Page 1

Agile dogs compete • B1

Inside the mind of a bike mechanic D1 •

JUNE 4, 2012

MONDAY 75¢

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

UNIVERSITIES

PRONGHORN

Buckle up: Road projects start now

‘Super seniors’ pushed to graduate

State owns slice of resort property

By Daniel de Vise

By Lauren Dake

The Washington Post

The Bulletin

MADISON, Wis. — Some of the nation’s signature public universities are gently prodding slackers and fifth-year “super seniors” toward the graduation stage, moving to reinvent a campus culture that treats on-time completion as the exception rather than the rule. At 33 of the 50 state flagships, fewer than half of students graduate in four years. The overall four-year graduation rate is 31 percent for public colleges and 52 percent for private ones, the federal government reported this year. University leaders are embracing on-time completion amid mounting concern about wasted tax dollars, spiraling tuition and America’s plummeting global rank in college attainment. Four years and out is a long tradition at private colleges, a value reinforced by the parents who pay the bills. Public universities, by contrast, have long tolerated the five- or six-year degree. But too often, experts say, the slow track leads nowhere. “The longer it takes people to graduate, the less likely they are to graduate, ever,” said William Bowen, former Princeton University president and co-author of the book “Crossing the Finish Line.” Here at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, about half the students graduate on time. Nick Korger said he arrived in Madison four years ago “with absolutely no clue what I wanted to do.” See Universities / A4

SALEM — The state of Oregon owns a small but integral 6.5-acre piece of property at the Pronghorn golf resort. The state foreclosed on the property in December after the resort defaulted on a $1.2 million loan from the Department of Energy. The money was meant to go toward building a solar electricity generation facility on the property. The state is leasing the land, which has four maintenance and administrative buildings and two 1,000-pound gas tanks, to the resort’s current owners for $6,570 a month. A Honolulu-based company, The Resort Group, took ownership of the resort in February. Randy Koss, the managing partner, said the new owners intend to buy the property back from the state. Solar panels were placed on the property but never installed, Koss said. That’s in part because Pronghorn paid New Path Renewables to work on the project. The company went out of business, and New Path’s owner, Eric Wisehart, was convicted in 2011 of racketeering, aggravated theft and unlicensed construction work. He was sentenced to six years in prison. Anthony Buckley, the administrator who oversees the energy development services for the Department of Energy, said the state eventually would like to sell the property for the value of what was left to be paid on the loan, or $1.2 million. See Pronghorn / A4

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Traffic navigates a temporary gravel diversion road last week around the construction zone for a pedestrian tunnel near Forest Service Road 41 and Century Drive. The tunnel is being installed before the planned repaving of Century Drive from the Bend city limits to the Mt. Bachelor ski area. By Scott Hammers

Inside 27 Galveston Ave. 5

Bl vd . s Wa

20

Bear Creek Rd.

Reed Market Rd.

k Broo

6

Powers Rd.

2

27th St.

hin gton

M t.

Wilson Ave. Reed Market Rd.

sw oo dB lvd.

landowner adjacent to the Mt. Washington and Simpson roundabout site, but it is not expected to significantly delay construction. Construction on the other two roundabouts to be built this year, at Brookswood and Powers Road and at 18th Street and Empire Avenue, is likely to begin in early July. Arnis said the city intends to schedule informational meet-

Greenwood Ave. Franklin Ave. BUS 97

Simpson Ave.

Drive and Simpson Avenue is scheduled to begin within a few weeks and will continue through October. An informational meeting on the project will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday in the Bend City Council chambers. City transportation engineering manager Nick Arnis said the city has encountered some difficulty securing right-of-way from a private

Conners Rd. Penn Ave. Neff Rd.

Revere Ave. Newpor t Ave.

1

Murphy Rd

ings in the coming weeks for residents likely to be affected by the construction. Starting today, on Brookswood, crews will be conducting the first stage in a two-year process to resurface the road between Bond Street and Powers Road. See Roadwork / A4

“I see major advances being made in big diseases.”

BANK OF AMERICA

— Dr. Richard Pazdur, cancer drug chief, Food and Drug Administration

Loss forecast hidden before Merrill vote

More advanced therapies aimed at cancer By Marilynn Marchione The Associated Press

CHICAGO — New research shows a sharp escalation in the weapons race against cancer, with several high-tech approaches long dreamed of but not possible or successful until now. At a weekend conference of more than 30,000 cancer specialists, scientists reported: • New “smart” drugs that deliver powerful poisons directly to cancer cells while leaving healthy ones alone. • A new tool that helps the immune system attack a broad range of cancer types. • Treatments aimed at new

We use recycled newsprint MON-SAT

• A map of upcoming projects, A4

Ninth St.

The city will be posting detour information and updates on the progress of construction on its website. See www.ci.bend.or.us/ streets for the latest news.

15th St.

Summer road construction swings into action today, with Bend’s first major project of the year set to begin on Brookswood Boulevard. Motorists will see more construction as a result of a bond measure approved by voters in May 2011. The $30 million bond funds three new roundabouts this year, and next year will bring improvements to Reed Market Road, Northeast 27th Street and — if the money is available — Northwest 14th Street. Construction on a roundabout at Mt. Washington

14th St.

Find detours

The Bulletin

U|xaIICGHy02329lz[

genes and cancer pathways, plus better tests to predict which patients will benefit from them. “I see major advances being made in big diseases” such as breast and prostate cancers, said Dr. Richard Pazdur, cancer drug chief at the federal Food and Drug Administration, which on Wednesday announced a new policy intended to speed breast cancer drugs to the market. The field continues to move toward more precise treatments with fewer side effects and away from old-style chemotherapy that was “like dropping a bomb on the body,” he said. See Cancer / A3

By Gretchen Morgenson New York Times News Service

The Associated Press file photo

A lab officer cuts a DNA fragment under UV light for DNA sequencing as part of research to determine genetic mutation in a blood cancer patient in Singapore.

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 109, No. 156, 30 pages, 5 sections

INDEX Calendar Classified Comics

C3 E1-6 C4-5

Crosswords C5, E2 Dear Abby C3 Editorials B4

Green, Etc. C1-6 Local News B1-6 Obituaries B5

Days before Bank of America shareholders approved the bank’s $50 billion purchase of Merrill Lynch in December 2008, top bank executives were advised that losses at the investment firm would most likely hammer the combined companies’ earnings in the years to come. But shareholders were not told about the looming losses, which would prompt a second taxpayer bailout of $20 billion, leaving them instead to rely on rosier projections from the bank that the deal would make money relatively soon

TODAY’S WEATHER Sports D1-6 Sudoku C5 TV & Movies C2

Rain showers High 57, Low 38 Page B6

after it was completed. What Bank of America’s top executives, including its chief, Kenneth Lewis, knew about Merrill’s vast mortgage losses and when they knew it emerged in court documents filed Sunday evening in a shareholder lawsuit being heard in U.S. District Court in Manhattan. The disclosure, coming to light in private litigation, is likely to reignite concerns that federal regulators and prosecutors have not worked hard enough to hold key executives accountable for their actions during the financial crisis. See BofA / A2

TOP NEWS BRITAIN: Diamond jubilee, A3 MASSACRE: Syria denies role, A3


THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

A2

The Bulletin

S S

How to reach us

Discoveries, breakthroughs, trends, names in the news — things you need to know to start your day.

TODAY

POLITICS

STOP, START OR MISS YOUR PAPER?

It’s Monday, June 4, the 156th day of 2012. There are 210 days left in the year.

541-385-5800 Phone hours: 5:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 6:30 a.m.-noon Sat.-Sun.

GENERAL INFORMATION

HAPPENINGS

541-382-1811

• Pfizer reports on a “smart bomb” drug it is testing for certain types of lymphoma and leukemia. A1 • Environmental groups such as the Natural Resources Defense Council put up blank websites in protest of efforts by Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper to crack down on opponents of the Keystone XL pipeline.

ONLINE

www.bendbulletin.com EMAIL

bulletin@bendbulletin.com NEWSROOM AFTER HOURS AND WEEKENDS

541-383-0367 NEWSROOM FAX

541-385-5804 NEWSROOM EMAIL Business ..... business@bendbulletin.com City Desk...........news@bendbulletin.com Community Life......................................... communitylife@bendbulletin.com Sports.............. sports@bendbulletin.com

OUR ADDRESS Street Mailing

1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702 P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

New York Times News Service file photos

President Barack Obama — left, with his family at Andrews Air Force Base — and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney — with his grandchildren on a campaign stop in Colorado Springs, Colo. — have a few shared tastes when it comes to areas outside politics.

IN HISTORY

Obama and Romney: kinship in chicken, college and ‘Star Trek’ By Mark Leibovich New York Times News Service

ADMINISTRATION Chairwoman Elizabeth C. McCool ...........541-383-0374 Publisher Gordon Black .....................541-383-0339 Editor-in-Chief John Costa .........................541-383-0337

DEPARTMENT HEADS Advertising Jay Brandt ..........................541-383-0370 Circulation and Operations Keith Foutz .........................541-385-5805 Finance Karen Anderson...541-383-0324 Human Resources Traci Donaca ......................541-383-0327 New Media Jan Even ........541-617-7849

TALK TO AN EDITOR Business ............................541-383-0360 City Editor Erik Lukens ......541-383-0367 Assistant City Editor Mike Braham......................541-383-0348 Community Life, Health Julie Johnson.....................541-383-0308 Editorials Richard Coe ......541-383-0353 Family, At Home Alandra Johnson................541-617-7860 GO! Magazine Ben Salmon........................541-383-0377 News Editor Jan Jordan ....541-383-0315 Photos Dean Guernsey......541-383-0366 Sports Bill Bigelow.............541-383-0359

TALK TO A REPORTER Bend ...................................541-383-0387 Business Tim Doran ..........................541-383-0360 Elon Glucklich ....................541-617-7820 Jordan Novet......................541-633-2117 Rachael Rees .....................541-617-7818 Calendar ............................541-383-0351 Consumer Heidi Hagemeier ................541-617-7828 Crook County .....................541-617-7837 Deschutes County Hillary Borrud.....................541-617-7829 Education Patrick Cliff .........................541-633-2161 Ben Botkin (Redmond/Sisters)...541-977-7185 Family/Aging Mac McLean ......................541-617-7816 Features/Fine Arts David Jasper ......................541-383-0349 Health Anne Aurand ......................541-383-0304 Betsy Q. Cliff.......................541-383-0375 Markian Hawryluk..............541-617-7814 Jefferson County ...............541-617-7837 La Pine/Sunriver ...............541-383-0348 Music Ben Salmon ............541-383-0377 Public Lands Dylan J. Darling..................541-617-7812 Public Safety Scott Hammers..................541-383-0387 Redmond/Sisters Erik Hidle ............................541-617-7837 Salem Lauren Dake ...........541-554-1162 Special Projects Sheila G. Miller ...................541-617-7831 Washington, D.C. Andrew Clevenger..............202-662-7456

REDMOND BUREAU Street address .......226 N.W. Sixth St. Redmond, OR 97756 Mailing address ....P.O. Box 788 Redmond, OR 97756 Phone.................................541-504-2336 Fax .....................................541-548-3203

CORRECTIONS The Bulletin’s primary concern is that all stories are accurate. If you know of an error in a story, call us at 541-383-0358.

TO SUBSCRIBE Home delivery and E-Edition: One month: $11 (Print only: $10.50) By mail in Deschutes County: One month: $14.50 By mail outside Deschutes County: One month: $18 E-Edition only: One month: $8 TO PLACE AN AD Classified...........................541-385-5809 Advertising fax ..................541-385-5802 Other information .............541-382-1811

OTHER SERVICES Photo reprints....................541-383-0358 Obituaries ..........................541-617-7825 Back issues .......................541-385-5800 All Bulletin payments are accepted at the drop box at City Hall. Check payments may be converted to an electronic funds transfer. The Bulletin, USPS #552-520, is published daily by Western Communications Inc., 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702. Periodicals postage paid at Bend, OR. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Bulletin circulation department, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. The Bulletin retains ownership and copyright protection of all staff-prepared news copy, advertising copy and news or ad illustrations. They may not be reproduced without explicit prior approval.

WASHINGTON — Points of unity: Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama both like process-driven decisions, iPads, ABC’s “Modern Family” and chicken. Grilled chicken, not fried, in keeping with the shared bodymindedness of the combatants (Obama does treadmill and hoops, Romney elliptical and bike). Spicy, too, as Romney (who often peels the skin off) has demonstrated with his endorsement of the jalapeno chicken sandwich at Carl’s Jr. and Obama has with his praise of the grilled chicken tacos made by the White House chef. While a few shared tastes do not erase the general distaste of this campaign, the candidates do have a surprising amount in common. Granted, little of it concerns how to fix the economy, shrink the deficit or deal with Russia. But interviews with people from the candidates’ overlapping realms — at Harvard, in the health care policy arena and in politics — yield similar observations about their personalities and their leadership

BofA Continued from A1 The filing in the shareholder suit included sworn testimony from Lewis in which he concedes that before Bank of America stockholders voted to approve the Merrill deal, he had received loss estimates relating to the deal that were far greater than those that had appeared in the proxy documents filed with regulators. Shareholders rely on statements made in proxy filings to decide whether to approve transactions their companies have proposed, and companies must disclose all facts that could be meaningful for shareholders trying to decide how to vote on a deal. The bank’s purchase of Merrill, struck during the depths of the financial crisis, was the culmination of an acquisition binge by Lewis that transformed Bank of America from its base in North Carolina into a financial behemoth that could compete head-tohead with the biggest institutions on Wall Street. But the transaction, which was ultimately encouraged by government officials who were concerned about the impact on the financial system of a foundering Merrill Lynch, also saddled the bank with billions in losses and required an additional $20 billion from taxpayers on top of the $15 billion bailout it received in 2008. Bank of America officials and a lawyer for Lewis did not immediately respond to emails seeking comment. In a deposition taken on March 27 of this year, Lewis discussed the tumultuous period between the announcement of the merger in September 2008 and the shareholders’ vote on the deal on Dec. 5, 2008. The suit, filed on behalf of Bank of America shareholders, asserts that the bank’s executives misled them by not

and decision-making styles. Both are analytical introverts operating in a province of extroverts. “Neither is the epitome of the backslapping pol,” said Edward Rendell, a Democrat and former governor of Pennsylvania who knew Romney when he was governor of Massachusetts. “Both of them are almost shy, which is amazing in this business,” said Rendell, who is a supporter of Obama. Neither candidate has much stomach for small talk or idle chatter. They have both been called difficult to know and even aloof at times. But if they were to convene for, say, a chicken barbecue — not likely, but whatever — they could explore some shared affinities and experiences. Afterdinner, for instance, maybe over plates of pie (enjoyed by both), Obama and Romney could play the “did you know” game from their Harvard days or name-check the policy experts they consulted during their respective health care overhauls. They could compare counties visited in Iowa, activists fawned over in New Hamp-

shire and the irritations of dealing with blowhard colleagues in state government. They could exchange trivia about “Star Trek” (liked by both) or complaints about the press (disliked). Supporters admire them as confident and disciplined leaders. They are described as cautious and deliberate decisionmakers who distrust gut instinct and the emotional tenor of the modern political debate. In previous jobs, as governor of Massachusetts (Romney) and senator from Illinois (Obama), both were viewed as shorttimers passing through to headier stations. Each served one term in those posts, or less (in Obama’s case), and spent much of it plotting or actively running for the next. There is a restless quality to both Obama and Romney, people close to them say. They spent formative periods living abroad and attended several colleges before carving out political careers as above-it-all outsiders. They had their convictions questioned by ideological purists in their parties (and their religions, too, by others). Each suffered tough losses

in early campaigns that might have, in retrospect, been illadvised: Romney lost a 1994 Senate race in Massachusetts against the incumbent, Edward Kennedy; Obama was crushed in a 2000 Democratic congressional primary in Illinois by the incumbent, Bobby Rush. While each was the product of doting and strong mothers, the candidates forged their identities in part through the specters of their fathers — or the absence of one, in the case of Obama. “Someone once said that every man is trying to either live up to his father’s expectations or make up for his father’s mistakes,” Obama wrote in his 2006 book “The Audacity of Hope.” He has repeated the line often, sometimes adding that both might be true in his case. Clearly a “father’s expectations” guy, Romney idolized his father, George, an auto executive turned politician. He followed his father everywhere, worked tirelessly on his campaigns and placed his photo on his desk in his freshman dorm room.

disclosing Merrill’s mounting mortgage losses in proxy documents recommending approval of the deal. For example, the proxy statement estimated that the purchase of Merrill Lynch would reduce earnings only 3 percent in 2009, would not hurt the bank’s profits in 2010 and might actually add a bit to them. Lewis echoed this view at the meeting where shareholders voted on the deal. When asked whether the transaction would dilute Bank of America’s earnings in coming years or add to its income, he referred the questioner to the proxy statement. But in sworn testimony taken in the case, Lewis testified that by the time shareholders voted, the merger’s effect on Bank of America’s profit outlook had changed. According to the court filing, Lewis confirmed that the bank “expected the merger to be more than 13 percent dilutive in 2009 and 2.8 percent dilutive in 2010.” Asked by Steven Singer, a lawyer at Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossmann who represents the plaintiffs, whether the figures shareholders had received in the proxy state-

ment were no longer accurate on the date of the merger vote, Lewis said: “They were not those numbers, no.” Singer declined to comment on the filing. But the document submitted to the court said that Lewis’ “sworn admissions leave no genuine dispute that his statement at the December 5 shareholder meeting reiterating the bank’s prior accretion and dilution calculations was materially false when made.” Lewis himself is a defendant in the suit, as are Bank of America board members who recommended that shareholders approve the Merrill merger. Email messages uncovered in the litigation show that Merrill’s losses had severely damaged its financial position before the shareholder vote. Indeed, the court filing notes, by Nov. 26, the bank ordered Merrill to liquidate hundreds of billions of dollars in assets. These asset sales significantly reduced the combined companies’ future earnings power by at least $1 billion a year, Jeffrey Brown, the bank’s former treasurer, testified. On Dec. 3, two days before

the vote, Lewis met with top executives of the bank and the investment firm to assess Merrill’s fourth-quarter losses, the filing says. Both companies determined that the loss for the period would be $14 billion before tax, or $9 billion after tax. Shortly after the meeting, Brown urged Joe Price, Bank of America’s chief financial officer at the time, to disclose Merrill’s losses, given their size, the filing said. When Brown received resistance, he warned Price that the failure to disclose “could be a criminal offense, stating that he did not want to be ‘talking through a glass wall over a telephone’ if no disclosure was made,” the filing noted.

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend www.highdesertbank.com

Highlights: In 1919, Congress approved the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, guaranteeing citizens the right to vote regardless of their gender, and sent it to the states for ratification. In 1937, one of the first, if not the first, shopping carts was introduced by supermarket chain owner Sylvan Goldman in Oklahoma City. In 1942, the World War II Battle of Midway began, resulting in a decisive American victory against Japan and marking the turning point of the war in the Pacific. In 1990, Dr. Jack Kevorkian carried out his first publicly assisted suicide, helping Janet Adkins, a 54-year-old Alzheimer’s patient from Portland, end her life in Oakland County, Mich. Ten years ago: President George W. Bush said the CIA and FBI had failed to communicate adequately before the Sept. 11 terror attacks; Congress began closed-door hearings into intelligence lapses. Five years ago: Military judges dismissed charges against a Guantanamo detainee accused of chauffeuring Osama bin Laden and another who allegedly killed a U.S. soldier in Afghanistan. A panel of U.S. Roman Catholic bishops called for a zero-tolerance policy against priests who molest children in the future and a twostrikes-he’s-out policy for those guilty of past abuse. One year ago: China’s Li Na captured her first Grand Slam singles title, becoming the first tennis player from China, man or woman, to achieve such a feat; Na beat Francesca Schiavone 6-4, 7-6 (0) in the French Open final.

BIRTHDAYS Actor Bruce Dern is 76. Musician Roger Ball is 68. Actress-singer Michelle Phillips is 68. Actor Eddie Velez is 54. Actress Julie White is 51. Tennis player Andrea Jaeger is 47. Actress Angelina Jolie is 37. — From wire reports

for appointments call 541-382-4900

EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

S D A R G & S DAD

LE Sg A On Sale!!

Everythin

$

8999

CD Player w/Sub Control and iPod Hookup

2 10" Subs in box w/amp

541-728-0033 431 NW Franklin Ave. Downtown Bend Open Monday-Saturday

keypropertiesbend.com

$

19999

REDMOND 1538 SW Indian Ave.

541-923-1636

Automotive Electronics Specialist


MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A3

T S NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH SHOOTING

FLOTILLA FIT FOR A QUEEN

Zimmerman back in jail 2 days after bond pulled

Syria’s Assad denies role in massacres By Rima Marrouch and Patrick J. McDonnell

By Jennifer Kay

Los Angeles Times

The Associated Press

AMMAN, Jordan — A defiant Syrian President Bashar Assad offered no new initiatives Sunday to revive a faltering United Nations peace plan but instead assailed a “foreign conspiracy” stoking violence and denied his government had a role in “monstrous massacres” across the nation. “The truth is that even monsters do not do what we saw, especially in the Houla massacre,” Assad said, referring to the house-to-house executions last month of scores of civilians, mostly women and children, in the town of Houla. The killings in Houla sparked international repudiation of the Syrian government. U.N. officials said evidence pointed to pro-government death squads as the killers. But authorities in Syria blamed the slayings on foreign-backed “terrorists” seeking to frame Syrian security services and undermine the peace process. “The crisis is not internal,”

MIAMI — George Zimmerman, the former neighborhood watch volunteer charged with murder in the killing of Trayvon Martin, surrendered to police Sunday and was booked into a central Florida jail two days after his bond was revoked. Zimmerman’s legal team said in a tweet Sunday afternoon that he was in police custody. Circuit Judge Kenneth Lester revoked Zimmerman’s bond on Friday, saying the defendant and his wife had lied to the court in April about their finances so he could obtain a lower bond. About 40 minutes before the 2:30 p.m. Sunday deadline to surrender, the Seminole County jail website listed Zimmerman as an inmate. He was being held without bail and had $500 in his jail account, the website showed. Seminole County Sheriff Donald Eslinger said Zimmerman turned himself in to two sheriff’s office employees around 1:25 p.m. near the jail, and was then driven there. Zimmerman arrived in a white minivan and did not respond to questions from reporters as he walked inside, handcuffed and wearing blue jeans, sneakers and a buttondown shirt. “He is quiet and cooperative,” Eslinger said at a news conference after Zimmerman’s surrender. The sheriff’s office said the 28-year-old Zimmerman would be in a cell by himself, separated from the general population, because the case is so high-profile.

Peter Macdiarmid / The Associated Press

LONDON — A flotilla of 1,000 boats set off Sunday down the Thames in an extravagant royal pageant of a kind last seen hundreds of years ago. The pageant, the highlight of a four-day national holiday to celebrate the diamond jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II, right, was reported by the police to have drawn a million spectators. The flotilla was divided into 10 squadrons, many with bands, ensembles and orchestras playing as they moved downstream. One ensemble played Handel’s Water Music, and a band played the James Bond theme from the movie “Goldfinger” as the flotilla passed the Thames-side headquarters of Britain’s Secret Intelligence Service, MI6. — New York Times News Service

The Associated Press

JPMorgan executives said to ignore warning of risk New York Times News Service A small group of shareholder advocates delivered an urgent message to top executives at JPMorgan Chase more than a year ago: The bank’s risk controls needed to be improved. JPMorgan officials dis-

missed the warning from the CtW Investment Group, the advocates, who also cautioned bank officials that the company had fallen behind the risk-management practices of its peers. Now, after disclosing a $2 billion trading loss at JPMorgan in May and watching the

bank’s market value drop more than $25 billion, those officials are expected to follow one of the group’s recommendations, strengthening the board panel that oversees risk. Still, that will not address weaknesses that critics say undermined the power of the

bank’s chief risk officer. According to two former traders at the chief investment office and outside specialists, the chief risk officer was not focused on the huge credit market bets the chief investment office made that eventually went bad.

Cancer

women who were given two other drugs. Dozens of similar “smart bomb” drugs are in development. Pfizer Inc. plans to report today on one it is testing for certain types of lymphoma and leukemia. Only one such drug is on the market now — Adcetris, sold by Seattle Genetics Inc. for some less common types of lymphoma. The other big news at the conference involved a very different approach: using the immune system to fight cancer. For more than a century, doctors have been trying to harness its power, but tumor cells have cloaking mechanisms that have kept the immune system from recognizing them as “enemy” and going on the attack. Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. has developed two drugs — one aimed at cancer cells and the other at key soldier cells of the immune system — to remove one of these invisibility cloaks. Two studies involving nearly 500 people found some tumor shrinkage in up to one quarter of patients with lung and kidney cancers as well as the deadly skin cancer, melanoma. The treatments had less impact against colon and prostate cancer. These are only early results — not survival comparisons or definitive tests, doctors warn. More testing is needed to even establish safety. In one study, three patients died of a lung inflammation considered due to the treatment. However, ordinary chemo-

therapy can prove fatal, too, said one study leader, Dr. Julie Brahmer of Johns Hopkins University. “There were a few patients who had a complete remission” from the immune system treatments and most patients suffered few side effects, she said. “It’s great to see patients feeling well. They don’t have

hair loss, they don’t have a drop in blood counts and are not as prone to infections.” Dr. Roy Herbst, medical oncology chief at Yale Cancer Center in New Haven, Conn., was hopeful. “I haven’t seen anything this good” for many years for treating lung cancer, he said. “I’d be very surprised

Continued from A1 In fact, an emerging class of “smart bombs” was one of the most hopeful developments reported at the meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. These are two-punch weapons that combine substances called antibodies, which bond with specific cancer cells, and toxins that are too potent to be given by themselves. A chemical link holds them together until they attach to a tumor cell, releasing the poison inside it and killing the cell. “This is a classic example of the magic bullet concept” first proposed more than 100 years ago but only now possible with advances in technology, said Dr. Louis Weiner, director of Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. “The antibody basically targets this very toxic drug right to the cancer cell and places it inside the cancer cell where the drug can do its damage” without harming healthy cells nearby, he said. On Sunday, a large study showed that one such drug — Genentech’s T-DM1 — delayed the time until cancer got worse in women with very advanced breast cancer. The drug also seems to be improving survival, although it will take more time to know for sure. So far, women on the new treatment were living more than a year longer than a comparison group of

Nigerian plane crashes, killing all 153 on board By Jon Gambrell

Dylan Martinez / The Associated Press

Assad declared, repeating his government’s long-term assertion that foreign powers are behind the nearly 15-month-long uprising. “Rather, it is a foreign war with internal tools.” The Syrian opposition says it is an indigenous movement, though rebel leaders have called on other nations to provide funding and arms to help oust Assad. The president’s nationally televised address before Syria’s newly elected parliament seemed aimed mostly at a domestic audience. He appeared to be preparing Syrians for more hardships after months of violence and withering economic sanctions have battered and traumatized the population. “We are facing a real war from outside,” Assad told the Syrian people. “Everyone is responsible for defending the homeland.” Assad, whose family has ruled Syria for more than 40 years, mocked opposition calls for democracy, declaring: “This democracy that they talked about is soaked with our blood.”

LAGOS, Nigeria — A commercial airliner crashed into a densely populated neighborhood in Nigeria’s largest city on Sunday, killing all 153 people on board and others on the ground in the worst air disaster in nearly two decades for the troubled nation. The cause of the Dana Air crash remained unknown Sunday night, as firefighters and police struggled to put out the flames around the wreckage of the Boeing MD83 aircraft. Authorities could not control the crowd of thousands gathered around to see the crash site, with some crawling over the

if there wasn’t some benefit” on survival, said Herbst, who has consulted for the drug’s maker.

plane’s broken wings and standing on a still-smoldering landing gear. Harold Demuren, the director-general of Nigeria’s Civil Aviation Authority, said all on board the flight were killed in the crash. Lagos state government said in a statement that 153 people were on the flight traveling from Nigeria’s central capital of Abuja to Lagos in the nation’s southwest. The flight’s pilots radioed to the Lagos control tower just before the crash, saying the plane had engine trouble, a military official said. The official spoke on condition of anonymity as he was not authorized to speak to journalists.

7:30 AM - 5:30 PM MON-FRI 8 AM - 3 PM SAT. 541-382-4171 541-548-7707

856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com

2121 NE Division Bend

641 NW Fir Redmond

www.denfeldpaints.com

Highway Closes June 4-8


THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

Pronghorn Continued from A1 “We’re not out to make a profit, but we are out to cover our losses,” Buckley said. Buckley said this is not common for the state. “The loan program has been in existence for well over 30 years,” he said. “We’ve done … around 848 loans and less than 10 defaults in that.” The state’s small-scale energy loan program is self-sustaining

through the loan repayments. Buckley said it’s not odd that the state gave a luxury resort a low-interest loan. “Yes, we provided a loan to this luxury golf course,” he said. “But it was a loan on an energy project; it was not meant to benefit only the golf course but the community as a whole.” Paying off the state is not the new Pronghorn owner’s only concern. Pronghorn also owes about $3.2 million in property taxes, $600,000 of

which is interest, according to Koss. He said resort officials are working with the county toward paying off the taxes. The properties, two golf courses, the clubhouse and dozens of unsold lots for single homes, have four years’ worth of unpaid property taxes. “We’ve been working with the county to work toward paying them off,” Koss said. “It doesn’t happen overnight.” — Reporter: 541-554-1162, ldake@bendbulletin.com

Roadwork Bond roadwork road worktotobegin begin Three roundabouts will be constructed this year, the first projects funded under a $30 million bond approved by Bend voters in May 2011. Empire Boulevard; Cost: $3 million

SCHEDULED TO BEGIN NEXT YEAR

18th St.

•4 Reconstruct 27th Street from Butler Market Road to Conners Road; Cost: $1 million •5 Road and pedestrian improvements on 14th Street from Simpson Avenue to Galveston

* The 14th Street project is planned only if enough funds are left over.

Empire Ave. 97 20

r tle Bu

Revere Ave. Newport Ave.

s Wa M t.

BUS 97

Wilson Ave. Reed Market Rd.

k Broo

4

Conners Rd. Penn Ave. Neff Rd.

Bear Creek Rd.

Reed Market Rd. 6

Powers Rd.

2

Murphy Rd. 15th St.

1

d. tR

Greenwood Ave. Franklin Ave. 20

5

Simpson Ave.

rke Ma

15th St.

Galveston Ave.

3

27th St.

•1 Roundabout at Simpson Avenue and Mt. Washington Boulevard; Cost: $3 million •2 Roundabout at Brookswood Boulevard and Powers Road; Cost: $3 million •3 Multilane roundabout at 18th Street and

Avenue; Cost: $4.5 million* 6 • Reconstruct Reed Market Road from Third Street to 27th Street, including a multilane roundabout at 15th Street and a bridge; Cost: $18.3 million Total cost: $32.8 million

27th St.

SCHEDULED TO BEGIN IN JUNE AND JULY

Ninth St.

Continued from A1 Between today and Friday, crews will be in the area doing “leveling,” said Bend Streets Manager Hardy Hanson — a combination of grinding down high spots and filling in low spots. Hanson said the road will “look terrible; it’ll look patchwork,” until next spring, when crews return to lay down a fresh layer of asphalt. The Brookswood project is one of several ongoing maintenance projects not funded under the bond the city has scheduled for this summer. Hanson said the precise scheduling of the projects has not been determined, and crews will move from one project to another as they are completed and as weather allows. Additional grinding and leveling is scheduled this summer on Empire between Purcell Boulevard and 18th, and a “grind and inlay,” which grinds up the damaged road surface to create new asphalt, is planned on Neff Road between 27th Street and Pilot Butte Middle School. Crews will be chipsealing a section of Mt. Washington Drive between Chandler Avenue and the roundabout at Mt. Washington and Century Drive. As part of the same project, chipsealing will continue from the roundabout down Reed Market Road all the way to the Bend Parkway. Chipsealing is also scheduled on 15th Street between Reed Market Road and Bear Creek Road, and on Butler Market Road between 8th Street and 27th Street. Hanson said the chipsealing should cause only minimal interruption for drivers, with the Reed Market Road project requiring only two or three days. The city streets scheduled for repairs this summer are not necessarily just those in

14th St.

that started college in 2004, put the university’s rate at 49.7 percent.) Students arrive in Madison expecting to finish in four years, and 83 percent finish by year six. The “professional student,” who stays indefinitely to savor campus life and party on State Street, is all but extinct. “I don’t really know anyone who’s just hanging out, eight years later, and dabbling in classes,” said Madeline Sivanich, 20, a Wisconsin sophomore from Minnesota. Why, then, the lackluster four-year graduation rate? Students and administrators cite a tangle of academic and social factors, common to most of the nation’s flagships. First, most Wisconsin students don’t take enough classes to finish in four years. The average student amasses 14 credit hours per semester, too few to attain the required 120 in four years. University leaders say the key problem is work. By senior year, most students hold on- or off-campus jobs. Second, some academic programs, including majors in engineering and education, are designed to take five years. Although the American college is built on a four-year model, some programs stretch four years into five. Third, budget cuts have led to academic bottlenecks: crushing demand for introductory courses that are graduation requirements for large numbers of students. “What you hear every single semester is the frustration from kids. Courses fill up,” said Robert Schlaeger, 22, a senior from Milwaukee who is graduating on time.

sw oo dB lvd.

Continued from A1 He thought about pre-med, but washed out after seeing his first biology grades. Now he is studying history and English, writing for the campus newspaper and driving a truck in the summer. He’ll return in the fall for a fifth year. “I’m gonna go watch all my friends graduate,” said Korger, 21, of Oshkosh, Wis. “And if they’re still in the state, I hope they’ll all come watch me graduate.” Colleges are mobilizing on the issue for several reasons. Public tuition and fees have doubled since the mid-1990s, in inflation-adjusted dollars, to an average $8,244. President Barack Obama has set a goal for the nation to regain the world lead in college attainment by 2020. The economic downturn has pushed state lawmakers to target perceived collegiate “slackers” and the tax dollars that subsidize their education. This year, the University of Texas at Austin announced a push to raise its on-time graduation rate to 70 percent by 2016, from the current 53 percent. UT President Bill Powers said the goal is “ambitious but attainable.” “The state pays an average of $7,563 for every student, every year,” said Texas state Sen. Florence Shapiro, a Republican. Each dawdling student, she said, “prevents another student from coming in and starting that process.” Indiana University will offer discounted courses this summer to encourage on-time graduation. The University at Buffalo in New York unveiled

an on-time graduation pledge, hoping to raise its rate from about 45 to 60 percent. Half the incoming class has signed it. University leaders are pressing four-year graduation as a goal from the day freshmen arrive on campus. Public institutions largely avoided class-year “branding” in the past, partly to avoid shaming students who could not finish on time, and partly because on-time graduation was not the norm. At the University of Minnesota convocation last fall, each student was given an envelope containing a “2015” tassel. President Eric Kaler told the freshmen, “Hang it where you will see it every day — in your room, on your laptop, on your roommate’s nose — as a reminder that graduating in four years is your goal.” Other schools are working the four-year theme into recruiting events, as a selling point to the cost-conscious. “The easiest way for me to get a round of applause is to say we expect the students to graduate in four years,” said Michael Amiridis, provost of the University of South Carolina. “And it’s not the students who applaud. It’s the parents.” In Madison, administrators say they introduced the class year concept to 2010 freshmen and identified the Class of 2014 in a #uw2014 hash tag on Twitter. “That language was never part of our culture,” said Jocelyn Milner, an associate provost at Wisconsin. Internal data show the university’s four-year completion rate has risen from 47 percent in 2005 to 56 percent in 2011. (The new federal data, which tracked a cohort of students

Blv d.

Universities

hin gton

A4

97

Ch in aH

Source: City of Bend

the worst condition, Hanson said, noting that traffic volumes and other considerations factor into the decision of which streets will be fixed when. Hanson said that in some cases, streets have become so badly damaged through years of neglect — such as portions of Northeast 15th Street — that

at

Rd .

. Rd ott n K

MILES 0

1/2

they’re likely to be replaced entirely once the city can find the money to do so. “It’s just throwing money away,” he said. “We can fix them for a couple of years, but in a couple more years we’d just be chasing our tails.” — Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

1

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin


MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Have you noticed a change in your ability to remember? “The more hearing loss you have, the greater the likelihood of developing dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. Hearing aids could delay or prevent dementia by improving the patients’s hearing. – 2011 Study by John Hopkins University School of Medicine and the National Institute on Aging

EDIT ON APPROVED CR

Expires 6/13/12.

Expires 6/13/12.

HURRY! OFFER EXPIRES 6/13/12

Call now for your appointment Shanelle Vega, AAS Hearing Aid Specialist, Owner

Bend River Promenade 3188 N Hwy. 97, Suite 118 next door to T.J. Maxx

(541) 389-3381

•Risk Free Offer-the aids must be returned in satisfactory condition within 45 days of the completion of fittings. If you are not completely satisfied 100% of your purchase price will be refunded. **Hearing tests are always free. Hearing test is an audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only. Hearing aids do not restore natural hearing. Individual experiences vary depending on severity of loss, accuracy of evaluation, proper fit and ability to adapt to amplification.

A5


A6

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

E L A S S G TA LY R A E

MONDAY

CL TED S O P ACH E IN LE!! C I VEH

YOUR LOCAL FORD STORE.

SALE STARTS TODAY! PRICES GOOD THRU SATURDAY! NE

W

2012 FORD FUSION SEL

NE

W

2012 FORD EXPLORER XLT 4X4

NE

W

2012 FORD F150 SUPER CREW 4X4 XLT

RETAIL TRADE-IN ASSISTANCE BONUS CUSTOMER CASH $750! 1995 OR NEWER TRADE-IN

LOADED SEL ~ Automatic ~ Leather Interior ~ Moonroof

LOADED XLT ~ Sony Sound System - 12 Speakers

Stk.#12049 VIN:294964 RECEIVE AN ADDITIONAL $750 CASH TRADE IN CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE BONUS* *1995 or Newer Trade-In

MSRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,330 WRIGHT FORD DISCOUNT .- $1,831 $27,499 RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH . -$1,500

RECEIVE AN ADDITIONAL $750 CASH TRADE IN CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE BONUS* *1995 or Newer Trade-In

~ Navigation ~ Comfort Package ~ Trailer Tow Package

~ Automatic ~ Trailer Tow Package ~ Off-Road Package ~ Sync Voice Activation System ~ Power Heated Mirrors

$

25,999

~ Power Driver Seat ~ Power Sliding Rear Window ~ Reverse Sensing System ~ XLT Chrome Package ~ Chrome Step Bar

Stk.# T2036 VIN: A06029

MSRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $38,970 WRIGHT FORD DISCOUNT . .- $1,971 $36,999 RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH . . -$1,000

RECEIVE AN ADDITIONAL $750 CASH TRADE IN CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE BONUS* *1995 or Newer Trade-In

MSRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $41,700 WRIGHT FORD DISCOUNT . .- $3,211 $38,499 XLT RETAIL BONUS CASH. .- $1,000 RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH . .- $1,500

MONDAY MARK-DOWN

MONDAY MARK-DOWN

MONDAY MARK-DOWN

$

LOADED XLT

~ 6-Speed Automatic ~ Leather Seats ~ Rear View Camera ~ Dual Zone Auto A/C Stk.# 12023 VIN: A56927

$

35,999

35,999

GREAT SELECTION USED FORD ESCAPES STARTING AT STK#P1763 VIN:77852

13,999

$

1998 Saturn SW2

1992 Dodge Dakota 4x4

2000 Toyota Camry Solara SE

1995 Dodge Ram 1500 ST 4x4

2006 Ford Freestar SE

2007 Dodge Caliber SXT

Mark Down Monday $

Mark Down Monday $

Mark Down Monday $

Mark Down Monday $

Mark Down Monday $

Mark Down Monday $

STK#P1892B, VIN:209788

STK#11087B, VIN:525287

STK#T2046A, VIN:373209

STK#P1942M, VIN:106218

STK# P1942A, VIN:A66548

STK#P1681B, VIN:340612

2003 Ford F150 XLT 4x4

2010 Chevrolet Cobalt LT

2009 Ford Focus SE

2007 Jeep

2004 Mazda

2007 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS

3,999

4,999

6,999

6,999

7,999

Liberty Sport 4x4 B4000 Cab Plus 4x4

9,999

3rd Row Seat

Mark Down Monday $

Mark Down Monday $

Mark Down Monday $

Mark Down Monday $

Mark Down Monday $

Mark Down Monday $

STK#12050A, VIN:A20120

STK#P1917, VIN:164425

STK#P1865, VIN:257116

STK#P1883, VIN:707293

STK#P1925A, VIN:M05784

STK#P1940, VIN:029657

2010 Hyundai Sonata GLS

2006 Nissan Titan SE 4x4

2011 Ford Fusion SEL

2011 Nissan Rogue S AWD

2011 Ford Fusion SEL

2010 Ford Transit Connect XL

Mark Down Monday $

Mark Down Monday $

Mark Down Monday $

Mark Down Monday $

Moonroof, Leather STK#12016A, VIN:274520

STK#P1936, VIN:011187

12,999

12,999

12,999

12,999

Leather, V-6

Mark Down Monday $

Mark Down Monday $

STK#P1949, VIN:658938

STK#12028A, VIN:532091

15,999

16,999

2005 Ford F250 2008 Ford Lariat Super Duty 4x4 Edge Limited AWD

18,999

V6, Leather STK#P1856, VIN:115787

19,999

STK#P1941, VIN:674594

19,999

19,999

2006 Ford F150 King Ranch 4x4

2011 Ford F150 4x4

2010 Ford F250 XLT 4x4

Mark Down Monday $

Mark Down Monday $

STK#P1948, VIN:D73813

STK#12052A, VIN:A51683

Mark Down Monday $

Mark Down Monday $

Mark Down Monday $

STK#T1009B, VIN:A64838

STK#11090A, VIN:A07336

STK#11066A, VIN:649038

STK#11098A, VIN:C68567

21,999

Leather, Moonroof, Only 5710 Miles!

15,999

2009 Toyota Tacoma 4x4

Mark Down Monday $

19,999

12,999

23,999

26,999

29,999

32,999

REDMOND 541-548-2138 • 1835 S. HWY 97 WWW.WRIGHTFORDINC.COM Art for illustration purposes only. All prices shown before License, Title & Doc fees. On approval of credit. Expires 6/10/12.


LOCALNEWS

Reader photo, B2 Editorials, B4

B

Obituaries, B5 Weather, B6

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

LILY RAFF MCCAULOU

Staving off stress is key for locals

B

efore he was executive director of the Central Oregon Community College Foundation, Jim Weaver worked for the Heart Institute of Spokane, where he espoused three habits for keeping one’s ticker healthy. The first two are familiar. In fact, we’ve all heard them countless times, usually accompanied by a finger wag: Get regular exercise and eat a nutritious diet. Weaver’s third tip might surprise you: “Take a few minutes each day for quiet contemplation,” he says. He does this religiously, every morning. It isn’t meditation, exactly. He sits quietly and, instead of clearing his mind, lets thoughts come and go naturally. Weaver says his reasoning is best expressed by a quote by Lao Tse, a Taoist philosopher: Muddy water, let stand, becomes clear. The simple practice, he says, helps reduce stress in his life. It may not be an obvious approach, but it isn’t a secret, either. It turns out several local professionals with high-stress jobs employ similar techniques for coping with stress. Bend’s city manager, Eric King, starts his daily work schedule with what he calls his “morning power hour,” from 8 to 9. He uses this time to set priorities for the rest of his day. “I look at the meetings I have scheduled and try to discern, ‘What do I want to accomplish this day?’ It just helps to kind of center me,” King says, “so that I’m a little bit more focused.” King heard about this strategy a couple of years ago, at a leadership conference. Without this practice, “it’s so easy to play that Whac-A-Mole game, and just spend the day putting out fire after fire,” King says. When he doesn’t fit in a morning power hour, King says, “those are the days where I just, like, come home and I’m staring at a wall.” Gene Kranz, a psychologist at St. Charles Bend, says that “stress is a psychological and physical response of the body that occurs whenever we have to adapt to changing conditions.” All of us have stress in our lives. “Being a human, you’re going to experience stress,” Kranz says. “It can be very functional, it can motivate you to take care of things and do things.” Stress can also be crippling. Overwhelming amounts of stress can cause anxiety, depression, lower back pain, tension in the jaw, headaches and irritable bowel syndrome, Kranz says. To Kranz, Weaver’s method of quiet contemplation makes sense. “He’s kind of priming himself for the day, “ he says, “increasing his bandwidth so he can face challenges a bit more easily.” Kranz recommends taking a few minutes at the beginning and end of each day to quietly “observe one thing, inside yourself or outside.” With practice, this can be a handy mechanism for coping with stress. For Dr. Michael Feldman, a nephrologist at Bend Memorial Clinic, stress is an accepted part of his identity as a doctor. “I never leave work at work,” he says. Feldman’s most complicated case involved a woman dying of lupus. “I didn’t leave the hospital for 45 days,” he says. “We dragged her through it, and I still keep in touch with her today.” Feldman says he doesn’t consider himself an introspective person, but he, too, practices his own version of “quiet contemplation.” Each morning, Feldman looks at his schedule and notes the most challenging cases. Then he redoubles his efforts to give those patients his utmost attention and patience. Ultimately, this makes him feel less stressed. “Look,” he says, “the worst thing you want to do is feel like, at the end of the day, you didn’t do the right thing because it wasn’t fun.” — Lily Raff McCaulou is a columnist for The Bulletin. 541-617-7836, lraff@bendbulletin.com

www.bendbulletin.com/local

SISTERS SCHOOL DISTRICT

LOCAL BRIEFING

Budget plan cuts 6 teachers

Area can expect a wet week

By Ben Botkin

If you go

The Bulletin

The Sisters School District might have a teaching staff in the next school year that is 8.6 percent smaller. As part of efforts to bridge a $1.3 million gap between revenues and costs anticipated in the next budget, the district plans to lay off certified educators. Those cuts would trim the equivalent of 6.2 full-time certified teaching jobs for the upcoming school year, Superintendent Jim Golden said. For the small district with about 1,200 students and a staff of 72 teachers, those cuts won’t go unnoticed. “It’s heartbreaking,” Golden said. Among the proposed layoffs: a physical education teacher, a business teach-

What: Sisters School District budget presentation When: Tuesday, 5 to 7 p.m. Where: Sisters High School, Lecture Drama Room

er and an English teacher. A part-time drama teaching job and part-time film teaching job at the high school are also on the list. A full-time counselor and part-time counselor would also be cut. “The high school was hit hardest because the high school in our growth years did a brilliant job of staffing up and creating a wide array of electives,”

Golden said. In a letter to parents, the district invited the community to a meeting scheduled for Tuesday in which Golden will give a presentation explaining the decisions and answer questions. Besides trimming staff, the budget proposal also calls for cutting five days from the school calender and dipping into reserves. The school board is scheduled to vote on the proposed budget Wednesday evening. The fiscal year for the new budget starts July 1. “We have just completed some very difficult cost-cutting decisions in the form of painful layoffs and other cuts for the next school year,” Golden wrote in the letter. See Sisters / B2

Keeping up with the pack • Furry athletes flock to Prineville to compete in national agility trials By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

PRINEVILLE — A nationally licensed dog agility trial is absolutely a competition. There is a physical aspect — for both owner and canine alike — hours of training, and an equal amount of thoughtful preparation. Even a bit of strategy comes into play when deciding how best to run an obstacle course. But if you ever meet the owner of an agility dog, and talk with them about their quick and nimble pooch, you’ll find that there is much more to it than winning a race. “Agility (competition) is really about the bond between the handler and the dog,” said Barb Brandt, club president of Bend Agility Action Dogs. “The dogs have to have a love for it, obviously, but they also have to trust us. That’s a big part of it.” Sunday was the final day of a weekend agility event licensed by the United States Dog Agility Association, which brought more than 100 dogs and their owners to the Crook County Fairgrounds. The dogs make jumps, run tunnels and bound through slaloms for the best times. See Agility trials / B2

2 still in hospital after collision

“It’s a game of strategy. But (my dog) knows what he’s doing. And he’s out here having a good time.”

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Cheri Kanaan, of Beaverton, runs through the steeplechase course with her Australian shepherd, Skor, during the United States Dog Agility Association-licensed agility trials at the Crook County Fairgrounds in Prineville on Sunday.

— Barb Brandt, president, Bend Agility Action Dogs

May 2012 weather for Bend DAILY HIGHS AND LOWS Average temperature: 49.7° (0.7° below normal) DAY

1

HI 59

2

3

4

5

6

57

56

57

53

61

7

8

62 73

Central Oregonians should plan for cool, wet weather this week, as forecasters from the National Weather Service say it is likely to rain sporadically over the next seven days. “It’s going to be real showery,” said Rob Brooks, a forecaster with the weather service office in Pendleton. “It’s going to be a wet, unInside settled pat• Detailed tern we’re 5-day in through forecast, the weekB6 end. You can just see (from weather maps) the water and the activity trailing from way out past San Francisco ... and just driving directly toward Oregon and Washington.” Today is likely to see the hardest showers, with a 90 percent chance of precipitation throughout the day. There is a slight chance of thunderstorms across Central Oregon in the morning. Today’s temperatures should reach the high 50s, with evening lows in the high 30s. Tuesday should be mostly cloudy, with a 50 percent chance of rain. Highs are likely to sit in the low 50s, with lows in the low 30s. Evening winds are also expected. Wednesday through Friday should see highs in the high 50s to the 60s, and lows in the 30s. Clouds are expected to cover the sky throughout the three-day span, with a slight chance of rain. The weekend should see much of the same, with highs in the 60s, lows in the 30s and a chance of rain.

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

79

58

58

73

83

83 82

83

73

63

67 77

76

65

58 58

48

57

62

67

67

70

77

H

H

H

One of the drivers involved in a head-on collision Saturday morning has been upgraded to fair condition, a hospital supervisor said. David O’Conner, 47, of Bend, was originally listed in serious condition after being hospitalized at St. Charles Bend. The other driver, Vanessa Maddox, 20, of Bend, remained in fair condition Sunday. Police said Maddox was driving east on U.S. Highway 20 when her 2009 Chevrolet Aveo drifted into the westbound lane near milepost 8. The Chevrolet collided with a 1995 Toyota Camry driven by O’Conner. — Bulletin staff reports

80

STATE NEWS 60

40 FREEZING

20 LO 29

27

27

36

24

26

24 24

41

L 23

L 23

28

38

L 23 44

44

42

30

30 48

32

44

32 35

36

36

37

35

32

PRECIPITATION TOTAL: 1.03” Historical average precipitation for the month: .98” INCH

.13

.05

39

T

T

.51

.34

Historical average snow for the month: 0.2”

T = Trace

INCH

ALMANAC Highest temperature Highest recorded temperature Highest for therecorded month:

maximum for the month 93° on May 23, 2001

83°

Lowest temperature

23°

Average high

66.5°

Average low

Lowest recorded temperature for the month:

Monthly average high temperature through the years:

Monthly average low temperature through the years:

13°

65.5°

35.4°

on May 1, 1954

* Monthly averages calculated from 1928 through 2005, Western Regional Climate Center Sources: NOAA, Western Regional Climate Center, Bend Public Works Department

Medford

• • Ashland

T = Trace T

SNOW TOTAL: 0

33

33°

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

• Oregon: Banks in the state are sporting healthy outlooks. • Ashland: Medford woman finds energy in singing and penny slots. • Medford: ODFW formulating new rules for salmon anglers on the Rogue River. • Ashland: Brewery listed among Top 5 greenest businesses in the state. Stories on B3, B5


B2

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

Sisters Continued from B1 The district’s budget challenges come from a combination of factors, including reduced enrollment and higher operating costs, such as those for the state’s Public Employees Retirement System. “The good news is we have been able to keep most of what makes Sisters special,” Golden wrote, such as small class sizes and preservation of arts and music programs in all schools. The proposed cuts will impact the programs in which the

Agility trials Continued from B1 Owners meticulously walk courses before each event, looking for the best path by which to achieve the best score on obstacles that graduate in difficulty and points. “It’s a game of strategy,” said Brandt, who says her 6-yearold border collie, Dillon, isn’t the fastest pup in the event he is about to race. “But he knows what he’s doing. And he’s out here having a good time.” Brandt said her four dogs are “pets first” and she wouldn’t do this if they weren’t having a good time. And it’s clear, as the dogs jump around and pant wildly after a run, that most competing are enjoying the workout. They’re not the only ones. Take a look at Sally Hildt, 60, of Seattle. She said she lost 60 pounds two years ago because of Em, her 4-year-old Shetland sheepdog. “I lost it because of her,” Hildt said, holding her dog in her lap. “I have to keep up with my dog. I owe her that. I ask her to do this sport and I need to keep up. She is the wind beneath my wings.” Sandy Schneider, a Tumalo

educators teach, such as business, drama and film. Golden stressed that the district doesn’t want to see the classes simply go away. Instead, he said, it will look for ways to offer those classes through community partnerships with organizations like Central Oregon Community College and Sisters Parks and Recreation. “This gets us to next year,” he said. “Then, hopefully, we’ll see enrollment increase and hopefully we’ll see our economy turn around a bit more.”

Well shot! READER PHOTOS Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication. Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

— Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

resident and BAAD member, said she loves hearing comments like that. A few years back, Schneider was told that her Shetland sheepdog, Typhoon, would never do agility trials again. “I was told he was too crippled,” Schneider said. “So I went off to a massage school in Colorado.” Schneider now gives Typhoon a massage regimen and acupuncture treatments. On Sunday, Typhoon was bounding about the course with that happy-dog look. “You can give up on the dog,” Schneider said, “or you can believe it has something to teach you. He has taught me.” For many, it isn’t about the results. It’s about the journey. Still, Brandt was going for her third “top 10 percent” finish with Dillon. Brandt and Dillon came up short. “I kind of changed my mind (on which course to take) when I got up there to go,” Brandt said. “That kind of messed me up. But it’s okay. The next chance to get a top (finish) will be in Vancouver (Wash.) in August.”

LICHEN LANDSCAPE Joan Smith Anable, of Bend, snapped this photo of a rock east of Bend using a Nikon CoolPix P500 on the macro setting.

P O

— Reporter: 541-617-7837, ehidle@bendbulletin.com

For The Bulletin’s full list, including federal, state, county and city levels, visit www.bendbulletin.com/officials. Phone: 202-225-6730 Web: http://walden.house.gov/

CONGRESS

Email: superintendent.castillo @state.or.us Web: www.ode.state.or.us

U.S. Senate

STATE OF OREGON Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore.: 107 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-3753 Web: http://merkley.senate.gov Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. 223 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-5244 Web: http://wyden.senate.gov U.S. House of Representatives Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Sue Eastman, of Renton, Wash., directs her border collie, Jack, over a jump while competing during the United States Dog Agility Association-licensed event on Sunday at the Crook County Fairgrounds in Prineville.

Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River 2182 Rayburn House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515

Treasurer Ted Wheeler, Democrat 159 Oregon State Capitol 900 Court St. N.E. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4329 Email: oregon.treasurer @state.or.us Web: www.ost.state.or.us

Gov. John Kitzhaber, Democrat 160 State Capitol, 900 Court St. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4582 Fax: 503-378-6872 Web: http://governor.oregon.gov Secretary of State Kate Brown, Democrat 136 State Capitol Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1616 Fax: 503-986-1616 Email: oregon.sos@state.or.us

Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian 800 N.E. Oregon St., Suite 1045 Portland, OR 97232 Phone: 971-673-0761 Fax: 971-673-0762 Email: boli.mail@state.or.us Web: www.oregon.gov/boli

Attorney General John Kroger, Democrat 1162 Court St. N.E. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4400 Fax: 503-378-4017 QUEEN Sets Pillowtop or Plush

Superintendent of Public Instruction Susan Castillo 255 Capitol Street N.E. Salem, Oregon 97310 Phone: 503-947-5600 Fax: 503-378-5156

$ from

299

541- 678 - REST (7378)

A Collection of Bend’s Best Restaurants

! e c a l P e n O All in

Mongolian Grill - Seafood - Sushi - Salad - Dessert Buy One Entree, Get the Second for 1/2 off

ALL YOU CAN EAT!

*off equal or lesser value, not valid on 2 for $20

There’s No Place Like The Neighborhood™

CHINESE • AMERICAN • JAPANESE

5.99

Dinner Buy 1, Get 1 Buffet FREE!

With coupon. Expires 7/15/12. (not valid on June 17) Coupon can be used with up to 4 people. Monday - Friday only.

REG. $11.99. Mon.-Sat. after 4pm. Sunday all day. With purchase of 2 beverages. With coupon. Expires 7/15/12. (not valid on June 17)

Lunch $ Buffet

Web: www.doj.state.or.us

$

5

BURGER NIGHT Sun & Mon

FREE KIDS MEAL!!

5pm-Close Coupon Expires 6/11/12

NO MSG

2000 NE 3rd • Bend (behind NE 3rd McDonalds) • (541) 388-2988

One Free Kids Meal, per Adult Entree with this coupon.

Available only at Bend and Redmond locations.

Bend 541-318-5720 • Redmond 541-923-4777

NOW ! OPEN

ALL DAY

SPECIAL

$

$

5

00

5

95* and…

…We have a Great Lunch Buffet and Dinner Buffet

Any Regular Sandwich, Chips & Regular Drink. Exp. 6/15/12

2115 NE HWY 20 • BEND • 541-678-5699

To advertise in this space, Call Angie Kooistra at 541-617-7834

*Offer expires June 30, 2012


MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

B3

O N State banking outlook healthy after recession

SOUTHERN OREGON

By Brent Hunsberger The Oregonian

Jamie Lusch / Ashland Daily Tidings

Peggy Rose, 86, plays video poker at Lava Lanes in Medford. Rose sings jazz and hosts a Singers Showcase at the Wild Goose Cafe and Bar on Monday nights in Ashland.

Octogenarian finds energy on the stage, in penny slots By Janet Eastman Ashland Daily Tidings

ASHLAND — When Peggy Rose was born, a few pennies could buy a loaf of bread, a half-gallon of gas or a ticket to a movie matinee. The elegant 86-year-old, however, has stretched a few pennies into a lifelong singing career and a small-time gambling habit that she proudly calls her only vice. “Pennies from Heaven” is her signature opener when she performs on Monday nights to adoring crowds at the Wild Goose Cafe and Bar in Ashland. On Friday afternoons, she’s at Lava Lanes in Medford with her son, Michael Robertson, playing the penny slots. Every time it rains, it rains pennies from heaven. On Friday morning, Rose was inside her Medford home, singing softly but with the swing of a seasoned jazz performer. Her tiger-striped, dangling earrings swayed in rhythm with her voice. “Don’tcha know each cloud contains pennies from heaven?” She smiles, considers the link between the joy she gets from pacing those lyrics and from playing the slots. She confesses that she can string out her $10 betting budget for hours and has only lost it completely twice in her life. Then she sings again: “You’ll find your fortune fallin’ all over town. Be sure that your umbrella is ...” She pauses, then stretches out the ending: “Up ... Side ... Down.” Appreciating her good fortune, she says: “Look at me. I’m 86. I can walk, talk, sing and swing. To me, that’s everything.” She is nestled in a cushy recliner with a pink afghan blanket draped behind her, but she rises every few minutes to demonstrate the way she sings a song. Her fingers snap with the beat, her body moves side to side, her blue eyes are bright. “I’m a big blob of swing,” she says. The self-taught singer has

“She’s like a force of nature. When she starts singing, the band swings twice as hard and she has the crowd in her hand. She’s a born entertainer and a born singer.” — Dal Carver, owner, Wild Goose Cafe and Bar

been performing jazz standards in large and small venues across the United States since World War II. She usually auditioned by singing “Pennies from Heaven” because it quickly showed that she was an allaround singer who could pull off jazz, ballad, folk, you name it. But she prefers swing and she says, “to me, jazz swings more than other types of music.” She stands up for emphasis. “With jazz, there’s an extra you have to give.” Her late husband, Ron Robertson, was an accomplished drummer who performed with Spike Jones and Louis Prima. After the couple moved to Ashland in 2003, they found swing soulmates at the Wild Goose, especially with owner Dal Carver. About five years ago, Carver launched the Singers Showcase Hosted By Peggy Rose, now a Monday night open-mic tradition in which a trio plays live for a stream of singers. Rose begins the show at 7:30 p.m. and usually ends it around 10 p.m. or so. “She’s a terrific singer,” says Carver, who plays piano in the Singers Showcase Trio with Mike O’Malley on drums and Dave Miller on bass. “She’s like a force of nature. When she starts singing, the band swings twice as hard and she has the crowd in her hand. She’s a born entertainer and a born singer.” He adds that she doesn’t have a big voice or an impressive range, “she just knows how

to make music.” When Rose first heard Carver would be her piano player, she said she was nervous. But all tension was broken at the first chord. “He’s a swinger, too,” she says. “I enjoy every minute I’ve been at the Wild Goose.” She says that some musicians can play the notes, but they just don’t evoke the right feel. “If you’re stuck with that, it’s hard to get through it,” she says. But Carver plays “muy primo,” she says, and she feels grateful for others she has met over her career who also have that talent. “Most of the time, musicians swing their butts off,” says the attractive octogenarian who peppers her remarks with mild profanities. But she does recall a tiny club in the mountains somewhere where she heard the piano player pounding out her intro. She stands again and uses her voice to imitate the sound. She remembers she stopped him from playing by saying to him, “Honey, I have to have a beat.” She has always been energetic, she says, and has endured a few physical ailments, but she can’t remember them specifically. “Oh damn it,” she says. “The only thing I can say bad about being 86 is my memory is shot.” Says son Robertson, 46, of Jacksonville, the youngest of her six children: “She’s open. She’s passionate. She’s a people person. It takes us an extra 20 minutes to leave a restaurant because she’ll talk to everyone.” She explains her crowdpleasing performances: “It’s just inside of me. I can feel what the audience is waiting for.” Her advice to beginning singers: “There are so many ways to start out, but if your joy is taking a melody and interpreting the words in a certain type of music, sooner or later, you will run into people who like what you do.” She pauses. “If you really love it, stick to it.”

As the financial crisis started its spiral four years ago, Oregon’s banking industry found itself in the vortex. Loans withered, customers moved deposits and lawmakers clamped down on excessive fees. Today, the state’s banking landscape has certainly been altered. But the most surprising thing might be how recognizable and relatively healthy it is, considering. Only six banks failed; none since 2010. Most are profitable again. And the tenuous ones may yet find salvation in acquisition. “We are guardedly optimistic that we are seeing improvements in the banking industry overall,” said David Tatman, administrator for the Oregon Division of Finance and Corporate Securities, which regulates the state’s banks. “What we’re seeing in banks reflects the economy. The economy is improving quite slowly and banks are improving fairly slowly.” Oregon has 29 statechartered banks, down from 36 in 2006, but still more than it had a decade ago. During the first quarter of this year, 25 of them posted a profit, the most since 2008. The amount of money they’ve set aside as protection against loan losses is at the lowest level in two years. Nobody believes banks are completely out of the woods yet. The situation could change again quickly if consumer sentiment drops or the recovery stalls. Here’s a look at how the state’s banking landscape has changed: the winners, the losers and more.

Rebecca Nonweiler, MD, Board Certified

(541) 318-7311

www.northwestmedispa.com

Winners Umpqua Bank is known nationally for its marketing moxie. Turns out it has a lot of basic banking chops, too. During the crisis, Umpqua leaped over Chase in deposit market share. It tackled troubled loans early and neutralized threats more quickly than most. Its book of healthy loans is growing. It recently bought a small Bay Area bank and is looking to buy more. This year, it plans a flagship branch in San Francisco’s financial district. “Umpqua’s never been in a better market position in our history than we are right now,” Chief Executive Ray Davis said in April. “The balance sheet is incredibly strong.” Tacoma-based Columbia Bank was another go-to repository when regulators shut down other banks. It worked with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. to take over Columbia River Bank in The Dalles and four other Washington institutions. Columbia, which also owns Bank of Astoria, now operates almost twice as many branches as it did before the crisis. Its financials haven’t suffered, either. The bank is flush with capital and has reduced money set aside for bad loans by 88 percent. Despite bearing the public’s wrath over the crisis, big banks have an even greater grip on the Oregon market now than before. Between 2007 and 2011, bank deposits in Oregon grew by $12.5 billion, or 23 percent, FDIC data show. Bank of America, Wells Fargo and U.S. Bank vacu-

umed up $8.5 billion of that. Wells Fargo is hiring for its Oregon call centers, and Bank of America says it’s hiring small-business bankers in the state. Too big to fail, apparently, are also too convenient for customers to ignore.

Losers The banks that closed their doors for good in 2009 and 2010 were small and largely rural: Columbia River Bank in The Dalles; Community First Bank in Prineville; Silver Falls Bank of Silverton; Pinnacle Bank of Beaverton; Liberty Financial Group Inc. in Eugene; and Home Valley Bancorp Inc. of Grants Pass.

Survivors Lake Oswego’s West Coast Bancorp, Spokane’s Sterling Financial Corp. and Bend’s Cascade Bancorp, parent of Bank of the Cascades, all were midsize players on the ropes, having lent heavily into the collapsing housing markets. All needed big injections of capital. All got what they needed from respected, national private equity firms. The state’s financial institutions say they’re healthy enough now. Healthier than they’ve been in a while. All they need are some good borrowers to walk in the door. “We’d love to see more small-business customers to take loans now, because we’ve got a lot of money to loan,” said Neil Grossnicklaus, president of Willamette Valley Bank in Salem. “The economy continues to improve, but it’s just a very slow go.”


B4

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

B  M C G B  J C  R  C

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

Big fires require more aircraft

I

t’s hard to get your head around a fire that covers at least 300 square miles, as the one now burning in New Mexico does. That’s a square 12 by 25 miles, or one that stretches

on its short sides from Bend almost to Redmond, and on its long sides from Bend to the other side of Sisters. That is how much land, roughly, was burning in New Mexico on Friday. It’s also more than double the size of the B&B Complex fires that did so much damage in this region in 2003. Clearly, fighting fires that big takes everything the U.S. Forest Service can put to the task, and unfortunately one part of the standard arsenal, aircraft, is in dangerously short supply. In fact, according to Sen. Ron Wyden, a retardant tanker fleet that should stand at 40 planes is down now to 11 and is expected to grow to at most 17 in the near future. The agency also is short of helicopters and supertankers, which are converted 747s. There are several reasons for the problem. A spate of fatalities several years ago pushed the agency to quit using some older planes. And it has been remarkably slow about finding new ones. Meanwhile, the nature of Western wildfires has changed in recent years. Years of neglect have left forests in the American West in sad shape, and the Forest Service

has not been able to do the kind of serious, widespread restoration work that must be done to improve the situation. That may be in part because Congress has failed to give the agency enough money for the task. It may also be in part because its proposed clean-up actions tend to be challenged in court, which both slows the process down and no doubt makes the agency reluctant to move aggressively to get the job done. Clearly, making serious inroads against the problem will take a variety of efforts. In the short term the Forest Service must be persuaded to replace its air fleet far more quickly than it has done to date. And over time the agency must be given the money and tools it needs to make Western forest land far healthier than it is today.

Pilot project is a positive sign on landuse planning

A

recent executive order from Gov. John Kitzhaber acknowledges the importance of regional variation in landuse planning. It offers a ray of hope for more flexibility. The order, signed in early May, sets up a pilot project in Douglas, Jackson and Josephine counties that might lead to new criteria for the use of land now limited to farm and forest use only. The plan is the result of compromise with legislative Republicans who promoted a bill this year that urged such a program, according to The Associated Press. The governor’s approach allows the three counties to work with the state’s Department of Land Conservation and Development to produce their own ways to define forest- and farmland. It recognizes that those definitions might vary from one part of the state to another, and it provides $350,000 for the project. Oregon’s highly restrictive landuse laws have been credited with limiting sprawl and saving farmand forestlands from development. But they have been criticized for limiting property owners’ rights, and for applying a one-size-fits-all

approach across the state. The governor’s order recognizes that problem: “The flat, fertile fields of the Willamette Valley differ from lands in the Rogue and Umpqua valleys and lands along Oregon’s Coast. High-value crop areas in parts of Central Oregon irrigated from the Crooked and Deschutes rivers differ from the high plateau wheat fields in the northern part of the state.� In Central Oregon, the most visible recent controversy about state land law involved the proposed expansion of Bend’s Urban Growth Boundary. Millions of dollars have been spent trying to find the sweet spot between state regulations and the way the city sees its needs. It’s still unresolved after years of work. The new pilot program is a cautious one: It retains control in the hands of the DLCD. And it’s not going to change anything in a big hurry: It reports back to the governor and Legislature in January 2014. But it is promising to see an openness to the possibility of change, to the reality that regions of the state have different circumstances and needs.

My Nickel’s Worth Trapping is not like hunting The Bulletin’s May 21 defense of trapping is completely lame. In that editorial, The Bulletin likens trapping of small animals as similar to deer hunting to control populations. There is no similarity. Deer hunting, which is mostly humane in its methods, produces meat that can put food on the table for families. While deer hide is a useful product, and there are some trophy hunters, little deer hunting is done for just the hide or antlers. However, few if any animals like beavers, otters or raccoons are trapped for food. They are trapped for “vanity� products — fur coats and trims on garments, not necessary for survival. A trip to the fabric store will show that there are plenty of synthetic substitutions that are very difficult to detect as fake. We don’t allow cock- or dogfighting, among other inhumane and barbaric activities toward domestic or wild animals. While there can be some nuisance animals such as raccoons, there are humane methods of trapping that don’t cause suffering, injury or death. As humans in control of this planet, we need to learn that every time we think we are smart enough to “manage� wildlife to benefit ourselves, we create a new set of problems, not recognizing the interdependency of species. In the end, humankind will suffer. Linda Davis Sisters

Column uninformed and vitriolic After reading Alfred Ferguson’s uninformed and vitriolic rant on May 25, I was initially surprised that The Bulletin would print it. But then

I came to my senses, and realized that your newspaper will not fact check anything from the extreme right. Ferguson first calls President Barack Obama a Marxist, and then completely out of context, declares he’s worth $10 million. Maybe Ferguson is confused and has been reading Groucho, not Karl. Alan Pachtman Bend

Editorial examines wrong question on REALMS Examining the question of funding for Rimrock Expeditionary Alternative Learning Middle School (REALMS) on May 14, The Bulletin expressed the opinion that the school “hasn’t presented a sufficient argument for the school to receive so much more than other charter schools around the state.� (The increase is less than the Bend City Council is considering spending on its new publicity campaign.) How did The Bulletin decide that this is the question to examine? How about these instead: Why, in the first place, is the minimum given to middle schools 10 percent less than high schools? Does The Bulletin really agree with the state’s apparent conclusion that educating middle school students is somehow easier, less costly or less important than educating high school students? REALMS has demonstrated that is has done as well, or better, at educating its students as “the district’s own schools� (which receive 100 percent funding). Why should the standard it must meet be “better than other charter schools around the state,� instead of “equal to the schools that receive full funding?� If the school board were to gain

insight from the answers to these questions, it seems clear that REALMS would get its increase in funding and be better able to continue its exceptional work educating students at that most challenging age. Barb Campbell Bend

More fans needed On May 25, under the lights at Vince Genna Stadium, I had the pleasure of seeing the Summit Storm baseball team convincingly beat a team from Milwaukee in the quarterfinals of the Class 5A baseball tournament. The fans at the game were vocal but it seemed to me that there were not that many of them for such an important game. I did not have a son playing and I do not know any of the players; I just love baseball. Yes, I did play baseball at a high school in western Massachusetts which had a strong winning tradition, and our crowds were always large and loud. It was a rush to play in front of so many people. There is nothing like the roar of the crowd acknowledging a momentous effort or a hard-earned victory. As I approach sixty years of age, I remember these days as a high school baseball player; the camaraderie of teammates, my coach telling me “you can do it!� when I had my doubts, and the sheer joy of the game. So, the bottom line is, I just want more fans to show up to watch these skilled athletes compete and play. This is a special time for these special kids. I invite you to go out and see them in action. Then, you will be a part of their “field of dreams.� Play ball! David Stetson Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

C h ina’s blog censorship rules have U.S. parallels By Noah Feldman Bloomberg News

W

hat’s the opposite of free speech? If you answered, “totalitarian censorship,� you are right — and you are old. In the Internet age, censorship is all about allowing partial, temporary free speech, then shutting it down once enough has been said. The innovator, as usual these days when it comes to nondemocratic governance, is China, where the leading microblog site, Sina Weibo, unveiled its modified censorship model this week. Users get 80 points. Monitors will take away points for violations. These include the censors’ old favorite, criticizing the government. You can also lose points for spreading rumor (which I thought was the whole point of the Internet) or promoting cults (a provision apparently aimed at the banned spiritual movement Falun Gong). The monitors will also scour your comments for puns or other circumlocutions used to avoid censorship in the past. If you run out of points, you’re cut off. If free speech is so threatening, why

don’t the powers-that-be in China just shut down the microblogs altogether? Part of the answer is that with 324 million users, Sina Weibo has become too big to fail, or at least too much a part of normal Chinese life to be eliminated. But the deeper reason to keep the masses microblogging is that the Chinese government reaps important gains from it. This is not your father’s Communist Party. Nor your grandfather’s. China’s leadership is engaged in a complicated, risky process of trying to gain some of the advantages of democratic government without the disadvantage of putting itself up for direct election. Free speech is a crucial part of the experiment. A major benefit of allowing people to complain on the Web is that it allows society to blow off steam. This is a venerable value of free speech, recognized by U.S. Supreme Court Justice William Douglas in a famous dissent in 1951, responding to the court’s choice to uphold the conviction of 11 American Communists for teaching subversive ideas. “The airing of ideas releases pressures which otherwise might become destructive,� Douglas

wrote. If such release is beneficial in a democracy, it’s doubly so in a place where there is no robust public sphere. Another advantage of limited free speech is that it allows the government to gather information about public concerns. Chinese authorities can’t rely on ordinary polling data, because pollsters in China can’t operate freely, lest they learn of serious opposition to the government. And it’s impossible to spy on 1.3 billion people all the time. The microblogs serve as “the abstract and brief chronicles of the time,� as Hamlet called the theater. Once the microblogs have conveyed what people are thinking, the government can respond to their concerns, as it did last summer after the Zhejiang train derailment when Premier Wen Jiabao made a special visit to the site in apparent reaction to public frustration with bureaucratic silence and denials. Responding to public opinion is the hallmark of accountable government. Without elections to provide oversight, China’s leaders need every opportu-

nity they can get to demonstrate that they respond to people’s concerns. Seen this way, limited free speech, followed by government action, is an important part of how the Chinese Communist Party seeks to sustain its legitimacy. The party is utterly aware that free speech could help bring the government down. That is why it is experimenting with freedom in moderation, and using quasi-private entities like Sina Weibo as its proxies. China’s leaders are trying to gain the advantages of free speech without paying its full price. First Amendment absolutists will probably raise their eyebrows at this. After all, Americans have been raised to believe that free speech has a life of its own; that truth is great and shall prevail. Yet there is an extraordinary precedent for China’s censorship model: the history of free speech in England and the U.S. before the modern era. When it was drafted, the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution didn’t contemplate the radical freedom Americans now enjoy. Its language, drawn from English prec-

edents, was aimed essentially at prohibiting what is called prior restraint: government censorship of books and newspapers before they could be published. As with the Sina Weibo rules, once you had spoken or written, you could still be punished for what you had freely said. You were accountable under the crime of seditious libel. That law punished — you guessed it — criticizing the government, spreading false rumor and impugning religion. It was, according to the great English legal scholar William Blackstone, “necessary for the preservation of peace and good order, of government and religion.� It existed in the U.S. even after the Constitution was ratified, sustaining convictions through the late 18th century. Britain didn’t officially take it off the books until 2009. Censors, take note. Or on second thought, please don’t. I want to keep all 80 of my points in case I need them. — Noah Feldman, a law professor at Harvard University and the author of “Scorpions: The Battles and Triumphs of FDR’s Great Supreme Court Justices,� is a Bloomberg View columnist.


MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

O

NORTHWEST NEWS

ODFW mulls new rules Dawson won an Emmy for anglers on the Rogue for hosting ‘Family Feud’ kiss all people,� he said in a 2010 interview for the Archive Richard Dawson, the British- of American Television. “It born actor and comedian who sounds crazy, but when I first played a larcenous prisoner came here, Petula Clark was on of war on the comedy a show with Nat King “Hogan’s Heroes� and FEATURED Cole and he kissed her became a star as the the cheek and 81 OBITUARY on dapper and gregarious stations in the South host of the game show canceled him. I kissed “Family Feud,� died on Satur- black women daily and nightly day in Los Angeles. He was 79. on ‘Family Feud’ for 11 years The cause was complica- and the world didn’t come to tions of esophageal cancer, an end, did it?� his son Gary wrote on his After the show was canceled Facebook page Sunday. in 1985, it was revived in 1988 From a hardscrabble up- with Ray Combs as the host. bringing in post-World War II Dawson returned to the show England, Dawson, whose earli- for one year in 1994. Steve est aspiration was to be a dock- Harvey is the current host. worker, became one of the most After an early career as well-known television person- a comedian in England, he alities in the 1970s and ’80s. He moved to the United States won a daytime Emmy in 1978 with his first wife, Diana Dors, for his work on “Family Feud.� a voluptuous actress known as Dawson, who rankled tele- the “British Marilyn Monroe.� vision executives and made They divorced in 1966. housewives blush with his tenDawson gained initial fame dency to kiss nervous female in the 1960s playing Cpl. Peter contestants, was the host on the Newkirk, a con man, forger show’s initial run, from 1976 to and pickpocket, in the CBS se1985. Two families would com- ries “Hogan’s Heroes,� a popupete against each other trying lar comedy about a Nazi prison to guess the most popular an- camp where the inmates rouswer to survey questions like, tinely outwit their bumbling “Name the room in your house captors. He also had stints on that is most in need of redeco- the “Dick Van Dyke Show� and rating,� or, “Name something “Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In.� people do to entertain a baby.� In 1987, Dawson played It was among the most alongside Arnold Schwarpopular game shows in the zenegger in the dystopian country, leading to a nighttime thriller “The Running Man.� syndicated version that even- In the film he played a dark tually was broadcast five days caricature of himself, the a week. Television executives host of a game show in which at times tried to get Dawson to convicted felons must outrun stop the kissing, he said. Some bands of deadly hunters for a viewers complained when he chance to win their freedom. pecked the cheeks of women Asked in the 2010 interview of different races. how he would want the world Dawson said he actively to remember him, he said simfought any discrimination in ply as a nice guy. this regard. “You wouldn’t want to move “It’s very important to me if you sat next to me on the bus,� that on ‘Family Feud’ I could he said. “Or maybe you would.�

By Michael Schwirtz

New York Times News Service

The Associated Press file photo

Richard Dawson hosts an episode of “Family Feud� in June 1978. Dawson, the wisecracking British-born entertainer who was among the schemers in the 1960s sitcom “Hogan’s Heroes� and a decade later began kissing thousands of female contestants as host of the game show “Family Feud,� died Saturday. He was 79.

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254 Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

D E 

 Deaths of note from around the world: LeRoy Ellis, 72: Played basketball for 14 years in the NBA — including a stint with the Portland Trailblazers — after a standout college career in New York. Died Saturday in Portland of cancer. Adolfo Calero, 81: Led the largest force of U.S.-backed Contra rebels against Nicaragua’s Sandinista government in the 1980s. Died Saturday in Managua, Nicaragua, of lung problems. Lawrence Galowin, 87: Former section chief, program manager and researcher in building service systems at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Died May 15 in Bethesda, Md., of cardiomyopathy. Alice Thuermer, 92: Former Associated Press journalist who accompanied her husband on CIA postings around the globe. Died May 6 in Middleburg, Va., of heart failure. Conrad Pearson, 81: Retired Navy Reserve captain who, as a civilian, became head of labor relations in the Office of the Secretary of the Navy. Died May 24 in Newville, Pa., of pulmonary fibrosis. — From wire reports

B5

By Mark Freeman The Mail Tribune (Medford)

State fish managers are crafting a management plan for the Rogue River’s fall chinook salmon to ensure that the basin’s most robust salmon run stays that way. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is taking comments on its draft plan that at first would create no changes in angling seasons, rules or catch limits in the Rogue. But it would set minimum standards that could trigger changes to protect the nearly all-wild run of the basin’s largest salmon. The plan will set benchmarks for a desired number of chinook and for a minimum level of returns that would trigger measures to conserve the run. But the draft defines the run’s “desired status� as a running 10-year average of just under 58,000 chinook returning to the basin, according to the draft. The current 10-year average for the basin actually is more than 97,000 chinook and the run’s estimate has been below that desired status line only once — during the drought-ravaged run of 1991. That’s far different than the basin’s Spring Chinook

Management Plan, crafted last decade amid depressed runs. Those numbers triggered cutbacks in the quantity of wild spring chinook caught and kept by anglers. Unlike the spring chinook plan, the fall chinook plan has been crafted not in the midst of a salmon crisis, but with averting one in mind. “We’ll be setting some sideboards for conservation, but we’re nowhere near there,� says Todd Confer, the ODFW’s Gold Beach District fish biologist, who has worked on the plan. “We’re doing this because we want to avoid conservation issues down the road.�

Curry County rivers The picture is less rosy for the Chetco River and a handful of other Curry County rivers with fall chinook runs. They also are covered in the 176-page draft plan, but it focuses primarily on the Rogue. The Rogue run of fall chinook begins in July and extends into December. They have ranged historically from small 2-year-old “jack� salmon to 6-year-olds weighing sometimes more than 70 pounds. Most river-bound chinook spawn in the mainstems of the Rogue, Applegate and Illinois, while lower Rogue fish tend to spawn largely in tributaries.

The only hatchery influence is a small facility on Indian Creek near Gold Beach and strays from other river systems. An estimated 16 percent of the Rogue’s fall chinook population is caught at sea in sport and commercial fisheries, while in-river catches can shave another 10 to 15 percent off the run, Confer says. However, the run is considered so robust that it could withstand harvest rates of up to 60 percent, Confer says. The rosy fall chinook picture is painted largely by the location and operations of Lost Creek and Applegate reservoirs, with Lost Creek on the mainstem Rogue near Trail and Applegate on the Applegate River in southeast Jackson County. “The bottom line is fall chinook likely are much more abundant than they were historically, and that’s because of Lost Creek and Applegate (reservoirs),� Confer says. The draft will be tweaked following the public comment period and presented to the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission for adoption, likely this fall, ODFW spokeswoman Meghan Collins said.

Ashland brewery ranked among Top 5 greenest businesses in state By Greg Stiles The Mail Tribune (Medford)

ASHLAND — It’s one thing to talk about sustainability as a pursuit and lifestyle — it’s another to live it. Ashland’s Standing Stone Brewing Co., the downtown food and brew spot, continued its sustainable progression over the past year and once again ranked among the state’s greenest employers, according to rankings compiled by Oregon Business Magazine. Standing Stone has made the list all four years it’s been in existence and has ranked among the top three businesses three years running. After rising to No. 2 among the 100 Best Green Companies last year, the establishment settled back to No. 3. Still, no other entrant has matched the company’s sustained performance during the past three years. “After last year, there was only one place to go,� said Alex Amarotico, who co-founded the establishment 15 years ago. “We bounced back to No. 3, but that’s a good sign. We’re not only trying to be sustainable, but to sustain our spot on the list.� Oregon Environmental Council, a clean air and water nonprofit agency from Portland, topped this year’s list with a score of 290.00. Rose City Mortgage of Portland was No. 2 with 288.36 mark, while Standing Stone scored 286.76. The list is based on sustainable practice surveys of both employees and employers. More than 20,000 employees from 431 businesses and nonprofit organizations took part. Companies needed at least 15 full- or part-time Oregon employees, and nonprofits needed at least 10 employees or qualified volunteers. The highest possible score is 300. In years past, Standing Stone built its reputation by providing employees with bicycles. More recently, it has reduced waste and begun raising its own beef, lamb and chickens. The restaurant greatly reduced the amount of trash it sends to the landfill. A year ago it filled three 95-gallon plastic receptacles three times a week. It’s now down to less than one a week. “We produce less garbage than the average family

produces annually,� Amarotico said. “We compost the rest.� The biggest change, and what perhaps puts Standing Stone at the forefront of sustainable practices, is its farming activity on 265 leased acres where it’s raising 18 steers, four ewes, nine lambs and 250 chickens, all under the watchful eyes of three Anatolian shepherds. “We would love to supply all of our own protein,� Amarotico said. “Hopefully, in the next month-and-a-half or two, we will begin processing our own chicken. That will be the No. 1-exciting thing, when that actually happens.� Typically, two people spend half of their work day doing farm chores. “It’s really a half-time position,� Amarotico said. “But we like to spread it around and send as many people out there as we can to experience what goes on.� The restaurant and brewery has grown at a 5 percent

rate and now has nearly 70 employees, and the kitchen area is being remodeled to double the prep space. “We were hoping to get that done by June 1,� Amarotico said. While there is no guarantee of remaining a pacesetter, Standing Stone is not standing still. The business is looking forward to growing much of its produce in the near future. “There are some companies not on the list that in the whole scheme of things are doing better things,� Amarotico said. “We will never get there, but our goal is to keep working toward zero netenergy consumption.�

I B Photographer dead after fall in forest PORTLAND — Cowlitz County authorities say a 52year-old Toutle, Wash., man apparently fell to his death from a high bridge in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest after taking photos of the remote scenery near Woodland. The Oregonian reports investigators found Lance Chandler’s badly damaged camera near his body Saturday. The county coroner’s office is expected to perform an autopsy. The death investigation followed a call to the sheriff’s office by a U.S. Forest Service employee, who reported that an abandoned vehicle had been parked for a few days on a Washington state Highway 504 bridge between Woodland and Cougar.

Part of Interstate 5 repaved in Medford MEDFORD — Interstate 5 traffic will detour through downtown Medford from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. today while crews repave the roadway between the north end of the viaduct and Exit 30. The work is part of a $3.9 million repaving job on I-5 between the Medford viaduct and Exit 35. Single lane closures will begin around 5 p.m. before the full closures, so traffic is expected to be affected all evening. All lanes are scheduled to reopen by 7 a.m.

2 sentenced in grow operation SILVERTON — A man and woman living in Silverton have been given prison sentences for growing marijuana near two schools. Silverton Police say 55-yearold James Payne was sentenced to two years in prison and three years’ probation. He was convicted of manufacturing marijuana within 1,000 feet of a school and attempting to deliver pot to an undercover officer. The Statesman Journal in Salem reports Payne was arrested after detectives connected him to a marijuana grow operation discovered when firefighters were putting out a fire. Kathleen Eck, 51, who lived with Payne, was sentenced to 10 days in jail and three years’ probation after pleading guilty to delivering marijuana within 1,000 feet of a school. Payne and Eck also have been ordered to pay fines. — From wire reports

Providing unparalled service across a variety of industries since 1983.

541-389-1505 400 SW Bluff Dr Ste 200 Bend , OR 97702

Self Referrals Welcome

www.expresspros.com

541-706-6900

DEAL of the

DAY BUY ONE BREAKFAST OR LUNCH SANDWICH & GET ONE FREE!* *Second sandwich must be of equal or lesser value.

19570 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend In The Brookswood Plaza • 541-728-0095

We’re right next to LOVEJOY’S MARKET Limit one per visit. Coupon valid for 06/04/2012 only. Coupon has no cash value. Not valid with any other offer. Must present original newsprint coupon.

Sign up to receive notification of these and other great money saving offers in The Bulletin. E-mail your name and address to emailnotifications@bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

B6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, JUNE 4

TUESDAY

Today: Rain showers.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

LOW

57

38

Astoria

61/49

53/47

Cannon Beach 53/49

65/50

60/47

58/46

Lincoln City

Salem

55/47

60/45

Corvallis Florence 56/46

61/45

54/35

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

54/47

61/44

Coos Bay

Crescent

54/46

Chemult

60/45

54/46

69/46

Paulina 49/35

Unity 72/41

66/43

Vale

52/34

79/44

55/36

67/36

JordanValley

56/37

Rome

Klamath Falls 58/34

Ashland

55/44

• 88°

81/41

Rome

63/36

55/33

64/47

Brookings

77/42

Frenchglen

Yesterday’s state extremes

74/39

Chiloquin

Medford

84/53

Juntura

Burns Riley

Paisley

54/45

CENTRAL Cloudy with rain and showers. Rain will be steadiest in the south.

Nyssa

61/34

62/43

WEST Cloudy with rain and showers. Rain will be steadiest in the south.

85/53

Hampton

59/40

• 39°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

75/40

62/36

Klamath Falls

80/34

-30s

-20s

-10s

10s

Vancouver 59/50

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

0s

Calgary 70/54

Needles, Calif.

Billings 91/62

• 30°

Cheyenne 86/53

Angel Fire, N.M.

San Francisco 64/50

• 4.13” Wiscasset, Maine

Las Vegas 100/75

Salt Lak e City 98/66

Los Angeles 67/60

Denver 89/60 Albuquerque 92/65

Phoenix 103/75

Honolulu 85/72

Tijuana 69/53 Chihuahua 95/68

Anchorage 57/45

La Paz 92/65 Juneau 57/43

30s

Saskatoon 81/64

Seattle 62/49 Portland 62/52 Boise 89/51

• 106°

20s

40s

Winnipeg 77/58

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 68/43

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 59/44

Halifax 56/44 Portland To ronto 59/48 62/53 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 80/59 75/51 57/50 Bufal o Rapid City Detroit 64/51 New York 89/62 71/54 67/52 Des Moines Philadelphia Columbus 82/61 Chicago 74/53 72/54 74/56 Omaha Washington, D. C. 88/63 77/59 Louisville Kansas City 82/59 89/65 St. Louis Nashville Charlotte 87/65 85/60 80/61 Oklahoma City 94/68 Little Rock Birmingham Atlanta 92/71 83/70 85/67 Dallas 97/76 New Orleans 91/75 Orlando Houston 94/72 94/75 Bismarck 84/57

Monterrey 102/72 Mazatlan 81/73

FRONTS

FRIDAY Mostly cloudy.

HIGH LOW

57 35

Mostly cloudy.

HIGH LOW

63 39

66 39

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .5:59 a.m. . . . . . 9:46 p.m. Venus . . . . . .5:27 a.m. . . . . . 8:43 p.m. Mars. . . . . .12:52 p.m. . . . . . 1:48 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . .4:32 a.m. . . . . . 7:14 p.m. Saturn. . . . . .3:58 p.m. . . . . . 3:16 a.m. Uranus . . . . .2:26 a.m. . . . . . 2:50 p.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64/50 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . 92 in 1970 Average month to date. . . 0.10” Record low. . . . . . . . . 26 in 1962 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.07” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Average year to date. . . . . 5.12” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.29.91 Record 24 hours . . .1.33 in 1934 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today. . . . . . 5:24 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:44 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:23 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:45 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 9:18 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 5:36 a.m.

Moon phases Full

Last

New

First

June 4 June 11 June 19 June 26

OREGON CITIES

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.....Low Bend, east of Hwy. 97......Low Redmond/Madras ........Low

Astoria . . . . . . . .59/48/0.00 Baker City . . . . . 68/50/trace Brookings . . . . . 59/47/trace Burns. . . . . . . . . 79/53/trace Eugene . . . . . . . .61/49/0.01 Klamath Falls . . .70/39/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .75/50/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .63/48/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .72/52/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .57/46/0.00 North Bend . . . . .59/48/0.00 Ontario . . . . . . . .87/57/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .67/53/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .64/50/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .65/51/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .69/51/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . 63/53/trace Salem . . . . . . . . .64/49/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .72/55/0.00

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . .61/49/sh . . . . .57/48/sh . . . . . 69/46/t . . . . .54/34/sh . . . .55/44/sh . . . . .57/46/sh . . . . . 72/38/t . . . . .54/32/sh . . . . . 61/45/r . . . . .60/43/sh . . . . . 58/34/r . . . . . 50/31/rs . . . .62/36/sh . . . . . 49/32/rs . . . . . 55/34/r . . . . . 50/27/rs . . . . . 64/47/r . . . . .61/44/sh . . . .54/48/sh . . . . .54/45/sh . . . . . 55/47/r . . . . .56/45/sh . . . . . 84/53/t . . . . .62/43/sh . . . .66/50/sh . . . . .64/44/sh . . . .62/52/sh . . . . .58/49/sh . . . . . 53/39/r . . . . .57/34/sh . . . . . 62/38/r . . . . .57/32/sh . . . .60/45/sh . . . . .60/44/sh . . . .61/48/sh . . . . .60/44/sh . . . . . 55/37/r . . . . .51/33/sh . . . .65/50/sh . . . . .63/47/sh

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT Sisters ...............................Low La Pine...............................Low Prineville..........................Low

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 50,694 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191,268 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 80,634 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 40,323 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141,953 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 449 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . 1,020 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . 211 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . 19.7 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . 40 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 226 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 10.5 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 4

POLLEN COUNT

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

HIGH LOW

52 32

EAST Ontario Cloudy with show84/53 ers.

Brothers 52/35

Silver Lake

53/32

Grants Pass

Gold Beach

61/37

Christmas Valley

Port Orford

65/42

Union 70/45

John Day

53/39

Fort Rock 56/36

53/33

48/28

Roseburg

57/38

La Pine 55/34

Crescent Lake

54/45

Bandon

58/43

Prineville Sisters Redmond 55/37 57/38 Sunriver Bend

Eugene

65/41

Mitchell 54/40

52/35

55/47

65/41

Baker City

Madras

Camp Sherman

63/47

Enterprise Joseph

Granite Spray68/43

Warm Springs

65/40

Meacham

La Grande

Condon 59/44

63/46

Yachats

63/45 61/43

Wallowa

59/40

66/46

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

66/50

Ruggs

Maupin

61/48

54/48

Pendleton

66/51

63/44

Government Camp 48/34

61/48

Hermiston65/51

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy 60/49

McMinnville

64/51

The Biggs Dalles 66/51

63/49

Hillsboro Portland 62/52

Tillamook

Umatilla

Hood River

THURSDAY

Parly cloudy.

HIGH LOW

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

Chance of rain.

Tonight: Rain showers.

HIGH

WEDNESDAY

Miami 92/77

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .97/70/0.00 . . . 98/70/t . . .94/69/t Akron . . . . . . . . . .77/55/0.03 . .71/50/sh . 69/50/sh Albany. . . . . . . . . .70/52/0.12 . .63/49/sh . . 66/50/c Albuquerque. . . . .94/61/0.00 . .92/65/pc . 90/66/pc Anchorage . . . . . .54/49/0.00 . .57/45/pc . 58/48/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . . .84/62/0.00 . . . 85/67/t . . .82/63/t Atlantic City . . . . .78/55/0.00 . . . 72/57/t . 67/57/pc Austin . . . . . . . . . .92/73/0.00 . .96/73/pc . . .94/72/t Baltimore . . . . . . .79/53/0.00 . .76/56/pc . 71/56/pc Billings . . . . . . . . .77/54/0.00 . . . 91/62/s . . .94/56/t Birmingham . . . . .91/64/0.14 . . . 83/70/t . . .85/64/t Bismarck. . . . . . . .83/59/0.11 . .84/57/pc . 84/63/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . . .90/55/0.00 . .89/51/pc . 59/38/sh Boston. . . . . . . . . .62/54/0.00 . .57/50/sh . 56/52/sh Bridgeport, CT. . . .78/57/0.00 . . . 63/51/t . 66/51/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . . .64/54/0.87 . .64/51/sh . 66/51/pc Burlington, VT. . . .72/54/0.02 . .59/49/sh . . 68/48/c Caribou, ME . . . . .61/50/0.00 . .59/47/sh . . 59/44/c Charleston, SC . . .86/58/0.00 . . . 90/70/t . . .84/70/t Charlotte. . . . . . . .83/55/0.00 . . . 85/60/t . 82/61/pc Chattanooga. . . . .87/56/0.00 . . . 79/63/t . . 80/62/s Cheyenne . . . . . . .83/55/0.01 . . . 86/53/s . .84/52/w Chicago. . . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . .74/56/pc . 70/57/pc Cincinnati . . . . . . .80/51/0.00 . .77/55/pc . 72/52/pc Cleveland . . . . . . .80/59/0.00 . .69/54/sh . 68/54/pc Colorado Springs .90/50/0.00 . .86/53/pc . 84/52/pc Columbia, MO . . .85/54/0.00 . .87/62/pc . . 81/59/s Columbia, SC . . . .88/57/0.00 . . . 89/66/t . . .83/65/t Columbus, GA. . . .91/65/0.00 . . . 91/71/t . . .88/65/t Columbus, OH. . . .80/52/0.00 . .74/53/pc . 70/50/pc Concord, NH. . . . .61/54/0.03 . .58/46/sh . 62/49/sh Corpus Christi. . . .90/77/0.00 . .91/76/pc . 92/75/pc Dallas Ft Worth. . .96/76/0.00 . .97/76/pc . . .91/73/t Dayton . . . . . . . . .79/51/0.00 . .75/53/pc . 70/50/pc Denver. . . . . . . . . .90/59/0.00 . .89/60/pc . 88/58/pc Des Moines. . . . . .84/55/0.00 . .82/61/pc . 81/61/sh Detroit. . . . . . . . . .80/59/0.00 . .71/54/pc . 69/55/pc Duluth. . . . . . . . . 78/47/trace . .72/50/sh . 70/49/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . . .98/67/0.00 . .100/72/s 100/71/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . . .71/46/0.00 . . . 75/49/t . . .74/49/t Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . . . 83/57/s . 83/61/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . . .81/38/0.00 . . . 79/48/s . .75/42/w

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .78/54/0.00 . .74/51/pc . 70/52/pc Green Bay. . . . . . .84/55/0.00 . .75/51/pc . 73/51/pc Greensboro. . . . . .80/53/0.00 . .80/57/pc . 75/57/pc Harrisburg. . . . . . .74/50/0.04 . .72/52/pc . 70/55/pc Hartford, CT . . . . .77/53/0.04 . .62/51/sh . 63/53/sh Helena. . . . . . . . . .74/43/0.00 . .85/52/pc . . .72/40/t Honolulu. . . . . . . .83/73/0.00 . . . 85/72/s . . 85/73/s Houston . . . . . . . .95/72/0.00 . .94/75/pc . . .93/74/t Huntsville . . . . . . .87/60/0.02 . . . 80/62/t . 81/62/pc Indianapolis . . . . .80/51/0.00 . .78/56/pc . 74/56/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .91/67/0.00 . .93/72/pc . . .88/69/t Jacksonville. . . . . .90/61/0.00 . .95/73/pc . . .90/70/t Juneau. . . . . . . . . .58/41/0.01 . . . 57/43/s . 58/46/pc Kansas City. . . . . 80/59/trace . .89/65/pc . . 84/64/s Lansing . . . . . . . . .78/57/0.00 . .72/48/pc . 70/50/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .103/78/0.00 . .100/75/s . .91/69/w Lexington . . . . . . .80/55/0.02 . .78/56/pc . 74/58/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .90/60/0.00 . .90/61/pc . . 85/63/s Little Rock. . . . . . .95/69/0.00 . .92/71/pc . . .89/66/t Los Angeles. . . . . .70/62/0.00 . .67/60/pc . . 70/59/s Louisville. . . . . . . .84/58/0.00 . .82/59/pc . 78/58/pc Madison, WI . . . . .80/50/0.00 . .77/54/sh . 75/53/pc Memphis. . . . . . . .91/67/0.04 . . . 87/70/t . . 87/66/s Miami . . . . . . . . . .92/74/0.00 . .92/77/pc . 89/77/pc Milwaukee . . . . . .80/59/0.00 . .70/52/pc . 66/52/pc Minneapolis . . . . .77/57/0.00 . .80/59/pc . 79/60/sh Nashville. . . . . . . .88/57/0.00 . . . 80/61/t . . 80/62/s New Orleans. . . . .90/70/0.00 . .91/75/pc . . .90/76/t New York . . . . . . .76/58/0.01 . . . 67/52/t . 68/54/sh Newark, NJ . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . . . 68/52/t . . .69/53/t Norfolk, VA . . . . . .78/60/0.00 . .84/59/pc . 74/62/pc Oklahoma City . . .90/64/0.14 . .94/68/pc . 85/63/pc Omaha . . . . . . . . .90/59/0.00 . .88/63/pc . . 84/64/s Orlando. . . . . . . . .92/69/0.00 . .94/72/pc . 93/74/pc Palm Springs. . . .101/72/0.00 . . . 99/68/s . . 94/65/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . 82/52/trace . .80/58/sh . 77/56/pc Philadelphia . . . . .78/58/0.03 . . . 72/54/t . 69/55/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .103/75/0.00 . .103/75/s . 101/75/s Pittsburgh. . . . . . .75/53/0.21 . .71/49/pc . 68/50/pc Portland, ME. . . . .55/53/2.13 . . . 59/48/r . 61/50/sh Providence . . . . . .74/56/0.34 . .63/51/sh . 59/52/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . . .81/52/0.00 . .84/58/pc . 76/58/pc

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City. . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . .89/62/pc . 90/62/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . . .89/58/0.00 . .72/38/sh . 58/37/sh Richmond . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . .80/58/pc . 74/60/pc Rochester, NY . . . .67/54/1.20 . .64/51/sh . 68/51/pc Sacramento. . . . . .89/56/0.00 . .71/51/sh . 73/53/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . . .88/59/0.00 . .87/65/pc . . 82/63/s Salt Lake City . . . .92/62/0.00 . . 98/66/w . .86/47/w San Antonio . . . . .89/75/0.00 . .94/75/pc . . .94/74/t San Diego . . . . . . .66/60/0.00 . .67/61/pc . . 67/60/s San Francisco . . . .68/51/0.00 . .64/50/sh . . 62/50/s San Jose . . . . . . . .78/53/0.00 . .67/50/sh . . 68/50/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .90/49/0.00 . .83/61/pc . 82/61/pc

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .88/58/0.00 . . . 91/71/t . . .85/71/t Seattle. . . . . . . . . .63/49/0.00 . .62/49/sh . 60/48/sh Sioux Falls. . . . . . .90/54/0.00 . . . 81/56/s . . 81/62/s Spokane . . . . . . . 66/50/trace . .72/50/sh . 53/45/sh Springfield, MO . .78/59/0.14 . .87/65/pc . . 82/60/s Tampa. . . . . . . . . .89/73/0.00 . .89/77/pc . 91/76/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . . .99/67/0.00 . .100/67/s . . 99/71/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .92/70/0.00 . .93/70/pc . 88/65/pc Washington, DC . .80/58/0.00 . .77/59/pc . 72/58/pc Wichita . . . . . . . . .85/66/0.31 . .91/67/pc . 87/65/pc Yakima . . . . . . . . .73/51/0.00 . .61/48/sh . . 65/44/c Yuma. . . . . . . . . .100/74/0.00 . .103/74/s . 101/70/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .54/46/0.00 . .56/47/sh . . 63/52/c Athens. . . . . . . . . .84/57/0.00 . . . 84/66/s . . 84/63/s Auckland. . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . .61/57/sh . 61/54/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .102/72/0.00 . .109/80/s . 108/76/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . .92/80/pc . . .93/80/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . .91/75/pc . 95/67/pc Beirut . . . . . . . . . .82/68/0.00 . . . 78/68/s . . 77/69/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .55/45/0.00 . . .62/52/c . . 62/51/c Bogota . . . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . .65/50/sh . 68/48/pc Budapest. . . . . . . .84/54/0.00 . . . 79/55/t . 70/46/sh Buenos Aires. . . . .64/43/0.00 . .52/41/pc . . 54/35/s Cabo San Lucas . .82/72/0.00 . . . 90/64/s . . 89/70/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .93/70/0.00 . . . 92/66/s . . 92/69/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .66/39/0.00 . .70/54/pc . 68/54/sh Cancun . . . . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . . . 82/78/t . . .84/78/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .52/46/0.00 . .59/44/pc . 54/50/sh Edinburgh. . . . . . .54/43/0.00 . . .52/41/c . . 53/48/c Geneva . . . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . .66/51/pc . 71/52/pc Harare. . . . . . . . . .68/43/0.00 . .61/44/pc . . 66/42/s Hong Kong . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . .85/80/pc . . .86/81/t Istanbul. . . . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . . . 78/65/s . 82/68/pc Jerusalem . . . . . . .91/67/0.00 . . . 87/56/s . . 83/57/s Johannesburg. . . .68/45/0.00 . . . 63/43/s . . 62/41/s Lima . . . . . . . . . . .70/68/0.00 . . . 75/65/s . . 74/65/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . .76/60/pc . 79/65/pc London . . . . . . . . .55/50/0.00 . . .60/46/c . 64/54/sh Madrid . . . . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . . . 88/60/s . . 89/62/s Manila. . . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . .87/78/c . . .85/78/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .118/95/0.00 . . 114/88/t . 115/87/s Mexico City. . . . . .77/55/0.00 . . . 74/52/t . . .75/52/t Montreal. . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . .58/52/sh . 65/49/sh Moscow . . . . . . . .52/45/0.00 . .63/48/pc . 67/52/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . . .72/59/0.00 . . . 70/58/t . . .75/58/t Nassau . . . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . .88/77/pc . . 87/78/c New Delhi. . . . . .120/84/0.00 . .111/88/s 110/90/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . . .79/68/0.00 . . .76/68/c . . 77/63/c Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .55/39/0.00 . . .58/40/c . 60/45/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . .58/52/sh . 67/47/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . .56/45/sh . 68/58/sh Rio de Janeiro. . . .95/72/0.00 . . .87/69/c . 88/68/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . . . 75/59/t . . 75/60/c Santiago . . . . . . . .61/46/0.00 . . . 55/48/s . . 58/47/s Sao Paulo . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . . .78/66/c . 75/66/sh Sapporo . . . . . . not available . . .66/55/c . 66/57/pc Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . . . 79/60/s . . 78/67/s Shanghai. . . . . . . .77/68/0.00 . .76/61/pc . . 78/66/s Singapore . . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . . . 87/80/t . . .87/80/t Stockholm. . . . . . .54/45/0.00 . .60/48/sh . 50/40/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . . .59/57/0.00 . .66/51/sh . 58/47/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .81/75/0.00 . .77/70/sh . 77/74/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . . . 84/65/s . . 83/64/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .73/63/0.00 . .72/64/pc . . 75/61/c Toronto . . . . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . .62/53/sh . 66/55/sh Vancouver. . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . .59/50/sh . 57/50/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . . . 65/54/t . 67/49/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . . .63/43/0.00 . .63/51/pc . . .59/45/t


GREEN, ETC.

TV/ Movies, C2 Calendar, C3 Dear Abby, C3 Horoscope, C3

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

Big firms say ‘no’ to oil with bioplastic

Where ‘what is’ meets ‘what if’ • Research raises questions on the value of scientific speculation

By Ronald D. White Los Angeles Times

By James Gorman New York Times News Service

Woody Allen once said that when you do comedy, you sit at the children’s table. The same might be said of speculation in science. And yet speculation is an essential part of science. So how does it fit in? Two recent publications about the misty depths of canine and human SCIENCE history suggest some answers. In one, an international team of scientists concluded that we really don’t know when and where dogs were domesticated. Greger Larson of the University of Durham, in England, the first of 20 authors of that report, said of dog DNA, “It’s a mess.” In the other, Pat Shipman, an independent scientist and writer, suggested that dogs may have helped modern humans push the Neanderthals out of existence and might even have helped shape human evolution. Is one right and the other wrong? Are both efforts science — one a data-heavy reality check and the other freewheeling speculation? The research reported by Larson and his colleagues in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences is solid science — easily judged by peers, at any rate. The essay by Shipman is not meant to come to any conclusion but to prompt thought and more research. It, too, will be judged by other scientists, and read by many nonscientists. But how is one to judge the value of speculation? The questions readers ought to ask when confronting a “what if” as opposed to “what is” article are: Does the writer make it clear what is known, what is probable and what is merely possible? Shipman was careful to make these distinctions in her essay in American Scientist, and in an interview. First, she said, we know that modern humans and Neanderthals occupied Europe at the same time, from about 45,000 to 25,000 years ago, and that the humans’ fortunes rose as the Neanderthals’ fell. Somehow modern humans outcompeted Neanderthals. And here we are now, with our computers, our research and our beloved dogs, which, scientists agree, evolved from wolves. Second, and this point is crucial, Shipman thinks dogs were very probably around during this time, although she recognizes that others disagree. She tells us about the research that convinced her: a 2009 report of three skulls, the oldest dating to 32,000 years ago, by Mietje Germonpre of the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences in The Journal of Archaeological Science. The skulls are clearly from canids, but those include wolves, jackals and foxes. Germonpre and her colleagues concluded the skulls belonged to dogs. That’s where things get sticky. See ‘What if’ / C3

C

Comics, C4-5 Sudoku, C5 Daily Bridge, C5 Crossword, C5

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Dan Cecchini, director of information technology services at Central Oregon Community College, has joined the “bring your own device” to work movement, using his smartphone at work.

‘BYOD’ • ‘Bring Your Own Device’ trend expands, brings benefits, challenges to Central Oregon companies Practical Employment and Labor

By Rachael Rees The Bulletin

Law Compliance Solutions”

here’s a growing trend

T

of employees using their personal devices —

smartphones, laptops and tablets — in the workplace.

report released last month by Littler Medelson, a U.S. law firm specializing in employment and labor law. “The significant growth of mobile devices and their use

Employers are struggling to

by employees to conduct

accept and integrate the

business — with or without

“bring your own device”

OTECH

employee work policy and cost. But whether they are ready or not, the shift — labeled “BYOD” — is happening. “The move to greater adoption of mobile devices is clearly accelerating and appears irreversible,” according to the “‘Bring Your Own Device to Work Movement’: Engineering

Illustration by Jennifer Montgomery / The Bulletin

“The high price of oil is responsible for the rapid emergence in interest in bioplastics.” — Douglas Smock, plastics analyst

the company’s support —

to work movement, while balancing company security,

LOS ANGELES — After months of crude prices above $90 a barrel, many companies are trying to wring the oil out of their operations. Ford Motor Co. is using soybean foam in its upholstery. McDonald’s Corp. is testing paper cups for hot drinks in place of polystyrene containers, which start out as petroleum. Coca-Cola Co. and PepsiCo Inc. are becoming bioplastic bottlers. And a California cleaning products manufacturer has set out to eliminate diesel from its GREEN fleet. “When oil was cheap, it became pervasive throughout our economy in hundreds and hundreds of invisible ways, as a raw material,” said Daniel Yergin, an energy consultant who wrote a Pulitzer Prizewinning history of the oil industry. “Now there are accelerating efforts to squeeze oil out and find ways to substitute for it. That is the power of price.” The Energy Department expects U.S. benchmark West Texas Intermediate crude to set a record average above $105 a barrel in 2012. U.S. oil imports based on the price of Brent North Sea oil have been averaging more than $117 a barrel this year.

combined with the continued blurring of the line between personal and work lives, will

force employers to respond.” Benefits for employers include a reduction in expenses from employees purchasing their own devices, improvement in employee productivity and quicker adaptation to newer technologies. See BYOD / C6

“When a company’s raw materials come from oil, it’s a double whammy,” said Bruce Bullock, executive director of the Maguire Energy Institute at Southern Methodist University. The global chemicals market is worth about $3 trillion annually, according to the American Chemistry Council. Its products can be found in 95 percent of all manufacturing processes. Much of it involves petrochemicals, which account for about 24 percent of the crude oil used in the U.S., according to the Energy Department. “A lot of brand owners, particularly those that rely heavily on packaging, are interested in protecting their long-term costs,” said Douglas Smock, a plastics analyst who wrote a report for market research firm BCC Research that predicted a boom in plantbased bioplastics. “They want more predictable cost structures going forward. The high price of oil is responsible for the rapid emergence in interest in bioplastics.” Ford said it has eliminated 5 million pounds of petroleum annually by using soybean-based cushions in all of its North American vehicles. The company said it got rid of an additional 300,000 pounds of oil-based resins a year by making door bolsters out of kenaf, a tropical plant in the cotton family. See Bioplastic / C6


C2

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

TV & M

A b andon ‘Hope’ on NBC to wander around the hospital, where he routinely runs into spirits of patients who By David Wiegand are completely dead while San Francisco Chronicle Alex and some other doctors, You sit down to check out a including her sexy-exie Joel TV show imported from Can- Goran (Daniel Gillies), try to ada called “Saving Hope� and keep Charlie’s actual body right away, you know it’s prob- alive. None of the spirits Charably a dramatic series because lie runs into seem to mind it opens with footage of a city that he’s wearing a tuxedo, at night. Some sitcoms open proving that, if nothing else, with urban aerial shots at death apparently makes one night — “Friends� quite indifferent did, for example fashion. Plus, TV SPOTLIGHT to — but more often you don’t have to than not, dramas worry about colike to tell you there are a lot pays anymore. of stories in big cities and By the second episode, most are no laughing matter. Charlie’s ex-wife shows up Shows set in small towns open and, after an icy hug with with scenery, because aerial Alex, complains that no one shots of small towns at night has considered coma arousal wouldn’t communicate much. therapy, which involves inThat’s why “The Middle� tense sensual stimulation, inopens with corn, for example. cluding giving old Charlie a Soon enough, you realize helping hand, as it were. Anythat “Saving Hope� isn’t even way, if you’re keeping score, a sitcom, much less anything we have Charlie in a vegetalike Fox’s “Raising Hope.� In- tive state and his ex-wife destead, it’s about otherworldly scending on a metaphorical things. You know this because broomstick, while Alex is left the camera lens is greased up entirely on this mortal coil to like an Easter ham so streaks cope with Charlie’s coma and of light regularly cross your the presence of her scruffy screen and make you think ex-boyfriend on the surgical your glasses need cleaning. staff. Wow. What a tinderLater, you try not to think box of sexual tension. And about why the EKG monitor that doesn’t even include the next to the comatose patient young resident who insists is gleaming like the gates of she doesn’t have a crush on heaven itself. Joel but would happily do NBC, the network that just him. In surgery to remove a canceled the smart other- patient’s spleen, suction is worldly show “Awake,� has called for at one point and she imported this series set in a turns to Joel and says, “That’s hospital called Hope Zion, pre- what SHE said.� miering Thursday night. The show is kind of a lukeThe show is about young warm stew of ideas from other doctors in love, specifically shows (“Grey’s Anatomy,� chief of surgery Charlie Har- “Touched by an Angel,� the firis (Michael Shanks) and his nally-out-of-its-misery “A Giftfiancee, surgeon Alex Reid ed Man�) and films (“Ghost,� (Erica Durance). On their way “The Sixth Sense�) with stock to get hitched after a long day characters and situations that in the OR, the couple’s taxi occasionally jerk a demi-tear gets broadsided and Charlie or two, but with absolutely no winds up in a coma. authenticity. Charlie’s spirit is now free I see a dead series. “ S a v ing Hope� 9 p.m. Thursday, NBC

L M T 

FOR MONDAY, JUNE 4

REDMOND

EDITOR’S NOTES: • Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15. • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

Redmond Cinemas

BEND

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 3:30, 6:15, 9 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 3:15, 6:15, 9:15

THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30

MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 4:30, 7, 9:30

DARLING COMPANION (PG-13) 1:15, 7:15

SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 3:45, 6:30, 9:15

FOR GREATER GLORY (R) Noon, 3, 6

DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) 7:15

SISTERS

THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45

CourtesyARC Entertainment

MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15

Andy Garcia and Eva Longoria star in “For Greater Glory.�

MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 1, 4, 7 MY WAY (R) 4:15

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOUR EXPECTING (PG-13) 12:10, 3:25, 6:40, 9:45

McMenamins Old St. Francis School

680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:55, 6:20, 9:40 CHERNOBYL DIARIES (R) 1:30, 4:45, 8, 10:30 CHIMPANZEE (G) 12:30 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) 12:50, 4:05, 7:20, 10:05 THE DICTATOR (R) 1:20, 4:40, 7:55, 10:05

CABIN IN THE WOODS (R) 9 SAFE HOUSE (R) 6 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

DICTATOR (R) 5:20 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS 3-D (PG13) 3:30, 6:30

Sisters Movie House 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 4:40, 7 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 4:15, 6:50

CHIMPANZEE (G) 6:15 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 6:15 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 6:45

PRINEVILLE

SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 6:30

MADRAS Madras Cinema 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 4, 6:40

Pine Theater 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

MEN IN BLACK 3 (UPSTAIRS — PG13) 4:15, 7:20 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 4, 7 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Tin Pan Theater

THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2:50, 6, 9:10 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG13) 11:30 a.m., 12:15, 2:45, 3:30, 6:10, 7:05, 9:20, 10:15

869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

The theater is closed on Mondays.

MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS 3-D (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 3, 6:45, 10 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 3:05, 4:30, 6:05, 7:45, 9:05, 10:20 MEN IN BLACK 3 IMAX (PG-13) 12:40, 3:55, 7:15, 10:10

Award-winning neighborhood on Bend’s westside.

MEN IN BLACK 3-D (PG-13) 12:20, 3:40, 6:50, 9:35 THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS (PG) 1:10 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) Noon, 1, 3:15, 3:45, 4:15, 6:30, 7, 7:30, 9:25, 9:55, 10:25

www.northwestcrossing.com

L TV L

 

MONDAY PRIME TIME 6/4/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00 KATU News News News KEZI 9 News The Simpsons Electric Comp. NewsChannel 8 Meet, Browns Ciao Italia ‘G’

5:30 World News Nightly News Evening News World News The Simpsons Fetch! With Ruff Nightly News Meet, Browns Rachel’s-Food

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Ă… NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Ă… Access H. Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men This Old House Business Rpt. NewsChannel 8 News King of Queens King of Queens My Family ‘PG’ Time Goes By

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ Big Bang Big Bang PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Violin Competition of Indianapolis

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

The Bachelorette The group travels to Bermuda. (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… America’s Got Talent (N) ’ ‘PG’ American Ninja Warrior (N) ‘PG’ How I Met 2 Broke Girls Two/Half Men Mike & Molly ’ The Bachelorette The group travels to Bermuda. (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Hell’s Kitchen (N) ‘14’ Ă… MasterChef Auditions No. 1 ‘14’ AndrĂŠ Rieu: The Homecoming ’ ‘G’ Ă… America’s Got Talent (N) ’ ‘PG’ American Ninja Warrior (N) ‘PG’ Breaking Pointe ‘PG’ The Catalina ’ ‘14’ Ă… Musical Threads: Expression World News Tavis Smiley (N)

10:00

10:30

11:00

11:30

(10:01) Castle Kill Shot ‘PG’ Ă… KATU News (11:35) Nightline Grimm Plumed Serpent ‘14’ Ă… News Jay Leno Hawaii Five-0 Ki’ilua ‘14’ Ă… News Letterman (10:01) Castle Kill Shot ‘PG’ Ă… KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Use Your Brain to Change Your Age With Dr. Daniel Amen ‘G’ Ă… Grimm Plumed Serpent ‘14’ Ă… NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno Cops ‘14’ Ă… ’Til Death ‘PG’ ’Til Death ‘PG’ That ’70s Show Charlie Rose (N) ’ Ă… PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

The First 48 ‘PG’ Ă… The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… Gene Simmons Family Jewels Family Jewels Family Jewels Monster Monster Monster Monster *A&E 130 28 18 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… ››› “Independence Dayâ€? (1996, Science Fiction) Will Smith, Bill Pullman, Jeff Goldblum. Earthlings vs. evil aliens in ››› “Independence Dayâ€? (1996, Science Fiction) Will Smith, Bill Pullman, Jeff Goldblum. Earthlings vs. evil aliens in The Killing Bulldog Sarah and Holder *AMC 102 40 39 15-mile-wide ships. 15-mile-wide ships. go on the run. ‘14’ Ă… River Monsters: Unhooked ‘PG’ Swamp Wars ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Call-Wildman Call-Wildman Call-Wildman Call-Wildman Call of Wildman Call of Wildman Call-Wildman Call-Wildman *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Hillbilly Handfishin’ ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Housewives The Real Housewives of New York City ‘14’ Ă… Don’t Be Tardy Don’t Be Tardy Housewives/NJ The Real Housewives of New York City (N) Ă… (10:31) The Real Housewives of New York City BRAVO 137 44 Kitchen Nightmares ’ ‘14’ Ă… Kitchen Nightmares Cafe 36 ‘14’ ›› “Ace Ventura: Pet Detectiveâ€? (1994) Jim Carrey. ’ Ă… ››› “Blazing Saddlesâ€? (1974, Comedy) Cleavon Little. ’ Ă… CMT 190 32 42 53 Kitchen Nightmares ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Costco Craze: Inside the American Greed Mad Money Biography on CNBC American Greed Teeter Hang Wealth-Trading CNBC 51 36 40 52 Biography on CNBC Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront CNN 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… Always Sunny (5:54) 30 Rock (6:25) 30 Rock Colbert Report Daily Show South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Daily Show Colbert Report COM 135 53 135 47 Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Talk of the Town Local issues. Cooking Oregon Joy of Fishing Journal Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 Politics & Public Policy Today CSPAN 58 20 12 11 Politics & Public Policy Today Austin & Ally ’ Good-Charlie A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ ›››› “Beauty and the Beastâ€? (1991) ’ Ă… (10:05) Jessie Austin & Ally ’ Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ *DIS 87 43 14 39 Austin & Ally ’ Austin & Ally ’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie The Devil’s Ride ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Devil’s Ride ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Devil’s Ride Bad Blood ‘14’ Outlaw Empires Italian Mafia ‘14’ The Devil’s Ride Bad Blood ‘14’ *DISC 156 21 16 37 Biker Build-Off Russ Mitchell. ‘PG’ Biker Build-Off ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (4:00) ››› “Mean Girlsâ€? (2004) Keeping Up With the Kardashians E! News (N) 2012 Miss USA Competition ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Keeping Up With the Kardashians Chelsea Lately E! News *E! 136 25 Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 (4:00) MLB Baseball Los Angeles Dodgers at Philadelphia Phillies (N) SportsCenter NFL Live (N) Ă… Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… NBA Tonight (N) NFL Live Ă… NASCAR Now ESPN2 22 24 21 24 College Softball NCAA World Series Championship, Game 1: Teams TBA (N) Ă… AWA Wrestling Ă… UWF Wrestling PBA Bowling Ă… AWA Wrestling Ă… College Basketball First Semifinal. From March 12, 2011. (N) ESPNC 23 25 123 25 Battle of the Network Stars Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… Secret Life of American Teen Secret Life of American Teen Pretty Little Liars unmAsked ‘PG’ Secret Life of American Teen The 700 Club ‘G’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 (4:30) ›› “The Last Songâ€? (2010) Miley Cyrus, Greg Kinnear. Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five FNC 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Best Dishes All Star Grill-Fest: South Beach Good Eats: Right on Q Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Invention Hun. Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Mystery Diners Diners, Drive *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes (3:00) “Black Hawk Downâ€? (2001) How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “You Don’t Mess With the Zohanâ€? (2008, Comedy) Adam Sandler, John Turturro. “You Don’t Messâ€? FX 131 My First Place My First Place My First Place Love It or List It Maharishi ‘G’ Love It or List It Mark & Alana ‘G’ Love It or List It (N) ‘G’ Ă… House Hunters Hunters Int’l Love It or List It Shanahan ‘G’ HGTV 176 49 33 43 My First Place American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn *HIST 155 42 41 36 American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba As Is ‘PG’ Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… ››› “Unfaithfulâ€? (2002, Drama) Richard Gere, Diane Lane, Olivier Martinez. Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… LIFE 138 39 20 31 Reba ‘PG’ Ă… The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word The Ed Show The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews MSNBC 56 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) Pauly D Project Pauly D Project 2012 MTV Movie Awards ’ ‘14’ Teen Wolf Omega ’ ‘PG’ Teen Wolf Shape Shifted (N) ’ Teen Wolf Omega ’ ‘PG’ MTV 192 22 38 57 That ’70s Show Punk’d ’ ‘14’ SpongeBob Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Fred: The Show Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘14’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘14’ NICK 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob The Will: Secrets Revealed The Will: Secrets Revealed Undercover Boss: Abroad ‘PG’ Are You Normal, America? ‘14’ Are You Normal, America? ‘14’ Undercover Boss: Abroad ‘PG’ OWN 161 103 31 103 The Will: Secrets Revealed Boys in the Hall Mariners Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (N) (Live) Mariners Post. The Dan Patrick Show MLB Baseball ROOT 20 45 28* 26 Paid Program Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die GTTV Presents: E3 All Access Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die World’s Wildest Police Videos ’ SPIKE 132 31 34 46 Ways to Die Eureka Worst Case Scenario ’ Eureka Ex-Machina (N) ’ Ă… Lost Girl Fae Gone Wild (N) Ă… Eureka Ex-Machina ’ Ă… SYFY 133 35 133 45 (4:48) ›››› “Close Encounters of the Third Kindâ€? (1977) Richard Dreyfuss, François Truffaut. Behind Scenes Living Edge Kingdom Conn. Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord (Live). Ă… Joel Osteen Manna-Fest Against Odds Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord TBN Classics TBN 205 60 130 Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan (N) ‘14’ Ă… *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘G’ ››› “The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essexâ€? (1939) Bette Davis. A power ››› “The Virgin Queenâ€? (1955) Bette Davis, Richard Todd. Premiere. Eliza- ›››› “The Stingâ€? (1973) Paul Newman, Robert Redford, Robert Shaw. Two (11:15) ››› “The Young PhiladelTCM 101 44 101 29 struggle erupts between the queen and her lover. beth I’s stormy relationship with Sir Walter Raleigh. Depression-era con men plot to swindle a crime lord. Ă… phiansâ€? (1959) Paul Newman. Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘G’ Ă… Extreme Cou Extreme Cou Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Extreme Cou Extreme Cou Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ *TLC 178 34 32 34 Four Weddings ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NBA Basketball Oklahoma City Thunder at San Antonio Spurs (N) (Live) Ă… Inside the NBA (N) (Live) Ă… Falling Skies Mutiny ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist Red Tide ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist *TNT 17 26 15 27 NBA Pregame (N) (Live) Ă… Johnny Test ’ Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ Wrld, Gumball Adventure Time Adventure Time Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ *TOON 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bourdain: No Reservations Bourdain: No Reservations Hotel Impossible (N) ‘G’ Ă… Hotel Impossible ‘G’ Ă… *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Bourdain: No Reservations M*A*S*H ‘PG’ (6:32) M*A*S*H (7:05) M*A*S*H (7:43) Home Improvement ’ ‘G’ Home Improve. Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 Bonanza The Crucible ‘G’ Ă… NCIS Red Cell ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS: Los Angeles Missing ‘14’ NCIS Biohazard isolation. ’ ‘PG’ WWE Monday Night RAW (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (11:05) Common Law ‘PG’ Ă… USA 15 30 23 30 NCIS Conspiracy Theory ’ ‘PG’ Basketball Wives Finale ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives Reunion (N) ‘14’ Single Ladies (N) ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives Reunion ‘14’ Single Ladies ’ ‘14’ VH1 191 48 37 54 (4:30) ›› “ATLâ€? (2006) Tip Harris, Lauren London. ’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:15) ›› “The Touristâ€? 2010 Johnny Depp. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ›› “The Green Hornetâ€? 2011, Action Seth Rogen. ‘PG-13’ Ă… ››› “Shanghai Knightsâ€? 2003 Jackie Chan. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:20) ›› “Step Up 3â€? 2010 ’ ›› “Planet of the Apesâ€? 2001, Science Fiction Mark Wahlberg. ‘PG-13’ Ă… › “Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Liâ€? 2009 Kristin Kreuk. Ă… › “The Marineâ€? 2006 ‘PG-13’ FMC 104 204 104 120 (4:30) › “Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Liâ€? UFC Fight Night UFC: Korean Zombie vs. Poirier From Patriot Center in Fairfax, Virginia. Hooters’ Snow Angels ‘14’ UFC Reloaded UFC 79: St-Pierre vs. Hughes Georges St-Pierre vs Matt Hughes. FUEL 34 Big Break Atlantis (N) Golf Central (N) (Live) Big Break Atlantis Golf Central GOLF 28 301 27 301 Big Break Atlantis Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Ceremony ‘G’ Face Off With ›› “The Adjustment Bureauâ€? 2011 Matt Damon. A man battles the agents of 24/7 Pacquiao/ Real Time With Bill Maher Journalist ››› “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2â€? 2011 Daniel Radcliffe. The Ricky Ger- 24/7 Pacquiao/ HBO 425 501 425 501 Max Kellerman Fate to be with the woman he loves. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Bradley ‘MA’ Michelle Bernard. ’ ‘MA’ Harry may have to make the ultimate sacrifice. ‘PG-13’ vais Show ‘MA’ Bradley ‘MA’ ›› “The Last Legionâ€? 2007, Action Colin Firth. ‘PG-13’ (7:15) ›› “Lord of Warâ€? 2005, Drama Nicolas Cage, Jared Leto. ‘R’ (9:45) ›› “The Last Legionâ€? 2007, Action Colin Firth, Ben Kingsley. ‘PG-13’ IFC 105 105 (4:50) “Beatdownâ€? 2010, Action Rudy Youngblood, Mi- (6:20) ›› “The Sixth Manâ€? 1997, Comedy Marlon Way- (8:15) ››› “Intolerable Crueltyâ€? 2003 George Clooney. A successful attorney ››› “Gladiatorâ€? 2000, Historical Drama Russell Crowe. A fugitive general MAX 400 508 508 chael Bisping, Bobby Lashley. ’ ‘R’ Ă… ans, David Paymer. Premiere. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… matches wits with a gold digger. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… becomes a gladiator in ancient Rome. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Snipers, Inc. ‘PG’ Wild Justice (N) ‘14’ 21st Century Sex Slaves (N) ‘14’ Snipers, Inc. ‘PG’ Wild Justice ‘14’ 21st Century Sex Slaves ‘14’ Alaska State Troopers ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Odd Parents Odd Parents Odd Parents Monsuno ‘Y7’ Wild Grinders SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Dragonball GT Supah Ninjas Fisher’s ATV Overhaul Destination Pol. Mudslingers Four Wheeler Best of West Overhaul Fisher’s ATV Destination Pol. Four Wheeler Mudslingers Overhaul OUTD 37 307 43 307 Bone Collector Hunt Masters (3:30) ›› “The Twilight Saga: New (5:50) ›› “The Twilight Saga: Eclipseâ€? 2010 Kristen Stewart. Bella must Weeds System Episodes Episode The Borgias Juan tries to spin his Nurse Jackie ’ The Big C Killjoy The Borgias Juan tries to spin his SHO 500 500 Moonâ€? 2009 Kristen Stewart. choose between Edward and Jacob. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Overhead ‘MA’ 4 ’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Ă… combat injury. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… combat injury. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Gearz ‘G’ Hot Rod TV ‘G’ Hot Rod TV ’ Guys Garage Guys Garage Gearz ‘G’ Gearz ‘G’ Hot Rod TV ‘G’ Hot Rod TV ’ Guys Garage Guys Garage Unique Whips ‘14’ SPEED 35 303 125 303 Gearz ‘G’ ›› “Disney’s A Christmas Carolâ€? 2009 ‘PG’ Ă… (7:10) ›› “Little Black Bookâ€? 2004 Brittany Murphy. ‘PG-13’ Ă… ›› “30 Minutes or Lessâ€? 2011 Jesse Eisenberg. ››› “Friends With Benefitsâ€? 2011 ’ ‘R’ Ă… STARZ 300 408 300 408 Frnds-Benefits (4:45) ›› “Joe the Kingâ€? 1999 Noah Fleiss. A teen with a “Few Optionsâ€? 2011 Kenny Johnson. An ex-convict must ›› “The Mechanicâ€? 2011 Jason Statham. An elite hit-man (9:35) ››› “Narcâ€? 2002, Crime Drama Ray Liotta. A disgraced cop probes ››› “Air Force TMC 525 525 miserable home life turns to crime. ‘R’ take a job with his former partners. ‘NR’ Ă… teaches his deadly trade to an apprentice. the death of an undercover colleague. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Oneâ€? ‘R’ NHL Postgame Costas Tonight Sports Talk Poker After Dark Cash 200K Darts NHL 36 ‘G’ NBCSN 27 58 30 209 2012 Stanley Cup Final New Jersey Devils at Los Angeles Kings (N) (Live) Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer Pilot ‘PG’ Ă… Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ *WE 143 41 174 118 Golden Girls


MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Woman searches for recourse to ex-husband’s public abuse Dear Abby: I’m divorced with a young son. My ex-husband and I share joint custody, and for the most part it has worked well. My problem is that my ex is very bitter about our divorce and the fact I have moved on with my life. He constantly makes derogatory comments to me in front of our son and others. It is bad enough that my son must witness this, but my ex has taken it a step further. He is the editor of a small newspaper and is now making disparaging comments about me in his column. He is trying to improve his image at my expense; however, I am unable to respond because he won’t print a rebuttal in his paper. The abuse continues despite the divorce, but now the audience is wider. Is this ethical journalism, and how can I put a stop to it? — Frustrated Ex Dear Frustrated Ex: Using a newspaper column to continue a personal vendetta over a failed marriage is not ethical journalism, although it may make for titillating reading. You do not have to tolerate his public sniping. Take the offensive clippings to your lawyer and ask him or her to write a strong letter to the publisher of the newspaper — because THAT’S who will be liable if there are grounds for a lawsuit. Dear Abby: My husband and I attended a wedding in September of last year. We purchased expensive crystal for the bride and groom, which cost us nearly $600. This was separate from the bridal shower gift we gave them in May. We have not received thank-you notes for either of these gifts. My husband told me that you have said it’s appropriate to send thank-you notes up to one year after the wedding. My mother taught me to send them as quickly as possible. My sister had her wedding

DEAR A B B Y thank-you notes out in three weeks, and I had mine out in two weeks. My sister and I both worked and were setting up new households with our husbands, but we felt it was a priority. We wanted to ensure that our family and friends knew how much their thoughtfulness was appreciated. Can you please clarify thank-you note etiquette? I am tired of wondering if my gifts were received and appreciated. — Disgusted in Delaware Dear Disgusted: I have said in the past that a thank-you note anytime is better than none at all. However, good manners dictate that thank-you notes should follow within three months at the latest, and preferably within one month — regardless of whether the giver has been thanked verbally. Dear Abby: I work in the medical field and have recently learned about a campaign that was launched in England. It urges people to store the word “ICE� (In Case of Emergency) in their cellphone address book, along with the phone number of the person you would want contacted. It’s such a simple idea, but it could be extremely helpful in an emergency situation. It would save ambulance crews and hospital staff precious time and ensure that a patient’s loved ones are contacted as quickly as possible. — Tanya F., Miami Dear Tanya: The idea is certainly worth considering; however, I would offer a minor adjustment. I would recommend that it be indexed under “Emergency Contact� rather than an obscure heading such as “ICE.� — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Monday, June 4, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar This year you often feel as if you are combustible, but you need to remember to stay calm and easy. People, including you, are impulsive and could have short fuses. Be smart — process your feelings and have control over your words. Pick appropriate times to have serious conversations with others. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Misplaced frustration or anger, when coupled with a lunar eclipse, could cause a problem to amplify. If you find that you become irritated, choose to say little and work through it within. If someone else appears to be out of kilter, try not to react. Demonstrate your wisdom in interpersonal relationships. Tonight: Listen to several friends’ war stories of the day. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH You are a sign known to handle money well, and usually you do. Right now, you need to be very careful with your personal funds. You might be lacking self-discipline, and that makes an error possible. Play it conservatively, and you will be left smiling. Postpone your desire to talk through a problem with a loved one. Tonight: Note the hectic pace around you. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH With the lunar eclipse directly impacting your sign, stay level when dealing with others. Play it cool, and you will be a lot happier. Recognize that others are under similar pressure. Keep your focus, and handle what you must. If you decide to head in a new direction or make a resolution, give it a day. Tonight: Once more, you are in a social whirlwind. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Stay focused, whether you are doing something difficult or something very simple. As a child of the Moon, lunar eclipses can hit you very hard. You might feel a little down. Know that this, too, will pass. Give yourself the gift of not reacting. Tonight: Vanish while you can. Do something you’ve secretively wanted to do. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Despite the eclipse, you are on a roll and have no intention of stopping. Your sense of humor emerges in situations involving confusion. Realize that someone might very well be upset. You need to be sensitive to this person. You cannot ignore his or

her vulnerability. Tonight: Use your creativity when making plans. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Pressure builds and forces you to do something in order to let off some steam. The biggest mistake you could make would be doing nothing and holding everything in. It’s as if you have to juggle two opposing interests. Tonight: Happily head home, lock the door and screen your calls. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH No one can predict when his or her popularity or insecurity will soar; however, today you will experience one or the other. You might be juggling more than you would like. Avoid becoming overly serious. Attempt to stay tuned in to your needs, as well as those of someone who is active in your daily life. Tonight: Say “yes� to the right offer. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH You could be so overwhelmed that you might not be sure of yourself and your decisions. You offer a lot, but often find the behavior of key people in your life to be confusing. Do not take risks with your finances. Tonight: Balance your checkbook first. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH You could get hot under the collar when dealing with a boss or someone you need to answer to. You might be acting out in response to this person’s feelings. Stop. Stay cool, calm and collected if possible. Tonight: Beam in your desires. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Take your time handling a personal matter. You might be picking up on something, or realize that some fact is out of sync. You seem to go way overboard when discussing a situation with people, but when the facts finally get sorted out, others will feel better — and so will you. Tonight: Play it low-key. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You mean well, but no matter what you do, you seem to be out of sync. Your feelings are intense, and you might have difficulty understanding why a loved one is being so difficult right now. You are so devoted to your friends that perhaps this person is jealous. Tonight: Only where the gang is. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Somehow, no matter which way you turn, you encounter a problem. Be clear about what you want from a child or loved one. Receiving a clear message could be as challenging as sending one, as a haze seems to surround you. Tonight: A late night. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

C3

C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY

THURSDAY

SELF-PRESENTATION ON FACEBOOK: A discussion of how teen girls use Facebook; free; 3:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-633-3854.

SISTERS RODEO SLACK PERFORMANCE: Slack performance, with breakfast concessions; free; 8 a.m.; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www.sistersrodeo.com. TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-6 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, off of U.S. Highway 20 and Cook Avenue; 541-728-0088, earthsart@gmail.com or http:// tumalogardenmarket.com. “NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE, FRANKENSTEIN�: London’s National Theatre presents a play based on Shelley’s Gothic horror novel; $15; 7 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. SCOTT PEMBERTON BAND: The Portland-based rockers perform; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Preview night for Innovation Theatre Works’ presentation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org. ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL: The Western swing band performs; $38$50; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; www .lastbandstanding.net.

TUESDAY TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637 or info@sustainableflame.com. TRANSIT OF VENUS VIEWING: Observe Venus as it passes between the Earth and the Sun; $5 suggested donation; 3-7 p.m.; Oregon Observatory at Sunriver, 57245 River Road; 541-598-4406. GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring screenings of “Nourish� and “Food Forward,� which explore our relationships with food and agriculture; free; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504.

WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket .com. SISTERS RODEO: Featuring an “Xtreme Bulls� bull-riding event, followed by a dance; $20-$50, $5 for dance; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www.sistersrodeo.com. “NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE, FRANKENSTEIN�: London’s National Theatre presents a play based on Shelley’s Gothic horror novel; $15; 7 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. AMY LAVERE: The Memphis, Tenn.-based singer-songwriter performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com. FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS: Featuring displays of paintings, quilts, jewelry and more; with a performance by Mike Strickland; free; 7 p.m.; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond; 541-5483367 or www.redmondcpc.org. “SOCIAL SECURITY�: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org.

‘What if’ Continued from C1 The rest of Shipman’s essay is clear enough. If the humans had dogs, the dogs must have been helping somehow, in hunting or pulling travois. And they may have been so helpful that they gave modern humans an edge. If they helped in hunting, they might have watched human eyes for clues about what was going on, as they do now. Other researchers have suggested that the white of the human eye evolved to foster cooperation because we could more easily see where others were looking. If dogs were watching us too, that would have added survival value to having a partly white eye and thus played a role in our evolution. Fair enough, but the dogs had to be there at that time when humans and Neanderthals overlapped. I asked Larson about Shipman’s essay, and I confess I expected he might object to its speculative nature. Not so. “I love speculation,� he wrote back. “I do it all the time.� And, he said of Shipman’s essay, “It’s a lovely chain of reasoning.� But, he said, “it begins from the premise that the late Pleis-

FRIDAY PATIO SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit church activities; free admission; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, 16137 Burgess Road, La Pine; 541-536-3571. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@ gmail.com or http://bendfarmers market.com. FRACTALS, PHYSICS AND ART: Richard Taylor talks about art and the use of fractal analysis and computers; $10, $8 Sunriver Nature Center members, $3 students; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-593-4394. “GREGORIAN, GOSPEL AND GERSHWIN�: Mark Oglesby presents an organ concert; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-3631. CASCADE CHORALE: The group performs “Carmina Burana,� poems set to music, under the direction of James Knox; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-7512, jwknox@ cocc.edu or http://cascadechorale .org. SISTERS RODEO: A PRCA rodeo

tocene canid remains are dogs. And they are not.� He wrote, “There is not a single piece of (credible) evidence to suggest that the domestication process was under way 30,000 years ago.� He cited an article in The Journal of Archaeological Science that is highly critical of the Germonpre paper. The article, by Susan Crockford at the University of Victoria and Yaroslav Kuzmin at the Siberian branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, suggests the skulls in question came from short-faced wolves and do not indicate domestication. Crockford, who had read Shipman’s paper, thought it “too speculative for science.� But she did not view the case of early domestication as closed. She said in an email: “We simply need more work on these ancient wolves before we can determine if these canids are incipient dogs ... or if they simply reflect the normal variation in ancient wolves. At present, I am leaning strongly toward the latter.� Perhaps the way to judge the scientific value of speculation would be to see if it prompts more research, more collecting of fossils, more study. Until then, only proximate answers will exist to the question of where dogs came from. Mine came from a shelter. How about yours?

performance with roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; $12, free ages 12 and younger; 7 p.m.; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www.sistersrodeo.com. “SOCIAL SECURITY�: Opening night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; with a champagne and dessert reception; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascades theatrical.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. “THE IRON LADY�: A screening of the PG-13-rated 2011 movie; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www .jcld.org. PRISTINE BLUE: The Portlandbased country band performs; free; 9 p.m.; Maverick’s Country Bar and Grill, 20565 Brinson Blvd., Bend; 541-325-1886.

SATURDAY BIG PINE WALK-RUN-BIKE: 5K or 10K walk/run, or a 25- or 50-mile bike ride; proceeds benefit youth activity scholarships; $20; 8 a.m.; Finley Butte Park, Walling Lane and Finley Butte Road, La Pine; www.big pine.org. PATIO SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit church activities; free admission; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, 16137 Burgess Road, La Pine; 541-536-3571. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Free admission; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-489-3239 or madrassatmkt@ gmail.com. PORSCHE SHOW AND SHINE: A show of all years and models of Porsches; free, $20 to enter a car; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; president@highdesertpca.com. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www .centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. CRUISE TO THE CENTER OF OREGON: See cars in a variety of makes and models; with vendors and train rides; free for spectators, donations of nonperishable food accepted; 10 a.m.-3 p.m., gates open 8 a.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-815-3320 or www .ccrodders.com. RUNNING ON FAITH: A 5K run, followed by kids mini run, live music and more; $20, free for kids; 10 a.m.; Troy Field, Bond Street and Louisiana Avenue, Bend; 541-3894854, grivera@saintfrancisschool .net or www.saintfrancisschool.net.

SISTERS ART IN THE PARK: Featuring arts, crafts and a silent auction benefiting the Make-AWish Foundation of Oregon; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue; 541-420-0279 or centraloregonshows@gmail.com. REDMOND SATURDAY MARKET: Vendors sell arts and crafts; free admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Ambiance Art Co-op, 435 Evergreen Ave.; 541-480-7197. BEND PRIDE CELEBRATION: Gay pride festival includes live music, entertainers and vendors; free; noon-6 p.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-385-3320 or www.human dignitycoalition.org. SISTERS RODEO: Featuring a parade and a PRCA rodeo performance with roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; $12-$18; 9:30 a.m. parade, 1 and 7 p.m. rodeo; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www.sisters rodeo.com. “THE BEAR AND I�: Les Joslin talks about his relationship with Smokey the Bear, followed by a tour of a restored ranger station; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. “THE SNOW QUEEN�: Redmond School of Dance presents the ballet; $12 or $6 ages 11 and younger in advance, $14 or $8 children at the door; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-548-6957 or www .redmondschoolofdance.com. BEATLES SINGALONG: Local acts perform Beatles material with community members joining in; with a silent auction, trivia and costume contests and more; proceeds benefit KPOV; $10-$12 in advance, $15 adults at the door, $5 ages 17 and younger; 7-10 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-322-0863 or www.kpov.org. “SOCIAL SECURITY�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www .innovationtw.org.

Your Oriental Rugs Deserve Expert Care! Our family has been cleaning and restoring Oriental Rugs for over 90 years. All work is performed locally by Anthony Kupelian

KUPELIAN’S ORIENTAL RUGS Established in 1920 A Third Generation Business

WASHING ~ REPAIRING ~ REWEAVING BUYING ~ SELLING ~ APPRAISING Bend, Oregon

541-383-3368 By Appointment Kupsrugs.com


C4

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


M O N D AY, JUNE 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

C5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


C6

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

BYOD Continued from C1 Lynnea Miller, principal broker and owner of Bend Premier Real Estate, said the BYOD movement allows her employees to conduct their business anywhere in the world. The idea of being chained to a desk is gone, she said, along with the 9 to 5 workday. People can be doing business while they’re on the beach or on top of a mountain as long as they have cell service, she said. Miller said there are pluses and minuses to the movement in the sense that employees have their cellphones at home so they are constantly bringing their work home with them. But, she said employees having their cellphones means clients can always reach them. “It can increase your quality of life as a person who is working,” Miller said, “and the accessibility for your clients.” Tablets, laptops, smartphones and Internet programs like DocuSign that provide electronic signatures, she said, make it so her employees don’t need a piece of paper to generate a transaction, eliminating the need for a fax machine or a printer. “You don’t have to be wired in, you just need an electronic source,” she said. But there are also challenges. The Littler report said companies allowing the use of dual-devices — devices used for personal and company activities — face issues including who owns and controls the content and data on devices; security breaches; need for increasing network infrastructure; and deviation from company policy on what devices can be used during work hours. Sally Sorenson, president of the Human Resource Association of Central Oregon — a member organization for human resource professionals and a local chapter affiliated with the Society for Human Resource Management — said the BYOD movement’s potential benefits depend on the industry employees are working in. “There’s not any question that technology is changing rapidly,” she said. “In some cases, bringing your own devices will be appropriate in the workplace, and in others, there may need to be restrictions.” Some businesses have propriety information that can’t leave the office, she said. The use of cellphones that are equipped with cameras could be detrimental if photographs were taken of proprietary information or processes, she said, as could having company documents on personal computers. Sorenson said another concern is whether an employee is using his personal device to conduct personal business during paid time. However, she said, it is the responsibility of an employer to monitor and control such abuses for equipment ranging from landline telephones to laptops. “Creating a flexible workplace is always desirable as long as it doesn’t interfere with business objectives,” she said. “To maintain their competitive edge, employers need to be open to technology as well as other ways to be flexible.” Dan Cecchini, director of information technology services at Central Oregon Community College, said the college has seen the BYOD trend coming and is working to rewrite the information technology acceptable use policy for both employees and students who use COCC’s network. “A single person can come to campus carrying multiple BYOD items, such as a smartphone, tablet and laptop,” Cecchini wrote in an email. “So 100 people may create 300 wireless connections to our network.” In addition to maintaining traditional computer infrastructure, Cecchini said these increased connections require the college to support new infrastructure. “With 17,000 students and hundreds of employees, the infrastructure behind the wire-

less connections takes time and money to implement, manage, maintain and upgrade,” he said. Cecchini said the college also has to be privy to legal data security and privacy considerations when employees are using dual devices, since personal information — Web surfing and chat histories, email, photos, music, movies, user names and passwords, and financial account numbers — can be stored alongside work-related data on the same devices. And because personal devices aren’t owned by the college, he said, there are limitations on what programs and software the institution can insist be installed on them, such as anti-malware software and encryption, leaving the college’s network vulnerable. “There is a challenge to balance the convenience of the BYOD trend against the need to protect individual privacy data,” he said. John Pritchard, IT security manager for St. Charles Health Systems, said in industries like health care, there are stricter regulations, which can make the adoption of the movement difficult. “Within the health care industry, we see protecting our patients’ records and confidentiality as a critical component of high-quality patient care,” he said. “One of the real challenges with the mobile device movement is how to maintain that data security.” Whether it’s a personal or corporate device, he said an employer must establish use expectations and security policies for the workforce. A company needs to have tight policies and procedures, Pritchard said, but it also has to have a management framework to enforce them and additional technical controls to help safeguard data. Pritchard said the five basic functions an organization using the BYOD model might consider having are: the ability to password-protect a device so data is secure when it’s left lying about; the capability for encryption to make data unreadable when the device is not in use; the option to lock a device, to allow a company to safeguard it from its former owner after he has left the company; the capability to wipe a device, restoring it to a factory default-like setting and eliminating all data, applications and user customization; and the ability to segregate personal and company data, a function that may not be available on all devices. Pritchard said St. Charles Health Systems is looking at the use of mobile devices within the health care sector, seeing where other companies have made mistakes and weighing the benefits and risks. “Its not something you want to be on the bleeding edge of,” he said. “There are organizations in the health care sector that have failed to safeguard their patients’ data. Some of those organizations are facing millions, if not billions of dollars in litigation.” There are trade-offs employers and employees need to think about, he said. “Technically you can do a lot of things with BYOD devices, but people really need to think carefully whether they want to,” he said. “Do you want to give your employer access to your personal device, to control it to some degree? Every organization has to wrestle with these questions — what’s going to enable our employees to utilize technology so they can be efficient at their jobs, but … make sure data is being handled in a safe and effective manner?” — Reporter: 541-617-7818, rrees@bendbulletin.com

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME

Bioplastic Continued from C1 “Finding alternative sources for materials is becoming imperative as petroleum prices continue to rise and traditional, less-sustainable materials become more expensive,” said John Viera, Ford’s global director of sustainability and vehicle environmental matters. Smaller business are making big changes too. BioSolar Inc. of Santa Clarita, Calif., dealt every day with the fact that solar modules are typically made with a glass front, an aluminum frame and a back sheet made out of a petroleum-based plastic or polymer. “We saw where the price of petroleum was going,” BioSolar Chief Executive David Lee said. “That was one of our motivations. We’re not economists, but we knew that the price of oil was going to keep going up. The cost of photovoltaic cell manufacturing was going to skyrocket.” BioSolar has changed its process to instead use castor beans. Los Angeles businessman Neal Harris once relied on beads made from a petroleum-based polymer to hold fragrances for his company’s products. Harris’ company, ScentEvents, sells fragrances as a marketing tool to enhance movie premieres, concerts, parties and products. This year, he’ll use ceramic beads 95 percent of the time. “It’s saving us money, and we no longer have to keep track of oil prices,” Harris said. Saving money isn’t the only motivation. Many businesses are responding to younger customers who are concerned about the environment. “There is a strong generational interest in not using oil,” said Amy Myers Jaffe, associate director of Rice University’s Energy Program. “And that interest is more ideological than economic. These are people concerned about climate change and the social-justice issues of how the oil industry operates.” San Francisco environmental advocacy group As You Sow garnered support

Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times

Tom Lopez, a driver for the Coca-Cola Los Angeles Distribution Center, loads half-liter bottles of Dasani water at the plant. Coca-Cola developed its own PlantBottle packaging in 2011, which uses 30 percent plant-based materials.

last year from 29 percent of McDonald’s shareholders for a proposal urging the fastfood giant to consider “more environmentally beneficial beverage containers.” In March, McDonald’s began a tryout of double-walled paper hot-drink cups in 2,000 restaurants, mainly on the West Coast. “McDonald’s is striving to reduce, reuse and recycle wherever possible as part of our overall sustainability strategy,” said McDonald’s spokeswoman Heather Oldani. “We will continue to evaluate the pilot and new cups based on customer feedback.” Method Products Inc., of San Francisco, makes a line of home-cleaning items, hand and body cleansers, air fresheners and candles that have earned a following at major retailers, including Target and Costco. Its trucks are decorated with the words “Biodiesel is how we roll.” The company even collects used vegetable oil for reuse as fuel. “We have seven trucks and 18 trailers that run on a minimum of 20 percent biodiesel,” said Drummond Lawson, Method’s director of sustainability. “Lowering our costs and our exposure to oil is just part of it. Our other goal is to reduce resource consumption as much as possible in making our products.” With PepsiCo claiming

to have developed the first 100 percent plant-based and renewably sourced plastic bottle last year, Coca-Cola developed its own PlantBottle Packaging Project last year. The PlantBottle reduces the use of petroleum-based products compared with traditional plastic bottles by using 30 percent plant-based materials derived from sugar cane — cutting its use of fossil fuels. Coke aims to use plant-based

material in all of its packaging by 2020, said Scott Vitters, general manager of Coca-Cola’s PlantBottle initiative. “With crude oil, you’re talking about a finite resource,” Vitters said. “We’re making a long-term bet that the price of oil isn’t really going to go down. This makes good economic sense in terms of long-term cost containment, but it also makes sense environmentally.”


S PORTS

Scoreboard, D2 NBA, D3 Tennis, D3 MLB, D4

D

Golf, D5 Motor sports, D5 Cycling Central, D6

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

LOCALLY Thousands run or walk Bend 5K Bend’s Frans Alajoki finished first out of 815 timed competitors during Sunday’s Heaven Can Wait 5K running event at Bend’s Drake Park. Event organizers estimated that around 3,700 people took part in the event as timed and untimed participants. Alajoki completed the course in 17 minutes, 23 seconds, beating out second-place finisher Alan Nielsen, also of Bend, who clocked in at 18:07. Bend’s Jason Townsend finished third for the men at 18:51. Olivia Brooks, of Bend, took first in the women’s division, 11th overall, at 19:59. Ciara Jones was across the finish line second as the Bend woman posted a time of 21:37. Evelyn Thissel, of La Pine, and Jeannie Groesz, of Redmond, came in third and fourth place after they both clocked in at 22:24. Heaven Can Wait is a benefit for Sara’s Project, which raises funds for breast health education. For the top finishers from Sunday’s race, see Scoreboard, D 2. — Bulletin staff report

MLB No lock at No. 1 for today’s draft NEW YORK — Most major league teams agree that there’s no Stephen Strasburg or Bryce Harper in this year’s baseball draft. There’s not even a Gerrit Cole or Danny Hultzen, last year’s first two picks, at the top of the class. So, without a clearcut No. 1 prospect and several significant rule changes in place, teams face some intriguing decisions and an unpredictable first round in this year’s draft that starts tonight, with the Houston Astros leading things off. “It’s a below-average draft as far as drafts go, and it’s certainly down from last year as far as depth and premium players in the first round,” said Sean Johnson, Minnesota’s West Coast scouting supervisor. “It’s lean in certain spots.” Allotted spending caps based on the number and placement of team’s picks, and an earlier signing deadline are among the changes clubs will navigate this year. The draft also is shorter now, pared down from 50 to 40 rounds. “I’m old school,” said Seattle scouting director Tom McNamara, whose team picks third. “I wish it was 70 rounds. You may find a guy in the 55th round. I was an undrafted free agent as a player, so maybe I would have been drafted if there were 100 rounds.” The Astros have the No. 1 pick for the first time since taking Phil Nevin in 1992 — one of five teams to pass on a young shortstop named Derek Jeter, selected sixth overall by the New York Yankees.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

A look inside a bike mechanic’s world • Hutch’s Bicycles’ Chris Knight gives some insight into fixing rides By Laura Winberry For The Bulletin

Y

ou are on your feet all day, your hands are greasy (or at least the latex gloves covering them are), the apron across your chest is weighted with Allen wrenches, pencils and measuring devices, and you have seen at least 40 different bicycles pass before your eyes in the past six hours. You are a bicycle mechanic, and this is just the beginning. For 35-year-old Chris Knight, with whom I recently spoke while he worked at Hutch’s Bicycles west-side location in Bend, greasy hands and a plethora of technical questions launched from

Summit took the Class 5A state volleyball title in the fall; pictured are Laney Hayes, center, and Nicole Ruttke, right.

Summit’s Travis Neuman, center, won the boys 5A individual crosscountry title and led the Storm to a team title.

John Klicker / For The Bulletin

Matthew Aimonetti / For The Bulletin

Summit’s Madison Odiorne took the girls golf individual title as the Storm also won as a team in Class 5A.

Summit’s Tommy Brewer, center, had a big Class 5A state swim meet to lead the Storm boys to a team title.

Ethan Erickson / For The Bulletin

Matthew Aimonetti / For The Bulletin

Year of the Storm • Summit squads won an amazing 10 team state championships during the school year

T

he year of Summit started when Megan Fristoe crossed the finish line at the Class 5A girls state cross-country championships at Lane Community College in November, and it did not end until Summit’s near-miss in Saturday’s baseball final in Keizer. In the seven months between, Bend’s west-side school won an astonishing 10 Oregon School Activities Association team state titles. “I’m guessing only Jesuit has had such single-year success in the past decade,” says OSAA sports informa-

BEAU EASTES tion director Steve Walker. The Storm started the school year with a bang, claiming the 5A boys and girls state cross-country championships in Eugene behind Fristoe and Travis Neuman’s individual wins. A week later, Gabby Crowell led a late Summit rally past West Albany in the volleyball final as the Storm

became the first program from the city of Bend to win a volleyball state crown. Summit’s success continued into the winter, as the Storm added team state championships in boys and girls swimming. “This has been 11 years in the making,” Summit swim coach Amy Halligan said after the championship meet about her program’s dual victories. The Storm saved their best for the spring, though, as Summit rolled to five over the past month. See Storm / D5

They are the champions A list of the Summit teams that won Class 5A state titles during the fall, winter and spring seasons: • Boys and girls cross country • Volleyball • Boys and girls swimming • Boys and girls track and field • Boys and girls tennis • Girls golf

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

COLLEGE BASEBALL: NCAA REGIONALS

UO advances to super regionals; OSU ousted from postseason

GOLF

Woods uses miraculous shot to take PGA Tour title, D 5

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Hutch’s Bicycles mechanic Chris Knight gives a Specialized mountain bike a tuneup at the west-side Bend shop earlier this spring. Knight has been fixing bikes for 15 years.

PREP SPORTS COMMENTARY

— The Associated Press

Tiger wins at the Memorial

customers in need are just part of being a bike mechanic. “A portion of our job as mechanics is to be involved in the sales end of things,” says Knight. “We look over walk-in bikes (bikes brought in without an appointment), give an evaluation and price quote, and then inform customers of what the bike needs, as well as what it doesn’t necessarily need but could benefit from.” A Boston native who began working for a bicycle shop employee in Vail, Colo., in 1997, Knight has garnered 15 years of experience and is well aware of all that goes with being a bicycle mechanic. See Mechanic / D6

CYCLING CENTRAL

Ivar Vong / The Register-Guard via The Associated Press

Oregon’s Connor Hofmann celebrates a run during the Ducks’ 8-1 win over Austin Peay in an NCAA regional game on Sunday in Eugene.

From wire reports EUGENE — One college baseball team from Oregon will keep playing in the NCAA postseason. Jake Reed pitched seven scoreless innings as Oregon beat Austin Peay 8-1 on Sunday night and advanced out of the NCAA regionals for the first time since 1954. Oregon State lost to LSU 6-5 in 10 innings in the Baton Rouge, La., regional, eliminating the Beavers from the postseason. Brett Thomas had three RBIs for Oregon (45-17), which reinstated baseball in 2009 after the university eliminated the sport in 1981. The Ducks will play Kent State, likely at home, next weekend in the super regionals. “Obviously, we’re very proud and excited to bring a regional title back to Oregon,” said coach George Horton, who left a perennial College World Series team at Cal State Fullerton to revive the program five years ago. See Baseball / D5

Friday, June 8th 6:35pm vs. Klamath Falls Gems

FREE

Sponsored by:

Magnetic Calendar General Admission Tickets, Hot Dogs or Sodas & more! Just $2 Each! Sponsored by:


D2

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

SCOREBOARD BASEBALL WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE ——— League standings East Division W Wenatchee AppleSox 2 Kelowna Falcons 0 Bellingham Bells 1 Walla Walla Sweets 1 West Division W Kitsap BlueJackets 3 Bend Elks 2 Corvallis Knights 2 Klamath Falls Gems 0 Cowlitz Black Bears 0 Sunday’s Games Wenatchee 5, Bellingham 3 Bellingham 2, Wenatchee 1 Kitsap 4, Cowlitz 3 Walla Walla 9, Corvallis 1 Today’s Games Wenatchee at Bellingham, 7:05 p.m. Kitsap at Walla Walla, 7:05 p.m.

L 1 0 2 2 L 0 0 1 2 3

RUNNING Local Heaven Can Wait 5K Sunday Bend (Place, name, hometown, time) Top 400 placers 1, Frans Alajoki, Bend, 17:23. 2, Alan Nielsen, Bend, 18:07. 3, Jason Townsend, Bend, 18:51. 4, Jason Adams, Bend, 19:02. 5, Eric Hammer, Bend, 19:03. 6, Shane Cochran, Bend, 19:21. 7, Gabriel Coler, Bend, 19:30. 8, Sean Leslie, Seattle, 19:40. 9, Alex Martin, Bend, 19:51. 10, Eric Martin, Bend, 19:51. 11, Olivia Brooks, Bend, 19:59. 12, Zachry Weber, Bend, 20:11. 13, Ron Deems, Bend, 20:12. 14, Brandon Hawes, Madras, 20:29. 15, Rigo Ramirez, Redmond, 20:30. 16, David Martin, Canberra, Australia, 20:33. 17, Jack Strang, Bend, 20:34. 18, Quinn Fettig, Bend, 20:36. 19, Nate Pedersen, Bend, 20:38. 20, Martin Marquez, Bend, 20:46. 21, Graham Lelack, Bend, 20:58. 22, Joey Gann, Bend, 21:02. 23, Kenny Weigandt, Springfield, 21:04. 24, John Holland, Redmond, 21:09. 25, Brad Mandal, Bend, 21:13. 26, Ciara Jones, Bend, 21:37. 27, Trenton Kropf, Bend, 21:44. 28, Rod Thompson, Bend, 21:54. 29, Keenan Giamanco, Bend, 22:08. 30, Rick Jacobs, Bend, 22:17. 31, Tray Libolt, Bend, 22:18. 32, Callan Valentine, Bend, 22:23. 33, Evelyn Thissel, La Pine, 22:24. 34, Jeannie Groesz, Redmond, 22:24. 35, Jeff Holden, Bend, 22:25. 36, Amy Holcomb, Bend, 22:26. 37, Terran Libolt, Bend, 22:30. 38, Kylee Johnson, Redmond, 22:31. 39, Punk Thissell, La Pine, 22:35. 40, Sam Sobotta, Bend, 22:36. 41, Russell Taylor, Bend, 22:38. 42, Ian Churchill, Bend, 22:39. 43, Joseph De Leone, Terrebonne, 22:40. 44, Lindsay Garlington, Redmond, 22:41. 45, Teresa Martin, Bend, 22:41. 46, Emily Rose, Bend, 22:41. 47, Anthony Havey, Klamath Falls, 22:42. 48, Melanie Mangin, Bend, 22:43. 49, Melissa Morris, Bend, 22:48. 50, Darren Moore, Bend, 23:02. 51, Justine Deets, Bend, 23:06. 52, Chase Brennan, Bend, 23:07. 53, Madi Mansberger, Bend, 23:14. 54, Lindsay Valentine, Bend, 23:20. 55, Shaun Kooch, Terrebonne, 23:28. 56, Casey Marker, Redmond, 23:29. 57, Hannah Tobinason, Bend, 23:31. 58, Ken Reiswig, Bend, 23:38. 59, Liz Fancher, Bend, 23:40. 60, Zachary Imel, Bend, 23:42. 61, Sarah Curran, Bend, 23:42. 62, Grace Curran, Bend, 23:42. 63, Scott Pisani, Bend, 23:44. 64, Brian Page, Bend, 23:47. 65, Addison Hartford, Bend, 23:48. 66, Alexis Eudy, Bend, 23:50. 67, William Churchill, Bend, 23:50. 68, Shaelynn Davis, Bend, 23:50. 69, Doug Lundy, Bend, 23:50. 70, Katie Lamarre, Bend, 23:51. 71, Brandon Bartlett, Bend, 23:52. 72, Madison Leapaldt, Bend, 23:53. 73, Micaela Martin, Bend, 23:54. 74, Maribel Eames, Bend, 23:58. 75, Michelle Lane, Redmond, 23:58. 76, Eva Cihon, Bend, 23:59. 77, Jackson Murphy, Bend, 24:00. 78, Chris Fonseca, Redmond, 24:01. 79, Stephanie Jacobson, Bend, 24:02. 80, Brian Merrill, Bend, 24:02. 81, Sue Dougherty, Bend, 24:06. 82, Laura Jacobs, Bend, 24:15. 83, Jason Yancy, Bend, 24:15. 84, Kevin Peck, Bend, 24:16. 85, Maddy Cochrane, Gilchrist, 24:20. 86, Cindi Eielson, Bend, 24:24. 87, Cole Timm, Bend, 24:26. 88, Bruce Churchill, Bend, 24:27. 89, David Stewart, Bend, 24:27. 90, Julie Opsahl, Bend, 24:29. 91, 1007 Lori Ozment, Champaign, 24:30. 92, Troy Ansell, Corvallis, 24:36. 93, Mike Baxter, Bend, 24:36. 94, Steven Little, Bend, 24:37. 95, Patrick Weishaupt, Bend, 24:38. 96, Caryn Hill, Bend, 24:39. 97, Mark Hobbs, Bend, 24:39. 98, Paul MacMillan, Bend, 24:40. 99, Collin Robinson, Bend, 24:42. 100, Jack Cauble, Bend, 24:43. 101, Josh Brown, Sunriver, 24:43. 102, David Hoover, Bend, 24:43. 103, Benny Saito, Redmond, 24:50. 104, Jake Marcus, Bend, 24:50. 105, Katie Saito, Redmond, 24:51. 106, Shannon Mara, Bend, 24:56. 107, Jeanne Wadsworth, Bend, 24:59. 108, Ben Anderson, Madras, 25:01. 109, Daniel Vance, Bend, 25:02. 110, Sharon Frank, Bend, 25:03. 111, Ryan Elliston, Redmond, 25:09. 112 1 Susanna Abrahamson, Bend, 25:10. 113, Kim Bruhn, Bend, 25:14. 114, Krystal Schadwald, Bend, 25:15. 115, Katie Tiktin, Bend, 25:15. 116, Kirdy Molan B 25:16. 117, Sara Murphy, Bend, 25:17. 118, Kermit Yensen, Bend, 25:19. 119, Sam Hatfield, Bend, 25:22. 120, Lisa Bowerman, Bend, 25:23. 121, Diane Yensen, Bend, 25:29. 122, Ian Katz, Bend, 25:30. 123, Jonathan Nickless, Bend, 25:34. 124, Sonja Von Ehrenstein, Bend, 25:35. 125, Paul Leapaldt, Bend, 25:36. 126, Chad Schlottmann, Sunriver, 25:36. 127, Zachary Hoskins, Bend, 25:36. 128, Hailey Dodson, Bend, 25:37. 129, Matthew Lachance, Bend, 25:41. 130, Brad Covington, Bend, 25:42. 131, Lisa Marie Potter, Bend, 25:43. 132, Emily Hyde, Bend, 25:44. 133, Laura Becker, Bend, 25:45. 134, Ryan Decastilhos, Bend, 25:46. 135, Sherri Katz, Bend, 25:46. 136, Rebecca Lynch, Bend, 25:47. 137, Corey Bruhn, Bend, 25:48. 138, Amy Wiensheim, Redmond, 25:49. 139, Robert Poggione, Bend, 25:53. 140, Robert Small, Bend, 25:55. 141, Corey Esson, Bend, 25:58. 142, Kerianne Bethers, Redmond, 25:59. 143, Mallory Roberts, Bend, 26:00. 144, Tessie Nolin, Bend, 26:00. 145, Jen Roberts, Bend, 26:01. 146, Gavin Gutowsky, Bend, 26:04. 147, Kym Townsend, Bend, 26:06. 148, Wendy Stock, Bend, 26:08. 149, Jake Woodruff, Bend, 26:08. 150, John Farwell, Bend, 26:10. 151, Trevor McCreery, Bend, 26:10. 152, Connor Bellusci, Bend, 26:11. 153, Tyra Tobiason, Bend, 26:13. 154, Kirby Mansberger, Bend, 26:14. 155, Becky Myhrum Condon, Bend, 26:16. 156, Tate Valentine, Bend, 26:16. 157, Sawn Polizzi, Bend, 26:19. 158, Terri Mucha, Bend, 26:19. 159, Michelle Lauerman, Bend, 26:20. 160, Brian Kent, Bend, 26:20. 161, Bethany Loumena, Gresham, 26:22. 162, Kasey Corwin, Bend, 26:22. 163, Mary Weerts, Bend, 26:24. 164, Jessica Czmowski, Bend, 26:25. 165, David Oak, Bend, 26:26. 166, Sue Carroll, Bend, 26:26. 167, Sarah West, Bend, 26:29. 168, Stacey Lynch, Powell Butte, 26:32. 169, Tami Brna, Arvada, 26:33. 170, Connie Heim, Terrebonne, 26:34. 171, Tia Yankovich, Bend, 26:34. 172, Emma Brooks, Bend, 26:35. 173, Orrin Libolt, Bend, 26:40. 174, Taylor Smith, Bend, 26:41. 175, Joren Fettig, Bend, 26:42. 176, Tiffany Stevens, Bend, 26:43. 177, Jill Mercer 26:43. 178, Megan McCleary, Bend, 26:43. 179, Sue Henderson, Bend, 26:43. 180, Liv Downing, Bend, 26:44. 181, Kelly Meyer, Bend, 26:45. 182, Brandi Moles, Bend, 26:45. 183, Andrea Levesque, Bend, 26:46. 184, Arnold Jones, Bedford, 26:46. 185, Clyde Dunithan, Bend, 26:47. 186, Conner Mansberger, Bend, 26:48. 187, Gena Huff, Redmond, 26:51. 188, Wendy Miller, Redmond, 26:59. 189, Audra Green, Redmond, 27:02. 190, Kasey Naugher, Redmond, 27:07. 191, Heather Moore, Bend, 27:11. 192, Shelby Little, Bend, 27:12. 193, Stephanie Leapaldt, Bend, 27:12. 194, Zachary Martin, Bend, 27:15. 195, Katherine Skovborg, Bend, 27:15. 196, Lily Chrisman, Bend, 27:15. 197, Paul Messett, Bend, 27:16. 198, Lauren Jones, Bedford, 27:18. 199, Kaitlyn Elliston, Redmond, 27:21. 200, Tobias Holme, Bend, 27:23. 201, Dave Roberts, Sisters, 27:28. 202, Regan Roberts, Sisters, 27:28. 203, Young Hersch, Bend, 27:33. 204, Hayley Newton, Prineville, 27:38. 205, Monique McCleary, Bend, 27:40. 206, Robert Guinee, Bend, 27:40. 207, Keith Cannon, Redmond, 27:45. 208, Donna Howard, Redmond, 27:47. 209, Brian Barber, Bend, 27:51. 210, Elena Messett, Bend, 27:52. 211, Cambria Nutter, Bend, 27:53. 212, Kristal Hopkins, Bend, 27:56. 213, Rick Clothier, Bend, 27:57. 214, Susan Gorman, Bend, 27:57. 215, Sarah Bartlett, Bend, 28:02. 216, Elizabeth Rochefort, Redmond, 28:05. 217, Sachi Nishikawa, Bend, 28:05. 218, Yvette Nishikawa, Bend, 28:05. 219, Carina Rosterolla, Gilchrist, 28:06. 220, McGregor Mead, Bend, 28:08. 221, Julia Fecteau, Bend, 28:09. 222, Ann Story, Bend, 28:09. 223, Kyle Steenport, Bend, 28:09. 224, Claire Irvine, Bend, 28:10. 225, Amelia Carmosino, Bend, 28:10. 226, Mary Kate Clason, Bend, 28:10.

227, Erin MacMillan, Bend, 28:11. 228, Rachel Worbes, Bend, 28:11. 229, Eric Kozowski, Bend, 28:13. 230, Siri Chotechuang, Bend, 28:16. 231, Matthew Horning, Bend, 28:16. 232, Brady Bedsworth, Bend, 28:16. 233, Christy Schryver, Bend, 28:17. 234 1002 Hollie Williams, Bend, 28:18. 235, Hank Weathers, Bend, 28:18. 236, Kristina Smith, Bend, 28:21. 237, Nate Lelack, Bend, 28:24. 238, Haley Tobiason, Bend, 28:27. 239, Alyssa Bennett, Bend, 28:28. 240, Nicholas Lelack, Bend, 28:28. 241, Bob Garner, Bend, 28:29. 242, Julie Johnson, Bend, 28:30. 243, Jackson Skovborg, Bend, 28:30. 244, Hailee Smith, Gilchrist, 28:30. 245, Ashlyn Clason, Bend, 28:31. 246, Susie Rossi, Bend, 28:31. 247, Sharon Austin, Bend, 28:32. 248, Laurie Martin, Bend, 28:33. 249, Jack Fecteau, Bend, 28:33. 250, Kassie Krochina, Bend, 28:34. 251, Tricia Maxson, Bend, 28:35. 252, Jennifer Boone, Bend, 28:35. 253, Tiffany Gomes, Bend, 28:41. 254, Colene Lord, Bend, 28:42. 255, Linda Hickmann, Bend, 28:43. 256, Jeff Freyermuth, Bend, 28:44. 257, Terri Freyermuth, Bend, 28:44. 258, Debbie Fred, Bend, 28:45. 259, Janice McConnell, Bend, 28:45. 260, Samantha Warner, Bend, 28:46. 261, Christina Large, Bend, 28:48. 262, Judy Luce, Reno, 28:50. 263, Trevor Davis, Powell Butte, 28:51. 264, Carolyn Bruhn, Bend, 28:51. 265, Margie Untermeyer, Bend, 28:55. 266, Pam Fortier, Bend, 28:55. 267, Laura Pederson, Bend, 28:57. 268, Kameron Giamanco, Bend, 28:58. 269, Rene Libolt, Bend, 28:59. 270, Erika Holmes, Redmond, 28:59. 271, Julie Singer, Bend, 29:00. 272, Tristan Blackburn, Bend, 29:01. 273, Johanna Geisen, Redmond, 29:01. 274, Elizabeth Lopez, Bend, 29:02. 275, Missy Geary, Bend, 29:02. 276, Lisa Caine, Bend, 29:02. 277, Adrian Mikkelson, Bend, 29:03. 278, Dawn Ulvi, Bend, 29:06. 279, Tyrell Hobbs, Bend, 29:07. 280, Emily Zamarripa, Bend, 29:07. 281, Kaylee Wilson, Bend, 29:09. 282, Christina Faria, Bend, 29:13. 283, Ashleigh Mitchell, Bend, 29:15. 284, Nicole Morgen, Bend, 29:16. 285, Craig Fettig, Bend, 29:18. 286, Todd Tanton, Bend, 29:18. 287 4 Michela Aiello, Bend, 29:19. 288, Gavin Rhoades, Bend, 29:19. 289, Tom Malin, Bend, 29:20. 290, Robert Paterson, Bend, 29:21. 291, Francesca Rossi, Bend, 29:23. 292, Alanna McGlone, Bend, 29:23. 293, Sharon Bellusci, Bend, 29:23. 294, Tatum Diemer, Westminster, 29:24. 295, Gage Decamp, Redmond, 29:26. 296, Penni Borghi, Bend, 29:26. 297, Janine Richardson, Bend, 29:27. 298, Cheryl Morgen, Bend, 29:28. 299, Jane Clemo, Bend, 29:30. 300, Zachary Jepson, Bend, 29:32. 301, Sather Ekblad, Redmond, 29:33. 302, Jennifer Geisen, Redmond, 29:33. 303, Honore Richards, Bend, 29:34. 304, Rhonda Willey, Crooked River Ranch, 29:34. 305, Andre Sinard, Bend, 29:34. 306, Amanda Meltzer, Bend, 29:36. 307, Trevor Knott, Otis, 29:37. 308, Anya Katz, Bend, 29:37. 309, Jeanine Faria, Bend, 29:37. 310, Jennifer Phillips, Bend, 29:38. 311, Marcia Filicetti, Bend, 29:38. 312, Joe Decamp, Redmond, 29:39. 313, John MacMillan, Bend, 29:40. 314, Julia Gorman, Bend, 29:42. 315, Erica Nelson, Bend, 29:45. 316, Audrey Rampton, Bend, 29:45. 317, Chris Chang, Bend, 29:46. 318, Kambel Quatre, Bend, 29:47. 319, Haydn Quatre, Bend, 29:47. 320, Taylor Poggione, Bend, 29:48. 321, Cole Rupert, Bend, 29:51. 322, Lindsey Kiesz, Bend, 29:54. 323, Lisa Janssen, La Pine, 29:54. 324, Alethea Kercher, Bend, 29:55. 325, Kelly Farrell, Bend, 29:56. 326, Rachel Polley, Bend, 30:00. 327, Lorna Havey, Klamath Falls, 30:00. 328, Lori Scott, Bend, 30:00. 329, Dominic Ficco-Juslen, Bend, 30:01. 330, Linda Holland, Redmond, 30:03. 331, Davis Cancills, Redmond, 30:04. 332, Christina Hansen, Bend, 30:05. 333, Jill Fincham, Bend, 30:05. 334, William Martin, Bend, 30:06. 335, Ashley Sanders, Bend, 30:08. 336, Lori Myers, Bend, 30:08. 337, Meredith Berrigan, Bend, 30:09. 338, Les Scott, Bend, 30:11. 339, Sarah Mattox, Bend, 30:12. 340, Nathan Brott, Redmond, 30:13. 341, Jody Stott, Redmond, 30:14. 342, Eileen Dodson, Bend, 30:14. 343, Mark Reddick, Bend, 30:15. 344, Dawn Reddick, Bend, 30:15. 345, Susan Henry, Bend, 30:16. 346, Jamie Miller, Bend, 30:17. 347, McKenzie Wheeler, Bend, 30:17. 348, Bobbi Vercruysse, Athena, 30:18. 349, Angela Buller, Bend, 30:18. 350, Keonna Vercruysse, Redmond, 30:19. 351, Denise De Leone, Terrebonne, 30:19. 352, Jennfier McCormick, Bend, 30:25. 353, Richard Bigelow, Redmond, 30:28. 354, Tracy Huettl, Bend, 30:29. 355, Renee Brodock, Bend, 30:33. 356, Morgan Hanson, Bend, 30:34. 357, Darlene Paterson, Bend, 30:38. 358, Ryan Higgins, Terrebonne, 30:43. 359, Matt Dailey, Redmond, 30:44. 360, Brandy O’Sullivan, Bend, 30:45. 361, Lori Diggs, Bend, 30:47. 362, Gena Bennett, Madras, 30:47. 363, Galit Miller, Bend, 30:48. 364, Savannah Stalker, Bend, 30:48. 365, Amy Smith, Mountlake, 30:54. 366, Amanda Noland, Prineville, 30:55. 367, Cori Kuntz, Redmond, 30:57. 368, Payton Kelly, Powell Butte, 30:57. 369, Helen Kelly, Powell Butte, 30:58. 370, Jason Kish, Redmond, 30:58. 371, Davinie Fiero, Redmond, 30:58. 372, Jenniffer Smith, Bend, 31:00. 373, Tracy Lombardo, Bend, 31:01. 374, Cami McCullough, Bend, 31:01. 375, Ashley Beatty, Bend, 31:04. 376, Hannah Carrick, Bend, 31:05. 377, Jack Erskine, Bend, 31:08. 378, Carly Watkins, Bend, 31:12. 379, Ileana Bourland, Bend, 31:13. 380, Terri Brown, Sisters, 31:15. 381, Michelle Cannon, Redmond, 31:18. 382, Jennifer Fischer, Portland, 31:23. 383, Teri Donatoni, Bend, 31:31. 384, Lori Hurworth, Bend, 31:36. 385, Mark Hanschka, Sunriver, 31:38. 386, Tina Decamp, Redmond, 31:38. 387, Susan Keith, Bend, 31:38. 388, Kristi Winstead, Bend, 31:41. 389, Susan Guinee, Bend, 31:42. 390, Jarrod Heredia, Bend, 31:44. 391, Becki Doden, Bend, 31:47. 392, Carina McCarthy, Bend, 31:47. 393 8 Tessa Allen, Bend, 31:48. 394, Kari McConnell, Bend, 31:49. 395, Deanne Spencer, Bend, 31:49. 396, Erica Nyden, Bend, 31:50. 397, Kristen Place, Bend, 31:50. 398, Emily Moore, Bend, 31:52. 399, Lane Gladden, Bend, 31:53. 400, Hannah Davis, Bend, 31:53.

GOLF PGA Tour The Memorial Sunday At Muirfield Village Golf Club Dublin, Ohio Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,352; Par: 72 Final Round Tiger Woods (500), $1,116,000 70-69-73-67—279 Andres Romero (245), $545,600 69-73-72-67—281 Rory Sabbatini (245), $545,600 69-69-71-72—281 Spencer Levin (123), $272,800 67-72-69-75—283 D. Summerhays (123), $272,800 69-71-74-69—283 Jonathan Byrd (95), $215,450 71-70-72-71—284 Matt Every (95), $215,450 69-75-71-69—284 Justin Rose (85), $192,200 73-72-71-69—285 Aaron Baddeley (75), $167,400 69-72-73-72—286 Ryo Ishikawa, $167,400 72-70-71-73—286 Greg Owen (75), $167,400 72-71-76-67—286 Luke Donald (65), $142,600 71-73-75-68—287 J.B. Holmes (58), $119,867 72-75-74-67—288 Bo Van Pelt (58), $119,867 73-69-75-71—288 Jim Furyk (58), $119,867 72-68-75-73—288 Davis Love III (54), $99,200 74-72-71-72—289 Vijay Singh (54), $99,200 72-73-69-75—289 Kevin Stadler (54), $99,200 72-73-71-73—289 Blake Adams (50), $72,540 69-77-71-73—290 K.J. Choi (50), $72,540 74-71-77-68—290 John Huh (50), $72,540 71-74-76-69—290 Dustin Johnson (50), $72,540 71-71-73-75—290 Hunter Mahan (50), $72,540 72-73-77-68—290 Charl Schwartzel (50), $72,540 73-72-73-72—290 Ricky Barnes (40), $40,777 72-72-76-71—291 Brian Davis (40), $40,777 73-72-74-72—291 Branden Grace, $40,777 74-72-75-70—291 Chris Kirk (40), $40,777 75-70-75-71—291 Stewart Cink (40), $40,777 71-73-73-74—291 Nicolas Colsaerts, $40,777 72-74-73-72—291 David Hearn (40), $40,777 70-75-70-76—291 Trevor Immelman (40), $40,777 71-70-75-75—291 David Mathis (40), $40,777 71-71-74-75—291 Pat Perez (40), $40,777 74-73-72-72—291 Kyle Reifers (40), $40,777 71-70-73-77—291 Scott Stallings (40), $40,777 66-73-75-77—291 Cameron Tringale (40), $40,777 72-74-73-72—291 Greg Chalmers (30), $24,800 71-71-77-73—292 Erik Compton (30), $24,800 67-75-75-75—292 Brendon de Jonge (30), $24,800 73-71-74-74—292 Troy Matteson (30), $24,800 72-69-76-75—292 Ryan Moore (30), $24,800 70-73-71-78—292 Nick O’Hern (30), $24,800 74-73-74-71—292 Jeff Overton (30), $24,800 72-72-78-70—292 Johnson Wagner (30), $24,800 72-72-73-75—292 Lucas Glover (24), $17,577 74-68-75-76—293 Rod Pampling (24), $17,577 72-74-73-74—293 Adam Scott (24), $17,577 70-72-77-74—293 Henrik Stenson (24), $17,577 74-68-71-80—293 Fred Couples (21), $15,438 74-73-76-71—294 Steve Stricker (21), $15,438 73-70-75-76—294 Bud Cauley (18), $14,539 70-76-77-72—295 Rickie Fowler (18), $14,539 71-71-69-84—295 Seung-Yul Noh (18), $14,539 72-73-75-75—295 Charlie Wi (18), $14,539 71-75-75-74—295 Robert Allenby (15), $14,074 73-74-77-72—296 Jhonattan Vegas (15), $14,074 74-73-75-74—296 Chris DiMarco (12), $13,702 73-72-73-79—297 Ernie Els (12), $13,702 70-75-74-78—297 Marc Leishman (12), $13,702 72-75-75-75—297

Geoff Ogilvy (12), $13,702 Harris English (8), $13,206 Ryuji Imada (8), $13,206 Brendan Steele (8), $13,206 Jimmy Walker (8), $13,206 Brandt Jobe (5), $12,834 Mark Wilson (5), $12,834 Scott Piercy (3), $12,648 Ben Crane (2), $12,524 Robert Garrigus (1), $12,338 Camilo Villegas (1), $12,338

71-74-79-73—297 71-75-80-72—298 75-72-71-80—298 72-75-74-77—298 72-73-78-75—298 73-74-79-73—299 70-76-78-75—299 70-75-80-75—300 72-75-74-80—301 71-76-79-77—303 73-74-82-74—303

LPGA Tour ShopRite LPGA Classic Sunday At Stockton Seaview Hotel and Golf Club, Bay Course Galloway, N.J. Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 6,155; Par 71 Final Round Stacy Lewis, $225,000 65-65-71—201 Katherine Hull, $134,854 71-66-68—205 Mika Miyazato, $86,752 65-73-68—206 Azahara Munoz, $86,752 69-68-69—206 Lexi Thompson, $50,821 69-71-67—207 Hee-Won Han, $50,821 71-67-69—207 Anna Nordqvist, $50,821 69-67-71—207 Alison Walshe, $34,701 73-66-69—208 Paula Creamer, $34,701 67-70-71—208 Eun-Hee Ji, $28,794 71-70-68—209 Ai Miyazato, $28,794 70-69-70—209 Jenny Shin, $22,272 73-68-69—210 Sophie Gustafson, $22,272 71-69-70—210 Na Yeon Choi, $22,272 70-69-71—210 Karine Icher, $22,272 71-68-71—210 Amy Yang, $22,272 74-65-71—210 Yani Tseng, $22,272 71-67-72—210 Laura Davies, $17,011 75-68-68—211 Inbee Park, $17,011 73-69-69—211 Suzann Pettersen, $17,011 74-67-70—211 Jennifer Johnson, $17,011 77-63-71—211 Mariajo Uribe, $17,011 67-71-73—211 Gerina Piller, $14,914 74-68-70—212 Karrie Webb, $14,914 72-70-70—212 I.K. Kim, $13,327 72-74-67—213 Brittany Lang, $13,327 78-68-67—213 Kris Tamulis, $13,327 73-70-70—213 So Yeon Ryu, $13,327 70-67-76—213 Haeji Kang, $9,920 76-70-68—214 Seon Hwa Lee, $9,920 70-75-69—214 Mindy Kim, $9,920 70-74-70—214 Jeong Jang, $9,920 74-69-71—214 Maude-Aimee Leblanc, $9,920 68-75-71—214 Sarah Jane Smith, $9,920 71-72-71—214 Lorie Kane, $9,920 73-69-72—214 Ilhee Lee, $9,920 73-69-72—214 Brittany Lincicome, $9,920 72-70-72—214 Mo Martin, $9,920 69-73-72—214 Shanshan Feng, $9,920 70-70-74—214 Jodi Ewart, $6,579 72-74-69—215 Morgan Pressel, $6,579 74-72-69—215 Beatriz Recari, $6,579 72-72-71—215 Hee Kyung Seo, $6,579 73-71-71—215 Marina Alex, $6,579 77-66-72—215 Taylor Coutu, $6,579 70-73-72—215 Cristie Kerr, $6,579 73-70-72—215 Jee Young Lee, $6,579 71-72-72—215 Sun Young Yoo, $6,579 71-72-72—215 Diana D’Alessio, $4,959 74-72-70—216 Lisa Ferrero, $4,959 74-71-71—216 Anna Grzebien, $4,959 69-76-71—216 Christina Kim, $4,959 69-76-71—216 Nicole Castrale, $4,959 71-73-72—216 Becky Morgan, $4,959 71-68-77—216 Sandra Changkija, $4,208 71-75-71—217 Mi Jung Hur, $4,208 75-71-71—217 Heather Bowie Young, $4,208 70-76-71—217 Pornanong Phatlum, $4,208 75-68-74—217 Marcy Hart, $3,593 73-73-72—218 Catriona Matthew, $3,593 73-72-73—218 Hannah Yun, $3,593 75-70-73—218 Momoko Ueda, $3,593 74-70-74—218 Meena Lee, $3,593 75-68-75—218 Reilley Rankin, $3,593 71-70-77—218 Lizette Salas, $3,138 74-72-73—219 Laura Diaz, $3,138 79-66-74—219 Caroline Hedwall, $3,138 72-73-74—219 Jennifer Rosales, $3,138 75-70-74—219 Jennifer Song, $3,138 77-68-74—219 Angela Stanford, $3,138 71-73-75—219 Candie Kung, $2,843 77-69-74—220 Jane Park, $2,843 70-76-74—220 Alena Sharp, $2,843 75-71-74—220 Grace Park, $2,843 70-75-75—220 Jennifer Gleason, $2,843 73-71-76—220 Maria Hernandez, $2,617 73-73-75—221 Pat Hurst, $2,617 75-71-75—221 Belen Mozo, $2,617 74-72-75—221 Ji Young Oh, $2,617 73-73-75—221 Jessica Korda, $2,617 73-72-76—221 Leta Lindley, $2,617 72-73-76—221 Irene Cho, $2,617 72-72-77—221 Paige Mackenzie, $2,617 74-69-78—221 Cindy LaCrosse, $2,452 73-72-77—222 Karin Sjodin, $2,452 69-75-78—222

Champions Tour Principal Charity Classic Sunday At Glen Oaks Country Club West Des Moines, Iowa Purse: $1.75 million Yardage: 6,897; Par: 71 Final Round Jay Haas (263), $262,500 66-65-66—197 Larry Mize (140), $140,000 66-68-68—202 Kirk Triplett (140), $140,000 67-73-62—202 Fred Funk (94), $93,625 70-67-66—203 Tom Lehman (94), $93,625 68-67-68—203 Andrew Magee (70), $70,000 68-68-68—204 David Eger (56), $56,000 69-71-65—205 Jeff Freeman (56), $56,000 68-70-67—205 Kenny Perry (56), $56,000 68-69-68—205 Mark Calcavecchia (40), $40,250 68-72-66—206 Bernhard Langer (40), $40,250 70-69-67—206 Lonnie Nielsen (40), $40,250 69-69-68—206 Mark Wiebe (40), $40,250 71-70-65—206 Mark Brooks (0), $30,625 67-71-69—207 Bob Gilder (0), $30,625 70-69-68—207 Mike Goodes (0), $30,625 64-74-69—207 Tom Pernice Jr. (0), $30,625 66-72-69—207 Jeff Sluman (0), $24,558 67-73-68—208 Russ Cochran (0), $24,558 67-71-70—208 Loren Roberts (0), $24,558 73-68-67—208 Fulton Allem (0), $18,929 71-69-69—209 Brad Faxon (0), $18,929 70-71-68—209 Jeff Hart (0), $18,929 70-71-68—209 Willie Wood (0), $18,929 71-69-69—209 Dan Forsman (0), $18,929 67-70-72—209 Rod Spittle (0), $18,929 68-70-71—209 Joel Edwards (0), $15,575 69-71-70—210 Eduardo Romero (0), $15,575 67-73-70—210 John Cook (0), $13,230 71-67-73—211 Gary Hallberg (0), $13,230 71-72-68—211 Morris Hatalsky (0), $13,230 69-74-68—211 Dick Mast (0), $13,230 68-70-73—211 Jim Rutledge (0), $13,230 69-74-68—211 Jim Carter (0), $11,025 69-71-72—212 Mark McNulty (0), $11,025 68-73-71—212 D.A. Weibring (0), $11,025 71-71-70—212 Andy Bean (0), $9,100 72-74-67—213 Olin Browne (0), $9,100 71-71-71—213 Brad Bryant (0), $9,100 69-71-73—213 P.H. Horgan III (0), $9,100 71-74-68—213 Steve Pate (0), $9,100 72-74-67—213 Peter Senior (0), $9,100 67-70-76—213 Chip Beck (0), $6,650 69-71-74—214 Jay Don Blake (0), $6,650 74-71-69—214 Vicente Fernandez (0), $6,650 76-68-70—214 David Frost (0), $6,650 66-75-73—214 Jim Gallagher, Jr. (0), $6,650 67-72-75—214 Mark W. Johnson (0), $6,650 69-75-70—214 Sandy Lyle (0), $6,650 70-73-71—214 Ted Schulz (0), $6,650 73-70-71—214 Hale Irwin (0), $4,375 70-75-70—215 Gary Koch (0), $4,375 67-75-73—215 Gil Morgan (0), $4,375 76-71-68—215 Scott Simpson (0), $4,375 75-70-70—215 Craig Stadler (0), $4,375 70-74-71—215 Hal Sutton (0), $4,375 73-72-70—215 Bobby Clampett (0), $3,413 74-70-72—216 Chien Soon Lu (0), $3,413 73-71-72—216 Jim Thorpe (0), $3,413 71-73-72—216 Fuzzy Zoeller (0), $3,413 69-74-73—216 Wayne Levi (0), $2,713 75-73-69—217 J.L. Lewis (0), $2,713 72-73-72—217 Steve Lowery (0), $2,713 69-72-76—217 Bob Tway (0), $2,713 75-73-69—217 Dana Quigley (0), $2,100 72-73-73—218 Mike Reid (0), $2,100 73-72-73—218 Joey Sindelar (0), $2,100 73-70-75—218 Tom Kite (0), $1,645 75-71-73—219 Blaine McCallister (0), $1,645 73-73-73—219 Larry Nelson (0), $1,645 66-80-73—219 Tom Jenkins (0), $1,383 73-75-72—220 Lance Ten Broeck (0), $1,383 70-77-73—220 Damon Green (0), $1,225 73-80-70—223 Keith Fergus (0), $1,155 73-72-79—224 Bill Glasson (0), $1,085 72-78-75—225 Jim Colbert (0), $980 78-75-76—229 Bobby Wadkins (0), $980 80-77-72—229 Mike McCullough (0), $875 76-77-78—231

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION NBA Playoff Glance All Times PDT (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) ——— CONFERENCE FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami 2, Boston 2 Monday, May 28: Miami 93, Boston 79 Wednesday, May 30: Miami 115, Boston 111, OT Friday, June 1: Boston 101, Miami 91 Sunday, June 3: Boston 93, Miami 91, OT Tuesday, June 5: Boston at Miami, 5:30 p.m. Thursday, June 7: Miami at Boston, 5:30 p.m. x-Saturday, June 9: Boston at Miami, 5:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 2, Oklahoma City 2 Sunday, May 27: San Antonio 101, Oklahoma City 98 Tuesday, May 29: San Antonio 120, Oklahoma City 111 Thursday, May 31: Oklahoma City 102, San Antonio 82 Saturday, June 2: Oklahoma City 109, San Antonio 103 Today: June 4: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 6: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. x-Friday, June 8: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 6 p.m. Sunday’s Summary

Celtics 93, Heat 91 MIAMI (91) James 12-25 4-8 29, Battier 2-4 0-0 6, Anthony 1-1 0-0 2, Chalmers 5-13 2-2 12, Wade 7-22 4-5 20, Miller 1-4 0-0 2, Haslem 4-6 4-4 12, Cole 1-2 3-5 5, Jones 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 34-80 17-24 91. BOSTON (93) Pierce 8-18 5-6 23, Bass 3-8 5-5 11, Garnett 820 1-1 17, Rondo 7-14 1-2 15, Allen 6-16 0-0 16, Stiemsma 0-0 0-0 0, Daniels 0-1 1-2 1, Dooling 3-5 1-2 10, Pietrus 0-3 0-2 0. Totals 35-85 14-20 93. Miami 23 24 21 21 2 — 91 Boston 34 27 12 16 4 — 93 3-Point Goals—Miami 6-19 (Battier 2-3, Wade 2-6, Jones 1-2, James 1-3, Miller 0-2, Chalmers 03), Boston 9-27 (Allen 4-11, Dooling 3-4, Pierce 2-6, Garnett 0-1, Rondo 0-2, Pietrus 0-3). Fouled Out— James, Pierce. Rebounds—Miami 56 (Haslem 17), Boston 53 (Garnett 14). Assists—Miami 20 (Wade 6), Boston 22 (Rondo 15). Total Fouls—Miami 28, Boston 30. Technicals—Rondo. A—18,624 (18,624).

WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Chicago 4 1 .800 Connecticut 4 1 .800 Indiana 4 1 .800 Atlanta 2 3 .400 Washington 1 4 .200 New York 1 5 .167 Western Conference W L Pct Minnesota 7 0 1.000 Los Angeles 5 1 .833 San Antonio 2 3 .400 Phoenix 2 4 .333 Seattle 1 4 .200 Tulsa 0 6 .000 ——— Sunday’s Games Connecticut 94, Washington 86 Phoenix 79, Tulsa 72 New York 87, Indiana 72 Minnesota 83, San Antonio 79 Los Angeles 67, Seattle 65 Today’s Games No games scheduled

HOCKEY GB — — — 2 3 3½ GB — 1½ 4 4½ 5 6½

NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) ——— STANLEY CUP FINALS Los Angeles 2, New Jersey 0 Wednesday, May 30: Los Angeles 2, New Jersey 1, OT Saturday, June 2: Los Angeles 2, at New Jersey 1, OT Today, June 4: New Jersey at Los Angeles, 5 p.m. Wednesday, June 6: New Jersey at Los Angeles, 5 p.m. x-Saturday, June 9: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 5 p.m. x-Monday, June 11: New Jersey at Los Angeles, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 13: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 5 p.m.

TENNIS Professional

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts GF D.C. 8 4 3 27 28 New York 8 3 2 26 26 Sporting Kansas City 8 3 1 25 17 Columbus 5 4 3 18 13 Chicago 5 5 3 18 15 New England 5 7 1 16 18 Houston 4 3 4 16 12 Montreal 3 7 3 12 15 Philadelphia 2 7 2 8 8 Toronto FC 1 9 0 3 8 Western Conference W L T Pts GF Real Salt Lake 9 3 2 29 22 San Jose 8 3 3 27 27 Seattle 7 3 3 24 16 Colorado 6 6 1 19 20 Vancouver 5 3 4 19 13 Chivas USA 4 6 3 15 9 Portland 3 5 4 13 12 FC Dallas 3 8 4 13 15 Los Angeles 3 8 2 11 15 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Sunday, June 10 Houston at Vancouver, 4 p.m.

Gainesville, Fla. Sunday, June 3 Georgia Tech 3, College of Charleston 0, CofC eliminated Florida 15, Georgia Tech 3, Florida advances At Mark Light Stadium Coral Gables, Fla. Sunday, June 3 Stony Brook 10, Missouri State 7, Missouri St. eliminated Stony Brook 12, UCF 5 Today, June 4 Game 7 — UCF (45-16) vs. Stony Brook (49-12), 4 p.m. At US Steel Yard Gary, Ind. Sunday, June 3 Kentucky 6, Purdue 3, Purdue eliminated Kent State 3, Kentucky 2, Kent State advances At Alex Box Stadium Baton Rouge, La. Sunday, June 3 Oregon State 11, Louisiana-Monroe 2, Louisiana-Monroe eliminated LSU 6, Oregon State 5, 10 innings, LSU advances At Reckling Park Houston Sunday, June 3 Sam Houston State 4, Rice 1, Rice eliminated Arkansas 5, Sam Houston State 1, Arkansas advances At Baylor Ballpark Waco, Texas Sunday, June 3 Baylor 5, Oral Roberts 2. Oral Roberts eliminated Baylor 9, Dallas Baptist 2 Today, June 4 Game 7 — Dallas Baptist (41-18) vs. Baylor (47-15), 4:30 p.m. At Olsen Field College Station, Texas Sunday, June 3 TCU 10, Texas A&M 2 TCU 5, Mississippi 2 Today, June 4 Game 7 — Mississippi (37-25) vs. TCU (39-20), 4:35 p.m. At PK Park Eugene Sunday, June 3 Austin Peay 3, Cal State Fullerton 0, Cal State Fullerton eliminated Oregon 8, Austin Peay 1, Oregon advances At Sunken Diamond Stanford, Calif. Sunday, June 3 Pepperdine 8, Fresno State 5, Fresno St. eliminated Stanford 8, Pepperdine 7, Stanford advances At Jackie Robinson Stadium Los Angeles Sunday, June 3 Creighton 7, New Mexico 2, New Mexico eliminated Game 6 — UCLA 13, Creighton 5, UCLA advances At Hi Corbett Field Tucson, Ariz. Sunday, June 3 Louisville 11, Missouri 3, Missouri eliminated Game 6 — Arizona 16, Louisville 3, Arizona advances

GA 19 18 10 13 17 18 12 21 14 21 GA 14 17 9 18 14 14 15 24 21

French Open Sunday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $23.47 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men Fourth Round Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Andreas Seppi (22), Italy, 4-6, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 7-5, 6-3. Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def. David Goffin, Belgium, 5-7, 7-5, 6-2, 6-4. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (5), France, leads Stanislas Wawrinka (18), Switzerland, 6-4, 7-6 (6), 3-6, 3-6, 4-2, susp., darkness. Juan Martin del Potro (9), Argentina, leads Tomas Berdych (7), Czech Republic, 7-6 (6), 1-6, 6-3, susp., darkness. Women Fourth Round Sara Errani (21), Italy, def. Svetlana Kuznetsova (26), Russia, 6-0, 7-5. Angelique Kerber (10), Germany, def. Petra Martic, Croatia, 6-3, 7-5. Dominika Cibulkova (15), Slovakia, def. Victoria Azarenka (1), Belarus, 6-2, 7-6 (4). Sam Stosur (6), Australia, def. Sloane Stephens, United States, 7-5, 6-4.

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR

SOFTBALL College NCAA Division I World Series Glance At ASA Hall of Fame Stadium Oklahoma City All Times PDT Double Elimination x-if necessary ——— Sunday, June 3 Oklahoma 5, Arizona State 3, Arizona State eliminated Alabama 5, California 2, California eliminated Championship Series (Best-of-3) Today, June 4: Oklahoma (53-8) vs. Alabama (58-7), 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 5: Oklahoma vs. Alabama, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 6: Oklahoma vs. Alabama, 5 p.m.

BASEBALL College NCAA Division I Regionals Glance All Times PDT Double Elimination x-if necessary ——— At Davenport Field Charlottesville, Va. Sunday, June 3 Oklahoma 2, Army 1, 10 innings, Army eliminated Appalachian State 6, Virginia 5 Oklahoma 5, Virginia 4, Virginia eliminated Today, June 4 Game 6 — Appalachian State (41-16) vs. Oklahoma (40-23), 1 p.m. At Boshamer Stadium Chapel Hill, N.C. Sunday, June 3 North Carolina 5, East Carolina 3, ECU eliminated St. John’s 9, North Carolina 5, St. John’s advances At Dail Park Raleigh, N.C. Sunday, June 3 N.C. State 17, UNC Wilmington 5, UNCW eliminated N.C. State 6, Vanderbilt 5 Today, June 4 Game 7 — Vanderbilt (35-27) vs. N.C. State (42-18), 4 p.m. At Carolina Stadium Columbia, S.C. Sunday, June 3 Clemson 5, Coastal Carolina 3, Coastal eliminated South Carolina 4, Clemson 3, South Carolina advances At Dick Howser Stadium Tallahassee, Fla. Sunday, June 3 Samford 3, Mississippi State 2, Miss. State eliminated Florida State 5, Samford 2, Florida St. advances At Alfred A. McKethan Stadium

Sprint Cup FedEx 400 benefiting Autism Speaks Sunday At Dover International Speedway Dover, Del. Lap length: 1 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (2) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 400 laps, 149.8 rating, 48 points, $319,411. 2. (6) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 400, 114.6, 42, $250,001. 3. (5) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 400, 118.7, 42, $201,601. 4. (17) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 400, 107, 41, $142,340. 5. (4) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 400, 108.4, 39, $147,904. 6. (12) Aric Almirola, Ford, 400, 94.8, 38, $148,426. 7. (18) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 400, 93.1, 37, $140,204. 8. (11) Joey Logano, Toyota, 400, 95.1, 36, $115,465. 9. (13) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 400, 94.5, 35, $110,015. 10. (21) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 400, 79.7, 34, $128,598. 11. (7) Greg Biffle, Ford, 400, 87.9, 33, $106,205. 12. (16) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 400, 84.7, 32, $132,525. 13. (14) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 400, 117.9, 32, $139,591. 14. (1) Mark Martin, Toyota, 400, 108, 31, $101,480. 15. (3) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 400, 80.8, 29, $135,613. 16. (23) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 400, 75, 28, $134,280. 17. (20) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 400, 70.7, 27, $100,805. 18. (10) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 400, 78, 27, $133,121. 19. (24) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 400, 70, 25, $122,138. 20. (22) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 399, 62.8, 24, $117,788. 21. (28) David Ragan, Ford, 398, 63.2, 24, $105,938. 22. (15) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, engine, 364, 76.1, 22, $127,905. 23. (42) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 348, 48, 21, $115,738. 24. (9) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, engine, 338, 61.6, 20, $107,588. 25. (29) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 331, 41.7, 19, $137,705. 26. (19) Carl Edwards, Ford, 318, 80.3, 18, $129,846. 27. (26) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 306, 43.8, 17, $103,702. 28. (31) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 296, 40, 16, $115,496. 29. (8) Kyle Busch, Toyota, engine, 202, 87.3, 15, $129,563. 30. (38) Reed Sorenson, Ford, accident, 124, 34.7, 0, $94,705. 31. (39) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, engine, 110, 59.9, 13, $84,555. 32. (41) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, accident, 65, 41, 12, $81,905. 33. (32) David Stremme, Toyota, overheating, 63, 48.8, 11, $81,755.

34. (34) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, overheating, 41, 51.1, 10, $81,555. 35. (37) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, accident, 29, 32.4, 9, $90,830. 36. (36) Mike Bliss, Toyota, steering, 23, 46.6, 0, $81,205. 37. (43) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, vibration, 21, 44.2, 7, $81,035. 38. (27) Landon Cassill, Toyota, accident, 9, 44.4, 6, $107,272. 39. (35) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, accident, 9, 37.3, 0, $77,485. 40. (30) David Gilliland, Ford, accident, 9, 37.2, 4, $77,325. 41. (40) Casey Mears, Ford, accident, 8, 32.9, 3, $77,145. 42. (33) Michael McDowell, Ford, accident, 8, 29.5, 2, $77,065. 43. (25) Scott Speed, Ford, accident, 8, 28.4, 1, $77,438. ——— Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 122.835 mph. Time of Race: 3 hours, 15 minutes, 23 seconds. Margin of Victory: 2.550 seconds. Caution Flags: 7 for 32 laps. Lead Changes: 17 among 7 drivers. Lap Leaders: J.Johnson 1-6; M.Martin 7-29; J.Johnson 30-60; M.Martin 61-70; M.Kenseth 71; D.Ragan 72-74; M.Martin 75-84; J.Johnson 85210; J.Gordon 211-227; J.Johnson 228; J.Gordon 229-244; J.Johnson 245-293; M.Kenseth 294; D.Earnhardt Jr. 295; D.Hamlin 296-297; J.Gordon 298-324; J.Johnson 325-400. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): J.Johnson, 6 times for 289 laps; J.Gordon, 3 times for 60 laps; M.Martin, 3 times for 43 laps; D.Ragan, 1 time for 3 laps; M.Kenseth, 2 times for 2 laps; D.Hamlin, 1 time for 2 laps; D.Earnhardt Jr., 1 time for 1 lap Top 12 in Points: 1. G.Biffle, 486; 2. M.Kenseth, 485; 3. D.Earnhardt Jr., 476; 4. D.Hamlin, 464; 5. J.Johnson, 453; 6. M.Truex Jr., 441; 7. K.Harvick, 440; 8. T.Stewart, 407; 9. Ky.Busch, 406; 10. C.Bowyer, 405; 11. B.Keselowski, 400; 12. C.Edwards, 390.

IndyCar Chevrolet Detroit Belle Isle Grand Prix Results Sunday At The Raceway at Belle Isle Park Detroit, Mich. Lap length: 2.07 miles (Starting position in parentheses) 1. (1) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 2. (14) Dario Franchitti, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 3. (4) Simon Pagenaud, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 4. (2) Will Power, Dallara-Chevrolet, 60, Running. 5. (16) Oriol Servia, Dallara-Chevrolet, 60, Running. 6. (18) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Chevrolet, 60, Running. 7. (6) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Chevrolet, 60, Running. 8. (20) Charlie Kimball, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 9. (15) Mike Conway, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 10. (3) Alex Tagliani, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 11. (22) Marco Andretti, Dallara-Chevrolet, 60, Running. 12. (21) Ed Carpenter, Dallara-Chevrolet, 60, Running. 13. (25) Simona de Silvestro, Dallara-Lotus, 60, Running. 14. (19) J.R. Hildebrand, Dallara-Chevrolet, 59, Running. 15. (12) Josef Newgarden, Dallara-Honda, 59, Running. 16. (7) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Chevrolet, 59, Running. 17. (8) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Chevrolet, 59, Running. 18. (5) E.J. Viso, Dallara-Chevrolet, 59, Running. 19. (17) Graham Rahal, Dallara-Honda, 58, Running. 20. (11) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 38, Contact. 21. (13) James Hinchcliffe, Dallara-Chevrolet, 38, Contact. 22. (10) Justin Wilson, Dallara-Honda, 28, Mechanical. 23. (23) James Jakes, Dallara-Honda, 26, Mechanical. 24. (9) Sebastien Bourdais, Dallara-Chevrolet, 24, Mechanical. 25. (24) Rubens Barrichello, Dallara-Chevrolet, 11, Mechanical. ——— Race Statistics Winners average speed: 85.012. Time of Race: 1:27:39.5053. Margin of Victory: 1.9628 seconds. Cautions: 4 for 12 laps. Lead Changes: 0 among 1 driver. Lap Leaders: Dixon 1-60. Points: Power 232, Dixon 206, Castroneves 177, Franchitti 176, Hinchcliffe 176, Pagenaud 171, Hunter-Reay 169, Briscoe 142, Kanaan 141, Servia 129.

NHRA NATIONAL HOT ROD ASSOCIATION ——— Toyota SuperNationals Sunday At Old Bridge Township Raceway Park Englishtown, N.J. Final Finish Order Top Fuel 1. Steve Torrence; 2. Brandon Bernstein; 3. Spencer Massey; 4. Clay Millican; 5. Tony Schumacher; 6. Morgan Lucas; 7. Doug Kalitta; 8. Shawn Langdon; 9. Bob Vandergriff; 10. Khalid alBalooshi; 11. Dom Lagana; 12. Terry McMillen; 13. Antron Brown; 14. David Grubnic; 15. T.J. Zizzo; 16. Bruce Litton. Funny Car 1. Johnny Gray; 2. Ron Capps; 3. Robert Hight; 4. Courtney Force; 5. Mike Neff; 6. Jack Beckman; 7. John Force; 8. Matt Hagan; 9. Jim Head; 10. Jeff Arend; 11. Blake Alexander; 12. Bob Bode; 13. Alexis DeJoria; 14. Tony Pedregon; 15. Bob Tasca III; 16. Tim Wilkerson. Pro Stock 1. Greg Anderson; 2. Jason Line; 3. Erica Enders; 4. Allen Johnson; 5. Rodger Brogdon; 6. Ronnie Humphrey; 7. Mike Edwards; 8. Vincent Nobile; 9. Shane Gray; 10. Larry Morgan; 11. Ron Krisher; 12. Kurt Johnson; 13. Grace Howell; 14. Warren Johnson; 15. V. Gaines; 16. Steve Kent. Pro Stock Motorcycle 1. . Eddie Krawiec; 2. Hector Arana; 3. Hector Arana Jr; 4. LE Tonglet; 5. Andrew Hines; 6. Matt Smith; 7. Michael Ray; 8. Scotty Pollacheck; 9. Michael Phillips; 10. Steve Johnson; 11. John Hall; 12. Karen Stoffer; 13. Mike Berry; 14. Joe DeSantis; 15. Jerry Savoie; 16. Shawn Gann.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Selected the contract of RHP Steve Johnson from Norfolk (IL). Transferred LHP Zach Britton to the 60-day DL. CLEVELAND INDIANS—Placed OF Johnny Damon on the paternity list. Recalled INF/OF Matt LaPorta from Columbus (IL). DETROIT TIGERS—Announced the retirement of OF Magglio Ordonez. National League COLORADO ROCKIES—Placed RHP Juan Nicasio on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Guillermo Moscoso from Colorado Springs (PCL). HOUSTON ASTROS—Recalled INF Brett Wallace from Oklahoma City (PCL). Placed INF Carlos Lee on the 15-day DL. NEW YORK METS—Recalled INF Josh Satin from Buffalo (IL). Placed OF Mike Baxter on the 15-day DL, retroactive to June 2. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Reinstated INF Logan Forsythe from the 60-day DL and OF Mark Kotsay from the 15-day DL. Placed INF Andy Parrino on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 31. Optioned C Yasmani Grandal to Tucson (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Selected the contract of LHP Mike Gonzalez from Syracuse (IL). Optioned RHP Ryan Perry to Syracuse. Transferred RHP Drew Storen to the 60-day DL.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 2,480 165 95 17 The Dalles 1,654 101 22 4 John Day 1,457 105 7 1 McNary 760 41 10 1 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 162,833 7,888 6,080 1,845 The Dalles 113,975 6,936 1,861 944 John Day 102,552 6,348 1,955 1,264 McNary 94,247 4,366 4,780 2,214


MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

NBA PLAYOFFS: EASTERN CONFERENCE FINALS

T E LEV ISION Today TENNIS 2 a.m.: French Open, round of 16, ESPN2. 6 a.m.: French Open, round of 16, ESPN2. 7 a.m.: French Open, round of 16, Tennis Channel. BASEBALL 10 a.m.: MLB, St. Louis Cardinals at New York Mets, MLB Network. 4 p.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Dodgers at Philadelphia Phillies, ESPN. 7 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels, Root Sports. CYCLING 1 p.m.: Criterium du Dauphine, stage 1 (same-day tape), NBC Sports Network. 2 p.m.: Philadelphia International Classic, (taped), NBC Sports Network. SOFTBALL 5 p.m.: College, Women’s College World Series championship Game 1, Alabama vs. Oklahoma, ESPN2. HOCKEY 5 p.m.: NHL playoffs, Stanley Cup finals, New Jersey Devils at Los Angeles Kings, NBC Sports Network. BASKETBALL 6 p.m.: NBA playoffs, Western

Conference finals, Oklahoma City Thunder at San Antonio Spurs, TNT.

Tuesday TENNIS 5 a.m.: French Open, quarterfinals, Tennis Channel. 10 a.m.: French Open, quaterfinals (same-day tape), ESPN2. CYCLING 1 p.m.: Criterium du Dauphine, stage 2 (same-day tape), NBC Sports Network. SOFTBALL 5 p.m.: College, Women’s College World Series championship Game 2, Alabama vs. Oklahoma, ESPN2. BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m.: NBA playoffs, Eastern Conference finals, Boston Celtics at Miami Heat, ESPN. BASEBALL 4 p.m.: MLB: Los Angeles Dodgers at Philadelphia Phillies or Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees, MLB Network. 7 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels, Root Sports. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

Cycling

Baseball

• Durbridge wins prologue of Criterium du Dauphine: Promising Australian rider Luke Durbridge won the prologue of the Criterium du Dauphine stage race in Grenoble, France, edging out defending champion Bradley Wiggins. The 21-yearold Australian national time-trial champion bested the field over the quick 5.7-kilometer run through the streets of southeastern Grenoble in 6 minutes, 38 seconds. Wiggins, a Briton and Olympic champion who won the Paris-Nice race in March, was one second behind. Andriy Grivko of Ukraine was third, another two seconds back.

• Ordonez makes retirement official: Magglio Ordonez has made his retirement official, ending a stellar career in which the outfielder hit .309 in 15 seasons with the Detroit Tigers and Chicago White Sox. Ordonez held a news conference at Comerica Park on Sunday, and the Tigers had a ceremony planned before their game against the New York Yankees. Ordonez’s homer to win Game 4 of the 2006 AL championship series against Oakland sent Detroit to the World Series and remains one of the most memorable moments in Tigers history.

• Dartmouth repeats as national champs: Dartmouth repeated as national champions, beating Arizona 24-5 in the third annual USA Sevens Collegiate Rugby Championship in Chester, Pa. Dartmouth’s Will Mueller led the Big Green with two tries, while Kevin Clark and Will Lehmann had one each. Arizona’s Brett Thompson scored the Wildcats’ lone try on the final play of the first half.

Basketball • Former NBA player LeRoy Ellis dies at 72: LeRoy Ellis, who played 14 years in the NBA after a standout career at St. John’s, died of prostate cancer. He was 72. St. John’s announced on Sunday that Ellis died Saturday in Portland after a long battle with cancer. Ellis, a former Portland Trail Blazer, was a native New Yorker, born in Brooklyn, and played at St. John’s from 195962. He still holds the school single-season record for rebounding with an average of 16.5 in his junior year, and the record for most rebounds in a game with 30 against NYU on Dec. 30, 1961.

Olympics • Gymnast ends comeback, retires: The knee injury that sparked Shawn Johnson’s comeback put an end to it, too. The Olympic gold medalist announced her retirement from competitive gymnastics four days before the start of the U.S. championships. She has had repeated setbacks with her left knee, seriously damaged in a January 2010 ski accident, and she feared she was putting her long-term health at risk by continuing with her attempts to make a second Olympic team. “It just little by little gets worse and worse,” Johnson told The Associated Press. “My body is to the point where I need time to rest and retire so I can be healthy for the rest of my life. It’s hard to wrap my mind around. Gymnastics has been my entire life, and now it’s no more.” After winning four medals at the 2008 Games — only Michael Phelps, Natalie Coughlin and Nastia Liukin left Beijing with more — Johnson took the next two years off.

Celtics tie series with Heat By Brian Mahoney The Associated Press

S   B

Rugby

D3

Softball • Sooners, Crimson Tide to meet in WCWS finals: Jackie Traina homered and threw a two-hitter, Kaila Hunt and Jazlyn Lunceford also connected and Alabama beat top-seeded California 5-2 to reach the Women’s College World Series finals for the first time. The No. 2 seed Crimson Tide (587) ended a Sunday jinx at the World Series in Oklahoma City after getting eliminated in the semifinals three of the past four years. The best-of-three championship series starting tonight will pit the Tide against fourthseeded Oklahoma, which beat defending champion Arizona State 5-3 on Sunday. Danielle Henderson hit a two-run homer for California, but also got picked off to diffuse a rally in the sixth.

Golf • Texas wins NCAA men’s golf title: Texas won its third NCAA men’s golf championship, defeating Alabama on a 20-foot birdie putt by senior Dylan Frittelli on Sunday at Riviera in Los Angeles. With the match tied at two, Frittelli, who is from South Africa, came to the 18th hole all square with Cory Whitsett. After Whitsett’s birdie chip came up well short, Frittelli drained his birdie opportunity. Texas also won NCAA championships in 1971 and 1972, when PGA Tour golfers and major championship winners Ben Crenshaw and Tom Kite were on the team.

Soccer • U.S. men’s team ties Canada: The United States played a scoreless draw against Canada on Sunday night in Toronto, its third exhibition in eight days. The U.S. controlled most of the early action. Jermaine Jones’ shot was blocked in the second minute, and Clarence Goodson missed on a close opportunity about a minute later, sending an attempt wide to the left. But the Canadians settled in and began to do some attacking of their own. Dwayne De Rosario shot wide right in the ninth minute. —From wire reports

BOSTON — Rajon Rondo delivered the trash talk at halftime and the big plays in overtime. And after one final defensive stand, the Boston Celtics were two wins away from an improbable chance to play for another championship. Rondo had 15 points and 15 assists, and scored the final three points of the Celtics’ 93-91 overtime victory over the Heat on Sunday night that evened the Eastern Conference finals at two games apiece. Getting a huge break when LeBron James fouled out for the first time since moving to Miami, the Celtics recovered after blowing an 18-point lead in regulation and moved two games away from a third trip to the NBA finals in five years. Kevin Garnett added 17 points and 14 rebounds for the Celtics, while Paul Pierce scored 23 points before fouling out. Ray Allen finished with 16 points. “Stops,” Rondo said when asked what was the difference in the tight game. “I think we executed offensively, came up with some lucky plays and we got stops at the end.” James had 29 points and Dwyane Wade scored 20 after another dismal start for the Heat, who host Game 5 on Tuesday. “Not stressed the series is tied 2-2,” James said. “It’s great basketball, great competition. We wanted to get one up here and we didn’t.” In a game that started as a Celtics blowout and turned into a foul- and tension-filled fourth quarter, followed by the second overtime in this series, the Celtics held on when

Charles Krupa / The Associated Press

Boston Celtics forward Kevin Garnett (5) stops Miami Heat forward LeBron James, right, on a drive to the basket during the third quarter of Game 4 in their Eastern Conference finals playoffs series in Boston, Sunday.

Wade missed a potential winning three-pointer on the last possession. “We knew they were going to Wade. I wanted to check him,” Rondo said. “They set a great pick. ... We’re lucky we got a stop.” Mickael Pietrus drew James’ sixth foul and grabbed two huge offensive rebounds that extended consecutive possessions for the Celtics, who lost Game 4 in overtime in a second-round series against the

Heat last year with a chance to tie the series. This time, they overcame their second-half stall on the offensive end by limiting the Heat to just one basket in overtime, by Udonis Haslem. “At the end you have a chance to win after 50-plus minutes and losing the MVP. Hey, you’ll take that,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. Rondo’s layup gave the Celtics a 92-91 lead with 2:34 left, and neither team scored

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

TENNIS: FRENCH OPEN

Djokovic, Federer win in Paris Sam Stosur, who ended 19year-old unseeded American Sloane Stephens’ best Grand Slam run 7-5, 6-4. No. 21 Sara Errani of Italy beat two-time major champion Svetlana Kuznetsova 6-0, 7-5, setting up a match against No. 10 Angelique Kerber of Germany, a 6-3, 7-5 winner over unseeded Petra Martic of Croatia.

By Howard Fendrich The Associated Press

PARIS — There was a moment, a little past 4 p.m. on a dank and dreary Sunday at the French Open, when the gray sky above appeared to be falling on some of the best of the best. A listless Novak Djokovic, looking very little like someone ranked No. 1 and bidding to become the first man in 43 years to win four consecutive Grand Slam titles, was trying to work his way out of a twoset deficit against 22nd-seeded Andreas Seppi of Italy on Court Philippe Chatrier. Even more astonishingly, a flummoxed Roger Federer, owner of a record 16 major championships, was trudging to the sideline after dropping his first set against 109thranked David Goffin of Belgium, a 21-year-old kid thrilled merely to be sharing Court Suzanne Lenglen with his idol. Goffin, it must be noted, was a “lucky loser” — a player beaten in qualifying who got to make his Grand Slam debut only because someone else withdrew. By that point, one significant upset already was complete Sunday: The No. 1-seeded woman, Australian Open champion Victoria Azarenka, was headed home after losing to No. 15 Dominika Cibulkova of Slovakia 6-2, 7-6 (4), busting a racket on the way out the door. Asked afterward what she will do to recover from the defeat, Azarenka replied sarcastically, “I’m going to kill myself,” then added: “This tournament is over for me. What’s to recover from?” It seemed reasonable, if ever so briefly, to ask in the afternoon whether the tournament might soon be over in the fourth round for Djokovic and Federer, too. In the end, of course, the answer was no. For quite some time, Djokovic missed shots this way and that, then shook his head or yelled at himself or spread his arms wide with palms up as if to ask, “What’s going on here?” He finished with 81 unforced errors in all, exactly his total for his first three matches combined. But Seppi’s not nearly as accustomed to these

Bernat Armangue / The Associated Press

Novak Djokovic returns in his fourth-round match against Andreas Seppi at the French Open in Roland Garros stadium in Paris, Sunday. Djokovic won in five sets 4-6, 6-7, 6-3, 7-5, 6-3.

stages or stakes, and Djokovic pulled out a 4-6, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 75, 6-3 victory, his 25th in a row at a major tournament. “One of those days where ... nothing is working,” Djokovic said. “I could not get into the rhythm.” He began to turn things around by breaking serve to begin the third set, and he kept on doing that, nine times in all. “Maybe I could have started the third set better. I could have done a little more there,” Seppi said. “But he returns very well, and gets serves back almost always, which makes things difficult.” The third-seeded Federer, the 2009 champion at Roland Garros, did that one better after his 5-7, 7-5, 6-2, 6-4 victory, giving Goffin a tap on the head and a pat on the backside when they were done playing. Federer’s quarterfinal opponent will be No. 7 Tomas Berdych or No. 9 Juan Martin del Potro, whose match was suspended because of darkness with 2009 U.S. Open champion del Potro ahead, two sets to one. Djokovic, meanwhile, will face No. 5 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga or No. 18 Stanislas Wawrinka, who also will resume today, with Tsonga leading 4-2 in the fifth set. In the women’s quarterfinals, Cibulkova earned a spot against U.S. Open champion

again until he made a free throw with 21 seconds to play. Wade, already finding it tough to locate any room with Chris Bosh out and then having to do it with James also on the sideline, saw his potential winning attempt bounce off the rim as time expired. In what could have been the final Beantown game for the Celtics’ Big Three, Boston scored 61 points in a sensational first half that concluded with some televised trash talk from Rondo. But the Celtics managed only 12 points in the third quarter, and Wade finally got going after managing just eight points on two-of-11 shooting in the first half. “Our execution in the first half was flawless,” Celtics coach Doc Rivers said. “It was as good as maybe we’ve had. And then we just got away from it.” With the Celtics down by two, Pierce and Rondo made consecutive layups for an 8583 edge with 3:08 to go in regulation. But with the Celtics up three, they lost James, who was wide open with plenty of time to set himself for a threepointer that evened it at 89 with 37.5 seconds left. Garnett was called for an offensive foul on the next possession, giving the Heat the ball back with 21 seconds left. But they passed it around too long, leaving them with a long forced attempt from Haslem that was well off before the buzzer. And after leading the Celtics to the highest-scoring half the Heat have surrendered this postseason, Rondo even fired a shot at the visitors, saying in his televised halftime interview what was working for Boston was the Heat “complaining and crying to the referees in transition.”


D4

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

MA JOR L E AGUE BASEBA LL Minnesota AB Span cf 4 Revere rf 5 Mauer dh 3 a-Mastroianni ph-dh 1 Willingham lf 5 Morneau 1b 5 Doumit c 4 Dozier ss 3 Plouffe 3b 4 J.Carroll 3b 0 A.Casilla 2b 2 Totals 36

R 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 6

H 0 1 1 0 2 1 1 2 3 0 0 11

BI 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 2 6

BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3

American League SO 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 7

Avg. .297 .286 .298 .115 .280 .236 .265 .245 .198 .225 .237

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .270 Kipnis 2b 4 1 0 0 0 0 .280 A.Cabrera ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .295 Jo.Lopez 3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .269 Brantley cf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .281 Duncan dh 4 0 1 1 0 1 .213 LaPorta 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Cunningham lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .200 b-Kotchman ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .209 Marson c 3 0 1 1 0 0 .186 c-Chisenhall ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Totals 35 3 9 3 0 2 Minnesota 101 100 210 — 6 11 3 Cleveland 000 200 100 — 3 9 1 b-grounded into a double play for Cunningham in the 9th. c-flied out for Marson in the 9th. E—Plouffe (5), Dozier 2 (6), Brantley (1). LOB—Minnesota 8, Cleveland 6. 2B—Willingham 2 (17), Dozier (5), Plouffe (4), Choo (14), Marson (3). SB—Span (7), Revere (5). DP—Minnesota 2 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Diamond W, 4-1 7 7 3 0 0 2 93 1.86 Perkins H, 8 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 3.13 Capps S, 12-13 1 1 0 0 0 0 5 3.43 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Masterson L, 2-5 6 7 3 3 3 3 103 5.09 Hagadone 2-3 3 2 2 0 2 20 2.95 Accardo 1 1-3 1 1 0 0 2 22 1.69 C.Perez 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.53 T—2:47. A—21,238 (43,429).

White Sox 4, Mariners 2 Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins lf J.Montero c Smoak 1b Ackley 2b Olivo dh M.Saunders cf Liddi 3b Ryan ss Totals

AB 4 4 4 2 4 4 3 3 3 31

R 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

H 0 0 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 5

BI 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 1 1 0 2 2 0 2 0 8

Avg. .267 .181 .259 .238 .248 .202 .257 .240 .171

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lillibridge cf 4 0 1 1 1 2 .208 Beckham 2b 5 0 1 1 0 1 .237 A.Dunn 1b 3 1 0 0 2 1 .222 Viciedo dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .277 Rios rf 4 0 2 2 0 0 .289 Fukudome lf 0 1 0 0 1 0 .171 O.Hudson 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .184 Al.Ramirez ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .224 Flowers c 4 1 2 0 0 2 .229 E.Escobar 3b-lf 2 1 2 0 2 0 .178 Totals 32 4 9 4 7 8 Seattle 020 000 000 — 2 5 0 Chicago 011 200 00x — 4 9 0 LOB—Seattle 4, Chicago 12. 2B—M.Saunders (14). HR—Olivo (4), off Sale. DP—Seattle 1; Chicago 1. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Millwood L, 3-5 4 7 4 4 5 4 95 3.90 Pryor 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 3.86 Luetge 2 1 0 0 2 0 37 0.00 Kelley 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 2.77 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sale W, 7-2 9 5 2 2 2 8 119 2.30 T—2:45. A—23,062 (40,615).

Blue Jays 5, Red Sox 1 Boston AB Podsednik cf 4 Nava lf 3 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 Ortiz dh 4 Youkilis 3b 3 Sweeney rf 4 Aviles ss 4 Punto 2b 4 Shoppach c 2 b-Saltalamacchia ph 1 Totals 33

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

H 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 6

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 1 0 6

Avg. .370 .303 .269 .315 .245 .313 .262 .180 .277 .265

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. K.Johnson 2b 3 1 0 0 1 2 .250 Y.Escobar ss 2 1 1 0 1 0 .252 Bautista rf 3 1 1 4 1 0 .226 Encarnacion dh 0 0 0 1 1 0 .279 a-Mathis ph-dh 2 0 0 0 0 2 .214 Cooper 1b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .333 Lawrie 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .281 Rasmus cf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .227 Arencibia c 3 1 0 0 1 2 .230 R.Davis lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .240 Totals 27 5 6 5 6 8 Boston 000 010 000 — 1 6 1 Toronto 320 000 00x — 5 6 0 b-popped out for Shoppach in the 9th. E—Punto (2). LOB—Boston 8, Toronto 6. 2B— Ad.Gonzalez (20), Cooper (3). HR—Shoppach (3), off Hutchison; Bautista (14), off Bard. SB—Podsednik (3), Punto 2 (2), K.Johnson (6), Lawrie (8). DP—Boston 2. Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bard L, 5-6 1 2-3 1 5 5 6 2 55 5.24 F.Morales 4 1-3 2 0 0 0 4 52 3.48 Atchison 1 1 0 0 0 1 8 0.86 R.Hill 1 2 0 0 0 1 18 2.84 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hutchison W, 5-2 7 5 1 1 1 5 109 4.35 Oliver 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 9 1.93 Cordero 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 5.82 Janssen 1 1 0 0 0 0 22 3.32 T—2:52. A—41,925 (49,260).

Yankees 5, Tigers 1 New York Jeter ss Granderson cf Al.Rodriguez dh Cano 2b Teixeira 1b Ibanez lf Wise lf Swisher rf Er.Chavez 3b Martin c Totals

AB 5 4 4 4 3 4 0 3 4 3 34

R 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

H 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 2 1 10

BI 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 4

SO 1 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .336 .261 .284 .284 .253 .252 .130 .243 .284 .194

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Berry cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .333 Worth 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .184 Mi.Cabrera 3b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .318 Fielder 1b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .319 D.Young dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .267 Boesch rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .229 Jh.Peralta ss 3 0 2 0 0 0 .247 Kelly lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .174 O.Santos c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Totals 30 1 4 1 3 8 New York 201 020 000 — 5 10 0 Detroit 000 100 000 — 1 4 1 E—Worth (1). LOB—New York 7, Detroit 5. 2B— Granderson (7), Martin (7). 3B—Cano (1). HR—Jeter (6), off Verlander; Al.Rodriguez (9), off Verlander; Fielder (9), off P.Hughes. DP—New York 1; Detroit 2. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA P.Hughes W, 5-5 9 4 1 1 3 8 123 4.96 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Verlander L, 5-4 6 1-3 9 5 3 4 4 114 2.67 Below 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 16 2.63 Villarreal 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 0.82 T—2:39. A—42,419 (41,255).

Royals 2, Athletics 0 Oakland Cowgill lf Pennington ss Reddick rf Cespedes cf Ka’aihue 1b

AB 4 3 3 4 3

R 0 0 0 0 0

H 2 0 2 0 0

BI 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 1 0 1

Braves 3, Nationals 2

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

AL Boxscores Twins 6, Indians 3

SO 0 0 0 0 1

Avg. .262 .189 .271 .244 .225

Tampa Bay Baltimore New York Boston Toronto

W 31 30 29 28 28

L 23 24 24 26 26

Chicago Cleveland Detroit Kansas City Minnesota

W 31 28 25 23 20

L 23 25 29 29 33

Texas Los Angeles Seattle Oakland

W 32 28 24 23

L 22 27 32 31

East Division Pct GB WCGB .574 — — .556 1 — .547 1½ — .519 3 1½ .519 3 1½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .574 — — .528 2½ 1 .463 6 4½ .442 7 5½ .377 10½ 9 West Division Pct GB WCGB .593 — — .509 4½ 2 .429 9 6½ .426 9 6½

Sunday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 5, Detroit 1 Toronto 5, Boston 1 Tampa Bay 8, Baltimore 4 Kansas City 2, Oakland 0 Chicago White Sox 4, Seattle 2 Minnesota 6, Cleveland 3 Texas 7, L.A. Angels 3

National League

L10 5-5 2-8 7-3 6-4 4-6

Str Home Away W-1 19-11 12-12 L-1 14-13 16-11 W-1 14-11 15-13 L-1 13-14 15-12 W-1 16-12 12-14

L10 9-1 3-7 5-5 6-4 5-5

Str Home Away W-1 14-14 17-9 L-2 16-16 12-9 L-1 12-14 13-15 W-1 7-18 16-11 W-2 9-17 11-16

L10 5-5 8-2 3-7 1-9

Str Home Away W-1 15-11 17-11 L-1 15-12 13-15 L-1 9-13 15-19 L-1 10-15 13-16

Today’s Games Minnesota (De Vries 0-1) at Kansas City (W.Smith 1-1), 5:10 p.m. Seattle (Vargas 6-4) at L.A. Angels (E.Santana 2-6), 7:05 p.m. Texas (Feldman 0-3) at Oakland (J.Parker 1-2), 7:05 p.m.

Washington Miami New York Atlanta Philadelphia

W 30 31 31 29 28

L 22 23 23 25 27

Cincinnati Pittsburgh St. Louis Milwaukee Houston Chicago

W 30 27 27 24 23 18

L 23 26 27 30 31 35

Los Angeles San Francisco Arizona Colorado San Diego

W 33 30 25 23 18

L 21 24 29 30 37

East Division Pct GB WCGB .577 — — .574 — — .574 — — .537 2 2 .509 3½ 3½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .566 — — .509 3 3½ .500 3½ 4 .444 6½ 7 .426 7½ 8 .340 12 12½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .611 — — .556 3 1 .463 8 6 .434 9½ 7½ .327 15½ 13½

Sunday’s Games Atlanta 3, Washington 2 Miami 5, Philadelphia 1 Houston 5, Cincinnati 3 Pittsburgh 6, Milwaukee 5 Colorado 3, L.A. Dodgers 2 San Francisco 2, Chicago Cubs 0 Arizona 6, San Diego 0 N.Y. Mets 6, St. Louis 1

L10 5-5 7-3 7-3 3-7 6-4

Str Home Away L-1 16-9 14-13 W-2 16-10 15-13 W-3 19-11 12-12 W-1 12-11 17-14 L-2 12-15 16-12

L10 6-4 7-3 2-8 6-4 2-8 3-7

Str Home Away L-1 15-9 15-14 W-1 16-11 11-15 L-5 13-11 14-16 L-1 12-15 12-15 W-1 17-12 6-19 L-3 12-15 6-20

L10 3-7 7-3 6-4 7-3 2-8

Str Home Away L-1 21-9 12-12 W-3 17-11 13-13 W-2 10-15 15-14 W-1 15-15 8-15 L-2 13-18 5-19

Today’s Games St. Louis (Lohse 5-1) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 4-3), 10:10 a.m. Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 5-3) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 3-2), 12:45 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 4-3) at Philadelphia (Worley 3-2), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (Friedrich 3-1) at Arizona (J.Saunders 3-3), 6:40 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Yankees 5, Tigers 1: DETROIT — Derek Jeter and Alex Rodriguez each homered off Justin Verlander, and Phil Hughes pitched a four-hitter to lead New York to victory over Detroit. • Rangers 7, Angels 3: ANAHEIM, Calif. — Matt Harrison won his third straight start, Nelson Cruz hit a long two-run homer and Texas beat streaking Los Angeles to avoid a three-game sweep. • Twins 6, Indians 3: CLEVELAND — Scott Diamond allowed three unearned runs over seven innings as surging Minnesota beat Cleveland. Joe Mauer’s first-inning RBI single off Justin Masterson (2-5) put Minnesota ahead 1-0. • Royals 2, Athletics 0: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Vin Mazzaro pitched six stellar innings and Kansas City beat punchless Oakland, handing the Athletics their third shutout in four games. Eric Hosmer homered as the Royals sent the A’s to their 10th loss in 11 games. • Blue Jays 5, Red Sox 1: TORONTO — Jose Bautista hit a three-run home run, rookie Drew Hutchison won for the fourth time in five starts and Toronto beat Boston to avoid a three-game sweep. In an ill-tempered game that featured four hit batters, home plate umpire Mike Winters warned both benches after Boston’s Kevin Youkilis was drilled on the shoulder in the sixth. • Rays 8, Orioles 4: ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — B.J. Upton hit a tiebreaking two-run double, Matt Moore won for the first time after losing four straight decisions and Tampa Bay beat Baltimore. • White Sox 4, Mariners 2: CHICAGO — Chris Sale pitched a five-hitter for his first major league complete game and Chicago won for the 10th time in 11 games.

• Braves 3, Nationals 2: WASHINGTON — Tommy Hanson shook off an agonizing start to outpitch Gio Gonzalez, and Atlanta beat Washington to end a sixgame skid against their NL East rivals. • Giants 2, Cubs 0: SAN FRANCISCO — Barry Zito pitched 8 1⁄3 scoreless innings for his 150th career win and Joaquin Arias snapped an 18 at-bat hitless stretch with an RBI single that led San Francisco over Chicago. • Marlins 5, Phillies 1: PHILADELPHIA — Carlos Zambrano homered and pitched into the eighth inning, and Hanley Ramirez went deep, too, to lead Miami over Philadelphia. • Diamondbacks 6, Padres 0: SAN DIEGO — Trevor Cahill threw a six-hitter and Paul Goldschmidt, Miguel Montero and Gerardo Parra homered to lead Arizona past San Diego. • Astros 5, Reds 3: HOUSTON — Jordan Lyles pitched seven strong innings, Justin Maxwell hit his third pinch-hit home run this season and Houston ended a season-worst eight-game losing streak by beating Cincinnati. • Rockies 3, Dodgers 2: DENVER — Alex White gave the overworked Colorado bullpen some much-needed rest, pitching shutout ball into the seventh inning as the Rockies beat Los Angeles. • Pirates 6, Brewers 5: MILWAUKEE — Andrew McCutchen and Garrett Jones hit consecutive homers and James McDonald struck out eight and won for the third time in four starts when Pittsburgh beat Milwaukee. • Mets 6, Cardinals 1: NEW YORK — Jonathon Niese struck out a career-high 10 in six scoreless innings and New York shut down slumping St. Louis for the third straight game.

Inge 3b S.Smith dh Donaldson c a-Crisp ph Rosales 2b b-J.Weeks ph Totals

4 4 3 1 2 1 32

0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 3 3

.171 .217 .148 .165 .308 .228

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Gordon lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .244 Giavotella 2b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .245 Moustakas 3b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .274 Butler dh 4 0 3 0 0 1 .294 1-Maier pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Francoeur rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .279 Y.Betancourt 3b-2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .279 Hosmer 1b 3 1 2 1 0 0 .214 B.Pena c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .267 A.Escobar ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .298 Dyson cf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .264 Totals 31 2 10 2 1 6 Oakland 000 000 000 — 0 7 1 Kansas City 010 010 00x — 2 10 1 a-grounded out for Donaldson in the 9th. bgrounded out for Rosales in the 9th. 1-ran for Butler in the 8th. E—Ka’aihue (2), Y.Betancourt (3). LOB—Oakland 9, Kansas City 6. 2B—A.Gordon (16). HR—Hosmer (7), off Milone. SB—Reddick (6), Hosmer (3), Dyson (9). DP—Oakland 3; Kansas City 2. Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Milone L, 6-5 7 8 2 2 1 6 103 3.53 Carignan 1 2 0 0 0 0 12 5.00 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mazzaro W, 2-0 6 4 0 0 3 3 97 2.25 K.Herrera H, 9 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 3.10 G.Holland H, 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 5.40 Broxton S, 13-15 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 1.66 T—2:37. A—21,111 (37,903).

Rays 8, Orioles 4 Baltimore Andino 2b En.Chavez lf Hardy ss Ad.Jones cf b-N.Johnson ph Wieters c Mar.Reynolds 1b R.Paulino dh Pearce rf Tolleson 3b Totals

AB 5 5 5 4 1 4 5 3 4 3 39

R 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 4

H 1 0 3 1 0 3 3 0 1 0 12

BI 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 3

SO 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 2 8

Avg. .245 .120 .267 .315 .181 .244 .216 .306 .250 .267

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Pena 1b 1 1 0 1 2 0 .201 B.Upton cf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .276 Joyce rf 3 0 0 1 0 2 .289 Zobrist 2b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .208 Scott dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .225 Matsui lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .188 1-Thompson pr-lf 1 1 0 0 0 0 .063 Rhymes 3b 1 1 0 0 1 0 .273 a-S.Rodriguez ph-3b 2 1 1 0 0 1 .231 E.Johnson ss 3 1 1 1 1 1 .255 J.Molina c 3 1 0 1 0 0 .182 Totals 29 8 6 6 4 7 Baltimore 010 010 011 — 4 12 3 Tampa Bay 000 224 00x — 8 6 1 a-singled for Rhymes in the 6th. b-popped out for Ad.Jones in the 9th. 1-ran for Matsui in the 6th. E—Ad.Jones (4), Tolleson (3), Wieters (6), E.Johnson (4). LOB—Baltimore 11, Tampa Bay 3. 2B—Andino (7), B.Upton (9), Zobrist (10). HR—Wieters (9), off M.Moore; Mar.Reynolds (3), off W.Davis. DP—Tampa Bay 1. Baltimore Arrieta L, 2-7 Eveland Ayala Patton O’Day Tampa Bay

IP 4 2-3 2-3 2-3 1 1-3 2-3 IP

H 2 2 2 0 0 H

R 4 2 2 0 0 R

ER BB SO NP 4 4 3 83 2 0 1 18 1 0 0 14 0 0 2 16 0 0 1 6 ER BB SO NP

ERA 5.53 3.93 2.13 3.55 1.71 ERA

M.Moore W, 2-5 6 7 2 1 McGee 1 1 0 0 W.Davis 1 1-3 3 2 2 Rodney 2-3 1 0 0 T—3:00. A—21,693 (34,078).

3 0 0 0

4 1 3 0

93 21 34 17

4.45 1.47 2.45 1.03

Rangers 7, Angels 3 Texas Kinsler 2b Andrus ss Hamilton cf-lf Beltre 3b M.Young dh N.Cruz rf Dav.Murphy lf 1-Gentry pr-cf Napoli c Moreland 1b Totals

AB 6 4 5 3 5 5 4 0 3 4 39

R 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 7

H 2 3 1 0 2 1 2 0 2 1 14

BI 1 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 7

BB 0 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 6

SO 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 6

Avg. .279 .311 .354 .311 .288 .270 .264 .300 .252 .273

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Trout lf 5 0 2 1 0 0 .318 Callaspo 3b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .235 Pujols 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .235 Trumbo rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .331 Tor.Hunter dh 3 0 0 0 1 2 .235 H.Kendrick 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .253 Aybar ss 4 0 1 1 0 0 .222 Bourjos cf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .215 a-M.Izturis ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .227 Hester c 2 1 1 1 1 0 .316 b-K.Morales ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Totals 33 3 6 3 5 4 Texas 001 011 202 — 7 14 0 Los Angeles 000 011 100 — 3 6 1 a-struck out for Bourjos in the 9th. b-fouled out for Hester in the 9th. 1-ran for Dav.Murphy in the 9th. E—Haren (1). LOB—Texas 14, Los Angeles 8. 2B—Kinsler (19), Andrus (14), Dav.Murphy 2 (9), Trumbo (13), Aybar (7). HR—N.Cruz (8), off Cassevah; Hester (1), off M.Harrison. SB—Hamilton (5), Gentry (8). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA M.Harrison W, 7-3 6 2-3 4 3 3 3 3 85 4.37 Ogando H, 7 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 15 2.40 Mi.Adams H, 9 1 0 0 0 1 0 16 3.79 Nathan 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 1.99 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Haren L, 3-6 5 7 2 2 2 2 104 3.52 Cassevah 1 3 3 3 2 0 37 7.20 Takahashi 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.76 D.Carpenter 1 1-3 2 2 2 2 2 29 6.32 Walden 2-3 2 0 0 0 1 12 3.06 Cassevah pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. T—3:09. A—42,465 (45,957).

C.Gomez cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .277 Conrad 1b-ss 4 1 1 1 0 1 .061 M.Maldonado c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .158 Fiers p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Loe p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --J.Perez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Maysonet ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .194 Fr.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Axford p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Kottaras ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .224 1-Wolf pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Totals 33 5 6 5 4 10 Pittsburgh 010 031 001 — 6 11 1 Milwaukee 200 001 101 — 5 6 0 a-struck out for J.Perez in the 7th. b-flied out for Ransom in the 8th. c-walked for Axford in the 9th. 1-ran for Kottaras in the 9th. E—Barmes (7). LOB—Pittsburgh 6, Milwaukee 5. 2B—Walker (9), McGehee (5), Green (5). HR— A.McCutchen (9), off Fiers; G.Jones (7), off Fiers; Barajas (5), off Loe; Barmes (3), off Axford; Morgan (2), off Ja.McDonald; M.Maldonado (1), off J.Cruz; Conrad (2), off Hanrahan. SB—Morgan (7). DP—Pittsburgh 1. Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McDonald W, 5-2 6 4 3 1 1 8 100 2.14 J.Cruz H, 9 1 1 1 1 0 2 12 1.74 Grilli H, 13 1 0 0 0 2 0 15 1.71 Hanrahan S, 14-15 1 1 1 1 1 0 12 2.70 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fiers L, 1-1 5 8 4 4 1 8 101 3.75 Loe 1 2-3 2 1 1 0 3 21 2.81 J.Perez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 3.60 Fr.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.13 Axford 1 1 1 1 1 0 19 3.54 T—3:05. A—34,334 (41,900).

Astros 5, Reds 3 Cincinnati Cozart ss Stubbs cf Votto 1b B.Phillips 2b Bruce rf Heisey lf Cairo 3b Marshall p Ondrusek p b-Ludwick ph Hanigan c Arroyo p Frazier 3b Totals

AB 4 4 2 3 4 4 3 0 0 1 3 2 1 31

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3

H 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 7

BI 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5

Avg. .240 .238 .346 .271 .259 .273 .135 ----.207 .296 .176 .267

Pittsburgh Tabata lf-rf Walker 2b A.McCutchen cf G.Jones rf J.Cruz p J.Harrison 3b Hague 1b Grilli p Hanrahan p McGehee 3b-1b Barajas c Barmes ss Ja.McDonald p G.Hernandez lf Totals

AB 4 5 5 4 0 0 4 0 0 3 4 4 3 1 37

R 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 6

H 0 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 11

BI 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 6

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

SO 2 1 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 12

Avg. .220 .263 .337 .242 --.235 .250 ----.190 .240 .176 .130 .200

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schafer cf 3 0 0 1 0 1 .256 Altuve 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .316 F.Martinez rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .111 Myers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --J.D.Martinez lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .244 C.Johnson 3b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .293 Wallace 1b 3 1 2 0 0 1 .667 J.Castro c 3 1 2 1 0 1 .243 Ma.Gonzalez ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .250 Lyles p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .250 a-Maxwell ph 1 1 1 2 0 0 .236 W.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bogusevic rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .220 Totals 30 5 10 5 1 7 Cincinnati 002 000 010 — 3 7 0 Houston 010 020 20x — 5 10 1 a-homered for Lyles in the 7th. b-struck out for Ondrusek in the 9th. E—Ma.Gonzalez (2). LOB—Cincinnati 4, Houston 6. 2B—Frazier (7), C.Johnson (10). HR—Cozart (6), off Lyles; Maxwell (4), off Arroyo. DP—Houston 1

Milwaukee Aoki lf Morgan cf-rf Hart rf-1b Green 3b R.Weeks 2b Ransom ss b-Braun ph

AB 5 4 4 2 3 3 1

R 0 2 0 1 0 0 0

H 0 1 1 1 1 0 0

BI 0 1 0 1 1 0 0

BB 0 0 0 2 1 0 0

SO 2 0 0 0 2 2 0

Avg. .283 .235 .252 .234 .170 .228 .308

Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arroyo L, 2-4 6 1-3 8 5 5 1 4 106 3.91 Marshall 1 0 0 0 0 2 7 3.72 Ondrusek 2-3 2 0 0 0 1 23 2.35 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lyles W, 1-1 7 5 2 2 2 3 101 4.97 W.Lopez H, 6 1 2 1 1 0 1 30 2.43 Myers S, 13-14 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 1.86 T—2:58. A—19,914 (40,981).

NL Boxscores Pirates 6, Brewers 5

Atlanta Bourn cf Prado 3b F.Freeman 1b Uggla 2b M.Diaz lf O’Flaherty p Kimbrel p Heyward rf D.Ross c 1-Beachy pr Boscan c Simmons ss Hanson p Constanza lf Totals

AB 5 5 5 3 3 0 0 4 2 0 0 4 3 1 35

R 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 9

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 1 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 8

Avg. .300 .327 .246 .263 .259 ----.235 .250 .125 .143 .143 .053 .429

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lombardozzi lf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .309 Harper cf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .288 Zimmerman 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .233 LaRoche 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .276 Morse rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .000 Desmond ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Espinosa 2b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .223 Flores c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .271 G.Gonzalez p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .105 Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Ankiel ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .228 Mic.Gonzalez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --S.Burnett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 2 6 2 2 9 Atlanta 001 020 000 — 3 9 1 Washington 200 000 000 — 2 6 0 a-struck out for Stammen in the 7th. 1-ran for D.Ross in the 8th. E—Uggla (8). LOB—Atlanta 9, Washington 5. 2B—Uggla (12), Simmons (1), Harper (7), Espinosa (9). HR—Lombardozzi (1), off Hanson; Harper (5), off Hanson. SB—Bourn (15). S—G.Gonzalez. DP—Atlanta 1; Washington 1 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP Hanson W, 6-4 7 6 2 2 0 6 84 O’Flaherty H, 8 1 0 0 0 2 0 18 Kimbrel S, 16-17 1 0 0 0 0 3 13 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP G.Gonzalez L, 7-2 4 2-3 7 3 3 3 5 91 Stammen 2 1-3 0 0 0 1 2 24 Mic.Gonzalez 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 S.Burnett 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 T—2:38. A—38,046 (41,487).

ERA 3.71 3.66 1.80 ERA 2.31 1.52 0.00 0.54

Marlins 5, Phillies 1 Miami Reyes ss Infante 2b H.Ramirez 3b Stanton rf Dobbs lf a-Ruggiano ph-lf Morrison 1b J.Buck c Coghlan cf Zambrano p Cishek p H.Bell p Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 3 1 4 3 4 4 0 0 39

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 5

H 2 1 1 1 2 0 0 1 2 2 0 0 12

BI 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 6

Avg. .278 .311 .276 .295 .296 .375 .231 .164 .169 .174 .000 ---

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rollins ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Pierre lf 4 0 3 1 0 0 .340 Pence rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .269 Luna 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .333 Victorino cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .251 Polanco 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .290 Galvis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Schneider c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .276 Blanton p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .048 Qualls p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Diekman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Fontenot ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .409 Schwimer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 1 6 1 2 8 Miami 001 100 300 — 5 12 0 Philadelphia 000 000 010 — 1 6 0 a-lined out for Dobbs in the 7th. b-struck out for Diekman in the 8th. LOB—Miami 8, Philadelphia 7. 2B—Reyes (12), Pierre (5). HR—Zambrano (1), off Blanton; H.Ramirez (11), off Blanton. Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Zambrano W, 4-3 7 2-3 4 1 1 2 7 114 2.81 Cishek 2-3 2 0 0 0 1 19 1.14 H.Bell S, 12-16 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 6.65 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blanton L, 4-6 6 9 5 5 1 6 88 5.27 Qualls 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 14 4.43 Diekman 1 1-3 2 0 0 0 0 19 4.50 Schwimer 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 7.04 Blanton pitched to 4 batters in the 7th. T—2:36. A—45,356 (43,651).

Rockies 3, Dodgers 2 Los Angeles D.Gordon ss E.Herrera 3b Lindblom p a-Castellanos ph Belisario p Elbert p Abreu lf Ethier rf Hairston Jr. 2b Loney 1b A.Ellis c Gwynn Jr. cf Eovaldi p A.Kennedy 3b Totals

AB 4 3 0 1 0 0 3 4 4 3 3 4 1 0 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2

H 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 5

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2

Avg. .223 .311 --.400 ----.310 .320 .366 .248 .315 .269 .000 .213

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 3 1 1 0 1 2 .298 Scutaro ss 4 1 1 1 0 0 .257 C.Gonzalez lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .332 Cuddyer rf 2 0 0 0 2 1 .283 Helton 1b 2 0 1 1 2 0 .243 Pacheco 3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .300 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Giambi ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250 R.Betancourt p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --W.Rosario c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .238 LeMahieu 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .250 White p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .077 Brothers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Nelson 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .218 Totals 28 3 6 3 5 6 Los Angeles 000 000 200 — 2 3 0 Colorado 100 002 00x — 3 6 0 a-grounded out for Lindblom in the 7th. b-struck out for Belisle in the 8th. LOB—Los Angeles 6, Colorado 6. 2B—Pacheco (7). HR—A.Ellis (6), off White. RBIs—A.Ellis 2 (25), Scutaro (11), Helton (27), Pacheco (13). SB—Abreu (2), Fowler (6). DP—Los Angeles 2. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eovaldi L, 0-2 5 2-3 5 3 2 4 4 102 2.84 Lindblom 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.70 Belisario 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 1.35 Elbert 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 3.45 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA White W, 2-3 6 2-3 2 2 2 5 2 100 5.60 Brothers 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 5.19 Belisle H, 6 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 16 2.51 Betancourt S, 10-111 0 0 0 0 0 12 2.25 Brothers pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Belisario pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—2:57. A—35,353 (50,398).

Diamondbacks 6, Padres 0 Arizona R.Roberts 2b Kubel lf J.Upton rf M.Montero c Goldschmidt 1b J.Bell 3b G.Parra cf Jo.McDonald ss Cahill p Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 3 3 4 4 4 33

R 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 6

H 2 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 1 8

BI 0 1 0 2 1 0 2 0 0 6

BB 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2

SO 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 7

Avg. .227 .285 .249 .255 .277 .174 .253 .290 .087

San Diego Venable cf Denorfia cf Kotsay rf Alonso 1b Headley 3b Guzman lf Jo.Baker c Forsythe 2b E.Cabrera ss Stults p Mikolas p a-Amarista ph

AB 1 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 0 1

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

SO 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0

Avg. .268 .250 .324 .274 .253 .248 .241 .667 .228 .167 --.163

Thayer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 28 0 6 0 3 5 Arizona 010 003 200 — 6 8 0 San Diego 000 000 000 — 0 6 1 a-flied out for Mikolas in the 8th. E—Alonso (6). LOB—Arizona 3, San Diego 4. 2B—Kotsay (3), Forsythe (1). 3B—Forsythe (1). HR—Goldschmidt (6), off Stults; M.Montero (3), off Stults; G.Parra (3), off Stults.SB—R.Roberts (4). DP—Arizona 4; San Diego 1. Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cahill W, 3-5 9 6 0 0 3 5 109 3.45 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stults L, 1-2 6 1-3 7 6 6 2 4 83 4.44 Mikolas 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 19 3.29 Thayer 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 4.97 T—2:14. A—32,228 (42,691).

Giants 2, Cubs 0 Chicago Campana cf Barney 2b S.Castro ss A.Soriano lf Je.Baker 1b I.Stewart 3b Re.Johnson rf K.Hill c T.Wood p a-Mather ph Russell p Camp p Totals

AB 4 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 2 1 0 0 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 4

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 6

Avg. .293 .275 .310 .263 .246 .204 .262 .167 .375 .247 -----

San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. G.Blanco rf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .266 Theriot 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .226 Me.Cabrera lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .371 Posey 1b 3 0 1 0 0 2 .295 Pagan cf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .314 H.Sanchez c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .273 Arias 3b 2 0 1 1 1 0 .233 B.Crawford ss 2 0 0 0 1 1 .223 Zito p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .095 Romo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 26 2 4 2 3 7 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 4 0 San Francisco 000 010 01x — 2 4 0 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for T.Wood in the 8th. LOB—Chicago 4, San Francisco 4. 2B—Posey (11), Pagan (11). DP—Chicago 1; San Francisco 2. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T.Wood L, 0-2 7 3 1 1 2 7 101 4.56 Russell 2-3 0 1 1 1 0 10 1.88 Camp 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 6 2.54 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Zito W, 5-2 8 1-3 4 0 0 2 5 96 2.98 Romo S, 2-2 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 0.57 T—2:23. A—41,112 (41,915).

Mets 6, Cardinals 1 St. Louis Furcal ss Craig 1b Holliday lf Beltran rf Freese 3b Y.Molina c Greene 2b Cleto p Rzepczynski p b-Ma.Adams ph Motte p Chambers cf Westbrook p S.Freeman p Descalso 2b Totals

AB 5 4 4 5 4 3 3 0 0 1 0 4 2 0 1 36

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 8

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

SO 1 1 1 2 2 0 2 0 0 1 0 2 2 0 0 14

Avg. .319 .339 .271 .284 .257 .335 .212 ----.283 --.286 .143 --.242

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Nieuwenhuis lf 5 2 3 3 0 0 .301 A.Torres cf 4 1 3 2 0 1 .232 D.Wright 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .363 Duda rf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .258 Dan.Murphy 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .307 I.Davis 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .166 Quintanilla ss 3 1 0 0 1 0 .313 Thole c 3 1 1 0 1 0 .283 Niese p 2 1 2 0 0 0 .200 a-Valdespin ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Parnell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --El.Ramirez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Byrdak p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Hairston ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .271 F.Francisco p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 6 11 6 3 4 St. Louis 000 000 010 — 1 8 0 New York 100 203 00x — 6 11 2 a-fouled out for Niese in the 6th. b-struck out for Rzepczynski in the 8th. c-grounded into a double play for Byrdak in the 8th. E—D.Wright (5), I.Davis (5). LOB—St. Louis 12, New York 7. 2B—Craig (6), A.Torres (4). 3B— A.Torres (2). HR—Nieuwenhuis (3), off Westbrook. SB—Y.Molina (5). DP—St. Louis 1. St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Westbrook L, 4-5 5 9 5 5 2 2 106 4.23 S.Freeman 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 9 18.00 Cleto 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 12 0.00 Rzepczynski 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.43 Motte 1 0 0 0 1 0 13 3.27 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Niese W, 4-2 6 6 0 0 1 10 96 4.11 Parnell 1 0 0 0 2 1 27 3.13 El.Ramirez 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 14 13.50 Byrdak 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 3.07 F.Francisco 1 0 0 0 0 2 18 5.82 Westbrook pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. T—3:01. A—23,559 (41,922).

Leaders Through Sunday’s games American League BATTING—Konerko, Chicago, .366; Hamilton, Texas, .354; Jeter, New York, .336; Trumbo, Los Angeles, .331; Fielder, Detroit, .319; MiCabrera, Detroit, .318; Ortiz, Boston, .315; AdJones, Baltimore, .315. RUNS—Kinsler, Texas, 43; Hamilton, Texas, 40; De Aza, Chicago, 39; Granderson, New York, 38; AdJones, Baltimore, 38; Kipnis, Cleveland, 38; Ortiz, Boston, 37. RBI—Hamilton, Texas, 57; MiCabrera, Detroit, 44; Encarnacion, Toronto, 43; ADunn, Chicago, 38; Bautista, Toronto, 37; Ortiz, Boston, 37; NCruz, Texas, 36; Willingham, Minnesota, 36. HITS—Jeter, New York, 75; MiCabrera, Detroit, 70; Hamilton, Texas, 69; AdJones, Baltimore, 68; Konerko, Chicago, 67; Fielder, Detroit, 66; Andrus, Texas, 64; Ortiz, Boston, 64. DOUBLES—AdGonzalez, Boston, 20; Cano, New York, 19; Kinsler, Texas, 19; Ortiz, Boston, 18; Willingham, Minnesota, 17; Brantley, Cleveland, 16; AGordon, Kansas City, 16; Seager, Seattle, 16; Sweeney, Boston, 16. TRIPLES—JWeeks, Oakland, 4; 10 tied at 3. HOME RUNS—Hamilton, Texas, 21; ADunn, Chicago, 17; Encarnacion, Toronto, 17; Granderson, New York, 17; AdJones, Baltimore, 16; Bautista, Toronto, 14; Reddick, Oakland, 14. National League BATTING—MeCabrera, San Francisco, .371; DWright, New York, .363; Votto, Cincinnati, .346; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, .337; YMolina, St. Louis, .335; CGonzalez, Colorado, .332; Prado, Atlanta, .327. RUNS—CGonzalez, Colorado, 45; MeCabrera, San Francisco, 40; Pence, Philadelphia, 40; Bourn, Atlanta, 38; Furcal, St. Louis, 37; Uggla, Atlanta, 37; Holliday, St. Louis, 35; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 35; DWright, New York, 35. RBI—Ethier, Los Angeles, 46; CGonzalez, Colorado, 45; Beltran, St. Louis, 42; Stanton, Miami, 40; Cuddyer, Colorado, 37; HRamirez, Miami, 37; Braun, Milwaukee, 36. HITS—MeCabrera, San Francisco, 82; Bourn, Atlanta, 69; Altuve, Houston, 67; SCastro, Chicago, 67; Furcal, St. Louis, 67; CGonzalez, Colorado, 67; Pagan, San Francisco, 65; Prado, Atlanta, 65; DWright, New York, 65. DOUBLES—Votto, Cincinnati, 22; DWright, New York, 19; Cuddyer, Colorado, 18; Ethier, Los Angeles, 18; Alonso, San Diego, 16; Prado, Atlanta, 16; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 16. TRIPLES—MeCabrera, San Francisco, 7; Fowler, Colorado, 5; OHudson, San Diego, 5; 8 tied at 4. HOME RUNS—Beltran, St. Louis, 15; Braun, Milwaukee, 14; CGonzalez, Colorado, 14; Pence, Philadelphia, 13; Stanton, Miami, 13; Bruce, Cincinnati, 12; Kemp, Los Angeles, 12.


MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Storm

GOLF ROUNDUP

Tiger rallies late at the Memorial, wins 73rd title • Woods ties with Nicklaus for career PGA Tour victories The Associated Press DUBLIN, Ohio — Tiger Woods was at his best Sunday at the Memorial. He hit nearly every shot just the way he wanted, worked the gallery into a frenzy with one last charge over the final hour and left everyone buzzing — especially Jack Nicklaus — with a shot they will talk about for years. Better yet was the timing of his 73rd win. Woods tied Nicklaus for career PGA Tour victories at the tournament that Jack built. And the 14-time major champion suddenly looks equipped to resume his chase of another Nicklaus mark that is more significant — 18 major championships. The U.S. Open starts in 11 days. With a chip-in that even Woods called one of the toughest shots he ever made, he birdied three of his last four holes to close with a 5-under 67 and turn a two-shot deficit into a two-shot victory over Rory Sabbatini and fast-closing Andres Romero. Coming off a two-putt birdie on the 15th, Woods hit 8-iron over the green at the par-3 16th and into an impossible lie. It was buried in deep rough, the pin 50 feet away along a ridge. Woods hit a full flop shot, hopeful to give himself a reasonable putt for par. Far more likely was the ball going short and down a slope away from the pin, or coming out too strong and rolling into the water. No one was thinking birdie, not even Woods, until he took two steps and delivered an uppercut when the ball fell in the right side of the cup. Nicklaus was gushing from the broadcast booth. “The most unbelievable, gutsy shot I’ve ever seen,” he said. “Under the circumstances — the circumstances being Tiger has been struggling — it was either fish or cut bait,” Nicklaus said later. “He had one place to land the ball. He’s playing a shot that if he leaves it short, he’s going to leave himself again a very difficult shot. If he hits it long, he’s going to probably lose the tournament. He lands the ball exactly where it has to land. Going in the hole was a bonus.

Changes ahead for Central Oregon preps

Jay LaPrete / The Associated Press

Tiger Woods pumps his fist after making a birdie putt on the 18th hole during the final round of the Memorial golf tournament, Sunday in Dublin, Ohio. Woods birdied three of his last four holes to win the Memorial and match tournament host Jack Nicklaus with his 73rd title on the PGA Tour.

But what a shot! “I don’t think under the circumstances I’ve ever seen a better shot.” Woods, who finished at 9under 279, won the Memorial for the fifth time. At age 36, he is 10 years younger than Nicklaus when the Golden Bear won his 73rd tournament at the 1986 Masters. Sam Snead holds the PGA Tour record with 82 wins. It was vintage Woods at Muirfield Village, the fifth course where he has won at least five times. And it was the perfect way for him to end his worst stretch as a pro. After winning at Bay Hill in March, he tied for 40th in the Masters, missed the cut at Quail Hollow and tied for 40th at The Players Championship. Asked about the endless chatter about whether his game is back, Woods eventually sighed and said, “I’ll let you guys figure that out.” Woods won for the second time this year and moved to No. 4 in the world. This was more impressive than his five-shot win in the Arnold Palmer Invitational at Bay Hill in March, when he had a one-shot lead going into the final round on a course where he could get by with par. The Memorial required much more work, especially when he had to go after birdies on the back nine. And that’s what he did. Woods reached the par-5 15th into the wind in two shots

to set up a two-putt birdie and get within one shot of Sabbatini. But just like that, it looked as if his chances were over when his 8-iron bounded through the green and into a tough lie behind the green. “I had to take a cut at it because the lie wasn’t as great,” he said. “I went for it. I pulled it off. And for it to land as soft as it did was kind of a surprise, because it was baked out and it was also running away from me. It just fell in. I didn’t think it was going to get there at one point.” Sabbatini didn’t need to see it. He was on the 15th green, scrambling for par, when Muirfield Village shook with the loudest roar of the day. “I knew something was going on up in front,” said Sabbatini, who shot 72. “I was really just trying to focus on my own game, and the only thing I could do was control what I was doing. I knew that I was going to have to put a good number up there.” The South African hit his tee shot into the right bunker on the 16th, the third-hardest hole Sunday that yielded only four birdies, and then blasted out to just inside 15 feet and took bogey to fall one behind. That was all Woods needed. From the middle of the 18th fairway, with Nicklaus watching from behind the green, Woods hit 9-iron to the perfect spot on the back of the green, where it caught the slope and rolled to just inside 10 feet for

the final birdie of a masterful finish. Also on Sunday: Lewis wins LPGA event by four strokes GALLOWAY, NJ. — Stacy Lewis shot an even-par 71 to win the ShopRite LPGA Classic by four strokes over Katherine Hull. Lewis finished 54 holes at the Stockton Seaview Hotel and Golf Club at 12-under par 201. It was Lewis’ third LPGA win and her second of 2012. Haas wins third Champions Tour event in Iowa WEST DES MOINES, Iowa — Jay Haas finished with a 16-under 197 total to win the Principal Charity Classic by five strokes, becoming the first golfer to win the Champions Tour event in Iowa three times. Haas, the winner at Glen Oaks Country Club in 2007 and 2008, led by three shots heading into Sunday and made it stand up with a final round 5under 66. Thongchai Jaidee wins Wales Open NEWPORT, Wales — Thailand’s Thongchai Jaidee survived a poor start to win the Wales Open by one stroke, with a final round 1-over 72 in wet conditions. The 42-yearold Jaidee, who was the leader through three rounds, holed four birdies on the back nine at Celtic Manor, after bogeying the fourth and double-bogeying the par-five ninth, where he went out of bounds before finding a bunker.

MOTOR SPORTS ROUNDUP

Johnson wins at Dover for 7th time The Associated Press DOVER, Del. — Jimmie Johnson was the mane man at Dover. Wearing an afro clown wig — tufts of green, red, yellow and blue could be spotted from the stands — Johnson had to admit it was hard to take him seriously while he played the role of race jester. Some guys just have all the fun. That especially includes on this track. Johnson romped again at Dover International Speedway, racing his way into the track’s history books on Sunday with his seventh win on the concrete, matching the mark held by Hall of Fame drivers Richard Petty and Bobby Allison. No active driver owns the track like the five-time Sprint Cup champion. Johnson led 289 of the 400 laps and looked every bit like the driver who swept the two Cup races at Dover in 2002 and 2009. Johnson last won at Dover on Sept. 26, 2010. He also won the September 2005 race. “God, I love this place,” Johnson said as he took a victory spin. Then it was off to goof around in Victory Lane. Johnson, crew chief Chad Knaus and other Hendrick Motorsports crew members wore the wacky wig seen in the talking-

Continued from D1 Freshman Madison Odiorne led the Storm girls golf team to its fourth consecutive state title on May 15 and then four days later Summit’s boys and girls tennis squads secured their own championships. The Storm boys and girls track teams pulled off the double state meet victory over Memorial Day Weekend, and Summit’s baseball team capped its record-breaking season with the school’s first baseball final appearance Saturday before losing to Portland’s Wilson High.

animal movie, “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted.” They had good reason to clown around. Throw in the All-Star race and that’s a sweet four-race winning streak for NASCAR’s top organization. Johnson won at Darlington Raceway and Kasey Kahne won the Coca Cola 600. Johnson also won the non-points All-Star race during that span as the No. 48 Chevrolet is heating up as he chases a sixth Cup championship. “I’ve never been one to pay attention to stats,” Johnson said. “I just truthfully never thought I’d be the guy who’d build up any cool stats. Here I am with some pretty cool stats with legends of our sport and guys that I’ve looked up to.” Johnson won his second race of the season — and first where he celebrated with a rainbow circus wig. “I’m just proud of this hair,” Johnson said. “The hair brought some speed to the team.” Petty needed 46 races to win seven times and Allison had 35 races. Johnson got to seven in his 21st start at the track known as the Monster Mile. “You whipped ’em today,” Knaus said over the radio. Kevin Harvick, Matt Kenseth, Dale Earnhardt Jr., and Clint Bowyer rounded out the top five.

Johnson’s win came about 390 miles after a massive 13car accident ended weeks of mostly accident-free races and took out defending Cup champion Tony Stewart. Stewart eventually returned and finished 25th. Johnson’s only real challenge for a stretch came from teammate Jeff Gordon. The No. 24 was strong enough to lead 60 laps midway through the race and had perhaps the car to beat until a tire issue and an ill-timed debris caution combined to land him in 13th. “It’s always more frustrating when you’ve got a car that can win and you show it by going up there and taking the lead,” Gordon said. “We don’t care about finishing top 15 or top 10 right now. That does nothing for us. We need wins.” Maybe Gordon really did have the top car. But Johnson had the win. Earnhardt joined his Hendrick teammates up front most of the race and posted his fifth top-five of the season. His losing streak stretched to 142 races, but he has only one finish outside the top 10 in his past nine races. Also on Sunday: Scott Dixon wins shortened Detroit Grand Prix DETROIT — Scott Dixon won IndyCar’s Detroit Grand Prix that was marred because

poor track conditions stopped the race for a little more than 2 hours. A red flag halted the event 45 laps into a race that was scheduled for 90 laps and shortened to 60. Torrence wins Top Fuel at NHRA SuperNationals ENGLISHTOWN, N.J. — Steve Torrence earned his second Top Fuel victory of the season, beating Brandon Bernstein in the final round at NHRA SuperNationals. Torrence eliminated Tony Schumacher and Spencer Massey in earlier rounds before using a horsepower advantage to edge Bernstein for the title.

The opening of Ridgeview High in Redmond, the town’s second high school, this fall will change the prep landscape not just for the town of Redmond, but for all of Central Oregon. For Redmond High, the expected loss of students to Ridgeview will drop the Panthers from Oregon’s Class 6A classification level to 5A, putting them back in direct competition with Bend High, Mountain View and Summit — all 5A schools — for state playoff berths. No longer will Redmond be paired with Portland and Eugene schools for state postseason purposes. “This makes it so much simpler for everyone,” Redmond School District athletic director Brent Walsh says. “Last year (Redmond High) was in five different districts for

Baseball Continued from D1 “This is why I came here.” Oregon went 3-0 at the regional this weekend and Sunday got its second victory against the Governors (40-24). Austin Peay defeated Cal State Fullerton 3-0 earlier in the day in an elimination game. The Ducks needed two runs in the bottom of the ninth inning to beat Austin Peay 6-5 Friday night. No comeback was necessary this time. Reed (7-4), Oregon’s No. 2 starter, was brilliant from the start. The freshman allowed just two hits over seven innings with a career-high eight strikeouts. “It was a big deal for us to get this done in three (games),” Reed said. “That was right there in the back of my mind.” Joey Housey finished off the win with two innings of one-hit relief. Oregon’s offense backed Reed up with some early run production. The Ducks went up 1-0 in the first, scoring on a fielder’s choice by Brett Thomas. They added two more in the third on a single by Thomas and a sacrifice fly by Kyle Garlick. Oregon, masterful at manufacturing runs all weekend, extended its lead in the fourth on a squeeze bunt, sac fly and RBI single

D5

various sports. For softball, for example, I’d go to a 6A Special District 1 meeting one day and an Intermountain Conference meeting the next.” Ridgeview will initially open as a 4A school, giving Crook County another 4A rival in the Intermountain Conference hybrid league. Crook County and Ridgeview will also be Class 4A Special District 1 opponents, as the winner of the two-team district in all sports will earn an automatic berth to the 4A play-in round. The two Redmond schools, which will play one another in every sport but football, will compete in separate classifications for at least the next two years. The OSAA has two more academic years on its current four-year time block, after which the state’s governing body for high school athletics will re-examine its leagues and various competition levels. Since moving from four classifications to six before the start of the 2006-07 school year, the OSAA has struggled to balance schools’ desires for larger leagues with similar-sized institutions that are in close proximity of one another. Proposals are expected to begin trickling in to the OSAA’s Wilsonville office this fall, with strong consideration being given to moving from six classifications to five. “The majority of schools are for it,” says Walsh about a five-classification system, who guesses that the enrollment cutoff for the large-school classification will be around 1,200 students. The OSAA’s next four-year time block is not set to begin until fall 2014. — Reporter: 541-383-0305, beastes@bendbulletin.com

to go up 6-0. “It definitely helps you out to get that run support,” Reed said. “That’s what we’ve been able to do all season long.” Brett Hambright added a two-run homer in the seventh to make it 8-0. In Baton Rouge, LSU’s Alex Edward hit a game-tying double in the ninth inning and Austin Nola scored the go-ahead run on a wild pitch in the 10th as the Tigers won the regional. Oregon State, playing as the home team on LSU’s field, led 5-3 in the bottom of the sixth before the Tigers rallied. Michael Conforto, Tyler Smith, Ryan Barnes and Ryan Gorton all had two hits for the Beavers (40-20 overall) in the loss. OSU won 40 games for the second consecutive season. Earlier in the day, Oregon State defeated Louisiana Monroe 11-2 to stave off elimination. Conforto went three for four with four RBIs, pushing him to 75 on the season.

ICE ED! R P UC D RE K E N R E N N E R Principal Broker

541-280-5352 MOTIVATED SELLER! BRING OFFERS! Gorgeous 2.5 acre lot in the gated golf community of Sunset View Estates. Build your dream home amongst the tall pine trees and soak up the Cascade Mountain Views. Reduced to $199,000. 20145 Red Sky Lane. ken.renner@sothebysrealty.com • www.cascadesothebysrealty.com

650 SW Bond St., Suite 100, Bend

Each Office is Independently Owned & Operated.


D6

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

C YCL I NG C EN T R A L

C C  C 

Please email Cycling Central event information to sports@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

CAMPS/CLASSES/ CLINICS

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Hutch’s Bicycles mechanic Chris Knight gives a bike a tuneup.

Mechanic Continued from D1 Although he never attended a formal school for his profession, as many mechanics do not, Knight notes how the knowledge gained over the years has prepared him for all kind of repairs. From building wheels (Knight’s favorite) to specialty requests involving time trial and road bikes, to front fork rebuilds and rear shock replacements on mountain bikes, to the simple fix of a flat tire, it is obvious that a mechanic’s work requires both broad knowledge and a wide range of skills. “I’d always been a home mechanic and then I started working in a bike shop … and realized I really didn’t know anything about fixing bikes,” Knight reflects. “Years and years of working as a bike mechanic are where my knowledge has come from. More often than not you’ll have several bikes you’re working on, from multiple manufacturing years and multiple brands, which means you’re dealing with an array of technologies and, consequently, compatibility issues. That’s where years of experience come in handy.” There are days, however, when bike shop life is not always so technical and demanding. Although most of the repairs Knight likes to work on himself tend to involve higherend bicycles, the most common shop repairs typically relate to shifting adjustments and flat tires. And there is not a single kind of bicycle he won’t work on or a customer he won’t work with. The repairs Knight undertakes are generally more complex and require a broader knowledge base. But, as he points out, he is not above fixing

a flat tire or making simple shifting adjustments. The everyday fixes, he observes, are just as much a part of his job as the more intricate repairs. “I really like problem-solving and dealing with issues in order to resolve them or make them better,” Knight says enthusiastically. “I’ve always liked the mechanical side of things, working with my hands and my brain to help make things better than they were before. Overall, I like what I do. “It’s not the highest-paying job,” says the married father of two young children, “but that’s improving.” Fortunately for Knight, he says, his profession has few disadvantages. But he can point to at least one drawback — one that comes with his line of work and that he has learned to deal with. “One of the only cons to being a bike mechanic is difficult people,” he says. “But I’d say there are more positive people than negative. There are plenty of people who are positive and who appreciate the fact that you’re taking something important to them and fixing it or making it better. I like being able to help people do something they enjoy as much as I do.” Perhaps next time you visit your local shop, make a mechanic’s day and give a quick show of appreciation to the grease-handed guy or gal in the work apron who dutifully answers your questions, simple or complex, and gets you back out on your bike for a safe and smooth ride. —Laura Winberry is a freelance journalist who lives in Bend. She can be reached at laura@organicasana.com or at 201819-4017. For other cycling questions, comments or information directed to The Bulletin, email to sports@bendbulletin.com.

WOMEN’S 101: Beginning women’s road cycling clinic; Mondays, June 4-25; 5 p.m.; practical and fundamental clinic to improve technical knowledge, handling skills and road etiquette; taught by certified cycling coaches; $99; Powered by Bowen; 541-585-1500. DIRT DIVAS MOUNTAIN BIKING PROGRAM IN-STORE CLINIC: Wednesday; 7 p.m.; Pine Mountain Sports, Bend; with expert bike fitter Bart Bowen of Powered by Bowen; free; snacks and socializing at 6:30 p.m.; contact Leanna with questions and register at 541-385-8080. RIDE & REACH: Cycling and yoga clinic; Friday and Saturday, June 15-16; 8:30 a.m.; Bend; with pro rider and yoga instructor Ryan Leech; includes yoga sessions, lunch, shuttles to trailheads and rides; $99 per day or $25 for morning yoga session; cogwild. com/one-day-tours/ryan-leech-yoga-clinic/.

YOUTH DEVELOPMENT JUNIOR TRAINING CAMPS: Grades eight through 12; training for endurance, functional and core strength, balance and other skills; weekly survivor team challenge will include rope course, mountain biking, disc golf and standup paddleboarding; sessions Mondays through Fridays, June 18-July 13 and July 23-Aug. 17; $195 per session; Powered by Bowen, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-585-1500; poweredbybowen.com. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY XC MOUNTAIN TEAM: Ages 13-18; ride local trails to develop strength, skills,

fitness and racing knowledge; Tuesdays through Sundays through August; bill@ bendenduranceacademy.org; www. BendEnduranceAcademy.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY ROAD TEAM: Ages 13-18; improve road skills, learn team tactics and access full race support; Tuesdays through Sundays through August; bill@bendenduranceacademy.org; online www.BendEnduranceAcademy.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY MINI BIKES AND MIGHTY BIKES YOUTH MOUNTAIN BIKING: Ages 6-12; develop mountain biking skills with age-appropriate games and trail; Mondays through Thursdays, JuneAugust; bill@bendenduranceacademy.org; www.BendEnduranceAcademy.org . BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY FREERIDE: Ages 13-18; for young riders who love the Lair, Slalom Play Loop and Whoops Trail; develop dirt jumping and mountain trail skills; Tuesdays through Sundays, JuneAugust; bill@bendenduranceacademy.org; www.BendEnduranceAcademy.org.

EVENTS BEND SHOPS BIKE DEMO WITH COG WILD SHUTTLES: Friday, June 15-Saturday, June 16; 11 a.m.-6 p.m. at Phil’s Trail trailhead; shuttle to Whoops trail to do the same ride on many different bikes; bike demo free with ID; shuttle $10 for unlimited runs each day; cogwild.com/news/. BEND BICYCLE FILM FESTIVAL: Friday, June 15; GoodLife Brewing Co., 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; locally produced bicycle-related short films; Bill Warburton; 541-335-1346; bill@ bendenduranceacademy.org.

RACES GOPRO’S KING AND QUEEN OF THE COURSE: Sunday, June 17; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Century Center, Bend; ride track with ledges, jumps and turns; participants can take as many runs as desired; fastest time in each division wins; men’s and women’s categories; $5, proceeds to Central Oregon Trail Alliance; www.theoutsidegames.com. SISTERS TO SUMMIT HILL CLIMB SERIES:

Wednesdays, June 6-27; 6:30 p.m. start, riders will leave at 1-minute intervals; Sisters; 30-mile course with climb up Three Creeks Road; men’s and women’s categories; $10, register at Village Green City Park in Sisters, 5:30 p.m.-6:20 p.m.; 541-595-8711; joel@sistersstampede.com. MBSEF CRITERIUM SERIES: Wednesdays, June 13, June 27, July 11, July 25, Aug. 8 and Aug. 22; Summit High School, Bend; A, B and junior races; riders will earn points in each race that count toward overall series standings; Molly CogswellKelley; 541-388-0002; molly@mbsef.org.

RIDES HUTCH’S DOUBLE DAWG SMITH ROCK ROAD RIDE: Sunday, June 17; 9 a.m.; 65-mile ride from Bend to Smith Rock and back; one food stop; $5; hutchsbicycles. com; theoutsidegames.com. FREERIDE WITH KIRT VOREIS & FRIENDS AND WOMEN’S RIDE WITH LINDSEY VOREIS: Thursday, June 14; 1 p.m.-4 p.m.; Bend; freeride mountain bike rally with pro rider Kirt Voreis; learn proper technique and watch pro riders demonstrate in jumping and pumptracking; women’s ride with instruction in basic through advanced skills with pro rider Lindsey Voreis; theoutsidegames.com. CENTRAL OREGON 500 +: Five days of century rides based out of Bend; Monday, June 4-Friday, June 8; 8 a.m. starts; field limited to 25 riders; benefit for Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation Cycling Programs; two days of flatter rides and three days with bigger climbs; food, water, mechanical and sag support; $400-$600; www.mbsef.org/events/central_oregon_ 500; centraloregon500@gmail.com.

OUT OF TOWN 2012 OBRA ROAD RACE CHAMPIONSHIPS: Saturday , June 16; 9:30 a.m.; Turner; races of various lengths on 15.9-mile loop, depending on division; categories split between the two days; $15$30; online and day of race registration available; capitolvelo.com/orrc/.

C C   B  General • Bike/pedestrian summit on tap: A tricounty bike and pedestrian summit has been scheduled for June 19 at Black Butte Ranch west of Sisters. The event, coordinated by the Deschutes County Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee, will feature presentations by local officials from Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties, city representatives and state agencies.

CYCLING SCOREBOARD

The summit, which will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., is free to attend. Topics will include bike and pedestrian improvements, current/future bike and pedestrian efforts, funding for bike and pedestrian improvements, and bike and pedestrian master planning. Registration is available at bikecentraloregon.org. For more information, contact Cheryl Howard at 541-316-0867 or howard.cheryl@ gmail.com. — Bulletin staff report

Mountain biking STXC Series Race No. 5 May 30, Bend A — 1, Cody Peterson. 2, Sean Haidet. 3, Cole Sprague. 4, Brian Jorgensen. B — 1, Lance Haidet. 2, Javier Colton. 3, Sean Lewis. 4, Eric Birky. 5, Jason Oman. 6, Cory Tanler. 7, Vincent Sikorski. 8, Donovan Birky. 9, Drew Moore. 10, Anders Hatlestad.

ATTENTION TOUR OF HOMES™ ADVERTISERS 40th Anniversary

12

A SHOWCASE OF THE FINEST HOMES IN CENTRAL OREGON JULY 20, 21, 22 AND 27, 28, 29 Fridays: Noon – 6 pm, Saturdays and Sundays: 10 am – 6 pm Official Sponsors:

The Bulletin presents the Official Tour Guide, to be published Wednesday, July 18. Extra copies of the guide will also be distributed at the homes during the Tour.

Reach more than 70,000 adult readers in the official Tour of HomesTM Guide

ADVERTISING DEADLINE: FRIDAY, JUNE 27 Call your Bulletin sales representative today! Space is limited.

541-382-1811


THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012 E1

CLASSIFIEDS

To place your ad visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

The Bulletin

LEGAL NOTICES

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

EMPLOYMENT

GENERAL MERCHANDISE

Find Classifieds at

www.bendbulletin.com

RENTALS/REAL ESTATE

contact us:

TRANSPORTATION

hours:

Place an ad: 541-385-5809

FAX an ad: 541-322-7253

Business Hours:

Place an ad with the help of a Bulletin Classified representative between the business hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Include your name, phone number and address

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Subscriber Services: 541-385-5800

Classified Telephone Hours:

Subscribe or manage your subscription

24 Hour Message Line: 541-383-2371

On the web at: www.bendbulletin.com

Place, cancel, or extend an ad

T h e

B u l l e t i n :

1 7 7 7

S . W .

C h a n d l e r

A v e . ,

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

B e n d

O r e g o n

9 7 7 0 2

208

208

212

253

266

270

341

476

General Merchandise

Pets & Supplies

Pets & Supplies

Antiques & Collectibles

TV, Stereo & Video

Heating & Stoves

Lost & Found

Horses & Equipment

Employment Opportunities

200

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines, $12 or 2 weeks, $20! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

202

Want to Buy or Rent Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage costume jewelry. Top dollar paid for Gold/Silver.I buy by the Estate, Honest Artist Elizabeth,541-633-7006 WANTED: RAZORS, Double or singleedged, straight razors, shaving brushes, mugs & scuttles, strops, shaving accessories & memorabilia. Fair prices paid. Call 541-390-7029 between 10 am-3 pm. 205

Items for Free Free National Geographics 1982-2011. 541-388-4575. 208

Pets & Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Call a Pro Whether you need a fence ixed, hedges trimmed or a house built, you’ll ind professional help in The Bulletin’s “Call a Service Professional” Directory

541-385-5809 AKC Black Lab Pups. Champion bloodlines. Health certificate. Raised with love. $600. 541-280-5292. Barn cats/ mousers ready to work in your barn, shop or home in exchange for safe shelter, food & water. Altered, shots. We deliver! 541-389-8420

Boxer/ Bulldog (Valley Bulldog) new litter,CKC Reg., taking deposits. $700. 541-325-3376 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds Chihuahua Pups, toy, 3 females, 1 male, $200, 541-678-0786. Chug pups, 6/15 black /white,3 lbs full grown, adorable,1 male,1 female, $200 firm 541-233-3534.

Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

www.bendbulletin.com

Color TV, 27” PhilipsMagnavox, works The Bulletin reserves great, $25. Yorkie Mix male pup, the right to publish all 541-389-9416 tiny, 1st shots, $260 ads from The Bulletin cash. 541-678-7599 newspaper onto The DEXTER Seasons 1-4 Bulletin Internet weblike new $65, 210 site. 541-318-5732 Furniture & Appliances 255 A1 Washers&Dryers

$150 ea. Full warranty. Free Del. Also wanted, used W/D’s 541-280-7355 Amana side x side refrigerator, with water / ice dispenser, $300 obo. 541-389-9680 Baker china cabinets, 2 all-glass fronts, 1 dry bar, 81” H x 36” wide, $890 obo. Other cabinets. 541-389-9680

240

Crafts & Hobbies Singer 29-4 Leather & Cloth Sewing machine. Has Cast iron base, wooden slide table, extra bobbins & various needles of different sizes, 2 threading wires and 3 manuals. $375 OBO 541-279-6097 241

Bicycles & Beautiful brown Free! Part Manx Accessories reclining leather rocker, Call 382-6818 like new, $225. Cannondale R500 Road 541-923-9867 German Shepherd AKC Bike, dk green, 54cm, puppies, born March Bed frame, metal, converted to flat bar 27, 1st & 2nd shots, queen. Great shape. (drops incl), exc cond, Emily 541-647-8803 $20. 541-279-1930 $500. 541-382-2259 Labradoodles - Mini & Entertainment Center 242 med size, several colors black & silver w/glass Exercise Equipment 541-504-2662 shelves in 2 side towwww.alpen-ridge.com ers, expandable up to 60” TV, $200. (new Weight Bench, deluxe Maltese Pup, male, folding, lat tower, arm $1100). 541-475-6797 pure white, adorable curl pad, butterflies,bar, $50, 541-388-1899 11 wks, shots, $750 - Entertainment Centers firm 541-233-3534 (1)1-piece,$150,(1) oak Weight Set, graduated, 4-piece, $400, pics 200lbs., weights/bars, Malti-Pom puppy, male avail., 541-208-5053. $100, 541-388-1899 white w/black, 11wks, shots, $549 OBO, GENERATE SOME ex246 541-233-3534. citement in your Guns, Hunting neighborhood! Plan a Maremma Guard Dog garage sale and don't & Fishing pup, female, 5 mos, forget to advertise in good dog, shots, classified! AR-15 Custom rifle .223 $350. 541-546-6171. 541-385-5809. w/9 mags & ammo. $1200. 541-647-8931 New kittens available! Also great rescued La-Z-Boy rocker/recliner, CASH!! taupe fabric, was $65, cats. 65480 78th St., For Guns, Ammo & now $50 541-749-0024 Bend, Sat/Sun 1-5; Reloading Supplies. other days by appt. 541-408-6900. 541-647-2181. Al- MUST SELL: Solid tered, shots, ID chip, brass king headDO YOU HAVE more. Info: 389-8420. board, couch, SOMETHING TO Map, photos, more at dresser & mirror, reSELL www.craftcats.org production oak table FOR $500 OR & chairs/6 chairs/2 Papillon-mix with toy LESS? 24" leaves. poodle, 1 male left. 8 Non-commercial 541-923-9681 wks. Black/white, will advertisers may be pretty. $150. 541 place an ad Small dropleaf table w/4 350-1684 with our solid oak padded "QUICK CASH Pitbull Purebred Pups, chairs, $75. SPECIAL" blue’s & blue brindles, 541-647-1333 1 week 3 lines $12 $250-$300, call Polly, or Solid oak dresser $350; 541-280-8720 2 weeks $20! Entry table, $75; book Ad must case $20; all exc. include price of cond. 541-647-1333 single item of $500 Twin bed, like new, or less, or multiple must see to appreciitems whose total ate! Mattress, box does not exceed spring, bookcase/ Poodle pups, toy, for $500. headboard, & extras, SALE. Also Rescued $350. 541-536-5067 Poodle Adults for Call Classifieds at adoption, to loving 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com homes. 541-475-3889 The Bulletin r ecommends extra Queensland Heelers caution when pur- REM 1100 LT, 20ga, standard & mini,$150 & chasing products or extra 20” barrel, $400. up. 541-280-1537 http:// services from out of 541-408-0895. rightwayranch.wordpress.com the area. Sending Siberian Husky AKC! cash, checks, or ROSSI Model 62SA, .22 Long Rifle, $250, Black/white fem, 6 mos credit information 541-390-8000 $500. 541-977-7019 may be subjected to FRAUD. For more Ruger LC9 with LaserSpay your mother cat information about an Max, only 30 rounds for only $45, we will advertiser, you may shot. $400. alter her litter for free! call the Oregon 541-408-3288 Bend Spay & Neuter State Attorney Project will spay/neuRuger Mini-14 tactical General’s Office ter the first four kitrifle w/8mags & ammo, Consumer Protectens, aged 8-12 $900. 541-647-8931 tion hotline at weeks. Kittens MUST 1-877-877-9392. be at least 2 lbs. AdS&W 357 mag combat ditional kittens $5 Mdl 19-3 6” brl. Coleach. Call today for lector condition. $650. appt. 541-617-1010. 541-312-2785. 212

Antiques & Collectibles St. Bernard Puppies, dry mouth, 1st shots, dewormed, $400, 541-280-8069

Antiques wanted: tools, furn., fishing, marbles, old sports gear, costume jewelry, rock posters. 541-389-1578

Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, or 503-351-2746 247

Sporting Goods - Misc.

Dog Kennel,6’x8’x6’ high, w/shade cover, $250; Igloo dog house, me- Yorkie AKC pups, small, Pooley Armoire, 1 of a Want to buy treadmill kind, pictures avail., dium size, rarely used, delivered, in good big eyes,shots,parents $900 OBO, must see, $75,medium size crate, working cond. in home, 1 boy, 1 girl, 541-280-5053. $50, 541-593-3331. $950+, 541-316-0005. 541-388-4575.

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

Get your business

GROWIN

G

with an ad in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory 257

Musical Instruments Everett upright piano, excellent cond, 48” tall x 58” wide, $920 obo. 541-389-9680 260

Misc. Items 40-ft Storage container, excellent condition, $2800. 541-620-2135

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

NOTICE TO Lost precious 7lb Pomeranian female, all ADVERTISER black, white face, miSince September 29, crochipped, “Ebony,” 1991, advertising for 5/15, 78th St beused woodstoves has tween Bend & Redbeen limited to modmond. 541-639-3222 els which have been certified by the OrREMEMBER: If you egon Department of have lost an animal, Environmental Qualdon't forget to check ity (DEQ) and the fedThe Humane Society eral Environmental in Bend 541-382-3537 Protection Agency Redmond, (EPA) as having met 541-923-0882 smoke emission stanPrineville, dards. A certified 541-447-7178; woodstove may be OR Craft Cats, identified by its certifi541-389-8420. cation label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowFarm ingly accept advertisMarket ing for the sale of uncertified woodstoves. Pellet Earth Stove, ivory color, 28” x 28”, perfect cond, $700 obo. 541-389-9680 267

Fuel & Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection. • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

Saxon’s Fine Jewelers 541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. BUYING & SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419. Greenwood Cemetery grave space (1), $650 cash. 541-636-4191 Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 263

Tools 10” Ridgid Chopsaw, like new, $35. 541-389-9416 265

Building Materials Consignment Tool Auction June 30 Nels Anderson Rd., Bend. All classes of tools are being accepted for this auction. 541-480-0795. dennisturmon.com Turmon Enterprises LLC

Dry seasoned tamarack red fir, $165 rnd, $185 split 541-977-4500 or 541-416-3677

300 308

Farm Equipment & Machinery Consignment Tool Auction June 30 Nels Anderson Rd., Bend. All classes of tools are being accepted for this auction. 541-480-0795. dennisturmon.com Turmon Enterprises LLC

269

For newspaper delivery, call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email

classified@bendbulletin.com

SUPER TOP SOIL

www.hersheysoilandbark.com

Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949. 270

Lost & Found MADRAS Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Found Rottweiler, female, 5/24, Alfalfa Quality at area, 541-771-9143. LOW PRICES 84 SW K St. Found RX Glasses, on 541-475-9722 bench near footOpen to the public. bridge on River trail, Prineville Habitat 5/30, 541-749-0464. ReStore Building Supply Resale LOST 36”x48” mtn land1427 NW Murphy Ct. scape painting, vicin541-447-6934 ity of Baker Rd & Hwy Open to the public. 97. 541-382-6757

Caregivers! At Home Care Group is hosting a Caregiver www.steelduststable.com Job Fair May 30th and May 345 31st, 2012 Livestock & Equipment 5pm-8pm at our office: 205 SE Wilson, Ste 1, Round Hay Feeder, Bend, OR 97702 $95. 541-388-3886, 541-312-0051 evenings Come for on-the-spot interviews! 350 Must be 18 or over with Horseshoeing/ reliable transportation. Farriers Background check & Drug Screen required. LARGE west side Bend equestrian center on HELP WANTED! 80 acres now boarding. Indoor/outdoor Immediate opening arena, indoor hot/cold No experience nec. showers, automated Exc. training proexerciser, extensive gram. Opportunity trail system. Call for for advancement, full info, 541-306-7507. or part time. Call 541-550-8801. USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Door-to-door selling with fast results! It’s the easiest way in the world to sell. The Bulletin Classiied 358

Farmers Column

541-385-5809.

10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net (15) Main line irrigation pipe, 40’ x 5”, $1.80/ft. 541-604-4415

Kioti CK20 tractor w/bucket, backhoe & grader blade. 370 hrs. $13,900 Prineville, 541-416-0300

Employment

325

Hay, Grain & Feed

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw;Compost.546-6171

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 333

Poultry, Rabbits, & Supplies 15 Black Austrolorp mix chicks and 5 old heritage turkey poults sold in one package for $75.00. Call 51-420-0156.

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

541-385-5809

John Deere Model 40 1955, nearly 100% Orig, runs good, exc. tin, 3 point hitch, hydraulics, light, $2000, 541-504-2891 or 541-977-3120

1st quality grass hay for horses. Barn stored, no Well seasoned Lodgerain, 2nd cutting, $220/ pole Pine, $135 cord ton. Patterson Ranch, split, 2 cord min., Fuel Sisters, 541-549-3831 costs may apply. Fast, friendly service! Want to buy Alfalfa 541-410-6792 standing, in Central 541-382-6099 Ore. 541-419-2713 Gardening Supplies & Equipment

COLT STARTING We build solid foundations. Check us out. 541-419-3405

Want to buy Alfalfa standing, in Central Ore. 541-419-2713

400 421

Schools & Training

TRUCK SCHOOL

www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

VIEW the Classifieds at:

www.bendbulletin.com

MANUFACTURING

Central Oregon mill is accepting resumes for a full time

Forklift Operator

with cabinet shop experience who can multi task. High energy for a fast paced environment needed. We offer an excellent benefits package. Pay is D.O.E. Please email your resume to: Employment.resumes@ ymail.com

Mechanic - small engine. High-production repair facility seeking qualified professional. who has exp. in lawn & garden equip. industry. People skills a must. Incl. benefits. FT or PT considered. 541-382-6769.

Remember.... Add your web ad470 dress to your ad and readers on The Domestic & Bulletin' s web site In-Home Positions will be able to click through automatically Caregiver, live-in fullto your site. time, housing & food included; salary nego. Advertise your car! Compassionate, reAdd A Picture! sponsible, kind. References & back- Reach thousands of readers! Call 541-385-5809 ground check req’d. The Bulletin Classifieds Contact Maureen, 541-385-8906 or 541-480-1380 Person needed to mow lawn in Redmond. Must have lawn mower. Call after 6 pm., leave msg. 541-923-1528. 476

Employment Opportunities AV Tech - Swank Audio Visuals is seeking a PT Audio Visual Technician in Sunriver. For more information or to apply please visit www.swankav.com Become a Team Member. EOE Caregiver Prineville Senior care home looking for Care Manager for multiple shift, part-time to full-time. Pass criminal background check. 541-447-5773.

Retail Sales Design Oriented

Furniture Outlet, part-time, experience is helpful. Serious applicants with professional appearance apply in person at: 1735 NE Hwy 20, Bend. RV Tech

Big Country RV, Central Oregon's largest RV dealership is seeking an experienced RV Tech, top dollar & benefits. Great working environment. Apply in person at: 3111 N. Canal Blvd, Redmond


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

E2 MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Edited by Will Shortz

PLACE AN AD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . .11:00 am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Starting at 3 lines

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise

OVER $500 in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days ................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days .................................................. $18.50 7 days .................................................. $24.00 14 days .................................................$33.50 28 days .................................................$61.50

4 lines for 4 days.................................. $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 476

Employment Opportunities The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Finance & Business

500 528

Loans & Mortgages

600

Every day thousands of buyers and sellers of goods and services do business in these pages. They know you can’t beat The Bulletin Classiied Section for selection and convenience - every item is just a phone call away. The Classiied Section is easy to use. Every item is categorized and every category is indexed on the section’s front page. Whether you are looking for a home or need a service, your future is in the pages of The Bulletin Classied.

749

860

870

880

880

881

Southeast Bend Homes

Motorcycles & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com, currently receiving over 1.5 million page views, every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or ques659 tions, we suggest you Houses for Rent consult your attorney Sunriver or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, In River Meadows a 3 1-877-877-9392. bdrm, 1.5 bath, 1376 573 sq. ft., woodstove, brand new carpet/oak Business Opportunities floors, W/S pd, $895. 541-480-3393 Looking for your or 541-610-7803 next employee? 687 Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and Commercial for reach over 60,000 Rent/Lease readers each week. Your classified ad Office/Warehouse lowill also appear on cated in SE Bend. Up bendbulletin.com to 30,000 sq.ft., comwhich currently repetitive rate, ceives over 1.5 mil541-382-3678. lion page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Real Estate Get Results! Call For Sale 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Wastewater Operator I CITY OF MADRAS Operates and maintains the City’s utility systems, which include wastewater, water and stormwater. Reports to the Utilities Supervisor. The position requires the equivalent to an Associate’s Degree in chemistry, biology, or a wastewater treatment discipline, plus one year of experience in wastewater treatment operations. Certifications required are Oregon Wastewater Treatment Level I and Oregon Wastewater Collections Level I. Additional industry training or certification may substitute for some higher education. Must possess valid Oregon commercial driver’s license with a Class B rating, as well as tanker and air-brake endorsements. Rentals Monthly salary range: $2,797-$3,165 DOQ. Excellent benefit package including fully paid PERS. Send completed city application form, letter of interest and resume to “Wastewater Opera605 tor I Recruitment”, Roommate Wanted City of Madras, 71 SE “D” Street, Madras, OR 97741-1685. For Room for rent, Just bring your tooth brush, 1 a complete job debdrm, full bath, office, scription and applicakitchen use, fully tion go to stocked with utensils. www.ci.madras.or.us Beautiful home at The Closing date: Green Golf Course in June 20, 2012. Redmond. $500/mo. + Equal Opportunity small utility bill. OwnEmployer ers absent often. 541-279-9538. Looking for your next employee? 630 Place a Bulletin help Rooms for Rent wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 Studios & Kitchenettes readers each week. Furnished room, TV w/ Your classified ad cable, micro & fridge. will also appear on Utils & linens. New bendbulletin.com owners.$145-$165/wk which currently 541-382-1885 receives over 1.5 634 million page views every month at Apt./Multiplex NE Bend no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Alpine Meadows Call 385-5809 Townhomes or place 1, 2 & 3 bdrm apts. your ad on-line at Starting at $625. bendbulletin.com 541-330-0719 FIND YOUR FUTURE HOME IN THE BULLETIN Your future is just a page away. Whether you’re looking for a hat or a place to hang it, The Bulletin Classiied is your best source.

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Located by BMC/Costco, 2 bdrm, 2 bath duplex, 55+,2350 NEMary Rose Pl, #1, $795 no smoking or pets, 541-390-7649

SPRING IN FOR A GREAT DEAL!!

$299 1st month’s rent! * 2 bdrm, 1 bath $530 & 540 Carports & A/C incl! Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co *Upstairs only with lease*

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend A quiet newer 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1692 sq.ft., mtn views. dbl. garage w/opener. $1195 541-480-3393,610-7803.

700 732

Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale ½ acre in Prineville OR industrial park 24'x80' shop with 40'x60' unfinished addition, $160,000. Call for more info; can send pics. 541-604-0344 740

Condo/Townhomes for Sale $125,900 townhouse 2 bdrm/2 bath. Near shops/ hospital. Passive solar heat, wood stove, garage, private patio. HOA's $207/mo. 1953 NE Otelah Pl. Call 503-881-6540 745

Homes for Sale 4270 sq ft, 6 bdrm, 6 ba, 4-car, corner, .83 acre mtn view, by owner. $590,000 541-390-0886 See: bloomkey.com/8779 BANK OWNED HOMES! FREE List w/Pics! www.BendRepos.com bend and beyond real estate 20967 yeoman, bend or

NOTICE:

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

3 Bdrm, 1 level, approx. 19.5’ 1988 373V 4 yrs. old, like new, HD FXST Softail Ranger Bass Boat, Mercury 115 Motor, 1322 sq.ft., dbl. garage 2003 Annv Edition Ranger trailer, trolling w/opener, nice open 12200 mi: Inc. Extras elec. motor, fish finder plan, A/C,media panel, Excl Cond; $8,900 & sonor, 2 live wells & quiet cul-de-sac, low 541-504-6912 all accessories, new 1996 Beaver Monterey Monaco Dynasty 2004, maint. yard, on land batteries & tires, great lease, $68,000, HONDA CRF 250X 30' Diesel pusher, low loaded, 3 slides, cond., $6500. 503-810-5661. miles, fully loaded, $159,000, 541-923- 8572 2006, senior citizen 541-923-6555. good Toyo tires, tow or 541-749-0037 (cell) bought new in 2007, 750 package, very clean. trail riding only in Look at: Redmond Homes $25,000. 541-604-0344 Camp Sherman, low Bendhomes.com or 541-447-2175 hours, not ridden last year, JD jetting kit, ra- for Complete Listings of Looking for your next diator & trans. guards, Area Real Estate for Sale employee? exc. cond., $2800 Place a Bulletin help OBO, 541-595-2559 Monaco LaPalma 37’, wanted ad today and 2004 w/ 2 slides, 25k reach over 60,000 mi., loaded, $42,500. readers each week. 541-923-3510. 2002 Country Coach Your classified ad Intrigue 40' Tag axle. will also appear on 400hp Cummins Die19-ft Mastercraft Probendbulletin.com sel. Two slide-outs. Star 190 inboard, which currently re41,000 miles. Most 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 Honda Shadow Arrow ceives over options. $110,000 hrs, great cond, lots of 2006, exlnt cond, low 1.5 million page OBO 541-678-5712 extras, $10,000 obo. mi, always garaged, views every month National Sea Breeze 541-231-8709 $3900. 541-420-4869 at no extra cost. 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, Bulletin Classifieds 2 power slides, upGet Results! graded queen matCall 385-5809 or tress, hyd. leveling place your ad on-line Honda VT700 system, rear camera at Shadow 1984, 23K & monitor, only 6k mi. mi, many new parts, bendbulletin.com Beaver Patriot 2000, A steal at $43,000! battery charger, Walnut cabinets, so19’ Glass Ply, Merc 541-480-0617 good condition. lar, Bose, Corian, tile, cruiser, depth finder, 773 Now for $1000, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, RV CONSIGNMENTS trolling motor, trailer, Acreages WANTED cash! 541-598-4351 W/D. $75,000 $3500, 541-389-1086 We Do The Work, You 541-215-5355 or 541-419-8034. *** Keep The Cash, Piaggio LT50 Scooter CHECK YOUR AD On-Site Credit Coachman 2003 , rarely driven in Please check your ad Approval Team, 9 yrs, only 660 miles, Freelander 2011, on the first day it runs Web Site Presence, mint condition; plus 2 27’, queen bed, 1 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner to make sure it is corWe Take Trade-Ins. helmets, a Mote Tote slide, HD TV, DVD 205 Run About, 220 rect. Sometimes inFree Advertising. tow bar and tie down player, 450 Ford, HP, V8, open bow, structions over the BIG COUNTRY RV accessories, all for exc. cond., very fast $49,000, please phone are misunderBend 541-330-2495 only $1750. w/very low hours, call 541-923-5754. stood and an error Redmond: 541-548-5254 Call 541-389-3044 lots of extras incl. can occur in your ad. tower, Bimini & If this happens to your 865 Gulfstream Scenic custom trailer, ad, please contact us Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, ATVs $19,500. the first day your ad Cummins 330 hp die541-389-1413 appears and we will sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 be happy to fix it as in. kitchen slide out, soon as we can. new tires,under cover, Southwind 35.5’ Triton, Deadlines are: Weekhwy. miles only,4 door 2008,V10, 2 slides, Dudays 11:00 noon for fridge/freezer ice- pont UV coat, 7500 mi. next day, Sat. 11:00 maker, W/D combo, Avg NADA ret.114,343; 20.5’ Seaswirl Spya.m. for Sunday and asking $99,000. Interbath tub & Yamaha yfz450 2005 der 1989 H.O. 302, Call 541-923-2774 Monday. shower, 50 amp proSport Race quad, built 285 hrs., exc. cond., 541-385-5809 4-mil stroked to 470cc, pane gen & more! Tioga 30’ 2005, like new stored indoors for Thank you! lots of mods, $4950 obo $55,000. condition, E450 Super life $11,900 OBO. The Bulletin Classified Call 541-647-8931 541-948-2310 Duty, always garage 541-379-3530 *** stored, 17,345 non870 smoker mi., awning, People Look for Information Ads published in the Boats & Accessories never cooked in, A/C, "Boats" classification About Products and sleeps 8, $42,500, for include: Speed, fish- Hunter’s Delight! PackServices Every Day through details call age deal! 1988 Wining, drift, canoe, The Bulletin Classifieds 541-480-3217 nebago Super Chief, house and sail boats. 38K miles, great For all other types of shape; 1988 Bronco II TRADE? 2004 watercraft, please see 4x4 to tow, 130K Bounder by FleetClass 875. Boats & RV’s mostly towed miles, wood 35’ 3 slides, 541-385-5809 12’ Aluminum Boat, nice rig! $15,000 both. loaded. 44k, very 5HP motor, $875, 541-382-3964, leave clean, reliable w/8.1 503-319-5745. msg. Workhouse chassis, $45,000. GENERATE SOME ex541-382-1853 citement in your neig- CAN’T BEAT THIS! 12' Smokercraft Look before you borhood. Plan a ga2000 & trailer. 2007 buy, below market rage sale and don't 9.9 HP Johnson 850 value ! Size & mileforget to advertise in w/less than 5 hrs Snowmobiles age DOES matter, classified! 385-5809. use, Exc. shape. Class A 32’ Hurri$3200, Call Polaris 2003, 4 cycle, cane by Four Winds, 360-903-7873 to fuel inj, elec start, re2007. 12,500 mi, all view. In town. Winnebago Outlook 32’ verse, 2-up seat, amenities, Ford V10, 2008, Ford V10 eng, cover, 4900 mi, $2500 lthr, cherry, slides, Used out-drive Wineguard sat, TV, surobo. 541-280-0514 like new, can see parts - Mercury round sound stereo + 13’ Smokercraft anytime, $58,000. OMC rebuilt ma860 more. Reduced to 1997, Alaskan Fish 541-548-5216 rine motors: 151 $49,000. 541-526-1622 Boat w/ 9.9 Merc & Motorcycles & Accessories or 541-728-6793 $1595; 3.0 $1895; elec. motor, swivel Jamboree 24’ 1982, 4.3 (1993), $1995. seat, fish finder, anChevy 350, 66K, all 881 541-389-0435 chor, cover & top, new: cam, lifters, trans, Travel Trailers trailer, $2450, paint, brakes, batteries, 541-977-2644. upholstery, tires, fuel 875 pump. Large fridge/ Watercraft freezer, 4-burner stove/ Harley Davidson Heri- 16.2 Smokercraft with oven, solar charging, 50hp 4-stroke Yama- Ads published in "Watage Classic 2000 $5250 OBO, 541-549ha, electric trolling tercraft" include: KaySoftail, 7200 mi, many 1736 or 808-936-7426. motor on bow, like aks, rafts and motorextras, $8000. Call new, $9000. Call Fleetwood 24’ Pioneer ized personal 541-419-5634 541-548-6857 Spirit, 2007, good watercrafts. For Harley Davidson Softcond, minor dent on "boats" please see Jayco Greyhawk 16’ Smokercraft 2001, Tail Deluxe 2007, front saves you $$! Class 870. 40 HP 2 stroke Merc, 2004, 31’ Class C, white/cobalt, w/pas$8000. 541-419-5634 541-385-5809 10 hrs., elec. trolling 6800 mi., hyd. jacks, senger kit, Vance & Jayco Eagle 2000 26’ motor, after market new tires, slide out, Hines muffler system $10,500 OBO. 14’ slide, seats, full enclosure, exc. cond, $49,900, & kit, 1045 mi., exc. awning, air, heat, genfish finder, pole 541-480-8648 cond, $19,999, tly used. 541-595-2003 holder, exc. cond., 541-389-9188. $6300, Please call Space for rent In TuHarley Heritage 541-593-3331. malo. 30 amp + water, Softail, 2003 no septic, level gravel $5,000+ in extras, lot. $100 wk., $350 $2000 paint job, mo. 541-419-5060 30K mi. 1 owner, Inflatable Raft,Sevylor For more information Fishmaster 325,10’3”, London Aire Motor SPRINGDALE 2005 please call complete pkg., $650 Home, class C, 28 ft. 27’, has eating area 541-385-8090 Firm, 541-977-4461. slide, A/C and heat, 1990, in exc. shape, 18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 or 209-605-5537 new tires, all conready to go. Sleeps 6, Volvo Penta, 270HP, tents included, bedUpgrade your camping low hrs., must see, HD FAT BOY ding towels, cooking experience! $11,995. $17,500, 541-330-3939 1996 and eating utensils. Call 541-389-7955 Kayak, Eddyline Great for vacation, Completely rebuilt/ Call The Bulletin At Metal RV cover 14’x14x Sandpiper, 12’, like fishing, hunting or customized, low 541-385-5809 41’long, 3 sided, walk-in new, $975, living! $15,500 miles. Accepting ofPlace Your Ad Or E-Mail door, like new, $4000. 541-420-3277. 541-408-3811 fers. 541-548-4807 At: www.bendbulletin.com 541-620-2135

800

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide,Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504

Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 29’, weatherized, like new, furnished & ready to go, incl Winegard Satellite dish, $26,995. 541-420-9964

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, fuel station, exc cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $24,999. 541-389-9188 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 882

Fifth Wheels

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $12,750. 541-923-3417.

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, fireplace, 2 flat screen TVs. $60,000. 541-480-3923

Escaper 29’ 1991, 2 slides, A/C, elec/gas fridge, walk around queen bed, elec. front jacks, $4000 OBO, 541-382-8939 or 541-777-0999.

Fleetwood Wilderness 36’ 2005 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, AC, W/D hkup beautiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380 Keystone Laredo 2009, $30,000, 541-419-3301 or 541-419-4649 for more info.

Komfort 24’ 1999, 6’ slide, fully loaded,never used since buying, $8500, 541-923-0854.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012 E3

882

885

916

932

933

935

940

975

975

Fifth Wheels

Canopies & Campers

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Vans

Automobiles

Automobiles

Jeep Willys 1947 cstm, small block Chevy, PS, OD, mags + trlr. Swap for backhoe. No a.m. calls, pls. 541-389-6990

Ford Windstar 1995 7 pass., 140k, 3.8 V6, no junk. Drive it away for $1750; 1996 Nissan Quest 7 pass., 152k, 3.0 V6, new tires, ready for next 152k, $4500. Call 541-318-9999, ask for Bob.

Chevy Silverado 1998, Lance 11.6 camper Mdl 1130, 1999. Ext’d cab, Chrysler 300 Coupe black and silver, pro fully self-contained. 1967, 440 engine, lifted, loaded, new 33” Incl catalytic heater, auto. trans, ps, air, tires, aluminum slot TV/VCR combo. Very frame on rebuild, re- wheels, tow pkg., drop well taken care of, painted original blue, hitch, diamond plate clean. Hauls easily, original blue interior, tool box, $12,000, or very comfortable. 1982 INT. Dump w/Aroriginal hub caps, exc. possible trade for newer $7300. 541-382-1344 borhood, 6k on rebuilt chrome, asking $9000 Tacoma. 541-460-9127 392, truck refurbished, or make offer. Chevy Silverado 2500 Lance-Legend 990 has 330 gal. water 541-385-9350. 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, HD 2007 extra cab, tank w/pump & hose. early model, grill exc. cond., generator, Everything works, guard, side steps, tow solar-cell, large refrig, Reduced - now $5000 pkg., 6L, 115,440 all AC, micro., magic fan, OBO. 541-977-8988 hwy miles, exc. cond., bathroom shower, Chrysler SD 4-Door serviced regularly, removable carpet, 1930, CDS Royal MONTANA 3585 2008, white, $19,200, Call custom windows, out9’ DUMP BED Standard, 8-cylinder, exc. cond., 3 slides, 541-419-3301 or door shower/awning with hydraulic lift, body is good, needs king bed, lrg LR, Arc541-419-4649. set-up for winterizing, some restoration, for 1-ton flatbed tic insulation, all opelec. jacks, CD/steDodge 1500 2001 4x4 runs, taking bids, truck, + 2 alumitions $37,500. reo/4’ stinger. $8500. sport, red, loaded, 541-383-3888, num tool boxes. 541-420-3250 Bend, 541.279.0458 rollbar, AND 2011 541-815-3318 $2700 obo. Moped Trike used 3 Lance-Legend 990 541-410-6945 months, street legal. 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, call 541-433-2384 exc. cond., generator, Consignment Tool solar-cell, large refrig, Dodge 1500 STL Quad Auction June 30 AC, micro., magic fan, Cab Hemi 4x4, 21,000 Nels Anderson Rd., bathroom shower, miles, $16,500. Bend. All classes of Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th removable carpet, 541-538-6185 tools are being ac- FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd, wheel, 1 slide, AC, custom windows, outcepted for this aucTV,full awning, exceldoor panels w/flowers door shower/awning tion. 541-480-0795. lent shape, $23,900. & hummingbirds, set-up for winterizing, dennisturmon.com 541-350-8629 white soft top & hard elec. jacks, CD/ste- Turmon Enterprises LLC top, Reduced! $5,500. reo/4’ stinger. $8500. 541-317-9319 or Bend, 541.279.0458 541-647-8483 Montana 34’ 2003, 2 slides, exc. cond. throughout, arctic winter pkg, new 10ply tires, W/D ready, price reduced, Now $18,000, 541-390-6531

Regal Prowler AX6 Extreme Edition 38’ ‘05, 4 slides,2 fireplaces, all maple cabs, king bed/ bdrm separated w/slide glass dr,loaded,always garaged,lived in only 3 mo,brand new $54,000, still like new, $28,500, will deliver,see rvt.com, ad#4957646 for pics. Cory, 541-580-7334

Taurus 27.5’ 1988

Everything works, $1750/partial trade for car. 541-460-9127

personals

Autos & Transportation

900 908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718 Just too many collectibles?

Sell them in St. Jude Novena. May The Bulletin Classiieds the Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, glorified, loved and pre541-385-5809 served throughout the world, now and for- 1/3 interest in wellever. Sacred Heart of equipped IFR Beech Jesus, pray for us; St. Bonanza A36, loJude, worker of cated KBDN. $55,000. miracles, pray for us; 541-419-9510 St. Jude, helper of the hopeless, pray for us. Executive Hangar Say this prayer 9 times at Bend Airport a day. It has never (KBDN) been known to fail. Publication must be 60’ wide x 50’ deep, w/55’ wide x 17’ high promised. Thank you, bi-fold door. Natural Jesus & St. Jude. M.L. gas heat, office, bathSt. Jude Prayer, May room. Parking for 6 the Sacred Heart of cars. Adjacent to Jesus be adored, gloFrontage Rd; great rified, loved and previsibility for aviation served throughout the bus. 1jetjock@q.com world, now and for541-948-2126 ever. Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us; St. Jude Worker of Miracles, pray for us; Helper of the Hopeless, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day and by the ONLY 3 OWNERSHIP SHARES LEFT! eighth day,your prayer Economical flying in shall be answered. It your own Cessna has never been 172/180 HP for only known to fail. Publica$10,000! Based at tion must be promBDN. Call Gabe at ised. Thank you St. Professional Air! Jude for Granting me 541-388-0019 my Petition, CVW.

Peterbilt 359 potable water truck, 1990, 3200 gal. tank, 5hp pump, 4-3" hoses, Ford Galaxie 500 1963, camlocks, $25,000. 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, 541-820-3724 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & radio (orig),541-419-4989

Dodge 3500 2007 Quad Cab SLT 4x4, 6.7L Cummins 6-spd AT, after-market upgrades, superb truck, call for details, $28,000 OBO. 541-385-5682

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac, dealer maint’d, loaded, now $17000. 503-459-1580

Range Rover 2005 HSE, nav, DVD, local car, new tires, 51K miles. $24,995. 503-635-9494

Range Rover, 2006 Sport HSE,

nav, AWD, heated seats, moonroof, local owner, Harman Kardon, $23,995. 503-635-9494 Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

925

Utility Trailers

975

Automobiles AUDI QUATTRO CABRIOLET 2004, extra nice, low mileage, heated seats, new Michelins, all wheel drive, $12,995 503-635-9494.

BMW 525i 2004

New body style, Steptronic auto., cold-weather package, premium package, heated seats, extra nice. $14,995. 503-635-9494. Buick Lucerne CX 2006 65k, 3.8 V6, cloth int., 30 mpg hwy, $7500. Buick Park Avenue 1992, leather, 136k, 28 mpg hwy. $2500. Bob, 541-318-9999 Ask me about the Free Trip to Washington, D.C. for WWII Veterans.

Infiniti I30 Ltd., 1999, 4 door luxury car, leather & woodgrain interior, power windows & seats, side Toyota 2007 Camry airbags, Bose sound Solara SLE V6 Consystem, sunroof, 3.0 L vertible, 23,000 mi., V6, must see! $6000 exc. cond., loaded, obo. 541-350-4779 extras, Blizzard Pearl with Ivory Leather. Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl $22,800. 541-408-7830 white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218. Take care of your investments with the help from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory Nissan Altima 2009 47K miles, 30+ mpg, exc. cond., 1 owner, ext warranty, snow tires. $14,700. 541-419-6057 PORSCHE 914, 1974 Roller (no engine), lowered, full roll cage, 5-pt harnesses, racing seats, 911 dash & instruments, decent shape, very cool! $1699. 541-678-3249 Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Volkswagen Convertible, 2006, 55K mi, 2.5L eng, 5 spd, lots of extras, new tires. $12,400. 541-728-4355 Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Looking for your next employee?

Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great Ford F-150 1995, 112K, 4X4, long bed, auto, shape, $9000 OBO. very clean, runs well, 530-515-8199 new tires, $6000. 541-548-4039.

Ford F-350 XLT 2003, 4X4, 6L diesel, 6-spd manual, Super Cab, short box, 12K Warn winch, custom bumper GMC ½ ton 1971, Only & canopy, running $19,700! Original low boards, 2 sets tires, mile, exceptional, 3rd wheels & chains, many Need help ixing stuff? owner. 951-699-7171 extras, perfect, ONLY 29,800 miles, $27,500 Call A Service Professional OBO, 541-504-8316. ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 931 4-dr. sedan, in storAutomotive Parts, age last 15 yrs., 390 GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi Service & Accessories High Compression motor, mechanically engine, new tires & liA-1, interior great; Traction Snow Tires (4), cense, reduced to body needs some has Snowflake, 235/ $2850, 541-410-3425. TLC. $4000 OBO. 70R16, great shape, Call 541-382-9441 lots of tread, $250, The Bulletin 541-408-0531 To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to We Buy Junk www.bendbulletin.com Cars & Trucks! Cash paid for junk International Flat vehicles, batteries & Bed Pickup 1963, 1 catalytic converters. ton dually, 4 spd. Serving all of C.O.! trans., great MPG, Call 541-408-1090 could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, 932 new brakes, $1950. Plymouth Barracuda Antique & 541-419-5480. 1966, original car! 300 Classic Autos hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 Mazda B4000 2004 eng & wheels incl.) Chevy 1951 pickup, Cab Plus 4x4. 4½ yrs 541-593-2597 restored. $13,500 obo; or 95,000 miles left on 541-504-3253 or ext’d warranty. V6, 933 503-504-2764 5-spd, AC, studded Pickups tires, 2 extra rims, tow pkg, 132K mi, all records, exlnt cond, $9500. 541-408-8611 Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, 935 1995, extended cab, Chevy Wagon 1957, long box, grill guard, Sport Utility Vehicles running boards, bed 4-dr., complete, rails & canopy, 178K Cadillac Escalade ESV $15,000 OBO, trades, miles, $4800 obo. 2007 $37,977 #283459 please call 208-301-3321 (Bend) 541-420-5453.

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

541-598-3750

aaaoregonautosource.com

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Computer/Cabling Install QB Digital Living •Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Debris Removal

Handyman

Landscaping/Yard Care

ERIC REEVE HANDY NOTICE: OREGON SERVICES. Home & Landscape ContracCommercial Repairs, tors Law (ORS 671) Carpentry-Painting, requires all businesses that advertise Pressure-washing, to perform LandHoney Do's. On-time scape Construction promise. Senior which includes: Discount. Work guarplanting, decks, anteed. 541-389-3361 fences, arbors, or 541-771-4463 water-features, and Bonded & Insured installation, repair of CCB#181595 irrigation systems to I DO THAT! be licensed with the Home/Rental repairs Landscape ContracSmall jobs to remodels tors Board. This Honest, guaranteed 4-digit number is to be work. CCB#151573 included in all adverDennis 541-317-9768 tisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and Landscaping/Yard Care workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status More Than Service before contracting Peace Of Mind with the business. Persons doing landSpring Clean Up scape maintenance •Leaves do not require a LCB •Cones license. •Needles •Debris Hauling Nelson Landscape •Aeration •Dethatching Maintenance Compost Top Dressing Serving Central Oregon Residential Weed free Bark & Commercial & flower beds •Sprinkler

Landscaping/Yard Care

Spring Clean up. Bi-weekly & monthly maint., debris hauling, property clean-up, bark decoration. Residential & Commercial. Free Estimates.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005, low miles., good tires, new brakes, moonroof Reduced to $15,750 541-389-5016.

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maintenance, thatching, sod, sprinkler blowouts, water features, more! Chevy Tahoe, 1999, Allen 541-536-1294 very clean, loaded, LCB 5012 23,600k on new motor; Aeration / Dethatching new tires & battery, $5000. 541-330-1151 BOOK NOW! Weekly / one-time service avail. Bonded, insured, Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 4x4. 120K mi, Power free estimates!

COLLINS Lawn Maint. Call 541-480-9714 Organicscapes, Inc. LCB#8906

541.771.9441 www.bendorganiclandscaping.com

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through The Bulletin Classifieds

seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd row seating, extra tires, CD, privacy tinting, upgraded rims. Fantastic cond. $9500 Contact Timm at 541-408-2393 for info or to view vehicle.

Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc. cond., $19,900, call 541-923-0231.

Maverick Landscaping Mowing, weedeating, Infiniti QX56 Sport Utility 4x4 2006. 66,000 I Haul Away FREE ORGANIC PROGRAMS miles, dark grey with For Salvage. Also tan leather interior, Cleanups & Cleanouts Landscape Aux port for iPod, Mel, 541-389-8107 Maintenance DVD player, heated •Weekly Mowing Full or Partial Service • Clean-up • Aerate front & back seats, Electrical Services •Bi-Monthly & Monthly • De-thatch • Free Est. •Mowing •Edging backup camera, Bose Maintenance •Pruning •Weeding • Weekly / Bi-wkly Svc. Premium Sound SysQuality Builders Electric Sprinkler Adjustments •Flower Bed Clean Up call Josh 541-610-6011 tem, navigation sys• Remodels •Bark, Rock, Etc. tem, Bluetooth wire• Home Improvement Fertilizer included •Senior Discounts less, Extended Painting/Wall Covering • Lighting Upgrades Platinum Warranty with monthly program Bonded & Insured • Hot Tub Hook-ups through Jan., 2015 or All About Painting 541-815-4458 541-389-0621 80,000 miles. SepaWeekly, monthly Interior/Exterior/Decks. LCB#8759 www.qbelectric.net rate full set of studor one time service. Mention this ad get CCB#127370 Elect ded snow tires & 15% Off interior or Lic#9-206C wheels. $26,000. BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS exterior job. EXPERIENCED email kj@bje.bz or Restrictions do apply. Commercial Search the area’s most Excavating call 541-647-9611 Free Estimates. & Residential comprehensive listing of CCB #148373 classiied advertising... Levi’s Dirt Works: All Free Estimates 541-420-6729 real estate to automotive, your excavation needs: Senior Discounts merchandise to sporting Small jobs for HomeWESTERN PAINTING goods. Bulletin Classiieds owners - job or hr., Util541-390-1466 CO. Richard Hayman, appear every day in the ity lines,Concrete, Public Same Day Response a semi-retired paintWorks, Subcontracting, print or on line. ing contractor of 45 Jeep Cherokee 1990, Custom pads, Driveway Just bought a new boat? Call 541-385-5809 years. Small Jobs 4WD, 3 sets rims & grading - low cost-get rid Sell your old one in the www.bendbulletin.com Welcome. Interior & tires, exlnt set snow of pot holes & smooth out classiieds! Ask about our Exterior. ccb#5184. tires, great 1st car! your drive,Augering,ccb# Super Seller rates! 541-388-6910 $1800. 541-633-5149 194077, 541-639-5282 541-385-5809

JUNK BE GONE

Activation & Repair yard detailing, chain •Back Flow Testing saw work & more! •Thatch & Aerate LCB#8671 541-923-4324 • Spring Clean up Holmes Landscape Maint

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

E4 MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN %

% 1000

PUBLIC NOTICE The Bend Park & Recreation District Board of Directors will meet in a work session beginning at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, June 5, 2012, at the district office, 799 SW Columbia, Bend, Oregon. Agenda items include presentation of a COCC forestry students capstone project for Gopher Gulch Ranch, a police services report and final review of the Strategic Plan. the board will conduct a business session beginning at 7:00 p.m. to conduct a public hearing regarding the FY 2012-13 budget and consider resolutions to adopt the budget, impose and

1000

Legal Notices Legal Notices g categorize taxes, FIND YOUR FUTURE adopt the 2013-17 Five-Year Capital Im- HOME IN THE BULLETIN provement Plan, and Your future is just a page away. consider adoption of Whether you’re looking for a hat or the Strategic Plan. a place to hang it, The Bulletin The June 5, 2012, Classiied is your best source. board report is posted on the district’s web- Every day thousands of buyers and site, www.bendparksellers of goods and services do sandrec.org. For more business in these pages. They information call know you can’t beat The Bulletin 541-389-7275. Classiied Section for selection BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS and convenience - every item is Search the area’s most just a phone call away. comprehensive listing of The Classiied Section is easy classiied advertising... to use. Every item is categorized real estate to automotive, merchandise to sporting and every category is indexed on goods. Bulletin Classiieds the section’s front page. appear every day in the Whether you are looking for a home print or on line. or need a service, your future is in Call 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com the pages of The Bulletin Classied.

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: GREGORY WINEBARGER. Trustee:FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee:NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: As described on the attached Exhibit A - EXHIBIT A: ALL THAT CERTAIN LAND SITUATED IN THE STATE OF OR, COUNTY OF Deschutes, CITY OF Redmond, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE QUARTER CORNER COMMON TO SECTIONS 20 AND 21, TOWNSHIP 15 SOUTH, RANGE 13 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 19' 29" WEST, 1,311 76 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 42' 19" EAST, 42900 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 19' 29 EAST, 12300 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 42' 19" WEST, 15900 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 19' 29" WEST, 12300 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 42' 19" EAST, 15900 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. 3.RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: August 3, 2007. Recording No. 2007-42750 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,430.77 each, due the first of each month, for the months of October 2011 through February 2012; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5.AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $264,529.23; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the Terms of the Promissory Note from September 1, 2011; plus late charges of $1,391.94; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF SALE. Date:July 26, 2012. Time:11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30887). DATED: February 23, 2012. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. 1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by LARRY L. BARNES AND LIMING BARNES, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor(s), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., as Beneficiary, dated 01/18/2005, recorded 01/21/2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2005-03773, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT TWENTY-EIGHT (28), RIDGE AT EAGLE CREST 38, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 627 HIGHLAND MEADOW LOOP REDMOND, OR 97756

S41026 kk

1000

Legal Notices

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $639.37 beginning 02/01/2010; plus late charges of $31.97 each month beginning with the 02/01/2010 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-95.91; plus advances of $465.50; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further 1000 1000 1000 sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above deLegal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices scribed real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on LEGAL NOTICE the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payTRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE able, said sums being the following to wit: $131,200.00 with interest Loan No: xxxxxx5678 T.S. No.: 1347918-09. thereon at the rate of 6.25 percent per annum beginning 01/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, Reference is made to that certain deed made by Keith E Alexander Who costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said Acquired Title As Keith Alexander, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protecfavor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Bention of the above described real property and its interests therein. eficiary, dated January 24, 2008, recorded January 31, 2008, in official WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Monday, August 20, 2012 at the fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008 04719 ** covering the folhour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS lowing described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes Lot thirty-five (35), Block J, Deschutes River Woods, County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at recorded march 22, 1962, plat book 6, public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described Deschutes County, Oregon. ** modify 6-1-10 2010-48733 real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of Commonly known as: the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest 59707 Cheyenne Rd Bend OR 97702. which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the exBoth the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real ecution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby seproperty to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice cured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised by the Trustee. Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, Failure to pay the monthly payment due July 1, 2011 of principal, interest at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary purreinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other suant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default $1,447.71 Monthly Late Charge $57.91. By this reason of said default the occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust imthat is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required unmediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum der the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying of $176,075.21 together with interest thereon at 4.750% per annum from said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by June 01, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the benefithat the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees ciary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corpo- In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" ration the undersigned trustee will on August 20, 2012 at the hour of includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other per1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon son owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of if any. Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to Dated: April 11, 2012 convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonFor further information, please contact: able charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paySIMI VALLEY, CA. 93063 ment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such (800) 281-8219 portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default (TS# 11-0089926) 1006.143298-FEI occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering Publication Dates: May 28, June 4, 11 and 18, 2012. 1006.143298 the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular Where can you ind a Need to get an includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Need to get an ad helping hand? ad in ASAP? grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the perforin ASAP? From contractors to mance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and You can place it "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: yard care, it’s all here online at: April 12, 2012. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Fax it to 541-322-7253 in The Bulletin’s www.bendbulletin.com Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Recon“Call A Service veyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird The Bulletin Classiieds 541-385-5809 Professional” Directory R-408674 05/14, 05/21, 05/28, 06/04. 1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by REBECCA C. VALReference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by ROBERT W. BARLIE-SCHLACHTER AND MARK D. SCHLACHTER, as grantor(s), to Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by VINCENT CEGERS NETT, as grantor(s), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of AND DANIELLE D. CEGERS, as grantor(s), to WESTERN TITLE AND WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as BenESCROW COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECMORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 08/31/2005, recorded 09/06/2005, in the mortgage records TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated eficiary, dated 04/06/2005, recorded 04/13/2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's 02/06/2006, recorded 02/13/2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2005-59582, and subseCounty, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2005-22214, and subsequently assigned to THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE Number 2006-09941, and subsequently assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, quently assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDN.A. by Assignment recorded 10/29/2010 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYERS OF THE CWABS INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. WIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP by Assignment recorded 2005-HYB9 by Assignment recorded 12/15/2010 in Book/Reel/Volume No. 2010-43308, covering the following described real property situated in said 12/07/2010 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. county and state, to wit: fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2010-48695, covering the fol2010-49850, covering the following described real property situated in said lowing described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: county and state, to wit: LOT 27 AND THE EASTERLY 75 FEET OF LOT 28, BLOCK FFF, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, LOT 38, GREENS AT REDMOND, PHASES 4 AND 5, LOT 11, WESTERLY SUBDIVISION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 4008 SW TOMMY ARMOUR LANE REDMOND, OR 97756

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 18992 OBSIDIAN ROAD BEND, OR 97702

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 20259 MARINER DRIVE BEND, OR 97701

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,721.94 beginning 08/01/2009; plus late charges of $66.62 each month beginning with the 08/01/2009 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-532.96; plus advances of $345.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $327,981.48 with interest thereon at the rate of 4.88 percent per annum beginning 07/01/2009 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Friday, August 24, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,411.83 beginning 09/01/2008; plus late charges of $56.47 each month beginning with the 09/01/2008 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-282.22; plus advances of $2,240.50; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $186,488.42 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.88 percent per annum beginning 08/01/2008 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Friday, August 17, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $898.69 beginning 06/01/2010; plus late charges of $44.93 each month beginning with the 06/01/2010 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-44.93; plus advances of $300.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $159,766.09 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75 percent per annum beginning 05/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Monday, August 27, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Dated: April 19, 2012

Dated: April 10, 2012

Dated: April 19, 2012

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA. 93063 (800) 281-8219 TS No. 10-0155374 (TS# 10-0155374) 1006.121916-File No.

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA. 93063 (800) 281-8219 (TS# 10-0134439) 1006.117845-FEI

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA. 93063 (800) 281-8219 TS No. 12-0030221 (TS# 12-0030221) 1006.157800-File No.

Publication Dates: June 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2012. 1006.121916

Publication Dates: May 28, June 4, 11 and 18, 2012. 1006.117845

Publication Dates: June 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2012. 1006.157800


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012 E5

%

% 1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by THOMAS G. DEAN, Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by MARY CHARLYNN as grantor(s), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF SNOKE, as grantor(s), to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTOREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, TRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 09/01/2006, recorded dated 08/14/2008, recorded 08/26/2008, in the mortgage records of Des09/08/2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as chutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/recepRecorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2006-61381, tion Number 2008-35378, and subsequently assigned to BANK OF and subsequently assigned to HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIAAMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS TION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE DEUTSCHE ALT-A SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP SECURITIES, INC. MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, MORTGAGE by Assignment recorded 08/02/2011 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2007-AR2 by Assignment reNo. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2011-26978, corded 10/27/2011 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's covering the following described real property situated in said county and fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2011-037813, covering the folstate, to wit: lowing described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT THIRTHY-FOUR (34), EAGLENEST, PHASE II, LOT 28 IN OBSIDIAN MEADOWS, CITY OF REDMOND, RECORDED MAY 8, 1998, IN CABINET E, PAGE 19, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 3462 SW METOLIOUS MEADOW COURT REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,019.15 beginning 07/01/2011; plus late charges of $50.96 each month beginning with the 07/01/2011 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-101.92; plus advances of $120.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $188,150.00 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.50 percent per annum beginning 06/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Monday, August 27, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 23, 2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA. 93063 (800) 281-8219 TS No. 11-0149300 (TS# 11-0149300) 1006.151108-File No. Publication Dates: June 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2012. 1006.151108 Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809 Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by SONYA K CRUM, as grantor(s), to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 10/31/2005, recorded 11/14/2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2005-77943, and subsequently assigned to THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-84, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-84 by Assignment recorded 07/15/2011 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2011-24899, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 8, BLOCK 1, HIGH COUNTRY, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON.

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2733 NE HOPE DRIVE BEND, OR 97701

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to the deed of trust under which Diane E. Flowerday and Michael S. Flowerday, as grantor, Western Title and Escrow Company is the trustee, and Oakwood Acceptance Corporation, LLC is the beneficiary, which was dated July 3, 2002 and recorded on July 8, 2002 in Book 2002, Page 36845 in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest was transferred to JPMorgan Chase Bank by assignment recorded on November 12, 2002 in Book 2002, Page 63155. Thereafter, the beneficial interest was transferred to The Bank of New York Mellon by assignment recorded on December 27, 2011 as Recording No. 2011-045977. Said deed of trust covers the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to-wit: Lot 12, Block 2, Singing Pines, Deschutes County, Oregon. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said deed of trust and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to ORS 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Failure to make monthly payments of $839.36 each due on the 1st day of July 2011 through February 1, 2012. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: $97,692.41; plus a per diem of $23.89; plus attorney and trustee's fees and costs. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will, on Friday, July 13, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 A.M., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the Deschutes County Courthouse located at 1100 NW Bond St, Bend, OR 97701, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said deed of trust, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are a debt collector. This communication is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. DATED: February 23, 2012. John W. Weil, Successor Trustee 1001 SW 5th Avenue, Suite 2150 Portland, Oregon 97204 Telephone No. (503) 226-0500

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,262.81 beginning 08/01/2010; plus late charges of $50.51 each month beginning with the 08/01/2010 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-151.53; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $147,653.80 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.88 percent per annum beginning 07/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Thursday, August 23, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying PUBLIC NOTICE said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by RAYMOND SCOTT not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. MIERJESKI AND ALETA A. MIERJESKI, as grantor(s), to AMERITITLE, In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other perSYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 05/01/2007, recorded 05/09/2007, son owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2007-26589, and subseif any. quently assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYDated: April 19, 2012 WIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP by Assignment recorded 10/24/2011 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2011-037472, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 LOT FIVE (5), BLOCK ONE (1), SUNSET WEST, SIMI VALLEY, CA. 93063 DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. EXCEPTING THEREFROM A (800) 281-8219 PORTION OF LOT 5, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT TS No. 12-0028118 (TS# 12-0028118) 1006.157831-File No. THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 5; THENCE NORTH 53 DEGREES 04'50" WEST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY LINE OF Publication Dates: June 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2012. 1006.157831 SAID LOT 5, A DISTANCE OF 59.32 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 24'12" EAST, 89.64 FEET TO THE NORTHWESTERLY The Bulletin LINE OF MIDAY WAY; THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 27'23" WEST TURN THE PAGE Find exactly what To Subscribe call ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY LINE, 5.30 FEET; THENCE 36.36 FEET you are looking for in the For More Ads 541-385-5800 or go to ALONG THE ARC OF A 50 FOOT RADIUS CURVE WHICH IS CONCAVE CLASSIFIEDS The Bulletin TO THE SOUTHEAST (THE LONG CHORD OF WHICH BEARS www.bendbulletin.com SOUTH 57 DEGREES 58'16" WEST, 35.52 FEET) TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A PORTION OF LOT ONE (1), 1000 1000 1000 BLOCK TWO (2), SUNSET WEST, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices CORNER OF LOT 1; THENCE SOUTH 75 DEGREES 05'06" EAST, 228.10 FEET; THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES 30'06" WEST, 14.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 07'12" WEST, 220.70 FEET TO THE PUBLIC NOTICE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A PORTION OF LOT TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE FOUR (4), BLOCK ONE (1), SUNSET WEST, Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by KIMBERLY STEDESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: FANCHICK AND MICHAEL STEFANCHICK, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 4, ALSO grantor(s), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTBEING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 5; THENCE SOUTH GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, 82 DEGREES 30'00" WEST ALONG THE NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID dated 05/08/2008, recorded 05/16/2008, in the mortgage records of DesLOT 4, A DISTANCE OF 88.17 FEET TO THE EASTERLY LINE OF chutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/recepO.B. RILEY ROAD; THENCE 33.52 FEET ALONG THE ARC OF A tion Number 2008-21382, and subsequently assigned to BANK OF 1830 FOOT RADIUS CURVE WHICH IS CONCAVE TO THE AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SOUTHWEST (THE LONG CHORD OF WHICH BEARS SOUTH SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP 29 DEGREES 00'06" EAST, 33.52 FEET); THENCE LEAVING THE by Assignment recorded 03/05/2010 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page EASTERLY LINE OF SAID ROAD, NORTH 82 DEGREES 30'00" EAST, No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2010-9511, 107.71 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 38 DEGREES 53'37" EAST, 78.53 FEET; covering the following described real property situated in said county and THENCE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 24'12" EAST, 45.00 FEET TO THE NORTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 4; THENCE NORTH state, to wit: 53 DEGREES 04'50" WEST ALONG THE NORTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 4, A DISTANCE OF 161.37 FEET TO THE LOT 19, BLOCK 6, BRIGHTENWOOD ESTATES II, TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON.

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 20296 SILVER SAGE ST BEND, OR 97702-2682

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 60615 DEVON CIRCLE BEND, OR 97702

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 63861 SUNSET DRIVE BEND, OR 97701

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,099.66 beginning 09/01/2011; plus late charges of $44.90 each month beginning with the 09/01/2011 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $ .00; plus advances of $359.74; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $172,431.74 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25 percent per annum beginning 08/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Monday, August 27, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,976.51 beginning 05/01/2009; plus late charges of $79.06 each month beginning with the 05/01/2009 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-237.18; plus advances of $1,418.04; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $249,216.44 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.13 percent per annum beginning 04/01/2009 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Thursday, August 23, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,474.96 beginning 07/01/2011; plus late charges of $63.32 each month beginning with the 07/01/2011 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-126.64; plus advances of $ 40.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $207,311.99 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.63 percent per annum beginning 06/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Wednesday, August 22, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Dated: April 19, 2012

Dated: April 19, 2012

Dated: April 17, 2012

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA. 93063 (800) 281-8219 TS No. 12-0030084 (TS# 12-0030084) 1006.157804-File No.

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA. 93063 (800) 281-8219 TS No. 10-0028191 (TS# 10-0028191) 1006.89437-File No.

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA. 93063 (800) 281-8219 TS No. 12-0029941 (TS# 12-0029941) 1006.157594-File No.

Publication Dates: June 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2012. 1006.157804

Publication Dates: June 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2012. 1006.89437

Publication Dates: June 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2012. 1006.157594


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

E6 MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012 • THE BULLETIN %

% 1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF BEND - PROJECT NUMBER WA0902 TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE SURFACE WATER IMPROVEMENT PROJECT The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in HDPE - CONDUIT PURCHASE PACKAGE - APPROXIMATELY 2.5 MILES OF 36" HDPE PIPE OF VARYING THICKNESSES the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to Notice of Invitation to Bid ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: Mortenson is requesting sealed bids for Bid Package #02 HDPE - ConMARK ALLISON AND LISA ALLISON. Trustee:FIRST AMERICAN TITLE duit Purchase Package. This package consists of supply and delivery of INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee:NANCY K. approximately 2.5 miles of 36" HDPE pipe. CARY. Beneficiary:WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2.DESCRIPTION OF Sealed bid must be received prior to 2:00 p.m. on Tuesday June 26, 2012 PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot 4, Block 2, at: M.A. Mortenson Construction, C/o City of Bend, 710 NW Wall St. 2ND BOONES BOROUGH NO 2, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3.RECORDING. Floor, Bend, OR 97701 Attention: Gary Rea, Sr. Project Manager. Bids The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: November 21, must be physically received at the location listed by the deadline. No 2006. Recording No.: 2006-76979 Official Records of Deschutes County, faxed or electronic (email) submissions will be accepted. There will be a Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the formal bid opening in the City of Bend Council Chambers at 2:15 p.m. folTrust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the lowing the submission deadline. Bids will not be accepted after the stated Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly opening date and time. Late bids will be returned to the vendor unopened. payments in the amount of $1,596.20 each, due the first of each month, for the months of April 2010 through February 2012; plus late charges and The invitation to bid, addenda, and notification of bid results for this bid may be viewed, printed or ordered via M.A. Mortenson Company's FTP advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. site: ftp://ftp2.mortenson.com/SeattleEstimating/Bend%20SWIP%20BP02/ AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the - Log In (user name - SeattleEstFTP / password n33dle) - (Upon zip file Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of opening use 11050003-02 for password) $365,954.19; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of Pre-bid meeting is not required. All questions should be sent to the attenthe Promissory Note from March 1, 2010; plus late charges of $648.40; tion of Gary Rea Sr. Project Manager M.A. Mortenson Company at plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF gary.rea@mortenson.com. PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to Bid documents can be viewed at M.A. Mortenson Company, 10230 NE satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Points Drive, Suite 300. Kirkland, WA 98033 and Central Oregon Builders Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been reExchange "COBE" 1902 NE 4th St. Bend, OR 97701. corded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF M.A. Mortenson Company reserves the right to reject any or all bids not in SALE. Date:July 26, 2012. Time:11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County compliance with bid package procedures and per ORC 279B.100. Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINPublished:June 4, 2012 STATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that Gary Rea is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have Sr. Project Manager this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to M.A. Mortenson Company the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of 206-588-9214 the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the perfor1000 1000 1000 mance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount LEGAL NOTICE provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 Loan No: xxxxxx9385 T.S. No.: 1290243-09. or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Thomas A Gary and TyFor more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to rene Gary, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to First American Title Insurhttp://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should ance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of Wachovia Mortgage, be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS Fsb, Its Successors and/or Assignees A Federal Savings Bank, as Benefi#17368.30803). DATED: March 2, 2012. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. ciary, dated July 02, 2008, recorded July 09, 2008, in official records of Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/InOR 97440. strument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-29131 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: LEGAL NOTICE Lot 9, block 1, Lower Bridge Estates, TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Deschutes County, Oregon. The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the diCommonly known as: rection of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in 70440 NW 96th Ct. Nka 8202 NW 96th Ct. Terrebonne OR 97760-9730. the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice DWANE KRUMME AND DONNA L. KRUMME. Trustee:FIRST AMERIhas been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised CAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2.DEFailure to pay the monthly payment due October 15, 2009 of principal, inSCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: terest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late Lot Ten (10) in Block Twelve (12) of DEER PARK II, Deschutes County, charges; failure to pay escrow advance when due, said sums having been Oregon. 3.RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date advanced by the beneficiary; together with all subsequent sums adRecorded: June 20, 2005. Recording No.: 2005-38634 Official Records of vanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other pertrust. Monthly payment $3,717.94 Monthly Late Charge $161.23. By this son obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,920.20 each, due the fiffollowing, to-wit; The sum of $673,993.64 together with interest thereon at teenth of each month, for the months of December 2010 through Febru6.850% per annum from September 15, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued ary 2012; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any taxes or liens, plus interest. 5.AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western balance in the amount of $348,060.85; plus interest at an adjustable rate Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 30, pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from November 15, 2010; 2012 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section plus late charges of $872.82; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Desand costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the chutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Desproperty will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. chutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oror had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said egon. 7.TIME OF SALE. Date:July 26, 2012. Time:11:00 a.m. Place:Destrust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors chutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reportion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, instated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tenDeed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the dering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assingular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in insistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal povterest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the erty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid properformance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" grams, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 Dated: April 24, 2012. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East (TS #17368.30926). DATED: February 23, 2012. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western ReNancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, conveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird Eugene, OR 97440. R-409419 05/28, 06/04, 06/11, 06/18 PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by ALLEN RAY SANTEE AND CHRISTINA ALLEAN SANTEE, as grantor(s), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., as Beneficiary, dated 03/19/2007, recorded 03/26/2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2007-17605, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT TWENTY-ONE 21, JONAHS LANDING, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1954 NORTHEAST PURSER AVENUE BEND, OR 97701 Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,618.35 beginning 03/01/2011; plus late charges of $70.31 each month beginning with the 03/01/2011 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $ .00; plus advances of $185.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $270,000.00 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25 percent per annum beginning 02/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Thursday, August 23, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 19, 2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA. 93063 (800) 281-8219 TS No. 12-0029927 (TS# 12-0029927) 1006.157822-File No. Publication Dates: June 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2012. 1006.157822

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by GREGORY D MCDONALD, as grantor(s), to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 04/02/2008, recorded 04/14/2008, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2008-16268, and subsequently assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. by Assignment recorded 10/04/2010 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2010-39282, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT ONE HUNDRED TWENTY NINE, CANYON POINTS ESTATES - PHASE 4, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2820 NW 17TH ST REDMOND, OR 97756-1181 Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,179.03 beginning 04/01/2010; plus late charges of $87.16 each month beginning with the 04/01/2010 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-345.46; plus advances of $15.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $289,482.54 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.50 percent per annum beginning 03/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Monday, August 27, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 19, 2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA. 93063 (800) 281-8219 TS No. 10-0125674 (TS# 10-0125674) 1006.115030-File No. Publication Dates: June 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2012. 1006.115030

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads The Bulletin

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates!

541-385-5809

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by JOHN H WRIGHT, AND SARAH N WRIGHT, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor(s), to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE CO, as Trustee, in favor of Look at: Need help i xing stuff? MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as BenFind exactly what Bendhomes.com Call A Service Professional eficiary, dated 08/25/2005, recorded 08/30/2005, in the mortgage records you are looking for in the ind the help you need. for Complete Listings of of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's CLASSIFIEDS www.bendbulletin.com fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2005-57898, and subseArea Real Estate for Sale quently assigned to THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE 1000 1000 1000 BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices 2005-AB4 by Assignment recorded 09/30/2011 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. LEGAL NOTICE 2011-034356, covering the following described real property situated in TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE said county and state, to wit: The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in LOT 45, JUSTIN GLEN, PHASE III, the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: GREGORY R YEAKEL AND ROBIN L YEAKEL. Trustee:FIRST AMERIPROPERTY ADDRESS: CAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: 817 NW POPLAR AVENUE REDMOND, OR 97756 NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: As described on the attached Exhibit A. EXHIBIT "A" - LEGAL DESCRIP- Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default TION: That portion of the South Half of the Northwest Quarter has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the (S1/2NW1/4) of Section Seventeen (17), Township Seventeen (17) South, default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,544.18 beginning Oregon, described as follows: Commencing at the Northwest corner of the 07/01/2009; plus late charges of $66.79 each month beginning with the NE1/4SW1/4NW1/4 of said Section 17; thence South along the East line 07/01/2009 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-1,402.59; plus of the West Half of the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter advances of $502.50; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and (W1/2SW1/4NW1/4) of said Section 17, 790 feet to the Southwest corner attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further of that certain tract of land described in instrument to Brady A. Smith, etux, sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above derecorded June 28, 1978, in Book 276, Page 946, Deed Records, thence scribed real property and its interest therein. South 89°52'28" East along the South line of said Smith tract, 551 feet to the true point of beginning; thence North 0°01'42" East, 482 feet to a point; By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and paythence South 89°54'24" East, 532 feet to a point on the East line of said able, said sums being the following to wit: $193,250.04 with interest Smith tract, said point being also located at the centerline of easement thereon at the rate of 6.95 percent per annum beginning 06/01/2009 until described in instrument recorded in Book 199, Page 85, Deed Records; paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, thence Southwesterly along said centerline to the East line of the fee parcosts, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said cel described in instrument recorded in Book 199, Page 85, Deed default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protecRecords; thence North 00°07'32" East to the Northeast corner of the land tion of the above described real property and its interests therein. described in instrument recorded in Book 199, Page 85, Deed Records, thence North 89°52'28" West, 284 feet along the South line of said Smith WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Thursday, August 23, 2012 at the tract to the point of beginning. EXCEPTING THEREFROM any portion hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS contained in road as described in Declaration of Dedication recorded Au187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes gust 20, 1984, in Book 69, Page 881, Official Records. 3.RECORDING. County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: October 2, public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described 2006. Recording No. 2006-66226 Official Records of Deschutes County, real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the exBeneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly ecution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby sepayments in the amount of $3,647.93 each, due the first of each month, cured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge for the months of November 2011 through February 2012; plus late by the Trustee. charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5.AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed $785,163.99; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other the Promissory Note from October 1, 2011; plus late charges of $992.25; than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required unsatisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of der the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been resaid sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by corded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation SALE. Date:July 26, 2012. Time:11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINnot exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. STATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other perthis foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to son owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing if any. any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs Dated: April 19, 2012 and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 For further information, please contact: or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to SIMI VALLEY, CA. 93063 http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should (800) 281-8219 be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS TS No. 12-0030021 (TS# 12-0030021) 1006.157811-File No. #17368.30747). DATED: February 29, 2012. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, Publication Dates: June 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2012. 1006.157811 OR 97440.


Bulletin Daily Paper 06/04/12  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Monday June 4, 2012

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you