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Murder trial puts Tetherow owners get six-month extension videos on stand Subdivisions sell, but lots vacant

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Deschutes County commissioners decided Monday to give the owners of a portion of the distressed Tetherow resort outside Bend six more months to complete foreclosure and clarify who owns

what, before they must build roads and utilities. Developer TD Cascade Highlands LLC is already a year late building roads, sewers and other infrastructure, as required by an agreement with the county. In March, the New York-based

equity capital firm iStar Financial filed notices of default against TD Cascade Highlands LLC for 191 residential lots and some common areas at Tetherow. The infrastructure work was supposed to be completed by June 2011. The deadline was set

Business, Page E1

by a 2008 agreement, in which the county allowed TD Cascade Highlands LLC to subdivide land into plots for single-family homes and put up a $2.2 million bond to guarantee it would finish the infrastructure work later. See Tetherow / A4

SNOW LINGERS AT THE HIGH LAKES

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Devil’s Lake brought a surprise to vacationers Rebecca Cornella, left, and her husband, Dante, of Stillwater, N.J., Monday afternoon. The couple didn’t expect to find a scene of winter during a break from their tour of the Cascade Lakes Highway. “ I didn’t expect this much snow this late in the year,” said Dante. “It’s beautiful.”

Taliban halts polio shots in Pakistan

By Dylan J. Darling The Bulletin

New York Times News Service

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Last week, jurors in a local murder trial watched as one of the prosecution’s key witnesses quietly cried while reading aloud her ex-boyfriend’s journal entries that detailed his desire to kill her. The defendant watched those tears fall twice, once in person and once as the jury saw them, projected on a screen in the courtroom. That’s because six core witnesses in the trial of accused murderer Richard Ward Clarke have taken the stand through prerecorded video testimony, a practice not commonly seen in criminal litigation. Clarke is accused of beating Clarke his roommate, Matt Fitzhenry, to death with a pink baseball bat at their Northwest Georgia Avenue home in October 2010. The trial, entering its third week Wednesday at the Deschutes County Circuit Court, was scheduled to begin in January. But on the first day of the original trial, the defense counsel asked for a postponement in order to have more time to test DNA evidence. Deputy District Attorney Van McIver said wrangling witnesses for the original trial was not easy. The group is a mix of transients and individuals with histories of drug abuse. One individual moved to Mexico and the state had already spent money to bring her back the first time. Delaying the trial was a “gamble” because the individuals scheduled to testify are not “people that are stable in the community with 9-to-5 jobs,” he said. “Would I rather have those people in person? Yes. But at the time I had to weigh that against whether I would get them at all, whether they remained cooperative,” McIver said. “It was sort of a balancing test and I decided it was more valuable to (pursue video testimony) while I knew where they were located.” See Video / A4

Firefighters prep for a ‘normal’ season’s work

By Declan Walsh

ISLAMABAD — A Pakistani Taliban commander has banned polio vaccinations in North Waziristan in the tribal belt, days before 161,000 children were due to be vaccinated. He linked the ban to U.S. drone strikes and fears that the CIA could use the polio campaign as cover for espionage, much as it did with Shakil Afridi, the Pakistani doctor who helped track Osama bin Laden. The commander, Hafiz Gul Bahadur, said polio vaccinations would be banned until the CIA stopped its drone campaign, which has been largely focused on North Waziristan. Bahadur said the decision had been taken by the shura-e-mujahedeen, a council that unites the myriad jihadi factions in the area. See Taliban / A4

By Holly Pablo

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin file photo

Keith Fields, engine captain of Forest Service engine 637, throws a shovel of dirt to knock down a hot spot while working on the Spring River prescribed burn in 2011.

A fresh group of 55 firefighters with state and federal agencies around Central Oregon are in Redmond this week to learn what it’s like to live at a fire camp and fight a blaze. “So it’s not a total shock when they go out on their first fire,” said Heather Fisher, fire prevention technician with the Newberry Division Initial Attack for the Deschutes National Forest and Prineville Bureau of Land Management. The firefighters are taking part in the annual guard school, through which they earn their certification to

work on the fireline, Fisher said. Once completed they’ll join more than 300 state and federal firefighters already set to work in Central Oregon this summer. Wildfires should start for real next month, when thunderstorms will likely start, fire officials said. They expect the upcoming fire season here to be a normal one. Over the last 10 years, wildfires in Central Oregon have averaged about 400 per year, said Mark Rapp, fuels management specialist for the Deschutes National Forest. Typically, 60 percent are caused by lightning and 40 percent by people. Most occur

in July and August. Hot temperatures, low humidity and winds in those summer months set the stage for fires, he said. How large they become depends on the weather and how quickly firefighters are able to respond. “It’s just not one thing that drives the fire season,” he said. Rapp said there are usually three or four rounds of thunderstorms each fire season. The National Weather Service is calling for a slight chance of thunderstorms near Bend Thursday, but it’s also calling for rain showers to possibly follow Thursday night. See Fire / A4

Mild winter, early spring brings out homeless bees by the swarm By Emily S. Rueb New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — One swarm covered the side-view mirror of a Volvo station wagon in a lot by the Hudson River, trapping a family of

three inside. Another humming cluster the size of a watermelon bent a tree branch in front of a Chase Bank in Manhattan, attracting a crowd of gasping onlookers. And for several hours,

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thousands of bees carpeted a 2-foot tall red standpipe on the patio of a South Street Seaport restaurant, sending would-be outdoor diners elsewhere. This spring in New York

INDEX Business Calendar Classified

E1-4 B3 G1-6

Comics B4-5 Community B1-6 CrosswordsB5, G2

Editorials C4 Local News C1-6 Obituaries C5

City, clumps of homeless bees have turned up at nearly double the rate of past years. A warm winter followed by an early spring, experts say, have created optimal breeding conditions for the insects.

TODAY’S WEATHER Oregon News C3 Sports D1-6 Stocks E2-3

Partly cloudy High 66, Low 36 Page C6

That may have caught some beekeepers off guard, especially the less experienced generation of keepers who have taken up the practice in recent years. See Bees / A4

TOP NEWS EGYPT: Uncertainty remains, A3 FIRES: Colorado’s inferno, A4


THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

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An overlooked health-care issue By Jordan Rau

HAPPENINGS

Kaiser Health News

Often overlooked in the Supreme Court challenge to the health-care law are changes that hospitals, doctors and insurers had been moving toward even before the law was passed in 2010. Some of these could be halted if the court throws out the Affordable Care Act, or hobbled if the justices excise parts of it, experts say. The changes include increasing the role of primary care, especially for lowincome patients, forcing hospitals and doctors to work together closely, and reducing pay to hospitals if they don’t meet patients’ expectations or outcome benchmarks set by the government. “We have to change and we know that,” said Ken Raske, president and chief executive of the Greater New York Hospital Association, which represents 250 hospitals and other medical facilities. “But it’s easier if you’re going to build the building to have the shovels and picks and the hammer and nails than trying to dig it out with your hands. That’s what the Affordable Care Act is.”

Doctor shortage One of the concerns raised during the debate over the law was that expanding coverage would lead to a shortage of primary-care doctors. The law allocates more money to provide primary care to people, especially the poor. The theory is that seeking early care or preventive measures will help more people stay well enough to avoid expensive hospitalizations or develop chronic conditions. The government has spent $1.9 billion to build and expand community health centers and $512 million to train more health-care workers, including primary-care doctors, physician assistants and nurse practitioners, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. Also at stake are some new methods to pay doctors and hospitals to reward good and efficient medical care, and ongoing efforts to come up with different reimbursement models. Many of these changes are being implemented by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. These include 65 collaborations among hospitals and doctors, which are

• The top vote-getters from Greece’s Sunday election meet to form a coalition government. • The Federal Reserve meets, and may discuss a change in strategy. E1

IN HISTORY

Rich Clement / Bloomberg News

Theresa Brown Gold of Bucks County, Pa., makes her support of the health-care law known amid protesters Monday at the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. An often overlooked issue is how the court’s decision on health care will affect changes already undertaken by many health-care providers.

“I don’t think we’d be where we are today in accountable care but for the Affordable Care Act.” — Douglas Hastings, a Washington health-care lawyer

working as “accountable care organizations.” Freed from antitrust laws, they can earn bonuses from Medicare if they provide care more cheaply without sacrificing quality. While only those organizations that volunteered are in ACOs, another change starting in October would automatically affect most hospitals in the country. Medicare has announced that hospitals will face financial penalties or earn bonuses depending on their rates of readmissions, reviews by patients and thoroughness in following basic guidelines for clinical care. Physicians, too, will see their Medicare pay rise or fall based on the quality of their care and the degree to which their patients don’t overuse Medicare services. The health law’s authors want to supplant the current, widely used piecemeal payment system in which providers earn more for a great number of tests and treatments without any concern about quality. The federal Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation is experimenting with

dozens of other targeted trials, giving money to groups that seek to reduce the prevalence and costs of asthma in New England, strokes in Louisiana, chronic pain in North Carolina and dental problems and diabetes among Native Americans on South Dakota reservations.

An uncertain future If the government’s efforts are curtailed, it is not clear whether the private healthcare market will move forward with changes to coordinate care and operate more efficiently. “I don’t think we’d be where we are today in accountable care but for the Affordable Care Act,” said Douglas Hastings, a health-care lawyer in Washington. He noted that nearly half of all people in the country with coverage get it through the government. “When I sit in on meetings with private payers, they say, ‘We model a lot on what Medicare does.’ Accountable care may still move forward in the private market, but if this law is deemed unconstitutional, it slows down or stops the

momentum.” But J. Peter Rich, a healthcare lawyer in Los Angeles, said the movement to transform the way care is provided will continue even without the law, with providers joining together into larger systems, forming new affiliations and being held to new standards for keeping down expenses and delivering results to patients. “There’s tremendous cost pressure nationwide on health plans as well as hospitals, primary-care physicians and other providers,” he said. “With an aging population and the increasing financial burden of chronic diseases like Type 2 diabetes, these cost pressures are not going to go away.” Even if the law is struck down, some supporters say Medicare might be able to resurrect some of these ventures as demonstration projects. But it would need congressional authority to expand them nationwide, said Gail Wilensky, a former Medicare administrator. If the court “literally invalidated everything, they’d need new legislative authority,” she said. Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent news service of the of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health-care policy organization that is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente.

CUTTING EDGE

Medical apps become a magnet for venture capital By Anna Edney Bloomberg News.

WASHINGTON — Venture capitalists seeking to profit from innovations in health care are turning to startups that make smartphone and tablet applications for doctors and hospitals. Two years ago, patients would be surprised to see their doctors pulling out an Apple iPhone to check their blood sugar, or cardiogram results. Now they’re finding such practices commonplace as investment in the kinds of companies that make health information apps rose 78 percent in 2011 to $766 million. Qualcomm has started a $100 million fund, Insight Venture Partners is putting $40 million into a startup and Oprah Winfrey is dipping in as well, with her company investing in a website that helps doctors and patients interact. “We’re at a sea change,” said David Jahns, managing partner of Galen Partners, a Stamford, Conn.-based private equity firm that invested in a company called Sharecare. Demand for apps that let doctors and nurses see test results quickly and monitor vital signs remotely, combined with a push from government and insurers to collect better data to contain rising medical costs, is propelling investor interest in an array of health information technology, Jahns said. “We really have to improve

Today is Tuesday, June 19, the 171st day of 2012. There are 195 days left in the year

David Paul Morris / Bloomberg News

Venture capitalists are turning to startups that make smartphone and tablet apps, including this app for understanding diseases and disorders of the nervous system.

our costs,” he said. “The best thing that our country can do is invest in technology that gets better outcomes with fewer procedures.” Timothy Kreth, a cardiologist at TriStar Summit Medical Center in Hermitage, Tenn., uses an application from AirStrip Technologies that lets him view emergency room patients’ electrocardiograms on his iPhone. “It’s more convenient for the patient,” Kreth said in a telephone interview. “I can look at it and determine some of the subtle nuances the emergency room doctor maybe could not. It gives us the opportunity to make diagnoses quicker.” Kreth and the five other cardiologists have used the AirStrip technology for about

six weeks at his hospital, which is part of HCA Holdings Inc. Previously, emergency room doctors faxed cardiologists the EKGs, Kreth said. AirStrip, based in San Antonio, Texas, was the first investment from the $100 million Qualcomm Life Fund that formed in December. Qualcomm Life doesn’t disclose how much it invests, though typically puts down $2 million to $5 million, Jack Young, who manages the fund, said

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by telephone. Richard Wells, a managing director at Insight Venture, defines the burgeoning market as software as a service — scheduling technology for doctors, patient-monitoring data for hospitals and online wellness tools for corporate health plans. “In a way it’s like outsourcing,” Wells said in a phone interview. “You don’t need IT guys, it’s all done for you.” The FDA is considering stricter standards for medical apps that directly diagnose or treat conditions. The agency released draft guidelines in July that said some mobile apps pose a potential risk and may have to meet medical-device quality standards before being sold for use with smartphones and tablets.

Highlights: In 1862, Congress passed, and President Abraham Lincoln signed, a measure abolishing slavery in U.S. territories. In 1865, Union troops commanded by Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston, Texas, with news that the Civil War was over, and that all remaining slaves in Texas were free. In 1910, the first-ever Father’s Day was celebrated in Spokane, Wash. The idea for the observance is credited to Sonora Louise Smart Dodd. In 1934, the Federal Communications Commission was created; it replaced the Federal Radio Commission. In 1953, Julius Rosenberg, 35, and his wife, Ethel, 37, convicted of conspiring to pass U.S. atomic secrets to the Soviet Union, were executed at Sing Sing Prison in Ossining, N.Y. In 1961, the Supreme Court struck down a provision in Maryland’s constitution requiring state officeholders to profess a belief in God. In 1972, Hurricane Agnes, blamed for at least 122 deaths, made landfall over the Florida Panhandle. In 1986, University of Maryland basketball star Len Bias, the first draft pick of the Boston Celtics, suffered a fatal cocaineinduced seizure. In 1987, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a Louisiana law requiring any public school teaching the theory of evolution to teach creation science as well. Ten years ago: A suicide bomber killed seven Israelis at a Jerusalem bus stop in the second deadly attack in the city in two days. The space shuttle Endeavour returned to Earth with one Russian and two American crewmen who’d spent 6½ months aboard the international space station. Rod Langway, Bernie Federko, Clark Gillies and Roger Neilson were elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame. Five years ago: A truck bomb struck a Shiite mosque in central Baghdad, killing at least 87 people. One year ago: Libya’s government said NATO warplanes had struck a residential neighborhood in the capital and killed nine civilians, including two children; NATO later confirmed one of its airstrikes had gone astray.

BIRTHDAYS Actress Gena Rowlands is 82. Singer Spanky McFarlane (Spanky and Our Gang) is 70. Nobel peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi is 67. Actress Phylicia Rashad is 64. Rock singer Ann Wilson (Heart) is 62. Actress Kathleen Turner is 58. Singerdancer Paula Abdul is 50. Actor Andy Lauer is 49. Rock singer-musician Brian Vander Ark (Verve Pipe) is 48. — From wire reports

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TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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After election, doubts remain By Kareem Fahim and Dina Salah Amer New York Times News Service

Manu Brabo / The Associated Press

A poster of Islamist candidate Mohammed Morsi, written in Arabic reads, “Mohammed Morsi, president for Egypt, revival is the will of the people,” was held up by an Egyptian man Monday in Cairo’s Tahrir Square. Egypt’s ruling military council pledged Monday to honor its promise to hand over power to the newly elected president by the end of this month.

G-20 leaders promise plan for growth The Associated Press LOS CABOS, Mexico — The leaders of the world’s largest economies have agreed to step up their efforts to boost growth and job creation, which they call the top priority in fighting the effects of the European economic crisis, according to a draft of the statement to be released Tuesday at the end of the Group of 20 annual meeting. The draft obtained by The Associated Press on Monday places the G-20 on the side of those who have been arguing for a focus on job creation, including through government spending, instead of the budget cutbacks and austerity pushed most notably by German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Germany feels that it been unfairly burdened by its large contributions to international bailouts of economically weaker European countries that overspent for years and, in exchange, it has been insisting on steep cutbacks from aid recipients such as Greece. Those cutbacks have led to dramatic economic hardship for voters in Greece and other countries. A growing number of European countries having been advocating spending and growth, not austerity, and the G-20 statement appears to place the group of the world’s largest economies into that camp. “We are united in our resolve to promote growth and jobs,” the draft says, declaring that the leaders will announce the “coordinated Los Cabos Growth and Jobs Action Plan” to achieve those goals, although the draft does not provide details of the plan. It throws its support specifically behind greater government spending as a response to a worsening global economy, saying that countries with the resources “stand ready” to take fiscal action. The plan says the Obama administration pledged to prevent sharp tax increases and government spending cuts from kicking in at the end of the year, as scheduled under current law, to avoid sending the U.S. into another recession. As G-20 officials wrangled over last-minute changes in the wording of the statement, European leaders at the summit struggled to reassure the world Monday that they were on the path to solving their continent’s relentless economic crisis.

CAIRO — The first celebrations for the new president were joyous but sparsely attended, saddled by fatigue and overwhelmed by traffic and heat. In Tahrir Square, flags waved and boys set off fireworks that disappeared in the midday sun. The hundreds who gathered on Monday cheered for Mohammed Morsi, a candidate of the Muslim Brotherhood who had held off a challenge from Hosni Mubarak’s former prime minister and is set to become Egypt’s first freely elected president. A milestone had passed and victory had been declared. But even among the revelers, doubts remained. “I didn’t sleep last night. I am happy we got rid of a remnant,” said Ahmed Adel, speaking of the defeated candidate, Ahmed Shafiq. On Monday, Adel was forced to come to terms with Morsi, who had not been his first choice, or even his second. “No one

knows him,” he said. Wrung through a neverending transition, Egyptians spent the last few days reeling from new tests. Voters, faced with polarizing candidates at the polls, struggled with their choices. The country’s military rulers issued new edicts, dissolving Parliament and stripping the presidency of much of its power. On Monday, Egyptians puzzled over their newly elected leader, whose accidental candidacy thrust him to the center of a tense national debate about citizenship, religion and politics. As president, Morsi, a symbol of Egypt’s divides, was suddenly responsible for healing them. “People who voted for Morsi chose him because of the institution he represents, not because of him,” said Nermine Gohar, a 39-year-old homemaker, one of many people — critics and supporters — who felt that the Brotherhood and its candidate were inseparable. “Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood have earned this. They worked harder and lon-

ger than anyone else.” Morsi had not even been supposed to run. After the 2011 Egyptian revolt, the Muslim Brotherhood declared it would not field a candidate in the race, with officials saying they feared the public would think them too eager to grab power. After the group changed its position — claiming it had not been able to find an independent candidate it could work with — Morsi, 60, became their standard-bearer, but only after the Brotherhood’s first choice, Khairat al-Shater, the group’s leading strategist, was deemed ineligible. During the first round of presidential voting in May, Morsi distinguished himself in a crowded field of candidates for his lack of charisma and for espousing polarizing, conservative views. He barely appeared in his own campaign advertisements. His early campaign stops with al-Shater led to the frequent charges that Morsi was simply a stalking horse for the disqualified leader.

People took to calling him the “spare tire.” Decades ago as a graduate student in the United States, Morsi also seemed like an unlikely Islamist leader, said Farghalli Mohammed, a friend and former professor. Pursuing his doctorate in materials sciences at the University of Southern California in the 1980s, Morsi was a bright student, and keen to socialize, but not especially pious or dogmatic. With a thesis titled “High-Temperature Electrical Conductivity Structure of DonorDoped Alpha-Aluminum Oxide,” he went on to become a professor. “I never thought he would be a person associated with the Muslim Brotherhood,” Mohammed said. Morsi became one of the group’s most prominent leaders, serving as the head of the Brotherhood’s parliamentary bloc and on its guidance council. He developed a reputation as a conservative enforcer, stamping out political dissent within the group.

Greeks try again to form coalition government By Rachel Donadio and Liz Alderman New York Times News Service

ATHENS, Greece — Antonis Samaras, leader of the center-right party that placed first in Greek parliamentary elections, began talks Monday to form a coalition government aimed at keeping Greece in the eurozone and renegotiating its loan agreement with foreign creditors. But even as European leaders expressed relief at the out-

come of the election, it was not clear whether the results of the vote would improve life for Greece’s fast-imploding middle class or stem a deepening political divide between right and left. In a televised statement after meeting with his Socialist counterpart, Evangelos Venizelos, Samaras said the two had agreed on the need to put their differences aside in a country with no strong tradition of coalition rule and form a governing bloc, something

Friends describe Sandusky as role model, ‘local hero’ By Jeremy Roebuck, Susan Snyder and Frank Fitzpatrick The Philadelphia Inquirer (MCT)

BELLEFONTE, Pa. — Friends and former colleagues described Jerry Sandusky as a “local hero” and an exemplary role model, as his lawyers began presenting his defense against child sex-abuse charges Monday. With prosecutors resting their case and Sandusky’s attorneys moving through their first witnesses at a fast clip, Judge John Cleland estimated that jurors could begin their deliberations as soon as Thursday. They will be sequestered once those discussions begin, he said. That announcement overshadowed what was otherwise a subdued day in court, as lawyers for the former Penn State assistant football coach attempted to counter prosecution claims of serial sexual abuse. Sandusky, 68, has denied charges that over 15 years he molested 10 boys he met through The Second Mile, a charity he founded for underprivileged young people. His attorneys left many questions surrounding their side of the case unanswered Monday — chief among them if their client would testify. Instead, lawyer Joseph Amendola called a string of character witnesses, all of whom spoke of Sandusky’s high profile in the community and sterling reputation before his arrest last year. None spoke specifically to any of the allegations, including claims that he molested boys in Penn State lockerroom showers. “I saw a mutual admiration between Second Mile youth and Jerry,” said David Pasquinelli, a State College political strategist, who volunteered for the charity. “Jerry had a unique way —

and a lot of us were inspired by this — of getting to youth of all ages down at their level.” Booker Brooks, a retired Penn State assistant football coach who played with Sandusky in college and later worked with him on the team, described Sandusky’s reputation as “exemplary, top-notch.” A former colleague, offensive coach Dick Anderson, said that given the job’s demanding schedule, he found it unlikely that anyone involved in the university’s football program would have time for the afternoon racquetball games and outings with children that several Sandusky accusers described. “Our schedule was pretty tenuous — Jerry’s more than most being the defensive coordinator and having a national name,” he said. Asked whether they thought it unusual for coaches to shower with younger boys, both men said they often bathed with men of all ages at Penn State athletic facilities and their local gyms. In fact, said Anderson, he had often seen Second Mile boys in the team locker rooms showering with Sandusky and thought nothing of it. Lead prosecutor Joseph McGettigan was quick to pounce on that answer. “If someone took your grandson into a shower and hugged him naked, you’re saying you wouldn’t have a problem with that?” he asked Booker. Booker responded: “Well, no, if it happened like that I would.” Also Monday, Sandusky’s lawyers issued subpoenas to several of the civil attorneys representing their client’s accusers. The documents asked for any fee schedules worked out between alleged victims and their lawyers and any communications the attorneys have had with the press.

they were unable to achieve in elections in early May that yielded largely the same outcome. “We agreed that a government has to be formed within this exploratory mandate,” which ends on Thursday, Samaras said. “We will talk again.” Samaras, whose party placed first but does not have enough seats to form a government on its own, also met with the leaders of two smaller parties: Independent Greeks

on the right, whose leader appeared unlikely to join a coalition, and Democratic Left, whose leader may be open to joining one. New Democracy won 29.6 percent of the vote, while the Socialists, who once dominated the electorate and were in power when Greece signed the first of its two loan agreements in 2010, placed third with 12.2 percent of the vote, or 32 seats. They were punished by austerity-weary voters who

turned to the leftist party Syriza, which placed second with 70 seats. Syriza spooked European leaders with its calls for tearing up Greece’s loan deal and shifted the debate with its position that the loan agreement was fatally flawed, a point Samaras and Venizelos have both conceded. After his talks with Syriza’s leader, Alexis Tsipras, on Monday, Samaras emphasized the need to renegotiate the bailout conditions.


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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

COLORADO

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Raging wildfires claim 189 homes

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By P. Solomon Banda The Associated Press

LOVELAND, Colo. — Firefighters faced dangerous conditions across much of the Rocky Mountain region Monday, as they toiled in hot, dry weather to battle a wildfire that has charred nearly 92 square miles in northern Colorado. Authorities said they determined eight more homes have burned in the fire near Fort Collins. The blaze started June 9 and now has destroyed at least 189 homes — the most in the state’s history. The fire is 50 percent contained. The wind was relatively calm Monday, despite forecasts of gusts of up to 50 mph, fire information officer Brett Haberstick said. Temperatures, however, were in the mid-90s, and the relative humidity was extremely low at 3 to 5 percent, he said. Other wildfires were burning in warm, arid weather from Wyoming to Arizona to Southern California, where a blaze that prompted the evacuation of at least 150 homes was 30 percent contained Monday. Fire officials warned that the 907-acre fire in eastern San Diego County still threatens 200 houses, sheds and other buildings. The fire has destroyed at least one home. In Colorado, another fire that started Sunday in the foothills west of Colorado Springs prompted evacuations of cabins, a Boy Scout camp and a recreation area near the Elevenmile Canyon Reservoir, which provides water to the Denver area. That fire has burned about 1 1/2 square miles, and fire managers said it has the potential to grow much more in the dry conditions. Authorities hadn’t listed a containment figure by

Fires Continued from A1 While this month, like the past two Junes, has been on the cool side, Rapp said the continuing melting of snow in the high country is priming the forests to burn. But fires in the mountains are likely still some time off, said Dan O’Brien, manager of the Northwest Coordination Center in Portland, which forecasts fire seasons in Oregon and Washington.

Ed Andrieski / The Associated Press

Smoke billows from the High Park Fire west of Fort Collins, Colo., on Monday. The wildfire has now burned about 90 square miles and destroyed 189 homes.

Monday. Meanwhile, a fire near Pagosa Springs in the southwestern part of the state grew to nearly 19 square miles and was 30 percent contained. As firefighters try to get the upper hand on the blaze near Fort Collins, which has burned large swaths of private and U.S. Forest Service land, local authorities have dispatched roving patrols to combat looting. On Sunday, deputies arrested Michael Stillman Maher, 30, of Denver, on charges including theft and impersonating a firefighter. The sheriff’s department said Maher was driving through the fire zone with phony firefighter credentials and a stolen government license plate.

“Up on the slope, we are still fairly green and that’s not going to change anytime soon,” he said. While winter snow and rain was late in coming to Central Oregon, it skipped over the grasslands of Harney and Malheur counties, O’Brien said. Without the snow, the grasslands are still thick from a bumper growing season last year, he said, making for what should be a busy fire season in southeast Oregon.

His truck was later seen near a bar in Laporte, and investigators said they found a gun and stolen property in the vehicle. Jeff Corum, whose home burned on the first day of the northern Colorado fire, described whirling, unpredictable winds that drove the blaze. “That’s what it’s been doing, back and forth,” Corum said. “It’s just like a washing machine, and it’s just rolling up there, and that’s the way the mountains are.” Corum grabbed some clothing and two weapons when he fled, but not his credit cards. He’s spent a few nights in a motel, some at a Red Cross evacuation center and some in his truck. The fire also is forcing wildlife to flee the flames. A moose

Five years of fire A look at the last five fire seasons on state and federal land in Central Oregon.

Lightning caused Year

Acres burned

Number of fires

Acres burned

Total Acres burned

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

190 312 263 182 218

19,672 65,820 19,824 16,341 78,327

182 201 187 174 182

23,833 6,947 2,297 58 7,727

43,505 72,767 22,121 16,399 86,054

Source: Deschutes and Ochoco national forests, the Bureau of Land Management and Oregon Department of Forestry via Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center

— Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Emily S. Rueb / The New York Times

Apprentice beekeepers learn about preventing swarms, and how to transfer bees to new hives, at the Brooklyn, N.Y., Navy Yard Black swarms of overcrowded, homeless honeybees have proliferated this season in New York City, possibly because of the mild weather.

difficult to trace a swarm to its source. Planakis said the bees he had collected were feral — meaning wild — but some beekeepers believe they were fleeing the poorly managed hives that have proliferated on rooftops, in backyards and on balconies since New York City lifted a decade-long ban on raising Apis mellifera — the common, nonaggressive honeybee — in March 2010. Since then, 114 people have registered 182 hives with the city’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Many others say they are reluctant to divulge the location of their hives for fear of retribution

Human caused

Number of fires

Bees Continued from A1 When Happy Miller, the Seaport restaurant manager, saw tourists flailing their arms in a cloud of airborne black specks late last month, he closed the glass door and quietly panicked. “Oh my God, what do I do?” he thought before calling 311, security guards and local news outfits. The television trucks, he said, were first to arrive. It took several hours before Officer Anthony Planakis, the New York City Police Department’s unofficial beekeeper-in-residence, arrived with a metal swarm box and a vacuum to collect the 17,500 or so homeless creatures. Planakis, who has been responding to swarm calls since 1995, said this had been New York’s busiest year of swarming bees he had experienced. Since mid-March, he said, he has tended to 31 jobs in the five boroughs, more than twice the number he handled last season, which normally extends from mid-April through July. “It’s been pretty hectic,” he said, adding that this week’s warmer temperatures could encourage more bees to take off. This resurgence comes after several years of a puzzling decline in the honeybee population. Since 2006, beekeepers have reported that an average of 30 percent of their hives have vanished each year. The phenomenon — known as Colony Collapse Disorder — has prompted vigorous research to determine the cause but has so far yielded inconclusive and ambiguous results. The swarms, while anxiety-provoking, have resulted in no major injuries. It can be

seeking shelter in Fort Collins is back in the wild after swimming across Horsetooth Reservoir, the Fort Collins Coloradoan reported. Wildlife officials tranquilized the moose, blindfolded it and moved it to an area away from the fire. City officials say they’re expecting more wild animals than usual because of the fire. On Monday, Rocky Mountain National Park enacted a ban on all campfires because of the threat of wildfires in Colorado. The park normally allows campfires in designated fire rings, but the ban will prohibit those, as well as charcoal grilling, for the first time since September 2010. Authorities also are trying to enforce a ban on using private fireworks in Colorado.

from landlords, neighbors and the city. Some estimate the actual number of hives may be as high as 400. “There’s a stigma to a beekeeper whose hive swarms,” said Joe Langford, who watched from his kitchen window in Brooklyn on Mother’s Day as a 20-foot-high cloud of his bees blotted out the sun before landing on a nearby tree, causing a few muffled screams from below. Before he could think about where to get a ladder, they had vanished. “I was awestruck and mortified at the same time,” he said. “For the rest of the day, I couldn’t stop looking up.”

While 311 will take complaints about bees, the New York City Beekeepers Association and NYCBeekeeping. org maintain swarm hotlines and may take the free bees. This year’s unusually mild winter may have also allowed more bees to survive. Flowering plants and trees began blossoming several weeks early this year, causing colony populations to peak early. In the spring, a colony can explode tenfold to take in the season’s nectar. The early arrival of their spring broods could have caught beekeepers off guard; bees swarm when they are overcrowded, following a queen in search of a roomier hollow to call home. “This year, all the rules were broken,” said Dennis vanEngelsdorp, a researcher at the University of Maryland, who co-led a national survey of managed honeybee colonies released this month. It showed that about 21.9 percent of bee colonies nationwide died over the winter, a substantial drop from the 30 percent average losses reported in the previous five years. When asked if this meant a rebound in the population, vanEngelsdorp said on Skype from Pretoria, South Africa, “It’s too early to tell.” The state’s Agriculture Department estimates there are 60,000 to 70,000 colonies in New York. And the state’s 17 or so beekeeping clubs have generally doubled in size in the past five years, said Paul Cappy, the head apiculturist for the New York State Department of Agriculture’s Apiary Inspection Program. A swarm is a perfectly natural phenomenon, Cappy said: “It’s good for the bee population, but not for the beekeepers.”

Under Oregon law, the court may require the requesting party to allow depositions of witnesses as a condition of postponement. Without consent, the court may refuse postponement. In this case, Clarke’s lawyers, Jacques DeKalb and T.J. Spear agreed to depositions in exchange for a later trial. A representative for the attorneys said Monday that they would not comment. Recording of the video depositions began in February, McIver said, and at the close of last week jurors had seen all prerecorded testimony. The lineup of video depositions included a jailhouse informant; Christopher Hodgkins, a third roommate; James Richmond, who testified he was close to Clarke because of their shared addiction to methamphetamine; and three women who were in relationships with the two men. McIver said the recording of video testimonies followed standard court procedures. Though neither a judge nor jury is present while depositions are recorded, the witnesses are subject to the

Taliban Continued from A1 The council includes the Taliban, al-Qaida and Punjabi extremists. The announcement, made over the weekend, is a blow to polio vaccination efforts in Pakistan, which is one of just three countries where the disease is still endemic and which accounted for 198 new cases last year — the highest rate in the world. The tribal belt, which has suffered decades of poverty and conflict, is the largest reservoir of the disease. A UNICEF spokesman said health workers had intended to target 161,000 children under age 5 in a vaccination drive scheduled to begin Wednesday. That operation is now likely to be canceled. So far this year, Pakistan has recorded 22 new polio cases, compared with 52 in the same period last year. The Taliban announcement will also likely rekindle controversy surrounding Afridi, who was recently convicted by a tribal court and sentenced to 33 years in prison. In March and April 2011, Afridi ran a vaccination campaign in Abbottabad that was designed to covertly determine whether bin Laden lived in a house in the city. Afridi failed to obtain a DNA sample, a senior U.S. official said, but did help establish that bin Laden’s local protector, known as “the courier,” was inside the bin Laden compound in Abbottabad. Afridi was arrested three weeks after U.S. Navy SEALs raided the house on May 2, 2011, and killed the al-Qaida leader. But the Abbottabad operation was not his only vaccination campaign. U.S. officials say Afridi had been working with the CIA for several years, at a time when he was leading polio vaccination efforts in Khyber Agency, a corner of the tribal belt that harbors a rare strain of the disease.

Tetherow Continued from A1 After the foreclosure process is completed, the new owner will probably ask for more time to complete the infrastructure, Deschutes County senior planner Will Groves told commissioners. “This will also provide the opportunity for the new owner to change the form of security,” Groves said, referring to the bond. Commissioners Alan Unger and Tony DeBone voted to approve the extension. Commissioner Tammy Baney was not at the meeting. Unger said the future of destination resorts is unclear. “It’s challenging times,” Unger said. “We don’t know how many years it will be

full extent of the law. Witnesses are placed under oath for their testimony and undergo direct and cross examination. Present in the courtroom is the court stenographer, a videographer, the defendant and his attorneys and prosecutors. While video depositions are commonplace in civil trials, District Attorney Patrick Flaherty said the specific statute requiring depositions for postponements is not employed often in criminal cases. These witnesses are typically held under a subpoena, which requires them to return to the courthouse should further questions arise. Flaherty noted that even with a subpoena, there’s no guarantee witnesses would be reachable. “That was our concern when the case got postponed. We went to great lengths to make sure we had each of these witnesses available for this trial. We had concerns, boy, if it gets postponed, we might not be able to get them back,” Flaherty said. Clarke’s trial continues Wednesday at 10 a.m. in Deschutes County Circuit Court. —Reporter; 541-633-2160, hpablo@bendbulletin.com

Western aid workers have sharply criticized the CIA for recruiting medical personnel and have complained of harsh restrictions on their work imposed by suspicious Pakistani authorities. U.S. officials say Afridi was targeting a mutual enemy of Pakistan and the United States. The Taliban statement suggests that suspicion about health workers has spread to militant groups, which are prepared to use the issue for propaganda purposes. Despite the challenges of North Waziristan, a hub of Taliban and al-Qaida fighters, UNICEF says 143,000 of the area’s 161,000 children under 5 were reached by the last round of vaccinations from June 4 to 6. Dr. Muhammad Sadiq, the surgeon general for North Waziristan, said he had already received Taliban orders to cancel the vaccination drive planned for Wednesday and Thursday. “Under these circumstances, we cannot continue,” he said in a telephone interview. Din Muhammad, a journalist based in neighboring South Waziristan tribal agency, said the main Taliban commander there, Mullah Nazir, was also planning to block polio vaccination efforts. The bans may be a product of paranoia about the U.S. drone strikes, which have increased in frequency and accuracy over the past year. Two weeks ago, a strike killed Abu Yahya al-Libi, al-Qaida’s deputy leader, at a farmhouse near Mir Ali in North Waziristan. In his statement, Bahadur said there was a “strong possibility of spying on mujahedeen for the U.S. during the polio vaccination campaign; one such example is Dr. Shakil Afridi.” Afridi is in prison in Peshawar, where the authorities have acknowledged he faces death threats from fellow inmates. An appeal filed by his family is to be heard Wednesday.

before things really turn around, especially for destination resorts.” Commissioners also voted Monday to adopt the county’s $276 million budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1. Commissioners delayed a decision on whether to grant District Attorney Patrick Flaherty’s request for approximately $89,000 to $92,000 annually to take back enforcement of certain child support cases from the state. Marty Wynne, the county’s finance director and treasurer, said commissioners will discuss the issue again soon and could approve a supplemental budget that includes the child support money in July or August. — Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com


TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

FLORIDA SHOOTING

Zimmerman’s wife focus of attention By Rene Stutzman The Orlando Sentinel (MCT)

SANFORD, Fla. — George and Shellie Zimmerman struggled with money problems. The year they married, he was sued, accused of failing to pay a credit card bill. Three years later, she was sued for the same thing. Both were in and out of community college, records show, and spent their first years together in a home owned by her parents. Then their lives were turned upside down — George Zimmerman shot and killed Trayvon Martin, an unarmed 17year-old, in February — and the money began pouring in. Now what Shellie Zimmerman told a judge about family

finances has made her a focus of national attention. It is the reason her husband is back behind bars and the basis for her Tuesday arrest on a charge of perjury. What is known about her? She is a 25-year-old Longwood native who wants to be a nurse and, when pressed, aggressively defends her husband. Although George Zimmerman has been vilified, especially on the Internet, for killing Martin, she testified at his bond hearing in April that she had never seen him angry. “Do you believe he’s a danger to the community?” asked his attorney, Mark O’Mara. “No, I do not,” she said. She and family members did not respond to phone calls

and email from the Orlando Sentinel, but acquaintances described her as respectful, polite and a good match for Zimmerman. George Michael Zimmerman married Shellie Nicole Dean in November 2007 in Daytona Beach, according to public records. He was 24. She was 20 and a cosmetologist who specialized in facials. She enrolled at Seminole State College — formerly Seminole Community College — in the fall of 2008 and left the school in the fall of 2010, their records show. Olivia Bertalan, a neighbor the couple helped after a burglary, described Shellie Zimmerman as a “stay-at-home student.”

“We had common interests,” Bertalan said. Both wanted to become nurses. The couple had moved into Sanford’s Retreat at Twin Lakes in 2009, records show. Frank Taaffe, one of George Zimmerman’s most visible friends and early defenders, said he met Shellie Zimmerman once or twice at homeowners association meetings. She was much less active in that group than her husband, he said. Together the Zimmermans mentored two black middleschool students, a brother and sister, according to family members. Leanne Benjamin, a longtime friend of George Zimmerman’s, met the children in December, she said.

Saudi defense minister is new crown prince The Associated Press RIYADH, Saudi Arabia — Saudi Arabia kept power within the surviving, aging sons of the kingdom’s founding patriarch Monday by naming Defense Minister Prince Salman bin Abdul-Aziz as the new heir to the throne in a country both battling and embracing the upheavals across the Middle East. The choice was expected and came just a day after the burial of the late crown prince, Prince Nayef, who died last week in Geneva and was in the No. 2 position only since November. Prince Salman, 76, is now the third successor for the 88-year-old King Abdullah

in the past year. It reflects the issues of health and age that will one day turn control of OPEC’s top oil exporter over to a younger generation. Yet it also displays the preference for cautious steps by the ruling House of Saud, which must balance its role as one of the West’s main Middle East allies with its need to appease its ultraconservative religious establishment. In Washington, President Barack Obama issued a statement praising Salman as “a man of deep faith who is committed to improving the lives of the people of Saudi Arabia and to the security of the region.”

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541-548-6023 541-382-3571 800-848-5775 541-312-4070 541-408-5683 541-388-0445 541-536-3344 541-536-5355 541-388-4064 541-548-0882 541-383-8825 541-504-2619 541-382-2332 541-383-5889 541-382-2421 541-475-2071 541-475-2020 541-330-1393 541-382-1579 541-382-4373 541-546-4171 541-382-8028 541-382-1795 541-536-2126 541-388-0078 541-382-4301 541-416-9000 541-460-4039 541-548-2515 541-536-2192 541-382-7580 541-548-1055 541-382-1662 541-728-0024 541-585-2400 541-447-6296 800-527-3932 800-338-0507 541-617-6164 541-617-9600 541-312-4201 541-526-2100 541-330-9093 541-382-5411 541-617-9866 541-382-0209 541-548-2299 541-617-9899 541-382-1401 541-923-3366 541-389-9999 541-318-7468 541-318-1940 541-475-2259 541-548-5688 541-447-6423 541-548-7275 541-923-3513 541-447-2631 541-382-7009 541-388-6783 541-549-1848 541-383-1718 541-546-5222 541-312-9758 541-382-5934 541-382-8471 541-749-4044 541-312-9626 541-382-3720 541-312-4730 541-312-4332 541-388-0300 541-383-7672 541-323-3011 541-382-7205 541-593-1502 541-382-6067 541-389-3031 541-593-3225 541-447-2005 541-593-2525 541-593-4915 541-548-7341 541-388-8839 541-385-8498 541-548-8707 541-388-2582 541-536-0700 541-504-8311 541-549-8479 541-475-8700 541-585-1140 541-915-5669 541-549-1538 541-749-2440 541-536-1294 541-382-7579 541-383-8502 541-317-3403 541-317-1998 541-541-3491 541-385-0534 541-420-8577 541-322-6122 541-475-3811 541-549-0416 541-593-8310 541-389-8359 541-553-1597 541-382-3426 541-318-1632 546-586-1194 541-318-1716


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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

A GIFT TO THE COMMUNITY PRESENTED EXCLUSIVELY BY

&

Listen to the synchronized soundtrack accompanying The Bulletin and Bank of the Cascades fireworks on these radio stations.

A VERY SPECIAL THANKS TO THE FOLLOWING FOR THEIR SUPPORT OF THIS COMMUNITY EVENT: PILOT BUTTE SCENIC VIEWPOINT • OREGON STATE PARKS • OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY • CITY OF BEND POLICE DEPT • CITY OF BEND FIRE DEPT BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA • DESCHUTES NATIONAL FOREST • TaylorNW


COMMUNITYLIFE THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

SPOTLIGHT Rec manager is honored Sue Jorgenson, recreation manager for the Bend Park & Recreation District, was recently honored for her work on behalf of children. The award was presented at the Champions for Children luncheon, which was put on by Healthy Beginnings, a local nonprofit organization that provides health screenings for children. The event is an annual fundraiser for the agency. Jorgenson was selected for her work both with the park district on behalf of children and for a number of youthfocused advisory roles, according to a news release. She was selected from five nominees and was recognized by the nearly 200 people in attendance. Contact: www.myhb .org or 541-383-6357.

B

TV & Movies, B2 Calendar, B3 Horoscope, B3 Comics, B4-5 Puzzles, B5

www.bendbulletin.com/community

Turning the page The Nature of Words begins a new chapter with Robert McDowell at the helm

By David Jasper • The Bulletin

S

ince its inception, The Nature of Words has been practically synonymous with its founder and public face: author and teacher Ellen Waterston. Seven years after the first festival, there’s a new occupant in the corner office of the nonprofit’s Bend headquarters: Robert McDowell. In

May, McDowell, 59, took over as executive director of The Nature of Words, or NOW, the Bend-based literary festival launched in 2005 by Waterston.

— From staff reports

Each fall, the festival has brought to Central Oregon acclaimed authors and poets for readings, panels and workshops, among them Annie Proulx, Timothy Egan, David Guterson, Anne Lamott, Benjamin Percy, Ted Kooser, Sherman Alexie, Ursula K. Le Guin, Augusten Burroughs and many more. NOW’s mission is “to strengthen and support the literary arts and humanities in the high desert,” and in recent years that has meant holding writing workshops and tutoring at its downtown headquarters and dispatching writers into

YOUR PET

Submitted photo

Daisy May likes to take it easy

area schools, Bend homeless cade Festival of Music and that shelter Bethlehem Inn and Deer grew into The Nature of Words, Ridge Correctional Institution “I figure I have a good 10 (years) in Madras. under my belt,” she says. This year, Waterston “I strongly felt and feel stepped down from her that there is a right time role leading NOW to fofor a founder-director cus on her own writing, to pass the baton, and teach through her longI think that’s key to the time endeavor The Writhealth of the organizaWaterston tion and the growth of ing Ranch and give any needed assistance to the the organization — fresh push for a creative writvisioning, fresh look at ing program at Oregon State things. I think that’s very, very University-Cascades campus. important.” Waterston notes that with McDowell will get his official the inclusion of The Music of introduction to NOW supportWords, a 2001 and 2002 poetry ers at NOW’s June 28 BOOKevent tied to the erstwhile CasPLATE event at Atelier 6000 in

Bend. An annual reception and auction fundraiser featuring literarily minded live and silent auction items, BOOKPLATE also features the announcement of the 2012 roster of festival authors.

Learning to write McDowell has a long and accomplished resume: teacher, magazine and book publisher and editor, poet and author of some 12 books. And now, fresh off a move from Ashland to Bend, McDowell is applying his experience to The Nature of Words. See McDowell / B6

Say hello to Daisy May, a 6-year-old Labradoodle who is an old lady at heart and likes to go to bed early. She also enjoys going swimming. Her nickname is “The Bearded Lady.” Daisy May lives in Bend with Cindy Mayer and her family. To submit a photo for publication, email a high-resolution image along with your animal’s name, age and species or breed, your name, age, city of residence and contact information, and a few words about what makes your pet special. Send photos to pets@bendbulletin. com, drop them off at 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. in Bend, or mail them to The Bulletin Pets section, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. Contact: 541-3830358.

ADOPT ME Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Robert McDowell, the new executive director of The Nature of Words, reads some of his poetry at the Downtown Bend Public Library on June 10. McDowell will be formally introduced to NOW supporters at the June 29 BOOKPLATE event, an annual reception and auction fundraiser featuring literarily minded live and silent auction items.

Submitted photo

Take JoJo home Meet JoJo, who was left behind when his family moved. He’s a big, quiet, social fellow about 3 years old. He has adapted well to his new situation but would love to have a home and family of his own again. If you would like to visit JoJo, or any other cat or kitten available for adoption through the Cat Rescue, Adoption and Foster Team, contact the organization at 541-389-8420 or info@ craftcats.org, or visit www.craftcats.org.

Here’s your chance to play the ponies in Prineville By Tom Olsen For The Bulletin

Horse racing comes to the High Desert only once a year, only on the track at the Crook County Fairgrounds in Prineville. This year, the races are set for July 11 through 14. The Crooked River Roundup Association sponsored its first horse races in 1966 — the first rodeo was held in 1945 — but Prineville’s racing roots go back to at least 1880, when the first track was built, said Doug Smith, CRRA racing director and treasurer; it’s been going strong there ever since. This year, the races are expected to draw more than 300 horses from all over the west

vying for purses that average $3,300 in almost 40 separate contests, Smith said. The largest purse of $18,000 for the seventh race Saturday night is expected to attract the best quarter horses in Oregon. Pari-mutuel betting will add to the excitement of the four-day meet. “Our horse racing has become the great party of Crook County,” Smith added. He has friends coming to the races from as far as Baltimore, and attendance is expected to top 16,000. Net proceeds from the event will fund breast cancer screening for women in Crook County who otherwise could not afford it. See Racing / B6

Riders battle for position on the final turn during the second horse race of the Crooked River Roundup in 2011. This year’s races will take place July 11-14 in Prineville. Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin file photo


B2

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

TV & M In his new sitcom, Cedric the Entertainer is right at home about their St. Louis childhoods and some of their favorite spots. Cedric, 48, was born CedBy Gail Pennington ric Kyles in Jefferson City and St. Louis Post-Dispatch lived in Caruthersville before ST. LOUIS — TV Land moving to St. Louis, where wanted Cedric the Enter- he graduated from Berkeley tainer to make Cleveland his High School. He worked as home. He held out for his real an insurance claims adjuster home: St. Louis. here before making it in In “The Soul Man,� a come- comedy. dy making its debut WednesNash, 42, was born in day on the cable network, California but spent much Cedric plays R&B of her childhood star Boyce “The with her grandTV SPOTLIGHT Voice� Ballantine, mother, Mildred who has given Brookins, in the up the fast life and moved Hamilton Heights neighborhome to take over his father’s hood. She has often said that church. she considers St. Louis home, Viewers first met Ballan- or at least a second home, and tine on TV Land’s “Hot in visits family here often. Cleveland� in an episode that Maybe it was their simifound him offering premari- lar roots, “but we had a nice tal advice to Betty White’s rhythm together right away,� character. Cedric says of Nash. “We “When we were talking have so many connections.� about the new series, they In “The Soul Man,� Boyce asked if I wanted to be from and Lolli Ballantine have Cleveland, but I wasn’t really been married for 18 years, comfortable with that,� Ced- with a teenage daughter, ric says. “I said, let’s make it Lyric, played by Jazz Raycole St. Louis, so the setup is that (“My Wife and Kids�). I leave Las Vegas and come When his father (John Beahome to St. Louis.� sley of “Everwood�) decided As co-creator and an ex- it was time to retire from the ecutive producer of “The Soul church he had led for many Man,� Cedric, who also co- years, Boyce saw a chance to wrote the pilot, had a hand in turn his life around by taking other details, including cast- over. ing. But choosing fellow St. As viewers meet him, he’s Louisan Niecy Nash to play getting comfortable in the his wife, Lolli, was a coinci- pulpit and trying to fit into dence, he says. the church community, often They had met years be- asking God for help along the fore and worked together on way. a movie (“Code Name: The TV Land ordered 12 epiCleaner�), but as for their sodes of “The Soul Man,� cosimilar roots, “I didn’t know!� created with Suzanne Martin The two soon compared notes of “Hot in Cleveland.� “The Soul Man� 10 p.m Wednesdays, TV Land

L M T  FOR TUESEDAY, JUNE 19

BEND Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BERNIE (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 FOR GREATER GLORY (R) Noon, 3, 6 HYSTERIA (R) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 1, 4, 7 MONSIEUR LAZHAR (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 12:20, 3:50, 6:55, 10:05 THE DICTATOR (R) 10:25 JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND (PG) 10 a.m. KIT KITTREDGE: AN AMERICAN GIRL (G) 10 a.m. MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) 11:10 a.m., 12:35, 2:40, 4:25, 6:10, 7:30, 9:55 MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) 12:45, 3:45, 7:50, 9:05 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 11 a.m., 2:30, 6, 9:20 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS 3-D (PG13) 11:30 a.m., 3, 6:30, 9:50 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 12:05, 7:05 MEN IN BLACK 3-D (PG-13) 3:40, 9:45 PROMETHEUS (R) 11:50 a.m., 3:20, 6:50, 10

PROMETHEUS 3-D (R) 6:05, 9 PROMETHEUS IMAX (R) Noon, 3:30, 7, 10:10 ROCK OF AGES (PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 12:25, 2:55, 4:10, 6:25, 7:25, 9:30, 10:30 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 12:15, 2:45, 4, 6:15, 7:15, 9:15, 10:15 THAT’S MY BOY (R) 11:40 a.m., 12:40, 3:10, 4:20, 6:40, 7:40, 9:40, 10:35 WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING (PG-13) 11:05 a.m., 2:35

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

EDITOR’S NOTES: • Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15. • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) 1:45, 4, 6:15, 8:30 PROMETHEUS (R) 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 ROCK OF AGES (PG-13) 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 3:45, 6:30, 9:15

SISTERS ROCK OF AGES (PG-13) 2:25, 4:40, 7:10, 9:35 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 4:05, 6:40, 9:25

Sisters Movie House 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) 5:15, 7:30

PRINEVILLE

MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 5:15

21 JUMP STREET (R) 9:30 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) 6 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

Pine Theater

PROMETHEUS (R) 5, 7:45 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 7:30

MADRAS Tin Pan Theater

Madras Cinema 5

869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

PROMETHEUS (R) 3:20, 10 Editor’s Note: As of press time, the full schedule for this theater was unavailable. Contact the theater for more information.

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

ROCK OF AGES (PG-13) 5, 7:45

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (UPSTAIRS — PG) 6 ROCK OF AGES (PG-13) 4, 7 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED 3-D (PG) 4:50, 7 MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) 2:10, 9:20 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 2:25, 4:40, 7:10, 9:35

REDMOND

PROMETHEUS 3-D (R) 2:15, 9:15

Redmond Cinemas

PROMETHEUS (R) 4:15, 6:50

Providing unparalled service across a variety of industries since 1983.

541-389-1505

for appointments call 541-382-4900

Care for loved ones. Comfort for all. 541-389-0006 www.evergreeninhome.com

400 SW Bluff Dr Ste 200 Bend , OR 97702

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L TV L   TUESDAY PRIME TIME 6/19/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00 KATU News News News KEZI 9 News The Simpsons Electric Comp. NewsChannel 8 Meet, Browns Mexico/Bayless

5:30 NBA Countdown Nightly News Evening News NBA Countdown The Simpsons Fetch! With Ruff Nightly News Meet, Browns Hey Kids-Cook

6:00

6:30

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

2012 NBA Finals Oklahoma City Thunder at Miami Heat (N) (Live) Ă… Jimmy Kimmel Paid Program Lose 30Lbs NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Ă… Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune America’s Got Talent ‘PG’ Ă… America’s Got Talent ’ Ă… Access H. Old Christine How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ NCIS The Good Son ’ ‘PG’ (9:01) NCIS: Los Angeles ’ ‘PG’ 2012 NBA Finals Oklahoma City Thunder at Miami Heat (N) (Live) Ă… Jimmy Kimmel Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Big Bang Big Bang Hell’s Kitchen (N) ‘14’ Ă… MasterChef Top 15 Compete ‘14’ This Old House Business Rpt. PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Queen Victoria’s Empire Industrial revolution; culture. ‘PG’ Ă… NewsChannel 8 News Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition America’s Got Talent ‘PG’ Ă… America’s Got Talent ’ Ă… King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ The Catalina (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… The L.A. Complex ’ ‘14’ The Return of Sherlock Holmes Meal Lifetime Independent Lens We Were Here (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… World News Tavis Smiley (N)

10:00

10:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Love in the Wild (N) ‘PG’ Ă… (10:01) 48 Hours Mystery (N) ’ Primetime: What Would You Do? News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Frontline Digital Nation ’ ‘PG’ Love in the Wild (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Cops ‘14’ Ă… ’Til Death ‘14’ Charlie Rose (N) ’ Ă…

11:00

11:30

KATU News (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:36) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Moyers & Company ’ ‘G’ Ă… NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno ’Til Death ‘PG’ That ’70s Show PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Barter Kings Barter Kings *A&E 130 28 18 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… CSI: Miami Meltdown A jewelry heist CSI: Miami Mommie Deadest A subur- CSI: Miami Time Bomb Horatio’s ex is ››› “The Fugitiveâ€? (1993, Suspense) Harrison Ford, Tommy Lee Jones, Sela Ward. An innocent man must evade ›› “U-571â€? (2000) Matthew McCo*AMC 102 40 39 ends in murder. ‘14’ Ă… ban mother is murdered. ‘14’ killed in an explosion. ‘14’ the law as he pursues a killer. Ă… naughey, Bill Paxton. Ă… River Monsters: Unhooked ‘PG’ The Blue Planet: Seas of Life ‘G’ The Blue Planet: Seas of Life ‘G’ The Blue Planet: Seas of Life ‘G’ The Blue Planet: Seas of Life ‘G’ The Blue Planet: Seas of Life ‘G’ *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Gator Boys Stormin’ Gators ‘PG’ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/OC Housewives/OC Pregnant in Heels (N) What Happens Housewives/OC BRAVO 137 44 (6:45) The Dukes of Hazzard ‘G’ Ă… (7:57) The Dukes of Hazzard ‘G’ (9:10) The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (10:22) The Dukes of Hazzard ’ Dukes-Hazzard CMT 190 32 42 53 (4:25) Dallas ’ (5:35) Dallas The Crucible ’ ‘PG’ 60 Minutes on CNBC American Greed Mad Money 60 Minutes on CNBC American Greed Paid Program Hair Free CNBC 51 36 40 52 The Costco Craze: Inside the Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront CNN 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… South Park ‘14’ (5:51) 30 Rock (6:23) 30 Rock Colbert Report Daily Show Workaholics (8:27) Tosh.0 (8:58) Tosh.0 (9:29) Tosh.0 Tosh.0 (N) ‘14’ Workaholics (N) Daily Show Colbert Report COM 135 53 135 47 Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Desert Cooking Oregon Redmond City Council Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 Capitol Hill Hearings CSPAN 58 20 12 11 Capitol Hill Hearings Wizards-Place Phineas, Ferb Jessie ‘G’ Ă… “Good Luck Charlie, It’s Christmas!â€? (2011) ’ ‘G’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ › “Avalon Highâ€? (2010) Britt Robertson. ’ ‘G’ (10:40) Jessie My Babysitter A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ *DIS 87 43 14 39 Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Ă… Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Ă… Deadliest Catch No Exit (N) ‘14’ After the Catch (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Deadliest Catch No Exit ’ ‘14’ *DISC 156 21 16 37 Deadliest Catch The Aftermath The aftermath of the hurricane. ‘14’ ››› “Mean Girlsâ€? (2004) Lindsay Lohan, Rachel McAdams. E! News (N) Heroes Gone Wrong ‘14’ Mrs. Eastwood Mrs. Eastwood Keeping Up With the Kardashians Chelsea Lately E! News *E! 136 25 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 College Baseball NCAA World Series, Game 9 -- Florida State vs. UCLA From Omaha, Neb. (N) Ă… NFL Live (N) Ă… EURO Tonight Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… NFL Live Ă… Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… NBA Tonight (N) NASCAR Now NFL Live Ă… ESPN2 22 24 21 24 SportsCenter Can’t Blame Can’t Blame Tennis From July 9, 2000. Ă… Golf Ă… Dick Schaap 30 for 30 Ă… Tennis (N) ESPNC 23 25 123 25 Golf Ă… SportsCenter SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. EURO Tonight H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsNation Pretty Little Liars ’ ‘14’ Ă… Pretty Little Liars (N) ‘14’ Ă… Jane by Design The Surprise ‘PG’ Pretty Little Liars ’ ‘14’ Ă… The 700 Club ‘G’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 ››› “Bring It On: In It to Win Itâ€? (2007, Comedy) Ashley Benson. Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five FNC 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Paula’s Cooking Chopped Sunny Side Apps Cupcake Wars Cupcake Wars L.A. Marathon Chopped Far Far Out! ‘G’ Chopped Chocolate Challenge (N) Chopped My Froggy Clementine *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes “Chipmunks-Squeakquelâ€? ›› “Tooth Fairyâ€? (2010, Comedy) Dwayne Johnson, Ashley Judd. ›› “The Proposalâ€? (2009, Romance-Comedy) Sandra Bullock, Ryan Reynolds. ›› “The Proposalâ€? (2009) Sandra Bullock. FX 131 Hunters Int’l Design Star ‘G’ Ă… Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Brothers ‘G’ Ă… Design Star (N) ‘G’ Ă… House Hunters Hunters Int’l Million Dollar Million Dollar HGTV 176 49 33 43 Hunters Int’l Ancient Aliens ‘PG’ Ă… Ancient Aliens ‘PG’ Ă… Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Swamp People Cold-Blooded ‘PG’ Ice Road Truckers ‘14’ Ă… (11:01) United Stats of America *HIST 155 42 41 36 Ancient Aliens ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Dance Moms ‘PG’ Ă… Dance Moms ‘PG’ Ă… Dance Moms ‘PG’ Ă… Dance Moms (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Bristol Palin: Life’s a Tripp ‘PG’ Bristol Palin: Life’s a Tripp ‘PG’ LIFE 138 39 20 31 Reba ‘PG’ Ă… The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word The Ed Show The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews MSNBC 56 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) Friendzone ‘PG’ Friendzone ‘PG’ Bieber Live (N) Teen Mom ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Teen Mom Letting Go ‘PG’ Ă… Teen Mom The Places You’ll Go Teen Mom Clos. Savage U (N) MTV 192 22 38 57 (5:13) Teen Wolf Allison must acquire a rare book. SpongeBob Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Figure It Out ‘Y’ SpongeBob Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Hollywood Heights (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ NICK 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Our America With Lisa Ling ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ Our America With Lisa Ling ‘PG’ Our America With Lisa Ling ‘PG’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ OWN 161 103 31 103 Our America With Lisa Ling ‘14’ Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Arizona Diamondbacks From Chase Field in Phoenix. (N) (Live) Mariners Post. The Dan Patrick Show MLB Baseball ROOT 20 45 28* 26 MLB Baseball Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Repo Games ’ Repo Games ’ SPIKE 132 31 34 46 Ways to Die › “The Hills Have Eyes 2â€? (2007, Horror) Michael McMillian. Fact or Faked: Paranormal Files Hollywood Treasure (N) Fact or Faked: Paranormal Files SYFY 133 35 133 45 “The Cursedâ€? (2010) Costas Mandylor, Louis Mandylor. Ă… Behind Scenes Joyce Meyer John Hagee Rod Parsley Praise the Lord (Live). Ă… ACLJ Joseph Prince: Grace Special Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord TBN Classics TBN 205 60 130 Seinfeld ‘PG’ Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan (N) ‘14’ *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ ›››› “Spartacusâ€? (1960, Historical Drama) Kirk Douglas, Laurence Olivier, Jean Simmons. A gladiator slave leads a revolt in Rome. ›› “The Brave Oneâ€? (1956, Drama) Michel Ray, Rodolfo Hoyos, Narciso ›› “The Bossâ€? (1956, Drama) John Payne. World War I TCM 101 44 101 29 Busquets. Premiere. Mexican boy tries to save pet bull. veteran becomes crooked political boss. Say Yes: ATL Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ What Not to Wear Kathy ’ ‘PG’ What Not to Wear (N) ‘PG’ Ă… What Not to Wear Mindy ’ ‘PG’ What Not to Wear Kathy ’ ‘PG’ *TLC 178 34 32 34 Say Yes: ATL Bones The Male in the Mail ‘14’ Rizzoli & Isles Sailor Man ‘14’ Rizzoli & Isles ‘14’ Ă… Rizzoli & Isles (N) ‘14’ Ă… Franklin & Bash (N) ‘14’ Ă… Rizzoli & Isles ‘14’ Ă… *TNT 17 26 15 27 Bones ’ ‘14’ Ă… Johnny Test ’ Regular Show Regular Show Wrld, Gumball Adventure Time Total Drama Level Up ‘PG’ Adventure Time King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ *TOON 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Mysteries at the Museum ‘PG’ Mysteries at the Museum (N) ‘PG’ Mysteries at the Museum ‘PG’ Bizarre Foods/Zimmern *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Bourdain: No Reservations M*A*S*H ‘PG’ (6:32) M*A*S*H (7:05) M*A*S*H (7:43) Home Improvement ’ ‘PG’ Home Improve. Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 Bonanza Mirror of a Man ‘G’ Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU CSI: Crime Scene Investigation USA 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU (5:50) Behind the Music ’ ‘14’ Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta ’ ‘14’ Single Ladies Ex Factor ’ ‘14’ Mob Wives Chicago ’ ‘14’ Tough Love: New Orleans ’ ‘14’ Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta ’ ‘14’ VH1 191 48 37 54 (4:40) Behind the Music ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS ››› “Innerspaceâ€? 1987, Comedy Dennis Quaid. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… ›› “Tron: Legacyâ€? 2010, Science Fiction Jeff Bridges. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (10:10) ›› “Big Trouble in Little Chinaâ€? 1986 Kurt Russell. ‘PG-13’ ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:00) ››› “Blade Runnerâ€? ‘R’ FXM Presents ››› “The Departedâ€? 2006 Leonardo DiCaprio. An undercover cop and a criminal lead double lives. ‘R’ FXM Presents ››› “The Departedâ€? 2006, Crime Drama Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon. ‘R’ Ă… FMC 104 204 104 120 Slumdog Mill The Ultimate Fighter Brazil UFC 147 Countdown (N) UFC Tonight (N) UFC Insider Action Sports Thrillbillies ‘14’ UFC Unleashed UFC Unleashed UFC Tonight UFC Insider FUEL 34 Golf Central Big Break Atlantis Big Break Atlantis Learning Center Inside PGA GOLF 28 301 27 301 Golf (N) Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Honeymoon ‘G’ (4:00) ›› “Just (5:45) ››› “X-Men: First Classâ€? 2011, Action James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Rose Byrne. ››› “Crazy, Stupid, Love.â€? 2011 Steve Carell. A suddenly single 40-some- REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel The Ricky Ger- “Hemingway & HBO 425 501 425 501 Wrightâ€? The early years of Charles Xavier and Erik Lehnsherr. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… thing needs help finding his groove again. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… vais Show ‘MA’ Gellhornâ€? 2012 ›› “King of New Yorkâ€? 1990 Christopher Walken. ‘R’ (7:15) ››› “The Bank Jobâ€? 2008, Crime Drama Jason Statham, Saffron Burrows. ‘R’ (9:45) ›› “King of New Yorkâ€? 1990, Crime Drama Christopher Walken. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (5:05) MAX on (5:20) ››› “Boogie Nightsâ€? 1997, Drama Mark Wahlberg, Burt Reynolds, Julianne Moore. A porn ›› “Unknownâ€? 2011, Suspense Liam Neeson, Diane Kruger. An accident ›› “Green Lanternâ€? 2011, Action Ryan Reynolds, Blake Lively. A test pilot MAX 400 508 508 Set ‘PG’ Ă… star’s ego leads to his downfall. ’ ‘R’ Ă… victim finds a man using his identity. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… joins a band of intergalactic warriors. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Amish: Out of Order ‘PG’ Amish: Out of Order (N) ‘PG’ American Colony: Hutterites American Colony: Hutterites Amish: Out of Order ‘PG’ Amish: Out of Order ‘PG’ Alaska State Troopers ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Power Rangers Power Rangers SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Power Rangers Power Rangers Odd Parents Ted Nugent Hunt., Country Most Wanted Hunting TV Workin’ Man West. Extreme Hal & Len Truth Hunting Hunt., Country Driven TV Steve’s Outdoor Whitetail Nation Hunter Journal OUTD 37 307 43 307 Driven TV (4:45) ››› “The Wedding Giftâ€? 1993 (6:15) › “The Back-up Planâ€? 2010 Jennifer Lopez. A single woman becomes The Borgias The Confession Lucrezia The Big C Fly Nurse Jackie ’ The Borgias The Confession Lucrezia The Big C Fly Nurse Jackie ’ SHO 500 500 Julie Walters. ‘PG-13’ Ă… pregnant, then meets her ideal man. ‘PG-13’ Ă… falls for a new suitor. ‘MA’ Away ’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Ă… falls for a new suitor. ‘MA’ Away ’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Ă… Dumbest Stuff Hard Parts Hard Parts My Ride Rules My Ride Rules Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff Hard Parts Hard Parts My Ride Rules My Ride Rules Unique Whips ‘14’ SPEED 35 303 125 303 Dumbest Stuff Magic City ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Magic City Atonement ‘MA’ Ă… ›› “Anonymousâ€? 2011 Rhys Ifans. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… (11:15) ›› “Roninâ€? 1998 ’ ‘R’ STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:40) ››› “As Good as It Getsâ€? 1997 Jack Nicholson. ’ ‘PG-13’ (4:30) › “According to Spencerâ€? 2001 (6:05) “After the Stormâ€? 2001, Suspense Benjamin Bratt, Armand Assante. “Flesh Woundsâ€? 2011 Kevin Sorbo. A predator stalks a › “The Bleedingâ€? 2009, Horror Vinnie Jones. A man must “Big Money Rustlasâ€? 2010, Comedy TMC 525 525 Jesse Bradford. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Two men try to recover treasure from a sunken yacht. ‘R’ covert ops team at a remote facility. ’ ‘R’ slay his vampire brother. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Violent J. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Boxing Gabriel Rosado vs. Sechew Powell Motorcycle Racing U.S. Olympic Trials Diving Men’s 10-meter semifinals. From Seattle. U.S. Olympic Trials Diving NBCSN 27 58 30 209 Boxing Kendra on Top Kendra on Top Kendra on Top Kendra on Top CSI: Miami Death Pool 100 ‘14’ Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Kendra on Top Kendra on Top Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *WE 143 41 174 118 Kendra on Top Workin’ It


TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Couple has had their fill of dinnertime socializing Dear Abby: We have been having a problem with a young neighbor couple in our rural area. They drop in to visit us about five evenings a week. They’re nice people and good neighbors, so we don’t want to offend them, but what would be a diplomatic way to tell them we don’t want company that often? The husband gets home from work at 4:30 p.m. every day and his wife always has dinner on the table when he walks in the door. My husband is 62. He works hard 10 to 12 hours a day and returns home anywhere between 5 and 7 p.m. So it’s not possible for me to have dinner ready and waiting. Our idea of a pleasant evening is eating dinner, watching an hour or two of TV, and going to bed about 9 p.m. My husband has to drive by these neighbors’ house on his way home, so they know when he gets here — and they usually arrive shortly thereafter. I feel very uncomfortable cooking a meal and eating with non-eating company in my kitchen, so I always put dinner preparation aside and visit with them for an hour or two. It’s not unusual for us to wind up having dinner at 9 p.m. Sometimes they stay so long my husband and I are too tired to even bother. We have about had it. How can we regain our privacy but remain friends? — Missing Dinner in Missouri Dear Missing Dinner: You and your husband have been such good neighbors that you have made yourselves prisoners in your own home. The next time the couple arrives at your door at dinnertime, in a pleasant tone, say, “John just got home from work and he’s tired and hungry. Please excuse us while we have dinner. We plan to retire early. And in the future, don’t just drop by — please wait until we call you.� Dear Abby: My husband, “Ted,� and I have been married for four years and have a 3-year-old son. Before we were

This year you are resilient and capable of changing your life. You might even choose to head in a new direction, if you so desire. You also could opt to revitalize a certain facet of your life. You experience others’ caring and receptivity to your ideas and personality. If you are single, you might be taken aback by someone quite exotic. Be careful about putting this person on a pedestal. If you are attached, curb a tendency to become too me-oriented. Yes, it is an exciting year, but you also have a partner to consider. CANCER is moody at times. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Get something off your chest first thing in the morning, and let a key person know how you feel; otherwise, your message will not be as clear. Matters involving real estate and/or your domestic life will become prominent in the afternoon. Do not attempt to postpone an important conversation. Tonight: As you like. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Make sure to pay that bill you’ve been putting off, and verify that your budget is alive and well. You quickly could be overwhelmed by calls and information heading your direction. Prioritize and perhaps even screen calls. Be willing to say “no.� Tonight: Catch up on a friend’s news. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH A new Moon in your sign announces a change in the near future. A new beginning becomes possible if you kick back and relax. Think about what you would like to change. Have a long-overdue conversation about a long-term desire. Tonight: A must show. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH You might move slowly in the morning, but once you get going, no one can stop you. You have a lot on your mind, and perhaps you need to share some random ideas with a key person in your life. Trust this person’s feedback. Tonight: All smiles. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Use the morning to the max, when you draw more positive results. You could actually pave the way to a new beginning involving a friendship. Listen to your instincts. Midday on, you will have a lot to ponder. Get feedback, but don’t do any decisionmaking today. Tonight: Share news with a trusted friend.

C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY DEAR ABBY married we talked about having at least two children. After our son was born, Ted went through what he believes was postpartum depression. He wasn’t prepared for the reality of having a baby, and it was hard on him. To his credit, he got through it and has been a fantastic father to our son. He now says he doesn’t want any more children. We are financially stable, but Ted says it isn’t the money. He just doesn’t want to go through it again. Abby, I can’t imagine not having one more child. I know I can’t force him to change his mind, but I’m afraid I will resent him for denying me something I want so badly, especially since we had agreed ahead of time. I feel there is no compromising on this. Either way, one of us is going to be miserable. I cry all the time and don’t know how to move on. Can you help? — Dreaming of Two in Tacoma, Wash. Dear Dreaming of Two: I wish I could, but not knowing the cause of your husband’s anxiety and aversion to having another child, I’m at a disadvantage. You should both talk this out with a licensed marriage and family therapist, and I hope you’ll do it before you become further depressed because your current mental state may adversely affect your ability to parent the child you have. Confidential To “Feeling Old at 45�: Old age doesn’t have to be lonely. It’s what you choose to MAKE it. Reflect on the late Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall’s comment on aging: “I have a lifetime appointment and I intend to serve it. I expect to die at 110 — shot by a jealous husband!� — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Tuesday, June 19, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar

B3

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH You might experience unexpected pressure or stress in the morning. Prioritize and focus as soon as possible. Your organization is imperative in setting and executing a plan. Use these abilities to choose the appropriate direction. You know what you want —go for it. Tonight: Only where there are crowds. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You might want to understand what is happening behind the scenes with an important community or work-related matter. By detaching some, you will gain an unusual perspective. Follow through on a hunch. Tonight: A force to be dealt with. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH You could be taken aback by someone’s choices. Still, you do not have time and/or the determination to change directions. You gain a new perspective as the day ages. You’ll want to think rather than react today. Tonight: Where there is music. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH You might feel as if you are fighting an uphill battle in order to accomplish more of what you need. Others know about your abilities, and they want your help. Practice saying “no� for now; you have a lot to do. Tonight: Hang out with a close friend or loved one. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Your vision of what might be possible could change midday. You have more energy, and you discover a new path early on. As a result, you are willing to go along with someone’s idea. Screen your calls, as it appears your popularity is too high to get anything done. Tonight: Catch up on others’ news. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH You might want to move in a new direction. Act quickly in the morning. A new beginning becomes possible if you let go of an innate resistance or judgment. Organize and focus if you want to finish up a project. Tonight: Go till the wee hours if need be. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH If you can get a slow start this morning, it might be a good idea. Whether you’re involved with a creative project or just coming up with a dynamic idea, you will be busy this afternoon. Others share their ideas, too. Tonight: Enjoy what you are doing. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or redmondfarmersmarket1@ hotmail.com. TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637 or info@ sustainableflame.com. “SOCIAL SECURITY�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; proceeds benefit Soroptimist International of Bend; $25; 7:30 p.m., reception 6:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-728-0051 or www.sibend.org. CROSSING WATER AND SAND: Israeli harpist Sunita Staneslow performs, with Laura Zaerr and Rebecca Hilary Smith, and dancing by Jennifer HeidenSmith; $15; 7:30 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Cascade School of Music, 200 N.W. Pacific Park Lane, Bend; 541-382-6866 or www.ccschoolofmusic.org. THE SKABBS: The Lawndale, Calif.-based rock band performs; free; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-7280879 or www.reverbnation .com/venue/thehornedhand.

WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket .com. MUSIC IN THE CANYON: Countryfied performs country music; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; American Legion Community Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; www .musicinthecanyon.com. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, LE COMTE ORY�: Starring Juan Diego Florez, Joyce DiDonato and Diana Damrau in an encore presentation of Rossini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $12.50; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. ELKS GAME FUNDRAISER: The Bend Elks play the Kitsap Blue Jackets; donations benefit Serendipity West Foundation; $5 or $7.50, donations accepted for children’s tickets; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue, Bend; 541-312-9259. FULL DRAW FILM TOUR: A showcase of outdoor independent filmmakers and their archery short films; $13.50, $11 children; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. YOGOMAN BURNING BAND: The Bellingham, Wash.-based reggae band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “SOCIAL SECURITY�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org.

THURSDAY TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-6 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, off of U.S. Highway 20 and Cook Avenue; 541-728-0088, earthsart@gmail.com or http:// tumalogardenmarket.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Craig Johnson reads from his book “As the Crow Flies�; free; 4 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. BENEFIT GALA: Featuring a silent auction, refreshments and music by the Moon Mountain Ramblers; proceeds benefit Full

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin file photo

Steven Halcomb of the Bend Elks knocks Klamath Falls Gems catcher Bo Cornish off balance in the bottom of the third inning during the Elks’ season opener on June 8. The Elks will play the Kitsap Blue Jackets on Wednesday in a fundraising game for the Serendipity West Foundation. Access; $30, $50 per couple; 6-9 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery Mountain Room, 901 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend; www.fullaccess.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Craig Johnson reads from his book “As the Crow Flies�; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. ANDY FRASCO & THE U.N.: The blues act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com. “PARENTS NIGHT OUT�: A screening of the presentation by Harvey Karp about raising happy children; $12.50; 7:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347 or www. fathomevents.com. “SOCIAL SECURITY�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www .innovationtw.org. DIRTY FILTHY MUGS: The Los Angeles-based punk band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541728-0879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; www .lastbandstanding.net.

FRIDAY “PERVASIVE INVASIVES — ANIMALS� EXHIBIT OPENS: Explore animals and the affect they have on the High Desert; exhibit runs through Jan. 6; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. 4 PEAKS MUSIC FESTIVAL: Camping music festival features performances by Poor Man’s Whiskey, Melvin Seals and JGB, The Mother Hips and more; $70 in advance, $80 at the gate, free ages 9 and younger; 1:30-9:45 p.m.; Rockin’ A Ranch, 19449 Tumalo Reservoir Road, Tumalo; www.4peaksmusic.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@ gmail.com or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street; www .sistersfarmersmarket.com. SPLASH, PEDAL AND DASH: A triathlon for kids ages 12 and younger; registration required; proceeds benefit the Three Rivers Care for Kids Foundation; $25; 4 p.m., 1- 3 p.m. registration; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center, 57250 Overlook Road; 541-408-7567 or www.racecenter .com/pacificcrest/kids. VFW DINNER: A dinner of chickenfried steak; $7; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. BENEFIT EVENT: See white buffalo

and hear storytelling; with live music and a barbecue; $25 in advance, $30 at the door; 6:30-10 p.m.; Silver Horse Ranch, 63950 Tyler Road, Bend; 541-408-4080 or www .silverhorseranch.com. “THE TOY SHOP AT MIDNIGHT�: Terpsichorean Dance Studio presents a dance performance about toys who come to life at night; proceeds benefit the studio’s scholarship fund; $9 in advance, $10 at the door; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-389-5351 or www .terpsichoreanbendoregon.com. CROOKED RIVER ROUNDUP: Annual PRCA rodeo; $14-$16, $10 ages 511, free ages 4 and younger; 7 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-4479 or www.crookedriverroundup.com. “SOCIAL SECURITY�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www .innovationtw.org. “OLEANNA�: Thoroughly Modern Productions presents the story of a college professor’s heated conversation with his student; $15 in advance, $18 at the door; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com.

SATURDAY YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Bend Genealogical Society; free; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541317-9553 or www.orgenweb .org/deschutes/bend-gs. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643 or prinevillefarmersmarket@gmail.com. COUNTRY QUILT SHOW: Featuring quilts for sale, awards, raffle and more; $2, free ages 11 and younger; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Crooked River Elementary School, 640-641 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-447-8048. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Free admission; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541489-3239 or madrassatmkt@gmail .com. 4 PEAKS MUSIC FESTIVAL: Camping music festival features performances by Poor Man’s Whiskey, Melvin Seals and JGB, The Mother Hips and more; $70 in advance, $80 at the gate, free ages 9 and younger; 10 a.m.-9:45 p.m.; Rockin’ A Ranch, 19449 Tumalo Reservoir Road, Tumalo; www.4peaksmusic.com. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www .centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. BITE OF BEND: Food festival includes local food booths offering bites of their creations, a beer garden, wine, a Top Chef competition, a children’s area and live music; proceeds benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon; free admission; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-323-

0964 or www.thebiteofbend.com. PROSPECTING AND PANNING: Pan for gold at a re-created placer mine; $2; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. SCLERODERMA AWARENESS WALK: Walk to benefit the Scleroderma Angel Foundation and the Scleroderma Research Foundation; $20 in advance, $25 day of walk, free ages 13 and younger; 11 a.m., 10:30 a.m. registration; American Legion Community Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-480-1958 or mzann@ bendbroadband.com. “OLEANNA�: Thoroughly Modern Productions presents the story of a college professor’s heated conversation with his student; $15 in advance, $18 at the door; 3 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Craig Johnson talks about his book “As The Crow Flies�; RSVP requested; free; 5:30 p.m.; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center, 57250 Overlook Road, Sunriver; 541-593-2525 or www .sunriverbooks.com. “PETER AND THE WOLF�: The Academie de Ballet Classique presents a ballet about a young boy and his animal friends; $15-$25, $8 children, free ages 5 and younger; 6:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Kim Meeder and Shelley Houston present their books, “Fierce Beauty� and “Julia, Coming Home�; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “THE TOY SHOP AT MIDNIGHT�: Terpsichorean Dance Studio presents a dance performance about toys who come to life at night; proceeds benefit the studio’s scholarship fund; $9 in advance, $10 at the door; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-389-5351 or www .terpsichoreanbendoregon.com. CROOKED RIVER ROUNDUP: Annual PRCA rodeo; $14-$16, $10 ages 511, free ages 4 and younger; 7 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-4479 or www.crookedriverroundup.com. WORDS ON TAP: Author and Richmond Fontaine frontman Willy Vlautin presents an evening of stories and songs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-312-1032 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “SOCIAL SECURITY�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www .innovationtw.org. “OLEANNA�: Thoroughly Modern Productions presents the story of a college professor’s heated conversation with his student; $15 in advance, $18 at the door; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com.


B4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

B5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


B6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

McDowell

Joining NOW

If you go

Continued from B1 McDowell grew up in Southern California’s San Gabriel Valley and went to University of California-Santa Cruz. However, before heading off to college, McDowell worked his first paid writing job. “My first job was as a reporter for the weekly Monterey Park Progress,” he says. “I worked for an editor named Johnny Edwards, who was the fastest man on a typewriter I ever saw. He was like out of a Hollywood picture. He was always smoking, so he always had a cigarette hanging out of the side of his mouth … he never dropped it.” Edwards “took a real liking to me, and assigned me feature stories to do, which was unheard of, as young as I was,” McDowell says. “I would turn these in and then he would just … tear them to pieces. I would walk out of the office furious, vowing to quit. Then I would cool down and revise and, you know, I learned how to write, and I learned how to write to deadline.”

‘Gifted, funny writer’ Mark Jarman, McDowell’s friend of more than 40 years, speaks frankly of the freshman he befriended in a creative writing class his sophomore year at UC-Santa Cruz. “His early writing, when he was a freshman in college, was not very promising,” says Jarman, professor of English at Vanderbilt University in Nashville and head of the creative writing program there. “But something happened to it his sophomore year,” he adds. “It just flourished. He became a wonderfully gifted, funny writer of surreal poems.” McDowell credits his to growth to one of his writing mentors — the late, great short story author and poet Raymond Carver, who beginning in 1971 taught for three years at the university as a visiting lecturer, according to UC-Santa Cruz’s website. “Ray was my first writing teacher in college, and we became pretty good buddies,” says McDowell. “He was a wonderful, wonderful man, and also a very good teacher. Very understated … very low key, but he got to you.” McDowell completed his undergraduate studies in three years, then headed to New York, where, in 1976, he earned his master of fine arts in poetry from Columbia University. “After that, it was an odyssey,” McDowell says. He moved back to Santa Cruz, then Southern California, doing odd jobs, “mainly painting houses.” He landed his first teaching job in the English department of a community college in the Antelope Valley of California. A year or so later, he moved to southern Indiana, where he taught at University of Southern Indiana in Evansville. He would live there for almost

Racing Continued from B1 Smith’s roots in Prineville are almost as deep as those of the town itself. His ranching grandparents moved to Central Oregon about 1900 and their descendents throughout the community now span nearly five generations. Two of Smith’s great uncles were founding members of the rodeo association in 1946, and his dad, Art, joined the board in 1956 and served until 1981. Smith was elected to the board at age 19 in 1977, he said, and has served on it continuously for 36 years. Most of the horses racing will be quarter horses or thoroughbreds, Smith explained, but the style of their races is very different. Quarter horses are the dragsters of the horse racing world; the distances are short — usually measured in yards — and it’s all about speed. “A (quarter horse) race is over in about 11 seconds and a hundredth of a second can determine first place,” said Smith, explaining why electronic timing devices and high-speed cameras may be required in any horse race to certify the winner. If quarter horses are the dragsters, the thoroughbreds are the “indie cars.” They usually run longer distances measured in furlongs — each furlong is one-eighth of a mile — and the jockey’s strategy and riding becomes much more important to winning a race, he continued.

What: BOOKPLATE Auction and Reception When: 5:30 p.m. June 28 Where: Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, No. 120, Bend Cost: $35 per person Contact: www.thenatureof words.org Robert McDowell

six years. Then, in his mid-thirties, “I left there and went to Europe, to Wales and Ireland for several months — just to bum around, really, (and) write.”

Founding a journal, press

Line Press, which is still active. Many Story Line titles written or edited by McDowell are available through the website www.storylinepress.net. After 2006, McDowell took an opportunity to teach English for a year at North Medford High School. “I love teaching. I teach a lot of independent workshops, but … that was a blast,” he says.

Upon his return, he taught creative writing for a year back at UC-Santa Cruz. “That’s about the point where my wife and I and Mark Jarman … started Story Line Press,” a nonprofit publisher of poetry and other books. McDowell served as its director and editor for 22 years. McDowell “has an almost visionary sense of the possible, which is what is going to make him very effective, I think, in this new job,” Jarman says. “He is just absolutely certain when he sees something that can be done, that it can be done. I’m a more skeptical, risk-averse person, but he’s not, and together, that made us a pretty good team.” In addition to cofounding a book press, in 1980, Jarman and McDowell founded The Reaper, a poetry magazine dedicated to two poetry movements: “new formalism,” with a focus on meter and rhyme and traditional forms including sonnets and sestinas, and “new narrative,” dedicated to storytelling in poetry. In 1989, the same year The Reaper ceased publication, McDowell and his family moved to tiny Brownsville, 30 miles north of Eugene. In 1998, they moved to Ashland. “We were ready for a change. We’d always liked Ashland; we’d always liked Southern Oregon more than the area we’d been living in,” he explains. Today, McDowell is divorced with two adult sons, ages 25 and 20, and a 15-year-old daughter who lives in Ashland with her mother. About his kids’ five-year differences in ages, “I always tell people ‘The fact is, five years is exactly as long as it takes for you to forget exactly what it’s like,’” he says, chuckling. In 2006, McDowell “stepped away” from Story Line Press to focus on his own writing projects. “I had done everything I could do. I’d overseen and published 250 books during that time … created various community outreach programs, had done the bulk of the fundraising. I was interested in writing a couple of books I wanted to write, and so I wanted to take the time to do that.” West Chester University in Pennsylvania took over Story

As someone associated with the new narrative movement, and as executive director of NOW, “The whole concept of storytelling is extremely important to me,” he says. Storytelling “keeps alive the stories of the tribe. In that sense, it’s like a community calling; it’s also a community builder. If you’re telling stories, you’re building community. If you’re just off by yourself reciting a meditative poem to a tree, you might be entertaining the tree; it’s debatable. It’s different when you’re in a group and you’re sharing a story.” Such beliefs, he says, have evolved into his spiritual practice. “I suppose at this point I’d describe myself a lapsed Catholic-Buddhist practitioner. I’ve been studying Tibetan Buddhism for seven years, and have a pretty active meditation practice,” he says. He’s unsure whether meditation helps in his poetry writing, but it has helped him to write a couple of his books, he says — “Poetry as Spiritual Practice: Reading, Writing, and Using Poetry in Your Daily Rituals, Aspirations, and Intentions” (2008, Free Press) and “The More We Get Together: The Sexual & Spiritual Language of Love” (2011, Poiêsis Press). He explains that the latter title was “a publisher’s moment,” meaning it was his publisher’s idea to remove “poetry” from its name. “Despite the lurid title, it’s a sequel to ‘Poetry as Spiritual Practice,’” he says. In all, McDowell has written 12 books. His 13th, the poetry collection “The World Next to This One,” is due from Salmon Poetry, an Irish press, in spring 2013. Along with practicing meditation, McDowell describes himself as history buff who’s read a lot of mythology. Some other interests include yoga, horses, gardening, astrology, alchemy, Celtic lore, spirituality, landscapes, rivers and quiet waters, singing, piano, baseball and basketball.

The longest thoroughbred race in Prineville is one-and-aneighth miles long. Horse racing in Oregon only takes place on tracks in Prineville, Union, Burns, Grants Pass, Tillamook and Portland, Smith said, and the state-sanctioned contests — and parimutuel betting associated with them — are conducted under the watchful eye of the Oregon Racing Commission. “Grooms, trainers, owners, jockeys and exercise riders all have to have a license to do their job in Oregon,” said Smith, adding that each race is attended by a state-employed investigator, a licensing agent and two stewards. “The steward is like the traffic cop for the race track,” Smith explained, “but they not only have the authority to catch (racing regulation) violators, they also hold the hearings (on the violations) and impose the sentences.” Smith has served as a racing steward in Union and Burns. “We work very hard to at both rider and horse safety,” said Smith, and today anyone on a mount at any Oregon race track must wear a “flak jacket” to protect their torso, and a certified helmet. Horse safety begins with the state veterinarian who is also present at every race. If a horse shows any sign of an injury, it is placed on the “vet’s list” and cannot compete until the vet observes the horse in a workout and certifies the animal as sound.

Track condition is also critical to keep horses and riders safe, Smith continued. The soil must not be too hard or too soft. A track that is too soft may hurt the horses’ soft tissue — its ligaments — and a track that is too hard may injure its bones due to the stress from the impact of its hooves. And the track must be even below its lighter top layer of soil so the horse’s hoof it won’t cant to one side or the other when it’s running at full stride. Smith said he personally inspects the Crook County track every night before the races to make sure its surface is smooth, it has “a little fluff” on top and a level, firm, but not hard bottom. If speed and strategy are the two keys to winning horse races, most spectators’ biggest thrill is trying to predict those winners in the form of pari-mutuel bets. In pari-mutuel betting, the sponsoring organization is paid a percentage of the total amount wagered — the handle — but has no financial interest in any particular horse. After the “house” is paid — in this case the CRRA and the state — the residual betting pool is divided amongst the successful bettors, typically those who predicted a particular horse would come in first, second or third (win, place or show), and sometimes, even in which order. “I like to see to see money staying in everybody’s pocket … rather than see a long shot come in,” Smith said. “For some reason, the guys that win big

Storytelling and community

McDowell learned of The Nature of Words position through a month-old Craigslist ad on the Rogue Valley page, he says. “I thought, ‘This has got to be some mistake.’” Yet it was so well-suited to his experience and interests that when he later showed the ad to his ex-wife over coffee, she asked him, “Are you writing your own job description?” “It felt very fated,” he says. “I thought, ‘Eh, what the heck. I think I’ll just send my résumé.” An hour after he had, he heard from Express Professionals, the Bend company that headed the search for NOW’s new director. In the end, McDowell bested almost 70 other candidates. Living and working in Ashland, McDowell had been aware of The Nature of Words and Waterston’s work on its behalf, he says. “It’s been great to watch it grow,” he says. “She’s a wonderful writer and tremendous teacher. Her following — you talk to people who take her workshops or worked with her in the past, and you get a sense of how special she is. “At the same time, she has exercised a large social conscience by giving back so much to her community, which is what The Nature of Words is: It can certainly be looked at as her gift to Central Oregon.” Rather than being sad about leaving, Waterston says she’s “seeing with some delight this organization that I birthed is taking the appropriate next step now” in bringing aboard McDowell. “I think this transition has been very, very smooth,” she adds. “It’s been an enormous pleasure to blow on the pilot light of this idea, watch the community respond in the way it has, watch this organization grow to the point that it can be handed off to somebody of Robert’s caliber, with the promise of a robust future.” Just a month after taking his new office, McDowell is talking about goals he has, including getting more writers into more area schools. “I can’t emphasize enough how important organizations like NOW are in communities like this all over the country … NOW fills a gap that has been created” with the reduction of school days and budgets, he says. He also has ambitions to bring more writers to Bend, and creating an annual writerin-residence position at NOW. Longtime friend and colleague Jarman says of McDowell, “I think he’s going to do a great job. This is what he has learned, (what) he has taught himself to do. He has become a terrific development person, organizational person, fundraiser. He’s done this very effectively wherever he’s been or been given a chance to do it. “He’s all about the arts, especially the literary arts, and so I think he’ll do a great job.” — Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com

If you go What: Crooked River Roundup Horse Races When: Thursday through Saturday July 11-14; doors open 6 p.m., races begin 7:15 p.m. Where: Crook County Fairgrounds Cost: Admission is $5 (programs are free); free for women July 11 (programs are $1) Contact: www.crooked riverroundup.com, 541447-4479

want (to leave the track) and go to Cinnebar’s (in downtown Prineville) for a drink!” When asked about his own betting, Smith was clear and to the point: “I don’t gamble,” he said. But he’s full of praise for his 15 fellow CRRA board members and the estimated 120 volunteers it takes to put on the rodeo and races each year: “They do it because of their love of the event and their love of the community. This is our time to celebrate our heritage.” Smith said the highlight of the meet will be the seventh race on Saturday night: “We’re going to have the best horses we’ve ever had … the fastest quarter horses in Oregon … and it will only take 11 seconds to decide who splits the $18,000 purse.” — Reporter: tom.olsen71 @gmail.com

P C GENERAL PET LOSS GROUP: Drop-in support group for anyone experiencing or anticipating the loss of a pet; free; 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays; Partners in Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; Sharon Myers at 541-382-5882.

DOGS BEHAVIORAL TRAINING: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; Lin’s School for Dogs, 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-536-1418 or www. linsschoolfordogs.com. AKC RING-READY COACHING: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; Lin’s School for Dogs, 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-536-1418 or www .linsschoolfordogs.com. PUPPY 101: Puppies ages 8 to 13 weeks may join any week; $85; 6-7 p.m. Thursdays; Dancin’ Woofs, 63027 N.E. Lower Meadow Drive, Suite D, Bend; Mare Shey at 541-312-3766 or www. dancinwoofs.com. PUPPY KINDERGARTEN CLASSES: Ongoing training, behavior and socialization classes for puppies 10 to 16 weeks; $80 for four weeks; 6:15-7:30 p.m. Thursdays; Pawsitive Experience, 65111 High Ridge Drive, Tumalo; Meredith Gage at 541-318-8459, trainingdogs123@bendbroadband. com or www .pawsitiveexperience.com. OBEDIENCE CLASSES: Six-week, drop-in classes; $99.95; 5 and 6 p.m. Mondays, 6 p.m. Fridays, and 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturdays; Petco, 3197 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; Loel Jensen at 541-382-0510. OBEDIENCE FOR AGILITY: Six weeks; $120; 4 p.m. Saturdays; Desert Sage Agility, 24035 Dodds Road, Bend; Stephanie Morris at 541-633-6774 or www .desertsageagility.com. PUPPY MANNERS CLASS: Social skills for puppies up to 6 months; $110 for seven-week class, cost includes materials; 6-7 p.m. Mondays; preregister; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling, 541-350-2869 or www .friendsforlifedogtraining. com. PRIVATE TRAINING: For aggression and other serious behavior problems and one-onone training; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling, 541-350-2869 or www .friendsforlifedogtraining. com. PRIVATE BEHAVIORAL COUNSELING: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Dancin’ Woofs, 63027 Lower Meadow Drive, Suite D, Bend; Mare Shey at 541-312-3766 or www. dancinwoofs.com. PRIVATE TRAINING: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Chris Waggoner, 541-633-0446; www.DeschutesRiverDogs.com. MUTTS ABOUT YOU: Positive methods for basic training, all age groups; $115 for five weeks; class size limited; call for class hours; The Dog Patch Boutique, info@ thedogpatchboutiqueinc.com or 541-678-5640. SOLVE CHALLENGING BEHAVIOR: S.A.N.E. Solutions for challenging dog behavior, private lessons; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Kathy Cascade, 541-516-8978 or kathy@ sanedogtraining.com. TELLINGTON TTOUCH: Learn tools to reduce stress and reactivity, help your dog become more confident and improve social skills; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Kathy Cascade, 541-516-8978 or kathy@ sanedogtraining.com.

FIX LEASH AGGRESSION: Cost by quotation, times by appointment; Dogs Ltd & Training, 59860 Cheyenne Road, Bend; Linda West at 541-318-6396 or www. dogsltdtraining.com. A BETTER-BEHAVED DOG: Individual marker training with positive reinforcement; cost by quotation, times by appointment; Anne Geser at 541-923-5665. BOARD AND TRAIN: Minimum of one week boarding; cost by quotation, times by appointment; La Pine Training Center, Diann Hecht, 541-536-2458 or diannshappytails@msn.com or http://diannshappytails.com. PRIVATE TRAINING: For owners and their dogs with special behavior or scheduling needs; cost by quotation, times by appointment; La Pine Training Center, Diann Hecht, 541-536-2458 or diannshappytails@msn.com or http://diannshappytails.com. DAY SCHOOL FOR DOGS: Training basics for companion dogs, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. four days a week for three weeks; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Dogs Ltd & Training; 59860 Cheyenne Road, Bend; Linda West, 541-318-6396 or www.dogsltdtraining.com. K9 NOSE WORK: Drop in class for advanced students; $15 per session; 6 p.m. Fridays; preregister; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling at 541-350-2869, Pam Bigoni at 541-306-9882 or www. friendsforlifedogtraining.com. K9 NOSE WORK AND INTRODUCTION TO ODOR: Introduction to the dog sport of nose work; $90 for six weeks; 4 p.m. Fridays, starts June 22; preregister; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling at 541-350-2869, Pam Bigoni at 541-306-9882 or www. friendsforlifedogtraining.com. RATTLESNAKE AVERSION TRAINING CLINIC FOR DOGS: Dogs learn to avoid the sights, sounds and smells of rattlesnakes, dogs should be at least six months old; clinic held by Natural Solutions; $75 per dog; June 24; preregister; contact Alisha at 5414-382-0741 or edatrotter@ gmail.com or visit www. RattlesnakeAversion.com.

HORSES ROLLING RANCH IN SISTERS: Open for trail-course practice and shows; $10 per horse; 69516 Hinkle Butte Drive, Sisters; Shari at 541-549-6962. WYLENE WILSON HORESEMANSHIP: Clinics and lessons in horsemanship; cost per class $75-$200, auditing is $25 per day; June 22-28; preregister; Silver Horse Ranch, 63950 Tyler Road, Bend; to register or for more information call Sarah at 541-4084080 or www.silverhorseranch. com. JOE LYNEIS TRAIL CLINIC: Covers approach, execution and departure of trail obstacles; $225; June 29-July 1; preregister; Sky Hawk Ranch, 6287 N.E. 33rd St., Redmond; 541-639-7030, madison@skyhawkranch.biz. BUCK BRANNAMAN CLINIC: Horsemanship 1 and 2; $25 per day for spectators, clinic is sold out; 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. June 29July 2; Rafter J Ranch, off the Old Bend Redmond Highway, call for directions; 541-420-2677. DANICA YATES DRESSAGE CLINIC: $90 per rider; June 30July 1; preregister; Stonepony Dressage, 5553 SW Quarry Ave., Redmond; Nancy Stearns, 541-923-6349, stonepony@ webformixair.com or www. danicayates.com. FUN NIGHTS ON THE TRAIL COURSE: $15; every other Tuesday, starts July 3; preregister; Sky Hawk Ranch, 6287 N.E. 33rd St., Redmond; 541-639-7030, madison@skyhawkranch.biz.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com 65th Annual Blow-out Celebration

ROCKHOUND SHOW & POW WOW JEWELRY, GEM & MINERAL SHOW June 21-24 • Crook County Fairgrounds • Prineville, OR 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday-Saturday • 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday ✦ FREE admission ✦ Public welcome ✦ Dealer booths - Inside & out - Vendors from all over the world ✦ Field trips ✦ Showcase displays & auction - Open to the public ✦ Potluck dinner at 6:30 p.m. on set-up day ✦ Excellent selection of materials ✦ Obsidian * Jade * Petrified Wood * Jasper * Plume Agate Limb Casts * Moss Agate * Thunder Eggs * Crystals Precious Gems * A wide variety of Faceting Rough & Lots More

For More Information Prineville Rockhound Pow Wow Rock & Gem Show Contact 541-447-5298 or Richknightr@gmail.com www.prinevillerockhoundpowwow.com


LOCALNEWS

Reader photo, C2 Editorials, C4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

LOCAL BRIEFING La Pine firehouse to host fundraiser The La Pine Fire District will host a fundraiser for children with muscular dystrophy June 30. The 2012 Fill the Boot campaign event will take place from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in front of Fire Station 101 on the corner of First Street and Huntington Road in La Pine. Local firefighters will be at the event dressed in fire gear and collecting money for the cause. Last year, the fire district raised $6,950 in the Fill the Boot campaign.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

Plane usage of Waldo to be monitored By Dylan J. Darling The Bulletin

State aviation officials want to know how many floatplanes are using Waldo Lake before it decides whether to permanently restrict or ban them from the lake. The Oregon State Aviation Board set temporary rules for floatplanes at Waldo Lake, which is about a two-hour drive southwest of Bend, earlier this month. The rules come after the Oregon State

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO ...

Marine Board upheld the 2010 ban on gas motor boats in April but lifted the ban on floatplanes, passing the airborne gas motor issue to the aviation board. It was unclear throughout the floatplane debate how many actually used the lake prior to the ban, said Mitch Swecker, director of the Oregon Department of Aviation. “What we really want to do is check usage,” he said.

To do so, the aviation board is requiring pilots who plan to land at the lake to file flight plans for the next six months, covering the peak flying seasons of summer and fall. Opponents of allowing floatplanes on the lake — the second deepest in the state behind Crater Lake — say the aircraft shatter the serenity of Waldo Lake while posing a fuel-spill risk to its waters. See Waldo Lake / C2

Following up on Central Oregon’s most interesting stories, even if they’ve been out of the headlines for a while. Email ideas to news@bendbulletin.com. To follow the series, visit www.bendbulletin.com/updates.

— Bulletin staff report

News of Record, C2

STATE NEWS • Portland • Salem

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Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

SOCIAL GAMING ORDINANCE

La Pine’s gamble paying off

Medford •

Waldo Lake Crane Prairie Reservoir Wickiup Reservoir

La Pine

58 Odell Lake

46 Cascade Lakes Highway

97

Crescent

Crescent Lake

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

SISTERS

City OKs budget featuring ‘optimistic’ revenue By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

• Salem: Supreme Court ruling will not stop state health overhaul. • Portland: 25 percent loss in staff follows shake-up at zoo. • Medford: Police struggle with repeat offender. Stories on C3

Have a story idea or submission? Contact us!

The Bulletin Call a reporter: Bend ................541-633-2160 Redmond ........ 541-617-7837 Sisters............. 541-617-7837 La Pine ........... 541-383-0348 Sunriver ......... 541-383-0348 Deschutes ...... 541-617-7829 Crook ............. 541-504-2336 Jefferson ....... 541-504-2336 Salem ..............541-554-1162 D.C. .................202-662-7456 Business ........ 541-383-0360 Education .......541-633-2161 Public lands .....541-617-7812 Public safety.....541-383-0387 Projects .......... 541-617-7831

Submissions: • Civic Calendar notices: Email event information to news@bendbulletin.com, with “Civic Calendar” in the subject, and include a contact name and phone number. Contact: 541-383-0354

• School news and notes: Email news items and notices of general interest to pcliff@bendbulletin.com. Email announcements of teens’ academic achievements to youth@bendbulletin.com. Email college notes, military graduations and reunion info to bulletin@bendbulletin.com. Details: School coverage runs Wednesday in this section. Contact: 541-383-0358

• Births, engagements, marriages, partnerships, anniversaries: Details: The Milestones page publishes Sunday in Community Life. Contact: 541-383-0358

Corrections In a story headlined “Business owner, retired Intel manager announce bids for Redmond council,” which appeared Saturday, June 16, on Page C1, Ed Petersen’s 3-year-old daughter and 1-year-old son were misidentified. The story also misstated the founding date of Petersen’s marketing company. The company was founded in 2008. The Bulletin regrets the errors.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin file photo

Tom Tirril sits at a gaming table in his business, the La Pine Bowling Center, in October 2011. At the time, Tirril said he had hired two new employees as a result of an approving vote for social gaming.

• Legalized small-stakes games draw customers to city’s watering holes By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

S

even months after La Pine’s first-ever social gaming ordinance legalized betting on cards, bars that host regular poker games say their business is looking up. Last year, the owner of the La Pine Bowling Center learned the poker games he’d hosted in the bowling alley bar for years could get him in trouble. Though Tom Tirril had never taken a cut — the money bet by the players was paid back out to the players, and the cans of food he required for a seat at the table were donated to the La Pine Community Kitchen — because the city didn’t have a social gaming ordinance and his bar didn’t have a social gaming license, the games were illegal. All social gambling in Oregon is regulated by the Oregon State Police. Tirril and another bar owner appealed to the La Pine City Council for a change in the law, and beginning Nov. 12, establishments that

“There has been a benefit and it has allowed an opportunity for some job creation, from full-time to part-time, and it’s been a boon for these several entities that put it in place.” — Ken Mulenex, mayor, La Pine

paid a one-time $100 licensing fee were cleared to host card games. Shortly after the law went into effect, 48 players turned out for a game at the bowling alley, Tirril said — an all-time record. Business has trailed off a bit since, he said, but added the card games have always been more popular in the winter when entertainment options are limited in La Pine. Under the state’s social gaming rules, no one but players in the game can receive any of the money wagered. Players typically buy into

Crook schools OK 2012-13 budget By Ben Botkin The Bulletin

PRINEVILLE — The Crook County School Board on Monday unanimously approved a $40.8 million budget for the 2012-13 school year. The budget will help the district avoid layoffs and cuts to school days. Still, district officials have said that in the long term, the school district faces tough challenges. That’s because the district is bridging a $1.7 million gap between revenues and ongoing expenses by using the ending fund balance from the current fiscal year. The new fiscal year for the district’s budget starts July 1. See Crook / C2

a game with $20 or so, and depending on the rules, the pot is awarded to one player or multiple players. If an establishment chooses to use an employee as a dedicated dealer, the dealer can receive no tips or compensation from the money players bet. “Nobody can make a living off of social gaming, is what it comes down to,” Tirril said. Tirril said for him, poker is a way of attracting customers in to buy food and drinks, something the bowling alley has occasionally struggled with through the recession. De Martin with the Homestead Tavern said its Sunday and Wednesday night games have drawn a sizable crowd of new customers. “It’s brought out people that normally wouldn’t even come to a tavern, but they will come out to play cards,” he said. Beyond the bowling alley and the Homestead Tavern, the Moose Lodge and the La Pine Inn are both using the new law to host poker games. See Social gaming / C2

SISTERS — Despite coming up short on this year’s property tax collections, the city of Sisters balanced its books thanks to construction and planning fees. That means new homes are being built in Sisters, and the city hopes that trend continues into the 2012-13 fiscal year. The Sisters City Council unanimously approved an $8.98 million city budget for fiscal year 2012-13 last week. The new budget includes a bump in expected development incomes as a result of recent construction. “We did the budget assuming that, based on what we saw on the numbers, (development fees) will go up,” City Manager Eileen Stein said. “We are being optimistic.” But a few new homes are going up in the area. Stein said development around the high school and near the Five Pines Lodge has been more active in the past year. City collections support that estimate. Building inspections fees, expected to bring $29,000 in revenue to Sisters in 2011-12, came in closer to $70,000. Planning fees, expected at $30,000, are currently at $44,000. For the coming year, the city estimates that revenues will increase by as much as 40 percent. “More construction is what we are seeing,” Stein said. “The planning fees show more land-use activity. We are seeing a little bit of growth in Sisters and I am pleased by that, we just don’t know yet if it’s a trend or a blip.” The additional income helped bridge a property tax shortfall of around $20,000. The city planned to collect $733,000 in property taxes by the end of June. Lisa Young, director of finance for the city, said by the end of this fiscal year, that number is likely to be closer to $712,000. See Sisters / C2

LOCALS RALLY BEHIND IMMIGRATION PROPOSAL Causa Oregon Latino Community Coordinator Greg Delgado talks about President Barack Obama’s immigration reform proposal to a group of people at Drake Park in Bend on Monday. “Local young Latinos can now dare to dream,” he said. “This will be exciting for the kids to be a part of the community and not be scared.” Pete Erickson The Bulletin


C2

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

Crook Continued from C1 The district cannot rely on the ending fund balance indefinitely, because it will run out in about three years, Superintendent Duane Yecha wrote in his memo to the budget committee. The Oregon School Boards Association recommends districts maintain a minimum ending fund balance of between 5 and 8 percent. The school district has rising costs tied to utilities, bus fuel and the state’s pension program for public employees. It’s not all about holding the line, though. For example, the new budget also reflects a $234,000 state grant that will give students hands-on training and job skills in manufacturing and engineering. The grant — tied to the state’s 21st Century Job Education program — required a $140,000 match from the district.

Waldo Lake

Well shot! READER PHOTOS

Continued from C1 The Columbia Seaplane Pilots Association, which has a pending lawsuit about the state’s handling of floatplanes on the lake, has estimated that about 30 planes landed at Waldo Lake per year before the motor ban. It takes a floatplane about a minute to take off, Swecker said. “If it’s 60 seconds, 30 times that is not a whole heck of a lot of noise for a whole year.� Depending how many planes the state determines use the lake, the aviation board will decide whether to establish restrictions, Swecker said. Along with the flight-plan requirement, the aviation board over the next six months will test rules to minimize the effect floatplanes have on Waldo Lake. The aviation board is limiting floatplanes to daytime landings on the east side of the lake, as well as prohibiting prolonged motor use. Before making such rules permanent, Swecker said the aviation board would hold public meetings. The public was left out of the temporary rule-making, said Doug Heiken, conservation and restoration coordinator for Oregon Wild. The statewide environmental group supports a ban on all gas motors on Waldo Lake. He said he is disappointed with the aviation board. “Essentially they have turned a scenic waterway and one of the purest lakes in the world into a parking lot for floatplanes,� Heiken said. “That is just not an appropriate use for that lake.�

Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication. Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

Considering a bond In other business, the school board heard a presentation from its facilities committee about the possibility of going out for a bond. The board hasn’t yet decided whether to go for a bond or how much money is needed. That would depend on whether the district sought only money for repairs or tried to secure money for a new school. For its next step, the district will hold a meeting on July 9 to present a report with options to the public.

SUMMER OUTFITS Mike Gallagher, of Redmond, snapped this photo during the Alpaca Shearing Festival on Saturday at Crescent Moon Ranch in Terrebonne, using a Nikon D5000 at 1/250 speed with a Nikkor 55-200mm lens. “(The festival is) a fascination for both old and young,� wrote Gallagher.

— Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Prineville Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief with estimated damage of $2,000 was reported at 9:22 a.m. June 15, in the area of Southeast Lynn Boulevard. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 11:51 a.m. June 15, in the area of Northeast Third Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:54 p.m. June 15, in the area of Southeast Lynn Boulevard. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 4:06 p.m. June 15, in the area of Northeast Court Street. Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

Unauthorized use — An all-terrain vehicle was reported stolen at 9 a.m. June 11, in the 5700 block of Southwest Elbe in Culver. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported June 12, in the area of Willow Creek Corral near Ashwood. Burglary — A burglary was reported June 13, in the 6300 block of Southwest Rim Road in Crooked River Ranch. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:26 p.m. June 13, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and Northeast Fern Lane in Madras. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made June 14, in the 500 block of East Center Ridge Drive in Culver. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 3 p.m. June 15, in the 1500 block of Northeast Vine Street in Madras. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported June 16, in the area of Jordan Road in Culver. Theft — A theft was reported June 17, in the area of Forest Road 800 near Camp Sherman. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:08 p.m. June 15, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 near Cascade Estates Drive.

Press logs from the Bend Police and other Deschutes County police departments are currently unavailable, due to a system update.

Sisters Continued from C1 Property tax collections in 2012-13 are set for $744,500. The city’s general fund expects to spend $960,745 worth of contingency

funds, but will avoid dipping into a $500,000 “rainy day� reserve fund. Stein said keeping the reserve intact shows the city is in a strong financial position. “The city has been blessed to have the reserves that it has,� she said, “and the budget

committee and City Council have chosen again not to dip into that reserve.� To protect that reserve, the city has made a few cuts. Employees will now be required to pay 10 percent of their medical premiums, and cost of living raises have been re-

moved. However, a 3 percent performance-based raise remains in effect, and the city only reduced full-time employment numbers by one-fourth of a position. — Reporter: 541-617-7837, ehidle@bendbulletin.com

— Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

“They have turned a scenic waterway and one of the purest lakes in the world into a parking lot.� Doug Heiken, conservation and restoration coordinator, Oregon Wild

P  O    For The Bulletin’s full list, including federal, state, county and city levels, visit www.bendbulletin.com/officials.

CONGRESS U.S. Senate

Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore.: 107 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-3753 Web: http://merkley.senate.gov Bend office: 131 N.W. Hawthorne Ave., Suite 208 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-318-1298 Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. 223 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-5244 Web: http://wyden.senate.gov Bend office: 131 N.W. Hawthorne Ave., Suite 107 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-330-9142 U.S. House of Representatives

Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River 2182 Rayburn House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: 202-225-6730 Web: http://walden.house.gov/ Bend office: 1051 N.W. Bond St., Suite 400 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-389-4408 Fax: 541-389-4452

STATE OF OREGON Gov. John Kitzhaber, Democrat 160 State Capitol, 900 Court St. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4582 Fax: 503-378-6872 Web: http://governor.oregon. gov Secretary of State Kate Brown, Democrat 136 State Capitol Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1616 Fax: 503-986-1616 Email: oregon.sos@state.or.us Superintendent of Public

Instruction Susan Castillo 255 Capitol Street N.E. Salem, Oregon 97310 Phone: 503-947-5600 Fax: 503-378-5156 Email: superintendent.castillo @state.or.us Web: www.ode.state.or.us

900 Court St. N.E., H-477 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1454 Email: rep.jasonconger@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/conger Rep. John Huffman, R-District 59 (portion of Jefferson) 900 Court St. N.E., H-476 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1459 Email: rep.johnhuffman@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/huffman

Treasurer Ted Wheeler, Democrat 159 Oregon State Capitol 900 Court St. N.E. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4329 Email: oregon.treasurer @state.or.us Web: www.ost.state.or.us

Rep. Mike McLane, R-District 55 (Crook, portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., H-385 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1455 Email: rep.mikemclane@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/mclane

Attorney General John Kroger, Democrat 1162 Court St. N.E. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4400 Fax: 503-378-4017 Web: www.doj.state.or.us

Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-District 53 (portion of Deschutes County) 900 Court St. N.E., H-471 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1453 Email: rep.genewhisnant@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/whisnant

Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian 800 N.E. Oregon St., Suite 1045 Portland, OR 97232 Phone: 971-673-0761 Fax: 971-673-0762 Email: boli.mail@state.or.us Web: www.oregon.gov/boli

DESCHUTES COUNTY 1300 N.W. Wall St. Bend, OR 97701 Web: www.deschutes.org Phone: 541-388-6571 Fax: 541-382-1692

LEGISLATURE Senate

Sen. Ted Ferrioli, R-District 30 (includes Jefferson, portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., S-323 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1950 Email: sen.tedferrioli@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/ferrioli

Sen. Doug Whitsett, R-District 28 (includes Crook, portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., S-303 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1728 Email: sen.dougwhitsett@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/whitsett

Rep. Jason Conger, R-District 54 (portion of Deschutes)

Tammy Baney, R-Bend Phone: 541-388-6567 Email: Tammy_Baney@ co.deschutes.or.us

County Court

Ken Fahlgren Phone: 541-447-6555 Email: ken.fahlgren@co.crook. or.us Seth Crawford Phone: 541-447-6555 Email: seth.crawford@co.crook. or.us

JEFFERSON COUNTY 66 S.E. D St. Madras, OR 97741 Phone: 541-475-2449 Fax: 541-475-4454 Web: www.co.jefferson.or.us County Commission

Mike Ahern, John Hatfield, Wayne Fording Phone: 541-475-2449 Email: commissioner@co. jefferson.or.us

CITY OF BEND 710 N.W. Wall St. Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-388-5505 Web: www.ci.bend.or.us

Social gaming Continued from C1 Mayor Ken Mulenex said the change has been positive for La Pine, boosting business and keeping residents’ entertainment dollars in the local economy. “I’ve actually been to all (the venues), and they fill up the house,� Mulenex said. Mulenex said he heard no concerns about liberalizing gambling before the ordinance was adopted, and has heard no complaints since the law went into effect. While conceding poker players can open themselves up to some financial risks, Mulenex said he’d much rather see the social gaming than Oregon Lottery video games, which he views as much more addictive and damaging. “I’m really pleased that we moved forward on this,� he said. “There has been a benefit and it has allowed an opportunity for some job creation, from full-time to part-time, and it’s been a boon for these several entities that put it in place.� — Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com

Alan Unger, D-Redmond Phone: 541-388-6569 Email: Alan_Unger@co.deschutes. or.us

Sen. Chris Telfer, R-District 27 (includes portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., S-423 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1727 Email: sen.christelfer@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/telfer

House

County Commission

Phone: 541-447-6555 Email: mike.mccabe@co.crook. or.us

Tony DeBone, R-La Pine Phone: 541-388-6568 Email: Tony_DeBone@ co.deschutes.or.us

CROOK COUNTY 300 N.E. Third St. Prineville, OR 97754 Phone: 541-447-6555 Fax: 541-416-3891 Email: administration@co.crook.or.us Web: co.crook.or.us

July 2

Crook County Judge Mike McCabe

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TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

C3

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Threatened bird’s habitat expanded The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has expanded the areas of West Coast beaches considered critical to the survival of the western snowy plover, a threatened shorebird. The critical habitat rule to be published today restores areas cut by the Bush administration and adds a little more as a precaution against rising sea levels forecast with global warming. The expanded area totals 24,500 acres in California, Oregon and Washington. Biologist Jim Watkins says the public will hardly notice the difference, because the restrictions that have the greatest impact on people — temporarily fencing off nesting areas — are not affected by this provision of the Endangered Species Act.

Coos Bay logger struck by log dies COOS BAY — Authorities report a 30-year-old Coos Bay logger died after a log struck him in the chest. The World in Coos Bay reported Monday that the log twisted and broke Friday as machinery lifted it. The Coos County sheriff’s office identified the man as Daniel Garcia-Vences. The logging site is 45 miles northeast of Coquille.

Grants Pass Grange damaged in fire GRANTS PASS — Fire has destroyed much of the Grange hall in Grants Pass, and firefighters say there’s reason to think it was set. The Grants Pass Daily Courier reports the fire at the Rogue River Valley Grange building was reported about 1:30 a.m. Monday. Mike Shaw of the Rural/ Metro Fire Department said in a statement that wind quickly fanned the fire, and it took about 40 minutes to get it under control. The fire department says there were signs that “could lead investigators to think that this fire was intentionally set” but didn’t say what they were.

Body identified as missing man’s PORTLAND — The Multnomah County sheriff’s office says a body found in the Willamette River in Portland is that of a 30-year-old Oregon City man reported missing earlier this month. The county medical examiner identified the body Monday as that of Harold Leroy Murrain. He was reported missing June 7. The medical examiner says Murrain drowned and there are no indications of foul play. The sheriff’s office says the man’s body was spotted Saturday night by a boater near the Steel Bridge and recovered by river patrol deputies.

Coast Guard saves 2 stranded surfers CANNON BEACH — Two surfers who were trapped in a small ocean cove just north of Cannon Beach have been rescued by a Coast Guard helicopter. The agency says it diverted a helicopter to the area Monday afternoon after Cannon Beach Fire and Rescue reported the surfers’ plight. The helicopter found them on a rocky outcropping on the cove, lowered a rescue swimmer and hoisted the surfers to safety. The Coast Guard crew then returned them to nearby Indian Beach. No injuries were reported. — From wire reports

Health overhaul to proceed Police MEDFORD

• Coordinated care organizations are ‘moving full steam ahead,’ but the federal court case might jeopardize the insurance exchange By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

SALEM — No matter what the U.S. Supreme Court decides about the future of the federal health care law, Gov. John Kitzhaber’s ambitious Medicaid overhaul will go forward, state officials said Monday. But if the court throws out the entire federal law — not just the most controversial parts — officials said the ruling could jeopardize a new health insurance exchange, a marketplace where individuals and small business can shop for coverage starting in 2014. The Supreme Court is expected to rule this month on the constitutionality of the federal health law’s individual man-

date requiring everyone to have health insurance or pay a fine. State officials say the ruling will have only a minimal impact on Kitzhaber’s plan to create new coordinated care organizations to manage the care of low-income patients on the Oregon Health Plan. The first coordinated care organizations begin operating Aug. 1, and Kitzhaber hopes they’ll slow the growth of health care costs by preventing avoidable hospital visits and reducing waste. “Whatever happens, we’re still moving full steam ahead, and we feel like this is going to be essential regardless of the outcome” at the Supreme Court, said Mike Bonetto, Kitzhaber’s health policy adviser.

Federal health officials have tentatively agreed to give Oregon $1.9 billion over the next five years to help pay for the transition to the new model of delivering health care. That money would be unaffected by the Supreme Court’s decision, officials insist, because it is authorized under federal laws that predate President Barack Obama’s 2010 health law. The court’s impact on a separate Kitzhaber health care initiative is less clear. The Oregon Health Insurance Exchange will provide a place for small employers, along with individuals who don’t get health coverage from a job, to compare plans and shop for coverage. The federal law

OREGON ZOO

Staff down more than 25% after shake-up The Associated Press PORTLAND — An exodus of more than a quarter of the Oregon Zoo’s staff has followed an administrative shake-up. The turnover follows a critical audit and the arrival of a new director, the Oregonian reported Monday. Zoo workers say morale is down, but Director Kim Smith says things are turning around. “Change takes three to five years,” said Smith. “We’re at year three. I feel like all that really painful stuff is over.” An audit in October showed management and finance problems have been solved. Smith took over from former Director Tony Vecchio in 2010 after the audit found disjointed management and a $1.6 million cost overrun on a new Predator of the Serengeti exhibit, which added cheetahs and lions to the collection. Since the beginning of 2010, 41 of 157 regular staff members have gone. Seventeen resigned; eight retired, weren’t medically able to work, or died; and 16 were terminated. Departures have been felt all over the zoo, and most of the vacancies have been filled. The zoo also has 484 temporary or seasonal employees.

The Portland zoo is under the control of the regional government Metro. It has a $20 million annual operating budget and 2,000 animals to care for. Among the departures was 62-year-old Dave Thomas, the lead primate keeper who spent 38 years caring for the zoo’s chimpanzees, orangutans and other animals. He was given the option to resign or be fired after he breached a safety protocol by stepping into a hallway where chimps were present. He resigned and has acknowledged the mistake. Weeks earlier, a keeper made a similar error and got only a reprimand. Smith said she hoped to find Thomas a new post, perhaps in the education department, if he wants it. Laborers’ International Local 483 represents about 120 employees, and union leaders said workers are concerned about disciplinary processes being used for minor policy offenses. “With the financial pressures that Metro is facing, the burden often falls on the frontline employees in the parks or the zoo, who are being asked to do more with less,” said Megan Hise, Local 483 communications director. “It’s not a sustainable situation.”

The Oregonian file photo

Former lead primate keeper David Thomas speaks at the Oregon Zoo in Portland in August 2010. More than a quarter of the zoo’s staff has left, including Thomas, following the arrival of a new director and an audit of the zoo’s performance and finances.

“Change takes three to five years. We’re at year three. I feel like all that really painful stuff is over.” — Kim Smith, director, Oregon Zoo

Talent artist awarded showcase at Burning Man By Mandy Valencia The Mail Tribune (Medford)

While Talent sculptor Kevin Christman was creating a large, clay sculpture of a woman in the fetal position, the clay began to crack like a dry riverbed — or, if you’ve ever been to Burning Man, like the playa. Playa is the name for the land in the Black Rock Desert of Nevada, where the weeklong art festival takes place each year. The texture that Christman’s work took on inspired him to apply for an art grant from Black Rock City LLC, the San Francisco-based nonprofit behind Burning Man. Christman’s sculpture was one of 47 art projects given awards this year, and he was the only Oregon artist selected. No doubt the female aspects of his creation — along with the tree-like structure integrating elements of life and death with a large DNA-like swirl at the top — attracted Burning Man organizers to his work, Christman says, because this year’s festival theme is “fertility.”

When Christman attended the festival for the first time in 2009, he was struck by the art and how surreal it appears in the desert landscape. “I love how the people gather around the art,” said Christman. “The whole event is about a shift in thinking. That’s the idea of this figure going into the fetal position and finding the balance. So, on a grander scale, this is a visual representation to stimulate that shift.” Creating artwork for Burning Man can be challenging because of the difficulties presented by the harsh setting. Unpredictable weather, high winds, and lots of playa dust — a talc-like powder — affect all aspects of transportation, engineering and construction. The piece, called “The Tree of Transmutation,” stands 21 feet tall and 16 feet wide. With the festival only two

months away, Christman is in a time crunch to get everything constructed and engineered in time to set it up for the festival, which runs from Aug. 27 to Sept. 3. “Yesterday, there were six people helping,” said Christman, in his studio in Talent, which is southeast of Medford. A large, curled-up nude female figure takes up a lot of space in Christman’s studio as he coats it with silicone rubber to make a mold that will be sent to Portland, where six fiberglass copies of the figure will be made. The female figures will then be suspended from the tree, somewhat like the form of a chandelier. “Then we’ll figure out the engineering we need to support it,” said Christman. Once the molds come back from Portland, Christman and his crew will have less than a

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month to put it together and get it to the Black Rock Desert, 120 miles north of Reno. This year, the demand for Burning Man tickets is higher than ever. The festival sold out in 2011 for the first time in its 25-year history. The organization leases the land from the Bureau of Land Management, which limits the number of attendees. BLM issued a special recreation permit this year that allows 60,900 people to congregate on the site. One major perk of having his work accepted is that he was given 15 tickets for himself and his construction crew. The honorarium from Burning Man will provide Christman with about half the money he needs to transport his piece, so he is starting a page on Kickstarter.com to collect donations to finance the rest of his costs.

struggle with repeat offender By Chris Conrad The Mail Tribune (Medford)

Eric One Ziegler is back in an all-too-familiar place — the Jackson County Jail. Ziegler, 39, was arrested late last month on charges related to methamphetamine, theft, breaking into cars and a parole violation. He remains lodged in the jail without bail. Ziegler has been a thorn in law enforcement’s side for more than a decade, Medford police Lt. Mike Budreau said. “We have had to deal with him several times over the years,” Budreau said. “But we aren’t the true victims. Ziegler has stolen the identities of many people and committed other crimes that have affected the residents of Medford.” The latest case against Ziegler involves him breaking into a car outside Rogue Valley Medical Center. He targeted a purse inside the car, Budreau said. “That’s what he does,” Budreau said. “He isn’t interested in stealing money out of a purse. He’s an identity thief.” Medford police tracked Ziegler to the Motel 6 on Alma Drive, where they found him in possession of methamphetamine, Budreau said. “We believe this isn’t his only crime since he was recently released from prison.” Ziegler has admitted to breaking into hundreds of cars over the years and stealing items worth thousands of dollars from them. While still in prison, he stole the victims’ information from police reports provided to him by his probation officer to commit identity theft. He pleaded guilty to two counts of identity theft and was sentenced to another two years in prison in 2010. In 2004, he pleaded guilty to a dozen charges, including first-degree burglary, aggravated first-degree theft, first-degree theft and identity theft, for a spree that had police scrambling to solve a huge increase in car break-ins and burglaries across the Rogue Valley. He was sentenced to six years in prison. Budreau is hoping these latest charges, which include a probation violation, could send Ziegler back to prison for years. “He clearly is not correcting his behavior,” Budreau said. “We want him to go away for a while in light of this latest arrest.”

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

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The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

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New and clean energy source is worth risks

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outh of Bend, scientists are preparing to pump 24 million gallons of water deep underground this September in the latest effort to harness the warmth of Earth.

If the experiment is successful, it could lead to more than 200 construction jobs, followed by 40 permanent jobs for each power plant that results. Taxes and royalties could be a big boost to the area. The much bigger promise is a truly renewable energy source based on a remarkably simple concept: Cold water goes down and is heated by hot rock; hot water comes up and runs turbines to make electricity; the same water goes back down to repeat the process after the rock is reheated by magma below. There’s lots of federal money involved — half the $42 million price tag is covered by a U.S. Department of Energy grant — and there are no guarantees. It is, however, a smart investment of taxpayer dollars, given the potential gain. Susan Petty, president of AltaRock Energy, Inc., said local geology is particularly well-suited to the experiment because of the relatively recent volcanic eruption — 1,300 years ago — and the comparatively gentle slope of the land surface. However, she said lessons learned from the Central Oregon experiment could make it possible to use the technology in less hospi-

table places in the future. There are, of course, significant environmental concerns. AltaRock and Davenport Newberry Holdings are working with the U.S. Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management and the Department of Energy, as well as state and local officials. BLM recently completed an environmental assessment that requires mitigation to protect groundwater and to monitor seismic effects. To address worries of a visual impact from nearby Newberry National Volcanic Monument, Petty said the affected surface area can be kept small because the wells can be angled to reach a larger area underground. Oregon State University water resources professor Michael Campana reviewed the groups’ plans and told The Bulletin the chemicals mentioned are commonly used and not a problem at the doses planned. Although much is unknown, Petty makes a convincing case for the safeguards in place. It will be important for regulators and critics to raise relevant questions as the experiment proceeds, but the potential is tremendous, clearly worth the costs and risks.

Transparency is best for fighting corruption

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.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky doesn’t like the latest proposal in Congress regarding campaign financing. It’s simply the Democrats’ way of keeping dissenters quiet, he says, and as such it should be killed. But a bill that would require unions and businesses to report how much money they spend on political campaigns is far from the gag that McConnell sees, and, in fact, was the very idea put forth by Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy in the 5-4 Citizens United decision. That case, you will recall, reiterated the notion that people, businesses and unions have the right to spend their money to sway elections if they so wish. That idea — that money can be an integral part of free speech — isn’t likely to change anytime soon, nor is the notion that unions and businesses have as much right to political speech as the lady next door. Meanwhile, since the Citizens United case, we’ve seen hours upon hours of political advertising that can be traced back to charities, but not to the unions and others actually making the donations. It’s that loophole Congress would close with passage of the

2012 version of the DISCLOSE Act. It would require quick and frequent reporting of money spent by business, labor, super PACs, 527 organizations and 501(c) corporations. Of that latter group, only charitable 501(c)(3)s — which cannot spend on politics in any event — are excluded from the act. Moreover, the groups would have to make public the names of those who donate if their money went to political causes. All that is reasonable, it seems to us. Sunlight is the best cure for political shenanigans, and the more of it, the better. The flaw in the Citizens United case is not that it treated businesses like people, but that it allowed donors to remain hidden from the people they’re trying to persuade. Voters are increasingly bombarded by charges and counter charges from groups far removed from political parties or the politicians they represent. As the noise grows, unfortunately, the ability of most of us to truly figure out who is talking — and why — diminishes. McConnell notwithstanding, the DISCLOSE Act aims to improve the situation, nothing more. So long as it is applied fairly to all groups, unions and business alike, it is worth passing.

My Nickel’s Worth Rodeo article an ‘insult’ The little article in the Monday, June 11, issue of The Bulletin, wrapping up rodeo coverage was an insult to the Sisters Rodeo, the hundreds of volunteers, the cowboys and cowgirls, and everyone else involved in presenting one of Central Oregon’s premier events. Why didn’t the reporter include a follow-up about the young man, Christian Radabaugh, hoping to add enough to his winnings to earn his Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association card? Barbara “BJ� Thomas Bend

Help prevent elder abuse June 15 was designated as International Elder and Vulnerable Abuse Awareness Day and Gov. John Kitzhaber also proclaimed it as Oregon Elder and Vulnerable Adult Awareness Day. This year, Oregon Department of Human Services is using this opportunity to educate Oregonians about financial abuse and exploitation, which is on the rise. In our community last year, there were 95 cases of financial exploitation that were reported and investigated. Financial exploitation can range from a trusted family member or caregiver cashing someone’s check with a forged signature, to a shady financial adviser persuading someone to give away their life savings in an investment scam. We must work together to better protect our elderly and vulnerable citizens from financial exploitation and abuse, an unthinkable crime that is becoming increasingly common. We can all help to prevent and reduce the abuse and mistreatment of our most vulnerable neighbors by becoming more involved and aware of what abuse looks like — not just

financial abuse, but all types — taking thoughtful steps to prevent it, and reporting suspected abuse to law enforcement or Adult Protective Services. What can we do to curb the problem of elder abuse? The answer is education. Everyone needs to know what elder abuse is, the signs and what to look out for, as well as how to report it. For more information, go to the Department of Human Services elder abuse website at www.oregon .gov/ DHS/spw pd /abuse/index .shtml; or call the local APS hotline at 541-693-2707 for Crook, Jefferson and Deschutes counties. Karren Ruesing, Supervisor, Aging and People with Disabilities Oregon Department of Human Services

Region’s gas prices are here to stay Well, the big oil companies are sticking it to us again. Because we live on the West Coast, we are paying way more at the pumps than the rest of the country. If you believe what we are being fed, it is because of the refinery fire up in Washington. So explain to me why then did the prices not remain at or near the level they were at when this happened, instead of rising at such a rapid and daily pace? The oil companies knew they would have to lower the prices here on the West Coast eventually, so they made sure they got the prices high enough so that when they do have to lower them they will never drop anywhere near the national average, before they rise again. Numerous politicians are accusing the oil companies of cutting production during this period in order to raise the price at the pumps. If this is true, something needs to be done, but rest assured we will nev-

er be anywhere near the national average. As always, greed will win out over what is fair to the consumer. James R. Harvey Bend

Strict penalties needed for feeding park birds In the June 12 Bulletin, on Page A5, was a replica of the little signs we see all over Drake Park and Farewell Bend Park, etc.: “Don’t feed the geese and ducks.� What is so interesting are the reasons. “It is not healthy for the birds.� Yeah, it might get them killed — as in gassed in garbage cans and then served up as a meal for someone. Shame! But the second reason is most interesting. “It is against the law.� Yes it is, but who cares? A simple little sign, made up and posted for all to see, and no one pays attention. I see people, particularly mothers with little kids in tow, feeding the ducks/geese all the time. How sweet, what a fun thing for Mom and child to share. Who cares if it gets the birds killed or if it’s against the law? They’re having fun. But the crux of it is that it will get the ducks and geese killed, their eggs oiled so they won’t hatch and it costs the city quite a bit of money — which you and I, taxpayers, are footing the bill for — and as the third reason stated, it “poo-lutes� the parks. So, here’s my solution. Leave those cute little signs up but put in some additional wording, such as: First Offense $250 fine; Second Offense $500 fine; Third Offense 6 months in jail and $1,000 fine, and enforce it. I’ll bet that will solve our overabundance of geese and ducks problem. Diana Hopson Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Progressive statists in U.S. pushing for ‘the noble lie’ By Richard Henry rogressives reject the Constitution, believe in big government, are anti-capitalists and pro universal health care — such as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, or “Obamacare.� They don’t believe in individualism, and certainly not in self-government. In short, they want the federal government to provide cradle-to-grave entitlements, tax the rich, redistribute wealth, and provide a home, a car, an education and health care. They want a totally level playing field where everyone is the same. This is called Utopia, which is radical egalitarianism. This theory has been around since ancient philosophers envisioned a Utopian state. In Plato’s “Republic� he referred to it as “the noble lie.� It conditioned citizens to surrender their personal wants and happiness to the needs of the city and

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the common good. Others — such as Thomas More’s “Utopia,� and Thomas Hobbes’ “Leviathan� — wrote of this as well, including Karl Marx in “The Communist Manifesto,� which states, “from each according to his ability, to each according to his need.� This philosophy was championed by U.S. presidents Teddy Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Franklin Delano Roosevelt — who was the first to implement it with Social Security and other government-run programs — and Lyndon Baines Johnson’s Great Society. Now we have Obama, the teleprompter and campaigner in chief, who didn’t understand — or comprehend — Joe the Plumber when he met him. Extemporaneous speaking is not Obama’s strong suit. The electorates that will vote for Obama this time are pure progressive statists that believe “the noble lie.� Our education system is full of pro-

I N M Y VIEW gressive teachers and professors, and the mainstream media promotes the progressive agenda under the title of liberals. They have hijacked the word liberal and use it as a euphemism for progressive statist to promote their cause. A progressive statist seeks authority and revels in power often arrogantly displaying his rejection of the conservative agenda, often speaking in the first person. Obama is a very progressive statist as evidenced by his attempt to take over the auto industry, the financial sector and health care. Liberals in the classic definition reject authority and power. Liberals fought the Revolutionary War, and won. They rebelled against the tyranny of the king. Classic liberals

embrace the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. True liberals are American patriots just like conservatives. We have different ideas about politics, social matters, taxes, war, unions, entitlements, but we share a love of this magnificent country, believe in self-government and an elected representative government with limited powers. Those who can’t govern themselves cannot govern others. Progressive statists don’t believe in the separation of powers: A bi-cameral legislature, an executive (president) and an independent non-elected judicial system beholden to no one. Does the Supreme Court make mistakes? How about Dred Scott v. Sanford or Roe v. Wade? In the first, Chief Justice Taney declared a black man is not equal to a white, and is the white’s property — i.e. slave. The Civil War settled that issue. In the

second, the Supreme Court legislated from the bench, not the Congress, a clear violation of an inconvenient document — the Constitution for the United States of America — and declared abortion a legal practice nationally. This subject is relegated to the states. Bill O’Reilly’s Fox News Channel show, “The O’Reilly Factor,� analyzes the news and current events. He ends each evening’s telecast with a segment titled “Pinheads and Patriots,� where he highlights a person or group that recently did something notable, good or bad. He lays out the scenario and, depending on how it rolls out, declares the subject either a pinhead or a patriot. Sometimes, however, because the event is dubious he’ll say, “You make the call.� So, are progressives pinheads? Are liberals patriots? You make the call. — Richard Henry lives in Bend.


TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

NORTHWEST NEWS

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Scientists reduce quake research for killer whales

H. Brenda Norma Ruth D N  David February 3, 1933 - June 14, 2012 Wiser Mark Cartier, of Portland, OR April 26, 1956 - June 14, 2012 Services: A celebration of life will occur at 2:00 p.m., Tuesday, June 19, 2012, at Lewis & Clark College, 0615 SW Palatine Hill Rd., Portland, OR 97219, in the Agnes Flanagan Chapel. Please carpool if possible. A reception will follow the ceremony. In lieu of flowers: donations may be made to two organizations that support climbing: The Smith Rock Group: http://smithrock.com/mark cartiers.index.html Portland Mountain Rescue: http:/www.pmru.org/conta ct/donation.html

Eric Michael Eckberg Dec. 6, 1945 - June 12, 2012 Eric Michael Eckberg of Bend, passed away Tuesday, June 12, 2012, at the age of 66. He was born December 6, 1945, to Philip Mercer Eckberg and Mary Ann Eckberg. Eric was born in Fort Bragg, North Carolina, and raised Eric Eckberg as an "Air Force Brat" in a career military family. He was raised on several airbases around the country, with much of his youth spent at Ellsworth AFB in South Dakota. Upon his father's retirement, the family settled in Bend, in 1963. He graduated from Bend Senior High School in 1964, and attended Central Oregon Community College and the University of Oregon. He enlisted in the Air Force in 1966, and spent four years stationed in Colorado, Wyoming and Germany. After finishing his service, he worked in the bar and restaurant industry at many local establishments, as well as in Eugene and Portland, most notably as manager of the Bend Woolen Mill during its heyday. Later, he also trained and worked as a hairdresser. Eric was a true "motorhead," enjoying a lifelong passion for cars and motorcycles. He also spent years as an avid bicyclist. With a keen memory, diverse knowledge, a myriad of interests, and his gregarious and affable nature, his favorite pastime was always a good conversation over a favorite beverage in the company of his many treasured friends. He was preceded in death by his parents and is survived by his brother and sister-in-law, Chris Eckberg and Gabrielle Taylor of Bend. He will be greatly missed. There will be celebration of Eric's life at the home of his friend, John "Paco" Serna, at 323 NW Congress Street, in Bend, on Sunday, June 24, from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. For more information on the gathering please call Paco at 541-350-8574. Please visit the online registry for the family at www.niswonger-reynolds.com

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 Deaths of note from around the world: Tom Maynard, 23: Batsman with the English county cricket team Surrey. Died Monday after being hit by an underground train in Wimbledon, England. Erica Kennedy, 42: Author of 2004’s “Bling� and its 2009 follow-up, “Feminista.� Her death in Miami Beach, Fla., was confirmed Monday. Bob Chappuis, 89: All-American halfback for the University of Michigan who was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1988. Died Thursday in Ann Arbor, Mich. R.C. Owens, 78: Longtime 49ers front office man and eight-year NFL wide receiver. Died Monday in Manteca, Calif. — From wire reports

David H. Brenda, La Pine, OR, 79, passed away June 14, 2012, from congestive heart failure. He was born February 3, 1933, in Bad Axe, MI, to Frederick and Elizabeth (Kolenda) Brenda. David graduated from Ceres High School in Ceres, CA, and then atDavid H. tended Brenda Modesto Junior College and Fresno State College where he received an associates degree in agriculture. He served in the US Army and married Ann Elizabeth Chapman on June 30, 1962, in Eugene, OR. David worked as a peach grower in California and managed a 10,000 acre cattle ranch in Klamath County, OR. David loved spending time with his grandkids and was an avid Oregon State University Beavers fan. He was a member of the Oregon Cattleman’s Association. He previously lived in Dearborn, MI; Ceres, CA; Dairy, Klamath Falls and Sweet Home, OR. Survivors include his wife, Ann Brenda of La Pine, OR; son and daughter-in-law, Berin and Heather Brenda, Bend, OR; daughter-in-law, Susan Brenda, Eugene, OR; sister, Lily Gary, Ceres, CA; sisters, Marguerite and Betty Brenda, Turlock, CA; sister, Lenore Wilson, Laguna Hills, CA; and eight grandchildren. He was preceded in death by son, David Brenda. Interment will be at Mt. Vernon Cemetery, Springfield, OR. Donations can be made to KLEOS Children’s Community, 32700 River Bend Rd., Chiloquin, OR 97624. Funeral arrangements by Smith-Lund-Mills Funeral Chapel, Cottage Grove, OR.

‘Kenny’ Willis Sr. August 13, 1939 - June 14, 2012 Kenneth “Kenny� George Willis Sr., loving husband, father and friend, passed away peacefully after a long illness at St. Charles Medical Center in Bend, on June 14, 2012, in the presence of his family. Ken was born on August 13, 1939, in Culver City, CA, to Ann Grace Dalgleish Willis and Harry George Willis. He had one Kenny Willis brother, Douglas Willis. Ken attended Culver City High School in California, where he played football, belonged to the Falcon Car Club and the Masons. He attended Cal Poly before joining the Army and going to Korea. He worked for McDonald Douglas in California and in the Dairy business in CA and OR. He retired from Korpine in Bend, OR. He married Rita Faye in 1975. Ken was a likeable guy and loved to shoot the breeze with anyone, even strangers! He was adored by family and friends and built life-long relationships. Until his death, he was still in contact with friends from every phase of his life, including grammar school. Ken is survived by his wife, Rita Willis; brother, Doug (Jeanne) Willis; sons, Steven (and Julie) Willis (Kyle, Ryan, Jared, Mason), Kevin (and Teri) Willis, Chas (and Karen) Willis (Kyle and Kymberly) and Kenneth (and Trisha) Willis Jr. (Ryan, Emily and Jake), daughters, Becky Willis Nyberg (Spencer and Liam) and Tori Willis (Sydney). He was preceded in death by his parents. Please join us for a celebration of life on Tuesday, June 19, at 5:30 p.m. at the old Fire Hall 5 NW Minnesota Ave, Bend, OR. In lieu of flowers, please send a card containing a memory of Kenny.

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May 16, 1937 - June 9, 2012 Saturday, June 9, Norma Wiser of Redmond, Oregon, peacefully and unexpectedly went to be with our Lord. Born to Paul an Ida Hempel (Knorr) on May 16, 1937, in Roseburg, Oregon. Norma graduNorma Ruth ated from Wiser South Eugene in 1955, and worked in the medical and business field. She spent the majority of her life in Oregon, and resided the last 20 years in Redmond, with her daughter and family. Survived by two darling sisters, Doris Withers and Lorraine Hendricks both of Redmond; and one handsome brother, Roy Hempel of Culver, Oregon. Preceded in death were her father and mother; three brothers; and one sister. Norma’s greatest joy in life was her children and grandchildren, Rick

Glover of Redmond, Oregon, Kevin Glover of Reno, Nevada, and Gib and Erika Stephens of Redmond, Oregon. She is loved by six grandchildren, Tabitha, Krista and Kody Glover, Trevor, Travis and Tasha Stephens; and one greatgranddaughter, Lili Glover. Norma loved her nieces and nephews and enjoyed every visit. She was never known to be without a dog, and most of her life, a horse. Her animals gave her great comfort and love. Anyone who knew Norma would say she was a straight shooter; she understood people’s weaknesses and loved being there when she was needed. This precious woman will be missed by so many. By His grace, surrounded by her loved ones, she experienced a most peaceful and delicate death. A Celebration of Life will be held on Saturday, June 23, 2012, at 1:00 p.m., at the family residents. All family and friends are welcome.

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The Associated Press TACOMA, Wash. — An expedition to study earthquake and tsunami risks off the coasts of Washington and Oregon has been scaled back for now out of concerns for endangered Puget Sound orcas. Scientists aboard the research vessel Marcus Langseth are using sonar to map a major earthquake fault along the Northwest coast, KPLU radio station reported Friday. The seismic researchers got a permit from the National Marine Fisheries Service, the federal agency that protects whales, to conduct three research studies on the 680-mile Cascadia subduction zone off the Oregon and Washington coast. But experts in Washington and Oregon initially were not consulted, the radio station reported. Lynne Barre, a biologist who supervises the marine mammal program for the Seattle office of NOAA, told KPLU that the three pods of southern resident orcas rarely go out into the open ocean but that doesn’t mean they never do.

A ‘miscommunication’ “In the summer, those southern residents spend a lot of their time in inland waters, like around the San Juan Islands, locally,� Barre said. “And so I think that was just a miscommunication somewhere along the way, about the potential for the whales not to be in that area, but to be along the coast, as well.� The Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, part of Columbia University, operates the ship as a sci-

entific research facility on behalf of the National Science Foundation. The ship is used by universities and research labs across the nation to study the earth’s interior deep beneath the ocean floors. The ship was docked in Astoria last week, while scientists negotiated with marine biologists over how to use the sonar while protecting killer whales that swim near the ship. Sonar blasts potentially could harm the whales. For now, the ship is limited to one of three planned research surveys, KPLU reported. Negotiations are still under way over the others, which take the ship closer to the endangered orcas habitat in Washington state. A call and email to observatory representatives by The Associated Press was not immediately returned.

Monitoring for whales As a precaution, the ship uses an underwater listening device, so scientists on the ship could hear any orca sounds and calls in the vicinity, KPLU reported. In a statement, Columbia University said the vessel follows strict procedures to minimize any disruption to marine mammals. At least four observers will be on board listening and watching for protected marine mammals during seismic operations. If marine mammals come near the ship, the sound sources will be shut down. The observatory said the results of the research surveys “could contribute to improving the resilience of communities exposed to earthquakes and tsunami in the Pacific Northwest.�

Washington governor Gallo blazed path announces tsunami in TV production debris cleanup plans FEATURED OBITUARY

By Rachel La Corte By Valerie J. Nelson Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — At 20th Century Fox Studios in the 1960s, Lillian Gallo earned the nickname, “Mrs. Average America.� She turned out to be anything but. Then a producer’s assistant, she was asked to screen the dailies of nearly every television show in the Fox pipeline. She was unafraid to express genuine emotion, Gallo later recalled, so if she laughed or cried during a scene, producers believed the heartland would follow. By the early 1970s, she was producing TV movies and breaking ground for women in the industry. When Gallo joined forces with screenwriter Fay Kanin, they became one of the first female producing teams in Hollywood and established their own production company in 1978. Gallo, a longtime resident of Beverly Hills, Calif., died June 6 of Alzheimer’s disease at age 84 at the Motion Picture and Television Fund’s retirement home in the Woodland Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles, said her daughter, Mary Ann Gallo.

‘Hustling’ The 1975 television movie “Hustling� was perhaps Gallo’s best-known project. Based on Gaily Sheehy’s book-length expose on prostitution in America, it starred Jill Clayburgh in an Emmy-nominated role as a streetwalker. Although “Hustling� was “raw and of the streets,� Gallo later said, it told the “plight of prostitutes in a very intimate way.� She liked to tell “personal stories about the human condition,� she said in a 1979 New York Times article headlined “TV Producing - No Longer a Man’s World.� When Gallo’s two children,

who were adopted, began asking questions about where they came from, she was inspired to make the 1974 TV film “Stranger Who Looks Like Me,� featuring Meredith Baxter as an adult adoptee searching for her biological parents. In the late 1970s, Brandon Stoddard, then an executive at ABC, signed Gallo and Kanin to an exclusive contract, effectively paying them not to offer their services to NBC or CBS. Their work had a “humanistic quality,� Stoddard told The New York Times in 1979. “Unlike men, they’re not afraid to express emotion. They treat emotion with great dignity, as a source of strength rather than weakness.�

Formed production firm After “Hustling,� Gallo and Kanin formed their production company but produced only one film together, “Fun and Games,� which starred Valerie Harper in a tale about workplace harassment. In the late 1950s, she came to Hollywood to work on “The Frank Sinatra Show� and met producer William Self, who mentored her at 20th Century Fox, where she worked over the next decade on such shows as “Peyton Place� and “Batman.� When Barry Diller, then an ABC executive, named Gallo director of Movies of the Weekend, she considered it her big break. In that role, she supervised 22 movies, including Steven Spielberg’s “Duel� (1971), and moved into producing in the early 1970s with “Haunts of the Very Rich,� a TV movie. Even after Gallo produced her final TV movie, the 1998 thriller “I Know What You Did,� she refused to say she was retired and continued to try to develop projects until about two years ago.

The Associated Press

OCEAN SHORES, Wash. — Washington Gov. Chris Gregoire announced Monday a state plan to address tsunami debris that reaches the state’s coast from Japan but stressed that federal help is needed. “We don’t have the resources at the state level to do what we’re going to have to do here,� she said at a news conference at a beachside hotel in Ocean Shores, Wash. Gregoire noted that the Department of Ecology has been approved to use $100,000 from its litter cleanup account for tsunami debris removal. However, a “steady dribble� of tsunami debris is expected over the next few years that will require more money, though she said the cost of the cleanup is unknown. “We are prepared to do

whatever it takes to keep our beaches and our coastal communities clean and safe,� she said. Gregoire announced a “Clean Shoreline Initiative� to be led by Washington National Guard commander Timothy Lowenberg, and includes the state Department of Health, Ecology and other agencies. Gregoire said the debris is not yet at a level where she needs to call out the National Guard or seek money from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. “I can’t declare an emergency until I actually have one on my hands,� she said. In March, Gregoire joined the governors of Oregon and California and the premier of British Columbia in announcing that they would collaborate to manage debris from the tsunami that might wash up along the West Coast.


THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

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W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, JUNE 19

WEDNESDAY

Today: Partly cloudy and slightly milder.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

LOW

66

36

HIGH LOW

Astoria 60/48

58/51

Cannon Beach 55/48

Hillsboro Portland 66/52 65/45

Tillamook 63/46

Salem

57/44

67/48

70/51

Maupin

69/39

Corvallis Yachats

63/31

Prineville 65/35 Sisters Redmond Paulina 61/31 66/33 68/34 Sunriver Bend

60/47

Eugene

Florence

68/46

65/47

65/33

70/44

Coos Bay

66/31

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

Crescent

Roseburg

61/47

Silver Lake

64/28

Port Orford 64/47

Gold Beach 59/50

63/31

Vale

64/38

Frenchglen 73/44

CENTRAL Partly to mostly cloudy. Mostly sunny in the south.

OREGON CITIES

Yesterday’s state extremes

Rome

• 77° Rome

71/36

73/45

• 41°

Fields

McDermitt

74/47

69/42

Baker City

74/40

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes

-10s

0s

Vancouver 64/52

10s Calgary 59/45

20s

30s

40s Winnipeg 68/54

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 68/57

70s

80s

90s

Quebec 82/68

100s 110s

Halifax 73/52 P ortland Billings Portland 69/59 To ronto 69/48 66/52 88/72 Boston • 115° Boise 79/67 Buffalo Green Bay St. Paul Detroit 71/47 88/67 89/72 New York 90/71 Blythe, Calif. 92/73 Rapid City 78/70 Des Moines Cheyenne 75/53 • 34° Philadelphia Columbus 95/73 Chicago 83/47 92/71 86/70 97/77 Yellowstone Nat’l Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 96/71 73/53 Park, Wyo. City 89/73 Denver Las 75/53 Louisville Kansas City • 3.51” 92/57 93/72 Vegas 92/76 St. Louis Charlotte Chippewa County 104/81 95/74 89/68 Los Angeles Int’l Arpt., Mich. Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 69/61 89/71 91/68 92/71 Albuquerque Atlanta Honolulu 95/66 88/68 Birmingham Phoenix 85/72 Dallas Tijuana 90/68 108/79 92/75 70/56 New Orleans 89/73 Orlando Houston 89/71 Chihuahua 88/75 101/70 Miami 86/78 Monterrey La Paz 98/71 91/68 Mazatlan Anchorage 88/77 69/55 Juneau 64/49

(in the 48 contiguous states):

New

First

June 19 June 26

Full

Last

July 3

July 10

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97...Mod. Bend, east of Hwy. 97....Mod. Redmond/Madras ........Low

Astoria . . . . . . MM/50/0.15 Baker City . . . . . .60/42/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .63/49/0.00 Burns. . . . . . . . . .66/43/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .67/54/0.00 Klamath Falls . . .63/49/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .70/46/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .60/46/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .71/52/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .59/50/0.06 North Bend . . . . . .61/52/NA Ontario . . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .70/53/0.00 Portland . . . . . . 66/57/trace Prineville . . . . . . .57/48/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .62/50/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .66/55/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . 65/53/trace Sisters . . . . . . . . .65/48/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .69/57/0.00

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . .60/48/sh . . . . .62/48/pc . . . .66/39/pc . . . . . .75/43/s . . . . .71/50/s . . . . . .75/49/s . . . . .70/36/s . . . . . .78/43/s . . . . .68/46/c . . . . .74/45/pc . . . . .72/38/s . . . . . .80/44/s . . . . .69/42/s . . . . . .79/51/s . . . . .67/30/s . . . . . .75/40/s . . . . .80/48/s . . . . . .86/54/s . . . . .57/48/c . . . . .59/45/pc . . . . .60/48/c . . . . .63/50/pc . . . . .74/49/s . . . . . .80/53/s . . . .71/46/pc . . . . . .77/52/s . . . .66/52/sh . . . . .73/52/pc . . . . .65/35/s . . . . . .76/46/s . . . .68/37/pc . . . . . .75/46/s . . . .73/48/pc . . . . .80/51/pc . . . . .69/46/c . . . . .74/47/pc . . . . .66/33/s . . . . . .73/42/s . . . .70/51/pc . . . . . .77/55/s

WATER REPORT Sisters .............................Mod. La Pine.............................Mod. Prineville........................Mod.

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 47,250 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189,975 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 79,724 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 39,086 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136,819 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 443 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . 1,340 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . 117 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 1,996 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . 20 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 228 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 10.1 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 4

POLLEN COUNT

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

Saskatoon 63/48

Seattle 63/51

Moon phases

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:52 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:52 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 5:33 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 8:58 p.m.

PRECIPITATION

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

64 37

WEST Mostly cloudy, chance of showers north. Mostly sunny in the far south.

74/38

Lakeview

HIGH LOW

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64/41 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.07” Record high . . . . . . . . 96 in 1961 Average month to date. . . 0.48” Record low. . . . . . . . . 28 in 1996 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.14” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Average year to date. . . . . 5.50” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.29.98 Record 24 hours . . .0.39 in 1948 *Melted liquid equivalent

71/40

Klamath Falls 72/38

69 42

TEMPERATURE

73/47

Jordan Valley

HIGH LOW

Mostly cloudy, chance of showers, cool.

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .7:06 a.m. . . . . 10:30 p.m. Venus . . . . . .4:17 a.m. . . . . . 6:55 p.m. Mars. . . . . .12:30 p.m. . . . . . 1:02 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . .3:44 a.m. . . . . . 6:33 p.m. Saturn. . . . . .2:57 p.m. . . . . . 2:16 a.m. Uranus . . . . .1:28 a.m. . . . . . 1:53 p.m.

73/39

69/37

82 51

Mostly cloudy, chance of showers, much cooler.

PLANET WATCH

EAST Ontario Sunny to partly 74/49 cloudy.

Juntura

66/32

Increasing cloudiness, chance of showers by evening, warm.

SATURDAY

BEND ALMANAC

75/49

Burns Riley

67/33

Chiloquin

Medford Ashland

71/50

64/40

64/39

Paisley 80/48

Brookings

66/39

Unity

72/35

Grants Pass 79/45

Baker City John Day

Christmas Valley

Chemult

73/48

54/34

FRIDAY

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Nyssa

Hampton

Fort Rock 66/32

64/29

58/24

Bandon

62/41

Brothers 65/30

La Pine 67/30

Crescent Lake

61/48

66/36

60/38

Union

Mitchell 67/36

68/37

Camp Sherman

71/47

60/37

Joseph

Granite Spray 71/42

Enterprise

Meacham 64/42

63/44

Madras

55/36

La Grande

Condon

Warm Springs

Wallowa

59/37

66/45

70/47

69/38

71/46

71/46

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

75/52

67/46

69/46

57/48

Hermiston 74/52

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 51/40

68/46

73/51

The Biggs Dalles 70/52

67/49

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

HIGH LOW

76 45

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

Mostly sunny and much warmer.

Tonight: Mostly clear and chilly.

HIGH

THURSDAY

Bismarck 64/49

FRONTS

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .94/69/0.00 . . . 93/72/s . 93/73/pc Akron . . . . . . . . . .86/68/0.53 . .92/69/pc . . 92/70/s Albany. . . . . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . .82/68/pc . 94/70/pc Albuquerque. . . . .98/62/0.00 . . . 95/66/s . . 96/69/s Anchorage . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . .69/55/pc . 68/56/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . . .87/65/0.00 . .88/68/pc . 89/70/pc Atlantic City . . . . .70/48/0.00 . .76/68/pc . 84/71/pc Austin . . . . . . . . . .95/70/0.00 . . .93/73/c . . .94/70/t Baltimore . . . . . . .70/58/0.03 . .86/70/pc . 97/76/pc Billings . . . . . . . . .80/56/0.00 . .69/48/sh . 74/51/sh Birmingham . . . . .88/69/0.00 . . . 90/68/s . 92/71/pc Bismarck. . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . . . 64/49/t . . 73/52/c Boise . . . . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . . . 71/47/s . 79/51/pc Boston. . . . . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . .79/67/pc . 94/73/pc Bridgeport, CT. . . .68/60/0.00 . .76/67/pc . 93/71/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . . .82/66/0.02 . . . 89/72/t . 91/72/pc Burlington, VT. . . .78/63/0.00 . . . 89/70/t . 94/73/pc Caribou, ME . . . . .75/49/0.00 . .81/63/pc . 84/66/pc Charleston, SC . . .84/60/0.00 . .85/67/pc . 86/69/pc Charlotte. . . . . . . .87/65/0.00 . .89/68/pc . 90/69/pc Chattanooga. . . . .88/63/0.00 . .93/69/pc . 94/69/pc Cheyenne . . . . . . .91/56/0.00 . .83/47/pc . 77/50/pc Chicago. . . . . . . . .94/69/0.00 . .97/77/pc . . .93/76/t Cincinnati . . . . . . .88/67/0.09 . . . 92/69/s . 92/70/pc Cleveland . . . . . . .87/67/0.19 . .87/73/pc . 87/70/pc Colorado Springs .98/64/0.00 . . . 90/54/s . . 78/55/s Columbia, MO . . .93/73/0.00 . . . 93/72/s . . 94/70/s Columbia, SC . . . .88/63/0.00 . .90/68/pc . 92/68/pc Columbus, GA. . . .89/64/0.00 . . . 90/66/s . . 90/69/s Columbus, OH. . . .88/69/0.25 . .92/71/pc . . 93/71/s Concord, NH. . . . .68/48/0.00 . .82/60/pc . 96/71/pc Corpus Christi. . . .95/73/0.00 . . . 91/76/t . . .92/74/t Dallas Ft Worth. . .92/76/0.00 . .92/75/pc . 91/74/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .89/70/0.01 . .92/70/pc . . 92/70/s Denver. . . . . . . . .100/69/0.00 . . . 92/57/s . . 82/57/s Des Moines. . . . . .96/79/0.00 . .95/73/pc . . .84/66/t Detroit. . . . . . . . . .84/60/0.68 . . . 92/73/s . 90/75/pc Duluth. . . . . . . . . .79/59/0.71 . . . 65/59/t . . .66/55/t El Paso. . . . . . . . .104/74/0.00 . .104/76/s . 102/75/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . 81/49/trace . . . 76/49/s . . 80/53/s Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .84/63/0.00 . . . 68/55/t . . .74/55/t Flagstaff . . . . . . . .86/53/0.00 . . . 83/45/s . . 85/45/s

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .92/61/1.04 . . . 94/72/s . . .93/70/t Green Bay. . . . . . .86/66/1.14 . . . 90/71/t . . .89/65/t Greensboro. . . . . .85/66/0.00 . .89/67/pc . . 90/68/s Harrisburg. . . . . . .69/62/0.07 . .86/69/pc . . 94/71/s Hartford, CT . . . . .73/57/0.00 . .83/66/pc . 95/70/pc Helena. . . . . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . .62/44/sh . 68/45/pc Honolulu. . . . . . . .84/74/0.00 . .85/72/sh . 85/72/pc Houston . . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . . . 88/75/t . . .90/74/t Huntsville . . . . . . .91/67/0.00 . . . 91/68/s . . 91/71/s Indianapolis . . . . .92/72/0.00 . . . 94/72/s . 93/72/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .91/71/0.00 . . . 91/68/s . 91/70/pc Jacksonville. . . . . .86/59/0.00 . .85/67/pc . 86/68/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . . 59/49/trace . .64/49/pc . . 64/49/c Kansas City. . . . . .96/77/0.00 . . . 92/76/s . 91/74/pc Lansing . . . . . . . . .83/60/0.55 . . . 93/71/s . 93/72/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .106/88/0.00 . .104/81/s . 108/84/s Lexington . . . . . . .87/68/0.00 . . . 90/68/s . . 91/69/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .95/76/0.00 . . . 96/72/s . . .84/65/t Little Rock. . . . . . .92/69/0.00 . .92/71/pc . . 93/73/s Los Angeles. . . . . .66/60/0.00 . .69/61/pc . 73/61/pc Louisville. . . . . . . .90/71/0.00 . . . 93/72/s . . 95/73/s Madison, WI . . . . .93/74/0.00 . .94/74/pc . . .88/64/t Memphis. . . . . . . .92/69/0.00 . . . 92/74/s . . 95/74/s Miami . . . . . . . . . .86/76/0.00 . . . 86/78/t . . .88/78/t Milwaukee . . . . . .93/72/0.01 . .93/72/pc . . .91/69/t Minneapolis . . . . .90/67/0.10 . . . 88/67/t . . 77/60/c Nashville. . . . . . . .92/64/0.00 . . . 91/68/s . . 93/71/s New Orleans. . . . .87/76/0.00 . .89/73/pc . 90/74/pc New York . . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . .78/70/pc . 95/76/pc Newark, NJ . . . . . .69/60/0.00 . .82/69/pc . 96/74/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . . .74/56/0.00 . .84/69/pc . 90/70/pc Oklahoma City . . .91/71/0.00 . .89/71/pc . . 90/70/c Omaha . . . . . . . . .95/78/0.00 . .96/71/pc . . .83/64/t Orlando. . . . . . . . .88/68/0.00 . . . 89/71/t . . .90/73/t Palm Springs. . . .109/78/0.00 . .107/73/s . 112/78/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .90/74/0.00 . .93/72/pc . . 92/72/s Philadelphia . . . . .72/57/0.00 . .86/70/pc . 94/76/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .112/87/0.00 . .108/79/s . 113/82/s Pittsburgh . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . .91/68/pc . 91/69/pc Portland, ME. . . . .64/54/0.00 . .69/59/pc . 92/68/sh Providence . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . .77/64/pc . 91/71/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . . .86/63/0.00 . .89/68/pc . 92/68/pc

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .93/53/0.00 . .75/53/pc . 76/55/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . . .88/69/0.00 . . . 83/57/s . . 93/60/s Richmond . . . . . . .76/56/0.04 . .88/70/pc . 94/72/pc Rochester, NY . . . .81/66/0.00 . . . 92/71/t . 93/72/pc Sacramento. . . . . .83/56/0.00 . . . 94/60/s . 100/60/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .95/77/0.00 . . . 95/74/s . . 96/75/s Salt Lake City . . . .98/66/0.00 . . . 75/53/s . . 83/59/s San Antonio . . . . .93/71/0.04 . .93/75/pc . . .92/74/t San Diego . . . . . . 71/63/trace . .67/59/pc . . 67/61/s San Francisco . . . .71/54/0.00 . .73/55/pc . 72/53/pc San Jose . . . . . . . .78/56/0.00 . . . 84/57/s . . 85/56/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .94/50/0.00 . . . 87/59/s . . 89/60/s

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .86/62/0.00 . .86/68/pc . 87/70/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . . .63/50/0.12 . .63/51/sh . 70/51/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . . .93/68/0.00 . . . 93/62/t . . .78/58/t Spokane . . . . . . . .63/48/0.04 . .64/47/pc . . 72/49/s Springfield, MO . .92/69/0.00 . . . 91/71/s . . 90/69/s Tampa. . . . . . . . . .91/71/0.00 . . . 92/73/t . . .92/74/t Tucson. . . . . . . . .105/74/0.00 . .103/71/s . 107/73/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .93/75/0.00 . .91/73/pc . 91/73/pc Washington, DC . .71/63/0.28 . .89/73/pc . 96/77/pc Wichita . . . . . . . . .94/71/0.00 . . . 93/74/s . . 93/72/s Yakima . . . . . . . 72/MM/0.00 . .70/45/pc . . 73/52/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .115/78/0.00 . .110/74/s . 111/77/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .63/52/0.00 . .68/53/pc . 70/58/pc Athens. . . . . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . . . 91/71/s . . 84/69/s Auckland. . . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . .60/50/sh . 62/51/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .111/88/0.00 . .109/87/s . 110/90/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . . . 88/76/t . . .86/77/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . .96/71/pc . 92/70/sh Beirut . . . . . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . . . 86/71/s . . 82/70/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .88/52/0.00 . .72/61/pc . 64/61/sh Bogota . . . . . . . . .72/46/0.00 . .64/49/sh . . .65/50/t Budapest. . . . . . . .91/66/0.00 . . . 93/68/s . . 89/71/s Buenos Aires. . . . .52/43/0.00 . .57/42/pc . . 58/51/c Cabo San Lucas . .95/77/0.00 . . . 93/74/s . . 95/72/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .99/77/0.00 . .101/70/s . . 97/70/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .57/46/0.00 . .59/45/sh . 64/46/sh Cancun . . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . . 87/75/t . . .87/77/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .63/41/0.00 . .64/47/sh . . 61/52/c Edinburgh. . . . . . .63/41/0.00 . .62/48/sh . 60/47/sh Geneva . . . . . . . . .86/59/0.00 . .81/64/sh . . .79/63/t Harare. . . . . . . . . .70/43/0.00 . . . 69/45/s . 68/45/pc Hong Kong . . . . . .88/81/0.00 . . . 88/82/r . . .87/82/t Istanbul. . . . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . . . 82/73/s . . 78/70/s Jerusalem . . . . . . .96/79/0.00 . . . 87/66/s . . 83/66/s Johannesburg. . . .66/41/0.00 . . .60/39/c . . 60/40/s Lima . . . . . . . . . . .70/66/0.00 . .74/65/pc . 75/65/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .72/59/0.00 . . . 72/55/s . . 73/64/s London . . . . . . . . .66/52/0.00 . .69/51/pc . . 69/53/c Madrid . . . . . . . . .90/61/0.00 . .85/65/sh . 88/62/pc Manila. . . . . . . . . .91/75/0.00 . .90/77/pc . 90/77/sh

Mecca . . . . . . . . .111/91/0.00 . .105/82/s . 104/84/s Mexico City. . . . . .77/57/0.00 . . . 72/54/t . . .71/55/t Montreal. . . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . .84/70/pc . 84/68/sh Moscow . . . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . .74/55/pc . 71/54/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . . .66/57/0.00 . .70/57/sh . 71/55/sh Nassau . . . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . . 87/77/t . . .86/77/t New Delhi. . . . . . .99/82/0.00 . .114/93/s . 115/91/s Osaka . . . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . . . 74/69/r . 81/64/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . .63/49/pc . 64/48/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . . . 84/68/t . 88/68/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . .73/61/pc . 76/64/pc Rio de Janeiro. . . .88/68/0.00 . . .80/69/c . 77/69/sh Rome. . . . . . . . . . .91/61/0.00 . . . 90/66/s . . 92/68/s Santiago . . . . . . . .63/41/0.00 . . . 53/48/s . . 50/49/c Sao Paulo . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . .72/63/sh . . .70/62/t Sapporo . . . . . . . .61/61/0.00 . . .73/57/c . 64/52/sh Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . .88/61/pc . 81/65/pc Shanghai. . . . . . . .77/72/0.00 . .79/68/pc . 88/72/pc Singapore . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . .85/79/sh . 87/79/pc Stockholm. . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . .67/50/pc . 65/49/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . .64/39/pc . . 59/43/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . .85/78/sh . 85/78/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .90/73/0.00 . . . 92/69/s . . 88/68/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .81/72/0.00 . . . 75/68/r . 81/64/sh Toronto . . . . . . . . .81/68/0.00 . . . 88/72/t . 90/72/pc Vancouver. . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . . .64/52/c . 66/54/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . . .90/61/0.00 . . . 89/65/s . 86/68/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . . . 76/58/s . . 81/65/c

ATTENTION TOUR OF HOMES™ ADVERTISERS

12

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541-382-1811


SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 Golf, D3 Olympics, D3

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

NBA

COMMUNITY SPORTS

WCL Elks suffer third straight loss CORVALLIS — The Bend Elks lost their third consecutive game Monday, falling to the Corvallis Knights 4-1 in West Coast League baseball action at Goss Stadium on the campus of Oregon State University. The Knights (12-4 WCL), who have won eight straight league games, gave up one run in the top of the first inning before shutting out Bend the rest of the night. Corvallis reliever Rob Dittrick earned the win, allowing just two hits and no runs in 5 2⠄3 innings of work. Knight outfielder Alex Michaels paced the Knights at the plate, ending the game two for four with three RBIs. Bend pitcher Derek Peterson, who relieved Elk starter Danny Chavez in the fifth inning with the game tied 1-1, took the loss after giving up one run over three innings. Bo Walter went two for four with a triple and an RBI to highlight Bend’s offense and raise his batting average to .447 this summer. The Elks (7-5 WCL) host two nonleague games against Top Speed tonight (6:35) and Wednesday (3 p.m.). They host Kitsap of the WCL Wednesday night.

Some humility looks good on the Heat By Harvey Araton New York Times News Service

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Bend swimmers Tommy Brewer, left, and Logan Madson at Juniper Swim and Fitness in Bend Thursday. They are Central Oregon’s representatives at the 2012 U.S. Olympic swim team trials, scheduled to begin June 25 in Omaha, Neb.

Splash for glory • Two Central Oregon swimmers are set to battle the country’s best at the U.S. Olympic Team Trials

— Bulletin staff report

AMANDA MILES

GOLF Bend duo start fast at OrAm TUALATIN — Bend golfers Tiffany Schoning and Jesse Heinly got off to solid starts Monday at the 103rd Oregon Amateur Championship. Schoning, who just finished her senior season at Portland State University, shot a 2-over-par 74 at Tualatin Country Club to finish the first round of stroke play in a tie for third place. Heinly, a junior-tobe at Xavier University, is in a tie for ninth place after a 1-over 73. Nine Central Oregon golfers — six men and three women — are competing in the men’s and women’s Oregon Amateur tournaments this week at Tualatin. The Oregon Amateur begins with 36 holes of stroke play. Sixty-four of the 116 golfers in the men’s field will advance to match play, which begins Wednesday, and will be seeded based on their finish in the strokeplay rounds. Thirty-two of the 40 golfers in the women’s field advance. Redmond golfers Andy Rodby (+5) and Andrew Fitch (+6) on the men’s side, and Bend golfers Rosie Cook (+5) and Chelsey Lind (+14) on the women’s side are also in position to make the cut. The Oregon Amateur will end Saturday with 36-hole championship matches. For complete results, visit www.oregonamateur.org.

L

ogan Madson is 25. Tommy Brewer is 15. Madson is several years out of college. Brewer just wrapped up his freshman year at Summit High School in Bend. On the surface, the two might not seem to have much in common, but

something they do share is that they both swim. Fast, like sailfish. So fast, in fact, that Madson and Brewer are slated to represent Central Oregon at the 2012 U.S. Olympic Team Trials in swimming, scheduled to begin Monday in Omaha, Neb. They are two of more than 1,500 swimmers who qualified for the event. Madson will compete in the 100-meter and 200-meter butterfly events, while Brewer will contest the 200-meter breaststroke. See Glory / D5

CYCLING

By Amanda Miles The Bulletin

Last week, he was out. Now, Chris Horner is in. On Monday, Horner, a longtime pro cyclist and Bend resident, was named to RadioShack-NissanTrek’s nine-rider squad for the 2012 Tour de France. Horner “Stoked to be headed to the Tour with @RSNT!� Horner tweeted on Monday. “Another 100 mile training day today - one more week of training and then it’s back to work!� The riders joining Horner, 40, on the team for this year’s tour, which starts June

30 with a prologue stage in Liege, Belgium, are Luxembourg’s Frank Schleck, third in the 2011 tour; Belgian Maxime Monfort; Swiss time trial expert Fabian Cancellara; Frenchman Tony Gallopin; Haimar Zubeldia of Spain, fifth twice in the tour; veteran Yaroslav Popovych of Ukraine; three-time tour stage winner Jens Voigt of Germany; and two-time Tour de France runner-up Andreas Kloden of Germany. On June 11, RadioShack released its 14-rider preliminary list for the tour, from which the team’s final roster would be determined. Horner’s name was notably absent, setting off a flurry of media

When: June 25-July 2 Where: CenturyLink Center, Omaha, Neb. Who: More than 1,500 swimmers competing for two spots per event on the U.S. Olympic team that will compete in London. The field includes two swimmers from Central Oregon: Bend Swim Club’s Logan Madson and Cascade Swim Academy’s Tommy Brewer. More info: usaswimming.org/ DesktopDefault.aspx?TabId=1450

reports and online activity. In various reports, RadioShack team officials attributed Horner’s absence to a back injury and his decision not to race in either the Tour de Suisse or the Criterium du Dauphine, both staged earlier this month. On Saturday, Horner said that he had engaged in some discussions with team director Johan Bruyneel. Those talks proved to be fruitful, as Horner will now compete in his sixth Tour de France. He placed ninth in 2010 for his best general classification finish. Horner also was named to his first U.S. Olympic team in road cycling on Friday. He will compete in London in the road race, scheduled for July 28, six days after the tour concludes in Paris.

MIAMI — With three simple words that were more playful than derisive, Kevin Durant helped along the continuing reputation reset of a team that for much of its two seasons in present form has been the essence of entitlement and presumption. Dwyane Wade didn’t initially hear the remark after Durant effortlessly canned a secondquarter jump shot over Wade, though from Durant’s lips to television viewers’ eyes the message was perfectly clear. “Actually, I had to run down the court and ask him what he said,� Wade would say, taking no offense, acknowledging that it was not delivered in the manner of what most folks would describe as standard industry trash talk. Given the sheepish smile formed at the corner of Durant’s mouth, it was merely a statement of fact. “You’re too small,� he told Wade again. Well, duh, said the 6-foot-4 Wade, “He’s got 7 inches on me.� Officially only five, though exaggeration is most acceptable when confronted with Durant’s spindly and freakish length. In any event, the portrayal of the Miami Heat as undersized — to go along with undermanned — has apparently become part of the NBA finals narrative, and LeBron James was thrilled to embrace the rewrite after the Heat’s 9185 victory over the Oklahoma City Thunder on Sunday night in Game 3 provided a 2-1 series lead. “I mean, size doesn’t matter,� James said. “It’s about just will and determination. It doesn’t matter if someone is taller than you or bigger than you or weighs more than you. Every last one of our guys plays bigger than what their height is, bigger than what their weight is.� See Humility / D5

Next up NBA finals, Oklahoma City Thunder at Miami Heat • When: Today, 6 p.m. • TV: ABC • Radio: KICE-AM 940 PAID ADVERTISEMENT

MLB

Big win: Clemens acquitted By Joseph White The Associated Press

MLB

R.A. Dickey, above, tosses his second straight one-hitter, D4

2012 U.S. Olympic Team Trials — Swimming

Bend’s Horner to compete in Tour de France

— Bulletin staff report

Another gem for Mets’ pitcher

D

Motor sports, D3 MLB, D4 Community Sports, D5, D6

Alex Brandon / The Associated Press

Former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens, center, leaves federal court with his wife Debbie Clemens, left, and others, Monday in Washington after his acquittal on charges of lying to Congress in 2008 when he denied ever using performance-enhancing drugs.

WASHINGTON — Give Roger Clemens one more victory, one that offers validation — at least in a legal sense — to the 354 games he won as one of the most accomplished pitchers in baseball history. Instead of hugs on the mound from teammates, this one wrapped up with hugs from his family in the courtroom, with Clemens’ wife dabbing his moist eyes with a tissue. It was a courthouse shutout for The Rocket vs. the government of the United States: acquittal Monday on all half-dozen counts that he lied to Congress when he denied using performance-enhancing drugs. See Clemens / D5

MOBILE GOLF BALL FITTING EVENT wednesday, june 27th 8:30am–3:30pm Players will need their driver, 6 or 7 iron and a wedge that they would use to a 50 yard target.

This is a complimentary event. Contact the golf shop at 541-693-5365 to schedule your appointment.

101++Kmjibcjmi>gp]?mw0/,(14.(0.++wrrr)kmjibcjmi^gp])^jh


D2

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION Today

Wednesday

SOCCER 11:30 a.m.: UEFA European Championship, England vs. Ukraine, ESPN. 11:30 a.m.: UEFA European Championship, Sweden vs. France, ESPN2. BASEBALL 4 p.m.: MLB, St. Louis Cardinals at Detroit Tigers or Atlanta Braves at New York Yankees, MLB Network. 5 p.m.: College World Series, Florida State vs. UCLA, ESPN. 6:30 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Arizona Diamondbacks, Root Sports. BASKETBALL 5 p.m.: NBA playoffs, finals, Oklahoma City Thunder at Miami Heat, ABC.

BASEBALL 10 a.m.: MLB, Atlanta Braves at New York Yankees or Toronto Blue Jays at Milwaukee Brewers, MLB Network. 12:30 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Arizona Diamondbacks, Root Sports. 5 p.m.: College World Series, Kent State vs. South Carolina, ESPN. HOCKEY 4 p.m.: NHL, 2012 NHL Awards Show, NBC Sports Network. OLYMPICS 7 p.m.: U.S. Olympic Trials, Men’s and women’s diving, NBC Sports Network. SOCCER 7 p.m.: MLS, Sporting Kansas City at Seattle Sounders, Root Sports.

Today BASKETBALL 5 p.m.: NBA playoffs, finals, Oklahoma City Thunder at Miami Heat, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B • Kent St. eliminates topseeded Gators: Kent State scored four unearned runs and another on a wild pitch, then held off Florida’s comeback bid in the ninth to eliminate the topseeded Gators from the College World Series with a 5-4 victory Monday in Omaha, Neb. The Gators loaded the bases with one out in the ninth against shaky relievers Michael Clark and Josh Pierce. Pierce fought back from a 3-0 count to strike out Casey Turgeon when Turgeon couldn’t check his swing and got called out on an appeal to the thirdbase umpire. Justin Shafer flew out to right to end the game. • Arkansas ends South Carolina’s NCAA tournament streak: Ryne Stanek and Barrett Astin combined on a four-hitter and Arkansas beat South Carolina 2-1 at the College World Series on Monday night in Omaha, Neb., ending the Gamecocks’ NCAA tournament record winning streak at 22 games. The Gamecocks (46-18) will have to beat Kent State on Wednesday to keep alive their hopes of winning a third straight national title. The Razorbacks (46-20) earned two days off and need one more win to go to the best-of-three finals.

Basketball • Bobcats hire St. John’s assistant coach: A person familiar with the decision says the Charlotte Bobcats have hired St. John’s assistant Mike Dunlap to be their new head coach. The person spoke on condition of anonymity Monday because an official announcement was still being planned for the next two days. The news comes as a bit of a surprise because Dunlap was not one of the team’s three finalists.

Football • Tomlinson retires: LaDainian Tomlinson was in the midst of saying goodbye to the NFL when his young son, Daylen, wandered across the dais and tugged on his pant leg, wanting a little attention. Tomlinson reached down and lifted him up, holding him as carefully as he used to carry the football. Joined by his family and several former teammates, Tomlinson ended his brilliant 11-year NFL career the same way he started it — with the San Diego Chargers. Tomlinson signed a one-day contract with the Chargers on Monday and then announced his retirement. “It wasn’t because I didn’t want to play anymore. It was simply time to move on,” Tomlinson said. Tomlinson rushed for 13,684 yards, fifth all-time, and scored 162 touchdowns, third-most ever. His 145 rushing touchdowns are second-most in history. • Goodell hears bounty appeals: NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell held appeals hearings Monday in the Saints bounty case for four suspended players, who complained that the process is unfair and the league hasn’t proven anything. Goodell met Monday at NFL headquarters with New Orleans linebacker Jonathan Vilma, who is out for the 2012 season, and defensive

61. Greg Owen 62. Padraig Harrington 63. Pat Perez 64. Nick Watney 65. Bryce Molder 66. Seung-Yul Noh 67. Jonas Blixt 68. John Merrick 69. Harris English 70. Geoff Ogilvy 71. Chris Stroud 72. Ian Poulter 73. Greg Chalmers 74. Tom Gillis 75. K.J. Choi 76. Robert Allenby 77. John Mallinger 78. J.B. Holmes 79. Bob Estes 80. Vijay Singh 81. Marc Leishman 82. Sergio Garcia 83. Henrik Stenson 84. Harrison Frazar 85. Charl Schwartzel 86. Daniel Summerhays 87. Andres Romero 88. Ricky Barnes 89. Colt Knost 90. Chad Campbell 91. Martin Flores 92. Brian Gay 93. Adam Scott 94. Fredrik Jacobson 95. James Driscoll 95. David Hearn 97. Jeff Maggert 98. Blake Adams 99. Boo Weekley 100. Charley Hoffman

IN THE BLEACHERS

WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE ——— League standings East Division W Wenatchee AppleSox 12 Bellingham Bells 11 Kelowna Falcons 7 Walla Walla Sweets 3 West Division W Corvallis Knights 12 Bend Elks 7 Cowlitz Black Bears 4 Kitsap BlueJackets 5 Klamath Falls Gems 1 Monday’s Games Kelowna 6, Kitsap 1 Corvallis 4, Bend 1 Wenatchee 3, Cowlitz 2 Bellingham 13, Klamath Falls 7 Today’s Games Walla Walla at Kelowna, 6:35 p.m. Corvallis at Cowlitz, 6:35 p.m. Bellingham at Klamath Falls, 7:05 p.m

L 3 3 4 9 L 4 5 9 13 12

Monday’s Summary

Knights 4, Elks 1 Bend 100 000 000 — 1 7 0 Corvallis 010 010 02x — 4 8 1 Chavez, Peterson (5), Brija (8), Hildenberger (8) and Guinn. Patito, Dittrick (4) and Lund. W — Dittrick. L — Peterson. 2B — Bend: Clark; Corvallis: Gallegos. 3B — Bend: Walter.

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Baseball

BASEBALL

end Will Smith, who has been docked for four games; Green Bay defensive end Anthony Hargrove, suspended for eight games; and Cleveland linebacker Scott Fujita (three games). Vilma left first, after about an hourlong session in the morning. The linebacker’s attorney, Peter Ginsberg, said the NFL requested an adjournment to Monday afternoon, but he and Vilma refused. Ginsberg called the hearing “a sham” and said Goodell failed to present the evidence on which he based his decision to impose Vilma’s penalty.

Soccer • U.S. women beat Japan: Abby Wambach and Alex Morgan each scored twice to give the United States a 4-1 win over Japan in Sweden in its penultimate tuneup for the Olympics. Morgan put the U.S. ahead in the third minute and Wambach made it 2-0 in the 10th in the third rematch of 2011 World Cup finalists this year. Yuki Nagasato got a goal back for Japan in the 28th minute. Morgan got her second in the 61st minute and Wambach put away the last goal in the second minute of stoppage time.

Olympics • Facebook posts page for all things Olympics: Facebook on Monday launched an official London Olympics page for fans to connect with their favorite athletes and teams, a move it says can help make this summer’s games the first “truly social” one. Many athletes — as well as the London Games organizers — already connect with their fans on the online social network, but Facebook says its new “Discover London 2012” page is a portal that brings together the profile pages of hundreds of athletes, national teams, and official organizing bodies to make them more accessible to its 900 million users.

Tennis • Nalbandian fined, faces assault inquiry: David Nalbandian was fined the maximum $12,560 and placed under police investigation for assault after kicking an advertising board and injuring a line judge during the Queen’s Club final. The ATP confirmed the fine for unsportsmanlike conduct on Monday and said the Argentine player also was stripped of his $57,350 in prize money. London police, meanwhile, said they were investigating a complaint of assault filed against Nalbandian, who was defaulted from Sunday’s match against Marin Cilic in the grasscourt Wimbledon warmup event. • Oudin wins first tournament in Birmingham: Melanie Oudin of the United States won her first WTA tournament, defeating Jelena Jankovic 6-4, 6-2 in the rain-delayed, grasscourt final of the Aegon Classic on Monday in Birmingham, England. The 20-year-old came through qualifying and won eight matches to claim her first tour title at the Wimbledon warm-up event. She also earned a wild card to compete at the All England Club next week. — From wire reports

NCAA College World Series Glance At TD Ameritrade Park Omaha Omaha, Neb. All Times PDT Double Elimination x-if necessary ——— Friday, June 15 Game 1 — UCLA 9, Stony Brook 1 Game 2 — Arizona 4, Florida State 3, 12 innings Saturday, June 16 Game 3 — Arkansas 8, Kent State 1 Game 4 — South Carolina 7, Florida 3 Sunday, June 17 Game 5 — Florida State 12, Stony Brook 2, Stony Brook eliminated Game 6 — Arizona 4, UCLA 0 Monday, June 18 Game 7 — Kent State 5, Florida 4, Florida eliminated Game 8 — Arkansas 2, South Carolina 1 Today, June 19 Game 9 — Florida State (49-16) vs. UCLA (48-15), 5 p.m. Wednesday, June 20 Game 10 — Kent State (47-19) vs. South Carolina (46-18), 5 p.m. Thursday, June 21 Game 11 — Arizona (45-17) vs. Game 9 winner, 5 p.m. Game 12 — Arkansas (46-20) vs. Game 10 winner, 6 p.m. Friday, June 22 x-Game 13 — Game 6 winner vs. Game 9 winner, 2 p.m. x-Game 14 — Game 8 winner vs. Game 10 winner, 6 p.m. If only one game is necessary, it will start at 5 p.m. Championship Series (Best-of-3) Sunday, June 24 Game 1 — 5 p.m. Monday, June 25 Game 2 — 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 26 x-Game 1 — 5 p.m.

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION NBA Playoff Glance All Times PDT (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) ——— FINALS Miami 2, Oklahoma City 1 Tuesday, June 12: Oklahoma City 105, Miami 94 Thursday, June 14: Miami 100, Oklahoma City 96 Sunday, June 17: Miami 91, Oklahoma City 85 Today, June 19: Oklahoma City at Miami, 6 p.m. Thursday, June 21: Oklahoma City at Miami, 6 p.m. x-Sunday, June 24: Miami at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 26: Miami at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m.

WNBA

GB — ½ 2 4 5 5 GB — 2 4½ 6½ 7 8½

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts GF D.C. 9 4 3 30 29 Sporting Kansas City 9 3 1 28 19 New York 8 4 2 26 27 Chicago 6 5 3 21 18 Columbus 5 4 4 19 13 Houston 5 4 4 19 15 New England 5 7 2 17 18 Montreal 4 7 3 15 19 Philadelphia 2 8 2 8 8 Toronto FC 1 10 0 3 8 Western Conference W L T Pts GF Real Salt Lake 10 3 2 32 25 San Jose 8 3 3 27 27 Vancouver 7 3 4 25 17 Seattle 7 4 3 24 17 Colorado 6 7 1 19 20 Chivas USA 4 7 3 15 9 Los Angeles 4 8 2 14 16 Portland 3 6 4 13 12 FC Dallas 3 9 4 13 16 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Wednesday’s Games Toronto FC at Houston, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m. San Jose at Colorado, 6:30 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at Seattle FC, 7 p.m. Montreal at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m. New York at Vancouver, 8 p.m. Saturday’s Games New England at Toronto FC, 2:30 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Houston at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Columbus at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Chivas USA at FC Dallas, 6 p.m. San Jose at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Seattle FC at Portland, 2 p.m. D.C. United at New York, 4 p.m.

$827,163 $1,018,762 $795,467 $822,007 $747,195 $755,692 $873,798 $746,633 $818,206 $744,108 $832,236 $901,808 $564,322 $726,804 $682,445 $759,557 $623,490 $755,430 $683,558 $630,805 $652,982 $801,316 $701,103 $720,635 $810,744 $674,625 $700,619 $626,889 $746,846 $508,149 $557,767 $607,483 $738,899 $659,431 $560,078 $585,355 $503,193 $590,492 $627,199 $604,519

LPGA Tour

College

WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Connecticut 8 2 .800 Chicago 7 2 .778 Indiana 5 3 .625 Atlanta 4 6 .400 New York 3 7 .300 Washington 2 6 .250 Western Conference W L Pct Minnesota 10 1 .909 Los Angeles 8 3 .727 San Antonio 4 4 .500 Seattle 3 7 .300 Phoenix 2 7 .222 Tulsa 1 9 .100 ——— Monday’s Game Los Angeles 101, Washington 70 Today’s Games New York at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Indiana at Connecticut, 4 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Washington at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Tulsa at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.

477 475 473 463 460 456 455 454 449 445 440 435 434 432 423 415 410 410 402 400 397 396 394 386 380 379 377 376 370 370 365 357 356 354 350 350 345 345 335 334

GA 19 10 21 18 13 16 18 22 15 23 GA 14 17 15 13 19 17 21 16 26

International 2012 European Championship Glance All Times PDT ——— FIRST ROUND GROUP A GP W D L GF GA PTS x-Czech Republic 3 2 0 1 4 5 6 x-Greece 3 1 1 1 3 4 4 Russia 3 1 1 1 5 3 4 Poland 3 0 2 1 2 3 2 x-advanced to quarterfinals Friday, June 8 At Warsaw, Poland Poland 1, Greece 1 At Wroclaw, Poland Russia 4, Czech Republic 1 Tuesday, June 12 At Wroclaw, Poland Czech Republic 2, Greece 1 At Warsaw, Poland Poland 1, Russia 1 Saturday, June 16 At Warsaw, Poland Greece 1, Russia 0 At Wroclaw, Poland Czech Republic 1, Poland 0 GROUP B GP W D L GF GA PTS x-Germany 3 3 0 0 5 2 9 x-Portugal 3 2 0 1 5 4 6 Denmark 3 1 0 2 4 5 3 Netherlands 3 0 0 3 2 5 0 x-advanced to quarterfinals Saturday, June 9 At Kharkiv, Ukraine Denmark 1, Netherlands 0 At Lviv, Ukraine Germany 1, Portugal 0 Wednesday, June 13 At Lviv, Ukraine Portugal 3, Denmark 2 At Kharkiv, Ukraine Germany 2, Netherlands 1 Sunday, June 17 At Kharkiv, Ukraine Portugal 2, Netherlands 1 At Lviv, Ukraine Denmark 1, Germany 2 GROUP C GP W D L GF GA PTS x-Spain 3 2 1 0 6 1 7 x-Italy 3 1 2 0 4 2 5 Croatia 3 1 1 1 4 3 4 Ireland 3 0 0 3 1 9 0 x-advanced to quarterfinals Sunday, June 10 At Gdansk, Poland Spain 1, Italy 1 At Poznan, Poland Croatia 3, Ireland 1 Thursday, June 14 At Poznan, Poland Italy 1, Croatia 1 At Gdansk, Poland Spain 4, Ireland 0 Monday, June 18 At Gdansk, Poland Spain 1, Croatia 0 At Poznan, Poland Italy 2, Ireland 0 GROUP D GP W D L GF GA PTS France 2 1 1 0 3 1 4 England 2 1 1 0 4 3 4 Ukraine 2 1 0 1 2 3 3 Sweden 2 0 0 2 3 5 0 Monday, June 11 At Donetsk, Ukraine France 1, England 1 At Kiev, Ukraine Ukraine 2, Sweden 1 Friday, June 15 At Donetsk, Ukraine France 2, Ukraine 0 At Kiev, Ukraine England 3, Sweden 2 Today, June 19 At Kiev, Ukraine Sweden vs. France, 11:45 a.m. At Donetsk, Ukraine England vs. Ukraine, 11:45 a.m. QUARTERFINALS Thursday, June 21 At Warsaw, Poland Czech Republic vs. Portugal, 11:45 a.m. Friday, June 22 At Gdansk, Poland Germany vs. Greece, 11:45 a.m. Saturday, June 23 At Kiev, Ukraine Spain vs. Group D second place, 11:45 a.m. Sunday, June 24 At Donetsk, Ukraine Group D winner vs. Italy, 11:45 a.m. SEMIFINALS Wednesday, June 27 At Donetsk, Ukraine Warsaw quarterfinal winner vs. Kiev quarterfinal winner, 11:45 a.m. Thursday, June 28 At Warsaw, Poland Gdansk quarterfinal winner vs. Donetsk quarterfinal winner, 11:45 a.m. FINAL Sunday, July 1 At Kiev, Ukraine Semifinal winners, 11:45 a.m.

TENNIS Professional Queen’s Club Monday At Edgbaston Priory Club Birmingham, England Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Championship Melanie Oudin, United States, def. Jelena Jankovic (5), Serbia, 6-4, 6-2. UNICEF Open Monday At Autotron Rosmalen Den Bosch, Netherlands Purse: Men, $568,250 (WT250); Women, $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Men First Round

Olivier Rochus, Belgium, def. Malek Jaziri, Tunisia, 6-3, 4-0, retired. Mate Pavic, Croatia, def. Robin Haase (4), Netherlands, 6-4, 7-6 (2). Benoit Paire, France, def. David Goffin, Belgium, 6-1, 6-4. Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, def. Mikhail Ledovskikh, Russia, 6-4, 6-2. Philipp Petzschner, Germany, def. Dmitry Tursunov, Russia, 6-4, 6-2. Alejandro Falla, Colombia, def. Ruben Ramirez Hidalgo, Spain, 6-4, 6-4. Paolo Lorenzi, Italy, def. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, 64, 6-4. Jurgen Melzer, Austria, def. Igor Kunitsyn (3), Russia, 6-1, 6-1. Tatsuma Ito, Japan, def. Marton Fucsovics, Hungary, 3-6, 6-3, 7-6 (2). Women First Round Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine, def. Sara Errani (2), Italy, 5-7, 6-3, 6-4. Nadia Petrova (2), Russia, def. Kiki Bertens, Netherlands, 6-2, 6-4. Monica Niculescu, Romania, def. Barbora Zahlavova Strycova, Czech Republic, 7-6 (6), 6-3. Irina-Camelia Begu, Romania, def. Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-1. Shahar Peer, Israel, def. Akgul Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, 6-2, 6-4. Roberta Vinci (6), Italy, def. Eleni Daniilidou, Greece, 6-3, 7-5. Urszula Radwanska, Poland, def. Ksenia Pervak, Kazakhstan, 4-6, 6-1, 6-4. Dominika Cibulkova (3), Slovakia, def. Alexandra Cadantu, Romania, 6-2, 6-2. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, def. Sam Stosur (1), Australia, 7-6 (7), 6-3. Arantxa Rus, Netherlands, def. Pauline Parmentier, France, 6-3, 6-4. Francesca Schiavone, Italy, def. Maria Kirilenko (5), Russia, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5. AEGON International Monday At Devonshire Park Eastbourne, England Purse: ATP, $575,700 (WT250); WTA, $637,000 (Premier) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Carlos Berlocq, Argentina, def. Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 3-6, 6-4, 6-2. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, def. Pablo Andujar (8), Spain, 6-1, 6-1. Ryan Harrison, United States, def. Vasek Pospisil, Canada, 3-6, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (6). Fabio Fognini, Italy, def. Albert Ramos, Spain, 7-6 (2), 6-7 (3), 6-2. Jeremy Chardy, France, def. Paul-Henri Mathieu, France, 7-5, 6-7 (5), 7-6 (4). Jamie Baker, Britain, def. Donald Young, United States, 6-1, 6-4. Marinko Matosevic, Australia, def. James Ward, Britain, 4-6, 6-1, 6-4. Women First Round Aleksandra Wozniak, Canada, def. Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, 6-3, 4-6, 7-6 (5). Daniela Hantuchova (8), Slovakia, def. Anne Keothavong, Britain, 6-2, 6-3. Tamira Paszek, Austria, def. Marina Erakovic, New Zealand, 7-5, 6-1. Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, def. Mona Barthel, Germany, 6-1, 4-6, 6-1.

GOLF PGA Tour FedEx Cup Standings Through June 17 Rank Player Points YTD Money 1. Jason Dufner 1,849 $4,077,013 2. Hunter Mahan 1,509 $3,255,212 3. Tiger Woods 1,452 $3,050,398 4. Zach Johnson 1,414 $3,072,341 5. Bubba Watson 1,372 $3,204,778 6. Rory McIlroy 1,372 $3,164,700 7. Matt Kuchar 1,343 $3,151,352 8. Phil Mickelson 1,313 $2,857,371 9. Webb Simpson 1,259 $2,735,197 10. Carl Pettersson 1,258 $2,459,113 11. Rickie Fowler 1,197 $2,731,569 12. Justin Rose 1,169 $2,636,250 13. Johnson Wagner 1,124 $2,093,283 14. Luke Donald 1,070 $2,299,506 15. John Huh 982 $2,120,080 16. Kyle Stanley 981 $2,022,213 17. Mark Wilson 940 $1,953,639 18. Jim Furyk 931 $1,939,396 19. Bill Haas 922 $1,887,862 20. Steve Stricker 911 $1,862,017 21. Dustin Johnson 898 $1,815,950 22. Brandt Snedeker 888 $1,757,814 23. Ben Curtis 886 $2,154,480 24. Keegan Bradley 876 $1,728,110 25. Martin Laird 847 $1,885,834 26. Graeme McDowell 812 $1,827,484 27. Ernie Els 802 $1,644,658 28. Kevin Na 779 $1,690,805 29. Ben Crane 747 $1,508,555 30. Robert Garrigus 709 $1,329,838 31. Spencer Levin 695 $1,240,911 32. Lee Westwood 690 $1,692,789 33. Louis Oosthuizen 672 $1,535,067 34. Charlie Wi 664 $1,219,342 35. D.A. Points 662 $1,345,313 36. Jonathan Byrd 655 $1,486,315 37. Ryan Palmer 641 $1,163,762 38. Matt Every 641 $1,365,897 39. Michael Thompson 628 $1,215,966 40. Charles Howell III 621 $896,483 41. Bo Van Pelt 619 $1,376,322 42. John Rollins 611 $1,183,937 43. John Senden 604 $1,089,172 44. Ken Duke 604 $1,155,835 45. George McNeill 572 $1,020,035 46. Kevin Stadler 561 $1,035,276 47. Cameron Tringale 548 $1,010,016 48. Brian Davis 546 $941,543 49. David Toms 524 $1,071,928 50. Brendon de Jonge 516 $736,675 51. Sean O’Hair 514 $776,434 52. Sang-Moon Bae 510 $967,285 53. Aaron Baddeley 506 $991,289 54. Dicky Pride 503 $1,088,363 55. Ryan Moore 500 $933,709 56. Jeff Overton 495 $845,378 57. Rory Sabbatini 494 $962,940 58. Bud Cauley 492 $771,461 59. Scott Piercy 485 $852,965 60. Jimmy Walker 483 $871,808

Money leaders Through June 10 Tournaments Money 1. Yani Tseng 10 $1,005,527 2. Stacy Lewis 11 $857,689 3. Azahara Munoz 11 $739,587 4. Ai Miyazato 9 $735,727 5. Shanshan Feng 8 $668,715 6. Sun Young Yoo 11 $613,031 7. So Yeon Ryu 10 $378,036 8. Na Yeon Choi 9 $365,151 9. Suzann Pettersen 11 $364,872 10. Jiyai Shin 8 $334,453 11. Angela Stanford 11 $333,007 12. Eun-Hee Ji 11 $299,149 13. I.K. Kim 7 $295,417 14. Candie Kung 11 $293,868 15. Mika Miyazato 9 $287,305 16. Karrie Webb 11 $279,028 17. Cristie Kerr 11 $253,867 18. Jenny Shin 11 $252,251 19. Morgan Pressel 11 $246,384 20. Amy Yang 9 $238,680 21. Lexi Thompson 9 $227,895 22. Katherine Hull 11 $223,974 23. Hee Kyung Seo 11 $222,573 24. Brittany Lincicome 11 $222,202 25. Vicky Hurst 11 $219,921 26. Hee Young Park 11 $219,097 27. Meena Lee 11 $215,362 28. Anna Nordqvist 11 $196,640 29. Jessica Korda 8 $192,374 30. Inbee Park 10 $180,144 31. Julieta Granada 11 $179,127 32. Paula Creamer 10 $177,866 33. Karin Sjodin 9 $174,824 34. Caroline Hedwall 10 $174,029 35. Se Ri Pak 6 $170,640 36. Karine Icher 9 $146,585 37. Brittany Lang 11 $142,039 38. Hee-Won Han 11 $141,134 39. Chella Choi 11 $132,497 40. Mina Harigae 11 $132,146 41. Haeji Kang 9 $121,569 42. Jodi Ewart 9 $120,657 43. Sandra Gal 11 $119,006 44. Sophie Gustafson 11 $111,531 45. Catriona Matthew 8 $110,815 46. Katie Futcher 11 $110,780 47. Natalie Gulbis 10 $110,620 48. Jennifer Johnson 10 $107,975 49. Gerina Piller 8 $103,384 50. Mariajo Uribe 6 $99,044

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Agreed to terms with OF Courtney Hawkins on a minor league contract and assigned him to Bristol (Appalachian). Agreed to terms with RHP Kyle Hansen, C Jose Barraza and C-1B Zach Stoner on minor league contracts. CLEVELAND INDIANS—Released RHP Hector Ambriz from Columbus (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Placed 2B Chris Getz on the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Nate Adcock to Omaha (PCL). Recalled RHP Louis Coleman and LHP Tommy Hottovy from Omaha. LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Reinstated C Bobby Wilson from the seven-day concussion DL. Recalled 3B Andrew Romine from Salt Lake (PCL). Designated RHP David Pauley for assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Agreed to terms with LHP Matt Smoral. National League CHICAGO CUBS—Placed RHP Ryan Dempster on the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Scott Maine from Iowa (PCL). Activated C Geovany Soto from the 15day DL. Optioned C Welington Castillo to Iowa. CINCINNATI REDS—Activated 3B Scott Rolen from the 15-day DL. Optioned INF/OF Kristoper Negron to Louisville (IL). HOUSTON ASTROS—Agreed to terms with RHP Lance McCullers. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NEW ORLEANS HORNETS—Announced president Hugh Weber will not return. Named Dennis Lauscha president and Mickey Loomis head of basketball operations. FOOTBALL National Football League NEW YORK JETS—Waived LB Donovan Robinson. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES—Agreed to terms with DT Fletcher Cox on a four-year contract. Claimed DE Monte Taylor off waivers from Seattle. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS—Signed RB LaDainian Tomlinson to a one-day contract and announced his retirement. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Released TE John Nalbone. Signed T Edawn Coughman. HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Agreed to terms with F Brandon Bollig and F Ben Smith on two-year contracts and G Carter Hutton on a one-year contract. Released G Alexander Salak. DALLAS STARS—Named Curt Fraser assistant coach. NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Signed G Magnus Hellberg to an entry-level contract. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Re-signed F Mike Angelidis to a one-year contract. TENNIS ATP—Fined David Nalbandian $12,560 and stripped him of $57,350 in prize money for unsportsmanlike conduct during Sunday’s Aegon Championships final. COLLEGE MARQUETTE—Named Jerry Wainwright director of men’s basketball operations and Devin Johnson video coordinator. MICHIGAN STATE—Signed athletic director Mark Hollis to a five-year contract. NORTHERN ARIZONA—Named Sue Darling women’s basketball coach. SEATTLE—Agreed to terms with baseball coach Donny Harrel on a four-year contract.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 2,643 269 326 99 The Dalles 2,234 201 94 42 John Day 1,741 187 57 15 McNary 1,458 53 75 26 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 191,805 10,803 6,615 2,569 The Dalles 138,616 9,131 2,487 1,101 John Day 122,975 8,173 2,324 1,401 McNary 113,138 5,243 5,113 2,276


TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

GOLF

MOTOR SPORTS COMMENTARY

Americans suddenly on a roll By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — In a little more than six months, they shared the stage in a playoff, became fast friends through their faith and then partners in the Presidents Cup. Webb Simpson and Bubba Watson are linked again in ways they never imagined. Major champions. Simpson joined the most important fraternity in golf Sunday at The Olympic Club with a flourish of birdies and a steady diet of pars at the end. The last one came from a delicate chip out of a hole in the rough to 3 feet that wound up being the decisive stroke in the U.S. Open. On a leaderboard loaded with possibilities, his name did not stand out. Simpson was playing in only his fifth major, and his second U.S. Open. He had missed the cut in his past two tournaments. And he was six shots out of the lead when he walked off the fifth green with his second bogey of the day. Some four hours later, Simpson sat in the clubhouse with his pregnant wife, Dowd. They tried to take their mind off the finish by watching videos of their young son, James, who stayed behind in North Carolina. She squeezed tight on his hand as they watched Jim Furyk hit into the bunker on the 18th to eliminate his chances, and then Graeme McDowell miss a 25-foot birdie putt that would have forced a playoff. “If I was honest with you, I believed in myself (that) I could win a major, but maybe not so soon,” Simpson said. “And I just gained all the respect for the guys who have won multiple majors because it’s so hard to do. The level of pressure is so much greater than a regular event.” “I probably prayed more the last three holes than I ever did in my life,” said Simpson, a religion major at Wake Forest. It was Simpson who called over to Watson, their caddies and their wives to huddle under an umbrella on the green at Royal Melbourne for a quick prayer after they won a match that set the tone in the Presidents Cup. They are nothing alike. Watson manufactured a swing on a public course in the Florida Panhandle and doesn’t have a formal teacher. Simpson grew up at a country club and even played Augusta National when he was a teenager. Watson speaks his mind. Simpson is more reserved. Watson and Simpson traded text messages the morning of the final round last year in New Orleans.

D3

Junior gives a lesson in perseverance By Jenna Fryer The Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — K, it’s just one win. The first in four years, no less. And as Tony Stewart pointed out, Dale Earnhardt Jr. returning to Victory Lane doesn’t exactly warrant a national holiday. But there is a level of importance to Earnhardt snapping his 143-race losing streak that goes beyond the immediate boost to NASCAR, which has been starving of late for any sort of scintillating story line unrelated to another Kurt Busch meltdown. What Earnhardt did Sunday at Michigan International Speedway was a lesson in perseverance, and a teachable moment for parents everywhere. Earnhardt proved that you can hit rock bottom and rise again. Some may roll their eyes at this point, perhaps even snicker at the notion that Earnhardt has ever had it Earnhardt very rough. He’s rich, has a secure sponsorship and rocksolid job security with Rick Hendrick, the most powerful owner in NASCAR. He also has a very famous last name, an enormous fan base and is the one driver who can absolutely move the needle for NASCAR. It’s a lot of pressure to carry around 11 months a year, particularly when stuck in a never-ending slump. It wasn’t just a slump, either. There have been stretches since 2008 where Earnhardt simply wasn’t very good. The first came in 2009, when his five top-10 finishes tied the career-low set in his 2000 rookie season. But he won two races and the All-Star event that first year, and with it came a bravado that overshadowed the on-track inconsistency. So 2009 was unlike any other season for NASCAR’s most popular driver, and the hole he fell into was so deep that it took him until Sunday to finally climb out. That season snowballed on him, and tension with cousin Tony Eury Jr. had reached its breaking point by Memorial Day, when Earnhardt quietly slipped in a side door for the driver meeting and stood off to the side among the fans rather than sit with his crew chief. Earnhardt finished 40th in the CocaCola 600, and Hendrick pulled the trigger a few days later with a much-needed divorce that both Earnhardt and Eury were too emotionally invested to realize themselves. A month later, with new crew chief Lance McGrew, he was able to see the toll it had taken. “I can’t have another year like this. I can’t mentally. I can’t physically. I don’t want to put the people around me through this,” Earnhardt told The Associated Press in a June 2009 interview. “When we were really, really struggling, everybody in the family was upset. Crying and carrying on. All the women were crying, the men we’re cussing. I’m serious. This is our family, Eurys and Earnhardts, racing is our life and it wears on all of them. We can’t put anybody through this (stuff) again. We’ve got to get this right.” The relationship was made right, but the performance didn’t improve. Part of that was because Earnhardt’s confidence was totally shattered. While he was sputtering along, teammates Jimmie Johnson, Mark Martin and Jeff Gordon combined to win 13 times and finish 1-2-3 in the championship race. No matter how good Earnhardt may be at tuning out the critics, it couldn’t have been easy to look in the mirror when his teammates were proving there was nothing wrong with the equipment. And no matter how hard he tried, Earnhardt couldn’t make the relationship with McGrew take off. Earnhardt understands his crew chief is subjected to intense scrutiny from the JR Nation fan club, and he tried to deflect some of it. But as the losses mounted, the vitriol increased, and Hendrick again made a change at the end of the 2010 season. Next up was Steve Letarte, who had shouldered more than his share of venom as Gordon’s longtime crew chief. Nobody knew if he could actually pick Earnhardt back up and coach him back to Victory Lane, but that’s the genius of Hendrick, who realized Earnhardt desperately needed someone to restore his confidence. Letarte played the cheerleader role to perfection, and although Earnhardt didn’t win last season, he improved his top-fives and top-10s, and returned to the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship for the first time since 2008. It set the stage for this season. Through 15 races, Earnhardt has matched his top10s from last season, improved his topfives (he has six after four last year) and his 218 laps led are his most since 2008. The turnaround is so impressive that Earnhardt — the guy who just snapped a four-year losing streak — is suddenly considered a viable championship contender. That’s what happens when you don’t quit, or bow to the pressure. Earnhardt could have made a pretty nice fortune running around in 15th or so for the rest of his career, collecting paychecks and trophies as the most popular driver. Instead, he bought into whatever Letarte sold him at the start of 2011. So what if Earnhardt never wins a Sprint Cup championship? It won’t be for lack of trying.

O

David Callow / The Associated Press file

U.S. team’s Bubba Watson, left, talks with teammate Webb Simpson on the 5th green during the Presidents Cup at Royal Melbourne Golf Course in Melbourne, Australia, last November.

Watson wound up beating him in a playoff, but the relationship took root. When it became clear they would qualify for the Presidents Cup, they asked U.S. captain Fred Couples if they could be partners. They won three of their matches. Couples was wandering around Olympic and watched it unfold. Simpson had a 68-68 weekend — he was the only player in the last nine groups who broke par in the foggy final round — and finished at 1-over 281 for a one-shot win over McDowell and Michael Thompson, who had a 67 that was almost good enough to return Monday for a playoff. He went to No. 5 in the world. He went to No. 3 in the Ryder Cup standings. And he extended a modest streak that indicates a quiet return of American golf. The Americans now have won the past three majors dating to Keegan Bradley’s playoff win at the PGA Championship in August. It might not sound like much, but it had been just over five years since Americans won three straight majors (two of those by Tiger Woods), and more than eight years since three different Americans put together a streak that long. The United States started the year with only six players among the top 15. Now there are nine. And these majors are coming from unlikely sources.

Bradley became only the second player in nearly 100 years to win on his first try at a major. Watson always had the talent, though his composure was always in question until he made four straight birdies on the back nine at Augusta National. He won his playoff by hooking a wedge some 40 yards out of the trees and onto the green to win with a par. Simpson won twice last year on the PGA Tour and lost a shot at the money title in the final round of the year. Even so, the 26-year-old had been quiet this year, and didn’t have high expectations even as he played the final round. “I never really wrapped my mind around winning,” Simpson said. “This place is so demanding, and so all I was really concerned about was keeping the ball in front of me and making pars. The course is so hard, you don’t know if you’re going to make three or four bogeys in a row.” He left that to the others. McDowell made four bogeys on the front nine and had to spend the rest of the day catching up. He holed a clutch birdie on the 17th hole to get within one shot and gave himself a look at birdie on the final hole. Furyk looked strong as ever, even rolling in a 30-foot par putt on the 12th hole, but a snap hook off the tee at the par-5 16th led to bogey, and he made bogey when he needed birdie on the 18th

by hitting into the bunker. While Simpson admired Woods and his 14 majors, inspiration came from Bradley. “If I see Keegan Bradley win a major — I respect his game a ton — but I feel like, ‘Keegan Bradley won one, I want to go win one,’ ” Simpson said. “All these guys that won before me, I thought, ‘I want to win a tournament.’ They’re great players, but I want to do what they’re doing.” It seems as though everyone is doing that. Simpson is the 15th player who has won the past 15 majors, the kind of parity golf hasn’t seen since a similar streak 14 years ago that ended with Lee Janzen’s win at Olympic Club in 1998. Simpson didn’t have an answer for so many different players winning majors. “One of my thoughts on the back nine was, ‘I don’t know how Tiger has won 14 of these things because of the pressure,’ ” Simpson said. “I couldn’t feel my legs most of the back nine. It grew my respect for Tiger all the more. I think the prime of golf was mid-30s. Now it’s moving closer to the mid-20s or late 20s. There’s so many young guys.” That they are young is not a surprise. Six of the past eight major champions were in their 20s. The surprise is that more of them are Americans.

OLYMPIC SWIMMING

Evans, 40, puts hopes into 800 freestyle By Beth Harris The Associated Press

IRVINE, Calif. — Janet Evans is close to finding out whether her comeback will end at the London Games. The 40-year-old winner of four Olympic gold medals already accomplished her main goal of qualifying for the U.S. trials that begin next week in Omaha, Neb. Now she wants to earn a spot in the final of the 800-meter freestyle, an event she once dominated. It won’t be easy. Evans must advance from the preliminary heats to make the eight-woman final. Then she has to finish first or second to punch her ticket to a fourth Olympics. “It’s fair to call her a long shot,” her coach, Mark Schubert, said. That’s because Evans simply isn’t as fast as she was in her heyday in the late 1980s and early ’90s. That’s when she built her legacy as the queen of distance swimming, with world records in the 400, 800 and 1,500 freestyles and back-to-back Olympic and world titles in the 800 free, becoming the first woman to do so. “The times I’m doing, I’m really proud of myself for 40 and to be with my two kids and have this be my job,” she said. “It’s pretty grueling being a distance swimmer.” Evans finished sixth in her final tuneup meet last month before trials. Her time of 8 minutes, 49.36 seconds in the 800 free was 15.71 seconds behind the winner of the 16-lap race. She was sixth in the event at an April meet with a time of 8:46.89. “What she’s done really well the last 18 months is dry-land training and strength training, and that is going to help her speed a lot,” Schubert said. “She’s tired from training right now, but I think in the end she’s going to swim real well.” Evans has tailored her comeback to suit a lifestyle that includes husband Billy Wilson and their two children. She rises at 4:30 a.m. to train and returns home by 8 a.m. to supervise older daughter Sydney and son Jake. She puts in another training session from 3 to 6 p.m. before coming home to make dinner. On some days, Evans is traveling to fulfill commitments with sponsors and giving motivational speeches. “Who does that?” said Schubert. “She’s a maniac. That’s just the best way I can describe it.”

Michael Goulding / The Orange County Register

Olympic gold medalist Janet Evans, 40, looks to earn a spot on the U.S. team in the 800-meter freestyle at next week’s Olympic trials.

Evans’ schedule is a far cry from her days as a college swimmer who went to workouts, skipped classes and watched television. “I could do this forever if I wasn’t so physically tired,” she said during a recent meet in Irvine, close to her Orange County home. “I have the most energetic 5- and 2-year-olds on the planet but I want to be there for them so I never have any downtime. That’s the hardest part for me. A lot of my girlfriends work and I think they feel that way as well, but for me, it’s physical, like getting my kids in and out of car seats. “There’s challenges because I’m tired. Billy is really funny because he’s like, ‘I never knew how hard it was.’ ” But Evans wouldn’t have it any other way. She pulls out her cellphone to show a photo of Sydney standing in the bathtub posing in Evans’ too-big suit. Then she plays a video of Sydney swimming backstroke right into the wall, not yet old enough to realize the flags over the pool warn that the wall is coming quickly. “Isn’t that the cutest thing you’ve ever seen?” Evans gushes. “She hits her head. She was totally cool with it.” Always on the hunt for future talent, Schubert asked Sydney if she wanted to swim. Her answer was no. “He’s like, ‘But you’re tall, you’re going to be like a tall Janet Evans.’ Could you imagine?” said Evans, who is 5-foot-6. “I’m like, ‘Mark, she doesn’t want to swim.’ ” Evans returned to competitive swimming after a 15-year retirement because it was some-

thing she could do just for herself. “As a mom, you put a lot of things on the backburner. I worked my whole life and I stopped when I had children. I miss working and for me work is swimming,” she said. “For me just to stay at home, it’s a personal thing. Some women can do it and some women can’t. Because I’ve worked my whole life I need more.” Her husband wonders what Evans will channel her energies into once her comeback ends. “He’s a little worried,” she said, smiling. “He’s like, ‘Are you going to head the PTA?’ We’ll see what’s next.” Evans is putting all her hopes into the 800, knowing that she lacks the speed to challenge for a berth in the 400. Still, the pressure and expectations that derail many a contender in the highly charged atmosphere at trials figure to have little effect on her. “She has a lot of experience and a lot of competitiveness, so I never count her out, especially in the big moment,” said Schubert, who coached Evans in her glory days. “The whole trials thing kind of changes people sometimes, but she knows how to handle it.” Evans began her comeback 1½ years ago. Unlike some retired athletes who must first lose middle-age pounds, Evans stayed fit. Her slender frame, long dark hair and big smile had hardly changed since the years when she churned through the water with her trademark windmill stroke. “I don’t see that there’s any reason that people can’t compete well into their 30s and their 40s if they stay fit,” Schubert said. “Dara (Torres) is a perfect example of somebody that has never let herself get out of shape. Janet is the same way. I don’t see her changing after this is over with.” If Evans makes the 800 final at trials, she could find herself relegated to an outside lane instead of in the middle of the pool, where the fastest-seeded swimmer is assigned. Regardless of whether she makes the U.S. team, Evans already considers her comeback a success. “It’s been a great journey, I have so many people that support me and depend on me and cheer for me. I’ve learned a lot and who says you can’t learn at 40?” she said. “I appreciate my family and time with my kids. It’s been rewarding on so many levels.”


D4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

Interleague Boxscores Diamondbacks 7, Mariners 1 Seattle M.Saunders lf Gutierrez cf Seager 3b J.Montero c C.Wells rf Smoak 1b Ackley 2b Ryan ss Noesi p a-Olivo ph Kelley p O.Perez p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 1 0 0 34

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 0 1 2 0 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 9

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 2 1 0 1 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 9

Avg. .265 .188 .260 .266 .286 .219 .251 .170 .000 .211 -----

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bloomquist ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .286 A.Hill 2b 4 3 4 1 0 0 .284 J.Upton rf 3 1 1 2 0 0 .259 Kubel lf 2 1 1 1 1 0 .295 Goldschmidt 1b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .277 M.Montero c 1 0 0 1 2 1 .251 C.Young cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .230 J.Bell 3b 4 0 2 1 0 1 .186 Miley p 3 0 1 0 0 1 .385 Collmenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-R.Roberts ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Putz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 29 7 11 7 3 6 Seattle 000 001 000 — 1 9 1 Arizona 301 002 10x — 7 11 0 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Noesi in the 7th. b-flied out for Collmenter in the 8th. E—J.Montero (2). LOB—Seattle 6, Arizona 5. 2B—Gutierrez (1), C.Wells (5), A.Hill (13), Goldschmidt (17), Miley (2). 3B—A.Hill (4). HR—A.Hill (8), off Kelley. RBIs—C.Wells (8), A.Hill (28), J.Upton 2 (24), Kubel (40), Goldschmidt (27), M.Montero (33), J.Bell (4). CS—Olivo (3). DP—Seattle 1; Arizona 1. Seattle IP H R Noesi L, 2-8 6 9 6 Kelley 2-3 1 1 O.Perez 1 1-3 1 0 Arizona IP H R Miley W, 8-3 7 9 1 Collmenter 1 0 0 Putz 1 0 0 T—2:23. A—24,284 (48,633).

ER BB SO NP 5 2 5 96 1 0 0 6 0 1 1 24 ER BB SO NP 1 0 8 98 0 0 0 9 0 0 1 11

ERA 5.69 3.93 0.00 ERA 2.30 5.59 5.14

Astros 9, Royals 7 Kansas City A.Gordon lf Y.Betancourt 2b Butler 1b Francoeur rf Moustakas 3b A.Escobar ss Quintero c Dyson cf J.Sanchez p a-Hosmer ph L.Coleman p c-Maier ph Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 3 2 1 0 0 38

R 2 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 7

H 3 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 13

BI 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 7

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 6

Avg. .262 .258 .298 .274 .278 .292 .231 .263 .000 .218 --.175

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Altuve 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .320 Bixler ss 5 2 3 3 0 2 .313 Maxwell cf 3 2 2 3 2 1 .246 Ca.Lee 1b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .295 J.D.Martinez lf 4 0 2 0 0 2 .228 C.Johnson 3b 3 1 0 0 0 1 .265 M.Downs rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .169 Bogusevic rf 1 1 1 1 0 0 .234 C.Snyder c 2 2 1 1 2 0 .196 Happ p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .083 D.Carpenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 W.Wright p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Lyon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Lowrie ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .271 Myers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --X.Cedeno p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 31 9 11 8 5 8 Kansas City 100 001 005 — 7 13 2 Houston 200 200 05x — 9 11 0 a-struck out for J.Sanchez in the 7th. b-popped out for Lyon in the 8th. c-hit a sacrifice fly for L.Coleman in the 9th. E—J.Sanchez 2 (4). LOB—Kansas City 7, Houston 7. 2B—A.Gordon (21), Bixler (3), Maxwell (5). 3B—Y.Betancourt (1). HR—Bixler (1), off J.Sanchez; Bogusevic (5), off L.Coleman; Maxwell (8), off L.Coleman. DP—Kansas City 1; Houston 1. Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Sanchez L, 1-3 6 6 4 3 4 3 106 5.70 L.Coleman 2 5 5 5 1 5 38 4.91 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ W, 5-7 6 4 2 2 1 3 108 5.15 D.Carpenter H, 2 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 6 5.06 W.Wright H, 9 2-3 0 0 0 1 2 14 4.12 Lyon H, 3 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 2.73 Myers 2-3 8 5 5 0 0 40 3.86 X.Cedeno S, 1-1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 3.12 Happ pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—3:04. A—15,436 (40,981).

Yankees 6, Braves 2

American League New York Baltimore Tampa Bay Toronto Boston

W 41 39 37 34 33

L 25 28 29 33 33

Chicago Cleveland Detroit Kansas City Minnesota

W 35 34 32 29 26

L 32 32 34 36 39

Texas Los Angeles Oakland Seattle

W 41 36 31 29

L 27 32 36 40

East Division Pct GB WCGB .621 — — .582 2½ — .561 4 — .507 7½ 3½ .500 8 4 Central Division Pct GB WCGB .522 — — .515 ½ 3 .485 2½ 5 .446 5 7½ .400 8 10½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .603 — — .529 5 2 .463 9½ 6½ .420 12½ 9½

Monday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 6, Atlanta 2 Cleveland 10, Cincinnati 9 N.Y. Mets 5, Baltimore 0 Houston 9, Kansas City 7 Chicago Cubs 12, Chicago White Sox 3

National League

L10 Str Home Away 10-0 W-10 20-12 21-13 7-3 L-1 19-14 20-14 6-4 W-1 21-15 16-14 4-6 L-1 19-15 15-18 5-5 W-2 14-19 19-14 L10 3-7 4-6 7-3 5-5 5-5

Str Home Away L-2 16-19 19-13 W-1 18-18 16-14 W-2 15-17 17-17 L-1 11-20 18-16 W-1 13-22 13-17

L10 8-2 7-3 6-4 3-7

Str Home Away W-4 20-12 21-15 L-1 18-16 18-16 L-1 15-17 16-19 L-1 12-19 17-21

Washington New York Atlanta Miami Philadelphia

W 38 36 35 33 31

L 26 32 32 33 37

Cincinnati Pittsburgh St. Louis Milwaukee Houston Chicago

W 38 34 34 31 28 23

L 28 31 33 36 39 44

Los Angeles San Francisco Arizona Colorado San Diego

W 42 38 33 25 24

L 25 30 34 40 44

East Division Pct GB WCGB .594 — — .529 4 — .522 4½ ½ .500 6 2 .456 9 5 Central Division Pct GB WCGB .576 — — .523 3½ ½ .507 4½ 1½ .463 7½ 4½ .418 10½ 7½ .343 15½ 12½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .627 — — .559 4½ — .493 9 2½ .385 16 9½ .353 18½ 12

Today’s Games Atlanta (T.Hudson 4-3) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 6-6), 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Leake 2-5) at Cleveland (Tomlin 3-4), 4:05 p.m. Minnesota (Diamond 5-2) at Pittsburgh (Correia 2-6), 4:05 p.m. St. Louis (Lynn 10-2) at Detroit (Verlander 6-4), 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 8-4) at Washington (Wang 2-2), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (Outman 0-2) at Philadelphia (Hamels 9-3), 4:05 p.m. Baltimore (Tom.Hunter 3-3) at N.Y. Mets (J.Santana 4-3), 4:10 p.m. Miami (Buehrle 5-7) at Boston (Buchholz 7-2), 4:10 p.m.

Milwaukee 7, Toronto 6 Arizona 7, Seattle 1 San Francisco 5, L.A. Angels 3 Texas 2, San Diego 1

L10 6-4 4-6 3-7 2-8 3-7

Str Home Away L-3 18-13 20-13 W-1 20-15 16-17 L-3 15-17 20-15 L-1 17-18 16-15 L-3 12-19 19-18

L10 7-3 6-4 5-5 5-5 4-6 4-6

Str Home Away L-1 20-13 18-15 W-2 19-11 15-20 L-1 17-16 17-17 W-1 17-17 14-19 W-1 19-14 9-25 W-1 14-19 9-25

L10 6-4 5-5 6-4 1-9 5-5

Str Home Away W-1 24-12 18-13 W-1 21-14 17-16 W-1 16-16 17-18 L-2 15-21 10-19 L-1 14-21 10-23

Kansas City (Hochevar 3-7) at Houston (W.Rodriguez 6-4), 5:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 0-3) at Chicago White Sox (Peavy 6-2), 5:10 p.m. Toronto (J.Chavez 0-0) at Milwaukee (Marcum 5-3), 5:10 p.m. Seattle (Er.Ramirez 0-1) at Arizona (D.Hudson 3-1), 6:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Harang 5-3) at Oakland (McCarthy 5-3), 7:05 p.m. San Francisco (Zito 5-4) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 7-4), 7:05 p.m. Texas (Feldman 0-6) at San Diego (Volquez 3-6), 7:05 p.m.

A.Soriano dh Clevenger 1b Barney 2b Valbuena 3b Soto c Campana lf Totals

5 5 5 5 5 4 42

2 1 1 1 1 1 12

2 1 1 3 2 1 15

2 1 1 3 1 0 12

0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 6

.269 .284 .272 .294 .173 .272

Chicago (A) AB R H BI BB SO Avg. De Aza cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .296 Beckham 2b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .236 a-E.Escobar ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .182 A.Dunn dh 4 0 1 0 0 3 .227 Konerko 1b 3 1 1 2 0 0 .359 b-Lillibridge ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .186 Rios rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .291 Jor.Danks rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .385 Pierzynski c 3 1 1 1 0 1 .286 Flowers c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .174 Viciedo lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .260 Al.Ramirez ss 3 0 2 0 0 0 .230 O.Hudson 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .176 Totals 33 3 6 3 1 9 Chicago (N) 002 031 600 — 12 15 0 Chicago (A) 000 012 000 — 3 6 0 a-grounded out for Beckham in the 8th. b-struck out for Konerko in the 8th. LOB—Chicago (N) 5, Chicago (A) 4. HR—LaHair (13), off Z.Stewart; S.Castro (6), off Z.Stewart; A.Soriano (13), off Z.Stewart; Soto (4), off Z.Stewart; Valbuena (2), off N.Jones; Pierzynski (12), off Garza; Konerko (13), off Garza. SB—Campana (24). Chicago (N) IP H R ER BB SO NP Garza W, 3-5 6 5 3 3 1 6 87 Camp 2 1 0 0 0 2 25 Corpas 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 Chicago (A) IP H R ER BB SO NP Z.Stewart L, 1-2 5 2-3 9 6 6 0 1 90 Ohman 2-3 1 2 2 0 2 17 N.Jones 0 5 4 4 0 0 16 H.Santiago 2 2-3 0 0 0 0 3 41 N.Jones pitched to 5 batters in the 7th. T—2:49. A—33,215 (40,615).

ERA 4.07 3.53 1.13 ERA 6.00 5.96 3.21 4.15

Indians 10, Reds 9

MLB roundup • Astros 9, Royals 7: HOUSTON — Brian Bixler drove in a career-high three runs on three hits, including his first career homer, and Justin Maxwell and Brian Bogusevic also homered as Houston held off Kansas City. J.A. Happ (5-7) yielded four hits and two runs in 6-plus innings to break a four-game losing streak. • Diamondbacks 7, Mariners 1: PHOENIX — Aaron Hill hit a solo homer in the seventh inning to become the fifth Arizona player to hit for the cycle, lifting the Diamondbacks to a win over Seattle. Hill hit a single in the first inning off Hector Noesi (2-8), added a triple in the third and a double off the Mariners starter in the fifth. He finished it off in style, hitting a one-out, solo homer off Shawn Kelley in the seventh for the majors’ second cycle this season. • Rangers 2, Padres 1: SAN DIEGO — David Murphy hit a two-run single in the first inning, Matt Harrison won his fifth straight decision and Texas beat San Diego for its fourth straight victory. Harrison (9-3) tied CC Sabathia and Ivan Nova of the New York Yankees for the AL lead in victories. He allowed one run and six hits in six innings, struck out four and walked two. • Giants 5, Angels 3: Matt Cain followed up his perfect game by persevering through five difficult innings for another victory, and Brandon Crawford had an early two-run double among San Francisco’s 13 hits in a victory over Los Angeles. Ryan Theriot had three hits and drove in two runs for the Giants. Cain gave up a hit on his third pitch at Angel Stadium to Mike Trout, eventually allowing three runs on six hits and a season-high four walks.

• Mets 5, Orioles 0: NEW YORK — R.A. Dickey became the first major league pitcher in 24 years to throw consecutive one-hitters and Ike Davis hit a grand slam to lead the New York Mets past Baltimore. Coming off a one-hit gem at Tampa Bay last Wednesday, the knuckleballer struck out a careerhigh 13 and allowed only Wilson Betemit’s clean single in the fifth inning. • Yankees 6, Braves 2: NEW YORK — CC Sabathia struck out 10, Derek Jeter drove in three runs and the Yankees won their 10th straight game, beating the Braves. Mark Teixeira and Robinson Cano hit solo home runs as the Yankees matched their longest winning streak since May 2005. • Indians 10, Reds 9: CLEVELAND — Lonnie Chisenhall and Casey Kotchman had three RBIs apiece and Cleveland ended Cincinnati’s six-game winning streak. Chisenhall and Kotchman hit two-run homers, and both drove in runs in the sixth inning off Sam LeCure (2-2) as Cleveland snapped a 7-7 tie. • Brewers 7, Blue Jays 6: MILWAUKEE — Aramis Ramirez’s liner down the left-field line was ruled a home run after umpires reversed a foul ball call using video replay in the seventh inning that snapped a tie and lifted the Brewers to a victory over the Blue Jays. Umpires spent about 90 seconds checking the replay, before returning and signaling a home run for Ramirez, his eighth of the year. • Cubs 12, White Sox 3: CHICAGO — Bryan LaHair and Alfonso Soriano homered to lead the Chicago Cubs to a victory over the White Sox in the opener of the crosstown, interleague series. With winds gusting to 41 mph the Cubs had season highs of five home runs, 15 hits and 12 runs.

Cano 2b 3 2 1 1 1 0 .301 An.Jones rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .208 R.Martin dh 4 1 2 1 0 2 .206 J.Nix lf 1 0 0 0 1 0 .244 a-Ibanez ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Wise lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .138 C.Stewart c 3 1 1 0 0 0 .263 Totals 30 6 8 6 4 10 Atlanta 100 010 000 — 2 7 0 New York 000 031 11x — 6 8 0 a-grounded into a double play for J.Nix in the 7th. LOB—Atlanta 5, New York 4. 2B—R.Martin (9), C.Stewart (3). 3B—Bourn (4). HR—Teixeira (12), off Minor; Cano (13), off Varvaro. DP—Atlanta 2; New York 1.

Atlanta Bourn cf Prado 1b McCann dh Uggla 2b M.Diaz lf C.Jones 3b Heyward rf Simmons ss D.Ross c Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 33

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

H 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 2 7

BI 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 1 2 0 1 1 3 0 1 10

Avg. .316 .309 .240 .251 .250 .278 .252 .333 .267

Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Minor L, 3-5 5 2-3 4 4 4 3 7 99 6.04 Medlen 1 3 1 1 0 0 16 3.45 Venters 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 10 4.21 Varvaro 1 1 1 1 0 2 16 8.10 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia W, 9-3 9 7 2 2 1 10 116 3.55 T—2:45. A—42,709 (50,291).

New York Jeter ss Granderson cf Teixeira 1b Al.Rodriguez 3b

AB 4 3 4 3

R 0 0 1 1

H 2 0 1 1

BI 3 0 1 0

BB 0 1 0 1

SO 0 2 2 1

Avg. .317 .254 .252 .270

Toronto Lawrie 3b Rasmus cf Bautista rf Encarnacion 1b

Brewers 7, Blue Jays 6 AB 5 3 3 4

R 3 1 1 1

H 2 1 1 1

BI 1 0 3 1

BB 0 2 0 0

SO 1 0 0 0

Avg. .288 .256 .231 .277

Y.Escobar ss R.Davis lf Arencibia c Coello p Oliver p c-Cooper ph Cordero p Vizquel 2b H.Alvarez p a-McCoy ph Laffey p Y.Gomes c e-K.Johnson ph Totals

4 4 3 0 0 1 0 4 1 1 0 1 1 35

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 10

Milwaukee AB R H Aoki rf 5 0 1 Morgan cf 3 2 1 Axford p 0 0 0 Braun lf 5 2 1 Ar.Ramirez 3b 3 1 3 Hart 1b 4 0 1 R.Weeks 2b 4 0 2 Kottaras c 3 0 1 b-M.Maldonado ph-c1 0 0 Maysonet ss 4 1 2 Wolf p 2 1 1 Loe p 0 0 0 Fr.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 d-Green ph 1 0 0 C.Gomez cf 0 0 0 Totals 35 7 13 Toronto 101 001

0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 2 7

.247 .265 .215 ----.290 --.231 .000 .429 --.211 .257

BI BB SO 1 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 3 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7 3 6 300 — 6

Avg. .284 .231 --.314 .262 .251 .183 .227 .226 .232 .136 ----.211 .266 10 1

Milwaukee 240 000 10x — 7 13 0 a-singled for H.Alvarez in the 5th. b-grounded out for Kottaras in the 7th. c-singled for Oliver in the 8th. d-struck out for Fr.Rodriguez in the 8th. e-flied out for Y.Gomes in the 9th. E—Lawrie (10). LOB—Toronto 5, Milwaukee 8. 2B—Lawrie (11), Ar.Ramirez (19), Maysonet (1). HR—Lawrie (6), off Wolf; Encarnacion (18), off Wolf; Bautista (20), off Loe; Ar.Ramirez (8), off Coello. DP—Milwaukee 1. Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA H.Alvarez 4 11 6 6 2 1 81 4.30 Laffey 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 16 3.00 Coello L, 0-1 1 1 1 1 0 2 15 3.60 Oliver 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 1.54 Cordero 1 1 0 0 1 2 16 5.27 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wolf 6 1-3 8 4 4 1 6 102 5.11 Loe W, 4-2 2-3 1 2 2 1 0 13 3.16 Fr.Rodriguez H, 14 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 4.02 Axford S, 12-15 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 5.13 Inherited runners-scored—Loe 1-1. HBP—by Wolf (Bautista). T—2:52. A—32,223 (41,900).

Cubs 12, White Sox 3 Chicago (N) DeJesus cf S.Castro ss LaHair rf

AB 3 5 5

R 1 3 1

H 0 3 2

BI 0 2 2

BB 0 0 0

SO 0 0 2

Avg. .257 .303 .299

Cincinnati Cozart ss Heisey cf Votto 1b B.Phillips 2b Bruce rf Ludwick lf Rolen 3b Frazier dh Hanigan c Totals

AB 4 5 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 38

R 0 0 2 3 3 1 0 0 0 9

H 0 0 2 3 3 2 2 0 2 14

BI 0 0 1 1 2 1 2 0 1 8

BB 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 4

SO 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 6

Avg. .260 .266 .368 .294 .259 .224 .188 .269 .294

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo rf 5 1 2 2 0 0 .265 A.Cabrera ss 3 1 0 0 1 1 .299 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .280 Jo.Lopez dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .241 Brantley cf 3 2 2 1 0 0 .285 C.Santana c 4 2 2 0 0 2 .232 Damon lf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .190 Cunningham lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .197 Kotchman 1b 4 1 1 3 0 1 .221 Chisenhall 3b 4 2 3 3 0 0 .269 Totals 35 10 13 10 1 6 Cincinnati 122 020 101 — 9 14 0 Cleveland 130 302 10x — 10 13 1 E—Damon (2). LOB—Cincinnati 6, Cleveland 3. 2B—Votto (29), B.Phillips (10), Ludwick 2 (11), Choo (19), Brantley 2 (20), Damon (4). 3B—Chisenhall (1). HR—Votto (13), off D.Lowe; Bruce (16), off J.Smith; Choo (6), off Latos; Chisenhall (3), off Latos; Kotchman (6), off Latos. DP—Cleveland 3. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP Latos 4 8 7 7 0 4 62 LeCure L, 2-2 2 3 2 2 0 0 35 Hoover 1 1 1 1 1 2 19 Ondrusek 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP D.Lowe 5 11 7 7 1 2 83 J.Smith W, 5-1 1 2-3 1 1 1 2 1 33 Pestano H, 17 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 30 C.Perez S, 22-23 1 2 1 1 0 2 19 T—3:06. A—19,948 (43,429).

ERA 5.20 3.76 3.06 3.16 ERA 4.30 3.38 2.00 2.73

Mets 5, Orioles 0 Baltimore B.Roberts 2b Hardy ss C.Davis rf Ad.Jones cf Wieters c Mar.Reynolds 1b Betemit 3b Pearce lf Arrieta p a-N.Johnson ph Gregg p Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 3 1 1 0 28

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2

SO 1 1 3 0 3 1 1 2 0 1 0 13

Avg. .269 .250 .288 .307 .249 .233 .238 .297 .000 .200 ---

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Nieuwenhuis cf-rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .290 Valdespin 2b 4 2 2 0 0 0 .200 D.Wright 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .353 Duda rf 3 1 1 0 1 2 .263 A.Torres cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .213 I.Davis 1b 3 1 1 4 1 1 .196 Hairston lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .279 Thole c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Quintanilla ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .254 Dickey p 3 1 1 0 0 0 .138 Totals 31 5 8 5 2 7 Baltimore 000 000 000 — 0 1 0 New York 000 004 01x — 5 8 0 a-struck out for Arrieta in the 8th. LOB—Baltimore 3, New York 4. 2B—Valdespin (4). 3B—Valdespin (1). HR—I.Davis (7), off Arrieta. DP—Baltimore 1. Baltimore Arrieta L, 3-9 Gregg New York Dickey W, 11-1

IP 7 1 IP 9

H 6 2 H 1

R 4 1 R 0

ER BB SO NP ERA 4 1 4 105 5.83 1 1 3 27 4.82 ER BB SO NP ERA 0 2 13 114 2.00

T—2:07. A—29,014 (41,922).

Rangers 2, Padres 1 Texas Kinsler 2b Andrus ss Mi.Young 1b Beltre 3b N.Cruz rf Dav.Murphy lf Gentry cf Napoli c L.Martin cf-lf Nathan p M.Harrison p b-Moreland ph M.Lowe p Mi.Adams p Hamilton lf Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 3 2 1 4 4 0 2 1 0 0 0 32

R 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BI 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 2 1 0 0 1 1 1 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 12

Avg. .277 .298 .270 .305 .253 .282 .345 .238 .143 --.000 .274 ----.330

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Denorfia rf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .286 Maybin cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .208 Gregerson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Jo.Baker c 1 0 1 0 0 0 .241 Headley 3b 5 0 3 1 0 1 .267 Quentin lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .400 Guzman 1b-2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .236 E.Cabrera ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .242 Hundley c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .162 d-Kotsay ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .278 Thayer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Amarista 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .186 a-Alonso ph-1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .254 Marquis p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .500 c-Venable ph-cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .265 Totals 36 1 9 1 2 6 Texas 200 000 000 — 2 5 0 San Diego 100 000 000 — 1 9 0 a-grounded out for Amarista in the 6th. b-flied out for M.Harrison in the 7th. c-struck out for Marquis in the 7th. d-flied out for Hundley in the 8th. LOB—Texas 6, San Diego 11. 2B—L.Martin (1), Headley (17). SB—Kinsler (11), Andrus (13), L.Martin (1). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA M.Harrison W, 9-3 6 6 1 1 2 4 101 3.41 M.Lowe H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.73 Mi.Adams H, 11 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 3.04 Nathan S, 14-15 1 2 0 0 0 0 16 1.63 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Marquis L, 1-2 7 5 2 2 3 10 113 1.86 Gregerson 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 3.99 Thayer 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 5.50 T—2:44. A—29,315 (42,691).

Giants 5, Angels 3 San Francisco G.Blanco rf Theriot 2b Me.Cabrera lf Posey c Pagan cf Sandoval dh Belt 1b B.Crawford ss Arias 3b Totals

AB 4 5 5 5 5 4 2 4 4 38

R 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 2 5

H 0 3 3 1 1 0 2 1 2 13

BI 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 5

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 3

SO 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 5

Avg. .265 .275 .364 .295 .306 .302 .261 .232 .242

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Trout cf 4 1 1 0 1 0 .323 Tor.Hunter rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .271 Pujols 1b 2 0 0 1 0 0 .254 K.Morales dh 3 0 0 0 1 2 .270 Trumbo lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .319 Callaspo 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .245 M.Izturis 2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .224 Aybar ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .239 Bo.Wilson c 2 0 0 1 0 1 .167 a-H.Kendrick ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .267 Totals 30 3 6 3 4 7 San Francisco 021 101 000 — 5 13 0 Los Angeles 110 100 000 — 3 6 0 a-struck out for Bo.Wilson in the 9th. LOB—San Francisco 10, Los Angeles 7. 2B—Belt (10), Arias (5), M.Izturis (5). 3B—B.Crawford (1). HR—Trumbo (16), off M.Cain. SB—Theriot (7), Belt (3), Arias (4), Trout 3 (19). DP—San Francisco 1; Los Angeles 1. San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA M.Cain W, 9-2 5 6 3 3 4 4 100 2.34 Loux H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 1.35 Romo H, 12 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 12 0.93 Affeldt H, 5 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 2.84 S.Casilla S, 19-20 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 1.32 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Williams L, 6-5 3 1-3 7 4 4 3 1 75 4.46 Takahashi 2 2 1 1 0 2 31 4.50 Hawkins 1 2-3 3 0 0 0 0 25 0.69 Walden 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 3.00 Isringhausen 1 0 0 0 0 1 17 1.88 T—3:21. A—41,234 (45,957).

Leaders Through Monday’s Games AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Konerko, Chicago, .359; Hamilton, Texas, .330; Trumbo, Los Angeles, .319; Jeter, New York, .317; Fielder, Detroit, .315; Mauer, Minnesota, .314; Ortiz, Boston, .311. HOME RUNS—ADunn, Chicago, 23; Hamilton, Texas, 22; Granderson, New York, 21; Bautista, Toronto, 20. STRIKEOUTS—Verlander, Detroit, 103; Sabathia, New York, 102; Scherzer, Detroit, 100; FHernandez, Seattle, 91; Darvish, Texas, 88; Shields, Tampa Bay, 86; Lewis, Texas, 84. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—Votto, Cincinnati, .368; MeCabrera, San Francisco, .364; Ruiz, Philadelphia, .354; DWright, New York, .353; CGonzalez, Colorado, .335; YMolina, St. Louis, .326; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, .325. HOME RUNS—Beltran, St. Louis, 19; Braun, Milwaukee, 19; CGonzalez, Colorado, 17. STRIKEOUTS—Dickey, New York, 103; Strasburg, Washington, 100; MCain, San Francisco, 100; GGonzalez, Washington, 97; Greinke, Milwaukee, 95; Hamels, Philadelphia, 92; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 88.

Jackson’s return to the lineup has the Tigers on the move By Larry Lage The Associated Press

Rex Arbogast / The Associated Press

Detroit Tigers’ Austin Jackson celebrates in the dugout with teammates after a home run last week. Detroit has won six of eight, its best stretch since a 9-3 start, thanks in large part because Jackson is back on the field.

DETROIT — The Tigers have been winning lately — six victories in eight games since Austin Jackson came off the disabled list. It doesn’t seem a coincidence. “He kind of gets everything started for us,” said Detroit catcher Alex Avila, who is hoping to get off the DL himself this week and join Jackson in the lineup. “It’s not a surprise to us that he’s that important to our team.” Jackson is a speedy center fielder who is tough to replace because he covers a lot of ground and helps Detroit’s corner outfielders. “If you hit in his direction, make sure you hit it far enough to where he can’t catch it — in the shrubs,” Colorado Rockies manager Jim Tracy said. He’s also a valuable leadoff hitter, getting on base regularly for sluggers Miguel Cabrera and Prince Fielder. Jackson’s average is up to .323 after hitting .293 as a rookie two years ago and slumping to .249 last year. He already has seven homers — just three from matching his career high from last year. His numbers are up because his strike-

outs are way down. He has struck out 38 times in 44 games after fanning an ALhigh 170 times as a rookie and finishing second in the league with 181 in the dubious category. “The holes aren’t as large as they used to be,” Tracy said. “If you make a mistake, he makes you pay for it.” Detroit manager Jim Leyland preaches patience with Jackson. He says the 25-year-old player from Denton, Texas, simply needs time to develop. “He’s still finding himself up here,” Leyland said. “It just takes time.” Jackson has had to grow up fast, though, playing regularly for the Tigers for a third straight season since they acquired him from the New York Yankees as part of the Curtis Granderson trade. Last winter, Jackson decided to make an adjustment in the batter’s box. He and hitting coach Lloyd McClendon agreed it was time to lose the high-leg kick at the plate. “We both wanted to make a change,” Jackson said. “It is helping me be more on time. When I was doing the highleg kick, I wasn’t consistent with my timing.” McClendon got to see the new ap-

proach before the team’s caravan last winter and during spring training. He believes the altered approach has had “everything” to do with Jackson’s stronger play. “He’s reaping the benefits of buying into the changes and putting in a lot of work,” McClendon said. Tigers owner Mike Ilitch put a lot of his money into his quest for a World Series title this year, signing Fielder to a $214 million, nine-year contract to replace injured designated hitter Victor Martinez. The early returns looked good. Detroit won nine of its first 12 games, with Jackson hitting .333. Then the Tigers went 17-28 in part because Jackson strained abdominal muscles May 16 and wasn’t healthy enough to play until June 9. The Tigers are suddenly successful again, winning three straight series heading into tonight’s series opener at home against St. Louis. Jackson is right in the middle of it — leading off with hits, homers and walks and taking away hits in the field. “I’m just trying to do whatever I can do to contribute to win,” he said. “That’s the main focus.”


TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Humility Continued from D1 With a head of steam going to the basket, James has been a Category 5 hurricane blowing through the Thunder’s interior throughout the first three games. But suddenly the Heat have camouflaged themselves as the proverbial little guy, as the midmajor gunning for big game in the madness of March. More to the point, the superteam hubris of a year ago has given way to humility and respect for the extended playoff process, for what it takes to go all the way. “Whatever it takes,” the Heat’s coach, Erik Spoelstra, said after his team overcame 37.8 percent shooting by winning the war inside the paint — or what Spoelstra had earlier called “the line of scrimmage.” Have the Heat ceded the high ground — or metaphorical air space — to their younger, longer, swifter opponents? A year ago Miami was the brash new thing, restless and relatively unchallenged in the playoffs until James and Wade woke up the veteran Dallas Mavericks with a premature display of grandeur in Game 2. Now it seems the James-led Heat will happily play the role of the older and wiser hard hats, grasping the lesson that no team — not even the one that James bragged would win enough rings to almost fill two hands — is too big to fail. “Well, really, every day we remind ourselves,” Chris Bosh said. “We think of that pain we experienced last year.” They talk about “not drinking the Kool-Aid,” said the veteran forward Udonis Haslem, and of playing “48-minute games,” and making sure no victory is celebrated unless it is the last one. The Heat might have had good reason to believe last year’s finals were supposed to be more coronation than crusade. Miami stormed through the Eastern Conference, winning every series in five before taking Game 1 of the finals and seemingly coasting in Game 2. Losing three straight and having the Mavericks win the title in Miami certainly humbled James — whose fourthquarter disappearances were conspicuously damning — and the Heat. Falling behind in the Indiana series this year and having to survive an elimina-

NBA weighs retroactive penalties for players who flop

Alan Diaz / The Associated Press

Oklahoma City Thunder point guard Russell Westbrook stretches during practice, Monday in Miami. The Thunder are scheduled to play the Miami Heat in Game 4 of the NBA Finals basketball series today.

tion game in Boston may well have hardened them. Championship growth within the two-month playoff grind has occurred throughout history and most strikingly for some teams now characterized as the NBA’s most cherished. Pat Riley, the Heat’s president, could speak with pride of how his brutish Knicks extended Michael Jordan’s Bulls to a seven-game, second-round slugfest in 1992 before Chicago won its second championship. James no doubt remembers his Cleveland Cavaliers taking the Celtics to seven games in the second round — and right after Atlanta also went the distance with them — during Boston’s 2008 title run. “It forces you to develop mental toughness and character because nothing comes easy,” said the reserve jumpshooter James Jones. “You have to fight and claw for everything. It’s become a grind, and you either embrace it or you fail.” Haslem added, “I think falling behind in a couple of series has definitely helped us find our recipe for success, and that is to play desperately.” Along the way, it never hurts to get a little help from oppo-

Clemens Continued from D1 “I put a lot of hard work into that career,” said Clemens, who had to stop and collect himself and fight back tears as he spoke to reporters outside the E. Barrett Prettyman Federal Courthouse, a few blocks from the House office building where he testified four years ago. “And so again I appreciate my teammates who came in and all the emails and phone calls. Thank y’all very much.” A trial that lasted into a 10th week produced less than 10 hours of jury deliberation over several days, capping an expensive, five-year investigation that is now another blow to the government’s legal pursuit of athletes accused of illicit drug use. Clemens, 49, was charged with two counts of perjury, three counts of making false statements and one count of obstructing Congress when he testified at a deposition and at a nationally televised hearing in February 2008. The charges centered on his repeated denials that he used steroids and HGH during a 24-year career with the Red Sox, Yankees, Blue Jays and Astros that produced a record seven Cy Young Awards. “I hope those in the public who made up their minds before there was a trial will now back up and entertain the possibility of what he has always said — using steroids and HGH is cheating and it was totally contrary to his entire career,” said Clemens’ lead lawyer, Rusty Hardin. After the jury foreman uttered “not guilty” for the sixth and final time, Clemens teared up, and one of his lawyers, Michael Attanasio, put his arm on the former pitcher’s back. Clemens bit his lower lip, and rubbed a tear off his eye. “Mr. Clemens, you’re free to go,” U.S. District Judge Reggie Walton said. Family members and lawyers took turns hugging each other. Clemens and his four sons — two teenagers and two young adults — gathered in the middle of the courtroom, arms interlocked, like football players in a huddle, and sobbing could be heard. Then Clemens kissed his wife, Debbie, who had testified for him in the case. Clemens did not take questions after his brief statement outside. The jury of eight women and four men declined comment through a court spokesman. The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia issued a statement thanking the jury and stating respect for the judicial process. But it will be hard for

nents and officials. In Game 2, Durant was victimized by a noncall when James elbow-checked him as he drove and shot for a tie in the dying seconds of a 2-point game. Sunday night, a fourth foul called after minimal contact — or less than James’ Game 2 physicality on Durant — with a driving Wade sent Durant to the bench in the third quarter just as the Thunder seemed to take control of the game. Soon there came a flurry of missed Oklahoma City free throws, errant passes, regrettable shot selection and fouling of three-point shooters — the Thunder playing like the 22- and 23-year-olds they are. The series tilted toward Miami but one defeat at home means the Heat must clinch in raucous Oklahoma City. In keeping with its new self-characterization, James insisted, “We know they’re not broken,” and added that Miami is only where it was last year after three games against Dallas, leading, two games to one. Too big to fail? If anything, in this series, the Heat is on the diminutive side, too small to take anything for granted and from most indications better off for it.

prosecutors to put any kind of positive spin on another disappointing outcome for the Department of Justice. A seven-year investigation into home run king Barry Bonds yielded a guilty verdict on only one count of obstruction of justice in a San Francisco court last year, with the jury deadlocked on whether Bonds lied to a grand jury when he denied knowingly taking performance-enhancing drugs. A two-year, multicontinent investigation that looked into possible drug use by cyclist Lance Armstrong was recently closed with no charges brought, though the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency filed formal accusations last week that could strip the seven-time Tour de France winner of his victories in that storied race. Armstrong denies any doping. In addition, the first attempt to try Clemens last year ended in a mistrial when prosecutors played a snippet of video evidence that had previously been ruled inadmissible. “I think he’s gone through enough,” said former Virginia Rep. Tom Davis, who was the top Republican on the House Government Reform Committee when Clemens testified in 2008. “We did the appropriate thing in referring it over to Justice. But hopefully this will put it behind him. He’s a good citizen.” The panel’s chairman at the time, Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Calif., also defended the decision to refer the conflicting testimony it heard to the Justice Department, but concluded: “The decision whether Mr. Clemens committed perjury is a decision the jury had to make and I respect its decision.” The government’s case relied heavily on Clemens’ longtime strength coach, Brian McNamee, who testified he injected Clemens with steroids in 1998, 2000 and 2001 and with HGH in 2000. McNamee produced a needle and other materials he said were from a steroids injection of Clemens in 2001, items that McNamee said he stored in and around a Miller Lite beer can inside a FedEx box for some six years. But McNamee was the only person to claim firsthand knowledge of Clemens using steroids and HGH, and even prosecutors conceded their star witness was a “flawed man.” Clemens’ lawyers relentlessly attacked McNamee’s credibility and integrity. They pointed out that his story had changed over the years and implied that he conjured up the allegations against Clemens to placate federal investigators.

MIAMI — David Stern is determined to stop the floppers, even if it takes until the next morning. The NBA commissioner believes too many players are deceiving referees into calling fouls by falling down, or flopping. So he and the league’s newly reformed competition committee met Monday for a discussion about how it can be prevented. One option, Stern said, is a “postgame analysis” in which a player could be penalized if it was determined he flopped. The league retroactively upgrades or downgrades flagrant fouls after review, and along those lines he said that perhaps a player could receive a message from New York saying: “Greetings from the league office. You have been assigned flopper status.” “No, I’m joking, but something like that,” Stern said. “That sort of lets people know that it’s not enough to say ‘it’s all part of the game.’ ” The committee is made up of coaches Doc Rivers of Boston, Rick Carlisle of Dallas and Lionel Hollins of Memphis; owners Dan Gilbert of Cleveland and Joe Lacob of Golden State, and general managers Bryan Colangelo of Toronto, Sam Presti of Oklahoma City, Mitch Kupchak of the Lakers and Kevin O’Connor of Utah. During a 6-hour meeting, they also discussed expanding instant replay for flagrant fouls and goaltending, decided the lottery system is the best one currently available, and seemed to favor leaving the away from the ball foul rule as is, so coaches could continue to intentionally foul notoriously bad free throw shooters. Any rules changes they recommend would have to be approved by the league’s Board of Governors, set for its next meeting in July. — The Associated Press

Some items associated with the beer can were found to have Clemens’ DNA and steroids, but the defense called the evidence “garbage” and claimed it had been contaminated or manipulated by McNamee. Other evidence offered tenuous links between Clemens and performance-enhancing drugs. Former teammate Andy Pettitte recalled a conversation in which Clemens supposedly admitted using HGH, but Pettitte said under cross-examination that there was a “50-50” chance that he had misheard. Convicted drug dealer Kirk Radomski testified he supplied McNamee with HGH for a starting pitcher and even sent a shipment to Clemens’ house under McNamee’s name, but Radomski had no way of knowing if any of the HGH was specifically used on Clemens. Debbie Clemens admitted receiving an HGH shot from McNamee, but she and McNamee differed over when the injection occurred and whether her husband was present. Clemens’ lawyers contended that the pitcher’s success resulted from a secondto-none work ethic and an intense workout regimen dating to his high school days. They said that Clemens was indeed injected by McNamee — but that the needles contained the vitamin B12 and the anesthetic lidocaine and not performance-enhancing drugs. Said Hardin after the trial: “This trial was the first chance we had to let somebody on his behalf question the accusations and what we knew were the wrong perceptions of him as a person. It got to where people thought arrogance was a man saying, ‘I didn’t do it.’ When a man says he didn’t do it, let’s at least start out giving him the benefit of the doubt.” Monday’s verdict is unlikely to settle the matter in sports circles as to whether Clemens cheated in the latter stages of a remarkable career that extended well into his 40s — during a period in which performance-enhancing drug use in baseball was thought to be prevalent. Clemens himself told Congress at the 2008 hearing that “no matter what we discuss here today, I’m never going to have my name restored.” A crucial barometer comes this fall, when Clemens’ name appears on the Hall of Fame ballot for the first time. His statistics would normally make him a shoo-in for baseball’s greatest honor, but voters have been reluctant to induct premier players — such as Mark McGwire and Rafael Palmeiro — whose careers were tainted by allegations of drug use.

Glory Continued from D1 “People say it is the fastest meet in the world because … (the U.S.) has the fastest athletes, and they only take two people,” Madson says of the Olympic trials, where only the two fastest swimmers in each event make the U.S. Olympic team. “More world records are broken at the Olympic trials than sometimes … at the Olympics.” Madson started swimming for the Bend Swim Club when he was 5. In 2004 and 2005, he played a significant role in the Storm’s team championships in Class 4A, then the state’s largest classification. After high school, he went on to a successful collegiate career at national swimming powerhouse Auburn University in Alabama. The Tigers of the Southeastern Conference won three NCAA titles while Madson was on the team, and as a senior in 2009 he placed third individually in the national meet in the 100-yard and 200-yard butterfly events. “Up here, I was kind of a big fish in a small pond. Going down there, I started out as a nobody,” Madson observes of competing in SEC country. “So I definitely had to get my name out there and work hard.” Upon a cursory glance, Madson might seem like a long shot just to make it out of the heats in Omaha. His marks on the most recent list of trials qualifiers rank him No. 60 of 138 swimmers in the 100 butterfly and No. 66 of 154 in the 200 butterfly. But some swimmers ranked ahead of him may opt out of those events, and the times are densely packed. For example, in the 100 butterfly, if Madson’s cut (qualifying time for the trials) was a second faster, he would be ranked 24th. Besides, as far as the trials go, Madson has been there before. He swam in the 2008 trials at the same site, then known as Qwest Center Omaha, which will seat more than 13,000 spectators and whose pool is built on the arena floor specifically for the event. In 2008, in a field of more than 100 swimmers, Madson advanced out of the heats to the semifinals of the 100 butterfly, in which he placed 16th and swam against Michael Phelps. Yes, the same Michael Phelps who went on to Olympic lore by winning eight gold medals in Beijing. “It was on TV, so everyone got to watch it because anything that Michael Phelps is in, they’re going to televise,” Madson recalls of his semifinal heat at the 2008 trials. “All of my friends got to watch me swim.” While Madson is an established veteran on the U.S. swimming scene, Brewer’s star is just starting to rise. He made an instant splash in his first Class 5A high school state meet in March, winning the 50-yard and 100-yard freestyle races in meet-record time. But the trials are a different pool altogether. At a lanky 6 feet, 6 inches, Brewer will be one of the tallest male competitors, but he will also be one of the youngest. “It’s going to be the biggest meet I’ve ever gone to,” says Brewer, adding that his biggest meet prior to the trials was junior nationals, a competition for swimmers age 18 and younger. While Brewer is young, he is realistic about what he will be trying to do in Omaha, which is “hopefully the beginning of a nationalcaliber career.” “I know I’m not really going to accomplish anything there,” concedes Brewer, whose time ranks 93rd of 136 qualifiers. “I’m just kind of going for the experience, so it will definitely be valu-

D5

able experience … get me prepared for nationals and stuff that I’m going to be going to up until next trials (in 2016).” Brewer swims for the Cascade Swim Academy Current, a small, relatively new Central Oregon club coached by his mother, Ann Brewer. Last summer, he says, the trials started showing up on his radar when he realized he was not far from making the cut. So he picked up his training and, in March, at a 2012 Western Zone Speedo Champion Series senior sectionals meet in Federal Way, Wash., he knocked two seconds off his personal-best time in the preliminaries. Then, in the final, he sliced off an additional three seconds to make the Olympic trials cut and set the meet record. “He had the right competitors next to him, it was the right atmosphere, and you’re lucky to get that in a season,” Ann Brewer says of her son achieving his trials cut. “But I have to give him all the credit. He put his head down and did the work.” Tommy Brewer, whose event gets going in Omaha on June 28, plans to use his trials experience to observe the top swimmers at the meet, to see how they compete in and manage a meet that will not conclude until July 2 and includes dozens of events and hundreds of heats. “I’d actually be really happy with matching my best time, “Brewer says. “But realistically … I’d want to at least re-get the trial cut to just kind of solidify the fact that I can do this and I can be here — (that) I’m not the 15-year-old that had some miracle swim.” Madson’s journey to the 2012 trials has been a bit more circuitous than it was in 2008 — and even more so than Brewer’s this year. After completing his collegiate eligibility at Auburn in 2009, he took a couple years off from the sport, during which time he moved back to Bend. By then weighing in at about 205 pounds, he decided to get back in the pool. “I came and talked to Mark (Bernett, the longtime Bend Swim Club head coach), and he was like, ‘Sure, let’s give it a shot,’ ” recalls Madson, who will begin his trials on June 27 with the heats and semifinals (if he advances) of the 200 butterfly. In January 2011, Madson resumed training. “Definitely, those first couple weeks were exhausting, to say the least,” Madson says of his return to intense training. “But it started to slowly come back and within a few months, the weight started to come off and the fitness came back.” In late June of 2011, Madson got his first trials cut. The second one came about five months later. “Really, the first five or six months was kind of an adventure,” Bernett notes. “And the fact that he made the trials cut in … June of last year, that was obviously a huge step just making the qualifying time again. He’s going to have to swim best times at the (trials) to have a shot at getting second swims.” These days, Madson is much trimmer at about 170 pounds. He is working out six days per week in the pool and twice per week with dryland training. And in just a few days, he and Brewer will take to the pool on the floor of the CenturyLink Center. A place of Olympic dreams. “I definitely am not as nervous just going into it already as I was in 2008. I’m more confident,” Madson says. “I think this time around I have a better shot than I did in 2008.” — Reporter: 541-383-0393, amiles@bendbulletin.com.

COMMUNITY SPORTS SCOREBOARD Horseshoes Bend Horseshoe Club Tournament At Juniper Park, June 16-17 Juniper No. 1 Class A — 1, Barry Chapelle, Portland. 2, Cliff Aumsbaugh, Albany. 3, Bob Bender, Bend. Class B — 1, Kathy Warner, Umpqua. 2, Russ Watkins, Hillsboro. Class C — 1, Betsy Barnhart, Wishram, Wash. 2, Betty Coulter, Lyons. 3, Bob Hummel, Hermiston.

Class D — 1, Alan Ringo, Medford. 2, Mike Flanary, Redmond. 3, Kasey Ackley, Redmond. Juniper No. 2 Class A — 1, Barry Capelle, Portland. 2, Jerry Gorton, Eugene. Class B — 1, Jim Peterson, Gresham. 2, Al Holland, Lebanon. Class C — 1, Clara Smith, La Pine. 2, Betty Coulter, Lyons. Class D — 1, Larry Flanary, Springfield. 2, Kasey Ackley, Redmond.


D6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

COM M U N I T Y SP ORTS

C S   C 

Please email Community Sports event information to sports@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a spaceavailability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

AUTOS AUTOCROSS CLUB OF CENTRAL OREGON MONTHLY MEETING: Wednesday; 6 p.m. social, 6:30 p.m. meeting; Pappy’s Pizza Parlor, Bend; all welcome; autoxclub.org.

BASEBALL BEND WIFFLE BALL ASSOCIATION: Looking for players and team managers for the 2012 season, which starts in mid-June; teams are of eight players, with four on the field at a given time; can sign up as a team or be placed on one; $20 per person; 541-977-1726; bendwiffle.info. BEND ELKS BASEBALL CAMP: Boys and girls ages 7-14; with Elks coaches and players; Monday, July 9-Thursday, July 12; $80 for Bend Park & Recreation District members, $108 otherwise; both sessions 8:30 a.m.-noon and at Vince Genna Stadium, Bend; bring baseball glove each day; bendparksandrec.org. COUGAR SUMMER BASEBALL CAMP: For boys entering grades four through eight; Tuesday, June 26-Thursday, June 28; 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Mountain View High School varsity baseball field; camp will be coached by MVHS head coach Dave McKae and Cougars baseball players; $60; email Kory.bright@ gmail.com or call 541-420-6266 for registration forms. REDMOND PANTHERS BASEBALL CLUB: Now seeking players ages 7-14; emphasis is to prepare players for high school baseball; opportunities include camps and instructional training; players do not need to live in Redmond to participate; age is based as of April 30; 541-788-8520; derisman@ unitedplanners.com; leaguelineup. com/redmondbluesox. PRIVATE PITCHING INSTRUCTION: With Dave McKae; drills, techniques and exercises to increase arm strength and velocity; $35 per lesson plus a check on your Bend Fieldhouse card; 541-480-8786; pitchingperfection@gmail.com. PRIVATE LESSONS: With Ryan Jordan, a graduate of Bend High School and a former Bend Elk who played at Lane Community College and the University of La Verne; specifically for catching and hitting, but also for all positions; available after 3 p.m. on weekdays, open scheduling on weekends; at the Bend Fieldhouse or an agreed upon location; $30 per half hour or $55 per hour; discounts for multiple players in a single session, referrals or booking multiple sessions; cash only; 541-788-2722; rjordan@ uoregon.edu.

BASKETBALL COBO LITTLE DRIBBLERS FUNDAMENTAL BASKETBALL CAMPS: Grades two through five; Monday, June 25-Thursday, June 28; Mountain View High School, Bend; Monday, July 23-Friday, July 26; Pilot Butte Middle School, Bend; 9 a.m.-noon both sessions; $75 for Bend Park & Recreation District members, $101 otherwise; bendparksandrec.org. COBO MIDDLE SCHOOL BASKETBALL CAMPS: Grades five through nine; Monday, June 25Thursday, June 28; 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Mountain View High School, Bend; Monday, July 23-Friday, July 26; Pilot Butte Middle School, Bend; 1 p.m.-4 p.m.; $75 for Bend Park & Recreation District members, $101 otherwise; bendparksandrec.org. TLS BASKETBALL CAMP: For grades two through eight; Monday, July 9-Thursday, July 12; Trinity School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend; 9 a.m.-noon grades two through five; 1 p.m.-4 p.m. grades six through eight; improve individual skills and team basketball concepts with Trinity Lutheran coaches Mike Polk and Hanne Krause; $68 for Bend Park & Recreation District residents, $92 otherwise; bendparksandrec.org. ADVANTAGE BASKETBALL CAMP: For kids ages 7-18; Monday, July 16-Friday, July 20; 9 a.m.5 p.m.; La Pine High School, La Pine; ball handling and shooting camp; one-day and three-day camps also available; $265, Kevin Schmidt, 503-332-4794; info@advantagebasketball.com; advantagebasketball.com. COBO ADVANCED MIDDLE SCHOOL BASKETBALL CAMP: Grades four through nine; Monday, Aug. 13Thursday, Aug. 16; Mountain View High School, Bend; 9 a.m.-noon for grades four through six, and 1 p.m.-4 p.m. for grades seven through nine; focus on advanced skill development in a competitive environment; campers should bring a snack; $75 for Bend Park & Recreation District members, $128 otherwise; bendparksandrec.org. PRO DEVELOPMENT CLINIC: For boys and girls ages 9-17; Saturday, Aug. 18; noon-4 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend; led by Jeff Christensen,

an assistant coach in the NBA Development League; register by Aug. 8; $50; 503-453-7741; jeff@showcasebasketball.com; showcasebasketball.com.

HIKING SILVER STRIDERS GUIDE SERVICE: Two guided hikes per week with a trained naturalist; hikes geared toward those age 50 and older; hikes in four state parks and four national forests; $20 for first hike, $25 for each hike after; strideon@ silverstriders.com; 383-8077; silverstriders.com. JUNIPER TREE, SPATTER CONES AND DERRICK CAVE: Sunday; visit the largest Juniper in Oregon; some large spatter cones and Derrick Cave at the north end of the Devils Garden Lava Field; adults $139, $99 for kids; 541-383-8077 or 541840-3800; trek@outbacktreks.com; outbacktreks.com. FORT ROCK CAVE AND FORT ROCK HOMESTEAD VILLAGE MUSEUM: Friday, June 29; tour what was an active community center for Native Americans 12,900 years ago, look for nesting prairie falcons and whitethroated swifts, identify desert wildflowers and tour museum; about 1.5 miles of easy walking; $139 or $99 for kids; 541-383-8077 or 541840-3800; trek@outbacktreks.com; outbacktreks.com. PICTURE ROCK PASS AND DEVILS GARDEN: Saturday, June 30; examine pahoehoe and aa’ forms of the lava, and see lava lakes, inflated lava and small caves; collect obsidian nodules to take home; $139 or $99 for kids; 541-383-8077 or 541-840-3800; trek@outbacktreks. com; outbacktreks.com. SILVER STRIDERS: Hikes geared toward those age 55 and older; Friday, Round Mountain South, Ochoco National Forest; Thursday, June 28, Echo Basin; Monday, July 2, Iron Mountain; first-time hikers $20, $25 after; strideon@ silverstriders.com; 541-383-8077; silverstriders.com.

2834; Don at 541-318-0890; Sean at 267-614-6477; bendtabletennis@ yahoo.com; www.bendtabletennis. com. AMERICAN POOLPLAYERS ASSOCIATION LEAGUE: Nine-ball play Monday and Wednesday nights; eight-ball on Thursdays; 7 p.m.; amateurs of all ability levels encouraged; Randee Lee at rlee973@gmail.com or Marshall Fox at Fox’s Billiard Lounge, 937 N.W. Newport Ave., 541-647-1363; www. foxsbilliards.com.

MULTISPORT MINI DUATHLON SERIES: Fourth race in series is Wednesday, June 27; heats at 4:15 p.m., 5:15 p.m. and 6:15 p.m.; Bend; simulated 20K Deschutes Dash bike course on CompuTrainer and 3K or 5K run outside; Powered by Bowen, 143 S.W. Century Drive; $15 adults, $10 juniors; poweredbybowen.com; 541-585-1500. PACIFIC CREST WEEKEND SPORTS FESTIVAL: Friday-Sunday; Sunriver; long course and Olympic triathlons/duathlons, Kids’ Splash, Pedal-n-Dash, marathon, half marathon, 10K, 5K, Kids’ Dash and Tour de Crest bike tours (26 and 55 miles); $12-$250, depending on event and time of registration; racecenter.com/pacificcrest. OYSTER OFF ROAD ADVENTURE RACE: Saturday, June 30; 8 a.m.; Bend; compete on teams of two to four members; race may include bikes, running, water and smart phones components; $75; www. oysterracingseries.com. SPLASH N’ DASH: Wednesday, July 4; Prineville; swimming, cycling, boating and running legs; teams and individuals; triathlon also available (no boating leg); $25$30; registration forms available at normsxtremefitness.com; Larry Smith, 541-633-3052; Ernie Brooks, 541-416-9180. RAT RACE TRAINING: For the Redmond Area Triathlon; Saturdays through August 4; 8 a.m.-9 a.m.; based out of Redmond’s Cascade Swim Center; RAT Race is 500meter swim, 12-mile bike ride and 5K run; all skill levels welcome; improve swimming skills and train with qualified instructors; drop-in fees apply.

HORSES

PADDLING

WESTERN CAMP: Ages 7-14; ceramics in the morning, lunch and riding in the afternoon at Diane’s Riding Place; Monday, June 25Friday, June 29; 8:45 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; learn skills in horse care, how to cinch a saddle and ride; transportation provided from RAPRD Activity Center, Redmond; $280; 541-548-7275; raprd.org.

PICKIN’ & PADDLIN’ SUMMER MUSIC SERIES: Boat and standup paddleboard demos available 4 p.m.-7 p.m. each day of series, as well as staff and manufacturer representatives; music begins at 7 p.m.; at Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, Bend; July 25, Shook Twins; Aug. 28, Eight Dollar Mountain; Sept. 19, Polecat; fundraisers for the Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; 541317-9407; laurel@tumalocreek.com. MBSEF JUNIOR PADDLE BOARD PROGRAM: For juniors age 12 and older; main focus will be stand-up paddleboarding, but participants may also learn skills in outrigger and prone paddling, basic lifesaving and water safety; three session options, Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, June 18-29, July 9-20 and Aug. 13-24; 9:30-11 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Bend; $120, includes all equipment, 10 percent discount on multiple sessions; mbsef@mbsef. org; mbsef.org. YAK-A-TAK KIDS SUMMER PADDLING CAMPS: Kids ages 8-16; whitewater camps Mondays through Thursdays, July 23-26 and Aug. 2023; practice in pool and then work on technique and reading currents on the Deschutes River and at Elk Lake; flatwater camps Aug. 6-9 and Aug. 27-30; explore river trails and alpine lakes while learning how to paddle own boat; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily; $295; transportation and gear provided; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe; 541397-9407; tumalocreek.com. YAK-A-TAK KIDS SUMMER STANDUP PADDLEBOARD CAMPS: For kids ages 8-16; Mondays through Thursdays, July 16-19 and Aug. 13-16; improve stroke technique and board balance; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily; $295; transportation and gear provided; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe; 541-397-9407; tumalocreek. com. KAYAKING: For all ages; weekly classes and open pool; equipment provided to those who preregister, first come, first served otherwise; Sundays, 4 p.m.-6 p.m., Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $3; 541548-7275; raprd.org.

MISCELLANEOUS RESTORE PROPER MOVEMENT YOGA: Restorative yoga for busy athletes such as cyclists, runners and triathletes already training; no strength poses, just restorative yoga for active recovery; Mondays; 5 p.m.; Powered by Bowen, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 30 minutes; 5 points on Power Pass or $5 per class; 541-585-1500. REDMOND COMMUNITY YOGA: 7 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays; $49 per six weeks, drop-in available, beginner to intermediate levels; Rebound Physical Therapy, 974 Veterans Way, Suite 4, Redmond; 541-504-2350. JUNIOR TRAINING CAMPS: Grades eight through 12; training for endurance, functional and core strength, balance and other skills; weekly survivor team challenge will include rope course, mountain biking, disc golf and stand-up paddleboarding; sessions Mondays through Fridays, June 18-July 13 and July 23-Aug. 17; $195 per session; Powered by Bowen, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-5851500; poweredbybowen.com. FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN ATHLETES NW SPORTS CAMP: Grades seven through 12; Monday, June 25-Friday, June 29; Northwest Nazarene University, Nampa, Idaho; all high school sports offered; transportation from Central Oregon to camp provided; $350, some scholarships available; Dennis Legg; DLegg@fca.org; 541-815-1274. ACROVISION TAEKWONDO: Age 6 and older; Tuesdays and Thursdays, July 3-26; 7-8 p.m.; RAPRD Activity Center, Redmond; students will train in a complete martial arts system; uniforms are required and will be available for purchase; $69; 541548-7275 or raprd.org. SPRING FENCING: High Desert Fencing in Bend welcomes newcomers and former fencers for competitive training and fitness; Mondays, 4-7 p.m. and Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 5:307 p.m.; Randall, 541-389-4547; Jeff at 541-419-7087. BEND TABLE TENNIS CLUB: Evening play Mondays; 6 p.m.-9 p.m. (setup 30 minutes prior); beginner classes available, cost is $60; at Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; drop-in fee, $5 for adults, $3 for youths and seniors; Jeff at 541-480-

Shoppe in Bend.

RUNNING COLLEEN & MAX’S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE TRAIL RUN NO. 2: Saturday; 7:30 a.m.; meet at FootZone in Bend and carpool to trailhead; for experienced runners; sign up at footzonebend.com. FOAM ROLLER CLINICS: Saturdays, June 23 and July 21; 8:45 a.m.; FootZone, downtown Bend; taught by Ashleigh Mitchell, CPT; learn basic myofacial release with a foam roller; bring yoga mat and foam roller if you own them; foam rollers available for purchase; limited to 15 participants; $5; register at FootZone; footzonebend.com. BITE OF BEND BEER RUN: Age 21 and older only; Sunday; 5K run with three beer stops; $20 through June 22, $30 otherwise; Bendticket.com. BENDISTILLERY MUD RUN AND FILTHY FROLIC: Saturday, June 30; 8 a.m.; Bend; mud, obstacles, hills and puddles; 5K event for individuals, pairs and teams; Filthy Frolic Mini Mudder for the Kids; prices range from $10 suggested donation for kids race to $150 for 10-person teams; footzonebend. com/events. SPARK YOUR HEART 5K: Wednesday, July 4; 8 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Bend; benefit for Children’s Heart Fund; $20 advance registration, $40 late, $10 Firecracker Dash (kids run); 541-706-6996; sparkyourheartbend.com. SMITH ROCK SUNRISE SUMMER CLASSIC: Saturday, July 7; 6 a.m.; Terrebonne; half marathon, 10K and 5K runs/walks; $20-$50; smithrockrace.com. SMITH ROCK MUDDY PIG RUN: Sunday, July 8; DD Ranch, Terrebonne; 1.5-mile course with 12 ranch- and military-style obstacles; also Li’l Piggy Mud Run for kids age 12 and younger; $5-$100, individual and team pricing; muddypigrun.com. CASCADE LAKES RELAY TRAINING RUN: Friday, July 13; 10 p.m.; FootZone, downtown Bend; join FootZone’s relay teams for an after-dark run; bring headlamp and appropriate clothing; 5-mile run; all paces accommodated; teague@ footzonebend.com; register at footzonebend.com. HERO RUSH: Saturday, July 14; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Redmond; 5K firefighterthemed obstacle course; adventure courses for kids under age 14; $74; herorush.com. JOE’S BOOTCAMP CHALLENGE: Saturday, Aug. 25; 10 a.m.; Bearly There Ranch, Redmond; free camping available on site; xdogevents.com.

SNOW SPORTS BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC SUMMER PROGRAMS: Twice weekly and five days weekly summer training programs for local skiers ages 13-23 and for summer visiting skiers ages 18-23; practices Mondays through Fridays through Aug. 14; $200 for twice weekly option, $500 for five times weekly option; 541-678-3864; ben@ bendenduranceacademy.org. TROUT LAKE NORDIC CAMP: For skiers ages 14-23; hosted by the Bend Endurance Academy in Trout Lake, Wash.; Wednesday, July 18Sunday, July 22; improve fitness, technique, strength and overall athletic preparation; $200, includes transportation from Bend, food and lodging; Ben Husaby; 541-6783864; bendenduranceacademy.org.

SOCCER OREGON RUSH WPSL MATCH: Saturday; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, Bend; vs. Issaquah (Wash.) Soccer Club; $5 adults, $2 kids; those wearing an Oregon Rush jersey will be admitted for free; oregonrush.com; wpsl.info. PORTLAND TIMBERS YOUTH CAMP: For kids ages 5-13; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Monday, Aug. 20Wednesday, Aug. 22; Big Sky Park, Bend; learn technical skills, meet a Timbers player and learn from Timbers TREES life skills and life values program; registration deadline Aug. 16; Erik Lyslo; elyslo@ portlandtimbers.com; 503-5535575; portlandtimbers.com/youth/ portland-timbers-camp-program.

SOFTBALL PICKLEBALL BEND PICKLEBALL CLUB: Multiple options for play each week with the club at locations in Bend, Sunriver and Redmond; go to oregonhighdesertpickleball. blogspot.com or email bendpickleballclub@hotmail.com for details; weekly play schedules also available at The Racquet

MOUNTAIN VIEW SKILLS CAMP: Hosted by the MVHS softball team; Monday, June 25-Wednesday,

June 27; for players ages 10-14; 3 p.m.-6 p.m.; Mountain View High School, Bend; $50; for more information, contact MVHS softball head coach Mike Durre, 541-4809593 or mdurre@netscape.net. HIGH DESERT YELLOWJACKETS: Redmond-based 10-and-under ASA fast pitch girls softball team is looking for one or two more girls; prospective players must have turned 11 years old after Jan. 1, 2012, to be eligible; Jeremy; 541-325-3689. CASCADE ALLIANCE SOFTBALL: Forming girls teams at the 10-andunder, 12-and-under, 14-and-under, 16-and-under, and 18-and-under levels for tournaments in the spring and summer of 2012; visit website or Facebook for upcoming tryouts for the 12U and 14U teams, open gyms for all ages, upcoming clinics, and coaching opportunities; cascadealliance.org. SKILL INSTRUCTION: Age 10 and older; with Mike Durre, varsity softball coach at Mountain View High School; lessons in fielding, pitching and hitting; $30 per hour or $50 per hour for two players; mdurre@netscape.net; 541-480-9593.

C S    B  Rock climbing • Local youth advances to national competition: Lukas Strauss-Wise led the Bend Endurance Academy Climbing Team at a USA Climbing Sport Climbing Series Divisional competition staged June 910 in Tigard. Strauss-Wise placed sixth in the male youth C division (birth years 1999 and 2000) of the event, which drew more than 200 of the top climbers from nine Western states. With his result, Strauss-Wise earned an invitation to the 2012 USA Climbing Sport Climbing Series Youth National Championships, scheduled for next month in Atlanta. Other BEA competitors at the divisional championships were Leah Pfeiffer, ninth in the female youth D division; Brady Pfeiffer, 21st in the male youth D division; and Jack Groh, 17th in the male youth B division.

SWIMMING

Soccer

COSMIC SWIM: For middle school students; Saturday; 8-10 p.m.; student ID required; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $2.50 drop-in fee; 541-548-7275, raprd.org. PRECOMP KIDS: Grades one through eight; advanced swimlesson program that serves as a feeder for Cascade Aquatic Club; must be able to swim one length of crawl stroke with side breathing and one length of backstroke in a level position; Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, July 9-27; 5:45 p.m.6:15 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $32; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org.

• Rush still searching for first win: The Oregon Rush Soccer Club’s Women’s Premier Soccer League squad fell to 0-3 for the season last Wednesday with a 3-2 loss to Eugene Metro Futbol Club at Summit High School in Bend. In the 13th minute of the match, Maryn Beutler staked the Rush to a 1-0 lead with a free kick from 20 yards out, but Eugene equalized just a minute later on a goal by Jacklyn Silsby. The visitors then seized the advantage with goals by Taylor Boyer and Chrissy Walker in the 52nd and 60th minutes, respectively. The Rush’s Molly McCool provided the final goal of the night in the 64th minute when she scored on a header off Beutler’s free kick. Next up for the Rush is a home match this Saturday against Issaquah (Wash.) Soccer Club, scheduled for 7 p.m. at Summit. Tickets are $5 for adults, $2 for kids. Children wearing an Oregon Rush jersey will be admitted for free. For more information, go to oregonrush.com and wpsl.info. • Youth league registration still available: The Bend Park & Recreation District still has limited space available in its upcoming youth soccer league. The recreational league is open to Central Oregon boys and girls who will be in grades one through eight during the 2012-13 school year. Twiceweekly practices are slated to begin Aug. 20, and games will take place on Saturdays from Sept. 8 through Oct. 27. Practices and games will take place on Bend-area fields. Registration fee is $60 for park district residents, $81 otherwise. Fee includes team jersey, shorts and socks. To register, go to bendparks andrec.org or call Rick Ekman, park district sports program coordinator, at 541-706-6126.

TENNIS YOUTH TENNIS CLINIC: Ages 4-17; for beginners through experienced players; session 1 is Mondays through Fridays, July 2-12; raprd. org for age groups, times and costs. YOUTH CLINIC: For boys and girls ages 6-14; hosted by the Summit High School girls tennis program; Monday, July 9-Thursday, July 12; Summit tennis courts; two sessions will be offered, based on age, ages 6-9 and 10-14; $45; contact Ryan Cruz at ryan.cruz@bend.k12.or.us for registration forms. WOMEN’S DOUBLES TOURNAMENT: For most levels of players; Tuesday, July 10; Bend Golf and Country Club; sponsored by the Ladies Tennis Association at BGCC; tournament proceeds go to Bend, Mountain View and Summit high schools; $45, entry fee includes lunch and prizes; Joni, 541-322-5762.

VOLLEYBALL ADULT SAND VOLLEYBALL LEAGUE: Age 18 and older; Saturdays, July 7-Aug. 11; 9:30 a.m.; one best-ofthree match per team per week; recreational league, players call own fouls and manage games; $80 per team; 541-548-7275; raprd. SUMMIT STORM VOLLEYBALL CAMP: For girls in grades three through nine during the 2012-13 school year; Monday, July 16Thursday, July 19; 1 p.m.-4 p.m.; Summit High School, Bend; with Storm staff and current varsity players; $80; registration form available at road9sports.com/team/ SummitVolleyball; 541-317-2827; jill@bendbroadband.com. TLHS VOLLEYBALL CAMP: For grades three through eight; Monday, July 16-Thursday, July 19; Trinity School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend; 9 a.m.-noon grades three through five; 1 p.m.-4 p.m. grades six through eight; improve skills by working on fundamentals through demonstration, guidance, repetition and correction; with Trinity Lutheran coaches; bring knee pads and wattle bottle; $68 for Bend Park & Recreation District residents, $92 otherwise; bendparksandrec.org. SAND VOLLEYBALL CAMP: For grades five through eight; Monday, July 30-Wednesday, Aug. 1; 9:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.; outdoor courts in Old Mill District, Bend; staged by Bend High School coaching staff; passing, serving, setting, spiking and agility drills; $51 for Bend Park & Recreation District residents, $69 otherwise; bendparksandrec.org.

—Bulletin staff reports

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

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BUSINESS

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Stock listings, E2-3 Calendar, E4 News of Record, E4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

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NASDAQ

CLOSE 2,895.33 CHANGE +22.53 +.78%

IN BRIEF Unemployment rates steady Jobless rates in Crook and Deschutes counties were essentially unchanged in May from the month before, while the rate in Jefferson County dropped slightly, according to an Oregon Employment Department report released Monday. Deschutes County’s jobless rate was 11.1 percent in May. The county added 1,460 jobs between April and May, far more than expected for the month. But that’s likely due in part to slow hiring the month before, the report said. Crook County’s jobless rate was 13.5 percent in May. That’s essentially unchanged from the 13.4 percent rate in April. The county added 130 jobs, at a time when 140 new jobs are typically seen. In Jefferson County, the 12 percent jobless rate in May was down from 12.2 percent the month before. The county added 170 jobs in May, a month that typically sees 110 new jobs. All three counties have higher levels of nonfarm employment, and lower unemployment rates, than in May 2011.

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DOW JONES

www.bendbulletin.com/business CLOSE 12,741.82 CHANGE -25.35 -.20%

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CLOSE 1,344.78 CHANGE +1.94 +.14%

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10-year Treasury

CLOSE 1.57 CHANGE -.63%

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$1625.70 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$1.30

Stalled Central Oregon subdivisions sell • Developments in Redmond and Bend have sold, though no building has occurred By Elon Glucklich The Bulletin

On the outskirts of Bend, Redmond and other Central Oregon communities sit noticeable signs of the real estate market bust: unfinished subdivisions. From east of Northeast 27th Street in Bend, to the outer boundaries of Redmond and smaller communities like

Terrebonne, they’re reminders of the rapid growth the region saw in the late 1990s and early 2000s, and the speed of the housing market’s collapse in 2008. But starting late last year, new owners bought a few of those developments, some local real estate and community development officials noted. And the trend appears to be

continuing in 2012. Last month, developers bought a pair of stalled Central Oregon subdivisions. Miguel Segoviano, the head of a Redmond home insulation company, purchased 38 empty lots at Ni-Lah-Sha, a northeast Redmond subdivision near Northeast Fifth Street, just east of U.S. Highway 97, featuring new streets with names like Apache Circle, Cheyenne Drive and Arapahoe Court, Deschutes Coun-

ty deeds records show. First planned by a Bend development company, the land — with 178 total tax lots — was purchased in 2005 for $5.1 million, records show. The property was sold to Lake Oswego developers later that year. They lost it to foreclosure in 2009. For the 38 vacant lots, Segoviano paid $287,000, or about $7,500 per lot, buying them from an affiliate of U.S. Bank, records show. See Subdivisions / E3

EXECUTIVE FILE

J.C. Penney exec to step down In the latest sign of turbulent times at J.C. Penney Co., the midprice department store chain said Michael Francis, the former Target Corp. executive brought in to help redefine the brand, is leaving the company. In a terse statement issued late Monday, the department store operator gave no reason for the immediate departure of Francis, who joined the company last October. Shares fell nearly 6 percent in after-hours trading.

Yahoo hires revenue officer Yahoo has appointed Google’s Michael Barrett as chief revenue officer as the company looks for new areas of growth under interim leader Ross Levinsohn. Barrett will be responsible for advertising revenue and operations globally, Yahoo said in a statement. — Staff and wire reports

Slow growth in G-20 nations Percentage change in GDP for the G-20 nations; the summit of the world's most important economies started Monday and continues today in Los Cabos, Mexico: Percentage change from Q4 2011 to Q1 2012 Russia* China Australia India Indonesia Mexico Japan S. Korea Argentina* S. Africa Turkey* Germany Canada U.S. Brazil France Euro area -0.3 U.K. Italy -0.8

1.9% 1.8 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.2 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.2 0.0 0.0 *Percentage change, Q3 2011 to Q4, 2011

Note: No data for Saudi Arabia Source: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development

© 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Terry Kissell and his wife, Cheri, co-owners of Exquisite Limousine, added a stretch Cadillac Escalade to their fleet in November.

Bringing some bling to the streets of Bend By Rachael Rees The Bulletin

T

erry Kissell said he’d never been in a limousine until the day he and his wife, Cheri Kissell, bought one to start their business, Exquisite Limousine. Now the couple owns three stretch limousines, including the newest addition to their fleet: a 14-passenger, white Cadillac Escalade. Equipped with leather seats, two digital fireplaces, lava lamps, a fog machine, laser light show and mirrored ceilings, the Escalade is Exquisite Limousine’s most popular vehicle with customers, Terry Kissell said. In 2002, the couple started the company in Klamath Falls. A year later, they moved to Bend, bringing Exquisite Limousine with them.

The basics What: Exquisite Limousine Employees: six Where: Bend Phone: 541-382-2977 Website: www.exquisitelimooregon.com

Kissell, 61, said the company started operating with a single limousine to learn the system and how the service works. Until the economic downturn, he said, business was growing, enabling them to add vehicles, including their current eight-passenger Lincoln Town Car and the 14-passenger Lincoln Navigator. But with the crash, he said, the company slowed down.

“We’ve seen a lot of limousine companies come and go, that’s just the nature of the beast,” he said. “The economy really did hurt us hard because it’s discretionary money that people use for limousine service.” This year, he said, business has started to pick up again. He attributes some of the increase to his purchase of the Cadillac Escalade — which he put into service in November. It has drawn the party crowd. “In the limo world you have to keep adding on and changing it up,” he said. “More people gravitate towards the SUV versus the standard car. You can accommodate more people, and it has a little more bling.” On average, Cheri Kissell said, the company has about three bookings a week. See Limousine / E4

With its foray into mobile maps, Apple steps up Google rivalry By Quentin Hardy New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — Get ready for the mobile map wars. For many people, phones have become an important way to navigate the world, and mobile maps are at the core of the journey. They are often the critical element in commerce, socializing and search. So far, Google has reigned supreme in the mobile map world, with its maps on every iPhone sold so far — and, of course, on every phone based on its own Android operating system. Last week, though, Apple gave notice it would enter the battle, announcing that

TECH FOCUS in the fall, its phones would no longer carry Google maps, but instead would have Apple’s own map service built in, part of its new mobile operating system. Maps are simply too important to be left to a rival. The question is: Can Apple build a map service that does as good a job, or a better one, than Google has? If Apple slips up, consumers in the highly competitive smartphone market may have a good reason to turn to Android phones. See Maps / E3

New York Times News Service

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CLOSE $28.665 CHANGE -$0.069

Fed eyes growing risks as it meets By Craig Torres Bloomberg News

WASHINGTON — Federal Reserve officials must choose this week between their best estimates and their worst fears of what will happen to the U.S. economy. Policymakers will bring new forecasts to their meeting today and Wednesday, and probably will mark down their April centraltendency estimate for growth of 2.4 to 2.9 percent this year. Lurking in the background is the risk of increasing financial stress in Europe and stubbornly high U.S. unemployment that has remained above 8 percent for 40 consecutive months. All this could prompt them to move away from their outlook for moderate growth and tilt toward a “risk-management” strategy pioneered by former Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan, which puts more emphasis on tracking and containing high-cost threats. Both Janet Yellen, the Fed’s vice chairman, and William Dudley, head of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, used the phrase in the past month. “What we are hearing from Vice Chairman Yellen and President Dudley, and the minutes of the last meeting, is that there are more risks on the downside,” said Donald Kohn, the former Fed vice chairman who is now a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. See Fed / E4

Fabricated bank adds to China’s list of fakery By Didi Tang The Associated Press

BEIJING — In a China awash with fake iPhones, pirated DVDs and knockoff Louis Vuitton bags, rice trader Lin Chunping took fakery to a whole Lin new level: He invented a U.S. bank and claimed he bought it. The little-known businessman shot to fame in January when state media reported that he had taken over Delawarebased Atlantic Bank. The unprecedented acquisition brought him praise: His hometown gave him a prestigious political appointment and state media called his business experience “legendary.” The only thing that may have been legendary is Lin’s audacity. Not only did he not buy Atlantic Bank in Delaware for $60 million as he claimed, but there is no Atlantic Bank in that state. Chinese reporters could not locate an Atlantic Bank or a bank registration by Lin in Delaware. He’s under arrest for an unrelated fraud and has been forced to give up his municipallevel appointment to the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference, the government’s top advisory body. See Fake bank / E3


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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

Consolidated stock listings N m

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A-B-C-D AAR 0.30 ABB Ltd 0.71 ACE Ltd 1.78 ACI Wwde AES Corp AFLAC 1.32 AGCO AGL Res 1.84 AK Steel 0.20 AMC Net n AOL ASML Hld 0.59 AT&T Inc 1.76 ATP O&G AU Optron 0.14 AVI Bio h Aarons 0.06 Aastrom AbtLab 2.04 AberFitc 0.70 AbdAsPac 0.42 Abiomed Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh Accenture 1.35 AccoBrds AccretivH Accuray Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActiveNet ActivePw h ActivsBliz 0.18 Actuant 0.04 Actuate Acuity 0.52 Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran 0.36 AdvAuto 0.24 AMD AdvSemi 0.11 AdvOil&Gs Adventrx AdvActBear AecomTch AegeanMP 0.04 Aegon 0.13 Aeropostl AEterna gh Aetna 0.70 AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agenus rs Agilent 0.40 Agnico g 0.80 Agrium g 1.00 AirLease AirProd 2.56 Aircastle 0.60 Airgas 1.60 AkamaiT Akorn AlaskAir s AlaskCom 0.20 Albemarle 0.80 AlcatelLuc Alcoa 0.12 Alere AlexBaldH 1.26 AlexREE 2.04 AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza rs AlignTech Alkermes AllegTch 0.72 Allergan 0.20 AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco 0.48 AlliBern 0.98 AlliantEgy 1.80 AlliantTch 0.80 AlldNevG AlldWldA 1.50 AllisonT n 0.24 AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate 0.88 AllyFn pfB 2.13 AlnylamP AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp 0.60 AlpTotDiv 0.66 AlpAlerMLP 1.00 AlteraCp lf 0.32 AlterraCap 0.56 Altisrce n Altria 1.64 Alumina 0.24 AlumChina Alvarion h AmBev 1.15 Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren 1.60 Amerigrp AMovilL s 0.28 AmAxle AmCampus 1.35 ACapAgy 5.00 AmCapLtd ACapMtg n 3.60 AEagleOut 0.44 AEP 1.88 AEqInvLf 0.12 AmExp 0.80 AFnclGrp 0.70 AmIntlGrp AmPubEd ARltyCT n 0.70 AmSupr AmTower 0.84 AVangrd 0.10 AmWtrWks 1.00 Amerigon Ameriprise 1.40 AmeriBrgn 0.52 Ametek 0.36 Amgen 1.44 AmkorTch Amphenol 0.42 Amylin Amyris Anadarko 0.36 Anadigc AnalogDev 1.20 Ancestry AngiesL n AnglogldA 0.49 ABInBev 1.57 Anixter 4.50 Ann Inc Annaly 2.37 Ansys AntaresP AntheraPh Anworth 0.90 Aon plc 0.60 A123 Sys Apache 0.68 AptInv 0.72 ApolloGrp ApolloInv 0.80 ApolloRM n 3.00 Apple Inc 10.60 ApldIndlT 0.84 ApldMatl 0.36 AMCC Approach ApricusBio AquaAm 0.66 ArQule ArabAmDv ArcelorMit 0.75 ArchCap ArchCoal 0.12 ArchDan 0.70 ArcosDor 0.24 ArcticCat ArdeaBio ArenaPhm AresCap 1.48 AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest 0.12 ArmHld 0.16 ArmourRsd 1.20 ArmstrWld 8.55 ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRt s AscentSol h AshfordHT 0.44 Ashland 0.90 AsiaInfoL AspenIns 0.68 AspenTech AsscdBanc 0.20 AsdEstat 0.72 Assurant 0.84 AssuredG 0.36 AstexPhm AstoriaF 0.16 AstraZen 2.80 athenahlth AtlPwr g 1.15 AtlasEngy 1.00 AtlasPpln 2.24 Atmel ATMOS 1.38 AtwoodOcn AuRico g Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn AutoNavi Autodesk Autoliv 1.88 AutoData 1.58 AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch 0.60 AvalnRare AvalonBay 3.88 AvanirPhm AVEO Ph AveryD 1.08 AvisBudg

10.35 +.01 16.06 +.06 72.27 -.48 41.99 +1.44 12.58 -.05 41.37 -.61 41.92 -.19 38.68 -.03 5.17 -.15 38.31 -.16 26.96 +.97 50.47 +.54 35.63 -.08 4.57 -.66 4.06 +.05 .67 +.01 27.68 +.12 2.27 +.08 62.70 +.20 31.15 -.39 7.60 +.08 21.70 -.45 3.11 -.05 35.84 +.79 1.53 +.04 58.88 -.20 10.23 -.01 12.00 +.94 5.99 6.58 -.09 21.60 +.26 23.88 +.18 15.71 -.09 .91 +.03 11.64 +.20 26.57 +.11 6.50 -.09 54.76 +.46 13.56 +.25 32.63 +.24 29.80 +.48 70.69 +.95 5.93 +.06 4.40 -.02 2.86 +.02 .51 +.03 23.92 -.09 16.15 +.20 5.06 +.29 4.25 -.09 16.91 +.18 .46 +.01 41.11 +.12 103.79 -.24 13.06 -.06 5.39 +.30 5.26 -.03 40.15 +.14 42.40 +.43 83.79 +1.62 19.94 +.04 79.60 +.12 11.44 +.03 84.50 -.35 31.33 +.19 14.80 +.20 35.25 +.67 2.04 +.07 60.32 +1.04 1.58 +.02 8.69 -.13 19.02 -.03 48.81 +.71 70.90 +.72 4.97 +.07 94.06 +.75 2.57 -.18 33.25 +1.51 16.27 +.59 28.89 -.60 93.12 +.67 130.23 +1.32 3.22 -.01 8.24 +.01 11.83 +.01 45.81 +.31 46.90 +1.43 30.17 +.88 76.63 +.42 18.41 -.41 1.80 +.02 27.53 +.76 10.93 +.03 33.98 -.17 22.15 +.05 11.75 +.17 8.44 -.38 6.11 -.01 4.15 +.01 15.57 -.04 33.74 +.68 22.48 +.08 70.37 +2.97 33.85 +.08 3.71 -.02 10.64 +.28 .40 -.03 37.55 +1.06 12.48 +.64 222.66 +4.31 29.43 +.20 11.99 33.90 +.29 62.01 +.39 24.73 +.62 9.70 -.01 44.34 +.13 33.61 +.01 9.38 -.05 23.67 -.14 19.42 +.21 40.07 +.13 10.51 -.02 55.85 -.43 39.37 +.26 31.51 +.03 29.24 -.04 11.10 +.10 3.91 +.03 68.62 +.86 25.46 -.58 33.90 +.20 11.21 -.69 49.65 -.10 37.81 +.52 51.82 +.40 72.02 +.73 4.71 +.13 56.44 +.72 27.81 +.42 3.12 +.46 64.63 -.74 1.85 +.03 37.56 +.65 27.94 +.38 14.80 +.24 36.88 +.04 70.77 -.20 53.90 +.87 24.68 -.08 16.86 -.05 65.51 +1.32 3.53 +.23 2.61 -.13 6.84 46.85 -.15 1.35 +.15 85.37 -2.43 27.68 +.29 33.21 +.10 7.42 -.09 19.35 -.09 585.78 +11.65 35.80 +.21 11.00 +.01 5.55 +.11 24.03 -.47 3.15 +.05 24.35 +.42 5.68 -.35 10.35 +.08 14.49 -.27 36.87 -.23 6.19 +.18 31.29 -.16 14.06 -.43 34.06 -.43 31.98 +.02 9.38 +.98 15.38 +.08 17.59 -.20 44.64 +.04 12.51 +.22 23.35 +.13 6.97 -.03 49.57 +.47 3.32 +.11 13.43 +.16 33.71 +.07 14.47 +.26 24.33 -.17 19.43 -.08 .73 +.04 8.62 -.06 67.24 +.80 12.50 -.29 28.70 +.25 22.18 -.06 12.71 +.05 15.24 -.10 33.75 -.11 12.11 -.26 2.01 +.06 9.64 +.15 42.16 +.37 85.94 +1.81 13.37 -.01 30.92 -.23 31.45 -1.13 7.09 +.11 34.54 +.19 38.18 -.76 8.57 +.22 5.01 +.36 4.60 +.01 37.08 +.18 12.37 -.19 33.64 +.27 53.30 +.53 55.10 +.06 386.73 +1.43 24.07 +.55 34.76 +.69 1.48 +.09 141.52 +.82 3.16 +.11 11.65 -.04 27.76 -.05 14.30 +.27

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Avnet Avon 0.92 Axcelis AXIS Cap 0.96 B&G Foods 1.08 BB&T Cp 0.80 BB&T pfD BBCN Bcp BBVABFrn BCE g 2.17 BE Aero BGC Ptrs 0.68 BHP BillLt 2.20 BHPBil plc 2.20 BJsRest BMC Sft BP PLC 1.92 BPZ Res BRE 1.54 BRFBrasil 0.42 BT Grp 1.23 BabckWil Bacterin Baidu BakrHu 0.60 BallCorp 0.40 BallyTech BanColum 1.12 BcBilVArg 0.57 BcoBrad pf 0.81 BcoMacro BcoSantSA 0.82 BcoSBrasil 0.36 BcpSouth 0.04 BkofAm 0.04 BkAm pfD 1.55 BkAm pfH 2.05 BkHawaii 1.80 BkIreld rs BkMont g 2.80 BkNYMel 0.52 BkNova g 2.20 Bankrate n Banro g BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPNG Barclay 0.39 Bar iPVix BarVixMdT Bard 0.80 BarnesNob BarrickG 0.80 BasicEnSv Baxter 1.34 BaytexE g 2.64 Bazaarvc n BeacnRfg Beam Inc 0.82 BeazerHm BebeStrs 0.10 BectDck 1.80 BedBath Belden 0.20 Belo 0.32 Bemis 1.00 Berkley 0.36 BerkH B BerryPet 0.32 BestBuy 0.64 BigLots BBarrett BioRefLab BioDlvry lf Biocryst BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR 0.86 BioSante rs BiostarP rs BlkRKelso 1.04 BlackRock 6.00 BlkBldAm 1.58 BlkDebtStr 0.32 BlkEEqDv 0.68 BlkIntlG&I 0.88 BlkRlAsst 1.09 Blackstone 0.40 BlockHR 0.80 BlueNile Bluegreen Blyth s BdwlkPpl 2.13 BodyCentrl Boeing 1.76 Boingo Boise Inc 0.48 BoozAllenH 0.36 BorgWarn BostPrv 0.04 BostProp 2.20 BostonSci BttmlnT BoulderTR BoydGm BradyCp 0.74 Brandyw 0.60 Braskem 0.65 BreitBurn 1.82 BridgptEd BrigStrat 0.44 Brightpnt BrigusG g Brinker 0.64 Brinks 0.40 BrMySq 1.36 BristowGp 0.80 Broadcom 0.40 BroadrdgF 0.64 BroadSoft BroadVisn Broadwd h BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g 0.56 BrkfInfra 1.50 BrkfldOfPr 0.56 BrklneB 0.34 BrwnBrn 0.34 BrownShoe 0.28 BrownFB 1.40 BrukerCp Brunswick 0.05 Buckeye 4.15 BuckTch 0.32 Buckle 0.80 Buenavent 0.63 BuffaloWW BldBear BldrFstSrc BungeLt 1.08 C&J Egy n CA Inc 1.00 CBL Asc 0.88 CBOE 0.48 CBRE GRE 0.54 CBRE Grp CBS B 0.40 CF Inds 1.60 CGI g CH Robins 1.32 CIT Grp CLECO 1.25 CME Grp 8.92 CMS Eng 0.96 CNH Gbl CNO Fincl 0.08 CPFL En s 1.84 CSX 0.56 CTC Media 0.52 CVB Fncl 0.34 CVR Engy 0.32 CVR Ptrs 2.09 CVS Care 0.65 CYS Invest 2.00 Cabelas CblvsNY s 0.60 Cabot 0.80 CabotOG s 0.08 CACI CadencePh Cadence Caesars n CalDive CalaStrTR 0.84 CalAmp Calgon Calix CallGolf 0.04 Callidus CallonPet Calpine CamdenPT 2.24 Cameco g 0.40 Cameron CampSp 1.16 CIBC g 3.60 CdnNRy g 1.50 CdnNRs gs 0.42 CP Rwy g 1.40 CdnSolar Canon CapOne 0.20 CapitlSrce 0.04 CapFedFn 0.30 Caplease 0.26 CapsteadM 1.70 CpstnTrb h CarboCer 0.96 CardnlHlth 0.95 CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd CaribouC CarMax Carmike Carnival 1.00 CarpTech 0.72 Carrizo Carters Caseys 0.66 CatalystH Caterpillar 2.08 CathayGen 0.04 Cavium CedarF 1.62 CelSci Celanese 0.30 Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh CelldexTh Celsion Cemex 0.32 Cemig pf s 1.18 CenovusE 0.88 Centene CenterPnt 0.81 CnElBras pf 0.87 CenElBras 0.65

C 31.54 15.63 1.22 31.87 26.98 30.05 25.31 10.88 3.22 40.07 43.94 6.25 65.92 57.59 38.71 44.01 39.52 2.38 49.16 16.13 31.56 24.20 1.33 121.37 39.61 42.49 47.09 62.66 6.31 15.22 12.00 5.87 7.73 14.05 7.76 23.69 25.72 45.38 5.71 53.54 20.94 50.36 20.32 4.26 38.54 20.40 3.36 12.30 16.97 48.51 103.20 15.24 40.19 9.43 49.92 42.48 19.25 25.62 62.63 2.71 5.63 73.43 74.26 32.38 5.94 32.05 37.34 82.15 35.84 19.80 38.12 16.52 24.39 3.66 3.81 141.96 36.89 18.31 2.48 1.65 9.45 173.45 23.09 4.07 7.06 6.82 9.98 12.30 15.50 30.37 5.74 36.37 25.84 8.22 71.90 11.22 6.70 15.24 65.94 8.45 104.94 5.78 18.42 16.35 7.28 27.02 11.80 11.89 16.34 18.95 17.28 4.81 .93 32.41 22.05 34.58 39.20 34.66 20.71 26.77 12.78 .26 4.69 17.05 32.06 33.54 16.55 8.74 26.37 11.78 92.09 15.49 20.52 50.02 26.47 37.91 39.25 86.86 4.21 4.35 58.28 18.99 26.45 18.72 27.98 7.71 16.39 31.63 170.91 22.56 59.01 33.21 41.80 282.21 23.87 37.35 7.39 25.23 22.69 8.43 10.89 24.41 21.07 45.67 14.16 35.19 12.39 37.35 36.82 50.60 2.90 10.79 12.05 2.43 9.32 7.74 13.15 7.99 5.38 4.97 4.07 16.33 67.58 20.88 43.88 31.98 69.65 83.17 27.63 73.00 3.64 40.55 54.11 6.57 11.73 4.14 13.90 1.03 82.68 42.57 .26 28.72 24.86 5.39 12.30 27.63 13.82 34.72 43.90 19.96 52.62 53.57 92.93 86.74 16.39 28.21 28.39 .41 37.99 7.68 65.93 .68 4.43 2.14 5.53 17.86 31.44 28.35 20.71 9.32 6.80

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CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g 0.01 CentAl CntryLink 2.90 Cenveo Cepheid Cerner s CerusCp ChRvLab ChartInds CharterCm ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura CheniereEn ChesEng 0.35 ChesGran n 1.97 ChesMidst 1.62 Chevron 3.60 ChicB&I 0.20 Chicos 0.21 Chimera 0.48 ChinBAK h ChiFnOnl ChinGerui ChinaLife 0.55 ChinaMble 2.14 ChinaTcF ChinaUni 0.16 Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb 1.64 ChungTel 1.91 ChurchDwt 0.96 CienaCorp Cigna 0.04 Cimarex 0.48 CinciBell CinnFin 1.61 Cinemark 0.84 Cintas 0.54 Cirrus Cisco 0.32 Citi pfJcld 2.13 Citigroup 0.04 CitzRpB rs CitzSoBk 0.04 CitrixSys CityNC 1.00 ClaudeR g CleanEngy CleanH s ClearChn s 6.08 ClearEnFd 1.46 Clearwire CliffsNRs 2.50 Clorox 2.56 CloudPeak Coach 1.20 CobaltIEn CocaCola 2.04 CocaCE 0.64 Coeur Cognex 0.44 CognizTech CohStInfra 1.44 CohStQIR 0.72 Coinstar ColdwtrCrk Colfax ColgPal 2.48 CollctvBrd ColonPT 0.72 ColumLb h Comcast 0.65 Comc spcl 0.65 Comerica 0.60 CmcBMO 0.92 CmclMtls 0.48 CmclVehcl CmwREIT 2.00 CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao 0.22 CompDivHd 1.44 CmplGnom CompSci 0.80 Compuwre ComstkRs Comverse Con-Way 0.40 ConAgra 0.96 Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch ConocPhil s 2.64 ConsolEngy 0.50 ConEd 2.42 ConstantC ConstellA ContlRes Cnvrgys 0.20 CooperCo 0.06 Cooper Ind 1.24 CooperTire 0.42 CopaHold 2.10 CopanoEn 2.30 Copart s Copel 0.94 CoreLabs 1.12 CoreLogic CorinthC CorOnDem CornstProg 1.10 Corning 0.30 CorpExc 0.70 CorpOffP 1.10 CorrectnCp 0.80 Cosan Ltd 0.28 Cosi Inc h CostPlus Costco 1.10 Cott Cp CousPrp 0.18 Covance CovantaH 0.60 CoventryH 0.50 Covidien 0.90 Crane 1.04 Cray Inc CSVLgNGs CS VS3xSlv CSVS2xVxS CSVelIVSt s CSVSVixST CredSuiss 0.82 CrSuiHiY 0.32 Cree Inc CreXus 1.19 Crocs Crosshr g CrosstexE 0.48 CrosstxLP 1.32 CrwnCstle CrownHold Ctrip.com CubeSmart 0.32 CubicEngy CubistPh CullenFr 1.92 Cummins 1.60 Curis CurEuro 0.22 CurAstla 3.88 CurJpn Cyberonics Cymer CypSemi 0.44 CytRx rs Cytori DCT Indl 0.28 DDR Corp 0.48 DFC Glbl DHT Hldgs 0.08 DNP Selct 0.78 DR Horton 0.15 DSW Inc 0.72 DTE 2.48 DanaHldg 0.20 Danaher 0.10 DaqoNwEn Darden 1.72 Darling DaVita DeVry 0.30 DealrTrk DeanFds DeckrsOut Deere 1.84 DejourE g Delcath Delek 0.15 Dell Inc 0.32 DelphiAu n DeltaAir Deluxe 1.00 DemndMda DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dentsply 0.22 Depomed DeutschBk 0.92 DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevonE 0.80 DexCom Diageo 2.68 DiamndF lf DiaOffs 0.50 DiamRk 0.32 DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg 0.50 Diebold 1.14 DigitalGen DigitalRlt 2.92 DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards 0.20 DirecTV A Dx30TBr rs DxEMBll rs 2.24 DxFnBull rs DrxTcBull DirSCBear DirFnBear DirLCBear DrxDNGBull 0.08 DirDGldBr 1.98 DirDGldBll 1.02 DrxTcBear DrxEnBear DrxSOXBll DirEMBear DrxREBull 2.00 DirxSCBull DirxLCBull

C 2.80 -.02 5.62 -.16 20.48 -.09 7.10 +.02 38.66 +.28 2.30 -.10 40.65 +.77 85.96 +3.32 3.28 +.04 32.56 +.51 65.06 +.46 67.63 +.74 49.16 -1.23 31.84 +.16 1.28 -.02 14.48 -.33 14.07 -.03 17.67 -.43 18.82 -.58 26.19 -.55 103.46 -.87 36.34 +.20 13.83 -.11 2.88 +.06 .65 +.02 1.36 +.15 2.52 -.17 37.91 +.60 52.20 +.73 1.06 -.01 14.10 +.15 414.46 +12.01 4.76 -.04 1.10 -.01 71.32 -.20 30.49 +.07 53.81 +.75 15.67 +.16 45.08 -.21 48.68 -.54 3.58 -.06 36.82 +.59 21.48 -.02 37.22 -.01 30.63 +1.65 17.14 +.04 25.60 27.55 -.76 16.47 +.03 6.55 -.04 80.45 +.33 48.52 -.36 .70 +.01 13.76 -.24 57.90 +.64 6.00 -.04 21.50 +.26 1.14 -.03 48.81 -.17 72.85 +.29 15.06 +.05 60.72 -.49 21.74 -.25 75.98 -.11 26.87 +.02 18.79 -.22 32.08 -.26 59.93 -.57 16.73 +.13 10.13 +.27 64.76 +1.95 .68 +.01 29.86 -.26 101.67 +.14 21.32 -.07 22.23 +.17 .68 -.01 31.16 +.07 30.59 +.09 29.66 -.30 37.82 +.13 11.79 -.26 8.31 -.15 18.25 +.18 24.19 +.16 45.75 +1.18 37.45 -.30 12.70 +.11 2.20 +.24 24.62 -.09 9.14 +.08 14.84 -.44 5.80 +.05 36.16 +.80 24.95 -.02 18.81 +.02 88.86 -2.28 67.75 +.56 55.07 -.39 27.93 -.11 63.48 +.38 18.76 -.21 19.67 +.01 68.51 -2.23 14.39 +.15 79.44 +.49 67.99 -.28 16.70 +.26 78.46 +1.73 27.34 +.16 23.79 +.49 21.15 -.22 118.54 -.04 17.23 +.04 2.56 -.07 22.01 +.74 5.32 -.15 13.10 +.09 39.57 +.80 22.30 +.18 27.24 +.44 12.45 +.35 .70 -.02 21.99 +.03 92.03 +.59 8.15 -.02 7.32 47.07 +.37 16.65 +.28 32.87 -.20 53.00 +.07 36.64 +.16 11.51 -.03 25.10 +4.20 25.57 +.22 6.41 -.78 10.45 +.82 36.60 -3.40 18.30 -.58 3.03 +.02 23.92 +.02 10.43 +.16 16.09 -.14 .29 -.00 13.99 -.57 15.99 -.63 58.80 +1.05 34.34 +.02 17.18 +.05 11.28 +.09 .40 +.01 40.09 +.61 55.87 +.19 94.36 -.33 4.76 +.01 125.09 -.83 101.31 +.31 124.23 -.68 44.89 +2.37 57.10 -.33 13.79 +.29 4.36 +.23 2.41 +.13 6.29 +.08 14.02 +.13 16.96 -.21 .65 +.00 11.16 +.04 16.50 +.62 52.13 -6.67 59.94 +.44 12.38 +.02 51.89 +.20 1.07 -.01 51.61 +.15 14.60 -.04 91.50 +2.12 26.60 -.24 28.14 +.21 16.56 +.22 49.42 +.81 74.89 -.46 .23 1.54 +.01 16.37 -.21 12.42 +.12 28.91 +.37 10.63 +.37 23.90 +.43 10.26 +.37 14.35 -.26 7.52 -.24 1.48 +.03 38.00 +.23 5.09 -.06 35.32 -1.19 50.02 +.03 4.79 56.87 -.48 12.84 +.15 100.24 +.64 18.28 +.05 59.77 -.81 10.21 +.02 7.20 -.05 9.33 -.20 46.66 +.86 37.25 +.66 12.57 +.10 74.49 +.45 14.55 +.17 15.61 +.56 67.03 +.74 45.32 +.44 52.75 -.90 75.62 +.52 83.03 -.64 48.76 +.93 20.40 -.10 24.80 +.16 22.24 -.23 20.87 -.25 39.64 -2.23 13.47 +.63 10.71 -.24 12.05 +.28 27.75 +1.24 15.74 -.14 68.57 +1.54 49.02 +.15 73.87 +.82

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TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Subdivisions Continued from E1 That purchase came a day after Bend developer Chet Antonsen and Portland-area developer Guy Wolcott bought 20 vacant lots at Angus Acres, a Terrebonne subdivision at the northernmost point of Northwest 16th Street, where that street meets Foss Drive. They paid $250,000 total for the lots, or $12,500 for each. Development plans for the Redmond and Terrebonne lots aren’t known. Multiple messages left with the developers weren’t returned. The purchases are part of a wave of ownership changes that community development officials have seen recently. Sean Cook, a senior planner with Redmond’s Community Development Department, said he’s seen about a halfdozen Redmond subdivisions go from bank-owned to developer-owned in the last year. “It’s a guess as to what their plans are” with the properties, Cook said. But there’s also plenty of evidence that those buyers aren’t planning to build any time soon. One of the companies that bought in Redmond is calling itself “Long-Term LLC,” Cook said. And his department isn’t receiving many building permit applications, a step that would show that the buyers are ready to build.

Maps Continued from E1 If Apple succeeds, Google will be under pressure at a time when it already has to deal with other competitors in map services. “It makes Apple more valuable and denies Google a lot of user data, and a brand presence, on the iPhone,” said Ben Bajarin, an analyst with the technology research firm Creative Strategies. If Apple cannot meet or exceed Google’s maps, he added, “it will irk their power users,” who are the most valuable customers. Apple’s move into maps was not exactly a surprise. It has bought a few companies that make mapping features, like three-dimensional visualizations, and has secured rights to data like the names and layouts of streets in over 100 countries from TomTom, a big digital map company based in the Netherlands.

Instead, they seem to be waiting for home values to improve, said Mark Valceschini, a broker with Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate. That could still be years away. For many property investors, building now just doesn’t make sense, Valceschini said. He’s trying to sell a largely vacant subdivision on 2.5 acres on Daniel Road, east of 27th Street between Northeast Butler Market and Northeast Wells Acres roads. But he isn’t having much luck. “People are able to buy finished lots for significantly less” than incomplete ones, Valceschini said. He calls the slew of partially developed lots “PVC farms.” In many cases, the pipes from plumbing and other infrastructure like roads and electric wiring have been partially installed. “I think there’s an adequate supply of lots that are finished, with curbs, sidewalks and streets,” he said. “Those are the lots that people are trying to work through now.”

Redmond developments In Redmond, however, it’s a slightly different story. For all the attention paid to Bend’s population and real estate boom in the early 2000s, Redmond grew even faster: The city’s population nearly doubled between 2000 and 2010, Census data show, booming from 13,481 to 26,215.

But making digital maps is not easy. Google has spent years working on its services, pouring all kinds of resources into the effort, including its Street View project to photograph and map the world. It will be hard to duplicate that depth and breadth. “Apple has gotten into a place that is very technical, quite a challenge, and like nothing they’ve done before,” said Noam Bardin, chief executive of Waze, a mapping service that provides realtime traffic information by tracking the movement of phones. Still, it would be foolish to underestimate Apple, said John Musser, editor of ProgrammableWeb, an online service that follows mobile application development. “Apple so far has close to nothing in maps, because they never had a product before,” Musser said. “But they are hardly empty-handed.” Mapping technology is a

AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div PE ... 1.16 .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40 .88 1.10f ... .28 .53f .22 .90f .20f .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

15 16 ... 38 13 ... 9 19 26 14 15 8 ... 12 7 22 6 ... 20 14 11

YTD Last Chg %Chg 35.25 26.32 7.76 19.99 71.90 4.45 45.61 51.29 92.03 7.43 19.95 21.05 9.56 27.42 7.40 22.81 3.50 10.01 21.95 14.63 29.84

+.67 -.02 -.14 -.02 -.09 -.23 +.29 +1.11 +.59 -.05 -.03 -.59 -.73 +.08 -.03 ... -.26 +.20 +.05 -.19 -.18

-6.1 +2.2 +39.6 +.2 -2.0 +1.6 -3.3 +10.2 +10.5 +23.4 -20.4 -18.3 -8.1 +13.1 -3.8 -5.8 -41.1 +24.0 +2.3 +7.9 +14.9

Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1626.00 $1625.70 $28.665

Forgeries abound Last year, officials found five fake Apple stores in the southwestern city of Kunming. The stores were modeled after the U.S. company’s iconic stores right down to the winding staircase and the staff in blue T-shirts. In early June, local press in eastern Shandong province exposed a fake university. Students who did not score high enough on the national college entrance exam to make it into university received sham admission letters to the Shandong Institute of Light Industry, a real school. The students paid nearly 30,000 yuan ($4,800) over the course of four years to attend classes at the institute. Weeks before graduation, the students learned they would not get diplomas because they were not officially enrolled at the school but in a private training program that rents space from the institute, according to the report in the state-run Jinan Times. The program organizer had disappeared, the newspaper reported. Among students, getting ahead by padding resumes or other subterfuge is common. Zinch China, the Chinese arm of U.S.-based educational networking site Zinch.com, estimates that 90 percent of recommendation letters to U.S. schools are fake, that 70 percent of the essays are written by someone else and that half the transcripts are fabricated. Zinch drew the numbers from interviews with Chinese students, parents and agents.

growing field that draws on everything from aerial photography to the movement of the continents, to individual comments on websites about a favorite hiking trail or a bad dining experience. ProgrammableWeb counts 240 mapping-related services that people building mobile map applications can draw from. That is up 73 percent from a year ago, and 243 percent from 2009. Apple has offered few details about its plans for the map service, which is part of the new operating system, iOS 6, that was unveiled at the company’s annual developer conference in San Francisco.

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Experts point to many reasons for the widespread of lack of scruples, from the need to be hyper-competitive to succeed in an over-populated society to an ancient sage who countenanced lying to achieve a higher purpose. He Huaihong, a Peking University philosophy professor who teaches ethics, takes aim at China’s politics, specifically the disconnect between an avowedly communist leadership and the capitalist economy it oversees. “Jargon left from a century of political revolution is so disconnected with reality that the society is filled with meaningless, empty talk,” said He.

A captivating story Lin told Chinese reporters that it took him two years to negotiate the purchase of the U.S. bank, and that the bank had declared bankruptcy in 2008 because of the financial crisis. To add more flair to the story, Lin told reporters that the bank had been running for 85 years and was run by Jews, who are stereotypically seen by many Chinese as having superior business skills. Lin’s story was particularly captivating because overseas acquisitions are a point of pride in China, showcasing its rising economic power. Lin’s supposed purchase of an American bank signaled both Chinese triumph and U.S. decline. His claims also cheered his hometown, the eastern city of Wenzhou, which was reeling from a government-imposed credit crunch that had ruined some highly leveraged entrepreneurs, some of whom fled the city and their debts. A few committed suicide. “People were shocked that an obscure businessman bought a foreign bank and it was a U.S. bank nonetheless. He wasn’t even a banker to begin with,” said Zhu Xiaochuan, a researcher on China’s financial law at CEIBS Lu-

Div PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstBcp Weyerhsr

1.44 1.08 1.78 ... .80f ... 1.68 .12 .70f .75f 1.56 .89f .68 ... .36f .78f .32 .88 ... .60

YTD Last Chg %Chg

21 101.40 -.35 +5.2 15 49.03 -.12 -1.4 20 47.35 -.17 -1.2 14 4.33 -.16 -4.6 12 39.42 +.02 +5.2 ... 1.66 -.06 -13.2 33 37.87 +.25 +3.6 20 169.09 +2.13 +2.6 10 17.64 -.33 -16.2 8 24.39 -.02 -42.3 30 132.28 +2.74 +48.2 12 35.73 +.37 -2.8 31 54.18 +1.64 +17.8 25 5.64 +.02 +15.8 16 12.40 -.05 +.1 12 31.52 -.06 +16.5 13 15.84 -.04 +13.2 11 32.46 +.01 +17.8 12 19.24 +.07 +23.3 32 20.95 +.16 +12.2

Prime rate

Pvs Day

Time period

Percent

$1627.00 $1627.00 $28.734

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

BkofAm S&P500ETF SPDR Fncl Bar iPVix SprintNex

1352030 7.76 -.14 891552 134.40 +.26 666250 14.26 -.08 613079 16.97 -1.52 469232 3.08 -.01

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

CSVLgNGs Lentuo ElsterGrp BlueLinx AcornIntl

25.10 +4.20 +20.1 2.09 +.35 +20.1 19.41 +3.01 +18.4 2.50 +.33 +15.2 3.10 +.38 +14.0

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

CSVInvNG PrUVxST rs ChiCBlood PrUShNG s DSW Inc

42.01 12.64 2.78 33.91 52.13

Chg %Chg -10.02 -2.54 -.42 -4.38 -6.67

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

ExtorreG g CheniereEn NwGold g NovaGld g GoldStr g

Last Chg

80770 4.16 +1.50 58397 14.07 -.03 39954 9.90 +.32 30767 6.18 +.19 27786 1.19 +.10

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

ExtorreG g IntTower g MeetMe CKX Lands Vringo

4.16 +1.50 +56.4 3.18 +.51 +19.1 2.52 +.29 +13.0 13.58 +1.28 +10.4 4.02 +.35 +9.5

Exposed The story attracted so much attention that Chinese journalists familiar with U.S. banking regulations checked into the legitimacy of Lin’s claims. They found no Atlantic Bank in Delaware and that Lin’s New HSBC was not licensed to offer banking services in Delaware. When his nonexistent bank was exposed in March, Lin told reporters he made “exaggerations” to raise his social status and to win future opportunities in banking. Lin is not known to have made any money off his bank claims, but after they were shown to be false he apparently became a target in a police campaign to crack down on economic crimes. A statement on the Wenzhou police bureau’s website said he is suspected of having falsified invoices worth of hundreds of millions of yuan (tens of millions of dollars) through several of his companies in a tax-evading scheme.

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Indexes Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Microsoft ArenaPhm Zynga n Facebook n SiriusXM

Last Chg

570320 29.84 -.18 452665 9.38 +.98 437619 5.78 +.22 418827 31.41 +1.40 412008 1.84 -.04

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

InterDig Amyris FFinSvc ATA Inc AmIndep

29.08 +6.20 +27.1 3.12 +.46 +17.3 2.90 +.40 +16.0 3.68 +.50 +15.7 4.80 +.60 +14.3

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

-19.3 -16.7 -13.1 -11.4 -11.3

Electrmed BreezeE Versar Accelr8 WizrdSft rs

2.40 6.15 2.84 2.77 2.12

-.30 -11.1 -.64 -9.4 -.26 -8.4 -.23 -7.5 -.13 -5.8

BodyCentrl CmtyWest ATP O&G KIT Digitl ClayEng

8.22 -7.77 -48.6 2.33 -.46 -16.5 4.57 -.66 -12.6 4.16 -.54 -11.5 50.80 -5.20 -9.3

1,778 1,261 99 3,138 100 41

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

245 198 37 480 1 11

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

jiazui Institute of International Finance in Shanghai. “The news must be credible because it was in mainstream media. The public were amazed how wealthy Wenzhou businessmen were.” A profile on the website of the ruling Communist Party’s newspaper People’s Daily depicts Lin as sharp and hardworking, selling buttons as a teenager, then purchasing a copper and gold mine in Ghana and investing in the rice business in China. The profile is still available online. Lin said he renamed the bank USA New HSBC Federation Consortium Inc. and that the institution had already attracted $40 million in deposits with the prospect of turning an annual profit of $5 million to $6 million. The new name had an air of respectability, borrowing from the Londonbased global banking giant HSBC Holdings, whose brand is well-known in China.

EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

Market recap

Name

Precious metals

Continued from E1 Lin, who was arrested in early June, could not be reached for comment. But the 41-year-old’s short, spectacular rise and fall shows how fakery has evolved in China, morphing from the manufacture of copycat goods to entire institutions and careers.

—Reporter: 541-617-7820 eglucklich@bendbulletin.com

Northwest stocks Name

Fake bank

That sparked an intense demand for new home construction, said Heather Richards, director of Redmond’s Community Development Department. Many developers found that building multiple homes under a single subdivision was a cost-effective way to maximize profits, she said. But when the market collapsed, “all of a sudden, people got stuck midway through development,” Richards said. “We have subdivisions probably in every level of development that have been vacated by their original developer.” Today, the city of Redmond is working with a consultant to develop a buildable-lands inventory. It’s part of the city’s effort to determine how much development-ready land is available in Redmond. Since the second half of last year, Richards said, developers have showed a bit of a renewed interest in buying subdivisions, which had been largely absent from the market since the 2008 crash. But when that interest will spur a new round of building, she said, is uncertain. “We obviously would like to see development continue on these properties,” Richards said. “Our interest is in the people who are capitalized and able to move forward in this market.”

E3

Diary

Chg %Chg

Diary 1,268 1,245 94 2,607 82 42

52-Week High Low

Name

13,338.66 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 483.57 381.99 8,496.42 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,422.38 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 860.37 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

12,741.82 5,192.13 484.02 7,662.29 2,298.10 2,895.33 1,344.78 14,043.10 772.53

-25.35 +100.89 +.97 -1.98 +9.55 +22.53 +1.94 +32.52 +1.21

-.20 +1.98 +.20 -.03 +.42 +.78 +.14 +.23 +.16

+4.29 +3.44 +4.16 +2.48 +.87 +11.14 +6.93 +6.47 +4.27

+5.48 -.17 +12.78 -4.61 +1.30 +10.10 +5.20 +3.82 -2.02

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

t t t s s s s t s s s s s s

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

+5.6

WelltnAdm 56.61 -0.03 Windsor 45.89 +0.05 WdsrIIAd 49.08 -0.09 Vanguard Fds: CapOpp 30.93 +0.13 DivdGro 16.13 -0.02 Energy 54.68 -0.27 EqInc 22.98 -0.01 Explr 75.09 +0.50 GNMA 11.07 HYCorp 5.80 HlthCre 137.31 +0.56 InflaPro 14.76 +0.01 IntlGr 16.80 +0.02 IntlVal 26.84 +0.02 ITIGrade 10.19 LifeCon 16.76 +0.02 LifeGro 22.17 +0.03 LifeMod 20.02 +0.03 LTIGrade 10.67 +0.05 Morg 19.17 +0.13 MuInt 14.22 PrmcpCor 13.99 +0.05 Prmcp r 64.53 +0.21 SelValu r 19.33 STAR 19.67 +0.04 STIGrade 10.74 StratEq 19.37 +0.11 TgtRetInc 11.93 +0.01 TgRe2010 23.41 +0.03 TgtRe2015 12.85 +0.02 TgRe2020 22.70 +0.03 TgtRe2025 12.87 +0.02 TgRe2030 21.98 +0.03 TgtRe2035 13.17 +0.02 TgtRe2040 21.59 +0.03 TgtRe2045 13.56 +0.02 USGro 19.96 +0.17 Wellsly 23.78 +0.01 Welltn 32.77 -0.02 Wndsr 13.60 +0.02 WndsII 27.65 -0.04 Vanguard Idx Fds: ExtMkt I 103.23 +0.53

297.01 2,110.59 3,066.19 5,491.09 6,248.20 19,427.81 38,043.08 13,009.63 3,455.68 8,721.02 1,891.71 2,824.22 4,183.87 5,525.39

-.19 -.39 -.69 +.22 +.30 +1.01 +.81 -2.85 +.25 +1.77 +1.81 +.47 +1.87 +.40

1.0120 1.5665 .9759 .001987 .1572 1.2580 .1289 .012638 .072161 .0309 .000863 .1425 1.0476 .0334

1.0082 1.5678 .9773 .002006 .1571 1.2637 .1289 .012705 .071835 .0309 .000860 .1432 1.0522 .0334

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EquityDv 19.05 +0.01 GlbAlloc r 18.69 +0.01 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 66.75 +0.41 Columbia Class A: TxEA p 14.08 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 29.35 +0.12 AcornIntZ 36.26 +0.13 LgCapGr 12.77 +0.09 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 7.51 +0.06 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.09 -0.01 USCorEq1 11.36 +0.02 USCorEq2 11.12 +0.01 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 34.28 +0.05 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 34.67 +0.05 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.30 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 17.76 +0.11 EmMktV 26.47 +0.16 IntSmVa 13.53 +0.01 LargeCo 10.60 +0.02 USLgVa 20.12 -0.04 US Small 21.40 +0.03 US SmVa 24.06 -0.05 IntlSmCo 13.84 Fixd 10.33 IntVa 14.08 -0.06 Glb5FxInc 11.14 2YGlFxd 10.11 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 71.26 -0.04 Income 13.69 +0.01 IntlStk 29.47 -0.04 Stock 108.37 -0.07 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.21 TRBd N p 11.21 Dreyfus:

+5.3 +2.5 +10.3 +5.1 +7.8 +6.3 +6.2 -8.2

+6.3 +5.7 +5.5 +5.6 +3.3 +3.7 +2.5 +1.0 +8.0 +6.0 +4.8 +4.2 +1.5 +0.5 -2.4 +2.5 +0.6 +6.3 +4.0 +0.8 +7.1 NA NA

Aprec 42.44 +0.01 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.05 -0.02 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.92 GblMacAbR 9.79 +0.02 LgCapVal 18.09 -0.02 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.29 +0.02 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.68 -0.01 FPACres 27.37 -0.01 Fairholme 27.82 +0.03 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.44 StrValDvIS 4.96 +0.02 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 21.79 +0.18 StrInA 12.31 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 22.07 +0.18 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.60 +0.02 FF2010K 12.46 +0.03 FF2015 11.36 +0.02 FF2015K 12.51 +0.03 FF2020 13.67 +0.02 FF2020K 12.84 +0.03 FF2025 11.30 +0.03 FF2025K 12.88 +0.03 FF2030 13.43 +0.03 FF2030K 12.99 +0.04 FF2035 11.05 +0.03 FF2035K 12.98 +0.04 FF2040 7.70 +0.02 FF2040K 13.01 +0.04 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.14 +0.04 AMgr50 15.71 +0.03 AMgr20 r 13.08 +0.01 Balanc 19.23 +0.04 BalancedK 19.24 +0.05 BlueChGr 46.57 +0.36 CapAp 28.25 +0.13

+5.1 +6.2 +3.3 +1.5 +6.3 +6.8 +1.0 +2.2 +20.2 +3.1 +3.7 +10.5 +3.9 +10.6 +4.1 +4.2 +4.2 +4.3 +4.5 +4.6 +4.8 +4.8 +4.9 +5.0 +4.9 +5.0 +4.8 +5.0 +8.1 +4.9 +3.4 +6.1 +6.3 +9.8 +14.7

CpInc r 8.97 Contra 74.78 ContraK 74.77 DisEq 22.73 DivIntl 26.37 DivrsIntK r 26.34 DivGth 27.69 Eq Inc 43.77 EQII 18.58 Fidel 34.05 FltRateHi r 9.73 GNMA 11.92 GovtInc 10.90 GroCo 90.57 GroInc 19.57 GrowthCoK90.54 HighInc r 8.86 IntBd 11.02 IntmMu 10.58 IntlDisc 28.52 InvGrBd 11.90 InvGB 7.88 LgCapVal 10.59 LowP r 37.60 LowPriK r 37.59 Magelln 68.71 MidCap 27.91 MuniInc 13.35 NwMkt r 16.61 OTC 57.65 100Index 9.60 Puritn 18.86 PuritanK 18.86 SAllSecEqF12.15 SCmdtyStrt 8.26 SCmdtyStrF 8.28 SrsIntGrw 10.68 SrsIntVal 8.08 SrInvGrdF 11.91 STBF 8.53 StratInc 11.02 TotalBd 11.13 USBI 11.92 Value 67.47

+0.01 +0.62 +0.62 +0.01 +0.03 +0.02 +0.05 -0.01 +0.02 +0.20

+0.01 +0.88 +0.02 +0.88

+0.06

-0.03 +0.04 +0.04 +0.34 +0.19

+6.3 +10.9 +10.9 +5.7 +3.3 +3.4 +7.0 +6.6 +7.3 +9.3 +2.4 +1.9 +1.9 +12.0 +7.7 +12.0 +5.4 +2.5 +2.6 +3.3 +3.1 +3.4 +5.2 +5.2 +5.3 +9.3 +6.9 +4.2 +7.6 +5.4 +8.8 +7.0 +7.1 +8.2 -7.8 -7.7 +5.6

+0.89 +0.01 +0.05 +0.05 +0.04 +0.07 +0.07 +0.02 -0.02 +0.01 +3.1 +1.0 +4.0 +3.4 +2.4 +0.01 +6.3

Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 47.88 +0.07 +8.0 500Idx I 47.88 +0.07 +8.0 Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r 37.35 +0.21 +6.5 500IdxAdv 47.88 +0.07 +8.0 TotMktAd r 38.79 +0.09 +7.7 USBond I 11.92 +2.4 First Eagle: GlblA 46.26 +0.12 +2.5 OverseasA 20.67 +0.06 +1.5 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.19 -0.01 +1.3 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.53 +0.01 +4.9 GrwthA p 47.64 +0.20 +6.7 HYTFA p 10.72 +6.5 IncomA p 2.12 +4.3 RisDvA p 36.32 +0.05 +4.4 StratInc p 10.30 +0.01 +4.2 USGovA p 6.89 +1.1 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 12.57 +0.03 +4.1 IncmeAd 2.11 +0.01 +4.9 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.14 +4.0 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.54 -0.01 +3.7 Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 12.61 +0.04 +4.0 GrwthA p 16.49 -0.08 +1.2 WorldA p 13.92 -0.05 +1.3 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 12.64 +0.04 +3.9 GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 41.73 +0.08 +7.7 GMO Trust III: Quality 23.34 -0.02 +6.5 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 18.20 -0.11 -3.8 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 10.36 +0.05 +0.5 Quality 23.35 -0.02 +6.5 Goldman Sachs Inst:

HiYield 7.05 MidCapV 35.55 +0.10 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.70 CapApInst 41.08 +0.34 Intl r 54.30 -0.11 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 30.50 +0.08 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 39.33 +0.10 Div&Gr 20.41 -0.01 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.69 +0.02 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r15.20 -0.04 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.76 CmstkA 16.07 -0.03 EqIncA 8.68 GrIncA p 19.50 -0.03 HYMuA 9.88 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.86 +0.01 AssetStA p 23.60 +0.01 AssetStrI r 23.83 +0.01 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 12.04 JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond 12.04 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 12.03 HighYld 7.80 IntmTFBd 11.32 -0.01 ShtDurBd 10.99 USLCCrPls 21.18 +0.01 Janus T Shrs: PrkMCVal T20.62 +0.05 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.81 +0.02 LSGrwth 12.57 +0.03 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 17.69 +0.18 Longleaf Partners: Partners 27.19 -0.06

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Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.43 +0.01 +5.8 StrInc C 14.82 +0.01 +4.4 LSBondR 14.37 +0.01 +5.6 StrIncA 14.74 +0.01 +4.7 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.30 +0.01 +5.0 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.07 -0.02 +5.4 BdDebA p 7.77 +4.7 ShDurIncA p4.58 +2.9 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.61 +2.5 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.57 -0.01 +2.7 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.49 -0.02 +4.4 ValueA 23.70 -0.04 +6.2 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.81 -0.05 +6.4 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 6.79 +0.01 +2.4 MergerFd 15.76 +1.1 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.66 +4.8 TotRtBdI 10.66 +4.9 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 35.04 +0.44 +6.4 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 27.61 -0.05 +1.7 GlbDiscZ 27.99 -0.04 +1.9 SharesZ 20.72 -0.01 +3.9 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 47.34 +0.24 +2.0 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.14 NA Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.95 +0.03 +3.3 Intl I r 16.75 -0.04 +1.2 Oakmark 45.15 +0.04 +8.3 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp x 7.00 -0.05 +4.1 GlbSMdCap13.99 +0.04 +3.9 Oppenheimer A:

DvMktA p 30.90 +0.08 GlobA p 55.37 +0.02 GblStrIncA 4.15 IntBdA p 6.26 MnStFdA 34.85 +0.17 RisingDivA 16.39 +0.01 S&MdCpVl28.93 +0.02 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.81 +0.01 S&MdCpVl24.51 +0.02 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p14.76 +0.01 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.36 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 30.58 +0.08 IntlBdY 6.25 -0.01 IntGrowY 26.42 +0.03 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.29 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.43 +0.01 AllAsset 11.91 +0.03 ComodRR 6.24 +0.05 DivInc 11.75 +0.01 EmgMkCur10.07 -0.02 EmMkBd 11.71 +0.01 HiYld 9.17 +0.01 InvGrCp 10.85 +0.01 LowDu 10.47 RealRtnI 12.39 ShortT 9.81 TotRt 11.29 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 12.39 TotRtA 11.29 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.29 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.29 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.29 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 47.03 -0.01

+5.4 +2.5 +4.7 +2.7 +8.4 +4.9 -2.4 +4.4 -2.8 +4.5 +10.8 +5.6 +2.8 +3.5 +5.4 +4.9 +4.2 -3.7 +6.5 +2.3 +6.2 +5.2 +7.0 +3.1 +6.3 +1.8 +5.5 +6.1 +5.4 +5.0 +5.4 +5.5 +2.0

Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 39.61 +0.03 Price Funds: BlChip 43.39 +0.40 CapApp 21.87 EmMktS 29.55 +0.23 EqInc 24.32 -0.01 EqIndex 36.40 +0.05 Growth 36.04 +0.39 HlthSci 39.20 +0.40 HiYield 6.62 InstlCpG 17.89 +0.19 IntlBond 9.74 -0.04 Intl G&I 11.55 -0.01 IntlStk 12.72 +0.01 MidCap 56.26 +0.47 MCapVal 22.44 +0.04 N Asia 15.06 +0.07 New Era 38.81 -0.06 N Horiz 34.30 +0.31 N Inc 9.79 +0.01 OverS SF 7.44 R2010 15.74 +0.02 R2015 12.19 +0.03 R2020 16.81 +0.04 R2025 12.27 +0.03 R2030 17.57 +0.06 R2035 12.40 +0.04 R2040 17.63 +0.06 ShtBd 4.83 SmCpStk 33.66 +0.18 SmCapVal 35.95 -0.02 SpecIn 12.56 Value 23.66 -0.02 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.31 -0.04 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.99 +0.03 PremierI r 18.79 +0.09 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 38.06 +0.08 S&P Sel 21.14 +0.04 Scout Funds: Intl 28.87 +0.02

+2.9 +12.3 +6.1 +3.6 +6.0 +7.9 +13.2 +20.2 +5.4 +11.0 +1.1 +0.3 +3.5 +6.7 +4.9 +8.3 -7.7 +10.5 +2.6 +1.6 +4.8 +5.3 +5.7 +6.0 +6.2 +6.3 +6.4 +1.4 +7.7 +4.3 +3.9 +5.0 +5.5 +2.1 +1.5 +7.6 +8.0 +3.2

Sequoia 153.66 +1.28 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 9.89 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 16.70 -0.03 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 24.46 +0.12 IntValue I 25.02 +0.12 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 22.84 +0.07 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 22.91 +0.04 CAITAdm 11.57 -0.01 CpOpAdl 71.45 +0.31 EMAdmr r 32.69 +0.22 Energy 102.67 -0.50 EqInAdm n 48.18 -0.01 ExtdAdm 41.83 +0.22 500Adml 124.51 +0.18 GNMA Ad 11.07 GrwAdm 34.83 +0.21 HlthCr 57.94 +0.23 HiYldCp 5.80 InfProAd 29.00 +0.02 ITBdAdml 12.01 ITsryAdml 11.79 IntGrAdm 53.46 +0.07 ITAdml 14.22 ITGrAdm 10.19 LtdTrAd 11.16 LTGrAdml 10.67 +0.05 LT Adml 11.61 MCpAdml 94.30 +0.61 MuHYAdm 11.06 PrmCap r 66.97 +0.22 ReitAdm r 91.09 +0.66 STsyAdml 10.77 STBdAdml 10.63 ShtTrAd 15.92 STIGrAd 10.74 SmCAdm 35.29 +0.12 TtlBAdml 11.12 +0.01 TStkAdm 33.57 +0.08 WellslAdm 57.63 +0.04

+5.4 -2.0 +1.8 +2.1 +4.5 +5.7 +3.4 +4.8 +3.3 -7.2 +5.7 +6.3 +8.0 +1.6 +9.9 +6.8 +5.1 +4.9 +3.9 +2.1 +2.8 +2.9 +4.4 +0.9 +6.4 +4.3 +5.8 +5.1 +4.6 +11.8 +0.3 +1.0 +0.5 +2.1 +5.7 +2.5 +7.7 +4.6

+5.3 +6.5 +7.3 +4.8 +4.6 -7.3 +5.7 +5.1 +1.6 +5.1 +6.8 +4.9 +2.8 +0.8 +4.3 +3.8 +5.1 +4.5 +6.4 +9.7 +2.9 +3.7 +4.5 +4.0 +5.0 +2.1 +5.6 +3.8 +4.4 +4.5 +4.7 +4.9 +5.1 +5.3 +5.3 +5.4 +10.6 +4.5 +5.3 +6.5 +7.3 +6.3

MidCpIstPl102.75 +0.67 TotIntAdm r22.04 +0.01 TotIntlInst r88.14 +0.04 TotIntlIP r 88.16 +0.04 500 124.48 +0.18 MidCap 20.77 +0.13 SmCap 35.25 +0.12 TotBnd 11.12 +0.01 TotlIntl 13.17 TotStk 33.55 +0.07 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 22.91 +0.04 DevMkInst 8.45 -0.02 ExtIn 41.83 +0.22 GrwthIst 34.83 +0.21 InfProInst 11.81 InstIdx 123.71 +0.19 InsPl 123.72 +0.19 InsTStPlus 30.38 +0.07 MidCpIst 20.83 +0.13 SCInst 35.29 +0.13 TBIst 11.12 +0.01 TSInst 33.57 +0.07 ValueIst 21.56 -0.04 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 102.85 +0.15 MidCpIdx 29.76 +0.20 STBdIdx 10.63 TotBdSgl 11.12 +0.01 TotStkSgl 32.40 +0.08 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.40 +0.01 Yacktman Funds: Fund p 18.38 -0.01 Focused 19.63 -0.01

+5.8 +0.9 +0.9 +1.0 +7.9 +5.7 +5.6 +2.5 +0.8 +7.7 +5.7 +0.4 +6.4 +9.9 +4.9 +8.0 +8.0 +7.8 +5.8 +5.7 +2.5 +7.7 +6.0 +8.0 +5.8 +1.0 +2.5 +7.7 +4.1 +5.0 +4.5


E4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

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If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

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TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. BREAKFAST WITH THE CHAMBER: Crooked River Ranch-Terrebonne Chamber of Commerce meeting; open to the public; free; 8 a.m.; Diego’s Spirited Kitchen, 447 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-923-2679 or www.crrchamber.com. VISIT BEND BOARD MEETING: Open to the public; 8 a.m.; Bend Visitor Center, 750 N.W. Lava Road; 541-382-8048 or valerie@visitbend .com. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. JOB FAIR: Central Oregon Community College will host a job fair aimed at finding part-time instructors to teach credit and noncredit classes in Madras, Deer Ridge Correctional Institution, Prineville and Redmond. Attendees should bring a rÊsumÊ and copy of college transcripts, if available; 4:30-6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7270 or www.jobs.cocc.edu . SENIOR FINANCIAL SCAMS, HOW TO PROTECT FAMILY AND FRIENDS: With Steve Esselstyn, Community Liaison, Bend Police Department; free; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 1386 N.E. Cushing Drive, Bend; 541-382-1795.

WEDNESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. DESIGNING HEALTHFUL, LIVABLE COMMUNITIES: Dr. Richard Jackson, pediatrician and chair of Environmental Health Sciences at UCLA will speak on how the built environment, transportation choices, architecture, and urban planning affect health — especially in children; tickets can be purchased through City Club of Central Oregon; $20 includes lunch; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-815-3951 or info@ cityclubco.com. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794 or luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765. ABC’S OF INTERNET SECURITY: Registration required; free; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 1386 N.E. Cushing Drive, Bend; 541-382-1795 or www.midoregon.com.

FRIDAY CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax. com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

MONDAY FILE IT, FIND IT: Registration required; class continues June 27; $59; 1-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc .edu. PHOTOSHOP ELEMENTS, BEGINNING: Registration required; contact http://noncredit.cocc.edu or 541-383-7270; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7700.

TUESDAY June 26 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING:

Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. WILL THE REAL INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS PLEASE STAND UP?: Kurt Barker and Jon Napier from Karnopp Petersen LLP and Evan Dickens from Jones & Roth will address questions about independent contracting; registration required; $25 for members and $45 for nonmembers; 11 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; www.bendchamber.org.

WEDNESDAY June 27 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-749-0789. THOSE LABOR LAWS DO APPLY TO YOU: What every non-union employer needs to know about the national labor relations act, with Tamara Russell and Todd Lyon; registration required; $15; 7:309:30 a.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-382-1795 or www.midoregon.com. THE BULLETIN BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Registration required; 5 p.m.; The Bulletin, 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org.

THURSDAY June 28 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. ETFS EXPLAINED: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794 or luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765. AFFORDABLE HOUSING INTEREST SESSION: Bend Area Habitat for Humanity offers a session for families interested in becoming homeowners; 5:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-385-5387, ext. 103 or djohnson@bendhabitat.org.

FRIDAY June 29 EXPLORING THE BUSINESS OF OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY: Registration required; contact 541241-2266 or welcome@ccophoto. com; $395; Cascade Center of Photography, 390 S.W. Columbia St., Suite 110, Bend; 541-241-2266. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Ponderosa Coffee House, 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax. com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

SATURDAY June 30 EXPLORING THE BUSINESS OF OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY: Registration required; contact 541241-2266 or welcome@ccophoto. com; $395; Cascade Center of Photography, 390 S.W. Columbia St., Suite 110, Bend; 541-241-2266.

SUNDAY July 1 EXPLORING THE BUSINESS OF OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY: Registration required; contact 541241-2266 or welcome@ccophoto. com; $395; Cascade Center of Photography, 390 S.W. Columbia St., Suite 110, Bend; 541-241-2266.

MONDAY July 2 PHOTOSHOP ELEMENTS, BEGINNING: Registration required;

contact http://noncredit.cocc.edu or 541-383-7270; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7700.

TUESDAY July 3 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. SMALL BUSINESS COUNSELING: Free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037.

WEDNESDAY July 4 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789.

Fed Continued from E1 “The ability to combat weakness with interest rates at the zero lower-bound is limited and uncertain. In a situation like this, their reasoning is you might want to buy some insurance.� That insurance may come in the form of extending Operation Twist — which JPMorgan Chase & Co. and Jefferies & Co. predict — or an even more aggressive response if Fed officials see high costs in a slowdown of U.S. growth. The $400 billion program, which was announced in September and ends this month, involves selling short-term debt and buying longer-term bonds. The Fed has about $190 billion of short-term maturities left to continue Operation Twist for another three months, based on calculations by Nomura Securities International Inc. The firm’s forecast is for no extension at the June meeting, with both Chairman Ben Bernanke and the Federal Open

Market Committee probably indicating they could take additional easing steps, such as outright bond purchases, if economic circumstances warrant. An extension would fit a forecast that says the U.S. economy will avoid a disaster scenario of rising unemployment and rapidly decelerating inflation. The Fed’s decision Wednesday at 12:30 p.m. New York time could be more aggressive than investors expect if policy makers decide their confidence in their own forecasts is low and want to do something extra to lean against a worst-case scenario, said Vincent Reinhart, chief U.S. economist in New York at Morgan Stanley. “We put high odds on them acting at the meeting,� said Reinhart, who was the head of the Fed board’s Division of Monetary Affairs, which develops policy strategy, under chairmen Greenspan and Bernanke. “Risk management says that you act in advance of a potential downdraft in activity

because that could trigger� a collapse in demand that would be difficult to escape with the main policy rate at zero. The Fed cut the target for the federal funds rate to a record-low range between zero and 0.25 percent in December 2008. Financial-market indicators are signaling a flight from risk. Yield spreads on the Credit Suisse U.S. Liquid Corporate Index, which tracks almost 1,300 U.S. investment-grade corporate bonds with an average maturity of about 10 years, widened to as much as 1.865 percentage points over Treasuries of similar maturity this month, the highest since January. Greece’s largest pro-bailout parties, New Democracy and Pasok, won enough seats to forge a parliamentary majority, easing concern the country was headed toward an imminent exit from the euro. Even so, optimism about the election quickly faded as Spain’s 10-year bond yields rose above 7 percent to a euro-era record.

THURSDAY July 5 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765.

FRIDAY July 6 CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax. com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

SATURDAY July 7 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY July 10 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. FINANCIAL PLANNING AND MONEY MANAGEMENT: Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541318-7506, ext. 109.

WEDNESDAY July 11 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. HOME PRESERVATION WORKSHOP: Learn about budgeting, debt management, refinancing, property taxes, energy conservation techniques, home maintenance issues, insurance, safety tips and community involvement; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-3187506, ext. 109 or www.homeowner shipcenter.org. CLEAN UP AND SPEED UP YOUR PC: Registration required; class continues July 18; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Madras Campus, 1170 E. Ashwood Road, Madras; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY July 12 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Cheri Kissell, co-owner of Exquisite Limousine, rides in the back of the stretch Cadillac Escalade, while her husband, Terry Kissell, drives around Bend.

Limousine Continued from E1 Terry Kissell said the majority are for trips within Central Oregon — in particular to downtown Bend and the Old Mill District — but he’s made trips to the Oregon Coast, Seattle and Vancouver, Wash. He said he also frequently takes customers to the Cowboy Dinner Tree in Silver Lake. “It can be construed as an expensive hobby,� Terry Kissell said, “but we have built a business over the years.� The Cadillac Escalade costs $140 an hour with a two-hour minimum, he said. The Lincoln Navigator costs $125 an hour, with a two-hour minimum. Kissell said he has a “real� job, managing the Crater Lake Trolley, which pays the bills. He said the limousine company is his business on the side. “Both my wife and I have a passion for what we do,� he said. “We want to provide outstanding service, make

sure our guests enjoy their time out and feel like they’ve gotten their money’s worth.� Terry Kissell answered the following questions from The Bulletin:

Q: A:

How does driving a limousine differ from a regular vehicle? My wife and I do the lion’s share of the driving ourselves. You have to watch where you are driving because of the length of the vehicle. Some of the streets out here are unforgiving. Roundabouts especially can be a bit of a challenge with the extra length of the vehicle. You have to be careful and preplan your trip ahead of time to pick the best route. How has the rise in gas Q: prices affected your business? It obviously adds to the A: cost. Although gasoline prices have gone up, we have opted not to up our prices. Our prices have been the same for the last four years. On the highway, the Lincoln

Town Car will get around 22 miles to the gallon, while the Lincoln Navigator and the Cadillac Escalade both get about 15 miles per gallon. What is your favorite Q: part about the limousine business? Being able to do someA: thing out of the norm and meet people that you wouldn’t in the normal walk of life. Have you driven any Q: We celebrities? have driven celebA: rities including Lars Larson, Pat Boone and Joan Collins. We’ve also driven a couple of rappers, but I can’t remember their names. My most interesting trip was bringing Robert Maxwell, a Medal of Honor recipient, and Jack Sherman, a member of the 101st Airborne’s 327th Glider Infantry Regiment, to the 60th anniversary of the end of World War II at Fort Vancouver in Washington. — Reporter: 541-617-7818, rrees@bendbulletin.com

N  R

DEEDS Deschutes County

Michael O. Roberts trustee for Roberts Trust to William D. Welch and Jennifer C. Lewis-Welch, Howells Hilltop Acres, Lot 2, Block 5, $205,000 David W. and Laura L. Skinkle to John W. and Katherine J. Pursley, Rockwood Estates, Phase 4, Lot 10, $325,000 Westview Property Investment LLC to Cyril E. Smith and Hugh L. Hull, Bridges at Shadow Glen, Phase 1, Lot 70, $248,000 Bank of New York Mellon fka Bank of New York to Margan Mitchell, Buck Run Third Addition, Lot 55, $261,000 Gabriel and Dayna Lanning to Keith J. and Joy A. Fino, Canyon Rim Village, Phase 6, Lot 141, $185,000 Ernest F. and Gaye S. Gilpin trustees for Gilpin Family Trust to Gary L. and Dianne H. Crooker,

Boones Borough No. 1, Lot 20, Block 1, $330,000 Blake I. Langeliers to Scott K. and Johanna B. Barr, NorthWest Crossing, Phase 12, Lot 567, $389,500 Eric J. and Tracy L. Walton to Tanya M. and Courtney Andrews trustees for Tanya and Courtney Andrews Trust, Partition Plat 2005-62, Parcels 1 and 2, $412,000 Columbia State Bank to Kevin G. Meyer, Palmer Addition to Awbrey Road, Lot 24, $298,000 Fannie Mae aka Federal National Mortgage Association to Jennifer Campbell, Arrowdale, Lot 3, Block 2, $235,000 Burke Holdings LLC to Rouse Investments LLC, Archie Briggs Condominium, Units 101 and 102, $250,000 Rouse Investments LLC to Burk Holdings LLC, North Brinson Business Park, Phase 3, Lot 78, $650,000

Arthur E. and Melinda L. Stevens trustees for Stevens Family Living Trust to Jeffrey D. and Diane K. Van Hoy trustees for Van Hoy Trust, Stage Stop Meadows Fourth Addition, Lot 19, $200,000 Accel Mortgage Corporation to Mary M. Elliott and Barbara J. Ruff trustees for Article 6 Credit Shelter Trust established under the 2001 Horace L. Elliott and Mary M. Elliott Revocable Living Trust, Mountain Village East 3, Lot 6, Block 17, $402,000 James D. and Jeanine M. Hilburn to Harold G. and Jean L. Campbell, River Springs Estates, Lot 12, $330,000 Bank of New York Mellon fka Bank of New York to Peter B. Shelton and Elyse J. Williams, Replat of Blocks 1, 2 and 3, Kenwood Gardens, Lot 2, Block 3, $247,197 Edwin and Helga Schweitzer to Harold J. and L. Whitney Hudson, Ridge at Eagle Crest 26, Lots 126 and 127, $285,000


ATHOME

Food, F2-3 Home, F4 Garden, F5

F

Ask Martha, F6 Recipe Finder, F6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/athome

FOOD GARDEN

Preserve a lingering taste of summer

Find your

perfect match

By Jan Roberts-Dominguez For The Bulletin

On very few occasions would my kitchen qualify for the Good Housekeeping Seal of Tidiness. But on this particular afternoon, things were especially bad. Anyone who has spent a day putting up a supply of jams or jellies has already zeroed in on the image and would understand me when I say that after five hours of paring, pitting, slicing, stirring, sweating and lugging massive amounts of food and canning supplies around my kitchen, I was ready for a nap. So when my husband entered onto the scene, and gazed admiringly upon the row of gleaming jars, I found little comfort in his words: “I think we could really say our life was in order if we were preserving all of the food this family needed.” I edited my response down to two words: “Get real.” But the truth is that there are plenty of families doing just that. Really. And I admire them tremendously. They move through the preserving season, from fruit to vegetable, u-pick field to roadside stand, ferreting out the freshest, most bountiful offerings of summer. One neighbor on our block was displaying over two dozen CARTONS of surplus canning jars at a garage sale. See Rhubarb / F2

AT THE MARKET

• Key questions can help weed out divas, spiteful plants or those making cameo appearances By Liz Douville For The Bulletin

T

he trap that I fall into at this time of year is the one Portland garden writer Dulcy Mahar always referred to as plant lust. I really am a conservative plant consumer, and I am only tempted by plants I know will grow here. I think that shows some restraint. However, I do have to admit that at last count I did have six one-gallon containers of various plants that I decided I couldn’t live with-

out, and I fear there are more to come after visiting Wintercreek Native Plant Nursery. At present, the six containers sit in a protected spot with no place to go. Irish garden writer Helen Dillion suggests that one way to make room for new plantings is to regularly walk around your garden and demand of each plant that it justify its existence. So if you are in a quandary as to where to plant a new heartthrob, take Dillion’s thoughts, combined with questions that Mahar would periodically ask her plants, and you may find a place to plant your latest lust. I asked my plants some of Mahar’s

Julie Johnson / The Bulletin

questions and surprised myself with some quick answers. 1. Deep down, do I really like you? Just because a plant did well in my friend’s garden doesn’t mean it will do well in mine. If it looks ragged, pull it out and enjoy it in your friend’s garden. 2. Are you a diva? Anything that demands too much attention — staking, constant deadheading or vigorous watering — is a candidate for dismissal. 3. Are you over the hill? Not all perennials are long-lived, but some take a long time to expire. See Dating game / F5

Illustration by Greg Cross / The Bulletin

DIY Adventures: clearing clutter and getting organized Editor’s Note: This is an installment of the bimonthly feature DIY Adventures, in which reporter Penny Nakamura tackles a home project and reports about the process. By Penny Nakamura For The Bulletin

I’m not sure if I’m an anomaly or not. But by the sheer number of books and magazines I own about organizing and clearing the clutter, I’m guessing there are others like me — people with a

TODAY’S RECIPES

HOME disorganized house. And admittedly, the word “disorganized” might be a bit of an understatement to describe our household clutter. Which is why, when I mentioned to my family that my next do-it-yourself project would be organizing my upstairs home office, my girls looked absolutely mortified at the prospect. “You have got to be joking,

• Gingery Rhubarb Chutney, F2 • Frozen Rhubarb Puree, F2

Mom. They’re going to think you should be on the show ‘Hoarders,’” smirked my 17-year-old daughter Kiyoko. “This is going to be so embarrassing. Can I change my last name?” chimed in my 14-year-old daughter Taye. So, gentle readers, I am throwing open my office doors, to air my dirty laundry, so to speak, and you will see that there may be hope for the chronically disorganized. See DIY / F4

• Sauteed Chicken Breasts with Rhubarb Chutney, F2 • Peach Mascarpone Flatbreads, F2

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Children’s schoolwork and artwork can be difficult to part with while trying to get organized.

• Salad of Summer Leaves, Cured Pork and Cherries, F2 • Homemade Nut Butter, F3

• Roasted Peanut Relish, F3 • Garlic Paste, F3

At the Market is a weekly look at produce available at local farmers markets. What: Oregon strawberries Season: Now through mid-summer Preparation: Oregon strawberries are a treat. Anticipated each year with excitement usually reserved for rock stars and tropical vacations, the berries are generally sweeter, smaller and redder than their larger cousins grown in California and elsewhere. According to the Oregon Strawberry Commission, the berries ripen slowly during the warm, sunny days and cool nights of Western Oregon’s spring and early summer. That long, slow ripening means a high sugar content. These scrumptious fruits require no preparation other than a quick rinse (don’t wash strawberries until you’re ready to eat them — the moisture will encourage the highly perishable fruit to quickly go bad). If eating them plain gets boring, try a very light drizzle of highquality balsamic vinegar over the sliced fruit. — Julie Johnson, The Bulletin

• Lemon-Pepper Salmon Cakes, F3 • Buttermilk Pie, F6


F2

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

F

Next week: Bone up on ribs

Perfectly sweet orb or overly tart reject? Ripeness is relative

Rhubarb Continued from F1 They were all pints and half pints, she explained, as I combed hungrily through the precious cache. Her family was only using quarts now. How many did she normally use, I asked. She pointed to the upper shelves in the garage, where another two dozen cartons of quart-size jars lined the walls. After calculating the number of kitchen hours those jars represented, I just wanted to go lie down. So, to these energetic souls about to take up permanent residence in their kitchens as they frantically capture summer’s essence for those leaner months, I’m dedicating this week’s column in their honor. Not that they’ll notice. They’re all out picking rhubarb.

By Bill Daley Chicago Tribune

— Jan Roberts-Dominguez is a Corvallis food writer, cookbook author and artist. Contact: janrd@proaxis.com.

Freezing rhubarb This spring-into-summer crop is one of the easiest fruits to prepare; no peeling, pitting, coring or stemming involved. Freezing is the simplest method for preserving, since rhubarb can be prepared without sugar, syrup or juice. Wash firm, young, well-colored stalks. Dry each stalk well. Trim and cut into desired size pieces to fit your packaging material, then proceed as follows. Dry pack method (no sugar): Pack the raw, dry pieces tightly into freezer bags or cartons, leaving a half-inch headroom to allow for expansion during freezing; seal and freeze. Wet pack method (syrup): Pack the raw, dry pieces into freezer bags or cartons, then cover with a cold syrup (see recipe), leaving a half-inch of headroom to allow for expansion during freezing; seal and freeze. Syrup: Dissolve 3 cups of sugar thoroughly in 4 cups of hot or cold water. If hot, chill the mixture well before packing. Syrup can be made the day before and refrigerated. Yields 5½ cups. Figure on ½ to 2⁄3 cup of syrup for each pint container of fruit.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Rhubarb puree makes a lovely topping for vanilla ice cream. It can also be used as a filling for tart shells. The puree is easy to make and can be frozen for later use, or stored in the refrigerator for up to a week.

Gingery Rhubarb Chutney

Frozen Rhubarb Puree

Makes 6-7 half-pints. One of the best rhubarb chutneys I’ve ever come across. Worth repeating. 7 C red-skinned rhubarb, cut into ½-inch dice (about 2 lbs of trimmed rhubarb) 1½ C coarsely chopped onions 1½ C golden raisins 1½ C sugar 1 C water

4 cloves garlic, peeled and minced 2 TBS finely minced fresh ginger 1 TBS pickling or other fine non-iodized salt 2 tsp mustard seed 1 tsp ground allspice

Makes about 2 cups. 1 tsp ground coriander ½ tsp dried red pepper flakes (or to taste) ¼ tsp cayenne pepper ¼ tsp ground cinnamon ¼ tsp ground cloves 2 C cider vinegar ¼ C light corn syrup

Wash 7 half-pint jars (or 3 pint jars and 1 half-pint). Keep hot until needed. Prepare lids as manufacturer directs. Combine all of the ingredients except the vinegar and corn syrup in a large pot; mix well. Bring to a boil over medium heat, lower the temperature, and simmer the mixture, stirring it occasionally, until the onion pieces are translucent, about 30 minutes. Add the vinegar and corn syrup and cook uncovered over medium-high heat (the mixture will appear to be very soupy at first, but don’t worry) until the chutney is thick and the consistency of ketchup (with lumps!) about 45 minutes. You will need to stir almost constantly the last 20 minutes or so to keep the chutney from scorching. Ladle the hot chutney into 1 hot jar at a time, leaving ¼-inch headspace. Wipe jar rim with a clean, damp cloth. Attach lid. Fill and close remaining jars. Process pints and half-pints in a boiling-water bath for 10 minutes. (Altitude adjustment: For elevations between 1000 and 6,000 feet above sea level, process for 15 minutes; at 6,001 to 9,000 feet, process for 20 minutes.) Store the jars for 3 weeks before opening. — Adapted from “Fancy Pantry,” by Helen Witty

1 lb fresh rhubarb, cut into ½-inch pieces ¾ C granulated sugar ¼ C water In a stainless steel or enameled saucepan, combine the rhubarb, sugar and water. Let the mixture stand for about 10 minutes to begin drawing out the rhubarb juices. Bring the mixture to a boil over moderate heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until it becomes a thick puree, about 30 minutes. Let the puree cool to room temperature and then pack into freezer storage bags or cartons and freeze. To use the puree, simply thaw it out. Note: Instead of freezing, rhubarb puree may be stored in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. Use the puree to fill tart shells or as a delicious ice cream topping.

Rhubarb shows its savory side at the dinner table By Joe Gray Chicago Tribune

Bite down into a stalk of rhubarb, and the raw, sharp tartness will make sure you don’t do it again. Rhubarb needs taming.

That’s why it shows up paired with sugar in pies, jams and lots of other sweet preparations. But rhubarb as savory makes a fine dinner plate companion. Here the ruby stalks are

chopped and paired with a jarred pepper jelly for a touch of heat and sweet. The tartness still shines through, though it’s reined in. The sweet-sour-spicy combo makes a great companion for chicken or pork.

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Sauteed Chicken Breasts with Rhubarb Chutney Makes 4 servings. 3 TBS olive oil 1 red onion, chopped ½ tsp salt 1½ tsp freshly grated ginger 1 lb rhubarb, trimmed, chopped 1 to 2 TBS jarred hot pepper jelly ¼ C flour 4 chicken breast halves, pounded to ½-inch thick Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the onion; season with ¼ teaspoon salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until soft, 5 minutes. Stir in ginger, rhubarb and pepper jelly. Lower heat to a simmer; cook 5 minutes. Remove from heat; keep warm. Meanwhile, put flour in a zipclose bag. Add chicken; shake to coat. Heat remaining 2 tablespoons oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Season chicken with remaining ¼ teaspoon salt; add to skillet. Cook, turning once, until browned on both sides and just cooked through, 6 minutes. Serve topped with the rhubarb chutney.

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Ripeness matters. Ask any rabid tomato or strawberry lover who spends most of the year in (wise) denial waiting for that perfect ripeness. So firm is the focus on the ripe that one could be forgiven for thinking ripeness is a moment as cruelly sharp as the blade of a shiv. Here today, a goner tomorrow. Yet ripeness can be a much more relative concept than one might expect. “Really, ripeness is a personal thing,” says Tovah Martin, a horticulturist and writer based in Roxbury, Conn. “For example, I eat gooseberries when they’re overripe. I’ve tried them the other way and, eh, nothing. But let them get slightly overripe, and to me they’re delicious. That’s the beauty of being a gardener. You can experiment and define ripeness for yourself.” “Webster’s New World College Dictionary” defines ripe as: “fully grown or developed ... ready to be harvested and used for food, as grain or fruit.” Harold McGee, in his landmark book, “On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen,” wrote that ripening was “long considered to be an early stage in the fruit’s general disintegration. But now it’s clear that ripening is a last, intense phase of life. As it ripens, the fruit actively prepares itself for its end, organizing itself into a feast for our eye and palate.” Ripeness has, of course, always mattered, but today’s emphasis on local and seasonal foods may be honing and articulating an appetite for it as an ideal. You can experience ripeness in two ways this season with two new books, both called “Ripe”: Nigel Slater a London-based food writer, has followed up on his vegetable book, “Tender,” with a recipe-filled musing on fruit called “Ripe: A Cook in the Orchard” (Ten Speed, $40) and Cheryl Sternman Rule

Bill Hogan / Chicago Tribune

Many foods, like Rainier cherries, have a period of peak ripeness, but ripeness is really a variable quality, with different meanings to different tastes.

has written a rainbow-hued book “Ripe: A Fresh, Colorful Approach to Fruits and Vegetables” (Running Press, $25). Still, determining when to join in on McGee’s proverbial ripeness feast has long been dictated by necessity and personal taste. Slater, for example, writes lyrically of “walking round the garden late on an autumn morning, pushing past the spiders’ webs that festoon the pathways and plucking those last, wine-colored berries from their blackened canes is as good as life gets.” Gardeners like Martin and Slater have a far easier time deciding when something is ripe for them. The rest of us must follow the dictates of supermarkets and, if we’re lucky, farmers markets or roadside stands. Use your senses to judge quality and ripeness. Touch, smell, nibble if you can; don’t go by looks alone. “Just because it looks perfect doesn’t mean it will taste perfect,” Rule says, urging consumers to ask questions, especially at farmers markets. “Speak up, ask them to pick for you,” she suggests. “Being bold and unafraid is my biggest piece of advice at farmers markets. And that goes for the produce manager at the supermarket as well.”

Peach Mascarpone Flatbreads Makes 6 appetizer servings. This recipe from Cheryl Sternman Rule’s “Ripe: A Fresh, Colorful Approach to Fruits and Vegetables” puts ripeness to work, using fruit in a savory, summery appetizer. 1 orange 4 whole-wheat flatbreads (4-6 inches wide) 2 TBS extra-virgin olive oil Salt and freshly ground pepper

½ C (4 oz) mascarpone 3 med firm but ripe peaches (about 1 lb), peeled, thinly sliced 1 ⁄3 C thinly sliced red onion 1 TBS balsamic vinegar

Remove half the orange zest in fine shreds, the other half in long coils. Squeeze orange juice into a small bowl. Brush flatbreads with oil; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Repeat on the flip side. Grill bread over medium direct heat, flipping once, until they puff slightly and grill marks appear, 3-4 minutes. Cool to room temperature. Season the mascarpone with 1⁄8 teaspoon each salt and pepper, the shredded orange zest (save the coils) and 2 tablespoons orange juice. Stir until smooth. Divide among the flatbreads, spreading thickly. Top with peach and onion. Cut each flatbread into thirds (if oblong) or quarters (if round). Place the vinegar in a small microwave-safe bowl; microwave until slightly thickened and reduced by about half, about 1 minute. Drizzle over flatbreads. Garnish with the coils of orange zest. Serve immediately.

Salad of Summer Leaves, Cured Pork and Cherries Makes 2 servings as a light lunch. British food writers don’t all swear allegiance to the strict, everythingmeasured-exactly style of recipe writing found in the United States. Here’s a wonderful example from Nigel Slater’s “Ripe: A Cook in the Orchard.” The idiosyncrasies — what is a “generous handful” or “a little” parsley anyway? — are balanced by the simplicity of the dish, which is echoed in the telegraphic delivery of the recipe. “The sweetsharp notes of the cherries lift the smoky, herbal notes of cured ham in the same way small tomatoes will,” Slater writes. 1 tsp Dijon mustard 2 tsp red wine vinegar 3 TBS olive oil Pinch of salt Freshly ground pepper 3 TBS whipping cream Parsley, finely chopped

2½ to 3½ oz thinly sliced cured ham, such as lomo, speck or coppa 4 generous handfuls salad leaves 4 handfuls cherries, halved, pitted

Put the mustard in a small bowl with the vinegar, olive oil, salt and a grinding of pepper. Whisk together; whisk in the cream. Add parsley. Tear the ham into strips. Toss the salad leaves with the ham. Add cherries. Drizzle over the dressing.


TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

FOOD

F3

Why not give nut butter a whirl? • All it takes to get started are nuts, salt, a food processor and a little imagination

Homemade Nut Butter Makes about 1½ cups. 1 lb (3½ C) shelled, raw nuts ½ tsp kosher salt, plus more to taste 2 tsp honey 1-4 TBS canola or peanut oil, depending on the nuts

By Jackie Burrell San Jose Mercury News

There are few things more all-American than peanut butter, and we’re not just talking about those iconic jars of Skippy and Jif. Their cousins — the all-natural, coarse-ground peanut, almond, walnut and other nut butter brethren — have been around since the days of peace, love and tie-dyed T-shirts. But something has happened in the nut butter aisles that goes far beyond that Italian interloper, Nutella. All of a sudden, nut butters have gone artisanal with small batch jars and intriguing flavor twists. New York City’s Lee Zalben of Peanut Butter and Co. may have been one of the first to start swirling upscale jam and maple syrup into his all-natural peanut butter. But he’s been joined by legions of others, including a pair of University of Oregon students who launched their own Wild Squirrel line of coconut-raisin and vanillaespresso nut butters last year. But here’s the thing: You don’t need anything fancy to do that at home — just nuts, a pinch of salt, a food processor and a little imagination, says Alana Chernila, the farmers market expert behind the new “Homemade Pantry” cookbook (Clarkson Potter, $24.99). Chernila is no fly-by-night DIYer. The Massachusetts mom and food writer makes her family’s crackers, hot sauce, Pop-Tarts and 98 other comestibles. Nut butter, she says, is one of the easiest and most customizable do-it-yourself projects around. “Everyone has different preferences. They want sweet or salty,” she says. “You can create the nut butter of your dreams.” That sense of limitless possibility was what prompted Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough’s nut butter experiments when they were working on their “Ultimate Peanut Butter Book” (Harper Collins, $16.99). Soon they were combining cardamom and pistachios, ginger and toasted cashews, and pumpkin seeds and pecans. “Don’t forget your meat products,” says Weinstein, who grew up in San Carlos, Calif. “Crispy crumbled bacon is a lovely thing mashed into peanut or almond butter.”

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spread the nuts on a baking sheet and roast for 10-15 minutes, or just until they begin to brown. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and allow the nuts to cool slightly. Place the nuts, salt and honey in the bowl of a food processor. Blend for 20 seconds. With the motor still running, drizzle a tablespoon of oil into the bowl through the chute in the lid, and process for 30 seconds. If the nut butter is still dry, continue to blend and add additional oil, a little at a time. Process for up to another minute to reach your desired consistency. Taste and adjust for salt, if needed, and stir in any flavorings you wish. Keeps refrigerated in a covered container for up to 1 month. — Alana Chernila, “The Homemade Pantry” (Clarkson Potter, $24.99)

Roasted Peanut Relish

Homemade nut butters include pistachio, pecan and, of course, peanut. Coffee, cardamom and other flavors can be added. Mark DuFrene / Contra Costa Times

Along the way, these nut butter aficionados discovered a few key things too. There are ways to achieve that silky supermarket style, but it takes a little food processor finesse (see “Nut butter secrets”). And nut butter recipes are templates, not commandments. “You have to play it by ear and be open to improvising as you go,” Weinstein says. “Is this too stiff? What’s going on in my food processor?” Most nuts need a little help in the oil department. You can use canola oil, but it’s better to use a flavorful oil that complements the nut, peanut oil in peanut butter, and walnut oil for walnut butter. “It’s the same calories whether it’s tasteless or has a lot of flavor,” Weinstein says. “There’s a reason nobody

canola oils their bread.” If you’re using a blender, be forewarned, says Mollie Katzen, the James Beard awardwinning author of such classics as “The Moosewood Cookbook.” Making nut butter is “a very cool thing to do,” she says, “but the hardest work is getting the stuff out of the blender.” The Berkeley food writer gives her blender a spritz of nonstick spray before she starts. Have fun with flavors, but if you’re taking a shortcut by using flavored nuts — honeyroasted cashews, for example — be wary of flavor intensity and salt. “A lot of flavored nuts are very salty,” Weinstein says. “Two or three with a gin and tonic is nice — but it’s not necessarily nice on a sandwich.”

Nut butter secrets • Roast the nuts to boost their flavor before you turn them into nut butter. • Use a full-size food processor, not a mini. You’ll burn a mini’s motor out before the butter is the right texture. • If you use a blender for nut butter, spray the inside first with cooking spray. • Most nut butters need a little oil. Add it slowly. You can always add more. Adding a little dairy butter, as well as oil, will give the spread nice flavor and texture. • A little honey or agave syrup adds sweetness without the grit of sugar.

• Despite what it says on the label, all classic supermarket peanut butter is creamy. If you’re trying to replicate the texture of commercial chunky-style, make smooth peanut butter and mix nut bits in. • For perfectly smooth nut butter, grind the nuts longer and give them a cooling-off period halfway through. The heat from the food processor helps the fat in the nuts melt, Bruce Weinstein says, but at a certain point, the oils begin to separate: “If you want to be a perfectionist, as soon as it starts getting a little oily, let it cool off for an hour, then start again.”

Makes 1 cup. This garlicky chutney is a staple in Maharashtra, India. Mix with softened, unsalted butter for a zesty sandwich spread or smear the spicy butter on a grilled steak or steamed vegetables. 1 C roasted peanuts ½ tsp garlic paste (see recipe) 1 tsp cayenne, or ½ tsp each cayenne and paprika Salt In a spice grinder, pulse-grind the peanuts into a coarse powder. Scrape into a small bowl. Mix in the garlic, cayenne and salt to taste. The texture should be rather lumpy. Store in refrigerator.

Garlic Paste Makes ½ cup. 4 oz garlic cloves, peeled 1 TBS canola oil 2 TBS water Place garlic in a blender. With motor running, add the oil, then water. Blend to a smooth paste, scraping down the sides often. Transfer to a clean glass jar, cover and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks. — Ruta Kahate, “Quick-Fix Indian” (Andrews McMeel, $16.99)

Let them eat cakes (made from leftover salmon) By Susan M. Selasky Detroit Free Press

Once summer hits, many of us are constantly on the go, so getting the most out of meals is essential. Today’s salmon cake recipe fits that bill because it started with a leftover broiled salmon. It’s like getting two meals out of one. When the salmon was broiled, the seasoning used was a basic all-purpose seasoning. So adding a slightly different seasoning was OK to make these tasty cakes. The flavor profile changed enough to make it different. Salmon cakes are one of my favorite uses for leftover salmon. For one thing, they are super easy and versatile: You can serve the cakes as is or on a bed of mixed greens, on a bun as a sandwich or on small rolls for sliders. Or you can make mini versions and serve them as appetizers — cold or hot. One of the binding ingredients that hold these together is panko bread crumbs. Popular for several years, panko bread crumbs — also called Japanese bread crumbs — are flaky and larger than store brand bread crumbs. They are made from the center of the bread and widely available at most grocery stores. Look for them in the ethnic aisle near the Asian ingredients or near bread crumb-type products. Most stores sell several brands and varieties. The makers of Progresso bread

Lemon-Pepper Salmon Cakes Makes 6-8 cakes. You can substitute just about any cooked fish for the salmon. ¾ lb cooked salmon 3 TBS canola oil, divided 1 ⁄3 C finely diced red bell pepper 2 green onions, ends removed, sliced 1½ to 2 tsp lemon pepper seasoning

3-4 TBS reduced-fat mayonnaise 1 TBS Dijon mustard 1 whole egg, lightly beaten 1 C panko bread crumbs, divided Mixed greens, for serving Tzatziki sauce, optional

In a mixing bowl, break the cooked salmon into pieces. Make sure the pieces are not too small — once you form the cakes, the salmon should look like lump crab does when making crab cakes. Set aside. In a large nonstick skillet, heat 1 tablespoon canola oil over medium heat. Add the red pepper and onion; sauté until soft. Cool a few minutes, then add to the salmon in the bowl. Stir in the lemon pepper seasoning, mayonnaise, Dijon, egg and ½ cup panko bread crumbs. Mix gently. If the mixture seems too loose, add more mayonnaise and more bread crumbs. Shape the mixture into desired-size patties. A 1⁄3 -cup measure will give you a good-size (about 2 ounces) salmon patty. Place the remaining ½ cup panko on a plate. Lightly coat both sides of each patty with the crumbs (use more if needed). Set the panko-coated patties on a plate and refrigerate for 30 minutes. When ready to cook, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons oil over medium heat in the same skillet in which you sautéed the red pepper and onion. Working in batches if necessary, cook the salmon patties about 3 minutes on each side or until lightly browned. Remove from the skillet and serve as is or on a bed of mixed greens. Note: A tzatziki sauce goes great with these salmon cakes. Mix together 1 cup plain Greek-style yogurt and 1⁄3 cup reduced-fat sour cream with ¾ cup chopped cucumber (peeled, seeded); lemon juice to taste, 1 tablespoon olive oil, salt and pepper to taste and 1 teaspoon minced garlic. Stir and chill 30 minutes before serving.

crumbs have a plain panko variety as well as a lemon-seasoned, which would work well with this recipe. Panko bread crumbs are ideal because they add a nice crunchy texture. In this recipe,

I also used the panko to coat the salmon cakes before pan frying. Serving the salmon cakes on a bed of mixed greens tossed with homemade vinaigrette is my preference.

Lemon-pepper Salmon Cakes start with leftover broiled salmon, yielding two dishes from one. Jessica J. Trevino Detroit Free Press


F4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

H

Next week: Make a no-sew baby blanket

DIY Continued from F1

Help on the way With a crisply ironed button-down shirt, complete with her company logo, “Tammie to the Rescue,” brightly embroidered on it, Tammie Barber is fastidiously neat, fasttalking and someone who gets straight to the point. “OK, you can do this. The word of the day is: purge,” said an enthusiastic Barber, who was still smiling as she perused my chaotic office space. “Half of this could all go, and you wouldn’t miss it. Trust me.” Barber is a licensed and bonded professional organizer who’s been doing this type of work for a decade. Because she offered to coach me through this, I had no choice but to trust her on this DIY project. Her company logo has her cartoon character wearing a superhero cape, and she promised she could bring order to my chaos and restore my sanity, too. I was skeptical, but my paper trail, also known as the paper trap in this office, needed to be curtailed. The most reassuring thing she said to me is that I’m not really a hoarder, as my family has accused me of. “Believe me, I’ve worked with real hoarders, and it’s a psychological problem. I’ve had to work with them and their psychologists who are helping them. You aren’t a real hoarder,” Barber soothingly assured me.

Game plan As Barber walked around in my small office space, she asked me why I have two printers and two paper shredders. Good question, for which I did not have a good answer. I think I meekly mumbled, “In case one of them breaks down.” Barber assured me I don’t need the redundancy of having two printers and two shredders. The questioning continued as she looked at my cluttered desk. “Why do you need five cups of pens?” “What are in these filing cabinets?” asked Barber. I felt good, because I actually knew the answer to this question, “Oh, we have our old tax papers in there.” Barber explained the Internal Revenue Service only requires you to keep seven

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Penny Nakamura located these books while in the midst of organizing her home office.

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Penny Nakamura enjoys the clean, newly organized office space at her Bend home.

years’ worth of taxes, and the rest can be shredded. She suggests SecureShred, a division of Bend Garbage & Recycling that does house calls and will shred your private and personal papers in their shredding trucks. You could also load up your own car and take it to the company for a reasonable shredding fee. Barber admitted she can be strict when trying to organize a client, and upon further questioning, I realized my feeble answers weren’t cutting it. “What else are in these filing cabinets?” I stammered, because in all honesty, I hadn’t really filed anything in those cabinets for several years now. “I think it’s the kids’ schoolwork and artwork from their elementary school years.” Barber gently explained that I’d need to go through it and purge as much as possible.

Paper pileup Yes, I know there are electronic readers and they’re all the rage, but I love hard-copy books, hard-copy newspapers and hard-copy magazines. I belong to not one, but two book clubs, and if I love the book, I keep it. I have four bookshelves in my office, filled to the brim with said books. I also have a tendency to keep magazines, which always seem to have at least one article I want to save, just in case I want to refer to it. Then there’s my newspaper habit. I get The Bulletin and The Oregonian every day, and I supplement them with the New York Times every weekend, and save some articles from the Times, too. Barber picked up one of the magazines lying on one of two clutter-filled tables in my office and asked the dreaded question, “Do you really need this? How old is this magazine? It’s from last year,” answering her own question after reading the cover. “Do you really need this?” “Uh, no,” I confessed. I was hoping she wouldn’t notice my large collection of the now -defunct “Bend Living” maga-

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“Purge, purge, purge, and then purge some more. You need three large boxes or garbage bags. One will be for the throwaway or garbage. The second one is for Goodwill or consignment stores. The third one is for assessing and categorizing where it should go.” — Tammie Barber, professional organizer

zines stacked behind my desk. But Barber misses nothing. I feebly mentioned something about having written some articles for the magazine. “Everything is online now,” she reminded me. But the real zinger was this: “What are in these red filing boxes?” I’m embarrassed to admit this, but I’m so old school, I actually keep what are known in journalism parlance as “cut sheets” or “tear sheets,” which are hard copies of articles I’ve written for this newspaper. Yes, The Bulletin has electronic archives, and I have all these articles stored on my hard drive here. I still don’t know if I can break this habit. I braced myself, as I was sure Barber was going to think my inspirational Yoda statue, which with a push of a button says, “Do or do not ... there is no try,” would be part of the giveaway box, but to my great relief, she’s a Yoda fan and said he could stay. Barber left me with these words of encouragement: “Purge, purge, purge, and then purge some more,” she said, with a kind but serious smile. “You need three large boxes or garbage bags. One will be for the throwaway or garbage. The second one is for Goodwill or consignment stores. The third one is for assessing and categorizing where it should go.” As an example of the latter, she asked, “Why do you have paint cans and tiles under your desk?” I explained that those were from my last DIY project. “It should be stored in the garage,” said Barber, with her still-encouraging smile. “I’m going to be on you and I’m going to check back here in a couple of weeks. And whatever you do, don’t buy any more stuff. People tend to do that, when they plan to organize themselves, they think if they buy more stuff to put things in, they’ll be organized. You have to clear it all out and then decide what you may need.”

Clutter-busting I looked around my office, and felt confident I could do this by the time she checked up on me again.

Wrong. Not even close. Two weeks after her first visit, I had made four trips to the parked Goodwill truck not far from my house, and had sold many bags of books to The Bookmark and Open Book. The office looked better, but schlepping all that stuff out didn’t seem to make much of a dent. “You can get rid of more. I know it’s hard,” said Barber, picking up a book upon her return check-up. “When was the last time you read this book? Ask yourself if you’ve even used or needed an item in the last 6 months to a year. If you haven’t, it can go.” I confess, I did commit a couple of cardinal sins, going against this organizing guru’s commandments. Instead of solely sticking to the office project, I figured, since I was making another run to the Goodwill truck, I should go through not only my closet, but also the closets of all three of my kids to see what they’ve outgrown or don’t wear any more. While this is all well and good, Barber stressed that you need to focus on the one room you’re working on. I lost focus as I started in on the clothes closets downstairs. My other cardinal sin was not obeying what Barber calls the “one-touch rule.” “It’s best to work clockwise, and start with just one bookshelf or one table at a time. When you pick up something like this paper, you decide in 10 seconds if it’s throw away, recycle, shredding, or if it really needs to be filed,” said Barber, who, as if reading my mind, then added, “You do not walk the paper over to your desk to deal with it later; you must decide immediately. It’s one touch per item. That’s a problem for most people; they take one thing from one area and just move it to another flat surface. Don’t do that.” Yes, I did that, over and over again. While I did recycle a lot of papers and files, almost all of the papers, newspapers and magazines got a quick read of at least the first paragraph, and if it was interesting, it got a full read. Do you know how long

that takes? It’s a time suck. Who am I kidding? Honestly, this DIY was harder than refinishing a deck, texturizing a wall or cutting and laying tiles. Not physically harder, but mentally draining, which is why I believe most people put off doing a major organizing project. With another two weeks to finish this project, I had to be ruthless with myself and stop reading every saved article and paper. Barber suggested taking out every single book in every bookshelf and placing them in the middle of the room, sorting through them again, and putting similar subjects in the same groupings, ordered by height. Books I haven’t used, read or referred to in the last year should get the boot. The little bookshelf behind my desk was mercifully already ordered with several years of Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manuals, Webster’s dictionaries and thesauruses and other reference books. I suppose I could get rid of some of the older AP manuals from the 1980s, and why do I have two dictionaries and two thesauruses? Does anyone besides me still own these relics, since there’s spellcheck and online dictionaries?

Emotional conundrum While I finally trained myself to stop reading everything that passed through my hands, I then ran into another conundrum, which was even more difficult for this mom. It’s the tug-at-my-heart emotional problem of what to do with my children’s old school reports and art projects. How much of this do I keep? I have an entire filing cabinet of my children’s schoolwork and projects that I can’t seem to discard, because it was made with “love” — after all, it says so in their scribbled, hard–to-decipher writing. All those handmade Mother’s Day cards? All those art projects? Sympathetic to my problem but still needing me to purge, Barber suggested having one small box per child and asking them what they want to keep. “I don’t think the kids really care if you keep their artwork, but you may want to keep a good report that they worked really hard on, or some artwork that was particularly nice, but if it’s just a scribble, or has beads glued to it — that you don’t need to keep,” suggested Barber.

Out goes the self-portrait of 6-year-old Kiyoko, with black beans glued to it as hair and red noodle lips. I was looking at it sentimentally until Kiyoko impatiently said, “Mom, toss it already.” A classic solution to kids artwork and projects is to have each child have a box, and at the end of the school year, they decide what to keep and what to toss. Barber says every year, they should go through this box, and they can add to it only if they get rid of something else from the previous year. That way only the projects they really care about get saved. After everything was said and done, I actually only saved 24 items between three kids. Each will have eight art projects or reports to remember those years.

Fabulous finds A nice perk of organizing and purging is unearthing items you thought were gone forever, or finding something you didn’t even remember you had. No, I didn’t get lucky enough to find an original Andy Warhol drawing, worth $2 million dollars, which did happen to someone earlier this year, but I did find two books I had borrowed from a neighbor. Alice, I’ll be returning those tomorrow. But the nicest surprise I found was the last handwritten letter my father wrote to me before he died. I couldn’t remember if it had been tossed years ago, but it was a great relief to know it was safely “lost” in my office until a week ago.

Ordered bliss After much prodding and much encouragement, I got the Barber seal of approval on the office, and it only took me a month. Here’s the disclaimer: If Barber had been here actually physically working beside me, she says we could’ve completed the office organization in less than a day. “I save people time, because we go through all this very quickly. I’m not emotionally tied to their things, so it’s easier for me to help them purge their stuff.” Barber looked at my cleared-off desk and asked where my office supplies are now, and I pointed across the office. “An office has to be usable and convenient for you. You don’t want to walk across the office to get the stapler or paper clips,” explained Barber, grabbing the office supplies and placing them within arm’s reach behind my desk. “Now, doesn’t this ‘new’ office feel better to you? When it’s cluttered, it’s stressful.” She’s right on all counts. Thank you, Barber, you came to my rescue. Hallelujah. Now to tackle my computer desktop, my pantry, kitchen, bedroom, closets, garage … — Reporter: pnakamura@ bendbulletin.com

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plies up or down a ladder. • Prevent eye injury. Safety glasses, goggles or full-face shields should be used when there is a possibility of splashing chemicals or flying dust. • Wear a hard hat and gloves, when appropriate. Hard hats should be worn when there’s a possibility something might fall

on you or you might hit your head. Gloves should be worn when working with chemicals or doing yard work, but not with tools that have a spinning or twisting blade or bit — the gloves could get caught. • Store power tools properly. Unplug the tool or remove the battery, and remove any bits

prior to storage. On portable electric saws, blades should be retracted and guards in place. • Clean up your dusty work area. Wear an N-95 dust mask (it filters 95 percent of airborne particles) and use a vacuum and wet mop. Remember that dust particles in sufficient quantity can be combustible.


TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

G

F5

Next week: Tips from OSU Extension Service’s Master Gardeners

Planting the seeds of survival •In the story of black gardeners in America, plants are tied to perseverance and independence

lot of people our parents’ age worked so hard and they got so little out of it, they won’t come back to the farm. That’s what they tell me, and I ask!” Like countless black families across the South, the Kimbles gardened because they had to. How else could you feed all those children? And they gardened because they could: The land was finally theirs to plant as they pleased. Gardening here is not easy. “They associate this kind of work with slavery,” Diana Kimble said of her four adult children, and then laughed. “And they say, ‘I’m not a slave.’” A little zealotry has its place in a job as vast as rebuilding the family farm. A friend recently told Kimble, “Diana, people in town don’t think you’re crazy — they know you’re crazy.” Yet only a lunatic would try to get anything done in the swelter of a Louisiana afternoon on the brink of summer. The sisters often spend the middle of the day in the cluttered kitchen of the farmhouse. It’s an old parish house that the sisters bought for $1 from the local Catholic church and carted to the farm. The idea is that once the structure gets power and hot water, it might become a conference center and training site for black sustainable growers. Friends have warned Kimble that long-lost relatives will reappear someday to claim the fruit of her labor. This is exactly what she hopes will happen. “There is enough land for everybody to come back and get their portion,” she said.

By Michael Tortorello New York Times News Service

DONALDSONVILLE, La. — Enslaved Africans did not win their freedom in order to starve. Kathe Hambrick-Jackson knew that much from her work as the founder and executive director of the River Road African American Museum here in this town, 60-odd miles up the Mississippi from New Orleans. But Hambrick-Jackson, 54, likes to recall what happened when she asked a group of second graders, “If you were going to free yourself and leave this plantation tonight, what would you bring with you to eat?” “One of them said, ‘a bag of potato chips,’” Hambrick-Jackson said. “And I said: ‘No, this was the year 1810. They weren’t invented yet.’ Then they started to say hamburgers and hot dogs. I said no, no, no.” The answer ultimately took the form of 10 raised beds in a community plot that she calls the Freedom Garden. Here, the museum raises plants that would have been familiar to slaves from both Africa and the New World. On a recent afternoon, Hambrick-Jackson was hanging cards describing the garden’s specimens, with the help of two children. Hambrick-Jackson’s brother, who runs a mortuary across the river, told her she was “junking up the garden” with these signs. What kind of kid wants to read about African botany? But Hambrick-Jackson figures “there are 50 kids in a one-block radius” who use the garden as a shortcut. Hang the labels at eye level and they’ll learn by accident. “Where’s my nail crew?” she asked, standing next to a muscadine grapevine sprawled over a wooden fence. Like blackberries, she said, these fruits would have been easy forage for freedom seekers in the backwoods. Other plants in the garden, like cowpeas, okra and rice, were indigenous to West Africa. Farmers would have raised them in fields near Atlantic ports like Goree, in order to larder slave ships. Leftover food became seed stock for enslaved Africans to grow on the plantation.

A lost tradition? In a sense, the Freedom Garden may sound like thousands of other African-American gardens across the country. These foods have been staples in many black kitchens for centuries. But an heirloom seed can be a complicated legacy when it comes from a person who sowed it in slavery. Put another way, it’s easy enough to find white colonial re-enactors, in bonnets and breeches, picking a tidy row of carrots. But it’s a loaded act for the black culinary historian

A shared heritage

Photos by Randy Harris / New York Times News Service

At top, the grandson of Kathe Hambrick-Johnson — founder and executive director of the River Road African American Museum in Donaldsonville, La., seen in the background at right — holds an ear of corn from the museum’s community garden. The museum raises foods that would have been familiar to slaves and became staples in black kitchens, including rice (right), corn and okra. Above, a neck collar and shackles worn by slaves are displayed at the museum.

and heirloom gardener Michael Twitty to don a period costume, as he does for occasions such as the Juneteenth demonstration at Natchez National Historical Park, in Mississippi. In a similar spirit of historical restoration, Twitty, 35, compiled the African American Heritage Collection of heirloom seeds for the D. Landreth Seed Co. Among the 30-odd plants are the long-handled dipper gourd, the white cushaw and the West India burr gherkin. What historical gardeners like Twitty and Hambrick-Jackson hope to demonstrate is how these plants were instrumental in African-American survival and independence. “All these heirlooms have their own story,” Twitty said, and that history is often specific to a region and a culture. Take the fish pepper, a Heritage Collection seed from the Chesapeake Bay region, where Twitty lives. Though this pepper probably started in West Africa, it may have arrived in the United States with an influx of British West Indians and Haitians into

the Chesapeake between 1790 and 1820, he said. “Coming into the part of the country with the largest free black population,” Twitty said, “they do what every immigrant does: They carve a niche for themselves. And that niche happens to be gardening and horticulture. For a couple of decades, the West Indians and Haitians basically run the fresh produce markets in the Chesapeake.” It’s heartening to trace a single plant, the fish pepper, to a tradition of “African-American entrepreneurialism,” Twitty said. But, he added, “I don’t believe in making up stories to make things sound good.” The broader truth is that gardening is a lost tradition in many African-American communities. The National Gardening Association doesn’t tally the number of black gardeners — nor, it would seem, does anyone else. The government survey that tracks farming demographics, the Census of Agriculture, offers mostly discouraging data about black farmers. In the last survey,

African-American operators controlled only 33,000 of the nation’s 2.25 million farms — less than 1.5 percent.

The Kimble farm In 1940, the number of African-American farm operators was close to 700,000. One of those farms belonged to Lee Earl Kimble and Sallie HarrisKimble. The previous year, the couple paid $3,950 for 74 acres in Colfax, La. Scratching together that kind of money, a decade into the Depression, must have been a heroic feat. Business may have been bad for the Urania Lumber Co., the seller listed on the deed. But the land would have been better known to locals as a tiny remnant of the 14,000-acre Calhoun plantations, a leviathan of sugar and cotton fields down the Red River from Shreveport. A few generations earlier, many of the black families in Colfax had labored there in slavery. The Kimble farm, then, was a freedom garden writ large. And it is a kind of horticultural saga — of slavery and Emanci-

pation on the same land — that is still being written, most recently by their granddaughter Diana Kimble. When Kimble moved back to the family farm a couple of years ago, she discovered two problems. There wasn’t a lot of farming going on, and there wasn’t a lot of family to do it. This was not always the case, said Kimble’s older sister Malva. Their grandmother had done her part, bearing 13 children. Diana, 61, and Malva, 63, lived with their parents in town (what there was of it) and visited the farm on weekends. “She pictures it like it was when we grew up,” Malva said. “Grandmother did the gardening,” Diana said. “And we ate out of the garden,” Malva said. “Dada” — their grandfather — “took care of the larger crops: watermelon, corn.” “She had everything: tomatoes, potatoes, peanuts, squash,” Diana said. “Beets,” Malva said. “Their sons were “field hands,” Malva said. “That’s why they’re not here now. A

For now, the children who visit the garden come from town. She and her sister teach a life-skills class for third, fourth and fifth graders. If nothing else, they are curious about her locked hair, which she has been growing out for almost 20 years. This is a perfect opportunity to talk about her African heritage and theirs. This winter, Malva spent two months in Ghana. After hearing about the farm in Louisiana, a Ghanaian friend asked her to accept a small piece of land as a gift. Diana would like to see it for herself. What would grow there? After she leaves her grandchildren the inheritance of the family farm, she imagines moving to Tanzania, maybe, or Burkina Faso. She doesn’t see herself dying in Colfax. The Kimble plot lies in a beautiful cemetery. But the family’s graves are relegated to the back, behind those of the white families who share their last name. Her mother’s people, meanwhile, rest outside a chapel on the Raven Camp plantation south of town, surrounded by the fields they knew as sharecroppers. “There was enough cotton in this lifetime,” Kimble said. The next garden will be different.

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Dating game Continued from F1 I realized this year that the Purple Palace Heuchera, planted at least 15 years ago, is now reduced to a malnourished-looking blob. I have good memories of introducing its merits to readers long before Heuchera became a gardener’s lust. So this year I will thank it, bless it and send it off to plant heaven. The creeping thyme has been creeping around the rockery for about as long as the Heuchera have sent up their flower spikes. The thyme from level 3 (highest point) has crept down to level 2, a wide, sloping boulder, and into the flatter area of level 1. Unfortunately, level 2 is suffering from an everincreasing bald spot. I’m not one for restorative treatments;

besides, I’ve heard they don’t work anyhow. So instead of trying to do a comb-over from level 3, I am going to denude the sloping boulder and enjoy its natural beauty. I might consider the sparse growth of level 1 as a little soil enhancement, but if it looks too quirky, I will get rid of that also. Why have some weak stubble hanging around when I could have a dramatic dash of something? 4. Are you just making a cameo appearance and, if so, when? Would it be considered un-American to remove the daylily clumps friends have shared with me? I have yet to enjoy the first bloom. The deer keep eating down the foliage. I scream and holler, but I refuse to use repellent sprays. So I guess the solution this year is to replace the daylilies with iris that the deer won’t bother. The iris will accom-

plish what I wanted for that area, which is a solid impact of color and foliage. I’m debating what to do: should I transplant the clumps to a fenced vegetable garden (would that encourage the deer to jump the fence for a favorite snack?) or should I have them join thyme and Purple Palace? 5. Are you just being spiteful? Dillion offers sage advice when writing that one should never plant a new plant where another has died; the new plant may well fail to thrive also. I read that two years after the fact. I wanted a lavender plant in the vegetable garden to help draw in more pollinators. The first plant died at the end of the season and yes, it was a variety known to do well in our area. I replanted the second year and had the same results. After reading Dillion’s advice, I am thinking

there is something amiss with the soil in that little area. That gives me another mystery to solve — do they ever end? It takes early-season walkabouts to assess the good, the bad and the ugly and then have the willpower to take control of what needs to be done. It’s like cleaning the closet. If we wait too long, we develop the “oh, well” attitude and the problem just compounds itself. Think about what brings you joy and satisfaction in the garden. Is it fragrance, color, shape, foliage or food for the body? Those are what you want to keep and improve. Attitude matters. Pay close attention to plants that do well in your garden and repeat them. Don’t fret over plants that do poorly, just get rid of them. — Reporter: douville@ bendbroadband.com


F6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

Keep sunscreen on kids and off your furniture For more on flag etiquette and customs, visit senate.gov.

MARTHA STEWART

Growing Japanese blood grass

Zinc sunscreen Q : works well on my son’s sensitive skin, but it

I live in Nashville, Tenn., and I’ve had Japanese Q: blood grass in my garden for

transfers easily. How do I remove the lotion’s white residue from our leather sofa? In order to be effective in the hot sun and in water, sunscreens contain moisture-repelling substances and waxy compounds. It’s generally these ingredients, rather than zinc, that make removing such stains a challenge. To eliminate the smudges from leather upholstery, blot with a clean, dry cloth. Then blot using a cloth barely dampened with hot water and a few drops of dishwashing liquid. Continue to blot until the mark is gone, and then follow up with a cloth dampened with water to remove any traces of detergent. You can also try a leather cleaner intended for the removal of oily stains, such as Amodex Ink & Stain Remover (available at amodexink.com). Test any product in an inconspicuous spot, and follow the directions carefully. To prevent smudges in the future, be sure to let sunscreen dry after you apply it: Wait five to 10 minutes before dressing or resuming your regular activities.

years — but I just heard that it might be an invasive plant. Should I get rid of it? In your area, it would be a good idea to dig up and dispose of your plant. Japanese blood grass is the common name for Imperata cylindrica “Red Baron.” This perennial ornamental grass has been a popular garden plant for many years because of the intense red color of its foliage. But the plant from which “Red Baron” was bred is a serious invasive weed in mild climates. Commonly known as cogongrass, it has taken over millions of acres worldwide and has become well established across the southern United States. It spreads aggressively by both seeds and rhizomes and forms dense stands that are impenetrable to native plants. It is difficult to control, requiring a management program that can involve burning as well as applications of herbicide. For this reason, planting any form of this grass is generally discouraged (visit www. cogongrass.org for information). Several states in the U.S. have passed laws banning the sale of all forms of cogongrass, including the “Red Baron” blood grass. If you decide to keep it, watch it carefully. If it produces flowers, cut them off immediately. Likewise, if it starts producing all-green foliage, it may be reverting to its natural form and should be dug up and discarded — not composted — right away.

Thinkstock

Nicole Bengiveno / New York Times News Service

A:

A:

Displaying the flag I’d like to hang the American flag in Q: front of my house. What is the correct way to handle it? There is a lot of lore surrounding the American flag, from its creation during the Revo-

A:

Nicole Bengiveno / New York Times News Service

There are different ways to hang an American flag, but one rule always comes first: Treat the flag with respect.

lutionary War to its proper display. Uniform rules about the U.S. flag date to the National Flag Conference in Washington, D.C., in 1923. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt codified the rules in 1942, and they were re-enacted with some minor amendments during the 1976 bicentennial celebrations. These voluntary guidelines are known as the Federal Flag Code. This code dictates when and how the flag should be flown.

There are many customs, but the general principle is simple: Always treat the flag with respect. Here are some rules that apply to home display: • The flag should be flown from sunrise to sunset; you may fly it at night, as long as it’s well illuminated. • It should always be in the highest position when it’s flown with other flags. The canton (the upper-left quarter of the flag, also called the Union) should be placed at the top of the staff or flagpole.

— Questions of general interest can be emailed to mslletters@ marthastewart.com. For more information on this column, visit www.marthastewart.com.

Buttermilk Pie, just like mom used to make By Julie Rothman

ny when you cut them.

The Baltimore Sun

Della Creighbaum, of Plym- Requests outh, Ind., was looking for a Mary Ewen, of Baltimore, recipe for buttermilk pie. She is looking for the recipe for the said that this was her son’s fa- zucchini bread that was served vorite pie when he was a in the breadbasket at the little boy and she always now-closed Harbor Lights made it for his birthday, Restaurant in North Bethany Beach, Del. It had the but she lost her recipe consistency and appearmany years ago. ance of an applesauce Lynn Master, of Timonium, Md., saw Creigh- RECIPE cake. Karen Herwig, of baum’s request and sent FINDER Baltimore, is trying to find the recipe for a creamy in a recipe for the pie that basil salad dressing that comes from her grandparents, Vara and Carl Kelly, was served warm over a tossed of Lillinton, N.C. This recipe salad at the original Perry Inn, makes two rich, custard-like in Perry Hall, Md. — Looking for a hard-to-find recipe pies with a mildly tangy butor can answer a request? Write termilk flavor. I tested it using to Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, refrigerator pie crusts, and I’m The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert sure it would taste even betSt., Baltimore, MD 21278, or email ter with a homemade crust. It baltsunrecipefinder@gmail.com. is best to allow the pies to cool Names must accompany recipes completely before serving, othfor them to be published. erwise they may be a little run-

Buttermilk Pie Makes 2 9-inch pies. 2 unbaked pie shells 2½ C sugar ½ C butter, melted ½ C flour

1 pint buttermilk 2 eggs beaten 1 TBS lemon juice 1 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Beat eggs, add sugar and flour. Stir in buttermilk and flavorings. Add melted butter. Divide evenly between two 9-inch unbaked pie shells. Bake for 45 minutes. Top should be golden brown, and center firm. Cool on wire racks before serving.

What is balsamic vinegar’s shelf life? natural mold that is used to make new batches of vinegar. Can balsamic vinegar go Mother wouldn’t be as thick bad? I reached for a bottle as the globs you’re describing, that had been in the though. In this case, it pantry about a year COOK Q&A sounds like the vineand it had turned into gar thickened up from globs of a jelly-like substance. sugar. It could be that the cap Was it useable? wasn’t tight and allowed the Vinegar in general has a vinegar to evaporate. If that’s very long shelf life. Older the case, it probably won’t taste bottles of wine-based vinegars like it’s supposed to and you’ll might develop sediment and be better off just pitching it out. — Submit questions at sometimes a growth of what is called Mother of Vinegar, the www.charlotteobserver.com/food. By Kathleen Purvis

McClatchy Newspapers

Q: A:


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264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found GARAGE SALES 275 - Auction Sales 280 - Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets & Supplies

Pets & Supplies

Australian Shepherds Regd minis born 5/12/12 Champ lines & health clearances. True structure & temperament. (541)639-6263 or

Chihuahua Pups, assorted colors, teacup, 1st shots, wormed, Want to Buy or Rent Barn cats/rodent spe$250,541-977-4686 cialists ready to work Baby gate wanted, in your barn or shop in Dachshund AKC, micro reasonable rate, used exchange for safe mini, black/tan female, 541-419-6408 shelter, food & water. short hair, $375. For Altered, shots. We info call 541-420-6044 Wanted: $Cash paid for deliver! 541-389-8420 541-447-3060 vintage costume jewelry. Top dollar paid for Dachshund AKC minis, Gold/Silver.I buy by the short & longhair, B/tan Estate, Honest Artist & choc/tan, F $375; M Elizabeth,541-633-7006 $325. 541-420-6044 WANTED: RAZORS, or 541-447-3060 Double or singleBogart, a sweet & soedged, straight cial cat abandoned by razors, shaving DO YOU HAVE his owner, needs a brushes, mugs & SOMETHING TO one-cat inside-only scuttles, strops, SELL home because he shaving accessories FOR $500 OR tested positive for fe& memorabilia. LESS? line FIV/AIDS. He Fair prices paid. Non-commercial seems healthy & the Call 541-390-7029 advertisers may vet estimated his age between 10 am-3 pm. place an ad with at 7-10, & feels that our Wanted Small Travel he may have been "QUICK CASH trailer, cheap, need vaccinated against feSPECIAL" for work in North Daline AIDS at some 1 week 3 lines, $12 kota to save my point, which means he or 2 weeks, $20! house. 541-633-7006 will always test posiAd must include tive. A home with a 208 price of single item similar cat would be of $500 or less, or great. Bogart will have Pets & Supplies multiple items to be confined indefinitely until a forever whose total does The Bulletin recomhome is found, & that not exceed $500. mends extra caution is no way to live. If when purchasyou can adopt him, Call Classifieds at ing products or serfoster him short-term, 541-385-5809 vices from out of the or provide towards www.bendbulletin.com ongoing care, contact area. Sending cash, info@craftcats.org, checks, or credit in541-389-8420, formation may be Find exactly what 541-598-5488, or subjected to fraud. you are looking for in the www.craftcats.org For more information about an adverCLASSIFIEDS tiser, you may call the Oregon State Foster homes needed: Attorney General’s kittens & spec. needs Office Consumer cats. No-kill, all-volProtection hotline at unteer rescue pro1-877-877-9392. Boxer/English Bulldog vides food, supplies, (Valley Bulldog) puppies, vet care & more; you CKC Reg’d, brindles & provide a safe, loving fawns, 1st shots. $700. short-term home. See 541-325-3376 www.craftcats.org or AKC Black Lab Pups. call 541-389-8420 or Champion bloodlines. Chicken, New Chick in 541-598-5488. Health certificate. Town “Serama”, Raised with love. smallest & lightest Free King Charles Toy $600. 541-280-5292. chicken breed in the Spaniel, female, 4 world, come out & Australian Shepherd yrs., to good senior visit. Appointments, puppies, standard, 2 home, 541-788-0090 541-433-2112. blue merle boys, 2 www.orseramas.com black-tri boys, $500. German Shepherd pups, 541-420-1580 1 black, 1 black & tan, $450. 541-620-0946 People Look for Information About Products and German Shepherd Pups, Chihuahua long hair Services Every Day through 8 wks, 1 male,1 female, male pups, 2 @ $180 The Bulletin Classifieds $250, 541-390-8875 cash. 541-678-7599 202

mountainviewminiaussies @yahoo.com

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Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

B e n d

O r e g o n

208

208

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260

269

Pets & Supplies

Pets & Supplies

Golf Equipment

Misc. Items

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Get your kitty fix here! Volunteers needed to care for cats & kittens @ no-kill, all volunteer rescue sanctuary. General chores, small maint. jobs, groom/ interact w/ cats, more. www.craftcats.org or call 541-389-8420, 647-2181, 598-5488.

Golden Retriever gorgeous, almost white coat, 2 years old. All shots, neutered, well trained and loves everyone! You will fall in love! Moving and unable to take with family. $500. Call 541.848.0278 Hound Puppies (3), 7 weeks, lots of color, $150 ea.,541-447-1323 King Charles Spaniel Male Puppy, $300, priceless little guy, 541-788-0090. KITTEN EXTRAVAGANZA! Local rescue group has kittens avail., variety of colors, fur length,, some w/extra toes. Small adoption fee: altered, shots, ID chip, free vet visit & more; discount for 2. Sat & Sun 10-5, for other days/times call 541-788-4170. At main foster home beween Bend/Redmond: 8950 S. Hwy 97, Rdmd, NE of Gift Rd, look for signs. Adopt a kitten & get a free adult mentor cat at rescue sanctuary! www.craftcats.org or CraftCats on Facebook.com Lab Pups AKC, black & yellow, Master Hunter sired, performance pedigree, OFA cert hips & elbows, Call 541-771-2330 www.kinnamanretrievers.com

Lab pups, Choc., AKC, 2 males, hunting & competition, sire: FC/AFC Way to Go Call of the Wild. Sire & dam OFA certified hips & elbows. avail 6/18,541-670-8044 kona_thomas@hotmail.com

Labradoodles - Mini & med size, several colors 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Lionhead baby bunnies, variety color, $15 ea. 541-548-0747 Maltese, Toy (1), AKC champ lines, 6 wks, $500. 541-420-1577 Parakeet Breeder; female Quaker parrot; male lemon yellow ringneck parakeet; male lovebird; breeder yellow canaries; male Cockatiel. In La Pine 541-410-9473

Poodle pups, toy, for SALE. Also Rescued Poodle Adults for adoption, to loving homes. 541-475-3889 Poodle, Toy Apricot, 3 month, female, shots, $300. 541-536-7770 Queensland Heelers standard & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://

rightwayranch.wordpress.com

Shih Tzu male, 1 yr., pet companion home only, $200, 541-788-0090

St. Bernard Puppies, dry mouth, 1st shots, dewormed, $400, 541-280-8069

Driver, New Cleveland Casket, handcrafted, Alder wood, 6’6” x 2’, Classic, 270 gram, white satin lined with graphite, regular flex, pillow, locks, handles, $249, 541-788-1653. corner pcs, beautiful 246 workmanship, $1200 obo. 541-420-6780 Guns, Hunting & Fishing

For newspaper delivery, call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email

Inverter 2500 watts, Heart Interface, $300. classified@bendbulletin.com Browning Citori White 541-382-6806 Yorkie AKC pups, small, Lightning 20ga, 28” big eyes, shots, health barrels,6 choke tubes, Karaoke / CD / record / PA guarantee,2 boys,1 girl, very good shape, system, w/2 mic’s, $950+, 541-316-0005. $950. Beretta AL391 SUPER TOP SOIL $55/obo. 541-647-2621 www.hersheysoilandbark.com Urika, 28" barrel, 5 210 choke tubes, hard Wanted- paying cash Screened, soil & compost mixed, no case, excellent cond, Furniture & Appliances for Hi-fi audio & sturocks/clods. High hu$950. 541-388-4230 dio equip. McIntosh, mus level, exc. for JBL, Marantz, DyCASH!! A1 Washers&Dryers flower beds, lawns, naco, Heathkit, SanFor Guns, Ammo & $150 ea. Full wargardens, straight sui, Carver, NAD, etc. Reloading Supplies. ranty. Free Del. Also screened top soil. Call 541-261-1808 541-408-6900. wanted, used W/D’s Bark. Clean fill. De541-280-7355 liver/you haul. 263 DO YOU HAVE 541-548-3949. Tools SOMETHING TO Fridge, White Kenmore, 270 SELL top freezer, icemaker, Craftsman air compresFOR $500 OR $150; 541-318-8554 Lost & Found sor, like new, $250. LESS? 541-408-2585 Non-commercial Found cell phone on advertisers may Empire, call to idenDewalt 13” planer, like place an ad tify, 1-760-917-1969 new, $450. with our 541-408-2585 Found HP computer Visit our HUGE "QUICK CASH cover, MS COA, west home decor SPECIAL" Rigid 10” jointer, exc. of C&D Auto. Call consignment store. 1 week 3 lines $12 cond. $400. 541-389-7955 New items or 541-408-2585 arrive daily! 2 weeks $20! Found set of keys, Mt. 930 SE Textron, Ad must Washington Dr., Bend 265 Bend 541-318-1501 include price of 6/17. 541-330-2342 www.redeuxbend.com Building Materials single item of $500 Lost Turtle, aquatic, or less, or multiple NW Elgin & 16th, Fri., REDMOND Habitat GENERATE SOME exitems whose total 6/8. 541-306-4171 RESTORE citement in your does not exceed Building Supply Resale neighborhood! Plan a $500. REMEMBER: If you Quality at garage sale and don't have lost an animal, LOW PRICES forget to advertise in Call Classifieds at don't forget to check 1242 S. Hwy 97 classified! 541-385-5809 The Humane Society 541-548-1406 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com in Bend 541-382-3537 Open to the public. Redmond, Loveseat recliner, light 541-923-0882 tan fabric. $60 obo. Ruger LC9 9mm laser 266 Prineville, pistol semi-auto, $390 541-419-6408. Heating & Stoves 541-447-7178; obo. 503-754-3947 Moving Sale 6/15-6/22 OR Craft Cats, La-Z-Boy hideabed $125. UTAH + OR CCW: OrNOTICE TO 541-389-8420. egon and Utah ConQueen boxspring matADVERTISER cealed License Class. tress/heavy metal frame, Since September 29, Reward - Lost Bracelet Silver, pink & red Sat June 30, 9:30 a.m. $100. Lots more! 1991, advertising for Chamilia / Pandora - Madras Range. Utah Call 541-536-3813 used woodstoves has style bracelet. Senti-$65; OR+UT $100. been limited to modSofa & Lovestop, neumental value. Lost Inc. photo for Utah, els which have been tral color, pillow back, Call Paul Sumner 6/4/12. 541-382-5673 certified by the Orexc. cond., $275 (541)475-7277 for preegon Department of 282 OBO, 541-447-4246 reg., email,map, info Environmental Qualor 541-420-9467 ity (DEQ) and the fed- Sales Northwest Bend Wanted: Collector Stove, 2-oven, Maytag eral Environmental seeks high quality Estate Sale! ceramic convection Protection Agency HUGE fishing items. Wed.- Sun., 6/20-6/24, $150. Microwave, all Call 541-678-5753, or (EPA) as having met 8-6,1925 SE Gardenia phases $50. Dish503-351-2746 smoke emission stanCt, complete housewasher $50. dards. A certified hold, furniture, china, 251 541-382-9211 woodstove may be tools, Christmas items, Hot Tubs & Spas identified by its certificollectibles,much more! cation label, which is The Bulletin Jacuzzi, cover, 4 perr ecommends extra permanently attached 286 son,110V, good cond, caution when purto the stove. The Bul- Sales Northeast Bend $100, 541-280-6150. chasing products or letin will not knowservices from out of ingly accept advertis255 the area. Sending ing for the sale of HH FREE HH cash, checks, or uncertified Computers Garage Sale Kit credit information woodstoves. Place an ad in The may be subjected to THE BULLETIN reBulletin for your gaquires computer adFRAUD. For more Just too many rage sale and revertisers with multiple information about an collectibles? ceive a Garage Sale ad schedules or those advertiser, you may Kit FREE! selling multiple syscall the Oregon Sell them in tems/ software, to disState Attorney KIT INCLUDES: close the name of the The Bulletin Classiieds General’s Office • 4 Garage Sale Signs business or the term Consumer Protec• $1.00 Off Coupon To "dealer" in their ads. tion hotline at Use Toward Your 541-385-5809 Private party advertis1-877-877-9392. Next Ad ers are defined as • 10 Tips For “Garage those who sell one Sale Success!” 267 computer. • And Inventory Sheet Fuel & Wood 260 PICK UP YOUR Check out the GARAGE SALE KIT at classiieds online Misc. Items WHEN BUYING 1777 SW Chandler www.bendbulletin.com FIREWOOD... Ave., Bend, OR 97702 1243 sq. ft. carpet; twin Updated daily bed w/drawers & exTo avoid fraud, tra pull-out; computer The Bulletin 212 armoire 541-815-1828 recommends payAntiques & ment for Firewood Buying Diamonds 290 Collectibles only upon delivery /Gold for Cash Sales Redmond Area and inspection. The Bulletin reserves Saxon’s Fine Jewelers • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 541-389-6655 the right to publish all 4’ x 4’ x 8’ MULTI-FAMILY YARD ads from The Bulletin SALE! Redmond, 8-5 • Receipts should BUYING newspaper onto The Lionel/American Flyer Fri & Sat, Jun 22-23 include name, Bulletin Internet webMartin & Washburn phone, price and trains, accessories. site. guitars, sporting kind of wood pur541-408-2191. goods, tent, Winonah chased. BUYING & SELLING canoe & accessories, • Firewood ads sleeping bags & pads. All gold jewelry, silver MUST include speRC model aircraft & and gold coins, bars, cies and cost per 242 accy’s to finish. rounds, wedding sets, cord to better serve Exercise Equipment class rings, sterling silClothing, housewares, our customers. ver, coin collect, vinelectronics, camera, Walkmaster II with Extage watches, dental tools, furniture. ometer, almost new, gold. Bill Fleming, No early birds. 541-382-9419. 702 NW 21st Court. $65 obo. 541-647-2621

9 7 7 0 2 Farm Market

300 308

Farm Equipment & Machinery (15) Main line irrigation pipe, 40’ x 5”, $1.80/ft. 541-604-4415 Wanted Used Farm Equipment & Machinery. Looking to buy, or consign of good used quality equipment. Deschutes Valley Equipment 541-548-8385 BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS Search the area’s most comprehensive listing of classiied advertising... real estate to automotive, merchandise to sporting goods. Bulletin Classiieds appear every day in the print or on line. Call 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

325

Hay, Grain & Feed 1st quality grass hay, 70# bales, barn stored, $220/ ton. Also 700# sq. bales, $77 ea. Patterson Ranch, Sisters, 541-549-3831 3A Livestock Supplies •Panels •Gates •Feeders Now galvanized! •6-Rail 12’ panels, $101 •6-Rail 16’ panels, $117 Custom sizes available 541-475-1255 Want to buy Alfalfa standing, in Central Ore. 541-419-2713 345

Livestock & Equipment

1977 14' Blake Trailer, refurbished by Frenchglen Blacksmiths, a Classy Classic. Great design for multiple uses. Overhead tack box (bunkhouse) with side and easy pickup bed access; manger with left side access, windows and head divider. Toyo radial tires & spare; new floor with mats; center partition panel; bed liner coated in key areas, 6.5 K torsion axles with electric brakes, and new paint, $10,500. Call John at 541-589-0777. BOER and Nubian goats, does, wethers and bucks. 541-923-7116 Take care of your investments with the help from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory 358

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net Want to buy Alfalfa standing, in Central Ore. 541-419-2713


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

G2 TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Edited by Will Shortz

PLACE AN AD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . .11:00 am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Starting at 3 lines

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise

OVER $500 in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days ................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days .................................................. $18.50 7 days .................................................. $24.00 14 days .................................................$33.50 28 days .................................................$61.50

4 lines for 4 days.................................. $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 476

476

476

476

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Office Clerk/ Project Engineer The Bulletin Central Oregon GenReceptionist FINANCE AND BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT Bend law firm seeks eral Contractor is Recommends extra caution when pur507 - Real Estate Contracts 410 - Private Instruction part-time office clerk/ looking for an experichasing products or enced full time conreceptionist. 10:30 514 - Insurance 421 - Schools and Training services from out of struction Project Ena.m. - 3:00 p.m., Mon. 528 - Loans and Mortgages 454 - Looking for Employment the area. Sending gineer, with min. 2 yrs - Fri. Duties include 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 543 - Stocks and Bonds cash, checks, or Full-Time, 4-10 hr. shifts, commercial project reception desk cover558 - Business Investments 476 - Employment Opportunities credit information Mon.-Fri. Critical care or management experiage and file manageASC experience premay be subjected to 573 - Business Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions ence. Degree in Conment. Applicant must ferred. Job offers excelFRAUD. struction Managebe highly motivated lent benefit package. 476 476 ment (or equivalent) For more informawith excellent comInterested persons tion about an adverrequired. Competitive munication, organizaEmployment Employment should email their retiser, you may call Wage & benefit packtion and customer Employment sume to jobs@bendsurOpportunities Opportunities the Oregon State age. Box 20145418, service skills. Appligery.com Open until Attorney General’s c/o The Bulletin, PO cant must be able to filled. General laborer seaOffice Consumer Box 6020, Bend, OR lift 50 pound boxes, sonal for summer. DriverProtection hotline at 97708. be over 18 years of Apply in person 400 Looking for truck 1-877-877-9392. age, have a high NW Paul Jasa Way, driver to pull 53’ Reschool diploma or USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Madras, Oregon. frigerated Van, run GED, have own car, Receptionist, F-T, for 48 states. Must be Manicurist - Urban valid driver’s license busy vet clinic. Door-to-door selling with 421 willing to be out 3 Beauty Bar in down- fast results! It’s the easiest and proof of auto inCustomer service, weeks at a time. Schools & Training town Bend, seeks 1 surance. Hourly wage computer/phone Looking for your next Looking for team way in the world to sell. full-time Nail Tech, is $15.00, no benefits. skills, multi-tasking employee? player, and at least 2 Tues-Sat; and 1 TRUCK SCHOOL Send resume to: experience required. Place a Bulletin help yrs. experience The Bulletin Classiied full-time Nail Tech/ www.IITR.net Office Manager, BryReply: wanted ad today and Company is based Aesthetician. Bring 541-385-5809 Redmond Campus ant Lovlien & Jarvis, dvc@bendbroadband.com reach over 60,000 out of Prineville, OR. resume to: 5 NW MinStudent Loans/Job 591 SW Mill View readers each week. E-mail resume to: nesota Ave., Bend. Waiting Toll Free Way, Bend, OR Your classified ad caveslogistics@ Remember.... 1-888-438-2235 97702. will also appear on Call The Bulletin At Mortgage Loan Add your web adyahoo.com bendbulletin.com 541-385-5809 Processor: dress to your ad and or call which currently Come Grow With Us! Call a Pro Place Your Ad Or E-Mail readers on The 541-977-6362. receives over 1.5 Bank of the CasTURN THE PAGE Whether you need a At: www.bendbulletin.com Bulletin' s web site million page views cades is looking for will be able to click For More Ads every month at fence ixed, hedges a Mortgage Loan through automatically no extra cost. Experienced CPA Medical/ OR Nurse The Bulletin Processor that has trimmed or a house to your site. Bulletin Classifieds Immediate opening for minimum 1 year built, you’ll ind Get Results! a licensed CPA w/ 4 previous loan proCall 385-5809 to 9 years of recent professional help in cessing experience. RV Salesperson or place public accounting exPlease see full job The Bulletin’s “Call a CAUTION READERS: Big Country RV, Inc., your ad on-line at perience. Please visit Full-Time, 4-10 hr. shifts, description and apCentral Oregon’s Service Professional” www.bendcpa.com/jobs bendbulletin.com Mon.-Fri. Scrub and cirply on-line at Largest RV DealerAds published in "Emfor application inforculating experience reDirectory www.botc.com. ship, is growing and ployment Opportuniquired. Job offers exmation. Bank of the Cas541-385-5809 adding to our strong cellent benefit package. ties" include emcades is an Equal sales staff. We are Interested persons ployee and Finance Opportunity Emlooking for the right should email their reindependent posi454 FinancialController ployer person who wants a & Business sume to jobs@bendsurtions. Ads for posiBig R is a 50 year Looking for Employment (EOE/AA/MF/D/V) career in one of the gery.com Open until tions that require a fee old company based fastest growing infilled. or upfront investment in White City, OrI have 30+ years exp in dustries in Central must be stated. With egon, and is seekhousekeeping, pet, Oregon. Great opany independent job ing a highly motifarm & ranch care. portunity for the right Electrician General Journeyman opportunity, please vated, teamCall 541-388-2706 individual in a wellWarm Springs Composite Products is looking investigate thororiented individual established, well-run for an individual to help a growing innovative oughly. for the role of Fi476 environment. Excep528 light manufacturing plant. nancial Controller. tional inventory of new Loans & Mortgages Employment Basic Duties: Assist in troubleshooting and reUse extra caution when The Controller is reand used RVs. UnlimOpportunities pairs of plant equipment. Install, repair and applying for jobs onsponsible for all fiited earning potential maintain all electrical and electronic equipline and never proWARNING nancial accounting with an excellent benCHILDCARE - Daycare ment. Able to read and revise electrical scheThe Bulletin recomvide personal inforand reporting. Canefit package to inAssistant for Thursmatics, Must be able to perform both electrimends you use caumation to any source didate must have a clude: days & Fridays. Must cal and mechanical preventive maintenance tion when you proyou may not have rebasic understand• IRA have background requirements and report, PLC experience. vide personal searched and deemed ing of corporations, • Dental Plan check. 541-322-2880 information to compato be reputable. Use strong background Minimum Skills: A minimum of 5 years in the • Medical Insurance nies offering loans or extreme caution when in accounting, with industrial maintenance field with a valid Or• Up to 35% commiscredit, especially responding to ANY senior-level acegon State Electricians License in ManufacDO YOU NEED sion those asking for adonline employment counting experituring. A strong mechanical aptitude with the • Great Training A GREAT vance loan fees or ad from out-of-state. ence. A 4-year acability to perform light welding and fabrication EMPLOYEE companies from out of counting related duties. Successful applicant shall supply the Must be able to work RIGHT NOW? state. If you have We suggest you call degree along with normal hand tools required for both electrical weekends and have a Call The Bulletin concerns or questhe State of Oregon CPA certification and mechanical maintenance. passion for the RV before 11 a.m. and tions, we suggest you Consumer Hotline at and/or 10+ years of Benefits: Full Family Medical, Vision, Dental, business. Please apget an ad in to pubconsult your attorney 1-503-378-4320 experience in fiLife, Disability, Salary Incentives, Company ply in person, or drop lish the next day! or call CONSUMER nance required. Bonuses, Pension and 401K w/Company resume off at: 541-385-5809. HOTLINE, For Equal Opportunity Please submit reMatching and Above Pay Rate Scale. Big Country RV, Inc. VIEW the 1-877-877-9392. Laws: Oregon Busume to 3500 N. Hwy 97 Please remit resume to: Classifieds at: reau of Labor & Inlnewport@bigRoregon.com Bend, OR 97701 www.bendbulletin.com Warm Springs Composite Products dustry, Civil Rights MONEY:We buy or email a resume to LOCAL PO Box 906, Warm Springs, OR 97761 Division, secured trust deeds & accounting@bigcrv.com Phone: 541-553-1143, Fax: 541-553-1145 note,some hard money 971-673-0764 Attn: Mac Coombs, mcoombs@wscp.com loans. Call Pat Kelley ADVERTISING SALES ASSISTANT 541-382-3099 ext.13. If you have any quesSay “goodbuy” tions, concerns or Manager Reverse Mortgages comments, contact: to that unused by local expert Kevin O’Connell item by placing it in Mike LeRoux Regional Production Manager sought for Classified Department NMLS57716 The La Grande Observer, Manager The Bulletin Classiieds A position is available in The Bulletin Call to learn more. The Bulletin in La Grande, OR. Advertising department for a Retail Sales 541-350-7839 541-383-0398 Assistant. This position assists outside sales Security1 Lending 541-385-5809 We are seeking an experienced production representatives and managers with account NMLS98161 leader who has the ability to recruit, train and and territory management, accurate supervise staff to lead us to the next level. paperwork, on-deadline ad ordering, and with 573 maintaining good customer service and Sales Business Opportunities This individual will supervise the pressroom, relationships. pre-press and mailroom operations and reIndependent Contractor Sales quires experience with a 6-unit Goss CommuDuties include but are not limited to: Looking for your We are seeking dynamic individuals. nity press. CTP and computer experience also Scheduling ads, organizing paperwork, next employee? required. proofing ads, taking photos, doing layout for Place a Bulletin help DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? ads, filing and working with customers of The wanted ad today and • OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE The ideal candidate will possess a hands-on Bulletin regarding their advertising programs. reach over 60,000 • PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC management style to coincide with excellent readers each week. • CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED people skills. A strong candidate must possess excellent Your classified ad communication, multi-tasking and will also appear on Our winning team of sales & promotion Ability to grow commercial print revenue while organizational skills. The person must be able bendbulletin.com maintaining excellent quality is also required. professionals are making an average of to provide excellent customer service and which currently reeasily establish good customer rapport. The $400 - $800 per week doing special ceives over 1.5 milThe Observer is part of Western Communicabest candidates will have experience with events, trade shows, retail & grocery lion page views tions, Inc. which is family owned and consists administrative tasks, handling multiple store promotions while representing every month at of seven newspapers, five in Oregon and two position responsibilities, proven time no extra cost. THE BULLETIN newspaper in California. The Observer publishes three management skills and experience working Bulletin Classifieds as an independent contractor times a week and also prints our sister paper within deadlines. Get Results! Call as well located in Baker City, also a three 385-5809 or place WE OFFER: times a week publication. We offer competiTwo years in business, advertising, sales, your ad on-line at •Solid Income Opportunity* tive compensation and benefits package to marketing or communications field is preferred. bendbulletin.com coincide with a culture that embraces change *Complete Training Program* The position is hourly, 40 hours per week and recognizes success. offers a competitive compensation plan with *No Selling Door to Door * benefits. *No Telemarketing Involved* Want to impress the If you are ready to join a progressive family *Great Advancement Opportunity* operation, please send your resume to; Please send a cover letter and resume to Sean relatives? Remodel * Full and Part Time Hours * Tate, Bulletin Advertising Manager at your home with the Kari Borgen, Regional Publisher: state@bendbulletin.com, or mail to Sean Tate help of a professional FOR THE CHANCE OF A at The Bulletin, 1777 SW Chandler Ave, Bend, publisher@lagrandeobserver.com from The Bulletin’s LIFETIME, OR 97702. No phone calls please. Please “Call A Service Call Adam Johnson submit your application by July 1, 2012. No phone calls please. 541-410-5521, TODAY! Equal Opportunity Employer EOE Professional” Directory Medical Pre/Post-op RN

400

500

Rentals

600 604

Storage Rentals 8’ x 20’ Container, $80 per month. Secure area. Pay 2 months, 3rd month free. Call 541-420-6851.

Good classiied ads tell the essential facts in an interesting Manner. Write from the readers view - not the seller’s. Convert the facts into beneits. Show the reader how the item will help them in some way.

630

Rooms for Rent

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 1, 2 & 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625. 541-330-0719

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Call for Specials! Limited numbers avail. 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks. MOUNTAIN GLEN, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Located by BMC/Costco, 2 bdrm, 2 bath duplex, 55+,2350 NEMary Rose Pl, #1, $795 no smoking or pets, 541-390-7649

Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting $150/ SPRING IN FOR A week or $35/nt. Incl GREAT DEAL!! guest laundry, cable & $299 1st month’s rent! * WiFi. 541-382-6365 2 bdrm, 1 bath $530 & 540 Studios & Kitchenettes Carports & A/C incl! Furnished room, TV w/ Fox Hollow Apts. cable, micro & fridge. (541) 383-3152 Utils & linens. New Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co owners.$145-$165/wk *Upstairs only with lease* 541-382-1885

AVAILABLE BEND AREA RENTALS •Spacious 2 Bdrm/1 Bath SE Duplexes - Sgl. garage. Large fenced back deck. All new appl. carpet, paint. W/D hook-ups. No pets. $650 WST. •Furnished 1 Bdrm/1Bath Mt. Bachelor Condo End unit. Access to pool and jacuzzi. Gas fireplace. $650 WST. •2 Bdrm, 2.5 Bath at base of Pilot Butte - Bonus room on 3rd level. 2 Master Suites. Large closets. W/D hookups. Single garage. $745 WS •Very nice 2 Bdrm/2½ bath Unit in Quad. - W/D included. Private back patio. Single garage. Gas cooking. GFA heat. Close to Old Mill Dist. Pets under 20#?? $745.00 WS •Cute 3 Bdrm, 2 Bath Home In newer subdivision off Hwy 20. Great Pilot Butte view. Dbl. garage. Fenced backyard. Pets?? 1719 sq. ft. $1025.

AVAILABLE REDMOND RENTAL •4 Bdrm/2 Bath Sgl. Level Home. Corner lot in NE. 2400 sq. ft. Pets under 20#s?? Fenced back yard. Auto sprinklers. Master separated, Has garden tub. Must see. $1100 mo. *** FOR ADDITIONAL PROPERTIES *** CALL 541-382-0053 &/or Stop By the Office at 587 NE Greenwood, Bend


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012 G3 745

870

870

880

880

Homes for Sale

Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

NOTICE:

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condos & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 730 - New Listings 732 - Commercial Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condos & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

636

652

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Houses for Rent NW Bend

Small studio downtown area, util. pd. No pets. $495, $475 dep. 541-330-9769 541-480-7870

Golf Course Home Single level 2600 sq ft, 3 or 4 bdrm, 3 bath, office, oversized 3-car garage, gas heat, AC. Avail 6/20/12. $1995 mo. 541-410-0671

Real Estate For Sale

700

Boats & RV’s

800

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any pref850 erence, limitation or discrimination based Snowmobiles on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, Polaris 2003, 4 cycle, familial status or nafuel inj, elec start, retional origin, or intenverse, 2-up seat, cover, 4900 mi, $2500 tion to make any such obo. 541-280-0514 preferences, limitations or discrimination. 860 We will not knowingly accept any advertis- Motorcycles & Accessories ing for real estate which is in violation of Harley Davidson Softthis law. All persons Tail Deluxe 2007, are hereby informed white/cobalt, w/pasthat all dwellings adsenger kit, Vance & vertised are available Hines muffler system on an equal opportu& kit, 1045 mi., exc. nity basis. The Bullecond, $19,999, tin Classified 541-389-9188. 750

Redmond Homes Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Harley Heritage Softail, 2003 $5,000+ in extras, $2000 paint job, 30K mi. 1 owner, For more information please call 541-385-8090 or 209-605-5537

18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 Volvo Penta, 270HP, low hrs., must see, $17,500, 541-330-3939

Honda VT700 Shadow 1984, 23K mi, many new parts, battery charger, good condition. Now for $1000, cash! 541-598-4351

875

FIND IT! Watercraft BUY IT! SELL IT! Ads published in "Watercraft" include: KayThe Bulletin Classiieds aks, rafts and motor19.5’ 1988 373V ized personal Ranger Bass Boat, watercrafts. For Mercury 115 Motor, "boats" please see Ranger trailer, trolling Class 870. elec. motor, fish finder 541-385-5809 & sonor, 2 live wells & all accessories, new batteries & tires, great cond., $6500. 541-923-6555.

19-ft Mastercraft ProStar 190 inboard, 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 hrs, great cond, lots of extras, $10,000 obo. 541-231-8709

HD FAT BOY 1996

Completely rebuilt/ customized, low miles. Accepting offers. 541-548-4807

Used out-drive parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

19’ Glass Ply, Merc cruiser, depth finder, trolling motor, trailer, $3500, 541-389-1086 or 541-419-8034.

Fleetwood Discovery 40X 2008, 31K miles, MUST SELL SOON, 3 slides, 1-owner, great shape, $129,975 OBO, call Bill 541-771-3030 CAN’T BEAT THIS! Look before you buy, below market value ! Size & mileage DOES matter, Class A 32’ Hurricane by Four Winds, 2007. 12,500 mi, all amenities, Ford V10, lthr, cherry, slides, like new, can see anytime, $58,000. 541-548-5216

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp dieInflatable Raft,Sevylor sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 Fishmaster 325,10’3”, in. kitchen slide out, complete pkg., $650 new tires,under cover, Firm, 541-977-4461. hwy. miles only,4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp proKayak, Eddyline pane gen & more! Sandpiper, 12’, like $55,000. new, $975, 541-948-2310 541-420-3277. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! 880 Motorhomes

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

National Sea Breeze 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, 2 power slides, upgraded queen mattress, hyd. leveling system, rear camera & monitor, only 6k mi. A steal at $43,000! 541-480-0617 RV CONSIGNMENTS WANTED We Do The Work, You Keep The Cash, On-Site Credit Approval Team, Web Site Presence, We Take Trade-Ins. Free Advertising. BIG COUNTRY RV Bend 541-330-2495

Redmond: 541-548-5254

Southwind 35.5’ Triton, 2008,V10, 2 slides, Dupont UV coat, 7500 mi. Avg NADA ret.114,343; asking $99,000. Call 541-923-2774 TRADE? 2004 Bounder by Fleetwood 35’ 3 slides, loaded. 44k, very clean, reliable w/8.1 Workhouse chassis, $45,000. 541-382-1853

Hunter’s Delight! Pack732 age deal! 1988 Win20.5’ 2004 Bayliner Commercial/Investment Beaver Patriot 2000, Need help ixing stuff? nebago Super Chief, 205 Run About, 220 Walnut cabinets, so38K miles, great Properties for Sale Call A Service Professional HP, V8, open bow, 773 lar, Bose, Corian, tile, shape; 1988 Bronco II A quiet newer 3 bdrm, ind the help you need. ½ acre in Prineville OR exc. cond., very fast 4 door fridge., 1 slide, Acreages 4x4 to tow, 130K 2.5 bath, 1692 sq.ft., www.bendbulletin.com w/very low hours, W/D. $75,000 mostly towed miles, industrial park 24'x80' mtn views. dbl. galots of extras incl. 865 541-215-5355 nice rig! $15,000 both. Winnebago Outlook 687 shop with 40'x60' *** rage w/opener. $1195 tower, Bimini & ATVs 541-382-3964, leave 32’ 2008, Ford V10 unfinished addition, CHECK YOUR AD Commercial for 541-480-3393,610-7803. custom trailer, eng, Wineguard sat, msg. $160,000. Call for Please check your ad $19,500. TV, sur- round sound Rent/Lease more info; can send on the first day it runs Yamaha Grizzly 700 FI 541-389-1413 Itasca Sun Cruiser stereo + more. Re2009, 543 mi, 2WD/ pics. 541-604-0344 to make sure it is cor$49,000. lo1997, 460 Ford, Class duced to 4WD, black w/EPS, Looking for your next Office/Warehouse rect. Sometimes inor cated in SE Bend. Up A, 26K mi., 37’, living 541-526-1622 fuel injection, indepenemployee? The Bulletin structions over the 541-728-6793 to 30,000 sq.ft., comroom slide, new awdent rear suspension Place a Bulletin help phone are misunderTo Subscribe call Chev 1-ton RV 94K, petitive rate, nings, new fridge, 8 winch w/handle conwanted ad today and stood and an error 1967, stove, sink, 541-385-5800 or go to 541-382-3678. new tires, 2 A/C, 6.5 trols & remote, ps, 20.5’ Seaswirl Spy881 reach over 60,000 can occur in your ad. fridge, 2 double beds, www.bendbulletin.com Onan Gen., new batauto, large racks, exc. readers each week. If this happens to your Travel Trailers der 1989 H.O. 302, rebuilt 350. New: rear PUBLISHER'S teries, tow pkg., rear cond., $7850, Your classified ad ad, please contact us 285 hrs., exc. cond., end, clutch, exhaust, NOTICE towing TV, 2 tv’s, new 745 541-322-0215 will also appear on the first day your ad stored indoors for tires, etc. $995. All real estate adverhydraulic jack springs, SPRINGDALE 2005 bendbulletin.com, Homes for Sale appears and we will life $11,900 OBO. 541-410-1685 tising in this newspatandem axel, $15,000, 27’, has eating area currently receiving be happy to fix it as 541-379-3530 per is subject to the 541-385-1782 slide, A/C and heat, over 1.5 million page 4270 sq ft, 6 bdrm, 6 ba, soon as we can. Fair Housing Act Coachman new tires, all conviews, every month Deadlines are: Weekwhich makes it illegal 4-car, corner, .83 acre Ads published in the Freelander 2011, tents included, bedmtn view, by owner. at no extra cost. days 11:00 noon for to advertise "any $590,000 541-390-0886 "Boats" classification 27’, queen bed, 1 ding towels, cooking Bulletin Classifieds next day, Sat. 11:00 preference, limitation See: bloomkey.com/8779 include: Speed, fishslide, HD TV, DVD and eating utensils. Get Results! a.m. for Sunday and Yamaha YFZ450 2005 or discrimination ing, drift, canoe, Great for vacation, player, 450 Ford, Call 541-385-5809 or Sport Race quad, built Monday. based on race, color, BANK OWNED HOMES! house and sail boats. fishing, hunting or $49,000, please place your ad on-line 4-mil stroked to 470cc, 541-385-5809 religion, sex, handiFor all other types of FREE List w/Pics! living! $15,500 at call 541-923-5754. lots of mods, $4950 obo Thank you! Monaco Dynasty 2004, cap, familial status, www.BendRepos.com watercraft, please see 541-408-3811 bendbulletin.com Call 541-647-8931 loaded, 3 slides, marital status or na- bend and beyond real estate The Bulletin Classified Class 875. $159,000, 541-923- 8572 *** 20967 yeoman, bend or tional origin, or an in541-385-5809 870 or 541-749-0037 (cell) tention to make any 775 Boats & Accessories such preference, limitation or discrimiManufactured/ nation." Familial staMobile Homes 14’ Classic P-14 GENERATE SOME extus includes children citement in your neigSt. Jude Prayer: May Seaswirl, 20HP under the age of 18 borhood. Plan a ga- Country Coach Intrigue 12’x40’, 1/1, lots of upthe Sacred Heart of motor, Bimini Top, 2002, 40' Tag axle. Every day thousands living with parents or rage sale and don't Springdale 29’ 2007, Jesus be adored, grades, Senior Park. new seats, Eagle 400hp Cummins Dielegal custodians, of buyers and sellers forget to advertise in slide,Bunkhouse style, Monaco LaPalma 37’, glorified, loved and north side of Bend. finder, trailer, ready sel. Two slide-outs. pregnant women, and classified! 385-5809. sleeps 7-8, excellent of goods and services preserved through2004 w/ 2 slides, 25k $6,500. 541-382-6530 to go, $1600, 41,000 miles. Most people securing cuscondition, $16,900, out the world now mi., loaded, $42,500. do business in these 541-923-2957. options. $110,000 tody of children under 541-390-2504 and forever. Sacred 541-923-3510. pages. They know OBO 541-678-5712 18. This newspaper Heart of Jesus, pray The Bulletin is your you can’t beat The will not knowingly acfor us. St. Jude, Employment cept any advertising Bulletin Classiied Worker of Miracles, for real estate which is pray for us; Helper of Section for selection Marketplace in violation of the law. the hopeless, pray and convenience Our readers are for us. Say this - every item is just a hereby informed that Call prayer 9 times a day phone call away. and by the 9th day, all dwellings adveryour prayer shall be tised in this newspa541-385-5809 answered. It has per are available on never been known to an equal opportunity to advertise. fail. Publication must basis. To complain of be promised. Thank discrimination call Thousands of ads daily www.bendbulletin.com you, St. Jude for HUD toll-free at in print and online. granting me my peti1-800-877-0246. The tion, MKM toll free telephone To place your ad, visit number for the hear- www.bendbulletin.com Thank you St. Jude & ing impaired is Sacred Heart of or call 541-385-5809 Jesus. j.d. 1-800-927-9275. 650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Where buyers meet sellers.

personals

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Building/Contracting

Handyman

Landscaping/Yard Care

Landscaping/Yard Care

NOTICE: Oregon state ERIC REEVE HANDY NOTICE: OREGON Call The Yard Doctor law requires anyLandscape ContracSERVICES. Home & for yard maintenance, one who contracts tors Law (ORS 671) Commercial Repairs, thatching, sod, sprinfor construction work requires all busiCarpentry-Painting, kler blowouts, water to be licensed with the nesses that advertise Pressure-washing, features, more! Construction Conto perform LandHoney Do's. On-time Allen 541-536-1294 tractors Board (CCB). scape Construction promise. Senior LCB 5012 An active license which includes: Discount. Work guarAeration / Dethatching means the contractor planting, decks, anteed. 541-389-3361 BOOK NOW! is bonded and infences, arbors, Weekly or 541-771-4463 / one-time service sured. Verify the water-features, and Bonded & Insured avail. Bonded, insured, contractor’s CCB liinstallation, repair of CCB#181595 free estimates! cense through the irrigation systems to COLLINS Lawn Maint. I DO THAT! CCB Consumer Home/Rental repairs be licensed with the Call 541-480-9714 Website Landscape Contracwww.hirealicensedcontractor. Small jobs to remodels tors Board. This Maverick Landscaping Honest, guaranteed com Mowing, weedeating, 4-digit number is to be work. CCB#151573 or call 503-378-4621. yard detailing, chain included in all adverDennis 541-317-9768 The Bulletin recomsaw work & more! tisements which indimends checking with cate the business has LCB#8671 541-923-4324 the CCB prior to con- Landscaping/Yard Care a bond, insurance and Holmes Landscape Maint tracting with anyone. workers compensa• Clean-up • Aerate Some other trades tion for their employ- • De-thatch • Free Est. also require addiees. For your protec- • Weekly / Bi-wkly Svc. tional licenses and tion call 503-378-5909 call Josh 541-610-6011 certifications. or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to Just bought a new boat? More Than Service Get your check license status Sell your old one in the business Peace Of Mind before contracting classiieds! Ask about our with the business. Super Seller rates! Spring Clean Up Persons doing land•Leaves 541-385-5809 scape maintenance GROW •Cones do not require a LCB with an ad in •Needles Computer/Cabling Install license. •Debris Hauling The Bulletin’s Where can you ind a •Aeration QB Digital Living “Call A Service •Dethatching •Computer Networking helping hand? Professional” •Phone/Data/TV Jacks Compost Top Dressing From contractors to •Whole House Audio Directory yard care, it’s all here Weed free Bark •Flat Screen TV & In& flower beds stallation in The Bulletin’s Painting/Wall Covering 541-280-6771 “Call A Service www.qbdigitalliving.com ORGANIC PROGRAMS All About Painting Professional” Directory CCB#127370 Elect Interior/Exterior/Decks. Lic#9-206C Landscape Mention this ad get Nelson Landscape Maintenance 15% Off interior or Debris Removal Maintenance Full or Partial Service exterior job. Serving Central Oregon •Mowing •Edging Restrictions do apply. JUNK BE GONE Residential •Pruning •Weeding Free Estimates. & Commercial Sprinkler Adjustments I Haul Away FREE CCB #148373 •Sprinkler For Salvage. Also 541-420-6729 Fertilizer included Cleanups & Cleanouts Activation & Repair with monthly program •Back Flow Testing WESTERN PAINTING Mel, 541-389-8107 CO. Richard Hayman, •Thatch & Aerate a semi-retired paintWeekly, monthly Electrical Services • Spring Clean up ing contractor of 45 or one time service. •Weekly Mowing years. Small Jobs Quality Builders Electric •Bi-Monthly & Monthly Welcome. Interior & EXPERIENCED • Remodels Maintenance Exterior. ccb#5184. Commercial • Home Improvement •Flower Bed Clean Up 541-388-6910 & Residential • Lighting Upgrades •Bark, Rock, Etc. • Hot Tub Hook-ups Quality Painter •Senior Discounts Free Estimates 541-389-0621 Fast Friendly Service Senior Discounts Bonded & Insured www.qbelectric.net Steve King Painting, 541-390-1466 CCB#127370 Elect 541-815-4458 CCB#60218, Same Day Response 541-977-8329 Lic#9-206C LCB#8759

ING


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

G4 TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent 881

882

882

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Fifth Wheels

Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 29’, weatherized, like new, furnished & ready to go, incl Winegard Satellite dish, $26,995. 541-420-9964

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, fuel station, exc cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $24,999. 541-389-9188 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 882

Fifth Wheels

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $12,750. 541-923-3417.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

931

932

933

935

975

Autos & Transportation

Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories

Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

900

We Buy Junk Cars & Trucks! Cash paid for junk vehicles, batteries & catalytic converters. Serving all of C.O.! Call 541-408-1090

908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

932

Antique & Classic Autos

BMW 525i 2004,

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in stor- Ford F350 2010, Gas V8, 5.4L, 4WD, X-cab, age last 15 yrs., 390 8000 mi., loaded w/exHigh Compression tras, always garaged, engine, new tires & liFord warranty,$31,900, cense, reduced to Home: 541-549-4834 $2850, 541-410-3425. Cell: 541-588-0068.

Chevy Pickup 1951, 1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718

restored. $13,500 obo; 541-504-3253 or 503-504-2764

1/3 interest in wellequipped IFR Beech Bonanza A36, lo- Chevy Wagon 1957, cated KBDN. $55,000. 4-dr., complete, 541-419-9510 $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. 916 Trucks & Chrysler 300 Coupe Heavy Equipment 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, re9’ DUMP BED painted original blue, with hydraulic lift, original blue interior, for 1-ton flatbed original hub caps, exc. truck, + 2 alumichrome, asking $9000 or make offer. num tool boxes. 541-385-9350. $1700 obo.

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th by Carriage, 4 slidewheel, 1 slide, AC, outs, inverter, satelTV,full awning, excellite sys, fireplace, 2 lent shape, $23,900. flat screen TVs. 541-350-8629 $60,000. 541-480-3923 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! Taurus 27.5’ 1988 541-385-5809 Everything works, 541-410-6945 $1750/partial trade for Escaper 29’ 1991, car. 541-460-9127 2 slides, A/C, elec/gas fridge, walk Chrysler SD 4-Door around queen bed, 1930, CDS Royal elec. front jacks, Standard, 8-cylinder, $4000 OBO, body is good, needs 541-382-8939 or some restoration, 541-777-0999. INT. Dump 1982, w/arruns, taking bids, Wilderness Advantage borhood, 6k on rebuilt 541-383-3888, 31’, 2004. 2 slides, 2 392, truck refurbished, 541-815-3318 TVs, micro, solar sys, has 330 gal. water $17,950. (Also avail: tank w/pump & hose. 2003 Ford F250 Diesel Everything works, X-cab.) 541-385-5077 Reduced - now $5000 OBO. 541-977-8988 Fleetwood Wilderness 885 36’, 2005, 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, Canopies & Campers AC, W/D hkup beauFIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, tiful unit! $30,500. Lance 11.6 camper Mdl door panels w/flowers 1130, 1999. Ext’d cab, 541-815-2380 & hummingbirds, fully self-contained. white soft top & hard Peterbilt 359 potable Incl catalytic heater, top, Reduced! $5,500. Montana 34’ 2003, water truck, 1990, TV/VCR combo. Very 541-317-9319 or 2 slides, exc. cond. 3200 gal. tank, 5hp well taken care of, 541-647-8483 pump, 4-3" hoses, throughout, arctic clean. Hauls easily, camlocks, $25,000. winter pkg., new very comfortable. 541-820-3724 $6999. 541-382-1344 10-ply tires, W/D

ready, $23,000, 541-948-5793

925 Lance-Legend 990 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, Utility Trailers exc. cond., generator, solar-cell, large refrig, AC, micro., magic fan, bathroom shower, Big Tex Landscapremovable carpet, ing/ ATV Trailer, custom windows, outdual axle flatbed, door shower/awning MONTANA 3585 2008, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. set-up for winterizing, exc. cond., 3 slides, GVW, all steel, elec. jacks, CD/steking bed, lrg LR, Arc$1400. reo/4’ stinger. $8500. tic insulation, all op541-382-4115, or Bend, 541.279.0458 tions $37,500. 541-280-7024. 541-420-3250 Need to get an Open Road 37' 2004 931 ad in ASAP? 3 slides, W/D hookup, large LR w/rear winAutomotive Parts, You can place it dow. Desk area. Service & Accessories online at: Asking $19,750 OBO www.bendbulletin.com Call (541) 280-7879 Cargo Box, Thule Exvisit rvt.com pedition, 86”, $200, ad#104243920 541-385-5809 541-330-8774. for pics

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597 933

Pickups

Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, 1995, extended cab, long box, grill guard, running boards, bed rails & canopy, 178K miles, $4800 obo. 208-301-3321 (Bend) Chevy Silverado 1998, black and silver, pro lifted, loaded, new 33” tires, aluminum slot wheels, tow pkg., drop hitch, diamond plate tool box, $12,000, or possible trade for newer Tacoma. 541-460-9127 Dodge 1500 2001, 4x4 sport, red, loaded, rollbar, AND 2011 Moped Trike used 3 months, street legal. call 541-433-2384

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

You’ll ind it in

935

The Bulletin Classiieds

Sport Utility Vehicles

541-385-5809 Ford Galaxie 500 1963, 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, Ford F-250 Super Duty 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & 1999,7.3LTurbo Diesel, radio (orig),541-419-4989 4WD,6-spd. stick trans, crew cab, A/C, pw,pdl, Ford Mustang Coupe short wide bed, cloth 1966, original owner, bucket seats, cruise, V8, automatic, great Silver Star front bumper shape, $9000 OBO. w/winch, $9000, needs 530-515-8199 tires & glow plugs, 541-419-2074

JEEP WRANGLER X 2002 6 cyl., 5 spd., A/C, hard top, exc. cond., $11,000. 541-419-4890.

HSE, nav, DVD, local car, new tires, 51K miles. $24,995. 503-635-9494

Range Rover, 2006 Sport HSE,

nav, AWD, heated seats, moonroof, local owner, Harman Kardon, $23,995. 503-635-9494 940

Vans

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005, low miles., good tires, new brakes, moonroof Reduced to $15,750 541-389-5016.

Ford Windstar 1995,7 passenger, 140k, 3.8 V6, no junk. Drive it away for $1750; Nissan Quest 1996, 7 passenger, 152k, 3.0 V6, new tires, ready for next 152k, $4500. 541-318-9999, ask for Bob. 975

Automobiles

Ford F250 XLT ‘95, 4WD Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 4x4. 120K mi, Power auto, long bed, 3/4 ton, seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd 8600 GVW, white,178K row seating, extra mi, AC, pw, pdl, Sirius, tires, CD, privacy tinttow pkg., bedliner, bed ing, upgraded rims. rail caps, rear slide GMC ½ ton 1971, Only Fantastic cond. $7995 window, new tires, ra$19,700! Original low Contact Timm at diator, water pump, mile, exceptional, 3rd 541-408-2393 for info hoses, brakes, more, owner. 951-699-7171 or to view vehicle. $5200, 541-322-0215

New body style, Steptronic auto., cold-weather package, premium package, heated seats, extra nice. $14,995. 503-635-9494. Buicks Galore! No junk! LeSabres, LaCrosse & Lucernes priced $5000-$8500 for serious buyers only. All are ‘03’s and newer. 541-318-9999. Ask about Free Trip to Washington, D.C. for WWII Veterans. Buick Lucerne CX 2006, 65K, 3.8 V6, cloth interior, 30mpg hwy, $7500. Buick Park Avenue 1992, leather, 136K, 28 mpg hwy. $2500. Bob, 541-318-9999 Ask me about the Free Trip to Washington, D.C. for WWII Veterans.

Jeep Willys 1947,custom, small block Chevy, PS, OD,mags+ trailer.Swap for backhoe.No am calls please. 541-389-6990

Range Rover 2005 International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

looking for?

What are you

GMC Denali 2003

loaded with options. Exc. cond., snow tires and rims included. 130k hwy miles. $12,000. 541-419-4890.

Ford F-350 XLT 2003, 4X4, 6L diesel, 6-spd manual, Super Cab, short box, 12K Warn winch, custom bumper & canopy, running boards, 2 sets tires, wheels & chains, many extras, perfect, ONLY 29,800 miles, $27,500 OBO, 541-504-8316. Jeep Cherokee 1990, 4WD, 3 sets rims & Ford Ranger XLT tires, exlnt set snow 1998 X-cab tires, great 1st car! 2.5L 4-cyl engine, $1800. 541-633-5149 5-spd standard trans, long bed, newer motor & paint, new clutch & tires, excellent condition, clean, $4500. Call 541-447-6552

Mazda B4000 2004 Cab Plus 4x4. 4½ yrs or 95,000 miles left on ext’d warranty. V6, 5-spd, AC, studded tires, 2 extra rims, tow pkg, 132K mi, all records, exlnt cond, $9500. 541-408-8611

Ford F-150 1995, 112K, 4X4, long bed, auto, very clean, runs well, new tires, $6000. 541-548-4039.

Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc. cond., $19,900, call 541-923-0231.

AUDI QUATTRO CABRIOLET 2004, extra nice, low mileage, heated seats, new Michelins, all wheel drive, $12,995 503-635-9494.

Chevrolet Camaro 1996,

V6, 135K mi, recent tune-up. $2600 obo. 541-408-7134, lv msg Chevy Camero 2010, 2SS/RS, 6-spd manual, black on black, 11,800 miles, $27,500, call 541-815-9679

Honda Accord EX 2004, V6, auto, leather, loaded, 78K mi., perfect cond., $11,500, 541-693-4767.

Infiniti I30 Limited 1999, 4 dr. luxury car, leather & woodgrain interior, power windows & seats, side airbags, Bose sound system, sunroof, 3.0 L V6, must see! $6000 obo. 541-350-4779 Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218. PORSCHE 914 1974, Roller (no engine), lowered, full roll cage, 5-pt harnesses, racing seats, 911 dash & instruments, decent shape, very cool! $1699. 541-678-3249 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through The Bulletin Classifieds Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Free Classified Ads! $ 00 No Charge For Any Item Under 200 1 Item*/ 3 Lines*/ 3 Days* - FREE! and your ad appears in PRINT and ON-LINE at bendbulletin.com

CALL 541-385-5809 FOR YOUR FREE CLASSIFIED AD *Excludes all service, hay, wood, pets/animals, plants, tickets, weapons, rentals and employment advertising, and all commercial accounts. Must be an individual item under $200.00 and price of individual item must be included in the ad. Ask your Bulletin Sales Representative about special pricing, longer run schedules and additional features. Limit 1 ad per item per 30 days.

www.bendbulletin.com

To receive this special offer, call 541-385-5809 Or visit The Bulletin office at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012 G5

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Mark J. Hentze, as grantor to WesternTitle Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated June 25, 2007, recorded June 29, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Instrument No. 2007-36550, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver of Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as covering the following described real property: The North Half of Lot 8, and all of Lot 9, Block 9, Taylor's Addition to the City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 938 S.W. 12th Street, Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,414.52, from May 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,375.23, from April 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $211,200.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.725% per annum from April 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 27, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-26-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 11-106616. 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-12-496601-SH Reference is made to that certain deed made by ALLISON V. VOGT, as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS") AS NOMINEE FOR PLAZA HOME MORTGAGE, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 11/21/2007, recorded 11/27/2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book / reel / volume number fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number 2007-61359,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 173818 LOT FIFTY-SIX (56) IN BLOCK ONE (1) OF TAMARACK PARK EAST PHASE III, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2969 NE ROCK CHUCK DRIVE, BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 11/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,462.92 Monthly Late Charge By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $220,553.40 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5000 per annum from 10/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 9/26/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 5/21/2012 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, as trustee Signature By: Timothy Donlon, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 A-4248174 06/05/2012, 06/12/2012, 06/19/2012, 06/26/2012

A NDISE H C R E M TOES HAOUM JOBS

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LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Andrew Loan No: 1000042889 T.S. No.: 11-02691-6 Harris, a married man, Amy Meadow, a married woman, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington MuReference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of August 5, tual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated October 2, 2006, recorded October 13, 2004 made by, GUY E. CAMPO AND THU-MINH NGO, AS TENANTS BY 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book THE ENTIRETY, as the original grantor, to AMERITITLE, as the original 2006, at Page 68658, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSBank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the TEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR FRONTIER INVESTMENT CO. DBA Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington MuRAIN LAND MORTGAGE COMPANY, as the original beneficiary, retual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot Thirteen corded on August 11, 2004, as Instrument No. 2004-47991 of Official (13), Hollygrape Subdivision, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the KNOWN AS: 19705 Harvard Place, Bend, OR 97702. Both the benefi"Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: PennyMac Corp., (the "Benciary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy eficiary"). the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been APN: 177326 recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for LOT FOUR (4), BLOCK THREE (3), TAMARACK PARK EAST, PHASE VII, which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the folDESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. lowing sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,508.61, from November Commonly known as: 1, 2009, and monthly payments in the sum of $2,405.38, from January 1, 1864 NE MONROE LANE, BEND, OR 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the sum being the following, to-wit: $296,775.40, together with interest grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late thereon at the rate of 6.1% per annum from October 1, 2009, together with charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $21,749.49 as of June all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary 12, 2012. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 27, 2012, at said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $117,557.11 together the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by with interest thereon at the rate of 6.50000% per annum from September ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Desfees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuchutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for ant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly apor had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, topointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on October 22, 2012 at the gether with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest achour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, quired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obliOregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 gations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said denamed in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later scribed real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclotime of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which sure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the princithe Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and pal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tenTrustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 dering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proin addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to ceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Bencure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in eneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said forcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default comIn construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and plained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INinterest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated FORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Informaon the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct proption: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender inerty inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that cludes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said refer"grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any enced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any informasaid Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their retion obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obspective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 14, 2012 FIDELITY tained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Auconstrued to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold thorized Signature you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-26-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & A-4259592 06/19/2012, 06/26/2012, 07/03/2012, 07/10/2012 SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. 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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-12-501288-SH

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-11-486385-SH

Reference is made to that certain deed made by MARY SHRAUGER, as Grantor to AMERICAN STATES TITLE CO, A OREGON CORPORATION, as trustee, in favor of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, A WASHINGTON CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 6/18/2001, recorded 6/25/2001, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book / reel / volume number in Book 2001 Page 29998 fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number 37382, , covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 113409 The South 750 feet of the West 330 feet of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SW 1/4 SW 1/4) of Section Five (5), Township Seventeen (17) South, Range Twelve (12) East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon; EXCEPT the right of way of the Old Bend-Sisters Highway now known as O. B. Riley Road. Commonly known as: 64020 O.B. RILEY RD, BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 12/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,384.82 Monthly Late Charge $69.24 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $173,055.27 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.2500 per annum from 11/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 10/9/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 6/4/12 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, as trustee Signature By: Timothy Donlon, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 A-FN4255195 06/19/2012, 06/26/2012, 07/03/2012, 07/10/2012

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Reference is made to that certain deed made by RICHARD G BAXTER, SHIRLEY A BAXTER, HUSBAND & WIFE, as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., as Beneficiary, dated 7/10/2007, recorded 9/24/2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book / reel / volume number fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number 2007-51455,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 114229 LOT 13, BLOCK 4 OF CAGLE 02 AS SHOWN IN THE RECORDED PLAT/MAP THEREOF IN 3201 OF DESCHUTES COUNTY RECORDS MORE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT 13 IN BLOCK 4 OF CABLE SUBDIVISION, PLAT NO. 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 52442 DOE LN, LA PINE, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 9/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,357.54 Monthly Late Charge $67.88 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $206,610.91 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.3750 per annum from 8/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 9/26/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale.For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 5/21/2012 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, as trustee Signature By: Timothy Donlon, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 A-FN4248178 06/05/2012, 06/12/2012, 06/19/2012, 06/26/2012

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-ALT-002402

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-119287

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JOHN BENNETT, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of ARGENT MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC, as beneficiary, dated 3/30/2005, recorded 4/6/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-20578, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE C-BASS MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-MH1. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: THE SOUTH HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 52665 RANCH DRIVE LA PINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as Of May 17, 2012 Delinquent Payments from March 01, 2010 3 payments at $946.70 each $2,840.10 6 payments at $910.50 each $5,463.00 18 payments at $913.72 each $16,446.96 (03-01-10 through 05-17-12) Late Charges: $721.53 Beneficiary Advances: $5,807.52 Suspense Credit: $-369.20 TOTAL: $30,909.91 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $104,729.22, PLUS interest thereon at 7% per annum from 02/01/10 to 5/31/2010, 6.45% per annum from 06/01/10 to 11/30/10, 6.5% per annum from 12/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 19, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for September 19, 2012. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 8/20/2012 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from you rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe you current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. DATED: 5/17/2012 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: ANGELIQUE CONNELL, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DANIEL D COOK AND TERRI L COOK, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., as beneficiary, dated 12/15/2005, recorded 12/20/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-87476, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: PARCEL I: LOT 30, BLOCK 24, DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, INC., UNIT 5, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PARCEL II: LOT 29, BLOCK 24, DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, INC., UNIT 5, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 201012-B0-03400-03500 LLOYD WAY ALSO APPEARING OF RECORD AS 56646 LLOYD WAY BEND, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 16, 2012 Delinquent Payments from September 01, 2010 19 payments at $1,694.59 each $32,197.21 2 payments at $1,978.55 each $3,957.10 (09-01-10 through 05-16-12) Late Charges: $918.00 Beneficiary Advances: $4,231.30 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $41,303.61 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $236,577.75, PLUS interest thereon at 6.25% per annum from 08/01/10 until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 20, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performan ce of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for September 20, 2012. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 8/21/2012 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from you rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe you current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. DATED: 5/16/2012 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: ANGELIQUE CONNELL, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

A-4246790 05/29/2012, 06/05/2012, 06/12/2012, 06/19/2012

A-FN4246616 05/29/2012, 06/05/2012, 06/12/2012, 06/19/2012

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-10-394583-NH Reference is made to that certain deed made by WILLIAM S GREENE & ELLEN R GREENE as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of FIRST HORIZON HOME LOANS CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 11/16/2005, recorded 11/30/2005, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in book / reel / volume number fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number 2005-82411,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 109865 LOT TWO IN BLOCK TWO, OF ARROWHEAD ACRES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 61550 WARD ROAD, BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 2/1/11, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $2,454.94 Monthly Late Charge $105.76 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $398,172.16 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.3750 per annum from 1/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 9/26/2012 at the hour of 1:00:00 PM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 5/21/2012 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, as trustee Signature By Timothy Donlon, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 9/26/2012. The date of this sale may be postponed. Unless the lender that is foreclosing on this property is paid before the sale date, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. After the sale, the new owner is required to provide you with contact information and notice that the sale took place. The following information applies to you only if you are a bona fide tenant occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a bona fide residential tenant. If the foreclosure sale goes through, the new owner will have the right to require you to move out. Before the new owner can require you to move, the new owner must provide you with written notice that specifies the date by which you must move out. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the new owner can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. PROTECTION FROM EVICTION IF YOU ARE A BONA FIDE TENANT OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING, YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO CONTINUE LIVING IN THIS PROPERTY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE FOR: o THE REMAINDER OF YOUR FIXED TERM LEASE, IF YOU HAVE A FIXED TERM LEASE; OR o AT LEAST 90 DAYS FROM THE DATE YOU ARE GIVEN A WRITTEN TERMINATION NOTICE. If the new owner wants to move in and use this property as a primary residence, the new owner can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even though you have a fixed term lease with more than 90 days left. You must be provided with at least 90 days' written notice after the foreclosure sale before you can be required to move. A bona fide tenant is a residential tenant who is not the borrower (property owner) or a child, spouse or parent of the borrower, and whose rental agreement: o Is the result of an arm's-length transaction; o Requires the payment of rent that is not substantially less than fair market rent for the property, unless the rent is reduced or subsidized due to a federal, state or local subsidy; and o Was entered into prior to the date of the foreclosure sale. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY BETWEEN NOW AND THE FORECLOSURE SALE: RENT YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD OR UNTIL A COURT TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE. SECURITY DEPOSIT You may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord as provided in ORS 90.367. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The new owner that buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out after 90 days or at the end of your fixed term lease. After the sale, you should receive a written notice informing you that the sale took place and giving you the new owner's name and contact information. You should contact the new owner if you would like to stay. If the new owner accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the new owner becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise: o You do not owe rent; o The new owner is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf; and o You must move out by the date the new owner specifies in a notice to you. The new owner may offer to pay your moving expenses and any other costs or amounts you and the new owner agree on in exchange for your agreement to leave the premises in less than 90 days or before your fixed term lease expires. You should speak with a lawyer to fully understand your rights before making any decisions regarding your tenancy. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR DWELLING UNIT WITHOUT FIRST GIVING YOU WRITTEN NOTICE AND GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU SHOULD CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm P951847 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 06/19/2012


CENTRAL OREGON MARKETPLACE

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TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

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THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

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C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

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TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2012

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THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

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SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

$

Special Oil Change Price!

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$

74

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 7/31/2012

BW0612

Whole House Cleaning

$

149

Up to 5 Rooms Cleaned

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 7/31/2012 BW0612

THANK YOU TO OUR LOYAL CUSTOMERS! In appreciation of our wonderful customers we are offering a One-Day Sale!

Handyman Gary (541) 390-7617 www.pulloutshelf.com

Present Coupon After Estimate

FREE IN-HOME ESTIMATE

$

OXI Fresh of Central Oregon 541-593-1799

Special Oil Change Price!

Organize Your Kitchen with Pull Out Shelves Call or go online to Sign-up today. It’s Easy!

3 Rooms Cleaned

Spring ! l Specia

Special Oil Change Price!

Special Oil Change Price!

Special Oil Change Price!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

Receive A FREE Set Of Guitar Strings With Any Accessory Purchase Of Equal Or Greater Value.

Get Any Instrument

OR

25% OFF

ONE DAY ONLY | WED., JUNE 20TH | WITH COUPON ONLY 1531 NE 3rd St. Bend • 541-323-2332 | www.sundayguitars.com

PROMOTIONAL PRICES START AT

$

1999 mo for 12 Months with 24-month agreement

Locally Owned - Giving Excellent Service!

INTERNET & SATELLITE

Got le? Troub

Lawn & Landscape Maintenance

Chem-Dry of Central Oregon Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties Independently Owned & Operated

20% OFF Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning www.chemdrybend.com

541-388-7374 Residential & Commercial Offer valid with coupon only. Not including RVs & stairs. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: 6/30/2012

LONGER LIFE THROUGH REGULAR MAINTENANCE

Receive a $8.00 Rebate from Valvoline Oil good for your next service at Subaru of Bend.

$

19

20% OFF Dethatching & Aeration Plus FREE Fertilizing

FIRST MONTH with NEW Seasonal Mowing Service Serving Central Oregon for Over 20 Years

541-382-3883

Coupons expire 6/30/12

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

5

INCLUDES: Up To 6 quarts 5w 30 Oil Subaru cars only. Other Makes slightly higher.

Subaru Genuine oil filter 32 point inspection

95

1/2 Price

$ 00 541-382-3173 $ Behind Bank of America

Guaranteed Everyday Lowest Prices!

SUBARU COMPLETE OIL & OIL FILTER SERVICE

MONEY-SAVING COUPONS!

J.L. Scott

Hot Carbonating Extraction

Let Chem-Dry of Central Oregon clean up after your little ones!

541.923.3234 1715 SW Highland Ave., Redmond www.linkpointnw.com

$

95

Synthetic oils 49

Must present coupon at time of service. Good through 6/30/12.

541-389-3031 • www.SubaruofBend.com • 2060 NE Hwy 20

OFF

LUNCH

on 3rd Street 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

Any two Lunch Entrees and two Beverages

Fish House

Coupon required, cannot combine with other offers, not valid with Lounge menu. Expires 7/3/12.

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

295 per month Space is limited, so call 541-382-1811 and reserve your full color coupon position today!

MAINTENANCE

Install new disc pads/shoes, resurface drums/rotors. Most cars per axle. Ceramic or carbon metallic pads extra if required. Starting at

$

99

119

Bearing Repack Extra Most cars & light trucks. Expires 6/30/12

$

99

29

We Use Synthetic Blend Motor Oil

• Chassis Lube • Wash Exterior Front • New Oil Filter Window • Up to 5 Qts of 5W30 • Vacuum Front Kendall Synthetic Blend Floorboards • Tire Rotation • Top off most Fluids under the hood Most cars & light trucks. 3/4 & 1 Ton may require extra fee. Expires 6/30/12

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE | 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

00

10

OFF

DINNER Any two Dinner Entrees and two Beverages

Coupon required, cannot combine with other offers, not valid with Lounge menu. Expires 7/3/12.

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 7/3/12

CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING

541-549-9090 ANTI-ALLERGENS & GREEN PRODUCTS • Most advanced truck mount extraction system • Recommended by carpet manufacturers • FAST Drying

Family owned and operated since 1986

SEE MORE OFFERS ON BACK

ANY 2 AREAS & HALL

$109 95

(UP TO 300 SQ. FT.)

SOAP-FREE PRODUCTS INCLUDED PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 7/29/12. STAIRS EXTRA.

LOW-LOW-LOW RATE! LOW-LOW-LOW

Place your coupon offer here and reach 130,000 readers for as little as

$

Lube, Oil, Filter & Tire Rotation

BRAKE

Only

$

Beyond Carpet Cleaning CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | FURNITURE

Serving Central Oregon 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER

85

per hour labor

Expires 7-31-12

Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, staircases, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. With coupon only. Some restrictions may apply. Expires 6/22/12 ®

®

541-728-0305 OFFERS END 6/22/12

Years of Experience for all of your RV Repairs!

62980 Boyd Acres Rd., Building B, Suite 2 (Boyd Acres Joint Venture)


C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!! murrayandholt.com

WAX PLUS

541-382-2222

Expires 6/30/12

$49.95 (CARS/SMALL SUVS) $59.95 (FULL SIZE TRUCK/SUV)

of Central Oregon

541-593-1799

INCLUDES: Hand Wash & Dry Wash System Applied Wax Tires & Wheels Cleaned Door Jams Wiped Out Tire Protect & Shine

IICRC Certiied Technician

Vacuum Interior Wipe Dash, Doors & Center Console Clean Glass Treat Dash-Vinyl & Leather SERVICE HOURS M–F 7:45am to 5:30pm

Right on the Corner of Third Street and Franklin in Bend. Right on the Price.

DO YOURSELF A FAVOR & SAVE SOME BIG BUCKS!!

541-382-2222

Organize Your Kitchen with Pull Out Shelves

Example:

your first order of $15 or more!

your first order of $25 or more!

Like New Jupiter Alto Saxophone Like New Armstrong Professional 80B Flute Was $499.95 Now $250 Was $995.95 Now $500

Sunday Guitars now has band & orchestra instruments . All used Band & Orchestra instruments are a whopping 50% off this Wednesday only!

SAVE

50% OFF All used Band & Orchestra Instruments!

ONE DAY ONLY | WED., JUNE 20TH | WITH COUPON ONLY 1531 NE 3rd St. Bend • 541-323-2332 | www.sundayguitars.com

Licensed Bonded Insured CCB#154815

Handyman Gary Authorized Dealer (541) 390-7617 • www.pulloutshelf.com

FREE In-home estimate

WE WILL PAY YOU 00 *

$

150 CASH

• We Bundle Dish Network & CenturyLink Hi-Speed Internet • RV Setup & Installation • FREE Installation up to 6 rooms • FREE HD/DVR Upgrade for existing customers *$100 Cash for Dish Network *$50 Visa Cash Card for Century Link

Locally Owned - Giving Excellent Service!

INTERNET & SATELLITE

REBATES1 ON TIRES UP TO

$

160

with a purchase of four select Goodyear® or Dunlop® tires on the Goodyear Credit Card. Offers valid June 1 through June 30, 2012.

J.L. Scott

Complete Landscape Maintenance Commercial & Residential * Mowing Services * Lawn Reseeding * De-thatching

NO INTEREST IF PAID IN FULL WITHIN 6 MONTHS* on purchase of $250 or more made from June 1, 2012 to June 30, 2012. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 6 months or if you make a late payment. Minimum payment required. See this ad for details.

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE • 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189 M&J CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING • 541-549-9090

$

149 95

SOFA CLEANING

$

(UP TO 500 SQ. FT.)

SOAP-FREE PRODUCTS INCLUDED

99

95

(STND. SIZE - CUSTOM FABRICS EXTRA)

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 7/29/12. STAIRS EXTRA.

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 7/29/12.

ALL ORIENTAL & ANY 7 AREAS AREA RUG CLEANING $ 95

179

(UP TO 650 SQ. FT.)

SOAP-FREE PRODUCTS INCLUDED PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 7/29/12. STAIRS EXTRA.

20% OFF

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 7/29/12. STAIRS EXTRA.

*Aeration *Fertilization * Spring & Fall Clean Up * Edging & Bed Reshaping

* Trimming *Bark Installation * Top Dressing

20%Off De-Thatching & Aeration Serving Central Oregon WE DO IT ALL! 541-382-3883 for Over 20 Years Expires 6/30/12

$ 00

5

OFF

541-382-3173 Behind Bank of America on 3rd Street 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

LUNCH

$

1000 OFF

DINNER

Any two Lunch Entrees and two Beverages

Fish House

Any two Dinner Entrees and two Beverages

Coupon required, cannot combine with other offers, not valid with Lounge menu. Expires 7/3/12.

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

Coupon required, cannot combine with other offers, not valid with Lounge menu. Expires 7/3/12.

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 7/3/12

ON ANY AQUA-HOT, HYDRO-HOT OR WEBASTO UNIT

Beyond Carpet Cleaning CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | FURNITURE

Serving Central Oregon 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER

Tile and Grout Special

Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com

62980 Boyd Acres Rd., Building B, Suite 2 (Boyd Acres Joint Venture)

Chem-Dry of Central Oregon 541-388-7374 Bend Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

ALIGNMENT SPECIAL FREE Help your tires last longer with a four wheel alignment by our factory trained technicians on our state-of-the-art alignment machine.

Special Price: $79.95 Coupon not valid with any other offer. Must present coupon at time of purchase. Limit 1 coupon per person. Coupon does not apply to prior purchases. Other restrictions may apply. Void where prohibited. Expires 6/30/12.

Car Care Inspection You will receive a multipoint inspection check list, estimate of any immediate repair needs as well as items that can be budgeted in for a later date. Must present coupon at time of service. Good through 6/30/12.

AIR CONDITIONING TUNE-UP INCLUDES: Draw system down under vacuum and test for leaks, Recharge and test operation. Call today to set aside time to have this valuable inspection performed by our Factory Trained Staff.

For Only: $99.95 Coupon not valid with any other offer. Must present coupon at time of purchase. Limit 1 coupon per person. Coupon does not apply to prior purchases. Other restrictions may apply. Void where prohibited. Expires 6/30/12.

This unique section publishes twice each month in The Bulletin and in Central Oregon Marketplace, wrapping the front of a section for amazing and never-before-offered visibility!

Expires 7/31/12

541-728-0305

Our Hot Carbonating Truck Mount Extraction cleans deep! We use one-fifth the amount of water compared to steam cleaners so carpet DRIES FAST! Our cleaner, The Natural®, is green certified, non-toxic, so it’s safe for your family and pets who are allergy sensitive! Leaves no sticky residue! Using Chem-Dry resists re-soiling so your carpet fibers stay cleaner, longer! Don’t forget your area rugs & upholstery too!

Reach 130,000 readers for as little as $295 per month!

10% OFF SERVICE

Exclusive Authorized Factory Certified Service Center

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

Lawn & Landscape Maintenance

1. Mail-In Rebate paid in the form of a Visa prepaid rebate card. To double your Mail-In Rebate, qualifying purchase must be made on the Goodyear Credit Card. Subject to credit approval. Offers valid on purchases between 06/01/12 - 06/30/12. Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery. See store associate for complete details and Rebate form. Additional terms and conditions apply.2

ANY 5 AREAS

541.923.3234 1715 SW Highland Ave., Redmond www.linkpointnw.com

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, staircases, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. With Valpak® coupon only. Some restrictions may apply. Expires 6/22/12 ®

®

OFFERS END 6/22/12

Only 18 coupon positions are available! Space is limited, so call 541-382-1811 and reserve your full color coupon position today!


Bulletin Daily Paper 06/19/12