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JULY 4, 2012

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$29 million park bond to be on fall ballot 500 local By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

New trails, a covered ice rink, safe passage through the Colorado Dam spillway and more will be on Bend ballots in November.

Guns draw increasing attention as wildfire catalysts

acres sold to benefit schools Ready, load, explode

The board of the Bend Park & Recreation District made it official Tuesday, voting unanimously to put a $29 million bond measure before voters. District Director Don Horton said it will mark the

first time the district has asked residents to approve a bond to fund new improvements. For a home with an assessed value of $200,000, a park district resident would pay $48 per year to

fund the bond. Trail improvements would consume 41 percent of the bond dollars, Horton said, allowing for the completion of the Deschutes River Trail. See Bond / A4

FOURTH OF JULY

• State auctions Deschutes, Crook, Jefferson parcels for $662,000 By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

SALEM — The state recently sold more than 500 acres of land in Central Oregon in an attempt to get rid of some of its least valuable property and create more money for the state’s Common School Fund. “We’re trying to cherry-pick the ones that are lowest-performing and small and harder to manage,” said John Russell, the asset manager with the Department of State Lands. The properties, which included more than 230 acres in Crook County, 160 acres in Deschutes County and 120 acres in Jefferson County, were sold in a public auction, raking in more than $662,000. The move is part of a strategy to rid the state’s portfolio of land that isn’t producing much revenue and target property with more potential. “We’re refining our direction and really it’s all about trying to increase returns to the Common School Fund,” Russell said. The fund has distributed more than $300 million to Oregon’s schools since 2000. The state also owns about 640 acres in southeast Bend, outside city limits, that it’s trying to annex into the city. The same goes for large parcels outside of Redmond. There, the state owns 950 acres it wants to be included in the urban growth boundary so it can be used for industrial use. And outside Prineville, the state has 160 acres it would like to see included within city limits so it can develop or sell the property at a higher value. See Land / A4

By Nicholas K. Geranios and Brian Skoloff The Associated Press

SPOKANE, Wash. — Campfires, fireworks and even lit cigarettes can spark wildfires. In the tinder-dry West, there is growing concern about the threat from guns. This year, officials believe target shooting or other firearms use sparked at least 21 wildfires in Utah and nearly Inside a dozen in • Air Force Idaho. Shoottankers ing is also beback in lieved to have the air, A3 caused fires in Arizona, Nevada and New Mexico. Those concerns come as states grapple with ways to cut the risk of new fires ahead of the Fourth of July holiday when many people fire their guns to celebrate the nation’s independence. Officials have been asking the public to scale back shooting as legions of firefighters contend with one of the busiest and most destructive wildfire seasons to ever hit the West. In Utah, Republican Gov. Gary Herbert took the unusual step of authorizing the top state forest official to impose gun restrictions on public lands after a gunfire-sparked fire. The official is expected to do so within days. Herbert said his decision doesn’t limit gun rights but is a commonsense response to dry conditions. Guns rights advocates, meanwhile, were skeptical that firearms use can cause so many wildfires. Clark Aposhian, chairman of the Utah Sports Shooting Council, said that perhaps 5 percent of the wildfires in the state have been caused by target shooters this year. “I don’t know how much of a problem it really is,” he said. See Guns / A4

Tibetan monks tackle science By Tim Sullivan The Associated Press

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Pat Olsen, the lead pyrotechnician for Homeland Fireworks, prepares to load a series of shells Tuesday for tonight’s grand finale while setting up for the Fourth of July fireworks display on Pilot Butte. The display will be launched from the top of Pilot Butte in Bend starting at 10 p.m.

Other fireworks displays • La Pine at 10 p.m.; the meadow near Third and Walker streets • Madras at 10 p.m.; Sahalee Park at Seventh and B streets

• Prineville at 10 p.m.; the viewpoint off U.S. Highway 26 • Redmond at 10 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way; gates open at 7 p.m.

SARAH, India — The shouts of more than a dozen Tibetan monks echo through the small classroom. Fingers are pointed. Voices collide. When an important point is made, the men smack their hands together and stomp the floor, their robes billowing around them. It’s the way Tibetan Buddhist scholars have traded ideas for centuries. Among them, the debate-asshouting match is a discipline and a joy. But this is something different. Evolutionary theory is mentioned — loudly. One monk invokes Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle. Another shouts about neutrinos. In an educational complex perched on the edge of a small river valley, in a place where the Himalayan foothills descend into the Indian plains, a group of about 65 Tibetan monks and nuns are working with American scientists to tie their ancient culture to the modern world. See Tibet / A4

Also ... Fireworks explained, A2 • Events and parades, B3 • Holiday closures, C1 • The Fourth by the numbers, E1

Blaming the brain for chronic back pain By Sarah C.P. Williams ScienceNOW

The vast majority of adults have had a sore back at some point in their lives. If they’re lucky, the pain subsides after a few days or weeks. But for some, whose initial inju-

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ries appear no different than the fortunate ones, back pain lasts for years. Now, researchers have discovered a difference in brain scans between the two groups of patients that appears early in the course of the pain. The finding could lead to

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 109, No. 186, 32 pages, 6 sections

not only ways of identifying patients who are the most at risk for long-term pain but to new treatments for chronic pain. “This is the very first time we can say that if we have two subjects who have the same type of in-

jury for the same amount of time, we can predict who will become a chronic pain patient versus who will not,” says neuroscientist Vania Apkarian of Northwestern University, who led the new work. See Pain / A4

INDEX Business Calendar Classified

E1-4 B3 F1-4

Comics B4-5 Community B1-6 Crosswords B5, G2

Editorials C4 Local News C1-6 Obituaries C5

Altaf Qadri / The Associated Press

Tibetan Buddhist monks work on their laptops at an educational complex in Sarah, India. For six hours a day, six days a week, professors from Emory University in Atlanta teach everything from basic math to advanced neuroscience.

TODAY’S WEATHER Sports D1-6 Stocks E2-3 TV & Movies B2

Mainly sunny High 76, Low 44 Page C6

TOP NEWS OBITUARY: Andy Griffith, C5


THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012

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Patterns in the sky Some of the most popular types of fireworks:

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Chrysanthemum Full, fluffy pattern of stars that hold their shape before fading

Palm Several large comets with a trunk created by a big fluffy tail

Comet Big head and noticeable tail

The Orlando Sentinel

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Peony Loose pattern of colored stars that breaks up, drops

Crossette Comet that splits into small pieces

Spiral Curve that winds out from a center point Source: Melrose Pyrotechnics

St. Paul Pioneer Press / © 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Putting the flash in fireworks Quick, violent chemical reactions put the bright colors in fireworks. A similar, more gentle reaction occurs in a fluorescent lamp:

Fireworks

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Transfer energy UV light excites Explosion phosphors heats on inside metals, walls of other tube chemicals in firework

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Make energy Shell Electric current makes gas explodes, in tube give off generates ultraviolet heat (UV) light

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3 Release energy Metal or chemical Phosphor gives off light gives off light Color depends on what element creates it

Color depends on phosphorus compound used

Greens

Purple-tinted light for indoor gardening

Barium Golden white

Iron, magnesium, aluminum

Cold, bluish light used in office

Yellow-orange “Full-spectrum” light that simulates daylight

Sodium Reds

Strontium

Warm, reddish “decorator” light

Purple

Potassium

Source: Argonne National Laboratory Division of Educational Programs © 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

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Oregon Lottery results As listed at www.oregonlottery.org

MEGA MILLIONS

The numbers drawn Tuesday night are:

3 4 24 36 52 45 x4 The estimated jackpot is now $12 million.

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TODAY

FOURTH OF JULY FIREWORKS

GENERAL INFORMATION

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Discoveries, breakthroughs, trends, names in the news — things you need to know to start your day.

Fourth of July might mean fireworks and family fun, but the holiday also means a spike in injuries. John Mulhall, a spokesman for the Orange County, Fla., Fire Rescue, said when he’s asked about fireworks safety, “Our top recommendation is always leave the fireworks to the professionals.” “I think a lot of people just underestimate the true danger of fireworks,” Mulhall said. According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission’s annual fireworks report released last week, there were about 9,600 fireworks-related injuries treated in emergency rooms in 2011 and four fireworks-related deaths, up from about 8,600 fireworks-related injuries in 2010. And children younger than 15 accounted for about a quarter of the injuries last year. Andrew Yeagley runs an independent fireworks stand near Colonial Drive and Fairvilla Road. Mortar fireworks — which generally consist of a tube and reloadable artillery shells that are lit and fired one at a time — are bestsellers, he said. But people should be careful to let the mortar tubes cool down after use, Yeagley said. Even handheld sparklers require care. According to the commission report, sparklers accounted for almost 18 percent of fireworks-related injuries during the holiday period. “They’re hot, and they give them to little kids,”

Tips for a safe Fourth of July Adults should always supervise fireworks activities. • Light fireworks one at a time, and back up from the fireworks after lighting them. • Never point or shoot fireworks at another person or an animal. • Don’t try to relight or pick up fireworks that didn’t work when first lit. • Keep a hose or bucket of water nearby in case of emergency, and make sure fireworks are completely extinguished after use. Source: Sentinel research

Yeagley said. The tips of handheld sparkers can reach 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the National Fire Protection Association. To put that in perspective, consider this: Water boils at 212 degrees and glass melts at 900 degrees. Andy Nicholls has owned Orlando Special Effects for more than 20 years, and he has worked in the specialeffects and fireworks industry for about 30 years. Nicholls said people should buy their fireworks from reputable retailers and avoid homemade fireworks. Common sense goes a long way, he said — accidents usually happen when people are drinking. Nicholls has two other basic safety tips: “Prevent the device from falling over, and never put any part of your body over the device.”

It’s Wednesday, July 4, the 186th day of 2012. There are 180 days left in the year.

HAPPENINGS • It’s Independence Day, commemorating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence in 1776 that declared independence from the kingdom of Great Britain. • With the reopening of NATO supply lines from Pakistan into Afghanistan, the first trucks are scheduled to begin moving across the border today. A3

IN HISTORY Highlights: In 1776, the Declaration of Independence was adopted by delegates to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia. In 1862, English mathematician and clergyman Charles L. Dodgson (“Lewis Carroll”) began devising the story of Alice in Wonderland for his young friend Alice Pleasance Liddell and her sisters during a boating trip. Ten years ago: A gunman opened fire at Israel’s El Al ticket counter at Los Angeles International Airport, killing two people; gunman Hesham Mohamed Hadayet was shot dead by an El Al guard. Five years ago: The Black Sea resort of Sochi was elected the host city of the 2014 Winter Olympics, taking the Winter Games to Russia for the first time. One year ago: Otto von Hapsburg, 98, the oldest son of Austria’s last emperor and longtime head of one of Europe’s most influential families, died in Poecking, Germany.

BIRTHDAYS Advice columnist Pauline Phillips (the original “Dear Abby”) is 94. Singer Bill Withers is 74. Broadcast journalist Geraldo Rivera is 69. TV personality Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino (TV: “Jersey Shore”) is 30. Presidential daughter Malia Obama is 14. — From wire reports

FOCUS: ENVIRONMENT

Northwest’s acidifying waters drive oysterman to Hawaii By Craig Welch

The owners of Goose Point Oysters have been raising oysters in Willapa Bay since the mid-1970s but recently opened a hatchery in Hawaii because ocean acidification made it harder to raise oysters in the Northwest.

The Seattle Times

SEATTLE — After 34 years rearing shellfish in Washington state’s Willapa Bay, Dave Nisbet was in a bind: Nature had stopped providing. Oysters were no longer reproducing naturally on the Washington Coast. Oyster larvae were even dying in nearby hatcheries, which use seawater to raise baby shellfish that get sold as starter seed to companies like Nisbet’s Goose Point Oysters. But when, in 2009, Nisbet heard oceanographers identify the likely culprit — increasingly corrosive ocean water, a byproduct of the same greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming — the oysterman did the unthinkable. Nisbet took out a loan and spent three years testing and building a new hatchery that opened recently. In Hawaii. Most of Washington’s $100 million-a-year oyster industry has been whipsawed in recent years by ecological problems. But Nisbet’s oyster company appears to be one of the first businesses in the Northwest — perhaps anywhere — to shift part of its business to a new region in response to ocean acidification. “I just got nervous,” Nisbet said. “I was afraid if I didn’t do something, then our business would just slowly die.” Now, rather than relying on oysters that have spawned in Willapa Bay or on juvenile oysters purchased from a nearby hatchery — as he has for years — Nisbet raises larvae in tanks in a million-dol-

Brian J. Cantwell Seattle Times

lar, 20,000-square-foot plant in Hilo, Hawaii. The tiny larvae are then sent by mail to Washington, where Nisbet and his team oversee the rest of the multiyear growing cycle in Willapa Bay. “It would have been much easier and cheaper to start a hatchery here,” Nisbet said. “But we just saw the hatcheries having failures, the larvae dying in the tanks and just decided to sidestep the issue completely.”

Changing oceans Nisbet’s move is just the latest sign of how the threat of ocean acidification is altering the way Washington’s shellfish growers do business. Scientists for years have warned that excess carbon dioxide from the burning of fossil fuels eventually would be taken up by marine waters and begin lowering the pH of the world’s oceans.

In the past five years, oceanographers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration working along the U.S. West Coast repeatedly have documented that ocean chemistry is already changing, decades earlier than anyone predicted. Scientists are still learning just how those changes ultimately may upend marine food webs. Researchers have shown that less-alkaline seawater causes sea urchin larvae to change shape, makes squid more lethargic and prompts clown fish to race toward rather than away from predators. But the type of calcium carbonate used by juvenile oysters during the initial stage of forming their shells is particularly vulnerable to even slight increases in acidity. And the dark, frigid water that wells up from the deep along the Northwest coast during north

winds already is naturally richer in carbon dioxide than most ocean surface water. Those natural conditions combined with greenhousegas emissions, scientists reported earlier this year, have turned the tidal currents on Washington’s once oysterrich coast into a death trap for juvenile oysters. “We’re the tip of the spear for the worst of the worst because of the way the ocean circulates,” said Bill Dewey, with Taylor Shellfish. Oysters now haven’t reproduced on their own in Willapa Bay since 2005, so every grower now relies on hatchery-produced larvae. Once the oysters make it to that stage, they can survive acidic conditions just fine.

Canary in the coal mine But even producing larval oyster has become a complex game.

Goose Point Oysters employs 70 people and processes several million pounds of shellfish a year, which are sold all over the world. Since water quality is as important to an oyster grower as air to a human, the company had been following the changes closely. “We didn’t know what was going on but we knew by 2009 that we could no longer depend on our current seed supply,” said Kathleen Nisbet, Dave’s daughter. When her father attended a meeting with NOAA oceanographers, the depth of the problem became clear. “They said, ‘We’re on an escalator with this thing,’” she said. “The problem is going to get worse, and we’re going to have to adapt.” Kathleen Nisbet had attended the University of Hawaii-Hilo and had contacts there, including Maria Haws, an associate professor of aquaculture. Hawaii also doesn’t experience the same upwelling events and acidification doesn’t appear to be a problem — at least not yet. “The Northwest is really the canary in the coal mine, though sooner or later we won’t have any place to run if we don’t somehow reverse the trend,” Haws said. “What I think is scary is that not everybody knows this is real, that it’s actually started to impact people,” Nisbet said. “For now, here, it’s oysters. But it’s going to start affecting a lot of other fish and a lot of other food that we get from the sea.”


WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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FDA approves first rapid, take-home HIV test By Matthew Perrone The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Americans will soon be able to test themselves in the privacy of their own homes for the virus that causes AIDS, now that the Food and Drug Administration has approved the first rapid, over-the-counter HIV test. The OraQuick test detects the presence of HIV antibodies using a mouth swab and returns a result in 20 to 40 minutes. Government officials estimate that about 240,000 people, or one-fifth of the roughly 1.2 million people carrying HIV in the U.S., don’t know they are infected. Testing is a chief means of slowing new

infections, which have held steady at about 50,000 per year for two decades. FDA officials said the test is designed for people who might not otherwise get tested. “The availability of a homeuse HIV test kit provides another option for individuals to get tested so that they can seek medical care, if appropriate,” said Dr. Karen Midthun, director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. Orasure plans to start selling the test in October, both online and through retailers like Walgreens, CVS and Walmart. It hasn’t set a price yet, but it expects the consumer version to cost less than $60 but

more than the one marketed to health professionals, which costs about $17.50. CEO Doug Michels said the price increase will help pay for a toll-free call center to provide counseling and medical referrals to test users. “Each of the call-center operators is bilingual in English and Spanish; they’ve gone through 160 hours of training on HIV counseling and testing,” Michels said in an interview with the Associated Press. “So they are highly trained professionals and they’ll be there to support the consumer.” Michels said the company’s marketing efforts will focus on populations at greatest risk of being infected with HIV,

N 

 B Pilot who disrupted flight found insane AMARILLO, Texas — A federal judge in Texas found a JetBlue Airways pilot who left the cockpit during a flight and screamed about religion and terrorists not guilty by reason of insanity Tuesday. U.S. District Judge Mary Lou Robinson in Amarillo issued the ruling during a bench trial for Clayton Osbon, noting he suffered from a “severe mental disease or defect.” Osbon’s attorney, Dean Roper, declined to comment. Osbon, who recently was found mentally competent to stand trial after a court-ordered psychiatric evaluation, will be sent to a federal mental health facility for further examination until another hearing on or before Aug. 6. The judge will decide then whether he can be released or should be committed to a mental facility. Osbon was indicted on one charge of interfering with a flight crew after the March 27 incident on a flight from Las Vegas to New York. Passengers say they wrestled him to the floor after he ran through the plane’s cabin yelling about Jesus and al-Qaida.

including gay and bisexual men, African-Americans and Hispanics. FDA stressed in its approval announcement that the test is not 100 percent accurate in identifying people with the virus. A trial conducted by test maker Orasure showed OraQuick detected HIV in those carrying the virus only 92 percent of the time, though it was 99.9 percent accurate in ruling out HIV in patients not carrying the virus. That means the test could miss one in 12 HIV-infected people who use it but would incorrectly identify only one patient as having HIV for every 5,000 HIV-negative people tested, the FDA said.

Holder says GOP using him as proxy WASHINGTON — Attorney General Eric Holder is charging that he’s become a “proxy” for Republican attacks against President Barack Obama in an election year. Holder tells The Washington Post that Republican congressional figures have used a failed gun-tracking operation known as Fast and Furious to attack a wide range of administration policies. Holder also says he feels California Republican Congressman Darrell Issa, head of a House investigative panel, is singling him out for scrutiny. The GOP-run House voted last week to cite Holder for contempt of Congress in a fight over documents related to Fast and Furious. Holder says it’s naive to think that vote was merely about documents. Rather, he says, he is “a proxy for the president in an election year.”

Cliff Owen / The Associated Press

A Gulf Power lineman works to restore a power line Tuesday in Middleburg, Va. A reported 1.07 million customers remained without power in the eastern U.S. as of late Tuesday, according to power companies.

Easy fix eludes power outage problems By Eric Tucker and Chris Kahn The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Utility crews have restored electricity to nearly two-thirds of the homes and businesses that lost power due to last weekend’s deadly storms that swept from the Midwest to the Mid-Atlantic. As of late Tuesday, power companies were reporting that 1.07 million customers remained without power. The wave of late Friday-evening

storms caused hurricane-like damage as it knocked out power to 3 million customers from Indiana to Washington, D.C. Twenty-four deaths have been blamed on the storms, including a utility contractor who fell to his death on Monday in Garrett County, Md. Utilities have warned that many neighborhoods could remain in the dark for much of the week, if not beyond. The powerful wind storms, which toppled trees onto power

lines and knocked out transmission towers and electrical substations, have renewed debate about whether to bury lines. With memories of other extended outages fresh in the minds of many of those who still lack electricity, some question whether the delivery of power is more precarious than it used to be. The storms that began Friday have been responsible for the deaths of 24 people in seven states and the District of Columbia, including

a utility contractor who fell to his death Monday in Garrett County, Md., while removing limbs from a storm-damaged tree. “It’s a system that from an infrastructure point of view is beginning to age, has been aging,” said Gregory Reed, a professor of electric power engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. “We haven’t expanded and modernized the bulk of the transmission and distribution network.”

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Chinese protesters clash with police

Syrian opposition split at Cairo meeting

BEIJING — Authorities in western China ordered organizers of a violent protest against a planned copper alloy plant to surrender or face severe punishment a day after thousands of residents clashed with police in the latest example of Chinese environmental activism. The Shifang government in Sichuan province warned on its micro-blog Tuesday that anyone who had “enticed, planned and organized the illegal gathering and protest or participated in the vandalism ... would be severely published.” Protesters began gathering outside a local government building Sunday, a day after a signing ceremony took place to build the $1.6 billion metal factory, according to news reports. The demonstrations remained peaceful until Monday when police fired tear gas and stun grenades into the crowd, estimated by some to be in the tens of thousands, including children and the elderly. Protesters responded by lobbing bricks, potted plants and water bottles at the government building. Authorities said 13 protesters were injured in the melee.

CAIRO — Syrian opposition groups struggled to form a united leadership Tuesday at a meeting in Cairo that exposed the vast disagreements that have prevented them from effectively leading the uprising against President Bashar Assad. The conference ended late Tuesday with an agreement on two documents, both of them vague. One provides a general outline to guide the opposition through a transitional period, while the other lays out the fundamental principles envisioned for a post-Assad Syria. The delegates agreed in general terms on support for the Free Syrian Army, the dissolution of the ruling Baath Party and the exclusion of Assad or other senior regime figures from a place in the transition. But they failed to reach an agreement on forming a unified body to represent the opposition. Arguments were rife among the roughly 250 conference participants over key questions, including whether to ask for foreign military intervention to halt the violence and what role religion would play in a post-Assad Syria. — From wire reports

Air Force planes again ready for fire missions By Dan Elliott The Associated Press

DENVER — Air Force tanker planes returned to the flight line for firefighting missions on Tuesday after a deadly weekend crash, bringing much-needed reinforcements to a strained fleet battling some of the worst wildfires in decades. The return of five C-130s means wildfire managers now have 19 heavy tankers to battle the huge fires that have burned hundreds of square miles and displaced thousands of people across the West. One wildfire in Montana has charred 320 square miles and burned 16 homes. The fire was 55 percent contained. The most active part of the fire was burning thick, largely inaccessible timber on the Custer National Forest. That has led firefighters to steer clear of the dangerous forward edge of the blaze, fire information officer Kathy Bushnell said. In Wyoming, erratic winds have spread a wildfire across 137 square miles in a sparse-

ly populated area north of Laramie since it started June 27. It was 25 percent contained Tuesday. “We’ve had this fire push north, push south, push east and push west at various times,” fire information spokesman Jim Whittington said. The Air Force had sidelined its seven remaining firefighting C-130s to review safety procedures after a C-130 from the North Carolina National Guard crashed Sunday, killing four crew members and injuring the other two. The plane was helping fight a wildfire in the Black Hills of South Dakota. The cause of the crash is under investigation. The National Guard identified the dead as Lt. Col. Paul K. Mikeal, 42, and Maj. Joseph M. McCormick, 36, both pilots; Maj. Ryan S. David, 35, a navigator; and Senior Master Sgt. Robert S. Cannon, 50, a flight engineer. All were from North Carolina and were assigned to the 145th Airlift Wing.

By Bradley Klapper and Rebecca Santana The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Ending a bitter seven-month standoff, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton apologized to Pakistan on Tuesday for the killing of 24 Pakistani troops last fall and won in return the reopening of critical NATO supply lines into Afghanistan. The agreement could save the U.S. hundreds of millions of dollars in war costs. Resolution of the dispute also bandages a relationship with Pakistan that will be crucial in stabilizing the region. The ties have been torn in the past year and a half by everything from a CIA contractor who killed two Pakistanis to the unilateral U.S. raid on Osama bin Laden’s Pakistan compound. But the accord carries risks for both governments — threatening to make Pakistan’s already fragile civilian leadership look weak and subservient to the United States while offering fodder to Republicans, including presidential candidate Mitt Romney, who contend that President Barack Obama says “sorry” too easily. The first trucks carrying NATO goods should move across the border today, U.S. officials said. It could take days to ramp up supplies to pre-attack levels, but around two dozen impatient truck drivers celebrated the news in a parking lot in the southern city of Karachi by singing, dancing and drumming on empty fuel cans.

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Pakistan opens Afghan supply lines

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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012

QUITO, Ecuador — Lonesome George’s inability to reproduce made him a global symbol of efforts to halt the disappearance of species. And while his kind died with him, that doesn’t mean the famed giant tortoise leaves no heir apparent. The Galapagos Islands have another centenarian who fills a shell pretty well. He’s Diego, a prolific, bossy, macho reptile. Unlike Lonesome George, who died June 24, Diego symbolizes not a dying breed but one resurrected.

Having sired hundreds of offspring, Diego has been central to bringing the Espanola Island type of tortoise back from nearextinction, rangers at Galapagos National Park say. Diego was plucked from Espanola by expeditioners sometime between 1900 and 1930 and wound up in the San Diego Zoo in California, said the head of the park’s conservation program, Washington Tapia. When the U.S. zoo returned him to the Galapagos in 1975, the only other known living members of his species were two males and 12 females.

Galapagos National Park via The Associated Press

The tortoise Diego is another Galapagos centenarian, but unlike his famed predecessor Lonesome George, who was not able to reproduce, Diego has sired hundreds of offspring.

Projects for proposed $29 million bond measure 20

Pine Nursery Park: Build more infrastructure for parking, electricity and water that will allow the park to be expanded for additional soccer fields, multipurpose fields and tennis and basketball courts.

97

18th St.

Gopher Gulch Ranch: Open up the newly acquired 122-acre parcel to the public with a Deschutes River Trail connection that will take people from Awbrey Butte to Tumalo State Park.

Rile y Rd

Empire A v e.

Deschutes River Trail: Work could include two new bridges, undercrossings at Colorado and Portland avenues, and upgrades to 31⁄2 miles of soft-surface trails.

27th St.

.

Davis Park: Develop the riverfront park with improvements to the Deschutes River Trail.

Revere Ave.

Neff Rd.

Newport Ave. Ice rink and event center: A seasonal, open-air ice rink that could be used for other purposes in the summer months.

Greenwood Ave. Franklin Ave.

BEND

BUS 97 97

20

Bear Creek Rd. 27th St.

— Reporter: 541-554-1162, ldake@bendbulletin.com

The Associated Press

OB

Continued from A1 Under the same strategy, the department is pushing to convert rangeland used for grazing into irrigated farmland. “If it’s the right kind of soil and conditions, we’re looking for ranchers or farmers who might want to expand their production and do a long-term lease with us,” Russell said. The state owns about 630,000 acres of rangeland in the eastern part of the state, according to Julie Curtis, spokeswoman for the department. Only about 6,000 of those acres are used for farming. The state would need to find interested farmers or ranchers to partner with and dig for wells to irrigate the land. The Oregon State Land Board voted last month to swap two parcels of land in Central Oregon. The first parcel was 80 acres south

of the Prineville Airport in Crook County, traded for an adjacent parcel held by PremierWest Bank. The other was 256 acres of state land with 120 acres of land owned by the Tumalo Irrigation District. The federal government granted Oregon certain sections of each township in the mid-1800s. At one time the state owned 3.5 million acres. It currently owns 119,770 acres of forestland, 5,860 acres of agricultural land, 7,010 acres of industrial, commercial and residential land and 625,510 acres of range land. The state also manages mineral and energy resources and has rights to certain waterways throughout the state. All the revenue goes to the common school fund. “It’s not a huge number, but when school districts are struggling every part helps,” Russell said.

By Gonzalo Solano

8th St.

Land

al-Qaida-linked Sunni insurgents plant bombs at Shiite marketplaces. The attacks injected new fear into Iraqis, resigned to worsening violence six months after the last American troops left the country. A spike in violence over the last month is blamed partially on Iraq’s paralyzing political crisis, which pits Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s Shiiteled government against rival Shiite politicians, Sunni Muslims and ethnic Kurds.

Ninth St.

The Associated Press BAGHDAD — Bombs pounded six Iraqi cities and towns Tuesday, killing at least 40 people and raising suspicion that security forces might be assisting terrorists in launching attacks on Shiite Muslims. The onslaught came just ahead of a religious pilgrimage that could attract even more violence. A senior Iraqi intelligence official said checkpoint guards may have been bribed to help

Galapagos’ new star tortoise a prolific dad

Bend Park way

Iraq bombs kill 40

14th St.

A4

Continued from A1 Over the past two decades, Apkarian’s lab has run many studies comparing the brains of patients with chronic back pain with those of healthy people, finding differences in brain anatomy or the function of certain regions. But the study designs made it hard to sort out which brain changes were consequences of the chronic pain — or the patients’ painkillers or altered lifestyles — versus those that drove the pain’s chronic nature. Apkarian and colleagues have now tracked the brains of back pain patients over time rather than comparing single neural snapshots. His team began with 39 people who had experienced moderate back pain — a 5 or 6 on a self-described scale of 10 — for one to four months. Over the next year, the team scanned the patients’ brains four times and followed their pain. By year’s end, 20 of the patients had recovered, while 19 continued to hurt, meeting the criteria for chronic pain. The scientists then looked at a number of brain characteristics, including the amount of communication between two areas of the brain previously seen to have altered activity in back pain patients: the insula and the nucleus accumbens. These regions are involved in emotional responses to a person’s environment and in how the brain learns. Not only did they measure more communication between the two areas in chronic back pain patients than in those whose pain subsided, but the increased crosstalk could be seen as far back as the start of the study, suggesting that it could have predicted which patients would suffer the whole year. But further work

Guns Continued from A1 Utah officials believe steeljacketed bullets are the most likely culprits, given one shot that hits a rock and throws off sparks can ignite surrounding vegetation and quickly spread. Popular exploding targets are also blamed for causing wildfires. The bullets were recently banned on state and federal lands in Utah. Officials are telling sportsmen to use lead bullets that don’t give off sparks when they hit rocks. Many in the West are avid Second Amendment proponents, so most state lawmakers are hesitant to enact

will need to confirm that the scans have predictive value. The results, published online Sunday in Nature Neuroscience, could be used to pinpoint patients who are at the highest risk for chronic pain, says Apkarian. And drugs could be developed to dampen the communication between the brain areas in such patients to treat or prevent chronic pain. “Our interpretation of the results is that how these areas of the brain engage with the injury then dictates how the rest of the brain is going to reorganize,” says Apkarian. It underscores that brain regions involved in learning and emotions are important in the development of chronic pain, he says, not just brain regions directly responsible for sensing pain. “This is a transformative piece of work,” says neurologist David Borsook of Harvard University, who was not involved in the study. “Finding that these changes are predictive is very exciting.” Borsook says more research is needed to completely sort out what makes pain chronic; the new finding is likely only one piece of the puzzle. “We’re still not sure when acute pain transforms to chronic pain,” he says. “We use these arbitrary time points.” And the results need to be repeated with different patient populations and study designs to gain traction within the field, he says. But the new study is a step on the way to having quantitative ways of defining pain by using scans, rather than relying on descriptions of the pain from patients. “This is a fantastic thing for the field of pain imaging,” Borsook says, “and I have no doubt that this same data set holds other findings about chronic pain that we will learn about in the near future.”

any restrictions for fear of a backlash. “We’re not trying to pull away anyone’s right to bear arms. I want to emphasize that,” said Louinda Downs, a county commissioner in fireprone Davis County, Utah. “We’re just saying target practice in winter. Target practice on the gun range. “When your pleasure hobby is infringing or threatening someone else’s right to have property or life, shouldn’t we be able to somehow have some authority so we can restrict that?” she asked. For weeks, state officials have said they were powerless to ban gun use because of Second Amendment rights,

T hi rd S

Pain

t.

Wilson Ave. Simpson Avenue parking lot: Offsite street improvements, including a new roundabout at the intersection of Simpson and Columbia avenues.

Colorado Dam passage and play area: Modify the dam and spillway to allow for safe passage for boaters and floaters and build a whitewater play area for kayakers.

Reed Market Rd. MILES

97 0

1/2

1

Source: Bend Park & Recreation District

Bond

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

as part of the Colorado Dam spillway project, and the Oregon Rush soccer club will assist in raising funds for four new soccer fields at Pine Nursery Park, including two artificial turf fields. Shortly before the vote, board member Dallas Brown raised objections that the list of the district’s bond projects did not include a skate park. Several skateboarders attended Tuesday’s meeting and voiced support for a new, centrally located skate park on the west side. Brown said skateboarders have made a good case for a skate park over the past several months, and the district will need the votes of all of the recreational constituencies it can

get to pass the bond. Other board members said they remained open to the idea of a skate park, possibly adjacent to the seasonal ice rink proposed for the old Mt. Bachelor Park and Ride lot. Board members Ted Schoenborn and Scott Wallace said they felt discussion of a skate park should wait until a master plan is drawn up for the park and ride site. A half dozen members of the public testified in support of the bond proposal, largely describing the bond as an economic development measure. Doug La Placa of Visit Bend said the tourism board fully supports the proposal, while Erik Tobiason, treasurer of Oregon Rush, said the bond would help his group grow its annual

invitational tournament. The tournament attracts 200 teams to Central Oregon and has an economic impact of more than $1 million, Tobiason said, but a lack of available field space is inhibiting further growth. Todd Taylor praised the focus on expanding access to the Deschutes River, recalling how when he was a child, the river was largely off-limits in Bend. Efforts to open river access over the last 25 years have transformed the town, Taylor said, making it a more attractive destination for tourists and new residents alike. “This is our beachfront; this is what draws people to Bend,” Taylor said.

Continued from A1 “I’d like to go back to my monastery ... to pass on my knowledge to other monks so that they might bring the (scientific) process to others,” said Tenzin Choegyal, a 29-year-old monk born in exile in India. If that seems a modest goal, it reflects an immense change in Tibetan culture, where change has traditionally come at a glacial pace. Isolated for centuries atop the high Himalayan plateau, and refusing entry to nearly all outsiders, Tibet long saw little of value in modernity. Education was almost completely limited to monastic schools. Magic and mysticism were — and are — important

parts of life to many people. New technologies were something to be feared: Eyeglasses were largely forbidden until well into the 20th century. No longer. Pushed by the Dalai Lama, a fierce proponent of modern schooling, a series of programs were created in exile to teach scientific education to monks, the traditional core of Tibetan culture. At the forefront is an intensive summer program, stretched over five years, that brings professors from Emory University in Atlanta. For six days a week, six hours a day, the professors teach everything from basic math to advanced neuroscience. “The Buddhist religion has a deep concept of the mind that goes back thousands of

years,” said Larry Young, an Emory psychiatry professor and prominent neuroscientist. “Now they’re learning something different about the mind: the mind-body interface, how the brain controls the body.” But why are Tibetans now embracing modernity? Many of the roots can be traced to 1959, when Chinese soldiers invaded Tibet amid an aborted uprising. The Dalai Lama and thousands of his followers fled across the Himalayas and into India, creating an exile community that now numbers an estimated 150,000 people around the world. The Tibetan culture, meanwhile, is increasingly imperiled. Ethnic Han Chinese, encouraged by generous government

subsidies, now outnumber Tibetans in much of Tibet. The traditional Tibetan herding culture is dying out as people move to cities. Amid such tumult, the Dalai Lama has encouraged modern schooling for exile children, and a democratic system to choose the Tibetan political leader (he renounced his political powers in 2011). There are job programs for the armies of unemployed young people. And, for a few dozen monks and nuns, there is science. Members of the first group from the Emory program have just finished their five years of summer classes. While they earned no degrees, they are expected to help introduce a science curriculum into the monastic academies.

but legislative leaders say they found an obscure state law that empowers the state forester to act in an emergency. Among the recent fires, target shooters on June 21 ignited a blaze about 30 miles south of Salt Lake City that grew to about 9 square miles and forced 2,300 people to evacuate before it was contained. Aposhian said his group will conduct tests to determine if the steel-jacketed bullet theory is true. If there are limits, “we want to make sure it is not knee-jerk legislation to ban guns or ammunition,” he said. “If it turns out the problem is with a few types of rounds, we will not be an apologist for them.”

There is no need for such tests, Utah State Fire Marshal Brent Halladay said. With steel bullets, “you might as well just go up there and strike a match,” he said. Statistics on wildfires caused by firearms are incomplete because the federal government does not list “shooting” as a cause on its fire reports. But some officials write in “target” or “shoot” as a cause, said Jennifer Jones of the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho. On land managed by the U.S. Forest Service only, the center found 17 such wildfires in 2010, 28 last year and 13 so far this year.

This year, the Bureau of Land Management said 11 of 31 wildfires it has battled in Idaho have been sparked by shooting activities. In New Mexico, state forestry officials said a landowner was target shooting when one of his bullets hit a rock and sparked a small blaze. “This is a sign that we are very dry,” said state forestry spokesman Dan Ware. “We’re starting to see very unique ways of fire starting.” Officials at Arizona’s Tonto National Forest had seven wildfires caused by firearms in 2010, 10 in 2011 and at least five so far this year. The potential for fire is so great that shooting for several years has

been prohibited on BLM property in the Phoenix area. In one case in the state, prosecutors said five friends at a campout and bachelor party set off an 18,000-acre fire May 12 when one of them loaded an incendiary shell, which burns rapidly and causes fires, into a shotgun and pulled the trigger. Meanwhile, firefighters are wary of more wildfires with the arrival of the Fourth of July holiday. “The Fourth and the 24th — our Pioneer Days — are all popular times to go shooting,” Aposhian said. “Many people use these times to show patriotism as well as support for the Second Amendment.”

Continued from A1 If approved, the bond would fund the connection of trail segments near downtown Bend, and a trail through the recently acquired Gopher Gulch property north of Awbrey Butte that would allow access all the way to Tumalo State Park. Two bridges would be built, one near First Street Rapids Park, and one across the Deschutes River Canyon to link the Archie Briggs Canyon Open Space with Gopher Gulch. The park district has arranged public-private partnerships for two projects on the list. Local kayakers have agreed to help raise the funds for a whitewater park that would be built

Tibet

— Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com


WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A GIFT TO THE COMMUNITY PRESENTED EXCLUSIVELY BY

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Listen to the synchronized soundtrack accompanying The Bulletin and Bank of the Cascades fireworks on these radio stations.

A VERY SPECIAL THANKS TO THE FOLLOWING FOR THEIR SUPPORT OF THIS COMMUNITY EVENT: PILOT BUTTE SCENIC VIEWPOINT • OREGON STATE PARKS • OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY • CITY OF BEND POLICE DEPT • CITY OF BEND FIRE DEPT BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA • DESCHUTES NATIONAL FOREST • TaylorNW

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TV & Movies, B2 Dear Abby, B3

Comics, B4 Puzzles, B5

B

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012

IN BRIEF Americans need to save more Nearly half of all Americans don’t have enough savings to cover three months of expenses, according to a recent study by finance www .bankrate.com. That is worse than the same time last year, up by 3 percent, but better than Bankrate .com’s 2006 poll, which found that 61 percent of Americans didn’t have enough cash to cover three months. Financial experts recommend keeping enough money in savings to cover six months of expenses in case of unforeseen circumstances. The poll found that roughly 25 percent of Americans have that on hand right now. It also found that another 28 percent have no emergency savings. The survey of 1,000 adults was conducted the second week of June. Bankrate.com aggregates information from more than 4,800 institutions on more than 300 financial products.

SETTING THE

MOOD • Retailers use scent, design, lighting to make shopping more pleasurable

The produce section at C.E. Lovejoy’s Market in Bend, shown here last week, demonstrates appealing store design. The trellis with its lighting, baskets for produce and greenery around the baskets transform the feel from grocery store to intimate market.

Gems, jewelry at 4-day show More than 40 vendors showcasing rocks, minerals, gems, fossils, jewelry and more will be on hand today through Sunday at the Roundup of Gems in Sisters. The event features locally made jewelry, including gold and silver earrings, necklaces and bracelets. Other items include jaspers, agates and petrified wood. Lapidary tools will also be for sale. It’s taking place from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. today through Saturday and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday at Sisters Elementary School, 644 E. Cascade Ave. Entrance is free. Food will be available. Contact: www .ogmshows.com or 503-829-2680.

Some would pay to deplane early Airlines already are tacking on fees for previously free services, like checked baggage and food. Now one travel website has polled the idea of paying more to get off an airplane first. As www.airfare watchdog.com put it in a news release, “Not surprisingly, 84 percent said no.” Yet 10 percent said they would be willing to pay $10 more, 3 percent said they would pay $20 more and 3 percent said they would pay another amount. The website polled more than 1,000 people for the survey.

Next French market nears The second French Flea Market has arrived. Pomegranate Home & Garden in Bend hosts the market Saturday on the lawn. It will feature local and out-of-area vendors, all juried, showing an array of vintage, funky items. The mix will include upcycled furniture, jewelry, yard art, home decor, totes and more. Additional markets are slated for Aug. 4, Aug. 25 and Sept. 12. They’re from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pomegranate is located at 120 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive. Contact: www.pome granate-home.com or 541-383-3713. — Heidi Hagemeier, The Bulletin

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

REI in Bend’s Old Mill District uses plenty of natural light to give its space a more welcoming feel. Research shows that shoppers like natural light better than artificial light, to the point that it can increase sales.

By Heidi Hagemeier • The Bulletin

O

n a recent springlike day, a business

The display of local winemaker Volcano Vineyards at C.E. Lovejoy’s Market is meant to give shoppers an intimate feel. feel.

professor prepped me to visit a Bend grocery store I’ve shopped at dozens

of times in the last decade. “The shopping experience begins the minute you get out of your car,” coached Jim Kress, who teaches marketing at Central Oregon Community College. Consumers go through a transition, he said, and often need about 20 feet of walking until they’re in the mind-set to shop. It’s the store’s challenge to ease consumers through a transition in a way that is quick and seamless. As we entered Ray’s Food Place in Bend, Kress pointed out details designed to prepare me to shop: the peaches and watermelons outside stacked in quaint crates, the awning overhead to allow my eyes to adjust to interior light, the double-door entry creating a greater distance to cover and thus more time for my brain to be ready. See Design / B6

Eyelash extensions help A modern take on the add flicker to your lights oldfangled alarm clock BE ALARMED

By Judith Newman New York Times News Service

By Farhad Manjoo

“You look so ... glamorous,” says a fellow mom at my son’s Sunday morning soccer game. “Thank you!” I reply, slightly puzzled, as I’m wearing no makeup, yoga pants, a puffy jacket and a “Dog Is My CoPilot” T-shirt. She stares at me, with a look more concerned than admiring, until I remember. “Oh, you mean the lashes,” I say. “I didn’t want to embarrass you,” she whispers conspiratorially. I cringe a little as I realize my eyelash extensions gave her the impression I’d recently done the walk of shame from someone’s apartment and had forgotten to remove the damning evidence. Tragically, my days for that walk are behind me, but the extensions had worked: They

New York Times News Service

Scott Varley / Los Angeles Daily News

Dionne Phillips puts eyelash extensions on Felicity Alston at her Los Angeles salon. Women who want fuller, longer lashes have been opting for extensions instead of the old-style false lashes.

had given me that tiny jolt of youthful eroticism, even on a dreary Sunday morning. Later that day, while I was still in soccer mom mufti, a cabdriver about 20 years my junior stopped his cab

(even though he was off duty — score!) and during the ride asked me out for coffee. He said I had beautiful eyes. This kind of thing happens to me approximately never. See Eyelashes / B3

I used to be a sleep bragger. You probably know the type. I was the guy in college who felt energized after getting just three hours of shut-eye before the midterm. I was your smug colleague who sermonized about the productivity gains achieved by waking before dawn. Sleeping, I’ve been known to argue, is an enormous waste of time, a scourge to be tamped down in favor of more work, or at least more time goofing off on the Web. Then I entered my 30s, married and had a child. The paradox in growing up and acquiring real responsibilities is that it makes sleep both more necessary and less possible. This, of course,

Handout via New York Times News Service

Clocky, which works by filling users with an invigorating sense of rage.

is not just my problem. Sleep researchers say we are a nation of drowsy zombies. In 2009, a team of scientists reported the discovery of a gene that allows some people to function normally on just six hours of sleep a night. But fewer than 5 percent of the population has such a mutation. Most of us need more than eight hours of sleep, but we tend to get six at best. See Clocks / B6


B2

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012

TV & M

Hilty takes a break from ‘Smash’ for fireworks TV SPOTLIGHT “Capitol Fourth� 8 tonight, OPB By Jessica Goldstein The Washington Post

Megan Hilty doesn’t think she’s famous. Sure, she’s the star of “Smash� on NBC, the dramatized — or, more accurately, soap opera-ized — story of the making of a Broadway musical based on Marilyn Monroe’s life. It’s true that her 2009 portrayal of Doralee Rhodes in “9 to 5: The Musical� on Broadway — a show based on the 1980 film, in which Rhodes was played by Dolly Parton — earned her multiple award nominations, including a Drama Desk nod. Plus, in a very meta and Marilynthemed twist, Hilty played Lorelei Lee in a concert staging of “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes� in May. But Hilty insists that her fame is yet to come. People do approach her on the street, she says, but not for the reasons you might think. “Everybody talks to my dogs before they talk to me,� she said, referring to her two Jack Russell terriers, Harley and Gracie. “But that’s OK. They’re cooler than I am.� The Monroe doppelganger was in town last month to support the Washington Humane Society at its annual Bark Ball and will be back in D.C. to open the concert for “A Capitol Fourth,� the PBSsponsored Fourth of July celebration. The event, hosted by Tom Bergeron, will also include an Olympian-filled send-off to Team USA and a musical tribute to Gene Kelly. The concert segment will fea-

ture, among others, Kool & the Gang, the National Symphony Orchestra and Matthew Broderick, who will reprise his “Twist and Shout� dance routine from “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off.� (Note: That is not true. Broderick will be singing numbers from the Broadway musical “Nice Work If You Can Get It.�) The star-spangled spectacle will close out with live cannon fire and, of course, a gigantic fireworks display. Hilty is “very, very excited� about opening the “Capitol Fourth� concert. In fact, she is very, very excited about everything; she describes all her projects with the exclamation-pointed enthusiasm of a freshman who can’t believe she scored an invite to a senior party. She’s at work recording her first album, a collection of covers and rearrangements of songs from the movies. While she can’t disclose specific titles just yet, she said to expect “some big epic theme songs� and “smaller songs from more independent films, like ‘Garden State.’ It’s a very eclectic mix, but the arrangements tie them all together.� The project came about, Hilty said, directly as a result of her work on “Smash,� which is on the Columbia Records label (her record will be co-produced by Sony and Columbia). “I feel like I’ve been auditioning for them all year in doing the show,� she said. On a reality scale of 1 to 10, 1 being Oz and 10 being Kansas, Hilty would give “Smash,� she said, “a strong 6.8. Here’s the thing: We’re by no means making a reality show. It’s a drama. While a lot of it is based on truth, we have to amp up the drama so people want to watch.�

L M T 

FOR WEDNESDAY, JULY 4

BEND Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 BERNIE (PG-13) Noon, 3, 6 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45 MOONRISE KINGDOM (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 SAFETY NOT GUARANTEED (R) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15 SEEKING A FRIEND FOR THE END OF THE WORLD (R) 1, 3:55, 7

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

ABRAHAM LINCOLN: VAMPIRE HUNTER (R) 12:50, 3:50 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG-13) 11 a.m., 2:30, 6:15, 9:35 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 3-D (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 3:10, 6:45, 10 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN IMAX (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 2:25, 7, 10:15 BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 12:35, 3:35, 6:40, 9:40 BRAVE (PG) 11:25 a.m., 2, 3:45, 4:45, 7:25, 9:20, 10:05 BRAVE 3-D (PG) 1, 6:30 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) 10 a.m. MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) 11:05 a.m., 1:30, 3:55, 6:20, 9:15 MAGIC MIKE (R) 11:10 a.m., 2:05, 4:55, 7:45, 10:25

MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 12:30, 3:40, 6:55, 10:10 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 9:50 PEOPLE LIKE US (PG-13) 1:10, 4:05, 7:05, 9:55 PROMETHEUS (R) 1:40, 4:40, 7:35, 10:30 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 1:20, 4:15, 7:15, 10:20 TED (R) 12:40, 3:30, 6:25, 7:30, 9:25, 10:25 THAT’S MY BOY (R) 2:15, 5:05, 7:55, 10:35 YOGI BEAR (PG) 10 a.m.

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

CHIMPANZEE (G 3 THE HUNGER GAMES (R) 6 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

Tin Pan Theater

MAGIC MIKE (R) 3, 5:30

EDITOR’S NOTES:

PEOPLE LIKE US (PG-13) 2:30, 5:15

• Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15. • Movie times are subject to change after press time. • As of press time, complete movie times for Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX and Regal Pilot Butte 6 were unavailable. Check The Bulletin’s Community Life section those days for the complete movie listings.

MADRAS Madras Cinema 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

ABRAHAM LINCOLN: VAMPIRE HUNTER (R) 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:15, 9:35

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15, 9:15 BRAVE (PG) 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 MAGIC MIKE (R) 11:30 a.m., 4:30, 9:30 TED (R) 11:30 a.m., 1:45, 4, 6:15, 8:30

869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

The theater is closed Wednesdays.

SISTERS

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

ABRAHAM LINCOLN: VAMPIRE HUNTER (R) 2, 7

Pine Theater 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

BRAVE (UPSTAIRS — PG) 3:30, 6 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

Redmond Cinemas

PRINEVILLE

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG13) 1, 4, 7

Sisters Movie House

REDMOND

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 3-D (PG-13) 12:50, 6:30 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG13) 3:40, 9:20 BRAVE (PG) Noon, 2:20, 4:40, 7, 9:15 MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) 12:35, 2:40, 4:45, 6:50, 9 MAGIC MIKE (R) 2, 4:20, 6:40, 9:05

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG13) 2, 5 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) 5:15 BRAVE (PG) 2:45

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BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00 KATU News News News KEZI 9 News The Simpsons Electric Comp. NewsChannel 8 Meet, Browns Primal Grill

5:30 World News Nightly News Evening News World News The Simpsons Fetch! With Ruff Nightly News Meet, Browns Scandinavian

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å Access H. Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men In the America Business Rpt. NewsChannel 8 News King of Queens King of Queens Outnumbered Last of Wine

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ Big Bang Big Bang PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Midsomer Murders ‘PG’ Ă…

8:00

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The Middle ‘PG’ Suburgatory ’ Off-Rockers Up All Night ’ Dogs in the City ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The Middle ‘PG’ Suburgatory ’ New Girl ’ ‘14’ New Girl ’ ‘14’ A Capitol Fourth (N) ’ ‘G’ Ă… Off-Rockers Up All Night ’ America’s Next Top Model ‘PG’ Doc Martin Don’t Let Go ’ ‘PG’

9:00

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Modern Family Modern Family (10:02) Final Witness (N) Ă… Macy’s 4th of July Fireworks Macy’s 4th of July Fireworks Criminal Minds ‘14’ Ă… (DVS) Boston Pops Fireworks Modern Family Modern Family (10:02) Final Witness (N) Ă… New Girl ’ ‘14’ New Girl ’ ‘14’ News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ A Capitol Fourth ’ ‘G’ Ă… Macy’s 4th of July Fireworks Fort Vancouver July Fireworks America’s Next Top Model ‘PG’ The L.A. Complex Home ’ ‘14’ World News Tavis Smiley ’ Charlie Rose (N) ’ ‘G’ Ă…

11:00

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KATU News (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Above Yellowstone ’ ‘G’ Ă… NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno ’Til Death ‘PG’ That ’70s Show PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Barter Kings Barter Kings Barter Kings Barter Kings *A&E 130 28 18 32 Criminal Minds The Fight ’ ‘14’ (4:30) ››› “The Patriotâ€? (2000, War) Mel Gibson, Heath Ledger, Joely Richardson. A man and his son fight side by ››› “Independence Dayâ€? (1996, Science Fiction) Will Smith, Bill Pullman, Jeff Goldblum. Earthlings vs. evil aliens in ››› “Independence Dayâ€? (1996) Will *AMC 102 40 39 side in the Revolutionary War. Ă… 15-mile-wide ships. Ă… Smith. Ă… Call-Wildman Call-Wildman Call-Wildman Call-Wildman Call of Wildman Call of Wildman Call of Wildman Call of Wildman Call of Wildman Call of Wildman Call of Wildman Call of Wildman Call of Wildman *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Call-Wildman Don’t Be Tardy Don’t Be Tardy Don’t Be Tardy for the Wedding Million Dollar LA Million Dollar LA Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/OC BRAVO 137 44 My Big Redneck Vacation ‘PG’ My Big Redneck Vacation ‘PG’ My Big Redneck Vacation ‘PG’ My Big Redneck Vacation ‘PG’ Ron White’s Comedy Salute to the Troops 2012 ’ Ron White’s CMT 190 32 42 53 My Big Redneck Vacation ‘PG’ Apocalypse 2012 American Greed Mob Money: Murders and Apocalypse 2012 American Greed Paid Program You Breathe! CNBC 51 36 40 52 Trash Inc: The Secret Life of Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Cruise to Disaster Big Hits, Broken Dreams Piers Morgan Tonight Cruise to Disaster Big Hits, Broken Dreams CNN 52 38 35 48 Cruise to Disaster Always Sunny 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Colbert Report Daily Show South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ Futurama ‘14’ Futurama ‘14’ Futurama ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report COM 135 53 135 47 Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Bend City Council Work Session Bend City Council Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 Capitol Hill Hearings CSPAN 58 20 12 11 Capitol Hill Hearings Good Luck Charlie ’ ‘G’ Ă… Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ’ A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Austin & Ally ’ Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Gravity Falls ‘Y’ Gravity Falls ’ Gravity Falls ’ My Babysitter Good Luck Charlie ’ ‘G’ Ă… *DIS 87 43 14 39 Good-Charlie Auction Kings Jesse James: Outlaw Garage ‘14’ Fast N’ Loud ’ ‘14’ Ă… Fast N’ Loud ’ ‘14’ Ă… Fast N’ Loud ’ ‘14’ Ă… Fast N’ Loud ’ ‘14’ Ă… Fast N’ Loud ’ ‘14’ Ă… *DISC 156 21 16 37 Auction Kings Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians The Soup ‘14’ E! Ent. Chelsea Lately Kardashian *E! 136 25 Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 (4:00) MLB Baseball Texas Rangers at Chicago White Sox (N) Ă… SportsNation SportsNation Ă… 2012 Hot Dog Eating Contest NFL Live Ă… Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… NASCAR Now SportsNation Ă… SportsNation ESPN2 22 24 21 24 SportsCenter Up Close Ă… Stories of... Stories of... Long Way Down Ă… White Shadow Ă… Stories of... Rome Classics Tennis Wimbledon Final, taped 7/5/92. Ă… ESPNC 23 25 123 25 (3:30) Tennis SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The 700 Club ‘G’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 America’s Funniest Home Videos The three finalists compete. ‘PG’ Frank Luntz Special On the Record Special The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Frank Luntz Special On the Record Special The Five FNC 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Restaurant: Impossible ‘G’ Restaurant: Impossible ‘G’ Restaurant: Impossible ‘G’ Restaurant: Impossible Food Network Star *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Diners, Drive (3:00) ›› “Spider-Man 3â€? Anger Anger Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Live Free or Die Hardâ€? (2007) Bruce Willis, Justin Long. America’s computers fall under attack. ››› “Live Free or Die Hardâ€? FX 131 House Hunters: Great Escapes Hunters Int’l House Hunters Income Prop. Kitchen Cousins Property Brothers (N) ‘G’ Ă… House Hunters Hunters Int’l Property Brothers ‘G’ Ă… HGTV 176 49 33 43 House Hunters: Great Escapes The Revolution ‘PG’ Ă… The Revolution ‘PG’ Ă… Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn *HIST 155 42 41 36 The Revolution ‘PG’ Ă… Wife Swap ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Wife Swap ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Wife Swap ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Wife Swap ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Coming Home (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Coming Home ‘PG’ Ă… LIFE 138 39 20 31 Wife Swap ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Lockup: Indiana Lockup: Indiana Lockup: Indiana Cutting. Lockup: Indiana Anonymous tip. Lockup: Indiana Lockup: Indiana Contraband. MSNBC 56 59 128 51 Lockup: Indiana Contraband. The Real World ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Real World (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Real World ’ ‘14’ Ă… MTV 192 22 38 57 Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness ››› “8 Mileâ€? (2002) Eminem. A Detroit man tries to achieve success as a rapper. SpongeBob Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Figure It Out ‘Y’ Figure It Out ‘Y’ All That ’ ‘G’ Kenan & Kel ‘Y’ Hollywood Heights (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘14’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ NICK 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Disappeared Danger at Dusk ‘PG’ Disappeared Gone at 17 ’ ‘PG’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ OWN 161 103 31 103 Disappeared Final Prayer ’ ‘PG’ MLS Soccer: Earthquakes at Timbers MLS Soccer Seattle Sounders FC at Real Salt Lake (N) (Live) MLB Baseball Baltimore Orioles at Seattle Mariners MLS Soccer Seattle Sounders FC at Real Salt Lake ROOT 20 45 28* 26 Dan Patrick ›››› “Star Wars IV: A New Hopeâ€? (1977, Science Fiction) Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford. ’ ›››› “Star Wars IV: A New Hopeâ€? (1977, Science Fiction) Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford. ’ SPIKE 132 31 34 46 (4:30) Band of Brothers ’ ‘MA’ Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone SYFY 133 35 133 45 Twilight Zone Karen Peck & Turning Point Joseph Prince End of the Age Praise the Lord Ă… Always Good Jesse Duplantis Change-Nation Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord TBN Classics TBN 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan ‘14’ *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ ›››› “Yankee Doodle Dandyâ€? (1942) James Cagney, Joan Leslie. Life of ››› “The Glenn Miller Storyâ€? (1953, Biography) James Stewart, June Allyson. ›› “Rhapsody in Blueâ€? (1945) Robert (7:15) ››› “Stars and Stripes Foreverâ€? (1952, Biography) Clifton Webb. TCM 101 44 101 29 song-and-dance man George M. Cohan. Ă… (DVS) About Marine bandmaster/march composer John Philip Sousa. Based on the life of the beloved big-band leader. Ă… Alda, Joan Leslie. Ă… Undercover Boss 7-Eleven ‘PG’ Undercover Boss Belfor ’ ‘PG’ Undercover Boss ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Undercover Boss ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Four Houses ’ ‘14’ Ă… Undercover Boss ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *TLC 178 34 32 34 Undercover Boss ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Dallas Hedging Your Bets ‘14’ Dallas The Price You Pay ‘14’ Dallas The Last Hurrah ‘14’ Ă… Dallas (N) ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… Dallas ‘14’ Ă… *TNT 17 26 15 27 Dallas ‘PG’ Ă… Johnny Test ’ Regular Show Regular Show Wrld, Gumball Adventure Time Johnny Test ’ NinjaGo: Mstrs Level Up ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ *TOON 84 Steak Paradise, Second Helping Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Best Sandwich Best Sandwich Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Hamburger Paradise ‘G’ Ă… The Soul Man The Exes ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Home Improve. Home Improve. Love-Raymond Love-Raymond The Soul Man The Exes ‘PG’ Retired at 35 King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 Bonanza ‘G’ Ă… NCIS Gibbs works with Kort. ‘14’ NCIS Legend ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Legend ‘14’ Ă… (DVS) NCIS Semper Fidelis ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Aliyah Tense reunion. ‘14’ Suits Meet the New Boss ‘PG’ USA 15 30 23 30 NCIS Hide and Seek ‘14’ Ă… Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta ’ ‘14’ Hollywood Exes ’ ‘14’ Hollywood Exes ’ ‘14’ Hollywood Exes ’ ‘14’ ››› “Barbershop 2: Back in Businessâ€? (2004) Ice Cube. ’ Ă… VH1 191 48 37 54 “You Got Servedâ€? PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:10) ›› “Ghostbusters IIâ€? 1989 Bill Murray. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… ›› “The Man With the Golden Gunâ€? 1974 Roger Moore. ‘PG’ Ă… (10:10) ›› “Priestâ€? 2011 Paul Bettany. ‘PG-13’ Animal House ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:20) ››› “Ghostbustersâ€? ’ FXM Presents ›› “Snow Dayâ€? 2000, Comedy Chris Elliott, Jean Smart. ‘PG’ Ă… ›› “Twin Dragonsâ€? 1991, Comedy Jackie Chan. ‘PG-13’ Ă… › “Mortal Kombat Annihilationâ€? FMC 104 204 104 120 (4:30) “The Water Horse: Legend of the Deepâ€? UFC Reloaded UFC 134: Silva vs. Okami Silva vs Okami and Rua vs Griffin. Clean Break (N) UFC Insider UFC Insider UFC 147: Silva vs. Franklin II - Prelims Executioners FUEL 34 State of the Game (N) On the Range Inside PGA Golf Central State of the Game On the Range School of Golf Big Break GOLF 28 301 27 301 On the Range (N) Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Venture ‘G’ (4:30) John Adams ’ (Part 6 of 7) (5:55) John Adams ’ (Part 7 of 7) Jim McKay: My World in My Words ››› “Dolphin Taleâ€? 2011, Drama Harry Connick Jr., Ashley Judd. People True Blood We’ll Meet Again Lafay- Real Time With Bill Maher Radio HBO 425 501 425 501 ‘PG’ Ă… ‘14’ Ă… band together to save a dolphin’s life. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… ette endangers Sookie. ‘MA’ host Amy Goodman. ‘MA’ Ă… ’ ‘PG’ Ă… ››› “The Bank Jobâ€? 2008, Crime Drama Jason Statham, Saffron Burrows. ‘R’ ››› “The Prestigeâ€? 2006, Drama Hugh Jackman, Christian Bale. ‘PG-13’ (10:15) “Prisonerâ€? 2007, Suspense Julian McMahon. ‘NR’ IFC 105 105 (4:20) ›› “Event Horizonâ€? 1997 Lau- ›› “The Riteâ€? 2011, Horror Anthony Hopkins. A skeptical seminary student ›› “Water for Elephantsâ€? 2011, Drama Reese Witherspoon. An orphaned ››› “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stoneâ€? 2001 Daniel Radcliffe. An orMAX 400 508 508 rence Fishburne. ’ ‘R’ Ă… attends a school for exorcists. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… veterinary student joins a traveling circus. ‘PG-13’ Ă… phan attends a school of witchcraft and wizardry. ’ ‘PG’ Titanic: With James Cameron America’s Lost Treasures ‘PG’ America’s Lost Treasures ‘PG’ America’s Lost Treasures ‘PG’ Titanic: The Final Word With James Cameron ‘PG’ Naked Science Fireworks. ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Wild Grinders Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Dragonball GT Iron Man: Armor SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Dragonball GT Iron Man: Armor Wild Grinders Shooting USA Ă… Best Defense Amer. Rifleman Impossible Gun Stories Gun Nuts Shooting USA Ă… Best Defense Gun Stories Impossible Amer. Rifleman OUTD 37 307 43 307 Gun Stories (3:50) ››› “The Constant Gardenerâ€? ››› “Fright Nightâ€? 2011, Horror Anton Yelchin, Colin Farrell. A teenager “Division III-Foot››› “The Helpâ€? 2011, Drama Viola Davis, Emma Stone, Bryce Dallas Howard. An aspiring writer Weeds Messy ’ Episodes ’ SHO 500 500 2005 Ralph Fiennes. ‘R’ discovers that his new neighbor is a vampire. ’ ‘R’ Ă… captures the experiences of black women. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… ballâ€? Supercars 101 Cars-Drive 101 Cars-Drive Barrett-Jackson Special Edition Supercars Supercars 101 Cars-Drive 101 Cars-Drive Barrett-Jackson Special Edition Unique Whips ‘14’ SPEED 35 303 125 303 Supercars ›› “Bad Teacherâ€? 2011 Cameron Diaz. ‘R’ Ă… (7:05) ›› “The Sorcerer’s Apprenticeâ€? 2010 Nicolas Cage. ’ ‘PG’ ›› “Colombianaâ€? 2011, Action Zoe Saldana. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ››› “Moneyballâ€? 2011 ‘PG-13’ STARZ 300 408 300 408 Jonas Brothers “Love’s Kitchenâ€? 2011 Claire Forlani. A widowed chef “Fatal Secretsâ€? 2009 Dina Meyer. A woman seeks help ›› “I Am Number Fourâ€? 2011, Action Alex Pettyfer, Dianna Agron. An alien “The Howling: Rebornâ€? 2011, Horror Lindsey Shaw, ›› “Jackass: The TMC 525 525 finds romance with a food critic. ‘PG-13’ Ă… after her lover becomes malicious. ’ ‘R’ Ă… teenager must evade those sent to kill him. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Landon Liboiron. Premiere. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Movieâ€? ‘R’ Adventure Adventure 2012 Tour de France Stage 4 - Plain From Abbeville to Rouen. Distance 214 km. NBCSN 27 58 30 209 2012 Tour de France Stage 4 - Plain From Abbeville to Rouen. Distance 214 km. Bridezillas ‘14’ Ă… Kendra on Top Kendra on Top Kendra on Top Kendra on Top Kendra on Top Kendra on Top Ghost Whisperer The One ‘PG’ L.A. Hair First Cut Is the Deepest *WE 143 41 174 118 Bridezillas Jeanine & Callie ‘14’


WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Alcoholic feels he doesn’t deserve the love of his life Dear Abby: I am a 39-yearold gay man in a three-year relationship with a wonderful man. We had both come out of very long and abusive relationships when we met. He works hard, and I stay home and take care of the house, the animals and the yard. There is no kind of abuse in our relationship. The problem is that I am an alcoholic. He keeps telling me he can handle it as long as there is no abuse. I feel I’m taking advantage of him and that he deserves better than this, and I have told him so. I have been in rehab several times and tried AA. Nothing worked. I always go back to drinking. Where do I go from here? I don’t want to lose the love of my life, but it’s killing me inside that he has to put up with my drinking problem. — Needs Help in Florida Dear Needs Help: There IS abuse going on in your relationship — substance abuse. Until you finally decide that there is something more important than a drink, you will remain stuck in your addiction. And as long as your partner continues to accept and “handle it,� he will be your enabler. Where you go from here is up to you, but getting counseling for your low selfesteem and going back to AA would be giant steps in the right direction. Dear Abby: It seems that every other letter you print concerns a demanding relative (a parent, in-law, sibling, etc.). The writer always wants to know how to avoid unreasonable demands without causing “unpleasantness.� May I say a word to these folks? Be honest and admit that the relationship is ALREADY unpleasant. Demanding people are impossible to please. They know their control over you depends on temper tantrums and/or fits of sulking and tears. They’ll pitch these

DEAR ABBY fits regularly no matter how hard you try to please them. When faced with an unreasonable demand, just say “no.� Don’t waste time giving reasons or trying to work out a compromise. You already know it won’t do any good. Then hunker down and wait for the explosion, keeping in mind that the longer you have been a doormat, the more violent and bitter the reaction will be. Above all, do not be drawn into a fight! Controlling people love to fight, and they are good at it. Your weapon should be polite withdrawal. Refuse meetings. Screen your calls. Ignore letters and emails unless they contain an apology and indicate a sincere desire for change. It may shock your domineering relatives into more reasonable behavior. If not, you haven’t lost a thing. You may even find that your life is less complicated without them. Draw the line and let your family know that future relationships will be based on love AND respect, or there will be no future relations. You won’t regret it. — Been There, Done That, Knoxville, Tenn. Dear Been There: People who have spent a lifetime trying to please others may find your recommendations difficult to put into practice. Habits can become so entrenched that they are hard to break without coaching and positive reinforcement. That is why I advise those who feel constantly put upon to consider taking classes in assertiveness training. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Wednesday, July 4, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar This year you could change your focus from being the person who values family and home above all else to the person who seeks different yet basic answers to questions of life and death. You might wonder: Why are we here? Some of you might become more involved with the esoteric arts. If you are single, you could meet someone who provokes deep thinking or has a lot of depth him- or herself. If you are attached, your conversations might be very important in designing your future years together. You might look at more traveling as well. AQUARIUS seems cool, but he or she really cares. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH You might shy away from some attention, yet it will find you. When you finally kick back and stop worrying, the fun mood of celebration allows you to join in on one of the biggest birthday parties of the year. Tonight: Where the action is. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Reach out for someone at a distance who might be very important to you. You have experienced a lot of tension, and finally relaxing feels good. A discussion could become very lively. You could wonder what is going on. Tonight: Where the action is. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Dedicate the morning and, if possible, most of the day to a loved one. You might notice that a child seems unusually restrained. Try to be clear when communicating. Travel is possible in the near future. Tonight: Choose something you haven’t done before. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Listen to a family member who might have a case of the blues. A parent or older friend startles you with his or her actions and decisions. If you become upset, do not take it out on someone else. You demonstrate unusual caring. Tonight: A must appearance. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You might want a lazy, easy pace, yet you have difficulty honoring your own desires. An element of the unexpected runs riot, but the end results could be quite delightful. Others seek you out with last-minute invitations. Tonight: Where the party is.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Maintain an easy pace. You’ll want to resist offering too much of your time and skills. To be generous is delightful, but not to the point where you jeopardize your wellbeing. A partner or friend could act in an unexpected manner. Tonight: Only what you want. Rearrange plans if need be. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You add that extra touch of merriment to any situation. Stop for a snooze if need be, but once you rev up your engine, you might not want to stop. A partner delights you with his or her reaction. You feel unusually whole with a child. Tonight: Play the night away. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Stay on top of a situation surrounding a family member. You might need to air out a problem to feel totally like yourself again. Invite friends and family over to celebrate. You might enjoy seeing everyone interact with each other. Tonight: Know that you do not need to add any fireworks. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Friends clearly want your attention, and the sooner, the better. Enjoy seeing and visiting with people who you rarely have a chance to see. The unexpected runs through your plans. Be spontaneous, and you will have a more memorable day. Tonight: Your treat. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Bring others together for a planned or spontaneous gettogether. A change at home could allow more flexibility. Dealing with an older relative or friend could be taxing. Allow others to be as spontaneous as you are. Tonight: Observe a tendency to overindulge yourself and others. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Beam in more of what you want. A call from someone at a distance could make you a little sad or sway you not to go through with plans. Relax with the moment and just go with the flow. Take action if someone seems reticent. Tonight: Leader of the gang. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Take your time, pull back and do some hard thinking before joining in on the local celebrations. Continue using care with your finances. A partner could be touchy and difficult. Unfortunately, there is no way around it. A relationship is changing. Tonight: Don’t feel like you have to do something. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

B3

C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY FIRECRACKER RIDE: Wear patriotic clothes for a 65-mile bike ride; proceeds benefit Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation; $20 in advance, $25 day of race; 8 a.m.; Alfalfa Market and Johnson Ranch roads, Bend; 541-388-0002, molly@mbsef .org or www.mbsef.org. SPARK YOUR HEART 5K: A 5K run/walk and children’s dash; registration required; proceeds benefit the Children’s Heart Fund; $20 in advance, $40 day of race; 8 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-706-6996 or www .sparkyourheartbend.com. BOOK SALE: A sale of recent and vintage used books; proceeds benefit Bend’s sister city, Condega, Nicaragua; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Trinity Episcopal Church, 469 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-633-7354. FREE DAY AT DES CHUTES HISTORICAL MUSEUM: In celebration of the Fourth of July, the museum offers free admission and ice cream; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-389-1813 or www.deschuteshistory.org. LA PINE FRONTIER DAYS: The Fourth of July celebration includes lawn mower races, a talent show, woodcutter’s jamboree, live entertainment and more; free; 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-536-7821. PET PARADE: Bring your leashed pet, no cats or rabbits, to be in the parade, or come to watch the procession of animals; lineup is between Bond and Wall streets, by the Bend-La Pine Schools administration building; free; 9:30 a.m. lineup, 10 a.m. parade; downtown Bend; 541-389-7275. PRINEVILLE FOURTH OF JULY PARADE: Parade assembles at Northwest Deer and Fourth streets; free; 10 a.m.; downtown Prineville. QUILT SHOW: The La Pine Needle Quilters present a quilting boutique, raffles and more; free admission; 10 a.m.7 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-536-6237. REDMOND FOURTH OF JULY PARADE: Themed “A Firecracker 4th of July�; free; 10 a.m., check-in begins at 8:30 a.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-923-5191. SUMMER BOOK SALE: The Friends of the Bend Libraries hosts a book sale featuring

thousands of books; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Deschutes Library Administration Building, 507 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-389-1622. FREEDOMFEST 2012: With food, power breaking, live music and children’s activities; free; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-8614 or www.calvary chapelredmond.com. FRONTIER DAYS BOOK SALE: A sale of books; free admission; 11 a.m.4 p.m.; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-312-1090. OLD-FASHIONED FOURTH OF JULY FESTIVAL: With games, live music, food, vendors and more; free; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-389-7275. REDMOND’S OLD FASHIONED FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION: A community celebration with games, music, a pie-eating contest and more; preceded by a cruise-in; free; 1-9 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way; 541-548-7275. THE GREAT FISH RACE: Watch fish race down Ochoco Creek; prizes will be awarded to winners; proceeds benefit Crook County CASA, Crook County Kids Club and Lutheran Community Services; $5 per fish; 1:30 p.m.; Ochoco Creek Park, 450 N.E. Elm St., Prineville; 541-815-2401 or development@ casaofcentraloregon.org. MUSIC IN THE CANYON: A Red, White and Redmond Blues Festival; free; 2-7 p.m.; American Legion Community Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; www .musicinthecanyon.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. SOUND FOURTH: The Cascade Horizon Band and the Festival Chorus perform patriotic music; followed by a barbecue; donations accepted; 3 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-639-7734, cascadehorizonband@aol.com or www.cascadehorizonband.org. MAC SPLASH: With a barbecue, swimming, music, games and fireworks viewing; $6-$40; 5:30 p.m.; Madras Aquatic Center, 1195 S.E. Kemper Way; 541-475-4253. FOURTH OF JULY BARBECUE AND BLUES: A barbecue, with live music by the Taelour Project; proceeds benefit the Vietnam Veterans of America; free admission, barbecue costs $11.99, $9.99 for seniors and ages 10 and younger, $15 all-youcan-eat; 6 p.m., barbecue starts at 5:30 p.m.; Jake’s Diner, 2210 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-382-0118.

Eyelashes Continued from B1 For the next few weeks I continued to think of the extensions as my Mrs. Robinson lashes, remembering that Anne Bancroft had lured Dustin Hoffman with her own set of alarming feather dusters. I had always enjoyed having thick, curly eyelashes. When I was a kid, between the eyelashes and the ringlets, the Shirley Temple moniker got thrown around a lot. My eyes were expressive, I was told, and if eyes are windows to the soul, I always thought my lashes were a pleasant window treatment. But age had taken its toll; they had thinned out in the last few years. I thought I could use a bit of time travel on the cheap. And maybe it was my imagination, but I’d noticed that everyone, be it teenagers or grandmas, suddenly seemed to have lashes that would make a llama jealous. As it turns out, I wasn’t hallucinating. In 2010 Women’s Wear Daily reported that while most beauty sales had been flat, false-eyelash sales were up about 6.2 percent, to $44 million annually. Lash extenders, prescription and nonprescription, were batting their way into everyone’s makeup bags, and there are now eyelash extension emporiums in New York and Los Angeles with names like Wink, Barbi Eyelashes and, inevitably if infelicitously, Eye Do. At these places, where in addition to the rather dizzying variety of lash lengths and textures that can be yours, you can buy

ELKS GAME FUNDRAISER: The Bend Elks play the Kelowna Falcons; a portion of proceeds benefits the Honor Flight of Eastern Oregon; $5; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue, Bend; 541-312-9259 or www.ezticketlive.com/HonorFlight. FRANCHOT TONE: The Californiabased pop-rock act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. HOPELESS JACK & THE HANDSOME DEVIL: The Portland-based blues band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation.com/ venue/thehornedhand. ANCESTREE: The Santa Cruz, Calif.based reggae band performs, with Marius and Autumn Electric; $10; 8:30 p.m.; The Sound Garden, 1279 N.E. Second St., Bend; 541-6336804 or www.thesoundgarden studio.com. BEND FIREWORKS: Fireworks are launched from the top of Pilot Butte in Bend; free; 10 p.m. MADRAS FIREWORKS: Fourth of July fireworks display; free; 10 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets. PRINEVILLE FIREWORKS: Fireworks launched from the Prineville viewpoint on U.S. Highway 126; free; 10 p.m. REDMOND FIREWORKS: Fourth of July fireworks display; free; dusk; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way; 541-548-7275.

THURSDAY TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-6 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, off of U.S. Highway 20 and Cook Avenue; 541-728-0088, earthsart@gmail.com or http:// tumalogardenmarket.com. THE 44S: The Los Angeles-based blues band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation.com/venue/ thehornedhand.

FRIDAY RUMMAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Compass Church’s overseas missions; free admission; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-280-0284 or kalisha@bendcable.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket.com.

Dionne Phillips puts eyelash extensions on Felicity Alston at her Los Angeles salon. Scott Varley Los Angeles Daily News

tiny ornaments to affix to the lashes. “Right now there is so much lash lust,� said Lindsay Ebbin, the national retail and makeup director for Red Door Spas, which recently added lash extensions to its services. “With celebrities like Katy Perry, Adele and Kim Kardashian, well, thicker and longer is what everyone wants.� Hard to argue there. And with the economy still shaky, women are looking for a quick fix that doesn’t break the bank, and just like a new lipstick, a $10 pair of false eyelashes or $20 mascara with lengthening fibers woven into the goo (sample name: Illegal Length by Maybelline) give satisfaction. “Eyelashes are the new breasts,� said the writer and former call girl Tracy Quan,

who blogs about pop culture and sex for The Huffington Post. “Maybe you can’t invest in larger breasts right now,� Quan said, but an inexpensive pair of lashes can also give you an instant lift. Presumably so when you tell him, “Hey, I’m up here,� he’s actually looking up there.

Getting extended Because I was a little nervous about anyone hovering around my eyes with pointy instruments, I, just as any Kardashian would, paid $500 to Courtney Akai, widely thought to be the diva of eyelash extensions in New York. She patiently discussed types of extensions, colors (pink or green: an option!) and length. I decided to be bold, though not purple-lash bold; just kind of a couple of milli-

SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street; www.sistersfarmersmarket.com. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill District; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. MUSIC IN THE CANYON: Larry and His Flask performs thrashgrass music; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; American Legion Community Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; www .musicinthecanyon.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Anna Keesey talks about her book “Little Century�; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jim Lynch talks about his novel “Truth Like the Sun�; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. RHYTHM ON THE RANGE: A weekend of live music, vendors and more; proceeds benefit Wonderland Express; $5, free ages 12 and younger; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Meadows Golf Course, 1 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541-5934609 or www.sunriver-resort.com. TAARKA: The Colorado-based jazzy world-folk band performs; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com. THE DIRTY WORDS: The Portlandbased rock band performs; $5; 9 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation.com/venue/ thehornedhand.

SATURDAY GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the Ladies of Elks scholarships; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Elks Lodge, 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-382-1371. RUMMAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Compass Church’s overseas missions; free admission; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-280-0284 or kalisha@bendcable.com. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643 or prinevillefarmersmarket@gmail.com. HIGH DESERT GARDEN TOUR: View six gardens in Prineville and Powell Butte in a self-guided tour; $10, free ages 16 and younger; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.541-548-6088 or http://extension.oregonstate.edu/ deschutes.

meters longer than I thought I’d be comfortable with. And I was right. “You have to be a little OCD to do this all day long,� Akai said, as she cheerfully and meticulously glued 90 to 130 tiny silk hairs to each of my own lashes. It took about two and a half hours, and she did only the top lashes (she can also do the bottoms). Since I asked for a glue for sensitive eyes, I was told they would probably fall off within two weeks. Yet they’re still there three weeks later, making me look like a superannuated Betty Boop. Next time (if there ever is a next time, because even after an hour of lying motionless like that, I felt the need to join the Rockettes to regain my sanity), I would pick something a bit more natural. I just don’t live a big-lash life. It was like walking around with a tiara all the time, while not, in fact, being the queen or Miss America. Diane Ackerman, the naturalist and author of works like “A Natural History of the Senses,� summed up the current craze best for me. “Eyelashes evolved to keep debris out of our delicate eyes, and long ones do suggest femininity and youth,� she said. “But the ones woman are wearing now look more like an accessory than makeup, the equivalent of high-heeled pointy shoes for the eyes.� And there’s something about these eye accessories that may be glam and sexy — but at a distance. They don’t invite intimacy. They’re for making statements, not love. “If you enjoy the tenderness of entwining eyelashes with a loved one until you’re not quite sure whose eyelashes are whose,� Ackerman said, “then your own silky strands work best.�


B4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

B5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


B6

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012

Design Continued from B1 Inside, Kress remarked on features I’d never noticed before. A trellis hangs over the produce section with its own lighting. “Now,” he said, “we’ve just gone from the grocery store to a little market.” The wine area feels more like a nook in a European shop. And the concrete floor changes color throughout the store. In one area it’s a warm red. In the produce section, it turns to green. (“Green looks good with produce,” Kress said.) The reason I’d never registered these design touches, called “atmospherics” in industry parlance, is that they’re not supposed to draw attention. Instead, experts say, their purpose is to subtly create a space that puts consumers at ease — and in the mood to spend. “An appealing and engaging design can lure shoppers in, increase a customer’s affinity for a store and keep them in the shop,” Jeff Needles, a shareholder in retailer design firm Sixthriver Architects in Texas, said in an email. “All of these things contribute to sales.” And they’re becoming more and more important in the retail industry, said Professor Kyle Murray, who studies atmospherics as director of the University of Alberta School of Retailing. Research now shows that elements like lighting, music and even scent play significant roles in how we shop. “Retailers have always been interested in this,” he said. “But researchers are now realizing it has more impact than we realized.” The difficult aspect for retailers, however, is that design elements and atmospherics aren’t one-size-fits-all. What works in one store with one demographic audience will fail in another one. Still, design revelations are leading some retailers to put significant investment into their design and atmosphere. Or as Kress put it, referring to amenities like coffee shops in supermarkets, “Who would have thought 15 years ago that I would stop at the grocery store to eat and relax?”

Subtle effects Every large chain store, Kress said, has its design strategies: Costco’s strippeddown look radiates low prices. Shoppers at Home Depot feel like they’re being allowed into a contractor’s hangout. Ikea showcases its products while trapping consumers in a maze, keeping them in the store as long as possible. Yet the study of store atmospherics is relatively new, starting in the 1980s, said Minjeong Kim, an associate professor in Oregon State University’s Department of Design and Human Environment. It’s only recently that some firm connections have been made between aspects like lighting and scent and consumer behavior. Recent research published by Murray and associates, for instance, shows that consumers will spend more in stores with natural light. “People tend to be happier in natural sunlight,” he said. “They’ll pay more for products and they’ll buy more.” Another study by Murray and a colleague published this year found that people’s preferences for products changed based on exposure to music or scents. High-energy music or scents, like grapefruit, led to subjects showing preference for an energy drink over an iced tea. The reverse held true for soothing scents and music. While these associations

have been demonstrated, there still hasn’t been enough research to provide magic formulas to retailers, Murray said. “It’s not like you can paint the store blue and people will spend more money,” he said. So a lot of experimentation is under way. Bloomingdale’s recently began using scent machines in various departments. Shoppers in the child and infant section get whiffs of baby powder, while lilac pervades the intimate apparel area and coconut for the bathing suits. Another pioneer in using atmospherics is Safeway, which at newer locations like on Bend’s west side offers in-store coffee shops and fireplaces. The point, Kress said, is to make grocery shopping seem more like a pleasure than a chore. Experts noted, however, that retailers must walk a fine line with atmospherics. Once shoppers realize certain elements are present to urge them to buy, Kim said, their effect wanes. The mood of an individual in that moment — happy or grumpy, stressed or relaxed — can change whether the atmospherics come across as positive or negative. Research is showing that both gender and ethnic differences factor into reactions to shopping environments. Strong stimuli tend to bring up negative feelings, so it’s essential for stores not to overdo it. The classic example of a store with a strong design is Abercrombie & Fitch. “It’s dark lighting, loud music, heavy perfume on the clothes — it’s cool for teens. It’s like a nightclub,” Murray said. “It can be repellent — even repulsive – to other demographic groups.” “Really, there are so many factors to consider,” Kim said. “You have to consider if it’s congruent with your brand.”

A shopping experience In one of his COCC marketing classes, Kress takes students on tours of several area stores to demonstrate design and atmosphere in action. At REI, he points out the natural light, the spacing between racks, and the transition space. He also notes REI’s knack for exposing you to what a product might actually be like in the field. Mini-models of tents, for instance, show what they would look like. Sometimes videos play on TV screens while shoppers wait in line to pay. Providing an experience, experts said, will become even more important for retail in the future. Kress noted that shopping is already at times a form of entertainment. With consumers increasingly shopping online, including with mobile devices, Kim said retail needs to become more like a destination. “The store needs to provide an experience that online just can’t,” she said. “It will not be just looking for bargains. It will be something you can enjoy, cool places to visit. “The brick-and-mortar store will continue,” she said, “but the role will change.” Kim expects more interactive experiences in stores — like an REI climbing wall — or decor that is just fun to look at. And a portion of that experience will be the touches the average shopper never notices. “They can put you in a better mood to spend more time there,” Kim said, “and buy more.” — Reporter: 541-617-7828, hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com

Clocks Continued from B1 Over the last few years, several technology companies have marketed gadgets that address our collective fatigue. These products function as a modern take on the old-fashioned alarm clock, and the most sophisticated among them try to monitor how much and how well we’re sleeping, and offer tips for improving our nocturnal habits. I tried out several such devices recently. And while I found a few of them helpful, none was the panacea I had hoped for. I’m still exhausted. The most straightforward gadget I tested was Clocky. Invented in 2005 by an MIT graduate student, Gauri Nanda, Clocky is an alarm clock on wheels. When it’s the hour to rise, the $39 timepiece emits a cute bubbly animal sound, rolls off your nightstand and trundles around your bedroom in the manner of a headless chicken. This behavior is quite adorable when you test the clock during the day. First thing in the morning, it’s not so endearing. Tocky, Clocky’s bubbleshape successor, has the same problem. It’s better looking than Clocky, and it can play MP3s in addition to sounding alarms. But at $60, Tocky is more expensive than Clocky, and just as infuriating. In fact, that’s the point — your rage at springing out of bed to catch the blasted clock is supposed to invigorate you. But is that the best way to start the day? I’m sure that the cliche that couples aren’t supposed to go to bed angry applies to waking, too.

A gentler approach Like Clocky, the Philips Wake-Up Light (around $70 to $160, depending on the model) tries to make morning inhospitable to sleep, though it takes a gentler approach. In addition to playing cheery bird sounds or broadcasting a favorite radio station (and, in some models, MP3s), the device gradually brightens in imitation of a sunrise. I found that it worked quite well. The first time my wife and I used it, I set it to turn on a half-hour before our normal waking time. The next morning, we woke to a room so bright we thought it was early afternoon. At least one study has shown that prolonged use of light-therapy devices like the Wake-Up Light can help reduce the groggy feeling some people experience for a few hours after waking (a condition known as “sleep inertia”). I used the light for only about a week, so I didn’t have time to notice a significant change in my sleep patterns, but I did find that it made waking very pleasant.

Handouts via New York Times News Service

The Tocky clock, which rolls off the nightstand and demands to be chased.

The Philips Wake-Up Light, which brightens gradually like the morning sky and has no harsh alarm sounds.

The Zeo Mobile Sleep Manager, which has a headband that picks up electrical signals that indicate quality of sleep.

Gear4’s Renew SleepClock, which is compatible only with Apple devices, keeps tabs on repose by way of radio sensors.

Tracking quality zzz’s The other products I tested took a much more active approach to improving sleep. They weren’t content with just helping me regain consciousness in the morning; they wanted to watch me all night long. Such devices, their manufacturers claim, can help users identify why they lack energy — perhaps their sleep is being interrupted, and they don’t even know it. Sleep monitoring can also improve how they wake up. Instead of ringing an alarm at a predetermined time, these devices rouse you when they detect that you’re in a phase of shallow sleep, which supposedly leaves you feeling more refreshed throughout the day. Each product keeps tabs on sleep in a slightly different

way. The Zeo Mobile Sleep Manager, which sells for about $80 and works with Apple’s iOS devices and Android phones, measures electrical activity in the brain by means of a headband to determine how you’re sleeping. The Lark Silent Alarm Clock — $99, for iOS only — operates similarly, though with a wristband rather than a headband. Then there’s the Renew SleepClock, by Gear4, which sits at your bedside and measures your breathing and body movements through a pair of radio sensors. (The SleepClock, which works only with Apple devices, sells for $199.) Finally, I tried Sleep Cycle, a 99-cent iPhone app made by Maciek Drejak Labs. Simply place your iPhone near your pillow at bedtime; the app uses the phone’s accelerometer to measure your mattress movements. The more restless you are, the less rest you are obviously getting. Some of these gadgets were more appealing than others. The Zeo Mobile Sleep Manager is easy to use. And there’s no need to be concerned about the very lowpowered radio waves it emits, the manufacturer insists; it’s entirely safe. But wearing a headband while you sleep is more than a tad goofy. My wife burst out laughing the first time I put on the Zeo accessory. Needless to say, spousal ridicule is not a key to happy slumber. For that reason, I preferred the Lark’s less obtrusive wristband technology. This product respects bedfellows not just by allowing the user to maintain sartorial dignity but also by signaling wakeup time with a silent buzzer in the wristband rather than a loud alarm. The Lark, though, had its own troubles. Its battery needs a full charge to last through the night; if you forget to dock the device in the morning, it’s useless. I also found the interface a little clunky: In order to change any alarm setting while you’re wearing the Lark, you’ve got to remove the wristband, put it back in its charging dock and then

make the adjustment. The Renew SleepClock, by comparison, is a dream to use — just place it on your bedside table and plug it in. When you’re ready to sleep, insert your iPhone into the dock, and set the time. Simplicity is also a selling point of the Sleep Cycle app — it’s one of the most hasslefree ways to monitor your night, and at 99 cents, it’s the best deal in dreamland.

Tell me what I don’t know But what do you get for all this sleep monitoring? Does analyzing your sleep actually help to improve it? Maybe. While all the gadgets attempted to wake me a few minutes before my scheduled alarm time — during a period in which they assumed I was primed to open my eyes — I still wanted to snooze. The main problem was that I hadn’t gotten enough sleep. Besides, I don’t need a graph to tell me how many hours I’ve slept, or the depth of my repose. At first, I found the pictures interesting, but after a few nights I began to ignore them because the screen matched what I felt: four hours of sleep equals one big yawn. The hope, of course, is that I’ll use the graphs to change my habits. With numeric proof that I’m cheating myself of sleep, maybe I’ll drink less coffee and log off the computer earlier. In other words, while these devices won’t automatically improve sleep, they may be a handy aid in that effort. Or, I could just turn out the lights and close my eyes — no tech required.

Get a taste of Food, Home & Garden In

AT HOME Every Tuesday

Change your mind. Change your life.

(541) 728-0505 www.neurofloat.com

2012 Deschutes County Fair Talent Show Sponsored By

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Eberhard’s Dairy Wednesday, Aug. 1, 1-4p.m. on the Eberhard’s Food Court Stage Singers, Musicians, Dancers, Bands, Magicians, Jugglers & Acts of all kinds!

4 acts will each win a $250 prize & perform again on Saturday Send a CD, DVD, videotape, (no 8mm or video) and/or photos along with name, age, address, phone number and email to: Deschutes County Fair Talent Show Audition 3800 SW Airport Way Redmond, OR 97756 All Audition materials must be at the fairgrounds by 12:00 noon Friday, July 6!

Notification will be completed by Wednesday, July 11. • Up to 24 acts will be chosen to perform on Wednesday, Aug. 1 between 1:00 and 4:00 p.m. • All acts must be residents of Deschutes County (an act from a neighboring county that does not participate in the State Fair Talent Show is eligible). • A panel of three judges will evaluate each act! • Four acts will be chosen for the $250 prizes and the right to perform again in a 10- to 12-minute set on Saturday, August 4. • Three divisions: children 1-9, youth 10-17, adult 18 and older may qualify for the State Fair Talent Show. • A sound system will be provided with a sound tech and both a CD/tape player. • CD/tape accompaniments must have the lead vocal tracks completely removed! Instrumental and harmony tracks are okay. • Bands will be expected to provide their own amps, keyboards, drums, patch cords, etc., (mics & stands are provided), and must set up and remove equipment. • All performances must be suitable for the family atmosphere at the Stage. • Performers under 16 get a pass and one for a parent/guardian. Performers 16 and over get a pass for themselves. • For more information, call 541-548-2711.


LOCALNEWS

Reader photo, C2 Editorials, C4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012

LOCAL BRIEFING

www.bendbulletin.com/local

• Some raise concerns about the impact of Bend’s Freedom Ride on the community

Break-in reported at Bend school An intruder or intruders broke into Mountain View High School in Bend last week and vandalized vending machines, police said. The burglary was discovered Thursday, and could have happened earlier that day or the day before, June 27, police said Tuesday. Police said no arrests have been made. A damage estimate was unavailable Tuesday.

Lane closure set for Reed Market Reed Market Road from Third Street to Division Street will be reduced to one lane for repaving from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. beginning Tuesday. The paving will continue through Thursday.

Hearing set for ex-RPA leader A settlement hearing is planned for Sept. 4 in the court case involving Michael Bremont, the former director of Redmond Proficiency Academy who is accused of sexually abusing a female student. The September hearing was scheduled Tuesday, according to court records. Bremont is charged in Deschutes County Circuit Court with one count of third-degree sodomy, one count of third-degree attempted rape, two counts of second-degree sexual abuse and 10 counts of third-degree sexual abuse. Bremont has pleaded not guilty to the charges. The case is scheduled to go to trial Jan. 8. In June, Bremont was charged in a second case that alleges Bremont sexually abused a female student at Central Linn High School between December 2005 and March 2006. Bremont was the principal at Central Linn.

Veterans group awarded $195K Central Oregon Veterans Outreach received a grant of $195,218 from the U.S. Department of Labor to fund job training and support services to help veterans succeed in civilian careers. — Bulletin staff reports

News of Record, C2

Outlook good for Bend boy with new heart By Markian Hawryluk The Bulletin

Bend meth raid yields 2 arrests Two Bend residents were arrested June 27 on suspicion of possession and delivery of methamphetamine, authorities said. Cindy Byrd, 40, and Lexie Cooper, 19, were taken into custody by the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement team after a search warrant was served in the 200 block of Northeast Third Street. Officers found 5 grams of meth, a scale and packaging material.

C

Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

Photos courtesy of Bike Around Bend

Bicyclists ride against traffic down Wall Street during the 2011 Freedom Ride in Bend. Bicycle advocates have raised questions this year about whether the event, which does not have official organizers or a permit, has gotten out of control.

What does freedom cost? By Hillary Borrud

Gabriel Lawson, the 11year-old Bend boy in need of a new heart, underwent an 11-hour transplant surgery early Monday morning and was still recovering late Tuesday at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital in Palo Alto, Calif. Doctors had trouble getting the new heart to beat properly when it was first implanted, but are now optimistic Lawson that Gabriel will make a full recovery. “We’re reducing the medications we’re using to help the heart beat more effectively,” said Dr. David Rosenthal, the transplant surgeon. “And he’s not really at the point yet where the breathing tube is likely to be taken out in the next couple of hours, but it’s within the next few days.” The medications are keeping Gabriel asleep as doctors monitor the new heart. See Transplant / C2

The Bulletin

M

ore than a decade after the July Fourth Freedom Ride began in Bend, some bicycle advocates say it has grown out of control. The event could be undermining efforts to improve relations between drivers and bicyclists, advocates say. Lucas Freeman, who runs the website Bike Around Bend, raised the concerns in a June 30 editorial on the website titled “Your Freedom Could Spell Less For the Rest of Us.” The Freedom Ride, Freeman wrote, has grown so large that, in its current unsanctioned and loosely organized format, problems are certain to arise. Bicyclists also bring traffic to a halt downtown, violate traffic laws by running red lights and are often intoxicated, which gives many drivers a bad impression of bicyclists that could have negative repercussions for law-abiding bicyclists on the road the rest of the year. Unofficial estimates of the number of bicyclists at last year’s Freedom Ride range from 300 to 1,000. The Freedom Ride has no official organizers. The route is not planned in advance and riders have never obtained an event permit from the Bend Police Department, so there is no way for the city to provide detours and close vehicle access to the streets used by bicyclists. Steve Esselstyn, community liaison with the Bend Police Department, said that without a permit and route plan, public safety agencies do not know how the event will unfold. “We don’t know where, we don’t know when,” Esselstyn said. “Most of the years it goes very well, but some years you get folks who are aggressive and they start pounding on cars and they sort of push the limits of what folks should do.” Lt. Brian Kindel said police did not count the number of citations they wrote

CROOK SCHOOLS

Bicyclists gather near Pioneer Park on Portland Avenue during the 2011 Freedom Ride in Bend.

for bicyclists involved in the ride last year, but “it wasn’t a lot.” The ride was calm, and most of the problems arose as people dispersed after the ride, Kindel said. People who support the ride in its current form say the lack of organization and permits is exactly what makes it a celebration of American independence. Events such as the Freedom Ride can result in social change, including more acceptance of bicyclists, said Bend resident Jay Stalker.

The appeal of no leadership “One of the things I like about the Freedom Ride is it is very difficult to say what is going on there, largely because it is one of those lovely little events that doesn’t have leadership, it doesn’t have marketing, it doesn’t have a profit motive, it doesn’t have talking points,” Stalker said. “I can understand why people in the bike community don’t want feathers ruffled,” Stalker said.

However, the Freedom Ride “is part of America, and part of America is unruly.” Jeff Monson, executive director of Commute Options, said the ride has good and bad aspects. He and his daughter participated in the ride last year, and had a great time. “It’s an amazing outpouring of enthusiasm for bike riding,” Monson said. However, he would like the event to be more family-friendly and for participants to work with the police and the Bend Park & Recreation District, which had to clean up the park where the event began last year. “With freedom comes responsibility, and I think that’s important to take into consideration. ... Nothing against beer, but there were some people who were wasted and riding their bikes, and that’s not good,” Monson said. “I guess my other thought would be, where is this enthusiasm for bicycling the rest of the year?” See Ride / C2

“With freedom comes responsibility, and I think that’s important to take into consideration. ... Nothing against beer, but there were some people who were wasted and riding their bikes, and that’s not good. I guess my other thought would be, where is this enthusiasm for bicycling the rest of the year?” — Jeff Monson, executive director, Commute Options

Public opinion sought on bond By Ben Botkin The Bulletin

The Crook County School District wants input from the public before the school board decides to seek voter approval of a bond for building improvements. The district’s facilities review committee completed a report in June that outlines three options for a bond proposal. The choices vary in scope and dollar amount. On the low end, the bond would cover building maintenance and repairs. On the high end, it would also pay for a new elementary school building. District representatives will give the public a presentation about the options at a Monday meeting and take questions. The school board won’t make a final decision at the meeting. “We want to listen to their input because this is going to affect the future of our community,” said Doug Smith, a school board member who served on the facilities review committee. See School bond / C5

Independence Day closures • Federal, state, county and city offices will be closed today for Independence Day. • The Deschutes Public Library system will be closed today. The Jefferson and Crook County libraries will also be closed. • Central Oregon Community College will be closed. • Most bank branches will be closed. • Most Central Oregon liquor stores will be open.

Fix-it Scout designs, builds benches By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

OUR SCHOOLS, OUR STUDENTS Educational news and activities, and local kids and their achievements. • School Notes and submission info, C2

For Peter Schwarz, becoming an Eagle Scout was a lesson in problem-solving, organization, resourcefulness and — above all — perseverance. “When I start a project, I want to be thorough and do it right,” Peter, 17, said. “It’s important that I see it through to the end.” Peter, a senior at Bend

High School, spent much of his free time last year developing a community service project as part of his Eagle Scout certification. He constructed benches for the Powell Butte Retreat Center. As part of the project, he had to write a detailed proposal, raise funds for materials, organize volunteers and, finally, implement it. He did all this while main-

taining a 4.17 GPA and participating in lacrosse, cross-country running and cross-country skiing. Peter is a second-generation Boy Scout. He says he’s stuck with the Boy Scouts through high school because of his family’s ties to the organization, and because of the leadership skills he’s learned. See Schwarz / C2

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Bend High School senior Peter Schwarz, 17, stands in front of his school Tuesday afternoon. Schwarz designed and built benches for the Powell Butte Retreat Center as part of his Eagle Scout project.


C2

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012

Transplant Continued from C1 Gabriel did wake up briefly Monday night and give his parents a “thumbs up” sign. “They have told us that everything is moving in the right direction, though at a very slow pace,” his father, Seth Lawson, said. If the recovery goes well, Gabriel should be able to resume a normal life. Some of the early pediatric heart transplant patients have lived for more than 30 years, and the procedure has been refined over the past few decades. The heart Gabriel received was a good match for him, although

Schwarz Continued from C1 For the past four years, he has been a leader at the organization’s National Youth Leadership Training Camp. From the beginning, the yearlong project was an exercise in problem-solving. He had to come up with a bench design and decided to construct the benches out of composite wood to keep maintenance costs down. But the composite material was flimsier — and heavier — than regular wood. “I had to figure out how to build a stronger bench, but make it so that it wouldn’t weigh a ton,” Peter said. Peter completed a 15-page research proposal for the Eagle Scout review board, then faced the daunting prospect

“They have told us that everything is moving in the right direction, though at a very slow pace.” — Seth Lawson, father of Gabriel Lawson

slightly bigger than his original heart. Rosenthal declined to give any details about the heart donor. The risk for transplant patients is highest in the first three to six months, as their immune systems are weakened to prevent rejection of the new organ. But that also leaves pa-

tients vulnerable to infection. “He’s still got a long way to go, but in the 24 hours between yesterday and today, he’s come along a nice distance,” Rosenthal said. “His heart has improved to where it’s functioning well.” Doctors believed Gabriel could be released from the hospital within a couple of weeks. He will initially remain in the Palo Alto area until his family feels comfortable managing the ongoing aspects of his care. But other than periodic visits to the hospital, he will have no other limitations. — Reporter: 541-617-7814 mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com

Ride Continued from C1 Freeman’s editorial drew a range of comments on the Bike Around Bend website, some supportive and others in disagreement. One person who commented on the Bike Around Bend website called the ride a party “in the form of a 1000-person

D.U.I.” Another person wrote that “the Freedom Ride is about Individual FREEDOM, not bicycles.” A third person wrote that if organizers do not want to work with the city to permit the event, that could “put the event at risk of becoming a protest rather than a celebration.” Freeman wrote that in the end, the way bicyclists partici-

pate in the Freedom Ride is a choice. “Ask yourself if your choice on Wednesday the 4th will be one that not only makes cyclists look bad, but also makes the anti-social statement that your few hours of selfish fun should come at the expense of others,” Freeman wrote. — Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com

Well shot! READER PHOTOS Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@ bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication.

Peter Schwarz, 17 Bend High School senior GPA: 4.17 Activities: Boy Scouts, lacrosse, cross-country running, cross-country skiing, community service activities Favorite TV Show: “The Big Bang Theory”

of raising the $1,400 he would need to build the benches. He contacted several businesses and was able to cover the cost with donations from The Home Depot and Miller Lumber. “I’d never done anything like that before,” Peter said. “It taught me about how open the community is and how open to helping people are if you

just ask.” Finally, after getting the materials, Peter led 30 volunteers in a springtime work session, completing 22 benches for the retreat center. He was awarded his Eagle Scout ranking after the project was completed. Peter says after he graduates from Bend High next year, he wants to go to a fouryear university and eventually study mechanical engineering or physics at a postgraduate level. Since he was young, Peter says he’s loved figuring out what makes things work. “I’ve always enjoyed fixing things and taking them apart,” Peter said. “Anytime anything breaks, I’m there taking it apart, and trying to make it better.”

Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

— Reporter: 541-383-0354, mkehoe@bendbulletin.com

S  N  REUNIONS Bend High School Class of 1977 will hold a reunion July 20-21; $35-45; for registration, visit www.bhs1977. com or contact Maureen Renwick Barteling, 541-420-3015 or Kathy Ingraham Rowles, 541-350-6298. Crook County High School Class of 1972 will hold a reunion July 2021; no-host social at Prineville Golf and Country Club on Friday, picnic and dinner and music Saturday; to register or for more information, contact Carolyn Puckett at 541-447-5291, or Fred Gerke, 541-312-0188. Redmond High School Class of 1987 will hold a reunion Aug. 3-5; $30 per person plus $8 for Sunday Buckaroo Breakfast; Deschutes County Fairgrounds; contact Lara Chan, 541-526-1626. Crook County High School Class of 1962 will hold a reunion Aug. 3-5; hors d’oeuvres, picnic, dinner at Meadow Lakes Golf Club and golfing; register by July 1; contact Janice Wood Anderson, 541-419-2436. Redmond High School Class of 1962 will hold a reunion Aug. 4 at Eagle Crest; to register or for information, contact Janet (McKinnon) Hodgers, 541-617-1498, Jim Pierce, 541-5482644, or Cherie (Hebert) Douglas, 541-279-1730. Crook County High School Classes 1940-1949 will hold a reunion Aug. 4; $23 per person; 5-6:30 p.m. no host bar, 6:30 p.m. dinner; A.R. Bowman Memorial Museum, 246 North Main Street, Prineville; for information contact Gwen Boothe at 541-447-4155. Bend High School Class of 1962 will hold a reunion Aug. 10-12; for information, visit www.bshs62 .com or contact Mike Stenkamp at 541-382-1739 or Susie Chopp Penhollow at 541-382-2724. Bend High School Class of 1972 will hold a reunion Aug. 10-11; $25 per person; visit www .bendclassof72.com to register; contact Patty Smiley Stell at 541388-1325 or stell@bendcable.com. Bend High School Class of 1992 will hold a reunion Aug. 10-12; formal dinner Aug. 11 at Awbrey Glen; for

registration information, contact Emily Anderson Stewart at 541-8151414, eanderson@blackbutteranch .com or quicksilvermonk@gmail. com. The Second (Indianhead) Division Association; for anyone who served in the Second Infantry Division at any time; Aug. 23-26, Reno, Nev.; for information or to register, contact Bob Haynes, 224-225-1202 or 2idahq@comcast.net or visit www.2ida.org. Bend High School Class of 1967 will hold a reunion Aug. 24-25; dinner at Awbrey Glen and more; register by July 1; for registration information, contact Frank Wilson at 541-3892363 or email bendclassof67@ gmail.com. Bend High School Class of 1952 will hold a reunion Sept. 7-9; hors d’oeurves and tours Friday, class picnic and catered dinner Saturday; brunch Sunday; $30 per person; register by July 31; contact Joanne Lubcke at 541-389-1075, JoAnn Austin at 541-306-3181 or Darlyne Haynes at 541-382-1560. USS Columbus CA-74/CG-12/SSN762 reunion; Sept. 12-16; Holiday Inn Portland Airport; for registration information, contact Allen R. Hope, president, 3828 Hobson Road, Fort Wayne, Ind., 46815-4505, 260486-2221 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. EST) or hope4391@frontier.com.

TEEN FEATS Abby Centola was recently honored at the state Capitol for earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. For her project she collected nearly 600 pounds of school supplies for an orphanage in Juarez, Mexico. Centola also received the Arlene Johns Memorial Gold Award Scholarship, which is given each year to one Gold Award recipient in Oregon. Centola is a 2012 graduate of Bend High School and the daughter of Chad and Juli Centola, of Bend.

MILITARY NOTES Navy Seaman Derek L. Luther

completed basic training at Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, Ill. Luther is a 2007 graduate of Mountain View High School and is the son of Jason Hamlin and Sina Barnes, both of Bend.

COLLEGE NOTES Chase Hammond, of Bend, received a bachelor of arts degree from Colby College, in Waterville, Maine. Kristen Robbel, of Bend, received a bachelor of science in community health education from Western Oregon University in Monmouth. The following local students were named to the spring 2012 dean’s list at University of Idaho: Katelyn Hammond, Breanna Wilson and Taylor Westlund, all of Bend, and Daniel Stirewalt, of Culver. Megan Brown, of Madras, and Adriana Teagle, of Bend, were named to the spring 2012 dean’s list at Eastern Washington University. Gregory Vibbert, of Redmond, has been named to the spring 2012 dean’s list at University of Montana Western. The following local students were named to the spring 2012 president’s list at Western Oregon University: Robin Roemer, of Bend, Carraig Colahan, of Burns, Janelle Emard, of Chiloquin, Tesalee Sensibaugh, of Madras, April Senner, of Powell Butte, and Zander Albertson, of Sisters. The following local students were named to the spring 2012 honor roll at Western Oregon University: Richard Borland, Rebecca Dooms, Chloe Fief, Reilly Noble, Mary Rice, Kelsey Shults and Molly Thompson, all of Bend; Kristy Reponen, of Burns; Audrianna Straub, of Gilchrist; Drew Heinz and Charlie White, both of Hines; Emily Nascimento, Sonya Perez, Caleb Pugh and Moriah Pugh, all of Madras; Megan Allison, Elysia Kiyija, McKenna Ontko, Rachael Prescott, Hannah Seely and Carlie Severson, all of Prineville; Jennifer AnDyke, Benjamin Baca, Spencer Campbell, Kylie Layton, Bryce Wolford and Richard Wollam, all of Redmond; and Dane Moorehead, of Sisters.

How to submit

Story ideas

Teen feats: Kids recognized recently for academic achievements or for participation in clubs, choirs or volunteer groups. (Please submit a photo.) Phone: 541-383-0358 Email: youth@bendbulletin.com Mail: P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

School briefs: Items and announcements of general interest. Phone: 541-633-2161 Email: pcliff@bendbulletin.com

Other school notes: College announcements, military graduations or training completions, reunion announcements. Phone: 541-383-0358 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Student profiles: Know of a kid with a compelling story? Phone: 541-383-0354 Email: mkehoe@bendbulletin.com

A MONKEY’S UNCLE Lesley Day, of Bend, submitted this photo of Herbie wearing a hat at Chimps Inc. in Tumalo on June 22. “(Herbie) donned his 4th of July hat ... in preparation for the festivities,” Day wrote.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 5:37 p.m. June 15, in the 100 block of Northeast Bend River Mall Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 12:41 p.m. June 20, in the 61400 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:52 a.m. June 21, in the 62400 block of Eagle Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 4:26 p.m. June 23, in the 2500 block of Northeast Twin Knolls Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 11:48 p.m. June 23, in the 100 block of Southwest Truman Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:37 a.m. June 26, in the 400 block of Southeast Wye Lane. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:41 p.m. June 26, in the 100 block of Southwest Century Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:11 p.m. June 27, in the 1000 block of Northeast Parkview Court. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 2:40 p.m. June 27, in the 61000 block of Borden Drive.

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:14 p.m. June 27, in the 200 block of Northwest Riverside Boulevard. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:43 p.m. June 27, in the 200 block of Northwest Riverside Boulevard. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 7:05 a.m. June 28, in the 2700 block of Northeast 27th Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:51 a.m. June 29, in the 1900 block of Northeast Lotus Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:19 p.m. June 29, in the 21200 block of U.S. Highway 20. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 1:43 p.m. June 29, in the 61100 block of Chuckanut Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:24 p.m. June 30, in the 1600 block of Northwest Newport Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:17 p.m. June 30, in the 1100 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:48 p.m. July 1, in the 1200 block of Northeast Fourth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:12 p.m. July 1, in the 63400 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 7:41 a.m. July 2, in the area of Southeast Garner Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:48 a.m. July 2, in the area of Northwest Madras Highway. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:57 p.m. July 2, in the area of Northwest Teal Loop. Oregon State Police

DUII — Carina Daria Rosterolla, 29,

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was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:44 a.m. July 1, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 156. DUII — Patrick W. Moon, 31, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 7:12 p.m. July 1, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 129. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:30 p.m. July 2, in the area of state Highway 31 near milepost 15.

BEND FIRE RUNS Friday 12:53 p.m. — Brush or brush-andgrass mixture fire, 436 S.E. Railroad St. 9:02 p.m. — Brush or brush-andgrass mixture fire, 639 S.E. Glencoe Place. 20 — Medical aid calls. Saturday 5:09 p.m. — Brush or brush-andgrass mixture fire, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and Dale Road. 27 — Medical aid calls. Sunday 3:32 a.m. — Trash or rubbish fire, 2121 N.W. West Hills Ave. 6:27 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 60449 Lakeview Drive. 9:57 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, in the area of Baker Road. 18 — Medical aid calls.

Press logs from other Deschutes County police departments are currently unavailable, due to a police department system update.


O N State relies excessively on sheltered workshops, U.S. warns

Man held in stabbing of boy has history of sex crimes

The Associated Press SALEM — The federal government has warned the state of Oregon that too many people with disabilities are segregated in “sheltered workshops,” doing rote work for low pay in institutional or industrial settings. A letter from the U.S. Justice Department warns the state that it’s violating the Americans with Disabilities Act and faces court action, The Oregonian reported Tuesday. The law requires states to provide services to people with disabilities in settings integrated into the wider community as much as possible. But investigators found that the majority of intellectually or developmentally disabled workers did repetitive tasks such as folding, sorting and bagging alongside other people with disabilities, said the letter from Thomas Perez, assistant attorney general for the Civil Rights Division. The settings for the workshops were described as “institutional in nature,” with little natural light. Some workshops were in industrial parks, so people had trouble getting public transportation or leaving for lunch. The nine-month investigation found that more than half the workers earned less than $3 an hour, with the average at $3.72. The state spends $30 million a year on sheltered workshops for people with disabilities. In March, according to state data, 1,642 people worked in sheltered workshops. By contrast, 422 workers were employed in the community with support, such as job coaching or help navigating the bus system.

By Nigel Duara

Corvallis OKs ban on plastic retail bags The Associated Press CORVALLIS — Corvallis has become the second city in Oregon to curtail plastic bags. The City Council unanimously gave its final approval Monday night to ban single-use plastic bags at retail outlets. Portland has already adopted a retail bag ban, and other cities, including Eugene, are studying the idea. San Francisco was the first U.S. city to ban the bags, and Seattle’s ban went into effect Sunday. Proponents argue that the plastic bags are a hazard to wildlife and a polluter of oceans. Opponents say bans deny consumers a choice and the bags are both convenient and recyclable. The new ordinance requires businesses to impose a pass-through fee of 5 cents or more on paper grocery bags to encourage consumers to use reusable bags, the Corvallis Gazette-Times reported. Businesses with more than 50 employees have six months to phase out plastic bags. Smaller businesses have a year. Violators face a minimum fine of $200. The law doesn’t ban bags used to wrap meat, produce or bulk food items. Bars and restaurants are exempt, as are pharmacy prescription bags. The law’s passage was assured by a vote two weeks ago, but the council delayed the final action so member Steve Hervey could put material into the record in support of the measure, in case it is challenged in court.

The Associated Press

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

Containers sit at the Port of Portland’s Terminal 6 in Portland on Friday. A federal judge Tuesday issued a 10-day order to end the labor dispute that has slowed down the port’s operations.

Longshoreman ordered to suspend slowdown By Steven DuBois The Associated Press

PORTLAND — A federal judge granted a temporary restraining order that requires longshoremen to end an illegal slowdown that has disrupted shipping at the Port of Portland and forced Northwest businesses to reroute cargo. Judge Michael Simon handed down the 10-day order Tuesday after learning that mediation failed to resolve a dispute between the unions representing longshoremen and electrical workers over duties that amount to two full-time jobs. Simon noted that 10 days isn’t a long time, and he urged the sides to continue negotiations. He said their disagreement will end, one way or another, but the economic damage — particularly if container shippers decide to permanently skip Portland — could be indefinite for the parties and the region. “It really is in your best interests, and the public’s, to end it sooner rather than later,” he said. The slowdown led the two main container-shipping lines that serve the port’s Terminal 6, Germany’s Hapag-Lloyd AG and South Korea’s Hanjin, to announce last month they were diverting ships to other ports. The International Longshore and Warehouse Union declined comment after the ruling. Simon had twice delayed acting on the National Labor Relations Board’s request for a temporary restraining order that would compel dockworkers to speed things up. To help broker a solution, he appointed former Oregon Gov. Ted Kulongoski to mediate. Kulongoski told the judge

Port dispute hits Snake River barges BOISE, Idaho — A unionon-union fight over whose members should plug in refrigerated shipping containers in Oregon has sent economic ripples 360 miles upstream to an Idaho port, where some customers have ditched river barges for trucks rather than wait out the uncertainty. Port of Lewiston manager David Doeringsfeld said the labor dispute between longshoremen and electrical workers at the Port of Portland is “definitely affecting container traffic” on the Snake River that would ordinarily be barged downstream to the Columbia River, then Portland. Some of Doeringsfeld’s customers from Idaho’s agriculture and wood-products industries have been concerned about whether container vessels will be loaded with their goods. As a result, they’ve pulled their Hanjin container business from the river and instead trucked cargo to ports on Washington state’s Puget Sound. “A customer may be forced with rolling over their delivery dates because their cargo didn’t get loaded, because it’s still sitting on docks,” Doeringsfeld said. “There are a fair

Tuesday there wasn’t enough time to get all the issues resolved: “I wish that I had a different message to deliver.” The dispute centers on the work of plugging and unplugging refrigerated shipping containers known as reefers, which the electrical workers have maintained for almost 40 years under a deal with the Port of Portland. The electrical workers, ICTSI and the Port of Portland announced Tuesday they will let the longshoremen have the jobs until the National Labor

number of Hanjin containers that are now going to be trucked to the Puget Sound, rather than go on the river.” Clearwater Paper, which makes pulp, tissue and paperboard at facilities in Lewiston, typically ships a small percentage of its products through the Port of Portland, via Lewiston’s river port. While this dispute continues, Clearwater is shifting some of those shipments to trucks bound for the Port of Tacoma, to make sure overseas deliveries stay on schedule, said Matt Van Vleet, a spokesman for the Spokane, Wash.-based company. Even though shipping by truck is typically more expensive than by river barge, producers such as Clearwater have concluded delivering their goods on time and according to contract is worth the extra money. In all, more than 1,000 regional businesses — including many lentil and pea growers, lumber mills and paper makers in Idaho — depend on the Port of Portland’s container terminal stricken by the work slowdown to get their goods to or from international markets. — The Associated Press

Relations Board, which held a hearing on the matter in May, issues a ruling on which union is entitled to the work. Ronald Hooks, regional director of the NLRB in Seattle, said a decision from Washington, D.C., could take weeks or months. Because the longshoremen have the jobs for now, ILWU attorney Rob Remar told the judge that the “underlying cause of the problems has been eliminated,” so the request for the temporary restraining order was moot.

O  B 

Fireworks blast blows off thumb PORTLAND — A Tualatin man’s right thumb was blown off Sunday when the fuse on fireworks burned faster than he expected and it went off in his hand. Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue rushed 27-year-old Curtis Januik to Legacy Emanuel Hospital where his thumb was reattached. He’s reported in fair condition KGW reports he told the Washington County Sheriff’s Office he bought the fireworks in Vancouver.

crab fishermen were rescued and a fourth is missing and presumed drowned after their boat went down off the Oregon Coast near Newport. Coast Guard spokesman Nathan Littlejohn said the search for the fourth crew member was suspended Tuesday afternoon. The other three fishermen were rescued after the Coast Guard responded early Tuesday morning to an emergency locator beacon from the fishing vessel Sound Leader about 2.5 miles off the coast.

Vancouver firm sues Crabber presumed I-5 bridge planners PORTLAND — Columbia drowned off coast River Crossing planners have NEWPORT — The Coast Guard says three

been sued over the proposed 95-foot height of a new Inter-

state 5 bridge between Vancouver and Portland. A Vancouver company that makes oil drilling rigs, Thompson Metal Fab, says the bridge would block the enormous steel products it barges down the river. The existing bridge’s lift span is 179 feet above. The Oregonian reports the lawsuit was filed before a July 3 deadline. Columbia River Crossing spokeswoman Many Putney says it’s still talking with Thompson and is confident of finding a solution. The Coast Guard and Corps of Engineers also say a 95foot-high bridge with no lift span is too low. Two environmental groups also sued the Columbia River Crossing. — From wire reports

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PORTLAND — The man accused of stabbing a 10-year-old in a fast food bathroom spent a tumultuous eight years in and out of jail since his release from prison in 2004. Adam Lee Brown was sentenced to 15 years in prison after Brown a notorious series of assaults in Roseburg in the early 1990s involving children. He was released after 11 years. There began a series of criminal incidents, major and minor, that culminated in a disturbing pattern of behavior. The behavior was reviewed by the Oregon Board of Parole and PostPrison Supervision, but because Brown was on postprison supervision, the board lacked the authority to return him to prison. “The parole board has no authority to return him to prison for any reason,” said board member Jeremiah Stromberg. “It would require a new conviction that requires a prison sentence. Violations of supervision with the resources we have is limited to local jail incarceration.” Brown was released to Douglas County’s probation system in 2004. In January 2011, he moved to Multnomah County and was put under its supervision. Multnomah County Probation, Parole and PostPrison Supervision spokesman Henry Stern said the county’s records on Brown are part of an investigation and not public record. Brown pleaded not guilty to Sunday’s attack. The boy he is accused of stabbing was released from the hospital Tuesday. The HIV-positive son of a church pastor, Brown was convicted in 1993 of three counts of first-degree sodomy, each involving a child. He pleaded no contest to reduced charges — the initial charges included attempted murder because of his HIV. At least nine children in the small logging town of Roseburg told police that Brown molested them. He was in prison from 1993-2004, earning three years off his 15-year sentence through accrued earned time. Less than one year after his release, Brown spent 75 days in jail for having contact with a minor. A Douglas County sheriff’s deputy said in 2005 Brown approached two girls, ages 8 and 9, on the way home from school and told one, “You’re pretty.” His most recent jail stint, from Jan. 15 to April 13 of this year, came after a host of charges, including firstdegree burglary. Brown entered a Portland U.S. Veterans Affairs clinic and grew irate when he was asked to leave the facility for being disruptive. Police believe he then hid in a bathroom at the clinic until staff left, then trashed the area and his case manager’s office.

www.smolichmotors.com

WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012

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The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

B  M C G B  J C  R  C

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

The Declaration of Independence I

n Congress, July 4, 1776. The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America. When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security. Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world. He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good. He has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his Assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them. He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the right of Representation in the Legislature, a right inestimable to them and formidable to tyrants only. He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of their public Records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures. He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people. He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the Legislative powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; the State remaining in the mean time exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within. He has endeavoured to prevent the population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migrations hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands. He has obstructed the Administration of Justice, by refusing his Assent to Laws for establishing Judiciary powers. He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone, for the tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries. He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harass our people, and eat out their substance. He has kept among us, in times of peace, Standing Armies without the Consent of our legislatures. He has affected to render the Military independent of and superior to the Civil power.

He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation: For Quartering large bodies of armed troops among us: For protecting them, by a mock Trial, from punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States: For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world: For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent: For depriving us in many cases, of the benefits of Trial by Jury: For transporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offences For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbouring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colonies: For taking away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable Laws, and altering fundamentally the Forms of our Governments: For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever. He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of his Protection and waging War against us. He has plundered our seas, ravaged our Coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people. He is at this time transporting large Armies of foreign Mercenaries to compleat the works of death, desolation and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of Cruelty & perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the Head of a civilized nation. He has constrained our fellow Citizens taken Captive on the high Seas to bear Arms against their Country, to become the executioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by their Hands. He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions. In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Redress in the most humble terms: Our repeated Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A Prince whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people. Nor have We been wanting in attentions to our British brethren. We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here. We have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our common kindred to disavow these usurpations, which, would inevitably interrupt our connections and correspondence. They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our Separation, and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, Enemies in War, in Peace Friends. We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.

Permanent solution for silt H By Dennis Sienko aving read and heard quite a bit about dredging the accumulated silt in Mirror Pond, I have come up with the perfect solution to the problem. A few things need to be understood by all. These include the facts that the residents of Bend will never permit this iconic piece of Bend to become a swampy marshland, that the silt has accumulated slowly over a period of decades, that the silt that has accumulated in Mirror Pond is just silt and not toxic waste, and that dredging the silt in one large operation is too expensive and would be opposed by some people with lawyers. My solution, the perfect solution, is to install a very smallscale dredging apparatus on the south side of the Greenwood Avenue bridge that would be capable of removing the silt at twice the rate that the silt is accumulating and that could be moved around the area of deepest silt accumulation. This apparatus could be completed submerged and not visible, except to fish, frogs and ducks. A relatively small pipeline — probably not more than a few inches in diameter, but that

IN MY VIEW

would have to be determined by a competent engineer — could run from the dredger intake to one of three or more places. The pipeline could simply run around the Pacific Power dam at the Greenwood Avenue bridge, further down the river past the next diversion dam; or to some downstream parcel of land onto which the dredged silt could be temporarily deposited. The problem of merely moving the silt around the Pacific Power dam is that the silt would accumulate at the next downstream diversion dam. That just moves the problem from Mirror Pond to the next diversion dam. Although it is a fact that all dams get silt behind them over time, nobody wants their dam to “silt up.� Making the pipeline long enough to get around that next diversion dam would be more expensive and would only move the silt further downstream to the next diversion dam. Depositing the dredged silt on a downstream parcel of land is also not going to be cheap, but the silt may have some value to farmers, home gardeners or to local landscaping companies

for topsoil — ever try to grow something in a lava bed like the ground in much of Bend? That might provide some revenue for this project. This mini-dredge could be run at full capacity for a number of years (perhaps with some project power from the Pacific Power dam) until enough silt was removed to assure the continued existence of Mirror Pond in an acceptable state and then run at a rate that moves newly accumulated silt out of Mirror Pond. Lots of Bend citizens would get behind this project financially, including me, which may help to get this project funded. I’m certain that the city, the Bend Park & Recreation District and Pacific Power would love to have a simple, cheap and elegant solution to this problem and would be able to find some funding for it. This plan has the advantage of being a long-term solution to the problem of accumulation of silt behind the Pacific Power dam, rather than a near-term fix — like a huge dredging project — that would have to be done again in a few decades. I await your congratulations and the appreciation of the citizens of Bend! — Dennis Sienko lives in Bend.

Letters policy

In My View policy How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin. com

Logic in Roberts’ ruling could overturn other acts of Congress By Jonathan Capehart The Washington Post

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assages in Chief Justice John Roberts’ opinion upholding the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act are beautiful in their view of the role of the Supreme Court. But they are also alarming in what they might mean for other acts of Congress that could come before the court. I’m thinking about the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act, which was passed by Congress and signed by President Bill Clinton. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 1st Circuit ruled in May that DOMA was unconstitutional because it denied same-sex couples who were married in Massachusetts, where same-sex marriage is legal, the same federal benefits granted to heterosexual married couples. There are questions about whether DOMA violates the Constitution’s guarantee of equal protection under the law. And the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit has ruled unconstitutional California’s Proposition 8, the voter-approved ban on same-sex marriage. A ruling from the high court on this case would apply only to California,

but it could have an impact on DOMA, depending on what the court says. President Barack Obama thinks DOMA is unconstitutional, and the administration stopped defending the discriminatory statute in court last year. But House Republicans keep fighting to preserve it. We won’t know until next term whether the Supreme Court will take up these issues. But in the wake of Roberts’ historic ruling, such a review has me concerned. The first six pages of National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius are an eloquent statement of the court’s power in settling disputes between those who like a particular law and those who loathe it. The ruling notes: “Our permissive reading of these powers is explained in part by a general reticence to invalidate the acts of the Nation’s elected leaders.... Members of this Court are vested with the authority to interpret the law; we possess neither the expertise nor the prerogative to make policy judgments. Those decisions are entrusted to our Nation’s elected leaders, who can be thrown out of office if the people disagree with

them. It is not our job to protect the people from the consequences of their political choices.� By this logic, the Roberts court would be disinclined to overturn DOMA. The fact that 30 states have constitutional amendments or statutes banning samesex marriage would seem to strengthen the court’s view. But right after the alarming paragraph came this: “Our deference in matters of policy cannot, however, become abdication in matters of law.... Our respect for Congress’s policy judgments thus can never extend so far as to disavow restraints on federal power that the Constitution carefully constructed.... And there can be no question that it is the responsibility of this Court to enforce the limits on federal power by striking down acts of Congress that transgress those limits.� DOMA clearly transgresses those limits. The president and the attorney general think so. All that’s missing is for the Supreme Court to deem it unconstitutional so that the 14th Amendment can apply to same-sex couples. — Jonathan Capehart is a columnist for The Washington Post.


WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

O D N  Evelyn Paullin March 6, 1922 - June 30, 2012

Ellen Joanna Shearer, of Prineville Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 541-416-9733 Services: In accordance with her wishes, no services will be held. Contributions may be made to:

Pioneer Memorial Hospice, 1201 NE Elm St., Prineville, OR 97754.

Nancy L. Fox, of Bend Sept. 14, 1917 - July 2, 2012 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: A private gathering will be held.

James A. Burr August 25, 1927 - June 29, 2012 Jim passed away surrounded by his family, following a car accident. Jim was born in Waunakee, Wisconsin, to Allen and Norma Burr. He met his beautiful wife, Leora Bowman, while in college. They were married on Sept. 4, 1949, in Pendleton, OR. Jim was highly reJames A. Burr spected for his contributions to Oregon Agriculture. He was inducted into the OSU Pioneers and the Professor Emeritus was awarded him for his contributions to his profession. Jim was an avid sports fan and especially enjoyed those involving his family members. He loved the OSU Beavers, his alma mater, and wearing his orange and black whenever possible. Jim devoted his life to the love of his family, his friends, and his Lord. He had an incredibly giving heart. He was very active within Trinity Episcopal Church and its ministries. Jim is survived by his wife, Lee, his children, Jay Burr, Laurie McCreery, Kent Burr and Terry Burr, 12 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. Service will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church Friday, July 6, at 5:00 p.m. Donations may be made at familykitchen.org in lieu of flowers. Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home was honored to serve the family. 541-382-2471.

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254 Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

E   Deaths of note from around the world: Ben Davidson, 72: Hulking defensive end who starred for the Oakland Raiders in the 1960s. Died Monday night. — From wire reports

Evelyn Paullin was born on March 6, 1922, to Frederick A. and Mary A. (Uffendell) Fitzpatrick in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. She passed away in Bend, OR, on June 30, 2012, at age 90. A public viewing at NiwongerReynolds Funeral Home, Evelyn Paullin July 4, 2012, from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church on 27th St., Thursday, July 5, 2012, at 10:30 a.m. Evelyn graduated from Sacramento, CA, High School in 1940. She later met and married David Warren Paullin, June 20, 1948, in Anchorage, AK. Evelyn worked for the Sacramento City Unified School District for 20-plus years as a secretary at Peter Lassen Jr. High School. She enjoyed hiking, cooking, travel and spending time with family. Evelyn is survived by her son, David G. Paullin of Sheridan, WY; son, Jeffrey N. Paullin of Battle Ground, WA; son, Thomas F. Paullin of El Dorado Hills, CA; eight grandchildren and one great-grandchild. She is preceded in death by her parents; brother, Earle Fitzpatrick; sisters, Gladys Meyers, and Winnifred Berg. The family has placed their trust in NiswongerReynolds Funeral Home for final arrangements. Please visit the on-line registry for the family at www.niswonger-reynolds. com

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OREGON NEWS

Agency helps track down life insurance policies By Ilene Aleshire The Register-Guard (Eugene)

The state Insurance Division has created a program to help people who are hunting for missing life insurance polices after a relative has died. “Each year, dozens of Oregonians who have lost a loved one call the Department of Consumer and Business Services for help locating missing life insurance policies that may name them as beneficiaries,� according to a statement from the Insurance Division. But, tracking down life insurance polices can be difficult when relatives not only don’t have a copy of any policy but may not even know the name of the company that issued it,

School bond Continued from C1 “The decisions that are made are going to be pretty large. The bottom line is, we’re going to be asking them to support what we arrive at, so their input is important,� Smith said. The potential move comes as the district’s existing construction bond — which paid for Crook County High School — will be repaid in early 2014. Currently, property owners pay about $1 for every $1,000 of assessed value on the bond that’s due to expire, according to the report. For the proposed new bond, one option is a $20.2 million bond that would

state officials said. “More than 300 companies sell life insurance or annuities in Oregon, and there is no central database of names and policies,� Insurance Division spokeswoman Cheryl Martinis said. The division has now posted a Life Insurance Finder Tool on its website that links people who are searching for policies with all the companies that sell life insurance and annuities in Oregon. “When people make a family member or friend a life insurance beneficiary, it is an act of care and kindness,� Acting Insurance Division Administrator Lou Savage said. “However, many people avoid talking about death or don’t make sure their financial records are in order. The result can be that

Find out more The school board will have a meeting from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday at Crook County High School. District representatives will present information about the bond options to the public and take questions. The meeting will start in the library and move to the auditorium.

last 15½ years, paying only for renovation work that would help the district’s buildings remain in use another 15 years. It would maintain the current level of $1 for every $1,000 of assessed value.

their loved ones do not receive the intended benefits.� The Insurance Division electronically forwards the request to all of the insurers that sell life insurance or annuities in Oregon. It also sends the person who is searching for a policy a link to a Web page where he or she can find the results of the insurers’ searches. Companies have 60 days to search their databases and report the outcome as “no policy found,� “active,� or “inactive� or “pending,� which means a company hasn’t yet searched its database. If a company response still shows pending after 60 days, consumers may file a complaint with the consumer advocacy section of the Insurance Division and an advocate will look into the issue.

The improvements are wide-ranging and include items like plumbing and electrical upgrades, new flooring, modernized classrooms and asbestos removal. The second option is a $16 million bond that would last 12½ years. It would renovate all facilities, but the work on two elementary schools — Ochoco and Crooked River — would only be enough for those two buildings to remain in use for another five years. The renovations on other schools would have the goal of making them last another 15 years. Like the first option, this bond would be aimed at keeping property taxes unchanged. But because of the limited work, the district would need voter approval of a second

Jaguar rolls from Walmart across busy state highway The Associated Press WEST LINN — Police in the Portland suburb of West Linn say while the driver of a late-model Jaguar parked in the Walmart parking lot, his car had its own agenda. Sgt. Neil Hennelly says the driver apparently forgot to set the parking brake. The Oregonian reports that the car rolled out of the lot Tuesday, crossed busy State Highway 43 without hitting anything and stopped after hitting a pipe protecting the pumps at a nearby gas station. As Hennelly put it: “The driver went to Walmart, but his car went to the Chevron station across the street.� No one was hurt.

bond in five years to replace Ochoco and Crooked River elementaries with a new facility. The third option would bring a new school building to the district. It’s a $30 million bond that would last for 20½ years. It would come with more property taxes — about $1.20 for every $1,000 of assessed value instead of $1. Under that option, a new elementary school built for 600 students would replace Ochoco and Crooked River schools in two years. The other schools would get improvements that would provide another 15 years of life. If the board decides to pursue a bond, it would likely go to voters in either November or May 2013. — Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

Griffith: From humble beginnings to TV legend By Douglas Martin New York Times News Service

Andy Griffith, an actor whose folksy Southern manner charmed audiences for more than 50 years on Broadway, in movies, on records and especially on television, died Tuesday at his home on Roanoke Island in North Carolina. He was 86. His death was confirmed by the Dare County sheriff, Doug Doughtie. Griffith was already a star, with rave reviews on Broadway in “No Time for Sergeants� and in Elia Kazan’s film “A Face in the Crowd,� when “The Andy Griffith Show� made its debut in the fall of 1960. And he delighted a later generation of television viewers in the 1980s and ’90s in the title role of the courtroom drama “Matlock.� But his fame was never as great as it was in the 1960s, when he starred for eight years as Andy Taylor, the sagacious sheriff of the make-believe Southern town of Mayberry, running weekly herd on a collection of eccentrics like his ineffectual deputy, Barney Fife, and the simple-minded gas station attendant Gomer Pyle while, as a widower, patiently raising a young son, Opie. “The Andy Griffith Show,� seen Monday nights on CBS, was No. 4 in the Nielsen ratings its first year and never fell below the Top 10. It was No. 1 in 1968, its last season. After the run ended with Episode No. 249, the show lived on in a spinoff series, endless reruns and even Sunday school classes organized around its rustic moral lessons. But by the late 1960s, the younger viewers networks prized were spurning cornpone, and Griffith had decided to leave to make movies after the 1966-67 season. CBS made a lucrative offer for him to do one more season, and “The Andy Griffith Show� became the No. 1 series in the 1967-68 season. But Griffith had decided to move on, and so had the zeitgeist. “Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In,� with its one-liners about drugs and Vietnam, and “The Mod Squad,� about an integrated police force, were grabbing a new generation of viewers. But the characters in “The Andy Griffith Show� — Barney (Don Knotts), Gomer (Jim

The Associated Press file photo

Actor Andy Griffith sits in front of a bronze statue of Andy and Opie from the “Andy Griffith Show,� after the unveiling ceremony in Raleigh, N.C., in October 2003. Griffith, 86, whose homespun mix of humor and wisdom made “The Andy Griffith Show� an enduring TV favorite, died Tuesday in Manteo, N.C.

Nabors), Opie (Ron Howard), Aunt Bee (Frances Bavier) and the rest, including Gomer’s cousin Goober Pyle (George Lindsey, who died in May) — remained tantalizingly real to enthusiasts who still gather online and sometimes in person in fan clubs to watch reruns. Griffith’s fans may have imagined him as a happy bumpkin, but he enjoyed life in Hollywood and knew his way around a wine list. His career was controlled by a personal manager, Richard Linke, who forbade Griffith to solicit advice from anyone else, even his wife. “If there is ever a question about something, I will do what he wants me to do,� Griffith said in an interview with The New York Times Magazine in 1970. “Had it not been for him, I would have gone down the toilet.� Far from the relaxed, gregarious, drawling Andy Taylor, Griffith was a loner and a worrier. He once hit a door in anger, and for two episodes of the second season of “The Andy Griffith Show� he had a bandaged hand (explained on the show as an injury Sheriff Taylor sustained while apprehending criminals). But the 35 million viewers

FEATUR ED OBITUARY of “The Andy Griffith Show� would have been reassured to learn that even at the peak of his popularity, Griffith drove a Ford station wagon and bought his suits off the rack. He said his favorite honor was having a 10-mile stretch of a North Carolina highway named after him in 2002. (That was before President George W. Bush presented him with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2005.) Another honor was having his character place No. 8 on TV Guide’s list of the “50 Greatest TV Dads of All Time� in 2004. (Bill Cosby’s Dr. Cliff Huxtable was No. 1.) But one honor that was denied him was an Emmy Award: Surprisingly, he was nominated only once, for his role in the TV movie “Murder in Texas,� although Knotts won five Emmys as Deputy Fife on “The Andy Griffith Show� and Bavier won one as Andy’s aunt. The show itself was nominated three times but also never won. Andy Samuel Griffith was born in Mount Airy on June 1, 1926, the only child of Carl Lee and the former Geneva Nann Nunn. His father was a foreman at a furniture factory. Griffith described his childhood as

happy but said he never forgot the pain he felt when someone called him “white trash.� After seeing the trombonist Jack Teagarden in the 1941 film “Birth of the Blues,� he bought a trombone from Sears, Roebuck & Co. with money he earned sweeping out the high school for $6 a month. He wheedled lessons out of a local pastor, who later recommended him to the University of North Carolina, where he won a music degree and married Barbara Edwards. He moved on from the trombone to singing, and for a while hoped to be an opera singer. After first aspiring to be a minister, he tried teaching music and phonetics at the high school in Goldsboro, N.C., but left after three frustrating years. “First day, I’d tell the class all I knew,� he told The Saturday Evening Post, “and there was nothin’ left to say for the rest o’ the semester.� In spare moments, Griffith and his wife put together an act in which he posed as a preacher, telling jokes about things like putting frogs in the baptismal water, and she danced. They played local civic clubs. In 1953, speaking to a convention of the Standard Life

Insurance Co. in Greensboro, Griffith, in his preacher persona, told a comic first-person tale about attending a college football game and trying to figure out what was going on. Some 500 discs of his monologue were pressed under the title “What It Was, Was Football,� and it became a hit on local radio. Linke, then with Capitol Records, scurried to North Carolina to acquire the rights and to sign Griffith. Linke began guiding Griffith’s career in television and nightclubs. His break came in 1955, when he was cast in the Broadway play “No Time for Sergeants� as a mountain yokel drafted into the Air Force — a role he had already played on television, on an episode of “Playhouse 90.� The New York JournalAmerican called him “an engaging and brilliant natural,� and the play was a hit, running for almost two years. He played the same role in the 1958 film version, with what Bosley Crowther of The Times admiringly called “staggering simplicity.� The pilot of “The Andy Griffith Show� was actually an episode of “The Danny Thomas Show� in February 1960. Danny Williams (Thomas) is arrested by a sheriff for running through a stop sign while driving through Mayberry. Williams baits the rural sheriff, calling him “hayseed� and “Clem.� “The name ain’t Clem, it’s Andy, Sheriff Andy Taylor!� Griffith responds. Sheldon Leonard, producer of Thomas’ show, intended “The Andy Griffith Show� to fit the image of its star. Griffith negotiated for 50 percent ownership, which enabled him to be a major player in the show’s development. One thing that always bothered Griffith was people’s assumption that his depiction of Sheriff Taylor was him pretty much playing himself. He said he not only threw himself into creating a textured persona for the small-town lawman, but also helped write almost every episode — though he didn’t receive writing credit. “You’re supposed to believe in the character,� Griffith said. “You’re not supposed to think, ‘Gee, Andy’s acting up a storm.’ �


THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012

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W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, JULY 4

THURSDAY

Today: Mainly sunny and mild.

LOW

76

44

Astoria

65/51

Seaside

61/52

Cannon Beach 61/51

81/53

74/50

68/50

Lincoln City

Salem

63/49

81/47

Corvallis Yachats Florence 66/47

Prineville Sisters Redmond 76/41 78/42 Sunriver Bend

Eugene 75/48

Coos Bay

74/39

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

75/41

75/48

Crescent

Roseburg

65/48

Gold Beach

80/48

79/50

Paulina 71/39

Vale 88/59

Brothers 75/38 Hampton 73/39

Juntura

Burns 81/46

JordanValley Rome

Klamath Falls 81/46

Ashland

74/51

Rome

77/45

85/54

Brookings

• 85°

90/52

81/49

Chiloquin

Medford

61/49

Yesterday’s state extremes

88/51

Paisley

83/52

83/51

Frenchglen

82/43

Grants Pass

EAST Ontario Mostly sunny 88/60 and pleasant conditions can be Nyssa expected. 86/58

88/51

76/40

Riley

77/41

Silver Lake

73/36

Port Orford 65/47

Unity

Christmas Valley

Chemult

79/53

79/47

John Day

75/43

Fort Rock 76/40

73/37

68/32

Bandon

76/44

La Pine 75/38

Crescent Lake

63/48

69/42

Baker City

79/45

73/39

64/52

76/49

Mitchell 77/44

WEST Coastal clouds early; otherwise, skies will be mostly sunny. CENTRAL Mostly sunny and pleasant conditions can be expected.

75/46

Union

Granite Spray80/50

Madras

Camp Sherman

76/49

74/45

Joseph

76/49

72/51

Warm Springs

77/49

Enterprise

Meacham

La Grande

Condon 80/46

Albany

Newport

74/50

Willowdale

69/43

69/45

79/53

75/50

62/49

82/51

Ruggs

Maupin

Wallowa

Pendleton

81/56

76/52

Government Camp 64/45

74/51

Hermiston81/54

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy 75/51

McMinnville

80/54

The Biggs Dalles 78/56

79/53

Hillsboro Portland 76/53

Tillamook

Umatilla

Hood River

79/51

• 43°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

90/56

82/47

Lakeview

92/50

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes

Needles, Calif.

• 37° Angel Fire, N.M.

• 1.60” Macon, Ga.

Honolulu 87/74

0s

Vancouver 66/50

(in the 48 contiguous states):

• 106°

-10s

10s

20s

Calgary 70/44

Saskatoon 78/52

40s

50s

60s

Winnipeg 84/59 Thunder Bay 89/62

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 79/60

Bismarck 85/62

Billings 88/62

Portland 76/53 Boise 87/55

Halifax 75/53 Portland 77/63

Green Bay Boston To ronto 94/71 82/70 91/63 Bufal o St. Paul Detroit 83/67 New York 100/81 97/73 90/77 Des Moines Philadelphia Columbus 99/77 Chicago 95/73 94/77 Cheyenne 102/76 Omaha San Francisco 89/62 Salt Lak e Washington, D. C. 101/77 70/53 City 96/77 Las Denver Louisville 95/75 Kansas City Vegas 95/67 100/78 101/77 St. Louis 97/81 Charlotte 104/77 96/72 Albuquerque Los Angeles Nashville Little Rock 92/72 71/62 96/73 99/73 Phoenix Oklahoma City Atlanta 103/76 94/82 Birmingham 95/74 Dallas Tijuana 94/74 96/76 72/57 Rapid City 90/67

Houston 93/77

Chihuahua 95/70

Anchorage 58/48

La Paz 90/68 Juneau 60/46

Mazatlan 88/78

New Orleans 92/80

Orlando 94/73 Miami 89/79

Monterrey 96/75

FRONTS

HIGH LOW

89 55

90 56

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .7:41 a.m. . . . . 10:06 p.m. Venus . . . . . .3:26 a.m. . . . . . 5:53 p.m. Mars. . . . . .12:11 p.m. . . . . 12:17 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . .2:56 a.m. . . . . . 5:50 p.m. Saturn. . . . . .1:59 p.m. . . . . . 1:16 a.m. Uranus . . . .12:29 a.m. . . . . 12:55 p.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68/49 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.02” Record high . . . . . . . . 98 in 1942 Average month to date. . . 0.05” Record low. . . . . . . . . 29 in 1962 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.51” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Average year to date. . . . . 5.77” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.30.07 Record 24 hours . . .0.35 in 1982 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today. . . . . . 5:28 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:51 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:29 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:51 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 9:28 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 6:40 a.m.

Moon phases Last

New

First

July 10 July 18 July 26

OREGON CITIES

Full

Aug. 1

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Wednesday Thursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.......NA Bend, east of Hwy. 97........NA Redmond/Madras ..........NA

Astoria . . . . . . . .62/52/0.11 Baker City . . . . . .74/50/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .67/53/0.00 Burns. . . . . . . . . .77/48/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .72/54/0.00 Klamath Falls . . .76/45/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .79/43/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .68/46/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .80/58/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .61/54/0.02 North Bend . . . . . .63/55/NA Ontario . . . . . . . .87/63/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .74/54/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .68/55/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .65/43/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .69/39/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .71/57/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .68/54/0.01 Sisters . . . . . . . . .66/49/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .72/58/0.00

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . .65/51/pc . . . . .65/52/pc . . . . .79/47/s . . . . . .84/49/s . . . . .74/51/s . . . . . .62/52/s . . . . .83/45/s . . . . . .85/47/s . . . . .75/48/s . . . . . .75/51/s . . . . .81/46/s . . . . . .81/46/s . . . . .82/47/s . . . . . .83/50/s . . . . .75/38/s . . . . . .79/43/s . . . . .85/54/s . . . . . .86/55/s . . . . .62/49/s . . . . .62/50/pc . . . . .63/49/s . . . . . .65/52/s . . . . .88/60/s . . . . . .94/62/s . . . . .82/51/s . . . . . .88/56/s . . . . .76/53/s . . . . . .78/55/s . . . . .75/43/s . . . . . .82/49/s . . . . .80/45/s . . . . . .84/48/s . . . . .79/53/s . . . . .79/55/pc . . . . .75/50/s . . . . . .76/52/s . . . . .76/41/s . . . . . .78/45/s . . . . .81/53/s . . . . . .87/58/s

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT Sisters .................................NA La Pine.................................NA Prineville............................NA

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 44,031 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182,298 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 79,651 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 36,810 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130,364 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 488 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . 1,310 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . 117 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90.9 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 1,840 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . 17 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 222 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 121 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 90.9 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 8

POLLEN COUNT

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL 30s

Seattle 70/52

HIGH LOW

85 51

Mostly sunny, very warm, a few storms possible.

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

HIGH LOW

82 48

SUNDAY Mainly sunny and very warm.

Mostly sunny and warm.

HIGH LOW

FORECAST: STATE

SATURDAY

Mostly sunny and warmer.

Tonight: Mainly clear and not as cold.

HIGH

FRIDAY

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .96/73/0.00 . .96/73/pc . 96/74/pc Akron . . . . . . . . . .85/69/0.17 . . . 91/69/t . 93/68/pc Albany. . . . . . . . . .87/62/0.00 . . . 90/67/t . . 87/62/s Albuquerque. . . . .94/68/0.00 . . . 92/72/t . . .87/69/t Anchorage . . . . . .56/49/0.01 . .58/48/sh . 63/49/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . . .99/71/0.04 . . . 95/74/t . 95/76/pc Atlantic City . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . . 90/73/t . . 90/74/s Austin . . . . . . . . . .97/69/0.00 . .97/75/pc . 97/74/pc Baltimore . . . . . . .96/67/0.00 . . . 95/76/t . 98/73/pc Billings . . . . . . . .103/61/0.00 . . . 88/62/s . . 91/63/s Birmingham . . . . .97/75/0.00 . . . 94/74/t . . .95/75/t Bismarck. . . . . . . .97/63/0.00 . .85/62/pc . . 86/65/s Boise . . . . . . . . . . .84/67/0.00 . . . 87/55/s . . 91/56/s Boston. . . . . . . . . .86/69/0.00 . . . 82/70/t . 86/67/pc Bridgeport, CT. . . .84/65/0.00 . . . 86/71/t . . 87/70/s Buffalo . . . . . . . . .88/62/0.05 . . . 83/67/t . . 83/65/s Burlington, VT. . . .84/57/0.00 . . . 89/66/t . 83/64/pc Caribou, ME . . . . .78/55/0.00 . . . 78/62/t . 76/58/sh Charleston, SC . . .94/76/0.00 . .93/77/pc . . .92/76/t Charlotte. . . . . . . .97/70/0.00 . . . 96/72/t . . .96/73/t Chattanooga. . . .100/70/0.00 . . . 94/69/t . . .95/73/t Cheyenne . . . . . . .92/60/0.00 . .89/62/pc . . .89/61/t Chicago. . . . . . . . .96/77/0.00 102/76/pc 101/77/pc Cincinnati . . . . . . .95/71/0.00 . .96/72/pc . 96/73/pc Cleveland . . . . . . .85/69/1.33 . . . 90/75/t . . 91/70/s Colorado Springs . .95/67/NA . .91/64/pc . . .89/63/t Columbia, MO . .101/71/0.00 . .102/75/s . 101/76/s Columbia, SC . . .104/73/0.00 . . . 97/76/t . . .97/75/t Columbus, GA. . . .96/72/0.60 . . . 95/73/t . . .94/76/t Columbus, OH. . . .95/71/0.00 . . . 95/73/t . 96/72/pc Concord, NH. . . . .84/55/0.00 . . . 83/63/t . 85/61/pc Corpus Christi. . . .94/77/0.00 . .91/79/pc . 90/79/pc Dallas Ft Worth. . .97/77/0.00 . .96/76/pc . 97/77/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .96/73/0.00 . . . 95/73/t . 94/72/pc Denver. . . . . . . . . .96/63/0.03 . .95/67/pc . . .95/68/t Des Moines. . . . . .99/76/0.00 . . . 99/77/s . . 99/77/s Detroit. . . . . . . . . .85/73/0.41 . . . 97/73/t . . 91/75/s Duluth. . . . . . . . . .90/66/0.25 . . . 76/67/t . . .86/68/t El Paso. . . . . . . . . .96/78/0.00 . . . 89/70/t . . .89/74/t Fairbanks. . . . . . . .62/54/0.12 . . .71/47/c . . 75/51/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .93/67/0.00 . . . 98/69/t . 89/68/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . . .82/54/0.00 . . . 75/52/t . . .76/53/t

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .96/76/0.03 . .94/72/pc . 96/75/pc Green Bay. . . . . . .91/68/0.28 . .94/71/pc . 96/74/pc Greensboro. . . . . .95/74/0.00 . . . 94/73/t . 93/74/pc Harrisburg. . . . . . .93/63/0.00 . . . 92/70/t . 95/73/pc Hartford, CT . . . . .87/63/0.00 . . . 89/69/t . . 89/65/s Helena. . . . . . . . . .83/56/0.00 . . . 83/51/s . . 88/57/s Honolulu. . . . . . . .80/72/0.05 . . . 87/74/s . . 86/74/s Houston . . . . . . . .93/74/0.00 . .93/77/pc . 94/75/pc Huntsville . . . . . .101/74/0.00 . . . 94/71/t . . .94/73/t Indianapolis . . . . .98/72/0.00 . .99/76/pc . 99/76/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .99/71/0.00 . . . 97/74/t . . .97/73/t Jacksonville. . . . . .95/72/0.29 . .94/73/pc . . .93/74/t Juneau. . . . . . . . . .55/47/0.00 . . .60/46/c . . 59/46/c Kansas City. . . . .100/77/0.00 . .101/77/s . 100/78/s Lansing . . . . . . . . .95/74/0.00 . .93/71/pc . 94/74/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .104/81/0.00 . .97/81/pc . 97/80/pc Lexington . . . . . . .95/68/0.00 . . . 97/74/t . 96/75/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .98/73/0.00 . . . 99/76/s . . 99/76/s Little Rock. . . . . .103/78/0.00 . .99/73/pc 100/76/pc Los Angeles. . . . . .71/63/0.00 . . . 71/62/s . . 70/63/s Louisville. . . . . . . .97/73/0.00 100/78/pc 100/77/pc Madison, WI . . . . .96/78/0.00 . .98/76/pc . 99/77/pc Memphis. . . . . . . .98/76/0.00 . .99/80/pc . 100/81/t Miami . . . . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . . 89/79/t . . .90/78/t Milwaukee . . . . . .97/73/0.07 . .93/76/pc . 84/75/pc Minneapolis . . . . .97/68/0.05 100/81/pc . 100/76/t Nashville. . . . . . . .99/72/0.00 . .96/73/pc . . .98/76/t New Orleans. . . . .96/77/0.00 . . . 92/80/t . . .90/76/t New York . . . . . . .89/71/0.00 . . . 90/77/t . . 93/73/s Newark, NJ . . . . . .95/71/0.00 . . . 93/76/t . . 93/72/s Norfolk, VA . . . . . .92/73/0.00 . . . 94/74/t . 95/74/pc Oklahoma City . . .97/76/0.00 103/76/pc . 98/73/pc Omaha . . . . . . . . .99/77/0.00 . .101/77/s . 100/77/s Orlando. . . . . . . . .95/74/0.00 . . . 94/73/t . . .93/74/t Palm Springs. . . .100/76/0.00 . .98/72/pc . 102/73/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .97/69/0.00 . .100/76/s . . 99/76/s Philadelphia . . . . .94/70/0.00 . . . 94/77/t . . 97/74/s Phoenix. . . . . . . .100/86/0.00 . . . 94/82/t 102/84/pc Pittsburgh. . . . . . .90/65/0.00 . . . 90/69/t . . 92/69/s Portland, ME. . . . .82/60/0.00 . . . 77/63/t . 80/63/pc Providence . . . . . .85/62/0.00 . . . 84/71/t . . 89/66/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .101/74/0.00 . . . 96/72/t . . .96/73/t

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City. . . . . .103/61/0.00 . .90/67/pc . 90/67/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . . .94/61/0.00 . . . 93/59/s . . 91/59/s Richmond . . . . . . .94/71/0.00 . . . 95/73/t . 97/73/pc Rochester, NY . . . .87/61/0.00 . . . 88/69/t . . 86/64/s Sacramento. . . . . .92/56/0.00 . . . 96/58/s . . 93/57/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .101/76/0.00 104/77/pc 103/79/pc Salt Lake City . . .100/73/0.00 . . . 95/75/s . . 89/72/c San Antonio . . . . .96/75/0.00 . .95/75/pc . 96/75/pc San Diego . . . . . . .68/62/0.00 . .68/63/pc . . 68/63/s San Francisco . . . .69/55/0.00 . . . 74/54/s . . 72/54/s San Jose . . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . . . 84/55/s . . 81/55/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .90/58/0.00 . .87/64/pc . . .85/62/t

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .96/75/0.00 . .94/76/pc . . .94/74/t Seattle. . . . . . . . . .64/53/0.31 . .70/52/pc . . 73/53/s Sioux Falls. . . . . . .97/76/0.00 . . . 99/74/s . . .97/74/t Spokane . . . . . . . 68/55/trace . . . 72/51/s . . 81/57/s Springfield, MO . .96/72/0.00 . .98/71/pc . . 98/75/s Tampa. . . . . . . . . .90/78/0.00 . . . 91/77/t . . .91/77/t Tucson. . . . . . . . . .94/77/0.00 . . . 88/72/t . . .95/75/t Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .98/78/0.00 101/74/pc 101/75/pc Washington, DC . .98/76/0.00 . . . 96/77/t . 99/78/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .100/75/0.00 100/74/pc 101/77/pc Yakima . . . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . . . 78/51/s . . 85/56/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . . .93/80/0.00 102/78/pc . 104/77/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .73/59/0.00 . .77/63/sh . 75/61/sh Athens. . . . . . . . . .84/71/0.00 . . . 93/72/s . . 93/78/s Auckland. . . . . . . .57/45/0.00 . .63/49/sh . 57/50/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .113/81/0.00 . .106/78/s . 106/76/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .93/79/0.00 . . . 89/75/t . . .91/77/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .97/68/0.00 . . . 95/78/t . . .88/74/t Beirut . . . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . . 84/76/s . . 85/76/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . .76/58/pc . . .81/62/t Bogota . . . . . . . . .64/43/0.00 . .64/49/sh . 63/50/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .97/68/0.00 . . . 92/69/t . 94/70/pc Buenos Aires. . . . .55/39/0.00 . .51/37/sh . 52/36/pc Cabo San Lucas . .93/73/0.00 . .89/75/pc . . 91/75/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .95/75/0.00 . . . 94/72/s . . 95/73/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . . . 70/44/s . . 72/46/s Cancun . . . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . . . 87/76/t . . .88/76/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .63/55/0.00 . .68/56/sh . 67/54/sh Edinburgh. . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . .67/59/sh . 65/56/sh Geneva . . . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . . . 83/65/t . . .75/61/t Harare. . . . . . . . . .73/46/0.00 . . . 70/45/s . . 71/43/s Hong Kong . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . .89/80/pc . . .91/81/t Istanbul. . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . . . 90/74/s . . 88/74/s Jerusalem . . . . . . .83/66/0.00 . . . 83/65/s . . 86/66/s Johannesburg. . . .68/48/0.00 . . . 69/45/s . . 68/43/s Lima . . . . . . . . . . .70/66/0.00 . .71/64/pc . 70/64/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . .73/61/pc . . 74/60/s London . . . . . . . . .66/59/0.00 . . . 71/59/r . 70/56/sh Madrid . . . . . . . . .93/61/0.00 . .92/64/pc . . 86/62/s Manila. . . . . . . . . .79/75/0.00 . . . 84/77/t . . .87/78/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .109/88/0.00 110/86/pc . 109/84/s Mexico City. . . . . .73/55/0.15 . . . 72/57/t . . .74/56/t Montreal. . . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . . . 87/63/t . 79/63/pc Moscow . . . . . . . .75/63/0.00 . .81/65/pc . . .81/64/t Nairobi . . . . . . . . .73/52/0.00 . . . 74/57/t . 72/54/sh Nassau . . . . . . . . .95/81/0.00 . . . 91/80/t . . .91/79/t New Delhi. . . . . .104/88/0.00 109/89/pc 104/87/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . . .77/68/0.00 . . . 86/74/t . . .82/73/t Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . . .68/54/c . 72/55/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . . .86/55/0.00 . . . 89/59/t . . 81/62/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . . . 75/61/t . 70/55/pc Rio de Janeiro. . . .90/66/0.00 . . . 82/65/s . . 83/64/s Rome. . . . . . . . . . .82/68/0.00 . .88/65/pc . . 87/66/s Santiago . . . . . . . .52/32/0.00 . .49/39/sh . . 52/40/s Sao Paulo . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . . . 76/55/s . . 75/56/s Sapporo . . . . . . . .64/64/0.00 . . . 76/66/t . . .75/66/t Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .77/73/0.00 . . . 86/73/t . . .84/72/t Shanghai. . . . . . . .97/79/0.00 . . . 94/79/t . 97/80/pc Singapore . . . . . . .84/77/0.00 . . . 87/79/t . . .83/78/t Stockholm. . . . . . .73/55/0.00 . .70/55/pc . 72/55/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . . .55/46/0.00 . .61/46/pc . 59/49/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .95/79/0.00 . .92/80/pc . 93/80/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . . . 86/73/s . . 88/74/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .75/70/0.00 . . . 81/71/t . . .83/72/t Toronto . . . . . . . . .81/68/0.00 . . . 91/63/t . . 82/68/s Vancouver. . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . .66/50/pc . 70/52/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . . .97/66/0.00 . .85/68/pc . 87/69/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . . .88/66/0.00 . .87/66/pc . 90/70/pc


SPORTS

D

Scoreboard, D2 NFL, D3 Basketball, D2 MLB, D4 Cycling, D3 Golf, D5, D6 Tennis, D3

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

Youngest gymnast on U.S. squad growing up quickly

WCL BASEBALL Elks win with six-run inning The Bend Elks scored six runs in the sixth inning to defeat the Kelowna Falcons 8-3 on Tuesday night in a West Coast League baseball game at Vince Genna Stadium. The Elks (11-12 WCL) trailed 3-2 entering the sixth inning, but they would bat around in taking command of the game. Tommy Pluschkell opened the inning with a double and would score after a single by Shawn O’Brien and an error by the Kelowna defense. Jordan Copeland and Kyle Gallegos contributed RBI singles in the inning, and Steven Halcomb added a tworun base hit. Six Elks had more than one hit in the game, with Copeland going four for four. O’Brien, Gallegos, Halcomb, Grant Newton and Bo Walter all had a pair of hits. Gallegos staked the Elks to a 2-0 lead in the second inning with a two-run single. Bend’s Josh McAlister got the win after pitching one inning of scoreless relief. The Elks gave up 13 hits, but only allowed Kelowna to score in the third inning. The final game of the series is set to take place today at 6:35 p.m. After the game, fans are invited to watch fireworks from the outfield grass.

OLYMPICS

By Will Graves The Associated Press

Gregory Bull / The Associated Press

Kyla Ross performs on the balance beam during the final round of the women’s Olympic gymnastics trials, Sunday in San Jose, Calif.

SAN JOSE, Calif. — The cramped room inside H.P. Pavilion turned into a sobbing, mascara-running free-for-all moments after the U.S. women’s gymnastics team was announced Sunday night. World champion Jordyn Wieber wept. So did Olympic trials winner Gabby Douglas. Ditto McKayla Maroney and Aly Raisman. Not Kyla Ross. No, the youngest member of the five-person team the U.S. will

send to London in three weeks smiled. She hugged. She shook with excitement. Her cheeks, however, remained tear-free. “They were trying to get me to,� the 15-year-old said with a laugh Monday. “They were all like, ‘Come on, Kyla.’� Maroney, whom Ross has known for a decade while growing up in Aliso Viejo, Calif., knew it was useless. See Gymnast / D5

— From wire reports

CYCLING

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

James Bowles, a 3-year-old from Bend, tees off Tuesday from Widgi Creek Golf Club’s new green tees. The Bend course’s 3,700-yard set of tees is one of many Central Oregon contributions to the PGA of America’s Golf 2.0 initiative. Peter Sagan crosses the finish line to win the third stage of the Tour de France.

Tour de France at a glance BOULOGNE-SURMER, France — A brief look at Tuesday’s third stage of the 99th Tour de France: Stage: A 122-mile trek from Orchies to Boulogne-sur-Mer on the English Channel, featuring five small climbs in the last 35 kilometers. Winner: Peter Sagan of Slovakia bolted from the pack along the uphill finish and won ahead of Edvald Boasson Hagen of Norway in second and Peter Velits of Slovakia in third. Yellow Jersey: Fabian Cancellara of Switzerland. The Swiss rider leads Bradley Wiggins of Britain by 7 seconds overall. Defending champ Cadel Evans of Australia is seventh, 17 seconds off the pace. Horner watch: Bend’s Chris Horner finished in 56th place on Tuesday for team RadioShack-Nissan. Horner is currently in 47th place overall. Stat of the Day: 3 — The number of riders who dropped out because of crashes on Tuesday: Jose Joaquin Rojas of Spain, Kanstantsin Sivtsov of Belarus and Maarten Tjallingii of the Netherlands. Today’s fourth stage: Riders set off on another bumpy ride along several hills, a 132-mile jaunt from Abbeville to Rouen in the heart of Normandy. For a related story, see D3. — The Associated Press

Golf 2.0 is on the way • Central Oregon courses are implementing the PGA program to help grow the game By Zack Hall The Bulletin

The first tee at Bend’s Widgi Creek Golf Club is a short par 4 by any standard. And all looks normal from the back tee at first glance. Ahead is the blue tee. Then the white. And a few more yards ahead sits the gold tee. But against a backdrop of towering pines off in the distance is something new. Something even shorter. Widgi Creek’s recently opened green tee lies some 100 yards ahead of the hole’s 343yard back tee. At 3,700 yards for 18 holes, Widgi’s

TEE TO GREEN green tees are among the shortest in the region. And that is no mistake. “We think this is going to be a great way for higher handicappers, shorter hitters, juniors and beginners to get into the game and enjoy it more,� says Dan Ostrin, Widgi Creek’s head professional. Such tees are becoming more common throughout the region.

After all, Widgi Creek is but one Central Oregon golf course that is implementing some or all of the PGA’s Golf 2.0 program, introduced with the hope of substantially growing the game. Golf 2.0 was first announced last year and was formally launched in January. Since then, it has been the talk of the industry. The idea is to get core golfers to play more, bring back “lapsed� golfers, and attract new players to game, according to the PGA, with the goal of increasing the number of U.S. golfers from the current 26 million to 40 million by 2020. See 2.0 / D6

GOLF: WOMEN’S U.S. OPEN

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Asians now a dominant force • Golf took off in many countries in Asia after Se Ri Pak won the U.S. Women’s Open in 1998

April L. Brown / The Associated Press

Top-ranked Yani Tseng, of Taiwan, will be one of the favorites when the U.S. Women’s Open takes place in Kohler, Wis., this weekend.

The Associated Press KOHLER, Wis. — Se Ri Pak admits it has not been easy being a legend in South Korea. Pak’s victory in the 1998 U.S. Women’s Open at Blackwolf Run in Kohler inspired South Korean women golfers, and in the 14 years since, their fine play has transformed the LPGA. During a news conference Tuesday for the 2012 Open, which begins Thursday, Pak said she has always worried about whether she was handling her status the right way. “It’s everybody. They say, ‘I’m playing golf because of Se Ri,’ � Pak said of her fellow South Koreans. “I had a lot of pressure because I don’t know (if) I’m leading the right way. That was the biggest (concern). Now I feel really proud and very happy. I’m very proud of them, of my country.� See Asians / D5

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D2

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION Today

Thursday

TENNIS 5 a.m.: Wimbledon, men’s quarterfinal, ESPN. CYCLING 5 a.m.: Tour de France, Stage 4, NBC Sports Network. BASEBALL 8 a.m.: MLB, San Francisco Giants at Washington Nationals, MLB Network. Noon: MLB, New York Yankees at Tampa Bay Rays or Boston Red Sox at Oakland Athletics, MLB Network. 1 p.m.: MLB, Baltimore Orioles at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. 4 p.m.: MLB, Texas Rangers at Chicago White Sox, ESPN. COMPETITIVE EATING Noon: 2012 Hot Dog Eating Contest, ESPN. SOCCER 7 p.m.: MLS, Seattle Sounders FC at Real Salt Lake, ESPN.

TENNIS 5 a.m.: Wimbledon, women’s semifinals, ESPN. CYCLING 5 a.m.: Tour de France, Stage 5, NBC Sports Network. GOLF 5:30 a.m.: European Tour, French Open, first round, Golf Channel. Noon: PGA Tour, Greenbrier Classic, first round, Golf Channel. 1 p.m.: LPGA Tour, U.S. Women’s Open, first round, ESPN2. BASEBALL 4 p.m.: MLB, San Francisco Giants at Washington Nationals or Philadelphia Phillies at New York Mets, MLB Network.

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Soccer

Olympics

• Timbers top Quakes: Danny Mwanga and Jack Jewsbury each scored, Portland tightened its sagging defense and the host Timbers knocked off the leagueleading San Jose Earthquakes 2-1 on Tuesday. The Timbers (57-4) exhibited an attack that was lacking in Saturday’s 3-0 loss at Colorado. Mwanga, a product of Portland’s Jefferson High and Oregon State, scored his first goal of the season off a beautiful cross from Franck Songo’o in the 29th minute for a 1-0 lead. Portland scored again in the 59th minute when San Jose keeper David Bingham bobbled a Futty Danso header, allowing Jewsbury an easy poke into the net.

• USOC to pass on 2022 bid, consider ’24 and ’26: The U.S. Olympic Committee will not bid for the 2022 Winter Games, but instead explore possible bids for either the 2024 Summer or 2026 Winter Olympics. In a meeting Tuesday, the USOC board decided to hold off on bidding for the next available Olympics because going for the 2022 Games would put the federation on a fast timeline. A bid for those games would be due in the fall of 2013. Last week, an exploratory committee in Denver recommended the city move forward on plans for a 2022 bid. Earlier this year, the USOC removed a major roadblock for another bid when it resolved a long-simmering feud over revenue sharing with the International Olympic Committee.

Basketball • Deron Williams takes Nets’ $98 million deal: Deron Williams is moving to Brooklyn with the Nets, instead of back home to Dallas. The All-Star point guard said on his Twitter page Tuesday night that he “made a very tough decision today” and posted a picture of the Nets’ new team logo that accompanies their move from New Jersey to Brooklyn. A person with knowledge of the decision said Williams told the team he was accepting their fiveyear contract worth $98 million. The person confirmed the agreement on condition of anonymity because contracts can’t be signed until July 11. • Rockets to meet with Lin today: Jeremy Lin will visit the Houston Rockets today, two people with knowledge of the plans said, and the New York Knicks restricted free agent is expected to get a contract offer. The Rockets waived Lin last December and he was claimed by the Knicks, turning into a breakout star when he landed the starting point guard job. Now with Goran Dragic not expected to return, Houston may want Lin back. One of the people told The Associated Press on Tuesday the Rockets are planning to make Lin a multiyear offer, though the Knicks can match it and have said they intend to keep him. • Sacramento’s ‘Plan B’ for new arena declared dead: Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson’s “Plan B” to build a new sports arena is dead. The second option for a new arena for the Sacramento Kings — or any other professional sports tenant — never really took shape. Johnson said Tuesday that the city and arena operator AEG have concluded that the financial model is not viable for the region without an anchor sports tenant. • Odom out, U.S. men down to 15 players for 12 spots: USA Basketball says Lamar Odom won’t try to earn an Olympic roster spot, leaving the Americans with 15 players for 12 spots. Odom informed USA Basketball chairman Jerry Colangelo and coach Mike Krzyzewski that he was unable to play this summer. He had previously been expected to take part in training camp this week despite a difficult season in which he and the Dallas Mavericks parted ways early. With the Americans lacking size up front, Odom’s departure could strengthen new Clippers teammate Blake Griffin’s hopes of making the team, or perhaps open the door for Memphis’ Rudy Gay.

Hockey • Jagr to Stars, Suter and Parise still deciding: While the two biggest stars on the NHL free-agent market were still pondering their futures, a future Hall of Famer found a new home in Texas. The Dallas Stars signed 40-year Jaromir Jagr to a oneyear deal worth $4.55 million on Tuesday. Ryan Suter and Zach Parise, however, were not yet ready to pick a team to play for next season and beyond.

Tennis • Tennis Hall of Fame in R.I. investigates abuse claim: The Rhode Island-based International Tennis Hall of Fame has hired a Boston attorney to investigate allegations a doubles champion inducted in 1992 sexually abused girls he coached. Hall Chief Executive Mark Stenning said Tuesday that attorney Michael Connolly is interviewing accusers and will help the Newportbased Hall determine whether to expel, suspend or take no action against Bob Hewitt. Massachusetts resident Heather Conner says she was abused by Hewitt.

Football • NFL denies appeals of bounty suspensions: NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell has rejected the appeals of four players suspended in connection with the league’s bounty investigation of the New Orleans Saints. In a ruling handed down on Tuesday, Goodell told Jonathan Vilma, Anthony Hargrove, Will Smith and Scott Fujita that each of them is still welcome to meet with him to give their side of the story, and that he reserves the right to reduce the suspensions should new information be brought forth. Instead, however, the players intend to fight Goodell’s rulings through the federal court system. • Arbitrator rules for Brees in franchise tag matter: An arbitrator in Philadelphia has ruled with Drew Brees in a dispute over how much the Saints would have to pay him if they applied the franchise tag to the star quarterback again in 2013. The Saints have already used the tag on Brees for 2012, meaning he can’t negotiate with another team and could be forced to settle for a one-year, $16.3 million deal if he cannot reach a new long-term deal by July 16. — From wire reports

LITTLE LEAGUE

NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Tuesday’s Games Houston 0, Chicago 0, tie Portland 2, San Jose 1 Today’s Games Sporting Kansas City at Montreal, 4 p.m. Toronto FC at FC Dallas, 6 p.m. Vancouver at Colorado, 6:30 p.m. Seattle FC at Real Salt Lake, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Local Oregon District 5 All-Stars At Madras ——— 9-10 Baseball At Juniper Hills Park ——— Tuesday’s Results Winners Bracket Bend North 16, Bend South 5 Hermiston 11, Jefferson County 0 Losers Bracket The Dalles 13, Redmond 8 (Redmond eliminated) Hood River 16, Warm Springs 1 (Warm Springs eliminated) Today’s Games Losers Bracket Bend South vs. Hood River Jefferson County vs. The Dalles

DEALS Transactions

10-11 Baseball At Juniper Hills Park ——— Tuesday’s Results Winners Bracket Bend North 11, Bend South 4 Losers Bracket The Dalles 12, Hermiston 4 (Hermiston eliminated) Today’s Game Losers Bracket Bend South vs. The Dalles 11-12 Baseball At Juniper Hills Park ——— Tuesday’s Results Winners Bracket John Day River 7, Bend North 6 Hermiston 10, Jefferson County 0 Losers Bracket Bend South 15, The Dalles 3 (The Dalles eliminated) South Central 6, Hood River 5 (Hood River eliminated) Today’s Games Losers Bracket Bend South vs. Jefferson County Bend North vs. South Central 9-10 Softball At Juniper Hills Park ——— Tuesday’s Result Losers Bracket Columbia/John Day River 16, Hermiston 8 (Hermiston eliminated in third place) Today’s Game Championship Columbia/John Day River vs. Bend South/South Central 11-12 Softball At Juniper Hills Park ——— Tuesday Result Losers Bracket Redmond 10, Crook County 8 (Crook County eliminated in third place) Today’s Game Championship Bend North/South vs. Redmond Junior Softball At Juniper Hills Park ——— Tuesday’s Result Losers Bracket Crook County 22, Warm Springs 21 (Warm Springs eliminated in third place) Today’s Game Championship Columbia vs. Crook County

CYCLING Tour de France Tuesday At Boulogne-sur-Mer, France Third Stage A 122.4-mile medium-mountain ride through the Monts du Boulonnais from Orchies, France to Boulogne-sur-Mer, with five climbs over the final 22 miles 1. Peter Sagan, Slovakia, Liquigas-Cannondale, 4 hours, 42 minutes, 58 seconds. 2. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway, Sky Procycling, 1 second behind. 3. Peter Velits, Slovakia, Omega Pharma-QuickStep, same time. 4. Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland, RadioShack-Nissan, same time. 5. Michael Albasini, Switzerland, Orica GreenEdge, same time. 6. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing, same time. 7. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, France, AG2R La Mondiale, same time. 8. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi, same time. 9. Bauke Mollema, Netherlands, Rabobank, same time. 10. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Liquigas-Cannondale, same time. 11. Ryder Hesjedal, Canada, Garmin-Sharp-Barracuda, same time. 12. Wouter Poels, Netherlands, Vacansoleil-DCM, same time. 13. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, RadioShack-Nissan, same time. 14. Robert Kiserlovski, Croatia, Astana, same time. 15. Jelle Vanendert, Belgium, Lotto Belisol, same time. 16. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, BMC Racing, same time. 17. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Astana, same time. 18. Robert Gesink, Netherlands, Rabobank, same time. 19. Maxime Monfort, Belgium, RadioShack-Nissan, same time. 20. Frank Schleck, Luxembourg, RadioShack-Nissan, same time. Also 25. Jurgen Van Den Broeck, Belgium, Lotto Belisol, same time. 35. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Omega PharmaQuickStep, same time. 41. Sylvain Chavanel, France, Omega Pharma-QuickStep, same time. 53. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Procycling, same time. 56. Christopher Horner, United States, RadioShackNissan, same time. 59. George Hincapie, United States, BMC Racing, same time. 75. Christian Vande Velde, United States, GarminSharp-Barracuda, 2:08. 172. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Sharp-Barracuda, 9:00. 174. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-SharpBarracuda, same time. 175. Thomas Danielson, United States, GarminSharp-Barracuda, 9:11. Overall Standings (After three stages) 1. Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland, RadioShack-Nissan, 14 hours, 45 minutes, 30 seconds.

2. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Procycling, 7 seconds behind. 3. Sylvain Chavanel, France, Omega Pharma-QuickStep, same time. 4. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, BMC Racing, :10. 5. Edvald Boasoon Hagen, Norway, Sky Procycling, :11. 6. Denis Menchov, Russia, Katusha, :13. 7. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing, :17. 8. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Liquigas-Cannondale, :18. 9. Ryder Hesjedal, Canada, Garmin-Sharp-Barracuda, same time. 10. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, RadioShack-Nissan, :19. 11. Bauke Mollema, Netherlands, Rabobank, :21. 12. Maxime Monfort, Belgium, RadioShack-Nissan, :22. 13. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Astana, same time. 14. Rein Taaramae, Estonia, Cofidis, same time. 15. Peter Sagan, Slovakia, Liquigas-Cannondale, :23. 16. Jean-Christophe Peraud, France, AG2R La Mondiale, same time. 17. Marco Marcato, Italy, Vacansoleil-DCM, same time. 18. Haimar Zubeldia, Spain, RadioShack-Nissan, :24. 19. Wouter Poels, Netherlands, Vacansoleil-DCM, same time. 20. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, France, AG2R La Mondiale, same time. Also 22. Robert Gesink, Netherlands, Rabobank, :26. 23. Jurgen Van den Broeck, Belgium, Lotto Belisol, :28. 30. Frank Schleck, Luxemboureg, RadioShack-Nissan, :38. 37. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Omega PharmaQuickStep, :45. 47. Christopher Horner, United States, RadioShackNissan, 1:29. 57. George Hincapie, United States, BMC Racing, 2:27. 58. Christian Vande Velde, United States, GarminSharp-Barracuda, 2:29. 126. Thomas Danielson, United States, GarminSharp-Barracuda, 9:41. 165. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Sharp-Barracuda, 12:52. 172. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-SharpBarracuda, 13:26.

BASEBALL WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE ——— League standings East Division W Wenatchee AppleSox 19 Bellingham Bells 15 Kelowna Falcons 13 Walla Walla Sweets 11 West Division W Corvallis Knights 18 Bend Elks 11 Cowlitz Black Bears 10 Kitsap BlueJackets 8 Klamath Falls Gems 6 Tuesday’s Games Bend 8, Kelowna 3 Cowlitz 6, Kitsap 5 Corvallis at Bellingham, late Walla Walla 12, Wenatchee 0 Today’s Games Corvallis at Bellingham, 1:35 p.m. Wenatchee at Walla Walla, 5:05 p.m. Kelowna at Bend, 6:35 p.m. Cowlitz at Kitsap, 7:35 p.m. Thursday’s Games Cowlitz at Kitsap, 6:35 p.m. Corvallis at Bellingham, 7:05 p.m. Wenatchee at Walla Walla, 7:05 p.m.

L 4 9 10 15 L 7 12 13 23 18

Kelowna 003 000 000 — 3 13 1 Bend 020 006 00x — 8 15 0 Maton, Gebert (6), DSouza (6), Hoelzen (6) and Qualls. Doyle, Hildenberger (2), Birosak (3), McAlister (6), Keane (7), Spencer (9) and Gallegos. W — McAlister. L — Gebert. 2B— Bend: Halcomb, Pluschkell. 3B—Kelowna: Qualls.

Wimbledon Tuesday At The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct GB Connecticut 10 4 .714 — Chicago 8 5 .615 1½ Indiana 8 5 .615 1½ Atlanta 7 8 .467 3½ New York 5 9 .357 5 Washington 3 10 .231 6½ Western Conference W L Pct GB Minnesota 13 2 .867 — Los Angeles 10 6 .625 3½ San Antonio 8 5 .615 4 Seattle 7 8 .467 6 Phoenix 4 11 .267 9 Tulsa 2 12 .143 10½ ——— Tuesday’s Game San Antonio 82, Phoenix 81 Today’s Games No games scheduled Thursday’s Games Minnesota at Los Angeles, noon San Antonio at Indiana, 4 p.m.

MLS

Elks 8, Falcons 3

Professional

Wimbledon Show Court Schedules Wednesday At The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club Wimbledon, England Play begins at 5 a.m. PDT Centre Court Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, vs. Mikhail Youzhny (26), Russia David Ferrer (7), Spain, vs. Andy Murray (4), Britain No. 1 Court Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, vs. Florian Mayer (31), Germany Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (5), France, vs. Philipp Kohlschreiber (27), Germany

SOCCER

Tuesday’s Summary

TENNIS

Wimbledon, England Purse: $25.03 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Men Fourth Round David Ferrer (7), Spain, def. Juan Martin del Potro (9), Argentina, 6-3, 6-2, 6-3. Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Marin Cilic (16), Croatia, 7-5, 6-2, 6-3. Florian Mayer (31), Germany, def. Richard Gasquet (18), France, 6-3, 6-1, 3-6, 6-2. Philipp Kohlschreiber (27), Germany, def. Brian Baker, United States, 6-1, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (5), France, def. Mardy Fish (10), United States, 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-4. Women Quarterfinals Serena Williams (6), United States, def. Petra Kvitova (4), Czech Republic, 6-3, 7-5. Angelique Kerber (8), Germany, def. Sabine Lisicki (15), Germany, 6-3, 6-7 (7), 7-5. Victoria Azarenka (2), Belarus, def. Tamira Paszek, Austria, 6-3, 7-6 (4). Agnieszka Radwanska (3), Poland, def. Maria Kirilenko (17), Russia, 7-5, 4-6, 7-5.

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts D.C. 10 5 3 33 New York 9 4 4 31 Sporting Kansas City 9 5 2 29 Chicago 8 5 4 28 Houston 6 5 6 24 Columbus 6 5 4 22 New England 5 7 4 19 Montreal 5 10 3 18 Philadelphia 3 9 2 11 Toronto FC 2 10 3 9 Western Conference W L T Pts San Jose 11 4 3 36 Real Salt Lake 10 6 2 32 Seattle 7 5 5 26 Vancouver 7 4 5 26 Colorado 7 8 1 22 Los Angeles 6 9 2 20 Chivas USA 5 7 4 19 Portland 5 7 4 19 FC Dallas 3 9 5 14

GF 34 32 20 21 22 16 22 24 13 17

GA 22 25 16 19 24 15 22 32 17 29

GF 36 28 21 18 24 25 11 16 16

GA 24 21 18 19 21 27 18 21 26

BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Placed INF Brian Roberts on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July 2. Recalled OF Xavier Avery from Norfolk (IL). Agreed to terms with RHP Jake Pintar on a minor league contract. BOSTON RED SOX—Placed RHP Daisuke Matsuzaka on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Mauro Gomez from Pawtucket (IL). Reached a contract termination settlement with RHP Bobby Jenks and placed him on unconditional release waivers. CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Agreed to terms with 3B Jeff Baisley. DETROIT TIGERS—Optioned RHP Luis Marte and INF Danny Worth to Toledo (IL). Recalled RHP Jose Ortega from Toledo. Selected the contract of LHP Darin Downs from Toledo. Designated OF Matt Young for assignment. MINNESOTA TWINS—Recalled RHP Cole De Vries from Rochester (IL). Optioned RHP Liam Hendriks to Rochester. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Reinstated RHP Bartolo Colon from the 15-day DL. Designated LHP Brian Fuentes for assignment. SEATTLE MARINERS—Agreed to terms with C Mike Zunino on a minor league contract. TAMPA BAY RAYS—Agreed to terms with OF Joey Rickard on a minor league contract. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Designated RHP David Pauley for assignment. Recalled RHP Andrew Carpenter from Las Vegas (PCL). Agreed to terms with RHP Marcus Stroman on a minor league contract. National League CHICAGO CUBS—Recalled RHP Chris Volstad from Iowa (PCL). Optioned RHP Casey Coleman to Iowa. Agreed to terms with RHP Ryan McNeil, RHP Trey Lang, RHP Justin Amlung, RHP Jasvir Rakkar and INF David Bote on minor league contracts. HOUSTON ASTROS—Agreed to terms with C Victor Tavarez, OF Luis Payano and SS Kristian Trompiz on minor league contracts. LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Placed RHP Todd Coffey on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Shawn Tolleson from Albuquerque (PCL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Recalled OF Gorkys Hernandez from Indianapolis (IL). Optioned OF Jose Tabata to Indianapolis. Agreed to terms with 3B Julio Delacruz on a minor league contract. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Placed RHP ChienMing Wang on the 15-day DL. Activated RHP Henry Rodriguez from the 15-day DL. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association ATLANTA HAWKS—Named Wes Wilcox assistant general manager. GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS—Signed F Harrison Barnes. ORLANDO MAGIC—Signed F Andrew Nicholson. HOCKEY National Hockey League COLORADO AVALANCHE—Signed D Erik Johnson to a four-year contract. DALLAS STARS—Signed F Jaromir Jagr to a oneyear contract. DETROIT RED WINGS—Signed F Marek Tvrdon and D Max Nicastro to entry-level contracts. LOS ANGELES KINGS—Signed D Andrew Campbell to a two-year contract. NEW JERSEY DEVILS—Signed D Bryce Salvador to a three-year contract. NEW YORK RANGERS—Agreed to terms with F Kris Newbury. OTTAWA SENATORS—Signed F Hugh Jessiman to a one-year, two-way contract. PHOENIX COYOTES—Signed LW Rob Klinkhammer to a one-year, two-way contract. WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Signed D Jack Hillen to a one-year contract. SOCCER Major League Soccer L.A. GALAXY—Activated D Omar Gonzalez from the disabled list. Announced the retirement of F Adam Cristman. SEATTLE SOUNDERS—Removed G Josh Ford from the disabled list. COLLEGE CHARLOTTE—Named Jim Durning football strength and conditioning coach. GEORGIA TECH—Named Derek Schwandt men’s assistant tennis coach. GOUCHER—Named Brendan Kincaid men’s tennis coach. KANSAS—Named Jamie Bermel men’s golf coach. MONMOUTH (N.J.)—Named Brian Fisher men’s lacrosse coach. NEW MEXICO—Named Dan Spencer pitching coach. NYU—Named Cassandra Loftus women’s assistant basketball coach. RADFORD—Named Victoria Best and Danielle Dawson women’s assistant basketball coaches. SAINT LOUIS—Named Tanner Bronson men’s assistant basketball coach, Mike Lepore director of basketball operations and Danny Brown senior graduate manager. STANFORD—Announced the resignation of Lea Maurer, women’s swim coach . TENNESSEE—Promoted men’s assistant basketball coach Tracy Webster to associate head coach. TEXAS SOUTHERN—Announced the resignation of Tony Harvey, men’s basketball coach, effective immediately. TEXAS TECH—Suspended senior WR Darrin Scott Moore from the football team after his April arrest on a drunken-driving charge. TRINITY (TEXAS)—Named Derick Lawrence men’s and women’s cross country coach and Marcus Whitehead men’s and women’s track and field coach. UNLV—Named Mark Carr and Cortney Sobrero women’s assistant soccer coaches. WASHINGTON—Named Dan Potter men’s assistant golf coach.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,381 219 664 294 The Dalles 1,314 153 287 98 John Day 1,107 259 221 118 McNary 1,573 105 162 49 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 216,730 14,641 15,229 4,986 The Dalles 162,035 12,316 5,167 1,930 John Day 144,148 11,863 4,367 2,301 McNary 137,796 7,018 6,787 2,754

Warriors meet with former Blazer Roy By Antonio Gonzalez The Associated Press

OAKLAND, Calif. — The Bay Area could be a landing spot for Brandon Roy’s return to basketball. The Golden State Warriors and Roy met earlier this week about him joining the team in the free agent’s attempted comeback, a person familiar with the situation said Tuesday. The person, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the talks were preliminary, said the Warriors met with Roy on Sunday and were hoping to meet with the former Portland guard again this week. Nothing was scheduled yet. Roy, a three-time All-Star, announced his retirement in December after five

NBA seasons with the Trail Blazers because of chronic knee problems. The 27-year-old has averaged 19 points, 4.7 assists and 4.3 rebounds in 321 games. Minnesota, Cleveland and others also have expressed an interest in Roy. While he has only played for Portland, Golden State does offer some familiarity. Roy used to be represented by new Warriors general manager Bob Myers, a former sports agent. Roy would seem to be a perfect fit for Golden State’s system — if healthy — playing alongside shooters Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson. New center

Andrew Bogut also is expected to team with scoring power forward David Lee. It’s unclear how much money Roy is seeking. The Warriors also are still unsure of the status of Roy’s knees. Myers had said Monday that it’s unlikely the Warriors would use all of their mid-level exception — about $5 million — because the team was close to the luxury tax. It’s also doubtful Roy would sign for the veteran minimum, which will be around $1 million a year. The sixth overall pick in the 2006 draft out of Washington, Roy was acquired by the Blazers in a draft-day trade. The 2007 NBA Rookie of the Year made the AllStar team from 2008-2010.


WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

CYCLING: TOUR DE FRANCE

NFL

Sagan picks up second tour stage win By Jamey Keaten The Associated Press

BOULOGNE-SUR-MER, France — Once upon a time in Hollywood, the cry was “Run, Forrest, Run!” The message was not lost on Peter Sagan at the Tour de France. The 22-year-old Slovakian won Tuesday’s ride toward the English Channel in dramatic fashion, and then went cinematic — pumping his arms in the running style of fictional antihero Forrest Gump at the behest of his Liquigas teammates. Competing in his first Tour, Sagan earned his second victory in the three full stages so far. He is picking up where he left off in May at the Tour of California, where he won a stunning five of eight stages. On Tuesday, he mastered a tricky uphill finish and schooled many older riders on the last of five small climbs over the 122-mile ride from Orchies to the fishing port of Boulogne-sur-Mer. With the pack split up because of crashes, Sagan bolted ahead with less than 300 meters left. He crossed the line several lengths — and one second — ahead of 46 other riders in his wake. Switzerland’s Fabian Cancellara was one of them, and he retained the leader’s yellow jersey for a fourth straight day after winning the opening-day prologue on Saturday. Tuesday’s ride marked the first crash-related withdrawals from this 99th Tour, which ends July 22 on Paris’ Champs-Elysees. The race remains wide open. After flat early stages, the Swiss rider has 43 rivals within a minute of his overall time, and that’s likely to change when the pack heads to the Alps in the second week and the Pyrenees in the third, if not sooner. Overall, Cancellara leads runnerup Bradley Wiggins, who is hoping to become Britain’s first Tour winner, and third-place Sylvain Chavanel — both seven seconds back. Defending champ Cadel Evans of Australia rose one spot to seventh, 17 seconds behind. Sagan was 15th, another six seconds slower. With Sagan’s Stage 1 victory Sunday, he became the youngest rider to win a Tour stage since Lance Armstrong in 1993 at 21. Even leaders of rival teams were marveling at his skill and potential after Tuesday’s victory. “You’ve got to give Sagan credit for the way he’s riding at the minute. When you see something like that you just have to stand back and admire it, and smile and say well done,” Team Sky manager Dave Brailsford said. “It’s a bit like watching Messi play-

Laurent Rebours / The Associated Press

Peter Sagan of Slovakia crosses the finish line to win the third stage of the Tour de France in Boulogne-sur-Mer, northern France, Tuesday.

ing football or something isn’t it?” he said, referring to Barcelona’s Lionel Messi. “He’s winning with such apparent ease at the moment that it’s pretty phenomenal.” Sagan enjoys putting on a show for fans. To that end, he churned his arms, as a runner might, in a nod to the title character in the movie “Forrest Gump.” “It’s a thing I’d discussed with my teammates about what kind of gesture I’d do on the line,” Sagan said. “Everybody said, ‘Do a Forrest Gump’ because when he was told to run, he ran. And when I’m told to win, I win.” Sagan also showed a humbler side, saying he felt honored to ride along-

side the likes of Vincenzo Nibali and two-time Giro d’Italia winner Ivan Basso on the Italian squad. “With Basso, I feel like I’m on the level of someone who would shine his shoes,” Sagan said. The top standings didn’t change much on Tuesday. But Belgium’s Philippe Gilbert, who last year had 18 victories in all competitions and was the top-ranked rider in the standings, went tumbling after getting hit from behind. He clambered back onto his bike with scrapes on his left leg and arm and kept going, but lost more time to change a shoe damaged in the crash, said his BMC team manager, John Lelangue.

Gilbert straggled across the finish line 7:46 after Sagan, plunging to 104th place overall. The Belgian began the day in seventh place, 13 seconds behind Cancellara. Gilbert’s slide meant Evans rose a notch. It was one of at least four crashes that marred the stage as riders jostled to get up front for climbs near the finish, including one within the last mile. Some riders also had mechanical troubles and flat tires. “The group was nervous. Everyone wanted to be up front,” Sagan told France-2 television. “There were a lot of crashes. ... It was a very dangerous stage.” Five riders broke out early through northern France’s wheat fields and former steel industry hubs, speeding through medieval villages like Isbergues — named for a sister of Charlemagne who, legend has it, could cure skin and eye illnesses. But the pack of contenders overcame them near the end. With about 30 miles to go, several riders crashed in a flat portion of road through a wheat field in a slight turn. Sky’s Kanstantsin Sivtsov of Belarus became the first competitor to drop out this year. A Tour medical report said he broke his left shin and was facing surgery. Rabobank’s Maarten Tjallingii broke his left hip in the same accident but finished the stage. Team spokesman Richard Plugge said the Dutch rider was taken to a hospital in the Netherlands for surgery. And some 18 miles later, another crash sent riders flying off the shoulder of the road on both sides. One flew into a wire fence. Spain’s Jose Joaquin Rojas of Movistar got into an ambulance and was hospitalized with a broken collarbone, the medical report said. American veteran Tom Danielson, who at eighth was the top American finisher at last year’s Tour, crashed hard but finished the stage. A hospital exam showed he had separated his right shoulder — the same one that the East Lyme, Conn., cyclist hurt in a crash in the 2007 Spanish Vuelta, Garmin-Sharp team spokeswoman Marya Pongrace said in an email. It wasn’t immediately clear if Danielson would start today. Fellow American and Garmin sprint specialist Tyler Farrar went down in the first crash and was delayed in the second, but he was not badly injured, Pongrace said. Today’s fourth stage takes riders on another bumpy ride along several hills, a 134-mile leg from Abbeville to Rouen in the heart of Normandy.

TENNIS: WIMBLEDON

Serena tops defending champ Kvitova By Howard Fendrich The Associated Press

WIMBLEDON, England — Thanks to a bit of advice from her big sister and a bunch of aces from her big serve, Serena Williams is back in the Wimbledon semifinals. With two more victories, Williams will be holding a Grand Slam trophy for the first time in two years. The thud of racket-againstball reverberating under the closed Centre Court roof, Williams smacked 13 aces at up to 120 mph and overpowered defending champion Petra Kvitova 6-3, 7-5 in the quarterfinals Tuesday at the All England Club. Beforehand, Williams’ father and coach, Richard, asked his other title-winning daughter to relay some suggestions. “I went and had Venus talk to her, because Venus can get (through) to Serena better than anyone in the world. So I told Venus, ‘I’m not going to talk to her. You talk to her.’ So Venus went and talked to her. When the match was over, I told her, ‘Venus: Good coaching! Good coaching!’ ” Dad said after snapping photos of Serena’s victory from his front-row perch in the guest box above a scoreboard. “I wanted Serena to move her feet a little bit more and to not concentrate on what the girl’s doing, but concentrate exactly on what she wished to do,” he continued. “And that was the only message.” Consider it delivered. The 30-year-old Williams, bidding to become the first woman at least that age to win a major title since Martina Navratilova at Wimbledon in 1990, turned in her best per-

formance of the tournament against her most difficult opponent. After being stretched to 9-7 and 7-5 third sets against less-accomplished women in the two previous rounds, the No. 6-seeded Williams was on top of things from the get-go against No. 4 Kvitova. “You can’t play a defending Wimbledon champion or Grand Slam champion and not elevate your game,” said Williams, who produced 27 winners and only 10 unforced errors. “I had to weed out the riffraff and just get serious.” Kvitova had won 16 of her past 17 matches at Wimbledon, including 11 in a row since a loss to Williams in the 2010 semifinals. Two days later, Williams went on to win the championship — her fourth at Wimbledon, her 13th at a Grand Slam tournament and her most recent to date. Within a week, Williams cut her feet on glass at a restaurant, leading to a series of health problems, including being hospitalized for clots in her lungs, then the removal of a pocket of blood under the skin on her stomach. “No one tries to have ups and downs. Some things happen sometimes, and you have absolutely no control over it,” said Williams, whose only first-round loss in 48 Grand Slam tournaments came at the French Open in late May. “So I think it’s how you recover from that, and how you handle the downs even more than the ups can really (reveal your) character.” On Thursday, Williams will play No. 2 Victoria Azarenka of Belarus, the reigning Australian Open champion, who defeated unseeded Tami-

Anja Niedringhaus / The Associated Press

Serena Williams reacts after beating Petra Kvitova during a quarterfinal match at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon, England, Tuesday.

ra Paszek 6-3, 7-6 (4) under the roof at night to reach the Wimbledon semifinals for the second straight year. The other semifinal will be No. 3 Agnieszka Radwanska of Poland against No. 8 Angelique Kerber of Germany. A little before 10 p.m. on Centre Court, Radwanska finished her 7-5, 4-6, 7-5 victory over No. 17 Maria Kirilenko — whose boyfriend, two-time NHL MVP Alex Ovechkin of the Washington Capitals, was in the stands. Earlier, the match was forced off Court 1

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because of showers, tied 4-all in the third set. “Today was for me, like, 40 hours,” Radwanska said after reaching her first Grand Slam semifinal. “I was on and off all the time, waiting pretty much all day.” Kerber was a 6-3, 6-7 (7), 7-5 winner over No. 15 Sabine Lisicki in an all-German matchup. Lisicki saved three match points in the second set, but then let a 5-3 lead slip away in the third against Kerber, also a semifinalist at last year’s U.S. Open.

With more rain in the forecast, the roof could be shut again today, when the men’s quarterfinals are No. 1 Novak Djokovic vs. No. 31 Florian Mayer, No. 3 Roger Federer vs. Mikhail Youzhny, No. 4 Andy Murray vs. No. 7 David Ferrer, and No. 5 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga vs. No. 27 Philipp Kohlschreiber. While defending champion Djokovic, six-time champion Federer and Youzhny got a chance to rest Tuesday — particularly important for Federer, whose back ached during his fourth-round victory — everyone else slogged through a start-stop-startstop afternoon of rain delays with the temperature in the low 60s. The last two American men in the draw were beaten: 10thseeded Mardy Fish wasted the one-set lead he built before play was suspended Monday and lost to Tsonga 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-4, and 126th-ranked qualifier Brian Baker’s surprising run ended against Kohlschreiber 6-1, 7-6 (4), 6-3. “I went to bed last night, and I thought I could maybe win the tournament, the way I was playing,” said Fish, who hadn’t played a match in 2½ months before Wimbledon because of an accelerated heartbeat. Murray eliminated No. 16 Marin Cilic 7-5, 6-2, 6-3 to prolong Britain’s hopes for its first male champion at Wimbledon since 1936; Ferrer easily got past No. 9 Juan Martin del Potro 6-3, 6-2, 6-3 to earn his debut trip to the quarterfinals at the All England Club; Mayer defeated No. 18 Richard Gasquet 6-3, 6-1, 3-6, 6-2 to return to the round of eight for the first time since 2004.

Former Raider Davidson dies at 72 By Josh Dubow The Associated Press

ALAMEDA, Calif. — Ben Davidson, the hulking defensive end who starred for the Oakland Raiders in the 1960s before becoming a famous television pitch man, has died. He was 72. Davidson died Monday night. He was being treated for prostate cancer. Former Raiders coach John Madden first reported Davidson’s death Tuesday on KCBS radio in San Francisco. Davidson spent 11 years in pro football, starting with the Green Bay Packers and Washington Redskins in the NFL before joining the Raiders in the AFL in 1964. That’s where the 6-foot-8 Davidson became famous. With his distinctive handlebar mustache, raspy voice and physical play, Davidson helped personify Al Davis’ renegade Raiders on the 1960s. “He was a tough, gutsy ballplayer, team oriented with enough meanness in him to be feared and enough talent to be effective,” former Raiders teammate Tom Flores said. Flores, who recently played golf with Davidson, got the news while in Las Vegas for a celebration of Davis, who would have turned 83 today. Davidson played in the second Super Bowl for Oakland after the 1967 season and then was on the team that lost the conference title game the next three seasons. One of Davidson’s most memorable plays came on Nov. 1, 1970, against Kansas City. The Raiders trailed 1714 late in the fourth quarter when Chiefs quarterback Len Dawson ran for a first down to seemingly seal the win. As Dawson was on the ground, Davidson dived into him with his helmet. In a rage, Chiefs wide receiver Otis Taylor jumped on Davidson and a brawl ensued. “Their attitude was, if you’ve got a shot at the quarterback, take it,” Dawson recalled in 2010. The play was negated by offsetting penalties and the Chiefs eventually had to punt. Oakland tied the game on a field goal by George Blanda with eight seconds remaining, and that proved to be the difference in the AFC West race. The Raiders won the division with a record of 8-4-2, while the Chiefs missed the playoffs at 7-5-2. Davidson didn’t play football until going to East Los Angeles Community College. He went from there to the University of Washington, where he helped the Huskies win Rose Bowls in 1960 and ’61. He was then a fourth-round pick by the New York Giants in 1961. He played his rookie season with Green Bay, winning the NFL championship with the Packers in 1961. He then spent two years in Washington before joining the Raiders in Davis’ second season as coach in Oakland. He spent eight seasons with the Raiders. He was a second-team Associated Press All-AFL selection in 1965 and first-teamer in 1967. After his playing career, Davidson became a successful actor with roles in films like “M-A-S-H,” “Conan the Barbarian” and “Necessary Roughness,” and he played himself in Miller Lite ads.

Ernest Bennett / The Associated Press file

In this Jan. 3, 1968, file photo, Oakland Raiders defensive end Ben Davidson twirls his handlebar moustache in Oakland, Calif.


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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

AL Boxscores Orioles 5, Mariners 4 Baltimore AB Avery lf 5 Hardy ss 4 C.Davis rf 5 Ad.Jones cf 4 Thome dh 4 Wieters c 4 Betemit 1b-3b 4 Flaherty 3b 3 b-M.Reynolds ph-1b 1 Andino 2b 4 Totals 38

R 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 5

H 3 2 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 11

BI 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 5

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

American League SO 1 1 3 1 2 1 1 1 0 1 12

Avg. .247 .237 .275 .298 .182 .247 .265 .198 .206 .228

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. I.Suzuki rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .265 C.Wells lf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .265 Seager 3b 3 0 0 1 1 1 .244 J.Montero dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .245 Olivo c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .211 M.Saunders cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .258 Smoak 1b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .204 Ackley 2b 3 1 1 0 0 1 .241 Ryan ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .182 a-Jaso ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .279 1-Kawasaki pr-ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .194 Totals 32 4 5 4 1 9 Baltimore 000 004 001 — 5 11 0 Seattle 000 000 130 — 4 5 1 a-singled for Ryan in the 8th. b-flied out for Flaherty in the 9th. 1-ran for Jaso in the 8th. E—M.Saunders (3). LOB—Baltimore 7, Seattle 3. 2B—Avery (6), M.Saunders (19). HR—Andino (4), off Furbush; C.Wells (3), off W.Chen. Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP W.Chen 7 1-3 2 2 2 0 9 97 Strop BS, 4-7 1-3 3 2 2 1 0 25 O’Day W, 5-0 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 Johnson S, 24-25 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP F.Hernandez 5 1-3 8 4 4 0 8 90 O.Perez 2 1-3 1 0 0 0 3 37 Kinney 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 Furbush L, 4-2 1 2 1 1 1 1 22 T—2:59. A—16,270 (47,860).

ERA 3.64 1.73 2.36 1.26 ERA 3.26 1.04 0.00 2.02

Athletics 3, Red Sox 2 Boston Nava lf Pedroia 2b Ortiz dh C.Ross rf Ad.Gonzalez 1b Saltalamacchia c Kalish cf Aviles ss Punto 3b Totals

AB 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 3 4 32

R 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

H 1 0 1 0 2 1 1 1 0 7

BI 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

BB 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 4

SO 1 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 1 6

Avg. .293 .266 .301 .280 .275 .250 .250 .264 .184

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Crisp cf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .223 J.Weeks 2b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .214 Reddick rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .258 Cespedes lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .270 J.Gomes dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .239 Carter 1b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .455 Inge 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .203 Hicks ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .143 a-S.Smith ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Pennington ss 1 1 1 0 0 0 .206 K.Suzuki c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .210 b-Moss ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .257 Totals 33 3 8 3 2 12 Boston 010 100 000 — 2 7 2 Oakland 100 000 002 — 3 8 1 Two outs when winning run scored. a-struck out for Hicks in the 7th. b-singled for K.Suzuki in the 9th. E—Aviles (8), Kalish (2), Carter (2). LOB—Boston 7, Oakland 8. HR—Saltalamacchia (16), off B.Colon; Crisp (3), off Lester. SB—Pedroia (6). DP—Oakland 2. Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester 6 2-3 4 1 1 1 9 107 4.33 Padilla H, 18 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 3 27 3.48 Aceves L, 0-6 2-3 3 2 1 0 0 19 4.32 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA B.Colon 6 5 2 1 1 3 87 4.05 Norberto 1 1 0 0 0 1 21 3.23 J.Miller 1-3 0 0 0 2 1 19 1.78 Blevins W, 2-0 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 20 2.36 T—3:10. A—35,067 (35,067).

New York Baltimore Tampa Bay Boston Toronto

W 48 43 43 42 41

L 32 37 38 39 40

Chicago Cleveland Detroit Kansas City Minnesota

W 43 41 39 36 35

L 37 39 42 43 45

Texas Los Angeles Oakland Seattle

W 50 45 40 35

L 31 36 42 48

East Division Pct GB WCGB .600 — — .538 5 — .531 5½ ½ .519 6½ 1½ .506 7½ 2½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .538 — — .513 2 2 .481 4½ 4½ .456 6½ 6½ .438 8 8 West Division Pct GB WCGB .617 — — .556 5 — .488 10½ 4 .422 16 9½

Tuesday’s Games Cleveland 9, L.A. Angels 5 Minnesota 8, Detroit 6 Toronto 6, Kansas City 3 Tampa Bay 7, N.Y. Yankees 4 Chicago White Sox 19, Texas 2 Oakland 3, Boston 2 Baltimore 5, Seattle 4

DP—Washington 1.

National League

L10 6-4 3-7 4-6 5-5 4-6

Str Home Away L-2 25-16 23-16 W-1 22-20 21-17 W-2 24-18 19-20 L-2 21-21 21-18 W-1 22-18 19-22

L10 7-3 4-6 5-5 5-5 7-3

Str Home Away W-1 20-21 23-16 W-1 21-19 20-20 L-2 17-20 22-22 L-1 14-23 22-20 W-5 17-25 18-20

L10 6-4 6-4 6-4 4-6

Str Home Away L-2 27-15 23-16 L-1 22-17 23-19 W-3 21-19 19-23 L-1 16-24 19-24

Today’s Games N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 1-3) at Tampa Bay (Price 11-4), 12:10 p.m. Boston (A.Cook 2-1) at Oakland (Griffin 0-0), 1:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (E.Santana 4-8) at Cleveland (D.Lowe 7-6), 1:05 p.m. Baltimore (Tillman 0-0) at Seattle (Noesi 2-10), 1:10 p.m. Minnesota (Duensing 1-4) at Detroit (Verlander 8-5), 4:05 p.m. Kansas City (Mendoza 3-4) at Toronto (Villanueva 2-0), 4:07 p.m. Texas (Feldman 2-6) at Chicago White Sox (Axelrod 0-1), 4:10 p.m.

Washington New York Atlanta Miami Philadelphia

W 46 44 42 38 36

L 32 37 38 42 46

Cincinnati Pittsburgh St. Louis Milwaukee Houston Chicago

W 44 44 42 38 32 30

L 36 36 39 42 49 50

San Francisco Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado

W 45 45 39 32 31

L 36 37 41 50 49

East Division Pct GB WCGB .590 — — .543 3½ ½ .525 5 2 .475 9 6 .439 12 9 Central Division Pct GB WCGB .550 — — .550 — — .519 2½ 2½ .475 6 6 .395 12½ 12½ .375 14 14 West Division Pct GB WCGB .556 — — .549 ½ — .488 5½ 5 .390 13½ 13 .388 13½ 13

Tuesday’s Games Milwaukee 13, Miami 12, 10 innings Washington 9, San Francisco 3 Pittsburgh 8, Houston 7 Atlanta 10, Chicago Cubs 3 N.Y. Mets 11, Philadelphia 1 Colorado 3, St. Louis 2 San Diego 9, Arizona 5 L.A. Dodgers 3, Cincinnati 1

L10 6-4 5-5 4-6 5-5 2-8

Str Home Away W-2 21-14 25-18 W-1 24-17 20-20 W-1 19-21 23-17 L-2 22-22 16-20 L-6 17-24 19-22

L10 5-5 6-4 6-4 5-5 3-7 6-4

Str Home Away L-1 23-16 21-20 W-2 25-13 19-23 L-1 19-19 23-20 W-4 22-19 16-23 L-6 23-19 9-30 L-1 19-20 11-30

L10 6-4 2-8 4-6 7-3 4-6

Str Home Away L-1 26-16 19-20 W-1 26-16 19-21 L-4 20-19 19-22 W-4 16-24 16-26 W-1 18-25 13-24

Today’s Games San Francisco (Bumgarner 10-4) at Washington (E.Jackson 4-4), 8:05 a.m. Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 0-5) at N.Y. Mets (C.Young 2-1), 10:10 a.m. Houston (Keuchel 1-0) at Pittsburgh (Correia 4-6), 10:35 p.m. Miami (Jo.Johnson 5-5) at Milwaukee (Wolf 2-6), 1:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Maholm 5-6) at Atlanta (Delgado 4-8), 4:10 p.m. Colorado (Guthrie 3-7) at St. Louis (Wainwright 6-8), 4:15 p.m. Cincinnati (Leake 3-5) at L.A. Dodgers (Harang 5-5), 6:10 p.m. San Diego (Marquis 1-4) at Arizona (I.Kennedy 6-7), 6:40 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Rays 7, Yankees 4: ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Sean Rodriguez hit a go-ahead two-run homer, helping Tampa Bay continue its home dominance over New York in a victory over the AL East leaders. James Shields (8-5) gave up four runs and 10 hits over seven innings for the Rays, who have won nine straight at Tropicana Field over the Yankees. • Blue Jays 6, Royals 3: TORONTO — Adam Lind hit a three-run homer, Brett Cecil won for the first time in three starts and Toronto beat Kansas City. Lind’s sixth homer was the big blow in Toronto’s six-run fourth inning. • Indians 9, Angels 5: CLEVELAND — Rookie Zach McAllister lasted six innings, overcoming a throwing error and two home runs in the fifth, and Shelley Duncan homered to lead Cleveland past Los Angeles. • White Sox 19, Rangers 2: CHICAGO — Kevin Youkilis, Adam Dunn and Alex Rios homered in the first inning off Roy Oswalt and All-Star Chris Sale won his 10th game and Chicago beat Texas. • Twins 8, Tigers 6: DETROIT — Josh Willingham and Trevor Plouffe hit homers in a five-run third and Ryan Doumit had a go-ahead sacrifice fly in the seventh inning, lifting Minnesota past Detroit. • Athletics 3, Red Sox 2: OAKLAND, Calif. — Coco Crisp hit a game-ending sacrifice fly to go with his leadoff homer in the first, and Oakland rallied past Boston. • Orioles 5, Mariners 4: SEATTLE — Robert Andino homered in the ninth off Seattle reliever Charlie Furbush to give Baltimore a win over the Mariners after starter Wei-Yin Chen flirted with a perfect game for more than six innings.

• Brewers 13, Marlins 12: MILWAUKEE — Aramis Ramirez hit a two-run homer off Heath Bell in the bottom of the 10th inning to lift Milwaukee past Miami. Livan Hernandez (2-1) pitched the 10th and picked up the win after surrendering a home run to Jose Reyes. • Pirates 8, Astros 7: PITTSBURGH — Drew Sutton hit a one-out solo homer in the bottom of the ninth and Pittsburgh improved to eight games over .500 for the first time in 20 years with a win over Houston. • Mets 11, Phillies 1: NEW YORK — Jonathon Niese had a two-run single to back his fine performance on the mound and David Wright hit a three-run homer to break open New York’s romp against Philadelphia. • Nationals 9, Giants 3: WASHINGTON — All-Star shortstop Ian Desmond hit his 14th home run, and Washington became the latest team to beat up on San Francisco’s Tim Lincecum, pounding the struggling right-hander hard early and often. • Braves 10, Cubs 3: ATLANTA — Newly chosen AllStar Chipper Jones delivered his first five-hit game in a decade, driving in four runs and leading Atlanta past Chicago. Jones was added to the NL All-Star roster before the game. The 40-year-old third baseman replaced injured Dodgers outfielder Matt Kemp. • Rockies 3, Cardinals 2: ST. LOUIS — Jeff Francis worked five solid innings before the Colorado bullpen took over and Tyler Colvin hit a three-run homer as the Rockies beat St. Louis. • Padres 9, Diamondbacks 5: PHOENIX — Chase Headley doubled in three runs and San Diego roughed up Arizona rookie Trevor Bauer in his home debut. • Reds 3, Dodgers 1: LOS ANGELES — Luis Cruz doubled home the go-ahead run in his second game with the Dodgers and stole home on the next pitch, leading Los Angeles to a victory over Cincinnati.

Twins 8, Tigers 6 Minnesota Span cf Revere rf Mauer c Willingham lf Morneau 1b Plouffe 3b Doumit dh Dozier ss A.Casilla 2b Totals

AB 5 4 5 3 4 4 3 5 4 37

R 0 2 3 1 1 1 0 0 0 8

H 1 2 3 2 1 1 0 0 0 10

BI 0 0 1 3 0 2 1 0 0 7

BB 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 5

SO 1 1 1 0 0 1 2 3 1 10

Avg. .270 .328 .332 .272 .238 .249 .282 .235 .244

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Jackson cf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .320 Berry lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .295 Mi.Cabrera 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .317 Fielder 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .299 D.Young dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Avila c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .253 Raburn 2b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .180 Boesch rf 4 1 3 3 0 0 .238 R.Santiago ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .228 Totals 35 6 10 6 1 3 Minnesota 105 000 101 — 8 10 0 Detroit 030 300 000 — 6 10 2 E—R.Santiago 2 (4). LOB—Minnesota 9, Detroit 3. 2B—Mauer (18), Willingham (21), Raburn (10). HR—Willingham (18), off Below; Plouffe (19), off Ortega; Mauer (5), off Benoit; Boesch (8), off Blackburn; A.Jackson (9), off Blackburn. SB—Revere (16), Mauer (4). CS—Boesch (2). DP—Minnesota 1. Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP Blackburn 4 8 6 6 1 1 75 Gray W, 5-0 2 1 0 0 0 1 31 Waldrop H, 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 T.Robertson H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 Perkins S, 4-6 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP Below 2 2-3 5 5 1 0 3 60 Ortega 2 1-3 1 1 1 1 4 44 Villarreal L, 3-2 2 3 1 1 2 1 42 Benoit 1 1 1 1 1 1 22 D.Downs 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 Benoit pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. T—3:26. A—36,757 (41,255).

ERA 8.10 4.08 0.00 5.40 3.28 ERA 2.75 3.38 1.61 2.37 0.00

Indians 9, Angels 5 Los Angeles Trout cf Tor.Hunter rf Pujols 1b K.Morales dh Trumbo lf Callaspo 3b H.Kendrick 2b Aybar ss Hester c a-M.Izturis ph Totals

AB 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 1 37

R 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 5

H 2 0 1 2 0 2 1 2 0 0 10

BI 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 6

Avg. .340 .271 .272 .283 .304 .263 .280 .265 .262 .228

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo rf 5 2 2 0 0 2 .292 A.Cabrera ss 5 0 0 0 0 1 .290 Kipnis 2b 4 2 2 1 1 1 .275 Jo.Lopez dh 4 1 3 1 0 0 .270 Brantley cf 4 1 1 2 0 0 .280 C.Santana c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .218 Kotchman 1b 4 2 2 0 0 0 .226 Duncan lf 2 1 1 2 0 0 .221 Cunningham lf 1 0 1 1 0 0 .181 Hannahan 3b 4 0 2 1 0 1 .257 Totals 36 9 14 8 2 5 Los Angeles 000 050 000 — 5 10 1 Cleveland 120 130 11x — 9 14 1 a-grounded out for Hester in the 9th. E—Pujols (4), Hannahan (7). LOB—Los Angeles 5, Cleveland 6. 2B—K.Morales (11), Aybar (16), Choo (25), Jo.Lopez (11), Kotchman (10), Hannahan 2 (8). 3B—Choo (2). HR—Trout (10), off McAllister; Pujols (13), off McAllister; Duncan (7), off Haren. RBIs—Trout 3 (36), Pujols (49), Kipnis (48), Jo.Lopez (27), Brantley 2 (37), Duncan 2 (19), Cunningham (5), Hannahan (19). SB—Brantley (10). SF—Duncan. DP—Los Angeles 1; Cleveland 1. Los Angeles Haren L, 6-8 Takahashi

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 4 1-3 9 7 6 1 1 69 4.86 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 2 27 4.08

Hawkins 1 2 1 1 0 0 20 1.56 Walden 1 3 1 1 0 2 16 4.15 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McAllister W, 3-1 6 8 5 3 0 5 92 3.93 J.Smith H, 12 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.22 Pestano H, 20 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 1.91 Rogers 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 1.59 T—2:37 (Rain delay: 1:41). A—29,292 (43,429).

Tampa Bay 003 200 20x — 7 10 0 E—Er.Chavez (3), R.Martin 2 (4). LOB—New York 4, Tampa Bay 6. 2B—Jeter (15), Granderson (10), Ibanez 2 (12), De.Jennings (7), S.Rodriguez (10). HR—Wise (3), off Shields; S.Rodriguez (6), off Nova. SB—De.Jennings 2 (15), B.Upton (15), S.Rodriguez (4), E.Johnson (14). DP—New York; Tampa Bay 1.

White Sox 19, Rangers 2

New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nova L, 9-3 6 7 6 3 2 5 102 4.05 Rapada 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 3.00 Qualls 1 2-3 3 1 1 0 0 36 3.86 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields W, 8-5 7 10 4 4 0 5 100 4.11 Badenhop H, 4 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 3.74 Jo.Peralta H, 18 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 4.68 Rodney S, 24-25 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 0.96 Nova pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—2:56. A—26,453 (34,078).

Texas AB R Kinsler 2b 3 0 Alb.Gonzalez 2b 1 0 Andrus ss 4 0 Hamilton lf 2 0 L.Martin lf 1 0 Beltre 3b 3 0 1-B.Snyder pr-3b 1 0 Mi.Young dh 4 0 N.Cruz rf 3 0 Dav.Murphy rf 1 0 Napoli 1b 4 1 Torrealba c 4 0 Gentry cf 3 1 Totals 34 2

H 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 9

BI 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 5

Avg. .276 .255 .306 .316 .231 .323 .327 .266 .259 .290 .235 .227 .354

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. De Aza cf 6 3 2 0 0 0 .295 Youkilis 3b-1b 6 3 3 4 0 1 .242 A.Dunn dh 2 3 2 2 2 0 .216 b-Flowers ph-dh 1 1 0 0 1 1 .164 Konerko 1b 4 1 2 2 0 0 .337 E.Escobar 3b 2 1 1 0 0 0 .214 Rios rf 4 3 3 3 0 0 .314 Jor.Danks rf 0 0 0 1 0 0 .389 Pierzynski c 5 1 3 3 0 2 .291 Viciedo lf 4 2 2 0 1 1 .256 Al.Ramirez ss 5 1 3 2 0 0 .252 Beckham 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .239 a-O.Hudson ph-2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .179 Totals 44 19 21 17 4 7 Texas 000 000 020 — 2 9 1 Chicago 430 090 30x — 19 21 0 a-struck out for Beckham in the 6th. 1-ran for Beltre in the 7th. E—Kinsler (12). LOB—Texas 6, Chicago 6. 2B— Andrus (20), Gentry (7), A.Dunn (11), E.Escobar (2), Pierzynski (9), Viciedo (6), Al.Ramirez (11). 3B—De Aza (4). HR—Youkilis (5), off Oswalt; A.Dunn (25), off Oswalt; Rios (11), off Oswalt; Pierzynski (15), off Tateyama. DP—Texas 1; Chicago 2. Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Oswalt L, 2-1 4 2-3 13 11 9 1 4 112 7.79 Tateyama 1-3 5 5 5 1 0 17 14.40 Grimm 3 3 3 3 2 3 54 10.80 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sale W, 10-2 7 1-3 5 1 1 1 4 95 2.19 Omogrosso 1 2-3 4 1 1 0 1 37 5.40 T—2:58. A—30,183 (40,615).

Rays 7, Yankees 4 New York Jeter ss Granderson cf Al.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b Swisher rf Ibanez dh Er.Chavez 1b R.Martin c Wise lf Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 34

R 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 4

H 2 1 0 2 0 2 1 0 2 10

Tampa Bay De.Jennings lf C.Pena 1b B.Upton cf Keppinger 3b Zobrist rf Scott dh J.Molina c S.Rodriguez 2b E.Johnson ss Totals New York

AB R H 3 2 1 4 0 0 4 2 2 4 0 1 3 0 1 4 0 0 4 1 1 4 1 3 4 1 1 34 7 10 201 100

BI 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 0 7

Avg. .301 .244 .262 .315 .261 .237 .272 .182 .271

BI BB SO 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 5 2 6 000 — 4

Avg. .235 .197 .248 .317 .254 .201 .200 .221 .263 10 3

Blue Jays 6, Royals 3 Kansas City A.Gordon lf A.Escobar ss Hosmer 1b Butler dh Y.Betancourt 2b Moustakas 3b Francoeur rf S.Perez c Bourgeois cf Dyson cf Totals

AB 3 4 4 3 4 4 3 3 2 1 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 3

H 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 6

BI 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 2 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .276 .305 .233 .290 .255 .266 .253 .375 .333 .249

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lawrie 3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .294 Rasmus cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .259 Bautista rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .243 Encarnacion 1b 3 1 2 1 1 0 .296 K.Johnson 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .243 Y.Escobar ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .252 R.Davis lf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .273 Lind dh 4 1 2 3 0 1 .197 Mathis c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .235 Totals 34 6 13 6 2 6 Kansas City 003 000 000 — 3 6 0 Toronto 000 600 00x — 6 13 0 LOB—Kansas City 3, Toronto 6. 2B—Moustakas (19), Dyson (4). 3B—Bourgeois (1). HR—Lind (6), off Mazzaro. SB—Dyson (14). DP—Kansas City 2; Toronto 1. Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP Mazzaro L, 3-3 5 1-3 13 6 6 0 3 79 G.Holland 1 2-3 0 0 0 2 2 27 Mijares 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP Cecil W, 2-1 6 5 3 3 1 3 98 Frasor H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 Oliver H, 8 1 1 0 0 0 2 12 Janssen S, 10-11 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 Cecil pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—2:30. A—15,516 (49,260).

ERA 5.70 3.86 1.69 ERA 5.64 3.82 1.53 2.56

NL Boxscores Rockies 3, Cardinals 2 Colorado Colvin cf Belisle p c-E.Young ph R.Betancourt p Scutaro 2b C.Gonzalez lf Cuddyer rf Helton 1b Nelson 3b W.Rosario c J.Herrera ss Francis p Roenicke p Brothers p Fowler cf Totals

AB 3 0 1 0 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 0 0 1 32

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3

H 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 5

BI 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 5

SO 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .304 .000 .241 --.285 .338 .260 .243 .261 .247 .243 .000 .000 --.287

St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Furcal ss 5 0 1 0 0 0 .275 Jay cf 4 1 2 0 1 1 .326 Holliday lf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .313 Beltran rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .304 Craig 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .314 Y.Molina c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .309 Freese 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .286 1-S.Robinson pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .252 Greene 2b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .229 a-M.Carpenter ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Salas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Schumaker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .283 J.Kelly p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Browning p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Descalso ph-2b 1 0 1 0 1 0 .227 Totals 35 2 9 2 3 5 Colorado 003 000 000 — 3 5 0 St. Louis 200 000 000 — 2 9 1 a-struck out for Greene in the 7th. b-singled for Browning in the 7th. c-struck out for Belisle in the 9th. d-grounded out for Salas in the 9th. 1-ran for Freese in the 9th. E—Y.Molina (3). LOB—Colorado 7, St. Louis 9. HR—Colvin (10), off J.Kelly; Holliday (14), off Francis. SB—Y.Molina (8). DP—St. Louis 1. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP Francis W, 2-1 5 5 2 2 1 2 77 Roenicke H, 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 18 Brothers H, 9 2-3 2 0 0 1 1 17 Belisle H, 11 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 15 Betancourt S, 13 1 1 0 0 1 1 25 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP J.Kelly L, 1-1 6 5 3 2 4 5 96 Browning 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 Salas 2 0 0 0 1 3 22 T—3:00. A—41,701 (43,975).

ERA 5.16 2.57 3.52 1.83 3.03 ERA 3.29 0.00 5.60

Nationals 9, Giants 3 San Francisco G.Blanco rf-cf Theriot 2b Me.Cabrera lf Christian lf Posey 1b Hensley p Penny p b-Arias ph-3b Sandoval 3b Burriss 3b Ja.Lopez p Pagan cf Kontos p a-Belt ph-1b H.Sanchez c B.Crawford ss Lincecum p Schierholtz rf Totals

AB 5 5 3 1 3 0 0 0 2 2 0 2 0 1 4 4 1 3 36

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 3

H 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 10

BI 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 1 1 11

Avg. .256 .265 .352 .143 .300 .000 --.245 .302 .216 --.290 --.267 .254 .241 .136 .250

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lombardozzi lf 4 2 1 0 1 0 .257 Harper cf-rf 5 1 2 1 0 1 .276 Zimmerman 3b 4 2 1 0 1 1 .241 Ankiel cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .224 Morse rf 5 0 1 2 0 1 .287 Mic.Gonzalez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --H.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --LaRoche 1b 3 1 1 2 0 1 .252 Desmond ss 4 2 2 2 0 1 .279 Espinosa 2b 4 1 3 1 0 0 .232 Flores c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .245 Zimmermann p 3 0 1 1 0 0 .286 Mattheus p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-DeRosa ph-3b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .122 Totals 37 9 13 9 2 6 San Francisco 000 020 010 — 3 10 2 Washington 023 300 01x — 9 13 1 a-struck out for Kontos in the 6th. b-walked for Penny in the 8th. c-doubled for Mattheus in the 8th. E—G.Blanco (2), Posey (8), Zimmerman (6). LOB—San Francisco 8, Washington 7. 2B— Me.Cabrera (17), Sandoval (12), Harper 2 (14), LaRoche (19), Espinosa (19), Zimmermann (2), DeRosa (2). HR—Desmond (14), off Lincecum. SB—G.Blanco (15), Lombardozzi (2), Espinosa 2 (13).

San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lincecum L, 3-9 3 1-3 9 8 7 2 2 87 6.08 Kontos 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 29 1.80 Hensley 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 3.30 Penny 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 Ja.Lopez 1 2 1 1 0 0 21 3.63 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Zimmermn W, 5-6 6 7 2 1 0 7 99 2.70 Mattheus 2 2 1 1 1 2 29 1.95 Mic.Gonzalez 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 12 1.80 H.Rodriguez 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 5.06 Zimmermann pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—3:07 (Rain delay: 1:25). A—36,985 (41,487).

Braves 10, Cubs 3 Chicago DeJesus cf d-Campana ph S.Castro ss Rizzo 1b A.Soriano lf LaHair rf Clevenger c Barney 2b Valbuena 3b Volstad p Corpas p b-Mather ph Dolis p Asencio p c-Je.Baker ph Totals

AB 4 1 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 0 1 0 0 1 38

R 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10

BI 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 5

Avg. .272 .272 .291 .296 .269 .288 .279 .264 .230 .000 --.236 ----.239

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourn cf 3 3 1 3 2 1 .305 Prado lf 3 1 1 2 1 1 .320 Heyward rf 5 1 1 1 0 0 .273 C.Jones 3b 5 0 5 4 0 0 .313 1-J.Francisco pr-3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .223 F.Freeman 1b 3 0 0 0 2 1 .259 Uggla 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .231 McCann c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .225 Simmons ss 4 2 1 0 0 0 .323 Jurrjens p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .125 a-Hinske ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .206 Medlen p 1 1 0 0 1 1 .250 Venters p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 10 10 10 9 5 Chicago 003 000 000 — 3 10 0 Atlanta 100 054 00x — 10 10 1 a-walked for Jurrjens in the 5th. b-struck out for Corpas in the 6th. c-grounded out for Asencio in the 9th. d-singled for DeJesus in the 9th. 1-ran for C.Jones in the 8th. E—Uggla (9). LOB—Chicago 8, Atlanta 7. 2B— Rizzo (3), C.Jones 2 (10). 3B—Bourn (5). HR—Heyward (13), off Volstad. SB—A.Soriano (2), C.Jones (1). DP—Chicago 2; Atlanta 1. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP Volstad L, 0-7 4 1-3 7 6 6 2 3 77 Corpas 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 9 Dolis 1-3 0 3 3 3 0 16 Asencio 2 2-3 2 1 1 3 2 64 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP Jurrjens W, 2-2 5 9 3 0 0 2 80 Medlen H, 4 3 0 0 0 0 2 31 Venters 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 T—3:01. A—27,834 (49,586).

ERA 7.94 1.54 6.75 2.84 ERA 5.19 3.07 4.26

Pirates 8, Astros 7 Houston Schafer cf Altuve 2b Lowrie ss Ca.Lee 1b S.Moore 3b Lyon p d-J.Castro ph W.Wright p J.D.Martinez lf Bogusevic rf C.Snyder c Harrell p Fe.Rodriguez p M.Downs 3b Totals

AB 5 3 3 5 4 0 1 0 5 4 2 3 0 1 36

R 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 7

H 2 1 2 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 13

BI 2 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3

SO 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 1 9

Avg. .238 .304 .258 .286 .333 --.255 .000 .235 .217 .188 .226 --.171

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Presley lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .242 G.Hernandez lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .154 Sutton rf 5 2 3 1 0 2 .407 A.McCutchen cf 4 2 3 2 0 0 .360 G.Jones 1b 4 2 2 2 0 2 .270 Walker 2b 4 1 1 0 0 3 .276 McGehee 3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .249 Barajas c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .218 Barmes ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .203 a-P.Alvarez ph 1 0 1 2 0 0 .234 1-Ja.McDonald pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .121 J.Cruz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Grilli p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Fryer ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hanrahan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --A.J.Burnett p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .042 Resop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-J.Harrison ph-ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .218 Totals 38 8 13 8 0 13 Houston 021 102 001 — 7 13 0 Pittsburgh 000 203 201 — 8 13 0 One out when winning run scored. a-singled for Barmes in the 6th. b-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Resop in the 6th. c-popped out for Grilli in the 8th. d-doubled for Lyon in the 9th. 1-ran for P.Alvarez in the 6th. LOB—Houston 8, Pittsburgh 5. 2B—Altuve (19), Ca.Lee 2 (15), S.Moore (2), J.Castro (11), C.Snyder (5). HR—A.McCutchen (16), off Harrell; G.Jones (12), off Lyon; Sutton (1), off W.Wright. SB—Schafer (19), Bogusevic (8). DP—Pittsburgh 1. Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harrell 5 9 5 5 0 9 100 4.56 Fe.Rodriguez H, 7 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 6.46 Lyon BS, 1-1 2 2 2 2 0 2 30 3.13 W.Wright L, 0-2 1-3 1 1 1 0 1 8 3.91 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA A.J.Burnett 5 12 6 6 2 5 91 3.74 Resop 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 3.54 J.Cruz 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 2.54 Grilli H, 19 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 1.99 Hanrahan W, 4-0 1 1 1 1 1 0 19 2.32 A.J.Burnett pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. Harrell pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. T—3:15. A—21,516 (38,362).

Brewers 13, Marlins 12 (10 innings) Miami Reyes ss D.Solano 3b-lf Dobbs rf Choate p Cishek p H.Ramirez 3b Morrison lf-1b Ruggiano cf-rf Infante 2b G.Sanchez 1b M.Dunn p H.Bell p J.Buck c A.Sanchez p Gaudin p b-Kearns ph Webb p LeBlanc p d-Cousins ph-cf Totals

AB 6 5 4 0 0 0 5 4 5 5 0 0 4 2 0 0 0 0 2 42

R 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 12

H 3 2 1 0 0 0 2 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 14

BI 2 1 1 0 0 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 12

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .272 .368 .290 --.000 .259 .238 .403 .285 .194 .000 --.180 .083 .000 .271 .000 --.222

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Gomez cf 5 2 2 1 1 0 .247 Aoki rf 5 1 1 2 0 2 .292 Braun lf 6 2 2 3 0 2 .309 Ar.Ramirez 3b 6 1 2 4 0 0 .263 Hart 1b 5 2 3 1 0 1 .251 R.Weeks 2b 5 2 3 1 0 1 .194 Ransom ss 4 1 2 0 1 1 .215 M.Maldonado c 4 0 1 1 0 0 .266 Estrada p 2 1 1 0 0 1 .154 a-Ishikawa ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .250 Veras p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --M.Parra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Green ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Loe p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Fr.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Axford p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Kottaras ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .224 L.Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 44 13 17 13 3 8 Miami 200 000 360 1 — 12 14 3 Milwaukee 003 006 200 2 — 13 17 1 Two outs when winning run scored. a-was intentionally walked for Estrada in the 6th. b-was hit by a pitch for Gaudin in the 7th. c-flied out for M.Parra in the 7th. d-homered for LeBlanc in the 8th. e-popped out for Axford in the 9th.

E—Reyes 2 (9), D.Solano (1), R.Weeks (10). LOB—Miami 5, Milwaukee 7. 2B—Reyes (18), D.Solano (4), Morrison (14), Ruggiano (10), Ar.Ramirez (24), Hart (22), R.Weeks (14), Estrada (2). HR—Morrison (9), off Estrada; Ruggiano (4), off Veras; J.Buck (8), off Loe; Cousins (1), off Fr.Rodriguez; Reyes (3), off L.Hernandez; Hart (16), off A.Sanchez; Braun (23), off Gaudin; Ar.Ramirez (10), off H.Bell. SB—Dobbs (4), C.Gomez 2 (11). DP—Miami 1; Milwaukee 1. Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP A.Sanchez 5 11 6 5 1 5 95 Gaudin 1 1 3 0 1 0 16 Webb 1-3 3 2 2 0 1 18 LeBlanc 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 Choate 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 Cishek 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 21 M.Dunn 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 H.Bell L, 2-4 BS,5 2-3 1 2 2 1 1 16 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP Estrada 6 4 2 2 0 6 90 Veras 1-3 3 3 3 1 0 25 M.Parra H, 4 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 Loe 1-3 4 4 4 0 0 17 Fr.Rodriguez BS,5 2-3 2 2 1 1 0 18 Axford 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 Hernandez W, 2-1 1 1 1 1 0 2 24 A.Sanchez pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. T—4:28. A—33,178 (41,900).

ERA 4.19 4.76 5.66 0.00 2.45 2.31 5.94 6.39 ERA 4.31 4.54 4.46 4.21 4.17 4.73 5.24

Dodgers 3, Reds 1 Cincinnati Cozart ss Stubbs cf Votto 1b B.Phillips 2b Bruce rf Ludwick lf Frazier 3b Hanigan c Cueto p Ondrusek p c-Heisey ph Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 4 3 4 3 0 0 33

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

H 1 0 2 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 7

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 4

SO 0 2 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 7

Avg. .250 .218 .352 .283 .259 .242 .273 .272 .121 --.260

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. D.Gordon ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .228 A.Ellis c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .276 Abreu lf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .255 Lindblom p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Elbert p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Belisario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Van Slyke ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .186 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --J.Rivera rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .256 A.Kennedy 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .228 Loney 1b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .243 L.Cruz 3b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .200 Gwynn Jr. cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .249 Capuano p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .083 a-E.Herrera ph-lf 2 1 2 0 0 0 .250 Totals 30 3 7 2 1 8 Cincinnati 000 010 000 — 1 7 0 Los Angeles 000 001 20x — 3 7 0 a-singled for Capuano in the 6th. b-walked for Belisario in the 8th. c-walked for Ondrusek in the 9th. LOB—Cincinnati 9, Los Angeles 5. 2B—B.Phillips (13), L.Cruz (1). SB—L.Cruz (1). DP—Los Angeles 1. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cueto L, 9-5 7 7 3 3 0 7 106 2.35 Ondrusek 1 0 0 0 1 1 18 3.00 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Capuano 6 6 1 1 3 6 98 2.62 Lindblom 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.00 Elbert W, 1-1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.84 Belisario H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 1.03 Jansen S, 13-16 1 0 0 0 1 0 18 2.23 T—3:03. A—33,884 (56,000).

Padres 9, Diamondbacks 5 San Diego Venable rf Amarista 2b Headley 3b Quentin lf Gregerson p Grandal c Alonso 1b Maybin cf Ev.Cabrera ss Cashner p Ohlendorf p Vincent p Thayer p a-Guzman ph Thatcher p Denorfia lf Totals

AB 4 5 5 4 0 5 4 4 3 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 37

R 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 9

H 0 2 1 0 0 1 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 10

BI 0 1 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 8

BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 1 2 2 1 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10

Avg. .251 .290 .271 .289 .000 .263 .257 .210 .248 .000 .000 ----.239 --.292

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Drew ss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .143 A.Hill 2b 5 1 2 0 0 1 .301 J.Upton rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .268 Kubel lf 5 1 1 4 0 2 .295 Goldschmidt 1b 5 0 4 1 0 0 .308 M.Montero c 3 0 0 0 2 2 .268 C.Young cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .211 Blum 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .133 Bauer p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Corbin p 1 1 1 0 1 0 .182 D.Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 b-R.Roberts ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .236 Putz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 38 5 11 5 3 9 San Diego 020 510 010 — 9 10 0 Arizona 000 040 001 — 5 11 2 a-homered for Thayer in the 8th. b-flied out for D.Hernandez in the 8th. E—Kubel (1), Bauer (1). LOB—San Diego 6, Arizona 10. 2B—Headley (19), Alonso (18), A.Hill (19). HR—Alonso (3), off Bauer; Guzman (3), off Corbin; Kubel (13), off Vincent.SB—Ev.Cabrera 2 (15), Goldschmidt (8). DP—Arizona 1. San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP Cashner 2 1 0 0 0 2 28 Ohlendorf W, 2-0 2 1-3 4 3 3 2 1 64 Vincent 1 2-3 3 1 1 0 2 29 Thayer 1 1 0 0 0 1 8 Thatcher 1 0 0 0 1 1 20 Gregerson 1 2 1 1 0 2 24 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP Bauer L, 0-1 3 1-3 6 7 6 4 4 80 Corbin 4 1-3 4 2 1 1 6 66 D.Hernandez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 9 Putz 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 T—3:25. A—21,329 (48,633).

ERA 3.44 7.31 3.86 5.01 2.91 3.72 ERA 9.82 4.37 2.62 4.85

Mets 11, Phillies 1 Philadelphia Rollins ss Polanco 3b Utley 2b Ruiz c Pence rf Victorino cf Wigginton 1b Mayberry lf Worley p a-Luna ph Valdes p Sanches p b-Pierre ph Diekman p Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 3 4 2 3 1 1 0 0 1 0 30

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .256 .270 .294 .354 .286 .251 .246 .226 .000 .246 --.000 .317 ---

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tejada ss 5 2 3 1 0 0 .326 Dan.Murphy 2b 5 1 4 4 0 0 .288 D.Wright 3b 5 1 1 4 0 1 .351 I.Davis 1b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .199 Duda rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .256 Hairston lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .254 An.Torres cf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .206 Thole c 4 2 3 0 0 0 .274 Niese p 1 2 1 2 1 0 .217 c-Ju.Turner ph 1 1 0 0 0 0 .256 Rauch p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 37 11 15 11 2 8 Philadelphia 010 000 000 — 1 3 1 New York 130 203 02x — 11 15 0 a-grounded out for Worley in the 5th. b-grounded out for Sanches in the 8th. c-reached on error for Niese in the 8th. E—Polanco (3). LOB—Philadelphia 5, New York 5. 2B—Dan.Murphy 2 (23). 3B—Dan.Murphy (2). HR—Ruiz (12), off Niese; D.Wright (10), off Sanches. Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Worley L, 4-5 4 10 6 6 1 3 82 3.46 Valdes 1 2-3 2 2 2 1 2 36 3.48 Sanches 1 1-3 1 1 1 0 1 24 8.53 Diekman 1 2 2 1 0 2 20 3.94 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Niese W, 7-3 8 3 1 1 2 3 107 3.35 Rauch 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.06 T—2:38. A—42,516 (41,922).


WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Gymnast Continued from D1 “She’s just not a crier,” Maroney said. “She’s just not as emotional as everybody else. She kind of keeps things inside.” It’s no surprise to her parents, Jason and Kiana, who have watched the oldest of their three children become almost unflappable thanks to a poise that belies her age. “She’s just so competitive,” said Jason Ross, a former minor league baseball player. “It doesn’t matter if it’s gymnastics or if it’s school. She would come home from school and say, ‘This girl got a better grade than me’ and Kyla got a 98. She just always wants to win.” Maybe it’s because she’s gotten so used to it. The twotime U.S. junior champion has spent most of the past 10 years walking to the top of the podium at the end of most meets, where she dutifully accepts the medal and immediately begins focusing on the next one. She’s a vital part of a U.S. team with its sights firmly set on winning gold at the O2 Arena at the end of the month. The U.S. will need her graceful routines — and the high scores they produce — on uneven bars and beam to hold off the expected push from China and Russia. Though she lacks Wieber’s power and Douglas’ sass, the elegant Ross performs with a fluidity that makes it appear she floats between the bars and glides over the four-inch wide beam. The 15.650 Ross put together on bars during the finals on Sunday night was second only to the 15.900 posted by the otherworldly

Jae C. Hong / The Associated Press

Kyla Ross performs her floor exercise routine during the preliminary round of the women’s Olympic gymnastics trials last week in San Jose, Calif.

Douglas. Yet Douglas’ routines seem to be packed with drama. A hand-slip there, a daring flip over the bars there. There are no such theatrics for Ross. She’s smooth — every hand placement perfect, her body a study in kinetic energy and efficient movement. “She almost makes it look too easy,” Kiana Ross said. It wasn’t always that way. Her parents, who say their daughter was “born with muscles,” put Ross in the gym at age 3 to help calm her down. Yet she found more than an outlet, she found a home. She

loved the challenge of mastering a new trick and advanced so quickly she was thrust onto a competitive team at age 5 even though she was much smaller than most of the other gymnasts. Kiana Ross signed a “fat” stack of papers to give the coaches clearance to let her go and do her thing even though mom admits “I had no idea what we were getting into.” The early meets were a struggle as tiny Kyla tried to find her footing. The nerves didn’t last. She was top three in her age group by the end of that first season and hasn’t

looked back. She won the junior championship in 2009-10 and finished second last summer but was ineligible to compete for the world championship team in Tokyo last fall because she was too young. With the entire team that won gold at worlds trying to make a run for London, Ross knew she’d have to elbow her way into the picture. It didn’t take long. She was second to Wieber at the PacRim championships in her first meet as a senior. Her stock continued to climb at the U.S. championships in St.

Louis last month, finishing second on bars and grabbing fourth in the all-around and balance beam. Still, she wouldn’t mention London. At least, not to her parents. “We’d bring it up and she’d say, ‘Stop talking about it,’” Kiana Ross said. “She was only interested in what was the next thing.” At least, that’s what she told her parents. Maroney remembers a vivid talk the two had when they were still in elementary school, where they made a pact to make the Olympics one day. The memory flooded back to Maroney over the weekend, and on Sunday night she tweeted a picture of the two of them standing side-by-side as kids. “Cutest picture ever,” Maroney said with a laugh. On Monday they took a very different picture, one with them wearing red leotards with “USA” stitched on them. It’s a long way from the cramped gym in southern California when the Olympics were something you watched on TV. Now it’s real, but Ross is hardly intimidated by the stage. She sent her parents a text just before taking the floor on Sunday night telling them how excited she was to compete. She certainly looked ready, giving U.S. women’s team coordinator Martha Karolyi no reason to scratch Ross’ name off the list. When she was done there was joy, sure. Just no tears. Will they come in London if the U.S. wins team gold for the first time in 16 years? Maybe. But she doubts it.

GO LF NOTEBOOK

Pros earn another chance to chase after money By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

BETHESDA, Md. — Back when the PGA Tour season ended the first week of the November at the Tour Championship, there was growing support for a shorter season. Turns out that shorter season is not to take a break from golf, but to chase more money. There was the Kiwi Challenge that Hunter Mahan won in 2008. The Shanghai Masters was created last year. Tiger Woods went to Australia in 2009 and 2010, though he has a history of international travel from when he was a rookie. Phil Mickelson has a burgeoning golf course design business in Asia, and he is a two-time winner of the HSBC Champions in Shanghai. According to two British newspapers, the latest edition is the Turkish Airways World Golf Finals in October, with a $5.3 million pursue and the best players in the world. The Daily Mail and The Daily Telegraph report the field is to include Woods, Rory McIlroy, Luke Donald, Lee Westwood, Justin Rose, Charl Schwartzel, Webb Simpson and Mahan. The winner would receive $1.5 million, with $1 million going to the runner-up. The tournament is to be played Oct. 9-12, ending on a Friday so that it won’t steal attention away from the weekend of the Portugal Masters on the European Tour and the Frys.com Open on the PGA Tour, the second event in the Fall Series.

2.0 Continued from D1 It’s a lofty ambition. The number of golfers in the U.S. who played at least one round in a year slipped from 30 million in 2005 to 25.7 million in 2011, according to the National Golf Foundation. The PGA of America’s strategy to turn that trend is to reduce the barriers to playing the game — think more affordable options, short courses, pay-by-hole options, larger cups, forward tees and family-oriented events. “All of the programs and many more are designed to illustrate different opportunities to play more golf and also bring the entire family to the course,” says Brian Whitcomb, who owns Lost Tracks in Bend and is a former president of the PGA of America. “Many of the growth-of-the-game initiatives that have been offered previously are good, but this one has substance and specific tools to drive it,” adds Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch and a past president of the Pacific Northwest’s PGA section. Central Oregon courses Aspen Lakes, Awbrey Glen, Bend Golf and Country Club, Black Butte Ranch, Broken Top Club, Brasada, Crooked River Ranch, Eagle Crest, Juniper, Lost Tracks, Prong-

One newspaper said Woods is working toward a deal with the Turkish airline. None of the PGA Tour players involved were likely to be at the Frys.com Open, or in Las Vegas the week before. Woods made his Fall Series debut at the Frys.com Open last year, though he was still in conversation about a corporate deal at the time. Simpson lost in a playoff last year at the McGladrey Classic, which follows the Turkey event, though he was trying to win the money title. For the PGA Tour, the shorter regular season was created by the FedEx Cup, which offers $35 million in prize money. And the structure allowed it to then have a wraparound season starting in 2013, with the Fall Series being treated the same as regular PGA Tour events. One thing hasn’t changed. About the only break from golf is the week of Christmas. Fan voting The PGA Tour signed up Avis as a sponsor of its player-of-the-month award, and decided this year to let the fans vote. They have spoken for the month of June. Tiger Woods, who won the Memorial, received 51 percent of the vote to edge Webb Simpson, who won the U.S. Open. Also on the ballot was Memphis winner Dustin Johnson and Hartford winner Marc Leishman. There have been cases when a major champion didn’t win the award. Vijay Singh won in August 2008 over PGA

champion Padraig Harrington, though the Fijian won a World Golf Championship and FedEx Cup playoff event that month. Then again, it’s not just the fans. Players voted Rickie Fowler the PGA Tour rookie of the year in 2010 even though he didn’t win a tournament and failed to reach the Tour Championship. He won over Rory McIlroy, who shot 62 to win at Quail Hollow and tied for third in two majors, tying a record with a 63 at St. Andrews. Under the marketing deal, Avis made a $50,000 contribution to the Tiger Woods Foundation. This comes two days after Woods donated his $1.17 million check to the foundation from winning the AT&T National. Ogilvie out A sore back turned into a short year for Joe Ogilvie. Ogilvie was reaching down to pick up a head cover more than two months ago when he experienced a kind of pain he had never felt before. He treated it with massage, though it never went away entirely, and it reached a point where Ogilvie said he had issues with either his back, shoulder or neck three out of seven days. “Finally at Hartford, I woke up and couldn’t move,” Ogilvie said. An MRI revealed a herniated disk in his L-5 and S-1, meaning he is out for the year to let it properly heal. Ogilvie said doctors have said he should rest for four to six weeks and then start an intense rehabilitation. He could be ready by October if all goes well, but

horn, Sunriver Resort and Widgi Creek have all formally kicked off Golf 2.0 initiatives. Other area course have expressed a desire to do so in the future. In practice, that means facilities have such 2.0-inspired offerings as reduced family rates, family nights, nine-hole leagues, extreme forward tees, and golf lessons for children and women for whom the cost is either significantly reduced or free — among other initiatives. “If we don’t continue to bring new golfers into the game, and get latent golfers back, eventually the game, and business, of golf will dwindle away,” says Josh McKinley, head pro at Aspen Lakes in Sisters, which is now offering such programs as Family Golf Night, during which a family of four can play after 5 p.m. every day for $45, including carts. Golf courses are in the early stages of seeing what works. Awbrey Glen in Bend, for instance, has seen some success with its early programs, says head pro Tim Fraley. The course is considering staging a tournament in which a coffee can would be used instead of a regulation cup, “making life a little more rewarding and fun,” Fraley says. Making the game less frustrating for beginners is a key aim of Golf 2.0. Still, it is a work in progress. Crooked River Ranch’s 2.0 programs, which are centered around clinics and ju-

Ogilvie figures he is better off applying for a major medical exemption in 2013 instead of trying to make up ground in October. “If I was a 15-handicap, I could play golf,” he said. “It’s just really tough to beat Hunter Mahan this way.” The biggest pain now might be figuring out what to do with his time. He already is tired of reading everything on the Internet. Television doesn’t hold his interest for long. To kill time, the guy with an economics degree from Duke said he would study and take his Series 7 exam — formally known as the General Securities Representation Exam — required by all brokers and money managers. Of course. Rating races Tiger Woods again showed his television power last week when CBS Sports reported a 4.6 overnight rating with a 10 share for the final round Sunday, when Woods won the AT&T National for his third win of the year. It was up 188 percent over last year, though the rating did not measure the same metered markets because of widespread power outages in Philadelphia, Washington, Baltimore and Columbus, Ohio. Next up for Woods is The Greenbrier Classic, his first trip to West Virginia. The PGA Tour event will be up against NBC Sports and the U.S. Women’s Open, the biggest event on the LPGA Tour schedule. This will be the first time since 2003 that Woods has played the same week as the U.S. Women’s Open.

nior camps, have been slow to draw new golfers, Huffer says. But, he adds, “I think it is too early to measure the success of the program. It will take a concerted effort for two to three seasons before the real impact is felt. It doesn’t mean that one new golfer created won’t have an impact, but currently the game is losing players at a faster clip for a variety of reasons, and the tide needs to be turned.” Encouraging signs have emerged. Broken Top in Bend just introduced its own family golf night, too, geared to be friendliest to nongolfers. Each golfer plays the course’s family tees and gets one hour and 15 minutes to play as many holes as he or she wants. The idea is “to make the night more accessible to more people, and put the emphasis on fun rather than score,” says Louis Bennett, Broken Top’s head pro. The first tournament drew eight families and 23 golfers. Bennett is hoping that such experiences inspire nongolfers to love the game that he cherishes. The task is not an easy one. “The health and prosperity of our game is in the hands of the nongolfers,” reflects Bennett, “not in those that are already regular players.” — Reporter: 541-617-7868, zhall@bendbulletin.com.

D5

Asians Continued from D1 She should be: 36 South Koreans are currently ranked in the top 100 and they have won three of the past four U.S. Opens. They idolize Pak and even So Yeon Ryu, who won last year, said: “She is my hero.” Cristie Kerr said she believes the Asians, who include Taiwan’s Yani Tseng, the world’s top-ranked golfer, have been good for women’s golf. “It’s a different world we live in now,” Kerr said. “Golf has become such an international sport, especially in Asia. They’re just crazy for golf over there. It’s a very global thing now. We have a really talented tour, an international tour.” Pak, of course, has proved that her win was no fluke. She has won 25 tournaments including five majors, and in 2007 at age 30 became the youngest golfer inducted into the LPGA Hall of Fame. “I was a lucky person,” Pak said. “I’ve done everything I was dreaming for.” The Open will be played on the same layout as in 1998, a combination of Blackwolf Run’s River and Meadow Valley courses. Pak remembers how difficult the course was in 1998, and it will be longer this year at 6,954 yards, compared with 6,412. Par will be 72 instead of 71 because the seventh hole was changed to par 5. “I think that’s a very good move. It’s a little more fair,” Kerr said. The bunker on the left side of 18, a 445-yard par 4, will again be filled with water. Pete Dye built it so it could be flooded to create an intimidating water hazard for pro tournaments. Pak said she is happy officials decided to fill it again, even though the hole almost became a watery grave for her 1998 title hopes during the playoff with amateur Jenny Chuasiriporn. Pak had hit her drive into rough bordering the water hazard. She took her shoes and socks off, and waded into the water to hit a solid shot that extended the match, which she won on the 20th hole with a long birdie putt. Coming into this year’s event, Pak has not won since the 2010 Bell Micro LPGA Championship. But she has two top-10 finishes in 2012 despite a dislocated left shoulder that sidelined her earlier this year. She credits her fine play to excitement over returning to Blackwolf Run. “It’s really special,” Pak said.

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D6

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012

T EE T O GR EEN

G  B  Local • Redmond golfer wins junior consolation bracket: Redmond golfer Mason Rodby won the consolation bracket of the master flight last week in the 82nd annual Bob Norquist Oregon Junior Amateur at Oregon Golf Club in West Linn.

Rodby beat Montana Frame of Reedsport, 5 and 4, in the consolation bracket’s championship match. The Redmond High School senior-to-be lost his opening match in the main bracket but then won three consecutive matches before beating Frame. • Pronghorn, Troon to continue manage-

G W ment agreement: Pronghorn Golf Club has renewed its contract with Troon Golf, an Arizona-based management company. Troon, the largest golf management company in the world, has run the day-to-day operations at Pronghorn’s two golf courses since 2010. — Bulletin staff reports

GOLF SCOREBOARD The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-3850831, emailed to sports@bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

Club Results AWBREY GLEN GOLF CLUB Men’s Four-Ball Stroke Play, June 30 Four-Ball Stroke Play First Flight — Gross: 1, James Chrisman/Nick Vaughn, 68. Net: 1, John Maniscalco/Larry Hinkle, 61. 2, Bruce Branlund/Dave Morton, 64. Second Flight — Gross: 1, Dennis Magill/Bob Browning, 77. Net: 1, Jason Nyman/Jeff Weichman, 62. 2, Michael Mount/Dan Danford, 66. BEND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Ladies Golf Association, June 27 Stroke Play Championship Flight — Gross: 1, Nettie Morrison, 76. Net: 1, Jane Lussier, 73. A Flight — Gross: 1, Teddie Allison, 91. 2, Cindi Eielson, 94. Net: 1,Terry Markham, 73. 2, Kay Miller, 76. B Flight — Gross: 1, Ginger Williamson, 92. Net: 1, Linda Corson, 74. C Flight — Gross: 1, Robin Schueler, 103. 2, Mary Ellen Marlatt, 104. Net: 1, Sandy Mills, 72. 2 (tie), Linda Kammerich, 75; Joy Strickland, 75. D Flight — Gross: 1 (tie), Nan Cooley, 107; Nancy Eldredge, 107. Net: 1, Martha Weaver, 72. Nine-Hole Flight (Throw Out Worst Hole) — Gross: 1, Judy McKee, 51. Net: 1, Carolyn Olsen, 33. Men’s Day Game, June 28 O.N.E.S. First Flight (10 handicap or less) — Gross: 1, Charlie Rice, 34. Net: 1, Carl Ryan, 30.5. 2, Scott Holmberg, 33. Second Flight (11-16 handicaps) — Gross: 1, Mac Ryder, 37. Net: 1, Joe Miller, 32. 2, Brian Case, 32.5. Third Flight (17 and higher) — Gross: 1, Rich Gagne, 42. Net: 1, Rich Moorehead, 30. 2 (tie), Sid Smith, 32.5; Ken Kutska, 32.5. BLACK BUTTE RANCH Central Oregon Golf Tour, June 21 At Glaze Meadow Skins Ron Hostetler, 2. Mahina Young, 2. Tony Battistella, 1. Matt Pinkerton, 1. Lyle Zurflu, 1. Levi Drago, 1. Jim Palmer, 1. Mike Hannsen, 1. Bill Burley, 1. DESERT PEAKS GOLF CLUB Wednesday Ladies Club, June 27 Net Stroke Play 1, Vicki Moore, 72. 2 (tie), Jeanette Houck, 73; Sara Gephart, 73. KP — Vicki Moore. Wednesday Night Twilight League, June 27 Blind Nine 1, Dean Hunt, 33. 2 (tie), Ed McDaniel, 34.5; Bruce Stecher, 34.5. 4, Ken Southwick, 35. KP — Ed McDaniel. LD — Don Gish. Friday Night Couples, June 29 Chapman 1, Dick/Patty Pliska, 32.5. 2, Carl/Teresa Lindgren, 32.7. 3, Bruce/Jeanette Houck, 33.0. 4, Ed/Carol McDaniel, 33.1. Sunday Group Play, July 1 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Fred Blackman, 71. 2, Ed McDaniel, 73. 3, Mike Gardner, 76. 4, Ken Black, 77. Net: 1, Bob Ringering, 65. 2 (tie), Spud Miller, 67; Jim Wyzard, 67; Mike Funk, 67. KP — Val Paterson. LD — Ken Black. EAGLE CREST ECWGG Circle of Friends Tournament, June 26 Net Waltz 1, 2, 3 1, Lesley Hummel/Jan Jackson/Susan Moore/ Reenie Bozeman. 2, Pat Murrill/Susan Osborn/Susan Kaough/Karen Andrews. 3, Beattie Stabeck/Teddie Crippen/Maria Lanworthy/Vickiy Diegel. THE GREENS AT REDMOND Men’s Club, June 28 Net Stroke Play A Flight — 1, Joe Carpenter, 56. 2 (tie), Marv Bibler, 59; John Glover, 59. 4 (tie), Manual Diez, 60; Dan Morris, 60; Darwin Thies, 60. B Flight — 1, Scott McMillin, 56. 2, Ron Jondahl, 57. 3, Ron Minnice, 59. 4 (tie), Bill Armstrong, 62; Pee Wee Blackmore, 62. KPs — Dan Morris, No. 1; Bob Haak, No. 6; Joe Carpenter, No. 10; Mike Frier, No. 16. Golfers of the Week — A Flight: Marv Bibler; B Flight: Ron Minnice. JUNIPER Ladies Golf Club, June 27 True and False 0-23 handicaps — 1, Linda Wakefield, 34. 2, Debbie Kerr, 35. 3, Wesine Hall, 36. 24-34 handicaps — 1, Debbie Cooper, 32.5. 2, Pam Garney, 33. 3, Ginger Anderlohr, 35.5. 35-40 handicaps — 1, Adrienne Castle, 34.5. 2, Barb Wascher, 37. 3, Cherie Kurth, 38. KPs — Wesine Hall, Darla Farstvedt. LDs — Kareen Queen, Linda Wakefield, Diane Miyauchi, Ruby Kraus. Birdies — Mary Ann Doyle, Pam Garney, Kareen Queen, Sandy Cameron. MEADOW LAKES Cross Country Tournament, June 30 12-hole Stroke Play Gross: 1, Jim Montgomery, 46. 2, Caleb Henry, 52. Net: 1 (tie), Les Bryan, 46; Jeff Brown, 46. 3 (tie), Steve Spangler, 48; Mark Payne, 48; Rob Dudley, 48. KPs — Les Bryan, No. 1; Rob Dudley, No. 6 & No. 9. Senior League, July 3 Scramble Gross: 1, Lanny Webb/Gary Williams, 36. Net: James Shank/John McCulloch, 32; Phil Horton/Allen Jones, 32. KPs — Cliff Garrett, No. 13; John McCulloch, No. 17. QUAIL RUN Men’s Club, July 3 Stroke Play

Flight 1 — Gross: 1, Robert McPherson, 76. Net: 1, Josh Day, 71. 2, Ed Stoddard, 76. Flight 2 — Gross: 1, Ed Enright, 91. Net: 1, Al Wakefield, 69. 2, Tim Jenning, 72. Flight 3 — Gross: 1, Ron Moye, 99. Net: 1, Frank Domantay, 72. 2, Mo Walker, 77. KPs — Frank Domantay, No. 8; Robert McPherson, No. 14. RIVER’S EDGE Tuesday Men’s Club, June 26 Two-Man TRIPS Gross: 1, Derek Hampton/Andy Mack, 75. 2, Dave Fiedler/Mike Reuter, 78. 3, Randy Olson/Taylor Story, 82. 4, Wayne Johnson/Keith Wood, 83. 5, Roger Bean/Dick Carroll, 85. 6, Frank Spernak/Bob Rhodes, 86. 7, Richard Schieferstein/Jim Wilcox, 87. 8, Don Braunton/Doug King, 88. 9, Al Derenzis/Steve Langenberg, 91. 10, JJ Somer/Lloyd Vordenberg, 92. 11, Bob Deane/Mike Hoffman, 93. 12, Flip Houston/Jack Tibbetts, 98. Net: 1, Hampton/Mack, 57. 2, Johnson/ Wood, 60. 3, Schieferstein/Wilcox, 61. 4, Olson/Story, 62. 5, Spernak/Rhodes, 63. 6, Bean/Carroll, 64. 7(tie), Derenzis/Langenberg; Fiedler/Reuter, 65. 9, Braunton/ King, 67. 10, Deane/Hoffman, 70. 11, Somer/Vordenberg, 71. 12, Houston/Tibbetts, 72. KPs — Roger Bean, No. 4; Frank Spernak, No. 14. SUNRIVER RESORT Central Oregon Senior Women’s Golf Association June 27 at Meadows Stroke Play A Flight — Gross: 1, Jan Sandburg, 83. Net: 1, Janet King, 68. B Flight — Gross: 1, Linda Thurlow, 94. Net: 1, Teddie Crippen, 69. C Flight — Gross: 1, Sharlene Wanichek, 97. Net: 1, Julie Glender, 68. D Flight — Gross: 1, Diane Storlie, 110. Net: 1, Betty Cook, 72. KPs — A Flight: Carol Woodruff; B Flight: Karen Wintermeyer; C Flight: Midge Thomas. Accurate Drives — A Flight: Pauline Rhodes. B Flight: Phyllis Lees. C Flight: Julie Glender. D Flight: Pat Porter. Men’s Golf Club, June 27 at Crosswater Two-Net Best Balls First Group — 1, Scott Brown/Dan Frantz/Robert Hill/Tim Swezey, 121. 2, Mike Calhoun/Ron Bures/ Don Martin/T. Haselip, 126. Second Group — 1, Greg Cotton/Don Wright/ Dick Korban/S. Stedman, 122. 2, Paul Dorwart/Paul Grieco/Eric Selberg/D. Freeman, 132. Third Group — 1, R. Egertson/Gary Brooks/Tom Ellis/Frank Vulliet, 125. 2, Don Olson/Brian Guilfoyle/ Jim Zant/blind draw, 130. Stroke Play Gross: 1, Mike Calhoun, 74. Low Net: 1, Gary Brooks, 66. Skins Tournament Tees (0-18 handicaps) — Gross: Bures, 2. Olson, 2. Hill, 1. Frantz, 1. Net: Hill, 2. Olson, 2. Swezey, 2. Knaupp, 2. White Tees (0-18 handicaps) — Gross: Boston, 3. Dorwart, 3. Cotton, 2. Grieco, 2. Wellnitz, 1. Net: Boston, 2. Cotton, 2. Spaulding, 1. Wright, 1. (19-36 handicaps) — Net: Vulliet, 4. Poe, 1. Potts, 1. Freeman, 1. Larson, 1. Wood, 1.

Hole-In-One Report June 29 THE GREENS AT REDMOND Ragnar Bakken, Redmond No. 13. . . . . . . . . . . .139 yards . . . . . . . . . . 7-wood July 2 THE GREENS AT REDMOND Jenelle Burkhart, Bend No. 16. . . . . . . . . . . .102 yards . . . . . . . . . . . 8-iron

Calendar The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf events calendar. Items should be mailed to P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708; faxed to the sports department at 541385-0831; or emailed to sports@bendbulletin. com. ——— LEAGUES Tuesdays — The Men’s Club at River’s Edge Golf Course in Bend plays weekly tournaments. Members of the men’s club and others interested River’s Edge Golf Club men with an established USGA handicap are invited to participate. For more information or to register, call River’s Edge at 541-389-2828. Tuesdays — The Ladies League at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend plays weekly at 9 a.m. All women golfers are welcome. For more information, call the pro shop at 541-385-1818. Tuesdays — Black Butte Ranch Women’s Golf Club accepts women golfers of all levels. Cost to join is $40 plus green fees for the 2012 season. For more information or to register, call the Big Meadow golf shop at 541-595-1500. Tuesdays — Ladies of the Greens women’s golf club at The Greens at Redmond golf course plays weekly from May through October. New members are welcome. For more information, call the Greens at Redmond at 541-923-0694. Tuesdays — The Men’s Club at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters plays at 8:30 a.m. through the golf season. New members are welcome. For more information, call Aspen Lakes at 541-549-4653. Wednesdays — The Women’s Club at River’s Edge Golf Course in Bend plays weekly in tournaments that tee off at 9:30 a.m. Members are welcome and should sign up by the preceding Saturday for the tournaments. For more information, or to register, call River’s Edge at 541-389-2828. Wednesdays — Juniper Ladies Golf Club plays weekly between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. All women players welcome. For more information visit www.juniperladies.com. Wednesdays — Men’s Golf Association at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville plays weekly at 5 or 5:30 p.m. All men are welcome. For more information, call Zach Lampert at 541-447-7113. Wednesdays — Ladies Club at Desert Peaks in Madras. Times vary each week. For more information, call Desert Peaks at 541-475-6368. Wednesdays — Men’s club at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters plays every Wednesday morning. For more information, call Aspen Lakes at 541-549-4653.

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Wednesdays — Men’s club at Sunriver Resort plays weekly tournaments at the Meadows or Woodlands courses with shotgun starts around 9 a.m. Cost is $55 for annual membership. For more information, email Don Olson at d.s.olson@msn.com or go to www.srmensgolf.com. Wednesdays — Women’s club at Sunriver Resort plays weekly tournaments at the Meadows or Woodlands courses with shotgun starts approximately 9 a.m. There are both nine-hole and 18-hole groups. For more information, call Sue Revere at 541-593-9223. Wednesdays — Widgi Creek Women’s Golf Association at Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend is a weekly golf league. For more information, call the Widgi Creek clubhouse at 541-382-4449. Wednesdays — Widgi Creek Men’s Club at Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend is a weekly golf league. For more information, call the Widgi Creek clubhouse at 541-382-4449. Thursdays — Quail Run Golf Course women’s 18-hole golf league plays at 8 a.m. during the golf season. Interested golfers are welcome. For more information, call Penny Scott at 541-598-7477. Thursdays — Ladies of the Lakes golf club at Meadow Lakes Golf Course is a weekly women’s golf league. All women players welcome. For more information, call the Meadow Lakes pro shop at 541447-7113. ——— CLINICS OR CLASSES July 9-11 — Adult coed golf lessons at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend offered by the Bend Park & Recreation District. Sessions are 5:30 to 7 p.m. and are taught by PGA professional Bob Garza. Each session includes on-course instruction and a maximum student/teacher ratio of 8-to-1. Equipment will be provided for those students without their own. Cost is $55 for residents of the Bend Park & Recreation District, $74 for others. To register, call 541-389-7275 or visit www.bendparksandrec.org. July 16-18 — Youth golf lessons for children ages 8 to 14 at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend offered by the Bend Park & Recreation District. Sessions are 9 a.m. to noon and are taught by PGA professional Bob Garza and his staff. Each session includes on-course instruction, lesson on golf etiquette, and a maximum student/teacher ratio of 8-to-1. Equipment will be provided for those students without their own. Cost is $55 for residents of the Bend Park & Recreation District, $74 for others. To register, call 541-389-7275 or visit www.bendparksandrec.org. July 30-Aug. 3 — Oregon State University’s Junior Golf Camp in Corvallis is for boys and girls ages 12 through 18. Camp attendees will recieve instruction by Oregon State women’s golf coach Risë Alexander and assistant coach Kailin Downs, a former professional golfer and Mountain View High School standout. Cost is $995, and includes instruction, room, board, t-shirt, green fees and practice ball expenses). Cost is $845 for golfers who do not need room and board. For more information or to register, visit www. oregonstategolfcamp.com. Aug. 6-8 — Adult coed golf lessons at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend offered by the Bend Park & Recreation District. Sessions are 5:30 to 7 p.m. and are taught by PGA professional Bob Garza. Each session includes on-course instruction and a maximum student/teacher ratio of 8-to-1. Equipment will be provided for those students without their own. Cost is $55 for residents of the Bend Park & Recreation District, $74 for others. To register, call 541-389-7275 or visit www.bendparksandrec.org. Aug. 6-8 — Youth golf lessons for children ages 8 to 14 at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend offered by the Bend Park & Recreation District. Sessions are 9 a.m. to noon and are taught by PGA professional Bob Garza and his staff. Each session includes on-course instruction, lesson on golf etiquette, and a maximum student/teacher ratio of 8-to-1. Equipment will be provided for those students without their own. Cost is $55 for residents of the Bend Park & Recreation District, $74 for others. To register, call 541-389-7275 or visit www.bendparksandrec.org. ——— TOURNAMENTS July 7-8 — Prineville Invitational Pro-Am at Prineville Golf Club. Friday practice round and evening horse race for professionals also available. For more information, contact Prineville GC at 541-4803566. July 8 — The Audrey Ditmore Memorial Golf Tournament is an 18-hole four-person scramble at Desert Peaks Golf Club in Madras. Cost is $100 per team and includes green fees, KP and long drives, and barbecue lunch. For more information or to register, call Desert Peaks at 541-475-6368, visit www.desertpeaksgolf. com, or email desertpeaksgolf@gmail.com. July 9 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event at John Day Golf Course in John Day. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $150 for the season plus a $5 per-event fee. For more information, call Ron Meisner at 541-548-3307. July 9 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association tournament at Tetherow Golf Club in Bend. Tee times begin at noon. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, email cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga.com. July 10 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association’s looper tournament at Awbrey Glen Golf Club’s Loop Course in Bend. Event is for 6- to 8-year-olds. Golf begins at 4 p.m. Cost is $15 to register for three events, plus an $8 per-event fee. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, email cojga@ hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga.com. July 13 — Golf tournament at Eagle Crest Resort’s Ridge course in Redmond to benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon and Kiwanis Club of Redmond. Four-person scramble begins at 8 a.m. Entry fee is $125 per person or $500 per team and includes continental breakfast, barbecue lunch, prizes for the first- and second-place teams, men’s and women’s long-drive contest, and closest-to-the-pin contest on every hole. Awards ceremony and silent auction to follow tournament. Sponsorships are available. For more information, contact Brandy Fultz at 541-504-9060, or email to bfultz@bgcco.org. July 13 — The 31st annual St. Charles Medical Center golf tournament at Eagle Crest Resort’s Resort Course. This tournament is a four-person Texas scramble with awards for men, ladies and mixed doubles. Prizes for men’s and women’s longdrive competition. Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Entry fee is $95 per player and includes continental breakfast, golf, cart, range balls, prizes and catered lunch. For more information, call Jan at 541-923-9766. July 16 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Associa-

tion tournament at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. Tee times begin at 1 p.m. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, email cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga.com. July 16-17 — Peter Jacobsen’s Legends of Oregon golf tournament at a Central Oregon golf course to be determined. Tournament is a two-net shamble, and each team will include an Oregon “legend” in group to round out fivesome. University of Oregon alumni and coaches scheduled to be on hand include Mike Bellotti, Joey Harrington, and Jacobsen. Cost is $5,000 per foursome. Proceeds benefit the Duck Athletic Fund. For more information, call 541-346-5433, or visit www.legendsoforegon.com. July 19 — Couples Nine-Hole Golf Outing at Aspen Lakes Golf Course. Golf begins with 4:30 p.m. shotgun start and three-course dinner at Brand 33 Restaurant begins at 7 p.m. Cost is $90 per couple and includes golf and dinner. For more information or to register, call the Aspen Lakes pro shop at 541549-4653. July 19 — Central Oregon Golf Tour tournament at Black Butte Ranch’s Big Meadow course. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. July 19-20 — Diamond in the Rough Ladies Invitational at Crooked River Ranch is a 36-hole tournament for two-person teams. Thursday’s round is a best ball followed by a Friday Chapman. Open to any golfer with an official USGA handicap. For more information or to register, call Crooked River Ranch at 541-9236343, or visit www.crookedriveranch.com. July 20 — Rimrock Trails fundraising golf tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Fourperson scramble begins with 8 a.m. shotgun. Cost is $320 per team and includes golf, cart and dinner. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes pro shop at 541-447-7113. July 21 — Soroptomist fundraising tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Four-person scramble begins with 8 a.m. shotgun. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes pro shop at 541-447-7113. July 23 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association tournament at Tokatee Golf Club in Blue River. Tee times begin at 11 a.m. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, email cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga.com. July 23-24 — Oregon Chapter of the PGA pro-am tournament. Format for both days is a net Stableford. This two-day event is held at Sunriver Resort’s Crosswater Club and Tetherow Golf Club in Bend. Cost for amateurs is $200 per golfer. Contact: Amy Kerle, 800574-0503 or www.pnwpga.com. July 23-34 — Central Oregon Junior at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond is an Oregon Golf Association junior tournament. For more information or to register, call the OGA at 866-981-4653 or visit www. oga.org. July 24 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association’s looper tournament at Awbrey Glen Golf Club’s Loop Course in Bend. Event is for 6- to 8-year-olds. Golf begins at 4 p.m. Cost is $15 to register for three events, plus an $8 per-event fee. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, email cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga.com. July 25 — The Rude Rudy Golf Tournament at Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend benefits the Hunger Prevention Coalition of Central Oregon. Individual stroke-play event for men and women competing based on handicap index. Entry fee of $150 includes a luncheon and a barbecue dinner. Contact: Marie Gibson, 541-385-9227. July 29 — United Way Golf Classic at Sunriver Resort’s Crosswater Club. Scramble begins with a noon shotgun start. Cost is $175 per player or $700 per foursome and includes golf, cart, lunch, and awards barbecue. Sponsorships also available. Proceeds benefit the Deschutes County United Way. For more information or to register, call the Crosswater clubhouse at 541-593-1145 or visit www.sunriverresort.com. July 30 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association tournament at River’s Edge Golf Course in Bend. Tee times begin at 8 a.m. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, email cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga.com. July 30 — U.S. Amateur sectional qualifying tournament at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. Event is open to any amateur male player with a handicap index of 2.4 or lower. Top finishers qualify for the 111th U.S. Amateur Championship to be held Aug. 13-19 at Cherry Hills Country Club in Cherry Hills Village, Colo. Download a registration form at www. usga.org and click on the “championships” link. Aug. 3-5 — Kah-Nee-Ta Ladies Invitational at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino near Warm Springs. Two-person 54-hole tournament begins with first-round scramble, second-round best ball, and final-round Chapman. Optional practice round also available. Maximum handicap is 36 and team members must have handicaps within 12 strokes of each other. Cost is $250 per team and includes golf, range balls, and banquet. Discounted rates at Kah-Nee-Ta Spa Wanapine are also available. For more information or to register, visit www.kahneeta.com or call 541-553-4971. Aug. 4 — Phil Wick Memorial Tournament at Prineville Golf Club. For more information, contact Prineville GC at 541-480-3566. Aug. 6 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event at Valley Golf Course in Burns. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $150 for the season plus a $5 per-event fee. For more information, call Ron Meisner at 541-548-3307. Aug. 6 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Tee times begin at 8 a.m. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, email cojga@ hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga.com. Aug. 8-9 — Senior Master’s Invitational at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation is presented by the Oregon Chapter of the PGA. The 36-hole tournament features a team best ball format and individual 36-hole stroke play competition for professionals and amateurs. Golfers must turn at least 50 years old in 2012. For more information, call 541-553-4971 or visit www.orpga.com.

USGA U.S. WOMEN’S OPEN Site: Kohler, Wis. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Blackwolf Run, Championship Course (6,954 yards, par 72). Purse: TBA ($3.25 million in 2011). Winner’s share: TBA ($585,000 in 2011). Television: ESPN2 (ThursdayFriday, 1-5 p.m.) and NBC (Saturday-Sunday, noon-3 p.m.). Last year: So Yeon Ryu won the rain-delayed tournament in a Monday finish at The Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, Colo., beating South Korean rival Hee Kyung Seo by three shots in a three-hole playoff. Ryu birdied the final hole of regulation to tie Seo. Last week: Japan’s Ai Miyazato won the NW Arkansas Championship for her second LPGA Tour victory of the year and ninth overall. Notes: South Korea’s Se Ri Pak won the 1998 tournament at Pete Dye-designed Blackwolf Run, beating Jenny Chuasiriporn in a Monday playoff. .... The LPGA Tour is off the next two weeks. Play will resume July 26-29 with the Evian Masters in France.

PGA Tour GREENBRIER CLASSIC Site: White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: The Greenbrier Resort, The Old White TPC (7,274 yards, par 70). Purse: $6.1 million. Winner’s share: $1,098,000. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday, noon-4 p.m.) and CBS (Saturday-Sunday, noon-3 p.m.). Last year: PGA Tour rookie Scott Stallings won his first title, beating Bob Estes and Bill Haas with a birdie on the first hole off a playoff. Last week: Tiger Woods won the AT&T National at Congressional for his tour-best third victory of the season. Notes: Woods is playing the tournament for the first time. He’s second on the PGA Tour victory list with 74, one more than Jack Nicklaus and eight

behind Sam Snead. ... The John Deere Classic is next week in Silvis, Ill., followed by the British Open at Royal Lytham and St. Annes.

Champions Tour FIRST TEE OPEN Site: Pebble Beach, Calif. Schedule: Friday-Sunday. Courses: Pebble Beach Golf Links (6,837 yards, par 72) and Del Monte Golf Course (6,357 yards, par 72). Purse: $1.7 million. Winner’s share: $255,000. Television: Golf Channel (Friday, 4:30-6:30 p.m.; Saturday, 3:30-6:30 p.m.; Sunday, 4-6:30 p.m.). Last year: Jeff Sluman won the event for the third time, finishing with a 2-under 70 for a twostroke victory. Last week: Joe Daley won the Senior Players Championship at Fox Chapel in Pittsburgh for his first Champions Tour title. Notes: The U.S. Senior Open is next week at Indianwood in Lake Orion, Mich. ... Tom Kite won the 1983 Crosby and 1992 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach.

European Tour FRENCH OPEN Site: Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, France. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Le Golf National, Albatross Course (7,331 yards, par 71). Purse: $3.97 million. Winner’s share: $661,835. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-Friday, 5:30 a.m.9:30 a.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 5 a.m.-9 a.m.). Last week: France’s Thomas Levet closed with a 1-under 70 in windy conditions for a onestroke victory over Denmark’s Thorbjorn Olesen and England’s Mark Foster. Last week: Wales’ Jamie Donaldson won the Irish Open for his first European Tour title. Notes: The Scottish Open is next week at Castle Stuart, followed by the British Open at Royal Lytham and St. Annes. ——— All Times PDT

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“You don’t want to have students invest two years of their lives in a program and then have no job opportunities. In the career and technical education world, the goal is a career.” — Karin Hilgerson, vice president for instruction, Central Oregon Community College

Boeing predicts 34K plane sales Boeing is predicting that the world’s airlines will buy 34,000 new airplanes over the next 20 years, driven by strong growth in China, India and other emerging markets. Boeing predicted that $4.5 trillion worth of planes will be sold. It will have to compete with Airbus and other competitors including Bombardier, Embraer and China’s state-owned COMAC. Boeing says the most planes will be sold in the Asia Pacific region. The next biggest market is Europe. North America is third. The Chicago company reduced its projection for the number of freighter airplanes that will be sold. It says the cargo market remains sluggish.

‘Call of Duty’ goes online to China Activision is bringing its popular “Call of Duty” series to China as a free online game. Activision Blizzard Inc. said Tuesday that it will publish the game through a partnership with Tencent Holdings Ltd., a Chinese online game company. There is no release date yet, and the contents of the game must still be approved by the Chinese government. The game is being developed in Shanghai specifically for the Chinese market.

The 2011 dollar value of flags, fireworks and other items associated with Independence Day. • American flags imported into the U.S., mostly from China: $3.6 million. • U.S. flags exported: $633,071 • Fireworks imported from China: $232.3 million • Trade between the United States and the United Kingdom: $107.1 billion •Sales of Oregon cattle, the state’s top commodity: $799.8 million Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, Oregon Agricultural Information Network

Car sales see big increase in June Los Angeles Times (MCT)

P h o t o s b y T h e Associated Press

A recent state audit suggests nurses, electrical power line installers and repair workers, and graphic designers are some of the high-demand jobs for which Oregon’s Community Colleges need to provide training.

Where the JOBS will be • A state audit suggests some skills that will be in demand in the job market of the future By Rachael Rees • The Bulletin

B

ookkeepers, dental hygienists, electricians and workers in similarly trained occupations represent one-third of Oregon’s jobs, but the state may face a shortage of trained workers to fill those jobs in the future, according to a recent report. Oregon’s community colleges and regional workforce investment boards need to better identify those high-demand jobs and the skills needed to fill them, according to an Oregon secretary of state audit report released last month. The report recommends that the governor’s office coordinate with community college and workforce officials to build training programs for high-demand occupations into planning and budgeting. “Economic growth is linked with educational attainment, and having an adequate supply of skilled workers is central to a strong economy,” the report stated. “Producing fewer trained middle-skill workers than businesses require creates missed opportunities to better employment and increased earnings for Oregon’s workers.” The report, titled “Improvements need-

— From wire reports

Fourth of July by the numbers

CLOSE $28.243 CHANGE +$0.775

By Jerry Hirsch

Netflix viewing tops 1B hours Netflix says its subscribers watched more than 1 billion hours of online video last month as the advent of highspeed Internet connections and high-powered mobile devices change people’s viewing patterns. The milestone announced Tuesday is the latest sign that the Internet video service may be starting to reduce the amount of time its 26.5 million streaming subscribers spend watching advertising-supported entertainment bundled in more expensive cable-television packages. Netflix Inc. sells the service for $8 per month. The 1 billion hours of collective viewing during June works out to a monthly average of 38 hours per streaming subscriber. That’s up from an estimated 28 hours per customer in December.

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Stock listings, E2-3 Calendar, E4 News of record, E4

LOS ANGELES — If consumer confidence is lagging, it’s not hurting enough to stop people from buying cars. Most of the major automakers posted healthy U.S. sales gains in June and said they are pleased with how the domestic market has performed during the first half of this year. General Motors Co. said it sold 248,750 vehicles in June, a 16 percent increase over the same period a year ago and the company’s highest monthly sales figure since September 2008. The Chevrolet, Buick, GMC and Cadillac brands all logged doubledigit increases. “Across the board, June was a strong month for GM,” said Kurt McNeil, vice president, U.S. sales operations. “The combination of new products, available credit, lower fuel prices and modest economic growth was a stronger influence on consumer behavior than economic and political uncertainty.” See Cars / E3

Factory orders tick upward in May

Local demand

ed to better meet Oregon’s middle-skill workforce needs,” focuses on jobs that require more than a high school diploma — an associate degree or a postsecondary certificate — but not a bachelor’s degree. It calls them middle-skill jobs. In the region that includes Central Oregon, the report lists 10 occupations — including preschool teachers, registered nurses, truck drivers, aircraft mechanics, electric power line installers — where the training may not meet the demand for jobs in the future. Central Oregon Community College currently has more than 25 certificate and associate-degree options for middleskill jobs, and is adding more. “As community colleges, we try to be responsive to the community and workforce needs of Central Oregon,” said Karin Hilgersom, COCC vice president for instruction. “(But) we have to balance between student, fiscal and industry needs.” Career and technical education programs often have high startup costs, are capital-intensive and cost more to operate than other educational programs, the See Jobs / E3

Occupations for which the number of trained workers may not meet future demand in Region 5 — Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson and eight other counties east of the Cascades, between the California and Washington borders — according to the Oregon Secretary of State report, “Improvements needed to better meet Oregon’s middle-skill workforce needs.” • Aircraft mechanics and service technicians • Bookkeeping, accounting and auditing clerks • Electrical power line installers and repairers • Graphic designers • Legal secretaries • Pharmacy technicians • Preschool teachers • Registered nurses • Telecommunication equipment installers and repairers • Truck drivers

For more information of Central Oregon Community College’s career and technical education programs visit: http://current.cocc.edu/Degrees_Classes/Degrees_Reqs/ProfTech/default.aspx

By Martin Crutsinger The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Companies placed more orders with U.S. factories in May than in April, demanding more computers, machinery and other equipment that signal investment plans. The increase is a welcome sign after two months of declining factory orders. Still, factory orders are down from the start of the year. And more recent data show manufacturing activity shrank in June for the first time in three years, adding to worries that weaker global growth is weighing on the U.S. economy. “The demand for manufactured goods is recovering moderately and irregularly, but that recovery has been relatively weak relative to the magnitude of the previous declines,” said Steven Wood, chief economist at Insight Economics. See Orders / E3

AT WORK

Midweek Fourth slows the gears of industry By Hannah Sampson McClatchy Newspapers (MCT)

MIAMI — Jim Angleton plans to work all of this holiday-split week. But he’ll be lonely at the office. The owner and president of AEGIS FinServ Corp., a Miami Lakes, Fla.-based company that issues travel expense debit and credit cards for government and corporate clients, Angleton has given the bulk of his workers the week off with pay. Most of the

employees are veterans. “Me, myself and I — the three of me are working,” he said. “The lights will be off except for one.” Offices throughout the nation are similarly dark this week as a Wednesday Fourth of July — the last was in 2007 — has prompted workers to take five-day weekends or an entire week of vacation. While the extra time off for vacationers could lead to increased business for grocery stores, fireworks stands and

hotels, other companies are seeing the gears of industry grind to a temporary halt. “In my office, it’ll be hard to find a lot of my staff,” said Nicki Grossman, head of the tourism office in Broward County, Fla. There will be enough people on hand to help the visitors expected for the holiday week. “But many of my staff are taking the opportunity to do what most of America is doing, and that is travel a little bit,” she said.

According to a travel forecast from AAA, an estimated 42.3 million people nationwide are expected to travel 50 miles or more from home during the holiday, a nearly 5 percent increase from last year. While the association counts the official holiday stretch as July 3-8, 54 percent of people with travel plans said they intended to start the trip before the work week even began. The National Retail Federation says grocery stores could see a boost as more than 160

million people plan to spend the holiday at a cookout or picnic. AutoNation, a Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based chain of auto dealers, hopes consumers have an appetite for more than barbecue. Spokesman Marc Cannon said the company anticipates a busy week, as long as the weather cooperates; staffing could increase as much as 10 percent at some locations to handle the traffic. See Holiday / E3


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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012

Consolidated stock listings N m

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A-B-C-D AAR 0.30 ABB Ltd 0.71 ABM 0.58 ACE Ltd 1.78 AES Corp AFLAC 1.32 AGCO AGL Res 1.84 AK Steel 0.20 AMC Net AOL ASML Hld 0.59 AT&T Inc 1.76 ATP O&G AU Optron 0.14 AVI Bio h Aarons 0.06 Aastrom Abaxis AbtLab 2.04 AberFitc 0.70 AbdAsPac 0.42 Abiomed Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaHl n AcadiaPh AcadiaRlt 0.72 Accelrys Accenture 1.35 AccoBrds AccretivH Accuray Accuride Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActiveNet ActivsBliz 0.18 Actuant 0.04 Actuate Acuity 0.52 Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran 0.36 AdvAuto 0.24 AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi 0.11 AdvOil&Gs AdvActBear AecomTch AegeanMP 0.04 Aegon 0.13 Aegon cap 1.59 AerCap Aeropostl AeroViron AEterna gh Aetna 0.70 AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agilent 0.40 Agnico g 0.80 Agrium g 1.00 AirLease AirProd 2.56 Aircastle 0.60 Airgas 1.60 AkamaiT Akorn AlaskAir s AlaskCom 0.20 Albemarle 0.80 AlcatelLuc Alcoa 0.12 Alere AlxB Inc n AlexREE 2.04 AlexcoR g Alexion AlignTech Alkermes AllegTch 0.72 Allergan 0.20 AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco 0.48 AlliantEgy 1.80 AlldNevG AlldWldA 1.50 AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate 0.88 AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp 0.60 AlpTotDiv 0.66 AlpAlerMLP 1.00 AlteraCp lf 0.32 AlterraCap 0.56 AltraHldgs 0.20 Altria 1.64 Alumina 0.24 AlumChina AmBev 1.15 Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren 1.60 Ameresco Amerigrp AMovilL 0.28 AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus 1.35 ACapAgy 5.00 AmCapLtd ACapMtg n 3.60 AEagleOut 0.44 AEP 1.88 AEqInvLf 0.12 AmExp 0.80 AFnclGrp 0.70 AGreet 0.60 AmIntlGrp ARltyCT n 0.70 AmSupr AmTower 0.88 AVangrd 0.10 AmWtrWks 1.00 Amerigon Ameriprise 1.40 AmeriBrgn 0.52 Ametek s 0.24 Amgen 1.44 AmicusTh AmkorTch Amphenol 0.42 AmpioPhm Amtech Amylin Amyris Anadarko 0.36 Anadigc AnalogDev 1.20 Ancestry AnglogldA 0.49 ABInBev 1.57 Ann Inc Annaly 2.27 Ansys AntaresP AntheraPh Anworth 0.83 Aon plc 0.60 A123 Sys Apache 0.68 AptInv 0.72 ApogeeE 0.36 ApolloGrp ApolloInv 0.80 ApolloRM n 3.00 Apple Inc 10.60 ApldIndlT 0.84 ApldMatl 0.36 AMCC Approach AquaAm 0.66 ArQule ArcelorMit 0.75 ArchCap ArchCoal 0.12 ArchDan 0.70 ArcosDor 0.24 ArcticCat ArenaPhm AresCap 1.48 AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest 0.12 ArmHld 0.16 ArmourRsd 1.20 ArmstrWld 8.55 ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRt s AshfordHT 0.44 Ashland 0.90 AsiaInfoL AspenIns 0.68 AspenTech AsscdBanc 0.20 AsdEstat 0.72 Assurant 0.84 AssuredG 0.36 AstexPhm AstoriaF 0.16 AstraZen 2.80 athenahlth AtlPwr g 1.15 AtlasPpln 2.24 Atmel ATMOS 1.38 AtwoodOcn AuRico g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv 1.88 AutoData 1.58 AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch 0.60 AvalnRare AvalonBay 3.88 AvanirPhm AVEO Ph AveryD 1.08 AvisBudg Avista 1.16 Avnet Avon 0.92 AXIS Cap 0.96

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B&G Foods 1.08 BB&T Cp 0.80 BBCN Bcp BCE g 2.17 BE Aero BGC Ptrs 0.68 BHP BillLt 2.20 BHPBil plc 2.20 BMC Sft BP PLC 1.92 BPZ Res BRE 1.54 BRFBrasil 0.27 BT Grp 1.23 BabckWil Baidu BakrHu 0.60 BallCorp 0.40 BallyTech BanColum 1.12 BcBilVArg 0.57 BcoBrad pf 0.58 BcoSantSA 0.82 BcoSBrasil 0.37 BcpSouth 0.04 BkofAm 0.04 BkHawaii 1.80 BkIreld rs BkMont g 2.80 BkNYMel 0.52 BkNova g 2.20 BankUtd 0.68 Banner Cp 0.04 Banro g BarcGSOil BarcBk prA 1.78 Barclay 0.39 Bar iPVix BarVixMdT Bard 0.80 BarnesNob Barnes 0.40 BarrickG 0.80 BasicEnSv Baxter 1.34 BaytexE g 2.64 BeacnRfg Beam Inc 0.82 BeazerHm BebeStrs 0.10 BectDck 1.80 BedBath Belden 0.20 Belo 0.32 Bemis 1.00 BenchElec Berkley 0.36 BerkH B BerryPet 0.32 BestBuy 0.68 BigLots BBarrett BioDlvry lf Biocryst BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR 0.86 BioSante rs BioScrip BlkHillsCp 1.48 BlkRKelso 1.04 Blckbaud 0.48 BlackRock 6.00 BlkDebtStr 0.32 BlkEnhC&I 1.44 BlkEEqDv 0.68 BlkrkHigh 0.18 BlkIntlG&I 0.88 Blackstone 0.40 BlockHR 0.80 BdwlkPpl 2.13 BodyCentrl Boeing 1.76 Boise Inc 0.48 BonTon 0.20 BoozAllenH 0.36 BorgWarn BostPrv 0.04 BostProp 2.20 BostonSci BttmlnT BoydGm BradyCp 0.74 Brandyw 0.60 Braskem 0.65 BreitBurn 1.82 BrigStrat 0.44 Brightpnt BrigusG g Brinker 0.64 Brinks 0.40 BrMySq 1.36 BristowGp 0.80 Broadcom 0.40 BroadrdgF 0.64 BroadSoft BroadVisn Broadwd h BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g 0.56 BrkfInfra 1.50 BrkfldOfPr 0.56 BrkfldRP BrklneB 0.34 BrooksAuto 0.32 BrwnBrn 0.34 BrownShoe 0.28 BrownFB 1.40 BrukerCp Brunswick 0.05 Buckeye 4.15 BuckTch 0.32 Buckle 0.80 Buenavent 0.63 BuffaloWW BldrFstSrc BungeLt 1.08 BurgerK n C&J Egy n CA Inc 1.00 CBL Asc 0.88 CBOE 0.48 CBRE GRE 0.54 CBRE Grp CBS B 0.40 CF Inds 1.60 CGI g CH Robins 1.32 CIT Grp CLECO 1.25 CME Grp 8.92 CMS Eng 0.96 CNH Gbl CNO Fincl 0.08 CNOOC 6.81 CPFL En s 1.84 CSX 0.56 CTC Media 0.52 CVB Fncl 0.34 CVR Engy 0.32 CVR Ptrs 2.09 CVS Care 0.65 CYS Invest 2.00 Cabelas CblvsnNY 0.60 Cabot 0.80 CabotOG s 0.08 CACI CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaStrTR 0.84 CalAmp Calgon CalifWtr 0.63 Calix CallGolf 0.04 Callidus CallonPet Calpine CAMAC En Cambrex CamdenPT 2.24 Cameco g 0.40 Cameron CampSp 1.16 CampusCC 0.64 CIBC g 3.60 CdnNRy g 1.50 CdnNRs gs 0.42 CP Rwy g 1.40 CdnSolar CapOne 0.20 CapSenL CapitlSrce 0.04 CapFedFn 0.30 Caplease 0.26 CapsteadM 1.70 CpstnTrb h CarboCer 0.96 Carbonite n CardnlHlth 0.95 Cardiom gh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle 0.72 CarMax Carnival 1.00 CarpTech 0.72 Carrizo Carters Caseys 0.66 CasualMal Caterpillar 2.08 CathayGen 0.04 Cavium Cbeyond CelSci Celanese 0.30 Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom 1.71 CelldexTh Celsion Cemex 0.32 Cemig pf s 1.18 CenovusE 0.88 Centene CenterPnt 0.81 CnElBras pf 0.87 CenElBras 0.65 CentEuro CFCda g 0.01 CentAl CntryLink 2.90 Cenveo Cepheid Ceradyne 0.60

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8.53 83.56 3.52 34.34 69.00 72.21 49.53 32.19 .87 14.94 15.56 19.36 20.20 27.13 107.37 38.61 14.88 51.04 2.40 41.09 1.15 56.05 12.78 380.37 5.40 1.39 73.55 56.72 16.81 42.75 55.98 3.77 38.42 23.42 39.42 29.11 17.15 25.09 27.65 17.60 6.85 85.62 48.84 .66 16.35 58.55 6.01 1.13 1.64 50.43 72.67 17.97 58.35 25.44 79.16 28.76 3.76 18.17 19.60 59.75 10.76 70.46 .53 28.01 104.61 21.46 22.39 17.64 .73 32.03 31.44 31.55 38.22 13.18 19.19 27.44 49.92 40.68 1.97 25.09 9.45 17.16 5.92 36.18 25.86 19.97 89.16 68.79 15.95 56.41 31.19 15.97 62.57 18.62 28.25 71.08 14.95 79.84 69.04 17.74 80.33 28.09 24.36 21.73 4.30 117.65 19.58 3.17 5.41 13.08 5.75 46.11 23.37 29.78 13.06 94.42 8.45 7.96 48.11 17.32 31.08 54.24 2.69 12.75 128.13 23.84 4.06 12.21 30.04 18.60 3.13 25.21 10.18 4.82 15.86 .21 15.86 60.33 34.27 16.32 11.92 39.78 100.14 5.35 125.43 47.14 60.00 13.61 59.69 .64 2.87 6.27 14.82 18.55 .63 18.28 55.21 59.55 12.91 52.66 51.26 16.84 97.71 31.58 16.98 44.18 81.72 .23 1.72 18.55 12.68 26.31 10.76 26.00 11.45 15.75 7.31 1.31 4.76 37.72 5.75 37.21 12.08 4.83 58.48 13.06 103.59 17.82 60.76 10.45 8.09 9.65 49.73 37.96 76.49 16.96 63.41 50.29 .37 54.40 82.46 92.72 16.82 21.77 20.64 17.27 27.00 41.36 12.16 10.17 10.25 29.37 13.85 77.57 57.91 78.34 42.92 35.45 54.55 51.01 2.51 28.85 48.59 30.94 42.69 9.42 53.76 82.84 52.02 54.23 30.89

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1.80 78.74 0.36 33.52 1.04 11.95 1.54 0.60 23.61 1.26 54.23 1.33 1.28 31.69 1.36 43.90 3.61 19.49 47.00 0.48 4.53 68.61 0.12 2.31 1.72 49.59 0.60 28.87 3.06 68.69 0.68 14.82 1.52 71.86 0.60 34.30 1.03 19.51 4.35 .59 1.16 10.27

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1.24 0.56 2.50 3.58 0.28 2.16 0.58

1.50 0.24 3.32 2.51 3.00 0.72 0.88 1.58 0.35 4.40 0.53 0.80 1.92 0.16 0.41 0.10 2.10 0.36 0.56

0.80 2.28

0.28 0.36 0.48

1.24 0.08 0.84 0.68 0.56 2.76 0.96

0.56 0.80 1.15 0.32 1.81 0.24 0.32 0.20 0.60 0.04 0.04 0.32 0.80 0.20 0.27 0.08 0.60 2.20 0.64 0.25 0.64 1.44 0.64 0.27 1.21 0.72 0.20

0.05

1.90 0.60 1.08 1.25 0.40

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N m INGPrRTr ION Geoph IPG Photon IQ HdgMult iShGold iSAstla iShBraz iSCan iShEMU iSFrnce iShGer iSh HK iShItaly iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSSpain iSSwedn iSSwitz iSTaiwn iSh UK iShThai iShTurkey iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSh ACWI iSEafeSC iShEMBd iSSPGth iSSPGlH iSSPGlbEn iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShNMuBd iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShIntSelDv iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShs SOX iShMtg iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iShBFxBd iSR1KV iShPoland iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarIntC iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShBar3-7 iShHiDivEq iShBShtT iShUSPfd iSRus3K iShRussia iShDJTel iSSPCStp iShREst iShDJHm iShFnSc iShSPSm iShBasM iShEur350 iSSCVal iSMsciG iShSCGrth iStar ITC Hold ITT Cp s IconixBr Idacorp IdenixPh IDEX ITW Illumina Imax Corp ImmunoCll ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs ImpOil gs Imperva n Incyte IndiaFd IndoTel Inergy Infinera InfinityPh Informat Infosys IngerRd IngrmM Ingredion InnerWkgs Inphi Insulet IntgDv IntegrysE Intel InteractB lf IntcntlEx IntCtlHtl InterDig Intrface Interline Intermec InterMune InterNAP IBM IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif IntlSpdw InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntPotash Intuit InvenSen n Invesco InvMtgCap InVKSrInc InvTech InvRlEst IridiumCm IronMtn IronwdPh Isis ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeE h IvanhM g Ivanhoe rt Ixia j2Global JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMAlerian Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacobsEng Jaguar g Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JinkoSolar JiveSoft n JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesGrp JonesLL JosABank JoyGlbl JnprNtwk K12 KAR Auct KB Home

D 0.36 0.37 1.11 1.48 0.57 1.10 0.70 0.58 0.55 0.42 0.20 0.37 0.54 0.92 0.48 1.85 2.10 2.80 0.91 0.65 0.47 0.62 1.87 1.16 1.23 1.95 3.47 0.90 0.93 1.24 2.66 3.17 0.82 4.80 1.06 1.16 5.44 1.41 1.37 0.95 1.31 1.40 3.39 3.56 2.68 1.59 0.47 1.72 0.92 0.52 1.21 6.84 0.23 1.70 0.04 2.24 3.20 1.52 1.29 0.82 1.39 1.46 3.85 2.19 0.76 1.23 1.68 1.73 0.04 2.23 1.40 0.49 0.67 1.65 2.21 0.07 0.92 0.92 1.46 1.27 1.22 1.38 0.73 1.41 0.36 1.32 0.80 1.44

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N m D KBR Inc 0.20 KIT Digitl KKR 0.68 KKR Fn 0.72 KLA Tnc 1.40 KT Corp KV PhmA KC Southn 0.78 KA MLP 2.11 Kellogg 1.72 Kemet Kennamtl 0.56 KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp 0.20 KilroyR 1.40 KimbClk 2.96 Kimco 0.76 KindME 4.80 KindMorg 1.28 KindrM wt KindMM 4.80 KindredHlt KingldJwl Kinross g 0.16 KiOR KirbyCp KnghtCap KnightTr 0.24 KnightT 1.85 KodiakO g KohlbergC 0.96 Kohls 1.28 KoreaElc KosmosEn Kraft 1.16 KratosDef KrispKrm Kroger 0.46 KronosWw 0.60 Kulicke L&L Engy L-3 Com 2.00 LAN Air 0.47 LDK Solar LG Display LKQ Corp LSI Corp LTC Prp 1.74 LabCp LadThalFn LkShrGld g LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar 0.22 LaredoP n LVSands 1.00 LaSalleH 0.80 Lattice Lazard 0.80 LeCroy LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp 0.56 Lee Ent LeggMason 0.44 LeggPlat 1.12 LenderPS 0.40 LennarA 0.16 Lennox 0.72 LeucNatl 0.25 Level3 rs LexiPhrm LexRltyTr 0.50 Lexmark 1.20 LbtyASE 0.32 LibGlobA LibGlobC LibCapA LibtyIntA LibtProp 1.90 LifeTech LifePtH LigandPh LillyEli 1.96 LimelghtN Limited 1.00 Lincare 0.80 LincElec 0.68 LincNat 0.32 Lindsay 0.36 LinearTch 1.00 LinkedIn LinnEngy 2.90 LionsGt g Liquidity LithiaMot 0.40 LiveNatn LiveDeal 0.14 LivePrsn LloydBkg LockhdM 4.00 Loews 0.25 LogMeIn LonePine g LongweiPI Lorillard 6.20 LaPac Lowes 0.64 LucasEngy Lufkin 0.50 lululemn gs LumberLiq Luminex LyonBas A 1.60

25.42 4.44 13.29 8.80 48.96 13.64 .64 69.27 30.74 49.54 6.26 33.36 2.00 7.47 7.80 49.68 84.00 19.07 80.41 33.16 2.22 76.25 9.85 1.72 8.82 9.95 47.92 12.00 16.08 8.36 8.80 7.42 44.26 11.52 11.00 39.21 5.97 6.48 22.91 15.57 9.07 1.75 74.45 26.10 1.99 9.87 34.43 6.54 37.00 92.97 1.65 .93 37.82 29.04 52.37 21.75 43.18 29.80 3.87 26.76 14.26 6.68 10.44 38.32 1.65 26.89 21.27 26.02 31.05 47.36 22.28 21.51 2.48 8.70 27.75 4.57 50.64 48.96 91.03 17.93 36.86 44.45 39.86 17.37 43.16 3.08 44.14 41.31 43.78 21.73 68.00 31.66 108.54 38.91 14.90 40.17 23.84 9.73 15.34 19.29 1.96 87.51 41.34 31.00 2.69 1.63 136.92 11.13 27.62 1.48 55.66 57.93 32.86 25.39 41.94

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M-N-O-P M&T Bk MAP Phm MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MFA Fncl MIN MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc MacQGInf Macerich MackCali Macys MadCatz g MSG MagelMPtr MagicJck s MagnaInt g MagHRes MainStCap MAKO Srg MgHiYP Manitowoc MannKd ManpwrGp Manulife g MarathnO MarathPet MarchxB MktVGold MV OilSv s MV Semi n MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MktVCoal MktAxess MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo Mastec MasterCrd Matson Mattel Mattson MaximIntg MaxwllT McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McEwenM MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel

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N m D MedCath 6.85 MedAssets MedProp 0.80 MediCo Medicis 0.40 Medivation Mednax Medtrnic 1.04 MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW 0.72 MentorGr MercadoL 0.44 Merck 1.68 MergeHlth Meritage Meritor Metalico Methanx 0.74 MetLife 0.74 MetroPCS MetroHlth MKors n Micrel 0.16 Microchp 1.40 MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft 0.80 Micrvis rs MidstPet n MdwGold g MillMda n MillerEnR MillerHer 0.09 MindrayM 0.40 Mindspeed MitekSys MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MModal MobileTele Modine Mohawk Molex 0.88 MolinaHlth MolsCoorB 1.28 Molycorp Momenta Monsanto 1.20 MonstrBv s MonstrWw Montpelr 0.42 Moodys 0.64 MorgStan 0.20 Mosaic 0.50 MotrlaSolu 0.88 Motricity h Move rs MuellerWat 0.07 MultimGm MurphO 1.10 Mylan MyriadG NABI Bio NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt 1.80 NIC Inc 0.25 NII Hldg NPS Phm NQ Mobile NRG Egy NTT DOCO 0.36 NV Energy 0.68 NXP Semi NYSE Eur 1.20 Nabors NamTai 0.28 Nanosphere NasdOMX 0.52 NBGrce rs NatCineM 0.88 NatFnPrt NatFuGas 1.46 NatGrid 3.11 NatInstrm 0.56 NOilVarco 0.48 NatPenn 0.28 NatRetPrp 1.54 Nationstr n NatusMed NavideaBio Navios 0.24 Navistar NektarTh NeoStem Neonode NeptuneT g NetApp NetEase Netflix NetSpend NetSuite NetwEng h NetworkEq NBRESec 0.24 Neurcrine NeuStar Nevsun g 0.10 NwGold g NwOriEd s 0.30 NY CmtyB 1.00 NY Times Newcastle 0.80 NewellRub 0.40 NewfldExp NewmtM 1.40 NewpkRes NewsCpA 0.17 NewsCpB 0.17 Nexen g 0.20 NexPntCrd 0.42 NextEraEn 2.40 NiSource 0.96 NielsenH NikeB 1.44 NipponTT NiskaGsSt 1.40 NobleCorp 0.60 NobleEn 0.88 NokiaCp 0.26 NorandaAl 0.16 NordicAm 1.20 Nordion g 0.40 Nordstrm 1.08 NorflkSo 1.88 NA Pall g NoestUt 1.37 NthnO&G NorTrst 1.20 NorthropG 2.20 NStarRlt 0.60 NwstBcsh 0.48 NovaMeas NovaGld g Novartis 2.46 Novavax NovoNord 2.50 NuSkin 0.80 NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor 1.46 NustarEn 4.38 NustarGP 2.04 NutriSyst 0.70 NvCredStr 0.80 NuvMuOpp 0.88 NuMulCGv 1.25 NuvMuVal 0.47 NvPfdInco 0.76 NuvQPf2 0.66 Nvidia NxStageMd OCZ Tech OGE Engy 1.57 OReillyAu OaktreeC n 0.55 OasisPet ObagiMed OcciPet 2.16 OceanRig n Oceaneerg 0.72 Och-Ziff 0.47 Oclaro Oculus OcwenFn OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax Oi SA 6.16 OilStates OldNBcp 0.36 OldRepub 0.71 Olin 0.80 OmegaHlt 1.68 Omncre 0.28

7.49 13.68 9.76 23.81 34.79 95.00 69.00 39.05 11.15 75.02 27.49 15.55 80.63 41.81 3.09 34.32 5.48 2.28 28.53 31.21 6.57 9.99 42.67 9.65 33.06 6.89 51.34 19.18 30.76 1.59 10.35 1.56 13.77 4.99 19.50 30.30 2.61 4.16 4.91 3.40 14.02 17.72 7.12 69.97 24.30 23.01 41.67 21.81 14.28 83.58 74.88 8.43 21.65 37.21 15.11 55.67 48.34 .65 9.31 3.60 15.11 51.59 22.07 25.64 1.64 23.35 36.95 17.01 13.22 10.55 9.00 9.34 17.67 16.84 17.76 23.57 25.88 14.80 6.02 2.98 22.76 1.67 15.52 13.94 47.97 53.25 27.17 67.65 9.79 28.63 23.37 12.26 4.21 3.46 29.04 8.21 .55 6.50 4.92 31.10 58.67 72.04 9.45 55.19 1.41 1.31 4.50 8.20 33.90 3.33 10.07 24.00 12.72 7.98 6.93 18.12 29.97 49.73 6.30 22.73 22.90 17.81 6.30 68.57 24.81 26.57 90.48 23.61 12.90 33.67 88.10 2.13 7.87 13.82 9.36 50.56 71.91 2.18 39.26 17.06 46.62 63.94 5.35 11.94 8.43 5.70 56.33 1.71 148.83 48.51 25.69 24.00 38.90 54.68 31.90 11.65 9.21 15.14 12.48 10.42 9.19 9.10 13.80 17.04 6.27 52.19 84.36 36.75 26.14 15.00 88.04 14.50 49.81 7.56 3.00 .75 19.00 3.92 2.24 5.27 13.27 68.85 12.41 8.17 20.74 23.03 31.49

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Jobs Continued from E1 state report said. It noted that in the last five years, state general fund contributions to Oregon’s community colleges have dropped 18 percent, equaling about $100 million, while enrollment has increased 33 percent. “The state of Oregon has an ambitious agenda, but no additional funding. In fact it has cut funding,” Hilgersom said. “It makes it difficult to be responsive.” When choosing programs, Hilgersom said COCC looks at the return on investment.

Orders Continued from E1 Factory orders increased 0.7 percent in May from April, the Commerce Department said Tuesday. Core capital goods, which include machinery and computers, rose 2.1 percent. That’s better than the 1.6 percent estimated in a preliminary report a week ago and shows companies are still making investment plans. Overall factory orders increased to $469 billion. That’s 43.5 percent higher than the recession low reached in March 2009. But orders have fallen 2.5 percent over the past five months from their postrecession high hit in December. Manufacturing has lost some vigor this year. U.S. job growth has slowed and consumers and businesses are less confident in the economy. Europe’s debt crisis has reduced demand for U.S. exports. And manufacturing has slowed in big countries like China, which

Cars Continued from E1 Automakers said the annual pace of sales in June and for the first half of the year was above 14 million vehicles, the best rate in years. The sales gains are coming despite tepid consumer enthusiasm for spending. An index of sentiment compiled by the Conference Board slid to 62 in June from 64.4 in May, the fourth consecutive decline. Chrysler Group said it posted sales of 144,811 vehicles in June, a 20 percent increase from the same month a year

Middle-skill programs like the nursing program at COCC are expensive to run, she said, but result in students getting good-paying jobs that allow them to build their careers. At COCC, proposals for new programs occur when the college sees a need in the workforce and approaches industry representatives to see if local businesses would hire program graduates, or if an industry approaches the college needing help with skill-building for its employees, she said. Hilgersom said the college is starting new middle-skill programs in materials testing, entrepreneurship and veterinary tech.

It’s also expanding the nursing program and is in preliminary discussions about a program related to truck driving. When determining the viability of a new program, she said, the college uses feedback from industry representatives in the region, state and regional labor market trends and insight from Economic Development for Central Oregon. COCC wants to ensure it provides training for occupations for which employers are hiring, not just those predicted to have a shortage. “You don’t want to have students invest two years of their lives in a program and then have

AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div PE ... 1.16 .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40 .88 1.10f ... .28 .53f .22 .90f .20f .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

16 16 ... 42 13 ... 10 19 26 15 14 7 ... 11 8 22 6 ... 20 15 11

YTD Last Chg %Chg 36.75 26.96 8.06 22.31 74.27 5.80 50.61 53.75 94.42 8.20 19.71 20.36 10.25 26.86 7.80 22.91 3.87 11.13 22.09 15.55 30.76

+.32 +.01 +.01 +.87 +1.09 ... +2.78 +.92 +.02 -.02 +.30 +.20 -.15 +.20 +.08 +.10 ... +.18 +.21 +.06 +.20

-2.1 +4.7 +45.0 +11.8 +1.3 +32.4 +7.3 +15.5 +13.3 +36.2 -21.4 -21.0 -1.4 +10.8 +1.4 -5.4 -34.8 +37.9 +2.9 +14.7 +18.5

percent. Growth of 1.9 percent typically generates roughly 90,000 jobs a month. That’s considered too weak to reduce the unemployment rate, which was 8.2 percent in May. Employers added an average of only 73,000 jobs per month in April and May, a sharp slowdown from the monthly average of 226,000 jobs added

in January through March. Despite the slowdown, manufacturers have reported job gains for eight straight months. The government reports Friday on June employment. Economists forecast employers added just 90,000 jobs last month and no change in the unemployment rate.

earlier and the company’s best June since 2007. “June also marked our 27th consecutive month of yearover-year sales growth. . We have steadily increased sales, improved quality, added production and created jobs,” said Reid Bigland, Chrysler’s sales chief. One sign of the health of the industry is that the transaction price for vehicles continues to rise with consumer demand. The average transaction price for light vehicles in the United States was $30,508 in June 2012, up $849 or 2.9 percent from June 2011 and up

$148 or 0.5 percent from May 2012, according to auto price information company TrueCar.com. “Despite the relative slowdown in the last two months, the auto industry continues to experience improved profitability with strong year-overyear sales, historically high transaction prices and precise incentives spending,” said Jesse Toprak, TrueCar’s analyst. Ford Motor Co. said its June U.S. sales rose 7 percent to 207,759 vehicles compared to the same month a year earlier. Toyota Motor Corp. said its sales rose 60.3 percent to

177,795 units in June. The big increase was largely attributed to recovery from an inventory and production crunch created by the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami. Nissan North America said its U.S. sales in June rose 28.2 percent to 92,237 vehicles compared to the same month a year earlier. Volkswagen of America said it sold 38,170 vehicles in June, a 34.2 percent increase over the same month a year earlier. It was both the best June and the best first six months of the year for the VW brand since 1973.

NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1619.50 $1621.30 $28.243

Jumps in oil prices, orders boost stocks By Christina Rexrode The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Stocks rose Tuesday after the government reported higher factory orders for May. Energy stocks climbed the most after the price of oil jumped to the highest level since May. The major U.S. stock indexes moved higher. The Dow Jones industrial average was up 71 points to 12,943. The Standard & Poor’s 500 was up nine to 1,374. The Nasdaq composite index was up 22 to 2,973. Trading volume was light, with the market scheduled to close at 1 p.m. and many traders already off for the Fourth of July holiday. Energy stocks jumped 1.9 percent, more than any of the other nine industry groups in the S&P 500. Benchmark

Holiday Steven Senne / The Associated Press / File photo

Khan Simom glues cushions to unfinished shoes at the New Balance Athletic Shoe Inc. factory in Boston.

Continued from E1 With temperatures in the low 90s and high 80s forecast in South Florida throughout the week, The Frieze Ice Cream Factory in Miami Beach is expecting to do brisk business today. The shop is adding an extra person during the day and at night, said general manager David Warren, whose parents first opened the business on July 4, 1987. “With the hot weather, July is always a busy month for us,” Warren said. But what’s good for the ice cream parlor is not so great for the engineering firm. “I guess if you measured it in lost time, it would exceed the Final Four or the Super Bowl and World Series combined,” said Jim Fell, founder of Destin, Fla.-based Building Engineering Consultants. He said the lost time isn’t just this week; he figures employees spent plenty of work minutes planning their holiday trips. But, Fell said, because the holiday doesn’t usually fall on a Wednesday, the company didn’t get too worked up. “We certainly found the best way to do it is to sit back and enjoy it and participate in it,” said Fell, who is semi-retired

Market recap

Name

Div PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstBcp Weyerhsr

1.44 1.08 1.78 ... .80f ... 1.68 .12 .70f .75f 1.56 .89f .68 ... .36f .78 .32 .88 ... .60

Precious metals Metal

— Reporter: 541-617-7818,

rely on U.S. factories for equipment, machinery and vehicles. Orders for long-lasting durable goods, everything from airplanes to refrigerators, rose 1.3 percent in May. Orders for non-durable goods, which include food, paper, chemicals and energy products, edged up 0.2 percent. The increase may have been held back by falling oil and gas prices. Still, orders are likely to decline in June, based on a report from the Institute of Supply Management. The trade group of purchasing managers on Monday said manufacturing contracted in June for the first time since July 2009 — one month after the recession ended. Factory production and exports declined, and a measure of new orders plunged. Economists said the manufacturing figures from the ISM survey were consistent with growth at an annual rate of 1.5 percent or less. Such growth would be lower than the January-March quarter’s tepid annual pace of 1.9

Northwest stocks Name

no job opportunities,” she said. “In the career and technical education world, the goal is a career.” Even if community colleges offer the programs, there’s no guarantee students will seek training in the expected highdemand jobs, said Brenda Turner, occupational economist for the Oregon Employment Department. You cannot make someone take a specific course. Nor can you force them to stay in a region after they receive their training. “It’s a start to offer the programs,” she said. “But, there isn’t any way to guarantee the gap will be filled.”

YTD Last Chg %Chg

19 90.48 +1.63 -6.1 16 50.56 +.08 +1.7 20 47.87 +.16 -.1 18 5.27 +.07 +16.1 12 38.81 +.50 +3.6 ... 1.61 +.02 -15.7 35 40.34 +.42 +10.3 20 167.51 +1.67 +1.7 11 17.97 +.12 -14.6 13 29.21 +.87 -30.9 30 132.49 +.23 +48.4 12 38.05 +.74 +3.5 30 51.94 -.85 +12.9 24 5.54 +.11 +13.8 18 13.55 +.19 +9.4 12 32.58 +.14 +20.4 14 16.94 +.09 +21.1 12 33.48 -.07 +21.5 13 20.24 +.52 +29.7 35 22.67 +.33 +21.4

Prime rate

Pvs Day

Time period

Percent

$1598.00 $1597.20 $27.468

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

S&P500ETF BkofAm FordM iShEMkts iShR2K

Last Chg

722838 137.41 +.90 544442 8.06 +.01 489977 9.60 +.21 349746 39.91 +.79 293459 81.53 +1.05

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Xerium CSVLgCrde McEwenM FortunaSlv PzenaInv

3.52 +.50 +16.6 29.94 +3.74 +14.3 3.29 +.36 +12.3 3.85 +.41 +11.9 5.08 +.53 +11.6

Losers ($2 or more)

Amex

Name

Name

Last Chg

37461 15.56 +.76 24864 2.14 +.12 23103 10.07 +.60 19614 5.70 +.32 17972 3.30 +.19

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

PernixTh BovieMed MAG Slv g GoldenMin IntTower g

8.90 +1.40 +18.7 2.78 +.36 +14.9 9.38 +.94 +11.1 5.26 +.50 +10.5 3.06 +.29 +10.5

Losers ($2 or more) Last

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

CSVInvCrd BiP GCrb DirDGldBr DrDNGBear CSVS3xInSlv

61.70 10.73 41.36 17.27 39.51

-9.89 -13.8 -1.67 -13.5 -5.34 -11.4 -1.87 -9.8 -4.09 -9.4

Richmnt g 4.14 -.64 -13.4 MGTCap rs 5.35 -.70 -11.6 Servotr 8.14 -.41 -4.8 TelInstEl 3.51 -.17 -4.6 WisP pf 105.02 -4.78 -4.4

Diary

Vol (00)

SiriusXM MicronT Amylin Microsoft ArenaPhm

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

MediciNova Nanosphere XOMA CompCred CascadeM

2.05 2.98 3.44 4.36 4.98

+.41 +.46 +.44 +.52 +.57

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

InnerWkgs ColonyBk Amyris Groupon n NaturlAlt

12.76 -1.16 4.79 -.42 4.01 -.33 8.79 -.72 6.99 -.56

Diary 2,385 615 130 3,130 297 4

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg

529507 2.04 +.06 461864 6.89 +.34 250393 30.73 +.03 202983 30.76 +.20 155466 10.02 +.08

+25.0 +18.3 +14.7 +13.5 +12.9

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more)

Vol (00)

Chg %Chg -8.3 -8.1 -7.6 -7.6 -7.4

Diary 322 106 37 465 21 1

U.S. crude rose $2.97, about 3.5 percent, to $86.72 per barrel in New York because of renewed fears of a military conflict with Iran. Iran is threatening to block a critical Persian Gulf shipping route in response to a European embargo of Iranian oil. Action by Iran would increase the risk for violence in the region, slowing tanker traffic. Chrysler, Ford and General Motors all said that auto sales rose in May. Ford stock rose 3 percent, and GM rose 6 percent. Stocks rose broadly at 10 a.m. after the government reported that U.S. factories received more orders in May after two months of declines. On Monday, a trade group said that U.S. manufacturing shrank in June for the first time in almost three years.

and is spending much of the month visiting his wife’s family in Mississippi. The key this week for employers and employees is to be clear on what the company’s needs are and how to meet them, said Marilyn Jenkins, interim associate dean of business process at Barry University’s School of Adult and Continuing Education. “Have a little patience, go slowly with everybody and acknowledge that it is a holiday week and not everybody is here,” she said. “Share what are the challenges; make sure everything gets covered that needs to be covered.” At various Barry locations, summer classes are still in session every day but Wednesday, she said. Extra coordination was needed to make sure positions were covered every day. For Luis Salazar, who opened a new law firm in Miami with a partner in midJune, extended vacation is not an option — for him or for his employees. “We’re really right now overwhelmed and working around the clock,” he said. “We could easily work through July 4th. We’d have no one to talk to aside from ourselves.”

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) CheniereEn YM Bio g NwGold g NovaGld g Rubicon g

E3

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,757 651 144 2,552 185 16

52-Week High Low

Name

13,338.66 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 486.39 381.99 8,496.42 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,422.38 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 860.37 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

12,943.82 5,237.57 482.89 7,901.67 2,400.48 2,976.08 1,374.02 14,417.90 818.49

+72.43 +30.77 -1.61 +69.44 +33.81 +24.85 +8.51 +107.13 +10.55

+.56 +.59 -.33 +.89 +1.43 +.84 +.62 +.75 +1.31

+5.94 +4.34 +3.92 +5.68 +5.36 +14.24 +9.26 +9.31 +10.47

+2.97 -4.75 +10.66 -5.98 +.27 +5.32 +2.70 +1.40 -2.75

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Tuesday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Monday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

314.34 2,267.24 3,271.20 5,687.73 6,578.21 19,735.53 40,435.28 14,463.13 3,444.63 9,066.59 1,867.82 2,945.33 4,166.35 5,749.80

+1.31 +.58 +.96 +.83 +1.26 +1.51 +.81 +1.08 +.13 +.70 +.87 +1.19 -.15 +1.39

s s s s s s s s s s s s t s

1.0284 1.5693 .9877 .001997 .1574 1.2610 .1289 .012520 .075029 .0311 .000878 .1443 1.0499 .0335

1.0259 1.5692 .9836 .001997 .1574 1.2584 .1289 .012581 .075165 .0307 .000874 .1444 1.0477 .0334

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.67 +0.03 +6.7 GrowthI 27.35 +0.19 +11.3 Ultra 25.20 +0.22 +9.9 American Funds A: AmcpA p 20.56 +0.17 +9.6 AMutlA p 27.52 +0.09 +7.6 BalA p 19.53 +0.08 +8.3 BondA p 12.81 -0.01 +3.5 CapIBA p 51.62 +0.20 +6.9 CapWGA p 34.24 +0.25 +8.4 CapWA p 20.96 +0.01 +3.7 EupacA p 37.54 +0.48 +6.8 FdInvA p 38.18 +0.29 +8.6 GovtA p 14.56 -0.01 +1.6 GwthA p 31.92 +0.28 +11.1 HI TrA p 10.93 +0.02 +6.4 IncoA p 17.46 +0.06 +6.2 IntBdA p 13.72 -0.01 +1.6 ICAA p 29.41 +0.19 +9.5 NEcoA p 27.11 +0.17 +14.0 N PerA p 28.85 +0.27 +10.3 NwWrldA 49.57 +0.61 +7.5 SmCpA p 37.29 +0.43 +12.4 TxExA p 12.90 +4.9 WshA p 30.27 +0.13 +7.8 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.22 +0.30 +12.1 IntlVal r 26.85 +0.27 +7.0 MidCap 37.30 +0.38 +13.3 MidCapVal 20.57 +0.22 +4.4 Baron Funds: Growth 55.86 +0.48 +9.5 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.06 -0.02 +2.8 DivMu 14.83 +1.6 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 19.43 +0.09 +7.5 GlAlA r 18.98 +0.13 +4.5 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.62 +0.12 +4.1 BlackRock Instl:

EquityDv 19.48 +0.09 GlbAlloc r 19.09 +0.13 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 69.24 +0.34 Columbia Class A: TxEA p 14.08 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.31 +0.35 AcornIntZ 37.68 +0.45 LgCapGr 12.93 +0.11 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.03 +0.20 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.52 +0.09 USCorEq1 11.73 +0.11 USCorEq2 11.53 +0.11 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.10 +0.30 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 35.51 +0.31 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.33 -0.02 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 18.36 +0.29 EmMktV 27.37 +0.46 IntSmVa 14.14 +0.11 LargeCo 10.84 +0.07 USLgVa 20.79 +0.16 US Small 22.64 +0.30 US SmVa 25.60 +0.37 IntlSmCo 14.37 +0.12 Fixd 10.34 IntVa 14.75 +0.14 Glb5FxInc 11.16 -0.01 2YGlFxd 10.11 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 72.74 +0.33 Income 13.64 -0.02 IntlStk 30.67 +0.28 Stock 111.52 +0.70 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.20 TRBd N p 11.19 -0.01 Dreyfus:

+7.7 +4.7 +15.1 +5.3 +11.3 +10.4 +7.6 -1.8 +4.8 +9.7 +9.6 +8.0 +8.2 +3.8 +7.2 +6.0 +5.6 +10.4 +9.5 +10.8 +10.9 +5.4 +0.6 +2.2 +2.7 +0.6 +9.2 +4.5 +4.9 +10.9 +4.8 +4.7

Aprec 43.34 +0.37 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.54 +0.10 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.97 GblMacAbR 9.81 +0.02 LgCapVal 18.59 +0.11 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.75 +0.11 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.61 FPACres 27.74 +0.19 Fairholme 29.12 +0.27 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.47 -0.01 StrValDvIS 5.06 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 22.04 +0.15 StrInA 12.41 +0.01 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 22.34 +0.16 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.85 +0.07 FF2010K 12.69 +0.07 FF2015 11.57 +0.05 FF2015K 12.74 +0.06 FF2020 13.97 +0.08 FF2020K 13.12 +0.08 FF2025 11.59 +0.08 FF2025K 13.21 +0.09 FF2030 13.79 +0.10 FF2030K 13.34 +0.10 FF2035 11.39 +0.10 FF2035K 13.38 +0.11 FF2040 7.94 +0.06 FF2040K 13.42 +0.12 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.42 +0.08 AMgr50 15.96 +0.06 AMgr20 r 13.17 +0.02 Balanc 19.56 +0.08 BalancedK 19.57 +0.09 BlueChGr 47.55 +0.44 CapAp 28.66 +0.12

+7.8 +9.0 +4.1 +1.9 +9.2 +9.8 +1.1 +4.5 +25.8 +3.6 +6.3 +11.8 +4.8 +11.9 +6.0 +6.1 +6.2 +6.2 +6.8 +6.9 +7.5 +7.5 +7.7 +7.8 +8.2 +8.2 +8.1 +8.3 +10.6 +6.6 +4.1 +8.0 +8.1 +12.1 +16.4

CpInc r 9.09 Contra 75.65 ContraK 75.65 DisEq 23.48 DivIntl 27.45 DivrsIntK r 27.43 DivGth 28.61 Eq Inc 44.94 EQII 18.98 Fidel 34.89 FltRateHi r 9.80 GNMA 11.94 GovtInc 10.89 GroCo 92.96 GroInc 20.12 GrowthCoK92.93 HighInc r 9.02 IntBd 11.03 IntmMu 10.58 IntlDisc 29.79 InvGrBd 11.92 InvGB 7.89 LgCapVal 10.86 LowP r 38.89 LowPriK r 38.88 Magelln 70.11 MidCap 28.95 MuniInc 13.35 NwMkt r 16.80 OTC 58.98 100Index 9.81 Puritn 19.19 PuritanK 19.19 SAllSecEqF12.44 SCmdtyStrt 8.84 SCmdtyStrF 8.86 SrsIntGrw 11.07 SrsIntVal 8.54 SrInvGrdF 11.93 STBF 8.55 StratInc 11.11 TotalBd 11.16 USBI 11.93 Value 70.03

+0.02 +0.54 +0.55 +0.14 +0.30 +0.30 +0.31 +0.21 +0.08 +0.20 +0.01 -0.01 +0.90 +0.09 +0.89 +0.01 -0.01 +0.28 -0.02 -0.01 +0.06 +0.31 +0.30 +0.51 +0.30 +0.08 +0.56 +0.05 +0.07 +0.07 +0.09 +0.22 +0.22 +0.12 +0.07 -0.01 +0.01 -0.01 -0.02 +0.79

+8.0 +12.1 +12.2 +9.2 +7.6 +7.7 +10.6 +9.4 +9.6 +12.0 +3.3 +2.2 +1.9 +14.9 +10.7 +15.0 +7.5 +2.7 +2.8 +7.9 +3.4 +3.7 +7.8 +8.8 +8.9 +11.5 +10.8 +4.3 +9.0 +7.8 +11.2 +8.9 +9.0 +10.8 -1.3 -1.2 +9.5 +5.7 +3.4 +1.3 +5.0 +3.8 +2.6 +10.3

Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 48.96 +0.31 +10.4 500Idx I 48.97 +0.32 +10.4 Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r 39.00 +0.47 +11.2 500IdxAdv 48.97 +0.32 +10.5 TotMktAd r 39.83 +0.30 +10.6 USBond I 11.93 -0.01 +2.6 First Eagle: GlblA 47.80 +0.33 +5.9 OverseasA 21.42 +0.18 +5.2 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.16 -0.02 +1.0 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.50 +5.0 HYTFA p 10.71 +6.6 IncomA p 2.16 +0.01 +6.8 RisDvA p 36.62 +0.32 +5.2 USGovA p 6.88 +1.3 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 12.91 +0.07 +7.0 IncmeAd 2.14 +6.9 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.18 +0.01 +6.4 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.35 +0.16 +7.8 Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 12.95 +0.07 +6.8 GrwthA p 17.34 +0.19 +6.4 WorldA p 14.53 +0.15 +5.7 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 12.97 +0.07 +6.6 GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 42.61 +0.26 +10.0 GMO Trust III: Quality 24.02 +0.14 +9.6 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 19.30 +0.14 +2.1 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 10.77 +0.18 +4.5 Quality 24.03 +0.14 +9.6 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.16 +0.01 +7.8 MidCapV 36.58 +0.33 +9.0

Harbor Funds: Bond 12.68 -0.01 CapApInst 41.34 +0.28 IntlInv t 56.04 +0.61 Intl r 56.64 +0.62 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 31.30 +0.27 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 40.52 +0.38 Div&Gr 20.90 +0.11 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.39 -0.05 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r15.68 +0.11 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.00 +0.10 CmstkA 16.52 +0.09 EqIncA 8.84 +0.03 GrIncA p 19.92 +0.07 HYMuA 9.89 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.14 +0.23 AssetStA p 23.90 +0.23 AssetStrI r 24.13 +0.23 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 12.02 -0.02 JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond 12.02 -0.01 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 12.01 -0.02 HighYld 7.90 +0.02 ShtDurBd 10.98 -0.01 USLCCrPls 21.62 +0.16 Janus T Shrs: PrkMCVal T21.17 +0.20 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.02 +0.06 LSGrwth 12.89 +0.09 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.54 +0.30 Longleaf Partners: Partners 28.89 +0.27 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.56 +0.04

+5.3 +12.0 +7.8 +8.0 +8.6 +8.9 +8.1 -8.4 +2.1 +5.9 +9.4 +7.2 +7.9 +8.3 +7.0 +7.4 +7.5 +2.9 +3.2 +3.1 +7.1 +0.9 +9.5 +4.9 +7.4 +8.2 +10.4 +8.4 +7.2

StrInc C 15.01 +0.05 +6.1 LSBondR 14.50 +0.04 +7.0 StrIncA 14.92 +0.04 +6.4 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.36 +0.01 +5.9 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.33 +0.08 +8.3 BdDebA p 7.87 +0.01 +6.4 ShDurIncA p4.59 +3.3 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.62 +2.9 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.59 +3.3 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.69 +0.05 +6.0 ValueA 24.20 +0.15 +9.0 MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.31 +0.15 +9.2 Managers Funds: Yacktman p18.60 +0.05 +7.6 YacktFoc 19.99 +0.04 +7.0 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.08 +0.09 +6.8 MergerFd 15.81 +0.02 +1.4 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.69 -0.01 +5.2 TotRtBdI 10.69 -0.01 +5.3 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 35.39 +0.25 +7.5 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.84 +0.24 +6.3 GlbDiscZ 29.24 +0.25 +6.4 SharesZ 21.54 +0.17 +8.0 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 49.04 +0.65 +5.6 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.25 +0.01 +6.8 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.37 +0.21 +4.9 Intl I r 17.66 +0.17 +6.7 Oakmark 46.49 +0.29 +11.5 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.16 +0.03 +6.5 GlbSMdCap14.20 +0.17 +7.3

Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 32.22 +0.42 GlobA p 57.35 +0.56 GblStrIncA 4.21 +0.01 IntBdA p 6.34 +0.02 MnStFdA 35.37 +0.27 RisingDivA 16.77 +0.12 S&MdCpVl29.75 +0.35 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 15.17 +0.10 S&MdCpVl25.20 +0.30 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p15.11 +0.10 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.35 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 31.89 +0.41 IntlBdY 6.34 +0.02 IntGrowY 27.43 +0.17 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.33 -0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.67 +0.08 AllAsset 12.11 +0.08 ComodRR 6.62 +0.18 DivInc 11.85 +0.01 EmgMkCur10.24 +0.05 EmMkBd 11.81 +0.04 HiYld 9.31 +0.01 InvGrCp 10.94 LowDu 10.50 RealRtnI 12.33 ShortT 9.81 TotRt 11.33 -0.01 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 12.33 TotRtA 11.33 -0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.33 -0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.33 -0.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.33 -0.01 Perm Port Funds:

+9.9 +6.1 +6.5 +4.2 +10.0 +7.6 +0.4 +7.1

+7.2 +11.0 +10.1 +4.5 +7.5 +5.9 +7.9 +6.6 +2.8 +7.6 +4.0 +7.3 +7.0 +8.1 +3.5 +5.9 +1.9 +6.0 +5.7 +5.9 +5.5 +5.9 +6.0

Permannt 47.53 +0.43 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 40.48 +0.28 Price Funds: BlChip 43.89 +0.34 CapApp 22.19 +0.11 EmMktS 30.23 +0.43 EqInc 24.87 +0.15 EqIndex 37.02 +0.24 Growth 36.47 +0.26 HlthSci 41.52 +0.17 HiYield 6.72 +0.01 InstlCpG 18.13 +0.15 IntlBond 9.78 Intl G&I 12.03 +0.08 IntlStk 13.18 +0.15 MidCap 57.52 +0.59 MCapVal 23.40 +0.21 N Asia 15.43 +0.25 New Era 40.86 +0.92 N Horiz 35.32 +0.34 N Inc 9.81 -0.01 OverS SF 7.76 +0.05 R2010 16.03 +0.08 R2015 12.43 +0.07 R2020 17.19 +0.11 R2025 12.56 +0.08 R2030 18.02 +0.13 R2035 12.73 +0.10 R2040 18.10 +0.14 ShtBd 4.84 SmCpStk 35.25 +0.40 SmCapVal 37.92 +0.48 SpecIn 12.67 +0.01 Value 24.44 +0.16 Principal Inv: LgCGI In 9.88 +0.09 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.71 +0.10 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.44 +0.18 PremierI r 19.42 +0.28 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 38.97 +0.28

+3.1 +5.4 +13.6 +7.6 +6.0 +9.0 +10.3 +14.6 +27.4 +7.3 +12.5 +1.6 +4.4 +7.2 +9.1 +9.4 +10.9 -2.8 +13.8 +3.0 +6.0 +6.7 +7.3 +8.0 +8.5 +8.9 +9.2 +9.2 +1.7 +12.8 +10.0 +5.1 +8.4 +11.3 +8.7 +6.3 +4.9 +10.2

S&P Sel 21.62 +0.14 Scout Funds: Intl 29.68 +0.28 Sequoia 155.05 +1.36 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 9.88 -0.01 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 17.51 +0.24 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 25.09 +0.28 IncBuildC p18.35 +0.06 IntValue I 25.64 +0.28 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.77 +0.23 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 23.16 +0.10 CAITAdm 11.58 CpOpAdl 73.61 +0.56 EMAdmr r 33.65 +0.53 Energy 108.41 +2.47 EqInAdm n 48.95 +0.20 ExtdAdm 43.68 +0.53 500Adml 126.67 +0.81 GNMA Ad 11.07 -0.01 GrwAdm 35.41 +0.30 HlthCr 59.63 +0.14 HiYldCp 5.89 +0.01 InfProAd 28.79 ITBdAdml 12.02 -0.02 ITsryAdml 11.78 -0.01 IntGrAdm 55.56 +0.67 ITAdml 14.22 ITGrAdm 10.23 -0.01 LtdTrAd 11.16 LTGrAdml 10.67 -0.04 LT Adml 11.61 MCpAdml 96.90 +1.03 MuHYAdm 11.06 PrmCap r 69.09 +0.62 ReitAdm r 94.26 +0.50 STsyAdml 10.76 -0.01 STBdAdml 10.63 -0.01 ShtTrAd 15.92 STIGrAd 10.76

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SmCAdm 37.25 TtlBAdml 11.12 TStkAdm 34.29 WellslAdm 57.78 WelltnAdm 57.18 Windsor 47.03 WdsrIIAd 49.80 Vanguard Fds: CapOpp 31.87 DivdGro 16.34 Energy 57.73 EqInc 23.35 Explr 77.88 GNMA 11.07 HYCorp 5.89 HlthCre 141.32 InflaPro 14.66 IntlGr 17.46 IntlVal 28.02 ITIGrade 10.23 LifeCon 16.90 LifeGro 22.57 LifeMod 20.23 LTIGrade 10.67 Morg 19.42 MuInt 14.22 PrmcpCor 14.33 Prmcp r 66.58 SelValu r 19.94 STAR 19.89 STIGrade 10.76 StratEq 20.10 TgtRetInc 11.99 TgRe2010 23.73 TgtRe2015 13.08 TgRe2020 23.17 TgtRe2025 13.16 TgRe2030 22.54 TgtRe2035 13.53 TgtRe2040 22.21 TgtRe2045 13.95 USGro 20.29 Wellsly 23.85 Welltn 33.11

+0.46 -0.01 +0.26 +0.06 +0.18 +0.36 +0.25

+11.6 +2.6 +10.6 +5.7 +7.2 +10.3 +10.1

+0.25 +0.08 +1.31 +0.09 +0.96 -0.01 +0.01 +0.33

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+0.21 +0.28 -0.01 +0.05 +0.15 +0.10 -0.04 +0.15 +0.12 +0.61 +0.16 +0.10 +0.26 +0.02 +0.08 +0.06 +0.12 +0.07 +0.15 +0.10 +0.17 +0.11 +0.18 +0.02 +0.10

Wndsr 13.94 +0.10 WndsII 28.06 +0.14 Vanguard Idx Fds: ExtMkt I 107.81 +1.32 MidCpIstPl105.58 +1.12 TotIntAdm r23.01 +0.26 TotIntlInst r92.03 +1.03 TotIntlIP r 92.05 +1.03 500 126.67 +0.81 MidCap 21.34 +0.22 SmCap 37.21 +0.47 TotBnd 11.12 -0.01 TotlIntl 13.75 +0.15 TotStk 34.28 +0.26 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 23.16 +0.09 DevMkInst 8.88 +0.07 ExtIn 43.68 +0.54 GrwthIst 35.41 +0.30 InfProInst 11.73 InstIdx 125.86 +0.81 InsPl 125.86 +0.80 InsTStPlus 31.03 +0.23 MidCpIst 21.41 +0.23 SCInst 37.25 +0.46 TBIst 11.12 -0.01 TSInst 34.29 +0.26 ValueIst 21.98 +0.12 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 104.63 +0.67 MidCpIdx 30.58 +0.33 STBdIdx 10.63 -0.01 TotBdSgl 11.12 -0.01 TotStkSgl 33.09 +0.25 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.46 -0.02

+10.2 +10.1 +11.1 +8.7 +5.4 +5.4 +5.4 +10.4 +8.6 +11.5 +2.6 +5.3 +10.5 +7.4 +5.5 +11.1 +12.1 +4.4 +10.5 +10.5 +10.6 +8.7 +11.6 +2.6 +10.6 +8.8 +10.5 +8.7 +1.1 +2.6 +10.6 +4.8


E 4 THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

B C 

TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765.

FRIDAY CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; To schedule an appointment, call 541-385-9666 or go to www. myzoomtax.com.

SATURDAY

Road, Madras; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY July 12 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765.

Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. TOWN HALL FORUM: City forecast breakfast, registration required; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-3827437 or www.bendchamber.org. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765. HOW TO SELECT THE RIGHT FRANCHISE: Registration required; free; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY

FRIDAY

July 20

July 13

EXCEL 2010 INTERMEDIATE: Registration required; class continues July 27; $59; 9 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; to schedule an appointment, call 541-385-9666 or go to www. myzoomtax.com.

BUSINESS START-UP WORKSHOP: Registration required, $15; 11 a.m.1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541504-2900; call 541-383-7290 or go to http://noncredit.cocc.edu; . CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax. com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

MONDAY

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; call 541-447-6384 or go to www.happyhourtraining. com. TECH PETTING ZOO: Take a handson look at some of the popular eReader and tablet devices on the market today; 1-3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050.

SATURDAY

July 23

July 14

MONDAY

SUNDAY

FORECLOSURE PREVENTION CLASS: Learn about NeighborImpact’s Housing Center tools and services which can assist individuals struggling to pay their mortgages; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109, karenb@neighborimpact.org or www.homeownershipcenter.org. QUICKBOOKS PRO INTERMEDIATE: $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700. To register, go to http://noncredit.cocc.edu or call 541-383-7270.

FOOD MANAGER CERTIFICATION CLASS AND EXAM: This class will cover the new FDA Food Code requirements for your restaurant or food facility. We will be using the new Servsafe Manager 6th edition textbook. The certification exam will be given at the end of the day. Registration required; $125 or $75 without a textbook; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; call 866-697-8717 or go to http://helpingrestaurants.com. IS YOUR INVESTMENT STRATEGY IN THE FAIRWAY OR THE ROUGH?: Presented by Jake Paltzer, Certified Financial Planner; RSVP by July 6; free; 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Tetherow Golf Club, 61240 Skyline Ranch Road, Bend; 541-389-3624 or office@jakepaltzer.com.

July 15

TUESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; Call 541-420-7377. BEND CHAMBER MEMBER SUCCESS BRIEFING: Registration required; 10 a.m.; Bend Chamber of Commerce, 777 NW Wall St., Suite 200; 541-382-3221 or shelley@ bendchamber.org. FINANCIAL PLANNING AND MONEY MANAGEMENT: Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541318-7506, ext. 109.

WEDNESDAY July 11 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. THREE KEYS TO EMAIL MARKETING: Registration recommended; free; 7:30 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3823221 or www.bendchamber. org/events. HOME PRESERVATION WORKSHOP: Learn about budgeting, debt management, refinancing, property taxes, energy conservation techniques, home maintenance issues, insurance, safety tips and community involvement; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541318-7506, ext. 109 or www. homeownershipcenter.org. CLEAN UP AND SPEED UP YOUR PC: Registration required; class continues July 18; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Madras Campus, 1170 E. Ashwood

HOME BUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 9 a.m.5 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541318-7506, ext. 109. QUICKBOOKS PRO BEGINNING: Register by July 11; $59; 9 a.m.4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700; To register, call 541-383-7270 or go to http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

SAVING AND INVESTING: 5:307:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; call 541-318-7506 ext. 309 to reserve a seat.

TUESDAY July 17 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; Call 541-447-6384 or go to www.happyhourtraining. com. EMAIL TIPS AND TRICKS: Learn to manage your email from set-up, to attaching photos and documents, opening and saving files to creating folders. For ages 50 and older; $52 - $70; 10 a.m.-noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. CRR-TERREBONNE NETWORKING SOCIAL: Free; 5:30 p.m.; Juniper Realty, 14290 S.W. Chinook Road, Crooked River Ranch; 541-9232679 or www.crrchamber.com. SAVING AND INVESTING: Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541318-7506, ext. 109. SMALL BUSINESS COUNSELING: Free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037.

WEDNESDAY July 18 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. MAC HELP: Free, friendly, technical advice for your Mac, iPad or iPhone; 10 a.m.-noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133.

THURSDAY July 19 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Starts at 7 a.m.; Bend

TUESDAY July 24 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. EMAIL TIPS AND TRICKS: Learn to manage your email from set-up, to attaching photos and documents, opening and saving files to creating folders. For ages 50 and older; $52 - $70; 10 a.m.-noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. ETHICS AND LEADERSHIP IN THE 21ST CENTURY: City forecast breakfast, registration required; $25 for Chamber members and $45 for non-members; 11 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-7437 or www. bendchamber.org.

WEDNESDAY July 25 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. J BAR J BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: A special Business After Hours at The Oregon High Desert Classics, Central Oregon’s largest and longest-running horse shows, registration required; 5 p.m.; J Bar J Boys Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend; 541-389-1409 or www. bendchamber.org. QUICKBOOKS PRO INTERMEDIATE: $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700. To register contact http://noncredit.cocc.edu or call 541-383-7270;

THURSDAY July 26 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. RENEWABLE ENERGY AND NATURAL BUILDING CLASSES: Professional-level workshops on solar hot water and solar electric components, as well as a handson natural building workshop as part of the Solwest Fair; free with paid fair admission; Grant County Fairgrounds, 411 N.W. Bridge St., John Day; 541-575-1900.

Barclays chief resigns as banking scandal spreads By Mark Scott New York Times News Service

LONDON — Barclays is trying to quickly stem the fallout from a rate-manipulation scandal, as its chief executive, Robert E. Diamond Jr., resigned abruptly Tuesday. Less than a week ago, the big bank agreed to pay $450 million to settle accusations that it had tried to influence key interest rates for its own benefit, sparking a political firestorm in Britain. Now, the scandal has claimed three Barclays executives: Diamond; Marcus Agius, the chairman; and Jerry del Missier, who was promoted to chief operating officer last month. The resignations come as regulators in London and Washington are investigating whether big banks manipulated interest rates to their own advantage, aiming to increase profits and fend off questions about their financial health. Such benchmarks, including the London interbank offered rate, or LIBOR, are essential to setting the lending rates for corporations and consumers. In the Barclays case, regulators accused the bank of lowering its LIBOR submissions to deflect concerns about its high borrowing costs.

Continued scrutiny While Diamond is stepping down, he will face continued scrutiny Wednesday when he testifies before a British parliamentary committee. Local politicians are expected to question him about the actions within the bank that culminated in multimillion-dollar fines from the

Justice Department and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission in the United States and the Financial Services Authority in Britain. On Monday, Prime Minister David Cameron of Britain also announced a wide-ranging inquiry into the British banking sector, with the findings to be published by the end of the year. “We need to take action right across the board,� he told Parliament. The Serious Fraud Office of Britain also said Monday that it might pursue criminal prosecutions in connection with the manipulation of LIBOR. British authorities, who continue to work with their overseas counterparts, will make a decision about the evidence gathered by the country’s Financial Services Authority.

Mounting criticism Diamond’s resignation, which was effective immediately, came after mounting criticism of the bank’s actions from politicians and shareholders. Diamond’s decision to leave was made Monday afternoon in response to this pressure, according to a person with direct knowledge of the matter, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the discussions were private. Diamond had wanted to avoid prolonging the public focus on the bank’s past activities, the person added. “My motivation has always been to do what I believed to be in the best interests of Barclays,� Diamond said in a statement. “No decision over that period was as hard as the

one that I make now to stand down as chief executive. The external pressure placed on Barclays has reached a level that risks damaging the franchise. I cannot let that happen.� Del Missier resigned as chief operating officer Tuesday with immediate effect. He was the co-president of Barclays Capital, the firm’s investment banking unit, from 2005 to 2008, and become co-chief executive of corporate and investment banking at Barclays in 2009. Agius, who resigned as chairman Monday, will stay at the bank until a new chief executive has been found, and he will then step down, Barclays said in a statement. While the search is under way, he will head the executive committee and will be supported by Michael Rake, the bank’s deputy chairman. Further resignations could be in the works. Fresh details about the case show how Diamond and other senior executives played a role in the questionable actions and failed to prevent them, according to several people familiar with the details of the case. Diamond’s top deputies told employees in 2007 and 2008 to report artificially low rates in line with those of rivals in an effort to deflect scrutiny about the bank’s health at the height of the financial crisis, according to the people, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly. Barclays declined to comment about the involvement of senior executives.

MAJOR INDUSTRY MERGER

Duke, Progress become nation’s biggest power company; then new CEO quits By Emery P. Dalesio The Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. — Duke Energy Corp. and Progress Energy Inc. said Tuesday they had completed their merger now valued at about $32 billion to form the nation’s largest electric company. But the normally routine event came with a twist. Bill Johnson, who was tapped to lead the combined company as president and chief executive, has decided to leave by “mutual agreement,� the companies said. Duke CEO Jim Rogers, who was expected to be executive chairman, has instead been named CEO of the new company. “This is day one and we’re all one group of employees,� Rogers said in an interview. “They see what I see which is a belief in the long-term proposition of this combination. We put together the largest utility in this country. We see tremendous opportunities. We have a deep bench

of capable people that can deliver.� Whether it was Johnson or the company’s board that had a last-minute change of heart is unclear. But as late as Monday, Duke staffers were describing Johnson as the pending CEO and scheduling postmerger interviews for him as the top manager. The company declined to answer questions about the switch. “We are not going to address any questions with regard to the board’s deliberations. Bill resigned by mutual agreement with the board,� Ann Maynard Gray, lead director of Charlotte-based Duke Energy’s board of directors, said in an interview. Rogers said he spoke early Tuesday with about 60 of the combined company’s top executives to keep them on board with the new leadership. Some of those executives coming over from Progress Energy likely had developed

links to Johnson and may have expected that relationship to help them advance in the new company. “It is very strange. We were not expecting that, so I don’t know what to say,� Bernstein Research analyst Francois Broquin said. “No one had any answer on what were the circumstances behind the change.� Broquin said the company leaders indicated in discussions Tuesday that Johnson’s departure was not related to material performance of Progress Energy, but offered no other details. Johnson did not explain his reasons for leaving in an email to Progress. Rogers has twice before been the CEO leading his company through a merger, first when PSI Energy became part of Ohio-based Cinergy in 1988 and again when Cinergy merged with Duke Energy in 2006. Duke won federal approval for the merger announced in January 2011 on June 8.

N  R

BANKRUPTCIES Ch a p te r7 Filed June 26

JoA nn M. Grant, 1656 N.W. John Fremont, Bend Edward E. Tanguy III, P.O. Box 7969, Bend Andrew B. Schar, P.O. Box 1433, Sisters Filed June 27

Nicholas S. Irwin, 1632 N.E. Diablo Ave., Bend Roderick C. Munro, 140 N.E. Alpenview Lane, Bend Samuel J. Newman 20640 American Lane, Bend Richard J. Rukaveno, P.O. Box 251, Bend

Filed June 28

Holly G. Hamilton, 63040 Moonstone Lane, Bend Windy L. Dethman, 127 S.E. 11th, Madras Filed June 29

Charles Canizio, 825 Watt Way, Apt J-203, Bend Roy E. Wilmoth, P.O. Box 3567, La Pine Pamela L. Burks, 62360 Deer Trail Road, Bend Frederick W. Ellis, 316 North Alvord Ave., Burns Juan M. Gonzalez, 10401 N.E. Wilson Creek Road, Ashwood Amanda V. McCavitt, P.O. Box 6883, Bend Dieryel L. Wade III, 61715 Tulip Way, Bend Rick D. Clothier, P.O. Box 9624,

Bend Inawin V. Malesa, 1965 N.W. Monterey Pines #4, Bend Filed July 2

Tracie E. Silvers, P.O. Box 2229, Redmond Todd D. Surplus, 4540 N.W. Grimes Road, Prineville Eric C. Neumann, 131 N.W. Florida Ave., Bend Nancy L. Stillwell, 894 N.E. Providence, Bend Chapter 13 Filed June 26

Luis A. Campos, 2936 S.W. Indian Circle, Redmond Kenneth E. Crenshaw Jr., 63190 Cole Road, Bend Filed June 29

Keith A. Kirkpatrick, 60914 Platinum Drive, Bend


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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

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DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines, $12 or 2 weeks, $20! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

The Bulletin r ecommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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Want to Buy or Rent Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage costume jewelry. Top dollar paid for Gold/Silver.I buy by the Estate, Honest Artist Elizabeth,541-633-7006 WANTED: RAZORS, Double or singleedged, straight razors, shaving brushes, mugs & scuttles, strops, shaving accessories & memorabilia. Fair prices paid. Call 541-390-7029 between 10 am-3 pm.

Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

www.bendbulletin.com

212

Antiques & Collectibles

Free Shiba Enu, house broken, neutered, not good around small kids Antiques wanted: tools, Want to rent travel trailer or other dogs, to good furn., fishing, marbles, or small motorhome, home, 541-610-6053 old sports gear, cossleep 5+, 7/24-28. tume jewelry, rock Hound Puppies (3), 7 541-639-8442 posters. 541-389-1578 weeks, lots of color, 205 $150 ea.,541-447-1323 The Bulletin reserves Items for Free the right to publish all KITTENS! Large variety. ads from The Bulletin Small adoption fee: alDesk,oak finish,59”x30”, newspaper onto The tered, shots, ID chip, hanging file drawers, Bulletin Internet webfree vet visit & more; FREE, 541-350-3222 site. discount for 2. Sat & Sun 12-5, other days 208 call 541-788-4170. At Pets & Supplies Redmond foster home: 8950 S. Hwy 97, look 240 for signs. Adopt a kitThe Bulletin recomCrafts & Hobbies ten & get a free adult mends extra caution mentor cat at rescue when purchassanctuary! www.craft- Rock, Slab, Slice poling products or serisher, 27” Vibro Lap, cats.org or CraftCats vices from out of the $700, 541-548-3225 on Facebook.com area. Sending cash, checks, or credit in- Lab pups, AKC, 10 yel246 low, master hunter formation may be Guns, Hunting sired. 541-447-7972 subjected to fraud. & Fishing For more informa- Lab Pups AKC, black tion about an adver& yellow, Master CASH!! tiser, you may call Hunter sired, perforFor Guns, Ammo & the Oregon State mance pedigree, OFA Reloading Supplies. Attorney General’s cert hips & elbows, 541-408-6900. Office Consumer Call 541-771-2330 Protection hotline at www.kinnamanretrievers.com Deluxe Stoeger Coach 1-877-877-9392. gun, 12 ga., as Labradoodles - Mini & new. $400 OBO. med size, several colors 541-475-3984 541-504-2662

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. BUYING & SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419. Kitchen cabinet, nice, wheeled, could be island, $100, 385-6012 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

TOW BAR, Eaz-Lift Pro Lost Droid X2, on 6/28, possibly at Costco or Star, 26” bars, 10,000 NE Bend area. Relb towing capacity, ward. 541-480-7390. $290. 541-480-7823 Wanted- paying cash Lost Shih Tzu female, black & white, microfor Hi-fi audio & stuchipped Ridge Height dio equip. McIntosh, Rd/Knott Rd area, JBL, Marantz, Dy6/29. Reward. naco, Heathkit, San541-389-9694 sui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, 263 don't forget to check Tools The Humane Society in Bend 541-382-3537 1961 Shopsmith Mark Redmond, 5, plus attachments, 541-923-0882 $200. 541-330-8774 Prineville, 541-447-7178; 9’ Bandsaw, good conOR Craft Cats, dition. $60. 541-389-8420. 541-330-5819 Bandsaw, Craftsman 12”, tilting head, $185, 541-410-3425.

Trimmer / Brush Cutter, Shindaiwa B45, w/exFind exactly what Alusky puppies, 8 wks, Maltese Toy AKC Reg. tra blades, excellent male & female, $500. champion bloodlines, you are looking for in the condition, $375 firm. 541-280-3884. extremely small, 7 wks. CLASSIFIEDS 541-388-9270 $700. 541-420-1577 Aussie Mix, Toy, 1st shots, dewormed, Pembroke Welsh Corgi 265 DO YOU HAVE $150, 541-977-0035 adult male free if neuBuilding Materials SOMETHING TO tered. 541-383-4552. SELL MADRAS Habitat Call a Pro FOR $500 OR RESTORE Whether you need a LESS? Building Supply Resale Non-commercial fence ixed, hedges Quality at advertisers may LOW PRICES trimmed or a house place an ad 84 SW K St. built, you’ll ind with our 541-475-9722 Poodle pups, toy, for "QUICK CASH professional help in Open to the public. SALE. Also Rescued SPECIAL" The Bulletin’s “Call a Poodle Adults for 1 week 3 lines $12 266 Service Professional” adoption, to loving or Heating & Stoves homes. 541-475-3889 2 weeks $20! Directory Ad must Queensland Heelers 541-385-5809 NOTICE TO include price of standard & mini,$150 & ADVERTISER single item of $500 up. 541-280-1537 http:// Barn cats/rodent speSince September 29, or less, or multiple cialists ready to work in rightwayranch.wordpress.com 1991, advertising for items whose total your barn or shop in Siberian Husky AKC 5 used woodstoves has does not exceed exchange for safe been limited to modyrs., gray fem., blue $500. shelter, food & water. els which have been eyes, $350 Altered, shots. We decertified by the Or541-977-7019. Call Classifieds at liver! 541-389-8420 egon Department of 541-385-5809 Siberian Husky AKC! Environmental Qualwww.bendbulletin.com Blue Heeler pups, $250. Black/white female,8 mo. ity (DEQ) and the fedBeautiful, must see! 3 $450. 541-977-7019 eral Environmental left, Families will be Protection Agency screened. Please call Washer/Dryer, Whirlpool, Remington 243 788 carbine, scope, sling, nice! (EPA) as having met 503-777-3541 white, great cond, $175/ $500. 541-788-8137 smoke emission stanpair. 541-306-9138 dards. A certified Ruger 44 mag semiwoodstove may be Yorkie Pups, AKC, adorauto carbine, exc., able, 2 boys, 1 girl, identified by its certifi$500. 541-475-3984 small,health guarantee, cation label, which is $850+, 541-316-0005. permanently attached Wanted: Collector to the stove. The Bulseeks high quality Boxer/English Bulldog 210 letin will not knowfishing items. (Valley Bulldog) puppies, ingly accept advertisCall 541-678-5753, or CKC Reg’d, brindles & Furniture & Appliances ing for the sale of 503-351-2746 fawns, 1st shots. $700. uncertified 541-325-3376 A1 Washers&Dryers 255 woodstoves. $150 ea. Full warCATS - Sponsors & fosComputers ranty. Free Del. Also 267 ter homes needed for wanted, used W/D’s cats & kittens rescued Fuel & Wood THE BULLETIN re541-280-7355 from being shot. Tenant quires computer adleft; owner wanted the vertisers with multiple abandoned cats gone & Bedroom set, queen. 5 WHEN BUYING ad schedules or those started shooting. This piece, dark oak, $175. FIREWOOD... selling multiple sysstopped when the Sher541-350-3222 tems/ software, to disTo avoid fraud, iff was called after a close the name of the The Bulletin mom cat was shot in a Chair, wing-back, ready business or the term for reupholstering. trap, in front of a child. recommends pay"dealer" in their ads. $25. 541-389-2028 Non-profit, no-kill, all ment for Firewood Private party advertisvolunteer CRAFT was only upon delivery ers are defined as Couch, 3 cushions, asked to assist & has and inspection. those who sell one • A cord is 128 cu. ft. dark green faux rescued 24 from this rucomputer. suede, exc. cond. ral property, but needs 4’ x 4’ x 8’ $300. 541-410-8084 foster homes for kittens • Receipts should 257 & malnourished cats, & include name, 1 cat whose leg was Dresser, used 4-drawer Musical Instruments phone, price and beige w/gold trim, $30. removed after it was kind of wood pur541-388-1533. shattered by a bullet. Guitars and amps for chased. She needs time to trust GENERATE SOME exsale, must sell, exc. • Firewood ads people, heal & learn to cond. 541-815-7030. citement in your MUST include spewalk again. CRAFT also neighborhood! Plan a cies and cost per needs quality cat food, Good classiied ads tell garage sale and don't cord to better serve litter & funds for vet care the essential facts in an forget to advertise in our customers. since none is donated to interesting Manner. Write classified! CRAFT. Permanent from the readers view - not 541-385-5809. homes are needed for the seller’s. Convert the all; safe barn/shop facts into beneits. Show homes for those cats Get your not tame enough to be the reader how the item will 269 business pets. www.craftcats.org help them in some way. Gardening Supplies 541-389-8420 or & Equipment 598-5488, POB 6441, GROW Bend 97708.

ING

Chihuahua long hair male pup, $140 cash. 541-678-7599 Dachshund Mini, AKC, female, $325, Prineville, 541-633-3221 Dachshund Mini, AKC, male, $325, Prineville, 541-633-3221

with an ad in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

260

Misc. Items

Barbecue grill, 3-burner Weber Genesis Gold, Microwave $30 Kengas. $700+ new; used more 18”x13”x 9¾” only 3x, selling $400. white. 541-388-1533. obo. 541-388-9270 Patio Set: 7-piece, table Buying Diamonds with 6 rocking/swivel /Gold for Cash chairs, like new. Paid $540 new; sell $400. Saxon’s Fine Jewelers 541-639-2006 541-389-6655

Where can you ind a helping hand? From contractors to yard care, it’s all here in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Lighting Fixtures, 270 Chandeliers (2) $50 & $25, wall units (4), Lost & Found $10 ea, brass candle style, 678-333-5767. Found on 6/25, prescription glasses, in Louvered tailgate, 4’6”, case, on Ferguson treadmill Vitamaster, Rd. 541-300-9536. fridge; dorm type, bbq; 3/16” steel, Found on 6/26, Preunique, exc. cond., scription glasses by 3 ft. stand. Each $35. Mirror Pond, call 541-330-5819 541-550-7036.

www.alpen-ridge.com

Chihuahua female puppies (2), 8 wks, black, $250 ea.541-279-5859

SUPER TOP SOIL

www.hersheysoilandbark.com

Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

For newspaper delivery, call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email

Farm Market

300 308

Farm Equipment & Machinery Hay Bale Elevator, 16’, 3/4 HP, $350, 678-333-5767. 316

Irrigation Equipment Rainbird Impact Sprinkler Heads, $5 ea; Quick Change 1” valves, $10 ea., Quick Change keys, $5 ea., 678-333-5767 325

Hay, Grain & Feed Want to buy Alfalfa standing, in Central Ore. 541-419-2713 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw;Compost.546-6171 345

Livestock & Equipment

1977 14' Blake Trailer, refurbished by Frenchglen Blacksmiths, a Classy Classic. Great design for multiple uses. Overhead tack box (bunkhouse) with side and easy pickup bed access; manger with left side access, windows and head divider. Toyo radial tires & spare; new floor with mats; center partition panel; bed liner coated in key areas, 6.5 K torsion axles with electric brakes, and new paint, $10,500. Call John at 541-589-0777. Beef calves, 300-900 lbs, pasture ready, vaccinated. Delivery available. 541-480-1719 Healthy beef steers 600800+ lbs., dewormed, vaccinated; possible delivery. 541-382-8393 358

Farmers Column Want to buy Alfalfa standing, in Central Ore. 541-419-2713 383

Produce & Food

THOMAS ORCHARDS Kimberly, OR U-Pick: Sweet Dark Cherries, Apricots by 7/4. Ready Picked: Sweet Dark classified@bendbulletin.com Cherries & Apricots BRING CONTAINERS Open 7 days/week 8 am - 6 pm only 541-934-2870 Prompt Delivery Visit us on Facebook Rock, Sand & Gravel for updates Multiple Colors, Sizes Also we are at the Bend Instant Landscaping Co. Farmer’s Market at Drake 541-389-9663 Park & St. Charles.

Employment

400 421

Schools & Training

TRUCK SCHOOL

www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235 476

Employment Opportunities

Concrete Construction

Roger Langeliers Construction has openings for experienced Concrete Finishers & Laborers. Veterans are encouraged to apply. Mostly public wage work with full benefit package. RLC is an Equal Opportunity Employer and drug-free company. Call 541-948-0829 or 541-948-0315 for interview & application.

Dental Assistant Needed for 2 days per week. EFDA certification preferred. Looking for friendly hardworking person who enjoys working with other people. Please bring resume to Dr Schultz & Dr. Toms, at 611 SE 5th St., Madras. DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

MECHANIC CITY OF MADRAS

Immediate opening for a skilled mechanic to maintain a variety of fleet equipment, including light duty trucks, street sweepers, dump trucks and loaders. Requires experience as a heavy equipment operator and welder. Duties include a variety of labor-oriented work in connection with street and public right-of-way maintenance, and to perform repair and cleaning of streets. This position reports directly to the Street Supervisor. Applicants must possess a valid Oregon commercial driver’s license with a Class B rating with tanker and air-brake endorsements. Monthly salary range: $2,773-$3,215 DOQ. Excellent benefit package including fully paid PERS. Send completed employment application, letter of interest and resume to “Utility I/Mechanic Recruitment”, City of Madras, 71 SE “D” Street, Madras, OR 97741-1605. For a complete job description and application go to www.ci.madras.or.us Closing date: July 13, 2012. Medical Jefferson County EMS District currently has a position for an EMT with a minimum 2 years exp. working on an ALS ambulance. JCEMSD is a small special district that covers a large rural area. Benefits and salary package are based on experience. Deadline for applications is 7/13/2012. Request or send applications to: PO Box 265, Madras, OR 97741, 541-475-7476 for more information.

541-385-5809.

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Sell them in The Bulletin Classiieds

VIEW the Classifieds at:

RN

Equal Opportunity Employer

Field Service

Aspen Ridge Memory Care is seeking an experienced part time RN to lead and oversee the daily resident care program. Responsibilities include staff training and supervision, implementation of services and programs, documentation and communication, medication management and delegation, regulatory compliance, care plans and assessments. Prior experience with alzheimers, dementia or ALF a plus. Please mail, fax or email cover letter and resume with salary requirements to Aspen Ridge Memory Care, 1025 NE Purcell Blvd., Bend, OR 97701, Fax 541-312-6674, Email alzaspenridge@frontiermgmt. com EOE Drug free work place.

Take care of your investments with the help from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Finance & Business

500 528

Loans & Mortgages

RV Salesperson

Big Country RV, Inc., Central Oregon’s Largest RV Dealership, is growing and adding to our strong sales staff. We are looking for the right person who wants a career in one of the fastest growing industries in Central Oregon. Great opportunity for someone with prior vehicle sales experience. Exceptional inventory of New and Used RVs. Unlimited earning potential with an excellent benefit package to include: • IRA • Dental Plan • Medical Insurance • Up to 35% commission • Great Training

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

541-385-5809 Hoffmeyer Co. is seeking an energetic Remember.... person for long-term Add your web adHave an item to employment, Will asdress to your ad and sell quick? sist with conveyor readers on The belting installs, shipIf it’s under Bulletin' s web site ping, receiving, cus$ will be able to click 500 you can place it in tomer service. Job rethrough automatically quires flexible work The Bulletin to your site. schedule including Classii eds for: nights & weekends; some overnight travel. Garage Sales Must be able to work $ No experience re10 - 3 lines, 7 days weekends and have a quired; will train. ODL Garage Sales $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days passion for the RV REQUIRED. $9-$12/ business. Please ap- (Private Party ads only) hr. Application neces- Garage Sales ply in person, or drop sary. Please apply in resume off at: Find them MONEY:We buy person: 20575 PaintBig Country RV, Inc. LOCAL secured trust deeds & ers Ct., Bend, OR. in 3500 N. Hwy 97 note,some hard money Bend, OR 97701 The Bulletin Call The Bulletin At loans. Call Pat Kelley or email a resume to 541-382-3099 ext.13. 541-385-5809 Classiieds accounting@bigcrv.com Place Your Ad Or E-Mail 541-385-5809 At: www.bendbulletin.com Tick, Tock Sales Consultant Robberson Ford is Tick, Tock... Electrician General Journeyman seeking an experiWarm Springs Composite Products is looking enced sales profes...don’t let time get for an individual to help a growing innovative sional. Great pay plan away. Hire a light manufacturing plant. with full benefits. Basic Duties: Assist in troubleshooting and professional out Apply in person & ask repairs of plant equipment. Install, repair and for Tony or Greg (541) of The Bulletin’s maintain all electrical and electronic equip382-4521. “Call A Service ment. Able to read and revise electrical scheRobberson Ford is a matics, Must be able to perform both electridrug free workplace. Professional” cal and mechanical preventive maintenance EOE. Directory today! requirements and report, PLC experience. Minimum Skills: A minimum of 5 years in the industrial maintenance field with a valid Oregon State Electricians License in Manufacturing. A strong mechanical aptitude with the ability to perform light welding and fabrication duties. Successful applicant shall supply the normal hand tools required for both electrical and mechanical maintenance. Benefits: Full Family Medical, Vision, Dental, Life, Disability, Salary Incentives, Company Bonuses, Pension and 401K w/Company Matching and Above Pay Rate Scale. Please remit resume to: Warm Springs Composite Products PO Box 906, Warm Springs, OR 97761 Phone: 541-553-1143, Fax: 541-553-1145 Attn: Mac Coombs, mcoombs@wscp.com

Graphic Designer Position Available The Bulletin’s Creative Services team is seeking a full-time graphic designer. The ideal candidate possess practiced design skills and excellent communication skills in order to work with account executives and local businesses to design and produce advertisements that get results for that advertiser. Proficiency using Adobe InDesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop softwares to create basic and advanced ad layouts and designs is a must. The Bulletin is a drug-free workplace and an equal opportunity employer that provides competitive wages and benefits. Send a resume with qualifications, skills, experience and a past employment history to: The Bulletin, attention: James Baisinger 1777 S. W. Chandler Ave P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708-6020

541-385-5809


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

F2 WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Edited by Will Shortz

PLACE AN AD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . .11:00 am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Starting at 3 lines

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise

OVER $500 in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days ................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days .................................................. $18.50 7 days .................................................. $24.00 14 days .................................................$33.50 28 days .................................................$61.50

4 lines for 4 days.................................. $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Rentals

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Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent Madras

Homes for Sale

Jefferson County Homes

Farms & Ranches

Motorcycles & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

BANK OWNED HOMES! CENTRAL LOCATION $61,900. Very cute FREE List w/Pics! Luxury Home, 2450 New custom craftsman home situated on home for lease, 3 www.BendRepos.com sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2.5 bend and beyond real estate comfortable city lot. bdrm, 2 bath, great bath, office, 3 car ga20967 yeoman, bend or Low maintenance, view, near aquatic rage, mtn views., avail shed and double gacenter & COCC cam747 7/20. 2641 NE Jill Ct. rage as well as 3 pus, $1250/mo, owner Southwest Bend Homes $1750/mo. + dep. 605 comfortable bedpays sewer, water & 541-420-3557. rooms & much more. landscaping. No smkg/ ONE STORY, RIVER Roommate Wanted MLS#201108141 pets. 541-504- 9284 or 652 RIM. Owner Financ541-905-5724 DD Realty Group LLC Share mobile home in ing. 2000 sq. ft. 3/2 + Houses for Rent 866-346-7868 Terrebonne, $350 + den. $307,000. NW Bend utilities. 1-503-679-7496 541-322-7309 Charming end of Real Estate cul-de-sac home. with 630 750 Gorgeous 5 bdrm,3 bath, western motif. Living Rooms for Rent fully furnished,NW FlaFor Sale Redmond Homes room is plumbed for gline Dr.,minimum 1 yr. natural gas, wood & lease, $3200/mo, call Mt. Bachelor Motel has $329,950 REDMOND tile floors throughout. Robert 541-944-3063 rooms, starting $150/ VIEW HOME 4 Large landscaped lot week or $35/nt. Incl bdrm + den, 2 1/2 with sprinkler system 654 guest laundry, cable & baths, Master on and a fenced backWiFi. 541-382-6365 Houses for Rent main, Private fenced yard. $119,900! lot, RV parking, Studios & Kitchenettes SE Bend MLS#201109122. 745 killer kitchen. DeFurnished room, TV w/ DD Realty Group LLC Homes for Sale sign Quality makes cable, micro & fridge. 3/1, w/single car ga866-346-7868 it a Show Stopper!! Utils & linens. New rage; 24x36 shop Gorgeous cedar home MLS#20123413 owners.$145-$165/wk Close to schools - Nice w/220, fenced backon almost 16 acres, 541-382-1885 Call Dale Pilon, Prin3 bdrm Madras home yard w/patio & green$474,900 cipal Broker in town. Landscaped house, W/D, all appli. 634 Ad #2632 541-390-2901 with fenced yard, RV Pets neg. $980/mo. TEAM Birtola Garmyn Apt./Multiplex NE Bend Redmond RE/MAX parking too! $79,900 1st/last + $150/dep. Prudential High Desert Land & Homes MLS#201106963, Avail. 8/1. leave msg. Realty 541-312-9449 Real Estate CHECK OUT THIS DD Realty Group LLC at 541-410-9064. www.BendOregon 866-346-7868 HOT DEAL! 770 NE Quince Ave., RealEstate.com $299 1st month’s rent! * 658 Redmond, 3 bdrm, 2 NEW TOWNHOME 2 bdrm, 1 bath bath in quiet NE Houses for Rent Very clean, new conGorgeous Bend $530 & 540 neighborhood near struction in Madras. acreage, 4 Bdrm home Carports & A/C incl! Redmond public park. UpWell built, dbl. garage + shop, $235,000 Fox Hollow Apts. graded tile & wood. with landscaped front Ad #2072 (541) 383-3152 1422 NW Teak - BeauThis home shows yard and fenced Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co tiful newer home, 4 TEAM Birtola Garmyn pride of ownership. *Upstairs only with lease* backyard. Don’t miss bdrm, 2½ bath, 2 Prudential High Desert $158,000. this one! $75,000 Realty 541-312-9449 story, finished 2-car MLS#201202761 MLS#201201561 garage, large fenced www.BendOregon Say “goodbuy” Call Don Chapin, DD Realty Group LLC yard w/sprinklers, A/C RealEstate.com to that unused Broker 866-346-7868 gas fireplace & heat, 541-350-6777 dog on approval, bor- 1.5 acres adjoining foritem by placing it in Price Reduced 1783 sq. Redmond RE/MAX ders Tom McCall Elest land, $189,900. The Bulletin Classiieds ft. LOG HOME 1.49 Land & Homes ementary School. 1-yr Ad #2802 acre rim lot. Double Real Estate lease. $1300 + $1500 TEAM Birtola Garmyn garage. $259,000. dep. 541-480-7444 or Prudential High Desert 541-385-5809 Look at: MLS 201109591. 541-408-2000. Realty 541-312-9449 Bendhomes.com Call Nancy Popp Browww.BendOregon Call for Specials! ker 541-815-8000 for Complete Listings of Clean 2 Bdrm + den, 2 RealEstate.com Limited numbers avail. Crooked River Realty bath, dbl garage, Area Real Estate for Sale 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. $900/mo. 9199 SW 4270 sq ft, 6 bdrm, 6 ba, W/D hookups, patios 757 Panarama, CRR. No 4-car, corner, .83 acre Cute 2 bedroom cotor decks. tage on the south- Crook County Homes smkg. 541-504-8545 mtn view, by owner. MOUNTAIN GLEN, west side of town, $590,000 541-390-0886 541-383-9313 close to shopping, Best Place To Live In Well maintained 3 See: bloomkey.com/8779 Professionally easy access to Hwy bdrm 2 bath home, Prineville! Over managed by Norris & 97, recently remodgreat location, avail 2000 sq. ft. 3 bdrm, $499,000 Stevens, Inc. eled. $93,000 This is July 5. $1000 mo. 2.5 bath, quiet OVER 5 ACRES. a must see! 541-410-8247 neighborhood. TraLocated by BMC/Costco, Set in the Ponderosa MLS#201202320. ditional sale at 2 bdrm, 2 bath duplex, pines at the end of the D&D Realty Group LLC 660 $189,000. 55+,2350 NEMary Rose cul-de-sac. Double 866-346-7868 MLS#201202762 Pl, #1, $795 no smoking Houses for Rent master, one on main, Call Travis Hannan, or pets, 541-390-7649 gourmet kitchen w/Is756 La Pine Principal Broker land. 3 car garage, Jefferson County Homes 636 541-788-3480 plus a detached RV La Pine Nice 3 Bd, 2.5 Apt./Multiplex NW Bend Redmond RE/MAX barn/boat, separate 1.05 Acres, Jefferson Ba, in Crescent Creek Land & Homes shop 1/2 bath! subdivision. Gas appliview, $149,900, Nice, quiet 1 Bdrm, w/s/g Real Estate Mike Wilson, Broker ances & fireplace, dbl MLS#20120184 Call cable pd; carport, laun541-977-5345 garage, fitness center, Linda Lou Day-Wright LARGE LOT - This is a dry fac. No smkg. $510 park. $800 mo; $900 541-389-7910 nice 2 bdrm, 1 bath 541-771-2585 + $500 dep. 209 NW deposit. 541-815-5494 Hunter Properties home with a 2 car Crooked River Realty Portland. 541-617-1101 detached garage. Close to downtown and lots of room for all your toys. $37,500 MLS#201202393 DD Realty Group LLC 866-346-7868

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Sales Northwest Bend

Sales Northeast Bend

Sales Southeast Bend

3 Family garage sale, 64752 Saros Lane (Starwood off Tumalo Rd.) Sat. only 8-3. Garage Sale: 107 NW Drake, 2 blocks from Downtown, Sat. July 7th., 9-3, nice quality baby furniture, kitchen supplies, electronics & other household items Huge Vacation Home Furnishing Sale: Sat. 7/7, 8-?, 162 NW Outlook Vista Dr., follow signs to alley. July 6 & 7, 7:30-2. 63108 Fresca St., misc. antiques, lots of women’s clothing & shoes. household items.

H H

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Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $2.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!”

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT at

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

284

Sales Southwest Bend Fri.-Sat Only, 9-2, boys & girls toys, tools, Moving Sale: Fri. 7/6, washer & dryer, more Sat, 7/7, 8-4, fridge, 63525 JD Estates Dr. clothes, linens, furniture, butter churn, Ladies of Elks Annual bakers table, dishes, Garage Sale, Sat., 7/7, glassware, yard stuff, 8am-3pm. Glassware, antiques, collectibles, clothes, furniture, picbooks, bookcase, lots tures & much more! of stuff! 61388 Bend Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd. Elkhorn St.

Moving Sale: Fri. & Sat., July 6th & 7th, 8-4, 1009 SE Castlewood Dr. Furniture, antiques, collectibles, tools, BBQ Sat. only 7 a.m. - 1 p.m. 61753 SE Camellia. (27th to Starlight in Gardenside) 290

Sales Redmond Area 345 NW Canyon Dr. (Canyon & Dogwood), NOON on FRI., 7/6, and again at 8:00 SAT., 7/7. Thinning combined households! Office furn. & supplies, printers, monitors, speakers, bed & box springs, lamps, futon, kitchen stuff, table& chairs, Bowflex, hutch. Desert Terrace Mobile Estates Park Sale, 12+ families! Fri-Sat, 7/6-7, 9-5. Household, tools, fishing, lawn equip, boat, sauna, pool table, misc. 5063 S. Hwy 97. Huge Sale: Fri. & Sat. July 6 & 7, 126 W to Cline Falls, 1.5 mi. S. to 2667 SW 79th, follow signs.

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PANORAMIC VIEWS! Great location 3 miles NW of Redmond. LARGE Garage Sale Views of Smith Rock Fri-Sat, 9-3. We have & Ochocos. Custom all YOUR old junk! built 2478 sq. ft. home 2165 NW Quince Place on 4.74 acres. 1800 sq. ft. shop w/RV bay. Liquidating - ALL must MLS#201202726 go! Thurs-Sat, 7/5-7, $447,000. 9-5, 2840 NW 39th St. John L. Scott Real (See ad on craigslist Estate 541-548-1712 under “Garage Sale”) Local Nursery Plants Recent price reduction!! Custom home on 7+ Sale/Garage Sale. acres. Cascade Sat. 8am-3pm. views, 2146 sq.ft., 3 3370 SW Newberry Bdrm/2 Bath, living Ave. Don’t miss! room PLUS a family Moving Sale: Fri. 9-6, room & separate of10100 NE Crooked fice. Tile, granite and River Dr, Space 22, at hickory. 2016 sq.ft. Smith Rock,Terrebonne shop. $379,900. MLS#201106497 Moving Sale: Fri.-Sun. 9-6, 2508 SW Glacier John L. Scott Real Estate 541-548-1712 Ave, weight bench, bikes, furniture, etc. Two permitted homesites! 39ý acres. Yard Sale, Sat. 8-4, Gorgeous Unob1713 SW Lava, structed Cascade Something for everyMountain Views! one. Don’t Miss!! Possible OWC. 292 $325,000. MLS#201201125 Sales Other Areas Call Charlie, DesigBarn Sale - Saddles, nated Broker Tack, & Tools, West 541-350-3419 Redmond RE/MAX Powell Butte Estates, Land & Homes follow signs. 8 am, Real Estate Fri. & Sat. Don’t miss! Sales Redmond Area

35-Acre irrigated farm close to Prineville, presently in hay, cattle & onions. Price reduced to $298,000! 541-410-3425. 771

Lots

Honda VT700 Shadow 1984, 23K mi, many new parts, battery charger, good condition. Now for $1000, cash! 541-598-4351

Owner will carry! fantastic 1/2 acre lot with 865 views. $59,900. MLS ATVs 201008725 Call Julie Fahlgren, Broker 541-550-0098 Yamaha Grizzly 700 FI 2009, 543 mi, 2WD/ Crooked River Realty 4WD, black w/EPS, fuel injection, indepen773 dent rear suspension Acreages winch w/handle controls & remote, ps, Nice mountain views, auto, large racks, exc. 3.09 acres, $95,950 cond., $7850, MLS#201101554. Call 541-322-0215 Linda Lou Day-Wright, Broker, 541-771-2585 Crooked River Realty Powell Butte 6 acres, 360 views, great horse property, 10223 Houston Lake Rd. $99,900. 541-350-4684 775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes 12’x40’, 1/1, lots of upgrades, Senior Park. north side of Bend. $6,500. 541-382-6530 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, just under 2 fenced acres, 2001 manufactured in great cond., $79,900, MLS#201201999, Call Julie Fahlgren, Broker, 541-550-0098 Crooked River Realty

800 Polaris 2003, 4 cycle, fuel inj, elec start, reverse, 2-up seat, cover, 4900 mi, $2500 obo. 541-280-0514 860

Motorcycles & Accessories

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Country Coach Intrigue 2002, 40' Tag axle. 400hp Cummins Diesel. Two slide-outs. 41,000 miles. Most options. $110,000 OBO 541-678-5712 CAN’T BEAT THIS! Look before you buy, below market value ! Size & mileage DOES matter, Class A 32’ Hurricane by Four Winds, 2007. 12,500 mi, all amenities, Ford V10, lthr, cherry, slides, like new, can see anytime, $58,000. 541-548-5216 Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Reach thousands of readers!

12’ Smoker Craft, 5hp motor, located in Sunriver. Now $775 obo. 503-319-5745.

motor, Bimini Top, new seats, Eagle fish finder, trailer, ready to go, $1600, 541-923-2957.

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Snowmobiles

Want to impress the relatives? Remodel your home with the help of a professional from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Yamaha Raptor 2005 660R sport quad w/ reverse; new pipe & in GENERATE SOME exnew cond. $2400/obo citement in your neigCall 541-647-8931 borhood. Plan a garage sale and don't 870 forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. Boats & Accessories

14’ Classic P-14 Seaswirl, 20HP

Boats & RV’s

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Coachman Freelander 2011, 27’, queen bed, 1 slide, HD TV, DVD player, 450 Ford, $49,000, please call 541-923-5754.

17’

Seaswirl,

175HP in/ outboard, open bow, new upholster, $2900, 541-389-9684.

Used out-drive parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires,under cover, hwy. miles only,4 door fridge/freezer ice875 maker, W/D combo, Watercraft Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp proAds published in "Wapane gen & more! tercraft" include: Kay$55,000. aks, rafts and motor541-948-2310 ized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. Hunter’s Delight! Pack541-385-5809 age deal! 1988 Winnebago Super Chief, 38K miles, great shape; 1988 Bronco II 4x4 to tow, 130K mostly towed miles, nice rig! $15,000 both. 541-382-3964, leave msg. Inflatable Raft,Sevylor Itasca Sun Cruiser Fishmaster 325,10’3”, 1997, 460 Ford, Class complete pkg., $650 A, 26K mi., 37’, living Firm, 541-977-4461. room slide, new awnings, new fridge, 8 new tires, 2 A/C, 6.5 Onan Gen., new batteries, tow pkg., rear towing TV, 2 tv’s, new hydraulic jack springs, tandem axel, $15,000, Kawasaki 1200cc 190hp 541-385-1782 Jet Skis, ‘02 & ‘03, very low hrs, trailer, $5950. 541-382-6101

Harley Davidson Dyna Superglide 2006, Silver, 6-spd, 5241 mi., 18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 $7500, 541-504-8961 Volvo Penta, 270HP, low hrs., must see, Harley Heritage $17,500, 541-330-3939 Softail, 2003 $5,000+ in extras, 19.5’ 1988 373V $2000 paint job, Ranger Bass Boat, 30K mi. 1 owner, Mercury 115 Motor, For more information Ranger trailer, trolling please call elec. motor, fish finder 541-385-8090 & sonor, 2 live wells & or 209-605-5537 all accessories, new batteries & tires, great Kayaks: Dagger Trinidad HD FAT BOY cond., $6500. tandem w/rudder, $200. Jayco Greyhawk 541-923-6555. 2004, 31’ Class C, Dagger Dynamo kids 1996 kayak, $400. Prineville, 6800 mi., hyd. jacks, Completely rebuilt/ 509-301-4521 new tires, slide out, customized, low exc. cond, $49,900, miles. Accepting ofKlepper Kayak dbl Aerius 541-480-8648 fers. 541-548-4807 Expedition, state of the art folding Kayak, HD Heritage Classic bought new, never in Kodiak 23’ 2001, 350 2003, 100 yr. Anniv. salt water, only lakes in 19-ft Mastercraft ProFord, 43K mi., A/C, model. 10,905 Miles, Central Oregon. Known Star 190 inboard, gen., new tires. stored new tires, battery, for their stability, it 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 undercover. Comfortloaded w/ custom exbreaks down into 3 hrs, great cond, lots of able & enjoyable. tras, exhaust & bags. Extras incl. extras, $10,000 obo. $24,000. chrome. Hard/soft $2900. 541-318-8047. 541-231-8709 541-548-2640. bags & much more. Klepper Kayak Sgl Aerius $11,995, Expedition, state of the 541-306-6505 or art folding Kayak, 503-819-8100. bought new, never in salt water, only lakes in FIND IT! Central Oregon. Known BUY IT! for their stability, it SELL IT! 19’ Glass Ply, Merc breaks down into 3 Monaco LaPalma 37’, cruiser, depth finder, 2004 w/ 2 slides, 25k The Bulletin Classiieds bags. Extras incl. trolling motor, trailer, mi., loaded, $42,500. $2300. 541-318-8047. $3000, 541-389-1086 Honda 1500 Trike 1994 541-923-3510. or 541-419-8034. ‘08 Champion conversion, metallic red, always garaged, low mi, lots of options $18,000, pics avail, 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner Call 541-598-7718 205 Run About, 220 Sea Kayaks - His & National Sea Breeze HP, V8, open bow, Hers, Eddyline Wind 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, exc. cond., very fast Dancers,17’, fiberglass 2 power slides, upw/very low hours, boats, all equip incl., graded queen matlots of extras incl. paddles, personal floHonda Rebel 250 tress, hyd. leveling tower, Bimini & tation devices,dry bags, 2005, 6500+ miles., system, rear camera custom trailer, spray skirts,roof rack w/ $2500, please call & monitor, only 6k mi. $19,500. towers & cradles -- Just 541-280-9438 for A steal at $43,000! add water, $1250/boat 541-389-1413 more info. Firm. 541-504-8557. 541-480-0617


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 F3

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Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Fifth Wheels

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Range Rover, 2006 Sport HSE,

nav, AWD, heated seats, moonroof, local owner, Harman Kardon, $23,995. 503-635-9494

AUDI QUATTRO CABRIOLET 2004, extra nice, low mileage, heated seats, new Michelins, all wheel drive, $12,995 503-635-9494.

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BMW 525i 2004,

RV CONSIGNMENTS WANTED We Do The Work, You Keep The Cash, On-Site Credit Approval Team, Web Site Presence, We Take Trade-Ins. Free Advertising. BIG COUNTRY RV Bend 541-330-2495

Freightliner 2000, Taurus 27.5’ 1988

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ Everything works, 1996, 2 slides, A/C, $1750/partial trade for heat pump, exc. cond. car. 541-460-9127 for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night Just bought a new boat? shades, Corian, tile, Sell your old one in the Redmond: 541-548-5254 hardwood. $12,750. classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-923-3417.

541-385-5809

Southwind 35.5’ Triton, 2008,V10, 2 slides, Dupont UV coat, 7500 mi. Avg NADA ret.114,343; asking $99,000. Call 541-923-2774

Winnebago Outlook 32’ 2008, Ford V10 eng, Wineguard sat, TV, sur- round sound stereo + more. Reduced to $49,000. 541-526-1622 or 541-728-6793 881

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, fireplace, 2 flat screen TVs. $60,000. 541-480-3923

Fleetwood Wilderness 36’, 2005, 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, AC, W/D hkup beautiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380

Travel Trailers

Fleetwood 28’ Pioneer 2003, 13’ slide, sleeps Montana 3400RL 2008, 4 6, walk-around bed with slides, no smokers or new mattress; power pets, limited usage, hitch, very clean 5500 watt Onan gen, $11,500. Please call solar panel, fireplace, 541-548-4284. dual A/C, central vac, Fleetwood Williams- elect. awning w/sunburg 2006 tent trailer, 2 screen arctic pkg, rear kings, slide-out dinette, receiver, alum wheels, 2 many extras. indoor toilet / shower, TVs, outside shower, fridge, $35,500. 541-416-8087 furnace, water heater, stove, sink, BBQ grill, Montana 34’ 2003, awning, storage trunk, 2 slides, exc. cond. electric brakes. $5,900. throughout, arctic 503-791-6721 (Bend) SPRINGDALE 2005 27’, has eating area slide, A/C and heat, new tires, all contents included, bedding towels, cooking and eating utensils. Great for vacation, fishing, hunting or living! $15,500 541-408-3811

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide,Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504

Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 29’, weatherized, like new, furnished & ready to go, incl Winegard Satellite dish, $26,995. 541-420-9964

Viking Tent trailer 2008, clean, self contained, sleep 5, easy to tow, great cond. $6500. 541-383-7150.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, fuel station, exc cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $24,999. 541-389-9188 882

Fifth Wheels Alfa Ideal 2001, 31’, 3 slides, island kitchen, AC/heat pump, generator, satellite system, 2 flatscreen TVs, hitch & awning incl. $16,000. (Dodge 3500 1 ton also available) 541-388-1529;408-4877

winter pkg., new 10-ply tires, W/D ready, $18,000, 541-390-6531

Medium Conversion F, in good condition, $9000, 541-749-0724.

Ford Galaxie 500 1963, 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & radio (orig),541-419-4989

Hyster H25E, runs

well, 2982 Hours, $3500, call 541-749-0724

Wilderness Advantage 31’, 2004. 2 slides, 2 TVs, micro, solar sys, $17,950. (Also avail: 2003 Ford F250 Diesel X-cab.) 541-385-5077

INT. Dump 1982, w/arborhood, 6k on rebuilt 392, truck refurbished, has 330 gal. water 885 tank w/pump & hose. Everything works, Canopies & Campers Reduced - now $5000 OBO. 541-977-8988 Lance 11.6 camper Mdl 1130, 1999. Ext’d cab, fully self-contained. Incl catalytic heater, TV/VCR combo. Very well taken care of, clean. Hauls easily, very comfortable. Peterbilt 359 potable water truck, 1990, $6999. 541-382-1344 3200 gal. tank, 5hp Lance-Legend 990 pump, 4-3" hoses, 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, camlocks, $25,000. exc. cond., generator, 541-820-3724 solar-cell, large refrig, 925 AC, micro., magic fan, bathroom shower, Utility Trailers removable carpet, custom windows, outdoor shower/awning set-up for winterizing, elec. jacks, CD/steBig Tex Landscapreo/4’ stinger. $8000. ing/ ATV Trailer, Bend, 541.279.0458 dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. Autos & 541-382-4115, or Transportation 541-280-7024.

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Aircraft, Parts & Service

931

Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories We Buy Junk Cars & Trucks! Cash paid for junk vehicles, batteries & catalytic converters. Serving all of C.O.! Call 541-408-1090 932

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $37,500. 541-420-3250 Open Road 37' 2004 3 slides, W/D hookup, large LR w/rear window. Desk area. Asking $19,750 OBO Call (541) 280-7879 visit rvt.com ad#104243920 for pics

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718 1/3 interest in wellequipped IFR Beech Bonanza A36, located KBDN. $55,000. 541-419-9510

Antique & Classic Autos

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, Mazda B4000 2004 Cab Plus 4x4. 4½ yrs V8, automatic, great or 95,000 miles left on shape, $9000 OBO. ext’d warranty. V6, 530-515-8199 5-spd, AC, studded tires, 2 extra rims, tow pkg, 132K mi, all records, exlnt cond, $9500. 541-408-8611

Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 4x4. 120K mi, Power seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd row seating, extra tires, CD, privacy tinting, upgraded rims. Fantastic cond. $7995 Contact Timm at Chev Silverado 4x4 1998 541-408-2393 for info straight, exlnt cond, runs or to view vehicle. good, 119K miles, $5900. 541-480-9883 Chevy Trailblazer 2005, gold, LS 4X4, 6 cyl., auto, A/C, pdl, new tires, keyless Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, entry, 66K mi., exc. 1995, extended cab, cond. $9,399. long box, grill guard, 541-598-5111 running boards, bed rails & canopy, 178K miles, $4800 obo. 208-301-3321 (Bend)

lifted, loaded, new 33” tires, aluminum slot wheels, tow pkg., drop hitch, diamond plate tool box, $12,000, or possible trade for newer Tacoma. 541-460-9127

Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc. cond., $19,900, call 541-923-0231.

GMC Denali 2003

loaded with options. Exc. cond., snow tires and rims included. 130k hwy miles. $12,000. 541-419-4890.

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) Handyman

QB Digital Living •Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES. Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. On-time promise. Senior Discount. Work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Door-to-door selling with fast results! It’s the easiest way in the world to sell. The Bulletin Classiied

541-385-5809 Debris Removal

JUNK BE GONE

I Haul Away FREE

For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel, 541-389-8107

I DO THAT! Home/Rental repairs Small jobs to remodels Honest, guaranteed work. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

More Than Service Peace Of Mind

Spring Clean Up

•Leaves •Cones •Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration •Dethatching Compost Top Dressing Weed free Bark & flower beds ORGANIC PROGRAMS

Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Const.

28 yrs exp in Central OR!

Quality & honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to expert wall covering install / removal. Sr. discounts CCB#47120 Licensed/bonded/insured 541-389-1413 / 410-2422

Electrical Services Quality Builders Electric • Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Landscaping/Yard Care

Need to get an ad in ASAP? You can place it online at: www.bendbulletin.com

541-385-5809

Landscape Maintenance

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding Sprinkler Adjustments

Fertilizer included with monthly program Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Landscaping/Yard Care

Landscaping/Yard Care

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Landscape Construction which includes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-features, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be licensed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be included in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before contracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Nelson Landscape Maverick Landscaping Mowing, weedeating, Maintenance yard detailing, chain

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates!

541-385-5809

pw, pdl, great cond., business car, well maint, regular oil changes, $4500, please call 541-633-5149

Nissan Altima hybrid 2011 $19,995 #155382

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at Bend Airport Ford F250 XLT ‘95, 4WD (KBDN) auto, long bed, 3/4 ton, 8600 GVW, white,178K 60’ wide x 50’ deep, Chevy Wagon 1957, 4-dr., complete, mi, AC, pw, pdl, Sirius, w/55’ wide x 17’ high $15,000 OBO, trades, tow pkg., bedliner, bed bi-fold door. Natural please call Find It in rail caps, rear slide gas heat, office, bath541-420-5453. window, new tires, raroom. Parking for 6 The Bulletin Classifieds! diator, water pump, cars. Adjacent to Chrysler 300 Coupe 541-385-5809 hoses, brakes, more, Frontage Rd; great 1967, 440 engine, $5200, 541-322-0215 visibility for aviation auto. trans, ps, air, bus. 1jetjock@q.com frame on rebuild, re- Ford F-350 XLT 2003, Jeep Cherokee 1990, 541-948-2126 painted original blue, 4X4, 6L diesel, 6-spd 4WD, 3 sets rims & original blue interior, manual, Super Cab, tires, exlnt set snow original hub caps, exc. short box, 12K Warn tires, great 1st car! chrome, asking $9000 winch, custom bumper $1800. 541-633-5149 Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th or make offer. & canopy, running wheel, 1 slide, AC, boards, 2 sets tires, 541-385-9350. wheels & chains, many TV,full awning, excelPeople Look for Information extras, perfect, ONLY lent shape, $23,900. ONLY 2 OWNERSHIP About Products and 29,800 miles, $27,500 541-350-8629 SHARES LEFT! OBO, 541-504-8316. Economical flying in Services Every Day through The Bulletin Classifieds your own Cessna Ford Ranger XLT Jeep Willys 1947,custom, 172/180 HP for only small block Chevy, PS, 1998 X-cab $10,000! Based at OD,mags+ trailer.Swap 2.5L 4-cyl engine, BDN. Call Gabe at for backhoe.No am calls 5-spd standard trans, Professional Air! Chrysler SD 4-Door please. 541-389-6990 long bed, newer mo541-388-0019 Regal Prowler AX6 Ex1930, CDS Royal tor & paint, new clutch treme Edition 38’ ‘05, & tires, excellent conStandard, 8-cylinder, 916 4 slides,2 fireplaces, all dition, clean, $4500. body is good, needs Trucks & maple cabs, king bed/ Call 541-447-6552 some restoration, bdrm separated w/slide Heavy Equipment runs, taking bids, glass dr,loaded,always 541-383-3888, garaged,lived in only 3 541-815-3318 mo,brand new $54,000, Porsche Cayenne 2004, still like new, $28,500, 86k, immac, dealer GMC ½-ton Pickup, will deliver,see rvt.com, maint’d, loaded, now 1972, LWB, 350hi ad#4957646 for pics. $17000. 503-459-1580 motor, mechanically Cory, 541-580-7334 A-1, interior great; Ford 2007 LCF 45, V6 body needs some Power Stroke, 21,500 Sundance 29’ 2009, TLC. $4000 OBO. Range Rover 2005 mi.,14’ utility bed/box. 3 slides, quality Call 541-382-9441 HSE, nav, DVD, Like new cond., FM, FIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, queen mattress, non local car, new tires, door panels w/flowers CD, Bluetooth, Nav., smoking, elec. jacks, 51K miles. & hummingbirds, back-up camera, Sold upgrades, oak cabiFind exactly what $24,995. white soft top & hard new in 2010, still has nets, fully loaded, 503-635-9494 top, Reduced! $5,500. you are looking for in the drive-train warranty. $18,500 OBO; 541-317-9319 or $24,000 OBO, 541-610-5178 CLASSIFIEDS 541-647-8483 530-401-1754

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Buicks Galore! No junk! LeSabres, LaCheck out the 541-598-3750 Crosse & Lucernes aaaoregonautosource.com classiieds online GMC ½ ton 1971, Only priced $5000-$8500 $19,700! Original low www.bendbulletin.com PORSCHE 914 1974, for serious buyers Honda Odyssey 2000, mile, exceptional, 3rd Updated daily Roller (no engine), only. All are ‘03’s and 1 owner, 135K mi., owner. 951-699-7171 lowered, full roll cage, newer. 541-318-9999. new catalytic con935 5-pt harnesses, racAsk about Free Trip to verter, snow tires, ing seats, 911 dash & Sport Utility Vehicles Washington, D.C. for battery, brakes & instruments, decent WWII Veterans. windshield, maint. shape, very cool! Mercury Monterrey records, garaged, $1699. 541-678-3249 1965, Exc. All original, $6500, SE Bend, Cadillac Eldorado 2001, 4-dr. sedan, in storlow miles, runs great, 541-508-8784. What are you age last 15 yrs., 390 pearl in color, $4500 CHEVY High Compression OBO 541-548-2584, or SUBURBAN LT looking for? 541-815-2904. engine, new tires & li2005, low miles., NISSAN QUEST cense, reduced to You’ll ind it in good tires, new 1996, 3-seat mini $2850, 541-410-3425. van, extra nice in and Ford Thunderbird 1988, The Bulletin Classiieds brakes, moonroof 3.8 V-6, 35K actual mi., out $3,900. Sold my Reduced to new hoses, belts, tires, Windstar, need an$15,750 battery, pb, ps, cruise, other van! 541-389-5016. 541-385-5809 A/C, CD, exc. cond. in 541-318-9999, ask & out, 2nd owner, for Bob. Ask about Volvo XC70 2002, leather maint. records, must free trip to D.C. for sunroof, loaded, drives Chevy Suburban see & drive! $4500, WWII vets. great! Extra set of tires, LTZ 2007, white, Plymouth Barracuda 541-330-0733 $7600, 541-410-3386. approx. 26,600 mi., 1966, original car! 300 leather, to many ophp, 360 V8, centertions for ad. Excellines, (Original 273 lent-Excellent Coneng & wheels incl.) dition! $39,000. 541-593-2597 541-410-8932

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LEGAL NOTICE Estate of Dustin Douglas Weber. Notice to Interested Persons. Case No. 12PB0059. In the Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes. In the Matter of the Estate of Dustin Douglas Weber, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Jon Earl Weber and Lorriene Jean Davis have been appointed as the personal representatives of the above estate. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present them to the undersigned personal representative in care of the

undersigned at: Warren John West, Attorney at Law, 160 NW Irving, Bend, OR 97701 within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, as stated below, or such claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings in this estate may obtain additional information from the records of the Court, the personal representative or the attorney for the personal representative. Dated and first published July 4, 2012. Warren John West, 160 NW Irving, Bend, OR 97701.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee, under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in said Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. A. PARTIES TO THE TRUST DEED: Grantor: DEAN L. ROGERS, Trustee: ROBERT A. SMEJKAL, Attorney at Law, Beneficiary: MT. TOM, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company. B. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPERTY: "Lot 2 of PINE RIDGE PLAZA, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon." C. TRUST DEED INFORMATION: Dated: May 19, 2008, Recording Date: May 19, 2008, Instrument No.: 2008-21836, Recording Place: Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. D. DEFAULT: The Grantor is in default and the Beneficiary elects to foreclose the Trust Deed by reason of the Grantor's failure to pay: (1) the entire balance of the Promissory Note which became due in full on May 19, 2011; and (2) real property taxes for 2011-2012 in the amount of $6,721.60, plus interest. E. AMOUNT DUE: By reason of the default, the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the principal amount of $170,000.00, plus accrued interest as of February 22, 2012, in the amount of $6,223.56, plus interest on the principal amount at the rate of 17% per annum from February 23, 2012, until paid; plus late fees, attorney fees and foreclosure costs, and amounts advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of the Trust Deed and/or applicable law. F. ELECTION TO SELL: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Beneficiary and the Trustee, by reason of said default, have elected, and do hereby elect, to foreclose said Trust Deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes §86.705 et seq., and to cause to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash or certified funds, the interest in said described property which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution of the Trust Deed, together with any interest the Grantor acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed together with the expenses of sale, including the compensation of the Trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of the Trustee's attorney. G. DATE, TIME AND PLACE OF SALE: Date & Time: August 10, 2012, at 1:00 p.m. Place: Inside the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, regon. H. RIGHT TO REINSTATE: NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that at any time prior to five (5) days before the sale, this foreclosure proceeding may be dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Trustee of the entire amount then due (other than a portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or by tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses to the Trustee actually incurred by Beneficiary and the Trustee in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the Trustee's fees and attorney's fees. I. NOTICE: The Federal Fair Debt Practices Act requires we state that this is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. J. MISCELLANEOUS: In construing this Notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor, as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30 day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed term lease, you may be entitled to receive, after the date of the sale, a 60 day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30 day or 60 day notice, you must give the Trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed term lease, you must give the Trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the Trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 11, 2012. The name of the Trustee and the Trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to a tenant to refund any deposit or prepaid rent that was paid to a landlord. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the Lawyer Referral Service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this Notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included in this notice. There are government agencies and nonprofit organizations that give you information about foreclosure and help you decide what to do. For the name and telephone number of an organization near you, please call the statewide telephone contact number at 1-800-SAFENET (1-800-723-3638). You may also wish to talk to a lawyer. If you need help finding a lawyer, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 1-503-684-3763, or toll free in Oregon at 1-800-452-7636, or you may visit its website at www.osbar.org/public/ris/ris.html. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.lawhelp.org/program/694/index.cfm. DATED this 23rd day of March, 2012. ROBERT A. SMEJKAL, Trustee, PO Box 1758, Eugene, OR 97440


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

F4 WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON DESCHUTES COUNTY WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-FF15 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-FF15, through their loan servicing agent SELECT PORTFOLIO SERVICING, INC., Plaintiff/s, v. JENNIFER R. OSTROM; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., MERS; NATIONPOINT LOAN SERVICES; BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; ANY UNKNOWN PERSONS CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN Lot 15, Block 6, Summerfield Phase IV, Deschutes County, Oregon, Defendant/s. Case No.: 11CV0894 NOTICE OF SALE UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that I will on July 12, 2012 at 11:30 AM in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the following real property, known as 2203 SW 28th Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756, to wit, Lot 15, Block 6, Summerfield Phase IV, Deschutes County, Oregon Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution in Foreclosure issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated May 24, 2012, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as trustee for the holders of the First Franklin Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-FF15 Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-FF15, through their loan servicing agent, Select Portfolio Servicing, Inc., as plaintiff/s, recovered Corrected General Judgment of Foreclosure on May 7, 2012, against Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., MERS, Nationpoint Loan Services, and Bank of America, N.A. as defendant/s. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff Anthony Raguine, Civil Technician Date: June 11, 2012 Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications:June 13, 2012; June 20, 2012; June 27, 2012 Date of Last Publication: July 4, 2012 Attorney:Matthew Booth, OSB #082663 McCarthy &Holthus, LLP 8995 SW Miley Rd., Suite 103 Wilsonville, OR 97070 (503) 694-1145 Conditions of Sale:Potential bidders must arrive 15 minutes prior to the auction to allow the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office to review bidder's funds. Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON DESCHUTES COUNTY Gregory Lynn Roesch, Plaintiff/s, v. Robin K. Woolhiser; Janis L. Champoux; Angela Causer, and Occupants of the Property, Defendant/s. Case No.: 12CV0064 NOTICE OF SALE UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that I will on July 12, 2012 at 11:00 AM in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the following real property, known as 163 SE 3rd Street, Bend, Oregon 97702, to wit,

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: DAVID CALVIN MEARS. Trustee:TRANSNATION TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. Successor Trustee:NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:WASHINGTON FEDERAL fka WASHINGTON FEDERAL SAVINGS. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Six (6), Block One (1), KERRYBROOK ACRES recorded February 13, 1981 in Cabinet B, Page 800, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3.RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: June 5, 2007. Recording No.: 2007-31693 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $2,060.00 each, due the first of each month, for the months of December 2011 through April 2012; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5.AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $375,340.43; plus interest at the rate of 5.125% per annum from November 1, 2011; plus late charges of $320.60; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF SALE. Date:August 30, 2012. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #15148.30736). DATED: April 9, 2012. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON DESCHUTES COUNTY Federal National Mortgage Association, its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff/s, v. Karla I. Hayes, and Occupants of the Premises, Defendant/s. Case No.: 11CV0967 NOTICE OF SALE UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that I will on July 12, 2012 at 11:15 AM in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the following real property, known as 2336 Northwest Summerhill Drive, Bend, Oregon 97701, to wit, Lot Twenty-Five (25), Phase 2, SHEVLIN MEADOWS, PHASES 1 and 2, Deschutes County, Oregon Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution in Foreclosure issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated May 24, 2012, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Federal National Mortgage Association as plaintiff/s, recovered General Judgment of Foreclosure on April 27, 2012, against Karla I. Hayes and Occupants of the Premises as defendant/s. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property.

Anthony Raguine, Civil Division Date: June 11, 2012

Except that part of Lot 1 described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of said Lot 1; thence South along the East line of said Lot a distance of 11.3 feet; thence North 57° 55' West, a distance of 21.15 feet to the North line of said lot; thence East along said North line a distance of 18 feet to the point of beginning.

Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications:June 13, 2012; June 20, 2012; June 27, 2012 Date of Last Publication: July 4, 2012 Attorney:Tony Kullen, OSB #090218 Routh Crabtree Olsen, PC 621 SW Alder Street, Suite 800 Portland, OR 97205-3623 (503) 977-7840

NOTE: This legal description was created prior to January 1, 2008. Tax Parcel Number: 106154 Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated May 24, 2012, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Gregory Lynn Roesch as plaintiff/s, recovered General Judgment of Foreclosure and Money Award on April 19, 2012, against Robin K. Woolhiser and Janis L. Champoux as defendant/s. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff Anthony Raguine, Civil Technician Date: June 11, 2012 Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications:June 13, 2012; June 20, 2012; June 27, 2012 Date of Last Publication: July 4, 2012 Attorney:Jeffrey A. Trautman, OSB #041090 Fetherston Edmonds, LLP 960 Liberty Street SE Suite 110 Salem, OR 97302 (503) 581-1542 Conditions of Sale:Potential bidders must arrive 15 minutes prior to the auction to allow the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office to review bidder's funds. Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale.

Conditions of Sale: Potential bidders must arrive 15 minutes prior to the auction to allow the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office to review bidder's funds. Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. Need help ixing stuff? Call A Service Professional ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON DESCHUTES COUNTY Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff/s, v. Phyllis P. Thebo and Occupants of the Premises, Defendant/s. Case No.: 11CV1004 NOTICE OF SALE UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that I will on August 2, 2012 at 11:00 AM in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the following real property, known as 130 Southeast 15th Street, Bend, Oregon 97702, to wit, LOT 1, BLOCK 1, RAMSAY ESTATES, NO. 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution in Foreclosure issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated June 19, 2012, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns as plaintiff/s, recovered General Judgment of Foreclosure on April 27, 2012, against Phyllis P. Thebo and Occupants of the Premises as defendant/s. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications:July 4, 2012; July 11, 2012; July 18, 2012 Date of Last Publication: July 25, 2012 Attorney: Sean C. Currie, OSB #08297 Routh Crabtree Olsen, P.C. 621 SW Alder St., Ste 800 Portland, OR 97205 (503) 459-0116 Conditions of Sale: Potential bidders must arrive 15 minutes prior to the auction to allow the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office to review bidder's funds. Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale.

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LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff Lisa Griggs, Civil Technician Date: June 28, 2012

Reference is made to that certain deed made by MICHAEL A JUSTAD AND THERESA DEMADURA, MARRIED TO EACH OTHER as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of BANK OF AMERICA, N.A, as Beneficiary, dated 10/25/2007, recorded 10/29/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in book / reel / volume number fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number 2007-57248, , covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to wit: APN: 242851 LOT TWENTY - EIGHT (28), RIDGE AT EAGLE CREST 46, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 360 SPLIT RAIL LANE , EAGLE CREST, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 9/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,843.23 Monthly Late Charge $92.16 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $281,466.62 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.3750 per annum from 8/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 10/17/2012 at the hour of 01:00 PM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at At the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR 97701 County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 6/11/2012 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, as Trustee Signature By: Timothy Donlon, Assistant Secretary

LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff

Lots One (1) and Two (2) in Block Four (4) of Terminal Addition, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-11-491237-SH

Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 10/17/2012. The date of this sale may be postponed. Unless the lender that is foreclosing on this property is paid before the sale date, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. After the sale, the new owner is required to provide you with contact information and notice that the sale took place. The following information applies to you only if you are a bona fide tenant occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a bona fide residential tenant. If the foreclosure sale goes through, the new owner will have the right to require you to move out. Before the new owner can require you to move, the new owner must provide you with written notice that specifies the date by which you must move out. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the new owner can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. PROTECTION FROM EVICTION IF YOU ARE A BONA FIDE TENANT OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING, YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO CONTINUE LIVING IN THIS PROPERTY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE FOR: o THE REMAINDER OF YOUR FIXED TERM LEASE, IF YOU HAVE A FIXED TERM LEASE; OR o AT LEAST 90 DAYS FROM THE DATE YOU ARE GIVEN A WRITTEN TERMINATION NOTICE. If the new owner wants to move in and use this property as a primary residence, the new owner can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even though you have a fixed term lease with more than 90 days left. You must be provided with at least 90 days' written notice after the foreclosure sale before you can be required to move. A bona fide tenant is a residential tenant who is not the borrower (property owner) or a child, spouse or parent of the borrower, and whose rental agreement: o Is the result of an arm's-length transaction; o Requires the payment of rent that is not substantially less than fair market rent for the property, unless the rent is reduced or subsidized due to a federal, state or local subsidy; and o Was entered into prior to the date of the foreclosure sale. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY BETWEEN NOW AND THE FORECLOSURE SALE: RENT YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD OR UNTIL A COURT TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE. SECURITY DEPOSIT You may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord as provided in ORS 90.367. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The new owner that buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out after 90 days or at the end of your fixed term lease. After the sale, you should receive a written notice informing you that the sale took place and giving you the new owner's name and contact information. You should contact the new owner if you would like to stay. If the new owner accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the new owner becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise: o You do not owe rent; o The new owner is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf; and o You must move out by the date the new owner specifies in a notice to you. The new owner may offer to pay your moving expenses and any other costs or amounts you and the new owner agree on in exchange for your agreement to leave the premises in less than 90 days or before your fixed term lease expires. You should speak with a lawyer to fully understand your rights before making any decisions regarding your tenancy. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR DWELLING UNIT WITHOUT FIRST GIVING YOU WRITTEN NOTICE AND GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU SHOULD CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm P958002 6/20, 6/27, 7/4, 07/11/2012


Bulletin Daily Paper 07/04/12