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Brew Shop back in business Home-brewing store opens new location with more big plans on the way • BUSINESS, B1

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• September 7, 2011 75¢

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MILLER’S LANDING

KIDS: GEAR UP FOR SNOW SEASON, E1 Boarders

turn out to push for skatepark

SHADOW LAKE FIRE COULD BURN FOR ANOTHER MONTH

By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Firefighters Matteo Gouveia, left, Anselmo Salgado and Alejandro Ayala douse hot spots while working the edge of the Shadow Lake Fire near the Big Lake Youth Camp on Tuesday. Fire officials on Tuesday defended their decision to let the wildfire burn more than 4,600 acres near Mount Washington to avoid risking firefighters’ lives. For the full story, plus wildfire updates, see Page C1.

In jobs speech, Obama likely to call for extended payroll tax cut By Jackie Calmes New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The centerpiece of the job creation package that President Barack Obama plans to announce Thursday — payroll tax relief for workers and likely their employers — is neither his first policy choice

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roll tax that employees pay, which means about $1,000 more for the average household. And he is considering a proposal to expand the tax relief to employers. In his prime-time address to a joint session of Congress, Obama is expected to call for a package totaling sever-

al hundreds of billions of dollars that would also extend other business tax cuts, put federal dollars into building and repairing roads, rails, airports, schools and other infrastructure programs and provide aid to states to avert more layoffs of teachers. See Jobs / A4

1 DAY, 10 Y E A R S: SEP T. 11, 2 0 01- SEP T. 11, 2 011

IRAQ: Obama considers keeping 3,000 troops past year’s end, Page A3 TEXAS: 1,000 homes destroyed as high winds whip wildfires, Page A2

Abby

nor that of many economists. But it is the one that they figure has the best chance of getting Republicans’ support. Obama has signaled that he will propose to extend for another year a reduction of 2 percentage points in the 6.2 percent Social Security pay-

Skateboards, T-shirts and trucker hats seemed to outnumber khakis, button-ups and dress shoes at Tuesday night’s Bend Park & Recreation District board meeting, where officials discussed the future of Miller’s Landing. The 4.6-acre parcel on the Deschutes River near the Old Mill is set to become Bend’s next community park, and the district has been seeking public input on how it should develop the land over the next several years. Dozens of skateboarders — many of them riding in the parking lot of the district’s Columbia Street headquarters before the meeting — showed up with hopes of convincing the board that a skatepark belongs at Miller’s Landing. While board members made no decisions, they acknowledged the need for a new skatepark in Bend, noting the shortcomings of an aged and outdated facility located in Ponderosa Park. “I recognize it’s a good idea,” Park District Board of Directors Chairman Ted Schoenborn said of building a new skatepark. “It’s an idea that costs a lot of money to build ... and that’s a barrier.” The park district has plans to replace the Ponderosa Park skateboarding area, which is shaped much like a cement swimming pool, but it doesn’t have any money set aside to do so. Many local skateboarders consider the Ponderosa Park skatepark something of a relic. They say they must travel to places like Madras or Redmond to find what they consider adequate skating opportunities that are open to the public. There’s a private indoor skate facility in Bend that charges for skateboarding. Another group is working with the Oregon Department of Transportation and the city of Bend to build a public skatepark on Division Street under an overpass, though that plan is at least a year away from fruition. A common theme among many of the skateboarders at Tuesday’s meeting was the need for a skatepark on Bend’s west side. Among the benefits of the Miller’s Landing location, they said, are its central location near Bend’s downtown and Old Mill District and the fact that it occupies a unique spot along the Deschutes River. See Skatepark / A5

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Operation Iraqi Freedom began on March 20, 2003, after President George W. Bush argued that “Iraq harbors terrorists ... and could share weapons of mass destruction with terrorists.” Though connections to Sept. 11 remain elusive, the war continues. View 30 images from the conflict at bendbulletin.com/sept11. Photos from

DAY 1: Pulitzer winners

DAY 2: Flight 175 sequence

Central Oregon used 9/11 funds to up readiness By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Ozier Muhammad / New York Times News Service

A severe sandstorm blankets a convoy from the Headquarters Battalion of the 1st Marine Division north of the Euphrates River in Iraq, on March 25, 2003. Nearly two years after the terrorist attacks of 9/11, President George W. Bush presented a document to Congress arguing that the invasion of Iraq was necessary “because Iraq harbors terrorists and because Iraq could share weapons of mass destruction with terrorists.”

archive

DAY 3: U.S. archives

DAY 4: The towers

Visit bendbulletin.com/sept11 each day for more images

DAY 5: Ground Zero

DAY 6: War in Afghanistan

DAY 7: War in Iraq

DAY 8: The remnants

DAY 9: How we remember

DAY 10: The day

DAY 11: Fred R. Conrad

In the wake of the 9/11 terror attacks, the newly created Department of Homeland Security handed out federal grants to local and state agencies in an attempt to improve emergency preparedness and security in ports, water sources, airports and other locations. Here in Central Oregon, law enforcement agencies used the money largely to upgrade radio systems in anticipation of a large-scale emergency. And today, those agencies say they’ll be ready if and when something bad happens. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Sgt. Tim Edwards said the region’s experience with wildfires also has improved its readiness for other disasters, whether they’re caused by terrorists or Mother Nature. “I think we’re ready for something big,” he said. “We may not be a hotbed for terror but we are a hotbed for wildfire. We have a lot of experience over the past 10 years, and we’d do exactly the same thing we do in a terror attack as we do in a wildfire.” See Funds / A4


A2 Wednesday, September 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Oregon Lottery Results

As listed by The Associated Press

MEGA MILLIONS The numbers drawn are:

1 36 38 42 49 19 x4 Nobody won the jackpot Tuesday night in the Mega Millions game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $44 million for Friday’s drawing.

Wind-whipped fires spread in Texas By Jim Vertuno and Michael Graczyk The Associated Press

BASTROP, Texas — One of the most devastating wildfire outbreaks in Texas history left more than 1,000 homes in ruins Tuesday and stretched the state’s firefighting ranks to the limit, confronting Gov. Rick Perry with a major disaster at home just as the GOP presidential contest heats up. More than 180 fires have erupted in the past week across the rain-starved Lone Star State, and nearly 600 of the homes destroyed since then were lost in one catastrophic blaze in and around Bastrop, near Austin, that raged out of control Tuesday for a third day. Whipped into an inferno by Tropical Storm Lee’s winds over the weekend, the blaze burned more than 45 square miles, forced the evacuation of thousands and killed at least two people, bringing the overall death toll from the outbreak to at least four. “We lost everything,” said Willie Clements, whose two-story colonial home in a housing development near Bastrop was reduced to a heap of metal roofing and ash. A picket fence was melted. Some goats and turkeys survived, but about 20 chickens and ducks were burned to death in a coop that went up in flames. On Tuesday, Clements and his family took a picture of themselves in front of a windmill adorned with a charred red,

Karl Anderson / The Associated Press

Wildfire smoke billows behind a home near Montgomery, Texas, on Tuesday. More than 1,000 homes have been destroyed in at least 57 wildfires across rain-starved Texas, most of them in one devastating blaze near Austin that is still raging out of control. white and blue sign that proclaimed, “United We Stand.” “This is the beginning of our new family album,” the 51-yearold Clements said. Perry cut short a presidential campaign trip to South Carolina to deal with the crisis. On Tuesday, he toured a blackened area near Bastrop, about 25 miles from Austin, and later deployed the state’s elite search team to the area to look for more possible victims. Texas Task Force 1 is the same outfit sent to New York following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and to New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. “Pretty powerful visuals of individuals who lost everything,”

Perry said after the tour. “The magnitude of these losses are pretty stunning.” The governor would not say whether he would take part in Wednesday evening’s Republican presidential debate in California, explaining that he was “substantially more concerned about making sure Texans are being taken care of.” But campaign spokesman Mark Miner said in an e-mail later in the day that Perry planned to be there. White House spokesman Jay Carney said the Obama administration has approved seven federal grants to Texas to help with the latest outbreak, and “we will continue to work closely with the

state and local emergency management officials as their efforts to contain these fires.” About 1,200 firefighters battled the blazes, including members of local departments from around the state and crews from such places as Utah, California, Arizona and Oregon, many of them arriving after Texas put out a call for help. More firefighters will join the battle once they have been registered and sent where they are needed. Five heavy tanker planes, some from the federal government, and three aircraft capable of scooping 1,500 gallons of water at a time from lakes also took part in the fight. “We’re getting incredible support from all over the country, federal and state agencies,” said Mark Stanford, operations director for the Texas Forest Service. The disaster is blamed largely on Texas’ yearlong drought, one of the most severe dry spells the state has ever seen. The fire in Bastrop County is easily the single most devastating wildfire in Texas in more than a decade, eclipsing a blaze that destroyed 168 homes in North Texas in April. Texas Forest Service spokeswoman April Saginor said state wildfire records go back only to the late 1990s. At least 11 other fires exceeded 1,000 acres Tuesday, including an 8,000-acre blaze in Caldwell County, next to Bastrop County. At least six homes were lost in a fire 40 percent contained.

Haitian divers make a splash with coral reef protection By Brent McDonald New York Times News Service

CÔTES DES ARCADINS, Haiti — It was an immaculately clear midsummer morning, a perfect day for diving. No trash had yet washed up on the beach. A dozen volunteers, all excited, some a bit apprehensive, donned flippers and masks and shimmied into the bathtub-warm sea, eager to join a team of eco-divers responsible for surveying, and perhaps one day helping save, Haiti’s endangered coral reefs. Only one thing stood in their way: For most of them — like Jessika Laloi, 21 — this was their first time swimming in the ocean. Until a few months ago, Laloi had not even known how to dog paddle. Now she was wading into the ocean in shorts and a tank top, with a life preserver strapped to her torso, a welcome distraction from the tumult of life since her home collapsed in the earthquake a year and a half ago. “Diving and swimming is a way of showing you that you are in the environment,” Laloi said. “You are part of it. You don’t have to destroy it.” Environmental degradation is rife in Haiti — deforestation, erosion, pollution — and for the most part it is hard to miss. But for decades the country’s marine environment has suffered unseen. Its extensive coral reef system, an attraction to foreign scuba divers in the 1970s and ’80s, has largely died off — partly from sedimentation and climate change, but mostly from overfishing. “It’s probably the worst overfishing I’ve seen anywhere in the world,” said Gregor Hodgson, the director of Reef Check, a nonprofit organization in California that monitors reef health around the globe. Hodgson, who has been leading the training of Laloi and her fellow Haitians, said his organization had worked on reefs in 90 countries. Months after the earthquake that devastated Port-au-Prince, this nation’s capital, Hodgson flew to Haiti to inspect reefs, checking for quake damage. Instead, he found something more alarming: dead coral as far as the eye could see, and almost no fish. He estimates that about 85 percent of the coral reef has died. In Haiti 54,000 fishermen rely on the ocean for their livelihood, according to the Ministry of Agriculture, which oversees fisheries management. In recent decades, as their usual catches of Nassau groupers and snappers have dwindled and disappeared, many of them have subsisted by netting and spearing small reef

Brent McDonald / New York Times News Service

Jessika Laloi, right, holds onto Gregor Hodgson, the director of Reef Check, a California-based nonprofit organization that monitors reef health around the globe, before her first reef snorkel, along the Côtes des Arcadins, north of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. fish that keep coral clean of algae. Now those too are almost gone, and the algae have taken over. On a recent dive near La Gonave Island, Hodgson floated through a wasteland of intact, dead coral, overgrown with algae and sponges and nearly devoid of fish. Haiti has the second-longest coastline of all the Caribbean countries, yet it is the only one that has not established marine protected areas where fishing is restricted or off-limits, according to the U.N. Environment Program. So Reef Check decided to survey the reefs and propose that the Haitian government create marine parks where fish can feed, grow and reproduce. “It’s an unusual situation to come into a country where there are no marine ecologists with respect to coral reefs and no marine biology programs in universities,” Hodgson said. “We’re starting from square one.” Pierre Guy LaFontant, Haiti’s director general of fisheries, acknowledged that overfishing was a problem and said that officials were receptive to the idea of establishing protected waters. But if the government cannot enforce its existing fishing regulations, can fishermen be persuaded to abide by an invisible line in the water? “That would be my deepest dream,” LaFontant said, “but the reality is totally different. For fishermen, there are no alternatives. Poverty is the law.” Hodgson argued the fishermen could, in fact, become the project’s strongest supporters. “Once they see the fish coming back, see the fish growing, see a beautiful reef coming back, then they become the ones who protect the reef,” he said. Under Reef Check’s guidance,

once volunteers demonstrate proficiency in swimming and snorkeling, they will eventually

be taught to scuba dive, map the reefs foot by foot and count crucial species of fish, urchins and lobsters — basically, anything people like to eat. The organization began recruiting volunteer divers earlier this year, but the going has been slow. According to Hodgson, only one of 30 applicants selected for a pool test in April could swim half its length. The rest could not swim at all. But what the volunteers lack in experience, they make up for in passion and curiosity. “It’s exciting,” Melissa Barbot, 24, an architecture student, said after a snorkel outing. “This is my first time, and naturally, I’m having this ‘wow’ feeling.” For some students, learning to dive has also proved to be therapeutic. “When I saw how amazing it is,” Laloi said of her time in the water, “I just forgot that I live in a very ugly zone.”

A flexible way to use the sun’s rays By Susan Carpenter Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Carl Harberger’s 6,000-squarefoot house in the Chatsworth neighborhood of Los Angeles is equipped with six refrigerators, five TVs, a smattering of computers and a pool, among other things — enough to draw the wagging finger of the ecominded if it were not for what Harberger has on his roof. By the end of the month, the home’s 24-kilowatt installation of thin-film solar panels will bring to life what is believed to be the largest residential installation of its kind in the country. The thin-film panels generate about 50 percent less electricity per square foot and cost about 10 percent more than traditional photovoltaic panels, but the flexible film can handle curved surfaces and integrate less obtrusively into a home’s silhouette. It’s also lighter weight — an advantage in earthquake country — and unlike bulky bracketed panels, thin-film doesn’t need to be drilled into the roof, reducing the risk of leaks. Harberger’s installation will power not only his lighting, electronics and air conditioning, but also systems that would traditionally be juiced with natural gas. The thin film will heat all the water for the home and run the forcedair heating system as well as the clothes dryer and oven. “There are so many advantages to going all electric with very little natural gas,” Harberger said. Outside, natural gas powers a barbecue grill and an auxiliary heater for a shallow pool that is otherwise warmed by the sun or an electric heater. Inside, natural gas is used only for the kitchen cook top and a living room fireplace. Less natural gas indoors means fewer vents to shuttle carbon monoxide outside, resulting in a less cluttered exterior. Like most homeowners who go solar, Harberger considered the bulkier panels that are commonplace across the country. But the metal-sheet construction and curvature of his roof led him to Uni-Solar thin film. Mounted on the southernand western-facing sections of the roof, the thin film can better handle seasonal differences in the sun’s patterns and maximize electricity generation.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 7, 2011 A3

TS  U.S. may keep 3,000 troops in Iraq past 2011, sources say By David S. Cloud McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration is considering leaving about 3,000 American troops in Iraq after this year, rejecting more ambitious Pentagon options that would have deployed 10,000 or more military personnel, two U.S. officials said Tuesday. The White House has made it clear to Pentagon officials and military commanders that it wants to retain only a skeletal force in Iraq, primarily to train the nation’s military and police. Even the smaller number is subject to approval by Iraqi officials, who have final say over the presence of U.S. troops in their country. The scaled-down proposal would allow President Barack Obama to say that he has fulfilled

his pledge to end U.S. involvement in the Iraq war and bring home most American troops. But the internal debate has created tension between the White House and some military commanders, who argued that even a scaled-down U.S. role requires a military force large enough to protect itself. “Whatever mission is given to us, we want to make sure that we have enough for force protection; that’s the concern,” said a senior U.S. military official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the discussions. As of last month, about 46,000 U.S. troops were deployed in Iraq. Unless the two governments agree to a continuing U.S. troop presence, all but a few will be withdrawn by year’s end un-

der a 2008 agreement reached with the Iraqis by the George W. Bush administration. As the deadline nears, some senior U.S. and Iraqi officials warn that Iraq’s army and police, despite billions of dollars in aid from Washington and its allies, will be unable to contain sectarian violence or prevent neighboring Iran from expanding its operations if U.S. forces are drawn down too far. Pentagon officials had presented the White House with proposals to leave a larger force with greater responsibilities. But Obama’s aides have rebuffed those plans, arguing that Washington can maintain influence in Baghdad through arms sales and diplomatic engagement, rather than a large troop presence.

Gunman opens fire in restaurant, killing 4, including 2 Guardsmen By Ian Lovett New York Times News Service

LOS ANGELES — A man armed with an AK-47 assault rifle opened fire Tuesday morning on a group of uniformed National Guard members as they ate breakfast at an IHOP restaurant in Carson City, Nev. He hit all five Guard members, killing two of them. He also killed a woman and wounded five people before taking his own life. The gunman, identified by the police as Eduardo Sencion, 32, began his five-minute shooting rampage around 9 a.m. as people flocked to the restaurant for the breakfast rush. The Carson City sheriff, Ken Furlong, said the authorities had not yet established a motive. However, he said it appeared that Sencion did seek out the National Guard members, at least once he was inside the restaurant. Five of the 11 people shot were in uniform, and one of the wounded civilians was caught in the line of fire between Sencion and the Guardsmen. “It appears as though his gunfire was primarily focused on those military members,” Furlong said. “We do not know whether the gunman was aware that there were National Guardsmen in the restaurant, but it appears as though he did. He had to travel through the entire restaurant to get to the back where the Guardsmen were having breakfast.” Furlong said the authorities were investigating Sencion’s mental health history. However, Sencion did not have any prior criminal history, nor did he have any known affiliation with the military or with anyone inside the restaurant. But he shot every one of the Guard members inside.

Cathleen Allison / The Associated Press

Officers look for evidence at the scene of a shooting at an IHOP restaurant in Carson City, Nev., on Tuesday. Another assault rifle and a handgun were found inside the blue minivan Sencion parked outside the restaurant. Victims lay both inside and outside the restaurant in the wake of the shooting. Three were pronounced dead at the scene, while six others were transported to nearby hospitals, where at least five remained in surgery Tuesday afternoon, according to the Carson City Sheriff’s Department. Sencion, a Carson City resident, was also transported to a hospital, where he later died. Sencion filed for bankruptcy in 2009, when he was living in nearby Stateline, a rougharound-the-edges casino town on the California border. Ralph Swagler, the owner of a nearby barbecue restaurant, told the AP that he saw the gunman

pull up outside the restaurant, where he first shot a man on a motorcycle and then headed inside. “I wish I had shot at him, but he was going in the IHOP,” Swagler said. “But when he came at me — when somebody is pointing an automatic weapon at you — you can’t believe the firepower, the kind of rounds coming out of that weapon.” The shootings shocked a city just emerging from a long holiday weekend when many locals and tourists flocked to nearby Lake Tahoe. Carson City has less of the glitz — and grime — associated with Las Vegas or Reno, the latter of which is 25 miles to the north. It has steadily grown over the years, but it is still sleepier than Reno, which was hit hard by the recession’s impact on construction and casino spending.

Romney unveils jobs plan to revive economy By Michael Finnegan Los Angeles Times

Facing new trouble in his quest for the Republican presidential nomination, Mitt Romney released a detailed plan Tuesday to revive the nation’s stumbling economy, proposing tax cuts and rollbacks in environmental, health and banking rules. Romney’s 59-point agenda came two days before President Barack Obama plans to unveil his own proposals to combat the nation’s stubbornly high joblessness, a pivotal step in his re-election campaign. Speaking to invited guests at a truck dealership in North Las Vegas, Romney said Obama “just doesn’t have a clue what to do” to revive the economy. The former Massachusetts governor described Obama’s ideas as outdated. “Your pay-phone strategy does not work in a smartphone world,” Romney said. Romney, a former chief executive of the Bain Capital investment firm, brandished a blue paperback copy of his plan, “Believe in America.” “This is the product of somebody who spent his life in the private sector,” he told the crowd.

Romney put out his plan amid a raft of new polls finding that he lost his Republican front-runner status in recent days to Texas Gov. Rick Perry. A debate of the party’s White House contenders on Wednesday at the Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, Calif., is supposed to be the first to include Perry if wildfires in Texas allow him to attend. The growing rivalry between Perry and the field’s former frontrunner was on display Tuesday with Romney’s pointed reference to his own business background — Perry has spent decades in government — and as the Texas governor’s campaign denounced Romney’s jobs plan. “As governor of Massachusetts, Mitt Romney failed to create a pro-jobs environment and failed to institute many of the reforms he now claims to support,” Perry spokesman Mark Miner said in a statement. Romney’s 160-page plan fit mainstream conservative doctrine. He called for cutting the corporate income tax rate from 35 percent to 25 percent, eliminating the estate tax and extending personal income tax cuts en-

acted under President George W. Bush. He proposed a 10 percent cut in the federal workforce and a $200 billion-per-year reduction in the Medicaid healthcare program for the poor. Romney would convert Medicaid into a block grant for states. Romney’s plan included a harsh critique of Obama’s economic record that in some cases ignored steps by Obama that have disappointed Democrats. Romney slammed the president for his “costly and ineffective anti-carbon agenda” despite criticism by former Vice President Al Gore and others that Obama has failed to show leadership in fighting global warming. Ben LaBolt, an Obama campaign spokesman, said Romney’s plan “would tip the scales against hardworking Americans.” Romney “repackaged the same old policies that helped create the economic crisis: boosting oil company profits and allowing Wall Street to write its own rules, more tax breaks for large corporations and more tax cuts for the wealthiest while working Americans are forced to carry a greater burden,” he said.

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A4 Wednesday, September 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Working-age adults make up Obama calls on Libya’s neighbors Scientists record share of America’s poor to arrest fleeing Gadhafi loyalists call for end By Hope Yen The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Workingage America is the new face of poverty. Counting adults 18-64 who were laid off in the recent recession as well as single twentysomethings still looking for jobs, the new working-age poor represent nearly 3 out of 5 poor people — a switch from the early 1970s when children made up the main impoverished group. While much of the shift in poverty is due to demographic changes — Americans are having fewer children than before — the nowweakened economy and limited government safety net for workers are heightening the effect. Currently, the ranks of the working-age poor are at the highest level since the 1960s when the war on poverty was launched. When new census figures for 2010 are released next week, analysts expect a continued increase in the overall poverty rate due to persistently high unemployment last year. If that holds true, it will mark the fourth year in a row of increases in the U.S. poverty rate, which now stands at 14.3 percent, or 43.6 million people. “There is a lot of discussion about what the aging of the baby boom should mean for spending on Social Security and Medicare. But there is not much discussion about how the wages of workers, especially those with no more

Jobs Continued from A1 But the single biggest stimulus measure he will propose is likely to be temporary payroll tax relief. If the current tax cut, due to expire at the end of the year, is expanded next year to employers as well as employees, it would pump roughly $200 billion into the economy, with the aim of stimulating much-needed demand for goods and services from consumers and businesses and, additionally, of giving companies an incentive to hire additional employees. For the White House, its appeal is that it may be the only large stimulus measure that can pass Congress this year given Republicans’ preference for tax cuts. And if Republicans oppose him, the White House figures Obama at least has the better of the political argument because he will be trying to block a tax increase that otherwise would apply to virtually all households on Jan. 1. Republican leaders have said they would support the payroll tax cut’s extension only if its cost is offset by equal spending cuts, a condition they did not apply for extending the Bush-era tax cuts on high incomes. Obama has said he will propose long-term deficit savings to offset the short-term costs of his stimulus proposals, although that is not likely to satisfy Republicans. Obama previewed his argument on Labor Day in Detroit, at one point addressing a raucous rally of union supporters as if he were speaking to Republicans. “You say you’re the party of tax cuts? Well then, prove you’ll fight just as hard for tax cuts for middle-class families as you do for oil companies and the most affluent Americans,” Obama said. Interrupted by applause and hoots, he continued: “Show us what you got. The time for Washington games is over.” A payroll tax break was not the tax cut that Obama preferred in December when he and Congress’ Republican leaders first agreed to a stimulus package of tax cuts. He wanted to extend the “Making Work Pay” tax credit for low- and middle-income households, part of his original two-year stimulus package for 2009 and 2010. But Republicans, newly empowered by their big gains in the 2010 midterm elections, blocked him. Obama countered with the broad-based and more costly payroll tax cut. Both the administration and many economists, including those at the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, agree that some spending measures, in particular unemployment compensation and aid to states to avert layoffs, have more “bang for the buck” than many tax cuts — that is, for each dollar of cost to the federal government, more than a dollar is added to the economy’s output. Generally, such programs keep money in people’s pockets that they quickly spend, whereas high-income taxpayers tend to save.

than a high school degree, are not rising,” said Sheldon Danziger, a University of Michigan public policy professor. Census numbers show that out of 8.8 million families who are poor, about 60 percent had at least one person who was working. “The reality is there are going to be a lot of working poor for the foreseeable future,” Danziger said, citing high unemployment and congressional resistance to raising the minimum wage. The newest poor include Richard Bowden, 53, of southeast Washington, who has been on food stamps off and on the last few years. A maintenance worker, Bowden says he was unable to save much money before losing his job months ago. He no longer works due to hip and back problems and now gets by on about $1,000 a month in disability and other aid. “At my work, we hadn’t gotten a raise in two years, even while the prices of food and clothing kept going up, so I had little left over,” Bowden said. “Now, after rent, the utility bill, transportation and other costs, my money is pretty much down to nothing.” “I pray and hope that things get better, but you just don’t know,” he said. The poverty figures come at a politically sensitive time for President Barack Obama, after a Labor Department report last Friday showed zero job growth in August.

But Republicans oppose spending measures. In a letter to Obama on Tuesday, the House Republican leaders — Speaker John Boehner and Majority Leader Eric Cantor — said that continued high unemployment had vindicated their opposition to his 2009 stimulus package. “As you know,” they wrote, “we argued at the time that a large, deficit-financed government spending bill was not the best way to improve our economic situation or create sustainable growth in employment.” Nonpartisan analyses have found that the first stimulus package, which was roughly one-third tax cuts, did prevent unemployment from rising higher and economic growth from being lower. Now many economists and analysts say the recovery needs further assistance, especially given the fallout from global economic problems; some have reduced their projections of economic growth because the earlier stimulus measures have ended or are about to, while Congress and the White House have been cutting spending to reduce deficits. “We are looking at a substantial fiscal drag on the economy next year as the spending cuts take hold and state and local governments continue to contract,” said Karen Dynan, an economist at the Brookings Institution, a policy research organization. “If this tax cut expires, that’s going to take a lot of money out of people’s pockets and that is going to slow consumption substantially in the first part of next year.” Letting the payroll tax for employees expire would shave a half-percentage point from economic growth in 2012, Moody’s Analytics has reported. “The payroll tax cut is better than nothing, and letting it lapse without putting anything else in its place would certainly worsen our economic problems,” said Leonard Burman, a former Treasury economist now teaching at Syracuse University. “But it’s far from ideal,” Burman added. “A lot of the money goes to higher-income people whose consumption is likely to be unaffected by the additional after-tax income. Even for lowerincome people, if they save the money or use it to pay down debt, it doesn’t boost the economy in the short run.” Still, said Donald Marron, director of the Tax Policy Center and a former economics adviser in the George W. Bush administration, “Relative to other things you could do on the tax side, it’s a pretty attractive stimulus.” Also, Marron said, broad tax changes generally can mean a much bigger package in dollar terms than a spending initiative. “It’s very hard on the spending side to identify any single lever that gets to that kind of scale, particularly over the period of a year,” he said. “So if you want to do something big, you almost inevitably have to do something on the tax side.” That is especially true, he added, “when you layer on the political constraints” of Republicans’ opposition to spending.

By Karen DeYoung and Leila Fadel

A Libyan rebel stands guard as his comrades search a building to find weapons stored by ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi in Tripoli, Libya. Efforts to negotiate the peaceful handover of the city of Bani Walid — one of Gadhafi’s last remaining strongholds — have proved difficult.

The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration on Tuesday urged Libya’s neighbors to arrest fleeing members of Moammar Gadhafi’s ousted government, as at least a dozen senior Libyan military officials arrived in Niger after escaping across the southern desert. U.S. overhead surveillance observed a convoy entering Niger on Tuesday morning, but U.S. and NATO officials said any attempt to stop the vehicles would have been outside their mandate. The State Department and Libyan rebel officials said there was no indication that Gadhafi was among those who fled. Conflicting reports from rebel forces placed Gadhafi in various locations throughout his tribal heartland, a triangle between his coastal home town, Sirte; the oasis town of Bani Walid to the west, where Gadhafi’s son Seif al-Islam is believed to be hiding, and the city of Sabha, on the edge of the Sahara in the south. NATO aircraft continued flying strike missions over coastal areas, but officials said that a decreasing number of targets fall within the alliance’s authorized mission of protecting civilians from government forces. That mission has been broadly interpreted to include any massed group of government troops and command-and-control facilities. The current NATO mandate runs out on Sept. 27, and its renewal would require a political decision by alliance members. Military mission commanders could also recommend an end to the bombing before then. “The actual operational plan says that the end state is whenever we decide we’ve achieved what we set out to do,” said a NATO official,

Funds Continued from A1 The agencies, he said, are accustomed to communicating, and the group has practice dealing with emergencies already. “We don’t have a bomb disposal unit or anything like that, but I think we’re wellprepared for any big event that would come our way,” he said. “Eventually we would have to have help from the outside depending on how big a thing it was, but our initial response and the first several days of a big event, I think we’re prepared to handle here in Central Oregon.” In Deschutes County, the Central Oregon Emergency Response Team received a $51,000 grant to create a weapons of mass destruction and terrorism plan. It also received two grants from the Oregon Office of Emergency Management, through the federal homeland security offices, totaling more than $366,000 to pay for county security improvements. And the Department of Homeland Security has given Deschutes County more than $417,000 since 2005. Some of that money has been for multi-agency work, including an engineering study to figure out what radio system infrastructure and equipment improvements were necessary in Deschutes, Crook and Jefferson counties to comply with a mandate that requires all public safety groups by January 2013 to move radio operations to narrowband frequencies. Other grants from the homeland security department paid for communication site security and actual radios and technology improvements.

Abdel Magid Al Fergany The Associated Press

who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the issue. In Sirte and Bani Walid, Gadhafi “still has organized military forces capable of inflicting damages on civilians. As long as air power is still capable of dealing with that threat, we still have a mission. We’re still destroying stuff every day.” Although U.S. “national technical means.” or satellites and high-flying reconnaissance aircraft, observed the convoy entering Niger, the area is nearly 1,000 miles south of where NATO strike aircraft are operating, the official said. Hitting such targets “would be a completely different operation. . . . We would have to refuel over Libyan territory.” In addition, he said, the alliance has “no independent means to verify” who is traveling in closed vehicles. “We have no idea where Gadhafi is,” the official said. “We really haven’t had a good sense for a while.” NATO spokesman Col. Roland

Lavoie, in Naples, said it is not within the alliance’s mission “to track and target thousands of fleeing former regime leaders, mercenaries, military commanders and internally displaced people.” Estimates of the number of vehicles in the convoy to Niger varied from 50 to more than 200. An official of the rebels’ governing Transitional National Council said the vehicles were armed and carried more than 250 people. The official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity so he could talk frankly, said the rebels are worried about security along Libya’s thousands of miles of border because they have no ability to lock it down. Mustafa Abdel Jalil, the head of the council, has asked Niger to stop Gadhafi and his top officials from crossing the border. But according to council members and media accounts from Niamey, the capital of Niger, the loyalist convoy was welcomed inside the country.

In the past 10 years, Edwards said the agency was able to install a new radio tower on Mt. Bachelor that allows personnel to communicate in areas like the Cascade lakes and farther into the mountains. And the county has been able to upgrade its systems to keep up with technology advancements. It operates on two separate radio systems to ensure it’s interoperable — or compatible — with all area public safety personnel. That helps other agencies, like the Crook County Sheriff’s Office, communicate with deputies in Deschutes County during large-scale emergencies. Since 2007 Crook County, for example, has received nearly $945,000 in federal grants and an additional $177,000 in county matching funds to help improve communication and interoperability with other counties’ personnel. “Prior to Sept. 11, that was a big issue, that during the disaster they didn’t have interoperability,” said Crook County Sheriff’s Office Sgt. James Savage, who oversees emergency management for the county. And it was the same throughout Central Oregon, he said. “We were all on our own frequencies, doing our own thing and we had to get together and nobody could communicate, nobody knew what the others were doing.” The upgrades Crook County Emergency Management has completed allow fire and police personnel all over the area to communicate with one another. They’ve also ensured narrowband compliance. “It also improved interoperability with each other,” Savage said. “We’re not completely in the loop yet but we’re on our way to solving that issue.” Savage said his office and the county’s fire department must contact each other nearly every day, and county personnel com-

municate routinely when a problem occurs near a county line. The funds also helped improve the way in which law enforcement and fire officials get emergency calls. They’re now sent to responders’ computers so they can read all the information rather than hearing it on the radio. Savage said it’s only a matter of time before that computer system will show other agencies’ calls as well. And the county has improved its emergency operations plans to include local hospitals and other necessary groups. “We’re preparing for this type of thing,” Savage said. “We’re a lot more prepared than we were. You can never 100 percent be there but we are definitely a lot more prepared than we were 10 years ago.”

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to deep-sea fishing By Juliet Eilperin The Washington Post

Industrial fishing in the deep sea should be banned because it has depleted fish stocks that take longer to recover than other species, according to a paper by an international team of marine scientists. The article, published in the scientific journal Marine Policy, describes fishing operations that have in recent decades targeted the unregulated high seas after stocks near shore were overfished. Describing the open ocean as “more akin to a watery desert,” the scientists argue that vessels have targeted patches of productive areas sequentially, depleting the fish there and destroying deep-sea corals before moving on to new areas. Certain deep-sea species have gained widespread popularity — including orange roughy and Patagonian toothfish, otherwise known as Chilean sea bass — only to crash within a matter of years. Elliott Norse, president of the Marine Conservation Institute and the paper’s lead author, said the world has turned to deep-sea fishing “out of desperation” without realizing fish stocks there take much longer to recover. “We’re now fishing in the worst places to fish,” Norse said in an interview. “These things don’t come back.” As vessels use Global Positioning System devices and trawlers, which scrape massive metal plates across the sea bottom, the catch of deep-water species has increased sevenfold between 1960 and 2004, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. “What they’re doing out there is more like mining than fishing,” said Kevin Hassett, director of economic policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute. The estimated mean depth of fishing has more than tripled since the 1950s, from 492 feet to 1,706 feet in 2004, according to Telmo Morato, a marine biologist with the Department of Oceanography and Fisheries at the University of the Azores in Portugal and one of the paper’s co-authors. Fishing subsidies help sustain this practice, according to Rashid Sumaila, the paper’s other co-author, who directs the University of British Columbia Fisheries Centre. He said high-seas trawlers around the world receive roughly $162 million each year in government handouts, which amounts to a quarter of the value of the fleets’ catch.

Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 7, 2011 A5

Remnants of Lee soak South, East By Bill Poovey The Associated Press

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. — Disorganized yet deadly, the leftovers from Tropical Storm Lee spread farther inland Tuesday, soaking much of the East Coast. Areas still drying out from Irene were hit with more rain while farmers in the Southeast welcomed the wet weather. Lee spawned tornadoes that damaged hundreds of homes. Roads were flooded, trees uprooted and power was knocked out to hundreds of thousands of people. Winds from the storm had fanned wildfires in Louisiana and Texas, though calmer air Tuesday was expected to help firefighters. Lee even kicked up tar balls on the Gulf Coast. At least four people died in the storm. Lee formed just off the Louisiana coast late last week and gained strength as it lingered in the Gulf for a couple of days. It dumped more than a foot of rain in New Orleans, testing the city’s pump system for the first time in years. The storm then trudged across Mississippi and Alabama. By Tuesday, it had collided with a cold front leaving much of the East Coast wet, with unseasonably cool temperatures.

Skatepark Continued from A1 “Where you build a skatepark says a lot about a community’s values,” said Dan McCoy, a Redmond middle school teacher who carried his skateboard into the meeting. “I don’t really think a skatepark should be tucked away or under a bridge. We should be proud of it.” Not everyone at the meeting agreed. There were several people, including representatives of the surrounding Old Bend Neighborhood Association, who were concerned about putting a skatepark in a small area next to the Deschutes River. Others said the park, which was bought for about $1.8 million through a collaboration between the Trust for Public Land and the park district, is a “crown jewel” of the riverfront park system and shouldn’t be tainted by a skatepark. “This park isn’t just for us or our children, it’s for posterity,” Bend resident Spencer Dahl said. “I don’t think it’s appropriate to time stamp this park in concrete.” Park officials consider Miller’s Landing a community river park similar to Drake Park and Riverbend Park. As such, the district has put certain constraints on what can be built there. For instance, riverfront parks — with the exception of Harmon Park — typically don’t include sporting fields. The district is still developing various plans for Miller’s Landing based on all the public comments it has received from questionnaires and meetings. It plans to use that input as well as its own guidelines to come up with three conceptual designs that will be presented during an open house that will likely take place in early October. Ideas the district will consider, in addition to the skatepark, include whether the new park should have off leash areas for dogs, walking trails, restrooms and other amenities normally associated with outdoor recreation. Some open space also may be set aside to serve as riparian wildlife habitat. The district is expected to choose a final design for Miller’s Landing sometime in the winter. It will begin building the park in phases starting in spring or summer of 2012. The district has about $450,000 in its current year budget to develop Miller’s Landing. Whether a skatepark will be included in those plans remains to be seen. Even if it is, it’s uncertain whether there will be enough money to build a park in the first year of construction or soon thereafter. Travis Yamada, one of the people behind the Division Street underpass project, wants to see the district put a priority on building a new skatepark. “How come every other town in Oregon has an awesome skatepark and Bend doesn’t?” Yamada asked district board members. “I think the public and the skate community really wants to see a commitment. ... One skatepark isn’t going to do it. This is one of our hugest needs.” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

At one point, flood watches and warnings were in effect from northeast Alabama through West Virginia to New England. Heavy rain bands scattered across the central Appalachians and Northeast. The National Weather Service said 4 to 8 inches of rain were possible, with isolated downpours up to 10 inches. In southeast Louisiana, Red Eubanks used a floor squeegee to clean up his restaurant and bar. His parking lot had been dry — and the headquarters for Livingston Parish sheriff’s deputies and their rescue boat — but the nearby Amite River slowly rose and overflowed its banks. Water crept into the dining hall and back of Red’s Restaurant and Bar. Eubanks’ son and several friends put the refrigerator, freezers and salad display boxes on cinder blocks to protect them. “This makes the fifth time I’ve had water in this building in 31½ years,” he said. In New Jersey, where many residents were still cleaning up after Hurricane Irene, the remnants of Lee were expected to drop anywhere from 2 to 5 inches of rain. Officials were not expecting any new major flooding but they were keeping an eye on the saturated grounds and still-bulging rivers.

Family of black man slain in Mississippi sues white suspects By Kim Severson New York Times News Service

Susan Poag / The (New Orleans, La.) Times-Picayune

Steven Louque pushes out muddy water from the driveway at Griffin Fishing Charters in Barataria, La., on Tuesday while cleaning up from Tropical Storm Lee. Much of Pennsylvania was under a flood watch, and 5 inches or more of rain were expected. Lee’s damage paled in comparison with Irene, though. At least 46 deaths were blamed on that storm, millions lost power and the damage was estimated in the billions of dollars. Still, Lee was an unprecedented storm in some places. In Chattanooga, a 24-hour record for rainfall was set with 9.69 inches, eclipsing the pre-

vious record of 7.61 inches in March of 1886. By Tuesday, more than 10 inches of rain had fallen in the state’s fourth-largest city, which had its driest August ever with barely a drop of rain. The soggy ground meant even modest winds were toppling trees onto homes and cars. A tree fell on a Chattanooga woman while she was moving her car, killing her, said police Sgt. Jerri Weary.

The family of a black man run down and killed in a motel parking lot in Jackson, Miss., filed a wrongful death lawsuit Tuesday against the white teenagers they say are responsible. The lawsuit, filed in Hinds County Circuit Court in Jackson, depicts the death of James Craig Anderson as a racially motivated attack and outlines an evening of drinking that culminated with a caravan of teenagers from a largely white suburban county driving 16 miles to Jackson intent on harassing African-Americans. “We want to send a message to people who want to use race as a reason to target someone,” said Morris Dees of the Southern Poverty Law Center, who joined Winston Thompson III, the family’s lawyer, in filing the suit. The suit was also designed to offer Anderson’s family some financial compensation, although it did not specify an amount. Anderson, 48, died shortly after 5 a.m. on June 26. Images from a widely circulated security video show that two carloads of teenagers drove into the parking lot. Some jumped out and went toward Anderson, who was near his truck. Anderson was beaten and robbed, then a teenager driving a Ford pickup truck backed up and then accelerated forward, running over and killing him, the prosecutors and the lawsuit allege. One of the people yelled “white power” during the attack, and others used a racial epithet and bragged about the killing, according to the lawsuit and the prosecutors.


A6 Wednesday, September 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

W  B James Murdoch knew of hacking, execs say LONDON — Media executive James Murdoch knew of a damaging piece of evidence three years ago that phone hacking was practiced by more than one reporter at the News of the World tabloid, despite his statements to the contrary, two of his former colleagues said Tuesday. The assertion by Colin Myler, the paper’s last editor, and Tom Crone, its head in-house lawyer, boosted the likelihood that Murdoch will be called to appear again before Parliament to explain the discrepancy. Both he and his father, media magnate Rupert Murdoch, gave evidence to lawmakers in July after the phone-hacking scandal broke wide open and threw their massive News Corp. empire into turmoil. Myler and Crone, who were summoned to reappear before Parliament on Tuesday, said they talked to James Murdoch briefly in 2008 about an e-mail that seemed to implicate the News of the World’s chief reporter in the tapping of cellphones, an illegal tactic for which a colleague, Clive Goodman, had already been convicted and jailed.

Serbian army chief guilty of war crimes The former head of the armed forces in Serbia was convicted on Tuesday of crimes against humanity and war crimes by an international tribunal at The Hague. The former official, Momcilo Perisic, was the army chief of staff of Yugoslavia in Momcilo the 1990s when Perisic that crumbling nation was reduced to just Serbia and Montenegro, and he was a principal architect of the ethnic war in the breakaway republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina. He was charged in connection with attacks on civilians by soldiers under his command in Bosnia and Croatia, including in the cities of Sarajevo and Srebrenica, and was sentenced on Tuesday to 27 years in prison. The conviction of Perisic, 67, was the first by the tribunal against a Serbian official for crimes committed in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the court said.

Italians strike to protest austerity plan ROME — Thousands of workers took to the streets in Italy in a general strike on Tuesday to protest a package of ever-changing austerity measures, adding to tensions in a crucial week for the future of the euro. The strike placed mounting pressure on the government of Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, which grudgingly proposed the $64 billion, austerity package last month in exchange for the European Central Bank buying Italian debt to help Italy help fend off a sovereign debt crisis. It also added to broader concerns over his government’s ability to push through labor reforms and whether Europe could solve its spreading debt crisis. European stocks were off 0.7 percent on Tuesday, after a battering of more than 4 percent on Monday.

Russia, 6 allies plan to fortify military ties MOSCOW — Russia and six former Soviet states plan to bolster their political, law-enforcement and military alliance to protect each other from the kind of uprisings that toppled regimes in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya. “The events in North Africa opened our eyes to many things,” Nikolai Bordyuzha, general secretary of the Collective Security Treaty Organization, said in an interview in the Tajik capital, Dushanbe, Sept. 3. “We must reflect on what happened there and develop means of defense.” The protests this year against authoritarian rulers unseated governments in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya and sparked unrest in other countries in the Middle East and North Africa. The United States and the European Union imposed sanctions on nations such as Belarus where opposition activists have been imprisoned. Russia is seeking to bolster its influence, opposing the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s expansion into eastern Europe and vying with the U.S. and Europe for central Asian oil and gas. — From wire reports

W OR L D

Afghanistan struggles to enlist Pashtuns in Taliban heartland By Ray Rivera

Amid the uprising, another reality for Syrians in Damascus

New York Times News Service

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan — Every morning, jobless young men gather by the hundreds at the busy central square here in this southern city, desperate for whatever work they can find. In other places, this would be an army recruiter’s dream. Not so in Kandahar. Many of the men here have brothers and cousins in the insurgency, or are former fighters themselves. Others fear what would happen to them or their families if they joined the Afghan Army. “I don’t want to be killed by the Taliban,” Janan, 30, who like many Afghans goes by one name, said on a recent day as he jostled with the crowd under a scorching sun. Afghan and NATO officials have long struggled to entice young men in the heavily Pashtun south — the Taliban heartland — to join the Afghan Army. Despite years of efforts to increase the enlistment of southern Pashtuns, an analysis of recruitment patterns by The New York Times shows that the number of them joining the army remains relatively minuscule, reflecting a deep and lingering fear of the insurgents, or sympathy for them, as well as doubts about the stability and integrity of the central government in Kabul, the capital. The influx of tens of thousands of U.S. troops, who have pushed the Taliban back in much of the south, has done little to ease those concerns or to lift recruitment. In some places, the numbers of southern Pashtun recruits are actually shrinking, causing an overall decline of nearly 30 percent from a year ago. As the deadline looms for the withdrawal of most foreign forces in 2014, the need to enlist more southern Pashtuns is pressing if Afghanistan is to have a national army that resembles the ethnic and geographic makeup of the country. It is no small concern. The absence of southern Pashtuns reinforces the impression here that the army is largely a northern institution — to be used against them — and what Afghan and Western officials worry is a dangerous division of the country. The predominately Pashtun southern and southeastern provinces — Kandahar, Helmand, Oruzgan, Zabul, Paktika and Ghazni — make up about 17 percent of Afghanistan’s total population, yet they contributed just 1.5 percent of the soldiers recruited since 2009. Some progress has been made, but merely in percentage terms; Kandahar and Helmand more than doubled their number of recruits last year from the previous year. The raw numbers, however, are discouraging, and officials worry that the recent erosion of security in Kandahar City could re-

By The New York Times

Kuni Takahashi / New York Times News Service

Afghan National Army soldiers of different tribal backgrounds take a weapons class at the Army Training Center, in Kandahar, Afghanistan. verse the few gains they have made. The two provinces are home to nearly 2 million people. Yet since 2009 they have contributed fewer than 1,200 soldiers to the army, less than 1 percent of the nearly 173,000 enlistees in that period. By comparison, Kunduz, a northern province of about 900,000 people, enlisted more than 16,500 recruits. Oruzgan, a province of more than 300,000 residents, had 14 recruits all of last year. Not surprisingly, the vast majority of recruits come from provinces in the north and northeast, where the insurgency is weaker. While the overall representation of Pashtuns, Afghanistan’s largest ethnic group, in the army is equitable — they make up about 42 percent of the population and roughly the same percentage of the army — the vast majority come from a few northeastern provinces. More than a third come from Nangarhar province alone. Trying to lure more southern Pashtuns, Ministry of Defense officials have made it easier for them to qualify for officer candidate school and have assigned two southern Pashtun generals to the region to focus on recruiting. “Their job is to reach out to their communities and explain why it’s not only honorable, but it’s the right thing to do to join the army and to send your sons to join the army,” said Maj. Gen. D. Michael Day, the Canadian Army officer in charge of military training for NATO. “Because unless the elders, unless some recognized authority figure says this is what we should be doing, it doesn’t get done.” An assassination campaign in the south has hampered those efforts. In the past two years, suicide bombers

and armed men on motorcycles have struck down dozens of tribal elders sympathetic to the government, highlevel officials and even civil servants. “People are afraid,” said Abdul Ghani, deputy director of the Kandahar army recruiting center. “When we have assassinations and bombings every day like we have now, it really affects recruiting.” The center, operating out of a lonely cinder-block compound guarded by a machine-gun tower, sends teams of recruiters into the city and outlying districts every day armed with leaflets and posters. The increase in U.S. troops has made it easier for the teams to expand into more villages. Still, about half of the province’s 16 districts remain cut off, Ghani said. The recruiters themselves live under constant threat. Last year, a group of men beat a recruiter after he spoke to young people in a city bazaar. So far, though, most have been lucky. They have not had the kind of attack like the suicide bombing in March that killed 36 people at recruiting center in Kunduz. Recruiters must also compete with drug lords: Kandahar and Helmand provinces are the country’s largest producers of opium, and recruiting, desertion and even violence fluctuate with the poppy harvest. Where the recruiters have had the most difficulty is in persuading local mullahs, Muslim religious leaders, to join in the effort. “One word from a mullah is worth a thousand words from me,” Ghani said. But, he added, the mullahs “are not helping us right now, because they are afraid.” “They know if they preach for two or three days advocating for us, their heads will be cut off.”

DAMASCUS, Syria — As protests broke out across a restive Syria on a recent Sunday, and crowds were dispersed yet again by gunfire that left many dead, the conversation in the capital dwelled not on the uprising but rather on nails, along with the choice of polish and hair color and the latest in makeup trends. “I want either fuchsia or orange to match my dress,” a woman in her 50s said as she rummaged through a box of nail polish in an upscale beauty salon in Damascus. “Either one.” It does not take long to realize that there is a disconnect between Damascus and the rest of Syria. With a mix of denial and fear, and occasionally even satisfaction at the government’s determination to stanch dissent, many Damascenes insist on another reality. Sometimes jarring, sometimes reassuring, the detachment appears to have only deepened as the country plunges into some of its starkest international isolation since the Assad family took power in 1970 and as cities fall victim, one after the other, to a ferocious crackdown by a government seemingly without direction. Syria’s uprising has entered its sixth month, and protesters continue to defy the heavyhanded security forces that have, by the United Nations’ count, killed more than 2,200 people since mid-March. Sanctions have mounted, and once-friendly nations have criticized President Bashar Assad, urging him to reform and declaring that they have lost patience with his government’s attacks on its own people. Others have called on him to step down. But Damascus remains the linchpin, a reality that even activists acknowledge. Until protests reach this capital, their thinking goes, Syria’s leadership will avoid the fate of its ossified equivalents in places like Egypt and Tunisia. And so far, Damascus — along with Aleppo, the nation’s second-largest city — has stayed firmly on the margins, as anger builds toward both cities from Syrians bearing the brunt of the uprising. “Trust me, everything is normal,” insisted a manicurist at the salon. The salon, whose clientele includes the wives of the “rich and famous,” as one hairdresser described them, is just one of many examples that indicate how well Damascus has managed to shield itself during months of violence across the country. “At the beginning, there were some guys demonstrating for freedoms and rights, but it later turned out they were only trying to create a sectarian war,” the manicurist said. “The security forces are hunting them down, one by one. And they are almost done with them.” Her version of events is one that is repeated daily by Syrian state news media and television channels close to the government: that the country is facing a foreign conspiracy to divide it and that security forces are battling armed Islamist extremists who are terrorizing residents and have killed 500 police officers and soldiers so far. Even in neighborhoods where activists and protesters have reported demonstrations, life quickly returns to normal, as the government tries to rewrite what just happened, residents say.


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At Work Experts encourage more activity in increasingly inactive work spaces, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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2,473.83 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -6.50 -.26%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

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11,139.30 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE -100.96 -.90%

Collections of the Transient Room Tax hit a record in July at $540,914 for the city of Bend, up 10.5 percent from $489,662 collected in July 2010, according to reports released Tuesday by Deschutes County and the region’s tourism promotion agencies. The increase marked the 20th consecutive year-overyear monthly increase, according to Doug La Placa, president and CEO of Visit Bend, the city’s tourism promotion agency. For lodging outside of Bend, July collections reached the third highest monthly total on record at $762,447, up 12.8 percent, from $675,977 collected in July 2010. It also marks the fifth consecutive year-over-year monthly increase, according to Alana Audette, president and CEO of the Central Oregon Visitors Association.

1,165.24 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -8.73 -.74%

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 1.98 treasury CHANGE -.50%

FORECLOSURES IN DESCHUTES COUNTY

Notices of default down, rescission filings on rise

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$1869.90 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$3.80

Yahoo chief Carol Bartz fired SAN FRANCISCO — Carol Bartz, Yahoo’s chief executive, was fired Tuesday, ending a rocky two-year tenure in which she tried to revitalize the online media company. Bartz was informed of the board’s decision while she was traveling to New York from Maine, according to a person familiar with the board’s action. Timothy Morse, the company’s chief financial officer, will serve as the interim chief executive.

$41.818 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE -$1.202

%FGBVMUBOESFTDJTTJPOOPUJDFGJMJOHT Deschutes County filings of default notices, the legal document that begins foreclosure proceedings, and rescission notices, which rescind a default notice, from August 2010 through August 2011. Default notices

Rescission notices

600

So far this year, the filing of official legal notices that begin foreclosure proceedings has dropped 31 percent in Deschutes County, compared to 2010. But filings of the official document that cancels, or rescinds, foreclosure notices have increased 61 percent, according to the Deschutes County Clerk’s Office recording system.

More rescissions, however, does not necessarily mean fewer foreclosures. From January to August, 1,840 notices of default were filed in Deschutes County, a decrease of 834 during the same period in 2010. A notice of default is the legal document that initiates foreclosure proceedings and is generally filed by a lender after a borrower’s mortgage is 90 days delinquent. Not all notices of default end up in

foreclosure, and Deschutes County does not track actual foreclosures. Despite the overall dip in default filings, the number filed in April represented the single highest monthly total since at least January 2005, according to a tally of the notices by The Bulletin. Recontrust Company, a subsidiary of Bank of America, filed more than 80 percent of the April notices. See Notices / B5

400 300

183 200

163

100 0

AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG 2010 2011

4PVSDF%FTDIVUFT$PVOUZ$MFSLhT0GGJDFPOMJOFSFDPSEJOHTZTUFN "OEZ;FJHFSU5IF#VMMFUJO

Leadership shakeup at Bank of America

Grants awarded for hydro projects Two Central Oregon hydropower projects are among 16 nationwide to share in nearly $17 million in grants from the Departments of Energy and the Interior, federal officials announced Tuesday. Bend-based Earth By Design will receive $1.5 million to develop and test new modular hydropower technology in the North Unit Irrigation District canal, according to a joint news release from the two federal departments. Natel Energy, of Alameda, Calif., will receive $746,042 to deploy and test the commercial feasibility of a hydropower system that generates electricity from moving water dropping as little as three feet, according to the company’s website. Testing will be conducted at a Bureau of Reclamation facility near Madras, the news release stated.

t

500

By Tim Doran The Bulletin

Region’s hotel tax revenue still on rise

t

By Susanne Craig and Nelson D. Schwartz New York Times News Service

Brew, top to bottom Beer gear supplier’s new location features basement pub By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

T

he Brew Shop, which sells beer and home-brewing supplies, will open the Platypus Pub on Monday at its new location on Northeast Third Street and plans to add a brewery by early next year. The store had been located be-

tween Addison and Yale avenues on Northeast Division Street for the past four years. Store owners cited a lack of foot traffic as one reason for the relocation. Plus, adding a pub to the mix has been a goal for the owners. “We were always looking at doing a pub type of thing,� said Jeff Hawes, one of The Brew Shop’s

four co-owners. “But we just happened to find the right building where we could have both the pub and The Brew Shop under one roof.� The shop and pub take the place of Ernesto’s Italian Restaurant, at 1203 N.E. Third St., which closed in 2008. See Brew Shop / B5

Above: The Brew Shop is open in a new location on Third Street in Bend. Below: Coowner Tom Gilles tests a tap in the new pub located downstairs. The pub is scheduled to open Monday. Photos by Dean Guernsey The Bulletin

— Staff and wire reports

More business in brief on Page B2.

Drop in U.S. mail A shaky economy and changing customer habits are cutting into the U.S. Postal Service’s bottom line.

Bank of America shook up its top management team on Tuesday, as the beleaguered financial firm contended with a flagging share price and mounting legal liabilities. As part of the reshuffling, the bank announced the departure of two senior executives, Sallie Krawcheck, one of the top women on Wall Street, and Joe Price, a Bank of America veteran. David Darnell and Tom Montag were named co-chief operating officers, in newly created positions that will report directly to the company’s chief executive, Brian Moynihan. Montag will oversee the banking and markets activities, including Bank of America Merrill Lynch, which he headed previously. Darnell, currently head of global commercial banking, will run all of the consumer businesses, including wealth management and home loans. The reorganization — which essentially splits the sprawling empire into two main units, one focused on consumers, the other on businesses and institutions — comes as Bank of America faces an erosion of investor confidence. Amid growing losses linked to the mortgage crisis and fears that its capital cushion was insufficient, the financial firm has been pummeled, the laggard stock in an already troubled industry. Bank of America got a brief respite from its market problems last month when the billionaire Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway made a $5 billion investment. In the days that followed, the stock rose steadily. But the company’s legal problems continued to pile up, once again putting pressure on the stock. On Friday, federal regulators filed suit against Bank of America and 16 other firms, accusing them of misrepresenting the quality of mortgages that they sold to the housing giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. See Shake-up / B5

Volumes and revenue (In billions of pieces and dollars) First-class Advertising Other ( ) Revenue 212 ($75)

By Dominic Basulto

167 ($65)

Special to The Washington Post

Down 18 percent Down 26 percent 2007

Wal-Mart ventures into social commerce

2011

Source: U.S. Postal Service Š 2011 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Wal-Mart is starting to turn heads in the tech world — and that might have important implications for the way we think about the future of the shopping experience. A N A Once known for a soulless retail store experience and a hyper-efficient supply chain that delivered “everyday low prices,� WalMart has been fusing innovations from the mobile and social-network-

ing worlds to create the foundation for a radically new type of hyper-personalized shopping experience. The latest salvo from Wal-Mart is the creation of an @WalmartLabs group in the very heart of L Y S I S Silicon Valley — a move that might very well turn out to be the company’s most significant yet in an effort to become the undisputed leader of social commerce. What companies such as Wal-

Mart are realizing is that the lines between online, offline and mobile have blurred to the point at which every company must become a leader in each of these. Although Wal-Mart’s prowess in traditional retail almost goes without saying, the company has lagged when it comes to e-commerce and mobile commerce. As Amazon is pulling down $34 billion a year in e-commerce sales, Wal-Mart.com is turning over $6 billion. See Wal-Mart / B5

New York Times News Service ile photo

Checking out at Walmart in Saddle Brook, N.J. Wal-Mart is looking to social-media startup Kosmix as a way of expanding its market.


B

B2 Wednesday, September 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

U S I N E S S

M   www.bendchamber.org. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www .facebook.com/Zoomtax.

New painkiller rules cutting off patients

MONDAY

By Carol M. Ostrom

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. CULTURE OF PREPAREDNESS — THE 72 HOUR RULE: Hosted by U.S. Small Business Administration and Agility Recovery Solutions weekly webinars with steps on preparing for emergencies for National Preparedness Month. Advance registration encouraged; free; 11 a.m.-noon; www1.gotomeeting .com/register/582741824.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. BBG BEND BUSINESS GROUP: Weekly meeting. Guests please preregister with Matt Bassitt; free; 7:30 a.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-323-7000. ETFs EXPLAINED: Better understand ETFs: what they are, how they work and how they can be useful investments. Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz .soutomaior@schwab.com or www .schwab.com. GREEN PATHWAYS: Presentation about how to help homeowners improve their weatherization and incentives available for doing so; free; 5:30-6:30 p.m.; Neil Kelly, 190 N.E. Irving Ave., Bend; 541-389-1058 or www.coba.org.

FRIDAY BUSINESS 20/20: Host Karnopp Peterson and sponsor Oregon Business Magazine bring experienced business executives to Central Oregon in this breakfast series to encourage new ideas, promote professional growth and provide educational opportunities. The first speaker is Kanth Gopalpur who will discuss “Access to Capital” and his financial experiences building three companies; register by Sept. 6 at http://biz2020.eventbrite.com/. Breakfast included; $25; 7:30-9:30 a.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-318-9800 ext. 312, arg@karnopp.com or www .kpbusiness2020.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www .facebook.com/Zoomtax.

SATURDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining .com. HOMEBUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

TUESDAY KNOW COMPUTERS FOR BEGINNERS: Introduction to computers, e-mail and the Internet. Reservations encouraged; free; 10:30 a.m.-noon; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-6177080. OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS ANNUAL CELEBRATION: A general membership business meeting followed by an evening social with award recognition sponsored by OnPoint Community Credit Union and Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt. Registration requested; $15; 4:30-7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-318-4650, info@opp-knocks.org or http:// opportunityknocksevents.eventbrite. com.

WEDNESDAY Sept. 14 BUSINESS NETWORK

INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. BUSINESS SUCCESS PROGRAM, TOP 10 WAYS TO MINIMIZE THE RISK OF EMPLOYEE CLAIMS: Ron Roome, Jon Napier and Kurt Baker from Karnopp Petersen LLP discuss best practices for avoiding claims, minimizing exposure if a claim is filed and dos and don’ts when it comes to employment law, human resources and management; free; 7:30-9 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining .com. THE 10 COMMANDMENTS OF DISASTER PREPAREDNESS: Hosted by U.S. Small Business Administration and Agility Recovery Solutions weekly webinars with steps on preparing for emergencies for National Preparedness Month. Advance registration encouraged; free; 11 a.m.-noon; www1.gotomeeting. com/register/767371552. BANKS AND OTHER FINANCIAL SERVICES: Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NETWORKING SOCIAL: Free; 5:30 p.m.; Juniper Realty, 14290 S.W. Chinook Road; 541-923-2679 or www.crrchamber.com. ENERGY TRUST OF OREGON HOSTS HOME ENERGY IQ WORKSHOP: Learn to save energy by making small changes around your house. Identify the biggest energy users in your home and how energy use changes over time. Also learn how to offset the cost of qualifying improvements with cash incentives and tax credits. Register at www.regonline.com/Register/ Checkin.aspx?EventID=972491; free; 6-8 p.m.; Sunriver Fire Department, 57475 Abbott Drive; 866-368-7878.

THURSDAY Sept. 15 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. BBG BEND BUSINESS GROUP: Weekly meeting. Guests please preregister with Matt Bassitt; free; 7:30 a.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-323-7000. NORTHWEST GREEN BUILDING INDUSTRY SUMMIT: Hosted by the Central Oregon Builders Association, a green building event with 16 classes offered on topics ranging from building materials and methods to heating and cooling equipment to landscaping. Keynote speaker is Christine Ervin, former U.S. assistant secretary of energy and the first CEO of the U.S. Green Building Council; $40 for COBA members: $55 for others; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center, 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-389-1058 or www.coba.org. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz. soutomaior@schwab.com or www .schwab.com.

FRIDAY Sept. 16 TOWN HALL FORUM, BEND PARKS & RECREATION FORECASTS IMPACTS TO LOCAL COMMUNITY: Bend Parks and Recreation executive director Don Horton addresses how the growth of Bend impacts the park system, plans for the future, the right balance of parks for a city Bend’s size and the role parks play in economic development; $30 for Bend Chamber members, $40 for others; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-3221 or

The Seattle Times

Sept. 19 WORRIED ABOUT MAKING HOUSE PAYMENTS?: Learn what to do if you fall behind. Registration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541318-7506, ext. 109.

TUESDAY Sept. 20 KNOW INTERNET FOR BEGINNERS: Reservations encouraged; free; 10:30 a.m.-noon; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-6177080.

WEDNESDAY Sept. 21 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; ; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. RESILIENT AMERICA - PERSONAL AND COMMUNITY PREP: Hosted by U.S. Small Business Administration and Agility Recovery Solutions weekly webinars with steps on preparing for emergencies for National Preparedness Month. Advance registration encouraged; free; 11 a.m.-noon; https://www1.gotomeeting.com/ register/652630793. CUSTOMER SERVICE, GAINING AND RETAINING A STRONG MARKET: An Opportunity Knocks event with presenters Ben Perle, regional manager for the Oxford Hotel Group who will discuss remembering customers and making them feel special; Ali Cammelletti, client training specialist for Navis will discuss how to get your employees to implement and sustain a customer service environment and Teague Hatfield, owner of Footzone will discuss striving for a genuine, healthy culture where good people are empowered to do what is right for their customers. Registration required; $30 for Opportunity Knocks members; $45 for others; 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-318-4650, info@oppknocks.org or http://www.eventbrite .com/event/1885986035/eorg. RISK MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION SOCIAL: RSVP requested; $5; 4-7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-389-8140 or jay.g.clark@chase.com. UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING CREDIT: Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541318-7506, ext. 109.

THURSDAY Sept. 22 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. WHAT WORKS, A TIME-TESTED APPROACH TO INVESTING: Learn how to develop an investment plan, put the plan into action and know how to review and adjust the plan. Registration required; free; ; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz. soutomaior@schwab.com or www .schwab.com. BBG BEND BUSINESS GROUP: Weekly meeting. Guests please preregister with Matt Bassitt; free; 7:30 a.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-323-7000. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining .com. FACEBOOK AND TWITTER BASICS: Registration required; $39; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc .edu.

NEWS OF RECORD BANKRUPTCIES Chapter 7 Filed Aug. 30

Danial J. Eggleston, 1375 Elk Court #128 and Chandra L. Eggleston, P.O. Box 5472, Bend Steen W. Claussen and Sandra E. Claussen, 19748 Aspen Ridge Drive, Bend Dalaina Smith, 24859 Elk Lane, Bend Filed Aug. 31

Marcelino Mendoza and Maria A. Mendoza, 63940 Pioneer Loop, Bend Jamasa L. Sattler, 785 S.W.

Second St., Madras David P. Miller, 1915 N.W. Second St., Bend Travis M. Ryan and Jessica R. Ryan, P.O. Box 535, Prineville Rick A. Jacobsen and Kimberly D. Jacobsen, 1947 N.W. Jackpine Place, Redmond Dennis L. Coffman and Patsy E. Coffman, 61611 Summer Shade, Bend Filed Sept. 1

John D. Crisp and Judy L. Crisp, P.O. Box AA, Madras Othon A. Gomez and Rosa M. Gomez, 3031 N.E. Stonebrook Drive, Bend

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

Filed Sept. 2

Michael A. Teitgen and Janelle M. Teitgen, 61710 Darla Place, Bend Filed Sept. 5

Kathryn C. Greene, 60855 Jennings Road, Bend

SEATTLE — Denis Murphy’s last doctor got suspicious when he saw him sitting in a restaurant. Murphy, 72, who contracted a painful nerve disorder after a case of shingles, had told the doctor his condition is so painful he often has to stand up. At his next appointment, the doctor accused him of flimflamming him: making up a story to score narcotic pain relievers. Murphy, a retired IRS pension-plan examiner and manager from Edmonds, Wash., was humiliated. Now, he has a new doctor and a new prescription — but also a growing fear that he could suddenly lose the only relief he’s found in six years. Over the last several months, an effort in Washington to curb a steep rise in prescription drug overdose deaths — the most ambitious crackdown in the nation — has prompted a number of doctors and clinics to stop taking new chronicpain patients on opiates, and in some cases to cut off current pain patients. The hard new line marks the end of a period of relatively liberal prescribing that began in the late 1980s. Before then, studies showed that pain was being seriously undertreated, even in dying patients. The statistics and stories fueled assisted-death campaigns in Washington and Oregon and prompted medical boards to reassure doctors not to fear discipline for relieving pain. But as opiate prescribing increased, so did the deaths — to alarming levels.

donment going on.” McGough calls the new law and rules helpful and important, saying many pain patients weren’t previously well-managed. “That said, a lot of physicians are saying it’s more trouble than it’s worth, so I’m just going to send my patients away.” The swift reaction by doctors and clinics to the new rules has startled even critics who expected some negative fallout for patients. What lawmakers wanted to do was to stop the dying.

relieving it should be a national priority. But on the ground, practical realities rule. At Country Doctor Community Health Centers, Dr. Hal Moore, clinic site director, said providers decided they were spending too much energy on pain patients. “Is the pain real, are they drug seeking, is mental health a factor? There are all these factors you have to consider,” he said, and the rules added another layer. As a result, Moore said, new pain patients no longer will get opiates at those clinics. For some pain patients, the changes are unnerving. “I’m living in fear of cutoff,” says Denis Murphy, despite being what his wife, Judy Murphy, calls a career rule-follower. He understands that doctors are afraid of being disciplined, so he endures the random urine tests, although “at the age of 70-plus, it’s no fun to go down to one of these druggie centers and stand in line with all these guys with tattoos and pee in a bottle.” Others say they know they need to reduce their medication but say they haven’t been given help to do so. Eric, a Mercer Island father who has had severe back pain for years after several failed surgeries, said he wants to cut back on his opiate dose but doesn’t know how he’d get pain relief during the process. “When I don’t have my pain meds, I sit in the corner shaking and doubled over in pain.”

‘Overtreatment is the new undertreatment’ The graphs and charts were ominous, and testimony by Dr. Alex Cahana, head of the UW’s Division of Pain Medicine, among others, drew a grim picture of patients addicted or dying from lax prescribing. Cahana, chief proponent of the new regulations, thinks many doctors have been too quick with the pills, in part because they have little training in other modes of relief, a situation he is working to change at the UW. “Since when does good pain management equal opioids? Since when has the whole practice been reduced to just prescribing a pill?” says Cahana. “The U.S. is the only country in the world where overtreatment is the new undertreatment.” In a report this year, the federal Institute of Medicine estimated that chronic pain affects 116 million American adults and that

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Last year, Washington lawmakers attempted to reverse the trend, requiring licensing boards to craft tougher rules for treating pain patients, except for those with injuries, surgery, cancer or who are dying. The rules don’t take effect until Jan. 1 but already, many doctors say they will mean a lot of work, requiring them to gather records, check emergency-room reports, sign pain contracts with patients and arrange consultations as they try to assess an invisible affliction. In the South Puget Sound area, a University of Washington Medicine neighborhood clinic stopped taking new chronic-pain patients on opiates about two months ago, after patients flooded in, saying their doctors had cut them off. “A lot of it is because other providers have stopped doing it,” said Dr. Peter McGough, chief medical officer for UW Medicine’s Neighborhood Clinics. “I think there’s been a fair amount of patient aban-

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B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 7, 2011 B3

A W We all need to get up and move, but what can we do?

NOT TOO

In the spirit of public service (and because our boss made us), The Post’s infographics department tested exercises in and around our cubicles twice a day for a week to see which ones real people could incorporate into a workday. The moves were suggested by experts whose jobs involve studying motion, preventing obesity and generally getting people off their duffs. We rejected a few immediately — jumping jacks? Not in this bra! — but chose these nine. The Washington Post Our observations aren’t scientific, but they’re definitely real.

Raise the roof (20 reps) — While marching in place, push toward the ceiling with your palms up and thumbs almost touching your shoulders. Make it harder by holding books or water bottles.

1

2

Triceps kick (20 reps) — While marching in place, bend at the hips, about 45 degrees. Bend your elbows, then extend them behind you as if you are lifting weights.

3

45°

VERY

Difficult?

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2

3

Sweaty?

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2

3

Humiliating?

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2

3

The hulk (20 reps) — Keep marching and leaning. With your elbows bend and fists together in front, move your arms back like wings. Try to touch your shoulder blades together.

Increased activity stressed for office workers

Source:

1 Artist / The Bulletin

1

1

2

1

2

2

2

New York Times Pro: One person foundNews it Service “comforting” to dust off a 1990s dance move. © Con: 2011 McClatchy-Tribune Brief moment ofNews Service

panic while you try to remember if you shaved your armpits.

4

Hamstring curl (20 reps) — Bend arms at the elbow. Bring one foot up toward your rear end while straightening your arms so that your hands are down when your foot is up.

5

1

3

Pro: Some people make funny sound effects.

Con: Awkward-looking. Several people accidentally whacked things behind them.

Con: Draws attention to the chest area.

Knee lift (20 reps) — Just like hamstring curls, except you lift your knee up in front as your arms go down.

6

Hallelujah (20 reps) — Sweep arms above your head and down again as you step side-to-side. Yelling “Hallelujah!” is optional.

1

1 2

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7

Punching (20 reps) — While rocking foot to foot, punch with alternating arms. To reduce elbow stress, try not to fully straighten your arm.

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Pro: Wakes up the hip flexors and quadriceps. Con: Requires concentration and coordination.

8

Desk pushup (10 reps) —

1 2 2

Pro: Cathartic; and outlet for aggression. Con: Most workplaces do not allow you to actually hit anyone.

The Washington Post

Pro: Loosens your upper body.

1

Pro: Not terribly noticeable. Con: Requires caution to avoid kicking things behind you.

By Christian Torres

Place hands on edge of desk, shoulder width apart, legs out behind you. Push off with as much force as you can.

Wardrobe warning: Hemlines will rise on both skirts and shirts.

1

Wardrobe warning: Impossible in a tight skirt; illadvised in a short skirt.

3

Pro: Made us smile. Lends a flash-mob feel to even the least coordinated group. Con: Not the slightest bit subtle.

9

Side lunge (10 reps) — Take a big step to one side. Point toes forward and bend one knee, keeping other leg straight. Push back up.

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Pro: Not noticeable from across the room. Tough, in a good way. Con: First, make sure your desk doesn’t slide easily.

Pro: Doesn’t attract much attention. Con: Can be hard on the knees.

Sources: Toni Yancey, professor of health services at UCLA; Alice Burron, exercise physiologist and spokeswoman for the American Council on Exercise; Catrine Tudor-Locke, who studies walking behavior at Pennington Biomedical Research

Wardrobe warning: Difficult (and risky) in pencil skirts, tight pants and heels.

Give public workers their due By Katrina vanden Heuvel Special to The Washington Post

T

his year has been one of the toughest for public workers that I can remember. Every month until this past one, the private sector has added jobs, and every month the public sector has lost them. The August employment report shows that the public sector got hit hard again — losing 17,000 jobs. In states across the country, public workers aren’t COMME just being laid off; they’re being made into economic scapegoats. These workers deserve to be treated fairly any time. But in the wake of Hurricane Irene, as we watched teams of federal, state and local government workers tirelessly saving lives, they deserve much better. The last decade has been marked by both peril and possibility, and in all of it there has been no shortage of American heroes. Many, if not the vast majority, worked for the government — as firefighters and police, as teachers and rescue workers. In the aftermath of Sept. 11, 2001, men and women proudly wore hats and shirts labeled “FDNY” and “NYPD.” When we wept for our nation, it was the bravery of the first responders that reminded us of our national character. In the 10 years since, those and other public workers haven’t been any less heroic or any less essential. But they have been significantly less appreciated, even demonized. “There are a lot of government employees that need to go find a real job,” Rep. Paul Broun, R-Ga., snorted in June. For

many on the right, a government worker isn’t a worker at all. This, more than anything, comes from a broadening acceptance that government can do no good. But even within the farright fringes, it used to be the case that government, though small, was supposed to serve essential functions. When it is convenient, government and government workers are praised, N T A R Y as in the case of Gov. Chris Christie, RN.J., who lauded FEMA workers as “very responsive” in preparing for Hurricane Irene. When it isn’t, they are attacked, as in the case of the same Christie, who spent most of his career bashing government workers, and whose signature achievement has been to slash benefits for public-sector unions. It’s hard to imagine what government would be like in the face of crisis were the tea party in control of more than just the House of Representatives. Would it have defunded the National Weather Service, making it impossible to know where the hurricane would hit and who would need to flee from harm’s way? Would it have defunded the Federal Emergency Management Agency, as one of their heroes, Rep. Ron Paul, RTexas, has called for, and instead opted to “be like 1900,” as he described it? If the tea party had its way, might there have been too few first responders on 9/11? Government isn’t just about first responders, of course. When our public school teachers are constantly asked to do more with

less, when they work to prepare the next generation for an uncertain economic future, they deserve our deepest gratitude. There’s no question that, in any number of ways, government lets us down. Our leaders have too often stacked government against the interests of working people in favor of corporate elites. But was it overpaid and undertaxed

CEOs who saved flood victims or rushed into the towers? Our impulse should not be to renounce government; it should be to recapture and restore it. It is time for the era of despised government to end. Katrina vanden Heuvel is editor and publisher of the Nation magazine.

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Summer vacations are over for most people, so it’s time to head back to the daily grind. But work today doesn’t usually mean breaking a sweat. More of us are spending our 9 to 5 at a desk — and we’re less healthy as a result. A study published in May by the online journal PLoS One estimates that Americans are burning more than 100 fewer calories per day in the workplace than they did just a few decades ago, when fewer jobs were confined to a desk. “We’ve had massive changes in the ‘workplace’ environment, and in this case, it’s a loss of physically active jobs,” said lead author Tim Church, an exercise researcher at Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge. Church and his colleagues found that the number of people in jobs requiring moderate physical activity decreased from 48 percent in 1960 to 20 percent in 2008. The researchers also found a match between the drop in calories burned and increase in average weight during the past five decades. A few creative types have come up with ideas to increase workplace activity. For example, endocrinologist James Levine of the Mayo Clinic has promoted the treadmill desk, which lets you walk slowly as you work at an attached desktop; factory-made models cost $2,000 and up. There are under-desk step machines such as the $195 Gamercize PCSport; if you stop pedaling, your mouse or keyboard stop working. Toni Yancey, a researcher at the UCLA School of Public Health, has developed and written a book about a 10-minute exercise routine called “Instant Recess.” It includes both strength training and aerobic exercises that can be done within the boundaries of a cubicle. Whichever approach workers might take, researchers agreed, the most important step is getting up and moving. “Something’s always better than nothing,” Church said.

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B USI N ESS

B4 Wednesday, September 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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A-B-C-D AAR ABB Ltd ABM ACE Ltd ACI Wwde AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMC Net n AMN Hlth AMR AOL APACC ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXT Inc Aarons Aastrom AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac AboveNet Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaRlt Accelrys Accenture AccoBrds AccretivH Accuray Accuride n Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Actuate Acuity Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvATech AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Adventrx AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agria Cp Agrium g AirLease n AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas Aixtron AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom AlbnyIn Albemarle AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alere AlexBld AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion s AlignTech Alkerm AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBGlbHi AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlldNevG AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AllyFn pfB AlonUSA AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf AlterraCap AltraHldgs Altria AlumChina AmBev s Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL s AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AmIntlGrp AmStsWtr AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn AmCasino Ameron Ametek s Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev Ancestry AnglogldA ABInBev Anixter Ann Inc Annaly Ansys AntaresP Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC Approach AquaAm ArQule ArcelorMit ArchCap s ArchCh ArchCoal ArchDan ArcosDor n ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmourRsd ArmstrW s Arris ArrowEl ArtioGInv ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRtl AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth AtlPwr g AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS Atrins rsh AtwoodOcn Augusta g AuRico g Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalRare n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw

0.30 0.64 0.56 1.36

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Nm AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil BabckWil Baidu BakrHu BallCp s BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantSA BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm pfJ BkAm wtA BkAML pfQ BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g Banro g BarcGSOil BiPCop BarcBk prD Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BectDck BedBath Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biocryst Biodel BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkBldAm BlkDebtStr BlkGlbOp BlkIntlG&I Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat Blyth +11.73 BdwlkPpl Boeing Boise Inc BoozAllen n BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoydGm BradyCp Brandyw Braskem BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker BrMySq BristowGp BritATob Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSoft Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldOfPr BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp Brunswick BuckTch Buckle Buenavent BungeLt C&J Egy n CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBOE CBRE GRE CBS B CF Inds CGG Verit CGI g CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC CNinsure CPFL En s CRH CSG Sys CSX s CTC Media CVB Fncl CVD Eqp CVR Engy CVS Care CYS Invest Cabelas CblvsNY s Cabot CabotO&G CACI CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaCvOp CalaStrTR Calgon Calix CallGolf Callidus CallonP h Calpine CAMAC En CamdenPT Cameco g CameltInfo Cameron CampSp CampCC n CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet CapellaEd CapOne CapitlSrce CapFdF rs CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CarboCer CardnlHlth Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd CaribouC Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CashAm CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen Cavium Cbeyond CedarSh Celadon Celanese Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom CelldexTh Celsion Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE Centene CenterPnt CnElBras lf CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CenGrdA lf

D 12.31 -.04 1.10 23.91 -.12 24.50 -.45 0.92 21.24 -.24 1.29 -.02 0.92 27.35 -.27 0.84 17.19 -.10 0.64 20.89 -.02 2.07 38.74 -.82 31.73 -.35 0.68 6.23 +.16 2.02 80.56 -1.42 2.02 64.20 -1.42 43.48 -.90 50.93 +.03 38.02 -.90 1.68 36.39 -.14 3.37 -.04 1.50 48.50 -.04 0.35 19.30 -.18 20.59 -.26 143.19 +2.74 0.60 57.56 -.71 0.28 34.85 -.17 28.89 -.49 1.36 63.68 -1.01 0.59 8.19 -.25 0.80 17.74 -.29 0.82 8.27 -.31 1.65 9.13 -.52 0.04 10.06 -.05 0.04 6.99 -.26 2.05 23.74 -.53 1.81 21.80 -.65 3.33 -.11 2.16 24.15 -.65 1.80 37.96 -.34 1.10 -.08 2.80 60.02 -.89 0.52 19.53 -.42 2.08 52.78 -1.10 4.67 -.03 21.92 -.05 52.81 -.78 2.03 24.54 -.37 0.36 9.89 -.71 42.72 +1.24 64.93 +.63 0.76 91.76 -.09 11.78 +.07 0.32 21.44 +.25 0.48 53.59 +.72 19.08 -1.25 1.24 54.07 -.05 2.40 47.19 -1.34 17.46 +.38 1.82 -.09 0.10 6.42 +.09 1.64 78.43 -.06 56.61 +.17 0.24 5.14 -.01 0.96 29.86 -.08 12.43 -.12 0.32 29.55 -.43 68.37 -1.00 0.32 44.97 -.55 0.64 23.30 -.80 31.88 -.13 45.46 -.27 2.86 -.05 1.18 91.91 +.33 28.12 -.45 0.80 17.66 +.10 2.55 +.03 1.46 29.94 -.29 1.04 8.34 +.06 42.99 -.14 5.50 152.41 -3.63 1.42 19.82 +.04 0.32 3.96 +.03 2.28 15.50 -.07 1.36 8.85 -.01 0.40 12.50 -.52 0.60 13.49 +.08 15.53 +.10 0.20 64.80 2.10 24.85 -.06 1.68 62.77 -1.26 0.80 5.62 -.16 14.92 -.34 67.50 -.57 0.04 5.53 +.06 2.00 101.77 +.52 6.31 -.11 5.51 -.12 0.72 26.15 -.10 0.60 9.00 -.12 1.05 22.34 -.20 20.48 +.08 0.44 14.86 -.11 28.12 +.20 9.27 -.07 1.51 -.03 0.64 21.16 -.54 1.32 29.24 +.23 0.60 41.31 -.18 3.86 88.58 -1.65 0.36 33.12 -1.45 0.64 20.43 -.06 29.35 -.01 .57 +.01 3.65 +.01 14.65 -.69 0.52 28.36 -.41 0.56 16.28 -.14 0.34 7.97 +.15 0.32 8.52 -.01 0.32 19.71 -.26 0.28 7.34 -.08 1.28 68.07 -1.80 12.96 -.30 0.05 14.68 0.24 25.37 +.20 0.80 36.23 -2.37 0.49 47.57 +.29 1.00 62.74 -.42 24.95 -1.30 0.20 19.81 -.34 13.96 -.39 0.84 13.49 -.13 0.48 24.19 +.16 0.54 7.61 +.02 0.40 22.95 -.41 1.60 185.69 +3.80 20.61 -2.33 18.40 -.67 1.16 65.40 -1.59 0.04 44.41 -.43 32.44 -.32 1.12 34.25 -.23 5.60 254.79 -3.91 0.84 19.04 -.26 29.93 -.42 5.79 -.02 6.42 182.19 -9.39 9.70 -.10 1.52 25.60 -.19 0.87 16.38 -.39 12.63 -.11 0.48 20.36 -.20 0.91 14.33 -.30 0.34 7.94 -.03 18.47 -.15 27.32 +.98 0.50 35.81 +.38 2.40 12.75 +.24 21.85 -.13 0.60 16.57 -.37 0.72 32.40 -.64 0.12 75.10 +.86 49.98 +.06 6.36 +.23 8.79 -.09 2.23 -.44 1.14 11.98 +.04 0.63 8.43 -.14 14.92 +.06 12.40 -.49 0.04 5.43 +.18 4.22 -.05 5.30 -.02 14.22 -.20 .75 -.04 1.96 65.04 +.08 0.40 22.19 -.34 5.10 -.12 49.19 -.44 1.16 31.19 -.27 0.64 10.98 -.16 3.60 76.14 -1.11 1.30 70.88 -.78 0.36 34.85 -.65 1.20 54.28 -1.12 5.86 -.18 .21 30.42 0.20 41.73 -.55 0.04 6.30 +.17 0.30 10.49 +.01 1.64 12.71 +.17 1.09 -.01 0.96 145.97 -.69 0.86 41.22 -.19 24.24 -.01 24.22 -.34 15.32 -.04 14.14 -.07 0.72 35.73 -.61 26.51 +.05 1.00 30.47 -.39 0.72 46.67 -1.16 27.43 -.11 29.27 -.38 0.60 44.08 +.33 0.14 54.38 +1.22 53.55 -.45 1.84 85.70 +.32 0.04 11.54 -.04 29.79 -.43 9.13 +.06 0.36 3.42 +.14 0.08 10.65 -.54 0.24 41.67 -2.30 7.86 -.17 59.23 +.89 1.13 -.06 3.49 21.15 -.67 2.68 -.08 3.58 -.02 4.96 -.09 1.89 17.93 -.24 0.80 34.37 -.44 30.79 -.09 0.79 19.23 -.22 1.56 10.27 +.28 6.49 -.61 11.12 -.36 0.01 25.71 -.16 7.23 -.14

Nm CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid CeragonN Cerner s ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds CharterCm ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinaInf h ChinaLife ChinaMble ChinaSecur ChinaTcF ChinaUni Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel n ChurchD s CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfN Citigrp rs Citigp wtA CitrixSys CityNC Clarcor ClaudeR g CleanEngy CleanH s Clearwire CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn CocaCola CocaCE Coeur CoffeeH CogdSpen CogentC Cognex CognizTech Coinstar ColdwtrCrk Colfax ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmclVehcl CmwREIT CmtyBkSy CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CmGnom n CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComScore ComstkRs Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire Copart Copel CoreLabs CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpExc CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Cosi Inc Costco Cott Cp Cntwd pfB CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrackerB Credicp CSVS2xVxS CSVelIVSt s CredSuiss Cree Inc CreXus Crocs CrosstexE CrosstxLP CrwnCstle CrownHold Ctrip.com CubistPh CullenFr Cummins CumMed Curis CurEuro CurrCda CurJpn CurSwiss CurtisWrt Cymer CypSemi CytRx h Cytec Cytori DCT Indl DFC Gbl s DG FastCh DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton Drdgold DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DanaHldg Danaher DaqoNEn n Darden Darling Datalink DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckrsOut DeerConsu Deere DejourE g Delcath Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir Deluxe DemMda n DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DB Cap pf DBGoldSh DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE DexCom Diageo DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards DineEquity Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBull DrSCBr rs DirFnBr rs DirLCBr rs DirDMBr rs DirDGldBr DirDGldBll DrxEMBull DrxTcBear DRE Bear DrxEnBear DrxSOXBll DirEMBear DrxFnBull Dir30TrBear Dir30TrBull DrxREBull DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull

D 10.93 -.16 2.90 33.23 -.92 3.84 -.09 80.57 -.04 34.17 +.16 9.60 -.05 64.45 +.45 31.52 -.24 2.71 -.07 45.87 +.44 47.91 -.97 52.68 -.38 26.36 -.01 4.24 +.15 12.49 -.19 7.11 -.06 0.35 30.92 -1.19 3.12 95.61 -.80 0.20 33.82 +1.02 0.20 13.00 +.02 40.62 -.17 0.62 2.89 1.04 -.01 0.91 35.01 -.74 2.04 50.71 +1.37 6.14 -.06 2.39 -.17 0.12 21.23 +.24 310.43 +4.93 9.39 -.19 1.56 59.33 -1.05 1.91 34.06 +.04 0.68 42.86 +.56 2.83 -.08 13.07 -.71 0.40 66.50 -.84 3.00 -.08 1.61 26.53 -.35 0.84 20.33 +.14 0.49 30.26 -.57 14.17 -.03 0.24 15.28 -.13 1.97 26.01 +.01 0.04 27.70 -.70 .42 -.03 56.14 -1.21 0.80 41.44 -.33 0.42 44.41 +.65 2.01 -.02 12.18 -.24 51.38 -.08 2.96 -.14 1.12 75.20 -3.29 2.40 68.47 -.12 19.38 -.04 0.90 53.13 -.08 9.41 -.03 1.88 69.43 -.31 0.52 26.86 -.04 29.15 0.12 18.26 +.27 0.40 4.03 -.05 13.03 -.14 0.36 29.51 -.11 60.37 -.73 44.61 -.61 .90 +.08 22.90 -.49 2.32 88.99 +.47 12.69 +.20 0.60 20.39 +.12 2.16 +.07 0.45 20.71 -.29 0.45 20.52 -.28 0.40 22.66 -.78 0.92 36.66 -.49 0.48 10.63 -.33 6.31 -.04 2.00 19.41 +.08 0.96 23.47 -.01 18.08 -.36 32.54 +.16 0.39 39.60 -.33 8.64 +.23 26.92 -.72 0.80 27.65 -.94 7.75 -.11 15.40 +.06 18.74 -.39 0.40 23.06 -.40 0.92 23.90 -.19 84.78 -.81 38.73 -.30 2.64 65.70 -.74 0.40 43.65 -1.13 2.40 55.78 -.29 18.78 -.36 0.96 37.94 -.26 51.40 -1.16 6.32 +.02 9.46 -.24 0.06 73.66 +.89 1.16 43.49 -1.04 0.42 11.14 -.46 41.20 -.13 1.00 21.33 -.01 1.00 109.29 +.12 11.28 -.14 1.87 -.04 0.64 44.94 -.82 0.20 14.04 -.08 0.60 31.25 +.01 1.65 24.95 -.10 22.51 +.09 0.28 11.24 -.26 .59 -.10 0.96 78.40 -.16 7.62 -.17 1.75 21.46 -.04 0.18 6.50 -.04 48.33 +.83 0.30 15.70 -.09 31.75 +.19 0.80 50.24 -.29 3.15 -.06 0.88 40.40 -.18 1.95 98.51 +.51 59.58 +3.37 7.16 -.22 1.40 23.84 -3.54 30.15 -.08 0.87 8.82 -.18 25.89 +.49 0.40 11.26 -.07 1.24 16.61 +.76 42.06 -.22 33.64 -.52 39.44 -.23 32.69 -.21 1.84 47.26 -.18 1.60 85.54 -1.28 2.45 -.07 3.04 +.16 0.19 139.46 -1.93 0.11 100.48 -.58 126.92 -1.40 114.80-10.45 0.32 28.36 -.50 37.09 -.59 0.36 15.05 -.19 .35 -.00 0.50 40.59 -1.06 3.06 -.09 0.28 4.35 +.03 21.87 +.58 20.19 -.01 0.40 2.72 -.07 0.78 9.97 -.01 1.33 29.99 +.07 0.15 9.73 -.24 0.07 5.63 +.06 0.70 43.50 -.78 0.60 44.90 +.64 2.35 48.87 -.77 12.03 -.16 0.08 42.93 -.12 5.24 -.15 1.72 46.18 -.25 16.04 -.09 9.07 -.21 72.04 +.68 0.24 41.45 +.71 8.10 +.02 86.79 +.89 0.20 4.03 -.80 1.64 77.14 -.89 .28 -.02 3.73 -.08 14.25 +.01 0.48 21.98 +.02 7.13 -.14 1.00 19.88 -.42 7.98 -.41 14.34 -.59 10.81 -.15 1.49 -.06 3.59 +.11 0.20 33.35 -.62 5.84 -.04 1.07 33.58 -2.69 1.90 24.30 -.04 11.03 +.01 71.49 -.27 4.08 +.02 0.16 11.42 -.06 0.68 63.84 -.77 11.36 -.16 2.63 78.47 -2.07 0.18 75.40 -.88 0.50 61.27 -.30 0.32 7.19 +.04 8.57 -.24 9.29 +.06 32.86 -.08 1.12 27.19 -.33 2.72 57.32 -.53 18.11 -.47 0.20 44.21 +.33 37.39 -.58 18.14 -.38 42.06 -.17 0.84 30.55 -.46 47.91 +.34 63.33 +2.71 43.82 +.87 44.27 +3.91 29.70 -.29 41.54 +.48 1.20 22.14 -.66 24.52 +.36 12.50 +.12 18.46 +.62 0.01 23.76 -.48 22.49 +.68 12.38 -.71 19.24 -.67 1.39 61.03 +1.89 0.05 49.92 -.27 40.39 -.44 0.10 52.17 -1.15 43.07 -1.60

Nm

D

Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DishNetwk Disney DolbyLab DoleFood DollarGen DollarTh DollarTree DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip DryShips DuPont DuPFabros Df&PGblUt DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad Dunkin n DurectCp DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy DynexCap

0.24 23.89 -.33 39.77 -.57 37.98 -.79 24.06 -.24 0.40 31.76 -.70 32.09 -.03 9.81 -.23 36.45 +.39 64.63 -.25 72.18 +.97 1.97 47.89 -.09 27.36 +.50 1.40 76.68 +1.33 0.60 55.77 -.21 1.04 14.03 -.30 1.39 -.02 0.52 17.32 +.11 1.26 53.87 -1.15 1.00 26.14 -.57 1.28 37.43 -.30 18.83 -.96 41.70 +1.13 0.52 4.58 -.01 62.31 +.44 2.82 -.13 1.64 46.14 -.62 0.48 21.59 -.26 0.35 20.00 -.01 1.00 18.64 -.14 0.68 11.18 +.01 1.44 63.59 -.07 27.02 +.02 1.41 -.03 1.48 +.06 17.64 +.58 2.28 +.09 5.32 +.41 1.08 8.43 +.04

E-F-G-H ECDang n E-House E-Trade eBay EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp ETFSGold EV Engy EagleBulk EagleMat ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton s EatnVan EV EEq2 EV TxAd EV TxAG EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW Ebix Inc EchoStar Ecolab Ecopetrol EdisonInt EducMgmt EducRlty EdwLfSci 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoEl ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts Embraer Emcore lf Emdeon EmersonEl EmmisCm EmpDist EmployH EmpIca Emulex EnbrEPt s Enbridge s EnCana g EndvrInt rs EndvSilv g EndoPhrm Endologix EndurSpec Ener1 lf Energen Energizer EngyConv EngyPtrs EngyTEq EngyTsfr EngyXXI EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys EnPro ENSCO Entegris Entergy EntPrPt EnterPT EntropCom EnzonPhar Equifax Equinix EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EsteeLdr Esterline EtfSilver EthanAl Euronet Evercore EverestRe EvergEn ExactSci h ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl Express ExpScripts ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl Ezcorp F5 Netwks FEI Co FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tch s FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FX Ener FactsetR FairIsaac FairchldS FamilyDlr Fastenal s FedExCp FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferrellgs Ferro FiberTwr FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird FinclEngin Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstBusey FstCashFn FstCwlth FFnclOH FstHorizon FstInRT FMajSilv g FMidBc FstNiagara FstRepB n FstSolar FTDJInet FT ConDis FT RNG FT REIT FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FiveStar FlagstBcp Flagstone Flextrn Flotek FlowInt FlowrsFd s Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil FormFac Fortinet s Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel Francesc n FrankRes FredsInc FMCG s Freescale n FreshMkt n FrontierCm Frontline FuelTech FuelCell FullerHB

7.02 -.20 6.29 -.33 11.19 -.21 29.27 -.14 21.41 -.02 20.75 -.33 1.38 37.03 -1.83 0.64 86.96 -1.39 0.88 58.53 +.41 186.46 -.33 3.04 69.34 +1.09 1.76 -.03 0.40 18.52 +.49 0.20 7.07 +.05 0.20 15.35 -.01 2.08 74.82 -3.40 3.19 -.05 1.36 40.05 -.27 0.72 22.14 -.13 1.11 10.26 -.06 1.29 14.56 -.27 1.23 13.46 -.09 1.16 9.12 -.04 1.14 8.66 -.11 1.21 10.43 -.16 15.70 +.37 23.00 -.12 0.70 51.83 +.18 1.39 43.13 -.54 1.28 35.67 -.52 15.53 -.37 0.28 8.89 +.07 73.09 +.39 4.52 +.41 0.04 18.55 -.08 0.88 33.39 -.03 1.92 36.19 -.20 10.04 -.06 0.12 21.36 +.51 21.89 -.10 0.72 24.54 -.04 1.46 -.05 18.67 -.03 1.38 43.45 -.58 .65 -.04 19.63 -.35 0.24 11.39 +.19 5.58 -.23 6.34 -.12 2.13 27.97 -.22 0.98 32.58 -.29 0.80 23.65 -1.27 8.89 -.01 12.58 -.03 30.45 -.26 8.99 +.09 1.20 34.57 -.31 .35 +.00 0.54 45.08 -1.54 71.76 -.84 .62 -.04 12.10 -.01 2.50 37.11 -.60 3.58 43.36 -.36 25.08 -.12 3.10 -.03 2.16 27.86 -.40 0.79 19.44 -.59 20.99 +.11 35.74 -.32 1.40 47.18 +.04 6.82 -.05 3.32 63.01 -.61 2.42 41.22 -.40 2.80 39.62 +.25 4.12 +.04 8.28 +.06 0.64 30.54 -.48 90.06 -.83 0.88 17.02 -.11 1.47 59.43 -.28 0.37 10.61 -.35 0.75 95.19 -.84 62.94 -1.22 41.88 -1.10 0.28 15.10 -.47 15.69 -.02 0.72 23.85 -.27 1.92 77.99 -.39 1.20 7.51 -.10 1.80 -.07 0.16 12.63 -.02 6.77 -.04 2.10 42.37 -.24 5.24 +.70 4.81 -.03 0.28 29.77 +.53 0.50 41.84 -1.24 17.05 -.42 45.40 +.06 10.62 -.41 0.56 20.91 +.08 2.72 +.12 1.88 71.15 -.99 33.00 +1.35 76.03 -.28 30.13 +.33 0.24 24.81 +.05 0.60 71.71 -.84 42.37 +.01 0.48 8.23 -.09 1.98 -.02 34.48 -.36 5.49 -.03 1.08 82.46 -1.52 0.08 23.82 -.03 12.47 -.01 0.72 50.36 -1.55 0.52 32.22 +.16 0.52 73.60 -1.30 2.76 87.15 +.64 0.24 4.75 -.05 0.96 16.48 -.02 2.75 -.13 2.00 20.89 -.22 7.34 -.29 1.01 -.10 9.13 -.10 0.48 16.50 -.09 0.20 25.74 -1.08 1.28 9.28 -.04 0.24 9.75 +.13 21.35 +.52 19.37 -.84 0.20 19.24 +.26 0.24 14.44 -.20 0.16 4.36 48.21 +2.06 0.12 4.00 +.08 0.48 14.88 +.17 0.04 6.24 -.07 8.41 -.17 23.32 -1.06 0.04 7.68 -.17 0.64 9.99 -.08 24.00 -.15 87.59 -2.51 0.05 30.98 +.01 0.08 18.57 -.11 0.05 18.59 -.29 0.40 14.60 -.02 2.20 42.91 -.11 0.64 11.36 -.10 52.43 -1.06 2.93 +.03 .56 -.03 0.16 6.65 -.01 5.42 6.29 +.17 2.18 -.12 0.60 18.67 +.01 1.28 87.94 -1.17 0.50 57.89 -.24 29.38 -1.20 1.16 67.04 -.86 0.66 19.43 -.15 3.74 -.14 10.22 -.20 2.52 -.16 12.27 -.23 33.15 +.05 17.82 -.69 7.39 +.02 18.20 -.20 3.14 -.06 0.76 54.63 -.21 92.38 -1.38 21.74 -.57 2.02 16.96 -.92 21.02 -1.24 1.00 112.05 -1.66 0.20 11.06 +.12 1.00 44.36 -.58 10.97 -.20 36.29 +.08 0.75 7.19 -.06 0.47 6.45 -.41 5.76 -.09 1.03 -.01 0.30 20.28 -.14 0.25

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Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm FultonFncl FurnBrds Fusion-io n GFI Grp GMAC CpT GMX Rs GNC n GT AdvTc GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa SA Gallaghr GameStop Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenComm GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills GenMoly GenMot n GMot wtA GMot wtB GM cvpfB Gensco GenesWyo GenOn En Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt Genworth GeoGrp GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GiantIntac GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc GlaxoSKln GlimchRt GlobalCash GlobCrsg GloblInd GlobPay GblXChCon GblX Uran GlbXSilvM GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GolarLNG GoldFLtd GoldResrc Goldcrp g GoldenMin GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google GovPrpIT vjGrace Graco GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy lf GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GraphPkg GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPanSilv g GtPlainEn GreenDot GreenMtC GreenbCos Greenhill Greif A GrifolsSA n Group1 GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess GugInsidr GugMultAs GugSolar GulfportE H&E Eq HCA Hld n HCC Ins HCP Inc HDFC Bk s HFF Inc HMS Hld s HSBC HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme HancHld Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HanoverIns HansenMed HansenNat HanwhaSol HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp HWinstn g Harsco HartfdFn HartfFn wt HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HlthCSvc s HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtlndEx HrtldPay Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife s HercOffsh Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HigherOne HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HillenInc HilltopH HollyFrt s Hollysys Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp Honda HonwllIntl HorizLns Hormel s Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic

D 0.20

8.29 -.04 2.44 -.10 22.70 -.42 0.20 4.08 +.03 20.50 -.49 2.54 -.09 23.45 +.03 11.18 -.25 0.58 5.14 -.09 1.68 16.93 +.04 0.29 9.25 -.19 1.32 26.85 -.33 22.81 +.66 0.32 9.97 -.47 0.45 15.69 +.09 0.20 73.51 +.09 2.00 32.08 +.08 34.06 +.13 .24 -.02 3.99 -.07 22.59 -.62 57.67 +1.29 6.74 +.10 4.02 27.00 -.51 8.59 -.03 1.88 60.30 -.64 0.60 15.25 -.51 0.40 12.48 -.23 .35 -.03 1.22 36.89 -.52 3.73 -.06 21.44 -.63 12.91 -.60 8.66 -.52 2.38 36.67 -1.13 47.85 +.57 47.37 -.73 3.10 +.04 0.18 15.49 -.41 0.48 24.56 -.24 6.70 +.06 1.80 52.79 -.64 6.04 -.35 20.41 -.37 18.51 -.38 0.25 8.17 -.09 2.59 -.05 0.18 7.62 -.14 .86 -.02 0.30 25.72 -.36 38.64 -.18 0.52 10.42 -.07 2.17 41.55 -.19 0.40 8.14 -.03 2.60 -.07 26.12 -.62 4.45 -.12 0.08 42.96 -.83 0.19 16.06 -.40 0.40 10.20 -.16 0.25 28.10 -.40 0.15 15.52 -.27 3.18 -.13 0.12 7.34 -.10 1.10 31.16 -.66 0.24 16.69 -.14 0.60 22.46 +.10 0.41 54.60 -.11 13.55 -.39 2.66 +.01 1.40 104.56 -2.50 1.16 85.73 +.55 14.59 -.28 11.06 -.44 522.18 -2.66 1.68 21.70 -.10 36.26 -.95 0.84 36.59 -.50 13.92 -.34 2.64 148.99 +.59 3.05 -.12 6.16 -.02 14.70 +.07 0.52 19.82 +1.21 3.90 -.05 2.20 -.13 0.08 4.54 -.07 3.45 +.09 0.83 18.72 -.22 31.34 +1.35 106.51 +2.95 15.04 -.29 1.80 32.20 -.27 1.68 49.60 -.44 6.74 -.06 0.52 38.94 +.78 0.05 11.11 -.09 0.15 19.74 -1.04 0.80 29.84 -1.03 0.20 29.75 -.21 1.01 19.65 -.20 0.03 4.84 -.18 27.26 -.80 9.02 -.42 18.76 +.11 0.62 27.53 -.33 1.92 35.48 -.06 0.22 32.34 +.38 10.19 -.64 25.23 -.12 1.90 41.07 -1.34 30.82 -.15 30.85 +.48 0.36 40.87 -.67 6.35 +.09 0.96 27.91 -.19 26.15 -.28 .90 -.00 1.10 33.85 -.03 3.84 -.08 85.34 +1.71 3.36 +.03 17.45 +.01 0.50 35.15 -.85 0.30 33.20 -1.09 4.48 -.11 0.08 13.94 +.15 1.12 37.95 -.28 15.13 +.80 0.82 21.52 -.14 0.40 16.71 -.52 9.96 -.40 10.97 -.03 1.20 35.50 -.99 4.10 26.06 -.05 1.24 22.85 -.34 3.81 -.08 2.03 +.03 2.86 49.60 +.36 0.64 15.11 -.09 7.33 -.06 1.20 16.84 +.02 23.62 -.20 20.19 -.81 36.63 -.66 0.08 13.88 -.13 0.04 20.53 -.22 5.64 -.06 7.96 +.10 1.92 51.15 -.56 15.43 -.19 0.28 53.55 -1.16 .31 62.82 -.65 0.80 55.44 +.11 3.74 -.20 0.24 3.44 -.05 1.38 56.86 -.35 9.87 -.43 0.40 56.73 -1.28 0.48 23.63 -.71 20.98 -.31 10.84 +.61 34.78 +.15 14.52 -.48 1.70 30.79 -.04 0.45 27.43 -1.51 0.76 19.11 +.02 7.70 +.25 0.35 34.92 +.91 6.64 +.72 15.85 -.03 1.00 32.05 -.13 35.75 -.46 2.48 64.30 -.09 30.60 -1.35 1.33 45.05 -.40 .50 -.05 0.51 26.77 -.35 23.70 +.42 9.57 -.27 44.23 -.38 1.80 21.86 -.48 0.12 10.73 -.34 0.28 7.94 +.09

Nm HstnAEn HovnanE HubGroup HubbelB HudsCity HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk HuntIng n Huntsmn Hyatt Hyperdyn

D 0.02 18.15 1.49 28.64 1.52 55.56 0.32 5.63 11.56 1.00 74.03 0.52 37.75 0.16 4.57 27.59 0.40 12.00 31.36 4.38

-.04 -1.20 -.67 -.14 -.37 -.15 -.71 -.08 -.03 -.39 -1.07 +.24

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk iGateCorp II-VI s ING GlbDv ING ING 8.5cap INGPrRTr ION Geoph IPG Photon iRobot iShGold iSAstla iSAstria iShBraz iSCan iShEMU iSFrnce iShGer iSh HK iShItaly iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSSpain iSSwedn iSSwitz iSTaiwn iSh UK iShChile iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSh ACWI iSEafeSC iShEMBd iShIndones iSSPGth iSSPGlF iSSPGlbEn iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShs SOX iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSR1KV iSMCGth iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShBar3-7 iShBShtT iShUSPfd iSRus3K iShDJTel iShREst iShDJHm iShFnSc iShUSEngy iShSPSm iShBasM iShEur350 iStar ITC Hold ITT Corp ITT Ed Iberiabnk Icon PLC IconixBr Idacorp IdenixPh IDEX ITW Illumina Imation Imax Corp ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs ImpOil gs ImperlSgr Incyte IndiaFd IndoTel Inergy Infinera Informat Infosys IngerRd IngrmM Inhibitex InlandRE InovioPhm Inphi n InsightEnt InsitTc Insulet IntgDv ISSI IntegrysE Intel InteractBrk IntcntlEx IntCtlHtl InterDig Intrface Intermec InterMune InterNAP IntlBcsh IBM IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif IntTower g InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntraLinks IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invesco InvMtgCap InVKSrInc InvTech InvBncp iPInv1-21Vx IridiumCm IronMtn Isis IstaPh ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g Ixia j2Global JA Solar JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMCh wt JPMAlerian Jabil JackHenry

38.87 +.28 0.20 21.82 +.40 0.63 38.15 +.17 0.15 10.91 -.15 18.26 -.70 1.20 9.65 -.06 7.14 -.79 2.13 24.09 -.30 0.31 5.22 -.13 6.24 -.19 53.94 -.08 26.17 +.01 18.34 -.03 1.06 22.94 -.54 0.47 17.02 -.72 3.42 62.93 -.93 0.53 28.97 -.35 1.15 28.41 -1.45 0.67 20.37 -1.04 0.67 18.71 -1.04 0.42 17.15 +.06 0.49 12.17 -.67 0.17 9.39 -.21 0.50 53.97 -.68 0.39 14.08 -.03 0.71 56.12 -1.29 0.50 12.62 -.06 1.73 42.55 -.63 2.41 66.07 -1.34 1.92 32.57 -1.41 1.04 24.74 -.95 0.53 22.69 -1.56 0.29 13.24 -.18 0.48 15.62 -.38 0.98 64.22 -2.63 41.05 -1.13 1.14 52.75 -.42 1.80 49.00 -.40 4.70 115.92 -.69 1.27 54.81 +.10 0.85 37.17 +.05 1.08 79.08 -1.14 2.45 117.39 -.83 3.78 110.24 +.29 0.84 41.13 -.43 5.09 113.35 +.66 1.02 41.61 -.74 1.48 36.81 -1.29 5.57 110.84 -.41 0.18 32.29 -.28 1.24 63.34 -.20 1.15 36.29 -1.09 0.79 35.84 -.60 1.10 45.17 -.81 1.31 53.28 -.58 4.02 113.68 +1.17 3.14 104.68 +.14 0.75 84.65 +.01 1.68 50.03 -1.70 0.99 40.46 -.37 0.53 52.77 -.28 1.64 93.15 -.70 1.03 82.88 -.56 7.28 85.97 -1.03 0.21 46.11 -.31 0.51 94.19 +1.34 1.97 66.97 -.11 1.38 58.46 -.59 0.72 95.02 -.54 0.77 54.69 -.24 1.25 64.88 -.40 1.31 60.17 -.24 2.58 104.44 +.16 0.52 78.36 -.27 0.94 68.27 -.19 2.27 121.61 -.09 0.10 110.26 +.03 2.56 37.14 -.25 1.27 69.23 -.47 0.62 21.38 -.29 2.09 54.78 -.12 0.07 9.49 -.11 0.70 46.21 -.73 0.52 37.37 -.45 0.75 61.70 -.15 1.06 67.45 -.57 1.15 33.36 -1.47 6.59 -.42 1.41 73.75 -.95 1.00 43.46 -.78 68.64 +1.37 1.36 44.34 -.49 20.42 +.10 17.37 -.13 1.20 36.00 -.38 5.49 +.26 0.68 34.09 -.59 1.44 43.40 -.27 49.48 -.29 6.81 +.01 16.66 +.16 10.49 3.86 -.06 18.49 -.32 0.44 38.99 -1.01 0.08 7.65 -.23 14.62 -.02 3.87 26.65 +.19 1.50 36.16 +2.22 2.82 27.29 -.76 7.02 +.03 36.33 -2.10 1.35 48.94 -.65 0.48 32.85 +.47 17.16 -.16 3.12 -.04 0.57 7.59 -.01 .68 -.00 7.87 -.24 17.70 +.01 15.99 +.09 16.96 +.01 5.40 7.55 -.16 2.72 48.04 -.41 0.84 19.54 -.10 0.40 14.35 -.05 113.18 +.65 0.35 16.30 -.12 0.40 67.48 -.91 0.08 13.63 -.32 6.76 -.07 25.42 +.41 4.60 +.06 0.38 13.91 -.07 3.00 165.11 -1.87 1.24 56.04 -.05 0.24 14.21 -.34 1.05 27.77 +2.28 20.48 -.75 7.96 -.19 59.63 -1.86 0.24 7.59 -.26 0.48 10.47 -.14 8.68 33.64 +.49 0.60 47.10 -.25 376.81 +6.18 0.49 16.83 -.18 3.94 16.30 -.12 0.29 4.36 -.01 10.47 -.05 13.37 +.17 13.78 -.85 7.25 -.03 1.00 31.51 -.01 7.07 +.12 3.94 -.15 0.84 17.71 -.59 36.15 -.52 1.52 -.01 1.48 20.34 -1.05 7.15 -.68 0.80 30.69 -.33 3.13 -.21 12.51 -.27 1.00 33.44 -1.19 10.89 -.32 1.94 34.59 -.31 0.28 15.91 -.46 0.42 28.10 -.15

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm JackInBox JacobsEng Jaguar g JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JinkoSolar JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesGrp JonesLL JosABank JournalCm JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KB FnclGp KB Home KBR Inc KBW Inc KIT Digitl KKR KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA KC Southn KapStone KeeganR g Kellogg Kemet rs Kenexa Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp Kforce KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KindMor n KindredHlt KineticC Kinross g KirbyCp KiteRlty KnghtCap KnightTr Knoll Inc Knology KodiakO g Kohls KoreaElc KornFer Kraft KratonPP KratosDef KrispKrm Kroger KronosW s Kulicke L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LG Display LKQ Corp LRAD LSB Inds LSI Corp LTXCrd rs LaZBoy LabCp LadThalFn LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice Lazard LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp s LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibStarzA LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH LigandP rs LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare LincEdSv LincElec s LincNat LinearTch LinkedIn n LinnEngy LionsGt g Liquidity LithiaMot LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg Local.com LockhdM Loews Logitech LogMeIn LongweiPI LoopNet Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol Lufkin lululemn gs LumberLiq LyonBas A

D 19.76 -.14 35.14 +.11 6.50 -.09 9.49 -.52 0.20 6.61 0.35 27.40 -.07 41.67 -.13 0.30 14.48 -.30 4.05 -.03 13.00 -1.03 2.28 64.64 +.57 0.64 29.81 -.05 0.20 10.21 -.31 0.30 60.56 -1.30 50.53 +.37 3.09 -.11 0.70 79.90 +.51 19.97 -.23 37.86 -.85 0.25 5.85 -.17 0.20 28.48 +.35 0.20 13.60 +.19 9.79 +.01 0.73 11.01 -.53 0.72 7.84 -.16 1.40 34.25 -.57 16.98 +.01 1.49 -.04 50.56 -.42 13.99 +.20 8.20 +.09 1.72 53.51 -.10 7.89 -.44 17.98 -.43 0.48 33.26 -.78 3.84 -.01 13.23 -.36 0.12 6.11 -.13 9.44 -.18 1.40 33.83 +.06 2.80 68.26 +.13 0.72 16.31 -.32 4.60 68.44 -.94 1.20 25.37 +.18 11.49 -.19 66.59 -.53 0.12 17.71 +.12 51.55 -.95 0.24 3.95 -.04 12.18 +.17 0.24 14.15 -.25 0.40 14.48 +.24 13.00 -.40 5.76 +.18 1.00 43.58 -.35 10.23 +.01 14.63 -.22 1.16 34.08 -.19 22.07 -.11 8.67 -.20 8.70 +.13 0.42 22.76 -.32 0.60 20.04 -.79 7.94 -.04 1.80 64.11 -.58 0.57 28.44 -.70 5.12 -.18 8.61 -.59 24.68 +.16 1.90 -.26 37.34 -.28 6.60 +.01 5.50 -.03 7.92 +.06 82.74 +1.51 1.54 +.01 35.55 -.67 19.48 -.49 0.22 38.75 -.71 45.85 +.75 0.44 17.21 -.47 5.21 +.06 0.64 26.45 -.71 7.93 -.17 3.10 +.04 0.50 42.92 -1.19 0.32 25.92 -.48 1.12 21.18 -.31 0.40 15.86 -.49 0.16 13.80 -.08 0.72 28.99 -.02 0.25 27.29 -.13 1.66 -.06 1.20 -.03 0.46 6.78 -.06 30.40 -.15 0.34 4.47 -.02 38.08 -.16 36.44 -.24 14.97 -.58 66.09 -1.79 65.46 -.72 1.90 32.46 -.18 40.57 +.28 35.17 -.09 33.84 -.35 14.03 -.24 1.96 36.23 -.21 2.23 +.01 0.80 35.75 -.10 0.80 20.57 +.21 1.00 8.47 -.46 0.62 31.13 -.43 0.20 18.22 -.81 0.96 27.35 -.11 79.14 -1.13 2.76 36.31 -.32 7.07 +.06 31.73 +1.68 0.28 16.75 +.03 8.43 -.12 10.95 -.03 5.51 -.01 1.97 -.13 2.63 3.00 71.22 -.15 0.25 35.56 -.51 9.85 -.74 30.35 +1.49 1.03 -.02 17.39 -.09 5.20 108.59 -1.48 6.10 +.06 0.56 19.21 +.27 1.44 134.70 -.04 0.50 60.41 +1.58 54.11 +.96 13.94 +.07 0.80 32.10 -.01

M-N-O-P M&T Bk 2.80 MB Fncl 0.04 MBIA MCG Cap 0.68 MDC 1.00 MDU Res 0.65 MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl 1.00 MMT 0.51 MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MKS Inst 0.60 MPG OffTr MSCI Inc Macerich 2.00 MackCali 1.80 Macys 0.40 MadCatz g MSG MagelMPtr 3.14 Magma MagnaI gs 1.00 MagHRes MaidenH 0.32 Majesco MAKO Srg ManTech 0.84 Manitowoc 0.08 MannKd ManpwrGp 0.80 Manulife g 0.52 MarathnO s 0.60 MarathP n 0.80 MarinaBio MktVGold 0.40 MktVRus 0.18 MktVJrGld 2.93 MktV Agri 0.33 MktVIndo s 0.27 MktAxess 0.36 MarIntA 0.40 MarshM 0.88 MartMM 1.60

71.61 -.68 14.89 -.01 7.53 -.11 4.40 +.06 18.18 -.24 20.10 -.26 6.36 -.03 4.96 -.02 7.16 +.12 6.45 -.20 2.29 +.10 10.32 5.17 -.02 22.16 +.06 2.50 -.10 31.67 -.82 44.83 -.84 29.89 -.17 24.84 -.52 .72 -.03 22.57 -.08 59.00 -.59 5.06 -.12 35.50 -.73 4.19 +.05 8.15 +.02 2.35 -.03 37.64 +.74 33.92 -.17 9.47 -.42 3.16 +.23 35.83 -1.69 12.74 -.22 25.05 -.73 35.00 -.42 .20 -.01 65.34 +.43 32.23 -.20 37.86 -.42 50.63 -.59 31.44 -.05 28.59 -.33 26.56 -.72 28.78 -.21 69.59 +3.45

Nm D MarvellT 12.83 -.06 Masco 0.30 7.85 -.13 Masimo 0.75 22.84 -.17 Mastec 20.26 +.10 MasterCrd 0.60 323.00 +2.32 Mattel 0.92 26.31 +.08 MaximIntg 0.88 22.28 +.25 Maximus s 0.36 35.25 -.78 McClatchy 1.46 -.05 McCorm 1.12 46.50 -.12 McDrmInt 13.25 -.33 McDnlds 2.44 88.82 -.27 McGrwH 1.00 40.10 -.52 McKesson 0.80 76.65 -.85 McMoRn 12.23 -.24 MeadJohn 1.04 70.20 -.01 MdbkIns 0.16 8.85 +.04 MeadWvco 1.00 26.17 +.03 Mechel 16.79 -.38 Mechel pf 5.82 -.41 MecoxL n 2.36 -.04 MedAssets 10.09 -.08 MedcoHlth 52.79 -.12 MedProp 0.80 10.15 +.04 MediCo 14.01 +.02 Medicis 0.32 38.21 +.19 Medifast 14.46 -.36 Medivation 17.47 +1.29 MedQuist n 7.58 +.02 Medtrnic 0.97 34.28 +.07 MelcoCrwn 12.46 +.12 Mellanox 28.65 -.34 MensW 0.48 28.21 +.69 MentorGr 10.50 -.27 MercadoL 0.32 65.79 -2.01 MercerIntl 8.50 -.03 Merck 1.52 32.25 -.12 Meredith 1.02 23.54 -.30 MergeHlth 5.87 +.09 Meritage 16.79 -.17 Meritor 7.35 -.27 Metalico 3.92 -.08 Methode 0.28 7.83 -.15 MetLife 0.74 29.50 -1.27 MetroPCS 10.13 -.19 MettlerT 152.39 -2.62 Micrel 0.16 9.58 -.16 Microchp 1.39 31.47 +.11 Micromet 4.40 +.02 MicronT 5.67 +.17 MicrosSys 44.99 -.13 MicroSemi 14.78 -.29 Microsoft 0.64 25.51 -.29 Micrvisn .88 +.02 MidAApt 2.51 67.83 -.38 MdwGold g 2.70 +.06 MillerEnR 3.17 -.15 MillerHer 0.09 18.40 +.07 MindrayM 0.30 24.46 -.52 Mindspeed 5.32 +.04 Minefnd g 17.50 +.04 MinesMgt 1.95 +.09 MitekSys 12.67 +.74 MitsuUFJ 4.18 -.14 MizuhoFn 2.84 -.05 MobileTele 1.06 15.26 -1.37 Mohawk 47.13 -.88 Molex 0.80 20.06 -.17 MolinaH s 17.82 +.04 MolsCoorB 1.28 42.28 -.38 Molycorp 53.30 -1.51 Momenta 16.38 +.25 MoneyGrm 2.40 -.06 MonroMf s 0.36 37.86 +.62 Monsanto 1.20 64.86 -.94 MonstrWw 8.28 -.45 Montpelr 0.40 16.32 -.07 Moodys 0.56 29.05 -.29 Moog A 35.41 -.96 MorgStan 0.20 15.33 -.63 Mosaic 0.20 70.38 +.38 MotrlaSol n 0.88 39.93 -.47 MotrlaMo n 37.67 -.08 Motricity 2.08 -.02 Move Inc 1.79 +.20 Mueller 0.40 43.17 -.51 MuellerWat 0.07 2.22 +.09 MurphO 1.10 50.35 -1.60 Mylan 19.27 -.13 MyriadG 18.50 -.12 NABI Bio 1.86 +.04 NCR Corp 15.87 -.50 NETgear 26.06 -.04 NFJDvInt 1.80 16.68 -.22 NIC Inc 0.25 11.24 +.07 NII Hldg 36.16 -1.07 NPS Phm 6.92 -.01 NRG Egy 22.80 -.36 NTT DOCO 0.63 17.85 -.38 NV Energy 0.48 14.20 -.12 NXP Semi 15.90 -.51 NYSE Eur 1.20 25.09 -.79 Nabors 17.16 -.42 NalcoHld 0.14 36.07 +.04 Nanomtr 14.09 -.40 NaraBncp 6.56 +.02 NasdOMX 21.69 -.87 NBkGreece 0.29 .83 -.06 NatCineM 0.88 13.37 -.36 NatFuGas 1.42 60.00 -.32 NatGrid 2.92 49.67 -.60 NOilVarco 0.44 63.68 +.04 NatPenn 0.12 6.64 +.07 NatRetPrp 1.54 26.60 +.04 NatSemi 0.40 24.90 +.01 NavigCons 8.52 -.06 Navios 0.24 3.51 -.07 NaviosMar 1.76 14.06 -.74 Navistar 38.80 -.78 NektarTh 5.34 +.03 Neoprobe 2.86 -.09 Ness Tech 7.66 -.01 NetLogicM 30.13 +.24 NetApp 35.27 -.54 Netease 48.18 -1.33 Netflix 218.77 +5.66 NtScout 12.50 +.01 NetSuite 29.81 -.45 NetwkEng 1.21 -.05 NBRESec 0.24 3.81 +.02 NeuStar 23.60 -.29 NeutTand 10.57 +.04 Nevsun g 0.06 7.06 -.09 NewFrnt 1.24 NwGold g 13.52 -.03 NwOriEd s 29.55 -.04 NY CmtyB 1.00 11.98 -.09 NY Times 7.34 -.18 Newcastle 0.40 4.90 -.01 NewellRub 0.32 13.07 -.18 NewfldExp 47.08 -.91 NewmtM 1.20 64.51 +.34 NewpkRes 7.51 -.14 Newport 11.39 -.42 NewsCpA 0.19 16.33 +.06 NewsCpB 0.19 16.50 -.06 Nexen g 0.20 20.26 -.12 NextEraEn 2.20 55.05 -.58 NiSource 0.92 20.90 -.01 Nicor 1.86 54.33 -.32 NielsenH n 28.83 -.68 NikeB 1.24 83.76 -.28 99 Cents 18.49 +.38 NipponTT 23.22 NobleCorp 0.53 32.31 -.35 NobleEn 0.88 84.50 -1.47 NokiaCp 0.55 6.14 -.20 Nomura 3.80 -.28 NorandaAl 10.26 -.41 NordicAm 1.10 17.19 -.06 Nordson s 0.50 40.61 -.84 Nordstrm 0.92 43.80 +.54 NorflkSo 1.72 65.03 -.09 NoAmEn g 5.65 +.01 NA Pall g 3.56 -.20 NoWestCp 1.44 32.70 -.20 NoestUt 1.10 33.46 -.26 NDynMn g 9.61 -.30 NthnO&G 19.16 +.30 NorTrst 1.12 36.01 -.52 NthgtM g 4.28 +.04 NorthropG 2.00 51.66 -.14 NStarRlt 0.40 3.39 -.17 NwstBcsh 0.44 11.58 +.35 NovaGld g 11.22 +.31 Novartis 2.53 55.94 -1.36 NovtlWrls 3.28 -.02 Novavax 1.76 +.02 Novlus 26.78 -.39 NovoNord 1.82 104.60 +.71 NuSkin 0.64 40.57 +.39 NuVasive 21.70 -.12 NuanceCm 17.49 -.12 Nucor 1.45 33.28 -.79 NvMSI&G2 0.80 8.65 -.01 Nvidia 13.18 +.26

D

NxStageMd 17.68 -.14 OCZ Tech 5.25 +.09 OGE Engy 1.50 47.80 -.61 OM Group 28.71 -.37 OReillyAu 66.60 +.85 OasisPet 24.70 -.44 OcciPet 1.84 82.72 -.69 Oceaneer s 0.60 40.79 -.20 Och-Ziff 1.08 10.33 -.30 Oclaro 4.30 -.25 OcwenFn 13.06 +.53 OdysMar 2.60 -.12 OfficeDpt 2.28 -.01 OfficeMax 5.26 -.15 OilSvHT 1.58 126.44 -1.26 OilStates 60.26 -2.41 Oilsands g .20 -.00 Oilsands rt .00 -.00 OldDomFrt 30.34 -.35 OldNBcp 0.28 8.92 -.08 OldRepub 0.70 9.07 -.17 Olin 0.80 18.60 -.08 OmegaHlt 1.60 17.51 +.13 Omncre 0.16 28.19 -.31 Omnicom 1.00 38.41 -.31 OmniVisn 17.15 -.20 Omnova 4.17 -.24 OnSmcnd 6.82 -.10 Oncothyr 7.24 +.09 ONEOK 2.24 67.54 -1.01 OnyxPh 31.53 +.23 OpenTxt 55.57 -1.20 OpenTable 59.34 +1.82 OpnwvSy 1.53 -.23 OpkoHlth 4.03 +.02 Opnext 1.48 -.05 OptimerPh 10.48 +.59 Oracle 0.24 26.49 -.48 OrbitalSci 14.08 -.24 Orexigen 1.36 -.06 OrientEH 6.87 -.02 OrionMar 6.08 +.10 Oritani 0.40 12.16 +.15 OshkoshCp 17.81 -.19 OvShip 0.88 16.32 +.03 OwensMin 0.80 28.62 -.26 OwensCorn 26.32 +.32 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+.40 PrUltSP500 s 0.05 50.80 -1.15 ProSUltGold 118.54 -.38 ProUSSlv rs 11.30 +.60 PrUltCrde rs 33.28 -.15 PrUShCrde rs 56.13 +.26 ProVixSTF 91.68 +2.64

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14.77 +.05 231.08-12.82 13.98 +.31 17.74 +.46 2.10 62.38 -.17 2.48 48.21 -.19 18.52 -.78 1.40 17.96 -.34 0.50 21.50 -.46 54.06 +.32 58.28 +4.54 1.22 8.29 +.04 0.70 34.87 +.20 0.64 16.78 -.55 0.54 8.24 -.14 0.48 11.52 +.08 1.15 45.32 -1.28 1.37 32.89 -.19 3.80 118.89 +.30 0.10 2.81 -.14 4.21 -.17 0.52 5.91 +.06

Q-R-S-T QEP Res QIAGEN Qihoo360 n QlikTech Qlogic Qualcom QuantaSvc QntmDSS Quepasa QstDiag QuestRM g QuestSft Questar Questcor QksilvRes Quiksilvr QuinStreet RAIT rs RF MicD RPC s RPM RSC Hldgs RTI Biolog RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp RadioShk Ralcorp RLauren Rambus Randgold RangeRs RaptorPhm RareEle g RJamesFn Rayonier s Raytheon RealD RealNwk rs RealPage RltyInco RedHat Rdiff.cm RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegncyEn Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola Renren n RentACt Rentech RepubAir RepubSvc RschMotn ResMed ResoluteEn ResrceCap ResConn RetailHT RexEnergy RexahnPh ReynAm s Richmnt g RigelPh RightNow RioTinto RiteAid Riverbed s RobbMyer RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RofinSinar RogCm gs Rollins s Roper RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RBSct prT RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues Ruddick Rudolph rue21 RuthsHosp Ryder RdxSPEW Ryland S1 Corp SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SM Energy SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SpdrIntRE SP Mid S&P500ETF SpdrBiot Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrBarcCv SpdrLehHY SpdrNuBST SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrMetM SPX Cp STEC STMicro SVB FnGp SWS Grp SXC Hlth s SabraHlt n Safeway StJude Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty SamsO&G SanderFm SanDisk SandRdge SangBio Sanmina Sanofi Santarus Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satcon h SavientPh Schlmbrg Schnitzer Schulmn SchwUSMkt SchwMCap Schwab SchMau SciClone SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet SeadrillLtd SeagateT SealAir SearsHldgs SeattGen SelCmfrt SelMedHld SemGroup SemiHTr SempraEn Semtech SenHous SensataT Sequenom ServiceCp SvcSourc n SevArts rs ShandaGm ShawGrp Sherwin ShipFin Shire ShoreTel ShufflMstr Shutterfly SiderurNac Siemens SifyTech SigaTech h SigmaAld SignatBk SignetJwlrs SilicGrIn SilicnImg SilcnLab

0.08 33.73 -.31 14.43 -.32 22.33 -.44 23.09 -.76 12.83 -.21 0.86 49.45 -.23 18.00 +.06 1.75 +.02 4.06 -.19 0.40 49.17 +.11 4.39 -.25 15.93 -.25 0.61 17.92 -.20 29.74 +.41 8.94 -.12 3.86 -.08 10.80 -.13 0.24 3.43 -.10 5.83 -.01 0.32 23.83 -.76 0.84 18.41 -.23 7.29 +.11 3.24 +.02 23.41 -.81 35.06 +.61 0.01 3.03 0.25 11.72 -.19 84.99 -.01 0.80 131.04 -.79 10.94 -.05 0.20 109.18 +1.18 0.16 63.89 +.27 4.17 -.10 8.29 -.34 0.52 25.87 -.19 1.60 39.52 -.33 1.72 40.75 -.52 13.49 -.07 7.67 -.61 20.35 +.84 1.74 33.27 -.04 36.95 -.32 7.93 +.02 1.00 12.16 +.04 0.72 55.15 -.30 0.84 12.81 +.10 1.85 38.60 -.50 1.80 22.78 -.39 68.55 +3.77 1.09 62.94 -1.30 0.04 3.89 -.24 0.24 13.87 -.14 0.72 49.48 -.29 0.48 38.58 -.21 1.04 64.57 +.59 3.14 +.08 7.03 -.12 0.64 25.87 -.14 .90 -.02 2.90 -.08 0.88 28.85 -.15 30.97 +.85 29.37 -.67 12.62 -.12 1.00 5.26 +.10 0.20 9.33 -.12 2.22 101.46 +.21 12.00 -.24 .96 +.03 2.12 37.20 +.13 11.30 +.08 7.15 -.03 30.52 +.34 1.17 57.49 -1.68 1.02 22.94 -.24 0.18 45.23 +.33 0.56 22.09 -.39 0.80 52.79 +2.54 1.70 57.18 -2.12 0.96 46.76 -.24 47.19 -1.13 20.94 -.40 1.42 37.71 -.88 0.28 19.55 -.18 0.44 72.34 -1.12 42.41 +.18 0.88 73.93 +.33 45.77 -.72 34.11 -.32 2.16 48.73 -.92 6.92 -1.01 14.00 -.51 0.40 23.80 -.22 3.36 64.53 -1.59 3.36 64.07 -1.60 0.44 80.70 +1.73 4.27 -.20 12.32 +.33 7.43 -.15 0.52 38.88 +.29 6.46 +.07 23.56 +1.00 4.51 -.14 1.16 43.02 -1.33 0.69 43.46 -.29 0.12 10.41 -.21 8.89 -.06 12.97 +.03 0.82 50.90 -1.09 37.05 -.35 1.94 39.37 -.02 0.24 15.91 -.41 15.51 -.16 0.40 68.05 -2.44 0.40 12.55 -.13 0.10 73.33 -.50 3.12 111.21 -1.07 182.90 -.34 3.54 36.07 -.70 1.65 150.60 -.93 2.44 116.99 -.86 61.34 +.85 1.74 49.83 -.36 0.31 14.16 -.06 0.20 18.15 -.29 0.72 32.73 -.69 1.64 37.19 +.15 4.23 37.86 -.46 0.40 24.51 +.21 45.85 -.01 0.37 20.18 -.06 0.46 47.10 +.24 0.47 50.73 -.33 0.42 55.47 -.81 1.00 50.97 -1.65 8.96 -.09 0.40 5.80 -.50 42.79 -.08 0.04 4.78 +1.03 52.34 -.06 1.28 11.29 -.11 0.58 17.80 +.15 0.84 43.90 9.31 +.03 120.93 -2.68 28.21 +.01 17.24 +.44 2.48 +.01 0.68 38.78 35.57 +.63 6.80 -.11 5.04 -.15 6.91 -.14 1.82 34.74 -.31 3.09 0.35 9.99 -.03 0.46 17.53 -.02 1.53 44.28 -1.36 1.23 +.05 3.69 -.14 1.00 74.32 -.10 0.07 40.56 -1.65 0.62 17.25 -.14 0.51 28.12 -.19 0.14 22.52 -.24 0.24 11.33 -.21 0.60 60.59 +.58 4.26 +.02 8.04 -.34 1.20 46.59 +.16 0.40 39.93 -.77 3.03 30.12 -1.03 0.72 10.60 -.11 0.52 17.59 -.16 53.80 -.72 17.72 +.97 15.16 +.39 6.77 -.01 22.09 -.04 0.64 27.97 -.10 1.92 50.82 -.84 21.10 +.03 1.48 22.70 +.01 30.78 -.40 5.51 -.08 0.20 9.57 -.02 17.32 -.80 .59 -.03 5.30 -.10 23.53 +1.70 1.46 72.42 -.19 1.56 15.16 -.01 0.40 94.69 +.39 6.67 +.42 9.40 +.02 50.72 +.34 0.81 9.41 -.17 3.72 93.66 -4.85 4.37 -.07 4.93 -.17 0.72 61.61 -.38 52.15 -.12 0.40 37.00 -1.07 14.44 -.20 5.18 +.26 31.91 -.50

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D 10.34 +.27 0.28 4.51 30.87 +.78 0.12 40.09 -.62 0.08 7.90 +.37 3.20 116.14 +1.55 102.19 +.98 0.48 6.93 +.03 1.69 -.03 0.24 30.11 -1.48 14.92 +.19 4.92 +.25 0.16 12.09 -.03 19.30 -.32 4.27 -.36 3.08 +.06 0.64 37.03 +.15 1.75 -.05 21.11 +.13 1.92 70.47 -.81 0.64 20.32 -.13 0.73 60.50 -1.46 38.45 +2.86 76.79 +.63 2.40 21.99 +.21 23.74 +.21 11.69 -.89 0.40 54.85 -1.14 16.33 -.07 0.10 12.54 -.05 8.78 -.08 1.16 30.91 +.15 2.24 -.03 0.30 19.86 -.87 0.20 34.34 -.51 1.00 18.10 -.34 26.51 -.49 1.89 41.24 +.08 2.19 31.86 -.56 0.60 41.57 -.02 0.02 8.06 -.19 36.33 -.36 13.73 +.31 1.04 24.88 -.56 5.60 -.05 8.18 +.02 15.33 -.31 0.05 18.00 -.45 3.37 -.16 19.79 -.43 16.55 +.07 8.04 +.22 0.36 13.74 -.17 0.86 27.50 -.32 1.30 33.79 -.18 0.63 32.53 +.08 0.83 30.22 -.12 0.59 35.95 -.11 1.06 65.50 -.72 0.18 12.32 -.22 0.67 30.53 -.32 0.35 23.51 -.11 1.33 33.13 -.16 0.28 12.90 +.48 2.31 -.08 1.64 57.58 -.54 0.40 13.63 -.18 2.30 -.05 0.52 37.75 +.26 0.30 40.94 -1.10 1.76 17.55 +.02 0.72 32.58 -.75 1.10 22.84 -.53 0.40 11.49 -.34 0.24 7.24 -.10 0.50 6.75 +.17 1.39 +.01 82.68 -.15 0.68 29.92 -.15 0.10 11.39 -.01 33.35 +.20 0.14 5.76 +.02 27.85 +.26 14.37 -.23 23.38 -.83 6.83 -.44 4.21 -.08 0.72 47.79 +.52 0.37 31.19 20.26 -.57 5.42 -.21 2.88 3.89 -.04 1.44 25.77 -.20 0.44 29.64 -.85 0.60 38.03 +1.92 4.74 -.24 12.49 -.28 6.47 -.18 5.45 -.12 4.54 -.08 0.20 18.33 +.11 2.08 +.04 34.50 +.71 0.35 7.65 +.06 0.08 6.04 +.03 10.54 -.13 29.29 +.12 7.39 -.70 4.76 -.20 14.57 +.38 16.08 -.28 0.24 9.96 +.17 23.33 -.11 24.55 1.57 58.99 -3.70 25.01 -.08 24.56 -.08 0.04 1.31 -.03 1.05 -.01 1.04 26.87 -.29 2.08 27.52 +.07 0.72 21.56 -.74 0.20 9.37 -.26 0.20 13.98 -.32 0.72 28.76 -.55 0.85 17.54 -.17 8.31 -.04 1.79 -.01 28.37 -1.05 0.76 52.09 -.18 38.23 -1.34 9.99 -.04 17.88 -.36 0.52 11.52 -.14 12.61 2.53 +.13 23.56 -.35 0.27 15.70 -.26 0.80 27.13 +.22 5.85 -.03 1.16 30.55 -.05 2.28 33.34 -.46 1.20 49.34 -.37 3.70 -.08 4.33 +.12 0.45 16.32 +.29 1.75 55.73 +.15 22.67 -1.32 45.15 -.58 0.60 41.63 -.77 1.27 26.06 -.01 0.99 5.96 -.10 6.32 -.15 3.70 +.17 0.52 12.12 -.30 1.61 21.98 -.81 0.92 10.32 +.09 0.81 10.95 -.69 3.03 29.57 -.65 1.98 18.89 -1.06 0.83 16.73 -.21 8.40 -.40 0.47 23.86 -.50 0.08 3.73 -.06 40.50 -.09 0.52 30.85 +6.22 0.54 10.67 -.18 56.32 +.57 0.68 30.06 -1.41 5.06 +.03 29.30 -.46 49.88 +.85 11.16 -.33 14.09 -.63 0.75 23.88 -.60 22.94 -.13 23.35 +.27 13.31 +.04 18.55 -.04 9.31 -.01 0.87 39.36 -.87 23.42 -.20 0.30 34.87 +2.71 0.52 24.91 -.17 0.32 13.74 +.09 0.08 15.11 -.45 52.02 -.32 40.39 -.49 7.90 1.24 28.90 -.99 0.60 19.71 -.19 31.52 -.56 15.96 -.29 2.20 78.08 -1.27 20.68 -.33 1.00 51.56 -.13 1.16 68.65 +.65 0.68 46.43 -1.06 42.92 -.01 .83 -.02 1.92 62.88 -.67 0.94 29.99 -.61 0.20 34.76 -1.13 0.02 20.11 -.20 26.20 +1.33 0.30 14.97 -.20 10.83 +.09 16.11 -.02 0.48 35.31 -.56 0.80 52.20 +.11 2.72 77.24 -1.12 2.38 45.17 -2.24 0.28 17.12 -.08 0.75 22.90 .73 -.01 0.58 68.27 -1.07 0.48 59.86 +.22 1.68 42.94 -.09 0.88 49.38 -.64 1.19 -.08 88.08 -1.33 0.79 52.43 -1.30 4.05 -.16 1.64 48.53 -.34 34.18 +.08 53.03 +.66 17.98 +.19 .20 -.00 4.80 -.05 35.46 -.42

Nm

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12.51 0.36 24.36 7.09 0.16 49.18 12.85 28.74 0.26 4.33 0.92 19.28 1.20 64.14 10.85 1.00 13.11 1.59 9.28 1.00 39.80 23.69 0.16 16.84

-.88 -.49 -.16 +.15 -.29 +.05 -.04 -.15 +.26 -.11 +.20 +.07 +.07 -.65 -.25

U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It UBS AG UDR UGI Corp UIL Hold URS US Airwy US Gold USEC USG UTiWrldwd UltaSalon UltraPt g Ultrapar s Ultratech Umpqua UndrArmr UniSrcEn UnilevNV Unilever UnionPac Unisys Unit UBWV UtdContl UtdMicro UtdNtrlF UtdOnln UPS B UtdRentals US Bancrp US NGs rs US OilFd USSteel UtdStatn s UtdTech UtdTherap UtdhlthGp UnvAmr UnvslCp UnivDisp U H U mG U U U m U mR U O

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9.91 -.24 12.34 -1.46 0.80 25.79 +.05 1.04 28.73 -.68 1.73 32.77 -.10 32.52 +.09 5.04 -.18 6.15 +.04 2.00 -.06 8.56 +.08 0.06 13.59 -.95 55.37 +.04 31.50 -.39 0.57 17.15 -.56 19.90 +.01 0.20 9.18 -.02 67.99 +.63 1.68 36.73 -.24 1.21 32.76 -.71 1.21 32.67 -.54 1.90 88.52 +.25 15.45 -.85 44.53 -.76 1.20 20.54 -.11 17.64 -.43 0.19 1.88 -.06 38.01 -.26 0.40 5.17 -.12 2.08 64.35 -1.26 15.61 +.10 0.50 21.27 -.34 9.90 +.19 33.59 -.05 0.20 27.39 -.27 0.52 29.04 -.49 1.92 70.50 -.54 42.92 +1.31 0.65 45.71 -.02 10.56 +.15 1.92 39.18 -.50 50.71 +.8


C

OV ER

Brew Shop

B  B Technical upgrades now allow CBS television programming in Central Oregon to be controlled in Bend by station owner Zolo Media, instead of KOIN-TV in Portland. As of Thursday, new transmitters, towers and antenna arrays have been bringing shows programmed in Bend at KBNZ — CBS for Central Oregon — according to a news release from Zolo Media, sister company to BendBroadband. The station will continue to run newscasts from KOIN, although the noon, 5:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. KOIN newscasts have been eliminated, according to the KBNZ website. KBNZ can be found at Channel 7.1 for over-theair viewers, or Channel 6 or 606 in HD for those with service from BendBroadband.

Groupon may delay going public Groupon is considering a delay to its long-awaited initial public offering amid stock market turmoil. While the online coupon giant had been hoping to go public by the end of this month, it is studying the market conditions and may push back the timing of the offering, said two people briefed on the matter who were not authorized to speak publicly about internal discussions. Earlier this summer, Groupon was aiming for an IPO at a valuation near $30 billion and had been considering a roadshow for potential investors next week. The roadshow now appears to be off the table. The hesitation by Groupon underscores how the continued volatility in the market is rattling even those with the most reason to be confident. The company has also been in discussions with the Securities and Exchange Commission over its IPO prospectus. A recent memo from the company’s chief executive, Andrew Mason, may complicate that process. The memo to employees promoted the company’s growth and strength against rivals. But the memo found its way in to the public sphere, raising concerns about whether the company had violated the mandatory “quiet period” that applies to companies waiting to go public.

Jordan Novet can be reached at 541633-2117 or at jnovet@bendbulletin.com.

Wal-Mart

that into hyper-personalized offers, promotions and discounts. What’s interesting is that the Kosmix founders, Venky Harinarayan and Anand Rajaraman, are Amazon veterans, having worked on the development of Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. That’s some great DNA to add to the social genome of a company that has not exactly been perceived as a hot young tech innovator. If successful, Wal-Mart’s embrace of mobile and social as part of a comprehensive shopping experience could provide a model for other companies eager to be seen as innovation leaders. Last year, “design thinking” was all the rage, and before that, it was “sustainable innovation.” The next big idea might just be social commerce — the full integration of the retail store, the Web and mobile into one unified shopping experience. It would be tough to bet against Wal-Mart at this point, given how well the company has executed on other innovation initiatives. With the acquisitions of Kosmix and Vudu, Wal-Mart may have the right mix of cosmic voodoo to take on doubters in Silicon Valley.

Continued from B1 So it makes sense that Wal-Mart has explored acquisitions as a way of catching up with competitors such as Amazon. With deals for social media start-up Kosmix ($300 million) and video download platform Vudu ($100 million), Wal-Mart might just be the Biggest Start-up in Silicon Valley You’ve Never Heard Of. Not only is the company becoming a leader in digital movie downloads with Vudu, it is also pioneering the integration of social data into the e-commerce experience. This goes way beyond just grafting on Facebook “like” buttons to an e-commerce shopping cart. It means the full embrace of “big data” — something that Wal-Mart has lots of — as a way of learning about customers and making the shopping experience that much better. In short, Wal-Mart is using Kosmix — aka @Wal-MartLabs — to fundamentally change the shopping experience by taking what it knows about your digital and mobile behaviors and transforming

Fewer CEOs cutting profit forecasts NEW YORK — The number of chief executive officers cutting profit forecasts fell 38 percent below average last month, even as the slowing economy pushed valuations to the lowest level at the start of September since 1985. A total of 138 companies reduced earnings forecasts in August, compared with the average of 221 for the same month since 2000, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. At the same time, the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index slumped 5.7 percent, pushing its price-earnings ratio to 13.3, the data show. Futures on the S&P 500 that expire this month fell as much as 2.8 percent today. For bears, the lowest multiples since March 2009 show companies will capitulate and lower their estimates, causing the benchmark index for American equities to fall this month, historically the worst for U.S. stocks, according to Bloomberg data since 1928. — Staff and wire reports

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 7, 2011 B5

Scott Woehle opened the shop, a 250square-foot space at 875 S.E. Third St. in Bend, named The Home Brewer, according to advertisements placed in The Bulletin in the early 1990s. Subsequent owners include Danny Elsey and Larry Johnson. In 1999, Johnson sold the store to Tyler Reichert. Elsey died last year. In 2000, Reichert started Silver Moon Brewing as part of the store and moved everything to a space on Division Street, he said. In 2003, Reichert changed the name of the store to The Brew Shop. Two years later, he moved the supply store and the brewery to the Silver Moon brewery’s current location on Northeast Greenwood Avenue. In 2007, he sold the Brew Shop to Tom Gilles, who now shares ownership of the business with Hawes, Glen Samuels and Randy Woodbridge. Gilles moved the store back to Division Street, leaving all the room in the Greenwood space for Silver Moon. Bill Herrick, who teaches a class on brewing beer at Central Oregon Community College, said he enjoys buying malts and other brewing ingredients from the Brew Shop because the prices are competitive, the goods fresh and the selection wide. “Having variety is really important for breweries, especially in the Northwest,” Herrick said. “This is a not an unsophisticated crowd that (is) brewing.”

Continued from B1 With the addition of the pub, the four owners who have served as the only employees at the store will be hiring six to seven employees as servers and kitchen staff, Hawes said. The pub, to be located downstairs in the new building, also could become home to a brewery that will produce beer only for on-premises consumption, Hawes said, but the process of establishing the pub’s brewery could take six to nine months. The owners will probably employ the one-third-barrel brew system they currently use for personal purposes, Hawes said. “It’s not something that we’re really looking to explode and really make a whole lot of money off of,” he said. “It’s just more of a quirky type of thing.” The new location more than triples the Brew Shop’s space from 2,100 square feet at its old location to 6,700 square feet at the new location. The shop will carry 600 beers — up from 500 — and increase its brewing supplies, including hops, grains, grain extracts, yeast, brewing kits and bottles. As Central Oregon’s brewing scene continues to grow — 12 breweries are operational, and at least four are in development — support from related businesses appears to be getting stronger and stronger. Sales have increased each year, Hawes said. The store has expanded under several owners since the early 1990s.

CBS TV programming goes local

S T OR I ES

Notices Continued from B1 On the other side of the foreclosure document, 1,404 rescissions of notices of default have been filed in the county during the first eight months of this year, compared to 870 over the same period in 2010. A rescission, generally, withdraws the default notice and reinstates the obligations that existed before it was issued, according to a spot check of the documents filed during August. They also contain lan-

Shake-up Continued from B1 Shares of Bank of America closed at $6.99 Tuesday, off about 50 percent since the start of the year. With Bank of America staggering under the weight of soured mortgages, most of which were acquired when it bought Countrywide in 2008, there has been speculation that a broader reorganization of the company could be in the offing. Options might include spinning off its highly profitable Merrill Lynch unit and putting Countrywide into bankruptcy, but bank officials say both scenarios are highly unlikely. The company, in an effort to reduce costs and increase profits, is set to review proposals for Project New BAC, an internal initiative aimed at making the company more nimble. It is expected to cut 10 percent of the overall workforce over the next few years, according to a person with knowledge of the matter. The cost savings associated with the departures of Krawcheck, the president of global wealth and investment management, and Price, the president of consumer and small business banking, are potentially substantial. Kraw-

guage stating that the conditions that led to the default remain and the rescission does not take away the right to sell the property. Some of those who monitor the local foreclosure market have disagreed whether the declining number of default notices indicates the worst of the foreclosure crisis has passed or whether banks and other lenders have simply become better at timing the release of properties onto the market. Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

check made $6.2 million in 2010, and $1.9 million in 2009, the year she was hired. Their teams also include large support staffs. The shake-up marks the second time this year that Moynihan has changed his management team. He named a new chief financial officer, Bruce Thompson, to succeed Charles Noski, who left to tend to “a serious illness of a close family member.” Gary Lynch of Morgan Stanley was selected to become the global chief of legal, compliance and regulatory relations, a new position. Krawcheck has been a wellknown figure on Wall Street for decades and among the small cadre of top women executives in finance. After college at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, she moved to New York, landing a job as an investment banker at Salomon Brothers and switching after a few years to Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette. Later at Sanford Bernstein, Krawcheck distinguished herself as a stock analyst, covering securities companies. Early on, she made headlines with some of her bold calls, notably upsetting Wall Street executive Sanford Weill when she criticized the acquisition of Salomon by his firm the Travelers Group. Shortly after Alliance Capital Management purchased Bernstein in 2000, she was named chairman and chief executive.

• Weight Loss & Weight Management • Nutritional Counseling • Hormone Balancing • Age Management AGEWISEMD.COM 541.678.5150

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Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

... 1.10 .04 .36 1.68 ... 1.00f .88 .96 ... .24 .48 .22 .84f .12 .42 ... ... .65 ... .64

7 13 ... 9 13 13 13 22 25 13 19 6 ... 9 6 12 12 ... 15 18 9

53.97 -.41 -4.8 23.91 -.12 +6.2 6.99 -.26 -47.6 13.55 -.27 -12.9 62.77 -1.26 -3.8 8.76 +.21 +3.7 34.96 -1.63 -26.1 48.86 -.72 -19.0 78.40 -.16 +8.6 5.54 -.10 -25.0 24.81 +.05 -16.6 23.63 -.71 -43.9 9.05 -.37 -26.2 19.54 -.10 -7.1 6.11 -.13 -31.0 22.76 -.32 +1.8 5.21 +.06 -14.0 6.10 +.06 -35.5 20.10 -.26 -.8 10.50 -.27 -12.5 25.51 -.29 -8.6

Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB rs Weyerh

1.24 .92 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .58 .07 1.46 .86f .52 ... .20 .50 .24 .48 ... .60

19 14 18 9 18 ... 33 21 11 11 16 8 25 6 22 10 16 9 15 4

83.76 -.28 -1.9 43.80 +.54 +3.4 43.99 -.16 -5.3 5.26 -.15 -70.3 35.47 -.20 -38.1 1.97 -.08 -4.8 35.56 -.26 -5.0 156.14 +.04 +12.2 17.80 +.15 -20.9 40.56 -1.65 -38.9 72.42 -.19 -13.5 27.50 -.32 -39.1 37.75 +.26 +17.5 7.09 -.16 -39.3 9.18 -.02 -24.6 21.27 -.34 -21.1 13.95 +.03 -17.6 23.92 -.28 -22.8 14.20 +.39 +.7 16.93 -.18 -10.6

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1878.00 $1869.90 $41.818

Market recap

Pvs Day $1880.00 $1873.70 $43.020

Prime rate Time period

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

BkofAm S&P500ETF SPDR Fncl GenElec iShEMkts

2725718 2396728 1042145 959345 636875

Last Chg 6.99 116.99 12.32 15.25 41.13

-.26 -.86 -.22 -.51 -.43

Gainers ($2 or more) Name SWS Grp TempleInld Blyth GushanE rs DirDMBr rs

Last

Chg %Chg

4.78 +1.03 30.85 +6.22 64.80 +11.73 2.11 +.33 44.27 +3.91

+27.5 +25.3 +22.1 +18.5 +9.7

Losers ($2 or more) Name CalDive ProUltEafe CredSuiss RBScotlnd ProUR1KV

Last

-.44 -9.65 -3.54 -1.01 -3.01

3.25 3.25 3.25

Vol (00)

NwGold g NovaGld g NthgtM g GoldStr g VantageDrl

Last Chg

69507 13.52 -.03 67230 11.22 +.31 64120 4.28 +.04 48966 2.66 +.01 40877 1.35 -.02

ExeterR gs VistaGold MidsthBcp EntreeGold NvTxAdFlt

HaderaPap Accelr8 MexcoEn Vicon XPO Log rs

Chg %Chg

Name

5.24 4.01 11.19 2.08 2.32

+.70 +15.4 +.43 +12.0 +.89 +8.6 +.15 +7.8 +.14 +6.4

ChinaSky Hollysys Imris gn AmIndep Medivation

831 2,224 83 3,138 16 209

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last

Last

Last Chg 15.28 25.51 53.29 19.54 12.91

-.13 -.29 +.01 -.10 +.04

Chg %Chg

2.41 +.28 +13.0 6.64 +.72 +12.2 4.59 +.44 +10.6 5.78 +.50 +9.5 17.47 +1.29 +8.0

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

42.59 -5.31 -11.1 2.76 -.30 -9.8 6.54 -.49 -7.0 3.26 -.24 -6.9 11.33 -.77 -6.4

Name

Last

WashFd wt GblEduc n DeerConsu ElbitImg Wintrust wt

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

617492 529593 507627 427219 359619

Gainers ($2 or more)

Last

Name

-16.5 -13.6 -12.9 -12.7 -11.7

Vol (00)

Cisco Microsoft PwShs QQQ Intel Yahoo

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

2.23 61.08 23.84 6.92 22.72

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

NYSE

Indexes

Chg %Chg

4.01 -.89 4.10 -.90 4.03 -.80 2.55 -.42 12.88 -2.07

-18.2 -18.0 -16.6 -14.1 -13.8

Diary 154 306 36 496 4 16

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

884 1,675 95 2,654 17 239

12,876.00 9,941.84 Dow Jones Industrials 5,627.85 4,067.94 Dow Jones Transportation 442.01 381.99 Dow Jones Utilities 8,718.25 6,652.32 NYSE Composite 2,490.51 1,867.96 Amex Index 2,887.75 2,101.52 Nasdaq Composite 1,370.58 1,040.88 S&P 500 14,562.01 10,913.67 Wilshire 5000 868.57 597.33 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,139.30 4,382.98 424.24 7,148.13 2,241.97 2,473.83 1,165.24 12,262.58 680.87

-100.96 -62.34 -2.48 -102.60 -34.12 -6.50 -8.73 -87.86 -2.49

YTD %Chg %Chg -.90 -1.40 -.58 -1.41 -1.50 -.26 -.74 -.71 -.36

52-wk %Chg

-3.79 -14.17 +4.75 -10.24 +1.52 -6.75 -7.35 -8.22 -13.12

+7.72 +.96 +6.74 +2.70 +15.98 +11.99 +6.72 +7.06 +8.20

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed yesterday.

Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Monday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

% Change

273.33 2,109.89 2,965.64 5,156.84 5,193.97 19,710.50 34,437.16 14,049.71 3,270.56 8,590.57 1,766.71 2,774.33 4,160.70 4,862.27

-.41 t -.36 t -1.13 t +1.06 s -1.00 t +.48 s +1.64 s -1.98 t -.69 t -2.21 t -1.07 t +.04 s -1.50 t +3.65 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0491 1.5936 1.0100 .002155 .1565 1.3991 .1283 .012875 .079803 .0337 .000928 .1546 1.1608 .0343

1.0550 1.6098 1.0090 .002161 .1566 1.4091 .1284 .013015 .079863 .0339 .000934 .1547 1.2720 .0344

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 16.47 -0.19 -11.1 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.76 -0.06 -5.3 GrowthI 24.21 -0.12 -6.3 Ultra 22.05 -0.07 -2.6 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.66 -0.12 -5.9 AMutlA p 23.91 -0.20 -4.5 BalA p 17.45 -0.11 -1.6 BondA p 12.60 -0.01 +5.7 CapIBA p 48.30 -0.74 -1.4 CapWGA p 31.50 -1.00 -10.5 CapWA p 21.37 -0.11 +6.5 EupacA p 36.18 -1.39 -12.5 FdInvA p 33.63 -0.46 -7.8 GovtA p 14.61 +0.01 +6.4 GwthA p 28.03 -0.24 -7.9 HI TrA p 10.77 -0.09 +0.2 IncoA p 16.07 -0.18 -1.0 IntBdA p 13.68 -0.01 +3.4 ICAA p 25.43 -0.32 -8.9 NEcoA p 23.62 -0.29 -6.8 N PerA p 25.92 -0.67 -9.4 NwWrldA 49.04 -1.21 -10.2 SmCpA p 34.15 -0.64 -12.1 TxExA p 12.33 +0.03 +7.2 WshA p 26.19 -0.22 -2.7 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 25.98 -0.64 -13.8 IntEqII I r 10.74 -0.28 -13.8 Artisan Funds: Intl 20.14 -0.54 -7.2 IntlVal r 24.00 -0.89 -11.5 MidCap 32.68 -0.05 -2.8 MidCapVal 19.40 -0.19 -3.4 Baron Funds: Growth 48.84 -0.30 -4.7 SmallCap 22.42 -0.16 -5.7 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.27 +6.6 DivMu 14.72 +0.02 +5.4 TxMgdIntl 13.16 -0.58 -16.3

BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.83 -0.17 GlAlA r 18.98 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.70 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 16.87 -0.17 GlbAlloc r 19.07 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 49.09 -0.20 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 58.04 -0.21 Columbia Class A: TxEA p 13.42 +0.03 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 27.15 -0.20 AcornIntZ 36.86 -1.05 LgCapGr 12.35 +0.04 ValRestr 43.90 -0.66 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.39 -0.07 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.62 -0.38 USCorEq2 9.80 -0.08 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 30.95 -0.38 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 31.32 -0.39 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.47 -0.02 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 19.32 -0.37 EmMktV 30.18 -0.63 IntSmVa 14.66 -0.60 LargeCo 9.23 -0.06 USLgVa 17.92 -0.19 US Small 18.82 -0.08 US SmVa 21.58 -0.11 IntlSmCo 15.16 -0.56 Fixd 10.36 IntVa 15.06 -0.69 Glb5FxInc 11.47 -0.01 2YGlFxd 10.24 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 64.91 -0.70

-3.1 NA NA -3.0 NA -8.0

+8.5 -8.9 -7.7 -0.6 -12.6 +0.5 -13.2 -10.2 -9.9 -9.7 +5.9 -12.4 -16.1 -13.8 -6.0 -10.4 -11.7 -15.5 -10.7 +0.7 -16.4 +5.4 +0.9 -6.5

Income 13.51 -0.02 IntlStk 30.23 -1.22 Stock 95.75 -1.37 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.25 Dreyfus: Aprec 38.12 -0.38 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 16.12 -0.18 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.64 -0.03 GblMacAbR 10.14 +0.01 LgCapVal 16.17 -0.18 FMI Funds: LgCap p 14.72 -0.20 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.84 FPACres 25.93 -0.18 Fairholme 25.84 -0.42 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.44 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 19.13 -0.07 StrInA 12.50 -0.05 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 19.34 -0.08 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.31 -0.11 FF2015 11.10 -0.09 FF2015K 12.33 -0.09 FF2020 13.35 -0.12 FF2020K 12.62 -0.12 FF2025 10.99 -0.12 FF2025K 12.62 -0.14 FF2030 13.06 -0.14 FF2030K 12.73 -0.14 FF2035 10.71 -0.14 FF2040 7.47 -0.10 FF2040K 12.73 -0.16 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.42 -0.09 AMgr50 14.91 -0.12 AMgr20 r 12.81 -0.05 Balanc 17.73 -0.09 BalancedK 17.73 -0.09

+4.2 -15.3 -10.4 +8.6 -0.2 -11.1 -0.9 +1.6 -10.9 -5.7 +2.0 -2.3 -27.4 +5.6 -4.0 +4.1 -3.8 -1.7 -1.8 -1.7 -2.8 -2.8 -4.2 -4.2 -4.8 -4.7 -6.3 -6.4 -6.4 -7.6 -2.5 +1.4 -1.9 -1.9

BlueChGr Canada CapAp CpInc r Contra ContraK DisEq DivIntl DivrsIntK r DivGth Eq Inc EQII Fidel FltRateHi r GNMA GovtInc GroCo GroInc GrowthCoK HighInc r IntBd IntmMu IntlDisc InvGrBd InvGB LgCapVal LowP r LowPriK r Magelln MidCap MuniInc NwMkt r OTC 100Index Puritn SCmdtyStrt SrsIntGrw SrsIntVal SrInvGrdF STBF StratInc StrReRt r TotalBd USBI

43.25 55.17 23.31 8.88 65.17 65.19 20.42 26.68 26.68 25.01 38.41 15.85 30.45 9.44 12.00 10.98 81.41 16.77 81.44 8.57 10.93 10.37 28.88 11.92 7.72 10.04 36.36 36.37 63.13 25.74 12.86 16.08 52.35 8.22 17.28 12.54 10.16 8.37 11.92 8.53 11.18 9.71 11.10 11.84

-0.15 -0.59 -0.15 -0.09 -0.26 -0.26 -0.24 -0.85 -0.85 -0.30 -0.63 -0.25 -0.15 -0.04 +0.01 -0.04 -0.20 -0.04 -0.08 -0.01 +0.02 -1.09 -0.01 -0.01 -0.15 -0.47 -0.47 -0.61 -0.14 +0.04 -0.03 +0.06 -0.06 -0.10 -0.06 -0.34 -0.37 -0.01 -0.05 -0.04 -0.01 +0.01

-4.6 -5.1 -8.0 -2.2 -3.7 -3.6 -9.4 -11.5 -11.4 -12.0 -12.5 -12.5 -5.1 -1.8 +7.0 +6.8 -2.1 -7.7 -2.0 -0.2 +5.7 +6.0 -12.6 +6.6 +6.7 -12.4 -5.3 -5.2 -11.8 -6.2 +7.8 +6.6 -4.7 -5.9 -2.7 -0.8 -10.0 -15.8 +6.7 +1.8 +4.2 +2.8 +6.0 +6.6

Value 59.82 -0.86 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 54.29 +0.37 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 33.89 -0.19 500IdxInv 41.39 -0.31 IntlInxInv 30.69 -1.35 TotMktInv 33.85 -0.23 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 41.39 -0.31 TotMktAd r 33.85 -0.24 First Eagle: GlblA 45.36 -0.72 OverseasA 22.02 -0.50 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.99 +0.05 FoundAl p 9.57 -0.21 HYTFA p 10.13 +0.03 IncomA p 2.04 -0.03 USGovA p 6.94 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.71 -0.07 IncmeAd 2.03 -0.02 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.06 -0.02 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 18.72 -0.26 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.03 -0.37 GlBd A p 13.74 -0.07 GrwthA p 15.85 -0.66 WorldA p 13.41 -0.42 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.77 -0.07 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 36.98 -0.33 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.34 -0.16 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 19.00 -0.76 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 12.37 -0.15 Quality 20.35 -0.15 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 6.88 -0.07

-12.9 +6.2 -10.1 -6.1 -12.5 -6.8 -6.1 -6.8 -2.2 -2.8 +9.1 -7.1 +8.9 -1.9 +5.8 +4.3 -1.8 -2.3 -8.5 -13.6 +4.1 -10.9 -9.6 +3.8 -8.1 +2.2 -11.3 -8.6 +2.3 -0.7

MidCapV 31.86 -0.36 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.37 -0.03 CapApInst 35.99 -0.06 IntlInv t 52.86 -2.04 Intl r 53.48 -2.06 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 28.49 -0.57 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 28.55 -0.57 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 36.20 -0.64 Div&Gr 17.90 -0.22 TotRetBd 11.52 +0.01 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.79 +0.05 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 16.09 -0.30 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.46 -0.16 CmstkA 14.19 -0.13 EqIncA 7.93 -0.06 GrIncA p 17.16 -0.17 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.88 -0.33 AssetStA p 23.66 -0.34 AssetStrI r 23.89 -0.34 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.90 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.89 HighYld 7.73 -0.07 ShtDurBd 11.02 -0.01 USLCCrPls 18.67 -0.14 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 38.05 -0.82 PrkMCVal T 20.90 -0.15 Twenty T 58.65 -0.66 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.23 -0.08 LSGrwth 11.89 -0.11 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.38 -0.31 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 19.77 -0.31

-11.9 +3.5 -2.0 -11.9 -11.7 -17.7 -17.6 -14.5 -8.1 +6.0 +4.1 -3.8 -4.4 -9.2 -6.9 -10.2 -3.6 -3.1 -2.9 +6.2 +6.4 -0.5 +1.6 -9.7 -24.9 -7.4 -10.8 -4.5 -7.4 -10.6 -10.8

Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.60 -0.40 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.45 -0.11 StrInc C 14.88 -0.14 LSBondR 14.40 -0.10 StrIncA 14.80 -0.14 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.47 -0.05 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 9.85 -0.11 BdDebA p 7.56 -0.06 ShDurIncA p 4.54 -0.01 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.57 -0.01 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.54 -0.01 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.51 -0.11 ValueA 20.77 -0.25 MFS Funds I: ValueI 20.87 -0.25 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.48 -0.30 MergerFd 15.67 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.55 -0.01 TotRtBdI 10.55 -0.01 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 36.78 -0.38 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 25.86 -0.58 GlbDiscZ 26.23 -0.58 SharesZ 18.90 -0.26 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 45.25 -0.20 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.05 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.52 -0.24 Intl I r 16.13 -0.52 Oakmark 38.50 -0.46 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.32 -0.06 GlbSMdCap 13.81 -0.25

-5.9 +4.9 +3.1 +4.7 +3.7 +6.3 -14.5 +0.8 +1.7 +1.2 +1.7 -2.8 -8.3 -8.2 -13.1 NA +4.7 +5.0 -1.5 -9.2 -9.0 -8.3 -1.5 NA -4.4 -16.9 -6.8 -3.9 -9.0

Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 32.01 -0.42 -12.2 GlobA p 53.66 -1.67 -11.1 GblStrIncA 4.22 -0.02 +2.6 IntBdA p 6.68 -0.08 +4.5 MnStFdA 29.65 -0.20 -8.5 RisingDivA 14.66 -0.15 -4.9 S&MdCpVl 28.74 -0.23 -10.3 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.27 -0.14 -5.5 S&MdCpVl 24.51 -0.20 -10.8 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.22 -0.14 -5.5 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.89 +0.02 +9.4 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 31.72 -0.42 -12.1 IntlBdY 6.67 -0.08 +4.5 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.02 -0.03 +3.7 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.89 -0.09 +4.8 AllAsset 12.27 -0.10 +3.4 ComodRR 9.09 -0.10 +5.9 DivInc 11.38 -0.05 +3.3 EmgMkCur 10.72 -0.10 +2.3 HiYld 8.88 -0.10 +0.3 InvGrCp 10.74 -0.02 +6.2 LowDu 10.43 -0.03 +1.9 RealRtnI 12.20 -0.06 +10.6 ShortT 9.83 +0.5 TotRt 11.02 -0.03 +3.8 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.43 -0.03 +1.7 RealRtA p 12.20 -0.06 +10.3 TotRtA 11.02 -0.03 +3.6 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.02 -0.03 +3.0 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.02 -0.03 +3.6 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.02 -0.03 +3.8 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 49.17 -0.58 +7.3 Pioneer Funds A:

PionFdA p 36.61 Price Funds: BlChip 37.03 CapApp 19.40 EmMktS 31.25 EqInc 21.35 EqIndex 31.49 Growth 30.55 HlthSci 31.39 HiYield 6.44 IntlBond 10.42 Intl G&I 11.71 IntlStk 12.74 MidCap 54.40 MCapVal 21.63 N Asia 18.05 New Era 46.18 N Horiz 32.45 N Inc 9.76 R2010 15.11 R2015 11.59 R2020 15.87 R2025 11.52 R2030 16.39 R2035 11.53 R2040 16.38 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 31.05 SmCapVal 32.28 SpecIn 12.36 Value 21.11 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 11.97 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.49 PremierI r 19.21 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 34.74 S&P Sel 18.38 Scout Funds: Intl 28.18 Sequoia 133.27 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 17.30 Third Avenue Fds:

-0.40 -10.3 -0.02 -0.14 -0.55 -0.22 -0.24 -0.04 +0.10 -0.05 -0.12 -0.47 -0.36 -0.36 -0.10 -0.16 -0.50 -0.04

-2.9 -4.5 -11.4 -9.1 -6.3 -5.0 +3.7 -0.2 +6.6 -12.0 -10.5 -7.1 -8.8 -5.9 -11.5 -3.1 +5.3 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA +1.6 -0.19 -9.8 -0.17 -10.7 NA -0.21 -9.6 NA -0.10 -10.0 -0.19 -5.6 -0.26 -6.6 -0.13 -6.1 -1.02 -12.5 -1.01 +3.1 -0.90 -13.4

ValueInst 44.40 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 24.22 IntValue I 24.77 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 21.75 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 20.90 CAITAdm 11.21 CpOpAdl 67.57 EMAdmr r 35.00 Energy 114.51 ExtdAdm 37.20 500Adml 107.75 GNMA Ad 11.20 GrwAdm 30.00 HlthCr 54.12 HiYldCp 5.58 InfProAd 27.96 ITBdAdml 11.96 ITsryAdml 12.15 IntGrAdm 54.71 ITAdml 13.86 ITGrAdm 10.19 LtdTrAd 11.17 LTGrAdml 10.25 LT Adml 11.17 MCpAdml 85.01 MuHYAdm 10.54 PrmCap r 62.97 ReitAdm r 78.21 STsyAdml 10.86 STBdAdml 10.71 ShtTrAd 15.95 STIGrAd 10.72 SmCAdm 31.08 TtlBAdml 11.06 TStkAdm 29.19 WellslAdm 53.84 WelltnAdm 51.53 Windsor 40.09 WdsrIIAd 41.98 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.83

-0.84 -14.2 -1.12 -13.0 -1.14 -12.8 -0.74 -8.7 -0.08 +0.03 -0.54 -0.66 -1.91 -0.20 -0.80

-1.2 +7.4 -12.0 -12.2 -5.3 -9.9 -6.1 +6.7 -0.13 -4.5 -0.32 +5.6 -0.04 +2.8 -0.14 +11.7 +9.9 +9.0 -1.82 -11.1 +0.03 +7.2 -0.01 +6.9 +3.2 +0.03 +14.0 +0.03 +7.8 -0.55 -7.8 +0.02 +7.7 -0.60 -7.8 -0.19 +1.3 +2.2 +3.0 +1.5 -0.01 +1.9 -0.15 -10.6 +0.01 +6.7 -0.20 -6.8 -0.18 +4.3 -0.47 -2.7 -0.55 -11.4 -0.44 -6.9 -0.13 -6.1

CapOpp 29.24 DivdGro 14.03 Energy 60.96 EqInc 19.79 Explr 65.97 GNMA 11.20 GlobEq 16.08 HYCorp 5.58 HlthCre 128.21 InflaPro 14.23 IntlGr 17.18 IntlVal 27.56 ITIGrade 10.19 LifeCon 16.02 LifeGro 20.55 LifeMod 18.79 LTIGrade 10.25 Morg 16.76 MuInt 13.86 PrecMtls r 26.31 PrmcpCor 12.85 Prmcp r 60.65 SelValu r 17.29 STAR 18.36 STIGrade 10.72 StratEq 17.26 TgtRetInc 11.46 TgRe2010 22.38 TgtRe2015 12.21 TgRe2020 21.43 TgtRe2025 12.09 TgRe2030 20.53 TgtRe2035 12.24 TgtRe2040 20.04 TgtRe2045 12.59 USGro 17.37 Wellsly 22.22 Welltn 29.83 Wndsr 11.88 WndsII 23.65 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r 23.19 TotIntlInst r 92.79 500 107.73

-0.23 -0.10 -1.02 -0.16 -0.42

-12.0 -1.4 -5.4 -1.5 -9.5 +6.6 -0.35 -10.0 -0.04 +2.7 -0.77 +5.5 -0.07 +11.7 -0.58 -11.2 -1.02 -14.3 -0.01 +6.8 -0.09 -1.1 -0.24 -6.3 -0.16 -3.2 +0.03 +13.9 -0.08 -7.0 +0.03 +7.1 +0.03 -1.4 -0.10 -6.7 -0.58 -7.8 -0.16 -7.8 -0.18 -2.9 -0.01 +1.8 -0.10 -5.8 -0.05 +2.8 -0.16 +0.3 -0.10 -1.7 -0.20 -3.0 -0.12 -4.2 -0.23 -5.3 -0.16 -6.5 -0.26 -6.8 -0.16 -6.7 -0.05 -4.8 -0.07 +4.2 -0.28 -2.7 -0.16 -11.5 -0.25 -6.9 -0.79 -12.0 -3.15 -12.0 -0.80 -6.2

MidCap

18.71 -0.12 -7.9

SmCap

31.02 -0.15 -10.7

SmlCpGth

19.99 -0.11 -8.8

SmlCpVl

13.97 -0.07 -12.7

STBnd

10.71

TotBnd

11.06 +0.01 +6.6

+2.9

TotlIntl

13.86 -0.47 -12.1

TotStk

29.18 -0.20 -6.8

Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst DevMkInst ExtIn

20.90 -0.08 -1.2 8.72 -0.37 -12.6 37.20 -0.20 -9.8

FTAllWldI r

82.62 -2.82 -11.9

GrwthIst

30.00 -0.13 -4.5

InfProInst

11.39 -0.05 +11.8

InstIdx

107.02 -0.80 -6.1

InsPl

107.03 -0.80 -6.1

InsTStPlus

26.40 -0.19 -6.7

MidCpIst

18.78 -0.12 -7.7

SCInst

31.08 -0.15 -10.6

TBIst

11.06 +0.01 +6.7

TSInst

29.19 -0.21 -6.8

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

89.01 -0.66 -6.1

STBdIdx

10.71

TotBdSgl

11.06 +0.01 +6.7

TotStkSgl

28.17 -0.20 -6.8

+3.0

Western Asset: CorePlus I

11.13 -0.01 +5.8

Yacktman Funds: Fund p

16.66 -0.06 +0.7


B6 Wednesday, September 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Patty Clark, Act Executive Beecher Carlson Ins 541-749-4968 patty.clark@beechercarlson.com

LaPine Community Health Center 541-536-3435 www.lapinecc.com

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Dutch Brothers 541-312-0133 www.dutchbros.com

Dwyer, Williams & Potter Attorneys, LLP 800-285-8678 www.roydwyer.com

provides newspapers for our local schools

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Best Buy 541-383-5850 63455 N. Hwy 97, Bend

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Central Oregon Community College 541-383-7700 www.cocc.edu

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L 

Inside

OREGON Kitzhaber calls for change in education system, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Betty Skelton, the ‘fastest woman on Earth,’ see Page C5.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011

Farmer’s hay barn burned down — again

HOW TO CO N TAC T Your state legislators SENATE Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Dist. 27 Phone: 503-986-1727 E-mail: sen.christelfer@state.or.us Sen. Doug Whitsett, R-Dist. 28 Phone: 503-986-1728 E-mail: sen.dougwhitsett@state.or.us Sen. Ted Ferrioli, R-Dist. 30 Phone: 503-986-1950 E-mail: sen.tedferrioli@state.or.us

HOUSE Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-Dist. 53 Phone: 503-986-1453 E-mail: rep.genewhisnant@state.or.us Rep. Jason Conger, R-Dist. 54 Phone: 503-986-1454 E-mail: rep.jasonconger@state.or.us Rep. Mike McLane, R-Dist. 55 Phone: 503-986-1455 E-mail: rep.mikemclane@state.or.us Rep. John Huffman, R-Dist. 59 Phone: 503-986-1459 E-mail: rep.johnhuffman@state.or.us

Your D.C. delegation U.S. Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore. Phone: 202-225-6730 Bend office: 541-389-4408 Web: walden.house.gov U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore. Phone: 202-224-3753 Bend office: 541-318-1298 Web: merkley.senate.gov U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. Phone: 202-224-5244 Bend office: 541-330-9142 Web: wyden.senate.gov

HOW TO SUBMIT

Juvenile charged with arson in fire that caused $70K in damage By Duffie Taylor The Bulletin

On Aug. 27 a 12-year-old boy rode his bicycle to a neighbor’s barn, flicked on a cigarette lighter and set the structure ablaze. For Terrebonne barn owner and hay farmer Ken Caudell, the incident was the second time a child had deliberately torched his property. It happened the first time 12 years ago, he says, when a neighborhood boy, also 12 at the time, set fire to more than 100 tons of hay Caudell had stored at his Lower Bridge Road prop-

erty. The hay was worth more than $15,000. This time, his 48-by-96-foot barn was destroyed, along with the tractor, two trailers and about $15,000 worth of hay stored inside. The latest fire is estimated to have caused about $70,000 damage. Caudell said he knew neither of the boys and cannot think of a reason why they targeted him. “It doesn’t actually dawn on you that a kid would do this. This is a strange, once-in-a-lifetime deal, and it happened to

me twice.� The Aug. 27 fire started about 6:30 p.m., when Caudell was working about 10 miles down the road in Lone Pine. Caudell said he often travels back and forth between his nearby ranches and the barn, and he had left the barn door unlocked that day. The boy was caught trying to leave the property on his bike by a woman and a man, who were driving by the barn and stopped when they saw it in flames, he said. The couple quickly called fire officials. See Hay / C6

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

A charred tractor and two trailers sit in Ken Caudell’s hay barn, which was burned in an Aug. 27 fire allegedly started by a juvenile. Caudell has lost a barn twice in the past 12 years to fires.

Budget cuts lead to bigger class sizes As districts reduce staff, student-teacher ratios on the rise By Patrick Cliff • The Bulletin

Civic Calendar notices: • E-mail: news@bendbulletin.com • Please write “Civic Calendarâ€? in the subject line and include a contact name and daytime phone number. School news and Teen Feats: • E-mail notices of general interest to pcliff@bendbulletin.com. • E-mail announcements of a student’s academic achievements to youth@bendbulletin.com. • More details: The Bulletin’s Local Schools page publishes Wednesday in this section. Births, engagements, marriages and anniversaries: • Mail information to Milestones, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708, within one month of the celebration. • More details: Milestones publishes in Sunday’s Community Life section.

News of Record on Page C2.

Oregon wildfires The following fires were burning in the mapped area below as of 5:12 a.m. Tuesday. For updates, go to www.nwccweb.us/information/ firemap.aspx.

HIGH CASCADES FIRE • Acres: 106,697 • Containment: 70 percent • Threatened structures: 290 • Cause: Lightning

DOLLAR LAKE FIRE • Acres: 4,500 • Containment: 10 percent • Threatened structures: 32 • Cause: Lightning

By Dylan Darling

D

espite several consecutive years of budget-related cuts, Bend-La Pine Schools have been able to maintain programs. However, there will be noticeable changes in the coming school year as the district has had to trim about $15 million from its 2011-2012 budget. Some classes

will be more crowded because the district eliminated 49 teaching positions, including a dozen devoted to special education.

All elementary vice principal positions were cut, as were several educational assistant positions. And Bend, Mountain View and Summit high schools have a new seven-period day. Staff members — from teachers to the superintendent — also gave up cost-of-living raises and have agreed to take up to 10 furlough days. But the district’s list of cuts does not include academic programs. “It’s been a very conscious decision, from the OUR board level to the district to the schools. We were SCHOOLS going to try and make those reductions as far What’s changing in away from students as Central Oregon, for the new school year and beyond. possible. Obviously, you can’t completely avoid it Third in a series. because that’s where most of the dollars go,� SuperFor The Bulletin’s roundup intendent Ron Wilkinson of schedules, vaccinations said. and other back-to-school In 2009, the district emnotes, go to www.bend ployed the equivalent of bulletin.com/school2011. 1,614 full-time workers, a number that fell to 1,477 this year. At the same time, district enrollment has climbed from 15,834 to a projected 16,193 students. Those contrasting trends mean student-teacher ratios have jumped over the past four years. This year, for example, kindergarten and first-grade student-teacher ratios increased to 24-to-1 from 18-to-1 in 2008-09. The staffing ratio from last year to this year will remain mostly unchanged, however. An average second-grade classroom will have two more students, for a total of 26. Middle school classrooms, too, will be slightly more crowded, increasing an average of 1.5 students to 31.5 per teacher, according to the district. Even though Bend-La Pine cut 17 high school teaching positions for 2011-12, student-teacher ratios remain at 35-to1. That stability is possible because the district adopted a seven-period day in some high schools, allowing teachers to handle more classes each day. See Cuts / C5

Fewer teachers, more students Bend-La Pine Schools have chopped staff numbers over the past five school years, moves necessitated by budget shortfalls. As a consequence, teacher-student ratios have increased across all grade levels.

'VMMUJNFFNQMPZFFTBDSPTTHSBEFMFWFMTJO#FOE-B1JOF Numbers are rounded; Employment numbers for 10-11 and 11-12 are budgeted 250

Grade level:

K-3

4-5

6-8

9-12

210 196

200

150

193

192

181

172

167 149 133

145 135 102

100

130

93

93

’09-’10

’10-’11

90

50 ’08-’09

’11-’12

Student-teacher ratios across grade levels in Bend-La Pine Grade level

’08-’09

’09-’10

’10-’11

’11-’12

K-1

18-1

20-1

24-1

24-1

2

20-1

22-1

24-1

26-1

3

25-1

27-1

28-1

28-1

4-5

30-1

30-1

31-1

31-1

6-8

28-1

30-1

30-1

31.5-1

9-12

34-1

35-1

35-1

35-1*

* Changed schedule to maintain class sizes Source: Bend-La Pine Schools

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

SHADOW LAKE FIRE • Acres: 4,610 • Containment: None • Threatened structures: 57 • Cause: Lightning

Deschutes library launches free music service

Pendleton

By Rachael Rees The Bulletin

High Cascades Madras

Mitchell Sisters Prineville Bend

Shadow Lake La Pine

John Day

Burns

MILES 0

Officials: Fighting Shadow Lake Fire too risky The Bulletin

Letters and submissions: • Mail: My Nickel’s Worth or In My View, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 • E-mail: bulletin@bendbulletin.com • More details inside this section.

Dollar Lake

C

50

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

On Tuesday, the Deschutes Public Library inaugurated a service that allows patrons to download free music files using their home computers. Through a service known as Freegal, library users can choose from more that 2.5 million tracks offered by Sony and the Independent Online Distribution Alliance. Each week users may download up to three songs in MP3 format and transfer the tracks

to their own music libraries. The download period restarts every Sunday night, allowing users to download three new songs. Users can keep the track, said Wylie Ackerman, e-services and web manager of the Deschutes Public Library. Library users may access the Freegal service either by clicking the “My DPL� link on the library system’s home page (www.deschuteslibrary.org) or by clicking “Freegal� on the district’s online resources page un-

der the heading for audio books, ebooks and music. Before downloading music, users must enter library card information and a pin number. The Freegal music page then allows users to browse the catlogue and preview songs prior to downloading selected tracks. Ackerman said it’s important to click “save� instead of “open� when downloading files. The most popular downloads at the Deschutes Public Library will appear at My Lib Top 10 on the Freegal music page, Acker-

man said. And the most popular Freegal downloads nationally will be listed on the Freegal page as the National Top 10. Library staff have been testing the program for a couple of weeks, said Ackerman, but for the general public “we are just starting to get the word out. I would hope thousands will use (Freegal), but it’s hard to speculate.� Rachael Rees can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at rrees@bendbulletin.com.

Not wanting to risk firefighters’ lives, fire officials said they decided late last month to let a blaze near Mount Washington sparked by a lightning strike burn and battle it only if it spread out of the wilderness. Nine days later, the Shadow Lake Fire has grown to 4,610 acres and could keep burning for another month, charring the forest north of the mountain to Highway 126, said Bill Anthony, Sisters District ranger for the Deschutes National Forest. “This fire is going to be here with us for awhile,� Anthony said.

$500,000 a day So far, Anthony said efforts to contain the fire have cost about $3 million, and each day of fighting it costs about another $500,000. Anthony was among a group of federal fire officials who spoke Tuesday night at a public meeting in Sisters. All defended the manner in which the fire is being fought to a crowd of more than 100. “This is an area that is difficult to access,� Anthony said. A flurry of fires over the last decade has created a buffer between the Shadow Lake Fire and heavily populated areas to the east, including Sisters and Black Butte Ranch, Anthony said. Nonetheless, smoke from the blaze has poured into those communities, as well as Bend and to the Willamette Valley, depending on the winds. The forests to the west of the fires are in a much different state. “This area was kind of ready for it,� said Meg Mitchell, supervisor of the Willamette National Forest. The fire is partially burning on the Willamette and may spread further there. “The big question here is what happens on the western edge of this fire,� Anthony said. Expecting the fire to make a charge to the west later this week, when forecasters believe winds will blow from the east, firefighters lit a 1,300acre “backburn� Monday. See Fires / C6

“It really is going to hurt the tourism economy to have this fire here.� — Chris King, has home in Black Butte Ranch


C2 Wednesday, September 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Theft — A barbecue grill was reported stolen at 11 a.m. Sept. 2, in the 500 block of Northeast 15th Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:16 p.m. Sept. 2, in the 2200 block of Northwest Hill Street. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 2:07 p.m. Sept. 2, in the 2600 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 4:50 p.m. Sept. 2, in the 3100 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Unauthorized use — A motorcycle was reported stolen at 5:21 p.m. Sept. 2, in the 3500 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 8:40 p.m. Sept. 2, in the 3100 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:47 p.m. Sept. 2, in the 19300 block of Green Lakes Loop. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:26 a.m. Sept. 3, in the 63300 block of Tristar Drive. DUII — Shane Michael Crowder, 29, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:41 am Sept. 3, in the area of Northwest 11th Street and Northwest Newport Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:05 a.m. Sept. 3, in the 1500 block of Northwest Wall Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:41 a.m. Sept. 3, in the area of Southeast Third Street and Southeast Miller Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 12:05 p.m. Sept. 3, in the area of Northwest Bond Street and Northwest Georgia Avenue. DUII — Roger Judd Campbell, 21, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:30 p.m. Sept. 3, in the area of Northwest Greenwood Avenue and Northwest Hill Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:07 a.m. Sept. 4, in the area of Northwest Harriman Street Northwest Thurston Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and a purse stolen at 7:42 a.m. Sept. 4, in the 300 block of Southeast Sena Court. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and a wallet stolen at 8:04 a.m. Sept. 4, in the 2200 block of Southeast Wind Rider Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 11:53 a.m. Sept. 4, in the 300 block of Southeast Soft Tail Loop. Theft — A purse was reported stolen from a vehicle at 2:09 p.m. Sept. 4, in the 3100 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 3:14 p.m. Sept. 4, in the 2200 block of Southeast Pilatus Lane. Burglary — A burglary was reported and an arrest made at 7:24 p.m. Sept. 4, in the 600 block of Northeast Ninth Street. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 8:52 p.m. Sept. 4, in the 100 block of Northeast Bend River Mall Avenue. DUII — Jason Lee Taylor, 35, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:54 p.m. Sept. 4, in the area of Northwest Georgia Avenue and Northwest Harriman Street. DUII — Michael Lee Stratemeyer, 32, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:02 a.m. Sept. 5, in the area of Northeast Third Street and Northeast Division Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and a GPS stolen at 8:47 a.m. Sept. 5, in the 1100 block of Northwest Rockwood Lane. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:34 a.m. Sept. 5, in the 500 block of Southwest Industrial Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 1 p.m. Sept. 5, in the 800 block of Northeast Locksley Drive. Criminal mischief — Damage to a window was reported at 8:18 p.m. Sept. 5, in the 1100 block of South U.S. Highway 97. DUII — Shawna Mary Burke, 31, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:19 p.m. Sept. 5, in the area of Northwest 13th Street and Northwest Jacksonville Avenue. Redmond Police Department

Theft — Prescription medications were reported stolen at 9:23 p.m. Sept. 2, in the 900 block of Northwest Redwood Place. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 6:39 p.m. Sept. 2, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way.

Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 4:45 p.m. Sept. 2, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 2:34 p.m. Sept. 2, in the 1900 block of Southwest Canyon Drive. Theft — Pallets were reported stolen at 1:44 p.m. Sept. 2, in the 1700 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 12:23 p.m. Sept. 2, in the 800 block of Southwest Deschutes Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:02 a.m. Sept. 2, in the 300 block of Southwest 27th Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:07 a.m. Sept. 2, in the 200 block of Southwest Second Street. DUII — Linda E. Adee, 59, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:14 p.m. Sept. 3, in the area of Southwest Fifth Street and Southwest Glacier Avenue. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 5:12 p.m. Sept. 3, in the 3600 block of Southwest 21st Place. DUII — Michael Spencer Klass, 52, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:10 p.m. Sept. 3, in the 1200 block of Southwest Highland Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 3:39 p.m. Sept. 3, in the 100 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 3:08 p.m. Sept. 3, in the 2700 block of Southwest Umatilla Court. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:57 p.m. Sept. 3, in the 800 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — Gasoline was reported stolen at 5:48 a.m. Sept. 3, in the 2000 block of South U.S. Highway 97. DUII — Francisco Chavez Cruz, 27, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:38 a.m. Sept. 3, in the 400 block of West Antler Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 11:04 p.m. Sept. 4, in the 300 block of Southwest 11th Street. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 10:30 p.m. Sept. 4, in the 1900 block of Southwest Canyon Drive. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 9:09 p.m. Sept. 4, in the 2000 block of Southwest Canyon Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 4:58 p.m. Sept. 4, in the 1100 block of Northwest Quince Avenue. Theft — A dryer was reported stolen and an arrest made at 9:14 a.m. Sept. 4, in the 100 block of Northwest Dogwood Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:10 a.m. Sept. 4, in the 3100 block of Southwest Pumice Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 6:57 p.m. Sept. 5, in the 1500 block of Southwest 24th Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 5:43 p.m. Sept. 5, in the 700 block of Northwest Maple Court. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:55 p.m. Sept. 5, in the 700 block of Northwest Maple Court. Unauthorized use — A jet ski was reported stolen at 4:22 p.m. Sept. 5, in the 1200 block of Northeast Fourth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:20 p.m. Sept. 5, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 1:06 p.m. Sept. 5, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:11 a.m. Sept. 5, in the 3100 block of Southwest Quartz Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:39 a.m. Sept. 5, in the 3200 block of Southwest Quartz Avenue. Prineville Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 2:45 p.m. Sept. 2, in the are of Northwest Second Street. Burglary — A burglary and criminal mischief were reported at 11:37 a.m. Sept. 3, in the area of Northwest Locust Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:34 p.m. Sept. 4, in the area of Northwest Ninth Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

DUII — Ryan Dale Magee, 34, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:05 p.m. Sept. 2, in the 52500 block of U.S. Highway 97 in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:47 p.m. Sept. 2, in the area of Northwest Pershall Way in Redmond. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:15 p.m. Sept. 2, in the area of the Tam McArthur Rim parking lot.

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:23 p.m. Sept. 2, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 and Plainview Road in Cloverdale. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:57 p.m. Sept. 2, in the 56800 block of Venture Lane in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:16 a.m., in the 63300 block of U.S. Highway 20 in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:20 p.m. Sept. 3, in the 63200 block of Cimarron Drive. DUII — Rodney Arthur Ehman, 59, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 5:13 p.m. Sept. 3, in the area of Cinder Butte and Navajo roads in Bend. Theft — A trolling motor was reported stolen at 3:59 p.m. Sept. 3, in the area of Craine Prairie Reservoir. DUII — Mychal Benjamin Wagner, 29, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:40 p.m. Sept. 4, in the area of Southwest Cline Falls Road and West state Highway 126 in Redmond. Theft — Two bicycles were reported stolen at 12:16 p.m. Sept. 4, in the 400 block of West Hood Avenue in Sisters. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:36 a.m. Sept. 4, in the area of Northeast First Street and Northeast Smith Rock Way in Terrebonne. DUII — John Nicholas Slanchik Jr., 59, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:53 p.m. Sept. 5, in the area of 15th Street and Knott Road in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:13 p.m. Sept. 5, in the area of Fifth Street and Twin Drive in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:49 p.m. Sept. 5, in the area of West state Highway 126 near milepost 102. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:15 p.m. Sept. 5, in the area of Bear Creek Road and U.S. Highway 20 in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:59 p.m. Sept. 5, in the 52500 block of U.S. Highway 97 in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:47 p.m. Sept. 5, in the area of Starwood Drive and Tumalo Road in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:09 p.m. Sept. 5, in the area of Johnson Road and Saddleback Drive in Bend. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 1:32 p.m. Sept. 5, in the 51400 block of Hemlock Road in La Pine. DUII — Roland Kevin Delapp, 22, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:02 a.m. Sept. 5, in the area of Eagle Crest Boulevard and West state Highway 126 in Redmond. DUII — Albert Henry Wenzloff, 31, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:53 a.m. Sept. 5, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and Northeast Hemlock Avenue in Redmond. Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 7:48 p.m. Aug. 30, in the 100 block of Northwest Depot Road in Madras. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:50 p.m. Aug. 31, in the area of Feather Drive and Gem Lane in Culver. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen Sept. 2, in the 500 block of Adams Avenue in Metolius. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported Sept. 3, in the area of Frazier and Fisch lanes in Culver. Oregon State Police

DUII — Aaron Douglas Alexander, 29, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:46 p.m. Sept. 2, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 160. DUII — Kelly K. Huskey, 34, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:28 a.m. Sept. 3, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 133. DUII — Christopher Allen Gemmell, 44, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:03 a.m. Sept. 3, in the area of East U.S. Highway 20 near milepost 97. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:23 p.m. Sept. 3, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 145. DUII — Michael Monroe Flint, 59, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 7:36 p.m. Sept. 3, in the area of Northeast Purcell Boulevard and Boyd Acres Road. DUII — Christopher James Harper, 29, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:30 a.m. Sept. 4, in the area of Empire Avenue and Corporate Place. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:25 a.m. Sept. 4, in the area of East U.S. Highway 20 near milepost 50.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

L.A. stadium bill may pave way for other exceptions By Kevin Yamamura McClatchy -Tribune News Service

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — A last-minute bill to expedite environmental review on a downtown Los Angeles football stadium may pave the way for similar exceptions on other construction projects, including a downtown arena in Sacramento. Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg is talking with Assembly Speaker John A. Perez and California Gov. Jerry Brown about a companion measure to accelerate judicial review for alternative energy manufacturing plants, clean energy projects and urban infill, including sports stadiums, according to sources who would not be named because negotiations are ongoing.

As with the Los Angeles stadium proposal, Senate Bill 292, the broader legislation would allow developers to ask state appellate courts to review environmental challenges on a shortened timetable. Under SB 292, the Los Angeles-based Second District Court of Appeal would issue a decision on a stadium challenge within 175 days, cutting 100 days or more off the typical process, according to an Assembly analysis. “I think the L.A. stadium project is very worthy,” said Steinberg, a Democrat. “I also think this is a unique moment in time to do everything we can to focus on expediting existing processes to help our economy recover. There are a lot of productive discussions going back and forth.” Steinberg declined to discuss specifics. Anschutz Entertainment

Group has proposed a $1.3 billion NFL stadium adjacent to the Staples Center in Los Angeles. Some environmental groups, including the Natural Resources Defense Council, offered conditional support Tuesday after negotiating changes to the bill. Others such as Sierra Club California remain opposed because they say AEG is getting special treatment in the closing days of legislative session. The companion measure Steinberg is seeking would authorize the governor to decide which projects qualify, using environmental targets such as low carbon emissions as criteria, according to a legislative source. The proposal would fast-track projects that include farms generating wind power, electric car factories and downtown sports complexes.

Panama Canal treaties signed in 1977 The Associated Press Today is Wednesday, Sept. 7, the 250th day of 2011. There are 115 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Sept. 7, 1964, the controversial “Daisy” commercial, an ad for President Lyndon B. Johnson’s election campaign, aired on NBC-TV. (In the spot, footage of a little girl in a meadow plucking the petals of a flower is overtaken by a countdown leading to a nuclear explosion.) ON THIS DATE In 1533, England’s Queen Elizabeth I was born in Greenwich. In 1825, the Marquis de Lafayette, the French hero of the American Revolution, bade farewell to President John Quincy Adams at the White House. In 1892, James J. Corbett knocked out John L. Sullivan to win the world heavyweight crown in New Orleans in a fight conducted under the Marquess of Queensberry rules. In 1907, the British liner RMS Lusitania set out from Liverpool, England, on its maiden voyage, arriving six days later in New York. In 1936, rock legend Buddy Holly was born Charles Hardin Holley in Lubbock, Texas. In 1940, Nazi Germany began its eight-month blitz of Britain during World War II with the first air attack on London. In 1968, feminists protested outside the Miss America pageant in Atlantic City, N.J. (The pageant crown went to

T O D AY IN HISTORY Miss Illinois Judith Ford.) In 1977, the Panama Canal treaties, calling for the U.S. to eventually turn over control of the waterway to Panama, were signed in Washington by President Jimmy Carter and Panamanian leader Omar Torrijos. In 1986, Desmond Tutu was installed as the first black to lead the Anglican Church in southern Africa. In 1996, rapper Tupac Shakur was shot and mortally wounded on the Las Vegas Strip; he died six days later. TEN YEARS AGO White House budget chief Mitch Daniels warned top congressional Republicans the Social Security surplus was on track to be tapped for other programs, prompting a hastily called meeting to discuss ways of avoiding that politically perilous scenario. Venus Williams and Serena Williams reached the finals of the U.S. Open, defeating Jennifer Capriati and Martina Hingis respectively, becoming the first sisters to play for a Grand Slam championship in more than 100 years. FIVE YEARS AGO British Prime Minister Tony Blair gave in to a fierce revolt in his Labour Party and reluctantly promised to quit within a year. Former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage confirmed he was the source of a leak that had disclosed the identity of CIA employee Valerie Plame, saying he didn’t realize Plame’s job was covert.

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ONE YEAR AGO A Chinese fishing trawler and two Japanese patrol boats collided near disputed islands in the East China Sea, further straining relations between Beijing and Tokyo. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Sen. Daniel Inouye), D-Hawaii, is 87. Jazz musician Sonny Rollins is 81. Actor Bruce Gray is 75. Actress Susan Blakely is 63. Singer Gloria Gaynor is 62. Rock singer Chrissie Hynde (The Pretenders) is 60. Actress Julie Kavner is 60. Rock musician Benmont Tench (Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers) is 58. Actor Corbin Bernsen is 57. Actor Michael Emerson (TV: “Lost”) is 57. Pianist Michael Feinstein is 55. Singer Margot Chapman is 54. Actor W. Earl Brown is 48. Actor Toby Jones is 45. Model-actress Angie Everhart is 42. Actress Diane Farr is 42. Actress Monique Gabriela Curnen is 41. Actor Tom Everett Scott is 41. Rock musician Chad Sexton (311) is 41. Actress Shannon Elizabeth is 38. Actor Oliver Hudson is 35. Actor Devon Sawa is 33. Singer-musician Wes Willis (Rush of Fools) is 25. Actress Evan Rachel Wood is 24. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “The theory seems to be that as long as a man is a failure he is one of God’s children, but that as soon as he succeeds he is taken over by the devil.” — H.L. Mencken, American journalist-author (1880-1956)


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 7, 2011 C3

O UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

AlcoholEdu gives freshmen a schooling on drinking at college lead not only to risky sex but EUGENE — Classes don’t also sexual assault. begin for a few weeks, but the The course, which includes first test for the class of 2015 a test at the end, gives students at the University of Oregon is information about how alcohol already under way. It’s part of affects the body, mind, percepan online course designed to tions and behavior. discourage underage and binge The first part takes about drinking. two hours. It leads students AlcoholEdu for College aims through a series of modules to give new students a more ac- that gauge their history of alcocurate view of hol use and taicampus culture lor the informaand help them “They don’t tion presented make better de- have to feel this to each student’s cisions about background alcohol, The Eu- is something and knowledge. gene Register- everybody does. After students Guard reported. have been on Students 21 We want to make campus for a and younger sure students are week or two, are expected to they complete a take the course making the right, short follow-up and could face well-informed module. sanctions if they Student test decisions and not don’t, school ofinformation is basing them on ficials said. kept anonymous Manystudents false perceptions and individual come to campus results are not thinking that of what’s actually given to the unibinge drinking happening.” versity, but camis common, said pus officials get Jennifer Sum- — Jennifer Summers, aggregate data mers, director of director of abuse that helps them substance abuse prevention at University gauge students’ prevention. In of Oregon knowledge and fact, almost a experience with third of students alcohol. don’t drink at all, and another AlcoholEdu is used by more large percentage drink little or than 500 campuses. A study in in moderation, she said. the Journal of Health Communi“Those misperceptions can cation in 2010 said students who really skew what students completed the course reported a think,” Summers said. “They significantly lower level of alcodon’t have to feel this is some- hol use, fewer negative drinking thing everybody does. We want consequences and fewer positive to make sure students are mak- alcohol-related attitudes coming the right, well-informed pared with a control group that decisions and not basing them did not take the course. on false perceptions of what’s AlcoholEdu for College is actually happening.” produced by a for-profit comThe same goes for sexual pany, Outside the Classroom. behavior, Summers said. The The university signed a fourcourse informs students about year contract for the program, consent and how alcohol can at a total cost of $80,080.

The Associated Press

O  B Brothers drown at Portland park PORTLAND — Two brothers drowned while swimming Monday at Kelley Point Park in Portland. Rescue crews told KGW that 24-year-old Kissan Kumar started struggling and his brother, 21-year-old Ram Kumar, went in to help him. Both disappeared. Divers found the bodies about an hour-and-ahalf later. Warm weather has attracted people to the sandy beaches at the north Portland park where the Willamette and Columbia rivers meet.

Man drowns at Sauvie Island beach PORTLAND — Witnesses told Oregon State Police a man was trying to swim to his boat at Sauvie Island when he went motionless in the water. Friends were performing CPR on the man Sunday night at Collins Beach when a trooper and Columbia County deputies arrived. Medics rook over but were unable to revive him, and 45year-old Michael L. Walker, of Forest Grove, was declared dead at the scene.

Crashes killed 3 over weekend, police say PORTLAND — Oregon State Police say three people died in traffic accidents over the Labor Day weekend. The police said in a statement Tuesday the number is preliminary. The total is below the average of seven for the holiday weekend. Officers reported two fatal crashes between 6 p.m. Friday and midnight Monday: a crash involving a motorcycle in Clackamas County that killed two people Friday and a pickup truck crash that killed a man west of Grass Valley. The truck

was found Monday. Police say the truck went over a guardrail and plunged more than 400 feet down a steep hillside off Highway 216.

Umpqua drowning victim was trainer ELKTON — The woman who drowned in the Umpqua River at Elkton was a personal trainer and body builder. KVAL reported 34-year-old Genevieve Moreno, of Eugene, was with friends Sunday afternoon when she tried to swim across the rapids. She was not wearing a life vest and disappeared under the water. Moreno was the co-owner of a personal training company in Eugene and competed in body building competitions.

Gasoline price up 8 cents a gallon PORTLAND — AAA Oregon reports that gasoline prices in Oregon have risen 8 cents a gallon, pushed upward by storms that closed refineries along the East Coast and the Gulf of Mexico. The organization says its surveys showed the national average price up a nickel, to $3.66. Oregon’s average price was pegged at $3.83. AAA Oregon says prices are about 85 cents a gallon higher than at the same time last year.

1 injured in 2-alarm house fire at Gaston GASTON — One person was injured in a 2-alarm fire that destroyed a home Monday evening at Gaston. The Gaston Fire Department describes the injuries as nonlife threatening. The Red Cross is helping the homeowners and residents of an attached apartment who have been displaced by the fire. — From wire reports

Kevin Clark / The Register-Guard

Gov. John Kitzhaber, center, smiles after addressing teachers and administrators at Springfield High School on Tuesday in Springfield. Springfield School District Superintendent Nancy Golden, left, served as the governor’s educational policy advisor for the past six months. Oregon State Superintendent of Public Instruction Susan Castillo is on the right.

Antiquated education system needs change, Kitzhaber says Governor seeks ‘culture of excellence’ through tough times By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

SPRINGFIELD — Oregon’s public schools are stuck in an oldfashioned way of doing business, Gov. John Kitzhaber said Tuesday, telling an audience of school teachers and administrators that improving education “requires the courage to change.” He laid out a vision of an education system that identifies atrisk children from birth, gives their parents the tools they need to help children be ready to read by kindergarten, and helps students transition through the education system without falling behind. “The path forward in this new century requires innovation, requires the willingness to challenge assumption, requires the courage to change,” Kitzhaber said at the annual backto-school event for Springfield Public Schools employees. As students in much of the state returned Tuesday to classrooms more crowded than last year, Kitzhaber said education is

underfunded at all levels. But he said the lack of money makes it even more important to overhaul the education bureaucracy and turn “islands of excellence” into a “culture of excellence.” Since taking office in January, Kitzhaber has focused much of his attention on remaking the mechanical workings of the education bureaucracy, even as legislators and interest groups insisted funding for schools is way too low and should get more attention. Oregon’s model of teaching young people is so disorganized, he said, it’s a stretch to even call it an education “system.” “We must improve our systems and invest in proven practices that can improve results from students today and increase resources for teachers,” Kitzhaber said. “As more resources become available, we must be prepared to reinvest in an education system better designed for the 21st century.” To that end, he persuaded the state Legislature this year to approve a framework for creating

Jeld-Wen says takeover by Canada firm on track The Associated Press PORTLAND — Jeld-Wen, Oregon’s largest privately held company, says its agreement to be taken over by a Canadian corporation is on track despite a published report that a proposed bond sale critical to the deal has been met with a skepticism by market analysts. The Klamath Falls window and door company said in a brief statement Tuesday that it has “more than adequate cash and liquidity to conduct business as usual” while it tries to sell $575 million in bonds needed to close a deal with Onex Corp., a private equity firm. The Oregonian reported last week that Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s gave the proposed bond issue junk ratings, and an independent bond reviewer in New York wrote a report critical of the bond documents, calling them poorly drafted and seriously flawed. But Robert Matz, the Covenant Review analyst who wrote the report, told The Oregonian the bigger problem may be the slump in the bond market re-

sulting from the stalled U.S. economy. “Sloppiness aside,” Matz said, “if a deal needs to get done and the market’s there for it, it can be fixed.” Jeld-Wen was built by billionaire Dick Wendt, who died last year. The company is now led by his son Ron. The Great Recession dealt the company a blow. During the past three years, the company shed 25 percent of its workers and closed 21 plants, according to Standard & Poor’s. Factories are operating at half their capacity, Moody’s said. The Oregonian said Jeld-Wen was laboring under $1.2 billion in debt when it negotiated a cash infusion from Onex, intending to give the Canadians a minority stake. Last month, however, Onex said it would boost its investment to $864 million and take a majority stake, ending family control of the 50-year-old company. The paper quoted business analysts as saying that the difficulty with the bond sale could lead to a bankruptcy filing.

an Education Investment Board. He hopes the board, controlled by the governor, will eventually become a powerful oversight committee with widespread authority to recommend education funding and policy for all programs involved in educating children from birth through college. But first, he’ll have to prove the framework can work and get approval from the Legislature — and also likely from the educators in Springfield and elsewhere who share their thoughts with their representatives.

$3.8 billion annually Kitzhaber wants to use the state’s substantial education spending — about $3.8 billion per year — as a powerful tool to encourage effective teaching and to hold schools and teachers accountable for success. The programs that show the most success should be rewarded with money, he said. Kitzhaber said he wants in-

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struction to be more individualized and flexible, so a student can progress at his own best pace. And he questioned the value of today’s standardized tests, saying they’re “simplistic and overemphasized,” and not particularly useful to students, parents and teachers. The governor said schools should strive to ensure that all students graduate from high school and 80 percent of them get at least two years of posthigh school education or training. He called the goal a “North Star” to guide efforts to change education. “But ... we won’t get there if we hold tight to the status quo, set our sights low and continue to let school funding be the only statewide education debate that matters,” he said. Kitzhaber’s ideas sounded good to Jean Costin, a Title I reading instructional assistant at Moffitt Elementary in Springfield. It may be a bit unrealistic to expect that every student come to kindergarten ready to read, she said, but it’s “an excellent goal,” and progress in that area would make a difference for children.

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C4 Wednesday, September 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Bend should extend discount for businesses

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oving even just across town can be as much fun as a root canal. The Bend City Council may try to make moving easier on small businesses. The council is

scheduled to consider today extending a program that gives a 50 percent discount on some planning and engineering fees. It’s for Bend businesses with fewer than 20 full-time employees that want to relocate within Bend. The council approved the program last year and capped the discounted fees at a total of $50,000 for the entire program. There is still about $16,500 left. The extension would continue the program with that money. The city should extend it. Thirteen businesses have used the program since it started, including Goody’s, the New York City Sub-Shop and others. The discount has meant savings between $600 and $7,500 for the 13 businesses. The planning and engineering fees from a move across town can be substantial for a small business. For instance, before the program began, Big Island Kona Mix Plate moved to the Old Mill from Reed Lane Plaza. The owners stood to lose some seating compared to the old location, but figured they would pick up foot traffic from the new location near the movie theaters. The move cost the business about $2,900 in fees, according to city documents. On top of the other expenses

of moving and especially for a small business, that money spent in fees could make a difference in whether the move is affordable or not. Of course, that hints at a flaw in the program. The city does not have a way to distinguish businesses that don’t need a discount to be able to afford a move from those that do. And there is a second consideration. The city of Bend is having trouble finding enough money to fund all its programs. It has gone through budget cuts. It has laid off more than 40 employees and not filled more than 50 vacancies. There might be other urgent needs the city has for the $16,500. If so, city staff did not identify them. Extending the program does send a small message that the city is committed to working with the businesses it has. That’s a worthwhile message for the city to send. There may also be a more important question to ask: Are the planning and engineering fees too high to begin with?

Make best of closure M

erchants in the Crescent Lake area are understandably worried about the Oregon Department of Transportation’s plans to repair viaducts and a tunnel on state Highway 58 over the next two summers. Their livelihoods depend largely on those using the highway and the prospect of road closures and traffic delays is not a pleasant one. Yet the roadwork must be done, and it cannot be accomplished without some disruption to traffic. Merchants and others at Crescent Lake, east of the Willamette Pass summit, and Oakridge, on the west, gave ODOT officials plenty to think about at meetings last week, says Rick Little, public information officer for the agency’s Region 2. The first step in that process is to return to the engineering team that designed the project and see if a new approach is available that is more acceptable to residents of the two communities. That may be difficult, however. For one thing, some of the repairs necessary require closure of the full road at the time. As things now stand, the highway will be closed six times over the course of next summer for four weekdays at a time. Though ODOT does

not know now when those closures will occur, it will work with the contracting company that wins the project to create a schedule that is acceptable to both. The delay is unavoidable, in part because plans for the project still may change and in part because negotiation over the schedule cannot begin until a company actually wins the right to complete it. Business owners in the two communities worry, however, that the word may not get out to casual travelers in any event. Little says agency officials understand their concerns and will do what it can to help. It may, for example, work with the California Department of Transportation to place warning signs as far south as Weed, in Northern California. It may also contact automobile associations and other tourist groups to spread the word that way. In the end, ODOT may not be able to avoid causing at least some problems for Willamette Pass merchants, though Little says it will do what it can to keep the pain to a minimum. That may not be what the folks in Oakridge and Crescent Lake want to hear, but it is likely the best they can expect.

Bend’s future relies on reroute IN MY VIEW

By David Ditz and Jerry Mitchell Bulletin guest columnists

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any members of the Bend community are aware that the Oregon Department of Transportation has recently issued a draft environmental impact statement for ODOT’s North Corridor project, which proposes to reroute U.S. Highway 97 in the north end of Bend between the Empire Avenue interchange and a point about a mile north of Cooley Road. Two alternatives have been prepared and studied: “DS-1,” which would provide a full highway interchange just north of where Bowery Lane meets Highway 97, and “DS-2,” which would provide a set of limited-access flyover ramps immediately east of the Deschutes Gardens cemetery. Between the Empire interchange and Cooley Road, the two alternatives are identical. ODOT has conducted numerous public meetings to discuss this project with the community over the past several years, and recently held an additional meeting to review the details of the draft environmental impact statement and to take public testimony. Based on public input and its own analysis, ODOT will soon make a selection of one of the two alternatives and put that alternative through a final environmental impact statement analysis, a process which will likely take an additional 18 to 24 months. We feel it is of vital importance that the community understand the critical nature of this decision. There are pros and cons with each of the two alternatives, but the issue which we feel requires the most careful study by ODOT and the community as a whole is access to Juniper Ridge. Cooley Road is currently the only means of access to Juniper Ridge.

There are approximately 525 acres of the Juniper Ridge property within the Urban Growth Boundary. Approximately 300 acres of the property are now zoned light industrial; the remainder is still zoned urban area reserve. The remainder urban area reserve acreage is proposed to become the mixed-use “town center” component of Juniper Ridge. There are currently only two companies at Juniper Ridge: the Les Schwab headquarters and the Suterra headquarters and manufacturing facility. Traffic impact on Cooley Road by these two companies is minimal. Obviously, traffic on Cooley Road will increase as Juniper Ridge grows. The DS-1 alternative would create an opportunity for additional access to Juniper Ridge at the north end of the property, which is consistent with the City Council-approved Cooper Robertson Conceptual Master Plan. This access would alleviate and balance traffic growth on Cooley Road. The DS-2 alternative precludes this opportunity, and would force all future Juniper Ridge traffic to Cooley Road. Cooley Road is classified as a minor arterial in the city’s transportation system plan; eventually, Cooley Road is proposed to be extended to the east to connect to Deschutes Market Road. The roadway runs through a residential neighborhood (part of the Boyd Acres Neighborhood Association), and directly past the Lava Ridge/Sky View school complex. It is our view (and we are speaking as private citizens, not as representatives of the city) that the selection of Alternative DS-2 will severely threaten the success of Juniper Ridge. To

limit the access to a 500-acre mixed use project to a single roadway that passes through a residential neighborhood and directly past two schools would be a highly dubious planning decision that could be seen as a fatal flaw by companies considering locating at Juniper Ridge. In fact, an access to the Juniper Ridge property at its northern boundary, with direct access to Highway 97, is clearly vital to the project’s success. We respectfully acknowledge the concerns about Alternative DS-1 that have been raised by the Hunnell United Neighbors as well as the Cascade Village retail consortium. We agree that DS-1’s proposed alignment of Third Street north of Cooley Road is intrusive upon the Hunnell neighborhood, and that additional study of this area is necessary. Constructive dialog has taken place with representatives of the Hunnell neighborhood, out of which has come a suggestion that ODOT reevaluate the original “East 1” scheme. We would strongly support such a step by ODOT. Bend’s future depends on a sensible, well-planned solution to a significant transportation problem at the north end of the city. We urge the community to study this issue carefully, and let your voices be heard before the public comment period ends Sept. 12, 2011. Information on the North Corridor Project and the draft environmental impact statement can be found on the project website at www.us97solutions.org. David Ditz and Jerry Mitchell recently served as the city of Bend’s project executive and staff development manager, respectively, for Juniper Ridge.

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Not everyone benefits from events that close Bend streets By Scott Linden Bulletin guest columnist

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he city of Bend continues to toss out street closure permits like Mardi Gras beads, costing downtown retailers real dollars each time a starter’s gun goes off or another hair band tunes its guitars. Let’s face it: The race-and-festival tail is wagging the dog, and it’s time to put a leash on it. New York Yankee great Yogi Berra said it best: “Nobody goes there anymore — it’s too crowded.” Why doesn’t this happen at the malls? Or the Old Mill’s shopping area? Along Third Street? Have you seen any concerts smack-dab in front of Victoria’s Secret, bike race starting lines in front of Costco, or knickknack sellers blocking the entrance to Home Depot? There must be a sound business rationale that has somehow evaded the powers-that-be in City Hall. My guess is blocking commercial streets, restricting traffic and

mobbing sidewalks is bad for business. In other commercial districts, there are nearby locations that host events without impeding the flow of customers. You and I know there are similar, complementary venues downtown. Permitdispensing bureaucrats should insist that event promoters use them. It’s time they gave consideration to the commercial heart of the community so everyone would benefit, not just those who rely primarily on visitors. How many of us can go a day without pay? That’s what downtown merchants suffer when another bike race or concert crowd blocks their door. How about being “furloughed” from your job every time a Lycra-clad horde clutters the sidewalk in front of your place of employment? The primary beneficiaries are an elite circle of race and festival promoters, spectators and hotels. Even restaurant owners are bleeding red ink as downtown eateries face the same re-

IN MY VIEW stricted access, watching customers take their wallets to the Old Mill or Third Street for dinner and easy parking. But don’t visitors spend piles of money here? Sure. Kind of. Though it may be a carefully-constructed myth when you do the math: Factor in the slim profit margins seen by the few beneficiary businesses. Add the costs of residents’ lost personal time and income (who gets paid for sitting in traffic while bike racers close the road?). Include the tax dollars squandered on beefed-up police and public safety, and lost business opportunities locally-owned firms experience, and our community as a whole might actually lose money on events. Mobbed sidewalks make it difficult for real customers to open a door. (Where are the ADA zealots during a criterium?) Folks looking for free en-

By and large, local businesses depend on local customers. And most of those locals are smart enough to avoid downtown when the spandex crowd swoops in. If they need something, they take their paychecks to the big boxes and malls instead. tertainment clog street parking, and the taxpayer-funded parking garage is so crowded even the skate punks won’t ride there. Business owners relate stories of streets blockaded the day before an event, planters used as ashtrays, generators rattling windows. Freeloading competitors camp on their sidewalk with a cart and music is so loud it loosens the dentures of little old ladies. By and large, local businesses depend on local customers. And most of those locals are smart enough to avoid down-

town when the spandex crowd swoops in. If they need something, they take their paychecks to the big boxes and malls instead. It’s time city pencil-pushers who grant permits at the drop of a bike helmet consider the rights of local instead of pimping for fun-seekers clamoring for the recreation equivalent of a one night stand. Let’s start the next bike race in front of city councilors’ homes and then see how they feel. Scott Linden lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 7, 2011 C5

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N   Daniel Richard Owen, of St. George, UT Nov. 16, 1984 - Sept. 2. 2011 Arrangements: SereniCare Funeral Home, St. George, UT 435-986-2085 Services: Was held on Monday, Sept. 5, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., at the St. George East Stake, Ninth Ward LDS Chapel, 550 E. 700 S., St. George, UT. Interment will take place at the Tonaquint Cemetery, St. George, UT.

Floyd ‘Buck’ R. Case, of Prineville Aug. 29, 1919 - Sept. 4, 2011 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 541-416-9733 Services: Graveside service will be held at 11:00 a.m., Sat., Sept. 24, 2011, at the Prairie City Cemetery, in Prairie City, OR. Contributions may be made to:

Pioneer Memorial Hospice, 1201 NE Elm St., Prineville, OR 97754.

Jack W. Allanach, of Bend June 7, 1933 - Sept. 4, 2011 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, 541-382-5592 www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: Scattering service will be held in Newport Beach, CA. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

Laura Denise Lonergan, of Redmond July 8, 1958 - Sept. 1, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Viewing was held on Tues., Sept. 6, at the funeral home; Funeral services will be held at 11:00 am, Sept. 7, at Highland Babtist Church, in Redmond, followed by interment at Redmond Memorial Cemetery, at 1:00 pm.

Mary C. Wade, of Bend Feb. 12, 1915 - Aug. 31, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend. 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Monday, Sept. 12, 2011, at 12:30 p.m., at Evergreen Memorial Gardens, Vancouver, WA. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701, or Central Oregon Humane Society, 61170 SE 27th, Bend, OR 97702.

Neal C. Roberts, of Redmond Aug. 12, 1934 - Aug. 20, 2011 Services: Please join us for a Celebration of Neal’s life at our home, Sept. 24, 2011 at 2:00 p.m. Bring your best stories and happiest memories of Neal to share with all.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Richard Lee Gribling

Lawrence E. Keyte

Aug. 21, 1958 – Aug. 31, 2011

Lawrence E. Keyte, 95, of Bend, passed away August 31, 2011. He was born October 25, 1915, in Greenridge, Missouri, to Earl & Pearl (Miller) Keyte. Lawrence grew up and attended school in Missouri and graduated from Greenridge High School. He married Willa Shaver October 19, Lawrence E. 1941, in Keyte Yuma, AZ. He worked in the Civilian Conservation Corp and during WWII, from 1941 to 1950, was in Civil Service in Hawaii. He continued his civil service career in Barstow, CA. Following retirement, they moved to Bend in 1972. Larry was very active in the Masonic orders, Past Master Blue Lodge, York Rite Bodies, Shriners Al Malaikah Temple as well as the Order of the Eastern Star and Amaranth. He was a member of Eastmont Church. He enjoyed fishing, travel and gardening, especially flowers. His greatest love was his family and all children. He is survived by a son and daughter-in-law, David and Linda Keyte of Sequim, WA; a daughter, Debbie Yale of Prineville, OR; two sisters, Eloise Dhooghe of Parsons, KS, and Betty Shafer of Gresham, OR; five grandchildren, Ron, Brenda, Jennifer, Brian and Selina; five greatgrandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his wife, Willa; and two brothers, Kenneth and Alvin. A funeral service will be held Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011, at 11:00 a.m., in the Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home Chapel. Private interment will follow in Deschutes Memorial Gardens. Those who wish, may make memorial contributions to the Shriners Childrens Hospital, 3101 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd., Portland, OR 97239. Please sign our guest book at

Rick quietly took the hand of our Heavenly Father on August 31, 2011, after a 2-year battle with melanoma. A memorial service will be held Saturday, September 10, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. at Dayspring Christian Center in Terrebonne, Oregon, with Rick Gribling a reception to follow at the church. Rick was born in La Grande, Oregon, and most of his adult life was spent in Central Oregon. Rick married Tamara Goodright in June, 1985. The Griblings lived in Redmond on a small farm for 23 years. Rick was a licensed Journeymen millwright and worked in several local mills. His most recent employer was Key Tech in Redmond, which he really enjoyed, but due to the cancer, he retired in 2010. Many in the area know Rick's great love was guitars. The Griblings owned and operated Swing Shift Guitars for many years in Redmond, OR. Rick's faith grew into a strong love for the Lord, in part due to the many people who touched his life while he was in business. Dayspring Christian Center was Rick and Tami's home for worship. He played on the worship platform for many years. If the doors were open, he was there. Many wonderful stories have started from his gift to share his love of music. Rick was very loved by his family and will be greatly missed by his children: daughters, Haylie Gribling, Brian and Katie (Gribling) Vernon (from a previous marriage); and Kaylee Gribling; sons, Branden Moore and Mike (wife, Sarah) Caven. Rick and Tami were also blessed with two grandsons, Connor Vernon and Adrian Caven. Rick is survived by his wife, Tami; father, Gayle and step-mother, Barb Gribling of Elgin, OR; mother, Dixie Stanton of Bend, OR; brothers, Gordon (wife, Roberta) Gribling, of Redmond, OR, and Greg (wife, Julie) Gribling of La Grande, OR; and numerous nieces and nephews. Memorial contributions can be made for Kaylee J. Gribling’s college fund at any Columbia Bank; or Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct. #1, Bend, OR 97701. Baird Funeral Home of Bend is in charge of arrangements. (541)382-0903. www.bairdmortuaries.com.

Orlie Austin Nov. 17, 1933 - August 25, 2011 Orlie Austin died at home on August 25, 2011. He was 78. He met his wife, Alice, at Multnomah School of the Bible. They were married November 20, 1954, and had three children. He built everything from huts for missionaries, working with tribal groups, to a million dollar home in Sunriver. He taught Sunday School at Post and Ashwood before going to Brazil with Wycliffe Bible Translators. He enjoyed hunting, fishing and the rockhound hobby. He was the first to make flowers of agate and jasper. His lapidary display was well known in western states and he was a lapidary judge. He fought his diseases with courage and humor, wanting his attitude to honor his Lord. When cancer made him retire, he did wood turning, cut difficult jigsaw puzzles and made intarsia birds. He kept his mind active doing hard Sudoku puzzles. A memorial service will be held Saturday, October 15, at 11:00 a.m. at Prineville Community Church. Memorial contributions to Wycliffe Bible Translators can be made through the church.

Oct. 25, 1915 - August 31, 2011

Stephen Alexander Morris-Reade July 12, 1960 - Aug. 27, 2011 Steve was born July 12, 1960, in Vancouver, BC, to Allan and Sue Morris-Reade. The family moved to Southern California in the early 60s, where Steve grew up enjoying all things outdoors, particularly water sports. He lettered in Stephen track at both Alexander Morris-Reade Millikan High School and Long Beach City College. In 1983, Steve married Sharon Payne and embarked on a career as a software engineer. Steve and Sharon now have four children, Stephen, Jessica, Ashley and Alan; and three wonderful grandchildren, Clayton, Shelby and Gunner. Steve is also survived by his mother, Sue; brother, Jeff; and sister, Carolyn. Having lived in Bend for the past 22 years, Steve also leaves a great many friends in the community. Steve was always happiest when spending time with his family and together enjoying boating, sailing swimming and diving. He also enjoyed playing hockey or basketball, skating, riding motorcycles, playing drums and dancing. Family and friends gathered to remember Steve at Eastmont Church on Saturday, September 3rd. The family wishes to thank all who were able to attend and share, as well as the many others who have been so kind in words and deeds. It has been a wonderful testament to the far-reaching impact of Steve's life. Though taken from us much too soon, family and friends will always cherish our memories of Steve's quiet strength, understated humor, steadfast integrity and joy for life.

www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Betty Skelton, 85, known as ‘fastest woman on Earth’ By Matt Schudel The Washington Post

Betty Skelton, a daredevil pilot who was a three-time national aerobatics champion and became known as the “fastest woman on Earth” when she set speed records in airplanes and automobiles, died Wednesday at her home in The Villages, Fla. She was 85. She had cancer, said Dorothy Cochrane, a friend and the curator of general aviation at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum. Skelton, a 5-foot-2 spitfire, made her first solo flight — illegally — at age 12. She went on to become a pioneering and charismatic pilot in the days of propellers and open cockpits. She gave her first aerobatics performance at 19, appearing in the same show in Jacksonville, Fla., in which the Navy’s precision flight team, the Blue Angels, debuted in 1946. In her brightly painted Pitts Special biplane, the Little Stinker, Skelton performed awe-inspiring feats of airborne daring. She was the first woman to attempt the “inverted ribbon cut,” in which she would fly upside down only 10 feet off the ground, slicing a ribbon with her propeller. The first time Skelton attempted the stunt, Cochrane said, her engine died. She calmly righted her plane and landed on the wheels, then started it up and went back into the air. “She enjoyed challenges, she enjoyed speed, she enjoyed technology,” Cochrane said. From 1949 through 1951, when she retired from competitive flying, Skelton was the international women’s aerobatics champion. Years later, she donated her biplane to the National Air and Space Museum. Restored and repainted in its original red-and-white pattern, the Little Stinker now hangs in the entrance of the museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center

near Dulles International Airport in suburban Washington. When she wasn’t astonishing crowds at air shows, Skelton pursued the outer limits of what airplanes — and pilots — could accomplish. She twice set light-plane altitude records, reaching a maximum height of 29,050 feet in a Piper Cub in 1951 - higher than Mt. Everest. At that altitude, the temperature outside her airplane was 53 degrees below zero. “I usually fly bare-footed,” Skelton said in 1999 interview for a NASA oral history project, “and my feet darn near froze to death.” She set an unofficial women’s air speed record of 421 mph in a P-51 Mustang, but the engine exploded in mid-flight, and she had to guide the plane back to the ground at an Air Force base in Florida. She did not get credit for the record because she did not land where she took off. Nevertheless, Skelton broke so many barriers in the air and on land that she became known as the “first lady of firsts.” In 1954, she became the first woman to be a test driver for the auto industry. She was the first female boat jumper in the United States, memorably flying a boat over a Dodge sedan in a publicity stunt in 1955. As an advertising executive in the 1950s and 1960s, she worked on the Corvette account as a test driver and as a spokeswoman at auto shows. In 1957, driving a translucent, custommade gold Corvette, she became the first woman to drive a pace car at the Daytona 500. She was the first woman to drive an Indy car and, in the 1950s, repeatedly set records for speed and acceleration at racetracks, on the sands of Daytona Beach, Fla., and on the Bonneville Salt Flats of Utah. In 1956, Skelton broke a transcontinental speed record, driving from New York to Los Angeles, covering 2,913 miles in 56 hours, 58 minutes.

Keith Tantlinger, 92, builder of cargo container By Margalit Fox New York Times News Service

Nearly six decades ago, Keith W. Tantlinger built a box — or, more accurately, the corners of a box. It was a seemingly small invention, but a vital one: It set in motion a chain of events that changed the way people buy and sell things, transformed the means by which nations do business and ultimately gave rise to the present-day global economy. Tantlinger’s box, large, heavy and metal, is known as the shipping container. Though he did not invent it (such containers had been in use at least since the 19th century to haul heavy cargo like coal), he is widely credited with having created, in the 1950s, the first commercially viable modern one.

Refining the box The crucial refinements he made — including a corner mechanism that locks containers together — allowed them to be hefted by crane, stacked high in ships and transferred from shipboard to trucks and trains far more easily, and cheaply, than ever before. Thus, without ever intending

Cuts Continued from C1 Such adjustments have not always been possible in recent years, however. “We’ve increased class sizes, and that’s how we’ve accommodated cuts in staffing,” said Vicki Van Buren, chief academic officer for secondary programs. Bend-La Pine is not the only area district struggling to maintain services. Facing an $8 million short-

to, Tantlinger, an engineer who died at 92 on Aug. 27 and who had long worked out of the limelight, helped bring about the vast web of international trade that is a fact of 21st-century life. More than any other innovation, the modern shipping container — by turns venerated and castigated — is now acknowledged to have been the spark that touched off globalization. As Marc Levinson, the author of “The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger” (2006), said in a telephone interview Monday, “The scale of modern container shipping would not have been possible without Tantlinger’s innovations.” He explained: “Most consumer goods, by a wide margin, come in by ship. Containerization made it possible to ship goods very long distances at very low costs. Globalization in the way we know it today just would not be possible without the container.” Tantlinger’s work is everywhere. Thanks to the stacking and locking mechanisms he devised, a ship can now carry thousands of containers at once. Tens of millions of shipping con-

tainers roam the world today, filled with lumber, coal and hay, not to mention computers and cars. Refrigerated containers carry seafood, meat and other perishables across previously unimaginable distances. Until the mid-1950s, however, seaborne cargo transport had changed little since the day man first lashed together a raft, stocked it with trade goods and set out for distant shores. For centuries, on waterfronts worldwide, goods as diverse as flour, coffee, whiskey and mail were literally manhandled — loaded by longshoremen onto ships in sacks and crates and barrels and, at the other end, loaded off again. The method was expensive and took time. In 1954, Levinson’s book reports, the cargo ship Warrior left Brooklyn for Germany carrying 194,582 separate items. These had arrived at the Brooklyn docks in 1,156 separate shipments. Containerization unified the process, letting a single shipper move merchandise across land and sea. In 1958, The New York Times described the new technology this way: “A trailer is loaded, for example, in Springfield, Mo. It

fall for 2011-12, the Redmond School District has cut 28 teaching positions, among other things. Last year, a high school class had between 28 and 30 students, according to Mike McIntosh, the district’s chief financial officer. Final ratios won’t be known for another week, but Redmond’s classrooms have gotten more crowded, McIntosh said. “I spoke with one teacher at (Redmond High School) who has six periods of class with 35 to 38 kids in each class. That’s over

200 students a day,” he said. Despite Bend-La Pine’s attempts to the contrary, some of the cuts will be noticeable to staff and students alike. This year, the district has eliminated all elementary assistant principal positions, for instance. With fewer administrators at each school, some things may move more slowly, according to Lora Nordquist, chief academic officer for elementary programs. Parents may wait longer for return calls, for example.

travels by road to New York or San Francisco, sealed, virtually damage-proof and theft-proof. By ship it goes to France or to Japan, eliminating warehousing, stacking and sorting. Each ship takes on her cargo with a few hundred lifts, compared to 5,000 individual lifts by the old method.” But designing a container 40 feet long and 8 or 9 feet tall that could be safely stacked six high on a rolling ship was no simple task. That was where Tantlinger came in.

The twist-lock He designed a set of steel fittings, which were welded to each corner of a container. Each fitting contained a hole into which a lock he designed, called a twist-lock, could be dropped. A second container could then be stacked atop the first, a handle turned, and the two locked together. The process could be repeated, building a tall stack. Cranes could latch directly onto Tantlinger’s corner fittings, neatly lifting containers on and off ships. His twist-lock could also be used to secure a container to a truck chassis or a railroad car.

Inside the classroom, there will be fewer teaching staff in part because the district cut 33 educational assistant positions. Those employees, who work up to seven hours a day, often pull students into small reading or math groups, Nordquist said. “We’re going to have far fewer of those,” Nordquist said. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com. Bulletin reporter Erik Hidle contributed to this article.


W

C6 Wednesday, September 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E AT H ER

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, SEPTEMBER 7

HIGH Ben Burkel

93

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

94/54

88/58

95/55

79/57

80s

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

95/52

89/44

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

92/49

93/50

Camp Sherman 90s 88/44 Redmond Prineville 93/47 Cascadia 90/48 92/48 Sisters 91/46 Bend Post 90s 93/47

Oakridge Elk Lake 90/46

80/35

Sunny and warm conditions today. Clear skies tonight. Central

95/51

90/43

89/45

92/43

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

88/42

91/45

83/37

Chemult 88/41

88/44

Fort Rock

Vancouver 79/58

83/51

Seattle 80s

City

84/55

Missoula 90/44

Helena

Eugene 95/54

Grants Pass

Bend

87/50

Boise

93/47

89/51

98/55

Idaho Falls

90s

89/46

Elko

80/48

70s

88/46

Reno

78/48

92/62

San Francisco

80s

73/56

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:35 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:31 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:36 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:29 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 4:59 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 1:49 a.m.

Salt Lake City 84/59

LOW

Full

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

PLANET WATCH

Last

New

First

Sept. 12 Sept. 20 Sept. 27 Oct. 3

Wednesday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 70/50/0.00 . . . . . . 78/53/s. . . . . . 74/52/pc Baker City . . . . . .89/41/trace . . . . . . 91/46/s. . . . . . 92/49/pc Brookings . . . . . . 67/46/0.00 . . . . . 69/53/pc. . . . . . 68/57/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . .89/44/trace . . . . . . 91/54/s. . . . . . 90/54/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 91/47/0.00 . . . . . . 95/54/s. . . . . . . 93/55/s Klamath Falls . . . 86/46/0.00 . . . . . . 87/47/s. . . . . . 87/48/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 86/39/0.00 . . . . . . 90/50/s. . . . . . 89/52/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 88/37/0.00 . . . . . . 92/43/s. . . . . . 88/39/pc Medford . . . . . . . 98/56/0.00 . . . . . 101/59/s. . . . . . . 99/61/s Newport . . . . . . . 59/46/0.00 . . . . . . 70/50/s. . . . . . 65/50/pc North Bend . . . . . 63/48/0.00 . . . . . . 72/51/s. . . . . . 69/52/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 92/52/0.00 . . . . . . 92/57/s. . . . . . 92/60/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 92/54/0.00 . . . . . . 96/57/s. . . . . . . 95/54/s Portland . . . . . . . 91/57/0.00 . . . . . . 93/59/s. . . . . . . 91/60/s Prineville . . . . . . . 87/46/0.00 . . . . . . 90/48/s. . . . . . . 91/50/s Redmond. . . . . . . 91/45/0.00 . . . . . . 94/49/s. . . . . . . 92/49/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 93/55/0.00 . . . . . . 95/55/s. . . . . . . 93/56/s Salem . . . . . . . . . 92/50/0.00 . . . . . . 95/55/s. . . . . . . 93/55/s Sisters . . . . . . . . . 87/43/0.00 . . . . . . 91/46/s. . . . . . 90/53/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 95/56/0.00 . . . . . . 96/59/s. . . . . . . 96/56/s

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

MEDIUM 2

4

6

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86/50 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 in 1955 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 in 1961 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.12” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.67” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 7.50” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.11 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.14 in 1978 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.......Ext. Sisters................................High Bend, east of Hwy. 97......High La Pine.................................Ext. Redmond/Madras.........Mod. Prineville ............................Ext.

LOW

LOW

88 45

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Thursday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly sunny and warm. HIGH

90 46

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .5:08 a.m. . . . . . .6:56 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:08 a.m. . . . . . .7:48 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .2:02 a.m. . . . . . .5:14 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .9:29 p.m. . . . . .11:26 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .9:11 a.m. . . . . . .8:43 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .8:02 p.m. . . . . . .8:15 a.m.

Moon phases

SUNDAY Mostly sunny and hot.

HIGH

91 47

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

70s

99/64

Sunny and very warm conditions today. Clear skies tonight.

HIGH

BEND ALMANAC

Redding

87/43

LOW

91 46

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

80s

Crater Lake

Mostly sunny and hot.

NORTHWEST

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

HIGH

47

93/59

Burns

La Pine

LOW

Yesterday’s state extremes • 98° Medford • 37° La Pine

SATURDAY

Mostly sunny, chance of an isolated storm, hot.

Tonight: Mostly clear and cool.

Portland

Sunny and very warm conditions today. Clear skies tonight. Eastern

FRIDAY

High pressure will be in control of the weather and will keep dry and quiet weather in place.

86/44

Brothers

89/44

Today: Mostly sunny, very slight chance of an isolated storm, hot.

Paulina

90/45

Sunriver

THURSDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,711 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111,048 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 81,814 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 19,240 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112,961 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,330 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,780 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 259 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.8 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 79/58

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Calgary 83/51

S

Saskatoon 83/50

Seattle 84/55

S Winnipeg 84/58

S

S

Thunder Bay 78/54

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 68/57

Halifax 68/56 Portland Billings To ronto P ortland 64/58 (in the 48 87/54 70/60 93/59 St. Paul Green Bay contiguous states): Boston 75/57 73/50 Boise 65/60 Buffalo Detroit 89/51 66/59 New York • 106° 69/62 Rapid City 72/67 Gila Bend, Ariz. 81/55 Columbus Philadelphia Chicago 70/59 72/63 79/71 Cheyenne • 31° Omaha Des Moines San Francisco Salt Lake 70/48 75/52 Washington, D. C. 73/56 76/52 Stanley, Idaho City Las 78/71 Denver Louisville 84/59 Kansas City Vegas • 2.87” 70/51 69/59 75/53 St. Louis 102/80 Fort Myers, Fla. 76/53 Albuquerque Los Angeles Charlotte Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 81/59 86/67 80/59 84/54 70/57 78/56 Phoenix Atlanta 107/87 Honolulu 72/58 Birmingham 87/71 Dallas Tijuana 74/56 87/60 83/65 New Orleans 81/63 Orlando Houston 88/72 Chihuahua 89/60 90/61 Miami 92/77 Monterrey La Paz 91/69 96/78 Mazatlan Anchorage 90/75 56/46 Juneau 58/47 Bismarck 82/55

FRONTS

Hay Continued from C1 Bend, Redmond and Crooked River Ranch fire departments all responded to the fire, which burned through the night and the next day, said Redmond Fire Marshal Traci Cooper. Cooper said fire crews had trouble extinguishing the fire because of the high volume of hay stored in the barn. “The structure was a total loss,” she said. Cooper said the boy has been charged with arson in the first degree and criminal mischief. The court system looks at a “multitude of factors” when deciding how to try youth arson cases, said Cooper, who has worked in youth fire education programs for 20 years. “Age is very important in determining how the case will be treated,” she said, adding that minimum sentences are in place for juveniles over age 15. In her experience, young people often misuse fire as an attempt to regain power, Cooper said. “Sometimes when a child

Fires Continued from C1 The backburn, or fire set between a fireline and a wildfire, raised the Shadow Lake Fire’s burn area to 4,610 acres Tuesday morning, said Katie Lighthall, a spokeswoman for the Shadow Lake Incident Management Team. Smoke from Monday’s backburn filled Sisters, but it didn’t seem to stop the usual influx of tourists brought by Labor Day weekend. “It was still pretty busy,” said Chris Wilder, owner of Sisters Log Furniture. He said word must have been spread to the Willamette Valley that Sisters and Redmond were not shut down by the fire. The smoke could become a problem though, said Chris King, who has a summer home in Black Butte Ranch. He said September and October can be the nicest time of year around Sisters, but smoky days could dissuade people from visiting.

doesn’t have control over the situation, they’re attracted to fire because fire can be very powerful.” Caudell said he thinks the boy’s action was an attempt to make himself heard. “I couldn’t help but feel sorry for the kid,” Caudell said. “I thought this is a young man craving for attention of any kind.” Caudell wasn’t able to salvage any inventory from the barn. He said he lost all his delivery equipment in the fire. Though the barn and contents were insured, he says he’ll still end up losing about $35,000 as a result of the blaze. In the days since his barn and equipment were destroyed, Caudell has relied on neighbors, friends and fellow ranchers, who have offered up their own equipment and barn storage space so he could continue to produce this season. “It’s been a pretty humbling experience,” he said. “I don’t know what I’d do without them.” Duffie Taylor can be reached at 541-383-0376 or at dtaylor@bendbulletin.com

“It really is going to hurt the tourism economy to have this fire here,” he said. He also said fire officials should give advance warnings about backburns so people who are sensitive to smoke can protect themselves. While Monday’s backburn appears to have protected Big Lake and a youth camp there, the fire may still grow all the way to Highway 126, Anthony said. He said weather forecasters are calling for a hot, dry September, so the fire may burn into October. More Central wildfires continue to burn Tuesday near Warm Springs, where the High Cascade Complex has burned nearly 107,000 acres, according to fire officials. The fire, also started by lightning late last month, was 70 percent contained as of Tuesday. Nearly 2,300 firefighters were fighting the High Cascade Complex Fire while almost 500 were fighting the Shadow Lake Fire. Dylan Darling can be reached at 541-617-7812 or at ddarling@bendbulletin.com.

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .89/47/0.00 . 86/57/pc . . 85/58/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .67/55/0.00 . . .71/58/r . . 73/61/sh Albany. . . . . . . . .67/60/0.71 . . .66/58/r . . 71/58/sh Albuquerque. . . .85/65/0.00 . . .81/59/t . . 78/59/pc Anchorage . . . . .58/48/0.00 . . .56/46/r . . 59/45/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . .78/62/0.64 . 72/58/pc . . . 77/62/s Atlantic City . . . .75/64/0.30 . . .78/70/r . . 78/69/sh Austin . . . . . . . . .92/52/0.00 . . .91/60/s . . . 89/59/s Baltimore . . . . . .64/62/1.40 . . .78/70/t . . 80/67/sh Billings. . . . . . . . .85/60/0.00 . . .87/54/s . . . 85/51/s Birmingham . . . .61/57/0.32 . . .74/56/s . . . 78/60/s Bismarck . . . . . . .83/48/0.00 . . .82/55/s . . . 82/53/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .91/62/0.00 . . .89/51/s . . . 89/52/s Boston. . . . . . . . .74/61/0.58 . . .65/60/r . . 69/62/sh Bridgeport, CT. . .76/62/1.70 . . .68/64/r . . 73/66/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . .63/55/0.01 . . .66/59/r . . 72/63/sh Burlington, VT. . .67/57/0.36 . . .66/55/r . . . 74/56/s Caribou, ME . . . .67/55/0.24 . . .67/51/c . . . 72/45/s Charleston, SC . .89/78/0.52 . 84/66/pc . . . 85/69/s Charlotte. . . . . . .86/74/0.17 . 80/59/pc . . . 84/61/s Chattanooga. . . .66/62/0.49 . . .71/58/c . . 76/63/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .69/53/0.03 . 70/48/pc . . 71/46/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .66/51/0.00 . . .72/63/s . . . 73/64/c Cincinnati . . . . . .72/56/0.04 . .69/59/sh . . 73/62/sh Cleveland . . . . . .68/60/0.00 . .69/64/sh . . 73/65/sh Colorado Springs 83/55/0.00 . . .64/48/t . . 66/49/pc Columbia, MO . .74/45/0.00 . . .75/51/s . . 76/57/pc Columbia, SC . . .87/78/0.01 . 84/62/pc . . . 86/65/s Columbus, GA. . .83/60/0.31 . 77/61/pc . . 82/63/pc Columbus, OH. . .71/58/0.00 . .70/59/sh . . 73/64/sh Concord, NH . . . .69/57/0.37 . . .65/55/r . . 74/57/sh Corpus Christi. . .93/64/0.00 . . .90/73/s . . . 89/67/s Dallas Ft Worth. .88/58/0.00 . . .87/60/s . . . 85/60/s Dayton . . . . . . . .67/51/0.00 . .68/59/sh . . 71/62/sh Denver. . . . . . . . .76/61/0.00 . . .70/51/t . . 74/49/pc Des Moines. . . . .72/50/0.00 . . .76/52/s . . . 75/58/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .67/54/0.00 . .69/62/sh . . 73/62/sh Duluth . . . . . . . . .69/44/0.00 . . .75/52/s . . . 75/57/s El Paso. . . . . . . . .92/63/0.00 . . .92/68/s . . 89/66/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .63/50/0.03 . 64/41/pc . . 63/42/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .80/55/0.00 . . .81/55/s . . . 82/56/s Flagstaff . . . . . . .74/56/0.09 . . .78/49/s . . . 77/48/s

Yesterday WednesdayThursday Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .69/44/0.00 . 73/51/pc . . 76/55/sh Rapid City . . . . . .88/54/0.00 . . .81/55/s . . 79/55/pc Green Bay. . . . . .66/39/0.00 . . .73/50/s . . . 75/55/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .91/53/0.00 . . .92/62/s . . . 89/61/s Greensboro. . . . .81/63/2.58 . . .83/65/t . . 82/65/pc Richmond . . . . . .78/65/0.97 . . .84/70/t . . 84/69/sh Harrisburg. . . . . .63/61/0.00 . . .75/64/r . . 79/65/sh Rochester, NY . . .64/57/0.00 . . .66/61/r . . 74/60/sh Hartford, CT . . . .70/61/0.85 . . .67/61/r . . 72/63/sh Sacramento. . . . .98/53/0.00 . . .98/60/s . . . 98/61/s Helena. . . . . . . . .86/46/0.00 . . .87/50/s . . . 87/49/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . . .76/53/s . . 75/60/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .85/70/0.00 . . .87/71/s . . . 87/72/s Salt Lake City . . .80/61/0.01 . . .84/59/s . . . 83/58/s Houston . . . . . . .94/59/0.00 . . .89/60/s . . . 92/63/s San Antonio . . . .95/59/0.00 . . .92/62/s . . . 92/60/s Huntsville . . . . . .60/57/0.75 . 72/56/pc . . 75/58/pc San Diego . . . . . .97/67/0.08 . . .83/67/s . . . 81/65/s Indianapolis . . . .69/51/0.00 . .66/59/sh . . 68/61/sh San Francisco . . .73/52/0.00 . . .79/57/s . . . 70/55/s Jackson, MS . . . .78/55/0.00 . . .78/56/s . . . 81/59/s San Jose . . . . . . .86/57/0.00 . . .92/61/s . . . 83/59/s Jacksonville. . . . .83/75/0.04 . 86/64/pc . . . 86/67/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .81/56/0.00 . 73/48/pc . . 72/48/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .57/48/0.37 . . .58/47/r . . . .55/48/r Kansas City. . . . .74/50/0.00 . . .75/53/s . . . 76/56/s Lansing . . . . . . . .67/44/0.00 . 71/53/pc . . 73/52/sh Amsterdam. . . . .61/57/0.00 . .61/53/sh . . 62/53/sh Las Vegas . . . . . .96/73/0.00 . .102/80/s . . 102/81/s Athens. . . . . . . . .87/66/0.00 . 85/71/pc . . 85/70/pc Lexington . . . . . .61/55/0.38 . .66/56/sh . . 70/59/sh Auckland. . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . . .63/47/s . . . 62/47/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .74/44/0.00 . . .76/52/s . . . 75/55/s Baghdad . . . . . .109/82/0.00 . .108/79/s . . 105/76/s Little Rock. . . . . .80/56/0.00 . . .79/57/s . . 80/57/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . .89/77/t . . . .88/77/t Los Angeles. . . . .84/64/0.00 . . .86/67/s . . . 82/66/s Beijing. . . . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . 81/61/pc . . 77/61/sh Louisville . . . . . . .66/55/0.20 . .69/59/sh . . 72/61/sh Beirut. . . . . . . . . .88/81/0.00 . . .87/79/s . . . 86/77/s Madison, WI . . . .69/39/0.00 . . .71/50/s . . . 75/56/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . .65/54/sh . . 61/52/sh Memphis. . . . . . .77/56/0.00 . . .78/58/s . . 77/58/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . .67/49/sh . . 65/50/sh Miami . . . . . . . . .94/76/0.52 . . .92/77/t . . . .90/79/t Budapest. . . . . . .79/52/0.00 . . .83/57/s . . . 70/53/c Milwaukee . . . . .65/55/0.00 . . .70/62/s . . . 73/62/s Buenos Aires. . . .72/39/0.00 . . .66/44/s . . 65/45/pc Minneapolis . . . .74/51/0.00 . . .75/57/s . . . 79/58/s Cabo San Lucas .93/77/0.00 . 93/78/pc . . 93/79/pc Nashville . . . . . . .58/55/1.10 . . .70/57/c . . 73/57/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .95/75/0.00 . . .92/72/s . . . 92/73/s New Orleans. . . .80/65/0.00 . . .81/63/s . . . 84/65/s Calgary . . . . . . . .79/46/0.00 . . .83/51/s . . . 84/51/s New York . . . . . .67/60/2.75 . . .72/67/r . . 78/67/sh Cancun . . . . . . . .88/72/0.35 . . .85/77/t . . . .86/75/t Newark, NJ . . . . .68/62/2.50 . . .71/66/r . . 80/66/sh Dublin . . . . . . . . .61/54/0.00 . .59/49/sh . . 62/52/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .93/79/0.00 . . .86/72/t . . 86/70/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .61/54/0.00 . .60/49/sh . . 59/48/sh Oklahoma City . .83/54/0.00 . . .84/54/s . . . 82/55/s Geneva . . . . . . . .75/48/0.00 . .70/54/sh . . 72/55/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .73/51/0.00 . . .75/52/s . . . 76/56/s Harare . . . . . . . . .79/52/0.00 . . .79/50/s . . . 77/49/s Orlando. . . . . . . .88/77/0.04 . . .88/72/t . . 89/72/pc Hong Kong . . . . .91/82/0.00 . . .90/82/t . . . .91/82/t Palm Springs. . .100/76/0.03 . .110/83/s . . 110/80/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .82/70/0.00 . . .84/67/s . . . 85/67/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .71/48/0.00 . . .75/53/s . . 73/58/sh Jerusalem . . . . . .88/69/0.00 . . .88/65/s . . . 87/65/s Philadelphia . . . .66/61/2.05 . . .79/71/r . . 80/69/sh Johannesburg . . .79/52/0.00 . . .80/53/s . . . 81/52/s Phoenix. . . . . . .107/85/0.00 . .107/87/s . . 107/87/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .64/59/0.00 . 64/58/pc . . 64/59/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .62/55/0.13 . . .70/60/r . . 76/62/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .88/63/0.00 . . .81/61/s . . . 86/67/s Portland, ME. . . .71/60/0.06 . . .64/58/r . . 69/56/pc London . . . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . 63/52/pc . . 65/55/sh Providence . . . . .74/59/1.49 . . .69/62/r . . 71/63/sh Madrid . . . . . . . .88/57/0.00 . . .89/60/s . . . 91/61/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .88/77/0.01 . . .85/69/t . . 83/68/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . .86/77/t . . . .87/77/t

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . .92/80/0.09 . 85/64/pc . . . 85/69/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .84/53/0.00 . . .84/55/s . . . 84/55/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .73/52/0.00 . . .77/50/s . . . 78/56/s Spokane . . . . . . .88/56/0.00 . . .91/60/s . . . 93/60/s Springfield, MO. .76/45/0.00 . . .77/50/s . . . 76/52/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .88/75/1.09 . . .87/75/t . . 88/75/pc Tucson. . . . . . . .100/74/0.21 . 99/75/pc . . 99/73/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .81/48/0.00 . . .80/54/s . . . 81/56/s Washington, DC .66/64/0.76 . . .78/71/t . . 80/68/sh Wichita . . . . . . . .82/50/0.00 . . .81/54/s . . . 81/56/s Yakima . . . . . . . .93/48/0.00 . . .93/57/s . . . 95/54/s Yuma. . . . . . . . .105/80/0.00 . .109/83/s . . 110/80/s

INTERNATIONAL Mecca . . . . . . . .109/84/0.00 . .108/85/s . 106/84/pc Mexico City. . . . .68/59/0.00 . .73/55/sh . . 74/53/pc Montreal. . . . . . .66/57/0.00 . .70/59/sh . . 73/57/pc Moscow . . . . . . .63/46/0.00 . 67/47/pc . . 64/46/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . .72/59/0.00 . .72/57/sh . . 71/57/sh Nassau . . . . . . . .95/79/0.00 . 91/82/pc . . . .90/80/t New Delhi. . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . .91/80/t . . . .90/80/t Osaka . . . . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . . .82/73/s . . . 84/72/s Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .57/50/0.00 . .61/51/sh . . . 59/47/c Ottawa . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . .70/59/sh . . 74/58/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . 65/52/pc . . 69/56/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .81/70/0.00 . . .88/65/s . . . 90/67/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .84/64/0.00 . . .84/65/s . . . 84/64/s Santiago . . . . . . .64/36/0.00 . 64/37/pc . . . 68/43/c Sao Paulo . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . .71/59/sh . . 75/60/sh Sapporo. . . . . . . .73/70/0.00 . .72/63/sh . . 79/65/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . . .84/65/s . . . 77/65/c Shanghai. . . . . . .84/70/0.00 . . .84/75/c . . . .86/77/t Singapore . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .88/78/t . . . .87/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .66/57/0.00 . . .61/53/r . . . 60/50/c Sydney. . . . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . 65/53/pc . . 64/53/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . 89/75/pc . . 90/78/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . .88/74/s . . . 87/73/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .82/72/0.00 . . .84/71/s . . . 84/72/s Toronto . . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . .70/60/sh . . 74/60/sh Vancouver. . . . . .75/54/0.00 . . .79/58/s . . . 79/58/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . .73/56/sh . . 70/54/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .70/52/0.00 . .67/53/sh . . 61/50/sh


S

D

Football Inside The Pac-12 gets out of the gate slowly on the opening weekend, see Page D5.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011

CROSSCOUNTRY Oregon, Gonzaga set to stage dual meet in Sunriver The University of Oregon’s nationally ranked men’s and women’s cross-country teams will open their 2011 season this weekend in Central Oregon. The Ducks are scheduled to entertain Gonzaga in a dual meet Saturday at Sunriver Resort. The Oregon men were ranked No. 4 and the UO women No. 16 in the U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association preseason polls. Opening Saturday’s meet will be a 5,000-meter women’s race starting at 6 p.m. The men’s race, set for four miles, will follow at about 6:30 p.m. The races will be staged on holes No. 1 and No. 2 at Sunriver’s Meadows golf course. Both schools’ women’s teams have Central Oregon connections. Kimber Mattox, the 2004 Oregon Class 4A state cross-country champion as a sophomore at Bend High School, is a redshirt senior for the Ducks. According to a UO press release, Mattox has been slowed by a recent leg injury and may not run against Gonzaga. The Gonzaga roster includes another Bend High product, Catherine Theobald. A sophomore at the Spokane, Wash., school, Theobald ran both cross-country and track for the Bulldogs as a freshman. In Gonzaga’s first meet of the season last week in Spokane — the Inland Northwest Cross Country Classic — Theobald placed 33rd overall out of 64 finishers and 11th among Bulldog runners. Spectators are welcome at Saturday’s meet, and admission is free. Spectator parking will be at the main lodge at Sunriver Resort. —Bu lletin staff report

PREP BOYS SOCCER PREVIEW

IMC is wide open in 2011 Bend High, Mountain View and Summit are all in the mix for a league title this season By Robert Husseman The Bulletin

Last season, Mountain View dominated boys soccer in the Class 5A Intermountain Conference. The Cougars went undefeated and untied against rivals Bend and Summit in 2010, leading to a run to the Class 5A state quarterfinals. Six starters, though, including 2010 Intermountain Conference player of the year Cam Riemhofer, have since graduated. Suddenly, the Intermountain Conference

looks very much up for grabs. “You never know what to expect,� Mountain View coach Chris Rodgers says. “(Bend and Summit) are both very well coached. Both coaches are extreme motivators.� The Cougars are motivated, in part, by what Rodgers characterizes as “kind of a disappointing finish.� Mountain View played in the 5A state championship match in 2009 and was expected to contend for a state title in 2010. This season the Cougars return six seniors and add a seventh in Madras transfer Eduardo Lopez, who received all-Tri-Valley Conference first-team honors in 2010. “He’s a special player,� Rodgers says about Lopez. See Soccer / D4

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

The Bend boys soccer team will feature the experience of, from left, Tony Watters, Nick Petrich, Aldy Larson and Christian Raymond.

TEE TO GREEN CENTRAL OREGON GOLF COURSE TOUR

The basics

Sunriver Resort: Meadows course

General information about Sunriver Resort’s Meadows course: Number of holes: 18 Status: Open seasonally Location: In Sunriver, 15 miles south of Bend, west of U.S. Highway 97 Tee times: 541-593-4402 Course stats: Par 71, 7,012 yards Green fees: Through Sept. 25, $79 for Deschutes County residents, $99 daily for all others before 1 p.m.; $59 for Deschutes County, $69 all others after 1 p.m.; $49 for all golfers after 5 p.m. From Sept. 26-Oct. 31: $49 daily for Deschutes County, $59 for all others (All prices include cart and practice balls) Director of resort operations: Scott Ellender Head golf professional: Tony Blasius Course designers: Meadows course, John Fought redesign (opened 1968; redesigned 1999) Extras: Driving range, practice facilities include chipping green with bunker, putting green and nine-hole putting course Website: www.sunriver-resort.com

Breaking down the course A closer look at the Meadows course. For more information, see Page D5.

DIFFICULTY

INSIDE MLB Yankees .........5 Orioles ...........3

Dodgers .........7 Nationals .......3

Tigers .......... 10 Indians ...........1

Phillies...........6 Braves............3

Red Sox ....... 14 Blue Jays .......0

Astros ............4 Pirates ...........1

Rangers .........8 Rays ...............0

Mets...............7 Marlins ..........4

White Sox ......3 Twins .............0

Reds...............4 Cubs ..............2

Mariners ........2 Angels ...........1

Cardinals .......4 Brewers..........2

Royals ............7 A’s ..................4

Rockies ..........8 D’backs ..........3

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

A view of the 16th hole at Sunriver Resort’s Meadows course with Mount Bachelor in the distance.

STRATEGY

Meadows is a forgiving track designed to attract golfers of all stripes Editor’s note: This is another in a seasonlong series visiting each public and semiprivate golf course in Central Oregon.

SUNRIVER — golfer always stands a good chance of playing with somebody from far away at Sunriver Resort’s Meadows course. The resort draws thousands of

A

ZACK HALL tourists each summer. And the Meadows course — even more so than the resort’s tight Woodlands course and

Meadows, with its generous fairways and few trees in play, is not a particularly punitive golf course for low-handicappers. Water is abundant, so most players should still be careful. But with few forced carries, most novices should be able to make their way around the course.

its world-class challenge at Crosswater — was designed to cater to just about all of them. That much was made clear to me when I played Meadows on a recent toasty morning. My usual playing partner and I were paired with a Texas golfer named Bruce and a Californian named Larry. The two friends were on a West Coast golf tour. See Meadows / D5

Wide fairways help to minimize the course’s distance of more than 7,000 yards from the back tees. Avoid the course’s many fairway bunkers, which are present on nearly every hole. The greens generally slope away from the middle, so be careful on approach.

EXTRAS The clubhouse at Meadows is inside Sunriver Resort’s Main Lodge, so amenities abound. The course has all the basics: a spacious driving range, practice green and short-game practice area. But make time to play Meadows’ cool nine-hole putting course.

Giants ............6 Padres ...........4

PREP GIRLS SOCCER Roundup, see Page D3

CORRECTION A prep sports roundup headlined “Cowgirls eye sixth straight title� that appeared in Tuesday, Aug. 30th’s Bulletin on Page D1 contained incorrect information about the 2010 volleyball season. Mountain View went 2-1 at last year’s Class 5A state tournament and placed fourth. Summit finished 1-2 at the 5A state tournament and placed fifth. The Bulletin regrets the error.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Tennis ........................................D2 MLB ...........................................D3 Prep sports ............................... D4 Motor sports............................. D4 NFL ........................................... D4 College football .........................D5 Tee to Green.............................. D6

Mountain View opens with win over Redmond Bulletin staff report

Next up • Mountain View at North Medford, Friday

Next up • Crook County at Redmond, Thursday

REDMOND — Madison Shore and Tash Anderson scored three goals apiece, and McKayla Madison had three assists Tuesday night as Mountain View overran Redmond, 10-0, in Intermountain Hybrid girls soccer action. The Panthers were outmatched from the opening minute, when Shore scored off an assist by Anderson. The Cougars scored four goals in the first half and six in the second, emptying the bench to give younger players experience. “We’ve got kids that don’t have game experience, don’t have starting experience,� said Mountain View coach Grant Mattox. “We know we’re going to have battles on our hands (in conference play).� Mattox awarded praise to Mountain View center backs Torie Morris and Allie Cummins and their ability to set up the Cougars’ offensive attack.

Experience‌

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Inside • More coverage of Tuesday’s prep sports action, Page D4 “Those two are just solid back there,â€? Mattox said. “It gives the midfielders and the strikers the chance to be aggressive and go get those scores.â€? Mountain View freshman goalkeeper Tia Hatton made two saves in her varsity debut, as the Cougars’ defense was only occasionally challenged. “They had a shot on goal in the last minute of the game,â€? Mattox said of Redmond. “They didn’t quit playing. They fought all the way to the end. “(For us,) keeping a goose egg on the other line is important.â€? Mountain View (1-0) next plays at North Medford on Friday. Redmond (0-1) is at home on Thursday against Crook County.

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D2 Wednesday, September 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

TENNIS

Today Girls soccer: La Pine at Madras, 4 p.m. Volleyball: Summit at West Albany, 4:30 p.m.; Mountain View at West Albany, 6:30 p.m.; Gilchrist at Paisley, 5 p.m. Thursday Boys soccer: Redmond at Crook County, 5 p.m.; Churchill at Summit, 4 p.m.; Madras at Junction City, 4:30 p.m.; Stayton at Sisters, 4:30 p.m. Girls soccer: Crook County at Redmond, 5:30 p.m. ; Madars at Elmira, 4 p.m.; Sisters at Mazama, 4 p.m. Cross-country: Madras at Cascade, 4:30 p.m. Volleyball: Redmond at Bend, 6:30 p.m.; Madras at Scappoose, 6:30 p.m.; Phoenix at La Pine, 6 p.m.; Sisters at Stayton, 6 p.m.; Culver at Regis, 6 p.m.

8 a.m. — U.S. Open, ESPN2. 8 a.m. — U.S. Open, Tennis Channel. 4 p.m. — U.S. Open, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Atlanta Braves at Philadelphia Phillies, ESPN. 7 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels, ESPN, Root Sports.

THURSDAY GOLF 6 a.m. — European PGA Tour, KLM Open, first round, Golf Channel.

TENNIS 8 a.m. — U.S. Open, ESPN2. 8 a.m. — U.S. Open, Tennis Channel. 4 p.m. — U.S. Open, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — College, Arizona at Oklahoma State, ESPN. 5:30 p.m. — NFL, New Orleans Saints at Green Bay Packers, NBC.

BASEBALL 7 p.m. — MLB, Kansas City Royals at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. 7 p.m. — MLB, Philadelphia Phillies at Milwaukee Brewers or Cleveland Indians at Chicago White Sox, MLB Network. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Baseball • Beckett to miss next start with sprained ankle: Boston Red Sox right-hander Josh Beckett has a sprained right ankle and will miss his next scheduled start. Beckett left in the fourth inning of Monday’s start at Toronto after experiencing pain in his ankle on consecutive pitches. He flew back to Boston on Tuesday to be examined by a specialist. Red Sox medical director Dr. Tom Gill said in a statement that Beckett’s “examination was consistent with an ankle sprain,” adding that an MRI revealed no damage to Beckett’s ankle tendons or his Achilles tendon. He will be re-evaluated later this week. Beckett is 12-5 in 27 starts with a 2.49 ERA.

Football • Jaguars release starting quarterback Garrard: The Jacksonville Jaguars released starting quarterback David Garrard on Tuesday, making a “pure football decision” that will save the franchise $9 million in 2011. Coach Jack Del Rio Del Rio turned the starting job over to Luke McCown, who outplayed Garrard and rookie Blaine Gabbert in the preseason. Playing mostly with and against second- and third-teamers, McCown completed 12 of 18 passes for 133 yards, with two touchdowns, no interceptions and no sacks. Garrard missed the preseason opener because of a sore back, but started the final three games. He completed 50 percent of his passes for 216 yards, with no touchdowns and an interception. He was sacked three times. Garrard ends his Jacksonville career with 16,003 yards passing, 89 touchdowns, 54 interceptions and a 3937 record. He also ran for 1,746 yards and 17 scores. • USC reinstates suspended running back: Southern California reinstated tailback Marc Tyler from suspension Tuesday, clearing last season’s leading rusher to play Saturday against Utah. Tyler missed USC’s season-opening win over Minnesota and much of training camp for a series of disciplinary problems, culminating in a rant on TMZ. Tyler has been quiet ever since, and he met several unspecified requirements from coach Lane Kiffin and athletic director Pat Haden to earn reinstatement. Kiffin said Tyler has been “doing everything right” since his suspension July 18. Tyler returned to practice Aug. 24, working with the Trojans’ scout team.

Basketball • Next NBA meeting set for today: NBA players and owners will resume talks today, two people with knowledge of the plans said Tuesday. This comes a week after the sides vowed to meet more frequently in hopes of reaching a new collective bargaining agreement. The session will be just the third between top negotiators since the lockout started July 1. But with the opening of training camps less than a month away, both sides said they recognized the urgency to pick up the pace. The meeting — expected to be a small group — will be in New York. The site hasn’t been disclosed. No new proposals were exchanged last week during a meeting that lasted about six hours.

Soccer • Belgium beats U.S. men: The U.S. national soccer team lost to Belgium 1-0 Tuesday in Brussels, leaving Jurgen Klinsmann without a win in three games since he was hired as the Americans’ coach. This was the first road game for the U.S. since Klinsmann came aboard. The Americans earlier tied Mexico and lost to Costa Rica. Nicolas Lombaerts’ half volley in the 55th minute was the only goal in an exhibition game dominated by the Belgians. An inexperienced U.S. team rarely threatened.

Mixed martial arts • Lesnar returns to UFC Dec. 30: Brock Lesnar will return to the UFC’s octagon on Dec. 30, fighting former Strikeforce heavyweight champion Alistair Overeem in Las Vegas. UFC President Dana White confirmed the matchup Tuesday on Twitter. Lesnar is the UFC’s biggest pay-per-view draw, but the former pro wrestler hasn’t fought since losing the heavyweight title to Cain Velasquez last October. Lesnar is a former college wrestling champion, but his mixed martial arts career has been slowed by a prolonged bout of diverticulitis, an intestinal ailment. He has fought just twice since July 2009, most recently dropping out of a fight with Brazil’s Junior Dos Santos in June.

Cycling • Haedo gets Vuelta stage win: Juan Jose Haedo took advantage of a chaotic finish to win the 16th stage of the Spanish Vuelta, and Juanjo Cobo increased his overall lead going into the final week of racing. Daniele Bennati was leading the sprint finish but mistakenly went right at a roundabout just before the end, taking the leading riders with him and allowing Haedo to move to the left and dash in alone over the finish line. — From wire reports

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct x-Indiana 20 11 .645 x-Connecticut 20 13 .606 x-Atlanta 19 14 .576 x-New York 18 14 .563 Chicago 14 17 .452 Washington 6 26 .188 Western Conference W L Pct z-Minnesota 25 7 .781 x-Seattle 19 13 .594 x-Phoenix 18 13 .581 x-San Antonio 16 16 .500 Los Angeles 13 19 .406 Tulsa 3 28 .097 x-clinched playoff spot z-clinched conference ——— Tuesday’s Games Atlanta 85, Connecticut 74 San Antonio 82, Los Angeles 65 Today’s Game Washington at Indiana, 4 p.m.

Friday Football: Redmond at Grants Pass, 7 p.m.; Jefferson at Bend, 7 p.m.; North Medford at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; Summit at Benson, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Pendleton, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Madras, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Burns, 7 p.m.; Culver at Lost River, 7 p.m.; Hosanna Christian at Gilchrist, 4 p.m. Boys soccer: South Medford at Bend, 4 p.m.; North Medford at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Culver at East Linn Christian, 4 p.m. Girls soccer: Redmond at Crook County, 4 p.m.; Bend at South Medford, 4 p.m.; Mountain View at North Medford, 4 p.m.; Summit at Wilsonville, 7 p.m. Cross-country: Mountain View, Sisters, La Pine at Marist XC Invite in Eugene, noon Volleyball: Triad at Gilchrist, 4 p.m.; Prospect at Trinity Lutheran, 2 p.m. Saturday Boys soccer: North Medford at Bend, 11 a.m.; South Medford at Mountain View, 11 a.m.; Madras at Summit, 1:30 p.m.; Irrigon at Central Christian, 1 p.m. Girls soccer: Bend at North Medford, 11 a.m.; Mountain View at South Medford, 11 a.m.; Summit at Clackamas, noon Cross-country: Redmond, Bend, Summit, Madras at Trask Mountain Assault in McMinnville, 10 a.m.; Crook County at Breese Ranch Stampede in Prineville, TBA Volleyball: Redmond, Bend, Summit, Crook County at Mountain View tournament, 8 a.m.; Madras, Sisters at Cascade Tournament, 8 a.m.; Culver at Heppner Tournament, TBA; Gilchrist at La Pine JV Tournament, 9 a.m.; Central Christian at Paisley, 1 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran at Triad, 4 p.m.

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— Week One Thursday New Orleans at Green Bay, 5:30 p.m. Sunday Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 10 a.m. Atlanta at Chicago, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Indianapolis at Houston, 10 a.m. Tennessee at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Philadelphia at St. Louis, 10 a.m. Detroit at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m. Carolina at Arizona, 1:15 p.m. Minnesota at San Diego, 1:15 p.m. Seattle at San Francisco, 1:15 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Washington, 1:15 p.m. Dallas at N.Y. Jets, 5:20 p.m. Monday, Sept. 12 New England at Miami, 4 p.m. Oakland at Denver, 7:15 p.m.

College POLLS ——— The AP Top 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 5, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Oklahoma (32) 1-0 1,448 1 2. LSU (17) 1-0 1,415 4 3. Alabama (9) 1-0 1,409 2 4. Boise St. (2) 1-0 1,310 5 5. Florida St. 1-0 1,196 6 6. Stanford 1-0 1,154 7 7. Texas A&M 1-0 1,033 8 8. Wisconsin 1-0 1,031 11 9. Oklahoma St. 1-0 981 9 10. Nebraska 1-0 947 10 11. Virginia Tech 1-0 906 13 12. South Carolina 1-0 843 12 13. Oregon 0-1 828 3 14. Arkansas 1-0 752 15 15. Ohio St. 1-0 606 18 16. Mississippi St. 1-0 594 20 17. Michigan St. 1-0 530 17 18. Florida 1-0 382 22 19. West Virginia 1-0 357 24 20. Baylor 1-0 284 NR 21. Missouri 1-0 242 21 22. South Florida 1-0 221 NR 23. Penn St. 1-0 147 NR 24. Texas 1-0 135 NR 25. TCU 0-1 130 14 Others receiving votes: Arizona St. 119, Auburn 85, Southern Cal 69, Georgia 52, Northwestern 40, Maryland 34, BYU 33, Iowa 29, Houston 27, Utah 24, Notre Dame 22, Michigan 17, Air Force 11, Pittsburgh 11, UCF 10, NC State 8, Hawaii 6, Tennessee 6, Arizona 5, N. Illinois 5, Southern Miss. 4, Clemson 1, Georgia Tech 1. USA Today Preseason Top 25 Poll The USA Today Top 25 football coaches poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 5, total points based on 25 points for first place through one point for 25th, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Oklahoma (43) 1-0 1,454 1 2. Alabama (9) 1-0 1,412 2 3. LSU (7) 1-0 1,366 4 4. Florida State 1-0 1,198 5 5. Boise State 1-0 1,197 7 6. Stanford 1-0 1,180 6 7. Oklahoma State 1-0 1,038 8 8. Texas A&M 1-0 997 9 9. Wisconsin 1-0 988 10 10. Nebraska 1-0 910 11 11. Virginia Tech 1-0 863 13 12. South Carolina 1-0 827 12 13. Arkansas 1-0 786 14 14. Oregon 0-1 752 3 15. Ohio State 1-0 686 16 16. Michigan State 1-0 584 17 17. Mississippi State 1-0 497 20 18. Florida 1-0 375 23

4 times for 14 laps; C.Bowyer, 2 times for 8 laps; D.Hamlin, 5 times for 6 laps; M.Truex Jr., 1 time for 3 laps; B.Keselowski, 1 time for 2 laps; M.Skinner, 1 time for 2 laps; L.Cassill, 1 time for 1 lap; A.Lally, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Johnson, 873; 2. Ky.Busch, 852; 3. C.Edwards, 835; 4. M.Kenseth, 834; 5. J.Gordon, 830; 6. K.Harvick, 819; 7. Ku.Busch, 789; 8. R.Newman, 786; 9. D.Earnhardt Jr., 753; 10. T.Stewart, 751; 11. Bra.Keselowski, 728; 12. D.Hamlin, 709.

Saturday’s Games Real Salt Lake at Seattle FC, 1 p.m. Houston at Sporting Kansas City, 1 p.m. Vancouver at New York, 4:30 p.m. Portland at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. FC Dallas at New England, 4:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Chicago at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. D.C. United at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

DEALS Transactions

GB — 1 2 2½ 6 14½ GB — 6 6½ 9 12 21½

MOTOR SPORTS 19. Missouri 1-0 309 21 20. Penn State 1-0 247 25 21. Texas 1-0 231 24 22. Auburn 1-0 197 19 23. Arizona State 1-0 189 NR 24. West Virginia 1-0 185 NR 25. TCU 0-1 140 15 Others receiving votes: Baylor 117; South Florida 97; Iowa 44; Utah 42; Georgia 35; Houston 31; Northwestern 30; Arizona 28; Central Florida 18; Hawaii 17; Michigan 15;North Carolina 15; Clemson 13; Northern Illinois 13; Southern Mississippi 12; Air Force 10; Notre Dame 8; Tennessee 5; Brigham Young 4; Maryland 4; Georgia Tech 3; Washington 3; California 1; Cincinnati 1; Texas Tech 1. PACIFIC-12 CONFERENCE All Times PDT ——— North Conference All Games W L W L California 0 0 1 0 Stanford 0 0 1 0 Washington 0 0 1 0 Washington St. 0 0 1 0 Oregon 0 0 0 1 Oregon St. 0 0 0 1 South Conference All Games W L W L Arizona St. 0 0 1 0 Utah 0 0 1 0 Arizona 0 0 1 0 Southern Cal 0 0 1 0 Colorado 0 0 0 1 UCLA 0 0 0 1 Thursday’s Game x-Arizona at Oklahoma State, 5 p.m. Friday’s Game x-Missouri at Arizona State, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10 x-Oregon State at Wisconsin, 9 a.m. x-California at Colorado, 12:30 p.m. x-Stanford at Duke, 12:30 p.m. x-Hawaii at Washington, 12:30 p.m. x-Nevada at Oregon, 12:30 p.m. x-UNLV at Washington State, 2 p.m. Utah at USC, 4:30 p.m. x-San Jose State at UCLA, 7 p.m. x=nonconference Schedule Thursday’s Games SOUTH Florida A&M at Hampton, 4:30 p.m. Maryville (Tenn.) at Tennessee Tech, 5 p.m. SOUTHWEST Arizona at Oklahoma St., 5 p.m.

Betting Line NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Thursday PACKERS 4 4 Sunday RAVENS 2.5 2.5 BUCS 2 1.5 Falcons 3 3 CHIEFS 6.5 6 TEXANS 5.5 8.5 Eagles 5 5 BROWNS 6.5 6.5 JAGUARS 3 NL Giants 3 3 CARDS 7 7 49ERS 5.5 5.5 CHARGERS 9 8.5 JETS 4.5 4.5 Monday Patriots 7 7 BRONCOS 3 3 Favorite

OKLAHOMA ST ARIZONA ST LOUISVILLE WISCONSIN Iowa KENTUCKY San Diego St OHIO ST Miss St N CAROLINA No Illinois SMU TENNESSEE Tulsa

COLLEGE Thursday 14 Friday 7 7.5 4 4 Saturday 18 21.5 7 7 13.5 12.5 9.5 10 20.5 19.5 5.5 7 10 10.5 5.5 6.5 17.5 19.5 6 6.5 14.5 13.5 14

Underdog

Virginia Tech MINNESOTA WASHINGTON OREGON California Stanford Alabama Tcu NC State Purdue Southern Miss S Carolina Temple NEBRASKA Virginia TEXAS FLORIDA S FLORIDA I-ARKANSAS WASHINGTON ST VANDERBILT USC C FLORIDA Notre Dame UCLA MICHIGAN ST ARKANSAS ST Houston Navy Georgia Tech KENT ST

19.5 18.5 3 25.5 4 20 10.5 2.5 5.5 1 8.5 2.5 14 28 6.5 6 22 21.5 35 14 PK 9.5 6 3.5 22.5 33 14 22 12.5 11 9.5

20 E CAROLINA 20 New Mexico St 6 Hawaii 26.5 Nevada 6 COLORADO 21 DUKE 10 PENN ST 2 AIR FORCE 2.5 WAKE FOREST 1 RICE 8 MARSHALL 3 GEORGIA 14.5 AKRON 28 Fresno St 6.5 INDIANA 7 Byu 23 Uab 20.5 Ball St 36 New Mexico 14 Unlv 2 Connecticut 8.5 Utah 7 Boston Coll 3.5 MICHIGAN 21.5 San Jose St 32.5 Fla Atlantic 14.5 Memphis 22.5 NORTH TEXAS 10 W KENTUCKY 11 MID TENN ST 9.5 UL-Lafayette

TENNIS U.S. Open Show Court Schedules Today At The USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center New York All Times PDT Play begins at 8 a.m. Arthur Ashe Stadium Gilles Muller, Luxembourg, vs. Rafael Nadal (2), Spain Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, vs. Janko Tipsarevic (20), Serbia Night Session (play begins at 4 p.m.) Serena Williams (28), United States, vs. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (17), Russia Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, vs. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (11), France Louis Armstrong Stadium David Ferrer (5), Spain, vs. Andy Roddick (21), United States Sam Stosur (9), Australia, vs. Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia Not before noon: Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, vs. Andrea Petkovic (10), Germany Grandstand Donald Young, United States, vs. Andy Murray (4), Britain John Isner (28), United States, vs. Gilles Simon (12), France Angelique Kerber, Germany, vs. Flavia Pennetta (26), Italy

Saints Steelers Lions BEARS Bills Colts RAMS Bengals TItans REDSKINS Panthers Seahawks Vikings Cowboys DOLPHINS Raiders

Arizona Missouri Florida Int’l Oregon St IOWA ST C Michigan ARMY Toledo AUBURN Rutgers KANSAS Utep Cincinnati TULANE

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Columbus 11 8 7 40 31 Sporting Kansas City 9 8 10 37 40 Houston 8 8 11 35 34 Philadelphia 8 7 10 34 31 New York 6 6 14 32 41 D.C. 7 7 10 31 34 Chicago 4 7 15 27 30 Toronto FC 4 12 12 24 26 New England 4 11 11 23 26 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 14 3 10 52 39 Seattle 13 5 9 48 42 FC Dallas 13 7 7 46 36 Real Salt Lake 12 7 6 42 35 Colorado 10 7 11 41 39 Portland 9 12 5 32 33 Chivas USA 7 10 10 31 32 San Jose 5 10 11 26 27 Vancouver 4 13 9 21 27 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Today’s Game New England at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Friday’s Game Colorado at Los Angeles, 8 p.m.

GA 30 36 33 26 37 35 33 49 39 GA 22 29 29 21 36 41 30 35 42

NASCAR SPRINT CUP AdvoCare 500 Tuesday At Atlanta Motor Speedway Hampton, Ga. Lap length: 1.54 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (5) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 325 laps, 145.4 rating, 48 points, $329,786. 2. (17) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 325, 101.7, 43, $253,761. 3. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 325, 103.1, 41, $216,208. 4. (10) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 325, 102, 40, $175,525. 5. (7) Carl Edwards, Ford, 325, 110.1, 40, $171,441. 6. (14) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 325, 103.5, 39, $141,933. 7. (21) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 325, 112.8, 37, $159,361. 8. (13) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 325, 113.3, 37, $151,550. 9. (6) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 325, 117, 36, $153,886. 10. (11) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 325, 89.6, 34, $141,386. 11. (4) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 325, 84.9, 33, $128,714. 12. (15) Greg Biffle, Ford, 325, 83.5, 32, $114,925. 13. (27) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 325, 81.5, 31, $109,925. 14. (8) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 325, 85.9, 31, $106,775. 15. (12) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 325, 77.3, 29, $136,183. 16. (25) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 325, 75.5, 28, $131,589. 17. (32) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 325, 65.4, 27, $104,175. 18. (22) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 325, 69.9, 26, $103,175. 19. (29) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 325, 64, 25, $102,350. 20. (9) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 325, 66.6, 24, $133,100. 21. (18) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 324, 68.3, 23, $122,741. 22. (37) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 324, 54.5, 0, $108,333. 23. (3) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 324, 90.2, 22, $136,941. 24. (24) Joey Logano, Toyota, 324, 56.9, 20, $98,325. 25. (31) J.J. Yeley, Ford, 324, 53.6, 20, $104,208. 26. (40) Mike Bliss, Ford, 324, 44.8, 0, $100,483. 27. (35) Mike Skinner, Chevrolet, 323, 42.5, 0, $98,672. 28. (38) Casey Mears, Toyota, 321, 39.9, 16, $87,400. 29. (43) David Starr, Ford, 320, 37.5, 0, $84,225. 30. (42) Andy Lally, Ford, 319, 44.4, 15, $97,075. 31. (16) David Reutimann, Toyota, 315, 60.1, 13, $114,333. 32. (30) Scott Speed, Ford, electrical, 310, 34.1, 0, $84,750. 33. (26) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 284, 52.7, 11, $109,920. 34. (1) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, engine, 269, 65.5, 11, $102,725. 35. (19) David Ragan, Ford, engine, 249, 76.5, 9, $92,200. 36. (2) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, accident, 243, 90.5, 9, $128,258. 37. (36) David Gilliland, Ford, transmission, 174, 43.4, 7, $82,950. 38. (23) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, accident, 91, 45, 6, $109,170. 39. (33) Robby Gordon, Dodge, rear gear, 34, 30.4, 5, $82,700. 40. (34) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, ignition, 27, 31.1, 0, $82,550. 41. (28) Michael McDowell, Toyota, rear gear, 23, 32, 3, $82,375. 42. (41) Travis Kvapil, Ford, electrical, 17, 27.9, 0, $82,280. 43. (39) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, vibration, 2, 25.8, 1, $82,641. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 124.623 mph. Time of Race: 4 hours, 0 minutes, 58 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.598 seconds. Caution Flags: 9 for 64 laps. Lead Changes: 35 among 14 drivers. Lap Leaders: C.Bowyer 1; K.Kahne 2-16; C.Bowyer 17-23; D.Hamlin 24-25; Ky.Busch 26-31; D.Hamlin 32; A.Lally 33; Ky.Busch 34-45; J.Gordon 46-77; C.Edwards 78-79; J.Gordon 80-94; D.Hamlin 95; J.Gordon 96-98; Ky.Busch 99; J.Gordon 100-130; D.Hamlin 131; M.Kenseth 132-145; J.Gordon 146164; M.Kenseth 165-174; D.Hamlin 175; C.Edwards 176-185; M.Kenseth 186-201; C.Edwards 202; J.Yeley 203-217; M.Kenseth 218-240; J.Johnson 241; M.Kenseth 242; C.Edwards 243; L.Cassill 244; M.Truex Jr. 245-247; J.Johnson 248-275; J.Gordon 276-283; B.Keselowski 284-285; M.Skinner 286287; J.Gordon 288-325. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): J.Gordon, 7 times for 146 laps; M.Kenseth, 5 times for 64 laps; J.Johnson, 2 times for 29 laps; Ky.Busch, 3 times for 19 laps; J.Yeley, 1 time for 15 laps; K.Kahne, 1 time for 15 laps; C.Edwards,

BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Suspended L.A. Angels minor league OF Ercilio De La Cruz (Dominican Summer League) 50 games for a performance-enhancing substance violation. American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Activated INF Chris Davis from the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Josh Bell from Norfolk (IL) and INF Pedro Florimon from Bowie (EL). Selected the contracts of RHP Jeremy Accardo and LHP Clay Rapada from Norfolk. Designated INF Blake Davis and LHP Mark Hendrickson for assignment. CLEVELAND INDIANS—Activated INF Jason Kipnis from the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Luis Valbuena from Columbus (IL). Assigned RHP Jason Rice to Columbus. LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Recalled 2B Alexi Amarista and INF Gil Velasquez from Salt Lake (PCL). MINNESOTA TWINS—Selected the contract of RHP Liam Hendriks from Rochester (IL). Recalled OF Joe Benson and 1B Chris Parmelee from New Britain (EL). NEW YORK YANKEES—Recalled RHP Hector Noesi, OF Greg Golson and RHP Andrew Brackman and from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Selected the contract of RHP George Kontos from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. Reinstated INF Ramiro Pena from the 15-day DL. Designated RHP Lance Pendleton for assignment. Sent RHP Ryan Pope outright to Scranton/Wilkes Barre. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Called up RHP Kyle Drabek, OF Adam Loewen, RHP Chad Beck, RHP Danny Farquhar, LHP Brad Mills and 1B David Cooper from Las Vegas (PCL). National League CHICAGO CUBS—Recalled LHP John Gaub, INF DJ LeMahieu and OF Lou Montanez from Iowa (PCL). COLORADO ROCKIES—Recalled C-INF Jordan Pacheco from Colorado Springs (PCL) and C Wilin Rosario from Tulsa (Texas). Selected the contract of RHP Jim Miller from Colorado Springs. Placed INF Jonathan Herrera on the 60-day DL. FLORIDA MARLINS—Named Marty Scott vice president of player development. Reassigned Jim Fleming to special assistant to president of baseball operations. Promoted Stan Meek to vice president of scouting. LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Called up C Tim Federowicz, RHP John Ely and OF-INF Jerry Sands from Albuquerque (PCL). MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Recalled RHP Tim Dillard from Nashville (PCL). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Recalled INF-OF Pete Orr from Lehigh Valley (IL). Announced the resignation of Chuck LaMar, assistant general manager of player development and scouting. PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Recalled LHP Jeff Locke, LHP Aaron Thompson, LHP Daniel Moskos and INF Pedro Alvarez from Indianapolis (IL). Selected the contract of RHP Jared Hughes from Indianapolis. Reinstated RHP Evan Meek from the 60-day DL. Transferred LHP Paul Maholm and LHP Kevin Correia to the 60-day DL. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Activated INF Nick Punto from the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Tyler Greene, C Tony Cruz and OF Adron Chambers from Memphis (PCL). SAN DIEGO PADRES—Recalled RHP Erik Hamren from Tucson (PCL). Announced Steve Weber, pitching coach for Tucson (PCL), will join the club for the remainder of the season. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Recalled LHP Eric Surkamp and LHP Dan Runzler from Fresno (PCL). Selected the contract of OF Justin Christian from Fresno. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Activated RHP Stephen Strasburg from the 60-day DL. Recalled RHP Yunesky Maya, RHP Craig Stammen, LHP Atahualpa Severino and OF Corey Brown from Syracuse (IL). Selected the contracts of RHP Brad Peacock and INF Steve Lombardozzi from Syracuse. Transferred RHP Cole Kimball to the 60-Day DL. Released RHP Adam Carr. Designated RHP Garrett Mock for assignment. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association DETROIT PISTONS—Named Dennis Mannion president of business operations. FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS—Claimed OT Sam Young off waivers from Dallas. Released WR Ruvell Martin. CINCINNATI BENGALS—Signed CB Rico Murray. Released QB Dan LeFevour from the practice squad. Signed QB Zac Robinson to the practice squad. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Signed WR Chris Brooks and QB Mike Hartline to the practice squad. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Released QB David Garrard. NEW YORK GIANTS—Signed WR Dan DePalma to our practice squad. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Signed LB Tavares Gooden to a one-year contract. Released LB Antwan Applewhite. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Released DE Maurice Fountain and S Josh Pinkard from the practice squad. Signed G Paul Fanaika and DT Pep Levingston to the practice squad. COLLEGE COLORADO—Announced QB Connor Wood has transferred from Texas. MONMOUTH (NJ)—Announced men’s basketball G Stephen Spinella will not play for the school and will reenroll at South Carolina. OKLAHOMA—Announced RB Jonathan Miller will transfer. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA—Reinstated RB Marc Tyler from suspension. WISCONSIN—Dismissed DL Jake Irwin from the football team after he was arrested for his role in an altercation on Sept. 1. Announced TE Brock DeCicco has transferred from Pittsburgh and will have two seasons of eligibility remaining.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 18,549 2,157 4,101 1,090 The Dalles 9,220 1,358 3,653 833 John Day 3,913 810 2,275 602 McNary 2,951 354 1,295 357 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 396,091 120,625 300,325 111,589 The Dalles 259,659 91,414 202,960 79,608 John Day 209,132 83,320 146,446 60,646 McNary 195,959 63,758 123,008 45,559

TENNIS: U.S. OPEN

Players get a day off: Rain postpones all of Tuesday’s matches By Howard Fendrich The Associated Press

NEW YORK — A little after 3 p.m. local time Tuesday, Rafael Nadal settled in at a table in the U.S. Open players’ cafeteria and sprinkled some salt on his lunch of salmon and rice. The day’s work for the defending champion was complete, consisting of a 1½-hour practice session indoors at Flushing Meadows instead of his scheduled fourth-round match outdoors, because steady rain washed out all of Tuesday’s action. Sitting a couple of seats away, Toni Nadal — Rafael’s uncle and coach — laughed at a question about the scary scene during a post-match news conference over the weekend, when his nephew grimaced and called for a trainer’s help for right leg cramps, then slid out of his chair to the floor.

“He’s perfectly healthy, with no problems at all,” Uncle Toni said. “He’s good. Practice was normal yesterday, and normal today.” During last year’s run to his first U.S. Open title, which completed a career Grand Slam, Nadal served superbly — “His best serving in one tournament,” Uncle Toni called it — regularly hitting aces at more than 130 mph and getting broken a total of five times in seven matches. This year, Nadal already was broken nine times in three matches, and six in his opener alone. “In the first round, he played no good. He made so many mistakes. He was broken so much. But after, he played so much better,” Uncle Toni said. “I’m not worried about his serve. His serve isn’t a problem.” Indeed, their biggest concern suddenly is when the weather will allow

players to get back on court. As it is, the men in the second-seeded Nadal’s half of the draw — such as No. 4 Andy Murray, No. 21 Andy Roddick and No. 28 John Isner — could be forced to play four matches in five days, or even worse. “We would prefer to play today, because after not playing today, every day is one day less,” Uncle Toni said. “That makes it more complicated.” The men in the other half of the field, including No. 1 Novak Djokovic and 16-time major champion Roger Federer, already have progressed to the quarterfinals. “It’s a huge advantage for the top half right now. They have one match to play in the next four days, and the other guys have two — and then they’ll have two more after that,” said U.S. Davis Cup captain Jim Courier, a four-time Grand Slam title

winner. “It’s the luck of the draw.” There is no permanent or retractable roof on any court used for matches at the U.S. Open, unlike at Wimbledon and the Australian Open. The French Open announced plans to install a retractable roof on center court by 2016. Citing financial concerns and technical complexities, the U.S. Tennis Association says it doesn’t have plans to put a roof on Arthur Ashe Stadium, although it is still studying possible options. Past estimates put the cost of a roof at $150 million to $200 million. And so wet weather affects plans at the year’s last Grand Slam tournament, where rain pushed the men’s final back a day to Monday in 2008, 2009 and 2010. The two-week U.S. Open began Aug. 29, and is scheduled to end Sunday.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 7, 2011 D3

M AJ O R L E A GUE B A SE BA L L AL BOXSCORES White Sox 3, Twins 0 Chicago AB Pierre lf 4 Al.Ramirez ss 4 Pierzynski dh 4 Rios cf 4 A.Dunn 1b 1 1-Lillibridge pr-1b 0 Flowers c 3 De Aza rf 3 Morel 3b 2 Beckham 2b 3 Totals 28

R 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 3

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 4 3 4

SO 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 5

Avg. .283 .265 .288 .224 .161 .262 .227 .312 .254 .228

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Benson cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Plouffe ss 4 0 2 0 0 1 .246 Mauer dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .287 Valencia 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .249 Parmelee 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .500 L.Hughes 2b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .234 Tosoni lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .177 Dinkelman rf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .348 a-Repko ph-rf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .236 R.Rivera c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .156 b-Kubel ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Butera c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .164 Totals 33 0 6 0 2 14 Chicago 010 110 000 — 3 4 0 Minnesota 000 000 000 — 0 6 0 a-singled for Dinkelman in the 7th. b-flied out for R.Rivera in the 7th. 1-ran for A.Dunn in the 9th. LOB—Chicago 2, Minnesota 8. 2B—Plouffe (13). 3B—De Aza (3). HR—Rios (9), off Hendriks. RBIs—Rios (35), De Aza (17), Morel (26). SB—Plouffe (3). CS—Lillibridge (6). DP—Minnesota 1 (L.Hughes, Plouffe, Parmelee). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Peavy W, 7-7 6 1-3 4 0 0 2 9 105 4.92 Ohman 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 4.30 Frasor H, 14 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 9 3.50 Thornton H, 18 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 3.06 Santos S, 29-34 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 3.18 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hendriks L, 0-1 7 4 3 3 3 4 99 3.86 Oliveros 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 5.51 Hoey 1 0 0 0 1 0 10 6.88 Ohman pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Frasor pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Ohman 1-0, Frasor 2-0, Thornton 1-0. WP—Peavy. T—2:29. A—36,959 (39,500).

Red Sox 14, Blue Jays 0 Boston Ellsbury cf Reddick rf Pedroia 2b Aviles 2b Ad.Gonzalez 1b Lowrie 1b Youkilis 3b D.Ortiz dh Scutaro ss C.Crawford lf Spears lf Saltalamacchia c Lavarnway c D.McDonald rf-cf Totals

AB 4 1 5 1 5 0 4 6 5 4 2 5 0 5 47

R 2 1 0 0 3 0 2 3 2 0 0 1 0 0 14

H 2 1 0 0 3 0 2 4 4 1 0 1 0 2 20

BI 0 1 0 0 2 0 1 2 4 1 0 2 0 1 14

BB 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 2 1 2 0 1 11

Avg. .312 .295 .302 .245 .342 .266 .263 .318 .282 .250 .000 .250 .304 .201

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Y.Escobar ss 4 0 2 0 0 1 .292 E.Thames lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .269 Bautista rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .304 1-Wise pr-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .136 Lind 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Teahen 1b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .194 Encarnacion dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .274 K.Johnson 2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .277 Woodward 2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Lawrie 3b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .312 Arencibia c 3 0 1 0 0 2 .219 McCoy cf-rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .211 Totals 32 0 4 0 1 11 Boston 422 320 010 — 14 20 1 Toronto 000 000 000 — 0 4 1 1-ran for Bautista in the 6th. E—Youkilis (8), Lawrie (4). LOB—Boston 11, Toronto 6. 2B—Ellsbury (38), Ad.Gonzalez (42), Youkilis (32), D.Ortiz 2 (37), Scutaro 3 (18), C.Crawford (22). HR—Saltalamacchia (15), off L.Perez; Reddick (7), off McGowan. RBIs—Reddick (27), Ad.Gonzalez 2 (105), Youkilis (79), D.Ortiz 2 (91), Scutaro 4 (39), C.Crawford (53), Saltalamacchia 2 (50), D.McDonald (20). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester W, 15-6 7 3 0 0 1 11 100 2.93 Weiland 2 1 0 0 0 0 21 6.75 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA L.Perez L, 3-3 2 2-3 10 8 8 2 1 76 4.76 R.Lewis 1 1-3 5 3 3 0 3 48 9.00 McGowan 4 5 3 3 3 5 74 6.75 Carreno 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 1.00 McGowan pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—R.Lewis 2-0, Carreno 2-0. WP—Lester, L.Perez 2. T—3:10. A—17,565 (49,260).

Tigers 10, Indians 1 Detroit A.Jackson cf Dirks rf D.Young lf Inge 3b Mi.Cabrera 1b Raburn lf V.Martinez dh Avila c O.Santos c Jh.Peralta ss b-Rhymes ph-2b Kelly 3b-lf-1b R.Santiago 2b-ss Totals

AB 5 4 3 0 5 0 4 4 0 3 1 5 5 39

R 1 2 1 0 2 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 10

H 1 1 2 0 3 0 2 1 0 2 0 2 1 15

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 2 0 1 1 8

BB 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 7

Avg. .258 .257 .276 .191 .331 .239 .325 .299 .125 .307 .211 .236 .255

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. G.Sizemore cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .230 a-Duncan ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Fukudome rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .287 A.Cabrera ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .275 C.Santana 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .236 Thome dh 2 0 0 0 2 0 .233 1-Phelps pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Kipnis 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .282 Valbuena 2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .152 Chisenhall 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .223 c-Donald ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .293 Carrera lf-cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Marson c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .225 Totals 31 1 4 1 3 8 Detroit 530 000 020 — 10 15 0 Cleveland 000 000 100 — 1 4 0 a-struck out for G.Sizemore in the 8th. b-lined out for Jh.Peralta in the 9th. c-struck out for Chisenhall in the 9th. 1-ran for Thome in the 9th. LOB—Detroit 8, Cleveland 6. 2B—A.Jackson (21), Dirks (10), Mi.Cabrera (39). HR—Fukudome (3), off Porcello. RBIs—Mi.Cabrera (94), V.Martinez 3 (85), Jh.Peralta 2 (77), Kelly (17), R.Santiago (24), Fukudome (15). SF—Jh.Peralta. DP—Cleveland 2 (Chisenhall, Valbuena, C.Santana), (Valbuena, A.Cabrera, C.Santana). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Prcello W, 13-8 6 1-3 3 1 1 1 1 75 4.87 Coke 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 4 22 4.47 Alburquerque 2-3 1 0 0 2 2 26 2.15 Schlereth 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 3.68 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Crmona L, 6-14 1 1-3 8 7 7 1 0 41 5.18 Durbin 2 2-3 2 1 1 2 2 39 4.90 Hagadone 2 1 0 0 0 3 26 7.36 Judy 2 3 2 2 2 2 35 3.86 Herrmann 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 5.07 Inherited runners-scored—Coke 2-0, Schlereth 3-0, Durbin 1-1. WP—Durbin 2, Hagadone. Balk—Carmona. T—2:46. A—27,544 (43,441).

Rangers 8, Rays 0 Texas Kinsler 2b A.Blanco 2b Andrus ss J.Hamilton lf a-L.Martin ph-cf Mi.Young dh A.Beltre 3b b-German ph-3b Dav.Murphy rf Napoli c Moreland 1b En.Chavez cf-lf Totals

AB 4 0 5 3 1 4 3 1 4 3 4 4 36

R H 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 2 4 0 1 0 0 0 1 8 12

Tampa Bay Jennings lf

AB R 4 0

BI 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 4 1 0 0 8

BB 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 4

SO 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 3 2 9

Avg. .243 .203 .276 .299 .333 .333 .275 .500 .271 .294 .266 .305

H BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 0 0 .303

B.Upton cf 2 0 0 0 2 0 .222 Longoria dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .236 Zobrist 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .272 S.Rodriguez 3b 2 0 1 0 1 1 .218 Kotchman 1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .316 Guyer rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .167 Lobaton c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .071 Jaso c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .221 E.Johnson ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .191 Totals 28 0 5 0 3 6 Texas 113 020 010 — 8 12 0 Tampa Bay 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 a-struck out for J.Hamilton in the 9th. b-fouled out for A.Beltre in the 9th. LOB—Texas 6, Tampa Bay 4. 2B—J.Hamilton 2 (28), Dav.Murphy 2 (11), Napoli (21). HR—Kinsler (26), off Niemann; Dav.Murphy (9), off Niemann. RBIs—Kinsler (69), J.Hamilton (80), A.Beltre (81), Dav.Murphy 4 (39), Napoli (61). CS—En.Chavez (5). SF—A.Beltre. DP—Texas 4 (Andrus, Kinsler, Moreland), (Andrus, Moreland), (Andrus, Kinsler, Moreland), (Andrus, A.Blanco, Moreland); Tampa Bay 1 (S.Rodriguez, Zobrist, Kotchman). Texas IP H R ER BB Wilson W, 15-6 9 5 0 0 3 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB Niemann L, 9-7 4 2-3 9 7 7 1 C.Ramos 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 J.Cruz 2-3 0 0 0 1 McGee 1 2 1 1 1 B.Gomes 1 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—C.Ramos C.Ramos (Napoli). T—2:41. A—11,611 (34,078).

SO NP ERA 6 117 3.13 SO NP ERA 3 93 4.07 2 31 4.03 0 8 3.89 3 28 5.23 1 9 3.60 1-1. IBB—off

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W New York 87 Boston 85 Tampa Bay 77 Toronto 70 Baltimore 55 Central Division W Detroit 80 Chicago 71 Cleveland 70 Kansas City 60 Minnesota 58 West Division W Texas 81 Los Angeles 77 Oakland 64 Seattle 59

L 53 56 64 72 85 L 62 69 69 83 84 L 62 65 78 82

Pct .621 .603 .546 .493 .393 Pct .563 .507 .504 .420 .408 Pct .566 .542 .451 .418

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB — 2½ 10½ 18 32 GB — 8 8½ 20½ 22 GB — 3½ 16½ 21

Tuesday’s Games N . Y. Yankees 5, Baltimore 3 Detroit 10, Cleveland 1 Boston 14, Toronto 0 Texas 8, Tampa Bay 0 Chicago White Sox 3, Minnesota 0 Kansas City 7, Oakland 4 Seattle 2, L.A. Angels 1

AB 4 5 4 5 5 5 5 3 3 39

R H 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 2 10

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2

BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

SO 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 1 7

Avg. .272 .249 .304 .282 .227 .222 .285 .272 .164

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. M.Izturis 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .277 Aybar ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .266 B.Abreu dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .253 Tor.Hunter rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .266 Trumbo 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Callaspo 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .279 V.Wells lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .219 Bourjos cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .274 Bo.Wilson c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .198 a-Trout ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .238 Mathis c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .178 b-H.Kendrick ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .292 Conger c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .207 Totals 32 1 4 1 2 7 Seattle 010 100 000 — 2 10 1 Los Angeles 000 001 000 — 1 4 4 a-struck out for Bo.Wilson in the 5th. b-grounded out for Mathis in the 7th. E—F.Hernandez (2), E.Santana (5), Aybar (12), Callaspo (14), Conger (6). LOB—Seattle 14, Los Angeles 6. 2B—B.Abreu (27). 3B—Ackley (7). RBIs—T.Robinson (9), M.Saunders (8), Callaspo (43). SB—I.Suzuki (35), Ackley (4), Seager (1), Bourjos (19). SF—T.Robinson. Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 9 (Carp 2, Ryan 3, Olivo, Seager, Ackley, T.Robinson); Los Angeles 2 (Trumbo, Aybar). Runners moved up—I.Suzuki 2, Smoak. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP Hrndz W, 14-11 8 4 1 0 2 7 111 Lgue S, 33-38 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP Sntana L, 11-10 6 7 2 0 2 4 110 Richards 1 2 0 0 0 2 16 Ho.Ramirez 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 8 R.Thompson 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 14 T.Bell 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 Inherited runners-scored—R.Thompson PB—Olivo. T—2:48. A—36,533 (45,389).

ERA 3.15 2.87 ERA 3.18 8.10 9.53 3.04 3.26 1-0.

Royals 7, Athletics 4 Kansas City A.Gordon lf Me.Cabrera cf Butler dh Hosmer 1b Francoeur rf Giavotella 2b S.Perez c Y.Navarro 3b A.Escobar ss Totals

AB 4 5 4 5 5 5 5 4 3 40

R H 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 2 3 1 1 2 3 0 1 0 1 7 12

BI 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 7

BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

SO 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 8

Avg. .300 .300 .302 .288 .284 .244 .301 .250 .248

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. J.Weeks 2b 5 0 3 2 0 1 .295 Pennington ss 4 0 1 2 1 1 .267 Matsui dh 5 0 1 0 0 0 .261 Willingham lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .243 S.Sizemore 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Allen 1b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .253 Taylor rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .167 Sweeney cf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .271 Recker c 3 1 0 0 1 2 .214 Totals 34 4 7 4 5 8 Kansas City 040 030 000 — 7 12 0 Oakland 002 000 101 — 4 7 1 E—Pennington (21). LOB—Kansas City 9, Oakland 8. 2B—S.Perez (6), J.Weeks (21). HR—Hosmer (16), off G.Gonzalez; Francoeur (17), off G.Gonzalez. RBIs— A.Gordon 2 (78), Hosmer (66), Francoeur (77), Giavotella (15), S.Perez (9), A.Escobar (41), J.Weeks 2 (27), Pennington 2 (55). SB—Hosmer (9), Francoeur (20). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Duffy W, 4-8 6 1-3 4 3 3 3 4 119 5.64 Bl.Wood 1 2-3 2 1 1 1 2 30 3.88 Soria S, 26-33 1 1 0 0 1 2 25 4.17 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gnzlez L, 12-12 5 10 7 6 3 4 98 3.43 Carignan 2 1 0 0 0 3 36 0.00 Blevins 2 1 0 0 0 1 27 3.20 Bl.Wood pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Bl.Wood 2-1, Soria 2-1. T—3:06. A—12,064 (35,067).

Yankees 5, Orioles 3 Baltimore Angle lf a-Reimold ph Hardy ss Markakis rf Ad.Jones cf Guerrero dh Mar.Reynolds 1b Wieters c C.Davis 3b Andino 2b Totals

AB 2 1 5 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 3

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 7 3 2

SO 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 1 8

Avg. .111 .229 .267 .281 .284 .279 .225 .269 .233 .258

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .266 Jeter ss 3 1 1 0 1 1 .297 Granderson cf 3 0 0 0 1 3 .269 Teixeira 1b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .249 Cano 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .305 Swisher rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .266 Dickerson rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .310 Er.Chavez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .269 Posada dh 3 2 1 1 0 0 .239 Cervelli c 3 1 1 1 0 1 .275 Totals 30 5 5 4 2 9 Baltimore 000 002 100 — 3 7 3 New York 001 011 20x — 5 5 1 a-struck out for Angle in the 9th. E—Mar.Reynolds (27), Tom.Hunter (1), Angle (1), Teixeira (4). LOB—Baltimore 8, New York 4. 2B—Markakis (25), Guerrero (24). HR—Wieters (17), off P.Hughes; Posada (13), off Tom.Hunter; Cervelli (4), off Tom.Hunter; Gardner (7), off Tom.Hunter. RBIs—Markakis (64), Wieters 2 (57), Gardner (35), Teixeira (102), Posada (40), Cervelli (22). SB—Angle (4), Gardner (43). S—Angle. GIDP—Wieters, Swisher. DP—Baltimore 1 (Andino, Hardy, Mar.Reynolds); New York 1 (Er.Chavez, Cano, Teixeira). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T.Hunter L, 3-3 6 2-3 5 5 4 2 6 99 5.28 Rapada 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 7.11 Strop 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 3.09 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA P.Hughes 6 5 2 2 1 5 106 6.41 Noesi H, 3 2-3 1 1 1 0 1 12 3.56 Logan BS, 2-2 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 2.92 Wade W, 4-0 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.05 Robertson H, 31 1 0 0 0 1 1 12 1.26 Rivera S, 39-44 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 2.13 Logan pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Rapada 1-0, Logan 1-1, Wade 1-0. HBP—by Tom.Hunter (Gardner), by P.Hughes (Angle). WP—P.Hughes 2. T—3:07. A—44,573 (50,291).

L10 9-1 5-5 5-5 4-6 2-8 L10 7-3 6-4 5-5 6-4 3-7 L10 6-4 5-5 4-6 3-7

Str W-6 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-4 Str W-5 W-3 L-2 W-2 L-5 Str W-1 L-1 L-2 W-1

Home 46-26 42-29 38-33 34-35 32-39 Home 42-29 31-37 39-32 34-39 29-42 Home 44-28 41-30 38-32 34-37

Away 41-27 43-27 39-31 36-37 23-46 Away 38-33 40-32 31-37 26-44 29-42 Away 37-34 36-35 26-46 25-45

Today’s Games Detroit (Verlander 21-5) at Cleveland (Masterson 11-8), 9:05 a.m. Baltimore (Britton 9-9) at N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 9-11), 10:05 a.m. Texas (D.Holland 13-5) at Tampa Bay (Price 12-12), 10:10 a.m. Kansas City (Chen 10-6) at Oakland (Moscoso 7-8), 12:35 p.m. Boston (Wakefield 6-6) at Toronto (Morrow 9-10), 4:07 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Danks 6-10) at Minnesota (Pavano 7-11), 5:10 p.m. Seattle (Furbush 3-7) at L.A. Angels (J.Williams 2-0), 7:05 p.m.

Mariners 2, Angels 1 Seattle I.Suzuki rf Ryan ss Ackley 2b Carp dh Smoak 1b Olivo c Seager 3b T.Robinson lf M.Saunders cf Totals

WCGB — — 8 15½ 29½ WCGB — 13½ 14 26 27½ WCGB — 8½ 21½ 26

East Division W Philadelphia 90 Atlanta 82 New York 69 Washington 65 Florida 63 Central Division W Milwaukee 85 St. Louis 75 Cincinnati 70 Pittsburgh 65 Chicago 61 Houston 48 West Division W Arizona 81 San Francisco 75 Los Angeles 69 Colorado 67 San Diego 61

L 48 59 71 75 78 L 58 67 72 77 81 94 L 61 67 72 75 81

Pct .652 .582 .493 .464 .447 Pct .594 .528 .493 .458 .430 .338 Pct .570 .528 .489 .472 .430

GB — 9½ 22 26 28½ GB — 9½ 14½ 19½ 23½ 36½ GB — 6 11½ 14 20

Tuesday’s Games Philadelphia 6, Atlanta 3 Houston 4, Pittsburgh 1 L.A. Dodgers 7, Washington 3 N.Y. Mets 7, Florida 4, 12 innings Cincinnati 4, Chicago Cubs 2, 13 innings St. Louis 4, Milwaukee 2 Colorado 8, Arizona 3 San Francisco 6, San Diego 4

WCGB — — 12½ 16½ 19 WCGB — 7½ 12½ 17½ 21½ 34½ WCGB — 7½ 13 15½ 21½

L10 7-3 4-6 7-3 3-7 4-6 L10 6-4 6-4 4-6 3-7 4-6 5-5 L10 8-2 5-5 7-3 4-6 1-9

Str W-2 L-2 W-1 L-1 L-1 Str L-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 W-1 Str L-1 W-2 W-1 W-1 L-2

Home 48-22 44-28 30-36 39-31 28-43 Home 50-19 37-34 37-34 32-39 34-40 26-45 Home 42-26 40-32 36-35 36-34 29-42

Away 42-26 38-31 39-35 26-44 35-35 Away 35-39 38-33 33-38 33-38 27-41 22-49 Away 39-35 35-35 33-37 31-41 32-39

Today’s Games N.Y. Mets (Dickey 7-11) at Florida (Hand 1-5), 2:10 p.m. San Francisco (Cain 11-9) at San Diego (Harang 12-5), 3:35 p.m. Atlanta (Beachy 7-2) at Philadelphia (Oswalt 7-8), 4:05 p.m. Houston (Happ 5-15) at Pittsburgh (Burres 1-0), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Eveland 1-0) at Washington (Wang 2-3), 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 9-5) at Chicago Cubs (Dempster 10-11), 5:05 p.m. Milwaukee (Greinke 14-5) at St. Louis (C.Carpenter 8-9), 5:15 p.m. Arizona (J.Saunders 9-12) at Colorado (Millwood 2-1), 5:40 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Red Sox 14, Blue Jays 0: TORONTO — Jon Lester struck out 11 in seven innings to win his fourth straight decision, Marco Scutaro and David Ortiz each matched a career-high with four hits and Boston beat Toronto. Lester (15-6) allowed just three hits, all singles, and walked one to improve to 4-0 with a 1.16 ERA in five starts since losing at Minnesota on Aug. 10. • White Sox 3, Twins 0: MINNEAPOLIS — Jake Peavy struck out a season-high nine and Alex Rios homered to lead the Chicago White Sox. Peavy (77) allowed four hits and walked two in 6 1⁄3 innings against a Twins team that had three players who were called up from Double-A in the past two days. • Tigers 10, Indians 1: CLEVELAND — Victor Martinez drove in three runs and Detroit dropped Cleveland 8½ games back in the AL Central. Detroit has won five straight and is 15-4 since Aug. 19. • Rangers 8, Rays 0: ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — C.J. Wilson threw a five-hitter, David Murphy drove in four runs and AL West-leading Texas beat Tampa Bay. Wilson (15-6) matched his career high in wins from last year and became the first Texas left-hander to record 15 or more wins in consecutive seasons. He has three complete games this year. • Royals 7, Athletics 4: OAKLAND, Calif. — Eric Hosmer and Jeff Francoeur hit back-to-back home runs in the second inning, Danny Duffy won for the first time in more than a month and Kansas City beat Oakland. Salvador Perez added three hits while six players drove in runs for the Royals, who have scored 29 runs in their past three road games. • Mariners 2, Angels 1: ANAHEIM, Calif. — Felix Hernandez pitched eight innings of four-hit ball to win at Angel Stadium for the first time since 2006, and Seattle snapped a five-game skid and slowed the Los Angeles Angels’ playoff surge. • Yankees 5, Orioles 3: NEW YORK — Only 500 fans or so were left in the stands early today when New York finished off a rain-delayed win over Baltimore at 2:15 a.m. local time, getting the goahead run on Francisco Cervelli’s disputed home run. Cervelli hit his tiebreaking shot in the seventh inning off Tommy Hunter (3-3). Two fans reached near the left-field wall to grab it, and even though Orioles manager Buck Showalter argued, the umpires upheld their home-run call after a replay.

• Dodgers 7, Nationals 3: WASHINGTON — Stephen Strasburg allowed two hits over five shutout innings in his first major league start since undergoing Tommy John surgery, but the bullpen blew the lead as Washington lost to the Los Angeles Dodgers. • Phillies 6, Braves 3: PHILADELPHIA — Rookie Vance Worley pitched six effective innings and Philadelphia extended its lead in the NL East to 9½ games. The major league-leading Phillies won their 90th game and reduced their magic number for clinching their fifth straight division title to 14 games. • Cardinals 4, Brewers 2: ST. LOUIS — Kyle Lohse threw six scoreless innings on eight days’ rest and St. Louis got home runs from Jon Jay and Matt Holliday in the third inning. The Brewers still lead the Cardinals by 9½ games in the NL Central. • Rockies 8, Diamondbacks 3: DENVER — Troy Tulowitzki homered, Seth Smith tripled twice and Colorado rallied for the win. Jordan Pacheco and Carlos Gonzalez had two hits apiece for the Rockies, who beat Arizona for just the fifth time in 17 games. • Reds 4, Cubs 2: CHICAGO — Joey Votto hit a tiebreaking RBI double in the 13th inning and Cincinnati bounced back after blowing a two-run lead in the ninth. John Grabow (3-1) got the loss. • Astros 4, Pirates 1: PITTSBURGH — Brett Myers pitched into the eighth inning to earn his first win in 2½ months, leading Houston to the victory. Myers (4-13) allowed one run and four hits over 7 2⁄3 innings at soggy, chilly PNC Park as last-place Houston snapped a four-game losing streak. • Giants 6, Padres 4: SAN DIEGO — Brett Pill hit a two-run homer in his first big league at-bat, Eric Surkamp earned his first major league win and San Francisco had to escape a bases-loaded jam in the ninth inning to beat San Diego. • Mets 7, Marlins 4: MIAMI — Nick Evans drove in three runs, including a go-ahead single in the 12th inning, to give the New York Mets a win over Florida. Jose Reyes, Justin Turner, Angel Pagan, and Evans each had three hits for the Mets, who lost a two-run lead in the bottom of the ninth inning.

NL BOXSCORES Phillies 6, Braves 3 Atlanta AB R H Bourn cf 5 1 3 Prado lf 4 0 1 McCann c 4 0 1 Uggla 2b 4 2 1 C.Jones 3b 4 0 2 Freeman 1b 3 0 1 Ale.Gonzalez ss 3 0 1 Constanza rf 4 0 0 T.Hudson p 3 0 0 C.Martinez p 0 0 0 c-Hinske ph 1 0 0 Varvaro p 0 0 0 Totals 35 3 10

BI 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 1 0 1 2 1 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 10

Avg. .299 .262 .282 .237 .279 .291 .230 .324 .131 .333 .247 ---

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Victorino cf 4 1 1 0 1 0 .303 Polanco 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .276 Utley 2b 5 2 1 1 0 0 .264 Howard 1b 3 2 1 1 1 1 .254 Pence rf 3 1 2 0 1 1 .310 Ibanez lf 4 0 3 3 0 0 .246 Schneider c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .171 b-Ruiz ph-c 0 0 0 0 1 0 .281 M.Martinez ss 2 0 0 0 2 2 .211 Worley p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .231 a-Mayberry ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Stutes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Lidge p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Gload ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .236 Madson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 6 9 5 6 6 Atlanta 000 101 100 — 3 10 0 Philadelphia 200 002 20x — 6 9 0 a-grounded into a double play for Worley in the 6th. bwalked for Schneider in the 7th. c-reached on a strikeout and wild pitch for C.Martinez in the 8th. d-flied out for Lidge in the 8th. LOB—Atlanta 10, Philadelphia 9. 2B—Bourn (31), C.Jones (27), Pence (33), Ibanez (27). HR—Uggla (33), off Worley; Utley (10), off T.Hudson. RBIs—Uggla 2 (72), Ale.Gonzalez (48), Utley (41), Howard (108), Ibanez 3 (70). SB—Bourn (50). SF—Ale.Gonzalez. DP—Atlanta 1 (Ale.Gonzalez, Uggla, Freeman); Philadelphia 2 (M.Martinez, Howard), (Utley, Howard). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hudson L, 14-9 6 6 4 4 4 5 110 3.14 C.Martinez 1 2 2 2 2 1 33 3.62 Varvaro 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 3.27 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Worley W, 11-1 6 7 2 2 3 6 108 2.85 Stutes H, 10 1 1 1 1 1 0 21 3.69 Lidge H, 5 1 1 0 0 0 3 20 1.46 Mdsn S, 28-30 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 2.84 HBP—by C.Martinez (Polanco). WP—T.Hudson, Lidge. T—3:05. A—44,781 (43,651).

Reds 4, Cubs 2 (13 innings) Cincinnati B.Phillips 2b Sappelt cf-lf Cordero p Votto 1b Bruce rf Mesoraco c Arredondo p Chapman p

AB 6 5 0 6 5 5 0 0

R 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 2 2 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 0 2 3 1 0 0

Avg. .299 .270 --.316 .263 .200 .500 ---

g-Heisey ph-lf Cairo 3b Frazier lf 1-Stubbs pr-cf Valaika ss Janish ss Leake p e-Alonso ph Bray p Masset p LeCure p Hanigan c Totals

1 5 4 1 3 2 3 1 0 0 0 1 48

0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 12

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 11

.242 .267 .225 .251 .250 .208 .216 .382 ----.143 .265

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. S.Castro ss 6 1 1 0 0 0 .304 Barney 2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .275 d-LaHair ph 1 1 1 2 0 0 .444 Marmol p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Marshall p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Montanez ph-rf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .255 Ar.Ramirez 3b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .305 C.Pena 1b 5 0 0 0 0 3 .225 Grabow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --A.Soriano lf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .247 2-Campana pr-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .269 Byrd cf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .284 Colvin rf-1b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .147 Soto c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .226 b-DeWitt ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Je.Baker 2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .276 R.Lopez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .083 R.Ortiz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-LeMahieu ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Samardzija p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 K.Wood p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Re.Johnson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .329 K.Hill c 1 0 0 0 1 1 .200 Totals 41 2 6 2 3 10 Cin. 000 002 000 000 2 — 4 12 1 Chi. 000 000 002 000 0 — 2 6 1 a-grounded out for R.Ortiz in the 6th. b-grounded out for Soto in the 9th. c-grounded out for K.Wood in the 9th. d-homered for Barney in the 9th. e-struck out for Leake in the 10th. f-doubled for Marshall in the 11th. g-popped out for Chapman in the 13th. 1-ran for Frazier in the 9th. 2-ran for A.Soriano in the 10th. E—Mesoraco (1), Ar.Ramirez (12). LOB—Cincinnati 10, Chicago 5. 2B—Sappelt 2 (5), Votto 2 (33), Montanez (4). HR—LaHair (1), off Leake. RBIs—Votto 2 (90), Cairo (32), LaHair 2 (3). SB—Campana (19). CS—Cairo (4), S.Castro (6). DP—Cincinnati 3 (B.Phillips, Votto), (Valaika, B.Phillips, Votto), (Cairo, Mesoraco, Votto); Chicago 2 (R.Lopez, S.Castro, C.Pena), (S.Castro, Barney, C.Pena). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Leake 9 3 2 2 0 6 91 4.00 Bray 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 2.70 Masset 0 2 0 0 1 0 8 3.98 LeCure 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 3.65 Arredondo 2-3 1 0 0 2 0 18 3.18 Chpman W, 4-1 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 14 3.71 Crdero S, 31-36 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 2.34 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA R.Lopez 5 2-3 8 2 2 2 2 92 4.82 R.Ortiz 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 5.40 Samardzija 2 0 0 0 0 2 25 3.26 K.Wood 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.35 Marmol 1 0 0 0 1 3 19 4.13 Marshall 1 0 0 0 1 2 17 2.42 Grabow L, 3-1 2 4 2 2 1 1 25 4.78 Masset pitched to 3 batters in the 10th. Inherited runners-scored—LeCure 3-0, Chapman 2-0, R.Ortiz 1-0. IBB—off Arredondo (Ar.Ramirez), off Grabow (Stubbs). HBP—by Leake (A.Soriano). WP—

R.Ortiz. Catchers’ interference—Mesoraco. T—3:54. A—35,297 (41,159).

Rockies 8, Diamondbacks 3 Arizona AB R R.Roberts 3b 4 0 A.Hill 2b 4 2 J.Upton rf 4 0 M.Montero c 4 0 Goldschmidt 1b 4 1 C.Young cf 4 0 G.Parra lf 4 0 Jo.McDonald ss 3 0 Collmenter p 3 0 Ziegler p 0 0 Da.Hernandez p 0 0 Paterson p 0 0 Demel p 0 0 Totals 34 3

H BI BB 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 2 1

SO 1 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .256 .392 .297 .277 .248 .227 .294 .174 .147 ---------

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 4 1 0 1 1 0 .272 M.Ellis 2b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .268 C.Gonzalez rf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .299 Tulowitzki ss 4 1 1 3 0 1 .304 Giambi 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .270 1-E.Young pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .221 Wigginton 1b 1 1 1 0 0 0 .249 S.Smith lf 4 2 3 1 0 0 .292 W.Rosario c 3 1 0 0 1 1 .000 Pacheco 3b 4 0 2 2 0 0 .500 R.Betancourt p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hammel p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Street p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Mat.Reynolds p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 a-Kouzmanoff ph-3b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .244 Totals 34 8 12 8 2 5 Arizona 100 000 110 — 3 8 0 Colorado 000 010 07x — 8 12 1 a-singled for Belisle in the 8th. 1-ran for Giambi in the 7th. E—Pacheco (1). LOB—Arizona 5, Colorado 6. 2B— A.Hill (7), J.Upton (38), Goldschmidt (6), Jo.McDonald (1), C.Gonzalez (26). 3B—S.Smith 2 (9). HR—Tulowitzki (30), off Da.Hernandez. RBIs—M.Montero (74), G.Parra (36), Fowler (39), C.Gonzalez (88), Tulowitzki 3 (103), S.Smith (57), Pacheco 2 (2). SB—E.Young (18), S.Smith (9). S—Hammel. Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Collmenter 6 1-3 5 1 1 0 4 78 3.10 Ziegler H, 3 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 8 1.98 Hernandez L, 3-3 2-3 5 5 5 0 0 20 3.47 Paterson 0 2 2 2 1 0 10 3.09 Demel 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 12 4.21 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hammel 7 6 2 1 1 6 95 4.98 Street 2-3 1 1 0 0 1 10 3.72 Mat.Reynolds 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 4.24 Belisle W, 10-4 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 3.68 R.Betancourt 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 3.14 Mat.Reynolds pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Paterson pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Ziegler 2-0, Paterson 1-1, Demel 2-1, Mat.Reynolds 1-1, Belisle 1-0. HBP—by Demel (Kouzmanoff). PB—M.Montero, W.Rosario. T—2:49. A—25,691 (50,490).

Dodgers 7, Nationals 3 Los Angeles D.Gordon ss Loney 1b

AB R 5 1 5 1

H BI BB SO Avg. 3 0 0 0 .277 1 0 0 2 .277

Kemp cf J.Rivera lf 1-Gwynn Jr. pr-lf Ethier rf Miles 3b Barajas c Sellers 2b Lilly p a-J.Carroll ph Guerrier p Kuo p b-Oeltjen ph Jansen p MacDougal p d-Velez ph Guerra p Totals

4 3 0 5 4 4 4 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 38

2 1 0 2 0 0 1 2 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 13

1 0 0 4 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

.319 .287 .255 .292 .284 .236 .238 .082 .289 ----.224 ----.000 ---

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Desmond ss 4 0 1 0 1 2 .244 Werth cf 3 0 0 1 1 1 .229 Zimmerman 3b 5 0 2 0 0 3 .291 Morse lf 5 0 0 0 0 4 .311 J.Gomes rf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .208 Peacock p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Severino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --H.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Lombardozzi ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 --Maya p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 e-C.Brown ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Espinosa 2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .229 Marrero 1b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .306 W.Ramos c 3 1 1 1 1 1 .261 Strasburg p 1 1 0 0 0 1 .000 Slaten p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ankiel rf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .244 Totals 34 3 7 2 5 17 Los Angeles 000 003 022 — 7 13 1 Washington 030 000 000 — 3 7 0 a-singled for Lilly in the 6th. b-flied out for Kuo in the 7th. c-walked for H.Rodriguez in the 8th. d-grounded out for MacDougal in the 9th. e-flied out for Maya in the 9th. 1-ran for J.Rivera in the 8th. E—Lilly (2). LOB—Los Angeles 7, Washington 11. 2B—D.Gordon (6), Loney (23), Ethier (30), Barajas (11), Marrero (1), W.Ramos (21). RBIs—Kemp (107), Ethier 4 (62), Barajas 2 (43), Werth (53), W.Ramos (43). SB—D.Gordon (16), Gwynn Jr. (20), Desmond (22). S—Strasburg. DP—Washington 1 (Desmond, Espinosa, Marrero). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lilly 5 4 3 2 3 9 105 4.37 Guerrier 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 12 3.67 Kuo 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 9.14 Jansen W, 2-1 1 0 0 0 0 3 16 3.30 McDgal H, 12 1 0 0 0 1 0 16 1.92 Guerra 1 2 0 0 1 2 26 2.15 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Strasburg 5 2 0 0 0 4 56 0.00 Slaten H, 3 1-3 2 2 2 0 1 15 3.29 Peacock 1 1-3 4 1 1 1 0 38 6.75 Severino 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 8 0.00 Rdriguez L, 3-3 1 3 2 2 0 0 20 3.92 Maya 1 2 2 2 2 0 17 5.88 Inherited runners-scored—Kuo 1-0, Peacock 2-2, Severino 1-0. IBB—off Maya (Kemp). HBP—by Jansen (Werth). WP—MacDougal. T—3:35 (Rain delay: 0:31). A—29,092 (41,506).

Cardinals 4, Brewers 2 Milwaukee C.Hart rf Morgan cf Braun lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b Y.Betancourt ss Counsell 2b b-T.Green ph-2b Lucroy c Gallardo p Loe p c-Kotsay ph De La Cruz p Totals

AB 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 1 3 3 0 1 0 37

R H 1 2 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 10

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 1 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 7

Avg. .284 .313 .333 .292 .237 .252 .170 .538 .278 .226 .000 .260 ---

St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Furcal ss 3 0 2 0 1 0 .214 Jay cf 3 2 2 2 0 0 .304 Pujols 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .293 Holliday lf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .302 Berkman rf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .283 2-Chambers pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Motte p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Freese 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .298 Descalso 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Schumaker 2b-rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .298 Y.Molina c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .292 Lohse p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .140 Salas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Rzepczynski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Craig ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .312 1-Greene pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .196 McClellan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Theriot 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .271 Totals 31 4 9 4 3 6 Milwaukee 000 000 011 — 2 10 0 St. Louis 102 000 10x — 4 9 1 a-singled for Rzepczynski in the 7th. b-singled for Counsell in the 8th. c-grounded out for Loe in the 8th. 1-ran for Craig in the 7th. 2-ran for Berkman in the 8th. E—Freese (10). LOB—Milwaukee 12, St. Louis 7. 2B—C.Hart (17), Lucroy (15). HR—Jay (10), off Gallardo; Holliday (22), off Gallardo. RBIs—Fielder (108), Lucroy (56), Jay 2 (35), Holliday (72), Berkman (84). S—Jay. GIDP—McGehee, Pujols. DP—Milwaukee 1 (McGehee, Counsell, Fielder); St. Louis 1 (Descalso, Theriot, Pujols). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gllrdo L, 15-10 6 4 3 3 3 5 103 3.71 Loe 1 3 1 1 0 0 12 3.53 De La Cruz 1 2 0 0 0 1 16 1.86 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lohse W, 13-8 6 4 0 0 3 6 91 3.59 Salas H, 4 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 12 2.44 Rzpczynski H, 4 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 1.98 McClellan 1 2 1 1 0 0 25 4.07 Motte S, 3-6 1 3 1 1 0 0 14 1.70 Inherited runners-scored—Rzepczynski 1-0. HBP— by Lohse (Fielder). WP—Gallardo, De La Cruz. T—2:46. A—35,397 (43,975).

Astros 4, Pirates 1 Houston J.Schafer cf Altuve 2b Shuck lf Ca.Lee 1b Bogusevic rf Paredes 3b Barmes ss Quintero c Myers p W.Wright p c-M.Downs ph Melancon p Totals

AB 4 5 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 0 1 0 36

R 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB SO 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 3 1 0 0 2 0 0 2 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 9 4 2 10

Avg. .250 .287 .216 .275 .294 .300 .246 .257 .132 .000 .276 ---

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Presley lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .308 G.Jones rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .244 A.McCutchen cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .267 D.Lee 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .382 Walker 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .271 Doumit c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .291 P.Alvarez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .193 d’Arnaud ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .208 Lincoln p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .125 a-Paul ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .256 Resop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Leroux p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-J.Harrison ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .270 Veras p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Moskos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 1 5 1 1 7 Houston 020 000 002 — 4 9 1 Pittsburgh 010 000 000 — 1 5 0 a-grounded out for Lincoln in the 6th. b-reached on error for Leroux in the 8th. c-struck out for W.Wright in the 9th. E—Myers (4). LOB—Houston 7, Pittsburgh 5. 2B— Paredes (8), Quintero (11), G.Jones (30). HR—Doumit (8), off Myers. RBIs—Paredes (15), Quintero 3 (24), Doumit (26). SB—Ca.Lee (4). CS—Walker (5). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Myers W, 4-13 7 2-3 4 1 1 0 6 92 4.66 W.Wright H, 2 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 7 1.08 Mlncn S, 17-22 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 3.18 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lincoln L, 1-2 6 5 2 2 0 6 97 3.53 Resop 2-3 2 0 0 0 0 13 4.66 Watson 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 4.59 Leroux 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.12 Veras 1-3 2 2 2 1 1 15 3.70 Moskos 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 14 3.00 Inherited runners-scored—W.Wright 1-0, Watson 2-0, Moskos 1-0. T—2:53. A—9,840 (38,362).

Giants 6, Padres 4 San Francisco Christian cf Keppinger 2b Beltran rf C.Ross lf DeRosa 3b-1b Pill 1b Affeldt p d-Fontenot ph Romo p Ja.Lopez p S.Casilla p R.Ramirez p O.Cabrera ss C.Stewart c Surkamp p Edlefsen p P.Sandoval 3b Totals

AB 4 5 4 5 4 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 2 0 2 37

R H 1 1 1 2 1 3 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 6 11

BI 0 0 3 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

Avg. .250 .299 .299 .235 .233 .333 .000 .221 --.000 ----.223 .196 .000 --.297

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Maybin cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .272 Bartlett ss 3 1 1 0 1 1 .250 Guzman 1b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .327 Blanks lf 1 0 0 1 2 0 .237 Hundley c 4 1 1 1 0 2 .275 Denorfia rf 2 1 2 0 0 0 .270 b-Venable ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .253 e-O.Hudson ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .246 Darnell 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .174 f-Hermida ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .138 Parrino 2b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .235 LeBlanc p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .286 a-Cunningham ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .155 Bass p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-L.Martinez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .233 Gregerson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Spence p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hamren p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --g-Rizzo ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .147 Totals 31 4 7 4 4 8 San Francisco 021 010 011 — 6 11 1 San Diego 021 000 001 — 4 7 0 a-grounded out for LeBlanc in the 5th. b-grounded out for Denorfia in the 6th. c-struck out for Bass in the 7th. d-was intentionally walked for Affeldt in the 8th. e-walked for Venable in the 9th. f-struck out for Darnell in the 9th. g-doubled for Hamren in the 9th. E—Surkamp (1). LOB—San Francisco 7, San Diego 8. 2B—Christian (1), Keppinger (19), Beltran (34), C.Stewart (7), Bartlett (19), Denorfia (12), Rizzo (8). HR—Pill (1), off LeBlanc; Hundley (7), off Surkamp. RBIs—Beltran 3 (76), Pill 2 (2), O.Cabrera (12), Blanks (22), Hundley (24), Parrino (1), Rizzo (7). SB—Blanks (2). S—Christian. SF—Blanks, Parrino. DP—San Francisco 1 (O.Cabrera, Keppinger, Pill). San Fran. IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Surkamp W, 1-0 5 5 3 3 1 2 76 3.27 Edlefsen H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 15 3.86 Affeldt H, 13 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 23 2.64 Romo H, 20 1 0 0 0 1 2 23 1.56 Ja.Lopez 0 0 1 1 1 0 4 2.70 S.Casilla H, 6 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 20 1.28 Ramirez S, 4-5 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 3.02 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA LeBlanc L, 2-5 5 8 4 4 0 1 84 5.33 Bass 2 0 0 0 0 0 22 1.91 Gregerson 1 1 1 1 2 0 16 3.04 Spence 0 1 1 1 0 0 2 2.25 Hamren 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 2.53 Spence pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Ja.Lopez pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Affeldt 1-0, S.Casilla 1-1, R.Ramirez 3-0, Hamren 1-1. IBB—off Gregerson (Fontenot). HBP—by S.Casilla (Maybin, Bartlett). T—3:06. A—21,866 (42,691).

Mets 7, Marlins 4 (12 innings) New York Jos.Reyes ss Ju.Turner 2b Stinson p Duda rf D.Wright 3b Pagan cf Harris lf Parnell p Bay lf Evans 1b R.Paulino c Batista p a-Baxter ph Acosta p c-Thole ph Isringhausen p Pridie lf Beato p Byrdak p Igarashi p g-R.Tejada ph-2b Totals

AB 6 4 0 5 6 6 3 0 1 6 6 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 48

R H 1 3 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 3 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 16

BI 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 1 2 0 2 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

SO 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 9

Avg. .334 .262 --.281 .272 .268 .247 --.235 .293 .282 .000 .235 --.260 --.225 ------.281

Florida AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bonifacio ss 5 1 2 0 0 2 .293 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 f-Dominguez ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 --L.Nunez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Rottino rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Infante 2b 7 1 1 0 0 2 .276 Dobbs 3b 6 1 3 2 0 0 .288 G.Sanchez 1b 5 0 0 0 1 1 .268 Morrison lf 4 1 0 0 2 0 .248 Cameron cf 4 0 1 2 2 0 .239 2-Hatcher pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ceda p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Petersen rf-cf 3 0 2 0 3 0 .285 Hayes c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .225 d-Stanton ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .261 1-Do.Murphy pr-ss 2 0 0 0 0 2 .095 Volstad p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .205 Hensley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Jo.Baker ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 R.Webb p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Jo.Lopez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .232 J.Buck c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .228 Totals 45 4 9 4 10 9 New York 000 011 011 003 — 7 16 3 Florida 000 010 102 000 — 4 9 0 a-struck out for Batista in the 7th. b-struck out for Hensley in the 7th. c-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Acosta in the 8th. d-walked for Hayes in the 8th. e-struck out for R.Webb in the 8th. f-was hit by a pitch for Mujica in the 10th. g-struck out for Igarashi in the 12th. 1-ran for Stanton in the 8th. 2-ran for Cameron in the 11th. E—Pagan (10), D.Wright (11), Evans (2). LOB—New York 15, Florida 16. 2B—Pagan 2 (22), Harris (10), Bay (13), R.Paulino (13), Dobbs 2 (22), Cameron (8). RBIs—Jos.Reyes (38), Ju.Turner (47), Duda (45), Pagan (53), Evans 3 (17), Dobbs 2 (46), Cameron 2 (18). S—Ju.Turner, Batista. DP—New York 1 (Jos.Reyes, Ju.Turner, Evans). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Batista 6 5 1 1 4 3 98 3.92 Acosta BS, 2-2 1 2 1 0 0 1 15 3.25 Isrnghsen H, 19 1 0 0 0 3 2 30 4.05 Parnell BS, 4-9 1 2 2 2 2 2 33 4.38 Beato 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 3.86 Byrdak 1 0 0 0 1 0 21 3.24 Igarashi W, 4-1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 4.80 Stinson S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 0.00 Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Volstad 6 6 2 2 3 3 86 5.37 Hensley 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 5.25 R.Webb 1 2 1 1 1 1 18 3.51 Mujica 2 3 1 1 2 0 34 2.91 L.Nunez 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 4.33 Ceda L, 0-1 2-3 4 3 3 1 2 40 5.40 Cishek 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 8 3.15 Inherited runners-scored—Byrdak 1-0, Igarashi 20, Cishek 3-1. IBB—off Parnell (Petersen), off Mujica (D.Wright, Harris), off R.Webb (Harris). HBP—by Beato (Dominguez). WP—Parnell. T—4:29. A—22,318 (38,560).

LEADERS Through Tuesday’s Games ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—AdGonzalez, Boston, .342; MiYoung, Texas, .333; MiCabrera, Detroit, .331; VMartinez, Detroit, .325; DOrtiz, Boston, .318; Kotchman, Tampa Bay, .316; Ellsbury, Boston, .312. RUNS—Granderson, New York, 126; Ellsbury, Boston, 100; Kinsler, Texas, 99; AdGonzalez, Boston, 98; Bautista, Toronto, 96; MiCabrera, Detroit, 94; AGordon, Kansas City, 93. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—JosReyes, New York, .334; Braun, Milwaukee, .333; Kemp, Los Angeles, .319; Votto, Cincinnati, .316; Morse, Washington, .311; Pence, Philadelphia, .310; Helton, Colorado, .306. RUNS—Braun, Milwaukee, 96; JUpton, Arizona, 93; Kemp, Los Angeles, 92; Votto, Cincinnati, 92; Pujols, St. Louis, 91; CGonzalez, Colorado, 88; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 88.


D4 Wednesday, September 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Soccer

PREP ROUNDUP

Mountain View boys soccer tops Redmond in season opener Bulletin staff report Mountain View won its season-opening boys soccer match at home Tuesday afternoon, defeating Redmond 4-2 in an Intermountain Hybrid contest. The Cougars (1-0) relied on a strong defensive effort to post the victory. “The back four played extraordinary,” said Mountain View coach Chris Rogers. Cougar defenders Mike McLean, Hudson Newell, Nacho Camcho and Wyatt Lay were instrumental in the win, according to Rogers. Logan Riemhofer recorded the first goal for the Cougars, scoring off a penalty kick in the seventh minute of the game. Eduardo Lopez scored the next two Mountain View goals, with assists coming from Diego Martinez and Matt Larraneta, respectively. Zel Rey netted the final goal for the Cougars. Rogers says although the squad played well overall, his team will be working to improve their fitness level for the rest of the season. “We were tired after the first 60 minutes (of the game),” Rogers said. Redmond (0-1) plays Crook County at home on Thursday in another Intermountain Hybrid game. Mountain View hosts North Medford on Friday. In other prep events Tuesday: BOYS SOCCER Beaverton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Summit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 BEAVERTON — The Storm dropped their season opener, allowing three goals in each

half. The Beavers (1-0) led 3-0 at halftime before breaking the game open in the final 40 minutes. Andrew Orlich scored Summit’s lone goal. The Storm (0-1) host Churchill, of Eugene, on Thursday. Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 SISTERS — Jake McAlister scored in the 74th minute for the Outlaws to salvage a tie in their season opener against the Cowboys. Sisters opened the game with an 11th-minute goal from Tim Hernandez. The Cowboys fired back in a hurry, as Phillip Splerling scored two goals in a 10-minute span to put Crook County ahead 2-1. The Outlaws’ Sebastian Boehm drove through three defenders to score in the 30th minute and force a 2-2 halftime tie. Sisters’ Robert Small and Crook County’s Daryel Lopez traded goals in the opening minutes of the second half before Edgar Toledo’s long free kick sailed over the Outlaws’ defense and in for a 4-3 Cowboys’ lead in the 50th minute. Sisters (0-0-1) next plays at home on Thursday against Stayton, while Crook County (0-0-1) hosts Redmond on the same day. VOLLEYBALL Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-27-25 Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13-25-14 REDMOND — Hannah Troutman registered 12 kills and four aces to lead the Cowgirls past the Panthers in both teams’ Intermountain Hybrid opener. Makayla Lindburg added 11 kills for Crook County and Braiden Johnston went 21 of 22 from the service line with five aces. After winning the opening

game, the Cowgirls trailed 25-24 in game two before scoring the next three points to take a commanding two-games-to-zero lead. Johanna Bailey paced the Panthers with 14 kills, and Natalie Nigg added 11 kills and 12 blocks. The Panthers are back on the court Friday at Bend High, while Crook County is off until Saturday’s Mountain View Invitational tournament. Burns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-25-25 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13-14-8 LA PINE — The Hawks lost their season opener to the Hilanders, but La Pine coach Aaron Mallory said he was pleased overall with the team’s effort. Holly Jackson led the Hawk offense with five kills and paced the defense with 11 digs and four blocks. Keara Parrish contributed three digs, two blocks and two aces, and Kellie Grigsby added seven digs. La Pine plays Phoenix at home on Thursday. Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-25-25 Scio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-1-10 CULVER — The Bulldogs rolled in their Tri-River Conference opener, sweeping the Loggers in three games. Kelsie Stafford paced the Culver offense, leading the team with 18 aces and 10 kills. Stafford took control of the match in the second game when she recorded nine aces from the service line. Gabrielle Alley added seven kills. The Bulldogs, who host defending league champion Regis on Thursday, opened their season at the Warrenton tournament on Saturday, where they went 4-1 with wins over Clatskanie, Toledo, Waldport and Neah-Ka-Nie.

MOTOR SPORTS: NASCAR

Gordon holds on at Atlanta for 85th career win By Paul Newberry The Associated Press

HAMPTON, Ga. — Jeff Gordon was sliding all over the track those final 10 laps, doing everything he could to hold off fivetime defending champion Jimmie Johnson. It was a thrilling display by two of the sport’s biggest stars, who drove the high-banked Atlanta Motor Speedway like it was nothing more than a little dirt track. When Gordon held on at the end Tuesday, taking the checkered flag for his third win of the year and 85th of his career, there was little doubt he’ll be making a serious run at his fifth Cup title. Ohhhh, we can’t wait for these two to go at it again in the Chase for the championship. “I’ve been trying to step it up for 10 years,” Gordon said, referring to the decade he’s gone since the last of his four titles, a period when he ceded dominance to his teammate Johnson. But the driver of the No. 24 car isn’t ready to fade away just yet. Spurred on by a new crew chief, Gordon is going through a career renaissance at age 40, already winning more races this season than he did the last three years combined. He is certainly feeling good about his chances heading to the Chase, which begins after next weekend’s race at Richmond. “I’m just excited to go to the racetrack,” Gordon said. “It doesn’t matter where we go — our cars are competitive, we’re having a blast out there and I think we have more to come when the Chase starts.” With his win in the rain-delayed AdvoCare 500, Gordon snapped a tie with Bobby Allison and Darrell Waltrip for third on

Alan Marler / HHP Images via The Associated Press

Driver Jeff Gordon crosses the finish line to win the NASCAR Sprint Cup AdvoCare 500 auto race, Tuesday in Hampton, Ga. the career victory list. Richard Petty (200) and David Pearson (105) are the only drivers in Cup history with more wins than Gordon. “I totally forgot about that,” said Gordon, who received a special plaque from NASCAR during the victory ceremony in front

of the main grandstand. “Eightyfive, wow! That is un-un-believable. With the kind of day we had, the kind of year we’re having, I feel rejuvenated.” He certainly earned this win. Johnson put his No. 48 car in front of Gordon’s Chevrolet a couple of times but couldn’t hold

on through the corners. At the end, with both drivers racing as hard as they could on fading tires, their cars came close to getting sideways several times. Johnson made one last run for the lead on the final lap, but had to back off to keep from putting his car in the wall. Gordon pulled away to win by 0.598 seconds. “I’m so glad I grew up racing on dirt,” Johnson said. “I could have spun out four or five times at the end.” The defending champ isn’t going to give up his unprecedented title run without a fight. In fact, he moved past Kyle Busch to take the top spot in the season standings, so he’s still the one everyone’s chasing even with only one win this year. “We’re having a terrible year,” Johnson quipped. “The reality is we have a lot to be proud of. ... We know we have a very good chance of winning the championship.” Tony Stewart was feeling a lot better about his chances after making up more than eight seconds on the leaders in the final laps to finish third. He solidified his hold on 10th place — the final spot in the Chase that will be determined on points — going to Richmond. Six drivers had already clinched a spot in the 12-driver playoff, and three more joined them Tuesday. Kurt Busch and Ryan Newman are locked in on points, and Brad Keselowski wrapped up at least a wild card with his sixth-place finish. This was only the second Cup race since 1978 to be run on a Tuesday. It was originally scheduled for Sunday night, but rain from the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee forced a two-day postponement.

Saints embrace chance to defy NFL ‘kickoff’ trend By Brett Martel The Associated Press

METAIRIE, La. — No one has to remind Sean Payton about the dangers of Thursday night NFL openers. The New Orleans coach is well aware that since defending champs began hosting these prime-time games in 2004 they are undefeated, while visitors are a woeful 0-7. He and the Saints will be on the road Thursday against Green Bay. But despite the odds, Payton looks at the big picture, and sees reasons to be thankful the NFL looks at his club as one that is worthy to showcase. “Certainly, you look to become one of those teams that is having success. You understand and appreciate that with that comes Thursday night, Monday night, Sunday night, NFL Network Saturday night, and Thanksgiving games,” Payton said. “That comes when you are

FOOTBALL playing well. When you start getting a bunch of 12 o’clock or 1 o’clock games throughout the course of the season, then that’s a bigger challenge.” Payton has experienced both sides of Thursday night openers. The Saints lost 41-10 at Indianapolis in 2007 and won 14-9 over visiting Minnesota last season. This will be New Orleans’ third Thursday-night opener in the past five years, a sign of just how far they have come. There were many Sundays the Saints weren’t even on local television because they were so lousy they had trouble selling out. “What we do know about this game is that it is a media and fan spectacle with all the stuff going on and the unveiling of the championship banner and all those things,” Saints

quarterback Drew Brees said. “The biggest thing for us is just understanding that we need to hunker down, eliminate distractions, focus on the game and not get caught up in all the hoopla — understanding how excited they’re going to be and they’re going to come out all jacked up just like we did last year. We just need to weather the storm and really stay focused on the task.” Payton tends not to buy into historical trends. From the time he arrived he was quick to say nothing that occurred during the Saints predominantly losing history before his arrival applied to his regime. He also bristled when asked in 2009 whether he was concerned about a three-game skid to end the regular season, something that no Super Bowl winner had done before. Payton had the last laugh, of course, as the Saints rebounded with a three-game winning

streak during the playoffs, enough to carry them to the first Super Bowl title in franchise history. Yet, even while Payton may delight in defying historical trends, he still studies them. “We go through the history of the game,” Payton said, noting from memory that the first Thursday night regular season game was held in 2002, with San Francisco visiting the New York Giants, but did not involve a defending champion. “You do study the challenges,” Payton said. “The challenges are going into a venue with added excitement because there is going to be a recognition of last year’s championship. “When you go in to an environment, especially a place like Lambeau Field, it’s without a doubt the most historic stadium in our league ... you learn about your team, and it’s a tremendous challenge.”

Continued from D1 Mountain View sophomore Logan Riemhofer — Cam’s younger brother — is also back. Riemhofer was the only freshman in the IMC to garner all-league mention last season. “Last year, we had impact players,” Rodgers said. “This year, we have a team of players. Everyone is playing on the same level.” Bend, which finished third among the three 5A teams last year, will rely heavily on underclassmen in 2010. Lava Bear coach Nils Eriksson, who is in his 16th season guiding Bend High, expects significant contributions from four freshmen on his varsity roster. “The freshmen have all played at a pretty high level,” Eriksson says. “They came in with (club) experience. They’re going to be able to develop and have fun.” The Lava Bears have four seniors that will provide systemic knowledge and leadership, according to Eriksson. Among them: 2010 all-IMC first-team pick Aldy Larson — a “go-to” player for Bend, according to Eriksson — Nick Petrich, and Tony Watters, who will start in goal for the Lava Bears. Eriksson believes that Bend, Mountain View and Summit are “getting fairly even” this year, but a clear favorite stands out. “Summit is the team to beat,” Eriksson says. “They have the most upperclassmen (and) the most kids out for soccer. They are who we’re chasing.” Says Mountain View’s Rogers, “I expect Summit to be the league leaders.” Asked who the league favorite might be in 2011, Storm head coach Ron Kidder declined to name a team. “To be honest, I have no idea (about) this year,” Kidder says. “I don’t know what to expect. We had high expectations last year, and we underachieved.” Summit does have seven returning starters from its 2010 squad that finished the year 4-92. That includes senior defender Andrew Orlich, an all-IMC second-team selection last season, and senior midfielder Nick Nordby, who received IMC honorable mention in 2010. Kidder also awarded high praise for junior goalkeeper Hayes Joyner, who split time in goal last season for the Storm. “He’s had an outstanding preseason,” Kidder says about Joyner. Kidder likes his team, but is hesitant to make comparisons to Bend and Mountain View. “All three are well coached,” he says. “The players have a drive to succeed.” In Madras, a strong 2010 season has created optimism for 2011. The White Buffaloes won the Class 4A Tri-Valley Conference in coach Clark Jones’ second season, going 8-2 in league play. In the Class 4A state playoffs, Madras made the state semifinals before falling to Hidden Valley 4-1. “You can think or do a lot of things (about this season),” Jones cautions, “but we need to work hard to get anywhere.” A talented group of returners should help. Senior Joe Medina, an all-conference first-team selection in 2010, is praised by Jones for his leadership. Senior Hosvaldo Diaz is a talented defender who, in Jones’ words, “makes the other 10 (players) feel better.” Repeating the feat of a second consecutive league title is especially difficult in the Tri-Valley Conference. Two of Madras’ league opponents, La Salle of Milwaukie and Gladstone, combined for seven consecutive appearances in state championship games between 2003 and 2009. (La Salle won two state titles over that span.) “This league is tough,” Jones says. “It has in the past been a perennial power (at the state level). Somebody wins or is playing for a state championship about half the time.” Sisters is looking for a repeat conference championship of its own, after winning the Class 4A Sky-Em League last season with a 6-1-1 league record. Sky-Em player of the year Scotty Bowen has since graduated, but coach Rob Jensen has two returning all-league selections in seniors Tim Hernandez and Sebastian Boehm leading the Outlaws. At Redmond, coach Jason Clark is back for his second season after guiding the Panthers to an 8-4-2 record and a berth in the Class 6A state playoffs during his first year at the school. Senior goalkeeper Ulisses Faurrieta and junior forward Shane Buerger both return for Redmond after all-league seasons in 2010. Crook County looks to bounce back from a winless season last year. Senior defender Lucas

Prep boys soccer at a glance A look at the Central Oregon high school boys soccer teams competing this fall:

REDMOND Head coach: Jason Clark (second season) 2010 record: 8-4-2 overall, 2-2-1 SD1 (third); lost in first round of Class 6A state playoffs Returning all-league players: Ulisses Faurrieta, sr.; Shane Buerger, jr. Season opener: Redmond at Mountain View, Tuesday Class 6A Special District 1 opener: Thurston at Redmond, Sept. 23

BEND Head coach: Nils Eriksson (16th season) 2010 record: 4-9-1 overall, 0-3-1 IMC (third) Returning all-league player: Aldy Larson, sr. Season opener: Bend at South Eugene, Sept. 1 (W, 3-1) Class 5A Intermountain Conference opener: Bend at Mountain View, Sept. 27

MOUNTAIN VIEW Head coach: Chris Rodgers (second season) 2010 record: 9-4-3 overall, 4-0-0 IMC (first); lost in Class 5A state quarterfinals Returning all-league players: Miguel Molina, sr.; Logan Riemhofer, so. Season opener: Redmond at Mountain View, Tuesday Class 5A Intermountain Conference opener: Bend at Mountain View, Sept. 27

SUMMIT Head coach: Ron Kidder (seventh season) 2010 record: 4-9-2 overall, 1-2-1 IMC (second) Returning all-league players: Andrew Orlich, sr.; Nick Nordby, sr. Season opener: Summit at Beaverton, Tuesday Class 5A Intermountain Conference opener: Summit at Bend, Sept. 29

CROOK COUNTY Head coach: Joel Carrillo (second season, second tenure) 2010 record: 0-11-3 overall, 0-2-2 SD1 (third) Key returner: Lucas Smith, sr. Season opener: Crook County at Sisters, Tuesday Class 4A Special District 1 Season opener: Crook County at Roosevelt, Sept. 28

MADRAS Head coach: Clark Jones (third season) 2010 record: 14-3 overall, 8-2 Tri-Valley (first); lost in Class 4A state semifinals Returning all-league players: Joe Medina, sr.; Carlos Garcia, jr.; Derrick Pacheco, jr.; Michael Giron, sr.; Edmond Zacharis, sr.; Hosvaldo Diaz, sr. Season opener: Madras at Junction City, Thursday Class 4A Tri-Valley Conference opener: Madras at La Salle Prep, Sept. 22

SISTERS Head coach: Rob Jensen (fifth season) 2010 record: 8-4-1 overall, 6-1-1 Sky-Em (first) Returning all-league players: Tim Hernandez, sr.; Sebastian Boehm, sr. Season opener: Crook County at Sisters, Tuesday Class 4A Sky-Em League opener: Junction City at Sisters, Sept. 22

CULVER Head coach: Tom Kirk (seventh season) 2010 record: 7-7 overall, 7-5 SD5 (third); lost in first round of Class 3A/2A/1A state playoffs Season opener: Culver at East Linn Christian, Friday Class 3A/2A/1A Special District 5 opener: Culver at Irrigon, Sept. 13

CENTRAL CHRISTIAN Head coach: Jeff Reynolds (third season) 2010 record: 6-7 overall, 5-7 SD5 (fourth) Season opener: Irrigon at Central Christian, Saturday Class 3A/2A/1A Special District 5 opener: Irrigon at Central Christian, Sept. 10 Smith is expected to lead the Cowboy defense. Robert Husseman can be reached at 541-617-7811 or rhusseman@bendbulletin.com.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 7, 2011 D5

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Pac-12 struggles to open inaugural season By John Marshall

LSU moves up to No. 2; Oregon falls to No. 13

The Associated Press

PHOENIX — Oregon went looking for one of the big kids on the playground in its opening game and got pushed around. Star running back LaMichael James had one of the worst games of his career, Oregon had four turnovers and LSU’s big front lines pushed the Ducks around for a second straight loss to an SEC power that had Oregon coach Chip Kelly a bit prickly during the Pac-12 teleconference on Tuesday. “They have good players, they’re wellcoached,” snapped Kelly, whose team dropped nine spots to No. 13 in The Associated Press Top 25 after the loss. “Sometimes the other team deserves credit.” Kelly wasn’t the only Pac-12 coach feeling a little frustrated after an inaugural weekend that included some disheartening losses, shaky wins and troublesome injuries. It at least started off well. Arizona State easily handled UC Davis at home Thursday night and Utah, despite laboring offensively after building a 24-0 lead, beat Montana State by 17. More good news came off the field with the revival of rumors that Texas and Oklahoma were again interested in heading West, re-opening the super conference possibility. Saturday brought a few good wins. Stanford, behind Heisman Trophy favorite Andrew Luck, crushed San Jose State in coach David Shaw’s debut, Cal rolled over Fresno State and Arizona, after a shaky second quarter, pulled away to rout Northern Arizona. The rest of it didn’t go so well. Headlined by Oregon’s loss to LSU at Cowboys Stadium, it was, for the most part, a Pac-12 plop in its opening weekend. UCLA couldn’t keep up with Houston, a team it beat last season, and Colorado had its road losing streak extended to 18 games — 19, if you include the 2007 Independence Bowl.

Meadows Continued from D1 It can be refreshing to play with a golfer from outside the area. After all, visitors are usually looking at a golf course differently from a local, who is often quite familiar with a given track. So when we stood that morning on the rather treeless par-5 17th, Bruce opened my eyes to something. “There is nothing wrong with this course,” the Texan said before teeing off. “It’s a good recreational, tourist-type course that’s fairly wide-open.” He was right. Meadows is exactly what Sunriver Resort intended it to be when John Fought — a native Oregonian who co-designed Sunriver’s Crosswater and Pumpkin Ridge near Portland — was hired to redesign the course in the late 1990s. In most cases, resort golf is supposed to be fun rather than an epic challenge. And like many resort courses of Meadows’ caliber, the fairways are generous. Though ponderosa pines line the course, rarely does a tree come into play. Sure, the course has plenty of obstacles, including water, wetlands, tons of fairway bunkers, and tricky greens that often slope away from the middle of the putting surface (a hallmark of a Fought-designed course). But the forgiving Meadows is not meant to punish any golfer, even those who are a bit off their game. That makes sense on a course that relies on play from tourists. Sunriver Resort has little interest in spoiling a visitor’s vacation. Such courses can be fun, though. Meadows, for instance, includes some beautiful holes, starting with the 578-yard second hole, which is entirely bordered by water. But the real strength of the course comes in its finish. The par-3 16th hole perfectly frames Mount Bachelor, which during our round was still mostly covered with snow. The par-5 17th, at 536 yards, is reachable in two shots. And with little trouble other than two fairway bunkers, it sure is fun to try. Then comes the difficult and somewhat awkward 18th hole. At 467 yards, the hole is a brute of a par 4. “I’m hoping this is a short par 5, but I don’t think it is,” Bruce joked as we walked up to the tee box. Looking from the tee down the fairway, whose entire left side is guarded by a pond, he appeared intimidated.

NEW YORK — Winning the biggest game of college football’s opening weekend boosted LSU to No. 2 in The Associated Press Top 25. No. 1 Oklahoma held on to the top spot in the first regular-season rankings, while the Tigers used their 40-27 victory against Oregon to jump rival Alabama, which slipped to No. 3. “It’s way too early to feel like we have accomplished anything,” LSU coach Les Miles said. “Our guys understand the need to improve each game.” Oregon dropped nine spots to No. 13 and defending national champion Auburn, which started the season at No. 23, fell out of the Top 25 after needing a late rally to beat Utah State 42-38 at home. — T h e A s s ociated Press

Tony Gutierrez / The Associated Press

Oregon fans look on dejectedly in the final minutes of Saturday’s game against LSU in Arlington, Texas. LSU won 40-26. Oregon was one of several Pac-12 teams starting the season with a less than stellar performance last weekend. Even some of the wins fell into the notso-great category. Washington needed a late interception to hold off FCS Eastern Washington by three, USC labored to beat rebuilding Minnesota by two and Washington State lost quarterback Jeff Tuel for six to eight weeks with a broken collarbone in the Cougars’ 64-21 win over Idaho State. The worst of the weekend, though, came in Corvallis, where Oregon State was stunned by Sacramento State, an FCS school from the Big Sky Conference. Already too close to a team they were supposed to steamroll, the injury-riddled Beavers lost in overtime when Sac State

Scorecard The scorecard for Sunriver Resort’s Meadows course: Hole Par Yardage No. 1 Par 4 421 yards No. 2 Par 5 578 yards No. 3 Par 4 469 yards No. 4 Par 3 174 yards No. 5 Par 4 356 yards No. 6 Par 4 366 yards No. 7 Par 4 430 yards No. 8 Par 3 213 yards No. 9 Par 4 431 yards Out Par 36 3,438 yards Hole Par Yardage No. 10 Par 5 542 yards No. 11 Par 4 415 yards No. 12 Par 4 417 yards No. 13 Par 3 228 yards No. 14 Par 4 393 yards No. 15 Par 4 371 yards No. 16 Par 3 205 yards No. 17 Par 5 536 yards No. 18 Par 4 467 yards In Par 36 3,574 yards *All distances from back tees “This is quite a hole, isn’t it?” he asked. The 18th sure is. Even with a strong drive, most golfers will

quarterback Jeff Fleming hit Brandyn Reed for a touchdown pass and found him again when they went for a twopoint conversion in the 29-28 win. The Hornets swarmed the field after the big win and the Beavers left their own stadium tail tucked, searching for answers with a road game against Wisconsin next. “We’ve got a big, big opponent this week and we’ve got to try to find a way to compete to win that game,” Oregon State coach Mike Riley said. UCLA coach Rick Neuheisel entered the season on the hot seat and last weekend’s loss to Houston likely won’t help. The Bruins pulled away from Houston

have to make the approach with a middle iron, with water still in play. The finishing hole is a challenge, but it is also a memorable one. And that is what playing resort golf is all about.

Difficulty of course Aptly named, the Meadows course winds through an area of Sunriver characterized by wetlands and a meandering brook that runs adjacent to seven holes. Though ponderosa pines are present on every hole, rarely do they encroach on play. And the course’s generous fairways make driver an option on nearly every hole. Those characteristics present an opportunity for skilled players to post a low score. Mid-handicappers will likely choose to play either the 6,625yard blue tees or the 6,250-yard white tees. Both sets might be a bit out of the comfort zone of golfers who usually choose tees set at about 6,500 yards. Though Meadows presents few forced carries over hazards, beginners or novices might struggle with the course’s myriad water hazards.

last year and knocked out quarterback Case Keenum in the process, but had no answer for him this time around. Playing with a sixth year of eligibility, Keenum picked UCLA apart, throwing for 310 yards and a pair of touchdowns in the Cougars’ 38-34 win. UCLA also lost quarterback Kevin Prince to a concussion and has a tough schedule coming up, including games against Texas and Stanford. “For whatever reason, we didn’t play fast on defense,” Neuheisel said. “These are kids that are fast, are athletic and we did not play that. I don’t know if it was indecision with first-game stuff, but we did not look as quick as we did a year ago

Favorite hole Meadows’ signature 16th hole, a 205-yard par 3, offers the best view on the course. Mount Bachelor towers behind the green. But Meadows’ most enjoyable hole to play is No. 2, a 578-yard par 5. Water borders the entire left side of the fairway of the severe dogleg left, forcing a golfer to play the right side of the fairway. That, however, in effect makes the hole play longer, eliminating all but the longest hitters from a chance to reach the green in two shots. Golfers who lay up will be left with a short-iron approach shot. But the play can be dicey, with three bunkers right and water left of a relatively small green.

Strategy Meadows offers plenty of room to miss from the tee with its generous fairways. That allows most golfers to use driver off the tee whenever they choose, making Meadows’ 7,012 yards play a bit shorter than the posted yardage would suggest. Aggressive golf can lead to birdies on Meadows. The course has only three par 5s, but the two on the backside both offer strong opportunities to reach the greens

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playing against the very same team.” Washington also needed a late interception — by Desmond Trufant in the end zone with 29 seconds left — to get by Eastern Washington. The Huskies gave up 504 yards to an FCS opponent and have a lot of work to do in a short timeframe with high-flying Hawaii and quarterback Bryant Moniz coming in on Saturday. “I think the mentality of the team was off,” Washington coach Steve Sarkisian said. “For us to play a cautious game like that is disappointing to me. That is something that is the last thing I want our teams to play with, a cautious mentality. We should be aggressive. We should be relentless. We should be going for it. For a team that I’m coaching to play that way is one of the most disappointing things that I’ve seen around here.” Sarkisian isn’t alone. Coaches all across the Pac-12 are searching for answers, too.

in two shots. And long hitters can hit drives close to the putting surface on the sixth and 15th holes, both par 4s that play relatively short. But be careful of Meadows’ many fairway bunkers, which encroach into landing areas on nearly every hole longer than a par 3. Like many of John Fought’s designs, the greens tend to slope away from the center of the green, making precision approach shots a must. The firm, fast surfaces make for the course’s greatest resistance to par.

Extras Because Meadows’ pro shop is located inside Sunriver’s Main Lodge, amenities are not hard to find. Sunriver Resort’s restaurant and bar establishment, the Owl’s Nest, is located on the floor above the clubhouse. Just outside the restaurant is a patio, giving patrons a chance at panoramic views of the golf course and the Cascade Range in the background. Meadows features a cool ninehole putting course, which even has bunkers, just behind the clubhouse. A snack bar down-

stairs offers sandwiches and drinks. The driving range is especially roomy, and the practice putting green is situated just behind the first tee. Near the driving range, golfers can work on their chipping at the short-game practice area.

Value Like its sister course at Sunriver Resort, the Woodlands, Meadows once was one of the most expensive golf courses in the region. But it has become much more affordable in recent years, especially for locals. Deschutes County residents can play Meadows during prime time for $79, on par with the region’s peer courses considering all of Meadows’ rates include cart rental and range balls. Those from outside the area can play for $99. After that, Meadows becomes a decent bargain. After 1 p.m., Meadows costs $59 for Deschutes County residents. At 5 p.m., the price for locals drops to $49. On Sept. 26, the rate drops to $49 for locals daily. Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

CarreraAudi


T EE T O G R EEN

D6 Wednesday, September 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

GOLF SCOREBOARD LOCAL The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-385-0831, e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

Flight B — 1, Mary Ann Doyle, 35. 2, Deb Cooper, 36. 3, Marilyn Baer, 36.5. Flight C — 1, Cherie Kurth, 33. 2 (tie), Barb Schreiber, 39; Joann Hare, 39. 4, Doris Thompson, 39.5. Chip-ins —Karen Wintermyre, Nos. 4, 5; Cherry Spurlock, No. 11; Barb Schreiber, No. 17; Judy Davidson, No. 18. KPs — Ruby Krauss, No. 3; Mary Ann Doyle, No. 13; Sally Martin, No. 16.

Club Results

Associated Press ile photos

From left, Robert Allenby, Geoff Ogilvy and Aaron Baddeley, all of Australia, are all hoping to be chosen by international captain Greg Norman to play in the Presidents Cup this November in Melbourne. Norman has only two picks, meaning at least one Aussie might not make the cut.

A homecoming Aussies do not want to miss Trio hopes to be picked for Presidents Cup

one could get left out. The Presidents Cup might not mean much to everyone, but it does to them. It means everything. That’s why Allenby was so melancholy after he finished at the TPC Boston, and the normally cheerful Baddeley barely cracked a smile when he shot his second straight 75 and tied for last. “Definitely a big goal,” Baddeley said. “It was a disappointing week.” Baddeley, who won this year at Riviera and has revived his game since returning to swing coach Dale Lynch, has done well enough that he is No. 25 and comfortably made it to the third playoff event next week outside Chicago — the final event before the Presidents Cup teams are determined. That wasn’t the case for Ogilvy, whose year has been bizarre since slicing open his finger on a piece of coral in the Pacific Ocean two days before the season opener in Hawaii. He was No. 91 in the FedEx Cup standings, and only the top 70 moved on to Chicago. Ogilvy had to birdie one of the last two holes at the TPC Boston to advance, and it didn’t look good when he hit his tee shot on the 17th behind a rock, leading to a one-shot penalty. He made a 20foot putt to escape with par, and then made a 6-foot birdie on the last hole. That gave him one more week, either to move into the top 10 in the team standings, or to audition for Norman. Ogilvy is likely to be a pick. He doesn’t want it come down to that. “Obviously, you would want as many Australians on the team as you could. That’s only natural,” said Ogilvy, who has a house off the fairway at Royal Melbourne.

By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

NORTON, Mass. — Robert Allenby was more dejected than angry after the final round of the Deutsche Bank Championship. He finished out of the top 50 for the second straight playoff event. Time is running out for him. Only this had nothing to do with the FedEx Cup and its $10 million prize. “It’s about a tournament that doesn’t pay a dime,” Allenby said. Allenby is among three Australians — Geoff Ogilvy and Aaron Baddeley are the others — who care more about going to Royal Melbourne for the Presidents Cup than to East Lake for the Tour Championship and a shot at golf’s biggest payoff. U.S. captain Fred Couples made it hard on himself for promising a pick to Tiger Woods, who has gone two years without a win and has played only two tournaments in the past five months. That leaves Couples only one more pick, with complaints sure to follow that someone was unfairly left out. International captain Greg Norman might have it tougher. He has two picks, and three Aussies who might need them. Making it even more compelling is that all three grew up in Melbourne, where the Presidents Cup will be played Nov. 17-20. And all three of them were in the gallery in 1998, when the matches were last held at Royal Melbourne. With two weeks left to qualify,

Ogilvy was a 21-year-old who had just turned pro when the Presidents Cup first came to Australia. He remembers missing the cut in New Zealand and flying home to watch Australia’s biggest golfing event ever at the time. Ogilvy is only a fraction of a world ranking point behind Louis Oosthuizen, who didn’t qualify for the playoffs. That’s why it was so important to get to Chicago, giving him another shot at making the team. Even so, he still can’t believe he’s in this position. The notion of missing the Presidents Cup never crossed his mind in January. “I never felt better about my golf game — ever,” he said. “If you had asked me in Maui the morning I hurt my finger, I would have said this was the best year I was going to have. I felt that way. But life happens. You hurt yourself. Then you hurt yourself again. It’s nothing half the tour doesn’t put up with each year.” Once the right finger healed, he injured his shoulder at the Masters and wasn’t fully healthy until the summer, just in time to cope with a parasite that affected his stomach. Allenby gets a rap in America for not winning enough — his last PGA Tour win was in 2001. It’s a different story Down Under. He has 14 wins in Australia, including 2005 when he won the Triple Crown — the Australian Masters, Australian Open and Australian PGA. “I’m just trying to play as good as I can and work my way into the top 10 instead of having to rely on being a pick. It makes for a tough decision for Greg,” Allenby said. “I haven’t played bad. I’m hitting the ball as good as I’ve ever hit it, but I’m not making any putts. I think I’m forcing it. Greg knows how much this means to me.”

G W AMATEUR WALKER CUP Site: Aberdeen, Scotland. Schedule: Saturday-Sunday. Course: Royal Aberdeen Golf Club, Balgownie Course (6,873 yards, par 70). Television: ESPN2 (Sunday, noon-2 p.m.). Format: Team match play. Saturday, four morning alternateshot matches and eight afternoon singles matches; Sunday, four morning alternate-shot matches and 10 afternoon singles matches. United States: Blayne Barber, Lake City, Fla.; Patrick Cantlay, Los Alamitos, Calif.; Harris English, Thomasville, Ga.; Russell Henley, Macon, Ga.; Kelly Kraft, Denton, Texas; Patrick Rodgers, Avon, Ind.; Nathan Smith, Pittsburgh; Jordan Spieth, Dallas; Peter Uihlein, Orlando, Fla.; Chris Williams, Moscow, Idaho. Captain: Jim Holtgrieve, St. Louis. Britain and Ireland: Steven Brown, England; James Byrne, Scotland; Paul Cutter, Ireland; Alan Dunbar, Ireland; Stiggy Hodgson, England; Tom Lewis, England; Rhys Pugh, Wales; Jack Senior, England; Michael Stewart, Scotland; Andy Sullivan, England. Captain, Nigel Edwards, Wales. Last matches: Uihlein and Rickie Fowler each went 4-0 in 2009 at Merion in Ardmore, Pa., to lead the United States to 16½-9½ victory. The United States has won three straight times to take a 34-7-1 series lead. Notes: The matches, first played in 1922, are named in honor of former USGA president George Herbert Walker — President George H.W. Bush’s grandfather and President George W. Bush’s great-grandfather. ... Kraft won the U.S. Amateur on Aug. 28, beating Cantlay 2-up at Erin Hills in Wisconsin. ... Henley and English, teammates at Georgia, won Nationwide Tour events this year. ... The 2013 matches will be played at the National Golf Links of America in Southampton, N.Y., and the 2015 event is set for Royal Lytham and St. Anne’s in England.

LPGA TOUR NW ARKANSAS CHAMPIONSHIP Site: Rogers, Ark. Schedule: Friday-Sunday. Course: Pinnacle Country Club (6,284 yards, par 71). Purse: $2 million. Winner’s share: $300,000. Television: Golf Channel (Friday-Sunday, noon-3 p.m.). Last year: Taiwan’s Yani Tseng won the last of her three 2010 titles, closing with a 6-under 65 to beat Michelle Wie by a stroke. Last event: Brittany Lincicome won the Canadian Women’s Open on Aug. 28 in Mirabel, Quebec, for her second victory of the year, beating Wie and Stacy Lewis by a stroke. Notes: The top-ranked Tseng, the LPGA Championship and

Women’s British Open winner, leads the tour with four victories this season and has seven overall wins this year. ... Lewis won the inaugural tournament in 2007, an unofficial victory after the event was cut to 18 holes because of rain. The then-University of Arkansas player shot a 65. She won the Kraft Nabisco in April. ... All 12 U.S. Solheim Cup players are in the field. ... South Korea’s Jiyai Shin won in 2009. She made up a seven-stroke deficit with a final-round 64, then beat Angela Stanford and Sun Young Yoo with a birdie on the second hole of a playoff. ... The Navistar LPGA Classic is next week in Prattville, Ala., followed by the Solheim Cup at Killeen Castle in Ireland.

EUROPEAN TOUR KLM OPEN Site: Hilversum, Netherlands. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Hilversumsche Golf Club (6,906 yards, par 70). Purse: $2.53 million. Winner’s share: $422,220. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-Friday, 6-9:30 a.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 4-8 a.m.). Last year: German star Martin Kaymer finished with a 4-under 66 for a four-stroke victory over Christian Nilsson and Fabrizio Zanotti. Last week: Thomas Bjorn won the European Masters in Switzerland for his second victory in two weeks, closing with a 9-under 62 for a four-stroke victory. The 40-year-old Dane had an eagle and nine birdies in the final round. He won the Johnnie Walker Championship two weeks ago in a playoff at Gleneagles in Scotland and won the Qatar Masters in February. Kaymer was second. Notes: Kaymer is in the field along with U.S. Open champion Rory McIlroy and Lee Westwood. McIlroy tied for third in Switzerland. ... Maarten Lafeber won in 2003 at Hilversumsche to become the first Dutchman to win the national championship since Joop Ruhl in 1947. ... The tournament was first played in 1912. ... The Seve Trophy is next week in Paris, followed by the Austrian Open.

PGA TOUR FEDEX CUP PLAYOFFS Next event: BMW Championship, Sept. 15-18, Cog Hill Golf and Country Club, Dubsdread Course, Lemont, Ill. Last week: Webb Simpson won the Deutsche Bank Championship at TPC Boston on Monday for his second victory in three weeks, beating Chez Reavie with a birdie on the second hole of a playoff. Simpson made a 30-foot birdie putt on the par-5 18th hole, then got into the playoff when Reavie closed with a bogey. Simpson moved to No. 1 in the FedEx Cup playoffs and the chase for a $10 million prize. ——— All Times PDT

AWBREY GLEN Saturday Men’s Game, Aug. 31 Net Better Ball 1, Jerry Heck/Rick Jacobson, 63. Team Gross Skins — Tom Kemph/Jack Kavanagh, nine skins; Jerry Heck/Rick Jacobson, three skins. Nine-Hole Women’s Sweeps, Aug. 31 Odd/Even 1 (tie), Barbara Chandler/Sandra Honnen/Alicia Mehlis/Blind Draw, 43; Rosie Long/Maryanne Adame/Sally Murphy/Darlene Warner, 43. 3, Chris Cercone/Carol Moore/Julie Haas/Blind Draw, 44. Chip-in — Rosie Long. Men’s Sweeps, Aug. 31 Three Net Best Balls 1, Gary Peters/Chuck Woodbeck/Richard Gallio/Duane Warner, 180. 2, Bill Macri/Michael Mount/Kevin Bleyer/Archie Bleyer, 180. 3, John Seaton/Larry Hinkle/Bob Jakse/Bob Chamberlain, 185. 4, Ron Knapp/Don Fellows/Jim Weir/Rick Jacobson, 190. Women’s Sweeps, Sept. 1 Odd/Even 1, Kaye Williams/Carmen West/Trish Kloch/Blind Draw, 91. 2, Judy Bluhm/Theresa Kavanagh/Wendy Hemingway/Pat Roland, 92. 3, Sue Rogers/Molly Mount/Chris Larson/Blind Draw, 92. Chip-ins — Norma Barnes, No. 10; Mary Fellows, No. 16. Labor Day Couples, Sept. 5 Odd/Even Flight 1 — 1, John Maniscalco & Susie Lovisco/Chuck & Lani Sanders, 82. 2, Larry Hinkle & Kaye Williams/Jim & Carol Lee, 88. Flight 2 — 1, Chip & Claudia Arthur/Ron & Dee Anderson, 88. 2, Dennis & Donna Baird/Gary & Debbie Hill, 89. Team KPs — Collins Hemingway, No. 8; Bob Scott, No. 13. BEND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Labor Day Couples Mixer, Sept. 5 Shamble Best Ball Jimmy Hoffa Award (Low Gross) — 1, Brandon & Jodi Kearney, 62. George Meany Award (Low Net) — 1, Kevin & Michelle Corby, 51. Teamsters Flight — Gross: 1, Kevin Rueter & Tiffany Schoning, 65. 2, Bob Brubaker & Sue Keeney, 67. 3, Spencer Sanvitale & Terri Holmquist, 70. 4, Jim & Julane Dover, 71. Net: 1, Sam & Becky Mccoll, 55. 2, Mac Ryder & Sue Dougan, 57. 3, Brad & Shirleen Chambers, 58. 4, Eric & Amy Anderson, 59. UAW Flight — Gross: 1, Steve & Jeri Boe, 70. 2 (tie), Joe & Lynn Murphy, 71; Brett & Rayna Evert, 71. 4, Les Mombert & Nancy Lynch, 73. Net: 1, Don & Joanne Christensen, 52. 2, Don & Tess Tompos, 53. 3, Ron Tokuyama & Robin Schueler, 56. 4, Frank & Pat Putnam, 58. IBEW Flight — Gross: 1, Les Scully & Eloise Elliott, 77. 2, Sam & Judy Mckee, 79. 3, Bob & Carol Reinhard, 80. 4, Ed & Naida Schmidt, 81. Net: 1 (tie), Bruce & Kathi Salvog, 54; Wes Price & Angie Jacobsen, 54. 3, Mal Murphy & Jane Boubel, 57. 4, Roger & Linda Bjorvik, 59 AFL-CIO Flight — Gross: 1, Doug & Vicki Schmidt, 82. 2 (tie), Don & Kathy Frazer, 84; Maury & Jean Hardman, 84. 4, Joe & Charlotte Rodgers, 85. Net: 1, Mike Barker & Sheila Gleich, 52. 2, Roy & Kristie Bowen, 53. 3, Pete & Diana Gustavson, 57. 4, Jon & Deborah Cox, 59. KP — Men: Skip Marlatt, No. 3. Women: Mari Tank, No. 11. Long Putts — Men: Sam McKee, No. 9; Women: Barbara Werdell, No. 18. BLACK BUTTE RANCH Women’s Club, Aug. 30 Two Net Best Ball 1, Valerie Collins/Lori Cooper/Mae Williamson/Barbara Schulz, 119. 2, Debbie Kronick/Jane Krause/Sandra Zielinski/Phyllis Lees, 128. 3 (tie), Sue Blaker/Barbara Harris/Linda Goebel/Pat Neufeldt, 129; Karen Mayberry/Carolyn Hayden/Betty Carlsmith/Juliane Kaneko, 129. Men’s Club, Aug. 31 Net Best Ball 1, Rich Elliott/Jerry Lawhun, 59. 2, Rob Ball/Marv Hoff/Owen Osborne, 60. 3, Warren Zielinski/Byron Kirchart/Les Stevens/Bill Benson, 62. 4, Ed Seabloom/Dick Howells/Marv Hoff, 63. BROKEN TOP Men’s Gathering, Aug. 31 Net Rotation: 1,2,3,4 1, Kim Seneker/Craig Moore/Joe Mansfield/Bruce Grout, 157. 2, Greg Kast/Frank Lemma/Bob Abraham/Bob Brookman, 168. 3 (tie), Rick Cortese/Kip Gladder/Dell Squire/Jack Williams, 171; John Aspell/Paul Craig/Don Turnage, 171. Ladies 18-Hole Play, Sept. 2 One Gross, One Net As & Cs — 1, Janet Gardner/Norma DuBois/Mary Erbe/ Margi Lillegard, 139. Bs & Ds — 1, Gail Johnson/Sharon Swanson/Susan Michel/ Pam Williams, 146. Labor Day Couples, Sept. 4 Gross: 1, Bill & Susan Michel/Jeff & Lucy Stack, 107. Net: 1, Mike & Carolyn Peters/Greg Newton & Lisa Schrunk, 82. 2, Harold & Peggy Ashford/Brent & Susan Krantz, 84. KPs — Ladies: Judy Heck, No. 2; Carolyn Peters, No. 16. Men: Bob Pearson, No. 5; Jeff Stack, No. 13. CROOKED RIVER RANCH 2011 Men’s Club Championship, Aug. 29-30 36-Hole Stroke Play Overall Champion — Fred Johnson 69-75—144. A Flight — 1, Mac Kilgo 76-76—152. 2 (tie), Herb Parker 75-78—153; Jim Martin 77-76—153. 4, Dennis Glender 7876—154. 5, Darrell Wells 80-77—157. B Flight — 1, Jay Snavely 82-76—158. 2, Mike Woltering 83-79—162. 3 (tie), Roger Provost 84-81—165; Ronald Aker 78-87—165. 5, Ron Garzini 81-85—166. C Flight — 1, Jerry Harris 79-85—164. 2, Mike Bolier 8189—170. 3 (tie), Billy Romaine 88-85—173; Jack Martin 9083—173. 5, Dale Monroe 84-91—175. D Flight — 1, Wes Price 97-88—185. 2 (tie), Ron Mahood 88-98—186; Terry Rodgers 92-94—186. 4, Ed Elliot 98-98— 196. 5, A.K. Majors 102-95—197. Ladies Club, Aug. 31 Stroke Play Flight A — Gross: 1, Selma Cusick, 82. 2, Myrna Harris, 86. 3, Judi Skaurud, 95. Net: 1, Judy Parker, 63. 2, Marie Olds, 70. 3, Ellie Rice, 74. Flight B — Gross: 1, Anita Johnson, 96. Charlyn Hughes, 100. Cathy Hunter, 106. Net: 1, Jo Modrell, 68. Cecilia Bryant, 70. Barb Roberts, 71. Birdies — Selma Cusick, Nos. 3, 12; Pam Garzini, No. 2. DESERT PEAKS Thursday Men’s Club, Sept. 1 Net Throw Out One Hole 1, Don Kraus, 57. 2, Ken Southwick, 65. 3 (tie), Don Lupinacci, 66; Dean Hunt, 66; Bob Victorin, 66. KP — Val Paterson. LD — Don Kraus. Friday Night Couples, Sept. 2 Net Chapman 1, Bruce Houck/Jeanette Houck, 32. 2, Jim Wyzard/Phyllis Rice, 32.9. 3, Wade Simmons/Teresa Lindgren, 33. Sunday Group Play, Sept. 4 Blind Draw Gross: 1, Denny Story/Joe Stanfield, 161. 2, Fred Blackman/ Al Dupont, 164. Net: 1, Scott Gardner/Teresa Lindgren, 132. 2, Gary Gruner/Dean Ditmore, 138. KP — Fred Blackman. LD — Teresa Lindgren. EAGLE CREST Women’s Club Championship, Aug. 23. 30 36-Hole Stroke Play at Ridge and Resort courses Club Champion — 1, Kat Widmer, 162. Overall Low Net — 1, Teddie Crippen, 133. Flight A — Gross: 1, Debbie Hehn, 163. 2, Margaret Sturza, 174. Net: 1, Kathleen Mooberry, 134. 2, Pat Murrill, 137. Flight B — Gross: 1, Linda Thurlow, 183. 2, Carole Flinn, 201. Net: 1, Jean Sowles, 136. 2 (tie), Betty Stearns, 145; Susan Osborn, 145. Flight C — Gross: 1, Maria Langworthy, 202. 2, Judy Moore, 203. Net: 1, Joni McDonald, 135. 2, Adrienne Nickel, 143. THE GREENS AT REDMOND Ladies of the Greens, Aug. 31 To Each Her Own (Three Clubs and a Putter) A Flight — Gross: 1, Diane Miyauchi, 38. 2, Janie Richter, 39. 3, Sharon Rosengarth, 42. Net: 1, Lois Morris, 28. 2, Hazel Blackmore, 31. B Flight — Gross: 1, Vivian Webster, 39. 2, Lynne Holm, 44. 3, Bev Tout, 44. Net: 1, Michelle Oberg, 31. 2, Barbara Rogen, 31. 3, Lynne Ekman, 32. C Flight — Gross: 1, Claudia Powell, 41. 2, Linda Johnston, 45. 3, Ruth Chaffey, 46. Net: 1, Lonie Bibler, 29. 2, Ethelmae Hammock, 30. 3, Lou Wayne Steiger, 31. D Flight — Gross: 1, Carol Suderno, 43. 2, Evelyn Kakuska, 48. 3, Mary Bohler, 49. Net: 1, Karlene Grove, 27. 2, Margaret Pickett, 29. 3, Anita Epstein, 29. Low Putts — Vivian Webster, 15; Judy Thorgeirsson, 15. Golfer of the Week — Vivian Webster, 39/27. Men’s Club, Sept. 1 Net Stroke Play A Flight — Nine Holes: 1 (tie), Terry Lucas, 25.5; Ron Munkres, 25.5. 3 (tie), Marv Bibler, 28; Miles Hutchins, 28. 18 Holes: 1, Terry Lucas, 54. 2, Marv Bibler, 55. 3, Jeff Strauser, 56. 4, Ken Ennor, 57. B Flight — Nine Holes: 1, Bob Haak, 26. 2, Phil Backup, 27.5. 3, Dave Kurowski, 30. 4 (tie), Ron Jondahl, 30.5; Paul Osborne, 30.5. 18 Holes: 1, Bob Haak, 53. 2, Phil Backup, 59. 3, Ron Jondahl, 60. 4, Keith McNeil, 61. KPs — Dan Morris, No. 1; Marv Bibler, No. 9; Miles Hutchins, No. 10; Bob Haak, No. 13. Golfer of the Week — Bob Haak. JUNIPER Ladies Club, Aug. 31 Odd Holes Flight A — 1, Nancy Hakala, 32.5. 2, Karen Wintermyre, 35.5. 3, Jan Carver, 36.

MEADOW LAKES Senior Men’s League, Aug. 30 Net Best Ball 1, Allen Burnett/Boyd Joyce, 28. 2, Trevor Russell/Ron Powell, 30. KPs — Jim Murphy, No. 4; Allen Burnett, No. 8. Men’s Association, Aug. 31 Best Ball Gross: 1 (tie), Zach Lampert/Jim Montgomery, 35; Les Bryan/ Steve Kidder, 35. Net: 1 (tie), Steve Spangler/Rick Fosburg, 29; John McCulloch/Ken Rasmussen, 29. 3, Dave Barnhouse/Rick Fosburg (Blind Draw), 30. KPs — A Flight: Dewey Springer, No. 4; Mark Payne, No. 8. B Flight: Mike Ball, No. 4; Larry Conklin, No. 8. Senior Men’s League, Sept. 6 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Nelson Haas, 43. Net: 1, Trevor Russell, 31. 2, Charlie McDermott, 33. KPs —Nelson Haas, No. 4; Ron Powell, No. 8. PRINEVILLE GOLF CLUB Club Championship, Aug. 27-28 36-Hole Stroke Play Men (Par 65) — Gross: 1, Greg Kelso, 68-66—134. 2, Bruce Neelands, 70-68—138. Net: 1 (tie), Steve Pierce, 6364—127; Richard Kludt, 60-67—127. Women (Par 68) — Gross: 1, Shelly Hollis, 80-87—167. Net: 1, Marla Stafford, 67-75—142. Senior: 1, Cathy Thompson, 86-89—175. Super Senior: 1, Diane Hayes, 97-97—194. QUAIL RUN Men’s Club, Aug. 31 Stroke Play Flight 1 — Gross: 1, Jim Elmblade, 84. Net: 1, Dennis Haniford, 71. 2, Kelly O’Neill, 72. Flight 2 — Gross: Al Wakefield, 89. Net: 1, Tim Jennings, 71. 2, Bill Knox, 72. Flight 3 — Gross: Mike Mann, 90. Net: 1, Al Rice, 71. 2, Jim Myers, 72. KPs — Jim Elmblade, No. 8; Frank Domantay, No. 14. RIVER’S EDGE Ladies Club Championship, Aug. 31-Sept. 1 36-Hole Stroke Play Gross: 1, Wynan Pelley, 177. 2, Teresa Smith, 210. 3, Ardene Fullerton, 230. Net: 1, Susie Backstrom, 147. 2, Jullie Story, 154. 3, Sharon Allen, 162. KP — Wynan Pelley. LD — Day 1: Teresa Smith. Day 2: Wynan Pelley. Men’s Club, Aug. 30 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Hi Becker, 73. 2, Scott Brasher, 75. 3, Jerry Egge, 82. 4, Paul Runge, 86. 5, Mike Reuter, 88. 6, Steve Langenberg, 89. 7, Mike Brasher, 90. 8, Lee Agee, 91; 9 (tie), Richard Schieferstein, 96; Roy Fullerton, 96; Skip Paznokas, 96. Net: 1, Egge, 64. 2, Becker, 66. 3, Schieferstein, 67. 4, Agee, 68. 5 (tie), John Bihary, 71; S. Brasher, 71. 7, David Black, 72. 8 (tie), Langenberg, 73; Paznokas, 73. 10 (tie), Bob Deane, 74; Reuter, 74. KPs — Hi Becker, No. 7; Jerry Egge, No. 14. WIDGI CREEK Women’s Golf Association 2011 Club Championship 36-hole Stroke Play Overall Gross Champion — Jan Sandburg, 159. Championship Flight — Gross: 1, Marietta Bajer, 169. 2, Melinda Bailey, 171. Net: 1, Pam Chase, 134. 2, Sherry Deetz, 141. 1st Flight — Gross: 1, Pam Brooks, 191. 2, Hillary Kenyon, 196. Net: 1, Donna Baker, 145. 2, Mindy Cicinelli, 150. 2nd Flight — Gross: 1, Jan Guettler, 207. 2, Kathy Lauchlan, 214. Net: 1, Karen Larson, 153. 2, Nancy Stewart, 162. 3rd Flight — Gross: 1, Karen Goodman, 204. 2, Marcia Hoover, 222. Net: 1, Debra Bergeson, 142. 2, Diane Struve, 158. 2011 Men’s Club Championship, Aug. 30 36-Hole Stroke Play Open Division — Gross: 1, Bob Brydges, 156. Net: 1, Bill Burley, 154. Senior Division — Gross: 1, Greg Watt, 157. 2, John Deetz, 162. 3, Jim Wellock, 172. Net: 1, Gary Wendland, 136. 2, John Ramsey, 142. 3, Mike Carroll, 144. Super Senior Division — Gross: 1, Dave Madrigal, 164. 2, Ted Thoren, 167. 3, Bill Brown, 168. Net: 1, Gene Waddell, 135. 2, Ron Stassens, 139. 3, Russell Struve, 140. KPs — Super Senior: Ron Stassens, No. 15. Senior: John Deetz, No. 5. Open: Andy Knowlton, No. 11.

Hole-In-One Report Aug. 30 AWBREY GLEN Dennis Sienko, Bend No. 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-iron Aug. 30 WIDGI CREEK Eddie McKeon, Bend No. 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-iron Aug. 30 EAGLE CREST RIDGE Michael Everitt, Fresno, Calif. No. 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-wedge Aug. 30 RIVER’S EDGE Jerry Egge, Bend No. 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . unknown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . unknown Sept. 1 CROOKED RIVER RANCH Bill Rhoads, Crooked River Ranch No. 16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-iron Sept. 2 AWBREY GLEN Rob Wilbur, Yuma, Ariz. No. 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-iron Sept. 5 THE GREENS AT REDMOND Terry Lucas, Yuma, Ariz. No. 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . gap wedge

Calendar The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf events calendar. Items should be mailed to P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708; faxed to the sports department at 541-385-0831; or e-mailed to sports@ bendbulletin.com. ——— CLINICS OR CLASSES Mondays — Adult beginner golf clinics at Juniper Golf Course. Cost is $20. For more information, call Stuart Allison at 480-540-3015 or e-mail him at pro@stuartallisongolf.com. Tuesdays — Central Oregon Community College hosting golf classes for beginners at River’s Edge Golf Course in Bend. A PGA professional will teach students golf fundamentals including grip, stance, full swing, putting, short game, rules and etiquette. Bring your own clubs, or clubs are available if needed. Geared for beginners but all levels welcome. Class meets at Rivers Edge, from Sept. 13 to Oct. 11, from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Cost is $79. To sign up or for more information, call 541-383-7270 or vistit noncredit.cocc.edu. ——— TOURNAMENTS Sept. 8 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Sunriver Resort’s Woodlands course. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. Sept. 10 — American Legion of La Pine’s annual golf tournament at Quail Run Golf Course in La Pine. For more information or to register, call Larry Matthews at 541-419-0861. Sept. 10-11 — Juniper Best Ball is a 36-hole tournament for two-person men’s teams at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. For more information or to register, call 541-548-3121, or download an entry form at www.playjuniper.com. Sept. 12 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event

at The Greens at Redmond. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $110 for the season plus a $5 per-event fee. For more information, call Ron Meisner at 541-548-3307. Sept 13 — Fundraising tournament for the Kiwanis Club of Prineville at the Club at Brasada Ranch in Powell Butte. Eleventh annual event is a four-person shamble, which begins with a shotgun start at noon and includes net and gross divisions. Barbecue lunch to follow. Cost is $125 per player and includes cart, range balls and lunch, and registration is open to the first 128 players. For more information or to register, call the Brasada Ranch clubhouse at 541-526-6849. Sept. 15 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Sunriver Resort’s Meadows course. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. Sept. 16 — Mountain View Hospital Foundation Classic at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino is an annual event benefiting the Community Health Improvement Partnership. The tournament will begin with an 11:30 a.m. shotgun start. Cost is $150 per person or $500 per team. Entry fee includes green fees, driving range balls, cart, lunch, awards, and a traditional salmonbake dinner with Native American dancers. Sponsorships and discounted room rates at Kah-Nee-Ta are also available. For more information or to register, call Jill Sansom at 541-460-4033, or e-mail her at jsanson@mvhd.org. Sept. 16 — Gopher Broke Scramble at Bend Golf and Country Club. This four-person scramble tournament begins with a 1 p.m. shotgun. Proceeds from the golf tournament go to Bend Park & Recreation District Foundation scholarships. For more information or to register, visit www.bendparksandrec.org or e-mail Sue Boettner at sueb@bendparksandrec.org. Sept. 19 — 14th annual Bend Chamber Fall Invitational at Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend. Tournament separated into two flights: a serious net competition and a scramble with mulligans and strings. Shotgun start at 11 a.m. followed by dinner and awards starting about 4:30 p.m. Amateur men and women golfers compete in a four-person scramble tournament. Cost is $145 per person and includes cart, dinner, and contests. To register or for more information, call Gayle Najera at 541-382-3221. Sept. 26 — Cougar Summer Baseball Fall Classic at the Club at Brasada Ranch. Four-person scramble begins with a 9 a.m. shotgun start. Cost is $100 per player, and includes golf cart, lunch, and on-course drinks. Proceeds benefit the Cougar summer baseball program of Mountain View High School. For more information or to register, e-mail Kory Bright at kory.bright@ gmail.com. Sept. 26-29 — The Fall Tour is a pro-am tournament for teams and individuals through the Oregon Chapter of the PGA. This four-day event is held at Pronghorn Club in Bend, Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend, Eagle Crest Resort’s Ridge Course in Redmond and Black Butte Ranch’s Big Meadow course. Admission is free for spectators. Contact: Amy Kerle, 800-574-0503 or www. pnwpga.com. Sept. 29 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-3185155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. Oct. 1-2 — The 84th OGA Men’s Team Championship at the Club at Brasada Ranch in Powell Butte is an Oregon Golf Association 36-hole gross stroke-play event. OGA member clubs nominate four amateur golfers to represent the club. Team scores are calculated using the best three individual scores on the team each day. For more information, visit www.oga.org or call the OGA at 866-981-4653. Oct. 1-2 — The Crooked River Ranch Couples Caper is a 36-hole mixed couples Chapman. Open to any golfer with an official USGA handicap. For more information or to register, call Crooked River Ranch at 541-923-6343, or visit www.crookedriveranch.com. Oct. 1-2 — Deer Widows Invitational at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond is a women-only tournament. For more information or to register, call Juniper at 541-548-3121, or visit www. playjuniper.com. Oct. 3 — The 2011 Bpositiv Charity Golf Tournament at Bend Golf and Country Club. Four-person scramble begins with 1 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $125 for a single golfer, $225 for a twosome, $325 for a threesome, or $425 for a foursome. Proceeds benefit Bpositiv, a nonprofit that serves families whose children are sent to hospice care. For more information or to register, call 541-330-7684, email dtpite@aol.com or visit www.bpositiv.org. Oct. 8 — Red Dog Classic Golf Tournament at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. The four-person scramble begins with a noon shotgun. Cost is $100 per golfer and benefits the Humane Society of Redmond. For more information or to register, call 541350-7605 or visit www.redmondhumane.org. Oct. 8 — The Patriot Challenge at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters. Two-Person Best Ball begins with a noon shotgun start. Maximum of a 10-stroke handicap differential between partners. Cost is $200 per team, and includes cart, range balls, contests, lunch and tee prizes. Proceeds benefit the Folds of Honor Foundation and Patriot Golf Day. For more information or to register, call Aspen Lakes head pro Josh McKinley at 541-549-4653 or e-mail him at josh@aspenlakes.com. Oct. 10 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $110 for the season plus a $5 per-event fee. For more information, call Ron Meisner at 541548-3307. Oct. 11 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Prineville Golf Club. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www. centraloregongolftour.com. Oct. 13 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-3185155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. Oct. 20 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at the Club at Brasada Ranch in Powell Butte. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. Oct. 22-23 — The Tetherow Two-Ball Invitational is a twoperson, select-drive best ball at Tetherow Golf Club in Bend. Tee times Saturday will be between 10:30 a.m. and noon. Play will begin Sunday at 11 a.m. Cost is $600 per team, with no more than one professional on each team, and includes Friday practice round, breakfast and on-course snacks, Saturday dinner, caddie, gifts, trophies and prizes. Gross and net divisions. The field will be limited to the first 30 teams to register. For more information, call Tetherow at 541-388-2582. Oct. 27 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Crooked River Ranch. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www. centraloregongolftour.com.


S

SAVVY SHOPPER

Inside

This is a tribute “Rescue Me” ends with a salute to fallen firefighters, Page E2

Dear Abby Son’s pregnant girlfriend has dad expecting trouble, see Page E2

SHOPPING IN BRIEF New deals website debuts A new website offering discounts with Central Oregon businesses is slated to launch today. Deal Bend has a similar model to businesses active in other markets like Groupon and Living Social. It anticipates starting out by broadcasting deals Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. The deals will be available for purchase for one to three days. Participating business will range from yoga to restaurants to salons. People wanting to find out about the deals can sign up at the website below. Subscribers will then receive an e-mail each time a deal goes out. The deals will also be posted on Deal Bend’s Facebook page and Twitter feed. Contact: www.benddeals.com or 541-390-4552.

Time to sign up for COCC classes Learn how to most economically stock your kitchen, pair wine and food or best use the Internet for your travel plans through courses offered this fall through Central Oregon Community College Community Learning. Registration is on now for myriad noncredit courses offered through Community Learning that can up your consumer acumen. They range from financial, like one on the stock market called “Beating the Bear, Riding the Bull,” to knowing what to buy in the kitchen. There is no registration deadline for the classes, although attendees must sign up and pay before the first session. Some courses also may fill up, so it pays to register early. A catalog of courses is available by going to the Web address below, then clicking on the picture at right, which is the catalog cover. Registration is available online, as well as well by phone or in person at COCC. Contact: http://noncredit.cocc .edu or 541-383-7270.

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INSIDE

E

HELPING YOU MAKE GOOD BUYING DECISIONS

Taking CHILD-FRIENDLY scissors to annoying , shirt tags PARENT-FRIENDLY

GEAR COST By Heidi Hagemeier The Bulletin

Y

ou might not be ready to hear it, but it must be said nonetheless: It’s time to outfit the family for winter sports season. A Sept. 30 deadline already looms for early season pass prices at Mt. Bachelor. After that, passes shoot up by several hundred dollars. There are also a number of other fast-approaching dates to circle on the calendar to get in on quality secondhand gear or seasonlong lease deals. So even though the mountains are still wearing summer clothes, it’s best to make decisions now about getting the kids ready for snow. Luckily, there are options available for finding boots and bindings, skis and boards. And they’re tailored to a range of ages and abilities, from toddlers making their first wobble on skis to preteens wanting to ride the terrain parks.

Look to lease For winter sport newbies or fast-growing children, parents should check out renting gear. Rental options range locally from daylong to seasonlong for various sports, including alpine and nordic skiing as well as snowboarding. Day rentals are available at a variety of sports shops throughout Central Oregon, as well as at Mt. Bachelor. These can be worthwhile for those only venturing out a few times a season. Think of that 4-year-old you want to expose to the snow. “For a 4-year-old, you’re going to get about 20 minutes,” said Susan Bonacker, owner of Sunnyside Sports in Bend. “In terms of the economy of it, it doesn’t make sense to buy the stuff.” Those seeking something between renting for a day and buying a package, however, can consider seasonlong gear leases. At least two shops in Bend offer such deals: Skjersaa’s and Powder House. See Gear / E6

By Kate Murphy

New York Times News Service

Leah Missbach Day, 52, a photojournalist in Chicago, likes designer labels like Balenciaga, Alexander Wang and Dries Van Noten. But not next to her skin. “I cut them out because they’re scratchy and they bug me,” she said. “I’ve got a whole drawer full of tags.” Though clothing designers and manufacturers may sweat the graphics and placement of their signature labels, many of their customers, armed with tiny sewing scissors and seam rippers, toil just as avidly to remove them. On the Web, several sites demonstrate how it’s done without leaving telltale holes. But lately there’s been a trend toward subtlety and comfort in clothing labels. Big tags with blaring logos sewn inside garments are seen by many as passe (and forget about crocodiles and polo ponies stitched on the outside). More designers are downplaying or even disguising their labels, which can lend cachet, like a club with an unmarked door. So-called “tagless” labels, printed directly onto clothes, are also more widely used, as are transparent plastic labels that are almost invisible. The result is a change in the way clothes look and feel. See Labels / E3

Don’t label me Though clothing designers may sweat the details of the graphics and placement of their signature labels; many of their customers, armed with tiny sewing scissors and seam rippers, toil just as avidly to remove them. Below, a tank top from Rick Owens with the label sewn in flat. Tony Cenicola New York Times News Service

The Wine Shop reopens downtown The Wine Shop and Tasting Bar has reopened its doors in downtown Bend, and now features a new bar, an eighttap kegerator and other touches from a recent remodel. The shop, located at 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., has added more beer, both in bottles and on tap. It Thinkstock emphasizes European beers, with four Belgian-made brews presently on tap as well as a German pilsner. And it has added beer flights. The Wine Shop and Tasting Bar continues to offer bottles of wine, as well as meats, cheeses, olives and more. It’s adding paninis to its menu, as well. It’s open Tuesdays through Thursdays from 1 to 9 p.m. and Fridays and Saturdays from 1 to 11 p.m. or midnight. Contact: 541-389-2884. — Heidi Hagemeier, The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin ile photo

Volunteers prepare gear during the October 2007 Skyliners Winter Sports Swap, an annual event put on by the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation. The swap is a prime opportunity for outfitting your children for the winter sports season.

Gear up for grabs Lines form every year before the doors open to the Skyliners Winter Sports Swap, which will take place this year from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 15. The event is put on by the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation and benefits its scholarship program. Inside is a plethora of winter gear and wear, from toddler to adult, at bargain prices. Admission is $3 per individual or $6 for per family. It will take place at the Mt. Bachelor Bus Barn, 115 S.W. Columbia St., Bend. Contact: www.mbsef.org or 541-388-0002.

K2’s Bad Seed skis retail new at Powder House in Bend for roughly $400. K2 Luv Bug skis are available new at Powder House for about $285. Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Put your grocery bill on a diet By Holly E. Thomas The Washington Post

Bought groceries recently? Then you probably know this already: Supermarket trips can be expensive. Studies indicate that shoppers on quick jaunts to the store usually buy over 50 percent more than they planned, and impulse buys — cookies from an aisle display, chips you sampled in a taste test — make up more than half of the average total grocery order. But that doesn’t mean you’re doomed to overspend every time you walk through the automatic doors — or that you have to cut out everything new, fun or delicious to save money. Here, we’ve gathered the best tips and tricks from the Web and the real world — from coupons to price books — to help you make the most of your monthly food budget. See Groceries / E6


T EL EV ISION

E2 Wednesday, September 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Son’s pregnant girlfriend has dad expecting trouble

‘Rescue Me’ ends with a salute to fallen firefighters By Rick Bentley McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Dear Abby: My son’s girlfriend is pregnant. I think there is a chance it may not be his, although she claims it is. “Ben” met “Christy,” and a little over a week later she announced she was pregnant. She’s now 34 weeks into the pregnancy. I have asked him repeatedly if he is sure the baby is his and he says yes, but the math doesn’t seem right to me. I have suggested Ben seek a paternity test, but I don’t think he’s going to take my advice. I am not the only person who is questioning this, and I feel terrible for having the doubt. He has asked Christy to marry him and she accepted. I couldn’t believe it. They were going to marry that same month, but when Ben mentioned a prenuptial agreement to protect the real estate and other property he owns (and that I’m financially involved in), Christy blew up! She just about kicked Ben to the curb. Now, thankfully, the wedding is postponed. Christy’s overboard reaction has added to my suspicion. What do you think, Abby? — Suspicious Dad in Rhode Island Dear Dad: I agree that before your son marries Christy, everything should be out in the open. Regardless of whose child she is carrying, your son may be in love with her and it may not matter to him. If the child is indeed his, a paternity test would lay any doubts to rest. That said, I spoke with my gynecologist and asked how long after conception it would take for a pregnancy to show up in a test, and was told the answer is one week AFTER A WOMAN’S PERIOD IS LATE. For Ben not to insist on having a prenuptial agreement under these circumstances would be a mistake, and I hope he will reconsider. Dear Abby: My mother died suddenly three years ago and my sister overdosed a year

DEAR ABBY later. I didn’t know she was so depressed. Her son, “Jordan,” is the joy of my life. Every time I watch him, all I can think of is “Why?” Why did my sister choose to leave us alone? I don’t know how to move on when I look at Jordan and think of my sister. Please help. — Left With the Memories Dear Left: Please accept my deepest sympathy for the multiple losses you have suffered. Although you feel left alone by your sister’s suicide, the truth is you are NOT alone. In the United States, millions of people’s live shave been touched by suicide — whether it was that of a colleague, friend or a family member. That you are reminded of your sister when you see your nephew is a normal reaction. When your sister overdosed, she may have been acting on impulse and trying to end what she perceived to be intolerable psychic pain. Please contact the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. Among the many program sit offers is a listing of local support groups for survivors. The website is www. afsp.org; the phone number is 888-333-2377. Author Eric Marcus has written an excellent book onthis subject, “Why Suicide?” published by Harper One. He, like you, is a survivor of suicide, and you may find the answers you’re looking for by reading it. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

LOS ANGELES — “Rescue Me” is more than a TV show to Denis Leary. The FX Network series Leary and Peter Tolan created three years after 9/11 was meant as a continuing memorial to the 343 firefighters who died in New York the day of the terrorist attack. It’s a reminder that firefighters run into burning buildings when everyone else is running out. Now, the series is coming to an end tonight. In keeping with the spirit of the show, the final images will be one last salute to the fallen firefighters. Leary brought a personal understanding to the show. His cousin, a firefighter in western Massachusetts, was killed in the line of duty in 1999. He saw how firefighters, especially the ones who are still working, avoid dealing with loss and tried to show that through his character, Tommy Gavin — a character Leary says tried to “to drink it away or (expletive) it away.” The show has been a labor of love for Leary, who not only starred in it but was the executive producer and one of three main writers, along with Tolan and John Scurti. Like a good commander, Leary gives most of the credit to his team — Larenz Tate, Andrea Roth, Callie Thorne, Steven Pasquale, John Scurti, Daniel Sunjata, Mike Lombardi — for making the show work so well. He knew he had a great cast when he heard them read the first script. Leary says that reading made him realize the show could go from silly to serious

Jason DeCrow / The Associated Press

Dennis Leary, center, takes a break with other cast members during filming of “Rescue Me.” The series comes to an end tonight. and each actor would be able to handle the challenge. The hardest part about ending “Rescue Me” was coming up with the proper finale. Ideas ranged from Gavin sitting down in the middle of a burning room in a chair — as either a suicide or a heroic gesture — to having him swim out into the ocean. The ending they picked was based on one question: Will a man who has survived this great tragedy actually survive it or not? “I think in the face of seven seasons of television, you don’t want to say no to that question. You don’t want to bring people along on a journey that long and then say, ‘No, he’s not going to survive.’ It’s just a very negative

message. So we decided to, at that point, go with something a little more hopeful,” Tolan says. As has been the case throughout the show, even “hopeful” can come with a lot of dark humor and touching moments. Whether dealing with life or death, “Rescue Me” found the humor in sad situations and the sadness of lighter moments. Leary had always hoped the series would remain popular enough to stay on the air until the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11. It not only survived, it’s such a part of pop culture that Tommy Gavin’s bunker gear was donated to the Smithsonian Institution. That’s when Leary and Tolan realized they created a culturally significant TV show.

‘Rescue Me’ When: 10 tonight Where: FX

“Working in television, that’s the last thing you expect to happen to anything you write. It made me really stop and think about how this show is how we really deal with things,” Tolan says. “This is how people move forward. They continue to live, and they laugh, and they bust each other’s balls. Life goes on. “You don’t think that when you are starting it. You just think, ‘Oh, let’s do the show, and let’s make it the best it can be.’ And then, all of a sudden, it’s significant.”

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Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune How I Met Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 Å Inside Edition (N) Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Lawrence Welk’s Big Band Splash ‘G’ Å

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

10:00

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The Middle ‘PG’ The Middle ‘PG’ Modern Family Modern Family Primetime Nightline (N) ’ Å Minute to Win It (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å America’s Got Talent (N) ‘PG’ Å Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Big Brother (N) ’ Å Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å (DVS) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ The Middle ‘PG’ The Middle ‘PG’ Modern Family Modern Family Primetime Nightline (N) ’ Å Buried Treasure (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Buried Treasure ’ ‘PG’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Burn Notice Friends Like These ‘PG’ Burn Notice Long Way Back ’ ‘PG’ Great Performances Singer Jackie Evancho. ‘G’ Å Simon and Garfunkel: Songs of America ‘PG’ Å Minute to Win It (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å America’s Got Talent (N) ‘PG’ Å Law & Order: Special Victims Unit America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ House of Payne Meet the Browns BBC World News Tavis Smiley (N) Charlie Rose (N) ’ ‘G’ Å

11:00

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KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Grand Canyon Serenade ‘G’ Å News Jay Leno Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ PBS NewsHour ’ Å

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK ROOT SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 ‘14’ Å Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars ‘PG’ Å Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars (N) Storage Wars (N) Storage Wars Storage Wars 130 28 18 32 Criminal Minds Critical decision. ‘PG’ ›››› “GoodFellas” (1990, Crime Drama) Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci. An Irish-Italian hood joins the 1950s New York ›››› “GoodFellas” (1990) Robert De ››› “Ocean’s Twelve” (2004, Comedy-Drama) George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon. Indebted criminals plan an elaborate 102 40 39 heist in Europe. Å Mafia. Å Niro, Ray Liotta. Å Confessions: Animal Hoarding ‘PG’ Confessions: Animal Hoarding ‘14’ Animal Cops Houston (N) ‘PG’ Å Saved (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Confessions: Animal Hoarding ‘14’ Saved ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 26 38 Confessions: Animal Hoarding ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ Top Chef: Just Desserts ‘14’ Top Chef: Just Desserts ‘14’ The Rachel Zoe Project ‘14’ Å Real Housewives/Beverly Top Chef: Just Desserts (N) ‘14’ Top Chef: Just Desserts ‘14’ 137 44 (6:06) Extreme Makeover: Home Edition ‘PG’ Å Extreme Makeover: Home Edition (8:26) Ron White: They Call Me Tater Salad ‘14’ Å Ron White: Call Me Tater Salad Blue Collar TV ’ Are You Smarter? 190 32 42 53 (4:56) Texas Women ’ ‘PG’ Å American Greed 9/11 Fraud (N) American Greed 9/11 Fraud Mad Money American Greed 9/11 Fraud American Greed 9/11 Fraud Wealth-Risk 1 Minute-Makeup 51 36 40 52 The Facebook Obsession Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Å Dr. Sanjay Gupta Reports Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Å Dr. Sanjay Gupta Reports 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 Å Colbert Report Chappelle Show Chappelle Show (8:58) South Park (9:29) South Park South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 (4:52) South Park (5:22) Tosh.0 ‘14’ (5:53) Scrubs ‘14’ (6:23) Scrubs ‘14’ Daily Show U of O Today City Edition Bend City Council Work Session Bend City Council (N) (Live) Epic Conditions Word Travels ’ Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ Outside Presents 11 Capitol Hill Hearings 58 20 12 11 Capitol Hill Hearings Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Phineas and Ferb Good-Charlie So Random! ‘G’ ›› “Eloise at the Plaza” (2003) Julie Andrews. ‘G’ A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ So Random! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie 87 43 14 39 Phineas and Ferb A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Sons of Guns ’ Cash-Chicago Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Sons of Guns ’ ‘14’ Å Sons of Guns ’ ‘14’ Å Sons of Guns (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Sons of Guns ’ ‘14’ Å Sons of Guns ’ ‘14’ Å 156 21 16 37 Sons of Guns ’ MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 (4:00) MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at Philadelphia Phillies (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å NFL Live (N) NFL Yearbook NASCAR Now (N) NFL Live Å 22 24 21 24 (4:00) 2011 U.S. Open Tennis Men’s and Women’s Quarterfinals (N) (Live) SportsCentury Who’s Number 1? Å SportsCentury SportsCentury Å Up Close Å Up Close Å Up Close Homecoming With Rick Reilly Å One on One 30 for 30 Å 23 25 123 25 SportsCentury 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express America’s Funniest Home Videos Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey ›› “Cheaper by the Dozen” (2003, Comedy) Steve Martin, Bonnie Hunt. The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Secret Life of American Teen Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Best Dishes Iron Chef America Restaurant: Impossible Snooty Fox Restaurant: Impossible Country Fare Restaurant: Impossible Scrimmages Restaurant: Impossible Mamma D’s The Great Food Truck Race 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa Hellboy-Army Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” (2009, Action) Hugh Jackman, Liev Schreiber, will.i.am. Rescue Me The members of 62 truck struggle. (N) ‘MA’ Rescue Me ‘MA’ 131 Get It Sold ‘G’ My First Place My First Place Hunters Int’l House Hunters Income Property Income Property Property Brothers (N) ‘G’ Å Property Brothers Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Income Property 176 49 33 43 Get It Sold ‘G’ Modern Marvels Mad Electricity ‘PG’ Modern Marvels Wiring America ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Top Gear The $500 Challenge ‘PG’ Top Gear Luxury Car Challenge ‘PG’ Top Gear Beating Tanner ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 (4:00) Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å Dance Moms She’s a Fighter ‘PG’ Dance Moms Abby plays cupid. ‘PG’ Dance Moms (N) ‘PG’ Å Roseanne’s Nuts Roseanne’s Nuts 138 39 20 31 Cold Case Files ’ ‘PG’ Å (6:45) GOP Debate Analysis (N) GOP Debate Analysis (N) GOP Debate at Ronald Reagan Presidential Library (N) GOP Debate Analysis (N) 56 59 128 51 GOP Debate at Ronald Reagan Presidential Library (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show True Life Living at home. ’ Å Awkward. ’ ‘14’ Awkward. ’ ‘14’ Teen Mom Stay With Me ‘PG’ Å The Challenge: Rivals (N) ’ ‘14’ Jersey Shore Twinning ’ ‘14’ Å 192 22 38 57 That ’70s Show SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å Victorious ’ ‘G’ Big Time Rush SpongeBob Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘14’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘14’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Cougars Access Huskies Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (N) (Live) Mariners Post. The Dan Patrick Show MLB Baseball 20 45 28* 26 Beavers DEA Juarez Cartel. ’ ‘14’ DEA A fugitive murder suspect. ‘14’ Deadliest Warrior ’ ‘14’ Å Deadliest Warrior ’ ‘14’ Å Deadliest Warrior (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Deadliest Warrior ’ ‘14’ Å 132 31 34 46 DEA Undercover missions. ’ ‘14’ Ghost Hunters Spirits of the Night Ghost Hunters Empire State Haunt Ghost Hunters Mission Point Resort. Ghost Hunters Dark Shadows (N) ’ Paranormal Witness (N) Ghost Hunters Dark Shadows Å 133 35 133 45 Ghost Hunters ’ ‘PG’ Å Behind Scenes David Jeremiah Joseph Prince This Is Your Day Praise the Lord Å Easter Exper. Jesse Duplantis Thru History Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘G’ Seinfeld ‘G’ ›› “Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail” (2009) Tyler Perry, Derek Luke. House of Payne House of Payne Conan (N) ‘14’ Å 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ ›› “The Big Street” (1942) Henry Fonda, Lucille Ball. A busboy (10:45) ››› “Lady of Burlesque” (1943, Mystery) Barbara Stan››› “Follow the Fleet” (1936, Musical Comedy) Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers. A sailor ››› “Hobson’s Choice” (1954, Comedy) Charles Laughton, John Mills, Brenda de 101 44 101 29 spends shore leave with his song-and-dance partner. Å Banzie. A daughter wants to marry her father’s apprentice. falls for a self-centered nightclub singer. Å wyck, Michael O’Shea. Cake Boss ‘PG’ LA Ink Training Day ’ ‘PG’ Å Outrageous Kid Outrageous Kid Know-Pregnant Know-Pregnant Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Å Toddlers & Tiaras (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Å 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ‘PG’ Bones Intern in the Incinerator ‘14’ Bones Boy in the Time Capsule ‘14’ The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Å The Mentalist Red Bulls ‘14’ Å ››› “1408” (2007, Horror) John Cusack, Samuel L. Jackson. Å 17 26 15 27 Bones A Halloween killer. ‘14’ Å Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ Scaredy Squirrel Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Hole in the Wall Would Happen Destroy Build King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v Food Man v Food Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (5:43) Sanford & Son ‘PG’ Å Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Happily Divorced Retired at 35 The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 The Jeffersons NCIS UnSEALed ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Reveille ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Identity Crisis ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Dog Tags ’ ‘14’ Å Necessary Roughness (N) ‘PG’ Burn Notice Better Halves ‘PG’ 15 30 23 30 NCIS Bete Noir ’ ‘PG’ Å Famous Food ’ ‘PG’ Famous Food Putting Out Fires ‘PG’ Famous Food (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ton of Cash If Lakes Could Kill ‘14’ ››› “New Jack City” (1991) Wesley Snipes, Ice-T. ’ Å 191 48 37 54 Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:05) ›› “Navy SEALS” 1990, Action Charlie Sheen. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› “Casino” 1995 Robert De Niro. A mob employee makes a play for power in 1970s Las Vegas. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› “8 Mile” 2002 Eminem. ‘R’ ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:20) ››› “Get Shorty” 1995 ‘R’ ››› “Only the Lonely” 1991 John Candy, Ally Sheedy. ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “Less Than Zero” 1987, Drama Andrew McCarthy. ‘R’ Å ›› “Robin Hood: Men in Tights” FMC 104 204 104 120 ›› “Robin Hood: Men in Tights” 1993 Cary Elwes. ‘PG-13’ Å Air in the Square Thrillbillies ‘14’ Bruce Lee Lives! Bruce Lee Lives! Thrillbillies ‘14’ The Daily Habit Legend Fighting Championship Bruce Lee Lives! Bruce Lee Lives! Thrillbillies ‘14’ The Daily Habit Danny & Dingo FUEL 34 Feherty Feherty 19th Hole Golf Central Golf Central Feherty Feherty 19th Hole European Tour 19th Hole GOLF 28 301 27 301 Ryder Cup Highlights Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Yearning ‘G’ Å ››› “Catfish” 2010 A man documents his brother’s meeting with › “Jonah Hex” 2010, Action Josh Brolin. A supernatural gunTrue Blood Sookie summons her powers True Blood Soul of Fire Sookie summons Hard Knocks: A Decade of NFL Training Camps Celebrating 24/7 Mayweather/ HBO 425 501 425 501 an online friend. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å slinger faces an old enemy. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å to save Bill. ’ ‘MA’ Å her powers. ’ ‘MA’ Å 10 years of the series. ’ ‘MA’ Å Ortiz ’ (4:05) ››› “Chaos” 2005 Jason Statham. ‘R’ Å (6:20) ›› “Hard Candy” 2006, Drama Patrick Wilson, Ellen Page. ‘R’ Å (8:35) ›› “The Babysitter” 1995, Suspense Alicia Silverstone. ‘R’ Å (10:40) ››› “Chaos” 2005 Jason Statham. ‘R’ Å IFC 105 105 (4:50) ›› “Green Zone” 2010 Matt Damon. Army inspectors (6:45) ›› “The Replacement Killers” 1998, Action Chow Yun- (8:15) ››› “Fargo” 1996, Suspense Frances McDormand. Premiere. An overex›› “Knight and Day” 2010, Action Tom Cruise, Cameron Diaz. A woman becomes the MAX 400 508 508 seek weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. ‘R’ Fat, Mira Sorvino. ’ ‘R’ Å tended salesman hires goons to kidnap his wife. ’ ‘R’ Å reluctant partner of a fugitive spy. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Border Wars ‘14’ Border Wars ‘PG’ Border Wars Cocaine Sting ‘14’ Border Wars ‘14’ Border Wars ‘PG’ Border Wars Cocaine Sting ‘14’ Deadly 60 ‘PG’ Deadly 60 ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z: Broly - The Legendary Super Saiyan ’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z: Broly - The NTOON 89 115 189 115 Dragon Ball Z: Broly - The Legendary Super Saiyan ’ Shooting USA Å Impossible Shots Amer. Rifleman Gun Stories Shooting Gallery Gun Nuts Shooting USA Å Best Defense Gun Stories Impossible Shots Amer. Rifleman OUTD 37 307 43 307 Gun Nuts (4:05) ›› “Femme (5:45) “Love’s Kitchen” 2011, Romance-Comedy Claire Forlani, Dougray Scott. iTV. A (7:25) ››› “The Tillman Story” 2010, Documentary Narrated by Inside the NFL (iTV) (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Inside NASCAR The Green Room Inside the NFL (iTV) ’ ‘PG’ Å SHO 500 500 Fatale” widowed chef finds romance with a food critic. ‘PG-13’ Josh Brolin. iTV. ’ ‘R’ Å (iTV) (N) ‘PG’ Dumbest Stuff My Ride Rules My Ride Rules The Car Show Prove It (N) Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff My Ride Rules My Ride Rules The Car Show Prove It NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 303 Dumbest Stuff ››› “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs” 2009 ’ (7:41) ››› “Apocalypto” 2006, Adventure Rudy Youngblood, Raoul Trujillo. ’ ‘R’ Å Torchwood: Miracle Day ‘14’ Å ›› “Country Strong” 2010 ‘PG-13’ STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:05) ›› “Maid in Manhattan” ’ (4:45) ›› “Last Dance” 1996 Sharon Stone. A clemency worker ›› “Adventures of Power” 2008 Ari Gold. A dreamer wants to “Maximum Velocity” 2003 Dale Midkiff. Premiere. A catastrophic (9:35) ›› “Jackass: The Movie” 2002 Johnny Knoxville. Nitwits “All American Orgy” 2009 Laura SilverTMC 525 525 tries to save a woman awaiting execution. become the world’s greatest air-drummer. Å storm threatens the planet. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å perform stunts and pull practical jokes. ‘R’ man. Premiere. ’ ‘R’ Å Madden 2012 Pro-Am Special ››› “North Dallas Forty” (1979, Comedy-Drama) Nick Nolte, Mac Davis. Adv. Sports Adv. Sports Adv. Sports Adv. Sports VS. 27 58 30 209 ››› “North Dallas Forty” (1979, Comedy-Drama) Nick Nolte, Mac Davis. ››› “Steel Magnolias” 1989, Comedy-Drama Sally Field, Dolly Parton. ‘PG’ Ghost Whisperer The One ‘PG’ Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å WE 143 41 174 118 ››› “Steel Magnolias” 1989, Comedy-Drama Sally Field, Dolly Parton. ‘PG’


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 7, 2011 E3

CALENDAR TODAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 3-7 p.m.; Mirror Pond parking lot, eastern end of Drake Park; 541-408-4998 or www.bendfarmers market.com. MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Featuring traditional island dances and music by the Hokulea Dancers; food vendors available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or redmondsummerconcerts.com. PORTLAND CELLO PROJECT: The cello fusion group performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. “WYNTON MARSALIS AND ERIC CLAPTON PLAY THE BLUES”: A screening of the musicians performing at the Lincoln Center; $12.50; 7:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347 or www.fathomevents.com.

THURSDAY GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Into the Wild” by Jon Krakauer; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. RUN TO THE CASCADES MOTORCYCLE RALLY: The rally includes camping, music, racing and more; $25 day pass, $60 event pass in advance, $75 event pass at the gate; 3 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6575 or www.runtothecascades.com. RINDY AND MARV ROSS: The Portland-based musicians, from Quarterflash and The Trail Band, perform; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “FUDDY MEERS”: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of the dark comedy about a woman’s attempt to regain the memories she loses each night; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. DIEGO’S UMBRELLA: The San Francisco-based pirate polka band performs; $7 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. REVEREND HORTON HEAT: The Dallas-based rockabilly band performs, with Nashville Pussy; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www. randompresents.com.

FRIDAY RUN TO THE CASCADES MOTORCYCLE RALLY: The rally includes camping, music, racing and more; $25 day pass, $60 event pass in advance, $75 event pass at the gate; 10-12:30 a.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6575 or www. runtothecascades.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or www. bendfarmersmarket.com. REDMOND FRIDAY FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Redmond Greenhouse, 4101 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-604-5156 or redmondfridaymarket@gmail.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-7 p.m.; North Ash Street and West Main Avenue; www. sistersfarmersmarket.com. MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor

screening of “Coraline”; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Compass Park, 2500 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; www.nwxevents.com. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL: Threeday folk music festival including performances by Dave Alvin, Steve Forbert, Mary Gauthier and more; $95 weekend pass; 6 p.m.-1 a.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-4979, info@sistersfolkfestival.org or www. sistersfolkfestival.org. YOGIS UNITE!: Meet yoga instructors and mingle with yogis; registration requested; $45 for three-day event, fees for credit/ debit; see website for individual class prices; 6-9 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-382-8436, information@ yogisunitebend.com or http:// yogisunitebend.com. “FUDDY MEERS”: Opening night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of the dark comedy about a woman’s attempt to regain the memories she loses each night; with a champagne and dessert reception; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. “STEEL MAGNOLIAS”: A screening of the 1989 PG-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. PILOT BUTTE STAR PARTY: Gather at the butte’s summit and tour the night sky; telescopes provided; free; 7:30-10 p.m.; Pilot Butte State Park, Northeast Pilot Butte Summit Drive, Bend; 541-388-6055, ext. 27 or cristina.mastrangelo@state.or.us.

SATURDAY HIGH DESERT SWAP MEET & CAR SHOW: A sale of antiques and more; proceeds benefit local and regional charities; free admission; 7 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-4467 or bramsey@bendbroadband.com. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643. SPORTSMAN JAMBOREE COLLECTIBLE SHOW: A show of guns, knives, coins and collectibles; food available; proceeds benefit the La Pine Senior Activity Center; $5, $4 with a trade gun, free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-536-6237. YOGIS UNITE!: An outdoor yoga event with classes, exhibitors, a raffle and more; registration requested; $45 for three-day event, fees for credit/debit; see website for individual class prices; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; information@ yogisunitebend.com or http:// yogisunitebend.com. ANTIQUE APPRAISAL FAIR: Appraisers offer estimates and answer questions about heirlooms, two per attendee; with workstations on caring for heirlooms and photographs; $5; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-389-1813. BEND CASTING GAMES: A flyfishing casting tournament; with a barbecue lunch; proceeds benefit Deschutes Trout Unlimited; $25; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Orvis, 320 S.W. Powerhouse Drive; 541-312-8200, deschutestu@gmail.com or www. deschutestu.org. FESTIVAL OF CULTURES: With cultural booths, dance troupes, live music, food and more; free; 10 a.m.8 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-382-4366 or www .festivalofcultures.info. RUN TO THE CASCADES MOTORCYCLE RALLY: The rally

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

includes camping, music, racing and more; $25 day pass, $60 event pass in advance, $75 event pass at the gate; 10-12:30 a.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6575 or www.runtothecascades.com. UNDER PRESSURE: Watch artists use road equipment to make art prints; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759. VOLLEYBALL FOR BABIES: Volleyball competition; proceeds benefit March of Dimes and Bend Beach Volleyball courts; $80 per four-person team; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; sand volleyball courts, across from Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend; 541-548-8194 or dmarbell@ farmersagent.com. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL: Threeday folk music festival including performances by Dave Alvin, Steve Forbert, Mary Gauthier and more; $95 weekend pass; 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-5494979, info@sistersfolkfestival.org or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. 9/11 ANNIVERSARY BARBECUE: Barbecue meal, with live music; proceeds benefit the Wounded Warrior Program; donations accepted; noon; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. HISTORY DAY: Featuring loggingthemed exhibits, games, live music, food and more; free; noon-4 p.m.; Redmond Museum, 529 S.W. Seventh St.; 541-316-1777. WALK TO DEFEAT ALS: A threemile walk to raise awareness of Lou Gehrig’s disease; registration required; proceeds benefit ALS research; donations accepted; noon, check-in at 11 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 800-681-9851 or www .walktodefeatals.org. MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “Rudy”; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-389-0995 or www.c3events.com. “FUDDY MEERS”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the dark comedy about a woman’s attempt to regain the memories she loses each night; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org.

prints; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL: Threeday folk music festival including performances by Dave Alvin, Steve Forbert, Mary Gauthier and more; $95 weekend pass; 10:15 a.m.-4:45 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-5494979, info@sistersfolkfestival.org or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. REMEMBERING 9/11: A tribute honoring emergency service personnel; Bruce Russell will speak about his experiences in New York following 9/11; free; 10:45 a.m.12:30 p.m.; Culver Christian Church, 501 W. 4th Ave.; 541-546-3301 or culver4jesus@netscape.net. ANNUAL GREAT DRAKE PARK DUCK RACE: Event includes live music, food, activity booths and duck races; proceeds from duck sales benefit local charities; free admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www.theduckrace.com. “FUDDY MEERS”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the dark comedy about a woman’s attempt to regain the memories she loses each night; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. SECOND SUNDAY: Freddy Vilches reads from a selection of his works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. BARN DANCE AND BARBECUE: Featuring a locally sourced barbecue, live music and a silent auction; proceeds benefit the Oregon League of Conservation Voters; $20, $50 per family; 3-7 p.m.; Hollinshead Barn, 1235 N.E. Jones Road, Bend; 541968-8269 or ashley@olcv.org. ICE CREAM SOCIAL: Children are introduced to various musical instruments and learn about programs at the school; free; 3:30-5:30 p.m.; Cascade School of Music, 200 N.W. Pacific Park Lane, Bend; 541-382-6866.

Leah Missbach Day, who wears designer clothing, but removes the labels or tags for comfort, in Chicago. “I cut them out because they’re scratchy and they bug me,” she said. “I’ve got a whole drawer full of tags.”

MONDAY

Sally Ryan New York Times News Service

“THE CHILD”: A screening of the documentary about challenges to parental rights and American family values; free; 6:30 p.m.; Highland Baptist Church, 3100 S.W. Highland Ave., Redmond; 541-639-7784.

SUNDAY PATRIOT DAY CEREMONY: Featuring music, a reading of a city proclamation, flag displays and more memorializing the victims of the 9/11 attack; free; 7 a.m.; Brooks Park, Bend Heroes Memorial, 35 N.W. Drake Road, Bend; 541-388-5591. SPORTSMAN JAMBOREE COLLECTIBLE SHOW: A show of guns, knives, coins and collectibles; food available; proceeds benefit the La Pine Senior Activity Center; $5, $4 with a trade gun, free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-5366237. VETERANS TRIBUTE BREAKFAST: Breakfast to honor members of the military and to recognize their sacrifices; registration requested; $5; 9 a.m.; Elks Lodge, 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-678-5483 or mphillis@ councilonaging.org. MUTT STRUT & MORE: Featuring a 1.3-mile dog walk, games, contests and more; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Central Oregon; free, $20 for walk; 10 a.m.-1 p.m., 9 a.m. registration for walk; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-382-3537. UNDER PRESSURE: Watch artists use road equipment to make art

TUESDAY REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: 11:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or www. localharvest.org/redmond-farmersmarket-M31522. FLY FISHING IN THE PATAGONIA: Jeff Perin talks about fly fishing in Chile and Argentina; free; 6:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7040 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. SHARING THE ARCTIC’S NEWEST DISCOVERIES: Liz O’Connell shares video and stories about volcanoes, archaeology and permafrost from scientists working in Alaska; free; 7 p.m., 6:30 p.m. social; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-389-0785.

WEDNESDAY Sept. 14 BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 3-7 p.m.; Mirror Pond parking lot, eastern end of Drake Park; 541-408-4998 or www.bendfarmers market.com. CRAIG CAROTHERS: The Nashvillebased singer-songwriter performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

M T For Wednesday, Sept. 7

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE GUARD (R) 2:50, 5:30, 7:55 THE HELP (PG-13) 2, 5, 8 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG13) 2:30, 5:20, 7:50 ONE DAY (PG-13) 2:20, 4:50, 7:20 SARAH’S KEY (PG-13) 2:10, 4:40, 7:10 THE WHISTLEBLOWER (R) 2:40, 5:10, 7:40

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

APOLLO 18 (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 9:45 CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER (PG-13) 12:50, 6:50, 9:35 CARS 2 (G) 3:50 COLOMBIANA (PG-13) 1:40, 4:40, 7:40, 10:05 CONAN THE BARBARIAN (R) 10:20 COWBOYS & ALIENS (PG13) 12:55, 3:55, 7, 9:40 CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE. (PG-

13) 12:05, 3, 6:20, 9 THE DEBT (R) 1, 4, 7:20, 10:05 DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK (R) 2, 5, 8, 10:15 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 (PG-13) 12:25, 3:40, 7:10, 10:10 THE HELP (PG-13) 12:15, 3:25, 6:45, 9:55 HORRIBLE BOSSES (R) 7:50, 10:15 OUR IDIOT BROTHER (R) 1:50, 4:50, 7:35, 9:50 RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 12:40, 3:05, 6:10, 9:20 SEVEN DAYS IN UTOPIA (G) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:10 SHARK NIGHT (PG-13) 4:30 SHARK NIGHT 3-D (PG13) 1:30, 7:30, 10 THE SMURFS (PG) Noon, 3:20 SPY KIDS 4: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD 3-D (PG) 12:20, 3:15 WYNTON MARSALIS AND ERIC CLAPTON PLAY THE BLUES (no MPAA rating) 7:30

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend,

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and older only. Guests younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) LARRY CROWNE (PG-13) 9:30 TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON (PG-13) 6 ZOOKEEPER (PG) 3

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

APOLLO 18 (PG-13) 5, 7, 9 CONAN THE BARBARIAN (R) 6:30, 9 RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 5, 7:15, 9:30 SHARK NIGHT (PG-13) 5:15, 7:15, 9:15 SPY KIDS 4: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD (PG) 4

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

BUCK (PG) 7 THE HELP (PG-13) 6:15

MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG-13) 7 THE TREE OF LIFE (PG-13) 6:30

MADRAS CINEMA 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

BAD TEACHER (R) 4:45 CARS 2 (G) 6:45 CONAN THE BARBARIAN (R) 7 DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK (R) 4:50, 7:15 FRIGHT NIGHT (R) 4:35 RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 4:30, 6:45 SHARK NIGHT 3-D (PG-13) 4:40, 6:50

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

CONAN THE BARBARIAN (R) 4, 7 SPY KIDS 4: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD (UPSTAIRS — PG) 6 EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Labels Continued from E1 Some people, like Day, find labels uncomfortable, while others object to having another person’s name or corporate logo on their clothes. Still others think tags detract from the attractiveness of garments, particularly when they show through something sheer or flip up so they are visible above a collar or waistband. (All the more distressing when strangers, or your mother-in-law, tuck them back in for you.) Susan Fisher, 56, of New York, who wears designer clothes by Donna Karan, Carolina Herrera and Jil Sander, uses nail scissors to snip the stitching around labels and tweezers to pull out the threads. “Why leave them in there when they’re only going to annoy you?” she said. “The washing instructions are meaningless to me because I err on the side of caution and dry clean everything, and I don’t really care who made it as long as it looks good on me.” Those who are sensitive about their size may also be quick to cut out labels. Rozlind Power, 27, an events planner in Houston who used to sell clothes in a highend boutique, said it’s common for people to remove labels if the size is bigger than their self-image. “It’s understandable when sizes vary so much,” Power said. “I wear an XS at Banana Republic but have a bridesmaid’s dress by Betsey Johnson that is size 10, which I would probably cut out if I had to look at it all the time.” Zak Graff, 34, a marketing consultant in Los Angeles, said he likes the cut and fit of the Spanish brand Zara, but “the labels drive me crazy because they are 2 to 3 inches long and stacked one on top of another.” (Any clothing sold in the European Union must have attached labels translated into every member country’s language.) Graff keeps a seam ripper in his dopp kit to remove such aesthetic and potentially allergenic offenses. “I take out the labels when I cut off the hanging price tag,” he said. “It’s this whole process after I buy something new.” But before he can remove a label, he has to actually see it. Some brands, like the French active-wear line Aigle, as well as Elie Tahari and Josie Natori have within the last three years begun using clear labels. Made of flexible plastic, these are usually in the side seam.

Tagless improvements Tagless labels, which first appeared a decade ago but have become more prevalent within the last two to three years, involve either stamping or ironing text onto the garment. “People really have issues with labels,” said Rick Elmore, vice president for product development at Hanesbrands, one of the first companies to feature tagless labels. “We were hearing it again and again.” Athletic-wear brands including Nike, Adidas, Reebok and Puma soon followed, and now tagless labels can be found on garments made by many top brands including Banana Republic, J.Crew, Gap, Ann Taylor and H&M. While there were early complaints that the ink used in tagless labels flaked and became prickly after several washings, the technology has improved. “The digital presses are more precise so we use less ink and it settles into the garment, so it doesn’t look as plasticky and it’s softer,” said Shawn Neville, vice president for retail branding at Avery Dennison Corp., which develops and makes labels. “That’s why you see more well-known brands going tagless these days.” But tagless labels can fade over time, according to Scott Schuman, who writes the Sartorialist fashion blog. “And then you end up putting on your T-shirt backwards, which is a total pain,” he said. He believes labels are an important design feature that denote quality and even add value like an artist’s signature on a print. Indeed, vintage clothes with intact labels sell for higher prices than those without. “We all like to complain about labels but we secretly love them,” Schuman said. Nontraditional designer labels can be a mark of distinction. Consider Martin Margiela’s blank white label, Stella McCartney’s delicate metal chain, Peggy Jennings’ bit of lace and Rick Owens’ two slim, parallel gray ribbons. Marcia Sherrill, 50, a handbag designer in New York, said she has a “moment of bonding” looking at the designer labels in her clothes before getting dressed. “To see the Givenchy and Yves Saint Laurent brands is a reminder that this little girl from Alabama made good,” she said. That doesn’t stop her, though, from putting a Band-Aid over them to keep them from scratching.


E4 Wednesday, September 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 7, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BI GA R

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011: Be smart — avoid arguments, yet clearly own your feelings. You won’t hold in your emotions and cause yourself secondary issues and at the same time you will keep the air clear. You often are too concerned about your finances, being such a practical sign. You also can learn to visualize and manifest more often. If you are single, romance won’t elude you, but on the other hand, be discriminating as to who you date and make a commitment to. You might want to play the field. If you are attached, the two of you need to walk away from fights and eye the greater good of the coupling. A new addition is likely. CAPRICORN encourages you to imagine. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Take the lead, knowing some opportunities only happen once. A partner might not feel like bailing out, but he or she certainly has an issue, which for now is armored. You could be surprised by what goes down. Tonight: Avoid an argument. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Reach out for someone at a distance. You could be trying to make an impression when you don’t need to. Stop; clear; be yourself. An argument could be inevitable, but don’t hit below the belt. Tonight: Try to understand where someone is coming from. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Investigate new possibilities

with the help of a key associate. Together you’ll get past a block you might be experiencing. Be open to different types of selfexpression. Not everyone says things the way you want them to. Tonight: Togetherness works. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH You cannot always let others dominate the scene, but right now, you might not have a choice. Slow down and evaluate what would be most effective. Don’t allow insecurity and/or a low level of negativity to dominate. Tonight: The only answer is “yes.” LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Stay on top of your work and projects. Try not to cut someone off, and be as brief as you can. You might be best off screening your calls. Surely you feel overwhelmed at the possibility of everything you feel is about to happen. Tonight: Listen carefully. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Allow for greater giveand-take right now. You might be surprised by what is going on within a friendship, but given your energy and ingenuity, you are right on top of any unexpected developments. Someone around you could be quite distraught. Tonight: Enjoy every single moment. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You are anchored and centered. You need to understand why you are having such a strong reaction with a key person. Try to demonstrate more warmth. You could feel stressed by your family and career demands. Tonight: Happy at home. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

HHHHH You read a situation well, but be careful about absorbing another person’s anger. Clear the air. If you are resisting, look within — maybe you are more comfortable with the distance. Feel empowered through mastery of your feelings. Tonight: Hanging out. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH You might have difficulty unleashing someone who feels a lot like an albatross. You might try diplomacy, but arguments could start brewing. Choose your words with care. A friend could be difficult in either case. Tonight: Treat yourself well. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Your energy, poise and knowledge could be quite challenging to many. You certainly will see the results of these qualities. You cannot turn a situation around, for now. Let the other person have his or her space. Say little. Tonight: A force to be dealt with. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Know when to back off. News from another person isn’t forthcoming. You are not getting the full story. Don’t make a judgment just yet; stay open. A pleasant attitude will go far without revealing too much! Tonight: Some personal time. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Don’t hesitate to zero in on a long-term goal. Meetings hold promise. You’ll discover just how much others support you in a venture. Your sensitivity comes out when dealing with a child or loved one. Your goals might differ from someone else’s. Tonight: Midweek break. © 2011 by King Features Syndicate


E6 Wednesday, September 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Groceries Continued from E1

The bottom line If you’re looking for ways to save, put your monthly food budget under the microscope. Cut back on budget-wrecking impulse buying by planning meals and sticking to a shopping list. Make coupon clipping more effective by combining store circular discounts with online offers, manufacturers’ deals and double-coupon savings.

Before you shop Make a meal plan for the coming week, focusing on dishes that incorporate similar ingredients. Bonus points if your recipes create leftovers that can be repurposed into new dishes — such as Monday’s roasted chicken that becomes Tuesday’s chicken soup. Then make your list. Sign up for savings cards at all your local supermarkets, and provide your e-mail and physical addresses to get updates on deals. Some stores offer additional discounts on their websites. But clipping coupons reaps significant savings, provided you’re willing to devote the time and effort. First, keep your shopping list handy. Starting with the weekly store circulars in the Sunday paper and in stores, check whether any items on your list are among the discounted offerings. Don’t clip coupons for things that aren’t on your list. Yes, there is such a thing as “extreme couponing” — there are dozens of Web sites and a TLC TV series dedicated to the craze. While it’s not everyone’s bag, there are tricks to be gleaned from the experts. When you find a store coupon for an item on your list, do an Internet search for manufacturers’ coupons for the same item. Many stores let you combine coupons, and sites such as Coupons. com, CouponMom.com and MoneySavingMom.com offer searchable coupon databases. Find out when stores offer double-coupon savings.

Save in the store Stick to your grocery list. Shopping alone can minimize the impulse buys. If you’re just picking up a few items, don’t use a shopping cart — you’ll buy less if you have to carry everything. Most stores have produce and

perishable foods lining the perimeter. Do as much of your shopping here as you can — and stay away from the pricier prepared foods in the center aisles. Remember the store circular mentioned above? Usually, the products on the front page are priced low to encourage you to come into the store. So stock up for later. Does the name-brand spaghetti sauce taste that much better than the store brand? Probably not. Experiment with lower-priced store brands to give your budget a break. Not sure which product size is the best deal? Comparing unit prices — the price per ounce or per pound, usually listed in a smaller font — lets you easily see which items are cheapest. When it makes sense, buy in bulk — but that doesn’t mean you should lug home a giant vat of mayo. Bulk buying can be as simple as choosing only the amount of spices you need from a bin, instead of buying full-size containers that you might not use up entirely.

Budget between trips The savviest shoppers swear by a no-waste policy, which means that every leftover gets used. Got veggies and fruits that are nearing the end of the line? Toss them into soups and smoothies to stretch your dollars. Keep a running grocery list in the kitchen and add to it as you use up ingredients. This makes it easy to focus on what you really need, plus you’ll have a list ready when store circulars arrive each week. Die-hard savers keep “price books,” running rosters that note what they purchase, where they bought it and how much it cost — and they update it after every shopping trip. It might sound extreme, but it can help you track price trends and determine which stores have the best prices on the items you buy. For some consumers, it makes sense to pay the upfront membership costs at Costco, Sam’s Club or BJ’s, especially if you can split the bulk packages (and the membership costs) with a friend. If you find you’re spending a small fortune on, say, peanut butter — and a neighbor is, too — it might be a smart move.

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Gear Continued from E1 Jeremy Nelson, owner of Skjersaa’s, said he often recommends his seasonlong lease program to parents over buying a package. He offers gear for skiing and snowboarding at $150 for the season. The program kicks off Oct. 1. “For most kids, unless they’re competing, then consider leasing,” he said. The reason, Nelson said, is to ensure proper fit throughout the winter. Gear that fits helps children grow in the sport. They don’t feel frustrated by flopping around with skis too long or boots too large. If the boot is way too big, it can even be a question of safety when zooming down the mountain. And an added benefit is parents don’t have to pick up and drop off the gear at the shop with each outing. The Skjersaa’s and Powder House programs allow those leasing to get refitted as often as needed. So the boy who grows two shoe sizes in a school year or the girl whose skill improves quickly can adjust as the season wears on. “I grew up using gear from my brother who was three years older than me,” Nelson recalled. “But when the boot is too big, it’s harder to control the skis.” The same holds true for nordic skiing, said Bonacker of Sunnyside Sports. She recommended that when introducing children to classic skiing — and later skate skiing — it’s best to rent and get a good fit. Sunnyside offers daily rentals for children at $10 for classic and $12 for skate, although she advises waiting to introduce skate skiing until age 7 or 8. “With skis, the ’ol buying them with a bunch of growing room can really shoot parents in the foot,” she said. “Then the kids aren’t going to enjoy it.” When Bonacker fits young beginners, she said she errs for skis on the short side. That helps them learn technique. Shanda McGee, owner of Powder House, said her shop offers seasonlong rentals for nordic, snowshoeing, snowboarding and alpine, including regular and twin-tip skis. Twin tips, which are popular with terrain park riders, curl up on both ends and are for skiing backward or doing tricks. The starting price for skiing and snowboarding season leases, McGee said, is $149, although twin-tips cost more. That price

Mt. Bachelor deal For parents seeking an economic way to introduce skiing or snowboarding, take a look at Mt. Bachelor’s Ski or Ride in 5 deal. The program, launched in 2009, is geared toward beginners and available from age 6 to adult. For $199, it offers five lessons, gear rental and a beginner lift ticket, which covers the Carousel and Sunrise chairlifts. Once the lessons are complete, children and teens receive a free pass for the rest of the season. Parents must find their children gear after graduation. But

last season Mt. Bachelor offered graduates a chance to purchase a package at a discount. In addition, Ski or Ride in 5 graduates 18 or younger are offered 50 percent off a season pass the following year, and 25 percent off a pass the year after that. Andy Goggins, marketing director for Mt. Bachelor, said the program has proven popular. “We’ve had a surprising number of parents take it with their children,” he said. The start date for the program is Jan. 2. Contact: www.mtbachelor. com.

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

The Powder House in Bend offers seasonlong rentals. This Rossignol snowboard (above) and these Atomic nordic skis (left and right) are part of the shop’s seasonal rental fleet.

doesn’t include poles. She added that the program is so popular that when it kicks off on Oct. 1, a line will extend out the door. “It’s just great for families with growing kids, and you cannot beat it for beginners,” she said.

Opt to own Sometimes, however, it’s time to get the kids their own setup. Owning a gear package might be more attractive for those who want to zip straight to the snow, rather than stop by the shop for a daily rental. It also starts to make more sense when children’s growth slows, as it does for some by the time they hit high school. Also, those involved in racing programs through organizations like the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation or the Bend Endurance Academy will possibly need their own gear. It’s best to talk to the organization in those cases to get a sense of what will best suit the child’s needs. Again, sporting goods stores throughout Central Oregon are now starting to get in their winter goods and are offering sales on packages. Between boots, bindings and skis or board, expect to

spend several hundred dollars. There are other options for owning, as well. Those who do the season lease from Skjersaa’s can opt to keep the package. How it works is Skjersaa’s charges $299 at the lease outset. Those who return the gear get a refund, bringing the seasonlong price down to $150. “They may want to take it into next season,” Nelson said. Secondhand shops throughout Central Oregon also offer children’s sizes for snow sports. The Gear Peddler, which has locations in Bend and Redmond, advertised last week on its website youth ski packages starting at $50. The granddaddy of secondhand gear opportunities is the Skyliners Winter Sports Swap, slated for this year on Oct. 15. Put on by the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation, the swap packs Mt. Bachelor’s bus barn with winter gear and wear (see “Gear up for grabs,” see Page E1). Needless to say, by the time you find the best gear and get it fitted and waxed, a coating of white will have dusted the mountains. Heidi Hagemeier can be reached at 541-617-7828 or hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 7, 2011 F1

C LASSIFIEDS

To place your ad visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

The Bulletin

General Merchandise

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208

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634

675

Guns, Hunting and Fishing

Misc. Items

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Employment Opportunities

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

RV Parking

Pug Puppies, Black AKC, 2 boys, 1 girl, $500 each, 541-788-7313 after 7 pm.

Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/

Tiny White Pups ¾ Maltese, ¼ Yorkie, 2 fem., $300; 2 males, $250; cash 541-546-7909 Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage costume Jewelry. Top dollar Yorkie Puppy, 17 wks, 1 tiny paid for Gold & Silver. I buy male left, vet checked. $600. by the Estate, Honest Artist. Will deliver to Central OR. Elizabeth, 541-633-7006 1-541-792-0375, Mt. Vernon. WANTED: Good-running Mini Yorkie Pups (3), purebred feVan - Will trade beautiful males, quiet temperament, Breedlove Guitar & Peavey $850, 541-388-3322. Acoustic Amp. ($2500 value). 541-350-4656 210

Pets and Supplies

Furniture & Appliances

Adult companion cats FREE to seniors, disabled & veterans! Enhance your life with a new furry friend. Tame, altered, shots, ID chip, more. Photos, etc. at www.craftcats.org. 389-8420, 647-2181. Open Sat/Sun 1-5, other days by appt. 65480 78th St., Bend. Border Collie Pups, nice dogs, working parents, first shots, $150. 541-546-6171 Boxer/Bulldog CKC Reg. Flashy Valley Bulldogs. Taking deposits. $1200. 541-325-3376

Chihuahua/Lhasa Apso Puppies (2), first shots $250 541-280-1840

Chihuahua - Micro Teacup, charting to weigh 3 lbs full grown, long hair, exceptional, $400, 541-771-2606

Cockatiels: 2 males, 2 females, w/large cage & accessories, $150 for all. 541-350-9713 Dachshund, AKC minis, smooth coat, choc & tan, 1 F, 4 M, shots/wormed, $325-$375. Pix available. 541-420-6044

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Dark solid wood Ethan Allen coffee table $95. Blond entry table & 2 matching Italian chairs, $150, Blond wine cabinet $95. 2 lamps $25 & $35. Wicker chair $25. Call 541-633-7076.

Lots of kittens/cats avail. to adopt thru local rescue group. Sat/Sun 1-5 at sanctuary, other days & from foster homes by appt. (call 541-647-2181). 65480 78th St, Bend. Altered, shots, ID chip & vet visit incl. Low adoption fees, discount for 2! 389-8420, www.craftcats.org

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Antiques & Collectibles 24th Annual Coburg Antique Fair

Rifles: Mann/Schon 30/06; SAKO Forester .308; M70 .257R; M70 S.G. .270; Ruger #IH 7x57. 541-389-1392

Ruger Vaquero .44 Mag/ Special, like new, Full leather western Gun belt incl. Cowboy action job, $450 OBO, 541-480-1482. Sportsman Jamboree Gun, Knife, Coin & Collectibles La Pine Senior Activity Ctr. 16450 Victory Way, La Pine (next to Bi-Mart) Sat 9/10, 9-5; Sun 9/11,9-3 Adults $5 ($4 w/trade gun); Children 12 & under, Free! Exhibitor info: 541-536-6237

UTAH PERMIT Class w/ LIVE-FIRE BONUS. $99. Sat., 9/10. 817-789-5395. Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

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22LR Mossberg semi-auto rifle, synthetic stock, 2mags, like new, $200. 541-647-8931 AR-15 DEL-TON: 223 16'' barrel, shoulder sling, front grip top handle, perfect condition, $800. AR-15 BUSHMASTER: 223, 24” stainless bull barrel, tripod, Springfield Armory 4-14x40 scope smooth trigger action, $1800 OR trade this for Discovery 1 BROWNING: LIGHT TWELVE AUTO 12 gauge, gold trigger very nice condition $500. I am in Bend 541-241-0014 Baby Eagle Pistol, .40 S&W, 6 clips, few rounds fired, some holster wear, $450 Firm, 541-480-1482.

Pit Bull Puppy, blue nose blue, shots/wormed, $100 to approved home. 541-357-0353 Poodle Pups, AKC toy for sale, Adults for adoption to approved homes. 541-475-3889

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Lost Cat on 8/23, Gray & black Tabby female, La Pine/Bend area. Call 541-598-7231.

Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands! Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

541-647-8261 La Pine Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 52684 Hwy 97 541-536-3234 Open to the public . Rough Sawn Lumber Fir, 2x6, 4x4, 1x6, 1x8, Sold in one unit, 541-389-5355.

The Hardwood Outlet Wood Floor Super Store

Belly Fat A Problem? FREE DVD Reveals weight loss myths. Get ANSWERS to lasting weight loss. Call 866-700-2424

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541-322-0496 266

Heating and Stoves

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

TV, Stereo and Video

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

13” Color TV, $30, please call 541-647-1276 for more information.

• Receipts should include,

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Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

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Musical Instruments Acrosonic Piano, built by Baldwin. Excellent cond, $500 or best offer. 541-548-2404

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Travel/Tickets Def Leppard & Heart tickets (2), Vancouver, WA, 7:30 pm 9/14/11, Lawn section, Row GAO, Seats 39-40. $200 total. 541-771-6077

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name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

All Year Dependable Firewood: Dry , split lodgepole, 1 for $155 or 2 for $300. No limit. Cash, check, or credit. Bend 541-420-3484

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

541-389-9663

For newspaper delivery , call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

Misc. Items Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. DIABETIC TEST STRIPS wanted: will pay up to $25/box. Call Sharon 503-679-3605. Husqvarna Viking Sapphire 835 sewing machine, new, w/ cabinet, all quilting attachments, $1000. 503-910-0087

308

Farm Equipment and Machinery Ford Model 640 Tractor, circa 1954. Front loader hydraulic system totally rebuilt. 7-ft scraper blade; PTO; chains; new battery. Oldie but goodie! $3750. 541-382-5543

Premium Horse Hay Orchard Grass & Timothy Grass mix, 2nd cut, $190/ ton. Will be ready around 9/12. Sarah, 541-419-5942 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost. 541-546-6171.

341

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Think Ahead! Unused bio & non-biodegradable gardening pots, small to large, hanging ones too! 75 @ $1.00-5.00 ea. 541-330-9935

454

Looking for Employment Nanny from London, England, great experience & references. Reasonable rates; will pick up school. 541-977-8397 Seeking a Head Hunter to help with my job search for an Admin Assistant position. Please call 541.382.6939.

476

Employment Opportunities Automotive Service Advisor If you are hard working, goal oriented, have proven experience, and CSI focused we may have a career for you. Send resume to P.O. 6676, Bend, OR 97708

Caregiver Prineville senior care home looking for Care Manager for 2-3 24 hour shifts per week. Must be mature and compassionate & pass criminal background check. Ref. required. 541-447-5773.

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 Field Mechanic: Exp. w/Logging & heavy equip. repair, long hours & weekends. Extensive travel in Central OR. & N. CA. Wages DOE, 541-330-1930 Firefighter Paramedic: LaPine Rural Fire Protection District will test & establish hiring list to use to fill current and future vacancies. Applications and more information is available via: • In Person at the District Offices 51590 Huntington Road, LaPine during business hours of 8 am - 5 pm, M-F. • On our website at: www.lapinefire.org • By E-mail info@lapinefire.com APPLICATION PERIOD CLOSES OCTOBER 3, 2011, 4 p.m. The La Pine Rural Fire Protection District is an ADA /Equal Opportunity Employer.

Horses and Equipment

Journeyman Electrician C & G Electric is seeking a AQHA Palomino Filly, 1 yr. 4 mo., Journeyman Electrician. Must fantastic bloodline, Continenhave valid license. Please call tal Black Burn & Little Steel 541-383-2523. Dust, 30% Poco Bueno, 100% Foundation, easy to work with, Livestock Truck Driver $1500, 541-419-3082 Excellent equip., flex schedules, progressive company, 401K 358 & insurance, $50,000/yr. NW only. Call 541-475-6681 Farmers Column

10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

375 Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS

Schools and Training

Adult Abuse Investigator Lutheran Community Services Northwest is seeking an Adult Abuse Investigator for individuals who experience Developmental Disabilities in Deschutes, Jefferson & Crook Counties. Bachelors degree in Human, Social Behavioral or Criminal Science and two (2) years experience in human services, law enforcement or investigative experience or an Associates degree in the Human, Behavioral or Criminal Science and four years of human services, law enforcement or investigative experience. Resume: LCSNW 365 NE Court St., Prineville, OR 97754. Fax: 541-447-6694. Email: crookcounty@lcsnw.org Closing: September 16, 2011

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Meat & Animal Processing Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole, grass & grain-fed, no hormones $3.25/lb., hanging weight, cut & wrap included. Please call 541-383-2523.

GRASS FED BEEF, quick sale special. $1.85/lb. hanging weight+kill, cut & wrap. Order now with deposit. Call 541-388-4687,541-610-6408

Medical Clare Bridge Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care Community are hiring Resident Care Associates. If you are interested in a health care career and enjoy helping others, we now have positions available. Must be able to pass a pre-employment drug screen and criminal history background check. We have competitive wages, benefits, and great paid time off plan. Please apply in person at 1099 NE Watt Way, Bend, OR. No phone calls please.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Finance & Business

500 528

Loans and Mortgages

Great Mid-Town Deal! 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath townhouse, W/D hookup, W/S paid, $625+ dep., 2940 NE Nikki Ct., 541-390-5615.

Call for Specials! Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2 bdrm 1 bath, granite, wood floors, underground parking/storage area, laundry on site, $650/mo. 541-480-3666

1 Mile From Old Mill - 2 Bdrm, 1 bath, garage, security dep. $595/mo. 580 SE Wilson, 541-385-0844 or se habla espanol: 714-227-3235.

STONE CREEK APARTMENTS 2 bdrm., 2 bath apartments W/D included, gas fireplaces 339 SE Reed Mkt. Rd., Bend Call about Move-In Specials 541-312-4222

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 2 bdrm., 1 bath, large upstairs unit, laundry onsite, no smoking/pets, W/S/G+gas paid, $500/mo. 358 NW 17th St., Gael, 541-350-2095.

FALL BLAST! Studios $375 1 Bdrm $400 Free Move-in Rent! • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond Close to schools, shopping, and parks! 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

Rural Redmond, nice 1 bdrm, semi-furnished, W/D, dishwasher, parking, yard, pets? utils/internet/cable paid, $575, avail. 9/15, 541-480-5274.

648

541-382-3402 LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Rentals

600

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend A Nice 3 bdrm, 1.75 bath 1428 sq. ft., woodstove, fenced yard, RV parking, 2.5 acres, horse OK. $995. 541480-3393 or 541-610-7803.

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend

630

Rooms for Rent East Bend room avail. now, $400+ 1/2 utilities, no pets. large closet, 541-280-5936.

STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

3 bdrm, 1 bath, 1008 sq. ft., woodstove, fenced yard, rear deck, sgl. garage w/opener, quiet cul-de-sac $895. 541-480-3393 or 610-7803 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Newer custom 2000 sq ft 3 bed, 2½ bath, fenced yd, wood floors, granite counters, etc. 20310 SE Knights Bridge Pl. $1195/mo. 541-350-2206

658

Houses for Rent Redmond

632

Apt./Multiplex General 1600 Sq.ft., 3 bdrm+den, 1.75 The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 2

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 2 Story 2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath, near East Side medical community, end unit w/fireplace, porches & fenced backyard, $1024 sq.ft., W/D hookups, W/S trash paid, walk to school & park. $650/mo + $800 security, 1 yr. lease, 2077 NE York Cir. 928-642-6572.

Customer Service Representative Immediate opening in the circulation department for an entry level Customer Service Representative. Looking for someone to assist our subscribers and delivery carriers with subscription transactions, account questions and delivery concerns. Essential: Positive attitude, strong service/team orientation, and problem-solving skills. Must be able to function comfortably in a fast-paced, performance-based customer call center environment and have accurate typing, phone skills and computer entry experience. Most work is done via telephone, so strong communication skills and the ability to multi-task is a must. Work shifts hours are Tuesday through Friday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. and Saturday 6 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Bring Containers

Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $625$650/mo. 541-385-6928.

Houses for Rent General

383

Look for us on Facebook. Open 7 Days a week,8 am-6 pm 541-934-2870

541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

638

Produce and Food THOMAS ORCHARDS Kimberly, OR: We will be at Farmer’s Market Wed. & Fri. in Bend, every week all summer! U-Pick: Freestone Canning Peaches - Loring/Elberta, Suncrest, Angelus, Elbertas, Zee Lady, ready Sat.$0.70/lb, Nectarines, $0.75/lb., Bartlett Pears, $0.60. Ready Picked: #2 Peaches, $10/box

1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625.

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

Farm Market

3 large zero-clearance fire325 places, showroom models, 1 right corner, 2 flat wall, $500 Hay, Grain and Feed ea, OBO. 1 newer woodstove, $1200 firm. Several gas & 100 Acres of Fall Pasture Avail. 9/20-11/20, E. of Terrebpellet stoves, $800 each onne, call Terry, OBO. All warrantied for 1 541-548-0731 for details. season. Call 541-548-8081

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Alpin e M e a d o w s T o w n h o m e s

SOCIAL SERVICES

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you proDO YOU NEED A vide personal information to GREAT EMPLOYEE companies offering loans or Lost on 8/30, a black & gray RIGHT NOW? credit, especially those day pack, between Columbia, Call The Bulletin before 11 asking for advance loan fees or Bend River Park, Brooka.m. and get an ad in to companies from out of state. swood, and DRW. Call publish the next day! If you have concerns or 541-280-9438. 385-5809. questions, we suggest you VIEW the Classifieds at: consult your attorney or call LOST Shih-Poo male, reported www.bendbulletin.com CONSUMER HOTLINE, stolen.“Frodo,” 15 lbs, cream 1-877-877-9392. color, Hollow Tree Ln, on9/2, 2:30pm. REWARD. Please BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? return, no questions asked; Private party will loan on real needs meds. 541-382-1551 estate equity. Credit, no Enthusiastic, Professional Team problem, good equity is all REMEMBER: If you have lost an player wanted to join our you need. Call now. Oregon animal, don't forget to check Chiropractic team! $12-$15hr Land Mortgage 388-4200. The Humane Society in DOE, Full Time, M-F, occaBend, 541-382-3537 sional weekends. Required Redmond, 541-923-0882 Exp: Grammar, spelling, typFREE Prineville, 541-447-7178; ing, math, Word, Excel, BANKRUPTCY OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420. 10-Key. No previous ChiroEVALUATION practic Experience needed. Skills Test given. We train visit our you. Please fax resumes and website at cover letters (541)388-0839 www.oregonfreshstart.com or email (Word or PDF only) dionne.applicant@gmail.com

LOST Nike prescription sunglasses on Green Lakes Trailhead, 8/22. 541-385-0956

300

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft.

400

Caregiver Foster Care home is seeking a candidate with proven skills caring for 3 to 5 elderly in a single home setting. Will train and hire immediately. Please call 541-617-8945.

Building Materials

(2) 12-foot Paddle Boards $140 each. Call 541-420-3277

Antiques Wanted: Tools, wood furniture, fishing, marbles, old signs, beer cans, costume jewelry. 541-389-1578

12g Mossberg maverick pump shotgun, syn stock, 28” bbl, like new $200. 541-647-8931

Lost Black Leather Wallet, on 9/1 around 3pm. SE Wilson/ Roosevelt, Bend. Reward for return of I.D., 541-408-3969

265

Sporting Goods - Misc.

248

Bend local, Pays CASH for GUNS! Call for info: 541-526-0617

Found young female Black Lab mix, 8/22, Sunriver. Call to identify, 541-593-6825

On Oxygen? Nice oxygen concentrater, $500. Call 520-891-0258.

Ruger M77 .338 mag with 3 x 9 Nikon scope. Like new. $850. 541-923-9778.

Health and Beauty Items

Autographed Guitar collection, must sell. Stones, Zeppelin, Eagles, others. Appraised over $2,000 each. Asking $450 each, with COA. Call for pix. 541-550-1936

Medical Equipment

Found Fly Fishing Flies, 8/27 off S. Century Dr. Call to identify, 541-383-1767.

Ruger 10/22 tact. w/scope, $285. Marlin 22mag rifle, w/scope, $250.541-647-8931

Camping Package: tent, stove, lantern, ice chest, mattress and sleeping bag. $100. 541-350-4656

Browning Safari 7mm mag with Redfield Tracker scope, $800; Winchester Mdl 94 Classic lever action 30-30, octagon barrel, $650; Glock 19 Crimson Trace laser grip, $550. Tim, 541-350-5674.

Miniature Schnauzers, 14 weeks, $400, housebroken, some training, 541-905-1793

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com

Remington 870 mag, 12g shot gun, wood stock, 28” bbl, $200. 541-647-8931

Guns, Hunting and Fishing

Lab puppies (2). Superb temperament mother and father. puppies are black with some white $100. Please call 541-420-5895, for more info. Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Portland Expo Center Sept. 10th & 11th, 2011 Sat., 9-6, Sun. 9-4 Admission $9 503-363-9564 wesknodelgunshows.com

Found: Duffel Bag, red, intersection of Cooley & 97, Sun. 9/4, 541-312-9312.

SOLID MARBLE COLUMNS Beautiful columns at Equine Outreach. Sold for over $2,800 ea. There are 5 columns that weigh about 1,200 lbs ea. and would be great in a custom home or supports for a pergola on a deck. They are 6’8” tall & available for only $3,750 for all 5. Call Gary Everett 541-480-6130.

246

Kitten, neutered, white w/black spots & matching adult female, $25, 541-548-5516.

270

GIANT Gun & Knife Show

Employment

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

Lost and Found

Remington 12g semi-auto shotgun, wood stock, humpback, $200 541-647-8931

ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES The Bulletin reserves the right AKC registered, first shots to publish all ads from The & microchipped. Ready to Bulletin newspaper onto The go! $2000. 541 416-0375 Bulletin Internet website. Free adult cats/mousers for barn/shop, fixed, shots. We deliver. 541-389-8420. Free German Shepherd/New 242 Foundland mix, 4 yr. neuExercise Equipment tered male, to good home, 503-999-7542. Weslo Exercise bike, new, Free Poodle: To good home, $145, please call miniature 10 yr. old female, 541-647-1276. red, Garbriele, 541-771-9551

Frenchie/ Pug puppies. Beautiful colors. Puppy package incl. $100 deposit . $700 to $650 OBO ea. 541-548-0747 or 541-279-3588. Golden Retriever purebred puppies, 8 weeks old, $300. 541-788-2005

Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

Range, 30” Kenmore Gas, like new, works perfectly, stainless, $250, 623-466-4626

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Your Backyard Birdfeeding Specialists!

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809.

Doxies Mini, AKC parents, $325 (?): 1 boy, 2 girls. 8 wks, shots, dewclaws removed. 541-389-2517.

Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

INDIAN SUMMER Time to bring the outdoors in! An affordable selection of art & handcrafts, vintage, new & like new goods inspired by nature. For you, your home & garden. The Whistle Stop 1900 NE Division St, Bend. Tue-Sat 10-4. www.indiansummerhome.com

Hbar AR15 complete upper, $499. 5.5x45/.223, Cobray m11/9, 9mm, $450. Norinco Pressure Cooker, $20, please call 541-647-1276 for more 213 9mm, $275. S&W Mdl 10 info. .38 revolver $250. Rem 11 12ga $325. HiPoint carbine, 261 NIB, $300. 541-508-6780

Sunday, Sept. 11th 300 Antique Dealers I-5, Exit 199 Free Admission, Free Parking/Shuttle 541-683-0916

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

!Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

www.bendbulletin.com

Pets and Supplies

Want to Buy or Rent

208

Find Classifieds at

Please send resume to ahusted@bendbulletin.com PO Box 6020 Bend, Oregon 97708

bath, gas fireplace, 2 car garage, fenced back yard, auto sprinklers, great neighborhood, close to shopping and schools.$895/mo.+dep. Pets neg., avail 9/17/11, 541-504-4624,541-419-0137

Bdrm + den, 2 bath, dbl. garage, $850/mo. + dep. 9199 SW Panarama, CRR. 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, $900/mo. + dep. 14920 SW Maverick, CRR. No smoking. 541-504-8545; 541-350-1660

3 Bdrm, 1 bath, 1000 sq.ft. new paint, pets OK, garage w/opener, fenced yard, $725 +security dep. 1408 SW 17th 541-420-7397; 541-385-5934 4 Bedroom, 2 bath, 3-car garage, fenced yard, near high school, pet on approval with deposit, $1050 + security, 541-815-3206.

A Newer 3 bdrm, 1.75 bath, 1385 sq.ft., family room, nice yard, dbl garage w/opener, quiet, cul-de-sac, $995, 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver A 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath, 1376 sq.ft., wood stove, brand new carpet, brand new oak floors, W/S paid, rear deck, $850. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

RV

STORAGE SPECIAL

The 9th St RV Storage Center is offering a special price for uncovered spaces. Pay the first 2 mo and the 3rd mo is free (new customers only) Septic dump and city water included. 169 SE 9th, Bend. Call for rates 541-420-6851

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Office / Warehouse 1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. spaces, 827 Business Way, Bend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + $300 dep. 541-678-1404 Office/Warehouse located in SE Bend. Up to 30,000 sq.ft., competitive rate, 541-382-3678. The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend. Ample parking. $675. 541-408-2318.

Real Estate For Sale

700 740

Condo / Townhomes For Sale MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE CONDO remodeled, furnished, vaulted ceiling, end unit, sleeps 6. Price reduced $159,900. 541-749-0994.

745

Homes for Sale BANK OWNED HOMES! FREE List w/Pics! www.BendRepos.com bend and beyond real estate 20967 yeoman, bend or

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

749

Southeast Bend Homes EXTENDED FAMILY, 6 bdrm, 4 bath, (2) 1/2 baths, 4270 sq.ft., 2 kitchens, 4 car garage on .8 acre, corner lot, view, owner. $590,000 541-390-0886

762

Homes with Acreage HORSE RANCH RV PARK located by Fort Rock, OR. 3 bdrm main house, 1 bdrm attached apt., 1 bdrm rental house, 17 RV spaces. Lots of trees, on almost 28 acres. $380,000. 541-576-2488, 503-250-3435.

771

Lots FSBO: ½-acre lot, minutes to Sunriver, Paulina Lake, La Pine State Park & 3 blks to Deschutes River access. $39,400. 541-536-5039

773

Acreages ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. R..E Deadlines are: Weekdays 11:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday and Monday. 541-385-5809 Thank you! The Bulletin Classified *** Lowe Lane Estates - 3 miles N. of Bend. Rare, secluded 10 acres w/cabin and mtn views. Fenced with unique weather resistant steel, surrounded by old growth junipers, rock outcroppings, and wildlife. Swalley irrigation rights for your use. CC&R's, equestrian and hiking trails that back up to public lands. Owner terms available. $297,000 541-233-3227, FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $114,900, 541-350-4684.


F2 Wednesday, September 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 775

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Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Motorcycles And Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Antique and Classic Autos

MADRAS*** Own a manufactured home for less than $10,000? You bet you can! Owner financing & terms available OAC for remodeled mobile homes, plus a special space rent credit for qualified purchasers. Call 541-475-2291 today for more information. We’re here to help you get into a new home today!

Boats & RV’s

800 850

Summer Price Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997 Now only $850! Sled plus trailer package $1550. Many Extras, call for info, 541-548-3443.

Motorcycles And Accessories

HARLEY CUSTOM 2007 Dyna Super Glide FXDI loaded, all options, bags, exhaust, wheels, etc., low mi., beautiful, $11,600 OBO, 541-408-7908

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008 Too many upgrades to list, immaculate cond., clean, 15K miles. $14,900 541-693-3975

REMODELED Mobile Home in Madras. sgl. wide 2 Bdrm; 1 Bath w/BRAND NEW CARPET; REAL WOOD BASED TRIM; washer/dryer hookups, stove, fridge and new paint throughout. Owner financing & terms available OAC. $801 moves you into your new home, w/ low/flexible monthly payments available. Special space rent credit for qualified purchasers also sweetens the deal. Call 541-475-2291 to set up an appointment to view your new home today.

1984, 23K, many new parts, battery charger, good condition, $3000 OBO. 541-382-1891

Snowmobiles

860

New & Used manufactured homes, move-in ready, Financing avail. Call J & M Homes, 541-548-5511 www.jandmhomes.com

Honda VT700 Shadow

2010 Custom Pro-street Harley DNA Pro-street swing arm frame, Ultima 107, Ultima 6-spd over $23,000 in parts alone; 100s of man hours into custom fabrication. Past show winner & a joy to ride. $23,000 obo 541-408-3317 Honda Dream CA77 1964, Vintage, $3,000 FIRM, 541-923-8365.

KAWASAKI 750 2005 like new, 2400 miles, stored 5 years. New battery, sports shield, shaft drive, $3400 firm. 541-447-6552.

Kawasaki KLR650 Dual Sport, 2005, low miles, $4200. 541-350-3921

Yamaha XT225 Dual Sport, 2006, low miles, $3700. Call 541-350-3921

Polaris 330 Trail Bosses (2), used very little, like new, $1800 ea. OBO, 541-420-1598

282

286

HUGE Awbrey Butte Sale - 2 Families Moving: EVERYTHING! Low Prices! 2965 NW Horizon, Fri. & Sat. 8-4. Yard Sale: Fri. 9/9 & Sat. 9/10, 9 am-4 pm, 11 NW Kansas at Lava Rd, Regular Yard Sale Stuff + lots of small treasures & surprises.

284

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Boats & Accessories

12 Foot Fold-A-Boat, Needs work, $200, 9’ Fiberglass Dinghy, $250, 541-280-0514.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Yard Sale: Fri. & Sat. 8-5, Haller Haven, 19468 Baker Rd, boats, trailers, porcelain dolls, construction tools.

286

Sales Northeast Bend 5 Family: New climbing gear, ski masks, furniture, rugs, baby, toys, misc, 1776 NE Pheasant Ln. Fri & Sat.

290

Sales Redmond Area Crooked River Ranch Community Yard Sales! 47 Sites • Maps at CRR Sept. 9-10-11, 8am-4pm Mega Sale Of Stuff: Fri. & Sat. 9-4, Sun. 10-2, 10 years of Stuff: Collectibles, antique cast iron cabin stove, Tron Dolls, Glass furniture, futon, couch, Oak queen bed, women clothes, Vintage 80’s leather skirts - many sizes, sporting goods, household goods, too much to describe. 3430 SW Reindeer Ave.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504

MUST SELL GMC 6000 dump truck 1990. 7 yard bed, low miles, good condition, new tires! ONLY $3500 OBO. 541-593-3072

Shadow Cruiser 25’ RK 1994 Very rare, many new parts, 30,000 BTU heater, aerodynamic, $5250, fantastic cond, must see, 541-923-6116.

885

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $89,400. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Phoenix Cruiser 2001, 23 ft. V10, 51K. Large bath, bed & kitchen. Seats 6-8. Awning. $30,950. 541-923-4211

875 Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

880

Motorhomes A-Class

Hurricane by Four Winds 32’, 2007, 12K miles, cherry wood, leather, queen, sleeps 6, 2 slides, 2 TVs, 2 roof airs, jacks, camera, new condition, non-smoker, $59,900 or best offer. 541-548-5216.

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

882

Fifth Wheels

29’ Alpenlite Riviera 1997 5th whl. 1 large slide-out. New carpeting, solar panel, AC & furnace. 4 newer batteries & inverter. Great shape. Price reduced, now $12,900 541-389-8315 541-728-8088

Hunters, Take a Look at This! 1978 Dynacruiser 9½’ camper, fully self-contained, no leaks, clean, everything works, will fit 1988 or older pickup. $2500 firm. 541-420-6846

Pette Bone Mercury Fork Lift, 6000 lb., 2

Lance-Legend 990 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, exc. cond., generator, solar-cell, large refrig, AC, micro., magic fan, bathroom shower, removable carpet, custom windows, outdoor shower/awning set-up for winterizing, elec. jacks, CD/stereo/4’ stinger. $9500. Bend, 541.279.0458

stage, propane, hardrubber tires, $4000, 541-389-5355.

Truck with Snow Plow! Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $6500 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, nonsmoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded queen bed, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179. Winnebago Sightseer 30B Class A 2008 $79,500 OBO Top of the line! cell 805-368-1575

881

Travel Trailers

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cardinal 34.5 RL (40’) 2009, 4 slides, convection oven + micro., dual A/C, fireplace, extra ride insurance (3 yr. remaining incl. tires), air sleeper sofa + queen bed, $50,900 OBO, must see to appreciate, 406-980-1907, Terrebonne

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

Beaver Santiam 2002, 2 slides, 48K, immaculate, 330 Cummins diesel, $75,000. Call for details: 541-504-0874

Four Winds Chateau M-31F 2006, 2 power slides, back-up camera, many upgrades, great cond. $43,900. 541-419-7099

Gulfstream 36’ 2003, 330 Cat diesel, with 2 slides, 12,300 miles. Nice, no pets/smoke. $65,000. 541-848-9225 Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318

925

Utility Trailers

12 ft. Hydraulic dump trailer w/extra sides, dual axle, steel ramps, spare tire, tarp, excellent condition. $6500 firm. 541-419-6552

Autos & Transportation

900

Dodge pickup 1962 D100 classic, original 318 wide block, push button trans, straight, runs good, $1250 firm. Bend, 831-295-4903 Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

908 Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $30,000. 541-548-1422

Aircraft, Parts and Service Coleman Chesapeake 1993, Luxury 2009 by Carmint cond., garaged, 22 ’8” Carri-Lite riage, 4 slideouts, inverter, open, awning/screen encl. satellite sys, frplc, 2 flat scrn best buy on mkt. $3500. TVs. $65,000. 541-480-3923 619-971-4225, NW Bend.

Alfa See Ya 40 2005. 2 slides, 350 CAT. Tile. 2 door fridge with ice-maker. $98,000. 541-610-9985

Chevy Corvette Coupe 2006, 8,471 orig miles, 1 owner, always garaged, red, 2 tops, auto/paddle shift, LS-2, Corsa exhaust, too many options to list, pristine car, $37,500. Serious only, call 541-504-9945

Canopies and Campers

Watercraft

12’ Aluminum Boat, Trailer, 7.5 M ercury, depth finder, anchor system, much more, ready to fish! Moving. $885. 541-280-0268

Sales Southwest Bend Multi-Family Sale: Sat. 8-3, lots of misc., 19560 Sager Lp., W. on Powers, left on Brookswood, right on River Rim, left on Stonegate, left on Sager Lp.

Used out-drive parts Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

Yamaha Kodiak, 2005 - 450cc, with extras, $3850 OBO. Call 541-788-4325

870

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

Houseboat 38 x10, triple axle trailer incl. 20’ cabin, 12’ rear swim deck plus 6’ covered front deck. Great price! $14,500. 541-788-4844

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Yamaha Grizzly Sportsman Special 2000, 600cc 4-stroke, push button 4x4 Ultramatic, 945 mi, $3850. 541-279-5303

Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Kayak, 2-person Necky, user friendly and stable, with rudder. $1360. 541-312-3335.

Polaris Phoenix, 2005, 2+4 200cc, like new, low hours, runs great, $1700 or best offer. Call 541-388-3833

Jayco Greyhawk 2004, 31’ Class C, 6800 mi., hyd. jacks, new tires, slide out, exc. cond, $54,000, 541-480-8648

865

ATVs

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new Honda Trail 90 1969, Yellow, very nice, dual spd. trans, rack, street legal, $1495 OBO, 541-318-5010

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Forest River 26’ Surveyor 2011, Echo light model, aluminum construction, used 1 time, flat screen TV, DVD & CD player, outside speakers, 1 slide out, cherry cabinets, power awning, power tongue lift, can be towed by most autos, $19,500, call now at 541-977-5358.

Skyline Layton 25’ 2008, Model 208 LTD. Like brand new. Used 4x Bend to Camp Sherman. Winterized, in storage. 3855 lbs Sleeps 5. Queen walk around bed w/storage, full bathroom, full kitchen & lrg fridge. Dual batteries & propane tanks, awning,corner-leveling jacks, Easylift Elite load hitch w/ bars, furnace, AC, AM/FM stereo. Couch & dining table fold out for extra sleeping. $11,795 OBO. 760-699-5125. SPRINGDALE 2005 27’ eating area slide, A/C and heat, new tires, all contents included, bedding towels, cooking and eating utensils. Great for vacation, fishing, hunting or living! $15,500 541-408-3811

Springdale 20’ 179RD 2007 new tires, dinette w/rear window, 3- burner stove,oven,micro, tub /shower, A/C, outside shower, cover, $9200, 503-639-3355

COACHMAN 1997 Catalina 5th wheel 23’, slide, new tires, extra clean, below book. $6,500. 541-548-1422. Comfort 27’ 2006, 1 large slide, A/C, TV, solar panel & awning, $22,000 OBO, 541-923-6049.

Fleetwood Wilderness 36’ 2005 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, AC, W/D hkup beautiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718 AIRCRAFT HANGARS For Rent

Towmaster Equipment Trailer, 14,000 lb capacity. Tandemn axle, 4-wheel brakes, 18’ bed, heavy duty ramps, spare tire mounted, side mounted fork pockets, all tires in good condition. $3995. Call 541-420-1846.

Prineville Large rectangular 45’W x 36’D 12’H w/elec. bifold doors, exc. access, location, fuel prices, 541-350-9729

Executive Hangar at Bend Airport (KBDN). 60’ wide x 50’ deep, with 55’ wide x 17’ high bi-fold door. Natural gas heat, office & bathroom. Parking for 6 cars. Adjacent to Frontage Rd; great visibility for aviation bus. $235K 541-948-2126

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

VW BAJA BUG 1974 1776cc engine. New: shocks, tires, disc brakes, interior paint, flat black. $6500 OBO. partial trades considered. 541-322-9529.

932

Antique and Classic Autos Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $37,500. 541-420-3250

1982 INT. Dump with Arborhood, 6k on rebuilt 392, truck refurbished, has 330 gal. water tank with pump and hose. Everything works, $8,500 OBO. 541-977-8988 Chevrolet 3500 Service Truck, 1992, 4x4, automatic, 11-ft storage bed. Liftgate, compressor & generator shelf inside box, locked storage boxes both sides of bed, new tires, regular maintenance & service every 3K miles, set up for towing heavy equip. $3995. 541-420-1846

28th Annual Oregon High Desert Swap Meet & Car Show Saturday, September 10th. Starts 7 a.m. – Vendors 6:30 a.m. The Deschutes County Fairgrounds and Expo Center, Redmond Oregon. Free admission to the public. Special antique section indoors with many dealers from the Pacific Northwest. Contact Butch Ramsey for info & reservations phone: (541)548-4467 online:

Willis Jeep 1956, new rebuilt motor, no miles, power take off winch, exc. tires, asking $3999, 541-389-5355.

933

Pickups CHEVROLET SILVERADO 2500 HD 2004 Extended cab LS 4x4. READY FOR WINTER! Vin#109450. $19,995 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

bramsey@bendbroadband.com

A

Local Danchuk Dealer stocking Hundreds of Parts for ‘55-’57 Chevys. Calif., Classic, Raingear Wiper Setups Call Chris 541-410-4860

West of 97 & Empire, Bend www.aaaoregonautosource.com

MUST SELL 25’ Catalina Sailboat 1983, w/trailer, swing keel, pop top, fully loaded, $10,000, call for details, 541-480-8060

Jayco 1994, 22’, 50K, full bath, kitchen, bed, dinette, gen, selfcontained, lots more, immaculate! $10,500. 541-385-5682

Springdale 20’ 179RD 2007 new tires, dinette w/rear window, 3- burner stove,oven,micro, tub /shower, A/C, outside shower, cover, $9200, 503-639-3355

Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th wheel, 1 slide, AC, TV, full awning, excellent shape, $23,900. 541-350-8629

Chevy 18 ft. Flatbed 1975, 454 eng., 2-spd trans, tires 60%, Runs/drives well, motor runs great, $1650. 541-771-5535

For Memorial 70 Monte Carlo All original, beautiful, car, completely new suspension and brake system, plus extras. $4000 OBO. 541-593-3072

Ford

F-250

1986,

Lariat, x-cab, 2WD, auto, gas or propane, 20K orig. mi., new tires, $5000, 541-480-8009.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 7, 2011 F3

933

935

940

975

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Vans

Automobiles

Jeep 4-dr Wagon, 1987

FORD Windstar Mini Van, 1995, 138K, nice inside & out, only half worn out! Seats 7, Michelins, nice wheels, drives excellent 1 look is worth 1000 words! $2495. 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639. Free Trip to D.C. for WWII Vets!

FORD F250 4x4 - 1994 460 engine, cab and a half, 4-spd stick shift, 5th wheel hitch, 181K miles. $2100. Call 541-389-9764 FORD F350 2003, crew cab 4x4 V-10, great tires, towing pkg, power windows, locks and seats, CD. 132,621 miles, Carfax avail. $10,550. See craigslist 255692031 for pics. 541-390-7649. FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800. 541-350-1686 FORD RANGER XLT 2004 SUPER CAB 4X4, 50k miles auto trans. Vin #B33524

$12,995 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

West of 97 & Empire, Bend www.aaaoregonautosource.com

Ford Sport Trac Limited Edition 2007, 4x4, many extras incl. new tires, 107k, $15,995, 541-306-7546

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

4WD, silver, nice wheels, 183K, lots of miles left yet! Off-road or on-road, 4-wheeler’s or Hunter’s Special - $1900. Call 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639. Free trip to D.C. for WWII Vets! Jeep Grand Cherokee, 1998, Laredo trim pkg, 4.0L in-line 6-cylinder, automatic, full power, leather interior, alloy wheels, in excellent cond. with new tires & battery. 180K miles, runs great. Asking $3450. Call Bill at 541-480-7930

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED 2001

Lexus 300GS, 2000, gold w/tan leather interior, platinum pkg, 126K mi, original owner w/service records, good cond. $8200. 541-382-0474

Mercedes Benz ML500 2003, sport utility 4-dr., 26K orig. mi. by senior citizen, ESC, navigation, Bose premium sound, leather seats, 6 air bags, showroom clean, KBB, $18,665, asking $17,000 OBO, Ron 541-595-2559.

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005 72,000 miles, new shocks, rear brakes, one owner, $16,995, 541-480-0828.

Chevy Tahoe, 1999, very clean, loaded, 23,600 miles on new motor; new tires & battery, $6900. 541-330-1151

Find It in

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited, 2007, V6 Turbo Diesel, 20 mpg city, 24 mpg hwy, full time 4WD, leather int, every option, excellent cond, 52K mi, $20,950. 41-771-5616

Jeep Ltd Wagoneer 4WD, 1989 runs great, exc cond, lthr seats, full pwr, winch, brushgrd, tow pkg, 96K, perfect 2nd car/hunting rig, 24 mpg, $3850. Steve, 541-815-5600 Jeep Wrangler 1999, 4 cyl, oversize tires, AM/FM radio, soft top,, always garaged, 62K, $6999, 541-923-8365

call

Honda Element SC 2007, excellent cond, low miles, rare root beer color, $15,900. Private party, 541-480-6900.

AT, 76K, good all-weather tires, $13,500 obo. 858-345-0084

OTAK ARCHITECTS, INC., an Oregon corporation, Cross-Claimant, v. SAN DIEGO NATIONAL BANK, a national banking association; et al., Cross-Defendants.

975

Automobiles CHEVY CORVETTE 1989

OTAK, INC., an Oregon corporation, Cross-Claimant, v SAN DIEGO NATIONAL BANK, a national banking association; et al., Cross-Defendants. 50k miles, auto trans, factory A/C, removeable hardtop Vin. #117255. $12,995

Case No.: 09-CV-0826-ST NOTICE OF SALE UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION- REAL PROPERTY

541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

West of 97 & Empire, Bend www.aaaoregonautosource.com

Mercury Cougar 1994, XR7 V8, 77K mi, excellent cond. $4995. 541-526-1443

2007 Mazdaspeed 3, 77K mi, inc 4 snow tires, full roof-rack sys. $13,250. 541-610-5885

Classic Mini Coopers Anyone interested in forming a social Classic Mini Cooper Club, contact 541-408-3317.

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

BMW 323i convertible, 1999. 91K miles. Great condition, beautiful car, incredibly fun ride! $9300. 541-419-1763

Notice is hereby given that I will on October 13, 2011, at 11:20 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the real property described in the attached Exhibit "A", and also known as, 61533, 61536, 61550, and 61576 Alstrup Road, Bend, OR 97702. EXHIBIT A - LEGAL DESCRIPTION PARCEL 1: A portion of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SW1/4SW1/4) of Section Four (4), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of the SW1/4 of the SW1/4 of Section 4, Township 18 South, Range 12, E.W.M.; thence North 89°11'47" West, a distance of 744.10 feet along the South line of said SW1/4SW1/4; thence due North, a distance of 15.00 feet; thence South 88°21'02" East, a distance of 744.33 feet to a point on the East boundary of the SW1/4SW1/4, Section 4, Township 18 South, Range 12, E.W.M.; thence South 0°05'25" East, a distance of 4.0 feet to the point of beginning.

1980 Classic Mini Cooper All original, rust-free, classic Mini Cooper in perfect cond. $12,000 OBO. 541-408-3317

541-322-7253

Also that certain parcel of land, more particularly described by metes and bounds as beginning at the Northeast corner of the West Half of the Northwest Quarter (W1/2NW1/4) of Section Nine (9), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian; thence South along the East line of said W1/2NW1/4 of said Section, Township, and Range, 326.46 feet; thence Westerly 338.24 feet; thence Northerly 69 feet; thence Westerly 407 feet; thence Northerly 250.69 feet to a point in the line between Sections 4 and 9 of said Township and Range; thence Easterly along said Section line for a distance of 744.10 feet to the place of beginning, said tract being a part of the Northwest Quarter Northwest Quarter (NW1/4NW1/4) of Section 9, Township 18 South, Range 12, E.W.M., D.C.O. Excepting therefrom the following: Beginning at a point on the line between Sections 4 and 9, which point is located North 89°11'47" West, a distance of 744.10 feet from the Southeast corner of the SW1/4SW1/4 of Section 4, Township 18 South, Range 12, E.W.M.; thence South 0°44'43" West, a distance of 225.69 feet; thence South 89°36'42" East, a distance of 365.00 feet; thence North 0°44'43" East, a distance of 232.66 feet; thence North 88°21'02" West, a distance of 365.15 feet; thence due South for 15.00 feet to the point of beginning. PARCEL 2: A portion of Tract Fourteen (14), CARROLL ACRES, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows:

Porsche Cayenne S 2008 Nearly every option: 20" wheels, navigation, Bi-Xenon lights, thermally insulated glass, tow pkg, stainless steel nose trim, moonroof, Bose sys, heated seats. 66K mi. MSRP was over $75K; $34,900. 541-954-0230

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 38K mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $59,750 firm. 541-480-1884 TOYOTA SEQUOIA SR5 2007. Leather, moonroof, JBL. 50k miles. #288220 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

Vans CHEVY ASTRO EXT 1993 AWD mini van, 3 seats, rear barn doors, white, good tires/wheels. Pretty interior, clean, no rips or tears. Drives exc! $2500. Free trip to D.C. for WWII Vets! (541) 318-9999 or (541) 815-3639

personals I, Lorri Frazier, am not responsible for any debts incurred by Patrick G. DuPont from this date Aug. 19th on. I am not responsible for any debts that are in his name only. 541-546-2276

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property) KEHOE NORTHWEST PROPERTIES, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company, Plaintiff, v. CENTRAL OREGON INVESTORS, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company; et al., Defendants.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

940

cond., $24,000, 541-923-0231.

1000

Legal Notices

541-815-3639, 318-9999

West of 97 & Empire, Bend www.aaaoregonautosource.com

Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc.

1000

Legal Notices

only $7900.

$27,695

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

1000

Legal Notices

4x4 90k, leather, cream puff, one nice lady’s car.

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac.,loaded, dealer maint, $19,500. 503-459-1580.

ToyotaTundra 2000 SR5 4x4 perfect cond., all scheduled maint. completed, looks new in/out. $10,000 541-420-2715

1000

Legal Notices

Sportsmobile Van 2000 Ford E350 4x4, V-10, pop-top, many extras, 47,000 miles, $42,000. 541-383-0014

Nissan Xterra S - 4x4 2006, International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

1000

Legal Notices

Moving - Must Sell BMW 330 CI 2002 great cond., Newer tires. Harmon/Kardon stereo system. Asking $13,500. 541-480-7752. Buick LeSabre’s: 1995 Limited, 115K, leather, gold, almost perfect, 2nd owner, $3250; 1998 Custom, 94K, $3900, Larry in Springfield has Lucerne’s 2006 model. Free trip to D.C. for WWII Vets! Call Bob 541-318-9999 or Sam 541-815-3639. Caddilac El Dorado 1994, Total cream puff, body, paint, trunk as showroom, blue leather, nicely patina-ed gorgeous light blue, $1700 wheels w/snow tires although car has not been wet in 8 years. On trip to Boise last week avg. 28.5 mpg., $5700, 541-593-4016.

CADILLAC CONCOURS 1994, black, 130k mi., sun/moonroof, cruise, tilt, bucket seats, leather, keyless entry alarm. $1500. 541-389-3151

PARCEL 3: That part of the West Half of the Northwest Quarter (W1/2NW1/4) of Section Nine (9), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Porsche Boxter, 1999, exc cond 88K, $9995, 541-350-1379

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Beginning at the Northeast corner of the W1/2NW1/4 of Section 9, Township 18 South, Range 12, E.W.M.; thence Southerly 326.46 feet along the Easterly boundary line of Tract Fourteen (14) of Carroll Acres to the Northeast corner of Tract Thirteen (13), Carroll Acres, being the point of beginning of the tract to be conveyed; thence Westerly along the North line of said Tract 13, a distance of 275 feet; thence Southerly on a line parallel with the East line of said Tract 13 to a point on the South line thereof; thence Easterly along the South line of said Tract 13, a distance of 275 feet to the Southeast corner thereof; thence Northerly along the East line of said Tract 13, a distance of 292.09 feet to the point of beginning. PARCEL 4: That part of the West Half of the Northwest Quarter (W1/2NW1/4) of Section Nine (9) Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, as described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of the W1/2NW1/4 of Section 9, Township 18 South, Range 12, E.W.M.; thence Southerly 326.46 feet along the Easterly boundary line of Tract 14 of Carroll Acres to the Southeast corner of said Tract 14; thence 275 feet Westerly along the Southerly boundary line of Tract 14 of Carroll Acres to the point of beginning; thence 63.24 feet Westerly along the Southerly boundary line of Tract 14 of Carroll Acres; thence 69 feet North; thence 232.02 feet Westerly to a point, which point measures as follows: From the Southwest corner of Tract 14; thence Easterly along the Southerly boundary of Tract 14, 175 feet and North from that point 75.8 feet, said point being the Northeast corner of the Berry Tract; thence 88.8 feet South; thence 175 feet West to the Westerly boundary of Tract 13; thence Southerly 279.2 feet along the Westerly boundary line of Tract 13 to the Southwest corner of said Tract 13; thence Easterly along the Southerly boundary of Tract 13 of Carroll Acres, 471.25 feet; thence North to the point of beginning, being a part of Tracts 13 and 14 of Carroll Acres. PARCEL 5: Tract Twelve (12) of Carroll Acres, being more particularly described as follows:

Volvo 780 1990, extremely rare car, Bertone designed & built, Volvo reliability & safety, Italian elegance, all parts avail., Italian leather, Burl Wood, drives beautifully, $5500, 541-593-4016.

Chevy Corvette 1988 4-spd manual with 3-spd O/D. Sharp, loaded, 2 tops, (tinted & metal. New AC, water pump, brake & clutch, master cylinder & clutch slave cyl. VW Beetle GLS TDI 2003, Diesel, CD, luggage rack, set $6500 OBO. 541-419-0251. of snow tires, 52,600 mi., Chevy Impala LS 2001, $11,200, 541-322-0983. 105K, very clean, looks new, good tires, upgraded wheels, The Bulletin recommends $6200, Tom, 541-548-5716. extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call Chysler La Baron Convertthe Oregon State Attorney ible 1990, Good condition, General’s Office Consumer $3200, 541-416-9566 Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Beginning at a point 618.55 feet South of the Northeast corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (NW1/4NW1/4) of Section Nine (9), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon; thence South on the East line of said NW1/4NW1/4 for a distance of 291.66 feet; thence West (N. 89°36'42" W.) for 747.26 feet; thence North (N. 0°44'43" E.) for 291.66 feet; thence East (S. 89°36'42" E) for 746.25 feet. Excepting therefrom a tract in the Southwest corner of said Tract Twelve (12), more particularly described as follows: Beginning at an iron pipe at the Southwest corner of the above described Tract 12; thence North 0°44'43" East for 169.66 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 89°36'42" East for 192.00 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 0°44'43" West, for 169.66 feet to an iron pipe; thence North 89°36'42" West for 192.00 feet to the point of beginning. PARCEL 6: A triangular parcel of land lying Southeasterly of the right of way of the Central Oregon Irrigation Company's Canal, the same being situate in the Southeasterly corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SW1/4SW1/4) of Section Four (4), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. Except a portion of the SW1/4 of the SW1/4 of Section 4, Township 18 South, Range 12, E.W.M., described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of the SW1/4SW1/4 of Section 4, Township 18 South, Range 12, E.W.M.; thence North 89°11'47" West, a distance of 744.10 feet along the South line of said SW1/4SW1/4; thence due North, a distance of 15.00 feet; thence South 88°21'02" East, a distance of 744.33 feet to a point on the East boundary of the SW1/4SW1/4 of Section 4, Township 18 South, Range 12, E.W.M.; thence South 0°05'25" East, a distance of 4.0 feet to the point of beginning. Also except that part of the SW1/4SW1/4 described as follows: Beginning at a point located 380.0 feet North 0°05'25" West of the West 1/16 corner of Sections Four (4) and Nine (9); thence North 90° West 361.23 feet to the Easterly right-of-way line of the Central Oregon Canal; thence Northerly and Easterly along said Central Oregon Canal right-of-way to a point that is 611.06 feet North 0°05'25" West of said West 1/16 corner; thence South 0°05'25" East 231.06 feet to the point of beginning. Except that portion lying Westerly of Alstrup Road.

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $3950 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Beginning at a point on the line between Sections Four (4) and Nine (9), which point is located North 89°11'47" West, a distance of 744.10 feet from the Southeast corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SW1/4SW1/4) of Section Four (4), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian; thence South 0°44'43" West, a distance of 225.69 feet; thence South 89°36'42" East, a distance of 365.00 feet; thence North 0°44'43" East, a distance of 232.66 feet; thence North 88°21'02" West, a distance of 365.15 feet; thence due South for 15.00 feet to the point of beginning.

PARCEL 7: Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

A portion of Tract Twelve (12) of the unofficial plat of CARROLL ACRES, in the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (NW1/4NW1/4) of Section Nine (9), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at an iron pipe at the Southwest corner of Tract Twelve (12); thence North 0?44'43" East for 169.66 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 89?36'42" East for 192.00 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 0?44'43" West for 169.66 feet to an iron pipe; thence North 89?36'42" West for 192.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. PARCEL 8: A tract of land located in the Northwest Quarter (NW1/4) of Section Nine (9), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, and being part of Tract 1 of Carroll Acres and being more fully described as follows:

$

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NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Quality Builders Electric

Kelly Kerfoot Construction 28 years exp. in Central OR! Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to expert wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts; licenced, bonded, insured • CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Russ Peterson Builder / Contractor 40 years experience Home Repairs & Remodels 541-318-8789 • CCB 50758

Computer/Cabling Install QB Digital Living •Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

• Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Excavating Levi’s Dirt Works:RGC & CGC Landscaping, Yard Care Residential & Commercial subcontracting for all your dirt & excavation needs. • Small & large jobs for contractors & home owners by the job - or hour. • Driveway grading (low cost get rid of pot holes & smooth out your driveway) • Custom pads large & small • Operated rentals & augering • Wet & dry utilities • Concrete CCB#194077 541-639-5282.

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Drywall ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler installation & repair • Aerate • Trimming • Summer Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759 Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. 541-388-6910. ccb#5184 Picasso Painting Interior/Exterior. Ask about our 10% discount, Affordable, Reliable. 25 yrs exp. CCB# 194351 Bruce Teague 541-280-9081.

Beginning at a point 284.97 feet East and South 03?58' East, 710.2 feet from the Northwest corner of Section 9, Township 18 South, Range 12, East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, and running thence South 03?58' East, 82.53 feet to the North line of the Brosterhous Road; thence along the North right of way line of said Brosterhous Road, South 45?58'35" East, 42.70 feet; thence around a 389.25 foot radius curve right, 44.93 feet to the true point of beginning, long chord bears South 42?40'07" East, 44.91 feet; thence around a 389.25 foot radius curve right, 139.66 feet, long chord bears South 29?05'00" East, 138.91 feet; thence South 18?48'17" East, 43.84 feet; thence East, 22.39 feet to the West right of way line of the Alstrup Road; thence along the West right of way line of said Alstrup Road, North 01?01'43" East, 207.70 feet; thence South 67?26'48" West, 116.69 feet to the true point of beginning. PARCEL 9: That part of the West Half of the Northwest Quarter (W1/2NW1/4) of Section Nine (9), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows, to wit: Beginning at the Northeast corner of said West Half of the Northwest Quarter (W1/2NW1/4) and running thence Westerly 744.10 feet along the North line of Tract 14 Carroll Acres; thence South 250.69 feet to the actual point of beginning of this description; thence South 94 feet; thence East 175.0 feet; thence North 88.8 feet; thence Westerly along the line fence 175.2 feet to point of beginning. Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution of Real Property (Foreclosure) issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated August 2, 2011, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein KEHOE NORTHWEST PROPERTIES, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company, as plaintiff, recovered Limited Judgment of Foreclosure on June 27, 2011, against CENTRAL OREGON INVESTORS, LLC, and KITTLESON AND ASSOCIATES, INC., as defendants. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff By: Anthony Raguine, Civil Technician Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications:September 7, 2011; September 14; and September 21, 2011 Date of Last Publication:September 28, 2011 Attorney:Kimberley Hanks McGair, OSB #984205 Farleigh Wada Witt 121 SW Morrison Street, Suite 600 Portland, OR 97204 (503) 228-6044 Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale.

Tile, Ceramic I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Deck Refinishing Time! Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

541-322-7253

541-385-5809


F4 Wednesday, September 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Decision Travel Management Project Deschutes National Forest, Ochoco National Forest, and Crooked River National Grassland Deschutes, Jefferson, Crook, Klamath, Lake, Grant, and Wheeler Counties, Oregon

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE

official plat of Lytle Acres, Deschutes County, Oregon.

Civil Technician

Portland, OR 97209 541-224-0055

As the Responsible Officials, John Allen, Deschutes National Forest Supervisor, and Kate Klein, Ochoco National Forest Supervisor, signed a Record of Decision on August 4, 2011 approving the Travel Management Project for the Deschutes and Ochoco National Forests and the Crooked River National Grassland. The selected alternative : 1) Prohibits motorized access off of designated routes and outside of designated areas as shown on the Motor Vehicle Use Map; 2) Allows motorized access for dispersed camping within 300 feet of designated routes shown as open to such use on the Motor Vehicle Use Map only to existing, designated, or defined dispersed sites no closer than 30 feet to a stream, wetland, or water body; 3) Prohibits motorized mixed use on all roads not shown as open to such use on the Motor Vehicle Use Map; 4) Designates some existing rock/cinder pits as open to cross-country motorized travel; 5) Amends the Ochoco and Crooked River National Grassland Land and Resource Management Plan by eliminating Standards and Guidelines that are redundant or in conflict with the 2005 Travel Management Rule, and; 6) Rescinds current Forest Orders for permanent or temporary public motorized use restrictions that are redundant to the Travel Management Rule. Copies of the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Record of Decision, and Motor Vehicle Use Maps are available at all Deschutes and Ochoco National Forest and District Offices and the Crooked River National Grassland Office. Copies are also available on the web at: http://www.fs.usda.gov/got o/centraloregon/travel-man agement http://www.fs.usda.gov/got o/centraloregon/mvum This decision is subject to administrative review (appeal) pursuant to 36 CFR 215. The 45-day appeal period begins the day following the date the legal notice of this decision is published in The Bulletin, Bend, Oregon. The publication date in The Bulletin, newspaper of record, is the exclusive means for calculating the time to file an appeal. Those wishing to appeal this decision should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source. Individuals or organizations who submitted comments during the DEIS comment period (October 9, 2009 December 8, 2009) specified at 215.6 may appeal this decision. Interest expressed or comments provided on this project prior to or after the close of the comment period do not have standing for appeal purposes. The notice of appeal must meet the appeal content requirements at 36 CFR 215.14. Names and addresses of appellants will become part of the public record. Appeals can be submitted in several forms, but must be received by the Appeal Deciding Officer, Regional Forester, within 45 days from the date of publication of this Notice of Decision in The Bulletin, Bend, OR. Appeals may be : 1) Mailed to: Appeal Deciding Officer, Pacific Northwest Region, USDA Forest Service, Attn. 1570 Appeals, PO Box 3623, Portland, OR 97208-3623; 2) Emailed to: appeals-pacificnorthwest-regional-office@fs.fed.us. Please put APPEAL and the project name in the subject line. Electronic appeals must be submitted as part of an actual e-mail message, or as an attachment in Microsoft Word (.doc), rich text format (.rtf), or portable document format (.pdf) only. The appeal must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic appeals. E-mails submitted to addresses other than the ones listed above or in formats other than those listed above or containing viruses will be rejected. It is the responsibility of the appellant to confirm receipt of appeals submitted by electronic mail. For electronically mailed appeals, the sender should normally receive an automated electronic acknowledgement from the agency as confirmation of receipt. If the sender does not receive an automated acknowledgement of the receipt of the appeal, it is the sender's responsibility to ensure timely receipt by other means; 3) Delivered to: Pacific Northwest Regional Office, 333 S.W. First Avenue, Robert Duncan Plaza Building, Portland, Oregon 97204-3440 between 7:45 AM and 4:30 PM, Monday through Friday except legal holidays; or 4) Faxed to: Regional Forester, Attn.: 1570 APPEALS at (503) 808-2339. If no appeals are filed within the 45-day time period, implementation of the decision may occur on, but not before, 5 business days from the close of the appeal filing period. When appeals are filed, implementation may occur on, but not before, the 15th business day following the date of the last appeal disposition. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Melinda Thomas, Successor Trustee under the Trust Deed described below, hereby elects to sell, pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes Sections 86.705 to 86.795, the real property described below at 10:00 a.m. on December 28, 2011 in the lobby of the offices of Bryant, Lovlien & Jarvis, 591 SW Mill View Way, Bend, Oregon, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed described below. All obligations of performance which are secured by the Trust Deed hereinafter described are in default for reasons set forth below and the beneficiary declares all sums due under the note secured by the trust deed described herein immediately due and payable. The beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property described below to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed. GRANTOR: Mark B. Gerdes and Rebecca L. Gerdes BENEFICIARY: SELCO Community Credit Union TRUST DEED RECORDED: January 4, 2005, in Volume 2005, at Page 00532, Official Records, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY COVERED BY TRUST DEED: Lot One (1), AIRPORT BUSINESS CENTER PHASE 1, Deschutes County, Oregon. DEFAULT: Failure to pay: 1. $387.18, representing the difference between the full regular payment of principal and interest of $1,777.68 due on February 5, 2011, and the partial payment on February 28, 2011 in the amount of $1390.50; 2. Regular monthly payments of principal and interest of $1,777.68 due on March 5, 2011 and subsequent monthly payments due thereafter up to and including the date of this Notice of Default and Election to Sell, in the amount of $8,888.40; 3. Late charges of $88.80 for installments more than 15 days delinquent for a total amount of $800.00; 4. Taxes for the year 2009-2010 in the amount of $2,699.49 plus interest, and taxes for the year 2010-201 1 in the amount of $5,515.82. 5. Other - Trustee's Sale Guarantee: $795.00. SUM OWING ON OBLIGATION SECURED BY TRUST DEED: Principal balance of $236,318.81 with interest at 6.750% per annum from June 22, 2011, until paid. Notice is given that any person named pursuant to Section 86.753, Oregon Revised Statutes, has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by curing the above-described defaults, by payment of the entire amount due (other than such portions of principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. Melinda Thomas, Successor Trustee Bryant, Lovlien & Jarvis, P.C. 591 SW Mill View Way Bend, OR 97702 LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property) HOME FEDERAL BANK, successor to Community First Bank, an Oregon state-chartered commercial bank, Plaintiff, v. PATRICK M. GISLER, an individual, THE PATRICK M. GISLER LIVING TRUST, an Oregon trust, and GMC, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company, Defendants. Case No.: 10CV0031SF Notice is hereby given that I will on October 13, 2011, at 11:10 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash, the following real property, known as 1430 NW Wall Street, Bend, Oregon 97701, to wit, A portion of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (NE1/4 NE1/4) of Section Thirty-two (32), Township Seventeen (17) South, Range Twelve (12) East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a point which is located North 03º19'02" East (sometimes erroneously shown of record as North 33º19'02" East), a distance of 474.38 feet from the Southwest corner of said Northeast Quarter (NE1/4 NE1/4) of Section 32; thence North 0º14'22" West, a distance of 149.76 feet to an iron pipe; thence North 89º25' East, a distance of 160.49 feet to an iron pipe at an existing fence line; thence North 89º25' East, a distance of 43.0 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 0º14' West, a distance of 198.90 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 89º25' West, a distance of 202.25 feet to an iron pipe marking the point of beginning, also being a portion of Tract 19 of the un-

EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion conveyed to the City of Bend by Warranty Deed recorded May 2, 1997 in Book 446, Page 2085, Deschutes County Records. Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated June 27, 2011, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Home Federal Bank as successor in interest to Community First Bank, an Oregon state-chartered commercial bank (the "Bank") as plaintiff, recovered Stipulated Limited Judgment of Foreclosure on June 22, 2011, against Patrick M. Gisler, an individual, the Patrick M. Gisler Living Trust, an Oregon Trust and GMC, LLC, an Oregon Limited liability company as defendants. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff By Lisa Griggs, Civil Technician Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications: September 7, 2011; September 14, 2011; September 21, 2011 Date of Last Publication September 28, 2011 Attorney: Peter S. Hicks, OSB #933057 Ball Janik LLP 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1200 Portland, OR 97204 (503) 228-2525 Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property) HOME FEDERAL BANK, a federal savings bank chartered under the laws of the United States of America, as successor in interest to LIBERTYBANK, an Oregon chartered bank, Plaintiff, v. REMPROP, INC., an Oregon corporation, DAVID J. ZIMMERMAN, an individual, KATHLEEN E. DEGREE, an individual, PHILIP R. DEGREE, an individual, SUSAN I. MOON, an individual, THANE C. MOON, an individual, ROBERT M. CHAMBERS, an individual, VICKI D. CHAMBERS, an individual, CALIFORNIA BANK & TRUST, a California state chartered bank, Defendants. Case No.: 10CV0537ST Notice is hereby given that I will on September 22, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash, the following real property, known as 345 NW 4th Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756 and 429 NW Cedar Avenue, Redmond, Oregon 97756, to wit, LOTS 25, 26, 27, 28, 29 AND 30 OF SOTHMAN'S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. TOGETHER WITH THAT PORTION OF VACATED ALLEY INURRING THERETO BY VACATION THEREOF. EXCEPTING THEREFROM: THE EAST 30 FEET OF LOT 25, ALSO KNOWN AS THE RIGHT OF WAY OF NW 4TH STREET. Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution For Sale of Real Property issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated June 16, 2011, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Home Federal Bank as plaintiff, recovered Limited Judgment of Foreclosure of Real Property on June 2, 2011, against Remprop, Inc., David J. Zimmerman, Kathleen E. Degree, Philip R. DeGree, Susan I. Moon, Thane C. Moon and California Bank & Trust as defendants. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff By Lisa Griggs,

Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications: August 17, 2011; August 24, 2011; August 31, 2011 Date of Last Publication September 7, 2011 Attorney: Andrew P. Parks, OSB #024161 Arnold Gallagher Percell Roberts & Potter, PC PO Box 1758 Eugene, OR 97440 541-484-0188 Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale.

Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property) HOME FEDERAL BANK, successor to Community First Bank, an Oregon state-chartered commercial bank, Plaintiff, v. PATRICK M. GISLER, an individual, THE PATRICK M. GISLER LIVING TRUST, an Oregon trust, and GMC, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company, Defendants. Case No.: 10CV0031SF

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property) WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, v. MODERA HOMES, LLC; JEFFREY L. NOOTENBOOM; JENNIFER NOOTENBOOM, Defendants. Case No.: 10CV1091MA Notice is hereby given that I will on September 22, 2011, at 11:10 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash, the following real property, known as 15788 Twin Drive, La Pine, Oregon 97739, to wit, Lot 14, Block 97, Deschutes River Recreation Homesites, Unit 8, Part II, Deschutes County, Oregon. Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution in Foreclosure issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated March 23, 2011, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Wells Fargo Bank, NA as plaintiff, recovered General Judgment (Foreclosure as to All Defendants; Money Judgment as to Defendants Modera Homes, LLC and Jeffrey L. Nootenboom Only) on February 2, 2011, against Modera Homes, LLC and Jeffrey L. Nootenboom as defendants. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff By Lisa Griggs, Civil Technician Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications: August 17, 2011; August 24, 2011; August 31, 2011 Date of Last Publication September 7, 2011 Attorney: James P. Laurick, OSB #82153 Kilmer, Voorhees & Laurick, P.C. 732 N.W. 19th Avenue

Notice is hereby given that I will on October 13, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash, the following real property, known as 21 NW Kearney Avenue, Bend, Oregon 97701, to wit, Lots Twelve (12), Thirteen (13), Fourteen (14), Fifteen (15), Sixteen (16), Seventeen (17), and Eighteen (18), Resubdivision of Block Twenty-four (24), PLAT OF BEND, recorded March 7, 1912 in Cabinet A, Page 7, Deschutes County, Oregon. TOGETHER with that portion of the vacated alley which inured to said Lots by Ordinance No. NS 257. Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated June 27, 2011, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Home Federal Bank as successor in interest to Community First Bank, an Oregon state-chartered commercial bank (the "Bank") as plaintiff, recovered Stipulated Limited Judgment of Foreclosure on June 22, 2011, against Patrick M. Gisler, an individual, the Patrick M. Gisler Living Trust, an Oregon Trust and GMC, LLC, an Oregon Limited liability company as defendants. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff By Lisa Griggs, Civil Technician Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications: September 7, 2011; September 14, 2011; September 21, 2011 Date of Last Publication September 28, 2011 Attorney: Peter S. Hicks, OSB #933057 Ball Janik LLP 101 SW Main Street,

Suite 1200 Portland, OR 97204 (503) 228-2525 Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. LEGAL NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS CONTRACTOR FOR OPERATIONS ASSISTANCE AT NEGUS TRANSFER STATION IN REDMOND, OR Notice is hereby given that Deschutes County, through the Department of Solid Waste, will receive proposals per specifications until 5:00 P.M., September 22, 2011, for operations assistance at Negus Transfer Station in Redmond, OR. No proposals will be received or considered after that time. Copies of the Request for Proposals can be viewed and downloaded at www.deschutes.org/solidwaste. Follow the Projects link at the bottom of the page. The purpose of this solicitation is to select a Contractor to provide services, as described in the scope, for assistance in the operation of the solid waste transfer station in Redmond, OR. The Contractor selected will be expected to enter into a 5 year agreement to provide the specified services. The Contractor shall provide a past history of similar work. The Contractor's work must be in accordance with all State and Federal Laws. Questions should be directed to Timm Schimke,Director of the Department of Solid Waste, at (541) 317-3177, Proposals are to be sent to Timm Schimke, at the Department of Solid Waste 61050 SE 27th Street, Bend, OR 97702. This is not a public works contract subject to ORS 279.348 to 279.380 or the Davis-Bacon Act (40 U.S.C. 276a). Upon receipt of the Project Proposals, the Director of Solid Waste along with other representatives from the Department will evaluate the Project Proposals, select the most qualified proposal and negotiate a contract for award by the Deschutes County. The County reserves the right to reject any and all proposals not in compliance with all prescribed public bidding procedures and requirements, reject for good cause any and all proposals upon the finding that it is in the public interest to do so and waive any and all informalities. DATED this 2nd day of September, 2011 Timm Schimke, Director Deschutes County Department of Solid Waste Published: Bend Bulletin September 7th and 11th 2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Stephen L. Barnette, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated April 5, 2007, recorded April 13, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 21250, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot 15, Block 42, Center Addition to Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon.

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: D527842 OR Unit Code: D Loan No: 115230404/WETTER Min No: 100186300000146595 AP #1: 200059 Title #: 5457579 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by DOUGLAS S WETTER, RETHA M WETTER as Grantor, to FIDELITY SERVICE CORPORATION as Trustee, in favor of STERLING SAVINGS BANK as Beneficiary. Dated November 7, 2007, Recorded November 16, 2007 as Instr. No. 2007-60151 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 10 OF THE BLUFFS AT RIVER BEND PHASE 1,CITY OF BEND,DESCHUTES COUTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 7 PYMTS FROM 12/01/10 TO 06/01/11 @ 1,928.33 $13,498.31 6 L/C FROM 12/16/10 TO 05/16/11 @ 96.42 $578.52 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $608.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$14,684.83 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 36 SW TAFT AVE, BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $255,874.83, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 11/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on October 10, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The Beneficiary may be attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 06/02/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 943273 PUB: 08/24/11, 08/31/11, 09/07/11, 09/14/11

COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 616 N.E. Franklin Avenue, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,279.79, from May 1, 2009, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,264.98, from April 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $218,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.1% per annum from April 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on December 13, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the

time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed

of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 08-09-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105228 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Steven R. Carter and Martha J. Carter, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated January 31, 2007, recorded February 8, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 08237, as covering the following described real property: Lot Thirty-Four (34), Westbrook Village, Phase II, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 61641 Kaci

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-11-426757-NH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, STEPHEN COSTELLO AND LISA COSTELLO , HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of FIRST FRANKLIN A DIVISION OF NAT. CITY BANK OF IN A NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, as Beneficiary, dated 1/14/2005, recorded 1/21/2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2005-03558,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 119456 LOT FOURTEEN (14), BLOCK ONE (1), DAVIS FIRST ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 21089 CLA1RAWAY AVENUE BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 3/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,286.82 Monthly Late Charge $64.34 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $184,297.87 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.7500 per annum from 2/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 12/29/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 12/29/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 11/29/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 08/22/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 EI Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 4075699 09/07/2011, 09/14/2011, 09/21/2011, 09/28/2011


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Lane, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,336.54, from December 1, 2009,, monthly payments in the sum of $1,356.57, from February 1, 2010,, monthly payments in the sum of $1,440.85, from April 1, 2010,, monthly payments in the sum of $1,429.11, from February 1, 2011, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,519.71, from April 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $301,349.19, together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.98% per annum from November 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on December 1, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 07-27-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105172 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Angela D. Garoutte, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated October 25, 2006, recorded October 30, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 72232, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot 26, Stonehaven, Phase 1, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 20404 Aberdeen Drive, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums:

Monthly payments in the sum of $1,805.86, from December 1, 2009,, monthly payments in the sum of $1,815.65, from August 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,915.22, from December 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $363,160.41, together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.982% per annum from November 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 28, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 07-26-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-104829 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0178656898 T.S. No.: 11-02954-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of October 15, 2008 made by, JERAD H. WILMOT AND TARA WILMOT, as the original grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the original trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, NA., as the original beneficiary, recorded on October 20, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008-42607 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, NA., (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 129924 LOT 6 IN BLOCK 2 OF MEADOWBROOK ESTATES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 444 SW 29TH COURT, REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $7,880.57 as of July 29, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $151,756.37 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.50000% per annum from December 1, 2010 until paid;

plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on December 14, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 08/10/2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michae! Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4069263 08/17/2011, 08/24/2011, 08/31/2011, 09/07/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Richard Gross and Linda Gross, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated April 21, 2006, recorded April 28, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 29545, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lots Twenty-Four (24), and Twenty-Five (25), Rivers Edge Village, Phase III, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 3167 N.W. Quiet River Lane, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,399.99, from October 1, 2009,, monthly payments in the sum of $3,672.42, from February 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $2,805.45, from February 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $414,386.17, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.95% per annum from September 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 28, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure pro-

ceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 07/26/2011

By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 09-103593 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE AMOUNT OF YOUR INDEBTEDNESS TO THE BENEFICIARY, THEIR SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST AND/OR ASSIGNEES AS RECITED BELOW, AS OF THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER, IS $159,867.58. INTEREST FEES AND COSTS WILL CONTINUE TO-ACCRUE AFTER THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER. UNLESS YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING NOTICE OF THIS DOCUMENT, THIS OFFICE WILL ASSUME THE DEBT TO BE VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY THIS OFFICE IN WRITING WITHIN THE 30-DAY PERIOD THAT THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF IS DISPUTED, VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT WILL BE OBTAINED AND WILL BE MAILED TO YOU. UPON WRITTEN REQUEST WITHIN 30 DAYS, THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR, IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR, WILL BE PROVIDED. NOTICE: WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR PURPOSES OF DEBT COLLECTION. Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Tracy V. Rivera, as grantor, to U.S. Bank Trust Company, National Association, as trustee, in favor of U.S. Bank National Associa-

tion ND, as beneficiary, dated August 17, 2007, recorded August 22, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recording Number 2007-46162, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot 125 of Hayden View Phase Three, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Both the beneficiary and the trustee, David A. Weibel, will sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statues 86.753(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor’s failure to pay the following sums: 1.Monthly Payments: Delinquent Monthly Payments Due from 12/1/2010 through 6/1/2011: 3 payment(s) at $1128.76, 4 payment(s) at $1126.56. Total Payments: $7,892.52; Accrued Late Charges: $288.91. Property Inspections $95.00. THE SUM OWING ON THE OBLIGATION SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED: $8,276.43. 2. Delinquent Real Property Taxes, if any. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Unpaid balance is $157,367.58 as of June 29, 2011. In addition there are attorney's fees and foreclosure costs which as of the date of this notice are estimated to be $2,500.00. Interest, late charges and advances for the protection and preservation of the property may accrue after the date of this notice. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, David A. Weibel, on November 9, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 am, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front

entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), paying all advances authorized under the trust deed, including all costs and expenses incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, and by curing any other default complained of therein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural,

the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED: July 7, 2011. David A. Weibel, Trustee. For Information Call: Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S., 720 Olive Way, Suite 1301, Seattle, WA 98101, (206) 622-7527. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Mary E. Cascio and Marc Osier, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated December 22, 2006, recorded December 28, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 84368, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as purchaser of the loans and other assets of Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA (the "Savings Bank") from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, acting as receiver for the Savings Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot 5, Block 12, Unit No. 1, Oregon Water Wonderland, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 55315 Big River Drive, Bend, OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant

to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,704.71, from May 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,335.25, from February 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $195,788.87, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.275% per annum from April 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 21, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-UM-109467

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, MATTHEW CULVER AND STORI CULVER, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of NEW CENTURY MORTGAGE CORPORATION , as beneficiary, dated 3/3/2004, recorded 3/9/2004, under Instrument No. 2004-006274, records of DOUGLAS County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Indenture Trustee for New Century Home Equity Loan Trust 2004-1. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT SEVEN (7) SADDLE BUTTE VILLAGE P.U.D., DOUGLAS COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 180 VILLAGE DRIVE WINCHESTER, OR 97495 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of August 12, 2011 Delinquent Payments from April 01, 2011 5 payments at $ 1,0 92.94 each $ 5,464.7 0 (04-01-11 through 08-12-11) Late Charges: $ 3,167.00 Beneficiary Advances: $ 9.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 8,640.70 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $134,016.06, PLUS interest thereon at 7.950% per annum from 3/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on December 15, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at AT THE FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DOUGLAS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1036 S. E. DOUGLAS, ROSEBURG, County of DOUGLAS, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for December 15, 2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 11/15/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from you rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe you current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. DATED: 8/12/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By ANNA EGDORF, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JAMES E HARSH AND CONSTANCE S HARSH, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as Trustee, in favor of SECURITY BANK, ITS SUCCESSOR AND/OR ASSIGNS, as beneficiary, dated 5/8/2001, recorded 5/14/2001 in Volume 2001, page 22598, of Deeds of Trust, under Instrument No. XXX, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SECURITY BANK (NKA UMPQUA BANK), ITS SUCCESSOR AND/OR ASSIGNS. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 120B, RIVER BEND ESTATES REPLAT, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. BEGINNING AT A POINT AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 120, RIVER BEND ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE MAP FILED IN DESCHUTES COUNTY RECORDS OFFICE ON NOVEMBER 9, 1961; THENCE SOUTH 46º36'32" EAST, 518.95 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 27º01'22" WEST, 244.49 FEET; THENCE NORTH 43º43'32" WEST, 605.37 FEET; THENCE NORTH 48º22'23" EAST, 136.72 FEET; THENCE AROUND A CURVE LEFT WHOSE CHORD BEARS NORTH 45º57'48" EAST, 69.93 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 60690 RANCHO ROAD BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of August 11, 2011 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2011 8 payments at $ 949.00 each $ 7,592.00 (01-01-11 through 08-11-11) Late Charges: $ 255.64 Beneficiary Advances: $ 1,504.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 9,351.64 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $92,421.70, PLUS interest thereon at 7.000% per annum from 12/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on December 13, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY JUSTICE CENTER, 1100 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for December 13, 2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 11/10/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from you rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe you current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. DATED: 8/11/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: ANNA EGDORF, AUTHORIZED ARGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

ASAP# 4070431 08/24/2011, 08/31/2011, 09/07/2011, 09/14/2011

ASAP# 4069105 08/24/2011, 08/31/2011, 09/07/2011, 09/14/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-NC-111341


F6 Wednesday, September 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced prop-

erty. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 07-19-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105094 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: WEI Q. CHEN AND HONG F. JIANG. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE. Successor Trustee:NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:OREGON HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT, STATE OF OREGON, as assignee of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot 24 of CROSSWINDS, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3.RECORDING. The Trust

Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: January 16, 2008. Recording No.: 2008-02050 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $$1,380.00 each, due the first of each month, for the months of February 2011 through June 2011; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5.AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $190,641.05; plus interest at the rate of 5.6250% per annum from January 1, 2011; plus late charges of $176.13; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date:November 3, 2011. Time:11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-10-374111-NH

payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #07754.30398). DATED: June 16, 2011. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: BARTON M. ELLIS AND SANDRA D. ELLIS. Trustee: WESTERN TITLE AND ES-

CROW COMPANY. Successor Trustee:NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:SELCO COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Five (5), Block Three (3), WESTWOOD ACRES SECTION TWO, recorded April 25, 1975, in Cabinet B, Page 105, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3.RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: March 16, 2006. Recording No.: 2006-18116 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $995.00 each, due the fifth of each month, for the months of December 2010 through May 2011; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $122,939.97; plus interest at the rate of 7.000% per annum from November 5, 2010; plus late charges of $15.00; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF

SALE. Date:October 27, 2011. Time:11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #18316.30019). DATED: June 2, 2011. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-11-448936-NH

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030266704 T.S. No.: 11-02858-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of July 26, 2004 made by, ROBERT R. LACROIX, as the original grantor, to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as the original trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC, as the original beneficiary, recorded on July 28, 2004, as Instrument No. 2004-44863 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Citibank, N.A., as Indenture Trustee for American Home Mortgage Investment Trust 2004-3, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 209113 LOT 32, FAIRHAVEN, PHASE V, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 2118 NW CEDAR AVE, REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor{s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $4,010.57 as of July 28, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $124,019.49 together with

interest thereon at the rate of 3.75000% per annum from March 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on December 13, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other

default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 08/10/2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4069261 08/17/2011, 08/24/2011, 08/31/2011, 09/07/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-11-455904-NH

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, PEDRO VARGAS, SR as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR PACIFIC COMMUNITY MORTGAGE, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 11/30/2006, recorded 12/7/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2006-80194,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 241945 LOT 25 OF FAIRHAVEN PHASE VI, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 533 NW 24TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 4/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,348.00 Monthly Late Charge $67.40 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $182,491.70 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.3750 per annum from 3/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 12/27/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 12/27/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 11/27/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, SAMUEL F. FALLEY, A MARRIED MAN. as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY., as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS"), AS NOMINEE FOR GREYSTONE RESIDENTIAL FUNDING, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 9/25/2007, recorded 10/1/2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2007-53003,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 111164 LOT 1, BLOCK P, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 60107 CINDER BUTTE ROAD BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 2/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,379.51 Monthly Late Charge $68.98 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $148,843.31 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.1250 per annum from 1/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 12/23/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 12/23/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31,2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 11/23/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee 3 First American Way Santa Ana, CA 92707 Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MARK S. VALCESCHINI, CYNTHIA A. VALESCHINI, HUSBAND & WIFE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., as Beneficiary, dated 4/14/2008, recorded 4/16/2008, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2008-16663,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 100253 LOT THREE (3). BLOCK NINE (9), EASTWOOD ADDITION, CITY OF BEND, RECORDED APRIL 21, 1966, IN CABINET A, PAGE 134, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 1656 NE NORTH VIEW DR. BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 4/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,227.88 Monthly Late Charge $61.39 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $197,223.89 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.0000 per annum from 3/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 12/19/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 12/19/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 11/19/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 8/15/2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee 3 First American Way Santa Ana, CA 92707 Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

ASAP# FNMA4072325 08/31/2011, 09/07/2011, 09/14/2011, 09/21/2011

ASAP# 4072324 08/31/2011, 09/07/2011, 09/14/2011, 09/21/2011

ASAP# FNMA4071564 08/31/2011, 09/07/2011, 09/14/2011, 09/21/2011


Bulletin Daily Paper 09/07/11