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Pressure on public pensions mounts

Bend airman to be honored

By Mary Williams Walsh and Danny Hakim New York Times News Service

Few investors are more bullish these days than public pension funds. While Americans are typically earning less than 1 percent interest on their savings accounts and watching their 401(k) balances yo-yo along with the stock market, most public pension funds are still betting they will earn annual returns of 7 to 8 percent over the long haul, a practice that New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg recently called “indefensible.” Now public pension funds across the country are facing a painful reckoning. Their projections look increasingly out of touch in today’s low-interest environment, and pressure is mounting to be more realistic. But lowering their investment assumptions, even slightly, means turning for more cash to local taxpayers — who pay part of the cost of public pensions through property and other taxes. See Pensions / A3

Nine-year-old Adler can say just four words. Technology, however, helps him and kids in similar plights reach out. ‘I feel like he’s there again,’ says Adler’s mom, Stephanie.

Photos by Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Inmates hold the keys at this prison By Alberto Arce Associated Press

SAN PEDRO SULA, Honduras — Inside one of Honduras’ most dangerous and overcrowded prisons, inmates operate a free-market bazaar, selling everything from iPhones to prostitutes. It’s more like a fencedin town than a conventional prison, where raccoons, chickens and pigs wander freely among food stalls and in troughs of open sewage. But guards do not dare cross the painted, yellow “linea de la muerte” (line of death) into the inner sanctum run by prisoners, and prisoners do not breach the perimeter controlled by guards. “The prisoners rule,” assistant prison director Carlos Polanco said. “We only handle external security. They know if they cross the line, we can shoot.” See Prison / A2

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Stephanie Utzman helps her son Adler, 9, choose what he will eat for breakfast as 2-year-old Jonah watches at the Utzmans’ home in Bend. Adler uses an iPad with an app called Proloquo2Go, which uses pictures to help Adler make choices. Adler has speech apraxia — in addition to cerebral palsy and some developmental disabilities — which means he can know what he wants but be unable to translate it into words.

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n an afternoon in early May, 9-yearold Adler Utzman let his mom know he wanted to eat

crackers. For most kids, this request is easily expressed with a few words. But not for Adler, whose profound developmental disabilities left him unable to communicate even the most basic desires to his parents. By age 9, he couldn’t express choices most toddlers can — what toy he’d like to play with, what food he wanted to eat, what to wear. It’s only within the past few months that Adler has been able to communicate a choice like this — to demonstrate his will in a measurable way. He is making these choices by using an app on an iPad, a tablet computer technology that is fast becoming a source of hope for families of children with communication challenges. Adler has speech apraxia, in addition to cerebral palsy and some developmental disabilities. For Adler, speech apraxia means he may know what he wants, but being able to translate that into words is nearly impossible. At age 9, Adler can say just four words: car,

A day in the life of Adler at www. bendbulletin.com/adler.

Four-year-old Kelsey Kreuzer demonstrates some of the games and sign language programs on her iPod that she uses to communicate as her mother looks on. The device is one of 14 given away by Adler’s Voice, the nonprofit started by Stephanie Utzman.

bagoon (for balloon), pruck (for truck) and nng (for moon). Adler is cognitively delayed and in many ways seems at the same developmental level as his 2-year-old brother, Jonah. According to an assessment from last fall, Adler had the listening comprehension and expressive communication levels of a child who was about 11⁄2 years old. He takes a long time to learn motor skills. He was nearly 4 when he first walked and still struggles to do things like climb stairs — he often has to practice a new skill hundreds of times before he can master it. His parents, Stephanie and

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Steve Utzman, of Bend, have tried to intuit what Adler wanted, but they couldn’t always guess correctly. Stephanie Utzman felt a distance growing between her and Adler because she could not understand what he needed or wanted. “I felt like I broke his spirit,” she said. That’s why Adler expressing a desire for crackers feels like a breakthrough for Utzman. “With this iPad, it’s been amazing. I feel like he’s there again. I finally feel like the bond is back. … You can tell when there’s a wall between you and your kid. I don’t think

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the wall is there any more.” Utzman is hoping the technology will also help other kids with communication challenges. With the help of Central Oregon Disability Support Network, she formed a nonprofit called Adler’s Voice to give communication devices to families in need. “This is my heart and soul,” Utzman said. Since January the group has given away 14 devices. One device went to Kelsey Kreuzer, a 4-year-old in Redmond who can only say about 10 words due to a stroke she experienced when she was 13 months old. Her mom, Allison Kreuzer, says the difference it has made for her daughter is “life-changing.” In the three weeks since they loaded special communication software onto the device, Kelsey has been able to ask for particular foods, choose her clothes and select activities to do, such as color in coloring books — all things that were beyond her ability before. See Voice / A4

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The Bulletin

Bend airman Justin Wilkens will be recognized today in Salem at a ceremony honoring Oregonians killed in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Wilkens, 26, a first lieutenant, was one of four U.S. airmen killed in a February crash near Wilkens a military base in the east African nation of Djibouti. The Pentagon described the flight of the small single-engine plane, commonly used for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, that ended with the death of the four men as part of the war in Afghanistan. The names of Wilkens and Marine Cpl. Adam Buyes of Salem have been added to the Afghan-Iraqi Freedom Memorial, located on the grounds of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs in Salem, and will be read aloud during today’s ceremony. With their deaths, a total of 133 men and women with Oregon ties have been killed in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan since 2003. See Wilkens / A2

More Memorial Day • Events across the region, C3 • List of closures, B1

By Alandra Johnson The Bulletin

By Scott Hammers

Homeless female vets a challenge for shelters By Annie Gowen The Washington Post

Four years ago, Veronica Witherspoon was stationed in Baghdad, enduring roiling sandstorms and neardaily rocket fire as she worked as a Navy petty officer at Camp Victory. By January, she’d left the military, lost her job as a civilian contractor, split with her husband and ended up virtually homeless, bunking with family. Deeply ashamed and desperate for a way out, she ran across a story on a military website for a new program for female veterans called Final Salute. See Veterans / A5

TOP NEWS SYRIA: U.N. condemns Assad, A3 WEST POINT: Strategy debate, A3


THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012

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By Katherine Tallmadge Special to The Washington Post

Are you shying from bad foods that are actually good for you? With all the hoopla about healthful eating, it’s hard to separate

fact from fiction. As a nutrition consultant, I’ve come to realize there is no shortage of surprises and superstitions in the world of nutrition. Here are reasons to enjoy some of your favorites.

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Gluten and wheat They are “the most demonized ingredients beyond high fructose corn syrup and hydrogenated oil,” said Melissa Abbott, culinary director at the Hartman Group, a company specializing in consumer research. Yet decades of studies have found that glutencontaining foods, such as whole wheat, rye and barley, are vital for good health, and are associated with a reduced risk of diabetes, heart disease, cancer and excess weight. Only about 1 percent of the population, or less, cannot tolerate gluten and must eradicate it from their diet to ease abdominal pain and other symptoms. One reason wheat-free or gluten-free diets are popular is that people who don’t eat wheat often end up bypassing excess calories in sweets and snack foods. Then they start feeling better, lose weight, and mistakenly attribute their success to gluten or wheat avoidance. Thinkstock photos

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HAPPENINGS • It’s Memorial Day, as Americans honor the fallen, veterans and military personnel in ceremonies and private remembrances. In Salem, a ceremony will be held for Oregonians killed in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. A1 • Tropical Storm Beryl is expected to continue dumping rain over parts of Florida and Georgia after making landfall in northeastern Florida early this morning.

Eggs

Potatoes

Fruits

Soy

Alcohol

Fried Foods

Eggs also don’t deserve their bad reputation. In recent decades, their high cholesterol content has been thought to play a role in increasing LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and heart disease risk. But cholesterol in food is a minor factor contributing to high blood cholesterol for most people, and studies have not confirmed a correlation between eggs and increased heart disease risk. The major determinant of LDL (bad) cholesterol is saturated fat, and while eggs are high in cholesterol — 184 milligrams in the yolk — they’re relatively low in saturated fat — about 1.6 grams in the yolk. Interestingly, some of the biggest egg eaters in the world, the Japanese, have low cholesterol and heart disease rates, in part because they eat a diet low in saturated fat. In contrast, Americans eat eggs alongside sausage, bacon, and buttered toast.

Potatoes have been blamed for increasing blood glucose levels, insulin resistance, excess weight and Type 2 diabetes. A recent Harvard study that followed large populations and their disease rates linked potato eating with being overweight, blaming it on the blood glucose rise. But the study lumped all potato products together, including potato chips and french fries, very fattening versions of potatoes usually eaten in large portions alongside hamburgers, hot dogs and sodas. “It’s an easy food to attack; but the meal pattern may be the culprit,” said David Baer, a research leader at the Agricultural Research Service of the Department of Agriculture. Potatoes are a great source of potassium, Vitamin C and fiber that many cultures — Scandinavians, Russians, Irish, and Peruvians — relied on as a nutritious staple for centuries. And they were not fat.

People often ask me if fruit is too high in sugar, especially for diabetics. This fear of fruit, I believe, is left over from the Atkins craze, which discouraged eating some fruits on the grounds that they are high in carbohydrates. Avoiding fruit could actually damage your health. Study after study over many decades shows that eating fruit can reduce the risk of some cancers, heart disease, blood pressure and diabetes. Fruit is high in water and fiber, which help you feel full with fewer calories, one reason why eating it is correlated with lower body weight. Even though they contain simple sugars, most fruits have a relatively low glycemic index. That is, when you eat fruit, your blood sugar raises only moderately, especially when compared with refined sugar or flour products. Several health organizations recommend Americans eat at least five cups of fruits and vegetables a day.

Though popular for centuries in many Asian cuisines, soy is sometimes seen as dangerous after studies found elevated rates of breast cancer among rats when they were fed a concentrated soy derivative. But studies looking at whole soy foods in humans have not found a connection. In fact, the reverse may be true. Soy, “when consumed in childhood or adolescence may make breast tissue less vulnerable to cancer development later in life and probably has no effect on breast cancer risk when consumption begins in adulthood,” said Karen Collins, registered dietitian and nutrition adviser with the American Institute for Cancer Research. Actually, Collins said, the evidence is so strong for protection against heart disease that the FDA allowed a health claim for labels on soy food products.

Alcohol is feared because of the potential for abuse and alcoholism and complications such as liver disease, which are valid concerns. But decades’ worth of research shows that moderate alcohol consumption “can reduce deaths from most causes, particularly heart disease, and it raises HDL (good) cholesterol,” the USDA’s David Baer said. Wine may have additional benefits because its grapes are filled with nutrients called polyphenols, which reduce blood-clotting, inflammation and oxidation. The key is to drink alcohol moderately and with meals. What’s moderation? One serving daily for women and two servings for men, with a serving being 5 ounces of wine, 12 ounces of beer or 1.5 ounces of spirits.

While it’s true that frying food usually increases its caloric content, that doesn’t necessarily make it unhealthful. As long as food is fried in healthful oil instead of butter, shortening, or trans fat, and it’s eaten in moderation, it isn’t less healthy. In fact, fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K, and heart-healthy, cancer-preventive carotenoids such as beta-carotene (e.g., carrots, sweet potatoes), lycopene (e.g., tomatoes) and lutein/zeaxanthin (deep-green leafy vegetables), need fat in order to be absorbed by the body. “The consumption of certain fats, such as saturated fatty acids and trans fatty acids, is associated with an … increased risk of cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, the unsaturated fats, monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids (canola, safflower and olive oils) have significant metabolic benefits and are health promoting,” said the 2010 U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee.

Basketball Hall-of-Famer Jerry West is 74. Former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani is 68. Singer John Fogerty is 67. Singer Kylie Minogue is 44.

— Katherine Tallmadge is a registered dietitian and author of “Diet Simple: 195 Mental Tricks, Substitutions, Habits & Inspirations”

— From wire reports

Prison Continued from A1 The unofficial division of power at the San Pedro Sula Central Corrections Facility is mimicked throughout the country, where a Lord-of-theFlies system allows inmates to run a business behind bars, while officials turn a blind eye in exchange for a cut of the profits they say is spent on prison needs. This culture virtually guarantees that even in the glare of international scrutiny over a fire that killed 361 prisoners at another Honduran prison three months ago, little stands to change. Just one month after the fire at Comayagua prison, convicts at San Pedro Sula turned on their leader, killing 14 people and taking over the prison for three weeks be-

fore officials could get inside. Less than two weeks ago another inmate was killed and 11 wounded in a brawl. The AP this month toured the prison in San Pedro Sula, where 2,137 inmates live in a space built for 800. Journalists gained access not through the prison director but with permission from the head inmate, Noe Betancourt, who provided a team of eight prisoners as security. No guards went inside the bustling, autonomous town, where women and children mill about the stalls selling Coca-Cola, fruit, T-shirts, hammocks, shoes and rugs. Some 30 people enter from outside every day to work the market. The guards typically keep to an area between two sets of locked doors. The first set

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It’s Monday, May 28, the 149th day of 2012. There are 217 days left in the year.

Wilkens Continued from A1 A Bend native, Wilkens was the son of Dr. Jim Wilkens and his wife, Sharon. He was survived by his parents and three siblings. Wilkens began flying as a boy, earning his certification as a glider instructor when he was still a teenager and serving as the commanding officer of the local Civil Air Patrol cadet program. Homeschooled by his parents, Wilkens received a commission to the Air Force Academy, graduat-

ing in 2009. A combat systems officer, Wilkens was on his third deployment with the Air Force when he died and had logged more than 400 combat hours. Also today, Wilkens’ name will be added to the Bend Heroes Memorial, located on Northwest Newport Avenue at the west end of the Veterans Memorial Bridge. Wilkens is the eighth Central Oregonian killed in military operations related to the war on terror. — Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com

is locked against entry to the outside world. Between those doors, and the doors to prison cells, lies the yellow line. Prisoners keep to their side of it so religiously that the doors to the indoor market and the cells are unlocked during the day. At night, guards do venture in to lock the cells, inmate Betancourt said, but inmates

IN HISTORY Highlights: In 1533, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, declared the marriage of England’s King Henry VIII to Anne Boleyn valid. In 1892, the Sierra Club was organized in San Francisco. In 1937, President Franklin D. Roosevelt pushed a button in Washington signaling that vehicular traffic could begin crossing the justopened Golden Gate Bridge in California. Neville Chamberlain became prime minister of Britain. In 1959, the U.S. Army launched Able, a rhesus monkey, and Baker, a squirrel monkey, aboard a Jupiter missile for a suborbital flight which both primates survived. Ten years ago: NBC announced that Brian Williams would succeed Tom Brokaw as anchor of its “Nightly News” after the 2004 presidential election. Mildred Wirt Benson, creator of the “Nancy Drew” children’s mystery stories, died in Toledo, Ohio, at age 96. Five years ago: The United States and Iran broke a 27year diplomatic freeze with a four-hour meeting in Baghdad about Iraqi security. One year ago: After a four-year blockade, Egypt permanently opened the Gaza Strip’s main gateway to the outside world. North Korea freed Eddie Jun, an American it had held for a half year for reportedly proselytizing.

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T S Iran will U.N. condemns Syria not halt over civilian massacre enrichment, official says New York Times News Service TEHRAN, Iran — Iran’s nuclear chief, reversing the country’s previous statements, said on state television Sunday that the country would not halt its production of higher-grade uranium, suggesting that the Iranian government was veering back to a much harder line after talks in Baghdad with the West last week ended badly. The official, Fereydoon Abbasi, said there would be no suspension of enrichment by Iran, the central requirement of several U.N. Security Council resolutions. He specifically said that applied to uranium being enriched to 20 percent purity — a steppingstone that puts it in fairly easy reach of producing highly enriched uranium that can be used for nuclear weapons. “We have no reason to retreat from producing the 20 percent because we need 20 percent uranium just as much to meet our needs,” Abbasi said, according to Iranian state TV. Abbasi’s statement will be of particular concern to the United States and Israel because Iran is producing more of its 20 percent enriched uranium in a deep underground site that is considered highly resistant to bombing. The site, called Fordow, is on a military base and was discovered by Western intelligence agencies several years ago, but Iran only acknowledged the work there in 2009. The Fordow plant, near the holy city of Qum, is so deep that Israeli officials say if Iran makes progress there, it will have entered a “zone of immunity” where it would be safe from Israeli or U.S. military action. Getting Iran to halt its 20 percent enrichment, and ultimately dismantle and close the Fordow plant, has been described by U.S. officials as their top priority.

Pensions Continued from A1 In New York, the city’s chief actuary, Robert North, has proposed lowering the assumed rate of return for the city’s five pension funds to 7 percent from 8 percent, which would be one of the sharpest reductions by a public pension fund in the U.S. But that change would mean finding an additional $1.9 billion for the pension system every year, a huge amount for a city already depositing more than a 10th of its budget — $7.3 billion a year — into the funds. But to many observers, even 7 percent is too high in today’s market conditions. Public retirement systems from Alaska to Maine are running into the same dilemma as they struggle to lower their assumed rates of return in light of very low interest rates and unpredictable stock prices.

The Washington Post BEIRUT — The U.N. Security Council on Sunday blamed the Syrian government for most of the deaths in a massacre of 116 civilians in the village of Houla, issuing a unanimous statement condemning the killings that was supported by Syria’s staunch allies Russia and China. The killings on Friday, which included at least 32 children, represented one of

the bloodiest single incidents yet in the 14-month-old uprising against President Bashar al-Assad’s rule and have served to highlight the failure of a U.N. monitoring mission to halt the violence, which appears to be steadily rising again. After meeting in a closeddoor emergency session Sunday, the 15-member Security Council issued a statement directly accusing Syria of carry-

ing out the killings “of dozens of men, women and children and the wounding of hundreds more … in attacks that involved a series of government artillery and tank shellings on a residential neighborhood.” The “outrageous use of force” against civilians constitutes a violation of international law and of Syria’s commitment to abide by a U.N.-mandated peace plan, the statement added.

Cadets practice for maneuvers at the U.S. Military Academy in West Point in New York. The faculty is debating whether the counterinsurgency strategy used in Iraq and Afghanistan is dead as a doctrine.

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By Elisabeth Bumiller New York Times News Service

WEST POINT, N.Y. — For two centuries, the U.S. Military Academy has produced generals for the United States’ wars, among them Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, George Patton and David Petraeus. It is where President George W. Bush delivered what became known as his pre-emption speech, which sought to justify the invasion of Iraq, and where President Barack Obama told the nation he was sending an additional 30,000 U.S. troops to Afghanistan. Now at another critical moment in U.S. military history, the faculty here on the com-

They are facing opposition from public-sector unions, which fear that increased pension costs to taxpayers will further feed the push to cut retirement benefits for public workers. Ailing pension systems have been among the factors that have recently driven struggling cities into Chapter 9 bankruptcy. Such bankruptcies are rare, but economists warn that more are likely in the coming years. Faulty assumptions can mask problems, and municipal pension funds are often so big that if they run into a crisis their home cities cannot afford to bail them out. The typical public pension plan assumes its investments will earn average annual returns of 8 percent over the long term, according to the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Actual experience since 2000 has been much less, 5.7 per-

manding bend in the Hudson River is deep in its own existential debate. Narrowly, the argument is whether the counterinsurgency strategy used in Iraq and Afghanistan — the troopheavy, expensive doctrine of trying to win over the locals by building roads, schools and government — is dead. Broadly, the question is what the United States gained after a decade in two wars. “Not much,” Col. Gian Gentile, the director of West Point’s military history program and the commander of a combat battalion in Baghdad in 2006, said flatly in an interview last week. “Certainly not worth the effort. In my view.”

cent over the last 10 years, according to the National Association of State Retirement Administrators. (New York state announced last week that it had earned 5.96 percent last year, compared with the 7.5 percent it had projected.) Worse, many economists say, is that states and cities have special accounting rules that have been criticized for greatly understating pension costs. Governments do not

Gentile, long a critic of counterinsurgency, represents one side of the divide at West Point. On the other is Col. Michael Meese, the head of the academy’s influential social sciences department and a top adviser to Petraeus in Baghdad and Kabul when Petraeus commanded the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. “Nobody should ever underestimate the costs and the risks involved with counterinsurgency, but neither should you take that off the table,” Meese said, also in an interview last week. Counterinsurgency, he said, “was broadly successful in being able to have the Iraqis govern themselves.”

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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012

Voice Continued from A1 Gone are the 20-minute tantrums Kelsey threw while Kreuzer tried to figure out what her daughter wanted. Gone are the intense feelings of frustration on both sides. When Kreuzer realized what it meant, she cried. “It’s huge. I can’t even explain it,” she said. “This is going to give her the voice she didn’t have.”

Why technology There are lots of reasons children may struggle to communicate through words. And while some children with communication challenges are profoundly developmentally delayed, others are whip smart. For Adler, it’s a matter of neurological wiring. Utzman explains he has a planning problem — which means translating a word from his head to his mouth and tongue is extremely challenging. For 16-year-old Brittany Peterson of Bend, communication is difficult because of motor function. Cerebral palsy makes it hard for the teen to speak in a way that most people can understand. For 4-year-old Kelsey, a stroke damaged part of her brain that works with language. Utzman estimates there are “about 250 children with significant communication needs and about another 200 with speech/articulation issues” in Deschutes County. Advances in technology have revolutionized how these kids are able to communicate. Paul Andrews, who served as the director for special programs at the High Desert Education Service District until last year, says 20-plus years ago, parents would try to build something out of wood and an old calculator to help their kid communicate. Even just a few years ago, communication devices might have functioned OK, but cost $7,000 or more. Thanks to the iPad’s relative low price, ease of use and many free and low-cost apps, the devices are quickly replacing many older, cumbersome and prohibitively expensive communication technologies. The High Desert ESD cur-

Joe Kline/The Bulletin

Maria Elder, left, an Elk Meadow Elementary School life skills education assistant, gives Adler Utzman, 9, a high-five after Adler completed a puzzle on his iPad during a school day in Bend. Adler uses the iPad for games and activities at school.

rently has a closet full of old technologies that used to be popular but are no longer in demand. The ESD, which serves seven Central and Eastern Oregon counties, has 48 iPads currently in use by students. Bend speech and language pathologist Caroline Skidmore says she worked with children who used a voice output system, in which an individual who couldn’t speak would point to a picture or word and then the device would say the word. Skidmore says they were big, heavy, hard to program and cost thousands of dollars. She says insurance rarely covered the cost. “Before the iPad, that was our option.”

How it works The iPad is driven by a touch screen. Users upload various apps, each with a different function. One of the most well-regarded (and more expensive) apps for communication is called Proloquo2Go — which costs just under $200. Adler, Kelsey and Brittany all use the app in a different way. Adler uses it in a basic way: His mom takes pictures of different items and then allows Adler to make a choice between them. She hopes as

he masters that level, he will be able to use some of its other elements. Adler has always been drawn to games and pushing buttons, so the functionality of the iPad appeals to him. When he selects the image of the cracker, the app also says the word aloud, which reinforces the choice. Utzman says it helps Adler choose items that are not right in front of him (he can select “mac and cheese” for dinner without his mom having to make it first to see if he wants it.) Beyond that, Utzman says “the more he uses the iPad to make choices in what he does or eats, and the more success he experiences with its use, then the more inclined he will be to use it to communicate other wants and needs.” She says taking small steps — like choosing crackers — helps Adler understand the functionality of the iPad. Brittany utilizes the app’s sentence-making function with her, as she calls it, “one good finger.” Due to cerebral palsy, Brittany can’t walk and has limited use of her body. But she has good control of the index finger on her left hand. As she selects images or words by tapping on them with her finger, the words appear at the top of the screen. Then when she is ready, she hits a button

and the words are read aloud. She recently gave a 4-minute speech to a group in Medford utilizing this method. Other apps help in all sorts of ways. Adler practices his fine motor skills using an app that guides him to pop balloons on the screen. There are also sign language apps, apps that help with math skills and on and on. Some help kids learn to take turns, another is called “I Need a Break” and is a way kids can let people know they are feeling frustrated. Skidmore believes this kind of functionality can open up a new world for some children. She has been using an iPad with a girl who has Down syndrome and a severe speech disorder. “What I was most struck by was seeing what she had inside of her that I didn’t know before. I was learning things that she knew that I didn’t think she knew.” It is a tool that allows a glimpse inside the minds of these kids. Skidmore believes this kind of technology can help reduce frustration and can help kids communicate clearly and effectively. She also likes that kids can often take the technology home with them. While some previous therapy devices had to stay at school,

now therapists or teachers can use apps to help children work on skills at home. The Central Oregon Disability Support Network offers free classes to interested parents, teachers and support staff who want to learn how to use apps and iPads to help kids with special needs. The classes are offered about every six weeks — a recent one was attended not only by parents but also by speech therapists and school district employees trying to glean the latest information to help the kids they work with. So what is it about the touch screen iPad that makes it so appealing? Why couldn’t Adler just, say, point to the cracker he wanted? Sue Siefken, an occupational therapist at St. Charles Bend, believes the brightness and contrast on the screen is attractive. Plus it’s shiny and “so responsive to their touch.” Skidmore says “kids are just drawn to computers.” The visuals are more appealing and engaging for kids than flash cards. Tracy Gray is managing director for the American Institutes for Research in Washington, D.C., which focuses on schools’ use of technology to support kids with special needs. She is hearing stories from around the country about how much technology — and specifically iPads — are positively impacting the lives of families. Gray believes children have an innate ability to figure out these tools, which is why they work so well. She calls kids “digital natives.” Gray sees another advantage, too, in that the technology is now within reach of many families financially. That means instead of waiting to see if and when a school district will purchase a device, “parents and students can just take control.” iPads cost between $400 and $500. “There is no way schools can keep up. Kids need them now, not in six months or nine months,” Gray said. “It’s a great thing for kids to feel empowered, too … (they are not) held hostage by the school district’s ability to meet their needs.” “It’s so exciting and the potential is huge, and we are all

just enamored with it. Finding out how to make it work for each student, that is kind of difficult,” said Carrie Compton, an assistive technology assistant for High Desert ESD.

Adler’s Voice Adler’s Voice is an idea that Utzman has had for quite some time. She was hoping that helping others might somehow help Adler get the assistance he needed. Utzman knows she couldn’t form a nonprofit to help her son, but hoped for a ‘pay it forward’ response. The family, who lived in La Pine until last year, can’t afford private therapy. (In November they figured out how to foot the bill for Adler’s iPad.) Last June, Utzman connected with Dianna Hansen, director of the Central Oregon Disability Support Network, who loved the idea. Adler’s Voice became part of the larger nonprofit. From there the goal was to find funding. The group applied for a grant from Cow Creek Umqua Indian Foundation. In December Utzman learned it had been awarded $10,000. “I was thrilled, I couldn’t believe it. It was the first grant we applied for,” Utzman said. In order to qualify, children must need help with communication and the family’s income must not exceed 300 percent of the federal poverty level. While most applicants have asked for iPads, Utzman says they would be open to helping with anything, including copays or other technology. “It’s hard. I want to help all these kids. We are going to run out of money,” Utzman said. Every applicant so far has requested either an iPod touch or an iPad. Fourteen requests were approved, three didn’t meet the requirements and seven applications are pending.

Kelsey Up until Kelsey was about 10 months old, she was a typically developing child. Then she contracted a respiratory virus and it just “did her in,” says her mom, Allison Kreuzer. It turns out Kelsey has a mitochondrial disease that affects her immune system. Continued on next page


MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

“People may think it’s some little iPod or whatever, but it’s not. It’s a lifeline for her.”

From previous page Now every cold means a trip to the hospital and IV fluids. “When she gets sick, there’s a risk of her dying,” Kreuzer said. The life expectancy for kids with this condition isn’t very long: “most don’t make it to 10,” Kreuzer said. When she was 13 months old, Kelsey could say many words, but after her stroke damaged one side of her brain that controls language, almost all of those words disappeared. But Kelsey’s desires and spirit remained intact. It’s unclear what Kelsey’s cognitive capacity is — she seems like a typical 4-year-old in every respect, save the fact she can say just 10 words. She is full of energy and verve. When she wanted something and couldn’t explain, she would sometimes throw a screaming fit for 20 or 30 minutes. “There were days and days of utter chaos for us,” Kreuzer said. Not being able to give her daughter what she needed made Kreuzer “feel like crap.” “She would just scream and I had no idea why. People looked at you like, ‘You’re a horrible person; you’re a horrible mom.’” But with this new technology, that chaos is gone. Kelsey is able to express herself. She uses an app to say “I want” and then fills in the blank by choosing different items from the screen. In the morning, she uses the app to let her mom know she is ready to get dressed and chooses her clothing for the day — underwear, socks, pants, shirt. Sometimes Kelsey uses it to her impish advantage: She will turn the volume on it up and “yell” from her room “I want a drink.” Or she will use it to tell her older brother, Chase, “leave me be.” Pretty much like a typical 4-year-old. Kelsey even uses it to connect with people she doesn’t know. If they are at the store and someone says “hello,” Kelsey can touch the screen

— Allison Kreuzer, about her daughter Kelsey

and get it to say “I’m Kelsey, I am 4, I don’t speak but I can listen.” People can ask her a question and she can flip through and show them an answer — maybe about her brother or about her puppy. She is also using it at a special needs preschool. Kreuzer had always worried about her attending school. She was fearful that without a voice, Kelsey would get left behind and left out. Now that worry has vanished. Kreuzer says Kelsey is so proud of herself whenever she finds an image that expresses what she wants to say and has the device speak for her — almost as if she were saying the word herself. “People may think it’s some little iPod or whatever, but it’s not. It’s a lifeline for her,” Kreuzer said.

Brittany Brittany Peterson, who has cerebral palsy, also uses that word — lifeline — to describe Brittany the iPad. She Peterson uses hers in oruses her der to talk beiPad for cause, unless a variety the listener is of tasks, familiar with including her speech patupdatterns, Brittany ing her is difficult to website, understand. Her reading speech sounds books and garbled, and communiher tongue gets cating with tired if she talks friends. for too long. Other than her physical limitations, however, Brittany is incredibly high-functioning. Like many other teens, she is very tech savvy. She uses her iPad to update her website and blog. She reads books with it, listens to music and communicates with

friends around the country. It’s hard to imagine Brittany’s life without technology. She could scratch out her name with a pen and paper, but it would be difficult for her to write much more than that. Technology like the iPad is allowing this aspiring film director to write movie scripts and blog posts. Being able to express herself — to demonstrate her intelligence and wit — is vital for the teen. “It’s really important for me to get my thoughts out,” Brittany said. She and her two younger sisters, Maddie, 14, and Eliza, 8, raise money for their nonprofit Helpful Hearts by selling homemade greeting cards and knitted pot holders. In the past they have donated the money to organizations helping veterans or the homeless. This time, Brittany suggested they help a child like her. They found Adler’s Voice and the girls are donating the funds to provide an iPad and communication software to a kid in need. “I think it’s great what Mrs. Utzman is doing. I am glad we get to be a part of something so cool,” Brittany said. Although she has to use a wheelchair to get around and her speech is difficult to understand, Brittany sees herself in a positive light. “I am really blessed and fortunate to have my voice and use of my one good finger.” She knows many kids have no words at all: “It’s really sad because people deserve a voice.”

Future Utzman sees great potential for Adler’s Voice. She believes the need is statewide, nationwide. She wants to establish more outreach to outlying areas such as

Warm Springs and Prineville. Utzman is busy trying to write grants and raise money for the nonprofit. She is also hoping to put together a donation program, so when people upgrade to the newest iPad version, they can donate their old version to Adler’s Voice. Utzman looks into Adler’s future and isn’t sure what will happen. She was told he would never walk — now he walks with no aids. When she was told he would never speak a word, four feels like a lot. She sees potential. “I believe he can learn,” Utzman said. When they first got the iPad, Adler didn’t understand the meaning of it. He just slapped at the screen. It took about a month for him to begin to get how to use it. Now, Utzman says he sees it as a tool. He’s gone from making a choice between two options to choosing between three or four items. He can use it to direct his play time — like choosing to play with a train or cars. Utzman believes, contrary to what some people had told her in the past, Adler does have “stuff going on upstairs. This is proving he is intelligent. He is making choices.” Still, Adler’s mind remains a mystery to Utzman. “The hardest part is not really understanding what he’s thinking about.” And each new skill takes a long time to develop. “It will come. I just want it to come tomorrow.” She wants to see him move from choosing what he wants to eat to being able to communicate feelings or pain. “Eventually I want to be able to talk to him about his day.” She wants to ask: What did you do today? What do you want to do today? “I think it will happen. I didn’t used to think it would happen. But I totally do and I can see it.” — Reporter: 541-617-7860, ajohnson@bendbulletin.com

Veterans Continued from A1 The women-only shelter for veterans opened its doors in November in a quiet culde-sac in suburban Fairfax County, Va. The group home, the brainchild of an Army captain who was once homeless herself, is one of a small but growing number of womenonly shelters that have opened up across the country in recent years to cater to a rising number of female veterans who have wound up on the streets after their military service. In recent years, the Department of Veterans Affairs has made strides in its five-year campaign to end veteran homelessness. Though the overall number of homeless veterans declined 12 percent between 2010 and 2011, the number of homeless female veterans is increasing, the VA said in a draft report this month, and these women are now the fastest-growing segment of the homeless veterans population. “The increase of homeless women veterans is significant, and it does suggest that we have to address this as an emerging issue,” said John Driscoll, president and CEO of the National Coalition for Homeless Veterans. Officially, homeless female veterans number about 3,328, a figure that doubled from 2006 to 2010, according to an estimate from the Government Accountability Office, although the GAO says the data is incomplete and the actual number is likely higher. Many of them are mothers, middleaged or suffering from some kind of disability. Last year the VA served an estimated 14,847 female veterans who were homeless, formerly homeless or at risk of becoming homeless, according to Stacy Vasquez, deputy director of its homeless veterans initiative. The VA acknowledged in the report that there was an “acute” need to improve ser-

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LOCALNEWS

News of Record, B2 Editorials, B4

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012

LILY RAFF MCCAULOU

Beating the odds, building a museum

W

hen the High Desert Museum opened its doors 30 years ago next month, it did so despite astonishingly slim odds. For one thing, deserts were not widely viewed as museum-worthy resources. As recently as the 1960s, the deserts of Nevada, for example, were testing grounds for nuclear bombs. On top of that, Bend’s lumber mills were winding down and most of the city seemed to be going broke. Tourism was barely a glimmer in the eyes of local businessmen. But a determined young Portlander had ignored these barriers. Donald Kerr grew up in Portland but spent summers in Central Oregon. In the sixth grade, Kerr’s teacher brought a falcon into the classroom, and the boy was mesmerized. It marked the beginning of his lifelong love affair with birds of prey. Kerr attended Millbrook, a private high school in New York that has its own zoo. For biology class, he raised a wolf pup. He studied wildlife biology at Oregon State University and made regular trips to the High Desert for field work. As a young adult, Kerr found creative ways to maintain close relationships with animals. “He built a structure in his Volkswagen van so his great horned owls could hold on while he drove around,� says Janeanne Upp, president of the museum. Beginning in the early 1970s, he appealed to Bend’s bigwigs for major donations to open a museum dedicated to the natural and cultural history of the High Desert. At first, they turned him down. All of them. But Kerr kept coming back, toting increasingly detailed plans. Bob Chandler, the late longtime editor of The Bulletin, was initially a skeptic, but eventually became a major donor and a member of the museum’s board of directors. In 1987, Chandler told a reporter: “If you’d asked anyone (Kerr) talked to 10 years ago what the chances were of him collecting and paying for a $10 million facility, I don’t know who the hell would have believed it.� The museum opened in 1982, on 135 acres donated by Brooks Resources. Cathy Carroll, a spokeswoman for the museum, says Brooks Resources let Kerr choose between two parcels — the current location or a spot on Tumalo Creek. Though an avid naturalist, Kerr was shrewd enough that the choice was easy. “He said, ‘I’ll take the one off the highway and make my own creek,’� Carroll says. Today, the museum has a man-made creek winding through its outdoor exhibits, just as Kerr envisioned. The museum has been expanded several times to include a “Desertarium,� an observation deck and, fittingly, the Donald M. Kerr Birds of Prey Center. This summer, the museum will host its annual fundraiser, the High Desert Rendezvous. The auction and gala was once a modest affair in which hunters emptied their freezers for a dinner of wild game, served at the Pine Tavern. Today, the museum draws nearly 170,000 visitors per year. See Kerr / B5

B

Obituaries, B5 Weather, B6

www.bendbulletin.com/local

Sawyer lawyer faces probe • State Bar looking into Albertazzi’s role in real estate fraud case By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

The Oregon State Bar will conduct a formal disciplinary proceeding against a local attorney for his role in a Deschutes County fraud case. Anthony Albertazzi faces allegations that he violated three rules of professional conduct in his dealings with Tami Sawyer, a former Bend real

estate broker who is facing charges in both federal and local courts for allegedly mismanaging investor money. The disciplinary proceedings stem from a complaint filed by Richard Braun, an attorney who represented the trust beneficiaries of Thomas Middleton Sr., a Sawyer friend who died by assisted suicide in July 2008 after battling Lou

Gehrig’s disease. Middleton was also an investor in Sawyer’s company Starboard LLC, handing over $250,000 to her company and receiving monthly interest payments before his death. Sawyer served as successor trustee, in charge of Middleton’s trust after his death. Before his death, Middleton transferred his home to the trust, with instruc-

tions to rent it until the market improved and then sell it. Albertazzi represented Sawyer, who listed the house for sale two days after Middleton’s death. The house sale closed in October 2008 with $202,000 in net proceeds. Bank records show Sawyer took that money and deposited it in Starboard’s bank account, then transferred it to her other companies to pay personal and business debts. See Albertazzi / B5

Ski season ends

with a splash

LOCAL BRIEFING Some clouds but no rain expected Partly sunny skies and a high in the upper 60s are forecast for today, giving Central Oregon a decent shot at getting a rain-free Memorial Day, according to the National Weather Service. The only areas with a slight chance of rain today are in the higher elevations along the western edge Inside of Des• Detailed chutes 5-day County, forecast, said Ann B6 Adams, an assistant meterologist with the National Weather Service office in Pendleton. The lower-elevation areas, such as Bend and Sunriver, should be dry, she said. The temperature tonight is expected to drop to freezing, or below in some areas. Lows for the rest of the week are expected to be in the 40s. Mostly sunny skies are forecast for much of the remaining week, continuing Tuesday through Thursday. Tuesday is likely to see high temperatures around 70 degrees, while Wednesday and Thursday are forecast to be considerably warmer, nearing 80, according to the weather service. On Friday, the forecast calls for mostly sunny skies, but with a slim chance of showers and a high around 75. Temperatures are expected to drop on Saturday, with a high of around 65 degrees and a slight chance of showers, according to the weather service. — Bulletin staff report

Photos by Joe Kline / The Bulletin

“Hula Guy� Matt Harwood crosses an icy pond on skis during his run at the North American Pond Skimming Championships at Mt. Bachelor on Sunday.

By Ben Botkin • The Bulletin

T

hey slid down the slopes of Mt. Bachelor, aiming for a dry stop but knowing that a wet one may

be unavoidable. About 80 snowboarders and skiers participated in the ski resort’s North American Pond Skimming Championships on Sunday. The goal is

Memorial Day closures • All city, county, state and federal offices • Libraries in Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties • Banks • Schools, including school district offices and Central Oregon Community College • Post offices; mail will not be delivered or picked up • Juniper Swim & Fitness Center in Bend will be open from noon to 5 p.m. • Most liquor stores will be open.

simple but daunting for the faint-hearted: ski to the bottom and skim all the way across a 100-foot-long makeshift pond filled with ice-cold water. See Mt. Bachelor / B2

“Catwoman� Stephanie Ulm celebrates her successful skim across the pond at Mt. Bachelor on Sunday. The event drew some 80 snowboarders and skiers, from rookies to veteran skimmers.

Lemos case, others raise questions about when to remove educators By Ben Botkin The Bulletin

For Oregon public school teacher Christopher Gilman, the state needed eight years, two complaints about him inappropriately touching students and his 2004 admission to improper behavior before deciding in April that he shouldn’t teach again. His superiors at the Medford School District in southern Oregon weren’t much different when it came to getting rid of the elementary school teacher. They needed

two complaints as well, and didn’t fire Gilman until six years after problems with him surfaced in 2004. The actions entailed behavior such as patting fourth-grade girls on the buttocks, tickling and touching students on the leg, according to state records. The case raises questions about when teachers deserve second chances — and when to keep them out of Oregon classrooms. It also bears a resemblance to another case in-

volving Brian Lemos, who was fired as principal of Redmond High School in 2011. After terminating him, the Redmond School District filed a complaint against Lemos with the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission that is pending. The TSPC, the state agency that licenses Oregon educators and investigates potential misconduct, doesn’t release details about complaints under investigation. See Educators / B2

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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012

Educators Continued from B1 But Daniel Snyder, Lemos’ attorney, complained to the district in a letter about a “false claim” a district employee made to the TSPC alleging Lemos used Vicodin at work. Lemos was hired in two districts — Crook County and Redmond — even though the TSPC suspended his teaching license for 60 days and put him on four years of probation in 2000 following an arrest for domestic harassment while a teacher in the Tillamook School District. That 2000 decision also took into account arrests and convictions dating back to the 1990s for assault, drunken driving and disorderly conduct. “I can tell you the commission, which is made up of educators and members of the public, are as tough on educators as they can be, given the facts they have,” said Victoria Chamberlain, executive director of the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission. Gilman was teaching at Medford in 2004 when the school district filed its first complaint against him with the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission. Gilman was still teaching there in 2010, when the district filed yet another complaint about him with the state commission. Only then did the school district fire him, and the state commission decided he shouldn’t be a licensed teacher.

First strike When the commission investigated Gilman the first time, he admitted to “inappropriate physical conduct” with fourth-grade female students, records show. Those actions entailed tickling, touching students on the leg and giving pats on the buttocks during athletic events, according to TSPC records. He also let students sit on his lap during class instruction. Gilman was allowed to continue teaching. The commission publicly rep-

rimanded Gilman and put him on probation for two years. (That probation was tied to his status as a licensed teacher, and is different from court-ordered probation.) The teacher also signed an agreement in which he acknowledged the behavior was inappropriate. As part of his probation, Gilman was required to have medical evaluations every six months examining his fitness to teach children, with the results sent to the commission. Chamberlain drew a distinction between one-time actions and repeated behavior. “Somebody who makes a mistake is different from somebody who has a pattern of behavior,” she said. She added: “Those facts are actually fairly detailed, which is important because it gives notice to people that there was an incident with him.” As for the reprimand, that was entered into the national clearinghouse that states rely upon when licensing educators, she said. “Had he, for example, left the state, any new state would have had notice that Oregon had enough concerns to put a public sanction on his license,” she said. Instead of working outside Oregon, Gilman was still welcome in Medford, where he taught at Howard Elementary School. Even after the first complaint, the school’s website told parents that Gilman and another educator had attended the school “as tots,” according to a lawsuit filed against the district over its handling of the matter. Gilman couldn’t be reached for comment. Medford School District Superintendent Phil Long declined to say why Gilman was allowed to teach there after the first complaint. Long noted that he wasn’t the superintendent during the first complaint involving Gilman.

Second strike The 2010 complaint filed with the commission against Gilman described behavior such as touching a female

student on the buttocks and thigh, hugging a student around the buttocks and lower back and touching at least one student’s private area. Gilman also stuck his tongue out at students and simulated licking them, gave students “Indian burns,” and put students into headlocks, according to the complaint. Gilman didn’t dispute the complaint. His teaching license expired in 2011, the year after he left the Medford School District. The commission’s April action revoked his right to apply for teaching credentials. “That’s a demonstration of a pattern of behavior and obviously, even the probation the first time didn’t get his attention,” Chamberlain said.

Well shot! READER PHOTOS Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@ bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication. Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

The aftermath Gilman didn’t face criminal charges after the complaints. After investigating, Jackson County District Attorney Mark Huddleston said the actions “clearly constitute inappropriate touching” but didn’t rise to a level that would support conviction in court beyond reasonable doubt. In his statement, made in 2010, Huddleston said there wasn’t evidence that Gilman’s actions involved a sexual intent. The parents of three female students in Gilman’s class sued the school district in federal court. The lawsuit, which sought $1 million in damages for each student, alleged that school officials should have done more to safeguard the students after already being aware of Gilman’s past behavior. The lawsuit contended that the school district should have kept Gilman under supervision with an aide or another teacher instead of letting him teach unsupervised. Court documents indicate that the case was settled out of court for undisclosed terms. Long declined to provide the settlement terms this week, saying he needed a public records request first.

STARK’S BEND

— Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

HE’S SERIOUS ABOUT FISHING Phil Hansen, of Bend, took this photo with a Nikon P-100 at the fishing pond near Aspen Hall in Shevlin Park, as “this intense youngster’s dad was lying on the bank” nearby.

Mt. Bachelor Continued from B1 The annual event is Mt. Bachelor’s traditional way of wrapping the winter sports season. It’s also one that draws a mix of rookies and seasoned skimmers. Keeping your speed up is crucial to doing well in the event, said Dylan Gaier, of Bend. He came down the hill, skimmed across the water and landed on the other side without sinking. Another tip: keeping good posture. “You just have to stay balanced,” said Parker Hoffman, a skier from Sunriver. Costumes were encouraged,

and contestants sported outfits that included action figures and pirates. Pat Fulton and Denise Saylors, both of Bend, teamed up as a boat pulling a water-skiing Barbie doll. They fell into the water, but that didn’t diminish their enthusiasm. “The odds were against us,” said Saylors, who recently moved to the area from Hawaii. “But it was too fun. You wait until next year.” At the bottom around the pond, crowds gathered, cheering for the successful skimmers and the soaked wannabes alike. At the top of the slopes, contestants waited their turn,

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pumping each other up and building up the will to aim for the pond. At the bottom, the less fortunate ones were handed towels and an extended pole to help pull them out of the frigid waters. “I’m pretty nervous,” said Eric Ritchie, 14, of Eugene, as he waited his turn at the top. He said he had watched a few videos to prepare himself, but wasn’t sure how helpful they were. Then he headed down to experience it firsthand. “I’m going to go for it,” he said before making it halfway across the pond. —Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

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MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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Martial arts master’s neo-Nazi past surfaces By Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

GOLD HILL— Andrew Lee Patterson still shaves his head, like he did back in his white supremacist skinhead days. Back then, he did six years in prison for beating up two homeless people and a motel owner. As for the brown shirt from his time leading a local chapter of the neo-Nazi National Socialist Movement, he has replaced that with the black robe and belt of a karate master. Today, Patterson teaches at his karate studio on the main street in Gold Hill, a workingclass town of about 1,200 people near the California border that dates to the tail end of the Gold Rush days. Saying he has left the violence and hatred behind, he said he hopes to march with his students in the annual Gold Dust Day Parade on Saturday. “I’ll never be perfect, but I’m trying to be better,” he said. “I want to be remembered as a person who changed his life and tried to help his community.” City Councilor Christine Alford is not ready to give Patterson a pass just yet. At a City Council meeting this week, she raised Patterson’s past crimes while questioning whether he should be allowed to march, saying they were more disturbing than his politics. “He is entitled to be a Holocaust denier. He is entitled to be a Nazi. But the criminality of it, the community needed to know that,” said Alford, who lives down the street from the martial arts studio. Patterson grew up in the Rogue Valley, enlisting in the Oregon National Guard before

Jeff Barnard / The Associated Press

Andrew Lee Patterson, outside his karate studio in Gold Hill. Patterson says he no longer wants to be known for the violence and white supremacist beliefs that sent him to prison and prompted him to lead a chapter of the neo-Nazi National Socialist Movement.

he finished high school. He was planning on a military career, until his arrest in 2003. That came after he and a buddy were sent home ahead of their outfit from peacekeeping duty in Sinai after the buddy poured lighter fluid on the floor of the barracks in the shape of a cross and lit it, filling the barracks with smoke. Friends from back home, Patterson said, he wouldn’t rat on Chadwick James Ritchie, and shared his punishment. Back home, they ignored orders to stay away from each other and were linked by police to attacks on homeless people and chasing some black teenagers. Patterson was convicted of beating a motel owner from India. Patterson said Ritchie

wanted revenge after being kicked out of the motel for partying too loudly. While police were tracking them down, Ritchie shot and killed himself in a restaurant parking lot. Drawn to the white supremacy movement by feelings that his race was treated unfairly, Patterson said he saw himself as a soldier sworn to uphold the Constitution when he started looking for gangbangers to beat up, and “that rolled over to just being violent.” After prison, he was still wrapped up in white supremacy, establishing a local chapter of the National Socialist Movement that stood on the side of the road holding Nazi-style flags, and handed out fliers on Hitler’s birthday.

Suspect in St. Helens stabbing had a change in medication The Associated Press ST. HELENS — The mother of a man accused of stabbing a health worker to death says he was being weaned off his antipsychotic medication. Debbie Redd tells The Oregonian that her son Brent was being taken off his meds in preparation for a hepatitis-C treatment. “He was scared,” said Debbie Redd, who lives in The Dalles. “Those meds are what regulate him every day.” Brent Redd was committed to the Oregon State Hospital five years ago for trying to strangle his mother, but eventually he was released to live semi-indeRedd pendently in a St. Helens duplex. The 30-year-old seemed stable and even held down a job at a thrift store. But when caseworker Jennifer Warren showed up to deliver medicine to his apartment on May 20, police say, he stabbed her to death before calling 911. Brent Redd was indicted on a murder charge Thursday. Redd was under the supervision of the Psychiatric Security Review Board, which supervises criminal defendants judged guilty except for insanity in felony cases. Currently, there are 183 in the Oregon State Hospital and 413 are on conditional release. Redd had been sentenced to 20 years of supervision for the 2007 attempt to kill his mother. He was committed to the state hospital and released to a residential treatment center in St. Helens in September 2010. In May 2011, the review board approved his transfer to a duplex supervised by Columbia Community Mental Health, the nonprofit that provided his day-today therapy and monitoring. Redd took random weekly drug tests, attended group

therapy sessions five times a week, saw his therapist weekly, and his caseworker checked in twice a day. He attended three substance abuse meetings a week and passed random drug tests weekly. He had to stay at home between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m. and swallow medication in front of a caseworker. Redd’s mother said it had taken years to find the right medication to keep his paranoia and schizophrenia at bay.

She asked him if it was a good idea to be weaned off his medicine, and recalls his response: “They told me it’s going to be OK,” he told her. “They told me that I will know. That I’ll see signs” if there are problems. Redd’s caregivers knew about the medication change, said Gina Nikkel, a consultant with Warren’s employer, Columbia County Mental Health. “People feel that he was not a risk,” she said.

Though he still maintains pride in his race, he said he no longer hates people for being of another race, and feels violence doesn’t solve anything. As for his conversion, he said it was not any person or event that changed him. He just grew up. “I want to be good to people,” he said.

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O  B 

Man arrested after 6-hour standoff SALEM — Police say they’ve arrested a 19-yearold man following a six-hour standoff. Officers went looking for Jeremy Russell Dunham at a home Saturday evening as they investigated a report that someone had been menaced with a weapon. Police determined he was in the home and there were weapons inside, but they say he refused to come outside or speak with officers. A SWAT team was brought to the scene by about 9 p.m. Saturday, and they entered the home just before 2 a.m. Sunday. A police dog found Dunham hiding under a stairwell. He was treated for a dog bite at Salem Hospital before his transfer to the Marion County Jail. He was charged with menacing with a weapon, possession of methamphetamines, initiating a false report, and interfering with a police dog.

Coast Guard has a busy weekend ASTORIA — It’s been a busy holiday weekend for the Coast Guard off of Washington and Oregon. The agency says it rescued

two divers who were caught in strong currents west of Whidbey Island, Wash., on Saturday evening, and then crews also rescued the people who were operating their dive boats. One of the divers was flown to a Port Angeles hospital for treatment of hypothermia. Around the same time, a Coast Guard helicopter crew spotted two other divers who became stranded on Island Rock near Port Orford. The helicopter couldn’t reach them, but a lifeboat crew did, and brought them to Gold Beach.

Cyclist killed in Eugene hit-and-run EUGENE — Police are looking for a vehicle that struck and killed a 54-yearold cyclist in Eugene. The man was hit just after 11 p.m. Saturday. Sheriff’s deputies said they believe the vehicle was a white Ford passenger car. The car left the crash scene, leaving the man lying in the roadway. A witness told investigators that when a driver stopped to help the man, another passing vehicle hit him and injured him further. The man died at a local hospital. — From wire reports


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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012

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The death of Capt. Waskow Editor’s Note: Pulitzer Prize-winning World War II correspondent Ernie Pyle wrote the following column after a stay with the 36th Division units near Mignano and Venafro, Italy. He was killed on April 18, 1945, by Japanese machine-gun fire.

I

n this war I have known a lot of officers who were loved and respected by the soldiers under them. But never have I crossed the trail of any man as beloved as Capt.

Henry T. Waskow, of Belton, Texas. Capt. Waskow was a company commander in the 36th Division. He had led his company since long before it left the States. He was very young, only in his mid-20s, but he carried in him a sincerity and a gentleness that made people want to be guided by him. “After my own father, he came next,� a sergeant told me. “He always looked after us,� a soldier said. “He’d go to bat for us every time.� “I’ve never known him to do anything unfair,� another one said. I was at the foot of the mule trail the night they brought Capt. Waskow’s body down the mountain. The moon was nearly full at the time, and you could see far up the trail and even partway across the valley. Soldiers made shadows as they walked. Dead men had been coming down the mountain all evening, lashed onto the backs of mules. They came lying belly-down across wooden pack saddles, their heads hanging down on the left side of the mule, their stiffened legs sticking out awkwardly from the other side bobbing up and down as the mule walked. The Italian mule-skinners were afraid to walk beside dead men, so Americans had to lead the mules down that night. Even the Americans were reluctant to unlash and lift off the bodies at the bottom, so an officer had to do it himself and ask others to help. The first one came in early in the evening. They slid him down from the mule and stood him on his feet for a moment. In the half light, he might have been merely a sick man standing there, leaning on the others. Then they laid him on the ground in the shadow of the low stone wall alongside the road. I don’t know who that first one was. You feel small in the presence of the dead men and ashamed of being alive, and you don’t ask silly questions. We left him there beside the road, that first one, and we all went back into the cowshed and sat on water cans or laid on the straw, waiting for the next batch of mules. Somebody said the dead soldier had been dead for four days, and then nobody said anything more about it. We talked soldier talk for an hour or more. The dead man lay all alone outside, in the shadow of the stone wall. Then a soldier came into the dark cowshed and said there were some more bodies outside. We went out into the road.

Four mules stood there, in the moonlight, in the road where the trail came down off the mountain. The soldiers who led them stood there waiting. “This one is Capt. Waskow,� one of them said quietly. Two men unlashed his body from the mule and lifted it off and lay it in the shadow beside the low stone wall. Other men took the other bodies off. Finally there were five, lying end to end in a long row alongside the road. You don’t cover up dead men in the combat zone. They just lie there in the shadows until somebody else comes after them. The unburdened mules moved off to their olive orchard. The men in the road seemed reluctant to leave. They stood around, and gradually one by one you could sense them moving close to Capt. Waskow’s body. Not so much to look, I think, as to say something in finality, to him and to themselves. I stood close by and I could hear. One soldier came and looked down and he said out loud, “Goddammit.� That was all he said, and then he walked away. Another one came. He said “Goddammit to hell anyway.� He looked down for a few moments, and then he turned and left. Another man came; I think he was an officer. It was hard to tell officers from men in the half-light, for all were bearded and grimy dirty. The man looked down in to the dead captain’s face, and then he spoke directly to him, as though he were alive. He said: “I’m sorry, old man.� Then a soldier came and stood beside the officer, and bent over, and he too spoke to his dead captain, not in a whisper but awfully tenderly, and he said: “I sure am sorry, sir.� Then the first man squatted down, and he reached down and took the dead hand, and he sat there for five full minutes, holding the dead hand in his own and looking intently into the dead face, and he never uttered a sound all the time he sat there. And then finally he put the hand down, and then reached up and gently straightened the points of the captain’s shirt collar, and then he sort of rearranged the tattered edges of his uniform around the wound. And then he got up and walked away down the road in the moonlight, all alone. — Reprinted by permission of Scripps Howard Foundation

My Nickel’s Worth Support trapping People. So you want to take away the livelihood of trappers? Don’t expect trappers to mark their traps so that someone can destroy them. If you ban trapping, you need to ban all forms of hunting. There are animals out there that are suffering because they have been shot with a gun or an arrow and the hunter couldn’t or wouldn’t track them to administer the kill shot. If you are a responsible pet owner and really care about your dog, keep her or him on a leash. Have you given any thought to the adults and children who are afraid of dogs? I’ve had strange dogs come running up to me while out walking and a few have jumped up on me. Those of us without dogs like to enjoy the outdoors, too. Maybe we should push for a leash law that covers all public lands. I bet the trappers and hunters would support one. Thresa Jenkins Bend

ty’s solid waste department, was for the center to provide environmental awareness to students in the local schools. This payment is improper for two reasons. First, the county’s solid waste program is a monopoly enterprise owned by the citizens. If it makes a profit, that profit must be returned to the owners. It should not be treated as a commissioner slush fund. Second, the Environmental Center’s effort to take its ideology into the schools is unacceptable. Children are not the source of our county’s waste; we adults are. Besides, it is the parents’ responsibility to make the lifestyle choices for their families. Indoctrinating children with ideas that may run counter to those of their parents is an insidious invasion of parental responsibility. Now is a good time to compare Commissioner Alan Unger’s predilection for slush funds with challenger Tom Greene’s and plan your November vote accordingly. Jared Black Bend

County payment improper

Don’t pave Phil’s Trail parking area

We all know that some politicians favor distributing monies (earmarks) to their favored constituents. This practice became a top national news story when the $398 million Alaskan Bridge to Nowhere was revealed. That earmark was canceled due to public outcry and the earmark brouhaha died down somewhat. Such payments are less common at the local level, but they do exist. For example, the Deschutes County Commissioners announced a payment to the local Environmental Center. The money, from the coun-

This is in regard to the Fort Rock Ranger District’s proposed plan to pave the parking area at the head of Phil’s Trail mountain bike recreation area. First off, it makes no sense to want a paved area for off-road mountain bikes. The Ranger District’s claim that paved parking will prevent vegetation destruction also doesn’t make sense. Vehicles do not park anywhere but designated areas as it is. There are no problems with off-roading vehicles or even bikes going off trail. Furthermore, how does the Ranger District justify cutting down 20 enormous ponderosa

pines and paving over other vegetation in its quest to “save vegetation�? There are three potential plans to provide parking, ranging from $512,475 to $761,500. The current situation has zero cost and leaves the area in its au naturel state. The reason mountain bikers flock to the area is to escape the concrete and pavement of the city. Given today’s current economic situation, why would the taxpayer want to support this unneeded expenditure? Imagine what over $700,000 could do to improve our Bend-La Pine Schools, or our current roads and bridges, or our homeless and battered women and children in the community. By not wasting taxpayer dollars and leaving Phil’s Trail as is, we will preserve an area known worldwide for what it has been, what it is and what it always should be: a place for mountain bikers to be in harmony with nature. Shelby Dietsch Bend

Give parade back to children Very soon we will be planning for the annual Pet Parade. My question is, whatever happened to the original intent for kids and their pets, decorated bikes and trikes? For years, starting in the 1930s, this was an event enjoyed by the children of Bend. This has turned into an adultand pets-dominated function. How about an age limit to get back to the “original� Pet Parade? I’m not alone in this idea. Each time it comes up, those discussing it wonder how it ever evolved to what it is today. It’s time to give the Pet Parade back to the children. Barbara Buxton Bend

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

The battle against obesity in America: There’s no free lunch By Caroline Poplin McClatchy-Tribune News Service

T

he Institute of Medicine, the Centers for Disease Control and HBO just released a film, “Weight of the Nation,� warning us of the latest epidemic to sweep the country: obesity. Today, two-thirds of American adults are overweight or obese, along with one-third of children. The tally has doubled since 1988. And this, despite $40 billion spent in 2007 alone for diet aids. Obesity is a serious problem. It can cause chronic illness, disability and death: the IOM pegs the cost at $190.2 billion a year. Are we suffering from a national collapse of willpower, as some would have us believe? To strengthen our resolve, the IOM recommends incorporation of physical exercise into daily life, more healthy food and beverage

options, better “messaging� and further efforts by health-care providers, employers and schools to keep us trim. That will not be enough, however. If we want to slim down, we must restrain, and redirect, the commercial forces that profit from stimulating our appetites and reducing the need for any physical activity. Humans developed over millennia when starvation was a constant threat. So we are hard-wired to eat beyond satiation, because the hunting or gathering might be bad tomorrow. Fat, sugar and salt stimulate the appetite and trigger the pleasure centers in our brains, perhaps because fat is the most concentrated form of energy, sugar is the quickest form of energy and a small amount of salt is essential to life. Moreover, new research has identified hormonal changes triggered by

IN MY VIEW weight loss. After a diet, anti-starvation mechanisms kick in. One study in the New England Journal of Medicine found that a year after a 30-pound weight loss by obese dieters, their ghrelin (the “hunger hormone�) remained about 20 percent above pre-diet levels, while peptide YY, which suppresses hunger and increases metabolism, remained abnormally low. To those of us of a certain age, it is clear why Americans started putting on pounds in the 1970s. Until then, most children walked or took school buses to school, because it was the only way to get there. There were fewer cars; more people lived in cities and close-in suburbs, where they walked or took public transportation. Many labored in factories. Women who could

stayed home and prepared three meals a day for their families. Americans today are victims of their own success. In our free enterprise system, huge corporations profit mightily from developing and marketing inexpensive foods, deliberately loaded with the fat, salt and sugar that speak directly to our brains. Other companies introduce convenient devices that render physical exertion superfluous. Such economic activity helps our economy grow. Education, exhortation, even more healthy options, will not be enough to conquer obesity: We must change our environment. Consider smoking, a health threat as dire as obesity. (And we don’t need tobacco to live.) To reduce smoking, America needed a fullcourt press — restrictions on advertising, particularly to children, reduced availability, warning labels, high to-

bacco taxes and smoking bans in public places — along with education. We are going to need all that and more to control our intake of unhealthy food. Increasing exercise will be just as difficult. Over time, we must reinvent our environment so that we can walk, bike or take public transportation. We must redirect producers toward healthier products. The resistance will be enormous, maybe overwhelming. The food industry alone is huge — $1.5 trillion in revenues in 2011 — and powerful. Companies will attack any new regulations as the ruination of free enterprise. Republicans will decry the nanny state. But too much fat, salt and sugar, together with too little exercise, will kill us before our time. There is no free lunch. — Caroline Poplin is a physician and lawyer.


MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

O Otis Clark survived deadly 1921 race riot in Tulsa, Okla.

Donald Kerr and the High Desert Museum

By Matt Schudel The Washington Post

Submitted photo

Submitted photo

For years, few people dared to speak about what happened on the night of May 31, 1921, during one of the most deadly and devastating race riots in the nation’s history. Otis Clark, who was 18 at the time, had grown up in Greenwood, a thriving African-American section of Tulsa, Okla.. During a night that history almost forgot, Clark dodged bullets, raced through alleys to escape armed mobs and saw his family’s home burned to the ground. He fled Tulsa on a freight train headed north. He would eventually move to Los Angeles, where he was the butler in the home of movie star Joan Crawford. He later turned to preaching and was known as the “world’s oldest evangelist.” But for nine decades, he remained a living witness to a night of horror, when Greenwood died. Clark died May 21 in Seattle at age 109, family members told the Tulsa World newspaper. The cause of death was not disclosed. Before the riot, Greenwood had 15,000 residents, a 65-room hotel, several banks and two newspapers. It also faced, on its border, growing racial resentment from an emboldened presence of the Ku Klux Klan.

FEATURED OBITUARY On the final day of May 1921, white mobs were sparked into action by rumors that a young black man had improperly touched a white woman. Armed vigilantes were deputized by the local police, giving them the legal standing of a militia, as they gathered on the edge of Greenwood. Clark had to flee his house. “Gunfire and the blaze from the fire was getting closer,” he told the Tulsa World in 2000. He went to a mortuary, where another man was planning to get an ambulance out of the garage to help victims. “The man was just then about to open the door when a bullet shattered his hand into pieces, blood flying everywhere,” Clark recalled. He ran through streets and alleys until he saw a cousin: “I jumped in the car and we hadn’t gone two blocks before we turned this corner and ran right into a crowd of white men coming toward us with guns.” Running for his life, Clark eventually reached some train tracks, where he hopped on a freight car. He didn’t get off until he was in Milwaukee. When the smoke cleared over Greenwood, more than 1,200 houses were destroyed, along with dozens of office buildings, restaurants, churches and schools. The death toll was first placed at about 35, but in the 1990s, when historians re-ex-

D E 



Rob Kerr / The Bulletin file photo

TOP: In the early years, Donald Kerr outfitted his VW van with a structure for his great horned owls to hold onto while he drove. CENTER: A great horned owl accompanies Kerr on a visit to the High Desert Museum shortly after its opening in 1982; his fascination with birds of prey was a driving force behind his vision for the museum. BOTTOM: Kerr, High Desert Museum President Art Wolf (at podium), and others celebrate the opening of the museum’s birds of prey exhibit in July of 2000.

Kerr Continued from B1 To put that in context, Deschutes County has about 160,000 residents. According to Upp, 75 percent of the museum’s visitors are from out of the area. Kerr and his wife, Cameron, remain involved with the museum, although Kerr is

Albertazzi Continued from B1 Concerned about the state of the trust, the Middleton sons sought to remove Sawyer from her trusteeship, beginning in September 2008. That litigation dragged on until August 2009. Albertazzi’s firm provided two trust inventories, which claimed the trust contained the proceeds from the home sale, partly as a Starboard investment and partly as cash. “That was not true,” a bar summary of the case reads. “Even if Sawyer’s depositing the sale proceeds into Starboard and promptly disbursing them to pay her debts could fairly be characterized as an ‘investment’ in that company, she did not retain $52,568 (or any amount) in cash.” According to the bar summary, in December 2008 Albertazzi’s firm received a call regarding Middleton’s case from the “Oregon State Police Crime Law and FBI for fraud.” “The firm records also suggest that Albertazzi was becoming increasingly concerned about Sawyer’s failure/ refusal to produce financial records,” the summary states. In January, Sawyer met with Albertazzi and another

paralyzed by viral encephalitis and cannot speak. The family suspects that Kerr contracted the disease when an owl’s talon nicked his skin in 1995. It’s a breathtakingly tragic result of Kerr’s love of raptors. But if it weren’t for Kerr and his passion for the region’s flora and fauna, there would

attorney, Matthew Mohill. Mohill, who was implicated in the original bar complaint, was cleared of misconduct by the bar. At the January meeting, Sawyer told the pair that the home sale proceeds had been deposited in the Starboard account, and Albertazzi and Mohill told her to put some of the money back in the trust account. Albertazzi also told Sawyer she may want to file for bankruptcy, and sent her an email explaining the costs associated with his firm representing her in a bankruptcy. “Albertazzi and Mohill knew by January 2009, that Sawyer had mishandled trust assets. Albertazzi also knew that Sawyer and her companies were broke and that bankruptcy was likely,” the summary states. “However, he continued to defend her in the beneficiaries’ litigation to remove her as trustee until late April 2009, and even offered to represent her in bankruptcy. He made no effort to correct, mitigate or otherwise rectify the fraudulent inventory, and thereby assisted Sawyer in concealing her wrongful conduct.” The ethics analysis of the summary is not a public record, but Albertazzi will face

B5

certainly be no High Desert Museum. In the last 30 years, more than 4 million visitors have peered through Kerr’s window into a subtle landscape that is otherwise too easy to take for granted. — Lily Raff McCaulou is a columnist for The Bulletin. 541-617-7836, lraff@bendbulletin.com

formal disciplinary charges for failing to abide by a client’s objectives, a conflict of interest with a former client, and failing to withdraw from a case when representation violates ethics rules or other law. Albertazzi said Thursday he intends to fight the charges. “I really strongly disagree with the allegations,” he said, noting that he hadn’t yet seen the formal complaint against him. Oregon State Bar spokeswoman Kateri Walsh said both sides will now go through the discovery process, and then there will be a trial panel hearing before a three-person State Bar panel. Sawyer, along with her husband, former Bend Police Capt. Kevin Sawyer, are under federal indictment on charges of money laundering, wire fraud, conspiracy to commit wire fraud, bank fraud and false statement to a financial institution. Their trial is due to start in October. Sawyer also faces state felony charges of first-degree criminal mistreatment and aggravated theft. She’s due back in Deschutes County Circuit Court to enter a plea on those charges on June 4. — Reporter: 541-617-7831, smiller@bendbulletin.com

Deaths of note from around the world: Kathi Kamen Goldmark, 63: A beloved San Francisco literary impresario and country-rock singer, most famous for founding the Rock Bottom Remainders, a notorious band of authors that included Stephen King and Dave Barry on guitar and Amy Tan on keyboards. Died Thursday at the University of California at San Francisco Medical Center after a long battle with breast cancer. Edoardo Mangiarotti, 93: Won more Olympic medals — a total of 39 gold, silver and bronze medals — and world championships than any fencer, starting with the Berlin Games in 1936. Died Friday at his home in Milan; news reports said the cause was probably a heart attack. Andrew Steinberg, 53: A pre-eminent aviation lawyer who helped American Airlines prevail against charges of “predatory pricing” in the early 1990s and later, as a Transportation Department assistant

amined what is now known as the Tulsa Race Riot, they estimated that about 300 people — 90 percent of them AfricanAmerican — were killed.

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254 Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

secretary, helped negotiate a landmark “open skies” pact to expand U.S. commerce. Died May 20 at his home in Chevy Chase, Md. — From wire reports

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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012

B6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, MAY 28

TUESDAY Tonight: Mostly cloudy, chance rain.

Today: Mostly cloudy.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

HIGH

LOW

70

33

Astoria

62/47

54/47

Cannon Beach 53/46

70/47

61/43

60/43

Lincoln City

Salem

56/43

73/40

Corvallis 64/43

59/47

62/42

67/30

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

67/42

61/42

Coos Bay

Crescent

58/46

Chemult

64/46

58/46

Gold Beach

69/44

Paulina 68/30

Unity

75/51

Vale 75/52

Nyssa

Brothers 67/29 Hampton 65/30

Riley

72/45

68/31

67/40

JordanValley Rome

57/48

Klamath Falls 68/43

Ashland

59/47

Hermiston

66/39

73/50

Brookings

• 78°

73/42

69/44

Chiloquin

Medford

Yesterday’s state extremes

70/46

Paisley

71/45

65/43

Frenchglen

69/37

Grants Pass

74/51

Juntura

Burns

69/32

Silver Lake

66/27

CENTRAL Partly to mostly cloudy skies.

Ontario

66/43

71/43

WEST Mostly cloudy skies, slight chance of morning showers.

67/46

• 28°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

72/50

67/44

Lakeview

75/39

-30s

-20s

-10s

10s

Vancouver 59/48

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

0s

Calgary 63/43

Saskatoon 59/39

Boise 72/48

• 20° G.C. Airport, Ariz.

Cheyenne 70/39 San Francisco 63/50

Brainerd, Minn.

Las Vegas 90/69

Salt Lak e City 70/54

Denver 76/45 Albuquerque 82/54

Los Angeles 73/61 Phoenix 95/69

Honolulu 87/74

Tijuana 72/56 Chihuahua 95/66

Anchorage 56/44

La Paz 94/65 Juneau 53/41

Mazatlan 88/75

40s

Winnipeg 61/43

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 70/50

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 66/54

Halifax 68/46 Portland 61/53 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 77/51 84/57 To ronto Bufal o 67/59 Rapid City Detroit 81/64 90/71 New York 62/43 90/72 85/70 Des Moines Philadelphia Columbus 85/56 Chicago 92/70 91/71 90/63 Omaha Washington, D. C. 80/53 92/73 Louisville Kansas City 92/72 86/61 St. Louis Charlotte 94/70 85/68 Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 90/69 93/70 94/72 Atlanta Birmingham 86/68 Dallas 91/70 93/74 New Orleans 92/74 Orlando Houston 89/72 91/74 Bismarck 58/44

Billings 64/43

Smyrna, Tenn.

• 2.94”

30s

Seattle 60/48 Portland 65/48

• 100°

20s

Miami 88/76 Monterrey 98/71

FRONTS

FRIDAY Mostly sunny.

HIGH LOW

HIGH LOW

78 45

Mostly sunny.

HIGH LOW

80 49

78 46

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .5:33 a.m. . . . . . 8:59 p.m. Venus . . . . . .6:01 a.m. . . . . . 9:38 p.m. Mars. . . . . . .1:05 p.m. . . . . . 2:10 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . .4:55 a.m. . . . . . 7:33 p.m. Saturn. . . . . .4:26 p.m. . . . . . 3:44 a.m. Uranus . . . . .2:53 a.m. . . . . . 3:16 p.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63/39 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.45” Record high . . . . . . . . 87 in 1934 Average month to date. . . 0.76” Record low. . . . . . . . . 21 in 1954 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.07” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Average year to date. . . . . 4.89” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.30.00 Record 24 hours . . .0.52 in 1993 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today. . . . . . 5:27 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:39 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:27 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:39 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 12:54 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 1:08 a.m.

Moon phases First

Full

Last

May 28 June 4 June 11 June 19

OREGON CITIES

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m. Astoria . . . . . . . 58/51/trace Baker City . . . . . .64/47/0.03 Brookings . . . . . 57/49/trace Burns. . . . . . . . . .64/37/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .65/51/0.00 Klamath Falls . . .65/30/0.04 Lakeview. . . . . . .61/28/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .64/32/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .73/43/0.00 Newport . . . . . . 55/50/trace North Bend . . . . .61/52/0.00 Ontario . . . . . . . .68/52/0.04 Pendleton . . . . . .75/53/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .64/52/1.02 Prineville . . . . . . .64/36/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .68/35/0.05 Roseburg. . . . . . .72/52/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .63/49/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .69/35/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .70/56/0.00

New

. . . . .62/47/c . . . . .60/49/pc . . . .69/43/pc . . . . .71/42/pc . . . . .59/47/c . . . . .62/49/pc . . . .70/41/pc . . . . .73/41/pc . . . . .62/42/c . . . . .66/46/pc . . . .68/43/pc . . . . . .73/42/s . . . .67/44/pc . . . . .71/45/pc . . . .68/29/sh . . . . .67/36/pc . . . .73/50/pc . . . . . .77/50/s . . . . .55/45/c . . . . .56/48/pc . . . . .58/45/c . . . . .58/49/pc . . . .75/51/pc . . . . .80/51/pc . . . .73/47/pc . . . . .71/47/pc . . . . .65/48/c . . . . .67/52/pc . . . .72/34/sh . . . . .69/41/pc . . . . .68/34/c . . . . .67/41/pc . . . . .64/46/c . . . . .72/47/pc . . . . .63/44/c . . . . .67/47/pc . . . .68/32/sh . . . . .66/38/pc . . . .70/47/pc . . . . .71/47/pc

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

5

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

PRECIPITATION

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . .91-135 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . 153 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Mammoth Mtn., California . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . .8-36 Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . Carry chains or T. Tires Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Squaw Valley, California . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . Closed for season Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report For links to the latest ski conditions visit: For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html www.tripcheck.com or call 511 Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

THURSDAY

Mostly sunny.

73 41

EAST Partly cloudy skies.

69/43

Christmas Valley

Port Orford

64/40

Union

62/35

John Day

72/34

Fort Rock 69/31

66/28

61/23

Roseburg

70/33

La Pine 68/29

Crescent Lake

57/46

Bandon

71/38

Prineville Sisters Redmond 68/32 70/33 Sunriver Bend

Eugene

69/46

Mitchell 73/35

65/30

56/47

Florence

65/41

Baker City

Madras

Camp Sherman

Enterprise Joseph

Granite Spray72/41

Warm Springs

65/40

Meacham

La Grande

Condon 72/39

63/43

Yachats

68/43 65/40

Wallowa

61/36

73/42

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

73/47

Ruggs

Maupin

63/44

55/45

Pendleton

75/48

67/45

Government Camp 49/34

61/45

Hermiston74/48

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy 62/46

McMinnville

73/49

The Biggs Dalles 70/45

66/46

Hillsboro Portland 65/48

Tillamook

Umatilla

Hood River

Mostly sunny.

HIGH LOW

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

WEDNESDAY

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . .92/72/pc . 95/71/pc Akron . . . . . . . . . .91/65/0.00 . .92/71/pc . . .84/57/t Albany. . . . . . . . . .84/57/0.00 . .88/69/pc . . .85/64/t Albuquerque. . . . .78/53/0.00 . . . 82/54/s . . 85/58/s Anchorage . . . . . .49/45/0.15 . .56/44/pc . 58/46/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . . .89/73/0.00 . . . 86/68/t . . 85/69/c Atlantic City . . . . .84/68/0.00 . .76/68/pc . 78/70/pc Austin . . . . . . . . . .91/73/0.00 . .93/71/pc . 94/72/pc Baltimore . . . . . . .89/68/0.00 . .94/70/pc . 90/69/pc Billings . . . . . . . . .56/37/0.15 . .64/43/sh . . .69/45/t Birmingham . . . . .93/69/0.00 . . . 91/70/t . . .91/69/t Bismarck. . . . . . . .67/51/0.11 . . .58/44/c . 58/39/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . . .65/49/0.01 . .72/48/pc . 77/47/pc Boston. . . . . . . . . .70/64/0.00 . . .67/59/c . . .74/62/t Bridgeport, CT. . . .78/65/0.00 . .84/67/pc . 80/66/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . . .84/58/0.00 . .90/71/pc . . .83/59/t Burlington, VT. . . .77/52/0.00 . . . 81/62/t . . .81/62/t Caribou, ME . . . . .68/42/0.00 . . .62/47/c . . .60/48/t Charleston, SC . . .87/72/0.00 . . . 84/71/t . . .84/71/t Charlotte. . . . . . . .85/65/0.00 . .85/68/pc . . .86/70/t Chattanooga. . . . .94/68/0.00 . . . 91/68/t . . .89/65/t Cheyenne . . . . . . .67/46/0.00 . .70/39/pc . 73/44/pc Chicago. . . . . . . . .97/70/0.00 . . . 90/63/t . . 78/55/s Cincinnati . . . . . . .91/64/0.00 . . . 92/69/t . . .88/62/t Cleveland . . . . . . .89/63/0.00 . .91/71/pc . . .82/57/t Colorado Springs .72/50/0.00 . .71/44/pc . 73/47/pc Columbia, MO . . .92/66/0.01 . . . 89/63/t . . 83/59/s Columbia, SC . . . .90/72/0.00 . . .86/68/c . . .87/69/t Columbus, GA. . . .94/76/0.00 . . . 87/70/t . . .90/70/t Columbus, OH. . . .93/72/0.00 . . . 92/70/t . . .86/61/t Concord, NH. . . . .82/51/0.00 . . . 78/57/t . . .77/62/t Corpus Christi. . . .90/71/0.00 . .89/75/pc . 91/75/pc Dallas Ft Worth. . .93/72/0.00 . .93/74/pc . 93/74/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .91/70/0.00 . . . 91/70/t . . .86/61/t Denver. . . . . . . . . .75/45/0.00 . .76/45/pc . 79/50/pc Des Moines. . . . . .91/74/0.00 . .85/56/pc . 74/52/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . . .84/61/0.00 . . . 90/72/t . . .84/59/t Duluth. . . . . . . . . .52/46/0.66 . .73/48/sh . 55/43/sh El Paso. . . . . . . . . .90/61/0.00 . . . 93/68/s . . 97/70/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . .62/50/0.01 . .65/44/sh . . 61/44/s Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .81/55/0.57 . . .65/47/c . . 56/41/c Flagstaff . . . . . . . .64/25/0.00 . . . 72/37/s . . 75/39/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .86/62/0.00 . . . 91/64/t . 75/54/pc Green Bay. . . . . . .81/59/0.04 . . . 84/57/t . 70/47/pc Greensboro. . . . . .85/65/0.00 . . . 85/68/t . . .86/68/t Harrisburg. . . . . . .87/69/0.15 . .90/69/pc . . .86/66/t Hartford, CT . . . . .84/63/0.00 . .85/66/pc . . .84/64/t Helena. . . . . . . . . .43/32/0.49 . .59/38/sh . 63/43/sh Honolulu. . . . . . . .84/73/0.00 . . . 87/74/s . . 87/73/s Houston . . . . . . . .92/70/0.00 . .91/74/pc . 91/74/pc Huntsville . . . . . . .96/67/0.00 . . . 91/68/t . . .89/67/t Indianapolis . . . . .91/70/0.00 . . . 94/71/t . 84/61/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .95/68/0.00 . .95/70/pc . 92/68/pc Jacksonville. . . . . .85/67/0.21 . . . 86/72/t . . .87/70/t Juneau. . . . . . . . . .50/46/0.08 . .53/41/sh . 53/42/sh Kansas City. . . . . .90/73/0.00 . .86/61/pc . 83/60/pc Lansing . . . . . . . . .83/61/0.00 . . . 92/66/t . 78/55/pc Las Vegas . . . . . . .82/58/0.00 . . . 90/69/s . . 94/71/s Lexington . . . . . . .92/65/0.00 . . . 90/69/t . . .85/61/t Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .93/74/0.00 . .80/51/pc . 75/55/pc Little Rock. . . . . . .93/69/0.01 . .94/72/pc . 91/70/pc Los Angeles. . . . . .67/54/0.00 . . . 73/61/s . 71/59/pc Louisville. . . . . . . .93/71/0.00 . . . 92/72/t . . .87/64/t Madison, WI . . . . .94/65/0.00 . . . 86/56/t . . 72/48/s Memphis. . . . . . . .94/70/0.00 . .96/75/pc . 93/71/pc Miami . . . . . . . . . .89/74/0.02 . .88/76/pc . 88/76/pc Milwaukee . . . . . .82/58/0.00 . . . 87/61/t . . 73/51/s Minneapolis . . . . .92/64/0.00 . .77/51/sh . 63/46/pc Nashville. . . . . . . .95/68/0.00 . . . 93/70/t . . .90/66/t New Orleans. . . . .94/76/0.00 . .92/74/pc . 91/72/pc New York . . . . . . .81/64/0.05 . .85/70/pc . 81/70/pc Newark, NJ . . . . . .83/70/0.04 . .87/70/pc . . .83/69/t Norfolk, VA . . . . . .83/68/0.00 . . .86/69/c . 88/69/pc Oklahoma City . . .86/70/0.00 . . . 90/69/t . . .88/67/t Omaha . . . . . . . . .94/74/0.00 . .80/53/pc . 73/54/pc Orlando. . . . . . . . .93/72/0.00 . . . 89/72/t . . .90/73/t Palm Springs. . . . .90/57/0.00 . . . 97/66/s . . 98/67/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .93/72/0.00 . . . 90/64/t . . 79/58/s Philadelphia . . . . .88/70/0.00 . .91/71/pc . 90/70/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . . .87/62/0.00 . . . 95/69/s . . 99/74/s Pittsburgh. . . . . . .91/63/0.00 . .91/70/pc . . .84/60/t Portland, ME. . . . .70/54/0.00 . . . 61/53/t . . .65/58/t Providence . . . . . .81/64/0.00 . . .76/62/c . 79/62/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . . .86/66/0.15 . . . 87/68/t . . .87/70/t

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City. . . . . . .74/43/0.00 . . .62/43/c . 71/47/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . . .66/45/0.00 . . . 77/49/s . . 80/51/s Richmond . . . . . . .88/64/0.00 . . .90/70/c . 89/70/pc Rochester, NY . . . .82/54/0.00 . .92/70/pc . . .85/60/t Sacramento. . . . . .75/50/0.00 . . . 84/54/s . . 85/55/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .93/76/0.00 . . . 94/70/t . 86/63/pc Salt Lake City . . . .63/45/0.01 . .70/54/pc . 81/53/pc San Antonio . . . . .90/73/0.00 . .93/73/pc . 94/75/pc San Diego . . . . . . .68/58/0.00 . . . 68/60/s . 67/60/pc San Francisco . . . .61/52/0.00 . .63/50/pc . 63/50/pc San Jose . . . . . . . .67/53/0.00 . . . 73/51/s . . 72/52/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .73/42/0.00 . . . 76/40/s . . 77/48/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .87/70/0.02 . . . 85/71/t . . .84/72/t Seattle. . . . . . . . . .63/53/0.00 . . .60/48/c . 66/51/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . . .84/70/0.00 . . . 71/47/s . 64/42/pc Spokane . . . . . . . .70/37/0.00 . .69/47/pc . 70/46/pc Springfield, MO . .91/67/0.00 . . . 88/66/t . . 86/60/s Tampa. . . . . . . . . .91/78/0.00 . . . 87/75/t . . .88/75/t Tucson. . . . . . . . . .86/54/0.00 . . . 95/62/s . . 98/65/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .91/73/0.00 . . . 91/71/t . 88/65/pc Washington, DC . .87/71/0.00 . .92/73/pc . 90/72/pc Wichita . . . . . . . . .91/72/0.00 . .89/62/pc . 84/62/pc Yakima . . . . . . . . .80/41/0.00 . .72/43/pc . 70/50/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . . .90/62/0.00 . . . 98/68/s . . 99/71/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .77/55/0.00 . . . 70/48/s . . 62/46/c Athens. . . . . . . . . .73/55/0.05 . . . 79/61/s . 76/61/pc Auckland. . . . . . . .63/55/0.00 . .63/41/sh . 57/50/pc Baghdad . . . . . . . .95/72/0.00 . .93/78/pc . 106/84/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .93/84/0.00 . .86/80/sh . . 88/81/c Beijing. . . . . . . . . .88/61/0.00 . . .96/61/c . 80/58/sh Beirut . . . . . . . . . .75/68/0.00 . . . 82/74/s . . 86/73/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .73/32/0.00 . .72/51/pc . . 64/45/c Bogota . . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . .64/52/sh . 62/50/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . .72/51/sh . 71/55/sh Buenos Aires. . . . .68/61/0.00 . .70/60/pc . 69/49/pc Cabo San Lucas . .88/72/0.00 . . . 90/70/s . . 90/65/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .90/72/0.00 . . . 98/74/s . 96/68/pc Calgary . . . . . . . . .54/34/0.00 . . . 63/43/s . . 68/46/s Cancun . . . . . . . . .84/73/0.00 . .86/76/pc . . .86/76/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . .66/46/pc . 63/50/pc Edinburgh. . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . .64/47/pc . . 59/47/c Geneva . . . . . . . . .79/52/0.00 . .75/55/pc . 70/53/sh Harare. . . . . . . . . .72/43/0.00 . . . 68/48/s . . 69/46/s Hong Kong . . . . . .88/81/0.00 . .86/79/sh . 83/78/sh Istanbul. . . . . . . . .73/57/0.00 . .73/63/sh . 71/62/sh Jerusalem . . . . . . .80/63/0.00 . . . 86/70/s . 94/67/pc Johannesburg. . . .66/39/0.00 . . . 65/42/s . . 65/44/s Lima . . . . . . . . . . .73/64/0.00 . .71/65/pc . . 72/66/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . . . 73/55/s . 73/59/pc London . . . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . .79/59/sh . 68/53/sh Madrid . . . . . . . . .82/52/0.00 . . . 85/57/s . 84/61/pc Manila. . . . . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . .91/80/sh . 92/80/sh

Mecca . . . . . . . . .115/88/0.00 110/90/pc 113/89/pc Mexico City. . . . . .82/59/0.00 . . . 80/54/t . . .81/53/t Montreal. . . . . . . .70/57/0.00 . .68/63/sh . 79/59/sh Moscow . . . . . . . .70/41/0.00 . .67/49/sh . 74/54/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . .74/59/sh . 74/56/sh Nassau . . . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . .83/73/pc . . .86/76/t New Delhi. . . . . .106/84/0.00 . .111/88/s . 114/92/s Osaka . . . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . .77/57/pc . 76/64/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .77/50/0.00 . .61/36/pc . . 57/39/c Ottawa . . . . . . . . .73/52/0.00 . .75/63/sh . 84/55/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . . . 77/55/r . . 74/55/s Rio de Janeiro. . . .82/68/0.00 . .84/70/sh . . 85/69/s Rome. . . . . . . . . . .79/50/0.00 . .69/54/pc . 72/58/pc Santiago . . . . . . . .61/54/0.00 . .68/50/pc . 69/54/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . . .75/57/0.00 . .78/64/sh . 81/65/pc Sapporo . . . . . . not available . .56/46/pc . 59/46/pc Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .72/59/0.00 . .78/59/pc . . 86/61/c Shanghai. . . . . . . .84/61/0.00 . .76/71/pc . . .76/65/r Singapore . . . . . . .84/73/0.00 . .88/80/sh . 88/81/sh Stockholm. . . . . . .73/41/0.00 . . .60/44/c . 58/41/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . .64/49/pc . 64/49/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .79/73/0.00 . .80/77/sh . 86/78/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .82/68/0.00 . . . 90/75/s . 97/70/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . .72/56/sh . 75/57/sh Toronto . . . . . . . . .75/59/0.00 . .81/64/sh . 79/55/sh Vancouver. . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . . .59/48/c . . 61/50/c Vienna. . . . . . . . . .73/50/0.00 . .73/55/pc . 75/55/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . .70/52/pc . 75/47/sh


GREEN, ETC.

TV/ Movies, C2 Calendar, C3 Dear Abby, C3 Horoscope, C3

C

Comics, C4-5 Sudoku, C5 Daily Bridge, C5 Crossword, C5

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

Fights brew over plans to export coal from Northwest By Craig Welch The Seattle Times

The Bulletin file photo

Apple plans to build solar arrays, similar to these at PV Powered in Bend, to help power its data center in North Carolina.

Apple data center to rely on

Courtesy Bloom Energy

Apple is installing a five-megawatt fuel cell near its data center in Maiden, N.C.

RENEWABLES By Jordan Novet • The Bulletin

• Prineville facility will follow the company’s North Carolina center by using a mix of solar and other renewable technologies for power

W

hile Apple partially powers its North Carolina data center with coal, that facility will operate exclusively on renewable energy by the end of the year, the company says.

The tech giant based in Cupertino, Calif., vowed this month to do the same for the

data center it’s building in Prineville. A few miles away from its 20-megawatt data center in Maiden, N.C., Apple is building what it calls the largest privately owned solar installation in the country, with two 100-acre arrays capable of generating 84 million kilowatt hours per year.

Biogas-fed fuel cells near the data center will contribute an additional 40 million kilowatt hours per year. Between the fuel cell and the solar installations, Apple will generate on site 60 percent of the energy it will need in

Todd Sumlin / The Charlotte Observer

Apple’s data center in Maiden, N.C., will function exclusively with renewable energy.

order to store, send and receive information from users of its iCloud and other digital services. Apple will buy the rest of the energy it needs for the data center from local and regional sources, according to its website. Apple announced on May 15 that it would exclusively use renewables for its Maiden data center, two days after the environmental group Greenpeace staged protests in Cupertino over Apple’s use of power in North Carolina from Duke Energy, most of which comes from coal. OTECH “All three of our data centers will be coal-free, which is an industry first for anybody of our size,” Peter Oppenheimer, Apple’s chief financial officer, told Bloomberg News, referring to its data centers in Prineville, North Carolina and Newark, Calif. Greenpeace in 2010 brought up the same issues about Facebook’s planned partial use of power from coal at its data center in Prineville, across the highway from Apple’s future data center site. A solar array was running when Facebook officially opened its data center in April 2011. See Apple / C6

SEATTLE — With the Northwest poised to become the country’s leading coal-export region, fights are emerging on several fronts. On the table are proposals to capitalize on Asia’s thirst for cheap energy by building a half-dozen terminals in GREEN Washington and Oregon that would export coal from the Rockies. Physicians fret about an explosion of locomotive exhaust, while mayors grumble about the potential for long traffic-snarling trains. Washington state fears 1,200 new barge trips on the Columbia River could spark more accidents and marine-vessel groundings. Tribes worry that spilled coal could poison aquatic food webs. But as the federal government begins its first lengthy review of plans to ship coal through Northwest ports, it’s not clear how — or if — the feds will weigh in on perhaps the most far-reaching issue: the potential effect new markets for coal could have on greenhouse-gas emissions. If each of the proposed terminals, which range from Bellingham, Wash., to Coos Bay, Ore., is built to capacity, Washington and Oregon eventually would export 150 million or more tons of coal a year — half again as much coal as all U.S. exports combined in 2011. While the National Environmental Policy Act requires federal agencies to review the environmental impact of major decisions, it’s not clear if carbondioxide emissions from burning U.S. coal overseas qualifies. Still, some regional leaders are insisting the impacts on climate play a role in assessing the future of the projects. They argue, as have environmentalists, that if the U.S. supplies Asia with cheap coal, places such as China and India will invest in new coal-fired power plants and the incentive to find cleaner energy will plummet. “If the United States is going to embark on a largescale export of coal to Asia, it is imperative that we ask — and answer — the question of how such actions fit with the larger strategy of moving to a lower-carbon future,” Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber said last month in a strongly worded letter to the secretary of the Interior and the secretary of the Army. See Coal / C6

Global warming winner: Once-rare butterfly thrives By Seth Borenstein The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Man-made climate is threatening the existence of many species, such as the giant polar bear. But in the case of a small drab British butterfly, it took a species in trouble and made it thrive. Scientists say global warming is rescuing the once-rare brown Argus butterfly. It’s all about food. Over about 25 years, the butterfly went from in trouble to pushing north in Britain where it found a veritable banquet. Now the butterfly lives in twice as

large an area as it once did and is brown Argus is unusual compared not near threatened, according to to other species and that’s why scia study in Friday’s issue of entists are studying it more, the journal Science. said study co-author Jane Decades ago, the brown Hill, a professor of ecology Argus “was sort of a special at the University of York. butterfly that you would Biologists expect climate have to go to a special place change to create winners to see and now it’s a butterfly SCIENCE and losers in species. Stanyou can see in regular farmford University biologist land or all over the place,” Terry Root, who wasn’t said study co-author Richard Fox, part of this study, estimated that an ecologist at Butterfly Conserva- for every winner like the brown tion, a science and advocacy group Argus there are three losers, like in the United Kingdom. the cuckoo bird in Europe. Hill Global warming helping the agreed that it’s probably a three-

to-one ratio of climate change losers to winners. As the world warms, the key interactions between species break down because the predator and prey may not change habitats at the same time, meaning some species will move to cooler climes and won’t find enough to eat, Root said. What makes the brown Argus different is that it found something new to eat, something even better than its old food, the less common rockrose plant, Hill said. The new food is a geranium and it is more widespread.

Keith Warmington / Butterfly Conservation via The Associated Press

Global warming is rescuing the once-rare brown Argus butterfly, according to a study in the journal Science.


C2

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012

TV & M ‘Idol’playing to type – no longer a good thing

L M T  FOR MONDAY, MAY 28

ers the nation over. (Aiken Los Angeles Times recently lost to Arsenio Hall LOS ANGELES — The on Donald Trump’s “Celebwinner has been declared. A rity Apprentice,� which isn’t nation has decided, and we the path many would have went to bed on Wednesday predicted in 2003, when Aikfinally knowing that Ameri- en’s debut album went platican Idol No. 11 is, in the num on the heels of his “Idol� words of dozens of Twitter star turn.) commenters, another “white Since then, those who grew guy with guitar� up on the show (WGWG). Rest like Sanchez, TV SPOTLIGHT — easy, America. who was 5 when Phillip Phillips, Kelly Clarkson a 21-year-old wouldbecame the first “Idol� be troubadour with winner — have come husk in his voice, a to understand a centwinkle in his eye and tral truth: that the ina smile tailor-made dividual contestants, for winning over the while often magnetic, world’s grandmas, got Phillips be they winners, runthe majority of the 132 ners-up or among the million votes cast for top dozen, are disposthe long-running Fox music able, flawed and often uncompetition. worthy of sustained musical He bested 16-year-old interest. We’ve seen Randy Jessica Sanchez, who can Jackson feign excitement sustain a note for miles and way too many times. who on the show’s finale Yes, “Idol� has produced performed a stunning duet idols: Carrie Underwood, of “And I Am Telling You I’m Clarkson, Adam Lambert, Not Going� with Jennifer Chris Daughtry and McCreHolliday. This memorable ery among them. And a few moment, though, was too — most notably, Clarkson little, too late. With enough and Lambert — have even Southern grace to charm pushed the pop music cona nation of “Idol� watch- versation forward. ers whose preferences have Whether Phillips succeeds trended toward WGWG, will be up to him. Hopefully the unflappable Phillips be- he will follow first-year wincomes the fifth of a kind in ner Clarkson’s model of a row, following Scotty Mc- defiant independence. She Creery, Lee DeWyze, Kris earned her artistry and conAllen and David Cook. tinued respect not merely Who knew we still loved through her 2001 victory but white guys with guitars so through determination, good much? taste and a keen understandMany “Idol� watchers ing for her strengths as a pop did, which is probably one singer. Here’s hoping he and reason why viewership has his catchy, if derivative, song nearly halved since the se- “Home� will become a 2012 ries’ peak in 2003, when 38 classic and a harbinger of million people witnessed good fortune and good muRuben Studdard best Clay sic to come. But in the end, if Aiken and established their it doesn’t, American culture relevance around water cool- has lost very little. By Randall Roberts

MEN IN BLACK 3 IMAX (PG-13) 12:40, 3:55, 7:10, 10:05 THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS (PG) 1 WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOUR EXPECTING (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 2:55, 6:15, 9:05

BEND Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:10 DARLING COMPANION (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 9:30 THE DEEP BLUE SEA (R) 1, 4, 7, 9:15 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:35 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15, 9:20 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) Noon, 3, 6, 9

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX (PG) 12:30 MIRROR MIRROR (PG) 3 THE RAVEN (R) 9 WRATH OF THE TITANS (PG-130 6 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING (PG-13) 1:30, 6:30

Sisters Movie House 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 3:45, 6:30 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) 6:45 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 3:30, 6:30 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 4:30, 7 WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING (PG-13) 4:15

MADRAS

Tin Pan Theater

Madras Cinema 5

680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

The theater is closed on Mondays

REDMOND Redmond Cinemas 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) 11 a.m., 4, 9 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15, 9:15

• Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15. • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

SISTERS

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 12:50, 2:50, 4:05, 6, 7:20, 9, 10:20 CHERNOBYL DIARIES (R) 1:10, 4:30, 7:50, 10:20 CHIMPANZEE (G) 1:15, 3:25 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) 1:25, 4:40, 7:40, 10:25 THE DICTATOR (R) 12:10, 1:30, 3:20, 4:45, 6:45, 8, 9:25, 10:30 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 3:05, 6:20, 9:40 THE LUCKY ONE (PG-13) 6:05, 9:10 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 2:45, 3:45, 6:10, 7, 9:20, 10:10 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS 3-D (PG13) 11:45 a.m., 3, 6:40, 9:55 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) Noon, 3:15, 4:15, 6:30, 7:30, 9:30, 10:15 MEN IN BLACK 3-D (PG-13) 12:20, 3:35, 6:50, 9:50

EDITOR’S NOTES:

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 1:05, 4, 6:50 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) Noon, 2:25, 4:50, 7:20 THE DICTATOR (R) 1:40, 3:40, 5:40, 7:40 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS 3-D (PG13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 12:05, 2:20, 4:40, 7

PRINEVILLE Pine Theater 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

BATTLESHIP (UPSTAIRS — PG13) 6 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 4, 7 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

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L TV L   MONDAY PRIME TIME 5/28/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00 KATU News News News KEZI 9 News The Simpsons Electric Comp. NewsChannel 8 Meet, Browns Ciao Italia ‘G’

5:30 World News Nightly News Evening News World News The Simpsons Fetch! With Ruff Nightly News Meet, Browns Rachel’s-Food

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å Access H. Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men This Old House Business Rpt. NewsChannel 8 News King of Queens King of Queens My Family Time Goes By

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ Big Bang Big Bang PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Choral Society Michael Graves

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

The Bachelorette Emily’s friends question the bachelors. (N) ’ Ă… America’s Got Talent (N) ’ ‘PG’ American Ninja Warrior (N) ‘PG’ How I Met 2 Broke Girls Two/Half Men Mike & Molly ’ The Bachelorette Emily’s friends question the bachelors. (N) ’ Ă… House A teenage boy with partial paralysis. ’ (PA) ‘14’ Ă… Antiques Roadshow Jackpot! ‘G’ History Detectives ’ ‘G’ Ă… America’s Got Talent (N) ’ ‘PG’ American Ninja Warrior (N) ‘PG’ Gossip Girl ’ ‘14’ Ă… Hart of Dixie Hart of Dixie ’ ‘PG’ In Performance at White House World News Tavis Smiley ’

10:00

10:30

11:00

11:30

(10:01) Castle ’ ‘PG’ Ă… KATU News (11:35) Nightline Grimm Pilot ’ ‘14’ Ă… News Jay Leno Hawaii Five-0 Ike Maka ‘14’ Ă… News Letterman (10:01) Castle ’ ‘PG’ Ă… KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Independent Lens Hell and Back Again (N) ’ ‘PG’ Gathering/Hero Grimm Pilot ’ ‘14’ Ă… NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno Cops ‘PG’ Ă… ’Til Death ‘PG’ ’Til Death ‘PG’ That ’70s Show Charlie Rose (N) ’ Ă… PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Gene Simmons Family Jewels (N) Monster Monster Monster Monster *A&E 130 28 18 32 Storage Wars ›› “Midwayâ€? (1976, War) Charlton Heston, Henry Fonda, James Coburn. Japanese and American forces battle over ››› “Flags of Our Fathersâ€? (2006, War) Ryan Phillippe, Jesse Bradford, Adam Beach. The men who raised the flag The Killing 72 Hours Sarah moves *AMC 102 40 39 a Pacific island. Ă… on Iwo Jima become heroes. unsteadily. ’ ‘14’ Ă… Mermaids: The Body Found ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters Exploring Guyana’s Essequibo River. (N) ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters ’ ‘PG’ *ANPL 68 50 26 38 River Monsters: Unhooked Searching for an actual “Jaws.â€? ’ ‘PG’ Bethenny Ever After Bethenny Ever After Bethenny Ever After Bethenny Ever After Don’t Be Tardy Don’t Be Tardy Bethenny Ever After (N) Bethenny Ever After BRAVO 137 44 ››› “A Few Good Menâ€? (1992, Drama) Tom Cruise, Jack Nicholson, Demi Moore. ’ Ă… Ron White’s Celebrity CMT 190 32 42 53 ››› “A Few Good Menâ€? (1992, Drama) Tom Cruise, Jack Nicholson, Demi Moore. ’ Ă… Cocaine Cowboys ‘14’ The Costco Craze: Inside the Cocaine Cowboys ‘14’ Teeter Hang Paid Program CNBC 51 36 40 52 The Costco Craze: Inside the Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront CNN 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… Workaholics COM 135 53 135 47 South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Workaholics Dept./Trans. City Edition Talk of the Town Local issues. Cooking Oregon Joy of Fishing Journal Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 Politics & Public Policy Today CSPAN 58 20 12 11 Politics & Public Policy Today Jessie ’ Ă… Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Jessie ‘G’ Ă… ›› “Alice in Wonderlandâ€? (2010) Johnny Depp. Premiere. ’ Ă… Good-Charlie A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Phineas, Ferb Shake It Up! ‘G’ *DIS 87 43 14 39 Austin & Ally ’ Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Deadliest Catch The Hook ’ ‘14’ Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Ă… Deadliest Catch A Wizard deckhand collapses; hurricane. ‘14’ Ă… Outlaw Empires (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Ă… *DISC 156 21 16 37 Deadliest Catch Weak Links ‘14’ Ice Loves Coco Mrs. Eastwood & Company ‘PG’ Mrs. Eastwood Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians Mrs. Eastwood Mrs. Eastwood Chelsea Lately Kardashian *E! 136 25 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 NBA Countdown NBA Basketball Conference Final: Teams TBA (N) (Live) Ă… ProFILE: 60 SportsNation Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… SportsNation SportsCenter Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… NBA Tonight (N) SportsNation SportsCenter NASCAR Now ESPN2 22 24 21 24 ProFILE: 60 PBA Bowling From Feb. 14, 2010. SportsCentury Ă… IndyCar Racing SportsCentury Ă… ESPNC 23 25 123 25 (4:30) Battle of the Network Stars College Football From Jan. 1, 2011. Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… Secret Life of American Teen ››› “Aladdinâ€? (1992) Voices of Scott Weinger, Robin Williams. The 700 Club ‘G’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 ››› “The Blind Sideâ€? (2009) Sandra Bullock. A well-to-do white couple adopts a homeless black teen. Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five FNC 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Invention Hun. Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Mystery Diners Diners, Drive *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Restaurant: Impossible (4:00) › “John Tucker Must Dieâ€? How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Kung Fu Pandaâ€? (2008, Comedy) Voices of Jack Black, Angelina Jolie. ››› “Kung Fu Pandaâ€? (2008), Angelina Jolie FX 131 House Hunters: Beachfront Love It or List It ‘G’ Ă… Love It or List It (N) ‘G’ Ă… Property Virgins Property Virgins House Hunters Hunters Int’l Love It or List It Cira Bagnato ‘G’ HGTV 176 49 33 43 House Hunters Hunters Int’l (11:06) Hatfields & McCoys ‘14’ *HIST 155 42 41 36 Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Hatfields & McCoys (N) (Part 1 of 3) ‘14’ Ă… ›› “Murder in Greenwichâ€? (2002) Christopher Meloni. ‘14’ Ă… “Shadow of Fearâ€? (2012) Amanda Righetti, Will Estes. ‘PG’ Ă… ›› “Sex & Lies in Sin City: The Ted Binion Scandalâ€? (2008) ‘14’ LIFE 138 39 20 31 “To Love, Honor and Betrayâ€? The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word The Ed Show The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews MSNBC 56 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) MTV 192 22 38 57 Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Money Strang. Money Strang. Ridiculousness Victorious Tori Goes Platinum ‘G’ “Ragsâ€? (2012) Max Schneider, Keke Palmer. Premiere. ’ ‘G’ Ă… George Lopez George Lopez Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ NICK 82 46 24 40 (4:30) Victorious iCarly Carly is suspicious of her boyfriend. ’ ‘G’ I (Almost) Got Away With It ‘14’ The Will: Secrets Revealed The Will: Secrets Revealed The Will: Secrets Revealed The Will: Secrets Revealed The Will: Secrets Revealed OWN 161 103 31 103 I (Almost) Got Away With It ‘14’ Mariners Post. MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers From Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas. Dan Patrick ROOT 20 45 28* 26 MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers From Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas. (N) (Live) Band of Brothers Why We Fight ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Band of Brothers Points ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Undrcvr Stings Undrcvr Stings World’s Wildest Police Videos ’ World’s Wildest Police Videos (N) SPIKE 132 31 34 46 (4:30) Band of Brothers ’ ‘MA’ ››› “Casino Royaleâ€? (2006, Action) Daniel Craig, Eva Green, Mads Mikkelsen. Ă… ›› “Quantum of Solaceâ€? (2008) SYFY 133 35 133 45 ›› “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skullâ€? (2008) Harrison Ford, Cate Blanchett. Behind Scenes Living Edge Kingdom Conn. Jesse Duplantis Flag of My Father Medal of Honor Joel Osteen Manna-Fest Live-Holy Land Creflo Dollar The Conscientious Objector TBN 205 60 130 Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan ‘14’ Ă… *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ ›››› “The Bridge on the River Kwaiâ€? (1957, War) William Holden, Alec Guinness, Sessue Hayakawa. A British colo- ›››› “The Great Escapeâ€? (1963, War) Steve McQueen, James Garner, Richard Attenborough. Allied POWs stage a ››› “Kelly’s Heroesâ€? (1970, War) TCM 101 44 101 29 nel builds a bridge for his Japanese captor. Ă… daring escape from a Nazi prison camp. Ă… Clint Eastwood. Ă… (DVS) Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Extreme Cou Extreme Cou Cake Boss ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *TLC 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Law & Order Hands Free ’ ‘14’ Law & Order ‘14’ Ă… (DVS) The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Closer Road Block ‘14’ Ă… The Closer Silent Partner ‘14’ *TNT 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Floater ’ ‘14’ MAD ‘PG’ MAD ‘PG’ Wrld, Gumball Wrld, Gumball Adventure Time Adventure Time Regular Show Annoying King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ *TOON 84 Bourdain: No Reservations Bourdain: No Reservations Bourdain: No Reservations Bourdain: No Reservations Hotel Impossible ‘PG’ Ă… Hotel Impossible ‘G’ Ă… *TRAV 179 51 45 42 State Fair Foods ‘G’ Ă… M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Home Improve. Home Improve. Home Improve. Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond TVLND 65 47 29 35 Bonanza Day of the Dragon ‘G’ NCIS Swan Song ’ ‘14’ NCIS: Los Angeles ’ ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Pyramid ‘14’ Ă… (DVS) WWE Monday Night RAW (N) ’ Ă… “National Treasure: Bookâ€? USA 15 30 23 30 NCIS Baltimore ‘14’ Ă… (DVS) Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives Finale (N) ‘14’ Single Ladies (N) ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives Finale ’ ‘14’ Single Ladies ’ ‘14’ VH1 191 48 37 54 Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:20) ›› “Big Trouble in Little Chinaâ€? 1986 Ă… ›› “Godzillaâ€? 1998, Science Fiction Matthew Broderick, Jean Reno. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… (10:20) › “Resident Evil: Afterlifeâ€? 2010 ‘R’ Ă… ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:30) ››› “The Thingâ€? 1982 Kurt Russell. ‘R’ FXM Presents ›› “Mr. & Mrs. Smithâ€? 2005, Action Brad Pitt, Angelina Jolie. ‘PG-13’ Ă… FXM Presents ›› “Mr. & Mrs. Smithâ€? 2005, Action Brad Pitt. ‘PG-13’ Ă… FMC 104 204 104 120 (4:30) ››› “1408â€? 2007 John Cusack. ‘PG-13’ Best of PRIDE Fighting UFC 146: Dos Santos vs. Mir Prelims Hooters Dream Girls ‘14’ UFC Reloaded UFC 92: Evans vs. Griffin Forrest Griffin against Rashad Evans. FUEL 34 Big Break Atlantis (N) Feherty (N) Top 10 (N) Golf Central Big Break Atlantis Feherty The Golf Fix Golf Fitness GOLF 28 301 27 301 Big Break Atlantis Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Beginning ‘G’ (4:30) ››› “Taking Chanceâ€? 2009 RenĂŠe Fleming: 24/7 Pacquiao/ Real Time With Bill Maher Journalist Game of Thrones Stannis’ fleet at- “Hemingway & Gellhornâ€? 2012, Docudrama Clive Owen, Nicole Kidman. Premiere. Writers Ernest The Ricky GerHBO 425 501 425 501 Kevin Bacon. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… Masterclass Bradley Ă… Michelle Bernard. ’ ‘MA’ vais Show ‘MA’ tacks King’s Landing. ’ ‘MA’ Hemingway and Martha Gellhorn begin a romance. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… ›› “The Last Legionâ€? 2007, Action Colin Firth. ‘PG-13’ (7:15) ››› “The Last of the Mohicansâ€? 1992, Adventure Daniel Day-Lewis. ‘R’ (9:45) ››› “Alien 3â€? 1992, Science Fiction Sigourney Weaver, Charles S. Dutton. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:45) ›› “Major Leagueâ€? 1989, Comedy Tom Berenger, (6:35) › “Major League IIâ€? 1994, Comedy Charlie Sheen. The Cleveland (8:20) ›› “Major League: Back to the Minorsâ€? 1998, ›› “The A-Teamâ€? 2010, Action Liam Neeson, Bradley Cooper. Former Special MAX 400 508 508 Charlie Sheen. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Indians return for another pennant race. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Comedy Scott Bakula. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Forces soldiers form a rogue unit. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… Inside 9/11: Zero Hour ‘PG’ Witness: G.I. Homecoming ‘PG’ Inside 9/11: Zero Hour ‘PG’ Witness: G.I. Homecoming ‘PG’ Supercarrier: USS Ronald Reagan NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Odd Parents Odd Parents Odd Parents Monsuno ‘Y7’ Wild Grinders SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Dragonball GT Supah Ninjas Fisher’s ATV Overhaul Destination Pol. Mudslingers Four Wheeler Best of West Overhaul Fisher’s ATV Destination Pol. Four Wheeler Mudslingers Overhaul OUTD 37 307 43 307 Bone Collector Hunt Masters (4:15) “Wombâ€? 2010, Science Fiction (6:15) ›› “Barbershopâ€? 2002, Comedy Ice Cube. A barbershop owner con- Weeds Cats! Cats! Episodes Episode ››› “Source Codeâ€? 2011 Jake Gyllenhaal. A pilot experi- (10:35) “Fear Islandâ€? 2009 Haylie Duff. A mysterious killer SHO 500 500 Eva Green. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… siders selling his establishment. ’ ‘PG-13’ ences the last few minutes of a man’s life. terrorizes five students on an island. ‘NR’ Cats! ‘MA’ 3 ’ ‘MA’ Gearz ‘G’ Hot Rod TV (N) Hot Rod TV ’ Guys Garage Guys Garage NASCAR Race Hub Gearz ‘G’ Gearz ‘G’ Hot Rod TV ’ Hot Rod TV ’ Guys Garage Guys Garage SPEED 35 303 125 303 Gearz ‘G’ (7:10) ›› “Cars 2â€? 2011 Voices of Owen Wilson. ’ ‘G’ Ă… ›› “Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tidesâ€? 2011 Johnny Depp. ‘PG-13’ Ă… Straw Dogs ‘R’ STARZ 300 408 300 408 (5:10) ›› “The Recruitâ€? 2003, Suspense Al Pacino. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… › “Thirstâ€? 2008 Lacey Chabert. Two couples struggle to (6:35) “Psych:9â€? 2010, Suspense Sara Foster, Cary Elwes, Michael Biehn. “The Violent Kindâ€? 2010, Horror Cory Knauf, Taylor Cole, ›› “Drive Angryâ€? 2011, Action Nicolas Cage, Amber Heard. A brutal felon TMC 525 525 survive in the California desert. ‘R’ Ă… Strange events at a hospital may solve a series of murders. ‘R’ Bret Roberts. ’ ‘R’ Ă… escapes from hell to save his grandchild. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Poker After Dark ‘PG’ Ă… Poker After Dark ‘PG’ Ă… NBC Sports Talk Poker After Dark ‘PG’ Ă… Darts NBC Sports Talk NBCSN 27 58 30 209 Poker After Dark ‘PG’ Ă… Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Ă… My Fair Wedding *WE 143 41 174 118 Golden Girls


MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Dad’s dying wish for burial becomes a financial burden Dear Abby: How important are a dying person’s last wishes? My dad died recently and said that he wanted to be buried with his first wife in a state far from where we live. If his estate — or his current wife — can’t afford to comply with his request, would it be horrible to do something else? In today’s economy most seniors don’t have any extra income. To follow Dad’s final wishes would take a sizable chunk of his estate. His wife feels it’s not important to follow his last wishes because of the cost, but it really bothers me. Dad was in the Navy during WWII. If his wife isn’t willing to spend the money, would I still be a good guy by scattering his ashes in the ocean? I know he’d rather be in the deep than sitting on a shelf in the work shed. Please help. — Disturbed Son in Nevada Dear Disturbed Son: Your letter illustrates why it is important for people to have their wishes in writing. In this case, your father’s wife would have the right to his ashes, unless it was stated otherwise in black and white. As far as granting a personal last wish, you need to use your best judgment, particularly if doing so would cause financial hardship. In this case, cremation would be a creative way to make everyone happy. Your father’s ashes could be divided into thirds, with one portion placed with his first wife, another with his second wife, and the rest scattered at sea. Dear Abby: My spouse, “Jack,� and I were married four years ago. Three years ago he made me choose between him and my then 7-year-old son. I haven’t spoken to or seen my son for three years. Not having my child in my life has made me become depressed, but I keep it bottled up inside. Jack has three children — all adults. We rarely see them. I brought two children into our marriage, ages 7 and 14. Jack says he doesn’t want to be a

This year you stay calm and centered. Look at the expectations you put on yourself; they might differ from what others expect from you. You demand the best from yourself, which is an excellent quality. On the other hand, if it drives you to judge yourself too harshly, it will be a problem. Remind yourself that you are only human. Many opportunities will be present from June on. Follow your instincts. If you are single, you meet someone quite important to your life history. If you are attached, you feel loved. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH A vague sense of uncertainty could weave its way through your day. You do not need to let it impact your decisions or actions. Just recognize that the feeling exists. Taking time to chat might be nice and even desirable, but first attend to more demanding matters. Tonight: Do for you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Note the implicit risk of going after a certain wish. Unexpected hunches might impact your finances. Detach and you’ll gain an unusual perspective about what might be going on. Indulge a loved one. Remind this person that he or she is special. Tonight: Add fun to the mix. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Today you can be found doing mental gymnastics in order to understand others, their actions and how to choose an appropriate response. Do not forget to tap into your feelings; otherwise, it could seem as if you’re playing an overly intellectual chess game. Tonight: Pick up the phone and have a longoverdue discussion. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH If you don’t open up an issue for discussion, you might never get it resolved or get feedback. It is fine and good to work out a problem in your head, but you certainly will not get someone else’s perspective that way. Tonight: Talk over dinner. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Be smart when handling your finances. Do not get involved in someone else’s theory or idea; instead, focus on your own. You could be evading an emotional or intellectual risk, but you might decide to jump in anyway. With the

C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY DEAR A B B Y father or grandfather. (We have three grandchildren.) I am scared to question why it is like this. Am I a terrible mother/ grandmother? Does this mean he doesn’t really love me since my children are a part of me? I want to be a grandmother and enjoy my grandchildren. He knew I had kids when we were dating, but both of them lived with relatives at the time because of custody issues. — Sad Grandma in Arizona Dear Sad Grandma: It isn’t that Jack doesn’t love you. He appears to be so preoccupied with his own needs, desires and controlling you that he probably doesn’t think about much else. That you are “scared� to question him speaks volumes about your relationship. If you want to be a part of your children’s and grandchildren’s lives, you will have to do so without his blessing or participation. You will also have to strengthen your backbone and emancipate yourself. Dear Abby: One of my neighbors regularly uses power equipment before 9 a.m. on Saturday mornings. I think people should refrain from using loud machinery before 10 a.m. on weekends. Am I being unreasonable? — Deb in Tacoma Dear Deb: Not in my book. Most municipalities have noise ordinances in place that regulate sound levels that might become an annoyance. To find out if there is one in your neighborhood, inquire at City Hall. If there isn’t, consider gathering signatures on a petition so regulations can be established. You may not be the only neighbor who is bothered by the disruption. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Monday, May 28, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar

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excitement and hectic pace, make sure to fit in some exercise and/or schedule a checkup. Tonight: Do some personal shopping. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH You might feel on top of the world, but you could be wearing rose-colored shades that are distorting reality. A child or loved one appears to be adjusting and changing in front of your very eyes. Tonight: Knowing the world is your oyster, what would you go for? LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH You are a skilled diplomat following your intuition, and if your instincts suggest you do little, do just that. A person or persons in your life have developed some very unpredictable behavior. Don’t worry why — just strap on your seatbelt and go for the excitement. Tonight: Get as much R and R as possible. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH You probably are the organizer of the Memorial Day party or get-together. Curb your innate nervousness by spending some time with a special friend who always helps you relax. Tonight: Expect fireworks. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You feel as if you could take the world on. Wherever you go, you run into friends. Knowing how to handle this many people who all want your attention takes talent. Tonight: Enjoy the admiration. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Reach out for someone you have cared about for a long time. It is not important that you are with this person — just enjoy catching up on his or her news. Detach from a situation that can easily trigger you. Help someone who feels overwhelmed. Tonight: Let the party go on. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Someone demands all your attention, yet you seem to be able to accomplish a lot in a little amount of time. Use care when handling money. You could drop some cash or misplace your wallet. Tonight: A long-overdue, caring talk. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH You see what you want to see, and nothing more. This trait of late might help or level out a difficult situation. Just the same, be more realistic. Bone up on your listening capacity. Tonight: Let someone else steal the limelight. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

NOT JUST A NUMBER: A continuous Memorial Day reading of the name, age and hometown of soldiers killed in Iraq and Afghanistan; free; 8:30 a.m., opening ceremony 8:15 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-310-0701 or firstamendmentsightings@live .com. TERREBONNE MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONY: A memorial ceremony; free; 9 a.m.; Terrebonne Pioneer Cemetery, Smith Rock Way, near Smith Rock State Park; 541-280-5161. PRINEVILLE MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE: Event begins with a parade through downtown Prineville; followed by services at Juniper Haven Cemetery; free; 10:30 a.m.; downtown Prineville; 541-447-2329. CELEBRATE SPRING!: Help homesteaders prepare for spring on a 1904 ranch with planting, baking and furniture crafting; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. MEMORIAL DAY SERVICES: Service will be followed by an open house at the American Legion Post 45; free; 11 a.m.; La Pine Community Cemetery, U.S. Highway 97 and Reed Road; 541536-1402. REDMOND MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONY: A ceremony with an avenue of flags display; free; 11 a.m.; Redmond Cemetery, Yew Avenue and U.S. Highway 97; 541280-5161. SISTERS MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE: A memorial service followed by a barbecue; free; 11 a.m.; Village Green Park, 335 S. Elm St.; 541-549-4162. MADRAS MEMORIAL DAY CELEBRATION: A tribute ceremony followed by a barbecue; donations accepted; noon; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-350-8009. VFW LUNCH: A Memorial Day barbecue; $5-$6; noon-3:30 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-548-4108. BEND MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE: Featuring speaker Maj. Scot Caughran and a jet flyover; followed by a reception at VFW Post 1643; free; 1 p.m.; Deschutes Memorial Gardens, 63875 N. U.S. Highway 97; 541-382-5592.

WEDNESDAY WORDS WITHOUT WALLS STUDENT SHOWCASE: A reading of works from the 2012 The Nature of Words creative writing students; free; 6-8 p.m.; PoetHouse Art, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-647-2233 or info@ thenatureofwords.org.

THURSDAY LET FREEDOM RING: The Bells of Sunriver perform music of America on handbells; free; 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-593-1635. CONVERSATIONS ON BOOKS AND CULTURE: Read and discuss “Typical American� by Gish Jen; free; noon-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; kroth1@cocc.edu. SHIFTING THE DISCOURSE: Tanya Golash-Boza talks about immigrant rights as human rights; free; 3 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-318-3726 or esandoval@ cocc.edu. LEFT COAST COUNTRY: The Portland-based Americana band performs; free; 7 p.m.;

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin file photo

Alysa Williams of Forest Grove runs next to her Border Collie named Dharma on the course of the Agility Trial in 2008 at the Crook County Fairgrounds in Prineville. Dogs will navigate obstacle courses from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Admission is free for spectators. McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. COMEDY NIGHT: Susan Rice performs; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; The Original Kayo’s Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-3232520. JAZZ CONCERT: The Central Oregon Community College Big Band Jazz performs under the direction of Andy Warr; $5, free ages 11 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Pinckney Center for the Arts, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-280-9371. JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS: The Boise, Idahobased folk grass band performs; $3; 9 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541728-0879 or www.reverbnation .com/venue/thehornedhand.

FRIDAY BEAR CREEK CARNIVAL: Featuring games, bounce houses, dancers and more; $5 per child, free for adults; 5-8 p.m.; Bear Creek Elementary School, 51 S.E. 13th St., Bend; 541-355-1400. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill District; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. LIVES ON THE LINE: An interactive, multimedia art installation to empower women in the community; proceeds benefit Global Shine Project; free; 5-8 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-410-5513. MOMMY MINGLE: A gathering for mothers with vendors, photo sessions, local resources and more; proceeds benefit Family Access Network; free admission; 6-9 p.m.; Baby Phases Tot 2 Teen, 759 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Suite 1, Bend; 541-306-3942 or www. bendmomsformoms.com. PUSH: A skate deck art show and auction; proceeds benefit the Division Street Skatepark Project; free; 6-10 p.m.; old Boomtown location, 910 N.W. Harriman St., Bend; 503-475-8161 or www. divisionstreetskatepark.org. “BEGINNERS�: A screening of the R-rated 2010 movie; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www. jcld.org.

SATURDAY AGILITY TRIAL: Bend Agility Action Dogs presents a day of dogs navigating obstacle courses; free; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-410-4646 or www. benddogagility.com. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the school’s Sparrow Club; free admission; 8 a.m.-1 p.m.; Seven Peaks School, 19660 S.W. Mountaineer Way, Bend; 541-788-8001. PLANT SALE: A sale of annual and perennial plants; proceeds benefit the Redmond Opportunity Center Foundation; free admission; 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m.; Zion Lutheran Church, 1113 S.W. Black Butte Blvd., Redmond; 541-382-7044. VFW BREAKFAST: A breakfast of pancakes; $7; 8:30-10:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. HIGH DESERT RHUBARB FESTIVAL: Dutch-oven cooks prepare a variety of rhubarb dishes; with live music, vendors, a car show and more; proceeds benefit S.C.O.O.T.R; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; L&S Gardens and Land Clearing, 50792 S. Huntington Road, La Pine; 541-536-2049. SADDLE UP FOR ST. JUDE: A nineor 14-mile trail ride; registration required; proceeds benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital;

donations accepted; 9 a.m.-noon; Sisters Cow Camp, F.S. Road 15, three miles west of State Highway 242; 541-815-9398 or hrsnarnd@ webformixair.com. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www. centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. LARKSPUR FESTIVAL: Featuring a plant sale, family activities, games, craft sales, live music and more; free; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Larkspur Park, 1700 S.E. Reed Market Road, Bend; 541-388-1133. MOMMY MINGLE: A gathering for mothers with vendors, photo sessions, local resources and more; proceeds benefit Family Access Network; free admission; 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Baby Phases Tot 2 Teen, 759 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Suite 1, Bend; 541-306-3942 or www. bendmomsformoms.com. REDMOND SATURDAY MARKET: Vendors sell arts and crafts; free admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Ambiance Art Co-op, 435 Evergreen Ave.; 541-480-7197. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Phillip Margolin talks about his book “Capitol Murder�; RSVP requested; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525 or www. sunriverbooks.com.


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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

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DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012

Apple Continued from C1 Apple purchased 160 acres for its Prineville data center in February. It “will be every bit as environmentally responsible as our Maiden data center,” Apple states on its website. “At Prineville we have access to enough local renewable energy sources to completely meet the needs of the facility.” So far, though, it’s unclear exactly how the company will do so. Apple spokeswoman Kristin Huguet declined to comment. But plans for Apple’s North Carolina facility could suggest how the company will power its operations with renewable energy in Central Oregon. In addition to Apple’s North Carolina data center, other facilities it has in Austin, Texas; Elk Grove, Calif., Munich; and Cork, Ireland, all run off renewable energy sources, the company said in a report released earlier this year. The push to run data centers on renewable energy has increased among American companies in the past three or four years, said William Tschudi, an employee in the Environmental Energy Technologies Division of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, Calif. “Some companies, like Intel, claim to have most, if not all, of their energy supplied by green sources,” Tschudi said. “Some companies are being really aggressive about that.” BendBroadband’s 30,000square-foot Vault data center in Bend, which opened last year, runs with zero carbon emissions, thanks to a solar array, an efficient cooling system and purchases of carbon offset credits and Pacific Power’s Blue Sky renewableenergy program. Apple uses a similar threepronged approach to reach its goal of net-zero energy use:

Coal Continued from C1 “In the absence of a clear federal policy on this point, we will simply be deciding by not deciding.” This month, the Seattle City Council echoed that view, arguing in its own letter that coal-export terminals “risk altering the country’s progress” in combating climate change. Both letters also were directed to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, because it will take the lead in evaluating coal-export projects. The agency is only beginning to review the first, in Boardman, Ore. Coal-industry analyst Andy Roberts, with Maryland-based Wood Mackenzie research and consulting service, says he isn’t surprised some are arguing for using NEPA to look at the global impact of coal burning. “But it’s a national — not an international — act,” Roberts said. “I think people against this kind of development will reach for any lever they can pull.” He and other energy analysts say the Asian market for coal is so strong that if Rocky Mountain energy isn’t sent to the Pacific Rim, China and India will buy it elsewhere. “I’m in Asia four or five months a year, and they’re just drooling for it,” said Topekabased coal-industry analyst Randy Rahm.

A long journey Thus far, each project calls for shipping coal by rail, mostly from Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. In Boardman, coal would be offloaded and barged downriver to cargo ships near the Columbia’s mouth. Other projects call for the black gold to stay on trains all the way to Cowlitz or Grays Harbor counties, or travel south to Oregon or north through Seattle to a port in Bellingham. Here’s why the proposals are exploding: The U.S. produces 1.1 billion tons of coal each year, but the rise of cheap natural gas and the Environmental Protection Agency’s crackdown on coal-fired power plants has flatlined coal consumption in the U.S. Meanwhile, China is growing so fast it has gone in the past two years from a net coal exporter to a net importer. And while there are midsize coal yards in Canada and a small one in Alaska, there is no coal-export terminal on the continental U.S. West Coast

Jeff Willhelm / The Charlotte Observer

Construction workers perform grading work for a solar farm Apple is building near its data center in Maiden, N.C.

generating renewable energy on site, buying renewable energy elsewhere and minimizing the amount of energy its equipment needs. Under a sunlight-reflecting white roof, the North Carolina facility uses motion sensors for lights and variable-speed fans for servers, among other energy-conserving tools. It also takes in cold air from outside to cut down on using its chillers to keep servers cold, just as Facebook does at its Prineville data center, less than a mile away from Apple’s. Facebook has said the dry, cool air in Central Oregon was one motivating factor for locating in the region. Details are not yet publicly available for Apple’s Prineville

“The world has been increasing its consumption of coal on an annual basis since 2001,” said coal analyst Michael Dudas, with Sterne Agee, a brokerage house. “In the U.S., growth has been zero, with a negative bias.” As home to the world’s largest recoverable coal reserves, the American coal industry is pitching exports as a jobs and construction bonanza. But analysts say the industry also sees exports to Asia as its best shot at growth. “Coal used to be 51 percent of our electricity generation,” analyst Rahm said. “Now it’s down to 40 percent. The whole coal environment in the U.S. has changed.”

Environmental review But communities along rail routes from Montana to the sea have spent the past year raising questions about everything from increased train traffic to the risks from wafting coal dust. The Environmental Protection Agency last month said both have the potential to cause “significant impacts to public health.” It’s still so early the Corps of Engineers hasn’t outlined the scope of its review. The agency hasn’t even decided if it will evaluate each export proposal independently as a simple construction project — or if it will combine all of them into one and conduct a major environmental review so it can consider cumulative impacts. The governors of Wyoming and Montana have argued that coal should be viewed as a commodity, no different from corn or wheat, but Washington and Oregon have spent the past year challenging that notion quietly behind the scenes. In a series of letters, they’ve twice asked the Bureau of Land Management to reconsider plans for new coal-mining leases in Wyoming because the federal government had evaluated only the environmental impact of domestic coal use — not the impact of coal exports through the Northwest. The bureau, in both cases, refused their request. Just this month, two environmental groups sued the BLM over some of the largest coal leases in Wyoming, claiming the agency didn’t consider the impact the eventual burning of that coal ultimately would have on global warming. At least one of those leases was sold to a company interested in exporting coal through the Northwest.

“Central Oregon is a wonderful resource for renewable energy. We obviously have sunshine.” — Paul Israel, president of Bend-based Sunlight Solar Energy

data center. But according to its website, the company will buy geothermal, hydroelectric and wind power from two utility companies. Geothermal potential could be as close to Prineville as Powell Buttes. A handful of geothermal exploration wells were drilled on the buttes in 1980, according to records from the state Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. Companies continue to apply to generate hydroelectric energy in Central Oregon.

South of Prineville, Portland General Electric has expressed interest in installing a hydroelectric unit at Bowman Dam, although the presence of a wild and scenic river boundary has blocked the project. And wind power could be available about 30 miles south of Prineville, where the 104megawatt West Butte Wind Power Project was approved last year. In addition, utilities and other companies operate or have proposed 29 wind farms

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

in Gilliam, Morrow and Sherman counties about 150 miles north of Prineville, according to a list from Renewable Northwest Project, a nonprofit in Portland. Between 2006 and 2011, Portland-based PacifiCorp, Pacific Power’s parent company, increased its wind-power capacity by more than 1,400 megawatts, according to a handout from the utility. Ninety percent or more of the power Redmond-based Central Electric Cooperative Inc. provides comes from the Bonneville Power Administration’s hydroelectric facilities, said CEC’s member-services director, Jeff Beaman. In the immediate area of the Prineville data-center facility, Apple has 160 acres to use, al-

though an unmanned 2-megawatt, 9,300-square-foot data center is being built now. At least one more building will be constructed, if Apple is to hire 35 workers by December 2013, as outlined in its enterprise zone application. Apple could build renewable-power generators on its Prineville land, as it is doing in North Carolina. It would need more land than it owns now to locate two 100-acre solar arrays, as it’s doing in North Carolina. However, a company would pay about 1 cent less per kilowatt hour of solar energy in Central Oregon than it would in the middle of North Carolina, according to an estimate using a performance calculator from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The calculator takes into account monthly solar radiation, the angle of solar panels, array size and other factors. Assuming the same amount of solar generation in Prineville, that one penny’s difference could add up to an $840,000 savings per year. “Central Oregon is a wonderful resource for renewable energy. We obviously have sunshine,” said Paul Israel, president of Bend-based Sunlight Solar Energy, which installed solar panels for Facebook and BendBroadband’s Central Oregon data centers. But one incentive for investing in renewable energy has been drastically reduced. The money available for state tax credits for renewable-energy projects fell last year from $300 million to $1.5 million per year, according to The Bulletin’s archives. The change could decrease the appeal of building a project, Israel said. “If Apple has the appetite and the financial wherewithal, then, yes, we probably do (want to bid) on it, design it and build it,” Israel said.

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Every Friday In

— Reporter: 541-633-2117, jnovet@bendbulletin.com


SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 Tennis, D2 NBA, D3 Golf, D3

D

MLB, D4 Motor sports, D5 Cycling Central, D6

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012

MOUNTAIN BIKING Hundreds ride in Sisters Stampede SISTERS — More than 240 riders from across the state and beyond took part Sunday in the 2012 Sisters Stampede. Champions were crowned in 26 competition categories in the third annual crosscountry mountain bike race, staged on a mainly singletrack course on the Peterson Ridge Trail system south of Sisters. Course lengths were 12, 26 or 28 miles, depending on the division. Bend’s Chris Sheppard repeated as the pro men’s division winner, while Serena Bishop Gordon, also of Bend, was first among pro women. Other male category winners included Zach Perrin, of Grants Pass (Cat 2 age 15-18); Lance Haidet, of Bend (Cat 1 15-18); John Merrill, of Ashland (Cat 1 1934); Brant Buckholz, of Lake Oswego (Cat 1 35-44); Bruce Rogers, of Bend, (Cat 1 45 and older); Zach Perrin, of Grants Pass (Cat 2 1518); Peter Vraniak, of Bend; (Cat 2 19-34); T.J. Paskewich, of Bend;, (Cat 2 men 35-44); Daniel Sprouse, of Portland; (Cat 2 men 45-54); Don Leet, of Bend (Cat 2 men 55 and older); Cameron Beard, of Bend, (Cat 3 10-14); Brandon Ortiz, of Orchards, Wash. (Cat 3 15-18); Corbyn John, of Klamath Falls (Cat 3 19-34); Joseph Hosang, of Sisters (Cat 3 35-44); Chad Butler, of Scio (Cat 3 45 and older); Matt Wilkin, of Portland (Clydesdale) and Cordino Longiotti, of Ashland (single speed). Additional female division winners were Melissa Norland, of Corvallis (Cat 1); Kristin Duyn, of Tualatin (Cat 2 19-34); Jill Howe, of Eugene; (Cat 2 35 and older); Sharon Hart, of Washougal, Wash. (Cat 3 10-18); Julia Sparks, of Corvallis (Cat 3 1934); Tessa Sugahara, of Salem (Cat 3 35-44); Pam Reid, of Portland (Cat 3 45 and older) and Lisa Belair, of Portland (single speed). See complete results in Cycling Central Scoreboard, D6.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

Five hundred for the road

PREP COMMENTARY

Redmond teen helps a fallen teammate and friend

• The Central Oregon 500+ is a new cycling series designed to challenge riders, raise funds By Lydia Hoffman The Bulletin

Picture it: five century bike rides in a single week, through some of Central Oregon’s most scenic areas. It’s a test of endurance. It’s an accomplishment to be proud of. And it’s happening June 4-8 as a Bend man’s way of supMt. BachCYCLING porting elor Sports EducaCENTRAL tion Foundation. For Tom Lomax, 53 and the director of mountain operations at Mt. Bachelor ski area, the first Central Oregon 500+ will mark the fourth year in a row in which he has traded a week of work for a week of full-time cycling. He is hoping that this year will be the beginning of a tradition for MBSEF. The idea for the event, as Lomax recalls, began in 2009 as a personal goal for his 50th birthday. See Cycling / D5

The Central Oregon 500+, at a glance The Central Oregon 500+ will take place June 4-8. Standard registration for the week is $400. Daily registration is $80. For donors at a higher level, the $600 “premium” registration comes with extras including a bike tuneup, a massage and a domestique for a day. Preregistration is not required. Sign-ups for each ride will be available each day at the event starting point at 7 a.m. For more information, email Tom Lomax at centraloregon500@gmail. com or visit www.mbsef. com. Course information: www.mapmyride.com/ events/473008/

BEAU EASTES

D

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Tom Lomax rides his bike along Forest Service Road No. 45, a section of road near the Cascade Lakes Highway, earlier this month. Lomax is the organizer of the Central Oregon 500+ cycling event, in which cyclists will complete five century rides in a week.

Girls on the run

—Bulletin staff report

COLLEGE BASEBALL OSU sweeps; UO to host regional CORVALLIS — Taylor Starr scattered seven hits in 6 1⁄3 innings and Michael Conforto and Kavin Keyes each drove in two runs to send the 23rd-ranked Oregon State baseball team to a 5-0 win over No. 5 Oregon on Sunday at Goss Stadium. The win gave the Beavers a series sweep of the Ducks. Starr improved to 5-2 after picking up the win for OSU (38-18, 18-12 Pac-12). He threw 98 pitches in his second start of the season, allowing two walks with three strikeouts. Jeff Gold started for Oregon (42-17, 19-11) and took the loss after allowing three hits and two runs in four innings. The right-hander dropped to 8-4 on the year. Also on Sunday, Oregon was selected to host an NCAA Division I regional starting next weekend. Regional matchups will be announced today at 9 a.m. PST on ESPNU. — From wire reports

Photos by Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Above, runners cross over the Deschutes River near the start of the Happy Girls Half Marathon on Sunday in Bend. At right, Keely Likosky and other runners leave the starting line of the Happy Girls 5K run on Sunday at Riverbend Park. More than 400 runners completed the 13.1-mile race, which is in its second year. Amanda Basham won the half marathon, which is geared toward women, in 1 hour, 32 minutes, 6 seconds. Amy Vantassel placed second in 1:33:33, while Nikki Bilello finished third, 1:34:03. More than 200 completed the 5-kilometer run. For results, see Scoreboard, D2.

aulton Hanks’ life pretty much revolves around

sports. A senior football and baseball standout at Redmond High — he plans to play baseball at Shasta College in Redding, Calif., next season — Hanks signed up for a sports medicine class at RHS last year thinking it might be a career path that keeps him close to athletics when his playing days are over. He had no idea the class would help save his best friend’s life. Eight days ago, on May 20, Hanks and his pals and classmates Connor Lau and Kyle Reed were hunting sage rats on Hanks’ grandparents’ property near Culver. Hanks and Reed had been teammates in football, all-Intermountain Conference honorable mention quarterback and tight end, respectively. Reed and Lau had been teammates in basketball. And Hanks and Lau had played together on the Redmond High baseball team. The three had been hunting for several hours that Sunday when they saw a sage rat scurry into the end of an irrigation pipe. Reed and Hanks conspired to flush the varmint out: Hanks stood on one end of the pipe to anchor it so it wouldn’t slide while Reed picked up the other end of the pipe and walked it up to force out the sage rat, which Lau would then shoot. Focused on their task, the three young hunters were unaware of the danger directly overhead — a section of power lines. The pipe, which Hanks estimated to be at least 30 feet in length, made contact with the power lines and severely shocked the unsuspecting Reed. “There was an explosion in the pipe,” Hanks recalled on Friday. “I turned around to see what happened and Kyle was on the ground.” Hanks said he felt a jolt, but as he explained, because he was on the pipe and not grounded, he was spared the blast that shocked Reed. Hanks sprinted from his end of the pipe to Reed’s and found his friend having a seizure, with his eyes rolled back in his head. See Redmond / D5

Franchitti wins third Indy 500, pays tribute to Wheldon By Jenna Fryer The Associated Press

AJ Mast / The Associated Press

Dario Franchitti reacts after winning IndyCar’s Indianapolis 500 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Sunday.

INDIANAPOLIS — Dan Wheldon couldn’t win his third Indianapolis 500. Dario Franchitti did it for him. And if it wasn’t going to be Franchitti, then it would be Scott Dixon. Maybe even Tony Kanaan. No matter what, one of Wheldon’s best buddies was going to Victory Lane. In the end, they celebrated a 1-23 sweep that honored D-Dub, their missing friend.

MOTOR SPORTS Franchitti stamped his name in the record books by winning his third Indy 500 on Sunday, a day that started and ended as a tribute to Wheldon, who won the race a year ago but was killed in an October crash in the IndyCar season finale. As his three friends lined up with six laps remaining for the final restart — Kanaan out front, Chip Ganassi teammates Franchitti and Dixon second and third — they

couldn’t help but wonder if Wheldon was at play. “Kind of like old times, the three of us back and forwards,” Franchitti said. “I thought, ‘Dan is laughing at us right now going at it.’ ” It was an absolutely fitting finish, even if the elation for Franchitti’s win was tempered by the heartbreak for two other deserving drivers. Dixon, a one-time Indy 500 winner, temporarily relocated his family to St. Petersburg, Fla., to support Wheldon’s wife and two sons. See Indy / D5


D2

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012

SCOREBOARD ON DECK Tuesday Baseball: Class 5A state semifinals: Sherwood at Summit, 5 p.m.; Bend at Wilson, 4:30 p.m.

RUNNING Local Happy Girls Half Marathon & 5K Sunday In Bend Half Marathon Individuals 1, Amanda Basham, 1:32:06. 2, Amy Vantassel, 1:33:33. 3, Nikki Bilello, 1:34:03. 4, Jody Chinchen, 1:34:59. 5, Nicole Downin, 1:35:37. 6, Carolyn Green, 1:36:12. 7, Kathy Schoderbek, 1:37:04. 8, Karly Nash, 1:37:44. 9, Alison Viles, 1:38:11. 10, Gretchen Hingley, 1:38:27. 11, Dani Emrick, 1:41:52. 12, Kristen Petty, 1:43:00. 13, Susan Clark, 1:43:44. 14, April Wilbur, 1:44:38. 15, Jessica Slaughter, 1:45:18. 16, Cambria Gilsdorf, 1:45:29. 17, Julie Davison, 1:46:11. 18, Elizabeth Thompson, 1:47:04. 19, Teresa Wymetalek, 1:47:11. 20, Laura McKenna, 1:47:12. 21, Carolyn Daubeny, 1:47:23. 22, Melissa Chapin, 1:47:32. 23, Leann Gurney, 1:47:34. 24, Nicole Jones, 1:47:41. 25, Tanya Hackett, 1:48:02. 26, Katie Saito, 1:48:07. 27, Kimberly Swanson, 1:49:34. 28, Jan Tarr, 1:49:50. 29, Sharon Sieveking, 1:50:05. 30, Nicole Stilson, 1:50:12. 31, Lisa Nasr, 1:50:30. 32, Tanya Hiebler, 1:50:49. 33, Katie Banks, 1:51:02. 34, Teresa Martin, 1:51:07. 35, Justine Deets, 1:51:17. 36, Debbie Putnam, 1:51:47. 37, Adrianne Sanden, 1:52:07. 38, Jenny Berg, 1:52:10. 39, Gina Crowder, 1:52:14. 40, Suzanne Scholsberg, 1:52:30. 41, Devon Fliss, 1:53:03. 42, Colene Lord, 1:53:12. 43, Corrinne Leblanc, 1:53:14. 44, Nikole Crafton, 1:53:21. 45, Lori Lassere, 1:53:44. 46, Melanie Mangin, 1:53:46. 47, Katie McGowan, 1:54:16. 48, Alice Chang, 1:54:17. 49, Taylor Williams, 1:54:20. 50, Sunshine Sommers, 1:54:48. 51, Molly McCevitt, 1:55:11. 52, Laura O’Connell, 1:55:12. 53, Suzy Hayes, 1:55:45. 54, Andrea Sanchez, 1:55:53. 55, Kelsey Newport, 1:55:55. 56, Heather Roley, 1:56:04. 57, Sara Green, 1:56:23. 58, Timori Gould, 1:56:45. 59, Hannah Souter, 1:56:52. 59, Rilley Swanson, 1:56:52. 61, Olivia Clark, 1:56:53. 62, Ellen Aster, 1:57:15. 63, Erin Burk, 1:57:22. 64, Lisa Davidson, 1:57:42. 65, Amy Lang, 1:57:48. 66, Noel Mickelberry, 1:57:49. 67, Danielle Vezina, 1:58:16. 68, Tj Pressey, 1:58:45. 69, Laura Pritchard, 1:59:01. 70, Kalie Whitcomb, 1:59:12. 71, Keri Dodge, 1:59:15. 72, Ashley Bruce, 1:59:21. 73, Leeann Kriegh, 1:59:30. 74, Lynnette Cauble, 1:59:35. 75, Jamie Littlejohn, 2:00:07. 76, Leslie Brown, 2:00:58. 77, Jill Sukraw, 2:01:42. 78, Melinda Fahey, 2:02:48. 79, Kalene Peterson, 2:03:16. 80, Jill Evans, 2:03:25. 81, Jodi Husband, 2:03:29. 82, Colleen Moyer, 2:03:34. 83, Amy Aylsworth, 2:03:44. 84, Jennifer Vaught, 2:03:45. 85, Denise Garcia, 2:03:45. 86, Taunya Rediger-Hicks, 2:03:47. 87, Kaitlyn Gunn, 2:03:56. 88, Lori Ozment, 2:04:05. 89, Katy Wallace, 2:04:07. 90, Roxy Ramseyer, 2:04:14. 91, Autumn Ekstrom, 2:04:25. 92, Lisa Maclellan, 2:04:34. 93, Cheryl Younger, 2:04:35. 94, Merry Irwin, 2:04:44. 95, Pamela Askew, 2:04:45. 96, Erin Matlock, 2:04:45. 97, Bree Burch, 2:04:54. 98, Sara Maier, 2:04:57. 99, Samanthia Waltjen, 2:04:59. 100, Katherine Stewart, 2:05:02. 101, Becky Detering, 2:05:04. 102, Amy Bahrman, 2:05:05. 103, Sunny Bliss, 2:05:07. 104, Sara Hobin, 2:05:08. 105, Korey Hehn, 2:05:17. 105, Marie Toft, 2:05:17. 107, Lindsey Anderlik, 2:05:40. 108, Emily Canfield, 2:05:41. 109, Leslie Veenstra, 2:05:45. 110, Rachel Simmons, 2:05:48. 111, Kara Nelson, 2:05:49. 112, Tracey March, 2:05:51. 113, Lynette Child, 2:05:51. 114, Jodie Keyser, 2:05:57. 115, Julie Lycett, 2:06:06. 116, Claudia Deenik, 2:06:07. 117, Tessie Nolin, 2:06:23. 118, Jennifer Stoll, 2:06:25. 119, Tina Grassman, 2:06:34. 120, Stephanie Njenga, 2:06:45. 121, Moira Curley, 2:06:58. 122, Kathy Moore, 2:07:03. 123, Brandi Summers, 2:07:09. 124, Stephanie Nanna, 2:07:09. 125, Kristina Scott, 2:07:09. 126, Miranda Kreb, 2:07:15. 127, Donna Hougnon, 2:07:15. 128, Julie McCabe, 2:07:20. 129, Karen Saunders, 2:07:23. 130, Denise Keesee, 2:07:25. 131, Deb Shaffer, 2:07:36. 132, Jackie Jones, 2:07:46. 133, Rebekah Hernandez, 2:07:59. 134, Danette Elliottmullens, 2:08:02. 135, Marcy Anderson, 2:08:28. 136, Marjorie McGreevy, 2:08:28. 137, Kim Johnson, 2:08:50. 138, Dedee West, 2:08:57. 139, Teresa Loo, 2:09:00. 140, Jayne Root, 2:09:00. 141, Miriam Castillo, 2:09:06. 142, Pb Jay, 2:09:21. 143, Zila Phillips, 2:09:22. 144, Pauline Kinneman, 2:09:25. 145, Alison McBroom, 2:09:26. 146, Alison Hohengarten, 2:09:30. 147, Donna Phillips, 2:09:33. 148, Randi Hansen, 2:09:36. 149, Molly Mayes, 2:09:46. 150, Michelle Grande, 2:10:04. 151, Holly Myers, 2:10:30. 152, Dee Mader, 2:10:35. 153, Deedee Sowers, 2:10:52. 154, Megan Geiss, 2:11:09. 155, Jill Gove, 2:11:16. 156, Suzanne Grund, 2:11:33. 157, Jenny Schossow, 2:11:35. 158, Brynrose Foote, 2:11:44. 159, Kurt Foote, 2:11:45. 160, Lisa Dewitt, 2:11:51. 161, Katie Brandow, 2:12:18. 162, Jennifer Hamlow, 2:12:21. 163, Alyssa Tierney, 2:12:24. 164, Nikki Cheney, 2:12:27. 165, Erin Bevando, 2:12:29. 166, Jennifer Tracy, 2:12:36. 167, Cheri Damitio, 2:12:45. 168, Harriet Chase, 2:12:55. 169, Kristen Sukraw, 2:13:01. 170, Leah Schluter, 2:13:02. 171, Brandi Shroyer, 2:13:04. 172, Holly Bailey, 2:13:06. 173, Kristie Downing, 2:13:19. 174, Mary F. Anderson, 2:13:19. 175, Sarah Schnitzius, 2:13:49. 176, Kristina Smith, 2:14:08. 177, Ali Meyer, 2:14:09. 178, Dianne Nelson, 2:14:10. 179, Katie Brink, 2:14:13. 180, Michele Debuhr, 2:14:13. 181, Michelle Jansen, 2:14:29. 182, Nicole Weathers, 2:14:39. 183, Stephanie Burnett, 2:14:47. 184, Terry Inokuma, 2:14:52. 185, Kristin Lee, 2:14:59. 186, Jill Mercer, 2:15:15. 187, Lydia Specht, 2:15:29. 188, Patty Bouchard, 2:15:30. 189, Dana Arntson, 2:15:35. 190, Stacey Price, 2:15:41. 191, Michelle Watts, 2:15:44. 192, April Bays, 2:16:01. 193, Deborah Schluter, 2:16:06. 194, Lura Wilhelm, 2:16:07. 195, Lynn Tallman, 2:16:07. 196, Beth Reddekopp, 2:16:23. 197, Erika Arrivee, 2:16:29. 198, Rebekah Riedell, 2:16:35. 199, Julie Ewers, 2:16:43. 200, Joyce Mansisidor, 2:16:43. 201, Maya Schjoll, 2:16:44. 202, Tiffany Stevens, 2:17:46. 203, Dana Hanner, 2:17:47. 204, Dawn Hietala, 2:17:58. 205, Kimberly Laveine, 2:18:18. 206, Stefanie Smith, 2:18:23. 207, Becky Sharp, 2:18:23. 208, Lori Myers, 2:18:31. 209, Ashley Sanders, 2:18:31. 210, Misty Laten, 2:18:33. 211, Colleen Riedell, 2:18:35. 212, Sheena Miltenberger, 2:18:36. 213, Letha Crawford, 2:18:36. 214, Stephanie Krause, 2:18:50. 215, Jan Jordan, 2:19:05. 216, Shelby Grassman, 2:19:05. 217, Nancy Morris, 2:19:05. 218, Patti Widmer, 2:19:06. 219, Joan Fusek, 2:19:08. 220, Sara Wright, 2:19:12. 221, Rhonda Schumacher, 2:19:35. 222, Jamie Vohs, 2:19:36. 223, Carrie Martin, 2:19:41. 224, Samantha Bushnell, 2:19:59. 225, Mellissa Elliot, 2:20:02. 226, Erin Hanson, 2:20:09. 227, Stacy Bahns, 2:20:20. 228, Dawn Boucher, 2:20:25. 229, Sarah Mcmoyler, 2:20:27. 230, Jasmine Borgatti, 2:20:52. 231, Jenelle Walker, 2:20:53. 232, Karen Wolfe, 2:20:58. 233, Kristina Stone, 2:21:08. 234, Jana Eads, 2:21:09. 235, Leslie Neugebauer, 2:21:21. 236, Lauren Ward, 2:21:35. 237, Kimberly Savarese, 2:21:37. 238, Hot Rods On The Run (Kristen Rodriguez, Kari Rodriguez), 2:22:20. 239, Yohko Ogawa, 2:23:01. 240, Terri Freyermuth, 2:23:04. 240, Patricia Williams, 2:23:04. 242, Andrea Aragon, 2:23:13. 243, Erin Stauffer, 2:23:17. 244, Laura Spaulding, 2:23:20. 245, Sarah Williams, 2:23:37. 246, Andraya Offutt, 2:24:06. 247, Sherri Twomey, 2:24:08. 248, Karen Ludes, 2:24:10. 249, Connie Dingeman, 2:24:14. 250, Patti Larose, 2:24:29. 251, Amanda Bonivert, 2:24:47. 252, Barbara Co-

chran, 2:25:16. 253, Melinda Nichols, 2:25:54. 254, Hillary Collins, 2:25:58. 255, Alisa Hayes, 2:25:59. 256, Carri Hanson, 2:26:02. 257, Diana Koester, 2:26:02. 258, Allison Kimball, 2:26:19. 259, Janet Bowman, 2:26:20. 260, Laura Gifford, 2:26:22. 261, Linda Hehn, 2:26:36. 262, Angie Farnworth, 2:26:46. 263, Julie Luedtke, 2:26:46. 264, Kari Hathorn, 2:26:59. 265, April Anderson, 2:27:18. 266, Bette Sue Ruff-Nelson, 2:27:24. 267, Tamara Merriam, 2:27:37. 268, Jody Harper, 2:27:41. 269, Nicole Shappart, 2:27:52. 270, Mandy Ransom, 2:28:09. 271, Jackie Ravarra, 2:28:22. 272, Lynne Oldham, 2:28:32. 273, Anne Ferrell, 2:28:59. 274, Sarah Mattox, 2:29:01. 275, Angela Buller, 2:29:06. 276, Angie Christianson, 2:29:18. 277, Tanya Smith, 2:29:18. 278, Amy Mccollum, 2:29:27. 279, Wendie Jackson, 2:29:31. 280, Elizabeth Underwood, 2:29:32. 281, Karin Crisci, 2:29:38. 282, Anne-Marie Daggett, 2:29:58. 283, Robin Ten Brink, 2:29:58. 284, Becky Stock, 2:29:59.5 285, Rebecca Seago-Coyle, 2:30:00. 286, Nikki Roberson, 2:30:01. 287, Amanda Stahler, 2:30:07. 288, Gina Goldrick, 2:30:14. 289, Liza Fish, 2:30:14. 290, Allyson Fry, 2:30:15. 291, Bethany Harrington, 2:30:23. 292, Jodie Barram, 2:30:28. 293, Katharine Wilson, 2:30:37. 294, Leah Larkin, 2:30:41. 295, Stephanie Logan, 2:31:36. 296, Jill Plant, 2:31:48. 297, Kim Baney, 2:31:49. 298, Katie Boehm, 2:32:00. 299, Valeri Rankins, 2:32:03. 300, Judy Rosen, 2:32:04. 301, Marcy Filicetti, 2:32:28. 302, Julane Dover, 2:32:29. 303, Helen Shepard, 2:32:33. 304, Lisa Cunningham, 2:33:12. 305, Susie Strangfield, 2:33:16. 306, Beth Phillips, 2:33:18. 307, Tami Albrecht, 2:33:19. 308, Barb Brooks, 2:33:43. 309, Casee Hamilton, 2:34:17. 310, Turtle Martin, 2:36:01. 311, Deena Kamm, 2:36:05. 312, Susan Laramee, 2:36:09. 313, Ladonna Church, 2:36:12. 314, Michele Jensen, 2:36:27. 315, Keeley Mannila, 2:36:36. 316, Lindsay Woods, 2:36:37. 317, Diane Speelman, 2:36:45. 318, Kelly Sparks, 2:36:46. 319, Jamie Sullivan, 2:36:53. 320, Devin Miller, 2:37:01. 321, Patrece Mansisidor, 2:37:09. 322, Sherrie Curtin, 2:37:51. 323, Kathleen Leahey, 2:37:58. 324, Patti Orsatti, 2:38:52. 325, Debbie Sagers, 2:39:06. 326, Ann-Marie Cedros, 2:39:20. 327, Susan Doke, 2:41:01. 328, Suzanne Butterfield, 2:41:44. 328, Lorre Islas, 2:41:44. 330, Cherie Simmons, 2:42:17. 331, Suzanne Davis, 2:42:23. 332, Shar Tobin, 2:42:35. 333, Christina Carrillo, 2:42:47. 334, Sherry Meyers, 2:42:53. 335, Deanna Blazejewski, 2:43:02. 336, Diane O’Connor, 2:43:47. 336, Lisa Swanston, 2:43:47. 338, Julie Craig, 2:44:15. 339, Michelle Robinson, 2:44:43. 340, Janelle Decelles, 2:45:07. 341, Bernie Saenz, 2:45:07. 342, Shannon Shaver, 2:45:32. 343, Elizabeth Cruz, 2:45:34. 344, Linda Murphy, 2:45:58. 345, Sunshine Betts, 2:46:10. 346, Amber Petersen, 2:46:16. 347, Chantal Blanchard, 2:47:24. 348, Krista Baker, 2:47:56. 349, Leta Kao, 2:50:24. 350, Angela Schlenker, 2:50:26. 351, Donnie Chugg, 2:51:07. 352, Tiffnie Schmadeka, 2:51:50. 353, Holly Gullickson, 2:53:21. 354, Kristy Sumner, 2:53:22. 355, Martha Rhine, 2:54:17. 356, Paige Quattlebaum, 2:55:04. 357, Elizabeth Flogerzi, 2:55:29. 358, Tricia Salcido, 2:55:34. 359, Debra Buchanan, 2:55:46. 360, Barbara Dempsey, 2:57:09. 361, Shirley Stearns, 2:57:09. 362, Brena Lopez, 2:57:14. 363, Lenora James, 2:58:03. 364, Nicole Jackson, 2:58:06. 365, Monica Hill, 2:58:07. 366, Laura Markey, 2:58:07. 367, Jeanette King, 2:58:37. 368, Heather Franceschina, 2:58:44. 369, Tracy Read, 3:00:30. 370, Trish Lutgen, 3:00:54. 371, Patrice Dirksen, 3:01:06. 372, Julie Auvil, 3:01:16. 373, Aja Yerges, 3:01:19. 374, Teresa Goetter, 3:01:31. 375, Kristen Taylor, 3:01:32. 376, Lola Hagman, 3:01:47. 377, Glory Roy, 3:02:53. 378, Andrea Green, 3:02:54. 379, Amy Mclaughlin, 3:03:11. 380, Kelley Underhill, 3:05:08. 381, Sherryn Adair, 3:05:46. 382, Lynn Adams, 3:05:47. 383, Kathleen Quick, 3:05:50. 384, Claudia Williams, 3:06:12. 385, Laurie Starr, 3:06:53. 386, Carolyn Voss, 3:07:12. 387, Marti Clementdragos, 3:09:56. 388, Vicki Taylor-Roskopf, 3:09:56. 389, Georgana Cooke, 3:09:58. 390, Carolyn Ervin, 3:09:59. 391, Donna Karr, 3:10:04. 392, Sharon Hummert, 3:10:35. 393, Julie Gaertner, 3:11:34. 394, Lori Larson, 3:11:36. 395, Carmen Cook, 3:11:37. 396, Barbara Perry-White, 3:11:49. 397, Tonya Barber, 3:11:52. 398, Linda Fisher-Berlanga, 3:11:53. 399, Cheryl Hettervig, 3:12:33. 400, Nicole Ross, 3:13:42. 401, Sherry Dodd, 3:15:18. 402, Leslie Mitts, 3:15:19. 403, Carolyn Hizak, 3:15:52. 404, Fran Starry, 3:16:38. 405, Kathie Conley, 3:17:08. 406, Kaytlynn Davis, 3:17:57. 407, Nancy Groth, 3:18:14. 408, Kiersten Brown, 3:18:29. 408, Renee May, 3:18:29. 410, Terri Brown, 3:18:29. 411, Amber Lynn, 3:18:52. 412, Sally Lynch, 3:19:01. 413, Jamie Chester, 3:20:51. 414, Heather Ebright, 3:21:01. 415, Angie Crouse, 3:21:12. 416, Kelly Tanguay, 3:21:13. 417, Jamie Bowers, 3:21:56. 418, Becky Best, 3:21:56. 419, Heather Davis, 3:24:09. 420, Heidi Cromwell, 3:25:25. 421, Lori Yerges, 3:27:12. 422, Heather Mcguire, 3:27:35. 423, Jordana Levenick, 3:27:35. 424, Lizabeth Lewis, 3:28:31. 425, Christie Pack, 3:28:48. 426, Kayla Ormsby, 3:30:15. 427, Julie Echols, 3:30:27. 428, Sharon Young, 3:30:27. 429, Michelle Waight, 3:31:53. 430, Gabrielle Keith, 3:31:54. 431, Sue Marceaux, 3:32:01. 432, Carolyn Carlberg, 3:32:02. 433, Susan Stratton, 3:32:06. 434, Debbie Tallman, 3:32:35. 435, Diane Hopster, 3:32:36. 436, Crystal Yost, 3:34:27. 437, Alanna Davis, 3:36:22. 438, Evelyn Bittner, 3:37:04. 439, Kiersten Burkhardt, 3:37:56. 440, Bethany Stai, 3:37:56. 441, Valerie Ireland, 3:38:19. Half Marathon Relay (top 25 finishers) 1, Kari Strang, Charmion Freifeld, 1:31:04. 2, Brooke Keudell, Ashley Berry, 1:36:31. 3, Deanna Cranston, Kathleen DeAlicante, 1:52:31. 4, Deanna Wyland, Hannah Fortier, 1:53:16. 5, Rachelle Hedges, Sommer VanBerckelaer, 1:56:00. 6, Rebecca Beaudin, Audra Green, 1:59:21. 7, Anne Sjogren, Jeanne Schwarm, 2:04:11. 8, Joyce Watson, Kristi Grant, 2:04:28. 9, Gretchen Heberling, Konnie Handschuch, 2:04:39. 10, Melissa Baca, Stacy Glasser, 2:08:36. 11, Robin Baney, Dawnelle Roth, 2:08:45. 12, Kim Meske, Dawn Ojukwu, 2:08:48. 13, Anne Brown, Jennie Roggencamp, 2:09:19. 14, Tawnya Kropf, Shannon Waller, 2:09:27. 15, Robin Antonson, Stacy Neil, 2:11:23. 16, Cali Clement, Abby Elvebak, 2:11:42. 17, Lisa Bailey, Brad Bailey, 2:13:07. 18, Jean Bury, Rebecca Fender, 2:15:33. 19, Beth Reynolds, Barbara Taylor, 2:16:05. 20, Julie Schmidt, 2:17:50. 21, Nicole Bigelow, 2:19:46. 22, Jill Rosell, Melissa Durham, 2:19:47. 23, Aleta Nissen, Andie DeSha, 2:20:10. 24, Jane Lambert, Amy Althauser, 2:21:03. 25, Theresa Quade, Haley Thornton, 2:22:46. 5K (top 10 finishers) 1, Dawson Cockman, 24:48.2. 2, Kristan Dauble, 24:59.1. 3, Hannah Gindlesperger, 25:23.7. 4, Siri Chotechuang, 25:52.6. 5, Brad Cockman, 25:56.4. 6, Julie Aster, 26:25.0. 7, Marilu Semph, 26:43.7. 8, Nichole Chambers, 26:45.8. 9, Susanne Flynn, 26:53.5. 10, Mary Horvath, 8:44.0.

GOLF PGA Tour Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial Sunday At Colonial Country Club Fort Worth, Texas Purse: $6.4 million Yardage: 7,204; Par: 70 Final Round Zach Johnson (500), $1,152,000 64-67-65-72—268 Jason Dufner (300), $691,200 65-64-66-74—269 Tommy Gainey (190), $435,200 66-67-73-67—273 Jim Furyk (135), $307,200 69-69-68-68—274 Harris English (93), $216,960 65-70-73-67—275 Rickie Fowler (93), $216,960 68-68-70-69—275 John Huh (93), $216,960 70-66-69-70—275 Chris Kirk (93), $216,960 71-69-70-65—275 Ryan Palmer (93), $216,960 68-67-70-70—275

Jonas Blixt (70), $160,000 73-67-66-71—277 Jonathan Byrd (70), $160,000 72-68-67-70—277 Ben Crane (70), $160,000 70-71-68-68—277 Sergio Garcia (56), $113,067 66-73-71-68—278 Kevin Na (56), $113,067 70-71-71-66—278 Kyle Reifers (56), $113,067 65-72-72-69—278 Chris Stroud (56), $113,067 69-73-67-69—278 David Hearn (56), $113,067 71-72-65-70—278 Charley Hoffman (56), $113,067 69-70-69-70—278 Tim Clark (49), $72,229 70-69-71-69—279 Roberto Castro (49), $72,229 67-74-68-70—279 Tom Gillis (49), $72,229 65-69-69-76—279 Trevor Immelman (49), $72,229 70-71-69-69—279 Geoff Ogilvy (49), $72,229 70-70-70-69—279 Louis Oosthuizen (49), $72,229 71-67-68-73—279 Bo Van Pelt (49), $72,229 69-64-71-75—279 Ken Duke (43), $47,360 68-75-66-71—280 Martin Flores (43), $47,360 68-73-70-69—280 Matt Kuchar (43), $47,360 72-69-67-72—280 Ryan Moore (43), $47,360 67-69-70-74—280 Carl Pettersson (43), $47,360 70-69-71-70—280 Bryce Molder (38), $37,120 72-64-75-70—281 Seung-Yul Noh (38), $37,120 70-69-72-70—281 Greg Owen (38), $37,120 69-68-71-73—281 Corey Pavin (38), $37,120 71-70-67-73—281 Boo Weekley (38), $37,120 72-71-68-70—281 Y.E. Yang (38), $37,120 73-69-66-73—281 Sung Kang (33), $29,440 70-69-69-74—282 J.J. Killeen (33), $29,440 72-70-69-71—282 Hunter Mahan (33), $29,440 69-71-68-74—282 John Senden (33), $29,440 69-71-72-70—282 Chad Campbell (28), $23,040 71-71-69-72—283 Kevin Chappell (28), $23,040 70-67-70-76—283 John Daly (28), $23,040 70-69-70-74—283 Brendon de Jonge (28), $23,040 67-74-68-74—283 Brandt Jobe (28), $23,040 67-75-70-71—283 Charlie Wi (28), $23,040 68-69-75-71—283 Blake Adams (21), $16,240 69-72-70-73—284 Greg Chalmers (21), $16,240 70-69-72-73—284 Will Claxton (21), $16,240 72-69-71-72—284 Chris DiMarco (21), $16,240 66-74-73-71—284 John Mallinger (21), $16,240 71-72-70-71—284 Rory Sabbatini (21), $16,240 71-71-71-71—284 Vijay Singh (21), $16,240 70-69-70-75—284 Michael Thompson (21), $16,240 69-71-71-73—284 Bill Haas (16), $14,656 72-71-70-72—285 David Mathis (16), $14,656 71-67-71-76—285 Kris Blanks (12), $14,144 73-69-73-71—286 Jason Bohn (12), $14,144 70-70-71-75—286 Jerry Kelly (12), $14,144 72-70-69-75—286 Kelly Kraft, $14,144 71-71-64-80—286 Marc Leishman (12), $14,144 72-68-74-72—286 Josh Teater (12), $14,144 70-71-72-73—286 Aaron Baddeley (7), $13,568 71-70-73-73—287 William McGirt (7), $13,568 70-71-73-73—287 Pat Perez (7), $13,568 69-74-70-74—287 M. Angel Carballo (4), $13,120 75-68-70-75—288 Bobby Gates (4), $13,120 71-67-72-78—288 Andres Romero (4), $13,120 66-71-78-73—288 Mark Wilson (4), $13,120 71-71-72-74—288 Gary Christian (1), $12,736 70-73-72-74—289 George McNeill (1), $12,736 72-69-72-76—289 Nick Watney (1), $12,544 71-71-72-76—290 Made cut, did not finish Hunter Haas (1), $12,224 71-72-73—216 Edward Loar (1), $12,224 72-71-73—216 Brendon Todd (1), $12,224 70-71-75—216 Gary Woodland (1), $12,224 70-70-76—216 Sang-Moon Bae (1), $11,904 70-70-77—217 Heath Slocum (1), $11,776 70-73-75—218 Justin Leonard (1), $11,648 69-73-77—219

Champions Tour Senior PGA Championship Sunday At The Golf Club at Harbor Shores Benton Harbor, Mich. Purse: $2.1 million Yardage: 6,861; Par: 71 Final Round Roger Chapman, $378,000 68-67-64-72—271 John Cook, $227,000 69-66-69-69—273 Hale Irwin, $143,000 71-66-69-68—274 Peter Senior, $74,400 74-67-71-63—275 Sandy Lyle, $74,400 74-71-66-64—275 Joe Daley, $74,400 73-72-66-64—275 Bernhard Langer, $74,400 73-68-69-65—275 David Frost, $74,400 70-70-68-67—275 Kenny Perry, $55,000 75-70-69-62—276 Steve Pate, $51,000 70-69-67-71—277 Michael Allen, $47,000 77-64-68-69—278 Mark Calcavecchia, $34,429 73-68-74-64—279 Fred Couples, $34,429 76-67-70-66—279 Boonchu Ruangkit, $34,429 72-69-71-67—279 Jim Carter, $34,429 70-71-70-68—279 Willie Wood, $34,429 72-72-67-68—279 Loren Roberts, $34,429 72-67-71-69—279 Joel Edwards, $34,429 73-67-67-72—279 Gene Jones, $24,000 71-71-70-68—280 Kirk Triplett, $24,000 73-70-68-69—280 Barry Lane, $19,500 74-73-68-66—281 Paul Wesselingh, $19,500 71-72-72-66—281 Bill Glasson, $19,500 74-72-67-68—281 Bob Tway, $19,500 72-69-69-71—281 Lonnie Nielsen, $15,625 71-70-72-69—282 Christopher Williams, $15,625 74-71-68-69—282 Jeff Hart, $15,625 72-73-68-69—282 Steve Jones, $15,625 74-70-68-70—282 Jeff Freeman, $12,550 74-73-72-64—283 Russ Cochran, $12,550 73-74-71-65—283 Kiyoshi Murota, $12,550 73-70-73-67—283 Tom Lehman, $12,550 76-69-70-68—283 Jay Haas, $12,550 70-74-70-69—283 Jay Don Blake, $12,550 71-72-67-73—283 Tim Thelen, $10,400 75-69-73-67—284 Gary Wolstenholme, $10,400 79-67-69-69—284 Bill Britton, $10,400 73-71-69-71—284 Wayne Levi, $8,600 73-70-73-69—285 Tom Pernice, Jr., $8,600 76-70-70-69—285 Larry Mize, $8,600 74-69-72-70—285 Mark Brooks, $8,600 78-67-70-70—285 Mark McNulty, $8,600 71-72-71-71—285 Scott Simpson, $8,600 75-67-70-73—285 Sonny Skinner, $6,750 77-70-69-70—286 Mark Mouland, $6,750 72-73-71-70—286 Jeff Sluman, $6,750 70-75-73-68—286 John Huston, $6,750 73-70-72-71—286 Dick Mast, $5,850 73-71-74-69—287 Bobby Clampett, $5,850 71-71-71-74—287 Jim Gallagher, Jr., $5,400 75-72-70-71—288 Bobby Wadkins, $5,050 76-71-73-69—289 Jong-Duck Kim, $5,050 75-72-72-70—289 Anders Forsbrand, $5,050 71-74-74-70—289 J. L. Lewis, $5,050 70-73-71-75—289 Andrew Oldcorn, $4,800 74-70-71-75—290 Jeff Coston, $4,562 76-71-77-67—291 P.H. Horgan, III, $4,562 72-74-77-68—291 Mark James, $4,562 73-70-76-72—291 Rod Spittle, $4,562 75-72-70-74—291 Andrew Magee, $4,400 73-74-76-69—292 Bruce Vaughan, $4,275 76-69-78-70—293 Tom Purtzer, $4,275 77-70-74-72—293 Stan Utley, $4,275 73-74-74-72—293 Tom Jenkins, $4,275 75-70-72-76—293 Blaine McCallister, $4,125 74-72-75-73—294 David J. Russell, $4,125 76-69-74-75—294 Peter Fowler, $4,075 75-71-78-71—295 Ted Schulz, $4,038 73-73-75-76—297 Tom Atchison, $4,038 76-71-72-78—297 Mike Hulbert, $4,000 77-70-76-75—298 Tom Wargo, $3,975 74-73-76-77—300

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION NBA Playoff Glance All Times PDT (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) ——— CONFERENCE FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami vs. Boston

Today, May 28: Boston at Miami, 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 30: Boston at Miami, 5:30 p.m. Friday, June 1: Miami at Boston, 5:30 p.m. Sunday, June 3: Miami at Boston, 5:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 5: Boston at Miami, 5:30 p.m. x-Thursday, June 7: Miami at Boston, 5:30 p.m. x-Saturday, June 9: Boston at Miami, 5:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 1, Oklahoma City 0 Sunday, May 27: San Antonio 101, Oklahoma City 98 Tuesday, May 29: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 6 p.m. Thursday, May 31: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Saturday, June 2: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 5:30 p.m. x-Monday: June 4: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 6 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 6: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. x-Friday, June 8: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 6 p.m. Sunday’s Summary

Spurs 101, Thunder 98 OKLAHOMA CITY (98) Durant 8-19 11-12 27, Ibaka 1-3 3-3 5, Perkins 1-4 3-4 5, Westbrook 7-21 1-2 17, Sefolosha 3-7 0-0 7, Harden 7-17 0-0 19, Collison 2-3 1-2 5, Fisher 6-8 00 13, Cook 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 35-83 19-23 98. SAN ANTONIO (101) Leonard 3-9 0-0 7, Duncan 6-15 4-6 16, Diaw 4-6 0-0 8, Parker 6-15 5-7 18, Green 0-6 0-0 0, Ginobili 9-14 5-5 26, Bonner 0-2 0-0 0, Neal 5-9 0-0 12, Splitter 4-5 1-5 9, S.Jackson 1-2 2-2 5. Totals 38-83 17-25 101. Oklahoma City 18 29 24 27 — 98 San Antonio 24 22 16 39 — 101 3-Point Goals—Oklahoma City 9-23 (Harden 5-9, Westbrook 2-3, Fisher 1-3, Sefolosha 1-3, Cook 0-1, Durant 0-4), San Antonio 8-24 (Ginobili 3-5, Neal 2-4, S.Jackson 1-2, Parker 1-2, Leonard 1-3, Diaw 0-1, Bonner 0-2, Green 0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Oklahoma City 48 (Durant 10), San Antonio 57 (Duncan 11). Assists—Oklahoma City 18 (Westbrook 5), San Antonio 22 (Parker 6). Total Fouls—Oklahoma City 24, San Antonio 18. A— 18,581 (18,797).

WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Connecticut 3 0 1.000 Indiana 3 0 1.000 Chicago 1 1 .500 Washington 1 1 .500 Atlanta 1 2 .333 New York 0 4 .000 Western Conference W L Pct Minnesota 4 0 1.000 Los Angeles 3 1 .750 San Antonio 1 1 .500 Phoenix 1 2 .333 Seattle 0 3 .000 Tulsa 0 3 .000 ——— Sunday’s Games Indiana 78, Atlanta 62 Minnesota 84, Seattle 71 Today’s Games No games scheduled Tuesday’s Game Tulsa at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.

GB — — 1½ 1½ 2 3½ GB — 1 2 2½ 3½ 3½

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) ——— STANLEY CUP FINALS Wednesday, May 30: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 5 p.m. Saturday, June 2: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 5 p.m. Monday, June 4: New Jersey at Los Angeles, 5 p.m. Wednesday, June 6: New Jersey at Los Angeles, 5 p.m. x-Saturday, June 9: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 5 p.m. x-Monday, June 11: New Jersey at Los Angeles, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 13: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 5 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts GF D.C. 8 4 3 27 28 New York 8 3 2 26 26 Sporting Kansas City 8 3 1 25 17 Columbus 5 4 3 18 13 Chicago 5 4 3 18 15 Houston 4 3 4 16 12 New England 4 7 1 13 16 Montreal 3 7 3 12 15 Philadelphia 2 7 2 8 8 Toronto FC 1 9 0 3 8 Western Conference W L T Pts GF Real Salt Lake 9 3 2 29 22 San Jose 8 3 3 27 27 Seattle 7 3 3 24 16 Colorado 6 6 1 19 20 Vancouver 5 3 4 19 13 Chivas USA 4 6 3 15 9 Portland 3 5 4 13 12 FC Dallas 3 8 4 13 15 Los Angeles 3 8 2 11 15 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Sunday’s Game Sporting Kansas City 2, San Jose 1 Saturday, June 2 Chicago at New England, 4:30 p.m.

GA 19 18 10 13 15 12 18 21 14 21 GA 14 17 9 18 14 14 15 24 21

BASEBALL College Pacific-12 Conference All Times PDT ——— Conference W L Arizona 20 10 UCLA 20 10 Oregon 19 11 Stanford 19 11 Oregon St. 18 12 Arizona St. 18 12 Washington 13 17 Washington St. 12 18 California 11 19 USC 8 22 Utah 7 23 Sunday’s Games Arizona 8, Arizona State 7

All Games W L 38 17 42 14 42 17 39 15 38 18 36 20 30 25 28 28 28 26 23 31 14 42

x-Cal State Bakersfield 3, Utah 2 Stanford 5, Cal 3 UCLA 7, USC 6 Washington State 3, Washington 2 Oregon State 5, Oregon 0 x-nonleague End of regular season

163-171, Franchitti 172-173, Dixon 174-176, Franchitti 177, Dixon 178, Franchitti 179-186, Kanaan 187-193, Franchitti 194, Dixon 195-198, Franchitti 199-200. Points: Power 200, Castroneves 164, Hinchcliffe 164, Dixon 153, Hunter-Reay 143, Franchitti 136, Pagenaud 136, Briscoe 128, Kanaan 113, Hildebrand 103.

TENNIS

NASCAR

Professional French Open Sunday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $23.47 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Fabio Fognini, Italy, def. Adrian Mannarino, France, 6-0, 7-5, 6-1. Marin Cilic (21), Croatia, def. Daniel Munoz-de la Nava, Spain, 6-4, 6-4, 7-5. Juan Carlos Ferrero, Spain, def. Jonathan Dasnieres de Veigy, France, 6-1, 6-4, 6-3. Edouard Roger-Vasselin, France, def. Vasek Pospisil, Canada, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2, 6-2. Cedrik-Marcel Stebe, Germany, def. Joao Souza, Brazil, 6-3, 2-0, retired. Juan Martin del Potro (9), Argentina, def. Albert Montanes, Spain, 6-2, 6-7 (5), 6-2, 6-1. Stanislas Wawrinka (18), Switzerland, def. Flavio Cipolla, Italy, 6-3, 6-3, 4-6, 3-6, 6-2. Fernando Verdasco (14), Spain, def. Steve Darcis, Belgium, 6-3, 6-2, 7-6 (4). Pablo Andujar, Spain, def. Victor Hanescu, Romania, 6-1, 2-6, 1-6, 6-3, 6-1. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (5), France, def. Andrey Kuznetsov, Russia, 1-6, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4. Nicolas Devilder, France, def. Filip Krajinovic, Serbia, 6-2, 6-2, 6-0. Nicolas Mahut, France, def. Andy Roddick (26), United States, 6-3, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2. Gilles Muller, Luxembourg, def. Igor Sijsling, Netherlands, 2-6, 7-5, 3-6, 6-4, 8-6. Michael Berrer, Germany, def. Jurgen Melzer (30), Austria, 6-7 (5), 4-6, 6-2, 6-2, 6-3. Kevin Anderson (31), South Africa, vs. Rui Machado, Portugal, 7-6 (2), 6-7 (6), 4-6, 6-1, 7-7, susp., darkness. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, leads Karol Beck, Slovakia, 7-5, 6-2, 4-4, susp., darkness. Women First Round Sam Stosur (6), Australia, def. Elena Baltacha, Britain, 6-4, 6-0. Svetlana Kuznetsova (26), Russia, def. Mirjana Lucic, Croatia, 6-1, 6-3. Lucie Safarova (20), Czech Republic, def. Anastasiya Yakimova, Belarus, 6-2, 6-0. Melanie Oudin, United States, def. Johanna Larsson, Sweden, 6-3, 6-3. Irina Falconi, United States, def. Edina GallovitsHall, Romania, 3-6, 6-3, 6-1. Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez, Spain, def. Eva Birnerova, Czech Republic, 4-6, 6-4, 8-6. Angelique Kerber (10), Germany, def. Zhang Shuai, China, 6-3, 6-4. Sara Errani (21), Italy, def. Casey Dellacqua, Australia, 4-6, 6-2, 6-2. Ana Ivanovic (13), Serbia, def. Lara ArruabarrenaVecino, Spain, 6-1, 6-1. Shahar Peer, Israel, def. Stephanie Dubois, Canada, 6-2, 6-2. Aleksandra Wozniak, Canada, def. Heidi El Tabakh, Canada, 7-5, 6-2. Irena Pavlovic, France, def. Chang Kai-chen, Taiwan, 6-4, 7-5. Venus Williams, United States, def. Paula Ormaechea, Argentina, 4-6, 6-1, 6-3. Mathilde Johansson, France, def. Anastasia Rodionova, Australia, 5-7, 7-6 (6), 6-4. Dinah Pfizenmaier, Germany, def. Caroline Garcia, France, 3-6, 6-4, 6-3 Alexa Glatch, United States, def. Anna Tatishvili, Georgia, 6-3, 5-7, 6-4.

MOTOR SPORTS IndyCar Indianapolis 500 Results Sunday At Indianapolis Motor Speedway Indianapolis, Ind. Lap length: 2.5 miles (Starting position in parentheses) 1. (16) Dario Franchitti, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 2. (15) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 3. (8) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Chevrolet, 200, Running. 4. (27) Oriol Servia, Dallara-Chevrolet, 200, Running. 5. (1) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Chevrolet, 200, Running. 6. (2) James Hinchcliffe, Dallara-Chevrolet, 200, Running. 7. (21) Justin Wilson, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 8. (14) Charlie Kimball, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 9. (20) Townsend Bell, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 10. (6) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Chevrolet, 200, Running. 11. (10) Rubens Barrichello, Dallara-Chevrolet, 200, Running. 12. (11) Alex Tagliani, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 13. (12) Graham Rahal, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 14. (18) J.R. Hildebrand, Dallara-Chevrolet, 200, Running. 15. (17) James Jakes, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 16. (23) Simon Pagenaud, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 17. (19) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 199, Contact. 18. (9) E.J. Viso, Dallara-Chevrolet, 199, Running. 19. (22) Michel Jourdain, Dallara-Honda, 199, Running. 20. (25) Sebastien Bourdais, Dallara-Chevrolet, 199, Running. 21. (28) Ed Carpenter, Dallara-Chevrolet, 199, Running. 22. (30) Katherine Legge, Dallara-Chevrolet, 199, Running. 23. (13) Ana Beatriz, Dallara-Chevrolet, 190, Running. 24. (4) Marco Andretti, Dallara-Chevrolet, 187, Contact. 25. (7) Josef Newgarden, Dallara-Honda, 161, Mechanical. 26. (24) Sebastian Saavedra, Dallara-Chevrolet, 143, Electrical. 27. (3) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Chevrolet, 123, Suspension. 28. (5) Will Power, Dallara-Chevrolet, 79, Contact. 29. (29) Mike Conway, Dallara-Honda, 78, Contact. 30. (31) Bryan Clauson, Dallara-Honda, 46, Mechanical. 31. (26) Wade Cunningham, Dallara-Honda, 42, Electrical. 32. (32) Simona de Silvestro, Dallara-Lotus, 10, Handling. 33. (33) Jean Alesi, Dallara-Lotus, 9, Handling. ——— Race Statistics Winners average speed: 167.734. Time of Race: 2:58:51.2532. Margin of Victory: Under Caution. Cautions: 8 for 39 laps. Lead Changes: 34 among 10 drivers. Lap Leaders: Hinchcliffe 1, Briscoe 2-4, Hinchcliffe 5-6, Briscoe 7-15, Hinchcliffe 16-17, Briscoe 1819, Andretti 20-21, Briscoe 22, Andretti 23-44, Tagliani 45-46, Dixon 47, Kimball 48-49, Andretti 50-73, Dixon 74-78, Kimball 79, Andretti 80-90, Dixon 91-118, Sato 119-123, Barrichello 124-125, Sato 126-146, Dixon 147, Sato 148-152, Franchitti 153-159, Dixon 160, Franchitti 161-162, Dixon

SPRINT CUP Coca-Cola 600 Results Sunday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (7) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 400 laps, 135.5 rating, 47 points. 2. (8) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 400, 112.7, 43. 3. (17) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 400, 119.2, 42. 4. (4) Greg Biffle, Ford, 400, 135.5, 42. 5. (24) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 400, 99.6, 40. 6. (12) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 400, 94.5, 38. 7. (23) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 400, 100.2, 38. 8. (14) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 400, 100.9, 37. 9. (28) Carl Edwards, Ford, 400, 88.1, 35. 10. (20) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 399, 93, 34. 11. (3) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 399, 111.2, 33. 12. (15) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 399, 84.2, 32. 13. (5) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 398, 85, 31. 14. (16) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 398, 75.3, 30. 15. (9) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 398, 73.2, 29. 16. (1) Aric Almirola, Ford, 398, 82.1, 29. 17. (10) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 398, 72.5, 27. 18. (18) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 398, 65.3, 27. 19. (22) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 398, 71.6, 25. 20. (29) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 398, 64.9, 24. 21. (31) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 397, 76.3, 23. 22. (25) Casey Mears, Ford, 397, 53.9, 22. 23. (19) Joey Logano, Toyota, 397, 57.4, 21. 24. (13) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 397, 59, 0. 25. (21) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 397, 60.6, 19. 26. (39) David Gilliland, Ford, 397, 53.8, 18. 27. (42) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 396, 54.3, 17. 28. (26) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 396, 46.7, 16. 29. (37) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 395, 46.7, 15. 30. (40) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 395, 42.9, 0. 31. (41) T.J. Bell, Ford, 390, 34.2, 0. 32. (2) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 367, 93.6, 13. 33. (11) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 361, 67.2, 11. 34. (6) Mark Martin, Toyota, engine, 338, 81.2, 10. 35. (30) David Ragan, Ford, engine, 281, 47.3, 10. 36. (32) Michael McDowell, Ford, engine, 228, 38.5, 8. 37. (38) Scott Speed, Ford, fuel pump, 136, 35.6, 7. 38. (35) David Stremme, Toyota, rear gear, 86, 30.9, 6. 39. (34) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, vibration, 74, 29, 5. 40. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, engine, 54, 35.6, 4. 41. (43) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, vibration, 47, 30.9, 0. 42. (27) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, vibration, 33, 27.4, 0. 43. (33) Josh Wise, Ford, vibration, 15, 27.3, 1. ——— Top 12 in Points: 1. G.Biffle, 453; 2. M.Kenseth, 443; 3. D.Hamlin, 437; 4. D.Earnhardt Jr., 435; 5. J.Johnson, 405; 6. M.Truex Jr., 404; 7. K.Harvick, 398; 8. Ky.Busch, 391; 9. T.Stewart, 388; 10. C.Edwards, 372; 11. B.Keselowski, 368; 12. C.Bowyer, 366.

Formula 1 Monaco Grand Prix Results Sunday At Circuit de Monaco Monaco Lap length: 2.08 miles 1. Mark Webber, Australia, Red Bull, 78 laps, 1:46:06.557, 91.535 mph. 2. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 78, 1:46:07.200. 3. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 78, 1:46:07.504. 4. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 78, 1:46:07.900. 5. Lewis Hamilton, England, McLaren, 78, 1:46:10.658. 6. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Ferrari, 78, 1:46:12.752. 7. Paul di Resta, Scotland, Force India, 78, 1:46:48.094. 8. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Force India, 78, 1:46:49.119. 9. Kimi Raikkonen, Finland, Lotus, 78, 1:46:50.593. 10. Bruno Senna, Brazil, Williams, 78, 1:46:51.073. 11. Sergio Perez, Mexico, Sauber, 77, +1 lap. 12. Jean-Eric Vergne, France, Toro Rosso, 77, +1 lap. 13. Heikki Kovalainen, Finland, Caterham, 77, +1 lap. 14. Timo Glock, Germany, Marussia, 77, +1 lap. 15. Narain Karthikeyan, India, HRT, 76, +2 laps. Not Classfied 16. Jenson Button, England, McLaren, 70, retired. 17. Daniel Ricciardo, Australia, Toro Rosso, 65, retired. 18. Charles Pic, France, Marussia, 64, retired. 19. Michael Schumacher, Germany, Mercedes, 63, retired. 20. Vitaly Petrov, Russia, Caterham, 15, retired. 21. Kamui Kobayashi, Japan, Sauber, 5, retired. 22. Romain Grosjean, France, Lotus, 0, retired. 23. Pedro de la Rosa, Spain, HRT, 0, retired. 24. Pastor Maldonado, Venezuela, Williams, 0, retired.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Agreed to terms with OF Adam Jones on a six-year contract through 2018. MINNESOTA TWINS—Recalled RHP Jeff Manship from Rochester (IL). Designated OF Erik Komatsu for release or assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Recalled RHP Chad Beck from Las Vegas (PCL). Selected the contract of RHP Jesse Chavez from Las Vegas. Optioned INF Yan Gomes to Las Vegas. Designated RHP Ryota Igarashi for assignment. National League HOUSTON ASTROS—Placed LHP Fernando Abad on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 25. Selected the contract of LHP Xavier Cedeno from Oklahoma City (PCL). LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Announced the retirement of Rich Wemmer, senior director of security, effective May 31. Named Michael Hillmann director of security for the remainder of the 2012 season. PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Transferred INF Greg Picart from Altoona (EL) to State College (NYP) and RHP Logan Kensing from Bradenton (FSL) to Altoona.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,160 106 76 16 The Dalles 831 105 12 2 John Day 1,275 147 8 6 McNary 1,231 110 1 0 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 150,086 7,062 5,489 1,703 The Dalles 106,610 6,322 1,772 930 John Day 94,425 5,637 1,871 1,232 McNary 85,511 3,726 4,721 2,204

Roddick knocked out after first round of French Open By Howard Fendrich The Associated Press

PARIS — It’s easy to understand why Andy Roddick never enjoyed playing on red clay all that much. First and foremost, the footing is tricky as can be. The soft courts take his booming serves and forehands down a notch, too. Put simply, his game is built for hard or grass courts. As if that weren’t enough, he arrived at this French Open having played

only 16 matches in a season interrupted by injuries to his right hamstring and right ankle. If Roddick was tempted to sit out Roland Garros altogether — or tempted to use his health or rust as an excuse for playing poorly — he did not. The 26th-seeded American, once ranked No. 1 and once a Grand Slam champion, gave it a shot and came up short Sunday, exiting in a major tournament’s opening round for the

TENNIS first time since 2007, and at the same venue. His 6-3, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2 loss to 88thranked Nicolas Mahut at the French Open dropped Roddick’s record to 7-10 this season, 0-4 on clay. Of the seven previous major title winners in action on Day 1 in Paris only Roddick was beaten. “Wasn’t playing really well. I move

just horrendously out here. My first step is just so bad on this stuff,” Roddick said. “I feel like I’m always shuffling or hopping or not stopping or something.” Like Roddick, and for much the same reasons, Venus Williams is not nearly as comfortable on clay as faster surfaces. She’s also dealing with the difficult process of learning to live with Sjogren’s syndrome, a condition that

can cause fatigue and joint pain. But the 31-year-old Williams overcame a slow start Sunday to beat 19-year-old Paula Ormaechea of Argentina 4-6, 6-1, 6-3. The other past major champions who won Sunday were Juan Martin del Potro, Juan Carlos Ferrero, Sam Stosur, Ana Ivanovic and Svetlana Kuznetsova. Today’s schedule includes Novak Djokovic, Roger Federer, Victoria Azarenka and Li Na.


MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

O  A Today TENNIS 2 a.m.: French Open, first round, ESPN2. 6 a.m.: French Open, first round, ESPN2. 7 a.m.: French Open, first round, Tennis Channel. LACROSSE 10 a.m.: College, NCAA Tournament, men’s final, Loyola vs. Maryland, ESPN. BASEBALL 9 a.m.: NCAA Division I Selection Show, ESPNU. 10 a.m.: MLB, St. Louis Cardinals at Atlanta Braves or Philadelphia Phillies at New York Mets, MLB Network. 5 p.m. or 6 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers (5) or New York Yankees at Los Angeles Angels (6), MLB Network. 5 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers, Root Sports. BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m.: NBA playoffs, Eastern Conference final, Boston Celtics at Miami Heat, ESPN.

Tuesday TENNIS 2 a.m.: French Open, first round, ESPN2. 6 a.m.: French Open, first round, ESPN2. 7 a.m.: French Open, first round, Tennis Channel. BASEBALL 4 p.m.: MLB, Detroit Tigers at Boston Red Sox, ESPN. 5 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers, Root Sports. 7 p.m.: MLB, Milwaukee Brewers at Los Angeles Dodgers or Arizona Diamondbacks at San Francisco Giants, MLB Network. BASKETBALL 6 p.m.: NBA playoffs, Western Conference final, Oklahoma City Thunder at San Antonio Spurs, TNT.

RADIO Today BASEBALL 10 a.m.: MLB, St. Louis Cardinals at Atlanta Braves, KICE-AM 940. BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m.: NBA playoffs, Eastern Conference finals, Boston Celtics at Miami Heat, KICE-AM 940.

Tuesday BASKETBALL 6 p.m.: NBA playoffs, Western Conference finals, Oklahoma City Thunder at San Antonio Spurs, KICE-AM 940.

S   B Football • Detroit Lions’ Fairley arrested on DUI charge: Detroit Lions defensive tackle Nick Fairley was arrested in Tillman’s Corner, Ala., on charges of driving under the influence and attempting to elude police, his second arrest in his home state in two months. Alabama state troopers say the 24-year-old passed a state trooper early Sunday morning at 100 mph in his Cadillac Escalade in unincorporated Mobile County. After initially refusing to stop for the trooper’s emergency lights and siren, Fairley pulled over and seemed impaired. He was arrested without incident. Fairley was also cited for reckless driving, no proof of insurance and open container.

Soccer • Six newcomers picked for U.S. Olympic team: Abby Wambach returns to the U.S. Olympic team and Pia Sundhage picked six newcomers for the 18-woman squad that will try and defend its gold medal at this summer’s London Games. Wambach missed the Beijing Olympics after breaking her leg. Sydney Leroux, who has played in only nine games for the U.S., will make her Olympic debut along with Alex Morgan, Megan Rapinoe, Kelley O’Hara, Amy LePeilbet and Becky Sauerbrunn. Also on the roster are: goalkeepers Nicole Barnhart and Hope Solo; defenders Rachel Buehler, Heather Mitts and Christie Rampone; midfielders Shannon Boxx, Lauren Cheney, Tobin Heath, Carli Lloyd and Heather O’Reilly; and forward Amy Rodriguez. — From wire reports

Spurs strike first in West • San Antonio gets nasty in the second half en route to a 101-98 victory over Oklahoma City on Sunday By Paul J. Weber The Associated Press

SAN ANTONIO — Gregg Popovich wanted some “nasty.” The San Antonio Spurs obliged, and they have now tied NBA history. Not to mention left the Oklahoma City Thunder agonizing about what could have been. Manu Ginobili scored a playoff-high 26 points and the Spurs won their 19th in a row to tie the NBA record for longest winning streak kept alive in the playoffs, beating the Thunder 101-98 in the Western Conference finals opener on Sunday night. Obeying orders snarled by their coach in a fourth-quarter timeout to play “nasty,” the Spurs erased a ninepoint deficit that stunned the Thunder, who had looked on their way to finally kicking the perception that they’re the underdog. Kevin Durant led the Thunder with 27 points. Russell Westbrook had 17. “I talked to them about they’ve got to get a little bit uglier, get a little more nasty, play with more fiber and take it to these guys,” Popovich said. “Meaning you have to drive it, you have to shoot it.” And when they started doing just that, the Thunder couldn’t keep up. The 2001 Lakers are the only other team to carry a winning streak this long in the playoffs — and they did so on their way to a championship. Game 2 is Tuesday night. The Spurs matched the fourth-longest streak in NBA history, and with one more will become just the fourth team to surpass 20. Tim Duncan had 16 points and 11 rebounds, and Tony Parker shook off a dismal start to finish with 18 points. But it was Ginobili who steered the Spurs to strike first in a highly anticipated matchup of the West’s top two teams for practically the entire regular season. “They got us on our heels. We were not aggressive,” Ginobili said. “And in the second half, we did have it.” On the other end, Oklahoma City’s own Big Three struggled to find its shot early before awakening in the second half. Yet Westbrook still finished just six of 15 and took a nasty, face-first spill late in the fourth that had the entire Thunder bench crossing the court to check on their All-Star point guard underneath the opposite basket. Westbrook appeared to favor his left leg when he got up, but he never left the game.

Eric Gay / The Associated Press

San Antonio Spurs guard Manu Ginobili shoots against the Oklahoma City Thunder during the second half of Game 1 in their Western Conference finals playoff series in San Antonio Sunday. The Spurs won 101-98.

It was a tantalizingly close near-upset for the young Thunder, who were ousted in the Western Conference finals a year ago and were in position for home-court advantage throughout the playoffs until being overtaken by the Spurs in the final month of the season. But it was a fittingly close opener for two franchises with so many similarities. That includes Thunder general manager Sam Presti — the architect of the Thunder’s rapid turnaround from a 23win season to consecutive Western Conference finals in just four years — getting his big break in the NBA as an intern in San Antonio. And the Thunder didn’t even need their own Big Three to keep things close. Durant, Westbrook and Harden at one point through the second quarter were five of 21 — a typically ominous stat line for a trio that had been responsible for

nearly 70 percent of Oklahoma City’s points through the playoffs so far. But for all the talk about San Antonio’s superior bench, it was the Thunder’s reserves who picked up the slack. None more so than Derek Fisher, whose famous game-winner for the Lakers on this same court in the 2004 playoffs has made “0.4 seconds” a phrase that needs no further explanation to the Spurs. Eight years later, and the oldest player in this series at 37, Fisher already met his playoff average at halftime and finished with 13 points. Gary Neal added 12 points and was the only other Spurs player in double figures. Harden lost in the first round of his matchup with Ginobili, who’s also a lefty and a former Sixth Man of the Year winner. Harden finished with 19 points on seven-of-17 shooting but started by missing nine of his first dozen shots.

GOLF ROUNDUP

Johnson takes win at Colonial The Associated Press FORT WORTH, Texas — Zach Johnson was so caught up in the emotion of another Colonial title and a victory in honor of his caddie’s late father that he forgot to properly remark his ball before his final putt. Even with a two-stroke penalty, Johnson won by one over Jason Dufner and got to slip on the plaid jacket Sunday for his first victory since also winning at Hogan’s Alley two years ago. “There’s a number of adjectives I’m calling myself right now. And lucky would be the biggest one,” Johnson said. “Blessed would be another one, humbled would be another one. It’s an honor to put this jacket on once. ... I’m in shock I got it twice.” Johnson moved his original ball mark out of the line of Dufner’s putt on the 18th green. But he never moved it back before his final 5foot putt. The penalty was assessed before he signed his scorecard, and Johnson’s 12-under 268 total was enough to edge Dufner, who finally faltered and closed with a 74. Johnson had already shared celebratory hugs and kisses with his two young sons and done a winner’s television interview before caddie Damon Green, prompted by a rules official, asked the 2007 Masters champion if he had put his ball back in its original spot. “First time it crossed my mind,” Johnson said. “It’s

LM Otero / The Associated Press

Zach Johnson lines up a putt during the PGA Colonial Sunday, in Fort Worth, Texas. Johnson won the event.

not going to be the last time.” The victory came 10 days after Green’s 88-year old father died from stomach cancer. After Johnson’s runner-up finish at The Players Championship two weeks ago, the caddie drove to Pensacola, Fla., to see his father. But Damon Green was ready to get back on the course this week. “He wanted to be here, he felt like his dad wanted him to be here,” Johnson about his caddie of 10 years. “I think he’s the one that deserves this one more than I do. His courage and certainly his strength to get through last week and then work, and work well this week, to stay focused somehow. That’s really commendable.”

It is the eighth PGA Tour victory for Johnson, who won $1,152,000 even as his record streak of 15 consecutive under-par rounds at Colonial ended. Tommy Gainey was a distant third at 7 under after a 67, a stroke better than Jim Furyk. In what was essentially a match-play final round, Johnson took command at the 414yard 15th hole. Dufner’s approach hit the left side of that green then rolled into a ditch, leading to a triple bogey that put him four strokes back after Johnson’s par. Also on Sunday: Chapman cruises to Senior title BENTON HARBOR, Mich.

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— Roger Chapman won the Senior PGA Championship, holding on for a two-stroke victory after leading comfortably throughout the final round. Chapman led by five after 54 holes and was never really threatened Sunday. His closing 1-over 72 was his worst score of the tournament — but it was enough to give the Englishman a win at the major championship. John Cook was at 11 under after a 69. Hale Irwin shot 68 to finish another stroke back. Kenny Perry had a tournamentrecord 62 at Harbor Shores to finish five shots behind in ninth place. Donald defends title VIRGINIA WATER, England — Luke Donald took the top spot in the world ranking from Rory McIlroy for the third time in 10 weeks, successfully defending his title in the BMW PGA Championship. The Englishman won the European Tour’s flagship event by four strokes, closing with a 4-under 68 to finish at 15-under 273 on Wentworth’s West Course. Scotland’s Paul Lawrie and England’s Justin Rose tied for second. Lawrie had a 66, and Rose shot 70.

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NBA PLAYOFFS: WESTERN CONFERENCE FINAL

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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

AL Boxscores Yankees 2, Athletics 0 New York Jeter ss Granderson cf Teixeira 1b Al.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b Swisher rf An.Jones dh J.Nix lf Wise lf C.Stewart c Totals

AB 5 3 4 4 3 4 4 4 0 4 35

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

H 1 1 2 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 8

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

BB 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

American League SO 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 5

Avg. .338 .257 .254 .279 .297 .248 .227 .231 .130 .225

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. J.Weeks 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .207 Crisp cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .165 Reddick rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .271 S.Smith lf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .228 Ka’aihue dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Donaldson 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .146 Barton 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .204 K.Suzuki c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .210 Pennington ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .206 Totals 30 0 5 0 1 5 New York 010 000 100 — 2 8 0 Oakland 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 LOB—New York 8, Oakland 4. 2B—Teixeira 2 (12), J.Nix (1). HR—An.Jones (5), off Milone. SB—Crisp 2 (6). DP—New York 1.

Baltimore Tampa Bay New York Toronto Boston

W 29 29 26 24 23

L 19 19 21 24 24

Cleveland Chicago Detroit Kansas City Minnesota

W 26 26 23 19 15

L 21 22 24 27 32

Texas Los Angeles Oakland Seattle

W 30 24 22 21

L 18 25 26 29

East Division Pct GB WCGB .604 — — .604 — — .553 2½ 2½ .500 5 5 .489 5½ 5½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .553 — — .542 ½ 3 .489 3 5½ .413 6½ 9 .319 11 13½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .625 — — .490 6½ 5½ .458 8 7 .420 10 9

Sunday’s Games Kansas City 4, Baltimore 2 Tampa Bay 4, Boston 3 Chicago White Sox 12, Cleveland 6 Detroit 4, Minnesota 3 Texas 12, Toronto 6 N.Y. Yankees 2, Oakland 0 L.A. Angels 4, Seattle 2

National League

L10 5-5 5-5 6-4 4-6 6-4

Str Home Away L-2 14-13 15-6 W-1 17-7 12-12 W-5 14-11 12-10 L-5 12-10 12-14 L-1 10-13 13-11

L10 5-5 9-1 5-5 4-6 4-6

Str Home Away L-3 14-12 12-9 W-5 12-13 14-9 W-3 11-12 12-12 W-2 5-17 14-10 L-5 6-17 9-15

L10 6-4 7-3 3-7 5-5

Str Home Away W-3 14-9 16-9 W-6 11-10 13-15 L-5 10-15 12-11 L-4 9-13 12-16

Today’s Games Detroit (Fister 0-2) at Boston (Doubront 4-2), 10:35 a.m. Oakland (Blackley 0-0) at Minnesota (Diamond 3-1), 11:10 a.m. Chicago White Sox (Sale 5-2) at Tampa Bay (M.Moore 1-4), 12:10 p.m. Kansas City (Adcock 0-2) at Cleveland (Tomlin 1-2), 1:05 p.m. Baltimore (Tom.Hunter 2-2) at Toronto (Hutchison 3-2), 4:07 p.m. Seattle (Millwood 3-4) at Texas (M.Harrison 5-3), 5:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 4-5) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 6-1), 6:05 p.m.

New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kuroda W, 4-6 8 4 0 0 1 3 104 3.96 R.Soriano S, 5-5 1 1 0 0 0 2 20 2.08 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Milone L, 6-4 6 2-3 8 2 2 2 3 108 3.64 R.Cook 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0.00 Balfour 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.91 Fuentes 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.84 T—2:52. A—25,078 (35,067).

Washington New York Miami Atlanta Philadelphia

W 29 27 26 26 25

L 18 21 22 23 24

Cincinnati St. Louis Pittsburgh Houston Milwaukee Chicago

W 27 26 23 22 19 15

L 20 22 24 25 28 32

Los Angeles San Francisco Arizona Colorado San Diego

W 32 25 22 17 17

L 15 23 26 29 32

East Division Pct GB WCGB .617 — — .563 2½ — .542 3½ — .531 4 ½ .510 5 1½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .574 — — .542 1½ — .489 4 2½ .468 5 3½ .404 8 6½ .319 12 10½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .681 — — .521 7½ 1 .458 10½ 4 .370 14½ 8 .347 16 9½

Sunday’s Games Cincinnati 7, Colorado 5 N.Y. Mets 2, San Diego 0 San Francisco 3, Miami 2 Pittsburgh 10, Chicago Cubs 4 St. Louis 8, Philadelphia 3 L.A. Dodgers 5, Houston 1 Arizona 4, Milwaukee 3 Washington 7, Atlanta 2

Angels 4, Mariners 2 Los Angeles Trout lf Callaspo 3b Pujols 1b K.Morales dh Trumbo rf Calhoun rf H.Kendrick 2b Aybar ss Bourjos cf Bo.Wilson c Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 4 0 3 3 3 3 31

R 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

H 1 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 1 0 6

BI 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 4

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Avg. .302 .231 .227 .290 .324 .273 .256 .215 .205 .169

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ackley 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .242 Figgins cf 1 0 0 0 1 0 .178 b-M.Saunders ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .224 I.Suzuki rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .271 J.Montero dh 3 2 1 0 1 1 .247 Smoak 1b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .224 Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .259 Liddi lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Olivo c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .189 a-Jaso ph-c 0 0 0 0 1 0 .246 Ryan ss 2 0 0 0 0 2 .172 Totals 27 2 3 1 4 9 Los Angeles 100 100 101 — 4 6 2 Seattle 000 100 100 — 2 3 0 a-walked for Olivo in the 8th. b-struck out for Figgins in the 8th. E—S.Downs (1), Callaspo (1). LOB—Los Angeles 3, Seattle 4. 2B—K.Morales (5), Bourjos (3), J.Montero (8). HR—K.Morales (4), off Noesi; Trumbo (7), off Noesi. SB—Trout 2 (8), Smoak (1). CS—Aybar (1), Olivo (2). DP—Los Angeles 2. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Wilson W, 6-4 6 2 1 1 2 5 88 2.77 Walden H, 4 1 0 1 1 1 2 20 3.07 Frieri H, 3 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 0.00 S.Downs S, 5-7 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Noesi L, 2-6 8 5 3 3 2 0 102 5.01 Kelley 1 1 1 1 0 0 14 3.60 T—2:30. A—24,467 (47,860).

Rangers 12, Blue Jays 6 Toronto Y.Escobar ss R.Davis rf Rasmus cf Bautista rf-3b Encarnacion dh Thames lf Arencibia c Lawrie 3b-ss Cooper 1b Vizquel 2b Totals

AB 2 2 5 4 5 4 4 3 4 3 36

R 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 6

H 1 0 3 0 2 0 2 1 0 1 10

BI 0 0 2 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 6

BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 4

SO 0 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 5

Avg. .262 .220 .227 .229 .274 .243 .245 .273 .200 .194

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler dh 5 2 2 4 0 1 .289 Andrus ss 5 1 2 2 0 0 .305 Hamilton cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .368 a-Gentry ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .292 Beltre 3b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .318 M.Young 2b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .282 Dav.Murphy lf 3 2 1 0 1 1 .260 N.Cruz rf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .271 Napoli c 3 3 2 2 1 1 .239 Moreland 1b 3 1 0 1 1 2 .301 Totals 36 12 12 12 3 8 Toronto 001 110 012 — 6 10 0 Texas 072 000 30x — 12 12 0 a-fouled out for Hamilton in the 8th. LOB—Toronto 7, Texas 3. 2B—Rasmus (9), Lawrie (5), Kinsler (15), Andrus (11), M.Young (10), N.Cruz (12). HR—Arencibia (8), off Darvish; Arencibia (9), off Ogando; Rasmus (5), off Tateyama; Beltre (10), off Drabek; Kinsler (6), off Drabek; Napoli (8), off J.Chavez. DP—Texas 1. Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP Drabek L, 4-5 3 8 9 9 3 1 67 J.Chavez 5 4 3 3 0 7 72 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP Darvish W, 7-2 5 7 3 3 3 3 93 M.Lowe 2 1 0 0 0 1 19 Ogando 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 15 Tateyama 1 1-3 1 2 2 1 1 16 T—2:48. A—46,637 (48,194).

ERA 4.55 5.40 ERA 3.25 2.55 1.65 5.79

Tigers 4, Twins 3 Detroit Berry cf Dirks lf-rf-lf Mi.Cabrera 3b Fielder 1b Boesch dh Avila c 1-Laird pr-c Jh.Peralta ss Kelly rf a-D.Young ph-lf R.Santiago 2b Raburn 2b-rf Totals

AB 4 4 5 3 4 3 0 3 3 1 0 4 34

R 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H 3 2 2 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 12

BI 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 1 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 6

Avg. .381 .328 .312 .317 .249 .237 .286 .241 .164 .252 .203 .151

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Span cf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .307 Revere rf 5 1 2 0 0 0 .291 Mauer c 5 1 2 1 0 0 .300 Willingham lf 2 0 1 1 2 0 .270 2-Mastroianni pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .136 Morneau 1b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .237 Doumit dh 3 1 1 0 1 0 .264 Plouffe 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .156 Dozier ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .247 A.Casilla 2b 3 0 3 1 1 0 .248 J.Carroll ss-3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .236 Totals 36 3 12 3 4 3 Detroit 200 000 002 — 4 12 1 Minnesota 000 120 000 — 3 12 0 a-struck out for Kelly in the 8th. 1-ran for Avila in the 8th. 2-ran for Willingham in the 9th. E—Mi.Cabrera (7). LOB—Detroit 10, Minnesota 11. 2B—Fielder (10), Mauer (12), Doumit (5). 3B—A.Casilla (1). HR—Mi.Cabrera (9), off Capps. SB—Berry 2 (3), Boesch (3), Span (6), Revere (3), Willingham (2). DP—Detroit 1; Minnesota 3. Detroit Porcello Below Villarreal W, 1-1 Valverde S, 9-11 Minnesota Walters Burton H, 7 Perkins H, 6

IP 6 1 1-3 2-3 1 IP 6 1 1

H 9 1 1 1 H 7 2 1

R 3 0 0 0 R 2 0 0

ER BB SO NP ERA 3 3 2 106 5.21 0 0 0 15 2.45 0 0 1 19 0.00 0 1 0 14 4.66 ER BB SO NP ERA 2 5 4 93 2.96 0 0 0 15 4.34 0 0 2 15 3.60

L10 6-4 6-4 6-4 2-8 5-5

Str Home Away W-3 15-8 14-10 W-3 15-9 12-12 L-1 13-10 13-12 L-7 10-10 16-13 L-1 11-13 14-11

L10 Str Home Away 8-2 W-2 15-9 12-11 4-6 W-1 13-11 13-11 6-4 W-3 14-10 9-14 6-4 L-2 16-10 6-15 3-7 L-2 11-13 8-15 0-10 L-12 9-15 6-17 L10 8-2 6-4 6-4 2-8 3-7

Str Home Away W-2 21-5 11-10 W-1 12-10 13-13 W-2 10-15 12-11 L-2 9-14 8-15 L-3 12-16 5-16

Today’s Games Philadelphia (Hamels 7-1) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 3-2), 10:10 a.m. St. Louis (Lynn 7-1) at Atlanta (Hanson 5-3), 10:10 a.m. Washington (Zimmermann 3-4) at Miami (Zambrano 2-3), 10:10 a.m. Cincinnati (Arroyo 2-2) at Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 3-2), 10:35 a.m. San Diego (Suppan 2-3) at Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 0-1), 11:20 a.m. Houston (W.Rodriguez 4-4) at Colorado (Nicasio 2-2), 12:10 p.m., 1st game Arizona (Cahill 2-4) at San Francisco (Zito 3-2), 2:05 p.m. Houston (Undecided) at Colorado (White 1-3), 5:10 p.m., 2nd game Milwaukee (Marcum 2-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Harang 3-2), 5:10 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Rays 4, Red Sox 3: BOSTON — Sean Rodriguez hit a two-run homer in the ninth inning off Boston closer Alfredo Aceves, and Tampa Bay rallied for a victory over the Red Sox, a day after losing in the final inning. • Rangers 12, Blue Jays 6: ARLINGTON, Texas — Adrian Beltre homered during a seven-run second inning, Yu Darvish posted his seventh victory and Texas defeated Toronto for a three-game sweep. • Yankees 2, Athletics 0: OAKLAND, Calif. — Hiroki Kuroda (4-6) pitched eight scoreless innings and Andruw Jones hit a solo homer against Oakland that helped the New York Yankees win their season-high fifth straight game. • Tigers 4, Twins 3: MINNEAPOLIS — Miguel Cabrera’s two-run, one-out homer in the ninth inning lifted Detroit to a victory over Minnesota, as the Tigers finished a three-game sweep of the Twins in style after leaving 10 men on base earlier in the game. • White Sox 12, Indians 6: CHICAGO — Paul Konerko hit a tiebreaking three-run homer — his 400th with the White Sox — and Chicago routed Cleveland to complete a three-game sweep. • Angels 4, Mariners 2: SEATTLE — Kendrys Morales had three hits, including a home run, scored twice and drove in two runs to help the Los Angeles Angels complete their first four-game road sweep of Seattle. • Royals 4, Orioles 2: BALTIMORE — Jeff Francoeur and Billy Butler hit home runs, and Alcides Escobar had two hits to lead Kansas City over Baltimore.

• Cardinals 8, Phillies 3: ST. LOUIS — Roy Halladay gave up a grand slam to Yadier Molina in an abbreviated two-inning start before leaving with shoulder soreness, and St. Louis avoided a four-game sweep with a win over Philadelphia. • Pirates 10, Cubs 4: PITTSBURGH — The Chicago Cubs lost their 12th straight game as Pedro Alvarez, Andrew McCutchen and Garrett Jones homered for Pittsburgh. • Reds 7, Rockies 5: CINCINNATI — Brandon Phillips hit a three-run homer to help Cincinnati outslug Colorado in a game that set a record for Great American Ball Park with nine home runs. • Giants 3, Marlins 2: MIAMI — Melky Cabrera tied a career high with four hits, including a home run, and scored all three runs for San Francisco to help Matt Cain beat Miami. • Mets 2, Padres 0: NEW YORK — R.A. Dickey struck out 10 and reached double digits for strikeouts in consecutive games for the first time in his career and the New York Mets held San Diego scoreless for the second straight day. • Dodgers 5, Astros 1: LOS ANGELES — Jerry Hairston Jr. got a career-high five hits, Chris Capuano won again and the Los Angeles Dodgers beat Houston. • Diamondbacks 4, Brewers 3: PHOENIX — Aaron Hill doubled twice and singled as the Arizona Diamondbacks rallied past Milwaukee. • Nationals 7, Braves 2: ATLANTA — Bryce Harper hit his second homer in two days, Gio Gonzalez gave up only one hit in seven innings and the Nationals beat struggling Atlanta to complete a three-game sweep.

Capps L, 0-3 1 2 2 2 0 0 17 4.00 T—3:21. A—38,710 (39,500).

White Sox 12, Indians 6 Cleveland Choo rf Brantley cf Kipnis 2b Jo.Lopez 3b Kotchman 1b Duncan lf Damon dh J.Diaz ss Marson c Carlin c Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 3 5 4 3 1 2 38

R 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 6

H 0 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 12

BI 0 2 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 7

Avg. .268 .272 .275 .246 .219 .200 .158 .286 .147 .500

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. De Aza cf 4 2 2 1 0 1 .285 Beckham 2b 4 3 4 0 1 0 .224 A.Dunn dh 3 1 0 0 2 1 .240 Konerko 1b 4 2 2 4 1 0 .399 1-Lillibridge pr-1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .186 Rios rf 4 1 1 1 1 0 .281 Viciedo lf 5 0 2 2 0 0 .268 Al.Ramirez ss 5 1 3 2 0 0 .219 Flowers c 3 1 0 0 0 1 .194 O.Hudson 3b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .235 Totals 36 12 15 12 5 4 Cleveland 030 101 001 — 6 12 0 Chicago 301 330 02x — 12 15 1 1-ran for Konerko in the 8th. E—O.Hudson (1). LOB—Cleveland 9, Chicago 7. 2B—Jo.Lopez (6), Duncan (4), Carlin (1), Beckham (8), Al.Ramirez (5). 3B—De Aza (3), O.Hudson (1). HR—Damon (1), off Floyd; Konerko (11), off Jimenez. SB—Rios (5), Al.Ramirez (5). DP—Cleveland 1; Chicago 2. Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP Jimenez L, 5-4 4 7 7 7 4 3 99 Asencio 2 5 3 3 0 0 23 Sipp 1 2-3 2 2 2 1 1 30 J.Smith 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 3 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP Floyd W, 4-5 5 10 5 5 0 4 91 Ohman 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 N.Jones 2 0 0 0 0 2 23 H.Santiago 1 2 1 1 0 1 29 Floyd pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Jimenez pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. T—3:13. A—22,182 (40,615).

ERA 5.79 5.96 6.62 3.98 ERA 5.02 6.00 1.13 4.00

Rays 4, Red Sox 3 Tampa Bay C.Pena 1b B.Upton cf Joyce lf Zobrist rf Scott dh S.Rodriguez ss-2b Sutton 3b Rhymes 2b E.Johnson ss Gimenez c J.Molina c Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 4 4 4 3 1 3 0 33

R 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4

H 0 1 2 0 1 2 0 3 0 0 0 9

BI 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 2 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 0 9

Avg. .208 .301 .290 .206 .237 .241 .316 .286 .263 .191 .179

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Aviles ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 Pedroia 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 Ortiz dh 2 1 0 0 2 0 Youkilis 1b-3b 3 1 2 0 1 0 Ad.Gonzalez rf-1b 4 1 1 3 0 0 Saltalamacchia c 4 0 0 0 0 0 Middlebrooks 3b 3 0 1 0 0 2 Lin rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 a-Punto ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 Nava lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 Podsednik cf 3 0 2 0 0 0 Byrd cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 Totals 31 3 7 3 3 4 Tampa Bay 000 100 102 — 4 Boston 000 000 300 — 3 a-grounded out for Lin in the 9th.

Avg. .260 .294 .305 .250 .269 .265 .307 .200 .132 .286 .455 .264 9 0 7 1

E—Ad.Gonzalez (1). LOB—Tampa Bay 4, Boston 5. 2B—Joyce (5), S.Rodriguez (5). HR—S.Rodriguez (5), off Aceves; Ad.Gonzalez (4), off Hellickson. SB—Scott (2). DP—Tampa Bay 1; Boston 2. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hellickson 7 2-3 7 3 3 2 3 106 2.83 W.Davis 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 2.11 McGee W, 2-1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 1.65 Rodney S, 16-17 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 1.08 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buchholz 7 8 2 2 1 6 111 7.19 F.Morales H, 8 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 4.02 Padilla H, 11 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 11 5.40 Aceves L, 0-2 1 1 2 2 1 1 20 4.76 W.Davis pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—3:22. A—37,844 (37,067).

Royals 4, Orioles 2 Kansas City A.Gordon lf Giavotella 2b Butler dh Moustakas 3b Francoeur rf Hosmer 1b A.Escobar ss Maier cf Quintero c Totals

AB 4 5 2 4 4 4 4 3 4 34

R 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 4

H 1 0 1 0 2 0 2 0 2 8

BI 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 4

BB 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 0 1 1 0 3 1 2 1 10

Avg. .227 .189 .303 .264 .281 .201 .311 .200 .242

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Avery lf 5 0 1 1 0 2 .228 Hardy ss 5 1 2 0 0 0 .265 Markakis rf 5 0 1 1 0 1 .263 Ad.Jones cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .308 Wieters c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .232 C.Davis 1b 3 0 1 0 0 2 .305 Betemit 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .221 N.Johnson dh 3 0 0 0 0 3 .186 a-Tolleson ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Andino 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .259 Totals 36 2 8 2 1 10 Kansas City 110 002 000 — 4 8 2 Baltimore 100 100 000 — 2 8 1 E—Francoeur (2), Quintero (4), Ad.Jones (2). LOB—Kansas City 7, Baltimore 10. 2B—A.Gordon (12), Quintero (11), Markakis (12), Ad.Jones (10), C.Davis (8), Andino (6). HR—Butler (11), off Matusz; Francoeur (5), off Matusz. SB—Avery (4), Andino (2). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hochevar 4 2-3 7 2 1 1 6 104 6.19 Collins W, 2-0 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 11 2.66 K.Herrera H, 7 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 20 3.46 Mijares H, 6 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 3 2.25 Crow H, 8 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 3.05 Broxton S, 10-12 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 1.93 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matusz L, 4-5 6 7 4 3 3 5 100 4.82 O’Day 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 20 1.78 Patton 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 3.97 Ji.Johnson 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 9 0.84 T—3:05. A—33,919 (45,971).

NL Boxscores Diamondbacks 4, Brewers 3 Milwaukee Hart 1b Aoki rf Braun lf Kottaras c Lucroy c R.Weeks 2b Green 3b Ransom ss Morgan cf Veras p Dillard p Axford p c-Maysonet ph Wolf p C.Gomez cf

AB 4 4 3 2 1 3 4 2 3 0 0 0 1 2 2

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 1 2 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BI 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

Avg. .262 .313 .312 .233 .345 .152 .222 .283 .223 ------.160 .125 .250

Totals

31 3 7 3 5 7

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bloomquist ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .269 A.Hill 2b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .269 J.Upton rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .255 C.Young cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .284 Kubel lf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .299 Goldschmidt 1b 4 2 1 1 0 1 .248 R.Roberts 3b 4 0 2 1 0 1 .234 H.Blanco c 3 0 1 1 0 0 .205 D.Hudson p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 a-J.Bell ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .154 Zagurski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Shaw p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Overbay ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .345 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 D.Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Putz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 4 10 4 1 3 Milwaukee 000 021 000 — 3 7 1 Arizona 000 103 00x — 4 10 0 a-grounded out for D.Hudson in the 5th. b-grounded out for Shaw in the 6th. c-popped out for Axford in the 9th. E—Green (2). LOB—Milwaukee 6, Arizona 6. 2B—Green (3), A.Hill 2 (7), Kubel (12). HR—Goldschmidt (3), off Wolf. SB—A.Hill (5). DP—Arizona 3. Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wolf 5 2-3 7 3 2 1 1 110 5.73 Veras L, 3-2 1-3 2 1 0 0 0 17 4.88 Dillard 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 4.09 Axford 1 1 0 0 0 2 23 3.86 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA D.Hudson 5 6 2 2 1 3 83 5.48 Zagurski 1-3 1 1 1 3 0 27 5.56 Shaw W, 1-2 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 3.20 Ziegler H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.21 D.Hernandez H, 9 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.05 Putz S, 11-14 1 0 0 0 1 2 23 6.35 T—3:10. A—33,481 (48,633).

Dodgers 5, Astros 1 Houston Altuve 2b Lowrie ss J.D.Martinez lf Ca.Lee 1b M.Downs rf Fe.Rodriguez p X.Cedeno p Del Rosario p Maxwell cf C.Johnson 3b C.Snyder c Happ p Bogusevic rf Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 3 0 0 0 3 3 2 1 1 28

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BI 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

SO 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 1 10

Avg. .307 .272 .229 .294 .150 ------.194 .284 .167 .105 .218

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gwynn Jr. cf 5 1 2 2 0 2 .291 E.Herrera 2b 4 0 1 0 1 2 .342 Hairston Jr. 3b-lf 5 1 5 1 0 0 .381 Ethier rf 5 0 0 0 0 3 .314 Van Slyke 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .136 a-Loney ph-1b 1 0 0 0 1 0 .264 Sands lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .200 b-Abreu ph 0 0 0 1 1 0 .327 Lindblom p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Guerra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Treanor c 3 2 2 1 1 0 .290 D.Gordon ss 2 1 2 0 1 0 .227 Capuano p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .133 A.Kennedy 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Totals 34 5 12 5 5 11 Houston 100 000 000 — 1 2 2 Los Angeles 010 100 12x — 5 12 0 a-was intentionally walked for Van Slyke in the 7th. b-walked for Sands in the 7th. E—C.Johnson 2 (6). LOB—Houston 3, Los Angeles 12. 2B—Hairston Jr. (4). 3B—Altuve (4). HR—Treanor (2), off Happ. DP—Houston 2. Houston

IP

H R ER BB SO NP ERA

Happ L, 4-4 6 1-3 9 3 2 2 10 113 4.37 Fe.Rodriguez 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 3.78 X.Cedeno 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 Del Rosario 1 2-3 3 2 2 1 1 28 9.00 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Capuano W, 7-1 7 2 1 1 2 8 105 2.14 Lindblom H, 11 1 0 0 0 0 2 18 2.22 Guerra 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.22 Fe.Rodriguez pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. X.Cedeno pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—3:05. A—33,306 (56,000).

Cardinals 8, Phillies 3 Philadelphia Rollins ss Pierre lf Pence rf Ruiz c Victorino cf Luna 1b Galvis 2b Fontenot 3b Halladay p a-Orr ph Savery p Qualls p d-Polanco ph Contreras p Valdes p g-Mayberry ph Totals

AB 5 5 5 4 3 4 4 3 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 36

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 1 3 2 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11

BI 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .225 .314 .263 .366 .260 .350 .244 .444 .231 .300 .000 --.280 ----.231

St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Furcal ss 3 1 0 0 1 0 .333 Schumaker cf-rf 4 2 2 0 0 0 .314 Holliday lf 3 1 2 0 0 0 .267 Rzepczynski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Robinson ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .257 Beltran rf 4 1 1 3 0 0 .290 V.Marte p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Fick p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Boggs p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Freese 3b 2 1 0 0 1 2 .270 f-Greene ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .237 Y.Molina c 2 1 2 4 0 0 .325 b-T.Cruz ph-c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .143 Ma.Adams 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .345 Descalso 2b-3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .217 Wainwright p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .045 c-Chambers ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Totals 33 8 11 8 2 4 Philadelphia 001 000 011 — 3 11 0 St. Louis 400 031 00x — 8 11 0 a-sacrificed for Halladay in the 3rd. b-grounded out for Y.Molina in the 5th. c-grounded out for Wainwright in the 6th. d-grounded out for Qualls in the 7th. efouled out for Rzepczynski in the 7th. f-struck out for Freese in the 8th. g-popped out for Valdes in the 9th. LOB—Philadelphia 9, St. Louis 3. 2B—Rollins (7), Pence (8), Ruiz (11), Galvis (13), Ma.Adams (4), Descalso (2). HR—Y.Molina (7), off Halladay; Beltran (15), off Qualls; Ma.Adams (1), off Qualls. DP—Philadelphia 2. Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP Halladay L, 4-5 2 4 4 4 1 0 36 Savery 2 4 2 2 1 2 35 Qualls 2 2 2 2 0 1 20 Contreras 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 Valdes 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP Wainwright W, 4-5 6 7 1 1 0 2 87 Rzepczynski 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 V.Marte 1 2 1 1 0 0 15 Fick 2-3 2 1 1 1 0 18 Boggs 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 Savery pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. T—2:35. A—42,659 (43,975).

ERA 3.98 4.50 4.82 5.68 0.00 ERA 4.45 3.63 4.22 5.40 2.08

Pirates 10, Cubs 4 Chicago AB R DeJesus rf 1 0 b-Campana ph-cf 1 0 S.Castro ss 4 1 Mather 3b 4 0 A.Soriano lf 2 0 B.Parker p 0 0 c-Cardenas ph 1 0 R.Wells p 0 0 Je.Baker 1b-lf 4 1 Re.Johnson cf-rf 4 0 Barney 2b 3 0 K.Hill c 4 1 Garza p 2 0 Dolis p 0 0 Bowden p 0 0 Lalli 1b 2 1 Totals 32 4

H 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 7

BI 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 3

Avg. .287 .299 .313 .273 .259 --.160 .333 .239 .243 .259 .208 .056 --.000 .182

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tabata lf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .225 a-G.Hernandez ph-cf 2 1 1 2 0 0 .167 J.Harrison ss-2b 3 2 0 0 1 1 .250 A.McCutchen cf 4 2 2 1 0 0 .342 Barmes ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .175 P.Alvarez 3b 3 1 1 4 0 0 .207 Walker 2b 3 1 1 1 1 2 .258 Resop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 J.Cruz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --G.Jones rf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .225 Hague 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .222 McKenry c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .196 Bedard p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .118 Navarro lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .178 Totals 32 10 11 10 4 7 Chicago 000 000 031 — 4 7 1 Pittsburgh 300 016 00x — 10 11 0 a-singled for Tabata in the 6th. b-grounded out for DeJesus in the 8th. c-flied out for B.Parker in the 8th. E—Garza (3). LOB—Chicago 5, Pittsburgh 5. 2B—Je.Baker (4), Barney (11), G.Jones (7). 3B—Tabata (3). HR—S.Castro (3), off Resop; P.Alvarez (8), off Garza; A.McCutchen (8), off Garza; G.Jones (5), off Garza. DP—Chicago 1; Pittsburgh 2. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP Garza L, 2-3 5 7 6 5 1 6 91 Dolis 0 0 2 2 2 0 9 Bowden 1 3 2 2 1 0 26 B.Parker 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 R.Wells 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP Bedard W, 3-5 6 2 0 0 4 3 90 Resop 2 3 3 3 0 0 22 J.Cruz 1 2 1 1 0 0 17 Garza pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Dolis pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. T—3:04. A—27,486 (38,362).

ERA 4.22 5.68 7.45 0.00 4.30 ERA 3.12 4.09 1.45

Giants 3, Marlins 2 San Francisco G.Blanco rf B.Crawford ss Me.Cabrera lf Posey c Pagan cf A.Huff 1b Belt 1b Arias 3b Theriot 2b M.Cain p Romo p Ja.Lopez p S.Casilla p Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 2 3 1 3 4 3 0 0 0 31

R 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 0 0 4 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BI 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 3

Avg. .282 .233 .369 .295 .308 .167 .228 .263 .191 .167 ----.000

Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Reyes ss 4 0 1 1 1 0 .262 Infante 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .329 H.Ramirez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .247 Stanton rf 2 1 0 0 2 0 .292 Morrison 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .233 Petersen cf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .200 b-Ruggiano ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 J.Buck c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .161 c-Solano ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Coghlan lf-cf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .138 Nolasco p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .190 a-Dobbs ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .284 Choate p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Webb p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Hayes ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .300 Totals 32 2 6 2 4 7 San Francisco 100 101 000 — 3 7 1 Miami 000 010 100 — 2 6 1 a-walked for Nolasco in the 7th. b-struck out for Petersen in the 8th. c-lined out for J.Buck in the 9th. d-singled for Webb in the 9th. E—Pagan (4), J.Buck (4). LOB—San Francisco 5, Miami 8. 2B—Posey (9). 3B—Pagan (4). HR—Me.Cabrera (4), off Nolasco. RBIs—Me.Cabrera (25), Posey (25), Pagan (19), Reyes (9), Coghlan (8). SB—Me.Cabrera 2 (9). DP—San Francisco 1; Miami 1. San Francisco IP M.Cain W, 5-2 6 2-3 Romo H, 9 2-3 Ja.Lopez H, 5 1-3 S.Casilla S, 12-13 1 1-3

H 5 0 0 1

R 2 0 0 0

ER BB SO NP ERA 1 3 4 103 2.79 0 1 1 13 0.61 0 0 1 6 3.75 0 0 1 18 1.29

Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP Nolasco L, 5-3 7 5 3 3 2 2 95 Choate 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 10 Webb 1 1-3 2 0 0 1 1 32 T—2:58. A—30,199 (37,442).

ERA 4.26 0.57 3.74

Reds 7, Rockies 5 Colorado E.Young cf Scutaro 2b C.Gonzalez lf Tulowitzki ss Giambi 1b 1-Guthrie pr Cuddyer rf Pacheco 3b W.Rosario c Moyer p Roenicke p a-Fowler ph Mat.Reynolds p Ottavino p Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 3 0 4 4 3 2 0 1 0 0 32

R 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

H 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

BI 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

BB 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .238 .249 .302 .278 .257 .000 .272 .288 .215 .154 .000 .237 .000 ---

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cozart ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .243 Stubbs cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .240 Votto 1b 4 2 2 1 0 0 .325 B.Phillips 2b 4 1 2 3 0 0 .279 Bruce rf 3 1 1 1 1 1 .255 Ludwick lf 2 0 0 0 2 1 .208 Frazier 3b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .263 Hanigan c 3 1 1 0 0 0 .309 Latos p 1 1 0 0 0 0 .000 Arredondo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Chapman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 28 7 8 7 3 4 Colorado 010 111 010 — 5 5 0 Cincinnati 113 200 00x — 7 8 0 a-homered for Roenicke in the 8th. 1-ran for Giambi in the 9th. LOB—Colorado 2, Cincinnati 2. 2B—Cozart (12). HR—Tulowitzki (7), off Latos; C.Gonzalez 2 (10), off Latos 2; Cuddyer (5), off Latos; Fowler (6), off Latos; Votto (8), off Moyer; Bruce (11), off Moyer; B.Phillips (5), off Moyer; Frazier (5), off Moyer. SB—E.Young (6). DP—Colorado 3; Cincinnati. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP Moyer L, 2-5 5 7 7 7 1 2 79 Roenicke 2 0 0 0 1 2 20 Mat.Reynolds 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 15 Ottavino 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP Latos W, 4-2 7 1-3 5 5 5 0 3 96 Arredondo 0 0 0 0 1 0 12 Chapman S, 3-4 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 25 Arredondo pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. T—2:40. A—29,368 (42,319).

ERA 5.70 2.39 4.19 0.00 ERA 4.58 2.38 0.00

Mets 2, Padres 0 San Diego AB R Venable cf 4 0 E.Cabrera 2b-ss 4 0 Alonso 1b 4 0 Guzman lf 4 0 Headley 3b 3 0 Hundley c 2 0 Tekotte rf 3 0 Cashner p 0 0 Parrino ss 2 0 a-Denorfia ph-rf 0 0 Volquez p 1 0 Brach p 0 0 b-Amarista ph-2b 1 0 Totals 28 0

H 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

SO 3 3 0 1 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 11

Avg. .269 .194 .301 .256 .243 .173 .133 --.163 .250 .111 --.172

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Baxter lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .345 Nieuwenhuis cf-rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .288 D.Wright 3b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .382 Duda rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .255 F.Francisco p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Dan.Murphy 2b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .298 I.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .170 Turner ss 3 0 2 0 0 0 .262 Nickeas c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .158 Dickey p 3 0 1 0 0 1 .150 Byrdak p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --A.Torres cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .195 Totals 29 2 5 1 3 8 San Diego 000 000 000 — 0 3 0 New York 100 010 00x — 2 5 0 a-walked for Parrino in the 8th. b-lined out for Brach in the 8th. LOB—San Diego 4, New York 6. 2B—Guzman (13), Baxter (10), Turner (5). SB—D.Wright (5), Dan. Murphy (3). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Volquez L, 2-5 5 2-3 5 2 2 3 5 109 3.46 Brach 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 17 3.94 Cashner 1 0 0 0 0 2 19 3.38 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Dickey W, 7-1 7 1-3 3 0 0 1 10 102 3.06 Byrdak H, 12 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.57 Frncisco S, 13-15 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 6.41 T—2:36. A—28,361 (41,922).

Nationals 7, Braves 2 Washington Lombardozzi lf Harper rf Zimmerman 3b LaRoche 1b Desmond ss Espinosa 2b Ankiel cf Flores c 1-Maldonado pr-c G.Gonzalez p Stammen p S.Burnett p Totals

AB 5 4 5 3 5 3 4 4 1 1 0 0 35

R 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 7

H 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 9

BI 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 7

BB 0 1 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 0 1 2 0 2 1 3 0 1 1 0 0 11

Avg. .304 .287 .254 .295 .268 .218 .237 .263 .000 .111 .000 ---

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourn cf 3 2 1 0 1 2 .305 Pastornicky ss 2 0 0 1 0 1 .257 Prado 3b 4 0 0 1 0 1 .326 Uggla 2b 2 0 1 0 2 0 .260 M.Diaz lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .269 Hinske 1b 4 0 0 0 0 4 .242 Heyward rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .236 Boscan c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Beachy p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .136 L.Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-J.Francisco ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .235 C.Martinez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 28 2 3 2 3 13 Washington 000 204 010 — 7 9 0 Atlanta 101 000 000 — 2 3 2 a-singled for L.Hernandez in the 8th. 1-ran for Flores in the 7th. E—Pastornicky 2 (7). LOB—Washington 10, Atlanta 4. 2B—Lombardozzi (7), LaRoche (12), Uggla (11). 3B—Bourn (3). HR—Harper (4), off L.Hernandez. SB—Bourn (14). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA G.Gonzalez W, 7-1 7 1 2 2 3 10 108 2.04 Stammen 1 2-3 2 0 0 0 2 26 1.33 S.Burnett 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 0.66 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Beachy L, 5-3 5 3 3 1 4 7 105 1.77 L.Hernandez 3 6 4 4 1 1 56 3.68 C.Martinez 1 0 0 0 0 3 20 4.21 Beachy pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. T—3:10. A—38,543 (49,586).

Leaders Through Sunday’s Games AMERICAN LEAGUE PITCHING—Darvish, Texas, 7-2; Peavy, Chicago, 6-1; Weaver, Los Angeles, 6-1; Hammel, Baltimore, 61; Sabathia, New York, 6-2; Shields, Tampa Bay, 6-2; Price, Tampa Bay, 6-3; DLowe, Cleveland, 6-3; CWilson, Los Angeles, 6-4; Milone, Oakland, 6-4. STRIKEOUTS—Verlander, Detroit, 75; FHernandez, Seattle, 75; Scherzer, Detroit, 72; Sabathia, New York, 69; Shields, Tampa Bay, 66; Darvish, Texas, 66; Peavy, Chicago, 64. SAVES—JiJohnson, Baltimore, 16; CPerez, Cleveland, 16; Rodney, Tampa Bay, 16; Aceves, Boston, 11; Nathan, Texas, 10; Broxton, Kansas City, 10; Capps, Minnesota, 9; League, Seattle, 9; Valverde, Detroit, 9. NATIONAL LEAGUE PITCHING—Capuano, Los Angeles, 7-1; GGonzalez, Washington, 7-1; Hamels, Philadelphia, 7-1; Lynn, St. Louis, 7-1; Dickey, New York, 7-1; Miley, Arizona, 6-1; 12 tied at 5. STRIKEOUTS—GGonzalez, Washington, 79; Strasburg, Washington, 70; Hamels, Philadelphia, 66; MCain, San Francisco, 66; Greinke, Milwaukee, 62; Norris, Houston, 62; ASanchez, Miami, 62. SAVES—Papelbon, Philadelphia, 14; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 13; FFrancisco, New York, 13; SCasilla, San Francisco, 12; Myers, Houston, 12; Hanrahan, Pittsburgh, 11; Putz, Arizona, 11.


MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

MOTOR SPORTS ROUNDUP

Kahne wins to keep Hendrick success rolling at Charlotte The Associated Press CONCORD, N.C. — Welcome to the Hendrick family, Kasey Kahne. Kahne pulled away to victory in the Coca-Cola 600 on Sunday night, winning NASCAR’s longest race for the third time and gaining his stripes for Hendrick Motorsports the only way that matters — taking the checkered flag. Kahne wondered earlier this year when that might happen. The self-imposed pressure grew this week before Charlotte Motor Speedway at a party Hendrick threw to celebrate the owner’s 200th career win Jimmie Johnson earned at Darlington Raceway two weeks back. Kahne was introduced as part of the current team — after the 15 drivers who won races for Hendrick took a bow. Kahne said the gathering showed him what Hendrick has meant to the sport — and how much he wanted to add to that legacy. “It’s something I’ve been looking forward to for a long time,” Kahne said. And it was a popular triumph. Teammate Jeff Gordon rushed up to hug Kahne and told him, “Proud of you.” Hendrick saw that Kahne and crew chief Kenny Francis were frustrated by their early struggles when their best finish was a 14th in California. “You could see it was bothering him,” Hendrick said. “I tried to reassure him that we’re in this for the long haul.” Things began to click soon after, and Kahne entered the week with five straight top10 finishes. What a roll for Hendrick Motorsports. The program was stuck on 199 victories since October. Then came Johnson’s milestone win at Darlington. The five-time champion followed that with a victory in the All-Star race at Charlotte last week. Kahne led four Hendrick

cars in the top 11. Dale Earnhardt Jr. was sixth and Gordon was right behind in seventh — only his third top 10 finish of the year. Johnson came in 11th. He was vying for more but fell from contention with a mistake on the final pit stop as he left the stall with his gas can still engaged, dragging his crew member behind. Johnson was docked with a stop-and-go penalty that ended his chances at winning a third straight week. “I think we’re showing the consistency from all of our teams,” Hendrick said. “I can’t wait for the second half of the season.” Kahne crossed the finish line nearly 5 seconds ahead of Denny Hamlin. Kyle Busch was third, and series points leader Greg Biffle fourth. It was Kahne’s 13th career win and first since last November in Phoenix. Kahne’s a racing gym rat who can’t stay away from competition. He drives in NASCAR Truck races when the Sprint Cup series is off — as he did at Darlington in 2011 and Rockingham this spring — and raced this weekend in the World of Outlaws dirt track contest across the street from Charlotte Motor Speedway. Kahne led 96 laps, including the final 42. He doesn’t see why the winning can’t continue. “I just know that the cars and the people we have that Mr. Hendrick gives us is everything that we need to win,” Kahne said. Also on Sunday: Webber takes Monaco GP MONACO — Mark Webber won the Monaco Grand Prix from the pole, while Fernando Alonso moved narrowly into the championship lead. Webber is the sixth different driver to win in the opening six races of the season, a first for F1. Several drivers failed to finish, including Jenson Button and Michael Schumacher.

Indy

Franchitti was reminded of the delicate balance in celebrating a team win vs. beating a teammate. “I want to beat Scott. I know he wants to beat me. I don’t think I’ve met maybe a more competitive individual, except maybe Dan in the early years,” Franchitti said. “He’s my buddy. Out on the track, he’s competition, but a teammate, and then afterward he’s my friend. I see the disappointment in his face. I see the disappointment in T.K.’s face. “I think both those guys will get more championships and Indy wins. They’re just too good not to. When you beat guys like that, I take that as a big accomplishment because, God, they’re not easy to beat.” Kanaan, who used a bold move on a late restart to dart from fifth to first, couldn’t hold off Franchitti and Dixon on the last restart. He was OK with the final result. “I don’t think it could have been a better result for Dan,” Kanaan said. “Wherever he is right now, he’s definitely making fun of Sato, I can tell you that, and he’s giving Dario a tap on the back for sure, and he was going to call me a wanker that I didn’t win this thing. “I’m glad this is over. I’m glad that now I hope we can all move on and just remember Dan the way Dan was — a happy guy, a wonderful friend.” Wheldon’s wife, Susie, went to Victory Lane to congratulate Franchitti, who hid his tears of joy behind a pair of white sunglasses worn in tribute because they were Wheldon’s preference. She then sat next to Franchitti’s wife, actress Ashley Judd, in the backseat of the convertible — the same seat she had a year ago for Wheldon’s win — for the victory lap around the 2.5-mile oval.

Continued from D1 Kanaan, zero for 11 now at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, had openly wept following the death of his former teammate. “I think a lot of us that were close to Dan, you know, you wanted it that little bit more,” Dixon said. “I guess maybe in the back of your mind, you figured he would probably help you out today, too. I think in that situation, seeing how it lined up with the top three, three of Dan’s friends, it was a tough one.” Franchitti won a wheel-towheel, last-lap battle, sailing away to the checkered flag when Takuma Sato spun out trying to make one last pass on the inside and slammed into the wall. The race had shaped into what was expected to be a duel to the finish between Franchitti and Dixon. But when the Scot made his final pass of Dixon with two laps to go, he pulled Sato with him and it sapped Dixon’s momentum. So the last-lap pass attempt was Sato’s for the taking, and he couldn’t pull it off as he hugged the inside white line through Turn 1. His wheels appeared to touch Franchitti’s, he spun hard into the wall, and Franchitti sailed past for the win — this one, just like the first two, under caution. Dixon crossed the finish line in second, and Kanaan was third. “Everybody up there was a friend of Dan’s, and that about sums it up. Everybody loved him,” Franchitti said as bagpipes played over the public address system. “What a race! What a race!” Franchitti said. “I think D-Dub would be proud of that one.” Dixon met his teammate in Victory Lane, and

Redmond Continued from D1 “I had no idea what happened,” Hanks said. “I told (Lau) to call 911 and happened to look up and saw the power lines and realized he had gotten electrocuted.” Thankfully, Hanks’ assessment was not entirely correct — Reed was still alive. According to Hanks, Reed was hyperventilating immediately after the accident but soon began gasping, fighting to breathe.

Cycling Continued from D1 It was something that would be easy enough to do — the starting and ending point for all five of the 100-mile ride routes would be his east Bend home — yet challenging enough to be a physical achievement. Lomax planned to keep it simple. He would “go, ride, come home, eat, sleep, do it again,” he says. “I figured that was kind of what the professional riders get to do.” He was already logging a good many miles each week road biking, so he did not train specifically for the challenge. He also went solo for most of those rides. “I think one friend rode one of the days with me,” says Lomax, who rode with what he calls “mini-mart support,” packing water and some energy bars and stopping along the way for breaks and additional food. His inspiration for the week of century rides came from a friend, Verson Pandian, an enthusiast of the discipline of “randonneuring” — long-distance, unsupported endurance cycling. “It got my interest up in doing some long-distance rides,” says Lomax. Since that first year, he’s had some friends ride sections of his weeklong route with him, but nobody has joined him for all five stages. This year, Lomax decided to extend the invitation to other cyclists and make the riding count for something more. An avid supporter of MBSEF — he was this year’s recipient of the MBSEF/Skyliner award for outstanding contributions to the organization’s programs — Lomax proposed what would come to be called the “Central Oregon 500+” as a benefit ride for the foundation’s youth cycling programs. John Shiemer, executive director of MBSEF, was enthusiastic about Lomax’s ride, which he agreed would be a good fit for the organization’s youth cycling program, now in its seventh year. Rider participation fees will go to MBSEF to help pay for coaching, race support, equipment and supplies. “Over time this could be a great fundraiser,” said Schiemer in an email.

With Reed struggling for air, Hanks began performing CPR — which he had learned in his sports medicine class — on his fallen friend for the next 10 minutes until an officer from the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department arrived on the scene. “Once the police got there we kept doing CPR for another five to 10 minutes before the ambulance arrived,” Hanks said, recounting those tense moments and the effort to keep Reed alive. “Eventually

Air Life (emergency air transport) got there and took him to Bend.” “It was pretty freaky,” Lau recalled. “We had no idea what to think: ‘Is he going to live or die?’ ” Incredibly, on Friday, less than a week after the first responders on the scene of the accident found him without a pulse, Reed was discharged from Portland’s Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. Having spent part of the week in a medically induced coma, Reed

was in the hospital’s intensive care unit as late as Thursday. “I consider Kyle more of a brother than a friend,” said Hanks, who along with Lau went to St. Charles Bend on the evening of the accident to be with Reed and explain to his friend’s family what had happened. “More than anything, I was happy that I was able to tell (Reed’s family) that I did everything I could before they got him to the hospital.”

The rides that make up the Central Oregon 500+ cover some popular local routes, and each of the five rides, according to Lomax, is worthy of a century ride. He wanted to share the experience with other cycling enthusiasts. “I was just thinking,” he says, “there might be other people who would want to do it.” As of last week, seven riders, including Lomax, had signed up — some locals, some out-of-towners. “The first year will be a building year,” Lomax says of the event, which has been promoted at Oregon bike shops, on Northwest cycling blogs, and on a Facebook community page. He believes participation numbers could rise in the future. “Optimistically, I’d love to see it into the hundreds,” says Lomax. He notes that he plans to schedule next year’s event over a weekend to make it easier for many cyclists to participate. The 2012 Central Oregon 500+ will be more structured than Lomax’s week of mostly solo century rides in years past, he says. A sag wagon will follow the field of riders to assist with breakdowns or other mechanical or physical issues. And water stops will be stationed along each day’s route. Participants will also

form groups based on their expected pace. Lomax has enlisted the help of some cyclist friends to serve as guides and keep riders in the group drafting together. “If you’re riding in a group … you can draft each other and you’re only riding 75 to 80 percent as hard as the person who is breaking the wind ahead of you,” he says. And the extra help provided by drafting may come in handy to keep up the pace. “Some century rides are a relaxing daylong tour, but I’m pretty sure this group will be riding at the upper end of their abilities,” Lomax says. He anticipates the group heading out to ride by 8 o’clock each morning and finishing the day’s ride by 2 or 3 p.m., before afternoon thunderstorms have a chance to develop. The Wednesday (June 6) ride will be a 120-mile route and will be staged in memory of Lomax’s friend Bob Coil, who died unexpectedly in April. The ride goes from Bend to Prineville, Smith Rock and Sisters before finishing back in Bend. It’s “a really neat tour,” says Lomax,

recalling that Coil’s first 100mile-plus ride was with Lomax last year. “I think he was 68 last year when he rode that and it’s just amazing,” says Lomax. “The overall event sounds kind of overwhelming, but for someone who’s got a good base of riding it’s completely doable,” he says. “It’s amazing how fast your body recovers and lets you (ride again) the next day. “It’s really fun to do something that’s out of your range,” Lomax adds. “And if you do 500 miles in a week, it resets your range of possibilities of what you think you can do in cycling or in anything, which is really the goal for me.”

—Reporter: 541-383-0305; beastes@bendbulletin.com

—Reporter: 541-383-0358; lhoffman@bendbulletin.com. For other cycling questions, comments or information directed to The Bulletin, email sports@ bendbulletin.com.

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C C  C 

Please email Cycling Central event information to sports@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

CAMPS/ CLASSES/ CLINICS GRIT CLINIC: Two-day women’sspecific mountain biking clinic; Saturday and Sunday; Shevlin Park, Bend; morning sessions on bike handling skills and basic bike maintenance, afternoon sessions out on the trails; $250 per clinic or $225 for returning 2011 participants; registration available at Bend’s Pine Mountain Sports; www.GritClinics.com; info@ GritClinics.com. WOMEN’S 101: Beginning women’s road cycling clinic; Mondays, June 4-25; 5 p.m.; practical and fundamental clinic to improve technical knowledge, handling skills and road etiquette; taught by certified cycling coaches; $99; Powered by Bowen; 541-585-1500. WOMEN’S 201: Intermediate women’s road cycling clinic; Saturdays, June 2-23; 9 a.m.; will cover skills such as group riding, advanced cornering, descending and race tactics; taught by certified cycling coaches; $99; Powered by Bowen; 541-585-1500. DIRT DIVAS MOUNTAIN BIKING PROGRAM IN-STORE CLINIC: Wednesday, June 6; 7 p.m.; Pine Mountain Sports, Bend; with expert bike fitter Bart Bowen of Powered by Bowen; free; snacks and socializing at 6:30 p.m.; contact Leanna with questions and register at 541-385-8080. RIDE & REACH: Cycling and yoga clinic; Friday and Saturday, June 15-16; 8:30 a.m.; Bend; with pro rider and yoga instructor Ryan Leech; includes yoga sessions, lunch, shuttles to trailheads and rides; $99 per day or $25 for morning yoga session; cogwild. com/one-day-tours/ryan-leechyoga-clinic/.

YOUTH DEVELOPMENT BIKE RODEO: Saturday; noon4 p.m. Seventh Street Plaza, Redmond; bike-handling course and traffic skills event for kids ages 7-12, sponsored by Hutch’s Bicycles and the Redmond Police Department; free; 541-548-8200; redmond@hutchsbicycles.com; hutchsbicycles.com. JUNIOR TRAINING CAMPS: Grades eight through 12; training for endurance, functional and core strength, balance and other skills; weekly survivor team challenge will include rope course, mountain biking, disc golf and standup paddle boarding; sessions Mondays through Fridays, June 18-July 13 and July 23-Aug. 17; $195 per session; Powered by Bowen, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-5851500; poweredbybowen.com. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION CYCLING PROGRAM: Road cycling (age 12 and older) and mountain biking (age 8 and older) options; May-August; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef. org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY AFTER SCHOOL MOUNTAIN BIKING: Ages 8-14; all abilities

welcome; Wednesdays through June 6; 2:45-4:15 p.m. (grades 3-5); 1-4:15 p.m. (grades 68); transportation provided from area schools; bill@ bendenduranceacademy.org; www. BendEnduranceAcademy.org.

RACES CENTRAL OREGON STXC: Wednesday; 6 p.m.; Bend; short track mountain bike racing at Central Oregon Community College; $5 students, $10 otherwise; register at race site; 541-385-7413; centraloregonracing.net. SISTERS TO SUMMIT HILL CLIMB SERIES: Wednesdays, June 6-27; 6:30 p.m. start, riders will leave at 1-minute intervals; Sisters; 30mile course with climb up Three Creeks Road; men’s and women’s categories; $10, register at Village Green City Park in Sisters, 5:30 p.m.-6:20 p.m.; 541-595-8711; joel@sistersstampede.com. MBSEF CRITERIUM SERIES: Wednesdays, June 13, June 27, July 11, July 25, Aug. 8 and Aug. 22; Summit High School, Bend; A, B and junior races; riders will earn points in each race that count toward overall series standings; Molly Cogswell-Kelley; 541-3880002; molly@mbsef.org.

RIDES DIRT DIVAS MOUNTAIN BIKE PROGRAM: Women-only rides held twice per month based out of Pine Mountain Sports in Bend; next ride is June 11; 5:30 p.m.; free rentals available (show up 30 minutes early if taking out a rental); free; all ability levels welcome; 541-385-8080; www. pinemountainsports.com.

OUT OF TOWN THE OREGON GRAN FONDO: Saturday; 8 a.m.; Cottage Grove; options of 31.2, 71 and 117 miles; competitive and noncompetitive options; $30-$65; registration closes May 27; contact@ dark30sports.com; dark30sports. com. PIONEER CENTURY: Saturday; Clackamas County Fairgrounds, Canby; 7 a.m.; 38th annual ride; options of 32, 45, 55, 77 and 100 miles; includes lunch, rest stops; $30-$35; pwtc.com. STRAWBERRY CENTURY: Saturday, June 9; 7 a.m.; Lebanon; 20th annual tour of Linn County; route options of 13, 53, 72 and 101 miles; starts at Lebanon High School; $10-$35; santiam_spokes@comcast.net; santiamspokes.org. TOUR DE HOOD RIDE: Sunday, June 9; 8 a.m.; Hood River; ride options of 55 and 71 miles; start and finish at Cooper Spur Mountain Resort; $75-$85; tourdehoodride. com. 2012 OBRA ROAD RACE CHAMPIONSHIPS: Saturday, June 16; 9:30 a.m.; Turner; races of various lengths on 15.9-mile loop, depending on division; categories split between the two days; $15-$30; online and day of race registration available; capitolvelo. com/orrc/.

CYCLING CENTRAL SCOREBOARD Mountain Biking Sisters Stampede Sunday, Sisters Three Creeks Brewing and Five Pines Lodge (Place, name, hometown, time) ——— Pro Men 1, Chris Sheppard, Bend, 1:26:43.7. 2, Carl Decker, Bend, 1:29:29.6. 3, Brennan Wodtli, Bend, 1:30:23.2. 4, Sloane Anderson, Bend, 1:30:42.3. 5, Ben Thompson, Bend, 1:31:39.4. 6, Brig Brandt, Bend, 1:32:52.3. 7, William Sullivan, Lake Oswego, 1:32:54.0. 8, Ross Brody, Salem, 1:32:55.3. 9, Matt Russell, Bend, 1:33:28.6. 10, James Williams, Bend, 1:34:06.2. 11, Cody Peterson, Bend, 1:34:11.9. 12, Marcus Benton, Corvallis, 1:34:18.6. 13, Nelson Snyder, Hood River, 1:34:33;5. 14, Cary Miller, Portland, 1:36:43.7. 15, Bear Perrin, Grants Pass, 1:38:31.2. 16, Timmy Evens, Bend, 1:38:40.8. Cat 1 Men 15-18 1, Lance Haidet, Bend, 1:38:37.3. 2, Tyler Fox, Irrigon, 1:39:04.6. 3, Javier Colton, Bend, 1:39:31.8. 4, Adam Oliver, Eugene, 1:57:58.9. Cat 1 Men 19-34 1, John Merrill, Ashland, 1:32:56.3. 2, Brent Mattison, Bend, 1:38:56.8. 3, Robert Gilbert, Redmond, 1:39:06.0. 4, Doug Turnbull, Springfield, 1:39:06.2. 5, Shane Johnson, Redmond, 1:39:28.3. 6, Ethan Stehley, Eugene, 1:39:40.6. 7, Adam Demarzo, Coos Bay, 1:40:15.1. 8, Cole Sprague, Bend, 1:42:48.5. 9, Christopher Bagg, Portland, 1:43:03.5. 10, Matt Hayes, Port Orchard, Wash., 1:43:15.8. 11, Brian Gerow, Portland, 1:44:04.6. 12, Austin Line, Bend, 1:44:23.2. 13, Steve O’Neill, Portland, 1:44:40.9. 14, Kolben Preble, Forest Grove, 1:44:58. 15, Brian Jorgensen, Bend, 1:44:58.8. 16, Chris Johnston, Portland, 1:47:09.5. 17, Sean Lewis, Bend, 1:48:43.0. 18, Jeremy Warnicke, Grand Ronde, 1:48:55.5. 19, Greg Adams, Portland, 1:52:53.3. Cat 1 Men 35-44 1, Brant Buckholz, Lake Oswego, 1:36:34.5. 2, David Cloninger, Bend, 1:36:36.8. 3, Andy Olsson, Hood River, 1:36:47.9. 4, Sean Haidet, Bend, 1:39:15.0. 5, David Hemming, Portland, 1:39:25.3. 6, Chris Winans, Bend, 1:39:28.6. 7, Joe Santos, Portland, 1:39:34.6. 8, Matt Betts, Corvallis, 1:41:26.4. 9, Tom Keller, Central Point, 1:41:48.4. 10, Robert Uetrecht, Bend, 1:41:48.4. 11, Gabe Linn, Bend, 1:42:12.9. 12, Derek Stallings, Bend, 1:42:25.3. 13, Brian Marcroft, Hood River, 1:43:01.3. 14, Tre Hendricks, Hood River, 1:44:22.9. 15, Eric Kytola, Eugene, 1:47:02.5. 16, John Miller, Ashland, 1:47:17.9. 17, Joel Wilson, Eugene, 1:49:26.8. 18, Michael Szwaya, Portland, 1:50:47.8. 19, Alex Accetta, Portland, 1:51:27.4. 20, R. Christensen, 1:53:27.0. 21, Juston Manville, Portland, 1:53:27.0. 22, Justin Price, Philomath, 1:55:43.2. 23, Kurt Haas, Salem, 1:56:18.8. 24, Robert Christensen, Portland, 2:11:57.1. 25, Geoff Rice, Portland, 2:15:21.6. 26, Tim Jones, Bend, 2:17:45.0. Cat 1 Men 45+ 1, Bruce Rogers, Bend, 1;32:47.5. 2, Trevor Norland, Corvallis, 1:37:44.9. 3, Scott Seaton, Bend, 1:38:20.5. 4, Tim Butler, Portland, 1:38:26.95. 5, Jeff Otto, Aloha, 1:38:35.9. 6, Jeff Parker, Hood River, 1:41:15.2. 7, Dan Wolnick, Bend, 1:41:36.3. 8, Scott Carroll, Corvallis, 1:43:04.9. 9, David Hill, Dallas, 1:43:16.8. 10, Eric Power, Bend, 1:43:50.5. 11, David Baker, Bend, 1:45:03.5. 12, Jerry Fox, Irrigon, 1:45:10.8. 13, Todd Raudy, Bend, 1:45:23.9. 14, Todd Embree, Corvallis, 1:46:14.6. 15, Robert Huff, Portland, 1:47:05.6. 16, Todd Sprague, Bend, 1:48:07.1. 17, Jeff Standish, Gresham, 1:49:02.6. 18, Greg Creswick, Corvallis, 1:49:36.7. 19, Gregg Leion, Hood River, 1:49:55.1. 20, James Jonke, Portland, 1:51:30.2. 21, Rick Johnson, Bend, 1:54:30.4. Cat 2 Men 15-18 1, Zach Perrin, Grants Pass, 1:50:08, 2, 860 Andrew Scott, Grants Pass, 1:56:30, 3, Ben Thompson, Canby, 2:38:05. Cat 2 Men 19-34 1, Peter Vraniak, Bend, 1:40:52. 2, Nick Wood, Portland, 1:45:11. 3, Aaron Goodwin, Bend, 1:46:00. 4, Spencer Fransway, Portland, 1:46:49. 5, Stephen Staha, Ashland, 1:47:45. 6, Sean Corey, Portland, 1:49:19. 7, Eric Webster, Redding, 1:50:13. 8, Josh Nordell, Sisters, 1:50:37. 9, Ryan Hill, Medford, 1:50:49. 10, Casey Cardwell, Boise, 1:50:58. 11, Neal Richards, Bend, 1:51:15. 12, Nick Wagner, Portland, 1:51:43. 13, Kevin Bernstein, Salem, 1:53:00. 14, Robert Thayer, Portland, 1:53:39. 15, Nick Groesz, Portland, 1:54:12. 16, Deireck Ritter, Eugene, 1:55:37. 17, Samuel Stumbo, Bend, 1:55:38. 18, Brandon Manger, Bend, 1:56:50. 19, Joshua Wells, Eugene, 1:57:31. 20, Dave Keller, Redmond, 1:58:48. 21, Nick Beltz-Bunas, Eugene, 1:59:21. 22, Brett Stevens, Corvallis, 2:00:33. 23, Cody Ames, Klamath Falls, 2:03:47. 24 1026 Andrew Morphis, Portland, 2:04:59. 25, Tyler Klein, Corvallis, 2:05:21. 26, Thomas Pastor, Bend, 2:05:45. 27, Sean McGhee, Beaverton, 2:07:45. 28, Dipesh Sapkota, Bend, 2:07:48. 29, Daniel Brewster, Bend, 2:08:22. 30, Gabriel Gillan, Sisters, 2:08:29. 31, Brent Boardman, Mount Vernon, 2:09:40. 32, Adam Steele, Springfield, 2:12:14. 33, Josh Bernsen, Portland, 2:14:28. 34, Brian Fawcett, Grants Pass, 2:18:42. 35, James Peterson, Portland, 2:19:38. 36, Chris McElfresh, Corvallis, 2:20:41. Cat 2 Men 35-44 1, T.J. Paskewich, Bend, 1:41:11. 2, Rob Angelo, Bend, 1:42:53. 3, John Williams, Portland, 1:44:30. 4, Richard Horacek, Happy Valley, 1:45:04. 5, Ryan Russell, Beaverton, 1:45:09. 6, Ron Sines, Albany, 1:45:43. 7, Robert Schumacher, Bend, 1:46:31. 8, Chris Chambers, Bend, 1:48:06. 9, Jesse Lea, Portland, 1:48:14. 10, Chad Smeltzer, Portland, 1:48:20. 11, Mark Miskowiec, Bend, 1:48:37. 12, Michael Lindley, Salem, 1:48:50. 13, James Kerr, Bend, 1:50:14. 14, Geoff Grummon, Portland, 1:50:35. 15, Scott Brennan, Bend, 1:50:38. 16, Bill Larson, Portland, 1:50:46. 17, Alan Brandt, Bend, 1:50:48. 18, David Rosen, Beaverton, 1:51:10. 19, Bruce Haserot, Kelso, 1:51:36. 20, Samuel Echo, Reno, 1:51:39. 21, Shane Gibson, Portland, 1:51:59. 22, Bradley Pfeiffer, Bend, 1:52:09. 23, Matthew Westermeye Damascus, 1:52:36. 24, Dennis Stafford, Milwaukie, 1:52:38. 25, Alex Rocco, Bend, 1:53:12. 26, Eric Lilley, Bend, 1:53:12. 27, Spencer White, Portland, 1:53:36. 28, Rob Shatting, Bend, 1:53:57. 29, Chad Sage, Bend, 1:55:05. 30, Richard Rosko, Portland, 1:55:11.

C  B  Road cycling • Host families needed: The Cascade Cycling Classic is in search of host families to help house participants in this year’s race, which is scheduled for July 17-22. Race participants typically arrive a day or two prior to the start and leave the day after the race concludes. Hosts’ obligations are to allow for kitchen access and provide a safe place for cyclists to store their bikes. Families may choose the number of riders they wish to host. For more information, questions or to volunteer as a host, email Karen Kenlan at ccchousing@bendbroadband.com. • New event on tap at Pacific

Crest: The Tour de Crest, a cycling tour, is scheduled to make its debut at the Pacific Crest Weekend Sports Festival in Sunriver next month. Participants can choose between ride options of 26 and 55 miles for the tour, slated for the first day of the festival, June 22. The rides will allow participants the chance to travel along some of the same roads as the Pacific Crest long course and Olympic triathlon competitors. Both courses take place on low-traffic roads and do not include extremely steep grades. Registration fee is $40 to $80, depending on registration date and length of ride. Entry forms and online registration are avail-

able at racecenter.com/pacificcrest/tourdecrest/index.htm.

Gear • Pearl Izumi bike swap scheduled: The Bend Pearl Izumi store is scheduled to host the Pedal Fast Bike Swap this Saturday. In the swap, scheduled from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., individuals can buy and sell bicycle gear. Participants may pitch tents in the parking lot in front of the store, located at Bend Factory Stores, 61334 S. U.S. Highway 97. The space is free, but registration is requested. For more information, call 541312-3358. —Bulletin staff reports

31, Eric Moran, Corvallis, 1:55:13. 32, Alec Denes, Portland, 1:55:34. 33, Scott McKnight, Gresham, 1:55:48. 34, Robert Winnenberg, Bend, 1:55:54. 35, Brett Andres, Portland, 1:56:36. 36, Stephen Helt, Bend, 1:56:45. 37, Scott Wazny, Portland, 1:57:17. 38, Marc Lutz, Lake Oswego, 1:57:20. 39, Gregg Rice, Portland, 1:57:25. 40, Nick Hodson, Portland, 1:57:42. 41, Karole J. Durkee, Portland, 1:57:57. 42, Timothy Baumgarie, Bend, 1:58:42. 43, Gary O’Connell, Bend, 1:58:52. 44, Shea Hawes, La Grande, 1:58:53. 45, Anthony Colistro, Salem, 1:59:19. 46, Chad Hartley, Hillsboro, 1:59:50. 47, Jeff Minch, La Grande, 2:00:16. 48, Kyle Remington, Beaverton, 2:01:35. 49, Rob Rames, Bend, 2:01:56. 50, Jared Douglas, Bend, 2:02:06. 51, Mike Owens, Portland, 2:02:10.8. 52, Bjorn Clouten, Happy Valley, 2:02:14.4. 53, Sean Warner, Gresham, 2:02:29.1. 54, Eric Ronderhyde, Portland, 2:02:52.9. 55, Kevin Ruge, Washougal, Wash., 2:03:29.8. 56, Ronald Kizziar, Portland, 2:05:05.7. 57, Eddie Wang, Portland, 2:06:44.9. 58, Justin Serna, Bend, 2:12:31.0. 59, John Shorb, Portland, 2:12:34.1. 60, Bob Stephens, Tigard, 2:13:00.6. 61, Allan Nielsen, Estacada, 2:14:51.0. 62, Greg McBride, Redmond, 2:16:18.5. 63, Chris Skovborg, Bend, 2:16:55.1. 64, Daniel Freeman, Portland, 2:19:15.9. 65, Paul Nielsen, Sisters, 2:21:15.7. 66, John Hickey, Portland, 2:26:32.5. 67, Randy Gardner, Sisters, 2:32:35.5. Cat 2 Men 45-54 1, Daniel Sprouse, Portland, 1:45:11. 2, Tom Strodtbeck, Portland, 1:47:55. 3, Rich Wolf, Bend, 1:47:57. 4, Kevin Searl, Yalima, 1:50:39. 5, Charles Thomas, Bend, 1:50:40. 6, John O’Brien, Ridgefield, 1:50:48. 7, Bob Jacobs, Portland, 1:51:08. 8, Joseph Fricke, Portland, 1:51:54. 9, Ian Kennedy, Portland, 1:52:14. 10, Todd Schock, Bend, 1:52:23. 11, Robert Dudley, Medford, 1:53:08. 12, Paul Greenwalt, Beaverton, 1:53:33. 13, William Waring, Camas, 1:56:02. 14, Jeffrey Gerwing, Portland, 1:56:04. 15, Kris Schamp, Beaverton, 1:56:07. 16, David German, Portland, 1:56:14. 17, Greg O’Brien, Portland, 1:56:43. 18, Jason Saunders, Corvallis, 1:56:45. 19, Dan Davis, Bend, 1:57:31. 20, Karen Nelson, Vacaville, 1:57:40. 21, Duane Christman, La Grande, 1:57:52. 22, Mike Webb, Florence, 1:58:15. 23, Marcel Russenberge Bend, 1:58:18. 24, Robert Fletcher, Vacaville, 1:59:14. 25, Roger Montgomery, Veneta, 1:59:53. 26, Rob Kerr, Bend, 2:00:03. 27, Paul Kelly, Lake Oswego, 2:00:13. 28, Scott Ballard, Portland, 2:01:10. 29, Greg Kempthorn, Lake Oswego, 2:01:11. 30, Vern Ward, Troutdale, 2:01:52. 31, Mark Emry, Gresham, 2:02:46. 32, Gary Till, Vacaville, 2:04:07. 33, Dave Pickhardt, Powell Butte, 2:04:16. 34, Charles Barrett, Portland, 2:04:50. 35, Brian Smith, Bend, 2:04:57. 36, Jeff Steiner, Portland, 2:05:08. 37, Jeff Wester, Sisters, 2:08:11. 38, Jeff Walton, Beaverton, 2:12:26. 39, David Likosky, Kirkland, 2:13:04. 40, Matt Falkenstein, Bend, 2:14:42. 41, Thomas Holt, Redmond, 2:17:32. 42, Paul Bascom, Lake Oswego, 2:21:52. 43, Peter Orsatti, Bend, 3:00:35. Cat 2 Men 55+ 1, Don Leet, Bend, 1:50:53. 2, David Morrison, Redmond, 1:51:55. 3, Mike Reightley, Bend, 1:52:44. 4, Stan Kiefer, Bend, 1:53:38. 5, Alan Ott, Eugene, 1:54:10. 6, Vincent Sikorski, Bend, 1:56:16. 7, Amory Cheney, Bend, 1:59:01. 8, David Luoma, Portland, 1:59:26. 9, Rick Gregory, Eugene, 2:01:54. 10, Patrick Coughlin, Portland, 2:05:41. 11, Brent Wesenberg, Bend, 2:10:08. 12, Mark Hildebrandt, Tigard, 2:10:11. 13, Richard Marantz, Portland, 2:12:59. 14, Vern Krist, Portland, 2:15:07. 15, Gary Reynolds, Bend, 2:16:45. 16, Marc Thompson, Canby, 2:16:59. 17, Paul Weid, Bend, 2:25:53. 18, Dale Allen, Bend, 2:26:29. 19, Barry Allen, Bend, 2:35:52. Cat 3 Men 10-14 1, Cameron Beard, Bend, 53:24.1. 2, Donovan Birky, Bend, 56:15.3. 3, Leif Kytola, Eugene, 56:32. 4, Justin Ziehnert, Tigard, 57:09. 5, Brian Hart Jr., Washougal, Wash., 57:09. 6, Elkin Parker, Hood River, 1:00:28. 7, Liam Pickard, Powell Butte, 1:00:55. 8, Jerry McGlabe, Salem, 1:01:11. 9, Jett Ballantyne, Bend, 1:01:58. 10, Carson Westberg, Bend, 1:04:21. 11, Nate Lelack, Bend, 1:06:01. 12, Ian Steigrwald, Forest Grove, 1:09:29. 13, Ryder Uetrecht, Bend, 1:09:59. 14, Owen Szwaya, Portland, 1:10:33. 15, Joe Mendez, Sisters, 1:11:33. 16, Harrison Helt, Bend, 1:16:07. 17, Joseph Lukens, Bend, 1:17:10. 18, Max Palaauk, Sisters, 1:17:19. 19, Nathanael Hart, Washougal, Wash., 1:19:28. 20, Michael Ashley, Redmond, 1:25:11. 21, Parker Palubeski, Bend, 1:45:01. 22, Zachary Vialovos, Sisters, 1:45:07. 23, Cooper Palubeski, Bend, 2:00:20. Cat 3 Men 15-18 1, Brandon Ortiz, Orchards, Wash., 53:45. 2, Will Reinking, Bend, 54:01. 3, Ross Duncan, Sisters, 55:26. 4, Billy Waring, Camas, Wash., 55:44. 5, Keenan Reynolds, Bend, 57:33. 6, Ryan Carr, Springfield, 1:03:18. 7, Nathen Baker, Bend, 1:03:20. 8, Kyle Gustafson, Wilsonville, 1:04:30. 9, Gus Gyorgyfalvy, Bend, 1:04:55. 10, Jacob Klein, Coos Bay, 1:05:03. 11, Greyfaen Eastland, Bend, 1:05:38. 12, Sam Swindell, Portland, 1:06:31. 13, Alex Sundermeier, Tigard, 1:15:49. 14, Ryan Lindner, Tigard, 1:18:08. 15, Ethan Kizzlar, Portland, 1:18:47. Cat 3 Men 19-34 1, Corbyn John, Klamath Falls, 51:29. 2, Brad White, Watertown, 52:05. 3, Jason Oman, Bend, 53:49. 4, Neils Elbek, Bend, 54:13. 5, Mark Holden, Portland, 55:29. 6, Dave Hansen, Bend, 56:34. 7, Abram Hernandez, Portland, 57:18. 8, Bill Klingler, Portland, 57:23. 9, Jeremy Cantrell, Eugene, 58:05. 10, Bradley Buselli, Portland, 59:58.

11, Alex Wilson, Bend, 1:00:25. 12, Don Petersen, Bend, 1:00:32. 13, Ryan Lekberg, The Dalles, 1:01:01. 14, Robert Anderson, Portland, 1:02:16. 15, Scott Zenier, Portland, 1:03:13. 16, Jacob Corwin, Bend, 1:03:41. 17, Chris Sterry, Bend, 1:04:11. 18, Matt Grumbley, Veneta, 1:05:17. Cat 3 Men 35-44 1, Joseph Hosang, Sisters, 52:34. 2, Sean Stroup, Portland, 54:00. 3, Anthony Morales, Bend, 55:48. 4, Jon Fogarty, Bend, 56:11. 5, Jason Plant, Redmond, 56:24. 6, Dennis Bennett, Bend, 56:29. 7, Chris Zanger, Bend, 56:50. 8, Jaron Seaman, Salem, 58:26. 9, Dan Brobst, Bend, 59:48. 10, Tim Peterson, Bend, 59:52. 11, Jason Bacon, Portland, 1:04:20. 12, Scott Coleman, Beaverton, 1:04:23. 13, Troy Huddleston, Albany, 1:08:07. 14, Josh Pounds, Grants Pass, 1:08:30. 15, Steve Ashley, Redmond, 1:08:50. 16, Ryan Swanson, Portland, 1:09:30. 17, Troy Theriot, Portland, 1:09:36. 18, Joe Kim, Washougal, Wash., 1:09:59. 19, Josh Cosci, Sisters, 1:10:12. 20, Todd Rogers, Redmond, 1:10:15. 21, Robby Carter, Aloha, 1:10:39. 22, Sean Armstrong, Salem, 1:14:41. 23, Michael Ziehnert, Tigard, 1:15:43. 24, Chris Mayes, Sisters, 1:15:45. 25, Joe Mendez, Sisters, 1:17:01. 26, Todd Tanton, Bend, 1:23:55. Cat 3 Men 45+ 1, Chad Butler, Scio, 54:36. 2, Larry Remillard, Kennewick, Wash., 55:22. 3, Brian Hart Sr., Washougal, Wash., 55:30. 4, Jim Fox, Portland, 56:00. 5, Colonel Reynolds, Bend, 56:44. 6, Mark Chasse, Portland, 56:51. 7, Tim Gogolski, Bend, 57:44. 8, Philip Carr, Springfield, 57:53. 9, Johnathan Pierce, Sheridan, 58:50. 10, Mark Eberhard, Bend, 59:14. 11, Jeff Cobbs, Bend, 59:27. 12, Tom Cordier, Corvallis, 59:50. 13, Dale Webster, South Beach, 59:55. 14, Jeff Monson, 1:00:16. 15, Mike Taylor, Bend, 1:00:35. 16, Jed Dackert, Bend, 1:02:28. 17, David Gratke, Portland, 1:03:24. 18, Scott McCoy, Portland, 1:03:37. 19, Tom Moor, Redmond, 1:03:54. 20, Scott Huntsman, Bend, 1:04:19. 21, Brian Quigley, Stayton, 1:04:24. 22, Rick Gregory, Eugene, 1:04:25. 23, Cory Fawcett, Grants Pass, 1:04:31. 24, Pat Shields, Redmond, 1:05:17. 25, Bill Sundermeier, Tigard, 1:05:18. 26, Brian Danner, Beanon, 1:05:43. 27, Sandy MacDonald, Bend, 1:05:45. 28, Stratton Poindexter, Redmond, 1:06:48. 29, Jim Burton, Sherwood, 1:07:37. 30, Mark Waters, Bend, 1:09:40. 31, Eric Buckland, Bend, 1:10:23. 32, Gerald Wonnacott, Bend, 1:10:24. 33, David Darling, Bend, 1:11:23. 34, Carl Bengtson, Lebanon, 1:16:02. 35, Emk Eastland, Bend, 1:17:08. 36, David Gustafson, Wilsonvile, 1:21:13. 37, Frank Fleetham, Bend, 1:21:33. 38, John Walkenhorst, Bend, 1:22:05. 39, Rob Walsh, Bend, 1:28:02. Pro Women 1, Serena Bishop Gordon, Bend, 1:41:53. 2, Sue Butler, Portland, 1:42:54. 3, Beth Ann Orton, Portland, 1:46:25. 4, Karen Dewolfe, Corvallis, 1:48:18. 5, Laura Winberry, Bend, 1:55:15. Cat 1 Women 1, Melissa Norland, Corvallis, 1:48:38. 2, Alice Drobna, Bend, 1:49:06. 3, Lisa Turnbull, Springfield, 1:53:04. 4, Cherie Touchette, Bend, 1:53:20. 5, Megan Chinburg, Portland, 1:53:46. 6, Julie Browning, Portland, 1:55:22. 7, Renee Scott, Bend, 1:55:24. 8, Allison Halpin, Bend, 1:56:24. 9, Laura Trace, Portland, 1:56:46. 10, Jennifer Johnson, Hood River, 1:56:55. 11, Mielle Blomberg, Porltand, 1:59:08. 12, Kim Matheson, Portland, 2:00:07. 13, Rachel Beckhmann, Independence, 2:00:37. Cat 2 Women 19-34 1, Kristin Duyn, Tualatin, 1:56:44. 2, Molly MacGraw, Corvallis, 1:57:56. 3, Remy Maguire, Portland, 2:01:15. 4, Beth Flanagan, Portland, 2:04:24. 5, Michelle Mills, Bend, 2:04:38. 6, Jessica Smith, Bend, 2:04:54. 7, Deanna Lloyd, Corvallis, 2:05:31. 8, Suzanne Marcoe, Portland, 2:05:56. 9, Landakila Macnaugh, Portland, 2:06:54. 10, Leah Schaab, Powell Butte, 2:10:06. 11, Jessica Hudec, White Salmon, 2:13:26. 12, Kamila Gwaiazda, Seattle, 2:23:3. 13, Michelle Kunec, Portland, 2:32:06. 14, Susannah Hart, Washougal, 2:46:55. Cat 2 Women 35+ 1, Jill Howe, Eugene, 1:56:39. 2, Ann Kennedy, Portland, 1:58:36. 3, Teri Sheasby, Bend, 1:59:22. 4, Laura Hagen, Bend, 1:59:32. 5, Ina McLean, Bend, 2:00:39. 6, Virginie Calme, Portland, 2:03:21. 7, Maggie Rising, Lake Oswego, 2:04:07. 8, Mary Skrzynski, Bend, 2:04:49. 9, Michelle Bazemore Bend, 2:05:03. 10, Angeline Salerno, Bend, 2:06:00. 11, Cristina Tomkins, Beaverton, 2:06:01. 12, Andrea Thomas, Bend, 2:06:12. 13, Mary Ramos, Bend, 2:07:13. 14, Amy Rice, Portland, 2:08:14. 15, Julia Fudge, Eugene, 2:08:36. 16, Amber Clark, Bend, 2:09:24. 17, Sarah Tisdale, Hillsboro, 2:09:39. 18, Gretchen Raynak, Portland, 2:11:14. 19, Lynda Palubeski, Bend, 2:12:03. 20, Anne Linton, Bend, 2:12:38. 21, Lillian Schiavo, Klamath Falls, 2:12:41. 22, Ronda Sundermeier, Tigard, 2:15:42. 23, Karen Kenlan, Bend, 2:16:13. 24, Jennifer Morgan, Corvallis, 2:16:51. 25, Julie Kramer, Portland, 2:17:46. 26, Change your mind. Change your life.

(541) 728-0505 www.neurofloat.com

Vonda Derksen, Corvallis, 2:20:32. 27, Jan Moss, Milwaukie, 2:25:01. 28, Sherry Jako, Sunriver, 2:27:20. 29, Jill Ballantyne, Bend, 2:33:52. 30, Loraine Blake, Portland, 2:50:43. Cat 3 Women 10-18 1, Sharon Hart, Washougal, 1:02:06. 2, Ivy Taylor, Bend, 1:10:07. 3, Jessica Steigerwal, Forest Grove, 1:14:16. 4, Kate Ballantyne, Bend, 1:15:30. 5, Amy Ziehnert, Tigard, 1:15:38. 6, Lauren Ziehnert, Tigard, 1:16:24. 7, Skylar Grayson, Bend, 1:17:49. 8, Sarah Cordier, Corvallis, 1:42:44. 9, Jennelle Homes, Bend, 1:44:44. Cat 3 Women 19-34 1, Julia Sparks, Corvallis, 59:56. 2, Megan Kennear, Bend, 1:03:26. 3, Statia Smith, 1:03:49. 4, Jaime Kathlee Mena, Portland, 1:04:32. 5, Hannah Hart, Washougal, Wash., 1:04:35. 6, Erin Findlan, Port Orchard, Wash., 1:04:41. 7, Amanda Schram, Bend, 1:04:51. 8, Samantha Pharris, Redmond, 1:09:48. 9, Kari Kadhim, Bend, 1:09:56. 10, Sierra Reid, Portland, 1:10:10. 11, Karli Koreski, Redmond, 1:10:15. 12, Jen Schenk, Coburg, 1:10:27. Cat 3 Women 35-44 1, Tessa Sugahara, Salem, 1:04:27. 2, Amanda Durkee, Portland, 1:04:59. 3, Erika Miranda, Portland, 1:05:13. 4, Kristen Marlo Warr, Gresham, 1:06:04. 5, Julie Deal, Portland, 1:07:03. 6, Angela Brobst, Bend, 1:09:10. 7, Janet McKnight, Gresham, 1:09:50. 8, Siouxsie Jennett, Lake Oswego, 1:10:38. 9, Deb Bauer, Eugene, 1:10:57. 10, Brooke Ziehnert, Tigard, 1:33:31. Cat 3 Women 45+ 1, Pam Reid, Portland, 58:11. 2, Christine Jerko, Portland, 59:29. 3, P.J. Swan, 59:42. 4, Michelle Thorstrom, Bend, 1:00:35. 5, Cary Schwartz, Bend, 1:02:36. 6, Linda Caporicci, Gresham, 1:03:28. 7, Sami Fournier, Bend, 1:04:21. 8, Melissa Boyd, Corvallis, 1:05:15. 9, Rhonda Haynes, Newport, 1:07:58. 10, Sue Hanna, Portland, 1:15:50. 11, Katie Williams, Sisters, 1:47:57. Clydesdale 1, Matt Wilkin, Portland, 1:48:19. 2, Adam Short, Bend, 1:49:37. 3, David Taylor, Bend, 1:50:06. 4, Dwayne King, Portland, 1:57:19.5, Bryan Ross, Grants Pass, 1:57:58.6, John Lombard, Portland, 1:58:05. 7, Bradley Taylor, Bend, 1:58:12. 8, Kevin Thompson, Tigard, 1:58:51. 9, Gary Nagle, Reno, 1:58:57. 10, MacDonald Jackson, Corvallis, 1:58:59. 11, Spencer Rockwell, Salem, 2:04:10. 12, Wayne Nussbaum, Happy Valley, 2:04:25. 13, Russell Grayson, Bend, 2:05:26. 14, Travis Taylor, Redmond, 2:05:29. 15, William Glasson, Hillsboro, 2:06:07. 16, Bryan Smith, Portland, 2:07:43. 17, Curtis Burrill, Medford, 2:12:20. 18, Henry Abel, Bend, 2:17:18. 19, Mark Campbell, Bend, 2:19:15. 20, Eric Beckwith, Sisters, 2:25:03. 21, Luis Palacios, Eugene, 2:29:40. 22, Bryan Cox, Vancouver, 2:42:44. Single Speed Men 1, Cordino Longiotti, Ashland, 1:39:30. 2, John Bravard, Portland, 1:41:42. 3, Ryan Eisele, Dallas, 1:42:54. 4, Ian Eglitis, Powell Butte, 1:43:40. 5, John Walrod, Portland, 1:44:07. 6, Wade Goff, Sherwood, 1:44:21. 7, Travis Wilson, Veneta, 1:48:43. 8, Brian Cannon, Eugene, 1:48:57. 9, Wally Hockman, Salem, 1:50:55. 10, Aric Rist, Portland, 1:52:18. 11, David Larsen, Newport, 1:52:25. 12, Keith Fawcett, Grants Pass, 1:53:00. 13, Christopher Ryan, Portland, 1:53:18. 14, John Maestas, Seattle, 1:53:42. 15, Warren Rice, Sisters, 1:53:55. 16, Geoff Raynak, Bend, 1:54:08. 17, Brian Larson, Portland, 1:56:20. 18, Jonathan Penfold, Portland, 1:56:43. 19, Steven Westberg, Bend, 1:58:22. 20, Steven Basden, Portland, 2:00:25. 21, Andrew Mesesau, Bend, 2:00:58. 22, Carl Gurney, Corvallis, 2:03:36. 23, Kyle Mills, Bend, 2:05:58. 24, Bill Newton, Sisters, 2:20:14. Single Speed Women 1, Lisa Belair, Portland, 2:00:11. 2, Erin Hooten, Eugene, 2:18:06. STXC Series Race No. 4 May 23, Bend A race 1, Cody Peterson. 2, Bruce Rogers. 3, Matt Russell. 4, David Cloninger. 5, Eric Martin. 6, Matt Engel. 7, Cole Sprague. B race 1, Lance Haidet. 2, Jeremy Tufts. 3, Sean Lewis. 4, Matt Hickey. 5, Henry Abel. 6, Seth Taylor. 7, Mark Backus. 8, Rob Shatting. 9, Santi Ocariz. 10, Samuel Stumbo. 11, Chuck Kenlan. 12, Vincent Sikorski. 13, Laura Hagen. 14, Greg Hill. 15, Drew Moore. 16, Patti Wolfe.


THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012 E1

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Baby Canaries (6), $35 each, baby Finches (4), $10 each, call 541-460-5018 Barn cats ready to work in your barn, shop or home in exchange for safe shelter, food & water. Altered, shots. We deliver! 389-8420

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Chihuahua Teacup female pups, 6 wks, $300. 541-639-6974 or 541-318-7059. Chug pups, 6/15 black /white,3 lbs full grown, adorable,1 male,1 female, $350 firm 541-233-3534 Free Cow Dog Pups, English Shepherd & McNab Cross, 1 male, 1 female, red & white short haired, ready now, 541-493-2511. Free female Lab/Heeler mix to good home! We're moving and can't keep her. She's very sweet and loves to play! Contact 541-290-9395 FREE KITTENS, wide variety, Terrebonne, call 541-548-4870. German Shep. pups, all black / B&T, parents SWEET disp. M $400, F $450. 541-620-0946 German Short Hair puppies. AKC, all colors, $400. Call Mark 541-420-3580 Golden Retriever Pup, purebred, 9 weeks, all 1st shots, mother & father heath certified, $700, 605-248-2310 or 605-770-0838. Labradoodles - Mini & med size, several colors 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Maine Coon Kitten, 10 weeks old, $100, 541-389-0322. Maltese Pup, male, pure white, adorable 11 wks, shots, $800 firm 541-233-3534 Malti-Pom puppy, male white w/black, 11wks, shots, $750 - firm 541-233-3534. Mini Dachshund female 4 years old needs a new home with fenced yard, spayed, has had all shots, $100. Call 541-771-9560 after 4:00 PM. Mix dogs (2), male, smaller, ~9 mo. old, $50 ea, 541-389-0322 New kittens available! Also great rescued cats. 65480 78th St., Bend, Sat/Sun 1-5; other days by appt. 541- 647-2181. Altered, shots, ID chip, more. Info: 389-8420. Map, photos, more at www.craftcats.org

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Pets & Supplies

Golf Equipment

Building Materials

Sales Northeast Bend

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Papillon mixed with tiny Dynamis battery-operbit of toy poodle. Cute ated remote control colors, $150 each 541 walking golf cart w/ 350-1684 new battery & new charger. $120. Call 541-388-3193

La Pine Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 52684 Hwy 97 541-536-3234 Open to the public .

People Look for Information About Products and Prineville Habitat Services Every Day through ReStore The Bulletin Classifieds Poodle pups, toy, for Building Supply Resale SALE. Also Rescued 1427 NW Murphy Ct. 246 Poodle Adults for 541-447-6934 Guns, Hunting adoption, to loving Open to the public. homes. 541-475-3889 & Fishing Queensland Heelers Find exactly what standard & mini,$150 & 22LR Heritage 6-shot revolver, 3” bbl, ammo. you are looking for in the up. 541-280-1537 http:// $200. 541-647-8931. rightwayranch.wordpress.com CLASSIFIEDS CASH!! Siberian Husky AKC! For Guns, Ammo & 266 Black/white fem, 6 mos Reloading Supplies. $500. 541-977-7019 Heating & Stoves 541-408-6900. Spay your mother cat NOTICE TO GUN SHOW for only $45, we will ADVERTISER alter her litter for free! June 2nd & 3rd Since September 29, Bend Spay & Neuter Deschutes Fairgrounds. 1991, advertising for Project will spay/neuBuy! Sell! Trade! ter the first four kit- SAT. 9-5 • SUN. 10-3 used woodstoves has tens, aged 8-12 been limited to mod$8 Admission, weeks. Kittens MUST els which have been 12 & under free. be at least 2 lbs. Adcertified by the Orditional kittens $5 OREGON TRAIL GUN egon Department of SHOWS 541-347-2120 each. Call today for Environmental Qualappt. 541-617-1010. Henry 22 lever action, ity (DEQ) and the fedNIB, $300. Wincheseral Environmental ter 22 auto w/scope, Protection Agency $150. 541-771-5648 (EPA) as having met Yorkie Mix pups, tiny, smoke emission stan1st shots, $300 cash. Kimber 1911 stainless dards. A certified 541-678-7599 45acp, Ultra Carry II, woodstove may be $900. 541-647-8931 Yorkie Poo male, 8wks identified by its certifiold 6/6, blond, dew- Remington 22LR semication label, which is claws, tail docked, & permanently attached auto rifle w/scope, 1st shots. Will be to the stove. The Bul$175. 541-647-8931. small, non-shedding, letin will not knowRemington 700 BDL $325. 541-433-5261 ingly accept advertis.223 w/sling, rings & ing for the sale of 210 ammo. $500 uncertified 541-325-6928 Furniture & Appliances woodstoves. Ruger LC9 pistol, $400. 267 Ruger 9mm SS pistol, A1 Washers&Dryers $350. 541-647-8931 Fuel & Wood $150 ea. Full warranty. Free Del. Also Ruger Red Hawk,StainDry seasoned tamarack wanted, used W/D’s less Hunter, 44 mag, red fir, $165 rnd, $185 541-280-7355 7.5”,$490,541-279-0715 split 541-977-4500 or 541-416-3677 GENERATE SOME ex- S&W M&P, 9mm, citement in your box, 2 clips, like Lodgepole pine, 15” cut, neighborhood! Plan a new, all black, $450, $160/measured cord, garage sale and don't Call 541-604-5115 avail. now, delivered forget to advertise in local, 541-389-0322. classified! Taurus 22LR semi-auto 541-385-5809. 269 pistol, case & ammo, La-Z-Boy rocker/recliner, $200. 541-647-8931 Gardening Supplies taupe color fabric, $65 & Equipment Wanted: .22 Pump Rem OBO, 541-749-0024 Mod 121 or Win Mod Like new reclining 61, 541-546-3330. For newspaper leather rocker, brown, delivery, call the Wanted: Collector $275. 541-923-9867 Circulation Dept. at seeks high quality 541-385-5800 Redwood tbl w/5 chairs, fishing items. To place an ad, call 2 lounges, cushions etc, Call 541-678-5753, or 503-351-2746 541-385-5809 $199. 541-815-5000 or email Twin bed, like new, Winchester 12ga pump, classified@bendbulletin.com must see to appreci$175. Ithaca 16ga ate! Mattress, box pump, $325. Call spring, bookcase/ 541-771-5648 headboard, & extras, 247 $350. 541-536-5067 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Sporting Goods Screened, soil & comThe Bulletin - Misc. post mixed, no r ecommends extra rocks/clods. High hucaution when pur- 14’ Army tent w/arctic mus level, exc. for chasing products or pkg, all ropes incl, flower beds, lawns, services from out of great cond, all set up, gardens, straight the area. Sending ready to view. $400. screened top soil. cash, checks, or 541-923-5920/550-9225 Bark. Clean fill. Decredit information liver/you haul. 253 may be subjected to 541-548-3949. FRAUD. For more TV, Stereo & Video information about an 270 advertiser, you may 28” RCA color TV Lost & Found call the Oregon w/remote & manual, State Attorney $40. 541-504-7517 Found GM keys, corner General’s Office of Cooley & Hunter’s Consumer Protec- TV, Sharp 32” w/remote Circle, Bend, 5/21. & manual, like new tion hotline at $50 541-382-4657 541-350-9758 1-877-877-9392. 255 Lost during PPP, bag with Pearl Izumi bike Computers shoes & red helmet. near west side BMC, THE BULLETIN re212 541-317-5182. quires computer adAntiques & vertisers with multiple REMEMBER: If you Collectibles ad schedules or those have lost an animal, selling multiple sysdon't forget to check Framed Print of Augustems/ software, to disThe Humane Society tas Azalia Hole #13, by close the name of the in Bend 541-382-3537 Nancy Raborn, $65 business or the term Redmond, OBO, 541-548-8718 "dealer" in their ads. 541-923-0882 Private party advertisThe Bulletin reserves Prineville, ers are defined as the right to publish all 541-447-7178; those who sell one ads from The Bulletin OR Craft Cats, computer. newspaper onto The 541-389-8420. Bulletin Internet web260 site. 275 Misc. Items Auction Sales 40-ft Storage container, excellent condition, Train magazines, 1970s $2800. 541-620-2135 -80s, 60 @ $3 each. 541-306-8631 Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash Just bought a new boat? Saxon’s Fine Jewelers Sell your old one in the PUBLIC AUCTION541-389-6655 classiieds! Ask about our Monaco Coach Super Seller rates! BUYING Online Bidding at 541-385-5809 Lionel/American Flyer www.CharlestonAuctions.com trains, accessories. US Stamp Collection Friday, June 1st 541-408-2191. Mint cond., 1926-2000, Thursday, June 7th white Ace albums + BUYING & SELLING many Elvis stamps & Preview Inspection: record albums, $2000, All gold jewelry, silver June 4th - 6th 8am - 5pm and gold coins, bars, 541-447-4578 rounds, wedding sets, 91320 Coburg Industrial class rings, sterling sil241 Way,Coburg, OR 97408 ver, coin collect, vinBicycles & tage watches, dental Featured Equipment: Accessories Adwest Technologies gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419. 99% Retox RTOVOCDRECannondale R500 Road with Flameless Nox-Free Bike, dk green, 54cm, Sears gas BBQ with Operation; Munters Zeolpropane tank & cover converted to flat bar VOC Rotor Concentrator; $150. 541-977-2223. (drops incl), exc cond, Paint Booths; JBI Spray $500. 541-382-2259 Wanted- paying cash Booth Finishing Systems; for Hi-fi audio & stuMtn Bike, 2011 Giant, Murphy-Rodgers, Green dio equip. McIntosh, brand new off road Heck, Eurovac, & Torit JBL, Marantz, Dytires, must sell, great Dust Collectors; Over naco, Heathkit, Sancond., $300, (100) Lincoln & Miller sui, Carver, NAD, etc. 541-480-2652. Welders; Band Saws, Call 541-261-1808 Table Saws, Mitre Saws, TI Litespeed TusDisc Sanders, Belt Sand263 cany, 51cm, Ultegra ers, Drill Presses Tools 6700. Ultegra Call (877)357-8124 wheels, 11-28 gears. Cabinet Shop Closing - www.CharlestonAuctions.com $1100. Selling all tools, Gor541-389-0099 don, 541-410-9734

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT at

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

Employment

400 421

Schools & Training

TRUCK SCHOOL

www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235 476

Employment Opportunities

AV Tech - Swank Audio Visuals is seeking a PT Audio Visual Technician in Sunri292 ver. For more inforSales Other Areas mation or to apply please visit www.swankav.com SHOP SALE! 5/26-28, Become a 8-4, 8153 Shoshone, Culver. Snowblower & Team Member. EOE and a whole lot more! Caregiver Prineville Senior care home looking for Care Farm Manager for multiple Market shift, part-time to full-time. Pass criminal background check. 541-447-5773.

300 308

Farm Equipment & Machinery John Deere 466 PTO Driven Twine Baler, $3250, take cattle on trade, 541-410-3425. John Deere Model 40 1955, nearly 100% Orig, runs good, exc. tin, 3 point hitch, hydraulics, light, $2000, 541-504-2891 or 541-977-3120 Kioti CK20 tractor w/bucket, backhoe & grader blade. 370 hrs. $13,900 Prineville, 541-416-0300 325

Hay, Grain & Feed 1st quality grass hay for horses. Barn stored, no rain, 2nd cutting, $220/ ton. Patterson Ranch, Sisters, 541-549-3831 Want to buy Alfalfa standing, in Central Ore. 541-419-2713 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw;Compost.546-6171

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 341

Horses & Equipment COLT STARTING We build solid foundations. Check us out. 541-419-3405

www.steelduststable.com 345

COUNTER

SALES

Customer Service postion with a Pacific NW leader in the distribution of Waterworks, Irrigation, and Pumps. Qualifications: excellent phone and computer skills, ability to multi task, work hard, be a team player. Industry knowledge required. EEOC Drug Test req'd Exc Benefit Pkg. Apply: Send cover letter and resume to david@hdfowler.com. No phone calls please.

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

Field Service

Hoffmeyer Co. is seeking an energetic person for long-term employment, Will assist with conveyor belting installs, shipping, receiving, customer service. Job requires flexible work schedule including nights & weekends; some overnight travel. No experience required; will train. ODL REQUIRED. $9-$12/ hr. Application necessary. Please apply in person: 20575 Painters Ct., Bend, OR.

F & I Manager

Medical

Wallowa Memorial Hospital Located in Enterprise, Oregon Director of Cardiopulmonary

Full-Time AA or BA in RT Sleep lab experience required. Competitive benefit package. Visit our website at wchcd.org or contact Linda Childers, (541) 426-5313 EOE

Big Country RV, Inc., Remember.... Central Oregon’s Add your web adLargest RV Dealerdress to your ad and ship, is growing and readers on The adding a F&I ManBulletin' s web site ager. Ideal candidate will be able to click would have experithrough automatically ence selling extended to your site. service agreements and other finance products. Candidate Retail Sales must possess high Design Oriented moral character, excellent interpersonal skills, experience with Furniture Outlet, Lenders, attention to part-time, expedetail and be able to rience is helpful. work weekends. UnSerious applilimited earning potencants with protial, excellent benefit fessional appackage including • IRA pearance apply • Dental Plan in person at: • Medical Insurance Please send resume to: Big Country RV, Inc. 63500 N Hwy 97, Bend, OR 97701 or via email at accounting@bigcrv.com Insurance EARN $500 A DAY by selling Final Expense Insurance policies to the ever growing senior market. • Same Day Advances • Great Agent Benefits • Proven Lead System • Liberal Underwriting • Exotic Incentive Trips LIFE INSURANCE LICENSE REQUIRED. Call Lincoln Heritage: 1-888-713-6020

1735 NE Hwy 20, Bend. RV Sales Mgr

Big Country RV, Central Oregon's largest RV dealership is adding a Sales Manager position. Industry experience required. Full-time, weekends required. Exceptional pay and benefits. Submit resume to 63500 N Hwy 97, Bend, OR 97701 attention Teresa or via email at accounting@bigcrv.com

RV Salesperson

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Finance & Business

500 528

Loans & Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Big Country RV, Inc., Central Oregon’s Largest RV Dealer541-385-5809. ship, is growing and VIEW the adding to our strong Classifieds at: sales staff. We are www.bendbulletin.com looking for the right person who wants a career in one of the Check out the Driver /Part-Time fastest growing inWanted: classiieds online dustries in Central Class A CDL Oregon. Great op- www.bendbulletin.com Required, Redi-Mix Updated daily portunity for the right Experience individual in a wellpreferred. established, well-run 573 Must have a current environment. Excep- Business Opportunities copy of DMV record tional inventory of new Contact Shevlin and used RVs. UnlimOpportunity Sand & Gravel LLC ited earning potential Looking for your described at: 541-312-4730 with an excellent bennext employee? efit package to in- Place a Bulletin help heartcentercardiology.com clude: wanted ad today and BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS • IRA reach over 60,000 Search the area’s most • Dental Plan readers each week. comprehensive listing of • Medical Insurance Your classified ad classiied advertising... Medical • Up to 35% commiswill also appear on real estate to automotive, Wallowa sion bendbulletin.com merchandise to sporting • Great Training Memorial Hospital which currently regoods. Bulletin Classiieds ceives over 1.5 milLocated in appear every day in the Must be able to work lion page views Enterprise, Oregon print or on line. weekends and have a every month at Call 541-385-5809 passion for the RV no extra cost. Nursing Supervisor www.bendbulletin.com business. Please apBulletin Classifieds ply in person, or drop Get Results! Call Full-Time resume off at: 385-5809 or place ACLS, TNCC, PALS, Big Country RV, Inc. your ad on-line at CPR Required. 3500 N. Hwy 97 bendbulletin.com Embroidery Production Bend, OR 97701 Person - Eye of the Competitive benefit or email a resume to Needle -Strength, good package. Visit our accounting@bigcrv.com eyesight, stamina Call a Pro website at wchcd.org needed. Computer skills or contact Whether you need a & eager to learn. Starting Linda Childers, part time $9. Contact: RV Tech fence ixed, hedges (541) 426-5313 rexann@eyeoftheneedle Big Country RV, Centrimmed or a house EOE bend.com, 61478 Duncan tral Oregon's largest built, you’ll ind Ln, Bend, OR 97702 RV dealership is seeking an experiprofessional help in enced RV Tech, top Advertising Account Executive The Bulletin’s “Call a dollar & benefits. Great working envi- Service Professional” ronment. Apply in Directory person at: 63500 N 541-385-5809 Hwy 97, Bend.

Medical Assistant

Livestock & Equipment Healthy Beef Feeder Steers. Wormed vaccinated ready for pasture. Delivery avail for small fee. 541-382-8393 or msg 350

Horseshoeing/ Farriers LARGE west side Bend equestrian center on 80 acres now boarding. Indoor/outdoor arena, indoor hot/cold showers, automated exerciser, extensive trail system. Call for info, 541-306-7507. 358

The Bulletin is looking for a professional and driven sales and marketing person to help our customers grow their businesses with an expanding list of broad-reach and targeted products. This full time position requires a background in consultative sales, territory management and aggressive prospecting skills. Two years of media sales experience is preferable, but we will train the right candidate. The position offers a competitive compensation package including benefits, and rewards an aggressive, customer focused salesperson with unlimited earning potential. Please send your resume, cover letter and salary history to:

Want to buy Alfalfa standing, in Central Ore. 541-419-2713

Bulletin Advertising Department

Special Project Photographer/ Editorial Assistant The Bulletin is seeking a skilled photographer and editorial assistant to join the Special Projects team. Successful candidate will be responsible for on-site and studio photography for advertising products, including special magazines and niche products as well as retail advertising. Editorial assistant duties include some writing, organization, editing, data base management. Will also assist in some social media projects and participate in local events sponsored by The Bulletin.

Sean L. Tate Advertising Manager state@bendbulletin.com

Qualified employee will possess basic photography skills, computer skills including Microsoft Office Suite and Adobe Creative Suite. Will require the use of a reliable personal automobile, proof of insurance, lifting up to 40 lbs.

You may also drop off your resume in person or mail it to: 1777 SW Chandler, Bend, OR 97701. No phone inquiries please.

To apply, send a resume, cover letter and any appropriate work samples to: Martha Tiller at mtiller@bendbulletin.com. No phone call please.

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

Newspaper

EOE / Drug Free Workplace


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

E2 MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

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931

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories

Edited by Will Shortz

Rentals

600

SPRINGDALE 2005 27’, has eating area slide, A/C and heat, new tires, all contents included, bedding towels, cooking and eating utensils. Great for vacation, fishing, hunting or living! $15,500 541-408-3811

650

745

860

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Houses for Rent NE Bend

Homes for Sale

Motorcycles & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

NOTICE:

A quiet newer 3 bdrm, All real estate adver2.5 bath, 1692 sq.ft., tised here in is submtn views. dbl. gaject to the Federal rage w/opener. $1195 Fair Housing Act, 541-480-3393,610-7803. which makes it illegal Honda Shadow Arrow to advertise any prefCOUNTRY LIVING! 2/1 2006, exlnt cond, low 605 erence, limitation or mobile, heat pump, mi, always garaged, discrimination based A/C, gas range, refrigRoommate Wanted $3900. 541-420-4869 on race, color, relierator. No smoking. gion, sex, handicap, Small pet? $600 mo.+ 1bdrm apt, utils inc, familial status or nashare kitch, must love deposits, w/s/g intional origin, or intendogs! Redmond. $525 cluded. 541-382-1365 Honda VT700 tion to make any such 1st/last. 541-280-4936 Shadow 1984, 23K preferences, limitaLooking for your next mi, many new parts, tions or discrimination. 630 employee? battery charger, We will not knowingly Place a Bulletin help good condition. Rooms for Rent accept any advertiswanted ad today and Now for $1000, ing for real estate reach over 60,000 cash! 541-598-4351 Studios & Kitchenettes which is in violation of readers each week. Furnished room, TV w/ this law. All persons Your classified ad cable, micro & fridge. are hereby informed Piaggio LT50 Scooter will also appear on Utils & linens. New that all dwellings ad2003 , rarely driven in bendbulletin.com, owners.$145-$165/wk 9 yrs, only 660 miles, vertised are available 541-382-1885 currently receiving mint condition; plus 2 on an equal opportuover 1.5 million page helmets, a Mote Tote nity basis. The Bulleviews, every month 634 tow bar and tie down tin Classified at no extra cost. Apt./Multiplex NE Bend accessories, all for Bulletin Classifieds only $1750. 773 Get Results! Call 541-389-3044 Acreages Call 541-385-5809 or Alpine Meadows place your ad on-line 865 Townhomes 14 ACRES TALL PINES at 1, 2 & 3 bdrm apts. ATVs backs up to National bendbulletin.com Starting at $625. Forest. paved Road. 541-330-0719 Top recreational area. 652 Professionally Power at Property. managed by Houses for Rent Zoned for Residence. Norris & Stevens, Inc. 12 miles north of Bly, NW Bend OR. $35,000. By Owner. Call 541-892SPRING IN FOR A Broken Top gorgeous 3 Yamaha yfz450 2005 2829 or 541-783-2829 BR 3BA furnished home, GREAT DEAL!! Sport Race quad, built $299 1st month’s rent! * vaulted ceilings, $1950 / 20% discount for cash! 4-mil stroked to 470cc, 2 bdrm, 1 bath month, 1-yr lease. Call lots of mods, $5000 obo $530 & 540 Melissa, 541-306-7039 Call 541-647-8931 Carports & A/C incl! Fox Hollow Apts. USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Boats & RV’s 870 (541) 383-3152 Boats & Accessories Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co Door-to-door selling with *Upstairs only with lease* fast results! It’s the easiest 12' Smokercraft way in the world to sell. 638 2000 & trailer. 2007 Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 9.9 HP Johnson The Bulletin Classiied w/less than 5 hrs 541-385-5809 A Sharp Clean 2 bdrm, use, Exc. shape. 850 1.5 bath apt., NEW Clean small 2 bdrm. $3200, Call Snowmobiles CARPETS, neutral 360-903-7873 to Large yard. Wood colors, great storage, view. In town. heat. $700+ last + Polaris 2003, 4 cycle, private patio, no pets/ dep. Local ref. No fuel inj, elec start, resmoking, $530 incl. pets. 1015 NW Ogden. verse, 2-up seat, W/S/G, 541-633-0663 Smokercraft cover, 4900 mi, $2500 13’ 659 1997, Alaskan Fish obo. 541-280-0514 Houses for Rent 640 Boat w/ 9.9 Merc & elec. motor, swivel Sunriver 860 Apt./Multiplex SW Bend seat, fish finder, anMotorcycles & Accessories chor, cover & top, Spacious 2 bdrm 1½ In River Meadows a 3 trailer, $2450, bdrm, 1.5 bath, 1376 bath townhouse, w/d 541-977-2644. hkup, fenced yd. NO sq. ft., woodstove, PETS. Great loc! brand new carpet/oak $565 & up. 179 SW floors, W/S pd, $895. Hayes 541-382-0162; 541-480-3393 541-420-0133 or 541-610-7803 Harley Davidson Heri687 Call The Bulletin At tage Classic 2000 Commercial for 541-385-5809 Softail, 7200 mi, many extras, $8000. Call 16’ Driftboat, like new Rent/Lease Place Your Ad Or E-Mail 541-419-5634 cond., lots of upgrades, At: www.bendbulletin.com 6 HP LS motor, $6500, Office/Warehouse loHarley Davidson Softcall/text, 541-480-8075. cated in SE Bend. Up 648 Tail Deluxe 2007, to 30,000 sq.ft., comHouses for 1988 373V white/cobalt, w/pas- 19.5’ petitive rate, Ranger Bass Boat, senger kit, Vance & Rent General 541-382-3678. Mercury 115 Motor, Hines muffler system Ranger trailer, trolling & kit, 1045 mi., exc. PUBLISHER'S elec. motor, fish finder cond, $19,999, NOTICE Real Estate & sonor, 2 live wells & 541-389-9188. All real estate adverall accessories, new For Sale tising in this newspabatteries & tires, great per is subject to the TURN THE PAGE cond., $6500. Fair Housing Act 541-923-6555. For More Ads which makes it illegal The Bulletin to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination Harley Heritage 732 based on race, color, Softail, 2003 religion, sex, handi- Commercial/Investment $5,000+ in extras, cap, familial status, $2000 paint job, Properties for Sale 19-ft Mastercraft Promarital status or na30K mi. 1 owner, Star 190 inboard, tional origin, or an in- ½ acre in Prineville OR For more information 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 tention to make any please call industrial park 24'x80' hrs, great cond, lots of such preference, 541-385-8090 shop with 40'x60' extras, $10,000 obo. limitation or discrimior 209-605-5537 unfinished addition, 541-231-8709 nation." Familial sta$160,000. Call for tus includes children more info; can send HD FAT BOY under the age of 18 pics. 541-604-0344 1996 living with parents or dwelling legal custodians, Existing lot, Completely rebuilt/ and large shop + 2 pregnant women, and customized, low new lots for developpeople securing cusmiles. Accepting ofment, in fast-growing tody of children under fers. 541-548-4807 19’ Glass Ply, Merc Boardman, OR. Du18. This newspaper cruiser, depth finder, plex approved. Syswill not knowingly actrolling motor, trailer, Honda 1500 Trike, 1994 tem dev. fees waived. cept any advertising $3500, 541-389-1086 with ‘08 Champion $199,500. For details for real estate which is or 541-419-8034. conversion, metallic call 1-541-379-0362 in violation of the law. red, always garaged, Our readers are low miles, lots of op745 hereby informed that tions $21,500. Call Homes for Sale all dwellings adver541-598-7718 tised in this newspa20.5’ 2004 Bayliner per are available on 4270 sq ft, 6bd, 6ba, HONDA CRF 250X 205 Run About, 220 4-car, corner, .83 ac, an equal opportunity HP, V8, open bow, 2006, senior citizen mtn view, by owner. basis. To complain of exc. cond., very fast bought new in 2007, discrimination call $590,000 541-390-0886 w/very low hours, trail riding only in HUD toll-free at See: bloomkey.com/8779 lots of extras incl. Camp Sherman, low 1-800-877-0246. The BANK OWNED HOMES! tower, Bimini & hours, not ridden last toll free telephone custom trailer, year, JD jetting kit, raFREE List w/Pics! number for the hear- www.BendRepos.com $19,500. diator & trans. guards, ing impaired is bend and beyond real estate exc. cond., $2800 541-389-1413 1-800-927-9275. OBO, 541-595-2559 20967 yeoman, bend or

800

700

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, W/D. $75,000 541-215-5355 Georgetown 350, 2006, 11,000 mi, like new, generator, rear camera, 2 slides, auto leveling, awn. $50,000 541-549-4203 Gulfstream Scenic Springdale 29’ 2007, Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, slide,Bunkhouse style, Cummins 330 hp diesleeps 7-8, excellent sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 condition, $16,900, in. kitchen slide out, 541-390-2504 new tires,under cover, hwy. miles only,4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp propane gen & more! Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 $55,000. 29’, weatherized, like 541-948-2310 new, furnished & ready to go, incl Winegard Satellite dish, $26,995. 541-420-9964 Hunter’s Delight! Package deal! 1988 Winnebago Super Chief, 38K miles, great shape; 1988 Bronco II 4x4 to tow, 130K mostly towed miles, Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, nice rig! $15,000 both. fuel station, exc cond. 541-382-3964, leave sleeps 8, black/gray msg. interior, used 3X, $24,999. CAN’T BEAT THIS! 541-389-9188 Look before you buy, below market value ! Size & mileLooking for your age DOES matter, next employee? Class A 32’ HurriPlace a Bulletin help cane by Four Winds, wanted ad today and 2007. 12,500 mi, all reach over 60,000 amenities, Ford V10, readers each week. lthr, cherry, slides, Your classified ad like new, can see will also appear on anytime, $58,000. bendbulletin.com 541-548-5216 which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Jayco Greyhawk Classifieds Get Re2004, 31’ Class C, sults! Call 385-5809 6800 mi., hyd. jacks, or place your ad new tires, slide out, on-line at exc. cond, $49,900, bendbulletin.com 541-480-8648 Lazy Daze 26’ 2004, 11K mi., $46,000. 619-733-8472.

882

Fifth Wheels

20’ Tracker, Pontoon Fisherman, 40HP motor, great interior $8000, 541-912-9336

Regal Prowler AX6 Extreme Edition 38’ ‘05, 4 slides,2 fireplaces, all maple cabs, king bed/ bdrm separated w/slide glass dr,loaded,always garaged,lived in only 3 mo,brand new $54,000, still like new, $28,500, will deliver,see rvt.com, ad#4957646 for pics. Cory, 541-580-7334

London Aire Motor Home, class C, 28 ft. 25’ Catalina Sailboat 1983, w/trailer, swing keel, pop top, fully loaded, $9500 call for details, 541-480-8060 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

1990, in exc. shape, ready to go. Sleeps 6, Upgrade your camping experience! $11,995. Call 541-389-7955 Metal RV cover 14’x14x 41’long, 3 sided, walk-in door, like new, $4000. 541-620-2135

Monaco Dynasty 2004, loaded, 3 slides, $159,000, 541-923- 8572 or 541-749-0037 (cell)

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, fireplace, 2 flat screen TVs. $60,000. 541-480-3923

932

Antique & Classic Autos

Chevy 1951 pickup,

restored. $13,500 obo; 541-504-3253 or 503-504-2764

Sundance 29’ 2009, 3 slides, quality queen mattress, non smoking, elec. jacks, upgrades, oak cabinets, fully loaded, $25,900 OBO; 541-610-5178

Chevy Camaro, 1968, 454 big block, too much to list. $19,500. 360-921-9234 (Bend) Taurus 27.5’ ‘88,all work, $1750/partial trade for car. 541-460-9127 885

Canopies & Campers For sale or trade to- Chevy Wagon 1957, wards 24’-26’ trailer 4-dr., complete, with slide. Lance $15,000 OBO, trades, Squire 9’10” cabover, please call ‘96, elec. jacks, solar 541-420-5453. panel, 2-dr refrig, freezer, awning, out- Chrysler 300 Coupe door shower, exc. 1967, 440 engine, cond, $7000 obo. auto. trans, ps, air, 541-549-1342 frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, Lance 11.6 camper Mdl original blue interior, 1130, 1999. Ext’d cab, original hub caps, exc. fully self-contained. chrome, asking $9000 Incl catalytic heater, or make offer. TV/VCR combo. Very 541-385-9350. well taken care of, clean. Hauls easily, very comfortable. $8995. 541-382-1344 Lance-Legend 990 Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, Standard, 8-cylinder, exc. cond., generator, body is good, needs solar-cell, large refrig, some restoration, AC, micro., magic fan, runs, taking bids, bathroom shower, 541-383-3888, removable carpet, 541-815-3318 custom windows, outdoor shower/awning set-up for winterizing, Need help ixing stuff? elec. jacks, CD/ste- Call A Service Professional reo/4’ stinger. $9000. ind the help you need. Bend, 541.279.0458 www.bendbulletin.com

Autos & Transportation

900 908

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $12,750. 541-923-3417.

We Buy Junk Cars & Trucks! Cash paid for junk vehicles, batteries & catalytic converters. Serving all of C.O.! Call 541-408-1090

Aircraft, Parts & Service

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd, door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced! $5,500. 541-317-9319 or 541-647-8483

Ford Galaxie 500 1963, 1/3 interest in Colum- 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, bia 400, located at 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & Sunriver. $138,500. radio (orig),541-419-4989 Call 541-647-3718 Ford Mustang Coupe 1/3 interest in well1966, original owner, equipped IFR Beech V8, automatic, great Bonanza A36, loshape, $9000 OBO. cated KBDN. $55,000. 530-515-8199 541-419-9510

Executive Hangar

at Bend Airport (KBDN) 60’ wide x 50’ deep, w/55’ wide x 17’ high bi-fold door. Natural gas heat, office, bathroom. Parking for 6 cars. Adjacent to Frontage Rd; great visibility for aviation bus. 1jetjock@q.com 541-948-2126

COACHMAN 1997 GENERATE SOME exCatalina 5th wheel citement in your neig23’, slide, new tires, borhood. Plan a gaextra clean, below rage sale and don't book. $6,500. forget to advertise in 541-548-1422 classified! 385-5809. National Sea Breeze 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, 2 power slides, upgraded queen mat- Escaper 29’ 1991, 2 slides, A/C, tress, hyd. leveling elec/gas fridge, walk Used out-drive system, rear camera around queen bed, parts - Mercury & monitor, only 6k mi. elec. front jacks, OMC rebuilt maA steal at $43,000! $4000 OBO, rine motors: 151 541-480-0617 541-382-8939 or $1595; 3.0 $1895; RV CONSIGNMENTS 541-777-0999. 4.3 (1993), $1995. ONLY 3 OWNERSHIP WANTED 541-389-0435 SHARES LEFT! We Do The Work, You Economical flying in Keep The Cash, your own Cessna On-Site Credit 875 172/180 HP for only Approval Team, Watercraft $10,000! Based at Web Site Presence, BDN. Call Gabe at We Take Trade-Ins. Ads published in "WaProfessional Air! Free Advertising. Fleetwood Wilderness tercraft" include: Kay541-388-0019 BIG COUNTRY RV 36’ 2005 4 slides, rear aks, rafts and motorBend 541-330-2495 bdrm, fireplace, AC, ized personal Redmond: 541-548-5254 916 W/D hkup beautiful watercrafts. For Trucks & unit! $30,500. "boats" please see 541-815-2380 Heavy Equipment Class 870. HIJACKER 24-HSK-21 541-385-5809 5th Wheel Hitch. Minimal wear and use. Track bolts all inSouthwind 35.5’ Triton, cluded. Asking $425. 2008,V10, 2 slides, Du541.610.9816 pont UV coat, 7500 mi. 1982 INT. Dump w/ArAvg NADA ret.114,343; asking $99,000. borhood, 6k on rebuilt Call 541-923-2774 392, truck refurbished, has 330 gal. water Inflatable Raft,Sevylor Tioga 30’ 2005, like new tank w/pump & hose. condition, E450 Super Fishmaster 325,10’3”, Everything works, Duty, always garage Komfort 24’ 1999, 6’ complete pkg., $650 Reduced - now $5000 stored, 17,345 nonslide, fully loaded,never Firm, 541-977-4461. OBO. 541-977-8988 smoker mi., awning, used since buying, never cooked in, A/C, Look at: $8500, 541-923-0854. sleeps 8, $42,500, for Bendhomes.com details call Montana 34’ 2003, 2 for Complete Listings of 541-480-3217 slides, exc. cond. Area Real Estate for Sale throughout, arctic winter pkg, new 10- Peterbilt 359 potable water truck, 1990, ply tires, W/D ready, 3200 gal. tank, 5hp price reduced, Now pump, 4-3" hoses, $18,000, camlocks, $25,000. Kayak, Eddyline 541-390-6531 541-820-3724 Winnebago Outlook 32’ Sandpiper, 12’, like 2008, Ford V10 eng, new, $975, 925 Wineguard sat, TV, sur541-420-3277. Utility Trailers round sound stereo + more. Reduced to $49,000. 541-526-1622 880 or 541-728-6793 Motorhomes MONTANA 3585 2008, 881 Big Tex Landscapexc. cond., 3 slides, ing/ ATV Trailer, Travel Trailers king bed, lrg LR, Arcdual axle flatbed, tic insulation, all op7’x16’, 7000 lb. tions $37,500. GVW, all steel, 541-420-3250 $1400. 541-382-4115, or 1996 Beaver Monterey Need to get an 541-280-7024. 30' Diesel pusher, low ad in ASAP? miles, fully loaded, Fleetwood 24’ Pioneer good Toyo tires, tow 931 You can place it Spirit, 2007, good package, very clean. Automotive Parts, online at: cond, minor dent on $25,000. 541-604-0344 front saves you $$! www.bendbulletin.com Service & Accessories or 541-447-2175 $8000. 541-419-5634 ‘92-96 Ford F150, tailJayco Eagle 2000 26’ 541-385-5809 gate, maroon, exc cond, $10,500 OBO. 14’ slide, $125. 541-382-8973 awning, air, heat, gently used. 541-595-2003 Polished cherrywood steering wheel w/GT RV Queen mattress, 6’ horn & shift knob kit, long, top of line cond, 2002 Country Coach $135. 541-918-1380 $60. 541-595-6261 Intrigue 40' Tag axle. 400hp Cummins Die- Space for rent In Tu- Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th Traction Snow Tires (4), sel. Two slide-outs. wheel, 1 slide, AC, has Snowflake, 235/ malo. 30 amp + water, 41,000 miles. Most TV,full awning, excel70R16, great shape, no septic, level gravel options. $110,000 lent shape, $23,900. lots of tread, $250, lot. $100 wk., $350 OBO 541-678-5712 mo. 541-419-5060 541-350-8629 541-408-0531

GMC ½ ton 1971, Only $19,700! Original low mile, exceptional, 3rd owner. 951-699-7171

Lincoln Mark IV, 1972, needs vinyl top, runs good, $3500. 541-771-4747

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597 933

Pickups

Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, 1995, extended cab, long box, grill guard, running boards, bed rails & canopy, 178K miles, $4800 obo. 208-301-3321 (Bend) Chevy S10 2002 ext cab, 69K mi., tonneau cover, auto trans, exc. cond. $8400 obo Randy 541-504-1298 Dodge 1500 2001 4x4 sport, red, loaded, rollbar, AND 2011 Moped Trike used 3 months, street legal. call 541-433-2384

Dodge 3500 2007 Quad Cab SLT 4x4, 6.7L Cummins 6-spd AT, after-market upgrades, superb truck, call for details, $28,000 OBO. 541-385-5682

Ford F-150 1995, 112K, 4X4, long bed, auto, very clean, runs well, new tires, $6000. 541-548-4039.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012 E3

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Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc. cond., $19,900, call 541-923-0231.

AUDI QUATTRO CABRIOLET 2004, extra nice, low mileage, heated seats, new Michelins, all wheel drive, $12,995 503-635-9494.

Ford F-350 XLT 2003, 4X4, 6L diesel, 6-spd manual, Super Cab, short box, 12K Warn winch, custom bumper & canopy, running boards, 2 sets tires, wheels & chains, many extras, perfect, ONLY 29,800 miles, $27,500 OBO, 541-504-8316.

BMW 525i 2004

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Jeep Cherokee 1990, 4WD, 3 sets rims & tires, exlnt set snow tires, great 1st car! $1800. 541-633-5149 Jeep Liberty 2005 #693846…$15,995

541-598-3750

aaaoregonautosource.com

Jeep Willys 1947 cstm, small block Chevy, PS, OD, mags + trlr. Swap for backhoe. No a.m. calls, pls. 541-389-6990

New body style, Steptronic auto., cold-weather package, premium package, heated seats, extra nice. $14,995. 503-635-9494. Buick Lucerne CX 2006 65k, 3.8 V6, cloth int., 30 mpg hwy, $7500. Buick Park Avenue 1992, leather, 136k, 28 mpg hwy. $2500. Bob, 541-318-9999 Ask me about the Free Trip to Washington, D.C. for WWII Veterans. Good classiied ads tell the essential facts in an interesting Manner. Write from the readers view - not the seller’s. Convert the facts into beneits. Show the reader how the item will help them in some way.

Mazda B4000 2004 Cab Plus 4x4. 4½ yrs or 95,000 miles left on ext’d warranty. V6, 5-spd, AC, studded tires, 2 extra rims, tow pkg, 132K mi, all Porsche Cayenne 2004, records, exlnt cond, 86k, immac, dealer Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl $9500. 541-408-8611 maint’d, loaded, now white, very low mi. $17000. 503-459-1580 935 $9500. 541-788-8218. Sport Utility Vehicles Nissan Sentra 4-dr 1997, fuel efficient, Range Rover 2005 AT, FWD, CC, $1800. HSE, nav, DVD, Call 541-420-8831 local car, new tires, PORSCHE 914, 1974 51K miles. CHEVY Roller (no engine), $24,995. SUBURBAN LT lowered, full roll cage, 503-635-9494 2005, low miles., 5-pt harnesses, racgood tires, new ing seats, 911 dash & brakes, moonroof instruments, decent Reduced to shape, very cool! $15,750 Range Rover, $1699. 541-678-3249 541-389-5016. 2006 Sport HSE, nav, AWD, heated Get your seats, moonroof, business local owner, Harman Kardon, $23,995. G RO W 503-635-9494

IN G

Chevy Tahoe, 1999, very clean, loaded, 23,600k on new motor; new tires & battery, $5000. 541-330-1151 Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 4x4. 120K mi, Power seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd row seating, extra tires, CD, privacy tinting, upgraded rims. Fantastic cond. $9500 Contact Timm at 541-408-2393 for info or to view vehicle.

940

Vans Ford Windstar 1995 7 pass., 140k, 3.8 V6, no junk. Drive it away for $1750; 1996 Nissan Quest 7 pass., 152k, 3.0 V6, new tires, ready for next 152k, $4500. Call 541-318-9999, ask for Bob.

with an ad in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Building/Contracting

Handyman

NOTICE: Oregon state I DO THAT! law requires any- Home/Rental repairs one who contracts Small jobs to remodels for construction work Honest, guaranteed to be licensed with the work. CCB#151573 Construction Con- Dennis 541-317-9768 tractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor Landscaping/Yard Care is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Computer/Cabling Install QB Digital Living •Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458

•Leaves •Cones •Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration •Dethatching Compost Top Dressing Weed free Bark & flower beds ORGANIC PROGRAMS

Landscape Maintenance

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Electrical Services

•Sprinkler Activation & Repair •Back Flow Testing •Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up

Spring Clean Up

Debris Removal

For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel, 541-389-8107

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

More Than Service Peace Of Mind

CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

JUNK BE GONE

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

•Weekly Mowing •Bi-Monthly & Monthly Maintenance •Flower Bed Clean Up •Bark, Rock, Etc. •Senior Discounts

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding Sprinkler Adjustments

I Haul Away FREE

Landscaping/Yard Care

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

Free Estimates Senior Discounts Quality Builders Electric 541-390-1466 • Remodels Same Day Response • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups NOTICE: OREGON 541-389-0621 Landscape Contracwww.qbelectric.net tors Law (ORS 671) CCB#127370 Elect requires all busiLic#9-206C nesses that advertise to perform LandExcavating scape Construction which includes: Levi’s Dirt Works: All planting, decks, your excavation needs: fences, arbors, Small jobs for Homewater-features, and owners - job or hr., Utilinstallation, repair of ity lines,Concrete, Public irrigation systems to Works, Subcontracting, be licensed with the Custom pads, Driveway Landscape Contracgrading - low cost-get rid tors Board. This of pot holes & smooth out 4-digit number is to be your drive,Augering,ccb# included in all adver194077, 541-639-5282 tisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and Handyman workers compensation for their employERIC REEVE HANDY ees. For your protecSERVICES. Home & tion call 503-378-5909 Commercial Repairs, or use our website: Carpentry-Painting, www.lcb.state.or.us to Pressure-washing, check license status Honey Do's. On-time before contracting promise. Senior with the business. Discount. Work guarPersons doing landanteed. 541-389-3361 scape maintenance or 541-771-4463 do not require a LCB Bonded & Insured license. CCB#181595

LCB#8759

Spring Clean up. Bi-weekly & monthly maint., debris hauling, property clean-up, bark decoration. Residential & Commercial. Free Estimates. Call The Yard Doctor for yard maintenance, thatching, sod, sprinkler blowouts, water features, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012 Aeration / Dethatching BOOK NOW! Weekly / one-time service avail. Bonded, insured, free estimates!

COLLINS Lawn Maint. Call 541-480-9714 UGLY YARD? Retired Master Gardener make-overs Starting at $499. 541-633-9895 Organicscapes, Inc. LCB#8906

541.771.9441 www.bendorganiclandscaping.com

Maverick Landscaping Mowing, weedeating, yard detailing, chain saw work & more! LCB#8671 541-923-4324 Holmes Landscape Maint

• Clean-up • Aerate • De-thatch • Free Est. • Weekly / Bi-wkly Svc. call Josh 541-610-6011 Painting/Wall Covering

All About Painting

Interior/Exterior/Decks. Mention this ad get 15% Off interior or exterior job. Restrictions do apply. Free Estimates. CCB #148373 541-420-6729 WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. ccb#5184. 541-388-6910

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

maintain a consistent to appeal per 36 CFR basal area within the 215.12(e)(1) because NOTICE IS HEREBY Attorney for Personal research plots, the a 30-day public comGIVEN that the unRepresentative: plots are re-thinned ment period was ofdersigned has been Patricia L. Heatherman, Dated and first periodically. These fered and no comOSB #932990 appointed Personal published on The plots were thinned in ments were received. Representative of the Patricia L. Heatherman, May 21, 2012. 1985 and again in Implementation may P.C. above captioned es1995. Eight plots of begin following publi250 NW Franklin Ave. tate. All persons hav/s/Donna Hines, about ¼ acre each will cation of this legal noSuite 402 ing claims against the Personal In the Matter of the be thinned. A total of tice. The Decision Bend, OR 97701 estate are required to Representative Estate of 69 trees will be reMemo and project file Tel: (541) 389-4646 present them, with Jacqulyn Lee moved. Legal locaare available for reFax: (541) 389-4644 vouchers attached, to Personal Steinhauser, tion: Township 21 view at the Bend/Ft. E-mail: the undersigned PerRepresentative: Deceased. patricia@heathermanlaw.com South, Range 9 East, Rock Ranger Station, sonal Representative Donna Hines Sections 4, 5, 6; Des63095 Deschutes at: 250 NW Franklin 568 NE Savannah LEGAL NOTICE Case No. 12PB0034 chutes County, OrMarket Road, Bend, Avenue, Suite 402, Dr., #8 Notice of Decision egon. Oregon 97701. For Bend, Oregon 97701, Bend, OR 97701 2012 LOGS Plot NOTICE TO more information, within four months Tel: (541) 388-9882 Maintenance Project INTERESTED contact Beth Peer, This project is exafter the date of first Bend/Ft. Rock Ranger Fax: (541) 383-6737 PERSONS Environmental Coorcluded from docupublication of this noDistrict, Deschutes dinator, mentation in an envitice, or the claims may National Forest NOTICE IS HEREBY Attorney for Personal 541-383-4769. ronmental be barred. All perRepresentative: GIVEN that the unassessment or envisons whose rights The Deputy District dersigned has been Patricia L. Heatherman, ronmental impact may be affected by OSB #932990 Ranger of the appointed Personal Garage Sales statement. The Decithe proceedings may Bend/Ft. Rock Ranger Representative of the Patricia L. Heatherman, sion Memo cites catobtain additional inP.C. District has made a above captioned esegory 36 CFR formation from the decision to implement tate. All persons hav- 250 NW Franklin Ave. 220.6(e)(12) as the records of the court, Suite 402 the following project: ing claims against the appropriate category the Personal RepreBend, OR 97701 2012 LOGS Plot estate are required to of exclusion. A sentative, or the lawTel: (541) 389-4646 Maintenance Project. present them, with project file has been yer for the Personal Fax: (541) 389-4644 This project is a convouchers attached, to prepared to assess Representative, PatriE-mail: tinuation of the Levthe undersigned PerFind them in resource conditions cia L. Heatherman, els of Growing Stock sonal Representative patricia@heathermanlaw.com and the Deputy DisP.C. research that was LEGAL NOTICE The Bulletin at: 250 NW Franklin trict Ranger has found established in 1966 IN THE CIRCUIT Avenue, Suite 402, Classiieds! that based on those Dated and first and that continues to COURT OF THE Bend, Oregon 97701, assessments, no expublished on The provide numerous imSTATE OF OREGON within four months traordinary circumMay 21, 2012. plications for current after the date of first FOR THE COUNTY OF stances exist. This resource manageDESCHUTES publication of this noproject is not subject /s/Donna Hines, ment objectives. To Probate Department tice, or the claims may Personal be barred. All perRepresentative 1000 1000 1000 In the Matter of the sons whose rights Estate of Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices may be affected by Personal JACK K. KAYLOR, the proceedings may Representative: Deceased. LEGAL NOTICE obtain additional inDonna Hines TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE formation from the 568 NE Savannah Case No. 12PB0040 Loan No: xxxxxx9385 T.S. No.: 1290243-09. records of the court, Dr., #8 the Personal RepreBend, OR 97701 NOTICE TO Reference is made to that certain deed made by Thomas A Gary and Tysentative, or the lawTel: (541) 388-9882 INTERESTED rene Gary, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to First American Title Insuryer for the Personal Fax: (541) 383-6737 PERSONS ance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of Wachovia Mortgage, Representative, PatriFsb, Its Successors and/or Assignees A Federal Savings Bank, as Benefi1000 1000 1000 ciary, dated July 02, 2008, recorded July 09, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/InLegal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices strument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-29131 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: LEGAL NOTICE Lot 9, block 1, Lower Bridge Estates, TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Deschutes County, Oregon. Reference is made to the deed of trust under which Diane E. Flowerday Commonly known as: and Michael S. Flowerday, as grantor, Western Title and Escrow Company is the trustee, and Oakwood Acceptance Corporation, LLC is the 70440 NW 96th Ct. Nka 8202 NW 96th Ct. Terrebonne OR 97760-9730. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real beneficiary, which was dated July 3, 2002 and recorded on July 8, 2002 in property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice Book 2002, Page 36845 in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Orhas been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised egon. The beneficial interest was transferred to JPMorgan Chase Bank Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: by assignment recorded on November 12, 2002 in Book 2002, Page Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 15, 2009 of principal, in63155. Thereafter, the beneficial interest was transferred to The Bank of terest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late New York Mellon by assignment recorded on December 27, 2011 as Recharges; failure to pay escrow advance when due, said sums having been cording No. 2011-045977. Said deed of trust covers the following deadvanced by the beneficiary; together with all subsequent sums adscribed real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, vanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of to-wit: trust. Monthly payment $3,717.94 Monthly Late Charge $161.23. By this Lot 12, Block 2, Singing Pines, Deschutes County, Oregon. reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the property to satisfy the obligations secured by said deed of trust and a nofollowing, to-wit; The sum of $673,993.64 together with interest thereon at tice of default has been recorded pursuant to ORS 86.735(3); the default 6.850% per annum from September 15, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any following sums: sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of Failure to make monthly payments of $839.36 each due on the 1st day of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western July 2011 through February 1, 2012. Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 30, By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on 2012 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section the obligation secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Dessaid sums being the following, to-wit: chutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Des$97,692.41; plus a per diem of $23.89; plus attorney and trustee's fees chutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for and costs. cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will, on or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said Friday, July 13, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 A.M., in accord with the stantrust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the Deschutes County in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the Courthouse located at 1100 NW Bond St, Bend, OR 97701, sell at public foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the the execution by grantor of the said trust deed, together with any interest right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed rewhich the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the exinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due ecution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby se(other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no cured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by ten86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set dering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in inno default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein terest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required unperformance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" der the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all Dated: April 24, 2012. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Redeed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the conveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word R-409419 05/28, 06/04, 06/11, 06/18 "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by 1000 1000 1000 said deed of trust, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices respective successors in interest, if any. We are a debt collector. This communication is an attempt to collect a LEGAL NOTICE debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE DATED: February 23, 2012. The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the diJohn W. Weil, Successor Trustee rection of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in 1001 SW 5th Avenue, Suite 2150 the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to Portland, Oregon 97204 ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: Telephone No. (503) 226-0500 GREGORY R YEAKEL AND ROBIN L YEAKEL. Trustee:FIRST AMERI1000 1000 1000 CAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2.DELegal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices SCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: As described on the attached Exhibit A. EXHIBIT "A" - LEGAL DESCRIPLEGAL NOTICE TION: That portion of the South Half of the Northwest Quarter TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE (S1/2NW1/4) of Section Seventeen (17), Township Seventeen (17) South, Loan No: xxxxxx5678 T.S. No.: 1347918-09. Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Commencing at the Northwest corner of the Reference is made to that certain deed made by Keith E Alexander Who NE1/4SW1/4NW1/4 of said Section 17; thence South along the East line Acquired Title As Keith Alexander, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in of the West Half of the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Ben(W1/2SW1/4NW1/4) of said Section 17, 790 feet to the Southwest corner eficiary, dated January 24, 2008, recorded January 31, 2008, in official of that certain tract of land described in instrument to Brady A. Smith, etux, records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, recorded June 28, 1978, in Book 276, Page 946, Deed Records, thence fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008 04719 ** covering the folSouth 89°52'28" East along the South line of said Smith tract, 551 feet to lowing described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: the true point of beginning; thence North 0°01'42" East, 482 feet to a point; Lot thirty-five (35), Block J, Deschutes River Woods, thence South 89°54'24" East, 532 feet to a point on the East line of said recorded march 22, 1962, plat book 6, Smith tract, said point being also located at the centerline of easement Deschutes County, Oregon. ** modify 6-1-10 2010-48733 described in instrument recorded in Book 199, Page 85, Deed Records; Commonly known as: thence Southwesterly along said centerline to the East line of the fee par59707 Cheyenne Rd Bend OR 97702. cel described in instrument recorded in Book 199, Page 85, Deed Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real Records; thence North 00°07'32" East to the Northeast corner of the land property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice described in instrument recorded in Book 199, Page 85, Deed Records, has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised thence North 89°52'28" West, 284 feet along the South line of said Smith Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: tract to the point of beginning. EXCEPTING THEREFROM any portion Failure to pay the monthly payment due July 1, 2011 of principal, interest contained in road as described in Declaration of Dedication recorded Auand impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late gust 20, 1984, in Book 69, Page 881, Official Records. 3.RECORDING. charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary purThe Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: October 2, suant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment 2006. Recording No. 2006-66226 Official Records of Deschutes County, $1,447.71 Monthly Late Charge $57.91. By this reason of said default the Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust imTrust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the mediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly of $176,075.21 together with interest thereon at 4.750% per annum from payments in the amount of $3,647.93 each, due the first of each month, June 01, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all for the months of November 2011 through February 2012; plus late trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficharges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus ciary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. interest. 5.AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corpoby the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of ration the undersigned trustee will on August 20, 2012 at the hour of $785,163.99; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon the Promissory Note from October 1, 2011; plus late charges of $992.25; Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been reconvey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together corded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired SALE. Date:July 26, 2012. Time:11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINthereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that able charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paythe Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of ment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the perforoccurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curmance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs ing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the perforavailable if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. mance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should April 12, 2012. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Recon#17368.30747). DATED: February 29, 2012. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. veyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. R-408674 05/14, 05/21, 05/28, 06/04. LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES Probate Department

cia L. P.C.

Heatherman,

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

541-385-5809


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

E4 MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: GREGORY WINEBARGER. Trustee:FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee:NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: As described on the attached Exhibit A - EXHIBIT A: ALL THAT CERTAIN LAND SITUATED IN THE STATE OF OR, COUNTY OF Deschutes, CITY OF Redmond, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE QUARTER CORNER COMMON TO SECTIONS 20 AND 21, TOWNSHIP 15 SOUTH, RANGE 13 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 19' 29" WEST, 1,311 76 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 42' 19" EAST, 42900 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 19' 29 EAST, 12300 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 42' 19" WEST, 15900 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 19' 29" WEST, 12300 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 42' 19" EAST, 15900 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. 3.RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: August 3, 2007. Recording No. 2007-42750 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,430.77 each, due the first of each month, for the months of October 2011 through February 2012; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5.AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $264,529.23; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the Terms of the Promissory Note from September 1, 2011; plus late charges of $1,391.94; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF SALE. Date:July 26, 2012. Time:11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30887). DATED: February 23, 2012. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. 1000

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by LARRY L. BARNES AND LIMING BARNES, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor(s), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., as Beneficiary, dated 01/18/2005, recorded 01/21/2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2005-03773, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT TWENTY-EIGHT (28), RIDGE AT EAGLE CREST 38, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 627 HIGHLAND MEADOW LOOP REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $639.37 beginning 02/01/2010; plus late charges of $31.97 each month beginning with the 02/01/2010 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-95.91; plus advances of $465.50; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $131,200.00 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25 percent per annum beginning 01/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Monday, August 20, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 11, 2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA. 93063 (800) 281-8219 (TS# 11-0089926) 1006.143298-FEI

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: DWANE KRUMME AND DONNA L. KRUMME. Trustee:FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Ten (10) in Block Twelve (12) of DEER PARK II, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3.RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: June 20, 2005. Recording No.: 2005-38634 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,920.20 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of December 2010 through February 2012; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5.AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $348,060.85; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from November 15, 2010; plus late charges of $872.82; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF SALE. Date:July 26, 2012. Time:11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30926). DATED: February 23, 2012. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by VINCENT CEGERS AND DANIELLE D. CEGERS, as grantor(s), to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 02/06/2006, recorded 02/13/2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2006-09941, and subsequently assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. by Assignment recorded 10/29/2010 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2010-43308, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 27 AND THE EASTERLY 75 FEET OF LOT 28, BLOCK FFF, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 18992 OBSIDIAN ROAD BEND, OR 97702 Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,411.83 beginning 09/01/2008; plus late charges of $56.47 each month beginning with the 09/01/2008 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-282.22; plus advances of $2,240.50; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $186,488.42 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.88 percent per annum beginning 08/01/2008 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Friday, August 17, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: MARK ALLISON AND LISA ALLISON. Trustee:FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee:NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot 4, Block 2, BOONES BOROUGH NO 2, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3.RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: November 21, 2006. Recording No.: 2006-76979 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,596.20 each, due the first of each month, for the months of April 2010 through February 2012; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of Dated: April 10, 2012 $365,954.19; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from March 1, 2010; plus late charges of $648.40; RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to For further information, please contact: satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been re1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 corded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF SIMI VALLEY, CA. 93063 SALE. Date:July 26, 2012. Time:11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County (800) 281-8219 Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REIN(TS# 10-0134439) 1006.117845-FEI STATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to Publication Dates: May 28, June 4, 11 and 18, 2012. 1006.117845 the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the perfor1000 1000 1000 mance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount LEGAL NOTICE provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made, executed and delivor you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be ered by Daniel R. Olsen in said county and state, to-wit: Lot Sixteen (16), available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. Block Two (2), BROOKSIDE FIRST ADDITION, City of Bend, Deschutes For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to County, Oregon (Account No. 108976) also known as 63385 Omer Drive, http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should Bend, OR 97701. Michael B. McCord was named successor trustee by be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS appointment recorded April 12, 2012 as document number 2012-13412. #17368.30803). DATED: March 2, 2012. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Both the beneficiary and the successor trustee have elected to sell the Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and OR 97440. to foreclose said deed by advertisement and sale; the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following LEGAL NOTICE sums owing on said obligations, which sums are now past due, owing and TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE delinquent: Failure to make payments due December 1, 2011 and thereT.S. No.: OR-11-490762-SH after in the sum of $1,107.00 per month, together with late fees totaling $277.20, for a total of $4,694.20 together with additional payments of Reference is made to that certain deed made by SERGIO HERNANDEZ, $1,107.00 due on or after March 10, 2012. By reason of said default the as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in beneficiary has declared the entire unpaid balance of all obligations sefavor of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA, as Beneficiary, dated cured by said trust deed together with the interest thereon, immediately 12/27/2005, recorded 12/30/2005, in official records of County, Oregon in due, owing and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: book / reel / volume number fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception $150,826.66 plus 4.9500 percent interest from March 1, 2010. A notice of number 2005-89911, , covering the following described real property situdefault and ejection to sell and to foreclose was duly recorded at docuated in said County and State, to-wit: ment number 2012-13714 of said Deschutes Count Records, reference APN: 194161 thereto hereby being expressly made. WHEREFORE, NOTICE HEREBY LOT TWENTY-NINE, CANYON POINT ESTATES PHASE 2, IS GIVEN that the undersigned trustee will on the 22nd day of August, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. 2012 at the hour of 10 o'clock, a.m., as established by Section 187.110, Commonly known as: Oregon Revised Statutes, at the Front Steps of the Deschutes County 2705 NW 15TH ST, REDMOND, OR 977560000 Courthouse, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the installments of principal and interest which became due on 9/1/2011, and execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent propcharge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in erty taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes Section 86.760 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreand/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs closure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment of arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and prethe entire amount due (other than such portion of said principal as would serve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatenot then be due had no default occurred) together with costs, trustee's and ment, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or attorney's fees at any time prior to five days before the date set for said pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees sale. In construing this notice and whenever the context hereof so owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of requires, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,122.97 Monthly Late Charge $ singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in 56.15 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obliinterest to the grantor as 'veil as any other person owing an obligation, the gations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and their successors sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $166,625.55 together with in interest; the word "trustee" includes any successor trustee and the word interest thereon at the rate of 6.3750 per annum from 8/1/2011 until paid; "beneficiary" includes any successor in interest of the beneficiary named plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure in the trust deed. FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICE NOTICE: costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of Successor trustee is a debt collector. This communication is an attempt to said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Sercollect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. vice Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 8/27/2012 DATED this 2nd day of May 2012. Michael B. McCord, Successor at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section Trustee, 65 NW Greeley Ave., Bend, OR 97701, Phone: (541) 388-4434. 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance of the CourtSTATE OF OREGON, County of Deschutes) ss. Personally appeared the house, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701 County of , State of Orabove named Michael B. McCord this 2nd day of May 2012 and acknowlegon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the edged the foregoing instrument to be his voluntary act and deed. Before said described real property which the grantor had or had power to conme: Patricia L. Sewell, Notary Public for Oregon. NOTICE: YOU ARE IN vey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with DANGER OF LOSING YOUR PROPERTY IF YOU DO NOT TAKE any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after ACTION IMMEDIATELY. This notice is about your mortgage loan on your the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations property at 63385 Omer Drive, Bend, Oregon 97701. Your lender has dethereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasoncided to sell this property because the money due on your mortgage loan able charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named has not been paid on time or because you have filed to fulfill some other in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the obligation to your lender. This is sometimes called "foreclosure". The foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payamount you would have had to pay as of April 12, 2012 to bring your ment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such mortgage loan current was $5,801.20. The amount you must now pay to portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default bring your loan current may have increased since that date. By law, your occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curlender has to provide you with the details about the amount you owe, if ing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering you ask. If you want these details, you can call your lender at the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time (541)342-4000 to find out the exact amount you must pay to bring your prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information mortgage loan current and to get other details about the amount you owe. Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this noYou may also get these details by sending a request by certified mail to: tice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the sinMichael B. McCord, 65 NW Greeley Ave., Bend, OR 97701. THIS IS gular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest WHEN AND WHERE YOUR PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD IF YOU DO to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the perNOT TAKE ACTION: Date and time: August 22, 2012 at 10.00 a.m. Place: formance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street (Front Steps of 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. PursuWhite Block Building), Bend, Oregon. THIS IS WHAT YOU CAN DO TO ant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's STOP THE SALE: 1. You can pay the amount past due or correct any deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washingother default, up to five days before the sale. 2. You can refinance or ton. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of otherwise pay off the loan in full anytime before the sale. 3. You can call this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money your loan servicer, Mary Tesch at (541) 342-4000 to find out if your lender and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reais willing to give you more time or change the terms of your loan. 4. You son, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the can sell your home, provided the sales price is enough to pay what you sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. owe. There are government agencies and nonprofit organizations that can This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser give you information about foreclosure and help you decide what to do. shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the BenFor the name and telephone number of an organization near you, please eficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have call the statewide telephone contact number at 800-SAFENET previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been re(800-723-3638) or you may visit the website address for a directory of leased of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended legal aid programs at http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. You may also wish to to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS talk to a lawyer. If you need help finding a lawyer, you may call the Oregon OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMAState Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 1-503-684-3763 or toll-free in TION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by Oregon at 1-800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your http://www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information anti a the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 4/20/2012 Quality Loan Serdirectory of legal aid programs, call Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral vice Corporation of Washington, as trustee Signature By: Brooke Frank, Service at 1-503-684-3763 or toll-free at 800- 452-763 6, or contact the Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O QualOregon State Bar at http://www.osbar.org. WARNING: You may get offers ity Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 For from people who tell you they can help you keep your property. You Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington should be careful about those offers. Make sure you understand any c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 papers you are asked to sign. If you have any questions, talk to a lawyer 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 or one of the organizations mentioned above before signing. DATED: April 12, 2012. Successor Trustee Name: Michael B. McCord. Successor A-FN4234981 05/07/2012, 05/14/2012, 05/21/2012, 05/29/2012 Trustee Telephone Number (541) 388-4434.


Bulletin Daily Paper 05/28/12