues to dwindle, but golfers praise the Central Oregon event And the 49-year-old’s playing partners were fun, too. REDMOND — Jeff Walker “I didn’t struggle as much so was noticeably in a light mood it was more enjoyable,â€? Walker, as he milled about behind the who lives in Spokane, Wash., clubhouse of Eagle Crest Resaid while flashing a smile TEE TO sort’s Ridge Course. under sunny though slightly GREEN He had just played to his smoky skies. “And the two liking in Tuesday’s first round guys I was paired with I never of the Golf World Pacific Amamet before, but we had a blast. teur Golf Classic — this after struggling We all jelled well together and the over the weekend at some of Central weather was good. So no complaints.â€? See Pac Am / D5 Oregon’s toughest golf courses. By Zack Hall The Bulletin

But expectations remain high for the Storm. Back for Summit coach Jill Waskom in 2012 is 6-foot-1-inch senior middle blocker Laney Hayes, who last fall committed to play at Boise State University. Hayes, who is expected to move to outside hitter this season, will be joined at the net by junior middles Dani Taylor and Emma Dahl, both of whom are listed at 6-2. See Volleyball / D4

Capsules on Central Oregon teams, D4

Golf World Pacific Amateur Golf Classic At various Central Oregon courses:

TODAY 8:30 a.m.: Second round of competition, shotgun start 4-6 p.m.: Scoring reception and Lithia Test Drive Experience, Sunriver Resort, Main Lodge After competition: Pac Am Dine Around

THURSDAY 8:30 a.m.: Third round of competition, shotgun start 5:30-7 p.m.: Awards dinner at Sunriver Resort, Great Hall 7-8:30 p.m.: Awards ceremony, Sunriver Resort, Homestead Room 9 a.m.: Flight Finalists Championship Round, Crosswater Club at Sunriver Resort • For first-round leaders, see Scoreboard, D2. For more information and complete results, visit www.pacamgolf.com

CYCLING German wins 4th Vuelta stage

—The Associated Press

WEST COAST LEAGUE BASEBALL

Bend Elks drew lots of fans despite missing postseason By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

FRIDAY

—The Associated Press

SANXENXO, Spain — John Degenkolb won the 10th stage of the Spanish Vuelta on Tuesday for his fourth victory in this year’s race. Joaquin Rodriguez of Spain kept the overall lead on the eve of a crucial time trial. The German rider outsprinted Nacer Bouhanni of France and Daniele Bennati of Italy to finish the 118-mile leg in 4 hours, 47 minutes, 28 seconds. “The sprint was really hard and the final (part) was just (a fight),� said Degenkolb, who rides for Argos-Shimano. “The stage in general was not that hard, a small group took charge and we controlled the race the whole day.� There were no changes to the overall leading group after the ride through the western province of Galicia following the first rest day in the three-week race. Rodriguez maintained his 53-second advantage over Christopher Froome of Britain. Alberto Contador is 1 minute behind, while fellow Spaniard Alejandro Valverde is 1:07 back. Contador and Froome are the favorites for the individual time trial today, which is expected to be key in deciding the race winner. The 39.4-kilometer sprint from Cambados to Pontevedra may also suit Rodriguez as it is not a flat sprint but features a 10-kilometer climb up a category-3 hilltop to Monte Castrove.

D

Tennis, D4 Tee to Green, D5, D6

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Bob Wyrick, left, watches his putt while playing the first hole during the Pacific Amateur Golf Classic at Sunriver Resort’s Meadows course on Tuesday.

The Bend Elks saw more success off the field in 2012 than they did on it, leading the West Coast League in average attendance despite ending the summer 24-30 in league play and out of the playoffs. The Elks, who finished fourth in the five-team WCL West Division, averaged more than 1,400 spectators a game for the season, according to Bend owner and general manager Jim Richards. “That’s down compared to 2011, when we averaged 1,800 a game,â€? Richards said Tuesday about the Elks’ 13th season of operations. “But last year was an aberration. We’d never hit that number before. ‌ We were in a divisional race, in the playoffs, and had more late (summer) games.â€? The Elks played well in front of their home fans in 2012, going 18-10 at the friendly confines of Vince Genna Stadium. Away from Genna, though, was a completely different story, as Bend finished just 6-20 on the road. “We’ll revisit how we travel and who we travel with,â€? said Richards, whose club is on the road for 10 hours when it plays at Bellingham, Wash., and more than 12 for the trip to Kelowna, British Columbia. “We’ll revisit all the components, to how many people we take to what we do for meals before the game.â€? See Elks / D5 PAID ADVERTISEMENT

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Oregon State quarterback hopes to lead Beavers out of doldrums Oregon State quarterback Sean Mannion Don Ryan / The Associated Press

By Anne M. Peterson

Introducing the‌

The Associated Press

Sean Mannion embodies the term he believes will define this season’s Oregon State Beavers: Hardworking. Described by coach Mike Riley as a “gym rat,â€? Mannion strives to set an example as the Beavers prepare to put last season’s disaster behind them. That means work, the sophomore Inside • A guide to the quarterback maintains. upcoming “It’s something that we pride ourselves college on. We want to do the best at all the things football we can control, and that starts with hard season, D4 work,â€? Mannion said. “All the stuff in the summer, all the stuff we do in the film room, everything we do on the side on our own — that’s something we want to be part of our identity. And I think we’re on the way to doing that.â€? Last season started with a disheartening loss to lower-division Sacramento State and went downhill from there. The Beavers finished with a 3-9 overall record, out of the postseason for the second straight season. See Mannion / D5

half day academy 9:00am–NOON Helping you improve on your full swing, short game and video analysis. OdhH\cji`tyOjk,++O`\^c`mndi^`,442 Contributing editor “Golf Magazine� since 2003 & “Golf Digest� from 1990–2007

We also feature a Half Day Short Game Academy and a Half Day Playing Academy. Call for dates and times.

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D2

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION Today

Thursday

SOCCER 12:30 a.m.: UEFA Champions League, SC Braga vs. Udinese Calcio (same-day tape), Root Sports. 12:30 p.m.: UEFA Champions League, Borussia Monchengladbach vs. FC Dynamo Kyiv, Root Sports. TENNIS 7:30 a.m.: U.S. Open, second round, Tennis Channel. 10 a.m.: U.S. Open, second round, ESPN2. 4 p.m.: U.S. Open, men’s first round and women’s second round, ESPN2. BASEBALL 4 p.m.: MLB, St. Louis Cardinals at Pittsburgh Pirates, ESPN. 5 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Minnesota Twins, Root Sports. FOOTBALL 4:30 p.m.: NFL, preseason, New England Patriots at New York Giants, NFL Network. VOLLEYBALL 7 p.m.: Women’s college, UCLA at Jiangsu Chinese Team, Pac12 Network.

GOLF 5:30 a.m.: European Tour, European Masters, first round, Golf Channel. Noon: Web.com Tour, Mylan Classic, first round, Golf Channel. TENNIS 7:30 a.m.: U.S. Open, second round, Tennis Channel. 10 a.m.: U.S. Open, second round, ESPN2. 4 p.m.: U.S. Open, second round, ESPN2. BASEBALL 10 a.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Minnesota Twins, Root Sports. 4 p.m.: MLB, St. Louis Cardinals at Washington Nationals or Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto Blue Jays, MLB Network. FOOTBALL 4 p.m.: College, South Carolina at Vanderbilt, ESPN. 4 p.m.: College, Northern Colorado at Utah, Pac-12 Network. 4 p.m.: NFL, preseason, Kansas City Chiefs at Green Bay Packers, NFL Network. 4:30 p.m.: College, UCLA at Rice, CBS Sports Network. 7:15 p.m.: College, Washington State at BYU, ESPN. 7:30 p.m.: Northern Arizona at Arizona State, Pac-12 Network. 8 p.m.: College, Minnesota at UNLV, CBS Sports Network. 8 p.m.: NFL, preseason, Denver Broncos at Arizona Cardinals, NFL Network.

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Football • Mich. RB Toussaint pleads guilty: Michigan running back Fitzgerald Toussaint pleaded guilty Tuesday to drunken driving while his availability for Saturday night’s showdown with No. 2 Alabama remained unknown. Toussaint made a brief appearance in Washtenaw County District Court, pleading guilty to operating a vehicle while visibly impaired after being charged with the more serious operating while intoxicated. He faces up to 93 days in jail when he is sentenced Oct. 23, just after Michigan hosts Michigan State and prior to its game at Nebraska. • Redskins release TE Cooley: The Washington Redskins have released tight end Chris Cooley. The 30-year-old Cooley has spent his entire eight-season NFL career with Washington. He has 428 career receptions, including three seasons of at least 70. Injuries limited him to five games and eight receptions last season. The Redskins plan to use Fred Davis as their starting tight end. Redskins coach Mike Shanahan says parting with the two-time Pro Bowl selection was “as tough as it gets.” • Steelers WR Wallace ends holdout: With less than two weeks before the start of the regular season, Pro Bowl wide receiver Mike Wallace reported to the Pittsburgh Steelers. Wallace was at the team facility Tuesday morning. The 26-year-old restricted free agent will play under the one-year, $2.7 million tender offered by the Steelers and will hope something lengthier gets worked out before the regular season begins next week. Last season, Wallace had 72 receptions for 1,193 yards and eight touchdowns. • A&M vs. La. Tech game postponed: Texas A&M and Louisiana Tech have decided to postpone Thursday night’s season opener in Shreveport because of Hurricane Isaac’s forecast path through Louisiana. The game has been rescheduled until Oct. 13, which had been an open date for both teams.

to Minnesota: The Minnesota Twins will host the 2014 All-Star game at Target Field. A person with knowledge of the decision, speaking to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because neither the Twins nor Major League Baseball had announced it, confirmed the news on Tuesday. The decision was first reported by the Star Tribune. • Cubs’ SS Castro gets new deal: The Chicago Cubs and shortstop Starlin Castro have agreed to a seven-year contract with a club option for 2020. The 22-year-old Castro is a two-time All-Star and in just his second full major league season. Terms of the new deal were not released by the team, but published reports have placed the guaranteed money at $60 million over the duration of the extension. Since making his major league debut on May 7, 2010, Castro has more hits than any player in the NL with 486.

Motor sports • Stewart cools off after Bristol incident: Tony Stewart joked Tuesday that his twohanded toss of his helmet at Matt Kenseth was “not bad for a 41year-old who doesn’t work out.” Aside from that, Stewart said he’s not expecting any drama between the two drivers despite promising to run over Kenseth every chance he gets this season. “You get over that stuff. It’s been part of racing for as long as I can remember and that won’t be the last time you see two drivers have a disagreement,” Stewart said, adding he’ll only run over Kenseth “if I need to. It’s not our intention to go seek him out. We’ve gotten along more races than we’ve disagreed.” The three-time NASCAR champion lost his infamous temper Saturday night at Bristol Motor Speedway after contact with Kenseth caused him to wreck as they were racing for the lead. Before making his mandatory trip to the care center, Stewart waited on the track for Kenseth to pass by on pit road, and he heaved his helmet directly at the front grill of Kenseth’s car.

Baseball

Hockey

• Jays’ Bautista to have season-ending surgery: Toronto Blue Jays slugger Jose Bautista will have season-ending surgery to stabilize a tendon in his left wrist. Bautista said before Tuesday night’s game against the New York Yankees that the recovery period is three to four months and he would be ready to play long before the start of spring training next year. The two-time defending AL home run champion was immediately put back on the DL and sent to Cleveland to see a hand specialist. • 2014 MLB All-Star game

• Bettman, NHL issue another proposal: The NHL issued a new proposal to the players’ association Tuesday as a lockout looms next month. And at least one side is happy about it. “We believe,” NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman said, “that we made a significant, meaningful step.” Time will tell, but at least NHLPA executive director Donald Fehr and his players have another proposal — the league’s second this summer — to digest. The two sides will meet again today at the NHL offices. — From wire reports

ON DECK Friday Football: Marist at Bend, 7 p.m.; Mountain View at Lebanon, 7 p.m.; North Eugene at Summit, 7 p.m.; Sweet Home at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Medicine Hat (Alberta, Canada) at Ridgeview, 7 p.m.; Madras at Stayton, 7 p.m.; Henley at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Sisters at McLoughlin, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Chiloquin, 7 p.m. Cross-country: Crook County at the Night Meet in Wilsonville, 7 p.m. Volleyball: Central Christian at Trinity Lutheran, 2 p.m. Boys soccer: Sandy at Redmond, 3 p.m. Girls soccer: Sandy at Redmond, 4:30 p.m.

Serena Williams (4), United States, def. CoCo Vandeweghe, United States, 6-1, 6-1. Kiki Bertens, Netherlands, def. Christina McHale (21), United States, 6-4, 4-6, 6-3.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Show Court Schedules Today All Times PDT Play begins on all courts at 8 a.m. Arthur Ashe Stadium Victoria Azarenka (1), Belarus, vs. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium Not before 10 a.m.: Xavier Malisse, Belgium, vs. John Isner (9), United States Laura Robson, Britain, vs. Kim Clijsters (23), Belgium Night Session (Play begins at 4 p.m.) Maria Sharapova (3), Russia, vs. Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain Andy Murray (3), Britain, vs. Ivan Dodig, Croatia Louis Armstrong Stadium Kevin Anderson, South Africa, vs. David Ferrer (4), Spain Alize Cornet, France, vs. Petra Kvitova (5), Czech Republic Juan Martin del Potro (7), Argentina, vs. Lucky Loser TBA Not before 12:30 p.m.: Edina Gallovits-Hall, Romania, vs. Sam Stosur (7), Australia Grandstand Janko Tipsarevic (8), Serbia, vs. Guillaume Rufin, France Li Na (9), China, vs. Casey Dellacqua, Australia Not before noon: Mallory Burdette and Nicole Gibbs, United States, vs. Serena and Venus Williams, United States Benjamin Becker, Germany, vs. Ryan Harrison, United States Court 17 Nadia Petrova (19), Russia, vs. Simona Halep, Romania Varvara Lepchenko (31), United States, vs. Anastasia Rodionova, Australia Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, vs. Tommy Haas (21), Germany Jurgen Melzer, Austria, vs. Bradley Klahn, United States

Saturday Volleyball: Culver at Warrenton tournament, TBA Boys soccer: Sandy at Crook County, 4 p.m. Girls soccer: Sandy at Summit, noon Tuesday Boys soccer: Culver at Ridgeview, 4 p.m.; Sisters at Crook County, 4 p.m.; Summit at Sherwood, 4 p.m. Girls soccer: Sherwood at Summit, 4 p.m. Volleyball: Burns at Bend, 6:30 p.m.; Ridgeview at La Pine, 6:45 p.m.; Regis at Culver, 6 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 5 Girls soccer: Madras at La Pine, 4:30 p.m. Boys soccer: La Pine at Summit JV2, 4:30 p.m. Volleyball: Churchill at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; West Albany at Summit, 6:30 p.m.; Mountain View vs. West Albany at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; Mountain View vs. Churchill at Summit, 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 6 Cross-country: Madras at the Darrel Deedon Cascade Invite in Turner, TBA Boys soccer: Mazama at Ridgeview, 3 p.m.; Madras at Redmond, 4:30 p.m.; East Linn Christian at Culver, 4 p.m.; Molalla at Sisters, 5:30 p.m. Girls soccer: Mazama at Ridgeview, 4:30 p.m.; Molalla at Sisters, 4 p.m.; Redmond at Madras, 4 p.m. (Red schedule says at 4:30 p.m.) Volleyball: Redmond at Ridgeview, 6 p.m.; Stayton at Sisters, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Phoenix, 7 p.m.; Cascade at Madras, 6:30 p.m.; East Linn Christian at Culver, 6 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7 Football: Bend at Silverton, 7 p.m.; Century at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; Summit at Eagle Point, 7 p.m.; Redmond at Madras, 7 p.m.; Klamath Union at Ridgeview, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Cascade, 7 p.m.; Burns at Sisters, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Oakridge, 7 p.m.; Culver at Grant Union, 7 p.m.; Gilchrist at Elkton, 4 p.m. Boys soccer: Mountain View at North Medford, 4 p.m.; Bend at South Medford, 4 p.m.; McLoughlin at Redmond, 4:30 p.m. Girls soccer: North Medford at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Willamette at Summit, 4 p.m.; South Medford at Bend, 4 p.m.; McLoughlin at Redmond, 3 p.m. Volleyball: Gilchrist at Prospect, 5 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran at Butte Falls, 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8 Cross-country: Bend, Mountain View, Redmond, Summit, Sisters, La Pine, Ridgeview and Crook County at the Breese Ranch Stampede in Prineville, 8 a.m.; Madras at the Trask Mountain Assault in McMinnville, noon Volleyball: Summit at Central Catholic Invitational, 9 a.m.; Bend, Redmond, Ridgeview, Crook County at Mountain View tournament, TBA; Sisters, Madras at Cascade tourney, 8 a.m.; Culver at Heppner tournament, TBA; Trinity Lutheran at Prairie City tournament, TBA; Central Christian at Paisley, 2 p.m.. Boys soccer: Summit at Madras, 10 a.m.; Mountain View at South Medford, 11 a.m.; Bend at North Medford, 11 a.m.; Central Christian at Irrigon, 1 p.m. Girls soccer: North Medford at Bend, 11 a.m.

GOLF Local 2012 GOLF WORLD PACIFIC AMATEUR GOLF CLASSIC Aug. 28 At Courses Throughout Central Oregon Flight Leaders After Day One (Scores are Net) Flight 1 — 1, Ross Bridges (Eugene), 63. 2, Joe Schulte (Gearhart), 69. 3, Robert Donnelly (Camas, Wash.), 70. 4, Scott Brenden (Beaverton), 71. Flight 2 — 1, Vernon Carlson (Pasco, Wash.), 66. 2 (tie), Kevin Holland (Spokane, Wash.), 70; Luke Spiering (Hillsboro), 70; Brian Sleight (Seatac, Wash.), 70. Flight 3 — 1 (tie), Rick Barnett (Auburn, Wash.), 70; Dave Grim (Orting, Wash.), 70; Jared Ewen (Kennewick, Wash.), 70. 4 (tie), Charles Porter (Kent, Wash.), 71; Stanley Anderson III (Aurora), 71. Flight 4 — 1, Don Goethals (Lake Tapps, Wash.), 66. 2, Don Sherman (Portland), 69. 3 (tie), Jeff Stofiel (Waunakee, Wis.), 70; Jeff Walker (Spokane, Wash.), 70. Flight 5 — 1, Phil Woods (Baytown, Texas), 71. 2 (tie), Larry Stewart (Woodinville, Wash.), 72; Daniel Proulx (Keizer), 72. 3 (tie), Larry Hurley (Kingston, Wash.), 74; Brad Hales (Corvallis), 74; Randy Wright (Broomfield, Colo.), 74. Flight 6 — 1, Anthony Gonzalez (Menlo Park, Calif.), 66. 2, Ed Yanke (Gresham), 68. 3, Clint Walker (Yuba City, Calif.), 71. 4 (tie), Mike Parker (Portland), 72; Ron Franklin (Cashmere, Wash.), 72. Flight 7 — 1, Gary Erb (Seattle), 69. 2, Joe Murray (Aloha), 72. 3, Bruce Burson (Madras), 73. 4, Terry Miwongtum (Shoreline, Wash.), 74. Flight 8 — 1, James Bach (Kirkland, Wash.), 69. 2 (tie), Charles Korom (Phoenix), 73; Mark Novak (Seattle), 73. 4 (tie), Joe Abrams (Elk Grove, Calif.), 74; Timothy Borba (Camas, Wash.), 74. Flight 9 — 1, Terry Staats (Keizer), 69. 2, Thomas Ingram (Rohnert Park, Calif.), 70. 3 (tie), Stephen Laue (Edmonds, Wash.), 71; Chris Carter (Portland), 71. Flight 10 — 1, Beau Johnson (Bend), 68. 2, Joe Stanley (Las Vegas), 69. 3 (tie), Odie Carter (Snohomish, Wash.), 70; Gary DeMattei (San Leandro, Calif.), 70. Flight 11 — 1, Bob Wyrick (Arroyo Grande, Calif.), 65. 2, Steve Bence (Redmond, Wash.), 69. 3 (tie), Mike Mirgeaux (Belmont, N.C.), 70; Jim Edwards (Oroville, Calif.), 70; Brian White (Palm Desert, Calif.), 70. Flight 12 — 1, Thomas Rehorst (Colorado Springs, Colo.), 66. 2, Peach Waller (Pace, Fla.), 67. 3 (tie), Michael Calvert (Eugene), 69; Gilbert Gonzalez (Canby), 69. Flight 13 — 1, Don Morton (Garden Valley, Idaho), 67. 2, John O’Rullian (Rigby, Idaho), 68. 3, Alan Stewart (Redmond), 71. Gary Wiebusch (Issaquah, Wash.), 72. Flight 14 — 1 (tie), Al Davis (Anchorage, Alaska), 71; Bill Bienapfl (Meridian, Idaho), 71. 3 (tie), John Newnham (Randwick, Australia), 72; Glenn Murray (Surprise, Ariz.), 72. Flight 15 — 1, Jerry Gallardo (Grants Pass), 65. 2 (tie), Jerry Taylor (Galt, Calif.), 66; Dave Clark (Seattle), 66. 4, Ken Schwoerer (Villa Park, Calif.), 67. Flight 16 — 1, Hans Behrens (Sisters), 66. 2, Leonard Gallardo (Los Angeles), 68. 3 (tie), Jim Breymeyer (Yakima, Wash.), 69; Bill Alberth (Seal Beach, Calif.), 69; Don Landon (Penn Valley, Calif.), 69. Flight 17 — 1, Raymond Walker (Concord, Calif.), 63. 2, Taylor Story (Bend), 64. 3 (tie), Devon Bratsman (Rexburg, Idaho), 65; Robert Stephens (Sunriver), 65. Flight 18 — 1, Diane Greenwood (Eugene), 64. 2, Cathy Hickman (Walterville), 73. 3 (tie), Felicia King (Nampa, Idaho), 74; Mary Daby (Roseville, Calif.), 74. Flight 19 — 1, Colleen Moulton (San Jose, Calif.), 71. 2, Jennifer Fay (Milwaukie), 73. 3 (tie), Cheryl Horvath (Woodinville, Wash.), 75; Kathy McDonald (unknown), 75. Flight 20 — 1, Judy Knight (Hidden Valley Lake, Calif.), 68. 2, Carmen Eriksen (Surprise, Ariz.), 69. 3 (tie), Kaye Williams (Bend), 73; Sharon Wertz (Long Beach, Calif.), 73. Flight 21 — 1, Peg Toft (Kremmling, Colo.), 70. 2, Keiko Hanamoto (San Jose, Calif.), 71. 3, Marie Richter (Santa Rosa, Calif.), 73. 4, Laurilee Hatcher (Dallas, Ore.), 74. Flight 22 — Gross: 1, Gabriel Robles-Ellis (Beaverton), 70. 2, Paull Veroulis (Eureka, Mont.), 71. 3, Brett Johnson (Vancouver, Wash.), 74. 4, Bret Mackey (Valencia, Calif.), 76.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts Kansas City 14 7 5 47 New York 13 7 6 45 Houston 11 6 9 42 Chicago 12 8 5 41

GF 32 44 38 32

GA 23 37 30 30

BASKETBALL D.C. Montreal Columbus Philadelphia New England Toronto FC

12 9 4 40 41 12 13 3 39 42 10 8 6 36 29 7 12 4 25 24 6 14 5 23 30 5 15 6 21 29 Western Conference W L T Pts GF San Jose 15 6 5 50 52 Real Salt Lake 13 10 4 43 37 Seattle 12 6 7 43 40 Los Angeles 12 11 4 40 46 Vancouver 10 10 7 37 29 FC Dallas 8 12 8 32 33 Chivas USA 7 10 6 27 17 Colorado 8 16 2 26 33 Portland 6 13 6 24 26 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Today’s Games Columbus at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Chivas USA at New England, 5 p.m. New York at D.C. United, 5 p.m. Friday’s Games Colorado at Portland, 7:30 p.m

35 44 28 28 35 46

FOOTBALL

22.5 23 Miami-Ohio 9.5 10 W Michigan 1 1.5 IOWA ST 11.5 11 Nevada 17.5 20 So Miss PK 2 BOSTON COLL 6.5 10 No Illinois 5.5 6 Colorado St 37.5 37.5 Buffalo 29 29 Bowling Green 28.5 29.5 Wyoming 37.5 37 Texas St 3 3 Auburn 38.5 40 Hawaii 12 14 Michigan 17.5 19.5 TULANE 30.5 31 UTEP 10.5 10.5 Toledo 14.5 14.5 San Diego St 5.5 6 UAB 4 3.5 Florida Int’l 43.5 43.5 N Texas 35.5 35.5 Arkanas St Sunday LOUISVILLE 14.5 14 Kentucky BAYLOR 11 10.5 Smu s-Shreveport, La.; a-Atlanta, Ga.; d-Dublin, Ireland.; c-Chicago, Ill.; de-Denver, Colo..; ar- Arlington, Texas.

NFL

TENNIS

GA 33 32 26 40 35 37 32 40 43

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE Preseason Glance All Times PDT ——— Today’s Games Tampa Bay at Washington, 4 p.m. New England at N.Y. Giants, 4 p.m. Miami at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Atlanta at Jacksonville, 3:30 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Philadelphia, 3:35 p.m. Minnesota at Houston, 4 p.m. Baltimore at St. Louis, 4 p.m. Kansas City at Green Bay, 4 p.m. New Orleans at Tennessee, 4 p.m. Cincinnati at Indianapolis, 4 p.m. Buffalo at Detroit, 4 p.m. Chicago at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m. Carolina at Pittsburgh, 4:30 p.m. Oakland at Seattle, 7 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 7:05 p.m. Denver at Arizona, 8 p.m.

College PAC-12 CONFERENCE North Conf. Overall California 0-0 0-0 Oregon 0-0 0-0 Oregon State 0-0 0-0 Stanford 0-0 0-0 Washington 0-0 0-0 Washington State 0-0 0-0 South Conf. Overall Arizona 0-0 0-0 Arizona State 0-0 0-0 Colorado 0-0 0-0 UCLA 0-0 0-0 USC 0-0 0-0 Utah 0-0 0-0 Thursday’s Games Northern Colorado at Utah, 4:15 p.m. UCLA at Rice, 4:30 p.m. Washington State at BYU, 7:15 p.m. Northern Arizona at Arizona State, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Game San Jose State at Stanford, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games Nevada at California, noon Nicholls State at Oregon State, noon Colorado State vs. Colorado, 1 p.m. Hawaii at USC, 4:30 p.m. Toledo at Arizona, 7:30 p.m. San Diego State at Washington, 7:30 p.m. Arkansas State at Oregon, 7:30 p.m. Top 25 Schedule All Times PDT ——— Thursday’s Games No. 9 South Carolina at Vanderbilt, 4 p.m. Friday’s Games No. 13 Michigan State vs. No. 24 Boise State, 5 p.m. No. 21 Stanford vs. San Jose State, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 1 Southern Cal vs. Hawaii, 4:30 p.m. No. 2 Alabama vs. No. 8 Michigan at Arlington, Texas, 5 p.m. No. 3 LSU vs. North Texas, 4 p.m. No. 4 Oklahoma at UTEP, 7:30 p.m. No. 5 Oregon vs. Arkansas State, 7:30 p.m. No. 6 Georgia vs. Buffalo, 9:21 a.m. No. 7 Florida State vs. Murray State, 3 p.m. No. 10 Arkansas vs. Jacksonville State, 4 p.m. No. 11 West Virginia vs. Marshall, 9 a.m. No. 12 Wisconsin vs. Northern Iowa, 12:30 p.m. No. 14 Clemson vs. Auburn at Atlanta, 4 p.m. No. 15 Texas vs. Wyoming, 5 p.m. No. 17 Nebraska vs. Southern Miss., 12:30 p.m. No. 18 Ohio State vs. Miami (Ohio), 9 a.m. No. 19 Oklahoma State vs. Savannah State, 4 p.m. No. 22 Kansas State vs. Missouri State, 4 p.m. No. 23 Florida vs. Bowling Green, 12:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games No. 25 Louisville vs. Kentucky, 12:30 p.m. Monday’s Game No. 16 Virginia Tech vs. Georgia Tech, 5 p.m.

Betting line COLLEGE (Home teams in Caps) Thursday Favorite Opening Current Underdog S Carolina 6.5 6.5 VANDERBILT C Florida 23.5 23.5 AKRON BALL ST 3.5 3.5 E Michigan s-Texas A&M 6.5 PPD LA TECH CONNECTICUT 25.5 24.5 Massachusetts Ucla 16 16 RICE BYU 13.5 13 Washington St Minnesota 8 8.5 UNLV S. ALABAMA 6 PPD Tx-S Antonio Friday a-Tennessee 4 3 Nc State MICHIGAN ST 7 7 Boise St STANFORD 25.5 25.5 San Jose St Saturday i-Notre Dame 16.5 16.5 Navy W VIRGINIA 24 24 Marshall PENN ST 6.5 6 Ohio U Northwestern 1 1 SYRACUSE

OHIO ST ILLINOIS Tulsa CALIFORNIA NEBRASKA Miami-Fla c-Iowa d-Colorado GEORGIA FLORIDA TEXAS HOUSTON a-Clemson USC ar-Alabama Rutgers Oklahoma ARIZONA WASHINGTON Troy DUKE LSU OREGON

Professional U.S. Open Tuesday At The USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center New York Purse: $25.5 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic, def. David Goffin, Belgium, 7-5, 6-3, 6-3. Jimmy Wang, Taiwan, def. Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, 76 (4), 6-7 (8), 6-1, 6-4. Nicolas Almagro (11), Spain, def. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 6-4. Milos Raonic (15), Canada, def. Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, 6-3, 4-6, 3-6, 6-4, 6-4. Pablo Andujar, Spain, def. Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, 7-6 (5), 3-6, 7-6 (1), 7-5. Andy Roddick (20), United States, def. Rhyne Williams, United States, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (5), France, def. Karol Beck, Slovakia, 6-3, 6-1, 7-6 (2). Steve Darcis, Belgium, def. Malek Jaziri, Tunisia, 3-6, 6-1, 6-1, 6-1. Philipp Petzschner, Germany, def. Nicolas Mahut, France, 1-6, 4-6, 6-4, 7-5, 7-6 (3). Dennis Novikov, United States, def. Jerzy Janowicz, Poland, 6-2, 7-6 (6), 3-6, 6-3. Sam Querrey (27), United States, def. Yen-hsun Lu, Taiwan, 6-7 (4), 6-4, 6-4, 7-5. Stanislas Wawrinka (18), Switzerland, def. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, 6-7 (6), 7-6 (2), 6-4, 6-2. Julien Benneteau (31), France, def. Olivier Rochus, Belgium, 7-6 (1), 6-2, 6-3. Fabio Fognini, Italy, def. Edouard Roger-Vasselin, France, 3-6, 5-7, 6-4, 6-4, 7-5. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def. Juan Monaco (10), Argentina, 3-6, 1-6, 6-4, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (3). Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Paolo Lorenzi, Italy, 6-1, 6-0, 6-1. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, def. Matthias Bachinger, Germany, 6-2, 4-6, 6-4, 6-7 (8), 7-6 (5). Bernard Tomic, Australia, def. Carlos Berlocq, Argentina, 4-6, 7-5, 6-3, 6-4. Rogerio Dutra Silva, Brazil, def. Teymuraz Gabashvili, Russia, 4-6, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 7-5. Alexandr Dolgopolov (14), Ukraine, def. Jesse Levine, United States, 3-6, 4-6, 6-4, 6-1, 6-2. Women First Round Agnieszka Radwanska (2), Poland, def. Nina Bratchikova, Russia, 6-1, 6-1. Ana Ivanovic (12), Serbia, def. Elina Svitolina, Ukraine, 6-3, 6-2. Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, def. Kimiko Date-Krumm, Japan, 6-4, 6-2. Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, def. Eleni Daniilidou, Greece, 6-1, 6-4. Carla Suarez Navarro, Spain, def. Ksenia Pervak, Kazakhstan, 7-5, 1-2, retired. Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, def. Arantxa Rus, Netherlands, 6-1, 6-3. Andrea Hlavackova, Czech Republic, def. Klara Zakopalova (24), Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-4. Elena Vesnina, Russia, def. Peng Shuai (32), China, 7-6 (5), 6-1. Roberta Vinci (20), Italy, def. Urszula Radwanska, Poland, 6-1, 6-1. Lara Arruabarrena-Vecino, Spain, def. Shahar Peer, Israel, 6-4, 7-6 (5). Ayumi Morita, Japan, def. Monica Niculescu (26), Romania, 6-3, 6-3. Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, def. Mona Barthel, Germany, 4-6, 7-5, 6-2. Angelique Kerber (6), Germany, def. Anne Keothavong, Britain, 6-2, 6-0. Vera Dushevina, Russia, def. Nastassja Burnett, Italy, 6-0, 6-3. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, def. Vania King, United States, 6-4, 6-2. Venus Williams, United States, def. Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, 6-3, 6-1. Jelena Jankovic (30), Serbia, def. Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine, 6-1, 6-2. Dominika Cibulkova (13), Slovakia, def. Johanna Larsson, Sweden, 6-7 (5), 6-2, 6-0. Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria, def. Camila Giorgi, Italy, 6-3, 6-4. Johanna Konta, Britain, def. Timea Babos, Hungary, 6-2, 7-5. Silvia Soler-Espinosa, Spain, def. Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, 6-3, 6-2. Olga Govortsova, Belarus, def. Tamira Paszek (29), Austria, 6-3, 6-4. Sara Errani (10), Italy, def. Garbine Muguruza, Spain, 6-3, 6-7 (6), 6-1. Olga Puchkova, Russia, def. Irina Falconi, United States, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (2), 6-3. Sloane Stephens, United States, def. Francesca Schiavone (22), Italy, 6-3, 6-4. Greta Arn, Hungary, def. Agnes Szavay, Hungary, 6-4, 3-2, retired. Maria Kirilenko (14), Russia, def. Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, 6-2, 6-1. Irina-Camelia Begu, Romania, def. Caroline Wozniacki (8), Denmark, 6-2, 6-2. Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez, Spain, def. Mirjana Lucic, Croatia, 6-3, 7-5. Tatjana Malek, Germany, def. Akgul Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, 4-6, 6-2, 6-4.

WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct GB Connecticut 18 6 .750 — Indiana 15 8 .652 2½ Atlanta 12 13 .480 6½ Chicago 9 15 .375 9 New York 9 15 .375 9 Washington 5 19 .208 13 Western Conference W L Pct GB x-Minnesota 20 4 .833 — x-Los Angeles 19 6 .760 1½ x-San Antonio 17 7 .708 3 Seattle 11 13 .458 9 Tulsa 5 19 .208 15 Phoenix 4 19 .174 15½ x-clinched playoff spot ——— Tuesday’s Games Tulsa 84, Atlanta 80 Indiana 83, Washington 68 Connecticut 83, Chicago 72 Minnesota 96, San Antonio 84, OT Today’s Games No games scheduled Thursday’s Games Washington at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Indiana at New York, 4 p.m. Connecticut at San Antonio, 5 p.m. Los Angeles at Tulsa, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Seattle, 7 p.m.

RODEO Pro Rodeo Leaders Through Sunday Bareback Riding 1. Will Lowe, Canyon, Texas $110,294 2. Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb. $105,479 3. Kaycee Feild, Payson, Utah $93,434 4. Jessy Davis, Power, Mont. $85,004 5. Wes Stevenson, Lubbock, Texas $80,681 6. Bobby Mote, Culver, $77,674 7. J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo. $76,894 8. Caleb Bennett, Morgan, Utah $65,464 9. Winn Ratliff, Leesville, La. $54,622 10. Casey Colletti, Pueblo, Colo. $54,228 11. Matt Bright, Azle, Texas $51,105 12. Brian Bain, Culver, $51,023 13. Steven Peebles, Redmond, $48,200 14. Jared Keylon, Uniontown, Kan. $48,174 15. Dusty LaValley, Bezanson, Alberta $46,760

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Suspended Toronto RHP Marcus Stroman (New Hampshire-EL), Kansas City 1B Mark Donato (Royals-Arizona) and Tampa Bay OF Joshua Sale (Bowling Green-MWL) 50 games each for positive tests under the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Added LHP Joe Saunders to the 25-man roster. BOSTON RED SOX—Placed LHP Franklin Morales on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Aug. 24. Reinstated RHP Alfredo Aceves to the active roster. CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Placed RHP Gavin Floyd on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Aug. 27. Recalled RHP Dylan Axelrod from Charlotte (IL). Assigned OF Alejandro De Aza to Charlotte. National League CHICAGO CUBS—Agreed to terms with SS Starlin Castro on a seven-year contract through 2019. Activated RHP Blake Parker from the 60-day DL. Designated LHP Alex Hinshaw for assignment. PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Released LHP Erik Bedard. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Activated RHP Guillermo Mota from the restricted list. Placed LHP Jeremy Affeldt on the paternity list. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association ATLANTA HAWKS—Named Rick Sund has been named a senior adviser for basketball operations, Bob Weiss assistant coach-consultant and Kenny Atkinson assistant coach for player development. Women’s National Basketball Association TULSA SHOCK—Announced C Elizabeth Cambage will not return to the team this season. FOOTBALL National Football League NEW YORK JETS—Claimed P Spencer Lanning off waivers from Cleveland. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Signed WR Roscoe Parrish. Waived/injured OL Zach Hurd. TENNESSEE TITANS—Activated WR Kenny Britt from the physically-unable-to-perform list. WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Released K Graham Gano and TE Chris Cooley. Signed K Billy Cundiff. SOCCER Major League Soccer PHILADELPHIA UNION—Terminated the contract of F Jorge Perlaza. SPORTING KANSAS CITY—Loaned MF Konrad Warzycha to Carolina (NASL) for the remainder of the season. COLLEGE WEST COAST CONFERENCE—Named Lynn Holzman senior associate commissioner for governance and administration. NEW MEXICO—Suspended junior QB David Vega indefinitely. JAMES MADISON—Named Samantha Eustace women’s assistant lacrosse coach.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 6,033 1,076 1,986 634 The Dalles 2,350 582 1,221 443 John Day 1,148 355 548 204 McNary 1,009 261 421 157 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 276,733 28,458 164,449 64,849 The Dalles 205,772 22,705 101,501 43,805 John Day 178,740 20,128 62,753 28,597 McNary 174,730 11,425 56,342 22,753


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

D3

MA JOR L E AGUE BASEBA LL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

AL Boxscores Mariners 5, Twins 2 Seattle Ackley 2b Gutierrez cf Seager 3b J.Montero dh Smoak 1b Olivo c Thames rf T.Robinson lf Ryan ss Totals

AB 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 37

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 5

H 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 2 3 9

BI 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

American League SO 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4

Avg. .233 .255 .251 .256 .192 .217 .249 .247 .202

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Revere cf 2 0 0 1 1 1 .310 Mastroianni rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .267 Mauer c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .309 Willingham lf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .259 Morneau 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .274 Doumit dh 4 0 1 1 0 1 .283 Plouffe 3b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .239 J.Carroll 2b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .246 Florimon ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .270 Totals 28 2 4 2 5 7 Seattle 002 030 000 — 5 9 0 Minnesota 001 000 001 — 2 4 1 E—Plouffe (13). LOB—Seattle 6, Minnesota 6. 2B—Seager (26), Ryan 2 (17), Doumit (26). HR— Ackley (10), off Diamond. SB—T.Robinson 2 (5). SF—Revere. DP—Seattle 2. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP Iwakuma W, 5-3 6 1 1 0 4 4 92 O.Perez 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 8 Kinney 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 17 Furbush 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 18 Wilhelmsen S, 20 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 8 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP Diamond L, 10-6 7 7 5 5 1 2 96 Waldrop 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 Al.Burnett 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 T—2:55. A—29,854 (39,500).

AB 4 4 4 2 3 4 4 4 4 33

R 0 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 5

H 0 1 2 1 1 2 1 0 1 9

BI 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 6

Avg. .362 .282 .278 .192 .250 .231 .205 .000 .350

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Trout cf 5 1 3 2 0 1 .340 Tor.Hunter rf 3 1 0 1 1 1 .289 Pujols dh 4 1 2 1 0 0 .285 K.Morales 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .272 Trumbo lf 2 1 0 1 1 0 .279 H.Kendrick 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .290 M.Izturis 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .259 Aybar ss 3 1 0 0 0 0 .274 Iannetta c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .241 a-Callaspo ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .245 Totals 31 6 7 6 4 6 Boston 010 301 000 — 5 9 1 Los Angeles 200 002 002 — 6 7 2 Two outs when winning run scored. a-walked for Iannetta in the 9th. E—Kalish (3), H.Kendrick (11), Iannetta (1). LOB—Boston 4, Los Angeles 6. 2B—Lavarnway (3), H.Kendrick (23). HR—Saltalamacchia (22), off Weaver; Trout (25), off Buchholz; Pujols (29), off Buchholz. SB—Ellsbury (10), Ciriaco (10), Aybar (12). DP—Los Angeles 2. Boston IP H R Buchholz 7 6 4 Aceves L, 2-9 BS 1 2-3 1 2 Los Angeles IP H R Weaver 7 7 5 Richards 1 1 0 Jepsen W, 3-2 1 1 0 HBP—by Aceves (Aybar). T—3:01. A—38,745 (45,957).

ER BB SO NP ERA 4 3 5 109 4.50 2 1 1 24 4.76 ER BB SO NP ERA 4 1 5 106 2.85 0 1 1 25 4.84 0 0 0 10 3.45

Rangers 1, Rays 0 Tampa Bay De.Jennings lf B.Upton cf Joyce rf Fuld rf Longoria 3b Zobrist ss Scott dh C.Pena 1b R.Roberts 2b Lobaton c Totals

AB 4 3 1 3 4 3 3 4 4 3 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 1 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 1 0 7

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2

SO 1 2 1 0 1 1 1 4 2 1 14

Avg. .247 .245 .254 .317 .289 .264 .230 .188 .220 .228

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .269 Andrus ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .298 Hamilton cf-lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .290 Beltre 3b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .313 N.Cruz rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .264 Gentry cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .306 Mi.Young dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .269 Dav.Murphy lf-rf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .310 Soto c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .247 Moreland 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .296 Totals 26 1 4 1 2 8 Tampa Bay 000 000 000 — 0 7 0 Texas 000 100 00x — 1 4 0 LOB—Tampa Bay 8, Texas 4. 2B—Scott (17). HR—Kinsler (16), off Shields. SB—Fuld (6). DP—Tampa Bay 1; Texas 1. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields L, 12-8 7 3 1 1 2 8 121 3.91 McGee 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 2.21 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Darvish W, 13-9 7 6 0 0 2 10 110 4.31 Mi.Adams H, 24 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 2.45 Nathan S, 27-28 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 2.49 T—2:48. A—30,700 (48,194).

Athletics 7, Indians 0 Oakland Drew ss Reddick rf Cespedes cf S.Smith dh Carter 1b Moss lf Donaldson 3b D.Norris c Rosales 2b Totals

AB 3 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 40

R 0 1 0 3 2 1 0 0 0 7

H 0 1 0 2 3 2 1 0 2 11

BI 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 1 6

SO 2 2 3 1 2 2 1 2 1 16

Avg. .217 .253 .294 .244 .270 .244 .220 .196 .234

Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Milone W, 11-9 6 7 0 0 1 5 102 3.73 Blevins 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 24 2.56 Neshek 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 1.13 Scribner 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.61 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McAllister L, 5-5 4 1-3 9 5 5 3 8 110 3.82 Sipp 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 31 4.57 E.Rogers 2 0 0 0 0 4 26 2.29 J.Smith 1 2 2 0 0 2 19 3.29 T—3:13. A—13,413 (43,429).

Orioles 6, White Sox 0 AB 4 4 3 4 2 1 3 3 1

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

L 54 57 59 68 71

Chicago Detroit Kansas City Cleveland Minnesota

W 71 69 57 55 52

L 57 59 71 74 77

Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 77 71 67 63

L 52 57 62 67

Tuesday’s Games Baltimore 6, Chicago White Sox 0 Oakland 7, Cleveland 0 N.Y. Yankees 2, Toronto 1 Texas 1, Tampa Bay 0 Kansas City 9, Detroit 8 Seattle 5, Minnesota 2 L.A. Angels 6, Boston 5

BB 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

SO 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0

Avg. .279 .246 .205 .316 .302 .241 .288 .252 .263

National League

L10 4-6 7-3 5-5 4-6 2-8

Str Home Away W-1 40-25 35-29 W-4 36-29 35-28 L-4 35-30 35-29 L-1 32-38 30-30 L-1 31-30 26-41

L10 6-4 6-4 5-5 1-9 2-8

Str Home Away L-2 38-26 33-31 L-1 39-26 30-33 W-1 27-33 30-38 L-3 31-33 24-41 L-2 24-39 28-38

L10 8-2 8-2 5-5 7-3

Str Home Away W-2 43-24 34-28 W-4 39-27 32-30 W-1 34-29 33-33 W-2 33-30 30-37

Today’s Games Toronto (Happ 2-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 13-3), 10:05 a.m. Chicago White Sox (Axelrod 1-2) at Baltimore (J.Saunders 0-0), 4:05 p.m. Oakland (Blackley 4-3) at Cleveland (Kluber 0-2), 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Cobb 8-8) at Texas (M.Harrison 15-7), 4:05 p.m. Detroit (A.Sanchez 2-3) at Kansas City (B.Chen 9-10), 5:10 p.m. Seattle (Vargas 13-8) at Minnesota (Deduno 4-2), 5:10 p.m. Boston (Z.Stewart 1-2) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 9-9), 7:05 p.m.

Washington Atlanta Philadelphia New York Miami

W 77 74 61 60 59

L 51 56 68 69 71

Cincinnati St. Louis Pittsburgh Milwaukee Chicago Houston

W 79 71 69 61 49 40

L 52 58 60 67 79 89

San Francisco Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado

W 72 69 64 60 53

L 57 61 66 71 75

East Division Pct GB WCGB .602 — — .569 4 — .473 16½ 10 .465 17½ 11 .454 19 12½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .603 — — .550 7 — .535 9 2 .477 16½ 9½ .383 28½ 21½ .310 38 31 West Division Pct GB WCGB .558 — — .531 3½ 2½ .492 8½ 7½ .458 13 12 .414 18½ 17½

Tuesday’s Games N.Y. Mets 9, Philadelphia 5, 10 innings Pittsburgh 9, St. Louis 0 Miami 9, Washington 0 Milwaukee 4, Chicago Cubs 1 San Francisco 3, Houston 2 Colorado 8, L.A. Dodgers 4 Cincinnati 5, Arizona 2 Atlanta 2, San Diego 0

L10 4-6 4-6 7-3 4-6 5-5

Str Home Away L-5 36-24 41-27 W-1 36-29 38-27 L-1 31-36 30-32 W-3 30-35 30-34 W-2 30-31 29-40

L10 6-4 7-3 3-7 7-3 3-7 1-9

Str Home Away W-2 42-24 37-28 L-1 40-26 31-32 W-1 39-26 30-34 W-3 38-28 23-39 L-2 32-31 17-48 L-3 27-36 13-53

L10 7-3 4-6 3-7 8-2 8-2

Str Home Away W-1 37-28 35-29 L-3 35-29 34-32 L-5 33-33 31-33 L-1 32-33 28-38 W-2 28-39 25-36

Today’s Games L.A. Dodgers (Blanton 8-12) at Colorado (D.Pomeranz 1-7), 12:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Latos 10-4) at Arizona (Corbin 5-5), 12:40 p.m. Atlanta (Hanson 12-6) at San Diego (Stults 4-2), 3:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Harvey 2-3) at Philadelphia (Hamels 14-6), 4:05 p.m. St. Louis (J.Kelly 4-5) at Pittsburgh (W.Rodriguez 8-13), 4:05 p.m. Washington (Detwiler 7-6) at Miami (Ja.Turner 0-1), 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Fiers 7-6) at Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 8-11), 5:05 p.m. San Francisco (Zito 10-8) at Houston (Keuchel 1-6), 5:05 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Yankees 2, Blue Jays 1: NEW YORK — Phil Hughes had another fine start at home, Nick Swisher extended his torrid streak with an RBI single and New York handed Toronto’s Ricky Romero his 11th straight loss. Hughes (13-11) won his sixth consecutive decision at Yankee Stadium, giving up only Adeiny Hechavarria’s first major league homer in seven innings. He allowed four hits and walked three. • Orioles 6, White Sox 0: BALTIMORE — Chris Tillman allowed one hit over seven innings and Nick Markakis drove in three runs as Baltimore defeated Chris Sale and Chicago for its fourth straight win. Lew Ford homered for the second time in two nights and Adam Jones hit his 100th career home run for the Orioles, who moved a season-high 14 games over .500 (71-57) and remained atop the AL wild-card standings. • Angels 6, Red Sox 5: ANAHEIM, Calif. — Los Angeles’ Mike Trout and Torii Hunter drove in runs in the ninth inning against beleaguered Boston closer Alfredo Aceves. • Athletics 7, Indians 0: CLEVELAND — Tommy Milone and three Oakland relievers extended Cleveland’s scoreless streak to 22 innings. • Rangers 1, Rays 0: ARLINGTON, Texas — Yu Darvish struck out 10 over seven innings for Texas to win a pitchers’ duel with Tampa Bay’s James Shields. • Mariners 5, Twins 2: MINNEAPOLIS — Dustin Ackley hit a three-run homer and Hisashi Iwakuma gave up one hit and one unearned run over six innings to lead Seattle past Minnesota. • Royals 9, Tigers 8: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Mike Moustakas had three hits and three RBIs and Kansas City roughed up Detroit’s Justin Verlander. Verlander was charged with eight earned runs, matching his career high.

• Pirates 9, Cardinals 0: PITTSBURGH — Pedro Alvarez homered twice and drove in four runs, James McDonald scattered two hits over seven innings and Pittsburgh beat St. Louis. The Cardinals played most of the game without catcher Yadier Molina, who sustained neck, back and shoulder injuries in a violent collision at home plate with Josh Harrison. • Marlins 9, Nationals 0: MIAMI — Stephen Strasburg gave up a career-high seven runs in five innings and first-place Washington’s losing streak reached five games when the Nationals were beaten by Ricky Nolasco and last-place Miami. Nolasco (1012) allowed five hits in his third career shutout and eighth complete game. • Reds 5, Diamondbacks 2: PHOENIX — Johnny Cueto scattered four hits over seven innings for his major league-leading 17th win and Cincinnati beat slumping Arizona. • Braves 2, Padres 0: SAN DIEGO — Kris Medlen extended his scoreless streak to 28 1⁄3 innings for Atlanta by holding San Diego to five singles over eight innings. • Mets 9, Phillies 5: PHILADELPHIA — Ike Davis hit a tiebreaking double during a four-run 10th inning, Kelly Shoppach had a two-run homer and New York beat Philadelphia for its third straight victory. • Giants 3, Astros 2: HOUSTON — Pinch-hitter Hector Sanchez delivered a go-ahead single in the ninth inning and San Francisco rallied to beat Houston. • Rockies 8, Dodgers 4: DENVER — Wilin Rosario homered among his three hits and drove in three runs, Tyler Chatwood pitched five effective innings and Colorado beat Los Angeles. • Brewers 4, Cubs 1: CHICAGO — Jeff Bianchi hit a three-run shot for his first big league homer to lead Milwaukee over Chicago.

Olmedo ss Beckham 2b Totals

0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 2 28 0 2 0 4 7

.294 .228

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Markakis rf 4 0 1 3 0 0 .293 Hardy ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .232 Ad.Jones cf 3 1 1 1 1 1 .288 Wieters c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .238 Ford dh 4 1 1 1 0 2 .205 Mar.Reynolds 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .222 McLouth lf 4 1 3 0 0 0 .274 Machado 3b 2 1 0 1 1 1 .250 Andino 2b 3 1 2 0 1 0 .220 Totals 32 6 11 6 3 7 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 2 1 Baltimore 031 001 10x — 6 11 0 E—Pierzynski (6). LOB—Chicago 5, Baltimore 6. 2B—Markakis (24), Andino (10). HR—Ford (2), off Sale; Ad.Jones (25), off Humber. SB—McLouth (6), Machado (1). DP—Chicago 1; Baltimore 1. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sale L, 15-5 4 6 4 4 3 5 75 2.81 Humber 4 5 2 2 0 2 65 5.87 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tillman W, 7-2 7 1 0 0 4 5 109 3.26 Matusz 2 1 0 0 0 2 24 5.28 T—2:30. A—12,841 (45,971).

Yankees 2, Blue Jays 1 BB 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kipnis 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .255 As.Cabrera dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .274 Choo rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .278 C.Santana c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .244 Brantley cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .288 Duncan lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .203 Lillibridge ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .189 Kotchman 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .233 Donald 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .202 Totals 35 0 8 0 1 6 Oakland 022 010 002 — 7 11 1 Cleveland 000 000 000 — 0 8 2 E—Reddick (5), Choo (2), Lillibridge (5). LOB— Oakland 9, Cleveland 9. 2B—S.Smith (16), Carter (10), Rosales (2), As.Cabrera (30), Lillibridge (5). HR—Moss (14), off McAllister; Carter (12), off McAllister. SB—Donaldson (3).

Chicago Wise cf Youkilis 3b A.Dunn dh Konerko 1b Rios rf Jor.Danks rf Pierzynski c Viciedo lf Al.Ramirez ss

W 75 71 70 62 57

ERA 3.40 1.71 4.34 2.13 2.64 ERA 3.21 3.38 2.87

Angels 6, Red Sox 5 Boston Podsednik lf Pedroia 2b Ellsbury cf Lavarnway c Loney 1b Saltalamacchia dh Kalish rf Iglesias ss Ciriaco 3b Totals

New York Baltimore Tampa Bay Boston Toronto

East Division Pct GB WCGB .581 — — .555 3½ — .543 5 1½ .477 13½ 10 .445 17½ 14 Central Division Pct GB WCGB .555 — — .539 2 2 .445 14 14 .426 16½ 16½ .403 19½ 19½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .597 — — .555 5½ — .519 10 4½ .485 14½ 9

Toronto R.Davis lf Rasmus cf Encarnacion 1b Lind dh Y.Escobar ss Torrealba c McCoy 2b Sierra rf Hechavarria 3b Totals

AB 2 3 3 4 4 4 3 3 3 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

H 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 4

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

BB 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 1 0 1 0 3 0 0 2 7

Avg. .249 .232 .288 .227 .246 .243 .211 .294 .213

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jeter ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .321 Swisher 1b 3 0 1 1 1 2 .276 Cano 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .308 Pearce dh 2 1 0 0 1 1 .247 R.Martin c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .195 Granderson cf 2 0 0 1 0 1 .235 An.Jones rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .206 J.Nix 3b 3 1 2 0 0 0 .255 I.Suzuki lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .267 Totals 27 2 5 2 2 7 Toronto 000 010 000 — 1 4 0 New York 001 100 00x — 2 5 0 LOB—Toronto 5, New York 4. 2B—Y.Escobar (15). HR—Hechavarria (1), off P.Hughes. SB—J.Nix (5). DP—Toronto 1; New York 1. Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA R.Romero L, 8-12 7 5 2 2 2 6 106 5.50 Lyon 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 1.88 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hughes W, 13-11 7 4 1 1 3 5 110 4.02 D.Robertson H, 21 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 2.18 Soriano S, 34-37 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 2.01 T—2:28. A—42,472 (50,291).

Royals 9, Tigers 8 Detroit A.Jackson cf Dirks rf Mi.Cabrera 3b Fielder 1b D.Young dh Avila c Jh.Peralta ss Infante 2b Berry lf Totals

AB 3 5 5 3 5 4 4 4 4 37

R 3 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 8

H 3 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 10

BI 0 1 1 2 2 1 1 0 0 8

BB 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 1 1 0 2 3 1 0 2 10

Avg. .307 .333 .325 .311 .271 .252 .256 .274 .268

Kansas City J.Dyson cf

AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 3 2 1 0 2 1 .270

A.Escobar ss 5 1 2 1 0 1 .302 A.Gordon lf 5 2 2 2 0 2 .297 Butler dh 4 1 3 2 1 1 .308 1-L.Cain pr-dh 0 1 0 0 0 0 .244 S.Perez c 5 1 2 1 0 0 .297 Moustakas 3b 5 0 3 3 0 0 .250 Francoeur rf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .232 Hosmer 1b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .239 Giavotella 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .233 Totals 39 9 15 9 5 9 Detroit 303 000 110 — 8 10 0 Kansas City 340 001 01x — 9 15 0 1-ran for Butler in the 8th. LOB—Detroit 6, Kansas City 11. 2B—Dirks (15), Fielder (26), A.Gordon 2 (44), S.Perez 2 (13), Moustakas (26). HR—D.Young (15), off Mendoza; Jh.Peralta (10), off Crow. SB—A.Jackson (11), L.Cain (6), Giavotella (1). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Verlander 5 2-3 12 8 8 3 6 120 2.80 D.Downs 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 1.84 Villarreal L, 3-4 1 2-3 2 1 1 1 2 25 2.28 Coke 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 12 3.72 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mendoza 5 7 6 6 1 4 82 4.51 K.Herrera H, 16 1 2-3 2 1 1 0 2 26 2.66 Collins 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 3.06 Crow W, 3-1 BS, 6 1 1-3 1 1 1 0 3 20 3.52 G.Holland S, 8-10 1 0 0 0 2 1 24 2.89 Collins pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—3:30. A—13,601 (37,903).

NL Boxscores Mets 9, Phillies 5 (10 innings) New York Tejada ss Dan.Murphy 2b D.Wright 3b I.Davis 1b Duda lf Bay lf Shoppach c Baxter rf An.Torres cf R.Ramirez p Edgin p Rauch p b-Ju.Turner ph Parnell p C.Young p R.Carson p Hairston cf Totals

AB 5 5 3 5 5 0 5 4 3 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 2 40

R 2 0 2 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

H 2 3 2 1 2 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14

BI 0 0 2 1 1 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

SO 0 1 0 0 2 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 8

Avg. .301 .286 .319 .223 .242 .152 .318 .288 .228 ------.279 --.120 --.270

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rollins ss 3 1 0 0 2 0 .243 Frandsen 3b 4 1 0 0 0 1 .337 Utley 2b 4 2 2 1 1 0 .254 Howard 1b 5 1 1 4 0 3 .244 Mayberry cf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .243 D.Brown lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Pierre lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .298 L.Nix rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .261 Kratz c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .289 Worley p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .081 Valdes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Polanco ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .257 Lindblom p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bastardo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Papelbon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Wigginton ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Rosenberg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 5 6 5 5 7 New York 100 210 010 4 — 9 14 1 Philadelphia 400 010 000 0 — 5 6 0 a-grounded out for Valdes in the 6th. b-flied out for Rauch in the 9th. c-grounded out for Papelbon in the 9th. E—Dan.Murphy (12). LOB—New York 6, Philadelphia 7. 2B—Tejada (23), I.Davis (21), Shoppach (1). HR—Baxter (1), off Worley; Shoppach (2), off Rosenberg; Howard (9), off C.Young; Utley (9), off C.Young. DP—New York 1; Philadelphia 2.

New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Young 4 1-3 4 5 5 3 2 89 4.64 R.Carson 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 5.06 R.Ramirez 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 4.30 Edgin 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 25 4.34 Rauch 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 3.06 Parnell W, 4-3 2 1 0 0 0 2 24 3.02 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Worley 4 1-3 9 4 4 0 4 60 4.20 Valdes 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 26 2.93 Lindblom H, 19 1 0 1 1 2 1 18 3.70 Bastardo BS, 4-4 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 5.13 Papelbon 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 2.65 Rosenberg L, 0-2 1 4 4 4 0 0 18 12.66 Lindblom pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—3:41. A—41,227 (43,651).

Brewers 4, Cubs 1 Milwaukee Aoki rf R.Weeks 2b Braun lf Ar.Ramirez 3b Hart 1b M.Maldonado c C.Gomez cf Bianchi ss Gallardo p a-Morgan ph Fr.Rodriguez p Axford p Totals

AB 4 2 4 4 4 4 3 3 2 1 0 0 31

R 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 4

H 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 6

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .282 .215 .306 .292 .272 .274 .257 .227 .143 .238 --.000

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. DeJesus rf-cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .266 Valbuena 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .225 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .283 A.Soriano lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .260 S.Castro ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .276 W.Castillo c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .256 B.Jackson cf 2 0 0 0 1 2 .206 Camp p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Barney 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .256 T.Wood p 2 1 1 1 0 0 .222 Al.Cabrera p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Mather rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .213 Totals 29 1 3 1 3 11 Milwaukee 030 000 010 — 4 6 0 Chicago 001 000 000 — 1 3 0 a-grounded out for Gallardo in the 8th. LOB—Milwaukee 2, Chicago 4. 2B—Aoki (23), Braun (25), Hart (31). HR—Bianchi (1), off T.Wood; T.Wood (1), off Gallardo. SB—Aoki (21). DP—Milwaukee 1; Chicago 1. Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo W, 14-8 7 3 1 1 3 9 102 3.52 Fr.Rodriguez H, 24 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 4.76 Axford S, 21-29 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 5.26 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T.Wood L, 4-11 7 5 3 3 0 4 95 4.71 Al.Cabrera 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 17 8.38 Camp 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 14 3.48 T—2:34. A—30,017 (41,009).

Reyes ss 5 1 0 0 0 0 .281 Ca.Lee 1b 4 2 1 1 1 0 .280 Stanton rf 4 1 3 3 0 1 .292 Dobbs 3b 4 0 1 2 0 0 .308 D.Solano 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .288 Brantly c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .241 Nolasco p 3 1 1 0 0 2 .178 Totals 37 9 13 9 2 4 Washington 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 Miami 203 112 00x — 9 13 1 a-doubled for Stammen in the 9th. E—Espinosa (12), Dobbs (8). LOB—Washington 8, Miami 7. 2B—Tracy (6), Ca.Lee (22), Stanton (26). HR—Ruggiano (13), off Strasburg. SB—Petersen (6), Ca.Lee (3).

C.Johnson 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .268 R.Wheeler 1b 3 0 2 0 0 0 .222 Jo.McDonald ss 2 1 0 0 1 1 .231 Miley p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .212 Lindstrom p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Elmore ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .161 Bergesen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 30 2 4 2 2 6 Cincinnati 030 000 020 — 5 9 0 Arizona 100 010 000 — 2 4 1 a-flied out for Lindstrom in the 8th. b-flied out for Broxton in the 9th. E—Jo.McDonald (1). LOB—Cincinnati 6, Arizona 4. 2B—B.Phillips (28), G.Parra 2 (20), R.Wheeler (3). 3B—Frazier (6). SB—B.Phillips (11).

Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Strasburg L, 15-6 5 9 7 5 1 3 84 3.05 Stammen 3 4 2 2 1 1 43 2.54 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nolasco W, 10-12 9 5 0 0 0 6 115 4.78 T—2:22. A—24,877 (37,442).

Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cueto W, 17-6 7 4 2 2 1 5 105 2.48 Broxton H, 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 5.00 Chapman S, 33-37 1 0 0 0 1 1 14 1.27 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miley L, 14-9 7 6 3 3 1 5 107 2.85 Lindstrom 1 3 2 2 0 0 19 18.00 Bergesen 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 2.81 T—2:40. A—20,550 (48,633).

Pirates 9, Cardinals 0 St. Louis Jay cf Schumaker 2b Holliday lf S.Robinson lf Craig 1b Beltran rf Descalso ss Y.Molina c T.Cruz c Freese 3b Furcal ss M.Carpenter rf Westbrook p a-R.Jackson ph Dickson p Totals

AB 4 4 3 1 4 2 0 1 2 3 2 1 1 1 1 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 5

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 9

Avg. .312 .311 .309 .264 .316 .269 .221 .325 .245 .298 .268 .308 .130 .125 .500

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tabata lf 3 1 1 0 2 1 .237 Snider rf 4 0 2 1 1 1 .300 A.McCutchen cf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .345 G.Jones 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .281 P.Alvarez 3b 5 3 4 4 0 1 .247 McKenry c 5 1 2 1 0 1 .258 J.Harrison 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .239 Barmes ss 4 0 1 2 0 0 .223 Ja.McDonald p 0 0 0 0 1 0 .156 b-Clement ph 1 1 0 0 0 0 .000 Resop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Takahashi p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 9 14 9 4 6 St. Louis 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 Pittsburgh 102 041 10x — 9 14 0 a-popped out for Westbrook in the 6th. b-reached on error for Ja.McDonald in the 7th. E—Descalso (9). LOB—St. Louis 4, Pittsburgh 9. 2B—Jay (14), A.McCutchen (24), P.Alvarez (20). 3B—Snider (1). HR—P.Alvarez (24), off Westbrook; P.Alvarez (25), off Dickson. DP—Pittsburgh 2. St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Westbrk L, 13-10 5 11 7 7 4 2 103 3.94 Dickson 3 3 2 1 0 4 37 7.11 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McDonald W, 12-6 7 2 0 0 1 6 97 3.57 Resop 1 3 0 0 0 1 17 3.62 Takahashi 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 0.00 T—2:30. A—17,492 (38,362).

Braves 2, Padres 0 Atlanta Bourn cf Prado ss-lf Heyward rf C.Jones 3b F.Freeman 1b Re.Johnson lf Janish ss McCann c Uggla 2b Medlen p c-J.Francisco ph Kimbrel p Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 3 3 1 4 4 3 1 0 34

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

H 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 7

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 0 2 1 3 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 12

Avg. .285 .296 .277 .301 .267 .306 .201 .234 .207 .100 .251 ---

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ev.Cabrera ss 4 0 2 0 0 1 .241 Venable rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .258 Headley 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .276 Quentin lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Alonso 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .274 Forsythe 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .266 Maybin cf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .228 Jo.Baker c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Werner p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Amarista ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .253 Vincent p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Layne p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Kotsay ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Burns p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 31 0 6 0 0 12 Atlanta 100 010 000 — 2 7 0 San Diego 000 000 000 — 0 6 1 a-singled for Werner in the 6th. b-struck out for Layne in the 8th. c-grounded out for Medlen in the 9th. E—Alonso (10). LOB—Atlanta 7, San Diego 4. 2B—C.Jones (21). HR—Uggla (16), off Werner. SB—Prado 2 (17), Ev.Cabrera (25). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Medlen W, 6-1 8 5 0 0 0 9 100 1.71 Kimbrel S, 32-34 1 1 0 0 0 3 17 1.13 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Werner L, 1-1 6 4 2 2 0 7 92 3.00 Vincent 1 1-3 2 0 0 0 2 24 2.92 Layne 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 8 0.00 Burns 1 1 0 0 1 1 18 3.38 T—2:33. A—20,955 (42,691).

Reds 5, Diamondbacks 2 Cincinnati Cozart ss Stubbs cf B.Phillips 2b Ludwick lf Frazier 1b Rolen 3b Heisey rf Hanigan c Cueto p Broxton p b-Paul ph Chapman p Totals

AB 5 5 4 4 4 3 4 4 2 0 1 0 36

R 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

H 0 0 2 1 2 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 9

BI 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 3 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .245 .222 .297 .275 .295 .253 .279 .290 .107 --.283 ---

Arizona G.Parra cf A.Hill 2b Kubel lf J.Upton rf M.Montero c

AB 4 4 2 4 4

R 1 0 0 0 0

H 2 0 0 0 0

BI 1 0 1 0 0

BB 0 0 1 0 0

SO 0 0 0 2 1

Avg. .277 .296 .266 .276 .276

Rockies 8, Dodgers 4 Los Angeles M.Ellis 2b Victorino lf-cf Kemp cf J.Rivera lf Ad.Gonzalez 1b H.Ramirez ss Ethier rf A.Kennedy 3b A.Ellis c Capuano p a-Punto ph J.Wright p Wall p b-L.Cruz ph Totals

AB 4 4 0 2 3 4 4 3 2 2 1 0 0 1 30

R 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H 1 0 0 1 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BI 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 6

Avg. .265 .258 .337 .239 .200 .256 .290 .263 .281 .089 .200 .000 --.298

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Colvin cf 5 0 1 1 0 1 .289 Rutledge ss 4 2 2 0 0 0 .348 J.Herrera ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .249 Pacheco 1b 4 2 2 1 0 0 .308 W.Rosario c 4 2 3 3 0 0 .252 Nelson 3b 4 0 0 1 0 1 .272 A.Brown rf 4 1 3 1 0 1 .239 LeMahieu 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .293 Blackmon lf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .135 Chatwood p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Mat.Reynolds p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 C.Torres p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .400 R.Betancourt p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 36 8 14 8 0 3 Los Angeles 010 100 011 — 4 7 0 Colorado 401 100 20x — 8 14 0 a-grounded out for Capuano in the 7th. b-struck out for Wall in the 9th. LOB—Los Angeles 5, Colorado 5. 2B—M.Ellis (15), Ethier (32), Rutledge (12), Pacheco (23), A.Brown (5), LeMahieu (8), Blackmon (3). 3B—Rutledge (4). HR—H.Ramirez (21), off C.Torres; W.Rosario (22), off Capuano. SB—Victorino (31). DP—Colorado 2. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Capuano L, 11-10 6 10 6 6 0 3 86 3.58 J.Wright 1 4 2 2 0 0 13 4.18 Wall 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 11.57 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chatwood W, 4-3 5 5 2 2 3 4 80 4.81 Mat.Reynolds 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 14 4.44 C.Torres 2 2 2 2 1 1 34 4.26 R.Betancourt 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.44 T—2:50. A—28,368 (50,398).

Giants 3, Astros 2 San Francisco Pagan cf Scutaro 2b Sandoval 3b Romo p Posey c Pence rf Belt 1b G.Blanco lf b-Arias ph-3b B.Crawford ss M.Cain p S.Casilla p c-H.Sanchez ph 1-F.Peguero pr-lf Totals

AB 4 5 3 0 4 4 4 3 1 4 3 0 1 0 36

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 9

BI 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 3

BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 1 2 0 0 2 0 2 0 2 2 0 0 0 11

Avg. .291 .285 .285 --.327 .260 .264 .238 .282 .243 .159 .000 .265 .000

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Altuve 2b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .298 Paredes rf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .000 Wallace 1b 4 0 3 0 0 1 .292 J.Castro c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .259 Greene ss 3 0 0 0 1 2 .224 F.Martinez lf 3 1 1 1 0 2 .182 Fe.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-S.Moore ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .216 W.Wright p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 W.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ambriz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ma.Gonzalez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .235 B.Barnes cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .167 B.Norris p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .122 Bogusevic lf 1 0 0 0 1 0 .209 Totals 32 2 6 1 4 6 San Francisco 000 010 002 — 3 9 2 Houston 000 010 010 — 2 6 0 a-walked for Fe.Rodriguez in the 8th. b-doubled for G.Blanco in the 9th. c-singled for S.Casilla in the 9th. 1-ran for H.Sanchez in the 9th. E—M.Cain (2), Belt (4). LOB—San Francisco 8, Houston 8. 2B—Pagan (28), Posey (29), Pence (23), Arias (12), Wallace (6). HR—Pagan (8), off B.Norris; F.Martinez (2), off M.Cain. SB—Paredes (1). San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA M.Cain 7 1-3 6 2 2 3 5 118 2.82 S.Casilla W, 5-5 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 9 3.00 Romo S, 7-8 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 2.01 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA B.Norris 6 2-3 6 1 1 2 7 100 5.01 Fe.Rodriguez 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 3 24 5.57 W.Wright 0 1 1 1 0 0 3 3.38 W.Lopez L, 5-3 BS 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 18 2.45 Ambriz 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 7.71 W.Wright pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. T—3:13. A—13,516 (40,981).

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Marlins 9, Nationals 0 Washington Werth rf Harper cf Zimmerman 3b LaRoche 1b Morse lf Stammen p a-Tracy ph Desmond ss Espinosa 2b K.Suzuki c Strasburg p Lombardozzi lf Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 0 1 4 3 4 2 1 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 5

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 6

Avg. .298 .248 .280 .258 .283 .000 .281 .279 .249 .214 .267 .280

Miami Petersen lf Ruggiano cf

AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 1 1 0 0 0 .201 4 2 4 2 1 0 .327

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D4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012

Roddick, Venus win openers TENNIS: U.S. OPEN

By Howard Fendrich The Associated Press

NEW YORK — That Andy Roddick’s last match as a twentysomething would not be his last match at the 2012 U.S. Open was hardly in doubt Tuesday, especially whenever he was launching that intimidating, tough-tohandle serve of his. To close the first set: ace at 141 mph. To close the second: ace at 134 mph. To close the third: ace at 127 mph. Yes, even as Roddick’s 30th birthday approaches on Thursday, even as his body has succumbed to injury after injury, that serve is pretty much still the same as it ever was. Now that he more frequently faces opponents who grew up cheering for him — such as 21-year-old

qualifier Rhyne Williams of Knoxville, Tenn., the foil for Tuesday’s 6-3, 6-4, 6-4 victory — Roddick knows more than ever he needs to rely on the best thing he’s got, and 20 aces helped this time. “You really don’t see that shot,” Williams said glowingly about Roddick’s serve. Following Roddick into Arthur Ashe Stadium was 32-year-old Venus Williams, playing her first U.S. Open match since she pulled out before the second round in 2011 and revealed she had been diagnosed with an autoimmune disease. After a shaky start, dropping the first two games — and even seven points in a row in one stretch — Williams used her own powerful serve to right herself and beat

Bethanie Mattek-Sands of the U.S. 6-3, 6-1. One serve at 124 mph jammed Mattek-Sands’ left index finger, shoving it into a racket string so hard she needed attention from a trainer. “She was crushing her serves,” Mattek-Sands said. “I don’t think anyone’s returning those, so I’m not going to beat myself up too much.” Venus Williams won the 2000 and 2001 U.S. Opens, two of her seven career Grand Slam titles. That’s half as many as her younger sister, Serena, who began her bid for No. 15 with a 6-1, 6-1 victory over 75th-ranked CoCo Vandeweghe in Tuesday’s last match in Ashe, yet another all-American affair. Three of the day’s most notable upsets were turned in by young, up-and-coming Americans. In singles,

19-year-old Sloane Stephens, who is ranked 44th, eliminated 2010 French Open champion Francesca Schiavone 6-3, 6-4. And in doubles, 19-yearold Jack Sock and 22-yearold Steve Johnson knocked out the top-seeded team of Max Mirnyi of Belarus and Daniel Nestor of Canada 16, 7-6 (4), 6-2, while brothers Ryan and Christian Harrison defeated last year’s runnersup, Mariusz Fyrstenberg and Marcin Matkowski of Poland 7-6 (3), 2-6, 7-6 (7). One other exit of significance: 2009 runner-up Caroline Wozniacki, who began the year ranked No. 1 but has struggled and was seeded eighth, lost 6-2, 6-2 against 96th-ranked Irina-Camelia Begu of Romania. Bothered by a bad right knee, Wozniacki also lost in the first round at Wimbledon.

Prep volleyball at a glance A look at the Central Oregon high school volleyball teams competing this season:

CLASS 5A BEND

MOUNTAIN VIEW

SUMMIT

REDMOND

Head coach: Kristin Cooper (sixth season) 2011 record: 0-8 Intermountain Hybrid, 0-4 Class 5A Intermountain Conference (third); lost to West Albany in Class 5A play-in round Returning all-league players: Molly Maloney, middle blocker; Alicia Todd, sr., defensive specialist Season opener: Burns at Bend, Sept. 4 Class 5A Intermountain Conference opener: Bend at Summit, Sept. 27

Head coach: Jill McKae (second season) 2011 record: 4-4 Intermountain Hybrid, 2-2 Class 5A Intermountain Conference (second); went 0-2 at Class 5A state tournament Returning all-league players: Rachel Buehner, sr., libero; Jill Roshak, jr., middle blocker Season opener: Mountain View vs. West Albany and Churchill at Summit, Sept. 5 Class 5A Intermountain Conference opener: Mountain View at Redmond, Sept. 25

Head coach: Jill Waskom (sixth season) 2011 record: 6-2 Intermountain Hybrid, 4-0 Class 5A Intermountain Conference (first); defeated West Albany in Class 5A state final Returning all-league player: Laney Hayes, sr., middle blocker Season opener: West Albany at Summit, Sept. 5 Class 5A Intermountain Conference opener: Summit at Redmond, Sept. 18

Head coach: Kimber Beers (first season) 2011 record: 2-6 Intermountain Hybrid, 5-2 Class 6A Special District 1 (second); lost to Westview in the first round of the Class 6A state playoffs Key returning players: Johanna Bailey, sr., middle blocker; Shelby Bergum, jr., middle blocker Season opener: Redmond at Ridgeview, Sept. 6 Class 5A Intermountain Conference opener: Summit at Redmond, Sept. 18

CLASS 4A RIDGEVIEW Head coach: Debi Dewey (first season) 2011 record: First-year program Key players: Katie Nurge, jr., libero; Brianna Yeakey, jr., outside hitter; Kayla Jackson, jr., outside hitter; Rhian Sage, jr., setter; Kaci Sage, jr., defensive specialist Season opener: Ridgeview at La Pine, Sept. 4 Class 4A Special District 1 opener: Ridgeview at Crook County, Oct. 2

CROOK COUNTY

MADRAS

SISTERS

LA PINE

Head coach: Rosie Honl (17th season) 2011 record: 8-0 Intermountain Hybrid, 2-0 Class 4A Special District 1 (first); defeated Hidden Valley in Class 4A state final Returning all-league players: Makayla Lindburg, sr., middle blocker; Hannah Troutman, jr., outside hitter Season opener: Crook County at Mountain View tournament, Sept. 8 Class 4A Special District 1 opener: Ridgeview at Crook County, Oct. 2

Head coach: Jamie Smith (fourth season) 2011 record: 7-3 Class 4A Tri-Valley Conference (third); lost to Banks in Class 4A play-in round Returning all-league players: Lauren Simmons, sr., libero; Sarah Brown, sr., middle blocker, Shelby Mauritson, so., outside hitter Season opener: Cascade at Madras, Sept. 6 Class 4A Tri-Valley League opener: Estacada at Madras, Sept. 20

Head coach: Miki McFadden (first season) 2011 record: 10-0 Class 4A Sky-Em League (first); finished fifth at Class 4A state tournament Returning all-league player: Shannon Fouts, sr., setter Season opener: Stayton at Sisters, Sept. 6 Class 4A Sky-Em League opener: Sisters at Junction City, Sept. 18

Head coach: Aaron Mallory (third season) 2011 record: 0-10 Class 4A Sky-Em League (sixth) Key returning players: Cassandra Roes, sr., outside hitter; Kelley Terrell, sr., setter; Holly Jackson, sr., middle hitter Season opener: Ridgeview at La Pine, Sept. 4 Class 4A Sky-Em League opener: La Pine at Sweet Home, Sept. 18

CLASS 2A CULVER

CLASS 1A GILCHRIST

Head coach: Randi Viggiano (third season) 2011 record: 13-1 Class 2A Tri-River Conference (first); finished fourth at Class 2A state tournament Returning all-league players: Shealene Little, so., outside hitter; Gabrielle Alley, jr., outside hitter; Cassandra Fulton, sr., middle blocker; Marie Schumacher, jr., libero Season opener: Culver at Warrenton tournament, Sept. 1 Class 2A Tri-River Conference opener: Regis at Culver, Sept. 4

Head coach: Heather James (first year) 2011 record: 4-10 Class 1A Mountain Valley League (sixth) Key returning player: Ashley James, sr., middle; Paige Kooker, sr., outside hitter; Denise Gordon, sr., outside hitter Season opener: Gilchrist at Prospect, Sept. 7 Class 1A Mountain Valley League opener: Gilchrist at Prospect, Sept. 7

Volleyball Continued from D1 “It doesn’t change how we prepare,” Waskom says about her team entering the season as the defending state champions. “The pressure’s always there. Summit kids are expected to win and succeed no matter what. But we’ve turned that into a good thing.” The Storm are hardly the only program in Central Oregon that enters the 2012 volleyball season with high hopes. Mountain View, which lost to Summit in the state quarterfinals last year, brings back senior libero Rachel Buehner and junior middle Jill Roshak, among others. “Rachel really sets the tone for us as the libero with her serve receive,” Mountain View coach Jill McKae says about Buehner, who made the all-state second team in 2011. “And Jill, she hits a heavy ball. She’s really breaking into her own this year.” Bend High, which last made the state playoffs in 2007, heads into 2012 ready to make some noise in the Intermountain Conference. Middle blocker Molly Maloney headlines a senior class intent on making the postseason. “Our goal is always to make the state playoffs and win league,” says Bend coach Kristin Cooper, who brings back seven players with starting experience. “Our girls have set their goals high. We’ve got a lot of returners who want

CENTRAL CHRISTIAN

TRINITY LUTHERAN

Head coach: Brooke Smalstig (fifth season) 2011 record: 3-5 Class 1A Big Sky League (sixth) Key returning players: Desiree Duke, sr., outside hitter; Kaylin McAfee, jr., middle blocker; Valerie Goodew, jr., defensive specialist Season opener: Central Christian at Trinity Lutheran, Aug. 31 Class 1A Big Sky League opener: Central Christian at Horizon Christian, Sept. 25

Head coach: Greg Clift (second season) 2011 record: 1-13 Class 1A Mountain Valley League (eighth) Key returning players: Kelsey Polk, sr., opposite; Megan Clift, so., outside hitter; Katie Murphy, so., outside hitter Season opener: Central Christian at Trinity Lutheran, Aug. 31 Class 1A Mountain Valley League opener: Trinity Lutheran at Butte Falls, Sept. 7

to put a sign up in the gym (for state placers).” After advancing to the Class 6A state playoffs each of the past two years, Redmond, which is now competing at the 5A level because of an enrollment dip with the opening of Ridgeview High across town, returns just two players with varsity experience this season. “It’ll be a building year,” says firstyear coach Kimber Beers, who will look to middle blockers Shelby Bergum and Johanna Bailey to provide leadership for a young team. “I’ve been pleasantly surprised by the effort and enthusiasm so far.” Never short on effort or enthusiasm, Crook County rolls into the 2012 season as the team to beat in the Intermountain Hybrid and all of Class 4A. Senior middle blocker Makayla Lindburg, 4A’s player of the year in each of the past two seasons, highlights a Cowgirl team looking to win its seventh consecutive state title. Crook County is still figuring out who will replace graduated libero Braiden Johnston, but Lindburg and outside hitters Hannah Troutman and Annie Fraser should provide plenty of help while the Cowgirls settle on someone new to start their offense. “They’re looking good and hungry,” Crook County coach Rosie Honl says about her team. “We’ve got goals for all of our tournaments.” Also in 4A, Sisters looks to return to

the state tourney with new coach Miki McFadden, Madras hopes to improve on last year’s third-place finish in the TriValley Conference, La Pine will try to build around a strong senior class, and Ridgeview could contend for a play-in berth in its first year of existence. “We’ve got five returning varsity players (who saw time at Redmond High last season) and an amazing group of sophomores,” Ridgeview coach Debi Dewey says. “We’ll see how the season goes. We have some tough 4A competition right here in Central Oregon. … Hopefully we can all end up at the state (tournament) and duke it out there.” Central Oregon’s smaller schools expect to have banner seasons as well, in particular Class 2A Culver. The Bulldogs return four players from last year’s team that placed fourth at state, including Shealene Little, who received all-state first-team recognition as a freshman. “We’re young but talented,” says Culver coach Randi Viggiano. “We’ve got the tools, it’s just whether or not it all comes together.” Gilchrist, Central Christian (Redmond) and Trinity Lutheran (Bend) all will field Class 1A teams this season. The area’s three smallest schools hope to battle for postseason berths after all three programs missed out on the state playoffs last year. — Reporter: 541-383-0305, beastes@bendbulletin.com.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Story lines abound as 2012 season is ready to kick off By John Marshall The Associated Press

PHOENIX — College football is in for some big and, some say, much-needed changes with the switch to a four-team playoff. Before we get to that, there’s still a couple more seasons under the current system; the playoffs don’t begin until 2014. And this one will be worth watching. There’s plenty of interesting story lines, from Penn State trying to rebuild in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal to Urban Meyer’s return to coaching with Ohio State. There’s no shortage of great players, either. Southern California quarterback Matt Barkley skipped the NFL for the chance at a national title, Michigan’s Denard Robinson is a blur even without his shoelaces tied and Wisconsin’s Montee Ball is like trying to tackle a wrecking ball. Great teams? Could be a few of those, too. USC, LSU, Alabama, Oklahoma, Oregon — the BCS could be under a lot of strain this season with those teams all bidding for No. 1. So to get you ready, we’ve got a rundown of some of the things to watch out for this season. Enjoy.

Top teams USC. Barkley is back. So is his top target, Robert Woods. Former Penn State running back Silas Redd was a nice addition. Postseason eligible again, the Trojans aren’t aiming for just any bowl; they want a trip to Miami and a national championship. Alabama. The Crimson Tide have won two of the past three national championships. They figure to be contenders for another. LSU. The Honey Badger is gone. All those other NFL prospects — such as defensive end Sam Montgomery and safety Eric Reid — should keep the Tigers from missing him. Oklahoma. The Sooners have a record-setting QB in Landry Jones, a brick wall of an offensive line and with the return of Mike Stoops, Bob’s feisty little brother, they should be good on defense, too. Oregon. LaMichael James and Darron Thomas are gone? Big deal. The Ducks have plenty of other players who can fly in those new winged unis.

Keep an eye on Arkansas. QB Tyler Wilson and RB Knile Davis are back, coach John L. Smith has calmed the storm after Bobby Petrino’s motorcycle crash and subsequent firing. All Arkansas has to do now is get by Alabama and LSU — its only two losses a year ago — which isn’t as farfetched as you might think. Both visit the Natural state, one early (Alabama on Sept. 15) the other late (LSU the day after Thanksgiving) Florida State. The Seminoles’ return to prominence has been rumored for years. Under coach Jimbo Fisher, it may actually happen this season. Wisconsin. The Badgers are hungry after consecutive Rose Bowl losses and they have Ball, one of the nation’s best running backs. Michigan State. Behind RB Le’Veon Bell, the Spartans could be on the verge of breaking a Rose Bowl drought that goes back to 1988. Texas. Mack Brown’s crew appears to be headed back to the big stage behind a helmetrattling defense. West Virginia. The Mountaineers could make their first season in the Big 12 championship worthy.

Top players Barkley, USC. Projected as a high NFL draft pick, Barkley became an instant Heisman Trophy front-runner when he announced he was coming back for his senior season. Ball, Wisconsin. The Bad-

gers’ star running back changed the pronunciation of his name from Mon-tee to Mon-tay. Whatever you call him, dude’s good. Robinson, Michigan. The Wolverines’ electric quarterback has churned out more than 8,000 yards in his career, most of those the past two seasons. Imagine what he could do if he tied his shoes. Geno Smith, West Virginia. The Mountaineers’ QB set multiple school records as a junior and more could be on the way in his final season in Morgantown. Barkevious Mingo, LSU. Been known to train wreck offensive linemen. Jones, Oklahoma. He’s been around since Barry Switzer was coach. OK, maybe not that long, but the four-year starter will leave as the most prolific passer in OU history. De’Anthony Thomas, Oregon. Spectacular as a freshman last season and will likely get more touches this season now that James is in the NFL. Marcus Lattimore, South Carolina. Back from a torn ACL last season, he should be one of the nation’s top running backs this year.

Big games Sept. 1, Michigan vs. Alabama at Cowboys Stadium, Arlington, Texas. The annual opener at Jerry Jones’ funhouse has had some great matchups in the past. This one could be the best of the bunch. Sept. 15, Alabama at Arkansas. Winner could get the inside track on a national-title run. Sept. 22, Michigan at Notre Dame. Last season’s epic finish makes this a must-watch. Oct. 13, Oklahoma vs. Texas in Dallas. The Red River rivalry continues after all the conference shuffling and could become epic again with these two teams on the rise. Oct. 27, Notre Dame at Oklahoma. A rare meeting between power programs. Nov. 3, Alabama at LSU. We may not get sucked into calling it the Game of the Century again, but it still figures to have national-title implications. Nov. 3, Oregon at USC. Triple digits in combined points is a possibility with all those playmakers on the field. Nov. 24, Michigan at Ohio State. Meyer is running the Buckeyes and Michigan appears to be back. This rivalry could be heating back up.

The new guys There was quite a bit of turnover in the coaching ranks over the offseason, with some pretty big names landing in new places. Here’s a few: Bob Davie, New Mexico. Away from coaching for a decade, Davie tries to turn around a program plagued by embarrassments on and off the field under Mike Locksley. Todd Graham, Arizona State. The fast-talking Texan has done everything right in Tempe so far, soothing concerns about bouncing around while building excitement for the program. All that’s left is to win some games. Mike Leach, Washington State. His offenses are always entertaining. So’s his mouth. Meyer, Ohio State. Burned out no more, the two-time national champion coach returns to the sideline with one of the country’s premier programs — and too many references to an Urban renewal. Bill O’Brien, Penn State. The former o-coordinator of the New England Patriots might have the toughest job in the country. Rich Rodriguez, Arizona. RichRod’s three-year run at Michigan didn’t go so well, but he has Tucson buzzing about football again with his suped-up offense. Smith, Arkansas. The Razorbacks needed someone to smooth over the ugliness of Bobby Petrino’s firing. The even-keel Smith should be a good fit. Charlie Weis, Kansas. Weis’ first stint as a head coach petered out at Notre Dame. The Jayhawks are hoping he can turn around a program that languished under Turner Gill.


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Pac Am

GOLF SCOREBOARD

Continued from D1 In a lot of ways, Walker is exactly the golfer the Central Oregon Visitors Association is aiming to attract to the Pac Am, an annual amateur competition that draws golfers from around the country. Playing in the tournament for the second time (the first was in 2010), Walker represents the new blood the tournament craves. And he chose to stay in Central Oregon for an entire week rather than limit himself to the four days of the tournament. But since the economic downturn, the Pac Am has hosted fewer and fewer golfers each year: down from nearly 800 in 2007 and 2008 to fewer than 500 this year. Organizers blame a sluggish economy for the shrinking numbers, and stands to reason for Walker, who skipped the Pac Am last year. “For me, it’s my personal economy,” Walker said Tuesday. “Last year it just didn’t work out well for me to do it. “This year, maybe I shouldn’t have (played) because I have a wedding to participate in. But I committed to it and I am glad I did it.” Though the Pac Am field is smaller than in years past, it was hard to tell on Tuesday. More than 100 golfers took to Ridge, which is one of seven courses in this year’s Pac Am and was playing host in the first round to the men’s and super senior men’s (70 and older) divisions. For Dwight Stadeli, a 48-year-old from Silverton, this marks his 13th year as a Pac Am participant. Stadeli plans his family vacation around the tournament each year, and he still sees many of the same faces as were in the field for his first Pac Am. “It’s a great tournament,” Stadeli said. “You see the same people mostly come back and back. I’ve met a lot of guys over 13 years that I see every year. It’s cool.” Stadeli thinks that the Pac Am has made some wise changes in recent years, including, starting in 2010, moving the tournament from late September to late August, and this year adding open and noncompetitive divisions to appeal to a wider array of golfers. “I think they’re doing a great job,” Stadeli said. “It seems like they’re trying to fit anybody in that they can.” At 28, Andrew Larson, of Centennial, Colo., is making his second consecutive appearance at the Pac Am. Larson traveled alone this year to Central Oregon, but even as one of the youngest players in the field, he is having no trouble connecting with other Pac Am golfers. “All these guys are real friendly,” Larson said. “You can always have a good time (with older golfers). They can fill you with some

Mannion Continued from D1 Mannion was thrown into the fire as a redshirt freshman when he unseated Ryan Katz as the team’s starter. Understandably, he had growing pains. While Mannion finished with 3,332 yards passing (third most for a single season in school history) and 16 touchdowns, he also threw 18 interceptions. But along the way, Mannion earned the confidence of his teammates, and at the end of the season he was voted by the team as its most improved player, along with defensive end Scott Crichton. “He’s been an interesting guy … the minute that season was over he was on the film and out throwing with these guys early on. They all got together and kept doing that,” Riley said. “I know they started it in the summertime again. So if work ethic and desire plus talent have anything to do with improving, then he’s showed all the ingredients to take a good jump.” This year Mannion is one of the Beavers’ four team captains. “I would say I’m just a guy who wants to do whatever

Elks Continued from D1 The Elks’ travel schedule could be more favorable next season, when franchises in Medford and Victoria, British Columbia, join the league. Chico and Redding, both in Northern California, have also been awarded WCL clubs, according to Richards, and they may join the league as soon as next season. With more teams located in Oregon and possibly Northern California, the WCL could switch its division format from East and West to North and South. “There’s enormous growth on the horizon for our league,” said Richards, who added that the league expects to have franchises in Yakima, Wash., and Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, in the next two years as well. “We could envision a 16-team league by 2014.” As the WCL has grown — the league started in 2005 — so has the value of its

D5

The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-3850831, emailed to sports@bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

Club Results AWBREY GLEN Family Scramble, Aug. 24 Scramble/Alternate Shot on Loop Course 1, Ron Seals/Diane Seals/Matthew Seals/Jake Seals, 48. 2, James Chrisman/Anne Chrisman/Cole Chrisman/Natalie Chrisman, 49. 3, Brian Wasserman/Vicky Wasserman/TJ Wasserman/Molly Wasserman, 50. Saturday Men’s Game, Aug. 25 Partner’s Best Ball 1, Joe Oberto/Tom Carrico, 63. 2, Joe Oberto/Ron Lemp, 63. Skins — Joe Oberto, 4. Joe Oberto, 3. C.J. Edmonds, 3. Bert Larson, 2. C.J. Edmonds, 2.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Patrick Harrison putts from the fringe while playing the eighth hole during the Pacific Amateur Golf Classic at Sunriver Resort’s Meadows course on Tuesday.

knowledge, on the course and off the course.” Like a lot of golfers, Larson’s ability to play in the Pac Am comes down to resources, he said, and not the quality of the tournament itself. “I will probably have to re-evaluate every year, just to make sure it makes sense timingwise,” he said. “It’s a good event. So I don’t see why I wouldn’t come back, as long as financially and timing makes sense.” Friends talked John Downing, a 70-yearold retiree from Seattle, into playing in the Pac Am for the first time this year. Downing represents more of that new blood in the Pac Am. As he walked toward his car in the Eagle Crest parking lot after his Tuesday round, he offered glowing praise of Central Oregon and the Pac Am. “The people here are very welcoming and very pleasant,” Downing said. “It’s just terrific. I have nothing but good things to say.” His Pac Am experience had officially entailed all of 18 holes of golf. But Downing was not holding back in his appreciation of the tournament’s main offerings: “A lot of laughs and a lot of good camaraderie,” he said. And then he uttered the three words Pac Am organizers love to hear. “I’m coming back.” — Reporter: 541-617-7868, zhall@bendbulletin.com

the team asks of him. I try to be someone who can do all the little things well, someone who can kind of direct the other players on the field if they need help, someone with good knowledge of the offense,” Mannion said. “Those are the kind of things — all of the little things add up to make a big difference — and I think that’s really what I would like to be.” At 6 feet 5 and 218 pounds, Mannion is a classic dropback passer with a notably calm demeanor and a good grasp of the fundamentals, the product of growing up the son of a high school coach. Last season, Riley replaced Katz, a junior who had started for the entire 2010 season, at halftime of the team’s opening loss against Sacramento State. Katz started the next game, but he came out after one series and the job was Mannion’s the rest of the way. Katz has since transferred to San Diego State, and Mannion is backed up this season by junior Cody Vaz. “I’m continuing to learn, that’s the main thing. Continuing to get more accurate,” Mannion said. “I feel like I’ve taken a lot of strides in those areas. I feel at this point the

Elks take honors Five members of the Bend Elks have been named to the West Coast League’s 2012 all-league teams. University of Washington outfielder Will Sparks, who led the WCL in hitting with a .392 batting average, was named to the all-league first team, and the College of San Mateo’s Bo Walter (first base), Darin Gillies of Arizona State (starting pitcher) and the University of Portland’s Travis Radke (starting pitcher) all were named to the all-WCL second team. J.R. Bunda, also a pitcher at UP, received honorable mention.

member clubs. According to Richards, the franchise fee for WCL expansion teams is $250,000, an amount con-

game is slowing down for me. With the year’s experience, the game is much slower that it was a year ago.” The Beavers open on Saturday against Nicholls State, a game that is already drawing attention because of Hurricane Isaac. The Thibodaux, La., campus suspended operations through midweek, including football practice for the Colonels. Nicholls State coach Charlie Stubbs said he hopes damage from Isaac will be minimal enough to allow the team to practice on Thursday before the scheduled flight out of New Orleans on Friday. Mannion said the Beavers hope to embark on a new chapter on Saturday. The opener is not so much about Nicholls State as it is about the Beavers. “Just wanting to be successful is our motivation. Last year is something we don’t want to redo. We absolutely have to put it behind us,” Mannion said. “At this point all we’re focused on is our first game against Nicholls State and we’re not looking back any more, we’re looking forward to a new season and we’re all really excited about it.”

siderably greater than the $10,000 Richards paid to start the Elks in the old Pacific International League in 2000. “We’ve quickly emerged as one of the most visible, up-and-coming summer college (baseball) leagues in the country,” Richards said. “Our ownership groups have had a strategic plan to capture certain markets in the Northwest. And we have great relationships with college programs. … The result of that is, franchise values have gone through the roof.” While the Elks are finished for 2012, more baseball is scheduled for Genna Stadium in the weeks ahead. University of Oregon will hold a fall scrimmage in Bend on Oct. 13. Richards said he is also in talks with Oregon State University, which has scrimmaged in Bend in the past, to hold a similar event in Central Oregon this fall. — Reporter: 5 4 1 -3 8 3 -0 3 0 5 , beastes@bendbulletin.com.

DESERT PEAKS Wednesday Ladies Club, Aug. 22 Red, White and Blue 1, Vicki Moore, 78. 2 (tie), Margaret Sturza, 85; Sara Gephart, 85; Virginia Runge, 85. KP — Patty Pliska. Thursday Men’s Club, Aug. 23 Blind Nine 1, Bob Victorin, 30.5. 2, Val Paterson, 32.5. 3 (tie), Gerry Ellis, 33; Dean Hunt, 33. KP — Don Gish. LD — Joe Stanfield. Friday Night Couples, Aug. 24 Chapman 1 (tie), Francisco Morales/Teresa Lindgren, 30.8; Curt Olson/Margaret Sturza, 30.8. 3, Dean Ditmore/ Juanita Hawkins, 32.7. 4, Joe Stanfield/Cindy Stanfield, 33.3. Sunday Group Play, Aug. 26 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Francisco Morales, 74. 2, Brad Mondoy, 78. 3, Gary Gruner, 79. 4, Rich Vigil, 87. Net: 1, Frank Reece, 62. 2 (tie), Craig Weigand, 66; Al Dupont, 66. 4, Tina Gruner, 67. KP — Frank Reece. LD — Brad Mondoy. JUNIPER Ladies Golf, Aug. 22 Odd Holes A Flight — 1, Jan Carver, 33. 2, Sue Adams, 34.5. 3, Debbie Kerr, 38. B Flight — 1, Judy Davidson, 32. 2, Wesine Hall, 37. 3, Linda Wakefield, 37.5. C Flight — 1, Karen Farmer, 36. 2 (tie), Adrienne Castle, 37.5; Jackie Yake, 37.5. KPs — Cherie Kurth; Cheryl Steppe; Becky Carl. Birdies — Jan Carver; Kareen Queen; Judy Davidson; Becky Carl. Chip-ins — Becky Carl. MEADOW LAKES Senior Men’s League, Aug. 28 Scramble Gross: 1, Charlie McDermott/John McCulloch, 36. Net: Trevor Russell/Jim Shelton, 30. KPs — Trevor Russell, No. 4; John McCulloch, No. 8. QUAIL RUN Men’s Club Championship, Aug. 25-26 Stroke Play A Flight — Gross: 1, Brian Meade, 162. Net: 1, Jerry Smith, 143. 2, Gaylen Bridge, 150. B Flight — Gross: 1, Al Wakefield, 189. Net: 1, Dick Johnson, 144. 2 (tie), Doug Anderson, 154; Rick Bauman, 154. KPs — Bob Harriman, No. 2; Bill Felix, No. 8; Al Wakefield, No. 10; Jerry Smith, No. 14. Mixed Couples Tournament, Aug. 27 Nine-Hole Scramble 1, Dale Toten/Darlene Toten/Josh Day/Deb Aiken, 31. 2 (tie), Steve Randol/Barbara Klinski/Terry Cagaanan/Diane Cagaanan, 32; Tom Merrick/Barbara Heilman/Alan Wakefield/Vivian Taylor, 32; Rick Bauman/Linda Bauman/Jim Rollandi/Brenda Rollandi, 32. KPs — Women: Lahonda Elmblade, No. 8. Men: Dennis Hanniford, No. 8.

Hole-In-One Report Aug. 13 WIDGI CREEK Brenny Brenneman No. 15. . . . . . . . . . . .130 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-iron Aug. 20 WIDGI CREEK Shelly Garroutte, Bend No. 2. . . . . . . . . . . . .106 yards . . . . . . . . . . 4-hybrid Aug. 24 WIDGI CREEK Dave Finney, Surprise, Ariz. No. 5. . . . . . . . . . . . .115 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-iron Aug. 27 QUAIL RUN Jim Ulrey No. 10. . . . . . . . . . . .151 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-iron Aug. 27 RIVER’S EDGE Heidi Froelich, Bend No. 4. . . . . . . . . . . . .134 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-iron

Calendar The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf events calendar. Items should be mailed to P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708; faxed to the sports department at 541385-0831; or emailed to sports@bendbulletin. com. ——— CLINICS OR CLASSES Wednesdays — Golf clinic for senior golfers at Missing Link Family Golf Center in Redmond. Golf instructor Kenneth Johnson will introduce golfers to fundaments of golf swings. Classes held from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Cost is $15. For more information or to register, call 541-923-3426. Thursdays — Ladies golf clinic at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of golf by Stuart Allison, Juniper’s director of instruction. Clinic begins at 8:30 a.m. on Sept. 6 and Sept. 20. Cost is $20 per class and each is open to the public. For more information or to register: call 480-5403015 or email pro@stuartallisongolf.com. ——— TOURNAMENTS Aug. 31 — A Shot in the Dark Night scramble at Brasada Canyons Golf Club in Powell Butte. Four-person scramble begins with 9 p.m. shotgun and asks golfers to play the nine-hole tournament entirely after nightfall with glow-in-the-dark golf equipment. Cost is $5 for Brasada members; $85 for the public. For more information or to register: 541-504-3200. Sept. 6 — Central Oregon Golf Tour tournament at Sunriver Resort’s Woodlands course. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-3185155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. Sept. 8 — American Legion of La Pine’s annual golf tournament at Quail Run Golf Course in La Pine. For more information or to register, call Larry Matthews at 541-419-0861. Sept. 8-9 — Juniper Best Ball is a 36-hole tournament for two-person men’s teams at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. For more information or to register, call 541-548-3121, or download an entry form at www. playjuniper.com. Sept. 10 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event at The Greens at Redmond. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $150 for the season plus a $5 per-event fee. For more information, call Ron Meisner at 541-548-3307. Sept. 10 — Prineville Kiwanis Club Benefit Golf Tournament at Brasada Canyons Golf Club in Powell Butte. Eleventh annual event is a four-person shamble, which begins with a shotgun start at 9 a.m. and includes net and gross divisions. Cost is $125 per player and includes cart, range balls and barbecue lunch. For more information call Wayne Looney at 541-416-9380, or to register, call the Brasada clubhouse at 541-526-6380. Sept. 13-14 — The Kah-Nee-Ta Fall Invitational at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation is presented by the Oregon Chapter of the PGA. Admission is free to spectators. For more information, call 541-553-4971 or visit www. orpga.com. Sept. 14 — Ninth annual Gopher Broke Scramble at Awbrey Glen Golf Club. This four-person scramble tournament begins with a 12:30 p.m. shotgun. Cost is $600 per team and includes golf, cart, polo shirt, appetizers, and food at every hole. Proceeds from the golf tournament go to Bend Park & Recreation District Foundation scholarships. For more information or to register, email Sue Boettner at sueb@bendparksandrec.org or call her at 541-388-1133. Sept. 14 — 10th Annual Mountain View Hospital

Foundation Classic at Eagle Crest Resort’s Challenge Course. The tournament will begin with an 8 a.m. shotgun start. Cost is $150 per person or $500 per team. Entry fee includes green fees, driving range balls, cart, lunch and awards. Proceeds benefit the Mountain View Hospital Foundation. For more information or to register, call Jill Sansom at 541-475-3882. Sept. 15-16 — The Men’s and Women’s Oregon Mid-Amateur Championship at Black Butte Ranch’s Glaze Meadow is an Oregon Golf Association 36-hole strokeplay tournament for amateurs. The field is limited to men with a handicap index of 10 or better, and women must have a handicap index of 22.4 or better. All players must turn 25 by July 10 to be eligible. Entry forms at www.oga. org or call the OGA at 866-981-4653. Sept. 17 — 15th annual Bend Chamber Fall Invitational at Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend. Tournament separated into two flights: a serious gross & net competition and a scramble with mulligans and strings. Shotgun start at 11 a.m. followed by dinner and awards starting about 4:30 p.m. Amateur men and women golfers compete in a four-person scramble tournament. Cost is $145 per person and includes cart, dinner, and contests. To register or for more information, call Gayle Najera at 541-382-3221. Sept. 17-19 — PNGA women’s Senior Team at Sunriver Resort’s Meadows and Woodlands courses. Tournament is 54 holes of two-person team competition (four ball, chapman, and four ball) for golfers age 50 and older. All golfers must carry a 40.4 handicap index or better. Cost is $425 per team and field is limited to 60 teams. Deadline to enter is Aug. 27. For more information or to register, visit www.thepnga.org or call the PNGA at 800-643-6410. Sept. 19-21 — PNGA men’s Senior Team at Sunriver Resort’s Meadows and Woodlands courses. Tournament is 54 holes of two-person team competition (four ball, chapman, and four ball) for golfers age 50 and older. All golfers must carry a 26.4 handicap index or better. Cost is $425 per team and field is limited to 60 teams. Deadline to enter is Aug. 29. For more information or to register, visit www.thepnga.org or call the PNGA at 800-643-6410. Sept. 20 — Central Oregon Golf Tour two-man best ball tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. Sept. 21 — Red Dog Classic Golf Tournament at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. The four-person scramble begins with a noon shotgun. Cost is $100 per golfer and benefits the Humane Society of Redmond. For more information or to register, call 541-350-7605 or visit www.redmondhumane.org. Sept. 21-23 — Grapes & Golf tournament at Black Butte Ranch is a couples tournament. Two-day tournament features two rounds of golf, Saturday at Glaze Meadow and Sunday at Big Meadow. Cost is $590 per couple, and includes two rounds of golf, range balls each day, a four-course wine dinner, two breakfasts and a barbecue awards luncheon, plus prizes and gifts. Friday practice round available for additional $55. Space is limited to first 64 couples. For more information or to register: contact Kendal Daiger at 541-595-1536 or kdaiger@blackbutteranch.com, or click the “Events & Activities” link at www.blackbutteranch.com. Sept. 24-27 — The Fall Tour is a pro-am tournament for teams and individuals through the Oregon Chapter of the PGA. This four-day event is held at Pronghorn Club in Bend, Eagle Crest Resort’s Ridge Course in Redmond and Black Butte Ranch’s Glaze Meadow and Big Meadow courses. Admission is free for spectators. Contact: Amy Kerle, 800-574-0503 or www. pnwpga.com. Sept. 29-30 — Deer Widows Invitational at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond is a women-only tournament. For more information or to register, call Juniper at 541548-3121, or visit www.playjuniper.com. Oct. 2 — Central Oregon Golf Tour two-man best ball at Prineville Golf Club. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. Oct. 5-6 — The 85th OGA Men’s Team Championship at Pronghorn Club’s Nicklaus and Fazio courses is an Oregon Golf Association 36-hole gross stroke-play event. OGA member clubs nominate four amateur golfers to represent the club. Team scores are calculated using the best three individual scores on the team each day. For more information, visit www.oga.org or call the OGA at 866-981-4653. Oct. 5-7 — The Patriot Challenge at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters, Bend Golf and Country Club, and Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend. Two-person best ball tournament includes 18 holes of golf at each course. Cost is $565 per team and includes golf, cart, range balls, contests, lunch each day and tee prizes. Proceeds benefit the Folds of Honor Foundation and Patriot Golf Day. For more information or to register, contact Aspen Lakes head pro Josh McKinley at 541-549-4653 or josh@aspenlakes.com; Bend G&CC head pro Erik Nielsen at 541-382-2878 or erikn@bendgolfclub.com; or Widgi Creek head pro Dan Ostrin at 541-382-4449 or danostrin@widgi.com. Oct. 5-7 — Ace in the Hole tournament at Brasada Canyons Golf Club in Powell Butte. Cost is $299 and includes three rounds of golf, entry into poker tournament and a tee prize. For more information call Brasada at 541-504-3200. Oct. 6-7 — The Crooked River Ranch Couples Caper is a 36-hole mixed couples Chapman. Open to any golfer with an official USGA handicap. For more information or to register, call Crooked River Ranch at 541-923-6343, or visit www.crookedriveranch.com. Oct. 8 — Chip in Fore Kids charity golf tournament at Bend Golf and Country Club. Scramble tournament benefits the Deschutes Children’s Foundation and begins with a noon shotgun. Cost is $150 for an individual golfer and $500 for a foursome, and includes food, drinks and specialty games available. For more information or to register: call Jacob at 541-388-3101 or email jacob@deschuteschildrensfoundation.org. Oct. 8 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $150 for the season plus a $5 per-event fee. For more information, call Ron Mei-

sner at 541-548-3307. Oct. 11 — Central Oregon Golf Tour tournament at Black Butte Ranch’s Glaze Meadow course. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. Oct. 13-14 — Brewer’s Chapman at Broken Top Club in Bend. Noon shotgun both days and a dinner on the Friday night before the tournament. For more information or to register, call the Broken Top clubhouse at 541-383-0868.

Professional Men World Golf Ranking Through Sunday Rank. Name Country Points 1. Rory McIlroy NIR 10.14 2. Luke Donald ENG 9.40 3. Tiger Woods USA 8.61 4. Lee Westwood ENG 7.26 5. Webb Simpson USA 6.12 6. Bubba Watson USA 6.09 7. Jason Dufner USA 6.05 8. Justin Rose ENG 6.01 9. Adam Scott AUS 5.95 10. Steve Stricker USA 5.64 11. Matt Kuchar USA 5.52 12. Keegan Bradley USA 5.49 13. Graeme McDowell NIR 5.15 14. Sergio Garcia ESP 5.08 15. Zach Johnson USA 5.04 16. Dustin Johnson USA 4.96 17. Louis Oosthuizen SAF 4.94 18. Hunter Mahan USA 4.89 19. Nick Watney USA 4.72 20. Brandt Snedeker USA 4.71 21. Ernie Els SAF 4.65 22. Phil Mickelson USA 4.21 23. Rickie Fowler USA 4.16 24. Charl Schwartzel SAF 4.09 25. Francesco Molinari ITA 4.06 26. Ian Poulter ENG 4.02 27. Martin Kaymer GER 4.01 28. Bo Van Pelt USA 3.95 29. Jason Day AUS 3.93 30. Paul Lawrie SCO 3.86 31. Jim Furyk USA 3.81 32. Carl Pettersson SWE 3.72 33. Bill Haas USA 3.70 34. Peter Hanson SWE 3.69 35. Nicolas Colsaerts BEL 3.43 36. John Senden AUS 3.29 37. David Toms USA 3.18 38. K.J. Choi KOR 3.11 39. David Lynn ENG 2.93 40. Martin Laird SCO 2.87 41. Thomas Bjorn DEN 2.83 42. Geoff Ogilvy AUS 2.70 43. Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano ESP 2.66 44. Fredrik Jacobson SWE 2.66 45. Rafael Cabrera-Bello ESP 2.66 46. Simon Dyson ENG 2.57 47. Sang-Moon Bae KOR 2.56 48. Aaron Baddeley AUS 2.56 49. Mark Wilson USA 2.46 50. Alvaro Quiros ESP 2.45 51. Branden Grace SAF 2.41 52. Jonathan Byrd USA 2.40 53. Scott Piercy USA 2.39 54. Kevin Na USA 2.37 55. Jamie Donaldson WAL 2.36 56. Robert Garrigus USA 2.36 57. Kyle Stanley USA 2.35 58. Bud Cauley USA 2.34 59. Padraig Harrington IRL 2.32 60. Marcel Siem GER 2.30 61. Greg Chalmers AUS 2.29 62. Ben Crane USA 2.26 63. Anders Hansen DEN 2.25 64. Alexander Noren SWE 2.17 65. John Huh USA 2.16 66. Robert Karlsson SWE 2.15 67. Michael Thompson USA 2.08 68. Ben Curtis USA 2.08 69. Retief Goosen SAF 2.04 70. Robert Rock ENG 2.00 71. Tim Clark SAF 1.97 72. Vijay Singh FIJ 1.97 73. Marc Leishman AUS 1.97 74. Miguel Angel Jimenez ESP 1.95 75. Ryo Ishikawa JPN 1.95 LPGA Tour Money Leaders Through Sunday Trn 1. Inbee Park 17 2. Stacy Lewis 18 3. Na Yeon Choi 17 4. Ai Miyazato 16 5. Yani Tseng 16 6. Shanshan Feng 14 7. Azahara Munoz 18 8. Mika Miyazato 15 9. So Yeon Ryu 17 10. Amy Yang 16 11. Sun Young Yoo 17 12. Karrie Webb 16 13. Jiyai Shin 12 14. Suzann Pettersen 17 15. Angela Stanford 18 16. Brittany Lang 18 17. Anna Nordqvist 18 18. Hee Kyung Seo 18 19. Chella Choi 18 20. Cristie Kerr 16 21. I.K. Kim 15 22. Brittany Lincicome 17 23. Sandra Gal 18 24. Paula Creamer 17 25. Jenny Shin 18

Money $1,419,940 $1,301,496 $1,165,091 $1,115,351 $1,056,423 $1,028,057 $1,018,930 $871,050 $801,887 $743,124 $704,973 $582,557 $545,282 $545,136 $519,519 $496,204 $493,505 $492,498 $470,803 $455,092 $428,755 $426,430 $418,246 $408,504 $343,761

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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012

T EE T O GR EEN

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GOLF: LPGA TOUR

PGA Tour

Photos by Darryl Dyck / The Canadian Press

Lydia Ko hits a shot on the eighth hole during the final round of the LPGA Tour’s Canadian Women’s Open on Sunday, at the Vancouver Golf Club in Coquitlam, British Columbia. Ko, 15, won the tournament.

Teenagers continue their takeover of women’s game By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — The real phenom in women’s golf might be Angela Stanford. She won the HSBC Women’s Champions event in Singapore toward the start of the season, making her the oldest player to win on the LPGA Tour all year. She’s 34. That’s bordering on ancient, considering the average age of winners on the LPGA Tour this year is 24. While it is historic, it should no longer be all that shocking that 15-year-old amateur Lydia Ko could beat the very best in women’s golf. With a three-shot win at the Canadian Women’s Open, Ko became the youngest winner on the LPGA Tour. Such a feat might be even more astounding except that the previous record by 16year-old Lexi Thompson was set only 11 months ago. Thompson broke the record for a 72-hole LPGA event that had stood for a whopping six years. So maybe 15 is the new 25. “I won two state amateurs at 15. I thought that was pretty unbelievable,” Dottie Pepper said Tuesday. “That kid dusted me.” Michelle Wie won the U.S. Women’s Amateur Public Links at 13 and contended on the back nine of three majors at 16. She became less compelling the older she became, however, especially when kids her age achieved more (Morgan Pressel won a major at 18). The celebration of Ko should be more about her golf than the fact she is too young to drive a car. Think back to Tiger Woods and his watershed win at Augusta National in 1997. He is in the record book as the youngest Masters champion (21), but that week was more about the records he set on the golf course at 18-under 270 to win by 12 shots. And perhaps she is worthy of comparisons to Woods. Everyone has been looking for the next Woods, male or female, for the better part of a decade. What’s interesting about Ko, who was born in South Korea and moved

Lydia Ko is doused by fellow golfers after winning the LPGA Tour’s Canadian Women’s Open on Sunday.

to New Zealand when she was 6, is that she is winning at every level. A year ago, she won the New Zealand Stroke Play Championship and the New Zealand Match Play Championship. She made history, albeit briefly, when she won the New South Wales Open in January at age 14 to become the youngest player to win on a professional tour (that record was eclipsed when Brooke Henderson won a Canadian Women’s Tour event this summer over 36 holes). She won the U.S. Women’s Amateur two weeks ago near Cleveland, and then took her spot in LPGA Tour history. “This kid is an absolute rock star,” Pepper said. “Steve Williams, who caddies for Adam Scott, told me two years ago to watch out for this kid. Come on, now. She’s barely 13 years old. ‘You want me to watch out for who?’ And sure enough, her name started rising as her stock rose. It’s been pretty amazing to watch.” What’s next? Her plan is to stay an amateur — she passed up the $300,000 prize — finish high school and go to college. She qualified for the season-ending Titleholders event in Florida on the LPGA Tour, though Ko sounded like she wouldn’t be making the trip. “When I go back to New Zealand ... I actually have an external Cambridge exam, so I’m going to be really studying a lot and put golf at the back,” she said. “Yeah, I need to pass my exams and get good results for that.”

Judy Rankin, who won the Missouri State Amateur at 14, was in Vancouver for the Women’s Canadian Open as an analyst for Golf Channel. What she saw was a fluid swing packed with ample power, a teenager leaning on a local caddie four times her age to read the tricky greens, someone enjoying golf. She can’t help but wonder if Ko was inspired by what she saw on TV. “We have really gotten deeply into the generations that have seen all the best players in the world any time they want to see them on television,” Rankin said. “And no one is a better imitator than a child. Everything is broke down, everything is in super slo-mo. When I was a little girl, I saw Patty Berg one time at a clinic when I was 12 years old. I don’t think I would have seen anybody else who was really good, a professional player. “Imagine how much that has changed since the ’50s.” Rankin says there are more examples of teenage success in the women’s game because they physically mature earlier, though there are increasing examples of males making this kind of progress. Think back to June, when 14-year-old Andy Zhang became the youngest player to qualify for the U.S. Open, and 17-yearold Beau Hossler found himself atop the leaderboard at Olympic Club for a brief moment on Saturday. Ryo Ishikawa won his first Japan Golf Tour event at 15. Matteo Manassero won twice on the European Tour before he turned 18. Age no longer is a big deal. It’s what they do going forward, and how long they can sustain it, that determines greatness. Rory McIlroy comes to mind. He won his second major, both by eight shots, earlier this month at the PGA Championship. He’s only 23. Ko won against the best competition in the world on the LPGA Tour. Her next test is at Royal Liverpool for the Women’s British Open that starts Sept. 13. Can she win again? In a major? “It wouldn’t be the biggest shock,” Rankin said. “This was no fluke.”

DEUTSCHE BANK CHAMPIONSHIP Site: Norton, Mass. Schedule: Friday-Monday. Course: TPC Boston (7,214 yards, par 71). Purse: $8 million. Winner’s share: $1.44 million. Television: Golf Channel (Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Sunday, 10 a.m.-noon; Monday, 8:30-10:30 a.m.) and NBC (Sunday, noon-3 p.m.; Monday, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m.). Last year: Webb Simpson won for the second time in three weeks, beating Chez Reavie with a birdie on the second hole of a playoff. Simpson made a 30-foot birdie putt on the par-5 18th hole, and got into the playoff when Reavie closed with a bogey. Simpson won the U.S. Open this year. Last week: Nick Watney won The Barclays at Bethpage Black on Long Island, beating Brandt Snedeker by three strokes in the FedEx Cup playoffs opener. Watney took the lead in the points race for the $10 million prize, and Snedeker moved into second place. Notes: The top 100 in the FedEx Cup points qualified for the event. The field will be cut to 70 for the BMW Championship next week at Crooked Stick in Indianapolis, and to 30 for the Tour Championship at East Lake in Atlanta. ... Regular-season leader Tiger Woods tied for 38th last week to drop to third. He won the 2006 tournament. ... U.S. Ryder Cup captain Davis Love III will make his four wild-card selections after the tournament. Steve Stricker, the 2009 winner at TPC Boston, and Jim Furyk are expected to be two of the picks. Watney, Snedeker, Dustin Johnson, Hunter Mahan, Rickie Fowler, Bo Van Pelt and Bill Haas are in the running for the final spots in the Sept. 28-30 matches against Europe at Medinah. ... Vijay Singh won in 2004 and 2008, setting the tournament record of 22 under in 2008. Charley Hoffman won in 2010, closing with a 9-under 62 to also finish at 22 under.

four-stroke victory. Last week: Scotland’s Paul Lawrie won the Johnnie Walker Championship at Gleneagles for his second European Tour victory of the year and eighth overall. Australia’s Brett Rumford finished second, four strokes back. Notes: Jose Maria Olazabal completed the European Ryder Cup team Monday, selecting England’s Ian Poulter and Belgium’s Nicolas Colsaerts as captain’s picks. Lawrie, Rory McIlroy, Justin Rose, Graeme McDowell, Francesco Molinari, Luke Donald, Lee Westwood, Sergio Garcia, Peter Hanson and Martin Kaymer earned automatic spots for the Sept. 28-30 matches against the United States at Medinah. ... Lawrie is in the field along with Hanson, Olazabal, Bjorn, Greg Norman, John Daly, Darren Clarke, Branden Grace and Miguel-Angel Jimenez. Grace has a tour-high three victories this year. ... The KLM Open is next week in the Netherlands.

Web.com Tour MYLAN CLASSIC Site: Canonsburg, Pa. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Southpointe Golf Club (6,951 yards, par 71). Purse: $600,000. Winner’s share: $108,000. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday, noon-2 p.m.; FridaySaturday, 3:30-5:30 p.m.; Sunday, 4-6 p.m.). Last year: England’s Gary Christian beat John Mallinger by a stroke. Last week: Darron Stiles won the News Sentinel Open in Knoxville, Tenn., for his fifth career Web.com Tour title. Notes: Luke List leads the money list with $309,196, followed by two-time winners Casey Wittenberg ($304,628) and Ben Kohles ($262,875). The final top 25 will earn 2013 PGA Tour cards. List is skipping the event. Wittenberg and Kohles are in the field. They would earn an immediate PGA Tour promotion with a third victory this season. All Times PDT

Weekly Arts & Entertainment In

European Tour/ Asian Tour EUROPEAN MASTERS Site: Crans-sur-Sierre, Switzerland. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Crans-sur-Sierre Golf Club (6,822 yards, par 71). Purse: $2.62 million. Winner’s share: $437,080. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-Friday, 5:30-9:30 a.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 4-8 a.m.). Last year: Denmark’s Thomas Bjorn won the last of his three 2011 European Tour titles, closing with a 9-under 62 for a

Every Friday

L G  B   Courses • Tetherow waives green fees for veterans: Tetherow Golf Club in Bend is waiving its green fee for active duty or retired members of the U.S. military on Monday. On the Labor Day holiday only, veterans can play 18 holes for the cost of Tetherow’s $40 cart/ forecaddie fee. Military identification is required. The offer is part of Tetherow’s observance of Patriot Golf Day. The national fundraiser — observed this weekend by 14 Central Oregon golf courses — benefits the Folds of Honor Foundation, which provides post-secondary educational scholarships to families of American soldiers who have been disabled or killed in the line of duty. Guests of military members can play for $100, which includes

the cart/forecaddie fee. For more information or to make a tee time: 541-388-2582.

Tournaments • Bend junior fourth in charity tournament: Madison Odiorne, a sophomore at Bend’s Summit High School, paired with Eugene’s Nate Krause to shoot a best-ball 2-over-par 37-37—74 and finish in fourth place Monday in the Srixon Junior Challenge at The Reserve Vineyards and Golf Club in Aloha. Odiorne and Krause won the girls and boys divisions, respectively, of the 2012 Oregon Class 5A high school championships. The duo finished in fourth place out of four teams in the Srixon event. The Srixon Junior Challenge featured Oregon high school golf-

ers as part of the Umpqua Bank Challenge, a charity golf tournament featuring professionals from the PGA and Champions tours. • Redmond golfer lights up Montana course: Lindsay Reeve, a Redmond High School graduate, finished in third place overall and first among women players last week in the Canyon River Pro-Am

in Missoula, Mont. A junior at the University of Montana, Reeve shot a 6-underpar 66 at Canyon River Golf Club to outpace the majority of the 172-golfer field, which was composed mostly of men. Reeve’s 66 was a Canyon River record for women. —Bulletin staff reports

Awbrey Glen Golf Club

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BUSINESS

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Stock listings, E2-3 Calendar, E4 News of Record, E4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012

IN BRIEF Consumer confidence falls NEW YORK — Americans are feeling worse about the economy than they have in a long time — a fact that could have wide-reaching implications everywhere from Wal-Mart to the White House. Despite improving U.S. job and housing markets, consumer confidence fell to the lowest level it’s been since November 2011, according to The Conference Board, a private research group. The results are the latest swing in the index, which has been on a roller coaster ride this year. The index declined in January, rose in February and then posted four months of declines before registering an increase in July. August’s reading indicates that the gains in the job and housing markets aren’t big enough to put to rest Americans’ economic fears. That not only threatens to put a damper on retail sales for the back-to-school and winter holiday seasons — the two biggest shopping periods of the year — but it also could have an impact on how Americans vote in November’s presidential election. Mark Vitner, a Wells Fargo Securities economist, says that in elections since 1972, no president has been re-elected when confidence was below a reading of 90, which indicates a healthy economy. The index hasn’t reached that level since 2007. The Consumer Confidence Index in August fell to 60.6 from 65.4 in July.

Lexmark to cut 1,700 jobs LEXINGTON, Ky. — Lexmark is cutting 1,700 jobs, or almost 13 percent of its workforce, and says it will stop making inkjet printers as part of a drive to cut costs as it deals with shrinking sales of inkjets. The printer and software company said Tuesday that it will close its inkjet supply plant in the Philippines by the end of 2015. It is also putting its inkjet technology up for sale. Shares jumped $3.11, or 16 percent, to $22.12 in late morning trading. They had lost 43 percent of their value this year. Lexmark had about 13,300 employees as of Dec. 31. Lexmark has been shifting its focus from consumer inkjet printers, focusing on higher-profit laser printers and supplies for businesses and software services. — From wire reports

College costs For the 2011-12 school year, students shouldered 30 percent of the total cost, up from 24 percent four years ago. How the average American family paid the bill: Student Income/ savings

12% 18%

Parent Income/ savings

28%

Borrowing

29%

Borrowing

Grants and scholarships

9%

4% Friends/relatives Source: SallieMae.com survey © 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

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DOW JONES

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CLOSE $30.869 CHANGE -$0.170

Fuel economy rules finalized Chinese By Tom Krisher and Matthew Daly The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration has finalized new fuel economy rules that will require the fleetwide average of new cars and trucks sold in the U.S. to double over the next 13 years. The average fuel economy must reach 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025, up from 28.6 mpg at the end of last year. The regulations will bring dramatic changes to

the cars and trucks in U.S. showrooms, with the goal of cutting greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption. To meet the standard, automakers will need to introduce new technology to improve gasoline-powered engines. And they’ll need to sell more alternative fuel vehicles. Critics say the rules will add thousands to the price of new cars and make them unaffordable for many. The administration says

the latest changes will save families more than $1.7 trillion in fuel costs and bring an average savings of $8,000 over the lifetime of a new vehicle sold in 2025. The standards also are the biggest step the U.S. government has ever taken toward cutting greenhouse gas emissions, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson said. Tailpipe emissions from cars and light trucks will be halved by 2025,

the government said. President Barack Obama said the new fuel standards “represent the single most important step” his administration has taken to reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil. But Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has opposed the standards, and his campaign on Tuesday called them extreme and said they would drive up the price of new cars. See Fuel / E3

J o e Kline / The Bulletin

A construction crew works on a new home Friday in the McCall Landing subdivision in Bend. The area is being developed by Canadian investor Ender Ilkay.

Canadian investor developing subdivisions By Elon Glucklich The Bulletin

Add a Vancouver, British Columbia, real estate developer to the growing list of investors buying up Central Oregon land. Ender Ilkay, founder of Cedar Coast Properties, is developing McCall Landing, a partially built subdivision in northeast Bend, off of Northeast 18th Street. He bought 102 of the 129 single-family home lots in the subdivision from a California holding company in September, Deschutes County property records show. He also bought several undeveloped lots at Ochoco Pointe in Prineville, off of Northeast Hudspeth Lane. Since then he’s been securing building permits and working with Bend building and real estate company Pahlisch Homes on a plan to develop the subdivisions over the next five to eight years. Ilkay is focusing on development of the Bend subdivision. He’s received 11 permits from Deschutes

County to build homes valued between $180,000 and $240,000. “We have no debt on the property. We bought it completely with cash,” Ilkay said. “We’re in this for the long term.” Since 2009, developers have been taking advantage of a silver lining in the region’s depressed real estate market: With land values at a fraction of their prices just four years ago, groups with cash to spare can find deals that would have been unthinkable when real estate was booming. Numerous lots in bare subdivisions in east Bend have changed hands as a result. A development team that includes real estate investor Gary Miller, a congressman from California, has bought hundreds of mostly foreclosed lots on the east side of town over the last three years, including the Mirada, Gleneden and South Deerfield Park subdivisions. See Development / E3

New homes A Vancouver, B.C. real estate developer has purchased land in Bend and Prineville. Developer Ender Ilkay is partnering with a local construction firm to build new homes at the sites. Mornin gs

BEND 20 BUS 97

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CLOSE 3,077.14 CHANGE +3.95 +.13%

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Comet Lane Sierra D r.

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Steins Pillar Dr. Hudspeth Lane Ochoco Ave.

PRINEVILLE Main St.

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www.bendbulletin.com/business

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Laughlin Rd. Third St. First St.

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Greg Cross / The Bulletin

investing heavily in U.S. By David Pierson and Don Lee Tribune Washington Bureau

BEIJING — Facing a sharp economic slowdown at home, Chinese companies are plowing money into U.S. assets at a record pace, making huge bids for American energy, aviation, entertainment and other businesses. The increase in investment, already at least $8 billion this year, comes despite lingering American anxieties about potential breaches of national security and loss of technology to the powerful Asian competitor. Thus far, economic relations with China have received little attention in the political campaigns of either major U.S. party. But analysts said the country’s stepped-up investments, although welcomed by many budget-strapped state and local governments, could revive what has long been a contentious issue. With U.S. real estate prices depressed and many firms in the West starved for cash, the Chinese see a prime opportunity to rummage through the bargain bins of rich countries to gain technological know-how and international reach. They’re also hedging against rising costs and uncertainties inside China. The world’s second-largest economy is struggling with its slowest growth rate since the financial crisis in 2008. “The Chinese growth model is changing fundamentally,” said Thilo Hanemann, research director for the New York-based Rhodium Group, which tracks Chinese direct investment. “Chinese companies need to escape the profit squeeze in low-end manufacturing and move up and down the value chain. Expanding investment in developed economies is an essential part of that,” Hanemann said. Natural resources remain a major target for the Chinese, who have scoured the globe for oil and minerals to fuel the nation’s rapid industrial development. In April, China Petrochemical Corp., also known as Sinopec, closed a $2.5 billion deal to buy a one-third stake in Devon Energy Corp. of Oklahoma City. Across other industries, Chinese corporations are buying into American companies for their prowess in branding, marketing and research capabilities. Conglomerate Dalian Wanda Group paid $2.6 billion this year for the heavily indebted AMC Entertainment, one of the largest movie theater chains in North America. See China / E3

Studies find young workers leaving jobs after 2 years By Tiffany Hsu

AT WORK

Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — At a time when many laid-off workers have to take a pay cut to land a new job, members of the millennial generation are jumping ship from their companies after just two years, according to new studies. The millennials — 18- to 30-year-olds including those workers just entering the full-

time work force — are earning $39,700 a year on average, according to a report from the compensation data company PayScale and research group Millennial Branding. Employees on the younger end of this demographic are starting with salaries of $21,000. Hit disproportion-

ately hard by the recession, the group is much more likely than older workers to be laying out merchandise at retail stores, selling cellphones or performing other low-skill jobs, according to the study. And that’s despite the generation’s high level of education. About 63 percent of full-time, professional workers in that generation have a bachelor’s degree,

12.8 percent have a master’s degree and 1.7 percent have doctorates. Popular majors include neuroscience, bioengineering, entrepreneurial studies, sport management and Chinese. The disconnect may be causing young workers to leave their companies every two years. Baby boomers, by comparison, spend a median of seven years with each em-

ployer, while Gen X employees — those born in the 1960s, ’70s and early ’80s — spend five. Skipping around may be easier at small operations with fewer than 100 workers, where 47 percent of millennials are employed. Fewer than one-quarter have jobs at behemoth companies where the head count exceeds 1,500. See Jobs / E3


E2

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012

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10.25 61.69 4.61 3.69 2.39 .95 9.61 1.08 9.06 29.46 2.96 24.68 .82 37.28 9.02 5.91 31.56 16.27 5.72 3.98 1.63 35.89 14.18 18.14 15.03 35.11 60.58 40.50 49.67 .14 11.22 40.00 3.16 9.00 21.79 27.70 65.76 20.81 20.35 39.44 20.94 71.17 63.76 32.07 2.52 17.85 17.64 11.36 63.51 5.27 26.38 .17 .17 38.78 9.13 2.44 3.74 4.74 31.84 57.63 15.47 16.72 45.87 10.34 7.50 41.56 20.31 .29 14.81 11.35 15.25 4.94 5.01 40.76 12.60 18.41 39.88 5.29 1.35 2.30 105.03 13.93 11.58 677.25 22.64 57.77 49.60 9.79 205.98 2.64 4.49 20.87 28.57 5.64 .23 7.46 1.93 21.48 11.09 25.12 14.93 43.05 16.66 40.70 4.37 23.18 26.18 51.15 30.96 22.29 28.03 26.02 17.98 28.35 32.63 45.25 33.90 34.53 44.18 69.60 7.93 34.08 5.68 30.09 32.11 26.98 1.53 43.22 45.72 4.44 9.42 47.28 12.49 20.62 17.80 9.03 37.50 28.91 25.09 27.21 6.03 6.82 58.22 55.20 21.28 7.47 9.21 23.58 23.13 13.23 30.40 2.76 5.29 57.41 31.47 17.99 45.93 .70 76.19 50.02 4.12 11.28 4.92 72.49 14.40 50.84 16.90 22.92 19.36 56.87 12.23 32.97 27.32 18.11 26.03 11.01 40.39 19.57 56.53 23.81 16.07 64.16 23.79 20.12 32.54 58.56 4.16

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2.38 2.91 8.70 48.67 45.84 14.40 4.89 3.65 5.26 15.41 1.14 67.51 27.03 12.20 71.10 41.63 53.07 18.34 17.48 10.72 26.92 16.05 2.82 14.20 9.07 51.66 15.41 77.72 30.26 3.77 51.66 45.79 36.41 2.05 8.57 8.31 47.39 11.34 83.67 20.35 24.68 82.62 35.23 3.04 74.00 11.45 8.79 52.09 9.40 2.75 14.67 6.25 8.99 52.35 10.97 14.51 9.59 41.86 20.98 4.99 7.63 22.20 16.69 11.38 69.48 24.10 1.40 11.87 38.47 28.26 18.15 7.67 5.84 13.45 88.30 1.39 34.24 32.83 49.52 22.05 42.70 27.73 3.96 28.57 5.56 11.63 39.37 1.49 25.21 23.70 27.96 32.27 47.11 21.82 21.93 2.18 9.30 21.62 4.70 55.12 104.02 18.10 48.32 36.28 1.98 47.07 47.32 44.71 2.50 47.64 42.73 23.31 32.69 107.51 2.33 39.63 3.28 14.21 51.54 28.75 8.70 16.16 2.13 2.63 92.48 .29 40.22 9.41 21.62 1.29 129.79 13.44 27.85 52.06 65.09 46.41 47.48

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D

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59.30 2.05 41.85 21.02 24.07 38.30 9.46 12.90 10.25 9.60 14.86 15.17 8.79 9.37 14.29 12.19 3.55 5.89 54.03 86.60 37.91 29.50 13.33 87.45 16.34 54.74 7.93 2.73 24.83 3.70 1.53 5.64 3.78 78.67 45.16 13.29 8.79 21.38 23.76 32.17 51.10 16.11 6.21 2.76 5.12 3.71 44.47 56.19 72.56 53.65 43.16 .72 4.44 31.58 10.22 2.68 4.41 8.96 25.07 6.26 28.24 33.00 17.79 .61 27.41 12.25 7.37 44.02 17.46 107.63 5.68 5.82 61.97 20.82 108.89 29.30 21.81 92.77 39.63 9.52 .34 2.34 18.50 31.98 54.78 17.19 6.92 10.18 156.53 49.75 .44 10.10 21.60 2.45 27.74 4.29 80.77 2.17 11.68 3.98 74.17 34.06 15.34 33.23 22.36 7.08 39.12 6.37 14.56 10.83 25.30 15.93 21.36 26.14 42.18 11.94 9.22 19.32 73.12 2.37 16.25 10.38 10.95 26.99 16.89 111.08 70.53 9.97 20.97 21.60 12.47 6.45 23.85 1.23 66.67 12.77 90.88 23.06 41.96 12.84 5.83 16.96 18.14 5.29 26.85 11.25 14.01 11.31 19.35 51.61 7.65 98.37 26.08 13.35 86.08 40.89 30.24 40.72 3.94 75.77 10.50 1.16 15.58 31.39 38.87 15.79 27.15 4.85 51.20 40.75 6.31 40.17 28.41 57.33 30.11 22.35 9.47 15.05 27.34 18.37 24.75 27.85 25.67 19.03 14.75 30.16 16.99 68.40 .33 104.60 13.77 163.19 7.89 .50 15.77 62.06 590.12 29.12 4.65 12.51 27.21 16.09 33.91 24.84 34.96 14.36 70.12 60.25 28.11 58.66 40.53 15.34 21.57 16.06 58.58 18.14 46.65 32.70 63.12 25.81 59.94 41.81 28.85 84.62 52.09 37.14 5.42 34.42 37.56 24.76 16.14

C

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D

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29.01 17.71 17.98 21.55 21.51 12.39 62.01 17.46 24.23 1.61 .88 .34 60.54 27.96 19.75 42.49 3.79 3.10 8.55 4.77 16.49 3.74 17.89 12.79 27.17 12.02 22.19 59.56 3.71 3.38 2.49 70.81 159.06 4.68 12.93 98.98 65.91 4.02 34.85 49.05 56.23 10.43 25.59 42.96 56.88 14.13 68.60 13.83 49.30 23.13 146.77 7.11 17.99 52.31 76.95 1.59 3.85 35.97 2.28 33.22 27.71 7.02 37.51 9.22 12.82 5.89 11.10 12.87 .55 15.16 45.99 45.13 19.30 1.23 20.55 16.96 59.94 26.48 66.55 72.08 49.08 7.80 46.65 40.39 103.21 6.29 43.01 69.57 7.58 13.74 14.81 35.28 54.83 7.12 20.75 26.94 72.82 70.50 84.22 3.47 9.00 9.55 28.02 6.17 40.44 26.01 11.77 64.93 59.95 47.72 21.89 14.80 81.22 15.72 47.50 130.86 161.64 30.19 62.62 60.64 38.60 177.40 141.40 57.14 23.33 22.51 39.96 24.45 45.82 27.70 61.02 53.40 33.76 41.27 65.30 22.48 7.45 5.80 57.63 89.48 19.60 6.05 15.55 18.86 37.72 11.84 145.12 44.31 28.07 1.06 14.39 19.05 44.05 42.31 6.65 24.91 20.61 5.30 8.85 41.00 1.40 6.25 9.81 12.45 42.85 1.36 74.38 28.96 31.78 13.14 5.05 7.01 40.84 59.48 10.96 16.69 41.15 33.67 13.13 1.58 54.96 26.89 28.80 10.40 35.48 66.74 24.71 .22 22.27 30.54 3.81 13.00 8.97 .03 3.48 41.79 142.51 16.07 14.77 30.13 5.07 94.04 70.42 45.71 8.47

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N m

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SilicnImg SilcnLab SilicnMotn Slcnware 0.24 SilvStd g SilvWhtn g 0.37 SilvrcpM g 0.10 SimonProp 4.20 Sina Sinclair 0.60 Sinovac h SiriusXM SironaDent SixFlags 2.40 Skechers Skullcandy SkyWest 0.16 SkywksSol SmartBal SmithWes SmithAO 0.80 SmithfF Smucker 2.08 SnapOn 1.36 SocQ&M 1.04 SodaStrm Sohu.cm SolarCap 2.40 SolarWinds Solera 0.50 SoltaMed Somaxon h SonicAut 0.10 SonicCorp SonocoP 1.20 Sonus SonyCp 0.32 Sothebys 0.32 SouFun 2.00 Sourcefire SouthnCo 1.96 SthnCopper 1.66 SwstAirl 0.04 SwstnEngy SpectraEn 1.12 SpectPh SpiritAero SpiritAir Splunk n Spreadtrm 0.40 SprintNex SprottSilv SprottGold STAG Indl 1.08 StageStrs 0.40 Stamps.cm SP Matls 0.74 SP HlthC 0.74 SP CnSt 0.91 SP Consum 0.64 SP Engy 1.15 SPDR Fncl 0.23 SP Inds 0.74 SP Tech 0.40 SP Util 1.41 StdPac StanBlkDk 1.96 StanB&D 52 1.44 Staples 0.44 StarScient Starbucks 0.68 StarwdHtl 0.50 StarwdPT 1.76 StateStr 0.96 Statoil ASA 1.12 StlDynam 0.40 Steelcse 0.36 StemCells Stericycle Steris 0.76 SterlF WA 0.60 Sterlite 0.15 SMadden StewEnt 0.16 StifelFin StillwtrM StoneEngy Stratasys StratHotels Stryker 0.85 StudentTr g 0.56 SturmRug 1.05 SubPpne 3.41 SumitMitsu SunHlth SunLfFn g 1.44 SunCokeE Suncor gs 0.52 Sunoco 0.80 SunOpta SunPower SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst 0.20 SupEnrgy Supvalu 0.35 SusqBnc 0.24 Susser SwERCmTR SwftEng SwiftTrans SwisherH lf Symantec SymetraF 0.28 Synacor n Synaptics SynrgyP rs Synnex Synopsys Synovus 0.04 SyntaPhm Sysco 1.08 TAL Intl 2.40 TCF Fncl 0.20 TD Ameritr 0.24 TE Connect 0.84 TECO 0.88 TFS Fncl TICC Cap 1.16 TIM Part TJX s 0.46 TPC Grp TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi 0.50 TakeTwo TalismE g 0.27 TangerFac 0.84 Tangoe TanzRy g TargaRsLP 2.57 Target 1.44 Taseko TASER TataMotors 0.36 Taubmn 1.85 TechData TeckRes g 0.80 Teekay 1.27 TeekayTnk 0.53 TelefBrasil 1.86 TelefEsp TelData 0.49 Tellabs 0.08 Telus g 2.44 TmpGlb 0.54 TempurP Tenaris 0.76 TenetHlth Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium 0.75 TescoCp TeslaMot Tesoro 0.48 TesseraTch 0.40 TetraTc TetraTech TevaPhrm 0.99 TxCapBsh TexInst 0.68 TexRdhse 0.36 Textron 0.08 Theravnce ThermoFis 0.52 ThomCrk g ThomsonR 1.28 Thor Inds 0.60 Thoratec 3D Sys 3M Co 2.36 ThrshdPhm TibcoSft Tidwtr 1.00 Tiffany 1.28 TW Cable 2.24 TimeWarn 1.04 Timken 0.92 Titan Intl 0.02 TitanMach TitanMet 0.30 TiVo Inc TollBros Torchmark 0.60 ToroCo s 0.44 TorDBk g 2.88 Total SA 2.90 TotalSys 0.40 TowerGrp 0.75 TowersWat 0.46 Towerstm Toyota 0.52 TractSupp 0.80 TrCda g 1.76 TrnsatlPet TransDigm Transocn 3.16 Travelers 1.84 TreeHseF TrianglCap 2.00 TriangPet TriMas h TrimbleN TrinaSolar

C 4.71 38.06 15.19 5.56 14.45 33.40 5.82 158.59 56.06 11.78 2.25 2.53 53.13 55.07 21.79 16.27 8.73 29.49 11.97 8.15 54.13 18.97 84.58 69.46 59.99 37.65 40.90 22.96 54.92 41.36 3.08 .31 17.83 9.35 30.40 1.92 11.49 31.69 13.08 52.42 45.77 32.65 8.98 31.32 28.72 11.51 25.29 19.46 31.00 19.37 4.85 12.65 14.76 15.50 20.92 23.11 35.55 38.72 35.67 45.39 72.06 15.10 36.46 30.53 36.63 6.50 66.23 26.04 10.66 3.99 49.36 54.42 23.26 41.10 25.45 12.29 9.71 1.56 91.30 34.37 20.94 7.68 42.34 7.30 32.67 10.35 24.55 65.93 6.12 53.72 6.76 44.60 38.00 6.24 8.45 23.17 16.62 31.83 47.03 5.87 4.85 14.29 10.40 .96 24.79 21.32 2.40 10.56 35.20 8.82 20.59 7.88 1.68 17.75 12.41 8.29 30.41 4.76 34.28 33.44 2.04 6.75 30.45 34.54 11.00 16.67 35.02 17.57 8.74 10.36 18.97 45.79 40.88 42.63 10.66 25.28 14.31 10.35 14.13 33.42 16.70 4.36 39.60 63.81 2.93 5.55 20.97 79.51 49.18 28.88 30.97 4.04 21.94 12.72 24.19 3.58 63.12 9.53 32.15 41.00 5.24 30.55 76.27 15.70 20.36 19.31 9.95 28.69 39.56 15.12 25.71 6.98 40.16 45.40 29.24 17.20 26.49 27.19 56.28 2.58 29.09 31.48 32.80 43.06 92.30 8.26 29.88 48.61 62.50 89.88 41.53 40.07 21.16 22.94 12.48 9.54 32.41 50.98 37.37 82.11 49.46 23.19 18.46 54.31 4.22 80.89 96.70 45.29 1.07 137.98 48.99 64.84 52.40 23.60 6.91 21.62 49.14 4.92

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-.04 -.03 -.01 -.40 -.42 +.05 +.04 +.41 +.01 +.16 -.34 +.02 +.12 +.09 +.15 +.31 +.06 +.12 +.12 +.03 +.23 +.06 +.29 +.21 +.10 -.12 +.04 +.11 +.09 -.15 +.11 +.69 +1.13 +.07 -.07 +.36 -.03 +.17 -3.39 -.06 +.45 +.02 +.10 -.45 +.30 +.03 -.26 +.34 +.03 -.46 +.02 +.20 +.11 -.52 -.04 -.26 -.35 +.34 +.18 +.10 +.08 -.16 +.21 +.37 +.29 +.30 -.13 +.17 -.24 +1.10 -.08 +.01 +.05 +.28 -.36 +.09 +.04 +.43 +1.87 -.29 +.31 +.67 +.40 -.21 +.01 -.33 -.68 -.19 -.42 -.01 +.21 +.13 -.14 -.15 +.50 +.26 -.10 +.25 +.30 +.02 -.70 -.07 -.24 +.02 -1.44 +.14 -.34 +.64 -.23 +.17 +.55 +.92 +

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

China Continued from E1 The deal gives Wanda a foothold in the U.S. entertainment industry and a chance to gain expertise in the dayto-day operations of movie theaters. Just this month, Chinese auto parts giant Wanxiang Group Corp. announced plans to provide a $465 million rescue package for struggling battery maker A123 Systems Inc., based in Waltham, Mass. The agreement gives Wanxiang, one of China’s biggest private companies, a chance to buy a majority stake in a world-class battery developer for electric cars. Chinese investments in U.S. companies hit a record of nearly $9 billion in 2007, according to separate data compiled by Dealogic, a research firm, and Derek Scissors, a Heritage Foundation analyst who follows Chinese investments. Their figures don’t include Chinese purchases of American bonds, private real estate purchases and many smaller acquisitions. Nor do the data capture direct investments such as that announced this year by Uniscite Inc. in China’s Shanxi province. The maker of plastic films said it would build a new plant in Laurens County, S.C., to manufacture packaging products for the food industry. Companies like Uniscite are being aggressively recruited by state and local governments, many of which have offices or representatives in China. “We have a concerted effort to punch above our weight in China,” said Dan Hasler, commerce secretary of Indiana. He said the state has sent 14 different delegations to China in the last year to woo businesses. Although China has tight capital controls, that nation’s government officials want

Jobs Continued from E1 But with 8.3 percent unemployment, finding a job at any age and at any company is difficult. Of the 56 percent of so-called displaced job seekers able to get new full-time positions after being laid off between January 2009 and December 2011, more than half accepted less pay. A third saw their salaries slashed 20 percent or more, according to the Labor Department report.

companies to go after new technologies and diversify their markets. “The Chinese government has given an implicit green light to reach overseas to secure assets that will help Chinese businesses thrive in the long term,” said David Wolf, the Beijing-based head of the Wolf Group Asia consulting firm. That’s worrying some Washington officials, who fear that the United States is selling off valuable assets to the Chinese, ultimately at the expense of American jobs. Rep. Cliff Stearns, R-Florida, has warned that Wanxiang’s investment in A123 could end up as a transfer of taxpayer-funded intellectual property to a “foreign adversary.” The battery maker was the beneficiary of a $249 million clean-energy grant from the Department of Energy. Meanwhile, both Democrats and Republicans have raised concerns about a massive $15.1 billion bid by the stateowned China National Offshore Oil Corp., or CNOOC, to buy Nexen Inc., a Canadian oil company with operations in U.S. waters in the Gulf of Mexico. As such, the agreement is subject to review by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States. In 2005, CNOOC withdrew an $18.5 billion offer for American oil giant Unocal because of fierce political opposition in Washington. The deal’s collapse had a chilling effect on Chinese companies aiming to invest in the U.S. One of the leading impediments then — and now — is the suspicion that Chinese companies act on behalf of China’s Communist Party rulers, rather than shareholders. Staterun firms represent about 90 percent of Chinese outbound investment, according to the Heritage Foundation.

And it’s not just young people who are pulling in less money. Median annual incomes have dropped 4.8 percent to $50,964 a year in June from $53,508 in the same month in 2009, according to a report from Sentier Research. With the exception of householders older than 65, every demographic group included in the Sentier study is worse off than it was three years ago. For household heads between the ages of 25 and 34, income slumped 8.9 percent to $49,659.

F u el Continued from E1 Any savings at the pump would be wiped out by rising costs of cars, the campaign said. The gas mileage requirements will be phased in gradually and get tougher starting in 2017. They build on a 2009 deal between the Obama administration and automakers that committed cars and trucks to average 35.5 mpg by model year 2016. In the arcane world of government regulations, the rules don’t mean that cars and trucks will average 54.5 mpg in 13 years. It’s actually closer to 40 mpg in real-world driving. Under the complex regulations, dubbed “Corporate Average Fuel Economy, or CAFE,” automakers can have lower mileage by using credits for selling natural gas and electric vehicles, changing air conditioning fluid to one that pollutes less, and even for placing louvers on car grilles to improve aerodynamics. They won’t have to improve pickup truck mileage much for the first few years, but big improvements will come later, after 2020. Still, automakers have been adding technology to boost gas mileage, mainly because people want to spend less on gasoline, which averaged

D e v e lo p m e n t Continued from E1 Salem and Portland-area developers have also gotten in on the act, purchasing lots in northeast Bend subdivisions like Quail Crossing and Rabbit Hills. Bend marks the first venture into the United States for Ilkay, a 27-year real-estate veteran who has focused his development plans mostly on homes in British Columbia’s tourism and retirement communities. He was also the driving force behind a proposal to build a 250-cabin resort along the Juan de Fuca Marine Trail on Vancouver Island — a proposal that was blocked late last year amid concerns over the plan’s environmental impacts. In the case of McCall Landing, Ilkay purchased the lots at a fraction of their value before real estate crashed in 2008. Ilkay paid $1.63 million for

Northwest stocks Name

Div PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.16 .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40 .88 1.10 ... .28 .53 .24f .90f .20 .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

33.58 25.46 7.96 24.78 71.52 5.14 49.59 51.52 96.57 8.08 19.52 16.90 10.01 25.00 8.31 22.20 3.96 13.44 21.80 16.51 30.63

12 16 9 34 13 ... 10 18 27 54 13 6 ... 11 8 22 10 ... 19 14 15

-.33 -.01 -.11 -.41 +.14 +.03 -.06 +.84 -.07 +.22 -.14 -.31 -.14 +.16 ... +.20 +.07 -.17 -.09 +.09 -.06

-10.6 -1.1 +43.2 +24.1 -2.5 +17.4 +5.1 +10.7 +15.9 +34.2 -22.1 -34.4 -3.8 +3.1 +8.1 -8.3 -33.3 +66.5 +1.6 +21.8 +18.0

Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1668.00 $1666.50 $30.869

about $3.75 per gallon this week. The research firm J.D. Power and Associates says that fuel economy is the top factor people consider when buying a car in the U.S. By 2025, some bigger models may disappear, and dealers could offer more efficient gas-electric hybrids, natural gas vehicles and electric cars. There also will be smaller motors, lighter bodies and more devices to save fuel, such as circuits that temporarily shut off engines at traffic lights. The changes will raise new car prices, but the govern-

ment says that will be more than offset by the savings at the pump. The new rules were adopted after an agreement between the administration and 13 automakers last year. That’s a change from the past, when automakers fought stricter fuel economy changes, saying it cost them too much to build vehicles to meet the stricter standards. Industry leaders repeatedly told the Obama administration that they wanted one nationwide fuel standard, fearing separate mileage stan-

the lots, county records show, or about $16,000 per lot. The lots were valued at $9.5 million in June 2008, according to county records, or about $75,000 per lot. Pahlisch Homes owned the property back then, Deschutes County property records show. It sold the lots to California-based HOF Financial I LLC in 2010 to avoid losing it in foreclosure, records show. Values dropped far enough last year for Ilkay to decide the price wouldn’t go down much further. He had been looking across the Pacific Northwest to grow his real estate portfolio, but settled on Central Oregon. “Bend really got my attention,” Ilkay said. Even with real estate prices down, “it’s still a great, quality place to live and recreate. All those things are still there, and as long as that’s still there, it will be a good investment as real estate recovers.”

Pahlisch Homes is working with Ilkay as a development partner in the McCall Landing project, building the homes. Six homes have been built in the subdivision since Ilkay purchased the lots, he said. Five more homes are under construction now, said Jason Myhre, marketing director with Pahlisch Homes. Construction on four additional homes is expected to start next week. Pahlisch had been eyeing McCall landing for several years, having owned many of the lots there since 2008. But a demand for homes under $250,000 is driving new interest on home building this year, and Myhre said Pahlisch’s partnership with Ilkay gave the builder the means to start moving ahead with development. “We’re seeing low interest rates, pent-up demand and low inventory,” Myhre said. “That’s just led to a healthy turn in the market lately. I wouldn’t say

Market recap

Name

Div PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstBcp Weyerhsr

1.44 1.08 1.78 .08 .80 ... 1.68 .12 .70 .75 1.56 .89f .68 ... .36f .78 .32 .88 ... .60

Precious metals

Manuel Balce Ceneta / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama walks down a ramp after delivering a speech at a gathering where he announced new fuel efficiency standards for cars and light trucks at the Washington Convention Center. The average gas mileage of new cars and trucks will have to nearly double by 2025 under regulations that were finalized Tuesday by the Obama administration.

YTD Last Chg %Chg

21 98.87 +2.44 +2.6 18 57.44 -.24 +15.6 21 49.66 -.03 +3.6 12 5.64 +.15 +24.2 12 39.63 -.21 +5.8 ... 1.32 +.04 -30.9 37 40.72 -.06 +11.4 19 163.19 -.23 -1.0 9 15.55 +.12 -26.1 12 28.96 -.19 -31.5 29 142.51 -.09 +59.6 10 30.98 +.31 -15.7 27 49.36 +.22 +7.3 ... 5.63 -.10 +15.5 15 12.60 +.09 +1.7 12 33.31 +.12 +23.1 13 16.35 +.16 +16.9 11 34.10 +.08 +23.7 12 20.09 -.05 +28.8 38 24.62 +.17 +31.9

Prime rate

Pvs Day

Time period

Percent

$1668.00 $1672.40 $31.039

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name BkofAm NokiaCp S&P500ETF HewlettP SprintNex

Vol (00)

Last Chg

893587 7.96 -.11 694976 3.03 -.22 679748 141.40 -.14 327786 16.90 -.31 311719 4.85 +.03

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

SeaBrght Movado Lexmark Molycorp NamTai

10.96 35.36 21.62 10.75 9.90

Chg %Chg +2.69 +5.25 +2.61 +1.23 +1.09

+32.5 +17.4 +13.7 +12.9 +12.4

Last

Chg %Chg

SunTr wtB BP Pru DB AgriSh EqualEn g FXCM

2.50 -.25 93.46 -8.93 18.51 -1.74 3.40 -.29 8.60 -.72

Name

Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

40120 3.20 -.21 38072 14.98 +.35 20125 11.03 +.21 17539 4.50 -.02 15891 1.79 -.11

Gainers ($2 or more)

Vol (00)

HudsCity SiriusXM Intel Cisco Dell Inc

Last Chg

640288 7.26 -.19 354159 2.53 -.01 324275 25.00 +.16 297769 19.22 -.14 270473 10.91 -.21

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

NovaCpp n Medgen wt NDynMn g TelInstEl Crexendo

2.74 6.86 2.93 3.98 3.64

+.38 +16.1 +.86 +14.3 +.36 +14.0 +.27 +7.3 +.24 +7.1

Intphse FrozenFd Alexza rs Net1UEPS Micrvis rs

3.93 +.46 +13.3 2.39 +.26 +12.2 4.66 +.49 +11.8 10.17 +1.07 +11.8 2.65 +.25 +10.4

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

-9.1 -8.7 -8.6 -7.9 -7.7

MGTCap rs ASpecRlty Vringo AlmadnM g IntTower g

4.36 4.10 3.20 2.52 2.91

-.39 -.35 -.21 -.14 -.15

-8.2 -7.9 -6.2 -5.3 -4.9

Tangoe DialGlobal GlobusMar Cache Inc Jinpan

16.70 -3.39 -16.9 2.59 -.25 -8.8 2.70 -.21 -7.1 3.26 -.24 -6.9 5.26 -.37 -6.6

1,679 1,286 154 3,119 102 27

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

219 205 28 452 1 6

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more)

Vringo CheniereEn NwGold g NovaGld g NA Pall g

dards from California and other states. “They wanted certainty so that as they invest in the future they will know what rules they are playing by,” Jackson said. Fuel economy standards were first imposed on U.S. automakers in the 1970s. The aim was to make cars more efficient and reduce the nation’s dependence on foreign oil at time when the Arab oil embargo was creating gasoline shortages. The administration says this is the first update in decades. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration will enforce the standards, calculating the average mileage of cars sold by each automaker. Automakers can be fined if they don’t comply. The requirements, which can be imposed without congressional approval, will be reviewed in 2018 and could be reduced if the technology isn’t available to meet the standards. The rules are tough, but General Motors, the largest U.S. car company, will roll out features to comply, spokesman Greg Martin said. “Consumers want higher fuel efficiency in their cars and trucks, and GM is going to give it to them,” he said. The administration likes to tout cooperation between automakers and the government in forming the latest rules.

it’s booming, but it’s definitely getting healthier.” Ilkay, for his part, is convinced that the decline in home values has slowed, and prices are likely to rise. The median price of a single-family home in Bend was $235,000 in July, according to data from Bratton Appraisal Group. That’s a nearly fouryear high, though values have bumped up and down since mid-2009. But a dwindling supply of large lots for sale was the biggest factor in his decision to make the move on the McCall Landing project, Ilkay said. With other development teams scooping up vacant land, he might not have had another chance if he had waited much longer. “It’s not normal to have so many shovel-ready subdivisions on the market for sale,” Ilkay said. “There aren’t many of these left anymore.” — Reporter: 541-617-7820 eglucklich@bendbulletin.com

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more)

Losers ($2 or more)

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Amex

E3

Diary

Chg %Chg

Diary 1,427 991 142 2,560 58 28

52-Week High Low

Name

13,338.66 10,404.49 5,390.11 3,950.66 499.82 411.54 8,327.67 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,426.68 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 847.92 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

13,102.99 5,061.99 472.86 8,033.84 2,425.72 3,077.14 1,409.30 14,705.68 814.28

-21.68 -11.49 -.70 -2.41 +13.12 +3.95 -1.14 +4.34 +3.88

-.17 -.23 -.15 -.03 +.54 +.13 -.08 +.03 +.48

+7.25 +.84 +1.76 +7.45 +6.47 +18.12 +12.06 +11.49 +9.90

+13.35 +8.07 +9.30 +7.63 +6.24 +19.45 +16.19 +14.89 +11.84

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed yesterday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Friday compared with late Thursday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

329.23 2,352.07 3,431.55 5,775.71 7,002.68 19,811.80 39,950.98 14,993.01 3,629.05 9,033.29 1,916.33 3,040.07 4,386.95 5,931.78

-.94 -.84 -.90 -.02 -.64 +.07 -.05 -.13 +.16 -.57 -.08 -.15 +.32 -1.04

t t t t t s t t s t t t s t

1.0378 1.5822 1.0120 .002078 .1574 1.2564 .1289 .012734 .075808 .0312 .000880 .1512 1.0461 .0334

1.0380 1.5797 1.0097 .002079 .1572 1.2503 .1289 .012699 .075825 .0313 .000881 .1516 1.0410 .0334

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.88 +9.6 GrowthI 28.05 +0.02 +14.2 Ultra 26.17 +0.02 +14.2 American Funds A: AmcpA p 20.94 -0.01 +11.7 AMutlA p 28.18 -0.04 +10.2 BalA p 19.95 +10.6 BondA p 12.90 +4.6 CapIBA p 52.72 +0.01 +9.1 CapWGA p 35.30 -0.07 +11.7 CapWA p 21.33 +0.03 +5.5 EupacA p 38.44 -0.06 +9.3 FdInvA p 39.27 -0.02 +11.7 GovtA p 14.59 +0.01 +2.0 GwthA p 32.85 -0.01 +14.3 HI TrA p 11.08 +9.0 IncoA p 17.82 -0.01 +8.4 IntBdA p 13.76 +2.2 ICAA p 30.34 -0.03 +13.0 NEcoA p 27.53 +0.03 +15.8 N PerA p 29.63 -0.02 +13.3 NwWrldA 50.55 +0.01 +9.6 SmCpA p 37.72 +0.05 +13.7 TxExA p 13.08 +0.01 +7.0 WshA p 31.00 -0.01 +10.4 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.97 +0.02 +15.8 IntlVal r 27.97 -0.06 +11.5 MidCap 38.40 +0.09 +16.6 MidCapVal 20.85 +0.04 +5.8 Baron Funds: Growth 56.69 +0.27 +11.1 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.18 +0.01 +4.2 DivMu 14.87 +2.3 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 19.66 +9.3 GlAlA r 19.20 -0.01 +6.4 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.86 -0.02 +5.8 BlackRock Instl:

EquityDv 19.70 -0.01 GlbAlloc r 19.29 -0.01 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 69.36 +0.23 Columbia Class A: TxEA p 14.25 +0.01 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.52 +0.09 AcornIntZ 38.21 -0.05 LgCapGr 13.43 +0.04 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.32 -0.02 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.73 -0.03 USCorEq1 12.00 USCorEq2 11.79 +0.01 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.54 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 35.96 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.42 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 18.34 -0.07 EmMktV 27.32 -0.14 IntSmVa 14.41 -0.07 LargeCo 11.15 -0.01 USLgVa 21.57 -0.02 US Small 22.74 +0.10 US SmVa 26.01 +0.13 IntlSmCo 14.62 -0.04 Fixd 10.35 IntVa 15.17 -0.04 Glb5FxInc 11.29 +0.01 2YGlFxd 10.13 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 75.26 -0.11 Income 13.83 IntlStk 31.65 -0.13 Stock 116.15 -0.25 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.38 TRBd N p 11.37 Dreyfus:

+9.5 +6.6 +15.3 +7.2 +12.1 +12.0 +11.7 +1.7 +7.1 +12.3 +12.1 +9.4 +9.6 +5.4 +7.1 +5.8 +7.6 +13.6 +13.6 +11.3 +12.6 +7.2 +0.8 +5.1 +3.9 +0.8 +13.0 +6.0 +8.2 +15.5 NA NA

Aprec 44.70 +0.03 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.03 GblMacAbR 9.83 -0.02 FMI Funds: LgCap p 17.10 -0.04 FPA Funds: NewInco 10.65 FPACres 28.38 Fairholme 30.17 -0.03 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.56 StrValDvIS 5.13 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 22.53 +0.02 StrInA 12.61 +0.01 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 22.84 +0.02 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 14.12 +0.01 FF2010K 12.93 FF2015 11.80 FF2015K 13.00 +0.01 FF2020 14.27 FF2020K 13.40 FF2025 11.87 FF2025K 13.53 FF2030 14.13 FF2030K 13.67 FF2035 11.69 FF2035K 13.74 FF2040 8.16 FF2040K 13.78 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.79 -0.01 AMgr50 16.16 AMgr20 r 13.29 +0.01 Balanc 19.95 -0.01 BalancedK 19.95 -0.01 BlueChGr 49.49 +0.05 CapAp 29.20 +0.03 CpInc r 9.27 Contra 77.32 +0.08 ContraK 77.33 +0.08

+11.2 +5.5 +2.7 +12.1 +1.5 +6.9 +30.3 +4.9 +8.0 +14.2 +7.1 +14.4 +8.1 +8.2 +8.3 +8.4 +9.1 +9.1 +10.1 +10.1 +10.3 +10.5 +11.0 +11.1 +11.1 +11.2 +13.9 +8.5 +5.4 +10.6 +10.7 +16.6 +18.6 +11.0 +14.6 +14.7

DisEq 24.28 +0.03 DivIntl 28.15 -0.02 DivrsIntK r 28.13 -0.02 DivGth 29.61 +0.02 Eq Inc 46.03 -0.04 EQII 19.35 Fidel 35.40 FltRateHi r 9.88 GNMA 11.96 GovtInc 10.92 +0.01 GroCo 96.66 +0.06 GroInc 20.71 -0.01 GrowthCoK96.66 +0.07 HighInc r 9.18 IntBd 11.10 +0.01 IntmMu 10.64 IntlDisc 30.64 +0.01 InvGrBd 12.01 +0.01 InvGB 7.96 +0.01 LgCapVal 11.07 LowP r 40.23 -0.02 LowPriK r 40.23 -0.02 Magelln 72.52 +0.01 MidCap 29.44 +0.10 MuniInc 13.51 +0.01 NwMkt r 17.40 +0.02 OTC 61.08 +0.03 100Index 10.16 -0.01 Puritn 19.52 +0.01 PuritanK 19.52 +0.01 SAllSecEqF12.81 SCmdtyStrt 9.16 -0.02 SCmdtyStrF 9.19 -0.01 SrsIntGrw 11.32 SrsIntVal 8.83 SrInvGrdF 12.01 STBF 8.58 StratInc 11.29 +0.01 TotalBd 11.25 USBI 11.99 Value 72.08 +0.04 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 50.09 -0.04 500Idx I 50.09 -0.04

+12.9 +10.3 +10.4 +14.5 +13.0 +12.5 +14.3 +4.7 +2.7 +2.4 +19.5 +14.6 +19.6 +10.4 +3.7 +3.8 +11.0 +4.5 +5.0 +9.9 +12.6 +12.7 +15.4 +12.7 +6.2 +13.7 +11.7 +15.2 +11.3 +11.5 +14.1 +2.2 +2.5 +12.0 +9.3 +4.5 +1.8 +7.3 +5.1 +3.5 +13.6 +13.6 +13.6

Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r 39.31 +0.15 +12.1 500IdxAdv 50.09 -0.04 +13.7 TotMktAd r 40.83 +13.4 USBond I 11.99 +3.5 First Eagle: GlblA 48.66 -0.10 +7.8 OverseasA 21.83 -0.07 +7.2 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.25 -0.01 +1.8 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.72 +7.2 GrwthA p 49.33 -0.02 +10.5 HYTFA p 10.89 +0.01 +9.0 IncomA p 2.20 +9.3 RisDvA p 36.88 -0.04 +6.0 StratInc p 10.58 -0.01 +8.0 USGovA p 6.90 +1.8 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.10 -0.04 +9.4 IncmeAd 2.19 +10.0 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.22 +8.9 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 22.06 -0.02 +11.4 Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 13.14 -0.04 +9.2 GrwthA p 18.04 -0.04 +10.7 WorldA p 15.09 -0.03 +9.8 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.17 -0.04 +9.0 GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 44.17 -0.01 +14.0 GMO Trust III: Quality 23.55 +12.9 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 19.51 -0.03 +4.4 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 10.85 -0.02 +5.2 Quality 23.56 +13.0 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.26 +10.4 MidCapV 37.75 +0.03 +12.5 Harbor Funds:

Bond 12.88 +0.01 CapApInst 42.15 +0.06 IntlInv t 57.00 -0.07 Intl r 57.64 -0.07 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 31.62 -0.07 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 41.10 -0.05 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.05 +0.01 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r15.89 -0.01 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.63 -0.03 CmstkA 16.93 -0.03 EqIncA 9.04 -0.01 GrIncA p 20.48 -0.02 HYMuA 10.05 +0.01 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.96 AssetStA p 24.78 AssetStrI r 25.03 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 12.11 +0.01 JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond 12.11 +0.01 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 12.10 +0.01 HighYld 8.05 ShtDurBd 11.01 USLCCrPls 22.66 Janus T Shrs: PrkMCVal T21.59 +0.02 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.29 +0.01 LSGrwth 13.15 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.74 -0.02 Longleaf Partners: Partners 29.67 -0.11 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.75 +0.03 StrInc C 15.09 +0.02 LSBondR 14.69 +0.03

+7.0 +14.2 +9.6 +9.9 +9.7 +10.6 -11.1 +3.5 +9.8 +12.2 +9.6 +11.0 +11.0 +10.8 +11.3 +11.5 +3.9 +4.2 +4.1 +9.7 +1.3 +14.8 +6.9 +9.7 +10.4 +11.5 +11.3 +9.5 +7.3 +9.3

StrIncA 15.00 +0.02 +7.8 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.56 +0.02 +8.0 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.61 -0.01 +11.0 BdDebA p 7.97 +8.7 ShDurIncA p4.62 +4.6 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.65 +4.1 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.62 +4.6 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.98 -0.01 +8.3 ValueA 24.94 -0.01 +12.4 MFS Funds I: ValueI 25.06 -0.01 +12.6 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 6.05 +8.7 Managers Funds: Yacktman p18.84 -0.02 +9.0 YacktFoc 20.29 -0.03 +8.6 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.33 -0.02 +10.6 MergerFd 15.96 -0.01 +2.4 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.90 +0.01 +7.9 TotRtBdI 10.89 +8.0 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 34.35 +0.03 +4.3 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.67 -0.08 +9.3 GlbDiscZ 30.09 -0.08 +9.5 SharesZ 22.26 -0.02 +11.6 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 48.85 +0.12 +5.2 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.36 +9.6 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.68 +6.0 Intl I r 18.36 -0.09 +10.9 Oakmark 48.02 -0.07 +15.2 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.35 +9.3 GlbSMdCap14.41 -0.02 +8.9

Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 32.41 -0.02 GlobA p 59.20 -0.09 GblStrIncA 4.26 IntBdA p 6.45 MnStFdA 36.71 -0.04 RisingDivA 17.19 -0.01 S&MdCpVl30.22 +0.06 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 15.54 S&MdCpVl25.57 +0.06 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p15.48 -0.01 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA x 7.51 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 32.10 -0.02 IntlBdY 6.45 IntGrowY 28.32 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.47 +0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.99 AllAsset 12.45 ComodRR 6.93 -0.01 DivInc 12.08 +0.01 EmgMkCur10.28 EmMkBd 12.17 +0.02 HiYld 9.44 InvGrCp 11.13 +0.01 LowDu 10.57 RealRtnI 12.46 +0.02 ShortT 9.86 TotRt 11.47 +0.01 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 12.46 +0.02 TotRtA 11.47 +0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.47 +0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.47 +0.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.47 +0.01 Perm Port Funds:

+10.5 +9.5 NA NA +14.1 +10.3 +2.0 +9.7 +1.4 +9.8 +14.5 +10.8 NA +11.0 +7.6 +11.2 +9.5 +7.6 +10.4 +4.6 +11.4 +9.5 +10.6 +4.5 +7.2 +2.6 +7.8 +6.9 +7.5 +7.0 +7.6 +7.7

Permannt 48.23 -0.01 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 41.47 -0.04 Price Funds: BlChip 45.11 +0.09 CapApp 22.82 -0.01 EmMktS 30.63 EqInc 25.62 -0.03 EqIndex 38.08 -0.03 Growth 37.38 +0.06 HlthSci 41.92 +0.07 HiYield 6.80 InstlCpG 18.63 +0.04 IntlBond 9.98 +0.04 Intl G&I 12.26 -0.05 IntlStk 13.42 -0.01 MidCap 58.07 +0.04 MCapVal 24.31 +0.02 N Asia 15.39 New Era 42.37 -0.07 N Horiz 35.67 +0.14 N Inc 9.90 OverS SF 7.99 -0.03 R2010 16.36 R2015 12.70 -0.01 R2020 17.58 R2025 12.86 -0.01 R2030 18.46 R2035 13.04 -0.01 R2040 18.55 -0.01 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 35.57 +0.18 SmCapVal 37.89 +0.21 SpecIn 12.86 +0.01 Value 25.35 -0.05 Principal Inv: LgCGI In 10.21 +0.01 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.05 -0.02 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.52 +0.04 PremierI r 19.36 +0.06 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 40.04 -0.01

+4.6 +8.0 +16.7 +10.7 +7.4 +12.3 +13.5 +17.4 +28.6 +9.7 +15.6 +4.0 +6.4 +9.2 +10.1 +13.7 +10.6 +0.8 +15.0 +4.4 +9.2 +8.9 +9.7 +10.5 +11.1 +11.6 +11.8 +11.9 +2.2 +13.8 +9.9 +7.2 +12.5 +15.0 +11.4 +7.1 +4.5 +13.2

S&P Sel 22.24 -0.02 Scout Funds: Intl 30.59 -0.04 Sequoia 159.31 -0.14 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 10.14 +0.01 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.18 -0.04 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 25.65 -0.06 IncBuildC p18.65 -0.02 IntValue I 26.23 -0.06 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.44 -0.07 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 23.60 CAITAdm 11.68 CpOpAdl 75.86 -0.02 EMAdmr r 33.69 -0.15 Energy 112.57 -0.01 EqInAdm n 50.25 -0.02 ExtdAdm 44.14 +0.17 500Adml 130.35 -0.09 GNMA Ad 11.08 GrwAdm 36.71 -0.02 HlthCr 60.31 -0.05 HiYldCp 5.98 InfProAd 29.11 +0.07 ITBdAdml 12.11 ITsryAdml 11.80 +0.01 IntGrAdm 56.85 -0.08 ITAdml 14.35 +0.01 ITGrAdm 10.36 LtdTrAd 11.18 LTGrAdml 10.94 +0.01 LT Adml 11.75 MCpAdml 98.61 +0.05 MuHYAdm 11.22 +0.01 PrmCap r 70.97 -0.15 ReitAdm r 94.49 +0.30 STsyAdml 10.79 STBdAdml 10.66 ShtTrAd 15.93 STIGrAd 10.82

+13.6 +10.2 +9.5 +9.2 +6.7 +7.5 +7.4 +7.8 +11.9 +9.4 +5.0 +11.3 +6.4 +1.7 +11.1 +12.2 +13.7 +2.3 +16.2 +11.2 +9.7 +5.6 +5.4 +2.5 +9.3 +4.5 +6.9 +1.5 +10.1 +6.3 +10.6 +7.4 +10.8 +16.9 +0.6 +1.6 +0.8 +3.3

SmCAdm 37.44 TtlBAdml 11.17 TStkAdm 35.16 WellslAdm 59.09 WelltnAdm 58.33 Windsor 48.22 WdsrIIAd 50.98 Vanguard Fds: CapOpp 32.84 DivdGro 16.65 Energy 59.94 EqInc 23.97 Explr 78.27 GNMA 11.08 HYCorp 5.98 HlthCre 142.91 InflaPro 14.82 IntlGr 17.86 IntlVal 28.66 ITIGrade 10.36 LifeCon 17.16 LifeGro 23.04 LifeMod 20.60 LTIGrade 10.94 Morg 19.96 MuInt 14.35 PrmcpCor 14.82 Prmcp r 68.37 SelValu r 20.36 STAR 20.30 STIGrade 10.82 StratEq 20.72 TgtRetInc 12.16 TgRe2010 24.11 TgtRe2015 13.31 TgRe2020 23.60 TgtRe2025 13.42 TgRe2030 23.01 TgtRe2035 13.83 TgtRe2040 22.71 TgtRe2045 14.26 USGro 20.79 Wellsly 24.39 Welltn 33.77

+0.17 +12.2 +3.5 +13.4 +0.01 +8.1 -0.03 +9.3 -0.10 +13.1 -0.01 +12.7

-0.02 -0.01 -0.01 +0.34

-0.12 +0.04 -0.03 -0.02 +0.01 -0.01 +0.01 +0.02 +0.01 -0.03 -0.15

+0.02 +0.01 +0.01

-0.01 -0.01 -0.01 -0.01 -0.01 +0.02 +0.01 -0.02

+11.3 +9.2 +1.7 +11.1 +9.6 +2.2 +9.6 +11.1 +5.5 +9.2 +7.6 +6.8 +6.8 +10.0 +8.4 +10.0 +14.3 +4.4 +9.9 +10.7 +9.5 +9.3 +3.3 +13.0 +6.3 +7.5 +8.2 +8.8 +9.4 +10.0 +10.6 +10.8 +10.8 +15.2 +8.1 +9.3

Wndsr 14.29 -0.03 WndsII 28.73 Vanguard Idx Fds: ExtMkt I 108.95 +0.41 MidCpIstPl107.45 +0.06 TotIntAdm r23.47 -0.05 TotIntlInst r93.89 -0.19 TotIntlIP r 93.91 -0.20 500 130.33 -0.09 MidCap 21.71 +0.01 TotBnd 11.17 TotlIntl 14.03 -0.03 TotStk 35.15 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 23.60 DevMkInst 9.11 -0.02 ExtIn 44.14 +0.17 GrwthIst 36.71 -0.02 InfProInst 11.86 +0.03 InstIdx 129.51 -0.10 InsPl 129.52 -0.10 InsTStPlus 31.83 MidCpIst 21.78 +0.01 STIGrInst 10.82 SCInst 37.43 +0.16 TBIst 11.17 TSInst 35.17 +0.01 ValueIst 22.41 -0.01 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 107.67 -0.08 MidCpIdx 31.12 +0.02 STBdIdx 10.66 TotBdSgl 11.17 TotStkSgl 33.94 +0.01 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.59

+13.0 +12.7 +12.2 +10.6 +7.5 +7.5 +7.5 +13.6 +10.5 +3.4 +7.4 +13.3 +9.5 +8.2 +12.2 +16.2 +5.6 +13.7 +13.7 +13.5 +10.6 +3.4 +12.1 +3.5 +13.4 +10.9 +13.7 +10.6 +1.6 +3.5 +13.4 +6.5


E4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

U.S. government selling e-books through iTunes

B C 

TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-749-0789.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765.

FRIDAY COFFEE CLATTER: Redmond Chamber of Commerce meeting; free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; U.S. Cellular, 355 N.W. Oak Tree Lane, Redmond; 541-526-5945. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Ponderosa Coffee House, 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax. com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

SATURDAY SMARTPHONE AND TABLET WORKSHOP: Learn more about the features, tips and tricks of a specific device; free; 8:30-10 a.m.; U.S. Cellular, 3197 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-385-0853.

These classes are open to anyone 16 and older; free; 6 p.m.; COCC - Crook County Open Campus, 510 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-447-6228.

By Steve Vogel

FRIDAY Sept. 7 COFFEE CLATTER: Redmond Chamber of Commerce meeting; free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www. happyhourtraining.com. KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Free; 10:30 a.m.-noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-383-7290. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax. com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. KNOW COMPUTERS FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-383-7290.

SATURDAY Sept. 8 HOME BUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 309.

MONDAY Sept. 10 KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Free; 10:30 a.m.-noon; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-383-7290.

TUESDAY

TUESDAY

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-383-7290. SMALL BUSINESS COUNSELING: No appointment necessary; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290.

Sept. 11

WEDNESDAY Sept. 5 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-749-0789.

THURSDAY Sept. 6 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765. BE A TAX PREPARER: Registration required. Sept. 6 through Nov. 15; $389; 6-10 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. SYSTEMS TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION PREP INFORMATIONAL WORKSHOP: Learn the needed skills and obtain the required certification for a position in the high tech and server industry. The Systems Technician Certification Prep is a program that helps equip students for careers in the Information Technology industry.

The Washington Post

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. KNOW DIGITAL DOWNLOADS: Free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 2-3:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-383-7290. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-383-7290. SMALL BUSINESS COUNSELING: No appointment necessary; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290.

WEDNESDAY Sept. 12 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-749-0789. OVERCOME THE FEAR OF PUBLIC SPEAKING: Reservations encouraged; free; 7:30 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.bendchamber.org. UPGRADE YOUR SALES TEAM IN 2012: Dennis Hungerford, President of Sandler Training Oregon, presents; registration required; free; 8:30-11 a.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541382-4316 or www.hcc.sandler.com. KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Free; 9:3011 a.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-383-7290. ARE YOU READY TO BE IN BUSINESS?: Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Madras Campus, 1170 E. Ashwood Road, Madras; 541-383-7290.

THURSDAY Sept. 13 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; ; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125.

Lee Jin-man / The Associated Press

People walk past banners advertising Samsung and Apple’s smartphones Tuesday at a cellphone shop in Seoul, South Korea. A $1 billion verdict against Samsung for what rival Apple claimed was the illegal copying of its iPhone and iPad designs signals a turning point for the South Korean electronics giant.

S a msung seeks to reinvent self after verdict in patent suit By Youkyung Lee The Associated Press

SEOUL, South Korea — A U.S. jury’s $1 billion verdict against Samsung for what rival Apple claimed was the illegal copying of its iPhone and iPad designs signals a turning point for the South Korean electronics giant known for its prowess in adapting the innovations of others and nimbly executing production. The verdict not only jolted the world of global gadgetry but also likely sparked some soul-searching in Suwon, South Korea, where the family-run Samsung conglomerate is based. The world’s top seller of smartphones finds itself in the post-iPhone reality, where the decades-long practice of industry mimicry now can mean a bruising legal challenge. And so Samsung finds itself back at the drawing board, to recreate itself as an innovator, not an imitator. But the switch, experts say, will be much more challenging and time-consuming than the shortcuts Samsung used to take. “The case shows that Samsung is still inadequate in soft(ware) area, such as designs and patents,� M.S. Hwang, a Hong Kong-based analyst at Samsung Securities, said in a commentary. Samsung has a top-heavy command structure that centers on the founding family. At the apex is 70-year-old Lee Kun-hee, who inherited the mantle from his father, Samsung founder Lee Byungchull, in 1987. The strict hierarchy has enabled speedy and bold investment and swift execution. That, plus the ability to build on the innovations of others, like Sony — has helped Samsung become the world’s largest maker of televisions, memory chips, liquid crystal display panels and now smartphones. Its path is reminiscent of many Japanese companies, like Canon and Nikon, which started out by copying European designs and then became innovators and pacesetters in the 1960s and 70s. “It is impossible to be an innovator from the beginning,� said Chang Sea-jin, a professor at National University of Singapore. “If you don’t have a technology, imitating more advanced companies is the

easiest way to catch up.� Samsung has long been regarded as a “fast follower� — imitating or licensing technologies and then competing by lowering costs, improving quality and adding functions. It overcame its belated entry into the memory chip business in 1983 with efficient mass production and investments. Today, Samsung supplies about 30 percent of the chips that go into electronic gadgets. In the early 2000s, Samsung claimed leadership in the global television industry. But when Apple released its cutting-edge iPhone in 2007, Samsung employees were likely too pressed to catch up to scrutinize possible patent encroachments. South Korea also has a much less strict idea about intellectual property than the U.S., Chang said, and speedy execution is highly valued at Samsung. Still, Samsung outsold Apple this year in smartphones by offering more variety, including low-end phones for prices-conscious consumers. Last Friday, a jury in San Jose, California, ruled that Samsung went too far in copying the iPhone and the iPad. It awarded Apple $1.05 billion, while a judge considers whether to ban sales of eight Samsung products in the U.S. Samsung has vowed to appeal. Samsung’s stocks plunged 7.5 percent in Seoul on the first trading day after the verdict, costing $12 billion in market value. Samsung has vowed to appeal, but unsuccessful legal battles against Apple in a host of other countries means that Samsung has few choices other than to create its own design identity. In the last few years, Samsung has been investing in design, not only in mobile phones, but also in televisions and home appliances. But the results were not near the level of revolutionizing the look and feel of a consumer electronics product or the way consumers interact with technology. “Innovation does not necessarily mean an entire change. Doing better than the present and doing better than others are also innovation,� said Lee Myoung-woo, who once led Samsung’s consumer electronics businesses in the U.S. and is a professor at Hanyang University in Seoul.

NEED SOMETHING FIXED? Call a Service Professional!

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Langston Clarke

CCB #012S4Y6

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541.000.0000 Langstonclrkpaintcan.ore

WASHINGTON — Looking for a copy of the appendix to the budget of the United States? It’s available on iTunes. The Government Printing Office has signed an agreement with Apple to sell some federal publications in ebook form for iPads, eReaders, PCs and Macs. “This is kind of where GPO is going,� said Gary Somerset, spokesman for the agency, which announced the agreement last week. “We’ve moved beyond ink or paper.� The GPO began its move into e-books with Google’s eBookstore in late 2010. The office also makes e-books available in partnership with Barnes & Noble, OverDrive, Ingram, Zinio and other online vendors. “It not only saves money, but it makes government more relevant because it allows people to get content about the government in

the formats that they want,� Herbert Jackson, the GPO’s managing director of business products and services, said Friday. E-book sales represent only a tiny portion of GPO sales, which total about 700 from about 50 titles. But the GPO expects those numbers to grow significantly in coming years. “In the last several years, agencies have been asking for ebooks,� Jackson said. “The stream is moving in that direction, and we want to be part of it.� The GPO, which marked its 150th anniversary last year, is responsible for the production and distribution of information products and services for all three branches of the federal government, and works with federal agencies to produce their publications, books and reports in print and digital formats. E-book titles available on iTunes include “Ponzimonium: How Scam Artists are Ripping Off America.�

N  R

BANKRUPTCIES Chapter 7

Filed Aug. 24

Charles R. Laurie, 19506 River Woods Drive, Bend David A. Fisher, P.O. Box 5332, Bend

Filed Aug. 21

Richard L. Bilyeu, 2965 N.W. Horizon Drive, Bend Gilbert E. Brooks, 678 N.W. Apollo Road, Prineville Steven D. McLean, 2085 N.W. 11th Street, Redmond Douglas S. Starr, 20710 Snow Peaks Drive, Bend

Filed Aug. 27

Dan K. Nicholson, P.O. Box 389, Redmond Robert D. Kelly, 2200 N.W. Elm Ave. Redmond Eric D. Watkins, P.O. Box 76, Crescent Chapter 13

Filed Aug. 22

Filed Aug. 21

Tajh Miller, 120 N.W. Sisemore, Bend Michele A. Alejandre, 566 S.E. Centennial, Bend James R. Beard, 61854 Dobbin Road, Bend Sherry C. Fisher, 19920 Granite Drive #219, Bend Shannon S. Gray, 627 S.W. Ruby Street, Madras

Mark E. Waller, 60108 Cinder Butte Road, Bend

Filed Aug. 23

Earl B. Petrusse, 466 N.E. Mariposa Way, Prineville Rune A. Borgir, 1530 N.E. 10th Street, Bend Derek C. Lee, P.O. Box 6713, Bend Kelly L. Cameron, 20364 Mahsie Court, Bend Dawn N. LeRoy-Harrison, 2669 N.E. Jones Road, Bend

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend www.highdesertbank.com

EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

Filed Aug. 22

Brian J. Cartwright, 59877 Cheyenne Road, Bend Filed Aug. 23

Debra L. Walker, 2256 N.W. 37th Street, Redmond Filed Aug. 24

Robert E. Chamberlain, 20996 High Desert Lane, Bend Filed Aug. 27

Dwight K. Worley, P.O. Box 789, Terrebonne

for appointments call 541-382-4900


THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012 F1

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208

Pets & Supplies

Pets & Supplies

200 Boxer puppies, AKC reg, English Bulldog Pups. 1st shots, very social 3 female, AKC, ready $700. 541-325-3376 today! $2000. Call 541-367-3370 or go to Want to Buy or Rent www.ShippsMyTBulldogs.com Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage costume jewFree 2 female rats to elry. Top dollar paid for good home. If interested: Gold/Silver.I buy by the Estate, Honest Artist Buddha needs a furever leahw34@gmail.com Elizabeth,541-633-7006 home! Playful 8-yr old Golden Retriever Pup, 4 mo. male, exc. dispoboy LOVES people & WANTED: RAZORS, sition, parent certified, kids! Call Jefferson Co. Double or singleKennels (541-475-6889) $500, 541-420-1562 edged, straight or visit Buddha's Facerazors, shaving book page (Wanted: A Kittens/cats avail. thru brushes, mugs & rescue group. Tame, Home for Buddha the Pit scuttles, strops, shots, altered, ID chip, Bull) to learn more about shaving accessories adopting Buddha. more. Sat/Sun 1-5, & memorabilia. other days by appt. Chihuahuas 1 male, 1 Fair prices paid. 65480 78th Bend, female, 8 wks, black, Call 541-390-7029 541-389-8420; visit $175 ea.541-279-5859 between 10 am-3 pm. www.craftcats.org for photos & more. Chihuahuas, 2 males, 205 light brown, 8 wks, $250 Lab Pups AKC, black Items for Free ea 541-385-6167 & yellow, Master Hunter sired, perforHot tub, needs work, Dog Kennel, cyclone mance pedigree, OFA fencing, 10.5’ long, FREE if you haul cert hips & elbows, 58” wide, 82” tall, away. 541-382-3076 Call 541-771-2330 $150, 541-382-2036 www.kinnamanretrievers.com or 503-706-6993 208 Labradoodles - Mini & Where can you ind a med size, several colors Pets & Supplies helping hand? 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com From contractors to The Bulletin recommends extra caution yard care, it’s all here Find exactly what when purchasin The Bulletin’s you are looking for in the ing products or ser“Call A Service vices from out of the CLASSIFIEDS area. Sending cash, Professional” Directory checks, or credit inPurebred Pups, formation may be Doxie AKC mini pups, all Pitbull 2 female fawns, $150, subjected to fraud. colors inc wheaton &dapl, 541-280-8720 For more informa- $375-425. 541-508-4558 tion about an adver- www.bendweenies.com POODLE (TOY) PUPS tiser, you may call Well-socialized & lovthe Oregon State able. 541-475-3889 DO YOU HAVE Attorney General’s SOMETHING TO Queensland Heelers Office Consumer SELL standard & mini,$150 & Protection hotline at FOR $500 OR up. 541-280-1537 http:// 1-877-877-9392. LESS? rightwayranch.wordpress.com Non-commercial Schnoodles,Great w/kids, advertisers may non-shed, shots, $350 place an ad with males, $450 females. our Pup kit 541-410-7701 Barn/shop cats FREE, "QUICK CASH some tame, some not. SPECIAL" Whippet Puppies We deliver! Fixed, 1 week 3 lines, $12 whimsical, family pets, shots, etc. 389-8420 or 2 weeks, $20! $350, 541-280-1975. Ad must include price of single item Yorkie AKC Male,Champ of $500 or less, or lines, potty trained, multiple items healthy,all shots, health whose total does guarantee $595, not exceed $500. 541-233-3534 202

Bloodhound, female, almost 2 yrs, unaltered, AKC reg., $400, Brady, 541-848-9953.

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ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns, Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. 263 - Tools

C h a n d l e r

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

$150 ea. Full warranty. Free Del. Also wanted, used W/D’s 541-280-7355

Taylor Made Rocket Balls Irons, 4-Pitching wedge, $435, leave msg at 541-480-1014 246

Golden Power Wheelchair, like new, bright red, exc. cond., used only 3 mo, orig. $3500, sacrifice at $2000, 541-848-7755 or 541-948-7518. or Weatherby 7mm Mags dorene@quailbend.com (2), 1 left hand, 1 right hand,scope,slink, case, Lift Recliner Chair, w/ attached remote conexc. new cond., $1095 trol, taupe color, exc. each 541-593-8294. cond., used 1 yr., Winchester rifle, model $1000 new, now $400,541-848-7755 or 1894, good cond. 541-948-7518. or $750. King Arthur Sword, $60. Cross dorene@quailbend.com Bow, $30. Check out the 541-388-1101 classiieds online Yugoslavian SKS Rifle, www.bendbulletin.com Rare, $650 OBO, Updated daily John, 541-771-9902. Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, or 503-351-2746

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection. • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

FOUND hearing aid on Brianne Place, Bend. Call to ID, 707-849-2901. Found Hiking Poles, popular Cascade Mtn. trail, 8/21, call to ID, 541-647-1958. Found: Sunglasses on lawn outside PacSun in lawn, during the ZZ Top Concert. Call to identify, 541-382-4530. Found: Watch, 8/18, in Old Mill area, call to ID, 541-419-7706. Lost: 42nd Mason Ring, Jim Hignett engraved inside band. Lost at Walmart in Bend. REWARD! 541-382-7473. Lost: Black purse, in Redmond on 8/27. Owner is almost blind, left behind while shopping. Please help find. 541-548-3590. Lost Cat: Romaine Village Area, around 7/14, white female, w/1 black ear & black tail, 1 blue eye, 1 green eye, $100 Reward, 541-317-9299 or 503-724-5858.

Guns, Hunting Armoire, dark oak $99; & Fishing Rattan bookcase $45; rattan coffee table $35; wine cart $35. 1953 Winchester Model 12 Field Gun, 30” bbl, 541-593-7307 full choke, 95-98% cond, China Cabinet, contem- $500 firm. 541-382-8723 porary glass shelves, Bend local pays CASH!! $250, 541-419-0799 for Guns, Knives & Ammo. 541-526-0617 China Hutch, maple, very good cond. $350 Beretta 686 w. onyx, OBO. 541-279-0591 30” O/U shotgun w/chokes, $155. Call Desk, Rolltop, dark oak, Ralph, 541-255-3242. 43”x33”x20” Deep, 4 263 drawer, brass pulls, 253 Browning A-Bolt .270 $250, 541-382-0483 Tools Stainless Stalker, w/ TV, Stereo & Video Leupold VarX-II 2-9x GENERATE SOME exRockwell 10” contracvariable, silver scope citement in your TV for sale $45; 269 tors saw, model 10. & rings, exc. cond., neighborhood! Plan a 541-593-7307 $200. 541-389-2600 $600, 541-410-6242. Gardening Supplies garage sale and don't 255 forget to advertise in & Equipment Shopsmith Mk V-510 Browning BDA .380 Cal classified! w/11” band saw, 12” Computers semi auto. 13 round 541-385-5809. sanding disk,drill chuck, capacity. Excellent For newspaper more accessories, condition. Wood THE BULLETIN reLamps, (2) sets, $5 ea. delivery, call the $800, 541-317-9040. quires computer adgrips. $499 cash Call for details, Circulation Dept. at vertisers with multiple only. 541-749-8449 265 541-279-0591 541-385-5800 ad schedules or those To place an ad, call Building Materials selling multiple sysCASH!! W/D Set, older Frigidaire, 541-385-5809 tems/ software, to disFor Guns, Ammo & works well, $125, deor email MADRAS Habitat Reloading Supplies. close the name of the livered, 541-548-0040 classified@bendbulletin.com RESTORE 541-408-6900. business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Building Supply Resale Lost: Maine Coon Cat, The Bulletin Quality at Private party advertisdark brown tabby, Old DO YOU HAVE r ecommends extra LOW PRICES ers are defined as Bend-Redmond Hwy/ SOMETHING TO caution when pur84 SW K St. those who sell one Rogers Rd. area, Prompt Delivery SELL chasing products or 541-475-9722 computer. possibly injured, Rock, Sand & Gravel FOR $500 OR services from out of Open to the public. 541-788-8713. Multiple Colors, Sizes LESS? the area. Sending 257 Instant Landscaping Co. Call The Bulletin At 266 Non-commercial cash, checks, or Musical Instruments 541-389-9663 advertisers may credit information Heating & Stoves 541-385-5809 place an ad may be subjected to Baby Grand Piano in Place Your Ad Or E-Mail SUPER TOP SOIL with our FRAUD. For more NOTICE TO excellent condition, www.hersheysoilandbark.com At: www.bendbulletin.com "QUICK CASH information about an ADVERTISER $1000. 541-382-3076 Screened, soil & comSPECIAL" advertiser, you may Since September 29, post mixed, no Lost Siamese cat near 1 week 3 lines $12 call the Oregon 260 1991, advertising for COCC. She’s a Seal rocks/clods. High huor State Attorney used woodstoves has Point with blue eyes Misc. Items mus level, exc. for 2 weeks $20! General’s Office been limited to modand white feet. $100 flower beds, lawns, Ad must Consumer Protecels which have been reward if found call. 22’ alum. semi-truck trlr, gardens, straight include price of tion hotline at certified by the Or541-306-3078. best used for storage, screened top soil. single item of $500 1-877-877-9392. egon Department of $500. 541-447-4405 Bark. Clean fill. De- Lost small leopard or less, or multiple Environmental Qualliver/you haul. purse in Redmond off items whose total BBQ propane grill $60; ity (DEQ) and the fed541-548-3949. Lake Rd. Personal does not exceed Peach colored dishes eral Environmental contents. Would ap$500. $40. 541-593-7307 Protection Agency 270 preciate its return. 212 (EPA) as having met Buying Diamonds 541-318-4746. Call Classifieds at Lost & Found smoke emission stanAntiques & /Gold for Cash 541-385-5809 dards. A certified REMEMBER: If you Collectibles Saxon’s Fine Jewelers www.bendbulletin.com woodstove may be Found: 2 bikes, near have lost an animal, 541-389-6655 Skyview Middle identified by its certifidon't forget to check 1925 Home Comfort School, 1 red, 1 aqua, cation label, which is The Humane Society BUYING GUN SHOW wood cookstove with around 8/1. Call to permanently attached Lionel/American Flyer in Bend 541-382-3537 Sept. 1 & 2 warming oven, reidentify 541-389-5357 to the stove. The Bultrains, accessories. Redmond, stored & re-nickeled, Deschutes Fairgrounds letin will not know541-408-2191. 541-923-0882 $2000. 541-447-4446 Buy! Sell! Trade! FOUND 8/21 Prescripingly accept advertisPrineville, SAT. 9-5 • SUN. 10-3 BUYING & SELLING tion sunglasses at ing for the sale of 1950 Okeefe Merritt gas 541-447-7178; $8 Admission, All gold jewelry, silver Pine Nursery Park. uncertified stove, restored. OR Craft Cats, and gold coins, bars, 12 & under free. 541-410-4596 woodstoves. $4500. 541-382-3728 541-389-8420. rounds, wedding sets, OREGON TRAIL GUN class rings, sterling silAntiques wanted: tools, SHOWS 541-347-2120 ver, coin collect, vinfurniture, fishing, tage watches, dental Howa 1500 308 cal., marbles, old signs, gold. Bill Fleming, $500; Howa 1500 7 toys, costume jewelry. 541-382-9419. mm mag, $450; Win Call 541-389-1578 Mod 120 20 ga. COWGIRL CASH The Bulletin reserves pump, $250; Win Mod We pay cash for boots, the right to publish all 140, 20 ga. auto, buckles, jewelry & ads from The Bulletin $300; Rem Wingmasmore! 924 Brooks St. newspaper onto The ter 870, 12 ga., 30” 541-678-5162 Bulletin Internet webFull, $325; Win 97 12 www.getcowgirlcash.com site. ga., very nice, $425; Taurus Model 856, Poulan Pro riding lawn mower 42” 18½ hp .38 Special, 2”, NIB, good shape. $600 $325; Taurus 605, OBO. 541-389-9268 .357 mag, 2”, NIB, 215 $375; all very good or Wanted- paying cash Coins & Stamps NIB, 541-617-6328. for Hi-fi audio & stuPrivate collector buying dio equip. McIntosh, postage stamp alJBL, Marantz, Dybums & collections, DAY DEADLINE naco, Heathkit, Sanworld-wide and U.S. sui, Carver, NAD, etc. Monday 9/3....................................Wednesday, 8/29 4 p.m. 573-286-4343 (local, Call 541-261-1808 cell #) At Home 9/4...................................Wednesday, 8/29 4 p.m. LEARN TO SHOOT Get your 242 Tuesday 9/4.........................................Thursday, 8/30 Noon LIKE THE COPS Exercise Equipment business plus UTAH Permit Wednesday 9/5.........................................Friday, 8/31 Noon class. $99. Sisters, Bowflex Xtreme like 1 p.m., Sun. Sept. 9. new, assembly reCall 817-789-5395 quired, you haul, www.reacttraining$400. 541-383-3041. systems.com Tunturi C416 Stair Remington 721, 300 With an ad in Stepper, exlnt cond, Tuesday 9/4..............................Noon Saturday 9/1 H&H $750. Ruger 77 $25. 541-504-6437 The Bulletin's Hawkeye 25-06, new, $525. 541-548-4774 245

US made 38 S.W., 5 Golf Equipment shot, antique made Yorkie AKC pup, male, 1800s, ammo and teddy face, playful,health Easy Go Golf Carts 08 holster, $210. & 07, 36V, $2100/ea. guarantee,house trained 209-985-7015 541-280-3848. $550. 541-316-0005.

2012

DEADLINES

We will be closed Monday, Labor Day, Sept. 3, 2012 RETAIL & CLASSIFIED DISPLAY ADVERTISING

GRO W

IN G

CLASSIFIED LINER DEADLINES

Classifieds • 541-385-5809

"Call A Service Professional" Directory


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

F2 WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Edited by Will Shortz

PLACE AN AD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . .11:00 am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Starting at 3 lines

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise

OVER $500 in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days ................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days .................................................. $18.50 7 days .................................................. $24.00 14 days .................................................$33.50 28 days .................................................$61.50

4 lines for 4 days.................................. $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Farm Market

345

476

476

476

Livestock & Equipment

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Automotive Service Advisor Must be customer focused with CSI a top priority. Fast pace dealership offering great benefits with a lasting career for a hard working individual. Send resume to: PO Box 6676, Bend, OR 97708

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

400

300 325

Hay, Grain & Feed Premium 1st cutting Orchard Grass hay, shed stored, 70-lb bales, $225/ton. Call Ten Barr Ranch, 541-389-1165 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw;Compost.546-6171 Wheat straw, small 50-lb bales, in the stack, 75¢ each. 541-546-9821

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Employment

1977 14' Blake Trailer, refurbished by 421 Frenchglen Blacksmiths, a Classy ClasSchools & Training sic. Great design for multiple uses. OverTRUCK SCHOOL head tack box (bunkwww.IITR.net house) with side and Redmond Campus easy pickup bed acStudent Loans/Job cess; manger with left Waiting Toll Free side access, windows 1-888-387-9252 and head divider. Toyo radial tires & spare; new floor with mats; Need to get an center partition panel; ad in ASAP? bed liner coated in key areas, 6.5 K torsion You can place it axles with electric online at: brakes, and new paint, $7500 OBO! Call www.bendbulletin.com John at 541-589-0777. USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Door-to-door selling with fast results! It’s the easiest way in the world to sell. The Bulletin Classiied

541-385-5809 358

Farmers Column 80 lineal ft. of welded pipe horse corral, 4rail, 2” pipe with 3” posts & 2 feeders. $300 541-410-3218 Free 2 acres irrigated pasture, sheep fenced (sheep only!) til end of Oct., in Redmond. 541-548-2357

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION READERS: Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Classified Department The Bulletin 541-385-5809

286

290

Sales Northeast Bend

Sales Redmond Area

HH FREE HH Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $2.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!”

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT at

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

290

Sales Redmond Area

Banking

541-385-5809

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never proBULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS vide personal inforSearch the area’s most 383 mation to any source comprehensive listing of Produce & Food you may not have reclassiied advertising... searched and deemed real estate to automotive, THOMAS ORCHARDS to be reputable. Use merchandise to sporting Kimberly, OR extreme caution when goods. Bulletin Classiieds U-Pick & Ready Picked: responding to ANY appear every day in the Freestone Canning online employment print or on line. peaches: Suncrest, Lorad from out-of-state. ing, Elberta, Angelus, Call 541-385-5809 Necarines, Plums, Barwww.bendbulletin.com We suggest you call tlett Pears, Gala Apples the State of Oregon BRING CONTAINERS Consumer Hotline at Open 7 days a week 1-503-378-4320 8am-6 pm only 341 541-934-2870. Visit us on Facebook For Equal Opportunity Horses & Equipment Laws: Oregon Bufor updates Also we are at Bend reau of Labor & InLeather Western Farmer’s Mkt at Drake dustry, Civil Rights Saddle, 14.5” seat, Park & St. Charles Division, $195. 541-923-7332 971-673-0764

Garage Sale Kit

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads The Bulletin

Eagle Crest Sale, 9/1 Antiques, Glassware, tools, tires, furniture, pictures,799 Widgeon Rd,9-3 alturl.com/xi8ur, 541-316-0114 The Biggest Estate Sale in Central Oregon Fri. & Sat. 9-4, 5330 NW Coyner Ave, moving sale, everything must go! 292

Sales Other Areas Estate/Garage Sale Contractor tools, camping gear, furniture, scrapbooking, garden stuff, much, much more! 8/31 & 9/1, 8:30-5, NO EARLY SALES. 17315 Bakersfield Rd., Sunriver Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates!

8/30, 31 & 9/1, 9-5, 541-385-5809 Items for hunting, LaPine Garage Sale: fishing, camping, RVs Sat. 9/1, 8-4, 52195 household & more. Elderberry Ln, col665 Angus Ln., Terrelectibles, furniture, bonne. household & more. Casta Vista Estates Multi-Family Yard Sisters Garage/Estate Sale, 1 day only, Sat. Sale: Sat. 9/1, 8-3, 9/1, 8-4 3748 SW Xero 67996 Peterson Burn Pl, No early birds. Rd, lots of great items

We are excited to announce an available position in Bend, Oregon. Branch Supervisor Salary Range: $ 29,000 - $40,000 EOE. For more details, please apply online: www.sofcu.com

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

541-385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at:

www.bendbulletin.com

Heavy Truck Diesel Mechanic. 2 Yrs experience with own tools. Full time with benefits. Busy shop in Grants Pass. Submit resume to sales@pacifictruckandtrailer.com or call Bobby 541-471-4450. Hospitality Front desk positions part time and full time. Apply in person at Sugarloaf Mountain Motel, 62980 No. Hwy 97, Bend, Oregon. Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin' s web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Sales

Are you a highly competitive sales person who likes to win? If you are having a successful career selling IPBX business telephone systems and you are looking for a position that can provide you a long term competitive advantage WE HAVE IT FOR YOU. We are one of the fastest growing providers of hosted and on-site IPBX solutions in the Northwest and we are heavily committed to our success. If you are tired of competing with the same products and your only advantage is the lowest price, we have the solutions! We offer a competitive base salary, commissions and an excellent benefits package. To view position requirements and to apply, visit us online at www.uidchr.com.

Data Center Network Technicians Facebook is hiring! We’re seeking a highly motivated Data Center Network Technician to help us build a world-class facility at our Prineville, Oregon location. The ideal candidate will have 3+ years’ experience in data center network deployment, strong troubleshooting skills, a solid understanding of Layer 2 and Layer 3 network switching/routing, and experience in configuring and supporting Cisco, Juniper, and F5 devices.

SOCIAL SERVICES

Join one of the largest child education networks in Oregon preparing children for school. We are looking for an

ERSEA Supervisor

at our Madras center to recruit eligible families into our Head Start programs. Fulltime year-round position w/excellent benefits. $19.32 and up, depending on exper. Bilingual Spanish/ English required. Please visit our website www.ocdc.net for job description & requirements and to apply online. Or mail resume to: Oregon Child Development Coalition Attn: Human Resources, 659 NE “A” St., Madras, OR 97741 Equal Opportunity Employer

Call a Pro Whether you need a fence ixed, hedges trimmed or a house built, you’ll ind professional help in The Bulletin’s “Call a Service Professional” Directory

541-385-5809

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Just too many collectibles? Sell them in The Bulletin Classiieds

541-385-5809

Manufacturing Plant Electrician

Warm Springs Composite Products is looking for an individual to help a growing innovative light manufacturing plant. Basic Duties: Assist in troubleshooting and repairs of plant equipment. Install, repair and maintain all electrical and electronic equipment. Able to read and revise electrical schematics, Must be able to perform both electrical and mechanical preventive maintenance requirements and report, PLC experience. Minimum Skills: A minimum of 5 years in the industrial maintenance field with a valid Oregon State Electricians License in Manufacturing. A strong mechanical aptitude with the ability to perform light welding and fabrication duties. Successful applicant shall supply the normal hand tools required for both electrical and mechanical maintenance. Benefits: Full Family Medical, Vision, Dental, Life, Disability, Salary Incentives, Company Bonuses, Pension and 401K w/Company Matching and Above Pay Rate Scale. Please remit resume to: Warm Springs Composite Products PO Box 906, Warm Springs, OR 97761 Phone: 541-553-1143, Fax: 541-553-1145 Attn: Mac Coombs, mcoombs@wscp.com

TIRE SERVICE America’s Tire Co. is looking for

TIRE TECHNICIANS • Great attitude a must! • Competitive Wages! • Advancement opps • Must be able to do physical work • Able to pass drug/ background check • Start $10/DOE • Health insurance available • Will work around school schedule Visit our website tires.com for an application and to learn more about Discount Tire Co. Please bring completed application and apply in person: 63553 N. Highway 97 Bend, OR 97701 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Take care of your investments with the help from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Finance & Business

500 528

Loans & Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale LOCAL MONEY:We buy secured trust deeds & note,some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 ext.13. 573

Business Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

For more information please visit our careers page https://www.facebook.com/career or email ristine@fb.com.

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

Operate Your Own Business

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Prineville, Sunriver/La Pine H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours.

Must have reliable, insured vehicle. Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or 541-385-5809


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condos & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012 F3

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 730 - New Listings 732 - Commercial Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condos & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 642

Rentals

600 605

Roommate Wanted

Apt./Multiplex Redmond Duplex 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1260 sq.ft., 1 story, garage w/opener, fenced yard, RV/Boat parking, fridge, dishwasher, micro, walk-in laundry, W/S/G paid, front gardner paid, $775+dep., 541-604-0338 648

Share cozy mobile home in Terrebonne, $275+ 1/2 utils 1-503-679-7496

Houses for Rent General

Real Estate For Sale

700 738

Multiplexes for Sale

FSBO: 4-Plex,

5665 sq.ft., Built 1996, 1471 NE Tuscon Way, all rented, $399,000 541-480-8080.

745

870

880

881

Homes for Sale

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Boats & RV’s

BUNGALOW ON THE WESTSIDE! Cute with endless possibilities to re-design or plenty of room to add additional square footage on this large 860 double lot. Sturdy construction of a by- Motorcycles & Accessories gone era with all the quirky charm you just Harley Davidson Softdon’t find in modern Tail Deluxe 2007, homes today. white/cobalt, w/pas$219,900 senger kit, Vance & MLS#201204713 Hines muffler system Rhonda Garrison & & kit, 1045 mi., exc. Chris Sperry Princicond, $19,999, pal Broker & Broker 541-389-9188. 541-279-1768 & Harley Heritage 541-550-4922 Softail, 2003 John L. Scott Real $5,000+ in extras, Estate, Bend $2000 paint job, www.JohnLScott.com/Bend 30K mi. 1 owner, For more information NOTICE: please call All real estate adver541-385-8090 tised here in is subor 209-605-5537 ject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal HD FAT BOY to advertise any pref1996 erence, limitation or Completely rebuilt/ discrimination based customized, low on race, color, relimiles. Accepting ofgion, sex, handicap, fers. 541-548-4807 familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such Honda 90 Trail Bikes: preferences, limita- yellow, 1965, $1200; red tions or discrimination. 1974, $1400. Low miles, new cond. Deal on We will not knowingly like both! Call 702-578-5009 accept any advertis- or 541-593-3984 ing for real estate which is in violation of Honda Elite 80 2001, 1400 mi., absolutely this law. All persons like new., comes w/ are hereby informed carrying rack for 2” that all dwellings adreceiver, ideal for use vertised are available w/motorhome, $995, on an equal opportu541-546-6920 nity basis. The Bulletin Classified Softail Deluxe SW Bend Deschutes Landing 2010, 805 miles, Riverfront Townhomes Black Chameleon. Starting in the low $17,000 $400,000s Call Don @ Pahlisch Homes 541-410-3823 The Hasson Company Realtors. Edie Delay, Broker 865 541-420-2950, ATVs Julie Burgoni, Broker 541-306-8927

800

Ads published in the Itasca Sun Cruiser 1997, 460 Ford, Class "Boats" classification A, 26K mi., 37’, living include: Speed, fishroom slide, new awing, drift, canoe, nings, new fridge, 8 house and sail boats. new tires, 2 A/C, 6.5 For all other types of Onan Gen., new batwatercraft, please see teries, tow pkg., rear Class 875. towing TV, 2 tv’s, new 541-385-5809 hydraulic jack springs, tandem axel, $15,000, 541-385-1782 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Used out-drive parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435 875

Watercraft 2007 SeaDoo 2004 Waverunner, excellent condition, LOW hours. Double trailer, lots of extras.

$10,000 541-719-8444

The Bulletin

Acreages

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

CHECK YOUR AD

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

Home Improvement

Landscaping/Yard Care

EXT. HOUSEWASHING Nelson Landscape Want to clean the dust & Maintenance grime off your home’s Serving siding & soffit this Central Oregon summer? Residential Call House2oh @ & Commercial 541-263-1268 and talk •Sprinkler Repair to Cody today for free estimate. Now serving •Sprinkler Bend & Redmond. Installation •Back Flow Testing Kelly Kerfoot Const.

•Fire Prevention, Lot Clearing • Summer Clean up •Weekly Mowing •Bi-Monthly & Monthly Sr. discounts CCB#47120 Maintenance Licensed/bonded/insured •Flower Bed Clean Up 541-389-1413 / 410-2422 •Bark, Rock, Etc. •Senior Discounts Landscaping/Yard Care 28 yrs exp in Central OR!

Quality & honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to expert wall covering install / removal.

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades NOTICE: OREGON also require addiLandscape Contractional licenses and tors Law (ORS 671) certifications. requires all businesses that advertise Debris Removal to perform Landscape Construction JUNK BE GONE which includes: planting, decks, I Haul Away FREE fences, arbors, For Salvage. Also water-features, and Cleanups & Cleanouts installation, repair of Mel, 541-389-8107 irrigation systems to be licensed with the Handyman Landscape Contractors Board. This ERIC REEVE HANDY 4-digit number is to be SERVICES. Home & included in all adverCommercial Repairs, tisements which indiCarpentry-Painting, cate the business has Pressure-washing, a bond, insurance and Honey Do's. On-time workers compensapromise. Senior tion for their employDiscount. Work guarees. For your protecanteed. 541-389-3361 tion call 503-378-5909 or 541-771-4463 or use our website: Bonded & Insured www.lcb.state.or.us to CCB#181595 check license status I DO THAT! before contracting Home/Rental repairs with the business. Small jobs to remodels Persons doing landHonest, guaranteed scape maintenance work. CCB#151573 do not require a LCB license. Dennis 541-317-9768

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through The Bulletin Classifieds Call The Yard Doctor for yard maintenance, thatching, sod, sprinkler blowouts, water features, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012 Aeration/Fall Clean-up BOOK NOW! Weekly / one-time service avail. Bonded, insured, free estimates!

COLLINS Lawn Maint. Call 541-480-9714 Maverick Landscaping Mowing, weedeating, yard detailing, chain saw work & more! LCB#8671 541-923-4324 Holmes Landscape Maint

• Clean-up • Aerate • De-thatch • Free Est. • Weekly / Bi-wkly Svc. call Josh 541-610-6011

***

882

Fifth Wheels

Beaver Coach Marquis 40’ 1987. New cover, new paint (2004), new inverter (2007). Onan 6300 watt gen, 111K mi, parked covered $35,000 obo. 541-419-9859 or 541-280-2014 Good classiied ads tell the essential facts in an interesting Manner. Write from the readers view - not the seller’s. Convert the facts into beneits. Show the reader how the item will help them in some way.

900 908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718 1/3 interest in wellequipped IFR Beech Bonanza A36, located KBDN. $55,000. 541-419-9510

Executive Hangar

Immaculate!

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

ALFA 30' RL 2007, front-view bedroom, granite, leather recliners, 4x20 slide, HDTV, micro/conv, central vac, $31,000 909-229-2921

Tick, Tock Tick, Tock... ...don’t let time get away. Hire a professional out of The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory today!

at Bend Airport (KBDN) 60’ wide x 50’ deep, w/55’ wide x 17’ high bi-fold door. Natural gas heat, office, bathroom. Parking for 6 cars. Adjacent to Frontage Rd; great visibility for aviation bus. 1jetjock@q.com 541-948-2126

ONLY 1 OWNERSHIP SHARE LEFT! Economical flying in your own Cessna 172/180 HP for only $10,000! Based at BDN. Call Gabe at Professional Air! 541-388-0019 916

ING

Small studio downtown Warehouse - Industrial unit for rent. 5600 area, all util. pd. $550, sq.ft., $2250/month, $525 dep. No pets/ near Bend High. smoking. 541-330541-389-8794. 9769 or 541-480-7870

6800 mi., hyd. jacks, new tires, slide out, exc. cond, $49,900, 541-480-8648

Minn-Kota Trolling Motor, top of line, $100. 541-548-7137

Crooked River Ranch, Coleman Canoe, Ram 1350 sq.ft. ranch home, Rooms for Rent X-15, good condition, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. $300, 541-306-8160. garage, cement patio, 745 Mt. Bachelor Motel has mtn. views, no smokHomes for Sale rooms, starting $150/ ing, 1 small pet neg., week or $35/nt. Incl $795, 541-548-4225. 749 4 Bedroom, 2.5 bath, guest laundry, cable & 1963 sq. ft. home lo- Southeast Bend Homes WiFi. 541-382-6365 Need help ixing stuff? cated in the heart of Kayak, Eddyline Studios & Kitchenettes Call A Service Professional Prineville. This lovely Sandpiper, 12’, like NE Bend Furnished room, TV w/ ind the help you need. traditional style home new, $975, McCall Landing cable, micro & fridge. www.bendbulletin.com has a low mainte- Our Newest Community Honda TRX300 EX 2005 541-420-3277. sport quad w/Rev, runs Utils & linens. New nance yard, solid Starting in the Mid & rides great, new pipe & 650 owners.$145-$165/wk wood cabinetry $100,000’s. paddles incl. $1700 obo. 541-382-1885 Houses for Rent throughout, as well as Pahlisch Homes 541-647-8931 a tile entry, and lamiThe Hasson NE Bend 634 Yamaha Grizzly 700 FI nate wood floors. Company Realtors. Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 4 Bdrm 2.5 bath, 1700 sq 2009, 543 mi, 2WD/ Master on the main Rhianna Kunkler, 4WD, black w/EPS, floor and a bonus Broker, 541-306-0939 ft, appls, fenced yd, on fuel injection, indepen- Sea Kayaks - His & CHECK OUT THIS room over the garage. culdesac. No smoking. 750 dent rear suspension HOT DEAL! Wiring for AC unit is Pets? 2400 NE Jeni Jo Hers, Eddyline Wind winch w/handle con$299 1st month’s rent! * Ct., Redmond Homes near hospital. already there, short Dancers,17’, fiberglass trols & remote, ps, 2 bdrm, 1 bath $1050. 503-680-9590 distance to movies, boats, all equip incl., auto, large racks, exc. $530 & 540 restaurants, and 1/4 Mi. Deschutes River paddles, personal flocond., $7850, Carports & A/C incl! frontage. Custom shopping. MLS tation devices,dry bags, Looking for your next 541-322-0215 Fox Hollow Apts. single level 3 bdrm, 3 spray skirts,roof rack w/ #201108663 employee? (541) 383-3152 towers & cradles -- Just bath, 3962 sq.ft., $159,950. Place a Bulletin help Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co add water, $1250/boat 12.72 acre gated Team Clark wanted ad today and *Upstairs only with lease* Firm. 541-504-8557. community, private Century 21, reach over 60,000 setting. $997,000. Gold Country Realty readers each week. Call for Specials! 880 MLS #201205961. 541-548-2131 Your classified ad Limited numbers avail. Pam Lester, Principal Motorhomes will also appear on 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. Broker, Century 21 Yamaha Kodiak 400, bendbulletin.com, W/D hookups, patios Gold Country Realty, 2005 4x4, 2500 lb winch, Get your currently receiving or decks. gun rack & alum loading Inc. 541-504-1338 over 1.5 million page business MOUNTAIN GLEN, ramp, only 542 miles, views, every month 541-383-9313 show room cond, $4800. Looking for your next at no extra cost. Professionally 541-280-9401 employee? Bulletin Classifieds GROW managed by Norris & Place a Bulletin help Get Results! Stevens, Inc. 870 Allegro 2002, 2 slides, wanted ad today and Call 541-385-5809 or with an ad in Boats & Accessories 22K mi, workhorse reach over 60,000 636 place your ad on-line chassis, 8.1 Chev enThe Bulletin’s readers each week. at Apt./Multiplex NW Bend gine, like new, $41,900 Your classified ad bendbulletin.com “Call A Service 17’ 1984 Chris Craft obo. 541-420-9346 will also appear on - Scorpion, 140 HP Fully furnished loft Apt Professional” bendbulletin.com inboard/outboard, 2 on Wall Street in 658 Directory which currently redepth finders, trollBend, with parking. All Houses for Rent ceives over ing motor, full cover, utilities paid. Call 1.5 million page Redmond EZ - Load trailer, 541-389-2389 for appt 4270 sq ft, 6 bdrm, 6 ba, views every month $3500 OBO. 4-car, corner, .83 acre at no extra cost. 541-382-3728. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath mtn view, by owner. Say “goodbuy” Bulletin Classifieds Country Coach Intrigue home on 1.3 acres $590,000 541-390-0886 Get Results! 2002, 40' Tag axle. to that unused in Redmond, $895 See: bloomkey.com/8779 Call 385-5809 or 400hp Cummins Die17’ Seaswirl 1988 mo. 541-548-2408 item by placing it in place your ad on-line sel. two slide-outs. BANK OWNED HOMES! open bow, rebuilt at 41,000 miles, new The Bulletin Classiieds FREE List w/Pics! 687 Chevy V6 engine, bendbulletin.com tires & batteries. Most www.BendRepos.com new upholstery, Commercial for options. $95,000 OBO bend and beyond real estate $4500 or best offer. 541-385-5809 20967 yeoman, bend or Rent/Lease 541-678-5712 773 707-688-4523 630

Jayco Greyhawk 2004, 31’ Class C,

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Autos & Transportation

Monaco Dynasty 2004, loaded, 3 slides, diesel, Reduced - now $119,000, 541-9238572 or 541-749-0037

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, fireplace, 2 flat screen TVs. $60,000. 541-480-3923

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

Diamond Reo Dump Truck 1974, 12-14 yard box, runs good, $7900, 541-548-6812

National Sea Breeze 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, 2 power slides, upFleetwood Wilderness graded queen mat36’, 2005, 4 slides, tress, hyd. leveling rear bdrm, fireplace, system, rear camera AC, W/D hkup beau& monitor, only 6k mi. tiful unit! $30,500. Reduced to $41,300! 541-815-2380 Econoline trailer 541-480-0617 16-Ton 29’ Bed, w/fold up ramps, elec. RV CONSIGNMENTS brakes, Pintlehitch, WANTED $4900, 541-548-6812 We Do The Work, You Keep The Cash, Komfort 25’ 2006, 1 On-Site Credit slide, AC, TV, awning. Freightliner 2000, Approval Team, 24’ van box, 8.3L NEW: tires, converter, Web Site Presence, 210 HP eng. in batteries. Hardly used. We Take Trade-Ins. good cond. $9000, $19,500. 541-923-2595 Free Advertising. 541-749-0724. BIG COUNTRY RV Bend 541-330-2495

Redmond: 541-548-5254

Montana 3400RL 2008, 4 Hyster H25E, runs well, 2982 Hours, slides, no smokers or $3500, call pets, limited usage, 541-749-0724 5500 watt Onan gen, Southwind 35.5’ Triton, solar panel, fireplace, 2008,V10, 2 slides, Du- dual A/C, central vac, pont UV coat, 7500 mi. elect. awning w/sunBought new at screen arctic pkg, rear $132,913; receiver, alum wheels, 2 asking $94,900. TVs, many extras. Call 541-923-2774 $35,500. 541-416-8087 Peterbilt 359 potable water truck, 1990, 3200 gal. tank, 5hp pump, 4-3" hoses, camlocks, $25,000. 541-820-3724

925 Winnebago Class C 27’ MONTANA 3585 2008, Utility Trailers 1992, Ford 460 V8,64K exc. cond., 3 slides, mi., good cond., $7000 king bed, lrg LR, ArcOBO 541-678-5575 tic insulation, all options $37,500. 881 541-420-3250 Big Tex LandscapTravel Trailers Open Road 37' 2004 ing/ ATV Trailer, 3 slides, W/D hookup, dual axle flatbed, large LR w/rear win7’x16’, 7000 lb. dow. Desk area. GVW, all steel, Fleetwood 28’ Pioneer Asking $19,750 OBO $1400. 2003, 13’ slide, sleeps Call (541) 280-7879 541-382-4115, or Econoline RV 1989, 6, walk-around bed with visit rvt.com fully loaded, exc. cond, 541-280-7024. ad#104243920 35K orig. mi., $22,750. new mattress; power hitch, very clean for pics Call 541-546-6133. 931 $11,500. Please call 541-548-4284. Automotive Parts, CAN’T BEAT THIS! Service & Accessories Look before you buy, below market Honda Accord 1981 value! Size & mileparts car, $250. age DOES matter! 541-447-4405 Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th Class A 32’ Hurriwheel, 1 slide, AC, Tires, Mounted Goodcane by Four Winds, 2007. 12,500 mi, all Funfinder189 2008,slide, TV,full awning, excelyear Utragrip,P215/60 A/C, awning, furnace,self amenities, Ford V10, lent shape, $23,900. R15, $200, 317-9040. cont’d, queen, sleeps 5, lthr, cherry, slides, 541-350-8629 $11000 obo like new! New low 932 541-610-5702 price, $54,900. Antique & 541-548-5216 Classic Autos

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes in- 18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 Volvo Penta, 270HP, structions over the low hrs., must see, phone are misunder$17,500, 541-330-3939 stood and an error can occur in your ad. 18.5’ Bayliner 185 If this happens to your 2008. 3.0L, open bow, ad, please contact us slim deck, custom the first day your ad cover & trailer, exc. appears and we will cond., 30-35 total hrs., be happy to fix it as incl. 4 life vests, soon as we can. ropes, anchor, stereo, Deadlines are: Weekdepth finder, $12,000, days 11:00 noon for 541-729-9860. next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday and 19.5’ Bayliner Discovery 2008,Merc cruiser Monday. 135 HP motor, open 541-385-5809 bow, full canopy, alThank you! ways garage stored, Gulfstream The Bulletin Classified Scenic used 5 times, $16,500 *** Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Pilgrim Open Road 541-977-3120. Cummins 330 hp diePowell Butte 6 acres, 2005, 36’, 3 slides, sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 360 views, great horse w/d hookup, upin. kitchen slide out, Springdale 29’ 2007, property, 10223 Housgrades, $24,440. new tires,under cover, slide,Bunkhouse style, ton Lake Rd. $99,900. 541-312-4466 hwy. miles only,4 door Chev Corvair Monza consleeps 7-8, excellent 541-350-4684 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner fridge/freezer icevertible,1964, new top & condition, $16,900, 205 Run About, 220 775 maker, W/D combo, tranny, runs great, exlnt 541-390-2504 HP, V8, open bow, Interbath tub & cruising car! $5500 obo. Manufactured/ exc. cond., very fast 541-420-5205 shower, 50 amp prow/very low hours, Mobile Homes pane gen & more! lots of extras incl. $55,000. tower, Bimini & FACTORY SPECIAL 541-948-2310 Regal Prowler AX6 Excustom trailer, New Home, 3 bdrm,1026 treme Edition 38’ ‘05, $19,500. sq.ft., $46,900 finished 4 slides,2 fireplaces, all 541-389-1413 on your site,541.548.5511 Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 maple cabs, king bed/ www.JandMHomes.com 29’, weatherized, like bdrm separated w/slide ‘69 Chevy C-20 Pickup, Hunter’s Delight! Packglass dr,loaded,always new, furnished & all orig.Tubro 44; auto age deal! 1988 WinFIND YOUR FUTURE garaged,lived in only 3 4-spd,396, model CST ready to go, incl Winenebago Super Chief, HOME IN THE BULLETIN mo,brand new $54,000, w/all options, orig. owner, gard Satellite dish, 38K miles, great still like new, $28,500, $24,000, 541-923-6049 $26,995. 541-420-9964 20.5’ Seaswirl SpyYour future is just a page shape; 1988 Bronco II will deliver,see rvt.com, der 1989 H.O. 302, away. Whether you’re looking 4x4 to tow, 130K ad#4957646 for pics. 285 hrs., exc. cond., for a hat or a place to hang it, mostly towed miles, Cory, 541-580-7334 stored indoors for The Bulletin Classiied is nice rig! $15,000 both. life $11,900 OBO. your best source. 541-382-3964, leave SPRINTER 36’ 2005, 541-379-3530 msg. $10,500 obo. Two Every day thousands of Weekend Warrior Toy slides, sleeps 5, buyers and sellers of goods Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, Chevy Wagon 1957, queen air mattress, and services do business in fuel station, exc cond. 4-dr., complete, small sgl. bed, couch these pages. They know sleeps 8, black/gray $15,000 OBO, trades, folds out. 1.5 baths, you can’t beat The Bulletin interior, used 3X, please call 541-382-0865, “Arctic Fox Silver Edition 1140, 2005. 5 hrs on Classiied Section for $24,999. 541-420-5453. leave message! gen; air, slideout, dry bath, like new, loaded! . selection and convenience 541-389-9188 Also 2004 Dodge Ram 3500 quad cab dually - every item is just a phone Advertise your car! Add A Picture! 4x4, 11,800 mi, SuperHitch...” call away. Reach thousands of readers! Garage Sales Richard, Bend, OR The Classiied Section is Call 541-385-5809 easy to use. Every item Garage Sales The Bulletin Classifieds is categorized and every Chrysler 300 Coupe Taurus 27.5’ 1988 Get Results from Qualified Garage Sales cartegory is indexed on the 1967, 440 engine, Everything works, Central Oregon Buyers! section’s front page. auto. trans, ps, air, Find them $1750/partial trade for Call us at 541-385-5809 and ask Whether you are looking for frame on rebuild, recar. 541-460-9127 about our Wheel Deal Special! in a home or need a service, painted original blue, your future is in the pages of original blue interior, The Bulletin FIND IT! The Bulletin Classiied. original hub caps, exc. Classiieds BUY IT! chrome, asking $9000 SELL IT! or make offer. www .bendbulletin 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classiieds 541-385-9350.

SOLD IN 19 DAYS!


F4 WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

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Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318

Dodge 1500 2001, 4x4 sport, red, loaded, rollbar, AND 2011 Moped Trike used 3 months, street legal. call 541-433-2384 Ford F250 XLT ‘95, 4WD auto, long bed, 3/4 ton, 8600 GVW, white,178K mi, AC, pw, pdl, Sirius, tow pkg., bedliner, bed rail caps, rear slide window, new tires, radiator, water pump, hoses, brakes, more, $5200, 541-322-0215

FIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top. Just reduced to Ford Ranger 1999, 4x4, 71K, X-cab, XLT, $3,750. 541-317-9319 auto, 4.0L, $7900 or 541-647-8483 OBO. 541-388-0232

Jeep Willys 1947,custom, small block Chevy, PS, OD,mags+ trailer.Swap for backhoe.No am calls please. 541-389-6990

Jeep Wrangler 1999, TJ Sahara Ed., 4.0L, exc. tires, body & paint. 69,700+ mi, hardtop + new full buckskin soft & bikini tops, Warn winch, motorhome tow pkg, stinger, alum wheels, $12,300. 541-617-9176

Ford Ranger XLT 1998 X-cab Ford Galaxie 500 1963, 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & radio (orig),541-419-4989 Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Ford Ranchero 1979

with 351 Cleveland modified engine. Body is in excellent condition, $2500 obo. 541-420-4677 Ford T-Bird 1966 390 engine, power everything, new paint, 54K original miles,runs great, excellent cond in & out Asking $8,500. 541-480-3179

GMC ½ ton 1971, Only $19,700! Original low mile, exceptional, 3rd owner. 951-699-7171

2.5L 4-cyl engine, 5-spd standard trans, long bed, newer mo- Porsche Cayenne 2004, tor & paint, new clutch 86k, immac, dealer & tires, excellent conmaint’d, loaded, now dition, clean, $4500. $17000. 503-459-1580 Call 541-447-6552

Ford Super Duty F-250 2001, 4X4, very good shape, V10 eng, $8500 OBO. 541-815-9939

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $3131 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480. 935

Toyota 4Runner 4WD 1986, auto, 2 dr., $1200, 541-923-7384

Toyota 4-Runner 4x4 Ltd, 2006, Salsa Red pearl, 49,990 miles, exlnt cond, professionally detailed, $24,599. 541-390-7649

Toyota FJ Cruiser 2007 63K miles 2 sets tires, great shape. $20,350. 541-280-3068 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates!

Sport Utility Vehicles

541-385-5809

Chevy Suburban 2500 1995, 120K, auto, 4WD, pw/ps, CD, alloy wheels, extra set tires, roof cargo box, A/C, exc. cond., $3299, 541-325-2408

Vans

940

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597 933

Pickups Chevy 1 ton 1968, dual tires, 11’ flatbed, 327 engine, 58k miles, $1000. 541-548-4774

Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, 1995, extended cab, long box, grill guard, running boards, bed rails & canopy, 178K miles, $4800 obo. 208-301-3321 (Bend) Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 4x4. 120K mi, Power seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd row seating, extra tires, CD, privacy tinting, upgraded rims. Fantastic cond. $7995 Contact Timm at 541-408-2393 for info or to view vehicle. Chevy Trailblazer 2005, gold, LS 4X4, 6 cyl., auto, A/C, pdl, new tires, keyless entry, 66K mi., exc. cond. $8950. 541-598-5111

Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc. cond., $19,900, call 541-923-0231.

GMC Denali 2003

loaded with options. Exc. cond., snow tires and rims included. 130k hwy miles. $12,000. 541-419-4890.

Chevy Astro Cargo Van 2001,

pw, pdl, great cond., business car, well maint, regular oil changes, $4500, please call 541-633-5149

NISSAN QUEST 1996, 3-seat mini van, extra nice in and out $3,400. Sold my Windstar, need another van! 541-318-9999, ask for Bob. Ask about free trip to D.C. for WWII vets. 975

Automobiles

2004 Corvette Convertible. 6 speed. Spiral Gray Metallic with tan leather interior. Only 1,200 miles on new Michelin run flat tires, Corsa exhaust. Lots of extras. Only 25k miles. $28,950. (541) 410-2870.

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809 975

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Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Chryser LeBaron 1990 PORSCHE 914 1974, Buick LeSabre Limconvertible, 5 spd, ited 1997 111,000 Roller (no engine), new paint, top, tires miles, blue, new tires, lowered, full roll cage, and rims. $1400. brakes and air, $2900 5-pt harnesses, rac541-416-9566 firm. Others available, ing seats, 911 dash & Mercedes E320 2004, like a 1996 Regal with instruments, decent People Look for Information 71K miles, silver/silver, 86,000 miles, only shape, very cool! Volvo 740 ‘87, 4-cyl,auto About Products and exc. cond, below Blue 86k on eng.,exc. maint. $3500. Call Bob $1699. 541-678-3249 Book, $12,900 Call $2895, 541-301-1185. 541-318-9999. Services Every Day through www.youtu.be/yc0n6zVIbAc 541-788-4229 The Bulletin Classifieds Toyota Avalon, 1999, 250K miles, everyday Cadillac Seville STS Ford Thunderbird 1988, driver. Moved to MarFind exactly what What are you 2003 - just finished 3.8 V-6, 35K actual mi., shall Islands; need to $4900 engine work new hoses, belts, tires, you are looking for in the sell. Best offer over looking for? by Certified GM mebattery, pb, ps, cruise, CLASSIFIEDS $2000. ALSO:, 1997 chanic. Has everyA/C, CD, exc. cond. in Camry coming soon, You’ll ind it in thing but navigation. & out, 2nd owner, with 100K miles. Too many bells and maint. records, must Mini Cooper Covert541-318-9999 The Bulletin Classiieds see & drive! whistles to list. I ible Basic 2007, Reduced! Now $3500, bought a new one. performance w/great obo. 541-330-0733 $6900 firm. mpg, low mi., great Toyota Camry’s 541-420-1283 shape, $16,500 nego1984, $1200 541-385-5809 tiable, 541-510-2330. OBO, 1985 $1400 Chevy Malibu 2008, OBO, 1986 parts Mitsubishi 3000 GT red, $15,997 #262697 car, $500; call for 1999, auto., pearl details, white, very low mi. VOLVO S40 2006 541-548-6592 Hyundai Accent 2008, $9500. 541-788-8218. AWD, 66k miles, 32MPG! $7900 obo Hatchback, 47,800 Pontiac Bonneville SE, $11,500 Volkswagen Passat 2005 mi., A/C, one 0wner, 1992, runs great TDI wagon, 71,000 mi, or best offer! 541-598-3750 Clean, 5 Spd Manual. $1350. 541-480-9808 $12,000. 541-408-5350 aaaoregonautosource.com 541-678-3913 541-550-9935

Looking for your next employee?

Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Need to get an ad in ASAP? Fax it to 541-322-7253 The Bulletin Classiieds

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Glenn Michael Woosley and Carol Anne Woosley, tenants in the entirety, as grantor to Ticor Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, in favor of First Horizon Home Loan Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated April 12, 2004, recorded April 19, 2004, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2004, at Page 21848, beneficial interest having been assigned to EverBank, as covering the following described real property: In Township Fifteen (15) South, Range Ten (10), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. Section Eighteen (18): The West Half of the West Half of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (W1/2 W1/2 NE1/4 NE1/4). COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 15125 Wildwing Road, Sisters, OR 97759. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $777.00, from April 1, 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $245,061.35, together with interest thereon at the rate of 2% per annum from March 1, 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 6, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-22-2012. By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 11-106281.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Sandra Johnson, as grantor to First American Title Ins. Co., as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated May 25, 2006, recorded May 30, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 37111, beneficial interest having been assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association as Trustee as successor by merger to Lasalle Bank, National Association as Trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-AR9 Trust, as covering the following described real property: Lot 11 in Block 5 of Fifth Addition to West Hills, Deschutes County, Oregon made a part hereof. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1968 N.W. Vicksburg Avenue, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,664.14, from August 1, 2009, monthly payments in the sum of $1,788.95, from July 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $2,071.36, from July 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $552,615.89, together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.81% per annum from July 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 1, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, OR, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-27-2012. By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone:(360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 11-106187.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Adam S. Brown and Carey J. Brown, husband and wife, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated April 19, 2006, recorded April 24, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 28118, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as covering the following described real property: Lot 16, Copper Canyon, Phase I, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 19960 Brass Drive, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,730.80, from October 1, 2010, monthly payments in the sum of $1,719.41, from June 1, 2011, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,788.86, from June 1, 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $367,603.29, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.65% per annum from September 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 1, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, OR, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-22-2012. By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone:(360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 11-106679.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Edgar King and Carolyn King, Husband and Wife, as grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated November 24, 2006, recorded November 30, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 78646, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver of Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as covering the following described real property: Lot 219 of River Canyon Estates No. 3, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 60990 Snowbrush Drive, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,263.43, from April 1, 2010, monthly payments in the sum of $2,369.49, from January 1, 2011, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,995.86, from January 1, 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $329,702.06, together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.213% per annum from March 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 1, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, OR, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-22-2012. By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone:(360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 10-105802.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012 F5

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES. In the Matter of the Estate of, ARRENE F. POWELL, Deceased. Case No.: 12PB0076. NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Linda M. Heath and Letha L. Powell have been appointed co-personal representatives of the Estate of Arrene F. Powell. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the co-personal representatives c/o Elliott, Anderson, Riquelme & Wilson, LLP, 1558 SW Nancy Way, Ste. 101, Bend, OR 97702, within four

months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representatives, or the attorney for the personal representatives, Timothy G. Elliott, Anderson, Riquelme & Wilson, LLP, 1558 SW Nancy Way, Ste. 101, Bend OR 97702, (541) 383-3755, Fax: (541) 330-1480. Dated and first published on August 22, 2012. ELLIOTT, ANDERSON, RIQUELME & WILSON, LLP, Timothy G. Elliott, OSB No. 952553, tim@eaattorneys.com, Attorneys for Personal Representatives.

LEGAL NOTICE City of Bend Purchasing Division CORRECTED PUBLIC NOTICE OF COOPERATIVE PROCUREMENT The City of Bend Street Department intends to enter into a contract with Houston Freightliner, Inc. for the purchase of two 2013 Freightliner M2-106 Chassis not to exceed $188,000.00 through an interstate cooperative procurement established by the Houston-Galveston Area Council (H-GACBuy), Houston, Texas, and in accordance with ORS 279A.220. It is in the best interest of the City to acquire the 2013 Freightliner M2-106 Chassis through the existing H-GACBuy contract to obtain cost

and time savings associated with expediting the procurement process using a cooperative procurement selection. The purpose of this notice is to provide information to the public and invite interested persons an opportunity to submit written comment. Any person may submit comments specific to this notice by September 5, 2012 at 4:00pm. The protest shall provide a detailed statement of the legal and factual grounds to support the protest, demonstrate how the procurement process is contrary to law, and the relief requested. Protests shall be handled pursuant to OAR 137-046-0470; ORS 279A.225, and ORS 279B.400 to 279B.425.

be delivered to Gwen Chapman, Purchasing Manager, PO Box 431, Bend, Oregon 97709. This notice is given in accordance with provisions of the Oregon Revised Statutes, 279A.220, and Oregon Administrative Rules, 137-046-0400 to 137-046-0480. Published August 29, 2012 Lynnsey Bondi Purchasing Analyst

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES. In the Matter of the Estate of SUSAN ANN SOLBERG, Deceased, Case No. 12PB0080. NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Thomas Cendrowski has been appointed personal representative for the Estate of Susan Ann Solberg. All persons having claims against the trust estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative at 747 SW Mill View Way, Bend, Oregon 97702, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Ronald E. Hill, as grantor to First American Title Ins. Co., as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated December 13, 2005, recorded December 20, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2005, at Page 87314, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver of Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as covering the following described real property: Lot 16, in Block 9 of Desert Woods, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 20944 Desert Woods Drive, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,613.50, from November 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $205,307.73, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.875% per annum from October 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 16, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 07-05-2012. By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone:(360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 12-109660.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Patrick F Bluhm, as grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated April 24, 2007, recorded May 8, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 26373, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver of Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as covering the following described real property: Lot Thirty (30), Block Two (2), North Pilot Butte Addition, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1219 NE Thompson Drive, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,210.71, from December 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $201,200.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6% per annum from November 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 1, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, OR, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-22-2012. By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone:(360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 12-109465.

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Legal Notices y y the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the lawyers for the personal representative, Ryan P. Correa. Dated and first published on August 29, 2012. THOMAS CENDROWSKI, Personal Representative.

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Legal Notices LEGAL NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS LEGAL SERVICES The City of Madras is currently in the process of accepting "Requests for Proposals" for legal services. Proposals must be received by the office of the City Administrator of the City of Madras by no later than 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, September 19, 2012. Respondents must provide (9) hard copies of their submittals clearly marked as "CITY OF MADRAS LEGAL SERVICES PROPOSAL" to the City of Madras, 71 S.E. "D" Street, Madras, Oregon 97741-1605.

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Legal Notices g being sought by the City can be obtained at the Madras City Hall between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, or will be placed in the mail by the City Recorder, upon request. The City Recorder can be contacted by calling (541) 475-2344 or by sending an e-mail to kcoleman@ci.madras. or.us. Publish Date: August 29, 2012 (The Bulletin) September 7, 2012 (The Bulletin)

Want to impress the relatives? Remodel your home with the help of a professional from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service A copy of the RFP information packet Professional” Directory outlining the services

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Christine Hudson, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated January 13, 2006, recorded February 1, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 07554, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as covering the following described real property: Lot Six (6), Northpointe Phase 1, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 20648 Beaumont Drive, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,030.08, from May 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,588.28, from January 1, 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $208,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.775% per annum from April 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 29, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-22-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 10-105192.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Mary E. Cascio and Marc Osier, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated December 22, 2006, recorded December 28, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 84368, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the FDIC as Receiver of Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as covering the following described real property: Lot 5, Block 12, Unit No. 1, Oregon Water Wonderland, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 55315 Big River Drive, Bend, OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,704.71, from May 1, 2010, monthly payments in the sum of $1,545.48, from January 1, 2012, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,432.92, from February 1, 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $195,788.87, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.275% per annum from April 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 1, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, OR, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 6-22-2012. By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone:(360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 10-105094.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Sydney E. Dorrell, as grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated February 13, 2008, recorded February 19, 2008, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2008, at Page 07270, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver of Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as covering the following described real property: Lot Five (5) in Block Five (5) of AUBREY HEIGHTS, City of Bend, recorded August 1, 1918, in Cabinet A, Page 28, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2205 N.W. Awbrey Road, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,105.26, from April 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,923.15, from January 1, 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $186,798.84, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.625% per annum from March 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 16, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 07-05-2012. By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone:(360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 10-105025.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Byron Jones and Lorette Simonet-Jones, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated April 22, 2004, recorded May 5, 2004, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Instrument No. 2004-26097, beneficial interest having been assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA as Trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2004-PR1 Trust, as covering the following described real property: Lot Three (3) in Block Three (3) of Saddleback, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 63366 Saddleback Place, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,754.40, from May 1, 2010, monthly payments in the sum of $1,652.16, from June 1, 2010, monthly payments in the sum of $1,577.98, from March 1, 2011, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,494.27, from June 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $237,743.50, together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.341% per annum from April 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 1, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-27-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 09-102067.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

S41026 kk

F6 WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Gretchen Stroup, Single, as grantor to Settlement Agent and JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Trustee, in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary, dated May 14, 2008, recorded May 19, 2008, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2008, at Page 21804, as covering the following described real property: See Legal Description Attached Hereto as Exhibit "A". COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 527 W Jefferson Avenue Unit 4, Sisters, OR 97759. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,769.40, from November 1, 2011, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,756.92, from February 1, 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $236,858.03, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.875% per annum from October 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 1, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, OR, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-22-2012. By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone:(360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 12-109726. "EXHIBIT A" Unit 4, COTTONWOOD CONDOMINIUM, a Condominium, described in and subject to that certain Declaration Submitting Cottonwood Condominium to the Oregon Condominium Act, recorded April 9, 2003, as Document No. 2003-23272, Official Records, Deschutes County, Oregon, together with the limited general common elements as set forth and described therein, appertaining to such unit. 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Carol Ann Armstrong, as grantor to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, a Washington corporation, as Beneficiary, dated July 29, 2005, recorded August 3, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2005, at Page 50881, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: See complete Legal Description attached hereto as Exhibit "A". COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 60357 Tekampe Road, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $3,466.62, from April 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $2,539.49, from November 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $545,655.08, together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.137% per annum from March 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 16, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 07-05-2012. By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 10-105479. EXHIBIT" A" A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE Northeast quarter of the Northeast quarter of Section 28, Township 18 South, Range 12 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Commencing at a point OD the East line of said Section 28, located 629.18 feet Southerly from the Northeast corner of said Section 28; thence South 89"50'18" West, a distance of 892.73 feet to a point; thence North 0027'32" East, a distance of299.70 feet to a point; thence North 89°50'46" East, a distance of 893.03 feet to a point on the East boundary of said Section 28; thence Southerly along the East boundary of said Section 28, a distance of 299.59 feet to the point of beginning. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion lying within the right of way of Tekampe Road.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE: AS THE RESULT OF AN ORDER ENTERED IN A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, TIMOTHY PATRICK KELLY AND SERENA LEA KELLY MAY NOT BE PERSONALLY LIABLE FOR THE UNPAID BALANCE OF THE BELOW REFERENCED LOAN. HOWEVER, THE BENEFICIARY RETAINS A DEED OF TRUST DESCRIBED BELOW WHICH IS SUBJECT TO FORECLOSURE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE LAWS OF THE STATE OF OREGON. AS OF THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER, THE BALANCE TO PAY OFF THE DEED OF TRUST IS $334,230.02. INTEREST FEES AND COSTS WILL CONTINUE TO ACCRUE AFTER THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER. UNLESS YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING NOTICE OF THIS DOCUMENT, THIS OFFICE WILL ASSUME THE DEBT TO BE VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY THIS OFFICE IN WRITING WITHIN THE 30-DAY PERIOD THAT THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF IS DISPUTED, VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT WILL BE OBTAINED AND WILL BE MAILED TO YOU. UPON WRITTEN REQUEST WITHIN 30 DAYS, THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR, IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR, WILL BE PROVIDED. NOTICE: IF YOU ARE NOT PERSONALLY LIABLE TO PAY THIS OBLIGATION BY REASON OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THEN THIS NOTICE IS NOT AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT BUT IS INTENDED ONLY TO RELAY INFORMATION REGARDING YOUR DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE: IF YOU ARE PERSONALLY LIABLE TO PAY THIS OBLIGATION, WE WISH TO INFORM YOU THAT WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR, ANY INFORMATION YOU PROVIDE TO US WILL BE USED FOR THE PURPOSES OF FORECLOSING THE DEED OF TRUST MENTIONED BELOW. Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Serena L. Kelly and Timothy P. Kelly, as grantor, to First American Title, as trustee, in favor of U.S. Bank National Association ND, as beneficiary, dated November 23, 2005, recorded November 28, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recording Number 2005-81259, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot 342 Riverrim P.U.D., Phase 7, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Both the beneficiary and the trustee, David A. Weibel, will sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statues 86.753(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor’s failure to pay the following sums: 1. Monthly Payments: Delinquent Monthly Payments Due from 5/1/2011 through 6/1/2012: Total Payments: $24,612.92. Accrued Late Charges: $1,097.07. Lender’s Other Fees: $201.00. THE SUM OWING ON THE OBLIGATION SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED: $26,010.99. 2. Delinquent Real Property Taxes, if any. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Unpaid balance is $331,730.02 as of June 26, 2012. In addition there are attorney's fees and foreclosure costs which as of the date of this notice are estimated to be $2,500.00. Interest, late charges and advances for the protection and preservation of the property may accrue after the date of this notice. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, David A. Weibel, on November 7, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 am, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), paying all advances authorized under the trust deed, including all costs and expenses incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, and by curing any other default complained of therein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED: July 3, 2012. David A. Weibel, Trustee. For Information Call: Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S., 720 Olive Way, Suite 1301, Seattle, WA 98101, (206) 622-7527.

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: F537189 OR Unit Code: F Loan No: 0999887326/BEAVER Investor No: 168907981 Min No: 100356720050502997 AP #1: 112526 Title #: 120186417 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by JERRY A. BEAVER, MELISSA A. BEAVER as Grantor, to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR EDGEWATER LENDING GROUP INC. as Beneficiary. Dated August 16, 2006, Recorded August 21, 2006 as Instr. No. 2006-57211 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: A PARCEL OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (NE 1/4 SE 1/4) OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 13, EAST OF WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: PARCEL 3 OF MAJOR PARTITION 94-25 AND FILED IN THE COUNTY RECORDER'S OFFICE AS PARTITION PLAT 1995-49. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 7 PYMTS FROM 11/01/11 TO 05/01/12 @ 679.23 $4,754.61 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$4,754.61 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 60980 KRAMER LANE, BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $249,916.77, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 10/01/11, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on October 1, 2012, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The Beneficiary may be attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 05/23/12 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 4000 W. Metropolitan Drive Suite 400 Orange, CA 92868 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 958740 PUB: 08/15/12, 08/22/12, 08/29/12, 09/05/12

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Danny Adams and Rhonda Adams, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Long Beach Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, dated March 15, 2006, recorded March 20, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 18750, beneficial interest having been assigned to Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Trust 2006-4, as covering the following described real property: Lot 9 in Block 2 of RIVER VILLAGE I, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 57691 Towhee Lane, Sunriver, OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,278.04, from June 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $2,229.57, from May 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $313,197.29, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.05% per annum from May 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 6, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, OR, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-22-12. By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone:(360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 09-103099. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing instrument shall constitute notice, pursuant to ORS 86.740, that the Grantor of the Trust Deed described below has defaulted on its obligations to beneficiary, and that the Beneficiary and Successor Trustee under the Trust Deed have elected to sell the property secured by the Trust Deed: TRUST DEED AND PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: This instrument makes reference to that certain line of credit instrument/line of credit deed of trust dated November 28, 2006, and recorded on December 1, 2006, in the official real property records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as instrument number 2006-78901; as modified by that certain modification of deed of trust dated May 12, 2008, and recorded on May 16, 2008, in the official real property records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as instrument number 2008-21440; as further modified by that certain modification of deed of trust dated October 29, 2009, and recorded on October 30, 2009, in the official real property records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as instrument number 2009 46273; as assigned to NW Bend, LLC by that certain assignment of deed of trust dated November 29, 2011 to be effective September 29, 2011, and recorded on December 2, 2011, in the official real property records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as instrument number 2011-042614 wherein Lee D. Dorsey III, is the Grantor, AmeriTitle is the Trustee, and NW Bend, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, assignee of Bank of the Cascades, is the Beneficiary (the "Trust Deed"). The aforementioned Trust Deed covers property (the "Property") described as: Lots Sixty-Five (65) and Sixty-Six (66), BOULDER BROOK PHASE 5, recorded January 13, 2006, in Cabinet G, Page 1003, Deschutes County, Oregon. Also commonly described as: 438 NW 19th Street, #65 and #66, Redmond, OR 97756. The tax parcel numbers are: 250912 and 250913. The undersigned hereby certifies that she/he has no knowledge of any assignments of the Trust Deed by the Trustee or by the Beneficiary or any appointments of a Successor Trustee other than the appointment of JEFFREY C. GARDNER, ESQ., as Successor Trustee as recorded in the property records of the county in which the Property described above is situated. Further, the undersigned certifies that no action has been instituted to recover the debt, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the Trust Deed. Or, if such action has been instituted, it has been dismissed except as permitted by ORS 86.735(4). The name and address of Successor Trustee are as follows: Jeffrey C. Gardner, Successor Trustee, Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219. The Trust Deed is not a "Residential Trust Deed", as defined in ORS 86.705(3), thus the requirements of Chapter 19, Section 20, Oregon Laws 2008, and Chapter 864 [S.B. 628], Oregon Laws 2009, do not apply. DEFAULT BY BORROWER: There are continuing and uncured defaults by Lee D. Dorsey III (the "Borrower") that, based on the provisions of the Trust Deed and the written documents for Loan No. 102344-001 (Bank of the Cascades Loan No. 300000825), including the promissory note dated and effective as of November 28, 2006, as amended and renewed by promissory note dated and effective as of May 12, 2008, as amended by two change in terms agreements dated May 26, 2009, and August 6, 2009, as amended and renewed by promissory note dated and effective as of October 29, 2009 which promissory note reduced the stated principal amount to $450,000.00 (collectively, the "Note"), authorize the foreclosure of the Trust Deed and the sale of the Property described above, which uncured and continuing defaults include but are not necessarily limited to the following: 1. The Loan secured by the Trust Deed matured on October 15, 2010, at which time the entire principal balance owed together with all accrued interest plus Beneficiary's unpaid fees, costs, and expenses was immediately due and payable by Borrower to Lender. Borrower has failed to pay to Lender a total of not less than $502,211.17 (the "Indebtedness") which total amount is comprised of an unpaid principal balance of $447,000.00 together with accrued and unpaid interest through and including March 9, 2012 of $50,953.08 plus Beneficiary's unpaid fees, costs, and collection expenses of not less than $4,258.09. Interest on account of the unpaid principal portion of the Indebtedness continues to accrue from and after March 9, 2012, at a rate that is currently 6.0% percent per annum or $71.67 per diem. ALL AMOUNTS are now due and payable along with all costs and fees associated with this foreclosure. 2. As to the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of the Trust Deed, the Borrower must cure each such default. Listed below are the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of the Trust Deed. Opposite each such listed default is a brief description of the action necessary to cure the default and a description of the documentation necessary to show that the default has been cured. The list does not exhaust all possible other defaults; any and all defaults identified by Beneficiary or the Successor Trustee that are not listed below must also be cured. OTHER DEFAULT/ Description of Action Required to Cure and Documentation Necessary to Show Cure. Payment of City of Redmond liens or HOA assessments, if any. Deliver to Successor Trustee written proof that liens or assessments against the Property are paid current. TOTAL UNCURED MONETARY (PAYMENT) DEFAULT: By reason of said uncured and continuing defaults, the Beneficiary has accelerated and declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed and the Property immediately due and payable. The sums due and payable being the following: Unpaid principal amount owing pursuant to the Obligations, as of March 9, 2012: $447,000.00. Unpaid interest owing pursuant to the Obligations as of March 9, 2012: $50,953.08. Accrued and unpaid fees, costs and collection expenses, including attorneys fees and costs to March 9, 2012: $4,258.09. TOTAL DUE: $502,211.17. Accordingly, the sum owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed is $502,211.17 as of March 9, 2012, together with interest accruing on the principal portion of that amount, plus additional costs and expenses incurred by Beneficiary and/or the Successor Trustee (including their respective attorney's fees, costs, and expenses). ELECTION TO SELL: Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary, by reason of the uncured and continuing defaults described above, has elected and does hereby elect to foreclose said Trust Deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.735 et seq., and to cause to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's interest in the subject Property, which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time the Grantor executed the Trust Deed in favor of the Beneficiary, along with any interest the Grantor or the Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed as well as the expenses of the sale, including compensation of the Trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of Trustee's attorneys. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the sale will be held at the hour of 10:00 a.m., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on Friday, September 7, 2012, on the front interior steps just inside the main entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon 97701. RIGHT OF REINSTATEMENT: Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed satisfied by (A) payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the terms of the obligation, as well as Successor Trustee and attorney fees as prescribed by ORS 86.753); and (B) by curing all such other continuing and uncured defaults as noted in this Notice. DATED: April 16, 2012. By: Jeffrey C. Gardner, OSB 980549, Successor Trustee, Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219. Telephone: (503) 228-2525. Facsimile: (503) 295-1058. Email: jgardner@balljank.com.

Bulletin Daily Paper 08/29/12  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Wednesday August 29, 2012

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