Page 1

H I G H

D E S E R T

PULSE

Central Oregon, nonprofit mecca G1

Digesting the fine print Stand-up paddleboarding: It’s what’s SUP on the Deschutes

l Oregon Healthy Living in Centra

Making the grade: Teacher/cyclist Renee Scott

Monday:

PULSE

MORE THAN

180

$

IN COUPONS INSIDE

MAY 13, 2012

SUNDAY $1.50

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

BEND

MAY 15 PRIMARY For our complete coverage, visit www.bendbulletin.com/election.

Low voter turnout? That likely won’t last By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Ballots have been trickling into county clerks’ offices, but officials anticipate a sharp surge in the final days before Tuesday’s election. As of the end of the day Friday, voters in Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties had returned between 21 and 29 percent of their ballots, largely in line with the same point in past presidential election years. If patterns hold, officials say nearly the same number of votes will make their way to election offices by Tuesday. Oregon was the first state to adopt an all-vote-by-mail system in 1998. Ballots go out to voters just more than two weeks before Election Day, and they must arrive back at the county clerk’s office by the end of the day on Election Day — postmarks don’t count — to be tallied. See Voting / A8

• A Prineville man cares for two three-legged cats, suspected victims of animal traps

A little wobble, a lot of love

• Officials are devising stricter rules for a program that offers bonus pay for community service and training By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Of the $5.5 million unionized Bend police make in salary without overtime, an estimated 10.5 percent comes through an incentive program in which officers are rewarded for taking college classes, passing a fitness exam and meeting certain training goals. That program is unique in that it includes a community service component that requires officers to volunteer anywhere from five to 25 hours in a year to get their pay bump, which can be as high as 14 percent. But while many officers tallied their volunteer hours for agencies such as Habitat for Humanity or Bend’s Community Center, officials say some have been counting work like coaching their kid’s soccer team as service to their community. As a result, the department is now trying to rein in its incentive program to make sure officers aren’t taking credit for something they likely would have done anyway. “This can’t be a gimme program,” Bend Police Chief Jeff Sale said. “I just want to tighten the program up.” See Incentives / A7

Voter turnout, now ... All ballots for the May 15 primary election must be returned by 8 p.m. Tuesday. Here’s where the current turnout stands, by county:

A generation that is graduating into debt

Crook . . . . . . . . . 27.1% Deschutes . . . . 21.1% Jefferson . . . . . 29.3%

By Andrew Martin and Andrew W. Lehren New York Times News Service

... and then To see how voting surged near Election Day in the past, see the chart on A8

TOP NEWS ROMNEY: Speech aimed at evangelical students, A3 IRAQ: U.S. might scrap multibillion-dollar police training program, A3

Perks for cops who volunteer to tighten

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Robert Biggs, of Prineville, holds Morris in the entrance of his RV. Morris (also pictured at top) has adapted well to the loss of his back left leg over the past year and a half. Biggs has a second cat, Marley, who just had his leg amputated, making Biggs the owner of two three-legged cats.

ADA, Ohio — Kelsey Griffith graduates today from Ohio Northern University. To start paying off her $120,000 in student debt, she is already working two restaurant jobs and will soon give up her apartment here to live with her parents. Her mother, who co-signed on the loans, is taking out a life insurance policy on her daughter. “If anything ever happened, God forbid, that is my debt also,” said Griffith’s mother, Marlene Griffith. With more than $1 trillion in student loans outstanding in this country, crippling debt is no longer confined to dropouts from for-profit colleges or graduate students who owe on many years of education, some of the overextended debtors in years past. Now nearly everyone pursuing a bachelor’s degree is borrowing, and as prices soar, a degree often comes with an enormous financial burden. See Debt / A4

By Ben Botkin The Bulletin

TODAY’S WEATHER Sunny High 88, Low 42 Page B6

INDEX Business G1-6 Books F4-6 Classified E1-10 Community C1-8 Crosswords C7, E2 Dear Abby C3 Horoscope C3 Local News B1-6

Milestones C6 Obituaries B5 Opinion F1-3 Oregon News B3 Sports D1-6 Stocks G4-5 Sudoku C7 TV & Movies C2

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper Vol. 109, No. 134, 50 pages, 7 sections

SUNDAY

We use recycled newsprint

U|xaIICGHy02330rzu

PRINEVILLE — Robert Biggs chokes up when talking about his three-legged cats. The Prineville man has plenty of compassion for the two cats, which roam inside and outside his motor home. For the cats, the journey from four-legged normalcy to feline tripods started at different times, but reportedly the same way: an animal trap. The way Biggs tells it, each cat lost its left rear leg in a neighbor’s trap. One cat lost a leg about a year and a half ago, and the second one did in the past week, he said. On Friday, Marley, a three-legged blackand-white cat, returned home with Biggs to recover from his surgery. At the Humane Society of Redmond, a veterinarian amputated Marley’s injured left rear leg and stitched up the wound. “They mean a lot to me,” Biggs said of his cats. Marley’s recovery could be quick. The feisty male cat leapt from Biggs’ arms

Mexico’s celebration of the ‘Mother Cult’ By William Booth The Washington Post

Biggs, 55, holds Marley in the car on the trip home after surgery to amputate his back left leg. Both of Biggs’ cats survived their mishaps, but their lives — each cat’s eight remaining ones — won’t be easy.

and ran out of sight Friday, surprising his owner. Biggs says the trap that lured in his cats had a door on it that swung shut behind them, injuring a leg. See Cats / A7

MEXICO CITY — Everybody loves mothers, but Mexicans? Maybe more so. In the annual celebration of the “Mother Cult,” Mexico is especially devout, and every year on May 10 (they don’t move the date around to fall on a Sunday), the entire nation stops what it is doing in the Inside afternoon and eats some serious • $18.6 billion, and other numbers lunch with Mom. to know this “For us Mexicans, first there Mother’s Day, A7 is the Virgin of Guadalupe, and second there is our mother,” said Maxine Woodside, radio host of the popular show “Todo Para La Mujer” — “All About Women” — and herself a mother of two boys. “Mexicans are very attached to family, not like in the United States, where they throw the kids out of the house at age 18. Here we see men in their 40s who still live with their mothers, and why not?” See Moms / A7


THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

A2

The Bulletin How to reach us STOP, START OR MISS YOUR PAPER?

541-385-5800 Phone hours: 5:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 6:30 a.m.-noon Sat.-Sun.

GENERAL INFORMATION

S S

Discoveries, breakthroughs, trends, names in the news — things you need to know to start your day.

Tower’s height, a symbol of spirit, may not count

TODAY It’s Sunday, May 13, the 134th day of 2012. There are 232 days left in the year.

HAPPENINGS

541-382-1811 er maintenance platforms. New York Times News Service Just how perceptible the difference will NEW YORK — 1776 will never lose its be from the street or surrounding buildplace in the history books, but its claim to ings is difficult to say. Although the disthe record books may have been under- tinction between the versions seems mimined by a decision not to build a sculp- nuscule on renderings only a few inches tural cladding for the mast atop 1 World high, the mast is more than 400 feet tall Trade Center. — about as tall as a 40-story REBUILDING building — so even the smallThe mast was to elevate an otherwise 1,368-foot sky- GROUND ZERO est changes are magnified by scraper into a 1,776-foot strucscale. ture whose defining measurement was The decision to eliminate the cladding meant to express U.S. spirit and resolve in was made in October and affirmed in the face of the 9/11 terrorist attack. January by Douglas Durst, the chairman Whether the Council on Tall Buildings of the Durst Organization, and the Port Auand Urban Habitat, a private body that thority of New York and New Jersey, with serves as a worldwide arbiter of build- which Durst is developing the building. The ing heights, counts the mast depends on change is coming to light with all the attenwhether it is considered a functional an- tion the project received when the building tenna or a nonfunctional spire. reached 1,271 feet, making it the tallest in While reserving its final decision until New York City. 1 World Trade Center is completed in early Should the Council on Tall Buildings 2014, the council has previously been in- ultimately disallow the unclad mast in its clined to include the mast because it was height calculation, 1 World Trade Center clad in a fiberglass and steel enclosure would lose both its symbolic dimension called a radome. The radome was a taper- and its claim to unseating the Willis Towing, multifaceted structure of interlocking er (formerly the Sears Tower) in Chicago triangles, 23 feet in diameter at its widest, as the tallest building in the U.S. It would that had been designed by Skidmore, Ow- not even be the second-tallest building in ings & Merrill with the sculptor Kenneth the U.S. That is the Trump International Snelson. Hotel and Tower, also in Chicago. Without this cladding, the mast is a “This definitely raises questions,� Kevin more straightforward pole of galvanized Brass, the public affairs manager for the steel trusswork, about 6 feet in diameter council, said in a statement Wednesday. for much of its height, intersected by wid- “Our criteria are very specific. We include By David W. Dunlap

ONLINE

www.bendbulletin.com EMAIL

bulletin@bendbulletin.com NEWSROOM AFTER HOURS AND WEEKENDS

541-383-0367 NEWSROOM FAX

541-385-5804 NEWSROOM EMAIL Business ..... business@bendbulletin.com City Desk...........news@bendbulletin.com Community Life......................................... communitylife@bendbulletin.com Sports.............. sports@bendbulletin.com

OUR ADDRESS Street Mailing

1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702 P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

ADMINISTRATION Chairwoman Elizabeth C. McCool ...........541-383-0374 Publisher Gordon Black .....................541-383-0339 Editor-in-Chief John Costa .........................541-383-0337

DEPARTMENT HEADS Advertising Jay Brandt ..........................541-383-0370 Circulation and Operations Keith Foutz .........................541-385-5805 Finance Karen Anderson...541-383-0324 Human Resources Traci Donaca ......................541-383-0327 New Media Jan Even ........541-617-7849

TALK TO AN EDITOR Business ............................541-383-0360 City Editor Erik Lukens ......541-383-0367 Assistant City Editor Mike Braham......................541-383-0348 Community Life, Health Julie Johnson.....................541-383-0308 Editorials Richard Coe ......541-383-0353 Family, At Home Alandra Johnson................541-617-7860 GO! Magazine Ben Salmon........................541-383-0377 News Editor Jan Jordan ....541-383-0315 Photos Dean Guernsey......541-383-0366 Sports Bill Bigelow.............541-383-0359

REDMOND BUREAU Street address .......226 N.W. Sixth St. Redmond, OR 97756 Mailing address ....P.O. Box 788 Redmond, OR 97756 Phone.................................541-504-2336 Fax .....................................541-548-3203

CORRECTIONS The Bulletin’s primary concern is that all stories are accurate. If you know of an error in a story, call us at 541-383-0358.

TO SUBSCRIBE Home delivery and E-Edition: One month: $11 (Print only: $10.50) By mail in Deschutes County: One month: $14.50 By mail outside Deschutes County: One month: $18 E-Edition only: One month: $8 TO PLACE AN AD Classified...........................541-385-5809 Advertising fax ..................541-385-5802 Other information .............541-382-1811

OTHER SERVICES Photo reprints....................541-383-0358 Obituaries ..........................541-617-7825 Back issues .......................541-385-5800 All Bulletin payments are accepted at the drop box at City Hall. Check payments may be converted to an electronic funds transfer. The Bulletin, USPS #552-520, is published daily by Western Communications Inc., 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702. Periodicals postage paid at Bend, OR. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Bulletin circulation department, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. The Bulletin retains ownership and copyright protection of all staff-prepared news copy, advertising copy and news or ad illustrations. They may not be reproduced without explicit prior approval.

Oregon Lottery results As listed at www.oregonlottery.org

POWERBALL

The numbers drawn Saturday night are:

10 24 35 53 58 22 The estimated jackpot is now $90 million.

MEGABUCKS The numbers drawn Saturday night are:

3 19 32 35 38 45 The estimated jackpot is now $1.2 million.

"NFSJDBT UBMMFTU

2,717 ft.

Durst Organization / New York Times News Service

Renderings of the new design for One World Trade Center no longer include a sculptural enclosure for the mast.

IN HISTORY spires and not antennas. If this is an antenna, it won’t be part of the height measurement. The cladding was an integral part of the design and made the extension part of the permanent look and feel of the building.� Eliminating the cladding would save about $20 million in construction costs.

Tallest completed buildings in the world and in the U.S. 1 World Trade Center spire A tapering enclosure, planned over the mast, has been eliminated. That could affect how the building’s height is calculated.

1,667 ft.

1,776 ft.

1,614 ft.

1,588 ft.

1,451 ft. 1,389 ft.

1,368 ft.

1,250 ft. 1,200 ft.

1 WTC

New York

Burj Khalifa

Taipei 101

Dubai

Taipei

Shanghai World Financial Center

International Commerce Center

Willis (Sears) Tower

Trump International Hotel and Tower

Empire State Building

Bank of America Tower

Shanghai

Hong Kong

Chicago

Chicago

New York

New York

4PVSDFT$PVODJMPG5BMM#VJMEJOHTBOE6SCBO)BCJUBU 1PSU"VUIPSJUZPG/FX:PSLBOE/FX+FSTFZ

/FX:PSL5JNFT/FXT4FSWJDF

And atop London’s buildings ... missile defenses? By Sarah Lyall New York Times News Service

LONDON — “It looked like one of those things where you get free pizzas through the post,� Hilal Bozkurt said, describing the innocuous-looking leaflet that came through her mail slot recently. “But this was like, free missiles.� The leaflet was from the Ministry of Defense, and it briskly informed Bozkurt that her building, Fred Wigg Tower, part of a sad-looking public housing project in a depressed neighborhood in an unloved corner of this city, had been selected as a possible front line against terrorist attacks during the Olympics. Because of the 17-story tower’s strategic location and “excellent allaround view,� the leaflet said, the military was considering installing a “high-velocity missile system� on the roof. “The air defense system will be manned by fully trained, professional soldiers,� the leaflet said, adding in the “frequently asked questions� section that it would “improve your local security and not make you a target for terrorists.� Bozkurt said she did not think a residential apartment building, even one made of concrete and built in the pugnacious Brutalist style of the 1960s, was a suitable place for a pop-up military base featuring surface-to-air weapons able to travel at three times the speed of sound and hit targets more than three miles away in less than eight seconds. “It does frighten you,� she said. The Ministry of Defense says it has not made a final decision on whether to use Fred Wigg Tower, in the borough of Waltham Forest, as a missile site, although “it would be sensible to be prepared for the worst,� Gen. Nick Parker, commander of the British Army land forces, told reporters. In any case, officials say, the air defense systems are only one piece of a broad program to keep the Olympic Park, with its proximity to residential ar-

OLYMPIC SECURITY eas, safe from attacks via land, water or air. Recent exercises to test the Olympics defense program included placing dummy missiles on the roof of Fred Wigg Tower and on another building, the Lexington Building water tower, in the borough of Tower Hamlets.

• Today is Mother’s Day. The modern holiday, an American creation in 1908, is celebrated worldwide with different customs (and often on different days). A1, A7 • Greece’s President Karolos Papoulias has announced he will meet with political party leaders today in a last-ditch effort to broker a deal for a coalition government. • Germany’s most populous state, North Rhine-Westphalia, holds elections that offer parties a major test of a national vote expected next year. • Mali holds its second round of presidential elections since the March military coup. • Israel’s President Shimon Peres awards that country’s scientific and artistic Wolf Prize to acclaimed Spanish tenor Placido Domingo along with seven other American, British and Israeli recipients.

The missiles — bolstered by larger ones on the ground — would be used only as a final line of defense, the Ministry of Defense said. During the Olympics, which open July 27, the Royal Navy’s largest ship, HMS Ocean, will be docked in London at Greenwich, and about 13,500 members of the military are being called on to reinforce

the police and security forces. London’s airspace will be patrolled by jets and helicopters, with other crafts on standby equipped with early-warning systems and carrying snipers. The rooftop plan has received the most attention, with some experts questioning the wisdom of using a missile-defense system in such a densely populated area.

Highlights: In 1607, English colonists arrived by ship at the site of what became the Jamestown settlement in Virginia. In 1861, Britain’s Queen Victoria declared her country’s neutrality in the American Civil War. In 1981, Pope John Paul II was shot in St. Peter’s Square by Turkish assailant Mehmet Ali Agca. Ten years ago: President George W. Bush announced that he and Russian President Vladimir Putin would sign a treaty to shrink their countries’ nuclear arsenals by two-thirds. Five years ago: Bush visited the site of the Jamestown settlement in Virginia to mark the 400th anniversary of its founding. Pope Benedict XVI, ending a five-day visit to Brazil, blamed both Marxism and unbridled capitalism for Latin America’s problems. One year ago: George Mitchell announced his resignation as the Obama administration’s special Mideast envoy.

BIRTHDAYS Actor Buck Taylor is 74. 63. Singer Stevie Wonder is 62. Basketball Hall of Famer Dennis Rodman is 51. Actor-comedian Stephen Colbert is 48. Country singer Lari White is 47. Actress Samantha Morton is 35. Actor Robert Pattinson is 26. Actress Candice Accola is 25. Actor Hunter Parrish is 25. — From wire reports

CASCADE VIEWS!

ROOM FOR YOU & MOM TOO!

Spacious home with open floor plan. Extra convenience of laundry and living room upstairs. 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths and 2154 sq. ft. $249,000. CALL TERRY SKJERSAA AT 541-383-1426. MLS: 201203465

Lovely 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath, 3186 sq. ft. home includes handicapped accessible motherin-law apartment. Convenient NE Bend location. $399,000. CALL BECKY OZRELIC AT 541-480-9191. MLS: 201202823

ONE-OF-A-KIND 75 ACRE RANCH

PRIVATE GREEN BUILT RETREAT

with approximately 65 acres of irrigation on 2 tax lots. 60 X 84 arena, separate shop, well maintained 1800 sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath home with pull-through driveway. $429,900. CALL TAMMY SETTLEMIER AT 541-410-6009. MLS: 201203098

Enjoy privacy, solitude, natural light and peaceful views from this 1516 sq. ft. waterfront two bedroom home. This timber framed home uses solid beams from lumber mills of Bend’s past and is truly one-of-a-kind. $250,000. CALL BILL PANTON AT 541-420-6545. MLS: 201106128

AWESOME! EXCELLENT SINGLE LEVEL IN DESIRABLE YARDLEY ESTATES Beautiful craftsman’s style 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with great room floor plan, all appliances included. AC, gas fireplace, master with double closets. Fenced back yard. $170,000. CALL AUBRE CHESHIRE AT 541-598-4583. MLS: 201202947

Live in the manufactured home while building your dream home. Paved DOWNTOWN, PARKS,TRAILS, ROAD TO MT BACHELOR street, wildlife, lots of possibilities. Excellent sunny floor plan. 3 or 4 bedbonus room, 2 car garage with alley Possible owner will carry. $74,500. room, access. Level lot with Southern orientation, a CALL CANDY BOWERMAN AT gardeners dream. Extra parking. Shows great. $265,000. CALL CARMEN COOK AT 541-410-3193. MLS: 201107908 541-480-6491. MLS: 201109244

Bend ~ Main Office Dayville/John Day ~ Branch

Tel 541-382-8262 Tel 541-987-2363

} } www.dukewarner.com

REALTOR


SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A3

T S

U.S. may scrap plan to train Iraqi police

SPEECH AT LIBERTY UNIVERSITY

By Tim Arango New York Times News Service

Luke Sharrett / New York Times News Service

Mitt Romney, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, prays with the Rev. Jerry Falwell Jr., son of the late founder of Liberty University and current school chancellor, at the Lynchburg, Va., evangelical college’s commencement ceremony Saturday. Romney, making by far his most spiritual speech of his campaign, offered a fierce defense of Judeo-Christian values and an America that he said “has trusted in God, not man.”

Romney to evangelicals: My values are yours, too By Ashley Parker New York Times News Service

LYNCHBURG, Va. — Mitt Romney traveled to Liberty University, the spiritual heart of the conservative movement, on Saturday, seeking to quell concerns about him among evangelical voters, by offering a forceful defense of faith and Christian values in public life. At a graduation speech at the college, founded by the evangelical leader Jerry Falwell, Romney made the case that he is bound theologically and politically to the same belief and value system as Christian conservatives, though he never explicitly mentioned his Mormon faith. And he barely touched on hot-button social issues like abortion and gay marriage, instead offering a broad-based defense of values like family and hard work. “Culture — what you believe, what you value, how you live — matters,” Romney told graduates gathered in the football stadium on Liberty University’s campus in the Virginia mountains. “The American culture promotes personal responsibility, the dignity of work, the value of education, the merit of service, devotion to a purpose greater than self, and at the foundation, the preeminence of the family.” Instead of a red-meat conservative policy speech, Romney discussed his own family

“There is no greater force for good in the nation than Christian conscience in action.” — Mitt Romney on Saturday

and offered a defense of Christianity, saying that “there is no greater force for good in the nation than Christian conscience in action.” Still, he was inclusive: “Men and women of every faith, and good people with none at all, sincerely strive to do right and lead a purposedriven life,” Romney said. In the same week that President Barack Obama galvanized his base by endorsing same-sex marriage, Romney’s message was that evangelicals could count on him to operate under “a common worldview,” including his position that marriage should be between only a man and a woman. American values, he said, “may become topics of democratic debate from time to time. So it is today with the enduring institution of marriage. Marriage is a relationship between one man and one woman.” It was Romney’s most extensive and direct discussion of religion since his 2007 speech about his own faith and was intended to help him reassure conservatives, some of whom do not accept Mormonism as a

Christian religion. Romney acknowledged the divide between his church and evangelical Christians, while suggesting that they seemed more in sync than not. “People of different faiths, like yours and mine, sometimes wonder where we can meet in common purpose, when there are so many differences in creed and theology,” Romney said. “Surely the answer is that we can meet in service, in shared moral convictions about our nation stemming from a common worldview.” Mormons consider themselves Christians, as noted in the church’s formal name, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, but some evangelicals don’t consider the Mormon scripture to be Christian. Gary Bauer, the president of a Christian advocacy group called American Values, said that this speech would help assuage the concerns of Christian evangelicals. “I thought it was a home run, and I think so will most values voters,” he said. “He also clearly stood for the sanctity of life, clearly stood for the traditional definition of marriage, and I think importantly, encouraged the students to be bold and stand for those kinds of values, too. I think it’s going to be hard for critics to find much in this to criticize.” — The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Tea party focus turns to Senate shake-up By Jennifer Steinhauer and Jonathan Weisman New York Times News Service

The primary victory of a tea party-blessed candidate in Indiana illustrates how closely Republican hopes for a majority in the Senate are tied to candidates who pledge to infuse the chamber with the deep-seated conservatism that has been the hallmark of the House since the Republicans gained control in 2010. Richard Mourdock, who last week defeated Sen. Richard Lugar, a six-term incumbent, promises to bring an uncompromising ideology to Capitol Hill if he prevails in November. And he is not the only Senate candidate who contends that Senate Republicans are badly in need of new blood. In Arizona, Missouri, Nebraska and Texas, Republican Senate candidates are vying for the mantle of tea party outsider. A number of them say they would seek to press an agenda that is generally to the right of the minority leader, Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, and that they would demand a deeper policy role for the Senate’s growing circle of staunch conservatives. Some say they have not decided whether they would support McConnell, who could find himself contending with the type of fractious rank and file that has vexed the House speaker, John Boehner of Ohio. “We need to shake up the

Related • Back in the spotlight, but widely divergent: gays and abortion, A8

Republicans,” said Sarah Steelman, the Missouri state treasurer, who is seeking her party’s nomination to run against Sen. Claire McCaskill, a Democrat. Asked if that meant new leadership in the Senate, Steelman replied, “Possibly.” McConnell’s leadership does not appear to be in jeopardy. Aides to McConnell say he has already secured enough votes for his re-election as leader, regardless of the November results. And supporters say such threats have surfaced in the past, only to fizzle after Election Day.

Inspiration from House Republican hopefuls want the Senate to act more like the House. Dan Liljenquist, a tea party-backed Republican challenging Sen. Orrin Hatch in Utah’s primary next month, said Republican leaders in the House, many of them young upstarts themselves, ditched traditional rules of seniority last year and let energetic upand-comers take on powerful roles. At 42, Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, the House Budget Committee chairman, has become perhaps his party’s most important policymaker. In the Senate, Liljenquist said, “The leaders most anx-

ious to take on the entitlement system and the entrenched problems the nation faces are being benched by a system that puts them at the bottom rung.” McConnell has already made adjustments. He recently enlisted Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, a freshman elected with tea party backing, to lead efforts to coordinate GOP messages and agendas in the Senate and the House with the party’s presidential nominee. A spokesman for McConnell, Don Stewart, said McConnell was exploring joining Mourdock on the campaign trail. But pressure remains. Several Republican freshmen in the Senate under the tutelage of the tea party kingmaker Jim DeMint of South Carolina, have laid the groundwork for a more conservative path in the Senate, often throwing their own logs on the fire of gridlock that has seized Congress. The stakes are considerable. The country faces what the Federal Reserve chairman, Ben Bernanke, has called a “fiscal cliff” on Jan. 1, when the Bush-era tax cuts of 2001 and 2003 are set to expire and across-the-board spending cuts of more than $1 trillion are to go into effect. If a bipartisan agreement cannot be reached before the end of the year, nearly $8 trillion in deficit reduction could go into force in a sudden rush, a boon to budget hawks but a potential disaster for the fragile economic recovery.

BAGHDAD — In the face of spiraling costs and Iraqi officials who say they never wanted it in the first place, the State Department has slashed — and may jettison entirely by the end of the year — a multibillion-dollar police training program that was to have been the centerpiece of a hugely expanded civilian mission here. What was originally envisioned as a training cadre of about 350 U.S. law enforcement officers was quickly scaled back. The latest restructuring calls for 50 advisers, but most experts and even some State Department officials say even they may

be withdrawn by the end of this year. The training effort, which began in October and has already cost $500 million, was conceived of as the largest component of a mission billed as the most ambitious U.S. aid effort since the Marshall Plan. Instead, it has emerged as the latest high-profile example of the waning American influence here following the military withdrawal, and it reflects a costly miscalculation on the part of U.S. officials, who did not count on the Iraqi government to assert its sovereignty so aggressively. “I think that with the departure of the military, the Iraqis decided to say, ‘OK, how large is the American presence

here?’” said James Jeffrey, the U.S. ambassador to Iraq, in an interview. “How large should it be? How does this equate with our sovereignty? In various areas they obviously expressed some concerns.” Last year the State Department embarked on $343 million worth of construction projects around the country to upgrade facilities to accommodate the police training program, which was to have comprised hundreds of trainers and more than 1,000 support staff members working in three cities — Baghdad, Erbil and Basra — for five years. But like so much else in the nine years of war, occupation and reconstruction here, it has not gone as planned.

N   B California shortfall balloons to $16 billion LOS ANGELES — The state budget shortfall in California has increased dramatically in the last six months, forcing state officials to assemble a series of new spending cuts that are likely to mean further reductions to schools, health care and other social programs already battered by nearly five years of budget retrenchment, state officials announced Saturday. Gov. Jerry Brown, disclosing the development in a video posted on YouTube, said California’s budget shortfall was now projected to be $16 billion, up from $9.2 billion in Janu-

ary. Brown said he would propose a revised budget Monday to deal with it. He urged viewers to back an initiative he is putting on the November ballot that would increase sales taxes, by 0.25 percent, and impose an income tax surcharge on wealthy Californians to try to stave off more cuts.

Pentagon to expand cybersecurity plan The Pentagon is expanding and making permanent a trial program that teams the government with Internet service providers to protect defense firms’ computer networks against data theft by foreign adversaries.

It is part of a larger effort to broaden the sharing of classified and unclassified cyberthreat data between the government and industry in what Defense Department officials say is a promising collaboration between the public and private sectors. The department said the industry’s increased reliance on the Internet for daily business has exposed large amounts of sensitive information held on network servers to the risk of digital theft. Corporate cyber-espionage has reached epidemic scale, experts and officials say, with much of the activity traced to China and Russia. — From wire reports


A4

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

#PSSPXJOHGPSDPMMFHFUIFOFXOPSNBM College has become a major family expense ...

Public colleges and universities

Debt

71% Nonprofit private

For-profit private

48%

30% 40%

of income Tuition, fees, room and board at four-year schools as a share of median household income.

30 20 %BUBOPU BWBJMBCMF CFGPSF

%BUBOPU BWBJMBCMF CFGPSF

’80

’90

’00

’10

’00

’10

’00

10 ’10

1992-93 Nonprofit private

Public 58% did not take out loans

Nearly all families now borrow to pay for a bachelor’s degree.

For-profit private

48%

33%

1%

1%

Share of families that borrowed these amounts, adjusted for inflation.

2008-09 7%

5%

3%

10 20 30 40 $50,000 NO LOANS

5%

25% had more than $50,000

14%

46% 2006

... and a growing share of the debt is not getting paid.

38% 2011

7% 8%

2006 2011 Repayment status of federal student loan balance in dollars.

DEFAULT

DELIQUENT Over 30 days

FORBEARANCE DEFERMENT Delayed Delayed with interest with no interest

IN SCHOOL OR GRACE

4PVSDFT64%FQBSUNFOUPG&EVDBUJPO $FOTVT#VSFBV 1SPKFDUPO4UVEFOU%FCU

CURRENT REPAYMENT /FX:PSL5JNFT/FXT4FSWJDF

“I placed a priority on ... education, and I didn’t think about the debt. (But) I need my generation to understand that nothing is free.� — Christina Hagan, an Ohio legislator and soon-to-be college graduate

Continued from A1 Griffith, 23, wouldn’t seem a perfect financial fit for a college that costs nearly $50,000 a year. Her father, a paramedic, and mother, a preschool teacher, have modest incomes, and she has four sisters. But when she visited Ohio Northern, she was won over by admissions staff and faculty members who urge students to pursue their dreams rather than obsess about the sticker price. “As an 18-year-old, it sounded like a good fit to me, and the school really sold it,� said Griffith, a marketing major. “I knew a private school would cost a lot of money. But when I graduate, I’m going to owe like $900 a month. No one told me that.� Ninety-four percent of students who earn a bachelor’s degree borrow to pay for higher education — up from 45 percent in 1993, according to an analysis by The New York Times of the latest data from the Department of Education. This includes loans from the federal government, private lenders and relatives. For all borrowers, the average debt in 2011 was $23,300, with 10 percent owing more than $54,000 and 3 percent more than $100,000, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York reports. Average debt for bachelor degree graduates who took out loans ranges from under $10,000 at elite schools like Princeton and Williams College, which have plenty of wealthy students and enormous endowments, to nearly $50,000 at some private colleges with less affluent students and less financial aid. Here at Ohio Northern, recent graduates with bachelor’s degrees are among the most indebted of any college in the country, and statewide, graduates of Ohio’s more than 200 colleges and universities carry some of the highest average debt in the country, according to data reported by the colleges and compiled by an educational advocacy group. The current balance of federal student loans nationwide is $902 billion, with an additional $140 billion or so in private student loans. “If one is not thinking about where this is headed over the

next two or three years, you are just completely missing the warning signs,� said Rajeev Date, deputy director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the U.S. agency created after the financial crisis.

The new loan crisis? Date likened excessive student borrowing to risky mortgages. And as with the housing bubble before the economic collapse, the extraordinary growth in student loans has caught many by surprise. But its roots are in fact deep, and the cast of contributing characters — including college marketing officers, state lawmakers wielding a budget ax and wide-eyed students and families — has been enabled by a basic economic dynamic: an insatiable demand for a college education, at almost any price, and plenty of easy-tosecure loans, primarily from the federal government. Much like the mortgage brokers who promised pain-free borrowing to homeowners just a few years back, many colleges don’t offer warnings about student debt in the glossy brochures and pitch letters mailed to prospective students. Instead, reading from the same handbook as for-profit colleges, they urge students not to worry about the costs. That’s because most students don’t pay full price. Even discounted, the price is beyond the means of many. Yet too often, students and their parents listen without question. “I readily admit it,� said Gordon Gee, the president of Ohio State University, who has also served as president of Vanderbilt and Brown, among others. “I didn’t think a lot about costs. I do not think we have given significant thought to the impact of college costs on families.�

‘Nothing is free’ Christina Hagan is an Ohio lawmaker who says students need to understand that attending college is not an entitlement. Last year, the Republican was appointed to fill a seat once occupied by her father in the Ohio House. Hagan is also a 23-year-old college student. Continued next page


SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

From previous page “I was promised the She will graduate shortly world and was given from Malone University, an evangelical college, with more a garbage dump to than $65,000 in student debt. clean up.” Though she makes $60,000 a — A student complaining year as a state representative, about $100,000 in debt she plans to begin waiting tafrom a for-profit school bles in the next few weeks at a Mexican restaurant to help pay down her student loans and credit cards. She pays $8.50 an hour working for about $1,000 a month. an employment training “I placed a priority on a center in Florida. Christian education, and I “I was promised the didn’t think about the debt,” world and was given a garsaid Hagan, who says she takes bage dump to clean up,” she responsibility for her debt. “I wrote in a complaint at conneed my generation to under- sumeraffairs.com. The student loan crisis stand that nothing is free.” While Hagan’s perspective has spread from for-profit is unusually personal, it is a colleges to more traditional common view among law- institutions, but the formakers here in Ohio and many profit colleges continue to states. From 2001 to 2011, state represent the worst of the and local financing per stu- problem. Students comdent declined by 24 percent plain that they were misled nationally. Over the same pe- about the costs of education riod, tuition and fees at state and that their job prospects schools increased 72 percent, were exaggerated. Governcompared with 29 percent ment reports and lawsuits for nonprofit private institu- have accused some for-proftions, according to the College it colleges of outright fraud, Board. Many of the cuts were including doctoring attenthe result of a sluggish econo- dance records or peddling my that reduced tax revenue, near-worthless degrees. The result? Students at but the sharp drop in per-student spending also reflects a for-profit colleges are twice change: An increasing number as likely as other students to of lawmakers voted to transfer default on their loans. Moremore of the financial burden of over, among students seekcollege from taxpayers to stu- ing a bachelor’s degree, only dents and their families. (Local 22 percent succeed within funding is a small percentage six years, compared with 65 of the total, and mostly goes to percent at nonprofit private community colleges.) schools and 55 per“To say that tuition cent at public institutions. (For-profit stugoes up because the Related state doesn’t pay enough • Jobless, dents, however, tend young and to do better at obtainmoney, well, that is the finding taxpayers’ money,” said ing associate degrees their own Ohio Gov. John Kasich, and certificates.) voice, G1 Leaders of the fora Republican elected in 2010 whose budget profit industry defendincluded cuts to higher ed themselves, saying education because of the end they were providing higher of federal stimulus money. education for lower-class stuDonald Heller, an expert on dents whom traditional colhigher education, said elected leges had left behind. “The officials in both parties had reality is the type of students figured out that colleges were we attract have no other one of the few parts of state opportunity,” said Steven government that could raise Gunderson, head of a leading money on their own. If law- trade organization. “We are makers cut state financing, the ones that provide a path the schools could make it up to the middle class.” The Obama administraby raising tuition. “It lets legislators off the hook and makes tion has tried to make college universities look like the bad pricing easier to understand; guy,” said Heller, dean of the as of last year, colleges were College of Education at Michi- required to post calculators on their websites that explain gan State University. If any state is representa- the net price after grants and tive of the role government has loans. But critics say they can played in the growth of student be confusing, misleading or debt, Ohio makes a good can- difficult to find. The adminisdidate. While other states have tration also has proposed that made steeper cuts in recent colleges be required to offer a years because of the recession, “shopping sheet” to make it Ohio has been chipping away easier for families to measure at it far longer. It now ranks the true costs and benefits. “We just have to get them sixth from the bottom in financing per student, at $4,480. much more information,” In the late 1970s, higher educa- Education Secretary Arne tion in Ohio accounted for 17 per- Duncan said. “If you’re gocent of the state’s expenditures. ing to college, you need to Now it is 11 percent. By contrast, know not what the first prisons were 4 percent of the year costs. You need to state’s budget in the late 1970s; know what it’s going to cost now they account for 8 percent. for the long haul.” Federal mandates and court orEven with more inforders have compelled lawmakers mation, students and their to spend more money on Medic- parents seem willing to pay aid and primary education, too. the ever-escalating price of Legislators could designate a a college degree, which regreater percentage of the budget mains the key rung up the to higher education by raising ladder of economic mobility. taxes, but there is no appetite for “It scares the hell out of that. Kasich has signed a pledge me,” Denise Entingh says of not to raise taxes, as have about her expected $45,000 debt two dozen legislators. load. The 44-year-old signed Some elected officials say on at the Hondros School of state colleges and universities Nursing, a for-profit college. have brought the debt prob- “But I think it will be all lem upon themselves. right. I’m not going to worry They suggest, for example, about it right now. I had to that state schools are bloated, take that plunge.” antiquated and don’t do a good enough job graduating students or training them for the workforce. Some complain about the salaries of football coaches and college presidents, like Gee, who makes $2 million a year as president of Ohio State. Kasich questions why all state universities need to offer every major, like journalism or engineering, instead of parceling those programs among the schools. “It’s not just inefficiencies,” said the governor, an Ohio State graduate. “It’s, ‘I want to be the best in this.’ It’s duplication of resources. It’s a sweeping change that is needed across academia.”

The shadow of for-profits Wanda McGill has stopped opening her student loan bills. She isn’t sure how much debt she has accumulated, though she thinks it’s about $100,000. But McGill, a 38-year-old single mother, knows for sure she cannot pay it. McGill said she dropped out of DeVry University, a forprofit college with a branch in Columbus, two years ago after she ran out of money — even with the loans. She now makes

A5

In Egypt’s turmoil, thieves dig up treasures By Hamza Hendawi The Associated Press

CAIRO — Taking advantage of Egypt’s political upheaval, thieves have gone on a treasure hunt with a spree of illegal digging, preying on the country’s ancient pharaonic heritage. Illegal digs near ancient temples and in isolated desert sites have swelled a staggering 100-fold over the past 16 months since a popular uprising toppled Hosni Mubarak’s 29-year regime and security fell apart in many areas as police simply stopped doing their jobs. The pillaging comes on top of a wave of break-ins last year at archaeological storehouses — and even at Cairo’s famed Egyptian Museum, the country’s biggest repository of pharaonic artifacts. Horrified archaeologists and antiquities authorities are scrambling to prevent smuggling, keeping a watch on European and American auction houses in case stolen artifacts show up there. “Criminals became so bold they are digging in landmark areas,” including near the Great Pyramids in Giza, other nearby pyramids and the grand temples of the southern city of Luxor, said Maj. Gen. Abdel-Rahim Hassan, commander of the Tourism and Antiquities Police Department. “It is no longer a crime motivated by poverty; it’s naked greed, and it involves educated people.” In a country with more than 5,000 years of civilization buried under its sands, illegal digs have long been a problem. With only slight exaggeration, Egyptians like to joke you can dig anywhere and turn up something ancient, even if it’s just pottery shards or a statuette. But in the security void, the treasure hunting has mushroomed, with 5,697 cases of illegal digs since the start of the uprising in 2011— 100 times more than the previous year, according to figures obtained from the Interior Ministry, which is in charge of police. Related crimes have risen as well — 1,467 cases of illicit trading in antiquities and 130 attempts to smuggle antiquities abroad. At least 35 people have been killed in incidents connected to illegal digs, including 10 buried alive in the southern city of Naga Hamadi in March when the hole they dug in the ground caved in. Others were killed in disputes when thieves fell out over sharing the finds, according to Interior Ministry officials familiar with the incidents. Those are just the crimes that police uncovered. In their digs, fortune hunters pick spots just outside major archaeological sites in hopes that treasures can be found some distance beyond their parameters. Others dig in areas set aside for future excavations by the Supreme Council of Antiquities, Egypt’s top state archaeological agency. Last month, police arrested two men who lived just behind the temple of Khnum in the southern town of Esna for illegally digging under their homes. Police said they found a 10-meter-deep hole under the houses with hieroglyphic inscriptions dating to the Ptol-

The Associated Press file photo

Egyptian special forces swarmed the Egyptian Museum early last year in the aftermath of the revolution in Cairo, guarding the famous funeral mask of King Tutankhamun and other artifacts. But thieves continue to take advantage of Egypt’s political upheaval outside of museum walls, going on a treasure hunt with a spree of illegal digging.

emaic dynasty as well as ancient clay pots. The ministry officials said the surge reflects in part the failure of the police to fully take charge of security after they melted away on Jan. 28 last year, after deadly clashes with protesters on the fourth day of the 18-day anti-Mubarak uprising. Since then, many police have been balking at investigating crimes and pursuing criminals, whether out of resentment over the revolution or because of the continued lack of strong political authority. The night of Jan. 28, thieves broke into the Egyptian Museum, located on the edge of Tahrir Square, the epicenter of the anti-regime uprising and scene of some of the bloodiest clashes between protesters and Mubarak’s police. The robbers

made off with 51 pieces that were on display — of which 29 have since been recovered. The early months of 2011 saw a rash of break-ins at antiquity storehouses around the country. Now that security has been beefed up at most warehouses, thieves have turned to digging. Mansour Bureik, the chief archaeologist in the Luxor area, said there was little chance treasure hunters would run across gold and gems that they dream of — which are found only in royal or aristocratic tombs. But Galal Mouawad, a QUEEN Sets Pillowtop or Plush

$ from

299

541- 678 - REST (7378)

senior archaeologist in the Giza area, said the potential for lucky strikes exist just about anywhere in the country. “Egyptians have over the centuries settled anywhere in Egypt until they have finally settled along the banks of the Nile. There is something valuable to be found anywhere.”

CUSTOM PICTURE FRAMING & GALLERY Where our quality and customer service is number one. 834 NW Brooks Street Behind the Tower Theatre

541-382-5884


A6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

PIRACY PROBLEM

Risks of ‘shoot to kill’ on the high seas By Alan Katz Bloomberg News

LONDON — At first the video depicts a seemingly calm, sun-drenched sea from aboard the Avocet, until a pale blue skiff appears in the distance, cutting rapidly across the Indian Ocean toward the bulk ship’s starboard side. After a tense radio exchange between the ship’s armed guards, who believe they’re under attack by pirates, their team leader steps through the bridge door and orders warning shots. Immediately, he and another guard fire dozens of rounds at the oncoming boat. The blaze of gunfire continues after the skiff crashes into the ship, with guards shooting down into the vessel, and as it then trails behind the Avocet. “Second skiff coming in,” he shouts, then they turn and begin firing on the new boat, and the video ends. At least some of the boats’ occupants were probably killed or injured, said Thomas Rothrauff, president of Virginia Beach, Va.-based Trident Group Inc., which provided the ship’s security crew. He said the incident on March 25 last year was the second attempt to hijack the Avocet in three days. After spotting rocket-propelled grenades on the first skiff, the guards feared for their lives. The shootings were justified and the guards acted responsibly, Rothrauff said, firing warnings before aiming at the boat. The gunfire exchange highlights a lack of rules governing the use of weapons on the high seas amid questions over how much force is legal and necessary to fight Somali piracy attacks, which targeted a record 237 ships last year. The video, presented at a shipping conference in December and leaked on the Internet last month, has fueled debate over when is it acceptable to open fire - and to keep shooting.

Turkish military / The Associated Press

Turkish commandos board a boat with seven pirates in the Gulf of Aden, off Somalia, in 2009. Both piracy and private armed guards are fanning out rapidly across the waters between Somalia and Yemen, including the gulf, and far out into the Indian Ocean.

Fear of pirate attacks is creating more violent and chaotic seas, where some overzealous or untrained guards are shooting indiscriminately, killing pirates and sometimes innocent fishermen before verifying the threat, according to more than two dozen interviews with lawyers, ship owner groups, insurance underwriters and maritime security companies. Reckless gun use at sea could put the whole industry at risk of reputational damage, said Stephen Askins, a partner at the London-based law firm Ince & Co., who has negotiated with Somali pirates for the release of hostages. “You can’t have a Blackwater out in the Indian Ocean,” he said, referring to the 2007 incident in which Blackwater Worldwide security guards allegedly fired on and killed civilians in Baghdad. New security companies have sprouted to cater to shipowners’ rising demand for private guards, often recruiting former soldiers from combat in Iraq or Afghanistan, as well as moonlighting police offi-

cers, they said. “It’s the Wild Wild West out there,” said James Staples, a retired U.S. merchant marine captain who spent more than 30 years working in the Indian Ocean and chased off pirates about to board his ship at 4:30 a.m. one morning in 2009 by shooting warning shots from his pistol. “There are no regulations or vetting process for these teams. The company doesn’t know who it’s getting on board. There’s no training requirement or training for lifesaving.” Nevertheless, Staples said that based on his understanding of the incident, he believes the Avocet guards were justified. The shipping industry is divided over whether the amount of shooting in the video was warranted, said Michael Frodl, a Washington-based chairman of C-Level Maritime Risks, a consultant with clients including ship owners and insurance underwriters. “Some ship owners don’t want to spend money on security groups that just shoo away the pirates; they want to

see pirates destroyed,” he said. “Others say you can’t import the values of warfare to what’s essentially a police action against criminals.” There’s no doubt that pirates are a lethal and costly enemy on the high seas, with their attacks, hijackings and ransom demands translating into billions in economic losses. As vessel owners also confront rising fuel prices and cargo rates that have plunged since 2008, piracy is a problem they can ill afford. Since 2008, gangs of Somali pirates linked to clans in the failed state on the eastern coast of Africa have carried out more than 800 attacks on ships, from private yachts to oil supertankers. Pirates hijacked more than 170 of those vessels, taking hostage some 3,400 seafarers and killing 25, according to Intercargo, an industry group representing global owners of dry cargo vessels. Maritime piracy cost the global economy roughly $7 billion, including $530 million spent on private armed guards, according to Oceans

Beyond Piracy, a project of Broomfield, Colorado-based non-profit One Earth Future Foundation. The pirate groups earned about $160 million last year through ransom payments for vessels and crew. The threat makes it tough on companies like New Yorkbased Eagle Bulk Shipping Inc., which operates a fleet of 45 carriers, including the Avocet, that transport cargoes of minerals and grains. The Avocet was traveling from Europe, passing through the Gulf of Aden, between Yemen and Somalia, when the pirates first approached on March 22 last year, said Trident’s Rothrauff, whose company specializes in maritime security. The pirates fired on the ship, but retreated, he said. For the next three days, the pirates followed from a larger vessel they appeared to have hijacked, their skiffs on board ready to be lowered into the water. By the day of the videotaped shooting, the Avocet had reached a point in the center of the Arabian Sea, an area of the Indian Ocean midway between Somalia and India. Its American security team, which included former U.S. Navy SEALs, had been on alert for 72 hours, using their radar to monitor the location, Rothrauff said in telephone interviews. With the release of the Avocet video, a State Department official said its context was insufficient for him to provide a definitive opinion about whether the guards’ actions were appropriate. “It certainly doesn’t dissuade me or my colleagues in the U.S. government from the view that the increased use of armed security teams is purely a reaction to the increase in pirate attacks and is demonstrably effective in repelling attacks,” said Thomas Kelly, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs. “And that is a good thing.”

Private security is proliferating The presence of private armed guards is escalating rapidly on ships crossing areas prone to piracy — generally considered to include the Gulf of Aden and waters off Somalia and fanning out to the Indian Ocean, covering an area about the size of the continental United States. Some 160 maritime security companies operate in high-risk areas, according to William Mackenzie Green, business development manager at Protection Vessels International, one of those companies. About 40 percent of the 42,500 ships that transit the region each year now use armed guards, compared to 15 percent a year ago, he said. The armed-guard business boom is based on financial calculations by cash-strapped ship owners. Freight rates have slumped since the final quarter of 2008, and an oversupply of new ships and high fuel costs cut earnings to unprofitable levels for most types of tankers, container ships and dry cargo vessels in 2011. Hiring armed guards is cheaper than the extra fuel required to detour around pirate areas or to go fast enough to outrun them, according to Roland Hoeger, managing director of the shipping companies of the Komrowski Group in Hamburg, which has used such guards since one of its container ships, Taipan, was hijacked in 2010. No ship with armed guards aboard has been hijacked by Somali pirates, according to Peter Cook, chairman of the Security Association for the Maritime Industry, a group that has created an accreditation system for private guard companies. — Bloomberg News

State Senate: What’s the difference between Tim Knopp and Chris Telfer?

Vote for Tim Knopp Knopp NO YES2 NO3 NO 6

YES NO

8

YES

9

YES

YES10 1

Chris Telfer

COMPARE LIMITING TAXES AND SPENDING Sponsored “Kicker” bill letting government Keep HALF of Your Kicker Refunds Sponsored “Kicker” in Constitution returning over a Billion to Taxpayers Voted for Large increase in Gas Tax, trading her Vote for Earmarks Took credit for rebalancing budget, but didn’t vote for the budget bills that did it

Telfer YES1 NO YES4 YES5

REPUBLICAN CREDENTIALS Lifelong Republican Changed Party from Democrat to Republican before running for senate

NO YES7

PUBLIC EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT SYSTEM (PERS) REFORM Built bi-partisan coalition that reformed PERS and saved taxpayers billions

NO

CUT LEGISLATORS PAY Led successful effort to cut legislators pay during recession saving several hundred thousand dollars

NO

AWARDS AND RECOGNITION Honored with multiple awards for leadership and legislative service by groups representing Republicans, taxpayers, nurses, senior living and small business groups

Telfer sponsored SJR 26 with, among others, Portland Democrats that would keep half your Kicker refunds for government.

2

Knopp sponsored HJR 17 that became Ballot Measure 86 in 2000 passed overwhelmingly by voters to protect Kicker refunds.

3

Knopp voted against one of the largest gas tax increases in 1999.

4

Telfer voted in favor of one of the largest gas tax increases in Oregon history in 2009 in exchange for earmarks.

5

The Oregonian/Politifact exposed Telfer for taking credit for the budget rebalance in 2012 saying,“Her statement is not accurate and makes a ridiculous claim. We rate it Pants on Fire.”

6

KBND radio debate March 13, 2012

7

KBND radio debate March 13, 2012

8

Knopp Chaired the committee and led the PERS reforms in 2003 that saved taxpayers billions of dollars.

9

Knopp led the effort in 2002 and 2003 to reduce legislators pay to lead by example while cutting budgets, HB 3644 in 2003 and The Bulletin January 4, 2002.

NO

10 Knopp has received the 2003 National Republican Legislators Association, Leader of the Year Award; 2001 Taxpayers Association of Oregon,Taxpayer Medal of Honor; 2001 Senior Champion Award for Outstanding Leadership, Oregon Healthcare Association; 1999, 2001 Friend of Nursing Award Oregon Nurses Association, 2003. Hall of Fame Award, Oregon Nurses Association; 2001 Outstanding Legislators of the Year, Oregon Remodelers Association; 2002 Friend of Taxpayer Award, Citizens for a Sound Economy; 2002 Taxpayer Watchdog Award,Taxpayers Association of Oregon (partial list).

For more Information please visit www.timknopp.com Paid for by Tim Knopp for State Senate

Tim Knopp, a Republican with a track record you can trust.


SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Uniformed Afghans kill 2 soldiers McClatchy Newspapers KABUL, Afghanistan — Two members of the U.S.-led coalition were killed Saturday when two men wearing Afghan police uniforms opened fire on them at an undisclosed location in southern Afghanistan. One of the attackers reportedly was killed when coalition forces returned fire. A hunt is under way for the second attacker, who escaped. NATO declined to say where the at-

tack had occurred. The attack is the latest in a series of so-called “green-onblue” killings that have seen Afghan soldiers or policemen turn their weapons on their coalition colleagues; 15 such attacks have been reported so far this year that had resulted in 20 coalition deaths. Service members from the U.S. and NATO countries are based with Afghan soldiers and policemen throughout Afghanistan.

Cats

mas Valley had its leg amputated after getting caught in a leg-hold trap. The dog made it back to its owner with a damaged leg, an indication that the trapper may have released the dog, she said. While they can walk around, three-legged cats face a lifetime of challenges that go against their nature. That’s because a cat’s defense mechanism is to paw or scratch at an animal, Bauersfeld said. With a rear leg missing, that leaves only one leg for the cat to boost itself up with. As a result, three-legged cats are suited for life as indoor rather than outdoor pets, she said. Bauersfeld said she understands the need to trap feral cats so they can get spayed or neutered but stresses that traps should be checked frequently — at least every 24 hours.

Continued from A1 “His leg was up and cocked underneath him, and it was sitting there flopping,” Biggs said. Biggs, 55, is a disabled former construction worker who lives alone with his cats. He said the first cat, Morris, was injured but came to his trailer covered in mud and with his leg bone visible. These days, the brown cat is doing better. With a missing rear leg, Morris, also a male, balances forward off of his right rear leg, walking with short but sure steps that closely resemble hops. Biggs has a couple of other cats, too — the four-legged variety. Four felines mingle about together, coming in and out of his trailer. Chris McKinney, a neighbor two doors away from Biggs, said all of Biggs’ cats are docile creatures, four legs or three. “They don’t tear into people’s garbage or anything,” he said. “They’re well-behaved cats. They don’t get into our flower beds.”

Three-legged challenges Kris Bauersfeld, shelter manager at the Humane Society of Redmond, said Marley’s injury fractured the leg and dislocated a joint, apparently as the cat struggled to get out of the trapdoor that came down on it. The incision should heal in about 10 to 14 days, she said, adding that pain medicine will help in the meantime. “It’s not a pleasant surgery, but it is a life-saving surgery in most instances,” she said. Last year, a dog from Christ-

Incentives Continued from A1 Incentives are common in union contracts for police, firefighters and other public employees. For instance, Bend Firefighters Association members can earn extra pay for getting paramedic certification, and other city employees will see a bigger paycheck if they work a jackhammer or speak Spanish. The incentives can add up, too. The fire department pays out an estimated $615,000 in incentives in addition to its annual base payroll of $5 million. When breaking down the roughly $575,000 the police department pays to its 74 eligible members, that’s a bonus of nearly $7,800 per person per year. That amount can be larger or smaller depending on which incentive level an officer achieves and whether an officer is successful in meeting the program’s requirements. But Sale said the Bend Police Department’s incentive program has evolved over the years to the point where there was a lot of gray surrounding certain requirements, particularly when it came to commu-

The future It’s unknown how long these three-legged cats will be a common sight in Prineville. Biggs had an eviction notice posted on his trailer window in April, asking him to leave by this Tuesday. The power was cut off to his trailer last week, too. And the trailer facility — Ochoco RV Park — has problems of its own: A county inspector on Friday posted a notice barring anyone from entering the park’s laundry room because of plumbing and electrical problems. Whether it’s in Prineville or elsewhere, though, Biggs plans to have his cats with him. “I’m going to baby-sit them for the rest of my life,” he said. — Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

nity service. There was also a recent instance in which Sale said he had to deny an officer who was scheduled to earn a 14 percent pay bump that money because that individual didn’t properly fulfill the education requirement on time. “The idea of the program is very good,” Sale said. “It’s just that it’s been around for a long time, and it’s morphed over time.” To clearly define what would be eligible under the performance incentive program, the department recently formed a committee that would evaluate each officer’s proposal to make sure it followed appropriate guidelines. Lt. Ken Stenkamp helped develop that committee and said it’s a way to let an officer know from the beginning whether his or her proposal passed muster. If not, the committee would then suggest a new route. While many of the requirements are straightforward — you either took the class or you didn’t — Stenkamp said this process is most useful when considering volunteering efforts. “This can’t just be something they were going to do anyway,” Stenkamp said. “You have to

Moms Continued from A1 A popular Mother’s Day gift? Irons. “Their moms still do their laundry!” Woodside says. (Also big: blenders, not for margaritas, but soups, sauces and salsas.) Mexican thinker Octavio Paz, in his classic work on the national psyche, “The Labyrinth of Solitude,” spends a lot of pages mulling Mexico’s worship of saintly, suffering, giving mother figures. In Mexican slang, to insult the mother, to take in vain “la madre,” is to swear with serious intent. On Thursday, in honor of the maternal, outgoing Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard invited Paul McCartney, the Beatle, to play for 200,000 fans at a free concert in the capital’s central square, the Zocolo. “Hola, D.F.!,” the former mop head said, speaking Spanish to the Distrito Federal, Mexico’s version of D.C., saying how happy he was to be here on this special day. “Estamos muy contentos de estar aqui en el Dia de las Madres!” Mexicans are, interestingly, Beatle fanatics. There are radio stations that play nothing but Beatles music. But McCartney was wise to have on stage some mariachi players, since crooning mariachis are central to the celebration of mothers here. The musicians pack the restaurants, but another tradition, especially in the countryside, holds that the mariachis (and the adoring children) gather outside their mothers’ homes for a serenade. The most popular song is the sweet, sugary “Las Mananitas”: “Awaken, my dear, awaken / and see that the day has dawned / now the little birds are singing / and the moon has set.” Having 80 over for lunch on this day? Not unusual. “It is, without a doubt, the most important day for restaurants, our busiest day of the year, when we sell double, triple what we would on a normal day,” said Manuel Gutierrez,

come up with a plan that looks at each activity and gauge that activity based on the benefit to the community and the benefit to the police department.” Stenkamp noted that there wasn’t rampant abuse of the program, and said the incidents in which individuals might have skirted the community service requirements were isolated. A new goal for the department, one that Sale is pushing, is persuading officers to focus volunteer efforts on programs that include a public safety component such as Neighborhood Watch, safety fairs and outreach in local schools. This doesn’t mean officers will be discouraged from building homes for Habitat for Humanity or coaching youth sports, Stenkamp said. It’s just taking a different view of volunteering in a way that makes the police department seem more present in the community because it could involve officers doing that work in uniform. “We have the goal of making the program viable and meaningful,” Stenkamp said. “The idea is to benefit the community and for us to get out and be a positive influence in the community.”

“It is, without a doubt, the most important day for restaurants, our busiest day of the year, when we sell double, triple what we would on a normal day.”

Mother’s Day math Mother’s Day is the most #1 popular day to dine out all year, surpassing even Valentine’s Day, according to the National Restaurant Association. Amount the $152 average person is expected to spend this year for Mother’s Day, according to a survey conducted for the National Retail Federation. That’s up from $140.73 last year.

Thinkstock

$18.6B

Total amount Americans will spend this year for Mother’s Day, according to the NRF survey. (Yes, that’s in billions.)

to be spent on flowers for Mother’s Day, $1.9B Amount according to statisticbrain.com. who say they take over Mom’s responsibilities 84% Dads on Mother’s Day, according to stastisticbrain.com. Increase in phone-call volume over New Year’s Day. 8% Volume also is up 11 percent from Valentine’s Day and 62 percent from Halloween, according to VIP Communications. number of mothers in the U.S. in 85.4M Estimated 2009, according to the Census Bureau. of 15- to 50-year-old women who were 53% Percentage mothers in 2010, according to the Census Bureau. Number of stay-at-home moms in 2011 — same as in 5M 2010 and down from 5.1 million in 2009 and 5.3 million in 2008. In 2011, 23 percent of married-couple family groups with children younger than 15 had a stay-at-home mother, up from 21 percent in 2000, according to the Census Bureau. The number of children reportedly born to the first Mrs. 69 Feodor Vassilyev of Shuya, Russia, according to the Guinness Book of World Records. In 27 pregnancies between 1725 and 1765, she gave birth to 16 pairs of twins, seven sets of triplets and four sets of quadruplets; 67 survived infancy. Jacilyn Dalenberg’s age when she acted as a surrogate 56 mother for her daughter, giving birth to three girls in Cleveland in 2008, according to world record book. — The Houston Chronicle

president of the national association of restaurateurs, who has worked in and around commercial kitchens since he was a boy. Gutierrez estimates that for this one day, Mexico puts 200,000 extra waiters to work. The most popular restaurants are, naturally, family-style, where kids can run around and families eat from big long tables, piled with kilos of carnitas and barbacoa.

A7

A decent Mother’s Day lunch can easily clock in at five hours. Also common: Mom might knock back a shot or two of tequila, for her heart. “The mother is an institution in Mexico, and Mexicans are party animals. And as the mother traditionally is the one working for us, cleaning for us, cooking for us, we believe that at least one day a year, we ought to take her out and let someone else do the cooking,”

— Manuel Gutierrez, president of Mexico’s national association of restaurateurs

Gutierrez said. At the flower market in the San Angel barrio, florist Manuel Garcia was up before dawn on Thursday, making arrangements. “There is nothing like the Mother’s Day for us, because everybody gives flowers today to their mamas. If you can, you also buy a gift for her, or for the grandma, but flowers? You cannot show up without flowers.” It is also election season in Mexico, and campaign volunteers flooded into town squares to hand out roses to mothers, maybe with a little note reminding them who loves them the most and what political party they represent. And there was also a more somber note struck Thursday, as some mothers took to the streets in Mexico City to protest the government’s failure to stop the killing that has left 50,000 dead in the drug wars and to account for the missing. According to the human rights commission, at least 5,300 Mexicans have disappeared in the violence, never to be heard from again. Garcia explained that the tradition does not end with a mother’s death. “Of course, the children also come to buy flowers for their mothers who have passed away, because they go to visit them at the cemeteries,” which overflow with bouquets. “Maybe Mexicans don’t have many things, but we have a lot of love for our moms!” Weekly Arts & Entertainment Inside

Every Friday

Awards Dinner This night of celebrating “what’s right with kids” is possible ONLY because of our many sponsors. Thank you to: Platinum Sponsors

Junior Scholarship Sponsors

Dr. Knute and Dr. Patricia Buehler Dr. Tom and Nancy Carlsen Howie and Marcia Koff Dr. Jay and Arianna Moore Brian and Cathy Fleck Darren and Michael Powderly Steve and Natalie Hummel for Kids in the Game The Center

DJO Global James and Kim Mead Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. Peterson’s Orthotics Lab/Cyclesoles The Serenade Foundation Stephen Cappy Steve Pool, MD (2) Therapeutic Associates, Inc. Wells Fargo

Silver Sponsors

William K. Worrel Scholarship

Ater Wynne, LLP Bank of the Cascades Bregg Central Oregon Radiology Associates CS Construction Glen Lasken, Attorney at Law Legacy Leadership, LLC Michael and Julie Gonsalves Moss Adams Pacific Medical Dr. Larry Paulson and Dr. Viviane Ugalde Premier West Bank Rebound Physical Therapy St. Charles Health System

Bend Research Express Employment Professionals

Media Sponsors BendBroadband/COTV11 Good Morning Central Oregon Horizon Broadcasting Group

Special Friends Central Event Rentals Hunter Properties, LLC Tim McGinnis Pinnacle Architecture, Inc. Press Pros Steve Rewick Vic Russell Robert Thomas

High Desert Hero Scholarship Sponsor Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. Our world faces immense challenges and the following young people represent our hope for the future and the keepers of our legacy. Congratulations to these outstanding students.

2011-2012 High Desert Heroes

2012 Junior Scholarship Winners

Calah Clift – Trinity Lutheran High School Wyatt Gladden – Sisters High School Chloe Goad – Redmond High School Shani Rehwinkel – Madras High School Tyler Rockwood – Crook County High School Tom Steelhammer – Bend Senior High School Jacob Waggoner – Bend Senior High School Lindy Weddel – Bend Senior High School Hannah Wieber – La Pine High School

Kyle Bailey – Bend Senior High School Riley Barrett – Sisters High School Harli Bowers – Crook County High School Scott Cagan – Sisters High School Abegail Carpenter – Trinity Lutheran High School Jordan Gemelas – Madras High School Ashlee Horn – La Pine High School Noah Kanzig – Sisters High School Kenna Leis – Summit High School Max L’Etoile – Summit High School Jenna Mattox – Bend Senior High School Cassandra Roes – La Pine High School Daniel Schimmoller – Mt. View High School Gregory Shipman – Summit High School Emily Waggoner – Bend Senior High School IB

2012 William K. Worrell Scholarship Winner Tyler Rockwood – Crook County High School

Follow us on

www.centerfoundation.org

facebook


THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

A8

When do Oregonians vote? In both primary and general elections, about half the ballots cast will arrive at county clerks’ offices in the final four days before Election Day.

Gays, abortion back as wedge issues By David Crary

PERCENTAGE OF BALLOTS RETURNED

The Associated Press

in the 13 days leading up to four recent elections

NEW YORK — Abortion and gay marriage. For years, they’ve been lumped together as the paramount wedge issues of U.S. politics — hot-button topics in the vortex of sexuality, personal freedom and public policy. Yet these two divisive issues, prominent as ever this election season and still firing up the liberal and conservative bases of the two major parties, are evolving in intriguingly different ways. Partisans are taking care not to overstate how much the issues have in common. Same-sex marriage vaulted into the spotlight when President Barack Obama declared his support this past week, and conservatives restated their opposition. Republicans deny Democrats’ claims that they are waging a “war on women” that encompasses in-

100%

2008 general election Total election turnout: 84%

80

2010 general election Total: 70%

60

2008 May primary election Total: 58%

40

2010 May primary election Total: 41%

20 0

13

12

11

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

Source: Oregon Secretary of State’s Office Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Voting Continued from A1 Crook County Clerk Dee Berman said nearly every election follows the same pattern. A small number of voters return their ballots almost immediately, she said, followed by nearly two weeks in which the number of ballots coming back to the clerk’s office is nearly steady. Then, in the final three to four days, about half the ballots that will be cast arrive. Berman said in Crook County this year, there’s little to attract the interest of the 54 percent of Crook County voters who are Democrats, unaffiliated voters or members of minor parties, which may be depressing turnout. Republican County Commissioner Ken Fahlgren and county Judge Mike McCabe are both facing primary challenges, but the Democrats have not fielded a challenger in either race. “The only races that everyone is really interested in — the only unknowns — are those local races, and we don’t have any Democrat candidates in either of those races,” Berman said. Nancy Blankenship, the Deschutes County clerk, said the contests during any given election seem to determine when voters return ballots. When several candidates are battling for a long list of positions, Blankenship said, voters tend to wait nearly until Election Day to make a decision. When ballot measures are the main issue of contention — such as in the January 2010 special election, when voters approved two tax increases — voters make up their minds more quickly. “People will pretty much

know how they want to vote, and there will be more ballots coming back initially or in larger volumes.” Deschutes County’s turnout figures this election may appear artificially low because of voter registration campaigns four years ago that boosted voter numbers, Blankenship said. Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton were still locked in a tight race when Oregonians voted in May 2008, and voter registration in Deschutes County spiked during the runup to that election — Blankenship said her office processed 5,071 registrations in April 2008, compared with 2,157 this year. Voters who registered to vote in the 2008 primary would still be registered today, she said, even if they’ve seldom cast a ballot in the past four years. Berman said long-established voting patterns could change this fall if a plan to shutter Bend’s mail processing center proceeds. Should that happen, all mail sent in Central Oregon would travel to Portland or Medford. Voters would likely receive their ballots a day or two later, she said, and would have to mail them back a day or two earlier to ensure they arrived at the county election office on time. “That’s going to change the dynamics a lot on how fast people get their ballots, and if they get them back to us on time if they send it by mail,” Berman said. Berman said a handful of ballots arrive after the deadline every Election Day, prompting the clerk’s office to contact voters with the news their votes were not counted. — Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com

College sweethearts to marry 60 years later DYERSBURG, Tenn. — Two residents of a Tennessee assisted living center plan to marry today, more than 60 years after they first met. The State Gazette reports that Peggy Schuster and the Rev. Henry Freund were college sweethearts in the early 1950s. Freund said the couple often sat together in class at Rhodes College in Memphis (then Southwestern) and frequently dated. But they eventually went their separate ways and

married other people. While attending a church meeting in Memphis in 2001, Freund learned that Schuster had been widowed. Freund, who had lost his wife, wrote his college sweetheart to offer sympathy. A decade later, Schuster gave Freund her email address and the couple, both in their 80s, began corresponding. Freund said a spark that had survived for more than 60 years “burst into flames.” — The Associated Press

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

fringement of abortion rights. Polls on same-sex marriage show a huge shift in public opinion in just a decade, from overwhelming opposition to a slight edge in favor. By contrast, attitudes toward abortion have scarcely budged over several decades, with a modest majority of Americans favoring some degree of abortion rights and opposition remaining both stable and vehement. More profound is a moral difference. Americans who are ambivalent about samesex marriage can decide to accept it with a live-and-letlive philosophy, while the abortion debate inherently involves hard questions about when life begins and whether a fetus has rights. “Everybody knows gay people now — their community left the ghetto a long time ago and is part of everyday life,” said abortion-rights supporter

Jon O’Brien of Catholics for Choice. “Abortion is very private, often a sad and difficult decision. It’s entirely different.” Another difference: Acceptance of gays is now a given in popular culture, notably in the spate of hit TV shows such as “Glee” and “Modern Family” with gay and lesbian protagonists. There’s no equivalent embrace of abortion rights in Hollywood’s products; films depicting unintended pregnancies generally opt for a birth. “It’s harder to get out and advocate for abortion,” said Tony Perkins, president of the conservative Family Research Council. “Hollywood and others have been more helpful to the gay and lesbian community in promoting them in their story lines.” Polls reflect divergent trends in how young adults — Hollywood’s favorite demographic — view these two issues.

According to the Pew Research Center, Americans under 30 tilted slightly against same-sex marriage in 2004, and now favor it by 65 percent to 30 percent — a higher approval rate than for older Americans. “Assuming these trends continue, someone who supports same-sex marriage is probably heartened, because those most opposed are fading from the scene,” said David Masci, a senior researcher with the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life. There’s no equivalent shift or age gap on abortion. Pew’s latest survey on the topic, in April, found that the views of young adults had been more or less stable in recent years and differed little from their elders. While 53 percent of those under 30 supported abortion rights, the approval rate was 55 percent among those aged 50 to 64.

W  B 3 Boston students die in New Zealand WELLINGTON, New Zealand — With graduation approaching, a time for celebration turned somber at Boston University on Saturday as students who were packing up at the end of the school year learned three classmates studying in New Zealand were killed when their minivan crashed during a weekend trip. Five other students were injured in the accident early Saturday, including one who was in critical condition. Boston University spokesman Colin Riley said those killed in the accident were Daniela Lekhno, 20, of Manalapan, N.J.; Austin

Brashears, 21, of Huntington Beach, Calif.; and Roch Jauberty, 21, whose parents live in Paris. The students were traveling in a minivan near the North Island vacation town of Taupo when the van drifted to the side of the road and then rolled when the driver tried to correct course, New Zealand police said.

Protests in 80 cities decry Spanish crisis MADRID — Huge crowds of Spaniards demonstrated Saturday against “economic violence” and for a fairer society as the country’s Indignant Ones protest movement marked its first anniversary. Organizers said the demonstrators numbered hundreds

of thousands across Spain. In Madrid, an estimated 40,000 people gathered on the central Puerta del Sol square, where the movement, also known as 15-M, was launched on May 15, 2011. They staged a “silent cry” at midnight, observing a moment of silence. They defied orders by the authorities by leave the square, but police did not initially intervene. Madrid had deployed about 2,000 officers to watch over the demonstrations, which were echoed in about 80 cities around Spain. In Barcelona, protesters numbered about 22,000, according to the Interior Ministry. Similar rallies were staged in several European cities and in the United States.

Israeli envoy meets Palestinian leader JERUSALEM — An Israeli envoy met with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas on Saturday and delivered a letter from Prime Minister Benjamin Netanayahu detailing his government’s stance on stalled peace negotiations. Yitzhak Molcho held talks with Abbas in Ramallah, the seat of the Palestinian government. The modest exchange was the highest-level communication between the Palestinians and Israelis in months. Israel called for peace talks without preconditions. Palestinians are demanding that Israel cease settlement construction. — From wire reports

Happy Mother’s Day! From Central Oregon Council On Aging All Mothers & Grandmothers Dorothy Arnold Alice Baer Shirley Baldwin Lucile Bass Lillian Bennett Peggy Boock, In Memory Virginia L. Break Shirley Breen Ann Carlile Mary Carlson I.R. Cheeseworth Millie Chopp, In Memory Kieko Chung Darcy Whitaker Costello Rene Damon C. Janet Depp

June Ford Agnes Frey Mildred Gelbrich Gert Goldsmith Julia Green Rosalie Guinn Sophie Guzauskis Opal M. Halverson Magna Hanson Dorothy Harrington Nettie Harris Midred Norseth Hatch Bertie Hawes Virginia C. Hodgdon Melinda Hopper Catherine M. Jacobs Mildred Kentner, In Memory JoAnn (Jodi) Kloos

Ruth Koenig Sandra Kouba Sophie Kozak Barbara Kremers KC Lettenmeier Vivian Matson Mary McGoran Mattie Allen McKay, In Memory Helen McKinney Rose McLaughlin Margaret Hughes Monroe Shula Schwartz Monroe Hillary Moor Dorothy Morrison Kayla Nagelhout Christine N. Neal Jeane Ogdahl, In Memory

Annamay Pearson Marie Penhollow, In Memory Myldred Perrine Norma Priel Dorothy Reeves Berta Richards Hope Ronning, In Memory Irene Sigmund Leona A. Slate Jennie Snawder Alberta Shaw Stoefen Frances Styskel Avis Tangen Anne Taylor, In Memory Celeste Tucker Betty Valley Ruth Mirich Wright

In recognition or in memory of those listed above, the families have made a generous contribution to Central Oregon Council On Aging’s many services for seniors in celebration of Mother’s Day. We also received many anonymous contributions as part of this campaign. To everyone who contributed we would like to say: Thank you for your generous support! COCOA is a 501c3 • Central Oregon Council On Aging, 373 NE Greenwood, Bend OR 97701 Ph: 541-678-5483 www.councilonaging.org


LOCALNEWS

Reader photo, B2 Editorials, B4

Obituaries, B5 Weather, B6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/local

LOCAL BRIEFING

REDMOND

Police seek help in search for man

City planning ‘premier’ playground

Police are asking for the public’s assistance in finding a Bend man who has not been seen since Monday. David Paul Marks, 44, was reported missing by family members Wednesday. Though police do not know where he might be, he is known to spend time camping and hunting for rocks in remote areas near Burns and Lakeview. Marks’ vehicle, a green 1990 Land Rover, has not been found. Marks is approximately 6 feet tall, 170 to 190 pounds, with short brown thinning hair. Anyone with information about Marks or his vehicle is asked to contact the Bend Police dispatch line at 541693-6911.

By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

REDMOND — The city of Redmond wants to bring the “premier” playground in Central Oregon to the city’s largest park. Redmond is looking to build a $450,000 playground in the south end of Dry Canyon at Sam Johnson Park. The city has put down $90,000 worth of seed money

with the hope that grants, local partnerships and a community fundraising effort will bridge the financial gap. “The city has made a commitment to this project moving forward,” said Community Development Director Heather Richards. “We are looking at trying to install, if not the whole thing, at least one phase of (the play

structure) by next summer.” The city is likely to request designs that allow the project to be built in stages, and the city’s $90,000 should be more than enough to begin construction. The city originally planned to spend $75,000 on equipment to replace the dilapidated play structure at Sam Johnson Park this summer, but that plan changed

• Members of Warm Springs tribes share heritage at COCC meal

— Bulletin staff report

Have a story idea or submission? Contact us!

The Bulletin Call a reporter:

Salem ..............541-554-1162 D.C. .................202-662-7456 Business ........ 541-383-0360 Education .......541-633-2161 Public lands .....541-617-7812 Public safety.....541-383-0387 Projects .......... 541-617-7831

Submissions: • Civic Calendar notices: Email event information to news@bendbulletin.com, with “Civic Calendar” in the subject, and include a contact name and phone number. Contact: 541-383-0354

• School news and notes:

Details on the Obituaries page inside. Contact: 541-617-7825, obits@bendbulletin.com

• Community events: Email event information to communitylife@bend bulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” at www .bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Details: The calendar appears on Page 3 in Community Life. Contact: 541-383-0351

• Births, engagements, marriages, partnerships, anniversaries: Details: The Milestones page publishes Sunday in Community Life. Contact: 541-383-0358

Summit wind group wins at state The Bulletin

Deschutes ...... 541-617-7829 Crook ............. 541-504-2336 Jefferson ....... 541-504-2336

• Obituaries, Death Notices:

when Dalia Zimmerman, a Redmond mother of two, raised concerns about the location. In February, Zimmerman said she found lead in the paint on the current playground using a do-it-yourself test kit. A city investigation did find trace amounts of lead but determined they were far below dangerous levels. See Playground / B2

By Scott Hammers

Bend ................541-633-2160 Redmond ........ 541-617-7837 Sisters............. 541-617-7837 La Pine ........... 541-383-0348 Sunriver ......... 541-383-0348

Email news items and notices of general interest to pcliff@bendbulletin.com. Email announcements of teens’ academic achievements to youth@bendbulletin.com. Email college notes, military graduations and reunion info to bulletin@bendbulletin.com. Details: School coverage runs Wednesday in this section. Contact: 541-383-0358

B

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Alexandria Anguiano prepares a fillet of salmon for the fire during the annual Salmon Bake on Saturday at Central Oregon Community College in Bend.

Savoring the culture By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

T

he earliest pictures found around campus suggest that as far back as 1972, Central Oregon Community College students have hosted the school’s annual Salmon Bake. “Forty years is a long time,” said past organizer and American Indian art

instructor Justine Connor. “And then, it’s thousands of years, considering the indigenous culture.” Though the first Salmon Bake may be lost to memory, more than 100 community members joined students Saturday for a day of celebration. Dancers from the Warm Springs and Wasco tribes

performed, as did a troupe of traditional Aztec dancers from Portland. Students and volunteers from the local tribes prepared frybread and salmon cooked in traditional Northwestern style — on spears of wood over a low-burning alder fire. See Salmon Bake / B6

The Summit High School wind ensemble won its second consecutive state championship Thursday, besting a field of 11 groups at Oregon State University in Corvallis. Band director Dan Judd said the 48 students in the group put a lot of work into defending their title. “It’s a biggie,” Judd said. “The kids did a good job and really prepared hard all year and just played beautifully on Thursday.” Judd said Summit was the only school from east of the Cascades to qualify for the 5A state competition, which matches groups from schools between 851 and 1,520 students. Competing groups play a program at least 18 minutes long, which must include at least one piece of music from a list provided by the competition organizers. The Friends of Music, a booster group for music programs at Summit, played a key role in allowing the group to make the journey, Judd said. “We were thrilled to see lots of friends in the audience at Oregon State on Thursday, and they really have been a really supportive group helping the kids do many things — including their trip,” he said. “So we’ve got plenty of thanks we’d like to extend to the whole Summit community, but especially the Friends of Music.” Winning the state championship does not qualify Summit to continue to any regional or national competitions, but Judd said, “It’s the peak we all aspire to, so it’s very special in its own right.”

WASHINGTON WEEK WASHINGTON — The House of Representatives voted Thursday to replace the cuts to defense spending required by last year’s debt deal with cuts to poverty programs, including food stamps. Under the deal reached during last summer’s debt ceiling impasse, a series of cuts will go into effect in 2013, including mandatory cuts to the defense budget. The Sequester Replacement Reconciliation Act, which passed by a 218-199 margin (Rep. James Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., voted “present”) sets aside all defense cuts in favor of cuts to social programs. These include tighter eligibility for food stamps and Medicaid, and the elimination of all funding for the Social Services Block Grant — which pays for the Meals on Wheels program — and the newly created Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. No Democrats joined the Republican majority, and 16 Republicans voted against the measure, which the White House has threatened to veto in the unlikely event it passes the Senate.

U.S. HOUSE VOTE • Cut social service spending instead of defense Walden (R) ..................Y Blumenauer (D) ..........N Bonamici (D) ...............N DeFazio (D) ..................N Schrader (D) ...............N The House also voted on the United StatesIsrael Enhanced Security Cooperation Act of 2012, which expresses Congress’ desire that the U.S. continue its political and military support of Israel. In addition to reaffirming U.S. policy of Israel’s right to exist, it urges Israel’s neighbors to do the same. As a matter of policy, the U.S. will assist a negotiated settlement between Israel and Palestine, with the goal of two states co-existing together. The measure passed, 411-2, with nine members voting “present.”

U.S. HOUSE VOTE • Reaffirm the U.S. alliance with Israel Walden (R) ..................Y Blumenauer (D) ............. “present” Bonamici (D) ...............Y DeFazio (D) ..................Y Schrader (D) ...............Y

See Week / B2

— Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com

YESTERDAY STATE NEWS •

Portland

Keno

• Portland: Three eccentric frontrunners in eccentric city’s mayoral race. • Keno: Single mother of eight makes time for crafts, decorating. Stories on B3

Crocodile, ‘thunderbeast’ fossils uncovered in Clarno County Compiled by Don Hoiness from archived copies of The Bulletin at the Des Chutes Historical Museum.

100 YEARS AGO For the week ending May 12, 1912

Isaak Walton enjoys splendid Deschutes River trout fishing What would you rather do than go fishing?

Nothing. That seems to be the popular answer these days. Besides, everybody’s doing it. If you see a man with a hurried look trying to balance his books early, and growling when a customer delays him, why, mark him down as a fisherman. He wants to get out after ’em. If your boy forgets to split the stove wood and “slips up” on his lessons, remember that the mental picture of a walloping redside is at the bottom of all the trouble.

If your husband doesn’t get home until long after dark, don’t blame it on anything else but that he is up the river getting his feet wet. If you catch the man to whom you pay good wages sitting off in a corner varnishing his last year’s rod, patching his creel and soaking leaders, let him off easy for probably you’d feel the way he does if you got to thinking of that time last summer when you hooked the 12pound Dolly Vardon — which got away! Of course they shouldn’t do it. Sunday wasn’t made for fishing. But then — well

it’s pretty hard to sit at home when you know just the way those big redsides are jumping in the riffles up stream! Besides, everybody’s doing it. Last Sunday, for instance, everyone who went came home with a creel full. And then the fishermen don’t just stick just to Sabbaths, for lots of ’em sneak off on week days. Despite all the fishing last year, and the late spring, this season promises to be the best kind of a one for fish catching. See Yesterday / B2


B2

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

Yesterday Continued from B1 In addition to the local Isaak Walton’s, already several camping parties have been planned, and from early indications it seems likely that Crane Prairie and the more accessible reaches of the river will be pretty thickly thronged with anglers. To offset the depletion of trout, there now seems a strong probability that fry will be planted in the Deschutes. While up to the present it has been impossible to get any definite action from the state game authorities, it is extremely likely that a hatchery will be established on the Deschutes. Such a move will be welcomed by every person in Crook County for it would benefit all who have any interest in holiday outings along the splendid river. It would also be of great advantage to the constantly increasing number of visitors who come here for their summer holidays and would tend to increase this section of Central Oregon in popularity.

75 YEARS AGO For the week ending May 12, 1937

Airship Hindenburg explodes, 32 dead Compilations today listed 32 known dead or missing in the flames that destroyed the 800-foot-long dirigible Hindenburg, pride of the reich. American aviation authorities and German officials converged here to arrange for formal inquiries to seek the explanation of the spark that enveloped the hydrogen-filled airship in flames just as she was landing last night on the completion of her first transatlantic voyage this year. According to the lists issued by representatives of the Zeppelin company, out of 97 persons aboard the Hindenburg, 66 were known to be alive.

War correspondent recalls grim warning Webb Miller, United Press war correspondent, who made the first flight with the Hindenburg to the United States last year, disclosed today that he received before that flight an anonymous warning not to make the trip because something would happen to the ship when it arrived in the United States. “A year ago I was in Portland, Oregon when newspapers announced that I was starting for Germany to return in the Hindenburg,” Miller said. “I received at my hotel an anonymous telephone call: “Don’t travel on the Hindenburg. Something is going to happen to her when she arrives in the United States.” “The caller then hung up. I informed officials of the United Press of the incident before I sailed for Europe.”

No more hydrogen to be used in Zeppelins The Zeppelin company will use non-inflammable helium gas instead of hydrogen hereafter, Dr. Hugo Eckener, Ger-

man dirigible chief, said today. “Henceforth, naturally no passenger would set foot in a hydrogen filled airship,” he said. “Therefore, regardless of cost, we will use helium.”

50 YEARS AGO For the week ending May 12, 1962

Crocodiles along old rivers of Clarno area shared pastures with giant thunderbeast There are crocodiles in them thar hills! That is what they are saying over in the Clarno area where colored hills are capped by ancient lava. Actually, there are no crocodiles in the Clarno country at present, but definite proof has been found that they lived there long ago, when the Oregon land was still very young and ages before Columbia basalts covered ancient horizons. The report of the discovery of crocodile fossils was made from the University of Oregon this week after the skull of one of the Clarno creatures was pieced together and placed on display. They found the crocodile head in an area where sere ridges now lead up to Iron Mountain and its lava pillars. But before the crocodile was unearthed, paleontologists made even more startling finds. One of the most spectacular was a creature known as the Brontothere, the “thunderbeast” of the aged lands east of the Rockies. It was the first discovery of its kind ever made west of the Rockies. Thunderbeast and crocodile were not alone in the Clarno meadows that were bordered by meandering streams and fringed with semi-tropical forests. Also present were several types of rhinos, tapirs and carnivores. One of the most interesting finds was the fossil bones of a tiny horse, about as big as a collie dog. The little Clarno horse joins a fine herd of fossil horses that ranged over ancient Central Oregon from the Dawn Age to the Ice Age and grazed on a thousand horizons. Horses were abundant in Oregon in ancient times. They were of the three-toed type, and considerably larger than the Clarno pony. Horses continued their upward journey in time and space over millions of years moving from the John Day horizons to the Mascall hills, and on up into the Rattlesnake ranges and the old lands that were present when the Cascades were sheathed with ice. Last of the Oregon horses, whose black, sand polished bones have been found in the old lake beds of interior Oregon, were about as large as the modern horse. They had advanced far from the Clarno hills with its little pony whose bones are associated with those of the crocodile. The new discoveries made in the Clarno country increase interest of the region, and add another chapter to the story behind the scenery.

“We want a structure where not only can you wheel up to it in a wheelchair but also participate. That is a part of making this the premier park in Central Oregon.” — Heather Richards, community development director, Redmond

Playground Continued from B1 Zimmerman then went to the City Council and said if it did go ahead with the project, it should consider a larger playground. “They let (me and other parents) present what we wanted at the park,” Zimmerman said. “We had a list of what we wanted, and they listened. Everyone around the table collaborated and brainstormed and came up with what we thought would be best for the community.” The city has sent out a request for information from several companies and plans to choose three final designs this summer. “Hopefully in July and August, we will take a few options to the community and ask again what they like and don’t like,” Richards said. The design phase is still in its

infancy, but a few features appear to be sticking points for the city. The request calls for the standard tunnels, climbing apparatuses and slides. It also suggests elaborate equipment such as zip lines and electronic components. The request asks for a unique and local feel with re-creations of Smith Rock and Monkey Face incorporated into the design. And while several of those elements could be viewed as “wants,” both Richards and Zimmerman said a critical component of the park will be access for all. “We want a structure where not only can you wheel up to it in a wheelchair but also participate,” Richards said. “That is a part of making this the premier park in Central Oregon.” — Reporter: 541-617-7837 ehidle@bendbulletin.com

25 YEARS AGO For the week ending May 12, 1987

Vets memorial begins to rise About 50 people gathered at the Deschutes Memorial Gardens for the raising of a flagpole that marked the start of construction of a monument to veterans in Central Oregon. The 50-foot aluminum flagpole was set in place by volunteers using equipment donated by the Carlson Sign Company. Sal Scanzano, commander of Ponderosa Pines Post 1643, Veterans of Foreign Wars, organized the event and introduced Jack Wirges and his son Mark, both Central Oregon veterans who have been named co-chairmen of the fund raising committee for the project. The new memorial will feature a 9-foot-high wall built with personalized bricks, the 50-foot flagstaff and a massive American flag. The memorial will bear a large plaque that will read: “Dedicated to all of the men and women who have honorably served their country in the Armed Forces of the United States of America. May their sacrifices not have been in vain.” A special tribute to Korean War veterans will be placed near the flagstaff. The impetus for the project came from Scanzano’s discovery that a wooden Korean War monument originally erected near the Deschutes County Courthouse in 1952 later was lost or stolen and ended up being used as subflooring in a house near the courthouse.

Karnopp Picks U.O. Lisa Karnopp, the multi-talented senior from Mountain View High School, has signed a letter-of-intent to attend the University of Oregon. Karnopp is one of the state’s top runners, winning state class AAA crowns in crosscountry and track. She is also one of the nations top ski racers. “It made the most sense to me,” she said. “Oregon has one of the best running programs in the U.S., the world for that matter. I decided to go for a year and really concentrate on running, really give it a try. “My No. 1 goal is to enjoy it,” she said. “I know that running in college is much more serious than running in high school. But I’m going to try it for a year. If I like it, whether I’m doing well or not, I’m going to stick with it.” Karnopp will enter the school with some impressive credentials. As a junior she won the state Class AAA cross-country crown and then took first in the 1500 meters and fourth in the 3000 at the state Class AAA Track and Field Championships. This year, she won the InterMountain Conference crosscountry title for the fourth year in a row. Karnopp said she heard from between 75 and 100 schools, and visited Oregon, Colorado and the universities of Washington, Wyoming and Nebraska. She also considered Dartmouth, Washington State and Arizona State.

Week Continued from B1 On Tuesday, Senate Republicans blocked an effort to keep interest on federally subsidized student loans from doubling from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent. The rate is scheduled to go up on July 1, and Senate Democrats had introduced a plan to extend the lower rate for one year. Republicans balked at the way Democrats proposed paying for the $6 billion in costs by requiring certain smaller corporations to pay withholding taxes on income above $250,000. Needing 60 votes to overcome the threat of a filibuster, the matter failed by a 52-45 margin (Sen. Olympia Snowe, R-Maine, voted “present”). Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., was the only Democrat to vote with the Republican minority.

U.S. SENATE VOTE • Prevent increase in student loan interest rate Merkley (D) ..................Y Wyden (D) ...................Y — Andrew Clevenger, The Bulletin

Well shot! READER PHOTOS Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@ bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication. Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

GREAT LUNCH SPOT Ann Kieffer, of Bend, snapped this photo of hikers taking a break near Pamelia Lake in the Willamette National Forest using a Fuji FinePix S700.

P O For The Bulletin’s full list, including federal, state, county and city levels, visit www.bendbulletin.com/officials.

CONGRESS U.S. Senate

Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore.: 107 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-3753 Web: http://merkley.senate.gov Bend office: 131 N.W. Hawthorne Ave., Suite 208 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-318-1298 Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. 223 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510

Phone: 202-224-5244 Web: http://wyden.senate.gov Bend office: 131 N.W. Hawthorne Ave., Suite 107 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-330-9142 U.S. House of Representatives

Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River 2182 Rayburn House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: 202-225-6730 Web: http://walden.house.gov/

STATE OF OREGON Gov. John Kitzhaber, Democrat 160 State Capitol, 900 Court St.

Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4582 Fax: 503-378-6872 Web: http://governor.oregon.gov Secretary of State Kate Brown, Democrat 136 State Capitol Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1616 Fax: 503-986-1616 Email: oregon.sos@state.or.us Superintendent of Public Instruction Susan Castillo 255 Capitol Street N.E. Salem, Oregon 97310 Phone: 503-947-5600 Fax: 503-378-5156 Email: superintendent.castillo @state.or.us Web: www.ode.state.or.us


SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

B3

O N Weird city, weird mayor: Portland’s 3 front-runners

KLAMATH COUNTY

By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

Alex Powers / The Herald and News (Klamath Falls)

Andrea Dodson poses for a photo with her children — from left, Bryerson, 5, Kenninsten, 11, Kabella, 6, McKendrianna, 14, Kenzington, 1, Cashton, 2, Khaleighan, 10, and Zaidensen, 3 — in late April 2012 at the family’s home in Keno.

Even with 8 kids, single mother finds time for flashy decorations By Alex Powers The Herald and News (Klamath Falls)

KENO — Bryerson Dodson, 5, has found a frog. His siblings, ranging in age from 1 to 14 years old, dismount from playground equipment and come racing from corners of the yard to see it. There are eight in all, and they pass the frog around before their mother, Andrea, hands it to the youngest, Kenzington, who elicits shrieks and laughter when she squeezes the frog a little too hard. This is the life of Andrea Dodson: Mom to eight children, she baffles friends and family by still finding time for crafts and the online community CafeMom, where she’s known as housefullofkidz. And she does it as a single parent. “I swear she’s got to have a cape and a tiara,” said friend and CafeMom cohort Kim Probst of Klamath Falls. “That woman is amazing.” When members of the CafeMom website were given a chance to find out how some of the site’s celebrities live, they chose Dodson. The Keno-area resident is known in the online community of moms for her eccentric decorating, repurposed crafts and family of eight children. At her home last month, each room was a mix of crazy

On the Web To see CafeMom’s profile on Andrea Dodson, visit http://bit .ly/LCfCl1.

colors and an ever-present zebra motif. On a wall in the foyer of the house, a trio of mirrors is covered in blue glitter. Dodson pointed to the piece that started her home décor — a Daniel Dakota grandfather clock, painted in zebra pattern. While she’s taken discarded household items and decorated them with plastic jewels, glitter and vibrantly colored paint “for a long time,” Dodson said her home decorating picked up two years ago when she and her ex-husband, Jason, split up. “I don’t have a man living here, so I can live in a sparkling house,” she said. She began sharing her crafts with members of CafeMom, where she oversaw several forums. As a moderator, she was expected to make 50 posts each week on forum threads to encourage conversation and keep groups active. Dodson said she stepped down from her moderator post to spend more time with her children. But it was one such user

group of Klamath Falls-area members where Probst first met Dodson. Dodson currently moderates a handful of groups on the CafeMom forums and said conversations with group members led her to friendships with four local women. CafeMom is a website designed to allow moms to talk, share advice and make friends. Probst and Dodson each had children in a baby group for children with the same birthday. “We can ask, ‘Are your kids walking? Are they talking?’ and it’s great networking,” Probst said. Probst said Dodson is well-known on CafeMom for her large family and crafts. Many of Dodson’s posts are “charmed,” or have received a large number of “charms” — think of them as a “like” on Facebook — Probst said. “She’s big-time on CafeMom,” she said. “It’s a whole other world of women.” In February, an AOL web producer came out to Dodson’s home to take footage for CafeMom webcasts. “The Real Moms of CafeMom” episodes featuring Dodson aired on the CafeMomStudio YouTube channel May 5 and Friday, she said. “They wanted to know how I do it all, how my house looks, all of it,” Dodson said.

PORTLAND — Portland is famously weird and fiercely proud of it, so things can get a little bizarre when it comes time to pick a mayor. In one local tradition, candidates try to outdo each other in an eating contest at a doughnut shop known nationally for oddities such as oversized, maple-frosted doughnuts topped with strips of crispy bacon. That’s politics in a city where the main attraction is culture as opposed to commerce or landmarks. Food carts, fixed-gear bicycles, pot shops and craft beer make Portland a magnet for the young, hip and liberal. But it’s still a major city with all the attendant dilemmas. Leaders have to contend with tight budgets, high unemployment and crumbling roads. Minorities face economic and social disenfranchisement and are being pushed to the outskirts of town. Voters will weigh in Tuesday on which brand of liberal is best equipped to run the city while obeying the command posted in bright yellow letters on brick walls, car bumpers, T-shirts and concert fliers, “Keep Portland weird!” One contender, state Rep. Jefferson Smith, says he finished off three cream-filled treats at Voodoo Doughnut, which has gained national fame on food-themed cable TV shows such as Travel Channel’s “No Reservations” and “Man v. Food.” Another front-runner, Eileen Brady, the glutenaverse co-founder of a popular organic grocery chain, used a surrogate eater to avoid the deep-fried flour. She apparently preferred the stand-in over bringing steamed kale to the doughnut shop, an option she’d considered. The other high-profile candidate, Charlie Hales, skipped the tradition. All told, there are nearly two dozen contenders pur-

UO student dies of bacterial meningitis EUGENE — Officials believe a University of Oregon student has died of bacterial meningitis. Spokeswoman Julie Brown said the university is working with public health officials to identify others who may have had close contact with the student. She told KVAL that about 100 people are receiving preventive medication. Officials are not releasing the name or age of the student, who died Friday. Brown could not say whether the student was part of any campus organizations, but said members of the Chi Omega sorority were receiving the preventive medication.

Bank robber flees on bicycle in Medford MEDFORD — Police are searching for a man who robbed a Medford bank and got away on a bicycle. Officials say a person wearing a mask told the Umpqua Bank teller he was carrying a gun. He fled the bank Friday with cash and hopped on a mountain bike he’d stashed in a nearby parking lot. Medford Police Lt. Mike Budreau said the robbery left the teller shaken but nobody was injured. — From wire reports

version of the city so often depicted in popular culture. It’s a reputation she embraces. “They make fun of me because I’m a vegetarian, and I love eating leafy greens, love kale,” she said. “I’m probably classic ‘Portlandia.’ Organic garden. Chickens in my backyard. Ride my bike to work.” Brady’s family helped launch New Seasons Market, a Portland-area grocery-store chain that features organic and locally grown food, and she has made her business experience a key component of her campaign. Hales, 56, the only candidate with experience in city government, is positioned as a policy expert, whose work includes bringing electric streetcars to the city. Hales says Portland never set out to build landmarks to attract attention, such as Seattle’s Space Needle or St. Louis’ Gateway Arch. He says the city instead focused on amenities intended to enhance living standards. “We built light rail for us,” he said. “We built the streetcar for us. We built Pioneer Courthouse Square, and we’re about to build a Portland public market downtown for us. “Then other people notice these things in the rest of the country and say, ‘Wow, Portland sure is cool.’ ” With Portland home to 585,000 residents and counting, the city’s next leader will ultimately face the challenge of helping it learn to grow — without growing up.

Celebrating Our 80th Anniversary! Call Stark’s Vacuums for all your Central Vacuum needs!

Sales, Installation & In Home Services Available $97* on site service price includes all labor whether it’s 1 hour or 8 hours. (*parts and materials are extra)

Sewing Machine Repair & Service

STARK’S VACUUMS Rebecca Nonweiler, MD, Board Certified

(541) 318-7311

www.northwestmedispa.com

O  B 

suing the city’s top job, a field that includes an Occupy Portland leader and a reformed radi- Brady cal environmentalist. The winner will replace Sam Adams, whose election in 2008 made Port- Hales land the largest American city at the time to elect an openly gay mayor. Recent polling shows the race is Smith very close, and many voters are still making up their minds. Smith, Brady and Hales — the candidates with the most organized and well-funded campaigns — are all Democrats. The primary race is expected to whittle the field down to two candidates who will then face off in November. Each represents the quirks of Portland in their own way. Smith, 38, became something of a rock star among liberal political activists when he co-founded The Bus Project, a nonprofit that tries to take the stuffiness out of politics and make activism fun for young people. He started the organization in 2001 after walking away from a brief legal career that included working at top firms in New York City and Portland. In 2008, he was elected to the state Legislature representing far-east Portland, a workingclass enclave that’s home to a rising number of low-income and minority households displaced by rising home values in the city’s trendy urban core. Smith says Portland needs to “be ready for the 21st century with a city that isn’t as white, isn’t as small, isn’t as provincial, but hopefully maintains its neighborhood feel.” Brady, 50, more than her two main rivals, embodies the

HWY 20E & Dean Swift Rd. (1 block West of Costco) 541-323-3011 • starks.com Mon.-Fri. 9-7 Sat. 9-6 Sun. 11-5


B4

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

T W Cost a factor in California push to eliminate the death penalty By Howard Mintz San Jose Mercury News

SAN JOSE, Calif. — In a one-month span from December 2005 to January 2006, California carried out its last two executions, administering lethal drugs to condemned killers Stanley “Tookie” Williams and Clarence Ray Allen. But execution day was not the end of the line for just Williams and Allen. It also ended more than two decades of taxpayer-funded legal costs for challenging their convictions and death sentences. An unprecedented trove of records obtained by the Bay Area News Group shows the final price tag for all the state and federal appeals for Allen, the oldest death row inmate California ever executed, was more than $761,000. Appeals for Crips street gang co-founder Williams, who gained international notoriety on death row, cost the public nearly $1 million. The debate over such costs is at the heart of California’s first political campaign since 1978 to repeal the death penalty, clear the state’s bulging death row and replace capital punishment with life in prison without the possibility of parole. The secretary of state last month qualified the so-called SAFE California Act for the November ballot. Death penalty opponents, who in the past have argued executions are unfair and immoral, are now urging voters to think with their wallets — saying the ultimate punishment has become too expensive for deficit-ridden California. Death penalty supporters say overall cost estimates are inflated and no reason to do away with executing the state’s most heinous killers.

Legal costs might exceed $700 million The San Jose Mercury News’ review of the Williams and Allen cases — both considered typical for California’s death row — show the combined state and federal legal costs to see the state’s 724 condemned inmates through the nation’s most sluggish death penalty system would likely exceed $700 million, which does not include the expense for the attorney general’s office to defend those sentences in the courts. Although death penalty supporters say such costs can be reduced drastically if federal judges stop meddling and the state Supreme Court moves more swiftly, the past 30 years of death row appeals suggest the expenses are inevitable if California retains capital punishment. “I don’t know what the solution is,” said Carlos Moreno,

“I don’t know what the solution is. Under the current system, (the death penalty) just takes too long and is too expensive.” — Carlos Moreno, former justice, California Supreme Court

who reviewed such appeals as both a California Supreme Court justice and Los Angeles federal judge. “Under the current system, it just takes too long and is too expensive.”

Price of doing business As the Williams and Allen cases illustrate, both the state Supreme Court and federal judges have built in a system that gives death row inmates automatic rights to investigate and press their appeals, with cost just the price of doing business. An evidentiary hearing in Williams’ case, which failed to persuade the Supreme Court to accept his arguments, cost more than $111,000 for a single stage in his appeal, records show. Federal judges paid Allen’s lawyers, investigators and paralegals nearly $500,000 for his unsuccessful district court appeal, which lasted more than a decade. “That’s what it costs,” Moreno said. “I’ve seen it. I don’t think we’re overly generous.” Records show the cost of these appeals and clemency dwarfs the expense and time of ordinary appeals for a murderer sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. Williams’ appeals went on for 24 years, Allen’s for 26. In contrast, a murderer serving life without parole gets a lawyer for an initial state appeal, which is done in a few years, and often has little or no legal support for a federal appeal. California has more than 4,400 life-without-parole inmates, according to prison figures. The average cost of life-without-parole appeals is about $17,000, according to just compiled data from the six appellate projects that defend such inmates across the state. Just the clemency costs for Williams and Allen were $30,000 and $53,000, respectively. “It certainly says we have a penalty that is far too expensive,” said Jeanne Woodford, the former San Quentin warden leading the measure’s campaign. “We’re spending this amount of money for a handful of people and it doesn’t really do anything for public safety.”

The California ballot fight is coming at a crucial juncture in the nation’s death penalty conflict. Connecticut on April 25 became the 17th state to outlaw capital punishment. Studies in states such as Maryland, Nevada and Indiana have suggested the death penalty is a costly burden on justice systems. The measure’s supporters stress California has executed just 13 inmates in more than three decades, with little reason to believe the pace will quicken soon. Executions have been on hold for more than six years as a result of legal challenges to the state’s lethal injection procedures. There is ample dispute over the true cost of continuing California’s death penalty. A study last year co-authored by prominent federal appeals court Judge Arthur Alarcon found the state could save billions of dollars by abolishing the death penalty. The study cited the greater cost of death penalty trials, appeals and housing death row inmates.

‘A price on justice’ Death penalty supporters say the figures are overblown. “How do you put a price on justice?” asked McGregor Scott, a former Sacramento U.S. attorney heading the campaign against the measure. “The numbers that have been advanced ... are really made up out of whole cloth.” In fact, no firm numbers exist for some of the costs, such as the difference between housing a death row inmate and a murderer serving life. The Alarcon study, citing California prison officials’ public statements in 2005, estimated it costs $90,000 a year more to house a death row inmate than other inmates because of tighter security and other issues. But the state Department of Corrections said recently there is no reliable figure on that cost. However, no one disputes the major additional expense of a death row inmate’s unfettered right to contest a death sentence through the state and federal courts, or the cost of clemency proceedings in the months before an execution. The coalition opposing the measure says the costs can be lowered significantly, in large part by trimming what it considers unnecessary rounds of litigation. It also says there is hope a U.S. Supreme Court ruling last year reinstating a California death sentence will severely curtail future appeals and thus expenses. “It doesn’t have to cost that much,” said Kent Scheidegger, legal director of the Criminal Justice Legal Foundation. “There is an awful lot of stuff that doesn’t need to be done.”

WASHINGTON STATE

Whooping cough wreaks havoc amid the recession • Government agencies meant to fight outbreaks are underfunded By Kirk Johnson New York Times News Service

MOUNT VERNON, Wash. — Whooping cough, or pertussis, a highly infectious respiratory disease once considered doomed by science, has struck Washington state this spring with a severity that health officials say could surpass the toll of any year since the 1940s, before a vaccine went into wide use. Although no deaths have been reported so far this year, the state has declared an epidemic and public health officials say the numbers are staggering: 1,284 cases through early May, the most in at least three decades and 10 times last year’s total at this time, 128. The response to the epidemic has been hampered by the recession, which has left state and local health departments on the front lines of defense weakened by years of sustained budget cuts. Here in Skagit County, about an hour’s drive north of Seattle — the hardest-hit corner of the state, based on pertussis cases per cap-

ita — the local Public Health Department has half the staff it did in 2008. Preventive care programs, intended to keep people healthy, are mostly gone. The county’s top medical officer, Dr. Howard Leibrand, who is also a full-time emergency room physician, said that in the crushing triage of a combined health crisis and budget crisis, he had gone so far as to urge local physicians to stop testing patients to confirm a whooping cough diagnosis. If the signs are there, he said — especially a persistent, deep cough and indication of contact with a confirmed victim — doctors should simply treat patients with antibiotics. The pertussis test can cost up to $400 and delay treatment by days. About 14.6 percent of Skagit County residents have no health insurance, according to a state study conducted last year, up from 11.6 percent in 2008. “There has been half a million dollars spent on testing in this county,” Leibrand said late last week. “Do you know how much vaccination you can buy for half a million dollars?” And testing, he added, benefits only the epidemiologists, not the patients. “It’s an outrageous way to spend your health care dollar.” State health officials estimate that because of incomplete testing and the assumption that many people with mild cases are not seeking medical treatment, perhaps as few as

one in five pertussis cases is being recorded and tracked, suggesting that the outbreak is far more widespread than the numbers indicate. The pertussis vaccine is commonly given in childhood, and many states require it for children of school age. But Washington state, according to a federal study last year of kindergarten-age children, had the highest percentage of parents in the nation who voluntarily exempted their children from one or more vaccines, out of fear of side effects or for philosophical reasons. The drumbeat of publicity about the pertussis outbreak could be changing some minds. Mary Ann Mercer, 74, a retired schoolteacher, went to Skagit County’s walk-in clinic on Thursday morning for a vaccination after hearing news reports. She never had whooping cough as a child, she said, and never thought of it much until recently. “It’s just precautionary,” she said after receiving her shot. Her husband, Roger Mercer, who ran a local Blue Cross insurance plan before his retirement, sat anchored to his chair in the waiting area. “I’m a coward,” he said.

Self Referrals Welcome

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 541-706-6900

1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend www.highdesertbank.com

EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

You Deserve The Very Best! • Trained Professionals • Free Quotes • No “Hidden” Costs • On Time • Guaranteed Work

Central Oregon’s ONLY Cleantrust CERTIFIED Master Cleaners Residential & Commercial Carpet Cleaning • Upholstery Cleaning Oriental & Area Rug Cleaning Pet Odor Removal All Work Performed to Industry Standards

Serving Bend for Over 20 Years!

Ask about our “CLEAN FOR LIFE” Planned Maintenance Program

www.cleaningclinicinc.com Licensed Bonded Insured

541-382-9498 www.cleaningclinicinc.com • cleaningclinic@bendcable.com 20664 Carmen Loop, #4, Bend, OR 97702

20 541-382-9498

%

OFF

Minimum Service Call Applies Offer not valid with any other promotion. Expires 6/30/12.

Residential Upholstery Cleaning when combined with a Residential Carpet Cleaning.


SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

B5

O    D N   Mary Jo Hunt Beatrice J. Moen, of Bend April 28, 1925 - May 5, 2012 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541)382-5592;

www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: Mrs. Moen requested no services were to be held.

Dr. George Daniel McGeary, of Bend April 19, 1920 - May 7, 2012 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: The family is planning a Celebration of Life at a date yet to be announced. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

Erva E. Fivecoat, of Madras Dec. 19, 1912 - April 30, 2012 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Friday, June 1, 2012, 12 Noon, Cornerstone Baptist Church in Madras.

Harold S. (Don) Lee Feb. 17, 1936 - April 27, 2012 Harold S. (Don) Lee passed away peacefully at Hospice House of Bend, on April 27, 2012. He was born in Ainswort h, Nebraska, on February 17, 1936, to Harold E. Harold Lee and Beatrice Lee. He graduated from Springfield High School in 1954, and served in the Navy from 1955-1957. Don worked with his father, a general contractor, in the Springfield area, then for the State of Oregon Building Codes and State Fire Marshal’s Office in the area of Fire and Life Safety. He retired in 1994, and moved to Crooked River Ranch in Central Oregon in 1998. He is survived by his wife of 30 years, Kathleen; his daughter, JoAn McNaughten; his sister, Dixie Lillie, of Eugene; eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his daughter, Jamie Haubner. A Celebration of Life Mass will be held at St. Thomas Catholic Church in Redmond, on Saturday, May 19, at 11 a.m. A heartfelt "Thank You" to the staff of Partners In Care Hospice of Bend. Donations may be made in lieu of flowers to Partners In Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

Daniel Alan Mink Dec. 21, 1969 – April 30, 2012 Daniel Alan Mink was born December 21, 1969, in Salem, Oregon, to Michael and Catherine (Bowen) Mink. He married Jennifer Sessums on July 21, 1995, in Bend, Oregon. Daniel had a great love of the outdoors, fishing, hunting and hiking. He also loved helping family and friends. Daniel is survived be his wife, Jennifer of Bend; son, Tristin; and daughter, Madison both of Bend. Daniel is also survived by his brothers-in-law, Troy Douglas, Dan Ort and Lance Skinner; and by sisters-in-law, Angela Douglas, Sherri O’Dell, Nicole Skinner and Vicki Ort; and grandmother, Mabel Mink. Daniel was preceded in death by his brother, David Mink; and his uncle, Ron Mink; and his grandparents. A Celebration of Life will be held Saturday, May 12, 2012, at 11:00 a.m., at the South Salem Church of the Nazarene, 1661 Boone Road S.E., Salem, Oregon.

Charles S. Youlden

Sept. 23, 1925 - May 4, 2012

January 19, 1929 - April 27, 2012

Mary Jo Hunt passed away peacefully in her sleep after a short battle with pneumonia. Her family was grateful for the quality visits they shared before her passing. What a special lady. Jo was born in Lawrence, Oklahoma. After high school graduation she Mary Jo Hunt went to college at East Central State College in Ada, graduating with a bachelor of arts in education. Jo's parents, the Gregory's, both being in education, made sure their three daughters also got degrees. Jo was raised in the Baptist Church and one of her favorite stories was of her grandfather, The local Baptist minister, teaching the girls to swim in the Baptismal Font. Jo met her future husband, Dean Hunt, while she was in college and he was in the military. At 20 years old, she rode the train to Bend and married Dean on June 29, 1945. They raised four children and enjoyed 60 years of marriage here in Bend. Besides having her hands full with four rambunctious children she always worked a full time job. Her jobs included the Trailways Bus Depot, Brooks Scanlon and 28 years with a local law firm. The last few years as the City Attorney's secretary. Furthering her education and her love of reading continued throughout her life. Even when her vision deteriorated from macular degeneration she continued to enjoy her talking books from Oregon Library for the Blind. The Hunts traveled the world. After retirement they became "snowbirds", traveling the southwest. For 15 years Laughlin, NV. called to them where they continually tested their "luck". They were two lucky people and were loved by many. Jo was Worthy Matron of Eastern Star and was active in Star for several years. Her family was her main love and hobby whether they were camping at the lake, attending go cart races, fishing or traveling. She is survived by Greg (Carla) Hunt, Bend - Jerry (Peg) Hunt, Bend - Diane Hunt (Woody), Bend Gary (Marlene) Hunt, Terrebonne. There are also five grandchildren, Chanie, Charease, Jeff, Rob and Scott; and 10 great-grandchildren, Kailan, Karli, Makayla, Parker, Keegan, Jaxon, Rosie, James, Zack and Kaylan. A very special niece, Jana from Florida. She also leaves behind her sister, Joy, of Midwest City, Oklahoma and her family. She was preceded in death by her parents, a sister and her husband, Dean in 2005. A funeral service will be held Friday, May 18, 2012, at 1:00 p.m., in the Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Chapel. Donations may be made to Oregons Library for the Blind or Hospice. Please visit the online registry for the family at www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Charles S. Youlden Jr. passed away on April 27, 2012, at the age of 83, in Bend, Oregon. He was born on January 19, 1929, in Butte, Montana, to Charles and Ann Youlden. He grew up in Butte and upon graduation from high school, attended Claremont Charles S. Men's Youlden College in southern California and graduated with a degree in business. After college, he served in the Navy and was stationed at Pearl Harbor where he met his wife, Janet Benson. They had three children, Chip, Nancy and Peter. Charles returned to Butte, Montana, and worked at the familyowned business, Davidson Grocery Company for several years. They later moved to Grand Forks, North Dakota and Charles was a commercial loan officer at First National Bank for many years prior to owning his own company, Youlden Supply Company. While in Grand Forks, he was an elder at the First Presbyterian Church, President of Rotary Club, board member at the YMCA and lectured (business) at the University of North Dakota. After retiring, Charles moved to Bend, OR, and lived many happy years with his long-time partner, Alice Petrie, who was a childhood sweetheart. He volunteered at AARP-Tax Aid, providing free tax advice primarily for seniors. Charles had tremendous integrity, strong values and was a loyal, fair man. He had a kind heart, optimistic attitude and a dry-witted sense of humor. He was loving, accepting, and gave his children great freedom. He was inseparable from his partner, Alice, and was particularly proud of each of his three children and five grandchildren. "Chizzy" loved to call family and friends on their birthdays and had a generous heart. Charles loved Montana and spent considerable time at the family cabin on Moose Lake (southwestern Montana) - which remained one of the great loves throughout his life. There will not be a formal service but a small celebration to spread his ashes at Moose Lake this summer. Charles is survived by his partner, Alice B. Petrie of Bend, OR; his adored dog, Nikki, three children, Charles (Chip) E. Youlden (and Barbara) of Billings, MT, Nancy Tait Youlden (and Kim Moore) of Portland, OR, Peter J. Youlden (and Grace) of Moorhead, MN, along with four grandchildren; and his sister, MaryAnn McNamee (and Larry) of Pacific Palisades, CA. One grandchild, Andrew, preceded him in death. Please sign our guest book at www.niswonger-reynolds. com

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825.

Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details.

Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254

Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME

Faas won 2 Pulitzers for wartime photos By Paul Vitello New York Times News Service

Horst Faas, a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning war photographer who later was editor of The Associated Press staff in Saigon that produced the most haunting photographs of the Vietnam War, died Thursday in Munich. He was 79. His death was confirmed by the AP. Faas covered wars in Congo and Algeria in the late 1950s Faas before being sent to Vietnam Horst Faas / The Associated Press file photo in 1962. Though seriously wounded in a jungle rocket A father holds the body of his child as South Vietnamese Army attack in 1967, he remained Rangers look down from their armored vehicle in March 1964. in what he called “this little The photo won former Associated Press photographer Horst bloodstained country� until Faas his first Pulitzer Prize. Faas, 79, died Thursday. 1973, shortly before the U.S. withdrawal. Faas earned Pulitzers in namese photographer Huynh outcome of the war.� Making 1965 for combat photographs Cong Ut, showed a group of pictures about the suffering from Vietnam and in 1972 for terror-stricken children flee- and horror of war, he said, his coverage of the conflict in ing the scene of a U.S. bomb- was simply better than not ing, a young girl in the middle making them. Bangladesh. As celebrated as his own of the group screaming and Faas was known at the AP, naked, her clothing which he joined in 1956, for his pictures were, the photographs that came to FEATURED incinerated by burn- role as a teacher and mentor. be most closely assoDuring the Vietnam War, he OBITUARY ingInnapalm. interviews, Faas trained a cadre of young Vietciated with Faas were avoided grand state- namese men to take pictures, two that he selected, as an editor, for transmission ments about the power of supplying them with cameras, photography to change public film and daily marching oraround the world. The first, taken by Eddie opinion. He was at times ada- ders. Some became profesAdams in 1968, showed a mantly fatalistic on the issue. sionally successful, including “I don’t think we influenced Ut, who now works in Los Vietnamese official, his pistol at arm’s length, executing a the war at any time,� he said Angeles. captured Viet Cong soldier at in 1997. “I don’t think we Faas’ survivors include his point-blank range. The sec- helped to win it or helped to wife, Ursula, and his daughond, taken in 1972 by the Viet- lose it. We didn’t work on the ter, Clare Faas.

D E  Deaths of note from around the world: Angelica Garnett, 93: Last direct link to the Bloomsbury set, whose memoir of growing up amid its potent brew of sex, secrets, artistry and renown is notable for offering a child’s-eye view of that darkly charmed circle. Died May 4 in the south of France. Louis Pollak, 89: Federal judge and former dean of two prestigious law schools who played a significant role in major civil rights cases before the Supreme Court, including the landmark Brown v. Board of Education desegregation case. Died Wednesday at his home in Philadelphia of congestive heart failure. E.J. Potter, 71: Legend of the American drag strip. Died April 30 in Ithaca, Mich., of complications of Alzheimer’s disease — From wire reports

ALVIN L. CLARKE “Al� Clarke, born May 19, 1938 in Sandpoint, Idaho, to Jack and Theda Van Cleave Clarke. Mr. Clarke passed away March 19, 2012, at St. Alphonsus Hospital, Baker City, Oregon, with cancer. A family and friends “Celebration of Life� will be May 19, 2012, in Sumpter, Oregon, from 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM. For more info, Please call 541-419-9265. Mr. Clarke is survived by his wife, Myrna of Sumpter, sons, Cary R. and wife, Michaelle of Bend/Sumpter, and Kurt M. Clarke of Bend/Sumpter, and daughter, Lisa L. and husband, Edward Landers of Bend. Eight grandchildren, and one great grandchild. Mr. Clarke was a regular “MacGyver.� He could make a piano out of an apple crate. He was a master crafter and received multiple awards for homes and commercial buildings he built in Eugene, Lincoln City, Salishan and the Central Oregon area. At retirement, he was supervisor for Keeton King Construction. Projects included, Black Butte Ranch, Eagle Crest, Mt. Bachelor Village, The Old Mill, Regal Cinemas, REI & the City of Bend Water Pilot Butte Reservoir. He loved being outdoors; hunting, fishing, snowmobiles, ATV’s, berry & mushroom picking. He was Past President of the Moon Country Snowmobile Club, Boy Scout leader, Foster Parent, and Civic leader. He lived his dream, retiring to his “cabin in the woods,� on the base of the Elkhorn Mts. He was a dedicated community leader, member of the Fire Dept., President of the Sumpter Valley Blue Mountain Snowmobile Club, & had served on the Planning Department.

His smile was contagious. His motto was “Respect for self, respect for others & responsibility for your own actions.�

Howard Byron Luderman December 16, 1929 - April 30, 2012 Howard was born in Klamath Falls, Oregon to Edwin and Annie Luderman. At the age of 82 after spending a beautiful day filled with laughter love and memories with his brother Kenneth and his four children, he went to be with his Lord on April 30, 2012. He was married 57 years to his wife Patricia Luderman. They were married on October 18,1952 and moved to Bend in 1961 where they have lived for the past 51 years and raised four children. He is survived by his brother Kenneth (Gloria) Luderman and children, Rod Luderman (Nikki), of Snohomish, Wa,Terri Faith (Chris), of Prineville, Or., Cheryl Curley (Rick), of Redmond, Or., and Carla Luderman, of Bend, Or., and grandchildren, Chris (Kristine), Kelli (Chad), Zachary, Jacob, Ricky, Guy, Josh (Colie), Mandi (Randy), Ben (Kelly), Kim, Jessica,Tessa, Rachel (DJ), Devan (Chelsey), and 20 great-grandchildren, 2 nieces and 1 nephew. He is preceded in death by his beloved parents Edwin and Annie Luderman, wife Patricia and grandson Wesley Wilson.The family would like to send out a special thanks to Chelsey,for the tender and compassionate care she provided during grandpas last few weeks. Howard enjoyed farm work, hunting, fishing, and growing his own garden and with his wife Pat, they raised four children on their farm in Bend. Howard loved looking out the window and seeing his green fields with his cows grazing away. Howard was the type of person to help any one and everyone if needed. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy right out of high school from August of 1948 to August on 1949; he served as a fireman apprentice. Howard drove long haul trucks, and drove locally for many years up to his retirement in April of 1992. Howard was an avid bowler and bowled on several leagues. He was involved in yearly camping trips to the coast and high lakes with his family. He loved participating in the horse club. He hauled all our horses to play days and county fairs and enjoyed every minute. He was a caring and devoted husband, father, and grandfather, who will be dearly missed by all that knew him. Howard always enjoyed a good potluck dinner, so please feel free to bring a dish, and help celebrate his life with us. A Memorial Service will be held On May 20, 2012, 2 P.M. at Partners In Care, potluck following the service. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Partners In Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701. Autumn Funerals is in charge of arrangements.


THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

B6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, MAY 13

MONDAY

Today: Sunny.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

Tonight: Mostly clear.

HIGH

LOW

88

42

Astoria 74/49

64/49

Cannon Beach 68/49

Hillsboro Portland 88/56 85/53

Tillamook 73/50

Salem

68/48

89/52

80s 85/52

85/39

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

85/51

86/52

Coos Bay

Crescent

66/50

Chemult

90/54

Gold Beach

Hampton

83/49

Juntura

Burns

83/39

81/44

86/40

Riley 79/43

Jordan Valley

87/41

Silver Lake

84/36

83/48

Rome

90s

Klamath Falls 84/46

Ashland

66/52

• 89° Medford

82/45

94/57

Brookings

Yesterday’s state extremes

83/49

Chiloquin

Medford

CENTRAL Skies will be mostly sunny today with warm temperatures. Clear skies tonight.

82/42

Paisley

93/55

75/45

Frenchglen

84/41

Grants Pass

56/47

Vale

80s

WEST Mostly sunny skies today. Expect clear to partly cloudy skies tonight.

87/51

• 24°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

82/51

79/48

Redmond

86/41

-30s

-20s

-10s

10s

Vancouver 70/59

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

0s

Calgary 74/51

Saskatoon 77/53

Rapid City 74/49

• 15°

Cheyenne 62/39 San Francisco 61/51

Pearland, Texas

Las Vegas 98/72

Salt Lake City 76/51

Denver 62/43 Albuquerque 78/51

Los Angeles 70/59

Phoenix 104/73

Honolulu 83/68

Winnipeg 72/52

Tijuana 79/59

Anchorage 50/36

Juneau 47/38

60s

70s

Mazatlan 87/74

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 66/46

Thunder Bay 76/50 To ronto 66/49

Green Bay 72/47

Buffalo

Halifax Portland 62/45 65/53 Boston 78/55 New York 81/61 Philadelphia 81/62 Washington, D. C. 79/63

Detroit 68/50 66/48 Des Moines Columbus 74/51 Chicago 67/53 69/49 Omaha 74/50 Louisville Kansas City 69/56 72/52 St. Louis Charlotte 75/53 74/60 Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 73/55 72/55 Atlanta 77/57 74/62 Birmingham Dallas 74/60 79/60 Houston 83/64

Chihuahua 88/62

La Paz 96/64

50s

St. Paul 73/53

Boise 80/51

Shirley Basin, Wyo.

40s

Bismarck 79/48

Billings 80/45

Needles, Calif.

• 4.00”

30s

Seattle 80/49 Portland 88/56

• 103°

20s

Mostly clear.

HIGH LOW

Partly cloudy.

HIGH LOW

84 39

HIGH LOW

81 42

77 40

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .5:10 a.m. . . . . . 7:05 p.m. Venus . . . . . .7:03 a.m. . . . . 11:09 p.m. Mars. . . . . . .1:35 p.m. . . . . . 3:00 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . .5:43 a.m. . . . . . 8:14 p.m. Saturn. . . . . .5:29 p.m. . . . . . 4:45 a.m. Uranus . . . . .3:51 a.m. . . . . . 4:12 p.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73/32 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.01” Record high . . . . . . . . 88 in 2001 Average month to date. . . 0.30” Record low. . . . . . . . . 20 in 1985 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.63” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Average year to date. . . . . 4.43” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.30.17 Record 24 hours . . .0.42 in 2003 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:41 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:23 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:39 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:24 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 2:03 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 1:36 p.m.

Moon phases New

First

Full

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m. Astoria . . . . . . . .76/42/0.00 Baker City . . . . . .72/26/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .67/45/0.00 Burns. . . . . . . . . .73/29/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .79/38/0.00 Klamath Falls . . .78/35/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .75/34/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .80/27/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .89/44/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .68/41/0.00 North Bend . . . . .66/39/0.00 Ontario . . . . . . . .77/38/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .75/35/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .84/46/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .76/30/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .77/24/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .87/45/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .83/41/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .74/31/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .82/35/0.00

Last

May 20 May 28 June 4 June 11

OREGON CITIES . . . . .74/49/s . . . . .73/46/pc . . . . .80/42/s . . . . . .83/47/s . . . .66/52/pc . . . . .59/51/pc . . . . .81/44/s . . . . .83/48/pc . . . . .85/52/s . . . . .78/47/pc . . . . .84/46/s . . . . .79/46/pc . . . . .79/48/s . . . . . .76/46/s . . . . .86/38/s . . . . .82/38/pc . . . . .94/57/s . . . . .89/51/pc . . . . .60/50/s . . . . . .59/47/c . . . . .67/50/s . . . . .58/47/pc . . . . .82/49/s . . . . . .88/53/s . . . . .84/50/s . . . . . .89/51/s . . . . .88/56/s . . . . .87/53/pc . . . . .90/43/s . . . . . .85/48/s . . . . .86/45/s . . . . . .86/46/s . . . .90/54/pc . . . . .78/51/pc . . . . .87/53/s . . . . .84/49/pc . . . . .86/41/s . . . . . .81/40/s . . . . .89/52/s . . . . . .91/54/s

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . .111-147 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . 175 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report

8

V.HIGH

8

PRECIPITATION

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Mammoth Mtn., California . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .18-60 Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . Carry chains or T. Tires Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Squaw Valley, California . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . Closed for season Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report For links to the latest ski conditions visit: For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html www.tripcheck.com or call 511 Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

New Orleans 83/70

Orlando 85/70 Miami 83/74

Monterrey 92/67

FRONTS

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .69/59/0.00 . .74/56/pc . 75/55/pc Akron . . . . . . . . . .73/49/0.00 . .69/49/sh . 71/49/pc Albany. . . . . . . . . .79/37/0.00 . .79/58/sh . 70/52/sh Albuquerque. . . . .75/53/0.00 . . . 78/51/t . . .75/52/t Anchorage . . . . . .46/35/0.00 . .50/36/sh . 52/38/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . . .76/63/0.03 . . . 74/62/t . . .77/62/t Atlantic City . . . . .79/43/0.00 . .73/58/pc . 67/56/sh Austin . . . . . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . .83/62/pc . 81/64/pc Baltimore . . . . . . .79/50/0.00 . . . 79/64/t . 73/60/sh Billings . . . . . . . . .71/38/0.00 . . . 80/45/s . . 82/52/s Birmingham . . . . .78/65/0.00 . . . 74/60/t . 77/61/pc Bismarck. . . . . . . .72/31/0.00 . . . 79/48/s . . 82/51/s Boise . . . . . . . . . . .75/41/0.00 . . . 80/51/s . . 86/53/s Boston. . . . . . . . . .80/50/0.00 . . .78/55/c . 70/56/sh Bridgeport, CT. . . .75/45/0.00 . .75/58/sh . 69/56/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . . .73/49/0.00 . .68/50/sh . 70/48/sh Burlington, VT. . . .77/36/0.00 . .71/53/sh . 69/53/sh Caribou, ME . . . . .56/39/0.00 . .61/41/sh . 64/48/sh Charleston, SC . . .80/58/0.00 . . . 77/67/t . . .77/66/t Charlotte. . . . . . . .75/50/0.00 . . . 74/60/t . . .74/61/t Chattanooga. . . . .77/60/0.00 . . . 74/60/t . . .76/58/t Cheyenne . . . . . . .50/33/0.00 . .62/39/pc . . 71/43/s Chicago. . . . . . . . .69/57/0.03 . . . 69/49/s . . 75/53/s Cincinnati . . . . . . .74/47/0.00 . . . 68/53/t . . 73/53/s Cleveland . . . . . . .76/48/0.00 . . .66/49/c . 69/50/pc Colorado Springs .55/39/0.00 . . . 56/42/t . 69/45/pc Columbia, MO . . .76/59/0.00 . .74/49/pc . . 75/50/s Columbia, SC . . . .80/57/0.00 . . . 77/64/t . . .78/62/t Columbus, GA. . . .80/63/0.02 . . . 76/65/t . . .79/61/t Columbus, OH. . . .74/47/0.00 . .67/53/sh . 71/52/pc Concord, NH. . . . .80/31/0.00 . .77/53/sh . 67/54/sh Corpus Christi. . . .90/73/0.00 . .84/70/pc . 80/72/pc Dallas Ft Worth. . .73/64/0.11 . .79/60/pc . 78/61/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .72/51/0.00 . .68/52/sh . 73/52/pc Denver. . . . . . . . . .56/37/0.00 . . . 62/43/t . 73/45/pc Des Moines. . . . . .73/53/0.00 . . . 74/51/s . . 79/54/s Detroit. . . . . . . . . .76/55/0.00 . .66/48/pc . . 74/52/s Duluth. . . . . . . . . .70/37/0.00 . .72/47/pc . . 75/49/s El Paso. . . . . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . .85/68/pc . 81/64/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . . .59/34/0.00 . . .57/33/c . 55/36/sh Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .75/38/0.00 . . . 78/49/s . . 84/52/s Flagstaff . . . . . . . .74/34/0.00 . . . 73/36/s . . 72/36/s

Salmon Bake Continued from B1 Sheena Courtney, a Warm Springs tribal member and president of the COCC’s First Nations Student Union, said it was important to bring her tribal traditions with her when she left Warm Springs. “To me it’s like giving a part of our heritage and sharing it with the community,” she said. “Keeping old traditions alive (is important), because with each generation, it lessens.” Courtney, 20, said only a small number of Warm Springs residents her age have any interest in the traditions of the Warm Springs, Wasco and Paiute tribes — the three tribes that share the Warm Springs Reservation. Those that leave the reservation often find themselves detached from tribal practices, she said, while those who stay often struggle financially and simply don’t have the time or energy to learn about their heritage. A nursing student at COCC, Courtney said she’s committed to working at least two years at the Indian Health Service clinic on the reservation to give something back. Dancers from the Warm Springs tribe performed traditional tribal dances, clad in elaborate costumes of feathers and fur, bone and bells. Trevor Suppah, 20, brought a nontraditional touch to his grass dance costume, with dozens of intricately beaded basketballs adorned with the Nike Swoosh. Suppah said the costume was a gift from his greatgrandmother, who embroidered thousands of beads to create the design recognizing his love for basketball. Tyrone Lawrence had never

THURSDAY

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

WEDNESDAY Mostly clear.

85 46

Ontario EAST 82/49 Sunny skies and warm temperaNyssa tures today. Mostly 82/49 clear tonight.

78/41

82/48

Christmas Valley

Port Orford 71/50

80/42

Unity

Brothers 85/38

Fort Rock 87/40

84/37

79/32

Roseburg

88/42

La Pine 86/38

Crescent Lake

70s

Bandon

Baker City John Day

Prineville 90/43 Sisters Redmond Paulina 86/39 86/41 88/42 Sunriver Bend

Eugene

68/50

75/40

83/39

66/52

78/46

81/45

Mitchell 91/44

89/47

78/44

Union

82/43

Granite Spray 87/46

Madras

Enterprise Joseph

La Grande

80/51

90/48

76/40

Meacham

Condon Willowdale

Wallowa

76/34

80/51

88/50

Camp Sherman

Yachats Florence

Maupin

91/49

60s Corvallis 87/52

84/50

Ruggs

Warm Springs

86/52

Pendleton

87/53

84/49

70s

Albany

Newport

Hermiston 85/48

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

87/53

60/50

70/49

85/52

Government Camp 70/47

86/54

84/53

The Biggs Dalles 87/55

86/55

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

Mostly clear.

HIGH LOW

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

TUESDAY

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .65/56/0.13 . . . 71/45/s . . 75/51/s Green Bay. . . . . . .67/53/0.00 . . . 72/47/s . . 77/54/s Greensboro. . . . . .74/48/0.00 . . . 74/60/t . . .72/60/t Harrisburg. . . . . . .79/45/0.00 . .78/58/sh . 70/57/sh Hartford, CT . . . . .81/42/0.00 . .79/57/sh . 72/58/sh Helena. . . . . . . . . .71/31/0.00 . . . 78/46/s . . 80/50/s Honolulu. . . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . . . 83/68/s . . 84/69/s Houston . . . . . . . .83/69/0.10 . .83/64/pc . 83/65/pc Huntsville . . . . . . .83/64/0.00 . . . 73/58/t . 74/54/pc Indianapolis . . . . .75/54/0.00 . .72/54/pc . 74/54/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .74/64/1.42 . . . 77/58/t . 81/60/pc Jacksonville. . . . . .82/61/0.00 . . . 82/68/t . . .86/68/t Juneau. . . . . . . . . .43/41/0.49 . . . 47/38/r . . .47/37/r Kansas City. . . . . 65/55/trace . .72/52/pc . 77/54/pc Lansing . . . . . . . . .64/55/0.42 . .70/44/pc . . 75/50/s Las Vegas . . . . . . .96/71/0.00 . . . 98/72/s . . 97/72/s Lexington . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . . . 69/56/t . 72/55/sh Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .71/47/0.00 . .73/47/pc . 82/54/pc Little Rock. . . . . . .74/62/0.30 . .77/57/pc . 78/56/pc Los Angeles. . . . . .66/60/0.00 . . . 70/59/s . . 68/60/s Louisville. . . . . . . .74/58/0.00 . . . 69/56/t . 75/56/pc Madison, WI . . . . .68/54/0.00 . . . 71/47/s . . 76/54/s Memphis. . . . . . . .74/65/0.05 . . . 77/60/t . 79/60/pc Miami . . . . . . . . . .85/78/0.00 . . . 83/74/t . . .85/73/t Milwaukee . . . . . .69/56/0.00 . . . 65/48/s . . 73/53/s Minneapolis . . . . .69/50/0.00 . . . 73/53/s . . 79/55/s Nashville. . . . . . . .69/59/0.09 . . . 72/55/t . 76/55/pc New Orleans. . . . .83/71/0.25 . . . 83/70/t . 84/66/pc New York . . . . . . .78/53/0.00 . .81/61/sh . 72/58/sh Newark, NJ . . . . . .81/50/0.00 . .81/61/sh . 73/58/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . . .78/52/0.00 . .79/62/pc . . .78/63/t Oklahoma City . . .72/59/0.13 . .73/55/pc . . 76/57/c Omaha . . . . . . . . .72/51/0.00 . .74/50/pc . 80/55/pc Orlando. . . . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . . . 85/70/t . . .88/69/t Palm Springs. . . .100/67/0.00 . .106/73/s . 107/72/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .70/59/0.01 . . . 74/48/s . . 76/53/s Philadelphia . . . . .80/50/0.00 . .81/62/sh . 74/57/sh Phoenix. . . . . . . . .99/70/0.00 . .104/73/s . 104/73/s Pittsburgh . . . . . . .72/44/0.00 . .70/52/sh . 70/51/sh Portland, ME. . . . .77/41/0.00 . .65/53/sh . 61/53/sh Providence . . . . . .78/45/0.00 . . .79/54/c . 69/55/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . . .77/47/0.00 . .77/60/pc . . .75/61/t

Tyrone Lawrence, 19, performs with his fellow Warm Springs dancers during the annual Salmon Bake held Saturday at Central Oregon Community College in Bend. It was Lawrence’s first public performance. Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

performed in public and didn’t even have a costume when he woke up Saturday morning. He only learned he’d be participating when the rest of the dance group began leaning on him during the trip from Warm Springs. “These guys pushed me into it,” Lawrence, 19, said with a laugh. “I just came to watch.” Susie Slockish, 66, is one of the Warm Springs elders brought in by the school to oversee the Salmon Bake. For the past two years, Slockish has overseen the preparation of the fire pit, the filleting of the fish, and the placement of the fish on wooden skewers around the pit. Though the cooking process appears simple, it’s been refined over generations, Slockish said. With the wrong kind of fire or the wrong kind of wood, the fish won’t cook properly, or will come out tasting like pitch. “Way back when — when there were no ovens — the very first Indians, they had to think of ways to live, how

Your lawn is unique. Just like you.

to get their food done, how to preserve it,” she said. “They were really smart people, because they figured all this out.” Slockish grew up speaking Ichishkiin, the language of the Warm Springs people, and has spent the past 18 years of her life teaching it to younger residents of the reservation. Though her language lessons are focused on 3- and 4-yearold children, college-aged students are an important part

of keeping traditions alive. It’s often only when they leave the reservation that they realize how distinct their heritage is, she said. “As they get out into the world, they meet people from other cultures who will ask them about their culture,” Slockish said. “They feel embarrassed they don’t know their culture, and they want to learn.” — Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com

$

2995*

*First Lawn Treatment. New Customers Only.

Call us today at 541-610-3063 or visit us at TRUGREEN.COM to get TruGreen® Customized Service

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .81/65/0.00 . . . 79/66/t . . .81/67/t Seattle. . . . . . . . . .76/44/0.00 . . . 80/49/s . . 75/49/s Sioux Falls. . . . . . .69/43/0.00 . . . 72/47/s . . 82/54/s Spokane . . . . . . . .70/39/0.00 . . . 82/45/s . . 85/50/s Springfield, MO . 77/54/trace . .72/52/pc . 73/51/pc Tampa. . . . . . . . . .91/70/0.00 . . . 87/69/t . . .88/67/t Tucson. . . . . . . . . .95/60/0.00 . . . 98/65/s . . 97/66/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .74/60/0.12 . .75/56/pc . 75/53/pc Washington, DC . .78/52/0.00 . . . 79/63/t . 72/58/sh Wichita . . . . . . . . .70/54/0.03 . .72/51/pc . 76/52/pc Yakima . . . . . . . . .77/32/0.00 . . . 84/47/s . . 88/54/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .101/68/0.00 . .107/73/s . 108/75/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .54/43/0.00 . .53/41/pc . 63/53/pc Athens. . . . . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . . . 84/64/s . . .78/62/t Auckland. . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . .65/54/sh . 62/51/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .108/75/0.00 . .105/77/s . 102/71/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .99/84/0.00 . . 101/80/t . 100/80/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .75/59/0.00 . . . 78/57/s . . 75/61/s Beirut . . . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . . . 72/64/t . 71/63/sh Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .57/43/0.00 . .55/39/pc . 63/44/pc Bogota . . . . . . . . .63/52/0.02 . .64/51/sh . 63/51/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .86/50/0.00 . . .55/44/c . . 61/45/c Buenos Aires. . . . .61/41/0.00 . . . 62/46/s . 63/48/pc Cabo San Lucas . .90/68/0.00 . . . 90/67/s . . 94/69/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .97/70/0.00 . . . 86/69/s . 89/70/pc Calgary . . . . . . . . .70/43/0.00 . . . 74/51/s . 66/51/pc Cancun . . . . . . . . .86/79/0.00 . . .86/75/c . . .85/74/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .59/36/0.00 . . .53/42/c . 55/37/sh Edinburgh. . . . . . .57/34/0.00 . .50/42/sh . 49/33/sh Geneva . . . . . . . . .73/52/0.00 . . . 68/42/s . . 66/44/s Harare. . . . . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . .71/48/pc . 71/53/sh Hong Kong . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . .87/80/pc . . 89/77/c Istanbul. . . . . . . . .72/59/0.00 . .72/61/pc . . .63/57/t Jerusalem . . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . . . 78/54/s . 76/55/pc Johannesburg. . . .68/48/0.00 . .69/49/pc . 69/47/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . . .77/64/0.00 . .74/63/pc . 74/63/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . .90/66/pc . . 88/68/c London . . . . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . .60/45/pc . 61/44/sh Madrid . . . . . . . . .91/61/0.00 . .85/57/pc . . 85/56/s Manila. . . . . . . . . .95/81/0.00 . . . 92/80/t . . .91/81/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .108/82/0.00 . .108/81/s . 109/80/s Mexico City. . . . . .79/61/0.00 . . . 76/54/t . . .70/53/t Montreal. . . . . . . .75/45/0.00 . .70/56/sh . 68/55/sh Moscow . . . . . . . .81/52/0.00 . . .55/45/c . 54/42/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . . . 71/61/t . . .73/61/t Nassau . . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . . 80/74/t . . .86/74/t New Delhi. . . . . .104/73/0.00 107/84/pc 107/84/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . . .68/62/c . 69/60/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .52/36/0.00 . .56/35/pc . 48/36/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . . .79/37/0.00 . .72/51/pc . . 72/51/c Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .61/46/0.00 . . . 64/42/s . 68/54/pc Rio de Janeiro. . . .90/75/0.00 . .78/66/sh . 72/64/sh Rome. . . . . . . . . . .79/52/0.00 . . . 73/54/t . . .66/54/t Santiago . . . . . . . .66/39/0.00 . .69/52/pc . . 72/50/s Sao Paulo . . . . . . .70/64/0.04 . .66/60/sh . 64/59/sh Sapporo . . . . . . . .50/48/0.00 . . . 58/46/s . 62/50/sh Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .70/57/0.00 . .73/57/sh . . 72/51/c Shanghai. . . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . .76/64/sh . 78/64/sh Singapore . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . . 87/80/t . . .87/81/t Stockholm. . . . . . .50/41/0.24 . .57/44/pc . . 59/46/c Sydney. . . . . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . .63/45/pc . 68/49/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . .86/75/pc . 88/71/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .84/61/0.00 . . . 77/61/s . 76/63/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . .70/57/pc . 74/63/sh Toronto . . . . . . . . .77/52/0.00 . .66/49/sh . 68/54/pc Vancouver. . . . . . .64/45/0.00 . . . 70/59/s . 81/60/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . .56/39/pc . . 63/43/s Warsaw. . . . . . . . .64/43/0.10 . . .59/33/c . . 59/41/s

Inspections catch invasive mussels The Associated Press MEDFORD — Just days into Oregon’s first season of mandatory boat inspections, Department of Fish and Wildlife officials have already discovered two watercraft carrying invasive mussels. Last year, when the program was voluntary, inspectors found six boats all season with quagga or zebra mussels. The mussels have already invaded the Great Lakes and other American waterways, causing millions of dollars in

damage by clogging water systems and jamming navigational locks. State officials fear they’ll take hold in Oregon rivers and lakes. Inspectors in Southern Oregon found a boat infected with quagga mussels picked up from Lake Havasu in Arizona. Crews in La Grande discovered zebra mussels on a boat from Saginaw Bay, Mich. Invasive species inspections are now mandatory for all vessels in Oregon.

RESIDENTIAL PAVING

Support the High School Football Programs in Bend

2012 SCRIMMAGE ON THE LINKS GOLF TOURNAMENT AT LOST TRACKS GOLF CLUB

COMMERCIAL PAVING

This Four-Person Scramble includes a Hole-In-One for a New Car, Rafle Prizes, Silent Auction and a Catered Dinner.

JUNE 10TH - 2 P.M. TEE TIME Register at scrimmageonthelinks.com $100 per person or $400 per team with a catered lunch from Kayo’s

Your lawn is different from every other lawn. With TruGreen, your lawn care will be different too. Our lawn care specialists are committed to developing a customized plan specifically for you. We’ll get your lawn healthy and keep it there – guaranteed.**

Get your first custom lawn care treatment for only

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .66/30/0.00 . . . 74/49/s . . 81/52/s Reno . . . . . . . . . . .82/43/0.00 . . . 87/54/s . . 85/51/s Richmond . . . . . . .79/47/0.00 . .81/61/pc . . .77/62/t Rochester, NY . . . .76/43/0.00 . .69/50/sh . 70/49/sh Sacramento. . . . . .94/56/0.00 . .91/53/pc . . 84/55/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .80/59/0.00 . .75/53/pc . 77/53/pc Salt Lake City . . . .72/41/0.00 . . . 76/51/s . . 82/58/s San Antonio . . . . .82/63/0.00 . .84/63/pc . 82/65/pc San Diego . . . . . . .69/60/0.00 . . . 68/57/s . . 69/58/s San Francisco . . . .67/48/0.00 . .64/51/pc . . 63/50/s San Jose . . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . .78/50/pc . . 74/50/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .67/46/0.00 . . . 68/45/t . . .66/47/t

REPAIR & MAINTENANCE

SPECIALIZING IN PAVING & ASPHALT MAINTENANCE PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE BEND, MOUNTAIN VIEW AND SUMMIT FOOTBALL PROGRAMS

Call today for a FREE consultation

541-526-5800 www.tricountypaving.net

SPONSORED BY:

Lost Tracks Golf Club, Kayo’s Dinner House, Coral Construction Company, The Oxford Hotel of Bend, Pepsi of Bend, Smolich Motors, Bend Broadband, The Bend Radio Group, Robberson Ford, The Bulletin, and Kirby Naglehout Construction

Redmond, OR


COMMUNITYLIFE THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/community

Museums Columbia Gorge

SPOTLIGHT Seniors can learn new technology The Central Oregon Council on Aging will give seniors a chance to learn how to use Facebook, cellphones and digital cameras to keep in touch with their friends and family members through two upcoming Teen Elder Computer Help classes. The classes, which connect seniors with local teens who know and use the technology, will run from 2 to 3:15 p.m. Wednesday at the Cascades Academy of Central Oregon in Bend and at the Redmond Library. Call COCOA’s main office at 541-678-5483 if you have any questions or reserve a spot for either event.

C

TV & Movies, C2 Calendar, C3 Horoscope, C3 Milestones, C6 Puzzles, C7

of the

• From Maryhill west to Stevenson, there’s plenty to explore indoors

Larkspur Festival planned in northeast Bend Get your family fun on from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 2 at the Larkspur Festival, held at Larkspur Park, 1700 S.E. Reed Market Road, Bend. The seventh annual event includes kid-friendly games and activities, live music, craft vendors, a gardener’s mini-university and a community plant sale. Demonstrations of Zumba, line dancing and more will also take place. There is no charge to attend the event. Contact: 541-3881133.

By John Gottberg Anderson For the Bulletin

To Yakima 97

Portland

142

Columbia River Gorge 141 THE DALLES — When Maryhill Goldendale O R E G O N skies are blue — when the White Museum snowy summit of Mount Hood Salmon Carson of Art 14 is cloud-free and spring wild142 Stevenson flowers burst forth in an exploHood Columbia COLUMBIA Maryhill sion of color — there are few River R I V E R G O R G E River 84 14 more glorious sights than the N ATION A L 97 35 SCENIC AREA Columbia River Gorge. 84 The Dalles But visitors need not run and To To To Government Portland Madras Camp 197 To Maupin hide if the weather is less than perfect. The indoor attractions Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin of the Gorge nearly equal its outdoor appeal. BELOW: The Columbia In fact, I suspect the Gorge as a private mansion during Hood River museum calling Gorge Discovery Center has more museums, per capita, the era of World War I and itself “WAAAM” — an acroand Museum, official inthan anywhere else in the converted to a museum at the nym for the Western Antique terpretive center for the Pacific Northwest, with the start of the World War II, the Aeroplane and Automobile Columbia River Gorge possible exception of such museum has just completed the Museum. Opened 4½ years National Scenic Area, small historic districts as Jackfirst expansion in its vibrant ago beside a historic airfield, it stands beside the river sonville, in Southern Oregon, history. The $10 million Mary displays more than 250 aircraft two miles west of The or Wallace, and Bruce and motor vehicles. The vast NORTHWEST TRAVEL Stevenson Dalles. Exhibits focus on Idaho. majority of them are mainthe geology and history At least Wing will be tained in working order and Next week: 50 years of the Gorge, especially 15 museums officially deditaken out at least once a month of Seattle Center since the Ice Ages. stand in the cated today. for public demonstrations. John Gottberg Anderson 60-plus miles Of broader While the east end of the For The Bulletin of Columbia River between the significance to the region are Gorge, near Maryhill and The mouth of the Deschutes River two modern, federally supDalles, averages 14 inches and the Bonneville Dam. These ported museums that bookend of annual precipitation, just include regional and local colthe Gorge. Both the Columbia slightly more than Bend, the lections of history, geology, Gorge Discovery Center and western Gorge is much damptransportation and art, not Museum in The Dalles and the er. Hood River, a mere 23 miles counting many other historical Columbia Gorge Interpretive from The Dalles, gets 31 inches buildings, sites and exhibitions. Center in Stevenson, Wash., of rainfall in a year, while CasForemost among them, offer extensive background on cade Locks and Stevenson, 19 perhaps, is the grand Maryhill the formation and prehistory miles further west, average 77 Museum of Art, which appears of the Gorge, its settlement and inches. (Portland, by contrast, out of place on the cliffs above economic foundations. gets about 43 inches in a year.) See Museums / C4 the east end of the Gorge. Built Most surprising to me is a Bend

UO professor to speak about art, science Richard Taylor, a University of Oregon professor of physics, psychology and art, will discuss what fractals and science have to do with art in the talk “The Curse of Jackson Pollock” at 6:30 p.m. June 8 at Hitchcock Auditorium, Pioneer Hall, at Central Oregon Community College in Bend. Taylor is known for unraveling the 2005 art controversy about the authentication of 32 Jackson Pollocklike paintings. Taylor brought the tools of fractal analysis and computers to assist a team of art specialists tasked with determining if the paintings were authentic. Costs: $10 general admission, $8 for Sunriver Nature Center members, $3 for Central Oregon Community College students with identification. Advance tickets are available from the Sunriver Nature Center, 541-5934394 or 541-593-4442. Tickets will also be available at the door. Limited free tickets are available for COCC students. Contact: Karen Aylward, kaylward@ cocc.edu.

Contact us with your ideas Have a story idea or submission? Contact us! • Community events: Email event information to communitylife@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” at www.bend bulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-3830351. — From staff reports

Nonprofit harnesses the power of flowers By Mac McLean The Bulletin

Sharon Dawn sorted through a bunch of pink, purple, yellow and red flowers Trader Joe’s would have thrown away if Friends with Flowers of Oregon didn’t collect them and put them to a good use. “I love flowers,” said Dawn, who has volunteered with the nonprofit since it started. “Flowers bring happiness and joy. You can’t … complain when someone brings you flowers. ... You can’t feel sorry for yourself.” Each week, Friends with Flowers collects thousands of donated flowers from more than a dozen Central Oregon businesses — flower shops, grocery stores, event venues and funeral homes — rearranges them into bouquets and delivers them to hospice patients across the region who need something to brighten their day. Mother’s Day is one of the organization’s busiest times of the year, said its founder, Heidi Berkman, as those businesses stock their shelves to cater

Learn more To learn more about how you can help Friends with Flowers of Oregon collect donated flower arrangements, repurpose them and deliver them to hospice patients, visit the group’s web site www.friendswithflowersoforegon .com or call 541-480-8700.

to all of the fathers, sons and daughters buying flowers for moms. Nationwide, Americans spend $1.9 billion a year on flowers at Mother’s Day.

Getting started Berkman said three things — the death of a family member, a problem she had with her job as an event planner, and a magazine article she read about a guy from North Carolina — led her to start the local Friends of Flowers organization out of her basement in November 2007. See Flowers / C7

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Heidi Berkman of Friends with Flowers of Oregon delivers several vases of flowers to Partners in Care hospice. Mother’s Day is one of the busiest times of year for the organization.


C2

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

TV & M ‘Desperate Housewives’ ending 8-year series run of bile? We’ll find out starting tonight when the craziness resumes for Season 7.

By Chuck Barney Contra Costa Times

“Desperate Housewives’� 9:01 p.m. Sunday, ABC “How I Met Your Mother� The week is stuffed with 8:30 p.m. Monday season finales, so many that At last, we’ll learn the we couldn’t squeeze them identity of Barney’s (Neil all in. But we weren’t about Patrick Harris) future bride to ignore the swan song during an eventful two-part season finale of of a milestone I Met Your show. “DesperTV SPOTLIGHT “How Mother� that ate Housewives,� features a flashwhich is ending its eight-year run, clearly was forward to his wedding day. past its prime a long time But no matter what year it is, ago. But that doesn’t take we have a hard time believaway the fact that it was a ing that the skirt-chasing cad ratings blockbuster and cul- will ever get hitched. tural phenomenon back in “NCIS: Los Angeles� 2004 when it introduced us to 9 p.m. Tuesday CBS the women of Wisteria Lane. Devotees of “NCIS: Los The “splashy� two-hour finale revolves around Bree’s Angeles� get to double their (Marcia Cross) murder trial, pleasure tonight when the Renee’s (Vanessa Williams) action drama expands to two impending wedding, Susan’s hours for its season finale. (Teri Hatcher) secret attempt And if that’s not enough, exto sell her house and Mrs. Mc- pect a rollicking car chase Cluskey’s (Kathryn Joosten) and a “shocking� cliffhanger preparations to deal with to top it all off. the final stages of her lung “Person of Interest� cancer. A couple of familiar 9 p.m. Thursday, CBS faces will also return for the “Person of Interest,� one farewell episode: Katherine Mayfair (Dana Delany) and of TV’s more engaging new dramas, closes out its seathe late Mrs. Huber. son with an episode that has “Survivor� 8 p.m. Reese (Jim Caviezel) coming Sunday, CBS to the aid of a psychologist The season finale of “Sur- (Amy Acker) whose life is in vivor: One World� airs to- peril. Maybe if things work night and you know what out, she can do something that means: We find out to get inside this guy’s head which ruthless castaway out- and figure him out. lasted everyone else for 39 “Supernatural� days on a blasted island with9 p.m. Friday, The CW out resorting to cannibalism. The emotional roller “America’s Got Talent� coaster that is “Supernatu8 p.m. Monday, NBC ral� has the Winchester boys Will irreverent shock jock (Jared Padalecki, Jensen Howard Stern fit in as a judge Ackles) setting out to wreak on “America’s Got Talent�? vengeance on their most forOr will he turn the family- midable enemy: Dick Roman friendly summer hit into a pile (James Patrick Stuart).

L M T  FOR SUNDAY, MAY 13

BEND Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE ARTIST (PG-13) 4 DELICACY (PG-13) 1, 7 FOOTNOTE (PG) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15 KID WITH A BIKE (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) Noon, 3, 6 THINK LIKE A MAN (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

21 JUMP STREET (R) 1, 4:20, 7:50, 10:30 THE CABIN IN THE WOODS (R) 1:40, 4:45, 8, 10:25 CHIMPANZEE (G) 10:35 a.m., 1:45, 4:05, 6:20, 9:15 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 1:10, 2:50, 4, 6:05, 7:25, 9:05, 10:20 DARK SHADOWS IMAX (PG-13) 1:35, 10:15 THE FIVE-YEAR ENGAGEMENT (R) 12:40, 3:40, 6:55, 9:50 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 3:30, 6:45, 9:55 THE LUCKY ONE (PG-13) 1:20, 3:55, 7:10, 9:40 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 3, 3:45, 6:15, 7, 9:25, 10:10 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS 3-D (PG-

13) Noon, 12:50, 3:20, 4:30, 6:35, 7:40, 9:45 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS IMAX (PG-13) 10:30 a.m., 4:10, 7:15 MIRROR MIRROR (PG) 12:20, 3:10, 6:30, 9:10 THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS (PG) 2:45, 9 THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS 3-D (PG) 12:10, 6 THE RAVEN (R) 3:50, 10:25 SAFE (R) 1:25, 7:55

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

AMERICAN REUNION (R) 9 MAN ON A LEDGE (PG-13) 6 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) Noon, 3:05, 6:10, 9:15 THE LUCKY ONE (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2, 4:15, 6:30 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15, 9:15 THE RAVEN (R) 8:45

869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

Sisters Movie House 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

REDMOND Redmond Cinemas 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30

DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) 2:15, 5, 7:45 THE FIVE-YEAR ENGAGEMENT (R) 2, 4:45, 7:30 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS (PG) 1:30, 3:30 UNDEFEATED (PG-13) 5:30, 8

PRINEVILLE Pine Theater 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

THE FIVE-YEAR ENGAGEMENT (UPSTAIRS — R) 1:10, 4:30, 7:30 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 12:45, 4, 7:15 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS 3-D (PG13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 THE LUCKY ONE (PG-13) 12:05, 2:20, 4:30, 6:40 THE PIRATES: BANDS OF MISFITS(PG) 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:10 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) Noon, 2:25, 4:50, 7:20 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13)

Three Sisters Women’s Conference May 19, 2012 Mountain View Fellowship in Redmond. Cost is $25. Check out our website:

threesisterswomansconference.com or call 541-382-8609 for more information or to register.

Call 541-389-9690

12:10, 3:20, 6:30

Madras Cinema 5

JIRO DREAMS OF SUSHI (PG) 4, 6

70 Years of Hearing Excellence

• Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15. • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

SISTERS

MADRAS

Tin Pan Theater

EDITOR’S NOTES:

JAMES

James was surrendered to the shelter because he was a long time stray that needed a forever home. He is a year old and very friendly and has been around another cat before. James has a long and beautiful coat that will need to be brushed regularly to be maintained. James is looking for a comfortable and loving home so come down and check him out today. HUMANE SOCIETY OF CENTRAL OREGON/SPCA 61170 S.E. 27th St. BEND (541) 382-3537

Sponsored by Cascade Mortgage - Tim Maher

L TV L   SUNDAY PRIME TIME 5/13/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00

5:30

KATU News World News Grey’s Anatomy ’ ‘14’ Ă… Paid Program Evening News Entertainment Tonight (N) ’ ‘PG’ NUMB3RS ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Moyers & Company ’ ‘G’ Ă… NewsChannel 8 at 5PM (N) Ă… (4:00) ›› “The Big Brass Ringâ€? Kitchen Conversations ‘G’ Ă…

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Ă… News Nightly News The Unit Into Hell ‘14’ Ă… KEZI 9 News World News Bones The X in the File ‘14’ Ă… Oregon Art Beat Ore. Field Guide Nightly News Chris Matthews King of Queens King of Queens Doc Martin ’ ‘PG’ Ă…

7:00

7:30

America’s Funniest Home Videos Dateline NBC (N) ’ Ă… 60 Minutes (N) ’ Ă… America’s Funniest Home Videos The Simpsons Cleveland Show Antiques Roadshow ‘G’ Ă… Dateline NBC (N) ’ Ă… Heartland ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (DVS) Every War-Two Oregon Exp

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

11:00

11:30

Once Upon a Time (N) ‘PG’ Ă… (9:01) Desperate Housewives (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… KATU News (11:35) Cars.TV Harry’s Law The Whole Truth ‘14’ The Celebrity Apprentice The finalists plan a charity event. (N) ‘PG’ News Love-Raymond Survivor: One World Five women battle for the grand prize. (N) Ă… Survivor: One World (N) ’ ‘PG’ News Cold Case ‘PG’ Once Upon a Time (N) ‘PG’ Ă… (9:01) Desperate Housewives (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… KEZI 9 News The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons Bob’s Burgers Family Guy ‘14’ American Dad News Two/Half Men Big Bang Big Bang Finding Your Roots Masterpiece Mystery! (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Official-Fest Oregon Experience Harry’s Law The Whole Truth ‘14’ The Celebrity Apprentice The finalists plan a charity event. (N) ‘PG’ NewsChannel 8 Sports Sunday ›› “Nim’s Islandâ€? (2008) Abigail Breslin, Jodie Foster. Ă… Meet, Browns Meet, Browns Troubadour, TX (N) ’ Ă… Oregon Experience Moyers & Company ’ ‘G’ Ă… The War German occupation; American war effort. ‘14’ Ă… (DVS)

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

Storage-Texas Storage-Texas Storage-Texas Storage-Texas Storage Wars Storage Wars Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty *A&E 130 28 18 32 Flipped Off ‘PG’ Ă… (3:00) ››› “Space Cowboysâ€? (2000) ››› “Cinderella Manâ€? (2005, Biography) Russell Crowe, RenĂŠe Zellweger, Paul Giamatti. Premiere. Down-and-out The Killing Stan takes matters into his Mad Men Dark Shadows Don is com- (11:04) The Pitch Agency goes head *AMC 102 40 39 Clint Eastwood. Ă… boxer Jim Braddock makes a dramatic comeback. Ă… own hands. (N) ‘14’ Ă… petitive. (N) ‘14’ Ă… to head. (N) Ă… Tanked ’ ‘PG’ Swamp Wars (N) ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters (N) ’ ‘PG’ Swamp Wars ’ ‘PG’ *ANPL 68 50 26 38 River Monsters Searching for a modern-day “Jaws.â€? ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Around the World in 80 Plates Don’t Be Tardy Don’t Be Tardy Don’t Be Tardy Don’t Be Tardy Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ BRAVO 137 44 ››› “Blazing Saddlesâ€? (1974, Comedy) Cleavon Little, Gene Wilder. ’ Ă… Them Idiots Whirled Tour ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Ron White: They Call Me Tater Salad ’ ‘14’ Ă… Bayou Billion CMT 190 32 42 53 Ace Ventura Surviving a Car Crash The Facebook Obsession American Greed The Costco Craze: Inside the Greatest Pillow! LightVac CNBC 51 36 40 52 Stay Tuned: TV Bucks: Porsche BMW: A Driving Obsession CNN Newsroom (N) Voters in America: Vets Wanted? Piers Morgan Tonight CNN Newsroom Voters in America: Vets Wanted? CNN 52 38 35 48 Voters in America: Vets Wanted? Piers Morgan Tonight (6:44) ››› “The 40-Year-Old Virginâ€? (2005) Steve Carell, Catherine Keener. Ă… Kevin Hart: Laugh at My Pain ‘14’ Tracy Morgan: Black and Blue ’ Kevin Hart: Laugh at My Pain ‘14’ COM 135 53 135 47 (4:43) ›› “Office Spaceâ€? (1999) Ron Livingston. (4:30) City Club of Central Oregon Talk of the Town Local issues. Desert Cooking Oregon Joy of Fishing Journal Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 British Road to the White House Q&A British Road to the White House Washington This Week CSPAN 58 20 12 11 Q & A A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Austin & Ally ’ A.N.T. Farm ’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie *DIS 87 43 14 39 Good-Charlie MythBusters ‘PG’ Ă… MythBusters ‘PG’ Ă… MythBusters Driving in Heels ‘PG’ MythBusters Bouncing Bullet ‘PG’ NASA’s Unexplained Files ‘PG’ MythBusters Bouncing Bullet ‘PG’ *DISC 156 21 16 37 The Devil’s Ride ’ ‘14’ Ă… Khloe & Lamar Khloe & Lamar Khloe & Lamar Khloe & Lamar Khloe & Lamar Khloe & Lamar Khloe & Lamar Khloe & Lamar Khloe & Lamar Khloe & Lamar Khloe & Lamar The E! True Hollywood Story (N) Mrs. Eastwood *E! 136 25 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter Ă… SportsCenter Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 MLB Baseball Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Texas Rangers (N) (Live) 2011 World Series of Poker 2011 World Series of Poker 2011 World Series of Poker World, Poker NBA Preseason Basketball Teams TBA (N) Ă… MLB Baseball ESPN2 22 24 21 24 2011 World Series of Poker The Dotted Line Ă… 30 for 30 ‘PG’ Ă… The Dotted Line Ă… Boxing From Nov. 11, 2000. Boxing Ă… Ringside Ă… ESPNC 23 25 123 25 30 for 30 ‘PG’ Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ›› “The Time Traveler’s Wifeâ€? (2009) Rachel McAdams, Eric Bana. Premiere. ›› “A Walk to Rememberâ€? (2002, Romance) Shane West, Mandy Moore. FAM 67 29 19 41 (4:00) ›› “The Notebookâ€? (2004) Ryan Gosling, Rachel McAdams. Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Huckabee Stossel Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Fox News Sunday FNC 54 61 36 50 Huckabee (N) Best of Food Network Star Food Network Cupcake Champions (N) Food Network Star Fifteen finalists compete to host. (N) ‘G’ Invention Hun. Diners, Drive *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Diners, Drive (4:00) ››› “Star Trekâ€? (2009) Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto. ››› “Avatarâ€? (2009, Science Fiction) Sam Worthington. A former Marine falls in love with a native of a lush alien world. ››› “Avatarâ€? (2009) Sam Worthington. FX 131 For Rent ’ ‘G’ House Hunters Hunters Int’l Holmes on Homes ‘G’ Ă… Best of Holmes on Homes (N) ‘G’ Holmes Inspection ’ ‘G’ Ă… Holmes Inspection ’ ‘G’ Ă… Holmes on Homes Falling Flat ‘G’ HGTV 176 49 33 43 For Rent ’ ‘G’ Ax Men Up in Flames ‘14’ Ă… Ax Men Family Rivalry ‘14’ Ă… Ax Men Swamp Gold ‘14’ Ă… Ax Men Up in Smoke (N) ‘14’ (10:01) United Stats of America (11:01) Swamp People ‘PG’ Ă… *HIST 155 42 41 36 Ax Men Falling Apart ‘14’ Ă… › “The Quietâ€? (2005) Camilla Belle, Elisha Cuthbert. Premiere. Ă… Army Wives Blood Relative ‘PG’ The Client List (N) ‘14’ Ă… (11:01) › “The Quietâ€? (2005) LIFE 138 39 20 31 ›› “Chloeâ€? (2009, Drama) Julianne Moore, Liam Neeson. Ă… Caught on Camera Tangled Lives (N) The Toy Box: Where Evil Lurks The Longest Night Austrian Cult Killer Meet the Press ‘G’ Ă… MSNBC 56 59 128 51 Caught on Camera (6:18) True Life ’ Money Strang. Money Strang. Ridiculousness Punk’d Ă… Pauly D Project ›› “Get Rich or Die Tryin’â€? (2005) Curtis “50 Centâ€? Jackson. ’ MTV 192 22 38 57 (5:12) True Life ’ Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Big Time Rush iCarly ‘G’ Ă… ›› “Hotel for Dogsâ€? (2009) Emma Roberts. Premiere. ’ Ă… Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ NICK 82 46 24 40 Victorious ‘G’ Undercover Boss ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Undercover Boss ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Undercover Boss Hooters ’ ‘PG’ Undercover Boss ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Undercover Boss NASCAR ‘PG’ Undercover Boss Hooters ’ ‘PG’ OWN 161 103 31 103 Undercover Boss Baja Fresh ‘PG’ Paid Program Sports Unlimited World Poker Tour: Season 10 World Poker Tour: Season 10 MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at New York Yankees From Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, N.Y. ROOT 20 45 28* 26 MLS Soccer ›› “I, Robotâ€? (2004, Science Fiction) Will Smith, Bridget Moynahan. Premiere. ’ ›› “I, Robotâ€? (2004, Science Fiction) Will Smith, Bridget Moynahan. ’ SPIKE 132 31 34 46 ›› “Ramboâ€? (2008, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Julie Benz. ’ Eureka One Giant Leap ’ Ă… Eureka Lost ’ Ă… Eureka The Real Thing ’ Ă… Eureka The ship is found. Ă… Eureka Old animosities erupt. ’ › “Dreamcatcherâ€? (2003) SYFY 133 35 133 45 Eureka One Small Step ’ Ă… Joel Osteen Kerry Shook BelieverVoice Creflo Dollar ›› “Mary of Nazarethâ€? (1995) Myriam Muller, Didier Bienaime. Praise the Lord Ă… Story of Ruth TBN 205 60 130 ›› “Men in Black IIâ€? (2002) Tommy Lee Jones, Will Smith. Ă… (9:50) ›› “Men in Black IIâ€? (2002, Action) Ă… Mummy Return *TBS 16 27 11 28 (3:30) Yes Man ›› “The Mummy Returnsâ€? (2001, Adventure) Brendan Fraser, Rachel Weisz. ››› “Stella Dallasâ€? (1937, Drama) Barbara Stanwyck, John Boles. A classic ››› “Mildred Pierceâ€? (1945) Joan Crawford, Jack Carson. An ambitious ››› “Torrentâ€? (1926, Drama) Ricardo Cortez, Greta Garbo, Gertrude Olm››› “Autumn Sonataâ€? (1978) Ingrid TCM 101 44 101 29 story of a mother’s love and sacrifice for her daughter. Ă… woman and her selfish daughter vie for a man. Ă… (DVS) stead. Silent. Spanish peasant becomes prima donna. Bergman, Liv Ullmann. Sister Wives ’ Sister Wives ’ Sister Wives ’ ‘14’ Ă… Sister Wives (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… American Gypsy Wedding Sister Wives ’ ‘14’ Ă… *TLC 178 34 32 34 Sister Wives ’ Sister Wives ’ Sister Wives ’ ‘14’ Ă… ›› “Edge of Darknessâ€? (2010, Suspense) Mel Gibson, Ray Winstone. Ă… ›› “Edge of Darknessâ€? (2010) Mel Gibson. Ă… *TNT 17 26 15 27 Long Kiss Gdnt ››› “Ransomâ€? (1996, Suspense) Mel Gibson, Rene Russo, Gary Sinise. Ă… Johnny Test ’ Johnny Test ’ ››› “Garfield’s Pet Forceâ€? (2009, Comedy) Johnny Test ’ Adventure Time Adventure Time Venture Bros. King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Loiter Squad (N) *TOON 84 Extreme Terror Rides Sand Masters Sand Masters Hotel Impossible ‘G’ Ă… Bggage Battles Bggage Battles Man v. Food Miami ‘G’ Ă… Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Extreme Beaches ‘PG’ Ă… M*A*S*H ‘PG’ ››› “M*A*S*H: Goodbye, Farewell, Amenâ€? (1983, Drama) Alan Alda, Mike Farrell. ‘PG’ Ă… Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU ›› “The Break-Upâ€? (2006) Ă… USA 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU Mob Wives Taking the Rap ‘14’ Mob Wives Of Dogs and Men ‘14’ Mob Wives Omerta (N) ‘14’ Ă… Tough Love: New Orleans (N) ‘14’ Mob Wives Omerta ’ ‘14’ Ă… Tough Love: New Orleans ’ ‘14’ VH1 191 48 37 54 Mob Wives ’ ‘14’ Ă… PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:10) ›› “The Sorcerer’s Apprenticeâ€? 2010 Nicolas Cage. ’ ‘PG’ ›› “Uncle Buckâ€? 1989 John Candy. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (9:40) › “The Roommateâ€? 2011 Leighton Meester. (11:15) ›› “Highlanderâ€? 1986 ENCR 106 401 306 401 (3:45) ››› “Apollo 13â€? 1995 ››› “The Devil Wears Pradaâ€? 2006 Meryl Streep. ‘PG-13’ Ă… FXM Presents › “10 Things I Hate About Youâ€? 1999 Heath Ledger. ‘PG-13’ Ă… › “The Bachelorâ€? 1999 ‘PG-13’ FMC 104 204 104 120 (4:30) › “10 Things I Hate About Youâ€? 1999 Ă… (4:30) Ultimate Matt Hughes The Ultimate Fighter Live ’ The Ultimate Fighter Live ’ ‘14’ UFC 145: Jones vs. Evans Prelims ‘MA’ UFC Unleashed The Ultimate Fighter Live ’ FUEL 34 Live From THE PLAYERS Live From THE PLAYERS Live From THE PLAYERS GOLF 28 301 27 301 (4:00) Live From THE PLAYERS (5:56) ›› “The Nanny Expressâ€? (2009) Vanessa Marcil. ‘PG’ Ă… “Notes From the Heart Healerâ€? (2012) Genie Francis. ‘PG’ Ă… Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 (3:57) “Your Love Never Failsâ€? (4:30) ›› “One Dayâ€? 2011, Romance Anne Hathaway, (6:45) ››› “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2â€? 2011, Fantasy Daniel Radcliffe. Harry Game of Thrones Jaime meets a Veep Chung (N) ’ Girls Hard Being Game of Thrones Jaime meets a HBO 425 501 425 501 Jim Sturgess. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… may have to make the ultimate sacrifice. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… relative. (N) ’ ‘MA’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… Easy (N) ‘MA’ relative. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… ››› “Die Hard With a Vengeanceâ€? 1995, Action Bruce Willis. Premiere. ‘R’ (7:45) ››› “Die Hard With a Vengeanceâ€? 1995, Action Bruce Willis, Jeremy Irons. ‘R’ ›› “Slow Burnâ€? 2005 Ray Liotta, LL Cool J. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:00) ›› “Mob- (5:45) ›› “The League of Extraordinary Gentlemenâ€? 2003 Sean Connery. (7:35) ››› “Master and Commander: The Far Side of the Worldâ€? 2003, Adventure Russell ››› “My Cousin Vinnyâ€? 1992, Comedy Joe Pesci, Marisa Tomei. An inept MAX 400 508 508 stersâ€? ‘R’ Literary figures unite to stop a mad bomber. ‘PG-13’ Ă… Crowe. A British captain chases a French ship in 1805. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… lawyer tries to free his cousin from a Dixie jail. ’ ‘R’ Ă… (4:00) Inside the Vietnam War ‘14’ Wicked Tuna Mutiny at Sea ‘14’ Wicked Tuna Size Matters ‘14’ Inside the Vietnam War Veterans’ accounts, archival clips and photographs reveal covert operations. ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Power Rangers Planet Sheen Wild Grinders Odd Parents Odd Parents Legend-Korra Odd Parents SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Invader ZIM ’ Invader ZIM ’ NTOON 89 115 189 115 Legend-Korra Realtree Rdtrps Truth Hunting Friends of NRA Bone Collector Hunt Masters Your Weapon Hunt Adventure Realtree Rdtrps Wildgame Ntn Mathews Wardens Operation H20 OUTD 37 307 43 307 Hunt Adventure Wildgame Ntn (3:55) ››› The Borgias Day of Ashes Alexander Nurse Jackie ’ The Big C Life (5:25) ››› “Source Codeâ€? 2011, Suspense Jake Gyllen- The Borgias The Choice The Pope The Big C Face Nurse Jackie ’ Nurse Jackie (N) The Big C Life SHO 500 500 haal, Michelle Monaghan. ‘PG-13’ demands allegiance. ‘MA’ Off ‘MA’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… Rights (N) ‘MA’ begins a Lenten fast. (N) ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Ă… Rights ’ ‘MA’ “Panicâ€? 2000 NASCAR Victory Lane Octane Acad Car Crazy ‘G’ SPEED Center NASCAR Victory Lane Wind Tunnel With Dave Despain Car Warriors Challenger SPEED 35 303 125 303 Wind Tunnel With Dave Despain (6:09) ››› “Friends With Benefitsâ€? 2011 Justin Timberlake. ’ ‘R’ Magic City ’ ‘MA’ Ă… ›› “Colombianaâ€? 2011, Action Zoe Saldana. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… (10:50) “Midnight in Parisâ€? 2011 STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:30) ››› “Midnight in Parisâ€? (4:50) “It’s a Free Worldâ€? 2007 Kierston Wareing. Angie “Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hydeâ€? 2008 Dougray Scott. Dr. Henry ›› “Redâ€? 2010, Action Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman. The CIA targets a ››› “The Thomas Crown Affairâ€? 1999, Suspense Pierce Brosnan. An art thief TMC 525 525 helps immigrants find jobs. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… Jekyll’s mental imbalance leads to murder. team of former agents for assassination. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… steals an insurance investigator’s heart. ’ ‘R’ Ă… NHL Live Post Cycling Rugby Sevens World Series: England (N) Poker After Dark ‘PG’ Ă… VS. 27 58 30 209 NHL Hockey Los Angeles Kings at Phoenix Coyotes (N) (Live) My Fair Wedding Shannen Says The Wedding Gift Shannen Says The Wedding (N) My Fair Wedding My Fair Wedding My Fair Wedding *WE 143 41 174 118 My Fair Wedding


SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Adopted daughter grateful for birth mother’s sacrifice Dear Abby: I hope you will print this on Mother’s Day. This Mother’s Day greeting is for all those incredibly unselfish mothers who chose to place their child up for adoption. I am an adopted child whose life has been a wonderful journey. If I could send a message to my birth mother, it would be one of eternal gratitude for allowing someone else to give me the life she was unable to provide. My adoptive parents love me and instilled a value system and belief in God that have carried me through every challenge life has sent my way. I never felt abandoned, but knew that I was chosen by people who were unable to have children. There is no love like a mother’s love. That is why I want to tell all those mothers out there who gave their children to another parent to love and nurture that their sacrifice and heartache became a miracle for so many of us. God bless all of you on this Mother’s Day. — Thankful Daughter Dear Thankful Daughter: I’m pleased to print your Mother’s Day greeting, and I hope it will bring comfort and reassurance to any woman out there for whom today is a reminder of a painful sacrifice. I would also like to wish a happy Mother’s Day to mothers everywhere, be they birth mothers, adoptive and foster mothers, or stepmothers. I applaud you all. Dear Abby: As graduation time approaches, I begin to shudder. Graduation ceremonies have become more like rock concerts than a time to acknowledge student achievements. Families, friends and graduates behave horribly, making it impossible to watch or listen to the proceedings. As both a parent and an educator, may I please offer some gradua-

This year you open up to networking and expanding your group of friends. You will have a constant sense of renewal. If you are attached, as a couple you realize a long-term goal or desire this year. If you are single, you meet many people. One person could be unusually appealing, but you’ll often butt heads. Learn acceptance in order to make this bond work. Communication flows, and you often are inclined to take off and do what you want. PISCES is always a friend. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH You quickly feel your energy drain. You could be surprised by your need for a snooze or a change of pace. Rather than meet up with friends, why not just call a few of them and catch up on their news? Your temper could soar if you do not take good care of yourself. Tonight: Not to be found. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Others seek you out. The problem is that you already have plans, and you could be put in an either/or situation. Know where your interests are. Do not get angry at someone because you made plans with him or her. Tonight: Where you want to be. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Whether you are involved in a community project or have an older relative or friend nearby, you seem to need to answer to someone. You could become quite irate and difficult if a roommate or family member starts a problem. Tonight: Get a head start on tomorrow. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Much can be accomplished by getting on the phone and making calls. You could be overtired and withdrawn. Be careful, as you could be unduly sarcastic with someone who really does not deserve it. Tonight: Around music and friends. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH A close loved one does want to speak to you. Understand what needs to happen between you and a key associate. Defer to this person about your finances, especially if you both are involved. This party needs to feel your

C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY DEAR ABBY tion etiquette advice? 1. Do not yell, blow horns or leap into the air as your special graduate crosses the stage. It’s rude, immature, inappropriate and prevents those around you from hearing the names being called and seeing the next graduates. The noisemaking instruments hurt sensitive ears, so leave them at home. Your special person knows you are there and proud of him or her. 2. Honor all of the graduates. Each one deserves the same audience as the first to cross the stage. Do not disrupt by leaving after your grad has had his/her moment. Stay seated until all of them have received recognition. 3. Small children do not belong at graduations. They get bored, cry, run around, etc., and I don’t blame them. Hire a sitter and let them stay home. 4. The presenters have worked hard to prepare for the ceremony. Listen to them and behave like the mature, thoughtful adults you expect the graduates to become. 5. Have the wild party after the formal ceremony. — Frustrated in Columbus, Ga. Dear Frustrated: I agree that there are certain rules of conduct that should be followed on important occasions — and a graduation ceremony is one of them. I’m printing your very basic rules of behavior in the hope that they will serve as a reminder to those who have forgotten their manners or never learned them in the first place. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Sunday, May 13, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar

C3

support and trust. Tonight: A close discussion. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Others seem passionate about what they want. You would not want to be placated in this situation, so don’t interfere with their desires; otherwise, you might find yourself in a hot discussion. Tonight: Go with someone else’s plans. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Let others know what you want to do. Many people could try to coax you out of your plans. You might have a difficult time convincing them that you are quite content. Perhaps you need to let a loved one or friend know when you will have some time to visit. Tonight: Make it early. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Your creativity surges, and wherever you are, you seem to make interactions much livelier. A friend could be a little difficult or angry. If you ask for more information, you could be surprised by what you hear. Tonight: Make love, not war. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Sometimes you must take a day off to relax. You might be tempted to clear up a misunderstanding. Choose your words with care; otherwise, you could cause yourself even more of a problem. Tonight: Happy to be home. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH You might feel like a social butterfly, which is quite different for such a solid and grounded Capricorn. Let go and worry less about responsibilities. Love the people who surround you. Tonight: Dinner at a favorite spot. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH You might feel a little deflated after recent events. Be careful about how much you tend to overcompensate, or else you could live to regret today. Use care with a feisty friend or loved one. Tonight: Slow down the pace. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You feel so together and content that you could take flight. The problem lies with a partner, loved one or dear friend who is in the opposite mood and rains on your parade. A lively discussion might be more healing than anticipated. Tonight: Forget tomorrow. Live it up. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

RV GOLD RUSH: Featuring an RV show and sale, with gold panning; free; 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-419-8680. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 13:30 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541447-7395. “AND A CHILD SHALL LEAD�: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of children held in a concentration camp; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. SECOND SUNDAY: Chris Anderson and Cecelia Hagen read from a selection of their works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar. “SORDID LIVES�: Stage Right Productions presents the black comedy about a woman whose death causes chaos in a Texas town. Q & A with some of the cast after the show; $18 or $16 students and seniors in advance, $20 at the door. Wednesdays only: purchase tickets online for $13 with promo code LOCAL; 3 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com.

MONDAY ONE MAKES MANY: A volunteer fair featuring local nonprofit organizations on site to answer questions and offer volunteer opportunities; free; 3-6 p.m.; Crook County Library, 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-385-8977. “THE HEALTHCARE MOVIE�: A screening of the documentary about health care systems in Canada and the United States; free; 6 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-318-8169. “DIE WALKURE�: The Metropolitan Opera presents the second opera in Wagner’s “Ring� cycle; $15; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347 or www.fathomevents.com. BEND POETRY SLAM: Open mic poetry; poets read original pieces in three minutes or less; $3 suggested donation; 8 p.m., sign-ups at 7:30 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St.; 541-480-4054 or loudgirlproductions@live.com.

TUESDAY STUDENTS SPEAK — A WATERSHED SUMMIT: Local students share their watershed projects in art, science, videography and hands-on restoration; free; 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m.; Mt. Bachelor Village Resort Conference Center, 19717 Mount Bachelor Drive, Bend; 541-389-5900 or kyake@ restorethedeschutes.org. “OREGON STATE ARCHIVES RECORDS COLLECTION�: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Lane Sawyer; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541317-9553 or www.orgenweb. org/deschutes/bend-gs. ROB WYNIA & THE SOUND: The Floater musician performs ambient alternative music; $7 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; Players Bar & Grill, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-389-2558 or www.p44p.biz.

WEDNESDAY THE INDIAN WAR ERA IN EASTERN OREGON: Eric Iseman talks about “Captain Jack and the Modoc War of 1872-73�; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-617-4663 or ruthh@ uoregon.edu. “IF THESE HALLS COULD TALK�: A screening of the film about struggles and opportunities for students of

Spokesman file photo

Mary Peterson, of Redmond, picks out pansies at Redmond Garden Club’s annual plant sale. This year, the event takes place 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. color, with a discussion; free; 4-6 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; kroth1@cocc. edu. “SIEGFRIED�: The Metropolitan Opera presents the third opera in Wagner’s “Ring� cycle; $15; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347 or www. fathomevents.com. “SORDID LIVES�: Stage Right Productions presents the black comedy about a woman whose death causes chaos in a Texas town. Q & A with some of the cast after the show; $18 or $16 students and seniors in advance, $20 at the door. Wednesdays only: purchase tickets online for $13 with promo code LOCAL; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. SOCIAL DISTORTION: The California-based punk rockers perform, with The Toadies and Lindi Ortega; $35; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www. randompresents.com.

THURSDAY CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY CHILDREN’S CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a children’s concert under the direction of Michael Gesme; preceded by a hands-on instrument exploration; free; 7 p.m., interactive session 6 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-317-3941, info@cosymphony.com or www. cosymphony.com. COMEDY NIGHT: David Testroet and P.J. McGuire perform; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; The Original Kayo’s Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520. HIGH DESERT CHAMBER MUSIC — CROWN CITY STRING QUARTET: String musicians play selections of chamber music; $35, $10 children and students; 7:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-306-3988, info@ highdesertchambermusic.com or www.highdesertchambermusic.com. “SORDID LIVES�: Stage Right Productions presents the black comedy about a woman whose death causes chaos in a Texas town. Q & A with some of the cast after the show; $18 or $16 students and seniors in advance, $20 at the door. Wednesdays only: purchase tickets online for $13 with promo code LOCAL; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. 4 PEAKS PRE-FUNK WEEKEND: Featuring a performance by High Beamz; free; 8 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; www.4peaksmusic.com. AN EVENING WITH LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM: The Fleetwood Mac guitarist and songwriter performs; $62 or $96, plus fees; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www. lastbandstanding.net. “PEDAL-DRIVEN�: A screening of the documentary about trail user conflicts; proceeds benefit

Central Oregon Trail Alliance; $5; 9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-385-8080.

FRIDAY PLANT SALE: The Redmond Garden Club hosts its annual plant sale of annuals, perennials, shrubs and vegetables; proceeds benefit community projects sponsored by the club; free admission; noon6 p.m.; 2614 S.W. Quartz Ave., Redmond; 541-788-8510 or http:// redmondoregongardenclub.org. VFW DINNER: A dinner of fish and chips; $7; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-3890775. UPSTREAM FUNDRAISER: Featuring dinner, live music, a conservation program and a silent auction; proceeds benefit The Upstream Project of the Upper Deschutes Wastershed Council; $45; 6-9 p.m.; The Barn in Sisters, 68467 Three Creeks Road; 541-382-6103, ext. 33 or www. restorethedeschutes.org. BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring performances by The Substitutes, Selfless Riot, Sagebrush Rock and students in the rock band class; proceeds benefit the class; $6, $10 couples, $20 families; 7-11 p.m.; Culver High School, 710 Fifth St.; 541-546-2251. “MIDNIGHT IN PARIS�: A screening of the PG-13-rated 2011 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www. jcld.org. “SORDID LIVES�: Stage Right Productions presents the black comedy about a woman whose death causes chaos in a Texas town. Q & A with some of the cast after the show; $18 or $16 students and seniors in advance, $20 at the door. Wednesdays only: purchase tickets online for $13 with promo code LOCAL; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. 4 PEAKS PRE-FUNK WEEKEND: Featuring a performance by Huckle; music giveaway with donation of two cans of nonperishable food; donations accepted; 8 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; www.4peaksmusic.com.

SATURDAY PLANT SALE: The Redmond Garden Club hosts its annual plant sale of annuals, perennials, shrubs and vegetables; proceeds benefit community projects sponsored by the club; free admission; 9 a.m.3 p.m.; 2614 S.W. Quartz Ave., Redmond; 541-788-8510 or http:// redmondoregongardenclub.org. POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Participants will race through multiple sports from Mt. Bachelor to Bend; the Les Schwab Amphitheater, which marks the end of the race, will host a festival with music and vendor booths; free for spectators; 9:15 a.m. start time on Mt. Bachelor; 10:45 a.m. booths open; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-3880002 or www.mbsef.org. REDMOND SATURDAY MARKET: Vendors sell arts and crafts; free admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Ambiance Art Co-op, 435 Evergreen Ave.; 541-480-7197. “GOTTERDAMMERUNG�: The Metropolitan Opera presents the fourth opera in Wagner’s “Ring� cycle; $15; noon; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-3826347 or www.fathomevents.com. JAPANESE FESTIVAL: Featuring a silent auction, family activities, food and a performance by the Hokule’a Polynesian Dancers; proceeds benefit Japanese earthquake orphans; free; noon-4 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-355-4053 or ami. zepnewski@bend.k12.or.us. PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR STAR PARTY: Professional and amateur astronomers share telescopes with novice stargazers, preceded by a night sky tour; daytime activities include exhibits, activities and presentations; free; 1 p.m., star gazing begins at 10 p.m.; Prineville Reservoir State Park, 19020 S.E. Parkland Drive; 541-923-7551. COOL CATS CASINO NIGHTS: Featuring casino games, a silent auction, food and more; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; $25; 6-10 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, Conference Center, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-923-0882 or www. redmondhumane.org.

Call Sylvan today for a FREE Sylvan Assessment (a $195 value) Offer expires 06/30/2012. Valid at participating centers only. May not be combined with other offers.

If Your Mother is Suffering from Hair Loss or Thinning Hair - Treat her to a “New Do� for Mother’s Day!

Sylvan of Bend 2150 NE Studio Rd., Suite 10, Bend, OR. 97701

541-389-9252 bendsylvan@qwest.net Hair Stylist & Cranial Hair Prosthesis/Wigs Specialist Located Downtown Bend

541-408-6244 Call for your appointment.


C4

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

Photo by John Gottberg Anderson / For The Bulletin

Rising beyond fields of lupine and balsamroot on the slopes of Dalles Mountain, 11,245-foot Mount Hood dominates views of the Columbia River Gorge. The $10 million Mary and Bruce Stevenson wing, extending from the historic Maryhill Museum of Art beneath the distant gaze of Mount Hood, is being dedicated in ceremonies today. The gilt throne upon which Queen Marie of Romania sat in the early 20th century is a long-standing treasure of the Maryhill Museum of Art. The daughter of England’s Queen Victoria, Marie also donated Russian Orthodox icons and other royal Romanian regalia to the collection.

Museums Continued from C1 If you needed a reason to get inside, you may not need to look any further.

The Maryhill story The story of Sam Hill and the Maryhill community has been frequently told. At the start of the 20th century, as he lobbied the Oregon Legislature to build what became the Historic Columbia River Highway, Hill bought 5,300 acres overlooking the Columbia and named it for his wife, Mary. Then the wealthy Quaker businessman set to work developing a utopian agricultural community. The hamlet never reached fruition, but a pacifist war memorial to fallen soldiers — a concrete replica of Britain’s Stonehenge — still stands eerily on a desolate bluff. Four miles downriver, Hill constructed a three-story, Beaux Arts-style manor perched at the edge of a cliff 900 feet above the river. Encouraged by two friends — dancer Loie Fuller, of Paris, and Queen Marie of Romania — he began to transform it into an art museum where he could exhibit his diverse collections. Queen Marie, the daughter of England’s Queen Victoria, donated Russian Orthodox icons and royal Romanian regalia, including the gilt throne upon which she sat. Fuller added her personal collection of works by famed French sculptor Auguste Rodin, including original plaster studies of “The Thinker” and “The Burghers of Calais.” After Hill died in 1931, unpacked crates of art stood inside the building for six years. Then another of Hill’s women friends — Alma de Bretteville Spreckels, wife of a San Francisco sugar magnate — took up the cause of completing work on the museum. She added her own collection of

European and American oil paintings before the Maryhill Museum of Art opened to the public in May 1940. These gifts remain on display today, along with a later Spreckels donation of miniature mannequins dressed in post-World War II French fashions. The eclectic collection also includes Hill’s own assortment of Native American basketry, beadwork and ancient petroglyphs; more than 100 chess sets from all over the world; and a gallery with details about Hill’s rich life. The new, 25,000-squarefoot wing, which I toured last weekend, does not so much add exhibit space as flexibility. Built partially underground and cantilevered to blend into the bluff, it boasts a broad plaza for special events with vistas of the Gorge. Inside are a full-size cafe, Loie’s, and an art-education center where workshops will be supplemented by computer stations. Additional storage space will enable the Maryhill Museum to present temporary exhibits formerly beyond its grasp. Among them, said executive director Colleen Schafroth, are a showing of contemporary realist paintings by Cape Cod artists (June 9 to Sept. 3), and a compilation of 39 David Hockney etchings of Grimm’s fairy tales (Sept. 15 to Nov. 15). New outdoor sculpture has been added to the 26 acres of gardens that surround the museum, patrolled by loud and colorful peacocks.

Gorge Discovery Go to Maryhill for the art, but plan a couple of hours at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum for a history fix. Located a short distance off Interstate 84 two miles west of The Dalles, the Discovery Center opened in 1997 at a cost of $21.5 million. It serves as the official interpretive center for the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, which extends west from Maryhill to the Portland suburbs, and incorporates the Wasco County Historical Museum. There are two main sections to the facility, and both are impeccably curated. In the main Discovery Center, vivid murals provide a visual backdrop to the geologi-

cal and natural history of the Gorge, with a particular focus on the Ice Ages (ending about 12,000 years ago) and Bonneville floods. A replica plank house helps to illustrate native cultural history, and a family’s covered wagon on a riverborne raft is accompanied by audio depicting the trials of Oregon Trail immigrants. Short videos describe the growth of the modern economy, from early fur-trapping and maritime pursuits to fishing, timber harvesting, orchards, electricity and tourism. Oral histories from Wasco and Umatilla Indians portray the native peoples’ hopes for the future. The Wasco County Museum elucidates on the history of a county that was once the largest in the United States, extending all the way to the Continental Divide in modern Yellowstone National Park in the early years of the Oregon Territory. Exhibits include a recreated main street with a variety of shops as they might have appeared a century ago. There are also depictions of a riverboat depot and a salmon cannery, and a collection from a multi-generational family of saddle makers. Most significant to the modern era is a section on construction of The Dalles Dam. When it was completed in 1957, the dam inundated the fishing grounds of Celilo Falls and the native village of Celilo, 13 miles upstream; archeologists say it had been continually occupied for 10,000 years. Yet the dam provided muchneeded hydroelectric power and vastly improved modern river and rail transportation systems. The tribes were paid $27 million as compensation for the loss of their fishery. Now, more than a half-century later, funds are being raised for an elaborate park to memorialize the site. Renowned architect Maya Lin was commissioned by the Confluence Project to design an arc-shaped walkway that will trace a section of the ancient falls. A completion date has not yet been projected. Two smaller Discovery Center galleries display a fine collection of items from the Lewis and Clark expedition of 180306. There’s also a hands-on

early industry. But description of geology is left primarily to a 12-minute movie, “The Creation of the Gorge,” in a dedicated 45-seat mezzanine theater, and to a sequence of 1980 photographs of the erupting Mount St. Helens, immediately north of the Gorge. On the second floor of the Interpretive Center are local community exhibits, including historical photographs and artifacts such as children’s toys. One full room is devoted to the heritage of Asian immigrants, another to spiritual life. In the latter is the Don Brown Collection of 4,000 Roman Catholic rosaries, which the museum claims is the world’s largest. East, up the Washington side of the Columbia, is the small Gorge Heritage Museum in tiny Bingen. South, across the river from Stevenson, is the Cascade Locks Historical Museum. But of more impact than either of these local collections is the Columbia Gorge Sternwheeler. Two or three times daily from May through October, this 499-passenger ship cruis-

children’s gallery, a cafe and a gift shop. Outside is a small enclosure for rescued raptors and an interpretive trail that winds through 50 acres of native plant restoration.

‘She Who Watches’ Near the wet west end of the Gorge, on the Washington shore near the well-known Skamania Lodge, the Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center offers a more extensive look at early Native American culture. The likeness of Tsagaglalal, “She Who Watches,” a prehistoric chief immortalized in an upriver petroglyph, introduces a fine exhibit on the myths and spiritual beliefs of the ancient Chinook-speaking tribes who inhabited this region. Sections on pioneer settlement deploy such large artifacts as a giant fish wheel, an early logging truck and an 1876 steam engine to describe

LIMIT ONE COUPON PER PERSON PER VISIT • COUPON EXPIRES 5/22/12 Call for reservations, location & times: 541.783.7529 ext.209

es the Gorge from the Bonneville Locks to Herman Creek, passing beneath the historic Bridge of the Gods on a narrated four-hour voyage. This replica of the vessels that traveled the Columbia in the late 19th century is, in itself, a living museum.

Wings and wheels A century’s worth of antique aircraft are packed strut to fender with classic cars, combat Jeeps, tractors and motorcycles at WAAAM, the Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum three miles south of downtown Hood River. Two full-size hangars, with an acre of floor space each, house the collection, established at the 1927 Ken Jernstedt airfield in September 2007. Continued next page

www.AgateBeachMotel.com Private, vintage, ocean front getaway Newport, OR 1-800-755-5674


SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Expenses Gas, Bend to Cascade Locks via Maryhill (round-trip), 415 miles @ $4/gallon: $66.40 Admission, Maryhill Museum of Art: $9 Lodging (two nights including continental breakfast), Lyle Hotel, Lyle: $181.90 Dinner, Lyle Hotel: $42 Admission, Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center: $10

Lunch, The Little Viking, Stevenson: $7 Admission, WAAAM: $12 Dinner, Stonehedge Gardens, Hood River: $38.90 Breakfast, Lyle Hotel: $11 Admission, Columbia Gorge Discovery Center: $9 Lunch, Clock Tower Pub, The Dalles: $17 Total: $404.20

If you go INFORMATION • Columbia River Gorge Visitors Association. P.O. Box 1037, Stevenson, WA 98648; 800-984-6743, www.crgva. org • Hood River Chamber of Commerce. 702 E. Port Marina Drive, Hood River; 541-3862000, 800-366-3530, www. hoodriver.org • The Dalles Area Chamber of Commerce. 404 W. Second St., The Dalles; 541-296-2231, www.thedalleschamber.com

LODGING • Celilo Inn. 3550 E. Second St., The Dalles; 541-769-0001, www.celiloinn.com. Rates from $109 • Columbia Gorge Hotel. 4000 Westcliff Drive, Hood River; 541-386-5566, 800-345-1921, www.columbiagorgehotel. com. Rates from $149 • Hood River Hotel. 102 Oak Ave., Hood River; 541-3861900, www.hoodriverhotel. com. Rates from $99 • Lyle Hotel. 100 Seventh St., Lyle, Wash.; 509-365-5953, 800-447-6310, www.lylehotel. com. Rates from $75 winter, $85 summer. • Skamania Lodge. 1131 S.W. Skamania Lodge Way, Stevenson, Wash. 509-4277700, 800-221-7117, www. skamania.com. Rates from $144

DINING • Baldwin Saloon. 205 Court St., The Dalles; 541-296-5666, www.baldwinsaloon.com. Lunch and dinner. Moderate. • Bette’s Place. 516 Oak Ave., Hood River; 541-386-1880, www.bettesplace.com.

From previous page “It’s all wings and wheels and human stories,” said assistant director Donna Davidson. Davidson is an avid aviatrix who said she learned to fly at Jernstedt Field as a teenager. Twenty-three years after graduating from high school, she returned to Hood River with her husband just as founder Terry Brandt was establishing WAAAM. His collection then stood at 42 planes and a half-dozen road vehicles. It has since increased by more than 500 percent; with about three-fourths of the cars and planes loaned from other private collections. What makes WAAAM special, said Davidson, is that more than 90 percent of its antique machines are in full operating condition, including an 1899 Locomobile steam car “that accelerates from 0 to 40 in about 45 minutes,” she joked. Since March 2010 — on the second Saturday of every month — the museum takes many of its planes and cars from the hangars for public demonstrations. Such planes

Breakfast and lunch. Budget. • Clock Tower Ales. 311 Union St., The Dalles; 541-705-3590, www.clocktowerales.com. Lunch and dinner. Budget to moderate. • The Little Viking DriveIn. 340 State Highway 14, Stevenson, Wash.; 509-4278888. Lunch and dinner. Budget. • Stonehedge Gardens. 3405 Cascade Ave., Hood River; 541-386-3940, www. stonehedgegardens.com. Dinner only. Moderate to expensive.

ATTRACTIONS • Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum. 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles; 541-296-8600, www. gorgediscovery.org. • Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center. 990 Rock Creek Drive, Stevenson, Wash.; 509-4278211, www.columbiagorge. org. • Columbia Gorge Sternwheeler. 355 Cascade Locks Hwy., Cascade Locks; 541-374-8427, 800-224-3901, www.portofcascadelocks.org/ sternwheeler.htm. • Fort Dalles Museum. 500 W. 15th St., The Dalles; 541-2964547, www.historicthedalles. org • Maryhill Museum of Art. 35 Maryhill Museum Drive, Goldendale, Wash.; 509-7733733, www.maryhillmuseum. org. • Western Antique Aeroplane & Automobile Museum (WAAAM). Ken Jernstedt Airfield, 1600 Air Museum Road, Hood River; 541-3081600, www.waaamuseum.org.

as a 1917 Curtiss Jenny and a 1937 Aeronica LC are the only ones of their kind in the world that are still flying, Davidson said. Flying and driving lessons are available, too. Most popular are the Model T driving lessons offered once a month, at the end of June, July and August, at a cost of $150 to the public. In town, the Hood River County Museum has a heritage collection that includes photos of early wind surfing in the Columbia Gorge. Currently, however, it is closed for renovation.

Historical landmarks The region’s best local history collection is found at the Fort Dalles Museum, about a mile uphill from downtown The Dalles in the heart of a residential neighborhood. Built in 1856 as the residence of the fort’s surgeon, the museum is more than 100 years old. On the property are six other buildings, including the 1895 Anderson Homestead, built of hand-hewn logs.

Capt. Tom Cramblett of the Columbia Gorge Sternwheeler waits to greet passengers arriving for an afternoon river cruise from the port of Cascade Locks. Two or three times daily from May through October, the replica ship travels the Gorge on a narrated four-hour voyage. WAAAM Assistant Director Donna Davidson peers over the struts of a 1930 Davis D-1-K at Hood River’s Ken Jernstedt Airfield.

Among other historical structures in The Dalles — the city has more than two dozen dating from the 1800s — is the original 1858 Wasco County Courthouse. But no building is more prominent than Old St. Peter’s Landmark, a red-brick Catholic Church whose 176foot steeple was raised above the city in 1897. And none may be better known than the Baldwin Saloon, built in 1876 and a popular restaurant since 1991. With destinations all over the Gorge, I stayed in a small village, on the Washington side of the Columbia, without any museums. But the Lyle Hotel was like a museum in its own right. A historic, 10-room railway inn, it is a two-story, European-style lodge with shared bathrooms. And although the station is gone, trains still rumble past several times each day and night. Best of all, chef-owners Steve Little and Marianne Lewis helped me to feel right at home with gourmet dinners and weekend brunches. Don’t get me wrong. I appreciate luxury in lodgings. In Hood River, for instance, I could have combined indulgence with history at the 1920 Columbia Gorge Hotel. I could have dined nearby in a secluded woodland estate at Stonehedge Gardens. But on this occasion, the Lyle Hotel combined value with quality. And under clear blue skies, that was all I really needed. — Reporter: janderson@ bendbulletin.com

C5


C6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

M

  

Milestones guidelines and forms are available at The Bulletin, or send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to: Milestones, The Bulletin, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. To ensure timely publication, The Bulletin requests that notice forms and photos be submitted within one month of the celebration.

E  

B Delivered at St. Charles Bend Brinton and Ashley Cary, a girl, Presley Adalyn Cary, 5 pounds, 6 ounces, April 19. Joshua Huerta and Alicia Patterson, a boy, Pierson Cash Huerta, 6 pounds, 9 ounces, April 29.

Shaun Alexander and Jana Weant, a girl, Audrey Elise Alexander, 7 pounds, 12.5 ounces, May 3.

Mark Prickett and Tiffany Adams, a girl, Taylee Michelle Prickett, 6 pounds, 13 ounces, May 6.

Jon and Rebecca Dude, a boy, Bacchus Ivan Dude, 7 pounds, 9 ounces, May 5.

Scott and Sonya Cook, a boy, Henry Scott Cook, 8 pounds, 2 ounces, May 2.

Joshua and Melissa Reece, a boy, Gabriel Aizik Raymond Reece, 6 pounds, 4 ounces, May 3.

Delivered at St. Charles Redmond

Bradcus and Marlys Schrandt, a girl, Zhoe Nicole Hella Schrandt, 7 pounds, 7 ounces, May 2.

Jason and Bambi McKibbin, a girl, Emily Victoria Ann McKibbin, 7 pounds, 12 ounces, May 3.

Francisco Terrazas and Tylen Messenger, a boy, Dante Piedra Terrazas, 7 pounds, 11 ounces, May 2.

Brian and Veronica Johnson, a girl, Madeline Grace Johnson, 7 pounds, 5 ounces, May 1.

David and Livia VanLoo, a boy, Nolan Thomas VanLoo, 8 pounds, 10 ounces, May 3.

Bassam and Jessica Saleem, a boy, Nabiel Bassam Ali Ahmed Saleem, 7 pounds, 7 ounces, May 1.

Aaron Kuper and Jeri Bafford Larrance, a girl, Rylie Anne Kuper, 6 pounds, 4 ounces, April 30. Zane and Marissa Wilson, a boy, Samuel Peter Wilson, 8 pounds, 14 ounces, April 25. Patrick and Betsy Cliff, a boy, August Thomas Kitzinger Cliff, 9 pounds, 9 ounces, April 15. Zachery and Lisa Martin, a girl, Claire Marie Martin, 7 pounds, 3 ounces, April 23. Michael and Jami Steeley, twins, girls, Reagan Erin Steeley, 5 pounds, 8 ounces, and Kayla Elise Steeley, 5 pounds, 12 ounces, April 16.

Most babies aren’t allowed to snooze on their tummies By Rachel Saslow Special to The Washington Post

CJ Baxter, left, and Jodi Irvin.

Irvin—Baxter Jodi Irvin and CJ Baxter, both of Bend, plan to marry Aug. 4 in Powell Butte. The future bride is the daughter of Alan Irvin, of Boring, and Kay Irvin, of Prineville. She is a 1997 graduate of Crook County High School; a 2007 graduate of Eastern Oregon University, where she studied marketing; and a 2009 graduate of George Fox Uni-

versity, where she received a master of arts in teaching. She is a fourth-grade teacher at Culver Elementary School. The future groom is the son of Don and Terri Baxter, of Powell Butte. He is a 2003 graduate of Crook County High School and a 2007 graduate of Oregon State University, where he studied finance. He is a portfolio adviser at Merit Wealth Management in Bend.

A Mother’s Day getaway By Debra-Lynn B. Hook McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Risk factors

New customers only

Offer expires 5/31/12

Comprehensive Exam Includes: • X-rays • Oral Cancer Screening • Tooth and Gum Evaluation

ALPINE DENTAL 2078 NE Professional Ct.

(541) 382-2281 Roundabout Reconstruction scheduled for 4/16 - 5/21/12. Follow local traffic detour signs to access all your favorite neighborhood businesses. www.northwestcrossing.com

Jack R. Miller, D.M.D. Branden R. Ferguson, D.D.S. NOW O.D.S. Preferred Providers! NE Neff Rd.

Alpine Dental NE Pro

fession

al Ct.

MILESTONES GUIDELINES If you would like to receive forms to announce your engagement, wedding, or anniversary, plus helpful information to plan the perfect Central Oregon wedding, pick up your Book of Love at The Bulletin (1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend) or from any of these valued advertisers:

AAA Travel Bend Wedding & Formal Black Butte Ranch Chelsea Brix Wedding & Bridal Services Century Center Deschutes County Fair and Expo Center Eastlake Framing Journey Coaches Kellie’s Cakes McMenamin’s Old St. Francis School Sunriver Resort Sweet & Swanky Cakes The Old Stone The View Restaurant at Juniper Golf Course Treehouse Portraits Widgi Creek Golf Club

27th St.

in an outdoor country sunset wedding complete with horsedrawn carriage. The bride and groom are 5th generation family from the Bend/Redmond area. Both great grandparents settled the area in the late 1800s. After an extended honeymoon exploring and touring New Zealand, they have moved into their new ranch home east of Bend.

SAVE $120 with this coupon $170 value!

NE Williamson Blvd.

were Married July 15, 2011 at the Ward Ranch

4995

.

Amy Platt, daughter of Winton Platt & Patty Begin and Justin Ward, son of Kim & Sally Ward

$

Rd

JUSTIN & AMY WARD

SPECIAL

son

Meanwhile, research on the cause of SIDS continues. Some studies have pointed to risk factors such as prematurity or exposure to secondhand smoke. Willinger and her fellow researchers are looking at defects in neurotransmitter pathways in the brain as a possible cause. SIDS victims seem to have had pathway deficits in brain regions that control automatic functions such as breathing, heartbeat, blood pressure, body temperature and arousal from sleep. “Part of the problem is that you find a baby dead with

NEW PATIENTS

liam

It has been 20 years since the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) first recommended that parents place their babies on their backs to sleep for the first year of life to prevent sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS. The rate of SIDS in the United States has plummeted more than 50 percent since the government launched its “Back to Sleep” campaign in 1994. In 2006, 2,327 infants died from SIDS in the United States. Still, about 25 percent of U.S. babies sleep on their tummies or sides, according to a national infant sleep position study. (In 1992, before the “Back to Sleep” campaign, that proportion was roughly 85 percent, according to the study.) Like Cress, many parents find that infants sleep better and longer on their tummies. New babies startle easily while on their backs and can wake themselves up frequently. Swaddling them can help prevent this, but wrapping a crying baby like a burrito isn’t always easy for a sleep-deprived parent in the middle of the night. For some parents, there’s also a credibility issue. De-

concerned about the well-being of their child, and they want the best.” She understands the temptation to break the sleep rules. Some babies, newborns especially, sleep best when snuggled up next to Mom and Dad, under blankets or on their tummies. It can be difficult to put the baby down in the barebones sleep environment prescribed by the AAP, especially a baby who is crying.

Wil

Al and Peg Morris wish to thank WebFoot Painting and Sherwin Williams for selecting son, Brian’s home in their 2012 Paint Giveaway. You are a great crew who does a spectacular job!!!!

SIDS on the decline

no history of disease, so we’re starting at the end,” she says. Other sleep-related deaths are more easily understood, such as accidental suffocation or entrapment due to pillows, quilts, crib bumpers or sharing a bed with a parent. Last year, the AAP revised its sleep recommendations in response to a rise in the number of infant deaths attributable to accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed, which quadrupled (from 103 to 513) between 1984 and 2004. The new rules take into account a child’s “total sleep environment,” which includes not only back sleep but also soft bedding, whether a child is breast-feeding, incomplete immunizations, bedsharing, overheating and exposure to maternal smoking, alcohol and illicit drug use. Reston, Va., pediatrician Ruth A. Mann says she gets more resistance to the AAP guidelines from parents who want to share beds with their babies than from those who insist on letting their infants sleep on their tummies. It is common for some of her Indian, Pakistani and other Asian families to allow their babies to sleep with their parents or grandmothers. They’re not always receptive to changing that tradition. “It can be frustrating,” Mann says. “Every parent is

NE

For nine years, I have taken a pre-Mother’s Day mom-cation away from home and everybody in it. The first year was 2004. My children were 6, 10 and 14. I left for six days, but not before compiling seven pages of color-coded daily schedules for my husband, with several postscripts: “Remember Benjie needs his blankie at night. Emily should have a snack before piano. Chris is not allowed to ride with Joe to school because he’s a speed demon.” Nine seasons later, I still build a flexible career around the same vacation destination, to my sister’s home in New Orleans where she keeps a spacious room in the attic on reserve for wayward siblings. But everything else has changed. My children have grown to 15, 19, and 23 and out of the house. Six vacation days have evolved to 12 to embrace both weekends of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. And the ream of rules I used to give my husband has shrunk to one tiny request: “Please don’t forget me while I’m gone.” My vacation away from them, you see, has become theirs, too, away from me. This was never the purpose of the mom-cation, mind you. I give my husband credit early on for supporting the original theory, that mothers never really get away unless they GET AWAY, that this mom in particular, with no extended family respite nearby, needed a clearly defined break from her sweet, but dependent, charges. Just as importantly: We live in the North. I am from the South. My husband, aware that his career is what dragged me into

Yankee territory to begin with, also knows if his Southern wife doesn’t occasionally dance to the Neville Brothers in 90-degree humidity while wearing Mardi Gras beads, there could be trouble. What he didn’t know was how much he’d come to like it. “It’s easier to focus on my work when you’re gone,” my husband admits. “And I get to be master of the house without having to compromise.” Nine years of solo vacations later, I have a new perspective. I listen to my younger mother friends wax guilty when they leave their family for even a day or two. And I have to tell them what I’ve come to believe — that not only is Mom a better person when she gets to dance without a baby on her hip — but children, especially girl children, benefit from seeing their female role model take care of herself. And Dad gets to see what he’s capable of — including having not one, but two poker parties. I know this to be true. I called several nights during my most recent trip to check in with my youngest child. Two of those nights, I heard raucous, male laughter in the background. “I saw whiskey,” my 19-yearold daughter said. Nine years after my first solo vacation, I have to say, I am beginning to outgrow the need for lengthy separations. I no longer yearn for an extended vacation from children who are hardly home to begin with. Meanwhile, my vacations seem only to be growing on my husband. “Stay as long as you’d like,” he tells me. I know he means well. But at this point, what I like hearing more is what he says next: “Just as long as you come back.”

By the time new parents take their babies home from the hospital, they have been thoroughly drilled on the litany of infant-sleep no-nos: No stomach-sleeping. No loose blankets. No pillows. No soft mattresses. No crib bumpers. The list goes on. Whether parents choose to follow these rules is another matter. When her twins were born in 2008, Amy Cress of Silver Spring, Md., dutifully put her babies on their backs to sleep. But at about 6 months of age, her son Nathan rolled onto his stomach during the night. Cress was so relieved that her son was asleep, she left him like that. He preferred sleeping on his stomach from then on. “We used bumpers, too, which is really not allowed,” she says. “We felt like rebels.”

spite the correlation between back sleep and the drop in SIDS deaths, scientists still don’t know the precise cause of SIDS. In fact, SIDS is by definition a death without a known cause, or, as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines the syndrome, “deaths in infants less than 1 year of age that occur suddenly and unexpectedly,” and whose causes “are not immediately obvious prior to investigation.” Moreover, changing recommendations — between 1992 and 2000, the AAP said that side-sleeping was a safe alternative to back sleeping — make some people skeptical of the experts. Other parents worry that babies will get flat heads from sleeping on their backs or will be delayed in reaching such milestones as rolling over. Marian Willinger, who runs the SIDS research program at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Bethesda, Md., concedes that back-sleeping babies might have such delays; they might also learn to crawl later than stomach-sleepers. But by 18 months of age, there is no difference between the two groups, she says. Back-sleeping babies might also develop flat spots on the back of the head, but parents can help prevent it by repositioning the baby’s head during sleep and by having the baby spend time on his or her stomach during the day, she says.


SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

By Monica Rhor Houston Chronicle

HOUSTON — Amy Durant lives in a leafy suburb, not in a post-apocalyptic land of ruin and repression. She’s heading toward graduation from Kingwood High School, not stepping into a gladiator’s ring for a battle to the death. Her plans include college, not a marriage arranged by the state or a scientific cure for the ailment of love. Yet, when Durant sinks into the latest young adult dystopian novel to hit bookstore shelves, the 18-year-old often sees her own teenage concerns mirrored in the pages: the challenge of choosing a path to follow, the struggle to control her own destiny, the travails of a world racked by war and division. And, like millions of teenagers across the country, Durant can’t get enough of the genre, which explores societies where a perfect facade hides a brutal, deceptive ruling authority. Young readers eagerly count down the days to the latest release, enthusiastically rattle off the names of popular series and sign up for long waiting lists to check out dystopian titles from school libraries. “Kids go through fads. Vampires and angels were hot before; now, it’s dystopian. If you throw zombies in, it’s even more popular,” said librarian Erin Irvine of Seabrook Intermediate School in Clear Creek Independent School District. “We’re seeing a huge increase in kids requesting these books.” The trend has been fueled in part by the staggering success of “The Hunger Games” trilogy and movie adaptation, in part by the themes of identity, honor and autonomy that resonate with young adult readers. “At this age, a lot of things seem like the end of world. There’s so much we don’t know, but we want to make good decisions,” Durant said as she sat in Kingwood High’s library. “I like the idea that young kids can pull out strength in times of trouble. It shows that we don’t have to depend on other people. We can depend on ourselves and find strength when the world is ending.” Among Durant’s dystopian favorites: “Matched” by Ally Condie, which shows a young girl living in a world where the government controls all choices; “Delirium” by Lauren Oliver, which portrays a society that views love as an illness to be cured; and “Divergent” by

Reading list Popular young-adult dystopian novels (suggested by librarians and students): • “The Hunger Games” trilogy — “The Hunger Games,” “Catching Fire,” “Mockingjay” — by Suzanne Collins • “Matched” by Ally Condie • “Forest of Hands and Teeth” by Carrie Ryan • “Life As We Knew it” by Susan Beth Pfeffer • “Unwind” by Neal Shusterman • “Delirium” by Lauren Oliver • “Divergent” by Veronica Roth • “Uglies” by Scott Westerfeld • “The Knife of Never Letting Go” by Patrick Ness • “The Maze Runner” by James Dashner • “Gone” by Michael Grant

Veronica Roth, in which a 16year-old girl must choose her identity from predetermined factions.

Teen heroes Literary visions of a utopian ideal gone horribly wrong have long been a part of the school curriculum, with Aldous Huxley’s “Brave New World,” Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451” and George Orwell’s “1984” popping up on many required reading lists. Like those dystopian classics, current novels directed at young people often feature a controlling government, technology run amok, an emphasis on conformity and a protagonist who attempts to topple the oppressive society. However, unlike adult dystopian fiction, the young adult variations are often actionpacked and end with a glimmer of hope for humanity. And they typically feature a powerful teenage hero or heroine who rebels against the status quo. Think Katniss Everdeen, the bow-and-arrow-wielding central character in “The Hunger Games.” “I like how Katniss is on her own. She didn’t need anyone else to survive,” said Tristan Beasley, 12, a Seabrook Intermediate seventh-grader. “Being independent is very important.” For readers in the throes of adolescence, a time of peer pressure, parental mandates and strict school regulations, the appeal of a teenager stand-

ing up to authority is obvious. “I feel like people are controlling me all the time. Like when your mom is telling you to get up, brush your teeth, flipping on the light and banging on the door. That’s the number one time I feeTo l like that. I could really connect with that,” said Ella Barwick, 13, an eighth-grader at Seabrook Intermediate. “Before the movie, Katniss didn’t have a face, just the outline of a body with my face. I imagined me in her place the entire time I was reading.” Ella, who said she has read “The Hunger Games” trilogy “forward, backward and upside down” six times, is also a fan of “Hollowland” by Amanda Hocking. That book’s back cover tagline is: “This is the way the world ends - not with a bang or a whimper, but with zombies breaking down the back door.”

SUDOKU

Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SUDOKU SOLUTION IS ON C8

JUMBLE SOLUTION IS ON C8

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

Dystopias invite teenagers to bravely enter new worlds

A foot in the door That “The Hunger Games” trilogy, by Suzanne Collins, often leaps to the top of the dystopian top 10 for young readers is not surprising. Although “The Giver” by Lois Lowry has been popular dystopian reading for more than a decade, school librarians and reading teachers say Collins’ books represent the holy grail of literacy: the dream books that lure even the most reluctant readers into the wonders of the written word, the ones that get them hooked. “We’re always looking for a book that can be the foot in the door. If we can get that one book in their hand, they will want to read more,” said Irvine. “I just thank God for Suzanne Collins every day. These books don’t come along very often.” Many of the young adult books are written as a series, another strategy for drumming up interest among teenager readers. In the Klein school district north of Houston, the three books have circulated more than 2,000 times in the past 18 months. At Seabrook Intermediate, south of the city, the books have been checked out 235 times this year, with a long waiting list of students eager to borrow a copy. “The time was ripe for this to take off. In dystopian books, all the oil is gone, people have screwed up the world, and the kids have to work with what’s left,” said Susan Schilling, the Kingwood High School librarian. “These readers are young enough to be wondering about what the world is going to be like in 20 to 25 years.”

LOS ANGELES TIMES SUNDAY CROSSWORD

Flowers Continued from C1 During 2002, Berkman said, a distant relative decided to spend her final days in a hospice rather than in a traditional hospital environment. She said the care and attention this relative and her family received as part of this process changed how she looked at death. “They took a lot of fear out of walking up to the very edge when somebody passes, and it wasn’t scary,” Berkman said, adding that since the experience she had been looking for a way to pay the hospice back for what its staff had done for her dying relative. Berkman also wanted to cut down on the waste generated by the event planning business, a field she continues to consult in while running Friends with Flowers. One of her biggest concerns was the hundreds of flowers that would be thrown away at the end of someone’s party or event. Four years after her mother’s death, Berkman found a solution to these problems when she read an article about Randy McManus, who founded the first Friends with Flowers organization in Greensboro, N.C., in 2004. The two met in 2006 and figured out a way to duplicate those efforts here. “We can do something with these flowers,” she said. “We can repurpose them and put them to a wonderful use.”

Five years later Berkman ran in and out of her organization’s storefront

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Friends with Flowers volunteers Sharon Dawn, left, and Julie Linker work on flower arrangements for their organization.

— a space it has had rentfree since the Cascade Village Shopping Center named Friends of Flowers its official charity in 2009 — carrying 27 bouquets in trays she’d deliver to Partners in Care’s main office in Bend that afternoon. “I’ve had an SUV since I started this,” Berkman joked, adding that the extra space in the vehicle helps her deliver the 150 to 250 bouquets of flowers her organization delivers each week. Last year, Friends with Flowers repurposed and delivered 7,500 bouquets, she added. Berkman has learned a lot since she started Friends with Flowers out of her garage, including the quickest ways to get from her storefront office to the four Deschutes County hospices that receive its donations. Friends with Flowers has a satellite group in Prineville and is working to build re-

lationships so it can work with hospice patients in Madras. Another lesson she’s learned is that “you must train your volunteers” — something that happened when a volunteer took a funerary bouquet of flowers to a hospice in Redmond without rearranging it or removing the “We’ll miss you Grandma” sign. But perhaps the biggest lesson she’s learned is the value of flowers, an item most people would simply throw away if it wasn’t for her organization’s help, and how they can brighten up anybody’s day. “It’s wonderful,” said Suede Miller, a receptionist at the Partners in Care hospice center. “(Having flowers in a room) just makes their whole day, even if they see it for only a couple minutes while walking down the hall.” — Reporter: 541-617-7816, mmclean@bendbulletin.com

C7

CROSSWORD SOLUTION IS ON C8


C8

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

Gliding pasta midlife crisis on a skateboard By Alex Williams New York Times News Service

A grinding sound, somewhere between a rattle and a rumble, erupted over the suburban New Jersey hill. The figures, clad in motorcycle leathers and helmets, started to appear, one, two, three, until there were almost 20, crouched on skateboards, like a squadron of roller-villains. One by one, the skaters rounded a turn, dropping a gloved hand to the asphalt as they scraped their wheels in a slide, taking care that nobody crossed into oncoming traffic and found themselves splattered across the grill of a Buick. At the bottom of the hill, the leader of the Bergen County Bombers, as this gang of skateboarders is known, wrestled the black motorcycle helmet from his head, revealing a mortgage broker with gray flecks in his beard and the crow’s feet that come from decades in the white-collar trenches. “It’s a total midlife crisis,” said the group’s leader, Tom Barnhart, 47, of Cresskill, N.J., who started skateboarding two years ago for the first time since the Carter administration. His life, he said, had been in a rut. “My kids grew old, so I got a dog. My dog grew old, so I got a skateboard.” “That was what knocked the cobwebs out of my head,” he added. Forget the little red sports car: The new symbol for midlife crisis is the skateboard. Graying members of Generation X, and even their older brothers, are reclaiming their youth and rebellious streak by hopping back on a skate deck. Some are even showing off old tricks in the skate park. “The skate geezers are having their revenge,” said Michael Brooke, the publisher of Concrete Wave, a skateboard lifestyle magazine based in Ontario, Canada. Indeed, the skate geezer is becoming something of a trope in popular culture. A recent satire in The Onion was headlined, “43-Year-Old With Skateboard Not Fooling Anyone,” complete with a close-up of Tony Hawk, the skateboarding superstar, looking a bit weathered in his helmet. Dave Carnie, the gonzo writer and former Johnny Knoxville sidekick on “Jackass,” introduced a line of decks with Tum Yeto skateboards called Fat Old Guy Skateboards to appeal to skaters who “just awoke from a coma and still think it’s 1984,” he said. And why not? Skateboarding itself is entering middle age. Like the older members of Generation X, the sport was born in the ’60s. The pioneers are now at an age when they’re paying off mortgages and their children’s college tuition. “Tony Alva and I have joked about it,” said Stacy Peralta,

It’s not only the parks that have become more forgiving. The skateboards themselves are now smoother and grown-up-friendly, thanks to a booming segment called longboards. Longboards are the luxury sedans of the skateboarding world. They are usually about 40 to 48 inches long, compared with traditional street decks, which are around 32 inches. Fitted with bigger, softer wheels to roll over sidewalk cracks and pebbles, they are built for cruising and carving, not tricks and aerials, and ap-

SOLUTION TO TODAY’S SUDOKU

ANSWER TO TODAY’S JUMBLE

SUDOKU IS ON C7

JUMBLE IS ON C7

Ivan Pierre Aguirre / The New York Times

Bill Robertson, 49, an associate professor, skates last month at the Carolina Skate Park in El Paso, Texas. Graying members of Generation X, and even their older brothers, are reclaiming their youth and rebellious streaks by hopping back on the skate deck.

who, along with Alva, was a member of the legendary ZBoys skate team in Venice, Calif., in the 1970s. As detailed in Peralta’s 2001 documentary “Dogtown and Z-Boys,” they would sneak into unoccupied suburban homes and drain swimming pools to skate in them. “When we were kids, it was so new, we could never imagine doing this when we were 50,” he said. “The idea that my dad could be doing the same thing I was doing in a swimming pool was unheard of.” But now Peralta is 52, the father of a 21-year-old son, and he is doing precisely that, spending his weekends at a state-of-the-art skate park near his Santa Monica, Calif., home. “It’s got beautiful transitions and voluptuous shapes, unlike the dangerous pools we rode as kids,” Peralta said. “They finally figured out how to design a skateboard park that is forgiving to middle-aged men.”

Longboards

ANSWER TO TODAY’S LAT CROSSWORD

CROSSWORD IS ON C7

peal to riders who no longer risk broken bones by grinding rails and ollying curbs, as they did as teenagers. “It’s like snowboarding,” said Brian Petrie, the founder of Earthwing, a skateboard company based in New York. “Anyone can learn to push, turn and stop in no time.” Leading longboard manufacturers like Honey Skateboards of Colorado, Bustin Boards of New York and Original Skateboards of New Jersey report a surge in sales among older riders. That corresponds to a noticeable graying of the skateboard demographic. The number of skateboarders over 35 has nearly doubled in the past decade, to 742,000, from 404,000, and now accounts for 10 percent of the market, according to the National Sport-

ing Goods Association, a trade group in Mount Prospect, Ill. Even though longboards are more forgiving to older riders, the feeling they inspire is one of eternal youth, devotees said. A skateboard has a countercultural appeal that a single-speed bike or a tennis racket does not. It is a talisman of youthful rebellion, a rude gesture to Ward Cleaver responsibility.

Bad-boy image Many middle-aged skaters grew up reading about the outlaw exploits of skaters like the Z-Boys. And while they may not have sneaked into backyard swimming pools themselves, the sport’s subversive bad-boy ethos became as ingrained as the scars on a veteran skater’s elbows. As ev-

ery high schooler knows, skaters have always been the teenage thrill-junkies who tended toward punk rock, tattoos and C-minuses. Decades later, that renegade spirit lingers for middleaged cubicle captives who return to the fold. Their comeback ride is like the scene in “Easy Rider” where Billy and Captain America remove their watches and toss them roadside. “When you step on a board, all of your muscles are firing at the same time to do one thing,” said Chadd Hall, a 39-yearold information technology manager in Atlanta who slips out of work at lunch to ride his 39-inch Rayne skateboard. “You don’t have a whole lot of time to think about all the things that make up a 40-year-

old’s life: how the kids are doing in school, all the different people at work coming at you needing something. All of that fades away.” The anti-authority mystique is not lost on Joe Borress, 41, a contractor from Greenwich, Conn., who took up skateboarding two years ago and now commutes from Grand Central Terminal to his office in SoHo on a 38-inch Bustin Maestro. “Skateboarding has that association: youth, punk, rebel,” he said. “It has that connotation of being bad.” It’s not just men. Annie Messick, a 36-year-old housewife in Gulf Breeze, Fla., who took up longboarding last year, put it this way: “It is my mellow that I have been seeking for all my life.” That mellow, it should be noted, is not without a price. Don Bailey, a news technology manager for a television station in Atlanta, occasionally shows up at work with a limp. Colleagues don’t bother asking anymore. “I found out the asphalt is much harder,” said Bailey, who is at the older end of the skategeezer spectrum at 53. “You’re skinned up, with skinned elbows, so you stop at CVS on the way home and buy bandages, cover up as best as you can before wife sees it.” For those who ride in packs, skateboarding is not just a rebellion against age but also against middle-age isolation. The sport affords skaters in their 40s and older a chance to hang out with buddies in a way they have not since they married and had children. More than once, Gary Saenz, a 52-year-old quality-assurance specialist in Germantown, Md., has been skating in an industrial park or new housing development when a police cruiser has rolled up ominously. Bracing for a tense standoff with The Man, he usually just gets a quizzical look. “They realize I’m not a teenager,” he said, “just an overweight dude with gray hair.”


SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 NBA, D3 NHL, D3 Motor sports, D3

D

MLB, D4 Prep sports, D5 Golf, D6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

PREP GOLF: STATE PREVIEW

RUNNING Locals win at Redmond races REDMOND — Dan Poet, of Redmond, won the 5-kilometer race and Lucas Alberg, of Bend, placed first in the 10K at the Miles for Mothers event, staged Saturday at American Legion Park and along the Dry Canyon Trail. The event was a benefit for WaterCup Counseling Service, which provides assistance to mothers in crisis. A total of more than 130 participants posted finishing times, which are listed in today’s Scoreboard section on D2.

Mountain View golfer succeeds by going it alone • The Cougars’ only varsity player has a chance to shine in Class 5A Inside

By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

Central Oregon storylines abound in the upcoming high school state golf tournaments. Summit High’s girls golf team will go after its fourth consecutive Class 5A state title on Monday and Tuesday at Trysting Tree Golf Club in Corvallis. Summit freshman Madison Odiorne is expected to contend for 5A medalist honors in her first year of high school golf. And Bend High could very well give Central Oregon a 1-2 team finish. If you’re a local golf fan, though, don’t for-

• A look at all the area golfers competing in state tournaments, D5

get to look for Mountain View senior Hailey Ostrom in the overall standings. Playing as an individual at state for the second consecutive year, Ostrom, the lone Central Oregonian to defeat Odiorne this season, is a dark horse to win the 5A individual crown following a breakout regular season. See State / D5

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Mountain View golfer Hailey Ostrom hits practice balls at Bend’s Awbrey Glen Golf Club on Friday afternoon. Ostrom will be the sole representative for the Cougars at the upcoming Class 5A state tournament in Corvallis.

— Bulletin staff report

TENNIS GOLF COMMENTARY

LOCAL SPORTS Federer wins on blue clay MADRID — Roger Federer will play for his third Madrid Open title with a chance to take over the No. 2 spot in the world ranking after cruising past Janko Tipsarevic 6-2, 6-3 in the tournament semifinals on Saturday. The Swiss star and former No. 1 advanced to a finals matchup against Tomas Berdych, who edged Juan Martin del Potro 7-6 (5), 7-6 (6) in the other semifinal. A victory will push Federer ahead of Spain’s Rafael Nadal in the rankings. “It’s going to be a tough match,” said Federer. “Berdych is playing well himself. It’s quick conditions and he can be a big threat in the finals like that.” While both Rafael Nadal and top-ranked Novak Djokovic vowed to never again play on Madrid’s new blue-clay court after early exits, Federer’s more technical style has not been overly hampered by a surface many players have criticized as slippery. On the women’s side, Serena Williams will meet top-ranked Victoria Azarenka in the final after each won their semifinal matchups in straight sets.

How to find an instructor ZACK HALL

W Photos by Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Above, fans cheer after a goal in a game between teams from Sisters and Canby on one of the fields behind Sisters High School on Saturday during the Sisters Annual Lacrosse Invitational. Below, Sisters fans cheer for their high school’s varsity team during the High Desert League title game against Summit on Friday night at Sisters High School.

A lot of lacrosse

—The Associated Press

NBA PLAYOFFS First round Lakers Nuggets • Lakers win series, 4-3

96 87

Conference semifinals Celtics 92 76ers 91 • Celtics lead series, 1-0

Lakers survive against Nuggets Los Angeles tops Denver in Game 7 to advance, D3

• Thousands of players and spectators descend upon Sisters for an annual invitational By Amanda Miles The Bulletin

SISTERS — Thanks to thousands of lacrosse players and enthusiasts, the town of Sisters practically tripled in size this weekend. An estimated 1,400 players and 2,600 supporters converged on the athletic fields of Sisters High School, Sisters Middle School and Reed Stadium for the Sisters Annual Lacrosse Invitational, a two-day tournament that began on Friday afternoon and concluded Satur-

day evening. The tournament, often referred to by its acronym of SALI, is now in its eighth year, according to Andrew Gorayeb, chair of Outlaws Lacrosse and the Sisters High School junior varsity head coach. Outlaws Lacrosse, along with the Sisters Park and Recreation District, manages youth lacrosse in Sisters and the SALI tournament. SALI has grown from humble beginnings. The original tournament — not yet christened SALI — began when Sis-

ters varsity coach Bill Rexford brought in a handful of high school boys teams from Southern Oregon and the Willamette Valley. Over the years, the invitational expanded, drawing 61 teams this year. Many hailed from the Willamette Valley and Portland areas, while programs from Bend, Mountain View, Summit, Harney County, Sisters, Redmond and Hermiston represented the east side of the Cascades. Squads from Washington and Nevada also competed. See Lacrosse / D5

BEACH VOLLEYBALL

Motherhood a big change for Walsh in her third Olympic try Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant shoots over Denver Nuggets guard Arron Afflalo on Saturday.

NHL PLAYOFFS Rangers join NHL’s final four New York defeats Washington 2-1 to reach conference finals, D3

By Jimmy Golen The Associated Press

Preparing for this Olympics is different for Kerri Walsh because this time she has two kids tagging along on her training. The U.S. beach volleyball star now has a son for each of her Olympic gold medals. Although she brings Joey and Sundance along for tournaments and training whenever possible, when she does have to leave them

behind it’s an emotional struggle she didn’t have when training for Athens or Beijing. “It’s a whole different world,” said Walsh, who’s married to fellow beach volleyball pro Casey Jennings. “Joey understands that when Mommy and Daddy go to work, we have to go to the beach. And we always have to wear sunscreen. They’ve been really good sports. “ See Motherhood / D5

Natacha Pisarenko / The Associated Press

Kerri Walsh, left, and Misty May-Treanor, right, kiss their gold medals during the medal ceremony for women’s beach volleyball at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing. Walsh has had two children since the last Olympics.

e all know the path to getting better at golf: seek professional advice and practice often. Just about any golfer — this side of Bubba Watson, anyway — agrees on that. Yet searching for the right instructor can be daunting. In Central Oregon alone, the PGA of America lists 73 PGAcertified golf professionals living or working in the area (not all are active teaching professionals). That is a lot of names. And not one of them can guarantee that they will be a perfect match for every student. “Sometimes you’ll click with a student and other times maybe the communication is not there,” says Bob Garza, the director of instruction at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend. Lessons are no insignificant investment at around $50 or $60 per hour. But once a golfer has decided to seek instruction, where should he or she go to find a golf pro who will lead their game to new heights? Well, a few Central Oregon golf pros have some tips. • Start by asking around. A golf pro’s reputation, no matter how well deserved, is no surefire way to find a good fit. Asking fellow golfers who have personal experience with an instructor will offer more insight, says Bruce Wattenburger, the head pro at Juniper Golf Club in Redmond. “Talk to your buddies who play and see who they have gone to and who has helped them,” Wattenburger says. “That is how you get going.” Just how common is this approach? “Most of my business is word of mouth,” Garza says. “It’s sort of a word-of-mouth area here.” Dan Ostrin, head professional at Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend, agrees. And once you have focused in on a pro or two, try to initiate a conversation. “Usually it comes down to personalities,” Ostrin says. “If you can find a guy that you find enjoyable to talk with, then that will lead to probably somebody you would like to take a lesson from.” • Discover what kind of learning you prefer. Ostrin cites three basic types of ways to learn golf: visually, by listening, and by feel. See Instructor / D6


D2

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

O  A TELEVISION

SCOREBOARD

Today SOCCER 12:30 a.m.: Beach soccer, Sao Paulo vs. Seattle Sounders (same-day tape), Root Sports. 6:30 a.m.: English Premier League, Manchester City vs. Queens Park Rangers, ESPN2. 7 a.m.: English Premier League, Sunderland vs. Manchester United, FX. HOCKEY 6 a.m.: International Ice Hockey Federation World Championships, USA vs. Finland, NBC Sports Network. 5 p.m.: NHL playoffs, conference final, Los Angeles Kings at Phoenix Coyotes, NBC Sports Network. GOLF 9 a.m.: PGA Tour, The Players Championship, final round, Golf Channel. 11 a.m.: PGA Tour, The Players Championship, final round, NBC. BASKETBALL 10 a.m.: NBA playoffs, first round, Los Angeles Clippers at Memphis Grizzlies, ABC. 12:30 p.m.: NBA playoffs, conference semifinal, Indiana Pacers at Miami Heat, ABC. LACROSSE 10 a.m.: College men, NCAA tournament, first round, Princeton vs. Virginia, ESPN. BASEBALL 10 a.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at New York Yankees, Root Sports. 11 a.m.: MLB, Atlanta Braves at St. Louis Cardinals, TBS. 2 p.m.: College, USC at Oregon, Comcast SportsNet Northwest. 5 p.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Angels at Texas Rangers, ESPN. VOLLEYBALL Noon: U.S. Olympic Trials (taped), NBC Sports Network. RODEO 1 p.m.: Professional Bull Riders, Boise Invitational (taped), CBS. MOTOR SPORTS 2 p.m.: American Le Mans Series, Monterey, ESPN2. CYCLING 2 p.m.: Tour of California, Stage 1, NBC Sports Network. RUGBY 9 p.m.: Sevens World Series, England (taped), NBC Sports Network.

Monday SOCCER 1 p.m.: English Premier League, teams TBA (Taped), Root Sports. CYCLING 2 p.m.: Tour of California, Stage 2, NBC Sports Network. BASEBALL 4 p.m.: MLB, Chicago Cubs at St. Louis Cardinals, ESPN. 4 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Boston Red Sox, Root Sports. BASKETBALL 4 p.m.: NBA playoffs, conference semifinals, Philadelphia 76ers at Boston Celtics, TNT. 6:30 p.m.: NBA playoffs, conference semifinals, Los Angeles Lakers at Oklahoma City Thunder, TNT.

RADIO Today BASEBALL 11 a.m.: College, Oregon State at Utah, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

ON DECK Monday Baseball: Bend at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; Culver at East Linn Christian, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Culver at East Linn Christian, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Bend, 4 p.m.; Madras at Mountain View, 4:30 p.m. Boys golf: Class 6A state tourney at Emerald Valley in Creswell, 12:15 p.m.; Class 5A state tourney at Emerald Valley in Creswell, 7:30 a.m.; Class 4A state tourney at Quail Valley in Banks, 7:30 a.m. Girls golf: Class 6A state tourney at Trysting Tree in Corvallis, 12:15 p.m.; Class 5A state tourney at Trysting Tree in Corvallis, 7:30 a.m.; Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state tourney at Eagle Crest in Redmond, 8 a.m. Tuesday Boys golf: Class 6A state tourney at Emerald Valley in Creswell, 12:15 p.m.; Class 5A state tourney at Emerald Valley in Creswell, 7:30 a.m.; Class 4A state tourney at Quail Valley in Banks, 7:30 a.m. Girls golf: Class 6A state tourney at Trysting Tree in Corvallis, 12:15 p.m.; Class 5A state tourney at Trysting Tree in Corvallis, 7:30 a.m.; Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state tourney at Eagle Crest in Redmond, 8 a.m. Wednesday Track and field: Redmond at Class 6A Central Valley Conference championships in Keizer, 3 p.m. Baseball: Clackamas at Summit, 4 p.m. Softball: Redmond at Clackamas, 3 p.m. Thursday Baseball: Kennedy at Culver, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Kennedy at Culver, 4:30 p.m. Track and field: Sisters, La Pine at Sky-Em League championships in Sweet Home, TBA Boys tennis: Class 5A state tourney in Beaverton, 9 a.m.; Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state tourney in Eugene, 5 p.m. Girls tennis: Class 5A state tourney in Beaverton, 9 a.m.; Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state tourney in Eugene, 5 p.m. Friday Track and field: Class 2A, 1A state meets in Monmouth, 11 a.m.; Redmond at Class 6A Central Valley Conference championships in Keizer, 3:30 p.m.; Bend, Mountain View, Summit at Class 5A Special District 1 Championships in Bend, TBD; Madras at Tri-Valley Championships in Molalla, TBA; Crook County at Greater Oregon League championships in La Grande, 3 p.m. Boys tennis: Class 5A state tourney in Beaverton, 9 a.m.; Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state tourney in Eugene, 8 a.m. Girls tennis: Class 6A, 5A state tourneys in Beaverton, 9 a.m.; Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state tourney in Eugene, 8 a.m.

RUNNING Local Miles for Mothers Saturday, Redmond Place, name, town, time 5K 1, Dan Poet, Redmond, 22:02.2. 2, Joe McCook, Redmond, 22:12.5. 3, Ashley Bruce, Redmond, 22:29.4. 4, Rachel Poet, Redmond, 22:30.6. 5, Stephanie Hicks, Bend, 22:53.3, 6, Sam Erickson, Redmond, 23:13.7. 7, Brittyn Rond, Bend, 23:24.3. 8, Caleb Stewart, Redmond, 23:51.1. 9, Delray Rhoan, Culver, 23:58.0. 10, Teddy Tsai, Redmond, 23:58.5. 11, Cullen Dallas, Bend, 24:19.5. 12, Walt Carter, Prineville, 24:51.5. 13, Finn Anspach, Crooked River, 25:00.3. 14, Linda Anspach, Crooked River, 25:00.7. 15, Cody Decamp, Redmond, 25:02.0. 16, Rose Land, Redmond, 25:14.2. 17, Anna Land, Redmond, 25:14.5. 18, Michaela Wolff, Redmond, 26:11.6. 19, Anita Duren, Redmond, 26:16.0. 20, David Dallas, Bend, 26:21.6. 21, Luis Serna, Culver, 26:29.3. 22, Nicky Tsai, Redmond, 26:40.3. 23, Taj Smith, Redmond, 26:52.7. 24, Mary Dallas, Bend, 27:08.2. 25, Chase Anspach, Crooked River, 27:17.9. 26, Gena Huff, Redmond, 27:18.2. 27, Allison Emerson, Bend, 27:27.6. 28, Joe Decamp, Redmond, 28:01.0. 29, Linda Holland, Redmond, 28:06.2. 30, Gabe Caudell, Redmond, 28:20.0. 31, Mark Mahnke, Redmond, 28:36.8. 32, Danielle Duren, Redmond, 28:39.4. 33, Abbi Mahnke, Redmond, 28:39.9. 34, Branegan Dixon, Redmond, 28:50.8. 35, Gage Decamp, Redmond, 28:58.2. 36, Summer Beagle, Bend, 28:59.0. 37, Dale Brert, Bend, 28:59.3. 38, Jenniffer Smith, Bend, 29:03.0. 39, Jake Decamp, Redmond, 29:26.0. 40, Elizabeth McCook, Redmond, 29:33.5. 41, Megan McCook, Redmond, 29:34.0. 42, Nathan Mueller, Redmond, 30:20.0. 43, Dakota Quattlebum, Redmond, 30:20.4. 44, Annie McCauley, Redmond, 30:23.1. 45, Stacey Durden, Redmond, 30:32.2. 46, Krista Dowding, Redmond, 30:37.4. 47, Eileen Fahlgren, Terrebonne, 30:37.9. 48, Tina Decamp, Redmond, 31:21.6. 49, Alex Robertson, Redmond, 31:22.9. 50, Robin Robertson, Redmond, 31:23.2. 51, Lisa Hardin, Powell Butte, 31:26.0. 52, Dave Felton, Bend, 32:16.4. 53, Donna Senner, Powell Butte, 32:36.8. 54, Luana Moore, Redmond, 33:50.1. 55, Phil Emerson, Bend, 34:12.4. 56, Jill Dubisar, Redmond, 34:55.9. 57, Jeff Anspach, Crooked River, 35:01.5. 58, Susan Fitch, Redmond, 36:33.6. 59, Ed Fitch, Redmond, 36:38.9. 60, Annamarie Farrell, Sisters, 37:54.1. 61, Colin Mahnke, Redmond, 37:54.4. 62, Keri Johns, Redmond, 38:00.4. 63, Nathan Yordy, Redmond, 38:23.1. 64, Jenni Rettig, Redmond, 39:19.0. 65, Karis Mahnke, Redmond, 39:19.6. 66, Olivia Lowe, Redmond, 39:59.1. 67, Caprial Hope Longs, Redmond, 39:59.4. 68, Lulu Tsai, Redmond, 40:22.2. 69, Sarah Norrie, Redmond, 41:13.8. 70, Jeweliann Norrie, Redmond, 41:14.1. 71, Karen Cooper, Redmond, 41:21.2. 72, Alli Mahnke, Redmond, 41:26.4. 73, Quinn Clark, Redmond, 41:26.6. 74, Marci Campbell, Redmond, 41:46.3. 75, Amber Stoltz, Culver, 43:08.8. 76, David Cooper, Redmond, 43:14.5. 77, Carla Rice-Smith, Bend, 44:52.0. 78, Laurie Jarvis, Redmond, 44:52.3. 79, Rebecca Vallie, Redmond, 45:23.8. 80, Cat Zwicker, Redmond, 45:24.1. 81, Holly McLane, Powell Butte, 49:12.5. 82, Mike McLane, Powell Butte, 49:13.6. 83, Gloria Davis, Redmond, 49:33.6. 84, Cathy Beach, Redmond, 49:33.9. 85, Roberto Fuentes, Redmond, 50:55.7. 86, Mike Spurgeon, Redmond, 50:56.0. 87, Avery Carlson, Redmond, 51:15.2. 88, Kaylene Cooper, Redmond, 51:15.5. 89, Miranda McRae, Redmond, 51:15.7. 90, Holly Mahnke, Redmond, 51:39.6. 91, Elisa Carlson, Redmond, 51:40.9. 92, Michelle McRae, Redmond, 51:41.8. 93, Cathy Moore, Redmond, 59:22.4. 94, Valarie Webb, Redmond, 59:22.7. 95, Willis Roberts, Prineville, 1:00:38.8. 96, Patricia Roberts, Prineville, 1:00:40.3. 97, Lyne Lange, 1:10:30.3. 10K 1, Lucas Alberg, Bend, 35:02.8. 2, Gary Bruce, Redmond, 40:42.4. 3, Jim Perry, Redmond, 41:35.4. 4, Scott Abrams, Bend, 41:49.6. 5, John Holland, Redmond, 42:34.3. 6, Julie O’Neill, Redmond, 42:49.7. 7, Elizabeth Thompson, Redmond, 45:04.7. 8, Pat Shields, Redmond, 48:39.4. 9, Kimberly Swanson, Bend, 50:24.2. 10, Gregg Swanson, Bend, 50:28.9. 11, Pam Irby, Terrebonne, 51:17.0. 12, Diane Yensen, Bend, 52:34.4. 13, Connie Heim, Crooked River, 55:09.6. 14, Daniel Murphy, Redmond, 56:20.6. 15, April Lewis, Redmond, 56:25.9. 16, Jay Lilly, Redmond, 57:06.5. 17, Nancy Morris, Redmond,

58:16.9. 18, Denise Deleone, Crooked River, 59:58.3. 19, Wendy Miller, Bend, 1:00:11.6. 20, Leslie Povey, Redmond, 1:01:02.8. 21, Donna Lilly, Redmond, 1:01:13.0. 22, Chris Heim, Crooked River, 1:02:58.8. 23, Denny Irby, Terrebonne, 1:03:21.6. 24, Vicki Stoltz, Redmond, 1:03:21.9. 25, Lew Hollander, Redmond 1:07:10.8. 26, Kari Sieler, Redmond, 1:10:11.9. 27, Amber Chenault, Redmond, 1:11:00.2. 28, Chris Brophy, Bend, 1:15:35.8. 29, Linda Bafford, Sisters, 1:20:39.6. 30, Amy Hagenbach, Terrebonne, 1:23:54.2. 31, Madison Holsey, Redmond, 1:31:56.6. 32, Judi Holsey, Redmond, 1:32:02.9. 33, Treana Holsey, Redmond, 1:32:03.1. 34, Roberta Shirley, Crooked River, 1:40:22.8.

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION NBA Playoff Glance All Times PDT ——— FIRST ROUND (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Philadelphia 4, Chicago 2 Saturday, April 28: Chicago 103, Philadelphia 91 Tuesday, May 1: Philadelphia 109, Chicago 92 Friday, May 4: Philadelphia 79, Chicago 74 Sunday, May 6: Philadelphia 89, Chicago 82 Tuesday, May 8: Chicago 77, Philadelphia 69 Thursday, May 10: Philadelphia 79, Chicago 78 Miami 4, New York 1 Saturday, April 28: Miami 100, New York 67 Monday, April 30: Miami 104, New York 94 Thursday, May 3: Miami 87, New York 70 Sunday, May 6: New York 89, Miami 87 Wednesday, May 9: Miami 106, New York 94 Indiana 4, Orlando 1 Saturday, April 28: Orlando 81, Indiana 77 Monday, April 30: Indiana 93, Orlando 78 Wednesday, May 2: Indiana 97, Orlando 74 Saturday, May 5: Indiana 101, Orlando 99, OT Tuesday, May 8: Indiana 105, Orlando 87 Boston 4, Atlanta 2 Sunday, April 29: Atlanta 83, Boston 74 Tuesday, May 1: Boston 87, Atlanta 80 Friday, May 4: Boston 90, Atlanta 84, OT Sunday, May 6: Boston 101, Atlanta 79 Tuesday, May 8: Atlanta 87, Boston 86 Thursday, May 10: Boston 83, Atlanta 80 WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 4, Utah 0 Sunday, April 29: San Antonio 106, Utah 91 Wednesday, May 2: San Antonio 114, Utah 83 Saturday, May 5: San Antonio 102, Utah 90 Monday, May 7: San Antonio 87, Utah 81 Oklahoma City 4, Dallas 0 Saturday, April 28: Oklahoma City 99, Dallas 98 Monday, April 30: Oklahoma City 102, Dallas 99 Thursday, May 3: Oklahoma City 95, Dallas 79 Saturday, May 5: Oklahoma City 103, Dallas 97 L.A. Lakers 4, Denver 3 Sunday, April 29: L.A. Lakers 103, Denver 88 Tuesday, May 1: L.A. Lakers 104, Denver 100 Friday, May 4: Denver 99, L.A. Lakers 84 Sunday, May 6: L.A. Lakers 92, Denver 88 Tuesday, May 8: Denver 102, L.A. Lakers 99 Thursday, May 10: Denver 113, L.A. Lakers 96 Saturday, May 12: L.A. Lakers 96, Denver 87 L.A. Clippers 3, Memphis 3 Sunday, April 29: L.A. Clippers 99, Memphis 98 Wednesday, May 2: Memphis 105, L.A. Clippers 98 Saturday, May 5: L.A. Clippers 87, Memphis 86 Monday, May 7: L.A. Clippers 101, Memphis 97, OT Wednesday, May 9: Memphis 92, L.A. Clippers 80 Friday, May 11: Memphis 90, L.A. Clippers 88 Today, May 13: L.A. Clippers at Memphis, 10 a.m. ——— CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Boston 1, Philadelphia 0 Saturday, May 12: Boston 92, 76ers 91 Monday, May 14: Philadelphia at Boston, 4 p.m. Wednesday, May 16: Boston at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Friday, May 18: Boston at Philadelphia, TBD x-Monday, May 21: Philadelphia at Boston, TBD x-Wednesday, May 23: Boston at Philadelphia, TBD x-Saturday, May 26: Philadelphia at Boston, TBD Indiana vs. Miami Today, May 13: Indiana at Miami, 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 15: Indiana at Miami, 4 p.m. Thursday, May 17: Miami at Indiana, TBD Sunday, May 20: Miami at Indiana, 12:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 22: Indiana at Miami, TBD x-Thursday, May 24: Miami at Indiana, TBD x-Saturday, May 26: Indiana at Miami, TBD WESTERN CONFERENCE L.A. Lakers vs. Oklahoma City Monday, May 14: L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 16: L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City 6:30 p.m. Friday, May 18: Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, TBD Saturday, May 19: Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, TBD x-Monday, May 21: L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, TBD x-Wednesday, May 23: Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, TBD x-Sunday, May 27: L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, TBD Saturday’s Summaries

Celtics 92, 76ers 91 PHILADELPHIA (91) Iguodala 7-16 2-2 19, Brand 2-5 0-2 4, Hawes 612 3-4 15, Holiday 3-13 2-2 8, Turner 7-13 2-2 16, T.Young 1-4 3-6 5, L.Allen 5-7 2-2 12, L.Williams 4-11 0-0 9, Meeks 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 36-82 14-20 91. BOSTON (92) Pierce 3-11 8-8 14, Bass 4-9 2-2 10, Garnett 1220 5-5 29, Rondo 6-15 1-2 13, Bradley 4-11 0-0 8, R.Allen 4-10 2-2 12, Stiemsma 0-0 0-0 0, Hollins 1-2 0-0 2, Dooling 2-2 0-0 4, Pietrus 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 36-82 18-19 92. Philadelphia 28 19 24 20 — 91 Boston 18 24 25 25 — 92 3-Point Goals—Philadelphia 5-14 (Iguodala 35, Meeks 1-1, L.Williams 1-4, Holiday 0-4), Boston 2-18 (R.Allen 2-7, Pierce 0-2, Pietrus 0-2, Rondo 0-3, Bradley 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Philadelphia 49 (Turner 10), Boston 50 (Rondo 12). Assists—Philadelphia 19 (Iguodala 6), Boston 28 (Rondo 17). Total Fouls—Philadelphia 15, Boston 16. A—18,624 (18,624).

Lakers 96, Nuggets 87 DENVER (87) Gallinari 1-9 0-0 3, Faried 3-5 0-0 6, Mozgov 11 0-0 2, Lawson 11-19 0-2 24, Afflalo 6-11 2-2 15, Miller 1-10 1-1 3, McGee 1-7 4-6 6, Harrington 9-18 3-3 24, Brewer 2-9 0-0 4. Totals 35-89 10-14 87. L.A. LAKERS (96) World Peace 5-15 1-2 15, Gasol 9-19 5-5 23, Bynum 4-15 8-11 16, Sessions 2-8 0-1 4, Bryant 7-16 1-4 17, Hill 1-4 0-0 2, Blake 7-11 0-0 19, Barnes 0-1 0-0 0, Ebanks 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 35-89 15-23 96. Denver 24 18 26 19 — 87 L.A. Lakers 25 23 21 27 — 96 3-Point Goals—Denver 7-26 (Harrington 3-10, Lawson 2-6, Gallinari 1-3, Afflalo 1-3, Miller 0-1,

Brewer 0-3), L.A. Lakers 11-24 (Blake 5-6, World Peace 4-11, Bryant 2-2, Barnes 0-1, Sessions 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Denver 63 (McGee 14), L.A. Lakers 57 (Bynum 18). Assists—Denver 23 (Miller 8), L.A. Lakers 22 (Bryant 8). Total Fouls— Denver 21, L.A. Lakers 20. A—18,997 (18,997).

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) ——— CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE N.Y. Rangers 4, Washington 3 Saturday, April 28: NY Rangers 3, Washington 1 Monday, April 30: Washington 3, NY Rangers 2 Wednesday, May 2: NY Rangers 2, Washington 1, 3OT Saturday, May 5: Washington 3, NY Rangers 2 Monday, May 7: NY Rangers 3, Washington 2, OT Wednesday, May 9: Washington 2, NY Rangers 1 Saturday, May 12: NY Rangers 2, Washington 1 New Jersey 4, Philadelphia 1 Sunday, April 29: Philadelphia 4, New Jersey 3, OT Tuesday, May 1: New Jersey 4, Philadelphia 1 Thursday, May 3: New Jersey 4, Philadelphia 3, OT Sunday, May 6: New Jersey 4, Philadelphia 2 Tuesday, May 8: New Jersey 3, Philadelphia 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Phoenix 4, Nashville 1 Friday, April 27: Phoenix 4, Nashville 3, OT Sunday, April 29: Phoenix 5, Nashville 3 Wednesday, May 2: Nashville 2, Phoenix 0 Friday, May 4: Phoenix 1, Nashville 0 Monday, May 7: Phoenix 2, Nashville 1 Los Angeles 4, St. Louis 0 Saturday, April 28: Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 1 Monday, April 30: Los Angeles 5, St. Louis 2 Thursday, May 3: Los Angeles 4, St. Louis 2 Sunday, May 6: Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 1 CONFERENCE FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Monday, May 14: New Jersey at NY Rangers, 5 p.m. Wednesday, May 16: New Jersey at NY Rangers, 5 p.m. Saturday, May 19: NY Rangers at New Jersey, 10 a.m. Monday, May 21: NY Rangers at New Jersey, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 23: New Jersey at NY Rangers, 5 p.m. x-Friday, May 25: NY Rangers at New Jersey, 5 p.m. x-Sunday, May 27: New Jersey at NY Rangers, 5 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Phoenix vs. Los Angeles Today, May 13: Los Angeles at Phoenix, 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 15: Los Angeles at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Thursday, May 17: Phoenix at Los Angeles, 6 p.m. Sunday, May 20: Phoenix at Los Angeles, noon x-Tuesday, May 22: Los Angeles at Phoenix, 6 p.m. x-Thursday, May 24: Phoenix at Los Angeles, 6 p.m. x-Saturday, May 26: Los Angeles at Phoenix, 5 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts GF Sporting Kansas City 7 3 0 21 13 New York 6 3 1 19 20 D.C. 5 4 3 18 20 Chicago 4 2 3 15 11 New England 4 6 0 12 12 Montreal 3 5 3 12 12 Houston 3 3 2 11 8 Columbus 3 4 2 11 8 Philadelphia 2 5 1 7 5 Toronto FC 0 8 0 0 6 Western Conference W L T Pts GF Real Salt Lake 8 3 2 26 19 San Jose 7 2 1 22 21 Seattle 7 2 1 22 13 Vancouver 5 3 2 17 10 Colorado 5 5 0 15 15 FC Dallas 3 6 3 12 11 Los Angeles 3 5 2 11 12 Chivas USA 3 6 0 9 5 Portland 2 5 2 8 9 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Saturday’s Games Montreal 1, Los Angeles 1, tie Houston 1, D.C. United 0 New England 4, Vancouver 1 Columbus 2, FC Dallas 1 Chicago 2, Sporting Kansas City 1 Real Salt Lake 1, Seattle FC 0 Today’s Games New York at Philadelphia, 9:30 a.m. Chivas USA at San Jose, 4 p.m.

GA 7 14 16 10 13 16 9 11 9 18 GA 12 11 4 11 12 18 15 11 13

BASEBALL College Pacific-12 Conference All Times PDT ——— Conference W L Oregon 17 8 Arizona 15 8 UCLA 14 9 Arizona St. 14 10 Stanford 13 10 Oregon St. 12 11 Washington 11 12 Washington St. 9 13 California 9 14 USC 7 14 Utah 7 19 Saturday’s Games Utah 4, Oregon State 3 (11 innings) Arizona 4, California 1 UCLA 11, Washington 3 Oregon 4, USC 3 Stanford 8, Washington State 3 x-Arizona State 10, Gonzaga 1 Today’s Games Oregon State at Utah, 11 a.m. Arizona at California, 1 p.m. x-Arizona State at Gonzaga, 1 p.m. UCLA at Washington, 1 p.m. Washington State at Stanford, 1 p.m. USC at Oregon, 2 p.m. x-nonleague

All Games W L 36 14 32 15 34 13 31 17 31 14 31 17 26 20 24 22 25 21 22 22 13 34

TENNIS Professional Madrid Open Saturday At Caja Magica Madrid, Spain Purse: Men, $4 million, (WT1000); Women, $4 million (Premier) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men

Semifinals Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic, def. Juan Martin del Potro (10), Argentina, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (6). Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def. Janko Tipsarevic (7), Serbia, 6-2, 6-3. Women Semifinals Victoria Azarenka (1), Belarus, def. Agnieszka Radwanska (4), Poland, 6-2, 6-4. Serena Williams (9), United States, def. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, 7-6 (5), 6-0.

GOLF PGA Tour The Players Championship Saturday At TPC Sawgrass, Players Stadium Course Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Purse: $9.5 million Yardage: 7,215; Par 72 Third Round Kevin Na 67-69-68—204 Matt Kuchar 68-68-69—205 Rickie Fowler 72-69-66—207 Ben Curtis 68-71-70—209 Zach Johnson 70-66-73—209 Jhonattan Vegas 68-74-68—210 Brian Davis 68-70-72—210 Jonathan Byrd 68-70-72—210 Martin Laird 65-73-72—210 Johnson Wagner 69-73-69—211 Bo Van Pelt 71-70-70—211 Blake Adams 66-73-72—211 Charlie Wi 71-67-73—211 Sergio Garcia 73-71-68—212 David Mathis 72-71-69—212 Carl Pettersson 71-72-69—212 Phil Mickelson 71-71-70—212 Martin Kaymer 73-69-70—212 Jeff Maggert 70-71-71—212 Ian Poulter 65-76-71—212 Tim Clark 71-70-71—212 Jimmy Walker 71-70-71—212 Brendon de Jonge 69-71-72—212 Kevin Streelman 72-68-72—212 Kevin Stadler 68-71-73—212 Adam Scott 68-70-74—212 Harrison Frazar 68-76-69—213 John Rollins 72-72-69—213 Geoff Ogilvy 70-73-70—213 Henrik Stenson 71-71-71—213 John Huh 75-66-72—213 Luke Donald 72-69-72—213 Bill Haas 68-71-74—213 Bryce Molder 72-72-70—214 Pat Perez 69-75-70—214 Brian Gay 71-72-71—214 Chris Couch 72-71-71—214 Spencer Levin 74-68-72—214 Tiger Woods 74-68-72—214 Jim Furyk 72-70-72—214 Tom Gillis 70-71-73—214 Michael Thompson 68-71-75—214 Peter Hanson 73-71-71—215 Kris Blanks 69-74-72—215 Sung Kang 75-68-72—215 Ricky Barnes 74-69-72—215 Lee Westwood 71-70-74—215 Chris Kirk 71-73-72—216 Alvaro Quiros 72-72-72—216 Trevor Immelman 72-72-72—216 David Toms 69-74-73—216 Marc Leishman 73-70-73—216 Keegan Bradley 72-70-74—216 Ryan Moore 69-72-75—216 Harris English 70-67-79—216 Justin Leonard 75-68-74—217 Nick Watney 71-70-76—217 Brian Harman 73-68-76—217 J.J. Henry 71-73-74—218 Bob Estes 73-69-76—218 Josh Teater 71-71-76—218 Justin Rose 76-68-75—219 Robert Allenby 72-72-75—219 Graham DeLaet 71-73-76—220 Robert Karlsson 70-74-76—220 Jason Dufner 73-71-76—220 David Hearn 69-75-77—221 Cameron Tringale 73-71-77—221 Rod Pampling 71-72-78—221 Heath Slocum 73-70-78—221 Stewart Cink 71-72-78—221 George McNeill 70-73-82—225

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR Sprint Cup Bojangles’ Southern 500 Saturday At Darlington Raceway Darlington, S.C. Lap length: 1.366 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (2) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 368 laps, 141.1 rating, 48 points, $319,786. 2. (8) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 368, 116.4, 43, $238,656. 3. (17) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 368, 103.1, 41, $209,415. 4. (5) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 368, 120.9, 41, $178,123. 5. (6) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 368, 117.2, 40, $147,554. 6. (19) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 368, 96.7, 38, $154,776. 7. (7) Carl Edwards, Ford, 368, 104.8, 37, $145,906. 8. (3) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 368, 108.8, 37, $108,790. 9. (28) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 368, 74.8, 35, $130,748. 10. (21) Joey Logano, Toyota, 368, 90.6, 34, $104,715. 11. (26) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 368, 86.1, 33, $120,969. 12. (1) Greg Biffle, Ford, 368, 115.4, 33, $107,580. 13. (14) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 368, 76.4, 31, $100,705. 14. (9) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 368, 79.4, 30, $117,488. 15. (15) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 368, 75.9, 29, $124,725. 16. (23) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 368, 85.1, 28, $136,391. 17. (24) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 368, 75.9, 28, $96,930. 18. (10) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 368, 69.9, 26, $126,530. 19. (13) Aric Almirola, Ford, 368, 67.3, 25, $124,416. 20. (18) Mark Martin, Toyota, 368, 65.1, 24, $87,605. 21. (25) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 368, 87, 23, $110,063. 22. (31) Casey Mears, Ford, 367, 54.2, 22, $99,063. 23. (4) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 367, 79.1, 21, $125,263. 24. (27) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 366, 57, 20, $113,696. 25. (36) David Gilliland, Ford, 366, 54.5, 19, $94,913. 26. (20) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 366, 57, 19, $108,575. 27. (34) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 365, 51, 17, $78,255. 28. (37) David Ragan, Ford, 364, 38.7, 16, $90,152. 29. (22) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 364, 55.3, 15,

$88,680. 30. (42) Reed Sorenson, Ford, 363, 39.7, 0, $89,505. 31. (38) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 362, 44.5, 0, $76,980. 32. (33) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 362, 40.4, 12, $76,805. 33. (16) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 357, 70.9, 11, $121,480. 34. (11) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 345, 63.7, 10, $107,813. 35. (12) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 339, 80.9, 9, $124,466. 36. (41) David Reutimann, Toyota, 314, 43.4, 8, $84,380. 37. (43) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, clutch, 132, 32.5, 7, $75,915. 38. (39) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, vibration, 35, 30.9, 0, $75,682. 39. (32) David Stremme, Toyota, overheating, 32, 34.1, 5, $72,225. 40. (40) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, power steering, 27, 31.4, 0, $72,050. 41. (35) Mike Skinner, Toyota, electrical, 20, 29.6, 0, $71,875. 42. (29) Scott Speed, Ford, overheating, 20, 29.5, 2, $71,780. 43. (30) Josh Wise, Ford, vibration, 19, 27.3, 1, $72,139. ——— Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 133.802 mph. Time of Race: 3 hours, 45 minutes, 25 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.781 seconds. Caution Flags: 8 for 38 laps. Lead Changes: 22 among 8 drivers. Lap Leaders: G.Biffle 1-48; K.Kahne 49; J.Johnson 50; L.Cassill 51; Ky.Busch 52-72; G.Biffle 73-98; D.Hamlin 99-100; J.Johnson 101-172; Ky.Busch 173; J.Johnson 174-179; Ky.Busch 180-188; J.Johnson 189-194; Ky.Busch 195; D.Hamlin 196-199; K.Kahne 200-231; D.Hamlin 232-280; D.Earnhardt Jr. 281; M.Truex Jr. 282-298; D.Hamlin 299; M.Truex Jr. 300-307; J.Johnson 308-312; Ky.Busch 313-324; J.Johnson 325-368. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): J.Johnson, 6 times for 134 laps; G.Biffle, 2 times for 74 laps; D.Hamlin, 4 times for 56 laps; Ky.Busch, 5 times for 44 laps; K.Kahne, 2 times for 33 laps; M.Truex Jr., 2 times for 25 laps; D.Earnhardt Jr., 1 time for 1 lap; L.Cassill, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 12 in Points: 1. G.Biffle, 411; 2. M.Kenseth, 409; 3. D.Earnhardt Jr., 397; 4. D.Hamlin, 394; 5. J.Johnson, 372; 6. M.Truex Jr., 372; 7. T.Stewart, 369; 8. K.Harvick, 361; 9. Ky.Busch, 349; 10. C.Edwards, 337; 11. C.Bowyer, 335; 12. B.Keselowski, 328.

Formula 1 Spanish Grand Prix Lineup After Saturday qualifying; race today At Circuit de Catalunya Barcelona, Spain Lap length: 2.892 miles Third Session 1. Pastor Maldonado, Venezuela, Williams, 1 minute, 22.285 seconds. 2. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 1:22.302. 3. Romain Grosjean, Switzerland, Lotus, 1:22.424. 4. Kimi Raikkonen, Finland, Lotus, 1:22.487. 5. Sergio Perez, Mexico, Sauber, 1:22.533. 6. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 1:23.005. 7. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, No Time. 8. Michael Schumacher, Germany, Mercedes, No Time. 9. Kamui Kobayashi, Japan, Sauber, No Time. Eliminated after second session 10. Jenson Button, England, McLaren, 1:22.944. 11. Mark Webber, Australia, Red Bull, 1:22.977. 12. Paul di Resta, Scotland, Force India, 1:23.125. 13. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Force India, 1:23.177. 14. Jean-Eric Vergne, France, Toro Rosso, 1:23.265. 15. Daniel Ricciardo, Australia, Toro Rosso, 1:23.442. 16. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Ferrari, 1:23.444. Eliminated after first session 17. Bruno Senna, Brazil, Williams, 1:24.981. 18. Vitaly Petrov, Russia, Caterham, 1:25.277. 19. Heikki Kovalainen, Finland, Caterham, 1:25.507. 20. Charles Pic, France, Marussia, 1:26.582. 21. Timo Glock, Germany, Marussia, 1:27.032. 22. Pedro de la Rosa, Spain, HRT, 1:27.555. 23. Narain Karthikeyan, India, HRT, 1:31.122. 24. Lewis Hamilton, England, McLaren, 1:21.707.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Acquired LHP Mike Belfiore from Arizona to complete an earlier trade. Assigned Belfiore to Bowie (EL). Placed 3B Mark Reynolds on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 11. Selected the contract of INF-OF Bill Hall from Norfolk (IL). CLEVELAND INDIANS—Recalled RHP Zach McAllister from Columbus (IL). Placed RHP Josh Tomlin on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 8. Selected the contract of INF Jose Lopez from Columbus. Optioned INF Jason Donald to Columbus. Designated OF Nick Weglarz for assignment. KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Activated RHP Greg Holland from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Nate Adcock to Omaha (PCL). Agreed to terms with LHP Doug Davis on a minor league contract. National League CHICAGO CUBS—Placed RHP Carlos Marmol on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Casey Coleman from Iowa (PCL). CINCINNATI REDS—Placed 3B Scott Rolen on the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of 3B Mike Costanzo from Louisville (IL). BASKETBALL NBA—Fined Indiana Pacers head coach Frank Vogel $15,000 for his comments about how the referees should officiate the Pacers’ upcoming series with the Heat. Fined Atlanta Hawks forward Ivan Johnson $25,000 for directing an obscene gesture toward fans. Fined Michael Gearon, an owner of the Atlanta Hawks, $35,000 for publicly criticizing NBA officiating and making negative comments about an opposing player. FOOTBALL National Football League CLEVELAND BROWNS—Signed OL Mitchell Schwartz, DL John Hughes, WR Travis Benjamin, LB James-Michael Johnson, OL Ryan Miller, DL Billy Winn, DB Trevin Wade and FB Brad Smelley.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Friday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 5,381 294 38 10 The Dalles 12,338 472 4 1 John Day 9,224 299 15 6 McNary 3,085 89 9 5 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Friday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 94,444 2,340 4,571 1,429 The Dalles 48,886 1,673 1,629 910 John Day 30,378 1,211 1,747 1,187 McNary 13,552 342 4,634 2,190

S   B Baseball • Ducks take opener from USC: Oregon starter Alex Keudell earned his ninth victory and Jimmie Sherfy struck out the final four batters he faced for his 14th save as the Ducks notched a 4-3 win over USC in the opening game of their Pac-12 Conference series Saturday at PK Park in Eugene. UO’s Aaron Jones hit a solo home run in the third inning for the first score of the game, and the Ducks snapped a 1-1 tie in the fifth with a three-run rally that featured consecutive two-out RBI doubles by Ryon Healy and Brett Thomas. Thomas finished with three hits and Healy with two for league-leading Oregon (36-14 overall, 17-8 Pac-12). Alex Sherrod had three hits for the Trojans (22-22, 7-14), whose seven hits all came against Keudell (9-3) during

his 6 2⁄3 innings of work. The three-game series resumes today at 2:07 p.m. • Utah tops OSU in extra innings: Oregon State took a 3-2 lead in the top of the 11th inning on a run-scoring single by Max Gordon, but Utah answered with two runs in the bottom of the inning for a 4-3 win Saturday to even the three-game Pac-12 Conference series in Salt Lake City at one game apiece. Jo Jo Sharrar’s bases-loaded single with one out against Beaver reliever Tony Bryant delivered the tying and winning runs for the Utes (1334 overall, 7-19 Pac-12). Jace Fry was the starting pitcher for OSU and worked nine effective innings, allowing just four hits and two runs (both earned) while striking out six and walking three, but he did not figure in the decision. Sacrifice flies — by Danny Hayes in the second inning

and by Gordon in the seventh — accounted for the first two Beaver runs. Hayes and Gordon each had two hits for Oregon State (31-17, 12-11), as did Kavin Keyes. The series concludes today at Spring Mobile Ballpark starting at 11 a.m. Pacific time.

Running • Record set at 25K championships: Janet Cherobon-Bawcom, of Rome, Ga., posted a pending American record time of 1 hour, 24 minutes, 37 seconds in winning the women’s crown at the 2012 USA 25K Championships, staged Saturday in Grand Rapids, Mich. In the men’s portion of the 35th annual event, Joseph Chirlee, of Colorado Springs, Colo., claimed the title with a time of 1:15:11. Ryan Bak, of Bend,

finished fifth in the men’s field with a time of 1:16.57.

Cycling • Tiralongo wins stage; Hesjedal takes Giro lead: Paolo Tiralongo of Italy won the seventh stage of the Giro d’Italia on Saturday in Rocca Di Cambio, Italy, while Ryder Hesjedal replaced Adriano Malori as the overall leader to become the first Canadian to wear the pink jersey. Tiralongo tussled with defending champion Michele Scarponi in the final 600 yards of the steep climb to the line before finishing the 125-mile leg from Recanati to Rocca di Cambio in a time of 5 hours, 51 minutes, 3 with a final sprint. Hesjedal will wear the pink jersey today after crossing the line in fifth place, just behind Joaquim Rodriguez.

Today’s eighth stage is a 142-mile leg.

Swimming • Phelps takes second again at Charlotte: Michael Phelps settled for another runner-up finish at the Charlotte Grand Prix when he was edged by China’s Wu Peng in the 200-meter butterfly. Phelps was second all the way Saturday night, trailing Wu at the first turn, then falling behind Sebastien Rousseau through the middle of the race. Wu, who broke Phelps’ long winning streak in the 200 fly last year, showed an impressive finishing kick, passing Rousseau and Phelps to win in 1 minute, 56.69 seconds. Phelps was next at 1:56.87, while Rousseau slipped to third in 1:57.54. — From wire reports


SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

D3

MOTOR SPORTS ROUNDUP

NBA PLAYOFF ROUNDUP

Johnson gives Hendrick 200th victory

Mark J. Terrill / The Associated Press

Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant, top, goes up for a shot as Denver Nuggets guard Arron Afflalo defends during the first half of Game 7 in their first-round NBA basketball playoff series, Saturday in Los Angeles.

Lakers outlast Nuggets, set to battle Thunder The Associated Press LOS ANGELES — Stretched to the limit in the series and in Game 7, Pau Gasol and Metta World Peace led the Los Angeles Lakers off the brink of collapse and into the second round. Gasol had 23 points, 17 rebounds and six assists, World Peace scored 15 points in his return from a seven-game suspension, and the Lakers outlasted the Denver Nuggets for a thrilling 96-87 victory Saturday night to win their first-round series. Steve Blake scored a playoff career-high 19 points and Kobe Bryant had 17 points and eight assists for the Lakers, who blew a 16-point lead in the second half before surviving a finale with wild momentum swings and furious physical play. With Gasol leading the Lakers’ emotional effort — exemplified when he got five offensive rebounds on a single, unbelievable tip play with 7:10 left — the Lakers narrowly avoided becoming the ninth team in NBA history to blow a 3-1 series lead. “We were aggressive,” Gasol said. “We attacked the paint better. We pounded the boards as hard as we could, every single time. ... Our backs against the wall also had something to do with it.” Andrew Bynum had 16 points and a career playoffhigh 18 rebounds for Los Angeles, which will open the second round Monday night in Oklahoma City against the second-seeded Thunder. Ty Lawson and Al Harrington scored 24 points apiece for the sixth-seeded Nuggets, who committed 19 turnovers and managed just seven-of-27 shooting in the fourth quarter. Arron Afflalo scored 15 points in just the third Game 7 in franchise history for the Nuggets, who have lost in the first round in eight of the last nine postseasons — but never with this much excitement. “Tomorrow or the next day, when the funk gets out of your body, you’re going to be proud of them,” Denver coach George Karl said. “I’ve never been in a locker room at the end of a season where I’m proud of every guy. ... The game was so physical. I think their size won over our speed, barely. We made enough shots to win, but we just didn’t rebound the ball.” The Lakers appeared to be in control of the series after a narrow victory in Game 4 last weekend, but the Nuggets rallied for two straight dominant victories. Game 7 was a barnburner, with both teams blowing significant leads in the final minutes. World Peace hit four threepointers and energized Los Angeles with tough defense in his return. The former Ron Artest missed Los Angeles’

Hawks owner, Pacers coach fined by NBA ATLANTA — The NBA has fined Atlanta Hawks co-owner Michael Gearon Jr. $35,000 for publicly criticizing NBA officiating and making negative comments about an opposing player. Also, Indiana Pacers coach Frank Vogel will have to pay a $15,000 fine for comments he made Thursday about the Miami Heat. Vogel called Miami the “biggest flopping team in the NBA” and told reporters that it would be “interesting” to see how much flopping the officials reward. The NBA also on Saturday announced Hawks rookie Ivan Johnson was fined $25,000 for directing an obscene gesture toward fans. Gearon was quoted by The Atlanta JournalConstitution as calling Boston Celtics forward Kevin Garnett “the dirtiest guy in the league” on Wednesday. Gearon also criticized officiating in the series, won by the Celtics in six games. — The Associated Press

regular-season finale and the first six games against Denver for viciously elbowing Oklahoma City’s James Harden, the NBA’s Sixth Man of the Year and one of his probable defensive assignments in the next round. World Peace helped shut down Danilo Gallinari and Andre Miller, holding them to a combined two-for-19 shooting. “He made plays tonight that won’t show up in the stat sheet that was absolutely ... amazing,” said Mike Brown, who shrugged off Magic Johnson’s pregame pronouncement that the first-year coach’s job would be in jeopardy with a loss. “He was monstrous for us tonight.” Also on Saturday: Celtics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 76ers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 BOSTON — Kevin Garnett scored 29 points — his most in the regular- or postseason this year — and added 11 rebounds to give Boston a victory over Philadelphia in the opener of their Eastern Conference semifinal series. Rajon Rondo had 17 assists, 13 points and 12 rebounds for his eighth career playoff triple-double. He ran the length of the court to receive the inbounds pass and dribble out the final 3.4 seconds of the game. Game 2 is Monday night in Boston before the series shifts to Philadelphia for Games 3 and 4.

The Associated Press DARLINGTON, S.C. — Jimmie Johnson broke free on a restart three laps from the end in the Southern 500 and held on Saturday night to give Hendrick Motorsports its 200th Sprint Cup victory. “I can’t believe we won 200 of these things,” team owner Rick Hendrick said. “I can’t believe it took this long after we won 199.” Johnson seemed short on fuel and tires and looked vulnerable with Tony Stewart and Kyle Busch right behind and ready to pounce after Kurt Busch and Ryan Newman spun out with six laps left at Darlington Raceway. But Stewart had trouble once the green flag dropped and Johnson flew into the lead and cruised to his first victory since Kansas last October, breaking a 16-race winless streak for the five-time NASCAR champion and the Hendrick team. “That guy’s something,” Johnson said about Rick Hendrick. “He said, ‘We won 200. Let’s get 250.” Denny Hamlin was second, followed by Stewart and Kyle Busch. Danica Patrick lasted until the end of her second Sprint Cup race, finishing six laps behind Johnson in 31st. It was Johnson’s third Darlington win, but first since he swept the 2004 events at the track — the last season “The Lady in Black” had two Sprint Cup races. This was the place where fireworks took place a year ago when Kevin Harvick went after Kyle Busch for a late wreck. This time, it involved crew members for

Kurt Busch and Newman scrumming after the race. Martin Truex Jr. was fifth, followed by Matt Kenseth, Carl Edwards, Kasey Kahne, Marcos Ambrose and Joey Logano — the Nationwide winner Friday night. The race began with 171 laps without a caution, the longest stretch of green flag racing from the start with 171 laps since NASCAR began releasing such information, a run which helped speed up a race that’s often slogged through double-digit cautions. Biffle, the pole-sitter, and five-time Sprint Cup champion Johnson, each had long runs and built big leads. Biffle led 74 of the first 98 laps before Johnson took control for 72 straight laps until the race’s first stoppage for debris. When the cautions began, they didn’t stop — and played havoc with strategy the rest of the way. Johnson chose to stay out during a caution period 60 laps from the end, leaving him three laps short on fuel. When AJ Allmendinger and Jamie McMurray tied up a few moments later for another stoppage, Johnson had no choice but to remain on the track instead of surrendering track position to top off his tank. At still another caution a few laps later when Reed Sorenson slid through turn four, Kyle Busch dove low as if he were about to pit but returned to his spot before the commitment line. The final shootout came after Kurt Busch hit the wall and he and Newman spun out with six laps left. Stewart said there was nothing there when he stepped on the gas and was

Lesley Ann Miller / The Associated Press

Jimmie Johnson celebrates in victory lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race in Darlington, S.C., on Saturday.

glad to hold onto third. Patrick hadn’t raced in the Sprint Cup series since her debut at Daytona in February. That didn’t go well when she got caught up in early wreck and wound up 38th. But Patrick said this week she’s grown as a NASCAR driver and that was clear with her performances at Darlington, one of the quirkiest and toughest circuits in the sport. She brushed the wall plenty in Friday practices, but rebounded to finish 12th in the Nationwide Series race that night. In this one, Patrick quickly fell two laps down yet hung as tough as she could as the race went an incredible 171 green flag laps from the start without a caution flag. “You’re doing a hell of a job here,” crew chief Greg Zipadelli told his driver. “Keep racing the race track.” Patrick was hit with a pass-

through penalty for a commitment line violation with less than 80 laps left. Also on Saturday: Maldonado on Spain F1 pole BARCELONA, Spain — McLaren driver Lewis Hamilton lost his Spanish Grand Prix pole position for breaking Formula One rules, giving Pastor Maldonado first place on the starting grid for today’s race. Hamilton had an exceptionally strong final lap to beat the Williams driver by more than half a second for his third pole position of the season and 22nd of his career. But the Briton was forced to stop his car after crossing the line, with McLaren contending their driver had insufficient fuel to return to the pits. The sport’s governing body ruled Hamilton violated rules and he was “excluded” from qualifying results. Hamilton starts from last place instead.

NHL PLAYOFFS

Rangers headed to Eastern Conference finals By Ira Podell The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Henrik Lundqvist went from shaking his head in disgust to raising his arms in celebration when time finally ran out on the Washington Capitals. Such is life as a New York Ranger these days. Lundqvist was perfect in yet another nail-biting game that was razor close throughout the tensionfilled, seven-game series, until the Capitals cut the Rangers’ brief two-goal lead to one in the third period of Game 7. But Washington couldn’t muster much else, and New York held on for a 2-1 victory on Saturday night that sent the top-seeded Rangers into the Eastern Conference finals against the No. 6 New Jersey Devils. “We didn’t expect the first blowout,” said Rangers forward Brad Richards, who staked his team to a 10 lead just 1:32 in. “We expected another tight game. It came down to that again. It’s just the way this series has gone, and it didn’t change.” Michael Del Zotto also scored for the Rangers, who enjoyed the two-goal lead for all of 38 seconds before Capitals defenseman Roman Hamrlik made it 2-1 with 9:17 remaining. Coming into Game 7, these teams were tied or within one goal of each other for 90 percent of the time, and the finale provided much of the same. Lundqvist finished with 22 saves for the Rangers, who improved to 5-0 in Game 7s at Madison Square Garden. Now they will face the Atlantic Division-rival Devils in a rematch of the 1994 East finals, won dramatically by New York on Stephane Matteau’s double-overtime goal in Game 7. That propelled the Rangers toward their first Cup title in 54 years. It was that series that truly put this regional rivalry on an international stage. With stars on both sides, the Rangers and Devils, separated by just six miles and the Hudson River, played 27 periods of dramatic, tense hockey that ul-

Kathy Willens / The Associated Press

New York Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist celebrates after defeating the Washington Capitals in New York, Saturday.

open Monday in New York. The Devils have been off since eliminating the Philadelphia Flyers in Game 5 on Tuesday. “It feels good to get that win,” Rangers forward Marian Gaborik said. “You have to enjoy it for a little bit, but Monday we start from scratch again. We need to feel good about ourselves and get ready for the next series.” New York and Washington alternated wins and losses from Game 1 on, and this one didn’t come easy for the Rangers, who missed a chance to eliminate the Capitals in Game 6 on the road. It was yet another heartbreaker for Washington, which was trying to reach the conference finals for the third time. Six of the Capitals’ seven playoff losses were by one goal, and only one of their 14

games overall were decided by more than one. As they came off the ice following the final buzzer, the Capitals could be seen and heard smashing their sticks against the wall as they headed down the hallway to their dressing room. “It’s disappointing,” said Braden Holtby, who made 29 saves. “We really did believe in here that we had the team to do it all. We gave ourselves a great chance. It’s a tough loss. What we can take out of it is that New York is a very good team. We didn’t leave anything on the table.”

timately resulted in each team winning a Stanley Cup over the next 13 months. The Rangers have beaten the Devils in four of their five previous playoff meetings. This next installment will

IS COMING

DEAL of the

TOMORROW

DAY LOOK FOR YOUR COUPON ONLY IN TOMORROW’S BULLETIN

SAVE 50% OFF ON OUR MENS OR BOYS HAIRCUT! *Regularly $14. Tomorrow $7 with coupon Brought to you by The Bulletin & ...

Sign up to receive notification of these and other great money saving offers in The Bulletin. E-mail your name and address to emailnotifications@bendbulletin.com


D4

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

M A JOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

AL Boxscores

American League

Athletics 3, Tigers 1 Detroit Kelly cf-2b Dirks lf Mi.Cabrera 3b Fielder 1b D.Young dh Avila c Boesch rf R.Santiago ss Worth 2b b-A.Jackson ph-cf Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 2 2 1 31

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 1 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 5

BI 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 0 2 2 3 0 0 2 1 1 12

Avg. .243 .379 .282 .276 .237 .250 .223 .157 .188 .317

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. J.Weeks 2b 2 1 2 0 0 0 .205 a-Pennington ph-ss 2 1 1 1 0 1 .218 Barton 1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .192 Reddick rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .291 J.Gomes dh 4 0 1 1 0 2 .262 S.Smith lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .238 Inge 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .188 K.Suzuki c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .217 Sogard ss-2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .153 Cowgill cf 2 1 0 0 1 0 .100 Totals 32 3 8 3 2 11 Detroit 000 000 001 — 1 5 1 Oakland 100 000 20x — 3 8 0 a-struck out for J.Weeks in the 4th. b-struck out for Worth in the 8th. E—Fielder (3). LOB—Detroit 6, Oakland 7. 2B—D.Young (5). 3B—Pennington (1). SB—Boesch (1). SF—Avila. DP—Detroit 1. Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fister L, 0-1 6 5 1 1 2 8 105 0.54 Coke 2-3 3 2 2 0 0 19 5.93 Dotel 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 3 16 3.65 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McCarthy W, 3-3 7 4 0 0 0 10 91 2.56 R.Cook H, 9 1 0 0 0 1 1 20 0.00 Fuentes S, 2-3 1 1 1 1 0 1 15 3.86 T—2:35. A—20,077 (35,067).

Orioles 5, Rays 3 Tampa Bay Zobrist rf S.Rodriguez 3b B.Upton cf Keppinger 1b Guyer lf J.Molina c Scott dh E.Johnson ss b-C.Pena ph Gimenez c a-Joyce ph-lf Rhymes 2b Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 3 1 4 3 1 2 2 3 34

R 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 7

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 1 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 8

Avg. .198 .230 .273 .293 .143 .210 .250 .224 .225 .256 .282 .219

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Andino 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .284 Hardy ss 4 1 1 0 0 2 .232 Markakis rf 2 0 0 0 2 1 .246 Ad.Jones cf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .294 Wieters dh 3 1 0 0 1 2 .268 Betemit 1b 3 0 0 0 1 3 .238 Hall lf 3 1 1 1 1 2 .333 Flaherty lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .171 Tolleson 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .286 Exposito c 3 1 0 0 0 1 .100 Totals 30 5 6 4 5 12 Tampa Bay 010 002 000 — 3 7 5 Baltimore 020 020 01x — 5 6 2 a-struck out for Gimenez in the 6th. b-lined out for E.Johnson in the 9th. E—B.Upton (2), S.Rodriguez (5), Gimenez (3), Guyer (1), M.Moore (1), Betemit (6), Tolleson (2). LOB—Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 7. 2B—Andino (4), Tolleson (1). HR—Guyer (1), off Matusz Hall (1), off Howell. SB—B.Upton (3). DP—Baltimore 1. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA M.Moore L, 1-3 4 1-3 4 4 1 4 6 101 5.31 W.Davis 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 2 26 2.30 Badenhop 1 1 0 0 0 3 16 4.86 Howell 1 1 1 1 0 1 18 2.25 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matusz W, 2-4 5 2-3 7 3 2 1 5 95 5.50 Ayala H, 3 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 15 1.04 Strop H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 1.35 Johnson S, 11-11 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 0.57 T—3:01. A—32,862 (45,971).

Baltimore Tampa Bay New York Toronto Boston

W 22 20 19 19 14

L 12 14 14 15 19

Cleveland Detroit Chicago Kansas City Minnesota

W 18 16 16 12 9

L 15 17 18 20 24

Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 22 18 15 15

L 12 16 19 20

East Division Pct GB WCGB .647 — — .588 2 — .576 2½ — .559 3 ½ .424 7½ 5 Central Division Pct GB WCGB .545 — — .485 2 3 .471 2½ 3½ .375 5½ 6½ .273 9 10 West Division Pct GB WCGB .647 — — .529 4 1½ .441 7 4½ .429 7½ 5

Saturday’s Games L.A. Angels 4, Texas 2 N.Y. Yankees 6, Seattle 2 Baltimore 5, Tampa Bay 3 Boston 4, Cleveland 1 Kansas City 5, Chicago White Sox 0 Toronto 2, Minnesota 1 Oakland 3, Detroit 1

National League

L10 7-3 4-6 6-4 6-4 3-7

Str Home Away W-2 11-7 11-5 L-3 13-3 7-11 W-3 11-7 8-7 W-1 8-7 11-8 W-2 6-11 8-8

L10 5-5 4-6 4-6 6-4 3-7

Str Home Away L-2 8-10 10-5 L-2 9-9 7-8 L-1 6-10 10-8 W-1 4-13 8-7 L-1 5-12 4-12

L10 5-5 7-3 6-4 4-6

Str Home Away L-1 9-6 13-6 W-2 9-9 9-7 W-1 9-8 6-11 L-2 7-8 8-12

Today’s Games Seattle (Millwood 0-4) at N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 0-0), 10:05 a.m. Cleveland (Masterson 1-2) at Boston (Bard 2-4), 10:35 a.m. Tampa Bay (Shields 5-1) at Baltimore (Arrieta 2-3), 10:35 a.m. Kansas City (Duffy 2-2) at Chicago White Sox (Humber 1-2), 11:10 a.m. Toronto (R.Romero 4-0) at Minnesota (Diamond 1-0), 11:10 a.m. Detroit (Verlander 3-1) at Oakland (Parker 1-0), 1:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Weaver 5-0) at Texas (Feliz 2-1), 5:05 p.m.

AB 4 4 4 4 3 3 2 3 2 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

H 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 3

BI 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2

SO 1 1 0 2 0 1 1 0 1 7

Avg. .254 .277 .321 .248 .257 .232 .207 .296 .095

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Sweeney cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .340 Pedroia 2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .321 Ortiz dh 4 0 1 1 0 0 .349 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Middlebrooks 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .282 Nava lf 3 1 2 0 0 1 .500 C.Ross rf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .254 Saltalamacchia c 3 0 1 0 0 2 .225 Aviles ss 2 1 1 1 0 1 .269 Totals 31 4 8 4 0 9 Cleveland 000 001 000 — 1 3 0 Boston 002 101 00x — 4 8 0 LOB—Cleveland 3, Boston 4. 2B—Marson (2), Pedroia (12), Ortiz (14), Saltalamacchia (7). HR— C.Ross (6), off McAllister. Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McAllister L, 1-1 7 8 4 4 0 8 112 4.15 Asencio 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 5.21 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Doubront W, 3-1 6 3 1 1 2 5 109 4.46 A.Miller H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 0.00 Padilla H, 5 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 5.40 Aceves S, 7-9 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 6.14 T—2:30. A—38,048 (37,495).

Yankees 6, Mariners 2 Seattle Ackley 2b Jaso c I.Suzuki rf J.Montero dh Seager 3b Carp lf Smoak 1b M.Saunders cf Kawasaki ss Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 34

R 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2

H 2 1 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 8

BI 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 1 2 0 1 2 2 0 8

Avg. .248 .277 .288 .261 .295 .167 .195 .219 .194

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jeter dh 4 1 2 0 0 0 .376 Granderson cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .264 Al.Rodriguez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .287 Cano 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .306 Teixeira 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .222 Swisher rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Ibanez lf 3 2 2 2 0 0 .282 Wise lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Martin c 3 1 1 1 0 1 .184 J.Nix ss 3 1 1 2 0 1 .100 Totals 32 6 8 6 0 6 Seattle 000 000 101 — 2 8 0 New York 040 100 01x — 6 8 0 LOB—Seattle 6, New York 2. 2B—Carp (2), Teixeira (7), Ibanez (5), Martin (3). HR—Carp (2), off P.Hughes; J.Nix (1), off Noesi Ibanez (7), off Noesi. SB—Jeter (2). DP—New York 1. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Noesi L, 2-4 7 6 5 5 0 4 98 6.32 Wilhelmsen 1 2 1 1 0 2 19 3.38 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA P.Hughes W, 3-4 7 2-3 6 1 1 1 4 112 5.50 Logan S, 1-1 1 1-3 2 1 1 0 4 26 2.45 T—2:36. A—43,954 (50,291).

Angels 4, Rangers 2 Los Angeles Trout lf Callaspo 3b Pujols dh Tor.Hunter rf Trumbo 1b H.Kendrick 2b

AB 4 4 3 3 2 4

R 0 0 0 1 2 1

H 0 0 1 0 1 1

BI 1 0 0 0 2 0

BB 0 0 1 1 2 0

SO 2 0 0 1 1 1

Avg. .289 .236 .195 .256 .300 .292

W 21 21 19 17 15

L 12 13 14 16 19

St. Louis Cincinnati Houston Milwaukee Pittsburgh Chicago

W 20 16 15 15 15 13

L 13 16 18 18 18 20

Los Angeles San Francisco Arizona Colorado San Diego

W 22 16 15 13 12

L 11 17 19 19 22

East Division Pct GB WCGB .636 — — .618 ½ — .576 2 — .515 4 2 .441 6½ 4½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .606 — — .500 3½ 2½ .455 5 4 .455 5 4 .455 5 4 .394 7 6 West Division Pct GB WCGB .667 — — .485 6 3 .441 7½ 4½ .406 8½ 5½ .353 10½ 7½

Saturday’s Games Milwaukee 8, Chicago Cubs 2 N.Y. Mets 9, Miami 3 Pittsburgh 5, Houston 2 San Diego 2, Philadelphia 1 Washington 2, Cincinnati 1 Atlanta 7, St. Louis 2 San Francisco 5, Arizona 2 L.A. Dodgers 2, Colorado 1

L10 7-3 7-3 6-4 8-2 3-7

Str Home Away W-3 12-4 9-8 W-2 8-5 13-8 W-1 10-6 9-8 L-1 7-6 10-10 L-1 6-9 9-10

L10 5-5 5-5 6-4 4-6 5-5 5-5

Str Home Away L-2 8-6 12-7 L-2 8-8 8-8 L-1 10-8 5-10 W-2 9-8 6-10 W-1 9-8 6-10 L-2 9-10 4-10

L10 6-4 4-6 2-8 2-8 5-5

Str Home Away W-3 14-3 8-8 W-1 8-7 8-10 L-1 7-11 8-8 L-2 8-10 5-9 W-1 9-14 3-8

Today’s Games N.Y. Mets (Niese 2-1) at Miami (Zambrano 1-2), 10:10 a.m. Washington (E.Jackson 1-1) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 2-1), 10:10 a.m. Houston (W.Rodriguez 3-3) at Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 1-2), 10:35 a.m. San Diego (Suppan 2-0) at Philadelphia (Hamels 4-1), 10:35 a.m. Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 4-1) at Milwaukee (Estrada 0-2), 11:10 a.m. Atlanta (Hanson 3-3) at St. Louis (Lynn 6-0), 11:15 a.m. Colorado (White 0-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Lilly 4-0), 1:10 p.m. San Francisco (Zito 1-1) at Arizona (J.Saunders 2-2), 1:10 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• A ngels 4, Rangers 2: ARLINGTON, Texas — Kendrys Morales had a pinch-hit, tiebreaking sacrifice fly in the seventh inning to lead the Los Angeles Angels to a win over Texas. C.J. Wilson worked into the sixth for the Angels after becoming the first major leaguer in 11 seasons to start consecutive games. He had faced only five batters against his former team in the rain-interrupted series opener. • Orioles 5, Rays 3: BALTIMORE — Adam Jones had a pair of hits and knocked in two runs, Bill Hall hit a solo homer and Baltimore capitalized on five errors in the win over Tampa Bay. • Yankees 6, Mariners 2: NEW YORK — Phil Hughes won consecutive starts for the first time this season, and Raul Ibanez homered against his former team for the second straight day as New York beat Seattle. • Red Sox 4, Indians 1: BOSTON — Felix Doubront pitched six strong innings and Cody Ross homered to lead Boston to a win over Cleveland and its first winning streak in May. • Athletics 3, Tigers 1: OAKLAND, Calif. — Brandon McCarthy matched a career high with 10 strikeouts after missing his last start with a sore right shoulder, leading Oakland past Detroit. • Royals 5, White Sox 0: CHICAGO — Luke Hochevar allowed three hits in seven shutout innings and Kansas City scored three first-inning runs off Chris Sale to beat Chicago. • Blue Jays 2, Twins 1: MINNEAPOLIS — Jose Bautista homered for the third time in two nights and Drew Hutchison threw six strong innings for his second career win as Toronto beat Minnesota.

• Mets 9, Marlins 3: MIAMI — David Wright homered and singled three times in his fourth consecutive multihit game, and R.A. Dickey earned his fifth victory by pitching six innings to help the New York Mets beat Miami. • Brewers 8, Cubs 2: MILWAUKEE — Shaun Marcum pitched seven strong innings and Edwin Maysonet hit his first career grand slam to lead Milwaukee over the Chicago Cubs. • Pirates 5, Astros 2: PITTSBURGH — Andrew McCutchen had a solo home run among his four hits, Jose Tabata also homered and Pittsburgh beat Houston. • Padres 2, Phillies 1: PHILADELPHIA — Edinson Volquez pitched six effective innings, pinch-hitter Jesus Guzman drove in the go-ahead run with a sacrifice fly and San Diego beat Philadelphia and ace Roy Halladay for the second time this season. • Nationals 2, Reds 1: CINCINNATI — Jordan Zimmermann extended Washington’s streak of dominant starts, and Danny Espinosa homered for the second straight game, leading the Nationals over Cincinnati. • Braves 7, Cardinals 2: ST. LOUIS — Brandon Beachy pitched six innings of one-run ball and helped himself with an RBI single, Michael Bourn added a solo homer and Atlanta beat St. Louis. • Giants 5, Diamondbacks 2: PHOENIX — Matt Cain gave up three hits in six innings and singled in a pair of runs to help San Francisco end a nine-game losing streak against Arizona with a victory over Arizona. • Dodgers 2, Rockies 1: LOS ANGELES — Aaron Harang pitched eight solid innings, pinch-hitter Tony Gwynn Jr. hit a go-ahead RBI single, and the Los Angeles Dodgers improved the best record in the majors with a victory over Colorado.

Red Sox 4, Indians 1 Cleveland Brantley cf Kipnis 2b A.Cabrera ss C.Santana 1b Hafner dh Choo rf Duncan lf Hannahan 3b Marson c Totals

Washington Atlanta New York Miami Philadelphia

Bourjos cf Aybar ss a-K.Morales ph M.Izturis ss Hester c Totals

4 2 0 1 4 31

0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 4 6 4 4 8

.196 .200 .315 .271 .500

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .269 Andrus ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .311 Hamilton lf-cf 4 1 1 1 0 3 .402 Beltre dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .313 M.Young 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .292 N.Cruz rf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .254 Napoli c 2 1 0 0 1 1 .243 B.Snyder 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .346 Gentry cf 2 0 1 1 0 0 .320 b-Dav.Murphy ph-lf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .276 Totals 30 2 5 2 4 9 Los Angeles 000 200 200 — 4 6 0 Texas 000 011 000 — 2 5 0 a-hit a sacrifice fly for Aybar in the 7th. b-struck out for Gentry in the 7th. LOB—Los Angeles 6, Texas 7. HR—Trumbo (5), off M.Harrison; Hamilton (18), off C.Wilson. SB— Kinsler (3), Gentry (5). DP—Los Angeles 2. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP C.Wilson 5 2-3 5 2 2 3 4 93 Carpenter W, 1-1 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 9 Walden H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 Frieri H, 2 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 3 21 S.Downs S, 3-5 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP M.Harrison L, 4-3 6 4 4 4 2 5 97 Ogando 2 2 0 0 2 2 39 R.Ross 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 M.Harrison pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. T—2:54. A—47,699 (48,194).

ERA 3.42 5.19 4.50 0.00 0.00 ERA 5.23 0.48 2.45

Royals 5, White Sox 0 Kansas City Dyson cf Giavotella 2b Getz 2b A.Gordon lf Butler dh Francoeur rf Hosmer 1b Falu 3b A.Escobar ss Quintero c Totals

AB 4 3 1 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 39

R 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 5

H 2 0 0 1 2 0 1 2 2 2 12

BI 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 4

BB 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 1 1 1 7

Avg. .311 .000 .292 .264 .291 .233 .179 .500 .277 .241

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. De Aza cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .282 Beckham 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .216 A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .248 Konerko 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .331 Pierzynski c 2 0 0 0 2 1 .259 Rios rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .283 Al.Ramirez ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .199 Viciedo lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .202 Morel 3b 2 0 1 0 1 1 .179 Totals 29 0 3 0 4 10 Kansas City 300 000 020 — 5 12 0 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 E—Beckham (2). LOB—Kansas City 9, Chicago 6. 2B—A.Escobar 2 (12). SB—Morel (4). DP—Kansas City 1. Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hochevar W, 3-3 7 3 0 0 1 5 101 7.20 G.Holland 1 0 0 0 1 3 14 9.82 Crow 1 0 0 0 2 2 22 2.76 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sale L, 3-2 5 7 3 3 2 3 103 3.08 N.Jones 2 1-3 1 0 0 0 4 29 1.26 Ohman 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 9 5.40 Z.Stewart 1 1-3 3 1 1 0 0 22 2.89 Inherited runners-scored—Z.Stewart 1-1. Balk— Ohman. T—2:46. A—20,066 (40,615).

Blue Jays 2, Twins 1 Toronto K.Johnson 2b Y.Escobar ss Bautista rf Encarnacion dh Thames lf R.Davis lf Lawrie 3b Rasmus cf Lind 1b Mathis c Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 0 3 3 3 3 32

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

H 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 7

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 1 2 9

Avg. .256 .255 .197 .262 .260 .188 .290 .233 .191 .217

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Span cf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .295 Dozier ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .240 Mauer c 4 0 2 0 0 0 .282 Willingham lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .304 Doumit dh 2 0 0 0 2 2 .240 1-Komatsu pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Plouffe 3b-1b 3 0 0 1 1 1 .130 Parmelee 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .188 a-A.Casilla ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .247 Mastroianni rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .200 J.Carroll 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .214 Totals 31 1 5 1 6 7 Toronto 000 011 000 — 2 7 0 Minnesota 000 100 000 — 1 5 0 a-struck out for Parmelee in the 8th. 1-ran for Doumit in the 8th. LOB–Toronto 3, Minnesota 9. 2B—Rasmus (5), Dozier (1), Mauer (6). HR—Bautista (8), off Walters. DP–Toronto 1; Minnesota 2. Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hutchison W, 2-1 6 3 1 1 4 4 97 5.53 Cordero H, 4 1 1 0 0 1 1 28 8.76 Frasor H, 5 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 11 3.29 L.Perez H, 3 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 2.60 Janssen S, 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 4.38 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Walters L, 0-1 6 6 2 2 0 5 93 3.00 Duensing 2 0 0 0 0 2 22 2.16 Gray 1 1 0 0 0 2 14 1.84 Inherited runners-scored—L.Perez 2-0. WP— Cordero. T—2:50. A—38,820 (39,500).

NL Boxscores Mets 9, Marlins 3 New York A.Torres cf Nieuwenhuis lf D.Wright 3b Duda rf D.Carrasco p Dan.Murphy 2b I.Davis 1b Cedeno ss Nickeas c Dickey p a-Valdespin ph Acosta p Byrdak p Parnell p c-Baxter ph-rf Totals

AB 3 5 6 6 0 4 5 5 4 1 1 0 0 0 1 41

R 1 0 2 0 0 2 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 9

H 1 1 4 3 0 3 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 16

BI 2 1 3 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 9

BB 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 2 0 1 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .310 .303 .402 .269 --.321 .175 .263 .226 .143 .091 ------.346

Miami Reyes ss Infante 2b Gaudin p b-Kearns ph-lf H.Ramirez 3b Morrison lf Webb p Cishek p Stanton rf G.Sanchez 1b Bonifacio cf Hayes c d-Mattison ph

AB 5 3 0 2 5 4 0 0 4 4 3 3 1

R 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 4 1 0 1 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 0

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

SO 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Avg. .256 .330 .000 .273 .212 .287 .000 .000 .276 .202 .240 .273 .000

Nolasco p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 M.Dunn p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Do.Murphy 2b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .120 Totals 38 3 13 3 1 3 New York 101 131 011 — 9 16 0 Miami 010 001 100 — 3 13 1 a-flied out for Dickey in the 7th. b-grounded out for Gaudin in the 7th. c-doubled for Parnell in the 9th. d-grounded out for Hayes in the 9th. E—Hayes (3). LOB—New York 13, Miami 9. 2B—Duda (3), Baxter (5), H.Ramirez (7), Stanton (8), G.Sanchez (9). HR—D.Wright (4), off Nolasco. SB—Dan.Murphy (2). DP—New York 1; Miami 1. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP Dickey W, 5-1 6 9 2 2 1 0 95 Acosta 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 12 Byrdak 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 Parnell 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 D.Carrasco 1 2 0 0 0 1 23 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP Nolasco L, 4-1 4 2-3 9 6 6 3 3 95 M.Dunn 2-3 3 1 1 0 2 29 Gaudin 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 23 Webb 1 2 1 1 0 1 19 Cishek 1 2 1 1 0 0 29 T—3:28. A—32,128 (37,442).

ERA 3.65 8.27 3.48 2.25 4.50 ERA 3.65 9.95 0.71 3.06 1.65

Brewers 8, Cubs 2 Chicago DeJesus rf Campana cf S.Castro ss LaHair 1b A.Soriano lf I.Stewart 3b Soto c Barney 2b C.Coleman p Volstad p Cardenas 2b Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 2 0 2 1 31

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

H 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5

BI 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

SO 1 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 2 0 8

Avg. .265 .327 .328 .354 .250 .183 .145 .250 --.000 .111

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Morgan cf-rf 4 1 1 0 1 0 .200 Lucroy c 5 1 3 1 0 0 .341 Braun lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .305 Ar.Ramirez 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .228 Hart rf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .252 Veras p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Dillard p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ishikawa 1b 3 2 2 0 1 0 .217 Maysonet 2b 3 1 2 4 1 0 .750 C.Izturis ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .209 Marcum p 3 0 1 0 0 1 .067 Aoki cf 0 0 0 1 0 0 .220 Totals 34 8 13 7 3 1 Chicago 100 000 010 — 2 5 0 Milwaukee 100 005 02x — 8 13 0 LOB—Chicago 5, Milwaukee 7. 2B—DeJesus (7), Campana (4), Cardenas (1), Morgan (1), Lucroy (5), Hart (9), Ishikawa 2 (5). HR—Maysonet (1), off Volstad. CS—Braun (2). DP—Chicago 1; Milwaukee 1. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Volstad L, 0-5 6 9 6 6 2 1 99 6.92 C.Coleman 2 4 2 2 1 0 46 9.00 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Marcum W, 2-1 7 3 1 1 2 6 105 3.07 Veras 1 2 1 1 0 1 18 7.20 Dillard 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 4.70 T—2:58. A—42,339 (41,900).

Nationals 2, Reds 1 Washington Desmond ss Bernadina lf Zimmerman 3b LaRoche 1b Harper rf Espinosa 2b Ankiel cf

AB 5 4 3 3 4 3 4

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

H 1 1 0 1 0 2 0

BI 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

BB 0 0 1 1 0 1 0

SO 1 0 1 0 1 1 3

Avg. .257 .210 .247 .333 .213 .205 .260

W.Ramos c Flores c Zimmermann p Clippard p b-T.Moore ph H.Rodriguez p Totals

2 1 1 0 1 0 31

1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 6 2 5 11

.265 .200 .083 --.200 ---

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cozart ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .264 Stubbs cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Votto 1b 2 0 1 0 2 0 .296 B.Phillips 2b 4 0 0 1 0 1 .253 Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .294 Frazier 3b 4 0 1 0 0 3 .346 Ludwick lf 4 0 1 0 0 3 .187 Hanigan c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .288 Latos p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Arredondo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ondrusek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Cairo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Chapman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 1 5 1 2 13 Washington 000 011 000 — 2 6 0 Cincinnati 100 000 000 — 1 5 0 a-grounded out for Ondrusek in the 7th. b-struck out for Clippard in the 9th. LOB—Washington 8, Cincinnati 6. 2B—Desmond (9). HR—W.Ramos (3), off Latos; Espinosa (3), off Arredondo. SB—Espinosa 2 (3). DP—Washington 1; Cincinnati 1. Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Zimerman W, 2-3 7 5 1 1 1 9 105 2.14 Clippard H, 8 1 0 0 0 1 1 23 3.60 Rodriguez S, 8-10 1 0 0 0 0 3 10 2.45 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Latos 5 3 1 1 5 4 109 4.54 Arredondo L, 2-1 1 1 1 1 0 3 12 2.70 Ondrusek 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 0.00 Chapman 2 1 0 0 0 4 33 0.00 T—3:08. A—42,294 (42,319).

Braves 7, Cardinals 2 Atlanta Bourn cf Prado lf Freeman 1b Uggla 2b McCann c C.Jones 3b Heyward rf Pastornicky ss Beachy p a-J.Francisco ph Medlen p b-Diaz ph C.Martinez p Totals

AB 6 6 3 3 4 4 5 4 3 1 0 1 0 40

R 2 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7

H 3 1 0 2 2 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 13

BI 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 7

BB 0 0 2 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7

SO 1 0 0 1 0 2 4 0 2 0 0 0 0 10

Avg. .333 .274 .277 .282 .236 .302 .252 .268 .133 .224 1.000 .303 .000

St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Furcal ss 3 1 2 1 1 0 .369 Beltran rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .299 Holliday lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .257 Craig 1b 3 0 1 1 0 2 .324 Freese 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .301 Y.Molina c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .296 Jay cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .361 Greene 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .200 J.Romero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Wainwright p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .077 Salas p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Descalso 2b 1 1 1 0 0 0 .210 Totals 29 2 5 2 4 9 Atlanta 201 020 011 — 7 13 1 St. Louis 000 001 010 — 2 5 0 a-fouled out for Beachy in the 7th. b-singled for Medlen in the 9th. E—Uggla (6). LOB—Atlanta 13, St. Louis 5. 2B—Uggla (7). 3B—Descalso (3). HR—Bourn (1), off J.Romero. DP—Atlanta 2. Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Beachy W, 4-1 6 2 1 1 4 6 99 1.60 Medlen 2 2 1 1 0 1 22 2.49 C.Martinez 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 2.65 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wainwright L, 2-4 4 1-3 9 5 5 5 5 108 6.16 Salas 2 2-3 0 0 0 1 4 41 5.14 J.Romero 2 4 2 2 1 1 35 10.13 T—2:55. A—44,157 (43,975).

Pirates 5, Astros 2 Houston Schafer cf Lowrie ss Altuve 2b Ca.Lee 1b Bogusevic rf Maxwell lf M.Downs 3b C.Snyder c Happ p R.Cruz p Abad p c-M.Gonzalez ph Davi.Carpenter p Lyon p e-T.Buck ph Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 35

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 2 1 1 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

BI 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

Avg. .261 .297 .323 .263 .242 .250 .182 .146 .154 ----.233 ----.260

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tabata lf-rf 4 2 2 1 0 0 .250 Walker 2b 3 0 0 1 0 0 .273 A.McCutchen cf 4 1 4 1 0 0 .342 P.Alvarez 3b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .213 McGehee 1b 2 1 0 0 2 0 .233 Navarro rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .194 a-G.Jones ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .253 Resop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-McLouth ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .182 J.Cruz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Barmes ss 3 0 0 1 0 1 .153 McKenry c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .189 Morton p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 b-Presley ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .236 Totals 29 5 7 4 4 5 Houston 000 011 000 — 2 9 0 Pittsburgh 101 012 00x — 5 7 1 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Navarro in the 6th. b-grounded out for Morton in the 6th. c-struck out for Abad in the 7th. d-struck out for Watson in the 8th. e-flied out for Lyon in the 9th. E—P.Alvarez (8). LOB—Houston 7, Pittsburgh 6. 2B—Schafer (4), C.Snyder (1), P.Alvarez (5). 3B—Tabata (2). HR—A.McCutchen (3), off Happ; Tabata (2), off Happ. SB—A.McCutchen (6), McGehee (1). DP—Pittsburgh 2. Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP Happ L, 2-3 5 6 5 5 1 4 94 R.Cruz 2-3 0 0 0 2 0 19 Abad 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 Davi.Carpenter 1 1 0 0 1 0 25 Lyon 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP Morton W, 2-3 6 7 2 1 1 0 88 Resop H, 3 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 8 Watson H, 3 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 11 J.Cruz S, 3-3 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 Happ pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. T—2:59. A—34,187 (38,362).

ERA 5.72 1.74 7.20 3.07 2.19 ERA 4.05 3.21 4.63 0.69

Padres 2, Phillies 1 San Diego Venable rf Kotsay lf Darnell lf Cashner p Thayer p Headley 3b Alonso 1b O.Hudson 2b Maybin cf Jo.Baker c Bartlett ss Volquez p a-Guzman ph Gregerson p Denorfia lf Totals

AB 4 1 3 0 0 3 3 4 4 4 4 2 0 0 1 33

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

H 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 8

Philadelphia Rollins ss Polanco 3b Victorino cf Pence rf Wigginton 1b Ruiz c Mayberry lf Galvis 2b Halladay p b-Pierre ph Qualls p c-Orr ph Papelbon p Totals San Diego Philadelphia

AB R H 4 0 1 4 0 1 4 0 3 3 0 0 4 0 0 4 0 0 3 1 1 4 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 34 1 8 001 000 010 000

BI 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 4 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 11

Avg. .257 .294 .250 ----.244 .301 .200 .209 .143 .141 .071 .267 --.268

BI BB SO 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 4 9 100 — 2 000 — 1

Avg. .230 .282 .259 .250 .264 .327 .244 .216 .150 .344 --.286 --8 1 8 1

a-hit a sacrifice fly for Volquez in the 7th. b-singled for Halladay in the 7th. c-struck out for Qualls in the 8th. E—Gregerson (1), Qualls (1). LOB—San Diego 7, Philadelphia 12. 2B—Venable (6), Maybin (5), Bartlett (5), Victorino (5), Mayberry (4), Galvis (9). SB—Headley (3), Rollins (7), Victorino (10). DP—Philadelphia 1. San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Volquez W, 2-2 6 6 1 1 2 5 93 2.79 Gregerson H, 5 1 1 0 0 1 0 14 2.25 Cashner H, 4 1 0 0 0 1 2 17 3.45 Thayer S, 3-3 1 1 0 0 0 2 21 0.00 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Halladay L, 3-3 7 7 2 2 1 10 104 3.20 Qualls 1 1 0 0 1 1 22 2.92 Papelbon 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 2.77 T—2:50. A—45,542 (43,651).

Giants 5, Diamondbacks 2 San Francisco G.Blanco rf Belt 1b Me.Cabrera lf Posey c Pagan cf Arias 3b Burriss 2b B.Crawford ss M.Cain p Ja.Lopez p Hensley p c-Pill ph Romo p S.Casilla p Totals

AB 4 5 5 4 3 4 4 3 3 0 0 1 0 0 36

R 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

H 0 1 3 0 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 9

BI 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 1 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .234 .246 .331 .282 .273 .255 .231 .204 .235 ----.238 -----

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bloomquist ss 2 0 0 1 1 1 .214 G.Parra cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .259 J.Upton rf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .231 M.Montero c 4 0 1 0 0 3 .278 R.Roberts 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .198 Overbay 1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .318 a-Pollock ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Zagurski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Jo.McDonald ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .302 Kubel lf 3 1 2 0 1 0 .287 A.Hill 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .248 Cahill p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Breslow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Goldschmidt ph-1b2 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Totals 32 2 6 1 2 11 San Francisco 100 012 001 — 5 9 2 Arizona 001 000 100 — 2 6 2 a-struck out for Overbay in the 7th. b-reached on error for Breslow in the 7th. c-grounded out for Hensley in the 8th. d-grounded out for Ziegler in the 9th. E—Me.Cabrera (2), B.Crawford (8), R.Roberts (5), Cahill (1). LOB—San Francisco 11, Arizona 7. 2B—Me.Cabrera 2 (8), Pagan (5), M.Cain (2), G.Parra (7), Kubel (7). 3B—Belt (1), A.Hill (2). SB—G.Blanco (3), Pagan (6). DP—Arizona 1. San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA M.Cain W, 2-2 6 3 1 1 2 8 109 2.28 Ja.Lopez H, 4 1-3 1 1 0 0 1 10 1.35 Hensley H, 3 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 14 3.00 Romo H, 5 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 0.00 S.Casilla S, 7-8 1 1 0 0 0 0 19 1.38 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cahill L, 2-4 5 2-3 6 4 4 3 2 91 3.65 Breslow 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 27 1.62 Zagurski 1 1 1 1 0 2 17 7.11 Ziegler 1 1 0 0 1 0 15 1.15 Zagurski pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. T—3:10. A—31,719 (48,633).

Dodgers 2, Rockies 1 Colorado Scutaro 2b J.Herrera 3b C.Gonzalez lf Tulowitzki ss Helton 1b Cuddyer rf Colvin cf W.Rosario c Nicasio p a-Pacheco ph Outman p Belisle p Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 3 3 3 2 1 1 0 0 28

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 4

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3

Avg. .254 .255 .302 .267 .250 .278 .315 .240 .167 .217 --.000

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. D.Gordon ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .211 M.Ellis 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .279 Kemp cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .365 Ethier rf 3 1 2 0 0 1 .309 Abreu lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .286 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Uribe 3b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .250 Loney 1b 3 1 1 0 0 2 .230 A.Ellis c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .308 Harang p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 b-Gwynn Jr. ph-lf 1 0 1 1 0 0 .273 Totals 28 2 7 2 0 9 Colorado 000 000 100 — 1 4 0 Los Angeles 000 010 01x — 2 7 0 a-grounded out for Nicasio in the 8th. b-singled for Harang in the 8th. LOB—Colorado 4, Los Angeles 3. 2B—J.Herrera (3), W.Rosario (5), Ethier (11). HR—Colvin (3), off Harang. DP—Colorado 1; Los Angeles 1. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nicasio 7 5 1 1 0 9 102 4.65 Outman L, 0-1 0 1 1 1 0 0 6 Belisle 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 2.12 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harang W, 2-2 8 4 1 1 2 2 97 4.46 Jansen S, 3-4 1 0 0 0 0 1 17 2.41 Outman pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—2:31. A—33,735 (56,000).

Leaders Through Saturday’s Games AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Hamilton, Texas, .402; Jeter, New York, .376; Ortiz, Boston, .349; Sweeney, Boston, .340; Konerko, Chicago, .331; Pedroia, Boston, .321; ACabrera, Cleveland, .321. RUNS—Hamilton, Texas, 30; Kinsler, Texas, 30; AdJones, Baltimore, 27; De Aza, Chicago, 25; AJackson, Detroit, 24; Jeter, New York, 24; Pedroia, Boston, 24. RBI—Hamilton, Texas, 41; Encarnacion, Toronto, 29; MiCabrera, Detroit, 27; ADunn, Chicago, 26; Butler, Kansas City, 24; Ortiz, Boston, 24; Scott, Tampa Bay, 24; Swisher, New York, 24. HITS—Jeter, New York, 53; Hamilton, Texas, 49; Ortiz, Boston, 45; Pedroia, Boston, 45; Andrus, Texas, 41; Cano, New York, 41; AdJones, Baltimore, 40; Konerko, Chicago, 40; ISuzuki, Seattle, 40; MYoung, Texas, 40. HOME RUNS—Hamilton, Texas, 18; ADunn, Chicago, 11; Encarnacion, Toronto, 11; Granderson, New York, 11; AdJones, Baltimore, 10; Bautista, Toronto, 8; Hardy, Baltimore, 8; Reddick, Oakland, 8. PITCHING—Weaver, Los Angeles, 5-0; Sabathia, New York, 5-0; Darvish, Texas, 5-1; Shields, Tampa Bay, 5-1; DLowe, Cleveland, 5-1; Price, Tampa Bay, 5-2; Milone, Oakland, 5-2. STRIKEOUTS—FHernandez, Seattle, 58; Sabathia, New York, 53; Darvish, Texas, 51; Verlander, Detroit, 48; Weaver, Los Angeles, 47; Scherzer, Detroit, 45; Peavy, Chicago, 44; CWilson, Los Angeles, 44. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—DWright, New York, .402; Furcal, St. Louis, .369; Kemp, Los Angeles, .365; Jay, St. Louis, .361; LaHair, Chicago, .354; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, .342; Bourn, Atlanta, .333; LaRoche, Washington, .333. RUNS—Kemp, Los Angeles, 29; Beltran, St. Louis, 26; Furcal, St. Louis, 25; CGonzalez, Colorado, 25; Uggla, Atlanta, 25; Bourn, Atlanta, 24; MEllis, Los Angeles, 23; DWright, New York, 23. RBI—Ethier, Los Angeles, 32; Beltran, St. Louis, 31; Freeman, Atlanta, 27; Kemp, Los Angeles, 27; Freese, St. Louis, 26; CGonzalez, Colorado, 26; Bruce, Cincinnati, 24. HITS—Bourn, Atlanta, 49; Furcal, St. Louis, 48; MeCabrera, San Francisco, 45; DWright, New York, 45; SCastro, Chicago, 44; DanMurphy, New York, 43; Kemp, Los Angeles, 42. HOME RUNS—Beltran, St. Louis, 12; Kemp, Los Angeles, 12; Braun, Milwaukee, 10; Bruce, Cincinnati, 10; LaHair, Chicago, 8; 6 tied at 7. PITCHING—Lynn, St. Louis, 6-0; Capuano, Los Angeles, 5-0; Lohse, St. Louis, 5-1; Dickey, New York, 5-1; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 5-2; 10 tied at 4. STRIKEOUTS—Strasburg, Washington, 51; GGonzalez, Washington, 50; MCain, San Francisco, 48; Halladay, Philadelphia, 46; ASanchez, Miami, 46; Greinke, Milwaukee, 46; Worley, Philadelphia, 45.


SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Culver track produces two district champs Bulletin staff report JUNCTION CITY — Jesus Retano led the Culver boys to a fifth-place team finish with 72 overall points Saturday afternoon at the Class 2A TriRiver Conference track and field championships. Retano won the 400-meter race in 51.73 seconds and placed second in the 200 in 23.50, advancing to next week’s state meet in both events. Seven teams competed at the TRC championships, which were won by Central Linn on the boys side (165 points) and Regis on the girls side (151 points). Kyle Belanger also earned

PREP ROUNDUP a ticket to state, placing second in the boys 800 (2:02.28) and 400 (52.16). Additionally, Culver’s 1,600-meter boys relay team took second in 3:35.50. The Culver girls placed fourth with 86 points, led by Lori Sandy’s win in the triple jump (33-02) and secondplace finish in the long jump (16-03). Angelica Metteer also qualified for state, finishing second in the 1,500 (5:15.24). The Bulldogs’ girls 400 relay (Gabrielle Alley, Andrea Retano, Unity Ballard and Taylor Lynn) will also com-

pete at state after winning their event in 52.69. The Class 2A state meet will be held at Western Oregon University in Monmouth on Friday and Saturday. In other prep events Saturday: TRACK AND FIELD Grizzly girls second at districts GRANTS PASS — Gilchrist senior Brenna Gravitt captured the Class 1A Mt. Skyline district title in the girls long jump with a winning mark of 16 feet, 7 inches and placed second in the shot put to highlight the Grizzlies’ girls team. Gravitt advances to the 1A state championships

in both events. Paige Kooker won the discus, and Ashley James placed second in the same event for the Gilchrist girls. The top two finishers in each event at districts earn state berths. The Grizzly girls placed second as a team, while the boys finished fifth. Gilchrist senior Leanna McGregor will also compete at the state meet after placing second in the javelin (98-05). Zane Anderson, Dillon Link and Trinton Koch all earned state berths for the boys. Anderson won the shot put with a mark of 41-04, Link was second in the discus (12406), and Koch finished as the runner-up in the 300 hurdles

(44.2). The Class 1A state meet will be held at Western Oregon University in Monmouth on Friday and Saturday. BASEBALL Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21-11 Grant Union . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4 SISTERS — The Outlaws swept Grant Union in a nonleague doubleheader to extend their winning streak to 18 games. Sisters, which went a perfect 15-0 in SkyEm League play this year, concludes the regular season with a nonleague home game against Bend on Monday. The Outlaws (21-3 overall) will host a Class 4A play-in game next week.

PREP SCOREBOARD Track & field Saturday’s Results ——— Boys Tri-River Conference Championships In Junction City, Day 2 Team scores — Central Linn 165, Regis 128, East Linn Christian 96, Scio 91, Culver 72, Santiam 59, Kennedy 47. (Winners and Culver finishers in the top eight) 400-meter relay — 1, Central Linn (Wyne, Barnes, LaCoste, Avilez) 44.13. 1,500 — 1, Joseph Ewers, CL, 4:08.33. 3,000 — 1, Joseph Ewers, CL, 8:58.72. 100 — 1, Josue Avilez, CL, 11.30. 400 — 1, Jesus Retano, C, 51.73; 2, Kyle Belanger, C, 52.16. 110 hurdles — 1, Mark LaCoste, CL, 15.17. 800 — 1, A.J. Holmberg, S, 2:01.55; 2, Kyle Belanger, C, 2:02.28. 200 — 1, Josue Avilez, CL, 23.46; 2, Jesus Retano, C, 23.50. 300 hurdles — 1, Mark LaCoste, CL, 42.95; 4, Ryan Fritz, C, 46.03. 1,600 relay — 1, Scio (Holmberg, Smith, B. Jones, N. Jones) 3:31.09; 2, Culver 3:35.50.

High jump — 1, Patrick Nagel, ELC, 506.00; 4, Travis Klopp, C, 5-02.00. Discus — 1, Paul Bentz, R, 144-01. Pole vault — 1, Paul Bentz, R, 13-00.00; 4, Miguel Gutierrez, C, 9-00.00. Shot — 1, Trevor Walker, CL, 47-05.00. Javelin — 1, Zach Sherman, R, 164-04. Triple jump — 1, Peter Meyr, CL, 4109.50; 4, Gerson Gonzalez, C, 38-05.75; 7, Josue Gonzalez, C, 37-02.50; 8, Clay Gibson, C, 36-08.25. Long jump — 1, Paul Bentz, R, 2109.00; 5, Gerson Gonzalez, C, 19-02.25; 6, Clay Gibson, C, 18-06.50. ——— Mt. Skyline Class 1A District Championships In Grants Pass Team scores — Pacific 133, Camas Valley 128, Paisley 104, New Hope Christian 78, Gilchrist 48, Triad 44, Powers 41, Hosanna Christian 29, Elkton 27, Prospect 10 (Winners and Gilchrist finishers in the top eight) 400-meter relay — 1, Camas Valley (Andreas, Tilton, Wolfe, Lindsey) 44.71. 1,500 — 1, Chris Merlos, NHCS, 4:19.70. 3,000 — 1, Chris Merlos, NHCS, 9:47.2. 100 — 1, Gabe Ovgard, TC, 11.35.

400 — 1, Richard Andreas, CV, 50.95; 4, Kesson Poncil, GIL, 57.27. 110 hurdles — 1, Travis Onlgey, PAC, 15.79; 3, Trinton Koch, GIL, 18.56. 800 — 1, Manuel Finley, P, 2:03.74 200 — 1, Gabe Ovgard, Triad, 22.86 300 hurdles — 1, Travis Onley, P, 43.6; 2, Trinton Koch, GIL, 44.2 1,600 relay — 1, Camas Valley, 3:32.41; 4, Gilchrist (Boone, McGregor, Koch, Link), 3:44.17 High jump — 1, Charlie Jensen, PAC, 6-00.00. Discus — 1, Cody Hamilton, PAC, 12610; 2, Dillon Link, GIL, 124-06 Pole vault — 1, Luke McKay, PAIS, 1308.00; 4, Jonny Heitzman, GIL, 10-00.00. Shot — 1, Zane Anderson, GIL, 4104.00. Javelin — 1, Newton Allred, POW, 161-03 Triple jump — 1, Newton Allred, POW, 41-08 Long jump — 1, Richard Andreas, CV, 21-08.00. Girls Tri-River Conference Championships In Junction City Day 2 Team scores — Regis 151, Kennedy

147, East Linn Christian 118.5; Culver 86, Scio 78, Santiam 44, Central Linn 26.5. (Winners and Culver finishers in the top eight) 400-meter relay — 1, Culver (Alley, Retano, Ballard, Lynn) 52.69. 1,500 — 1, Bridget Donohue, K, 5:10.46; 2, Angelica Metteer, C, 5:15.24. 3,000 — 1, Lauren Stokley, K, 11:51.06. 100 — 1, Haley Guest, SCI, 12.85. 400 — 1, Haley Guest, SCI, 1:00.40; 3, Andrea Retano, C, 1:04.94; 5, Ana Badillo, C, 1:09.20. 100 hurdles — 1, Amelia Grosjacques, K, 16.84. 800 — 1, Bridget Donohue, K, 2:26.43; 4, Andrea Retano, C, 2:34.76; 6, Angelica Metteer, C, 2:57.48. 200 — 1, Haley Guest, SCI, 12.85; 6, Ana Badillo, C, 29.25. 300 hurdles — 1, Grace Smith, SCI, 49.78. 1,600 relay — 1, Kennedy (Manley, Cruz, Donohue, Sprauer) 4:14.22; 5, Culver 4:34.47. High jump — 1, Monica Webb, R, 501.00; 4, Cassie Fulton, C, 4-08.00. Discus — 1, Jaclyn Fessler, R, 104-07. Pole vault — 1, Zoe Engwall, ELC, 906.00; 4, Cassie Page, C, 7-06.00; 5, Taylor

Sandy, C, 7-00.00; 7, Micheala Miller, C, 5-06.00. Shot — 1, Haley Guest, SCI, 39-01.00. Javelin — 1, Kassie Linville, ELC, 12202; 3, Cassie Fulton, C, 107-00. Triple jump — 1, Lori Sandy, C, 3302.00; 6, Gabrielle Alley, C, 29-09.00. Long jump — 1, Ariel Koos, ELC, 1606.00; 2, Lori Sandy, C, 16-03.00. ——— Mountain Skyline Class 1A Championships In Grants Pass Team scores — Paisley 128, Gilchrist 112, Triad Christian 84, Pacific 81, New Hope Christian 67, Hosanna Christian 47, Camas Valley 46, Prospect 38, Elkton 22, Powers 8 (Winners and Gilchrist finishers in the top eight) 400-meter relay — 1, Camas Valley (Bringhurst, Hunt, Mooney, McIntire) 54.49. 1,500 — 1, Sarah Estabrook, TC, 5:15.20; 5, Jasmine Kronke, GIL, 6:23.05. 3,000 — 1, Sarah Estabrook, TC, 11:20.8. 100 — 1, Anna Rose McKay, PAIS, 13.33; 3, Brenna Gravitt, GIL, 13.48. 400 — 1, Kylee O’Connor, PAIS, 1:01.96; 3, Ashley James, GIL, 1:05.01. 100 hurdles — 1, Elana Hampton,

HOSC, 17.12; 3, Sydney Longbotham, GIL, 17.71. 800 — 1, Tess O’Leary, PAIS, 2:29.2; 5, Jasmine Kronke, GIL, 3:00.72 200 — 1, Moriah Trumbull, TC, 27.23; 7, Deonna Langford, GIL, 29.83 300 hurdles — 1, Kylee O’Connor, PAIS, 48.83; 4, Sydney Longbotham, GIL, 52.97 1,600 relay — 1, Paisley, 4:22.40; 5, Gilchrist 4:54.6 High jump — 1, Hannah Parker, E, 410.00; 5, Alleya Harris, GIL, 4-04.00. Discus — 1, Paige Kooker, GIL, 10401; 2, Ashley James, GIL, 94-11; 6, Leanna McGregor, GIL, 81-08; 7, Courtney James, GIL, 76-08 Pole vault — 1, Tess O’Leary, PAIS, 900.00; 5, Alleya Harris, GIL, 6-00.00. Shot — 1, Kaylee Biando, PROS, 3410.50; 2, Brenna Gravitt, GIL, 30-10.25; 6, Paige Kooker, GIL, 27-02.50. Javelin — 1, Justine Bringhurst, CAMV, 101-03; 2, Leanna McGregor, GIL, 98-05; 3, Ashley James, GIL, 97-06. Triple jump — 1, Anna Rose McKay, PAIS, 32-09.5; 7, Alleya Harris, GIL, 25-05.25; 8, Sara Carlson, GIL, 20-07.25 Long jump — 1, Brenna Gravitt, GIL, 16-07.00; 5, Sydney Longbotham, GIL, 1408.00.

Lacrosse Continued from D1 “It’s been exploding over the past years,” Sisters varsity team captain Beau Fitzke said. “The past three years, actually, we’ve seen huge jumps in the amount of people here, the amount of community help we get. It’s a great fundraiser for our teams.” The festivities kicked off on Friday afternoon, when a number of high school varsity games took place. Held in conjunction with the event, the High Desert League staged its postseason tournament Friday, when Summit grabbed the league’s No. 1 seed for the Oregon High School Lacrosse Association playoffs with an overtime win against Sisters. A veritable lacrosse city served as evidence of SALI’s growth on Saturday afternoon. At Sisters High School, every available patch of grass was lined for a field, while spectators lounged in folding chairs along sidelines. Some were tempted by the food vendors set up on site, and the Bend Lax Shack peddled merchandise. Dozens of youths warmed up or just whiled the time away by practicing their passing and cradling skills. With a total of eight fields scattered across three playing sites, games were going practically from dawn until dusk on Saturday. Contests began as early as 8 a.m., and started every hour, concluding with a masters game in the evening. Gorayeb estimated that during the tournament’s two days, more than 150 games were staged. SALI also serves as a fundraiser for Outlaws Lacrosse. Proceeds from the event, including from concessions and a taco feed staged on Friday night, will go right back to local lacrosse players. The revenue helps Outlaws Lacrosse players with playing fees and equipment purchases, especially for younger participants.

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Players from a team from the Salem Keizer Youth Lacrosse League stretch out before a game on Saturday afternoon behind Sisters High School at the Sisters Annual Lacrosse Invitational.

The tournament also serves to put a spotlight on junior varsity teams, which make up a significant portion of the SALI field. JV programs just wrapped up their seasons, Summit manager and junior varsity coach Jeff Melville said. He added that the additional play is helpful developmentally. “Lacrosse is a great sport. The kids love it,” Melville said. “It’s one of the funnest sports to practice, but they get better in games. “They get better by competing against other teams. And it really helps bring them together from a camarade-

State Continued from D1 “I’ve worked a lot harder this year,” says Ostrom, who is planning to attend George Fox University in McMinnville this fall and play golf for the Bruins. “My goal this year was to break 80. I’ve done that three times now in tournaments and probably five times in full rounds.” The lone varsity golfer for the Mountain View girls, Ostrom had to get creative in finding ways to push herself this spring. “Being the lone wolf on our team — the three other girls I have are freshmen with practically no experience — she hasn’t had any competition within the team,” says Mountain View coach Jim Coon. “Par has been her main competitor this year.” Ostrom opened the season with a bang, firing a 5-over-par 77 at Bend Golf and Country Club in the Bend Invitational to break 80 for the first time in her high school career. She placed second to Odiorne at that tournament but beat the Summit standout later in the month at the Tetherow Invitational at Bend’s Tetherow Golf Club. Odiorne has quickly emerged as the top high school girls golfer in Central Oregon this season. She won five prep tournaments in 2012, including the 5A Special District 1 tourney at Broken Top Club earlier this week, in which she carded a 4-under-par 68 during the final round, a score believed to be a new course record for women. “We’ve become really good friends, gotten really close this year since we play together in every tournament,” Ostrom says about her relationship with Odiorne. “She’s really motivated me to keep getting better when no one else is pushing me. Along with

rie standpoint and a teamwork standpoint. And it’s good for them to learn the game, because there’s a lot of things that go on in a game that you can’t simulate in practice. And so the best way to prepare your JV boys for varsity is to get them some competition.” With some high-caliber varsity squads on hand, that portion of the tournament, at least to Fitzke, also has its benefits. “It’s just really awesome, I guess, just being able to go against that level of play, rather than just the Central Oregon normal that we’re used to,” Fitzke

my dad and my coach, Madison’s been a big help. My little secret goal is I really want to beat Madison.” Gradually improving all season, Ostrom saved her best score of the year for district play, recording a 74 at Broken Top Club in Bend Monday during the second round of the Class 5A Special District 1 championships. After gong 3 over par on the front nine, Ostrom tore apart the back nine, ending her round with three consecutive birdies to finish the two-day tournament in second place with 154 strokes, 12 shots better than third-place finisher Kristen Parr of Summit (166), but 13 strokes back of Odiorne, who shot 73-68—141. “I’d love to have a team, but since that wasn’t going to happen this year, my goal was to make state on my own,” says Ostrom, who tied for 13th at the state championships last season and finished tied for 26th in 2010. “I’ve learned throughout the season, sometimes I may start really rough. But I can always come back.” In other state tournaments Monday and Tuesday, the Summit boys hope to contend for the Class 5A state title at Emerald Valley Golf Club in Creswell. Storm senior Dylan Cramer is coming off a Special District 1 individual championship performance in which he shot a 66 in the second round. The Bend High boys also expect to battle for a trophy after finishing second to Summit in district play. Locally, golfers from Crook County, La Pine and Bend’s Trinity Lutheran will be competing at the Eagle Crest Resort’s Ridge Course in Redmond at the Class 4A/3A/2A/1A girls state tournament. Crook County’s Kirsti Kelso, La Pine’s Samantha McPherson and Trinity Lutheran’s Victoria Sample are all potential medalists. — Reporter: 541-383-0305, beastes@bendbulletin.com.

noted. “So it’s awesome to see where we compare when we’re headed towards playoffs because it’s later in the season now.” Of course, the “Central Oregon normal” is not so bad. At least in the case of SALI, it involves a tournament that draws thousands of participants and spectators, and a high level of community involvement. Says Gorayeb: “We’re kind of becoming a force to be reckoned with, which is really fun.” — Reporter: 541-383-0393, amiles@bendbulletin.com.

D5

Motherhood Continued from D1 Walsh and teammate Misty May-Treanor won the gold medal in Athens in 2004 and they were on their way to another win in 2008 when they announced at the Olympics that they would be taking time off afterward to start families. Walsh got right to it: She says Joey, who is about to turn 3, was conceived after she won the gold medal but before she and Jennings returned home from Beijing. Walsh took less than three months off before returning to the domestic pro tour, but soon after, she was pregnant again. Sundance — yes, the name is from “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” — arrived less than a year after his brother. “Life has changed in the best way,” Walsh said in a recent telephone interview to announce her participation in the P&G “Thank you, Mom” campaign. “The babies are the next generation. I want them to have everything I had and more.” For now, though, Walsh has to concentrate on London. After spending much of the past Olympiad playing separately — Walsh had two pregnancies to deal with, and May-Treanor tore her Achilles’ tendon in 2008 while rehearsing for “Dancing with the Stars” — they reunited last year. The two-year Olympic qualifying period ends in June, but May-Treanor and Walsh are expected to easily amass enough points on the international pro tour to earn one of the two spots for U.S. women’s teams. “Two years is a significant amount of time to take off,” said Walsh, who is trying for her fourth Olympics, having also gone to the Sydney Games in 2000 as a member of the U.S. indoor volleyball team that finished fourth. “The game changes every single year. Our main problem was our rhythm. If you have rhythm, you have confidence. We just didn’t have that this year.” With their history of success, Walsh and MayTreanor will be among the medal favorites in London. They’re already fan favorites for the American TV audience that remembers May-Treanor sprinkling her mother’s ashes in the sand before the gold medal matches in Athens and Beijing. Since joining the ranks of motherhood, Walsh has added P&G as a sponsor. She’s helping with the campaign that will raise money for youth sports programs and pay the travel costs for more than 800 mothers of U.S. Olympians and Paralympians. The company has also come out with patriotic products, like the stars and stripes Pampers that Walsh is already dressing her sons in to get them into the Olympic spirit. “I want them looking their best,” she said.

Local at state tournaments A glance at Central Oregon participants at this year’s state golf tournaments:

BOYS

GIRLS

Class 6A championship Where: At Emerald Valley Golf Club in Creswell First round: Monday, 12:15 p.m. Redmond: Mason Rodby, jr.; Ben Moore, sr.

Class 6A championship Where: At Trysting Tree Golf Club in Corvallis First round: Monday, 12:15 p.m. Redmond: Chelsea Driggers, sr.

Class 5A championship Where: At Emerald Valley Golf Club in Creswell First round: Monday, 7:30 a.m. Summit: Dylan Cramer, sr.; Cole Ortega, sr.; Ryan Blackwell, so.; Declan Watts, so.; T.K. Wasserman, so. Bend: Ryan Crownover, jr.; Jaired Rodmaker, jr.; Chapin Pedersen, so.; Jack Klar, fr.; Carter McGowan, sr. Class 4A championship Where: At Quail Valley Golf Course in Banks First round: Monday, 7:30 a.m. Crook County: Ben McLane, sr.; Billy Dockins, sr.; Hadley Reece, sr.; Shae Ross, sr.; Kody Kuk, so. Sisters: Nate Pajutee, jr.; Zach Cummings, sr.; Jaxon Stark, sr.; Tyler Berg, jr.; Nolan Ferwalt, so.

Class 5A championship Where: At Trysting Tree Golf Club in Corvallis First round: Monday, 7:30 a.m. Summit: Madison Odiorne, fr.; Madi Mansberger, jr.; Kristen Parr, sr.; Megan Mitchell, so.; Ashley Dolinar, sr. Bend: Kayla Good, sr.; Heidi Frolich, jr.; Madeline Rice, so.; Lili Bornio, sr.; Danae Walker, sr. Mountain View: Hailey Ostrom, sr. Class 4A/3A/2A/1A championship Where: At Eagle Crest Resort’s Ridge Course in Redmond First round: Monday, 8 a.m. Crook County: Kirsti Kelso, sr.; Jaci McKenzie, sr.; Kalie Solomon, sr.; Sierra Morgan, sr.; Chelsea Stark, so. La Pine: Samantha McPherson, jr.; Taylor Tavares, jr.; Bridget McDonald, jr.; Ashley Ferns, sr.; Haley Clark, sr. Trinity Lutheran: Victoria Sample, fr.


D6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

Instructor

Kevin Na hits from a bunker on the 11th hole during the third round of the Players Championship at TPC Sawgrass Saturday in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla.

Chris O’Meara / The Associated Press

Na takes lead at Players The Associated Press PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. — Kevin Na didn’t feel comfortable about anything Saturday except his name atop the leaderboard at The Players Championship. Na rolled in a 15-foot birdie putt on the 18th hole for one of only three rounds without a bogey on a tough day at the TPC Sawgrass. It gave him a 4-under 68 and a one-shot lead over Matt Kuchar as he goes after the richest prize on the PGA Tour — a five-year exemption and a spot in all the majors. For all his practice swings and waggles, even purposely missing the ball so he could start over, Na pieced together a brilliant round free of bogeys. He finished with two birdies on the last three holes to build a one-shot lead over Matt Kuchar, who hit into the water at the island-green 17th and had to settle for a 69. Rickie Fowler, coming off his first PGA Tour win last week at Quail Hollow, was dynamic as ever as he shot up the leaderboard. Fowler didn’t make a bogey until the last hole but still had the best score

G O LF R O U N D U P of the third round with a 66 and was two shots behind. He is trying to become the first player since David Duval in 1997 to win his first two PGA Tour titles in consecutive weeks. Texas Open champion Ben Curtis also played bogey-free. He just didn’t have as many birdies, missing from inside 10 feet on his last two holes for a 70. He was five shots behind, along with former Masters champion Zach Johnson (73). Tiger Woods never came close to getting into contention, though he gave himself plenty of chances. The card shows two birdies, two bogeys and a 72 that left him 10 shots out of the lead going into the final round. It was hard for him to digest. “I played well today and didn’t get anything out of that round,” Woods said. “It was probably the most solid I’ve hit the golf ball all year, actually. Even though I hit a couple off line, they were just hit dead flush. I just got nothing out of

the round.” Kuchar went eight consecutive holes without a par — six birdies and two bogeys — to seize control on a windy day at Sawgrass. But he slightly missed on his tee shot at the par-3 17th and never came close to land. He did well to hit his third shot from the drop area to 5 feet to escape with bogey. “It was exciting,” Kuchar said. “A lot of birdies and a lot more bogeys than I normally make. But I knew today was going to be a tricky day. I knew there were going to be a lot of bogeys. I knew there were dangers around every corner.” Na managed to avoid them, and now tries to become the first 54-hole leader to win The Players Championship since the tournament moved to May. “I know how to play under pressure,” Na said. “I’ve won before. I’ve been in situations like this. I’ve got to take everything I’ve learned and do my best.” He was at 12-under 204.

Na is considered among the slowest players in golf, and he was given a bad time on the 16th hole for being on the clock and taking too long to hit his shot. One more bad time and he would have become the first PGA Tour player in 20 years to be given a one-shot penalty. Also on Saturday: Del Moral takes lead after record SANTO DA SERRA, Madeira Islands — Carlos Del Moral set a European Tour record of 20 putts in a 9-under 63 for a three-shot lead after the third round of the Madeira Islands Open. Del Moral birdied his last three holes to move to 17 under for the tournament on the mountainous Santo da Serra course. The Valenciaborn Del Moral, who is seeking a first win on the European Tour, made nine one-putts on the back nine. Swedish rookie Joakim Lagergren (70) birdied the last to move to 14 under, a shot clear of a four-way tie between Swedes Mikael Lundberg (64) and Magnus Carlsson (71), Portugal’s Ricardo Santo (68) and England’s Oliver Wilson (72).

Continued from D1 Some teachers are stronger than others in certain areas. Visual learners might opt to find an instructor who uses video instruction, for instance. “You want to find an instructor who can relate to you and explain things in a way you understand them,” Ostrin says. Garza, for example, tries to keep lessons simple by giving students just a few swing keys each lesson. Some teachers are more technical. “Ultimately,” Wattenburger says, “it comes down to communication and being able to understand the points that people are getting across.” • Take it slow. To ensure that you have a good fit with your instructor before making a long-term commitment, Garza suggests taking a single lesson to start with rather than buying a package of lessons even though a package is cheaper per lesson. (Garza, for instance, charges $60 per lesson, $250 for a package of five, and $450 for 10.) “Sometimes it happens where a person takes a lesson and they just say ‘Thanks, but no thanks,’ ” says Garza. “Take one lesson and see how chemistry is with that instructor and see if you like that style of teaching.” The first lesson will be a feeling-out process for both teacher and student, Wattenburger says. That should give a golfer some idea. But if after a few lessons the relationship still is not working, Ostrin says do not be afraid to try somebody new. “If they’re professional, they are not going to be upset by the fact that you want to try somebody else,” Ostrin says. “We understand that’s the business.” • Other considerations include finding an instructor who is certified by the PGA of America, Ostrin

says. (A list of PGA-certified instructors can be found at pga.com.) “At the minimum, it shows that they have spent several years going through the training of the PGA, and I think that can be invaluable,” Ostrin says. Golfers might want to seek instruction at a conveniently located facility, making access to the lessons and practice easier, Garza says. And beginning golfers should look for on-course instruction, Garza adds. “(New golfers) don’t understand the difference between swinging a club and playing golf,” Garza says. “You can go out there and hit the ball fantastic and not score that well. And the next day you hit it like crap, but you manage the game well and chip and putt well, and you have a better score.” • Most of all, be patient with instruction. Lower handicappers tend to take longer to show results than higher handicappers, Garza says. But no golf professional offers a cure-all. “There are a lot of people who want ‘The Secret’ and show up looking for the one thing that will help them hit it straight,” Wattenburger says. “Usually that doesn’t come in one golf lesson.” • And finally, expect to spend time practicing on your own to reinforce the lessons. Ostrin says golfers should commit to at least two or three practice sessions a week, separate from lessons, and each about a half-hour long. “A lot of times people don’t realize how much extra practice may be involved,” says Ostrin. “In the end it will always come down to the blood, sweat and tears.” — Reporter: 541-617-7868, zhall@bendbulletin.com

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 E1

CLASSIFIEDS

To place your ad visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

The Bulletin

GENERAL MERCHANDISE

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

EMPLOYMENT

LEGAL NOTICES

Find Classifieds at

www.bendbulletin.com

RENTALS/REAL ESTATE

contact us:

TRANSPORTATION

hours:

Place an ad: 541-385-5809

FAX an ad: 541-322-7253

Business Hours:

Place an ad with the help of a Bulletin Classified representative between the business hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Include your name, phone number and address

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Subscriber Services: 541-385-5800

Classified Telephone Hours:

Subscribe or manage your subscription

24 Hour Message Line: 541-383-2371 Place, cancel, or extend an ad

T h e

B u l l e t i n :

1 7 7 7

On the web at: www.bendbulletin.com S . W .

C h a n d l e r

B e n d

O r e g o n

9 7 7 0 2

208

210

246

260

260

265

Pets & Supplies

Furniture & Appliances

Guns, Hunting & Fishing

Misc. Items

Misc. Items

Building Materials

Labradoodles - Mini & Moving sale – lots of med size, several colors great stuff: Hot 541-504-2662 Springs Prodigy hot www.alpen-ridge.com tub, new cover with 264 - Snow Removal Equipment ITEMS FOR SALE lift, excellent condi201 - New Today 265 - Building Materials TURN THE PAGE tion $3500; Toro 202 - Want to buy or rent 266 - Heating and Stoves Power Clear 180 For More Ads 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 267 - Fuel and Wood snow blower like new 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket The Bulletin 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers $300; 3-piece lighted 205 - Free Items 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment bookcase great con208 - Pets and Supplies dition $250; enter270 - Lost and Found 210 - Furniture & Appliances tainment center with GARAGE SALES 211 - Children’s Items DVD storage good 275 - Auction Sales condition $150 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 280 - Estate Sales 541.317.8808 215 - Coins & Stamps 281 - Fundraiser Sales 240 - Crafts and Hobbies MALTESE PUPS, AKC, NEED TO CANCEL 282 - Sales Northwest Bend toy, champion blood 241 - Bicycles and Accessories YOUR AD? lines, All shots, potty 284 Sales Southwest Bend The Bulletin 242 - Exercise Equipment training started, well 286 - Sales Northeast Bend Classifieds has an 243 - Ski Equipment socialized, 1-male "After Hours" Line 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 244 - Snowboards avail. now. 1 female & Call 541-383-2371 290 - Sales Redmond Area 245 - Golf Equipment 1 male avail June 24 hrs. to cancel 246 - Guns, Hunting and Fishing 292 - Sales Other Areas 21st. 541-233-3534 your ad! www.maiasminisupremes.com 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. FARM MARKET Recliner With Otto248 - Health and Beauty Items Maremma Guard Dog 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery man, large Stresspups, purebred, great 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 316 - Irrigation Equipment less (Ekornes),beige, dogs, $300 each, 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed good cond., $500, 541-546-6171. 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 541-383-3786. 255 - Computers Papillon beautiful pup341 Horses and Equipment pies exceptionally well256 - Photography 345 - Livestock and Equipment cared for. Registered, The Bulletin 257 - Musical Instruments 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals vet checked. $350- r ecommends extra 258 - Travel/Tickets caution when pur$450. 541-367-7766. 350 Horseshoeing/Farriers 259 - Memberships chasing products or 358 Farmer’s Column PEOPLE giving pets 260 - Misc. Items services from out of 375 Meat and Animal Processing away are advised to the area. Sending 261 - Medical Equipment be selective about the 383 - Produce and Food cash, checks, or 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. new owners. For the credit information 263 - Tools protection of the animay be subjected to mal, a personal visit to 208 208 FRAUD. For more the animal's new information about an Pets & Supplies Pets & Supplies General home is recomadvertiser, you may Merchandise Boxer, AKC, pups, born mended. call the Oregon State Attorney 3/4, $700, awesome General’s Office pups! 541.306.1504 Consumer ProtecPoodles, Apricot, 1st tion hotline at shots, dewormed, 1-877-877-9392. $300, 541-977-0035 F1b Labradoodles $800 Born 3-26-12. Call Pug, AKC, black fe202 541-977-2942 male, 7 weeks old, Want to Buy or Rent $500, 541-598-5375 Boxer/ Bulldog (Valley 212 Wanted: $Cash paid for Bulldog) new litter,CKC Queensland Heelers Antiques & Reg., taking deposits. vintage costume jewstandard & mini,$150 & Collectibles elry. Top dollar paid for $700. 541-325-3376 up. 541-280-1537 http:// rightwayranch.wordpress.com Gold/Silver.I buy by the Chihuahua Pups, 1 Antiques wanted: tools, Estate, Honest Artist white female, 1 male, Rescued adult comfurn., fishing, marbles, Elizabeth,541-633-7006 $250, 541-536-1955. Felix needs a caring panion cats FREE to old sports gear, cosseniors, disabled & tume jewelry, rock home! Adorable HiCHIHUAHUA PUPS 9 205 veterans! Tame, alposters. 541-389-1578 malayan, loves people weeks old Champion Items for Free tered, shots, ID chip, & OK with other cats. Bloodlines, 1 Blue more. Will always take Inside only. Found Female, 1 Black FeFree aged garden manback if circumstances abandoned. Altered, male, 1 Black & White ure, we load, you haul, change. Photos, info has shots, ID chip. Male $950 - $1500 5/13 only. 541-526-5708 at www.craftcats.org. $75 rehoming fee. (ph) 541-350-4810 Visit our HUGE 541-389-8420, 647-2181, 389-8420. home decor 208 541-647-2181. Find exactly what consignment store. FREE-Young mom calico Sat/Sun 1-5, other Pets & Supplies you are looking for in the New items w/4-week-old female days by appt. 65480 arrive daily! kitten. Mom is litter-box CLASSIFIEDS 78th St., Bend. 930 SE Textron, The Bulletin recomtrained and very loving. Rescued kittens/cats. Bend 541-318-1501 mends extra caution Chihuahua Pups, tea541-480-7793 65480 78th St., Bend, www.redeuxbend.com when purchascup,1st shots, wormed, Sat/Sun 1-5; other ing products or ser$250,541-977-4686 days by appt. 541- Shirley Temple Colvices from out of the 647-2181. Altered, area. Sending cash, lectible Dolls (15), shots, ID chip, more. checks, or credit innever been out of box, Info: 541-389-8420. formation may be 541-678-8249. Map, photos, more at subjected to fraud. The Bulletin reserves Golden Retrievers www.craftcats.org For more informathe right to publish all Adorable male AKC tion about an adverads from The Bulletin ready now, dew claws Spring is here and so tiser, you may call Chi/Pugs (50-50) 1 boy are baby kittens, Cennewspaper onto The @$250; 1 girl @$300; removed, 2 shots the Oregon State tral Ore is in desperBulletin Internet web2 little girls @$350. given + 2 wormings. Attorney General’s ate need of Foster Best of both breeds in site. $650 ea. 541-849Office Consumer parents, very knowlone cute pup! No tire 2388 for more details. Protection hotline at edgable people who kickers/no dog kickers! 1-877-877-9392. can help you with this 541-389-2517 GSP Pups 2 male 1 feprocess. 541-306male Black/white, 240 Don’t miss the 8462. 541-815-3966 $750. 503-566-8105 Crafts & Hobbies GUN DOG EXPO jbonomo74@gmail.com June 22-23-24, kodakool1@gmail.com, Havanese, 2.5 yr. old Portland, OR. See: Crafters Wanted male, not fix, moving WANTED tall Jack AKC German www.GunDogExpo.com Open Jury must sell, loving comRussell, female, 5-6 Shepherd Puppies Sat., May 19, 9:30 a.m. panion, great w/kids & yrs. old, or DachsEmily 541-647-8803 Highland Baptist other pets, $300, DO YOU HAVE hund female, black & Church, Redmond. 541-610-2286 or SOMETHING TO tan, 541-633-7243. Tina 541-447-1640 or 541-788-0771. SELL www.snowflakeboutique.org FOR $500 OR 210 LESS? 245 Furniture & Appliances Non-commercial Golf Equipment advertisers may A1 Washers&Dryers place an ad with Taylor Made 2.0 SuperBandit, gorgeous, so$150 ea. Full warour fast White Driver, 10.5 cial Snowshoe, found ranty. Free Del. Also "QUICK CASH reg. flex, $100; New HAVANESE puppy abandoned. Good w/ wanted, used W/D’s SPECIAL" AKC, Dewclaws, UTD Taylor made Rocket people & other cats. 541-280-7355 1 week 3 lines, $12 shots/wormer, nonballs, 3 wood, stiff Inside only. Altered, or 2 weeks, $20! shed, hypoallergenic, shaft, $125, Taylor has shots, ID chip. Ad must include Computer oak desk $850 541-460-1277. Made Ghost Putter, $75 rehoming fee. price of single item with shelf top, nice! $60, 541-420-6613. 647-2181, 389-8420. of $500 or less, or $75. 541-706-1051 multiple items HUSKY 2½-yr-old 246 GENERATE SOME exBarn cats ready to work whose total does black/white/grey Guns, Hunting citement in your in your barn, shop or not exceed $500. male. Papered/neuneighborhood! Plan a home in exchange for & Fishing tered. Fun/energetic. garage sale and don't safe shelter, food & Call Classifieds at Current on all shots. forget to advertise in 1911 Llama 9mm, $550. water. Altered, shots. 541-385-5809 $350 obo classified! We deliver! www.bendbulletin.com Bushmaster .223 AR-15, 510-326-0626 $1050. 541-647-8931 541-385-5809. 541-389-8420

200

A v e . ,

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

BUYING & SELLING All gold jewelry, silver CASH!! and gold coins, bars, For Guns, Ammo & rounds, wedding sets, Reloading Supplies. class rings, sterling sil541-408-6900. ver, coin collect, vinDon’t miss the tage watches, dental GUN DOG EXPO gold. Bill Fleming, June 22-23-24, 541-382-9419. Portland, OR. See: Captians Bed,solid wood www.GunDogExpo.com w/headboard, 3 drawers, $200, 548-9358. DO YOU HAVE Child’s Concrete Garden SOMETHING TO Bench, 10”x20”x9” tall, SELL (4) $20/ea 541-306-8631. FOR $500 OR LESS? Garden Bench, Concrete, Non-commercial 15”x30”x16” tall 2 deadvertisers may signs, $50ea, 306-8631 place an ad GENERATE SOME with our EXCITEMENT "QUICK CASH IN YOUR SPECIAL" NEIGBORHOOD. 1 week 3 lines $12 Plan a garage sale and or don't forget to adver2 weeks $20! tise in classified! Ad must 541-385-5809. include price of single item of $500 GET FREE OF CREDIT or less, or multiple CARD DEBT NOW! items whose total Cut payments by up does not exceed to half. Stop creditors $500. from calling. 866-775-9621. Call Classifieds at (PNDC) 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 3 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised must equal $200 or Less • Limit 1 ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months Call 541-385-5809 Fax 541-385-5802 Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 261

Closing Sale

Discounts, Lumber, Hardware, Fixtures & Trucks,Backstrom Builders CenterMonFri 7-5, Sat. 8-2. 224 NE Thurstone, Bend 541-382-6861 BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS Search the area’s most comprehensive listing of classiied advertising... real estate to automotive, merchandise to sporting goods. Bulletin Classiieds appear every day in the print or on line. Call 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

Medical Equipment ATTENTION DIABETICS with Medicare. Glass Blocks, 8”x8”x4”, Get a FREE talking used, some w/paint or meter and diabetic chips, 60 at $3/ea., testing supplies at NO 541-306-8631 COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best New Pavers, gray, of all, this meter elimiL-shaped, 81 @ $1.00 nates painful finger each. 541-383-4231 pricking! Call 888-739-7199. Advertise your car! (PNDC) Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

263 Call 541-385-5809 Guns collection for sale: The Bulletin Classifieds Tools Call for details, 541-504-1619. 266 scaffold boards, 16’ Kahr PM45,compact .45 Kenmore beltless up- 2 and 24’, $200 & $300. Heating & Stoves right vacuum cleaner. auto, extra magazine, 541-617-5997 Rarely used. All atlike new, $850, NOTICE TO tachments and 4200 watt generator, 541-419-7001 ADVERTISER manual. $100. ConSubaru motor, less OREGON’S LARGEST Since September 29, tact 541-318-7279. than 100 hours, GUN AND KNIFE 1991, advertising for Homelite, $350. MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. SHOW used woodstoves has 541-388-1781/771-8791 NEW! FastStart enMay 19 & 20 been limited to modgine. Ships FREE. Sat 9-6 • Sun 9-4 els which have been 265 One-Year ADM: $9 certified by the OrBuilding Materials Money-Back Guaregon Department of Portland Expo Center antee when you buy Environmental QualI-5 Exit 306B DIRECT. Call for the 32’x44’ Doug fir custom ity (DEQ) and the fedFor Info: 503-363-9564 DVD and FREE Good made log shell, $39,500 eral Environmental wesknodelgunshows.com Soil book! obo. Vacation prop avail Protection Agency at Lake Billy Chinook. 877-357-5647. Rem. auto 12 ga 2 bbls, (EPA) as having met 541-595-0246 (PNDC) $350. JC Higgins mdl smoke emission stan583-18 16 ga, $150. dards. A certified Need:2 Used 8-10’ steel 36” full view storm doors 541-617-5997. (2), bronze, $100 obo. woodstove may be pipe for gate posts, 541-389-9268 Remington 760 30-06 identified by its certifi4-6”, square,548-9619 Pump, $300; Stirling cation label, which is Bend Habitat Stepping Stones, 25 ACP, $125, permanently attached RESTORE 16x16x2, 100 at $2/ea 541-771-5648. to the stove. The BulOBO, 541-306-8631. Building Supply Resale letin will not knowRemington Model 48, Quality at LOW ingly accept advertisLook at: 20 ga, auto, $230; PRICES ing for the sale of Bendhomes.com Marlin Model 778 12 740 NE 1st uncertified ga. VR Pump, $250, for Complete Listings of 541-312-6709 woodstoves. 541-771-5648 Open to the public. Area Real Estate for Sale Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, or 2 WEEKEND EVENT - May 19th & June 2nd 503-351-2746

ESTATE AUCTION

247

Sporting Goods - Misc. Canvas Cabin tent, 15x15, w/wood burning stove, used twice, $1300. 541-389-3232 X-long goose down mummy sleeping bag. Used 1x. $150 541-593-1682 255

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer. 260

Misc. Items

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash Saxon’s Fine Jewelers 541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

The Country Inn the City B and B Estate of Lois Wolcott 1776 NE 8th St. (and Revere Ave.), Bend, OR

May 19 SATURDAY 10:00 AM 1979 GMC Mdl. 25 Dura Trick Van, needs trans. work YARD DECOR: 20-4’ sections wrought iron fencing, lots of misc. yard furniture, stepping stone fish pond/fountain, cast iron ornate table w/4 chairs, wrought iron Heart Archway, Bentwood bar, birdhouses, plants and plant accessories. FURNITURE AND INN HOUSE ITEMS: Blonde bed headboard, older bedroom furniture, large selection of lamps, wicker items, small refrigerators, 2 large chest freezers, assorted linens, new and used kitchen appliances, brass items, silver plate items, kitchen dishes, cups, glasses and miscellaneous, pressed glass, lots of jewelry, collector plates, military smalls, playing cards, framed wall prints, people and animal figurines, coffee table books, novels, kids books, Valentine collection, decorative glassware, pottery, metal tea cart, glass bells, dolls, stuffed animals (Christmas, Easter), Christmas, Easter & Halloween decor. *Way too much to list for this all day auction*

NEXT AUCTION - JUNE 2 10:00 AM **Real estate for sale by private offering • Cascade Sotheby’s Int. Realty Tanya Tonge 541-410-9910. Historic residence, 1 acre, 4 tax lots, huge Ponderosa Pine trees, 3-level home, outbuildings w/living quarters.

AUCTIONEER’S NOTE: Mrs. Wolcott ran her bed & breakfast for 20 years. She was also a collector of everything. This will be 2 long days so bring a chair.** UCTIONEER’S NOTE: Mrs. Wolco LOCATION & PARKING: at Wagner Mall North Bend, turn East on Revere, cross over 8th Street. Parking on Revere Ave. ONLY. Side gate to property on Revere Ave.

Food Available www.dennisturmon.com Check Website for Photos

HIRE THE BEST • SERVING EASTERN OREGON SINCE 1979 Preview 8:00 a.m. Sat.

10% Buyers Fee

Terms Cash or Check

Dennis Turmon Enterprises, LLC Dennis Turmon 541/923-6261

AUCTIONEER 1515 S. Bent Loop • Powell Butte, OR 97753

Car/Cell: 541/480-0795 Fax: 541/923-6316


E2 SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

PU Z ZL E A NS W ER O N PAG E E 3

PLACE AN AD

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

Monday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday. . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . 11:00 am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat.

Starting at 3 lines

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00 *Must state prices in ad

Garage Sale Special 4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . . . . $20.00

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $33.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $61.50

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

(call for commercial line ad rates)

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE; Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 267

269

269

Fuel & Wood

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

For newspaper delivery, call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email

www.hersheysoilandbark.com

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection. • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

classified@bendbulletin.com

New Pavers: 310 gray 6x6’s @ 50 cents each. 541-383-4231 Prompt Delivery Rock, Sand & Gravel Multiple Colors, Sizes Instant Landscaping Co.

541-389-9663 Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

SUPER TOP SOIL

Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949. 270

Lost & Found FOUND computer charger. 541-771-2500.

325

476

Farm Market

Hay, Grain & Feed

Employment Opportunities

300

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

308

Farm Equipment & Machinery John Deere Model 40 1955, nearly 100% Orig, runs good, exc. tin, 3 point hitch, hydraulics, light, $2000, 541-504-2891 or 541-977-3120

Found Hearing Aid, 4/6, Les Schwab Amphi- Wanted Used Farm Equipment & Machintheater, 541-617-1579 ery. Looking to buy, or consign of good used Found male, not neuquality equipment. tered orange striped Deschutes Valley cat, friendly, about 1 Equipment year. on Smith Rock 345 541-548-8385 Way 541-548-4674. Livestock & Equipment 325

280

288

Estate Sales

Sales Southeast Bend

Look What I Found! Tools! Tools! Tools! Lots of misc., some You'll find a little bit of power tools, Thur.everything in Sun., 8 am- ?, 1925 The Bulletin's daily SE Gardenia Ct. off garage and yard sale Shadowood. section. From clothes to collectibles, from housewares to hardUSE THE CLASSIFIEDS! ware, classified is always the first stop for Door-to-door selling with cost-conscious fast results! It’s the easiest consumers. And if way in the world to sell. you're planning your own garage or yard The Bulletin Classiied sale, look to the classifieds to bring in the 541-385-5809 buyers. You won't find a better place 290 for bargains! Call Classifieds: Sales Redmond Area 541-385-5809 or email Garage/Estate Sale: classified@bendbulletin.com furniture, tools, riding mower, Fri.-Sun. 8-5, 286 2335 NW 21st Ct. Sales Northeast Bend

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT at

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

Just moved Sale...downsizing! Fri,. Sat. & Sun. 9-4. Appl., furniture, art, patio & clothes. 1728 NW Jackpine Ave. 292

Sales Other Areas Huge Madras Yard Sale! Fri., Sat., & Sun., 9-5, boats, golf cart, sinks, dryer, remodeling supplies, clothing & much more! 1042 NE Meadowlark Ln. Yard sale Fri-Sat 9-4, tools, camping and hunting gear, grooming equip. 16486 Sprague Loop, La Pine follow signs.

Employment

400 421

Schools & Training

Admin Asst (part time/ weekdays) - Bend. Diverse support role. Proficient w/MS Office. Articulate, organized, team player w/ professional demeanor. Experience in service industry a plus. Submit resume w/salary requirements by 5/18/12 to employment@coar.com No phone calls.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if quali- People Look for Information fied - Housing availAbout Products and able. Call Aviation Institute of Services Every Day through The Bulletin Classifieds Maintenance. 1-877-804-5293. AV Tech - Swank Au(PNDC) dio Visuals is seeking a PT Audio Visual ATTEND COLLEGE Technician in SunriONLINE from Home. ver. For more infor*Medical, *Business, mation or to apply *Criminal Justice, please visit *Hospitality. Job www.swankav.com placement assistance. Become a Computer available. Team Member. EOE Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Banking Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.c Branch om (PNDC) Manager

Found on 5/10 in Beef Feeder Steers, Hay, Grain & Feed morning, large item in healthy, wormed & middle of Butler Mkt vaccinated, call Rd. and Hamehook 1st quality grass hay for 514-382-8393. horses. Barn stored, no Rd. Call to identify. TRUCK SCHOOL rain, 2nd cutting, $220/ Simco 17” roping 541-410-8866 or www.IITR.net ton. Patterson Ranch, saddle, $375. 541-389-6220. Redmond Campus Sisters, 541-549-3831 541-447-4576 Student Loans/Job Found Pigeon, Fryrear 3A Livestock Supplies 358 Waiting Toll Free Rd., Fri. 5/4, call to ID, •Panels •Gates •Feeders 1-888-438-2235 Farmers Column 541-617-1716. Now galvanized! •6-Rail 12’ panels, $101 454 10X20 STORAGE Found wedge, Greens •6-Rail 16’ panels, $117 Looking for Employment BUILDINGS at Redmond golf Custom sizes available for protecting hay, course, call to I.D. 541-475-1255 Current COCC 4.0 GPA firewood, livestock 541-388-1533 graduate in Bus. Adetc. $1496 Installed. Just bought a new boat? ministration/Account541-617-1133. Sell your old one in the REMEMBER: If you ing, looking for entryCCB #173684. have lost an animal, classiieds! Ask about our level bookkeeping or kfjbuilders@ykwc.net Super Seller rates! don't forget to check management position. 541-385-5809 The Humane Society Horse Pasture For 541-610-7040. in Bend 541-382-3537 Want to buy Alfalfa Rent, 2.5 acres, irriRedmond, gated w/cover, $369 470 standing, in Central 541-923-0882 for season, Ore. 541-419-2713 Domestic & Prineville, 541-610-4006. In-Home Positions 541-447-7178; Wheat Straw: Certified & Want to buy Alfalfa OR Craft Cats, Bedding Straw & Garden standing, in Central Full-time live in car541-389-8420. Straw;Compost.546-6171 Ore. 541-419-2713 egiver wanted for Elderly man, room & board + salary. 541-554-2149.

John Day, Oregon Advanced knowledge & experience in finance & operations. See Old West Federal Credit Unions website for job description & online application. www.oldwestfcu.org

EOE DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

541-385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at:

www.bendbulletin.com

Management Coordinator CROOK COUNTYCentral Oregon Health Board Quality Management Coordinator $52,415- $56,465 Full time w/benefits Closes: June 4, 2012 at 5:00 p.m. The Central Oregon Health Board is seeking an experienced Quality Management Coordinator. The successful candidate must have a Master’s degree in social services and/or be an RN, and have three years post licensure or certification experience in psychiatric and substance abuse health care, knowledge of national healthcare standards, and experience in managing a quality management program. Experience managing quality management services in an HMO environment preferred. Applications and full job description can be found at www.co.crook.or.us . Please apply at the Crook County Treasurer’s/Tax Office at 200 NE 2nd ST, Prineville, OR 97754; 541-447-6554.

Developmental Disabilities Program Manager Community Counseling Solutions has a full time salaried position open for a Developmental Disabilities Program Manager based in our John Day, OR office. Qualified Applicant will have a Bachelors degree in a behavioral, social, health science, public administration, or human service administration and a minimum of fours years experience, with at least two of those years of experience in developmental disability services that provided recent experience in program management, fiscal management and staff supervision, or six years of experience in supervision or six years of experience staff technical or professional level work related to developmental disability services. The DD program manager provides supervision and oversight of the developmental disabilities programs in three counties (Lake, Harney and Grant) and works under the direction of the site manager. Must have excellent communication skills. Wages are $34,92052,380, DOEE. Excellent benefits. For an application, please contact Thad Labhart at 541-575-1466 or email at tlabhart@gobhi.net. You can also download an application at www.communitycounselingsolutions.org . Position open until filled.

Advertising Account Executive

The Bulletin is looking for a professional and driven sales and marketing person to help our customers grow their businesses with an expanding list of broad-reach and targeted products. This full time position requires a background in consultative sales, territory management and aggressive prospecting skills. Two years of media sales experience is preferable, but we will train the right candidate. The position offers a competitive compensation package including benefits, and rewards an aggressive, customer focused salesperson with unlimited earning potential. Please send your resume, cover letter and salary history to: Sean L. Tate Advertising Manager state@bendbulletin.com You may also drop off your resume in person or mail it to: 1777 SW Chandler, Bend, OR 97701. No phone inquiries please. EOE / Drug Free Workplace Sell an Item

Garage Sales

FAST!

Garage Sales

If it's under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for: $10 - 3 lines, 7 days

Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classiieds!

$16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

541-385-5809


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Medical Assistant Experience required. We are looking for a energetic dependable and outgoing person to join our team. We offer a superior salary, excellent benefit package and a four day work week. Typing and computer skills beneficial. Dermatology experience a plus. Outstanding patient care, team player and attention to detail a must. Position involves a variety of job duties in a fast paced work environment. Fax your resume with a cover letter to 541-323-2174 or email jodi@centraloregondermatology.com. No phone calls please.

MENTAL HEALTH THE CHILD CENTER A Circle of Care for Children & Families A treatment program for emotionally, behaviorally disturbed children and their families has openings for:

General Central Oregon Community College has openings listed below. Go to https://jobs.cocc.edu to view details & apply online. Human Resources, Metolius Hall, 2600 NW College Way, Bend OR 97701; (541)383 7216. For hearing/ speech impaired, Oregon Relay Services number is 7-1-1. COCC is an AA/EO employer. Office Specialist, Campus Public Safety Act as department receptionist, dispatcher, and clerical assistant for the Campus Public Safety Office. Provide general office functions for the department. $1921-$2287/mo. Closes May 28.

________________ Assistant Professor I of Emergency Medical Services (Tenure Track) Provide paramedic program courses instruction. See website for required qualifications. Start Fall 2012. $38,209-$46,309 for 9 months/yr. Closes May 28. Assistant Professor, Culinary Arts Cascade Culinary Institute Provide instruction in the discipline of Culinary Arts and restaurant operations. Start Fall 2012. $38,209-$46,309 for 9 months/yr. Closes May 30. Adjunct Instructor of Baking and Pastry, Cascade Culinary Institute Provide instruction in the discipline of Baking and Pastry Arts. Start Fall 2012. $500 per load unit. Closes Jun 5. Part-Time Instructors NEW! Outdoor Leadership, Veterinary Technician, Fine Arts & Music COCC is always looking for talented individuals to teach part-time in a variety of disciplines. Check our web site for instructor needs. All positions pay $500 per load unit (1 LU = 1 class credit), with additional perks. HOTEL - The Riverhouse is seeking a detail-oriented person with strong customer service skills to work Night Audit. Previous computer skills required. Benefits include insurance and free golf. Please apply at 3075 N Hwy 97 or online at www.riverhouse.com PRE EMPLOYMENT DRUG SCREENING REQUIRED. HOTEL - The Riverhouse is seeking a Front Desk Agent. Applicants must work a varied schedule, excel in customer service, have basic computer & cash handling skills. Previous experience is preferred. Bring resume and apply in person at The Riverhouse, 3075 N Hwy 97, Bend, OR. Or apply and submit cover letter/resume on line at: www.riverhouse.com PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG SCREENING REQUIRED. Housekeeping; room prep and quality control. Hotel resort exp. preferred. Part time/Weekend. Please apply at Worldmark Eagle Crest, 1522 Cline Falls Rd., Redmond (3rd floor of Hotel) Maintenance Tech Part-time position, variable schedule, drug free environment. WorldMark Eagle Crest. Call Dennis for Appt. 541-923-3564. Nurse Practitioners Part Time (24 hours per week) position available at our On-Site Chronic Disease Management Clinic Located in Bend, OR. • Must by proficient in Phlebotomy • Must be licensed as a Nurse Practitioner and in the state of Oregon. • Must have Two - Five years of professional clinical experience. Contact Genni Fairchild at 704-529-6161 for more info. Please fax to 704-323-7931 or email to genni.fairchild@healthstatinc.c om

Mental Health Clinician: Adult Consumer Center

Behavioral Support Specialist

Redmond School Dist. BA or BS degree. Experience with special needs children required. Eligible for certification as a “QMHA”. Salary range $20,027 $22,016, 1 FTE.

Child/Family Therapists

Redmond & Bend Areas

Minimum qualifications MA or MS degree in psychology, education or allied field. Salary range $31,056 to $34,280 1 FTE.

Receptionist

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Payroll/Human Resource Administrator for Gilchrist area. 40-45K/yr. Interested candidates please submit resume for consideration to Jennifer.clemens@ expresspros.com

Teacher Teacher for Youth Challenge Program, located 9 miles East of Bend, must be able to teach multiple subjects, Oregon certification needed. Must be creative and work well within a team setting. For application packet and information call Cascade Educational Services, 541-771-5616

Manufacturing Associates needed for immediate openings. Must be able to lift up to 75lbs and pass a math and mechanical aptitude tests. $10/hr. Call 541-389-1505 to set up appointment. Flaggers needed for immediate openings must have flagging certification. $11/hr. Call 541-389-1505 to set up an appointment. Construction accounting clerk. $14-15/hr. Submit resume to Jennifer.clemens@ expresspros.com.

Just too many collectibles?

(part-time to possible 1 FTE)

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Finance & Business

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 E3 THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE ANSWER

500 528

Loans & Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Ever Consider a Reverse Mortgage? At least 62 years old? Stay in your home & PUZZLE IS ON PAGE E2 increase cash flow! Safe & Effective! Call 573 573 Now for your FREE DVD! Call Now Business Opportunities Business Opportunities 888-785-5938. A Classified ad is an Safely select, evaluate, (PNDC) EASY WAY TO finance & succeed in a Every day thousands REACH over 3 million Franchise Business. LOCAL MONEY:We buy Pacific Northwestern- www.frannet.com/msipe of buyers and sellers secured trust deeds & ers. $525/25-word 541-610-5799 Good classiied ads tell of goods and services note,some hard money classified ad in 30 the essential facts in an loans. Call Pat Kelley do business in these daily newspapers for interesting Manner. Write 541-382-3099 ext.13. pages. They know 3-days. Call the PaFind exactly what from the readers view - not you can’t beat The cific Northwest Daily the seller’s. Convert the Connection (916) you are looking for in the Bulletin Classiied Garage Sales facts into beneits. Show CLASSIFIEDS 288-6019 or email Section for selection the reader how the item will elizabeth@cnpa.com Garage Sales and convenience help them in some way. for more info (PNDC) - every item is just a Garage Sales SOCIAL SECURITY phone call away. Advertise VACATION DISABILITY BENSPECIALS to 3 milFind them EFITS. WIN or Pay lion Pacific NorthNothing! Start Your in westerners! 30 daily Application In Under newspapers, six The Bulletin 60 Seconds. Call Tostates. 25-word clasday! Contact DisabilClassiieds Thousands of ads daily sified $525 for a 3-day ity Group, Inc. Liin print and online. ad. Call (916) The High Desert censed Attorneys & 541-385-5809 288-6019 or visit To place your ad, visit Museum is seeking BBB Accredited. Call www.pnna.com/advert www.bendbulletin.com individuals with an 888-782-4075. ising_pndc.cfm for the 573 or call 541-385-5809 enthusiasm and love (PNDC) Pacific Northwest for the High Desert Business Opportunities Daily Connection. Region to join our (PNDC) team. We have the WARNING The Bulletin following open recommends that you A Soda/Snack Vending positions: investigate every Route! Machines & phase of investment Big $$ Locations. $9K • Seasonal Rimrock opportunities, espeinvestment. Must Sell! Café Associates cially those from 1-800-367-6709 ext 895 • Seasonal Custodian out-of-state or offered • Seasonal Costumed by a person doing Extreme Value AdverCharacter business out of a lotising! 30 Daily newscal motel or hotel. Inpapers $525/25-word For more information vestment offerings classified, 3-days. please visit our web must be registered Reach 3 million Pasite at: with the Oregon Decific Northwesterners. www.highdesertmuseum.org partment of Finance. For more information We suggest you concall (916) 288-6019 or To apply, e-mail cover sult your attorney or email: letter & resume to call CONSUMER elizabeth@cnpa.com jobs@highdesertmuseum.org HOTLINE, for the Pacific Northor fax to 541-382-5256. 1-503-378-4320, west Daily ConnecNo calls, please. 8:30-noon, Mon.-Fri. tion. (PNDC)

Sell them in Minimum qualifications The Bulletin Classiieds high school graduate, experience working with the public in a some541-385-5809 times busy and confined area. Ability to in- Remember.... We are recruiting for a crease to full time as Add your web admaster’s level MH cli- need be. dress to your ad and nician, preferably lireaders on The censed, to facilitate Generous employee treatment with indi- benefit package: MediBulletin' s web site viduals who have se- cal, dental, vision, prewill be able to click vere and persistent scription, through automatically life, TSAmental illness. Posi- employer to your site. sponsored, tion primarily involves vacation. facilitating individual Resort and group treatment email: and supervision at our adult mental health Lcbmsw@earthlink.net or mail resume consumer center. ExAttn: LCB to: perience working with The Child Center diverse populations a huge plus; we are an 3995 Marcola Road, OR 97477 EOE. This is a Springfield, EOE Join our team at full-time position with Central Oregon’s benefits and a comFinest Resort. The petitive salary based Mortgage Loan Officer Ranch has the folupon experience and lowing current posicredentials. Submit tions available: resume and a cover letter to: Program Di- SELCO is looking for a GOLF SHOP full time Mortgage rector, BestCare •Administrative/ Loan Officer for CenTreatment Services, Merchandising tral Oregon. 125 SW C Street, Assistant Madras, Oregon The successful candi-Full-Time positiondate will promote 97741; or em-mail: Benefit Eligible SELCO Mortgage heatherc@bestcareGLAZE MEADOW Company and genertreatment.org ate sales primarily SPA Transportation through outside con• Nail Technician Call a Pro tact with realtors, -Full-Time positionOREGON contractors and poFull-Time hours Whether you need a DEPARTMENT OF tential customers and FACILITIES TRANSPORTATION fence ixed, hedges clients. Must have •Night Full-Time trimmed or a house three (3) years of diJanitorial Staff Traffic Systems rect mortgage lending LODGE & built, you’ll ind Technician 3 – Bend experience, valid ROBERT’S PUB professional help in driver's license and •AM/PM Servers This position directly The Bulletin’s “Call a must be bondable. •Line Cooks supports traffic and This position receives Glaze Meadow & Service Professional” design engineers in competitive compenBig Meadow solving practical Directory sation with full benSNACK SHOPS problems in the de541-385-5809 efits. •Grill Cooks sign, construction, To learn more about -all shifts and operation of intelthis position and apMental Health ligent transportation SPECIAL EVENTS ply visit our website at Clinician: Child & •Servers systems and their www.selco.org. ComFamily Services component subLAKESIDE pleted applications systems. This journey BISTRO may be returned to level position requires •Attendants any SELCO Branch or timely and expert apmailed to: SELCO All F & B positions plication of electronic Community CU, Attn: and software stanrequire a food hanHR, PO Box 7487, dardized practices to dlers card (OLCC is Eugene, OR 97401. extend the life and required for servers). SELCO is an Equal improve design of exExcellent seasonal We are recruiting for a Opportunity Employer. isting and future sysbenefits. Apply onmaster’s level child/ tems. To apply, visit line at family MH clinician, www.odotjobs.com or http://www.jobs@bla preferably licensed, to Where can you ind a call (866) ckbutteranch.com join our team in sunny helping hand? ODOT-JOBS or 711 or contact HR at Central Oregon. PosiFrom contractors to (Relay Operator for 541-595-1523. Black tion primarily involves the Deaf). Refer to Butte Ranch is a facilitating individual yard care, it’s all here Announcement drug-free workplace. and family therapy in in The Bulletin’s #ODOT12-0093oc. EOE an outpatient commu“Call A Service Application deadline: nity mental health May 20, 2012 @11:59 program, as well as Professional” Directory PM. ODOT is an health assessments Retail Sales AA/EEO Employer, and crisis work. ExpeDesign Oriented committed to building rience working with Operations Manager workforce diversity. diverse populations a Fast-growing, dynamic Furniture Outlet, investment firm in huge plus; we are an Bend is seeking an part-time, expe- Utility Locator - Full EOE. This is a time, needed. Must Operations Manager. full-time position with rience is helpful. pass background & Position entails back benefits and a comSerious applidriving expectations. office, administrative, petitive salary, based cants with proGreat Benefits & 401 and client servicing upon experience and offered. Please email fessional apduties. Additionally, credentials. Submit resume to person will provide pearance apply resume and a cover andrea@sctrl.com assistance in data letter to: Program Diin person at: collection for the firector, BestCare nancial planning deTreatment Service, Looking for your next 1735 NE Hwy 20, partment. Experi125 SW C Street, employee? Bend. ence in an investment Madras, Oregon Place a Bulletin help firm environment 97741; or e-mail: wanted ad today and preferred, but not heatherc@bestcareSALES - RAISE $ FOR reach over 60,000 necessary. Ideal treatment.org THE POOR. Redreaders each week. candidate: reliable, mond phone center, Your classified ad motivated, creative, up to $12/hr for qualiwill also appear on Get your team player, mature, fied indidividuals. No bendbulletin.com goal-oriented, percold calls. Mark, business which currently sonable, well-orga503-257-0100 receives over 1.5 nized, and have million page views up-to-date computer Security GROW every month at skills across typical See our website for our no extra cost. platforms. Compenavailable Security poBulletin Classifieds with an ad in sation: $35K plus bositions, along with the Get Results! The Bulletin’s nus and benefits. In42 reasons to join our Call 385-5809 terested parties may team! “Call A Service or place www.securityprosbend.com send resume to: your ad on-line at Professional” resume@valentineventures.com bendbulletin.com No calls please. Directory

ING

Clearance. Clearance. Clearance.

Where buyers meet sellers.

Executive Director CROOK COUNTYCentral Oregon Health Board Executive Director $82,296- $83,530 Full time w/benefits Closes: June 4, 2012 at 5:00 p.m. The Central Oregon Health Board is seeking an experienced health care professional to serve as Executive Director. The successful candidate must have a Master’s degree in a social service field and a minimum of five years progressive and proven leadership skill in a county Mental Health Program or Mental Health Organization. The position requires an understanding of the dynamics and sensitivities of the Oregon Coordinated Care Organization transformation and specific executive level leadership in project management, organizational development, government relations and contract negotiations is required. Applications and full job description can be found at www.co.crook.or.us . Please apply at the Crook County Treasurer’s/Tax Office at 200 NE 2nd ST, Prineville, OR 97754; 541-447-6554. SOCIAL WORKER (MSW) Established hospice, serving the community of Klamath Falls for 29 years, is recruiting for a full-time MSW to join our interdisciplinary team. Position is responsible for delivery of varied social work services to hospice patients and families, including: initial psychosocial evaluations, ongoing psychosocial counseling, direct casework services, and bereavement services. Requirements: • Master's Degree of Social Work from school accredited/approved by the Council on Social Work Education • A demonstrated ability in casework, counseling & group work, including clinical social work experience preferably in a healthcare or hospice setting • Computer literacy w/Microsoft Office programs • Possess valid state driver's license and reliable automobile, and be willing to operate personal car as necessitated by nature of job Excellent Benefits Package: • Fully paid medical & dental (begins on the 1st of month, following date of hire) • Fully paid short-long-term disability and life insurance • 25 days of paid time off. For additional information, contact Trebor at 541-882-2902 or e-mail her at treborm@klamthhospice.org.

DESCHUTES COUNTY CAREER OPPORTUNITIES ASSESSMENT TECHNICIAN II (2012-00034) – Assessor’s Office. Full-time position $2,582 - $3,533 per month for a 172.67 hour work month. Deadline: MONDAY, 05/20/12. BEHAVIORAL HEALTH DEPUTY DIRECTOR (2012-00022) – Behavioral Health Division. Full-time position $7,036 - $9,451 per month for a 172.67 hour work month. DEADLINE DATE EXTENDED, OPEN UNTIL FILLED, WITH SECOND REVIEW OF APPLICATIONS ON TUESDAY, 05/22/12. COURT SERVICES ASSISTANT (201200033) – Justice Court in Redmond. Fulltime position $2,582 - $3,533 per month for a 172.67 hour work month. Deadline: SUNDAY, 05/20/12. DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PROGRAM MANAGER (2012-00010) - Behavioral Health Division. Full-time position $5,933 $7,970 per month for a 172.67 hour work month. DEADLINE DATE EXTENDED, OPEN UNTIL FILLED, WITH SECOND REVIEW OF APPLICATIONS ON MONDAY, 06/18/12. MENTAL HEALTH SPECIALIST I, Assertive Community Treatment Team (2012-00011) - Behavioral Health Division. Full-time position $3,320 - $4,544 per month for a 172.67 hour work month. DEADLINE DATE EXTENDED: MONDAY, 05/21/12. MENTAL HEALTH SPECIALIST I, Community Support Services Team (2012-00012) - Behavioral Health Division. Full-time position will work in Redmond & Bend offices, $3,320 - $4,544 per month for a 172.67 hour work month. DEADLINE DATE EXTENDED: MONDAY, 05/21/12. TO APPLY ONLINE FOR THE ABOVE LISTED POSITIONS, PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT www.deschutes.org/jobs Deschutes County Personnel Dept., 1300 NW Wall Street, Suite 201, Bend, OR 97701 (541) 388-6553.

541-385-5809

Deschutes County provides reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities. This material will be furnished in alternative format if needed. For hearing impaired, please call TTY/TDD 711. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

E4 SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Rentals RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condos & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space Take care of your investments with the help from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 730 - New Listings 732 - Commercial Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condos & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

Want to impress the relatives? Remodel your home with the help of a professional from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Say “goodbuy” to that unused item by placing it in The Bulletin Classiieds

541-385-5809

600 Need help ixing stuff? Call A Service Professional ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

personals

630

659

744

762

775

Rooms for Rent

Houses for Rent Sunriver

Open Houses

Homes with Acreage

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Studios & Kitchenettes Furnished room, TV w/ In River Meadows a 3 cable, micro & fridge. bdrm, 1.5 bath, 1376 Utils & linens. New sq. ft., woodstove, owners.$145-$165/wk brand new carpet/oak 541-382-1885 floors, W/S pd, $895. 541-480-3393 634 or 541-610-7803 Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 1, 2 & 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625. 541-330-0719

Kim, Professionally When the next estate managed by sale has worn you Norris & Stevens, Inc. out, take a chance. They say Columbus Close in 2 bdrm, 1 bath did, and look what he WSG, yard maint. incl. found - a whole new No smoking/No pets. world. You just might $725 per mo. with do the same. Give me dep. 541-382-0088 a call. --Steve Call for Specials! Look at: Limited numbers avail. Bendhomes.com 1, 2 & 3 bdrms for Complete Listings of w/d hookups, patios or decks. Area Real Estate for Sale Mountain Glen 541-383-9313

announcements RON PAUL Sign Wave May 12th in Bend along 3rd and Greenwood Ave; from 1 PM to 3 PM. Please bring your friends, family, and Ron Paul signs to this event (we have signs). 541-279-4202 CentralOR4RP@ gmail.com

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Located by BMC/Costco, 2 bdrm, 2 bath duplex, 55+,2350 NEMary Rose Pl, #1, $795 no smoking or pets, 541-390-7649 !! NO APP FEE !! 2 bdrm, 1 bath $530 & 540 W/D hook-ups & Heat Pump. Carports & Pet Friendly Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

636

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily VILLAGE PROPERTIES Sunriver, Three Rivers, La Pine. Great Selection. Prices range $425 - $2000/mo. View our full inventory online at Village-Properties.com 1-866-931-1061 682

Farms, Ranches & Acreage

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Debris Removal

Landscaping/Yard Care

Landscaping/Yard Care

Landscaping/Yard Care

More Than Service Peace of Mind

Office/Warehouse located in SE Bend. Up to 30,000 sq.ft., comon Wall Street in petitive rate, Bend, with parking. All 541-382-3678. utilities paid. Call 541-389-2389 for appt Warehouse - Industrial 638 unit for rent. 5600 sq.ft., $2250/month, Apt./Multiplex SE Bend near Bend High. 541-389-8794. A Sharp Clean 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath apt., NEW CARPETS, neutral colors, great storage, Real Estate private patio, no pets/ For Sale smoking, $530 incl. W/S/G, 541-633-0663 640

Spring Clean Up

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

•Leaves •Cones •Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration •Dethatching Compost Top Dressing

ORGANIC PROGRAMS

Landscape Maintenance

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding Sprinkler Adjustments

Fertilizer included with monthly program Weekly, monthly or one time service.

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Domestic Services

Cleaning Services & More! We don’t cut corners we clean them! Hauling, clear outs, touch ups, no jobs too big or small - just Call Shelly, 541-526-5894 Home is Where the Dirt Is! 10 years Experience Clean Vacant Residences & Businesses. References Crecencia & Norma, 541-306-7426

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates!

541-385-5809

4270 sq ft, 6bd, 6ba, 4-car, corner, .83 ac, mtn view, by owner. $590,000 541-390-0886 See: bloomkey.com/8779

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809 Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com 771

Lots

Custom Home Lots Available in NorthWest Crossing.

Tick, Tock Tick, Tock... ...don’t let time get away. Hire a professional out of The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory today! 780

The Garner Group 541-383-4360

Mfd./Mobile Homes with Land Bank owned Homes on land start at $69,950. Call John at 541-350-1782 for details.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads The Bulletin

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

Search for Listings On our Web Site www.thegarnergroup.com The Garner Group 541-383-4360

541-385-5809

648

Houses for Rent General

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

700

Spacious 2 bdrm 1½ bath townhouse, w/d 740 hkup, fenced yd. NO PETS. Great loc! Condo/Townhomes $565 & up. 179 SW for Sale Hayes 541-382-0162; 541-420-0133 Splendid View, Furnished, 1 bdrm, 2 bath 642 condo, $85,000. Apt./Multiplex Redmond Fronts on River, scenic balcony vistas. All 1811 SW 21st Quiet utilitiess. paid. includspacious 2/2 duplex, ing cable tv, internet, gorgeous fenced yard 541-326-7063 after w/garage. Mint cond! 6 pm. W/S/G pd, pet ok. $715. 541-409-2175 Widgi Creek, 17th Fairway, 2 bdrm, 2.5 3 bdrm, 2½ bath 2-story, bath, fully furnished, 2 in Redmond, W/D car garage, exc. rental hookup, Fenced yard, history, $270,000, no smoking. $725 mo., 503-799-1571. Megan 541-771-6599

Weed free Bark & flower beds

Homes for Sale

1592 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2 bath, site-built, 2 car 10 year warranty! Start attached heated gaat 40 per Sq. Ft. More rage, 24x36 heated, Sq. Feet for less. Call finished shop w/10’ John at J & M Homes, ceilings & 220V power, 541-548-5511 all on 1.22 treed acre lot in CRR, too much to list, $195,000 call 2 bed, 1 bath $13,000. 2 bed, 1 bath $23,900. 541-633-9613. 3 bed, 2 bath $25,900. 3 bed, 2 bath $18,000. 5 Acres in CRR - w/ mobile home, carport Call J & M Homes for details, & large shop, 541-548-5511 $97,500, owner will carry, 559-627-4933.

NOTICE:

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Fully furnished loft Apt

Building/Contracting

745

Tumalo 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 2000 sw.ft. home with BANK OWNED HOMES! FREE List w/Pics! horse property. Large arena- barn houses www.BendRepos.com bend and beyond real estate 72x180 indoor arena, 20967 yeoman, bend or 25 stalls, 2 offices, 2 tack rooms, guest Take care of quarters, exercise room, game room & your investments viewing area w/ bar. with the help from Large outdoor arena Paddocks w/horse The Bulletin’s safe fencing & shel“Call A Service ters, beautiful pond. $3000/mo. Professional” Directory 541-327-8100

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Closed Sunday For Mother’s Day Watch for Next Week’s Open Homes The Garner Group 541-383-4360

Need to get an ad in ASAP? You can place it online at: www.bendbulletin.com

Alfalfa area, 2BR, 1 BA on 2 fenced ac. Quiet; pets considered. $750 Painting/Wall Covering + last + dep. References. 541-383-9074 Rented your property? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line. Call 541-383-2371 24 hours to cancel your ad!

541-385-5809

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Landscape Construction which includes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-features, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be licensed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be included in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before contracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend A quiet newer 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1692 sq.ft., mtn views. dbl. garage w/opener. $1195 541-480-3393,610-7803. When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

Call 541-385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com, currently receiving over 1.5 million page views, every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Handyman

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Clean small 2 bdrm. Large yard. Wood heat. $750+ last + dep. Local ref. No pets. 1015 NW Ogden. RV/Marine

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, W/D, fenced yard, clubhouse & pool, $1000/ mo., 12 mo lease, 503-798-1595. 658

Houses for Rent Redmond Avail. Now - 4 bdrm, 2 bath, family room, 3716 NW Arrowhead Ln pets w/dep, no smoking, $900, 541-526-0260 Terrebonne remodeled 3 bedroom, 1 bath, garage, fenced back yard. Pets considered. $795 + last and deposit. 541-420-9432.

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or 541-385-5809 Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30am to 5:00pm Telephone Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30am - 5pm • Saturday 10am - 12:30pm 24 Hour Message Line: 541-383-2371: Place, cancel, or extend an ad after hours. 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

Boats & RV’s

870

880

881

882

882

885

885

Motorcycles & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Fifth Wheels

Canopies & Campers

Canopies & Campers

Coachman Freelander 2011, 27’, queen bed, 1 slide, HD TV, DVD player, 450 Ford, $49,000, please call 541-923-5754.

SPRINGDALE 2005 27’, has eating area slide, A/C and heat, new tires, all contents included, bedding towels, cooking and eating utensils. Great for vacation, fishing, hunting or living! $15,500 541-408-3811

800 Yamaha F26R 2009, Low miles. $6999, Vin# BP50412 Snowmobiles Pro Caliber Motorsports 866-949-8607 Polaris 2003, 4 cycle, fuel inj, elec start, re865 verse, 2-up seat, ATVs cover, 4900 mi, $2500 obo. 541-280-0514 We buy motorcycles, 860 ATV’s, snowmobiles Motorcycles & Accessories & watercrafts. Call Ken at CRAMPED FOR 541-647-5151. 850

CASH?

Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 541-385-5809

Harley Davidson SoftTail Deluxe 2007, white/cobalt, w/passenger kit, Vance & Hines muffler system & kit, 1045 mi., exc. cond, $19,999, 541-389-9188.

Yamaha YFZ450 Sport Quad, 2005, new pipe & jet kit, too much to list, fast, fun bike, $3200 obo. 541-647-8931

Harley Heritage Softail, 2003 $5,000+ in extras, $2000 paint job, 30K mi. 1 owner, For more information please call 541-385-8090 or 209-605-5537

The Bulletin Classiieds

HD FAT BOY 1996

Boats & Accessories

Completely rebuilt/ customized, low miles. Accepting offers. 541-548-4807 HONDA CRF 250X 2006, senior citizen bought new in 2007, trail riding only in Camp Sherman, low hours, not ridden last year, JD jetting kit, radiator & trans. guards, exc. cond., $3200 OBO, 541-595-2559

Honda Elite 110 2010, Save tons on gas. $2499, Vin# B50394 Pro Caliber Motorsports 866-949-8607

Honda NT 700 2010, Tons of extras. $9999, Vin # B50416 Pro Caliber Motorsports 866-949-8607

Need to get an ad in ASAP? Fax it to 541-322-7253

870

12.6’ Smoker Craft ‘92, 15HP Evinrude ‘95; 30# thrust MinnKota trolling motor, all perf. cond.!!! E-Z Load trailer, Hummingbird fish finder, oars, rod holders, seats, 2 anchors & boat cover. $2450obo. 541-408 5256

12’ alum. Sea King with NEW: seats, cover, 6hp Nissan 4-stroke; also trolling, fish finder, trlr. $1500. 541-312-4504 12' Smokercraft 2000 & trailer. 2007 9.9 HP Johnson w/less than 5 hrs use, Exc. shape. $3200, Call 360-903-7873 to view. In town. 13’ Smokercraft 1997, Alaskan Fish Boat w/ 9.9 Merc & elec. motor, swivel seat, fish finder, anchor, cover & top, trailer, $2450, 541-977-2644.

Honda Shadow Arrow 2006, exc cond, low miles, always garaged, $3900 obo. 541-420-4869

Honda VT700 Shadow 1984, 23K, many new parts, battery charger, good condition, $3000 OBO. 541-382-1891

Suzuki C50T 2007, Ready for the open Road! $5999, Vin# BP50406. Pro Caliber Motorsports 866-949-8607

Suzuki GSXR600 2004, Must See! $6999, Vin# BP50415. Pro Caliber Motorsports 866-949-8607

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 E5

860

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

25’ Catalina Sailboat 1983, w/trailer, swing keel, pop top, fully loaded, $9500 call for details, 541-480-8060 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

A Project: 1971 21’ Fiberform, cabin style, good 2 axle trailer, $450 OBO, 541-382-2577 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Springdale 2012 18’ used 3 times (divorce sale) $10,900 OBO. 503-778-0002

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds Roamin Chariot pop-up camper, fits small pickup, good shape, USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! jacks & stand. $2400. Lance 9.5’ 1994, X-cab Komfort 24’ 1999, 6’ 541-325-6548 camper, sleeps 5, A/C, slide, fully loaded,never Door-to-door selling with furnace/catylitic heater, used since buying, fast results! It’s the easiest fantastic fan, in/outside $8500, 541-923-0854. way in the world to sell. showers, manual jacks, Find It in very good cond., The Bulletin Classifieds! The Bulletin’s The Bulletin Classiied $5500, 541-408-0538 “Call A Service 541-385-5809 541-385-5809 or 541-408-3118. Professional” Directory is all about meeting your needs.

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide,Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent Hunter’s Delight! Packcondition, $16,900, age deal! 1988 Win541-390-2504 nebago Super Chief, Call on one of the 38K miles, great professionals today! shape; 1988 Bronco II 4x4 to tow, 130K mostly towed miles, nice rig! $15,000 both. 541-382-3964, leave msg. Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 29’, weatherized, like new, furnished & MONTANA 3585 2008, CAN’T BEAT THIS! exc. cond., 3 slides, ready to go, incl WineLook before you king bed, lrg LR, Arcgard Satellite dish, buy, below market $26,995. 541-420-9964 tic insulation, all opvalue ! Size & miletions $37,500. age DOES matter, 541-420-3250 Class A 32’ Hurricane by Four Winds, 2007. 12,500 mi, all amenities, Ford V10, lthr, cherry, slides, Weekend Warrior Toy like new, can see Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, anytime, $58,000. fuel station, exc cond. 541-548-5216 sleeps 8, black/gray Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th wheel, 1 slide, AC, interior, used 3X, TV,full awning, excel$24,999. lent shape, $23,900. 541-389-9188 541-350-8629

Jayco Greyhawk 2004, 31’ Class C, 6800 mi., hyd. jacks, new tires, slide out, exc. cond, $49,900, 541-480-8648

882

Fifth Wheels

541-389-0435 875

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kay- National Sea Breeze 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, aks, rafts and motor2 power slides, upized personal graded queen matwatercrafts. For tress, hyd. leveling "boats" please see system, rear camera Class 870. & monitor, only 6k mi. 541-385-5809 A steal at $43,000! 541-480-0617

2002 Country Coach Intrigue 40' Tag axle. 400hp Cummins Diesel. Two slide-outs. 41,000 miles. Most options. $110,000 OBO 541-678-5712

RV CONSIGNMENTS WANTED We Do The Work, You Keep The Cash, On-Site Credit Approval Team, Web Site Presence, We Take Trade-Ins. Free Advertising. BIG COUNTRY RV Bend 541-330-2495

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, fireplace, 2 flat screen TVs. $60,000. 541-480-3923

COACHMAN 1997 Catalina 5th wheel 23’, slide, new tires, extra clean, below book. $6,500. 928-345-4731

Escaper 29’ 1991, 2 slides, A/C, elec/gas fridge, walk around queen bed, elec. front jacks, $4000 OBO, 541-382-8939 or 541-777-0999.

Road Ranger 1985, 24', catalytic & A/C, fully self-contained, $2795. 541-389-8315 Snowbird by Nu-Wa 1999, 2 slides, lot of extras, $9800; also 2005 Dodge 3500 Dually 4x4 Cummins 5.9, HD, 22k mi., extra 40 gal tank, tool box, $26,900; both in exc. cond. 503-307-8455 in Prineville Sundance 29’ 2009, with 3 slides, super clean. $29,950; also 2008 Dodge 250 diesel, hitch, brakes, additional $31,500, exc. cond., 541-610-5178

www.b end b ulletin.com

541-385-5809

Redmond: 541-548-5254

Southwind 35.5’ Triton, 2008,V10, 2 slides, Dupont UV coat, 7500 mi. Avg NADA ret.114,343; asking $104,000. Call 541-923-2774

BIG TENT. HUGE SAVINGS.

Winnebago Outlook 2008 32’ Ford V10 eng, Wineguard sat. TV, surround sound stereo + more. $55,000 obo. 541-526-1622.

Special Edition, Alloys, Auto, Keyless Entry, Bluetooth

881

Travel Trailers

Yamaha Cruiser 2007, 19’ Glass Ply, Merc Very nice. $3999, cruiser, depth finder, Vin# B50420 trolling motor, trailer, Pro Caliber Motorsports $3500, 541-389-1086 or 541-419-8034. 866-949-8607

Reach thousands of readers!

Regal Prowler AX6 ExMerc standard shaft 7½ treme Edition 38’ ‘05, hp outbrd mtr. Best FIND IT! BUY IT! 4 slides,2 fireplaces, all offer. 541-416-0758 Alpha “See Ya” 30’ maple cabinets, king SELL IT! 1996, 2 slides, A/C, The Bulletin size bdrm./bed sepaheat pump, exc. cond. The Bulletin Classiieds rated w/sliding glass dr, To Subscribe call for Snowbirds, solid loaded,always garaged, 541-385-5800 or go to oak cabs day & night only lived in 3 mo., shades, Corian, tile, www.bendbulletin.com brand new $54,000,still hardwood. $12,750. like new only $28,500 541-923-3417. Used out-drive OBO, will deliver, Cory, 541-580-7334 parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt maMonaco Dynasty 2004, rine motors: 151 loaded, 3 slides, $1595; 3.0 $1895; $159,000, 541-923- 8572 or 541-749-0037 (cell) 4.3 (1993), $1995.

16’ Driftboat, like new cond., lots of upgrades, 6 HP LS motor, $6500, call/text, 541-480-8075. Inflatable Raft,Sevylor Fishmaster 325,10’3”, 17' Lowe 1994, 60HP complete pkg., $650 Mercury 4-stroke, Firm, 541-977-4461. electric troll motor, GPS fishfinder, 3 batteries, two gas tanks, trailer w/spare. $7000 541-389-7535 Kayak, Eddyline 19.5’ 1988 373V Sandpiper, 12’, like Ranger Bass Boat, new, $975, Mercury 115 Motor, 541-420-3277. Ranger trailer, trolling elec. motor, fish finder 880 & sonor, 2 live wells & all accessories, new Motorhomes batteries & tires, great cond., $6500. 541-923-6555.

19-ft Mastercraft ProStar 190 inboard, 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 hrs, great cond, lots of extras, $10,000 obo. 541-231-8709

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires,under cover, hwy. miles only,4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310

Fleetwood Wilderness Terry 5th wheel 1996, 36’ 2005 4 slides, rear Chevy 4x4 2000 bdrm, fireplace, AC, combo. Both mint W/D hkup beautiful cond., 5.3 engine, alunit! $30,500. ways garaged, no 541-815-2380 children, pets/smoking, 10 ply tires, both loaded. $16,900. 541-420-8625.

For sale or trade to- Lance-Legend 990 wards 24’-26’ trailer 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, with slide. Lance exc. cond., generator, Squire 9’10” cabover, solar-cell, large refrig, ‘96, elec. jacks, solar AC, micro., magic fan, panel, 2-dr refrig, bathroom shower, freezer, awning, outremovable carpet, door shower, exc. custom windows, outcond, $7000 obo. door shower/awning 541-549-1342 set-up for winterizing, elec. jacks, CD/stereo/4’ stinger. $9000. Advertise your car! Bend, 541.279.0458 Add A Picture!

Jayco Eagle 2000 26’, 14’ slide, awning, air, Beaver Patriot 2000, heat, gently used. $12,000. 541-595-2003 Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, Kit Companion 19’ 4 door fridge., 1 slide, 2001, A/C, mirco, W/D. $75,000 $7000, 541-447-0706. 541-215-5355

Special Edition, Alloys, AWD, Rear View Monitor & more

1 @ this price!

2012 $ VERSA HB 1.8S

156/mo.

VIN: 258565. MSRP $17,400, Cap reduction $1,491. Cap cost $15,104. Acq. fee $595. 39 mo. lease. 12,000 miles/year. Residual 52% $9,048. Total due at signing $1,995, includes 1st payment + DMV. On approved credit. No security deposit.

1 @ this price!

2012 ROGUE S

$

VIN: 385432. MSRP $25,500, Cap reduction $1,398.79. Cap cost $22,696.21. Acq. fee $595. 39 mo. lease. 12,000 miles/year. Residual 54% $13,770. Total due at signing $1,995, includes 1st payment + DMV. On approved credit. No security deposit.

Convenience Package, Bluetooth, Rear Spoiler 1 @ this price!

2.5S

2012 ALTIMA COUPE

$

249/mo.

VIN: 241520. MSRP $27,285, Cap reduction $1,397.61. Cap cost $23,597.39. Acq. fee $595. 39 mo. lease. 12,000 miles/year. Residual 51% $13,915.35. Total due at signing $1,995, includes 1st payment + DMV. On approved credit. No security deposit.

Auto, ABS

1 @ this price!

2.5S

2012 ALTIMA SEDAN

$

Moonroof, Leather

1 @ this price!

$

11,000 OFF

MSRP VIN: 612619. MSRP $49,650, Smolich Discount $7,000. Factory Rebate $4,000. Sale Price $38,650 + DMV

19,995

+DMV VIN: 419255. MSRP $23,820, Smolich Discount $2,325. Factory Rebate $1,500

Moonroof, Navigation, 4x4, Leather

2012 ARMADA SL

248/mo.

1 @ this price!

2012 MAXIMA SV

$

8,230 OFF

MSRP VIN: 864603. MSRP $35,725, Smolich Discount $5,230. Factory Rebate $3,000 Sale Price $27,495 + DMV

SMOLICH

541-385-5809

“ W e m a k e c a r b u y i n g e a s y.” 541-389-1178 | VISIT SMOLICHNISSAN.COM All vehicles subject to prior sale, tax, title, license & registration fees. All financing, subject to credit approval. Pictures for illustration purposes only. Offers expires May 14, 2012.


E6 SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Autos & Transportation

900 908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles 929

932

Automotive Wanted

Antique & Classic Autos

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO Ford Mustang Coupe HERITAGE FOR THE 1966, original owner, BLIND. Free 3 Day V8, automatic, great Vacation, Tax Deshape, $9000 OBO. ductible, Free Towing, 530-515-8199 All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 877-213-9145. (PNDC)

245/70R17 108S hwy tires-40%, $125. 541-447-4576.

Lincoln Mark IV, 1972, needs vinyl top, runs good, $3500. 541-771-4747

People Look for Information 1/3 interest in ColumAbout Products and bia 400, located at Tailgate cargo holder, Sunriver. $138,500. Ford Super Duty. $49. Services Every Day through The Bulletin Classifieds Call 541-647-3718 541-536-1333. 1/3 interest in well- Tires (4), for Saturn, used Toyo Radials, equipped IFR Beech P195/60R15, $15 ea; Bonanza A36, loSpider Traction Decated KBDN. $55,000. vice, for Saturn, $25, 541-419-9510 541-383-3483.

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates!

541-385-5809

We Buy Junk Cars & Trucks! Cash paid for junk vehicles, batteries & catalytic converters. Serving all of C.O.! Call 541-408-1090 932

Antique & Classic Autos

Chevy 1951 pickup,

restored. $13,500 obo; 541-504-3253 or 503-504-2764

916

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

Chevy Wagon 1957, 4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. 1982 INT. Dump w/Arborhood, 6k on rebuilt Chrysler 300 Coupe 392, truck refurbished, 1967, 440 engine, has 330 gal. water auto. trans, ps, air, tank w/pump & hose. frame on rebuild, reEverything works, painted original blue, Reduced - now $5000 original blue interior, OBO. 541-977-8988 original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Peterbilt 359 potable water truck, 1990, 3200 gal. tank, 5hp pump, 4-3" hoses, camlocks, $25,000. 541-820-3724 THRUCKS ‘85 International 10 Wheel 46,000 GVW,‘89 GMC 30,000 GVW, ‘91 Ford 33,000 GVW, ‘01 Frieghtliner 33,000 GVW All Dump Flatbed. Backstrom Builders Center 541-382-6861 925

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

935

975

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Ford F150 2006, crew cab, 1 owner, 79,000 miles, $13,900. 541-408-2318.

Jeep Cherokee 1990, 4WD, 3 sets rims & tires, exlnt set snow tires, great 1st car! $1800. 541-633-5149 Ford F-350 XLT 2003, 4X4, 6L diesel, 6-spd manual, Super Cab, short box, 12K Warn winch, custom bumper & canopy, running boards, 2 sets tires, wheels & chains, many Jeep Willys 1947 cstm, extras, perfect, ONLY small block Chevy, PS, 29,800 miles, $27,500 OD, mags + trlr. Swap OBO, 541-504-8316. for backhoe. No a.m. calls, pls. 541-389-6990 Nissan Pathfinder SE 2006 #626844. $19,977 GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

931

Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories

1969 Cesena 182 0520P-Ponk, 3BLD Stol, nice panel, $70,000, 541-884-6567 or 541-881-1519 pm.

933

Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd, door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced! $5,500. 541-317-9319 or 541-647-8483

Ford Galaxie 500 1963, 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & radio (orig),541-419-4989

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597 933

Pickups

Mazda B4000 2004 Cab Plus 4x4. 4½ yrs or 95,000 miles left on ext’d warranty. V6, 5-spd, AC, studded tires, 2 extra rims, tow pkg, 132K mi, all records, exlnt cond, $9500. 541-408-8611 935

Sport Utility Vehicles

541-385-5809

The Bulletin Classified Chevy Cavalier Sedan 2004, Low miles. $4,999 Vin 339617 • Dlr #366

nav, AWD, heated seats, moonroof, local owner, Harman Kardon, $23,995. 503-635-9494 940

Vans Chevy 1/2 Ton work van 1997, 96K mi,, exclnt cond, full bins, appearance pkg., cruise, synth oils only, 2 sets wheels /tires, must see! $4995. Pix/info: 541-382-9222

1000

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE INVITATION TO BID Sealed bids for the construction of the City of Redmond, 9th Street Waterline Replacement Project - WA 12-02, addressed to the City Recorder, City of Redmond, Oregon will be received until 2:00 PM local time at the City Recorder's office, City Hall, 716 SW Evergreen Avenue, Redmond, Oregon, on May 31, 2012 and then publicly opened and read at 2:00 PM in Conference Room A, City Hall, Redmond, Oregon. First tier subcontractor list is required to be submitted by 4:00 PM, same day (Note: The first tier subcontractor list may also be submitted with the sealed bid at contractor's preference). Bids shall be clearly labeled: 9th Street Waterline Replacement Project - WA 12-02. No mandatory prebid meeting will be held. No bid will be accepted by a general contractor who is not on the plans holder list.

HYUNDAI

Scope of Work: Improvements generally include waterline replacement, asphalt overlay of street section, some curb and driveway replacement, and replacement of storm drainage facilities in 9th Street and Canyon Drive between Maple Avenue and Dogwood Avenue.

HYUNDAI

Range Rover, 2006 Sport HSE,

1000

Legal Notices

541-749-4025 Chevy Monte Carlo Z-34 1999, Low Miles. $3,999 Vin 245970 • Dlr #366

541-598-3750

HSE, nav, DVD, local car, new tires, 51K miles. $24,995. 503-635-9494

1000

Legal Notices

This is a Public Works Contract and subject to the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries (BOLI) Wage Rates, dated January 1, 2012 and amendments for region 10 as defined under ORS 279C.800 to 279C.870. No bids shall be received or considered unless the bid contains a statement by the bidder that ORS 279C.838 or 279C.840 shall be complied with. Bidders must identify whether bidder is a resident bidder as defined in ORS 279A.120.

aaaoregonautosource.com

Range Rover 2005 International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

*** CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

541-749-4025 Ford Escape Hybrid 2006, 4WD, 97,000 miles, avg 31 mpg, great rig for skiing and travel, $8500, 541-701-9883

Mazda 3 2008, Hatch-

back, perfect, 13K mi, bought 10/09, 2 sets wheels/tires, synth oils only, sunroof, 6 disc changer, mp3 port, $15,995. 541-382-9222

The project includes approximately 4420 LF of 12" Ductile Iron waterline installation, 980 LF of 8" DI waterline installation, 212 LF of 18" C905 PVC storm pipe, and 14043 SY of 1.5" Asphalt overlay. The City estimates the cost of improvements at $1,350,000. Contract Documents may be examined at the following locations: •City of Redmond Engineering Division 243 NE Antler Avenue, Redmond, Oregon. •Central Oregon Builder's Exchange, 1902 NE 4th Street, Bend, Oregon. Contract Documents may be obtained by qualified bidders only for a non-refundable price of $40.00 at the City of Redmond Engineering Division. The City may provide solicitation documents by electronic means available on the City of Redmond website: www.ci.redmond.or.us All interested prime bidders must formally request and purchase a hardbound set of project plans and specifications, which will register them as a plan holder on the project. The City of Redmond will not accept any bid that is not from a registered plan holder and submitted on the proposal form from the Contract Documents package. All requests for plans, plan holder list, and bid documents shall be made to Kathy Harms, Office Assistant, City of Redmond Engineering Department at (541) 504-2002.

*** CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad Mercedes S550 2007, on the first day it runs only 46K mi., always to make sure it is cor- 1972 Ford Bronco 4X4 Chrysler Town & garaged, immac. cond rect. Sometimes in302 V8 w/3 spd on Country 2003 LX in/out, 4 new studded structions over the floor, lots of new ready to use at PUBLISH:Daily Journal of Commerce - Once the week of May 7, 2012 snow tires. Price rephone are misparts, soft & hardtop, $3900. Also my pet Once the week of May 14, 2012 duced to $32,000! understood and an error runs great, $4300. 1996 Nissan Quest541-388-7944 can occur in your ad. OBO 541-410-1685. GXE. Call Bob at Bend Bulletin - Sunday, May 6, 2012 & Sunday, May 13, 2012 If this happens to your Mitsubishi 3000 GT 541-318-9999. 1000 1000 1000 ad, please contact us Buick Rainier 2006 4x4, Did you know about 1999, auto., pearl leather, $13,000. the first day your ad Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices white, very low mi. the free trip to D.C. 541-383-4907 appears and we will $9500. 541-788-8218. for WWII vets? be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Need to get an PUBLIC NOTICE Dodge Caravan Sport‘01, Deadlines are: WeekTRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE ad in ASAP? very clean, runs great, days 12:00 noon for $4400, 541-848-0004. CHEVY You can place it next day, Sat. 11:00 File No. 8308.20144 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by SUBURBAN LT a.m. for Sunday; Sat. Fred L. Bradford Johnson and Elaine L. Bradford Johnson as tenants by online at: 975 2005, low miles., 12:00 for Monday. If the entirety, as grantor, to Western Title and Escrow, as trustee, in favor of www.bendbulletin.com Automobiles we can assist you, good tires, new Bank of the Cascades Mortgage Center, as beneficiary, dated 01/03/08, please call us: brakes, moonroof recorded 01/14/08, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, 541-385-5809 541-385-5809 Reduced to as 2008-01746 and subsequently assigned to PennyMac Loan Services, AUDI QUATTRO The Bulletin Classified $15,750 LLC by Assignment recorded as 2010-24674, covering the following deCABRIOLET 2004, *** scribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: 541-389-5016. extra nice, low mileNeed to sell a age, heated seats, Vehicle? A parcel of land located in the Northwest One-Quarter (NW1/4) new Michelins, all Call The Bulletin Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 of the Northeast One-Quarter (NE1/4) of Section Nineteen (19), wheel drive, and place an ad to4x4. 120K mi, Power Township 17 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, $12,995 day! seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd Deschutes county, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: 503-635-9494. Ask about our row seating, extra Beginning at the Northeast corner of said Section 19 a 3 inch brass cap; "Wheel Deal"! tires, CD, privacy tintChevy 1500 Z71 1994, thence along the North line of said Section 19, North 89 degrees for private party ing, upgraded rims. 5.7 V8, New tires, 59' 15" West, 1644.17 feet to the true point of beginning; advertisers Fantastic cond. $9500 BMW 525i 2004 120K miles, $3200. thence leaving said line, South 00 degrees 10' 01" East, 412.02 feet to a Contact Timm at New body style, 541-279-8013 5/8 inch iron rod; thence North 89 degrees 55' 33" West, 260.00 feet to 541-408-2393 for info Steptronic auto., a 5/8 inch iron rod; thence due South 120.00 feet to a 5/8 inch iron rod; or to view vehicle. cold-weather pack541-385-5809 thence North 89 degrees 55' 33" West, 285.45 feet to a 5/8 inch iron rod; age, premium packthence North 06 degrees 26' 46" East, 534.79 feet to a point on the Ford Eddie Bauer age, heated seats, PORSCHE 914, 1974 Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, North line of said Section 19; thence along said North line, Explorer 1992, Low extra nice. $14,995. 1995, extended cab, Roller (no engine), South 89 degrees 59' 15" East, 484.22 feet to the point of beginning Miles. $3,999 503-635-9494. long box, grill guard, Vin A31480 • Dlr #366 lowered, full roll cage, and terminus thereof. Excepting therefrom: That portion which lies within running boards, bed 5-pt harnesses, racthe right of way of Butler Market Road rails & canopy, 178K ing seats, 911 dash & Buick LeSabre LTD miles, $4800 obo. instruments, decent PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1995, leather, 115k, HYUNDAI 208-301-3321 (Bend) shape, very cool! 22265 Butler Market Road Bend, OR 97701 3.8 litre V-6, $3000. 541-749-4025 $1699. 541-678-3249 2006 Lucerne CX Dodge 1500 2001 4x4 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to 65k, 3.8 V6, cloth sport, red, loaded, satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default int., $7500. Both get Saab 9-3 SE 1999 rollbar, AND 2011 30 mpg hwy. Call has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the convertible, 2 door, Moped Trike used 3 Bob, 541-318-9999 default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when Navy with black soft months, street legal. Ford Excursion Ask about the Free due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,934.61 beginning top, tan interior, very call 541-433-2384 2005, 4WD, diesel, Trip to Washington, 04/01/11; plus late charges of $75.74 each month beginning ; plus prior good condition. exc. cond., $19,900, D.C. for WWII Vetaccrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $27.00; together with title $5200 firm. call 541-923-0231. erans? expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by 541-317-2929. reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; Grand Cherokee “LimBuick Special “SJ” Toyota Corolla CE and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. ited” 1997, Low miles. 1996, Super low 1999, Great fuel By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the $4,999 miles. $3,999 sipper. $3,999 Dodge 3500 2007 Quad obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said Cab SLT 4x4, 6.7L Vin 684939 • Dlr #366 Vin 409112 • Dlr #366 Vin 187276 • Dlr #366 sums being the following, to wit: $384,904.97 with interest thereon at the Cummins 6-spd AT, rate of 2 percent per annum beginning 03/01/11; plus late charges of after-market upgrades, $75.74 each month beginning until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of superb truck, call for HYUNDAI HYUNDAI HYUNDAI $0.00; plus advances of $27.00; together with title expense, costs, details, $28,000 OBO. 541-749-4025 541-749-4025 541-749-4025 541-385-5682 trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 14, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Claire Swazey Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Johnson, Fred and Elaine (TS# 8308.20144) 1002.205201-File No. Publication Dates: May 13, 20, 27 and June 3, 2012. 1002.205201 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through The Bulletin Classifieds

Need help ixing stuff? Call A Service Professional ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 E7

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 7023.99250 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 7713.22075 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 7345.25951 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by CALEB M. GASCHE, as grantor, to Fidelity National Title Insurance ComStephen Forte and Cynthia Forte, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor, to Richard L. Waible, Sr., as grantor, to Fidelity National Title, as trustee, in pany, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc., as benefiPremier Title and Escrow, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee ciary, dated 03/30/04, recorded 04/02/04, in the mortgage records of DERegistration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Dream House Mortgage for Countrywide Bank, FSB, as beneficiary, dated 02/28/08, recorded SCHUTES County, Oregon, as 2004-18130, covering the following Corporation, a Rhode Island Corporation, its successors and assigns, as 03/05/08, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: beneficiary, dated 05/06/08, recorded 05/09/08, in the mortgage records of 2008-09996 and subsequently assigned to Fannie Mae ("Federal NaDeschutes County, Oregon, as 2008-20509 and subsequently assigned to tional Mortgage Association"), covering the following described real propLOT THIRTY (30) HAYDEN VIEW PHASE ONE, U.S. Bank National Association by Assignment, covering the following deerty situated in said county and state, to wit: DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. scribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot Thirty-three (33), Timber Creek II Phase 2, PROPERTY ADDRESS: Deschutes County, Oregon. Lot Thirty-Nine (39), Parkview Terrace Phases I and II, 3125 SOUTHWEST NEWBERRY AVENUE REDMOND, OR 97756-8953 Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to 320 South Timber Creek Drive Sisters, OR 97759 PROPERTY ADDRESS: satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default 3005 Northeast Canoe Court Bend, OR 97701 has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default due the following sums: monthly payments of $735.75 beginning 12/01/11 has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default and $738.15 beginning 03/01/12; plus late charges of $28.06 each month default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the beginning 12/16/11; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus addue the following sums: monthly payments of $1,780.94 beginning default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when vances of $93.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and 07/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 07/16/11; plus due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,352.87 beginning attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $1,390.15; together 09/01/11; plus late charges of $56.15 each month beginning 09/16/11; advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $185.00; toproperty and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary gether with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees inapplicable. for the protection of the above described real property and its interest curred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. sums being the following, to wit: $109,812.32 with interest thereon at the By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said rate of 3 percent per annum beginning 11/01/11; plus late charges of sums being the following, to wit: $417,584.36 with interest thereon at the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said $28.06 each month beginning 12/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late rate of 2.5 percent per annum beginning 06/01/11; plus late charges of sums being the following, to wit: $172,712.15 with interest thereon at the charges of $0.00; plus advances of $93.00; together with title expense, $0.00 each month beginning 07/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late rate of 6.375 percent per annum beginning 08/01/11; plus late charges of costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said charges of $0.00; plus advances of $1,390.15; together with title expense, $56.15 each month beginning 09/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said charges of $0.00; plus advances of $185.00; together with title expense, the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepaydefault; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepaydefault; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayAugust 2, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanWHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 1, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanthe main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside July 27, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanthe City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physiwritten request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physiwritten request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physithis notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestinformation concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive trustee.com. information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestinformation concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, trustee.com. information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestat any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, trustee.com. this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforbeing cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforbeing cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perfortrustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses ORS 86.753. trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes reORS 86.753. trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes reORS 86.753. honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inas well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inas well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoclude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inrated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoclude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. rated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpowesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. rated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart For further information, please contact: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Nanci Lambert For further information, please contact: P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Winston Khan GASCHE, CALEB M. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. (TS# 7023.99250) 1002.212098-File No. Waible, Richard L. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 (TS# 7345.25951) 1002.211556-File No. Forte, Stephen and Cynthia Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.212098 (TS# 7713.22075) 1002.211370-File No. Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.211556 Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.211370 PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 7777.17713 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Jeffery A. Adams and Amy Adams, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as File No. 7713.21916 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Eric Amend and Lisa Amend, husband and wife, as grantor, to Fidelity trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL OREGON, INC, as benNational Title Insurance Company, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Eleceficiary, dated 12/15/06, recorded 12/22/06, in the mortgage records of tronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for U.S. Bank NaDeschutes County, Oregon, as 2006-83442, covering the following detional Association its successors and assigns, as beneficiary, dated scribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: 03/26/10, recorded 04/01/10, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2010-13212 and subsequently assigned to U.S. Bank Lot Sixty-nine (69), Hayden Ranch Estates, Phase 1, National Association by Assignment recorded, covering the following deDeschutes County, Oregon. scribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: PROPERTY ADDRESS: Lot 87 of Canyon Rim Village, Phase 4, City of Redmond, 1416 NE 4TH ST REDMOND, OR 97756 Deschutes County, Oregon. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to PROPERTY ADDRESS: satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default 1052 Northwest Rimrock Drive Redmond, OR 97756 has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,266.41 beginning Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default 04/20/10, $1,107.88 beginning 07/20/10, $1,013.08 beginning 01/20/11 has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the and $1,281.63 beginning 07/20/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when beginning 05/05/12; plus prior accrued late charges of $1,345.37; plus addue the following sums: monthly payments of $1,937.68 beginning vances of $13,688.64 that represent property preservation fee, taxes and 05/01/11; plus late charges of $74.73 each month beginning 05/16/11; balance of payment; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $4,011.25; toattorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums gether with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees inadvanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real curred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its applicable. interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $254,205.72 with interest thereon at the sums being the following, to wit: $275,812.02 with interest thereon at the rate of 3.5 percent per annum beginning 02/20/10; plus late charges of rate of 4.95 percent per annum beginning 04/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 05/05/12 until paid; plus prior accrued late $74.73 each month beginning 05/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $1,345.37; plus advances of $13,688.64 that represent propcharges of $0.00; plus advances of $4,011.25; together with title expense, erty preservation fee, taxes and balance of payment; together with title costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by readefault; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of son of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayprotection of the above described real property and its interest therein; ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 6, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanAugust 16, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physi"Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestinformation is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. trustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perfortrust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes re- Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inis secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northrated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 ADAMS, JEFFERY A. and AMY (TS# 7777.17713) 1002.213088-File No. Publication Dates: May 13, 20, 27 and June 3, 2012. 1002.213088

For further information, please contact: Winston Khan Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 AMEND, ERIC and LISA (TS# 7713.21916) 1002.203690-File No. Publication Dates: May 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012. 1002.203690

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 8308.20335 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by James C. Eubanks, as grantor, to Western Title & Escrow, as trustee, in favor of Bank of the Cascades Mrtg. Center, as beneficiary, dated 06/09/05, recorded 06/15/05, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2005-37407 and subsequently assigned to PennyMac Loan Services, LLC by Assignment recorded as 2010-24674, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot 6, Block 3, Unit No. 1, Oregon Water Wonderland, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 55540 Gross Drive Bend, OR 97707 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $759.87 beginning 09/01/11; plus late charges of $37.99 each month beginning ; plus prior accrued late charges of ($37.99); plus advances of $847.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $118,065.41 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.625 percent per annum beginning 08/01/11; plus late charges of $37.99 each month beginning until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of ($37.99); plus advances of $847.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on July 26, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Claire Swazey Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Eubanks, James (TS# 8308.20335) 1002.211073-File Publication Dates: April 22, 29, May 6 and 13, 2012. 1002.211073


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

E8 SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN 1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 7713.22012 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Janet C. Stevens (unmarried), as grantor, to Fidelity National Title Insurance, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for U.S. Bank National Association, its successors and assigns, as beneficiary, dated 12/03/08, recorded 12/15/08, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2008-48938 and subsequently assigned to U.S. Bank National Association by Assignment, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lots 6 and 7, Block 1, Ellis Subdivision, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2130 Northeast 8th Street Bend, OR 97701

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. NICK P WILLIAMS; WENDY A.WILLIAMS; STATE OF OREGON; and OCCUPANTS OF THE PREMISES, Defendants. Case No. 11CV0772 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION

complaint, a copy of which was filed with the above-entitled Court. You must "appear" in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear" you must file with the court a legal paper called a "motion" or "answer." The "motion" or "answer" must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the Plaintiff's attorney or, if the Plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the Plaintiff. If you have any questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may contact the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service online at www.oregonstatebar. org or by calling (503) 684-3763 (in the Portland metropolitan area) or toll-free elsewhere in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. This summons is issued pursuant to ORCP 7.

1000

Legal Notices y and read at 2:00 PM in Conference Room A, City Hall, Redmond, Oregon. First tier subcontractor list is required to be submitted by 4:00 PM, same day (Note: The first tier subcontractor list may also be submitted with the sealed bid at contractor's preference). Bids shall be clearly labeled: Summer 2012 ASPHALT OVERLAY PROJECT.

Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,486.73 beginning 08/01/11; plus late charges of $124.34 each month beginning 08/16/11; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $326.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees inNo mandatory prebid curred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the meeting will be held. beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its No bid will be acinterest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. cepted by a general By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the contractor who is not TO THE DEFENobligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said on the plans holder DANTS: WENDY sums being the following, to wit: $403,365.85 with interest thereon at the list. A.WILLIAMS AND rate of 5.95 percent per annum beginning 07/01/11; plus late charges of OCCUPANTS OF $124.34 each month beginning 08/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late This is a Public Works THE PREMISES: charges of $0.00; plus advances of $326.00; together with title expense, Contract and subject In the name of the costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said to the Oregon Bureau State of Oregon, you default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of of Labor and Indusare hereby required to the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepaytries (BOLI) Wage appear and answer ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Rates, dated January the complaint filed WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on 1, 2012 and amendagainst you in the August 7, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanments for region 10 as above-entitled Court dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside defined under ORS and cause on or bethe main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in 279C.800 to fore the expiration of the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public 279C.870. 30 days from the date auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real of the first publication property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the Scope of Work: of this summons. The execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the The work contemdate of first publicagrantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of plated generally contion in this matter is the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the sists of asphalt overMay 13, 2012. If you costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. lay on existing city fail timely to appear Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested streets and striping. and answer, Plaintiff pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a The City estimates the will apply to the written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's cost of improvements above-entitled court "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physiat $327,000. for the relief prayed cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt for in its complaint. requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in Contract Documents This is a judicial fore- ROUTH CRABTREE this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no may be examined at OLSEN, P.C. closure of a deed of record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive the following locaBy Sean C. Currie, trust in which the information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid tions: OSB # 08297 Plaintiff requests that information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwest•City of Redmond EnAttorney for Plaintiff the Plaintiff be altrustee.com. gineering Division 243 621 SW Alder St., lowed to foreclose Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, NE Antler Avenue, Suite 800 your interest in the at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have Redmond, Oregon. Portland, OR 97205 following described this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by •Central Oregon (503) 459-0140; real property: payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such Builder's Exchange, Fax (425) 974-8183 LOTS FOURTEEN portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) 1902 NE 4th Street, (14) AND FIFTEEN scurrie@rcolegal.com and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of Bend, Oregon. (15), BLOCK TWO LEGAL NOTICE being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or (2), BEND VIEW ADINVITATION TO BID trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforAll requests for plans, DITION, DESmance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses plan holder list, and CHUTES COUNTY, Sealed bids for the actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with bid documents shall OREGON. construction of the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said be made to Commonly known as: City of Redmond, ORS 86.753. Donna-Lee Bovi or 580 Northwest Utica Summer 2012 ASRequests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes reBecky Leslie, Office Ave., Bend, Oregon PHALT OVERLAY ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be Assistant, City of 97701. PROJECT, adhonored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms Redmond Public NOTICE TO dressed to the City of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the Works Department at DEFENDANTS: Recorder, City of plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor 541.504.2000. READ THESE Redmond, Oregon will as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which be received until 2:00 is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" in- PAPERS CAREFULLY! The City may provide A lawsuit has been PM local time at the clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of solicitation docustarted against you in City Recorder's office, auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoments by electronic the above-entitled City Hall, 716 SW Evrated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northmeans available on court by Wells Fargo ergreen Avenue, westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. the City of Redmond Bank, N.A., Plaintiff. Redmond, Oregon, on website. www.ci.redPlaintiff's claims are May 29, 2012 and For further information, please contact: mond.or.us stated in the written then publicly opened Winston Khan Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 PUBLIC NOTICE Stevens, Janet C. TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE (TS# 7713.22012) 1002.212563-File No. File No. 7023.99202 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Publication Dates: May 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012. 1002.212563 Jay D. Jaeger, as grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., as beneficiary, dated 03/01/07, recorded 03/15/07, in the mortgage records of PUBLIC NOTICE DESCHUTES County, Oregon, as 2007-15551, covering the following deTRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE scribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: File No. 7023.99758 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by UNIT 29, GREYHAWK CONDOMINIUMS, Michael J. Houck, Jr and Christie A. Houck, as grantor, to First American DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, DESCRIBED IN AND SUBJECT Title, Oregon, as trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, Washington corporation, as beneficiary, dated 10/10/03, recorded 10/20/03, in the TO THAT CERTAIN DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM OWNERSHIP FOR GREYHAWK CONDOMINIUMS RECORDED FEBRUARY 1, 2007 mortgage records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon, as 2003-72764 and IN VOLUME 2007, PAGE 06945, DESCHUTES COUNTY subsequently assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. by Assignment recorded as 2007-13229, covering the following described real property OFFICIAL RECORDS, TOGETHER WITH THE LIMITED AND situated in said county and state, to wit: GENERAL COMMON ELEMENTS SET FORTH THEREIN APPERTAINING TO SAID UNIT. LOT 7 IN BLOCK 3 OF FORKED HORN ESTATES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1531 NW JUNIPER ST 29 BEND, OR 97701-1501 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 17345 IVY LANE SISTERS, OR 97759-9738 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default due the following sums: monthly payments of $515.70 beginning 03/01/09 has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the and $608.24 beginning 02/01/12; plus late charges of $25.78 each month default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when beginning 03/16/09; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus addue the following sums: monthly payments of $860.39 beginning 12/01/11 vances of $2,134.00 that represent bankruptcy fees and costs, property and $851.95 beginning 03/01/12; plus late charges of $35.20 each month inspection fees and paid attorney's fees and costs; together with title exbeginning 12/16/12; plus prior accrued late charges of $176.00; plus adpense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason vances of $123.13; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the proattorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums tection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the sums being the following, to wit: $76,958.40 with interest thereon at the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said rate of 6.875 percent per annum beginning 02/01/09; plus late charges of sums being the following, to wit: $104,176.69 with interest thereon at the $25.78 each month beginning 03/16/09 until paid; plus prior accrued late rate of 5.875 percent per annum beginning 11/01/11; plus late charges of charges of $0.00; plus advances of $2,134.00 that represent bankruptcy $35.20 each month beginning 12/16/12 until paid; plus prior accrued late fees and costs, property inspection fees and paid attorney's fees and charges of $176.00; plus advances of $123.13; together with title expense, costs; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayits interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 1, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanAugust 2, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physi"Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestinformation is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. trustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perfortrust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes re- Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inis secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northrated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 HOUCK, MICHAEL J. JR. and CHRISTIE A. (TS# 7023.99758) 1002.212024-File No. Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.212024

For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 JAEGER, ESTATE OF JAY D. (TS# 7023.99202) 1002.211862-File No. Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.211862

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE All interested prime Notice of 2012/2013 bidders must formally Budget Meeting request and purchase Special Road District #1 a hardbound set of Date: May 16, 2012 project plans and Location: specifications, which DRRH Club House will register them as a Time: 7:00 p.m. plan holder on the LEGAL NOTICE project. The City of PUBLIC AUCTION Redmond will not acPublic auction to be cept any bid that is held Saturday, June not from a registered 2, 2012 at 1:30 P.M., plan holder and subat Jamison Street Self mitted on the proStorage, 63177 Jamiposal form from the son St., Bend OR Contract. 97701. (Unit C-030, Lisa Williams). PUBLISH: Daily Journal of Advertise your car! Commerce - Once the Add A Picture! week of May 13, 2012 Reach thousands of readers! Call 541-385-5809 Bend Bulletin - Sunday, The Bulletin Classifieds May 13, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICE The Sisters School District is accepting proposals for Mechanical & Controls contractors for HVAC upgrades at Sisters Middle School. Bid packets are available at the District Website (www.sisters.k12.or.u s) or by contacting Leland Bliss at 541-549-8521 ext 4017. The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory is all about meeting your needs. Call on one of the professionals today!

LEGAL NOTICE INVITATION TO BID Sealed bids for the construction of the City of Redmond, S. Canal Blvd. Bicycle Lane and Sidewalk Project -TR 10-04, addressed to the City Recorder, City of Redmond, Oregon will be received until 2:00 PM local time at the City Recorder's office, City Hall, 716 SW Evergreen Avenue, Redmond, Oregon, on June 5, 2012 and then publicly opened and read at 2:00 PM in Conference Room A, City Hall, Redmond, Oregon. First tier subcontractor list is required to be submitted by 4:00 PM, same day (Note: The first tier subcontractor list may also be submitted with the sealed bid at contractor's preference). Bids shall be clearly labeled: S. Canal Blvd. Bicycle Lane and Sidewalk Project -TR 10-04. No mandatory prebid meeting will be held. No bid will be accepted by a general contractor who is not on the plans holder list. This is a Public Works Contract and subject to the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries (BOLI) Wage Rates, dated January 1, 2012 and amendments for region 10 as defined under ORS 279C.800 to 279C.870. No bids shall be received or considered unless the bid contains a statement by the bidder that ORS 279C.838 or 279C.840 shall be complied with. Bidders must identify whether bidder is a resident bidder as defined in ORS 279A.120. Scope of Work: Improvements generally include pavement widening to S. Canal Blvd., construction of 33,000 square feet of concrete sidewalk, and retaining wall. The City estimates the cost of improvements at $290,000. Contract Documents may be examined at the following locations: •City of Redmond Engineering Division 243 NE Antler Avenue, Redmond, Oregon. •Central Oregon Builder's Exchange, 1902 NE 4th Street, Bend, Oregon. Contract Documents may be obtained by qualified bidders only for a non-refundable price of $40.00 at the City of Redmond Engineering Division. The City may provide solicitation documents by electronic means available on the City of Redmond website. www.ci.redmond.or.us All interested prime bidders must formally request and purchase a hardbound set of project plans and specifications, which will register them as a plan holder on the project. The City of Redmond will not accept any bid that is not from a registered plan holder and submitted on the proposal form from the Contract Documents package. All requests for plans, plan holder list, and bid documents shall be made to Kathy Harms, Office Assistant, City of Redmond Engineering Department at (541) 504-2002. PUBLISH:Daily Journal of Commerce - Once the week of May 7, 2012 Once the week of May 14, 2012 Bend Bulletin - Sunday, May 6, 2012 & Sunday, May 13, 2012 PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 7021.11470 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Danny Parker, and Marijean D. Parker as Tenants by the Entirety, as grantor, to Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Countrywide Bank, FSB, its successors and assigns, as beneficiary, dated 02/11/08, recorded 02/15/08, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2008-06840 and subsequently assigned to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP FKA Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP, c/o BAC Home Loans Servicing LP by Assignment recorded as 2010-30799, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot Seven (7), Block AAA, Deschutes River Woods, recorded March 22, 1962, Plat Book 6, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 18615 Riverwoods Drive Bend, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $837.16 beginning 03/01/11; plus late charges of $32.68 each month beginning 03/16/11; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $107,555.70 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.75 percent per annum beginning 02/01/11; plus late charges of $32.68 each month beginning 03/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 13, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Winston Khan Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Parker, Danny and Marijean D. (TS# 7021.11470) 1002.212574-File No. Publication Dates: May 13, 20, 27 and June 3, 2012. 1002.212574


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 E9

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 8483.20044 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 7713.22024 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 7827.20368 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Agnes J. Rubow, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of FIKelley Portwood, as grantor, to Amerititle, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Terry Reed an Lynda Reed, Husband and Wife, as grantor, to David A. NANCIAL FREEDOM SENIOR FUNDING CORPORATION, A SUBSIDElectronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Taylor, Bean & Kubat, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, IARY OF INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., as beneficiary, dated 05/11/06, reWhitaker Mortgage Corp., and its successors and/or assigns, as benefiInc. solely as nominee for U.S. Bank National Association, its successors corded 05/16/06, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, ciary, dated 07/29/09, recorded 08/03/09, in the mortgage records of Desand assigns, as beneficiary, dated 09/07/05, recorded 09/12/05, in the as 2006-33766 and subsequently assigned to OneWest Bank, FSB, covchutes County, Oregon, as 2009-33154 and subsequently assigned to mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2005-61150 and subering the following described real property situated in said county and Seaside National Bank & Trust by Assignment, covering the following desequently assigned to U.S. Bank National Association by Assignment, state, to wit: scribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot three (3), block four (4), Rimrock Acres, City of Redmond, Lot Two (2), Block Six (6), Ponderosa Pines Second Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. recorded March 2, 1973, in Cabinet B, Page 17, Lot Seven (7), Block Two (2), Pinewood Country Estates, Deschutes County, Oregon. Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1049 NW Elm Avenue Redmond, OR 97756 PROPERTY ADDRESS: PROPERTY ADDRESS: 51948 BLACK PINE WAY LA PINE, OR 97739 17110 Shawnee Circle Bend, OR 97707 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); The satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default event of default under the note and deed of trust, pursuant to Section has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the 9(a)(i) of the Deed of Trust, which provides that, "Lender may require imdefault for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when mediate payment in full of all sums secured by this Security Instrument due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,109.73 beginning due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,091.08 beginning if…Borrower dies and the Property is not the principle residence of at least 06/01/11; plus late charges of $32.78 each month beginning 06/16/11; 09/01/11; plus late charges of $104.55 each month beginning 09/16/11; one surviving Borrower." . and pay, when due 9/1/2011 (Default Date), the plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $75.00; toplus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $587.00; tounpaid principle balance of $128,615.40, plus accrued, interest together gether with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees ingether with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees inwith accruing interest, costs, advances, attorneys' and trustees' fees and curred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the curred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the costs accruing until the date of sale or full satisfaction of the obligation. beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the sums being the following, to wit: $128,615.40; together with title expense, obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said sums being the following, to wit: $152,567.42 with interest thereon at the sums being the following, to wit: $323,496.27 with interest thereon at the default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of rate of 4.75 percent per annum beginning 05/01/11; plus late charges of rate of 5.875 percent per annum beginning 08/01/11; plus late charges of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepay$32.78 each month beginning 06/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late $104.55 each month beginning 09/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. charges of $0.00; plus advances of $75.00; together with title expense, charges of $0.00; plus advances of $587.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on July 27, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standefault; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepaythe above described real property and its interest therein; and prepaythe main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real August 7, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanJuly 30, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanproperty which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the Notice is further given that for payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, adNotice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested dressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physi"Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physiconcerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure prorecord legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive ceeding dismissed by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestinformation is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestno default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein trustee.com. trustee.com. that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required unNotice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, der the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other pertrust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perfortrust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforson owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be actrustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said cessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this referORS 86.753. ORS 86.753. ence. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes re- Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes rewww.USA-Foreclosure.com. ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the For further information, please contact: plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor Claire Swazey as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inis secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inP.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of Rubow, Agnes J auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpo(TS# 7827.20368) 1002.211965-File No. rated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northrated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.211965 For further information, please contact: Claire Swazey Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Portwood, Kelley (TS# 8483.20044) 1002.212330-File No. Publication Dates: May 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012. 1002.212330

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 7228.22343 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Dewayne C Parker and Sally A Parker, as grantor, to First American Title Company, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Aegis Wholesale Corporation, as beneficiary, dated 02/26/07, recorded 03/02/07, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2007-12787 and subsequently assigned to Aurora Bank FSB by Assignment, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot 54 in Block 12 of Fairway Crest Village III, Deschutes County, Oregon PROPERTY ADDRESS: 57671 RED CEDAR LN, AKA 54 RED CEDAR LN SUNRIVER, OR 97707 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $3,202.92 beginning 08/01/11; plus late charges of $139.11 each month beginning 08/16/11; plus prior accrued late charges of ($417.33); plus advances of $128.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $419,960.84 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.95 percent per annum beginning 07/01/11; plus late charges of $139.11 each month beginning 08/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of ($417.33); plus advances of $128.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on July 30, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 PARKER, DEWAYNE C. and SALLY A. (TS# 7228.22343) 1002.211719-File No. Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.211719

For further information, please contact: Winston Khan Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Reed, Terry and Lynda (TS# 7713.22024) 1002.211639-File No.

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 7037.76595 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Daniel R Patterson, as grantor, to David A. Kubat, OSBA 84265 C/O T.D. Service Company, Washington, as trustee, in favor of Western Sunrise a/k/a Crossland Mortgage Corp., as beneficiary, dated 01/26/99, recorded 02/01/99, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as VOL: PUBLIC NOTICE 1999 PAGE: 5040 and subsequently assigned to Chase Mortgage ComTRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE pany by Assignment recorded as 2001-1883, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: File No. 7314.01153 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Shane J. Parker, as grantor, to First American Title, as trustee, in favor of Lot 2, Block 1, Singing Pines Subdivision, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Deschutes County, Oregon. Homecomings Financial Network, Inc., as beneficiary, dated 07/19/05, recorded 07/27/05, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, PROPERTY ADDRESS: as 2005-48402 and subsequently assigned to GMAC Mortgage, LLC by 51381 Welch Rd La Pine, OR 97739 Assignment, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default Lot 17 of Brierwood, City of Redmond, has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the Deschutes County, Oregon. default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $542.72 beginning 01/01/11; PROPERTY ADDRESS: plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 01/16/11; plus prior ac2012 Southwest 23rd Street Redmond, OR 97756 crued late charges of $59.13; plus advances of $1,553.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,033.54 beginning By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said 04/01/11; plus late charges of $38.98 each month beginning 04/16/11; sums being the following, to wit: $49,072.52 with interest thereon at the plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $907.00; torate of 6.875 percent per annum beginning 12/01/10; plus late charges of gether with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees in$0.00 each month beginning 01/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late curred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the charges of $59.13; plus advances of $1,553.00; together with title exbeneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its pense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the proBy reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the tection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. sums being the following, to wit: $123,908.45 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.625 percent per annum beginning 03/01/11; plus late charges of WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 9, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stan$38.98 each month beginning 04/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside charges of $0.00; plus advances of $907.00; together with title expense, the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayproperty which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of August 1, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanthe trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physiexecution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestwritten request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's trustee.com. "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestbeing cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trustee.com. trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforNotice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such ORS 86.753. portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforof the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inORS 86.753. clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes reauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be rated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northhonored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor For further information, please contact: as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which Heather L. Smith is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inNorthwest Trustee Services, Inc. clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoPatterson, Daniel R rated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.north(TS# 7037.76595) 1002.212454-File No. westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.211639

For further information, please contact: Nanci Lambert Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Parker, Shane (TS# 7314.01153) 1002.211878-File No. Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.211878

Publication Dates: May 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012. 1002.212454

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Call The Bulletin At Check out the classiieds online 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com Place Your Ad Or E-Mail Updated daily At: www.bendbulletin.com


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

E10 SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN 1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 8308.20334 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 7037.91470 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by G. Scott Ferguson, as grantor, to Western Title, as trustee, in favor of Andrea L Lewis and Robert N Lewis, as grantor, to First American, as Bank of the Cascades, as beneficiary, dated 05/15/06, recorded 05/30/06, trustee, in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as beneficiary, dated in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2006-37386 08/20/10, recorded 09/01/10, in the mortgage records of Deschutes and subsequently assigned to PennyMac Loan Services, LLC by AssignCounty, Oregon, as 2010-34313, covering the following described real ment recorded as 2010-24674, covering the following described real propproperty situated in said county and state, to wit: erty situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot sixty-six(66), Ridge at Eagle Crest 21, Lot 12, Block 19, Wiestoria, Deschutes County, Oregon. Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1816 Turnstone Road Redmond, OR 97756 544 Northeast Marshall Avenue Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,082.25 beginning due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,546.61 beginning 09/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 09/16/11; plus 10/01/11; plus late charges of $46.94 each month beginning ; plus prior prior accrued late charges of $344.56; plus advances of $28.00; together accrued late charges of $281.64; plus advances of $0.00; together with with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for for the protection of the above described real property and its interest the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $307,976.05 with interest thereon at the sums being the following, to wit: $300,147.22 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.25 percent per annum beginning 08/01/11; plus late charges of rate of 2 percent per annum beginning 09/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 09/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late $46.94 each month beginning until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of charges of $344.56; plus advances of $28.00; together with title expense, $281.64; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayabove described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on July 27, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanJuly 23, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physi"Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestinformation is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. trustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perfortrust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes reRequests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inis secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northrated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: For further information, please contact: Heather L. Smith Claire Swazey Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Lewis, Andrea L. and Robert Ferguson, G (TS# 7037.91470) 1002.211648-File No. (TS# 8308.20334) 1002.210902-File Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.211648 Publication Dates: April 22, 29, May 6 and 13, 2012. 1002.210902 1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 7023.99967 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 7777.17765 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by BRYAN W. GRUETTER AND MICHELLE A. GRUETTER, as grantor, to Michael D. Smith and Meryl A. Smith, as Tenants by the Entirety, as Amerititle, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Financial Oregon, Inc., as grantor, to Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, as trustee, in favor beneficiary, dated 09/14/06, recorded 09/21/06, in the mortgage records of of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as beneficiary, dated 12/20/10, recorded Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2006-64203, covering the following de01/05/11, in the mortgage records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon, as scribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: 2011-00408, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT TWENTY-ONE (21), GOLDEN BUTTE PHASE 1, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Lot Twenty-Seven, Block Twenty-Four, Oregon Water Wonderland Unit 2, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 50 SOUTHWEST GLENEAGLES WAY BEND, OR 97702 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 17274 SCAUP DRIVE BEND, OR 97707-2393 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,742.77 beginning default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when 09/19/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 10/05/11; plus due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,010.97 beginning prior accrued late charges of $598.40; plus advances of $2,935.45 that 01/01/12 and $982.19 beginning 03/01/12; plus late charges of $40.81 represent property inspection fees and paid attorney's fees and costs; toeach month beginning 01/16/12; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; gether with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees inplus advances of $78.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees curred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above deinterest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. scribed real property and its interest therein; and prepayment By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the penalties/premiums, if applicable. obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the sums being the following, to wit: $590,857.04 with interest thereon at the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said rate of 3.5 percent per annum beginning 08/19/11; plus late charges of sums being the following, to wit: $149,987.08 with interest thereon at the $0.00 each month beginning 10/05/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late rate of 5 percent per annum beginning 12/01/11; plus late charges of charges of $598.40; plus advances of $2,935.45 that represent property $40.81 each month beginning 01/16/12 until paid; plus prior accrued late inspection fees and paid attorney's fees and costs; together with title excharges of $0.00; plus advances of $78.00; together with title expense, pense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the prodefault; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of tection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayprepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 9, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanAugust 6, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physi"Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestinformation is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. trustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perfortrust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes re- Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inis secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northrated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 SMITH, MICHAEL D. and MERYL A. (TS# 7023.99967) 1002.212463-File No. Publication Dates: May 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012. 1002.212463

For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 GRUETTER, MICHELLE A. and BRYAN W. (TS# 7777.17765) 1002.212458-File No. Publication Dates: May 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012. 1002.212458

File No. 7777.17370 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Ken Tillery, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL OREGON, INC., as beneficiary, dated 09/24/07, recorded 09/28/07, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2007-52779, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot Seven (7), Block Ninety-nine (99), DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES UNIT 8, PART II, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 15971 LAVA DR LA PINE, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,079.63 beginning 08/07/11 and $809.63 beginning 12/12/11 and $986.35 beginning 01/12/12; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 08/22/11; plus prior accrued late charges of $364.32; plus advances of $6,179.25 that represent balance of payment, NSF fees, and delinquent taxes paid; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $87,005.22 with interest thereon at the rate of 9.25 percent per annum beginning 07/07/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 08/22/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $364.32; plus advances of $6,179.25 that represent balance of payment, NSF fees, and delinquent taxes paid; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on July 23, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 TILLERY, KENNETH (TS# 7777.17370) 1002.211241-File Publication Dates: April 22, 29, May 6, and 13, 2012. 1002.211241 PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 7431.20277 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by David B. Johnson and Myra Kay Johnson, as grantor, to First American Title Company, as trustee, in favor of Columbia River Bank Mortgage Group, as beneficiary, dated 12/22/01, recorded 12/31/01, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2001-64541 and subsequently assigned to Freedom Mortgage Corporation by Assignment, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot 16 in Block 2 of First Addition to Whispering Pines Estates, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 65066 Hunnell Road Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $807.73 beginning 11/01/11; plus late charges of $33.22 each month beginning 10/16/11; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $12.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $36,047.48 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.75 percent per annum beginning 10/01/11; plus late charges of $33.22 each month beginning 10/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $12.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on July 31, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Winston Khan Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Johnson, David B. and Myra Kay (TS# 7431.20277) 1002.211673-File No. Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.211673


OPINION&BOOKS

Editorials, F2 Commentary, F3 Books, F4-6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

F

www.bendbulletin.com/opinion

JOHN COSTA

Support higher ed expansion

T

o call the first meetings speculative does not do justice to the word. More than a decade ago, members of the Central Oregon Regional Advisory Board were asked how higher education could be expanded in the region. At the time, in addition to Central Oregon Community College, distant universities provided an array of offerings through a COCC-based university center. They did a good job, but the need for a more comprehensive, degreegranting presence to serve students here seemed beyond debate to most of the CORAB members. Ironically, it is very difficult today, even for the true believers of CORAB, to realize how much of the dream has come true. The issue then was to persuade the State Board of Higher Education, the governor and the Legislature that an investment here made sense. As much of a no-brainer as it may seem in hindsight, it was an uphill slog. There were many arguments against it, and many powerful opponents. It was not the right time. It would draw funds from a struggling state university system. It was just another growth engine for Central Oregon. And it could draw support from, and therefore diminish, COCC. Wow, have times — and the discussion — changed. Now, the issue is a proposed major expansion of Oregon State University’s Cascades branch in Central Oregon. Since its inception, OSU-Cascades has granted degrees to about a thousand students who otherwise would not have a bachelor’s degree. It has done that in coordination with COCC, which has provided the first two years of the degree program. As you have read in The Bulletin, we could now be close to another major investment by the state in purchasing or developing facilities to allow OSU to offer a full, four-year undergraduate program, and room for graduate programs on a new and expanded campus in west Bend. We all — citizens, public bodies, private institutions — need to get behind this. Success or failure will define the future of Central Oregon. Unlike the days of wishes and prayers, we have a number of pluses in our favor. We now have an established university branch with a decade of growth to settle forever the question of local demand. OSU is unconditionally committed, as President Ed Ray has vowed, to its success. In fact, he believes that Bend could be the home to a full-fledged university with 3,000 to 5,000 students in the not-too-distant future. We have excellent local leadership. Becky Johnson, the leader of OSUCascades, and COCC President Jim Middleton are guiding their institutions to complementary and supportive goals. There is no necessary tension between these two great schools. In fact, after a decade of co-existence, both are bursting at the seams with applications. Municipal leaders who were somewhat cool to the idea a decade ago are now considering ways to support the expansion. While we should recognize what has been accomplished, we need to focus on what remains to be done. Last week, former CORAB leader Barbara Schenck, reflecting on the founding and growth of OSU-Cascades said, “This isn’t the time for talk of alternate or complementary universities. Given all we’ve been through, over decades of planning and over the past decade of hard work and hard times, so long as and only if all the players work toward one goal a victory is in sight.” Or as Patti Moss, former chief of the Bank of the Cascades and a CORAB stalwart said, “Higher education is so fundamental to economic development and the recruitment of wage-earning companies to our communities that we all should take a moment to celebrate the real successes to date and then do all we can to demonstrate community support to OSU and help make dreams of education become reality.” Well said, my friends. — John Costa is editor-in-chief of The Bulletin. Contact: 541-383-0337, jcosta@bendbulletin.com

UNDERCOVER UNDER PRESSURE AND

For these New York cops, there’s no easy way to leave the job behind By Al Baker and Joseph Goldstein • New York Times News Service

A

fter a decade spent working the bottom levels of New York’s drug world, Margaret Sasso, an undercover police officer, believed she had done and seen enough. The thought of entering more crack dens made her numb. She sought a hardship transfer in August, but nothing came

of it. In March, as she sat in her car before a shift, she began swallowing prescribed muscle relaxants. The police found her the next day, unconscious from what she said was a failed suicide attempt. “I just wanted to rest,” Sasso, 43, said in a recent interview, after her release from a hospital. “Get away from everything and just rest.” Sasso’s suicide attempt was seen by other detectives as a potent, if extreme, illustration of the difficulties plaguing undercover units at a time when the Police Department’s head count is diminished, but the demand for arrests has never been higher. Of the 120 or so undercover officers in the Organized Crime Control Bureau, which runs most of the department’s undercover operations, there is wide-

spread dissatisfaction among the ranks, according to interviews with nearly a dozen current or recently retired detectives, including several assigned to undercover units. About 40 undercover officers or detectives have pending requests to be transferred out, said one police official in Brooklyn who works with undercover officers, and who spoke on the condition of anonymity. Michael Palladino, head of the detectives’ union, said, “Once you’re in, there’s no way out.” See Undercover / F6

Beatrice de Gea / New York Times News Service

New York City Police Detective Debra Lawson has worked as an undercover police officer in the firearms unit. There is widespread dissatisfaction among Lawson and other undercover officers in the city’s Organized Crime Control Bureau.

BOOKS INSIDE SHADES OF CONTROVERSY: Libraries ban the racy ‘Fifty Shades’ trilogy F4

RAMBLIN’ MAN: Autobiography offers a candid look at Gregg Allman, F5

POLITICS, ART AND HISTORY: Book of campaign posters combines them all, F6


F2

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

B  M C G B  J C  R  C

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

Worst-case plan for Bend police is not pretty

N

ot enough manpower to investigate arson. Not enough for many cases of sex abuse. Not enough for robbery.

Bend’s police chief is looking to the future and the picture he

paints isn’t pretty. While what he talks about is a worst-case view, it’s better to warn citizens of what could happen than to let them be surprised if it does. Chief Jeff Sale is in the midst of drawing up a five-year plan that will guide his department should revenues remain flat and demands on his resources continue to rise. Some of what he plans would make sense no matter what his resources — among them changes in radio systems that would allow better communications within the city and with agencies outside. So, too, does it make sense to upgrade the department’s records management system and to put greater reliance on information to drive the way the police force spends its time. The chief also plans to combine some jobs and streamline purchasing procedures, moves that will improve efficiency even as they save money. Those are the moves we’d expect any good manager to make. What should get people’s attention is what Sale believes could happen if revenues do not increase. Were nothing to change, Bend could become a place in which theft and property crimes, no matter how large, went uninvestigated,

Already police have given up appearances at minor car accidents on private property, and they plan to begin asking that reports of some crimes be filed online. where missing persons were not sought unless there was some belief that foul play was involved, where suspicious deaths were not looked into. Already police have given up appearances at minor car accidents on private property, and they plan to begin asking that reports of some crimes be filed online. Other changes are in the works, as well. While some of what Sale sees in his department’s future is sure to become reality, the worst cannot be allowed to happen. At the same time, he’s right to lay out for everyone what could happen if things don’t change.

Bulletin’s endorsements for the May 15 election

B

elow are The Bulletin’s endorsements for the May 15 primary election. The editorial board interviews candidates only in contested races. Ballots were mailed to voters April 27 and must be returned to county clerks’ offices by 8 p.m. on Election Day. Deschutes County Clerk Nancy Blankenship advises that ballots should now not be mailed but delivered to one of the official drop boxes. Additional information is available at the websites of each county elections office or the Oregon Secretary of State.

Federal • President, Republican primary: Mitt Romney • Representative District 2, Democratic primary: Joyce Segers

State • Secretary of State, Democratic primary: Kate Brown • Attorney General, Democratic primary: Ellen Rosenblum • Court of Appeals Judge, nonpartisan: Tim Volpert

• Supreme Court Justice, nonpartisan: Timothy Sercombe • Senator District 28, Republican primary: Doug Whitsett • Senator District 27, Republican primary: Tim Knopp

Crook County • Judge, Republican primary: Craig Brookhart • Commissioner, Republican primary: Ken Fahlgren

Deschutes County • Circuit Court Judge, nonpartisan: Thomas Spear • Commissioner, Position 2, Republican primary: Tom Greene • Commissioner, Position 2, Democratic primary: Alan Unger (Dallas Brown’s name appears on the ballot, but he has withdrawn.) • 911 measure creates new district with permanent tax rate: Yes

Jefferson County • School bond provides funds to build school in Warm Springs and make extensive enhancements to existing schools: Yes

My Nickel’s Worth Knopp is the real Republican This election cycle, the choice for senator between Chris Telfer and Tim Knopp is simple. Telfer, going along to get along, has consistently voted with the liberals on the west side of the Cascades. She does not appear to be bothered by all of the waste in our state government, as evidenced by her voting record, and one could conclude that she feels more government is better government. Knopp, on the other hand, has always shown himself to be for less government, and more efficiency in government. While in Salem, Knopp consistently voted in the best interests of Central Oregon, fought against waste and voted in a manner to encourage job growth, development and better communities. However, for me the choice has been made even easier. I recently noticed that some of my Democrat neighbors, the ones who have previously had Steigler and Kitzhaber signs in their yards, now have signs up for Telfer. Changing the letter behind your name doesn’t necessarily make you a Republican. Don’t be fooled. Vote for the real, lifelong Republican. Vote for someone who will represent the interests of Central Oregon and our communities. Vote for Tim Knopp. Brendan Adams Bend

Bagley for Circuit Court With four candidates vying for Circuit Court Judge, Beth Bagley stands out. Her record of public service to the community is unmatched by the others. She has tried some of

Think indoor building Some people have said we need a municipal for parks golf course. I propose Some people have said we need a municipal golf course. This will only that before we consider cost a million or so, so they say, and this project again, let’s will make money. Others say not so. maintain the facilities we I propose that before we consider this project again, let’s maintain the have. ... Another novel facilities we have. idea is to build an indoor For example, Kevin Collier, sports building that would provide coordinator for the Bend Park & Recreation District, runs a very for multiple uses such as successful summer tennis camp for basketball, tennis, pickle kids along with sponsoring several ball and racquetball. tournaments. Furthermore, there the most difficult cases occurring in our community. As one of the few women in an elected position in Deschutes County, I am well aware of the obstacles one faces when running for office. Currently, only two of the seven circuit court judges in Deschutes County are women. This representation is disparate given the numbers of women and men actually practicing law. Bagley has been a trial attorney for 15 years, committed to public service for the last 13 as a prosecutor. She has shown leadership and fairness on the Bend-La Pine Schools Board. She has even saved taxpayer money, developing a court program that saves time, cuts costs, and keeps offenders accountable. I’m not saying you should vote for Bagley because she is a woman. You should vote for Beth Bagley because she is a qualified woman who has proven herself capable of serving as judge. Jodie Barram is a Bend City Councilor and mayor pro tem

is a tennis middle school program in the fall. It seems to me that we should look at maintaining what we have first. Specifically, looking at tennis — fix the cracks, repair netting and fix the fences so the balls stay in the court. Another novel idea is to build an indoor building that would provide for multiple uses such as basketball, tennis, pickle ball and racquetball. This would serve a broader population of the city. Just a thought. Mike Brock Bend

Bulletin should not be one-sided Now let me get this straight: Greg Walden gets a half-page picture on the front page on May 2 just because he “possibly backed Romney first.� Ron Wyden gets a small article in the business section because he is working to bring jobs to Oregon by getting the municipal airport improved. No, the Bulletin’s not one-sided. Not at all. Quit wagging the dog and practice some real journalism! Tommy Ocel Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

The ultra-rich are taking the rest of us for a ride By Jan W. Gallagher as Wall Street become the CEO of Washington, D.C.? Having recently finished reading “Winner-Take-All Politics� by Jacob S. Hacker & Paul Pierson, I would like to issue a challenge. Read this book — then see if you can resist the desire to write to our congressmen and senators. A subtitle on the book’s cover pretty well says it all: “How Washington Made the Rich Richer — And Turned Its Back on the Middle Class.� There is little question that the “ultra-rich� have the rest of the U.S. population at a disadvantage. With the great wealth that these fortunate few have at their disposal, they have, over the past 30 years or so, managed to assure only legislation that is to their advantage has been

H

signed into law, while any legislation that they disagree with is effectively blocked. Thus they have made their fleecing of America perfectly legal for the most part. Ethically — not so much! Obviously, the many issues and consequences presented in “Winner-Take-All Politics� cannot be addressed in a few paragraphs, but to say that Wall Street and Washington are in bed together is an unmitigated understatement. One of the most blatant abuses has been the gradual reduction of the tax rate of the U.S. tax code that the very wealthy pay, through the subtle manipulation of the progressive levels and the ever-increasing loopholes. An example of this is the fact that the top 25 hedge fund managers made an average of $900 million each dur-

IN MY VIEW ing 2007. While that sounds like a lot of money, if we put it in a simpler perspective, it amounts to almost $2 million per day. To make matters worse, thanks to loop holes in the tax code, they can treat much of this unimaginable income as capital gains, subject to only a 15 percent tax rate. So, if you would figure their income on the typical 40-hour workweek, on the average, they are making somewhere around $165,000 per hour after taxes. MSNBC.com recently reported that Raymond Dalio of Bridgewater Associates was the 2011 top moneymaker, taking home $3.9 billion — over $10 million per day. I wonder what his tax rate will be!

“Winner-Take-All� also explains how so many CEOs manage to take home colossal paychecks and benefits even though the corporations they shepherd may perform poorly, lose value and even fail. Again, the underhanded relationships between Wall Street and Washington have directly contributed to this situation. Isn’t it time the United States came to terms with this greed that has become so overpowering, it threatens to destroy our economy and the great society we have become? I fail to understand what drives these individuals to desire such immense fortunes, let alone what good such excesses will do for them, except to be able to say “I am a billionaire� and have the absurd decorum that allows. I can understand the desire to be wealthy, that is part of the great

“American Dream,� but to extend it to the point that these few gluttonous individuals have is grotesque. Apparently, someplace in their quest for riches, they have become intoxicated with the power that these immense fortunes avail them. Fortunately, “Winner-Take-All� offers some remedial recommendations, none of which will be easy. Reform never is. Since I am past 70, I doubt that I will benefit from any positive reform: however, it is up to all of us to correct this before the American Dream becomes the 21st Century Nightmare. Voting, by itself, will no longer suffice — we must tell all of our representatives and senators what we expect from them in no uncertain terms. Therein lies the challenge! — Jan W. Gallagher lives in Bend.


SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

C Playing politics with racial identity S

ometimes a trivial embarrassment can become a teachable moment. It was recently revealed that Harvard professor and U.S. Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren had self-identified as a Native American for nearly a decade — apparently to enhance her academic career by claiming minority status. Warren, a blond multimillionaire, could not substantiate her claim of 1⁄32 Cherokee heritage. (And would it have reflected any better on her if she could have?) Instead, she fell back on the stereotyped caricature that she had “high cheekbones.” Not long ago, University of Colorado academic Ward Churchill was likewise exposed as a fraud in his claims of Native American ancestry. This racial con artist was able to fabricate an entire minority identity and parlay it into an activist professorship otherwise not possible for a white male of his limited talent. In the Trayvon Martin murder case, the media was intent on promulgating a white oppressor/black victim narrative as proof of endemic white prejudice that still haunts America and thus requires perpetual recompense. However, a glitch arose when it was learned that Zimmerman had a Peruvian mother. By university and government diversity standards, he could be characterized as a “minor-

VICTOR DAVIS HANSON ity.” That bothersome fact threatened to undermine the entire hyped narrative of white-on-black crime. So the panicked media coined a new hybrid term for Zimmerman: “white Hispanic.” Note that the media has so far not in commensurate fashion referred to President Barack Obama as a “white African-American” even though he too had a white parent. In Obama’s memoirs, we learn that well into his 20s he self-identified as “Barry.” Only later did Obama begin using his African name, Barack, which at some key juncture offered a more valuable cachet than did the suburban-sounding “Barry.” Is there anything wrong with such chameleon-like self-identification in an age when universities are full of hyphenated careerists and newscasters awkwardly trill their names to remind us of their particular ethnicity? In the last 50 years, massive immigration from Asia, Africa and Latin America, coupled with rapid rates of integration and intermarriage, have created a truly multiracial society. So-called whites, for example, are now a minority of the

population in California, and millions of people of mixed ancestry don’t identify with any particular ethnic group. Does a Joe Lopez, the son of a white mother and a Hispanic father, “count” as Hispanic while a Joe Schmidt, the son of a Hispanic mother and a white father, does not? What about a José Schmidt? For that answer, ask George Zimmerman. Had he applied for college admission or a certain type of job, a politically correct university or an employer pressed to meet diversity quotas mostly certainly would have dubbed Zimmerman “Hispanic.” Identities, in psychodramatic fashion, are sometimes put on and taken off, like clothes, as self-interest dictates — given that so often they are no longer ascertainable from appearance. If that sounds crass or unfair, ask Elizabeth Warren, who dropped her Native American claims as soon as she at last received tenure and found her 1⁄32 con suddenly superfluous — to the apparent unconcern of her similarly cynical but now mum employer, Harvard. Nor is race sure proof of either poverty or past oppression. Asian Americans, for example, have a median family income more than $10,000 a year higher than white Americans. And if pigmentation is proof of ongoing prejudice, why

don’t darker Punjabis and Arabs — who do not qualify for special racial preferences — deserve consideration over those lighter-skinned minorities who do? How long after a Mexican national crossed the border would he become a Chicano eligible for affirmative action? Do Attorney General Eric Holder’s children qualify? Do 1 ⁄32 (one great-great-great grandparent) or 1⁄16 (one great-great grandparent) Cherokees receive preferential treatment? And if so, who administers this odious Jim Crow one-drop DNA test, and how? In truth, after a half-century in our self-created racial labyrinth, no one quite knows who qualifies as an oppressed victim or why — only that the more one can change a name or emphasize lineage, the better the careerist edge. The real worry is that soon we will have so many recompense-seeking victims that we will run out of concessiongranting oppressors. How odd (or rather, how predictable) that something that started out as a supposedly noble lie — that to atone for past bias we must be judged by the color of our skin rather than the content of our character — has become utterly ignoble and beneath us.

Cox News Service

L

et’s say there was a candidate running for president who had been a legislator, governor, ambassador, Cabinet official and vice president. He had been in politics most of his adult life and had relentlessly and ambitiously moved from one higher office to the next. His opposition would almost certainly and negatively call him a career politician. You might agree. Or you might call him Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson comes to mind when I hear candidates attack their opponents as career politicians — that is, when the attack registers. It’s such a common criticism that sometimes it’s just the political equivalent of the adult voices in “Peanuts.” Mwa mwa mwa. Here’s just one recent example: “I’m the only one in the race who isn’t a career politician.” That was Sean Hubbard, at a forum for Texas’ U.S. Senate candidates recently in Houston. News reports say Hubbard worked for a door company but left his job to run for office. He is not a career politician. He’s only 31, so it’s unclear whether he’s a career anything yet. The surprise wasn’t that we heard a swipe at career politicians during the forum, which included four Republican Senate candidates (Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, former Texas Solicitor General Ted Cruz, former Dallas Mayor Tom Leppert and former ESPN analyst Craig James) and, for the first time, two Democratic candidates (Hubbard and former state Rep. Paul Sadler). The surprise was learning there are Texas Democrats running for the U.S. Senate. For all the would-be citizen leg-

islators out there who assure voters they are not career politicians, I say, if you want to pursue politics as a career, go ahead. The founders believed in political service, and to effectively serve the public, it helps to win office. And sometimes the longer you stay in office the more effective you become. From his turn as a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1775 to the end of his presidency in 1809, Jefferson was rarely out of public office. The political career of his predecessor, John Adams, ran from 1774 to 1801. Like many politicians today, whose retirement is forced on them by either voters or the grave, Adams did not voluntarily leave public life; he was denied a second term. The list goes on, from James Madison, whose political career

stretches across 40 years, to John Jay, who served in government for more than 25 years, to, say, Thomas McKean, a signer of the Declaration of Independence who held public office of some kind for 45 years. There were exceptions. George Washington was the least politically experienced of our presidents until Zachary Taylor was elected in 1848, in terms of holding elected office, though you can hardly call a man who commanded an army politically inexperienced. None of today’s career politicians is in danger of being compared with a Founding Father. There is a difference between a politician who serves for 30 years then voluntarily returns home and a politician who stays in office until Death boots him out or, worse, until he leaves to be-

The Washington Post

I

’m just back from the Berkshire Hathaway shareholders meeting in Omaha, where billionaire Warren Buffett and 25,000 of his closest personal friends gather each year to talk money. The 81-year-old Oracle of Omaha and his 88-year-old sidekick, Charlie Munger, are still going strong and still preaching the gospel of value investing. “We’ve been students of other people’s folly, and it’s served us well,” Buffett observed, seemingly for the billionth time. No folly has hurt the United States more than the housing bubble of this century’s first decade. “All of us participated in the destructive behavior — government, lenders, borrowers, the media, rating agencies, you name it,” Buffett wrote in his latest annual letter to shareholders. “At the core of the folly was the almost universal belief that the value of houses was certain to increase over time and that any dips would be inconsequential. The acceptance of this premise justified almost any price and practice in housing transactions.”

Those characteristically pithy sentences cut through much conventional wisdom that would pin the crisis on lax regulators, deceptive financiers or profligate borrowers. The problem wasn’t so much that people acted irrationally, based on what they knew, as that they behaved rationally — and what they “knew” wasn’t true. Buffett’s common-sensical appraisal receives independent validation in a new paper by Federal Reserve economists Christopher Foote, Kristopher Gerardi and Paul Willen. Their data refute many oft-made accusations about the housing bubble. Did adjustable-rate subprime mortgages cause the wave of foreclosures? No: Defaults on such mortgages did not surge after two years, when their interest rates reset; the worst-performing vintage, made in January 2007, had no interest rate “shock,” since rates had fallen substantially by January 2009. Nor did sellers of mortgage-backed securities deceive buyers. Even the notorious 2007 Goldman Sachs deal known as Abacus AC1 CDO included enough information to determine

the current delinquency status of every individual loan in the securitized package. In fact, mortgage market insiders were among the biggest losers. As Foote, Gerardi and Willen put it, “the executives most likely to understand the subprime-lending process had made personal investment decisions that exposed them to subprime risk.” Meanwhile, “outsiders” such as John Paulson’s hedge fund made a killing. But Paulson, who famously bet against subprime securities, didn’t do so because he figured out that they were somehow “designed to fail.” Rather, he simply dissented from the belief that house prices were never going to fall significantly. Widely held optimism about prices, the Boston Fed economists show, overrode all other considerations in the market. Investors knew, or easily could have found out, that mortgage underwriting standards had been relaxed. They just didn’t care, because “in the event that the borrower defaulted, then the higher price of the house serving as collateral would eliminate any credit losses.” The same logic explains why so

Startups fuel new type of Arab Spring

many households played the game. Given the belief in eternal appreciation of house prices, you would have been crazy not to take out a 2/28 ARM with no money down, and maybe a little cash back at closing! As Buffett notes in his letter, “Large numbers of people who ‘lost’ their house through foreclosure have actually realized a profit because they carried out refinancings earlier that gave them cash in excess of their cost.” Foote, Gerardi and Willen admit that economists are no closer to explaining the U.S. house mania than they are to understanding the tulip mania in Holland almost four centuries ago. They think the Federal Reserve’s interest rate policy or Fannie Mae’s interventions might have helped start the madness but can’t account for its timing or momentum. We can clean up the housing mess and learn from it. But even the most enlightened policy can’t guarantee it will never happen again. Folly is human nature, and you can’t regulate human nature. — Charles Lane is a member of The Washington Post’s editorial board.

— Thomas Friedman is a columnist for The New York Times.

— Victor Davis Hanson is a classicist and historian at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University.

come a lobbyist. If “career politician” is a pejorative, then political experience is a liability. Except when lack of experience is a bigger liability. Barack Obama’s opponents tried to make an issue of his lack of experience four years ago. There have been a few feeble attempts to point out that Mitt Romney’s political experience is limited to a single, four-year term as governor of Massachusetts, which would make him, should he be elected president, one of the least politically experienced men to ever win the White House. Look at the résumés of the first 10 or so presidents, and the depth and breadth of their political experience is breathtaking: multiple political offices — state and federal, elected and appointed — held over a few decades. It’s a diversity of political experience rarely seen — or respected — today. Experience might matter at some political level, but at the presidential level, no lesson can be drawn. The founders who became president were politically experienced and were good or great presidents (well, except for Adams, maybe). But for every president since, neither political experience nor military experience has predicted his performance in office. There are six months left in this campaign cycle. Before it’s done you will hear one candidate call another a career politician. Think of Thomas Jefferson. Or your favorite founding father. It won’t matter who because the reminder will be the same: Sometimes the career makes the politician. — Jody Seaborn writes for the Austin American-Statesman.

Housing market ‘folly’ a lesson in human nature By Charles Lane

THOMAS FRIEDMAN

AMMAN, Jordan — ortunately, there is another Arab Spring going on alongside the drama in the streets of Cairo and Damascus. It is an explosion of startups by young Arab techies. Ground zero is a complex of buildings here in the heart of Amman. The site was built to be the headquarters of the Jordanian Army, but, at the last minute, King Abdullah ordered the army elsewhere, renamed the complex “The Business Park,” and declared it a special economic zone. The multistory army buildings now carry big signs that say “Microsoft,” “HP,” “Samsung” and “Cisco.” But it’s the building labeled “Oasis500” that really got my attention. It’s where Lawrence of Arabia meets Mark Zuckerberg. Oasis500 is an Arab-owned hightech accelerator, looking to nurture 500 new startups in Jordan. It has dangled seed money for any Jordanian or Arab who wants to create a new company here, and, like a flash rainstorm in the desert, Oasis500 has already helped dozens of Arabiccontent Internet startups to blossom practically overnight. Only 1 percent of global Web content is in Arabic today, but 75 percent of it is produced in Jordan. The Arab world needs to create millions of nongovernment jobs to satisfy its youth bulge. Alas, though, there are no employees without employers — high-IQ risk-takers ready to start companies — and that is what Oasis500 is trying to multiply, fast. Without this Arab Spring, the other Arab Spring will never last. There will be no middle class to sustain it. “We are big believers in creating companies rather than jobs,” says Usama Fayyad, the former chief data officer at Yahoo, who came home convinced that the raw material was here to create an Arab “Silicon Wadi.” There is no tradition of venture capital in the Arab world, so Oasis500 is a pioneer. It invites any Jordanian or Arab to come with a startup plan. Any plan that is accepted receives $15,000 in seed capital. Then the starter-uppers have to go through Oasis500 boot camp, an intense five-week course in how to build a company. The survivors are given office space at The Business Park for three to six months. For those who manage to grow after their first stage of incubation, there is more angel funding, legal advice, mentoring and networking opportunities with local business leaders. Oasis500 invests in each company that makes it that far. Fayyad said that since Oasis500 started in 2010, it has received 2,000 applications and has invested in 49 companies. Of those, they have harvested one profitable exit, 45 are still active and only three have failed. They are now getting hundreds of applicants a month for boot camp. During my visit, Fayyad introduced me to 30 of his latest startups, including: Doseyeh.com, an Arabic portal that provides course packets for undergraduate college classes; Firstbazaar.com, an online market for local artisans; Littlethinkingminds.com, which makes Arabic Internet content for kids; and Tawajod.com, an Arabic Motley Fool. With all the young people looking for work, “the only way to handle unemployment is to invent your own job,” said Majed Jarrar, founder of VitalTronix, which is developing heartmonitoring technology. That attitude is Jordan’s oil. The government here has real problems with corruption and political reform, but it has also created the best Arab platform combining education, high-speed bandwidth, uncensored Internet and laws that protect intellectual property and incentivize investment. This is a new Arab growth model — based on entrepreneurship, not government contracts. “Entrepreneurship is about empowerment,” said Fadi Ghandour, an investor in Oasis500 and a founder of the first Arab-based company listed on the Nasdaq: Aramex. “Taking ownership of your future, and giving the skills and tools to these young aspiring entrepreneurs, means they are less dependent on the state and become job creators rather than only job seekers, creating value for themselves, their employees and the community at large.” That is why I am rooting for this Arab Spring as much as the other one.

Political career isn’t automatically mockable By Jody Seaborn

F3

F


F4

BOOKS THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/books

Toni Morrison’s latest novel focuses on American racism

B- Publishers Weekly ranks the bestsellers for the week ending May 5. Hardcover fiction 1. “Deadlocked” by Charlaine Harris (Ace) 2. “The Wind Through the Keyhole” by Stephen King (Scribner) 3. “The Innocent” by David Baldacci (Grand Central) 4. “Calico Joe” by John Grisham (Doubleday) 5. “The Witness” by Nora Roberts (Putnam) 6. “Robert B. Parker’s Lullaby” by Ace Atkins (Putnam) 7. “Unnatural Acts” by Stuart Woods (Putnam) 8. “Guilty Wives” by James Patterson & David Ellis (Little, Brown) 9. “The Lost Years” by Mary Higgins Clark (Simon & Schuster) 10. “The Shoemaker’s Wife” by Adriana Trigiani (Harper) 11. “Sacre Bleu” by Christopher Moore (Morrow) 12. “A Dance with Dragons” by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 13. “Born of Silence” by Sherrilyn Kenyon (Grand Central) 14. “The Reverend’s Wife” by Kimberla Lawson Roby (Grand Central) Hardcover nonfiction 1. “The Passage of Power” by Robert A. Caro (Knopf) 2. “My Cross to Bear” by Gregg Allman (Morrow) 3. “Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake” by Anna Quindlen (Random House) 4. “Prague Winter” by Madeleine Albright (Harper) 5. “The Pioneer Woman Cooks: Food from My Frontier” by Ree Drummond (Morrow) 6. “The Blood Sugar Solution” by Mark Hyman, M.D. )Little, Brown) 7. “The Power of Habit” by Charles Duhigg (Random House) 8. “Drift.” by Rachel Maddow (Crown) 9. “Vegan Cooking for Carnivores” by Roberto Martin (Grand Central) 10. “The 17 Day Diet” by Dr. Mike Moreno (Free Press) 11. “Imagine” by Jonah Lehrer (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) 12. “The Presidents Club” by Nancy Gibbs & Michael Duffy (Simon & Schuster) 13. “Weeknights with Giada” by Giada De Laurentiis (Clarkson Potter) 14. “Manhunt” by Peter L. Bergen (Crown) Mass market paperback 1. “The Lucky One” by Nicholas Sparks (Vision) 2. “Under a Vampire Moon” by Lynsay Sands (Avon) 3. “The Fifth Witness” by Michael Connelly (Vision) 4. “Buried Prey” by John Sandford (Berkley) 5. “A Clash of Kings” by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 6. “Sunrise Point” by Robyn Carr (Mira) 7. “A Game of Thrones” by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 8. “Mystery” by Jonathan Kellerman (Ballantine) 9. “Chasing Fire” by Nora Roberts (Jove) 10. “Prey” by Linda Howard (Ballantine) 11. “A Storm of Swords” by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 12. “The Affair” by Lee Child (Dell) 13. “Vision in White” by Nora Roberts (Jove) 14. “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter” by Seth Grahame-Smith (Grand Central) Trade paperback 1. “Fifty Shades of Grey” by E L James (Vintage) 2. “Fifty Shades Darker” by E L James (Vintage) 3. “Fifty Shades Freed” by E L James (Vintage) 4. “The Last Boyfriend” by Nora Roberts (Berkley) 5. “In the Garden of Beasts” by Erik Larson (Broadway) 6. “The Lucky One” by Nicholas Sparks (Grand Central) 7. “Heaven Is for Real” by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent (Thomas Nelson) 8. “The Art of Fielding” by Chad Harbach (Back Bay) 9. “Bossypants” by Tina Fey (Back Bay/Reagan Arthur) 10. “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” by Rebecca Skloot (Broadway) 11. “Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man” by Steve Harvey (Amistad) 12. “Then Again” by Diane Keaton (Random House) 13. “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter” by Seth Grahame-Smith (Grand Central) 14. “The New Jim Crow” by Michelle Alexander (New Press) — McClatchy-Trib une News Service

“H o m e” by Toni Morrison (Alfred A. Knopf, $24) By Amy Driscoll McClatchy Newspapers

R o n Harris / The Associated Press

Deborah George, division director of materials management for the Gwinnett County Public Library in Lawrenceville, Ga., recommended that the 15-branch library system not stock E L James’ best-selling “Fifty Shades” books, below.

Grey area • Some public libraries say the best-selling ‘Fifty Shades’ triology is more porn than literature, and are banning it from their shelves By Tamara Lush The Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Public libraries in several states are pulling the racy romance trilogy “Fifty Shades of Grey” from shelves or deciding not to order the best-seller at all, saying it’s too steamy or too poorly written. Even in the age of e-books and tablets, banning a book from a public library still carries weight because libraries still play such a vital role in providing people access to books. “When a book is removed from the shelf, folks who can’t afford a Nook or a Kindle, the book is no longer available to them,” said Deborah Caldwell Stone, the deputy director of the American Library Association’s office for intellectual freedom. “Fifty Shades of Grey,” a novel about bondage, wild sex and yes, love, has been called “mommy porn” because of its popularity among middle-aged women. It has become so wellknown that “Saturday Night Live” performed a skit about it, joking that a Kindle with “Fifty Shades” uploaded on it was the perfect Mother’s Day gift. This week, the steamy books hold the top three spots on the New York Times best-seller list. Libraries in Wisconsin, Georgia and Florida have all either declined to order the book or pulled it from shelves. Other states may soon follow. “It’s semi-pornographic,” said Don Walker, a spokesman for Brevard County, Fla., where the library put 19 copies of the book on the shelves, then pulled the novel after reading reviews about it. Some 200 notices had to go out to people on a waiting list to read it. Librarians in at least four Florida counties have declined to buy the book — even though hundreds of people have requested it. Reasons range from not having the money to poor reviews. “It doesn’t suit our community standards,” said Cay Hohmeister, director of libraries for Leon County — where Florida’s capital, Tallahassee, is located. In Gwinnett County, Ga., a suburb northeast of Atlanta, all 15 library branches will not carry the book. “We do not collect erotica at Gwinnett County Public Library. That’s part of our materials management collection policy. So, E L James’ three books in the trilogy fit that description,” said Deborah George, the county library’s director of materials management. A copy of “Fifty Shades” sits on George’s cluttered desk. Wedged in it are nearly a dozen yellow sticky notes at various pages of sultriness. In a nutshell, here’s the plot: Anastasia Steele, a virgin who has just graduated college, meets Christian Grey, a rich and impeccably handsome young entrepreneur. Grey shows Steele his “playroom,” full of whips,

ropes and sex toys, and asks her to sign a contract to be his “submissive” sex partner. Before Steele signs, the pair romp mostly around Seattle — where the novel is set — performing a stunning array of erotic activities. As the sex gets more daring and Steele’s emotions more tangled, drama ensues. Here’s one of the milder excerpts from the book: “But last night, in the playroom, you ...” he trails off. “I do it for you, Christian, because you need it. I don’t. You didn’t hurt me last night. That was in a different context, and I can rationalize that internally, and I trust you. But when you want to punish me, I worry that you’ll hurt me. His gray eyes blaze like a turbulent storm. Time moves, and expands and slips away before he answers softly. “I want to hurt you. But not beyond anything that you couldn’t take.” Books with sexual content, and just as controversial as “Fifty Shades,” have long been — at least for a time — banned during their debuts. Gwinnett County, Ga., carries about a million books in its system, including the steamy passages from Henry Miller’s “Tropic of Cancer” and Vladimir Nabokov’s provocative “Lolita.” These and other novels have gone on to reach best-seller lists quickly, and some are taught in public classrooms. Library collections should be diverse, the American Library Association said, but should also reflect what people want to read. And decisions on what to buy shouldn’t be based on content alone — budgetary constraints, shelf space and bad reviews all come into play. A book’s provenance also can make a difference. Some libraries have policies against acquiring self-published books or books published by nontraditional means. The “Fifty Shades” trilogy took a nontraditional route to its paperback form: the author self-published in e-reader form, and many people felt comfortable reading it on tablets because those devices kept the novel mostly private, unlike a hardcover book. It was also published by a small press in print-on-demand trade paperback editions. Because of the books epopularity, Vintage Books, a division of Random House Inc., acquired the rights and published them April 3. So far, the books have sold 3 million cop-

ies in all formats, the publisher said, though it wasn’t clear how many were in paperback. Paul Bogaards, a spokesman for Random House, said Brevard County is engaging in censorship by taking the book off the shelves. “We believe the Brevard County Public Library System is indulging in an act of censorship, and essentially is saying to library patrons: ‘We will judge what you can read,’” Bogaards wrote in an email. Caldwell Stone said other libraries are in a grey area — no pun intended. “All libraries have to make these kinds of decisions,” she said. “It’s so hard to judge the decision to acquire or not acquire the book.” Reviews of the book have been mixed. While The Guardian of London called it “jolly” and “eminently readable,” the U.K. newspaper The Telegraph said the writing was “appalling,” “hackneyed” and readers would have to wade through “pages of treacly cliché.” Hohmeister said those kinds of reviews went into her decision not to buy the book for libraries around Tallahassee. “It has not received what we would consider good reviews,” she said. “It doesn’t meet our selection criteria.”

Mention Toni Morrison’s name and the superlatives follow. Nobel Prize. Pulitzer Prize. This spring, she’ll add Presidential Medal of Freedom winner to the list. But in her new book, a slim 160-page volume titled simply “Home,” the power comes not from the worldfamous author’s name printed on the cover but from the story within. And what a story it is: a tale of postwar homecoming that captures the United States’ chilling history of racism but also celebrates the courage of those strong enough to face it. Frank Money, a black man emotionally damaged from the Korean War, returns to an America that still sees the color of his skin before anything else. Battling his internal demons, driving away anyone who tries to help him, Frank is on the edge of sanity ... until he gets an urgent letter about his younger sister: “Come fast. She be dead if you tarry.” Cee is the closest person to his heart, the first person he ever felt responsible for and the only one who ever made him feel heroic, long ago in a grassy field when they were children. She’s the only one who could get him to go back to Lotus, the unforgiving, isolated, hopeless Georgia town he left for the military and planned never to see again. The letter propels him out of his paralytic misery. He sets off to find Cee, his mental fog lifting as he

makes his way across a dangerous, racist countryside, finding danger and assistance from surprising quarters. Morrison’s sketches of black-white relations are sad and stark: Frank knows to sit at the back of the bus, but he must rely on strangers — the black porter on the train, a pastor who puts him up for a night — to give him names of rooming houses that won’t turn him away and restaurants that will serve black people. Early in his journey, he winds up locked in a mental hospital, which he escapes barefoot in the dead of winter. The pastor warns him: “Listen here, you from Georgia and you been in a desegregated a r m y and maybe you think up North is way different from down South. Don’t believe it and don’t count on it. Custom is just as real as law and can be just as dangerous.” All the while, Frank struggles to repress flashbacks to war and death that threaten his grip on reality. The memories plague him — red organs gushing out of a thin shell of skin, a severed arm tucked onto a stretcher with his nowdead friend. Only his fear for Cee keeps him heading toward Georgia. The stories of Frank and Cee, told in a sort of call-andresponse pattern, urge the reader on with a rhythm that becomes the beating heart of the tale. In the end, the two storylines come together in a moment that is damning and hopeful, a kick to the gut delivered along with a gaze to the heavens.

Change your mind. Change your life.

(541) 728-0505 www.neurofloat.com

Don’t Replace ... Reface and save thousands!

Call today for a free consultation!

541-647-8261 www.cabinetcuresbend.com


SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Allman opens a window onto his extraordinary life • Iconic musician’s autobiography is rich with personal history, anecdotes and even some trivia

Mark Humphrey / The Associated Press

Gregg Allman, left, founding member of The Allman Brothers Band, talks with a fan as he signs copies of his autobiography “My Cross to Bear” in Nashville, Tenn., on Thursday.

“From the very beginning, we were too loud. I was always saying, ‘Guys, it’s just too damn loud,’ but the only one who would pay any attention was (drummer) Jaimoe (Johanson).” — Gregg Allman, founding member, The Allman Brothers Band

“From the very beginning, we were too loud. I was always saying, ‘Guys, it’s just too damn loud,’ but the only one who would pay any attention was (drummer) Jaimoe (Johanson),” Allman writes about the concert. Allman shows much affection for Johanson, even stating that he loves the drummer as much as he did brother Duane. As for the mythical guitar hero of the band, he is always, seemingly, at the forefront of Allman’s thoughts. How did Allman deal with his grief after Duane’s fatal motorcycle accident? For the first 10 years, by reliving his death every day. Allman still carries the guilt of his last conversation with Duane: a lie he told his brother about stealing some of his

‘Bodies’ is a worthy sequel to ‘Wolf Hall’ “Bring Up the Bodies” by Hilary Mantel (Henry Holt, $28) By Mary Ann Gwinn The Seattle Times (MCT)

Readers new to British author Hilary Mantel’s work through her 2009 novel “Wolf Hall” were introduced to a writer who can turn the oldest of stories into a spellbinding tale. What schoolchild doesn’t know the story of King Henry VIII and his six wives? Especially wife number two, the doomed schemer Anne Boleyn? But reading “Wolf Hall,” knowing the outcome didn’t mean a thing — Mantel’s story of Henry’s early reign, told through his right-handman, chief fixer and henchman Thomas Cromwell, lit up the early 16th century. Mantel’s portrait of Cromwell was a revelation, and won her the Man Booker Prize for literature. In her new novel, the sequel to “Wolf Hall,” death has diminished Cromwell. His wife is dead. His beloved daughters are dead, all wiped out by the plague. As he confronts a member of the king’s chamber about Anne’s alleged infidelities, the man, facing certain death, says he may die of grief. Cromwell shakes his head: “He once thought it himself, that he might die of grief: for his wife, his daughters, his sisters, his father and master the cardinal. But the pulse, obdurate, keeps its rhythm. ... You must thrive in spite of yourself; and so that you may do it, God takes out your heart

“My Cross to Bear” by Gregg Allman with Alan Light (Morrow, $27.99) McClatchy Newspapers

Atlanta Journal-Constitution (MCT)

ATLANTA — It’s fitting that Gregg Allman had to alter some dates on his book signing tour because of a health scare. After experiencing arrhythmia, he was cleared recently by the Mayo Clinic to embark on the book outing and a summer Allman Brothers tour. But it was just another sigh-inducing experience in Allman’s extraordinary life, a journey fraught with deaths, drugs, divorces and health disorders, but also one spiked with tremendous musical accomplishments and a persistent air of hopefulness. In the just-released “My Cross to Bear” (William Morrow/HarperCollins, $27.99), Allman’s autobiography written with music journalist Alan Light, Allman digs back to his earliest days in Daytona, Fla., when racism was prevalent and he and brother Duane learned their first guitar licks, to the recent years with a new liver and, last fall, playing at the Country Music Association Awards with the Zac Brown Band. The pages in between are filled with breezy anecdotes recounted with surprising clarity for someone who ingested massive amounts of drugs and alcohol, as Allman, 64, admits to not so much with shame, but with the wisdom of someone who now knows better. There is much for Georgians to relish — Macon natives especially — but there are other tidbits such as Allman’s mention of Atlanta promoter Toby Gunn, who booked the band’s first tour (when they were known as the Allman Joys) for $440 a week, to reminiscing about the Allman Brothers’ first gig at Piedmont Park in the spring of 1969.

Musician looks back on fame and shame By Howard Cohen

By Melissa Ruggieri

of flesh, and gives you a heart of stone.” This transformation makes “Bring Up the Bodies” a grimmer book than its predecessor. Cromwell’s world is narrowing, and his motives are threefold: 1. Survival. 2. Pleasing the king (see number one). 3. Revenge on the scheming aristocrats who brought down his mentor, Cardinal Wolsey. Events are set in motion when Henry tires of Anne Boleyn. He falls in love with Jane Seymour, a quiet, enigmatic girl for whom the phrase “plain Jane” was first coined. Anne was aggressive. The king wants demure. Anne was a schemer. Henry wants simplicity (though the Seymours scheme nearly as well as the Boleyns). Most important, Anne has borne a daughter, and Henry ardently desires a son. Cromwell sets out to do the king’s dirty work. The hardest part for “Wolf Hall” readers to swallow in “Bring Up the Bodies” may be the fact that in the first book, Cromwell was a sympathetic character. In “Bodies,” he is an understandable character, but that understanding requires a considerably darker view of human nature. Anyone can go online and find out what happened to Anne Boleyn; also Cromwell, whose fate will almost certainly play out in the third book in this projected trilogy. Never mind. This wonderful, terrible novel does an awful story full justice. You won’t be able to tear your eyes away.

cocaine. But, as he is apt to do, Allman wades through the muck to find the glint of hope. “Do I believe in reincarnation? After seeing Derek Trucks, how could I not?” he asks rhetorically, talking about the young ace guitarist nephew of original Allman Brothers drummer Butch Trucks. Duane stories aside, there are also finally answers to trivia that has been subject to years of rumors and incorrectly repeated stories. Where did the title of “Melissa” come from? When Allman, needing a three-syllable name for the song, overheard a woman in a grocery store calling to her granddaughter, “No, wait, Melissa.” What was it like being married to Cher? It wasn’t the

worst thing in the world, Allman decides. “We had our good times, we had our bad times. We were just different in a whole bunch of ways,” he says in a chapter that traces their fast, passionate union and its equally abrupt dissolution. Allman spends a bit of time explaining the discovery of his liver condition, which he blames primarily on the unsanitary conditions of needles used for his first tattoos, inked when he was 20, and his eventual transplant. It’s a startling brush with mortality that leads to him pondering his good fortunes over the years as well as the turmoil. But, he determines in the closing paragraphs, if he died today, “I have had me a blast.” However, his decision as to whether he’d like to relive those experiences just might come as a surprise.

F5

Any one of Gregg Allman’s stories about his life could lure a reader into his new memoir, but the 64year-old Allman begins “My Cross to Bear” with his biggest moment of shame, the induction of the Allman Brothers Band into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995. “It should have been the greatest week of my life, but instead I hit an alltime low,” he writes. “The Allman Brothers Band, the band my brother started, the band with our name on it, was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and I flatout missed it. I was physically there, but otherwise I was out of it — mentally, emotionally and spiritually. I was drunk ... the entire time. Welcome to the story of my life.” Given such a forthright enticement, Allman has no trouble hooking readers with the unflinching details of his highs — musical and otherwise — and lows. He writes in a charming, Southern gentlemanly first-person voice with help from Rolling Stone scribe Alan Light and contributing author John Lynskey, a history and government teacher at a Miami high school who has chronicled the Allman Brothers over the years. “My Cross to Bear” is essential reading for ABB fans.

Lead singer, songwriter and keyboardist for the band since its formation in 1969, Allman never knew his father; he was only 2 when his dad was murdered by a hitchhiker. He lost his brother and bandmate Duane Allman, one of rock’s most revered guitarists, to a motorcycle accident in 1971 just as their band was ascending to the A-list. His five marriages failed and one of them, to pop culture fixture Cher, made him People magazine fodder in the 1970s. He’s struggled with drug and alcohol addictions, battled hepatitis C and had a liver transplant. Allman doesn’t spend too much time explaining why his marriages failed and gives only cursory mentions to his five children. But the book’s detail-rich examination of key events in his music career gives “Cross” its dramatic momentum and value. The book’s tone is so open and engaging, “My Cross to Bear” could appeal even to readers whose knowledge of the band begins and ends with “Ramblin’ Man.” Its unfussy style also increases its value in helping readers understand how these major league musicians persevere despite the pitfalls. Simple: “A player has got to play,” Allman writes after doctors warn him to take it easy post-transplant. “(I)f traveling and making music is what takes me, I can’t think of a better way to go.”

856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

ATTENTION BUYERS! FREE! “Home Prices Now at 2002 Levels” “Perfect Storm for Home Buyers” ~ CNN Money, 04/24/2012

~ The Bulletin, 02/26/2012

Home Buyers Seminar May 17, 2012 • 5:30–7:30pm Shilo Inn Suites, Bend ~ 3105 OB Riley Road • Presentation is designed to show homes and home pricing in Bend • Solutions for those with credit problems and review the incredible financing options • Why & how you can buy today • Interest rates at or below 4% • Demonstrate how owning a home is within your reach • Benefits of owning instead of renting • Get into a home for as low as 3.5% down • No cost and no obligation for anyone attending! Refreshments will be served

This very important seminar is being sponsored by Alpine Real Estate, Directors Mortgage and True North Mortgage.

Please call Dan Zukaitis to reserve seats. 541-410-8038

GRAND OPENING! Dr. Carl Ryan and Dr. Derri Sandberg Celebrate their New Partnership OPEN HOUSE Wednesday, May 16 8am–6pm ~ Refreshments provided

25% OFF 10% OFF *

*

FRAMES & LENSES

CONTACT LENS BOXES

*Some restrictions apply

*Some restrictions apply

www.lvcbend.com • 541-382-3242 15 SW Colorado ~ Corner of Colorado & Broadway


F6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

Undercover Continued from F1 The job generally attracts young officers with three to five years of experience. After an interview process, which involves a role-playing component, applicants undergo a month of training, including crash courses on street drugs, and lessons on how to affect the mannerisms of an addict. Most candidates tend to be black or Hispanic; police officials say that many minority drug dealers are more likely to suspect white customers of being undercover officers. Sasso is white. The work is not glamorous. Their efforts are aimed at those who sell drugs or guns, making their jobs inherently dangerous. They are constantly at risk of being robbed and some have been killed by the suspects they hoped to arrest; they even face the risk of being shot by fellow officers who occasionally mistake them for armed criminals.

Friendly fire In 1994, a white off-duty officer, Peter Del-Debbio, mistakenly shot Desmond Robinson, a black officer who was working in a plainclothes unit, at a subway station in Manhattan. In 1998, Sean Carrington, an undercover detective, was killed in a Bronx drug operation. In 2003, two undercover detectives with the Firearms Investigation Unit, James Nemorin and Rodney Andrews, were executed by a man they believed was going to sell them guns on Staten Island. Carrington, Nemorin and Andrews were also black — underscoring the racial disparity between those who work undercover and their supervisors. “Who are the undercover officers?” Palladino said. “Hard-working minority men and women who grew up in some of the toughest neighborhoods in the city who chose to come into the NYPD, to try to make a difference. And the NYPD uses them.” In the small but elite firearms unit, which accepts only experienced undercover officers, most of whom intend to make a career out of that kind of work, there has not been a white undercover officer in several years, according to three former detectives from the unit. They say that the supervisors are overwhelmingly white. The organization 100 Blacks in Law Enforcement Who Care has long discouraged minority officers from volunteering for undercover assignments — exacerbating the shortage of new undercover detectives; only about a dozen or so are trained each year, one investigator said. The pressures of undercover work, and the desire to escape it, hung in the periphery of the 2006 fatal police shooting of Sean Bell in Queens. Gescard Isnora, the undercover detective who fired the first of the 50 police bullets at Bell’s vehicle, testified in a departmental trial that three months before the Bell shooting, he had sought to leave undercover work, even seeking a demotion to return to patrol. He explained at his trial, held last year, how two recent undercover operations had ended violently — one with his partner shooting at a man — and he acknowledged not wanting to buy drugs anymore. Isnora was fired because he was found to have acted improperly in the Bell shooting.

“Who are the undercover officers? Hard-working minority men and women who grew up in some of the toughest neighborhoods in the city who chose to come into the NYPD, to try to make a difference. And the NYPD uses them.” — Michael Palladino, head of the NYPD detectives’ union Fred R. Conrad / New York Times News Service

18 months, and a transfer out of undercover work after another 18 months, Palladino said. But some undercover officers end up working several years beyond that before being allowed to “flip,” police parlance for leaving undercover work. Palladino is lobbying state legislators in Albany to create a cap on the number of years officers spend undercover. Paul Browne, the chief spokesman for the Police Department, did not respond to repeated requests for comment. Detectives said that besides low morale and burnout, another downside of such a long stint was an increased chance of being recognized. “There are only a certain amount of times you can go to the same housing projects,” one Brooklyn detective said. Debra Lawson, another detective who worked in the firearms unit, said that staffing shortages led supervisors to ask her to switch off between working as an undercover “ghost,” who accompanies the undercover officer or hangs back down the street, and having other assignments in which she might wear a police raid jacket. Straddling both roles, sometimes within a single day, she said, put her and the undercover officers she worked with in danger of being recognized. Similarly, at one firearms unit in Brooklyn, undercover officers work from a busy police station, rather than a covert location, said two retired detectives, who believe the arrangement puts them at risk of being identified as police officers. On the streets, undercover officers are supposed to be supported by the “ghost” officer and by a backup team of six officers. But the backup team is often short-staffed, said Lawson, who has filed a lawsuit accusing supervisors of having “consistently falsified” the written tactical plans to make it seem as if the undercover operations were fully staffed. “I couldn’t depend on the field team,” she said. In interviews, several detectives who had worked in the firearms unit said they wanted the option of working in larger undercover teams, rather than in pairs, saying

the criminals they meet travel in large groups. Palladino is also pressing for lawmakers to force the department to replace the transmitters that undercover officers use as a hidden lifeline to a backup team. The transmitters have been criticized as unreliable and outdated; some that were in use in recent years resembled the hip-worn beepers popular two decades ago, Sasso said. One undercover officer, upset that his transmissions were apparently unheard by the backup team, recently came out of a Brooklyn operation saying, “Where were you guys, they put a knife to my neck,” the Brooklyn official said. Another officer said that in an operation his code word — meant to alert backup officers into action — went unheard, and he had to accede to a dealer’s demands that he smoke crack. He said he had heard of similar episodes from colleagues.

Sasso’s story Sasso, a Polish immigrant, joined the force in 1993. Her first attempt to buy drugs as an undercover officer ended in rejection, she recalled recently, probably because she was too polite: Her opening words to the dealer were “excuse me.” She eventually learned to play the role of an addict after seeking advice from a Brighton Beach pros-

titute, discovering she had a knack for the undercover work. Since then, she has been “walking miles for a vial,” slang for buy-and-bust work. She had an array of answers for dealers who demanded that she smoke crack to prove she was not a cop. Her most inspired response, she said, was to tell one dealer how her dead grandmother was watching through his eyes. She could therefore not smoke crack in front of him. “How many people can tell you they do what I actually did?” Sasso said about her career. “I was very proud of myself. And I enjoyed it.” That changed in late 2010, after her parents died in a car accident. Then her marriage began to fall apart. A lawyer told her she risked losing custody of her children because of the irregular hours of undercover narcotics work. In August, she sought a transfer to prisoner intake, an unpopular job, for its steady schedule. Since her suicide attempt in March, she has heard that the department approved her transfer. But in April, on her first day back to work after her suicide attempt, the department ordered her to attend a month of inpatient drug counseling in Pennsylvania. She said addiction was not one of her problems.

Campaign posters offer colorful lesson in American history “Presidential Campaign Posters: From the Library of Congress” from Quirk Books ($40) By Tish We lls McClatchy Newspapers

OK, political groupies, travel back through time to the campaigns of yesteryear. You can even wallpaper your bedroom with (long-dead) politicians touting their virtues — and sometimes sliming their opponents. “Presidential Campaign Posters,” an oversized book from the Library of Congress, is exactly what it says — wall posters — but with the added dollop of history on the side. In the preface, Brooke Gladstone of National Public Radio says about campaign art, “Fundamentally, it isn’t pitching politicians; it’s hawking images of America. The America we yearn for. Or, when the message is negative, the America we fear.” If you thought this year’s endless political bickering was ugly, travel back to 1828 when Andrew Jackson ran against John Quincy Adams. Jackson, a hero of the War of 1812, handed out campaign loot like hickory sticks in honor of his nickname, “Old Hickory.” Adams’ campaign struck back attacking him and his decisions. Jackson supporters reacted in kind. “Fed up with accusations that Jackson murdered the innocent, newspaper editor Isaac Hill printed the following statement in the New Hampshire Patriot: ‘On the 8th of January, 1815 (Jackson) murdered in the coldest kind of cold blood above fifteen hundred Brit-

ish soldiers for merely trying to get into New Orleans in search of Beauty and Booty!’ What began as a taunt became a campaign slogan what would lead Jackson to the presidency.” In 1856, you have a woodcut of a donkey with the caption of “The above is a true likeness of “ten cent Jimmy” Buchanan, the “DamedBlack-Rat’s” candidate for President.” James Buchanan won the presidency despite the poster. Campaign buttons were popular in 1860 when a tintype photograph campaign button with Lincoln and his vice-presidential nominee Hannibal Hamlin was issued. One of the beauties of this book is that it doesn’t restrict itself to posters of the winners. Included are losers in the presidential battle, and other groups like the Socialist Party in 1904 whose candidate, Eugene V. Debs, lost badly to Theodore Roosevelt. The Party’s animals became a shortcut for voters to know who to look for. In 1912, Woodrow Wilson went against William Howard Taft, Eugene Debs and Theodore Roosevelt. The cover of a campaign song sported a Democratic donkey for Wilson, a Republican elephant for Taft and a bull moose for Roosevelt. Poster makers followed popular trends through the decade. Robert (Bobby) Kennedy had a psychedelic hip look in 1968. Gerald Ford’s poster in 1976 was a takeoff on Fonzie in television’s “Happy Days.” It concludes with the iconic poster of Barack Obama from the 2008 campaign with the caption, “Hope.”

Tough to ‘flip’ Undercover assignments come with the promise of a detective’s gold shield within Weekly Arts & Entertainment Inside

$999 a month for 4 months 1-Bedroom

Every Friday

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

$1,499 a month for 4 months 2-Bedroom

1000’s Of Ads Every Day

Call us today • 541-389-0046 • 1801 NE Lotus Dr, Bend • www.reveraliving.com


B USINESS

G

News of Record, G2 Stocks/mutual funds, G4-5 Sunday Driver, G6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/business

Realtors wary of shadow market The jobless • Deschutes County foreclosures are down, but true inventory is uncertain By Elon Glucklich The Bulletin

The pace of bank-owned homes entering the Central Oregon market is on the decline to start 2012, after more than 5,000 foreclosed homes flooded the market between 2009 and 2011 depressing prices by more than 50 percent. Though the rate that bankowned properties — those foreclosed on and repossessed by

lenders after failing to sell at auction — are being marketed for sale in Deschutes County seems to be slowing, according to statistics compiled by RealtyTrac, local real estate officials disagree on what the next few months could bring. And that division underscores the doubts that continue to linger over the health of the region’s housing industry.

“We aren’t even nearly through the foreclosure cycle here,� said Becky Ozrelic, a principal broker specializing in distressed property sales at Duke Warner Realty in Bend. Ozrelic said she’s still seeing more homeowners receiving notices of default — the first official step in the foreclosure process. While only a fraction of those homes will end in foreclosure, the default rate is still higher than a healthy mar-

ket would allow, she said. RealtyTrac, a nationwide real estate research company, collects foreclosure data from about 2,200 counties across the country, issuing monthly foreclosure and market analysis reports. Its data show the shock the region absorbed in 2008 and 2009, as thousands of homeowners defaulted on loans: Deschutes County saw 32 homes hit the market as bank-owned properties in 2007. See Foreclosures / G2

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Crickett Randolph, a vocational aid with the Opportunity Foundation of Central Oregon, left, helps Tiffany Reynolds and Chuck Harris price a rack of clothing Thursday at Possibilities Thrift Store in Bend.

Central Oregon nonprofits make

AN IMPACT

young find their voice By Hannah Seligson New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — This may be little consolation to recent graduates who have sent out dozens of rĂŠsumĂŠs with nary a response; who have been turned down for unpaid internships; who have vast amounts of student debt to repay as they continue in jobs as baby sitters and waiters. But: Employers say they will hire 10.2 percent more college graduates from the class of 2012 than they did from the class of 2011, according to the National Association of Casey Templeton Colleges and New York Times News Service Employers. Aaron Smith, executive Nuggets of director of Young Invincinews like this bles, a youth employment are welcome advocacy organization, as the econoduring a roundtable dismy fitfully recussion at the University of covers. Even Richmond. so, joblessness among the young remains at crisis levels, economists say. In April, the unemployment rate for workers younger than 25 was 16.4 percent, compared with 8.1 percent overall. Those with only some college, or with high school degrees or less, are the worst off. But “every way you cut it — by race or gender, with or without a college degree — young people are just not getting the job opportunities they need, and it will have a lasting impact on their careers,â€? said Heidi Shierholz, an economist who studies the labor market at the Economic Policy Institute in Washington. No one wants to see millions of young people sitting idle. So what can be done? Can policies and programs be created to channel them into full-time jobs? Those questions are entangled in certain truths about the political process. Teachers have the American Federation of Teachers. Gun owners have the NRA. The older population has AARP. But where are the advocacy groups for jobless youth? See Jobless / G5

• Region’s charity sector provides large number of services, employment to Oregonians

By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

A

fter two hospice organizations in Bend merged in 2009, the resulting nonprofit, Partners In Care Inc., witnessed a decline in the number of patients amid a rough economy and uncertainty over health care reform. Managers spotted duplication in many departments and trimmed the workforce, to make the organization more sustainable. The new nonprofit shrunk from 150 employees to about 130, CEO Eric Alexander said. Patient numbers have since picked up. The employee count hovers between 140 and 145. Revenues — largely from Medicare — have improved as a result. One thing that hasn’t changed is the nonprofit’s commitment to its mission: providing end-of-

life care to patients with compassion, dignity and respect. “That’s the first metric we look at, is how we’re serving patients and families in doing what we’re doing,� Alexander said. Partners In Care stands out among Central Oregon’s 644 nonprofits for its more than $10 million in revenues in 2010. But, having shifted operations to reflect changing funding conditions, it fits in well among many nonprofits around the state. It also falls in with a group of nonprofits seeing increases in revenue in recent years. Those trends appeared in the Nonprofit Association of Oregon’s first-ever Oregon Nonprofit Sector Report, released May 1. It touts economic impacts of nonprofits and highlights the kinds of services available to Oregonians. See Nonprofits / G3

Find Oregon charities The Nonprofit Association of Oregon’s 41-page Oregon Nonprofit Sector Report: www.nonprofitoregon.org/ sites/default/files/uploads/ file/ONSR.pdf. Download the Oregon Department of Justice’s database of charities: www.doj.state.or.us/cgi-bin/ charigroup_db_start.pl.

Michael Stravato / New York Times News Service

Student Leena Nguyen, right, hands out fliers for Fix Young America, an advocacy group for youth unemployment, at the University of Houston. The group and another organization are advocating for solutions to the nation’s crisis-level youth unemployment rate.

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Is it safe for heavier passengers to fly? • Engineers scrutinize the safety of airplane seat belts against increased waistlines of today’s travelers By Christine Negroni

Travelers inside the Denver International Airport. When the federal standards on airplane seats and seat belts were written, the median weight of passengers was 170 pounds.

New York Times News Service

More than six decades ago, when the federal standards on the strength of airplane seats and seat belts were written, government regulations specified that seats be designed for a passenger weight of 170 pounds. But now the average American man weighs nearly 194 pounds and the average woman weighs 165. Now, some engineers and scientists have raised questions about whether airplane seats, tested with crash dummies that reflect the 170-pound rule, are strong enough to protect heavy travelers. “If a heavier person completely fills a seat, the seat is not likely to behave as intended during a crash,� said

Matthew Staver New York Times News Service

Robert Salzar, the principal scientist at the Center for Applied Biomechanics at the University of Virginia. “The

energy absorption that is built into the aircraft seat is likely to be overwhelmed and the occupants will not be pro-

tected optimally.� Nor would the injury necessarily be confined to that passenger, Salzar said. If seats fail, he said, those seated nearby could be endangered from “the unrestrained motion of the passenger.� Yoshihiro Ozawa, an engineer whose company, Jasti Ltd. in Japan, has been making crash dummies for 20 years, raised similar concerns. He said he worried that there was no data proving that “seats and seat belts are safe enough� for larger passengers. “If we don’t test with heavier dummies, we won’t know if it is safe enough,� Ozawa said through an interpreter in a telephone interview. “There is no regulation that says they have to test for heavier.� See Weight / G5

Experience‌

‌ Pronghorn

Nicklau s Signature Course foursome for $400 Sundays – Wednesdays Includes cart & forecaddie* *Forecaddie gratuity not included. Valid until May 30th.

101++Kmjibcjmi>gp]?mw0/,(14.(0.++wrrr)kmjibcjmi^gp])^jh

Call today for Real Estate information and a private tour. Pronghorn is proudly managed by


G2

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

M     N  R DEEDS Deschutes County

Lee Collins to David and Sally J. Davidson, Hollygrape Subdivision, Lot 9, $259,900 Christine G. Sandifer to Kevin King and Lori Penewit, Aubrey Heights, Lots 2 and 3, Block 5, $277,500 Rod and Susan Tomcho to Jana L. Mejdell, Awbrey Village, Phase 4, Lot 109, $429,900 Robert G. and Helen M. Daane to Jennifer L. Tucker trustee for Jennifer L. Tucker Revocable Trust, Overlook Park, Lot 4, Block 1, $385,000 Hayden Homes LLC to Jessica L. Haury, Aspen Rim Number 2, Lot 192, $164,990 Hayden Homes LLC to John L. Hoeck Jr. and Karen M. Hoeck, Aspen Rim Number 2, Lot 194, $194,990 James H. and Leslie M. Cogswell to John D. Bailey, Northwest Crossing, Phases 7 and 11, Lot 559, $370,000 Thomas L. and Yield M. Moe to Peter W. and Korin R. Tonning, Revised Plat of a Portion of Meadow Village, Lot 12, Block 5, $248,000 Recontrust Company N.A. to Federal National Mortgage Association, Davis First Addition, Lot 7, Block 2, $377,718 Kenneth and Jo Ann Wheaton trustees for Ken and Jo Wheaton Living Trust to Troy L. and Teresa E. Wise, Echo Rim Subdivision, Phases 1 and 2, Lot 5, $203,000 Christopher F. Richards and Katie B. Richards who took title as Katie B. McClure to Derek S. and Stephanie A. C. Halvorson, Braeburn, Phase 4, Lot 60, $350,000 Richard M. Heckert trustee for Dick Heckert Revocable Trust to Terrence C., Misty, Sean A. and Kerri L. Blackburn, Glaze Meadow Homesite, Lot 404, $234,500 Mary J. McDermott to Eric J. Woods, Hollow Pines Estates, Phase 2, Lot 38, $200,000 John S. and Elizabeth A. Hanson trustees for Hanson Family Trust to Ynes Zavala, Juniper Hill, Phase 1, Lot 17, $175,000 Deschutes Landing LLC to Yvonne S. Blewett, Deschutes Landing, Lot 23, Tract H, $483,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc. to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, Township 15, Range 13, Section 7, $442,081 Patricia L. Johanson trustee for Patricia L. Johanson Revocable Living Trust to Vincent P. and Ann B. Proctor, Heights of Bend, Phase 2, Lot 42, $318,500 Northwest Trustee Services Inc. to ING Bank FSB, Christie Acres, Lot 5, Block 1, $324,025.89 Carly A. Hickmann to Gary and Vikki Hickmann trustees for Gary and Vikki Hickmann Living Trust, Second Addition to Bend Park, Lot 8, Block 162, $235,000 Fannie Mae aka Federal National Mortgage Association to David and Claire Melhorn, Cimarron City, First Addition, Lot 5, Block 1, $282,000 Steven K. and Kathy T. Simpson

Foreclosures Continued from G1 That number jumped to 491 in 2008. It skyrocketed to 1,798 in 2009. The number peaked in 2010, with 2,227 properties hitting the market countywide, before dropping to 1,449 in 2011. The slowing trend appears to be continuing this year, with 173 bank-owned homes popping up in the first quarter. By contrast, the county saw 384 bank-owned properties in the first quarter of 2011, and 555 in the first quarter of 2010, according to RealtyTrac. But uncertainties continue to hang over the market, highlighted by what analysts call a shadow inventory: foreclosed homes being held by banks, or those in pre-foreclosure that could be headed there. In March, there were roughly 1.6 million housing units nationwide defined as shadow inventory, according to the property and finance research firm CoreLogic. CoreLogic compares Multiple Listing Service data in counties across the country and compares it with default rate and foreclosure data to come up with its estimates. That’s virtually unchanged from 1.7 million the same time last year. Terry Denoux, principal broker with GoBend Realty, said there’s plenty of evidence to show that the amount of dis-

to Jubal S. Frost, Lots 3, 4 and 5, Township 14, Range 12, Section 6, $200,000 Larry E. Garibay trustee for Ralph L. Garibay Revocable Living Trust to Thomas P. Treff and Karen A. Cordato, River Terrace, Lot 1, Block 16, $215,000 Bank of New York Mellon fka Bank of New York to Patrick C. and Suzanne A. Hughes, RiverRim P.U.D., Phase 6, Lot 171, $656,300 Wilson S. Talbott trustee for Wilson and Virginia Talbott Trusts A and B to Richard V. and Catherine A. Phelan, Fairway Crest Village, Phase 2, Lot 21, Block 6, $520,000 Yelas Developments Inc. to Margaret I. Bourland, Marken Heights, Lot 1, $373,549 Richard R. Murchie to Penny M. Lee, Dobbin Acres, Lots 4 and 5, Block 2, $178,000 Susan J. Decker aka Susan Sampson to Mark E. Sampson, Township 18, Range 12, Section 26, $220,000 Hayden Homes LLC to Robert and Nancy S. Boliard, Aspen Rim, Number 2, Lot 202, $235,235 Paul K. and Kelly D. MacNeil to Charles W. and Mildred H. Brisson, Skyview Terrace, Lot 2, Block 1, $425,000 Federal National Mortgage Association to Dennis King, Mountain Peaks, Phase 4, Lot 68, $174,000 Platt Properties LLC to Norma J. Elliott, Boyd Acres View Estates, Phases 1 and 2, Lot 29, Phase 2, $169,900 Michael Burton to Antoinette LaFerriere, Cottages at Northwest Crossing, Lot 17, $285,000 Robert V. McCormick Sr. and Vivian L. McCormick to Morris A. and Paula J. Woodruff, Amended Plat of Hampton Park Subdivision, Phase 1, Lot 11, $160,000 Renard M. and Veronica K. Alotta to Hedberg Management LLC, Fourth Addition to Stage Stop Meadows, Lot 37, $250,000 PNC Bank N.A. successor by merger to National City Bank successor by merger to National City Bank of Indiana to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, Maplewood, Phase 2, Lot 26, $168,000 Crook County

Dennis Jones trustee for the Dennis Jones Family Trust to Charles H. Forslund, Westridge Estates, Lot 27, $288,000 Howard L. McGuire to Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, Northridge Subdivision, Phase 2, Lot 61, $183,297.24 U.S. Bank as trustee for the certificate holders of Bank of America Funding Corporation Mortgage pass-through certificates series 2006-1 to Patricia Ann LLC, Brasada Ranch 2, Lot 270, $252,400 Daniel and Catherine Aronson to Adam J. Leary, Crystal Springs Subdivision, Phase 2, Lot 36, $185,000 Tom Moore and Yvonne Halvorson to Anthony and Kelly Newbill, Partition Plat 2000-01, Parcel 1, $850,000

tressed property in the region is lower today than it has been for several years. “But the question of the shadow inventory still lurks out there. We all know the banks are certainly holding onto some of their inventory,� Denoux said. However, the president of the Oregon Bankers Association contends that it’s misleading to point the finger solely at banks for potentially holding off foreclosures. “Most banks are absolutely trying to sell the real estate that they own,� said Linda Navarro, president and CEO of the bankers’ group. “Banks aren’t property developers and speculators at their core. I would argue the incentive is more in favor of banks selling their (foreclosure) properties if they can do so.� What banking and real estate officials agree on is that a series of state and federal government actions is changing the way banks handle foreclosures. Scrutiny over electronic foreclosure filing practices culminated in a $25 billion settlement between the federal government and major banks earlier this year. The settlement has changed the behavior of banks big and small, in terms of how they navigate the foreclosure process, said Mike Hoover, owner and principal broker with Windermere Central

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

Creating a tastier bagel with a tech-startup recipe Bloomberg News SAN FRANCISCO — Venture capitalists like to say they invest in entrepreneurs who are solving big problems. For foodies in San Francisco, there are few greater challenges than finding a good bagel. Dan Scholnick, a partner at Trinity Ventures, is putting his money where his mouth is. After spending years complaining about the poor quality of local bagels, he joined his wife and another couple in starting Schmendricks, to bring the taste of New York to the Bay Area. The quartet is trying to build Schmendricks more like an Internet startup than a food company, keeping up front costs to a minimum, reaching customers through services such as Twitter and collecting data on consumer preferences. They don’t have a physical store and are subleasing kitchen space at Asana, the startup led by Facebook co-founder Dustin Moskovitz. Bagels are sold through preordered pickups and deliveries and at weekend pop-ups, where the team sets up outside a local cafe or shop.

Chef secrets “We’re using a lot of the tools and tricks of tech companies across our business,� said Scholnick, who worked at two startups before becoming a venture capitalist in 2007. “It’s all about getting to market as quickly as possible, being really efficient with capital and using all the latest technology that’s available.� More important than the Silicon Valley startup savvy is making bagels that East Coast transplants crave. In particular, Scholnick says, there’s demand from local Jewish residents who grew up in New York and Boston eating traditional bagels, which are boiled before they’re baked. That process gives them a dense interior and crusty surface. So Scholnick and company, who attended Dartmouth College together in the late 1990s, spent two years working on an alternative recipe to the doughy bagels they found around town. The most prominent of those Bay Area shops is Noah’s New York Bagels, which has nine locations in San Francisco. Noah’s is owned by Einstein Noah Restaurant Group, a publicly traded company. Noah’s bagels are steamed — not boiled — before they’re baked. The company has

Oregon Real Estate. Hoover said he’s seeing more judicial foreclosure proceedings — foreclosures settled in court between the lender and debtor. Most foreclosures in Oregon are handled in a nonjudicial, or administrative, process. Being in court gives homeowners a better chance to contest the foreclosure, and potentially keep their homes. But it’s also prolonging the time span by which homes headed to foreclosure return to the market as bank-owned properties. And some banks are trying to improve their financial footing by selling their bad real estate mortgages. Bank of the Cascades sold $110 million in nonperforming assets in September at a loss of $52 million. Actions like the bulk sale of real estate assets often puts the titles of a foreclosed homes in a new owner’s hands. And it can take the new owners months to process them before putting them back on the market, said Brian Meece, principal broker with Re/Max Key Properties in Bend. “Some of that inventory is transferring to other banks, different investor groups that are going to sort through them and shuffle them back to the market,� Meece said. — Reporter: 541-617-7820, eglucklich@bendbulletin.com

David Paul Morris / Bloomberg News

From left, owners of Schmendricks Bagels, Daniel Scholnick, Deepa Subramanian, Dagny Dingman and David Kover, in a kitchen they rent in San Francisco. They are building the company more like an Internet startup than a food company.

been using that recipe since the late 1980s, and it has worked on the West Coast, said Richard Burjaw, chief marketing officer for Einstein Noah. The fluffy texture is also good for the sandwich menu, he said. In addition to the softness of San Francisco bagels, they also come in a variety of untraditional flavors that include fruits, vegetables and cheeses baked in. Schmendricks is sticking with the classic New York toppings of Sesame Seed, Poppy Seed, Salt and Everything, as well as plain. “Blueberries belong in muffins, they don’t belong in bagels,� said co-founder David Kover, a school psychologist who grew up in Brooklyn and has gained the title of chief authenticity officer. Blueberries do provide good fodder, though. On April 1, the company sent a Twitter post with a picture of a chalkboard promoting their flavors of the day as Blueberry, Chocolate Chip, Bacon-Asiago and Orange-Maple. It was an April Fool’s Day joke. To promote weekend popups and keep in touch with customers, Schmendricks

uses Twitter, Facebook and its email list. For arranging pickups, it uses software from startup Good Eggs. For accepting credit cards on site, the company has experimented with technology from Square and eBay’s PayPal unit. Those products let the company track individual customers’ preferences. “Even at a very early stage, we’re able to drive a lot of foot traffic and customer traffic to wherever we’re popping up,� Scholnick said. That’s how Schmendricks, named after the Yiddish word for a stupid person, sold out its launch party. While it has a growing fan base, the bagels aren’t cheap.

The company charges $3 each, compared with $1 to $1.50 at most of the local stores. Cream cheese, which they buy in stores and then flavor themselves, is an extra dollar. Ethan Kurzweil, a Bostonarea native, is willing to pay the premium. He compares it to buying an artisan chocolate vs. a supermarket candy bar. “They have to brand themselves as a different category — they are a bagel and nothing else is a bagel,� said Kurzweil, who became an early Schmendricks customer through his venture connection to Scholnick. “If I’m going to eat the carbs, it’s not really about the money. It’s about the food experience.�

GIFTS FOR MOM & Mother Nature

FORUM CENTER, BEND 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend


The Maybelle Clark Mac-

What’s a nonprofit?

Data are the latest available.

A nonprofit or not-forprofit organization, sometimes called a charity, is exempt from federal income taxes. The Internal Revenue Service has several classifications for nonprofits, the most popular of which is 501(c)(3). To be a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, an organization must operate only for certain purposes, such as charitable, educational or literary activities. The organization also must file for recognition of its proposed tax exemption from the IRS. It must prove that profits will not go to private interests, such as the organization’s founder.

Name

City

St. Charles Health System Inc.

Bend

NeighborImpact

Redmond

206

$15,703,471

114

$7,709,270

Partners In Care Inc.

Bend

144

$10,336,974

167

$9,267,838

Mosaic Medical

Prineville

114

$9,251,165

183

$4,743,765

Opportunity Foundation of Central Oregon

Redmond

447

$6,956,258

232

$7,879,485

Bestcare Treatment Services Inc.

Redmond

132

$5,651,810

270

$477,787

Maybelle Clark Macdonald Fund

Bend

3

$4,473,792

328 $104,065,804

Deschutes River Conservancy

Bend

16

$4,168,049

346

$855,865

Central Oregon Community Bend College Foundation

1

$4,042,646

352

$13,447,785

63

$4,009,007

358

$830,396

La Pine Community Health Center

Bloomberg News

WASHINGTON — Beef producers said the depiction of meat glue by consumer activists is unfair and the industry’s practice of using transglutaminase to bind pieces of meat into a single cut is safe. The American Meat Institute, a Washington-based trade group that includes Cargill and Tyson Foods, released information showing how transglutaminase is used in dairy, seafood and baked goods as well as in beef for texture or to bind cuts together. Transglutaminase is an enzyme sold for almost two decades and has inaccurately been nicknamed meat glue for “shock appeal,” the group said Monday. “Someone gave it a catchy name, so now it’s catching on,” said Jeremy Russell, a spokesman with the National Meat

State rank

3,340 $496,697,734

La Pine

Assets

7 $309,310,338

Sources: Oregon Department of Justice, Internal Revenue Service, Bulletin staff research

Top categories of Central Oregon nonprofits Category

No.

Sports, athletic, recreational and social activities

72

Other activities directed to individuals

68

Activities directed to other organizations

63

Schools, colleges and related activities

60

Youth activities

59

Cultural, historical or other educational activities

58

Other purposes and activities

53

Health services and related activities

52

Conservation, environmental and beautification activities

40

Inner-city or community activities

34

Source: Oregon Department of Justice

donald Fund, based in Bend, is on the other end of the spectrum. Its operating budget is currently around $6 million, said its president, Monique McCleary. The fund gives money to other nonprofits, specifically to help pay for the arts, education, human services, medical research and public service. In terms of assets, the Maybelle Clark Macdonald Fund ranks second only to St. Charles in the region, with $104 million. The assets are largely tied up in stocks and other investments, according to documents on file with the Internal Revenue Service. The fund’s sizable asset base would fit in at larger metropolitan areas, such as Portland, where it was based for decades. But in Bend, the fund’s holdings stand out. Bend became headquarters in 2010 after the fund’s executive director retired in 2010, because McCleary was in Bend, she said. Expenses fell, because the employee count dropped from five to three, and the fund’s longtime headquarters in Portland shut its doors. The nonprofit gives much of its grant money to nonprofits in the Portland area, but it also gives to Central Oregon nonprofits, such as Volunteers in Medicine and the Heart of Oregon Corps. Looking forward, McCleary said, her nonprofit’s mission probably will remain what it is now. What could change, however, is the organization’s financial well-being. “We hope we stay in a good financial position to continue funding as much as we have in the past,” she said.

Beef producers call ‘meat glue’ label unfair Stephanie Armour

Employees Revenue

Association, another industry lobbying group. The industry is trying to gain control of the debate over transglutaminase after a public backlash earlier this year over ammonia-treated beef scraps that consumer activists dubbed “pink slime” led to lost business for Beef Products and other companies. Sen. Ted Lieu, D-Calif., last week called for a U.S. Agriculture Department investigation into transglutaminase because of potential contamination risks. “Food suppliers, restaurants and banquet facilities should not be deceiving the public into thinking they are eating a whole steak if, in fact, the steak was glued together from various meat parts,” Lieu said in a letter to the agency. “I just don’t think consumers should be paying more,” he said.

In Redmond, the Opportunity Foundation of Central Oregon employs and supports people with developmental and intellectual disabilities. It runs a thrift store, a sawmill, a document-shredding business and other facilities in Madras, Redmond and Bend where clients earn wages. “Everybody can do some work,” said the foundation’s executive director, Darrel Wilson. “We value work. We think that work gives dignity and responsibility, and paid work is really a keynote of ours.” The foundation ranked as No. 11 on last year’s EDCO list

of top private employers, with 420 employees. Almost half are people with disabilities, Wilson said. As such, most of the nonprofit’s revenues come from the state and the federal government. Some money also comes from sales at the Opportunity Foundation’s businesses, tax filings show. “By providing employment in various business settings, we’ve been able to reduce what’s needed from the tax dollar to (pay for) what we’re doing to help support individuals,” Wilson said. “It’s really a great story, and I’m really proud of it.”

Funding challenges The new report shows that funding remains a challenge for Oregon nonprofits, on and off the balance sheet. Of the nonprofits that responded to the survey, 57 percent said they lack cash reserves to cover three months of operations. The report also notes that last year nonprofits “continued their struggle to meet increased needs with limited budgets, forcing many organizations to continue cutting costs.” That’s certainly true at Arts Central, a Bend nonprofit

founded in 1978 to promote the arts and provide arts education. Public support has dropped each year since 2006, according to tax filings. In response, Arts Central has consolidated its workforce and narrowed its mission. In a few years, the employee count has decreased from seven to the equivalent of four or 4½, said Cate O’Hagan, Arts Central’s executive director. Two years ago, when the education director retired, O’Hagan assumed that position on top of her own. Arts Central no longer involves itself with supporting public art, and it stopped operating the Mirror Pond Gallery. It still runs a mobile art studio in rural areas and an artistresidency program in schools in five counties. “When your donations go down, you make cuts and you become very strategic and very adaptable,” O’Hagan said. “And you make a very close examination of your programs. From my perspective, it’s a very, very difficult thing. But we’ve made it into a good thing. We took this time to really examine our programs and how they were developing or weren’t and started retooling our education programs.” — Reporter: 541-633-2117, jnovet@bendbulletin.com

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Standing out

Top Central Oregon nonprofits by revenue

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO A Difference O You Can Hear.

“I didn’t believe there could be so much difference from my old hearing aids. It’s incredible how much better I hear.” Mindy C. - Bend, OR Retired Banker

FREE

Video Ear Exam and

O OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Continued from G1 It shows that the average employee of a nonprofit in Oregon took home just $1,423 less in 2010 than her counterpart at a for-profit business. She made $39,545. Yes, the appropriate pronoun is “she” — 76 percent of employees are women at the average nonprofit in the Beaver State. That’s certainly been the case at Partners In Care. “I know we’ve converted all but one of the men’s bathrooms to men’s and women’s bathrooms, so that’s a pretty good indication that the largest category is female here,” Alexander said. At least from the perspective of employment, the nonprofit sector appears to be growing in Oregon. Of all private employment in the state, nonprofits as an industry account for 13 percent of the jobs. In 2002, they provided 11 percent of all private jobs in the state. Besides playing up the role of nonprofits in the state’s mix of employers, the report points to the many kinds of services nonprofits provide. In 2010, they spent more than $12 billion on program services. “It is clear that nonprofits play an increasingly vital role in supporting the state,” notes the report, which cites results of a survey of more than 600 nonprofits. Locally, nonprofits hold a smaller piece of the privateemployment pie than the state average, even as some employ hundreds or thousands of people. In Deschutes County, 11 percent of jobs came from nonprofits in 2011. That figure was 8 percent in Crook County and 5 percent in Jefferson County. Altogether, according to the new report, Central Oregon has 644 nonprofits. More than half of them are in Bend, according to a database the Oregon Department of Justice maintains. Their purpose varies. Some endeavor to help the elderly. Some strive to prevent animal cruelty. Some give scholarships. Still others give money to other organizations. They range from one-person, single-subject organizations, such as the Jefferson County branch of Habitat for Humanity, to multimillion-dollar operations with multiple facilities, such as St. Charles Health System. That nonprofit had $496 million in revenues and $309 million in assets in 2010, according to the state’s charity database, more than many companies. With 2,978 employees last year, it was the region’s biggest private employer, according to figures from Economic Development for Central Oregon. In relation to other nonprofits in Oregon, St. Charles’ revenues ranked seventh of nearly 16,000 nonprofits whose revenues were available in the charity database. According to the nonprofit association’s report, though, 71 percent of nonprofits have $100,000 or less in their annual operating budgets.

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Nonprofits

Beltone’s latest instruments are the smartest we’ve ever produced. And we’ve crafted our advanced technology to fit virtually every lifestyle, hearing loss, and price range. Our courteous staff offer FREE lifetime adjustments and in-house service to maintain your hearing aid’s original sound clarity and comfort.

25%-40% off MSRP

Trial Periods with

100%

Hearing Money-Back Screening Guarantee

Digital Hearing Aids starting at

99500

$

Call for your FREE Hearing Evaluation today!

Helping the World Hear Better.

541-389-9690

141 SE 3rd St. • Bend (Corner of 3rd & Davis)

Hearing Loss Work Related?

We Bill Insurances

Michael & Denise Underwood

0% Financing

(With Approved Credit) Compensation benefits may apply. OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

www.smolichmotors.com

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

G3


THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

G4

Mutual funds m

%

%

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

Name

AQR Funds:

Calamos Funds:

DivArb I n 11.10 ... +1.8 +13.5 MgdFutSt I n 9.57 +.09 -4.2 NS AcadEm n 17.34 -.57 -14.8 +50.8

ConvA p GlbGr&IncI Gr&IncC t Grth&IncA p Grwth&IncoI GrowthA p GrowthC t Growth I MktNeutI r MktNeutA p

Alger Funds A: SpectraN

13.34 -.09 +2.1 +79.9

Alger Funds I: CapApprI SmCapGrI

22.08 -.21 +1.8 +66.6 27.92 -.21 -6.0 +69.3

AllianceBernstein : IntDurInstl

16.10

...

+5.7 +31.9

AllianceBern A: GloblBdA r 8.47 GroIncA p 3.73 HighIncoA p 9.02 LgCapGrA p 27.12

-.01 -.05 -.05 -.42

+5.1 +4.1 +4.1 +1.3

+33.8 +54.1 +70.9 +59.2

AllianceBern Adv: HiIncm Adv

9.03 -.05 +4.4 +72.7

AllianceBern C: HighIncoC p

9.12 -.05 +3.2 +67.0

Allianz Admin MMS: NFJSmCpVl t 28.71 -.21 -2.2 +62.8

Allianz Fds Instl: NFJDivVal SmCpVl n

11.78 -.19 -1.3 +49.3 30.20 -.21 -1.9 +64.0

Allianz Funds A: NFJDivVal t SmCpV A

11.69 -.19 -1.6 +47.8 28.74 -.21 -2.3 +62.0

Alpine Funds: TaxOptInco 10.05 ... +1.6 +5.5 AmanaGrth n 25.96 -.30 +0.5 +49.7 AmanaInco n 32.99 -.25 -0.7 +43.6

Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst SmCapInst

20.28 -.27 -0.1 +52.7 20.17 -.12 -5.2 +67.5

Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv

19.24 -.26 -0.5 +51.1

Ameri Century 1st: Growth

27.63 -.38 +3.8 +65.2

Amer Century Adv: EqtyIncA p HeritageA p

7.54 -.04 +1.3 +41.8 21.71 -.45 -1.9 +73.4

Amer Century Inst: EqInc

7.54 -.05 +1.8 +43.7

Amer Century Inv: AllCapGr CAIntTF DivBond n DivBond EqGroInv n EqInco GNMAI GovtBd GrowthI HeritageI IncGro InfAdjBond IntTF IntTF n IntlBnd IntlGroI MdCapVal NT DivrBd n SelectI Ultra n ValueInv Vista

30.14 11.90 11.13 11.13 23.18 7.54 11.25 11.55 27.39 22.38 26.22 13.13 11.65 11.65 14.51 10.21 12.44 11.03 42.55 25.19 5.97 17.39

-.62 +.04 ... ... -.28 -.04 -.02 ... -.38 -.47 -.28 +.02 +.03 +.03 -.06 -.26 -.04 ... -.73 -.37 -.06 -.34

+2.2 +10.4 +7.6 +7.4 +4.6 +1.6 +6.1 +6.8 +3.6 -1.7 +3.4 +11.5 +9.1 +9.3 +2.6 -11.6 -0.8 +7.6 +4.9 +3.8 -0.2 -3.0

+71.9 +21.8 +22.8 +22.0 +60.3 +42.8 +18.4 +16.5 +64.2 +74.7 +54.5 +31.5 +20.4 +21.1 +17.1 +39.7 +63.4 +22.6 +62.3 +65.2 +47.7 +55.3

+1.6 +3.0 +4.3 +6.6 +1.4 -7.2 +3.3 -12.1 -1.7 -1.2 +6.8 -1.0 +3.0 +15.4 +2.5 +3.5 -10.6 -0.1 +7.1 -0.7 -4.0 -9.8 +1.0 -7.6 +12.4 +14.6 +4.4

+56.1 +53.6 +47.3 +30.0 +40.9 +36.4 +26.1 +30.5 +49.4 NS +16.5 +44.4 +60.3 +38.4 +52.7 +14.6 +32.6 +44.8 +18.6 +53.2 +47.4 +43.4 +5.3 +63.7 +26.2 +31.6 +56.7

+3.5 +0.7 -7.9 -1.8 +1.7

+44.0 +37.7 +33.3 +41.2 +49.2

American Funds A: AmcapFA p AmMutlA p BalA p BondFdA p CapInBldA p CapWGrA p CapWldA p EupacA p FundInvA p GlblBalA GovtA p GwthFdA p HI TrstA p HiIncMuniA IncoFdA p IntBdA p IntlGrIncA p InvCoAA p LtdTEBdA p NwEconA p NewPerA p NewWorldA STBFA p SmCpWA p TaxExA p TxExCAA p WshMutA p

20.52 27.14 19.27 12.76 50.98 34.23 21.03 37.57 37.85 25.41 14.47 31.64 11.07 14.86 17.27 13.72 28.28 28.98 16.32 26.81 28.62 49.59 10.09 37.48 12.94 17.36 29.78

-.14 -.21 -.18 -.01 -.27 -.45 -.10 -.79 -.41 -.24 ... -.32 -.03 +.07 -.09 ... -.47 -.31 +.03 -.35 -.42 -1.26 -.01 -.42 +.05 +.06 -.34

American Funds B: BalanB p CapInBldB p CapWGrB t GrowthB t IncomeB p

19.20 51.00 34.04 30.63 17.14

... ...

+3.7 +12.5 +3.4 +11.6

Apprec Ariel n

42.04 -.74 -7.9 +71.0 46.11 -.61 -12.5 +68.6

Artio Global Funds: GlbHiInco t GlbHiIncI r IntlEqI r IntlEqA IntlEqII I r TotRet I

10.14 9.69 24.16 23.59 10.16 13.74

-.03 -.03 -.62 -.60 -.26 -.02

+0.1 +0.3 -19.9 -20.1 -18.7 +7.2

+52.1 +53.3 +10.4 +9.6 +11.6 +28.8

Artisan Funds: Intl IntlInstl IntlValu r IntlValInstl MidCap MidCapInstl MidCapVal SmCapVal

21.95 22.08 26.61 26.66 37.93 39.32 20.57 15.59

-.50 -.50 -.32 -.33 -1.01 -1.04 -.16 -.09

-4.8 -4.5 -7.2 -7.0 +2.7 +3.0 -1.1 -6.7

+44.8 +45.7 +49.5 +50.4 +87.8 +89.1 +60.2 +53.6

Aston Funds: FairMidCpN M&CGroN

31.20 -.12 -6.2 +75.6 24.56 -.21 +5.3 +46.5

BBH Funds: BdMktN CoreSelN

10.35 16.22

... ...

+1.2 +10.6 +6.0 +65.5

BNY Mellon Funds: BondFund EmgMkts IntmBdFd LrgCapStk MidCapStk NatlIntMuni NtlShTrmMu

13.56 9.46 13.19 8.78 11.70 13.94 13.00

... -.33 +.01 -.14 -.06 +.04 ...

+6.0 -17.0 +4.6 -4.5 -9.8 +9.3 +2.0

+20.0 +37.7 +16.0 +52.6 +59.2 +21.6 +7.1

Baird Funds: AggBdInst CoreBdInst ShtTBdInst

10.85 +.01 +7.8 +32.0 11.04 ... +7.2 +37.7 9.71 ... +2.6 +15.1

Baron Fds Instl: Growth

55.16 -.20 -0.7

NS

Baron Funds: Asset n Growth SmallCap

50.10 -1.06 -1.8 +58.5 54.74 -.20 -0.9 +64.3 25.08 -.49 -3.3 +66.3

Bernstein Fds: IntDur Ca Mu DivMun NYMun TxMgdIntl IntlPort EmgMkts

13.99 14.92 14.90 14.64 12.82 12.75 26.13

... +.03 +.03 +.03 -.39 -.38 -1.05

+5.6 +6.9 +6.4 +6.2 -18.5 -18.6 -18.4

+31.1 +16.9 +15.8 +15.7 +12.4 +12.0 +37.8

Berwyn Funds: Income

13.14 -.10 +2.4 +40.7

BlackRock A: BasValA p CapAppr p EqtyDivid GlbAlA r HlthSciOpp HiYdInvA InflProBdA NatMuniA TotRetA

25.80 22.92 19.06 18.85 30.72 7.78 11.83 10.97 11.45

-.40 -.29 -.23 -.23 +.21 -.01 -.01 +.05 +.01

-3.6 -4.7 +3.5 -4.1 +0.5 NA NA +14.9 +5.7

+47.7 +53.4 +54.3 +29.8 +54.7 NA NA +30.2 +32.1

BlackRock B&C: EquityDivC GlobAlC t

18.65 -.23 +2.7 +50.9 17.52 -.22 -4.8 +26.9

BlackRock Fds Blrk: CapAppr p

23.84 -.30 -4.4 +55.2

BlackRock Instl: InflProtBd US Opps BasValI CoreBond EquityDiv GlbAlloc r CapAppr p HiYldBond NatlMuni S&P500 SCapGrI

11.96 35.93 25.98 9.56 19.10 18.95 23.80 7.78 10.96 16.64 24.32

... -.30 -.39 -.01 -.23 -.23 -.30 -.01 +.04 -.18 -.25

NA -9.3 -3.3 NA +3.8 -3.8 -4.5 NA +15.0 +2.7 -7.0

NA +53.7 +49.1 NA +55.6 +30.9 NS NA +30.9 +57.3 +61.2

BlackRock R: GlblAlloc r

18.21 -.23 -4.4 +28.5

Brandywine Fds: BlueFd 25.18 -.44 -5.8 +37.6 Brandywine 24.42 -.45 -16.0 +28.9 BrownSmCoIns 47.46 -.55 -4.1 +79.2

Buffalo Funds: SmallCap

28.04 -.19 -0.6 +50.9

CGM Funds: FocusFd n Realty n

27.45 -.29 -16.3 +6.8 30.15 -.05 +3.7 +111.3

CRM Funds: MidCapValI

28.96 -.23 -7.9 +47.3

Footnotes T M

E S f P

m m

B F

InsltRlty n RltyShrs n

44.66 +.20 +8.1 +124.1 68.83 +.31 +8.1 +122.5

Columbia Class A: Acorn t AcornIntlA t BldModAgg p DivEqInc A DivrBd DiviIncoA DivOpptyA FocusEqA t HiYldBond LgCapGrA t LgCorQA p MidCpValA PBModA p SelLgCpGr t StrtIncA TxExA p SelComm A

29.39 37.74 10.65 10.03 5.14 14.36 8.37 24.21 2.85 25.41 6.15 13.85 10.90 13.11 6.22 14.12 45.51

-.34 -.90 -.12 -.14 ... -.15 -.09 -.45 ... -.29 -.10 -.10 -.09 -.52 -.02 +.05 -.88

-2.3 -9.2 -1.0 -5.2 +6.5 +6.1 +2.1 +4.1 +5.9 +1.2 +5.5 -4.6 +0.5 -4.2 +6.2 +13.5 -0.7

Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z AcornIntl Z AcornUSA Bond DiviIncomeZ IntmBdZ n IntmTEBd n LgCapGr LgCapIdxZ MarsGrPrZ MidCapGr Z MidCpIdxZ MdCpVal p STIncoZ STMunZ SmlCapIdxZ n SmCapVal SCValuIIZ ValRestr n CRAQlInv np

30.44 37.96 30.02 9.61 14.37 9.41 10.96 13.25 26.31 22.73 26.88 11.75 13.87 9.94 10.56 17.60 42.59 14.41 47.28 11.17

-.35 -.90 -.20 ... -.15 -.01 +.03 -.52 -.29 -.46 -.40 ... -.09 -.01 +.01 -.02 -.04 +.02 -.64 ...

-2.0 -8.8 -3.6 +7.3 +6.3 +6.6 +9.3 -3.8 +2.9 +3.9 -7.1 -2.1 -4.3 +1.6 +2.1 +0.1 -6.8 -5.0 -8.4 +6.3

CoreFxInco LgGrw LgVal n

m

59.72 39.70 21.55 21.39 12.45

ComdyRetA t

FF2000 n FF2010 n FF2010K FF2015 nx FF2015A x FF2015K x FF2020 nx FF2020A FF2020K x FF2025 n FF2025A FF2025K x FF2030 n FF2030K x FF2035 nx FF2035A FF2035K FF2040 n FF2040K FF2045 nx FF2045K FF2050 nx FF2050K FreeIncK IncomeFd n

12.20 13.70 12.55 11.45 11.61 12.60 13.81 12.05 12.96 11.44 11.55 13.04 13.61 13.16 11.23 11.36 13.19 7.83 13.23 9.26 13.36 9.12 13.37 11.55 11.54

+71.1 +56.6 +46.1 +48.2 +28.1 +55.2 +70.4 +56.9 +56.9 +63.1 +64.1 +60.5 Fidelity Invest: +42.7 AllSectEq 12.25 +65.8 AMgr50 n 15.80 +36.8 AMgr70 nr 16.50 +27.5 AMgr20 nr 13.09 +62.0 Balanc 19.31 BalancedK 19.31 +72.7 BlueChipGr 47.51 +58.3 BluChpGrF n 47.61 +74.3 BluChpGrK 47.57 12.80 +24.5 CA Mun n 51.06 +56.5 Canada n +35.6 CapApp n 28.28 +21.6 CapApprK 28.32 +66.9 CapDevelO 11.08 +57.8 CapInco nr 9.21 +61.8 ChinaReg r 26.73 +76.3 Contra n 74.99 +74.7 ContraK 74.97 +61.8 CnvSec 24.28 +12.6 DisEq n 22.90 +6.1 DiscEqF 22.88 +71.2 +50.8 +66.4 +49.5 +16.7

7.81 -.13 -15.8 +13.7

Cullen Funds: 13.37 -.11 +6.5 +54.9

DFA Funds: Glb6040Ins IntlCoreEq n USCoreEq1 n USCoreEq2 n

12.87 9.65 11.61 11.41

+68.2 +82.7 +58.7 +44.2 +42.4

-.04 -.11 -.10 -.12 -.11 -.25 -.17 -.11 -.29 -.13 -.13 -.31 -.16 -.34 -.18 -.15 -.18 -.11 -.18 -.15 -.19 -.14 -.19 -.04 -.04

+2.0 +0.1 +0.2 +0.1 -0.2 +0.1 -0.8 -1.1 -0.7 -1.9 -2.2 -1.7 -2.4 -2.3 -3.7 -3.8 -3.6 -3.9 -3.7 -4.1 -4.0 -4.5 -4.5 +2.1 +2.1

+27.1 +38.5 NS +39.5 +39.8 NS +43.3 +44.0 NS +44.4 +45.4 NS +45.5 NS +45.1 +46.6 NS +45.8 NS +46.0 NS +46.3 NS NS +26.5

-.13 -.10 -.15 -.03 -.13 -.13 -.71 -.72 -.71 +.05 -.65 -.19 -.19 -.19 -.02 -1.21 -.83 -.83 -.26 -.52 -.52

-0.8 +0.2 -2.4 +3.0 +2.7 +2.9 +1.3 +1.5 +1.5 +12.7 -13.3 +5.2 +5.3 -4.5 -0.5 -17.2 +5.5 +5.7 -7.9 -4.5 -4.3

+56.8 +43.0 +47.5 +30.1 +48.5 +49.1 +72.0 NS +73.0 +25.1 +33.5 +65.9 +66.8 +59.8 +74.0 +31.8 +63.6 +64.2 +60.7 +37.9 NS

500Idx I IntlIdx Inst IntlIndxInv TotMkIdxF r TotMktIndInv USBond I

48.07 30.93 30.91 39.16 39.16 11.87

-.52 -.62 -.63 -.36 -.36 ...

+3.0 NS NS NS -14.3 +25.1 +2.0 NS +1.9 +61.1 +7.3 NS

Fidelity Spart Adv: ExtMktAdv r 500IdxAdv 500Index I IntlAdv r IntlIdx Inst TotlMktAdv r USBond I

38.62 48.07 48.07 30.92 30.93 39.16 11.87

-.11 -.51 -.52 -.63 -.62 -.36 ...

-2.7 +3.0 +3.1 -14.2 NS +1.9 +7.2

+73.8 +58.3 NS +25.2 NS +61.3 NS

-.91 -.53 -1.09 -.21

-2.0 -6.4 -19.9 +2.5

+44.4 +38.2 +30.1 +44.6

First Eagle: GlobalA OverseasA SoGenGold p US ValuA t

46.64 20.99 25.03 17.29

First Investors A GroIncA p

15.80 -.20 +2.2 +58.5

Forum Funds: AbsolStratI r

11.16 +.05 +2.6 +20.0

Frank/Temp Frnk A: AdjUS p BalInv p CAHYBd p CalInsA p CalTFrA p EqIncA p FedInterm p FedTxFrA p FlexCapGrA FlRtDA p FL TFA p FoundFAl p GoldPrM A GrowthA p HY TFA p HiIncoA IncoSerA p InsTFA p MichTFA p MO TFA p NJTFA p NY TFA p NC TFA p OhioITFA p ORTFA p PA TFA p RisDivA p SMCpGrA StratInc p TotlRtnA p USGovA p

8.90 40.85 10.39 12.79 7.43 17.29 12.49 12.57 48.99 9.08 11.96 10.39 29.73 48.31 10.76 2.02 2.14 12.48 12.28 12.69 12.62 12.07 12.87 13.03 12.52 10.87 36.53 37.07 10.46 10.28 6.89

+.01 -.30 +.06 +.07 +.04 -.26 +.05 +.06 -.79 -.01 +.03 -.10 -2.09 -.58 +.04 ... -.01 +.04 +.03 +.04 +.04 +.05 +.04 +.05 +.05 +.04 -.17 -.48 -.04 -.01 -.01

+2.2 -5.9 +21.4 +14.3 +15.4 +0.3 +10.9 +13.4 -0.2 +2.9 +11.3 -4.7 -31.0 +2.0 +15.8 +5.8 +0.3 +12.3 +9.6 +12.8 +13.2 +10.7 +12.4 +11.5 +11.8 +13.1 +4.2 -4.0 +3.7 +5.4 +5.5

+6.5 +51.3 +47.8 +24.9 +29.5 +54.3 +24.0 +26.8 +54.7 +28.5 +23.6 +43.6 +30.1 +61.1 +38.8 +55.6 +52.2 +23.2 +19.7 +24.9 +24.1 +21.0 +24.0 +19.2 +24.2 +24.6 +60.9 +72.1 +36.6 +31.4 +16.9

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

GrEqGS4 IntlEqGS4 ValuEqGS4

21.14 -.33 +6.3 +68.0 11.75 -.24 -15.3 +28.9 15.00 -.20 -1.1 +51.1

Harbor Funds: Bond CpAppInv p CapAppInst n HiYBdInst r IntlInv t IntlAdmin p IntlGr nr Intl nr

12.65 41.26 41.85 11.01 56.20 56.37 11.27 56.77

-.01 -.92 -.93 -.01 -1.32 -1.32 -.40 -1.33

NA +5.4 +5.8 +5.3 -10.1 -9.9 -10.0 -9.7

NA +61.4 +63.1 +44.9 +42.3 +42.8 +27.8 +43.8

Harding Loevner: EmgMkts r IntlEqty

46.21 -1.42 -8.5 +47.5 14.14 -.34 -9.4 +48.2

Hartford Fds A: CapAppA p Chks&Bal p DivGthA p EqtyInc t FltRateA px MidCapA p

31.37 9.55 19.89 14.16 8.88 19.79

9.10 30.53 33.01 21.21 21.27 30.81 3.09 59.16

-.02 -.22 -1.29 -.24 -.03 -.36 ... -.01

+4.5 -0.1 -27.7 -4.7 -4.9 -1.3 +1.9 +3.1

+55.6 +48.9 +13.2 +43.1 +50.0 +63.4 +12.7 +40.5

-.64 -.09 -.21 -.17 -.01 -.04

-10.9 -1.3 -0.5 +5.3 +3.9 -4.9

+30.9 +35.8 +46.2 +60.2 +38.8 +55.7

27.76 -.57 -11.6 +28.2 8.87 -.01 +3.1 +35.8

MdCpCGr t

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name 30.53 -.34 0.0 +73.3

PIMCO Funds C:

LSAggress LSBalance LS Conserv LSGrowth LS Moder

12.13 12.99 13.14 12.81 12.91

NA NA NA NA NA

NA NA NA NA NA

Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p LSV ValEq n

24.96 -.14 -7.0 +52.7 13.93 -.20 -4.3 +47.4

IDModAgg

-9.1 0.0 -3.9 +2.2 +0.7 -10.1 -4.7 -6.7 +6.8

+44.3 +49.1 +59.7 +45.4 +57.7 +34.2 +58.1 +70.1 +30.0

Hartford HLS IB: CapApprec p 40.08 -.78 -9.3 +43.2

Heartland Fds: ValueInv 40.08 +.01 -8.9 +57.2 ValPlusInv p 28.67 +.09 -6.9 +53.2

Henderson Glbl Fds: IntlOppA p

19.23 -.50 -15.5 +15.3

Hotchkis & Wiley: MidCpVal

25.72

...

-1.2 +88.4

Hussman Funds: StrTotRet r

12.27 -.02 +2.9 +16.6

EmgMktOp p 18.85 -.54 -9.5 +52.6

Legg Mason A: -.05 +6.5 +1.09 +3.0 -.08 +3.3 -.22 -6.3 +.02 +11.9 +.06 +16.3

+51.4 +71.8 +48.7 +43.1 +23.0 +29.8

Legg Mason C: WAMgMuC CMValTr p

16.99 +.06 +15.6 +27.6 40.07 -.47 -1.8 +41.8

Litman Gregory Fds: Intl I

13.07 -.39 -18.4 +25.5

EqIncInst Genesis n GenesInstl Guardn n HiIncBdInst LgCapV Inv n

9.23 -.08 -2.7 +41.3 11.31 34.48 48.43 15.21 9.27 25.44

... -.13 -.19 -.14 ... -.30

28.59 -.45 -5.7 +52.9 12.09 -.21 -21.0 +10.0 27.32 -.20 -2.1 +79.6

Loomis Sayles: GlbBdR t LSBondI LSGlblBdI StrInc C LSBondR StrIncA

16.75 14.65 16.91 15.12 14.59 15.04

-.07 -.02 -.07 -.03 -.02 -.03

+2.0 +0.1 +0.3 -4.9 +3.6 -13.0

+63.1 +62.8 +63.8 +51.2 NS +39.0

50.23 -.20 +0.1 +62.5

Nicholas Group: 46.69 -.38 +2.9 +69.3

Northern Funds: BondIdx EmgMEqIdx FixIn n HiYFxInc n IntTaxEx n IntlEqIdx r MMEmMkt r MMGlbRE r MMIntlEq r MMMidCap ShIntTaxFr SmlCapVal n StockIdx n TxExpt n

10.99 10.89 10.60 7.33 10.88 9.28 17.42 17.23 8.68 11.88 10.69 15.74 16.81 11.13

+.01 -.40 +.01 -.02 +.04 -.20 -.69 -.19 -.19 -.14 +.01 -.02 -.18 +.04

+7.3 -14.7 +7.1 NA +9.4 NA NA -1.6 NA NA +2.7 -1.3 +2.8 +12.4

+20.7 +39.8 +22.9 NA +18.8 NA NA +71.0 NA NA +7.5 +61.3 +57.5 +22.8

Nuveen Cl A:

Longleaf Partners: Partners Intl n SmCap

+43.6 +26.5 +29.2 +26.5 +30.4 +33.3 +44.8

Neuberger&Berm Fds:

Nichol n

18.43 -.53 -9.3 +54.2

Lazard Open: CBEqBldrA 14.04 CBAggGr p 123.12 CBAppr p 14.92 CBFdAllCV A 13.38 WAIntTmMu 6.76 WAMgMuA p 16.98

-2.2 -11.1 -5.1 -5.8 -4.8 -2.6 -2.8

Nationwide Serv:

-.20 -.11 -.02 -.16 -.06

EmgMktI

-.78 -.22 -.32 -.22 -.42 -.27 -.07 -.22 ...

NA

HiYldAd np

IntIdx I n 6.52 -.13 -14.5 +24.3 NwBdIdxI n 11.77 ... +6.9 +21.2 S&P500Instl n 11.34 -.12 +2.9 +57.8

Lazard Instl:

40.44 20.51 27.37 20.45 43.45 11.56 26.73 18.94 11.96

9.34 -.02 NA

Nationwide Instl:

CapAppY n CapAppI n DivGrowthY n FltRateI x TotRetBdY nx CapApp Div&Grwth GrwthOpp Advisers Stock IntlOpp MidCap SmallCo TotalRetBd

SAMBalA SAMGrA p

Prudential Fds A:

BondA p LgCpEqA StrIncA p

Hartford Fds Y:

Hartford HLS IA :

NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

John Hancock A: 15.93 -.02 +5.8 +48.2 25.62 -.38 -5.9 +40.0 6.59 -.02 +2.1 +45.9

-.08 -.20 -.29 -.29 -.29 -.07 -.17

Genesis n

34.11 -.69 -10.5 +32.7 31.39 -.64 -10.7 +32.0 20.19 -.20 0.0 +48.2 8.89 ... +4.2 +40.0 11.06 ... +6.6 +28.0

NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

10.53 11.96 6.30 9.34 10.47 12.21 9.82 11.25

QualGrowth I 28.22 -.30 -1.8 +53.2 QualityGrthJ 28.20 -.31 -2.1 +51.7

Jensen Funds:

12.49 19.67 28.31 28.04 28.68 17.16 21.16

Neuberger&Berm Tr:

19.83 -.21 -0.2 +47.4

...

AllAstAuth t All Asset p CommodRR p HiYldA LowDurA RealRetA p ShortTrmA p TotRtA

Mutual Series:

+2.6 +4.0 +3.0 +1.9 +3.7 +2.7

+35.1 +56.5 +36.5 +53.0 +55.1 +56.5

HYldMuBd p 16.40 +.08 +21.9 +56.0 AAMuB p 11.48 +.06 +16.6 +39.0 LtdMBA p 11.23 +.01 +5.6 +14.8

PIMCO Funds Admin: AllAstAut t AllAssetC t LwDurC nt RealRetC p TotRtC t

6.32 10.47 12.21 11.25 12.07 10.59 6.42 10.53 12.21 11.25

EqtyInco n Balanced

14.15 -.18 +2.3 +59.0

IntmDurMuBd 9.31 +.02 +8.7 +21.6 HYMuniBd 16.40 +.09 +22.1 +57.0

NA NA NA NA

NA NA NA NA

-.11 -.11 -.11 -.23 +.01 -.01

NA NA NA NA NA NA

NA NA NA NA NA NA

22.92 -.29 -2.0 +36.1

Paydenfunds: GNMA HiInc

10.77 7.17

... ...

+7.3 +21.5 +5.5 +44.9

Perm Port Funds: Permanent

47.26 -.76 -0.2 +43.8

Pioneer Funds A: CullenVal HighYldA p PionFdA p StratIncA p ValueA p

17.99 10.01 40.47 10.95 11.35

-.21 -.03 -.34 -.01 -.17

-5.0 -1.5 -5.1 +4.0 -3.3

+36.1 +65.5 +45.1 +43.1 +34.9

Pioneer Funds C: Pioneer Fds Y:

Nuveen Cl R:

-.11 -.02 +.01 -.01

Pax World:

HYMunBd t DivValueI

NA NA NA NA NA

27.82 -.19 +1.9 +52.0

PioneerFdY StratIncC t

Nuveen Cl I:

NA NA NA NA NA

Parnassus Funds:

Nuveen Cl C: 16.39 +.09 +21.3 +53.6

-.11 -.12 -.02 +.01 -.01

PIMCO Funds P: AllAsset AstAllAuthP CommdtyRR EmgLocalP RealRtnP TotRtnP

CullenVal Y GlbHiYld StratIncY p

40.62 -.35 -4.8 +46.9 10.71 -.02 +3.3 +40.1 18.05 -.20 -4.6 +37.6 9.74 -.05 -0.9 +75.8 10.95 -.01 +4.4 +44.4

Price Funds Adv: BlChipGr n

-.12 -.23 -.11 -.09

-2.2 -16.4 -0.7 -2.3

+39.1 +31.0 +62.0 +60.5

43.92 -.78 +8.2 +70.4

34.77 33.94 4.82 9.44 8.94

-.32 -.29 -.01 +.05 -.02

-8.5 -0.2 +5.0 +12.7 +4.9

+46.1 +40.2 +56.5 +26.3 +19.0

Cen a O egon

Eqty500IL

153.82 -1.66 +2.9 +58.0

DWS Invest S: CoreEqtyS GNMA S HiYldTx n LgCapValS r MgdMuni S ShtDurPlusS

17.14 15.62 12.82 17.62 9.45 9.29

-.25 -.03 +.06 -.25 +.04 ...

-2.3 +5.6 +15.5 -3.3 +12.9 +0.5

+55.5 +19.5 +38.5 +36.9 +27.0 +14.4

Davis Funds A: NYVen A

35.08 -.27 -2.2 +44.0

Davis Funds C: NYVen C

33.78 -.27 -2.9 +40.7

Davis Funds Y: 35.47 -.27 -1.9 +45.2

Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.31 +.01 +6.1 +39.3 SMIDCapGr 24.37 -.48 +1.3 +106.0 LtdTrmDvrA 8.93 +.01 +3.3 +17.2

Diamond Hill Fds: Dimensional Fds: EmMkCrEq n 18.50 EmgMktVal 27.60 GlbRESec n 8.83 IntSmVa n 14.51 LargeCo 10.70 STExtQual nx 10.88 STMuniBd nx 10.32 TAWexUSCr n 8.21 TAUSCorEq2 9.28 TM USSm 23.72 USVectrEq n 11.03 USLgVa n 20.38 USLgVa3 n 15.60 US Micro n 14.13 US TgdVal 16.31 US Small n 22.07 US SmVal 24.94 IntlSmCo n 14.79 GlbEqInst 13.07 EmgMktSCp n 19.77 EmgMkt n 25.18 Fixd nx 10.34 ST Govt n 10.85 IntGvFxIn n 13.06 IntlREst 4.90 IntVa n 14.92 IntVa3 n 13.94 InflProSecs 12.64 Glb5FxInc 11.15 LrgCapInt n 17.45 TM USTgtV 21.52 TM IntlValue 12.26 TMMktwdeV 15.32 TMUSEq 14.56 2YGlFxd n 10.13 DFARlEst n 26.31

-.68 -1.03 ... -.41 -.11 -.01 ... -.23 -.08 -.01 -.08 -.19 -.15 -.02 -.05 -.04 -.06 -.41 -.20 -.63 -.93 ... ... +.03 -.05 -.34 -.32 +.03 +.01 -.36 -.07 -.29 -.14 -.15 ... +.14

-15.7 +52.5 -21.3 +44.1 +4.9 +103.4 -17.3 +35.1 +3.0 +58.3 +3.1 +16.3 +1.8 +6.2 -16.7 +34.3 -2.3 +60.7 -3.7 +66.4 -4.7 +61.8 -5.5 +55.4 -5.4 +56.0 -3.1 +71.2 -6.8 +63.8 -3.9 +75.1 -6.5 +69.2 -14.4 +47.3 -7.3 +50.7 -15.1 +71.5 -13.8 +49.5 +0.7 +3.4 +3.0 +10.3 +9.0 +20.4 -4.2 +70.9 -20.4 +21.2 -20.3 +21.8 +12.8 +35.2 +4.7 +16.0 -14.2 +26.0 -5.5 +67.0 -20.3 +20.8 -4.7 +56.9 +1.7 +59.2 +0.9 +4.3 +11.5 +130.2

Dodge&Cox: Balanced n GblStock IncomeFd Intl Stk Stock

71.75 8.17 13.70 30.47 109.27

-.54 -.14 -.01 -.72 -1.09

-1.8 -11.6 +5.8 -16.5 -4.5

+44.1 +43.7 +29.2 +32.4 +48.0

DoubleLine Funds: CoreFxdInc I TRBd I TRBd N p

11.18 +.01 NA 11.22 ... NA 11.22 +.01 NA

NS NS NS

Dreyfus: Aprec 42.49 BasicS&P 27.73 BondMktInv p 11.02 CalAMTMuZ 15.32 Dreyfus 9.28 DreyMid r 28.51 Drey500In t 37.21 IntmTIncA 13.90 IntlStkI 13.18 MunBd r 11.79 NY Tax nr 15.48 OppMCVal A x 29.01 SmlCpStk r 21.21 DreihsAcInc 10.57

-.69 -.30 ... +.05 -.14 -.01 -.40 +.01 -.25 +.04 +.05 -.30 -.03 +.02

+5.2 +2.9 +6.8 +13.5 -2.8 -2.4 +2.6 +6.6 -7.1 +11.9 +10.9 -8.3 0.0 -2.1

+61.3 +57.8 +19.9 +24.8 +55.1 +73.2 +56.4 +36.1 +36.5 +24.6 +23.2 +70.8 +70.8 +17.9

Dupree Mutual: KYTF EVPTxMEmI

8.04 +.02 +9.4 +19.2 44.90 -1.37 -12.4 +53.2

Eaton Vance A: GblMacAbR p 9.91 FloatRate 9.35 IncBosA 5.86 LgCpVal 18.26 NatlMunInc 10.02 Strat Income Cl A8.05

-.04 ... ... -.18 +.05 -.03

+0.3 +3.4 +5.2 -1.8 +18.1 +2.1

+14.0 +40.2 +63.5 +36.9 +34.8 +29.8

Eaton Vance C: NatlMunInc

10.02 +.05 +17.3 +31.9

Eaton Vance I: AtlCapSMID FltgRt GblMacAbR IncBost LgCapVal ParStEmMkt EdgwdGInst n

17.46 9.04 9.90 5.86 18.32 13.80 13.08

+.01 -.01 -.04 ... -.18 -.42 -.14

+4.7 +3.7 +0.6 +5.5 -1.5 -13.3 +8.5

+77.3 +41.2 +15.0 +64.7 +37.9 +48.2 +45.3

FMI Funds: CommonStk LargeCap p

25.55 -.12 +2.3 +66.3 16.45 -.14 +1.3 +47.7

FPA Funds: Capit NewInc FPACres n Fairholme

42.62 10.66 27.79 28.87

-.85 +.01 -.24 -.82

-6.4 +1.7 +0.6 -11.3

+65.4 +8.2 +42.4 +33.1

Federated A: KaufmA p MuniUltshA StrValDiv p TtlRtBd p

5.25 -.07 -7.5 +46.3 10.05 ... +1.5 +4.6 4.86 -.01 +6.5 +60.7 11.47 -.02 +6.1 +24.3

Federated Funds: MidCapI Svc 22.03 -.01 -2.4 +73.2 TtlRtnBdSvc 11.47 -.02 +6.3 +25.2

Federated Instl: 9.98 -.02 +7.6 +60.3 5.25 -.07 -7.7 +46.3 10.05 ... +1.0 +3.2 11.47 -.02 +6.6 +26.3 9.18 ... +1.5 +11.7 4.88 ... +6.9 +62.0 9.87 12.09 12.12 34.06 17.30 21.86 22.28 12.45

... -.13 -.16 -.32 -.18 -.25 -.43 -.03

+2.8 -2.5 -4.0 -8.4 -8.3 +4.6 -11.6 +4.6

EqGrI n FltRateI n GroIncI LgCapI n MidCpII I n NewInsightI SmallCapI

63.89 9.85 18.76 19.93 17.56 22.15 23.51

-.65 ... -.27 -.36 -.19 -.24 -.46

+2.7 +3.1 +3.2 +0.2 -8.1 +4.9 -11.3

+49.7 +62.6 +59.0 +72.0 +29.3 +18.5 +67.0 +50.2 +65.5

21.40 -.47 +5.9 +64.1 31.97 -.23 +2.8 +73.5 22.20 -.25 -4.5 +68.2

AAGthA p CATxA p DvrInA p EqInA p GeoBalA GrInA p HiYdA p InvA p MultiCpGr NYTxA p TxExA p USGvA p VoyA p

12.66 8.27 7.61 15.82 12.65 13.62 7.70 13.73 53.53 8.90 8.97 13.71 21.73

-.14 +.04 -.01 -.27 -.10 -.22 ... -.19 -.89 +.02 +.02 +.01 -.43

NA +15.5 -2.3 -1.7 +2.0 -3.8 NA +1.2 -1.6 +11.6 +13.0 NA -10.8

NA +30.9 +54.5 +50.4 +41.0 +45.1 NA +57.4 +59.5 +25.1 +28.1 NA +49.5

RS Funds: CoreEqVIP 36.68 -.14 -7.1 +40.7 RSNatRes np 34.48 -.56 -10.9 +45.0 RSPartners 31.30 -.09 -6.5 +61.0

Rainier Inv Mgt: SmMCap SmMCpInst

35.15 -.48 -1.7 +69.8 36.13 -.49 -1.4 +71.1

RidgeWorth Funds: GScUltShBdI HighYldI IntmBondI InvGrTEBI n LgCpValEqI MdCValEqI SmCpValI TotRetBd I

10.16 9.74 10.56 12.69 13.20 10.71 13.16 10.91

... -.03 +.01 +.04 -.17 -.04 -.04 +.02

+1.7 +2.7 +6.1 +9.9 -1.0 -6.8 -4.9 +9.2

+6.9 +47.4 +17.7 +21.6 +53.8 +71.6 +64.8 +25.0

-.32 -.21 -.02 -.10 -.21 -.18 -.11 -.28 -.15

-16.5 -13.2 -7.5 -6.6 -5.0 +0.8 -3.2 -12.7 -8.0

+56.8 +63.2 +80.1 +61.1 +64.7 +53.4 +57.2 +51.2 +47.8

-.57 -.18 -.61 -.35 +.01 -.41 -.42

-13.0 -10.0 -15.3 -1.8 NA -1.2 +2.9

+52.5 +42.1 +22.6 +80.7 NA +49.8 +58.6

Royce Funds: LowPrSkSvc r MicroCapI n OpptyI r PennMuI rn PremierI nr SpeclEqInv r TotRetI r ValuSvc t ValPlusSvc

14.67 15.10 11.52 11.38 19.52 20.93 13.25 11.18 13.00

-.56 -.56 -.26 -.46 -.46 -1.18 -.80 -.57 -.16 -.57 -.20 -.18 ... -.29 -.01 +.01 -1.75 -.28 -1.74 -1.74 -.19 -.02 -.29 +.01 ... +.01 +.03 -.73 ... ... -.35 -.16 -1.83 -.25 -.51 -.52 -.90 -.89 +.04 -.20 -.17 -.17 +.05 -.21 -.39 +.04 -.10 -.10 -.10 -.57 -.15 -.14 +.04 +.14 -.13 -.16 -.16 -.56 -.56 -.23 -.23 -.21 -.13 -.13 -.01 +.01 -.01 -.01 -.15 -.08 -.11 -.22 -.10 -.31 -.17 -.04 -.02 +.04 -.01 -.85 ... -.01 -.48 -.36

-11.9 +27.8 -11.7 +28.6 +0.9 +66.4 -5.7 +60.2 -5.9 +59.4 -15.0 +38.5 -17.8 +42.7 -5.2 +44.9 -2.8 +45.3 -5.1 +45.6 -0.4 +48.8 -0.8 +48.7 +3.1 +25.7 -1.5 +45.1 +6.6 +21.1 +7.1 +16.2 +3.9 +77.4 +3.1 +55.0 +4.1 NS +4.0 +78.2 -9.1 +55.9 +5.1 +59.5 -6.7 +58.2 +11.4 +31.4 +5.7 +29.1 +5.1 +12.4 +8.3 +18.4 -13.3 +27.6 +7.4 +28.8 +7.5 +33.1 +0.1 +63.6 -6.7 +36.8 -11.1 +44.5 -8.6 +64.8 -1.1 +67.7 -1.0 +68.4 -7.1 +36.1 -7.0 +36.7 +11.3 +24.0 +4.8 +61.2 -1.9 +78.2 -1.7 +79.1 +12.0 +24.7 +11.9 +54.5 +1.9 +69.3 +10.2 +21.9 -4.7 +71.2 -4.6 +72.0 +5.3 +54.9 -12.2 +20.3 +2.5 +49.3 +2.6 +49.9 +7.4 +72.2 +12.2 +145.3 -0.6 NS -16.4 NS -16.2 NS -14.6 +46.5 -14.4 NS -6.0 NS -5.8 NS -6.1 NS -19.3 NS -19.2 NS +7.5 NS +4.1 +10.9 +1.8 NS +1.7 +12.6 -0.9 +87.8 -4.2 +73.0 -5.2 +86.5 -17.2 +56.2 0.0 +67.5 -2.9 +53.1 -5.0 +72.8 +5.0 +72.3 +4.8 +43.2 +12.3 +24.7 +7.1 +34.3 +1.3 +74.5 +7.3 NS +7.0 +21.6 -5.5 +62.8 -5.7 +48.3

+24.6 +46.8 +47.4 Fidelity Selects: +64.2 Biotech n 98.75 +4.92 +22.1 +53.9 ConStaple 76.09 -.88 +8.4 +59.9 Electr n 48.21 -.85 -10.8 +45.1 Energy n 47.96 -1.33 -15.3 +42.4 EngSvc n 63.97 -1.11 -19.4 Gold rn 34.79 -1.62 -25.4 +56.3 Health n 132.08 +1.27 +2.8 +39.2 Materials 65.03 -1.01 -6.5 MedDel n 60.28 +.32 -1.5 +70.9 MedEqSys n 27.72 -.05 -6.0 30.06 -.88 -18.1 +25.6 NatRes rn 82.94 -1.77 +6.6 +54.7 Softwr n 98.22 -2.47 -4.6 +63.9 Tech n +55.0 Fidelity Spartan: +61.1 ExtMktIndInv 38.62 -.11 -2.7 +46.3 500IdxInv n 48.07 -.51 +3.0

+86.7 +66.2 +77.6 +33.8 +33.7 +18.6 +78.2 +72.2 +88.7 +52.5 +33.3 +96.8 +95.1 +73.7 +58.2

UtilitiesA p

BalStrat p

Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: FdTF Adv GlbBdAdv n GrAdv t HY TF Adv IncomeAdv RisingDiv r TGlbTRAdv TtlRtAdv USGovAdv p

12.58 12.84 48.36 10.80 2.13 36.50 12.85 10.30 6.91

+.06 -.16 -.58 +.05 -.01 -.17 -.17 -.01 -.01

+13.6 -1.1 +2.3 +16.0 +0.4 +4.5 -0.3 +5.8 +5.6

+27.2 +28.1 +62.3 +39.3 +53.3 +62.1 +39.7 +32.4 +17.4

Frank/Temp Frnk C: CalTFC t FdTxFC t FoundFAl p HY TFC t IncomeC t RisDvC t StratIncC p USGovC t

7.42 12.56 10.22 10.92 2.16 35.99 10.46 6.85

+.04 +.05 -.10 +.04 -.01 -.17 -.04 -.01

+14.6 +12.8 -5.5 +15.2 -0.2 +3.4 +3.4 +5.0

+27.4 +24.6 +40.4 +36.6 +49.4 +57.3 +35.1 +15.1

Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: BeaconA SharesA

12.40 -.08 -2.5 +42.3 20.98 -.17 -3.1 +43.4

Frank/Temp Mtl C: SharesC t

20.76 -.17 -3.8 +40.5

Frank/Temp Temp A: DevMktA p ForeignA p GlBondA p GrowthA p WorldA p

21.89 6.05 12.88 17.01 14.41

-.97 -.14 -.16 -.28 -.30

-13.2 -19.0 -1.4 -11.2 -8.4

+46.7 +27.4 +27.2 +35.7 +37.7

Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: FlexCpGr FrgnAv GrthAv

49.95 -.81 +0.1 +55.9 5.99 -.14 -18.7 +28.5 17.02 -.28 -11.0 +36.8

StrGrowth ICM SmlCo

11.71 +.06 -4.6 -7.5 28.13 -.11 -3.3 +62.8

ING Funds Cl A: GlbR E p

16.65 -.18 -0.9 +67.4

IVA Funds: Intl I r WorldwideA t WorldwideC t Worldwide I r

15.09 15.58 15.46 15.59

IntlGrow

26.98 -.59 -7.6 +43.2

DivrsDiv p

12.80 -.03 +1.0 +54.1

Invesco Funds A: BalRiskA Chart p CmstkA Constl p DevMkt p DivrsDiv p EqtyIncA GlbCoreEq p GrIncA p HiYld p HYMuA IntlGrow MidCpCEq p MidCGth p MuniInA RealEst p SmCpValA t TF IntA p

12.36 17.02 16.33 23.34 31.28 12.80 8.79 11.76 19.77 4.25 9.87 26.62 22.20 27.01 13.78 25.78 17.10 11.83

Invesco Funds P: SummitP p

QuestA

Invesco Funds Y:

Franklin Templ:

BalRiskY

TgtModA p

Ivy Funds:

14.15 -.14 -1.7 +34.1 11.88 ... +7.6 +28.9 12.28 +.04 +12.0 +23.9 45.18 -.39 +4.1 +57.2 42.38 -.56 +0.6 +46.5

GE Instl Funds: IntlEq n SmCpEqI

9.99 -.22 -15.2 +16.7 16.14 -.10 +0.3 +74.9

GE Investments: TRFd1 TRFd3 p

16.60 -.15 -1.7 +31.3 16.55 -.14 -1.9 +30.5

GMO Trust: ShtDurColl r USTreas x

5.45 25.00

... ...

NE 0.0

NE +0.4

GMO Trust II: EmergMkt r

10.85 -.35 -16.5

NS

GMO Trust III: CHIE EmgMk r IntlIntrVal Quality

21.16 10.88 18.87 23.24

-.21 -.35 -.33 -.30

-10.1 -16.4 -17.0 +9.7

+16.4 +43.0 +17.5 +56.9

-.12 -.34 -.52 -.45 -.32 -.29 -.29

+12.2 -16.3 -14.4 -8.3 -17.0 +9.7 +9.8

+97.3 +43.2 +25.2 +42.1 +17.8 +57.2 +57.3

GMO Trust IV: EmgCnDt EmerMkt IntlCoreEq IntlGrEq IntlIntrVal Quality QualityV

9.66 10.80 25.73 22.24 18.86 23.26 23.26

GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r FlexEqVI IntlCoreEq Quality StrFixInco USCoreEq

10.80 17.34 25.71 23.25 16.76 13.04

-.35 -.61 -.51 -.29 +.03 -.10

-16.4 -7.0 -14.4 +9.8 +13.5 +7.1

+43.6 +0.4 +25.3 +57.4 +48.0 +57.3

Gabelli Funds: Asset EqInc p SmCapG n Util A p

50.62 -.47 -2.0 +62.5 21.56 -.23 -0.2 +56.0 33.96 -.03 -3.4 +58.1 5.80 ... +0.2 +48.1

Gateway Funds: GatewayA

26.84 -.16 +1.5 +21.1

Goldman Sachs A: GrthOppsA 23.25 -.24 +0.3 +69.0 MidCapVA p 36.24 -.23 -5.4 +61.0 SmaCapA 41.63 -.05 -0.2 +68.7

Goldman Sachs Inst: CoreFxc GrthOppt HiYield HYMuni n MidCapVal SD Gov ShrtDurTF n SmCapVal

10.49 24.89 7.18 9.11 36.53 10.27 10.66 43.75

+.01 -.25 -.02 +.02 -.23 ... +.01 -.04

+7.4 +0.7 +4.1 +17.0 -5.0 +1.0 +3.7 +0.2

+34.1 +71.1 +57.7 +48.1 +62.9 +6.1 +10.2 +70.7

GuideStone Funds: BalAllo GS4

12.40 -.08 +1.5 +42.3

+13.4 NS -1.7 +40.0 -2.6 +54.9 -5.3 +42.3 -4.8 +66.2 +0.9 +53.8 -1.2 +43.0 -13.4 +22.1 -2.2 +48.7 +4.7 +61.0 +17.2 +44.9 -7.9 +41.4 -8.2 +37.1 -10.0 +63.7 +13.7 +32.9 +10.4 +111.1 -5.5 +67.3 +8.6 +20.1

12.13 -.09 +12.6 NS 8.66 -.06 -1.8 +39.8 9.85 +.05 +16.3 +41.8

Franklin Mutual Ser:

S&S Income n TaxEx Trusts n US Eqty n

-.10 -.24 -.24 -.50 -.76 -.04 -.06 -.31 -.24 ... +.05 -.58 -.32 -.45 +.05 +.13 -.21 +.03

Invesco Funds C:

GlBdC p

GE Elfun S&S:

+37.9 +36.0 +33.0 +36.9

Invesco Fds Invest:

Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: 17.01 -.07 -2.9 +32.0

-5.1 -6.0 -6.7 -5.8

Invesco Fds Instl:

BalRiskC EqIncC HYMuC

12.90 -.17 -1.8 +25.6

-.23 -.22 -.22 -.22

AssetSC t AssetStrA p AssetStrY p AssetStrI r GlNatRsA p HighIncoA p HiIncI r LgCapGrA p LtdTrmA p

12.40 -.18 -1.6 +47.5 12.43 -.10 +13.7 23.51 24.26 24.31 24.49 16.41 8.37 8.37 14.38 11.20

-.81 -.84 -.83 -.84 -.57 -.02 -.02 -.31 -.01

NS

-6.9 -6.2 -6.2 -6.0 -28.2 +8.5 +8.8 +4.7 +3.0

+26.7 +29.6 +29.7 +30.5 +12.7 +60.1 +61.3 +52.3 +12.1

+7.2 +3.5 +1.0 +2.2 +0.2 -1.4 +8.3 +3.3

+24.4 +56.4 +36.2 +29.7 +43.3 +47.1 +83.7 +73.1

JPMorgan A Class: Core Bond A HighYld p Inv Bal p InvCon p InvGr&InA p InvGrwth p LgCpGrA p MdCpVal p

11.99 7.94 12.59 11.48 13.25 13.98 24.12 25.77

+.02 ... -.08 -.04 -.11 -.16 -.53 -.04

JPMorgan C Class: CoreBond pn 12.05 +.02 +6.6 +22.1

JP Morgan Instl: IntTxFrIn n 11.37 +.03 +7.3 +16.0 MidCapVal n 26.20 -.04 +3.8 +75.7

JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond n 11.99 +.02 +7.5 +25.8 HighYld r 7.96 ... +3.8 +58.0 MtgBacked 11.54 ... +6.4 +30.3 ShtDurBond 11.00 ... +1.9 +9.5

JPMorgan Select: MdCpValu SmCap USEquity n USREstate n

25.97 39.50 10.80 18.31

-.04 -.23 -.13 +.09

+3.5 +74.4 +3.0 +74.0 +1.7 +56.5 +9.8 +125.7

JPMorgan Sel Cls:

ValueY n

BalStrat MgdFutStr n CoreFxInA n EmMktDbt n HiYld n IntMuniA IntlEqA n LgCGroA n LgCValA n S&P500E n TaxMgdLC n EmgMkt SP500 n CoreEqty DivEqtySel FunUSLInst r IntlSS r 1000Inv r S&P Sel n SmCapSel TotBond TSM Sel r

Where can you find one?

19.22 -.21 -2.7 +43.1 12.38 12.29 12.39 14.16

+5.3 +4.5 +5.5 +4.7

+44.3 +41.2 +45.5 +54.7

9.30 10.91 15.94 15.85 11.23 12.82 10.43 7.93 20.95 11.68 4.60 16.77 32.36 11.31 12.18

... +.03 +.01 -.12 -.16 -.15 -.11 -.02 -.37 +.02 -.01 -.20 -.37 +.04 -.09

+4.1 +10.5 +3.5 -5.7 -6.1 -4.4 -2.7 +4.0 -6.1 +14.1 +3.8 -5.8 -4.5 +16.6 +1.0

+30.9 +23.4 +10.3 +59.5 +35.1 +47.3 +41.0 +51.0 +84.9 +41.2 +22.1 +62.0 +61.9 +35.7 +47.5

7.92 -.02 +4.2 +51.9 4.60 ... +4.1 +22.5

Lord Abbett I: 7.80 -.02 +4.8 +62.5 34.35 -.39 -4.2 +63.3

MFS Funds A: 12.93 20.42 16.72 13.91 46.10 10.56 14.26 21.66 25.03 13.89 8.07 10.87 26.77 13.81 14.63 17.48 24.08

-.30 -.32 -.27 ... -.55 ... -.18 -.50 -.37 -.13 +.02 ... -.29 -.38 -.15 +.02 -.42

-8.6 +0.5 +3.1 +6.9 +4.4 +6.2 -1.1 -5.5 -3.2 +1.0 +17.5 +6.2 +2.0 -13.4 +1.7 -0.1 0.0

+41.0 +48.8 +60.9 +46.4 +64.4 +15.6 +52.8 +64.0 +40.9 +46.9 +43.0 +34.7 +56.3 +31.3 +36.1 +59.5 +44.2

-.57 -.52 -.01 -.38 -.42

+4.7 -5.3 +6.3 -13.2 +0.3

+65.7 +65.2 +35.1 +32.4 +45.2

MFS Funds I: EmgGI IntNwDI n ResrchBdI n ReInT ValueI

47.98 22.24 10.87 14.25 24.19

MFS Funds Instl: IntlEqty n

17.11 -.40 -9.7 +43.8

MainStay Funds A: HiYldBdA LgCpGrA p

5.97 ... +6.4 +52.3 7.56 -.19 +1.1 +59.7

MainStay Funds I: EpochGlb r MnStMAP I ICAP SelEq S&P500Idx

15.57 32.95 35.90 31.41

-.13 -.40 -.51 -.34

-0.7 -2.2 -1.8 +2.8

+52.9 +51.4 +52.7 +56.9

Mairs & Power: Growth n

21.53 9.96 30.78 7.97 11.38 11.58 24.81 24.08 10.52 11.54 11.00 10.48 21.52

-.67 -.07 -.33 ... +.03 -.21 -.16 -.52 -.02 +.01 ... +.02 -.27

-10.6 +6.4 +2.9 +3.8 +7.2 -15.6 +0.5 +8.5 -2.2 +6.3 +1.8 +4.8 -0.2

+44.4 +69.6 +57.7 +57.5 +15.7 +25.0 +59.0 +84.9 +70.5 +29.7 +8.7 +17.4 +53.5

78.96 +.14 +5.1 +58.2

Managers Funds: PimcoBond n 10.83 -.01 +5.5 +28.9 TmSqMCpGI n 14.77 -.17 -0.4 +63.6 Bond n 26.94 +.02 +6.1 +50.6

Manning&Napier Fds: ProBConS n 13.23 -.03 +2.6 +26.1 WorldOppA n 7.11 -.14 -17.2 +27.3

Marsico Funds: AsiaDivInv r AsianG&IInv China Inv PacTigerInv MergerFd n

13.51 16.46 22.60 21.84 15.81

-.28 -.32 -.93 -.56 +.01

Metro West Fds: HiYldBdM p LowDurBd TotRetBd TotalRetBondI MontagGr I

10.13 -.02 +0.2 +51.1 8.61 ... +2.6 +32.7 10.63 -.01 NA NA 10.63 ... NA NA 24.68 -.21 +5.6 +47.7

Morgan Stanley A:

BalGldnRbw

FocusGroA

37.80 -.75 -2.8 +79.0

Janus S Shrs:

MorganStanley Inst:

Forty Overseas t

EmMktI n IntlEqI n MCapGrI n MCapGrP p SmlCoGrI n

35.69 ... +2.9 +40.6 32.82 -1.29 -27.8 NS

Janus T Shrs: BalancedT n 25.98 -.29 +1.9 +36.4 FlexBondT 10.80 ... +6.9 +29.2 Grw&IncT n 32.54 -.54 -0.5 +42.9

+60.8 +46.8 +39.8 +67.8 +12.4

45.80 -.25 +3.7 +81.4

James Adv Fds: 20.98 -.09 +4.0 +33.2

-3.4 -5.0 -16.9 -6.6 +0.1

Meridian Funds: Growth

+.01 -.09 -.01 +.03 -.14 -.43 -.23 -.41 -.21

+7.3 +7.2 +5.3 +9.1 -15.8 +4.0 -1.6 +2.8 +1.4

+39.3 +56.7 +75.7 +21.7 +24.8 +63.2 +48.5 +58.1 +54.8

18.99 -.76 -15.8 +41.8 22.33 -.24 +3.1 +58.1

23.41 13.10 36.10 34.80 13.56

Munder Funds A:

-.75 -.22 -.59 -.57 -.16

-11.6 -8.0 -8.9 -9.1 -9.1

+47.8 +28.9 +78.1 +76.8 +60.0

18.06 13.96 10.05 15.19 38.41 21.21 20.37 9.65 24.58

Intl MidCap r

TARGET:

11.17 +.02 +5.8 +15.5

RealEst

21.54 +.14 +11.2 +131.3

Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r GlobalI r Intl I r IntlSmCp r Oakmark Select

28.49 21.29 17.62 13.32 45.85 31.01

-.13 -.49 -.34 -.40 -.71 -.57

+0.2 -9.9 -14.0 -10.3 +2.8 +2.1

+35.1 +39.6 +40.8 +63.1 +64.9 +69.9

-.07 -.23 -.17 +.03 -.15

-8.2 -7.5 -14.7 +5.9 -14.7

+33.2 +52.9 +27.0 +14.2 +11.7

+.03 +.06 -.10 +.05 -.21 +.08 -.93 -.78 -.07 -.29 -.94 -.17 -.45 -.02 -2.01 -.05 -.26 -.76 +.03 -.52 -.22 -.18 -.29 ... -.37

+23.9 +20.8 -5.0 +22.6 +2.9 +4.0 -9.8 -0.5 -2.4 -5.5 -12.0 -7.6 -8.0 +1.4 -31.9 +0.2 -12.6 -8.2 +10.6 +5.3 +5.3 -3.0 +1.6 +3.3 -13.0

+56.5 +52.9 +41.0 +63.5 +50.8 +44.0 +60.6 +91.5 +46.0 +56.8 +45.6 +33.1 +57.8 +46.8 +38.5 +25.2 +42.7 +46.2 +27.0 +53.7 +49.5 +59.4 +48.7 +52.8 +43.6

Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp GlbSMdCap LgCapStrat MuniBond pn RealReturn

7.15 14.60 9.37 12.29 9.14

EqtyInc n Growth pn HiYld n MidCapGro n R2020A p R2030Adv np R2040A pn SmCpValA n TF Income pn

24.52 36.03 6.76 56.67 16.93 17.75 17.84 36.70 10.45

-.23 -.53 -.01 -.36 -.19 -.22 -.24 -.05 +.03

-0.3 +6.6 +4.0 -1.6 -0.3 -1.3 -2.0 0.0 +12.2

MidCapValA AmerShsD AmShsS p

Sit Funds: US Gov n

SoundShore n 32.12 -.31 -4.0 +39.9

St FarmAssoc: Balan n Gwth n

GSShDurItl 10.23 -.02 +0.7 +6.5 IbbotsBalSv p 12.12 -.08 -2.3 +36.7 IbbotsModSv p11.93 -.05 +0.4 +31.9 SmCapVal n EmMktInc SmlCapGr TotlRetBdI TotRtBdN p +50.1 +68.1 +57.8 +74.7 +49.5 +53.3 +54.0 +65.1 +24.3

MktNeutral r BdIdxInst BondInst EnLCGInst r EnLCVInst r EqIdxInst Gr&IncInst InfLkdBdInst IntlEqIInst IntlEqInst LgCGrInst LgCVl Inst LC2040Ret MdCVlRet RealSecInst S&P500IInst

MidCapIdx StockIndex

DevMktC t 30.61 -.89 -10.4 +57.2 GblStrIncoC 4.20 -.02 +0.6 +43.6 IntlBondC 6.32 -.05 -0.4 +22.7 LtdTmMuC t 14.93 +.03 +9.9 +24.1 RisingDivC p 15.02 -.27 +0.8 +45.4 SenFltRtC 8.27 ... +2.9 +50.6

Oppenheimer Roch: LtdNYA p LtdNYC t RoNtMuC t RoMu A p RoMu C p RcNtlMuA

3.38 3.36 7.33 16.84 16.81 7.35

... ... +.03 +.05 +.05 +.03

+9.9 +8.8 +18.3 +19.5 +18.4 +19.1

+27.2 +24.1 +56.9 +50.0 +46.2 +60.7

-.22 -.91 -.05 -.75 -.18 -.31 -.27

+3.3 -9.5 +0.6 -7.8 -2.6 +1.8 -7.9

+52.7 +62.2 +26.3 +48.4 +61.4 +50.1 +40.9

Oppenheimer Y: CapApprecY DevMktY IntlBdY IntlGrowY MainStSCY RisingDivY ValueY

49.37 31.57 6.34 27.40 22.62 17.05 21.99

Optimum Fds Instl: Fixed Inc

9.90 +.02 +7.3 +43.3

Osterweis Funds:

LgGrEqtyP LgVEqtyP

19.77 -.30 +2.4 +60.2 17.20 -.27 -2.6 +49.6

TotRetAd n

11.25 -.01 NA

NA NA NA

PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAssetAut r AllAsset CommodRR DiverInco EmgMktCur EmMktsBd FltgInc r FrgnBdUnd r FrgnBd n HiYld n InvGradeCp LowDur n ModDur n RERRStg r RealReturn RealRetInstl ShortT StksPlus TotRet n TR II n

10.60 12.07 6.43 11.78 10.29 11.74 8.64 11.02 10.86 9.34 10.80 10.47 10.86 5.43 11.95 12.21 9.82 8.39 11.25 10.84

-.11 -.11 -.11 -.03 -.15 -.10 -.04 -.07 ... -.02 -.02 -.02 -.02 +.04 +.04 +.01 +.01 -.09 -.01 ...

NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

17.58 -.03 -2.0 +82.5 16.10 -.10 -4.3 +59.9 15.09 -.11 0.0 +55.1 10.88 9.30 7.69 10.81 10.16 8.39 9.91 10.37 11.08 8.79 9.52 10.02 11.64 12.06 11.88 12.01 11.50 11.12 13.55 9.98 19.76 11.28 9.67

10.89 10.69 9.55 8.15 10.32 10.01 12.33 14.63 8.19 11.38 13.30 11.02 17.95 18.04 15.23

... ... -.11 -.10 -.10 -.11 +.02 -.30 -.19 -.21 -.12 -.16 -.09 -.09 -.17

+7.0 +7.0 +5.8 -0.1 +1.8 +4.0 +11.6 -14.0 -19.7 +4.7 -2.9 -2.5 -1.6 -1.3 +3.0

NS +23.3 +71.0 +49.1 +60.2 +56.9 +32.0 +25.1 +31.1 +60.3 +51.0 +48.3 +64.6 +65.8 +58.0

Templeton Class A: TGlbTRA

12.84 -.16 -0.5 +38.7

Templeton Instit: ForEqS

17.49 -.31 -15.5 +26.0

Third Avenue Fds: IntlValInst r REValInst r ValueInst

14.94 -.26 -15.5 +23.7 23.79 -.35 -2.6 +59.2 43.90 -1.00 -14.7 +25.9

Thornburg Fds C: IntValuC t

23.73 -.68 -15.2 +27.6

Thornburg Fds: IntlValA p IncBuildA t IncBuildC p IntlValue I LtdMunA p LtTMuniI ValueI

25.28 18.18 18.18 25.85 14.65 14.65 31.29

-.72 -.19 -.18 -.74 +.02 +.02 -.92

-14.6 -2.7 -3.4 -14.2 +6.1 +6.5 -15.6

+30.4 +50.6 +47.7 +32.0 +16.8 +18.0 +27.3

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt

ITCoAdmrl 10.21 LtdTrmAdm 11.19 LTGrAdml 10.52 LTsryAdml 13.07 LT Adml n 11.66 MCpAdml n 97.44 MorgAdm 60.51 MuHYAdml n 11.10 NJLTAd n 12.26 NYLTAd m 11.67 PrmCap r 67.74 PacifAdml 61.08 PALTAdm n 11.64 REITAdml r 92.94 STsryAdml 10.78 STBdAdml n 10.65 ShtTrmAdm 15.94 STFedAdm 10.85 STIGrAdm 10.77 SmlCapAdml n 36.17 TxMCap r 67.83 TxMGrInc r 60.79 TtlBdAdml n 11.07 TotStkAdm n 33.89 ValueAdml n 21.71 WellslAdm n 57.26 WelltnAdm n 56.73 WindsorAdm n 46.68 WdsrIIAdm 49.40 TaxMngdIntl rn 10.16 TaxMgdSC r 29.33

+8.3 +40.4 +3.4 +10.1 +17.4 +57.5 +26.7 +38.5 +12.2 +24.5 -2.5 +74.9 +1.0 +66.2 +13.7 +30.7 +12.0 +21.9 +10.5 +22.1 -3.4 +50.9 -9.8 +23.9 +10.9 +22.4 +11.5 +130.5 +1.8 +6.4 +2.8 +11.3 +1.5 +5.0 +2.6 +8.7 +2.5 +19.0 -3.5 +73.6 +2.3 +59.3 +3.0 +58.0 +7.3 +22.2 +1.9 +61.5 -0.4 +50.6 +8.1 +47.8 +3.5 +45.2 -2.7 +52.0 +2.1 +54.9 -14.3 +24.9 +0.4 +72.0

-.29 +.03 -.12 -.07 -.20 -.16 -.98 -.27 -.53 -.03 -.33 -.37 -.01 -.15 +.04 +.02 -.40 -.50 -.59 ... +.02 -.09 -.25 -.03 -.16 +.03 +.13 -.23 +.04 -.28 +.04 +.04 +.01 +.04 +.01 +.03 -1.10 -.12 -.58 -.11 -.20 ... -.01 ... -.06 -.05 -.13 -.10 -.20 -.12 -.24 -.16 -.28 -.28 -.17 -.35 -.09 -.22 -.18 -.35

+0.2 +10.6 -6.7 -6.4 +2.9 +6.3 -12.3 +6.5 -3.5 +6.2 -8.4 +3.1 +7.5 +6.9 +3.0 +11.7 -16.3 -11.9 -14.1 +8.2 +8.9 +1.6 -2.1 +3.4 +0.2 +17.3 +26.6 +2.4 +10.4 +0.9 +13.6 +9.6 +3.3 +12.2 +1.5 +11.3 -30.5 -3.5 -3.5 -1.9 +1.2 +2.4 +2.5 +1.7 -1.6 +4.9 +3.3 +1.8 +0.7 -0.1 -0.9 -1.9 -2.1 -2.1 -2.0 +2.7 +8.0 +3.4 -2.8 +2.0

Vanguard Fds: DivrEq n 21.88 CAIT n 11.64 CapOpp n 31.33 Convt n 12.53 DivAppInv n 22.77 DividendGro 16.18 Energy 57.04 EqInc n 22.96 Explorer n 77.87 GNMA n 11.05 GlobEq n 17.15 GroInc n 28.80 HYCorp n 5.89 HiDvdYld n 18.76 HlthCare n 136.13 InflaPro n 14.48 IntlExplr n 13.95 IntlGr 17.51 IntlVal n 27.82 ITI Grade 10.21 ITTsry n 11.71 LIFECon n 16.80 LIFEGro n 22.44 LIFEInc n 14.47 LIFEMod n 20.16 LTInGrade n 10.52 LTTsry n 13.07 MidCapGro 21.00 MATaxEx 10.84 Morgan n 19.51 MuHY n 11.10 MuInt n 14.29 MuLtd n 11.19 MuLong n 11.66 MuShrt n 15.94 OHLTTxE n 12.57 PrecMtlsMin r 16.34 PrmCpCore rn 14.14 Prmcp r 65.28 SelValu r 19.72 STAR n 19.85 STIGrade 10.77 STFed n 10.85 STTsry n 10.78 StratEq n 20.14 TgtRetInc 11.90 TgtRet2010 23.45 TgtRet2015 12.92 TgtRet2020 22.88 TgtRet2025 13.00 TgRet2030 22.25 TgtRet2035 13.35 TgtRe2040 21.91 TgtRet2050 n 21.81 TgtRe2045 n 13.76 USGro n 20.16 Wellsly n 23.63 Welltn n 32.85 Wndsr n 13.83 WndsII n 27.83 DevMkInPl nr 91.21 EmMkInPl nr 85.20 ExtMkt I n 106.81 MidCpIstPl n 106.16 SmCapInPl n 104.41 TotIntAdm nr 22.84 TotIntlInst nr 91.33 TotIntlIP nr 91.36 TotIntSig nr 27.40 500 n 124.98 Balanced n 22.96 DevMkt n 8.82 EMkt n 25.62 Extend n 43.25 Growth n 35.14 ITBond n 11.95 LTBond n 14.01 MidCap 21.46 REIT r 21.78 SmCap n 36.14 SmlCpGrow 23.36 SmlCapVal 16.22 STBond n 10.65 TotBond n 11.07 TotlIntl n 13.65 TotStk n 33.88 Value n 21.71

-1.90 -3.06 -.32 -.73 -.45 -.56 -2.27 -2.26 -.67 -1.35 -.12 -.19 -.92 -.13 -.41 +.02 +.07 -.15 +.11 -.15 -.16 -.03 ... ... -.34 -.32 -.19

BalInst n 22.97 DevMktInst n 8.75 EmMktInst n 25.62 ExtIn n 43.28 FTAllWldI r 81.15 GrowthInstl 35.14 InfProtInst n 11.59 InstIdx n 124.19 InsPl n 124.20 InstTStIdx n 30.67 InstTStPlus 30.67 LTBdInst n 14.01 MidCapInstl n 21.52 REITInst r 14.39 STIGrInst 10.77 SmCpIn n 36.17 SmlCapGrI n 23.41 TBIst n 11.07 TSInst n 33.89 ValueInstl n 21.71

-.12 -.19 -.92 -.13 -2.01 -.41 +.02 -1.33 -1.33 -.29 -.29 +.07 -.15 +.08 ... -.15 -.16 ... -.32 -.19

BalancSgl n ExtMktSgl n 500Sgl n GroSig n ITBdSig n MidCapIdx n REITSig r STBdIdx n SmCapSig n TotalBdSgl n TotStkSgnl n ValueSig n

22.72 37.19 103.25 32.54 11.95 30.75 24.81 10.65 32.59 11.07 32.71 22.59

-.12 -.11 -1.11 -.38 +.02 -.21 +.13 ... -.14 ... -.31 -.20

AggrOpp n EqtyInc n Growth n Grow&Inc n Intl n MPLgTmGr n MPTradGrth n

10.22 8.81 9.21 10.36 8.74 21.62 22.71

-.08 -.10 -.13 -.15 -.18 -.20 -.18

EmgMktI

15.51 -.17 -3.8 +37.6 9.44 -.21 +3.3 +84.0

WM Blair Fds Inst:

MulSStA p

4.85 -.01 +3.7 +38.6

Touchstone Family:

IntlGrwth

SandsCpGY n 12.30 -.19 +14.7 +103.6 SandsCapGrI 17.08 -.26 +15.2 +106.3 SelGrowth 12.07 -.18 +14.4 +102.2

WM Blair Mtl Fds:

Transamerica A:

Accumultiv AssetS p Bond x CoreInvA HighInc NwCcptA p ScTechA VanguardA

AsAlMod t

11.85 -.10 -1.4 +35.7

Transamerica Ptrs: InstStkIdx p

9.07 -.10 +2.7 +57.4 23.20 -.27 -3.6 +51.4

USAA Group: 35.48 21.97 15.65 15.51 8.42 13.04 13.32 10.66 23.23 25.88 20.30 20.31 9.20 13.60 13.72 10.84

13.59 -.43 -7.4 +51.1

IntlGrowthI r 20.93 -.66 -8.2 +49.9

Waddell & Reed Adv: 8.00 9.19 6.57 6.23 7.26 9.79 10.41 8.97

-.11 -.32 -.01 -.12 -.02 -.11 +.18 -.20

... -.25 -.02 -.01 -.23 -.10 -.22 -.12 -.11 -.15 -.10 -.10 -.08 -.12 -.14 -.16 -.16 -.16 -.06 -.02 +.07 -.10 -.02

+6.2 +41.8 -10.6 +35.0 +4.6 +52.7 +4.1 +61.2 -14.7 +24.3 +4.6 +58.9 +3.3 +74.0 -3.7 +43.8 -0.8 +42.8 +3.6 +55.6 +2.9 +57.5 +0.3 +49.3 +1.3 +47.9 -0.2 +50.4 -1.4 +51.6 -2.3 +51.4 -2.9 +51.6 -6.2 +73.7 -3.1 +67.9 +3.6 +74.1 +11.1 +123.8 -1.9 +93.1 -5.9 +64.2

-.75 -.23 -.22 -.22 ... -.12 +.02 ... -.48 -1.59 -.22 -.21 -.01 +.04 +.05 +.01

-0.1 NA -0.1 -2.8 +2.7 +0.6 +6.8 +5.7 -9.8 -25.1 +2.8 +2.9 +2.8 +10.7 +15.0 +4.0

+55.3 NA +51.8 +51.0 +71.6 +52.2 +35.0 +54.1 +41.2 +31.7 +57.4 +58.1 +18.0 +26.8 +32.4 +12.8

IncEqty Long/Short SmCapGrth

20.56 -.01 -2.2 +75.0 25.27 -.28 +2.7 +57.8

13.72 -.16 -5.6 +38.1 12.97 -.27 -3.5 +30.6 41.93 -.18 +3.5 +85.5

ShtIntmIco I Value n

12.53 -.01 +2.4 +14.8 33.07 +.71 +8.2 +64.4

Wells Fargo Adv A: AstAllA p EmgMktA p

12.27 -.13 NA 19.89

W

A

A

W

A

C

W

A M M

W

A

41.91 -1.35 -19.2 +28.4

Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml n 22.97 CAITAdm n 11.64 CALTAdm 11.83 CpOpAdl n 72.37 EM Adm nr 33.67 Energy n 107.09 EqIncAdml 48.12 EuropAdml 53.67 ExplAdml 72.48 ExntdAdm n 43.28 500Adml n 125.00 GNMA Adm n 11.05 GroIncAdm 47.04 GrwthAdml n 35.15 HlthCare n 57.44 HiYldCp n 5.89 InflProAd n 28.45 ITBondAdml 11.95 ITsryAdml n 11.71 IntlGrAdml 55.72 ITAdml n 14.29

+51.0 +28.2 +22.7 +63.6 +57.0 +86.0 +58.2 +52.4

Weitz Funds:

VALIC :

GlHardA

+0.9 -7.0 +8.1 +2.7 +7.9 -2.9 -0.5 +4.9

Wasatch:

Tweedy Browne: GblValue

+55.0 +51.1 +50.9 +54.8 +31.1 +41.7 +36.8

Virtus Funds: Virtus Funds A:

TA IDEX C:

-8.3 -2.7 +0.9 +1.0 -10.6 -1.8 -0.3

Victory Funds:

Delafield Gold t

AsAlModGr t 11.92 -.14 -3.8 +37.0

+4.6 +46.3 -2.9 +72.8 +3.0 +58.5 +5.5 +69.1 +10.7 +32.8 -2.5 +74.9 +11.5 +130.6 +2.8 +11.3 -3.5 +73.6 +7.3 +22.2 +1.9 +61.5 -0.4 +50.6

Vantagepoint Fds:

Tocqueville Fds:

Transamerica C:

+4.6 +46.4 -14.1 NS -14.5 +43.2 -2.9 +73.0 -14.4 +30.2 +5.6 +69.3 +11.8 +32.6 +3.1 +58.5 +3.1 +58.7 +2.0 +61.6 +2.0 +61.7 +20.9 +50.8 -2.5 +75.0 +11.6 +130.7 +2.6 +19.2 -3.5 +73.8 -3.9 +82.6 +7.3 +22.3 +1.9 +61.5 -0.3 +50.7

Vanguard Signal:

DvsStkA

AsAlModGr p 11.96 -.14 -3.2 +39.7

-14.1 NS -14.5 NS -2.9 NS -2.4 NS -3.5 NS -14.5 NS -14.5 NS -14.4 NS -14.5 NS +2.9 +58.0 +4.5 +45.6 -14.2 +25.1 -14.7 +42.3 -3.1 +72.1 +5.4 +68.5 +10.6 +32.4 +20.8 +50.1 -2.6 +74.1 +11.4 +129.7 -3.7 +72.9 -4.0 +81.7 -3.3 +64.0 +2.7 +10.9 +7.1 +21.7 -14.6 +28.5 +1.8 +61.0 -0.5 +49.9

Vanguard Instl Fds:

LgCapStock MuniBd

29.96 -.30 -3.9 +75.3 61.26 -4.01 -24.2 +68.5

+59.5 +22.1 +45.1 +44.9 +54.6 +55.0 +28.5 +65.5 +72.7 +19.4 +46.3 +56.5 +52.7 +61.6 +56.1 +31.9 +43.6 +40.0 +22.8 +40.0 +19.1 +34.1 +45.7 +27.8 +40.6 +56.9 +38.0 +75.4 +20.9 +65.4 +30.4 +20.3 +9.8 +24.2 +4.7 +21.7 +32.2 +52.4 +50.5 +63.7 +43.6 +18.7 +8.4 +6.1 +73.5 +32.5 +39.5 +41.5 +43.3 +45.3 +47.3 +48.8 +48.6 +48.7 +48.7 +56.4 +47.4 +44.8 +51.4 +54.5

Vanguard Idx Fds:

Thrivent Fds A: 22.63 -.28 -2.7 +39.7 11.82 +.04 +11.8 +22.5

... +.01 +.03 +.13 +.04 -.67 -.85 +.04 +.05 +.04 -.60 -1.55 +.03 +.48 ... ... +.01 -.01 ... -.16 -.65 -.66 ... -.32 -.19 -.22 -.39 -.62 -.62 -.21 -.03

Van Eck Funds:

Principal Inv: BdMtgInstl DivIntlInst HighYldA p HiYld In Intl I Inst LgCGr2In LgLGI In LgCV3 In LgCV1 In LgGrIn LgCpIndxI LgCValIn LT2010In LfTm2020In LT2030In LT2040In LfTm2050I MidCGIII In MidCV1 In PreSecs In RealEstSecI SGI In SmCV2 In

15.13 -.02 -0.9 +21.9

TIAA-CREF Funds:

AggGrwth r Growth r Stock r

Oppenheimer C&M:

+1.7 +45.9 +8.5 +71.5 +7.1 +22.1 +3.8 +52.5 +3.1 +52.6 +7.2 +49.9 -14.4 +47.1 -0.1 +51.2 +2.8 +57.3 +5.7 +18.5 +6.8 +69.2 +1.1 +55.1 +10.1 +97.2 +4.2 +59.1 +4.3 +70.2 +3.9 +57.0 +3.2 +34.3 -1.5 +78.9 +0.3 +21.9 -7.4 +63.0 -13.8 +33.1 -10.4 +46.3 -20.2 +37.8 +12.2 +26.0 +2.6 +100.2 -1.3 +75.9 -4.7 +55.3 -0.7 +60.2 -5.8 +87.3 -18.0 +27.7 +5.9 +108.5 +6.2 +25.6 -11.8 +36.7 +1.2 +48.8 -0.3 +54.6 +2.1 +40.1 -12.2 NS +11.9 +129.5 +1.7 +40.1 +1.1 +43.8 +0.5 +47.5 0.0 +50.6 -0.6 +52.6 -1.1 +54.3 -1.6 +55.2 -1.7 +55.2 -1.7 +55.2 +1.6 +35.0 -7.6 +67.9 +2.0 +11.2 0.0 +87.7 +0.2 +66.3 -1.5 +57.7 +4.5 +35.4 +8.7 +20.4 +12.6 +25.4 +16.6 +43.7 +4.2 +12.1 -1.6 +55.2 -2.4 +55.0

10.23 +.01 +5.9 +34.3

TFS Funds:

Primecap Odyssey :

RisingDivB 15.08 -.27 +0.7 +44.7 S&MdCpVlB 25.82 -.31 -13.8 +40.1

8.81 -.07 +5.5 +67.7 27.37 -.91 -15.3 +59.9 9.90 +.01 +6.2 +35.4

TCW Funds N:

PACE Funds P:

Oppenheimer B:

20.70 -.18 -3.0 +62.1

TCW Funds:

OsterweisFd n 27.38 -.09 -4.8 +39.9 StratIncome 11.64 +.01 +4.7 +37.5

6.98 12.08 9.39 8.56 47.19 8.96 31.91 61.41 9.16 24.10 57.07 14.38 29.11 4.21 28.70 6.34 10.83 27.54 14.99 35.23 13.54 21.52 16.67 8.26 30.45

55.96 -.06 +2.0 +31.9 54.59 -.17 -0.6 +43.5

Sun Capital Adv:

AgsvGth n CornstStr n Grwth n Gr&Inc n HYldInco n IncStk n Income n IntTerBd n Intl n PrecMM S&P Idx n S&P Rewrd ShtTBnd n TxEIT n TxELT n TxESh n

AMTFrMuA AMTFrNY ActiveAllA CAMuniA p CapAppA p CapIncA p DevMktA p DiscFd p Equity A EqIncA p GlobalA p GblAllocA GlblOppA GblStrIncoA Gold p IntlBdA p IntlDivA IntGrow p LtdTrmMu MnStFdA MainStrOpA p MnStSCpA p RisingDivA SenFltRtA S&MdCpVlA

11.38 +.01 +3.1 +14.8

Sound Shore:

Balance n BlueChipG n BdEnhIndx n CapApr n DivGro n EmMktB n EmMktS n EqInc n EqIdx n GNM n Growth n GwthIn n HlthSci n HiYld n InstlCpGr n InstHiYld n InstlFltRt n MCEqGr n IntlBd n IntlDis n IntlGr&Inc n IntStk n LatAm n MdTxFr n MediaTl n MidCap n MCapVal n NewAm n N Asia n NewEra n NwHrzn n NewInco n OverSea SF n PSBal n PSGrow n PSInco n RealAssets r RealEst n R2005 n R2010 n R2015 Retire2020 n R2025 R2030 n R2035 n R2040 n R2045 n Ret Income n SciTch n ST Bd n SmCapStk n SmCapVal n SpecGr SpecIn n SumMuInt n TxFree n TxFrHY n TxFrSI n R2050 n Value n

Oppenheimer A:

NA

42.56 -.34 -1.6 +46.6 42.54 -.34 -1.9 +45.1

ComStk A p 33.22 -.49 +1.1 +53.7 SmCoA p 7.80 -.05 -2.3 +67.8 Sequoia n 158.71 -.47 +9.1 +65.5

16.80 -.18 -0.5 +48.4 17.64 -.22 -1.6 +52.2 -.18 -.78 ... -.10 -.23 -.17 -1.10 -.23 -.40 -.03 -.53 -.19 +.39 -.02 -.32 -.02 ... -.18 -.08 -1.03 -.19 -.36 -1.44 +.03 -.35 -.37 -.13 -.37 -.51 -.75 -.26 -.01 -.15 -.21 -.33 -.14 -.22 +.10 -.09 -.14 -.13 -.18 -.15 -.23 -.17 -.24 -.16 -.09 -.57 ... -.16 -.05 -.28 -.05 +.04 +.03 +.06 +.01 -.13 -.20

31.23 -.15 NA

Sentinel Group:

Price Funds: 20.10 44.04 11.62 22.07 24.93 13.36 30.11 24.58 36.55 10.12 36.43 21.54 38.63 6.77 18.20 9.54 10.14 29.54 9.87 42.33 12.03 13.11 38.99 10.99 53.29 57.83 23.00 34.00 15.33 41.49 34.64 9.79 7.71 19.87 23.93 16.60 10.64 21.14 11.75 15.88 12.32 17.04 12.46 17.87 12.63 17.97 11.96 13.48 27.53 4.85 34.33 36.95 18.38 12.66 11.91 10.44 11.56 5.71 10.03 24.18

+49.4 +54.0 +61.9 +24.4 +58.8 +58.0 +71.8 +20.7 +61.1

Selected Funds:

Price Funds R Cl: Ret2020R p Ret2030R n

-0.1 +2.1 -1.2 -14.0 +2.2 +3.0 -3.9 +6.9 +2.1

29.94 -.74 -11.0 +38.6 13.60 -.17 -3.0 +85.0

Advert se your bus ness n Age ess Pub shes 4 t mes per year LtdTermR

-.23 -.17 -.10 -.31 -.38 -.23 -.03 ... -.23

Scout Funds:

AGELESS w be de vered to a Bu et n subscr bers and n Bu et n racks and newsstands reach ng more than 70 000 readers P us 2000 cop es w be d str buted through COCOA the r partners and other re ated bus nesses A so nd the u magaz ne on ne at www bendbu et n com

19.57 -.35 +4.3 +58.5 PIMCO Admin PIMS: CoreBond n 11.98 +.02 +7.4 +25.1 Focus p RelRetAd p 12.21 +.01 NA CorePlusBd n 8.41 +.01 +6.5 +33.8 Matthews Asian: ShtTmAd p 9.82 +.01 NA EmMkEqSl EqtyInc EqIndx HighYld IntmdTFBd n IntlValSel IntrdAmer LgCapGr MkExpIdx n MtgBckdSl n ShtDurBdSel TxAwRRet n USLCCrPls n

11.33 11.48 7.46 11.77 7.71 24.30 16.89 37.26 13.09

Security Funds:

Nuveen Cl Y:

-.03 -.02 -.02 +.01

Lord Abbett F:

IntlDiverA MITA MIGA BondA EmGrA GvScA GrAllA IntNwDA IntlValA ModAllA MuHiA t ResBondA RschA ReschIntA TotRA UtilA ValueA

22.60 -.04 -12.2 -15.0

Schwab Funds:

BdDbC p 7.95 -.02 +3.3 +48.1 ShDurIncoC t 4.63 -.01 +3.1 +19.3

HiYld SmCapVal

NA NA

SSgA Funds:

Lord Abbett C:

BondDeb ShtDurInco

10.28 -.11 NA

SEI Portfolios:

Lord Abbett A: FloatRt p IntrTaxFr ShDurTxFr ValueOpps p AffiliatdA p FundlEq BalanStratA BondDebA p DevGthA p HYMunBd p ShDurIncoA p MidCapA p RsSmCpA TaxFrA p CapStruct p

NA

Rydex Investor:

Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdA p InvGrBdC p InvGrBdY LSFxdInc

11.06 +.02 NA 10.38 -.11 NA

Russell LfePts C:

N PARTNERSH P W TH

13.65 +.14 +12.1 +57.3

17.32 8.41 27.77 36.39 11.19 28.99 32.17

Russell LfePts A:

CALL 541.382.1811 TO RESERVE YOUR ADVERTISING SPACE IN AGELESS TODAY! 27.24 27.22 15.97 28.33 28.33 26.84 21.71 43.71 18.52 43.70 22.55 34.27 9.86 27.64 11.90 10.82 92.08 19.74 92.04 92.04 19.84 9.08 24.25 13.12 11.00 11.02 10.63 29.33 11.84 7.84 18.68 10.74 50.08 28.03 38.83 38.81 69.38 69.32 12.65 11.03 29.03 29.03 13.42 16.60 31.14 13.59 58.28 58.67 9.58 29.10 18.97 18.97 11.05 31.64 12.26 8.55 8.57 15.60 15.64 10.96 10.99 11.71 8.30 8.32 11.84 10.88 8.54 8.54 21.69 16.25 11.11 17.79 15.23 26.62 19.28 11.77 11.15 11.57 11.10 74.75 11.87 11.87 69.50 18.73

-4.5 +5.6 +5.9 +2.6 -20.8 +3.3 -4.8 -3.4 +5.8

Putnam Funds A:

StratBd

50+ Magaz ne o hea h ac ve e y e nance and mo e

SPONSORED BY

DiverIntl n DiversIntK r DivStkO n DivGrowK DivGth n Emerg Asia r EmrgMkt n EqutInc n EQII n EqIncK Export n FidelFd FltRateHi r FourInOne n GNMA n GovtInc n GroCo n GroInc GrowCoF GrowthCoK GrStrat nr HighInc rn Indepndnce n InProBnd e IntBd n IntGov IntmMuni n IntlDisc n InvGrBd n InvGB n LargeCap n LgCapVal n LatAm n LevCoStock LowPr rn LowPriStkK r Magellan n MagellanK MA Muni n MegaCpStk n MidCap n MidCapK r MuniInc n NewMkt nr NewMill n NY Mun n OTC OTC K 100Index Ovrsea n Puritan PuritanK RealEInc r RealEst n SrAllSecEqF SCmdtyStrt n SCmdtyStrF n SrsEmrgMkt SrEmgMktF SrsIntGrw SerIntlGrF SrsIntSmCp SrsIntVal SerIntlValF SrsInvGrdF ShtIntMu n STBondF STBF n SmCapDisc n SmCpGrth r SmCapOpp SmallCapS nr SmCapValu r StkSlcACap n StkSelSmCap StratDivInc StratInc n TaxFreeB r TotalBond n Trend n USBdIdxF USBI n Value n Wrldwde n

-.26 -.46 -.01 -.22 -1.40 -.01 -.23 -.28 +.04

Russell Instl I:

No other oca y wr tten magaz ne h gh ghts today s Centra Oregon sen ors and the r act ve festy e ke AGELESS Created for sen ors but a he pfu and thoughtfu read for any stage n fe

17.57 -.13 +2.9 +24.0

GrowthZ MidCapGrZ SmallCoZ

EmerMkts GlobEq IntlDevMkt RESec StratBd USCoreEq USQuan

AGELESS a co or u and dynam c magaz ne u o content deve oped spec ca y or the argest and astest grow ng segment o our commun ty - those over 50 years o age The Centra Oregon Counc On Ag ng and The Bu et n have partnered to produce AGELESS Loca y wr tten t w eature engag ng n ormat ve content deve oped w th our oca sen or and boomer popu at on n m nd

DWS Invest Instl:

17.62 20.53 5.56 30.81 44.10 11.50 21.22 15.88 11.49

Russell Funds S:

DWS Invest A: DSmCaVal EqtyDivdA HiIncA MgdMuni p StrGovSecA

BlendA GrowthA HiYldA p MidCpGrA NatResA STCorpBdA SmallCoA p 2020FocA UtilityA

13.24 -.11 +1.0 +44.9 14.13 -.15 -0.4 +48.6

Prudential Fds Z&I:

10.41 11.81 10.47 12.21 11.25

PIMCO Funds D: CommodRR p LowDurat p RealRtn p TotlRtn p

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

-.11 -.12 -.11 -.02 -.02 +.01 +.01 -.01

PIMCO Funds A:

MdCpCGrY n 31.25 -.35 +0.2 +74.5

IntlMsterS r 17.77 -.33 -11.1 +53.7 USLgCapGr r 14.14 -.29 +6.7 +73.5

DivGthI n

9.91

Munder Funds Y:

Laudus Funds:

Hartford Fds I:

TRIII n

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

BeaconZ EuropZ GblDiscovA GlbDiscC GlbDiscZ QuestZ SharesZ

John Hancock Cl 1:

Hartford Fds C: CapAppC t FltRateC tx

HiYldT r Janus T OverseasT r PerkMCVal T PerkSCVal T ResearchT n ShTmBdT Twenty T

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

AgeLESS

7.74 -.12 -15.9 +12.9

HiDivEqI nr

+2.2 +4.6 +4.4 -11.7 +4.6

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

Central Oregon’s Newest Magazine

Credit Suisse Comm: CommRet t

-.62 -.65 -.24 -.41 -.03

Fidelity Freedom:

Credit Suisse ABCD:

Fidelity Advisor I:

NS F

EqGrT p GrOppT NwInsghts p SmlCapT p StrInT

8.71 +.01 +6.9 +30.9 15.96 -.21 +1.7 +62.8 9.06 -.12 -2.3 +50.5

NwInsghts tn 20.67 -.24 +3.9 StratIncC nt 12.42 -.03 +3.8 w

12.60 -.03 +4.9 +43.4

Fidelity Advisor T:

CG Cap Mkt Fds:

Fidelity Advisor C:

NE D NN F

NA

11.59 -.19 -12.6 +37.9 66.72 -.46 +1.7 +62.2

Cohen & Steers:

FltRateA r FF2030A p FF2040A p LevCoStA p MidCpIIA p NwInsghts p SmallCapA p StrInA

F

R

Institutnl nr Clipper

Fidelity Advisor A:

N

+28.2 +37.8 +41.3 +44.5 +45.6 +56.0 +52.6 +57.2 +23.5 +22.5

Causeway Intl:

HighYldBd r KaufmanR MunULA p TotRetBond UltShortBd StaValDivIS

F

-7.5 -4.3 -3.7 -3.0 -2.7 -8.2 -8.9 -8.0 +3.0 +2.8

Inco p 16.08 +.02 +2.4 +26.2 ShDurIncA t 16.13 ... +1.3 +14.3 SocEqA p 36.43 -.69 -1.3 +53.2

LongShortI

Ariel Investments:

StrInI -.14 -.12 -.41 -.40 -.39 -1.36 -1.23 -1.49 -.08 -.08

Calvert Invest:

NYVenY

-.18 -.27 -.45 -.31 -.09

Arbitrage Funds: Arbitrage I n 13.10 ArbitrageR p 12.86

17.28 10.76 31.94 31.84 31.13 50.43 45.19 55.33 12.30 12.42

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

-.12 +.03 +.04 -.28 -1.21 -1.85 -.57 -.97 -.49 -.13 -1.34 -.03 -.60 -.40 +.02 -.01 +.04 +.02 +.02 -1.59 +.04

+4.6 +10.7 +13.5 -6.7 -14.6 -12.2 +6.6 -16.2 -3.3 -2.9 +3.0 +6.3 +3.3 +5.6 +3.1 +7.6 +11.8 +10.7 +9.0 -11.8 +9.7

+46.3 +22.3 +25.6 +45.4 +42.8 +28.7 +65.9 +26.7 +73.6 +72.9 +58.5 +19.8 +57.1 +69.2 +56.3 +53.2 +32.4 +32.8 +19.5 +40.6 +20.6

M

W

A m

W M

W W

A

W

mB

W

Y

m

N

NA


SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Jobless

Weight

Continued from G1

Continued from G1 Executives with two U.S. airline-seat manufacturers declined to comment on the issue. Dede Potter, a spokeswoman for one of those manufacturers, B/E Aerospace, said only, “We comply with all industry regulations.” In 2005, the FAA updated the average passenger weights used in calculating each flight’s total weight and balance. Men’s weight was raised by 25 pounds to 200 and women’s by 34 pounds to 179. (That is the summer calculation; it is higher in the winter when travelers are wearing heavier clothes.) The size of the seats is not a function of passenger weight but a legacy of airplane design from a generation ago, said Vern Alg, a former airline executive who is now a private consultant. “The restriction is the dimension, the width of the aircraft,” he said. “With Boeing narrow bodies, for example, if they are going to have six seats across, they can only be 17.1 inches wide.” Strength and size are not the only factors affecting safety when the passenger is overweight. Use of the seat belt can also be a problem for these travelers. The FAA recommends wearing seat belts throughout the flight, though use is required only for takeoffs and landings. Dietrich Jehle, a professor of emergency medicine at the University at Buffalo who has conducted a study of more than 300,000 serious automobile accidents, said he found that very overweight drivers faced an increased risk of death in a severe crash and that they were 67 percent less likely to be wearing seat belts, which he suspected was for reasons of comfort. Jehle said obese air travelers may also be less likely to

The movement to mend They are coming. Two movements have sprouted to fight for this generation’s right to move out of the parental basement (or avoid it altogether): The Campaign for Young America and Fix Young America. In a way, they are the younger siblings of Occupy Wall Street but with a nonpartisan agenda, more centralized leadership and one specific mission: to help young people find jobs. “Occupy represented this bottled-up energy and frustration — it was the manifestation that our generation will not be able to reach the American dream,” said Aaron Smith, 30, co-founder of Young Invincibles, a nonprofit group based in Washington that is the force behind the Campaign for Young America. “Now we are trying to harness that energy into something tangible.” The Campaign for Young America is in the midst of a 21-state bus tour that is set to conduct 100 round tables with young people, Occupy Wall Street protesters, community leaders and entrepreneurs. “One thing we are really focused on is trying to better connect colleges and universities to local employers,” Smith said. Later this summer, the group will endorse specific policy recommendations based on input during the round tables and host candidate forums, he said. Fix Young America is supported by members of the nonprofit Young Entrepreneur Council, based in New York. (Officially the new group has a hashtag in front of its name, to reflect its presence on Twitter.) The group assembled more than two dozen people — including Sen. Ron Wyden, DOre., Rep. Patrick McHenry, R-N.C., university leaders and entrepreneurs — to offer prescriptions for solving youth unemployment. The ideas were required to have a track record. “Anyone and their mother could come up with ideas, but what we wanted to do with Fix Young America was to get the strongest voices in the room, the ones who showed there was proof in the pudding,” said Scott Gerber, 28, founder of the Young Entrepreneur Council and Fix Young America. The solutions was published Wednesday in a book. Smith, for one, wrote a chapter advocating student loan forgiveness for entrepreneurs who start businesses that create jobs. Another solution was proposed by Zach Sims, whose chapter focuses on teaching young people JavaScript, a computer programming language. “There are a limited number of things you can do with an English degree,” said Sims, 21, co-founder of Codecademy, a free website that teaches programming and coding. “Coding skills are such a clear path to employment, regardless of your background.” Sims suggests teaching coding nationally via sites like Codecademy and creating partnerships with high schools, colleges and local government. He wants to start a “national programming movement” and recently formed a partnership with the White House for a summer program to teach coding to underprivileged youth.

Casey Templeton / New York Times News Service

The Young Invincibles, a youth employment advocacy organization, make a stop for a roundtable discussion during their bus tour, “The Campaign for Young America,” at the University of Richmond. The group and other organizations are holding discussions with politicians and other leaders to help find ways to get young people employed.

Wyden’s efforts Other Fix Young America solutions have already been road-tested on a state level. Wyden’s idea is to expand the Self-Employment Assistance Program, an obscure government program that allows laid-off people to collect unemployment benefits while they start a business. (Regular unemployment insurance requires that a recipient actively search for work.) Wyden says the program, which is optional and used only by a handful of states, is one way to unstack the deck against young people. Adam Lowry, 32, and Michael Richardson, 26, took advantage of the program in Oregon, one state that offers it. In May 2009, the two were laid off from their jobs as software engineers (one of those supposedly safe careers) at a startup in Portland. They both applied for unemployment benefits, but they really wanted to start a company. When they found out about the self-employment program, they submitted the business plan for their company, a mobile services provider for app developers. Over six months (the maximum time allowed) they each received around $10,000. “It was a great solution because we could concentrate on building our business instead of finding contract work,” Lowry said. Today their company, Urban Airship, has 75 employees and has raised millions in venture funding. “We are growing like a weed,” Lowry said, “and the money we got from the SelfEmployment Assistance Program was critical. It paid our rent, food and bills, which were really the main expenses because we bought the computers and server space on credit.” Andrew Yang, another member of Fix Young America, says more college graduates should be steered toward fast-growing companies. He is founder of Venture for America, a nonprofit based in New York that places graduates from top-tier schools at startups in cities like Las Vegas and Cincinnati. “Our goal is to create 100,000 jobs by 2025,” he said. “We think job creation is pretty straightforward: You supply early-stage growth companies in lower-cost cities with talent so they can grow and hire more people, and then you train your best and brightest to become innovators.” Putting it another way, Yang

said, “If you send a Brown University graduate to Goldman Sachs, is that person going to create jobs?” Venture for America says it works only with companies that have demonstrated the ability to create jobs. The companies pay a salary, $32,000 to $38,000 a year, during a twoyear Venture for America fellowship. The first class of Venture for America fellows will graduate in 2014. Ten fellows are being hired by the Downtown Project, a $350 million effort to revitalize downtown Las Vegas. The project is largely financed by Tony Hsieh, CEO of the online shoe company Zappos, which is based in Las Vegas. Shierholz, of the Economic Policy Institute, said that what was really needed was more financial stimulus from the government to create jobs. “That would move the dial on youth unemployment in a speedy fashion.” The two new groups have attracted lawmakers’ attention in this election year. Last month, Gerber, along with other entrepreneurs, spoke in front of the Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship, emphasizing ways to help young veterans and advocating loan forgiveness for young entrepreneurs. Michael Ference, senior policy adviser for Eric Cantor, who is a Republican of Virginia and the House majority leader, later met with Gerber to discuss ways to work with the campaign. McHenry said that he did not agree with all of his fellow contributors to the Fix Young America book, but that the idea of proposing solutions attracted him. “It’s young people with innovative ideas who are going

AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div PE ... 1.16 .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40f .88 1.10f ... .28 .48 .22 .90f .12 .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

15 16 ... 39 13 ... 9 17 25 14 16 8 ... 12 8 24 8 ... 21 18 11

YTD Last Chg %Chg 34.16 25.77 7.55 20.54 73.56 5.35 46.70 47.33 84.60 7.67 21.39 23.15 9.65 27.63 7.89 22.97 5.08 9.54 22.98 14.03 31.16

+.16 -.11 -.15 -.22 -.24 -.37 -.07 +.31 +.72 +.03 -.16 -.36 +.01 +.39 ... +.01 +.02 +.11 +.05 +.10 +.42

-9.0 +.1 +35.8 +2.9 +.3 +22.1 -1.0 +1.7 +1.5 +27.4 -14.7 -10.1 -7.2 +13.9 +2.6 -5.2 -14.5 +18.2 +7.1 +3.5 +20.0

Name

Div PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB rs Weyerhsr

1.44 1.08f 1.78 ... .80f ... 1.68 .12 .58 .75f 1.56 .89f .68 ... .28 .78f .32 .88 ... .60

NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1581.00 $1583.60 $28.858

Both campaigns stress social media as part of their message, for example by asking for solutions on Twitter and their websites. But they are also mobilizing on the ground. Last month, thousands of college students turned out on more than 300 campuses for Fix Young America rallies. They were trying to gain the support not of politicians but of Stephen Colbert, host of “The Colbert Report” on Comedy Central. “He is known as the Oprah of Gen Y,” Gerber said. “He brings attention to major injustices through humor and satire and that’s what resonates with my generation.” (Colbert has not indicated whether he will back the effort.) Although Colbert is a satirist of right-wing politics, Fix Young America itself says it is nonpartisan. “We didn’t want to be held hostage by political rhetoric and agendas,” Gerber said. Like Gerber, Smith said the Campaign for Young America did not want to align itself with either political party, because concerns about youth unemployment cut across party lines. “Both Democrats and Republicans need to listen and respond to the concerns of our generation,” he said.

MEMORIAL

In our effort to provide dental care to children in Deschutes County who can’t afford it, the Kemple Memorial Children’s Dental Clinic wishes to thank the following dentists for their volunteered services in March.

Dentists volunteering in their own offices in March 2012

YTD Last Chg %Chg

23 108.26 +.70 +12.3 16 50.96 -2.57 +2.5 19 46.08 -.35 -3.9 17 5.06 -.17 +11.5 12 39.36 -.09 +5.0 ... 1.70 -.06 -11.0 34 38.64 -.03 +5.7 21 169.48 +.59 +2.8 11 18.97 -.19 -9.8 12 35.81 -1.11 -15.3 28 122.72 -.25 +37.5 12 37.01 +.12 +.7 32 55.01 +.16 +19.6 22 5.05 +.06 +3.7 17 13.08 -.16 +5.6 12 32.21 +.30 +19.1 15 17.88 -.37 +27.8 11 33.31 +.12 +20.9 12 19.73 -.08 +26.5 31 20.07 +.06 +7.5

Dr. Susan Armstrong Dr. Scot Burgess Dr. David Cauble

Dr. David Dunscomb Dr. Greg Everson Dr. Matt Falkenstein Dr. Phillippe Freeman Dr. Rex Gibson Dr. David Gobeille Dr. Ben Grieb Dr. Brad Hester Dr. Dennis Holly Dr. Brad Johnson Dr. Jeff Johnson Dr. Mark Keener Dr. Emine Loxley

431 NW Franklin Ave. Downtown Bend Open Monday-Saturday

keypropertiesbend.com

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more)

At the Kemple Memorial Children’s Dental Clinic, our mission is to improve the health and well-being of children in Deschutes County by facilitating urgent dental services for children (K-12) whose families cannot access basic dental care.

Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

BkofAm JPMorgCh S&P500ETF SPDR Fncl ChesEng

2361364 2036375 1356094 956425 847060

7.55 -.15 36.96 -3.78 135.61 -.41 14.81 -.17 14.81 -2.37

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

GrnwyMd n MonstrWw McDrmInt BeazerH13 Guidewre n

15.54 9.33 11.37 18.22 25.77

Chg %Chg +3.22 +1.49 +1.48 +1.99 +2.63

+26.1 +19.0 +15.0 +12.3 +11.4

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Feihe Intl Kemet Roundys n iP LEEmM Alere

6.72 6.06 10.14 74.68 19.02

Chg %Chg -2.02 -1.46 -2.11 -14.22 -3.28

-23.1 -19.4 -17.2 -16.0 -14.7

Amex

$1595.00 $1595.10 $29.136

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Indexes Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more)

Most Active ($1 or more)

Name

Name

Rentech NovaGld g CheniereEn NwGold g YM Bio g

Vol (00)

Last Chg

54258 1.85 -.08 35179 5.41 +.12 34665 17.40 +.18 26156 8.00 -.43 26051 2.06 +.26

Gainers ($2 or more)

Cisco ArenaPhm PwShs QQQ Microsoft SiriusXM

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

MGTCap rs YM Bio g Accelr8 IncOpR ElephTalk

4.14 2.06 3.80 2.15 2.05

+.53 +14.7 +.26 +14.4 +.42 +12.4 +.12 +5.9 +.11 +5.7

ArenaPhm Orexigen Jinpan Geeknet Intersectns

6.36 3.99 8.62 15.03 12.89

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg +2.70 +.64 +1.15 +1.87 +1.57

+73.8 +19.1 +15.4 +14.2 +13.9

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

AdmRsc SL Ind SED Intl Gastar grs Aurizon g

44.25 -9.39 -17.5 14.23 -2.79 -16.4 3.05 -.46 -13.1 2.14 -.23 -9.7 4.58 -.45 -8.9

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg

735180 16.50 -.31 693660 6.36 +2.70 434365 64.18 -.01 431893 31.16 +.42 351687 2.13 -.05

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Willdan AlliedMot Amtech Synacor n RecovEn rs

2.56 -.80 -23.8 6.25 -1.75 -21.9 5.40 -1.40 -20.6 9.24 -1.70 -15.5 3.00 -.49 -14.0

Diary 1,203 1,818 118 3,139 61 46

Vol (00)

Name

Diary Pvs Day

Dr. Ginny Murtague Dr. Dean Nyquist Dr. Casey O’Neil Dr. Michael Olin Dr. Zack Porter Dr Maurine Porter Dr. Catherine Quas Dr. Daniel Radatti Dr. Steven Rogers Dr. Brian Rosenzweig Dr. Mehdi Salari Dr. Anne Scott Dr. Ken Shirtcliff Dr. Marika Stone Dr. Steven Schwam Dr. Andrew Timm Dr. Jeff Timm Dr. Ryan Timm Dr. Steve Timm Dr. Peter Yonan

Dr. Scott Anderson

Dr. Blake Drew

541-728-0033

Chg %Chg

Diary 172 265 39 476 6 15

wear seat belts than thinner passengers. Unbelted passengers are at risk of injury and can be a mechanism for injury to others, Jehle said. “Force is mass times acceleration, and when someone is heavier and unbelted, there’s that much force that is being applied.” He said both airlines and car companies needed to address the unique challenges of protecting overweight people. “Since a third of the population is obese, we need to be doing some of our crash testing with obese dummies,” he said. Salzar said seat belts should also be tested to insure they could restrain heavier individuals. “You’d be amazed at how the large person blasts through that restraint,” he said. In airplane economy seats, Ozawa said the proximity to other passengers created a higher likelihood that the heavier passenger would become a hazard by colliding into those sitting nearby. The back of the seats may not be strong enough and the spaces between seats wide enough to protect passengers from the impact of heavier passengers behind or beside them, he said. The National Transportation Safety Board did recommend last year that the FAA begin collecting information about the size and weight of people flying in private planes to determine if testing accurately predicted the effectiveness of seat restraints for a range of people from the 5-foot, 110-pound woman to the 6-foot-2, 223-pound man. The safety board’s action was prompted by an accident in which a private pilot’s large belly prevented the inflation of an air-bag-equipped seat belt.

for appointments call 541-382-4900

Market recap

Precious metals Metal

Raising their voices

Dr. Karen Coe

Northwest stocks Name

to reform and restructure our economy,” he said. His chapter deals with crowdfunding, which allows the public to invest in startup companies through the Internet. (Legislation allowing crowdfunding was recently passed.)

G5

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

999 1,454 160 2,613 51 84

52-Week High Low 13,338.66 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 473.97 381.99 8,563.08 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,422.38 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 860.37 601.71

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

12,820.60 5,140.70 472.01 7,815.89 2,328.34 2,933.82 1,353.39 14,217.93 790.06

-34.44 +6.89 +.22 -36.86 -7.09 +.18 -4.60 -40.47 -1.69

-.27 +.13 +.05 -.47 -.30 +.01 -.34 -.28 -.21

+4.94 +2.41 +1.58 +4.53 +2.19 +12.62 +7.62 +7.79 +6.63

+1.79 -4.52 +8.03 -6.64 -.93 +3.72 +1.17 +.22 -5.46

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed yesterday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Friday compared with late Thursday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

305.28 2,184.43 3,129.77 5,575.52 6,579.93 19,964.63 38,890.85 14,045.35 3,548.06 8,953.31 1,917.13 2,883.40 4,342.69 5,567.50

+.77 -.13 -.01 +.57 +.95 -1.30 -.71 +.29 -.59 -.63 -1.43 -.70 -.26 +.37

s t t s s t t s t t t t t s

1.0031 1.6074 1.0001 .002056 .1584 1.2925 .1288 .012516 .073851 .0332 .000872 .1437 1.0759 .0340

1.0099 1.6153 .9989 .002053 .1583 1.2951 .1288 .012515 .074324 .0332 .000877 .1441 1.0783 .0340


G6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

S D  2012 BMW 335I

Beauty of new 3-series is found beneath the skin

By Paul Brand Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

I hate brake dust. I reQ : placed the front pads and rotors about a month ago on my ’98 Saab with Brembo rotors and EBC Red pads, which I have on another Saab and never notice a buildup of dust between washings. On the ’98, I have to wash the front wheels every two or three days after about 50 miles of driving. The amount of dust does not seem to be decreasing with use. Any suggestions? My only suggestion would be to check the finish pattern on the rotors. Some pads seem to like a certain type of finish pattern on a rotor. Check with the pad manufacturer to see if they have a specific recommendation. If you’re a do-it-yourselfer, you could try scuffing the pads with a non-symmetrical finish pattern using a 400-grit sanding disc on your electric drill.

By Mark Phelan Detroit Free Press

The 2012 BMW 335i sport sedan holds the line against the weight gain that detracted from some of the automaker’s recent vehicles. At $54,850 for the loaded car I tested, the 335i’s price tag is awful hefty, though. The 2012 3-series sedan is all new, despite styling that’s evolutionary in the sense that living creatures REVIEW evolve over millennia, with virtually no discernible difference from one generation to the next. Unless you’re a BMW salesman, you may have a hard time recognizing the 2012 335i. Under the skin, the differences are profound and for the good. The new car has more passenger and luggage room, a more powerful base engine and better fuel economy. The 3-series is BMW’s bestselling vehicle. It comes in a wide array of models, but only the sedan is new for 2012. New versions of the coupe, convertible and station wagon are coming, but all BMW will say about timing is not to expect any this year. A hybrid arrives this fall, and an optional all-wheel drive model. It’s unclear whether BMW will continue to offer a diesel. Prices for the 2012 BMW 3series sedan start at $34,900 for a 328i with a 240-horsepower turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine and sixspeed manual or eight-speed automatic transmission. The 2.0-liter base engine is new. It replaces a normally aspirated 3.0-liter straight-six that used more fuel and produced less power. The new 328i is slightly heavier than the 2011 model. The 335i uses a turbocharged version of the 3.0-liter I-6 that produces 300 horsepower and 300 pound-feet of torque. The 2012 335i is lighter and more fuel efficient than the old model. Prices start at $42,400 for a six-speed manual or eight-speed automatic. I tested a very wellequipped $54,850 335i. It had the manual transmission and options that included a navigation system, heads-up display, Harman/Kardon sound, 19-inch alloy wheels and adaptive suspension. The 335i competes with the Acura TL SH-AWD, Audi S4, Cadillac ATS, Infiniti G37, Lexus IS 350 and MercedesBenz C350. The 335i sedan’s base price compares well to all those cars except the ATS, for

Do you have b rake dust bu ildup? Check the p ads

A:

Q:

BMW via McClatchy-Tribune News Service

The 2012 BMW 335i sedan has more passenger and luggage room, a more powerful base engine and better fuel economy.

BMW 335i Base price: $42,400 As tested: $54,850 Type: Rear-wheel drive five-passenger sport sedan Engine: 3.0-liter turbocharged directinjection DOHC variable timing 24-valve straightsix; 300 horsepower at 5,800 rpm; 300 pound-feet of torque at 1,200-5,000 rpm; six-speed manual or eight-speed automatic Mileage: 20 mpg city, 30 mpg highway

which prices have not been announced. The 3-series’ cost rises with dismaying speed as you add options though. The 335i is a delight to drive. It practically leaps to life as the turbocharged straight-six produces 300 pound-feet of torque from just 1,200 rpm. The silky sixspeed manual transmission is virtually effortless. The light clutch makes it easy to work the gears enthusiastically. The suspension holds the 335i firmly planted during hard cornering and absorbs bumps well. The steering is quick and precise. It felt a bit light at 40 to 60 mph, however. Road and wind noise are loud enough to impede conversations. Despite being 3.7 inches longer, 0.2 inch wider, 0.4 inch taller, and having more pas-

senger and luggage space, the 2012 335i weighs a few pounds less than a comparably equipped ’11 model. The 335i I tested rates an excellent EPA combined city/ highway fuel economy rating of 23 mpg. Only the C250 Sport can match that, but the Mercedes only comes with an automatic transmission, and a 335i with BMW’s eight-speed automatic trounces it by 3 mpg. The 3-series has an autostop feature that shuts the engine off when the vehicle sits idling. It worked poorly with the automatic transmission in a 528i sedan I tested recently. It’s a bit better with a manual, but only operates when you shift into neutral and release the clutch. That process masks some of the system’s flaws. It’s also inconvenient enough that I doubt many drivers will use the feature much. Stop-start can be responsible for 3 to 4 percent of a vehicle’s EPA combined rating. BMW’s system needs work. The larger interior increases head and leg room. Big map pockets offer good storage space, but the bin in the center console is small. You’ll be hard put to find a good place for sunglasses, phone and music player. A 6.5-inch color display and BMW’s continually improving iDrive system make it reasonably easy to control the car’s secondary systems.

The interior materials are appealing. A soft and attractive black padded plastic covers the doors and dash. The steering wheel, shifter and seats all had leather, and the trim made restrained use of brightwork. The surfaces of the doors and dash are cast in sweeping, flowing shapes. The light, sleek 335i sedan’s comfort, performance and fuel economy set a high standard that goes a long way toward justifying the car’s high price. A quieter interior and better auto-stop would be welcome though.

I have excessive play in the steering wheel of my 1998 Dodge four-wheeldrive pickup truck with 150,000 miles. The steering gear seems to be the prime suspect because a mechanic said the steering linkage and suspension components are tight. When replacing the unit, how do I make sure the steering wheel stays straight in relation to the wheels? Will marking the steering coupler to its shaft and pitman arm apply to a new unit? With the hood open, watch the pitman arm, the steering gearbox input shaft and steering coupler closely as someone moves the steering wheel back and forth an inch or two. If the play is in the coupler, replace it. Scribe or mark the coupler orienta-

A:

tion with the front wheels straight in order to install it correctly. If the play is in the recirculating ball steering gearbox, it may be possible to adjust the worm gear bearing preload and the front thrust bearing. Chrysler recommends making these adjustments with the steering gearbox removed from the vehicle. Mark or scribe the pitman arm at the sector shaft master spline to reinstall the pitman arm in the correct position. I have a ’55 T-Bird with Q: the 292-cubic-inch engine and four-barrel “teapot” carburetor that is notorious for reliability. I’ve had the carb professionally rebuilt, but the engine won’t start without a shot of ether starting fluid. When it does start, it idles and runs fine. It does not seem to get gas on its own for starting even though it has a new fuel pump. Should I replace the old carb? You could try a one-way check valve in the fuel line between the pump and carb, but the most likely scenario is fuel leaking from the carburetor float bowl while the car sits. Thus, when you try to start it, there’s no fuel in the carb. To determine whether this is the problem, remove the air cleaner, and with the key off, stuff rags or paper towels down the venturis to prevent the screws from falling into the intake manifold and remove the carb top cover to check how much fuel is in the float bowl. If it’s empty, fuel leaking from the expansion plugs in the bottom of the float is the likely culprit.

A:

— Brand is an automotive troubleshooter and former race car driver. Email questions to paulbrand@startribune.com. Include a daytime phone number.


S U N D AY, Y MA AY 1 3 , 2 0 1 2

o S

HE PR H E ’S T

OUD M

OM

HE’S TH E GO OD SO N O

t e e M

BRAVO TV’S

ANDY ANDY COHEN COHEN AND THE REAL HOUSEWIFE WHO STARTED IT ALL: HIS MOM, EVELYN

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


Walter Scott,s

PARADE

THEY CERTAINLY WEREN’T LOOKING FOR ME WHEN THEY FOUND ME. WHEN IT CLICKS, AMERICA WILL KNOW.”

P Justine Carrelli and Bob Clayton in 1959

Q: What happened to my favorite American Bandstand couple, Justine Carrelli and Bob Clayton? —Blanche Keastead, N.J.

A: Though they split

in 1960 after three-plus years of jitterbugging on the Dick Clark–hosted show, they were happy to see each other at the 40th reunion in 1992. “We danced and it was like we had never stopped,” says Clayton, 70, who owns a gift boutique in Delaware (Carrelli, 68, sells real estate in Arizona). They share their memories of the late Clark at Parade.com/bandstand.

PT Taylor l S Swift ift via i IInstagram, t g in a photo shot in Sydney

WALTER SCOTT ASKS …

Ask Walter Scott your questions at personality@ parade.com

Alex Trebek The game show host, 71, will join celebrity contestants in Washington, D.C., for Jeopardy! Power Players Week (May 14–18; check local listings). Who will compete during Power Players Week?

Anderson Cooper, Dr. Mehmet Oz, and Lewis Black, to name a few—people who influence the way we perceive the news. It’s nice to see them in a different light. How would you do as a contestant on the show? Against my peers, I would do very well, but a good 30-year-old would clean my clock any day of the week! Have you thought about retiring? There will come a time, but as long as I’m having fun and not slowing down too much because of age, I’ll continue to do it. Will there ever be another Ken Jennings? That’s a tough one. We’ve had a lot of contestants since he won 74 games in a row. The most since then is 18, I think, so that 74 looms very large.

Q: What is Instagram, and

What would people be surprised to know about you?

why have I been hearing so much about it lately?

I like fixing things. I refer to myself as Mr. Sprinkler Man because I’ve gotten good at repairing those.

—Dayle Brown, Calif.

A: It’s an app (available

on Apple devices and

Letters to Walter Scott can be sent to P.O. Box 5001, Grand Central Station, New York, N.Y. 10163-5001.

P Brad Paisley Easton Corbin

Q: Brad Paisley is known for pulling pranks. Is his summer tour mate Easton Corbin nervous? —Lillian Hudson, Austin, Tex.

A: No, he’s excited because he wants payback for a stunt orchestrated by Paisley, 39, in 2010. “I was onstage singing ‘Roll With It’ and I saw this bread roll whiz by me,” Corbin, 30, says. “Of course, Paisley was the one throwing them. I’ll me. I’m get him this time. prepared!” See the video of Paisley’s prank and find out how to enter for a chance too see Corbin perform at

—Kelly Ripa on the search for Regis Philbin’s replacement on Live! Who should get the gig? Vote at Parade.com/live

the Ram Truck “Road to the Ram Jam” concert at Parade.com/country. Q: Does Kristi Yamaguchi still skate? —Lenny, Hollywood, Calif.

A: “I do for fun some-

times, but nothing serious,” says the 1992 Olympic gold medalist, 40. T These days, her career on the ice in inspires her childre children’s books. Her latest, It’ It s a Big World, Pig!, is set during Little Pig international skatan inter championship. ing cha P Krist Kristi Yamaguchi

PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ABC PHOTO ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES; FRAZER HARRISON/GETTY IMAGES FOR ACM; RICK DIAMOND/GETTY IMAGES FOR BMI; JIM SPELLMAN/WIREIMAGE; MITCHELL LAYTON/GETTY IMAGES. ILLUSTRATION: KIRSTEN ULVE

Android phones) that lets you share photos and transform their look and feel; Facebook bought it last month for $1 billion. Why the hefty price tag? Since its creation in 2010, Instagram has amassed more than 30 million devoted users, including stars like Taylor Swift, who documented her last tour with it.

2 • May 13, 2012

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO SAVE.

Scan to start a quote

ONLY PROGRESSIVE HAS THE NAME YOUR PRICE® TOOL. Give us a budget, and we’ll show you a range of options so you can find something that works for you and your budget. Coverage you can count on at a great price. Now that’s Progressive.

1-800-873-5175

PROGRESSIVE.COM

Progressive Casualty Ins. Co. & its affiliates, Mayfield Village, OH. Name Your Price® is available in most states for new auto quotes. Price and coverage match limited by state law. Amounts entered outside of our range of coverage prices will be shown the closest available coverage package. Auto insurance prices and products are different when purchased directly from Progressive or through independent agents/brokers. 11D00067.PRD (04/12)

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


THE HOUSEWIVES

What to read, see, and do this week

After eight seasons filled with mischief and mayhem, the women of Wisteria Lane are pulling up stakes. The Desperate Housewives finale (Sunday on ABC, 9 p.m. ET) will be “heartfelt and very satisfying,” says Emmy winner Felicity Huffman. “They’re throwing a lot of ingredients into the soup.”

For more, go go to to P Par Pa Parade.com/picks arade.com/picks

SOARING PIANO POP Blur or Oasis? Coldplay or Keane? The debate continues. But on their new album, Strangeland, Keane delivers with “On the Road,” a zippy number with an ’80s vibe, and the upbeat ballad “Day Will Come.”

HERE COMES OMES THE THE JUDGE JUDGE

Look for shock jock Howard Stern to make some noise when he joins America’s Got Talent on May 14 (NBC, NBC, 8 p.m. ET). Says fellow buzzer-pusher uzzer-pusher Howie Mandel, “While Howard is edgy and honest, est, he’s also compassionate and nd emotional. He’s serious about bout finding a star.”

Scan an this with yourr smartphone to see e the show’s most st shocking moments. m

THE WORLD ACCORDING TO IRVING APP OF THE WEEK It’s not just young Picassos who’ve made Draw Something the fastestgrowing mobile app game ever; adults are obsessed. Need proof? Elvis and the Beatles have been turning up as drawing prompts along with Rihanna. (Free; Android, iPhone)

It takes a master storyteller like John Irving to weave challenging topics (gender identity, death) into a novel that is both laughout-loud funny and genuinely moving. In One Person is a warm, richly detailed fictional memoir about a man whose life and loves defy easy stereotypes.

A MOTHER’S DAY TREAT Kids can show Mom the love by whipping up this parfait: Fill the base of a dessert dish with granola; layer with berries and yogurt; top with more granola and her favorite fruit. Serve with a smile! (For more easy Mother’s Day ideas, visit dashrecipes.com.)

PHOTOS: MATTHEW ROLSTON/ABC (DESPERATE HOUSEWIVES); ISTOCKPHOTO (PARFAIT). ILLUSTRATION: ANDRÉ CARRILHO

PA R A D E

BOW OUT

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


7-MINUTE SOLUTION

ORGANIZE YOUR KITCHEN Celebrity chef and author Giada De Laurentiis on arranging your kitchen gear like a pro

hvyq f fmbsh

The CDC now also recommends routine vaccination for boys 11–12 years old.

Boys can be affected by HPV disease too. GARDASIL HELPS PROTECT BOTH YOUR SON AND DAUGHTER.

1

Stash these seven utensils in a container by the stove: a whisk, a slotted spatula, a wooden spoon, a stainless steel spoon, a ladle, kitchen scissors, and a combination pasta spoon-strainer.

2

Divide kitchen drawer items into three groups and store them separately. Flatware and serving pieces go in one drawer (those in heavy rotation should be front and center); often used gadgets in another; and things you seldom touch in a third.

PHOTO: EUGENE GOLOGURSKY/WIREIMAGE

3

Keep knives safe— and sharp—in a block made from eco-friendly bamboo. You should own one for paring, one for serrating, and one for mincing, dicing, and chopping; for the latter duties, a mezzaluna (my personal favorite) fits the bill.

When it comes to human papillomavirus (HPV), females are only half the equation. There are 30 to 40 types of HPV that will affect an estimated 75% to 80% of males and females in their lifetime. For most, HPV clears on its own. But, for others who don’t clear certain types, HPV could cause cervical cancer in females and other types of HPV could cause genital warts in both males and females. And there’s no way to predict who will or won’t clear the virus. GARDASIL is the only HPV vaccine that helps protect against 4 types of HPV. In girls and young women ages 9 to 26, GARDASIL helps protect against 2 types of HPV that cause about 75% of cervical cancer cases, and 2 more types that cause 90% of genital warts cases. In boys and young men ages 9 to 26, GARDASIL helps protect against 90% of genital warts cases. GARDASIL may not fully protect everyone, nor will it protect against diseases caused by other HPV types or against diseases not caused by HPV. GARDASIL does not prevent all types of cervical cancer, so it’s important for women to continue routine cervical cancer screenings. GARDASIL does not treat cervical cancer or genital warts. GARDASIL is given as 3 injections over 6 months.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Anyone who is allergic to the ingredients of GARDASIL, including those severely allergic to yeast, should not receive the vaccine. GARDASIL is not for women who are pregnant. The side effects include pain, swelling, itching, bruising, and redness at the injection site, headache, fever, nausea, dizziness, vomiting, and fainting. Fainting can happen after getting GARDASIL. Sometimes people who faint can fall and hurt themselves. For this reason, your child’s health care professional may ask your child to sit or lie down for 15 minutes after he or she gets GARDASIL. Some people who faint might shake or become stiff. This may require evaluation or treatment by your child’s health care professional. Only a doctor or health care professional can decide if GARDASIL is right for your child. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088. Please read the Patient Information on the next page and discuss it with your child’s doctor or health care professional.

Talk to your child’s doctor about GARDASIL.

4

Group like items together. Small appliances, pots and pans, bakeware, glasses, and so on should each occupy their own cabinet space.

to complete MAKE SURE YOU GET ALL 3 DOSES SO THAT YOU GET THE BEST PROTECTION.

gardasil.com Check out Giada’s exclusive cookware line at Target stores, or visit target.com/giada.

1-800-GARDASIL

Having trouble paying for your Merck medicine? Merck may be able to help. Visit merck.com/merckhelps.

VACC-1019194-0004 03/12

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


USPPI 9883616 Patient Information about ® GARDASIL (pronounced “gard-Ah-sill”) Generic name: [Human Papillomavirus Quadrivalent (Types 6, 11, 16, and 18) Vaccine, Recombinant]

What is GARDASIL? GARDASIL is a vaccine (injection/shot) that is used for girls and women 9 through 26 years of age to help protect against the following diseases caused by Human Papillomavirus (HPV): 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 C 𰃊 ervical cancer 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 V 𰃊 ulvar and vaginal cancers 𰁕 Anal cancer 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 G 𰃊 enital warts 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 P 𰃊 recancerous cervical, vaginal, vulvar, and anal lesions GARDASIL is used for boys and men 9 through 26 years of age to help protect against the following diseases caused by HPV: 𰁕 Anal cancer 𰁕 Genital warts 𰁕 Precancerous anal lesions The diseases listed above have many causes, and GARDASIL only protects against diseases caused by certain kinds of HPV (called Type 6, Type 11, Type 16, and Type 18). Most of the time, these 4 types of HPV are responsible for the diseases listed above. GARDASIL cannot protect you from a disease that is caused by other types of HPV, other viruses, or bacteria. GARDASIL does not treat HPV infection. You cannot get HPV or any of the above diseases from GARDASIL. What important information about GARDASIL should I know? 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 Y 𰃊 ou should continue to get routine cervical cancer screening. 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 G 𰃊 ARDASIL may not fully protect everyone who gets the vaccine. 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 G 𰃊 ARDASIL will not protect against HPV types that you already have. Who should not get GARDASIL? You should not get GARDASIL if you have, or have had: 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 a 𰃊 n allergic reaction after getting a dose of GARDASIL. 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 a 𰃊 severe allergic reaction to yeast, amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate, polysorbate 80. What should I tell my health care provider before getting GARDASIL? Tell your health care provider if you: 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 a 𰃊 re pregnant or planning to get pregnant. GARDASIL is not recommended for use in pregnant women. 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 h 𰃊 ave immune problems, like HIV infection, cancer, or you take medicines that affect your immune system. 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 h 𰃊 ave a fever over 100°F (37.8°C). 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 h 𰃊 ad an allergic reaction to another dose of GARDASIL. 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 t𰃊ake any medicines, even those you can buy over the counter. Your health care provider will help decide if you should get the vaccine.

Can other vaccines and medications be given at the same time as GARDASIL? GARDASIL can be given at the same time as RECOMBIVAX HB®1 [hepatitis B vaccine (recombinant)] or Menactra [Meningococcal (Groups A, C, Y and W-135) Polysaccharide Diphtheria Toxoid Conjugate Vaccine] and Adacel [Tetanus Toxoid, Reduced Diphtheria Toxoid and Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Adsorbed (Tdap)]. What are the possible side effects of GARDASIL? The most common side effects with GARDASIL are: 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 p 𰃊 ain, swelling, itching, bruising, and redness at the injection site 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 h 𰃊 eadache 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 f𰃊 ever 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 n 𰃊 ausea 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 d 𰃊 izziness 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 v 𰃊 omiting 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 f𰃊 ainting There was no increase in side effects when GARDASIL was given at the same time as RECOMBIVAX HB [hepatitis B vaccine (recombinant)]. There was more injection-site swelling at the injection site for GARDASIL when GARDASIL was given at the same time as Menactra [Meningococcal (Groups A, C, Y and W-135) Polysaccharide Diphtheria Toxoid Conjugate Vaccine] and Adacel [Tetanus Toxoid, Reduced Diphtheria Toxoid and Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Adsorbed (Tdap)]. Tell your health care provider if you have any of the following problems because these may be signs of an allergic reaction: 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 d 𰃊 ifficulty breathing 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 w 𰃊 heezing (bronchospasm) 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 h 𰃊 ives 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 r𰃊 ash Tell your health care provider if you have: 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 s𰃊 wollen glands (neck, armpit, or groin) 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 j𰃊oint pain 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 u 𰃊 nusual tiredness, weakness, or confusion 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 c𰃊 hills 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 g 𰃊 enerally feeling unwell 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 l𰃊eg pain 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 s𰃊 hortness of breath 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 c𰃊 hest pain 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 a 𰃊 ching muscles 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 m 𰃊 uscle weakness 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 s𰃊 eizure 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 b 𰃊 ad stomach ache 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 b 𰃊 leeding or bruising more easily than normal 𰁕 skin infection Contact your health care provider right away if you get any symptoms that concern you, even several months after getting the vaccine.

Ask Marilyn By Marilyn vos Savant I often park my car in the sun. When I get back inside, it feels warmer than the outside temperature. Why is that? —Gary McConkey, Knightdale, N.C.

This is a good example of the “greenhouse effect,” which is essential to life on Earth. Without it, our planet wouldn’t be warm enough for living things to survive. In the case of a car, the sun’s rays enter through the window glass. Some of the heat is absorbed by interior components, such as the dashboard, seats, and carpeting. But the heat they radiate is a different wavelength from the rays of the sun that got through the glass, and it doesn’t let as much of the rays pass back out. As a result, more energy goes into the car than goes out, and the inside temperature increases.

How is GARDASIL given? GARDASIL is a shot that is usually given in the arm muscle. You will need 3 shots given on the following schedule: 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 D 𰃊 ose 1: at a date you and your health care provider choose. 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 D 𰃊 ose 2: 2 months after Dose 1. 𰃊 𰁕𰃊 D 𰃊 ose 3: 6 months after Dose 1.

For a more complete list of side effects, ask your health care provider.

Fainting can happen after getting GARDASIL. Sometimes people who faint can fall and hurt themselves. For this reason, your health care provider may ask you to sit or lie down for 15 minutes after you get GARDASIL. Some people who faint might shake or become stiff. This may require evaluation or treatment by your health care provider.

This leaflet is a summary of information about GARDASIL. If you would like more information, please talk to your health care provider or visit www.gardasil.com.

75

Manufactured and Distributed by: Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc. Whitehouse Station, NJ 08889, USA

73

13

Make sure that you get all 3 doses on time so that you get the best protection. If you miss a dose, talk to your health care provider.

Issued April 2011

63

19

59

25

1

What are the ingredients in GARDASIL? The ingredients are proteins of HPV Types 6, 11, 16, and 18, amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate, yeast protein, sodium chloride, L-histidine, polysorbate 80, sodium borate, and water for injection.

Registered trademark of Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc. Copyright © 2006, 2009 Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc. All rights reserved

VACC-1019194-0004 03/12

®

Numbrix

Complete 1 to 81 so the numbers follow a horizontal or vertical path—no diagonals.

55

79

53

81

49

7

33

11

27

ILLUSTRATION: GRAFILU

Read this information with care before getting GARDASIL.1 You (the person getting GARDASIL) will need 3 doses of the vaccine. It is important to read this leaflet when you get each dose. This leaflet does not take the place of talking with your health care provider about GARDASIL.

6 • May 13, 2012

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


25 to Lim 00 th it re e f ed sp ir on st de nt s

Spectacular Treasure from Mount St. Helens

The Beauty in the Beast F

or almost a hundred years it lay dormant. Silently building strength. At 10,000 feet high, it was truly a sleeping giant, a vision of peaceful power. Until everything changed in one cataclysmic moment. On May 18, 1980, the once-slumbering beast awoke with violent force and revealed its greatest secret.

It was one of nature’s most impressive displays of power. Mount St. Helens erupted, sending a column of ash and smoke 80,000 feet into the atmosphere. From that chaos, something beautiful emerged… our spectacular Helenite Necklace. Produced from the heated volcanic rock dust of Mount St. Helens, this brilliant green creation has captured the attention of jewelry designers worldwide. Today you can wear this 6½-carat stunner for the exclusive price of only $129! Your satisfaction is guaranteed. Our Helenite Necklace puts the gorgeous green stone center stage, with a faceted pear-cut set in gold-layered .925 sterling silver. The explosive origins of the stone are echoed in the flashes of light that radiate as the piece swings gracefully from its 18" gold-plated sterling silver chain. Today the volcano sits quiet, but this unique piece of natural history continues to erupt with gorgeous green fire.

Add the 3-carat earrings!

Your satisfaction is guaranteed. Bring home the Helenite Necklace and see for yourself. If you are not completely blown away by the rare beauty of this exceptional stone, simply return the necklace within 30 days for a full refund of your purchase price.

Helenite Necklace (6 ½ ctw)—$249 $129 Helenite Earrings (3 ctw)—$249 $129 Helenite Set (necklace & earrings)—$498 $199 Save $299

Stauer has a Better Business Bureau Rating of A+

“When it comes to color and sparkle, this gorgeous green stone gives the world’s finest emeralds a run for their money!”

Call now to take advantage of this extremely limited offer.

1-800-859-1979 Promotional Code HEL208-01

JEWELRY SPECS: - 6 ½ ctw Helenite in gold over sterling silver setting - 18" gold-fused chain

– James Fent Certified Gem Guru

Please mention this code when you call.

Stauer

®

14101 Southcross Drive W., Dept. HEL208-01, Burnsville, Minnesota 55337 www.stauer.com

Smart Luxuries—Surprising Prices ©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


O “I read his

PHOTO CREDITS WILL GO HERE AS SHOWN

blogs, his tweets, his Facebook,” says Evelyn Cohen of her son, Andy. “I’m very happy for social media because I can follow him without butting into his life— although I do.”

00 • Month 00, 2012

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


SAVE 40% *

on our Sleep Number SILVER EDITION BED ®

MEMORIAL DAY

SALE

UP TO

24-MONTH

on all Sleep Number® beds

ALL NEW

699

$

99

Sleep Number c2 Queen Mattress ®

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


SAVE 40% *

on our Sleep Number SILVER EDITION BED ®

What Makes Sleep Number So Different?

Celebrating 25

It started with a simple idea: indiv then, SLEEP NUMBER has improved love with their sleep again. And, bes

To celebrate our commitment to qu we’ve developed a Sleep Number® incredible value.

The Sleep Number® store. A place that changes lives every day and the only place you’ll find the SLEEP NUMBER® collection. Our beds and bedding let you personalize your comfort every night. So you feel your best every day.

The Sleep Number bed’s exclusive DualAir™ technology lets ets you… ® • Find your ideal firmness—your SLEEP NUMBER setting • Adjust each side, making it the perfect bed for couples • Wake up refreshed and rejuvenated, ready to face the day ®

ALL NE

699

$

Sleep Num c2 Queen M

(not show

HURRY! MEMORIAL DAY SALE ENDS JUNE 3

VISIT A SLEEP NU ©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


SAVE 40% *

on our Sleep Number SILVER EDITION BED ®

5 Years of Better Sleep

LIMITED TIME ONLY!

vidualized comfort for a better night’s sleep. Since d over 7 million lives. Our customers have fallen in st of all, couples are sleeping happily together.

SAVE

uality, innovation and comfort that’s unique to you, Silver Edition bed. Available for a limited time at an

on our Sleep Number

®

SILVER EDITION BED

SLEEP NUMBER® SILVER EDITION BED This unique Sleep Number bed offers generous layers of breathable comfort material along with antimicrobial protection for more deep, restorative sleep. Sleep Number® DualAir™ technology allows you to adjust the firmness on each side so it’s perfect for both of you. Scan this QR code to learn more

NEW

9

99

mber Mattress

wn)

40% *

®

SAVE $

300

Queen or King Sleep Number® p5 bed set

SAVE $

400

Queen or King Sleep Number® m7 bed set

UP TO

24-MONTH

FINANCING

PLUS

®

on all Sleep Number beds HURRY! LIMITED TIME ONLY

UMBER® STORE • CALL 1-800 SLEEP NUMBER (753-3768) • CLICK sleepnumber.com ©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


SAVE 40% *

on our Sleep Number SILVER EDITION BED ®

SAVE

25% ‡

on selected Sleep Number ®

BEDDING COLLECTION

ITEMS

Our SLEEP NUMBER® Bedding Collection offers innovative solutions designed to improve your sleep.

• PILLOWFIT® • TEMPERATURE BALANCING • NATURAL ALLERGY DEFENSE • ALL NATURAL • WARMING

sleep number

®

Bedding Collection

Visit a Sleep Number store. A place that changes lives every day. ®

See and feel how the SLEEP NUMBER® bed conforms to your body with IndividualFitSM, our exclusive 3-D imaging technology.

FIND YOUR SLEEP NUMBER® only at one of our 400 Sleep Number stores nationwide ®

HURRY! SALE ENDS JUNE 3

1-800 SLEEP NUMBER (753-3768) connect with us on Facebook and Twitter T

Facebook.com/SleepNumber

Beds.com/Twitter T

sleepnumber.com

This promotion is not valid with other discounts, offers or on previous purchases. Restrictions may apply. Prices subject to change without notice. Offers valid 5/11/12 – 6/3/12. Picture may represent features and options available at additional cost. Not all bed models are displayed in all stores. Beds not available for in-store pickup. Additional shipping and delivery fees apply unless otherwise stated.*No returns will be accepted on Sleep Number® Silver Edition beds. If, within 45 days of delivery, you are not satisfied, you are eligible for a one-time exchange to another Sleep Number® bed. You must contact customer service to authorize this exchange. You will be responsible for any price difference as well as shipping costs. †Financing valid 5/11/12 - 6/3/12 with your Sleep Number® Credit Card. Subject to credit approval. 6-month financing applies to purchases up to $1999.99. 18-month financing applies to purchases of $2000-$3199.99. 24-month financing applies to purchases of $3200 and up. See store for details. ‡Excludes mattress pads and clearance items. ©2012 Select Comfort

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


T MOTHER AND CHILD REUNION

BRAVO TV STAR ANDY COHEN SHARES A NIGHT ON THE TOWN WITH HIS BIGGEST FAN— HIS MOM BY LEAH ROZEN

o understand where Bravo TV executive and talk show host Andy Cohen gets his prodigious energy and gift for gab, one need only meet his mom. Evelyn Cohen, 75, silver-haired and diminutive, proves that big personalities can come in small packages. On this spring day, mother and son are having dinner at one of the Palm steak houses in Manhattan. Evelyn arrived in the afternoon from Clayton, Mo., the St. Louis suburb where 43-year-old Andy and his older sister, Emily, were raised (and which he fondly refers to as “Pleasantville”). They are dining on separate orders of filet mignon, Andy having announced preemptively, “I don’t want to split with you; I want a whole one for myself.” Cohen’s appetite is well earned. He has already finished up work at his day job, as executive vice president for development and talent at Bravo, and had a session with his trainer. Next he will head to his second gig, as host of Watch What Happens Live, a half-hour, five-night-a-week celebrity chatfest that airs live on Bravo at 11 p.m. on the East Coast. Evelyn is coming along to watch him work. “She texts me a review of my show every night,” says Andy, holding up his iPhone as proof. “She’ll say, ‘Fantastic.’ ‘You seem drunk.’ ‘Funny one.’” C OV E R AND OPE NI NG PHO TO GRAPHS BY M IC H AE L E DWARDS | May 13, 2012 • 9

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


today. “He had gotten to a place where he was about to burst,” says Baten, now a psychologist in Manhattan. “He felt comfortable enough with me to take that step, and it was a positive experience.” Positive enough that not long after, he told his parents. Although supportive, they needed time to adjust. “I cried for six months,” Evelyn says, explaining that back then she knew almost no other gay people; she also worried about AIDS and thought that Andy would have career trouble. Then a neighbor told her, “Andy is Andy. He’s still the same today as he was yesterday.” Realizing that was true, Evelyn, who had always been involved in community and volunteer work, turned activist: She helped establish Doorways, an interfaith organization in St. Louis that provides housing for individuals affected by HIV/AIDS. “That really speaks volumes as to who she is,” says Andy. “I love her for it.” Upon graduating in 1990, Cohen was hired as a news clerk at CBS This Morning. DistinThe surest sign that Cohen has arrived came guishing himself with his enthusiasm, he rose last month when he and his talk show were quickly. “It was a great place for him to learn how parodied on Saturday Night Live. SNL cast TV works and what works on TV. Every cell in member Taran Killam lampooned Cohen as self- his brain was geared to learning that,” says his adoring and obsessed with the trivial. “Look, I’m friend Harry Smith, who was an anchor on the wearing floaties,” the faux Cohen announced, program. “I told him once, ‘You’re gonna end up waving colorful blow-up water wings on his arms. with your own show.’ ” Cohen says he regards being satirized as an Cohen booked celebrity guests (Oprah honor. “It was funny; I revere SNL,” he says. (For Winfrey, Susan Lucci, Joey Buttafuoco) and the record, he has never worn floaties.) Mom is crisscrossed the country producing hard and markedly less pleased. “It hurt my feelings as a soft news stories. “He had good story ideas and mother,” says Evelyn. “Lou [husband Lou Cohen] was passionate about selling them,” recalls Paula and I turned it off. Andy is nothing Zahn, then co-anchor with Smith. like that. He isn’t an egotist.” After a decade at CBS, Cohen Cohen grew up in Clayton glued became a programming executive at Chat With Andy Cohen! to All My Children (a passion his the start-up cable channel Trio. “It He’ll dish mother came to share), Battle of the was like cable boot camp,” he says. with fans about the Network Stars, and CHiPs (he had an His next job was programming and Housewives and early crush on Erik Estrada). “He’s more at Facebook.com development at Bravo, where he also /parademag today, always been about TV,” says his sisbegan blogging and conducting interSunday, May 13, at 2 p.m. ET. Join him! ter, Emily Rosenfeld. Young Andy views on the network’s website. At used to yak for hours into a hairbrush, the suggestion of his bosses, Lauren pretending it was a microphone. “He never shut Zalaznick and Frances Berwick, Cohen served up,” Evelyn says. During high school, Cohen had as host of the second Real Housewives reunion internships at St. Louis TV and radio stations; show (Orange County, 2007), and his career as he then majored in communications at Boston a TV star was born. (This despite the fact that University and landed a summer internship at one of his eyes wanders a bit—something a CBS CBS News in New York. producer once warned him could keep him off It was during college that Cohen began telling the air. Cohen says he consulted an eye surgeon a good friends that he was gay. One of the first was couple of years ago who said the problem wasn’t Amanda Baten, with whom he remains close serious enough to warrant correction.) o Left, Cohen at

about age 4 with mom Evelyn, dad Lou, and sister Emily. Below, with the cast of The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills. “I love sociology and human behavior,” Cohen says, “and that’s why I love the Housewives. Watching them is like guilt-free gossiping.”

PHOTOS, THIS PAGE, FROM TOP: COURTESY OF THE COHEN FAMILY; COURTESY OF NBC/UNIVERSAL. COVER AND OPENING PHOTOS: SHOT ON LOCATION AT THE PALM, WEST 50TH STREET, N.Y.C.; STYLING, MONICA COTTO; HAIR AND MAKEUP, MAYA MICHELLE SHAPIRO/AMAZING COSMETICS

Evelyn chortles. “ ‘Too dirty,’ ” she chimes in. “ ‘Not our demographic.’ ‘Get some sleep.’ ‘Didn’t laugh once,’ ” Andy continues. “I feel a need before I go to bed to text him,” Evelyn explains. “I like it,” says Andy. “And my staff now asks, ‘What did your mom say?’ ” Evelyn may be critical of individual episodes of her son’s show, but she’s his biggest supporter. “Andy was a magnetic personality from the time he was a little boy,” she says. “He brings this energy with him and makes people happy.” The rest of the country is only now catching up with Evelyn in fully appreciating her beaming baby boy. After a career spent behind the scenes as a TV news producer and programming executive (overseeing Top Chef and the Real Housewives franchise, among other popular Bravo reality shows), Cohen has in recent years become a recognizable face himself, as the host— or, more accurately, referee—of the Housewives reunions as well as Watch What Happens Live. The freewheeling gabathon that is Live broadcasts from a tiny, bric-a-brac-filled studio that Cohen has dubbed the Clubhouse. Typically, it features an actor or singer promoting a project and a second guest who’s often a Bravo personality (a.k.a. a Bravolebrity). Liam Neeson, Anderson Cooper, and Sarah Jessica Parker, all friends of Cohen’s, have sat in Live’s swivel chairs, as have Housewives NeNe, LuAnn, Teresa, and many others. Part of Live’s shtick is that Cohen and his guests imbibe freely, and there’s an on-set bartender. “Anyone else need a refill on their Fresquila?” Cohen will ask, waving his tumbler of Fresca and tequila. (He also quaffs Maker’s Mark bourbon mixed with ginger ale on the air.) Then he’ll urge viewers to tweet him, contact him via Facebook, dial in with questions, post to Live’s website, and otherwise interact with the show. This month, Cohen also published a breezy memoir, Most Talkative: Stories From the Front Lines of Pop Culture. Mixed in with the boldface names are warm family tales and reminiscences of growing up Jewish, gay, and televisionobsessed in the Midwest. Why a book now? “I’ve been working in TV for 22 years, so I don’t want anyone to think that I just showed up and all this happened,” he says of his newfound fame. “Besides, I had good stories and I love to write. I just needed a deadline.” 10 • May 13, 2012

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


COVER CLOTHING, ANDY COHEN: SUIT, SHIRT, AND TIE, RALPH LAUREN BLACK LABEL. EVELYN COHEN: JACKET AND PANTS, PIAZZA SEMPIONE FROM BERGDORF GOODMAN; TANK, EILEEN FISHER. INSIDE, ANDY COHEN: SUIT, RALPH LAUREN BLACK LABEL; SHIRT, SEIZE SUR VINGT; TIE, LANVIN FROM BERGDORF GOODMAN. EVELYN COHEN: BLOUSE, RALPH LAUREN FROM BERGDORF GOODMAN; SCARF, EILEEN FISHER

All trademarks are owned by Société des Produits Nestlé S.A., Vevey, Switzerland.

See video from the cover shoot and hear more from Evelyn (give this woman her own show!) at Parade.com/cohens

Since Live expanded to five nights, Cohen has cut back some on his executive responsibilities at Bravo, though he still goes into his office—a corner perch on Rockefeller Center’s 46th floor, where he keeps a mini refrigerator stocked with Diet Cokes—three days a week and watches rough cuts of shows. What’s missing from Cohen’s life is a significant other. “I would like a boyfriend,” he says. “I’m a very happy person and it is the final, final piece of the puzzle. I’m looking for that shout-itout-from-the-mountaintops, fall-in-love person.” Evelyn worries that he’s too busy to meet Mr. Right. “Is life passing him by because he’s working so hard?” she asks at dinner. “Maybe I just haven’t met the right person,” Andy tells her. After dinner, they head to the Live studio. Evelyn sits in while Andy goes over the lineup— singer Monica and actor John Benjamin Hickey (The Big C) are the guests—then takes a seat in the Clubhouse as Andy runs through his lines. She objects to off-color dialogue in a Big C clip that he plans to show. “Too dirty,” she winces (a frequent reaction). Once the show starts, Evelyn laughs at her son’s jokes and kibitzes with him and the crew during commercial breaks. When Live finishes, Andy walks over and holds his cell phone aloft. “ ‘Good show,’ ” he says, reading his mother’s texted review. “It was,” she says, beaming. “So good I sent that text before the show was even over.”

With creamy garlic and marinara sauces, it’s twice the dipping and none of the tipping.

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


Views

By Lynn Sherr

PERFECT STROKES

Why I Swim

The author on her four-mile crossing of the Dardanelles.

strokes of my own: right arm, left arm, roll, breathe. All this, halfway around the world, submerged in the Hellespont (known today as the Dardanelles), the storied channel separating Europe from Asia in western Turkey. Geographically, I’m moving from one continent to the other, a passage more sensibly traveled by boat or plane. Historically, I’m swimming an iconic waterway crossed by heroes from the mythical Leander to the Romantic poet Lord Byron. I’m seeking adventure and have dusted off my college Greek to revisit the cradle of antiquity. But I am also testing my body. Officially, I’m in a race with more than 400 other international adventurers. Before the start, the mood is cheerful but edgy: scary sea; distant shore. The ships in this busy channel have been stopped for only 90 minutes. Marlin, the clown fish, grows That’s our window. Miss the time grumpy, Dory grabs his fin and and you get fished out; misjudge wriggles onward after singing, the currents and you get swept far “When life gets you down, you out into the Aegean. know what you’ve My goal? Just gotta do? Just keep make it across. I’ve swimming, swim- “SWIMMING IS chosen this event AN OBSESSION, carefully: tough ming, swimming.” BENIGN BUT Which is exactly enough to push me OBSTINATE.” what I’m doing on to my limits, reathis brilliant sumsonable enough for mer day. The sea me to think I might surrounds me, a warm expanse make it. I’ve been training of regal blue with gentle hard for more than a year. waves barely stippling the But unlike most of my surface. The calm is debuff competitors, I’m a ceptive. I am trying to grandmother approaching cut through a relentless 70. Am I nuts? Can I, too, crosscurrent with firm swim the Hellespont?

S

wimming is my sal-

vation. Ask me in the middle of winter, or at the end of a grueling day, where I’d most like to be, and the answer is always the same: in the water, gliding weightless, slicing a silent trail through whatever patch of blue I can find. Tell me, as the medical world does from time to time, to think of something pleasant and count backward, and I’m back in the drink, enveloped by an ocean, a lake, or a turquoise box, carving long and languorous laps that lull me into serenity. At one level, it’s purely sensual: the silky feeling of liquid on skin; the chance to float free, as close to flying as I’ll ever get; the opportunity to reach, if not for the stars, then at least for the starfish. Swimming stretches my body beyond its earthly limits. But it’s also an inward journey, a time of quiet contemplation. I find myself at peace, able to flex my mind and imagine new possibilities without the startling interruptions of modern life. The silence is stunning. Have I mentioned that I’m a Pisces? Swimming is, in short, an obsession, benign but obstinate. But unlike most addictions, it’s good for us. Water heals every ache, soothes every muscle. It’s also the world’s cheapest antidepressant, and the second-best way I know to fall asleep. And I’m not alone. When a recent poll

asked Americans which sport they’d like to participate in, nearly every age group listed swimming for fitness either first or second. Swimmer after swimmer tells me it restores their sanity and provides an escape—from the world, from their kids, from themselves. Life lessons from swimming permeate our society’s foundations, in everything from the Bible to rock music. It has made a splash through the centuries, from the underwater athletics of ancient Assyrian warriors to the aquatic extravaganzas of Hollywood’s Esther Williams. And then there’s the bighearted blue fish named Dory in Finding Nemo. When

PHOTOS: SHARON YOUNG

The water stretches my body beyond its limits—and flexes my mind, too

12 • May 13, 2012

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


Cartoon ®

Parade

“I love you.”

“You’re nobody in these parts until they’ve done a PBS special on you.”

DON’T WAIT TILL SUNDAY! Get Connie Schultz’s thoughts on graduation, and the best stories from our Parade of Papers every day, at Parade.com.

Play free brain games Parade.com/games

Like us on Facebook Facebook.com/parademag

Follow us on Twitter Twitter.com/ParadeMagazine EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

FROM TOP: DAVID SIPRESS; DONNA BARSTOW

EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


At first, it’s easy—I slip through the glittering water like a mermaid. But soon I feel more like a ship without radar. No lines to guide me, no walls to push off. Nothing to thwart the occasional jellyfish but a quick retreat. Yuck! I stroke on, willing my legs to keep kicking, my arms to propel me. And suddenly, I’m within reach. After more than an hour, the deadline is closing in, but so is the finish line. Just keep swimming, I tell myself, channeling Dory. My last hundred yards are fierce, as I fight a strong current that makes the trees on the shore stand still. “You made it, Lynn!” shouts one of the coaches, cheering me into the dock. Moments later, I actually do, leaping out in one hour, 24 minutes. I flip off my goggles, shake out my wet hair, and lift my arms in perfect Olympic form. I have, improbably, also won my age group. The medal decorates my neck all day. That was last summer, and I can still feel the glow. Still smile with pride. I did it! Waded into the water in Europe and waded out in Asia. Swam the Hellespont—four miles, a personal record. Discovered my own inner strength. Remembered what I’ve known since I first slipped into the water as a toddler: Swimming is magical. It can change your life. Lynn Sherr, an award-winning correspondent for ABC News for more than 30 years, is the author of the new book Swim: Why We Love the Water. Follow her on Twitter (@LynnSherr) or Facebook (facebook.com/swimthebook).

Sunday with ... he Round Mound of Rebound. Boy Gorge. The Leaning Tower of Pizza. From his playing days at Auburn through his 16 seasons in the NBA, Charles Barkley, 49, racked up a lot of nicknames inspired by his girth. But the Hall of Famer takes it all in stride—especially now that he’s a Weight Watchers pitchman and has dropped nearly 60 pounds. Currently weighing in at 292, he tells Kate Meyers he’s hoping to trim 20 more pounds from his 6-foot-5 frame. Meanwhile, Barkley shares his opinionated observations about the sport he loves on TNT’s Inside the NBA.

I’VE ALWAYS HAD GREAT PRIDE AND SELF-ESTEEM. I JUST FEEL BETTER BEING HEALTHY.”

T

PARADE What made

you take losing weight seriously? I’d gained, like, 100 pounds since I retired, and that wasn’t good. You donned a dress for your Weight Watchers ad about “Man Food.” Whose idea was that? It was mine. I thought their commercials were a little intense and I wanted to have more fun. I’ve dressed like a woman on Saturday Night Live, so it doesn’t bother me at all. My message is about health.

DR. OZ’S rmation Transformation Nation: Million Dollarr You

I read somewhere that you’re a Republican; true? No, I said I was rich like a Republican.

Are you a fan of President Obama? I am. I’m going to campaign with him again.

Charles Barkley The basketball great on weight loss, life lessons, and walking in high heels

What was the best advice you ever got? It was from [NBA star] Grant Hill’s mom. She said don’t have a bunch of freeloaders on your payroll and don’t start giving family and friends money. There’s a reason that around 70 percent of athletes go broke. Have you ever found your golf swing? No, I have not.

And the heels, Charles? I think women are the most talented people in the world. I walked a little bit in heels and almost killed myself. Do you do anything special on Sundays? Not really. Every day is pretty much a day of rest for me. I just try to enjoy and be thankful. You’re a self-described neat freak; where does that come from? When I was a kid, my mom was a maid, and I had to take care of my

brothers. My mom didn’t want to come home and clean, so I ended up doing all the cleaning.

Are you still trying? I love golf. Just smoking me a couple of stogies and drinking me some beer while I’m playing— that’s a perfect day.

What’s the most important thing you learned from your mom? You spend a lot of time Growing up with her and meeting your fans. my grandmother in It’s a privilege when peoAlabama, where there’s ple want to say hello to a lot of racial tension, me. I’ve had an amazing [I was taught] not to life. I got paid to play basget caught up in it. ketball; now There’s no I’m getting white or See the star’s paid to watch black, just hilarious Weight it. I should judge everyWatchers ad at always be in a one on their Parade.com/barkley good mood! own merits.

Be sure to stay hydrated as the weather warms up. Carry a reusable water bottle, adding flavor to your H2O with slices of lemon, lime, or strawberry. Eat water-rich fruit like watermelon or cantaloupe; for a snack, try a 100 percent fruit juice popsicle. For video tips from Dr. Oz, go to Parade.com/oz. SMART MOVE OF THE WEEK

PHOTOS, FROM TOP: WEIGHT WATCHERS; SONY PICTURES TELEVISION

Why I Swim | from page 12

14 • May 13, 2012

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


Event Dates: Sunday, May 13 – Saturday, May 19, 2012.

Save even more on

outdoor supplies in our Garden Center.

9

77

Black Flag® Flying Insect Trap t 5SBQTGMJFT XBTQT  BOEZFMMPXKBDLFUT -VSFTTPMETFQBSBUFMZ

284

$

Brute® 22" Self-Propelled Lawn Mower with Briggs & Stratton® 675ex Series Engine t .VMDI TJEFEJTDIBSHF  PSSFBSCBH t 7BSJBCMFTQFFE GSPOUXIFFMESJWF

482 each

Black Flag® Wasp & Yellow Jacket or Fly Lure t -VSFMBTUTVQUPĊNPOUI t ċDU

8"-."354"%7&35*4&%.&3$)"/%*4&10-*$:o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i30--#"$,w NFBOT UIBU UIF BEWFSUJTFE QSJDF JT FWFO MPXFS  UIBO UIF QSFWJPVTMZPGGFSFE&WFSZ%BZ-PX1SJDF*OBMMDBTFT XFSFTFSWFUIFSJHIUUPMJNJU RVBOUJUJFTUPOPSNBMSFUBJMQVSDIBTFTPSPOFQFSDVTUPNFSPSIPVTFIPME BOEUPFYDMVEF  EFBMFST0VSBEWFSUJTJOHDJSDVMBSNBZWBSZCZHFPHSBQIJDSFHJPO BOEBOZQBSUJDVMBSSFHJPOBMDJSDVMBSXJMMBQQMZPOMZUPTUPSFTJOUIBU SFHJPO0GGFSTBOEMJNJUBUJPOTWPJEXIFSFQSPIJCJUFECZMBX8FBQPMPHJ[FGPS CVUXJMMOPUCFCPVOECZ BOZFSSPSTJOPVSBEWFSUJTFNFOUT 5IJTBEWFSUJTFENFSDIBOEJTFQPMJDZEPFTOPUBQQMZUPPVS1SFTDSJQUJPO1SPHSBNª8BM.BSU4UPSFT *OD #FOUPOWJMMF "31SJOUFEJOUIF64" 1SJDFTBOEJUFNTBWBJMBCMFPOMZJOUIF64" NBZWBSZJO"MBTLB )BXBJJ 0LMBIPNB 8JTDPOTJO 1VFSUP3JDP PSPOMJOFBU8BMNBSUDPN4. 'PSUIFTUPSF MPDBUJPOOFBSFTUZPV QMFBTFDBMMPSDIFDLPOMJOFBU8BMNBSUDPN5IFiTQBSLwEFTJHO 8BMNBSU BOE4BWFNPOFZ-JWFCFUUFSBSFNBSLT BOEPSSFHJTUFSFENBSLTPG8BM.BSU4UPSFT *OD

Event Dates: Sunday, May 13 – Saturday, May 19, 2012. 1SJDFTBOEJUFNTBWBJMBCMFPOMZJOUIF64" NBZWBSZJO"MBTLB )BXBJJ 0LMBIPNB 8JTDPO TJO 1VFSUP3JDP PSPOMJOFBU8BMNBSUDPN 'PSUIFTUPSFMPDBUJPOOFBSFTUZPV QMFBTFDBMMPSDIFDLPOMJOFBU8BMNBSUDPN5IFiTQBSLw EFTJHO 8BMNBSU BOE4BWFNPOFZ-JWFCFUUFSBSFNBSLTBOEPSSFHJTUFSFENBSLTPG8BM.BSU4UPSFT *OD SM

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


WAVE® MUSIC SYSTEM III

More enjoyment. How did we improve the most highly acclaimed music system in its class? We added even more ease and convenience to its awardwinning sound. New features. The new Wave® music system III now has a digital FM/AM tuner with improved radio reception that also shows artist and station information as you listen. New touch-top controls let you operate basic functions with a simple touch. And in response to feedback from our customers, it now has dual alarms. So you can set two different wake-up times and gently wake up to the music of your choice. Music. As it was meant to be heard. The Wave® music system III reproduces music with the most accuracy we’ve ever produced in a system this small. Hear details you never noticed before. Even in songs you know by heart. Feel low notes come through with fullness and power. Exclusive Bose® waveguide speaker technology is what allows this small system to outperform many larger, more expensive systems.

Music from your iPod,® iPhone,® computer or tablet. In addition to radio and CDs, available accessories let you listen to music from other sources such as an iPod or iPhone, or wirelessly from a tablet or computer. And the compact Wave® music system III fits neatly just about anywhere. So you can enjoy all kinds of music – in all kinds of places. Hear it for yourself, risk-free. We believe the best way for you to appreciate the new Wave® music system III is to experience it in your own home. So call by June 30, 2012, to take advantage of our special, limited-time Audition offer. Hear the Wave® music system III for 90 days, risk-free. And be sure to ask how you can make 12 easy payments, with no interest charges from Bose.* Why wait any longer? Hear for yourself why Bose is the most respected name in sound.

THE BOSE 90-DAY, RISK-FREE AUDITION. FREE shipping to your home.

90 DAYS

to try it, with no obligation.

Not delighted? FREE return shipping.

Hear the sound and make up your own mind. But please act soon – this offer ends June 30, 2012. TO ORDER OR LEARN MORE:

1-800-787-2073, ext. TX792 www.Bose.com/TX792

*Bose payment plan available on orders of $299-$1500 paid by major credit card. Separate financing offers may be available for select products. See website for details. Down payment is 1/12 the product price plus applicable tax and shipping charges, charged when your order is shipped. Then, your credit card will be billed for 11 equal monthly installments beginning approximately one month from the date your order is shipped, with 0% APR and no interest charges from Bose. Credit card rules and interest may apply. U.S. residents only. Limit one active financing program per customer. ©2012 Bose Corporation. The distinctive design of the Wave® music system is a registered trademark of Bose Corporation. Financing and Audition offers not to be combined with other offers or applied to previous purchases, and subject to change without notice. Offers valid 5/1/12-6/30/12. Risk-free refers to 90-day Audition only and requires product purchase. Delivery is subject to product availability. iPhone and iPod are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.

Bulletin Daily Paper 05/13/12  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Sunday May 13, 2012

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you